Science.gov

Sample records for prolonged ozone exposure

  1. RESPIRATORY RESPONSES TO REPEATED PROLONGED EXPOSURE TO 0.12 PPM OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Repeated exposures to high concentrations of ozone results first in augmentation and then attenuation of pulmonary response in humans. o determine the effects of repeated prolonged low concentration ozone exposure, we exposed 17 healthy nonsmoking males to 0.12 ppm ozone for 6.6 ...

  2. Chronic bronchiolitis in nonhuman primates after prolonged ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Eustis, S.L.; Schwartz, L.W.; Kosch, P.C.; Dungworth, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    Bonnet monkeys (Macaca radiata) were exposed to 0.0, 0.5, or 0.8 ppm ozone for 7, 28, or 90 consecutive days, 8 hours per day. The pulmonary response was evaluated by means of pulmonary function testing, light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission microscopy, autoradiography, and morphometry. Pulmonary function values obtained before exposure did not statistically differ from values obtained after exposure. A general trend of increased quasistatic compliance of the lung was observed in both groups of exposed monkeys. Morphologic changes were principally characterized as low-grade chronic respiratory bronchiolitis. Tritiated thymidine labeling and counts of respiratory bronchiolar epithelium demonstrated up to a 37-fold increase in labeling index at 7 days but only a sevenfold increase at 90 days. Differential cell counts demonstrated an increase in the proportion of cuboidal bronchiolar cells constituting the respiratory bronchiolar epithelium. In control monkeys, 60% of the epithelial cells were cuboidal bronchiolar cells. At 90 days of exposure, more than 90% of the respiratory bronchiolar cells were cuboidal in appearance. The cuboidal bronchiolar cell in control monkeys does not appear secretory, but membrane-bound electron-dense secretory granules are present in this cell type from exposed monkeys. Epithelial hyperplasia (increased number of cells per millimeter of airway length) persisted through 90 days of exposure at a level slightly above that present at 7 days.

  3. Responses of older men with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to prolonged ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, H. Jr.; Shamoo, D.A.; Anderson, K.R.; Linn, W.S.

    1997-01-01

    We tested responses to ozone (O{sub 3}) under simulated {open_quotes}worst-case{close_quotes} ambient exposure conditions. Subjects included 9 men who had severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with subnormal carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (i.e., an emphysemic component) and 10 age-matched healthy men. Each subject was exposed to 0.24 ppm O{sub 3} and to clean air (control) in an environmentally controlled chamber at 24{degrees}C and 40% relative humidity. Exposures were randomized, they occurred 1 wk apart, and they lasted 4 h. During each half-hour interval, light exercise occurred (e.e., average ventilation 20 l/mm) for 15 min. during both control and O{sub 3} exposures, group mean symptom intensity and specific airway resistance (SRaw) increased, whereas forced expiratory performance decreased. The healthy subgroup`s mean arterial oxygen saturation (SaO{sub 2}) rose slightly, and the COPD subgroup`s mean SaO{sub 2} declined slightly, during exercise. Group mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV{sub 1.0}) declined significantly in O{sub 3} exposures, compared with controls (p {approx}.01). Mean excess FEV{sub 1.0} loss after 4 h in O{sub 3} (relative to control) was 8% of the preexposure value in the COPD subgroup, compared with 3% in the healthy subgroup (p > .05 [nonsignificant]). Overall FEV{sub 1.0} loss during O{sub 3} exposures, including exercise effects, averaged 19% in the COPD subgroup, compared with 2% in the healthy subgroup (p < .001). Symptoms, SRaw, and SaO{sub 2} responses, as well as healthy subjects` postexposure bronchial reactivity, differed little between O{sub 3}-exposed and control subjects. We therefore concluded that in older men with or without severe COPD, O{sub 3} causes lung dysfunction under {open_quotes}worst-case{close_quotes} ambient exposure conditions, despite older subjects` comparative unresponsiveness to O{sub 3}. 30 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. MORPHOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF PROLONGED EXPOSURE TO OZONE AND SULFURIC ACID AEROSOL ON THE RAT LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to determine the pulmonary effects of a combination of ozone (0.5 ppm) and sulfuric acid aerosol (1 mg/cu. m.) and to assess the possibility of interactive effects. Groups of Sprague-Dawley rats were continously exposed to the pollutants, either indi...

  5. PROLONGED EXPOSURE OF HUMANS TO AMBIENT LEVELS OF OZONE CAUSES CELLULAR AND BIOCHEMICAL CHANGES IN THE LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    An acute (2h) exposure of humans to 0.4 ppm ozone initiates biochemical changes in the lung resulting in the production of components which mediate inflammation and acute lung damage as well as components which have the potential to lead to long term effects such as fibrosis. owe...

  6. CHANGES IN PULMONARY FUNCTION AND AIRWAY REACTIVITY DUE TO PROLONGED EXPOSURE TO TYPICAL AMBIENT OZONE (O3) LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Daily ambient ozone levels between 0.08 and 0.12 ppm for periods exceeding 6 hours often occur in many urban, suburban, and rural areas of the United States and Europe. Substantial decrements in pulmonary functions, moderate to severe respiratory symptoms, and increased airway re...

  7. Effects of prolonged, sequential exposure to acid fog and ozone on pulmonary function in exercising, normal subjects. Final report, 28 Feb 89-28 Dec 90

    SciTech Connect

    Balmes, J.

    1990-05-01

    Thirty-nine apparently healthy and asymptomatic subjects were selected for a study that screened for sensitivity to ozone. After three hours of ozone exposure (at 0.20 ppm), eighteen of the subjects (46 percent) experienced a 10 percent reduction in forced expiratory volume, an indicator of exhaling ability. After four hours of exposure, 62 percent of the subjects experienced a similar reduction in expiratory volume. Further, narrowing of airways among the sensitive subjects was suggested by results of the methacholine challenge test, a standard test for measuring airway resistance. The lung capacity of all subjects decreased progressively during ozone exposures. Capacity was unchanged during acidic fog and pollutant-free air exposures. No statistically significant differences in airway resistance, airway responsiveness and symptoms that could be attributed to acid fog exposure were observed. The study indicates that exposue to fog containing nitric acid followed by exposure to ozone does not have additive or synergistic acute effects. However, the study confirms earlier indications that many apparently healthy and asymptomatic individuals are susceptible to and adversely affected by ozone at relatively low concentrations.

  8. Prolonged stimulus exposure reveals prolonged neurobehavioral response patterns.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brett A; Woo, Cynthia C; Zeng, Yu; Xu, Zhe; Hingco, Edna E; Ong, Joan; Leon, Michael

    2010-05-15

    Although it has been shown repeatedly that minimum response times in sensory systems can be quite short, organisms more often continue to respond to sensory stimuli over considerably longer periods of time. The continuing response to sensory stimulation may be a more realistic assessment of natural sensory responses, so we determined for how long a stimulus would evoke a response in naïve, freely moving animals. Specifically, we determined for how long such rats responded to odorants during continuous passive exposures by monitoring their sniffing with whole-body plethysmography. We found that naïve rats continue to sniff odorants vigorously for up to 3 minutes, much longer than what has been reported for highly trained, highly motivated rats. Patterns of 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) uptake in the glomerular layer of the rat olfactory bulb also were seen after only 1-5 minutes of odorant exposure, overlapping with the period of increased respiration to odorants. Moreover, these 2-DG uptake patterns closely resembled the patterns that emerge from prolonged odorant exposures, suggesting that activity mapping over prolonged periods can identify areas of activity that are present when rats are still attending and responding to odorant stimuli. Given these findings, it seems important to consider the possibility that prolonged exposure to other sensory stimuli will reveal more realistic neural response patterns. PMID:20232477

  9. Ozone exposure: a case report and discussion.

    PubMed

    Parks, S; Paul, D W

    2000-02-01

    A 45-year-old man working with ozone presents with evidence of sinusitis, mucus membrane irritation, sleep disturbance and shortness of breath. Naturally occurring or manmade, ozone may damage pulmonary alveolar type I cells at significant exposure levels. EPA and OSHA regulate exposure concentrations. Studies show dose responses with exposures. Supporting epidemiological studies are reviewed briefly. Limiting potential for excess exposure is key to prevention. Recognition of ozone as a potential exposure in the Oklahoma workplace is key to symptom management. PMID:10692811

  10. HUMAN EXPOSURE SYSTEM FOR CONTROLLED OZONE ATMOSPHERES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An experimental exposure system for health effects research in environmental pollutants that permits the introduction and control of ozone (O3) to an acrylic plastic chamber in which a human subject actively resides is described. Ozone is introduced into the chamber air intake an...

  11. Ozone exposure : Areas of potential ozone risk for selected tree species in Austria.

    PubMed

    Loibl, W; Smidt, S

    1996-12-01

    Increased tropospheric ozone concentrations cause damage to both human health and the environment. To assess the exposure of forest areas and selected tree species to ozone, it is necessary to calculate the ozone exposure distribution. The present article describes the application of an ozone interpolation model to the calculation of the ozone exposure distribution in combination with forest inventory data.The exposure of forest regions to ozone was assessed by means of an AOT40 map (accumulated ozone exposure over a threshold of 40 ppb). The calculation was performed by hourly running of the model during the summer term and accumulation of the patterns that exceeded 40 ppb.The exposure of the primary Austrian tree species to ozone can be assessed due to the spatial relation of ozone exposure and tree species patterns. This spatial relation also allows the verification of assumptions concerning ozone-related tree damage. PMID:24233419

  12. Influenza virus infection, ozone exposure, and fibrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jakab, G J; Bassett, D J

    1990-05-01

    Oxidant exposure following chemically induced lung injury exacerbates the tendency to develop pulmonary fibrosis. Influenza virus pneumonitis causes severe acute lung damage that, upon resolution, is followed by a persistent alveolitis and parenchymal changes characterized by patchy interstitial pneumonia and collagen deposition in the affected areas. To determine whether oxidant exposure exacerbates the virus-induced alveolitis and residual lung damage, mice were infected by aerosol inhalation with influenza A virus and continuously exposed to 0.5 ppm ozone or ambient air. Noninfected control mice were exposed to either ambient air or ozone. On various days during the first month after infection, groups of mice were sacrificed and their lungs assessed for acute injury (lung lavage albumin, total and differential cell counts, wet/dry ratios, and morphometry). At 30, 60, 90, and 120 days after infection, groups of mice were sacrificed for total and differential lavage cell counts, lung hydroxyproline content, and morphometric analysis. Ozone exposure did not alter the proliferation of virus in the lungs as quantitated by infectious virus titers of lung homogenates at 1, 4, 7, 10, and 15 days after virus infection but mitigated the virus-induced acute lung injury by approximately 50%. After Day 30 a shift in the character of the pulmonary lesions was observed in that continuous exposure to ozone potentiated the postinfluenzal alveolitis and structural changes in the lung parenchyma. Additional studies suggest that the mechanism for the enhanced postinfluenzal lung damage may be related to the oxidant impairing the repair process of the acute influenzal lung damage. These data demonstrate that ozone exposure mitigates acute virus-induced lung injury and potentiates residual lung damage. PMID:2339849

  13. AN HISTORICAL OVERVIEW OF THE OZONE EXPOSURE PROBLEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone can be found in essentially all locations in the troposphere. Too much exposure of vegetation and humans to this potent oxidizing gas can prove toxic. Reports of human toxicity to ozone first appeared in the 1800's from accidental occupational exposures when ozone was fir...

  14. CHANGES IN COMPLEX CARBOHYDRATE CONTENT AND STRUCTURE IN RAT LUNGS CAUSED BY PROLONGED OZONE INHALATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA GRANT NUMBER: R828112C065III
    Title: Changes in Complex Carbohydrate Content and Structure in Rat Lungs Caused by Prolonged Ozone Inhalation
    Investigator: Bhandaru Radhakrishnamurthy
    Institution: Tulane University of Louisiana
    EPA...

  15. Ecosystem Consequences of Prolonged Ozone Pollution in the Southern Sierra Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousins, S.; Battles, J. J.; Cisneros, R.; Esperanza, A.; Swenson, D.

    2015-12-01

    While acute O3 exposure is widely known to damage plant tissues, the chronic effects on long lived organisms such as trees remain unclear. In the southern Sierra Nevada, O3 pollution has afflicted pine-dominated forests for over 40 years. Here we report the results of a long-term study of O3 impact on tree injury, growth, and mortality. Our study employed a network of forest plots along a gradient of O3 pollution with recurring measurements from 1991-2012. Over the same period and locations, summer O3 was monitored via partnership with USNPS and USFS, making this one of the longest known ecosystem studies of O3 pollution and its effects. We found that exposure at the most polluted sites declined 33%, from a W126 index of 20.12 ppm-hrs in 1992 to 13.5 ppm-hrs in 2012. The severity of foliar pollution damage at these sites also declined, from 43.9 on the 0-100 Ozone Injury Index (OII) scale to 34.2, a drop of 22%. At locations with lower O3 exposure, damage declined from OII of 16.9 to 9.2. Mean annual tree mortality rates over the 20 year period, calculated with a profile likelihood approach, were 0.5%/yr (95% CI 0.3 to 0.8 %/yr). This rate is similar to that of healthy canopy trees in similar unpolluted stands. However, low and declining tree growth rates reveal possible ecosystem impacts of prolonged exposure to pollution. Across affected sites, mean relative growth rates were 1.1%/yr in 1991-2000, and just 0.9%/yr in 2000-2011, a decline of 15.6% in the second decade. Initial analyses suggest that tree damage is positively correlated with June-October O3, as indicated by previous studies. Further analysis will explore the drivers of ecosystem impacts and roles of other natural and anthropogenic stressors, including variation in climatic water deficit. Understanding the consequences of prolonged O3 exposure on both individual trees and complex forest ecosystems helps identify the hidden environmental costs of tropospheric O3 and potential benefits of cleaner air.

  16. The effects of prolonged exposure to weightlessness on postural equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homick, J. L.; Reschke, M. F.; Miller, E. F., II

    1977-01-01

    A postflight postural equilibrium rail tests on spacecrews was used to prove a pronounced decrement in ability to maintain an upright posture after prolonged exposure to weightlessness. Support for the hypothesis that central neural reorganization occurs in response to environmental change is obtained when postflight decrease in stability on the rails and the time course for recovery are compared with preflight performance.

  17. Cognitive Changes During Prolonged Exposure versus Prolonged Exposure Plus Cognitive Restructuring in Female Assault Survivors with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foa, Edna B.; Rauch, Sheila A. M.

    2004-01-01

    The authors report on changes in cognitions related to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among 54 female survivors of sexual and nonsexual assault with chronic PTSD who completed either prolonged exposure alone or in combination with cognitive restructuring. Treatment included 9-12 weekly sessions, and assessment was conducted at pretreatment,…

  18. A new PZT with prolonged exposure and Wuchang PZT catalogue.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Buxi; Li, Jingfeng; Hu, Yashe

    The most important improvement in the authors' PZT is that the stars with 11 mag. can be observed, because exposure time for dimmer stars is prolonged. The observational practice during last three years denotes that the method of prolonged exposure is very successful. The number of observed stars is increased about three times, and the precision is improved. As there are so many star images in the plate, a series of processes is suggested, which includes the process of predicting the positions of star images on plates, finding out the pairs of star images and their corresponding stars automatically, calculating the apparent positions of stars and giving the final observational results. The corrections of 289 stars (on 150 measured plates) are given. The results show that many errors of stellar positions in AGK 3R and AGK 3 are larger than 0″5.

  19. Exposure to Environmental Ozone Alters Semen Quality

    PubMed Central

    Sokol, Rebecca Z.; Kraft, Peter; Fowler, Ian M.; Mamet, Rizvan; Kim, Elizabeth; Berhane, Kiros T.

    2006-01-01

    Idiopathic male infertility may be due to exposure to environmental toxicants that alter spermatogenesis or sperm function. We studied the relationship between air pollutant levels and semen quality over a 2-year period in Los Angeles, California, by analyzing repeated semen samples collected by sperm donors. Semen analysis data derived from 5,134 semen samples from a sperm donor bank were correlated with air pollutant levels (ozone, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and particulate matter < 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter) measured 0–9, 10–14, and 70–90 days before semen collection dates in Los Angeles between January 1996 and December 1998. A linear mixed-effects model was used to model average sperm concentration and total motile sperm count for the donation from each subject. Changes were analyzed in relationship to biologically relevant time points during spermatogenesis, 0–9, 10–14, and 70–90 days before the day of semen collection. We estimated temperature and seasonality effects after adjusting for a base model, which included donor’s date of birth and age at donation. Forty-eight donors from Los Angeles were included as subjects. Donors were included if they collected repeated semen samples over a 12-month period between January 1996 and December 1998. There was a significant negative correlation between ozone levels at 0–9, 10–14, and 70–90 days before donation and average sperm concentration, which was maintained after correction for donor’s birth date, age at donation, temperature, and seasonality (p < 0.01). No other pollutant measures were significantly associated with sperm quality outcomes. Exposure to ambient ozone levels adversely affects semen quality. PMID:16507458

  20. Media Impacts on Women's Fertility Desires: A Prolonged Exposure Experiment.

    PubMed

    Knobloch-Westerwick, Silvia; Willis, Laura E; Kennard, Ashley R

    2016-06-01

    Media exposure may have implications for family planning, a public health issue of key importance. Drawing on social comparison theory and social identity theory, a prolonged exposure experiment examined whether media portrayals of women's social roles affect fertility desires among 166 American, nonstudent, never married, childless women ages 21-35 years old. After sign-up and baseline sessions, participants viewed magazine pages five days in a row. Stimuli presented women in either mother/homemaker roles, beauty ideal roles, or professional roles. Three days later, participants again indicated their number of desired children and time planned until first birth. Exposure to mother/homemaker and beauty ideal portrayals increased the number of desired children across time. Exposure to professional portrayals increased the time planned until 1st birth compared to beauty ideal portrayals-this impact was partially mediated by a shift toward more progressive gender norms (per social identity theory) and assimilation (per social comparison theory). PMID:27166510

  1. LUNG INJURY AFTER OZONE EXPOSURE IS IRON-DEPENDENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    We tested the hypothesis that oxidative stress and biological effect after ozone (O3) exposure are dependent on changes in iron homeostasis. After O3 exposure, healthy volunteers demonstrated increased lavage concentrations of iron, transferrin, lactoferrin, and ferritin. In norm...

  2. EFFICACY OF OZONE EXPOSURE INDICES IN THE STANDARD SETTING PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determining the appropriate ozone exposure index for a secondary ambient air quality standard requires a consideration of the underlying biological basis for the response and a method of describing the temporal fluctuations in pollutant concentrations. An exposure index that adeq...

  3. Immunosuppression of pulmonary natural killer activity by exposure to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Burleson, G.R.; Keyes, L.L.; Stutzman, J.D. )

    1989-01-01

    Ozone is an oxidant gas and an ubiquitous oxidant air pollutant with the potential to adversely affect pulmonary immune function with a consequent increase in disease susceptibility. Pulmonary natural killer (NK) activity was measured in order to assess the pulmonary immunotoxicity of continuous ozone exposure. Continuous ozone exposures at 1.0 ppm were performed for 23.5 hours per day for either 1, 5, 7, or 10 consecutive days. Pulmonary immune function was assessed by measuring natural killer (NK) activity from whole-lung homogenates of male Fischer-344 rats. Results of this study indicated that continuous ozone exposure for 1, 5, or 7 days resulted in a significant decrease in pulmonary NK activity. This suppressed pulmonary NK activity returned to control levels after continuous exposure to ozone for 10 days. The suppressed pulmonary NK response was thus attenuated and returned to normal values in the continued presence of ozone gas. This attenuation process is dynamic, complex, and doubtless involves several cell types and/or products of these cells. Pulmonary NK activity was also suppressed at 0.5 ppm ozone, but not at 0.1 ppm ozone, following 23.5 hours of exposure. NK activity is important for defense against viral, bacterial, and neoplastic disease. The depressed NK activity resulting from continuous ozone exposure could therefore result in a compromised ability to defend against pulmonary diseases.

  4. Pulmonary function and clearance after prolonged sulfuric acid aerosol exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, P.J. ); Gerrity, T.R.; DeWitt, P.; Folinsbee, L.J. )

    1991-03-15

    The authors studied pulmonary function and clearance responses after a 4 H exposure to 75-100 {mu}g/m{sup 3} sulfuric acid aerosol (SAA). Healthy subjects, who exercised for 30 min/H at ventilation of about 25 L/min, were exposed once to clean air and once to SAA. Oral hygiene and acidic juice gargle were used to minimize oral ammonia. Lung function tests, including spirometry, plethysmography, and partial flow-volume (PEFV) curves were performed before and after exposure. Clearance of 99m-Technetium labeled iron oxide was assessed after each exposure. The first moment of fractional tracheobronchial retention (M1TBR), after correcting for 24 H retention and normalizing to time zero, was used as an index of clearance. There were no significant changes in lung volumes, airways resistance, or maximum expiratory flows after SAA exposure. Flow at 40% of total lung capacity on PEFV curves decreased 17% (NS) after SAA exposure. Tracheobronchial clearance was accelerated after a single exposure to SAA; M1TBR decreased from 73 {plus minus} 5 min (air) to 69 {plus minus} 5 min (SAA). These results suggest that acute prolonged exposure to low levels of SAA has minimal effects on lung mechanics in healthy subjects but does produce a modest acceleration of particle clearance.

  5. Ozone exposure of human tracheal epithelial cells inactivates cyclooxygenase and increases 15-HETE production.

    PubMed

    Alpert, S E; Walenga, R W

    1995-12-01

    We assessed the immediate and prolonged effects of ozone on arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism by primary cultured human tracheal epithelial (TE) cells. TE monolayers were exposed at a gas-fluid interface to air or 0.1, 0.25, or 0.5 ppm ozone (15 min air, then 45 min air/ozone), and serially collected effluents were analyzed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and/or high-performance liquid chromatography. Release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and AA, but not 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) or its metabolites, was detected from cultures prelabeled with [14C]AA. PGE2 production, measured by immunoassay, was nearly constant during air exposure. In contrast, PGE2 increased two- to threefold during the first 15-min exposure to all concentrations of ozone, but then progressively declined to 78 +/- 17, 57 +/- 12 (P < or = 0.05), and 45 +/- 15% (P < or = 0.05) of air controls after exposure to 0.1, 0.25, and 0.5 ppm ozone. Ozone did not induce a new spectrum of AA metabolites; only PGE2, lesser amounts of PGF2 alpha, and 15-HETE were present in media and cell extracts of air- or ozone-exposed cultures provided with 30 microM exogenous AA. However, cyclooxygenase (CO) activity (PGE2 produced from 30 microM AA) decreased to 82 +/- 9, 53 +/- 8 (P < or = 0.05), and 28 +/- 6% (P < or = 0.05) vs. controls after 0.1, 0.25, and 0.5 ppm ozone, whereas 15-HETE production was unimpaired. When cells exposed to 0.5 ppm ozone were maintained for up to 6 h in 5% CO2-air, spontaneous PGE2 production remained decreased and recovery of CO activity was extremely slow. TLC analysis of lipid extracts from [14C]AA-labeled cells revealed a nearly twofold increase in free intracellular 15-HETE, and hydrolysis of phospholipids demonstrated increased esterified 15-HETE. Exposure of human TE cells to ozone leads to a transient increase followed by prolonged decrease in PGE2 production and increased intracellular retention of 15-HETE. Loss of the bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory properties

  6. OZONE EXPOSURE AND PULMONARY METABOLIC EFFECTS OF MEDIATORS AND HORMONES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several physiological effects of ozone exposure involving smooth muscle contracting substances have been studied in Sprague-Dawley derived, male rats whose body weights were in the range of 180-250 grams and whose ages were in the range of 45-60 days. The ozone concentration of i...

  7. PREDICTORS OF INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN ACUTE RESPONSE TO OZONE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purposes of this study were to identify personal characteristics which predict individual differences in acute response to ozone exposure and to develop a predictive model for decrements in FEV1 as a function of ozone concentration and individual predictors. esponse and predi...

  8. Long-term ozone exposure and ozone uptake of grapevines in open-top chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soja, G.; Reichenauer, T. G.; Eid, M.; Soja, A.-M.; Schaber, R.; Gangl, H.

    Ozone uptake of pot-grown grapevines, fruit yield and sugar concentrations in juice were studied over the course of 4 years. In three of the study years, plants were exposed to contrasting ozone levels in open-top chambers. Results showed that juice quality was more sensitive to ozone exposure than grape yield. Ozone-induced reductions in grape yield were best described by the level of ozone exposure in the 2 years prior to harvest, whereas sugar content of juice was mainly affected by current and previous year ozone exposure. Regression models were developed to facilitate quantitative assessments of the effects of ozone on yield and quality. The observed effects on grape yield and on carbohydrate accumulation in fruit were slightly better explained when a threshold of 6 nmol m -2 s -1 was applied to cumulative uptake of ozone (CUO6) compared with AOT40 exposure or other CUO thresholds. Curvilinear regression models were developed which explained up to 75% of variance of the datasets. These models indicate a critical level of 1.1 mmol m -2 ozone (CUO6 from June to September) to protect carbohydrate accumulation in fruit with ozone taken up by the plants over consecutive years. For grape yield the CUO6 threshold was 2.2 mmol m -2 ozone. Exceedance of this threshold would be expected to reduce grape yield and sugar translocation to fruit by 10% with substantial degree of uncertainty (95% confidence interval 1-19%). For individual years, the critical level could be increased to 2.3 mmol m -2 for carbohydrate accumulation and 3.5 mmol m -2 CUO6 for grape yield if the CUO6 of 0 in the subsequent year was not exceeded.

  9. PARAMETER EVALUATION AND MODEL VALIDATION OF OZONE EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT USING HARVARD SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CHRONIC OZONE EXPOSURE STUDY DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    To examine factors influencing long-term ozone exposures by children living in urban communities, we analyzed longitudinal data on personal, indoor, and outdoor ozone concentrations as well as related housing and other questionnaire information collected in the one-year-long Harv...

  10. Persistence of the acute effects of ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Folinsbee, L.J.; Horvath, S.M.

    1986-12-01

    Reexposure to ozone 24 h after an initial exposure results in greater decreases in forced expiratory tests of lung function following the second exposure. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this hyperresponsiveness was present earlier than 24 h or persisted beyond 24 h. Four groups of subjects (n = 6,6,7,7) were exposed to 0.25 ppm ozone and then reexposed at 12, 24, 48, or 72 h, respectively. During the 1-h exposures (Ta = 20 degrees C, RH = 70%) all subjects exercised continuously at approximately 65% of their respective peak VO2; VE averaged 63 L X min-1. The decrease in FEV1.0 after the second ozone exposure was significantly larger than that after the first for subjects reexposed at 12 or 24 h; FEV1.0 dropped 12% and 19% in the 12 h group, and 20% and 35% in the 24 h group. Subjects reexposed at 48 or 72 h had FEV1.0 responses which were not significantly different from the first exposure. Delta FEV1.0 on the first and second exposures were significantly correlated (r = 0.59). Symptoms generally paralleled changes in function. We conclude that the hyperresponsiveness to ozone following exposure to 0.25 ppm ozone under the conditions of this study is apparent within 12 h and is not present at 72 h.

  11. EVALUATION OF OZONE EXPOSURE INDICES FOR RELATING EXPOSURE TO PLANT PRODUCTION AND FOR ESTIMATING AGRICULTURAL LOSSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the report is: (1) to compare alternative ozone exposure indices that relate well to plant response and are useful in developing future standards for ozone; (2) to estimate standard errors and confidence intervals of regression coefficients and exposure levels of...

  12. Interannual Variability of Ozone and Ultraviolet Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.; Piacentini, R. D.; Ziemke, J.; Celarier, E.; Larko. D.

    1999-01-01

    Annual zonal averages of ozone amounts from Nimbus-7/TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) (1979 to 1992) are used to estimate the interannual variability of ozone and UVB (290 - 315 nm) irradiance between plus or minus 60 deg. latitude. Clear-sky interannual ozone and UVB changes are mainly caused by the Quasi Biennial Oscillation (QBO) of stratospheric winds, and can amount to plus or minus 15% at 300 nm and plus or minus 5% at 310 nm (or erythemal irradiance) at the equator and at middle latitudes. Near the equator, the interannual variability of ozone amounts and UV irradiance caused by the combination of the 2.3 year QBO and annual cycles implies that there is about a 5-year periodicity in UVB variability. At higher latitudes, the appearance of the interannual UVB maximum is predicted by the QBO, but without the regular periodicity. The 5-year periodic QBO effects on UVB irradiance are larger than the currently evaluated long-term changes caused by the decrease in ozone amounts.

  13. Exposure to ozone reduces influenza disease severity and alters distribution of influenza viral antigens in murine lungs.

    PubMed

    Wolcott, J A; Zee, Y C; Osebold, J W

    1982-09-01

    Exposure to ambient levels of ozone (0.5 ppm) was shown to alter the pathogenesis of respiratory infection after aerosol infection of mice with influenza A virus. A semiquantitative method for determination of the sites of virus replication by direct immunofluorescence indicated that exposure to ozone reduced the involvement of respiratory epithelium in the infectious process and resulted in a less widespread infection of the alveolar parenchyma. Furthermore, the ozone-mediated alteration in viral antigen distribution was consistent with significantly reduced influenza disease mortality and prolonged survival time, but only when the oxidant was present during the course of infection. Reduced disease severity in ozone-exposed animals appeared to be independent of peak pulmonary virus titers, pulmonary interferon titers, and pulmonary and serum-neutralizing antibody titers. These studies suggested that the distribution of influenza virus in the murine lung was a key factor in disease severity. PMID:6182839

  14. Exposure to ozone and erythrocyte osmotic resistance in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ikemi, Y.; Ohmori, K.; Ito, T.; Osaka, F.; Matuura, Y. )

    1992-10-01

    In order to learn the biological effect of photochemical oxidants on living bodies, we exposed newborn and adult rats, of both sexes, to ozone at a concentration of 0.25 ppm, which can be encountered in an urban environment, and then measured the osmotic resistance of their erythrocytes. The results of experiments using newborn rats indicated a positive increase in the osmotic resistance of erythrocytes in whole blood following ozone exposure for 4 weeks. An increase in the osmotic resistance of erythrocytes in the top part obtained by centrifugation was observed following ozone exposure for 12 weeks. This tendency was especially evident among male rats. On the other hand, no increase in the osmotic resistance of erythrocytes was recognized in the adult animals which had been exposed to the same concentration of ozone for 18 months.

  15. Examining potential contraindications for prolonged exposure therapy for PTSD

    PubMed Central

    van Minnen, Agnes; Harned, Melanie S.; Zoellner, Lori; Mills, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Although prolonged exposure (PE) has received the most empirical support of any treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), clinicians are often hesitant to use PE due to beliefs that it is contraindicated for many patients with PTSD. This is especially true for PTSD patients with comorbid problems. Because PTSD has high rates of comorbidity, it is important to consider whether PE is indeed contraindicated for patients with various comorbid problems. Therefore, in this study, we examine the evidence for or against the use of PE with patients with problems that often co-occur with PTSD, including dissociation, borderline personality disorder, psychosis, suicidal behavior and non-suicidal self-injury, substance use disorders, and major depression. It is concluded that PE can be safely and effectively used with patients with these comorbidities, and is often associated with a decrease in PTSD as well as the comorbid problem. In cases with severe comorbidity, however, it is recommended to treat PTSD with PE while providing integrated or concurrent treatment to monitor and address the comorbid problems. PMID:22893847

  16. Morphological study of the effects of ozone on rat lung. II. Long-term exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroshima, K.; Kohno, T.; Ohwada, H.; Hayashi, Y.

    1989-04-01

    To evaluate the morphological changes observed in animals after prolonged ozone exposure, 56 male rats were exposed to a high ambient level of ozone (0.5 ppm) 6 hr a day, 6 days a week, for 2, 3, 5, and 12 months and examined by light and electron microscopy. Bronchitis and peribronchitis were observed throughout the exposure periods, and connective tissue around the bronchi thickened as a result of fibrosis. Some bronchiolar ciliated cells were in a degenerated condition and others in a reparative phase. Hyperplastic nodules were not found in the bronchioles, but hyperplasia of the bronchiolar epithelium was observed. Hyperplasia of lymphoid nodules around small vessels was prominent after 2 months of exposure. After 3 months of exposure, alveolar ducts were lined by type 2 cells, and after 12 months, by the bronchiolar epithelium consisting of both ciliated and nonciliated cells. Alveolar macrophages accumulated in the centriacinar alveoli. Fibrous strands were seen to be deposited in alveolar ducts after 3 months, and in bronchioles after 5 months. This fibrosis was due to an increment in collagen fibers. The degree of fibrosis increased with the length of ozone exposure.

  17. The role of ozone exposure in the epidemiology of asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Balmes, J.R.

    1993-12-01

    Asthma is a clinical condition characterized by intermittent respiratory symptoms, nonspecific airway hyperresponsiveness, and reversible airway obstruction. Although the pathogenesis of asthma is incompletely understood, it is clear that airway inflammation is a paramount feature of the condition. Because inhalation of ozone by normal, healthy subjects causes increased airway responsiveness and inflammation, it is somewhat surprising that most controlled human exposure studies that have involved asthmatic subjects have not shown them to be especially sensitive to ozone. The acute decrement in lung function that is the end point traditionally used to define sensitivity to ozone in these studies may be due more to neuromuscular mechanisms limiting deep inspiration than to bronchoconstriction. The frequency of asthma attacks following ozone exposures may be a more relevant end point. Epidemiologic studies, rather than controlled human exposure studies, are required to determine whether ozone pollution increases the risk of asthma exacerbations. Asthma affects approximately 10 million people in the United States and, thus, the answer to this question is of considerable public health importance. Both the prevalence and severity of asthma appear to be increasing in many countries. Although increased asthma morbidity and mortality are probably of multifactorial etiology, a contributory role of urban air pollution is plausible. The epidemiologic database to support an association between asthma and ozone exposure is limited, but the results of several studies suggest such an association. Some potential approaches to further investigation of the relationship between asthma and ozone, including those that would link controlled human exposures to population-based studies, are considered. 57 refs.

  18. Exposure-Relevant Ozone Chemistry in Occupied Spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Beverly Kaye

    2009-04-01

    Ozone, an ambient pollutant, is transformed into other airborne pollutants in the indoor environment. In this dissertation, the type and amount of byproducts that result from ozone reactions with common indoor surfaces, surface residues, and vapors were determined, pollutant concentrations were related to occupant exposure, and frameworks were developed to predict byproduct concentrations under various indoor conditions. In Chapter 2, an analysis is presented of secondary organic aerosol formation from the reaction of ozone with gas-phase, terpene-containing consumer products in small chamber experiments under conditions relevant for residential and commercial buildings. The full particle size distribution was continuously monitored, and ultrafine and fine particle concentrations were in the range of 10 to>300 mu g m-3. Particle nucleation and growth dynamics were characterized.Chapter 3 presents an investigation of ozone reactions with aircraft cabin surfaces including carpet, seat fabric, plastics, and laundered and worn clothing fabric. Small chamber experiments were used to determine ozone deposition velocities, ozone reaction probabilities, byproduct emission rates, and byproduct yields for each surface category. The most commonly detected byproducts included C1?C10 saturated aldehydes and skin oil oxidation products. For all materials, emission rates were higher with ozone than without. Experimental results were used to predict byproduct exposure in the cabin and compare to other environments. Byproduct levels are predicted to be similar to ozone levels in the cabin, which have been found to be tens to low hundreds of ppb in the absence of an ozone converter. In Chapter 4, a model is presented that predicts ozone uptake by and byproduct emission from residual chemicals on surfaces. The effects of input parameters (residue surface concentration, ozone concentration, reactivity of the residue and the surface, near-surface airflow conditions, and

  19. Surface ozone exposures measured at clean locations around the world.

    PubMed

    Lefohn, A S; Krupa, S V; Winstanley, D

    1990-01-01

    For assessing the effects of air pollution on vegetation, some researchers have used control chambers as the basis of comparison between crops and trees grown in contemporary polluted rural locations and those grown in a clean environment. There has been some concern whether the arbitrary ozone level of 0.025 ppm and below, often used in charcoal-filtration chambers to simulate the natural background concentration of ozone, is appropriate. Because of the many complex and man-made factors that influence ozone levels, it is difficult to determine natural background. To identify a range of ozone exposures that occur at 'clean' sites, we have calculated ozone exposures observed at a number of 'clean' monitoring sites located in the United States and Canada. We do not claim that these sites are totally free from human influence, but rather than the ozone concentrations observed at these 'clean' sites may be appropriate for use by vegetation researchers in control chambers as pragmatic and defensible surrogates for natural background. For comparison, we have also calculated ozone exposures observed at four 'clean' remote sites in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres and at two remote sites (Whiteface Mountain, NY and Hohenpeissenberg, FRG) that are considered to be more polluted. Exposure indices relevant for describing the relationship between ozone and vegetation effects were applied. For studying the effects of ozone on vegetation, the higher concentrations are of interest. The sigmoidally-weighted index appeared to best separate those sites that experienced frequent high concentration exposures from those that experienced few high concentrations. Although there was a consistent seasonal pattern for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Geophysical Monitoring for Climate Change (GMCC) sites indicating a winter/spring maximum, this was not the case for the other remote sites. Some sites in the continental United States and southern Canada

  20. Ozone NAAQS Review: Risk/Exposure Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone is one of the six major air pollutants for which EPA has issued air quality criteria and established national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) based on those criteria. The Clear Air Act (CAA) requires EPA to periodically review and revise, as appropriate, existing air ...

  1. Sudden Gains in Prolonged Exposure and Sertraline for Chronic PTSD

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Janie J.; Zoellner, Lori A.; Feeny, Norah C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sudden gains are significant, rapid improvements in symptoms, larger than typical between-session symptom reduction.[8] Sudden gains in a large sample of individuals with PTSD have not been studied, and only one study has looked at it in pharmacotherapy, but not in PTSD. In the present study, we examined the occurrence of sudden gains in psychotherapy, specifically prolonged exposure (PE), and pharmacotherapy, specifically sertraline, for chronic PTSD. Method Sudden gains in PTSD symptoms (PTSD Symptom Scale-Self-Report[23]) were assessed in 200 individuals with PTSD during 10 weeks of PE or sertraline. Results Individuals in both PE (42.2%) and sertraline (31%) exhibited sudden gains. Individuals in PE made more gains toward the end of treatment (7.2%) than sertraline (2%, OR = 3.82). However, individuals in sertraline made larger gains during early treatment (M = 18.35, SD = 8.15) than PE (M = 12.53, SD = 5.16, d = .85). Notably, those on sertraline were more likely to exhibit a reversal of sudden gains than those in PE (OR = .23). Pointing to clinical significance, the presence of a sudden gain was associated with better reduction in symptoms from pre- to post-treatment (β = -.49). Conclusions Individuals in both PE and sertraline experienced gains, though sertraline was associated with earlier large but reversible gains, and PE was associated with later gains. This differential pattern of discontinuous change highlights potential differential mechanism for these therapies and marks important transition points for further detailed analyses of change mechanisms. PMID:23633445

  2. THE EFFECT OF CONTROLLED OZONE EXPOSURE ON HUMAN LUMPHOCYTE FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of ozone (03) on cell-mediated immunity were studied in 16 human subjects exposed to 1176 micrograms/cu.m. 03 (0.6 ppm) for 2 hr in an environmentally controlled exposure chamber. Venous blood smaples were taken before and immediately after controlled air and 03 expos...

  3. DECREMENTS IN OLFACTORY SENSITIVITY DUE TO OZONE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Approximate olfactory thresholds were determined in an exploratory study in which subjects were exposed to ozone (O3). The odorants were butyl alcohol (BA) and acetic acid (AA). Preliminary data suggest (1) temporary increases in thresholds due to O3 exposure, (2) diminution of O...

  4. BIOCHEMICAL CHANGES IN HUMANS UPON EXPOSURE TO OZONE AND EXERCISE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A total of 44 human subjects were exposed to 784 micrograms/cu.m.(0.4 ppm) ozone and 30 human subjects were exposed to air as controls. A four hour exposure was given on each of five consecutive days. Half of each group received a higher level of treadmill exercise than the other...

  5. EFFECTS OF EXPOSURE TO OZONE ON SUSCEPTIBILITY TO EXPERIMENTAL TUBERCULOSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of mice to 1.96 mg/cu. m. ozone (03) 3 h/day, 5 days/week, for up to 8 weeks beginning at 1 or 2 weeks after challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis R1Rv resulted in significant enhancement of bacterial titers in the lungs at 5 through 8 weeks after challenge when comp...

  6. Competing for Consciousness: Prolonged Mask Exposure Reduces Object Substitution Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodhew, Stephanie C.; Visser, Troy A. W.; Lipp, Ottmar V.; Dux, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    In object substitution masking (OSM) a sparse, temporally trailing 4-dot mask impairs target identification, even though it has different contours from, and does not spatially overlap with the target. Here, we demonstrate a previously unknown characteristic of OSM: Observers show reduced masking at prolonged (e.g., 640 ms) relative to intermediate…

  7. Ozone’s Impact on Public Health: Contributions from Indoor Exposures to Ozone and Products of Ozone-Initiated Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Weschler, Charles J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective The associations between ozone concentrations measured outdoors and both morbidity and mortality may be partially due to indoor exposures to ozone and ozone-initiated oxidation products. In this article I examine the contributions of such indoor exposures to overall ozone-related health effects by extensive review of the literature as well as further analyses of published data. Findings Daily inhalation intakes of indoor ozone (micrograms per day) are estimated to be between 25 and 60% of total daily ozone intake. This is especially noteworthy in light of recent work indicating little, if any, threshold for ozone’s impact on mortality. Additionally, the present study estimates that average daily indoor intakes of ozone oxidation products are roughly one-third to twice the indoor inhalation intake of ozone alone. Some of these oxidation products are known or suspected to adversely affect human health (e.g., formaldehyde, acrolein, hydroperoxides, fine and ultrafine particles). Indirect evidence supports connections between morbidity/mortality and exposures to indoor ozone and its oxidation products. For example, cities with stronger associations between outdoor ozone and mortality tend to have residences that are older and less likely to have central air conditioning, which implies greater transport of ozone from outdoors to indoors. Conclusions Indoor exposures to ozone and its oxidation products can be reduced by filtering ozone from ventilation air and limiting the indoor use of products and materials whose emissions react with ozone. Such steps might be especially valuable in schools, hospitals, and childcare centers in regions that routinely experience elevated outdoor ozone concentrations. PMID:17035131

  8. Airway response to ultra short-term exposure to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Fouke, J.M.; Delemos, R.A.; McFadden, E.R. Jr.

    1988-02-01

    To determine whether acute short-term exposure to oxidant pollutants can cause changes in respiratory mechanics, we gave 0.5 ppm ozone for 5 min to 7 baboons. We measured pulmonary resistance (RL) and obtained dose response curves to methacholine before and after the exposures. This brief insult increased resistance (control RL = 1.53 +/- 0.21 cm H/sub 2/O.L-1 s; post-ozone RL = 3.53 +/- 0.54 cm H/sub 2/O.L-1 s). On a second occasion, 6 of these animals were restudied before and after the administration of cromolyn sodium. Although this drug had no effect on the measurements of mechanics made in the control period, it significantly reduced the ozone-induced changes in mechanics. The increase in RL was 52% of that produced in the first study. The results demonstrated that the ozone injury with its acute and subacute airway sequelae occurs quite rapidly and after very brief exposure. The time course of the change in mechanics and the effects of cromolyn suggest the hypothesis that surface epithelial cells are disrupted, causing subsequent release of bronchoconstricting agents.

  9. Attenuated response to repeated daily ozone exposures in asthmatic subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, H. Jr.; Linn, W.S.; McManus, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    The development of attenuated response ({open_quotes}tolerance{close_quotes}) to daily ozone (O{sub 3}) exposures in the laboratory is well established in healthy adult volunteers. However, the capability of asthmatics to develop tolerance during multiday ozone exposures in unclear. We exposed 10 adult volunteers with mild asthma to 0.4 ppm O{sub 3} in filtered air for 3 h/d on 5 consecutive d. Two similar filtered-air exposures during the preceding week served as controls. Follow-up O{sub 3} exposures were performed 4 and 7 d after the most recent consecutive exposure. All exposures were performed in an environmental chamber at 31 {degrees}C and 35% relative humidity. The subjects performed moderate exercise (mean ventilation rate of 32 l/min) for 15 min of each half-hour. Responses were measured with spirometry and symptom evaluations before and after each exposure, and a bronchial reactivity test (methacholine challenge) was conducted after each exposure. All response measurements showed clinically and statistically significant day-to-day variation. Symptom and forced-expiratory-volume-in-1-s responses were similarly large on the 1st and 2nd O{sub 3} exposure days, after which they diminished progressively, approaching filtered air response levels by the 5th consecutive O{sub 3} day. This tolerance was partially lost 4 and 7 d later. Bronchial reactivity peaked after the first O{sub 3} exposure and remained somewhat elevated after all subsequent O{sub 3} exposures, relative to its control level following filtered-air exposures. Individual responses varied widely; more severe initial responses to O{sub 3} predicted less rapid attenuation. We concluded that asthmatics can develop tolerance to frequent high-level O{sub 3} exposures in much the same manner as normal subjects, although the process may be slower and less fully effective in asthmatics. 27 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Exposure of humans to ambient levels of ozone for 6. 6 hours causes cellular and biochemical changes in the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, R.B.; McDonnell, W.F.; Mann, R.; Becker, S.; House, D.E.; Schreinemachers, D.; Koren, H.S. )

    1991-01-01

    An acute (2 h) exposure of humans to 0.4 ppm ozone initiates biochemical changes in the lung that result in the production of components mediating inflammation and acute lung damage as well as components having the potential to lead to long-term effects such as fibrosis. However, many people are exposed to lower levels of ozone than this, but for periods of several hours. Therefore, it is important to determine if a prolonged exposure to low levels of ozone is also capable of causing cellular and biochemical changes in the lung. Nonsmoking males were randomly exposed to filtered air and either 0.10 ppm ozone or 0.08 ppm ozone for 6.6 h with moderate exercise (40 liters/min). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed 18 h after each exposure, and cells and fluid were analyzed. The BAL fluid of volunteers exposed to 0.10 ppm ozone had significant increases in neutrophils (PMNs), protein, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), fibronectin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) compared with BAL fluid from the same volunteers exposed to filtered air. In addition, there was a decrease in the ability of alveolar macrophages to phagocytize yeast via the complement receptor. Exposure to 0.08 ppm ozone resulted in significant increases in PMNs, PGE2, LDH, IL-6, alpha 1-antitrypsin, and decreased phagocytosis via the complement receptor. However, BAL fluid protein and fibronectin were no longer significantly elevated. We conclude that exposure of humans to as low a level as 0.08 ppm for 6.6 h is sufficient to initiate an inflammatory reaction in the lung.

  11. PULMONARY FUNCTION AND SYMPTOM RESPONSES AFTER 6.6-HOUR EXPOSURE TO 0.12 PPM OZONE WITH MODERATE EXERCISE (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Episodes occasionally occur when ambient ozone (03) levels remain at or near 0.12 ppm for more than 6 h. The hypothesis that prolonged exposure to 0.12 ppm 03 would result in progressively larger changes in respiratory function and symptoms over time was tested. Ten nonsmoking ma...

  12. Canine ovarian fibroma associated with prolonged exposure to mibolerone.

    PubMed

    Seaman, W J

    1985-01-01

    A study to determine the efficacy and safety of mibolerone following prolonged oral administration in the female dog was terminated after 9.6 yr. Histopathologic examination revealed the presence of small dense tumors in the ovaries of 12 of 92 dogs given mibolerone at the approximate efficacious dose. No such tumors were found in 60 vehicle control animals or 55 animals given exaggerated doses of mibolerone. The tumors were composed of dense fibrous connective tissue and incorporated occasional ovarian medullary tubules. The tumors appeared to grow by expansion with no evidence of invasion or metastasis and were diagnosed as fibromas. PMID:4070927

  13. Ozone exposure assessment in a southern California community.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, L J; Delfino, R; Koutrakis, P

    1997-01-01

    An ozone exposure assessment study was conducted in a Southern California community. The Harvard ozone passive sampler was used to monitor cohorts of 22 and 18 subjects for 8 weeks during the spring and fall of 1994, respectively. Ozone exposure variables included 12-hr personal O3 measurements, stationary outdoor O3 measurements from a continuous UV photometer and from 12-hr Harvard active monitors, and time-activity information. Results showed that personal O3 exposure levels averaged one-fourth of outdoor stationary O3 levels, attributable to high percentages of time spent indoors. Personal O3 levels were not predicted well by outdoor measurements. A random-effect general linear model analysis indicated that variance in personal exposure measurements was largely accounted for by random error (59-82%), followed by inter-subject (9-18%) and between-day (9-23%) random effects. The microenvironmental model performs differently by season, with the regression model for spring cohorts exhibiting two times the R2 of the fall cohorts (R2 = 0.21 vs. 0.09). When distance from the stationary monitoring site, elevation, and traffic are taken into account in the microenvironmental models, the adjusted R2 increased almost twofold for the fall personal exposure data. The low predictive power is due primarily to the apparent spatial variation of outdoor O3 and errors in O3 measurements and in time-activity records (particularly in recording the use of air conditioning). This study highlights the magnitude of O3 exposure misclassification in epidemiological settings and proposes an approach to reduce exposure uncertainties in assessing air pollution health effects. Images Figure 1. A Figure 1. B Figure 2. A Figure 2. B Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. PMID:9074882

  14. Chronic exposure to ozone causes restrictive lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Grose, E.C.; Costa, D.L.; Hatch, G.E.; Miller, F.J.; Graham, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    A chronic study to determine the progression and/or reversibility of ozone-induced lung disease was conducted. Male rats were exposed to a diurnal pattern of ozone (O{sub 3}) for 1 week, 3 weeks, 3 months, 12 months, or 18 months. The occurrence of chronic lung disease was determined by structural and functional endpoints. Structurally, a biphasic response was observed with an initial acute inflammatory response after 1 week of exposure, a reduced acute response after 3 weeks of exposure, and an epithelial and interstitial response observed after 3 months which persisted or increased in intensity up to 18 months of exposure. Functional studies showed a persistence of decreased total lung capacity and residual volumes at 3, 12, and 18 months of exposure, a response indicative of restrictive lung disease. Biochemical changes in antioxidant metabolism were also observed after 12 and 18 months of exposure. Most significant changes were resolved after the clean-air recovery period. The study has shown that chronic exposure to O{sub 3} causes restrictive lung disease as characterized by the development of focal interstitial fibrosis.

  15. PLASMA AND LUNG MACROPHAGE CAROTENOID RESPONSIVENESS TO SUPPLEMENTATION AND OZONE EXPOSURE IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    OBJECTIVE:: To examine the effect of ozone exposure and vegetable juice supplementation on plasma and lung macrophage concentrations of carotenoids. DESIGN:: A randomized trial. SETTING:: Subjects were exposed to ambient air prior to antioxidant supplementation and to ozone after...

  16. Prolonged in vitro exposure of Staphylococcus aureus to germicidal teat dips.

    PubMed

    Hogan, J S; Smith, K L

    1989-04-01

    Eight strains of Staphylococcus aureus were tested to determine if prolonged exposure to commercial teat dips could enhance bacterial tolerance to teat dips in vitro. All strains of S. aureus were serially plated 15 times on chemically defined agar medium containing sublethal concentrations of linear dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid, chlorhexidine, sodium hypochlorite, and iodophor teat dips. Growth responses of S. aureus to chlorhexidine, sodium hypochlorite, and iodophor were not affected by prolonged exposure to these teat dips. Isolates subcultured on agar containing .1% linear dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid teat dip subsequently had a greater mean growth response to .1% solution of the germicide than did controls subcultured on basal medium. Hemolytic patterns, tube coagulase, clumping factor, and protein A reactions of S. aureus were not altered by exposure to any of the teat dips tested. In general, prolonged exposure to commercial teat dips did not alter germicidal susceptibility of S. aureus. PMID:2745808

  17. Effect of prolonged exposure to organic solvents on the active site environment of subtilisin Carlsberg

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Vibha; Delgado, Yamixa; Fasoli, Ezio; Ferrer, Amaris; Griebenow, Kai; Secundo, Francesco; Barletta, Gabriel L

    2010-01-01

    The potential of enzyme catalysis as a tool for organic synthesis is nowadays indisputable, as is the fact that organic solvents affect an enzyme’s activity, selectivity and stability. Moreover, it was recently realized that an enzyme’s initial activity is substantially decreased after prolonged exposure to organic media, an effect that further hampers their potential as catalysts for organic synthesis. Regrettably, the mechanistic reasons for these effects are still debatable. In the present study we have made an attempt to explain the reasons behind the partial loss of enzyme activity on prolonged exposure to organic solvents. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies of the serine protease subtilisin Carlsberg chemically modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG-SC) and inhibited with a Dancyl fluorophore, and dissolved in two organic solvents (acetonitrile and 1,4-dioxane) indicate that when the enzyme is initially introduced into these solvents, the active site environment is similar to that in water; however prolonged exposure to the organic medium causes this environment to resemble that of the solvent in which the enzyme is dissolved. Furthermore, kinetic studies show a reduction on both Vmax and KM as a result of prolonged exposure to the solvents. One interpretation of these results is that during this prolonged exposure to organic solvents the active-site fluorescent label inhibitor adopts a different binding conformation. Extrapolating this to an enzymatic reaction we argue that substrates bind in a less catalytically favorable conformation after the enzyme has been exposed to organic media for several hours. PMID:20414456

  18. Response of the rat erythrocyte to ozone exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, E. C.; Kimzey, S. L.; Siler, K.

    1978-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to high (6-8 ppm) and moderate (1.5 ppm) amounts of ozone (O3) for various time periods. Response of the rat erythrocyte to ozone was monitored with red blood cell potassium (rubidium) influx studies, with storage stress combined with ultrastructural studies and with levels of erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. Erythrocytes of rats exposed to O3 showed no significant changes either in their potassium influx or in their glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities compared to controls. Erythrocyte differential counts on O3-exposed animals showed significant changes initially as well as following storage stress compared to controls. Rats exposed to 8 ppm O3 for 4 h showed a marked increase in echinocytes. These consistent transformations from discocytes to echinocytes following O3 exposure suggest latent erythrocyte damage has occurred.

  19. Exposure of human lung fibroblasts to ozone: cell mortality and hyaluronan metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, D.; Branscheid, D. )

    1992-04-01

    Exposure of cultures of human lung fibroblasts to 0.5 ppm ozone for 20 h resulted in a significant increase in cellular mortality by 29%; after exposure to 2.5 ppm ozone for 4 h, the increase amounted to 74%. A marked difference in sensitivity to ozone was observed between fibroblast lines from different individuals. This variability in resistance to ozone was more evident after exposure to 0.5 ppm ozone for 20 h, when compared with 2.5 ppm ozone for 4 h. In one fibroblast line, synthesis of hyaluronan was enhanced by exposure to 0.5 ppm ozone for 20 h. The concentrations of hyaluronan in culture media increased in experiments using different fibroblast cell lines, a phenomenon that was obvious both if cell numbers and combined protein concentrations of cells and media are selected as references for hyaluronan concentrations.

  20. USE OF AUXILIARY DATA FOR SPATIAL INTERPOLATION OF OZONE EXPOSURE IN SOUTHEASTERN FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to assess the impact of tropospheric ozone on forests, it is necessary to quantify ozone exposure on regional scales. Since ozone monitoring stations are widely scattered and mostly concentrate in urban and suburban areas, some form of spatial interpolation is necessary ...

  1. Ozone decreases spring root growth and root carbohydrate content in ponderosa pine the year following exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, C.P.; Hogsett, W.E.; Wessling, R.; Plocher, M.

    1991-01-01

    Storage carbohydrates are extremely important for new shoot and root development following dormancy or during periods of high stress. The hypothesis that ozone decreases carbohydrate storage and decreases new root growth during the year following exposure was investigated. The results suggest that (1) ponderosa pine seedlings exposed to 122 and 169 ppm hrs ozone for one season have significantly less root starch reserves available just prior to and during bud break the following year, and (2) spring root growth is decreased following ozone exposure. The carry-over effects of ozone stress may be important in long-lived perennial species which are annually subjected to ozone.

  2. Ozone Exposure System Designed and Used to High-Altitude Airship Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sharon K.

    2005-01-01

    High-altitude airships can receive high doses of ozone over short mission durations. For example, in 1 year at an altitude of 70,000 ft, the ozone fluence (number arriving per unit area) can be as high as 1.2 1024 molecules/sq cm. Ozone exposure at these levels can embrittle materials or change the performance of solar cells. It is important to expose components and materials to the expected ozone dosage to determine if the ozone exposure could cause any mission-critical failures.

  3. Prolonged Exposure Therapy for a Vietnam Veteran with PTSD and Early-Stage Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duax, Jeanne M.; Waldron-Perrine, Brigid; Rauch, Sheila A. M.; Adams, Kenneth M.

    2013-01-01

    Although prolonged exposure therapy (PE) is considered an evidence-based treatment for PTSD, there has been little published about the use of this treatment for older adults with comorbid early-stage dementia. As the number of older adults in the United States continues to grow, so will their unique mental health needs. The present article…

  4. Direction of Influence between Posttraumatic and Depressive Symptoms during Prolonged Exposure Therapy among Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aderka, Idan M.; Foa, Edna B.; Applebaum, Edna; Shafran, Naama; Gilboa-Schechtman, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Our objective in the present study was to examine the temporal sequencing of posttraumatic and depressive symptoms during prolonged exposure therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among children and adolescents. Method: Participants were 73 children and adolescents (56.2% female) between the ages of 8 and 18. Participants…

  5. Prolonged Exposure Treatment of Chronic PTSD in Juvenile Sex Offenders: Promising Results from Two Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Prolonged exposure (PE) was used to treat chronic PTSD secondary to severe developmental trauma in two adolescent male sex offenders referred for residential sex offender treatment. Both youth were treatment resistant prior to initiation of PE and showed evidence of long-standing irritability and depression/anxiety. Clinical observation and…

  6. Adaptive response of poplar (Populus nigra L.) after prolonged Cd exposure period.

    PubMed

    Jakovljević, Tamara; Bubalo, Marina Cvjetko; Orlović, Sanja; Sedak, Marija; Bilandžić, Nina; Brozinčević, Iva; Redovniković, Ivana Radojčić

    2014-03-01

    An outdoor pot experiment was designed to study the changes of growth parameters, accumulation, and distribution of Cd in poplar (Populus nigra L.) during a prolonged exposure period (growing period of 17 months including three harvest points), allowing the consideration of time effects and prolonged adaptation to Cd stress. Simultaneously, changes to the antioxidant system in roots and leaves were monitored. It was demonstrated that poplar could adapt to the Cd-contaminated soils after prolonged exposure. Total Cd accumulation in the aerial parts of poplar, due to high biomass production and acceptable Cd accumulation parameters, implies that the tested poplar species could be a good candidate for Cd phytoextraction application as well as could be used as phytostabilizer of Cd in heavily polluted soil. Furthermore, the activity of the antioxidant machinery displays both a tissue- and exposure-specific response pattern to different Cd treatments, indicating that strict regulation of the antioxidant defense system is required for the adaptive response of poplar. In addition, this report highlights the importance of prolonged exposure studies of physiological responses of plants, especially for long-life-cycle woody species under heavy metal stress, since some misleading conclusions could be reached after shorter time periods. PMID:24288057

  7. Prolonged Exposure versus Dynamic Therapy for Adolescent PTSD: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilboa-Schechtman, Eva; Foa, Edna B.; Shafran, Naama; Aderka, Idan M.; Powers, Mark B.; Rachamim, Lilach; Rosenbach, Lea; Yadin, Elna; Apter, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine the efficacy and maintenance of developmentally adapted prolonged exposure therapy for adolescents (PE-A) compared with active control time-limited dynamic therapy (TLDP-A) for decreasing posttraumatic and depressive symptoms in adolescent victims of single-event traumas. Method: Thirty-eight adolescents (12 to 18 years old)…

  8. Prolonged Duration and Frequency of Springtime Ozone Depletion Events in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure-Begley, A.; Petropavlovskikh, I. V.; Oltmans, S. J.; Uttal, T.; Crepinsek, S.

    2013-12-01

    Surface ozone measurements have been maintained in Barrow, Alaska since the mid-1970's, this long term data set allows for analysis and research regarding the year to year variability and long term trends of tropospheric ozone in this region. Since the discovery of ozone depletion events (ODE's) in the 1980's [Oltmans , 1981] evidence has shown that there is a direct correlation between sea ice age, wind direction, and ozone depletions. As the climate continues to change, the characteristics and chemistry of the sea ice, and in turn atmosphere, will change as well. With first year sea ice now making up the majority of Arctic ice cover, younger and saltier ice is being melted each spring. Bromine and other halogens are released into the atmosphere from brine depositions on the ice surface resulting in photo chemical reactions depleting ozone at the surface. It must be considered that wind direction of air masses moving into the measurement location play a great role on the intensity and frequency of events each year. When air masses have dominant land based direction, then the depletion events are not seen. These ODE's have been steadily increasing over time, with a remarkable amount of depletion detected in 2012. Data collected from Thermo Scientific Model 49c Ozone monitors in Barrow, Alaska and Tiksi, Russia (located at 71.6 N and 71.3 N respectively to minimize solar angle differences) can be correlated with dominant wind direction, Hybrid Single Particle Langrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) modeling, and ice age to form an association between ODE's and winds passing over the halogen rich arctic ice. 2013 data from both arctic locations is analyzed to determine the dynamics of ozone depletions with regard to changing ice conditions and wind patterns as compared to 2012 and historical data. The data must be scrutinized with regard to the confounding variables to determine the mechanism behind the extended duration and severity of depletion events in the

  9. Examining acute health outcomes due to ozone exposure and their subsequent relationship to chronic disease outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Ostro, B.D.

    1993-12-01

    Current evidence indicates that individuals exposed to short term elevations in ambient ozone may experience both upper and lower respiratory effects. Some respiratory symptoms and spirometric changes are mild and reversible in nature, while others involve more severe outcomes, including hospital admissions and emergency room visits. However, many questions remain about the effects of acute ozone exposure and the implications of this exposure for chronic disease outcomes. For example, the identification of sensitive subgroups, the delineation of the entire spectrum of health effects due to exposure to ozone, the potential synergy between viral infections and ozone exposure, and the nature of adaptation to ozone are not well characterized. In addition, studies that examine the association between acute responses to ozone and potential biological indicators of a chronic disease process would be desirable. This paper serves to provide an overview of the types of epidemiologic studies that may be appropriate and factors to consider in addressing these questions. 23 refs.

  10. Effects of varying environmental conditions on vegetation response to ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Zaleski, R.T.; Triemer, L.R.

    1995-12-31

    Developing an exposure-effects model for plant response to ozone exposure is a complex process. It is known that ozone must enter the plant through the stomata for an effect to occur. Therefore, ozone uptake is related not only to ambient ozone concentrations, but also to environmental factors which control stomatal movement. In addition, cellular factors within the plant can mitigate ozone impact and ultimately control plant response. This paper presents a review of the scientific literature on plant responses (e.g. visible foliar injury, reductions in growth or yield) to ozone exposures under varying environmental conditions known to affect stomatal aperture. The results of this effort show the importance of considering key environmental factors when developing exposure-effects models.

  11. TOWARDS RELIABLE AND COST-EFFECTIVE OZONE EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT: PARAMETER EVALUATION AND MODEL VALIDATION USING THE HARVARD SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CHRONIC OZONE EXPOSURE STUDY DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate assessment of chronic human exposure to atmospheric criteria pollutants, such as ozone, is critical for understanding human health risks associated with living in environments with elevated ambient pollutant concentrations. In this study, we analyzed a data set from a...

  12. ZINC-DEFICIENCY ENHANCES PRO-INFLAMMATORY RESPONSES AFTER OZONE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological and controlled exposure studies have demonstrated that humans are differentially susceptible to adverse health effects induced by exposure to ozone. Serum analysis of vitamins and trace elements have shown that the elderly (people >65 years) are deficient in sever...

  13. PROPORTION OF MODERATELY EXERCISING INDIVIDUALS RESPONDING TO LOW-LEVEL, MULTI-HOUR OZONE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to describe the proportion of moderately exercising individuals experiencing significant respiratory responses to low-level, multi-hour ozone exposure as a function of ozone concentration and exposure duration. ixty-eight healthy, nonsmoking adults, ...

  14. OZONE-INDUCED RESPIRATORY SYMPTOMS AND LUNG FUNCTION DECREMENTS IN HUMANS: EXPOSURE-RESPONSE MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Short duration exposure to ozone (<8 hr) is known to result in lung function decrements and respiratory symptoms in humans. The magnitudes of these responses are functions of ozone concentration (C), activity level measured by minute ventilation (Ve), duration of exposure (T), a...

  15. DURATION OF INCREASED PULMONARY FUNCTION SENSITIVITY TO AN INITIAL OZONE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The metabolic and pulmonary function effects were investigated in 6 non-smoking, young adults who were exposed for 2 hours (22 deg. WBGT) to: (1) Filtered air (FA), (2) 0.45 ppm ozone (DAY), and (3) Two days later to a second exposure to 0.45 ppm ozone exposure (DAY2). The subjec...

  16. A DYNAMIC NONLINEAR MODEL OF OZONE-INDUCED FEV1 RESPONSE UNDER CHANGING EXPOSURE CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Dynamic Nonlinear Model of Ozone-induced FEV1 Response under Changing Exposure Conditions. 1WF McDonnell, 2PW Stewart, 3MV Smith. 1Human Studies Division, NHEERL, U.S. EPA, RTP, NC. 2University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC. 3ASI, Durham, NC.

    Ozone exposure result...

  17. Determination of oxidant exposure during ozonation of secondary effluent to predict contaminant removal.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Ines; Avisar, Dror; Mamane, Hadas; Jekel, Martin; Hübner, Uwe

    2016-09-01

    The use of kinetic models to predict oxidation performance in wastewater is limited due to fast ozone depletion during the first milliseconds of the reaction. This paper introduces the Quench Flow Module (QFM), a bench-scale experimental technique developed to measure the first 5-500 milliseconds of ozone depletion for accurate determination of ozone exposure in wastewater-ozonation processes. Calculated ozone exposure in QFM experiments was up to 24% lower than in standard batch experiments, strongly depending on the initial sampling point for measurement in batch experiments. However, oxidation rates of slowly- and moderately-reacting trace organic compounds (TrOCs) were accurately predicted from batch experiments based on integration of ozone depletion and removal of an ozone-resistant probe compound to calculate oxidant exposures. An alternative concept, where ozone and hydroxyl radical exposures are back-calculated from the removal of two probe compounds, was tested as well. Although the QFM was suggested to be an efficient mixing reactor, ozone exposure ranged over three orders of magnitude when different probe compounds reacting moderately with ozone were used for the calculation. These effects were beyond uncertainty ranges for apparent second order rate constants and consistently observed with different ozone-injection techniques, i.e. QFM, batch experiments, bubble columns and venturi injection. This indicates that previously suggested mixing effects are not responsible for the difference and other still unknown factors might be relevant. Results furthermore suggest that ozone exposure calculations from the relative residual concentration of a probe compound are not a promising option for evaluation of ozonation of secondary effluents. PMID:27232995

  18. Physiological Stress Responses to Prolonged Exposure to MS-222 and Surgical Implantation in Juvenile Chinook Salmon

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Katie A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Seaburg, Adam; Skalski, John R.; Eppard, Matthew B.

    2014-07-17

    While many studies have investigated the effects of transmitters on fish condition, behavior, and survival, to our knowledge, no studies have taken into account anesthetic exposure time in addition to tag and surgery effects. We investigated stress responses to prolonged MS-222 exposure after stage 4 induction in surgically implanted juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). Survival, tag loss, plasma cortisol concentration, and blood Na+, K+, Ca2+, and pH were measured immediately following anesthetic exposure and surgical implantation and 1, 7, and 14 days post-treatment. Despite the prolonged anesthetic exposure, 3-15 minutes post Stage 4 induction, there were no mortalities or tag loss in any treatment. MS-222 was effective at delaying immediate cortisol release during surgical implantation; however, osmotic disturbances resulted, which were more pronounced in longer anesthetic time exposures. From day 1 to day 14, Na+, Ca2+, and pH significantly decreased, while cortisol significantly increased. The cortisol increase was exacerbated by surgical implantation. There was a significant interaction between MS-222 time exposure and observation day for Na+, Ca2+, K+, and pH; variations were seen in the longer time exposures, although not consistently. In conclusion, stress response patterns suggest stress associated with surgical implantation is amplified with increased exposure to MS-222.

  19. Effects of prolonged alcohol exposure on somatotrophs and corticotrophs in adult rats: Stereological and hormonal study.

    PubMed

    Trifunović, Svetlana; Manojlović-Stojanoski, Milica; Ristić, Nataša; Jurijević, Branka Šošić; Balind, Snežana Raus; Brajković, Gordana; Perčinić-Popovska, Florina; Milošević, Verica

    2016-05-01

    Exposure to alcohol alters many physiological processes, including endocrine status. The present study examined whether prolonged alcohol (A) exposure could modulate selected stereological and hormonal aspects of pituitary somatotrophs (growth hormone-GH cells) and corticotrophs (adrenocorticotropic hormone-ACTH cells) in adult rats. Changes in pituitary gland volume; the volume density, total number and volume of GH and ACTH cells following alcohol exposure were evaluated using a stereological system (newCAST), while peripheral GH and ACTH levels were determined biochemically. Our results demonstrated the reduction (p<0.05) of the volume density (37%) and volume of GH cells (29%) in the group A. Also, there was a tendency for the total number of GH cells to be smaller in the group A. Serum GH level was significantly decreased (p<0.05; 70%) in the group A when compared to control values. Moreover, prolonged alcohol exposure induced declines (p<0.05) in volume density (24%) and volume of ACTH cells (29%). The total number of ACTH cells and ACTH level were higher (p<0.05; 42%) in the group A than in control rats. Collectively, these results indicate that prolonged alcohol exposure leads not only to changes in GH and ACTH hormone levels, but also to alterations of the morphological aspects of GH and ACTH cells within the pituitary. PMID:27017477

  20. An evaluation of ozone exposure metrics for a seasonally drought-stressed ponderosa pine ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Panek, Jeanne A; Kurpius, Meredith R; Goldstein, Allen H

    2002-01-01

    Ozone stress has become an increasingly significant factor in cases of forest decline reported throughout the world. Current metrics to estimate ozone exposure for forest trees are derived from atmospheric concentrations and assume that the forest is physiologically active at all times of the growing season. This may be inaccurate in regions with a Mediterranean climate, such as California and the Pacific Northwest, where peak physiological activity occurs early in the season to take advantage of high soil moisture and does not correspond to peak ozone concentrations. It may also misrepresent ecosystems experiencing non-average climate conditions such as drought years. We compared direct measurements of ozone flux into a ponderosa pine canopy with a suite of the most common ozone exposure metrics to determine which best correlated with actual ozone uptake by the forest. Of the metrics we assessed, SUM0 (the sum of all daytime ozone concentrations > 0) best corresponded to ozone uptake by ponderosa pine, however the correlation was only strong at times when the stomata were unconstrained by site moisture conditions. In the early growing season (May and June). SUM0 was an adequate metric for forest ozone exposure. Later in the season, when stomatal conductance was limited by drought. SUM0 overestimated ozone uptake. A better metric for seasonally drought-stressed forests would be one that incorporates forest physiological activity, either through mechanistic modeling, by weighting ozone concentrations by stomatal conductance, or by weighting concentrations by site moisture conditions. PMID:11843543

  1. Prolonged Particulate Hexavalent Chromium Exposure Suppresses Homologous Recombination Repair in Human Lung Cells.

    PubMed

    Browning, Cynthia L; Qin, Qin; Kelly, Deborah F; Prakash, Rohit; Vanoli, Fabio; Jasin, Maria; Wise, John Pierce

    2016-09-01

    Genomic instability is one of the primary models of carcinogenesis and a feature of almost all cancers. Homologous recombination (HR) repair protects against genomic instability by maintaining high genomic fidelity during the repair of DNA double strand breaks. The defining step of HR repair is the formation of the Rad51 nucleofilament, which facilitates the search for a homologous sequence and invasion of the template DNA strand. Particulate hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), a human lung carcinogen, induces DNA double strand breaks and chromosome instability. Since the loss of HR repair increases Cr(VI)-induced chromosome instability, we investigated the effect of extended Cr(VI) exposure on HR repair. We show acute (24 h) Cr(VI) exposure induces a normal HR repair response. In contrast, prolonged (120 h) exposure to particulate Cr(VI) inhibited HR repair and Rad51 nucleofilament formation. Prolonged Cr(VI) exposure had a profound effect on Rad51, evidenced by reduced protein levels and Rad51 mislocalization to the cytoplasm. The response of proteins involved in Rad51 nuclear import and nucleofilament formation displayed varying responses to prolonged Cr(VI) exposure. BRCA2 formed nuclear foci after prolonged Cr(VI) exposure, while Rad51C foci formation was suppressed. These results suggest that particulate Cr(VI), a major chemical carcinogen, inhibits HR repair by targeting Rad51, causing DNA double strand breaks to be repaired by a low fidelity, Rad51-independent repair pathway. These results further enhance our understanding of the underlying mechanism of Cr(VI)-induced chromosome instability and thus, carcinogenesis. PMID:27449664

  2. The Harvard Southern California Chronic Ozone Exposure Study: assessing ozone exposure of grade-school-age children in two Southern California communities.

    PubMed Central

    Geyh, A S; Xue, J; Ozkaynak, H; Spengler, J D

    2000-01-01

    The Harvard Southern California Chronic Ozone Exposure Study measured personal exposure to, and indoor and outdoor ozone concentrations of, approximately 200 elementary school children 6-12 years of age for 12 months (June 1995-May 1996). We selected two Southern California communities, Upland and several towns located in the San Bernardino mountains, because certain characteristics of those communities were believed to affect personal exposures. On 6 consecutive days during each study month, participant homes were monitored for indoor and outdoor ozone concentrations, and participating children wore a small passive ozone sampler to measure personal exposure. During each sampling period, the children recorded time-location-activity information in a diary. Ambient ozone concentration data were obtained from air quality monitoring stations in the study areas. We present ozone concentration data for the ozone season (June-September 1995 and May 1996) and the nonozone season (October 1995-April 1996). During the ozone season, outdoor and indoor concentrations and personal exposure averaged 48.2, 11.8, and 18.8 ppb in Upland and 60.1, 21.4, and 25.4 ppb in the mountain towns, respectively. During the nonozone season, outdoor and indoor concentrations and personal exposure averaged 21.1, 3.2, and 6.2 ppb in Upland, and 35.7, 2.8, and 5.7 ppb in the mountain towns, respectively. Personal exposure differed by community and sex, but not by age group. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:10706534

  3. Effect of short-term ozone exposure on exogenous thyroxine levels in thyroidectomized and hypophysectomized rats

    SciTech Connect

    Clemons, G.K.; Wei, D.

    1984-06-15

    Short-term ozone exposure (1 ppm X 24 hr) of male rats results in a significant reduction of circulating thyroid hormones and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). The reduction of thyroid hormone levels after ozone exposure has been hypothesized as a possible adaptive mechanism to enhance survival of rats during ozone exposure. In this study, the authors investigated the effect of ozone on thyroid hormone (T4) levels in thyroidectomized and hypophysectomized rats which received exogenous T4 in the drinking water. Groups of normal, intact rats, thyroidectomized rats maintained on T4 at doses ranging from 75 to 1000 micrograms/liter, and hypophysectomized rats maintained on 300 micrograms T4/liter were exposed to ozone (1 ppm X 24 hr), Plasma T4 concentrations were significantly reduced after ozone exposure, and the results indicated that the higher the circulating T4 levels before exposure the more they were reduced after ozone exposure. This reduction in T4 levels cannot be accounted for in these animals by reduced pituitary TSH levels or the effects of fasting, but is likely to be due to peripheral changes in plasma thyroid binding proteins initiated by ozone exposure.

  4. Effect of controlled ozone exposure on human lymphocyte function

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, M.L.; Smialowicz, R.; Harder, S.; Ketcham, B.; House, D.

    1981-04-01

    The effects of ozone (O/sub 3/) on cell-mediated immunity were studied in 16 human subjects exposed to 1176 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ O/sub 3/ (0.6 ppM) for 2 h in an environmentally controlled exposure chamber. Venous blood samples were taken before and immediately after controlled air and O/sub 3/ exposures, as well as at 72 h, 2 and 4 weeks, and at one random time at least 1 month after treatment. The relative frequency of T lymphocytes in blood and the in vitro blastogenic response of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), pokeweed mitogen (PWM), and Candida albicans were determined. During the course of the experiment, no statistically significant changes were observed in the number of T lymphocytes that form spontaneous rosettes with sheep erythrocytes. The response of T lymphocytes to PHA was significantly reduced (P < 0.05) in samples taken at 2 and 4 weeks, following O/sub 3/ exposure. Normal response to PHA was observed at 2 months post-O/sub 3/ exposure. No statistically significant changes in lymphocyte responses to Con A, PWM, or Candida were seen. These results show that one 2 h exposure of humans to 0.6 ppM O/sub 3/ may lead to a transient suppression of the PHA-stimulated blastogenic transformation of peripheral blood lymphocytes. The data indicate that the blastogenic response to PHA of human lymphocytes is exquisitely sensitive to O/sub 3/ exposure and could serve as a bioassay for evaluating subtle changes in cellular immunity induced by O/sub 3/ and possibly other pollutants.

  5. Chlorophyll fluorescence quenching during ozone exposure of leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris (pinto)

    SciTech Connect

    Guralnick, L.J. ); Miller, R.; Heath, R.L. )

    1990-05-01

    During ozone exposure, observations have noted an initial decrease in CO{sub 2} uptake followed by a decrease in stomatal conductance. We examined this response utilizing the technique of fluorescence quenching. Fourteen day old plants were exposed to 0.3 ul/l ozone for 1 hour. Fluorescence quenching was monitored using the Hanstech modulated fluorescence system. This enabled us to measure changes in photochemical quenching (qQ) and non-photochemical quenching (qE) in control and ozone treated plants. Results have indicated no differences in qQ and qE between ozone treated and control plants. We are initiating further studies utilizing different ozone levels.

  6. Topoisomerase I inhibitors: the relevance of prolonged exposure for present clinical development.

    PubMed Central

    Gerrits, C. J.; de Jonge, M. J.; Schellens, J. H.; Stoter, G.; Verweij, J.

    1997-01-01

    Topoisomerase I inhibitors constitute a new class of anti-cancer agents. Recently, topotecan and irinotecan were registered for clinical use in ovarian cancer and colorectal cancer respectively. Cytotoxicity of topoisomerase I inhibitors is S-phase specific, and in vitro and in vivo studies have suggested that, for efficacy, prolonged exposure might be more important than short-term exposure to high concentration. Clinical development of those topoisomerase I inhibitors that have reached this stage is also focused on schedules aiming to achieve prolonged exposure. In this review, we summarize all published preclinical studies on this topic for topoisomerase I inhibitors in clinical development, namely 20-S-camptothecin, 9-nitro-camptothecin, 9-amino-camptothecin, topotecan, irinotecan and GI147211. In addition, preliminary data on clinical studies concerning this topic are also reviewed. The data suggest that prolonged exposure may indeed be relevant for anti-tumour activity. However, the optimal schedule is yet to be determined. Finally, clinical data are yet too immature to draw definitive conclusions. PMID:9328159

  7. Systemic metabolic derangement, pulmonary effects, and insulin insufficiency following subchronic ozone exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Miller, Desinia B; Snow, Samantha J; Henriquez, Andres; Schladweiler, Mette C; Ledbetter, Allen D; Richards, Judy E; Andrews, Debora L; Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2016-09-01

    Acute ozone exposure induces a classical stress response with elevated circulating stress hormones along with changes in glucose, protein and lipid metabolism in rats, with similar alterations in ozone-exposed humans. These stress-mediated changes over time have been linked to insulin resistance. We hypothesized that acute ozone-induced stress response and metabolic impairment would persist during subchronic episodic exposure and induce peripheral insulin resistance. Male Wistar Kyoto rats were exposed to air or 0.25ppm or 1.00ppm ozone, 5h/day, 3 consecutive days/week (wk) for 13wks. Pulmonary, metabolic, insulin signaling and stress endpoints were determined immediately after 13wk or following a 1wk recovery period (13wk+1wk recovery). We show that episodic ozone exposure is associated with persistent pulmonary injury and inflammation, fasting hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance, as well as, elevated circulating adrenaline and cholesterol when measured at 13wk, however, these responses were largely reversible following a 1wk recovery. Moreover, the increases noted acutely after ozone exposure in non-esterified fatty acids and branched chain amino acid levels were not apparent following a subchronic exposure. Neither peripheral or tissue specific insulin resistance nor increased hepatic gluconeogenesis were present after subchronic ozone exposure. Instead, long-term ozone exposure lowered circulating insulin and severely impaired glucose-stimulated beta-cell insulin secretion. Thus, our findings in young-adult rats provide potential insights into epidemiological studies that show a positive association between ozone exposures and type 1 diabetes. Ozone-induced beta-cell dysfunction may secondarily contribute to other tissue-specific metabolic alterations following chronic exposure due to impaired regulation of glucose, lipid, and protein metabolism. PMID:27368153

  8. Use of AIRS, OMI, MLS, and TES Data in Assessing Forest Ecosystem Exposure to Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spruce, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    Ground-level ozone at high levels poses health threats to exposed flora and fauna, including negative impacts to human health. While concern is common regarding depletion of ozone in the stratosphere, portions of the urban and rural United States periodically have high ambient levels of tropospheric ozone on the ground. Ozone pollution can cause a variety of impacts to susceptible vegetation (e.g., Ponderosa and Jeffrey pine species in the southwestern United States), such as stunted growth, alteration of growth form, needle or leaf chlorosis, and impaired ability to withstand drought-induced water stress. In addition, Southern Californian forests with high ozone exposures have been recently subject to multiyear droughts that have led to extensive forest overstory mortality from insect outbreaks and increased incidence of wildfires. Residual forests in these impacted areas may be more vulnerable to high ozone exposures and to other forest threats than ever before. NASA sensors collect a wealth of atmospheric data that have been used recently for mapping and monitoring regional tropospheric ozone levels. AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder), OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument), MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder), and TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) data could be used to assess forest ecosystem exposure to ozone. Such NASA data hold promise for providing better or at least complementary synoptic information on ground-level ozone levels that Federal agency partners can use to assess forest health trends and to mitigate the threats as needed in compliance with Federal laws and mandates. NASA data products on ozone concentrations may be able to aid applications of DSTs (decision support tools) adopted by the USDA FS (U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service) and by the NPS (National Park Service), such as the Ozone Calculator, in which ground ozone estimates are employed to assess ozone impacts to forested vegetation.

  9. Prolonged daily light exposure increases body fat mass through attenuation of brown adipose tissue activity

    PubMed Central

    Kooijman, Sander; van den Berg, Rosa; Ramkisoensing, Ashna; Boon, Mariëtte R.; Kuipers, Eline N.; Loef, Marieke; Zonneveld, Tom C. M.; Lucassen, Eliane A.; Sips, Hetty C. M.; Chatzispyrou, Iliana A.; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Meijer, Johanna H.; Coomans, Claudia P.; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Rensen, Patrick C. N.

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of circadian rhythmicity is associated with obesity and related disorders, including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Specifically, prolonged artificial light exposure associates with obesity in humans, although the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here, we report that increasing the daily hours of light exposure increases body adiposity through attenuation of brown adipose tissue (BAT) activity, a major contributor of energy expenditure. Mice exposed to a prolonged day length of 16- and 24-h light, compared with regular 12-h light, showed increased adiposity without affecting food intake or locomotor activity. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that prolonged day length decreases sympathetic input into BAT and reduces β3-adrenergic intracellular signaling. Concomitantly, prolonging day length decreased the uptake of fatty acids from triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, as well as of glucose from plasma selectively by BAT. We conclude that impaired BAT activity is an important mediator in the association between disturbed circadian rhythm and adiposity, and anticipate that activation of BAT may overcome the adverse metabolic consequences of disturbed circadian rhythmicity. PMID:25964318

  10. Pulmonary function and symptom responses after 6. 6-hour exposure to 0. 12-ppm ozone with moderate exercise (journal version)

    SciTech Connect

    Folinsbee, L.J.; Horstman, D.H.; McDonnell, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    Episodes occasionally occur when ambient ozone (O/sub 3/) levels remain at or near 0.12 ppm for more than 6 h. The hypothesis that prolonged exposure to 0.12 ppm O/sub 3/ would result in progressively larger changes in respiratory function and symptoms over time was tested. Ten nonsmoking males (18-35 yr) were exposed once to clear air (CA) and once to 0.12 pp, O/sub 3/ for 6.75 h. Exposures consisted of six 50-min exercise periods, each followed by 10-min rest and measurement; a 45-min lunch period followed the third exercise period. Exercise ventilation averaged approximately 40 1/min. Forced expiratory and inspiratory spirometry and respiratory symptoms were measured prior to exposure and after each exercise. Increases in the symptom ratings of cough and pain on deep inspiration were observed with O/sub 3/ exposure but not with CA. Airway reactivity to methacholine was approximately doubled following O/sub 3/ exposure. Spirometry results indicate that prolonged exposure to 0.12 ppm O/sub 3/ results in a marked increase in non-specific airway reactivity and progressive changes in respiratory function.

  11. Ozone influence on native vegetation in the Jizerske hory Mts. of the Czech Republic: results based on ozone exposure and ozone-induced visible symptoms.

    PubMed

    Hůnová, Iva; Matoušková, Leona; Srněnský, Radek; Koželková, Klára

    2011-12-01

    Ozone levels in the Jizerske hory Mts. measured at 13 sites by diffusive samplers during the 2006 and 2007 vegetation seasons are presented. A significant ozone gradient (5.4 ppb in 2006 and 4.0 ppb in 2007) per 100 m difference in altitude between 370 and 1,100 m a.s.l. was recorded. High-resolution maps of phytotoxic potential were developed. The AOT40 threshold (5 ppm h) was exceeded over the entire area with the highest levels exceeding this threshold by 12 times in the upper portions of the mountains. Ozone visible injury was evaluated at four of the monitoring sites on seven native plant and tree species. Four species showed ozone-like symptoms, two of which (Rubus idaeus and Fagus sylvatica) were confirmed as ozone-induced. Our results indicate that ambient ozone is likely to have a much lower impact on the Jizerske hory Mts. vegetation than expected, considering the measured ambient ozone exposures and favourable environmental conditions for ozone uptake. PMID:21374050

  12. Effects of long-term exposure to low levels of ozone: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Melton, C.E.

    1982-02-01

    Available literature regarding long-term effects of ozone on animals and humans is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on reports that have appeared since 1976, but some earlier reports are cited for completeness and perspective. This review shows that ozone concentration is more important than duration of exposure in determining the effects of an ozone exposure (dose). This conclusion calls into question the validity of the Time-Weighted Average (TWA) as an index of severity of ozone exposure. The literature review further reveals a wide variation in susceptibility of different animal species to ozone, making it difficult to apply results of animal experiments to humans. It further appears that a dose of ozone that is acutely innocuous is also innocuous over the long term. The effects of a symptom-producing dose of ozone are initially cumulative for the first two or three exposures; then an adaptive response may ensue that involves a plateau of response or even reversal. These effects are shown by both animals and humans. The mechanisms are unknown. Ozone probably causes damage by the free radical formation. Free radical scavengers, such as vitamin E and C, may provide protection against ozone damage.

  13. Diel trend in plant sensitivity to ozone: Implications for exposure- and flux-based ozone metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grantz, David A.

    2014-12-01

    Plant sensitivity to ozone (O3) is critical to modeling impacts of air pollution on vegetation. A diel timecourse of sensitivity (S) was recently determined in Pima cotton (Grantz et al., 2013). The sensitivity parameter serves as a weighting factor for stomatal uptake (ozone flux, F), or cumulative F (dose, D). Previous approaches used various weighting schemes to modify ozone concentration ([O3]) or cumulative [O3] (exposure, E). Use of the S parameter allows calculation of effective flux (Feff) and effective dose (Deff). Though theoretically sound, the practical significance of S has not been evaluated due to the previous lack of available data. Here, the newly available S parameter is used to explore the relationships between exposure- and flux-based O3 metrics in response to scenarios of contrasting stomatal conductance (gs) and ambient [O3]. The O3 scenarios were similar but differed in timing of peak [O3]. E varied by up to 13.7%, D by up to 15.4%, and Deff, which factors in sensitivity, by up to 19.0%. The gs scenarios differed in midday magnitude and nocturnal closure. Cumulative gs varied by 65.2%, which was attenuated in D to 49.2% and in Deff to 51.1%. A simulation of hourly [O3], F, and Feff was run using Monte Carlo techniques with a full month of ambient [O3] data. Resulting diel timecourses of [O3], F, and Feff were realistic, with the principal sources of uncertainty in the physiological parameters, gs and S. Analysis of hourly values from the scenarios and the simulation output demonstrated significant correlation among the O3 metrics. However, the uncertainty in both F and Feff predicted from [O3] was large and proportional to [O3], yielding greatest uncertainty under conditions of high [O3] and potential phytotoxicity. In contrast, Feff was significantly correlated with F, with low variability that was not proportional to F. As a result, uncertainty was low and prediction potentially useful under conditions of likely injury. These results

  14. Effects of prolonged exposure to space flight factors for 175 days on lettuce seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevzgodina, L. V.; Maximova, E. N.; Akatov, Yu. A.

    We have studied the effects of prolonged (up to 175 days) exposure of Lactuca sativa seeds to space flight factors, including primary cosmic radiation heavy ions. The data obtained evidence a significant fourfold increase ofs pontaneous mutagenesis in seeds both with regard to the total number of aberrant cells as well as the formation of single cells with multiple aberrations. Comparison of the present experiment with earlier works shows that the frequency of such aberrations increases with the duration of the flight.

  15. Effects of prolonged exposure to space flight factors for 175 days on lettuce seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Nevzgodina, L.V.; Maximova, E.N.; Akatov, Yu.A.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of prolonged (up to 175 days) exposure of Lactuca sativa seeds to space flight factors, including primary cosmic radiation heavy ions have been studied. The data obtained evidence a significant fourfold increase of spontaneous mutagenesis in seeds both with regard to the total number of aberrant cells as well as the formation of single cells with multiple aberrations. Comparison of the present experiment with earlier works shows that the frequency of such aberrations increases with the duration of the flight.

  16. Does ozone exposure alter growth and carbon allocation of mycorrhizal plants

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, L.C.; Gamon, J.A. ); Andersen, C.P. )

    1994-06-01

    Ozone is known to adversely affect plant growth. However, it is less clear how ozone affects belowground processes. This study tests the hypothesis that ozone alters growth and carbon allocation of vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) plants. Two ecotypes of Elymus glaucus (blue wild rye) were exposed to mycorrhizal inoculation and episodic ozone exposures simulating atmospheric conditions in the Los Angeles Basin. Preliminary results show that effects of ozone on growth were subtle. In both ecotypes, growth of aboveground biomass was not affected by ozone while root growth was decreased. In most treatments, mycorrhizal inoculation decreased growth of leaves and stems, but had no significant effect on root growth. Three-way ANOVA tests indicated interactive effects between ecotype, mycorrhiza and ozone. Further experimental work is needed to reveal the biological processes governing these responses.

  17. Secretory vesicle rebound hyperacidification and increased quantal size due to prolonged methamphetamine exposure

    PubMed Central

    Markov, Dmitriy; Mosharov, Eugene V.; Setlik, Wanda; Gershon, Michael D.; Sulzer, David

    2009-01-01

    Acute exposure to amphetamines collapses secretory vesicle pH gradients, which increases cytosolic catecholamine levels while decreases the quantal size of catecholamine release during fusion events. Amphetamine and methamphetamine, however, are retained in tissues over long durations. We used optical and electron microscopic probes to measure the effects of long-term methamphetamine exposure on secretory vesicle pH, and amperometry and intracellular patch electrochemistry to observe the effects on neurosecretion and cytosolic catecholamines in cultured rat chromaffin cells. In contrast to acute methamphetamine effects, exposure to the drug for 6–48 h at 10 μM and higher concentrations produced a concentration-dependent rebound hyperacidification of secretory vesicles. At 5–10 μM levels, methamphetamine increased the quantal size and reinstated exocytotic catecholamine release, although very high (>100 μM) levels of the drug, while continuing to produce rebound hyperacidification, did not increase quantal size. Secretory vesicle rebound hyperacidification was temperature dependent with optimal response at ~ 37°C, was not blocked by the transcription inhibitor, puromycin, and appears to be a general compensatory response to prolonged exposure with membranophilic weak bases, including amphetamines, methylphenidate, cocaine, and ammonia. Thus, under some conditions of prolonged exposure, amphetamines and other weak bases can enhance, rather than deplete, the vesicular release of catecholamines via a compensatory response resulting in vesicle acidification. PMID:19014382

  18. Increased radiation dose at mammography due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening

    SciTech Connect

    Kimme-Smith, C.; Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.; Chow, S. )

    1991-02-01

    Four single-emulsion films introduced over the past 2 years--Du Pont Microvision, Fuji MiMa, Konica CM, and Eastman Kodak OM--were compared with Eastman Kodak OM SO-177 (Min-RE) film to evaluate their varying effects on mean glandular dose of reciprocity law failure due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening as a result of increased radiation exposure to improve penetration of glandular tissue. Exposures over 1.3 seconds led to increased radiation doses of 20%-30%. Delays in processing of 6 hours decreased processing speed by 11%-32% for all films except Du Pont Microvision. Optical density increases of 0.40 required 20%-30% more skin exposure for all five films. Optimal viewing densities were also evaluated and found to be different for each of the five films. Mammographers need to be aware of these differences in mammographic films to achieve maximum contrast at mammography.

  19. Ozone Exposure Alters Serotonin and Serotonin Receptor Expression in the Developing Lung

    PubMed Central

    Van Winkle, Laura S.

    2013-01-01

    Ozone, a pervasive environmental pollutant, adversely affects functional lung growth in children. Animal studies demonstrate that altered lung development is associated with modified signaling within the airway epithelial mesenchymal trophic unit, including mediators that can change nerve growth. We hypothesized that ozone exposure alters the normal pattern of serotonin, its transporter (5-HTT), and two key receptors (5-HT2A and 5-HT4), a pathway involved in postnatal airway neural, epithelial, and immune processes. We exposed monkeys to acute or episodic ozone during the first 2 or 6 months of life. There were three exposure groups/age: (1) filtered air, (2) acute ozone challenge, and (3) episodic ozone + acute ozone challenge. Lungs were prepared for compartment-specific qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and stereology. Airway epithelial serotonin immunopositive staining increased in all exposure groups with the most prominent in 2-month midlevel and 6-month distal airways. Gene expression of 5-HTT, 5-HT2AR, and 5-HT4R increased in an age-dependent manner. Overall expression was greater in distal compared with midlevel airways. Ozone exposure disrupted both 5-HT2AR and 5-HT4R protein expression in airways and enhanced immunopositive staining for 5-HT2AR (2 months) and 5-HT4R (6 months) on smooth muscle. Ozone exposure increases serotonin in airway epithelium regardless of airway level, age, and exposure history and changes the spatial pattern of serotonin receptor protein (5-HT2A and 5-HT4) and 5-HTT gene expression depending on compartment, age, and exposure history. Understanding how serotonin modulates components of reversible airway obstruction exacerbated by ozone exposure sets the foundation for developing clinically relevant therapies for airway disease. PMID:23570994

  20. DETECTION OF RADICALS PRODUCED IN VIVO DURING INHALATION EXPOSURE TO OZONE: USE OF VARIOUS SPIN TRAPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone is known to induce lipid peroxidation of lung tissue, although no direct evidence of free radical formation has been reported. e have used the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping technique to search for free radicals produced in vivo by ozone exposure. he sp...

  1. Low level ozone exposure induces airways inflammation and modifies cell surface phenotypes in healthy humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The effects of low level ozone exposure (0.08 ppm) on pulmonary function in healthy young adults are well known, however much less is known about the inflammatory and immuno-modulatory effects oflow level ozone in the airways. Techniques such as induced sputum and flo...

  2. AN EVALUATION OF OZONE EXPOSURE METRICS FOR A SEASONALLY DROUGHT STRESSED PONDEROSA PINE ECOSYSTEM. (R826601)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone stress has become an increasingly significant factor in cases of forest decline reported throughout the world. Current metrics to estimate ozone exposure for forest trees are derived from atmospheric concentrations and assume that the forest is physiologically active at ...

  3. Systemic Metabolic Derangement, Pulmonary Effects, and Insulin Insufficiency following subchronic ozone exposure in rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone exposure induces a classical stress response with elevated circulating stress hormones along with changes in glucose, protein and lipid metabolism in rats, with similar alterations in ozone-exposed humans. These stress-mediated changes over time have been linked to in...

  4. Home cage locomotor changes in non-human primates after prolonged welding-fume exposure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Choong Yong; Sung, Jae Hyuck; Chung, Yong Hyun; Park, Jung Duck; Han, Jeong Hee; Lee, Jong Seong; Heo, Jeong Doo; Yu, Il Je

    2013-12-01

    To define the relationship between the brain concentration of manganese and neurological signs, such as locomotion, after prolonged welding-fume exposure, cynomolgus monkeys were acclimated for 1 month and then divided into three concentration groups: unexposed, low concentration (31 mg/m(3) total suspended particulate (TSP), 0.9 mg/m(3) of Mn), and high concentration (62 mg/m(3) TSP, 1.95 mg/m(3) of Mn) of TSP. The monkeys were exposed to manual metal-arc stainless steel (MMA-SS) welding fumes for 2 h per day over 8 months in an inhalation chamber system equipped with an automatic fume generator. The home cage locomotor activity and patterns were determined using a camera system over 2-4 consecutive days. After 25 and 32 weeks of exposure, the home cage locomotor activity of the high-concentration primates was found to be 5-6 times higher than that of the unexposed primates, and this increased locomotor activity was maintained for 7 weeks after ceasing the welding-fume exposure, eventually subsiding to three times higher after 13 weeks of recovery. Therefore, the present results, along with our previous observations of a high magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T1 signal in the globus pallidus and increased blood Mn concentration, indicate that prolonged welding-fume exposure can cause neurobehavioral changes in cynomolgus monkeys. PMID:24304306

  5. Short and prolonged exposure to hyperglycaemia in human fibroblasts and endothelial cells: metabolic and osmotic effects.

    PubMed

    Moruzzi, Noah; Del Sole, Marianna; Fato, Romana; Gerdes, Jantje M; Berggren, Per-Olof; Bergamini, Christian; Brismar, Kerstin

    2014-08-01

    High blood glucose levels are the main feature of diabetes. However, the underlying mechanism linking high glucose concentration to diabetic complications is still not fully elucidated, particularly with regard to human physiology. Excess of glucose is likely to trigger a metabolic response depending on the cell features, activating deleterious pathways involved in the complications of diabetes. In this study, we aim to elucidate how acute and prolonged hyperglycaemia alters the biology and metabolism in human fibroblasts and endothelial cells. We found that hyperglycaemia triggers a metabolic switch from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis that is maintained over prolonged time. Moreover, osmotic pressure is a major factor in the early metabolic response, decreasing both mitochondrial transmembrane potential and cellular proliferation. After prolonged exposure to hyperglycaemia we observed decreased mitochondrial steady-state and uncoupled respiration, together with a reduced ATP/ADP ratio. At the same time, we could not detect major changes in mitochondrial transmembrane potential and reactive oxygen species. We suggest that the physiological and metabolic alterations observed in healthy human primary fibroblasts and endothelial cells are an adaptive response to hyperglycaemia. The severity of metabolic and bioenergetics impairment associated with diabetic complications may occur after longer glucose exposure or due to interactions with cell types more sensitive to hyperglycaemia. PMID:24814290

  6. Long-Term Exposure to Ozone and Life Expectancy in the United States, 2002 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaoyang; Balluz, Lina S; Vaidyanathan, Ambarish; Wen, Xiao-Jun; Hao, Yongping; Qualters, Judith R

    2016-02-01

    Long-term exposure to ground-level ozone is associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality. The association remains uncertain between long-term exposure to ozone and life expectancy. We assessed the associations between seasonal mean daily 8-hour maximum (8-hr max) ozone concentrations measured during the ozone monitoring seasons and life expectancy at birth in 3109 counties of the conterminous U.S. during 2002 to 2008. We used latent class growth analysis to identify latent classes of counties that had distinct mean levels and rates of change in ozone concentrations over the 7-year period and used linear regression analysis to determine differences in life expectancy by ozone levels. We identified 3 classes of counties with distinct seasonal mean daily 8-hr max ozone concentrations and rates of change. When compared with the counties with the lowest ozone concentrations, the counties with the highest ozone concentrations had 1.7- and 1.4-year lower mean life expectancy in males and females (both P < 0.0001), respectively. The associations remained statistically significant after controlling for potential confounding effects of seasonal mean PM2.5 concentrations and other selected environmental, demographic, socio-economic, and health-related factors (both P < 0.0001). A 5 ppb higher ozone concentration was associated with 0.25 year lower life expectancy in males (95% CI: -0.30 to -0.19) and 0.21 year in females (95% CI: -0.25 to -0.17). We identified 3 classes of counties with distinct mean levels and rates of change in ozone concentrations. Our findings suggest that long-term exposure to a higher ozone concentration may be associated with a lower life expectancy. PMID:26886595

  7. Long-Term Exposure to Ozone and Life Expectancy in the United States, 2002 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chaoyang; Balluz, Lina S.; Vaidyanathan, Ambarish; Wen, Xiao-Jun; Hao, Yongping; Qualters, Judith R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Long-term exposure to ground-level ozone is associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality. The association remains uncertain between long-term exposure to ozone and life expectancy. We assessed the associations between seasonal mean daily 8-hour maximum (8-hr max) ozone concentrations measured during the ozone monitoring seasons and life expectancy at birth in 3109 counties of the conterminous U.S. during 2002 to 2008. We used latent class growth analysis to identify latent classes of counties that had distinct mean levels and rates of change in ozone concentrations over the 7-year period and used linear regression analysis to determine differences in life expectancy by ozone levels. We identified 3 classes of counties with distinct seasonal mean daily 8-hr max ozone concentrations and rates of change. When compared with the counties with the lowest ozone concentrations, the counties with the highest ozone concentrations had 1.7- and 1.4-year lower mean life expectancy in males and females (both P < 0.0001), respectively. The associations remained statistically significant after controlling for potential confounding effects of seasonal mean PM2.5 concentrations and other selected environmental, demographic, socio-economic, and health-related factors (both P < 0.0001). A 5 ppb higher ozone concentration was associated with 0.25 year lower life expectancy in males (95% CI: −0.30 to −0.19) and 0.21 year in females (95% CI: −0.25 to −0.17). We identified 3 classes of counties with distinct mean levels and rates of change in ozone concentrations. Our findings suggest that long-term exposure to a higher ozone concentration may be associated with a lower life expectancy. PMID:26886595

  8. Prolonged Exposure for Guilt and Shame in a Veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Lisa A.; Gros, Daniel F.; Strachan, Martha; Worsham, Glenna; Foa, Edna B.; Acierno, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Morally injurious events appear capable of producing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), even though they may not involve actual or perceived life-threat or a response of fear, horror, or helplessness. Researchers have questioned whether exposure therapies can address these events. The current report presents evidence of the effectiveness of this treatment approach for addressing posttraumatic symptoms related to a morally injurious event through an illustrative case of an Operation Iraqi Freedom veteran with PTSD characterized by symptoms of guilt and shame. The veteran was successfully treated with nine sessions of prolonged exposure therapy, reporting minimal PTSD symptoms one week post-treatment and at a six-month follow-up assessment. Implications for the treatment of veterans with significant guilt and shame using exposure-based therapies, and with respect to the recent changes to the diagnostic criteria for PTSD, are discussed. PMID:25505798

  9. OZONE DECREASES SPRING ROOT GROWTH AND ROOT CARBOHYDRATE CONTENT IN PONDEROSA PINE THE YEAR FOLLOWING EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Storage carbohydrates are extremely important for new shoot and root development following dormancy or during periods of high stress. he hypothesis that ozone decreases carbohydrate storage and decreases new root growth during the year following exposure was investigated. eedling...

  10. Germination of fungal conidia after exposure to low concentration ozone atmospheres.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The germinability of conidia of Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Penicillium digitatum, Penicillium expansum, or Penicillium italicum was determined periodically during exposure for approximately 100 days to a humid atmosphere of air alone or air containing 150 ppb ozone ...

  11. Controlled exposure of healthy young volunteers to ozone causes cardiovascular effects**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Recent epidemiology studies have reported associations between acute ozone exposure and mortality. Such studies have previously reported associations between airborne particulate matter pollution (PM) and mortality and support for a causal relationship has come from c...

  12. Controlled Exposure of Healthy Young Volunteers to Ozone Causes Cardiovascular Effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Recent epidemiology studies have reported associations between acute ozone exposure and mortality. Such studies have previously reported associations between airborne particulate matter pollution (PM) and mortality and support for a causal relationship has come from c...

  13. Ozone Exposure Increases Circulating Stress Hormones and Lipid Metabolites in Humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    RATIONALE: Air pollution has been associated with increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes; however, the mechanisms remain unknown. We have shown that acute ozone exposure in rats induces release of stress hormones, hyperglycemia, leptinemia, and gluoose intolerance that are assoc...

  14. Effect of ozone exposure on lung functions and plasma prostaglandin and thromboxane concentrations in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.D.; Ainsworth, D.; Lam, H.F.; Amdur, M.O.

    1987-03-30

    Male Hartley guinea pigs were exposed either to filtered air or to 1 ppm ozone (O/sub 3/) for 1 hr. At 2, 8, 24, or 48 hr after exposure we measured ventilation, respiratory mechanics, lung volumes, diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO), and alveolar volume (VA) in anesthetized, tracheotomized animals. Respiratory frequency and tidal volume were unchanged in all groups. Pulmonary resistance was increased 2 hr after O/sub 3/ but returned to control at 8 hr and thereafter. Prolonged reductions in lung volumes (total lung capacity, vital capacity, functional residual capacity, and residual volume) as well as in DLCO and VA occurred after O/sub 3/, with maximum decreases at 8 and 24 hr postexposure. Increased ratios of wet lung weight to body weight were seen at 2, 8, and 24 hr. In separate groups of animals, also exposed either to filtered air or to 1 ppm O/sub 3/, plasma eicosanoid (EC) concentrations were measured at 2, 8, 24, 48, or 72 hr after exposure. Significant increases in thromboxane B2 concentrations were seen at 2, 24, and 48 hr after exposure. Plasma concentrations of 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha (PGF1 alpha) and prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) were increased at 24 hr and at 24, 48, and 72 hr, respectively. The nature of this long-term pulmonary response to a short-term exposure to O/sub 3/ suggests alveolar involvement, including probable alveolar duct constriction and localized pulmonary edema. Although changes in plasma EC concentrations were observed concurrent with impaired lung functions, no simple causal relationship was apparent from these studies.

  15. Effects of prolonged exposure to perchlorate on thyroid and reproductive function in zebrafish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mukhi, S.; Patino, R.

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of prolonged exposure to perchlorate on (1) thyroid status and reproductive performance of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) and (2) F1 embryo survival and early larval development. Using a static-renewal procedure, mixed sex populations of adult zebrafish were exposed to 0, 10, and 100 mg/l nominal concentrations of waterborne perchlorate for 10 weeks. Thyroid histology was qualitatively assessed, and females and males were separated and further exposed to their respective treatments for six additional weeks. Eight females in each tank replicate (n = 3) were paired weekly with four males from the same respective treatment, and packed-egg (spawn) volume (PEV) was measured each of the last five weeks. At least once during weeks 14-16 of exposure, other end points measured included fertilization rate, fertilized egg diameter, hatching rate, standard length, and craniofacial development of 4-day-postfertilization larvae and thyroid hormone content of 3.5-h embryos and of exposed mothers. At 10 weeks of exposure, perchlorate at both concentrations caused thyroidal hypertrophy and colloid depletion. A marked reduction in PEV was observed toward the end of the 6-week spawning period, but fertilization and embryo hatching rates were unaffected. Fertilized egg diameter and larval length were increased by parental exposure to perchlorate. Larval head depth was unaffected but the forward protrusion of the lower jaw-associated cartilage complexes, Meckel's and ceratohyal, was decreased. Exposure to both concentrations of perchlorate inhibited whole-body thyroxine content in mothers and embryos, but triiodothyronine content was unchanged. In conclusion, prolonged exposure of adult zebrafish to perchlorate not only disrupts their thyroid endocrine system but also impairs reproduction and influences early F1 development. ?? 2007 Oxford University Press.

  16. Monitoring of Occupational Exposure of Mild Steel Welders to Ozone and Nitrogen Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeilzadeh, Morteza; Mehrabi, Yadollah; Salehpour, Sousan

    2011-01-01

    Background Metal Inert Gas (MIG) welding and Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding are widely used for mild steel segments in basic metal industries. Pulmonary problems such as asthma, pulmonary inflammation, hyper-responsiveness of airways and higher susceptibility to infections are reported as the result of occupational exposure of welders to ozone and nitrogen oxides. Potent oxidizing agents like ozone and nitrogen oxides are also reported to be a precursor for respiratory problems and cause lipid peroxidation of membranes. Materials and Methods A total of 43 nonsmoking MIG and TIG welders and 41 nonsmoking workers without appreciable exposure to any chemicals as the control population were chosen to participate in this study. Occupational exposure to ozone was monitored according to the validated methods. Malondialdehyde (MDA) of blood serum as a biomarker for lipid peroxidation was analyzed using Reverse Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography. Data obtained from this study were analyzed using t-test, Pearson's correlation coefficient and multiple regression analysis. Results A total of 88.4% and 74.4% of welders had exposure to ozone and nitrogen dioxide higher than the permissible limit of occupational exposure, respectively. Generally, exposure of MIG welders to ozone was significantly higher than TIG welders (P = 0.006). However, exposure to nitrogen dioxide gas was comparable in both groups. Serum MDA of welders was significantly higher than that of the control group (P = 0.001). A significant correlation was detected between ozone exposure and level of serum malondialdehyde. Such correlation was not observed for nitrogen dioxide exposure. Conclusion Considering the high exposure of welders to ozone and nitrogen dioxide, and higher level of serum malondialdehyde in them compared to controls, risk management is recommended for this group of workers. PMID:25191389

  17. Pulmonary function and symptom responses after 6. 6-hour exposure to 0. 12 ppm ozone with moderate exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Folinsbee, L.J.; McDonnell, W.F.; Horstman, D.H.

    1988-01-01

    Episodes occasionally occur when ambient ozone (O/sub 3/) levels remain at or near 0.12 ppm for more than 6 h. Small decrements in lung function have been reported following 2-h exposures to 0.12 ppm O/sub 3/. For short exposures to higher O/sub 3/ concentrations, lung function decrements are a function of exposure duration. Thus, we investigated the hypothesis that prolonged exposure to 0.12 ppm O/sub 3/ would result in progressively larger changes in respiratory function and symptoms over time. Ten nonsmoking males were exposed once to clean air and once to 0.12 ppm O/sub 3/ for 6.6 h. Exposures consisted of six 50-min exercise periods, each followed by 10-min rest and measurement; a 35-min lunch period followed by the third exercise period. Exercise ventilation averaged approximately 40 L/min. Forced expiratory and inspiratory spirometry and respiratory symptoms were measured prior to exposure and after each exercise. Airway reactivity to methacholine was determined after each exposure. After correcting for the air exposures, FEV 1.0 was found to decrease linearly during the O/sub 3/ exposure and was decreased by an average of 13.0 percent at the end of exposure. Decreases in FVC and FEF24-75% were also linear and averaged 8.3 and 17.4 percent, respectively, at the end of exposure. On forced inspiratory tests, the FIVC and FIV05 were decreased 12.6 and 20.7 percent, respectively. Increases in the symptom ratings of cough and pain on deep inspiration were observed with O/sub 3/ exposure but not with clean air. Airway reactivity to methacholine was approximately doubled following O/sub 3/ exposure.

  18. Human physiological responses to cold exposure: Acute responses and acclimatization to prolonged exposure.

    PubMed

    Castellani, John W; Young, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    Cold exposure in humans causes specific acute and chronic physiological responses. This paper will review both the acute and long-term physiological responses and external factors that impact these physiological responses. Acute physiological responses to cold exposure include cutaneous vasoconstriction and shivering thermogenesis which, respectively, decrease heat loss and increase metabolic heat production. Vasoconstriction is elicited through reflex and local cooling. In combination, vasoconstriction and shivering operate to maintain thermal balance when the body is losing heat. Factors (anthropometry, sex, race, fitness, thermoregulatory fatigue) that influence the acute physiological responses to cold exposure are also reviewed. The physiological responses to chronic cold exposure, also known as cold acclimation/acclimatization, are also presented. Three primary patterns of cold acclimatization have been observed, a) habituation, b) metabolic adjustment, and c) insulative adjustment. Habituation is characterized by physiological adjustments in which the response is attenuated compared to an unacclimatized state. Metabolic acclimatization is characterized by an increased thermogenesis, whereas insulative acclimatization is characterized by enhancing the mechanisms that conserve body heat. The pattern of acclimatization is dependent on changes in skin and core temperature and the exposure duration. PMID:26924539

  19. CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO OZONE CAUSES RESTRICTIVE LUNG DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A chronic study to determine the progression and or/reversibility of ozone-induced lung disease was conducted. ale rats were exposed to a diurnal pattern of ozone (O3) for 1 wk, 3 wk, 3 mo, 12 mo, or 18 mo. he occurrence of chronic lung disease was determined by structural and fu...

  20. Surface morphology and morphometry of rat alveolar macrophages after ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Dormans, J.A.; Rombout, P.J.; van Loveren, H. )

    1990-09-01

    As the ultrastructural data on the effects of ozone on pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) are lacking, transmission (TEM) and scanning (SEM) electron microscopy were performed on rat PAM present in alveolar lavages following exposure to ozone. Rats were continuously exposed for 7 d to ozone concentrations ranging from 0.25 to 1.50 mg/m3 for 7 d followed by a 5-d recovery period. Additionally, morphometry on lung sections was performed to quantitate PAM. In a second experiment rats were continuously exposed to 1.50 mg O3/m3 for 1, 3, 5, or 7 d. To study the influence of concurrent ozone exposure and lung infection, due to Listeria monocytogenes, rats were exposed for 7 d to 1.50 mg O3/m3 after a Listeria infection. The surface area of lavaged control PAM was uniformly covered with ruffles as shown by SEM and TEM. Exposure to 0.5 mg ozone/m3 for 7 d resulted in cells partly covered with microvilli and blebs in addition to normal ruffles. The number of large size PAM increased with an increase in ozone concentration. After 1 d of exposure, normal-appearing as well as many small macrophages with ruffles and scattered lymphocytes were seen. Lavage samples taken after 5 or 7 d of exposure showed an identical cell composition to that taken after 3 d of exposure. After Listeria infection alone, lavage samples consisted of mainly lymphocytes and some macrophages. Small quantitative changes, such as an increase in the number of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and large-size PAM, occurred in lavages after ozone exposure and infection with L. monocytogenes. Morphometric examination of lung sections revealed a concentration-related increase in the number of PAM, even in animals exposed to 0.25 mg ozone/m3 for 7 d. Centriacinar regions were more severely affected than other regions of lung tissue.

  1. Long-Term Ozone Exposure Attenuates 1-Nitronaphthalene–Induced Cytotoxicity in Nasal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myong Gyong; Wheelock, Åsa M.; Boland, Bridget; Plopper, Charles G.

    2008-01-01

    1-Nitronaphthalene (1-NN) and ozone are cytotoxic air pollutants commonly found as components of photochemical smog. The mechanism of toxicity for 1-NN involves bioactivation by cytochrome P450s and subsequent adduction to proteins. Previous studies have shown that 1-NN toxicity in the lung is considerably higher in rats after long-term exposure to ozone compared with the corresponding filtered air–exposed control rats. The aim of the present study was to establish whether long-term exposure to ozone alters the susceptibility of nasal mucosa to the bioactivated toxicant, 1-NN. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to filtered air or 0.8 ppm ozone for 8 hours per day for 90 days, followed by a single treatment with 0, 12.5, or 50.0 mg/kg 1-NN by intraperitoneal injection. The results of the histopathologic analyses show that the nasal mucosa of rats is a target of systemic 1-NN, and that long-term ozone exposure markedly lessens the severity of injury, as well as the protein adduct formation by reactive 1-NN metabolites. The antagonistic effects were primarily seen in the nasal transitional epithelium, which corresponds to the main site of histologic changes attributed to ozone exposure (goblet cell metaplasia and hyperplasia). Long-term ozone exposure did not appear to alter susceptibility to 1-NN injury in other nasal regions. This study shows that long-term ozone exposure has a protective effect on the susceptibility of nasal transitional epithelium to subsequent 1-NN, a result that clearly contrasts with the synergistic toxicological effect observed in pulmonary airway epithelium in response to the same exposure regimen. PMID:17901409

  2. Ozone exposure and systemic biomarkers: Evaluation of evidence for adverse cardiovascular health impacts.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Julie E; Prueitt, Robyn L; Sax, Sonja N; Pizzurro, Daniella M; Lynch, Heather N; Zu, Ke; Venditti, Ferdinand J

    2015-05-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently concluded that there is likely to be a causal relationship between short-term (< 30 days) ozone exposure and cardiovascular (CV) effects; however, biological mechanisms to link transient effects with chronic cardiovascular disease (CVD) have not been established. Some studies assessed changes in circulating levels of biomarkers associated with inflammation, oxidative stress, coagulation, vasoreactivity, lipidology, and glucose metabolism after ozone exposure to elucidate a biological mechanism. We conducted a weight-of-evidence (WoE) analysis to determine if there is evidence supporting an association between changes in these biomarkers and short-term ozone exposure that would indicate a biological mechanism for CVD below the ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) of 75 parts per billion (ppb). Epidemiology findings were mixed for all biomarker categories, with only a few studies reporting statistically significant changes and with no consistency in the direction of the reported effects. Controlled human exposure studies of 2 to 5 hours conducted at ozone concentrations above 75 ppb reported small elevations in biomarkers for inflammation and oxidative stress that were of uncertain clinical relevance. Experimental animal studies reported more consistent results among certain biomarkers, although these were also conducted at ozone exposures well above 75 ppb and provided limited information on ozone exposure-response relationships. Overall, the current WoE does not provide a convincing case for a causal relationship between short-term ozone exposure below the NAAQS and adverse changes in levels of biomarkers within and across categories, but, because of study limitations, they cannot not provide definitive evidence of a lack of causation. PMID:25959700

  3. Adjoint-based computation of U.S. nationwide ozone exposure isopleths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashok, Akshay; Barrett, Steven R. H.

    2016-05-01

    Population exposure to daily maximum ozone is associated with an increased risk of premature mortality, and efforts to mitigate these impacts involve reducing emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). We quantify the dependence of U.S. national exposure to annually averaged daily maximum ozone on ambient VOC and NOx concentrations through ozone exposure isopleths, developed using emissions sensitivities from the adjoint of the GEOS-Chem air quality model for 2006. We develop exposure isopleths for all locations within the contiguous US and derive metrics based on the isopleths that quantify the impact of emissions on national ozone exposure. This work is the first to create ozone exposure isopleths using adjoint sensitivities and at a large scale. We find that across the US, 29% of locations experience VOC-limited conditions (where increased NOx emissions lower ozone) during 51% of the year on average. VOC-limited conditions are approximately evenly distributed diurnally and occur more frequently during the fall and winter months (67% of the time) than in the spring and summer (37% of the time). The VOC/NOx ratio of the ridge line on the isopleth diagram (denoting a local maximum in ozone exposure with respect to NOx concentrations) is 9.2 ppbC/ppb on average across grid cells that experience VOC-limited conditions and 7.9, 10.1 and 6.7 ppbC/ppb at the three most populous US cities of New York, Los Angeles and Chicago, respectively. Emissions that are ozone exposure-neutral during VOC-limited exposure conditions result in VOC/NOx concentration ratios of 0.63, 1.61 and 0.72 ppbC/ppb at each of the three US cities respectively, and between 0.01 and 1.91 ppbC/ppb at other locations. The sensitivity of national ozone exposure to NOx and VOC emissions is found to be highest near major cities in the US. Together, this information can be used to assess the effectiveness of NOx and VOC emission reductions on mitigating ozone exposure in the

  4. Ozone exposure and blood antioxidants: a study in a periurban area in Southern France.

    PubMed

    Saintot, M; Bernard, N; Astre, C; Gerber, M

    1999-01-01

    Major carotenoids in plasma--especially beta-carotene--are affected by oxidative stress (e.g., tobacco smoking). Environmental ozone induced oxidative stress in experimental in vitro and in vivo studies, and it also increased the incidence of lung cancer in mice. We proposed to measure, after controlling for other determinants, the impact of personal ozone exposure on carotenoids levels in plasma. During the summer, we recruited 58 volunteer subjects who worked in a periurban zone. We asked each subject to wear a passive sample, which measured ozone exposure for 5 consecutive d. At the end of this period, we assessed plasma antioxidants. We observed a negative significant regression coefficient between alpha- or beta-carotene and ozone exposure (r = -.39, p < .01, and r = -.45, p = .02, respectively). In a subsample of 45 nonsmoker subjects, among whom carotene intake was lower than the median intake value (i.e., 6.6 mg/d) of the overall group, we noted that a relatively low exposure to ozone (> or = 50 microg/m3 x h or > or = 23.8 ppb) induced a significant decrease in plasma beta-carotene levels (i.e., 0.7 micromol/l to 0.4 micromol/l). This significant decrease suggested that a high dietary intake of fruit or vegetables can have a beneficial influence on the levels of plasma antioxidants generated in response to ozone exposure. PMID:10025414

  5. Studying cumulative ozone exposures in Europe during a 7-year period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastrup-Birk, Annemarie; Brandt, JøRgen; Zlatev, Zahari; Uria, Ignacio

    1997-10-01

    Ozone is one of the most harmful pollutants in the troposphere. High ozone concentrations can damage plants, animals and humans. The damaging effects depend on the magnitude of a critical level of a special parameter, the cumulative ozone exposure. This is why cumulative ozone exposures must be carefully studied. It is important to determine the relationships between relevant emissions (NOx emissions, human-made VOC emissions, and/or a combination of NOx emissions and human-made VOC emissions) and cumulative ozone exposures. All these issues are discussed in this paper. Meteorological data from seven consecutive years, from 1989 to 1995, have been used in the experiments with different scenarios for varying the emissions (the NOx emissions, the human-made VOC emissions, as well as both the NOx emissions and the human-made VOC emissions). The particular air pollution model used in this study is the Danish Eulerian Model. Several hundred runs with different input data (meteorological data and/or emission data) have been performed. Advanced visualization techniques are used to interpret the large amount of digital data collected in these runs and to show clearly different trends and relationships that are normally hidden behind millions and millions of numbers. The model results were compared with measurements taken at more than 80 stations located in different European countries. The experiments indicate that it is sufficient to carry out computations over 5 consecutive years in order to eliminate the influence of extreme meteorological conditions (very warm or very cold summer months) on the cumulative ozone exposures, while this effect is clearly seen if less than 5 years are used in the experiments. It is shown that the relationship between the emissions (NOx and/or human-made VOC emissions) and the cumulative ozone exposures is in general nonlinear. Finally, it is illustrated that the critical values for ozone exposures are exceeded in most of Europe (in many

  6. Responses of subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease after exposures to 0. 3 ppm ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Kehrl, H.R.; Hazucha, M.J.; Solic, J.J.; Bromberg, P.A.

    1985-05-01

    The authors previously reported that the respiratory mechanics of intermittently exercising persons with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were unaffected by a 2-h exposure to 0.2 ppm ozone. Employing a single-blind, cross-over design protocol, 13 white men with nonreversible COPD (9 current smokers; mean FEV1/FVC, 56%) were randomly exposed on 2 consecutive days for 2 h to air and 0.3 ppm ozone. During exposures, subjects exercised (minute ventilation, 26.4 +/- 3.0 L/min) for 7.5 min every 30 min; ventilation and gas exchange measured during exercise showed no difference between exposure days. Pulmonary function tests (spirometry, body plethysmography) obtained before and after exposures were unchanged on the air day. On the ozone day the mean airway resistance and specific airway resistance showed the largest (25 and 22%) changes (p = 0.086 and 0.058, respectively). Arterial oxygen saturation (SaO/sub 2/) obtained in 8 subjects during the last exercise interval showed a mean decrement of 0.95% on the ozone exposure day; this change did not attain significance (p = 0.074). Nevertheless, arterial oxygen desaturation may be a true consequence of low-level ozone exposure in this compromised patient group. As normal subjects undergoing exposures to ozone with slightly higher exercise intensities show a threshold for changes in their respiratory mechanics at approximately 0.3 ppm, these data indicate that persons with COPD are not unduly sensitive to the effects of low-level ozone exposure.

  7. Cognitive functions and cerebral oxygenation changes during acute and prolonged hypoxic exposure.

    PubMed

    Davranche, Karen; Casini, Laurence; Arnal, Pierrick J; Rupp, Thomas; Perrey, Stéphane; Verges, Samuel

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to assess specific cognitive processes (cognitive control and time perception) and hemodynamic correlates using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) during acute and prolonged high-altitude exposure. Eleven male subjects were transported via helicopter and dropped at 14 272 ft (4 350 meters) of altitude where they stayed for 4 days. Cognitive tasks, involving a conflict task and temporal bisection task, were performed at sea level the week before ascending to high altitude, the day of arrival (D0), the second (D2) and fourth (D4) day at high altitude. Cortical hemodynamic changes in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) area were monitored with fNIRS at rest and during the conflict task. Results showed that high altitude impacts information processing in terms of speed and accuracy. In the early hours of exposure (D0), participants displayed slower reaction times (RT) and decision errors were twice as high. While error rate for simple spontaneous responses remained twice that at sea level, the slow-down of RT was not detectable after 2 days at high-altitude. The larger fNIRS responses from D0 to D2 suggest that higher prefrontal activity partially counteracted cognitive performance decrements. Cognitive control, assessed through the build-up of a top-down response suppression mechanism, the early automatic response activation and the post-error adjustment were not impacted by hypoxia. However, during prolonged hypoxic exposure the temporal judgments were underestimated suggesting a slowdown of the internal clock. A decrease in cortical arousal level induced by hypoxia could consistently explain both the slowdown of the internal clock and the persistence of a higher number of errors after several days of exposure. PMID:27262217

  8. The effect of prolonged exposure to 750 C air on the tribological performance of PM212

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bemis, Kirk; Bogdanski, Michael S.; Dellacorte, Christopher; Sliney, Harold E.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of prolonged exposure to 750 C air on the tribological performance and dimensional stability of PM212, a high temperature, self-lubricating composite, is studied. PM212, by weight, contains 70 percent metal-bonded Cr3C2, 15 percent BaF2/CaF2 eutectic, and 15 percent silver. Rub blocks were fabricated from PM212 by cold isostatic pressing followed by sintering. Prior to tribo-testing, the rub blocks were exposed to 750 C air for periods ranging from 100 to 1000 hours. Then, the rub blocks were slid against nickel-based superalloy disks in a double-rub-block tribometer in air under a 66 N load at temperatures from 25 to 750 C with a sliding velocity of 0.36 m/s. Unexposed rub blocks were tested for baseline comparison. Friction coefficients ranged from 0.24 to 0.37 for the unexposed rub blocks and from 0.32 to 0.56 for the exposed ones. Wear for both the composite blocks and superalloy disks was typically in the moderate to low range of 10(exp -5) to 10(exp -6) mm(exp 3)/N-m. Friction and wear data were similar for the rub blocks exposed for 100, 500, and 1000 hours. Prolonged exposure to 750 C air increased friction and wear of the PM212 rub blocks at room temperature, but their triboperformance remained unaffected at higher temperatures, probably due to the formation of lubricious metal oxides. Dimensional stability of the composite was studied by exposing specimens of varying thicknesses for 500 hours in air at 750 C. Block thicknesses were found to increase with increased exposure time until steady state was reached after 100 hours of exposure, probably due to oxidation.

  9. Emotional attentional control predicts changes in diurnal cortisol secretion following exposure to a prolonged psychosocial stressor.

    PubMed

    Lenaert, Bert; Barry, Tom J; Schruers, Koen; Vervliet, Bram; Hermans, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis irregularities have been associated with several psychological disorders. Hence, the identification of individual difference variables that predict variations in HPA-axis activity represents an important challenge for psychiatric research. We investigated whether self-reported attentional control in emotionally demanding situations prospectively predicted changes in diurnal salivary cortisol secretion following exposure to a prolonged psychosocial stressor. Low ability to voluntarily control attention has previously been associated with anxiety and depressive symptomatology. Attentional control was assessed using the Emotional Attentional Control Scale. In students who were preparing for academic examination, salivary cortisol was assessed before (time 1) and after (time 2) examination. Results showed that lower levels of self-reported emotional attentional control at time 1 (N=90) predicted higher absolute diurnal cortisol secretion and a slower decline in cortisol throughout the day at time 2 (N=71). Difficulty controlling attention during emotional experiences may lead to chronic HPA-axis hyperactivity after prolonged exposure to stress. These results indicate that screening for individual differences may foster prediction of HPA-axis disturbances, paving the way for targeted disorder prevention. PMID:26539967

  10. Pre-activating wounding response in tobacco prior to high-level ozone exposure prevents necrotic injury.

    PubMed

    Orvar, B L; McPherson, J; Ellis, B E

    1997-02-01

    In tobacco, both wounding and treatment with jasmonates prior to exposure of the tissue to high concentrations of ozone (250 to 500 p.p.b.) produce a dramatic decrease in ozone injury. A systemic pattern of increased ozone tolerance developed within 3-6 h after wounding and also after local application of jasmonates. Ozone treatment of transgenic (NahG) tobacco plants showed that the inability of these plants to accumulate salicylic acid is also accompanied by increased ozone tolerance. Expression of mRNA encoding the anti-oxidant enzyme ascorbate peroxidase is upregulated by ozone challenge, wounding and by methyl jasmonate exposure within 3-4 h, while levels of carbonic anhydrase mRNA are simultaneously depressed following ozone exposure and methyl jasmonate treatment. The pattern of these results shows that the response to ozone challenge in tobacco involves signalling mechanisms similar to those induced in plants by other environmental stresses that generate reactive oxygen species. PMID:9076988

  11. Generation of oxidative stress in human cutaneous models following in vitro ozone exposure.

    PubMed

    Cotovio, J; Onno, L; Justine, P; Lamure, S; Catroux, P

    2001-01-01

    Ozone, one of the main components of photochemical smog, represents an important source of environmental oxidative stress. The skin, being the outermost barrier of the body, is directly exposed to environmental oxidant toxicants. Skin sebum and cellular plasma membrane lipids contain polyunsaturated fatty acids which are primary targets for ozone and free radical attack induced lipid peroxides. These ozonation processes in skin can also generate aldehydes, hydroxyhydroperoxides and specific Criegee's ozonides. In order to evaluate in vitro human skin susceptibility to ozone, we have exposed cultured immortalized human keratinocytes (DK7-NR) and the reconstructed human epidermis Episkin to 10 ppm of ozone in a specific incubator. We measured the formation of protein carbonyls by an ELISA method and monitored the oxidative stress using the fluorogenic probe 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin-diacetate (DCFH-DA). Results showed a time-dependent increase of fluorescence levels (linked to oxidative stress) in both models exposed to ozone. Using this protocol, we investigated the protective potential of different products including vitamin C, a thiol derivative and a plant extract. All products dramatically reduced oxidative responses during ozone exposure. Decreases observed in fluorescence levels were between 60 and 90% as compared to non-protected controls. These results demonstrate: (a) cutaneous in vitro models are remarkably susceptible to oxidative stress generated by an environmental air pollutant as ozone, and (b) raw antioxidants, thiols and vitamin C were efficient products to prevent ozone induced cellular oxidative damage. PMID:11566563

  12. Nonspecific bronchial responsiveness assessed in vitro following acute inhalation exposure to ozone and ozone/sulfuric acid mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    El-Fawal, H.A.N.; McGovern, T.; Schlesinger, R.B.

    1995-01-01

    Air pollution may play some role in the recent increase in severity and prevalence of asthma, but the specific chemical components with the ambient pollutant mix that may be responsible have not been delineated. Since ambient exposures involve mixtures, it is essential to examine airway responses to realistic pollutant mixtures. This study examined the ability of single (3-h) inhalation exposures to ozone and to mixtures of ozone plus sulfuric acid to induce nonspecific airway hyperresponsiveness in healthy rabbits. Airway responsiveness was assessed using an in vitro assay involving administration of increasing doses of acetylcholine to bronchial rings obtained from animals exposed to 0.1-0.6 ppm ozone or to mixtures of ozone and 50-125 {mu}g/m{sup 3} sulfuric acid aerosol; results were compared to those reported previously for sulfuric acid alone. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness in healthy animals and suggest that interaction with sulfuric acid may reduce the effectiveness of both pollutants. 31 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Response of rat tracheal epithelium to ozone and oxygen exposure in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Nikula, K.J.; Wilson, D.W. )

    1990-07-01

    Although ozone-induced epithelial injury in vivo has been morphologically characterized, effects of gaseous oxidants on respiratory epithelium in organ culture, where tissue organization is maintained but systemic influences are eliminated, have not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we exposed tracheal organ cultures from rats to 95% oxygen and 1 ppm ozone, alone and in combination, to determine (1) whether epithelial responses to ozone similar to those observed in vivo occur in airways separated from systemic physiologic, secretory, and inflammatory reactions; (2) whether concentrations of oxygen sufficient to potentially cause oxidant injury result in morphologic epithelial alterations similar to those that occur in ozone toxicity; and (3) if the combined oxidant insult of oxygen and ozone results in more severe damage to the tracheal epithelium than occurs with ozone in air. Tracheal organ cultures were exposed to filtered air and 5% carbon dioxide; filtered air, 5% carbon dioxide, and 1 ppm ozone; 95% oxygen and 5% carbon dioxide; or 95% oxygen, 5% carbon dioxide, and 1 ppm ozone for 96 hr. Light- and quantitative electron-microscopic evaluation showed that epithelia exposed to 1 ppm ozone in air exhibited loss of ciliated cells and ciliated cell damage. The epithelia exposed to 95% oxygen and 5% carbon dioxide were pseudostratified, columnar, ciliated, and hyperplastic. Epithelia exposed to 95% oxygen plus 1 ppm ozone were stratified and nonciliated or very sparsely ciliated. The predominant cell types in epithelia exposed to oxygen plus ozone were serous cells and metaplastic cells, and focal aggregates of adherent necrotic cells were present. We conclude that there was a synergism between oxygen and ozone exposure leading to enhanced epithelial injury and metaplasia.

  14. The physiological consequences of varied heat exposure events in adult Myzus persicae: a single prolonged exposure compared to repeated shorter exposures

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Nigel R.

    2016-01-01

    The study of environmental stress tolerance in aphids has primarily been at low temperatures. In these cases, and in the rare cases of high temperature tolerance assessments, all exposures had been during a single stress event. In the present study, we examined the physiological consequences of repeated high temperature exposure with recovery periods between these stress events in Myzus persicae. We subjected individuals to either a single prolonged three hour heating event, or three one hour heating events with a recovery time of 24 h between bouts. Aphids exposed to repeated bouts of high temperatures had more glucose and higher expression of proteins and osmolyte compounds, such as glycerol, compared to the prolonged exposure group. However, aphids exposed to the repeated high temperature treatment had reduced sources of energy such as trehalose and triglyceride compounds than the prolonged exposure group. Recovery time had more physiological costs (based on production of more protein and consumption of more trehalose and triglyceride) and benefits (based on production of more osmolytes) in repeated high temperature treatments. As aphids are known to respond differently to constant versus ‘natural’ fluctuating temperature regimes, conclusions drawn from constant temperature data sets may be problematic. We suggest future experiments assessing insect responses to thermal stress incorporate a repeated stress and recovery pattern into their methodologies. PMID:27547583

  15. The physiological consequences of varied heat exposure events in adult Myzus persicae: a single prolonged exposure compared to repeated shorter exposures.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, Behnaz; Andrew, Nigel R

    2016-01-01

    The study of environmental stress tolerance in aphids has primarily been at low temperatures. In these cases, and in the rare cases of high temperature tolerance assessments, all exposures had been during a single stress event. In the present study, we examined the physiological consequences of repeated high temperature exposure with recovery periods between these stress events in Myzus persicae. We subjected individuals to either a single prolonged three hour heating event, or three one hour heating events with a recovery time of 24 h between bouts. Aphids exposed to repeated bouts of high temperatures had more glucose and higher expression of proteins and osmolyte compounds, such as glycerol, compared to the prolonged exposure group. However, aphids exposed to the repeated high temperature treatment had reduced sources of energy such as trehalose and triglyceride compounds than the prolonged exposure group. Recovery time had more physiological costs (based on production of more protein and consumption of more trehalose and triglyceride) and benefits (based on production of more osmolytes) in repeated high temperature treatments. As aphids are known to respond differently to constant versus 'natural' fluctuating temperature regimes, conclusions drawn from constant temperature data sets may be problematic. We suggest future experiments assessing insect responses to thermal stress incorporate a repeated stress and recovery pattern into their methodologies. PMID:27547583

  16. Prolonged exposure to arsenic in UK private water supplies: toenail, hair and drinking water concentrations.

    PubMed

    Middleton, D R S; Watts, M J; Hamilton, E M; Fletcher, T; Leonardi, G S; Close, R M; Exley, K S; Crabbe, H; Polya, D A

    2016-05-18

    Chronic exposure to arsenic (As) in drinking water is an established cause of cancer and other adverse health effects. Arsenic concentrations >10 μg L(-1) were previously measured in 5% of private water supplies (PWS) in Cornwall, UK. The present study investigated prolongued exposure to As by measuring biomarkers in hair and toenail samples from 212 volunteers and repeated measurements of As in drinking water from 127 households served by PWS. Strong positive Pearson correlations (rp = 0.95) indicated stability of water As concentrations over the time period investigated (up to 31 months). Drinking water As concentrations were positively correlated with toenail (rp = 0.53) and hair (rp = 0.38) As concentrations - indicative of prolonged exposure. Analysis of washing procedure solutions provided strong evidence of the effective removal of exogenous As from toenail samples. Significantly higher As concentrations were measured in hair samples from males and smokers and As concentrations in toenails were negatively associated with age. A positive association between seafood consumption and toenail As and a negative association between home-grown vegetable consumption and hair As was observed for volunteers exposed to <1 As μg L(-1) in drinking water. These findings have important implications regarding the interpretation of toenail and hair biomarkers. Substantial variation in biomarker As concentrations remained unaccounted for, with soil and dust exposure as possible explanations. PMID:27120003

  17. The impact of dissociation and depression on the efficacy of prolonged exposure treatment for PTSD.

    PubMed

    Hagenaars, Muriel A; van Minnen, Agnes; Hoogduin, Kees A L

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of dissociative phenomena and depression on the efficacy of prolonged exposure treatment in 71 patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Diagnoses, comorbidity, pretreatment depressive symptoms, PTSD symptom severity, and dissociative phenomena (trait dissociation, numbing, and depersonalization) were assessed at pretreatment using semi-structured interviews and questionnaires. In a pretreatment behavioral exposure test, patients were imaginally exposed to (part of) their trauma memory for 9 min, during which subjective fear was assessed. At posttreatment and 6 months follow-up PTSD, depressive and dissociative symptoms were again assessed in the completers (n = 60). Pretreatment levels of dissociative and depressive symptoms were similar in dropouts and completers and none of the dissociative phenomena nor depression predicted improvement. Against expectations, dissociative phenomena and depression were associated with enhanced rather than impeded fear activation during the behavioral exposure test. However, these effects disappeared after controlling for initial PTSD severity. Hence, rather than supporting contraindication, the current results imply that patients presenting with even severe dissociative or depressive symptoms may profit similarly from exposure treatment as do patients with minimal dissociative or depressive symptoms. PMID:19766987

  18. Exposure to ozone modulates human airway protease/antiprotease balance contributing to increased influenza A infection.

    PubMed

    Kesic, Matthew J; Meyer, Megan; Bauer, Rebecca; Jaspers, Ilona

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to oxidant air pollution is associated with increased respiratory morbidities and susceptibility to infections. Ozone is a commonly encountered oxidant air pollutant, yet its effects on influenza infections in humans are not known. The greater Mexico City area was the primary site for the spring 2009 influenza A H1N1 pandemic, which also coincided with high levels of environmental ozone. Proteolytic cleavage of the viral membrane protein hemagglutinin (HA) is essential for influenza virus infectivity. Recent studies suggest that HA cleavage might be cell-associated and facilitated by the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) human airway trypsin-like protease (HAT) and transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2), whose activities are regulated by antiproteases, such as secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI). Based on these observations, we sought to determine how acute exposure to ozone may modulate cellular protease/antiprotease expression and function, and to define their roles in a viral infection. We utilized our in vitro model of differentiated human nasal epithelial cells (NECs) to determine the effects of ozone on influenza cleavage, entry, and replication. We show that ozone exposure disrupts the protease/antiprotease balance within the airway liquid. We also determined that functional forms of HAT, TMPRSS2, and SLPI are secreted from human airway epithelium, and acute exposure to ozone inversely alters their expression levels. We also show that addition of antioxidants significantly reduces virus replication through the induction of SLPI. In addition, we determined that ozone-induced cleavage of the viral HA protein is not cell-associated and that secreted endogenous proteases are sufficient to activate HA leading to a significant increase in viral replication. Our data indicate that pre-exposure to ozone disrupts the protease/antiprotease balance found in the human airway, leading to increased influenza susceptibility. PMID

  19. Response of Phaseolus vulgaris L. to differing ozone regimes having identical total exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musselman, Robert C.; Younglove, Theodore; McCool, Patrick M.

    Protocols were designed to test for differences in response of plants to ozone treatments having equal total exposure (concentration × time) but different exposure profiles Kidney beans ( Phaseolus vulgaris L., cv. California Dark Red) were exposed to ozone in controlled fumigation chambers within a greenhouse Four different ozone exposure profiles were used, each having the same total cumulative exposure (SUM00) and the same 7, 12 and 24 h seasonal means. The three exposure profiles which incorporated peak concentrations more severely impacted response parameters compared to a steady-state profile which did not exceed the National Ambient Air Quality Standard. Significant differences were found in percent necrotic leaf area, number of pods and top dry weight between exposure profiles. In additional analyses, the response parameters were regressed against seasonal cumulative ozone concentrations raised to powers of 0.33 and from 0.5 to 4 in steps of 0.5 in order to increase effective weighting of the higher concentrations. Total dry weight and leaf necrosis were best fit with the sum of the squared concentrations ( n = 2) while number of pods was best fit by the summed concentrations to the 3.5 power ( n = 3.5). These analyses suggest the peak ozone concentrations are important in determining plant response.

  20. Changes in thyroid function after short-term ozone exposure in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Clemons, G.K.; Garcia, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    Exposure of male rats to ozone for 24 h at 1 ppM caused a profound depression of the pituitary-thyroid axis as indicated by a highly significant reduction of circulating thyrotropin hormone (TSH), thyroid hormones (T4 and T3), and protein-bound iodine (PBI). The metabolic clearance of TSH was not altered during ozone exposure and the high TSH levels seen in thyroidectomized rats were also not affected. Circulating prolactin (PRL) levels were significantly elevated after exposure. Pituitary TSH and PRL content was considerably increased in ozone-exposed rats; however, only TSH was released significantly above control values in vitro. Thyroid weight was also significantly increased after exposure. The results suggest that the depression of the pituitary-thyroid axis may be an adaptive mechanism during ozone exposure by reducing hypothalamic stimulation via thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) and at the same time lifting the hypothalamic catecholamine inhibition on PRL release. Both may be necessary alterations in order to develop tolerance during ozone exposure.

  1. Ozone

    MedlinePlus

    ... Earth's surface. It shields us from the sun's ultraviolet rays. Part of the good ozone layer is ... enough good ozone, people may get too much ultraviolet radiation. This may increase the risk of skin ...

  2. Ozone

    MedlinePlus

    ... reactive form of oxygen. In the upper atmosphere, ozone forms a protective layer that shields us from the sun’s ultraviolet rays. At ground level, ozone is a harmful air pollutant and a primary ...

  3. Duration of increased pulmonary function sensitivity to an initial ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Bedi, J.F.; Drechsler-Parks, D.M.; Horvath, S.M.

    1985-12-01

    The metabolic and pulmonary function effects were investigated in six non-smoking young adults who were exposed for 2 hours (22 degrees C WBGT) to: filtered air (FA) 0.45 ppm ozone (DAY1); and two days later to a second exposure to 0.45 ppm ozone (DAY2). The subjects alternated 20-minute periods of rest and 20-minute periods of bicycle ergometer exercise at a workload predetermined to elicit a ventilatory minute volume (VE) of 27 L/min (BTPS). Functional residual capacity (FRC) was determined pre- and post-exposure. Forced vital capacity (FVC) was determined before and after exposure, as well as 5 minutes after each exercise period. Heart rate was monitored throughout the exposure, and VE, oxygen uptake (VO2), respiratory rate (fR), and tidal volume (VT) were measured during the last 2 minutes of each exercise period. There were no changes in any variable consequent to FA exposure. Both ozone exposures induced significant (P less than 0.05) decrements in FVC; FEV1.0 (forced expiratory volume in 1 second); FEV3.0 (forced expiratory volume in 3 seconds); FEF25-75% (average flow rate between 25% and 75% of FVC); and total lung capacity (TLC). The decrements following the DAY2 ozone exposure were significantly greater than following DAY1, and averaged 7.2 percentage points greater than those following the DAY1 exposure.

  4. DEVELOMENT AND EVALUATION OF A MODEL FOR ESTIMATING LONG-TERM AVERAGE OZONE EXPOSURES TO CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Long-term average exposures of school-age children can be modelled using longitudinal measurements collected during the Harvard Southern California Chronic Ozone Exposure Study over a 12-month period: June, 1995-May, 1996. The data base contains over 200 young children with perso...

  5. MEASUREMENTS OF CARDIOPULMONARY RESPONSE IN AWAKE RATS DURING ACUTE EXPOSURE TO NEAR AMBIENT CONCENTRATIONS OF OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although rodents are the most commonly studied animal species for ozone (O3) research, no acute cardiopulmonary function studies during exposure have been reported. wake Fischer-344 rats were exposed to )3 and response was evaluated before, during and after the exposure using a p...

  6. OZONE-INDUCED RESPIRATORY SYMPTOMS: EXPOSURE-RESPONSE MODELS AND ASSOCIATION WITH LUNG FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone-induced respiratory symptoms are known to be functions of concentration, minute ventilation, and duration of exposure. The purposes of this study were to identify an exposure-response model for symptoms, to determine whether response was related to age, and to assess the re...

  7. Ozone

    MedlinePlus

    Ozone is a gas. It can be good or bad, depending on where it is. "Good" ozone occurs naturally about 10 to 30 miles above ... the sun's ultraviolet rays. Part of the good ozone layer is gone. Man-made chemicals have destroyed ...

  8. Long-term behavioral effects in a rat model of prolonged postnatal morphine exposure.

    PubMed

    Craig, Michael M; Bajic, Dusica

    2015-10-01

    Prolonged morphine treatment in neonatal pediatric populations is associated with a high incidence of opioid tolerance and dependence. Despite the clinical relevance of this problem, our knowledge of long-term consequences is sparse. The main objective of this study was to investigate whether prolonged morphine administration in a neonatal rat is associated with long-term behavioral changes in adulthood. Newborn animals received either morphine (10 mg/kg) or equal volume of saline subcutaneously twice daily for the first 2 weeks of life. Morphine-treated animals underwent 10 days of morphine weaning to reduce the potential for observable physical signs of withdrawal. Animals were subjected to nonstressful testing (locomotor activity recording and a novel-object recognition test) at a young age (Postnatal Days [PDs] 27-31) or later in adulthood (PDs 55-56), as well as stressful testing (calibrated forceps test, hot plate test, and forced swim test) only in adulthood. Analysis revealed that prolonged neonatal morphine exposure resulted in decreased thermal but not mechanical threshold. Importantly, no differences were found for total locomotor activity (proxy of drug reward/reinforcement behavior), individual forced swim test behaviors (proxy of affective processing), or novel-object recognition test. Performance on the novel-object recognition test was compromised in the morphine-treated group at the young age, but the effect disappeared in adulthood. These novel results provide insight into the long-term consequences of opioid treatment during an early developmental period and suggest long-term neuroplastic differences in sensory processing related to thermal stimuli. PMID:26214209

  9. Changes in Temporal Attention Inhibition Following Prolonged Exposure and Sertraline in the Treatment of PTSD

    PubMed Central

    Echiverri-Cohen, Aileen; Zoellner, Lori A.; Gallop, Robert; Feeny, Norah; Jaeger, Jeffrey; Bedard-Gilligan, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Objective Attentional inhibitory deficits expressed as difficulty ignoring irrelevant stimuli in the pursuit of goal-directed behavior may serve as a fundamental mechanism of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Evidence of inhibitory processes as central to extinction suggests that exposure-based treatments may act more directly on the inhibitory deficits implicated in PTSD, whereas, in facilitating serotonergic neurotransmission, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may be less direct and bring about general neurochemical changes in the fear circuitry. If these inhibitory deficits underlie PTSD, then inhibition should improve with successful treatment, with those treated with prolonged exposure (PE) potentially resulting in greater changes in inhibition than those treated with sertraline. Method Changes in temporal attentional inhibition, using an attentional blink (AB) paradigm, were examined at pre-and post-treatment in 49 individuals (74.5% female, 66.7% Caucasian, age M = 37.69, SD = 12.8 years) with chronic PTSD. Participants completed 10 weeks of either PE or sertraline. Results Individuals who made greater improvements with PE showed faster improvements in temporal inhibition on the critical inhibitory lag of AB than those who made greater improvements with sertraline (d = 0.94). These changes could not be accounted for by basic attention. Conclusions Greater improvement in fundamental attentional inhibitory processes with better treatment response to PE, compared to sertraline, suggests potential specificity in how PTSD treatments normalize inhibitory processes, such that exposure-based treatments like PE may target inhibitory processes and improve basic inhibitory functioning. Public Health Significance Statement Inhibitory processes, particularly related to temporal attention, may play a critical role in response to exposure therapy for PTSD. The main finding that individuals with PTSD who made more clinical improvement showed faster

  10. An Adaptation of Prolonged Exposure Therapy for Pediatric Single Incident Trauma: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Adler Nevo, Gili; Manassis, Katharina

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of a modification for Prolonged Exposure (PE) therapy for single incident trauma in youth and examine the effective component(s) of treatment. Method: Fifteen youth (2 boys, 13 girls; mean age= 10.8 years) were treated with a developmentally modified version of PE called Trauma Mastery Therapy (TMT). The youth were evaluated pre-treatment, every 2 treatment sessions, and at 1 month follow-up. Primary outcome measure: the Child PTSD Symptom Scale (CPSS), a self administered PTSD questionnaire. Results: Post-treatment, 13 participants did not meet criteria for PTSD. Patients showed significant improvement at post-treatment. Analysis of variance models with pair-wise contrasts showed significantly higher scores at initiation of treatment as compared to the end of the exposure phase and, to a lesser extent, as compared to the psychoeducational phase, but no further significant improvement following the relapse prevention or follow-up phases. Conclusions: TMT appears to be a promising treatment for single incident trauma in youth. Flexibility within the structure of TMT may facilitate treatment success. The study suggests exposure, and to some extent, psychoeducation, to be important components of treatment. Additional research is required to further validate these initial findings. PMID:21541102

  11. Prolonged exposure of the HIV-1 gp41 membrane proximal region with L669S substitution

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiaoying; Dennison, S. Moses; Liu, Pinghuang; Gao, Feng; Jaeger, Frederick; Montefiori, David C.; Verkoczy, Laurent; Haynes, Barton F.; Alam, S. Munir; Tomaras, Georgia D.

    2010-01-01

    The conserved membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 envelope is a target for the rare broadly neutralizing 2F5, Z13, and 4E10 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). One strategy to elicit such antibodies is to design an immunogen with increased exposure of the 2F5 and 4E10 mAb epitopes. In this study we characterize a single leucine to serine substitution at position 669 (L669S) in the gp41 Env MPER that confers >250-fold more neutralization sensitivity to 2F5 and 4E10 mAbs than does the wild-type gp41 sequence. On synthetic liposomes, increased solvent exposure of MPER tryptophan residues and stable docking of 2F5 and 4E10 mAbs to mutant MPER peptide liposomes indicate more favorable membrane orientation of MPER neutralizing epitopes with L669S substitution. The time during which virus is sensitive to 2F5 mAb-mediated neutralization is approximately 3-fold longer when the mutation is present. These data suggest that a major contribution to the L669S mutant virus phenotype of enhanced susceptibility to MPER mAbs is prolonged exposure of the MPER neutralizing epitope during viral entry. PMID:20231447

  12. A Pilot Study of Prolonged Exposure Therapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Delivered via Telehealth Technology

    PubMed Central

    Tuerk, Peter W.; Yoder, Matthew; Ruggiero, Kenneth J; Gros, Daniel F.; Acierno, Ron

    2015-01-01

    We present a pilot study of 12 veterans diagnosed with combat-related PTSD and treated with prolonged exposure therapy (PE) via telehealth technology. A reference sample of 35 combat veterans treated with in-person PE in the same clinic is also included for a comparison. Feasibility and clinical outcomes of interest include: technical performance and practicality of the telehealth equipment, patient safety, treatment completion rates, number of sessions required for termination, and clinical outcomes. Results indicated large statistically significant decreases in self-reported pathology for veterans treated with PE via telehealth technology. Preliminary results support the feasibility and safety of the modality. Suggestions for the implementation of PE via telehealth technology are discussed. PMID:20135675

  13. Prolonged exposure therapy for chronic combat-related PTSD: a case report of five veterans.

    PubMed

    Nacasch, Nitsa; Foa, Edna B; Fostick, Leah; Polliack, Miki; Dinstein, Yula; Tzur, Dana; Levy, Pnina; Zohar, Joseph

    2007-09-01

    Prolonged exposure (PE) therapy has been found efficient in reducing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms mostly among rape victims, but has not been explored in combat-related PTSD. Five patients with severe chronic PTSD, unresponsive to previous treatment (medication and supportive therapy) are described. Patients were evaluated with the PTSD Symptom Scale-Interview, and Beck Depression Inventory, before and after 10-15 sessions of PE therapy. All five patients showed marked improvement with PE, with a mean decrease of 48% in PTSD Symptom Scale-Interview score and 69% in Beck Depression Inventory score. Moreover, four patients maintained treatment gains or kept improving 6-18 months after the treatment. The results suggest that PE was effective in reducing combat-related chronic PTSD symptoms. PMID:17805215

  14. Experimental chronic obstructive lung disease. I. Bronchopulmonary changes induced in rabbits by prolonged exposure to formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, J; Marinescu, D; Tapu, V; Eskenasy, A

    1978-01-01

    The prolonged exposure to formaldehyde induces in the rabbit lung reactional and dystrophic changes involving the intrapulmonary bronchi, the bronchioli and the lung tissue. These changes are represented by bronchial cell hyperplasia with hypermucigenesis, extrusion of bronchial cells, bronchiolar hypermucigenesis, parcellary squamous metaplasia or necrobiosis of epithelia, thickening of bronchial and bronchiolar walls by subepithelial cell accumulations, destruction of musculo-elastic structures with stenosis or ectasia; the vascular reactions are hyperhaemic and proliferative with an obstructive and fibrous tendency; the parenchymal lesions are atelectasias, intralobular emphysema, and cellular thickening of alveolar walls and interlobular areas. The acid phosphatase, Tween-60-esterase, naphthol-AS-D-acetate-esterase, proline-oxidase and hydroxyproline-2-epimerase activities are increasing, while the leucyl-aminopeptidase and beta-glucuronidase ones are decreasing. The qualitative observations are completed and sustained by quanitative studies of mucous cell kinetics, of cell accumulations and differentiations. PMID:151223

  15. Prolonged hypothermia exposure diminishes neuroprotection for severe ischemic-hypoxic primary neurons.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiao-Ya; Zhu, Shu-Zhen; Xiang, Wei; Huang, Kai-Bin; Hu, Ya-Fang; Gu, Yong; Pan, Su-Yue

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to identify optimal mild hypothermic (MH) condition that would provide the best protection for neuronal cells undergoing severe ischemia and hypoxia. We also sought to determine if longer exposure to mild hypothermia would confer greater protection to severe ischemia and hypoxia in these cells. We designed a primary neuronal cell model for severe glucose and oxygen deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R) to simulate the hypoxic-ischemic condition of patients with severe stroke, trauma, or hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. We evaluated the viability of these neurons following 3 h of OGD/R and variable MH conditions including different temperatures and durations of OGD/R exposure. We further explored the effects of the optimal MH condition on several parts which are associated with mitochondrial apoptosis pathway: intracellular calcium, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP). The results of this study showed that the apoptosis proportion (AP) and cell viability proportion (CVP) after OGD/R significantly varied depending on which MH condition cells were exposed to (p < 0.001). Further, our findings showed that prolonged MH reduced the neuroprotection to AP and CVP. We also determined that the optimal MH conditions (34 °C for 4.5 h) reduced intracellular calcium, ROS, and recovered MTP. These findings indicate that there is an optimal MH treatment strategy for severely hypoxia-ischemic neurons, prolonged duration might diminish the neuroprotection, and that MH treatment likely initiates neuroprotection by inhibiting the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. PMID:26802735

  16. Evaluation of the use of empirical ambient ozone pollutant modeling and subject activity logs as an indirect measurement of ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, L.P.; Fraser, M.P.; Ensor, K.B.; Rifai, H.S.

    1998-12-31

    The personal ozone exposure of women on the track team at Rice University was monitored using Harvard passive samplers over a period of six weeks during August and September of 1997. Each subject logged their location and activity in and around campus during the exposure period. A three-dimensional kriging model of ozone was developed to estimate the ozone exposure for each subject from ambient fixed site monitoring data. The ozone predictions from the model were combined with the activity and location information, adjusted for indoor environment when applicable, to estimate personal exposure concentrations for each subject. Using two independent approaches, the kriging model was proven to provide accurate spatial and temporal estimates of ozone at subject exposure points. The results from this work show that the method developed to estimate exposure through kriging over (x,y,t) to predict ozone concentrations at exposure points combined with subject activity/time logs produces exposure estimates within the error bounds of the analytical methods for personal monitoring.

  17. The action spectrum for vitamin D3: initial skin reaction and prolonged exposure.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Arjan; den Outer, Peter; van Kranen, Henk; Slaper, Harry

    2016-07-01

    Vitamin D3 photosynthesis in the skin is formulated as a set of reaction equations, including side-reactions to lumisterol, tachysterol and toxisterols, and the accompanying reverse reactions, isomerisation of previtamin D3 to vitamin D3 and photodegradation of vitamin D3. The solution of this set is given for the stationary irradiance spectrum. The effective action spectrum for the instantaneous vitamin D3 production changes shape as a function of exposure, and therefore, no single action spectrum can be used. We assessed the action spectrum for unexposed skin and for skin that has been exposed to 7.5 Standard Erythemal Doses (SED). We constructed two new estimates: (1) the RIVM action spectrum, based on absorption spectra, quantum yields and skin transmission spectra, and (2) the modified QUT action spectrum, which is adjusted for self-absorption and skin transmission. For previously unexposed skin, the modified QUT action spectrum gives a qualitatively similar, but larger estimate than the RIVM action spectrum. We have not been able to solve the lack of quantitative agreement between the vitamin D production estimates from the three action spectrum estimates (RIVM, modified QUT and CIE). All new action spectra have stronger emphasis on the short wavelengths than the CIE action spectrum. We showed that, for wavelengths larger than 300 nm, the bandwidth that was used in the experiment that formed the basis of the CIE action spectrum, gives a red-shift of about 1 nm. Generally, with the formation of previtamin D3, the return reaction to provitamin D3 limits the production of vitamin D3. After some exposure, the new action spectrum has negative values for the longer wavelengths in the UVB. For the RIVM action spectrum, this happens after 7.5 SED, for the modified QUT action spectrum already after 1.25 SED, and after 7.5 SED the net production rate is largely cancelled. Thus prolonged exposure of previously unexposed skin saturates vitamin D3 formation. For maximum

  18. U.S. EPA'S OZONE EPIDEMIOLOGY RESEARCH PROGRAM: A STRATEGY FOR ASSESSING THE EFFECTS OF AMBIENT OZONE EXPOSURE UPON MORBIDITY IN EXPOSED POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 mandate a future reduction of ambient ozone levels in many areas of the country, the cost of which will be great. n order to assess the current public health burden of ambient ozone exposure and to provide information for assessment of potenti...

  19. Passive samplers for ambient ozone, formaldehyde and sulfur dioxide: Indoor, outdoor, and personal exposure applications

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, D.; Grosjean, E.

    1994-12-31

    Time-integrated measurements of air pollutants have many applications in the context of regulations pertaining to indoor air quality, outdoor (ambient) monitoring, and personal exposure assessment. For several years, the passive samplers developed at DGA have been applied to cost-effective measurements of parts per billion levels of ozone, formaldehyde and sulfur dioxide. Examples of applications will be described. These include (a) formaldehyde measurements in indoor settings including museums, public buildings and personal exposure; (b) ozone measurements indoor (museums, cultural heritage buildings) and outdoor (Class 1 Wilderness areas; air quality surveys in Europe, Canada and Latin America, long-term monitoring of ozone exposure in forests) and (c) surveys of ambient levels of sulfur dioxide in several eastern European countries.

  20. In vitro ozone exposure inhibits mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation and IL-2 production

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, S.; Jordan, R.L.; Orlando, G.S.; Koren, H.S.

    1989-01-01

    Human blood mononuclear cells were exposed to ozone in vitro and thereafter analyzed for competence in mitogen-induced proliferation as well as IL-1 and IL-2 production. Proliferative responses induced by phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) were all depressed in lymphocytes exposed to an ozone concentration of 1 ppm for 4-6 h. The response to PWM was most sensitive to the ozone effect (38% suppression); responses to Con A and PHA were suppressed to a lesser extent, 23% and 18%, respectively, and were not significantly different from each other. PWM responses were affected at an ozone concentration as low as 0.1 ppm; however, no suppression of Con A-induced proliferation was seen below 0.18 ppm or of PHA-induced proliferation below 0.5 ppm. When lymphocytes and monocytes were exposed separately to ozone and then mixed back with control air-exposed monocytes or lymphocytes, both cell types appeared to be affected and the functional defects caused by the pollutant were additive. Monocyte IL-1 production induced by endotoxin was not affected by ozone exposure, while surface expression of HLA-DR on exposed monocytes was reduced by 40% 24 h after exposure. Moreover, lymphocytes exposed to ozone produced 46% less IL-2 while expressing similar surface density of IL-2 receptors. Taken together, these results show that exposure to ozone has distinct adverse effects on lymphocytes and monocytes, both of which are important in local immune defenses in the lung.

  1. Effects of ozone exposure on the xerophilic fungus, Eurotium amstelodami IS-SAB-01, isolated from naan bread.

    PubMed

    Antony-Babu, Sanjay; Singleton, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Xerophilic moulds cause contamination and spoilage of low moisture foods. This study examined the effect of ozone fumigation on growth of a Eurotium species isolated from naan bread. Two ozone treatments were used - a low-level long-term exposure (0.4 μmol/mol for 21 days) and high-level short-term exposure (300 μmol/mol for 5 to 120 min). For the low level exposure the combination of different media sucrose concentrations (0, 5, 10 and 20% w/v) with ozone treatment was also assessed. The growth of the isolate was found to be sensitive to low-level ozone fumigation depending on the media sucrose concentration and duration of the exposure. Low-level ozone exposure significantly (p<0.05) reduced the number of asexual spores formed in media with no added sucrose, an effect not observed in media with higher sucrose levels. Electron microscope observations of colonies indicated that ozone exposed cultures produced lower numbers of cleistothecia. High-level ozone exposure for short durations reduced spore viability although 100% reduction in viability was achieved only after 120 min exposure. This work demonstrates that ozone may be used to reduce spore production in Eurotium but that the ozone effect can be mediated by sucrose levels in the growth medium. PMID:21093088

  2. DOES CHRONIC OZONE EXPOSURE LEAD TO LUNG DISEASE?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential role of ozone in the induction of chronic lung diseases remains unclear. sing an ambient profile adopted from aerometric data from the Southwest Air Basin, rats were exposed to O3 for up to 18 months before assessments of pulmonary structure, function and biochemist...

  3. IMMUNOSUPPRESSION OF PULMONARY NATURAL KILLER ACTIVITY BY EXPOSURE TO OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone is an oxidant gas and an ubiquitous oxidant air pollutant with the potential to adversely affect pulmonary immune function with a consequent increase in disease susceptibility. ulmonary atural killer (NK) activity was measured in order to assess the pulmonary immunotoxicity...

  4. Respiratory responses of subjects with allergic rhinitis to ozone exposure and their relationship to nonspecific airway reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, W.F.; Horstman, D.H.; Abdul-Salaam, S.; Raggio, L.J.; Green, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Ozone exposure in man produces changes in respiratory function and symptoms. There is a large degree of unexplained intersubject variability in the magnitude of these responses. There is concern that individuals with chronic respiratory diseases may also be more responsive to ozone than normal individuals. The purpose of this study was to describe the responses of subjects with allergic rhinitis to ozone exposure and to compare these responses to those previously observed in normal individuals. A further purpose was to measure the association between baseline nonspecific airway reactivity and changes in lung function and respiratory symptoms following ozone exposure.

  5. Prolonged increased responsiveness of canine peripheral airways after exposure to O/sub 3/

    SciTech Connect

    Beckett, W.S.; Freed, A.N.; Turner, C.; Menkes, H.A.

    1988-02-01

    Because it is relatively insoluble, the oxidant gas O3 may penetrate to small peripheral airways when it is inhaled. Increased responsiveness in large airways after O3 breathing has been associated with the presence of inflammatory cells. To determine whether O3 produces prolonged hyperresponsiveness of small airways associated with the presence of inflammatory cells, we exposed the peripheral lungs of anesthetized dogs to 1.0 ppm O3 for 2 h using a wedged bronchoscope technique. A contralateral sublobar segment was simultaneously exposed to air as a control. In the O3-exposed segments, collateral resistance (Rcs) was increased within 15 min and remained elevated approximately 150% throughout the 2-h exposure period. Fifteen hours later, the base-line Rcs of the O3-exposed sublobar segments was significantly elevated, and these segments demonstrated increased responsiveness to aerosolized acetylcholine (100 and 500 micrograms/ml). There were no differences in neutrophils, mononuclear cells, or mast cells (numbers or degree of mast cell degranulation) between O3 and air-exposed airways at 15 h. The small airways of the lung periphery thus are capable of remaining hyperresponsive hours after cessation of localized exposure to O3, but this does not appear to be dependent on the presence of inflammatory cells in the small airway wall.

  6. Prolonged exposure of cholestatic rats to complete dark inhibits biliary hyperplasia and liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Han, Yuyan; Onori, Paolo; Meng, Fanyin; DeMorrow, Sharon; Venter, Julie; Francis, Heather; Franchitto, Antonio; Ray, Debolina; Kennedy, Lindsey; Greene, John; Renzi, Anastasia; Mancinelli, Romina; Gaudio, Eugenio; Glaser, Shannon; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2014-11-01

    Biliary hyperplasia and liver fibrosis are common features in cholestatic liver disease. Melatonin is synthesized by the pineal gland as well as the liver. Melatonin inhibits biliary hyperplasia of bile duct-ligated (BDL) rats. Since melatonin synthesis (by the enzyme serotonin N-acetyltransferase, AANAT) from the pineal gland increases after dark exposure, we hypothesized that biliary hyperplasia and liver fibrosis are diminished by continuous darkness via increased melatonin synthesis from the pineal gland. Normal or BDL rats (immediately after surgery) were housed with light-dark cycles or complete dark for 1 wk before evaluation of 1) the expression of AANAT in the pineal gland and melatonin levels in pineal gland tissue supernatants and serum; 2) biliary proliferation and intrahepatic bile duct mass, liver histology, and serum chemistry; 3) secretin-stimulated ductal secretion (functional index of biliary growth); 4) collagen deposition, liver fibrosis markers in liver sections, total liver, and cholangiocytes; and 5) expression of clock genes in cholangiocytes. In BDL rats exposed to dark there was 1) enhanced AANAT expression/melatonin secretion in pineal gland and melatonin serum levels; 2) improved liver morphology, serum chemistry and decreased biliary proliferation and secretin-stimulated choleresis; and 4) decreased fibrosis and expression of fibrosis markers in liver sections, total liver and cholangiocytes and reduced biliary expression of the clock genes PER1, BMAL1, CLOCK, and Cry1. Thus prolonged dark exposure may be a beneficial noninvasive therapeutic approach for the management of biliary disorders. PMID:25214401

  7. Effect of ozone exposure on antigen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, M.H.; Segura, P.; Campos, M.G.; Hong, E.; Montano, L.M.

    1994-12-31

    Airway hyperresponsiveness can be induced by several stimuli including antigen and ozone, both of which may be present in the air of polluted cities. Though the effect of ozone on the bronchoconstrictor response to antigen has been well described, the combined effect of these stimuli on airway hyperresponsiveness has not yet been studied. Sensitized guinea pigs with or without ozone exposure for 1 h at 3 ppm, 18 h prior to study, were challenged with a dose-response curve to histamine (0.01-1.8 {mu}g/kg, iv), and then by a second histamine dose-response curve 1 h later. Airway responses were measured as the increase in pulmonary insufflation pressure. In sensitized guinea pigs, the histamine ED50 significantly decreased after antigen challenge, demonstrating the development of airway hyperresponsiveness. Sensitized guinea pigs exposed to ozone showed airway hyperresponsiveness to histamine when compared with nonexposed animals, and such hyperresponsiveness was further enhanced after antigen challenge. We conclude that in this guinea pig model of acute allergic bronchoconstriction both antigen challenge and ozone induce airway hyperresponsiveness, while ozone exposure does not modify the development of antigen-induced hyperresponsiveness. 25 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Exposure to ozone reduces postharvest quality loss in red and green chilli peppers.

    PubMed

    Glowacz, Marcin; Rees, Deborah

    2016-11-01

    The effect of continuous exposure to ozone at 0.45, 0.9 and 2μmolmol(-1) on quality changes during the storage of red and green chilli peppers at 10°C was investigated. Ozone at 0.45 and 0.9μmolmol(-1) reduced disease incidence in red peppers, with no further benefits at 2μmolmol(-1). Ozone at 0.9μmolmol(-1) reduced weight loss during storage and improved firmness maintenance. Skin colour was bleached in red peppers exposed to ozone at 2μmolmol(-1), and in green ones at all tested doses. Total phenolic content was not affected by ozone but antioxidant activity was reduced in green chilli peppers exposed to ozone at 2μmolmol(-1), due to lower ascorbic acid content in those samples. Ozone at 0.9μmolmol(-1) extended the shelf-life of chilli peppers. PMID:27211651

  9. Relationships between ozone exposure and yield loss in European wheat and potato—a comparison of concentration- and flux-based exposure indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleijel, H.; Danielsson, H.; Ojanperä, K.; Temmerman, L. De; Högy, P.; Badiani, M.; Karlsson, P. E.

    Data from open-top chamber experiments with field grown crops, performed in Sweden, Finland, Belgium, Italy and Germany, were combined to derive relationships between yield and ozone exposure for wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) and potato ( Solanum tuberosum L.). Three different exposure indices were compared: AOT40 (accumulated exposure over a threshold ozone concentration of 40 nmol mol -1), CUO t (cumulative stomatal uptake of ozone, using a constant ozone uptake rate threshold of t nmol m -2 s -1) and mAOT c0 (conductance modified AOT using a threshold concentration for ozone of c0 nmol mol -1). The latter is essentially a combination of AOT and CUO. Ozone uptake was estimated using a Jarvis-type multiplicative model for stomatal conductance. In terms of correlation between relative yield (RY) and ozone exposure, CUO 5, the CUO index with an ozone uptake rate threshold of 5 nmol m -2 s -1, performed best for both wheat and potato, resulting in r2 values of 0.77 and 0.64, respectively. CUO 5 performed considerably better in terms of the correlation between RY and ozone exposure, than AOT40 for wheat, while mAOT10, the best performing mAOT index in this case, was intermediate in performance for this crop. For potato, the differences between the different ozone exposure indices AOT40, CUO 5 and mAOT20 (the mAOT index performing best for potato) in the correlation between RY and ozone exposure were relatively small. To test the assumption that the non-stomatal deposition of ozone was negligible for the uppermost, sunlit leaves, measurements of ozone uptake in relation to leaf conductance for water vapor of wheat leaves in a cuvette system were used. The non-stomatal deposition of ozone to the leaves turned out to be comparatively small. Based on the non-stomatal conductance ( gns=15 mmol m -2 s -1) estimated for the wheat leaves in the cuvette system, it was concluded that the consequence of omitting the non-stomatal conductance is small. In conclusion the study

  10. Episodic ozone exposure in adult and Senescent Brown Norway rats: Acute and delayed cardiovascular and thermoregulatory responses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Setting exposure standards for environmental pollutants may consider the aged as a susceptible population but the few published studies assessing susceptibility of the aged to air pollutants are inconsistent. Episodic ozone (O(3)) is more reflective of potential exposures occurri...

  11. Ocular and dermatologic health effects of ultraviolet radiation exposure from the ozone hole in southern Chile.

    PubMed Central

    Schein, O D; Vicencio, C; Muñoz, B; Gelatt, K N; Duncan, D D; Nethercott, J; Honeyman, J; Koren, H S; West, S

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This study sought to investigate numerous reports emanating from Punta Arenas, Chile (population 110,000, latitude 53 degrees S), that associated acute ocular and dermatologic disease in humans and animals with excess ultraviolet-B (UV-B) exposure in the setting of the thinning of the ozone column. METHODS. Ophthalmologic and dermatologic records in Punta Arenas were systematically reviewed to enumerate sentinel diagnoses potentially associated with UV-B exposure, ocular examinations on representative animal populations were performed, and the ambient UV-B exposure in the region during the time of maximal thinning was estimated. RESULTS. No increase in patient visits or conditions attributable to UV-B exposure was seen for periods of known ozone depletion compared with control periods. Although ambient UV-B exposure was 1.6 to 2.3 times the habitual exposure on individual days, this excess exposure conferred only a 1% increase in annual exposure on the region. CONCLUSION. This study does not support existing lay reports of ocular and dermatologic disease in humans and animals that had been associated with the ozone hole over southern Chile. PMID:7702120

  12. Effect of Gaseous Ozone Exposure on the Bacteria Counts and Oxidative Properties of Ground Hanwoo Beef at Refrigeration Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Youngjae; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to elucidate the effect of ozone exposure on the bacteria counts and oxidative properties of ground Hanwoo beef contaminated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 at refrigeration temperature. Ground beef was inoculated with 7 Log CFU/g of E. coli O157:H7 isolated from domestic pigs and was then subjected to ozone exposure (10×10−6 kg O3 h−1) at 4℃ for 3 d. E. coli O157:H7, total aerobic and anaerobic bacterial growth and oxidative properties including instrumental color changes, TBARS, catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity were evaluated. Ozone exposure significantly prohibited (p<0.05) the growths of E. coli O157:H7, total aerobic and anaerobic bacteria in ground beef samples during storage. Ozone exposure reduced (p<0.05) the CIE a* value of samples over storage time. The CIE L* and CIE b* values of the samples fluctuated over storage time, and ozone had no clear effect. Ozone exposure increased the TBARS values during 1 to 3 d of storage (p<0.05). The CAT and GPx enzyme activities were not affected by ozone exposure until 2 and 3 d of storage, respectively. This study provides information about the use of ozone exposure as an antimicrobial agent for meat under refrigerated storage. The results of this study provide a foundation for the further application of ozone exposure by integrating an ozone generator inside a refrigerator. Further studies regarding the ozone concentrations and exposure times are needed. PMID:26761291

  13. Effect of Gaseous Ozone Exposure on the Bacteria Counts and Oxidative Properties of Ground Hanwoo Beef at Refrigeration Temperature.

    PubMed

    Cho, Youngjae; Muhlisin; Choi, Ji Hye; Hahn, Tae-Wook; Lee, Sung Ki

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to elucidate the effect of ozone exposure on the bacteria counts and oxidative properties of ground Hanwoo beef contaminated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 at refrigeration temperature. Ground beef was inoculated with 7 Log CFU/g of E. coli O157:H7 isolated from domestic pigs and was then subjected to ozone exposure (10×10(-6) kg O3 h(-1)) at 4℃ for 3 d. E. coli O157:H7, total aerobic and anaerobic bacterial growth and oxidative properties including instrumental color changes, TBARS, catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity were evaluated. Ozone exposure significantly prohibited (p<0.05) the growths of E. coli O157:H7, total aerobic and anaerobic bacteria in ground beef samples during storage. Ozone exposure reduced (p<0.05) the CIE a* value of samples over storage time. The CIE L* and CIE b* values of the samples fluctuated over storage time, and ozone had no clear effect. Ozone exposure increased the TBARS values during 1 to 3 d of storage (p<0.05). The CAT and GPx enzyme activities were not affected by ozone exposure until 2 and 3 d of storage, respectively. This study provides information about the use of ozone exposure as an antimicrobial agent for meat under refrigerated storage. The results of this study provide a foundation for the further application of ozone exposure by integrating an ozone generator inside a refrigerator. Further studies regarding the ozone concentrations and exposure times are needed. PMID:26761291

  14. Comparison of ozone exposure characteristics in forested regions near Mexico City and Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Paul R.; de Lourdes de Bauer, María; Quevedo Nolasco, Abel; Hernández Tejeda, Tomás

    This comparison of forest exposure to ozone in the vicinity of México City and Los Angeles provides preliminary evidence of the seasonal differences in ozone concentrations. Summer concentrations near México City are not as high as those near Los Angeles because most of the precipitation and associated cloudiness occurs near México City during the months of June through September. Winter concentrations remain nearly as high as summer concentrations at México City, because in winter skies are clearer and incident sunlight remains high. Latitudinal influences on solar zenith angle and the higher altitude of the México City region both contribute to a higher actinic flux than in the Los Angeles region. The primary difference in forest exposure is that there is very little respite from adverse ozone concentrations during the entire year in the México City region. Also, the rainy summer season would likely diminish water stress and result in greater ozone uptake at the Desierto de los Leones compared to dry summer conditions in California. The closer proximity of the Desierto de los Leones monitoring site to the urban area also contributes to high winter exposures. There is some respite from exposure during the winter in the San Bernardino mountain region; however, summer concentrations are higher than near México City. The greater transport distance from the Los Angeles source region also contributes to lower winter exposures.

  15. Ozone exposure triggers insulin resistance through muscle c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Vella, Roxane E; Pillon, Nicolas J; Zarrouki, Bader; Croze, Marine L; Koppe, Laetitia; Guichardant, Michel; Pesenti, Sandra; Chauvin, Marie-Agnès; Rieusset, Jennifer; Géloën, Alain; Soulage, Christophe O

    2015-03-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that exposure to traffic-related air pollution is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Ozone, a major photochemical pollutant in urban areas, is negatively associated with fasting glucose and insulin levels, but most aspects of this association remain to be elucidated. Using an environmentally realistic concentration (0.8 parts per million), we demonstrated that exposure of rats to ozone induced whole-body insulin resistance and oxidative stress, with associated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation, and disruption of insulin signaling in skeletal muscle. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluids from ozone-treated rats reproduced this effect in C2C12 myotubes, suggesting that toxic lung mediators were responsible for the phenotype. Pretreatment with the chemical chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid, the JNK inhibitor SP600125, or the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine alleviated insulin resistance, demonstrating that ozone sequentially triggered oxidative stress, ER stress, and JNK activation to impair insulin signaling in muscle. This study is the first to report that ozone plays a causative role in the development of insulin resistance, suggesting that it could boost the development of diabetes. We therefore provide a potential mechanism linking pollutant exposure and the increased incidence of metabolic diseases. PMID:25277399

  16. Reduction of influenza virus pathogenesis by exposure to 0.5 ppm ozone.

    PubMed

    Jakab, G J; Hmieleski, R R

    1988-01-01

    Continuous exposure to 0.5 ppm ozone during the course of murine influenza A/PR8/34 virus infection reduced the severity of the disease as quantitated by histologic (morphometric), biochemical (serum albumin in lavage fluid), and gravimetric (lung wt/dry weight ratios) parameters of lung injury. The ozone-mediated abatement of the lung injury was independent of peak pulmonary virus titers. However, determination of the sites of virus multiplication indicated that exposure to ozone resulted in a less widespread infection of the lung parenchyma. Furthermore, ozone exposure reduced the antiviral immune response as shown by reduced numbers of phenotypically quantitated T- and B-lymphocytes recovered from lung tissues and reduction of serum antibody titers. Since the pathogenesis of influenza virus infection depends on both the site of viral replication and the antiviral immune response, these studies suggest that redistribution of virus growth in murine lungs and immunosuppressive mechanisms are factors in the ozone-reduced disease severity. PMID:3361616

  17. Modulation of bronchial epithelial cell barrier function by in vitro ozone exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, X Y; Takahashi, N; Croxton, T L; Spannhake, E W

    1994-01-01

    The epithelial cells lining the small, peripheral airways function as important targets for the action of inspired ozone. Loss of epithelial barrier integrity in these regions is a common element in ozone-induced airway inflammation. To investigate the direct effect of ozone on epithelial barrier function, canine bronchial epithelial (CBE) cells grown with an air interface were exposed for 3 hr to 0.2, 0.5, or 0.8 ppm ozone or to air. Mannitol flux, used as an index of paracellular permeability, increased above air controls by 461%, 774%, and 1172% at the three ozone concentrations, respectively. Transcellular electrical resistance exhibited a dose-related decrease. The immediate effect of 0.8 ppm ozone on permeability was significantly inhibited by preincubation for 48 hr in the presence of 1 ng/ml vitamin E (33%) or 1 microM vitamin A (34%). Responses to 0.5 ppm or 0.8 ppm were inhibited by pretreatment of the cells with 0.1 microM of the actin polymerizing agent phalloidin (34% and 25% inhibition, respectively). The increases in permeability induced by 0.2 and 0.5 ppm ozone were attenuated by 54% and 22%, respectively, at 18 hr after exposure, whereas that to 0.8 ppm was further enhanced by 42% at this time. The effects of ozone are modulated by the availability of antioxidants to the cells and appear to be associated with cytoskeletal dysfunction in CBE cells. The data are consistent with a loss of barrier function linked to a direct oxidative effect of ozone on individual CBE cells and indicate that the reversible or progressive nature of this effect is dose dependent. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:7713019

  18. Growth response of two varieties of slash-pine seedlings to chronic ozone exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Hogsett, W.E.; Plocher, M.; Wildman, V.; Tingey, D.T.; Bennett, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    Two geographical varieties of Pinus elliottii (Engelm.) seedlings, elliottii and densa, were exposed continuously to two daily peak exposure profiles of ozone having 7-h seasonal means of 0.104 and 0.076 ppm and charcoal-filtered air over a 112-day period. The profiles represented a daily rise and decline of hourly ozone concentration. They were constructed with a daily hourly maximum, which for one profile (0.126 micro l/l) exceeded the current ozone standard daily; the standard was not exceeded for the other profile (0.094 micro l/l). Destructive harvests at 7-day intervals over the exposure period were employed to assess visible injury and to construct growth curves for stem diameter, plant height, top and root dry weight, and needle number and length.

  19. Structural and functional localization of airway effects from episodic exposure of infant monkeys to allergen and/or ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Joad, Jesse P. . E-mail: jesse.joad@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu; Kott, Kayleen S.; Bric, John M.; Peake, Janice L.; Plopper, Charles G.; Schelegle, Edward S.; Gershwin, Laurel J.; Pinkerton, Kent E.

    2006-08-01

    Both allergen and ozone exposure increase asthma symptoms and airway responsiveness in children. Little is known about how these inhalants may differentially modify airway responsiveness in large proximal as compared to small distal airways. We evaluated whether bronchi and respiratory bronchioles from infant monkeys exposed episodically to allergen and/or ozone differentially develop intrinsic hyperresponsiveness to methacholine and whether eosinophils and/or pulmonary neuroendocrine cells play a role. Infant monkeys were exposed episodically for 5 months to: (1) filtered air, (2) aerosolized house dust mite allergen, (3) ozone 0.5 ppm, or (4) house dust mite allergen + ozone. Studying the function/structure relationship of the same lung slices, we evaluated methacholine airway responsiveness and histology of bronchi and respiratory bronchioles. In bronchi, intrinsic responsiveness was increased by allergen exposure, an effect reduced by bombesin antagonist. In respiratory bronchioles, intrinsic airway responsiveness was increased by allergen + ozone exposure. Eosinophils were increased by allergen and allergen + ozone exposure in bronchi and by allergen exposure in respiratory bronchioles. In both airways, exposure to allergen + ozone resulted in fewer tissue eosinophils than did allergen exposure alone. In bronchi, but not in respiratory bronchioles, the number of eosinophils and neuroendocrine cells correlated with airway responsiveness. We conclude that episodically exposing infant monkeys to house dust mite allergen with or without ozone increased intrinsic airway responsiveness to methacholine in bronchi differently than in respiratory bronchioles. In bronchi, eosinophils and neuroendocrine cells may play a role in the development of airway hyperresponsiveness.

  20. Exposure to medium and high ambient levels of ozone causes adverse systemic inflammatory and cardiac autonomic effects.

    PubMed

    Arjomandi, Mehrdad; Wong, Hofer; Donde, Aneesh; Frelinger, Jessica; Dalton, Sarah; Ching, Wendy; Power, Karron; Balmes, John R

    2015-06-15

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that exposure to ozone increases cardiovascular morbidity. However, the specific biological mechanisms mediating ozone-associated cardiovascular effects are unknown. To determine whether short-term exposure to ambient levels of ozone causes changes in biomarkers of cardiovascular disease including heart rate variability (HRV), systemic inflammation, and coagulability, 26 subjects were exposed to 0, 100, and 200 ppb ozone in random order for 4 h with intermittent exercise. HRV was measured and blood samples were obtained immediately before (0 h), immediately after (4 h), and 20 h after (24 h) each exposure. Bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed 20 h after exposure. Regression modeling was used to examine dose-response trends between the endpoints and ozone exposure. Inhalation of ozone induced dose-dependent adverse changes in the frequency domains of HRV across exposures consistent with increased sympathetic tone [increase of (parameter estimate ± SE) 0.4 ± 0.2 and 0.3 ± 0.1 in low- to high-frequency domain HRV ratio per 100 ppb increase in ozone at 4 h and 24 h, respectively (P = 0.02 and P = 0.01)] and a dose-dependent increase in serum C-reactive protein (CRP) across exposures at 24 h [increase of 0.61 ± 0.24 mg/l in CRP per 100 ppb increase in ozone (P = 0.01)]. Changes in HRV and CRP did not correlate with ozone-induced local lung inflammatory responses (BAL granulocytes, IL-6, or IL-8), but changes in HRV and CRP were associated with each other after adjustment for age and ozone level. Inhalation of ozone causes adverse systemic inflammatory and cardiac autonomic effects that may contribute to the cardiovascular mortality associated with short-term exposure. PMID:25862833

  1. Integrating Dialectical Behavior Therapy and Prolonged Exposure to Treat Co-Occurring Borderline Personality Disorder and PTSD: Two Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harned, Melanie S.; Linehan, Marsha M.

    2008-01-01

    Despite the high rate of trauma and PTSD among individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD), no studies have specifically evaluated the treatment of PTSD in a BPD population. These case studies illustrate the use of a protocol based on prolonged exposure therapy that can be integrated into standard dialectical behavior therapy to treat…

  2. Randomized Trial of Prolonged Exposure for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder with and without Cognitive Restructuring: Outcome at Academic and Community Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foa, Edna B.; Hembree, Elizabeth A.; Cahill, Shawn P.; Rauch, Sheila A. M.; Riggs, David S.; Feeny, Norah C.; Yadin, Elna

    2005-01-01

    Female assault survivors (N = 171) with chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were randomly assigned to prolonged exposure (PE) alone, PE plus cognitive restructuring (PE/CR), or wait-list (WL). Treatment, which consisted of 9-12 sessions, was conducted at an academic treatment center or at a community clinic for rape survivors. Evaluations…

  3. Absence of acute ocular damage in humans after prolonged exposure to intense RF EMF.

    PubMed

    Adibzadeh, F; van Rhoon, G C; Verduijn, G M; Naus-Postema, N C; Paulides, M M

    2016-01-21

    The eye is considered to be a critical organ when determining safety standards for radio frequency (RF) radiation. Experimental data obtained using animals showed that RF heating of the eye, particularly over a specific threshold, can induce cataracts. During the treatment of cancer in the head and neck by hyperthermia, the eyes receive a considerable dose of RF radiation due to stray radiation from the prolonged (60 min) and intense exposure at 434 MHz of this region. In the current study, we verified the exposure guidelines for humans by determining the association between the electromagnetic and thermal dose in the eyes with the reported ocular effects. We performed a simulation study to retrospectively assess the specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature increase in the eyes of 16 selected patients (encompassing a total of 74 treatment sessions) whose treatment involved high power delivery as well as a minimal distance between the tumor site and the eye. Our results show that the basic restrictions on the peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (10 W kg(-1)) and peak tissue temperature increase (1 °C) are exceeded by up to 10.4 and 4.6 times, on average, and by at least 6.2 and 1.8 times when considering the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval. Evaluation of the acute effects according to patients' feedback (all patients), the common toxicity criteria scores (all patients) and an ophthalmology investigation (one patient with the highest exposure) revealed no indication of any serious acute ocular effect, even though the eyes were exposed to high electromagnetic fields, leading to a high thermal dose. We also found that, although there is a strong correlation (R (2) =  0.88) between the predicted induced SAR and temperature in the eye, there are large uncertainties regarding the temperature-SAR relationship. Given this large uncertainty (129%) compared with the uncertainty of 3D temperature simulations (61%), we recommend using temperature simulations as a

  4. Absence of acute ocular damage in humans after prolonged exposure to intense RF EMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adibzadeh, F.; van Rhoon, G. C.; Verduijn, G. M.; Naus-Postema, N. C.; Paulides, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    The eye is considered to be a critical organ when determining safety standards for radio frequency (RF) radiation. Experimental data obtained using animals showed that RF heating of the eye, particularly over a specific threshold, can induce cataracts. During the treatment of cancer in the head and neck by hyperthermia, the eyes receive a considerable dose of RF radiation due to stray radiation from the prolonged (60 min) and intense exposure at 434 MHz of this region. In the current study, we verified the exposure guidelines for humans by determining the association between the electromagnetic and thermal dose in the eyes with the reported ocular effects. We performed a simulation study to retrospectively assess the specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature increase in the eyes of 16 selected patients (encompassing a total of 74 treatment sessions) whose treatment involved high power delivery as well as a minimal distance between the tumor site and the eye. Our results show that the basic restrictions on the peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (10 W kg-1) and peak tissue temperature increase (1 °C) are exceeded by up to 10.4 and 4.6 times, on average, and by at least 6.2 and 1.8 times when considering the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval. Evaluation of the acute effects according to patients’ feedback (all patients), the common toxicity criteria scores (all patients) and an ophthalmology investigation (one patient with the highest exposure) revealed no indication of any serious acute ocular effect, even though the eyes were exposed to high electromagnetic fields, leading to a high thermal dose. We also found that, although there is a strong correlation (R 2  =  0.88) between the predicted induced SAR and temperature in the eye, there are large uncertainties regarding the temperature-SAR relationship. Given this large uncertainty (129%) compared with the uncertainty of 3D temperature simulations (61%), we recommend using temperature

  5. THE EFFECT OF CHRONIC OZONE EXPOSURE ON THE METABOLITE CONTENT OF PONDEROSA PINE SEEDLINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) seedlings grown in field exposure chambers and fumigated with ozone at a concentration of 200 g/cu m 6 h/day; 7 days/wk for variable periods of up to 20 weeks. Pines were harvested at 4 wk intervals to determine the levels of the metabolites...

  6. MUCOCILIARY CLEARANCE OF INHALED PARTICLES MEASURED AT TWO HOURS FOLLOWING OZONE EXPOSURE IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mucociliary transport has been shown to increase during ozone exposure. his increase may have been due to a number of factors such as stimulation of muscarinic receptors, induction of cough, or a byproduct of inflammation. e exposed 15 healthy male and female on-smoking subjects,...

  7. COMPARISON OF THE RESPONSES OF CHILDREN AND ADULTS TO ACUTE OZONE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the paper is to compare the results of two studies in which the respiratory responses of children and adults to acute ozone (O3) exposure were measured. Forty-two 18-30 year old males were exposed for 2.5 hours in a controlled environmental chamber to either 0.0 or...

  8. INHIBITION OF HUMAN NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY FOLLOWING IN VITRO EXPOSURE TO OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study we have examined the effect of in vitro ozone exposure on human peripheral blood natural killer (NK) cell activity measured against K562 tumor cells. he data showed that NK activity was nhibited in a time dependent manner with marked suppression observed after 6 hou...

  9. TOPICAL REVIEW: Climate change, ozone depletion and the impact on ultraviolet exposure of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diffey, Brian

    2004-01-01

    For 30 years there has been concern that anthropogenic damage to the Earth's stratospheric ozone layer will lead to an increase of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching the Earth's surface, with a consequent adverse impact on human health, especially to the skin. More recently, there has been an increased awareness of the interactions between ozone depletion and climate change (global warming), which could also impact on human exposure to terrestrial UV. The most serious effect of changing UV exposure of human skin is the potential rise in incidence of skin cancers. Risk estimates of this disease associated with ozone depletion suggest that an additional peak incidence of 5000 cases of skin cancer per year in the UK would occur around the mid-part of this century. Climate change, which is predicted to lead to an increased frequency of extreme temperature events and high summer temperatures, will become more frequent in the UK. This could impact on human UV exposure by encouraging people to spend more time in the sun. Whilst future social trends remain uncertain, it is likely that over this century behaviour associated with climate change, rather than ozone depletion, will be the largest determinant of sun exposure, and consequent impact on skin cancer, of the UK population.

  10. Effects of combinations of diesel exhaust and ozone exposure on lung function in human volunteers.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone (03) exposure induces changes in human lung function, typically seen as a decrease in forced expiratory volume in one sec (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC). Because people are usually exposed to other ambient air pollutants simultaneously with 03, there may be interact...

  11. Climate change, ozone depletion and the impact on ultraviolet exposure of human skin.

    PubMed

    Diffey, Brian

    2004-01-01

    For 30 years there has been concern that anthropogenic damage to the Earth's stratospheric ozone layer will lead to an increase of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching the Earth's surface, with a consequent adverse impact on human health, especially to the skin. More recently, there has been an increased awareness of the interactions between ozone depletion and climate change (global warming), which could also impact on human exposure to terrestrial UV. The most serious effect of changing UV exposure of human skin is the potential rise in incidence of skin cancers. Risk estimates of this disease associated with ozone depletion suggest that an additional peak incidence of 5000 cases of skin cancer per year in the UK would occur around the mid-part of this century. Climate change, which is predicted to lead to an increased frequency of extreme temperature events and high summer temperatures, will become more frequent in the UK. This could impact on human UV exposure by encouraging people to spend more time in the sun. Whilst future social trends remain uncertain, it is likely that over this century behaviour associated with climate change, rather than ozone depletion, will be the largest determinant of sun exposure, and consequent impact on skin cancer, of the UK population. PMID:14971768

  12. Effects Of Combinations of Ozone and Diesel Exhaust Exposures On Blood, Cardiac, And Lung Endpoints

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human subjects were exposed to combinations of 300 ppb ozone (03) and 300 ug/m3 diesel exhaust (DE) to examine if synergistic effects were observed. Subjects received either filtered air (FA), 03, DE, or DE+03 on Day 1, followed by only 03 exposures on Day 2, and a follow-up on D...

  13. INFLUENCE OF EXERCISE AND HEAT STRESS ON PULMONARY FUNCTION DURING OZONE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The authors studied the effects of 2-h exposure to ozone in 14 nonsmoking males under four environmental conditions. Thirty minutes of exercise at 40% Vo2max was performed from 60 to 90 min for group A and 30 to 60 min for group B. Pulmonary Function changes, determined throughou...

  14. EFFECT OF OZONE EXPOSURE ON THE DISPERSION OF INHALED AEROSOL BOLUSES IN HEALTHY HUMAN SUBJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute exposure of humans to low levels of ozone are known to cause decreases FVC and increases sRaw. hese alterations in lung function do not, however, elucidate the potential for acute small airways responses. n this study we employed a test of aerosol dispersion to examine the ...

  15. Human Ozone (O3) Exposure Alters Serum Profile of Lipid Metabolites

    EPA Science Inventory

    HUMAN OZONE (O3) EXPOSURE ALTERS SERUM PROFILE OF LIPID METABOLITES Miller, D B.1; Kodavanti, U P.2 Karoly, E D.3; Cascio W.E2, Ghio, A J. 21. UNC-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, N.C., United States. 2. NHEERL, U.S. EPA, RTP, N.C., United States. 3. METABOLON INC., Durham, N.C., United...

  16. RESPONSES OF SUBJECTS WITH CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE AFTER EXPOSURES TO 0.3 PPM OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The authors previously reported (1982) that the respiratory mechanics of intermittently exercising persons with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were unaffected by a 2-h exposure to 0.2 ppm ozone. Employing a single-blind cross-over design protocol, 13 white men with ...

  17. MODULATION OF HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGE PROPERTIES BY OZONE EXPOSURE IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have investigated changes in human alveolar macrophage (HAM) function after exposure in vitro to ozone (O3) (0.1-1.0 ppm for 2-4 hours). he functions studied reflect concern that 03 is detrimental to host defense mechanisms in the broncho-alveolar spaces. xposure of HAM to cau...

  18. Exposure to ozone modulates human airway protease/antiprotease balance contributing to increased influenza A infection

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to oxidant air pollution is associated with Increased respiratory morbiditses and susceptibility to Infections Ozone is a commonly encountered oxidant air pollutant, yet Its effects on influenza infections in humans are not known ‘the greater Mexico City area was the pri...

  19. Static and dynamic vestibulo-cervico-ocular responses after prolonged exposure to microgravity.

    PubMed

    Kornilova, L N; Sagalovitch, S V; Temnikova, V V; Yakushev, A G

    2007-01-01

    The vestibular function was investigated in 13 Russian crew members of the ISS missions on days 1(2), 4(5), and 8(9) after prolonged exposure to microgravity (126 to 195 days). The static torsional otolith-cervico-ocular reflex was studied, as well as the dynamic vestibulo-cervico-ocular responses, vestibular reactivity, and spontaneous oculomotor activity using videooculography (VOG) and electrooculography (EOG) for simultaneous recording of eye movements. On days 1-2 of return to the gravity (R+1-2), the cosmonauts were found to increase the spontaneous oculomotor activity (floating eye movements, both typical and atypical forms of spontaneous nystagmus, square wave jerks, gaze nystagmus) with the head held in the vertical position. The otolith function during static head inclinations to the right or left shoulder at 30 degrees was suppressed as determined by the inversion or absence, or reduction by half of the amplitude of torsional compensatory eye counter-rolling and the vestibular reactivity during head yaw movements at 0.125 Hz was increased as revealed by a lowered threshold and an increased intensity of vestibular nystagmus. The pattern, depth, dynamics, and velocity of the vestibular function recovery varied with individual participants in the investigation. However, the suppressed otolith functioning in the period of readaptation to the normal gravity was, as a rule, accompanied by an exaggerated vestibular reactivity. PMID:18626133

  20. Prolonged Exposure Therapy With Veterans and Active Duty Personnel Diagnosed With PTSD and Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Gregory K; Kretzmer, Tracy; Crawford, Eric; Thors, Christina; Wagner, H Ryan; Strom, Thad Q; Eftekhari, Afsoon; Klenk, Megan; Hayward, Laura; Vanderploeg, Rodney D

    2015-08-01

    The present study used archival clinical data to analyze the delivery and effectiveness of prolonged exposure (PE) and ancillary services for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom, and Operation New Dawn veterans (N = 69) with histories of mild to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Data from standard clinical assessments of veterans and active duty personnel treated in both inpatient and outpatient programs at 2 Department of Veteran Affairs medical centers were examined. Symptoms were assessed with self-report measures of PTSD (PTSD Checklist) and depression (Beck Depression Inventory-II) before and throughout therapy. Mixed linear models were utilized to determine the slope of reported symptoms throughout treatment, and the effects associated with fixed factors such as site, treatment setting (residential vs. outpatient), and TBI severity were examined. Results demonstrated significant decreases in PTSD, B = -3.00, 95% CI [-3.22, -2.78]; t(210) = -13.5; p < .001, and in depressive symptoms, B = -1.46, 95% CI [-1.64, -1.28]; t(192) = -8.32; p < .001. The effects of PE treatment did not differ by clinical setting and participants with moderate to severe injuries reported more rapid gains than those with a history of mild TBI. The results provide evidence that PE may well be effective for veterans with PTSD and TBI. PMID:26201688

  1. Prolonged Exposure vs Dynamic Therapy for Adolescent PTSD: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gilboa-Schechtman, Eva; Foa, Edna; Shafran, Naama; Aderka, Idan M.; Powers, Mark B.; Rachamim, Lilach; Rosenbach, Lea; Yadin, Elna; Apter, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine the efficacy and maintenance of developmentally adapted prolonged Exposure (PE-A) compared to active control Time Limited Dynamic Therapy (TLDP-A) for reducing post-traumatic and depressive symptoms in adolescent victims of single event traumas. Method 38 adolescents (age 12–18) were randomly assigned to receive either PE-A or TLDP-A. Results Both treatments resulted in decreased post-traumatic stress disorder and depression, and increased functioning. PE-A exhibited greater reduction of PTSD and depression symptom severity, and greater increase in global functioning than did TDLP-A. At post-treatment, 68.4% of adolescents beginning treatment with PE-A and 36.8% of those beginning treatment with TLDP-A no longer met diagnostic criteria for PTSD. Treatment gains were maintained at 6 and 17 months follow-up. Conclusions Brief individual therapy is effective in reducing post-traumatic distress and behavioral trauma-focused components enhance efficacy. PMID:20855048

  2. Change in Sleep Symptoms across Cognitive Processing Therapy and Prolonged Exposure: A Longitudinal Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Gutner, Cassidy A.; Casement, Melynda D.; Gilbert, Karina Stavitsky; Resick, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is a core component in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Although cognitive-behavioral treatments for PTSD reduce the severity of sleep symptoms, they do not lead to complete remission. The present study examines the impact of Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) and Prolonged Exposure (PE) on subjective measures of sleep disturbance from treatment randomization through long-term follow-up (LTFU). Participants were 171 female rape victims with PTSD who were randomly assigned to CPT, PE, or Minimal Attention (MA). After 6-weeks, the MA group was randomized to CPT or PE. Sleep symptoms were assessed at baseline, post-MA, post-treatment, 3-months, 9-months and LTFU using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and nightmare and insomnia items from the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale. Change in sleep during MA, from pre- to post-treatment for CPT and PE, and from post-treatment through LTFU was assessed using piecewise hierarchical linear modeling with the intent-to-treat sample. Controlling for medication, sleep improved during CPT and PE compared to MA, and treatment gains were maintained through LTFU. CPT and PE were equally efficacious and improvements persist over LTFU, yet, neither produced remission of sleep disturbance. Overall, sleep symptoms do not remit and may warrant sleep-specific treatments. PMID:24184428

  3. Change in sleep symptoms across Cognitive Processing Therapy and Prolonged Exposure: a longitudinal perspective.

    PubMed

    Gutner, Cassidy A; Casement, Melynda D; Stavitsky Gilbert, Karina; Resick, Patricia A

    2013-12-01

    Sleep disturbance is a core component in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Although cognitive-behavioral treatments for PTSD reduce the severity of sleep symptoms, they do not lead to complete remission. The present study examines the impact of Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) and Prolonged Exposure (PE) on subjective measures of sleep disturbance from treatment randomization through long-term follow-up (LTFU). Participants were 171 female rape victims with PTSD who were randomly assigned to CPT, PE, or Minimal Attention (MA). After 6-weeks, the MA group was randomized to CPT or PE. Sleep symptoms were assessed at baseline, post-MA, post-treatment, 3-months, 9-months and LTFU using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and nightmare and insomnia items from the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale. Change in sleep during MA, from pre- to post-treatment for CPT and PE, and from post-treatment through LTFU was assessed using piecewise hierarchical linear modeling with the intent-to-treat sample. Controlling for medication, sleep improved during CPT and PE compared to MA, and treatment gains were maintained through LTFU. CPT and PE were equally efficacious and improvements persist over LTFU, yet, neither produced remission of sleep disturbance. Overall, sleep symptoms do not remit and may warrant sleep-specific treatments. PMID:24184428

  4. The effects of prolonged exposure and sertraline on emotion regulation in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Jerud, Alissa B; Pruitt, Larry D; Zoellner, Lori A; Feeny, Norah C

    2016-02-01

    The effects of current posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) interventions on emotion regulation are relatively unknown. Many conceptualize PTSD as a disorder of emotion dysregulation, and clinicians often fear that emotion regulation impairments will not change with stand-alone PTSD treatments, particularly for individuals with pre-existing emotion regulation difficulties. The present study examined changes in emotion regulation (expressive suppression, cognitive reappraisal, negative mood regulation) with prolonged exposure (PE) therapy or sertraline, specifically examining whether those with higher pre-existing emotion regulation difficulties improved over treatment on these indices. Individuals with chronic PTSD (N = 200) received 10 weeks of PE or sertraline and were followed through 6-month follow-up. Emotion regulation was assessed at pre- and post-treatment and at 3- and 6-month follow-up. Individuals with poorer initial emotion regulation showed greater improvement on all indices of emotion regulation, regardless of which treatment they received. Changes occurred during active treatment and were maintained over follow-up. These findings have both theoretical and clinical implications, arguing that emotion regulation is not impaired across all individuals with PTSD and that PE and sertraline effectively address emotion regulation difficulties. PMID:26723004

  5. Stratospheric ozone changes under solar geoengineering: implications for UV exposure and air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowack, Peer Johannes; Abraham, Nathan Luke; Braesicke, Peter; Pyle, John Adrian

    2016-03-01

    Various forms of geoengineering have been proposed to counter anthropogenic climate change. Methods which aim to modify the Earth's energy balance by reducing insolation are often subsumed under the term solar radiation management (SRM). Here, we present results of a standard SRM modelling experiment in which the incoming solar irradiance is reduced to offset the global mean warming induced by a quadrupling of atmospheric carbon dioxide. For the first time in an atmosphere-ocean coupled climate model, we include atmospheric composition feedbacks for this experiment. While the SRM scheme considered here could offset greenhouse gas induced global mean surface warming, it leads to important changes in atmospheric composition. We find large stratospheric ozone increases that induce significant reductions in surface UV-B irradiance, which would have implications for vitamin D production. In addition, the higher stratospheric ozone levels lead to decreased ozone photolysis in the troposphere. In combination with lower atmospheric specific humidity under SRM, this results in overall surface ozone concentration increases in the idealized G1 experiment. Both UV-B and surface ozone changes are important for human health. We therefore highlight that both stratospheric and tropospheric ozone changes must be considered in the assessment of any SRM scheme, due to their important roles in regulating UV exposure and air quality.

  6. The Effect of Lake Temperatures and Emissions on Ozone Exposure in the Western Great Lakes Region

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, Jerome D. ); Heilman, Warren E.

    2003-09-01

    A meteorological-chemical model with a 12-km horizontal grid spacing was used to simulate the evolution of ozone over the western Great Lakes region during a 30-day period in the summer of 1999. High ozone production rates were produced over the surface of the lakes as a result of stable atmospheric conditions that trapped ozone precursors within a shallow layer during the day. Simulations with lake temperatures derived from either satellite measurements or climatological values produced ozone mixing ratios over the lakes and around the lake shores that differed by as much as 50 ppb while differences over land were usually 10 ppb or less. Through another series of sensitivity studies that varied ozone precursor emissions, it was shown that a reduction of 50% NOx or VOC would lower the 60 ppb ozone exposure by up to 50 h per month in the remote forest regions over the northern Great Lakes. The implications of these results on future climate change and air quality in the region is discussed.

  7. Effects of chronic exposure to ozone on collagen in rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, E.S.; Kehrer, J.P.; White, D.M.; Smiler, K.L.

    1988-03-15

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a consequence of severe injury from some toxic agents including high doses of ozone. It is not known, however, whether chronic exposure to low doses of ozone, such as those encountered in polluted ambient atmospheres, could also result in abnormal accumulations of lung collagen. Rats were exposed to ozone for 20 hr per day, 7 days per week for 3, 6, 12, and 18 months at concentrations of 0.12, 0.25, or 0.50 ppm. Controls were exposed under identical conditions to purified air. Upon removal from the chambers, rats were euthanized and lung tissue slices incubated with (14C)proline. The incorporation of 14C into hydroxyproline and the total hydroxyproline content of lung tissue were measured as estimates of lung collagen synthesis and content, respectively. The formation of labeled hydroxyproline tended to decrease significantly with time in controls and at the three ozone doses. There were, however, no significant dose-related changes at any of the time points tested. Total lung hydroxyproline increased with age in all groups, but no dose-related changes were detected at any time point. It was concluded that chronic exposure of rats to ozone at concentrations which approximate ambient urban concentrations did not affect normal age-related changes in either synthesis or accumulation of lung collagen.

  8. Ozone exposure and flux-based response functions for photosynthetic traits in wheat, maize and poplar.

    PubMed

    Bagard, Matthieu; Jolivet, Yves; Hasenfratz-Sauder, Marie-Paule; Gérard, Joëlle; Dizengremel, Pierre; Le Thiec, Didier

    2015-11-01

    Ozone exposure- and dose-response relationships based on photosynthetic leaf traits (CO2 assimilation, chlorophyll content, Rubisco and PEPc activities) were established for wheat, maize and poplar plants grown in identical controlled conditions, providing a comparison between crop and tree species, as well as between C3 and C4 plants. Intra-specific variability was addressed by comparing two wheat cultivars with contrasting ozone tolerance. Depending on plant models and ozone levels, first-order, second-order and segmented linear regression models were used to derive ozone response functions. Overall, flux-based functions appeared superior to exposure-based functions in describing the data, but the improvement remained modest. The best fit was obtained using the POD0.5 for maize and POD3 for poplar. The POD6 appeared relevant for wheat, although intervarietal differences were found. Our results suggest that taking into account the dynamics of leaf antioxidant capacity could improve current methods for ozone risk assessment for plants. PMID:26253315

  9. Effects of in vitro ozone exposure on peroxidative damage, membrane leakage, and taurine content of rat alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, M.A.; Porter, D.W.; Martin, W.G.; Castranova, V. )

    1990-08-01

    Rat alveolar macrophages (AM) were isolated by pulmonary lavage, allowed to adhere to a tissue culture flask, and then exposed to 0.45 +/- 0.05 ppm ozone. After exposures ranging from 0 to 60 min, the medium was decanted and cells were harvested. Cells were assayed for oxidant damage and media analyzed for leakage of intracellular components. Increasing length of exposure to ozone resulted in a decreased number of adherent AM and decreased cell viability. Resting and zymosan-stimulated chemiluminescence increased immediately after ozone exposure and reached a maximum at 15-30 min, then declined to initial levels after 60 min of ozone exposure. Lipid peroxidation and leakage of protein and K+ ions increased with increasing length of exposure to ozone, while leakage of reduced and oxidized glutathione increased through 30 min, then declined (reduced) or leveled off (oxidized). Activity of the Na+/K+ ATPase decreased with time while intracellular taurine concentration exhibited an initial rise, peaked at 30 min, and then returned to the untreated level. Leakage of taurine into the medium increased with time of exposure, suggesting that exposure of AM to ozone results in a shift from bound to free intracellular taurine. These data indicate that in vitro exposure of AM to ozone results in a time-dependent alteration of cell function, membrane integrity, and viability.

  10. Effect of exposures to ambient ozone on ventilatory lung function in children

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, I.T.; D'Arcy, J.B.; Gibbons, D.I.; Avol, E.L.; Gross, K.B. )

    1990-05-01

    This study was undertaken to determine if the ventilatory capacity of children is affected by hourly concentrations of ozone inhaled during their daily activity. Over a 3-wk period children who were attending a summer camp in the San Bernardino mountains of California performed spirometry up to three times per day during their stay at the camp. Ozone, oxides of nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, temperature, and relative humidity were measured continuously. Daily average measurements of total suspended particulate and the PM10 particulate fraction were also made. Hourly ozone concentrations at the time of testing varied between 20 and 245 ppb. Regressions of each individual's FEV1 and FVC supported the view that high ozone levels reduced these lung function parameters. The average regression coefficient for FEV1 on ozone was -0.39 ml/ppb (SEM = 0.12) and for FVC -0.44 ml/ppb (SEM = 0.15), both of which were significantly different from zero. Statistical allowance for temperature and humidity increased the magnitude of these slopes. Nitrogen dioxide never exceeded 40 ppb during the time of testing and averaged 13 ppb. Sulfur dioxide's highest measurement was 8 ppb and often was at the limit of detection. Neither NO2 nor SO2 was considered in the statistical modeling. Data were divided based on whether each subject had been exposed to levels of ozone in excess of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) during the several hours previous to being tested. Exposures exceeding the NAAQS indicated a significant negative relationship between ozone and FEV1, FVC, and PEFR. Data for nonexceedance periods did not indicate this negative relationship for any of the three lung function parameters, but it could not be determined if this was due to an absence of an ozone effect or to a combination of the increased variability and decreased size of this data subset.

  11. Structural and biochemical effects in lungs of Japanese quail following a 1-week exposure to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Rombout, P.J.; Dormans, J.A.; van Bree, L.; Marra, M. )

    1991-02-01

    The effect of ozone inhalation on birds was investigated. Japanese quail were exposed continuously to 0, 0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/m3 ozone (0, 0.15, 0.50, and 1.50 ppm, respectively) for 7 days. Pulmonary effects were determined by light and electron microscopy as well as by biochemistry. Focal areas of hemorrhages were noticed in the birds exposed to 1.0 mg/m3 ozone. Additional effects after exposure to 1 mg/m3 included loss of cilia in trachea and bronchi, an inflammatory response, and necrosis of air capillary epithelial cells. Following exposure to 3 mg/m3 many atria of tertiary bronchi were completely obstructed by extensive hemorrhages, metaplasia of atrial wall cells, and hypertrophy of smooth muscle cells. Lung biochemistry data revealed that in the 3 mg/m3 group lactate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and glutathione reductase activities were significantly increased. In the 0.3 and 1.0 mg/m3 exposure groups no effects on lung antioxidant enzymes were observed. In conclusion, Japanese quail appear to respond to ozone exposure in a different way than mammals. Since no signs of repair in air capillary epithelium after 7 days of continuous exposure were observed, the quail seems to lack the morphological and biochemical repair ability as is observed in mammals. Therefore, more research of the effects of ozone on birds seems to be necessary, both from a mechanistic and an ecological point of view.

  12. Overview of ozone human exposure and health risk analyses used in the U.S. EPA's review of the ozone air quality standard.

    SciTech Connect

    Whitfield, R. G.

    1999-03-04

    This paper presents an overview of the ozone human exposure and health risk analyses developed under sponsorship of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These analyses are being used in the current review of the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone. The analyses consist of three principal steps: (1) estimating short-term ozone exposure for particular populations (exposure model); (2) estimating population response to exposures or concentrations (exposure-response or concentration-response models); and (3) integrating concentrations or exposure with concentration-response or exposure-response models to produce overall risk estimates (risk model). The exposure model, called the probabilistic NAAQS exposure model for ozone (pNEM/03), incorporates the following factors: hourly ambient ozone concentrations; spatial distribution of concentrations; ventilation state of individuals at time of exposure; and movement of people through various microenvironments (e.g., outdoors, indoors, inside a vehicle) of varying air quality. Exposure estimates are represented by probability distributions. Exposure-response relationships have been developed for several respiratory symptom and lung function health effects, based on the results of controlled human exposure studies. These relationships also are probabilistic and reflect uncertainties associated with sample size and variability of response among subjects. The analyses also provide estimates of excess hospital admissions in the New York City area based on results from an epidemiology study. Overall risk results for selected health endpoints and recently analyzed air quality scenarios associated with alternative 8-hour NAAQS and the current 1-hour standard for outdoor children are used to illustrate application of the methodology.

  13. Short-Term Exposure to Ozone Does Not Impair Vascular Function or Affect Heart Rate Variability in Healthy Young Men

    PubMed Central

    Barath, Stefan; Langrish, Jeremy P.; Blomberg, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Air pollution exposure is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, yet the role of individual pollutants remains unclear. In particular, there is uncertainty regarding the acute effect of ozone exposure on cardiovascular disease. In these studies, we aimed to determine the effect of ozone exposure on vascular function, fibrinolysis, and the autonomic regulation of the heart. Thirty-six healthy men were exposed to ozone (300 ppb) and filtered air for 75min on two occasions in randomized double-blind crossover studies. Bilateral forearm blood flow (FBF) was measured using forearm venous occlusion plethysmography before and during intra-arterial infusions of vasodilators 2–4 and 6–8h after each exposure. Heart rhythm and heart rate variability (HRV) were monitored during and 24h after exposure. Compared with filtered air, ozone exposure did not alter heart rate, blood pressure, or resting FBF at either 2 or 6h. There was a dose-dependent increase in FBF with all vasodilators that was similar after both exposures at 2–4h. Ozone exposure did not impair vasomotor or fibrinolytic function at 6–8h but rather increased vasodilatation to acetylcholine (p = .015) and sodium nitroprusside (p = .005). Ozone did not affect measures of HRV during or after the exposure. Our findings do not support a direct rapid effect of ozone on vascular function or cardiac autonomic control although we cannot exclude an effect of chronic exposure or an interaction between ozone and alternative air pollutants that may be responsible for the adverse cardiovascular health effects attributed to ozone. PMID:23872581

  14. PROTEIN ACCUMULATION IN LUNG LAVAGE FLUID FOLLOWING OZONE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accumulation of protein in lung lavage fluid was used as an indicator of pulmonary damage following exposure of guinea pigs to 03. Exposure of animals to 510, 1000 or 1960 micrograms/cu. m. (O.26, 0.51 or 1.0 ppm) of O3 for 72 hours resulted in significantly elevated levels of la...

  15. Transmission electron microscopy study of stress-ruptured aged 304H stainless steel after prolonged exposure in service

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, A.; Balogh, M.

    1996-12-01

    Type 304H stainless steel is widely used for long-term, high-temperature applications, e.g., superheater tubes in steam generators. The 304H stainless steel tube in the present investigation has been exposed in service to a temperature range of 565 to 595 C for a prolonged period (in excess of 20 years). Metallographic and transmission electron microscopic analysis was carried out on exposed material to study the nature and type of precipitates formed in this material after prolonged exposure in service.

  16. Transmission electron microscopy study of stress- ruptured aged 304h stainless steel after prolonged exposure in service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, A.; Balogh, M.

    1996-12-01

    Type 304H stainless steel is widely used for long- term, high- temperature applications, e.g., superheater tubes in steam generators. The 304H stainless steel tube in the present investigation has been exposed in service to a temperature range of 565 to 595 °C for a prolonged period (in excess of 20 years). Metallographic and transmission electron microscopic analysis was carried out on exposed material to study the nature and type of precipitates formed in this material after prolonged exposure in service.

  17. Plasmodium berghei infection in mice: effect of low-level ozone exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, G.S.; Calabrese, E.J.; Molteni, K.H.

    1984-07-01

    Animal and human studies have accumulated that report erythrocyte effects from inhaled ozone (O/sub 3/). It was the purpose of this research to demonstrate the effects of O/sub 3/ exposure on the course of parasitemia in mice. A study was designed utilizing Plasmodium berghei, a murine malarial parasite host-specific for rodents, as the specific pathogen. The purpose of this project was to study mortality and percent parasitemia in the A/J mouse first infected with P. berghei and then exposed to low levels of ozone.

  18. A probabilistic assessment of health risks associated with short-term exposure to tropospheric ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Whitfield, R.G; Biller, W.F.; Jusko, M.J.; Keisler, J.M.

    1996-06-01

    The work described in this report is part of a larger risk assessment sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Earlier efforts developed exposure-response relationships for acute health effects among populations engaged in heavy exertion. Those efforts also developed a probabilistic national ambient air quality standards exposure model and a general methodology for integrating probabilistic exposure-response relation- ships and exposure estimates to calculate overall risk results. Recently published data make it possible to model additional health endpoints (for exposure at moderate exertion), including hospital admissions. New air quality and exposure estimates for alternative national ambient air quality standards for ozone are combined with exposure-response models to produce the risk results for hospital admissions and acute health effects. Sample results explain the methodology and introduce risk output formats.

  19. Incorporation of glucose carbons into rat lung lipids after exposure to 0.6 ppm ozone.

    PubMed

    Bassett, D J; Rabinowitz, J L

    1985-05-01

    Continuous exposure to low concentrations of ozone has previously been associated with proliferation of lung alveolar type II epithelial cells. In this study, 14C incorporation into tissue lipids was determined in isolated rat lungs by perfusion with [U-14C]glucose, at a time of maximal hyperplasia brought about by 3 days continuous exposure to 0.6 ppm ozone. Ozone exposed lungs exhibited increased rates of glycolytic energy production, indicated by an 89% increase in 3H2O generation on perfusion with [5-3H]glucose, from a control value of 17.5 +/- 2.1 mumol X h-1 X g-1 X dry wt-1 (+/- SE, n = 4). Ozone exposure resulted in enhanced 14C incorporations into glyceride-glycerol and fatty acid moieties of lung lipids of 95 and 180%, respectively, with a greater proportion of label being recovered in shorter chain fatty acids. Although increased labeling was observed in both neutral and phospholipids, the pattern of 14C recovery suggested a relative increased glucose carbon incorporation into lung free fatty acids, phosphatidic acid, and such membrane associated lipids as phosphatidylinositol and those containing sphingosine. These results are consistent with the needs of a dividing cell population for enhanced energy production and synthesis of new lipids. PMID:3993775

  20. Early life exposure to allergen and ozone results in altered development in adolescent rhesus macaque lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, M.J.; Putney, L.F.; St George, J.A.; Avdalovic, M.V.; Schelegle, E.S.; Miller, L.A.; Hyde, D.M.

    2015-02-15

    In rhesus macaques, previous studies have shown that episodic exposure to allergen alone or combined with ozone inhalation during the first 6 months of life results in a condition with many of the hallmarks of asthma. This exposure regimen results in altered development of the distal airways and parenchyma (Avdalovic et al., 2012). We hypothesized that the observed alterations in the lung parenchyma would be permanent following a long-term recovery in filtered air (FA) housing. Forty-eight infant rhesus macaques (30 days old) sensitized to house dust mite (HDM) were treated with two week cycles of FA, house dust mite allergen (HDMA), ozone (O{sub 3}) or HDMA/ozone (HDMA + O{sub 3}) for five months. At the end of the five months, six animals from each group were necropsied. The other six animals in each group were allowed to recover in FA for 30 more months at which time they were necropsied. Design-based stereology was used to estimate volumes of lung components, number of alveoli, size of alveoli, distribution of alveolar volumes, interalveolar capillary density. After 30 months of recovery, monkeys exposed to HDMA, in either group, had significantly more alveoli than filtered air. These alveoli also had higher capillary densities as compared with FA controls. These results indicate that early life exposure to HDMA alone or HDMA + O{sub 3} alters the development process in the lung alveoli. - Highlights: • Abnormal lung development after postnatal exposure to ozone and allergen • This remodeling is shown as smaller, more numerous alveoli and narrower airways. • Allergen appears to have more of an effect than ozone during recovery. • These animals also have continued airway hyperresponsiveness (Moore et al. 2014)

  1. Protein cross-linking and oligomerization through dityrosine formation upon exposure to ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fobang; Kampf, Christopher; Reinmuth-Selzle, Kathrin; Berkemeier, Thomas; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Air pollution is a potential factor for the increasing prevalence of allergic diseases. Airborne allergenic proteins can be directly exposed to air pollution promoting post-translational modifications, which can enhance the allergenic potential of proteins. The formation of dimers or oligomers of allergenic proteins has been reported to result in an enhanced allergenicity. However, the oligomerization process for proteins at atmospherically relevant concentration of O3 is still largely unknown. In this study, the kinetics and reaction mechanism of protein oligomerization upon ozone exposure were studied at atmospherically relevant ozone concentrations and relative humidity (RH) in coated-wall flow tube experiments. Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) was used as a model protein. Protein ozone exposure was studied for different protein phase-states, i.e. amorphous solid (45% RH experiments), semi-solid (96% RH experiments) and liquid (bulk solution experiments) to account for the differences of phase in atmospheric particulates, e.g., aerosol particles and cloud droplets. Product analysis was performed using a size exclusion chromatography-high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector (SEC-HPLC-DAD). We demonstrate that protein cross-linking upon ozone exposure can be attributed to the formation of covalent intermolecular dityrosine species by gel electrophoretic and fluorescence spectroscopic methods. The exposure experiments indicate that in addition to ozone concentration, the oligomerization process was depending on the phase-state of protein. In liquid-phase experiments, dimer formation was significantly enhanced, thus indicating a potential relevance of in-cloud processes for protein oligomerization. The reactive turnover is higher at 96% RH compared to 45% RH, indicating a higher bulk diffusion coefficient at high RH, which is explicitly resolved by kinetic modeling. Further, the reactive turnover showed a strong correlation to particle surface

  2. Prolonged exposure to high and variable phenylalanine levels over the lifetime predicts brain white matter integrity in children with phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Hood, Anna; Antenor-Dorsey, Jo Ann V; Rutlin, Jerrel; Hershey, Tamara; Shimony, Joshua S; McKinstry, Robert C; Grange, Dorothy K; Christ, Shawn E; Steiner, Robert; White, Desiree A

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we retrospectively examined the microstructural white matter integrity of children with early- and continuously-treated PKU (N=36) in relation to multiple indices of phenylalanine (Phe) control over the lifetime. White matter integrity was assessed using mean diffusivity (MD) from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Eight lifetime indices of Phe control were computed to reflect average Phe (mean, index of dietary control), variability in Phe (standard deviation, standard error of estimate, % spikes), change in Phe with age (slope), and prolonged exposure to Phe (mean exposure, standard deviation exposure). Of these indices, mean Phe, mean exposure, and standard deviation exposure were the most powerful predictors of widespread microstructural white matter integrity compromise. Findings from the two previously unexamined exposure indices reflected the accumulative effects of elevations and variability in Phe. Given that prolonged exposure to elevated and variable Phe was particularly detrimental to white matter integrity, Phe should be carefully monitored and controlled throughout childhood, without liberalization of Phe control as children with PKU age. PMID:25481106

  3. Prolonged Exposure to High and Variable Phenylalanine Levels over the Lifetime Predicts Brain White Matter Integrity in Children with Phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Anna; Antenor-Dorsey, Jo Ann V.; Rutlin, Jerrel; Hershey, Tamara; Shimony, Joshua S.; McKinstry, Robert C.; Grange, Dorothy K.; Christ, Shawn E.; Steiner, Robert; White, Desiree A.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we retrospectively examined the microstructural white matter integrity of children with early- and continuously-treated PKU (N = 36) in relation to multiple indices of phenylalanine (Phe) control over the lifetime. White matter integrity was assessed using mean diffusivity (MD) from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Eight lifetime indices of Phe control were computed to reflect average Phe (mean, index of dietary control), variability in Phe (standard deviation, standard error of estimate, % spikes), change in Phe with age (slope), and prolonged exposure to Phe (mean exposure, standard deviation exposure). Of these indices, mean Phe, mean exposure, and standard deviation exposure were the most powerful predictors of widespread microstructural white matter integrity compromise. Findings from the two previously unexamined exposure indices reflected the accumulative effects of elevations and variability in Phe. Given that prolonged exposure to elevated and variable Phe was particularly detrimental to white matter integrity, Phe should be carefully monitored and controlled throughout childhood, without liberalization of Phe control as children with PKU age. PMID:25481106

  4. Vestibulo-Cervico-Ocular Responses and Tracking Eye Movements after Prolonged Exposure to Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kornilova, L. N.; Naumov, I. A.; Azarov, K. A.; Sagalovitch, S. V.; Reschke, Millard F.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.

    2007-01-01

    The vestibular function and tracking eye movements were investigated in 12 Russian crew members of ISS missions on days 1(2), 4(5-6), and 8(9-10) after prolonged exposure to microgravity (126 to 195 days). The spontaneous oculomotor activity, static torsional otolith-cervico-ocular reflex, dynamic vestibulo-cervico-ocular responses, vestibular reactivity, tracking eye movements, and gaze-holding were studied using videooculography (VOG) and electrooculography (EOG) for parallel eye movement recording. On post-flight days 1-2 (R+1-2) some cosmonauts demonstrated: - an increased spontaneous oculomotor activity (floating eye movements, spontaneous nystagmus of the typical and atypical form, square wave jerks, gaze nystagmus) with the head held in the vertical position; - suppressed otolith function (absent or reduced by one half amplitude of torsional compensatory eye counter-rolling) with the head inclined statically right- or leftward by 300; - increased vestibular reactivity (lowered threshold and increased intensity of the vestibular nystagmus) during head turns around the longitudinal body axis at 0.125 Hz; - a significant change in the accuracy, velocity, and temporal characteristics of the eye tracking. The pattern, depth, dynamics, and velocity of the vestibular function and tracking eye movements recovery varied with individual participants in the investigation. However, there were also regular responses during readaptation to the normal gravity: - suppression of the otolith function was typically accompanied by an exaggerated vestibular reactivity; - the structure of visual tracking (the accuracy of fixational eye rotations, smooth tracking, and gaze-holding) was disturbed (the appearance of correcting saccades, the transition of smooth tracking to saccadic tracking) only in those cosmonauts who, in parallel to an increased reactivity of the vestibular input, also had central changes in the oculomotor system (spontaneous nystagmus, gaze nystagmus).

  5. Cerebral volumetric changes induced by prolonged hypoxic exposure and whole-body exercise.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Thomas; Jubeau, Marc; Lamalle, Laurent; Warnking, Jan M; Millet, Guillaume Y; Wuyam, Bernard; Esteve, François; Levy, Patrick; Krainik, Alexandre; Verges, Samuel

    2014-11-01

    The present study assessed the isolated and synergetic effects of hypoxic exposure and prolonged exercise on cerebral volume and subedema and symptoms of acute mountain sickness (AMS). Twelve healthy males performed three semirandomized blinded 11-hour sessions with (1) an inspiratory oxygen fraction (FiO2) of 12% and 4-hour cycling, (2) FiO2=21% and 4-hour cycling, and (3) FiO2=8.5% to 12% at rest (matching arterial oxygen saturation measured during the first hypoxic session). Volumetric, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and arterial spin labelling 3T magnetic resonance imaging sequences were performed after 30 minutes and 10 hours in each session. Thirty minutes of hypoxia at rest induced a significant increase in white-matter volume (+0.8±1.0% compared with normoxia) that was exacerbated after 10 hours of hypoxia at rest (+1.5±1.1%) or with cycling (+1.6±1.1%). Total brain parenchyma volume increased significantly after 10 hours of hypoxia with cycling only (+1.3±1.1%). Apparent diffusion coefficient was significantly reduced after 10 hours of hypoxia at rest or with cycling. No significant change in cerebral blood flow was observed. These results demonstrate changes in white-matter volume as early as after 30 minutes of hypoxia that worsen after 10 hours, probably due to cytotoxic edema. Exercise accentuates the effect of hypoxia by increasing total brain volume. These changes do not however correlate with AMS symptoms. PMID:25160673

  6. Tissue deoxygenation kinetics induced by prolonged hypoxic exposure in healthy humans at rest.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Thomas; Leti, Thomas; Jubeau, Marc; Millet, Guillaume Y; Bricout, Veronique A; Levy, Patrick; Wuyam, Bernard; Perrey, Stephane; Verges, Samuel

    2013-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of sustained hypoxic exposure on cerebral and muscle oxygenation and cardiorespiratory function at rest. Eleven healthy subjects inhaled a normobaric hypoxic (FiO2=0.12) or normoxic (FiO2=0.21) gas mixture for 4 h at rest, on two separated blinded sessions. Arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2), heart rate variability (HRV), end-tidal CO2 (EtCO2), and oxygenation of quadriceps muscle, prefrontal and motor cortices assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) were measured continuously during each session. Acute mountain sickness symptoms were evaluated at the end of each session. During a hypoxic session, SpO2 reduction (∼13%) plateaued after 20 min, while deoxygenation pattern took 30 to 40 min at the cerebral sites to plateau (+5.3±1.6  μMol of deoxygenated-hemoglobin). Deoxygenation was more pronounced in the cerebral cortex compared to the muscle (+2.1±2.3  μMol of deoxygenated-hemoglobin), and NIRS-derived tissue perfusion index showed distinct profiles between the muscle (hypoperfusion) and the brain (hyperperfusion) with prolonged hypoxia. Changes in tissue oxygenation were not associated with cardiorespiratory responses (e.g., HRV, EtCO2) and altitude sickness symptom appearance during hypoxic sessions. These data demonstrate that sustained hypoxia elicits time delay in changes between arterial and tissue (especially cerebral) oxygenation, as well as a tissue-specific sensitivity. PMID:24064948

  7. Nutritional considerations during prolonged exposure to a confined, hyperbaric, hyperoxic environment: recommendations for saturation divers.

    PubMed

    Deb, S K; Swinton, P A; Dolan, E

    2016-01-01

    Saturation diving is an occupation that involves prolonged exposure to a confined, hyperoxic, hyperbaric environment. The unique and extreme environment is thought to result in disruption to physiological and metabolic homeostasis, which may impact human health and performance. Appropriate nutritional intake has the potential to alleviate and/or support many of these physiological and metabolic concerns, whilst enhancing health and performance in saturation divers. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to identify the physiological and practical challenges of saturation diving and consequently provide evidence-based nutritional recommendations for saturation divers to promote health and performance within this challenging environment. Saturation diving has a high-energy demand, with an energy intake of between 44 and 52 kcal/kg body mass per day recommended, dependent on intensity and duration of underwater activity. The macronutrient composition of dietary intake is in accordance with the current Institute of Medicine guidelines at 45-65 % and 20-35 % of total energy intake for carbohydrate and fat intake, respectively. A minimum daily protein intake of 1.3 g/kg body mass is recommended to facilitate body composition maintenance. Macronutrient intake between individuals should, however, be dictated by personal preference to support the attainment of an energy balance. A varied diet high in fruit and vegetables is highly recommended for the provision of sufficient micronutrients to support physiological processes, such as vitamin B12 and folate intake to facilitate red blood cell production. Antioxidants, such as vitamin C and E, are also recommended to reduce oxidised molecules, e.g. free radicals, whilst selenium and zinc intake may be beneficial to reinforce endogenous antioxidant reserves. In addition, tailored hydration and carbohydrate fueling strategies for underwater work are also advised. PMID:26744625

  8. Ozone changes under solar geoengineering: implications for UV exposure and air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowack, P. J.; Abraham, N. L.; Braesicke, P.; Pyle, J. A.

    2015-11-01

    Various forms of geoengineering have been proposed to counter anthropogenic climate change. Methods which aim to modify the Earth's energy balance by reducing insolation are often subsumed under the term Solar Radiation Management (SRM). Here, we present results of a standard SRM modelling experiment in which the incoming solar irradiance is reduced to offset the global mean warming induced by a quadrupling of atmospheric carbon dioxide. For the first time in an atmosphere-ocean coupled climate model, we include atmospheric composition feedbacks such as ozone changes under this scenario. Including the composition changes, we find large reductions in surface UV-B irradiance, with implications for vitamin D production, and increases in surface ozone concentrations, both of which could be important for human health. We highlight that both tropospheric and stratospheric ozone changes should be considered in the assessment of any SRM scheme, due to their important roles in regulating UV exposure and air quality.

  9. Impact of asthma, exposure period, and filters on human responses during exposures to ozone and its initiated chemistry products.

    PubMed

    Fadeyi, M O; Tham, K W; Wu, W Y

    2015-10-01

    The impact of asthma, exposure period, and filter condition downstream of the mixing box of air-conditioning system on building occupants' perceptual response, work performance, and salivary α-amylase secretion during exposures to ozone and its initiated chemistry products is studied. The experiments were conducted in a field environmental chamber (FEC) (240 m(3)) simulating an office environment. Experiments were conducted during periods when the air-handling system operated with new or used pleated panel filters at constant recirculation (7/h) and ventilation (1/h) rates. Average ozone and secondary organic aerosols (ozone-initiated chemistry products) measured during non-asthmatic and asthmatic subjects' 3-h exposures in the FEC were in the ranges approximately 20-37 ppb and approximately 1.6-3 μg/m(3), respectively. Asthmatic subjects' perceived odor intensity and sensory (eye, nose, and throat) irritation ratings were generally lower than those of non-asthmatic subjects, possibly explaining why asthmatic subjects accept perceived air quality more than non-asthmatic subjects. However, asthmatic subjects' perceived physiological-like symptom ratings (flu, chest tightness, and headache) and concentrations of secreted salivary α-amylase were generally higher than those of non-asthmatic subjects. Asthmatic subjects had significantly lower accuracy than non-asthmatic subjects in a task that required higher concentration although they had higher work speed. Filter condition did not make any significant difference for subjects' responses. PMID:25250543

  10. Exposure of surfactant protein A to ozone in vitro and in vivo impairs its interactions with alveolar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Oosting, R.S.; Van Iwaarden, J.F.; Van Bree, L.; Verhoef, J.; Van Golde, L.M.; Haagsman, H.P. )

    1992-01-01

    This study focused on the question of whether exposure of surfactant protein A (SP-A) to ozone affected properties of this protein that may be involved in regulating alveolar type II cell and alveolar macrophage functions. In vitro exposure of human or canine SP-A to ozone reduced the ability of this protein to inhibit phorbol-ester induced secretion of (3H)phosphatidylcholine by alveolar type II cells in culture. Ozone-exposed human SP-A showed a decreased ability to enhance phagocytosis of herpes simplex virus and to stimulate superoxide anion production by alveolar macrophages. Experiments with elastase showed that ozone-exposed canine SP-A was more susceptible to proteolysis. A conformational change of the protein could underlie this phenomenon. Surfactant isolated from ozone-exposed rats (0.4 ppm ozone for 12 h) was also less able to stimulate superoxide anion production by alveolar macrophages than surfactant from control rats, which suggested that SP-A in vivo was also susceptible to ozone. The results of this study suggest that SP-A-alveolar cell interactions can be inhibited by ozone exposure, which may contribute to the toxicity of ozone in the lungs.

  11. Interaction of ozone exposure with airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation induced by trimellitic anhydride in sensitized guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jian; Chung, K.Fan

    1997-09-01

    The effect of prior ozone (O{sub 3}) exposure on airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation induced by trimellitic anhydride (TMA) has been investigated in TMA-sensitized guinea pigs. Airway responsiveness was measured as the concentration of acetylcholine needed to increase baseline lung resistance (RL) by 300% (PC300). Ozone (3 ppm, for 3 h) caused an increase in-log PC300 at 1 h after exposure, with return of -log PC300 to control levels at 8 h. Ozone also increased baseline RL at 8 h. TMA challenge increase -log PC300 in TMA-sensitized guinea pigs at 8 h after challenge from 3.85 {+-} 0.09 to 4.11 {+-} 0.09. Ozone exposure prior to TMA challenge prevented the induction of airway hyperresponsiveness with a mean -log PC300 of 3.51 {+-} 0.20, which was not different from that of control TMA-Sensitized group. Baseline RL was significantly higher in ozone-pretreated animals after TMA challenge when compared to those of either control or challenged with TMA alone. Ozone had no effect on TMA challenge-induced BAL eosinophilia and neutrophilia. We conclude that a single exposure to ozone inhibits the increase in airway responsiveness, but increases the bronchoconstrictor response induced by TMA in TMA-Sensitized guinea pigs; however, the inflammatory airway response to TMA is unchanged by preexposure to ozone. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Pulmonary response to exposure to ozone of emphysematous rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, E.; Nambu, Z.; Ichikawa, I.; Uchiyama, I.; Arakawa, H.

    1987-02-01

    Rats were treated with a single intratracheal instillation of 6.5 units elastase or normal saline. Seven weeks after treatment, the animals were exposed for 24 hr to filtered air or 1 ppm O3, and their lung functions were measured. The exposure to O3 resulted in functional changes depending mainly on peripheral airway obstruction, and the direction and degree of those functional changes were in general similar between the saline- and elastase-treated animals. Another group of saline- or elastase-treated rats were exposed to 3 ppm O3 for 3 hr and the edematous response of their lungs was again similar. These results indicate that elastase-treated lungs responded to the exposure to O3 in a fashion similar to normal lungs in rats, but lung damage caused by the exposure to O3 superimposed over preexisting emphysematous damage, resulted in an additional lessening of the margin of pulmonary reserve capacity.

  13. Growth response of Pinus ponderosa seedlings and mature tree branches to acid rain and ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, P.D.; Houpis, J.L.J.; Helms, J.A.

    1994-10-01

    Forests of the central and southern Sierra Nevada in California have been subjected to chronic damage by ozone and other atmospheric pollutants for the past several decades. Until recently, pollutant exposure of northern Sierra Nevada forests has been mild but increasing population and changes in land use throughout the Sacramento Valley and Sierra Nevada foothills may lead to increased pollutant damage in these forests. Although, better documented in other regions of the United States, little is known regarding the potential for acidic precipitation damage to Sierra Nevada forests. Only recently have studies directed towards understanding the potential interactive effects of ozone and acidic precipitation been undertaken. A key issue in resolving potential regional impacts of pollutants on forests is the extent to which research results can be scaled across genotypes and life-stages. Most of the pollution research to date has been performed using seedlings with varying degrees of genetic control. It is important to determine if the results obtained in such studies can be extrapolated to mature trees and to different genetic sources. In this paper, we present results from a one-year study examining the interactive effects of foliar exposure to acidic rain and ozone on the growth of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), a conifer known to be sensitive to ozone. The response to pollutants is characterized for both seedlings and mature tree branches of three genotypes grown in a common environment.

  14. Source contributions to seasonal vegetative exposure to ozone in the US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapina, K.; Henze, D. K.; Milford, J.; Huang, M.; Lin, M.; Pfister, G.; Emmons, L. K.; Fiore, A. M.; Boynard, A.; Carmichael, G. R.; Sandiford, V.; Herrick, J. D.; Dutton, S.; Smith, T.; Porter, E. M.

    2012-12-01

    Frequent exposure to high levels of ozone leads to vegetation damage and can result in substantial economic losses. A cumulative ozone exposure metric, W126, has been considered by the US EPA for use as a secondary ozone standard. Information on source regions contributing to the non-attainment of this standard is crucial for developing a successful strategy to mitigate the negative effects of ozone on vegetation. In this work we quantify W126 source contributions for the US regions exceeding selected levels of the W126 standard by applying several source attribution techniques, including "tagging", emissions perturbation and adjoint sensitivity analysis, to a suite of five global and regional chemical transport models. We estimate the W126 North American background (defined as the W126 levels in the absence of North American anthropogenic emissions) and separate source contributions by sector and country of origin. Our calculations are performed for two periods in 2008 and 2010 and are compared to the W126 observations from the Air Quality System and CASTNET. Given that the W126 metric is highly non-linear, we discuss the pros and cons of the applied source attribution methods and the applicability of the results.

  15. Providing perspective for interpreting cardiovascular mortality risks associated with ozone exposures.

    PubMed

    Petito Boyce, Catherine; Goodman, Julie E; Sax, Sonja N; Loftus, Christine T

    2015-06-01

    When identifying standards for air pollutants based on uncertain evidence, both science and policy judgments play critical roles. Consequently, critical contextual factors are important for understanding the strengths, limitations, and appropriate interpretation of available science, and potential benefits of risk mitigation alternatives. These factors include the relative magnitude and certainty of the risks posed by various factors and the impacts of other risk factors on air pollutant epidemiology study findings. This commentary explores ozone's status as a risk factor for cardiovascular mortality in contrast with decades of strong and consistent evidence for other established risk factors. By comparison, the ozone evidence is less conclusive, more heterogeneous, and subject to substantial uncertainty; ozone's potential effects, if any, are small and challenging to discern. Moreover, the absence of a demonstrated causal relationship calls into question efforts to quantify cardiovascular mortality risks attributed to ozone exposures on a population level and highlights the need to explicitly acknowledge this uncertainty if such calculations are performed. These concerns are relevant for other similar policy contexts - where multiple established risk factors contribute to the health impact of interest; exposure-effect associations are relatively small, weak, and uncertain; and a causal relationship has not been clearly established. PMID:25817736

  16. Respiratory responses of subjects with allergic rhinitis to ozone exposure and their relationship to nonspecific airway reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, W.F.; Horstman, D.H.; Abdul-Salaam, S.; Raggio, L.J.; Green, J.A.

    1987-12-01

    Ozone exposure in man produces changes in respiratory function and symptoms. There is a large degree of unexplained intersubject variability in the magnitude of these responses. There is concern that individuals with chronic respiratory diseases may also be more responsive to ozone than normal individuals. The purpose of this study was to describe the responses of subjects with allergic rhinitis to ozone exposure and to compare these responses to those previously observed in normal individuals. A further purpose was to measure the association of baseline nonspecific airway reactivity with changes in lung function and respiratory symptoms following ozone exposure. A group of 26 nonasthmatic subjects with allergic rhinitis performed a bronchial inhalation challenge with histamine and subsequently underwent two hour exposures to both clean air and to 0.18 part per million ozone with alternating periods of rest and heavy exercise. The airway reactivity of this group of subjects was no greater than that of a comparable group of subjects without allergic rhinitis. The respiratory responses of these subjects to ozone exposure were similar to those previously reported for subjects without allergic rhinitis with the exception that the allergic rhinitis subjects appeared to have a modestly increased bronchoconstrictor response compared to normals. Furthermore, we observed no significant relationships between nonspecific airway reactivity and response to ozone as measured by changes in lung function or the induction of symptoms.

  17. A Genome-Wide mRNA Expression Profile in Caenorhabditis elegans under Prolonged Exposure to 1750MHz Radiofrequency Fields

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Dawen; Yu, Zhoulong; Wu, Tongning; Zhang, Chenggang

    2016-01-01

    Objective C. elegans has been used as a biomonitor for microwave-induced stress. However, the RF (radiofrequency) fields that have been used in previous studies were weak (≤1.8W/kg), and the bio-effects on C. elegans were mostly negative or ambiguous. Therefore, this study used more intense RF fields (SAR = 3W/kg) and longer time course of exposure (60h at 25°C, L1 stage through adult stage) to investigate the biological consequences of 1750 MHz RF fields in wild-type worms. Methods The growth rates and lifespans of RF-exposure group and the control group were carefully recorded. RNA samples were collected at L4 (35h) and gravid adult (50h) stages for further high-throughput sequencing, focusing on differences between the RF-exposure and the sham control groups. Results The RF-exposed and sham control groups developed at almost the same rate and had similar longevity curves. In L4 stage worms, 94 up-regulated and 17 down-regulated genes were identified, while 186 up-regulated and 3 down-regulated genes were identified in adult stage worms. GO analysis showed that the differentially expressed genes at 35h were associated with growth, body morphogenesis and collagen and cuticle-based development. Genes that were linked to growth rate and reproductive development were differentially expressed at 50h. Some embryonic and larval development genes in the offspring were also differentially expressed at 50h. Ten genes were differentially expressed at both 35h and 50h, most of which were involved in both embryonic and larval developmental processes. Although prolonged RF fields did not induce significant temperature increase in RF exposure groups, the temperature inside worms during exposure was unknown. Conclusions No harmful effects were observed in prolonged exposure to 1750 MHz RF fields at SAR of 3W/kg on development and longevity of C. elegans. Although some differentially expressed genes were found after prolonged RF exposure, these differences were ascribed to

  18. Inflammatory Cytokines and White Blood Cell Counts Response to Environmental Levels of Diesel Exhaust and Ozone Inhalation Exposures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological observations of urban inhalation exposures to diesel exhaust (DE) and ozone (O3) have shown pre-clinical cardiopulmonary responses in humans. Identifying the key biological mechanisms that initiate these health bioindicators is difficult due to variability in envi...

  19. The effect of ozone exposure on the dispersion of inhaled aerosol boluses in healthy human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, M.J.; Bennett, W.D.; DeWitt, P.; Seal, E.; Strong, A.A.; Gerrity, T.R. )

    1991-07-01

    Acute exposure of humans to low levels of ozone are known to cause decreases in FVC and increases in SRaw. These alterations in lung function do not, however, elucidate the potential for acute small airway responses. In this study we employed a test of aerosol dispersion to examine the potential effects of ozone on small airways in humans. Twenty-two healthy nonsmoking male volunteers were exposed to 0.4 ppm ozone for 1 h while exercising at 20 L/min/m2 body surface area. Before and immediately after exposure, tests of spirometry (FVC, FEV1, and FEF25-75) and plethysmography (Raw and SRaw) were performed. Subjects also performed an aerosol dispersion test before and after exposure. Each test involved a subject inhaling five to seven breaths of a 300-ml bolus of a 0.5 micron triphenyl phosphate aerosol injected into a 2-L tidal volume. The bolus was injected into the tidal breath at three different depths: at Depth A the bolus was injected after 1.6 L of clean air were inhaled from FRC, at Depth B after 1.2 L, and at Depth C after 1.2 L but with inhalation beginning from RV. The primary measure of bolus dispersion was the expired half-width (HW). Secondary measures were the ratio (expressed as percent) of peak exhaled aerosol concentration to peak inhaled concentration (PR), shift in the median bolus volume between inspiration and expiration (VS), and percent of total aerosol recovered (RC). Changes in pulmonary function after ozone exposure were consistent with previous findings.

  20. Effect of ozone exposure on the dispersion of inhaled aerosol boluses in healthy human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, M.J.; Bennett, W.D.; Dewitt, P.; Seal, E.; Strong, A.A.

    1990-12-06

    Acute exposure of humans to low levels of ozone are known to cause decreases FVC and increases sRaw. These alterations in lung function do not, however, elucidate the potential for acute small airways responses. In the study the authors employed a test of aerosol dispersion to examine the potential effects of ozone on small airways in humans. Twenty-two healthy non-smoking male volunteers were exposed to 0.4 ppm ozone for one hour while exercising at 20 l/min/m{sup 2} (BSA). Prior to and immediately following exposure, tests of spirometry (FVC, FEV1, and FEF25-75) and plethysmography (Raw and sRaw) were performed. Subjects also performed an aerosol dispersion test before and after exposure. Each test involved a subject inhaling five to seven breaths of a 300 ml bolus of a 0.5 micrometers triphenyl phosphate (TPP) aerosol injected into a 2 liters tidal volume. The bolus was injected into the tidal breath at three different depths: at depth A the bolus was injected after 1.6 liters of clean air was inhaled from FRC; at depth B after 1.2 liters; and at depth C after 1.2 liters but with inhalation beginning from RV. The primary measure of bolus dispersion was the expired half-width (HW).

  1. Ozone Exposure of Macrophages Induces an Alveolar Epithelial Chemokine Response through IL-1α

    PubMed Central

    Manzer, Rizwan; Dinarello, Charles A.; McConville, Glen; Mason, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Ozone is known to produce an acute influx of neutrophils, and alveolar epithelial cells can secrete chemokines and modulate inflammatory processes. However, direct exposure of alveolar epithelial cells and macrophages to ozone (O3) produces little chemokine response. To determine if cell–cell interactions might be responsible, we investigated the effect of alveolar macrophage–conditioned media after ozone exposure (MO3CM) on alveolar epithelial cell chemokine production. Serum-free media were conditioned by exposing a rat alveolar macrophage cell line NR8383 to ozone for 1 hour. Ozone stimulated secretion of IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-18 from NR8383 cells, but there was no secretion of chemokines or TNF-α. Freshly isolated type II cells were cultured, so as to express the biological markers of type I cells, and these cells are referred to as type I–like cells. Type I–like cells were exposed to diluted MO3CM for 24 hours, and this conditioned medium stimulated secretion of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemattractant-1 (CXCL1) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (CCL2). Secretion of these chemokines was inhibited by the IL-1 receptor antagonist. Although both recombinant IL-1α and IL-1β stimulated alveolar epithelial cells to secrete chemokines, recombinant IL-1α was 100-fold more potent than IL-1β. Furthermore, neutralizing anti-rat IL-1α antibodies inhibited the secretion of chemokines by alveolar epithelial cells, whereas neutralizing anti-rat IL-1β antibodies had no effect. These observations indicate that secretion of IL-1α from macrophages stimulates alveolar epithelial cells to secrete chemokines that can elicit an inflammatory response. PMID:17901407

  2. Effect of acute ozone exposure on the proteinase-antiproteinase balance in the rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, J.A.; Gregory, R.E.; Cole, D.J.; Hahn, F.F.; Henderson, R.F.

    1987-04-01

    Lung disease may result from a persisting proteinase excess or a depletion of antiproteinase in pulmonary parenchyma. We investigated the in vivo effect of a 48-hr exposure to ozone at 0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 ppm on proteinase and antiproteinase activity of rat lungs. Elastase inhibitory capacities of serum, lung tissue, and airway washings were measured as indicators of antielastase activity. Trypsin inhibitory capacity was measured using an esterolytic procedure. Proteinase was measured as radioactive release from a /sup 14/C-globin substrate. The 48-hr exposures to O/sub 3/ at levels up to 1 ppm produced concentration-dependent decreases of 35-80% of antiproteinase activities in serum and in lung tissue. However, exposure to 1.5 ppm O/sub 3/ resulted in no decrease in antiproteinase activities. Acid proteinase activities (pH 4.2) were increased 65-120% by exposure to 1 or 1.5 ppm O/sub 3/, which correlated with inflammatory cells noted histologically. At 1.5 ppm O/sub 3/, pulmonary edema and hemorrhage were noted in histologic sections. These changes led to a flooding of the alveoli with up to 40 times normal protein levels and a greater than fivefold increase in airway antiproteinase. These data suggest that serum and soluble lung tissue antiproteinase activity decreased upon exposure to low levels of ozone. However, if O/sub 3/ exposure is high enough to produce pulmonary hemorrhage, antiproteinase may increase following serum exudation. These changes may be important in the development of ozone-induced lung diseases, especially emphysema.

  3. Effect of acute ozone exposure on the proteinase-antiproteinase balance in the rat lung.

    PubMed

    Pickrell, J A; Gregory, R E; Cole, D J; Hahn, F F; Henderson, R F

    1987-04-01

    Lung disease may result from a persisting proteinase excess or a depletion of antiproteinase in pulmonary parenchyma. We investigated the in vivo effect of a 48-hr exposure to ozone at 0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 ppm on proteinase and antiproteinase activity of rat lungs. Elastase inhibitory capacities of serum, lung tissue, and airway washings were measured as indicators of antielastase activity. Trypsin inhibitory capacity was measured using an esterolytic procedure. Proteinase was measured as radioactive release from a 14C-globin substrate. The 48-hr exposures to O3 at levels up to 1 ppm produced concentration-dependent decreases of 35-80% of antiproteinase activities in serum and in lung tissue. However, exposure to 1.5 ppm O3 resulted in no decrease in antiproteinase activities. Acid proteinase activities (pH 4.2) were increased 65-120% by exposure to 1 or 1.5 ppm O3, which correlated with inflammatory cells noted histologically. At 1.5 ppm O3, pulmonary edema and hemorrhage were noted in histologic sections. These changes led to a flooding of the alveoli with up to 40 times normal protein levels and a greater than fivefold increase in airway antiproteinase. These data suggest that serum and soluble lung tissue antiproteinase activity decreased upon exposure to low levels of ozone. However, if O3 exposure is high enough to produce pulmonary hemorrhage, antiproteinase may increase following serum exudation. These changes may be important in the development of ozone-induced lung diseases, especially emphysema. PMID:3549351

  4. Effect of ozone exposure on the electrical characteristics of high-purity, large-diameter semiconducting carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jia; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2014-06-14

    In this study, we have elucidated the interactions between ozone and carbon nanotubes by monitoring the characteristics of field-effect transistors based on polymer-sorted, large-diameter semiconducting carbon nanotubes. The drain-source current of these transistors initially increases with ozone exposure and then it progressively decreases with increasing exposure beyond 3 min. This non-monotonic dependence of the drain-source current can be ascribed to two competing processes. At short ozone exposure, p-doping of carbon nanotubes dominates; the drain-source current thus increases as a result of increasing hole concentration. This effect is most evidenced in a progressive threshold voltage shift towards positive voltages with increasing exposure to ozone. At extended ozone exposure, chemical oxidation of carbon nanotubes instead dominates. The drain-source current decreases as a result of decreasing hole mobility. This effect manifests itself in a monotonic decrease in the mobility of these devices as a function of ozone exposure. PMID:24760174

  5. A morphological study of the effects of ozone on rat lung. I. Short-term exposure.

    PubMed

    Hiroshima, K; Kohno, T; Owada, H; Hayashi, Y

    1987-12-01

    In order to determine the effects of ozone on lungs and the course of cell renewal after damage, young male rats were exposed to 3 ppm of ozone for 4 hr. They were killed at 1, 6, 12, and 18 hr and 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, and 14 days after exposure. One hour before the killing, dividing cells were labeled with tritiated thymidine. Type 1 cells of centriacinar location and bronchiolar cells were severely damaged after exposure. Labeling indices of type 2 cells and bronchiolar nonciliated cells increased 1 day after exposure. Hyperplasia of type 2 cells and bronchiolar nonciliated cells was observed 2 and 3 days after exposure. Ciligenesis of bronchiolar ciliated cells occurred 4 days after exposure. Our study shows that injured type 1 cells are repaired by proliferation of type 2 cells and that injured bronchiolar ciliated and Clara cells are repaired by proliferation of bronchiolar nonciliated cells. These undifferentiated cells are probably progenitors of ciliated cells and Clara cells, and some nonciliated cells are in a transitional form between nonciliated and type 2 cells. PMID:3678465

  6. Characterization of anxiety-related responses in male rats following prolonged exposure to therapeutic doses of oral methylphenidate.

    PubMed

    Britton, Gabrielle B; Bethancourt, José A

    2009-10-01

    Increases in the rates of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis and the prescribed use of methylphenidate (MPH) in recent years have raised concerns over the potential effects of early MPH exposure on brain structure and function in adulthood. Animal studies have shown that long-term MPH exposure can modify anxiety-related behaviors and related neural circuitry in adulthood. The present study employed a battery of behavioral tests and repeated testing to assess the long-term effects of MPH exposure on anxious responding. Male Wistar rats beginning on post-natal day 27 were exposed to 4 or 7 weeks of twice daily MPH administration at doses of 2, 3, or 5 mg/kg. MPH was administered orally and on weekdays only in order to approximate drug treatment in clinical populations. Behavioral testing began 18 days following the last drug administration. Our results indicate that prolonged oral MPH treatment at therapeutic doses has little or no enduring effects on anxious behaviors. However, a comparison of MPH groups that received treatment for 4 or 7 weeks suggests that the two treatment periods influenced anxious behaviors in observably different manners in adulthood; namely, a more prolonged period of exposure produced less anxiety relative to the shorter period of MPH exposure as indicated by behaviors in the light-dark transition, elevated plus-maze, and fear conditioning tests. These findings were interpreted as evidence of the importance of considering length of drug exposure in pre-clinical studies aimed at investigating the effects of MPH exposure in ADHD populations. PMID:19540871

  7. Assessing ozone exposure for epidemiological studies in Malmö and Umeå, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmqvist, E.; Olsson, D.; Hagenbjörk-Gustafsson, A.; Forsberg, B.; Mattisson, K.; Stroh, E.; Strömgren, M.; Swietlicki, E.; Rylander, L.; Hoek, G.; Tinnerberg, H.; Modig, L.

    2014-09-01

    Ground level ozone [ozone] is considered a harmful air pollutant but there is a knowledge gap regarding its long term health effects. The main aim of this study is to develop local Land Use Regression [LUR] models that can be used to study long term health effects of ozone. The specific aim is to develop spatial LUR models for two Swedish cities, Umeå and Malmö, as well as a temporal model for Malmö in order to assess ozone exposure for long term epidemiological studies. For the spatial model we measured ozone, using Ogawa passive samplers, as weekly averages at 40 sites in each study area, during three seasons. This data was then inserted in the LUR-model with data on traffic, land use, population density and altitude to develop explanatory models of ozone variation. To develop the temporal model for Malmö, hourly ozone data was aggregated into daily means for two measurement stations in Malmö and one in a rural area outside Malmö. Using regression analyses we inserted meteorological variables into different temporal models and the one that performed best for all three stations was chosen. For Malmö the LUR-model had an adjusted model R2 of 0.40 and cross validation R2 of 0.17. For Umeå the model had an adjusted model R2 of 0.67 and cross validation adjusted R2 of 0.48. When restricting the model to only including measuring sites from urban areas, the Malmö model had adjusted model R2 of 0.51 (cross validation adjusted R2 0.33) and the Umeå model had adjusted model R2 of 0.81 (validation adjusted R2 of 0.73). The temporal model had adjusted model R2 0.54 and 0.61 for the two Malmö sites, the cross validation adjusted R2 was 0.42. In conclusion, we can with moderate accuracy, at least for Umeå, predict the spatial variability, and in Malmö the temporal variability in ozone variation.

  8. Cellular kinetics in the lungs of aging Fischer 344 rats after acute exposure to ozone.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, R.; Adamson, I. Y.

    1995-01-01

    Lung repair in aging Fischer 344 male rats was investigated after an acute inhalation exposure to ozone. Adult (9-month-old) and senescent (24-month-old) rats were exposed to 0.8 ppm ozone for a single period of 6 hours, and thereafter studied over 5 days of recovery in clean air. The animals were given intraperitoneal injections of colchicine and [3H]thymidine, 4 hours and 1.5 hours before termination, respectively. The lungs were inflated with glutaraldehyde, and tissue samples were embedded in epoxy resin for electron microscopy, or in glycol methacrylate for light-microscopic autoradiography. Exposure to ozone produced epithelial injury in alveolar ducts and terminal bronchioles, later reflected by the transient increase in mitotic activity of nonciliated bronchiolar cells and alveolar type 2 cells. The increase in metaphase-arrested cells and [3H]thymidine-labeled cells in bronchioles followed similar time courses, ie, maximal at days 1.5 to 2, and subsiding by day 3. In the alveoli, type 1 cell necrosis was observed early after exposure (6 hours recovery), without notable structural changes in the interstitial and endothelial compartments. The increased mitotic activity in the alveolar septa was mostly due to proliferation of epithelial type 2 cells, which was maximal at day 1.5, and of interstitial cells, maximal at day 2.5. The magnitude of the mitotic responses of nonciliated bronchiolar cells, alveolar type 2 cells and interstitial cells was highest (+50%) in the lungs of senescent rats. Although the cellular events during repair are essentially similar in both age groups, the results indicate that senescent rats have a significantly higher level of initial injury from inhalation of ozone than adult animals. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:7717445

  9. Ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    The author discusses the debate over whether concern about a hole in the ozone layer in Antarctic is real or science fiction. There is a growing consensus that efforts must be taken to protect the ozone layer. The issue now is not whether chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) should be controlled and regulated but how much and how soon. The United States has urged that the production of dangerous CFCs, and any other chemicals that affect the ozone layer, be restricted immediately to current levels and that their use be reduced 95 percent over the next decade. The American position was too strong for many European nations and the Japanese. Negotiations at an international conference on the matter broke down. The breakdown is due in part to a more acute concern for environmental matters in the United States than exists in many countries. Meanwhile CFCs are linked to another environmental problem that equally threatens the world - the Greenhouse Effect. The earth is in a natural warming period, but man could be causing it to become even warmer. The Greenhouse Effect could have a catastrophic impact on mankind, although nothing has been proven yet.

  10. Ozone-exposure and annealing effects on graphene-on-SiO2 transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, E. X.; Newaz, A. K. M.; Wang, B.; Zhang, C. X.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Bolotin, K. I.; Schrimpf, R. D.; Pantelides, S. T.; Alles, M. L.

    2012-09-01

    We employ resistance measurements and Raman spectroscopy to investigate the effects of UV ozone (UVO) exposure and Ar annealing on graphene-on-SiO2 transistors. Shorter UVO exposures lead to oxygen adsorption and doping; longer exposures lead to significant defect generation and then to etching. Elevated-temperature Ar annealing following UVO exposure leads to local defect healing, as shown by the evolution of the characteristic Raman D- and G-peaks. In striking contrast, the overall graphene transistor resistance increases significantly due to void formation. Density functional calculations show that carbon-oxygen reactions lead to efficient consumption and release of C atoms (as CO or CO2) under conditions of high surface oxygen concentration.