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Sample records for promiscuous sulfatase reaction

  1. Promiscuous sulfatase activity and thio-effects in a phosphodiesterase of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily†

    PubMed Central

    Lassila, Jonathan K.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The nucleotide phosphodiesterase/pyrophosphatase from Xanthomonas axonopodis (NPP) is a structural and evolutionary relative of alkaline phosphatase that preferentially hydrolyzes phosphate diesters. With the goal of understanding how these two enzymes with nearly identical Zn2+ bimetallo sites achieve high selectivity for hydrolysis of either phosphate monoesters or diesters, we have measured a promiscuous sulfatase activity in NPP. Sulfate esters are nearly isosteric with phosphate esters but carry less charge, offering a probe of electrostatic contributions to selectivity. NPP exhibits sulfatase activity with kcat/KM value of 2 × 10−5 M−1s−1, similar to the R166S mutant of alkaline phosphatase. We further report the effects of thio-substitution on phosphate monoester and diester reactions. Reactivities with these non-cognate substrates illustrate a reduced dependence of NPP reactivity on the charge of the nonbridging oxygen situated between the Zn2+ ions relative to that in alkaline phosphatase. This reduced charge dependence can explain about 102 of the 107-fold differential catalytic proficiency for the most similar monoester and diester substrates in the two enzymes. The results further suggest that active site contacts to substrate oxygen atoms that do not contact the Zn2+ ions may play an important role in defining the selectivity of the enzymes. PMID:18975918

  2. Recent developments in enzyme promiscuity for carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yufeng; Rahimi, Mehran; Geertsema, Edzard M; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2015-04-01

    Numerous enzymes have been found to catalyze additional and completely different types of reactions relative to the natural activity they evolved for. This phenomenon, called catalytic promiscuity, has proven to be a fruitful guide for the development of novel biocatalysts for organic synthesis purposes. As such, enzymes have been identified with promiscuous catalytic activity for, one or more, eminent types of carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions like aldol couplings, Michael(-type) additions, Mannich reactions, Henry reactions, and Knoevenagel condensations. This review focuses on enzymes that promiscuously catalyze these reaction types and exhibit high enantioselectivities (in case chiral products are obtained). PMID:25598537

  3. Promiscuous words

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Promiscuity is frequently used to describe animal mating behaviour, and especially to describe multiple mating by females. Yet this use of the term is incorrect, perhaps reflecting an erroneous adoption of common language to pique reader interest. We evaluated the patterns of use and misuse of the word ‘promiscuity’ in a representative journal of animal behaviour. This survey highlights how inappropriately the term is used, and how it can conceal critical features of animal mating strategies with intriguing evolutionary significance. Further analysis of the scientific impact of papers identified by the term promiscuous or polyandrous revealed that the former were cited less frequently. We argue that using promiscuity to describe animal mating strategies is anthropomorphic, inaccurate, and potentially misleading. Consistent with other biological disciplines, the word promiscuity should be used to describe indiscriminate mating behaviour only, and that polygyny and polyandry should be used to describe male and female mating frequency respectively. PMID:24209457

  4. Triesterase and promiscuous diesterase activities of a di-Co(II)-containing organophosphate degrading enzyme reaction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Alberto, Marta E; Pinto, Gaspar; Russo, Nino; Toscano, Marirosa

    2015-02-23

    The reaction mechanism for the hydrolysis of trimethyl phosphate and of the obtained phosphodiester by the di-Co(II) derivative of organophosphate degrading enzyme from Agrobacterium radiobacter P230(OpdA), have been investigated at density functional level of theory in the framework of the cluster model approach. Both mechanisms proceed by a multistep sequence and each catalytic cycle begins with the nucleophilic attack by a metal-bound hydroxide on the phosphorus atom of the substrate, leading to the cleavage of the phosphate-ester bond. Four exchange-correlation functionals were used to derive the potential energy profiles in protein environments. Although the enzyme is confirmed to work better as triesterase, as revealed by the barrier heights in the rate-limiting steps of the catalytic processes, its promiscuous ability to hydrolyze also the product of the reaction has been confirmed. The important role played by water molecules and some residues in the outer coordination sphere has been elucidated, while the binuclear Co(II) center accomplishes both structural and catalytic functions. To correctly describe the electronic configuration of the d shell of the metal ions, high- and low-spin arrangement jointly with the occurrence of antiferromagnetic coupling, have been herein considered. PMID:25582757

  5. Promiscuity in the Enzymatic Catalysis of Phosphate and Sulfate Transfer.

    PubMed

    Pabis, Anna; Duarte, Fernanda; Kamerlin, Shina C L

    2016-06-01

    The enzymes that facilitate phosphate and sulfate hydrolysis are among the most proficient natural catalysts known to date. Interestingly, a large number of these enzymes are promiscuous catalysts that exhibit both phosphatase and sulfatase activities in the same active site and, on top of that, have also been demonstrated to efficiently catalyze the hydrolysis of other additional substrates with varying degrees of efficiency. Understanding the factors that underlie such multifunctionality is crucial both for understanding functional evolution in enzyme superfamilies and for the development of artificial enzymes. In this Current Topic, we have primarily focused on the structural and mechanistic basis for catalytic promiscuity among enzymes that facilitate both phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer in the same active site, while comparing this to how catalytic promiscuity manifests in other promiscuous phosphatases. We have also drawn on the large number of experimental and computational studies of selected model systems in the literature to explore the different features driving the catalytic promiscuity of such enzymes. Finally, on the basis of this comparative analysis, we probe the plausible origins and determinants of catalytic promiscuity in enzymes that catalyze phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer. PMID:27187273

  6. Promiscuity in the Enzymatic Catalysis of Phosphate and Sulfate Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The enzymes that facilitate phosphate and sulfate hydrolysis are among the most proficient natural catalysts known to date. Interestingly, a large number of these enzymes are promiscuous catalysts that exhibit both phosphatase and sulfatase activities in the same active site and, on top of that, have also been demonstrated to efficiently catalyze the hydrolysis of other additional substrates with varying degrees of efficiency. Understanding the factors that underlie such multifunctionality is crucial both for understanding functional evolution in enzyme superfamilies and for the development of artificial enzymes. In this Current Topic, we have primarily focused on the structural and mechanistic basis for catalytic promiscuity among enzymes that facilitate both phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer in the same active site, while comparing this to how catalytic promiscuity manifests in other promiscuous phosphatases. We have also drawn on the large number of experimental and computational studies of selected model systems in the literature to explore the different features driving the catalytic promiscuity of such enzymes. Finally, on the basis of this comparative analysis, we probe the plausible origins and determinants of catalytic promiscuity in enzymes that catalyze phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer. PMID:27187273

  7. The Important Roles of Steroid Sulfatase and Sulfotransferases in Gynecological Diseases.

    PubMed

    Rižner, Tea Lanišnik

    2016-01-01

    Gynecological diseases such as endometriosis, adenomyosis and uterine fibroids, and gynecological cancers including endometrial cancer and ovarian cancer, affect a large proportion of women. These diseases are estrogen dependent, and their progression often depends on local estrogen formation. In peripheral tissues, estrogens can be formed from the inactive precursors dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and estrone sulfate. Sulfatase and sulfotransferases have pivotal roles in these processes, where sulfatase hydrolyzes estrone sulfate to estrone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate to dehydroepiandrosterone, and sulfotransferases catalyze the reverse reactions. Further activation of estrone to the most potent estrogen, estradiol, is catalyzed by 17-ketosteroid reductases, while estradiol can also be formed from dehydroepiandrosterone by the sequential actions of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-Δ(4)-isomerase, aromatase, and 17-ketosteroid reductase. This review introduces the sulfatase and sulfotransferase enzymes, in terms of their structures and reaction mechanisms, and the regulation and different transcripts of their genes, together with the importance of their currently known single nucleotide polymorphisms. Data on expression of sulfatase and sulfotransferases in gynecological diseases are also reviewed. There are often unchanged mRNA and protein levels in diseased tissue, with higher sulfatase activities in cancerous endometrium, ovarian cancer cell lines, and adenomyosis. This can be indicative of a disturbed balance between the sulfatase and sulfotransferases enzymes, defining the potential for sulfatase as a drug target for treatment of gynecological diseases. Finally, clinical trials with sulfatase inhibitors are discussed, where two inhibitors have already concluded phase II trials, although so far with no convincing clinical outcomes for patients with endometrial cancer and endometriosis. PMID:26924986

  8. The Important Roles of Steroid Sulfatase and Sulfotransferases in Gynecological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rižner, Tea Lanišnik

    2016-01-01

    Gynecological diseases such as endometriosis, adenomyosis and uterine fibroids, and gynecological cancers including endometrial cancer and ovarian cancer, affect a large proportion of women. These diseases are estrogen dependent, and their progression often depends on local estrogen formation. In peripheral tissues, estrogens can be formed from the inactive precursors dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and estrone sulfate. Sulfatase and sulfotransferases have pivotal roles in these processes, where sulfatase hydrolyzes estrone sulfate to estrone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate to dehydroepiandrosterone, and sulfotransferases catalyze the reverse reactions. Further activation of estrone to the most potent estrogen, estradiol, is catalyzed by 17-ketosteroid reductases, while estradiol can also be formed from dehydroepiandrosterone by the sequential actions of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-Δ4-isomerase, aromatase, and 17-ketosteroid reductase. This review introduces the sulfatase and sulfotransferase enzymes, in terms of their structures and reaction mechanisms, and the regulation and different transcripts of their genes, together with the importance of their currently known single nucleotide polymorphisms. Data on expression of sulfatase and sulfotransferases in gynecological diseases are also reviewed. There are often unchanged mRNA and protein levels in diseased tissue, with higher sulfatase activities in cancerous endometrium, ovarian cancer cell lines, and adenomyosis. This can be indicative of a disturbed balance between the sulfatase and sulfotransferases enzymes, defining the potential for sulfatase as a drug target for treatment of gynecological diseases. Finally, clinical trials with sulfatase inhibitors are discussed, where two inhibitors have already concluded phase II trials, although so far with no convincing clinical outcomes for patients with endometrial cancer and endometriosis. PMID:26924986

  9. SUMF1 enhances sulfatase activities in vivo in five sulfatase deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Fraldi, Alessandro; Biffi, Alessandra; Lombardi, Alessia; Visigalli, Ilaria; Pepe, Stefano; Settembre, Carmine; Nusco, Edoardo; Auricchio, Alberto; Naldini, Luigi; Ballabio, Andrea; Cosma, Maria Pia

    2007-01-01

    Sulfatases are enzymes that hydrolyse a diverse range of sulfate esters. Deficiency of lysosomal sulfatases leads to human diseases characterized by the accumulation of either GAGs (glycosaminoglycans) or sulfolipids. The catalytic activity of sulfatases resides in a unique formylglycine residue in their active site generated by the post-translational modification of a highly conserved cysteine residue. This modification is performed by SUMF1 (sulfatase-modifying factor 1), which is an essential factor for sulfatase activities. Mutations in the SUMF1 gene cause MSD (multiple sulfatase deficiency), an autosomal recessive disease in which the activities of all sulfatases are profoundly reduced. In previous studies, we have shown that SUMF1 has an enhancing effect on sulfatase activity when co-expressed with sulfatase genes in COS-7 cells. In the present study, we demonstrate that SUMF1 displays an enhancing effect on sulfatases activity when co-delivered with a sulfatase cDNA via AAV (adeno-associated virus) and LV (lentivirus) vectors in cells from individuals affected by five different diseases owing to sulfatase deficiencies or from murine models of the same diseases [i.e. MLD (metachromatic leukodystrophy), CDPX (X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata) and MPS (mucopolysaccharidosis) II, IIIA and VI]. The SUMF1-enhancing effect on sulfatase activity resulted in an improved clearance of the intracellular GAG or sulfolipid accumulation. Moreover, we demonstrate that the SUMF1-enhancing effect is also present in vivo after AAV-mediated delivery of the sulfamidase gene to the muscle of MPSIIIA mice, resulting in a more efficient rescue of the phenotype. These results indicate that co-delivery of SUMF1 may enhance the efficacy of gene therapy in several sulfatase deficiencies. PMID:17206939

  10. Recent advances in the study of enzyme promiscuity in the tautomerase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Baas, Bert-Jan; Zandvoort, Ellen; Geertsema, Edzard M; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2013-05-27

    Catalytic promiscuity and evolution: Many enzymes exhibit catalytic promiscuity--the ability to catalyze reactions other than their biologically relevant one. These reactions can serve as starting points for both natural and laboratory evolution of new enzymatic functions. Recent advances in the study of enzyme promiscuity in the tautomerase superfamily are discussed. PMID:23649962

  11. Evidence for the formation of an enamine species during aldol and Michael-type addition reactions promiscuously catalyzed by 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase.

    PubMed

    Poddar, Harshwardhan; Rahimi, Mehran; Geertsema, Edzard M; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W H; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2015-03-23

    The enzyme 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), which has a catalytic N-terminal proline residue (Pro1), can promiscuously catalyze various carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, including aldol condensation of acetaldehyde with benzaldehyde to yield cinnamaldehyde, and Michael-type addition of acetaldehyde to a wide variety of nitroalkenes to yield valuable γ-nitroaldehydes. To gain insight into how 4-OT catalyzes these unnatural reactions, we carried out exchange studies in D2 O, and X-ray crystallography studies. The former established that H-D exchange within acetaldehyde is catalyzed by 4-OT and that the Pro1 residue is crucial for this activity. The latter showed that Pro1 of 4-OT had reacted with acetaldehyde to give an enamine species. These results provide evidence of the mechanism of the 4-OT-catalyzed aldol and Michael-type addition reactions in which acetaldehyde is activated for nucleophilic addition by Pro1-dependent formation of an enamine intermediate. PMID:25728471

  12. Genetics Home Reference: multiple sulfatase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... condition that mainly affects the brain, skin, and skeleton. Because the signs and symptoms of multiple sulfatase ... of cells in particular tissues, specifically the brain, skeleton, and skin, cause many of the signs and ...

  13. Arylsulfatase K, a Novel Lysosomal Sulfatase*

    PubMed Central

    Wiegmann, Elena Marie; Westendorf, Eva; Kalus, Ina; Pringle, Thomas H.; Lübke, Torben; Dierks, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The human sulfatase family has 17 members, 13 of which have been characterized biochemically. These enzymes specifically hydrolyze sulfate esters in glycosaminoglycans, sulfolipids, or steroid sulfates, thereby playing key roles in cellular degradation, cell signaling, and hormone regulation. The loss of sulfatase activity has been linked to severe pathophysiological conditions such as lysosomal storage disorders, developmental abnormalities, or cancer. A novel member of this family, arylsulfatase K (ARSK), was identified bioinformatically through its conserved sulfatase signature sequence directing posttranslational generation of the catalytic formylglycine residue in sulfatases. However, overall sequence identity of ARSK with other human sulfatases is low (18–22%). Here we demonstrate that ARSK indeed shows desulfation activity toward arylsulfate pseudosubstrates. When expressed in human cells, ARSK was detected as a 68-kDa glycoprotein carrying at least four N-glycans of both the complex and high-mannose type. Purified ARSK turned over p-nitrocatechol and p-nitrophenyl sulfate. This activity was dependent on cysteine 80, which was verified to undergo conversion to formylglycine. Kinetic parameters were similar to those of several lysosomal sulfatases involved in degradation of sulfated glycosaminoglycans. An acidic pH optimum (∼4.6) and colocalization with LAMP1 verified lysosomal functioning of ARSK. Further, it carries mannose 6-phosphate, indicating lysosomal sorting via mannose 6-phosphate receptors. ARSK mRNA expression was found in all tissues tested, suggesting a ubiquitous physiological substrate and a so far non-classified lysosomal storage disorder in the case of ARSK deficiency, as shown before for all other lysosomal sulfatases. PMID:23986440

  14. Substrate-Assisted Catalysis in the Reaction Catalyzed by Salicylic Acid Binding Protein 2 (SABP2), a Potential Mechanism of Substrate Discrimination for Some Promiscuous Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Guo, Haobo; Chaiprasongsuk, Minta; Zhao, Nan; Chen, Feng; Yang, Xiaohan; Guo, Hong

    2015-09-01

    Although one of an enzyme's hallmarks is the high specificity for their natural substrates, substrate promiscuity has been reported more frequently. It is known that promiscuous enzymes generally show different catalytic efficiencies to different substrates, but our understanding of the origin of such differences is still lacking. Here we report the results of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations and an experimental study of salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2). SABP2 has promiscuous esterase activity toward a series of substrates but shows a high activity toward its natural substrate, methyl salicylate (MeSA). Our results demonstrate that this enzyme may use substrate-assisted catalysis involving the hydroxyl group from MeSA to enhance the activity and achieve substrate discrimination. PMID:26244568

  15. Substrate-Assisted Catalysis in the Reaction Catalyzed by Salicylic Acid Binding Protein 2 (SABP2), a Potential Mechanism of Substrate Discrimination for Some Promiscuous Enzymes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Guo, Haobo; Chaiprasongsuk, Minta; Zhao, Nan; Chen, Feng; Yang, Xiaohan; Guo, Hong

    2015-08-05

    Although one of an enzyme’s hallmarks is the high specificity for their natural substrates, substrate promiscuity has been reported more frequently. We know that promiscuous enzymes generally show different catalytic efficiencies to different substrates, but our understanding of the origin of such differences is still lacking. We report the results of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations and an experimental study of salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2). SABP2 has promiscuous esterase activity toward a series of substrates but shows a high activity toward its natural substrate, methyl salicylate (MeSA). Finally, our results demonstrate that this enzyme may use substrate-assisted catalysis involvingmore » the hydroxyl group from MeSA to enhance the activity and achieve substrate discrimination.« less

  16. Substrate-Assisted Catalysis in the Reaction Catalyzed by Salicylic Acid Binding Protein 2 (SABP2), a Potential Mechanism of Substrate Discrimination for Some Promiscuous Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Guo, Haobo; Chaiprasongsuk, Minta; Zhao, Nan; Chen, Feng; Yang, Xiaohan; Guo, Hong

    2015-08-05

    Although one of an enzyme’s hallmarks is the high specificity for their natural substrates, substrate promiscuity has been reported more frequently. We know that promiscuous enzymes generally show different catalytic efficiencies to different substrates, but our understanding of the origin of such differences is still lacking. We report the results of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations and an experimental study of salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2). SABP2 has promiscuous esterase activity toward a series of substrates but shows a high activity toward its natural substrate, methyl salicylate (MeSA). Finally, our results demonstrate that this enzyme may use substrate-assisted catalysis involving the hydroxyl group from MeSA to enhance the activity and achieve substrate discrimination.

  17. Mechanistic Diversity in the RuBisCO Superfamily: RuBisCO from Rhodospirillum rubrum is Not Promiscuous for Reactions Catalyzed by RuBisCO-Like Proteins (RLPs)†

    PubMed Central

    Warlick, Benjamin P. E.; Imker, Heidi J.; Sriram, Jaya; Tabita, F. Robert; Gerlt, John A.

    2012-01-01

    D-Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenases (RuBisCOs) are promiscuous, catalyzing not only carboxylation and oxygenation of D-ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate but also other promiscuous, presumably nonphysiological, reactions initiated by abstraction of the 3-proton of D-ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. Also, RuBisCO has homologues that do not catalyze carboxylation; these are designated RuBisCO-like proteins or RLPs. Members of the two families of RLPs catalyze reactions in the recycling of 5′-methylthioadenosine (MTA) generated by polyamine synthesis: 1) the 2,3-diketo-5-methylthiopentane 1-phosphate (DK-MTP 1-P) “enolase” reaction in the well-known “methionine salvage” pathway in species of Bacilli; and 2) the 5-methylthio-D-ribulose 1-phosphate (MTRu 1-P) 1,3-isomerase reaction in the recently discovered “MTA-isoprenoid shunt” that generates 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) for nonmevalonate isoprene synthesis in Rhodospirillum rubrum. We first studied the structure and reactivity of DK-MTP 1-P which was reported to decompose rapidly [Ashida, H., Saito, Y., Kojima, C., and Yokota, A. (2008) Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 72, 959–67]. The 2-carbonyl group of DK-MTP 1-P is rapidly hydrated in solution and can undergo enolization both nonenzymatically and enzymatically via the small amount of unhydrated material that is present. We then examined the ability of RuBisCO from R. rubrum to catalyze both of the RLP-catalyzed reactions. Contrary to a previous report [Ashida, H., Saito, Y., Kojima, C., Kobayashi, K., Ogasawara, N., and Yokota, A. (2003) Science 302, 286–290], we were unable to confirm that this RuBisCO catalyzes the DK-MTP 1-P “enolase” reaction either in vitro or in vivo. We also determined that this RuBisCO does not catalyze the MTRu 1-P 1,3-isomerase reaction in vitro. Thus, although RuBisCOs can be functionally promiscuous, RuBisCO from R. rubrum is not promiscuous for either of the known RLP-catalyzed reactions. PMID:23110715

  18. Multiple sulfatase deficiency with neonatal manifestation.

    PubMed

    Garavelli, Livia; Santoro, Lucia; Iori, Alexandra; Gargano, Giancarlo; Braibanti, Silvia; Pedori, Simona; Melli, Nives; Frattini, Daniele; Zampini, Lucia; Galeazzi, Tiziana; Padella, Lucia; Pepe, Stefano; Wischmeijer, Anita; Rosato, Simonetta; Ivanovski, Ivan; Iughetti, Lorenzo; Gelmini, Chiara; Bernasconi, Sergio; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Ballabio, Andrea; Gabrielli, Orazio

    2014-01-01

    Multiple Sulfatase Deficiency (MSD; OMIM 272200) is a rare autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by mutations in the sulfatase modifying factor 1 gene, encoding the formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE), and resulting in tissue accumulation of sulfatides, sulphated glycosaminoglycans, sphingolipids and steroid sulfates. Less than 50 cases have been published so far. We report a new case of MSD presenting in the newborn period with hypotonia, apnoea, cyanosis and rolling eyes, hepato-splenomegaly and deafness. This patient was compound heterozygous for two so far undescribed SUMF1 mutations (c.191C > A; p.S64X and c.818A > G; p.D273G). PMID:25516103

  19. Multiple sulfatase deficiency: A case series of four children

    PubMed Central

    Incecik, Faruk; Ozbek, Mehmet N.; Gungor, Serdal; Pepe, Stefano; Herguner, Ozlem M.; Mungan, Neslihan Onenli; Gungor, Sabiha; Altunbasak, Sakir

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sulfatase deficiency is biochemically characterized by the accumulation of sulfated lipids and acid mucopolysaccharides. The gene sulfatase-modifying factor 1 (SUMF1), recently identified, encodes the enzyme responsible for post-translational modification of a cysteine residue, which is essential for the activity of sulfatases. We describe clinical findings and mutation analysis of four patients. The patients presented with hypotonia, developmental delay, coarse face, ichthyosis, and hepatosplenomegaly. The diagnosis was made through clinical findings, enzymatic assays, and mutation analysis. We were detected to be homozygous for a novel missense mutation c. 739G > C causing a p.G247R amino acid substitution in the SUMF1 protein. PMID:24339620

  20. Phylogeny of Algal Sequences Encoding Carbohydrate Sulfotransferases, Formylglycine-Dependent Sulfatases, and Putative Sulfatase Modifying Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Many algae are rich sources of sulfated polysaccharides with biological activities. The physicochemical/rheological properties and biological activities of sulfated polysaccharides are affected by the pattern and number of sulfate moieties. Sulfation of carbohydrates is catalyzed by carbohydrate sulfotransferases (CHSTs) while modification of sulfate moieties on sulfated polysaccharides was presumably catalyzed by sulfatases including formylglycine-dependent sulfatases (FGly-SULFs). Post-translationally modification of Cys to FGly in FGly-SULFs by sulfatase modifiying factors (SUMFs) is necessary for the activity of this enzyme. The aims of this study are to mine for sequences encoding algal CHSTs, FGly-SULFs and putative SUMFs from the fully sequenced algal genomes and to infer their phylogenetic relationships to their well characterized counterparts from other organisms. Algal sequences encoding CHSTs, FGly-SULFs, SUMFs, and SUMF-like proteins were successfully identified from green and brown algae. However, red algal FGly-SULFs and SUMFs were not identified. In addition, a group of SUMF-like sequences with different gene structure and possibly different functions were identified for green, brown and red algae. The phylogeny of these putative genes contributes to the corpus of knowledge of an unexplored area. The analyses of these putative genes contribute toward future production of existing and new sulfated carbohydrate polymers through enzymatic synthesis and metabolic engineering. PMID:26635861

  1. Steroid promiscuity: Diversity of enzyme action. Preface.

    PubMed

    Lathe, Richard; Kotelevtsev, Yuri; Mason, J Ian

    2015-07-01

    This Special Issue on the topic of Steroid and Sterol Signaling: Promiscuity and Diversity, dwells on the growing realization that the 'one ligand, one binding site' and 'one enzyme, one reaction' concepts are out of date. Focusing on cytochromes P450 (CYP), hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs), and related enzymes, the Special Issue highlights that a single enzyme can bind to diverse substrates, and in different conformations, and can catalyze multiple different conversions (and in different directions), thereby, generating an unexpectedly wide spectrum of ligands that can have subtly different biological actions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Steroid/Sterol Signaling' . PMID:25596328

  2. Why Polyphenols have Promiscuous Actions? An Investigation by Chemical Bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Tang, Guang-Yan

    2016-05-01

    Despite their diverse pharmacological effects, polyphenols are poor for use as drugs, which have been traditionally ascribed to their low bioavailability. However, Baell and co-workers recently proposed that the redox potential of polyphenols also plays an important role in this, because redox reactions bring promiscuous actions on various protein targets and thus produce non-specific pharmacological effects. To investigate whether the redox reactivity behaves as a critical factor in polyphenol promiscuity, we performed a chemical bioinformatics analysis on the structure-activity relationships of twenty polyphenols. It was found that the gene expression profiles of human cell lines induced by polyphenols were not correlated with the presence or not of redox moieties in the polyphenols, but significantly correlated with their molecular structures. Therefore, it is concluded that the promiscuous actions of polyphenols are likely to result from their inherent structural features rather than their redox potential. PMID:27319142

  3. Molecular Basis of Symbiotic Promiscuity

    PubMed Central

    Perret, Xavier; Staehelin, Christian; Broughton, William J.

    2000-01-01

    Eukaryotes often form symbioses with microorganisms. Among these, associations between plants and nitrogen-fixing bacteria are responsible for the nitrogen input into various ecological niches. Plants of many different families have evolved the capacity to develop root or stem nodules with diverse genera of soil bacteria. Of these, symbioses between legumes and rhizobia (Azorhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, Mesorhizobium, and Rhizobium) are the most important from an agricultural perspective. Nitrogen-fixing nodules arise when symbiotic rhizobia penetrate their hosts in a strictly controlled and coordinated manner. Molecular codes are exchanged between the symbionts in the rhizosphere to select compatible rhizobia from pathogens. Entry into the plant is restricted to bacteria that have the “keys” to a succession of legume “doors”. Some symbionts intimately associate with many different partners (and are thus promiscuous), while others are more selective and have a narrow host range. For historical reasons, narrow host range has been more intensively investigated than promiscuity. In our view, this has given a false impression of specificity in legume-Rhizobium associations. Rather, we suggest that restricted host ranges are limited to specific niches and represent specialization of widespread and more ancestral promiscuous symbioses. Here we analyze the molecular mechanisms governing symbiotic promiscuity in rhizobia and show that it is controlled by a number of molecular keys. PMID:10704479

  4. Promiscuous Feminisms for Troubling Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voithofer, Rick

    2013-01-01

    Looking across the six articles in this issue, this paper argues that promiscuous uses of feminist methodologies offer a unique constellation of conceptual, pragmatic, material, and ethical strategies with which to understand and engage some of the social and cultural tensions that are occurring within and outside schools. It presents a…

  5. Steroid sulfatase gene in XX males.

    PubMed Central

    Mohandas, T K; Stern, H J; Meeker, C A; Passage, M B; Müller, U; Page, D C; Yen, P H; Shapiro, L J

    1990-01-01

    The human X and Y chromosomes pair and recombine at their distal short arms during male meiosis. Recent studies indicate that the majority of XX males arise as a result of an aberrant exchange between X and Y chromosomes such that the testis-determining factor gene (TDF) is transferred from a Y chromatid to an X chromatid. It has been shown that X-specific loci such as that coding for the red cell surface antigen, Xg, are sometimes lost from the X chromosome in this aberrant exchange. The steroid sulfatase functional gene (STS) maps to the distal short arm of the X chromosome proximal to XG. We have asked whether STS is affected in the aberrant X-Y interchange leading to XX males. DNA extracted from fibroblasts of seven XX males known to contain Y-specific sequences in their genomic DNA was tested for dosage of the STS gene by using a specific genomic probe. Densitometry of the autoradiograms showed that these XX males have two copies of the STS gene, suggesting that the breakpoint on the X chromosome in the aberrant X-Y interchange is distal to STS. To obtain more definitive evidence, cell hybrids were derived from the fusion of mouse cells, deficient in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase, and fibroblasts of the seven XX males. The X chromosomes in these patients could be distinguished from each other when one of three X-linked restriction-fragment-length polymorphisms was used. Hybrid clones retaining a human X chromosome containing Y-specific sequences in the absence of the normal X chromosome could be identified in six of the seven cases of XX males.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2301402

  6. Sulfatase 1 and sulfatase 2 in hepatocellular carcinoma: associated signaling pathways, tumor phenotypes, and survival.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ju Dong; Sun, Zhifu; Hu, Chunling; Lai, Jinping; Dove, Rebecca; Nakamura, Ikuo; Lee, Ju-Seog; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Kang, Koo Jeong; Chu, In-Sun; Roberts, Lewis R

    2011-02-01

    The heparin-degrading endosulfatases sulfatase 1 (SULF1) and sulfatase 2 (SULF2) have opposing effects in hepatocarcinogenesis despite structural similarity. Using mRNA expression arrays, we analyzed the correlations of SULF expression with signaling networks in human hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and the associations of SULF expression with tumor phenotype and patient survival. Data from two mRNA microarray analyses of 139 and 36 HCCs and adjacent tissues were used as training and validation sets. Partek and Metacore software were used to identify SULF correlated genes and their associated signaling pathways. Associations between SULF expression, the hepatoblast subtype of HCC, and survival were examined. Both SULF1 and 2 had strong positive correlations with periostin, IQGAP1, TGFB1, and vimentin and inverse correlations with HNF4A and IQGAP2. Genes correlated with both SULFs were highly associated with the cell adhesion, cytoskeletal remodeling, blood coagulation, TGFB, and Wnt/β-catenin and epithelial mesenchymal transition signaling pathways. Genes uniquely correlated with SULF2 were more associated with neoplastic processes than genes uniquely correlated with SULF1. High SULF expression was associated with the hepatoblast subtype of HCC. There was a bimodal effect of SULF1 expression on prognosis, with patients in the lowest or highest tertile having a worse prognosis than those in the middle tertile. SULFs have complex effects on HCC signaling and patient survival. There are functionally similar associations with cell adhesion, ECM remodeling, TGFB, and WNT pathways, but also unique associations of SULF1 and SULF2. The roles and targeting of the SULFs in cancer require further investigation. PMID:21104785

  7. Steroid Sulfatase Deficiency and Androgen Activation Before and After Puberty

    PubMed Central

    Idkowiak, Jan; Taylor, Angela E.; Subtil, Sandra; O'Neil, Donna M.; Vijzelaar, Raymon; Dias, Renuka P.; Amin, Rakesh; Barrett, Timothy G.; Shackleton, Cedric H. L.; Kirk, Jeremy M. W.; Moss, Celia

    2016-01-01

    Context: Steroid sulfatase (STS) cleaves the sulfate moiety off steroid sulfates, including dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) sulfate (DHEAS), the inactive sulfate ester of the adrenal androgen precursor DHEA. Deficient DHEA sulfation, the opposite enzymatic reaction to that catalyzed by STS, results in androgen excess by increased conversion of DHEA to active androgens. STS deficiency (STSD) due to deletions or inactivating mutations in the X-linked STS gene manifests with ichthyosis, but androgen synthesis and metabolism in STSD have not been studied in detail yet. Patients and Methods: We carried out a cross-sectional study in 30 males with STSD (age 6–27 y; 13 prepubertal, 5 peripubertal, and 12 postpubertal) and 38 age-, sex-, and Tanner stage-matched healthy controls. Serum and 24-hour urine steroid metabolome analysis was performed by mass spectrometry and genetic analysis of the STS gene by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and Sanger sequencing. Results: Genetic analysis showed STS mutations in all patients, comprising 27 complete gene deletions, 1 intragenic deletion and 2 missense mutations. STSD patients had apparently normal pubertal development. Serum and 24-hour urinary DHEAS were increased in STSD, whereas serum DHEA and testosterone were decreased. However, total 24-hour urinary androgen excretion was similar to controls, with evidence of increased 5α-reductase activity in STSD. Prepubertal healthy controls showed a marked increase in the serum DHEA to DHEAS ratio that was absent in postpubertal controls and in STSD patients of any pubertal stage. Conclusions: In STSD patients, an increased 5α-reductase activity appears to compensate for a reduced rate of androgen generation by enhancing peripheral androgen activation in affected patients. In healthy controls, we discovered a prepubertal surge in the serum DHEA to DHEAS ratio that was absent in STSD, indicative of physiologically up-regulated STS activity before puberty. This may

  8. Differential Effects of Estrogen Exposure on Arylsulfatase B, Galactose-6-Sulfatase, and Steroid Sulfatase in Rat Prostate Development

    PubMed Central

    Feferman, Leo; Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Birch, Lynn; Prins, Gail S.; Tobacman, Joanne K.

    2014-01-01

    Sulfatase enzymes remove sulfate groups from sulfated steroid hormones, including estrone-sulfate and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate, and from sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), including chondroitin sulfates and heparan sulfate. The enzymes N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase (Arylsulfatase B; ARSB) and N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS), which remove sulfate groups from the sulfated GAGs chondroitin 4-sulfate (C4S) and chondroitin 6-sulfate, respectively, have not been studied in prostate development previously. In this report, the endogenous variation and the impact of exogenous estradiol benzoate on the immunohistochemistry and activity of ARSB and GALNS in post-natal (days 1–30) ventral rat prostate are presented, as well as measurements of steroid sulfatase activity (STS), C4S, total sulfated GAGs, and versican, an extracellular matrix proteoglycan with chondroitin sulfate attachments on days 5 and 30. Findings demonstrate distinct and reciprocal localization of ARSB and GALNS, with ARSB predominant in the stroma and GALNS predominant in the epithelium. Control ARSB activity increased significantly between days 5 and 30, but following estrogen exposure (estradiol benzoate 25 µg in 25 µl sesame oil subcutaneously on days 1, 3, and 5), activity was reduced and the observed increase on day 30 was inhibited. However, estrogen treatment did not inhibit the increase in GALNS activity between days 5 and 30, and reduced STS activity by 50% on both days 5 and 30 compared to vehicle control. Sulfated GAGs, C4S, and the extracellular matrix proteoglycan versican declined between days 5 and 30 in the control, but these declines were inhibited following estrogen. Study findings indicate distinct variation in expression and activity of sulfatases, sulfated GAGs, C4S, and versican in the process of normal prostate development, and disruption of these events by exogenous estrogen. PMID:24508597

  9. Enzyme promiscuity in earthworm serine protease: substrate versatility and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Verma, Mahendra Kumar; Pulicherla, K K

    2016-04-01

    Enzymes are the most versatile molecules in the biological world. These amazing molecules play an integral role in the regulation of various metabolic pathways and physiology subsequently. Promiscuity of an enzyme is the capacity to catalyze additional biochemical reactions besides their native one. Catalytic promiscuity has shown great impact in enzyme engineering for commercial enzyme and therapeutics with natural or engineered catalytic promiscuity. The earthworm serine protease (ESP) is a classic example of enzyme promiscuity and studied for its therapeutic potential over the last few decades. The ESP was reported for several therapeutic properties and fibrinolytic activity has been much explored. ESP, a complex enzyme exists as several isoforms of molecular weight ranging from 14 to 33 kDa. The fibrinolytic capacity of the enzyme has been studied in different species of earthworm and molecular mechanism is quite different from conventional thrombolytics. Cytotoxic and anti-tumor activities of ESP were evaluated using several cancer cell lines. Enzyme had shown tremendous scope in fighting against plant viruses and microbes. ESP is also reported for anti-inflammatory activity and anti-oxidant property. Apart from these, recently, ESP is reported for DNase activity. The daunting challenge for researchers is to understand the molecular mechanism for such diverse properties and possibility of enzyme promiscuity. This review emphasizes molecular mechanism of ESP governing various biochemical reactions. Further, the concept of enzyme promiscuity in ESP towards development of novel enzyme based drugs has been reviewed in this study. PMID:26739820

  10. Level of Education, Sexual Promiscuity, and AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krull, Catherine D.

    1994-01-01

    Responses of 595 unmarried persons on the 1991 General Social Survey suggest that educational attainment indirectly increases promiscuous sexual behavior by liberalizing sexual attitudes. In a second study, the incidence of AIDS was partly explained by educational attainment, liberal sexual attitudes, and promiscuous sexual practices. (KS)

  11. Nosology, ontology and promiscuous realism.

    PubMed

    Binney, Nicholas

    2015-06-01

    Medics may consider worrying about their metaphysics and ontology to be a waste of time. I will argue here that this is not the case. Promiscuous realism is a metaphysical position which holds that multiple, equally valid, classification schemes should be applied to objects (such as patients) to capture different aspects of their complex and heterogeneous nature. As medics at the bedside may need to capture different aspects of their patients' problems, they may need to use multiple classification schemes (multiple nosologies), and thus consider adopting a different metaphysics to the one commonly in use. PMID:25389077

  12. Sulfatase inhibitors for recidivist breast cancer treatment: A chemical review.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ramanpreet; Singh, Jatinder; Singh, Dhandeep; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh; Singh, Nirmal

    2016-05-23

    Steroid sulfatase (STS) plays a momentous role in the conversion of sulfated steroids, which are biologically inactive, into biologically active un-sulfated steroid hormones, which support the development and growth of a number of hormone-dependent cancers, including breast cancer. Therefore, inhibitors of STS are supposed to be potential drugs for the treatment of breast and other steroid-dependent cancers. The present review concentrates on broad chemical classification of steroid sulfatase inhibitors. The inhibitors reviewed are classified into four main categories: Steroid sulfamate based inhibitors; Steroid non-sulfamate based inhibitors; Non-steroidal sulfamate based inhibitors; Non-steroidal non-sulfamate based inhibitors. A succinct overview of current treatment of cancer, estradiol precursors, STS enzyme and its role in breast cancer is herein described. PMID:26974384

  13. Multiple sulfatase deficiency is due to hypomorphic mutations of the SUMF1 gene.

    PubMed

    Annunziata, Ida; Bouchè, Valentina; Lombardi, Alessia; Settembre, Carmine; Ballabio, Andrea

    2007-09-01

    Sulfatases catalyze the hydrolysis of sulfate ester bonds from a wide variety of substrates and are implicated in several human inherited diseases. Multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the simultaneous deficiency of all known sulfatases. MSD is caused by mutations in the Sulfatase Modifying Factor 1 (SUMF1) gene encoding the alpha-formylglycine generating enzyme (FGE), which is responsible for the post-translational modification of sulfatases. In all MSD patients, residual sulfatase activities are detectable, at variable levels. To correlate the nature of the residual sulfatase activities detected in MSD patients with residual FGE activity, four FGE mutants (i.e. p.S155P, p.R224W, p.R345C, p.R349W) found in homozygosis in MSD patients were analyzed. Using viral-mediated gene delivery, these mutants were over-expressed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from a recently developed Sumf1 KO mouse line which is completely devoid of all sulfatase activities. The results obtained indicate that mutant SUMF1 cDNAs encode stable SUMF1 proteins which are of the appropriate molecular weight and are properly localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Expression of these cDNAs in Sumf1-/- MEFs results in partial rescue of sulfatase activities. These data indicate that MSD is due to hypomorphic SUMF1 mutations and suggest that complete loss of SUMF1 function is likely to be lethal in humans. PMID:17657823

  14. Promiscuity and diversity in 3-ketosteroid reductases

    PubMed Central

    Penning, Trevor M.; Chen, Mo; Jin, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Many steroid hormones contain a Δ4-3-ketosteroid functionality that undergoes sequential reduction by 5α- or 5β- steroid reductases to produce 5α- or 5β-dihydrosteroids; and a subsequent 3-keto-reduction to produce a series of isomeric tetrahydrosteroids. Apart from steroid 5α-reductase all the remaining enzymes involved in the two step reduction process in humans belong to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. The enzymes involved in 3-ketosteroid reduction are AKR1C1–AKR1C4. These enzymes are promiscuous and also catalyze 20-keto- and 17-keto-steroid reduction. Interest in these reactions exist since they regulate steroid hormone metabolism in the liver, and in steroid target tissues, they may regulate steroid hormone receptor occupancy. In addition many of the dihydrosteroids are not biologically inert. The same enzymes are also involved in the metabolism of synthetic steroids e.g., hormone replacement therapeutics, contraceptive agents and inhaled glucocorticoids, and may regulate drug efficacy at their cognate receptors. This article reviews these reactions and the structural basis for substrate diversity in AKR1C1–AKR1C4, ketosteroid reductases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ‘Steroid/Sterol signaling’. PMID:25500069

  15. Promiscuity and diversity in 3-ketosteroid reductases.

    PubMed

    Penning, Trevor M; Chen, Mo; Jin, Yi

    2015-07-01

    Many steroid hormones contain a Δ(4)-3-ketosteroid functionality that undergoes sequential reduction by 5α- or 5β- steroid reductases to produce 5α- or 5β-dihydrosteroids; and a subsequent 3-keto-reduction to produce a series of isomeric tetrahydrosteroids. Apart from steroid 5α-reductase all the remaining enzymes involved in the two step reduction process in humans belong to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. The enzymes involved in 3-ketosteroid reduction are AKR1C1-AKR1C4. These enzymes are promiscuous and also catalyze 20-keto- and 17-keto-steroid reduction. Interest in these reactions exist since they regulate steroid hormone metabolism in the liver, and in steroid target tissues, they may regulate steroid hormone receptor occupancy. In addition many of the dihydrosteroids are not biologically inert. The same enzymes are also involved in the metabolism of synthetic steroids e.g., hormone replacement therapeutics, contraceptive agents and inhaled glucocorticoids, and may regulate drug efficacy at their cognate receptors. This article reviews these reactions and the structural basis for substrate diversity in AKR1C1-AKR1C4, ketosteroid reductases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Steroid/Sterol signaling'. PMID:25500069

  16. Modeling catalytic promiscuity in the alkaline phosphatase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Fernanda; Amrein, Beat Anton

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that promiscuity plays a key role in the evolution of new enzyme function. This finding has helped to elucidate fundamental aspects of molecular evolution. While there has been extensive experimental work on enzyme promiscuity, computational modeling of the chemical details of such promiscuity has traditionally fallen behind the advances in experimental studies, not least due to the nearly prohibitive computational cost involved in examining multiple substrates with multiple potential mechanisms and binding modes in atomic detail with a reasonable degree of accuracy. However, recent advances in both computational methodologies and power have allowed us to reach a stage in the field where we can start to overcome this problem, and molecular simulations can now provide accurate and efficient descriptions of complex biological systems with substantially less computational cost. This has led to significant advances in our understanding of enzyme function and evolution in a broader sense. Here, we will discuss currently available computational approaches that can allow us to probe the underlying molecular basis for enzyme specificity and selectivity, discussing the inherent strengths and weaknesses of each approach. As a case study, we will discuss recent computational work on different members of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily (AP) using a range of different approaches, showing the complementary insights they have provided. We have selected this particular superfamily, as it poses a number of significant challenges for theory, ranging from the complexity of the actual reaction mechanisms involved to the reliable modeling of the catalytic metal centers, as well as the very large system sizes. We will demonstrate that, through current advances in methodologies, computational tools can provide significant insight into the molecular basis for catalytic promiscuity, and, therefore, in turn, the mechanisms of protein

  17. Sequence correlations shape protein promiscuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukatsky, David B.; Afek, Ariel; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2011-08-01

    We predict analytically that diagonal correlations of amino acid positions within protein sequences statistically enhance protein propensity for nonspecific binding. We use the term "promiscuity" to describe such nonspecific binding. Diagonal correlations represent statistically significant repeats of sequence patterns where amino acids of the same type are clustered together. The predicted effect is qualitatively robust with respect to the form of the microscopic interaction potentials and the average amino acid composition. Our analytical results provide an explanation for the enhanced diagonal correlations observed in hubs of eukaryotic organismal proteomes [J. Mol. Biol. 409, 439 (2011)], 10.1016/j.jmb.2011.03.056. We suggest experiments that will allow direct testing of the predicted effect.

  18. PubChem promiscuity: a web resource for gathering compound promiscuity data from PubChem

    PubMed Central

    Canny, Stephanie A.; Cruz, Yasel; Southern, Mark R.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Promiscuity counts allow for a better understanding of a compound's assay activity profile and drug potential. Although PubChem contains a vast amount of compound and assay data, it currently does not have a convenient or efficient method to obtain in-depth promiscuity counts for compounds. PubChem promiscuity fills this gap. It is a Java servlet that uses NCBI Entrez (eUtils) web services to interact with PubChem and provide promiscuity counts in a variety of categories along with compound descriptors, including PAINS-based functional group detection. Availability: http://chemutils.florida.scripps.edu/pcpromiscuity Contact: southern@scripps.edu PMID:22084255

  19. Galactokinase promiscuity: a question of flexibility?

    PubMed

    McAuley, Megan; Kristiansson, Helena; Huang, Meilan; Pey, Angel L; Timson, David J

    2016-02-01

    Galactokinase catalyses the first committed step of the Leloir pathway, i.e. the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of α-D-galactose at C1-OH. Reduced galactokinase activity results in the inherited metabolic disease type II galactosaemia. However, inhibition of galactokinase is considered a viable approach to treating more severe forms of galactosaemia (types I and III). Considerable progress has been made in the identification of high affinity, selective inhibitors. Although the structure of galactokinase from a variety of species is known, its catalytic mechanism remains uncertain. Although the bulk of evidence suggests that the reaction proceeds via an active site base mechanism, some experimental and theoretical studies contradict this. The enzyme has potential as a biocatalyst in the production of sugar 1-phosphates. This potential is limited by its high specificity. A variety of approaches have been taken to identify galactokinase variants which are more promiscuous. These have broadened galactokinase's specificity to include a wide range of D- and L-sugars. Initial studies suggest that some of these alterations result in increased flexibility at the active site. It is suggested that modulation of protein flexibility is at least as important as structural modifications in determining the success or failure of enzyme engineering. PMID:26862196

  20. Functional Promiscuity of the COG0720 Family

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Gabriela; Grochowski, Laura L.; Bonnett, Shilah; Xu, Huimin; Bailly, Marc; Haas-Blaby, Crysten; El Yacoubi, Basma; Iwata-Reuyl, Dirk; White, Robert H.; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2011-01-01

    The biosynthesis of GTP derived metabolites such as tetrahydrofolate (THF), biopterin (BH4), and the modified tRNA nucleosides queuosine (Q) and archaeosine (G+) relies on several enzymes of the Tunnel-fold superfamily. A subset of these proteins include the 6-pyruvoyl-tetrahydropterin (PTPS-II), PTPS-III, and PTPS-I homologs, all members of the COG0720 family, that have been previously shown to transform 7,8-dihydroneopterin triphosphate (H2NTP) into different products. PTPS-II catalyzes the formation of 6-pyruvoyltetrahydropterin in the BH4 pathway. PTPS-III catalyzes the formation of 6-hydroxylmethyl-7,8-dihydropterin in the THF pathway. PTPS-I catalyzes the formation of 6-carboxy-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropterin in the Q pathway. Genes of these three enzyme families are often misannotated as they are difficult to differentiate by sequence similarity alone. Using a combination of physical clustering, signature motif, and phylogenetic co-distribution analyses, in vivo complementation studies, and in vitro enzymatic assays, a complete reannotation of the COG0720 family was performed in prokaryotes. Notably, this work identified and experimentally validated dual function PTPS-I/III enzymes involved in both THF and Q biosynthesis. Both in vivo and in vitro analyses showed that the PTPS-I family could tolerate a translation of the active site cysteine and was inherently promiscuous, catalyzing different reactions on the same substrate, or the same reaction on different substrates. Finally, the analysis and experimental validation of several archaeal COG0720 members confirmed the role of PTPS-I in archaeosine biosynthesis, and resulted in the identification PTPS-III enzymes with variant signature sequences in Sulfolobus species. This study reveals an expanded versatility of the COG0720 family members and illustrates that for certain protein families, extensive comparative genomic analysis beyond homology is required to correctly predict function. PMID:21999246

  1. Determining the Degree of Promiscuity of Extensively Assayed Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Jasial, Swarit; Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In the context of polypharmacology, an emerging concept in drug discovery, promiscuity is rationalized as the ability of compounds to specifically interact with multiple targets. Promiscuity of drugs and bioactive compounds has thus far been analyzed computationally on the basis of activity annotations, without taking assay frequencies or inactivity records into account. Most recent estimates have indicated that bioactive compounds interact on average with only one to two targets, whereas drugs interact with six or more. In this study, we have further extended promiscuity analysis by identifying the most extensively assayed public domain compounds and systematically determining their promiscuity. These compounds were tested in hundreds of assays against hundreds of targets. In our analysis, assay promiscuity was distinguished from target promiscuity and separately analyzed for primary and confirmatory assays. Differences between the degree of assay and target promiscuity were surprisingly small and average and median degrees of target promiscuity of 2.6 to 3.4 and 2.0 were determined, respectively. Thus, target promiscuity remained at a low level even for most extensively tested active compounds. These findings provide further evidence that bioactive compounds are less promiscuous than drugs and have implications for pharmaceutical research. In addition to a possible explanation that drugs are more extensively tested for additional targets, the results would also support a “promiscuity enrichment model” according to which promiscuous compounds might be preferentially selected for therapeutic efficacy during clinical evaluation to ultimately become drugs. PMID:27082988

  2. Cerebroside Sulfatase Activity in Cultivated Human Skin Fibroblasts and Amniotic Fluid Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Carol W.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Prenatal monitoring for metachromatic leukodystrophy (a fatal inherited metabolic disorder) suggested that the determination of levels of cerebroside sulfatase in the amniotic fluid helped in the prenatal detection of this disorder. (DB)

  3. Detection of Sulfatase Enzyme Activity with a CatalyCEST MRI Contrast Agent.

    PubMed

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Fernández-Cuervo, Gabriela; Acfalle, Jasmine P; Pagel, Mark D

    2016-05-01

    A chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI contrast agent has been developed that detects sulfatase enzyme activity. The agent produces a CEST signal at δ=5.0 ppm before enzyme activity, and a second CEST signal appears at δ=9.0 ppm after the enzyme cleaves a sulfate group from the agent. The comparison of the two signals improved detection of sulfatase activity. PMID:26956002

  4. Neutral genetic drift can alter promiscuous protein functions, potentially aiding functional evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Jesse D; Romero, Philip A; Lu, Zhongyi; Arnold, Frances H

    2007-01-01

    Background Many of the mutations accumulated by naturally evolving proteins are neutral in the sense that they do not significantly alter a protein's ability to perform its primary biological function. However, new protein functions evolve when selection begins to favor other, "promiscuous" functions that are incidental to a protein's original biological role. If mutations that are neutral with respect to a protein's primary biological function cause substantial changes in promiscuous functions, these mutations could enable future functional evolution. Results Here we investigate this possibility experimentally by examining how cytochrome P450 enzymes that have evolved neutrally with respect to activity on a single substrate have changed in their abilities to catalyze reactions on five other substrates. We find that the enzymes have sometimes changed as much as four-fold in the promiscuous activities. The changes in promiscuous activities tend to increase with the number of mutations, and can be largely rationalized in terms of the chemical structures of the substrates. The activities on chemically similar substrates tend to change in a coordinated fashion, potentially providing a route for systematically predicting the change in one activity based on the measurement of several others. Conclusion Our work suggests that initially neutral genetic drift can lead to substantial changes in protein functions that are not currently under selection, in effect poising the proteins to more readily undergo functional evolution should selection favor new functions in the future. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Martijn Huynen, Fyodor Kondrashov, and Dan Tawfik (nominated by Christoph Adami). PMID:17598905

  5. No genome barriers to promiscuous DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewin, R.

    1984-06-01

    Farrelly and Butow (1983) used the term 'promiscuous DNA' in their report of the apparent natural transfer of yeast mitochondrial DNA sequences into the nuclear genome. Ellis (1982) applied the same term in an editorial comment. It is pointed out since that time the subject of DNA's promiscuity has exploded with a series of reports. According to a report by Stern (1984), movement of DNA sequences between chloroplasts and mitochondria is not just a rare event but is a rampant process. It was recently concluded that 'the widespread presence of ctDNA sequences in plant mtDNA is best regarded as a dramatic demonstration of the dynamo nature of interactions between the chloroplast and the mitochondrion, similar to the ongoing process of interorganellar DNA transfer already documented between mitochondrion and nucleus and between chloroplast and nucleus'.

  6. Bioinformatic Analysis of the Human Recombinant Iduronate 2-Sulfate Sulfatase

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Álvarez, Edwin D.; Rivera-Hoyos, Claudia M.; Landázuri, Patricia; Poutou-Piñales, Raúl A.; Pedroza-Rodríguez, Aura M.

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II is a human recessive disease linked to the X chromosome caused by deficiency of lysosomal enzyme Iduronate 2-Sulfate Sulfatase (IDS), which leads to accumulation of glycosaminoglycans in tissues and organs. The human enzyme has been expressed in Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris in attempt to develop more successful expression systems that allow the production of recombinant IDS for Enzyme Replacement Therapy (ERT). However, the preservation of native signal peptide in the sequence has caused conflicts in processing and recognition in the past, which led to problems in expression and enzyme activity. With the main object being the improvement of the expression system, we eliminate the native signal peptide of human recombinant IDS. The resulting sequence showed two modified codons, thus, our study aimed to analyze computationally the nucleotide sequence of the IDSnh without signal peptide in order to determine the 3D structure and other biochemical properties to compare them with the native human IDS (IDSnh). Results showed that there are no significant differences between both molecules in spite of the two-codon modifications detected in the recombinant DNA sequence. PMID:27335624

  7. Steroid Sulfatase Inhibitors Based on Phosphate and Thiophosphate Flavone Analogs.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Witold; Daśko, Mateusz; Masłyk, Maciej; Kubiński, Konrad; Rachon, Janusz; Demkowicz, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    A series of phosphate and thiophosphate flavone derivatives were synthesized and biologically evaluated in vitro for inhibition of steroid sulfatase (STS) activity. The described synthesis includes the straightforward preparation of 7-hydroxy-2-phenyl-4H-chromen-4-one 3a, 2-(4-fluorophenyl)-7-hydroxy-4H-chromen-4-one 3b, 7-hydroxy-2-(4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-4H-chromen-4-one 3c, 7-hydroxy-2-(p-tolyl)-4H-chromen-4-one 3d modified with different phosphate or thiophosphate moieties. The inhibitory properties of the synthesized compounds were tested against human placenta STS. Some of the novel STS inhibitors had good activities against STS. In particular, the bis-(4-oxo-2-(p-tolyl)-4H-chromen-7-yl) hydrogenthiophosphate, 6i had the most potent inhibitory effect with an IC50 value of 3.25 µM as compared to an IC50 value of 8.50 µM for the 2-(4-trifluoromethylphenyl)-chromen-4-one-7-O-sulfamate used as a reference. PMID:26415657

  8. [Proximity, intimacy and promiscuity in care].

    PubMed

    Flicourt, Nadia

    2015-04-01

    Lying at the heart of the intimacy of the other person, the nature of care supposes that the caregiver identifies the components resulting from the proximity and the invasion of the patient's personal space, where perceptions and representations give rise to reactive emotions and behaviour. Between modesty and nudity, proximity and promiscuity, caregivers have to adjust their approach of proper care, limiting the risks of intrusion. PMID:26043630

  9. A general binding mechanism for all human sulfatases by the formylglycine-generating enzyme.

    PubMed

    Roeser, Dirk; Preusser-Kunze, Andrea; Schmidt, Bernhard; Gasow, Kathrin; Wittmann, Julia G; Dierks, Thomas; von Figura, Kurt; Rudolph, Markus Georg

    2006-01-01

    The formylglycine (FGly)-generating enzyme (FGE) uses molecular oxygen to oxidize a conserved cysteine residue in all eukaryotic sulfatases to the catalytically active FGly. Sulfatases degrade and remodel sulfate esters, and inactivity of FGE results in multiple sulfatase deficiency, a fatal disease. The previously determined FGE crystal structure revealed two crucial cysteine residues in the active site, one of which was thought to be implicated in substrate binding. The other cysteine residue partakes in a novel oxygenase mechanism that does not rely on any cofactors. Here, we present crystal structures of the individual FGE cysteine mutants and employ chemical probing of wild-type FGE, which defined the cysteines to differ strongly in their reactivity. This striking difference in reactivity is explained by the distinct roles of these cysteine residues in the catalytic mechanism. Hitherto, an enzyme-substrate complex as an essential cornerstone for the structural evaluation of the FGly formation mechanism has remained elusive. We also present two FGE-substrate complexes with pentamer and heptamer peptides that mimic sulfatases. The peptides isolate a small cavity that is a likely binding site for molecular oxygen and could host reactive oxygen intermediates during cysteine oxidation. Importantly, these FGE-peptide complexes directly unveil the molecular bases of FGE substrate binding and specificity. Because of the conserved nature of FGE sequences in other organisms, this binding mechanism is of general validity. Furthermore, several disease-causing mutations in both FGE and sulfatases are explained by this binding mechanism. PMID:16368756

  10. Statistically enhanced promiscuity of structurally correlated patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukatsky, D. B.; Shakhnovich, E. I.

    2008-02-01

    We predict that patterns with correlated surface density of atoms have statistically higher promiscuity (ability to bind stronger to an arbitrary pattern) as compared with noncorrelated patterns with the same average surface density. We suggest that this constitutes a generic design principle for highly connected proteins (hubs) in protein interaction networks. We develop an analytical theory for this effect. We show that our key predictions are generic and independent, qualitatively, on the specific form of the interatomic interaction potential, provided it has a finite range.

  11. SUMF1 mutations affecting stability and activity of formylglycine generating enzyme predict clinical outcome in multiple sulfatase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Schlotawa, Lars; Ennemann, Eva Charlotte; Radhakrishnan, Karthikeyan; Schmidt, Bernhard; Chakrapani, Anupam; Christen, Hans-Jürgen; Moser, Hugo; Steinmann, Beat; Dierks, Thomas; Gärtner, Jutta

    2011-03-01

    Multiple Sulfatase Deficiency (MSD) is caused by mutations in the sulfatase-modifying factor 1 gene encoding the formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE). FGE post translationally activates all newly synthesized sulfatases by generating the catalytic residue formylglycine. Impaired FGE function leads to reduced sulfatase activities. Patients display combined clinical symptoms of single sulfatase deficiencies. For ten MSD patients, we determined the clinical phenotype, FGE expression, localization and stability, as well as residual FGE and sulfatase activities. A neonatal, very severe clinical phenotype resulted from a combination of two nonsense mutations leading to almost fully abrogated FGE activity, highly unstable FGE protein and nearly undetectable sulfatase activities. A late infantile mild phenotype resulted from FGE G263V leading to unstable protein but high residual FGE activity. Other missense mutations resulted in a late infantile severe phenotype because of unstable protein with low residual FGE activity. Patients with identical mutations displayed comparable clinical phenotypes. These data confirm the hypothesis that the phenotypic outcome in MSD depends on both residual FGE activity as well as protein stability. Predicting the clinical course in case of molecularly characterized mutations seems feasible, which will be helpful for genetic counseling and developing therapeutic strategies aiming at enhancement of FGE. PMID:21224894

  12. Estrone sulfatase versus estrone sulfotransferase in human breast cancer: potential clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, J R; Chetrite, G S

    1999-01-01

    Estrone sulfate (E1S) is concentrated in high levels in human breast cancer tissue. The values are particularly high in postmenopausal women and many times those circulating in the plasma. Also, the tissular concentration of this conjugate are significantly higher in tumoural tissue than in the area of the breast considered as normal. The enzyme which hydrolyzes E1S: sulfatase, as well as the enzyme which biosynthesises this conjugate: sulfotransferase, are present in significant concentrations in breast cancer tissue. Consequently, E1S is a balance between the activities of the two enzymes. As breast cancer tissue has all the enzymes necessary for the synthesis of estradiol (E2), and the formation of E2 from E1S 'via sulfatase' is the main pathway, it was very attractive to explore inhibitory agents of this enzyme. It was observed that different substances including antiestrogens (4-hydroxytamoxifen, ICI 164,384) and various progestins (promegestone, nomegestrol acetate, medrogestone) as well as Org OD14 (tibolone) can block the sulfatase activity. In addition, it was demonstrated that different progestins (medrogestone, nomegestrol acetate, TX-525) and org OD14 can stimulate the sulfotransferase activity for the formation of the biologically inactive E1S. It is concluded that the inhibition of sulfatase and the stimulation of sulfotransferase activity can open interesting possibilities to explore these effects in patients with breast cancer. PMID:10419004

  13. Location of Aryl Sulfatase in Conidia and Young Mycelia of Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Walter A.; Metzenberg, Robert L.

    1970-01-01

    Aryl sulfatase (arylsulfate sulfohydrolase, EC 3.1.6.1) was found to have multiple locations in Neurospora conidia. Some enzyme activity remained in the supernatant when a spore suspension was centrifuged or filtered. Part of the cell-bound activity could be detected by adding the assay ingredients to a suspension of intact spores (patent enzyme), and additional activity was only detectable when the spores were first treated to destroy their permeability barriers (cryptic enzyme). Such treatments include: disruption with an X-press, brief rinsing with chloroform or acetone, incubation at 60 C for 5 min, and incubation with phenethyl alcohol, nystatin, or ascosin. Part of the patent aryl sulfatase was inactivated by briefly acid treating the intact spores (no loss of conidial viability). This enzyme was considered to have a cell surface location. Some enzyme was acid-resistant in intact spores, but all of the enzyme was acid-sensitive in spores whose permeability barriers had been disrupted. The pH dependence, kinetic properties, and p-nitrophenyl sulfate uptake were investigated in acid-treated conidia. No aryl sulfatase was detected in ascospores. Young mycelia contained more aryl sulfatase than did conidia, but little, if any, was secreted into the growth medium. Cryptic activity was demonstrated in young mycelia by brief chloroform treatment or by rinsing the cells with 0.1 m acetate buffer. Enzyme activity in young mycelia was completely labile to acid treatment, as was cell viability. PMID:16559101

  14. Control of sulfatase activity by nomegestrol acetate in normal and cancerous human breast tissues.

    PubMed

    Chetrite, Gérard Samuel; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Shields-Botella, Jaqueline; Cortes-Prieto, Joaquin; Philippe, Jean-Claude; Pasqualini, Jorge Raul

    2005-01-01

    Nomegestrol acetate (NOMAC), a 17alpha-hydroxy-nor-progesterone derivative (17alpha-acetoxy-6-methyl-19-nor-4,6-pregnadiene-3,20-dione, the active substance in Lutenyl), is a potent and useful clinical synthetic progestin for the treatment of menopausal complaints and is under current development for oral contraception. Previous studies in this laboratory demonstrated that NOMAC can block sulfatase and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and transformation of estradiol (E2) in hormone-dependent MCF-7 and T-47D breast cancer cells. In the present study, the effect of NOMAC on sulfatase activity using total breast cancer tissue, compared to the effect in normal breast tissue, was explored. Slices of tumoral or normal breast tissues (45-65 mg) were incubated in buffer (20 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.2) with physiological concentrations of [3H]-estrone sulfate (5x10(-9) M), alone or in the presence of nomegestrol acetate (5x10(-5) - 5x10(-7) - 5x10(-9) M), for 4 h at 37 degrees C. Estrone sulfate (E1S), estrone (E1) and E2 were characterized by thin layer chromatography and quantified using the corresponding standard. It was observed that [3H]- E1S was only converted to [3H]- E1 and not to [3H]- E2, in normal or cancerous breast tissues, which suggests a low or no 17beta-HSD activity under these experimental conditions. The sulfatase activity was more intense with breast cancer tissue than normal tissue, since the concentrations of E1 were 42.5 +/- 3.4 and 27.2 +/- 2.5 pg/mg tissue, respectively. NOMAC, at the concentration of 5x10(-5) M, inhibited this conversion by 49.2% and 40.8% in cancerous and normal breast tissues, respectively. The sulfatase inhibition at low concentration (5x10(-7) M) was 32.5% and 22.8%, respectively. It is concluded that sulfatase activity is almost twice as potent in cancerous breast tissues than in normal tissues. Nomegestrol acetate is a strong anti-sulfatase agent, in particular with cancerous breast

  15. Discovery of a novel iota carrageenan sulfatase isolated from the marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas carrageenovora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genicot, Sabine; Groisillier, Agnès; Rogniaux, Hélène; Meslet-Cladière, Laurence; Barbeyron, Tristan; Helbert, William

    2014-08-01

    Carrageenans are sulfated polysaccharides extracted from the cell wall of some marine red algae. These polysaccharides are widely used as gelling, stabilizing, and viscosifying agents in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Since the rheological properties of these polysaccharides depend on their sulfate content, we screened several isolated marine bacteria for carrageenan specific sulfatase activity, in the aim of developing enzymatic bioconversion of carrageenans. As a result of the screening, an iota-carrageenan sulfatase was detected in the cell-free lysate of the marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas carrageenovora strain PscT. It was purified through Phenyl Sepharose and Diethylaminoethyl Sepharose chromatography. The pure enzyme, Psc ?-CgsA, was characterized. It had a molecular weight of 115.9 kDaltons and exhibited an optimal activity/stability at pH ~8.3 and at 40°C ± 5°C. It was inactivated by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride but not by ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid. Psc ?-CgsA specifically catalyzes the hydrolysis of the 4-S sulfate of iota-carrageenan. The purified enzyme could transform iota-carrageenan into hybrid iota-/alpha- or pure alpha-carrageenan under controlled conditions. The gene encoding Psc ?-CgsA, a protein of 1038 amino acids, was cloned into Escherichia coli, and the sequence analysis revealed that Psc ?-CgsA has more than 90% sequence identity with a putative uncharacterized protein Q3IKL4 from the marine strain Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC 125, but besides this did not share any homology to characterized sulfatases. Phylogenetic studies show that P. carrageenovora sulfatase thus represents the first characterized member of a new sulfatase family, with a C-terminal domain having strong similarity with the superfamily of amidohydrolases, highlighting the still unexplored diversity of marine polysaccharide modifying enzymes.

  16. Discovery of a novel iota carrageenan sulfatase isolated from the marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas carrageenovora

    PubMed Central

    Genicot, Sabine M.; Groisillier, Agnès; Rogniaux, Hélène; Meslet-Cladière, Laurence; Barbeyron, Tristan; Helbert, William

    2014-01-01

    Carrageenans are sulfated polysaccharides extracted from the cell wall of some marine red algae. These polysaccharides are widely used as gelling, stabilizing, and viscosifying agents in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Since the rheological properties of these polysaccharides depend on their sulfate content, we screened several isolated marine bacteria for carrageenan specific sulfatase activity, in the aim of developing enzymatic bioconversion of carrageenans. As a result of the screening, an iota-carrageenan sulfatase was detected in the cell-free lysate of the marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas carrageenovora strain PscT. It was purified through Phenyl Sepharose and Diethylaminoethyl Sepharose chromatography. The pure enzyme, Psc ι-CgsA, was characterized. It had a molecular weight of 115.9 kDaltons and exhibited an optimal activity/stability at pH ~8.3 and at 40 ± 5°C. It was inactivated by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride but not by ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid. Psc ι-CgsA specifically catalyzes the hydrolysis of the 4-S sulfate of iota-carrageenan. The purified enzyme could transform iota-carrageenan into hybrid iota-/alpha- or pure alpha-carrageenan under controlled conditions. The gene encoding Psc ι-CgsA, a protein of 1038 amino acids, was cloned into Escherichia coli, and the sequence analysis revealed that Psc ι-CgsA has more than 90% sequence identity with a putative uncharacterized protein Q3IKL4 from the marine strain Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC 125, but besides this did not share any homology to characterized sulfatases. Phylogenetic studies show that P. carrageenovora sulfatase thus represents the first characterized member of a new sulfatase family, with a C-terminal domain having strong similarity with the superfamily of amidohydrolases, highlighting the still unexplored diversity of marine polysaccharide modifying enzymes. PMID:25207269

  17. A Promiscuous De Novo Retro-Aldolase Catalyzes Asymmetric Michael Additions via Schiff Base Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Garrabou, Xavier; Beck, Tobias; Hilvert, Donald

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in computational design have enabled the development of primitive enzymes for a range of mechanistically distinct reactions. Here we show that the rudimentary active sites of these catalysts can give rise to useful chemical promiscuity. Specifically, RA95.5-8, designed and evolved as a retro-aldolase, also promotes asymmetric Michael additions of carbanions to unsaturated ketones with high rates and selectivities. The reactions proceed by amine catalysis, as indicated by mutagenesis and X-ray data. The inherent flexibility and tunability of this catalyst should make it a versatile platform for further optimization and/or mechanistic diversification by directed evolution. PMID:25777153

  18. Multisite Promiscuity in the Processing of Endogenous Substrates By Human Carboxylesterase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bencharit, S.; Edwards, C.C.; Morton, C.L.; Howard-Williams, E.L.; Kuhn, P.; Potter, P.M.; Redinbo, M.R.; /North Carolina U. /St. Jude Children's Hosp., Memphis /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-01-16

    Human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1) is a drug and endobiotic-processing serine hydrolase that exhibits relatively broad substrate specificity. It has been implicated in a variety of endogenous cholesterol metabolism pathways including the following apparently disparate reactions: cholesterol ester hydrolysis (CEH), fatty acyl Coenzyme A hydrolysis (FACoAH), acyl-Coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransfer (ACAT), and fatty acyl ethyl ester synthesis (FAEES). The structural basis for the ability of hCE1 to perform these catalytic actions involving large substrates and products has remained unclear. Here we present four crystal structures of the hCE1 glycoprotein in complexes with the following endogenous substrates or substrate analogues: Coenzyme A, the fatty acid palmitate, and the bile acids cholate and taurocholate. While the active site of hCE1 was known to be promiscuous and capable of interacting with a variety of chemically distinct ligands, these structures reveal that the enzyme contains two additional ligand-binding sites and that each site also exhibits relatively non-specific ligand-binding properties. Using this multisite promiscuity, hCE1 appears structurally capable of assembling several catalytic events depending, apparently, on the physiological state of the cellular environment. These results expand our understanding of enzyme promiscuity and indicate that, in the case of hCE1, multiple non-specific sites are employed to perform distinct catalytic actions.

  19. A superfamily of metalloenzymes unifies phosphopentomutase and cofactor-independent phosphoglycerate mutase with alkaline phosphatases and sulfatases.

    PubMed Central

    Galperin, M. Y.; Bairoch, A.; Koonin, E. V.

    1998-01-01

    Sequence analysis of the probable archaeal phosphoglycerate mutase resulted in the identification of a superfamily of metalloenzymes with similar metal-binding sites and predicted conserved structural fold. This superfamily unites alkaline phosphatase, N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase, and cerebroside sulfatase, enzymes with known three-dimensional structures, with phosphopentomutase, 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate-independent phosphoglycerate mutase, phosphoglycerol transferase, phosphonate monoesterase, streptomycin-6-phosphate phosphatase, alkaline phosphodiesterase/nucleotide pyrophosphatase PC-1, and several closely related sulfatases. In addition to the metal-binding motifs, all these enzymes contain a set of conserved amino acid residues that are likely to be required for the enzymatic activity. Mutational changes in the vicinity of these residues in several sulfatases cause mucopolysaccharidosis (Hunter, Maroteaux-Lamy, Morquio, and Sanfilippo syndromes) and metachromatic leucodystrophy. PMID:10082381

  20. The Promiscuous Nature of Stars in Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Jarrod R.; Shara, Michael M.

    2002-05-01

    The recent availability of special-purpose computers designed for calculating gravitational interactions of N bodies at extremely high speed has provided the means to model globular clusters on a star-by-star basis for the first time. By endeavoring to make the N-body codes that operate on these machines as realistic as possible, the addition of stellar evolution being one example, we are learning much about the interaction between the star cluster itself and the stars it contains. A fascinating aspect of this research is the ability to follow the orbits of individual stars in detail and to document the formation of observed exotic systems. This has revealed that many stars within a star cluster lead wildly promiscuous lives, interacting often intimately and in rapid succession with a variety of neighbors.

  1. Mutations Closer to the Active Site Improve the Promiscuous Aldolase Activity of 4-Oxalocrotonate Tautomerase More Effectively than Distant Mutations.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Mehran; van der Meer, Jan-Ytzen; Geertsema, Edzard M; Poddar, Harshwardhan; Baas, Bert-Jan; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2016-07-01

    The enzyme 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), which catalyzes enol-keto tautomerization as part of a degradative pathway for aromatic hydrocarbons, promiscuously catalyzes various carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions. These include the aldol condensation of acetaldehyde with benzaldehyde to yield cinnamaldehyde. Here, we demonstrate that 4-OT can be engineered into a more efficient aldolase for this condensation reaction, with a >5000-fold improvement in catalytic efficiency (kcat /Km ) and a >10(7) -fold change in reaction specificity, by exploring small libraries in which only "hotspots" are varied. The hotspots were identified by systematic mutagenesis (covering each residue), followed by a screen for single mutations that give a strong improvement in the desired aldolase activity. All beneficial mutations were near the active site of 4-OT, thus underpinning the notion that new catalytic activities of a promiscuous enzyme are more effectively enhanced by mutations close to the active site. PMID:27238293

  2. Promiscuity and electrostatic flexibility in the alkaline phosphatase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Pabis, Anna; Kamerlin, Shina Caroline Lynn

    2016-04-01

    Catalytic promiscuity, that is, the ability of single enzymes to facilitate the turnover of multiple, chemically distinct substrates, is a widespread phenomenon that plays an important role in the evolution of enzyme function. Additionally, such pre-existing multifunctionality can be harnessed in artificial enzyme design. The members of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily have served extensively as both experimental and computational model systems for enhancing our understanding of catalytic promiscuity. In this Opinion, we present key recent computational studies into the catalytic activity of these highly promiscuous enzymes, highlighting the valuable insight they have provided into both the molecular basis for catalytic promiscuity in general, and its implications for the evolution of phosphatase activity. PMID:26716576

  3. Sexual promiscuity: knowledge of dangers in institutions of higher learning.

    PubMed

    Ebong, R D

    1994-06-01

    Knowledge of dangers of sexual promiscuity was assessed in 2 institutions of higher learning. The objectives were to find out the knowledge of medical and social consequences as well as the factors responsible for sexual promiscuity among Nigerian youths. The study also assessed the discrepancies in societal concept of sex norms for males and females. The result was used as an index to determine the need for sex education for Nigerian youths. A total of 200 students (100 from each school) was assessed by random selection and use of a questionnaire. The result showed that students had a fair knowledge of sexual promiscuity, although in terms of medical consequences the knowledge was low for both groups. On social consequences, the knowledge was fair for both groups. Students agreed that lack of financial support and of supervision from parents and teachers were among the causes of sexual promiscuity. Recommendations were made for Health Education in these areas in institutions of higher learning. Also, recommendations were made for parental education on how to bring up, and care for, their adolescents to reduce the problems of sexual promiscuity. It was also recommended that a compulsory course on sexual promiscuity should be included in the syllabus in institutions of higher learning. PMID:7932483

  4. Is Promiscuous CALB a Good Scaffold for Designing New Epoxidases?

    PubMed

    Bordes, Isabel; Recatalá, José; Świderek, Katarzyna; Moliner, Vicent

    2015-01-01

    Candida Antarctica lipase B (CALB) is a well-known enzyme, especially because of its promiscuous activity. Due to its properties, CALB was widely used as a benchmark for designing new catalysts for important organic reactions. The active site of CALB is very similar to that of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) formed by a nucleophile-histidine-acid catalytic triad and an oxyanion hole typical for molecular structures derived from processes of α/β hydrolases. In this work we are exploring these similarities and proposing a Ser105Asp variant of CALB as a new catalyst for epoxide hydrolysis. In particular, the hydrolysis of the trans-diphenylpropene oxide (t-DPPO) is studied by means of quantum cluster models mimicking the active site of both enzymes. Our results, based on semi-empirical and DFT calculations, suggest that mutant Ser105Asp CALB is a good protein scaffold to be used for the bio-synthesis of chiral compounds. PMID:26404218

  5. Steroid sulfatase-deficient mice exhibit endophenotypes relevant to Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Trent, Simon; Dennehy, Alison; Richardson, Heather; Ojarikre, Obah A.; Burgoyne, Paul S.; Humby, Trevor; Davies, William

    2012-01-01

    Summary Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a common neurodevelopmental condition characterised by inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity; it is frequently co-morbid with anxiety and conduct disorders, sleep perturbation and abnormal consummatory behaviours. Recent studies have implicated the neurosteroid-modulating enzyme steroid sulfatase (STS) as a modulator of ADHD-related endophenotypes. The effects of steroid sulfatase deficiency on homecage activity, feeding/drinking behaviours, anxiety-related behaviours (assayed in light-dark box and open field paradigms), social dominance and serum steroid hormone levels were determined by comparing 40,XY and 39,XY*O mice. Subsequently, mice administered the steroid sulfatase inhibitor COUMATE acutely were compared to vehicle-treated mice on behavioural tasks sensitive to enzyme deficiency to dissociate between its developmental and ongoing effects. 39,XY*O mice exhibited heightened reactivity to a novel environment, hyperactivity in the active phase, and increased water (but not food) consumption relative to 40,XY mice during a 24 h period; the former group also demonstrated evidence for heightened emotional reactivity. There was no difference in social dominance between the 40,XY and 39,XY*O mice. COUMATE administration had no effect on homecage activity, water consumption or anxiety measures in the open field. 39,XY*O mice exhibited significantly lower dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) serum levels than 40,XY mice, but equivalent corticosterone levels. Together with previous data, the present results suggest that steroid sulfatase may influence core and associated ADHD behavioural endophenotypes via both developmental and ongoing mechanisms, and that the 39,XY*O model may represent a useful tool for elucidating the neurobiological basis of these endophenotypes. PMID:21723668

  6. Genetic and Pharmacological Modulation of the Steroid Sulfatase Axis Improves Response Control; Comparison with Drugs Used in ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Davies, William; Humby, Trevor; Trent, Simon; Eddy, Jessica B; Ojarikre, Obah A; Wilkinson, Lawrence S

    2014-01-01

    Maladaptive response control is a feature of many neuropsychiatric conditions, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). As ADHD is more commonly diagnosed in males than females, a pathogenic role for sex-linked genes has been suggested. Deletion or point mutation of the X-linked STS gene, encoding the enzyme steroid sulfatase (STS) influences risk for ADHD. We examined whether deletion of the Sts gene in the 39,XY*O mouse model, or pharmacological manipulation of the STS axis, via administration of the enzyme substrate dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate or the enzyme inhibitor COUMATE, influenced behavior in a novel murine analog of the stop-signal reaction time task used to detect inhibitory deficits in individuals with ADHD. Unexpectedly, both the genetic and pharmacological treatments resulted in enhanced response control, manifest as highly specific effects in the ability to cancel a prepotent action. For all three manipulations, the effect size was comparable to that seen with the commonly used ADHD therapeutics methylphenidate and atomoxetine. Hence, converging genetic and pharmacological evidence indicates that the STS axis is involved in inhibitory processes and can be manipulated to give rise to improvements in response control. While the precise neurobiological mechanism(s) underlying the effects remain to be established, there is the potential for exploiting this pathway in the treatment of disorders where failures in behavioral inhibition are prominent. PMID:24842408

  7. Finding promiscuous old drugs for new uses.

    PubMed

    Ekins, Sean; Williams, Antony J

    2011-08-01

    From research published in the last six years we have identified 34 studies that have screened libraries of FDA-approved drugs against various whole cell or target assays. These studies have each identified one or more compounds with a suggested new bioactivity that had not been described previously. We now show that 13 of these drugs were active against more than one additional disease, thereby suggesting a degree of promiscuity. We also show that following compilation of all the studies, 109 molecules were identified by screening in vitro. These molecules appear to be statistically more hydrophobic with a higher molecular weight and AlogP than orphan-designated products with at least one marketing approval for a common disease indication or one marketing approval for a rare disease from the FDA's rare disease research database. Capturing these in vitro data on old drugs for new uses will be important for potential reuse and analysis by others to repurpose or reposition these or other existing drugs. We have created databases which can be searched by the public and envisage that these can be updated as more studies are published. PMID:21607776

  8. Sanfilippo D syndrome: Estimation of N-acetylglucosamine-6-sulfatase activity with a radiolabeled monosulfated disaccharide substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, C.; Hopwood, J.J.

    1989-02-01

    N-Acetylglucosamine-6-sulfatase activity was assayed by incubation of the radiolabeled disaccharide O-(a-N-acetylglucosamine-6-sulfate)-(1----3)-L-(6-/sup 3/H)-idonic acid (GlcNAc6S-IdOA), with homogenates of leucocytes, cultured fibroblasts, and urine from normal individuals, patients affected with N-acetylglucosamine-6-sulfatase-deficiency (Sanfilippo D syndrome, mucopolysaccharidosis type IIID), and patients affected with other mucopolysaccharidoses and lysosomal storage disorders. The assay clearly distinguished affected homozygotes from their obligate heterozygotes and normal controls and other lysosomal storage disorders. Sulfatase activity in fibroblasts, leucocytes, and urine toward GlcNAc6S-IdOA exhibited a pH optimum at 4.2, 4.5, and 5.1, respectively. Sulfatase activity in fibroblasts had an apparent Km of 7.2 microM and was significantly inhibited by both sulfate and phosphate ions. The action of fibroblast or leucocyte N-acetylglucosamine-6-sulfatase activity toward GlcNAc6S-IdOA is recommended for the routine enzymatic detection and classification of mucopolysaccharidosis type IIID patients.

  9. Evolving new protein-protein interaction specificity through promiscuous intermediates.

    PubMed

    Aakre, Christopher D; Herrou, Julien; Phung, Tuyen N; Perchuk, Barrett S; Crosson, Sean; Laub, Michael T

    2015-10-22

    Interacting proteins typically coevolve, and the identification of coevolving amino acids can pinpoint residues required for interaction specificity. This approach often assumes that an interface-disrupting mutation in one protein drives selection of a compensatory mutation in its partner during evolution. However, this model requires a non-functional intermediate state prior to the compensatory change. Alternatively, a mutation in one protein could first broaden its specificity, allowing changes in its partner, followed by a specificity-restricting mutation. Using bacterial toxin-antitoxin systems, we demonstrate the plausibility of this second, promiscuity-based model. By screening large libraries of interface mutants, we show that toxins and antitoxins with high specificity are frequently connected in sequence space to more promiscuous variants that can serve as intermediates during a reprogramming of interaction specificity. We propose that the abundance of promiscuous variants promotes the expansion and diversification of toxin-antitoxin systems and other paralogous protein families during evolution. PMID:26478181

  10. Promiscuity and the evolution of sexual transmitted diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Sebastián; Kuperman, Marcelo; Ferreira da Costa Gomes, Marcelo

    2003-09-01

    We study the relation between different social behaviors and the onset of epidemics in a model for the dynamics of sexual transmitted diseases. The model considers the society as a system of individual sexuated agents that can be organized in couples and interact with each other. The different social behaviors are incorporated assigning what we call a promiscuity value to each individual agent. The individual promiscuity is taken from a distribution and represents the daily probability of going out to look for a sexual partner, abandoning its eventual mate. In terms of this parameter we find a threshold for the epidemic which is much lower than the classical SIR model prediction, i.e., R0 (basic reproductive number)=1. Different forms for the distribution of the population promiscuity are considered showing that the threshold is weakly sensitive to them. We study the homosexual and the heterosexual case as well.

  11. Extensive HLA class I allele promiscuity among viral CTL epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Frahm, Nicole; Yusim, Karina; Suscovich, Todd J.; Adams, Sharon; Sidney, John; Hraber, Peter; Hewitt, Hannah S.; Linde, Caitlyn H.; Kavanagh, Daniel G.; Woodberry, Tonia; Henry, Leah M.; Faircloth, Kellie; Listgarten, Jennifer; Kadie, Carl; Jojic, Nebojsa; Sango, Kaori; Brown, Nancy V.; Pae, Eunice; Zaman, M. Tauheed; Bihl, Florian; Khatri, Ashok; John, Mina; Mallal, Simon; Marincola, Francesco M.; Walker, Bruce D.; Sette, Alessandro; Heckerman, David; Korber, Bette T.; Brander, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Summary Promiscuous binding of T helper epitopes to MHC class II molecules has been well established, but few examples of promiscuous class I restricted epitopes exist. To address the extent of promiscuity of HLA class I peptides, responses to 242 well-defined viral epitopes were tested in 100 subjects regardless of the individuals’ HLA type. Surprisingly, half of all detected responses were seen in the absence of the originally reported restricting HLA class I allele, and only 3% of epitopes were recognized exclusively in the presence of their original allele. Functional assays confirmed the frequent recognition of HLA class I-restricted T cell epitopes on several alternative alleles across HLA class I supertypes and encoded on different class I loci. These data have significant implications for the understanding of MHC class I restricted antigen presentation and vaccine development. PMID:17705138

  12. Promiscuity and selectivity of bitter molecules and their receptors.

    PubMed

    Di Pizio, Antonella; Niv, Masha Y

    2015-07-15

    Bitter taste is essential for survival, as it protects against consuming poisonous compounds, which are often bitter. Bitter taste perception is mediated by bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs), a subfamily of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). The number of TAS2R subtypes is species-dependent, and varies from 3 in chicken to 50 in frog. TAS2Rs present an intriguing case for studying promiscuity: some of the receptors are still orphan, or have few known agonists, while others can be activated by numerous, structurally dissimilar compounds. The ligands also vary in the repertoire of TAS2Rs that they activate: some bitter compounds are selective toward a single TAS2R, while others activate multiple TAS2Rs. Selectivity/promiscuity profile of bitter taste receptors and their compounds was explored by a chemoinformatic approach. TAS2R-promiscuous and TAS2R-selective bitter molecules were found to differ in chemical features, such as AlogP, E-state, total charge, number of rings, globularity, and heavy atom count. This allowed the prediction of bitter ligand selectivity toward TAS2Rs. Interestingly, while promiscuous TAS2Rs are activated by both TAS2R-promiscuous and TAS2R-selective compounds, almost all selective TAS2Rs in human are activated by promiscuous compounds, which are recognized by other TAS2Rs anyway. Thus, unique ligands, that may have been the evolutionary driving force for development of selective TAS2Rs, still need to be unraveled. PMID:25934224

  13. Multiple sulfatase deficiency is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the human C(alpha)-formylglycine generating enzyme.

    PubMed

    Dierks, Thomas; Schmidt, Bernhard; Borissenko, Ljudmila V; Peng, Jianhe; Preusser, Andrea; Mariappan, Malaiyalam; von Figura, Kurt

    2003-05-16

    C(alpha)-formylglycine (FGly) is the catalytic residue in the active site of eukaryotic sulfatases. It is posttranslationally generated from a cysteine in the endoplasmic reticulum. The genetic defect of FGly formation causes multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD), a lysosomal storage disorder. We purified the FGly generating enzyme (FGE) and identified its gene and nine mutations in seven MSD patients. In patient fibroblasts, the activity of sulfatases is partially restored by transduction of FGE encoding cDNA, but not by cDNA carrying an MSD mutation. The gene encoding FGE is highly conserved among pro- and eukaryotes and has a paralog of unknown function in vertebrates. FGE is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and is predicted to have a tripartite domain structure. PMID:12757705

  14. Molecular basis for multiple sulfatase deficiency and mechanism for formylglycine generation of the human formylglycine-generating enzyme.

    PubMed

    Dierks, Thomas; Dickmanns, Achim; Preusser-Kunze, Andrea; Schmidt, Bernhard; Mariappan, Malaiyalam; von Figura, Kurt; Ficner, Ralf; Rudolph, Markus Georg

    2005-05-20

    Sulfatases are enzymes essential for degradation and remodeling of sulfate esters. Formylglycine (FGly), the key catalytic residue in the active site, is unique to sulfatases. In higher eukaryotes, FGly is generated from a cysteine precursor by the FGly-generating enzyme (FGE). Inactivity of FGE results in multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD), a fatal autosomal recessive syndrome. Based on the crystal structure, we report that FGE is a single-domain monomer with a surprising paucity of secondary structure and adopts a unique fold. The effect of all 18 missense mutations found in MSD patients is explained by the FGE structure, providing a molecular basis of MSD. The catalytic mechanism of FGly generation was elucidated by six high-resolution structures of FGE in different redox environments. The structures allow formulation of a novel oxygenase mechanism whereby FGE utilizes molecular oxygen to generate FGly via a cysteine sulfenic acid intermediate. PMID:15907468

  15. Harnessing natural product assembly lines: structure, promiscuity, and engineering.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Christopher C; Williams, Gavin J

    2016-03-01

    Many therapeutically relevant natural products are biosynthesized by the action of giant mega-enzyme assembly lines. By leveraging the specificity, promiscuity, and modularity of assembly lines, a variety of strategies has been developed that enables the biosynthesis of modified natural products. This review briefly summarizes recent structural advances related to natural product assembly lines, discusses chemical approaches to probing assembly line structures in the absence of traditional biophysical data, and surveys efforts that harness the inherent or engineered promiscuity of assembly lines for the synthesis of non-natural polyketides and non-ribosomal peptide analogues. PMID:26527577

  16. Evidence that the Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron chondroitin lyase II gene is adjacent to the chondro-4-sulfatase gene and may be part of the same operon.

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, E P; Salyers, A A

    1987-01-01

    The chondroitin lyase II gene from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron has previously been cloned in Escherichia coli on a 7.8-kilobase (kb) fragment (pA818). In E. coli, the chondroitin lyase II gene appeared to be expressed from a promoter that was about 0.5 kb from the beginning of the gene. However, when a subcloned 5-kb fragment from pA818 which contained the chondroitin lyase II gene and the promoter from which the gene is expressed in E. coli was introduced into B. thetaiotaomicron on a multicopy plasmid (pEG800), the chondroitin lyase specific activity of B. thetaiotaomicron was not altered. Further evidence that the promoter that is recognized in E. coli may not be the promoter from which the chondroitin lyase II gene is transcribed in B. thetaiotaomicron was obtained by making an insertion in the B. thetaiotaomicron chromosome at a point which is 1 kb upstream from the chondroitin lyase II gene. This insertion stopped synthesis of the chondroitin lyase II gene product, as would be predicted if the gene was part of an operon and was transcribed in B. thetaiotaomicron from a promoter that was at least 1 kb upstream from the chondroitin lyase II gene. A region of pA818 which was adjacent to the chondroitin lyase II gene and which included the region used to make the insertional mutation was found to code for chondro-4-sulfatase, an enzyme that breaks down one of the products of the chondroitin lyase reaction. The upstream insertion mutant of B. thetaiotaomicron which stopped synthesis of chondroitin lyase II had no detectable chondro-4-sulfatase activity. This mutant was still able to grow on chondroitin sulfate, although the rate of growth was slower than that of the wild type. Images PMID:3029024

  17. Much More than Power: The Pedagogy of Promiscuous Black Feminism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huckaby, M. Francyne

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores promiscuous black feminism by juxtaposing black feminism, Foucualt's poststructuralism, and my grandmother. The tensions created by these juxtapositions illuminate the ways black feminism and poststructuralism are resources and challenges to each other, and how both offer understandings of the relations at play that shape…

  18. Promiscuity in mice is associated with increased vaginal bacterial diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macmanes, Matthew David

    2011-11-01

    Differences in the number of sexual partners (i.e., mating system) have the potential to exert a strong influence on the bacterial communities present in reproductive structures like the vagina. Because this structure serves as a conduit for gametes, bacteria present there may have a pronounced, direct effect on host reproductive success. As a first step towards the identification of the relationship between sexual behavior and potentially pathogenic bacterial communities inhabiting vital reproductive structures, as well as their potential effects on fitness, I sought to quantify differences in bacterial diversity in a promiscuous and monogamous mammal species. To accomplish this, I used two sympatric species of Peromyscus rodents— Peromyscus californicus and Peromyscus maniculatus that differ with regard to the number of sexual partners per individual to test the hypothesis that bacterial diversity should be greater in the promiscuous P. maniculatus relative to the monogamous P. californicus. As predicted, phylogenetically controlled and operational taxonomic unit-based indices of bacterial diversity indicated that diversity is greater in the promiscuous species. These results provide important new insights into the effects of mating system on bacterial diversity in free-living vertebrates, and may suggest a potential cost of promiscuity.

  19. NDM-1, the ultimate promiscuous enzyme: substrate recognition and catalytic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngchang; Cunningham, Mark A.; Mire, Joseph; Tesar, Christine; Sacchettini, James; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    The specter of a return to an era in which infectious disease looms as a significant threat to human health is not just hyperbole; there are serious concerns about the widespread overuse and misuse of antibiotics contributing to increased antibiotic resistance in pathogens. The recent discovery of a new enzyme, first identified in Klebsiella pneumoniae from a patient from New Delhi and denoted as NDM-1, represents an example of extreme promiscuity: It hydrolyzes and inactivates nearly all known β-lactam-based antibiotics with startling efficiency. NDM-1 can utilize different metal cofactors and seems to exploit an alternative mechanism based on the reaction conditions. Here we report the results of a combined experimental and theoretical study that examines the substrate, metal binding, and catalytic mechanism of the enzyme. We utilize structures obtained through X-ray crystallography, biochemical assays, and numerical simulation to construct a model of the enzyme catalytic pathway. The NDM-1 enzyme interacts with the substrate solely through zinc, or other metals, bound in the active site, explaining the observed lack of specificity against a broad range of β-lactam antibiotic agents. The zinc ions also serve to activate a water molecule that hydrolyzes the β-lactam ring through a proton shuttle.—Kim, Y., Cunningham, M. A.; Mire, J., Tesar, C., Sacchettini, J., Joachimiak, A. NDM-1, the ultimate promiscuous enzyme: substrate recognition and catalytic mechanism. PMID:23363572

  20. Production of Sactipeptides in Escherichia coli: Probing the Substrate Promiscuity of Subtilosin A Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Himes, Paul M; Allen, Scott E; Hwang, Sungwon; Bowers, Albert A

    2016-06-17

    Sactipeptides are peptide-derived natural products that are processed by remarkable, radical-mediated cysteine sulfur to α-carbon coupling reactions. The resulting sactionine thioether linkages give rise to the unique defined structures and concomitant biological activities of sactipeptides. An E. coli heterologous expression system, based on the biosynthesis of one such sactipeptide, subtilosin A, is described and this expression system is exploited to probe the promiscuity of the subtilosin A sactionine bond-forming enzyme, AlbA. These efforts allowed the facile expression and isolation of a small library of mutant sactipeptides based on the subtilosin A precursor peptide, demonstrating broad substrate promiscuity where none was previously known. Importantly, we show that the positions of the sactionine linkages can be moved, giving rise to new, unnatural sactipeptide structures. E. coli heterologous expression also allowed incorporation of unnatural amino acids into sactipeptides by means of amber-suppression technology, potentially opening up new chemistry and new applications for unnatural sactipeptides. PMID:27019323

  1. Tissue-specific expression of human arylsulfatase-C isozymes and steroid sulfatase.

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, D G; Chang, P L

    1987-01-01

    Steroid sulfatase (STS; E.C.3.1.6.2), which acts on 3-hydroxysteroid sulfates, and arylsulfatase-C (ARC; E.C.3.1.6.1), assayed with aromatic artificial substrates, are both membrane-bound, microsomal enzymes with alkaline pH optima. Although they copurify during preparation and their gene loci are mapped to the short arm of the human X chromosome where they appear to have escaped from X inactivation, it has not been settled whether STS and ARC are the same enzyme or not. Recent work from our laboratory has shown that ARC exists in two electrophoretically distinct forms in human fibroblasts. We now report that these two forms--the faster migrating (F) and more slowly migrating (S)--occur in human tissues. Each of 11 human tissue types from 10 subjects showed a consistent pattern of ARC isozymes. Thyroid, heart, spleen, skeletal muscle, and adrenal tissue mainly had the S form. In contrast, kidney, liver, and pancreas tissue had mainly the F form, while gonadal, lung, and intestinal tissue had both the S and the F forms. The question of escape of their gene locus from X-chromosome inactivation was examined by comparing the specific activities of ARC and STS in male-derived vis-à-vis female-derived tissues. The majority of the tissues did not show any significant difference in these activities between the sexes, the exceptions being heart muscle, gonadal, and kidney tissue. None showed the 1:2 ratio between male- and female-derived tissues expected of a locus that had escaped X inactivation. The question of identity between ARC and STS was examined by comparing the ratios of their activities in these tissue types: if the enzymes were identical, the ratios of their activities should have remained constant across the different tissue types. It was thus shown that ARC activity varied by as much as 100-fold, depending on the ARC isozymic pattern of the tissue. STS, measured as estrone sulfatase and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfatase, did not show similar variations. This

  2. Engineering stereocontrol into an aldolase-catalysed reaction.

    PubMed

    Lamble, Henry J; Danson, Michael J; Hough, David W; Bull, Steven D

    2005-01-01

    A novel thermostable aldolase has been developed for synthetic application, and substrate engineering has been used to induce stereocontrol into aldol reactions of this naturally-promiscuous enzyme. PMID:15614394

  3. Designing of promiscuous inhibitors against pancreatic cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rahul; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Singla, Deepak; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2014-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains the most devastating disease with worst prognosis. There is a pressing need to accelerate the drug discovery process to identify new effective drug candidates against pancreatic cancer. We have developed QSAR models for predicting promiscuous inhibitors using the pharmacological data. Our models achieved maximum Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.86, when evaluated on 10-fold cross-validation. Our models have also successfully validated the drug-to-oncogene relationship and further we used these models to screen FDA approved drugs and tested them in vitro. We have integrated these models in a webserver named as DiPCell, which will be useful for screening and designing novel promiscuous drug molecules. We have also identified the most and least effective drugs for pancreatic cancer cell lines. On the other side, we have identified resistant pancreatic cancer cell lines, which need investigative scanner on them to put light on resistant mechanism in pancreatic cancer.

  4. Specificity, promiscuity, and the structure of complex information processing networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Christopher

    2006-03-01

    Both the top-down designs of engineered systems and the bottom-up serendipities of biological evolution must negotiate tradeoffs between specificity and control: overly specific interactions between components can make systems brittle and unevolvable, while more generic interactions can require elaborate control in order to aggregate specificity from distributed pieces. Complex information processing systems reveal network organizations that navigate this landscape of constraints: regulatory and signaling networks in cells involve the coordination of molecular interactions that are surprisingly promiscuous, and object-oriented design in software systems emphasizes the polymorphic composition of objects of minimal necessary specificity [C.R. Myers, Phys Rev E 68, 046116 (2003)]. Models of information processing arising both in systems biology and engineered computation are explored to better understand how particular network organizations can coordinate the activity of promiscuous components to achieve robust and evolvable function.

  5. Unattractive, promiscuous and heavy drinkers: perceptions of women with tattoos.

    PubMed

    Swami, Viren; Furnham, Adrian

    2007-12-01

    This study examined social and physical perceptions of blonde and brunette women with different degrees of tattooing. Eighty-four female and 76 male undergraduates rated a series of 16 female line drawings that varied in 2 levels of hair colour and 8 levels of tattooing. Ratings were made for physical attractiveness and sexual promiscuity, as well as estimates of the number of alcohol units consumed on a typical night out. Results showed that tattooed women were rated as less physically attractive, more sexually promiscuous and heavier drinkers than untattooed women, with more negative ratings with increasing number of tattoos. There were also weak interactions between body art and hair colour, with blonde women in general rated more negatively than brunettes. Results are discussed in terms of stereotypes about women who have tattoos and the effects of such stereotypes on well-being. PMID:18089280

  6. Designing of promiscuous inhibitors against pancreatic cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rahul; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Singla, Deepak; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains the most devastating disease with worst prognosis. There is a pressing need to accelerate the drug discovery process to identify new effective drug candidates against pancreatic cancer. We have developed QSAR models for predicting promiscuous inhibitors using the pharmacological data. Our models achieved maximum Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.86, when evaluated on 10-fold cross-validation. Our models have also successfully validated the drug-to-oncogene relationship and further we used these models to screen FDA approved drugs and tested them in vitro. We have integrated these models in a webserver named as DiPCell, which will be useful for screening and designing novel promiscuous drug molecules. We have also identified the most and least effective drugs for pancreatic cancer cell lines. On the other side, we have identified resistant pancreatic cancer cell lines, which need investigative scanner on them to put light on resistant mechanism in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24728108

  7. Crystal Structure and Promiscuous Partitioning of a Covalent Intermediate Common in the Pentein Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Linsky, Thomas W.; Monzingo, Arthur F.; Stone, Everett M.; Robertus, Jon D.; Fast, Walter

    2008-01-01

    Summary Many enzymes in the pentein superfamily use a transient covalent intermediate in their catalytic mechanisms. Here, we use a mutant (H162G) dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and an alternative substrate, S-methyl-L-thiocitrulline, to trap, crystallize and determine the 2.8 Å resolution structure of a stable covalent adduct which mimics this reaction intermediate. Observed interactions between the trapped adduct and active site residues along with comparison to a previously known product-bound structure provide insight into the normal catalytic mechanism. The plane of the trapped thiouronium intermediate is angled away from that seen in the product and substrate complexes, allowing for an altered angle of attack between the nucleophiles of the first and second half reactions. The stable covalent adduct is also capable of further reaction. Addition of exogenous imidazole can rescue the original hydrolytic activity. Notably, addition of other exogenous amines can instead yield substituted arginine products. These alternative products arise from partitioning of the trapped intermediate into the evolutionarily related amidinotransferase reaction pathway. The enzyme scaffold provides both selectivity and catalysis for the amidinotransferase reaction, underscoring commonalities between different reaction pathways found in this mechanistically diverse enzyme superfamily. The promiscuous partitioning of this covalent intermediate may also help to illuminate the evolutionary history of these enzymes. PMID:18482699

  8. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA: Common double deletion in the N-Acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase gene (GALNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Hori, Toshinori; Tomatsu, Shunji; Fukuda, Seiji

    1995-04-10

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS). We found two separate deletions of nearly 8.0 and 6.0 kb in the GALNS gene, including some exons. There are Alu repetitive elements near the breakpoints of the 8.0-kb deletion, and this deletion resulted from an Alu-Alu recombination. The other 6.0-kb deletion involved illegitimate recombinational events between incomplete short direct repeats of 8 bp at deletion breakpoints. The same rearrangement has been observed in a heteroallelic state in four unrelated patients. This is the first documentation of a common double deletion a gene that is not a member of a gene cluster. 39 refs., 5 figs.

  9. In situ imaging and proteome profiling indicate andrographolide is a highly promiscuous compound.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Wijaya, Hadhi; Samanta, Sanjay; Lam, Yulin; Yao, Shao Q

    2015-01-01

    Natural products represent an enormous source of pharmacologically useful compounds, and are often used as the starting point in modern drug discovery. Many biologically interesting natural products are however not being pursued as potential drug candidates, partly due to a lack of well-defined mechanism-of-action. Traditional in vitro methods for target identification of natural products based on affinity protein enrichment from crude cellular lysates cannot faithfully recapitulate protein-drug interactions in living cells. Reported herein are dual-purpose probes inspired by the natural product andrographolide, capable of both reaction-based, real-time bioimaging and in situ proteome profiling/target identification in live mammalian cells. Our results confirm that andrographolide is a highly promiscuous compound and engaged in covalent interactions with numerous previously unknown cellular targets in cell type-specific manner. We caution its potential therapeutic effects should be further investigated in detail. PMID:26105662

  10. In situ imaging and proteome profiling indicate andrographolide is a highly promiscuous compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin; Wijaya, Hadhi; Samanta, Sanjay; Lam, Yulin; Yao, Shao Q.

    2015-06-01

    Natural products represent an enormous source of pharmacologically useful compounds, and are often used as the starting point in modern drug discovery. Many biologically interesting natural products are however not being pursued as potential drug candidates, partly due to a lack of well-defined mechanism-of-action. Traditional in vitro methods for target identification of natural products based on affinity protein enrichment from crude cellular lysates cannot faithfully recapitulate protein-drug interactions in living cells. Reported herein are dual-purpose probes inspired by the natural product andrographolide, capable of both reaction-based, real-time bioimaging and in situ proteome profiling/target identification in live mammalian cells. Our results confirm that andrographolide is a highly promiscuous compound and engaged in covalent interactions with numerous previously unknown cellular targets in cell type-specific manner. We caution its potential therapeutic effects should be further investigated in detail.

  11. In situ imaging and proteome profiling indicate andrographolide is a highly promiscuous compound

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Wijaya, Hadhi; Samanta, Sanjay; Lam, Yulin; Yao, Shao Q.

    2015-01-01

    Natural products represent an enormous source of pharmacologically useful compounds, and are often used as the starting point in modern drug discovery. Many biologically interesting natural products are however not being pursued as potential drug candidates, partly due to a lack of well-defined mechanism-of-action. Traditional in vitro methods for target identification of natural products based on affinity protein enrichment from crude cellular lysates cannot faithfully recapitulate protein-drug interactions in living cells. Reported herein are dual-purpose probes inspired by the natural product andrographolide, capable of both reaction-based, real-time bioimaging and in situ proteome profiling/target identification in live mammalian cells. Our results confirm that andrographolide is a highly promiscuous compound and engaged in covalent interactions with numerous previously unknown cellular targets in cell type-specific manner. We caution its potential therapeutic effects should be further investigated in detail. PMID:26105662

  12. Promiscuous primates engage in same-sex genital interactions.

    PubMed

    MacFarlane, Geoff R; Vasey, Paul L

    2016-05-01

    Same-sex genital interactions (SSGIs) occur across the order primates, yet explaining their maintenance in evolutionary terms appears problematic; as such interactions seem to counteract reproductive goals. We hypothesised that in more promiscuous species, where sexual motivation, mating effort, and non-conceptive heterosexual behaviour are greater, SSGIs may also occur at greater frequencies without necessarily impeding reproduction. We found that the expression of both male and female SSGIs were greater in multimale systems than in unimale ones. Both male and female SSGIs were positively correlated with the degree of promiscuity (relative testes mass). As mating system confers biases in the sex ratio that may influence the expression of SSGIs, we controlled for availability of members of the same-sex. When employing this control, results were largely congruent. For males, SSGIs were expressed more frequently in multimale systems. For both sexes, SSGIs were expressed more frequently with greater relative testes mass. We suggest SSGIs in primates may be a neutral by-product of selection for increases in promiscuous sexual activity, and that in certain instances these interactions may be co-opted to facilitate adaptive social functions. PMID:26930251

  13. Site-directed mutagenesis maps interactions that enhance cognate and limit promiscuous catalysis by an alkaline phosphatase superfamily phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Wiersma-Koch, Helen; Sunden, Fanny; Herschlag, Daniel

    2013-12-23

    Catalytic promiscuity, an evolutionary concept, also provides a powerful tool for gaining mechanistic insights into enzymatic reactions. Members of the alkaline phosphatase (AP) superfamily are highly amenable to such investigation, with several members having been shown to exhibit promiscuous activity for the cognate reactions of other superfamily members. Previous work has shown that nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase (NPP) exhibits a >10⁶-fold preference for the hydrolysis of phosphate diesters over phosphate monoesters, and that the reaction specificity is reduced 10³-fold when the size of the substituent on the transferred phosphoryl group of phosphate diester substrates is reduced to a methyl group. Here we show additional specificity contributions from the binding pocket for this substituent (herein termed the R' substituent) that account for an additional ~250-fold differential specificity with the minimal methyl substituent. Removal of four hydrophobic side chains suggested on the basis of structural inspection to interact favorably with R' substituents decreases phosphate diester reactivity 10⁴-fold with an optimal diester substrate (R' = 5'-deoxythymidine) and 50-fold with a minimal diester substrate (R' = CH₃). These mutations also enhance the enzyme's promiscuous phosphate monoesterase activity by nearly an order of magnitude, an effect that is traced by mutation to the reduction of unfavorable interactions with the two residues closest to the nonbridging phosphoryl oxygen atoms. The quadruple R' pocket mutant exhibits the same activity toward phosphate diester and phosphate monoester substrates that have identical leaving groups, with substantial rate enhancements of ~10¹¹-fold. This observation suggests that the Zn²⁺ bimetallo core of AP superfamily enzymes, which is equipotent in phosphate monoester and diester catalysis, has the potential to become specialized for the hydrolysis of each class of phosphate esters via addition

  14. The human SUMF1 gene, required for posttranslational sulfatase modification, defines a new gene family which is conserved from pro- to eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Landgrebe, Jobst; Dierks, Thomas; Schmidt, Bernhard; von Figura, Kurt

    2003-10-16

    Recently, the human C(alpha)-formylglycine (FGly)-generating enzyme (FGE), whose deficiency causes the autosomal-recessively transmitted lysosomal storage disease multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD), has been identified. In sulfatases, FGE posttranslationally converts a cysteine residue to FGly, which is part of the catalytic site and is essential for sulfatase activity. FGE is encoded by the sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1) gene, which defines a new gene family comprising orthologs from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes. The genomes of E. coli, S. cerevisiae and C. elegans lack SUMF1, indicating a phylogenetic gap and the existence of an alternative FGly-generating system. The genomes of vertebrates including mouse, man and pufferfish contain a sulfatase modifying factor 2 (SUMF2) gene encoding an FGE paralog of unknown function. SUMF2 evolved from a single exon SUMF1 gene as found in diptera prior to divergent intron acquisition. In several prokaryotic genomes, the SUMF1 gene is cotranscribed with genes encoding sulfatases which require FGly modification. The FGE protein contains a single domain that is made up of three highly conserved subdomains spaced by nonconserved sequences of variable lengths. The similarity among the eukaryotic FGE orthologs varies between 72% and 100% for the three subdomains and is highest for the C-terminal subdomain, which is a hotspot for mutations in MSD patients. PMID:14563551

  15. Rapid degradation of an active formylglycine generating enzyme variant leads to a late infantile severe form of multiple sulfatase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Schlotawa, Lars; Radhakrishnan, Karthikeyan; Baumgartner, Matthias; Schmid, Regula; Schmidt, Bernhard; Dierks, Thomas; Gärtner, Jutta

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) is a rare inborn error of metabolism affecting posttranslational activation of sulfatases by the formylglycine generating enzyme (FGE). Due to mutations in the encoding SUMF1 gene, FGE's catalytic capacity is impaired resulting in reduced cellular sulfatase activities. Both, FGE protein stability and residual activity determine disease severity and have previously been correlated with the clinical MSD phenotype. Here, we report a patient with a late infantile severe course of disease. The patient is compound heterozygous for two so far undescribed SUMF1 mutations, c.156delC (p.C52fsX57) and c.390A>T (p.E130D). In patient fibroblasts, mRNA of the frameshift allele is undetectable. In contrast, the allele encoding FGE-E130D is expressed. FGE-E130D correctly localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum and has a very high residual molecular activity in vitro (55% of wildtype FGE); however, it is rapidly degraded. Thus, despite substantial residual enzyme activity, protein instability determines disease severity, which highlights that potential MSD treatment approaches should target protein folding and stabilization mechanisms. PMID:23321616

  16. Rapid degradation of an active formylglycine generating enzyme variant leads to a late infantile severe form of multiple sulfatase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Schlotawa, Lars; Radhakrishnan, Karthikeyan; Baumgartner, Matthias; Schmid, Regula; Schmidt, Bernhard; Dierks, Thomas; Gärtner, Jutta

    2013-09-01

    Multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) is a rare inborn error of metabolism affecting posttranslational activation of sulfatases by the formylglycine generating enzyme (FGE). Due to mutations in the encoding SUMF1 gene, FGE's catalytic capacity is impaired resulting in reduced cellular sulfatase activities. Both, FGE protein stability and residual activity determine disease severity and have previously been correlated with the clinical MSD phenotype. Here, we report a patient with a late infantile severe course of disease. The patient is compound heterozygous for two so far undescribed SUMF1 mutations, c.156delC (p.C52fsX57) and c.390A>T (p.E130D). In patient fibroblasts, mRNA of the frameshift allele is undetectable. In contrast, the allele encoding FGE-E130D is expressed. FGE-E130D correctly localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum and has a very high residual molecular activity in vitro (55% of wildtype FGE); however, it is rapidly degraded. Thus, despite substantial residual enzyme activity, protein instability determines disease severity, which highlights that potential MSD treatment approaches should target protein folding and stabilization mechanisms. PMID:23321616

  17. Transcriptional promiscuity of the human /alpha/-globin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Whitelaw, E.; Hogben, P.; Hanscombe, O.; Proudfoot, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    The human /alpha/-globin gene displays the unusual property of transcriptional promiscuity: that is, it functions in the absence of an enhancer when transfected into nonerythroid cell lines. It is also unusual in that its promoter region lies in a hypomethylated HpaII tiny fragment (HTF) island containing multiple copies of the consensus sequence for the SP1-binding site. The authors have investigated whether there is a relationship between these two observations. First, they investigated the mouse /alpha/-globin gene since it does not lie in an HTF island. They have demonstrated that it was not transcriptionally promiscuous. Second, they studied the transcriptional activity of the human /alpha/-globin gene in the absence of the GC-rich region containing putative SP1-binding sites and found a small (two- to threefold) but consistent positive effect of this region on transcriptional activity in both nonerythroid and erythroid cell lines. However, this effect did not account for the promiscuous nature of the human /alpha/-globin gene. They found that in a nonreplicating system, the human //a/-globin gene, like that of the mouse, required a simian virus 40 enhancer in order to be transcriptionally active in nonerythroid and erythroid cell lines. Since they only observed enhancer independence of the human /alpha/-globin gene in a high-copy-number replicating system, they suggest that competition for trans-acting factors could explain these results. Finally, the authors' experiments with the erythroid cell line Putko suggest that there are no tissue-specific enhancers within 1 kilobase 5' of the human /alpha/-globin cap site or within the gene itself.

  18. Catalytic and substrate promiscuity: distinct multiple chemistries catalysed by the phosphatase domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bharath; Marks, Hanna; Mitra, Sreyoshi; Smalley, David M; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-07-15

    The presence of latent activities in enzymes is posited to underlie the natural evolution of new catalytic functions. However, the prevalence and extent of such substrate and catalytic ambiguity in evolved enzymes is difficult to address experimentally given the order-of-magnitude difference in the activities for native and, sometimes, promiscuous substrate/s. Further, such latent functions are of special interest when the activities concerned do not fall into the domain of substrate promiscuity. In the present study, we show a special case of such latent enzyme activity by demonstrating the presence of two mechanistically distinct reactions catalysed by the catalytic domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase isoform δ (PTPRδ). The primary catalytic activity involves the hydrolysis of a phosphomonoester bond (C─O─P) with high catalytic efficiency, whereas the secondary activity is the hydrolysis of a glycosidic bond (C─O─C) with poorer catalytic efficiency. This enzyme also displays substrate promiscuity by hydrolysing diester bonds while being highly discriminative for its monoester substrates. To confirm these activities, we also demonstrated their presence on the catalytic domain of protein tyrosine phosphatase Ω (PTPRΩ), a homologue of PTPRδ. Studies on the rate, metal-ion dependence, pH dependence and inhibition of the respective activities showed that they are markedly different. This is the first study that demonstrates a novel sugar hydrolase and diesterase activity for the phosphatase domain (PD) of PTPRδ and PTPRΩ. This work has significant implications for both understanding the evolution of enzymatic activity and the possible physiological role of this new chemistry. Our findings suggest that the genome might harbour a wealth of such alternative latent enzyme activities in the same protein domain that renders our knowledge of metabolic networks incomplete. PMID:27208174

  19. Discovery of a sulfamate-based steroid sulfatase inhibitor with intrinsic selective estrogen receptor modulator properties.

    PubMed

    Ouellet, Charles; Maltais, René; Ouellet, Étienne; Barbeau, Xavier; Lagüe, Patrick; Poirier, Donald

    2016-08-25

    Steroid sulfatase (STS), the enzyme which converts inactive sulfated steroid precursors into active hormones, is a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of estrogen-sensitive breast cancer. We report herein the synthesis and in vitro study of dual-action STS inhibitors with selective estrogen-receptor modulator (SERM) effects. A library of tetrahydroisoquinoline-N-substituted derivatives (phenolic compounds) was synthesized by solid-phase chemistry and tested on estrogen-sensitive breast cancer T-47D cells. Three phenolic compounds devoid of estrogenic activity and toxicity emerged from this screening. Their sulfamate analogs were then synthesized, tested in STS-transfected HEK-293 cells, and found to be potent inhibitors of the enzyme (IC50 of 3.9, 8.9, and 16.6 nM). When tested in T-47D cells they showed no estrogenic activity and produced a moderate antiestrogenic activity. The compounds were further tested on osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells and found to significantly stimulate their proliferation as well as their alkaline phosphatase activity, thus suggesting a SERM activity. These results are supported by molecular docking experiments. PMID:27155470

  20. Integrating mapping and sequencing around the human iduronate-2-sulfate sulfatase locus

    SciTech Connect

    Timms, K.; Lu, F.; Shen, Y.

    1994-09-01

    The logical progression of the human genome project is from mapping to sequencing. However, the criteria for accurate sequencing and mapping are different and consequently, sequencing can reveal unexpected or erroneous relationships between cosmid clones that appear overlapping by hybridization. We are sequencing a 1 Mb region of human Xq28 spanning the genes for fragile X (fraxA) and iduronate-2-sulfate sulfatase (IDS). To date, seven cosmids from this region have been completed and another five are currently being sequenced. One of the completed cosmids contains the complete IDS gene, while another cosmid contains 4 of the 9 IDS exons. The exon sequences in both cosmids are identical, but corresponding introns have proved to be highly variant. This raises the possibility of either a second IDS gene or unusual pseudogene. In addition, one of the cosmids contains a microsatellite marker which has been mapped 150 kb distant from the gene for IDS. This indicates that either two cosmids containing IDS exons are separated by at least 100 kb, or a rearrangement in one of the cosmids prior to library construction. To simplify the development of sequence-ready cosmids, we have developed a rapid method of cosmid walking to select additional clones that are minimally overlapping.

  1. Recombinant human N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) produced in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-López, Alexander; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J.; Sánchez, Jhonnathan; Moreno, Jefferson; Beltran, Laura; Díaz, Dennis; Pardo, Andrea; Ramírez, Aura María; Espejo-Mojica, Angela J.; Pimentel, Luisa; Barrera, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IV A (MPS IV A, Morquio A disease) is a lysosomal storage disease (LSD) produced by mutations on N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS). Recently an enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for this disease was approved using a recombinant enzyme produced in CHO cells. Previously, we reported the production of an active GALNS enzyme in Escherichia coli that showed similar stability properties to that of a recombinant mammalian enzyme though it was not taken-up by culture cells. In this study, we showed the production of the human recombinant GALNS in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris GS115 (prGALNS). We observed that removal of native signal peptide and co-expression with human formylglycine-generating enzyme (SUMF1) allowed an improvement of 4.5-fold in the specific GALNS activity. prGALNS enzyme showed a high stability at 4 °C, while the activity was markedly reduced at 37 and 45 °C. It was noteworthy that prGALNS was taken-up by HEK293 cells and human skin fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner through a process potentially mediated by an endocytic pathway, without any additional protein or host modification. The results show the potential of P. pastoris in the production of a human recombinant GALNS for the development of an ERT for Morquio A. PMID:27378276

  2. Recombinant human N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) produced in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-López, Alexander; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J; Sánchez, Jhonnathan; Moreno, Jefferson; Beltran, Laura; Díaz, Dennis; Pardo, Andrea; Ramírez, Aura María; Espejo-Mojica, Angela J; Pimentel, Luisa; Barrera, Luis A

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IV A (MPS IV A, Morquio A disease) is a lysosomal storage disease (LSD) produced by mutations on N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS). Recently an enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for this disease was approved using a recombinant enzyme produced in CHO cells. Previously, we reported the production of an active GALNS enzyme in Escherichia coli that showed similar stability properties to that of a recombinant mammalian enzyme though it was not taken-up by culture cells. In this study, we showed the production of the human recombinant GALNS in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris GS115 (prGALNS). We observed that removal of native signal peptide and co-expression with human formylglycine-generating enzyme (SUMF1) allowed an improvement of 4.5-fold in the specific GALNS activity. prGALNS enzyme showed a high stability at 4 °C, while the activity was markedly reduced at 37 and 45 °C. It was noteworthy that prGALNS was taken-up by HEK293 cells and human skin fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner through a process potentially mediated by an endocytic pathway, without any additional protein or host modification. The results show the potential of P. pastoris in the production of a human recombinant GALNS for the development of an ERT for Morquio A. PMID:27378276

  3. Heparan sulfate sulfatase SULF2 regulates PDGFRα signaling and growth in human and mouse malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Joanna J.; Huillard, Emmanuelle; Robinson, Aaron E.; Ward, Anna; Lum, David H.; Polley, Mei-Yin; Rosen, Steven D.; Rowitch, David H.; Werb, Zena

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM), a uniformly lethal brain cancer, is characterized by diffuse invasion and abnormal activation of multiple receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling pathways, presenting a major challenge to effective therapy. The activation of many RTK pathways is regulated by extracellular heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), suggesting these molecules may be effective targets in the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we demonstrated that the extracellular sulfatase, SULF2, an enzyme that regulates multiple HSPG-dependent RTK signaling pathways, was expressed in primary human GBM tumors and cell lines. Knockdown of SULF2 in human GBM cell lines and generation of gliomas from Sulf2–/– tumorigenic neurospheres resulted in decreased growth in vivo in mice. We found a striking SULF2 dependence in activity of PDGFRα, a major signaling pathway in GBM. Ablation of SULF2 resulted in decreased PDGFRα phosphorylation and decreased downstream MAPK signaling activity. Interestingly, in a survey of SULF2 levels in different subtypes of GBM, the proneural subtype, characterized by aberrations in PDGFRα, demonstrated the strongest SULF2 expression. Therefore, in addition to its potential as an upstream target for therapy of GBM, SULF2 may help identify a subset of GBMs that are more dependent on exogenous growth factor–mediated signaling. Our results suggest the bioavailability of growth factors from the microenvironment is a significant contributor to tumor growth in a major subset of human GBM. PMID:22293178

  4. Tailoring Agility: Promiscuous Pair Story Authoring and Value Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tendon, Steve

    This chapter describes how a multi-national software organization created a business plan involving business units from eight countries that followed an agile way, after two previously failed attempts with traditional approaches. The case is told by the consultant who initiated implementation of agility into requirements gathering, estimation and planning processes in an international setting. The agile approach was inspired by XP, but then tailored to meet the peculiar requirements. Two innovations were critical. The first innovation was promiscuous pair story authoring, where user stories were written by two people (similarly to pair programming), and the pairing changed very often (as frequently as every 15-20 minutes) to achieve promiscuity and cater for diverse point of views. The second innovation was an economic value evaluation (and not the cost) which was attributed to stories. Continuous recalculation of the financial value of the stories allowed to assess the projects financial return. In this case implementation of agility in the international context allowed the involved team members to reach consensus and unanimity of decisions, vision and purpose.

  5. Maintenance of Sperm Variation in a Highly Promiscuous Wild Bird

    PubMed Central

    Calhim, Sara; Double, Michael C.; Margraf, Nicolas; Birkhead, Tim R.; Cockburn, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Postcopulatory sexual selection is an important force in the evolution of reproductive traits, including sperm morphology. In birds, sperm morphology is known to be highly heritable and largely condition-independent. Theory predicts, and recent comparative work corroborates, that strong selection in such traits reduces intraspecific phenotypic variation. Here we show that some variation can be maintained despite extreme promiscuity, as a result of opposing, copulation-role-specific selection forces. After controlling for known correlates of siring success in the superb fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus), we found that (a) lifetime extra-pair paternity success was associated with sperm with a shorter flagellum and relatively large head, and (b) males whose sperm had a longer flagellum and a relatively smaller head achieved higher within-pair paternity. In this species extrapair copulations occur in the same morning, but preceding, pair copulations during a female's fertile period, suggesting that shorter and relatively larger-headed sperm are most successful in securing storage (defense), whereas the opposite phenotype might be better at outcompeting stored sperm (offense). Furthermore, since cuckolding ability is a major contributor to differential male reproductive output, stronger selection on defense sperm competition traits might explain the short sperm of malurids relative to other promiscuous passerines. PMID:22194918

  6. Molecular mechanism underlying promiscuous polyamine recognition by spermidine acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Shigeru; Ishikawa, Sae; Tomitori, Hideyuki; Niiyama, Mayumi; Hirose, Mika; Miyazaki, Yuma; Higashi, Kyohei; Murata, Michio; Adachi, Hiroaki; Takano, Kazufumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Igarashi, Kazuei; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Spermidine acetyltransferase (SAT) from Escherichia coli, which catalyses the transfer of acetyl groups from acetyl-CoA to spermidine, is a key enzyme in controlling polyamine levels in prokaryotic cells. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of SAT in complex with spermidine (SPD) and CoA at 2.5Å resolution. SAT is a dodecamer organized as a hexamer of dimers. The secondary structural element and folding topology of the SAT dimer resemble those of spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT), suggesting an evolutionary link between SAT and SSAT. However, the polyamine specificity of SAT is distinct from that of SSAT and is promiscuous. The SPD molecule is also located at the inter-dimer interface. The distance between SPD and CoA molecules is 13Å. A deep, highly acidic, water-filled cavity encompasses the SPD and CoA binding sites. Structure-based mutagenesis and in-vitro assays identified SPD-bound residues, and the acidic residues lining the walls of the cavity are mostly essential for enzymatic activities. Based on mutagenesis and structural data, we propose an acetylation mechanism underlying promiscuous polyamine recognition for SAT. PMID:27163532

  7. Promiscuous 2-aminothiazoles (PrATs): a frequent hitting scaffold.

    PubMed

    Devine, Shane M; Mulcair, Mark D; Debono, Cael O; Leung, Eleanor W W; Nissink, J Willem M; Lim, San Sui; Chandrashekaran, Indu R; Vazirani, Mansha; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Simpson, Jamie S; Baell, Jonathan B; Scammells, Peter J; Norton, Raymond S; Scanlon, Martin J

    2015-02-12

    We have identified a class of molecules, known as 2-aminothiazoles (2-ATs), as frequent-hitting fragments in biophysical binding assays. This was exemplified by 4-phenylthiazol-2-amine being identified as a hit in 14/14 screens against a diverse range of protein targets, suggesting that this scaffold is a poor starting point for fragment-based drug discovery. This prompted us to analyze this scaffold in the context of an academic fragment library used for fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) and two larger compound libraries used for high-throughput screening (HTS). This analysis revealed that such "promiscuous 2-aminothiazoles" (PrATs) behaved as frequent hitters under both FBDD and HTS settings, although the problem was more pronounced in the fragment-based studies. As 2-ATs are present in known drugs, they cannot necessarily be deemed undesirable, but the combination of their promiscuity and difficulties associated with optimizing them into a lead compound makes them, in our opinion, poor scaffolds for fragment libraries. PMID:25559643

  8. Expression in CHO Cells and Pharmacokinetics and Brain Uptake in the Rhesus Monkey of an IgG-Iduronate-2-Sulfatase Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jeff Zhiqiang; Boado, Ruben J.; Hui, Eric K.-W.; Zhou, Qing-Hui; Pardridge, William M.

    2011-01-01

    Sulfatases are potential therapeutic biopharmaceuticals, as mutations in sulfatase genes leads to inherited disease. Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) Type II is caused by mutations in the lysosomal enzyme, iduronate 2-sulfatase (IDS). MPS-II affects the brain and enzyme replacement therapy is ineffective for the brain, because IDS does not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). To deliver IDS across the human BBB, the sulfatase has been re-engineered as an IgG-sulfatase fusion protein with a genetically engineered monoclonal antibody (MAb) against the human insulin receptor (HIR). The HIRMAb part of the HIRMAb-IDS fusion protein acts as a molecular Trojan horse to ferry the fused IDS across the BBB. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell were stably transfected to produce the HIRMAb-IDS fusion protein. The fusion protein was triaged to the lysosomal compartment of MPS-II fibroblasts based on confocal microscopy, and 300 ng/mL medium concentrations normalized IDS enzyme activity in the cells. The HIRMAb-IDS fusion protein was tritiated and injected intravenously into the adult Rhesus monkey at a low dose of 0.1 mg/kg. The IDS enzyme activity in plasma was elevated 10-fold above the endogenous level, and therapeutic plasma concentrations were generated in vivo. The uptake of the HIRMAb-IDS fusion protein in the brain was sufficiently high to produce therapeutic concentrations of IDS in the brain following IV administration of the fusion protein. PMID:21351076

  9. Specialized Dynamical Properties of Promiscuous Residues Revealed by Simulated Conformational Ensembles.

    PubMed

    Fornili, Arianna; Pandini, Alessandro; Lu, Hui-Chun; Fraternali, Franca

    2013-11-12

    The ability to interact with different partners is one of the most important features in proteins. Proteins that bind a large number of partners (hubs) have been often associated with intrinsic disorder. However, many examples exist of hubs with an ordered structure, and evidence of a general mechanism promoting promiscuity in ordered proteins is still elusive. An intriguing hypothesis is that promiscuous binding sites have specific dynamical properties, distinct from the rest of the interface and pre-existing in the protein isolated state. Here, we present the first comprehensive study of the intrinsic dynamics of promiscuous residues in a large protein data set. Different computational methods, from coarse-grained elastic models to geometry-based sampling methods and to full-atom Molecular Dynamics simulations, were used to generate conformational ensembles for the isolated proteins. The flexibility and dynamic correlations of interface residues with a different degree of binding promiscuity were calculated and compared considering side chain and backbone motions, the latter both on a local and on a global scale. The study revealed that (a) promiscuous residues tend to be more flexible than nonpromiscuous ones, (b) this additional flexibility has a higher degree of organization, and (c) evolutionary conservation and binding promiscuity have opposite effects on intrinsic dynamics. Findings on simulated ensembles were also validated on ensembles of experimental structures extracted from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Additionally, the low occurrence of single nucleotide polymorphisms observed for promiscuous residues indicated a tendency to preserve binding diversity at these positions. A case study on two ubiquitin-like proteins exemplifies how binding promiscuity in evolutionary related proteins can be modulated by the fine-tuning of the interface dynamics. The interplay between promiscuity and flexibility highlighted here can inspire new directions in protein

  10. Specialized Dynamical Properties of Promiscuous Residues Revealed by Simulated Conformational Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The ability to interact with different partners is one of the most important features in proteins. Proteins that bind a large number of partners (hubs) have been often associated with intrinsic disorder. However, many examples exist of hubs with an ordered structure, and evidence of a general mechanism promoting promiscuity in ordered proteins is still elusive. An intriguing hypothesis is that promiscuous binding sites have specific dynamical properties, distinct from the rest of the interface and pre-existing in the protein isolated state. Here, we present the first comprehensive study of the intrinsic dynamics of promiscuous residues in a large protein data set. Different computational methods, from coarse-grained elastic models to geometry-based sampling methods and to full-atom Molecular Dynamics simulations, were used to generate conformational ensembles for the isolated proteins. The flexibility and dynamic correlations of interface residues with a different degree of binding promiscuity were calculated and compared considering side chain and backbone motions, the latter both on a local and on a global scale. The study revealed that (a) promiscuous residues tend to be more flexible than nonpromiscuous ones, (b) this additional flexibility has a higher degree of organization, and (c) evolutionary conservation and binding promiscuity have opposite effects on intrinsic dynamics. Findings on simulated ensembles were also validated on ensembles of experimental structures extracted from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Additionally, the low occurrence of single nucleotide polymorphisms observed for promiscuous residues indicated a tendency to preserve binding diversity at these positions. A case study on two ubiquitin-like proteins exemplifies how binding promiscuity in evolutionary related proteins can be modulated by the fine-tuning of the interface dynamics. The interplay between promiscuity and flexibility highlighted here can inspire new directions in protein

  11. Using mutability landscapes of a promiscuous tautomerase to guide the engineering of enantioselective Michaelases.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Jan-Ytzen; Poddar, Harshwardhan; Baas, Bert-Jan; Miao, Yufeng; Rahimi, Mehran; Kunzendorf, Andreas; van Merkerk, Ronald; Tepper, Pieter G; Geertsema, Edzard M; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W H; Quax, Wim J; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2016-01-01

    The Michael-type addition reaction is widely used in organic synthesis for carbon-carbon bond formation. However, biocatalytic methodologies for this type of reaction are scarce, which is related to the fact that enzymes naturally catalysing carbon-carbon bond-forming Michael-type additions are rare. A promising template to develop new biocatalysts for carbon-carbon bond formation is the enzyme 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase, which exhibits promiscuous Michael-type addition activity. Here we present mutability landscapes for the expression, tautomerase and Michael-type addition activities, and enantioselectivity of 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase. These maps of neutral, beneficial and detrimental amino acids for each residue position and enzyme property provide detailed insight into sequence-function relationships. This offers exciting opportunities for enzyme engineering, which is illustrated by the redesign of 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase into two enantiocomplementary 'Michaelases'. These 'Michaelases' catalyse the asymmetric addition of acetaldehyde to various nitroolefins, providing access to both enantiomers of γ-nitroaldehydes, which are important precursors for pharmaceutically active γ-aminobutyric acid derivatives. PMID:26952338

  12. Using mutability landscapes of a promiscuous tautomerase to guide the engineering of enantioselective Michaelases

    PubMed Central

    van der Meer, Jan-Ytzen; Poddar, Harshwardhan; Baas, Bert-Jan; Miao, Yufeng; Rahimi, Mehran; Kunzendorf, Andreas; van Merkerk, Ronald; Tepper, Pieter G.; Geertsema, Edzard M.; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W. H.; Quax, Wim J.; Poelarends, Gerrit J.

    2016-01-01

    The Michael-type addition reaction is widely used in organic synthesis for carbon–carbon bond formation. However, biocatalytic methodologies for this type of reaction are scarce, which is related to the fact that enzymes naturally catalysing carbon–carbon bond-forming Michael-type additions are rare. A promising template to develop new biocatalysts for carbon–carbon bond formation is the enzyme 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase, which exhibits promiscuous Michael-type addition activity. Here we present mutability landscapes for the expression, tautomerase and Michael-type addition activities, and enantioselectivity of 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase. These maps of neutral, beneficial and detrimental amino acids for each residue position and enzyme property provide detailed insight into sequence–function relationships. This offers exciting opportunities for enzyme engineering, which is illustrated by the redesign of 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase into two enantiocomplementary ‘Michaelases'. These ‘Michaelases' catalyse the asymmetric addition of acetaldehyde to various nitroolefins, providing access to both enantiomers of γ-nitroaldehydes, which are important precursors for pharmaceutically active γ-aminobutyric acid derivatives. PMID:26952338

  13. Catalytic Promiscuity of the Radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine Enzyme NosL

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Wei; Ji, Xinjian; Li, Yongzhen; Zhang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic promiscuity plays a key role in enzyme evolution and the acquisition of novel biological functions. Because of the high reactivity of radical species, in our view enzymes involving radical-mediated mechanisms could intrinsically be more prone to catalytic promiscuity. This mini-review summarizes the recent advances in the study of NosL, a radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-dependent L-tryptophan (L-Trp) lyase. We demonstrate here the interesting chemistry and remarkable catalytic promiscuity of NosL, and attempt to highlight the high evolvability of radical SAM enzymes and the potential to engineer these enzymes for novel and improved activities. PMID:27446906

  14. Confocal fluorescence detection expanded to UV excitation: the first continuous fluorimetric assay of human steroid sulfatase in nanoliter volume.

    PubMed

    Billich, Andreas; Bilban, Melitta; Meisner, Nicole-Claudia; Nussbaumer, Peter; Neubauer, Andreas; Jäger, Stefan; Auer, Manfred

    2004-02-01

    Steroid sulfatase is an enzyme that currently enjoys considerable interest as a potential drug target in the treatment of estrogen- and androgen-dependent diseases, in particular breast cancer. We have purified human steroid sulfatase to apparent homogeneity from recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cells, and we established an assay with a new fluorogenic substrate, 3,4-benzocoumarin-7-O-sulfate (1). Substrate 1 features a K(m) value of 22.5 microM, which is close to the value for the natural substrate dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (26 microM) and much lower than the K(m) values of other synthetic substrates (276-736 microM). Importantly, the cleavage of substrate 1 can be monitored continuously during the enzymatic cleavage, since a change in fluorescence intensity is detectable at the pH where the enzyme is active; in contrast, all other synthetic substrates described so far require alkalization to reveal a measurable absorbance or fluorescence signal. The adaptation of the assay to the 96-well format allows continuous monitoring of multiple wells in a microplate fluorescence reader. Applications of the assay for the determination of IC(50) and K(i) values of novel steroid sulfatase inhibitors are presented. Most importantly the assay was transferred to the nanoscale format (1-microl assay volume) in 2080-well plates with confocal fluorescence detection. This miniaturization will permit screening with a minimum throughput of 20000 compounds per day. The system presented demonstrates that the confocal detection platform used for nanoscreening can be successfully adapted to assays for which conventional ultraviolet dyes like coumarins are necessary. This strongly broadens the application range of confocal readers in drug screening. PMID:15090207

  15. Catch bond interaction between cell-surface sulfatase Sulf1 and glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Harder, Alexander; Möller, Ann-Kristin; Milz, Fabian; Neuhaus, Phillipp; Walhorn, Volker; Dierks, Thomas; Anselmetti, Dario

    2015-04-01

    In biological adhesion, the biophysical mechanism of specific biomolecular interaction can be divided in slip and catch bonds, respectively. Conceptually, slip bonds exhibit a reduced bond lifetime under increased external force and catch bonds, in contrast, exhibit an increased lifetime (for a certain force interval). Since 2003, a handful of biological systems have been identified to display catch bond properties. Upon investigating the specific interaction between the unique hydrophilic domain (HD) of the human cell-surface sulfatase Sulf1 against its physiological glycosaminoglycan (GAG) target heparan sulfate (HS) by single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), we found clear evidence of catch bond behavior in this system. The HD, ∼320 amino acids long with dominant positive charge, and its interaction with sulfated GAG-polymers were quantitatively investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) based force clamp spectroscopy (FCS) and dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS). In FCS experiments, we found that the catch bond character of HD against GAGs could be attributed to the GAG 6-O-sulfation site whereas only slip bond interaction can be observed in a GAG system where this site is explicitly lacking. We interpreted the binding data within the theoretical framework of a two state two path model, where two slip bonds are coupled forming a double-well interaction potential with an energy difference of ΔE ≈ 9 kBT and a compliance length of Δx ≈ 3.2 nm. Additional DFS experiments support this assumption and allow identification of these two coupled slip-bond states that behave consistently within the Kramers-Bell-Evans model of force-mediated dissociation. PMID:25863062

  16. Circadian transcriptome analysis in human fibroblasts from Hunter syndrome and impact of iduronate-2-sulfatase treatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hunter syndrome (HS) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS) deficiency and loss of ability to break down and recycle the glycosaminoglycans, heparan and dermatan sulfate, leading to impairment of cellular processes and cell death. Cell activities and functioning of intracellular organelles are controlled by the clock genes (CGs), driving the rhythmic expression of clock controlled genes (CCGs). We aimed to evaluate the expression of CGs and downstream CCGs in HS, before and after enzyme replacement treatment with IDS. Methods The expression levels of CGs and CCGs were evaluated by a whole transcriptome analysis through Next Generation Sequencing in normal primary human fibroblasts and fibroblasts of patients affected by HS before and 24 h/144 h after IDS treatment. The time related expression of CGs after synchronization by serum shock was also evaluated by qRT-PCR before and after 24 hours of IDS treatment. Results In HS fibroblasts we found altered expression of several CGs and CCGs, with dynamic changes 24 h and 144 h after IDS treatment. A semantic hypergraph-based analysis highlighted five gene clusters significantly associated to important biological processes or pathways, and five genes, AHR, HIF1A, CRY1, ITGA5 and EIF2B3, proven to be central players in these pathways. After synchronization by serum shock and 24 h treatment with IDS the expression of ARNTL2 at 10 h (p = 0.036), PER1 at 4 h (p = 0.019), PER2 at 10 h (p = 0.041) and 16 h (p = 0.043) changed in HS fibroblasts. Conclusion CG and CCG expression is altered in HS fibroblasts and IDS treatment determines dynamic modifications, suggesting a direct involvement of the CG machinery in the physiopathology of cellular derangements that characterize HS. PMID:24083598

  17. The Role of Steroid Sulfatase as a Prognostic Factor in Patients with Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Moo; Jang, Ki-Seok; Koh, A Ra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was to determine steroid sulfatase (STS) expression in endometrial cancer patients and its correlation with disease prognosis. Materials and Methods We conducted a retrospective study in 59 patients who underwent surgery with histologically confirmed endometrial cancer from January 2000 to December 2011 at Hanyang University Hospital. Immuno-histochemical staining of STS was performed using rabbit polyclonal anti-STS antibody. Results Sixteen of the 59 patients (27.1%) were positive for STS expression. Disease free survival (DFS) was 129.83±8.67 [95% confidence interval (CI): 112.84–146.82] months in the STS positive group (group A) and 111.06±7.17 (95% CI: 97.01–125.10) months in the STS negative group (group B) (p=0.92). Overall survival (OS) was 129.01±9.38 (95% CI: 110.63–147.38) months and 111.16±7.10 (95% CI: 97.24–125.07) months for the groups A and B, respectively (p=0.45). Univariate analysis revealed that FIGO stage and adjuvant therapy are significantly associated with DFS and OS. However, in multivariate analysis, FIGO stage and adjuvant therapy did not show any statistical significance with DFS and OS. STS was also not significantly associated with DFS and OS in univariate and multivariate analysis. Conclusion STS expression was not significantly associated with DFS and OS, despite positive STS expression in 27% of endometrial cancer patients. Therefore, the role of STS as a prognostic factor in patients with endometrial cancer remains unclear and requires further research. PMID:26996578

  18. The expression of the human steroid sulfatase-encoding gene is driven by alternative first exons.

    PubMed

    Dalla Valle, Luisa; Toffolo, Vania; Nardi, Alessia; Fiore, Cristina; Armanini, Decio; Belvedere, Paola; Colombo, Lorenzo

    2007-10-01

    We have analyzed steroid sulfatase (STS) gene transcription in 10 human tissues: ovary, adrenal cortex, uterus, thyroid, liver, pancreas, colon, mammary gland, dermal papilla of the hair follicle, and peripheral mononuclear leukocytes. Overall, six different promoters were found to drive STS expression, giving rise to transcripts with unique first exons that were labeled 0a, 0b, 0c, 1a, 1c, and 1d, of which the last two and 0c are newly reported. All of them, except exon 1d, vary in length owing to the occurrence of multiple transcriptional start sites. While placental exon 1a is partially coding, the other five first exons are all untranslated. Three of these (0a, 0b, and 0c) are spliced to the common partially coding exon 1b, whereas the other two (1c and 1d) are spliced to the coding exon 2, which occurs in all transcripts. Whatever the ATG actually used, the differences are restricted to the signal peptide which is post-transcriptionally cleaved. Transcripts with exons 0a and 0b have the broadest tissue distribution, occurring, in 6 out of the 12 tissues so far investigated, while the other first exons are restricted to one or two tissues. The proximal promoter of each first exon was devoid of TATA box or initiator element and lacked consensus elements for transcription factors related to steroidogenesis, suggesting that regulatory sequences are probably placed at greater distance. In conclusion, the regulation of STS transcription appears to be more complex than previously thought, suggesting that this enzyme plays a substantial role in intercellular integration. PMID:17601726

  19. Alcohol and adult hippocampal neurogenesis: Promiscuous drug, wanton effects

    PubMed Central

    Geil, Chelsea R.; Hayes, Dayna M.; McClain, Justin A.; Liput, Daniel J.; Marshall, S. Alex; Chen, Kevin Y.; Nixon, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis is now widely accepted as an important contributor to hippocampal integrity and function but also dysfunction when adult neurogenesis is affected in neuropsychiatric diseases such as alcohol use disorders. Excessive alcohol consumption, the defining characteristic of alcohol use disorders, results in a variety of cognitive and behavioral impairments related wholly or in part to hippocampal structure and function. Recent preclinical work has shown that adult neurogenesis may be one route by which alcohol produces hippocampal neuropathology. Alcohol is a pharmacologically promiscuous drug capable of interfering with adult neurogenesis through multiple mechanisms. This review will discuss the primary mechanisms underlying alcohol-induced changes in adult hippocampal neurogenesis including alcohol's effects on neurotransmitters, CREB and its downstream effectors, and the neurogenic niche. PMID:24842804

  20. Butterfly genome reveals promiscuous exchange of mimicry adaptations among species

    PubMed Central

    Dasmahapatra, Kanchon K; Walters, James R.; Briscoe, Adriana D.; Davey, John W.; Whibley, Annabel; Nadeau, Nicola J.; Zimin, Aleksey V.; Hughes, Daniel S. T.; Ferguson, Laura C.; Martin, Simon H.; Salazar, Camilo; Lewis, James J.; Adler, Sebastian; Ahn, Seung-Joon; Baker, Dean A.; Baxter, Simon W.; Chamberlain, Nicola L.; Chauhan, Ritika; Counterman, Brian A.; Dalmay, Tamas; Gilbert, Lawrence E.; Gordon, Karl; Heckel, David G.; Hines, Heather M.; Hoff, Katharina J.; Holland, Peter W.H.; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle; Jiggins, Francis M.; Jones, Robert T.; Kapan, Durrell D.; Kersey, Paul; Lamas, Gerardo; Lawson, Daniel; Mapleson, Daniel; Maroja, Luana S.; Martin, Arnaud; Moxon, Simon; Palmer, William J.; Papa, Riccardo; Papanicolaou, Alexie; Pauchet, Yannick; Ray, David A.; Rosser, Neil; Salzberg, Steven L.; Supple, Megan A.; Surridge, Alison; Tenger-Trolander, Ayse; Vogel, Heiko; Wilkinson, Paul A.; Wilson, Derek; Yorke, James A.; Yuan, Furong; Balmuth, Alexi L.; Eland, Cathlene; Gharbi, Karim; Thomson, Marian; Gibbs, Richard A.; Han, Yi; Jayaseelan, Joy C.; Kovar, Christie; Mathew, Tittu; Muzny, Donna M.; Ongeri, Fiona; Pu, Ling-Ling; Qu, Jiaxin; Thornton, Rebecca L.; Worley, Kim C.; Wu, Yuan-Qing; Linares, Mauricio; Blaxter, Mark L.; Constant, Richard H. ffrench; Joron, Mathieu; Kronforst, Marcus R.; Mullen, Sean P.; Reed, Robert D.; Scherer, Steven E.; Richards, Stephen; Mallet, James; McMillan, W. Owen; Jiggins, Chris D.

    2012-01-01

    The evolutionary importance of hybridization and introgression has long been debated1. We used genomic tools to investigate introgression in Heliconius, a rapidly radiating genus of neotropical butterflies widely used in studies of ecology, behaviour, mimicry and speciation2-5 . We sequenced the genome of Heliconius melpomene and compared it with other taxa to investigate chromosomal evolution in Lepidoptera and gene flow among multiple Heliconius species and races. Among 12,657 predicted genes for Heliconius, biologically important expansions of families of chemosensory and Hox genes are particularly noteworthy. Chromosomal organisation has remained broadly conserved since the Cretaceous, when butterflies split from the silkmoth lineage. Using genomic resequencing, we show hybrid exchange of genes between three co-mimics, H. melpomene, H. timareta, and H. elevatus, especially at two genomic regions that control mimicry pattern. Closely related Heliconius species clearly exchange protective colour pattern genes promiscuously, implying a major role for hybridization in adaptive radiation. PMID:22722851

  1. Biological messiness vs. biological genius: Mechanistic aspects and roles of protein promiscuity.

    PubMed

    Atkins, William M

    2015-07-01

    In contrast to the traditional biological paradigms focused on 'specificity', recent research and theoretical efforts have focused on functional 'promiscuity' exhibited by proteins and enzymes in many biological settings, including enzymatic detoxication, steroid biochemistry, signal transduction and immune responses. In addition, divergent evolutionary processes are apparently facilitated by random mutations that yield promiscuous enzyme intermediates. The intermediates, in turn, provide opportunities for further evolution to optimize new functions from existing protein scaffolds. In some cases, promiscuity may simply represent the inherent plasticity of proteins resulting from their polymeric nature with distributed conformational ensembles. Enzymes or proteins that bind or metabolize noncognate substrates create 'messiness' or noise in the systems they contribute to. With our increasing awareness of the frequency of these promiscuous behaviors it becomes interesting and important to understand the molecular bases for promiscuous behavior and to distinguish between evolutionarily selected promiscuity and evolutionarily tolerated messiness. This review provides an overview of current understanding of these aspects of protein biochemistry and enzymology. PMID:25218442

  2. Analyzing compound activity records and promiscuity degrees in light of publication statistics

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    For the generation of contemporary databases of bioactive compounds, activity information is usually extracted from the scientific literature. However, when activity data are analyzed, source publications are typically no longer taken into consideration. Therefore, compound activity data selected from ChEMBL were traced back to thousands of original publications, activity records including compound, assay, and target information were systematically generated, and their distributions across the literature were determined. In addition, publications were categorized on the basis of activity records. Furthermore, compound promiscuity, defined as the ability of small molecules to specifically interact with multiple target proteins, was analyzed in light of publication statistics, thus adding another layer of information to promiscuity assessment. It was shown that the degree of compound promiscuity was not influenced by increasing numbers of source publications. Rather, most non-promiscuous as well as promiscuous compounds, regardless of their degree of promiscuity, originated from single publications, which emerged as a characteristic feature of the medicinal chemistry literature. PMID:27347396

  3. A canine Arylsulfatase G (ARSG) mutation leading to a sulfatase deficiency is associated with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Abitbol, Marie; Thibaud, Jean-Laurent; Olby, Natasha J.; Hitte, Christophe; Puech, Jean-Philippe; Maurer, Marie; Pilot-Storck, Fanny; Hédan, Benoit; Dréano, Stéphane; Brahimi, Sandra; Delattre, Delphine; André, Catherine; Gray, Françoise; Delisle, Françoise; Caillaud, Catherine; Bernex, Florence; Panthier, Jean-Jacques; Aubin-Houzelstein, Geneviève; Tiret, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs) represent the most common group of inherited progressive encephalopathies in children. They are characterized by progressive loss of vision, mental and motor deterioration, epileptic seizures, and premature death. Rare adult forms of NCL with late onset are known as Kufs’ disease. Loci underlying these adult forms remain unknown due to the small number of patients and genetic heterogeneity. Here we confirm that a late-onset form of NCL recessively segregates in US and French pedigrees of American Staffordshire Terrier (AST) dogs. Through combined association, linkage, and haplotype analyses, we mapped the disease locus to a single region of canine chromosome 9. We eventually identified a worldwide breed-specific variant in exon 2 of the Arylsulfatase G (ARSG) gene, which causes a p.R99H substitution in the vicinity of the catalytic domain of the enzyme. In transfected cells or leukocytes from affected dogs, the missense change leads to a 75% decrease in sulfatase activity, providing a functional confirmation that the variant might be the NCL-causing mutation. Our results uncover a protein involved in neuronal homeostasis, identify a family of candidate genes to be screened in patients with Kufs' disease, and suggest that a deficiency in sulfatase is part of the NCL pathogenesis. PMID:20679209

  4. Determination of the molecular defect of caprine N-acetylglucosamine 6-sulfatase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Leipprandt, J.R.; Jones, M.Z.; Cavanagh, K.T.

    1994-09-01

    Caprine N-acetylglucosamine 6-sulfatase (G6S) deficiency is the only animal analog of Sanfilippo syndrome (type D). The goat with this mucopolysaccharidousis disorder (MPS III D) demonstrated delayed motor development and growth retardation but reached sexual maturity before dying suddenly at 19 mo. Histochemical and biochemical analysis of the liver showed glycosaminoglycan storage and there was GM{sub 3} ganglioside accumulation in the brain. Towards further development of this animal model for treatment strategies, we have cloned the caprine G6S gene, determined the nature of the gene defect in caprine MPS III D and compared the goat sequence to the human sequence. The human and caprine sequences show an overall sequence similarity of about 90% in the coding region. The 5{prime}-coding region is very GC-rich in both the human and caprine G6S. One striking difference between the human and caprine genes is the presence of a GCC repeat in the goat resulting in insertion of 6 prolines and a leucine in the signal peptide. This proline-rich stretch was confirmed by amplifying and sequencing the same cDNA segment from other goats. Additionally, this region was examined in bovine cDNA and found to contain 4 prolines and 2 leucines. The mRNA for G6S consists of two species of approximately 4.0 and 4.2 kb with a coding region of 1.6 kb. For mutation analysis a series of primers was designed to cover the entire G6S coding region. Amplicons from RT-PCR on normal and affected goat total RNA were produced and sequenced. A single base substitution, T for C, was found in the 5{prime} region of the coding sequence of the affected animals that creates a stop codon. This mutation introduces an Alu I restriction site. PCR primers designed to amplify a short segment of genomic DNA encompassing the mutation have been used to identify putative carriers and develop a caprine Sanfilippo III D carrier colony.

  5. Sulfatases and a Radical S-Adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet) Enzyme Are Key for Mucosal Foraging and Fitness of the Prominent Human Gut Symbiont, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron*

    PubMed Central

    Benjdia, Alhosna; Martens, Eric C.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.; Berteau, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    The large-scale application of genomic and metagenomic sequencing technologies has yielded a number of insights about the metabolic potential of symbiotic human gut microbes. Nevertheless, the molecular basis of the interactions between commensal bacteria and their host remained to be investigated. Bacteria colonizing the mucosal layer that overlies the gut epithelium are exposed to highly sulfated glycans (i.e. mucin and glycosaminoglycans). These polymers can serve as potential nutrient sources, but their high sulfate content usually prevents their degradation. Commensal bacteria such as Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron possess more predicted sulfatase genes than in the human genome, the physiological functions of which are largely unknown. To be active, sulfatases must undergo a critical post-translational modification catalyzed in anaerobic bacteria by the radical AdoMet enzyme anaerobic sulfatase-maturating enzyme (anSME). In the present study, we have tested the role of this pathway in Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron which, in addition to 28 predicted sulfatases, possesses a single predicted anSME. In vitro studies revealed that deletion of the gene encoding its anSME (BT0238) results in loss of sulfatase activity and impaired ability to use sulfated polysaccharides as carbon sources. Co-colonization of formerly germ-free mice with both isogenic strains (i.e. wild-type or ΔanSME), or invasion experiments involving introduction of one followed by the other strain established that anSME activity and the sulfatases activated via this pathway, are important fitness factors for B. thetaiotaomicron, especially when mice are fed a simple sugar diet that requires this saccharolytic bacterium to adaptively forage on host glycans as nutrients. Whole genome transcriptional profiling of wild-type and the anSME mutant in vivo revealed that loss of this enzyme alters expression of genes involved in mucin utilization and that this disrupted ability to access mucosal glycans

  6. Stratum corneum lipids in disorders of cornification. Steroid sulfatase and cholesterol sulfate in normal desquamation and the pathogenesis of recessive X-linked ichthyosis.

    PubMed Central

    Elias, P M; Williams, M L; Maloney, M E; Bonifas, J A; Brown, B E; Grayson, S; Epstein, E H

    1984-01-01

    The pathological scaling in recessive x-linked ichthyosis is associated with accumulation of abnormal quantities of cholesterol sulfate in stratum corneum (J. Clin. Invest. 68:1404-1410, 1981). To determine whether or not cholesterol sulfate accumulates in recessive x-linked ichthyosis as a direct result of the missing enzyme, steroid sulfatase, we quantitated both steroid sulfatase and its substrate, we quantitated both steroid sulfatase and its substrate, cholesterol sulfate, in different epidermal strata, as well as within stratum corneum subcellular fractions obtained from normal human and neonatal mouse epidermis and from patients with recessive x-linked ichthyosis. In normal human and mouse epidermis, steroid sulfatase activity peaked in the stratum granulosum and stratum corneum, and negligible activity was detectable in lower epidermal layers. In contrast, in recessive x-linked ichthyosis epidermis, enzyme levels were virtually undetectable at all levels. In normal human stratum corneum, up to 10 times more steroid sulfatase activity was present in purified peripheral membrane preparations than in the whole tissue. Whereas in normal human epidermis cholesterol sulfate levels were lowest in the basal/spinous layer, and highest in the stratum granulosum, in recessive x-linked ichthyosis the levels were only slightly higher in the lower epidermis, but continued to climb in the stratum corneum. In both normal and in recessive x-linked ichthyosis stratum corneum, cholesterol sulfate appeared primarily within membrane domains, paralleling the pattern of steroid sulfatase localization. Finally, the role of excess cholesterol sulfate in the pathogenesis of recessive x-linked ichthyosis was directly tested by topical applications of this substance, which produced visible scaling in hairless mice in parallel to an increased cholesterol sulfate content of the stratum corneum. These results demonstrate an intimate relationship between steroid sulfatase and cholesterol

  7. Molecular basis of multiple sulfatase deficiency, mucolipidosis II/III and Niemann-Pick C1 disease - Lysosomal storage disorders caused by defects of non-lysosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Dierks, Thomas; Schlotawa, Lars; Frese, Marc-André; Radhakrishnan, Karthikeyan; von Figura, Kurt; Schmidt, Bernhard

    2009-04-01

    Multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD), mucolipidosis (ML) II/III and Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) disease are rare but fatal lysosomal storage disorders caused by the genetic defect of non-lysosomal proteins. The NPC1 protein mainly localizes to late endosomes and is essential for cholesterol redistribution from endocytosed LDL to cellular membranes. NPC1 deficiency leads to lysosomal accumulation of a broad range of lipids. The precise functional mechanism of this membrane protein, however, remains puzzling. ML II, also termed I cell disease, and the less severe ML III result from deficiencies of the Golgi enzyme N-acetylglucosamine 1-phosphotransferase leading to a global defect of lysosome biogenesis. In patient cells, newly synthesized lysosomal proteins are not equipped with the critical lysosomal trafficking marker mannose 6-phosphate, thus escaping from lysosomal sorting at the trans Golgi network. MSD affects the entire sulfatase family, at least seven members of which are lysosomal enzymes that are specifically involved in the degradation of sulfated glycosaminoglycans, sulfolipids or other sulfated molecules. The combined deficiencies of all sulfatases result from a defective post-translational modification by the ER-localized formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE), which oxidizes a specific cysteine residue to formylglycine, the catalytic residue enabling a unique mechanism of sulfate ester hydrolysis. This review gives an update on the molecular bases of these enigmatic diseases, which have been challenging researchers since many decades and so far led to a number of surprising findings that give deeper insight into both the cell biology and the pathobiochemistry underlying these complex disorders. In case of MSD, considerable progress has been made in recent years towards an understanding of disease-causing FGE mutations. First approaches to link molecular parameters with clinical manifestation have been described and even therapeutical options have been

  8. Molecular analysis of SUMF1 mutations: stability and residual activity of mutant formylglycine-generating enzyme determine disease severity in multiple sulfatase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Schlotawa, Lars; Steinfeld, Robert; von Figura, Kurt; Dierks, Thomas; Gärtner, Jutta

    2008-01-01

    Multiple Sulfatase Deficiency (MSD) is a rare inborn autosomal-recessive disorder, which mainly combines clinical features of metachromatic leukodystrophy, mucopolysaccharidosis and X-linked ichthyosis. The clinical course ranges from neonatal severe to mild juvenile cases. MSD is caused by mutations in the SUMF1 gene encoding the formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE). FGE posttranslationally activates sulfatases by generating formylglycine in their catalytic sites. We analyzed the functional consequences of missense mutations p.A177P, p.W179S, p.A279V and p.R349W with regard to FGE's subcellular localization, enzymatic activity, protein stability, intracellular retention and resulting sulfatase activities. All four mutations did not affect localization of FGE in the endoplasmic reticulum of MSD fibroblasts. However, they decreased its specific enzymatic activity to less than 1% (p.A177P and p.R349W), 3% (p.W179S) or 23% (p.A279V). Protein stability was severely decreased for p.A279V and p.R349W, and almost comparable to wild type for p.A177P and p.W179S. The patient with the mildest clinical phenotype carries the mutation p.A279V leading to decreased FGE protein stability, but high residual enzymatic activity and only slightly reduced sulfatase activities. In contrast, the most severely affected patient carries the mutation p.R349W leading to drastically decreased protein stability, very low residual enzymatic activity and considerably reduced sulfatase activities. Our functional studies provide novel insight into the molecular defect underlying MSD and reveal that both residual enzyme activity and protein stability of FGE contribute to the clinical phenotype. The application of improved functional assays to determine these two molecular parameters of FGE mutants may enable the prediction of the clinical outcome in the future. PMID:18157819

  9. MTH1 Substrate Recognition--An Example of Specific Promiscuity.

    PubMed

    Nissink, J Willem M; Bista, Michal; Breed, Jason; Carter, Nikki; Embrey, Kevin; Read, Jonathan; Winter-Holt, Jon J

    2016-01-01

    MTH1 (NUDT1) is an oncologic target involved in the prevention of DNA damage. We investigate the way MTH1 recognises its substrates and present substrate-bound structures of MTH1 for 8-oxo-dGTP and 8-oxo-rATP as examples of novel strong and weak binding substrate motifs. Investigation of a small set of purine-like fragments using 2D NMR resulted in identification of a fragment with weak potency. The protein-ligand X-Ray structure of this fragment provides insight into the role of water molecules in substrate selectivity. Wider fragment screening by NMR resulted in three new protein structures exhibiting alternative binding configurations to the key Asp-Asp recognition element of the protein. These inhibitor binding modes demonstrate that MTH1 employs an intricate yet promiscuous mechanism of substrate anchoring through its Asp-Asp pharmacophore. The structures suggest that water-mediated interactions convey selectivity towards oxidized substrates over their non-oxidised counterparts, in particular by stabilization of a water molecule in a hydrophobic environment through hydrogen bonding. These findings may be useful in the design of inhibitors of MTH1. PMID:26999531

  10. The mammalian mineralocorticoid receptor: tying down a promiscuous receptor.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Sanchez, Elise P

    2010-01-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) has been called a promiscuous receptor because its intrinsic affinity for aldosterone, cortisol and corticosterone is similar. Since glucocorticoids circulate in concentrations 100- to 1000-fold those of aldosterone, stoichiometry dictates that MR should be activated by glucocorticoids, not aldosterone, yet MRs are expressed in many tissues and regulate diverse functions, many of them under the regulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. A relatively small number of brain MRs are aldosterone selective and modulate blood pressure. Evidence for possible mechanisms conferring ligand specificity in the context of mineralocorticoid-induced hypertension and the brain are discussed. These include factors (or mechanisms) intrinsic to the receptor, such as alternative splice variants and translation start sites, and extrinsic to the MR, including differential access through the blood-brain barrier, differential recruitment of co-regulators and scaffolding proteins, 11beta-steroid dehydrogenase activity, synthesis of potent acylated aldosterone derivatives and the synthesis of relevant amounts of aldosterone in areas of the brain that modulate blood pressure. PMID:19648477

  11. Legume-rhizobia signal exchange: promiscuity and environmental effects.

    PubMed

    Lira, Mario A; Nascimento, Luciana R S; Fracetto, Giselle G M

    2015-01-01

    Although signal exchange between legumes and their rhizobia is among the best-known examples of this biological process, most of the more characterized data comes from just a few legume species and environmental stresses. Although a relative wealth of information is available for some model legumes and some of the major pulses such as soybean, little is known about tropical legumes. This relative disparity in current knowledge is also apparent in the research on the effects of environmental stress on signal exchange; cool-climate stresses, such as low-soil temperature, comprise a relatively large body of research, whereas high-temperature stresses and drought are not nearly as well understood. Both tropical legumes and their environmental stress-induced effects are increasingly important due to global population growth (the demand for protein), climate change (increasing temperatures and more extreme climate behavior), and urbanization (and thus heavy metals). This knowledge gap for both legumes and their environmental stresses is compounded because whereas most temperate legume-rhizobia symbioses are relatively specific and cultivated under relatively stable environments, the converse is true for tropical legumes, which tend to be promiscuous, and grow in highly variable conditions. This review will clarify some of this missing information and highlight fields in which further research would benefit our current knowledge. PMID:26441880

  12. Phytochemicals perturb membranes and promiscuously alter protein function.

    PubMed

    Ingólfsson, Helgi I; Thakur, Pratima; Herold, Karl F; Hobart, E Ashley; Ramsey, Nicole B; Periole, Xavier; de Jong, Djurre H; Zwama, Martijn; Yilmaz, Duygu; Hall, Katherine; Maretzky, Thorsten; Hemmings, Hugh C; Blobel, Carl; Marrink, Siewert J; Koçer, Armağan; Sack, Jon T; Andersen, Olaf S

    2014-08-15

    A wide variety of phytochemicals are consumed for their perceived health benefits. Many of these phytochemicals have been found to alter numerous cell functions, but the mechanisms underlying their biological activity tend to be poorly understood. Phenolic phytochemicals are particularly promiscuous modifiers of membrane protein function, suggesting that some of their actions may be due to a common, membrane bilayer-mediated mechanism. To test whether bilayer perturbation may underlie this diversity of actions, we examined five bioactive phenols reported to have medicinal value: capsaicin from chili peppers, curcumin from turmeric, EGCG from green tea, genistein from soybeans, and resveratrol from grapes. We find that each of these widely consumed phytochemicals alters lipid bilayer properties and the function of diverse membrane proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations show that these phytochemicals modify bilayer properties by localizing to the bilayer/solution interface. Bilayer-modifying propensity was verified using a gramicidin-based assay, and indiscriminate modulation of membrane protein function was demonstrated using four proteins: membrane-anchored metalloproteases, mechanosensitive ion channels, and voltage-dependent potassium and sodium channels. Each protein exhibited similar responses to multiple phytochemicals, consistent with a common, bilayer-mediated mechanism. Our results suggest that many effects of amphiphilic phytochemicals are due to cell membrane perturbations, rather than specific protein binding. PMID:24901212

  13. Butterfly genome reveals promiscuous exchange of mimicry adaptations among species.

    PubMed

    2012-07-01

    The evolutionary importance of hybridization and introgression has long been debated. Hybrids are usually rare and unfit, but even infrequent hybridization can aid adaptation by transferring beneficial traits between species. Here we use genomic tools to investigate introgression in Heliconius, a rapidly radiating genus of neotropical butterflies widely used in studies of ecology, behaviour, mimicry and speciation. We sequenced the genome of Heliconius melpomene and compared it with other taxa to investigate chromosomal evolution in Lepidoptera and gene flow among multiple Heliconius species and races. Among 12,669 predicted genes, biologically important expansions of families of chemosensory and Hox genes are particularly noteworthy. Chromosomal organization has remained broadly conserved since the Cretaceous period, when butterflies split from the Bombyx (silkmoth) lineage. Using genomic resequencing, we show hybrid exchange of genes between three co-mimics, Heliconius melpomene, Heliconius timareta and Heliconius elevatus, especially at two genomic regions that control mimicry pattern. We infer that closely related Heliconius species exchange protective colour-pattern genes promiscuously, implying that hybridization has an important role in adaptive radiation. PMID:22722851

  14. MTH1 Substrate Recognition—An Example of Specific Promiscuity

    PubMed Central

    Nissink, J. Willem M.; Bista, Michal; Breed, Jason; Carter, Nikki; Embrey, Kevin; Read, Jonathan; Winter-Holt, Jon J.

    2016-01-01

    MTH1 (NUDT1) is an oncologic target involved in the prevention of DNA damage. We investigate the way MTH1 recognises its substrates and present substrate-bound structures of MTH1 for 8-oxo-dGTP and 8-oxo-rATP as examples of novel strong and weak binding substrate motifs. Investigation of a small set of purine-like fragments using 2D NMR resulted in identification of a fragment with weak potency. The protein-ligand X-Ray structure of this fragment provides insight into the role of water molecules in substrate selectivity. Wider fragment screening by NMR resulted in three new protein structures exhibiting alternative binding configurations to the key Asp-Asp recognition element of the protein. These inhibitor binding modes demonstrate that MTH1 employs an intricate yet promiscuous mechanism of substrate anchoring through its Asp-Asp pharmacophore. The structures suggest that water-mediated interactions convey selectivity towards oxidized substrates over their non-oxidised counterparts, in particular by stabilization of a water molecule in a hydrophobic environment through hydrogen bonding. These findings may be useful in the design of inhibitors of MTH1. PMID:26999531

  15. Legume-rhizobia signal exchange: promiscuity and environmental effects

    PubMed Central

    Lira, Mario A.; Nascimento, Luciana R. S.; Fracetto, Giselle G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Although signal exchange between legumes and their rhizobia is among the best-known examples of this biological process, most of the more characterized data comes from just a few legume species and environmental stresses. Although a relative wealth of information is available for some model legumes and some of the major pulses such as soybean, little is known about tropical legumes. This relative disparity in current knowledge is also apparent in the research on the effects of environmental stress on signal exchange; cool-climate stresses, such as low-soil temperature, comprise a relatively large body of research, whereas high-temperature stresses and drought are not nearly as well understood. Both tropical legumes and their environmental stress-induced effects are increasingly important due to global population growth (the demand for protein), climate change (increasing temperatures and more extreme climate behavior), and urbanization (and thus heavy metals). This knowledge gap for both legumes and their environmental stresses is compounded because whereas most temperate legume-rhizobia symbioses are relatively specific and cultivated under relatively stable environments, the converse is true for tropical legumes, which tend to be promiscuous, and grow in highly variable conditions. This review will clarify some of this missing information and highlight fields in which further research would benefit our current knowledge. PMID:26441880

  16. Phytochemicals Perturb Membranes and Promiscuously Alter Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A wide variety of phytochemicals are consumed for their perceived health benefits. Many of these phytochemicals have been found to alter numerous cell functions, but the mechanisms underlying their biological activity tend to be poorly understood. Phenolic phytochemicals are particularly promiscuous modifiers of membrane protein function, suggesting that some of their actions may be due to a common, membrane bilayer-mediated mechanism. To test whether bilayer perturbation may underlie this diversity of actions, we examined five bioactive phenols reported to have medicinal value: capsaicin from chili peppers, curcumin from turmeric, EGCG from green tea, genistein from soybeans, and resveratrol from grapes. We find that each of these widely consumed phytochemicals alters lipid bilayer properties and the function of diverse membrane proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations show that these phytochemicals modify bilayer properties by localizing to the bilayer/solution interface. Bilayer-modifying propensity was verified using a gramicidin-based assay, and indiscriminate modulation of membrane protein function was demonstrated using four proteins: membrane-anchored metalloproteases, mechanosensitive ion channels, and voltage-dependent potassium and sodium channels. Each protein exhibited similar responses to multiple phytochemicals, consistent with a common, bilayer-mediated mechanism. Our results suggest that many effects of amphiphilic phytochemicals are due to cell membrane perturbations, rather than specific protein binding. PMID:24901212

  17. The energetic cost of mating in a promiscuous cephalopod.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Amanda Michelle; Squires, Zoe Elizabeth; Stuart-Fox, Devi

    2012-10-23

    Costs that individuals incur through mating can play an important role in understanding the evolution of life histories and senescence, particularly in promiscuous species. Copulation costs, ranging from energy expenditure to reduced longevity, are widely studied in insects but have received substantially less attention in other taxa. One cost of mating, the energetic cost, is poorly studied across all taxa despite its potential importance for the many species where copulation is physically demanding and/or frequent. Here, we investigated the energetic cost of mating in both male and female dumpling squid (Euprymna tasmanica). In this species, copulation can last up to 3 h and requires that the male physically restrains the female. We report that the act of copulation halves the swimming endurance of both sexes, and that they take up to 30 min to recover. Such a reduction in post-copulatory performance may have important implications for predator avoidance, foraging ability and energy allocation. Therefore, quantifying this cost is essential to understand the evolution of reproductive strategies and behaviours such as female receptivity and male and female mating frequency. PMID:22809722

  18. Beyond promiscuity: mate-choice commitments in social breeding

    PubMed Central

    Boomsma, Jacobus J.

    2013-01-01

    Obligate eusociality with distinct caste phenotypes has evolved from strictly monogamous sub-social ancestors in ants, some bees, some wasps and some termites. This implies that no lineage reached the most advanced form of social breeding, unless helpers at the nest gained indirect fitness values via siblings that were identical to direct fitness via offspring. The complete lack of re-mating promiscuity equalizes sex-specific variances in reproductive success. Later, evolutionary developments towards multiple queen-mating retained lifetime commitment between sexual partners, but reduced male variance in reproductive success relative to female's, similar to the most advanced vertebrate cooperative breeders. Here, I (i) discuss some of the unique and highly peculiar mating system adaptations of eusocial insects; (ii) address ambiguities that remained after earlier reviews and extend the monogamy logic to the evolution of soldier castes; (iii) evaluate the evidence for indirect fitness benefits driving the dynamics of (in)vertebrate cooperative breeding, while emphasizing the fundamental differences between obligate eusociality and cooperative breeding; (iv) infer that lifetime commitment is a major driver towards higher levels of organization in bodies, colonies and mutualisms. I argue that evolutionary informative definitions of social systems that separate direct and indirect fitness benefits facilitate transparency when testing inclusive fitness theory. PMID:23339241

  19. A promiscuous DNA packaging machine from bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhihong; Kottadiel, Vishal I; Vafabakhsh, Reza; Dai, Li; Chemla, Yann R; Ha, Taekjip; Rao, Venigalla B

    2011-01-01

    Complex viruses are assembled from simple protein subunits by sequential and irreversible assembly. During genome packaging in bacteriophages, a powerful molecular motor assembles at the special portal vertex of an empty prohead to initiate packaging. The capsid expands after about 10%-25% of the genome is packaged. When the head is full, the motor cuts the concatemeric DNA and dissociates from the head. Conformational changes, particularly in the portal, are thought to drive these sequential transitions. We found that the phage T4 packaging machine is highly promiscuous, translocating DNA into finished phage heads as well as into proheads. Optical tweezers experiments show that single motors can force exogenous DNA into phage heads at the same rate as into proheads. Single molecule fluorescence measurements demonstrate that phage heads undergo repeated initiations, packaging multiple DNA molecules into the same head. These results suggest that the phage DNA packaging machine has unusual conformational plasticity, powering DNA into an apparently passive capsid receptacle, including the highly stable virus shell, until it is full. These features probably led to the evolution of viral genomes that fit capsid volume, a strikingly common phenomenon in double-stranded DNA viruses, and will potentially allow design of a novel class of nanocapsid delivery vehicles. PMID:21358801

  20. The lifestyle of prokaryotic organisms influences the repertoire of promiscuous enzymes.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Núñez, Mario Alberto; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Katya; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2015-09-01

    The metabolism of microbial organisms and its diversity are partly the result of an adaptation process to the characteristics of the environments that they inhabit. In this work, we analyze the influence of lifestyle on the content of promiscuous enzymes in 761 nonredundant bacterial and archaeal genomes. Promiscuous enzymes were defined as those proteins whose catalytic activities are defined by two or more different Enzyme Commission (E.C.) numbers. The genomes analyzed were categorized into four lifestyles for their exhaustive comparisons: free-living, extremophiles, pathogens, and intracellular. From these analyses we found that free-living organisms have larger genomes and an enrichment of promiscuous enzymes. In contrast, intracellular organisms showed smaller genomes and the lesser proportion of promiscuous enzymes. On the basis of our data, we show that the proportion of promiscuous enzymes in an organism is mainly influenced by the lifestyle, where fluctuating environments promote its emergence. Finally, we evidenced that duplication processes occur preferentially in metabolism of free-living and extremophiles species. PMID:26109005

  1. Promiscuous mating in the harem-roosting fruit bat, Cynopterus sphinx.

    PubMed

    Garg, Kritika M; Chattopadhyay, Balaji; Doss D, Paramanatha Swami; A K, Vinoth Kumar; Kandula, Sripathi; Ramakrishnan, Uma

    2012-08-01

    Observations on mating behaviours and strategies guide our understanding of mating systems and variance in reproductive success. However, the presence of cryptic strategies often results in situations where social mating system is not reflective of genetic mating system. We present such a study of the genetic mating system of a harem-forming bat Cynopterus sphinx where harems may not be true indicators of male reproductive success. This temporal study using data from six seasons on paternity reveals that social harem assemblages do not play a role in the mating system, and variance in male reproductive success is lower than expected assuming polygynous mating. Further, simulations reveal that the genetic mating system is statistically indistinguishable from promiscuity. Our results are in contrast to an earlier study that demonstrated high variance in male reproductive success. Although an outcome of behavioural mating patterns, standardized variance in male reproductive success (I(m)) affects the opportunity for sexual selection. To gain a better understanding of the evolutionary implications of promiscuity for mammals in general, we compared our estimates of I(m) and total opportunity for sexual selection (I(m) /I(f), where I(f) is standardized variance in female reproductive success) with those of other known promiscuous species. We observed a broad range of I(m) /I(f) values across known promiscuous species, indicating our poor understanding of the evolutionary implications of promiscuous mating. PMID:22725709

  2. Morquio A syndrome: Cloning, sequence, and structure of the human N-acetylgalactosamine 6-sulfatase (GALNS) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C.P.; Guo, Xiao-Hui; Apostolou, S.

    1994-08-01

    Deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme, N-acetylgalactosamine 6-sulfatase (GALNS;EC 3.1.6.4), results in the storage of the glycosaminoglycans, keratan sulfate and chrondroitin 6-sulfate, which leads to the lysosomal storage disorder Morquio A syndrome. Four overlapping genomic clones derived from a chromosome 16-specific gridded cosmid library containing the entire GALNS gene were isolated. The structure of the gene and the sequence of the exon/intron boundaries and the 5{prime} promoter region were determined. The GALNS gene is split into 14 exons spanning approximately 40 kb. The potential promoter for GALNS lacks a TATA box but contains GC box consensus sequences, consistent with its role as a housekeeping gene. The GALNS gene contains an Alu repeat in intron 5 and a VNTR-like sequence in intron 6. 12 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Structural Basis for Substrate Promiscuity of dCK

    SciTech Connect

    Sabini, Elisabetti; Hazra, Saugata; Ort, Stephen; Konrad, Manfred; Lavie, Arnon

    2008-06-06

    Deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) is an essential nucleoside kinase critical for the production of nucleotide precursors for DNA synthesis. This enzyme catalyzes the initial conversion of the nucleosides deoxyadenosine (dA), deoxyguanosine (dG), and deoxycytidine (dC) into their monophosphate forms, with subsequent phosphorylation to the triphosphate forms performed by additional enzymes. Several nucleoside analog prodrugs are dependent on dCK for their pharmacological activation, and even nucleosides of the non-physiological L-chirality are phosphorylated by dCK. In addition to accepting dC and purine nucleosides (and their analogs) as phosphoryl acceptors, dCK can utilize either ATP or UTP as phosphoryl donors. To unravel the structural basis for substrate promiscuity of dCK at both the nucleoside acceptor and nucleotide donor sites, we solved the crystal structures of the enzyme as ternary complexes with the two enantiomeric forms of dA (D-dA, or L-dA), with either UDP or ADP bound to the donor site. The complexes with UDP revealed an open state of dCK in which the nucleoside, either D-dA or L-dA, is surprisingly bound in a manner not consistent with catalysis. In contrast, the complexes with ADP, with either D-dA or L-dA, adopted a closed and catalytically competent conformation. The differential states adopted by dCK in response to the nature of the nucleotide were also detected by tryptophan fluorescence experiments. Thus, we are in the unique position to observe differential effects at the acceptor site due to the nature of the nucleotide at the donor site, allowing us to rationalize the different kinetic properties observed with UTP to those with ATP.

  4. Filtering promiscuous compounds in early drug discovery: is it a good idea?

    PubMed

    Senger, Mario R; Fraga, Carlos A M; Dantas, Rafael F; Silva, Floriano P

    2016-06-01

    The use of computational filters for excluding supposedly nonspecific and promiscuous compounds from chemical libraries is a controversial issue, because many drugs used in clinics today would never reach the market if these filters were applied. In part, this conflict could be caused by the paradigm: one-drug-one-target, even though it is widely agreed that drug action is a result of a complex network of biomolecular interactions. Therefore, the so-called pan assay interference compounds (PAINS) or promiscuous compounds could be in fact assay artifacts, false positives or, simply, bright chemical matter (BCM) composed of privileged scaffolds, as we propose here. Despite apparent promiscuity, BCM can be tailored into new and safe drugs after overcoming selectivity criteria. PMID:26880580

  5. A cell-signaling network temporally resolves specific versus promiscuous phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kanshin, Evgeny; Bergeron-Sandoval, Louis-Philippe; Isik, S Sinan; Thibault, Pierre; Michnick, Stephen W

    2015-02-24

    If specific and functional kinase- or phosphatase-substrate interactions are optimized for binding compared to promiscuous interactions, then changes in phosphorylation should occur faster on functional versus promiscuous substrates. To test this hypothesis, we designed a high temporal resolution global phosphoproteomics protocol to study the high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) response in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The method provides accurate, stimulus-specific measurement of phosphoproteome changes, quantitative analysis of phosphodynamics at sub-minute temporal resolution, and detection of more phosphosites. Rates of evolution of dynamic phosphosites were comparable to those of known functional phosphosites and significantly lower than static or longer-time-frame dynamic phosphosites. Kinetic profile analyses indicated that putatively functional kinase- or phosphatase-substrate interactions occur more rapidly, within 60 s, than promiscuous interactions. Finally, we report many changes in phosphorylation of proteins implicated in cytoskeletal and mitotic spindle dynamics that may underlie regulation of cell cycle and morphogenesis. PMID:25704821

  6. Extreme promiscuity of a bacterial and a plant diterpene synthase enables combinatorial biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Meirong; Potter, Kevin C; Peters, Reuben J

    2016-09-01

    Diterpenes are widely distributed across many biological kingdoms, where they serve a diverse range of physiological functions, and some have significant industrial utility. Their biosynthesis involves class I diterpene synthases (DTSs), whose activity can be preceded by that of class II diterpene cyclases (DTCs). Here, a modular metabolic engineering system was used to examine the promiscuity of DTSs. Strikingly, both a bacterial and plant DTS were found to exhibit extreme promiscuity, reacting with all available precursors with orthogonal activity, producing an olefin or hydroxyl group, respectively. Such DTS promiscuity enables combinatorial biosynthesis, with remarkably high yields for these unoptimized non-native enzymatic combinations (up to 15mg/L). Indeed, it was possible to readily characterize the 13 unknown products. Notably, 16 of the observed diterpenes were previously inaccessible, and these results provide biosynthetic routes that are further expected to enable assembly of more extended pathways to produce additionally elaborated 'non-natural' diterpenoids. PMID:27060773

  7. The promiscuous phosphomonoestearase activity of Archaeoglobus fulgidus CopA, a thermophilic Cu+ transport ATPase.

    PubMed

    Bredeston, Luis M; González Flecha, F Luis

    2016-07-01

    Membrane transport P-type ATPases display two characteristic enzymatic activities: a principal ATPase activity provides the driving force for ion transport across biological membranes, whereas a promiscuous secondary activity catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters. This last activity is usually denoted as the phosphatase activity of P-ATPases. In the present study, we characterize the phosphatase activity of the Cu(+)-transport ATPase from Archaeglobus fulgidus (Af-CopA) and compare it with the principal ATPase activity. Our results show that the phosphatase turnover number was 20 times higher than that corresponding to the ATPase activity, but it is compensated by a high value of Km, producing a less efficient catalysis for pNPP. This secondary activity is enhanced by Mg(2+) (essential activator) and phospholipids (non-essential activator), and inhibited by salts and Cu(+). Transition state analysis of the catalyzed and noncatalyzed hydrolysis of pNPP indicates that Af-CopA enhances the reaction rates by a factor of 10(5) (ΔΔG(‡)=38 kJ/mol) mainly by reducing the enthalpy of activation (ΔΔH(‡)=30 kJ/mol), whereas the entropy of activation is less negative on the enzyme than in solution. For the ATPase activity, the decrease in the enthalpic component of the barrier is higher (ΔΔH(‡)=39 kJ/mol) and the entropic component is small on both the enzyme and in solution. These results suggest that different mechanisms are involved in the transference of the phosphoryl group of p-nitrophenyl phosphate and ATP. PMID:27086711

  8. Proton-in-Flight Mechanism for the Spontaneous Hydrolysis of N-Methyl O-Phenyl Sulfamate: Implications for the Design of Steroid Sulfatase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, David R.; Wolfenden, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The hydrolysis of N-methyl O-phenyl sulfamate (1) has been studied as a model for steroid sulfatase inhibitors such as Coumate, 667 Coumate and EMATE. At neutral pH, simulating physiological conditions, hydrolysis of 1 involves an intramolecular proton transfer from nitrogen to the bridging oxygen atom of the leaving group. Remarkably, this proton transfer is estimated to accelerate the decomposition of 1 by a factor of 1011. Examination of existing kinetic data reveals that the sulfatase PaAstA catalyzes the hydrolysis of sulfamate esters with moderate efficiencies of ~104; whereas, the catalytic rate acceleration generated by the enzyme for its cognate substrate is on the order of ~1015. Rate constants for hydrolysis of a wide range of sulfuryl esters, ArOSO2X−, are shown to be correlated by a two parameter equation based on pKaArOH and pKaArOSO2XH. PMID:22486328

  9. The "Promiscuous Audience" Controversy and the Emergence of the Early Woman's Rights Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaeske, Susan

    1995-01-01

    Examines the "Promiscuous Audience" charge against activist women in the 1830s--its emergence, persuasive force, motivations, and responses to it. Shows how, in establishing their right to speak from public platforms, activist women did not rely on natural law or Constitutional appeals, but rather emphasized the special nature of female…

  10. Broadening the Concept of Adolescent Promiscuity: Male Accountability Made Visible and the Implications for Family Therapists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dankoski, Mary E.; Payer, Rosemary; Steinberg, Marilyn

    1996-01-01

    Looks at male promiscuity and the gender bias that holds females accountable for sexual activity. Examines communication patterns, family structure, and other factors. Argues that family therapists can alter family communication patterns, redefine boundaries, and promote healthy parental involvement to make an impact on the issue of male sexual…

  11. Predictors of Drug/Alcohol Abuse and Sexual Promiscuity of College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nam, Jeong Sook; And Others

    This study examined the relationship between the individual's purpose in life, existential anxiety, powerlessness and use of alcohol/drugs and the tendency to be sexually promiscuous. The study is rooted in the work of Viktor E. Frankl, which suggested that a lack of meaning and purpose can cause socially deviant behavior and psychological…

  12. Differential Active Site Loop Conformations Mediate Promiscuous Activities in the Lactonase SsoPox

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Mikael; Chabriere, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes are proficient catalysts that enable fast rates of Michaelis-complex formation, the chemical step and products release. These different steps may require different conformational states of the active site that have distinct binding properties. Moreover, the conformational flexibility of the active site mediates alternative, promiscuous functions. Here we focused on the lactonase SsoPox from Sulfolobus solfataricus. SsoPox is a native lactonase endowed with promiscuous phosphotriesterase activity. We identified a position in the active site loop (W263) that governs its flexibility, and thereby affects the substrate specificity of the enzyme. We isolated two different sets of substitutions at position 263 that induce two distinct conformational sampling of the active loop and characterized the structural and kinetic effects of these substitutions. These sets of mutations selectively and distinctly mediate the improvement of the promiscuous phosphotriesterase and oxo-lactonase activities of SsoPox by increasing active-site loop flexibility. These observations corroborate the idea that conformational diversity governs enzymatic promiscuity and is a key feature of protein evolvability. PMID:24086491

  13. Monogamous and promiscuous rodent species exhibit discrete variation in the size of the medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kingsbury, Marcy A; Gleason, Erin D; Ophir, Alexander G; Phelps, Steven M; Young, Larry J; Marler, Catherine A

    2012-01-01

    Limbic-associated cortical areas, such as the medial prefrontal and retrosplenial cortex (mPFC and RS, respectively), are involved in the processing of emotion, motivation, and various aspects of working memory and have been implicated in mating behavior. To determine whether the independent evolution of mating systems is associated with a convergence in cortical mechanisms, we compared the size of mPFC and RS between the monogamous prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster) and the promiscuous meadow vole (Microtus pennsylvanicus), and between the monogamous California mouse (Peromyscus californicus) and the promiscuous white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus). For both promiscuous mice and voles, the mPFC occupied a significantly larger percentage of total cortex than in the monogamous species. No significant differences were observed for the RS or overall cortex size with respect to mating system, supporting the convergent evolution of mPFC size, specifically. Individual differences in the mating behavior of male prairie voles (wandering versus pair-bonding), presumably facultative tactics, were not reflected in the relative size of the mPFC, which is likely a heritable trait. Given the importance of the mPFC for complex working memory, particularly object-place and temporal order memory, we hypothesize that the relatively greater size of the mPFC in promiscuous species reflects a greater need to remember multiple individuals and the times and locations in which they have been encountered in the home range. PMID:22759599

  14. Steroid sulfatase inhibitor DU-14 protects spatial memory and synaptic plasticity from disruption by amyloid β protein in male rats.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xing-Hua; Tong, Jia-Qing; Wang, Zhao-Jun; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Xu; Liu, Xiao-Jie; Cai, Hong-Yan; Qi, Jin-Shun

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related mental disorder characterized by progressive loss of memory and multiple cognitive impairments. The overproduction and aggregation of Amyloid β protein (Aβ) in the brain, especially in the hippocampus, are closely involved in the memory loss in the patients with AD. Accumulating evidence indicates that the Aβ-induced imbalance of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) in the brain plays an important role in the AD pathogenesis and progression. The level of DHEA is elevated, while DHEAS is dramatically decreased in the AD brain. The present study tried to restore the balance between DHEA and DHEAS by using a non-steroidal sulfatase inhibitor DU-14, which increases endogenous DHEAS through preventing DHEAS converted back into DHEA. We found that: (1) DU-14 effectively attenuated the Aβ1-42-induced cognitive deficits in spatial learning and memory of rats in Morris water maze test; (2) DU-14 prevented Aβ1-42-induced decrease in the cholinergic theta rhythm of hippocampal local field potential (LFP) in the CA1 region; (3) DU-14 protected hippocampal synaptic plasticity against Aβ1-42-induced suppression of long term potentiation (LTP). These results provide evidence for the neuroprotective action of DU-14 against neurotoxic Aβ, suggesting that up-regulation of endogenous DHEAS by DU-14 could be beneficial to the alleviation of Aβ-induced impairments in spatial memory and synaptic plasticity. PMID:27222435

  15. The Effect of Recombinant Human Iduronate-2-Sulfatase (Idursulfase) on Growth in Young Patients with Mucopolysaccharidosis Type II

    PubMed Central

    Żuber, Zbigniew; Różdżyńska-Świątkowska, Agnieszka; Jurecka, Agnieszka; Tylki-Szymańska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II; Hunter syndrome) is an X-linked, recessive, lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of iduronate-2-sulfatase. Early bone involvement leads to decreased growth velocity and short stature in nearly all patients. Our analysis aimed to investigate the effects of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with idursulfase (Elaprase) on growth in young patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type II. Analysis of longitudinal anthropometric data of MPS II patients (group 1, n = 13) who started ERT before 6 years of age (range from 3 months to 6 years, mean 3.6 years, median 4 years) was performed and then compared with retrospective analysis of data for MPS II patients naïve to ERT (group 2, n = 50). Patients in group 1 received intravenous idursulfase at a standard dose of 0.58 mg/kg weekly for 52–288 weeks. The course of average growth curve for group 1 was very similar to growth pattern in group 2. The average value of body height in subsequent years in group 1 was a little greater than in group 2, however, the difference was not statistically significant. In studied patients with MPS II, idursulfase did not appear to alter the growth patterns. PMID:24454794

  16. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of new arylamide derivatives possessing sulfonate or sulfamate moieties as steroid sulfatase enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    El-Gamal, Mohammed I; Semreen, Mohammad H; Foster, Paul A; Potter, Barry V L

    2016-06-15

    A series of new arylamide derivatives possessing terminal sulfonate or sulfamate moieties was designed and synthesized. The target compounds were tested for in vitro inhibitory effects against the steroid sulfatase (STS) enzyme in a cell-free assay system. The free sulfamate derivative 1j was the most active. It inhibited the enzymatic activity by 72.0% and 55.7% at 20μM and 10μM, respectively. Compound 1j was further tested for STS inhibition in JEG-3 placental carcinoma cells with high STS enzyme activity. It inhibited 93.9% of the enzyme activity in JEG-3 placental carcinoma cells at 20μM with an efficacy near to that of the well-established drug STX64 as reference. At 10μM, 1j inhibited 86.1% of the STS activity of JEG-3. Its IC50 value against the STS enzyme in JEG-3 cells was 0.421μM. Thus, 1j represents an attractive new non-steroidal lead for further optimization. PMID:27143133

  17. The Effect of The Steroid Sulfatase Inhibitor (p-O-sulfamoyl)–Tetradecanoyl Tyramine (DU-14) on Learning and Memory in Rats with Selective Lesion of Septal-Hippocampal Cholinergic Tract

    PubMed Central

    Babalola, P. A.; Fitz, N.F.; Gibbs, R.B; Flaherty, P.; Li, P.-K.; Johnson, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), is an excitatory neurosteroid synthesized within the CNS that modulates brain function. Effects associated with augmented DHEAS include learning and memory enhancement. Inhibitors of the steroid sulfatase enzyme increase brain DHEAS levels and can also facilitate learning and memory. This study investigated the effect of steroid sulfatase inhibition on learning and memory in rats with selective cholinergic lesion of the septo-hippocampal tract using passive avoidance and delayed matching to position T-maze (DMP) paradigms. The selective cholinergic immunotoxin 192 IgG-saporin (SAP) was infused into the medial septum of animals and then tested using a step-through passive avoidance paradigm or DMP paradigm. Peripheral administration of the steroid sulfatase inhibitor, DU-14, increased step-through latency following footshock in rats with SAP lesion compared to both vehicle treated control and lesioned animals (p < 0.05). However, in the DMP task, steroid sulfatase inhibition impaired acquisition in lesioned rats while having no effect on intact animals. These results suggest that steroid sulfatase inhibition facilitates memory associated with contextual fear, but impairs acquisition of spatial memory tasks in rats with selective lesion of the septo-hippocampal tract. PMID:23022361

  18. Z linkage of female promiscuity genes in the moth Utetheisa ornatrix: support for the sexy-sperm hypothesis?

    PubMed

    Iyengar, Vikram K; Reeve, Hudson K

    2010-05-01

    Female preference genes for large males in the highly promiscuous moth Utetheisa ornatrix (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae) have previously been shown to be mostly Z-linked, in accordance with the hypothesis that ZZ-ZW sex chromosome systems should facilitate Fisherian sexual selection. We determined the heritability of both female and male promiscuity in the highly promiscuous moth U. ornatrix (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae) through parent-offspring and grandparent-offspring regression analyses. Our data show that male promiscuity is not sex-limited and either autosomal or sex-linked whereas female promiscuity is primarily determined by sex-limited, Z-linked genes. These data are consistent with the "sexy-sperm hypothesis," which posits that multiple-mating and sperm competitiveness coevolve through a Fisherian-like process in which female promiscuity is a kind of mate choice in which sperm-competitiveness is the trait favored in males. Such a Fisherian process should also be more potent when female preferences are Z-linked and sex-limited than when autosomal or not limited. PMID:20002164

  19. Substrate Promiscuity: AglB, the Archaeal Oligosaccharyltransferase, Can Process a Variety of Lipid-Linked Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Rosenzweig, Chen; Guan, Ziqiang; Shaanan, Boaz

    2014-01-01

    Across evolution, N-glycosylation involves oligosaccharyltransferases that transfer lipid-linked glycans to selected Asn residues of target proteins. While these enzymes catalyze similar reactions in each domain, differences exist in terms of the chemical composition, length and degree of phosphorylation of the lipid glycan carrier, the sugar linking the glycan to the lipid carrier, and the composition and structure of the transferred glycan. To gain insight into how oligosaccharyltransferases cope with such substrate diversity, the present study analyzed the archaeal oligosaccharyltransferase AglB from four haloarchaeal species. Accordingly, it was shown that despite processing distinct lipid-linked glycans in their native hosts, AglB from Haloarcula marismortui, Halobacterium salinarum, and Haloferax mediterranei could readily replace their counterpart from Haloferax volcanii when introduced into Hfx. volcanii cells deleted of aglB. As the four enzymes show significant sequence and apparently structural homology, it appears that the functional similarity of the four AglB proteins reflects the relaxed substrate specificity of these enzymes. Such demonstration of AglB substrate promiscuity is important not only for better understanding of N-glycosylation in Archaea and elsewhere but also for efforts aimed at transforming Hfx. volcanii into a glycoengineering platform. PMID:24212570

  20. Substrate promiscuity: AglB, the archaeal oligosaccharyltransferase, can process a variety of lipid-linked glycans.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Rosenzweig, Chen; Guan, Ziqiang; Shaanan, Boaz; Eichler, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Across evolution, N-glycosylation involves oligosaccharyltransferases that transfer lipid-linked glycans to selected Asn residues of target proteins. While these enzymes catalyze similar reactions in each domain, differences exist in terms of the chemical composition, length and degree of phosphorylation of the lipid glycan carrier, the sugar linking the glycan to the lipid carrier, and the composition and structure of the transferred glycan. To gain insight into how oligosaccharyltransferases cope with such substrate diversity, the present study analyzed the archaeal oligosaccharyltransferase AglB from four haloarchaeal species. Accordingly, it was shown that despite processing distinct lipid-linked glycans in their native hosts, AglB from Haloarcula marismortui, Halobacterium salinarum, and Haloferax mediterranei could readily replace their counterpart from Haloferax volcanii when introduced into Hfx. volcanii cells deleted of aglB. As the four enzymes show significant sequence and apparently structural homology, it appears that the functional similarity of the four AglB proteins reflects the relaxed substrate specificity of these enzymes. Such demonstration of AglB substrate promiscuity is important not only for better understanding of N-glycosylation in Archaea and elsewhere but also for efforts aimed at transforming Hfx. volcanii into a glycoengineering platform. PMID:24212570

  1. Molecular analysis of paternity shows promiscuous mating in female humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae, Borowski).

    PubMed Central

    Clapham, P J; Palsbøll, P J

    1997-01-01

    It is widely assumed that the mating system of the humpback whale. Magaptera novaeangliae, is similar to that of most mammals in that it represents some form of polygyny or promiscuity, but this cannot be tested without observations of copulation or data on paternity of offspring. Microsatellite DNA markers were used to examine the paternity of calves born to individually identified mature female humpback whales from the Gulf of Maine. Skin biopsies were obtained from three females, and several (range: three to five) of their known offspring. Multiple paternity of offspring, indicated by the presence of at least three different paternal alleles, was evident in all three females at either three or four of the six microsatellite loci surveyed. Such promiscuous mating is expected given current knowledge of the social ecology of this species. It is also consistent with resightings of individually identified female humpbacks with different male associates during two or more breeding seasons. PMID:9061965

  2. Ultrahigh-throughput discovery of promiscuous enzymes by picodroplet functional metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Colin, Pierre-Yves; Kintses, Balint; Gielen, Fabrice; Miton, Charlotte M.; Fischer, Gerhard; Mohamed, Mark F.; Hyvönen, Marko; Morgavi, Diego P.; Janssen, Dick B; Hollfelder, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Unculturable bacterial communities provide a rich source of biocatalysts, but their experimental discovery by functional metagenomics is difficult, because the odds are stacked against the experimentor. Here we demonstrate functional screening of a million-membered metagenomic library in microfluidic picolitre droplet compartments. Using bait substrates, new hydrolases for sulfate monoesters and phosphotriesters were identified, mostly based on promiscuous activities presumed not to be under selection pressure. Spanning three protein superfamilies, these break new ground in sequence space: promiscuity now connects enzymes with only distantly related sequences. Most hits could not have been predicted by sequence analysis, because the desired activities have never been ascribed to similar sequences, showing how this approach complements bioinformatic harvesting of metagenomic sequencing data. Functional screening of a library of unprecedented size with excellent assay sensitivity has been instrumental in identifying rare genes constituting catalytically versatile hubs in sequence space as potential starting points for the acquisition of new functions. PMID:26639611

  3. Structures of Human Pumilio with Noncognate RNAs Reveal Molecular Mechanisms for Binding Promiscuity

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta,Y.; Nair, D.; Wharton, R.; Aggarwal, A.

    2008-01-01

    Pumilio is a founder member of the evolutionarily conserved Puf family of RNA-binding proteins that control a number of physiological processes in eukaryotes. A structure of human Pumilio (hPum) Puf domain bound to a Drosophila regulatory sequence showed that each Puf repeat recognizes a single nucleotide. Puf domains in general bind promiscuously to a large set of degenerate sequences, but the structural basis for this promiscuity has been unclear. Here, we describe the structures of hPum Puf domain complexed to two noncognate RNAs, CycBreverse and Puf5. In each complex, one of the nucleotides is ejected from the binding surface, in effect, acting as a 'spacer.' The complexes also reveal the plasticity of several Puf repeats, which recognize noncanonical nucleotides. Together, these complexes provide a molecular basis for recognition of degenerate binding sites, which significantly increases the number of mRNAs targeted for regulation by Puf proteins in vivo.

  4. Differential plant invasiveness is not always driven by host promiscuity with bacterial symbionts.

    PubMed

    Klock, Metha M; Barrett, Luke G; Thrall, Peter H; Harms, Kyle E

    2016-01-01

    Identification of mechanisms that allow some species to outcompete others is a fundamental goal in ecology and invasive species management. One useful approach is to examine congeners varying in invasiveness in a comparative framework across native and invaded ranges. Acacia species have been widely introduced outside their native range of Australia, and a subset of these species have become invasive in multiple parts of the world. Within specific regions, the invasive status of these species varies. Our study examined whether a key mechanism in the life history of Acacia species, the legume-rhizobia symbiosis, influences acacia invasiveness on a regional scale. To assess the extent to which species varying in invasiveness correspondingly differ with regard to the diversity of rhizobia they associate with, we grew seven Acacia species ranging in invasiveness in California in multiple soils from both their native (Australia) and introduced (California) ranges. In particular, the aim was to determine whether more invasive species formed symbioses with a wider diversity of rhizobial strains (i.e. are more promiscuous hosts). We measured and compared plant performance, including aboveground biomass, survival, and nodulation response, as well as rhizobial community composition and richness. Host promiscuity did not differ among invasiveness categories. Acacia species that varied in invasiveness differed in aboveground biomass for only one soil and did not differ in survival or nodulation within individual soils. In addition, acacias did not differ in rhizobial richness among invasiveness categories. However, nodulation differed between regions and was generally higher in the native than introduced range. Our results suggest that all Acacia species introduced to California are promiscuous hosts and that host promiscuity per se does not explain the observed differences in invasiveness within this region. Our study also highlights the utility of assessing potential

  5. Functional promiscuity correlates with conformational heterogeneity in A-class glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed

    Hou, Liming; Honaker, Matthew T; Shireman, Laura M; Balogh, Larissa M; Roberts, Arthur G; Ng, Kei-Cheuk; Nath, Abhinav; Atkins, William M

    2007-08-10

    The structurally related glutathione S-transferase isoforms GSTA1-1 and GSTA4-4 differ greatly in their relative catalytic promiscuity. GSTA1-1 is a highly promiscuous detoxification enzyme. In contrast, GSTA4-4 exhibits selectivity for congeners of the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal. The contribution of protein dynamics to promiscuity has not been studied. Therefore, hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (H/DX) and fluorescence lifetime distribution analysis were performed with glutathione S-transferases A1-1 and A4-4. Differences in local dynamics of the C-terminal helix were evident as expected on the basis of previous studies. However, H/DX demonstrated significantly greater solvent accessibility throughout most of the GSTA1-1 sequence compared with GSTA4-4. A Phe-111/Tyr-217 aromatic-aromatic interaction in A4-4, which is not present in A1-1, was hypothesized to increase core packing. "Swap" mutants that eliminate this interaction from A4-4 or incorporate it into A1-1 yield H/DX behavior that is intermediate between the wild type templates. In addition, the single Trp-21 residue of each isoform was exploited to probe the conformational heterogeneity at the intrasubunit domain-domain interface. Excited state fluorescence lifetime distribution analysis indicates that this core residue is more conformationally heterogeneous in GSTA1-1 than in GSTA4-4, and this correlates with greater stability toward urea denaturation for GSTA4-4. The fluorescence distribution and urea sensitivity of the mutant proteins were intermediate between the wild type templates. The results suggest that the differences in protein dynamics of these homologs are global. The results suggest also the possible importance of extensive conformational plasticity to achieve high levels of functional promiscuity, possibly at the cost of stability. PMID:17561509

  6. Differential plant invasiveness is not always driven by host promiscuity with bacterial symbionts

    PubMed Central

    Klock, Metha M.; Barrett, Luke G.; Thrall, Peter H.; Harms, Kyle E.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of mechanisms that allow some species to outcompete others is a fundamental goal in ecology and invasive species management. One useful approach is to examine congeners varying in invasiveness in a comparative framework across native and invaded ranges. Acacia species have been widely introduced outside their native range of Australia, and a subset of these species have become invasive in multiple parts of the world. Within specific regions, the invasive status of these species varies. Our study examined whether a key mechanism in the life history of Acacia species, the legume-rhizobia symbiosis, influences acacia invasiveness on a regional scale. To assess the extent to which species varying in invasiveness correspondingly differ with regard to the diversity of rhizobia they associate with, we grew seven Acacia species ranging in invasiveness in California in multiple soils from both their native (Australia) and introduced (California) ranges. In particular, the aim was to determine whether more invasive species formed symbioses with a wider diversity of rhizobial strains (i.e. are more promiscuous hosts). We measured and compared plant performance, including aboveground biomass, survival, and nodulation response, as well as rhizobial community composition and richness. Host promiscuity did not differ among invasiveness categories. Acacia species that varied in invasiveness differed in aboveground biomass for only one soil and did not differ in survival or nodulation within individual soils. In addition, acacias did not differ in rhizobial richness among invasiveness categories. However, nodulation differed between regions and was generally higher in the native than introduced range. Our results suggest that all Acacia species introduced to California are promiscuous hosts and that host promiscuity per se does not explain the observed differences in invasiveness within this region. Our study also highlights the utility of assessing potential

  7. The Role of Flexibility and Conformational Selection in the Binding Promiscuity of PDZ Domains

    PubMed Central

    Münz, Márton; Hein, Jotun; Biggin, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    In molecular recognition, it is often the case that ligand binding is coupled to conformational change in one or both of the binding partners. Two hypotheses describe the limiting cases involved; the first is the induced fit and the second is the conformational selection model. The conformational selection model requires that the protein adopts conformations that are similar to the ligand-bound conformation in the absence of ligand, whilst the induced-fit model predicts that the ligand-bound conformation of the protein is only accessible when the ligand is actually bound. The flexibility of the apo protein clearly plays a major role in these interpretations. For many proteins involved in signaling pathways there is the added complication that they are often promiscuous in that they are capable of binding to different ligand partners. The relationship between protein flexibility and promiscuity is an area of active research and is perhaps best exemplified by the PDZ domain family of proteins. In this study we use molecular dynamics simulations to examine the relationship between flexibility and promiscuity in five PDZ domains: the human Dvl2 (Dishevelled-2) PDZ domain, the human Erbin PDZ domain, the PDZ1 domain of InaD (inactivation no after-potential D protein) from fruit fly, the PDZ7 domain of GRIP1 (glutamate receptor interacting protein 1) from rat and the PDZ2 domain of PTP-BL (protein tyrosine phosphatase) from mouse. We show that despite their high structural similarity, the PDZ binding sites have significantly different dynamics. Importantly, the degree of binding pocket flexibility was found to be closely related to the various characteristics of peptide binding specificity and promiscuity of the five PDZ domains. Our findings suggest that the intrinsic motions of the apo structures play a key role in distinguishing functional properties of different PDZ domains and allow us to make predictions that can be experimentally tested. PMID:23133356

  8. An ancient but promiscuous host-symbiont association between Burkholderia gut symbionts and their heteropteran hosts.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Hosokawa, Takahiro; Fukatsu, Takema

    2011-03-01

    Here, we investigated 124 stinkbug species representing 20 families and 5 superfamilies for their Burkholderia gut symbionts, of which 39 species representing 6 families of the superfamilies Lygaeoidea and Coreoidea were Burkholderia-positive. Diagnostic PCR surveys revealed high frequencies of Burkholderia infection in natural populations of the stinkbugs, and substantial absence of vertical transmission of Burkholderia infection to their eggs. In situ hybridization confirmed localization of the Burkholderia in their midgut crypts. In the lygaeoid and coreoid stinkbugs, development of midgut crypts in their alimentary tract was coincident with the Burkholderia infection, suggesting that the specialized morphological configuration is pivotal for establishment and maintenance of the symbiotic association. The Burkholderia symbionts were easily isolated as pure culture on standard microbiological media, indicating the ability of the gut symbionts to survive outside the host insects. Molecular phylogenetic analysis showed that the gut symbionts of the lygaeoid and coreoid stinkbugs belong to a β-proteobacterial clade together with Burkholderia isolates from soil environments and Burkholderia species that induce plant galls. On the phylogeny, the stinkbug-associated, environmental and gall-forming Burkholderia strains did not form coherent groups, indicating host-symbiont promiscuity among these stinkbugs. Symbiont culturing revealed that slightly different Burkholderia genotypes often coexist in the same insects, which is also suggestive of host-symbiont promiscuity. All these results strongly suggest an ancient but promiscuous host-symbiont relationship between the lygaeoid/coreoid stinkbugs and the Burkholderia gut symbionts. Possible mechanisms as to how the environmentally transmitted promiscuous symbiotic association has been stably maintained in the evolutionary course are discussed. PMID:20882057

  9. Plasmodium vivax Promiscuous T-Helper Epitopes Defined and Evaluated as Linear Peptide Chimera Immunogens

    PubMed Central

    Caro-Aguilar, Ivette; Rodríguez, Alexandra; Calvo-Calle, J. Mauricio; Guzmán, Fanny; De la Vega, Patricia; Elkin Patarroyo, Manuel; Galinski, Mary R.; Moreno, Alberto

    2002-01-01

    Clinical trials of malaria vaccines have confirmed that parasite-derived T-cell epitopes are required to elicit consistent and long-lasting immune responses. We report here the identification and functional characterization of six T-cell epitopes that are present in the merozoite surface protein-1 of Plasmodium vivax (PvMSP-1) and bind promiscuously to four different HLA-DRB1∗ alleles. Each of these peptides induced lymphoproliferative responses in cells from individuals with previous P. vivax infections. Furthermore, linear-peptide chimeras containing the promiscuous PvMSP-1 T-cell epitopes, synthesized in tandem with the Plasmodium falciparum immunodominant circumsporozoite protein (CSP) B-cell epitope, induced high specific antibody titers, cytokine production, long-lasting immune responses, and immunoglobulin G isotype class switching in BALB/c mice. A linear-peptide chimera containing an allele-restricted P. falciparum T-cell epitope with the CSP B-cell epitope was not effective. Two out of the six promiscuous T-cell epitopes exhibiting the highest anti-peptide response also contain B-cell epitopes. Antisera generated against these B-cell epitopes recognize P. vivax merozoites in immunofluorescence assays. Importantly, the anti-peptide antibodies generated to the CSP B-cell epitope inhibited the invasion of P. falciparum sporozoites into human hepatocytes. These data and the simplicity of design of the chimeric constructs highlight the potential of multimeric, multistage, and multispecies linear-peptide chimeras containing parasite promiscuous T-cell epitopes for malaria vaccine development. PMID:12065487

  10. Active Site Loop Conformation Regulates Promiscuous Activity in a Lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a “hot spot” in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity. PMID:25706379

  11. The Promiscuity of Allosteric Regulation of Nuclear Receptors by Retinoid X Receptor.

    PubMed

    Clark, Alexander K; Wilder, J Heath; Grayson, Aaron W; Johnson, Quentin R; Lindsay, Richard J; Nellas, Ricky B; Fernandez, Elias J; Shen, Tongye

    2016-08-25

    The promiscuous protein retinoid X receptor (RXR) displays essential allosteric regulation of several members in the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily via heterodimerization and (anti)cooperative binding of cognate ligands. Here, the structural basis of the positive allostery of RXR and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is revealed. In contrast, a similar computational approach had previously revealed the mechanism for negative allostery in the complex of RXR and thyroid receptor (TR). By comparing the positive and negative allostery of RXR complexed with CAR and TR respectively, we reported the promiscuous allosteric control involving RXR. We characterize the allosteric mechanism by expressing the correlated dynamics of selected residue-residue contacts which was extracted from atomistic molecular dynamics simulation and statistical analysis. While the same set of residues in the binding pocket of RXR may initiate the residue-residue interaction network, RXR uses largely different sets of contacts (only about one-third identical) and allosteric modes to regulate TR and CAR. The promiscuity of RXR control may originate from multiple factors, including (1) the frustrated fit of cognate ligand 9c to the RXR binding pocket and (2) the different ligand-binding features of TR (loose) versus CAR (tight) to their corresponding cognate ligands. PMID:27110634

  12. Steroid signaling: ligand-binding promiscuity, molecular symmetry, and the need for gating.

    PubMed

    Lathe, Richard; Kotelevtsev, Yuri

    2014-04-01

    Steroid/sterol-binding receptors and enzymes are remarkably promiscuous in the range of ligands they can bind to and, in the case of enzymes, modify - raising the question of how specific receptor activation is achieved in vivo. Estrogen receptors (ER) are modulated by 27-hydroxycholesterol and 5α-androstane-3β,17β-diol (Adiol), in addition to estradiol (E2), and respond to diverse small molecules such as bisphenol A. Steroid-modifying enzymes are also highly promiscuous in ligand binding and metabolism. The specificity problem is compounded by the fact that the steroid core (hydrogenated cyclopentophenanthrene ring system) has several planes of symmetry. Ligand binding can be in symmetrical East-West (rotation) and North-South (inversion) orientations. Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs) can modify symmetrical 7 and 11, also 3 and 17/20, positions, exemplified here by yeast 3α,20β-HSD and mammalian 11β-HSD and 17β-HSD enzymes. Faced with promiscuity and symmetry, other strategies are clearly necessary to promote signaling selectivity in vivo. Gating regulates hormone access via enzymes that preferentially inactivate (or activate) a subclass of ligands, thereby governing which ligands gain receptor access - exemplified by 11β-HSD gating cortisol access to the mineralocorticoid receptor, and P450 CYP7B1 gating Adiol access to ER. Counter-intuitively, the specificity of steroid/sterol action is achieved not by intrinsic binding selectivity but by the combination of local metabolism and binding affinity. PMID:24462647

  13. A study of the relationship between clinical phenotypes and plasma iduronate-2-sulfatase enzyme activities in Hunter syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ok Jeong; Kim, Su-Jin; Sohn, Young Bae; Park, Hyung-Doo; Lee, Soo-Youn; Kim, Chi-Hwa; Ko, Ah-Ra; Yook, Yeon-Joo; Lee, Su-Jin; Park, Sung Won; Kim, Se-Hwa; Cho, Sung-Yoon; Kwon, Eun-Kyung; Han, Sun Ju

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II or Hunter syndrome) is a rare lysosomal storage disorder caused by iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS) deficiency. MPS II causes a wide phenotypic spectrum of symptoms ranging from mild to severe. IDS activity, which is measured in leukocyte pellets or fibroblasts, was reported to be related to clinical phenotype by Sukegawa-Hayasaka et al. Measurement of residual plasma IDS activity using a fluorometric assay is simpler than conventional measurements using skin fibroblasts or peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This is the first study to describe the relationship between plasma IDS activity and clinical phenotype of MPS II. Methods We hypothesized that residual plasma IDS activity is related to clinical phenotype. We classified 43 Hunter syndrome patients as having attenuated or severe disease types based on clinical characteristics, especially intellectual and cognitive status. There were 27 patients with the severe type and 16 with the attenuated type. Plasma IDS activity was measured by a fluorometric enzyme assay using 4-methylumbelliferyl-α-iduronate 2-sulphate. Results Plasma IDS activity in patients with the severe type was significantly lower than that in patients with the attenuated type (P=0.006). The optimal cut-off value of plasma IDS activity for distinguishing the severe type from the attenuated type was 0.63 nmol·4 hr-1·mL-1. This value had 88.2% sensitivity, 65.4% specificity, and an area under receiver-operator characteristics (ROC) curve of 0.768 (ROC curve analysis; P=0.003). Conclusion These results show that the mild phenotype may be related to residual lysosomal enzyme activity. PMID:22474463

  14. Impact of salt exposure on N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase (arylsulfatase B) activity, glycosaminoglycans, kininogen, and bradykinin

    PubMed Central

    Kotlo, Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Yang, Bo; Feferman, Leonid; Tejaskumar, Shah; Linhardt, Robert; Danziger, Robert

    2013-01-01

    N -acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase (Arylsulfatase B; ARSB) is the enzyme that removes sulfate groups from the N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfate residue at the non-reducing end of chondroitin-4-sulfate (C4S) and dermatan sulfate (DS). Previous studies demonstrated reduction in cell-bound high molecular weight kininogen in normal rat kidney (NRK) epithelial cells when chondroitin-4-sulfate content was reduced following overexpression of ARSB activity, and chondroitinase ABC produced similar decline in cell-bound kininogen. Reduction in the cell-bound kininogen was associated with increase in secreted bradykinin. In this report, we extend the in vitro findings to in vivo models, and present findings in Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats exposed to high (SSH) and low salt (SSL) diets. In the renal tissue of the SSH rats, ARSB activity was significantly less than in the SSL rats, and chondroitin-4-sulfate and total sulfated glycosaminoglycan content were significantly greater. Disaccharide analysis confirmed marked increase in C4S disaccharides in the renal tissue of the SSH rats. In contrast, unsulfated, hyaluronan-derived disaccharides were increased in the rats on the low salt diet. In the SSH rats, with lower ARSB activity and higher C4S levels, cell-bound, high-molecular weight kininogen was greater and urinary bradykinin was lower. ARSB activity in renal tissue and NRK cells declined when exogenous chloride concentration was increased in vitro. The impact of high chloride exposure in vivo on ARSB, chondroitin-4-sulfation, and C4S-kininogen binding provides a mechanism that links dietary salt intake with bradykinin secretion and may be a factor in blood pressure regulation. PMID:23385884

  15. Hepatic Overexpression of Steroid Sulfatase Ameliorates Mouse Models of Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes through Sex-specific Mechanisms*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Mengxi; He, Jinhan; Kucera, Heidi; Gaikwad, Nilesh W.; Zhang, Bin; Xu, Meishu; O'Doherty, Robert M.; Selcer, Kyle W.; Xie, Wen

    2014-01-01

    The steroid sulfatase (STS)-mediated desulfation is a critical metabolic mechanism that regulates the chemical and functional homeostasis of endogenous and exogenous molecules. In this report, we first showed that the liver expression of Sts was induced in both the high fat diet (HFD) and ob/ob models of obesity and type 2 diabetes and during the fed to fasting transition. In defining the functional relevance of STS induction in metabolic disease, we showed that overexpression of STS in the liver of transgenic mice alleviated HFD and ob/ob models of obesity and type 2 diabetes, including reduced body weight, improved insulin sensitivity, and decreased hepatic steatosis and inflammation. Interestingly, STS exerted its metabolic benefit through sex-specific mechanisms. In female mice, STS may have increased hepatic estrogen activity by converting biologically inactive estrogen sulfates to active estrogens and consequently improved the metabolic functions, whereas ovariectomy abolished this protective effect. In contrast, the metabolic benefit of STS in males may have been accounted for by the male-specific decrease of inflammation in white adipose tissue and skeletal muscle as well as a pattern of skeletal muscle gene expression that favors energy expenditure. The metabolic benefit in male STS transgenic mice was retained after castration. Treatment with the STS substrate estrone sulfate also improved metabolic functions in both the HFD and ob/ob models. Our results have uncovered a novel function of STS in energy metabolism and type 2 diabetes. Liver-specific STS induction or estrogen/estrogen sulfate delivery may represent a novel approach to manage metabolic syndrome. PMID:24497646

  16. Heteroallelic missense mutations of the galactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) gene in a mild form of Morquio disease (MPS IVA)

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, D.E.C.; Gordon, B.A.; Rupar, C.A.

    1996-06-28

    Morquio disease (MPS IVA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) activity. Patients commonly present in early infancy with growth failure, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, corneal opacification, and keratan sulfaturia, but milder forms have been described. We report on a patient who grew normally until age 5 years. Her keratan sulfaturia was not detected until adolescence, and she now has changes restricted largely to the axial skeleton. She has experienced only mildly impaired vision. At age 22, thin-layer chromatography of purified glycosaminoglycans showed some keratan sulfaturia. GALNS activity in fibroblast homogenate supernatants was 20 {plus_minus} 5% of controls (as compared to 5 {plus_minus} 3% of controls in severe MPS IVA, P <.003). Kinetic analysis of residual fibroblast GALNS activity in patient and parents revealed decreased K{sub m} and increased V{sub max} in the mother and daughter, but not in the father, compatible with compound heterozygosity. GALNS exons were amplified from patient genomic DNA and screened by SSCP. Two missense mutations, a C to T transition at position 335 (predicting R94C) and a T to G transversion at position 344 (predicting F97V), were found on sequencing an abnormally migrating exon 3 amplicon. Digestion of the amplicon with FokI and AccI restriction enzymes (specific for the R94C and F97V mutations, respectively) confirmed heterozygosity. In fibroblast transfection experiments, heterozygous R94C and F97V mutants independently expressed as severe and mile GALNS deficiency, respectively. We interpret these findings to indicate that our patient bears heteroallelic GALNS missense mutations, leading to GALNS deficiency and mild MPS IVA. Our findings expand the clinical and biochemical phenotype of MPS IVA, but full delineation of the genotype-phenotype relationship requires further study of native and transfected mutant cell lines. 30 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Induction of steroid sulfatase expression in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells by insulin-like growth factor II.

    PubMed

    Sung, Chul-Hoon; Im, Hee-Jung; Park, Nahee; Kwon, Yeojung; Shin, Sangyun; Ye, Dong-Jin; Cho, Nam-Hyeon; Park, Young-Shin; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon; Kim, Donghak; Chun, Young-Jin

    2013-11-25

    Human steroid sulfatase (STS) plays an important role in regulating the formation of biologically active estrogens and may be a promising target for treating estrogen-mediated carcinogenesis. The molecular mechanism of STS gene expression, however, is still not clear. Growth factors are known to increase STS activity but the changes in STS expression have not been completely understood. To determine whether insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II can induce STS gene expression, the effects of IGF-II on STS expression were studied in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis showed that IGF-II treatment significantly increased the expression of STS mRNA and protein in concentration- and time-dependent manners. To understand the signaling pathway by which IGF-II induces STS gene expression, the effects of specific PI3-kinase/Akt and NF-κB inhibitors were determined. When the cells were treated with IGF-II and PI3-kinase/Akt inhibitors, such as LY294002, wortmannin, or Akt inhibitor IV, STS expression induced by IGF-II was significantly blocked. Moreover, we found that NF-κB inhibitors, such as MG-132, bortezomib, Bay 11-7082 or Nemo binding domain (NBD) binding peptide, also strongly prevented IGF-II from inducing STS gene expression. We assessed whether IGF-II activates STS promoter activity using transient transfection with a luciferase reporter. IGF-II significantly stimulated STS reporter activity. Furthermore, IGF-II induced expression of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) 1 and 3, whereas it reduced estrone sulfotransferase (EST) gene expression, causing enhanced estrone and β-estradiol production. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that IGF-II induces STS expression via a PI3-kinase/Akt-NF-κB signaling pathway in PC-3 cells and may induce estrogen production and estrogen-mediated carcinogenesis. PMID:24055520

  18. Effects of steroid hormone on estrogen sulfotransferase and on steroid sulfatase expression in endometriosis tissue and stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Piccinato, Carla A; Neme, Rosa M; Torres, Natália; Sanches, Lívia Renta; Derogis, Priscilla Bento Mattos Cruz; Brudniewski, Heloísa F; Rosa e Silva, Júlio C; Ferriani, Rui A

    2016-04-01

    Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent disease that afflicts about 10% of women in their reproductive age, causing severe pain and infertility. The potential roles of female steroid hormones in modulating key estrogen-metabolizing enzymes, steroid sulfatase (STS) and estrogen sulfotransferase (SULT1E1), were investigated. The expression of STS and SULT1E1 mRNA in biopsy samples (n=78) of superficial and deep endometriotic lesions, eutopic endometrium of women with endometriosis and endometrium from control patients were compared according to the menstrual cycle phase. Increased STS gene expression was detected in superficial and deep-infiltrating lesions and a reduced SULT1E1 expression was also observed in the eutopic endometrium relative to the superficial lesions. Additionally, a significantly positive correlation was detected between STS and SULT1E1 mRNA expression levels in biopsy specimens collected from the endometriosis patients, and not in control individuals. The actions of female steroid hormones on SULT1E1 and STS expression were evidenced in endometriosis, revealed by increased expression levels in the luteal phase of the cycle. There was an increased STS expression in primary eutopic and ectopic endometrial stromal cells treated with estradiol and progesterone (representative of the luteal phase, n=3). Although an increased STS mRNA expression was observed in hormone-induced endometrial stromal cells in vitro, no difference could be detected between the hormone treatment groups in estradiol formation from estradiol sulfate measured by LC-MS-MS. Interestingly, a greater expression of STS was observed in stromal cells from eutopic endometrium with an agreement in estradiol formation originated from estradiol sulfate. The differential regulation of STS and SULT1E1 could provide insights for novel studies of the therapeutic use of STS inhibitors. PMID:26723541

  19. Theoretical Proposal for the Whole Phosphate Diester Hydrolysis Mechanism Promoted by a Catalytic Promiscuous Dinuclear Copper(II) Complex.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Lucas F; Rey, Nicolás A; Dos Santos, Hélio F; Costa, Luiz Antônio S

    2016-03-21

    The catalytic mechanism that involves the cleavage of the phosphate diester model BDNPP (bis(2,4-dinitrophenyl) phosphate) catalyzed through a dinuclear copper complex is investigated in the current study. The metal complex was originally designed to catalyze catechol oxidation, and it showed an interesting catalytic promiscuity case in biomimetic systems. The current study investigates two different reaction mechanisms through quantum mechanics calculations in the gas phase, and it also includes the solvent effect through PCM (polarizable continuum model) single-point calculations using water as solvent. Two mechanisms are presented in order to fully describe the phosphate diester hydrolysis. Mechanism 1 is of the SN2 type, which involves the direct attack of the μ-OH bridge between the two copper(II) ions toward the phosphorus center, whereas mechanism 2 is the process in which hydrolysis takes place through proton transfer between the oxygen atom in the bridging hydroxo ligand and the other oxygen atom in the phosphate model. Actually, the present theoretical study shows two possible reaction paths in mechanism 1. Its first reaction path (p1) involves a proton transfer that occurs immediately after the hydrolytic cleavage, so that the proton transfer is the rate-determining step, which is followed by the entry of two water molecules. Its second reaction path (p2) consists of the entry of two water molecules right after the hydrolytic cleavage, but with no proton transfer; thus, hydrolytic cleavage is the rate-limiting step. The most likely catalytic path occurs in mechanism 1, following the second reaction path (p2), since it involves the lowest free energy activation barrier (ΔG(⧧) = 23.7 kcal mol(-1), in aqueous solution). A kinetic analysis showed that the experimental kobs value of 1.7 × 10(-5) s(-1) agrees with the calculated value k1 = 2.6 × 10(-5) s(-1); the concerted mechanism is kinetically favorable. The KIE (kinetic isotope effect) analysis

  20. The Role of Heparanase and Sulfatases in the Modification of Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans within the Tumor Microenvironment and Opportunities for Novel Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Edward; Khurana, Ashwani; Shridhar, Viji; Dredge, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are an integral and dynamic part of normal tissue architecture at the cell surface and within the extracellular matrix. The modification of HSPGs in the tumor microenvironment is known to result not just in structural but also functional consequences, which significantly impact cancer progression. As substrates for the key enzymes sulfatases and heparanase, the modification of HSPGs is typically characterized by the degradation of heparan sulfate (HS) chains/sulfation patterns via the endo-6-O-sulfatases (Sulf1 and Sulf2) or by heparanase, an endo-glycosidase that cleaves the HS polymers releasing smaller fragments from HSPG complexes. Numerous studies have demonstrated how these enzymes actively influence cancer cell proliferation, signaling, invasion, and metastasis. The activity or expression of these enzymes has been reported to be modified in a variety of cancers. Such observations are consistent with the degradation of normal architecture and basement membranes, which are typically compromised in metastatic disease. Moreover, recent studies elucidating the requirements for these proteins in tumor initiation and progression exemplify their importance in the development and progression of cancer. Thus, as the influence of the tumor microenvironment in cancer progression becomes more apparent, the focus on targeting enzymes that degrade HSPGs highlights one approach to maintain normal tissue architecture, inhibit tumor progression, and block metastasis. This review discusses the role of these enzymes in the context of the tumor microenvironment and their promise as therapeutic targets for the treatment of cancer. PMID:25105093

  1. Protease-catalysed direct asymmetric Mannich reaction in organic solvent.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yang; Li, Ling-Po; He, Yan-Hong; Guan, Zhi

    2012-01-01

    We reported the first enzyme-catalysed, direct, three-component asymmetric Mannich reaction using protease type XIV from Streptomyces griseus (SGP) in acetonitrile. Yields of up to 92% with enantioselectivities of up to 88% e.e. and diastereoselectivities of up to 92:8 (syn:anti) were achieved under the optimised conditions. This enzyme's catalytic promiscuity expands the application of this biocatalyst and provides a potential alternative method for asymmetric Mannich reactions. PMID:23094136

  2. Protease-catalysed Direct Asymmetric Mannich Reaction in Organic Solvent

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yang; Li, Ling-Po; He, Yan-Hong; Guan, Zhi

    2012-01-01

    We reported the first enzyme-catalysed, direct, three-component asymmetric Mannich reaction using protease type XIV from Streptomyces griseus (SGP) in acetonitrile. Yields of up to 92% with enantioselectivities of up to 88% e.e. and diastereoselectivities of up to 92:8 (syn:anti) were achieved under the optimised conditions. This enzyme's catalytic promiscuity expands the application of this biocatalyst and provides a potential alternative method for asymmetric Mannich reactions. PMID:23094136

  3. Protease-catalysed Direct Asymmetric Mannich Reaction in Organic Solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yang; Li, Ling-Po; He, Yan-Hong; Guan, Zhi

    2012-10-01

    We reported the first enzyme-catalysed, direct, three-component asymmetric Mannich reaction using protease type XIV from Streptomyces griseus (SGP) in acetonitrile. Yields of up to 92% with enantioselectivities of up to 88% e.e. and diastereoselectivities of up to 92:8 (syn:anti) were achieved under the optimised conditions. This enzyme's catalytic promiscuity expands the application of this biocatalyst and provides a potential alternative method for asymmetric Mannich reactions.

  4. Mesaconase/Fumarase FumD in Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Promiscuity of Escherichia coli Class I Fumarases FumA and FumB.

    PubMed

    Kronen, Miriam; Berg, Ivan A

    2015-01-01

    Mesaconase catalyzes the hydration of mesaconate (methylfumarate) to (S)-citramalate. The enzyme participates in the methylaspartate pathway of glutamate fermentation as well as in the metabolism of various C5-dicarboxylic acids such as mesaconate or L-threo-β-methylmalate. We have recently shown that Burkholderia xenovorans uses a promiscuous class I fumarase to catalyze this reaction in the course of mesaconate utilization. Here we show that classical Escherichia coli class I fumarases A and B (FumA and FumB) are capable of hydrating mesaconate with 4% (FumA) and 19% (FumB) of the catalytic efficiency kcat/Km, compared to the physiological substrate fumarate. Furthermore, the genomes of 14.8% of sequenced Enterobacteriaceae (26.5% of E. coli, 90.6% of E. coli O157:H7 strains) possess an additional class I fumarase homologue which we designated as fumarase D (FumD). All these organisms are (opportunistic) pathogens. fumD is clustered with the key genes for two enzymes of the methylaspartate pathway of glutamate fermentation, glutamate mutase and methylaspartate ammonia lyase, converting glutamate to mesaconate. Heterologously produced FumD was a promiscuous mesaconase/fumarase with a 2- to 3-fold preference for mesaconate over fumarate. Therefore, these bacteria have the genetic potential to convert glutamate to (S)-citramalate, but the further fate of citramalate is still unclear. Our bioinformatic analysis identified several other putative mesaconase genes and revealed that mesaconases probably evolved several times from various class I fumarases independently. Most, if not all iron-dependent fumarases, are capable to catalyze mesaconate hydration. PMID:26658641

  5. Mesaconase/Fumarase FumD in Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Promiscuity of Escherichia coli Class I Fumarases FumA and FumB

    PubMed Central

    Kronen, Miriam; Berg, Ivan A.

    2015-01-01

    Mesaconase catalyzes the hydration of mesaconate (methylfumarate) to (S)-citramalate. The enzyme participates in the methylaspartate pathway of glutamate fermentation as well as in the metabolism of various C5-dicarboxylic acids such as mesaconate or L-threo-β-methylmalate. We have recently shown that Burkholderia xenovorans uses a promiscuous class I fumarase to catalyze this reaction in the course of mesaconate utilization. Here we show that classical Escherichia coli class I fumarases A and B (FumA and FumB) are capable of hydrating mesaconate with 4% (FumA) and 19% (FumB) of the catalytic efficiency kcat/Km, compared to the physiological substrate fumarate. Furthermore, the genomes of 14.8% of sequenced Enterobacteriaceae (26.5% of E. coli, 90.6% of E. coli O157:H7 strains) possess an additional class I fumarase homologue which we designated as fumarase D (FumD). All these organisms are (opportunistic) pathogens. fumD is clustered with the key genes for two enzymes of the methylaspartate pathway of glutamate fermentation, glutamate mutase and methylaspartate ammonia lyase, converting glutamate to mesaconate. Heterologously produced FumD was a promiscuous mesaconase/fumarase with a 2- to 3-fold preference for mesaconate over fumarate. Therefore, these bacteria have the genetic potential to convert glutamate to (S)-citramalate, but the further fate of citramalate is still unclear. Our bioinformatic analysis identified several other putative mesaconase genes and revealed that mesaconases probably evolved several times from various class I fumarases independently. Most, if not all iron-dependent fumarases, are capable to catalyze mesaconate hydration. PMID:26658641

  6. The ancestral activation promiscuity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases from oxygenic photosynthetic organisms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (ADP-Glc PPase) catalyzes the first committed step in the synthesis of glycogen in bacteria and starch in algae and plants. In oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, ADP-Glc PPase is mainly activated by 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PGA) and to a lesser extent by other metabolites. In this work, we analyzed the activation promiscuity of ADP-Glc PPase subunits from the cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7120, the green alga Ostreococcus tauri, and potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber by comparing a specificity constant for 3-PGA, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), fructose-6-phosphate, and glucose-6-phosphate. Results The 3-PGA specificity constant for the enzymes from Anabaena (homotetramer), O. tauri, and potato tuber was considerably higher than for other activators. O. tauri and potato tuber enzymes were heterotetramers comprising homologous small and large subunits. Conversely, the O. tauri small subunit (OtaS) homotetramer was more promiscuous because its FBP specificity constant was similar to that for 3-PGA. To explore the role of both OtaS and OtaL (O. tauri large subunit) in determining the specificity of the heterotetramer, we knocked out the catalytic activity of each subunit individually by site-directed mutagenesis. Interestingly, the mutants OtaSD148A/OtaL and OtaS/OtaLD171A had higher specificity constants for 3-PGA than for FBP. Conclusions After gene duplication, OtaS seemed to have lost specificity for 3-PGA compared to FBP. This was physiologically and evolutionarily feasible because co-expression of both subunits restored the specificity for 3-PGA of the resulting heterotetrameric wild type enzyme. This widespread promiscuity seems to be ancestral and intrinsic to the enzyme family. Its presence could constitute an efficient evolutionary mechanism to accommodate the ADP-Glc PPase regulation to different metabolic needs. PMID:23433303

  7. Hyperstability and substrate promiscuity in laboratory resurrections of Precambrian β-lactamases.

    PubMed

    Risso, Valeria A; Gavira, Jose A; Mejia-Carmona, Diego F; Gaucher, Eric A; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2013-02-27

    We report a sequence reconstruction analysis targeting several Precambrian nodes in the evolution of class-A β-lactamases and the preparation and experimental characterization of their encoded proteins. Despite extensive sequence differences with the modern enzymes (~100 amino acid differences), the proteins resurrected in the laboratory properly fold into the canonical lactamase structure. The encoded proteins from 2-3 billion years (Gyr)-old β-lactamase sequences undergo cooperative two-state thermal denaturation and display very large denaturation temperature enhancements (~35 °C) relative to modern β-lactamases. They degrade different antibiotics in vitro with catalytic efficiencies comparable to that of an average modern enzyme. This enhanced substrate promiscuity is not accompanied by significant changes in the active-site region as seen in static X-ray structures, suggesting a plausible role for dynamics in the evolution of function in these proteins. Laboratory resurrections of 2-3 Gyr-old β-lactamases also endowed modern microorganisms with significant levels of resistance toward a variety of antibiotics, opening up the possibility of performing laboratory replays of the molecular tape of lactamase evolution. Overall, these results support the notions that Precambrian life was thermophilic and that proteins can evolve from substrate-promiscuous generalists into specialists during the course of natural evolution. They also highlight the biotechnological potential of laboratory resurrection of Precambrian proteins, as both high stability and enhanced promiscuity (likely contributors to high evolvability) are advantageous features in protein scaffolds for molecular design and laboratory evolution. PMID:23394108

  8. Reporting Sodium Channel Activity Using Calcium Flux: Pharmacological Promiscuity of Cardiac Nav1.5

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongkang; Zou, Beiyan; Du, Fang; Xu, Kaiping

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are essential for membrane excitability and represent therapeutic targets for treating human diseases. Recent reports suggest that these channels, e.g., Nav1.3 and Nav1.5, are inhibited by multiple structurally distinctive small molecule drugs. These studies give reason to wonder whether these drugs collectively target a single site or multiple sites in manifesting such pharmacological promiscuity. We thus investigate the pharmacological profile of Nav1.5 through systemic analysis of its sensitivity to diverse compound collections. Here, we report a dual-color fluorescent method that exploits a customized Nav1.5 [calcium permeable Nav channel, subtype 5 (SoCal5)] with engineered-enhanced calcium permeability. SoCal5 retains wild-type (WT) Nav1.5 pharmacological profiles. WT SoCal5 and SoCal5 with the local anesthetics binding site mutated (F1760A) could be expressed in separate cells, each with a different-colored genetically encoded calcium sensor, which allows a simultaneous report of compound activity and site dependence. The pharmacological profile of SoCal5 reveals a hit rate (>50% inhibition) of around 13% at 10 μM, comparable to that of hERG. The channel activity is susceptible to blockage by known drugs and structurally diverse compounds. The broad inhibition profile is highly dependent on the F1760 residue in the inner cavity, which is a residue conserved among all nine subtypes of Nav channels. Both promiscuity and dependence on F1760 seen in Nav1.5 were replicated in Nav1.4. Our evidence of a broad inhibition profile of Nav channels suggests a need to consider off-target effects on Nav channels. The site-dependent promiscuity forms a foundation to better understand Nav channels and compound interactions. PMID:25422141

  9. Promiscuity and pill: etiologic agents in the genesis of cervical malignancy.

    PubMed

    Leppäluoto, P A

    1977-01-01

    An 800% increase in the number of "suspicious" Papanicolaou smears from young women have been reported since 1970. In cases diagnosed from tissue specimens as "surface dysplasia," the majority of patients gave histories of use of birth control pills and sexual promiscuity. Sexually active women have an increased incidence of cervical ectopy. In cervical ectopy the endocervical columnar cells are exposed to the acid vaginal content. Development of squamous metaplasia may result. An ideal contraceptive would be one contributing to the preservation of a healthy cervical epithelium without ectopy, and a healthy vaginal content as shown by the presence of Doderlein flora. These conditions would serve to prevent cervical malignancy. PMID:266326

  10. Mutations, kataegis, and translocations in B lymphocytes: towards a mechanistic understanding of AID promiscuous activity

    PubMed Central

    Casellas, Rafael; Basu, Uttiya; Yewdell, William T.; Chaudhuri, Jayanta; Robbiani, Davide F.; Di Noia, Javier M.

    2016-01-01

    As B cells engage in the immune response they express the deaminase AID to initiate the hypermutation and recombination of immunoglobulin genes, which are crucial processes for the efficient recognition and disposal of pathogens, However, AID must be tightly controlled in B cells to minimize off-targeting mutations, which can drive chromosomal translocations and the development of B cell malignancies, such as lymphomas. Recent genomic and biochemical analyses have begun to unravel the crucial question of how AID-mediated deamination is targeted outside immunoglobulin genes. Here, we discuss the transcriptional and topological features that are emerging as key drivers of AID promiscuous activity. PMID:26898111

  11. Characterizing the Promiscuity of LigAB, a Lignin Catabolite Degrading Extradiol Dioxygenase from Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Kevin P.; Taylor, Erika A.

    2014-01-01

    LigAB from Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6 is the only structurally characterized dioxygenase of the largely uncharacterized superfamily of Type II extradiol dioxygenases (EDO). This enzyme catalyzes the oxidative ring-opening of protocatechuate (3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid or PCA) in a pathway allowing the degradation of lignin derived aromatic compounds (LDACs). LigAB has also been shown to utilize two other LDACs from the same metabolic pathway as substrates, gallate, and 3-O-methyl gallate; however, kcat/KM had not been reported for any of these compounds. In order to assess the catalytic efficiency and get insights into the observed promiscuity of this enzyme, steady-state kinetic analyses were performed for LigAB with these and a library of related compounds. The dioxygenation of PCA by LigAB was highly efficient, with a kcat of 51 s−1 and a kcat/KM of 4.26 × 106 M−1s−1. LigAB demonstrated the ability to use a variety of catecholic molecules as substrates beyond the previously identified gallate and 3-O-methyl gallate, including 3,4-dihydroxybenzamide, homoprotocatechuate, catechol, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzonitrile. Interestingly, 3,4-dihydroxybenzamide (DHBAm) behaves in a manner similar to that of the preferred benzoic acid substrates, with a kcat/Km value only ~4-fold lower than that for gallate and ~10-fold higher than that for 3-O-methyl gallate. All of these most active substrates demonstrate mechanistic inactivation of LigAB. Additionally, DHBAm exhibits potent product inhibition that leads to an inactive enzyme, being more highly deactivating at lower substrate concentration, a phenomena that, to our knowledge, has not been reported for another dioxygenase substrate/product pair. These results provide valuable catalytic insight into the reactions catalyzed by LigAB and make it the first Type II EDO that is fully characterized both structurally and kinetically. PMID:23977959

  12. Model studies on the first enzyme-catalyzed Ugi reaction.

    PubMed

    Kłossowski, Szymon; Wiraszka, Barbara; Berłożecki, Stanisław; Ostaszewski, Ryszard

    2013-02-01

    Multicomponent reactions are powerful tools for organic chemistry, and among them, the Ugi reaction provides remarkable improvement in many fields of organic chemistry such us combinatorial chemistry, medicinal chemistry, and peptide chemistry. A new, enzyme-catalyzed example of the Ugi three-component reaction is presented. The studies include the selection of an enzyme as well as determination of the scope and limitations of the newly described reaction. The presented method combines the enzyme promiscuity and multicomponent reaction advantages in the first one-pot formation of dipeptide 1. PMID:23343100

  13. QM/MM analysis suggests that Alkaline Phosphatase (AP) and Nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase slightly tighten the transition state for phosphate diester hydrolysis relative to solution: implication for catalytic promiscuity in the AP superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Guanhua

    2011-01-01

    Several members of the Alkaline Phosphatase (AP) superfamily exhibit a high level of catalytic proficiency and promiscuity in structurally similar active sites. A thorough characterization of the nature of transition state for different substrates in these enzymes is crucial for understanding the molecular mechanisms that govern those remarkable catalytic properties. In this work, we study the hydrolysis of a phosphate diester, MpNPP−, in solution, two experimentally well-characterized variants of AP (R166S AP, R166S/E322Y AP) and wild type Nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase (NPP) by QM/MM calculations in which the QM method is an approximate density functional theory previously parameterized for phosphate hydrolysis (SCC-DFTBPR). The general agreements found between these calculations and available experimental data for both solution and enzymes support the use of SCC-DFTBPR/MM for a semi-quantitative analysis of the catalytic mechanism and nature of transition state in AP and NPP. Although phosphate diesters are cognate substrates for NPP but promiscuous substrates for AP, the calculations suggest that their hydrolysis reactions catalyzed by AP and NPP feature similar synchronous transition states that are slightly tighter in nature compared to that in solution, due in part to the geometry of the bimetallic zinc motif. Therefore, this study provides the first direct computational support to the hypothesis that enzymes in the AP superfamily catalyze cognate and promiscuous substrates via similar transition states to those in solution. Our calculations do not support the finding of recent QM/MM studies by López-Canut and coworkers, who suggested that the same diester substrate goes through a much looser transition state in NPP/AP than in solution, a result likely biased by the large structural distortion of the bimetallic zinc site in their simulations. Finally, our calculations for different phosphate diester orientations and phosphorothioate diesters

  14. Identification of promiscuous ene-reductase activity by mining structural databases using active site constellations

    PubMed Central

    Steinkellner, Georg; Gruber, Christian C.; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Binter, Alexandra; Steiner, Kerstin; Winkler, Christoph; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Schwamberger, Orsolya; Oberer, Monika; Schwab, Helmut; Faber, Kurt; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The exploitation of catalytic promiscuity and the application of de novo design have recently opened the access to novel, non-natural enzymatic activities. Here we describe a structural bioinformatic method for predicting catalytic activities of enzymes based on three-dimensional constellations of functional groups in active sites (‘catalophores’). As a proof-of-concept we identify two enzymes with predicted promiscuous ene-reductase activity (reduction of activated C–C double bonds) and compare them with known ene-reductases, that is, members of the Old Yellow Enzyme family. Despite completely different amino acid sequences, overall structures and protein folds, high-resolution crystal structures reveal equivalent binding modes of typical Old Yellow Enzyme substrates and ligands. Biochemical and biocatalytic data show that the two enzymes indeed possess ene-reductase activity and reveal an inverted stereopreference compared with Old Yellow Enzymes for some substrates. This method could thus be a tool for the identification of viable starting points for the development and engineering of novel biocatalysts. PMID:24954722

  15. Promiscuous activity of ER glucosidase II discovered through donor specificity analysis of UGGT

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagawa, Atsushi; Totani, Kiichiro; Matsuo, Ichiro; Ito, Yukishige

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} UGGT has a narrow donor specificity. {yields} UGGT gave several non-natural high-mannose-type glycans. {yields} G-II has a promiscuous activity as broad specificity hexosidase. -- Abstract: In glycoprotein quality control system in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), UGGT (UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase) and glucosidase II (G-II) play key roles. UGGT serves as a glycoprotein folding sensor by virtue of its unique specificity to glucosylate glycoproteins at incompletely folded stage. By using various UDP-Glc analogues, we first analyzed donor specificity of UGGT, which was proven to be rather narrow. However, marginal activity was observed with UDP-galactose and UDP-glucuronic acid as well as with 3-, 4- and 6-deoxy glucose analogues to give corresponding transfer products. Intriguingly, G-II smoothly converted all of them back to Man{sub 9}GlcNAc{sub 2}, providing an indication that G-II has a promiscuous activity as a broad specificity hexosidase.

  16. Optical state engineering, quantum communication, and robustness of entanglement promiscuity in three-mode Gaussian states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adesso, Gerardo; Serafini, Alessio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2007-03-01

    We present a novel, detailed study on the usefulness of three-mode Gaussian states for realistic processing of continuous variable (CV) quantum information, with a particular emphasis on the possibilities opened up by their genuine tripartite entanglement. We describe practical schemes to engineer several classes of pure and mixed three-mode states that stand out for their informational and/or entanglement properties. In particular, we introduce a simple procedure—based on passive optical elements—to produce pure three-mode Gaussian states with arbitrary entanglement structure (upon availability of an initial two-mode squeezed state). We analyse in depth the properties of distributed entanglement and the origin of its sharing structure, showing that the promiscuity of entanglement sharing is a feature peculiar to symmetric Gaussian states that survives even in the presence of significant degrees of mixedness and decoherence. Next, we discuss the suitability of the considered tripartite entangled states to the implementation of quantum information and communication protocols with CVs. This will lead to a feasible experimental proposal to test the promiscuous sharing of CV tripartite entanglement, in terms of the optimal fidelity of teleportation networks with Gaussian resources. We finally focus on the application of three-mode states to symmetric and asymmetric telecloning, and single out the structural properties of the optimal Gaussian resources for the latter protocol in different settings. Our analysis aims to lay the basis for a practical quantum communication with CVs beyond the bipartite scenario.

  17. Privileged scaffolds or promiscuous binders: a comparative study on rhodanines and related heterocycles in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Mendgen, Thomas; Steuer, Christian; Klein, Christian D

    2012-01-26

    Rhodanines and related five-membered heterocycles with multiple heteroatoms have recently gained a reputation of being unselective compounds that appear as "frequent hitters" in screening campaigns and therefore have little value in drug discovery. However, this judgment appears to be based mostly on anecdotal evidence. Having identified various rhodanines and related compounds in screening campaigns, we decided to perform a systematic study on their promiscuity. An amount of 163 rhodanines, hydantoins, thiohydantoins, and thiazolidinediones were synthesized and tested against several targets. The compounds were also characterized with respect to aggregation and electrophilic reactivity, and the binding modes of rhodanines and related compounds in published X-ray cocrystal structures were analyzed. The results indicate that the exocyclic, double bonded sulfur atom in rhodanines and thiohydantoins, in addition to other structural features, offers a particularly high density of interaction sites for polar interactions and hydrogen bonds. This causes a promiscuous behavior at concentrations in the "screening range" but should not be regarded as a general knockout criterion that excludes such screening hits from further development. It is suggested that special criteria for target affinity and selectivity are applied to these classes of compounds and that their exceptional and potentially valuable biomolecular binding properties are consequently exploited in a useful way. PMID:22077389

  18. The promiscuous larvae: flexibility in the establishment of symbiosis in corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumbo, V. R.; Baird, A. H.; van Oppen, M. J. H.

    2013-03-01

    Coral reefs thrive in part because of the symbiotic partnership between corals and Symbiodinium. While this partnership is one of the keys to the success of coral reef ecosystems, surprisingly little is known about many aspects of coral symbiosis, in particular the establishment and development of symbiosis in host species that acquire symbionts anew in each generation. More specifically, the point at which symbiosis is established (i.e., larva vs. juvenile) remains uncertain, as does the source of free-living Symbiodinium in the environment. In addition, the capacity of host and symbiont to form novel combinations is unknown. To explore patterns of initial association between host and symbiont, larvae of two species of Acropora were exposed to sediment collected from three locations on the Great Barrier Reef. A high proportion of larvae established symbiosis shortly after contact with sediments, and Acropora larvae were promiscuous, taking up multiple types of Symbiodinium. The Symbiodinium types acquired from the sediments reflected the symbiont assemblage within a wide range of cnidarian hosts at each of the three sites, suggesting potential regional differences in the free-living Symbiodinium assemblage. Coral larvae clearly have the capacity to take up Symbiodinium prior to settlement, and sediment is a likely source. Promiscuous larvae allow species to associate with Symbiodinium appropriate for potentially novel environments that may be experienced following dispersal.

  19. Cytochrome P450 promiscuity leads to a bifurcating biosynthetic pathway for tanshinones.

    PubMed

    Guo, Juan; Ma, Xiaohui; Cai, Yuan; Ma, Ying; Zhan, Zhilai; Zhou, Yongjin J; Liu, Wujun; Guan, Mengxin; Yang, Jian; Cui, Guanghong; Kang, Liping; Yang, Lei; Shen, Ye; Tang, Jinfu; Lin, Huixin; Ma, Xiaojing; Jin, Baolong; Liu, Zhenming; Peters, Reuben J; Zhao, Zongbao K; Huang, Luqi

    2016-04-01

    Cytochromes P450 (CYPs) play a key role in generating the structural diversity of terpenoids, the largest group of plant natural products. However, functional characterization of CYPs has been challenging because of the expansive families found in plant genomes, diverse reactivity and inaccessibility of their substrates and products. Here we present the characterization of two CYPs, CYP76AH3 and CYP76AK1, which act sequentially to form a bifurcating pathway for the biosynthesis of tanshinones, the oxygenated diterpenoids from the Chinese medicinal plant Danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza). These CYPs had similar transcription profiles to that of the known gene responsible for tanshinone production in elicited Danshen hairy roots. Biochemical and RNA interference studies demonstrated that both CYPs are promiscuous. CYP76AH3 oxidizes ferruginol at two different carbon centers, and CYP76AK1 hydroxylates C-20 of two of the resulting intermediates. Together, these convert ferruginol into 11,20-dihydroxy ferruginol and 11,20-dihydroxy sugiol en route to tanshinones. Moreover, we demonstrated the utility of these CYPs by engineering yeast for heterologous production of six oxygenated diterpenoids, which in turn enabled structural characterization of three novel compounds produced by CYP-mediated oxidation. Our results highlight the incorporation of multiple CYPs into diterpenoid metabolic engineering, and a continuing trend of CYP promiscuity generating complex networks in terpenoid biosynthesis. PMID:26682704

  20. The Promiscuous Protein Binding Ability of Erythrosine B Studied by Metachromasy (Metachromasia)

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Lakshmi; Buchwald, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The present study aims to elucidate aspects of the protein binding ability of erythrosine B (ErB), a poly-iodinated xanthene dye and an FDA-approved food colorant (FD&C Red No. 3), which we have identified recently as a promiscuous inhibitor of protein–protein interactions (PPI) with a remarkably consistent median inhibitory concentration (IC50) in the 5–30 µM range. Because ErB exhibits metachromasy, i.e., color change upon binding to several proteins, we exploited this property to quantify its binding to proteins such as bovine serum albumin (BSA) and CD40L (CD154) and to determine the corresponding binding constants (Kd) and stoichiometry (nb) using spectrophotometric methods. Binding was reversible and the estimated affinities for both protein targets obtained here (Kd values of 14 and 20 µM for BSA and CD40L, respectively) were in good agreement with that expected from the protein–protein interaction (PPI) inhibitory activity of ErB. A stoichiometry greater than one was observed both for CD40L and BSA binding (nb of 5–6 and 8–9 for BSA and CD40L, respectively) indicating the possibility of nonspecific binding of the flat an rigid ErB molecule at multiple sites, which could explain the promiscuous PPI inhibitory activity if some of these overlap with the binding site of the protein partner and interfere with the binding. PMID:23456742

  1. Structural and Thermodymamic Basis for Enhanced DNA Binding by a Promiscuous Mutant EcoRI Endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Sapienza,P.; Rosenberg, J.; Jen-Jacobson, L.

    2007-01-01

    Promiscuous mutant EcoRI endonucleases bind to the canonical site GAATTC more tightly than does the wild-type endonuclease, yet cleave variant (EcoRI*) sites more rapidly than does wild-type. The crystal structure of the A138T promiscuous mutant homodimer in complex with a GAATTC site is nearly identical to that of the wild-type complex, except that the Thr138 side chains make packing interactions with bases in the 5'-flanking regions outside the recognition hexanucleotide while excluding two bound water molecules seen in the wild-type complex. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm exclusion of these waters. The structure and simulations suggest possible reasons why binding of the A138T protein to the GAATTC site has S more favorable and H less favorable than for wild-type endonuclease binding. The interactions of Thr138 with flanking bases may permit A138T, unlike wild-type enzyme, to form complexes with EcoRI* sites that structurally resemble the specific wild-type complex with GAATTC.

  2. Shu-Gan-Liang-Xue Decoction Simultaneously Down-regulates Expressions of Aromatase and Steroid Sulfatase in Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xue-song; Li, Ping-ping

    2011-01-01

    Objective Estradiol (E2) plays an important role in the development of breast cancer. In postmenopausal women, the estrogen can be synthesized via aromatase (CYP19) pathway and steroid-sulfatase (STS) pathway in peripheral tissues, when the production in ovary has ceased. The objective of our study was to explore the effects of Shu-Gan-Liang-Xue Decoction (SGLXD) on the expressions of CYP19 and STS in estrogen receptor positive breast cancer MCF-7 and T47D cells. Methods The effects of SGLXD on the cell viability of MCF-7 and T47D were analyzed by MTT assay. By quantitative real-time RT-PCR and Western blot, we evaluated the mRNA and protein expressions of CYP19 and STS in MCF-7 and T47D cells after SGLXD treatment. Results By MTT assay, the cell viability rates of MCF-7 and T47D were significantly inhibited by SGLXD in a dose-dependent manner, the IC50 values were 40.07 mg/ml for MCF-7 cells and 25.62 mg/ml for T47D cells, respectively. As evidenced by real-time PCR and Western blot, the high concentrations of SGLXD significantly down-regulated the expressions of CYP19 and STS both in the transcript level and the protein level. Conclusion The results suggest that SGLXD is a potential dual aromatase-sulfatase inhibitor by simultaneously down-regulating the expressions of CYP19 and STS in MCF-7 and T47D cells. PMID:23467843

  3. Student Sexual Orientation, Promiscuity and Urban Acculturation as Factors That Influence Teacher Judgments about HIV[Positive] Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruce, Michael K.; Stinnett, Terry A.; Choate, Kurt T.

    2003-01-01

    Attributions toward HIV[positive] adolescents made by teacher education students who graduated from rural or urban high schools were examined. Participants read vignettes in which level of promiscuity and sexual orientation were varied, then completed a rating scale that reflected various attitudes toward HIV[positive] students. The vignette…

  4. Molecular annotation of ketol-acid reductoisomerases from Streptomyces reveals a novel amino acid biosynthesis interlock mediated by enzyme promiscuity.

    PubMed

    Verdel-Aranda, Karina; López-Cortina, Susana T; Hodgson, David A; Barona-Gómez, Francisco

    2015-03-01

    The 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase superfamily oxidize and reduce a wide range of substrates, making their functional annotation challenging. Ketol-acid reductoisomerase (KARI), encoded by the ilvC gene in branched-chain amino acids biosynthesis, is a promiscuous reductase enzyme within this superfamily. Here, we obtain steady-state enzyme kinetic parameters for 10 IlvC homologues from the genera Streptomyces and Corynebacterium, upon eight selected chemically diverse substrates, including some not normally recognized by enzymes of this superfamily. This biochemical data suggested a Streptomyces biosynthetic interlock between proline and the branched-chain amino acids, mediated by enzyme substrate promiscuity, which was confirmed via mutagenesis and complementation analyses of the proC, ilvC1 and ilvC2 genes in Streptomyces coelicolor. Moreover, both ilvC orthologues and paralogues were analysed, such that the relationship between gene duplication and functional diversification could be explored. The KARI paralogues present in S. coelicolor and Streptomyces lividans, despite their conserved high sequence identity (97%), were shown to be more promiscuous, suggesting a recent functional diversification. In contrast, the KARI paralogue from Streptomyces viridifaciens showed selectivity towards the synthesis of valine precursors, explaining its recruitment within the biosynthetic gene cluster of valanimycin. These results allowed us to assess substrate promiscuity indices as a tool to annotate new molecular functions with metabolic implications. PMID:25296650

  5. Molecular annotation of ketol-acid reductoisomerases from Streptomyces reveals a novel amino acid biosynthesis interlock mediated by enzyme promiscuity

    PubMed Central

    Verdel-Aranda, Karina; López-Cortina, Susana T; Hodgson, David A; Barona-Gómez, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase superfamily oxidize and reduce a wide range of substrates, making their functional annotation challenging. Ketol-acid reductoisomerase (KARI), encoded by the ilvC gene in branched-chain amino acids biosynthesis, is a promiscuous reductase enzyme within this superfamily. Here, we obtain steady-state enzyme kinetic parameters for 10 IlvC homologues from the genera Streptomyces and Corynebacterium, upon eight selected chemically diverse substrates, including some not normally recognized by enzymes of this superfamily. This biochemical data suggested a Streptomyces biosynthetic interlock between proline and the branched-chain amino acids, mediated by enzyme substrate promiscuity, which was confirmed via mutagenesis and complementation analyses of the proC, ilvC1 and ilvC2 genes in Streptomyces coelicolor. Moreover, both ilvC orthologues and paralogues were analysed, such that the relationship between gene duplication and functional diversification could be explored. The KARI paralogues present in S. coelicolor and Streptomyces lividans, despite their conserved high sequence identity (97%), were shown to be more promiscuous, suggesting a recent functional diversification. In contrast, the KARI paralogue from Streptomyces viridifaciens showed selectivity towards the synthesis of valine precursors, explaining its recruitment within the biosynthetic gene cluster of valanimycin. These results allowed us to assess substrate promiscuity indices as a tool to annotate new molecular functions with metabolic implications. PMID:25296650

  6. A β-Alanine Catabolism Pathway Containing a Highly Promiscuous ω-Transaminase in the 12-Aminododecanate-Degrading Pseudomonas sp. Strain AAC

    PubMed Central

    Wilding, Matthew; Peat, Thomas S.; Newman, Janet

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We previously isolated the transaminase KES23458 from Pseudomonas sp. strain AAC as a promising biocatalyst for the production of 12-aminododecanoic acid, a constituent building block of nylon-12. Here, we report the subsequent characterization of this transaminase. It exhibits activity with a broad substrate range which includes α-, β-, and ω-amino acids, as well as α,ω-diamines and a number of other industrially relevant compounds. It is therefore a prospective candidate for the biosynthesis of a range of polyamide monomers. The crystal structure of KES23458 revealed that the protein forms a dimer containing a large active site pocket and unusual phosphorylated histidine residues. To infer the physiological role of the transaminase, we expressed, purified, and characterized a dehydrogenase from the same operon, KES23460. Unlike the transaminase, the dehydrogenase was shown to be quite selective, catalyzing the oxidation of malonic acid semialdehyde, formed from β-alanine transamination via KES23458. In keeping with previous reports, the dehydrogenase was shown to catalyze both a coenzyme A (CoA)-dependent reaction to form acetyl-CoA and a significantly slower CoA-independent reaction to form acetate. These findings support the original functional assignment of KES23458 as a β-alanine transaminase. However, a seemingly well-adapted active site and promiscuity toward unnatural compounds, such as 12-aminododecanoic acid, suggest that this enzyme could perform multiple functions for Pseudomonas sp. strain AAC. IMPORTANCE We describe the characterization of an industrially relevant transaminase able to metabolize 12-aminododecanoic acid, a constituent building block of the widely used polymer nylon-12, and we report the biochemical and structural characterization of the transaminase protein. A physiological role for this highly promiscuous enzyme is proposed based on the characterization of a related gene from the host organism. Molecular dynamics

  7. Synthesis and Structure–Activity Relationship Studies of Derivatives of the Dual Aromatase–Sulfatase Inhibitor 4-{[(4-Cyanophenyl)(4H-1,2,4-triazol-4-yl)amino]methyl}phenyl sulfamate

    PubMed Central

    Woo, L W Lawrence; Wood, Paul M; Bubert, Christian; Thomas, Mark P; Purohit, Atul; Potter, Barry V L

    2013-01-01

    4-{[(4-Cyanophenyl)(4H-1,2,4-triazol-4-yl)amino]methyl}phenyl sulfamate and its ortho-halogenated (F, Cl, Br) derivatives are first-generation dual aromatase and sulfatase inhibitors (DASIs). Structure–activity relationship studies were performed on these compounds, and various modifications were made to their structures involving relocation of the halogen atom, introduction of more halogen atoms, replacement of the halogen with another group, replacement of the methylene linker with a difluoromethylene linker, replacement of the para-cyanophenyl ring with other ring structures, and replacement of the triazolyl group with an imidazolyl group. The most potent in vitro DASI discovered is an imidazole derivative with IC50 values against aromatase and steroid sulfatase in a JEG-3 cell preparation of 0.2 and 2.5 nm, respectively. The parent phenol of this compound inhibits aromatase with an IC50 value of 0.028 nm in the same assay. PMID:23495205

  8. Promiscuous Mutations Activate the Non-Canonical NF-kB Pathway in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Keats, Jonathan J.; Fonseca, Rafael; Chesi, Marta; Schop, Roelandt; Baker, Angela; Chng, Wee-Joo; Van Wier, Scott; Tiedemann, Rodger; Shi, Chang-Xin; Sebag, Michael; Braggio, Esteban; Henry, Travis; Zhu, Yuan-Xiao; Fogle, Homer; Price-Troska, Tammy; Ahmann, Gregory; Mancini, Catherine; Brents, Leslie A.; Kumar, Shaji; Greipp, Philip; Dispenzieri, Angela; Bryant, Barb; Mulligan, George; Bruhn, Laurakay; Barrett, Michael; Valdez, Riccardo; Trent, Jeff; Stewart, A. Keith; Carpten, John; Bergsagel, P. Leif

    2007-01-01

    Summary Activation of NF-kB has been noted in many tumor types, however only rarely has this been linked to an underlying genetic mutation. An integrated analysis of high-density oligonucleotide array CGH and gene expression profiling data from 155 multiple myeloma samples identified a promiscuous array of abnormalities contributing to the dysregulation of NF-kB in approximately 20% of patients. We report mutations in ten genes causing the inactivation of TRAF2, TRAF3, CYLD, cIAP1/cIAP2, and activation of NFKB1, NFKB2, CD40, LTBR, TACI, and NIK that result primarily in constitutive activation of the non-canonical NF-kB pathway, with the single most common abnormality being inactivation of TRAF3. These results highlight the critical importance of the NF-kB pathway in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma. PMID:17692805

  9. HUMAN PARAOXONASE-1 (PON1): GENE STRUCTURE AND EXPRESSION, PROMISCUOUS ACTIVITIES AND MULTIPLE PHYSIOLOGICAL ROLES

    PubMed Central

    Mackness, Mike; Mackness, Bharti

    2015-01-01

    Human PON1 is a HDL-associated lipolactonase capable of preventing LDL and cell membrane oxidation and is therefore considered to be atheroprotective. PON1 contributes to the antioxidative function of HDL and reductions in HDL-PON1 activity, prevalent in a wide variety of diseases with an inflammatory component, is believed to lead to dysfunctional HDL which can promote inflammation and atherosclerosis. However, PON1 is multifunctional and may contribute to other HDL functions such as in innate immunity, preventing infection by quorum sensing gram negative bacteria by destroying acyl lactone mediators of quorum sensing, and putative new roles in cancer development and the promotion of healthy ageing. In this review we explore the physiological roles of PON1 in disease development, as well as PON1 gene and protein structure, promiscuous activities and the roles of SNPs and ethnicity in determining PON1 activity. PMID:25965560

  10. The promiscuous MLL gene links chromosomal translocations to cellular differentiation and tumour tropism.

    PubMed

    Collins, Emma C; Rabbitts, Terence H

    2002-09-01

    MLL is a promiscuous gene involved in a diversity of chromosomal fusions in haematological malignancies, usually resulting from chromosomal translocations. MLL-associated chromosomal rearrangements usually occur in tumours of specific haematological lineages, suggesting a crucial role for the MLL fusion partner in determining disease phenotype (or tumour tropism). The MLL gene is homologous to Drosophila trithorax, and is likewise involved in embryo pattern formation. Common themes linking several of the MLL partners include a possible involvement in embryo patterning via Hox gene regulation and chromatin remodelling. These findings reinforce the link between developmental regulation and chromosomal translocations, and indicate the role of chromosomal translocation in activating genes capable of determining tumour phenotype in leukaemias and sarcomas. PMID:12223315

  11. Catalytic Promiscuity of Transaminases: Preparation of Enantioenriched β-Fluoroamines by Formal Tandem Hydrodefluorination/Deamination.

    PubMed

    Cuetos, Aníbal; García-Ramos, Marina; Fischereder, Eva-Maria; Díaz-Rodríguez, Alba; Grogan, Gideon; Gotor, Vicente; Kroutil, Wolfgang; Lavandera, Iván

    2016-02-24

    Transaminases are valuable enzymes for industrial biocatalysis and enable the preparation of optically pure amines. For these transformations they require either an amine donor (amination of ketones) or an amine acceptor (deamination of racemic amines). Herein transaminases are shown to react with aromatic β-fluoroamines, thus leading to simultaneous enantioselective dehalogenation and deamination to form the corresponding acetophenone derivatives in the absence of an amine acceptor. A series of racemic β-fluoroamines was resolved in a kinetic resolution by tandem hydrodefluorination/deamination, thus giving the corresponding amines with up to greater than 99 % ee. This protocol is the first example of exploiting the catalytic promiscuity of transaminases as a tool for novel transformations. PMID:26836037

  12. A promiscuous intermediate underlies the evolution of LEAFY DNA binding specificity.

    PubMed

    Sayou, Camille; Monniaux, Marie; Nanao, Max H; Moyroud, Edwige; Brockington, Samuel F; Thévenon, Emmanuel; Chahtane, Hicham; Warthmann, Norman; Melkonian, Michael; Zhang, Yong; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Weigel, Detlef; Parcy, François; Dumas, Renaud

    2014-02-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are key players in evolution. Changes affecting their function can yield novel life forms but may also have deleterious effects. Consequently, gene duplication events that release one gene copy from selective pressure are thought to be the common mechanism by which TFs acquire new activities. Here, we show that LEAFY, a major regulator of flower development and cell division in land plants, underwent changes to its DNA binding specificity, even though plant genomes generally contain a single copy of the LEAFY gene. We examined how these changes occurred at the structural level and identify an intermediate LEAFY form in hornworts that appears to adopt all different specificities. This promiscuous intermediate could have smoothed the evolutionary transitions, thereby allowing LEAFY to evolve new binding specificities while remaining a single-copy gene. PMID:24436181

  13. Promiscuous Substrate Recognition in Folding and Assembly Activities of the Trigger Factor Chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Hackert, E.; Hendrickson, W

    2009-01-01

    Trigger factor (TF) is a molecular chaperone that binds to bacterial ribosomes where it contacts emerging nascent chains, but TF is also abundant free in the cytosol where its activity is less well characterized. In vitro studies show that TF promotes protein refolding. We find here that ribosome-free TF stably associates with and rescues from misfolding a large repertoire of full-length proteins. We identify over 170 members of this cytosolic Escherichia coli TF substrate proteome, including ribosomal protein S7. We analyzed the biochemical properties of a TF:S7 complex from Thermotoga maritima and determined its crystal structure. Thereby, we obtained an atomic-level picture of a promiscuous chaperone in complex with a physiological substrate protein. The structure of the complex reveals the molecular basis of substrate recognition by TF, indicates how TF could accelerate protein folding, and suggests a role for TF in the biogenesis of protein complexes.

  14. Tyrosine binding and promiscuity in the arginine repressor from the pathogenic bacterium Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mariutti, Ricardo Barros; Ullah, Anwar; Araujo, Gabriela Campos; Murakami, Mario Tyago; Arni, Raghuvir Krishnaswamy

    2016-07-01

    The arginine repressor (ArgR) regulates arginine biosynthesis in a number of microorganisms and consists of two domains interlinked by a short peptide; the N-terminal domain is involved in DNA binding and the C-terminal domain binds arginine and forms a hexamer made-up of a dimer of trimers. The crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of ArgR from the pathogenic Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis determined at 1.9 Å resolution contains a tightly bound tyrosine at the arginine-binding site indicating hitherto unobserved promiscuity. Structural analysis of the binding pocket displays clear molecular adaptations to accommodate tyrosine binding suggesting the possible existence of an alternative regulatory process in this pathogenic bacterium. PMID:27233609

  15. Pan Assay Interference Compounds (PAINS) and Other Promiscuous Compounds in Antifungal Research.

    PubMed

    Pouliot, Martin; Jeanmart, Stephane

    2016-01-28

    Every week, articles disclosing new antifungal leads reported as promising starting points for optimization projects are published. In many cases, the mechanism that accounts for their antifungal activity has not been fully elucidated. More significantly, the detrimental impact that could result from certain embedded chemical features has been underestimated or even overlooked. In the course of our research in the agrochemical area, we have concluded that in many cases such leads are actually nonoptimizable because they either contain what are now recognized as pan assay interference compounds (PAINS) or other promiscuous groups. This article is aimed at highlighting the pitfalls we have encountered and hopefully to steer other research groups away from them. PMID:26313340

  16. Structural Plasticity Underpins Promiscuous Binding of the Prosurvival Protein A1

    SciTech Connect

    Smits,C.; Czabotar, P.; Hinds, M.; Day, C.

    2008-01-01

    Apoptotic pathways are regulated by protein-protein interactions. Interaction of the BH3 domains of proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins with the hydrophobic groove of prosurvival proteins is critical. Whereas some BH3 domains bind in a promiscuous manner, others exhibit considerable selectivity and the sequence characteristics that distinguish these activities are unclear. In this study, crystal structures of complexes between the prosurvival protein A1 and the BH3 domains from Puma, Bmf, Bak, and Bid have been solved. The structure of A1 is similar to that of other prosurvival proteins, although features, such as an acidic patch in the binding groove, may allow specific therapeutic modulation of apoptosis. Significant conformational plasticity was observed in the intermolecular interactions and these differences explain some of the variation in affinity. This study, in combination with published data, suggests that interactions between conserved residues demarcate optimal binding.

  17. Fidelity and Promiscuity in an Ant-Plant Mutualism: A Case Study of Triplaris and Pseudomyrmex

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    The association between the myrmecophyte Triplaris and ants of the genus Pseudomyrmex is an often-reported example of mutualism but no molecular studies have examined this association to date. In this study, the interspecific relationships of Triplaris were reconstructed using five molecular markers (two chloroplast and three nuclear), and the relationships of the associated Pseudomyrmex using two molecular regions (one mitochondrial and one nuclear). A data set including all known collections of plant hosts and resident ants was also compiled. The pattern of distribution of both organisms reveals that there are varying degrees of host specificity; most ants show broader host usage (promiscuous) but one species (P. dendroicus) is faithful to a single species of Triplaris. In most ant-plant interactions, host usage is not specific at the species level and preferences may result from geographical or ecological sorting. The specificity of P. dendroicus could be based on chemical recognition of the host they were raised on. PMID:26630384

  18. Male coercion and the costs of promiscuous mating for female chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Martin N; Kahlenberg, Sonya M; Emery Thompson, Melissa; Wrangham, Richard W

    2007-01-01

    For reasons that are not yet clear, male aggression against females occurs frequently among primates with promiscuous mating systems. Here, we test the sexual coercion hypothesis that male aggression functions to constrain female mate choice. We use 10 years of behavioural and endocrine data from a community of wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) to show that sexual coercion is the probable primary function of male aggression against females. Specifically, we show that male aggression is targeted towards the most fecund females, is associated with high male mating success and is costly for the victims. Such aggression can be viewed as a counter-strategy to female attempts at paternity confusion, and a cost of multi-male mating. PMID:17264062

  19. Evolution of conformational dynamics determines the conversion of a promiscuous generalist into a specialist enzyme.

    PubMed

    Zou, Taisong; Risso, Valeria A; Gavira, Jose A; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M; Ozkan, S Banu

    2015-01-01

    β-Lactamases are produced by many modern bacteria as a mechanism of resistance toward β-lactam antibiotics, the most common antibiotics in use. β-Lactamases, however, are ancient enzymes that originated billions of years ago. Recently, proteins corresponding to 2- to 3-Gy-old Precambrian nodes in the evolution of Class A β-lactamases have been prepared and shown to be moderately efficient promiscuous catalysts, able to degrade a variety of antibiotics with catalytic efficiency levels similar to those of an average modern enzyme. Remarkably, there are few structural differences (in particular at the active-site regions) between the resurrected enzymes and a penicillin-specialist modern β-lactamase. Here, we propose that the ancestral promiscuity originates from conformational dynamics. We investigate the differences in conformational dynamics of the ancient and extant β-lactamases through MD simulations and quantify the contribution of each position to functionally related dynamics through Dynamic Flexibility Index. The modern TEM-1 lactamase shows a comparatively rigid active-site region, likely reflecting adaptation for efficient degradation of a specific substrate (penicillin), whereas enhanced deformability at the active-site neighborhood in the ancestral resurrected proteins likely accounts for the binding and subsequent degradation of antibiotic molecules of different size and shape. Clustering of the conformational dynamics on the basis of Principal Component Analysis is in agreement with the functional divergence, as the ancient β-lactamases cluster together, separated from their modern descendant. Finally, our analysis leads to testable predictions, as sites of potential relevance for the evolution of dynamics are identified and mutations at those sites are expected to alter substrate-specificity. PMID:25312912

  20. Exploiting the Substrate Promiscuity of Hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:Shikimate Hydroxycinnamoyl Transferase to Reduce Lignin.

    PubMed

    Eudes, Aymerick; Pereira, Jose H; Yogiswara, Sasha; Wang, George; Teixeira Benites, Veronica; Baidoo, Edward E K; Lee, Taek Soon; Adams, Paul D; Keasling, Jay D; Loqué, Dominique

    2016-03-01

    Lignin poses a major challenge in the processing of plant biomass for agro-industrial applications. For bioengineering purposes, there is a pressing interest in identifying and characterizing the enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of lignin. Hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:shikimate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HCT; EC 2.3.1.133) is a key metabolic entry point for the synthesis of the most important lignin monomers: coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols. In this study, we investigated the substrate promiscuity of HCT from a bryophyte (Physcomitrella) and from five representatives of vascular plants (Arabidopsis, poplar, switchgrass, pine and Selaginella) using a yeast expression system. We demonstrate for these HCTs a conserved capacity to acylate with p-coumaroyl-CoA several phenolic compounds in addition to the canonical acceptor shikimate normally used during lignin biosynthesis. Using either recombinant HCT from switchgrass (PvHCT2a) or an Arabidopsis stem protein extract, we show evidence of the inhibitory effect of these phenolics on the synthesis of p-coumaroyl shikimate in vitro, which presumably occurs via a mechanism of competitive inhibition. A structural study of PvHCT2a confirmed the binding of a non-canonical acceptor in a similar manner to shikimate in the active site of the enzyme. Finally, we exploited in Arabidopsis the substrate flexibility of HCT to reduce lignin content and improve biomass saccharification by engineering transgenic lines that overproduce one of the HCT non-canonical acceptors. Our results demonstrate conservation of HCT substrate promiscuity and provide support for a new strategy for lignin reduction in the effort to improve the quality of plant biomass for forage and cellulosic biofuels. PMID:26858288

  1. Males and Females Gain Differentially from Sociality in a Promiscuous Fruit Bat Cynopterus sphinx

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Kritika M.; Chattopadhyay, Balaji; Swami Doss, D. P.; Kumar, A. K. Vinoth; Kandula, Sripathi; Ramakrishnan, Uma

    2015-01-01

    Sociality emerges when the benefits of group living outweigh its costs. While both males and females are capable of strong social ties, the evolutionary drivers for sociality and the benefits accrued maybe different for each sex. In this study, we investigate the differential reproductive success benefits of group membership that males and females might obtain in the promiscuous fruit bat Cynopterus sphinx. Individuals of this species live in flexible social groups called colonies. These colonies are labile and there is high turnover of individuals. However, colony males sire more offspring within the colony suggesting that being part of a colony may result in reproductive benefits for males. This also raises the possibility that long-term loyalty towards the colony may confer additional advantage in terms of higher reproductive success. We used ten seasons of genetic parentage data to estimate reproductive success and relatedness of individuals in the colony. We used recapture data to identify long and short-term residents in the colony as well as to obtain rates of recapture for males and females. Our results reveal that males have a significantly higher chance of becoming long-term residents (than females), and these long-term resident males gain twice the reproductive success compared to short-term resident males. We also observed that long-term resident females are related to each other and also achieve higher reproductive success than short-term resident females. In contrast, long-term resident males do not differ from short-term resident males in their levels of relatedness. Our results re-iterate the benefits of sociality even in species that are promiscuous and socially labile and possible benefits of maintaining a colony. PMID:25794185

  2. Males and females gain differentially from sociality in a promiscuous fruit bat Cynopterus sphinx.

    PubMed

    Garg, Kritika M; Chattopadhyay, Balaji; Swami Doss, D P; Kumar, A K Vinoth; Kandula, Sripathi; Ramakrishnan, Uma

    2015-01-01

    Sociality emerges when the benefits of group living outweigh its costs. While both males and females are capable of strong social ties, the evolutionary drivers for sociality and the benefits accrued maybe different for each sex. In this study, we investigate the differential reproductive success benefits of group membership that males and females might obtain in the promiscuous fruit bat Cynopterus sphinx. Individuals of this species live in flexible social groups called colonies. These colonies are labile and there is high turnover of individuals. However, colony males sire more offspring within the colony suggesting that being part of a colony may result in reproductive benefits for males. This also raises the possibility that long-term loyalty towards the colony may confer additional advantage in terms of higher reproductive success. We used ten seasons of genetic parentage data to estimate reproductive success and relatedness of individuals in the colony. We used recapture data to identify long and short-term residents in the colony as well as to obtain rates of recapture for males and females. Our results reveal that males have a significantly higher chance of becoming long-term residents (than females), and these long-term resident males gain twice the reproductive success compared to short-term resident males. We also observed that long-term resident females are related to each other and also achieve higher reproductive success than short-term resident females. In contrast, long-term resident males do not differ from short-term resident males in their levels of relatedness. Our results re-iterate the benefits of sociality even in species that are promiscuous and socially labile and possible benefits of maintaining a colony. PMID:25794185

  3. Target Promiscuity and Heterogeneous Effects of Tarantula Venom Peptides Affecting Na+ and K+ Ion Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Redaelli, Elisa; Cassulini, Rita Restano; Silva, Deyanira Fuentes; Clement, Herlinda; Schiavon, Emanuele; Zamudio, Fernando Z.; Odell, George; Arcangeli, Annarosa; Clare, Jeffrey J.; Alagón, Alejandro; de la Vega, Ricardo C. Rodríguez; Possani, Lourival D.; Wanke, Enzo

    2010-01-01

    Venom-derived peptide modulators of ion channel gating are regarded as essential tools for understanding the molecular motions that occur during the opening and closing of ion channels. In this study, we present the characterization of five spider toxins on 12 human voltage-gated ion channels, following observations about the target promiscuity of some spider toxins and the ongoing revision of their “canonical” gating-modifying mode of action. The peptides were purified de novo from the venom of Grammostola rosea tarantulas, and their sequences were confirmed by Edman degradation and mass spectrometry analysis. Their effects on seven tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ channels, the three human ether-à-go-go (hERG)-related K+ channels, and two human Shaker-related K+ channels were extensively characterized by electrophysiological techniques. All the peptides inhibited ion conduction through all the Na+ channels tested, although with distinctive patterns. The peptides also affected the three pharmaceutically relevant hERG isoforms differently. At higher concentrations, all peptides also modified the gating of the Na+ channels by shifting the activation to more positive potentials, whereas more complex effects were recorded on hERG channels. No effects were evident on the two Shaker-related K+ channels at concentrations well above the IC50 value for the affected channels. Given the sequence diversity of the tested peptides, we propose that tarantula toxins should be considered both as multimode and target-promiscuous ion channel modulators; both features should not be ignored when extracting mechanistic interpretations about ion channel gating. Our observations could also aid in future structure-function studies and might help the development of novel ion channel-specific drugs. PMID:19955179

  4. Exploiting the Substrate Promiscuity of Hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:Shikimate Hydroxycinnamoyl Transferase to Reduce Lignin

    PubMed Central

    Eudes, Aymerick; Pereira, Jose H.; Yogiswara, Sasha; Wang, George; Teixeira Benites, Veronica; Baidoo, Edward E.K.; Lee, Taek Soon; Adams, Paul D.; Keasling, Jay D.; Loqué, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Lignin poses a major challenge in the processing of plant biomass for agro-industrial applications. For bioengineering purposes, there is a pressing interest in identifying and characterizing the enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of lignin. Hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:shikimate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HCT; EC 2.3.1.133) is a key metabolic entry point for the synthesis of the most important lignin monomers: coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols. In this study, we investigated the substrate promiscuity of HCT from a bryophyte (Physcomitrella) and from five representatives of vascular plants (Arabidopsis, poplar, switchgrass, pine and Selaginella) using a yeast expression system. We demonstrate for these HCTs a conserved capacity to acylate with p-coumaroyl-CoA several phenolic compounds in addition to the canonical acceptor shikimate normally used during lignin biosynthesis. Using either recombinant HCT from switchgrass (PvHCT2a) or an Arabidopsis stem protein extract, we show evidence of the inhibitory effect of these phenolics on the synthesis of p-coumaroyl shikimate in vitro, which presumably occurs via a mechanism of competitive inhibition. A structural study of PvHCT2a confirmed the binding of a non-canonical acceptor in a similar manner to shikimate in the active site of the enzyme. Finally, we exploited in Arabidopsis the substrate flexibility of HCT to reduce lignin content and improve biomass saccharification by engineering transgenic lines that overproduce one of the HCT non-canonical acceptors. Our results demonstrate conservation of HCT substrate promiscuity and provide support for a new strategy for lignin reduction in the effort to improve the quality of plant biomass for forage and cellulosic biofuels. PMID:26858288

  5. Promiscuous catalysis of asymmetric Michael-type additions of linear aldehydes to β-nitrostyrene by the proline-based enzyme 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yufeng; Geertsema, Edzard M; Tepper, Pieter G; Zandvoort, Ellen; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2013-01-21

    Exploiting catalytic promiscuity: The proline-based enzyme 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT) promiscuously catalyzes asymmetric Michael-type additions of linear aldehydes--ranging from acetaldehyde to octanal--to trans-β-nitrostyrene in aqueous solvent. The presence of 1.4 mol% of 4-OT effected formation of the anticipated γ-nitroaldehydes in fair to good yields with dr values of up to 93:7 and ee values of up to 81 %. PMID:23303727

  6. PAINS in the Assay: Chemical Mechanisms of Assay Interference and Promiscuous Enzymatic Inhibition Observed during a Sulfhydryl-Scavenging HTS

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Significant resources in early drug discovery are spent unknowingly pursuing artifacts and promiscuous bioactive compounds, while understanding the chemical basis for these adverse behaviors often goes unexplored in pursuit of lead compounds. Nearly all the hits from our recent sulfhydryl-scavenging high-throughput screen (HTS) targeting the histone acetyltransferase Rtt109 were such compounds. Herein, we characterize the chemical basis for assay interference and promiscuous enzymatic inhibition for several prominent chemotypes identified by this HTS, including some pan-assay interference compounds (PAINS). Protein mass spectrometry and ALARM NMR confirmed these compounds react covalently with cysteines on multiple proteins. Unfortunately, compounds containing these chemotypes have been published as screening actives in reputable journals and even touted as chemical probes or preclinical candidates. Our detailed characterization and identification of such thiol-reactive chemotypes should accelerate triage of nuisance compounds, guide screening library design, and prevent follow-up on undesirable chemical matter. PMID:25634295

  7. Enzymological and Structural Studies of the Mechanism of Promiscuous Substrate Recognition by the Oxidative DNA Repair Enzyme AlkB

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, B.; Hunt, J

    2009-01-01

    Promiscuous substrate recognition, the ability to catalyze transformations of chemically diverse compounds, is an evolutionarily advantageous, but poorly understood phenomenon. The promiscuity of DNA repair enzymes is particularly important, because it enables diverse kinds of damage to different nucleotide bases to be repaired in a metabolically parsimonious manner. We present enzymological and crystallographic studies of the mechanisms underlying promiscuous substrate recognition by Escherichia coli AlkB, a DNA repair enzyme that removes methyl adducts and some larger alkylation lesions from endocyclic positions on purine and pyrimidine bases. In vitro Michaelis-Menten analyses on a series of alkylated bases show high activity in repairing N1-methyladenine (m1A) and N3-methylcytosine (m3C), comparatively low activity in repairing 1,N6-ethenoadenine, and no detectable activity in repairing N1-methylguanine or N3-methylthymine. AlkB has a substantially higher kcat and Km for m3C compared with m1A. Therefore, the enzyme maintains similar net activity on the chemically distinct substrates by increasing the turnover rate of the substrate with nominally lower affinity. Cocrystal structures provide insight into the structural basis of this 'kcat/Km compensation,' which makes a significant contribution to promiscuous substrate recognition by AlkB. In analyzing a large ensemble of crystal structures solved in the course of these studies, we observed 2 discrete global conformations of AlkB differing in the accessibility of a tunnel hypothesized to control diffusion of the O2 substrate into the active site. Steric interactions between a series of protein loops control this conformational transition and present a plausible mechanism for preventing O2 binding before nucleotide substrate binding.

  8. Coexistence of unlimited bipartite and genuine multipartite entanglement: Promiscuous quantum correlations arising from discrete to continuous-variable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Adesso, Gerardo; Ericsson, Marie; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2007-08-15

    Quantum mechanics imposes 'monogamy' constraints on the sharing of entanglement. We show that, despite these limitations, entanglement can be fully 'promiscuous', i.e., simultaneously present in unlimited two-body and many-body forms in states living in an infinite-dimensional Hilbert space. Monogamy just bounds the divergence rate of the various entanglement contributions. This is demonstrated in simple families of N-mode (N{>=}4) Gaussian states of light fields or atomic ensembles, which therefore enable infinitely more freedom in the distribution of information, as opposed to systems of individual qubits. Such a finding is of importance for the quantification, understanding, and potential exploitation of shared quantum correlations in continuous variable systems. We discuss how promiscuity gradually arises when considering simple families of discrete variable states, with increasing Hilbert space dimension towards the continuous variable limit. Such models are somehow analogous to Gaussian states with asymptotically diverging, but finite, squeezing. In this respect, we find that non-Gaussian states (which in general are more entangled than Gaussian states) exhibit also the interesting feature that their entanglement is more shareable: in the non-Gaussian multipartite arena, unlimited promiscuity can be already achieved among three entangled parties, while this is impossible for Gaussian, even infinitely squeezed states.

  9. Coexistence of unlimited bipartite and genuine multipartite entanglement: Promiscuous quantum correlations arising from discrete to continuous-variable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adesso, Gerardo; Ericsson, Marie; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2007-08-01

    Quantum mechanics imposes “monogamy” constraints on the sharing of entanglement. We show that, despite these limitations, entanglement can be fully “promiscuous,” i.e., simultaneously present in unlimited two-body and many-body forms in states living in an infinite-dimensional Hilbert space. Monogamy just bounds the divergence rate of the various entanglement contributions. This is demonstrated in simple families of N -mode (N⩾4) Gaussian states of light fields or atomic ensembles, which therefore enable infinitely more freedom in the distribution of information, as opposed to systems of individual qubits. Such a finding is of importance for the quantification, understanding, and potential exploitation of shared quantum correlations in continuous variable systems. We discuss how promiscuity gradually arises when considering simple families of discrete variable states, with increasing Hilbert space dimension towards the continuous variable limit. Such models are somehow analogous to Gaussian states with asymptotically diverging, but finite, squeezing. In this respect, we find that non-Gaussian states (which in general are more entangled than Gaussian states) exhibit also the interesting feature that their entanglement is more shareable: in the non-Gaussian multipartite arena, unlimited promiscuity can be already achieved among three entangled parties, while this is impossible for Gaussian, even infinitely squeezed states.

  10. Crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of the promiscuous EphA4 receptor reveals two distinct conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Singla, Nikhil; Goldgur, Yehuda; Xu, Kai; Paavilainen, Sari; Nikolov, Dimitar B.; Himanen, Juha P.

    2010-09-08

    Eph receptors and their ephrin ligands are important mediators of cell-cell communication. They are divided in two subclasses based on their affinities for each other and on sequence conservation. Receptor-ligand binding within each subclass is fairly promiscuous, while binding cross the subclasses happens rarely. EphA4 is an exception to this general rule, since it has long been known to bind both A- and B-class ephrin ligands but the reason for this exceptional behavior has not been worked out at molecular level. Recent structural and biochemical studies on EphA4 ligand-binding domain alone and in complex with its ligands have addressed this question. However, the published structures of EphA4/ephrin complexes differ considerably from each other and strikingly different explanations for the exceptional promiscuity of EphA4 were proposed. To address these contradictory findings, we have determined a crystal structure of the EphA4 ligand-binding domain at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution and show that the receptor has an unprecedented ability to exist in two very different, well-ordered conformations even in the unbound state. Our results suggest that the ligand promiscuity of the Ephs is directly correlated with the structural flexibility of the ligand-binding surface of the receptor.

  11. Method development and analysis of free HS and HS in proteoglycans from pre- and postmenopausal women: Evidence for biosynthetic pathway changes in sulfotransferase and sulfatase enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Miller, Rebecca L.; Leary, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is one of the most complex and informative biopolymers found on the cell surface or in the extracellular matrix as either free HS fragments or constituents of HS proteoglycans (HSPGs). Analysis of free HS and HSPG sugar chains in human serum at the disaccharide level has great potential for early disease diagnosis and prognosis, however, the low concentration of HS in human serum, together with the complexity of the serum matrix, limits the information on HS. In this study, we present and validate the development of a new sensitive method for in-depth compositional analysis of free HS and HSPG sugar chains. This protocol involved several steps including weak anion exchange chromatography, ultrafiltration and solid phase extraction for enhanced detection prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. Using this protocol, a total of 51 serum samples from 26 premenopausal and 25 postmenopausal women were analyzed. Statistically significant differences in heparin/HS disaccharide profiles were observed. The proportion of N-acetylation and N-sulfation in both free HS and HSPG sugar chains were significantly different between pre- and postmenopausal women, indicating changes in N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferases (NDSTs), the enzymes involved in the initial step of the biosynthetic pathway. Differences in the proportion of 6-O-sulfation suggest that 6-O-sulfotransferase and/or 6-O-sulfatase enzymes may also be implicated. PMID:23659730

  12. Systems-Wide Prediction of Enzyme Promiscuity Reveals a New Underground Alternative Route for Pyridoxal 5'-Phosphate Production in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Oberhardt, Matthew A; Zarecki, Raphy; Reshef, Leah; Xia, Fangfang; Duran-Frigola, Miquel; Schreiber, Rachel; Henry, Christopher S; Ben-Tal, Nir; Dwyer, Daniel J; Gophna, Uri; Ruppin, Eytan

    2016-01-01

    Recent insights suggest that non-specific and/or promiscuous enzymes are common and active across life. Understanding the role of such enzymes is an important open question in biology. Here we develop a genome-wide method, PROPER, that uses a permissive PSI-BLAST approach to predict promiscuous activities of metabolic genes. Enzyme promiscuity is typically studied experimentally using multicopy suppression, in which over-expression of a promiscuous 'replacer' gene rescues lethality caused by inactivation of a 'target' gene. We use PROPER to predict multicopy suppression in Escherichia coli, achieving highly significant overlap with published cases (hypergeometric p = 4.4e-13). We then validate three novel predicted target-replacer gene pairs in new multicopy suppression experiments. We next go beyond PROPER and develop a network-based approach, GEM-PROPER, that integrates PROPER with genome-scale metabolic modeling to predict promiscuous replacements via alternative metabolic pathways. GEM-PROPER predicts a new indirect replacer (thiG) for an essential enzyme (pdxB) in production of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (the active form of Vitamin B6), which we validate experimentally via multicopy suppression. We perform a structural analysis of thiG to determine its potential promiscuous active site, which we validate experimentally by inactivating the pertaining residues and showing a loss of replacer activity. Thus, this study is a successful example where a computational investigation leads to a network-based identification of an indirect promiscuous replacement of a key metabolic enzyme, which would have been extremely difficult to identify directly. PMID:26821166

  13. Systems-Wide Prediction of Enzyme Promiscuity Reveals a New Underground Alternative Route for Pyridoxal 5’-Phosphate Production in E. coli

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Oberhardt, Matthew A.; Zarecki, Raphy; Reshef, Leah; Xia, Fangfang; Duran-Frigola, Miquel; Schreiber, Rachel; Henry, Christopher S.; Ben-Tal, Nir; Dwyer, Daniel J.; Gophna, Uri; et al

    2016-01-28

    Recent insights suggest that non-specific and/or promiscuous enzymes are common and active across life. Understanding the role of such enzymes is an important open question in biology. Here we develop a genome-wide method, PROPER, that uses a permissive PSI-BLAST approach to predict promiscuous activities of metabolic genes. Enzyme promiscuity is typically studied experimentally using multicopy suppression, in which over-expression of a promiscuous ‘replacer’ gene rescues lethality caused by inactivation of a ‘target’ gene. We use PROPER to predict multicopy suppression in Escherichia coli, achieving highly significant overlap with published cases (hypergeometric p = 4.4e-13). We then validate three novel predictedmore » target-replacer gene pairs in new multicopy suppression experiments. We next go beyond PROPER and develop a network-based approach, GEM-PROPER, that integrates PROPER with genome-scale metabolic modeling to predict promiscuous replacements via alternative metabolic pathways. GEM-PROPER predicts a new indirect replacer (thiG) for an essential enzyme (pdxB) in production of pyridoxal 5’-phosphate (the active form of Vitamin B6), which we validate experimentally via multicopy suppression. Here, we perform a structural analysis of thiG to determine its potential promiscuous active site, which we validate experimentally by inactivating the pertaining residues and showing a loss of replacer activity. Thus, this study is a successful example where a computational investigation leads to a network-based identification of an indirect promiscuous replacement of a key metabolic enzyme, which would have been extremely difficult to identify directly.« less

  14. Systems-Wide Prediction of Enzyme Promiscuity Reveals a New Underground Alternative Route for Pyridoxal 5’-Phosphate Production in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Reshef, Leah; Xia, Fangfang; Duran-Frigola, Miquel; Schreiber, Rachel; Henry, Christopher S.; Ben-Tal, Nir; Dwyer, Daniel J.; Gophna, Uri; Ruppin, Eytan

    2016-01-01

    Recent insights suggest that non-specific and/or promiscuous enzymes are common and active across life. Understanding the role of such enzymes is an important open question in biology. Here we develop a genome-wide method, PROPER, that uses a permissive PSI-BLAST approach to predict promiscuous activities of metabolic genes. Enzyme promiscuity is typically studied experimentally using multicopy suppression, in which over-expression of a promiscuous ‘replacer’ gene rescues lethality caused by inactivation of a ‘target’ gene. We use PROPER to predict multicopy suppression in Escherichia coli, achieving highly significant overlap with published cases (hypergeometric p = 4.4e-13). We then validate three novel predicted target-replacer gene pairs in new multicopy suppression experiments. We next go beyond PROPER and develop a network-based approach, GEM-PROPER, that integrates PROPER with genome-scale metabolic modeling to predict promiscuous replacements via alternative metabolic pathways. GEM-PROPER predicts a new indirect replacer (thiG) for an essential enzyme (pdxB) in production of pyridoxal 5’-phosphate (the active form of Vitamin B6), which we validate experimentally via multicopy suppression. We perform a structural analysis of thiG to determine its potential promiscuous active site, which we validate experimentally by inactivating the pertaining residues and showing a loss of replacer activity. Thus, this study is a successful example where a computational investigation leads to a network-based identification of an indirect promiscuous replacement of a key metabolic enzyme, which would have been extremely difficult to identify directly. PMID:26821166

  15. The protein kinase promiscuities in the cancer-preventive mechanisms of NSAIDs

    PubMed Central

    Norvaisas, Povilas; Chan, Diana; Yokoi, Kenji; Dave, Bhuvanesh

    2016-01-01

    NSAIDs have been observed to have cancer-preventive properties, but the actual mechanism is elusive. We hypothesize that NSAIDs might have an effect through common pathways and targets of anticancer drugs by exploiting promiscuities of anticancer drug targets. Here, we have explored NSAIDs by their structural and pharmacophoric similarities with small anticancer molecules. In-silico analyses have shown a strong similarity between NSAIDs and protein kinase (PK) inhibitors. The calculated affinities of NSAIDs were found to be lower than the affinities of anticancer drugs, but higher than the affinities of compounds that are not specific to PKs. The competitive inhibition model suggests that PK might be inhibited by around 10%, which was confirmed by biochemical screening of some NSAIDs against PKs. NSAIDs did not affect all PKs universally, but had specificities for certain sets of PKs, which differed according to the NSAID. The study revealed potentially new features and mechanisms of NSAIDs that are useful in explaining their role in cancer prevention, which might lead to clinically significant breakthroughs in the future. PMID:25714784

  16. Force Dependent Biotinylation of Myosin IIA by α-Catenin Tagged with a Promiscuous Biotin Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Shuji; Blee, Alexandra M.; Macway, Katherine G.; Renner, Derrick J.; Yamada, Soichiro

    2015-01-01

    Tissues and organs undergo constant physical perturbations and individual cells must respond to mechanical forces to maintain tissue integrity. However, molecular interactions underlying mechano-transduction are not fully defined at cell-cell junctions. This is in part due to weak and transient interactions that are likely prevalent in force-induced protein complexes. Using in situ proximal biotinylation by the promiscuous biotin ligase BirA tagged to α-catenin and a substrate stretch cell chamber, we sought to identify force-dependent molecular interactions surrounding α-catenin, an actin regulator at the sites of cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion. While E-cadherin, β-catenin, vinculin and actin localize with α-catenin at cell-cell contacts in immuno-fluorescent staining, only β-catenin and plakoglobin were biotinylated, suggesting that this proximal biotinylation is limited to the molecules that are in the immediate vicinity of α-catenin. In mechanically stretched samples, increased biotinylation of non-muscle myosin IIA, but not myosin IIB, suggests close spatial proximity between α-catenin and myosin IIA during substrate stretching. This force-induced biotinylation diminished as myosin II activity was inhibited by blebbistatin. Taken together, this promising technique enables us to identify force sensitive complexes that may be essential for mechano-responses in force bearing cell adhesion. PMID:25806963

  17. Force dependent biotinylation of myosin IIA by α-catenin tagged with a promiscuous biotin ligase.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Shuji; Blee, Alexandra M; Macway, Katherine G; Renner, Derrick J; Yamada, Soichiro

    2015-01-01

    Tissues and organs undergo constant physical perturbations and individual cells must respond to mechanical forces to maintain tissue integrity. However, molecular interactions underlying mechano-transduction are not fully defined at cell-cell junctions. This is in part due to weak and transient interactions that are likely prevalent in force-induced protein complexes. Using in situ proximal biotinylation by the promiscuous biotin ligase BirA tagged to α-catenin and a substrate stretch cell chamber, we sought to identify force-dependent molecular interactions surrounding α-catenin, an actin regulator at the sites of cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion. While E-cadherin, β-catenin, vinculin and actin localize with α-catenin at cell-cell contacts in immuno-fluorescent staining, only β-catenin and plakoglobin were biotinylated, suggesting that this proximal biotinylation is limited to the molecules that are in the immediate vicinity of α-catenin. In mechanically stretched samples, increased biotinylation of non-muscle myosin IIA, but not myosin IIB, suggests close spatial proximity between α-catenin and myosin IIA during substrate stretching. This force-induced biotinylation diminished as myosin II activity was inhibited by blebbistatin. Taken together, this promising technique enables us to identify force sensitive complexes that may be essential for mechano-responses in force bearing cell adhesion. PMID:25806963

  18. The Under-Appreciated Promiscuity of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Family.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Sean P; Hastings, Jordan F; Han, Jeremy Z R; Croucher, David R

    2016-01-01

    Each member of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family plays a key role in normal development, homeostasis, and a variety of pathophysiological conditions, most notably in cancer. According to the prevailing dogma, these four receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs; EGFR, ERBB2, ERBB3, and ERBB4) function exclusively through the formation of homodimers and heterodimers within the EGFR family. These combinatorial receptor interactions are known to generate increased interactome diversity and therefore influence signaling output, subcellular localization and function of the heterodimer. This molecular plasticity is also thought to play a role in the development of resistance toward targeted cancer therapies aimed at these known oncogenes. Interestingly, many studies now challenge this dogma and suggest that the potential for EGFR family receptors to interact with more distantly related RTKs is much greater than currently appreciated. Here we discuss how the promiscuity of these oncogenic receptors may lead to the formation of many unexpected receptor pairings and the significant implications for the efficiency of many targeted cancer therapies. PMID:27597943

  19. Synthesis, characterization, hydrolase and catecholase activity of a dinuclear iron(III) complex: Catalytic promiscuity.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Tiago P; Maia, Fernanda F; Chaves, Cláudia; de Souza, Bernardo; Bortoluzzi, Adailton J; Castilho, Nathalia; Bortolotto, Tiago; Terenzi, Hernán; Castellano, Eduardo E; Haase, Wolfgang; Tomkowicz, Zbigniew; Peralta, Rosely A; Neves, Ademir

    2015-05-01

    Herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of the new di-iron(III) complex [(bbpmp)(H2O)(Cl)Fe(III)(μ-Ophenoxo)Fe(III)(H2O)Cl)]Cl (1), with the symmetrical ligand 2,6-bis{[(2-hydroxybenzyl)(pyridin-2-yl)methylamino]methyl}-4-methylphenol (H3bbpmp). Complexes 2 with the unsymmetrical ligand H2bpbpmp - {2-[[(2-hydroxybenzyl)(2-pyridylmethyl)]aminomethyl]-6-bis(pyridylmethyl) aminomethyl}-4-methylphenol and 3 with the ligand L(1)=4,11-dimethyl-1,8-bis{2-[N-(di-2-pyridylmethyl)amino]ethyl}cyclam were included for comparison purposes. Complex 1 was characterized through elemental analysis, X-ray crystallography, magnetochemistry, electronic spectroscopy, electrochemistry, mass spectrometry and potentiometric titration. The magnetic data show a very weak antiferromagnetic coupling between the two iron centers of the dinuclear complex 1 (J=-0.29cm(-1)). Due to the presence of labile coordination sites in both iron centers the hydrolysis of both the diester model substrate 2,4-BDNPP and DNA was studied in detail. Complex 1 was also able to catalyze the oxidation of the substrate 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol (3,5-DTBC) to give the corresponding quinone, and thus it can be considered as a catalytically promiscuous system. PMID:25792035

  20. The Under-Appreciated Promiscuity of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Family

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Sean P.; Hastings, Jordan F.; Han, Jeremy Z. R.; Croucher, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Each member of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family plays a key role in normal development, homeostasis, and a variety of pathophysiological conditions, most notably in cancer. According to the prevailing dogma, these four receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs; EGFR, ERBB2, ERBB3, and ERBB4) function exclusively through the formation of homodimers and heterodimers within the EGFR family. These combinatorial receptor interactions are known to generate increased interactome diversity and therefore influence signaling output, subcellular localization and function of the heterodimer. This molecular plasticity is also thought to play a role in the development of resistance toward targeted cancer therapies aimed at these known oncogenes. Interestingly, many studies now challenge this dogma and suggest that the potential for EGFR family receptors to interact with more distantly related RTKs is much greater than currently appreciated. Here we discuss how the promiscuity of these oncogenic receptors may lead to the formation of many unexpected receptor pairings and the significant implications for the efficiency of many targeted cancer therapies. PMID:27597943

  1. Promiscuous and specific bacterial symbiont acquisition in the amoeboid genus Nuclearia (Opisthokonta).

    PubMed

    Dirren, Sebastian; Posch, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    We isolated 17 strains of the amoeboid genus Nuclearia (Opisthokonta) from five Swiss lakes. Eight of these nucleariid isolates were associated with bacterial endosymbionts and/or ectosymbionts. Amoebae were characterized morphologically and by their 18S rRNA genes. Phylogeny based on molecular data resulted in four established monophyletic branches and two new clusters. A heterogeneous picture emerged by highlighting nucleariids with associated bacteria. Apart from one cluster which consisted of only isolates with and three groups of amoebae without symbionts, we also found mixed clusters. The picture got even more 'blurred' by regarding the phylogeny of symbiotic bacteria. Although seven different bacterial strains could be identified, it seems that we still are only scratching the surface of symbionts' diversity. Furthermore, types of symbioses might be different depending on host species. Strains of Nuclearia thermophila harboured the same endosymbiont even when isolated from different lakes. This pointed to a specific and obligate interaction. However, two isolates of N. delicatula were associated with different endosymbiotic bacteria. Here the symbiont acquisition seemed to be rather promiscuous. This behaviour regarding symbiotic associations is especially remarkable considering the phylogenetic position of these basal opisthokonts. PMID:27199347

  2. Natural Diversity of Frankia Strains in Actinorhizal Root Nodules from Promiscuous Hosts in the Family Myricaceae

    PubMed Central

    Clawson, Michael L.; Benson, David R.

    1999-01-01

    Actinorhizal plants invade nitrogen-poor soils because of their ability to form root nodule symbioses with N2-fixing actinomycetes known as Frankia. Frankia strains are difficult to isolate, so the diversity of strains inhabiting nodules in nature is not known. To address this problem, we have used the variability in bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences amplified from root nodules as a means to estimate molecular diversity. Nodules were collected from 96 sites primarily in northeastern North America; each site contained one of three species of the family Myricaceae. Plants in this family are considered to be promiscuous hosts because several species are effectively nodulated by most isolated strains of Frankia in the greenhouse. We found that strain evenness varies greatly between the plant species so that estimating total strain richness of Frankia within myricaceous nodules with the sample size used was problematical. Nevertheless, Myrica pensylvanica, the common bayberry, was found to have sufficient diversity to serve as a reservoir host for Frankia strains that infect plants from other actinorhizal families. Myrica gale, sweet gale, yielded a few dominant sequences, indicating either symbiont specialization or niche selection of particular ecotypes. Strains in Comptonia peregrina nodules had an intermediate level of diversity and were all from a single major group of Frankia. PMID:10508084

  3. Probing the promiscuity of ent-kaurene oxidases via combinatorial biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Mafu, Sibongile; Jia, Meirong; Zi, Jiachen; Morrone, Dana; Wu, Yisheng; Xu, Meimei; Hillwig, Matthew L; Peters, Reuben J

    2016-03-01

    The substrate specificity of enzymes from natural products' metabolism is a topic of considerable interest, with potential biotechnological use implicit in the discovery of promiscuous enzymes. However, such studies are often limited by the availability of substrates and authentic standards for identification of the resulting products. Here, a modular metabolic engineering system is used in a combinatorial biosynthetic approach toward alleviating this restriction. In particular, for studies of the multiply reactive cytochrome P450, ent-kaurene oxidase (KO), which is involved in production of the diterpenoid plant hormone gibberellin. Many, but not all, plants make a variety of related diterpenes, whose structural similarity to ent-kaurene makes them potential substrates for KO. Use of combinatorial biosynthesis enabled analysis of more than 20 such potential substrates, as well as structural characterization of 12 resulting unknown products, providing some insight into the underlying structure-function relationships. These results highlight the utility of this approach for investigating the substrate specificity of enzymes from complex natural products' biosynthesis. PMID:26884192

  4. Promiscuous Gene Expression in the Thymus: A Matter of Epigenetics, miRNA, and More?

    PubMed Central

    Ucar, Olga; Rattay, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    The induction of central tolerance in the course of T cell development crucially depends on promiscuous gene expression (pGE) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). mTECs express a genome-wide variety of tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs), preventing the escape of autoreactive T cells to the periphery, and the development of severe autoimmunity. Most of our knowledge of how pGE is controlled comes from studies on the autoimmune regulator (Aire). Aire activates the expression of a large subset of TRAs by interacting with the general transcriptional machinery and promoting transcript elongation. However, further factors regulating Aire-independent TRAs must be at play. Recent studies demonstrated that pGE in general and the function of Aire in particular are controlled by epigenetic and post-transcriptional mechanisms. This mini-review summarizes current knowledge of the regulation of pGE by miRNA and epigenetic regulatory mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, and chromosomal topology. PMID:25784915

  5. AIDS and the stigma of sexual promiscuity: Thai nurses' risk perceptions of occupational exposure to HIV.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kit Yee; Rungpueng, Arattha; Reidpath, Daniel D

    2009-05-01

    This paper examines the culturally shaped meanings of AIDS and perceptions of accidental occupational exposure to HIV among a group of twenty nurses in Bangkok, Thailand. The findings are based on data collected as a part of a larger mixed-methods study that examined how perceptions of risk behaviours (including sexual promiscuity) shape health workers' perceptions of patients living with HIV/AIDS. Nurses' narratives revealed that despite acknowledgement of the low probability of occupational exposure to HIV, the fear of HIV infection remained and was largely driven by the enormity of the anticipated social (rather than the health) consequences of being HIV-positive. The perceived certainty of social ostracism was reinforced by participants' observations of the social rejection experienced by people living with HIV/AIDS both within and outside clinical settings. For female nurses, the dominant social perception that women living with HIV/AIDS were violators of gender norms, and thus 'guilty' victims, was an issue central to their self-identities. Ways of improving care for people living with HIV in the light of the nurses' concerns and future research are discussed. PMID:19263260

  6. Disorder, Promiscuous Interactions, and Stochasticity Regulate State Switching in the Unstable Prostate.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Prakash; Getzenberg, Robert H

    2016-10-01

    A causal link between benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer has long been suspected but not widely accepted. A new model is proposed that supports such a connection. In contrast to the prevailing wisdom, our model, that draws on dynamical systems theory, suggests that in response to stress, epithelial cells in the unstable gland can give rise to both types of diseases via a phenotypic switching mechanism. The central idea is that phenotypic switching is a stochastic process which exploits the plasticity of the epithelial cell. It is driven by 'noise' contributed by the conformational dynamics of proteins that are intrinsically disordered. In a system that is noisy when stressed, disorder promotes promiscuity, unmasks latent information, and rewires the network to cause phenotypic switching. Cells with newly acquired phenotypes can transcend the traditional zonal boundaries to give rise to BPH or prostate cancer depending on the microenvironment. Establishing causality between the two diseases may provide us with an opportunity to better understand their etiology and guide prevention and treatment strategies. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2235-2240, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27152744

  7. NSP-Cas protein structures reveal a promiscuous interaction module in cell signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, P.D.; Robinson, H.; Wallez, Y.; Dobaczewska, M. K.; Lee, J. J.; Pasquale, E. B.; Riedl, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Members of the novel SH2-containing protein (NSP) and Crk-associated substrate (Cas) protein families form multidomain signaling platforms that mediate cell migration and invasion through a collection of distinct signaling motifs. Members of each family interact via their respective C-terminal domains, but the mechanism of this association has remained enigmatic. Here we present the crystal structures of the C-terminal domain from the NSP protein BCAR3 and the complex of NSP3 with p130Cas. BCAR3 adopts the Cdc25-homology fold of Ras GTPase exchange factors, but it has a 'closed' conformation incapable of enzymatic activity. The structure of the NSP3-p130Cas complex reveals that this closed conformation is instrumental for interaction of NSP proteins with a focal adhesion-targeting domain present in Cas proteins. This enzyme-to-adaptor conversion enables high-affinity, yet promiscuous, interactions between NSP and Cas proteins and represents an unprecedented mechanistic paradigm linking cellular signaling networks.

  8. Probing the Catalytic Promiscuity of a Regio- and Stereospecific C-Glycosyltransferase from Mangifera indica.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dawei; Chen, Ridao; Wang, Ruishan; Li, Jianhua; Xie, Kebo; Bian, Chuancai; Sun, Lili; Zhang, Xiaolin; Liu, Jimei; Yang, Lin; Ye, Fei; Yu, Xiaoming; Dai, Jungui

    2015-10-19

    The catalytic promiscuity of the novel benzophenone C-glycosyltransferase, MiCGT, which is involved in the biosynthesis of mangiferin from Mangifera indica, was explored. MiCGT exhibited a robust capability to regio- and stereospecific C-glycosylation of 35 structurally diverse druglike scaffolds and simple phenolics with UDP-glucose, and also formed O- and N-glycosides. Moreover, MiCGT was able to generate C-xylosides with UDP-xylose. The OGT-reversibility of MiCGT was also exploited to generate C-glucosides with simple sugar donor. Three aryl-C-glycosides exhibited potent SGLT2 inhibitory activities with IC50  values of 2.6×, 7.6×, and 7.6×10(-7)  M, respectively. These findings demonstrate for the first time the significant potential of an enzymatic approach to diversification through C-glycosidation of bioactive natural and unnatural products in drug discovery. PMID:26331569

  9. Reprogramming acyl carrier protein interactions of an acyl-CoA promiscuous trans-acyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhixia; Musiol, Ewa M; Weber, Tilmann; Williams, Gavin J

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Protein interactions between acyl carrier proteins (ACP’s) and trans-acting acyltransferase domains (trans-AT’s) are critical for regioselective extender unit installation by many polyketide synthases. Yet, little is known regarding the specificity of these interactions, particularly for trans-AT’s with unusual extender unit specificities. Currently, the best-studied trans-AT with non-malonyl specificity is KirCII from kirromycin biosynthesis. Here, we developed a new assay to probe ACP interactions based on leveraging the extender unit promiscuity of KirCII. The assay allows us to identify residues on the ACP surface that contribute to specific recognition by KirCII. This information proved sufficient to modify a non-cognate ACP from a different biosynthetic system to be a substrate for KirCII. The findings form a foundation for further understanding the specificity of trans-AT:ACP protein interactions, and for engineering modular polyketide synthases to produce analogues. PMID:24726832

  10. A promiscuous biotin ligase fusion protein identifies proximal and interacting proteins in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Roux, Kyle J; Kim, Dae In; Raida, Manfred; Burke, Brian

    2012-03-19

    We have developed a new technique for proximity-dependent labeling of proteins in eukaryotic cells. Named BioID for proximity-dependent biotin identification, this approach is based on fusion of a promiscuous Escherichia coli biotin protein ligase to a targeting protein. BioID features proximity-dependent biotinylation of proteins that are near-neighbors of the fusion protein. Biotinylated proteins may be isolated by affinity capture and identified by mass spectrometry. We apply BioID to lamin-A (LaA), a well-characterized intermediate filament protein that is a constituent of the nuclear lamina, an important structural element of the nuclear envelope (NE). We identify multiple proteins that associate with and/or are proximate to LaA in vivo. The most abundant of these include known interactors of LaA that are localized to the NE, as well as a new NE-associated protein named SLAP75. Our results suggest BioID is a useful and generally applicable method to screen for both interacting and neighboring proteins in their native cellular environment. PMID:22412018