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Sample records for promising therapeutic target

  1. Promising therapeutic targets in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Matthay, Katherine K; George, Rani E; Yu, Alice L

    2012-05-15

    Neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid tumor in children, is derived from neural crest cells. Nearly half of patients present with metastatic disease and have a 5-year event-free survival of <50%. New approaches with targeted therapy may improve efficacy without increased toxicity. In this review we evaluate 3 promising targeted therapies: (i) (131)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), a radiopharmaceutical that is taken up by human norepinephrine transporter (hNET), which is expressed in 90% of neuroblastomas; (ii) immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies targeting the GD2 ganglioside, which is expressed on 98% of neuroblastoma cells; and (iii) inhibitors of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), a tyrosine kinase that is mutated or amplified in ~10% of neuroblastomas and expressed on the surface of most neuroblastoma cells. Early-phase trials have confirmed the activity of (131)I-MIBG in relapsed neuroblastoma, with response rates of ~30%, but the technical aspects of administering large amounts of radioactivity in young children and limited access to this agent have hindered its incorporation into treatment of newly diagnosed patients. Anti-GD2 antibodies have also shown activity in relapsed disease, and a recent phase III randomized trial showed a significant improvement in event-free survival for patients receiving chimeric anti-GD2 (ch14.18) combined with cytokines and isotretinoin after myeloablative consolidation therapy. A recently approved small-molecule inhibitor of ALK has shown promising preclinical activity for neuroblastoma and is currently in phase I and II trials. This is the first agent directed to a specific mutation in neuroblastoma, and marks a new step toward personalized therapy for neuroblastoma. Further clinical development of targeted treatments offers new hope for children with neuroblastoma. PMID:22589483

  2. Promising therapeutic targets in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Matthay, Katherine K.; George, Rani E.; Yu, Alice L.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, the most common extra- cranial solid tumor in children, is derived from neural crest cells. Nearly half of patients present with metastatic disease, and have 5-year EFS of less than 50%. New approaches with targeted therapy may improve efficacy without increased toxicity. The current review will evaluate three promising targeted therapies, including 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), a radiopharmaceutical taken up by the human norepinephrine transporter expressed in 90% of neuroblastomas, immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies targeting the GD2 ganglioside, expressed on 98% of neuroblastoma cells, and inhibitors of ALK, a tyrosine kinase which is mutated or amplified in approximately 10% of neuroblastoma and expressed on the surface of most neuroblastoma cells. Early phase trials have confirmed the activity of 131I-MIBG in relapsed neuroblastoma, with response rates of about 30%, but the technical aspects of administration of large amounts of radioactivity in young children and the limited access have hindered incorporation into treatment of newly diagnosed patients. Anti-GD2 antibodies have also demonstrated activity in relapsed disease, and a recent phase III randomized trial showed a significant improvement in event-free survival for patients receiving chimeric anti-GD2 (ch14.18) combined with cytokines and isotretinoin after myeloablative consolidation therapy. A recently approved small molecule inhibitor of ALK has promising pre-clinical activity for neuroblastoma, and is currently in phase I and II trials. This is the first agent directed to a specific mutation in neuroblastoma, and marks a new step toward personalized therapy for neuroblastoma. Further clinical development of targeted treatments offers new hope for children with neuroblastoma. PMID:22589483

  3. Interferon-γ: Promising therapeutic target in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Joe WE; Ramji, Dipak P

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the vasculature and is the primary cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD). CVD is currently the world’s leading cause of death and the numbers are predicted to rise further because of a global increase in risk factors such as diabetes and obesity. Current therapies such as statins have had a major impact in reducing mortality from CVD. However, there is a marked residual CVD risk in patients on statin therapy. It is therefore important to understand the molecular basis of this disease in detail and to develop alternative novel therapeutics. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that is often regarded as a master regulator of atherosclerosis development. IFN-γ is able to influence several key steps during atherosclerosis development, including pro-inflammatory gene expression, the recruitment of monocytes from the blood to the activated arterial endothelium and plaque stability. This central role of IFN-γ makes it a promising therapeutic target. The purpose of this editorial is to describe the key role IFN-γ plays during atherosclerosis development, as well as discuss potential strategies to target it therapeutically. PMID:26309816

  4. Epigenetic regulators as promising therapeutic targets in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gallipoli, Paolo; Giotopoulos, George

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the most prevalent acute leukemia in adults, is an aggressive hematological malignancy arising in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. With the exception of a few specific AML subtypes, the mainstays of treatment have not significantly changed over the last 20 years, and are still based on standard cytotoxic chemotherapy. As a result, clinical outcome remains poor for the majority of patients, with overall long-term survival in the region of 20–30%. Recent successes in characterizing the genetic landscape of AML have highlighted that, despite its heterogeneity, many cases of AML carry recurrent mutations in genes encoding epigenetic regulators. Transcriptional dysregulation and altered epigenetic function have therefore emerged as exciting areas in AML research and it is becoming increasingly clear that epigenetic dysfunction is central to leukemogenesis in AML. This has subsequently paved the way for the development of epigenetically targeted therapies. In this review, we will discuss the most recent advances in our understanding of the role of epigenetic dysregulation in AML pathobiology. We will particularly focus on those altered epigenetic programs that have been shown to be central to the development and maintenance of AML in preclinical models. We will discuss the recent development of therapeutics specifically targeting these key epigenetic programs in AML, describe their mechanism of action and present their current clinical development. Finally, we will discuss the opportunities presented by epigenetically targeted therapy in AML and will highlight future challenges ahead for the AML community, to ensure that these novel therapeutics are optimally translated into clinical practice and result in clinical improvement for AML patients. PMID:26137202

  5. EZH2 in Bladder Cancer, a Promising Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Fernández, Mónica; Rubio, Carolina; Segovia, Cristina; López-Calderón, Fernando F.; Dueñas, Marta; Paramio, Jesús M.

    2015-01-01

    Bladder Cancer (BC) represents a current clinical and social challenge. The recent studies aimed to describe the genomic landscape of BC have underscored the relevance of epigenetic alterations in the pathogenesis of these tumors. Among the epigenetic alterations, histone modifications occupied a central role not only in cancer, but also in normal organism homeostasis and development. EZH2 (Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2) belongs to the Polycomb repressive complex 2 as its catalytic subunit, which through the trimethylation of H3 (Histone 3) on K27 (Lysine 27), produces gene silencing. EZH2 is frequently overexpressed in multiple tumor types, including BC, and plays multiple roles besides the well-recognized histone mark generation. In this review, we summarize the present knowledge on the oncogenic roles of EZH2 and its potential use as a therapeutic target, with special emphasis on BC pathogenesis and management. PMID:26580594

  6. Hippocampal Area CA2: An Overlooked but Promising Therapeutic Target.

    PubMed

    Chevaleyre, Vivien; Piskorowski, Rebecca A

    2016-08-01

    While the hippocampus has long been recognized as a brain structure specialized in mapping 'space' in rodents, human studies and now recent data from rodents have shown that its function extends well beyond spatial coding. Recently, an overlooked area of the hippocampus, CA2, has emerged as a critical region for social memory. This area is also uniquely altered during several pathologies such as schizophrenia and age-related dementia. Because of its singular connectivity, we propose that area CA2 resides at the interface between emotional brain activity and higher cognitive function. Furthermore, because of the unique expression of multiple neuromodulator receptors in area CA2, we posit that this region may represent a fruitful therapeutic target for diseases where social dysfunction occurs. PMID:27372610

  7. Targeting Notch degradation system provides promise for breast cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Shen, Jia-Xin; Wen, Xiao-Fen; Guo, Yu-Xian; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Notch receptor signaling pathways play an important role, not only in normal breast development but also in breast cancer development and progression. As a group of ligand-induced proteins, different subtypes of mammalian Notch (Notch1-4) are sensitive to subtle changes in protein levels. Thus, a clear understanding of mechanisms of Notch protein turnover is essential for understanding normal and pathological mechanisms of Notch functions. It has been suggested that there is a close relationship between the carcinogenesis and the dysregulation of Notch degradation. However, this relationship remains mostly undefined in the context of breast cancer, as protein degradation is mediated by numerous signaling pathways as well as certain molecule modulators (activators/inhibitors). In this review, we summarize the published data regarding the regulation of Notch family member degradation in breast cancer, while emphasizing areas that are likely to provide new therapeutic modalities for mechanism-based anti-cancer drugs. PMID:27263934

  8. Targeting hydrogen sulfide as a promising therapeutic strategy for atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Suowen; Liu, Zhiping; Liu, Peiqing

    2014-03-15

    Physiological concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) have multiple protective effects in the cardiovascular system. Recent studies have implicated hydrogen sulfide (H2S) as a new member of vasculoprotective gasotransmitter family, behaving similarly to NO and CO. H2S has been demonstrated to inhibit multiple key aspects of atherosclerosis, including atherogenic modification of LDL, monocytes adhesion to the endothelial cells, macrophage-derived foam cell formation and inflammation, smooth muscle cell proliferation, neointimal hyperplasia, vascular calcification, and thrombogenesis. H2S also decreases plasma homocysteine levels in experimental animal models. In the human body, H2S production is predominantly catalyzed by cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE). CSE is the primary H2S-producing enzyme in the vasculature. Growing evidence suggests that atherosclerosis is associated with vascular CSE/H2S deficiency and that H2S supplementation by exogenous H2S donors (such as NaHS and GYY4137) attenuates, and H2S synthesis suppression by inhibitors (such as D, L-propargylglycine) aggravates the development of atherosclerotic plaques. However, it remains elusive whether CSE deficiency plays a causative role in atherosclerosis. A recent study (Circulation. 2013; 127: 2523-2534) demonstrates that decreased endogenous H2S production by CSE genetic deletion accelerates atherosclerosis in athero-prone ApoE-/- mice, pinpointing that endogenously produced H2S by CSE activation may be of benefit in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. This study will facilitate the development of H2S-based pharmaceuticals with therapeutic applications in atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24491853

  9. Does phosphodiesterase 11A (PDE11A) hold promise as a future therapeutic target?

    PubMed

    Kelly, Michy P

    2015-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase 11A (PDE11A) is the most recently discovered 3', 5'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase. By breaking down both cAMP and cGMP, PDE11A is a critical regulator of intracellular signaling. To date, PDE11A has been implicated to play a role in tumorigenesis, brain function, and inflammation. Here, we consolidate and, where necessary, reconcile the PDE11A literature to evaluate this enzyme as a potential therapeutic target. We compare the results and methodologies of numerous studies that report conflicting tissue expression profiles for PDE11A. We conclude that PDE11A expression is relatively restricted in the body, with reliable expression reported in tissues such as the brain (particularly the hippocampus), the prostate, and the adrenal gland. Each of the four PDE11A splice variants (PDE11A1-4) appears to exhibit a distinct tissue expression profile and has a unique N-terminal regulatory region, suggesting that each isoform could be individually targeted with a small molecule or biologic. Progress has been made in identifying a tool PDE11A inhibitor as well as an activator; however, the functional effects of these pharmacological tools remain to be determined. Importantly, PDE11A knockout mice do exist and appear healthy into late age, suggesting a potential safety window for targeting this enzyme. Considering the implication of PDE11A in disease-relevant biology, the potential to selectively target specific PDE11A variants, and the possibility of either activating or inhibiting the enzyme, we believe PDE11A holds promise as a potential future therapeutic target. PMID:25159071

  10. Flavones Inhibit the Activity of AKR1B10, a Promising Therapeutic Target for Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Zemanova, Lucie; Hofman, Jakub; Novotna, Eva; Musilek, Kamil; Lundova, Tereza; Havrankova, Jana; Hostalkova, Anna; Chlebek, Jakub; Cahlikova, Lucie; Wsol, Vladimír

    2015-11-25

    AKR1B10 is an NADPH-dependent reductase that plays an important function in several physiological reactions such as the conversion of retinal to retinol, reduction of isoprenyl aldehydes, and biotransformation of procarcinogens and drugs. A growing body of evidence points to the important role of the enzyme in the development of several types of cancer (e.g., breast, hepatocellular), in which it is highly overexpressed. AKR1B10 is regarded as a therapeutic target for the treatment of these diseases, and potent and specific inhibitors may be promising therapeutic agents. Several inhibitors of AKR1B10 have been described, but the area of natural plant products has been investigated sparingly. In the present study almost 40 diverse phenolic compounds and alkaloids were examined for their ability to inhibit the recombinant AKR1B10 enzyme. The most potent inhibitors-apigenin, luteolin, and 7-hydroxyflavone-were further characterized in terms of IC50, selectivity, and mode of action. Molecular docking studies were also conducted, which identified putative binding residues important for the interaction. In addition, cellular studies demonstrated a significant inhibition of the AKR1B10-mediated reduction of daunorubicin in intact cells by these inhibitors without a considerable cytotoxic effect. Although these compounds are moderately potent and selective inhibitors of AKR1B10, they constitute a new structural type of AKR1B10 inhibitor and may serve as a template for the development of better inhibitors. PMID:26529431

  11. Mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening as a promising therapeutic target in cardiac diseases.

    PubMed

    Javadov, Sabzali; Karmazyn, Morris; Escobales, Nelson

    2009-09-01

    In addition to their central role in ATP synthesis, mitochondria play a critical role in cell death. Oxidative stress accompanied by calcium overload, ATP depletion, and elevated phosphate levels induces mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) with formation of nonspecific MPT pores (MPTP) in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Pore opening results in mitochondrial dysfunction with uncoupled oxidative phosphorylation and ATP hydrolysis, ultimately leading to cell death. For the past 20 years, three proteins have been accepted as key structural components of the MPTP: adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) in the inner membrane, cyclophilin D (CyP-D) in the matrix, and the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) in the outer membrane. However, most recent studies have questioned the molecular identity of the pores. Genetic studies have eliminated the VDAC as an essential component of MPTP and attributed a regulatory (rather than structural) role to ANT. Currently, the phosphate carrier appears to play a crucial role in MPTP formation. MPTP opening has been examined extensively in cardiac pathological conditions, including ischemia/reperfusion as well as heart failure. Accordingly, MPTP is accepted as a therapeutic target for both pharmacological and conditional strategies to block pore formation by direct interaction with MPTP components or indirectly by decreasing MPTP inducers. Inhibition of MPTP opening by reduction of CyP-D activity by nonimmunosuppressive analogs of cyclosporine A or sanglifehrin A, as well as attenuation of reactive oxygen species accumulation through mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, is the most promising. This review outlines our current knowledge of the structure and function of the MPTP and describes possible approaches for cardioprotection. PMID:19509316

  12. Complement therapeutics in inflammatory diseases: promising drug candidates for C3-targeted intervention.

    PubMed

    Mastellos, D C; Ricklin, D; Hajishengallis, E; Hajishengallis, G; Lambris, J D

    2016-02-01

    There is increasing appreciation that complement dysregulation lies at the heart of numerous immune-mediated and inflammatory disorders. Complement inhibitors are therefore being evaluated as new therapeutic options in various clinical translation programs and the first clinically approved complement-targeted drugs have profoundly impacted the management of certain complement-mediated diseases. Among the many members of the intricate protein network of complement, the central component C3 represents a 'hot-spot' for complement-targeted therapeutic intervention. C3 modulates both innate and adaptive immune responses and is linked to diverse immunomodulatory systems and biological processes that affect human pathophysiology. Compelling evidence from preclinical disease models has shown that C3 interception may offer multiple benefits over existing therapies or even reveal novel therapeutic avenues in disorders that are not commonly regarded as complement-driven, such as periodontal disease. Using the clinically developed compstatin family of C3 inhibitors and periodontitis as illustrative examples, this review highlights emerging therapeutic concepts and developments in the design of C3-targeted drug candidates as novel immunotherapeutics for oral and systemic inflammatory diseases. PMID:26332138

  13. Hepcidin: A Promising Therapeutic Target for Iron Disorders: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Sun, Bingbing; Yin, Huijun; Liu, Sijin

    2016-04-01

    Iron is required for most forms of organisms, and it is the most essential element for the functions of many iron-containing proteins involved in oxygen transport, cellular respiration, DNA replication, and so on. Disorders of iron metabolism are associated with diverse diseases, including anemias (e.g., iron-deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic diseases) and iron overload diseases, such as hereditary hemochromatosis and β-thalassemia. Hepcidin (encoded by Hamp gene) is a peptide hormone synthesized by hepatocytes, and it plays an important role in regulating the systematic iron homeostasis. As the systemic iron regulator, hepcidin, not only controls dietary iron absorption and iron egress out of iron storage cells, but also induces iron redistribution in various organs. Deregulated hepcidin is often seen in a variety of iron-related diseases including anemias and iron overload disorders. In the case of iron overload disorders (e.g., hereditary hemochromatosis and β-thalassemia), hepatic hepcidin concentration is significantly reduced.Since hepcidin deregulation is responsible for iron disorder-associated diseases, the purpose of this review is to summarize the recent findings on therapeutics targeting hepcidin.Continuous efforts have been made to search for hepcidin mimics and chemical compounds that could be used to increase hepcidin level. Here, a literature search was conducted in PubMed, and research papers relevant to hepcidin regulation or hepcidin-centered therapeutic work were reviewed. On the basis of literature search, we recapitulated recent findings on therapeutic studies targeting hepcidin, including agonists and antagonists to modulate hepcidin expression or its downstream signaling. We also discussed the molecular mechanisms by which hepcidin level and iron metabolism are modulated.Elevating hepcidin concentration is an optimal strategy to ameliorate iron overload diseases, and also to relieve β-thalassemia phenotypes by improving ineffective

  14. New perspective on molecular markers as promising therapeutic targets in germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Chieffi, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) are the most frequent solid malignant tumors in men 20-40 years of age and the most frequent cause of death from solid tumors in this age group. TGCTs comprise two major histologic groups: seminomas and non-seminomas germ cell tumors (NSGCTs). NSGCTs can be further divided into embryonal carcinoma, Teratoma, yolk sac tumor, and choriocarcinoma. Seminomas and NSGCTs present significant differences in clinical features, therapy, and prognosis, and both show characteristics of the Primordial Germ Cells (PGCs). Many discovered biomarkers including HMGA1, GPR30, Aurora-B, estrogen receptor β, and others have given further advantages to discriminate between histological subgroups and could represent useful therapeutic targets. PMID:27195201

  15. New perspective on molecular markers as promising therapeutic targets in germ cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chieffi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) are the most frequent solid malignant tumors in men 20–40 years of age and the most frequent cause of death from solid tumors in this age group. TGCTs comprise two major histologic groups: seminomas and non-seminomas germ cell tumors (NSGCTs). NSGCTs can be further divided into embryonal carcinoma, Teratoma, yolk sac tumor, and choriocarcinoma. Seminomas and NSGCTs present significant differences in clinical features, therapy, and prognosis, and both show characteristics of the Primordial Germ Cells (PGCs). Many discovered biomarkers including HMGA1, GPR30, Aurora-B, estrogen receptor β, and others have given further advantages to discriminate between histological subgroups and could represent useful therapeutic targets. PMID:27195201

  16. Nicotinamide Mononucleotide Adenylyl Transferase 2: A Promising Diagnostic and Therapeutic Target for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Chunhui; Qi, Jia; Deng, Quanwen; Chen, Rihong; Zhai, Duanyang; Yu, Jinlong

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers all over the world. It is essential to search for more effective diagnostic and therapeutic methods for CRC. Abnormal nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) metabolism has been considered as a characteristic of cancer cells. In this study, nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferases (NMNATs) as well as p53-mediated cancer signaling pathways were investigated in patients with colorectal cancer. The CRC tissues and adjacent normal tissues were obtained from 95 untreated colorectal cancer patients and were stained for expression of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferase 2 (NMNAT2) and p53. The survival rate was analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test. The multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was conducted as well. Our data demonstrated that expression of NMNAT2 and p53 was significantly higher in CRC tissues, while NMNAT2 expression is in correlation with the invasive depth of tumors and TNM stage. Significant positive correlation was found between the expression of NMNAT2 and the expression of p53. However, NMNAT2 expression was not a statistically significant prognostic factor for overall survival. In conclusion, our results indicated that NMNAT2 might participate in tumorigenesis of CRC in a p53-dependent manner and NMNAT2 expression might be a potential therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:27218101

  17. Mammalian Antimicrobial Peptides: Promising Therapeutic Targets Against Infection and Chronic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Pujarini; Das, Santasabuj

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are integral components of the host innate immune system and functional throughout the plant and animal kingdoms. AMPs are short cationic molecules and lethal against a wide range of bacteria, viruses, fungi, yeast and protozoa due to their membranolytic effects on the negatively-charged microbial membranes. In addition, they exert multiple immunomodulatory roles like chemotaxis, modulation of cytokine and chemokine expression, leukocyte activation etc. Since AMPs suffer loss of microbicidal properties under serum and tissue environments, their capacity to modulate the immune system may predominates under the physiological conditions. Discovery of new antibiotics is lagging far behind the rapidly spreading drug resistance among the microorganisms. Both natural and synthetic AMPs have shown promise as 'next generation antibiotics' due to their unique mode of action, which minimises the chance of development of microbial resistance. In addition, they have therapeutic potential against non-infectious diseases like chronic inflammation and cancer. Many of the synthetic AMPs are currently undergoing clinical trials for the treatment of debilitating diseases, such as catheter-related infections, diabetic foot ulcers, chemotherapy-associated infections etc. Some of them have already entered the market as topical preparations. In this review, we synopsise the current literature of natural and synthetic AMPs in different infectious and inflammatory diseases of human microfloral habitats, especially the gastrointestinal, respiratory and genitourinary tracts and the skin. We also discuss the classification of AMPs, their mode action and antimicrobial spectrum, including the pathogen evasion mechanisms. In short, we tried to present the locus standi of AMPs in relation to human diseases and highlight the most promising synthetic peptides emerging from the clinical trials. Finally, we focused on the limitations and hurdles in terms of cost of

  18. Structural basis for selective targeting of leishmanial ribosomes: aminoglycoside derivatives as promising therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Shalev, Moran; Rozenberg, Haim; Smolkin, Boris; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Kopelyanskiy, Dmitry; Belakhov, Valery; Schrepfer, Thomas; Schacht, Jochen; Jaffe, Charles L.; Adir, Noam; Baasov, Timor

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis comprises an array of diseases caused by pathogenic species of Leishmania, resulting in a spectrum of mild to life-threatening pathologies. Currently available therapies for leishmaniasis include a limited selection of drugs. This coupled with the rather fast emergence of parasite resistance, presents a dire public health concern. Paromomycin (PAR), a broad-spectrum aminoglycoside antibiotic, has been shown in recent years to be highly efficient in treating visceral leishmaniasis (VL)—the life-threatening form of the disease. While much focus has been given to exploration of PAR activities in bacteria, its mechanism of action in Leishmania has received relatively little scrutiny and has yet to be fully deciphered. In the present study we present an X-ray structure of PAR bound to rRNA model mimicking its leishmanial binding target, the ribosomal A-site. We also evaluate PAR inhibitory actions on leishmanial growth and ribosome function, as well as effects on auditory sensory cells, by comparing several structurally related natural and synthetic aminoglycoside derivatives. The results provide insights into the structural elements important for aminoglycoside inhibitory activities and selectivity for leishmanial cytosolic ribosomes, highlighting a novel synthetic derivative, compound 3, as a prospective therapeutic candidate for the treatment of VL. PMID:26264664

  19. Structural basis for selective targeting of leishmanial ribosomes: Aminoglycoside derivatives as promising therapeutics

    SciTech Connect

    Shalev, Moran; Rozenberg, Haim; Smolkin, Boris; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Kopelyanskiy, Dmitry; Belakhov, Valery; Schrepfer, Thomas; Schacht, Jochen; Jaffe, Charles L.; Adir, Noam; Baasov, Timor

    2015-08-11

    Leishmaniasis comprises an array of diseases caused by pathogenic species of Leishmania, resulting in a spectrum of mild to life-threatening pathologies. Currently available therapies for leishmaniasis include a limited selection of drugs. This coupled with the rather fast emergence of parasite resistance, presents a dire public health concern. Paromomycin (PAR), a broad-spectrum aminoglycoside antibiotic, has been shown in recent years to be highly efficient in treating visceral leishmaniasis (VL)—the life-threatening form of the disease. While much focus has been given to exploration of PAR activities in bacteria, its mechanism of action in Leishmania has received relatively little scrutiny and has yet to be fully deciphered. In the present study we present an X-ray structure of PAR bound to rRNA model mimicking its leishmanial binding target, the ribosomal A-site. We evaluate PAR inhibitory actions on leishmanial growth and ribosome function, as well as effects on auditory sensory cells, by comparing several structurally related natural and synthetic aminoglycoside derivatives. The results provide insights into the structural elements important for aminoglycoside inhibitory activities and selectivity for leishmanial cytosolic ribosomes, highlighting a novel synthetic derivative, compound 3, as a prospective therapeutic candidate for the treatment of VL.

  20. Structural basis for selective targeting of leishmanial ribosomes: Aminoglycoside derivatives as promising therapeutics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shalev, Moran; Rozenberg, Haim; Smolkin, Boris; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Kopelyanskiy, Dmitry; Belakhov, Valery; Schrepfer, Thomas; Schacht, Jochen; Jaffe, Charles L.; Adir, Noam; et al

    2015-08-11

    Leishmaniasis comprises an array of diseases caused by pathogenic species of Leishmania, resulting in a spectrum of mild to life-threatening pathologies. Currently available therapies for leishmaniasis include a limited selection of drugs. This coupled with the rather fast emergence of parasite resistance, presents a dire public health concern. Paromomycin (PAR), a broad-spectrum aminoglycoside antibiotic, has been shown in recent years to be highly efficient in treating visceral leishmaniasis (VL)—the life-threatening form of the disease. While much focus has been given to exploration of PAR activities in bacteria, its mechanism of action in Leishmania has received relatively little scrutiny and hasmore » yet to be fully deciphered. In the present study we present an X-ray structure of PAR bound to rRNA model mimicking its leishmanial binding target, the ribosomal A-site. We evaluate PAR inhibitory actions on leishmanial growth and ribosome function, as well as effects on auditory sensory cells, by comparing several structurally related natural and synthetic aminoglycoside derivatives. The results provide insights into the structural elements important for aminoglycoside inhibitory activities and selectivity for leishmanial cytosolic ribosomes, highlighting a novel synthetic derivative, compound 3, as a prospective therapeutic candidate for the treatment of VL.« less

  1. Structural basis for selective targeting of leishmanial ribosomes: aminoglycoside derivatives as promising therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Shalev, Moran; Rozenberg, Haim; Smolkin, Boris; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Kopelyanskiy, Dmitry; Belakhov, Valery; Schrepfer, Thomas; Schacht, Jochen; Jaffe, Charles L; Adir, Noam; Baasov, Timor

    2015-09-30

    Leishmaniasis comprises an array of diseases caused by pathogenic species of Leishmania, resulting in a spectrum of mild to life-threatening pathologies. Currently available therapies for leishmaniasis include a limited selection of drugs. This coupled with the rather fast emergence of parasite resistance, presents a dire public health concern. Paromomycin (PAR), a broad-spectrum aminoglycoside antibiotic, has been shown in recent years to be highly efficient in treating visceral leishmaniasis (VL)-the life-threatening form of the disease. While much focus has been given to exploration of PAR activities in bacteria, its mechanism of action in Leishmania has received relatively little scrutiny and has yet to be fully deciphered. In the present study we present an X-ray structure of PAR bound to rRNA model mimicking its leishmanial binding target, the ribosomal A-site. We also evaluate PAR inhibitory actions on leishmanial growth and ribosome function, as well as effects on auditory sensory cells, by comparing several structurally related natural and synthetic aminoglycoside derivatives. The results provide insights into the structural elements important for aminoglycoside inhibitory activities and selectivity for leishmanial cytosolic ribosomes, highlighting a novel synthetic derivative, compound 3: , as a prospective therapeutic candidate for the treatment of VL. PMID:26264664

  2. Aurora-A Kinase as a Promising Therapeutic Target in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    D’Assoro, Antonino B.; Haddad, Tufia; Galanis, Evanthia

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian Aurora family of serine/threonine kinases are master regulators of mitotic progression and are frequently overexpressed in human cancers. Among the three members of the Aurora kinase family (Aurora-A, -B, and -C), Aurora-A and Aurora-B are expressed at detectable levels in somatic cells undergoing mitotic cell division. Aberrant Aurora-A kinase activity has been implicated in oncogenic transformation through the development of chromosomal instability and tumor cell heterogeneity. Recent studies also reveal a novel non-mitotic role of Aurora-A activity in promoting tumor progression through activation of epithelial–mesenchymal transition reprograming resulting in the genesis of tumor-initiating cells. Therefore, Aurora-A kinase represents an attractive target for cancer therapeutics, and the development of small molecule inhibitors of Aurora-A oncogenic activity may improve the clinical outcomes of cancer patients. In the present review, we will discuss mitotic and non-mitotic functions of Aurora-A activity in oncogenic transformation and tumor progression. We will also review the current clinical studies, evaluating small molecule inhibitors of Aurora-A activity and their efficacy in the management of cancer patients. PMID:26779440

  3. Cytokines in atherosclerosis: Key players in all stages of disease and promising therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Ramji, Dipak P.; Davies, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disorder of the arteries, is responsible for most deaths in westernized societies with numbers increasing at a marked rate in developing countries. The disease is initiated by the activation of the endothelium by various risk factors leading to chemokine-mediated recruitment of immune cells. The uptake of modified lipoproteins by macrophages along with defective cholesterol efflux gives rise to foam cells associated with the fatty streak in the early phase of the disease. As the disease progresses, complex fibrotic plaques are produced as a result of lysis of foam cells, migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells and continued inflammatory response. Such plaques are stabilized by the extracellular matrix produced by smooth muscle cells and destabilized by matrix metalloproteinase from macrophages. Rupture of unstable plaques and subsequent thrombosis leads to clinical complications such as myocardial infarction. Cytokines are involved in all stages of atherosclerosis and have a profound influence on the pathogenesis of this disease. This review will describe our current understanding of the roles of different cytokines in atherosclerosis together with therapeutic approaches aimed at manipulating their actions. PMID:26005197

  4. Vaccinia Virus Virulence Factor N1L is a Novel Promising Target for Antiviral Therapeutic Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Cheltsov, Anton V.; Aoyagi, Mika; Aleshin, Alexander; Chi-Wang, Yu Eric; Gilliland, Taylor; Zhai, Dayong; Bobkov, Andrey A.; Reed, John C.; Liddington, Robert C.; Abagyan, Ruben

    2010-01-01

    The 14 kDa homodimeric N1L protein is a potent vaccinia and variola (smallpox) virulence factor. It is not essential for viral replication, but it causes a strong attenuation of viral production in culture when deleted. The N1L protein is predicted to contain the BH3-like binding domain characteristic of Bcl-2 family proteins, and it is able to bind the BH3 peptides. Its overexpression has been reported to prevent infected cells from committing apoptosis. Therefore, interfering with the N1L apoptotic blockade may be a legitimate therapeutic strategy affecting the viral growth. By using in silico ligand docking and an array of in vitro assays, we have identified sub-micromolar (600 nM) N1L antagonists, belonging to the family of polyphenols. Their affinity is comparable to that of the BH3 peptides (70 nM ÷ 1000 nM). We have also identified the natural polyphenol resveratrol as a moderate N1L inhibitor. Finally, we show that our ligands efficiently inhibit growth of vaccinia virus. PMID:20441222

  5. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha: A promising therapeutic target in endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Lei; Wang, Wenyan; Zhang, Yu; Song, Enxue; Fan, Yijun; Wei, Bing

    2016-04-01

    Endometriosis is a common gynecologic disease defined as the presence of ectopic endometrial tissues on the ovaries and pelvic peritoneum, and it is a significant cause of pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea and infertility of women in their reproductive age. However, the etiology of endometriosis remains obscure. In recent years, a growing body of evidence validated that hypoxia developed a close relationship with endometriosis and the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α) was increased significantly in the development of endometriosis. Furthermore, inhibiting the expression of HIF-1α contributed to suppress endometriosis progression, suggesting HIF-1α plays a critical function in endometriosis. Nevertheless, the mechanisms by which HIF-1α associates with endometriosis are still undefined. In this brief review, we had a general understanding of HIF-1α firstly, and then we tried to sum up the collective knowledge of HIF-1α in endometriosis. Finally, we will discuss kinds of novel therapeutic approaches to endometriosis based on the functions of HIF-1α. PMID:26898675

  6. The characterization, current medications, and promising therapeutics targets for premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Gur, S; Sikka, S C

    2015-05-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is the most prevalent male sexual dysfunction. This is associated with negative personal and interpersonal psychological outcomes. The pharmacologic treatment of PE includes the use of antidepressants, local anesthetic agents, and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. While numerous treatments can control PE, only antidepressants and topical anesthetic creams and sprays have recently been shown to be more effective. This review focuses on the physiology and pharmacology of ejaculation, the pathophysiology of PE and the most effective pharmacological treatment of PE. Pharmacotherapy of PE with off-label short-acting selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is common, effective, and safe. Dapoxetine, a SSRI with a short half-life, has been recently evaluated for the treatment of PE by several countries and results are promising. In clinical practice, follow-up side effects are an important part of the management strategy for PE. The understanding of etiology, pathophysiology, and treatment modalities of PE would be beneficial to clinician in helping patients with this disappointing sexual problem. PMID:25951512

  7. Small Molecule Activators of the Heat Shock Response: Chemical Properties, Molecular Targets, and Therapeutic Promise

    PubMed Central

    West, James D.; Wang, Yanyu; Morano, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    All cells have developed various mechanisms to respond and adapt to a variety of environmental challenges, including stresses that damage cellular proteins. One such response, the heat shock response (HSR), leads to the transcriptional activation of a family of molecular chaperone proteins that promote proper folding or clearance of damaged proteins within the cytosol. In addition to its role in protection against acute insults, the HSR also regulates lifespan and protects against protein misfolding that is associated with degenerative diseases of aging. As a result, identifying pharmacological regulators of the HSR has become an active area of research in recent years. Here, we review progress made in identifying small molecule activators of the HSR, what cellular targets these compounds interact with to drive response activation, and how such molecules may ultimately be employed to delay or reverse protein misfolding events that contribute to a number of diseases. PMID:22799889

  8. PI3K/Akt/mTOR: A promising therapeutic target for non-medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Petrulea, Mirela S; Plantinga, Theo S; Smit, Jan W; Georgescu, Carmen E; Netea-Maier, Romana T

    2015-09-01

    Thyroid carcinoma (TC) is the most common endocrine malignancy. The pathogenesis of TC is complex and involves multiple genetic events that lead to activation of oncogenic pathways such as the MAP kinase (MAPK) pathway and the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. The PI3K/Akt pathway has emerged as an important player in the pathogenesis of TC, particularly in follicular and advanced anaplastic or poorly differentiated TC. Because these patients have a poor prognosis, particularly when their tumors become resistant to the conventional treatment with radioactive iodine, efforts have been made to identify possible targets for therapy within these pathways. Orally available drugs targeting the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway are being used with success in treatment of several types of malignant tumors. There is an increasing amount of preclinical and clinical data supporting that this pathway may represent a promising target for systemic therapy in TC. The present review focuses on the most recent developments on the role of the PI3K/Akt pathway in the pathogenesis of non-medullary TC and will provide insight into how this pathway can be targeted either alone or in the context of multimodal therapeutic strategies for treatment of advanced TC. PMID:26138515

  9. MST1: a promising therapeutic target to restore functional beta cell mass in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ardestani, Amin; Maedler, Kathrin

    2016-09-01

    The loss of insulin-producing beta cells by apoptosis is a hallmark of all forms of diabetes mellitus. Strategies to prevent beta cell apoptosis and dysfunction are urgently needed to restore the insulin-producing cells and to prevent severe diabetes progression. We recently identified the serine/threonine kinase known as mammalian sterile 20-like kinase 1 (MST1) as a critical regulator of apoptotic beta cell death and dysfunction. MST1 activates several apoptotic signalling pathways, which further stimulate its own cleavage, leading to a vicious cycle of cell death. This led us to hypothesise that MST1 signalling is central to the initiation of beta cell death in diabetes. We found that MST1 is strongly activated in a diabetic beta cell and induces not only its death but also directly impairs insulin secretion through promoting proteasomal degradation of key beta cell transcription factor, pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1), which is critical for insulin production.Pre-clinical studies in various animal models of diabetes have reported that MST1 deficiency remarkably restores normoglycaemia and beta cell function and prevents the development of diabetes. Importantly, MST1 deficiency can revert fully diabetic beta cells to a non-diabetic state. MST1 may serve as a target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes that trigger the cause of the disease, namely, the destruction of the beta cells. The major current focus of our investigation is to identify and test the efficacy of potent inhibitors of this death signalling pathway to protect beta cells against the effects of autoimmune attack in type 1 diabetes and to preserve beta cell mass and function in type 2 diabetes. This review summarises a presentation given at the 'Can we make a better beta cell?' symposium at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD. It is accompanied by two other reviews on topics from this symposium (by Heiko Lickert and colleagues, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3949-9 , and by Harry

  10. Hedgehog signaling pathway: A novel target for cancer therapy: Vismodegib, a promising therapeutic option in treatment of basal cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Abidi, Afroz

    2014-01-01

    The Hedgehog signaling pathway is one of the major regulators of cell growth and differentiation during embryogenesis and early development. It is mostly quiescent in adults but inappropriate mutation or deregulation of the pathway is involved in the development of cancers. Therefore; recently it has been recognized as a novel therapeutic target in cancers. Basal cell carcinomas (BCC) and medulloblastomas are the two most common cancers identified with mutations in components of the hedgehog pathway. The discovery of targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibitors has shown promising results in clinical trials, several of which are still undergoing clinical evaluation. Vismodegib (GDC-0449), an oral hedgehog signaling pathway inhibitor has reached the farthest in clinical development. Initial clinical trials in basal cell carcinoma and medulloblastoma have shown good efficacy and safety and hence were approved by U.S. FDA for use in advanced basal cell carcinomas. This review highlights the molecular basis and the current knowledge of hedgehog pathway activation in different types of human cancers as well as the present and future prospects of the novel drug vismodegib. PMID:24550577

  11. Pharmacological Targeting SHP-1-STAT3 Signaling Is a Promising Therapeutic Approach for the Treatment of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li-Ching; Teng, Hao-Wei; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Tai, Wei-Tien; Hung, Man-Hsin; Yang, Shung-Haur; Jiang, Jeng-Kai; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2015-09-01

    STAT3 activation is associated with poor prognosis in human colorectal cancer (CRC). Our previous data demonstrated that regorafenib (Stivarga) is a pharmacological agonist of SH2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) that enhances SHP-1 activity and induces apoptosis by targeting STAT3 signals in CRC. This study aimed to find a therapeutic drug that is more effective than regorafenib for CRC treatment. Here, we showed that SC-43 was more effective than regorafenib at inducing apoptosis in vitro and suppressing tumorigenesis in vivo. SC-43 significantly increased SHP-1 activity, downregulated p-STAT3(Tyr705) level, and induced apoptosis in CRC cells. An SHP-1 inhibitor or knockdown of SHP-1 by siRNA both significantly rescued the SC-43-induced apoptosis and decreased p-STAT3(Tyr705) level. Conversely, SHP-1 overexpression increased the effects of SC-43 on apoptosis and p-STAT3(Tyr705) level. These data suggest that SC-43-induced apoptosis mediated through the loss of p-STAT3(Tyr705) was dependent on SHP-1 function. Importantly, SC-43-enhanced SHP-1 activity was because of the docking potential of SC-43, which relieved the autoinhibited N-SH2 domain of SHP-1 and inhibited p-STAT3(Tyr705) signals. Importantly, we observed that a significant negative correlation existed between SHP-1 and p-STAT3(Tyr705)expression in CRC patients (P = .038). Patients with strong SHP-1 and weak p-STAT3(Tyr705) expression had significantly higher overall survival compared with patients with weak SHP-1 and strong p-STAT3(Tyr705) expression (P = .029). In conclusion, SHP-1 is suitable to be a useful prognostic marker and a pharmacological target for CRC treatment. Targeting SHP-1-STAT3 signaling by SC-43 may serve as a promising pharmacotherapy for CRC. PMID:26476076

  12. Pharmacological Targeting SHP-1-STAT3 Signaling Is a Promising Therapeutic Approach for the Treatment of Colorectal Cancer12

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Li-Ching; Teng, Hao-Wei; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Tai, Wei-Tien; Hung, Man-Hsin; Yang, Shung-Haur; Jiang, Jeng-Kai; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2015-01-01

    STAT3 activation is associated with poor prognosis in human colorectal cancer (CRC). Our previous data demonstrated that regorafenib (Stivarga) is a pharmacological agonist of SH2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) that enhances SHP-1 activity and induces apoptosis by targeting STAT3 signals in CRC. This study aimed to find a therapeutic drug that is more effective than regorafenib for CRC treatment. Here, we showed that SC-43 was more effective than regorafenib at inducing apoptosis in vitro and suppressing tumorigenesis in vivo. SC-43 significantly increased SHP-1 activity, downregulated p-STAT3Tyr705 level, and induced apoptosis in CRC cells. An SHP-1 inhibitor or knockdown of SHP-1 by siRNA both significantly rescued the SC-43–induced apoptosis and decreased p-STAT3Tyr705 level. Conversely, SHP-1 overexpression increased the effects of SC-43 on apoptosis and p-STAT3Tyr705 level. These data suggest that SC-43–induced apoptosis mediated through the loss of p-STAT3Tyr705 was dependent on SHP-1 function. Importantly, SC-43–enhanced SHP-1 activity was because of the docking potential of SC-43, which relieved the autoinhibited N-SH2 domain of SHP-1 and inhibited p-STAT3Tyr705 signals. Importantly, we observed that a significant negative correlation existed between SHP-1 and p-STAT3Tyr705expression in CRC patients (P = .038). Patients with strong SHP-1 and weak p-STAT3Tyr705 expression had significantly higher overall survival compared with patients with weak SHP-1 and strong p-STAT3Tyr705 expression (P = .029). In conclusion, SHP-1 is suitable to be a useful prognostic marker and a pharmacological target for CRC treatment. Targeting SHP-1-STAT3 signaling by SC-43 may serve as a promising pharmacotherapy for CRC. PMID:26476076

  13. Therapeutic cloning: promises and issues

    PubMed Central

    Kfoury, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    Advances in biotechnology necessitate both an understanding of scientific principles and ethical implications to be clinically applicable in medicine. In this regard, therapeutic cloning offers significant potential in regenerative medicine by circumventing immunorejection, and in the cure of genetic disorders when used in conjunction with gene therapy. Therapeutic cloning in the context of cell replacement therapy holds a huge potential for de novo organogenesis and the permanent treatment of Parkinson’s disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and diabetes mellitus as shown by in vivo studies. Scientific roadblocks impeding advancement in therapeutic cloning are tumorigenicity, epigenetic reprogramming, mitochondrial heteroplasmy, interspecies pathogen transfer, low oocyte availability. Therapeutic cloning is also often tied to ethical considerations concerning the source, destruction and moral status of IVF embryos based on the argument of potential. Legislative and funding issues are also addressed. Future considerations would include a distinction between therapeutic and reproductive cloning in legislative formulations. PMID:18523539

  14. Targeting Toll-Like Receptors: Promising Therapeutic Strategies for the Management of Sepsis-Associated Pathology and Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Savva, Athina; Roger, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern recognition receptors playing a fundamental role in sensing microbial invasion and initiating innate and adaptive immune responses. TLRs are also triggered by danger signals released by injured or stressed cells during sepsis. Here we focus on studies developing TLR agonists and antagonists for the treatment of infectious diseases and sepsis. Positioned at the cell surface, TLR4 is essential for sensing lipopolysaccharide of Gram-negative bacteria, TLR2 is involved in the recognition of a large panel of microbial ligands, while TLR5 recognizes flagellin. Endosomal TLR3, TLR7, TLR8, TLR9 are specialized in the sensing of nucleic acids produced notably during viral infections. TLR4 and TLR2 are favorite targets for developing anti-sepsis drugs, and antagonistic compounds have shown efficient protection from septic shock in pre-clinical models. Results from clinical trials evaluating anti-TLR4 and anti-TLR2 approaches are presented, discussing the challenges of study design in sepsis and future exploitation of these agents in infectious diseases. We also report results from studies suggesting that the TLR5 agonist flagellin may protect from infections of the gastrointestinal tract and that agonists of endosomal TLRs are very promising for treating chronic viral infections. Altogether, TLR-targeted therapies have a strong potential for prevention and intervention in infectious diseases, notably sepsis. PMID:24302927

  15. Glycogen synthase kinase-3--a promising therapeutic target: Dr Hagit Eldar-Finkelman interviewed by Emma Quigley.

    PubMed

    Eldar-Finkelman, Hagit

    2006-04-01

    Dr Hagit Eldar-Finkelman (Sackler School of Medicine, Israel) was interviewed by Emma Quigley (Commissioning Editor, Expert Opinion on Therapeutic Targets) on 16th February 2006. Born in Jerusalem, Dr Eldar-Finkelman received her BSc in Chemistry in 1984 and both her MSc in Physical Chemistry (1986) and PhD in Life Science (1993) from the Weizmann Institute of Science. She was a recipient of the British Council Award, which allowed her to conduct research in biological nuclear magnetic resonance at the University of Oxford in the laboratory of Professor George K Radda. Following postdoctoral work at the School of Medicine of the University of Washington with Nobel Laureate Professor Edwin G Krebs, she became an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Dr Eldar-Finkelman joined the Sackler School of Medicine at Tel Aviv University in 1999. Dr Eldar-Finkelman's research focuses on the molecular mechanisms regulating the protein kinase glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3), and their implications in negative regulation of signalling pathways. In particular, her work aims to develop specific inhibitors for GSK-3 and to test their functions in vitro and in vivo, considering the concept that such inhibitors may be useful in insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes. These studies provide a conceptual basis for development of GSK-3 inhibitors and may lead to design of small molecules for treatment of diabetes and or neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:16548769

  16. Yessotoxin, a Promising Therapeutic Tool

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso, Amparo; Vieytes, Mercedes R.; Botana, Luis M.

    2016-01-01

    Yessotoxin (YTX) is a polyether compound produced by dinoflagellates and accumulated in filter feeding shellfish. No records about human intoxications induced by this compound have been published, however it is considered a toxin. Modifications in second messenger levels, protein levels, immune cells, cytoskeleton or activation of different cellular death types have been published as consequence of YTX exposure. This review summarizes the main intracellular pathways modulated by YTX and their pharmacological and therapeutic implications. PMID:26828502

  17. Secukinumab: a promising therapeutic option in spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Ficco, Hernan; Perez-Alamino, Rodolfo; Maldonado-Cocco, José A

    2016-09-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is the second most common chronic inflammatory joint disease. Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is another less common but equally chronic and disabling spondyloarthritis (SpA). Therapeutic agents for the treatment of these diseases have been somewhat lacking as compared with those available for rheumatoid arthritis, which represents a significant challenge for both the treating physician and the pharmaceutical industry. A promising development for our understanding of the physiopathology of PsA and AS involves new targets to interrupt IL-17 and IL-12/IL-23 pathways. Up to 30-40 % of SpA patients have inadequate or poor response, or are intolerant to anti-TNF therapies. Therefore, there has been a clear unmet medical need in an important group of these patients. As a result, new therapeutic targets have emerged for the treatment of both axial and peripheral SpA. Interleukin 17 (IL-17) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that is increased in psoriatic lesions as well as in the synovial fluid of patients with PsA and in sites of enthesitis in SpA. IL-23 has been shown to play an important role in the polarization of CD4+ T-cells to become IL-17 producers. Based on these evidences, blockade of the cytokine IL-17 or its receptors was considered to have therapeutic implications for the treatment of psoriasis, as well as PsA and AS.This article presents a thorough review of an IL-17 A blocking agent, its mechanism of action, its clinical efficacy and its therapeutic safety. PMID:27437696

  18. Perspectives on the mGluR2/3 agonists as a therapeutic target for schizophrenia: still promising or a dead end?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng-Lin; Hu, Xi-Quan; Li, Feng; Gao, Wen-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR2/3) agonists once showed promise as non-dopaminergic antipsychotic drugs because of their efficacy in alleviating symptoms of schizophrenia (SZ) in both animal models and human patients. However, the recent failure of Phase III clinical trials dealt a huge blow to the scientific community and the aftershock of the setback in mGluR2/3 research can be felt everywhere from grant support and laboratory studies to paper publication. An immediate question raised is whether mGluR2/3 is still a promising therapeutic target for schizophrenia. Answering this question is not easy, but apparently a new strategy is needed. This article provides a focused review of literature on the study of mGluR2/3 agonists, especially on mGluR2/3 agonists’ mechanism of action and efficacy in both normal conditions and animal models of SZ, as well as clinical studies in human patients with the disease. We argue that the cellular and molecular actions of mGluR2/3 agonists, the distinct roles between mGluR2 and mGluR3, as well as their effects on different stages of the disease and different subpopulations of patients, remain incompletely studied. Until the mechanisms associated with mGluR2/3 are clearly elucidated and all treatment options are tested, it would be a great mistake to terminate the study of mGluR2/3 as a therapeutic target for schizophrenia. This review will thus shed light on the comprehensive features of the translational potential mGluR2/3 agonists as well as the need for further research into the more selective activation of mGluR2. PMID:25724760

  19. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 (CDK5) Controls Melanoma Cell Motility, Invasiveness, and Metastatic Spread—Identification of a Promising Novel therapeutic target1

    PubMed Central

    Bisht, Savita; Nolting, Jens; Schütte, Ute; Haarmann, Jens; Jain, Prashi; Shah, Dhruv; Brossart, Peter; Flaherty, Patrick; Feldmann, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Despite considerable progress in recent years, the overall prognosis of metastatic malignant melanoma remains poor, and curative therapeutic options are lacking. Therefore, better understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying melanoma progression and metastasis, as well as identification of novel therapeutic targets that allow inhibition of metastatic spread, are urgently required. The current study provides evidence for aberrant cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) activation in primary and metastatic melanoma lesions by overexpression of its activator protein CDK5R1/p35. Moreover, using melanoma in vitro model systems, shRNA-mediated inducible knockdown of CDK5 was found to cause marked inhibition of cell motility, invasiveness, and anchorage-independent growth, while at the same time net cell growth was not affected. In vivo, CDK5 knockdown inhibited growth of orthotopic xenografts as well as formation of lung and liver colonies in xenogenic injection models mimicking systemic metastases. Inhibition of lung metastasis was further validated in a syngenic murine melanoma model. CDK5 knockdown was accompanied by dephosphorylation and overexpression of caldesmon, and concomitant caldesmon knockdown rescued cell motility and proinvasive phenotype. Finally, it was found that pharmacological inhibition of CDK5 activity by means of roscovitine as well as by a novel small molecule CDK5-inhibitor, N-(5-isopropylthiazol-2-yl)-3-phenylpropanamide, similarly caused marked inhibition of invasion/migration, colony formation, and anchorage-independent growth of melanoma cells. Thus, experimental data presented here provide strong evidence for a crucial role of aberrantly activated CDK5 in melanoma progression and metastasis and establish CDK5 as promising target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26310376

  20. Targeting telomerase for cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Shay, J W; Keith, W N

    2008-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of advanced malignancies is continuous cell growth and this almost universally correlates with the reactivation of telomerase. Although there is still much we do not understand about the regulation of telomerase, it remains a very attractive and novel target for cancer therapeutics. Several clinical trials have been initiated, and in this review we highlight some of the most promising approaches and conclude by speculating on the role of telomerase in cancer stem cells. PMID:18231105

  1. Epigenetic Pathways of Oncogenic Viruses: Therapeutic Promises.

    PubMed

    El-Araby, Amr M; Fouad, Abdelrahman A; Hanbal, Amr M; Abdelwahab, Sara M; Qassem, Omar M; El-Araby, Moustafa E

    2016-02-01

    Cancerous transformation comprises different events that are both genetic and epigenetic. The ultimate goal for such events is to maintain cell survival and proliferation. This transformation occurs as a consequence of different features such as environmental and genetic factors, as well as some types of infection. Many viral infections are considered to be causative agents of a number of different malignancies. To convert normal cells into cancerous cells, oncogenic viruses must function at the epigenetic level to communicate with their host cells. Oncogenic viruses encode certain epigenetic factors that lead to the immortality and proliferation of infected cells. The epigenetic effectors produced by oncogenic viruses constitute appealing targets to prevent and treat malignant diseases caused by these viruses. In this review, we highlight the importance of epigenetic reprogramming for virus-induced oncogenesis, with special emphasis on viral epigenetic oncoproteins as therapeutic targets. The discovery of molecular components that target epigenetic pathways, especially viral factors, is also discussed. PMID:26754591

  2. Therapeutic targets for premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Karl-Erik; Abdel-Hamid, Ibrahim A

    2011-09-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is the most common male sexual complaint, and may exert a profound negative impact on the man's life and partnership. Using currently available treatment alternatives (e.g., selective serotonin uptake inhibitor, agents acting locally on the penis), PE can be treated in most, but not all patients. However, since long term success rates have been disappointing, and the only approved treatment so far is the short-acting selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor dapoxetine, there is currently an intensive search for new treatment modalities. Selection of the most promising therapeutic targets from a host of current and potential candidates depends heavily on their roles in the pathophysiology of PE. Possible central nervous targets that will be discussed are serotonin transporters, and CNS receptors for 5-HT(IA) and 5-HT(1B), dopamine, oxytocin, opioids, neurokinin-1, and glutamate. Putative peripheral targets include α(1)-adrenoceptors, phosphodiestrase enzymes, Rho kinases, purinergic (P2X) receptors, and penile sensory nerves. It is clear that exploiting the full therapeutic potential of these targets will require additional basic and clinical research. PMID:21816550

  3. Epigenomes as therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Christopher A; Costa, Fabricio F

    2015-07-01

    Epigenetics is a molecular phenomenon that pertains to heritable changes in gene expression that do not involve changes in the DNA sequence. Epigenetic modifications in a whole genome, known as the epigenome, play an essential role in the regulation of gene expression in both normal development and disease. Traditional epigenetic changes include DNA methylation and histone modifications. Recent evidence reveals that other players, such as non-coding RNAs, may have an epigenetic regulatory role. Aberrant epigenetic signaling is becoming to be known as a central component of human disease, and the reversible nature of the epigenetic modifications provides an exciting opportunity for the development of clinically relevant therapeutics. Current epigenetic therapies provide a clinical benefit through disrupting DNA methyltransferases or histone deacetylases. However, the emergence of next-generation epigenetic therapies provides an opportunity to more effectively disrupt epigenetic disease states. Novel epigenetic therapies may improve drug targeting and drug delivery, optimize dosing schedules, and improve the efficacy of preexisting treatment modalities (chemotherapy, radiation, and immunotherapy). This review discusses the epigenetic mechanisms that contribute to the disease, available epigenetic therapies, epigenetic therapies currently in development, and the potential future use of epigenetic therapeutics in a clinical setting. PMID:25797698

  4. Novel anticancer therapeutics targeting telomerase.

    PubMed

    Ruden, Maria; Puri, Neelu

    2013-08-01

    Telomeres are protective caps at the ends of human chromosomes. Telomeres shorten with each successive cell division in normal human cells whereas, in tumors, they are continuously elongated by human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). Telomerase is overexpressed in 80-95% of cancers and is present in very low levels or is almost undetectable in normal cells. Because telomerase plays a pivotal role in cancer cell growth it may serve as an ideal target for anticancer therapeutics. Inhibition of telomerase may lead to a decrease of telomere length resulting in cell senescence and apoptosis in telomerase positive tumors. Several strategies of telomerase inhibition are reviewed, including small molecule inhibitors, antisense oligonucleotides, immunotherapies and gene therapies, targeting the hTERT or the ribonucleoprotein subunit hTER. G-quadruplex stabilizers, tankyrase and HSP90 inhibitors targeting telomere and telomerase assembly, and T-oligo approach are also covered. Based on this review, the most promising current telomerase targeting therapeutics are the antisense oligonucleotide inhibitor GRN163L and immunotherapies that use dendritic cells (GRVAC1), hTERT peptide (GV1001) or cryptic peptides (Vx-001). Most of these agents have entered phase I and II clinical trials in patients with various tumors, and have shown good response rates as evidenced by a reduction in tumor cell growth, increased overall disease survival, disease stabilization in advanced staged tumors and complete/partial responses. Most therapeutics have shown to be more effective when used in combination with standard therapies, resulting in concomitant telomere shortening and tumor mass shrinkage, as well as preventing tumor relapse and resistance to single agent therapy. PMID:22841437

  5. Dysregulated Expression of Glycolipids in Tumor Cells: From Negative Modulator of Anti-tumor Immunity to Promising Targets for Developing Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Daniotti, Jose Luis; Lardone, Ricardo D.; Vilcaes, Aldo A.

    2016-01-01

    Glycolipids are complex molecules consisting of a ceramide lipid moiety linked to a glycan chain of variable length and structure. Among these are found the gangliosides, which are sialylated glycolipids ubiquitously distributed on the outer layer of vertebrate plasma membranes. Changes in the expression of certain species of gangliosides have been described to occur during cell proliferation, differentiation, and ontogenesis. However, the aberrant and elevated expression of gangliosides has been also observed in different types of cancer cells, thereby promoting tumor survival. Moreover, gangliosides are actively released from the membrane of tumor cells, having a strong impact on impairing anti-tumor immunity. Beyond the undesirable effects of gangliosides in cancer cells, a substantial number of cancer immunotherapies have been developed in recent years that have used gangliosides as the main target. This has resulted in successful immune cell- or antibody-responses against glycolipids, with promising results having been obtained in clinical trials. In this review, we provide a general overview on the metabolism of glycolipids, both in normal and tumor cells, as well as examining glycolipid-mediated immune modulation and the main successes achieved in immunotherapies using gangliosides as molecular targets. PMID:26779443

  6. Identification of PAM4 (clivatuzumab)-reactive epitope on MUC5AC: a promising biomarker and therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Donglin; Chang, Chien-Hsing; Gold, David V; Goldenberg, David M

    2015-02-28

    PAM4 is a monoclonal antibody showing high specificity for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Humanized PAM4 labeled with 90Y in combination with low-dose gemcitabine has shown promising therapeutic activity, and is being evaluated in a phase III clinical trial. Prior efforts have suggested that PAM4 potentially reacts with MUC5AC, a secretory mucin expressed de novo in early pancreatic neoplasia and retained throughout disease progression. In present study, we provide further evidence validating MUC5AC as the PAM4 antigen, and locate PAM4-reactive epitope within the N-terminal cysteine-rich subdomain 2 (Cys2), thus differentiating PAM4 from most anti-MUC5AC antibodies known to-date. Specifically, we show (i) PAM4-antigen and MUC5AC were co-localized in multiple human cancer cell lines, including Capan-1, BxPC-3, and CFPAC-1; (ii) MUC5AC-specific siRNA prominently reduced the expression of both MUC5AC and PAM4-antigen in CFPAC-1 cells; (iii) PAM4 preferentially binds to the void-volume fractions from Sepharose-CL2B chromatography of Capan-1 culture supernatants, which were revealed by Western blot to display the ladder pattern characteristic of oligomeric MUC5AC; and (iv) the N-terminal Cys2 within several recombinant MUC5AC fragments is essential for binding to PAM4. These findings shed light on the mechanism of PAM4-based diagnosis and treatment for pancreatic cancer, and guide further exploration of its clinical utility. PMID:25595893

  7. Identification of PAM4 (clivatuzumab)-reactive epitope on MUC5AC: A promising biomarker and therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Donglin; Chang, Chien-Hsing; Gold, David V.; Goldenberg, David M.

    2015-01-01

    PAM4 is a monoclonal antibody showing high specificity for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Humanized PAM4 labeled with 90Y in combination with low-dose gemcitabine has shown promising therapeutic activity, and is being evaluated in a phase III clinical trial. Prior efforts have suggested that PAM4 potentially reacts with MUC5AC, a secretory mucin expressed de novo in early pancreatic neoplasia and retained throughout disease progression. In present study, we provide further evidence validating MUC5AC as the PAM4 antigen, and locate PAM4-reactive epitope within the N-terminal cysteine-rich subdomain 2 (Cys2), thus differentiating PAM4 from most anti-MUC5AC antibodies known to-date. Specifically, we show (i) PAM4-antigen and MUC5AC were co-localized in multiple human cancer cell lines, including Capan-1, BxPC-3, and CFPAC-1; (ii) MUC5AC-specific siRNA prominently reduced the expression of both MUC5AC and PAM4-antigen in CFPAC-1 cells; (iii) PAM4 preferentially binds to the void-volume fractions from Sepharose-CL2B chromatography of Capan-1 culture supernatants, which were revealed by Western blot to display the ladder pattern characteristic of oligomeric MUC5AC; and (iv) the N-terminal Cys2 within several recombinant MUC5AC fragments is essential for binding to PAM4. These findings shed light on the mechanism of PAM4-based diagnosis and treatment for pancreatic cancer, and guide further exploration of its clinical utility. PMID:25595893

  8. Cathepsin B is a New Drug Target for Traumatic Brain Injury Therapeutics: Evidence for E64d as a Promising Lead Drug Candidate

    PubMed Central

    Hook, Gregory; Jacobsen, J. Steven; Grabstein, Kenneth; Kindy, Mark; Hook, Vivian

    2015-01-01

    There is currently no therapeutic drug treatment for traumatic brain injury (TBI) despite decades of experimental clinical trials. This may be because the mechanistic pathways for improving TBI outcomes have yet to be identified and exploited. As such, there remains a need to seek out new molecular targets and their drug candidates to find new treatments for TBI. This review presents supporting evidence for cathepsin B, a cysteine protease, as a potentially important drug target for TBI. Cathepsin B expression is greatly up-regulated in TBI animal models, as well as in trauma patients. Importantly, knockout of the cathepsin B gene in TBI mice results in substantial improvements of TBI-caused deficits in behavior, pathology, and biomarkers, as well as improvements in related injury models. During the process of TBI-induced injury, cathepsin B likely escapes the lysosome, its normal subcellular location, into the cytoplasm or extracellular matrix (ECM) where the unleashed proteolytic power causes destruction via necrotic, apoptotic, autophagic, and activated glia-induced cell death, together with ECM breakdown and inflammation. Significantly, chemical inhibitors of cathepsin B are effective for improving deficits in TBI and related injuries including ischemia, cerebral bleeding, cerebral aneurysm, edema, pain, infection, rheumatoid arthritis, epilepsy, Huntington’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and Alzheimer’s disease. The inhibitor E64d is unique among cathepsin B inhibitors in being the only compound to have demonstrated oral efficacy in a TBI model and prior safe use in man and as such it is an excellent tool compound for preclinical testing and clinical compound development. These data support the conclusion that drug development of cathepsin B inhibitors for TBI treatment should be accelerated. PMID:26388830

  9. Therapeutic target database update 2014: a resource for targeted therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Chu; Zhang, Cheng; Zhu, Feng; Xu, Feng; Chen, Shang Ying; Zhang, Peng; Li, Ying Hong; Yang, Sheng Yong; Wei, Yu Quan; Tao, Lin; Chen, Yu Zong

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe an update of the Therapeutic Target Database (http://bidd.nus.edu.sg/group/ttd/ttd.asp) for better serving the bench-to-clinic communities and for enabling more convenient data access, processing and exchange. Extensive efforts from the research, industry, clinical, regulatory and management communities have been collectively directed at the discovery, investigation, application, monitoring and management of targeted therapeutics. Increasing efforts have been directed at the development of stratified and personalized medicines. These efforts may be facilitated by the knowledge of the efficacy targets and biomarkers of targeted therapeutics. Therefore, we added search tools for using the International Classification of Disease ICD-10-CM and ICD-9-CM codes to retrieve the target, biomarker and drug information (currently enabling the search of almost 900 targets, 1800 biomarkers and 6000 drugs related to 900 disease conditions). We added information of almost 1800 biomarkers for 300 disease conditions and 200 drug scaffolds for 700 drugs. We significantly expanded Therapeutic Target Database data contents to cover >2300 targets (388 successful and 461 clinical trial targets), 20 600 drugs (2003 approved and 3147 clinical trial drugs), 20 000 multitarget agents against almost 400 target-pairs and the activity data of 1400 agents against 300 cell lines. PMID:24265219

  10. miRNA therapeutics in cardiovascular diseases: promises and problems

    PubMed Central

    Nouraee, Nazila; Mowla, Seyed J.

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are a novel class of non-coding RNAs which found their way into the clinic due to their fundamental roles in cellular processes such as differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Recently, miRNAs have been known as micromodulators in cellular communications being involved in cell signaling and microenvironment remodeling. In this review, we will focus on the role of miRNAs in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and their reliability as diagnostic and therapeutic biomarkers in these conditions. CVDs comprise a variety of blood vessels and heart disorders with a high rate of morbidity and mortality worldwide. This necessitates introduction of novel molecular biomarkers for early detection, prevention, or treatment of these diseases. miRNAs, due to their stability, tissue-specific expression pattern and secretion to the corresponding body fluids, are attractive targets for cardiovascular-associated therapeutics. Explaining the challenges ahead of miRNA-based therapies, we will discuss the exosomes as delivery packages for miRNA drugs and promising novel strategies for the future of miRNA-based therapeutics. These approaches provide insights to the future of personalized medicine for the treatment of CVDs. PMID:26175755

  11. Targeting aerobic glycolysis: 3-bromopyruvate as a promising anticancer drug.

    PubMed

    Cardaci, Simone; Desideri, Enrico; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2012-02-01

    The Warburg effect refers to the phenomenon whereby cancer cells avidly take up glucose and produce lactic acid under aerobic conditions. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying tumor reliance on glycolysis remains not completely clear, its inhibition opens feasible therapeutic windows for cancer treatment. Indeed, several small molecules have emerged by combinatorial studies exhibiting promising anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo, as a single agent or in combination with other therapeutic modalities. Therefore, besides reviewing the alterations of glycolysis that occur with malignant transformation, this manuscript aims at recapitulating the most effective pharmacological therapeutics of its targeting. In particular, we describe the principal mechanisms of action and the main targets of 3-bromopyruvate, an alkylating agent with impressive antitumor effects in several models of animal tumors. Moreover, we discuss the chemo-potentiating strategies that would make unparalleled the putative therapeutic efficacy of its use in clinical settings. PMID:22328057

  12. Therapeutic targets in subependymoma.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ling-Yuan; Wei, Jun; Haider, Ali S; Liebelt, Brandon D; Ling, Xiaoyang; Conrad, Charles A; Fuller, Gregory N; Levine, Nicholas B; Priebe, Waldemar; Sawaya, Raymond; Heimberger, Amy B

    2014-12-15

    Subependymomas are usually treated with surgical resection; however, no standard, defined alternative medical therapy is recommended for patients who are not surgical candidates, owing to a paucity of molecular, immunological, and genetic characterization. To address this, an ex vivo functional analysis of the immune microenvironment in subependymoma was conducted, a subependymoma cytokine/chemokine microarray was constructed for the evaluation of operational immune and molecular pathways, and a subependymoma cell line was derived and used to test a variety of cytotoxic agents that target operational pathways identified in subependymoma. We found that immune effectors are detectable within the microenvironment of subependymoma; however, marked immune suppression is not observed. The subependymoma tissue microarrays demonstrated tumor expression of p53, MDM2, HIF-1α, topoisomerase II-β, p-STAT3, and nucleolin, but not EGFRvIII, EphA2, IL-13RA2, CMV, CTLA-4, FoxP3, PD-1, PD-L1, EGFR, PDGF-α, PDGF-β, PDGFR-α, PDGFR-β, PTEN, IGFBP2, PI3K, MDM4, IDH1, mTOR, or Jak2. A topoisomerase inhibitor (WP744, IC50=0.83 μM) and a p-STAT3/HIF-1α inhibitor (WP1066, IC50=3.15 μM) demonstrated a growth inhibition of the subependymoma cell proliferation. Cumulatively, these data suggest that those agents that interfere with oncogenes operational in subependymoma may have clinical impact. PMID:25465288

  13. Therapeutic Targeting of Telomerase

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Kathrin; Walter, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length and cell function can be preserved by the human reverse transcriptase telomerase (hTERT), which synthesizes the new telomeric DNA from a RNA template, but is normally restricted to cells needing a high proliferative capacity, such as stem cells. Consequently, telomerase-based therapies to elongate short telomeres are developed, some of which have successfully reached the stage I in clinical trials. Telomerase is also permissive for tumorigenesis and 90% of all malignant tumors use telomerase to obtain immortality. Thus, reversal of telomerase upregulation in tumor cells is a potential strategy to treat cancer. Natural and small-molecule telomerase inhibitors, immunotherapeutic approaches, oligonucleotide inhibitors, and telomerase-directed gene therapy are useful treatment strategies. Telomerase is more widely expressed than any other tumor marker. The low expression in normal tissues, together with the longer telomeres in normal stem cells versus cancer cells, provides some degree of specificity with low risk of toxicity. However, long term telomerase inhibition may elicit negative effects in highly-proliferative cells which need telomerase for survival, and it may interfere with telomere-independent physiological functions. Moreover, only a few hTERT molecules are required to overcome senescence in cancer cells, and telomerase inhibition requires proliferating cells over a sufficient number of population doublings to induce tumor suppressive senescence. These limitations may explain the moderate success rates in many clinical studies. Despite extensive studies, only one vaccine and one telomerase antagonist are routinely used in clinical work. For complete eradication of all subpopulations of cancer cells a simultaneous targeting of several mechanisms will likely be needed. Possible technical improvements have been proposed including the development of more specific inhibitors, methods to increase the efficacy of vaccination methods, and

  14. Therapeutic Targeting of Telomerase.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Kathrin; Walter, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length and cell function can be preserved by the human reverse transcriptase telomerase (hTERT), which synthesizes the new telomeric DNA from a RNA template, but is normally restricted to cells needing a high proliferative capacity, such as stem cells. Consequently, telomerase-based therapies to elongate short telomeres are developed, some of which have successfully reached the stage I in clinical trials. Telomerase is also permissive for tumorigenesis and 90% of all malignant tumors use telomerase to obtain immortality. Thus, reversal of telomerase upregulation in tumor cells is a potential strategy to treat cancer. Natural and small-molecule telomerase inhibitors, immunotherapeutic approaches, oligonucleotide inhibitors, and telomerase-directed gene therapy are useful treatment strategies. Telomerase is more widely expressed than any other tumor marker. The low expression in normal tissues, together with the longer telomeres in normal stem cells versus cancer cells, provides some degree of specificity with low risk of toxicity. However, long term telomerase inhibition may elicit negative effects in highly-proliferative cells which need telomerase for survival, and it may interfere with telomere-independent physiological functions. Moreover, only a few hTERT molecules are required to overcome senescence in cancer cells, and telomerase inhibition requires proliferating cells over a sufficient number of population doublings to induce tumor suppressive senescence. These limitations may explain the moderate success rates in many clinical studies. Despite extensive studies, only one vaccine and one telomerase antagonist are routinely used in clinical work. For complete eradication of all subpopulations of cancer cells a simultaneous targeting of several mechanisms will likely be needed. Possible technical improvements have been proposed including the development of more specific inhibitors, methods to increase the efficacy of vaccination methods, and

  15. Myc proteins as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, WC; Weiss, WA

    2010-01-01

    Myc proteins (c-myc, Mycn and Mycl) target proliferative and apoptotic pathways vital for progression in cancer. Amplification of the MYCN gene has emerged as one of the clearest indicators of aggressive and chemotherapy-refractory disease in children with neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood. Phosphorylation and ubiquitin-mediated modulation of Myc protein influence stability and represent potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Phosphorylation of Myc proteins is controlled in-part by the receptor tyrosine kinase/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/mTOR signaling, with additional contributions from Aurora A kinase. Myc proteins regulate apoptosis in part through interactions with the p53/Mdm2/Arf signaling pathway. Mutation in p53 is commonly observed in patients with relapsed neuroblastoma, contributing to both biology and therapeutic resistance. This review examines Myc function and regulation in neuroblastoma, and discusses emerging therapies that target Mycn. PMID:20101214

  16. Targeted photodynamic therapy--a promising strategy of tumor treatment.

    PubMed

    Bugaj, Andrzej M

    2011-07-01

    Targeted therapy is a new promising therapeutic strategy, created to overcome growing problems of contemporary medicine, such as drug toxicity and drug resistance. An emerging modality of this approach is targeted photodynamic therapy (TPDT) with the main aim of improving delivery of photosensitizer to cancer tissue and at the same time enhancing specificity and efficiency of PDT. Depending on the mechanism of targeting, we can divide the strategies of TPDT into "passive", "active" and "activatable", where in the latter case the photosensitizer is activated only in the target tissue. In this review, contemporary strategies of TPDT are described, including new innovative concepts, such as targeting assisted by peptides and aptamers, multifunctional nanoplatforms with navigation by magnetic field or "photodynamic molecular beacons" activatable by enzymes and nucleic acid. The imperative of introducing a new paradigm of PDT, focused on the concepts of heterogeneity and dynamic state of tumor, is also called for. PMID:21547329

  17. Stem cells as promising therapeutic options for neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jongman; Kim, Han-Soo; Hwang, Dong-Youn

    2013-04-01

    Due to the limitations of pharmacological and other current therapeutic strategies, stem cell therapies have emerged as promising options for treating many incurable neurologic diseases. A variety of stem cells including pluripotent stem cells (i.e., embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells) and multipotent adult stem cells (i.e., fetal brain tissue, neural stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells from various sources) have been explored as therapeutic options for treating many neurologic diseases, and it is becoming obvious that each type of stem cell has pros and cons as a source for cell therapy. Wise selection of stem cells with regard to the nature and status of neurologic dysfunctions is required to achieve optimal therapeutic efficacy. To this aim, the stem cell-mediated therapeutic efforts on four major neurological diseases, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and stroke, will be introduced, and current problems and future directions will be discussed. PMID:23097262

  18. Inorganic Nanoparticles for Therapeutic Delivery: Trials, Tribulations and Promise

    PubMed Central

    Tonga, Gulen Yesilbag; Moyano, Daniel F.; Kim, Chang Soo; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2014-01-01

    Inorganic nanomaterials have a wide array of physical and structural properties that make them attractive candidates for imaging and therapeutic delivery. Nanoparticle platforms have been intensely studied for these applications, and examples are starting to enter the clinic. This review looks at why inorganic particles provide promising platforms for biomedicine, and what issues need to be addressed for them to reach their potential. PMID:24955019

  19. Fibromyalgia syndrome: novel therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Ablin, Jacob N; Häuser, Winfried

    2016-05-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic disorder characterized by widespread pain and tenderness, accompanied by disturbed sleep, chronic fatigue and multiple additional functional symptoms. FMS continues to pose an unmet need regarding pharmacological treatment and many patients fail to achieve sufficient relief from existing treatments. As FMS is considered to be a condition in which pain amplification occurs within the CNS, therapeutic interventions, both pharmacological and otherwise, have revolved around attempts to influence pain processing in the CNS. In the current review, we present an update on novel targets in the search for effective treatment of FMS. PMID:27296699

  20. Therapeutic Applications of Extracellular Vesicles: Clinical Promise and Open Questions

    PubMed Central

    Breakefield, Xandra O.; Leonard, Joshua N.

    2015-01-01

    This review provides an updated perspective on rapidly proliferating efforts to harness extracellular vesicles (EVs) for therapeutic applications. We summarize current knowledge, emerging strategies, and open questions pertaining to clinical potential and translation. Potentially useful EVs comprise diverse products of various cell types and species. EV components may also be combined with liposomes and nanoparticles to facilitate manufacturing as well as product safety and evaluation. Potential therapeutic cargoes include RNA, proteins, and drugs. Strategic issues considered herein include choice of therapeutic agent, means of loading cargoes into EVs, promotion of EV stability, tissue targeting, and functional delivery of cargo to recipient cells. Some applications may harness natural EV properties, such as immune modulation, regeneration promotion, and pathogen suppression. These properties can be enhanced or customized to enable a wide range of therapeutic applications, including vaccination, improvement of pregnancy outcome, and treatment of autoimmune disease, cancer, and tissue injury. PMID:25292428

  1. Therapeutic applications of extracellular vesicles: clinical promise and open questions.

    PubMed

    György, Bence; Hung, Michelle E; Breakefield, Xandra O; Leonard, Joshua N

    2015-01-01

    This review provides an updated perspective on rapidly proliferating efforts to harness extracellular vesicles (EVs) for therapeutic applications. We summarize current knowledge, emerging strategies, and open questions pertaining to clinical potential and translation. Potentially useful EVs comprise diverse products of various cell types and species. EV components may also be combined with liposomes and nanoparticles to facilitate manufacturing as well as product safety and evaluation. Potential therapeutic cargoes include RNA, proteins, and drugs. Strategic issues considered herein include choice of therapeutic agent, means of loading cargoes into EVs, promotion of EV stability, tissue targeting, and functional delivery of cargo to recipient cells. Some applications may harness natural EV properties, such as immune modulation, regeneration promotion, and pathogen suppression. These properties can be enhanced or customized to enable a wide range of therapeutic applications, including vaccination, improvement of pregnancy outcome, and treatment of autoimmune disease, cancer, and tissue injury. PMID:25292428

  2. KRAS as a Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Frank

    2015-01-01

    KRAS proteins play a major role in human cancer, but have not yielded to therapeutic attack. New technologies in drug discovery and insights into signaling pathways that KRAS controls have promoted renewed efforts to develop therapies, either through direct targeting of KRAS itself, new ways of blocking KRAS processing, or by identifying targets that KRAS cancers depend on for survival. While drugs that block the well-established downstream pathways, RAF-MAPK and PI 3 kinase, are being tested in the clinic, new efforts are underway to exploit previously unrecognized vulnerabilities, such as altered metabolic networks, or novel pathways identified through synthetic lethal screens. Furthermore, new ways of suppressing KRAS gene expression and of harnessing the immune system offer further hope that new ways of treating KRAS are finally coming into view. These issues are discussed in this edition of CCR Focus. PMID:25878360

  3. SLC Transporters as Therapeutic Targets: Emerging Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lawrence; Yee, Sook Wah; Kim, Richard B.; Giacomini, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Solute carrier (SLC) transporters — a family of more than 300 membrane-bound proteins that facilitate the transport of a wide array of substrates across biological membranes — have important roles in physiological processes ranging from the cellular uptake of nutrients to the absorption of drugs and other xenobiotics. Several classes of marketed drugs target well-known SLC transporters, such as neurotransmitter transporters, and human genetic studies have provided powerful insight into the roles of more-recently characterized SLC transporters in both rare and common diseases, indicating a wealth of new therapeutic opportunities. This Review summarizes knowledge on the roles of SLC transporters in human disease, describes strategies to target such transporters, and highlights current and investigational drugs that modulate SLC transporters, as well as promising drug targets. PMID:26111766

  4. Ursolic acid (UA): A metabolite with promising therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Dharambir; Tuli, Hardeep Singh; Sharma, Anil K

    2016-02-01

    Plants are known to produce a variety of bioactive metabolites which are being used to cure various life threatening and chronic diseases. The molecular mechanism of action of such bioactive molecules, may open up new avenues for the scientific community to develop or improve novel therapeutic approaches to tackle dreadful diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. Ursolic acid (UA) is one among the categories of such plant-based therapeutic metabolites having multiple intracellular and extracellular targets that play role in apoptosis, metastasis, angiogenesis and inflammatory processes. Moreover, the synthetic derivatives of UA have also been seen to be involved in a range of pharmacological applications, which are associated with prevention of diseases. Evidences suggest that UA could be used as a potential candidate to develop a comprehensive competent strategy towards the treatment and prevention of health disorders. The review article herein describes the possible therapeutic effects of UA along with putative mechanism of action. PMID:26775565

  5. Therapeutic target for protozoal diseases

    DOEpatents

    Rathore, Dharmendar; Jani, Dewal; Nagarkatti, Rana

    2008-10-21

    A novel Fasciclin Related Adhesive Protein (FRAP) from Plasmodium and related parasites is provided as a target for therapeutic intervention in diseases caused by the parasites. FRAP has been shown to play a critical role in adhesion to, or invasion into, host cells by the parasite. Furthermore, FRAP catalyzes the neutralization of heme by the parasite, by promoting its polymerization into hemozoin. This invention provides methods and compositions for therapies based on the administration of protein, DNA or cell-based vaccines and/or antibodies based on FRAP, or antigenic epitopes of FRAP, either alone or in combination with other parasite antigens. Methods for the development of compounds that inhibit the catalytic activity of FRAP, and diagnostic and laboratory methods utilizing FRAP are also provided.

  6. Nanobubbles: a promising efficient tool for therapeutic delivery.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Roberta; Soster, Marco; Argenziano, Monica

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades ultrasound-guided delivery of drugs loaded on nanocarriers has been the focus of increasing attention to improve therapeutic treatments. Ultrasound has often been used in combination with microbubbles, micron-sized spherical gas-filled structures stabilized by a shell, to amplify the biophysical effects of the ultrasonic field. Nanometer size bubbles are defined nanobubbles. They were designed to obtain more efficient drug delivery systems. Indeed, their small sizes allow extravasation from blood vessels into surrounding tissues and ultrasound-targeted site-specific release with minimal invasiveness. Additionally, nanobubbles might be endowed with improved stability and longer residence time in systemic circulation. This review will describe the physico-chemical properties of nanobubbles, the formulation parameters and the drug loading approaches, besides potential applications as a therapeutic tool. PMID:26769397

  7. Mitochondrial specific therapeutic targets following brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yonutas, H M; Vekaria, H J; Sullivan, P G

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a complicated disease to treat due to the complex multi-factorial secondary injury cascade that is initiated following the initial impact. This secondary injury cascade causes nonmechanical tissue damage, which is where therapeutic interventions may be efficacious for intervention. One therapeutic target that has shown much promise following brain injury are mitochondria. Mitochondria are complex organelles found within the cell. At a superficial level, mitochondria are known to produce the energy substrate used within the cell called ATP. However, their importance to overall cellular homeostasis is even larger than their production of ATP. These organelles are necessary for calcium cycling, ROS production and play a role in the initiation of cell death pathways. When mitochondria become dysfunctional, they can become dysregulated leading to a loss of cellular homeostasis and eventual cell death. Within this review there will be a deep discussion into mitochondrial bioenergetics followed by a brief discussion into traumatic brain injury and how mitochondria play an integral role in the neuropathological sequelae following an injury. The review will conclude with a discussion pertaining to the therapeutic approaches currently being studied to ameliorate mitochondrial dysfunction following brain injury. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:Brain injury and recovery. PMID:26872596

  8. The promise of epigenomic therapeutics in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lomberk, Gwen A; Iovanna, Juan; Urrutia, Raul

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is often viewed to arise primarily by genetic alterations. However, today we know that many aspects of the cancer phenotype require a crosstalk among these genetic alterations with epigenetic changes. Indeed, aberrant gene expression patterns, driven by epigenetics are fixed by altered signaling from mutated oncogenes and tumor suppressors to define the PDAC phenotype. This conceptual framework may have significant mechanistic value and could offer novel possibilities for treating patients affected with PDAC. In fact, extensive investigations are leading to the development of small molecule drugs that reversibly modify the epigenome. These new 'epigenetic therapeutics' discussed herein are promising to fuel a new era of studies, by providing the medical community with new tools to treat this dismal disease. PMID:27337224

  9. Neprilysin gene transfer: A promising therapeutic approach for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanli; Wang, Junqing; Zhang, Shenghao; Liu, Zhaohui

    2015-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by widespread neurodegeneration throughout the association cortex and limbic system, deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) in the neuropil and around blood vessels, and formation of neurofibrillary tangles. Aβ accumulation is considered the major pathological change in AD progression. In recent years, several therapeutic strategies for treating AD have focused on reducing the Aβ burden in the brain. Among these approaches, the expression of Aβ-degrading enzymes in the brain has been effective but, so far, impractical for treating patients. Neprilysin (NEP), the most prominent of the Aβ-degrading enzymes in vivo, has been successfully delivered intracranially by viral vectors and is a promising therapeutic approach for reducing Aβ accumulation and treating AD. However, some challenges are associated with the use of viral and nonviral vectors, including secondary toxicity, activation of the immune response, and low efficiency. Therefore, safe and efficient NEP delivery systems that could avoid the viral problems with minor injury and high transfection efficiency are required to deliver AD medical applications. This Mini-Review summarizes NEP gene transfer technologies that use viral and nonviral vectors and discusses the rationale and benefits of these delivery systems for AD treatment trials, providing a reference for basic and clinical studies on AD. PMID:26096375

  10. Cannabis and endocannabinoid modulators: Therapeutic promises and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Igor; Cahn, B. Rael

    2008-01-01

    The discovery that botanical cannabinoids such as delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol exert some of their effect through binding specific cannabinoid receptor sites has led to the discovery of an endocannabinoid signaling system, which in turn has spurred research into the mechanisms of action and addiction potential of cannabis on the one hand, while opening the possibility of developing novel therapeutic agents on the other. This paper reviews current understanding of CB1, CB2, and other possible cannabinoid receptors, their arachidonic acid derived ligands (e.g. anandamide; 2 arachidonoyl glycerol), and their possible physiological roles. CB1 is heavily represented in the central nervous system, but is found in other tissues as well; CB2 tends to be localized to immune cells. Activation of the endocannabinoid system can result in enhanced or dampened activity in various neural circuits depending on their own state of activation. This suggests that one function of the endocannabinoid system may be to maintain steady state. The therapeutic action of botanical cannabis or of synthetic molecules that are agonists, antagonists, or which may otherwise modify endocannabinoid metabolism and activity indicates they may have promise as neuroprotectants, and may be of value in the treatment of certain types of pain, epilepsy, spasticity, eating disorders, inflammation, and possibly blood pressure control. PMID:18806886

  11. Therapeutic targeting of replicative immortality

    PubMed Central

    Yaswen, Paul; MacKenzie, Karen L.; Keith, W. Nicol; Hentosh, Patricia; Rodier, Francis; Zhu, Jiyue; Firestone, Gary L.; Matheu, Ander; Carnero, Amancio; Bilsland, Alan; Sundin, Tabetha; Honoki, Kanya; Fujii, Hiromasa; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Amedei, Amedeo; Amin, Amr; Helferich, Bill; Boosani, Chandra S.; Guha, Gunjan; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Chen, Sophie; Mohammed, Sulma I.; Azmi, Asfar S.; Bhakta, Dipita; Halicka, Dorota; Niccolai, Elena; Aquilano, Katia; Ashraf, S. Salman; Nowsheen, Somaira; Yang, Xujuan

    2015-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of malignant cell populations is the ability to undergo continuous proliferation. This property allows clonal lineages to acquire sequential aberrations that can fuel increasingly autonomous growth, invasiveness, and therapeutic resistance. Innate cellular mechanisms have evolved to regulate replicative potential as a hedge against malignant progression. When activated in the absence of normal terminal differentiation cues, these mechanisms can result in a state of persistent cytostasis. This state, termed “senescence,” can be triggered by intrinsic cellular processes such as telomere dysfunction and oncogene expression, and by exogenous factors such as DNA damaging agents or oxidative environments. Despite differences in upstream signaling, senescence often involves convergent interdependent activation of tumor suppressors p53 and p16/pRB, but can be induced, albeit with reduced sensitivity, when these suppressors are compromised. Doses of conventional genotoxic drugs required to achieve cancer cell senescence are often much lower than doses required to achieve outright cell death. Additional therapies, such as those targeting cyclin dependent kinases or components of the PI3K signaling pathway, may induce senescence specifically in cancer cells by circumventing defects in tumor suppressor pathways or exploiting cancer cells’ heightened requirements for telomerase. Such treatments sufficient to induce cancer cell senescence could provide increased patient survival with fewer and less severe side effects than conventional cytotoxic regimens. This positive aspect is countered by important caveats regarding senescence reversibility, genomic instability, and paracrine effects that may increase heterogeneity and adaptive resistance of surviving cancer cells. Nevertheless, agents that effectively disrupt replicative immortality will likely be valuable components of new combinatorial approaches to cancer therapy. PMID:25869441

  12. Antioxidant therapeutic targets in COPD.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Irfan; Kilty, Iain

    2006-06-01

    Oxidative stress and chronic inflammation are important features in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Oxidative stress has important consequences for several elements of lung physiology and for the pathogenesis of COPD, including oxidative inactivation of antiproteases and surfactants, mucus hypersecretion, membrane lipid peroxidation, alveolar epithelial injury, remodeling of extracellular matrix, and apoptosis. Therefore, targeting oxidative stress with antioxidants or boosting the endogenous levels of antioxidants is likely to be beneficial in the treatment of COPD. Antioxidant and/or anti-inflammatory agents such as thiol molecules (glutathione and mucolytic drugs, such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine and N-acystelyn), dietary polyphenol (curcumin-diferuloylmethane, a principal component of turmeric), resveratrol (a flavanoid found in red wine), green tea (theophylline and epigallocatechin-3- gallate), ergothioneine (xanthine and peroxynitrite inhibitor), quercetin, erdosteine and carbocysteine lysine salt, have been reported to control NF-kappaB activation, regulation of glutathione biosynthesis genes, chromatin remodeling and hence inflammatory gene expression. Specific spin traps such as alpha-phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone, a catalytic antioxidant (ECSOD mimetic), manganese (III) meso-tetrakis (N,N'-diethyl-1,3-imidazolium-2-yl) porphyrin (AEOL 10150 and AEOL 10113), and a SOD mimetic M40419 have also been reported to inhibit cigarette smoke-induced inflammatory responses in vivo. Since a variety of oxidants, free radicals and aldehydes are implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD it is possible that therapeutic administration of multiple antioxidants will be effective in the treatment of COPD. Various approaches to enhance lung antioxidant capacity and clinical trials of antioxidant compounds in COPD are discussed. PMID:16787173

  13. Therapeutic targeting of replicative immortality.

    PubMed

    Yaswen, Paul; MacKenzie, Karen L; Keith, W Nicol; Hentosh, Patricia; Rodier, Francis; Zhu, Jiyue; Firestone, Gary L; Matheu, Ander; Carnero, Amancio; Bilsland, Alan; Sundin, Tabetha; Honoki, Kanya; Fujii, Hiromasa; Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Amedei, Amedeo; Amin, Amr; Helferich, Bill; Boosani, Chandra S; Guha, Gunjan; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Chen, Sophie; Mohammed, Sulma I; Azmi, Asfar S; Bhakta, Dipita; Halicka, Dorota; Niccolai, Elena; Aquilano, Katia; Ashraf, S Salman; Nowsheen, Somaira; Yang, Xujuan

    2015-12-01

    One of the hallmarks of malignant cell populations is the ability to undergo continuous proliferation. This property allows clonal lineages to acquire sequential aberrations that can fuel increasingly autonomous growth, invasiveness, and therapeutic resistance. Innate cellular mechanisms have evolved to regulate replicative potential as a hedge against malignant progression. When activated in the absence of normal terminal differentiation cues, these mechanisms can result in a state of persistent cytostasis. This state, termed "senescence," can be triggered by intrinsic cellular processes such as telomere dysfunction and oncogene expression, and by exogenous factors such as DNA damaging agents or oxidative environments. Despite differences in upstream signaling, senescence often involves convergent interdependent activation of tumor suppressors p53 and p16/pRB, but can be induced, albeit with reduced sensitivity, when these suppressors are compromised. Doses of conventional genotoxic drugs required to achieve cancer cell senescence are often much lower than doses required to achieve outright cell death. Additional therapies, such as those targeting cyclin dependent kinases or components of the PI3K signaling pathway, may induce senescence specifically in cancer cells by circumventing defects in tumor suppressor pathways or exploiting cancer cells' heightened requirements for telomerase. Such treatments sufficient to induce cancer cell senescence could provide increased patient survival with fewer and less severe side effects than conventional cytotoxic regimens. This positive aspect is countered by important caveats regarding senescence reversibility, genomic instability, and paracrine effects that may increase heterogeneity and adaptive resistance of surviving cancer cells. Nevertheless, agents that effectively disrupt replicative immortality will likely be valuable components of new combinatorial approaches to cancer therapy. PMID:25869441

  14. New therapeutic targets for cancer bone metastases

    PubMed Central

    Krzeszinski, Jing Y.; Wan, Yihong

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastases are dejected consequences of many types of tumors including breast, prostate, lung, kidney and thyroid cancers. This complicated process begins with the successful tumor cell epithelial–mesenchymal transition, escape from the original site, and penetration into circulation. The homing of tumor cells to the bone depends on both tumor-intrinsic traits and various molecules supplied by the bone metastatic niche. The colonization and growth of cancer cells in the osseous environment, which awaken their dormancy to form micro- and macro-metastasis, involve an intricate interaction between the circulating tumor cells and local bone cells including osteoclasts, osteoblasts, adipocytes and macrophages. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances in the identification of new molecules and novel mechanisms during each step of bone metastasis that may serve as promising therapeutic targets. PMID:25962679

  15. Epigenetics and therapeutic targets mediating neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Irfan A; Mehler, Mark F

    2015-12-01

    The rapidly evolving science of epigenetics is transforming our understanding of the nervous system in health and disease and holds great promise for the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches targeting neurological diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic factors and mechanisms serve as important mediators of the pathogenic processes that lead to irrevocable neural injury and of countervailing homeostatic and regenerative responses. Epigenetics is, therefore, of considerable translational significance to the field of neuroprotection. In this brief review, we provide an overview of epigenetic mechanisms and highlight the emerging roles played by epigenetic processes in neural cell dysfunction and death and in resultant neuroprotective responses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroprotection. PMID:26236020

  16. Antimicrobial peptides from frog skin: biodiversity and therapeutic promises.

    PubMed

    Ladram, Ali; Nicolas, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    More than a thousand antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been reported in the last decades arising from the skin secretion of amphibian species. Generally, each frog species can express its own repertoire of AMPs (typically, 10-20 peptides) with differing sequences, sizes, and spectrum of action, which implies very rapid divergence, even between closely related species. Frog skin AMPs are highly potent against antibiotic-resistant bacteria, protozoa, yeasts, and fungi by permeating and destroying their plasma membrane and/or inactivating intracellular targets. These peptides have attracted considerable interest as a therapeutic alternative to conventional anti-infective agents. However, efforts to obtain a new generation of drugs using these peptides are still challenging because of high associated R&D costs due to their large size (up to 46 residues) and cytotoxicity. This review deals with the biodiversity of frog skin AMPs and assesses the therapeutic possibilities of temporins, the shortest AMPs found in the frog skin, with 8-17 residues. Such short sequences are easily amenable to optimization of the structure and to solution-phase synthesis that offer reduced costs over solid-phase chemistry. PMID:27100511

  17. Targeting α-synuclein: Therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Dehay, Benjamin; Decressac, Mickael; Bourdenx, Mathieu; Guadagnino, Irene; Fernagut, Pierre-Olivier; Tamburrino, Anna; Bassil, Fares; Meissner, Wassilios G; Bezard, Erwan

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of the central role of α-synuclein (αSyn) in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) has powered, in the last decade, the emergence of novel relevant models of this condition based on viral vector-mediated expression of the disease-causing protein or inoculation of toxic species of αSyn. Although the development of these powerful tools and models has provided considerable insights into the mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in PD, it has also been translated into the expansion of the landscape of preclinical therapeutic strategies. Much attention is now brought to the proteotoxic mechanisms induced by αSyn and how to block them using strategies inspired by intrinsic cellular pathways such as the enhancement of cellular clearance by the lysosomal-autophagic system, through proteasome-mediated degradation or through immunization. The important effort undertaken by several laboratories and consortia to tackle these issues and identify novel targets warrants great promise for the discovery not only of neuroprotective approaches but also of restorative strategies for PD and other synucleinopathies. In this viewpoint, we summarize the latest advances in this new area of PD research and will discuss promising approaches and ongoing challenges. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:26926119

  18. Cucurbitacins - a promising target for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Alghasham, Abdullah A

    2013-01-01

    During the last decades a large number of cucurbitacins have been isolated from various plant species belonging to other plant families than Cucurbitaceae. Although the roots and the fruits of plant belong to these Cucurbitaceae species are very bitter, they have been used as folk medicines in some countries because of their wide spectrum of pharmacological activities such as anti-inflammation and anticancer effects. In the last ten years, cucurbitacins had been shown to inhibit proliferation and induced apoptosis utilizing a long array of in vitro and in vivo cancer cell models. Several molecular targets for cucurbitacins have been discovered, such as fibrous-actin, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT), cyclooxygenase-2, etc. This review aimed at elucidating the natural sources of some cucurbitacin compounds, their chemical structure and derivatives, physical properties, biological activities and mechanism by which they reduce the proliferation human cancer cells. This widens our armaments against a devastating disease that we are failing to face. PMID:23559908

  19. Non-Coding RNAs as Therapeutic Targets in Hepatocellular Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Braconi, Chiara; Patel, Tushar

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common malignancy that affects a large number of patients worldwide, with an increasing incidence in the United States and Europe. The therapies that are currently available for patients with inoperable HCC have limited benefits. Although molecular targeted therapies against selected cell signaling pathways have shown some promising results, their impact has been minimal. There is a need to identify and explore other targets for the development of novel therapeutics. Several non-protein coding RNAs (ncRNA) have recently been implicated in hepatocarcinogenesis and tumor progression. These ncRNA genes represent promising targets for cancer. However, therapeutic targeting of ncRNA genes has not been employed for HCC. The use of antisense oligonucleotides and viral vector delivery approaches has been shown to be feasible approaches to modulate ncRNA expression. HCC is an optimal cancer to evaluate novel RNA based therapeutic approaches because of the potential of effective delivery and uptake of therapeutic agents to the liver. In this review, we discuss selected ncRNA that could function as potential targets in HCC treatment and outline approaches to target ncRNA expression. Future challenges include the need to achieve site-specific targeting with acceptable safety and efficacy. PMID:22873215

  20. Non-coding RNAs as therapeutic targets in hepatocellular cancer.

    PubMed

    Braconi, Chiara; Patel, Tushar

    2012-11-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common malignancy that affects a large number of patients worldwide, with an increasing incidence in the United States and Europe. The therapies that are currently available for patients with inoperable HCC have limited benefits. Although molecular targeted therapies against selected cell signaling pathways have shown some promising results, their impact has been minimal. There is a need to identify and explore other targets for the development of novel therapeutics. Several non-protein coding RNAs (ncRNA) have recently been implicated in hepatocarcinogenesis and tumor progression. These ncRNA genes represent promising targets for cancer. However, therapeutic targeting of ncRNA genes has not been employed for HCC. The use of antisense oligonucleotides and viral vector delivery approaches have been shown to be feasible approaches to modulate ncRNA expression. HCC is an optimal cancer to evaluate novel RNA based therapeutic approaches because of the potential of effective delivery and uptake of therapeutic agents to the liver. In this review, we discuss selected ncRNA that could function as potential targets in HCC treatment and outline approaches to target ncRNA expression. Future challenges include the need to achieve site-specific targeting with acceptable safety and efficacy. PMID:22873215

  1. Therapeutic application of mesenchymal stem cell-derived exosomes: A promising cell-free therapeutic strategy in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Motavaf, M; Pakravan, K; Babashah, S; Malekvandfard, F; Masoumi, M; Sadeghizadeh, M

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells have emerged as promising therapeutic candidates in regenerative medicine. The mechanisms underlying mesenchymal stem cells regenerative properties were initially attributed to their engraftment in injured tissues and their subsequent transdifferentiation to repair and replace damaged cells. However, studies in animal models and patients indicated that the low number of transplanted mesenchymal stem cells localize to the target tissue and transdifferentiate to appropriate cell lineage. Instead the regenerative potential of mesenchymal stem cells has been found - at least in part - to be mediated via their paracrine actions. Recently, a secreted group of vesicles, called "exosome" has been identified as major mediator of mesenchymal stem cells therapeutic efficacy. In this review, we will summarize the current literature on administration of exosomes released by mesenchymal stem cells in regenerative medicine and suggest how they could help to improve tissue regeneration following injury. PMID:27453276

  2. Tracking of Multimodal Therapeutic Nanocomplexes Targeting Breast Cancer in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bardhan, Rizia; Chen, Wenxue; Bartels, Marc; Perez-Torres, Carlos; Botero, Maria F.; McAninch, Robin Ward; Contreras, Alejandro; Schiff, Rachel; Pautler, Robia G.; Halas, Naomi J.; Joshi, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based therapeutics with local delivery and external electromagnetic field modulation holds extraordinary promise for soft-tissue cancers such as breast cancer; however, knowledge of the distribution and fate of nanoparticles in vivo is crucial for clinical translation. Here we demonstrate that multiple diagnostic capabilities can be introduced in photothermal therapeutic nanocomplexes by simultaneously enhancing both near-infrared fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We track nanocomplexes in vivo, examining the influence of HER2 antibody targeting on nanocomplex distribution over 72 h. This approach provides valuable, detailed information regarding the distribution and fate of complex nanoparticles designed for specific diagnostic and therapeutic functions. PMID:21090693

  3. Targeted delivery of therapeutics to endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Simone, Eric; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2009-01-01

    The endothelium is a target for therapeutic and diagnostic interventions in a plethora of human disease conditions including ischemia, inflammation, edema, oxidative stress, thrombosis and hemorrhage, and metabolic and oncological diseases. Unfortunately, drugs have no affinity to the endothelium, thereby limiting the localization, timing, specificity, safety, and effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. Molecular determinants on the surface of resting and pathologically altered endothelial cells, including cell adhesion molecules, peptidases, and receptors involved in endocytosis, can be used for drug delivery to the endothelial surface and into intracellular compartments. Drug delivery platforms such as protein conjugates, recombinant fusion constructs, targeted liposomes, and stealth polymer carriers have been designed to target drugs and imaging agents to these determinants. We review endothelial target determinants and drug delivery systems, describe parameters that control the binding of drug carriers to the endothelium, and provide examples of the endothelial targeting of therapeutic enzymes designed for the treatment of acute vascular disorders including ischemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, and thrombosis. PMID:18815813

  4. Lipid A as a Drug Target and Therapeutic Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Sang Hoon

    2015-01-01

    In this review, lipid A, from its discovery to recent findings, is presented as a drug target and therapeutic molecule. First, the biosynthetic pathway for lipid A, the Raetz pathway, serves as a good drug target for antibiotic development. Several assay methods used to screen for inhibitors of lipid A synthesis will be presented, and some of the promising lead compounds will be described. Second, utilization of lipid A biosynthetic pathways by various bacterial species can generate modified lipid A molecules with therapeutic value. PMID:26535075

  5. Conotoxins: Molecular and Therapeutic Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Richard J.

    Marine molluscs known as cone snails produce beautiful shells and a complex array of over 50,000 venom peptides evolved for prey capture and defence. Many of these peptides selectively modulate ion channels and transporters, making them a valuable source of new ligands for studying the role these targets play in normal and disease physiology. A number of conopeptides reduce pain in animal models, and several are now in pre-clinical and clinical development for the treatment of severe pain often associated with diseases such as cancer. Less than 1% of cone snail venom peptides are pharmacologically characterised.

  6. ASICs as therapeutic targets for migraine.

    PubMed

    Dussor, Greg

    2015-07-01

    Migraine is the most common neurological disorder and one of the most common chronic pain conditions. Despite its prevalence, the pathophysiology leading to migraine is poorly understood and the identification of new therapeutic targets has been slow. Several processes are currently thought to contribute to migraine including altered activity in the hypothalamus, cortical-spreading depression (CSD), and afferent sensory input from the cranial meninges. Decreased extracellular pH and subsequent activation of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) may contribute to each of these processes and may thus play a role in migraine pathophysiology. Although few studies have directly examined a role of ASICs in migraine, studies directly examining a connection have generated promising results including efficacy of ASIC blockers in both preclinical migraine models and in human migraine patients. The purpose of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology thought to contribute to migraine and findings that implicate decreased pH and/or ASICs in these events, as well as propose issues to be resolved in future studies of ASICs and migraine. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in the Nervous System'. PMID:25582295

  7. ASICs as therapeutic targets for migraine

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is the most common neurological disorder and one of the most common chronic pain conditions. Despite its prevalence, the pathophysiology leading to migraine is poorly understood and the identification of new therapeutic targets has been slow. Several processes are currently thought to contribute to migraine including altered activity in the hypothalamus, cortical-spreading depression (CSD), and afferent sensory input from the cranial meninges. Decreased extracellular pH and subsequent activation of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) may contribute to each of these processes and may thus play a role in migraine pathophysiology. Although few studies have directly examined a role of ASICs in migraine, studies directly examining a connection have generated promising results including efficacy of ASIC blockers in both preclinical migraine models and in human migraine patients. The purpose of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology thought to contribute to migraine and findings that implicate decreased pH and/or ASICs in these events, as well as propose issues to be resolved in future studies of ASICs and migraine. PMID:25582295

  8. Medulloblastoma stem cells: Promising targets in medulloblastoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guo-Hao; Xu, Qing-Fu; Cui, You-Hong; Li, Ningning; Bian, Xiu-Wu; Lv, Sheng-Qing

    2016-05-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor. Despite great improvements in the therapeutic regimen, relapse and leptomeningeal dissemination still pose great challenges to the long-term survival of MB patients. Developing more effective strategies has become extremely urgent. In recent years, a number of malignancies, including MB, have been found to contain a subpopulation of cancer cells known as cancer stem cells (CSCs), or tumor initiating/propagating cells. The CSCs are thought to be largely responsible for tumor initiation, maintenance, dissemination, and relapse; therefore, their pivotal roles have revealed them to be promising targets in MB therapy. Our growing understanding of the major medulloblastoma molecular subgroups and the derivation of some of these groups from specific stem or progenitor cells adds additional layers to the CSC knowledge base. Herein we review the current knowledge of MB stem cells, highlight the molecular mechanisms relating to MB relapse and leptomeningeal dissemination, and incorporate these with the need to develop more effective and accurate therapies for MB patients. PMID:27171351

  9. Low Beclin-1 expression predicts improved overall survival in patients treated with immunomodulatory drugs for multiple myeloma and identifies autophagy inhibition as a promising potentially druggable new therapeutic target: an analysis from The Austrian Myeloma Registry (AMR).

    PubMed

    Willenbacher, Wolfgang; Thangavadivel, Shanmugapriya; Greil, Richard; Willenbacher, Ella; Weger, Roman; Manzl, Claudia; Jöhrer, Karin; Brunner, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    Beclin-1 is a key regulator of autophagy and has been suggested to be involved in the development of drug resistance in multiple myeloma (MM). We analyzed the expression of Beclin-1 in a retrospective cohort of 70 MMs. Beclin-1 expression did not influence overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with therapy-naïve MM. In patients treated with immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) lack of or low Beclin-1 expression resulted in a significantly improved OS and PFS compared to those treated with bortezomib or nonnovel agents. Beclin-1 expression was more frequently detected in relapsed MM than in therapy-naïve MM probably being a hallmark of tumor progression and therapy resistance. If validated prospectively, Beclin-1 expression might identify patients prone to profit above average from IMiDs and enable a more rational allocation of antimyeloma therapies. Furthermore, the inhibition of autophagy could be a new promising target to improve response to treatment in the relapsed/refractory setting. PMID:26880040

  10. Targeting tuberculosis: a glimpse of promising drug targets.

    PubMed

    Arora, N; Banerjee, A K

    2012-03-01

    Tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis has emerged as the biggest curse of our time causing significant morbidity and mortality. Increasing resistance in mycobacterium to existing drugs calls for exploration of metabolic pathways for finding novel drug targets and also for prioritization of known drug targets. Recent advances in molecular biology, bioinformatics and structural biology coupled with availability of M. tuberculosis genome sequence have provided much needed boost to drug discovery process. This review provides a glimpse of attractive drug targets for development of anti-mycobacterial drug development. PMID:22356190

  11. Monomeric CH3: A Small, Stable Antibody Domain with Therapeutic Promise | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Antibody domains are emerging as promising biopharmaceuticals because of their relatively small size compared to full-sized antibodies, which are too large to effectively penetrate tumors and bind to sterically restricted therapeutic targets. In an article published in The Journal of Biological Chemistry, Tianlei Ying, Ph.D., Dimiter Dimitrov, Ph.D., and their colleagues in the Protein Interactions Group, Cancer and Inflammation Program, Center for Cancer Research, reported their design of a novel antibody domain, monomeric CH3 (mCH3).

  12. The promises and pitfalls of RNA-interference-based therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Castanotto, Daniela; Rossi, John J.

    2009-01-01

    The discovery that gene expression can be controlled by the Watson–Crick base-pairing of small RNAs with messenger RNAs containing complementary sequence — a process known as RNA interference — has markedly advanced our understanding of eukaryotic gene regulation and function. The ability of short RNA sequences to modulate gene expression has provided a powerful tool with which to study gene function and is set to revolutionize the treatment of disease. Remarkably, despite being just one decade from its discovery, the phenomenon is already being used therapeutically in human clinical trials, and biotechnology companies that focus on RNA-interference-based therapeutics are already publicly traded. PMID:19158789

  13. Tumour vasculature--a potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, C. T.; Winslet, M. C.; Bradley, N. J.

    1995-01-01

    The tumour vasculature is vital for the establishment, growth and metastasis of solid tumours. Its physiological properties limit the effectiveness of conventional anti-cancer strategies. Therapeutic approaches directed at the tumour vasculature are reviewed, suggesting the potential of anti-angiogenesis and the targeting of vascular proliferation antigens as cancer treatments. PMID:7543770

  14. Liposarcoma: molecular targets and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Bill, Kate Lynn J; Casadei, Lucia; Prudner, Bethany C; Iwenofu, Hans; Strohecker, Anne M; Pollock, Raphael E

    2016-10-01

    Liposarcoma (LPS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma and accounts for approximately 20 % of all adult sarcomas. Current treatment modalities (surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy) all have limitations; therefore, molecularly driven studies are needed to improve the identification and increased understanding of genetic and epigenetic deregulations in LPS if we are to successfully target specific tumorigenic drivers. It can be anticipated that such biology-driven therapeutics will improve treatments by selectively deleting cancer cells while sparing normal tissues. This review will focus on several therapeutically actionable molecular markers identified in well-differentiated LPS and dedifferentiated LPS, highlighting their potential clinical applicability. PMID:27173057

  15. Targeting stromal microenvironment in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: controversies and promises

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Lin; Du, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal disease. Conventional therapeutics targeting pancreas cancer cell compartment using cytotoxics improved patient survival but at the expense of significant toxicity. Microscopically, the tumor is characterized by thick desmoplastic stroma that surrounds islands of pancreatic cancer cells. The tumor microenvironment has been found to play important roles in carcinogenesis, the development of drug resistance, and mediating immunosuppression. The understanding the tumor-stromal interaction has led to the development of novel therapeutic approaches. Here, we review the strategies that are currently in (or, near to) clinical evaluation and the underlying preclinical rationales. PMID:27284483

  16. Integration of Mitochondrial Targeting for Molecular Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, Philippe; Guerreschi, Pierre; Mortier, Laurent; Kluza, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial metabolism greatly influences cancer cell survival, invasion, metastasis, and resistance to many anticancer drugs. Furthermore, molecular-targeted therapies (e.g., oncogenic kinase inhibitors) create a dependence of surviving cells on mitochondrial metabolism. For these reasons, inhibition of mitochondrial metabolism represents promising therapeutic pathways in cancer. This review provides an overview of mitochondrial metabolism in cancer and discusses the limitations of mitochondrial inhibition for cancer treatment. Finally, we present preclinical evidence that mitochondrial inhibition could be associated with oncogenic “drivers” inhibitors, which may lead to innovative drug combinations for improving the efficacy of molecular-targeted therapy. PMID:26713093

  17. Resveratrol and cardiovascular health--promising therapeutic or hopeless illusion?

    PubMed

    Tang, Philip Chiu-Tsun; Ng, Yam-Fung; Ho, Susan; Gyda, Michael; Chan, Shun-Wan

    2014-12-01

    Resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) is a natural polyphenolic compound that exists in Polygonum cuspidatum, grapes, peanuts and berries, as well as their manufactured products, especially red wine. Resveratrol is a pharmacologically active compound that interacts with multiple targets in a variety of cardiovascular disease models to exert protective effects or induce a reduction in cardiovascular risks parameters. This review attempts to primarily serve to summarize the current research findings regarding the putative cardioprotective effects of resveratrol and the molecular pathways underlying these effects. One intent is to hopefully provide a relatively comprehensive resource for clues that may prompt ideas for additional mechanistic studies which might further elucidate and strengthen the role of the stilbene family of compounds in cardiovascular disease and cardioprotection. Model systems that incorporate a significant functional association with tissues outside of the cardiovascular system proper, such as adipose (cell culture, obesity models) and pancreatic (diabetes) tissues, were reviewed, and the molecular pathways and/or targets related to these models and influenced by resveratrol are discussed. Because the body of work encompassing the stilbenes and other phytochemicals in the context of longevity and the ability to presumably mitigate a plethora of afflictions is replete with conflicting information and controversy, especially so with respect to the human response, we tried to remain as neutral as possible in compiling and presenting the more current data with minimal commentary, permitting the reader free reign to extract the knowledge most helpful to their own investigations. PMID:25151891

  18. Angiotensins as therapeutic targets beyond heart disease.

    PubMed

    Passos-Silva, Danielle Gomes; Brandan, Enrique; Santos, Robson Augusto Souza

    2015-05-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a pivotal role in cardiovascular and hydro-electrolyte homeostasis. Blockade of the RAS as a therapeutic strategy for treating hypertension and related cardiovascular diseases is well established. However, actions of the RAS go far beyond the targets initially described. In this regard, the recent identification of novel components of the RAS, including angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)], Ang-(1-9), and alamandine, have opened new possibilities for interfering with the development and manifestations of cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular diseases. In this article, we briefly review novel targets for angiotensins and its therapeutic implications in diverse areas, including cancer, inflammation, and glaucoma. PMID:25847571

  19. Memory as a new therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Nader, Karim; Hardt, Oliver; Lanius, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    This review aims to demonstrate how an understanding of the brain mechanisms involved in memory provides a basis for; (i) reconceptualizing some mental disorders; (ii) refining existing therapeutic tools; and (iii) designing new ones for targeting processes that maintain these disorders. First, some of the stages which a memory undergoes are defined, and the clinical relevance of an understanding of memory processing by the brain is discussed. This is followed by a brief review of some of the clinical studies that have targeted memory processes. Finally, some new insights provided by the field of neuroscience with implications for conceptualizing mental disorders are presented. PMID:24459414

  20. Protein kinase C, an elusive therapeutic target?

    PubMed Central

    Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Das, Kanad; Grimes, Kevin V

    2013-01-01

    Preface Protein kinase C (PKC) has been a tantalizing target for drug discovery ever since it was first identified as the receptor for the tumor promoter phorbol ester in 19821. Although initial therapeutic efforts focused on cancer, additional diseases, including diabetic complications, heart failure, myocardial infarction, pain and bipolar disease were targeted as researchers developed a better understanding of the roles that PKC’s eight conventional and novel isozymes play in health and disease. Unfortunately, both academic and pharmaceutical efforts have yet to result in the approval of a single new drug that specifically targets PKC. Why does PKC remain an elusive drug target? This review will provide a short account of some of the efforts, challenges and opportunities in developing PKC modulators to address unmet clinical needs. PMID:23197040

  1. Nuclear receptor coregulators as a new paradigm for therapeutic targeting

    PubMed Central

    Hsia, Elaine Y.; Goodson, Michael L.; Zou, June X.; Privalsky, Martin L.; Chen, Hong-Wu

    2012-01-01

    The complex function and regulation of nuclear receptors cannot be fully understood without a thorough knowledge of the receptor-associated coregulators that either enhance (coactivators) or inhibit (corepressors) transcription. While nuclear receptors themselves have garnered much attention as therapeutic targets, the clinical and etiological relevance of the coregulators to human diseases is increasingly recognized. Aberrant expression or function of coactivators and corepressors has been associated with malignant and metabolic disease development. Many of them are key epigenetic regulators and utilize enzymatic activities to modify chromatin through histone acetylation/deacetylation, histone methylation/demethylation or chromatin remodeling. In this review, we showcase and evaluate coregulators with the most promising therapeutic potential based on their physiological roles and involvement in various diseases that are revealed thus far. We also describe the structural features of the coactivator and corepressor functional domains and highlight areas that can be further explored for molecular targeting. PMID:20933027

  2. Novel therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shing-Chun; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has become the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the last two decades. Only 3%-15% of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer had 5 year survival rate. Drug resistance, high metastasis, poor prognosis and tumour relapse contributed to the malignancies and difficulties in treating pancreatic cancer. The current standard chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer is gemcitabine, however its efficacy is far from satisfactory, one of the reasons is due to the complex tumour microenvironment which decreases effective drug delivery to target cancer cell. Studies of the molecular pathology of pancreatic cancer have revealed that activation of KRAS, overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2, inactivation of p16INK4A and loss of p53 activities occurred in pancreatic cancer. Co-administration of gemcitabine and targeting the molecular pathological events happened in pancreatic cancer has brought an enhanced therapeutic effectiveness of gemcitabine. Therefore, studies looking for novel targets in hindering pancreatic tumour growth are emerging rapidly. In order to give a better understanding of the current findings and to seek the direction in future pancreatic cancer research; in this review we will focus on targets suppressing tumour metastatsis and progression, KRAS activated downstream effectors, the relationship of Notch signaling and Nodal/Activin signaling with pancreatic cancer cells, the current findings of non-coding RNAs in inhibiting pancreatic cancer cell proliferation, brief discussion in transcription remodeling by epigenetic modifiers (e.g., HDAC, BMI1, EZH2) and the plausible therapeutic applications of cancer stem cell and hyaluronan in tumour environment. PMID:25152585

  3. Therapeutic Targeting of Autophagy in Disease: Biology and Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yan; Ren, Xingcong; Hait, William N.

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy, a process of self-digestion of the cytoplasm and organelles through which cellular components are recycled for reuse or energy production, is an evolutionarily conserved response to metabolic stress found in eukaryotes from yeast to mammals. It is noteworthy that autophagy is also associated with various pathophysiologic conditions in which this cellular process plays either a cytoprotective or cytopathic role in response to a variety of stresses such as metabolic, inflammatory, neurodegenerative, and therapeutic stress. It is now generally believed that modulating the activity of autophagy through targeting specific regulatory molecules in the autophagy machinery may impact disease processes, thus autophagy may represent a new pharmacologic target for drug development and therapeutic intervention of various human disorders. Induction or inhibition of autophagy using small molecule compounds has shown promise in the treatment of diseases such as cancer. Depending on context, induction or suppression of autophagy may exert therapeutic effects via promoting either cell survival or death, two major events targeted by therapies for various disorders. A better understanding of the biology of autophagy and the pharmacology of autophagy modulators has the potential for facilitating the development of autophagy-based therapeutic interventions for several human diseases. PMID:23943849

  4. Therapeutic strategies targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Xiaoyan; Shu, Jianchang; Du, Yiqi; Ben, Qiwen; Li, Zhaoshen

    2013-01-01

    Increasing studies have demonstrated a small proportion of cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in the cancer cell population. CSCs have powerful self-renewal capacity and tumor-initiating ability and are resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. Conventional anticancer therapies kill the rapidly proliferating bulk cancer cells but spare the relatively quiescent CSCs, which cause cancer recurrence. So it is necessary to develop therapeutic strategies acting specifically on CSCs. In recent years, studies have shown that therapeutic agents such as metformin, salinomycin, DECA-14, rapamycin, oncostatin M (OSM), some natural compounds, oncolytic viruses, microRNAs, cell signaling pathway inhibitors, TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), interferon (IFN), telomerase inhibitors, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and monoclonal antibodies can suppress the self-renewal of CSCs in vitro and in vivo. A combination of these agents and conventional chemotherapy drugs can significantly inhibit tumor growth, metastasis and recurrence. These strategies targeting CSCs may bring new hopes to cancer therapy. PMID:23358473

  5. Therapeutic strategies targeting cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ning, Xiaoyan; Shu, Jianchang; Du, Yiqi; Ben, Qiwen; Li, Zhaoshen

    2013-04-01

    Increasing studies have demonstrated a small proportion of cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in the cancer cell population. CSCs have powerful self-renewal capacity and tumor-initiating ability and are resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. Conventional anticancer therapies kill the rapidly proliferating bulk cancer cells but spare the relatively quiescent CSCs, which cause cancer recurrence. So it is necessary to develop therapeutic strategies acting specifically on CSCs. In recent years, studies have shown that therapeutic agents such as metformin, salinomycin, DECA-14, rapamycin, oncostatin M (OSM), some natural compounds, oncolytic viruses, microRNAs, cell signaling pathway inhibitors, TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), interferon (IFN), telomerase inhibitors, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and monoclonal antibodies can suppress the self-renewal of CSCs in vitro and in vivo. A combination of these agents and conventional chemotherapy drugs can significantly inhibit tumor growth, metastasis and recurrence. These strategies targeting CSCs may bring new hopes to cancer therapy. PMID:23358473

  6. Advancements in therapeutically targeting orphan GPCRs.

    PubMed

    Stockert, Jennifer A; Devi, Lakshmi A

    2015-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are popular biological targets for drug discovery and development. To date there are more than 140 orphan GPCRs, i.e., receptors whose endogenous ligands are unknown. Traditionally orphan GPCRs have been difficult to study and the development of therapeutic compounds targeting these receptors has been extremely slow although these GPCRs are considered important targets based on their distribution and behavioral phenotype as revealed by animals lacking the receptor. Recent advances in several methods used to study orphan receptors, including protein crystallography and homology modeling are likely to be useful in the identification of therapeutics targeting these receptors. In the past 13 years, over a dozen different Class A GPCRs have been crystallized; this trend is exciting, since homology modeling of GPCRs has previously been limited by the availability of solved structures. As the number of solved GPCR structures continues to grow so does the number of templates that can be used to generate increasingly accurate models of phylogenetically related orphan GPCRs. The availability of solved structures along with the advances in using multiple templates to build models (in combination with molecular dynamics simulations that reveal structural information not provided by crystallographic data and methods for modeling hard-to-predict flexible loop regions) have improved the quality of GPCR homology models. This, in turn, has improved the success rates of virtual ligand screens that use homology models to identify potential receptor binding compounds. Experimental testing of the predicted hits and validation using traditional GPCR pharmacological approaches can be used to drive ligand-based efforts to probe orphan receptor biology as well as to define the chemotypes and chemical scaffolds important for binding. As a result of these advances, orphan GPCRs are emerging from relative obscurity as a new class of drug targets. PMID

  7. Diabetic Kidney Disease: Pathophysiology and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Toth-Manikowski, Stephanie; Atta, Mohamed G.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic that has led to a rise in diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Over the past two decades, there has been significant clarification of the various pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of DKD. Nonetheless, very little has changed in the way clinicians manage patients with this disorder. Indeed, treatment is primarily centered on controlling hyperglycemia and hypertension and inhibiting the renin-angiotensin system. The purpose of this review is to describe the current understanding of how the hemodynamic, metabolic, inflammatory, and alternative pathways are all entangled in pathogenesis of DKD and detail the various therapeutic targets that may one day play a role in quelling this epidemic. PMID:26064987

  8. The Promise and Challenge of Therapeutic MicroRNA Silencing in Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Sethupathy, Praveen

    2016-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding, RNA molecules that regulate gene expression. They have a long evolutionary history and are found in plants, viruses, and animals. Although initially discovered in 1993 in Caenorhabditis elegans, they were not appreciated as widespread and abundant gene regulators until the early 2000s. Studies in the last decade have found that miRNAs confer phenotypic robustness in the face of environmental perturbation, may serve as diagnostic and prognostic indicators of disease, underlie the pathobiology of a wide array of complex disorders, and represent compelling therapeutic targets. Pre-clinical studies in animal models have demonstrated that pharmacologic manipulation of miRNAs, mostly in the liver, can modulate metabolic phenotypes and even reverse the course of insulin resistance and diabetes. There is cautious optimism in the field about miRNA-based therapies for diabetes, several of which are already in various stages of clinical trials. This review will highlight both the promise and the most pressing challenges of therapeutic miRNA silencing in diabetes and related conditions. PMID:27112956

  9. The Challenges and the Promise of Molecular Targeted Therapy in Malignant Gliomas1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongxiang; Xu, Tao; Jiang, Ying; Xu, Hanchong; Yan, Yong; Fu, Da; Chen, Juxiang

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common malignant primary brain tumors and one of the most challenging forms of cancers to treat. Despite advances in conventional treatment, the outcome for patients remains almost universally fatal. This poor prognosis is due to therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence after surgical removal. However, over the past decade, molecular targeted therapy has held the promise of transforming the care of malignant glioma patients. Significant progress in understanding the molecular pathology of gliomagenesis and maintenance of the malignant phenotypes will open opportunities to rationally develop new molecular targeted therapy options. Recently, therapeutic strategies have focused on targeting pro-growth signaling mediated by receptor tyrosine kinase/RAS/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway, proangiogenic pathways, and several other vital intracellular signaling networks, such as proteasome and histone deacetylase. However, several factors such as cross-talk between the altered pathways, intratumoral molecular heterogeneity, and therapeutic resistance of glioma stem cells (GSCs) have limited the activity of single agents. Efforts are ongoing to study in depth the complex molecular biology of glioma, develop novel regimens targeting GSCs, and identify biomarkers to stratify patients with the individualized molecular targeted therapy. Here, we review the molecular alterations relevant to the pathology of malignant glioma, review current advances in clinical targeted trials, and discuss the challenges, controversies, and future directions of molecular targeted therapy. PMID:25810009

  10. Interleukin-6 as a therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Jean-François; Lu, Zhao-Yang; Jourdan, Michel; Klein, Bernard

    2015-03-15

    Human IL6 is a cytokine produced by many cell types that has pleiotropic effects. In agreement, anti-IL6 therapy reduces inflammation, hepatic acute phase proteins, and anemia and has antiangiogenic effects. Blocking IL6 has demonstrated therapeutic efficacy with drug registration in Castleman disease and inflammatory diseases (rheumatoid arthritis) without major toxicity. Interestingly, the inhibition of C-reactive protein (CRP) production is a trustworthy surrogate marker of anti-IL6 therapy efficacy. Clinically registered IL6 inhibitors include siltuximab, an anti-IL6 mAb, and tocilizumab, an anti-IL6R mAb. In various cancers, in particular plasma cell cancers, large randomized trials showed no efficacy of IL6 inhibitors, despite a full inhibition of CRP production in treated patients in vivo, the numerous data showing an involvement of IL6 in these diseases, and initial short-term treatments demonstrating a dramatic inhibition of cancer cell proliferation in vivo. A likely explanation is the plasticity of cancer cells, with the presence of various subclones, making the outgrowth of cancer subclones possible using growth factors other than IL6. In addition, current therapeutic strategies used in these cancers already target IL6 activity. Thus, anti-IL6 therapeutics are able to neutralize IL6 production in vivo and are safe and useful in inflammatory diseases and Castleman disease. PMID:25589616

  11. Therapeutic Targeting of Mitochondrial Superoxide in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Dikalova, Anna E.; Bikineyeva, Alfiya T.; Budzyn, Klaudia; Nazarewicz, Rafal R.; McCann, Louise; Lewis, William; Harrison, David G.; Dikalov, Sergey I.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Superoxide (O2∸) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many human diseases including hypertension, however commonly employed antioxidants have proven ineffective in clinical trials. It is possible that these agents are not adequately delivered to the subcellular sites of superoxide production. Objective: Because the mitochondria are important sources of reactive oxygen species, we postulated that mitochondrial targeting of superoxide scavenging would have therapeutic benefit. Methods and Results: In this study, we found that the hormone angiotensin II increased endothelial mitochondrial superoxide production. Treatment with the mitochondrial targeted antioxidant mitoTEMPO decreased mitochondrial O2∸, inhibited the total cellular O2∸, reduced cellular NADPH oxidase activity and restored the level of bioavailable NO. These effects were mimicked by overexpressing the mitochondrial MnSOD (SOD2), while SOD2 depletion with siRNA increased both basal and angiotensin II-stimulated cellular O2∸. Treatment of mice in vivo with mitoTEMPO attenuated hypertension when given at the onset of angiotensin II infusion and decreased blood pressure by 30 mm Hg following establishment of both angiotensin II-induced and DOCA-salt hypertension, while a similar dose of non-targeted TEMPOL was not effective. In vivo, mitoTEMPO decreased vascular O2∸, increased vascular NO• production and improved endothelial-dependent relaxation. Interestingly, transgenic mice overexpressing mitochondrial SOD2 demonstrated attenuated angiotensin II-induced hypertension and vascular oxidative stress similar to mice treated with mitoTEMPO. Conclusions: These studies show that mitochondrial O2∸ is important for the development of hypertension and that antioxidant strategies specifically targeting this organelle could have therapeutic benefit in this and possibly other diseases. PMID:20448215

  12. Therapeutic Targets for the Treatment of Hepatitis E Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Scott P.; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the most common causes of acute viral hepatitis in the world with an estimated 20 million infections per year. Although the mortality rate is less than 1% among the general population, pregnant women can have a fatality rate of up to 30%. Additionally, chronic hepatitis E has increasingly become a significant clinical problem in immunocompromised individuals. Effective antivirals against HEV are needed. Areas covered This review article addresses the current state of knowledge of HEV infections with regard to animal and cell culture model systems that are important for antiviral discovery and testing, our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of virus replication, our understanding of how each viral protein functions, and areas that can potentially be exploited as therapeutic targets. Expert opinion Lack of an efficient cell culture system for HEV propagation, the limited knowledge of HEV lifecycle, and the inherent self-limiting infection within the normal populace make the development of new therapeutic agents against HEV challenging. There are many promising therapeutic targets, and the tools for identifying and testing potential antivirals are rapidly evolving. The development of effective therapeutics against HEV in immunocompromised and pregnant patient populations is warranted. PMID:26073772

  13. Targeting PARP in Prostate Cancer: Novelty, Pitfalls, and Promise.

    PubMed

    Palmbos, Phillip L; Hussain, Maha H

    2016-05-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer remains a highly lethal disease with no curative therapeutic options. A significant subset of patients with prostate cancer harbor either germline or somatic mutations in DNA repair enzyme genes such as BRCA1, BRCA2, or ATM. Emerging data suggest that drugs that target poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase (PARP) enzymes may represent a novel and effective means of treating tumors with these DNA repair defects, including prostate cancers. Here we will review the molecular mechanism of action of PARP inhibitors and discuss how they target tumor cells with faulty DNA repair functions and transcriptional controls. We will review emerging data for the utility of PARP inhibition in the management of metastatic prostate cancer. Finally, we will place PARP inhibitors within the framework of precision medicine-based care of patients with prostate cancer. PMID:27188668

  14. A Promising Development: "Promise" Scholarships Targeting Individual Communities Reduce Barriers to College Access--and Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses Promise Scholarships in community colleges and sources of funding. The following community colleges and their scholarships are mentioned in this article: (1) Oregon Promise, Oregon; (2) Ventura College Promise, California; (3) Kalamazoo Promise, Michigan; (4) Pittsburgh Promise, Pennsylvania; (5) SEED Scholarship, Delaware;…

  15. Pancreatic cancer: molecular pathogenesis and new therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Han H.; Lemoine, Nicholas R.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with pancreatic cancer normally present with advanced disease that is lethal and notoriously difficult to treat. Survival has not improved dramatically, despite routine use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy; this situation signifies an urgent need for novel therapeutic approaches. Over the past decade, a large number of studies that aimed to target the molecular abnormalities implicated in pancreatic tumor growth, invasion, metastasis, angiogenesis and resistance to apoptosis have been published. This research is of particular importance, as recent data suggest that a large number of genetic alterations affect only a few major signaling pathways and processes involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis. Although laboratory results of targeted therapies have been impressive, until now only erlotinib, an epidermal growth-factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has demonstrated modest survival benefit in combination with gemcitabine in a phase III clinical trial. Whilst the failures of targeted therapies in the clinical setting are discouraging, lessons have been learnt and new therapeutic targets that hold promise for the future management of the disease are continuously emerging. This Review describes some of the important developments and targeted agents for pancreatic cancer that have been tested in clinical trials. PMID:19506583

  16. Magnetic antibody-linked nanomatchmakers for therapeutic cell targeting

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ke; Shen, Deliang; Hensley, M. Taylor; Middleton, Ryan; Sun, Baiming; Liu, Weixin; De Couto, Geoffrey; Marbán, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation is a promising strategy for therapeutic cardiac regeneration, but current therapies are limited by inefficient interaction between potentially beneficial cells (either exogenously transplanted or endogenously recruited) and the injured tissue. Here we apply targeted nanomedicine to achieve in vivo cell-mediated tissue repair, imaging and localized enrichment without cellular transplantation. Iron nanoparticles are conjugated with two types of antibodies (one against antigens on therapeutic cells and the other directed at injured cells) to produce magnetic bifunctional cell engager (MagBICE). The antibodies link the therapeutic cells to the injured cells, whereas the iron core of MagBICE enables physical enrichment and imaging. We treat acute myocardial infarction by targeting exogenous bone marrow-derived stem cells (expressing CD45) or endogenous CD34-positive cells to injured cardiomyocytes (expressing myosin light chain. Targeting can be further enhanced by magnetic attraction, leading to augmented functional benefits. MagBICE represents a generalizable platform technology for regenerative medicine. PMID:25205020

  17. Critical questions in development of targeted nanoparticle therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Korsmeyer, Richard

    2016-06-01

    One of the fourteen Grand Challenges for Engineering articulated by the US National Academy of Engineering is 'Engineer Better Medicines'. Although there are many ways that better medicines could be engineered, one of the most promising ideas is to improve our ability to deliver the therapeutic molecule more precisely to the desired target. Most conventional drug delivery methods (oral absorption, intravenous infusion etc.) result in systemic exposure to the therapeutic molecule, which places severe constraints on the types of molecules that can be used. A molecule administered by systemic delivery must be effective at low concentrations in the target tissue, yet safe everywhere else in the body. If drug carriers could be developed to deliver therapeutic molecules selectively to the desired target, it should be possible to greatly improve safety and efficacy of therapy. Nanoparticles (and related nanostructures, such as liposomes, nanoemulsions, micelles and dendrimers) are an attractive drug carrier concept because they can be made from a variety of materials engineered to have properties that allow loading and precise delivery of bound therapeutic molecules. The field of targeted nanoparticles has been extraordinarily active in the academic realm, with thousands of articles published over the last few years. Many of these publications seem to demonstrate very promising results in in vitro studies and even in animal models. In addition, a handful of human clinical trials are in progress. Yet, the biopharmaceutical industry has been relatively slow to make major investments in targeted nanoparticle development programs, despite a clear desire to introduce innovative new therapies to the market. What is the reason for such caution? Some degree of caution is no doubt due to the use of novel materials and the unproven nature of targeted nanoparticle technology, but many other unproven technologies have generated intense interest at various times. We believe that the

  18. Critical questions in development of targeted nanoparticle therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Korsmeyer, Richard

    2016-01-01

    One of the fourteen Grand Challenges for Engineering articulated by the US National Academy of Engineering is ‘Engineer Better Medicines’. Although there are many ways that better medicines could be engineered, one of the most promising ideas is to improve our ability to deliver the therapeutic molecule more precisely to the desired target. Most conventional drug delivery methods (oral absorption, intravenous infusion etc.) result in systemic exposure to the therapeutic molecule, which places severe constraints on the types of molecules that can be used. A molecule administered by systemic delivery must be effective at low concentrations in the target tissue, yet safe everywhere else in the body. If drug carriers could be developed to deliver therapeutic molecules selectively to the desired target, it should be possible to greatly improve safety and efficacy of therapy. Nanoparticles (and related nanostructures, such as liposomes, nanoemulsions, micelles and dendrimers) are an attractive drug carrier concept because they can be made from a variety of materials engineered to have properties that allow loading and precise delivery of bound therapeutic molecules. The field of targeted nanoparticles has been extraordinarily active in the academic realm, with thousands of articles published over the last few years. Many of these publications seem to demonstrate very promising results in in vitro studies and even in animal models. In addition, a handful of human clinical trials are in progress. Yet, the biopharmaceutical industry has been relatively slow to make major investments in targeted nanoparticle development programs, despite a clear desire to introduce innovative new therapies to the market. What is the reason for such caution? Some degree of caution is no doubt due to the use of novel materials and the unproven nature of targeted nanoparticle technology, but many other unproven technologies have generated intense interest at various times. We believe that

  19. Targeting ischemic penumbra: part I - from pathophysiology to therapeutic strategy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shimin; Levine, Steven R.; Winn, H. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Penumbra is the viable tissue around the irreversibly damaged ischemic core. The purpose of acute stroke treatment is to salvage penumbral tissue and to improve brain function. However, the majority of acute stroke patients who have treatable penumbra are left untreated. Therefore, developing an effective non-recanalizational therapeutics, such as neuroprotective agents, has significant clinical applications. Part I of this serial review on “targeting penumbra” puts special emphases on penumbral pathophysiology and the development of therapeutic strategies. Bioenergetic intervention by massive metabolic suppression and direct energy delivery would be a promising future direction. An effective drug delivery system for this purpose should be able to penetrate BBB and achieve high local tissue drug levels while non-ischemic region being largely unaffected. Selective drug delivery to ischemic stroke penumbra is feasible and deserves intensive research. PMID:20607107

  20. CRISPR-Cas9 systems: versatile cancer modelling platforms and promising therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wan-Shun; Yuan, Zhi-Min; Ma, Shi-Jie; Xu, Jiang; Yuan, Dong-Tang

    2016-03-15

    The RNA-guided nuclease CRISPR-Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR associated nuclease 9) and its variants such as nickase Cas9, dead Cas9, guide RNA scaffolds and RNA-targeting Cas9 are convenient and versatile platforms for site-specific genome editing and epigenome modulation. They are easy-to-use, simple-to-design and capable of targeting multiple loci simultaneously. Given that cancer develops from cumulative genetic and epigenetic alterations, CRISPR-Cas9 and its variants (hereafter referred to as CRISPR-Cas9 systems) hold extensive application potentials in cancer modeling and therapy. To date, they have already been applied to model oncogenic mutations in cell lines (e.g., Choi and Meyerson, Nat Commun 2014;5:3728) and in adult animals (e.g., Xue et al., Nature 2014;514:380-4), as well as to combat cancer by disabling oncogenic viruses (e.g., Hu et al., Biomed Res Int 2014;2014:612823) or by manipulating cancer genome (e.g., Liu et al., Nat Commun 2014;5:5393). Given the importance of epigenome and transcriptome in tumourigenesis, manipulation of cancer epigenome and transcriptome for cancer modeling and therapy is a promising area in the future. Whereas (epi)genetic modifications of cancer microenvironment with CRISPR-Cas9 systems for therapeutic purposes represent another promising area in cancer research. Herein, we introduce the functions and mechanisms of CRISPR-Cas9 systems in genome editing and epigenome modulation, retrospect their applications in cancer modelling and therapy, discuss limitations and possible solutions and propose future directions, in hope of providing concise and enlightening information for readers interested in this area. PMID:26044706

  1. Multilevel therapeutic targeting by topoisomerase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, P. J.; Souès, S.

    1994-01-01

    The successful use of cytotoxic agents in the clinical management of LCH depends upon the selective targeting of cells participating in the disease process. The topoisomerase 'poisons', currently used extensively in the treatment of aggressive malignancies, represent an intriguing class of cytotoxic agents exerting their cytostatic and cytotoxic effects at multiple levels according to cell type. The non-DNA intercalating topoisomerase II poison, etoposide (VP-16), is the "drug of first choice" in the treatment of LCH by cytotoxic chemotherapy. This major anticancer agent traps the nuclear enzyme DNA topoisomerase II on DNA in a sequence-specific manner, the processing of trapped complexes giving rise to a plethora of cellular effects not least the potential activation of pathways leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. This short review describes the principles of topoisomerase inhibition, the multiplicity of cellular effects and the concept of cellular targeting in LCH. The successful treatment of LCH by cytotoxic chemotherapy will depend on both the identity of the target tissues and a clear view of therapeutic intent, given the potential for induction of haematological neoplasia. PMID:8075006

  2. Quadruplex Nucleic Acids as Novel Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Neidle, Stephen

    2016-07-14

    Quadruplex-forming sequences are widely prevalent in human and other genomes, including bacterial ones. These sequences are over-represented in eukaryotic telomeres, promoters, and 5' untranslated regions. They can form quadruplex structures, which may be transient in many situations in normal cells since they can be effectively resolved by helicase action. Mutated helicases in cancer cells are unable to unwind quadruplexes, which are impediments to transcription, translation, or replication, depending on their location within a particular gene. Small molecules that can stabilize quadruplex structures augment these effects and produce cell and proliferation growth inhibition. This article surveys the chemical biology of quadruplexes. It critically examines the major classes of quadruplex-binding small molecules that have been developed to date and the various approaches to discovering selective agents. The challenges of requiring (and achieving) small-molecule targeted selectivity for a particular quadruplex are discussed in relation to the potential of these small molecules as clinically useful therapeutic agents. PMID:26840940

  3. Development of novel activin-targeted therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Justin L; Walton, Kelly L; Al-Musawi, Sara L; Kelly, Emily K; Qian, Hongwei; La, Mylinh; Lu, Louis; Lovrecz, George; Ziemann, Mark; Lazarus, Ross; El-Osta, Assam; Gregorevic, Paul; Harrison, Craig A

    2015-03-01

    Soluble activin type II receptors (ActRIIA/ActRIIB), via binding to diverse TGF-β proteins, can increase muscle and bone mass, correct anemia or protect against diet-induced obesity. While exciting, these multiple actions of soluble ActRIIA/IIB limit their therapeutic potential and highlight the need for new reagents that target specific ActRIIA/IIB ligands. Here, we modified the activin A and activin B prodomains, regions required for mature growth factor synthesis, to generate specific activin antagonists. Initially, the prodomains were fused to the Fc region of mouse IgG2A antibody and, subsequently, "fastener" residues (Lys(45), Tyr(96), His(97), and Ala(98); activin A numbering) that confer latency to other TGF-β proteins were incorporated. For the activin A prodomain, these modifications generated a reagent that potently (IC(50) 5 nmol/l) and specifically inhibited activin A signaling in vitro, and activin A-induced muscle wasting in vivo. Interestingly, the modified activin B prodomain inhibited both activin A and B signaling in vitro (IC(50) ~2 nmol/l) and in vivo, suggesting it could serve as a general activin antagonist. Importantly, unlike soluble ActRIIA/IIB, the modified prodomains did not inhibit myostatin or GDF-11 activity. To underscore the therapeutic utility of specifically antagonising activin signaling, we demonstrate that the modified activin prodomains promote significant increases in muscle mass. PMID:25399825

  4. Phosphodiesterases as Therapeutic Targets for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among the elderly. In AD patients, memory loss is accompanied by the formation of beta-amyloid plaques and the appearance of tau in a pathological form. Given the lack of effective treatments for AD, the development of new management strategies for these patients is critical. The continued failure to find effective therapies using molecules aimed at addressing the anti-beta amyloid pathology has led researchers to focus on other non-amyloid-based approaches to restore memory function. Promising non-amyloid related candidate targets include phosphosdiesterases (PDEs), and indeed, Rolipram, a specific PDE4 inhibitor, was the first compound found to effectively restore cognitive deficits in animal models of AD. More recently, PDE5 inhibitors have also been shown to effectively restore memory function. Accordingly, inhibitors of other members of the PDE family may also improve memory performance in AD and non-AD animal models. Hence, in this review, we will summarize the data supporting the use of PDE inhibitors as cognitive enhancers and we will discuss the possible mechanisms of action underlying these effects. We shall also adopt a medicinal chemistry perspective that leads us to propose the most promising PDE candidates on the basis of inhibitor selectivity, brain distribution, and mechanism of action. PMID:23173065

  5. Delivery of Therapeutic RNAs Into Target Cells IN VIVO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Mei Ying; Hagen, Thilo

    2014-02-01

    RNA-based therapy is one of the most promising approaches to treat human diseases. Specifically, the use of short interfering RNA (siRNA) siRNA and microRNA (miRNA) mimics for in vivo RNA interference has immense potential as it directly lowers the expression of the therapeutic target protein. However, there are a number of major roadblocks to the successful implementation of siRNA and other RNA based therapies in the clinic. These include the instability of RNAs in vivo and the difficulty to efficiently deliver the RNA into the target cells. Hence, various innovative approaches have been taken over the years to develop effective RNA delivery methods. These methods include liposome-, polymeric nanoparticle- and peptide-mediated cellular delivery. In a recent innovative study, bioengineered bacterial outer membrane vesicles were used as vehicles for effective delivery of siRNA into cells in vivo.

  6. Therapeutic Implications of Targeting Energy Metabolism in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sakharkar, Meena K.; Shashni, Babita; Sharma, Karun; Dhillon, Sarinder K.; Ranjekar, Prabhakar R.; Sakharkar, Kishore R.

    2013-01-01

    PPARs are ligand activated transcription factors. PPARγ agonists have been reported as a new and potentially efficacious treatment of inflammation, diabetes, obesity, cancer, AD, and schizophrenia. Since cancer cells show dysregulation of glycolysis they are potentially manageable through changes in metabolic environment. Interestingly, several of the genes involved in maintaining the metabolic environment and the central energy generation pathway are regulated or predicted to be regulated by PPARγ. The use of synthetic PPARγ ligands as drugs and their recent withdrawal/restricted usage highlight the lack of understanding of the molecular basis of these drugs, their off-target effects, and their network. These data further underscores the complexity of nuclear receptor signalling mechanisms. This paper will discuss the function and role of PPARγ in energy metabolism and cancer biology in general and its emergence as a promising therapeutic target in breast cancer. PMID:23431283

  7. Neuronal and Cardiovascular Potassium Channels as Therapeutic Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Edward S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Potassium (K+) channels, with their diversity, often tissue-defined distribution, and critical role in controlling cellular excitability, have long held promise of being important drug targets for the treatment of dysrhythmias in the heart and abnormal neuronal activity within the brain. With the exception of drugs that target one particular class, ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels, very few selective K+ channel activators or inhibitors are currently licensed for clinical use in cardiovascular and neurological disease. Here we review what a range of human genetic disorders have told us about the role of specific K+ channel subunits, explore the potential of activators and inhibitors of specific channel populations as a therapeutic strategy, and discuss possible reasons for the difficulty in designing clinically relevant K+ channel modulators. PMID:26303307

  8. Programmed death-1 & its ligands: promising targets for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shrimali, Rajeev K; Janik, John E; Abu-Eid, Rasha; Mkrtichyan, Mikayel; Khleif, Samir N

    2015-01-01

    Novel strategies for cancer treatment involving blockade of immune inhibitors have shown significant progress toward understanding the molecular mechanism of tumor immune evasion. The preclinical findings and clinical responses associated with programmed death-1 (PD-1) and PD-ligand pathway blockade seem promising, making these targets highly sought for cancer immunotherapy. In fact, the anti-PD-1 antibodies, pembrolizumab and nivolumab, were recently approved by the US FDA for the treatment of unresectable and metastatic melanoma resistant to anticytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 antibody (ipilimumab) and BRAF inhibitor. Here, we discuss strategies of combining PD-1/PD-ligand interaction inhibitors with other immune checkpoint modulators and standard-of-care therapy to break immune tolerance and induce a potent antitumor activity, which is currently a research area of key scientific pursuit. PMID:26250412

  9. Advances in rheumatology: new targeted therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tak, Paul P; Kalden, Joachim R

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of inflammatory arthritides - including rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriatic arthritis - has seen much progress in recent years, partially due to increased understanding of the pathogenesis of these diseases at the cellular and molecular levels. These conditions share some common mechanisms. Biologic therapies have provided a clear advance in the treatment of rheumatological conditions. Currently available TNF-targeting biologic agents that are licensed for at east one of the above-named diseases are etanercept, infliximab, adalimumab, golimumab, and certolizumab. Biologic agents with a different mechanism of action have also been approved in rheumatoid arthritis (rituximab, abatacept, and tocilizumab). Although these biologic agents are highly effective, there is a need for improved management strategies. There is also a need for education of family physicians and other healthcare professionals in the identification of early symptoms of inflammatory arthritides and the importance of early referral to rheumatologists for diagnosis and treatment. Also, researchers are developing molecules - for example, the Janus kinase inhibitor CP-690550 (tofacitinib) and the spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor R788 (fostamatinib) - to target other aspects of the inflammatory cascade. Initial trial results with new agents are promising, and, in time, head-to-head trials will establish the best treatment options for patients. The key challenge is identifying how best to integrate these new, advanced therapies into daily practice. PMID:21624184

  10. Therapeutic targets for treating fibrotic kidney diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So-Young; Kim, Sung Il; Choi, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Renal fibrosis is the hallmark of virtually all progressive kidney diseases and strongly correlates with the deterioration of kidney function. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade is central to the current treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) for the renoprotective effects aimed to prevent or slow progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, the incidence of CKD is still increasing, and there is a critical need for new therapeutics. Here, we review novel strategies targeting various components implicated in the fibrogenic pathway to inhibit or retard the loss of kidney function. We focus, in particular, on anti-fibrotic approaches that target transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, a key mediator of kidney fibrosis, and exciting new data on the role of autophagy. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-7 and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) are highlighted as modulators of pro-fibrotic TGF-β activity. BMP-7 has a protective role against TGF-β1 in kidney fibrosis, whereas CTGF enhances TGF-β-mediated fibrosis. We also discuss recent advances in the development of additional strategies for anti-fibrotic therapy. These include strategies targeting chemokine pathways via CC chemokine receptor 1 and 2 to modulate the inflammatory response, inhibition of phosphodiesterase to restore nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic 3′,5′ guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) function, inhibition of NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1) and 4 (Nox4) to suppress reactive oxygen species production, as well as inhibition of endothelin-1 or tumor necrosis factor-α to ameliorate progressive renal fibrosis. Furthermore, a brief overview of some of the biomarkers of kidney fibrosis currently being explored that may improve the ability to monitor anti-fibrotic therapies. It is hoped that evidence based on the preclinical and clinical data discussed in this review leads to novel anti-fibrotic therapies effective in patients with CKD to prevent or delay progression to ESRD. PMID

  11. Toward Intracellular Targeted Delivery of Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Hetal; Debinski, Waldemar

    2013-01-01

    A number of anti-cancer drugs have their targets localized to particular intracellular compartments. These drugs reach the targets mainly through diffusion, dependent on biophysical and biochemical forces that allow cell penetration. This means that both cancer cells and normal cells will be subjected to such diffusion; hence many of these drugs, like chemotherapeutics, are potentially toxic and the concentration achieved at the site of their action is often suboptimal. The same relates to radiation that indiscriminately affects normal and diseased cells. However, nature-designed systems enable compounds present in the extracellular environment to end up inside the cell and even travel to more specific intracellular compartments. For example, viruses and bacterial toxins can more or less specifically recognize eukaryotic cells, enter these cells, and direct some protein portions to designated intracellular areas. These phenomena have led to creative thinking, such as employing viruses or bacterial toxins for cargo delivery to cells and, more specifically, to cancer cells. Proteins can be genetically engineered in order to not only mimic what viruses and bacterial toxins can do, but also to add new functions, extending or changing the intracellular routes. It is possible to make conjugates or, more preferably, single-chain proteins that recognize cancer cells and deliver cargo inside the cells, even to the desired subcellular compartment. These findings offer new opportunities to deliver drugs/labels only to cancer cells and only to their site of action within the cells. The development of such dual-specificity vectors for targeting cancer cells is an attractive and potentially safer and more efficacious way of delivering drugs. We provide examples of this approach for delivering brain cancer therapeutics, using a specific biomarker on glioblastoma tumor cells. PMID:22671766

  12. Necroptosis: a potential, promising target and switch in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Qu, Feng-Zhi; Li, Le; Lv, Jia-Chen; Sun, Bei

    2016-02-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell death is the major pathophysiological change in early acute pancreatitis (AP), and the death modalities are important factors determining its progression and prognosis. During AP, acinar cells undergo two major modes of death, including necrosis and apoptosis. Acinar necrosis can lead to intensely local and systemic inflammatory responses, which both induce and aggravate the lesion. Necrosis has long been considered an unregulated, and passive cell death process. Since the effective interventions of necrosis are difficult to perform, its relevant studies have not received adequate attention. Necroptosis is a newly discovered cell death modality characterized by both necrosis and apoptosis, i.e., it is actively regulated by special genes, while has the typical morphological features of necrosis. Currently, necroptosis is gradually becoming an important topic in the fields of inflammatory diseases. The preliminary results from necroptosis in AP have confirmed the existence of acinar cell necroptosis, which may be a potential target for effectively regulating inflammatory injuries and improving its outcomes; however, the functional changes and mechanisms of necroptosis still require further investigation. This article reviewed the progress of necroptosis in AP to provide a reference for deeply understanding the pathogenic mechanisms of AP and identifying new therapeutic targets. PMID:26514558

  13. Apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target for colorectal cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Abraha, Aman M; Ketema, Ezra B

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer among adults. The disease begins as a benign adenomatous polyp, which develops into an advanced adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and then progresses to an invasive cancer. Appropriate apoptotic signaling is fundamentally important to preserve a healthy balance between cell death and cell survival and in maintaining genome integrity. Evasion of apoptotic pathway has been established as a prominent hallmark of several cancers. During colorectal cancer development, the balance between the rates of cell growth and apoptosis that maintains intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis gets progressively disturbed. Evidences are increasingly available to support the hypothesis that failure of apoptosis may be an important factor in the evolution of colorectal cancer and its poor response to chemotherapy and radiation. The other reason for targeting apoptotic pathway in the treatment of cancer is based on the observation that this process is deregulated in cancer cells but not in normal cells. As a result, colorectal cancer therapies designed to stimulate apoptosis in target cells would play a critical role in controlling its development and progression. A better understanding of the apoptotic signaling pathways, and the mechanisms by which cancer cells evade apoptotic death might lead to effective therapeutic strategies to inhibit cancer cell proliferation with minimal toxicity and high responses to chemotherapy. In this review, we analyzed the current understanding and future promises of apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target in colorectal cancer treatment. PMID:27574550

  14. Apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target for colorectal cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Abraha, Aman M; Ketema, Ezra B

    2016-08-15

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer among adults. The disease begins as a benign adenomatous polyp, which develops into an advanced adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and then progresses to an invasive cancer. Appropriate apoptotic signaling is fundamentally important to preserve a healthy balance between cell death and cell survival and in maintaining genome integrity. Evasion of apoptotic pathway has been established as a prominent hallmark of several cancers. During colorectal cancer development, the balance between the rates of cell growth and apoptosis that maintains intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis gets progressively disturbed. Evidences are increasingly available to support the hypothesis that failure of apoptosis may be an important factor in the evolution of colorectal cancer and its poor response to chemotherapy and radiation. The other reason for targeting apoptotic pathway in the treatment of cancer is based on the observation that this process is deregulated in cancer cells but not in normal cells. As a result, colorectal cancer therapies designed to stimulate apoptosis in target cells would play a critical role in controlling its development and progression. A better understanding of the apoptotic signaling pathways, and the mechanisms by which cancer cells evade apoptotic death might lead to effective therapeutic strategies to inhibit cancer cell proliferation with minimal toxicity and high responses to chemotherapy. In this review, we analyzed the current understanding and future promises of apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target in colorectal cancer treatment. PMID:27574550

  15. Novel therapeutic targets on the horizon for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wan-Ling; Jain, Amit; Takano, Angela; Newell, Evan W; Iyer, N Gopalakrishna; Lim, Wan-Teck; Tan, Eng-Huat; Zhai, Weiwei; Hillmer, Axel M; Tam, Wai-Leong; Tan, Daniel S W

    2016-08-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, and is classically divided into two major histological subtypes: non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Although NSCLC and SCLC are considered distinct entities with different genomic landscapes, emerging evidence highlights a convergence in therapeutically relevant targets for both histologies. In adenocarcinomas with defined alterations such as EGFR mutations and ALK translocations, targeted therapies are now first-line standard of care. By contrast, many experimental and targeted agents remain largely unsuccessful for SCLC. Intense preclinical research and clinical trials are underway to exploit unique traits of lung cancer, such as oncogene dependency, DNA damage response, angiogenesis, and cellular plasticity arising from presence of cancer stem cell lineages. In addition, the promising clinical activity observed in NSCLC in response to immune checkpoint blockade has spurred great interest in the field of immunooncology, with the scope to develop a diverse repertoire of synergistic and personalised immunotherapeutics. In this Review, we discuss novel therapeutic agents for lung cancer that are in early-stage development, and how prospective clinical trials and drug development may be shaped by a deeper understanding of this heterogeneous disease. PMID:27511159

  16. Ascaris lumbricoides: an overview of therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Hagel, Isabel; Giusti, Tatiana

    2010-10-01

    A. lumbricoides is the largest of the common nematode parasites of man and has been associated with intestinal pathology, respiratory symptoms and malnutrition in children from endemic areas. Current anthelmintic treatments have proven to be safe. However, a reduced efficacy of single dose drugs has been reported. In veterinary practice, anthelmintic drug resistance is an irreversible problem. Thus, research and development of sensitive tools for early detection of drug resistance as well as new anthelmintic approaches are urgently needed. In this review, we summarized data providing information about current drug therapy against A. lumbricoides and other intestinal helminths, new drugs in experimental trials, future drugs perspectives and the identification of immunogenic parasite molecules that may be suitable vaccine targets. In addition to the WHO recommended drugs (albendazole, mebendazole, levamisole, and pyrantel pamoate), new anthelmintic alternatives such as tribendimidine and Nitazoxanide have proved to be safe and effective against A. lumbricoides and other soil-transmitted helminthiases in human trials. Also, some new drugs for veterinary use, monepantel and cyclooctadepsipeptides (e.g., PF1022A), will probably expand future drug spectrum for human treatments. The development of genomic technology has provided a great amount of available nematode DNA sequences, coupled with new gene function data that may lead to the identification of new drug targets through efficient mining of nematode genomic databases. On the other hand, the identification of nematode antigens involved in different parasite vital functions as well as immunomodulatory molecules in animals and humans may contribute to future studies of new therapeutic approaches. PMID:20701574

  17. Migraine: current therapeutic targets and future avenues.

    PubMed

    Arulmozhi, D K; Veeranjaneyulu, A; Bodhankar, S L

    2006-04-01

    Migraine is characterized by attacks of intense pulsatile and throbbing headache, typically unilateral in nature with or without aura. Migraine affects a substantial fraction (10-20 %) of the world population (more women than men). With regard to the pathophysiology of migraine, several theories have been proposed; the major three are vascular (due to cerebral vasodilatation), neurological (abnormal neurological firing) and neurogenic dural inflammation (release of inflammatory neuropeptides). The drugs used to treat migraine can be divided into two groups: agents that abolish the acute migraine headache and agents aimed at prevention. The acutely acting antimigraine agents (5-HT(1B/1D) receptor agonists) stimulated research interest in the field of migraine. Currently prophylactic treatments for migraine include calcium channel blockers, 5-HT(2) receptor antagonists, beta-adrenoceptor blockers and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) agonists. Unfortunately, many of these treatments are non-specific and not always effective. Despite progress, the complex etiology of migraine requires further research, the condition often remains undiagnosed and available therapies are underused. In this review, the evidence that linked the different theories of migraine with its pathophysiology is considered. Furthermore, the present therapeutic targets and future approaches for the acute and prophylactic treatment of migraine are critically evaluated. PMID:16611154

  18. Therapeutic targeting of autophagy in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Schiattarella, Gabriele G; Hill, Joseph A

    2016-06-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily ancient process of intracellular catabolism necessary to preserve cellular homeostasis in response to a wide variety of stresses. In the case of post-mitotic cells, where cell replacement is not an option, finely tuned quality control of cytoplasmic constituents and organelles is especially critical. And due to the ubiquitous and critical role of autophagic flux in the maintenance of cell health, it comes as little surprise that perturbation of the autophagic process is observed in multiple disease processes. A large body of preclinical evidence suggests that autophagy is a double-edged sword in cardiovascular disease, acting in either beneficial or maladaptive ways, depending on the context. In light of this, the autophagic machinery in cardiomyocytes and other cardiovascular cell types has been proposed as a potential therapeutic target. Here, we summarize current knowledge regarding the dual functions of autophagy in cardiovascular disease. We go on to analyze recent evidence suggesting that titration of autophagic flux holds potential as a novel treatment strategy. PMID:26602750

  19. Deubiquitinases: Novel Therapeutic Targets in Immune Surveillance?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is a protective response of the organism to tissue injury or infection. It occurs when the immune system recognizes Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs) or Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern (DAMPs) through the activation of Pattern Recognition Receptors. This initiates a variety of signalling events that conclude in the upregulation of proinflammatory molecules, which initiate an appropriate immune response. This response is tightly regulated since any aberrant activation of immune responses would have severe pathological consequences such as sepsis or chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Accumulative evidence shows that the ubiquitin system, and in particular ubiquitin-specific isopeptidases also known as deubiquitinases (DUBs), plays crucial roles in the control of these immune pathways. In this review we will give an up-to-date overview on the role of DUBs in the NF-κB pathway and inflammasome activation, two intrinsically related events triggered by activation of the membrane TLRs as well as the cytosolic NOD and NLR receptors. Modulation of DUB activity by small molecules has been proposed as a way to control dysregulation or overactivation of these key players of the inflammatory response. We will also discuss the advances and challenges of a potential use of DUBs as therapeutic targets in inflammatory pathologies. PMID:27597804

  20. Neuroimmunotherapies Targeting T Cells: From Pathophysiology to Therapeutic Applications.

    PubMed

    Bittner, Stefan; Wiendl, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic options for multiple sclerosis (MS) have significantly increased over the last few years. T lymphocytes are considered to play a central role in initiating and perpetuating the pathological immune response. Currently approved therapies for MS target T lymphocytes, either in an unspecific manner or directly by interference with specific T-cell pathways. While the concept of "T-cell-specific therapy" implies specificity and selectivity, currently approved approaches come from a general shaping of the immune system towards anti-inflammatory immune responses by non-T-cell-selective immune suppression or immune modulation (e.g., interferons-immune modulation approach) to a depletion of immune cell populations involving T cells (e.g., anti-CD52, alemtuzumab-immune selective depletion approach), or a selective inhibition of distinct molecular pathways in order to sequester leucocytes (e.g., natalizumab-leukocyte sequestration approach). This review will highlight the rationale and results of different T-cell-directed therapeutic approaches coming from basic animal experiments to clinical trials. We will first discuss the pathophysiological rationale for targeting T lymphocytes in MS leading to currently approved treatments acting on T lymphocytes. Furthermore, we will disuss previous promising concepts that have failed to show efficacy in clinical trials or were halted as a result of unexpected adverse events. Learning from the discrepancies between expectations and failures in practical outcomes helps to optimize future research approaches and clinical study designs. As our current view of MS pathogenesis and patient needs is rapidly evolving, novel therapeutic approaches targeting T lymphocytes will also be discussed, including specific molecular interventions such as cytokine-directed treatments or strategies enhancing immunoregulatory mechanisms. Based on clinical experience and novel pathophysiological approaches, T-cell-based strategies will remain a

  1. Passive anti-amyloid immunotherapy in Alzheimer's disease: What are the most promising targets?

    PubMed

    Moreth, Jens; Mavoungou, Chrystelle; Schindowski, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common dementia in the industrialized world, with prevalence rates well over 30% in the over 80-years-old population. The dementia causes enormous costs to the social healthcare systems, as well as personal tragedies for the patients, families and caregivers. AD is strongly associated with Amyloid-beta (Aβ) protein aggregation, which results in extracellular plaques in the brain, and according to the amyloid cascade hypothesis appeared to be a promising target for the development of AD therapeutics. Within the past decade convincing data has arisen positioning the soluble prefibrillar Aβ-aggregates as the prime toxic agents in AD. However, different Aβ aggregate species are described but their remarkable metastability hampers the identification of a target species for immunization. Passive immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against Aβ is in late clinical development but recently the two most advanced mAbs, Bapineuzumab and Solanezumab, targeting an N-terminal or central epitope, respectively, failed to meet their target of improving or stabilizing cognition and function. Preliminary data from off-label treatment of a small cohort for 3 years with intravenous polyclonal immunoglobulins (IVIG) that appear to target different conformational epitopes indicate a cognitive stabilization. Thus, it might be the more promising strategy reducing the whole spectrum of Aβ-aggregates than to focus on a single aggregate species for immunization. PMID:23663286

  2. Matrix metalloproteinases as breast cancer drivers and therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Radisky, Evette S.; Radisky, Derek C.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family have been identified as poor prognosis markers for breast cancer patients and as drivers of many facets of the tumor phenotype in experimental models. Early enthusiasm for MMPs as therapeutic targets was tempered following disappointing clinical trials that utilized broad spectrum, small molecule catalytic site inhibitors. However, subsequent research has continued to define key roles for MMPs as breast cancer promoters, to elucidate the complex roles that that these proteins play in breast cancer development and progression, and to identify how these roles are linked to specific and unique biochemical features of individual members of the MMP family. Here, we provide an overview of the structural features of the MMPs, then discuss clinical studies identifying which MMP family members are linked with breast cancer development and new experimental studies that reveal how these specific MMPs may play unique roles in the breast cancer microenvironment. We conclude with a discussion of the most promising avenues for development of therapeutic agents capable of targeting the tumor-promoting properties of MMPs. PMID:25961550

  3. Therapeutic targets of triple-negative breast cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Jamdade, Vinayak S; Sethi, Nikunj; Mundhe, Nitin A; Kumar, Parveen; Lahkar, Mangala; Sinha, Neeraj

    2015-09-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the second most common cause of cancer deaths. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) does not show immunohistochemical expression of oestrogen receptors, progesterone receptors or HER2. At present, no suitable treatment option is available for patients with TNBC. This dearth of effective conventional therapies for the treatment of advanced stage breast cancer has provoked the development of novel strategies for the management of patients with TNBC. This review presents recent information associated with different therapeutic options for the treatment of TNBC focusing on promising targets such as the Notch signalling, Wnt/β-catenin and Hedgehog pathways, in addition to EGFR, PARP1, mTOR, TGF-β and angiogenesis inhibitors. PMID:26040571

  4. Disrupting the scaffold to improve focal adhesion kinase-targeted cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Cance, William G; Kurenova, Elena; Marlowe, Timothy; Golubovskaya, Vita

    2013-03-26

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is emerging as a promising cancer target because it is highly expressed at both the transcriptional and translational level in cancer and is involved in many aspects of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Existing FAK-based therapeutics focus on inhibiting the kinase's catalytic function and not the large scaffold it creates that includes many oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases and tumor suppressor proteins. Targeting the FAK scaffold is a feasible and promising approach for developing highly specific therapeutics that disrupt FAK signaling pathways in cancer. PMID:23532331

  5. Small molecules targeting microRNA for cancer therapy: Promises and obstacles.

    PubMed

    Wen, Di; Danquah, Michael; Chaudhary, Amit Kumar; Mahato, Ram I

    2015-12-10

    Aberrant expression of miRNAs is critically implicated in cancer initiation and progression. Therapeutic approaches focused on regulating miRNAs are therefore a promising approach for treating cancer. Antisense oligonucleotides, miRNA sponges, and CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing systems are being investigated as tools for regulating miRNAs. Despite the accruing insights in the use of these tools, delivery concerns have mitigated clinical application of such systems. In contrast, little attention has been given to the potential of small molecules to modulate miRNA expression for cancer therapy. In these years, many researches proved that small molecules targeting cancer-related miRNAs might have greater potential for cancer treatment. Small molecules targeting cancer related miRNAs showed significantly promising results in different cancer models. However, there are still several obstacles hindering the progress and clinical application in this area. This review discusses the development, mechanisms and application of small molecules for modulating oncogenic miRNAs (oncomiRs). Attention has also been given to screening technologies and perspectives aimed to facilitate clinical translation for small molecule-based miRNA therapeutics. PMID:26256260

  6. Rituximab's new therapeutic target: the podocyte actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Chan, Andrew C

    2011-06-01

    Therapeutic off-target activities are well recognized for small-molecule drugs. In contrast, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) traditionally are believed to act specifically and lack off-target therapeutic effects. In this issue of Science Translational Medicine, Fornoni et al. show therapeutic benefit, through an off-target-mediated mechanism, of the mAb drug rituximab in recurrent focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) after kidney transplantation. These data shed new light on FSGS pathogenesis and suggest new therapeutic interventions for proteinuric diseases. PMID:21632983

  7. Garden of therapeutic delights: new targets in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Waldburger, Jean M; Firestein, Gary S

    2009-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms in rheumatic disease fostered the advent of the targeted therapeutics era. Intense research activity continues to increase the number of potential targets at an accelerated pace. In this review, examples of promising targets and agents that are at various stages of clinical development are described. Cytokine inhibition remains at the forefront with the success of tumor necrosis factor blockers, and biologics that block interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-17, IL-12, and IL-23 and other cytokines are on the horizon. After the success of rituximab and abatacept, other cell-targeted approaches that inhibit or deplete lymphocytes have moved forward, such as blocking BAFF/BLyS (B-cell activation factor of the tumor necrosis factor family/B-lymphocyte stimulator) and APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand) or suppressing T-cell activation with costimulation molecule blockers. Small-molecule inhibitors might eventually challenge the dominance of biologics in the future. In addition to plasma membrane G protein-coupled chemokine receptors, small molecules can be designed to block intracellular enzymes that control signaling pathways. Inhibitors of tyrosine kinases expressed in lymphocytes, such as spleen tyrosine kinase and Janus kinase, are being tested in autoimmune diseases. Inactivation of the more broadly expressed mitogen-activated protein kinases could suppress inflammation driven by macrophages and mesenchymal cells. Targeting tyrosine kinases downstream of growth factor receptors might also reduce fibrosis in conditions like systemic sclerosis. The abundance of potential targets suggests that new and creative ways of evaluating safety and efficacy are needed. PMID:19232066

  8. Anti-Alzheimer Therapeutic Drugs Targeting γ-Secretase.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yan; Zhang, Qi; Wong, Steven G; Hua, Qian

    2016-01-01

    γ-secretase is a membrane-embedded aspartyl protease carrying out cleavage of more than 100 single transmembrane-spanning proteins, including APP, Notch, N-cadherin, etc. Its subunit, presenilin (PS) is the catalytic component, of which mutations are a major cause of early onset familial Alzheimer disease (FAD). These mutations lead to an increase in the production of the highly amyloidogenic Aβ42 isoform. Drugs aimed at γ-secretase are now considered to be promising therapeutic targets for AD. γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) were first introduced into clinical trials due to their efficacy in lowering Aβ production, but later were found to cause severe adverse events due to their blockage of the Notch signaling process. γ-secretase modulators (GSMs) were developed to modulate γ-secretase activity by selectively targeting Aβ42 reduction over the Notch pathway, which have been shown to have less side effects. Although clinical studies show that none of the GSIs or GSMs have been proven to be fully effective, they shed light on the physiological role of γ-secretase and PS in AD development. At the same time, natural products, due to their structural diversity and pleiotropic profile, can modulate γ-secretase activity in a dose-dependent manner, broadening our vision of drug development. With the structural information of γ-secretase released recently, we speculate there will be an explosion of γ-secretase modulators targeting not only the proteolysic center but also the interaction of its different components. PMID:26268329

  9. Therapeutic Targeting of Eosinophil Adhesion and Accumulation in Allergic Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Baiula, Monica; Bedini, Andrea; Carbonari, Gioia; Dattoli, Samantha Deianira; Spampinato, Santi

    2012-01-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that eosinophils are important effectors of ocular allergy. Increased worldwide prevalence of allergic eye pathologies has stimulated the identification of novel drug targets, including eosinophils and adhesion molecules. Accumulation of eosinophils in the eye is a key event in the onset and maintenance of allergic inflammation and is mediated by different adhesion molecules. Antihistamines with multiple mechanisms of action can be effective during the early and late phases of allergic conjunctivitis by blocking the interaction between β1 integrins and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1. Small molecule antagonists that target key elements in the process of eosinophil recruitment have been identified and reinforce the validity of α4β1 integrin as a therapeutic target. Glucocorticoids are among the most effective drugs for ocular allergy, but their use is limited by adverse effects. Novel dissociated glucocorticoids can prevent eosinophil accumulation and induce apoptosis of eosinophils, making them promising candidates for ophthalmic drugs. This article reviews recent understanding of the role of adhesion molecules in eosinophil recruitment in the inflamed conjunctiva along with effective treatments for allergic conjunctivitis. PMID:23271999

  10. Endocannabinoid System: A Multi-Facet Therapeutic Target.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Rimplejeet; Ambwani, Sneha R; Singh, Surjit

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis sativa is also popularly known as marijuana. It has been cultivated and used by man for recreational and medicinal purposes since many centuries. Study of cannabinoids was at bay for very long time and its therapeutic value could not be adequately harnessed due to its legal status as proscribed drug in most of the countries. The research of drugs acting on endocannabinoid system has seen many ups and downs in the recent past. Presently, it is known that endocannabinoids has role in pathology of many disorders and they also serve "protective role" in many medical conditions. Several diseases like emesis, pain, inflammation, multiple sclerosis, anorexia, epilepsy, glaucoma, schizophrenia, cardiovascular disorders, cancer, obesity, metabolic syndrome related diseases, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease and Tourette's syndrome could possibly be treated by drugs modulating endocannabinoid system. Presently, cannabinoid receptor agonists like nabilone and dronabinol are used for reducing the chemotherapy induced vomiting. Sativex (cannabidiol and THC combination) is approved in the UK, Spain and New Zealand to treat spasticity due to multiple sclerosis. In US it is under investigation for cancer pain, another drug Epidiolex (cannabidiol) is also under investigation in US for childhood seizures. Rimonabant, CB1 receptor antagonist appeared as a promising anti-obesity drug during clinical trials but it also exhibited remarkable psychiatric side effect profile. Due to which the US Food and Drug Administration did not approve Rimonabant in US. It sale was also suspended across the EU in 2008. Recent discontinuation of clinical trial related to FAAH inhibitor due to occurrence of serious adverse events in the participating subjects could be discouraging for the research fraternity. Despite some mishaps in clinical trials related to drugs acting on endocannabinoid system, still lot of research is being carried out to explore and establish

  11. Therapeutic targeting of B cells for rheumatic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Engel, Pablo; Gómez-Puerta, José A; Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Lozano, Francisco; Bosch, Xavier

    2011-03-01

    Autoreactive B cells are characterized by their ability to secrete autoantibodies directed against self-peptides. During the last decade, it has become increasingly apparent that B lymphocytes not only produce autoantibodies but also exert important regulatory roles independent of their function as antibody-producing cells. This is especially relevant in the context of autoimmunity, because autoreactive B cells have been shown to possess the ability to activate pathogenic T cells, to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines, and to promote the formation of tertiary lymphoid tissue in target organs. The production of monoclonal antibodies against B-cell-surface molecules has facilitated the characterization of several distinct B lymphocyte subsets. These cell-surface molecules have not only served as useful cell differentiation markers but have also helped to unravel the important biological functions of these cells. Some of these molecules, all of which are expressed on the cell surface, have proven to be effective therapeutic targets. In both animal models and in clinical assays, the efficient elimination of B lymphocytes has been shown to be useful in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. The treatment of most rheumatic autoimmune diseases relies mainly on the use of cytotoxic immunosuppressants and corticosteroids. Although this has resulted in improved disease survival, patients may nonetheless suffer severe adverse events and, in some cases, their relapse rate remains high. The increasing need for safer and more effective drugs along with burgeoning new insights into the pathogenesis of these disorders has fueled interest in biological agents; clinical trials involving the B-cell depletion agent rituximab have been especially promising. This article reviews the current knowledge of B-cell biology and pathogenesis as well as the modern therapeutic approaches for rheumatic autoimmune diseases focusing in particular on the targeting of B

  12. Stem cells as a therapeutic target for diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Paras Kumar; Singh, Shree Ram; Joshua, Irving G.; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2010-01-01

    The rapidly increasing number of diabetes patients across the world poses a great challenge to the current therapeutic approach. The traditional method of exogenous supply of insulin is not sufficient and often causes lethal hypoglycemia that demands to develop a novel strategy. Recent investigations on regeneration of insulin producing cells (IPCs) revealed that in addition to primary source i.e., pancreatic beta cells, IPCs can be derived from several alternative sources including embryonic, adult, mesenchymal, and hematopoietic stem cells via the process of proliferation, dedifferentiation, neogenesis, nuclear reprogramming and trans-differentiation. There is considerable success in insulin independency of diabetes patient after transplantation of whole pancreas and/or the islets cell. However, the major challenge for regenerative therapy is to obtain a large source of islet/beta cells donor. Recent advances in the directed differentiation of stem cells generated a promising hope for a better and permanent insulin independency for diabetes patients. In this review we discussed stem cells as a potential future therapeutic target for the treatment of diabetes and associated diseases. PMID:20036830

  13. The Serotonin-6 Receptor as a Novel Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Hyung-Mun

    2011-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter that is found in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. 5-HT mediates its diverse physiological responses through 7 different 5-HT receptor families: 5-HT1, 5-HT2, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT5, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors. Among them, the 5-HT6 receptor (5-HT6R) is the most recently cloned serotonin receptor and plays important roles in the central nervous system (CNS) and in the etiology of neurological diseases. Compared to other 5-HT receptors, the 5-HT6R has been considered as an attractive CNS therapeutic target because it is expressed exclusively in the CNS and has no known isoforms. This review evaluates in detail the role of the 5-HT6R in the physiology and pathophysiology of the CNS and the potential usefulness of 5-HT6R ligands in the development of therapeutic strategies for the treatment of CNS disorders. Preclinical studies provide support for the use of 5-HT6R ligands as promising medications to treat the cognitive dysfunction associated with Alzheimer's disease, obesity, depression, and anxiety. PMID:22355260

  14. Targeting dendritic cells: a promising strategy to improve vaccine effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Macri, Christophe; Dumont, Claire; Johnston, Angus PR; Mintern, Justine D

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) targeting is a novel strategy to enhance vaccination efficacy. This approach is based on the in situ delivery of antigen via antibodies that are specific for endocytic receptors expressed at the surface of DCs. Here we review the complexity of the DC subsets and the antigen presentation pathways that need to be considered in the settings of DC targeting. We also summarize current knowledge about antigen delivery to DCs via DEC-205, Clec9A and Clec12A, receptor targets that strongly enhance cellular and humoral immune responses. Finally, we discuss the intracellular trafficking criteria of the targeted receptors that may impact their effectiveness as DC targets. PMID:27217957

  15. Emerging Mitochondrial Therapeutic Targets in Optic Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Lopez Sanchez, M I G; Crowston, J G; Mackey, D A; Trounce, I A

    2016-09-01

    Optic neuropathies are an important cause of blindness worldwide. The study of the most common inherited mitochondrial optic neuropathies, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) has highlighted a fundamental role for mitochondrial function in the survival of the affected neuron-the retinal ganglion cell. A picture is now emerging that links mitochondrial dysfunction to optic nerve disease and other neurodegenerative processes. Insights gained from the peculiar susceptibility of retinal ganglion cells to mitochondrial dysfunction are likely to inform therapeutic development for glaucoma and other common neurodegenerative diseases of aging. Despite it being a fast-evolving field of research, a lack of access to human ocular tissues and limited animal models of mitochondrial disease have prevented direct retinal ganglion cell experimentation and delayed the development of efficient therapeutic strategies to prevent vision loss. Currently, there are no approved treatments for mitochondrial disease, including optic neuropathies caused by primary or secondary mitochondrial dysfunction. Recent advances in eye research have provided important insights into the molecular mechanisms that mediate pathogenesis, and new therapeutic strategies including gene correction approaches are currently being investigated. Here, we review the general principles of mitochondrial biology relevant to retinal ganglion cell function and provide an overview of the major optic neuropathies with mitochondrial involvement, LHON and ADOA, whilst highlighting the emerging link between mitochondrial dysfunction and glaucoma. The pharmacological strategies currently being trialed to improve mitochondrial dysfunction in these optic neuropathies are discussed in addition to emerging therapeutic approaches to preserve retinal ganglion cell function. PMID:27288727

  16. Targeting macrophage necroptosis for therapeutic and diagnostic interventions in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Karunakaran, Denuja; Geoffrion, Michele; Wei, Lihui; Gan, Wei; Richards, Laura; Shangari, Prakriti; DeKemp, Ella M.; Beanlands, Rachelle A.; Perisic, Ljubica; Maegdefessel, Lars; Hedin, Ulf; Sad, Subash; Guo, Liang; Kolodgie, Frank D.; Virmani, Renu; Ruddy, Terrence; Rayner, Katey J.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis results from maladaptive inflammation driven primarily by macrophages, whose recruitment and proliferation drive plaque progression. In advanced plaques, macrophage death contributes centrally to the formation of plaque necrosis, which underlies the instability that promotes plaque rupture and myocardial infarction. Hence, targeting macrophage cell death pathways may offer promise for the stabilization of vulnerable plaques. Necroptosis is a recently discovered pathway of programmed cell necrosis regulated by RIP3 and MLKL kinases that, in contrast to apoptosis, induces a proinflammatory state. We show herein that necroptotic cell death is activated in human advanced atherosclerotic plaques and can be targeted in experimental atherosclerosis for both therapeutic and diagnostic interventions. In humans with unstable carotid atherosclerosis, expression of RIP3 and MLKL is increased, and MLKL phosphorylation, a key step in the commitment to necroptosis, is detected in advanced atheromas. Investigation of the molecular mechanisms underlying necroptosis showed that atherogenic forms of low-density lipoprotein increase RIP3 and MLKL transcription and phosphorylation—two critical steps in the execution of necroptosis. Using a radiotracer developed with the necroptosis inhibitor necrostatin-1 (Nec-1), we show that 123I-Nec-1 localizes specifically to atherosclerotic plaques in Apoe−/− mice, and its uptake is tightly correlated to lesion areas by ex vivo nuclear imaging. Furthermore, treatment of Apoe−/− mice with established atherosclerosis with Nec-1 reduced lesion size and markers of plaque instability, including necrotic core formation. Collectively, our findings offer molecular insight into the mechanisms of macrophage cell death that drive necrotic core formation in atherosclerosis and suggest that this pathway can be used as both a diagnostic and therapeutic tool for the treatment of unstable atherosclerosis. PMID:27532042

  17. Therapeutic Targeting of Casein Kinase 1δ in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Laura H.; Lafite, Marie; Quereda, Victor; Grant, Wayne; Chen, Weimin; Bibian, Mathieu; Noguchi, Yoshihiko; Fallahi, Mohammad; Yang, Chunying; Chang, Jenny C.; Roush, William R.; Cleveland, John L.; Duckett, Derek R.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of specific drivers of human cancer is required to instruct the development of targeted therapeutics. Here we demonstrate that CSNK1D is amplified and/or overexpressed in human breast tumors and that CK1δ is a vulnerability of human breast cancer subtypes overexpressing this kinase. Specifically, selective knockdown of CK1δ, or treatment with a highly selective and potent CK1δ inhibitor, triggers apoptosis of CK1δ-expressing breast tumor cells ex vivo, tumor regression in orthotopic models of triple negative breast cancer, including patient-derived xenografts, and tumor growth inhibition in HER2+ breast cancer models. We also show that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is a hallmark of human tumors overexpressing CK1δ, that disabling CK1δ blocks nuclear accumulation of β-catenin and T cell factor transcriptional activity, and that constitutively active β-catenin overrides the effects of inhibition or silencing of CK1δ. Thus, CK1δ inhibition represents a promising strategy for targeted treatment in human breast cancer with Wnt/β-catenin involvement. PMID:26676609

  18. SALL4 is a novel therapeutic target in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Gang; Zhu, Lei; Huang, Feizhou; Nie, Wanpin; Huang, Wei; Xu, Hongbo; Zheng, Shaopeng; Yi, Zhongjie; Wan, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is the most common and deadly disease of the biliary tree due to its poor prognosis. Sal-like protein 4 (SALL4), a stem cell marker, has been identified as a potential target for aggressive hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In our study, 175 ICC cases with an average age of 55 years were included, and 53% (93/175) were male. And 28 adjacent non-tumor tissues were also collected. The SALL4-positive immunoreactivity was detected in a total of 102 ICC cases (58%), whereas all 28 adjacent tissues showed negative staining. Univariate analysis, showed that the SALL4-positive ICC cases had significantly more frequent lymph nodal metastasis (P = 0.0460), vascular invasion (P < 0.0001), and nerve invasion (P < 0.0001). Furthermore, the strong SALL4-positive cases (n = 7, 5 months) had shorter overall survival, when compared to moderate SALL4-positive (n = 46, 9 months) or SALL4-negative cases (n = 73, 7 months), respectively. Our data also suggest that SALL4 may be involved in the regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in ICC. Those results for the first time indicate an oncogenic role of SALL4 in ICC. Therefore, SALL4 may serve as a promising therapeutic target for ICC. PMID:26317546

  19. TWEAK/Fn14 signaling: a promising target in intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Ping; Yuan, Chong-Ming; Zhang, Shuai-Gong; Hao, Qing-Hai; Wang, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Zhong; Meng, Qian; Li, Ming; Hao, Yue-Dong

    2016-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) is a potent chemoattractant cytokine with various biological functions, such as stimulation of angiogenesis, induction of proinflammatory cytokines, regulation of cellular proliferation and apoptosis. Therefore, it has also been implicated in several pathological processes, from cancer to inflammatory diseases. Remarkably, TWEAK and its receptors, fibroblast growth factor inducible 14 (Fn14), are also present in intervertebral disc (IVD) tissue, where they play a role in the pathogenesis of IVD degeneration. The interaction of TWEAK with Fn14 is involved in physiological and pathological activities of IVD degeneration patients, which includes apoptosis of endplate chondrocytes, extracellular matrix degradation, reduction in proteoglycan synthesis and so on. The blockade of this interaction results in suppressing over-production of proinflammatory factors and cell death in in vivo or in vitro experiments, suggesting that TWEAK/Fn14 signaling may be therapeutically relevant in IVD degeneration, and the targeting of TWEAK or Fn14 has been proposed as a potential therapeutic approach for autoimmune diseases such as Rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this article, we discuss the biological features of TWEAK/Fn14 signaling and summarize recent advances in our understanding of the role of TWEAK/Fn14 signaling in the pathogenesis and treatment of IVD degeneration. We think that the blockade of TWEAK/Fn14 signaling may be a promising therapeutic strategy for IVD degeneration in the near future. PMID:26907852

  20. Cell Membrane-Cloaked Nanoparticles for Targeted Therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luk, Brian Tsengchi

    The advent of nanoparticle-based delivery systems has made a significant impact on clinical patient outcomes. In recent decades, myriad nanoparticle-based therapeutic agents have been developed for the treatment and management of ailments such as cancer, diabetes, pain, bacterial infections, and asthma, among many others. Nanotherapeutics offer many distinct advantages over conventional free drug formulations. For example, nanoparticles are able to accumulate at tumor sites by extravasation through leaky vasculature at tumor sites via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect; nanoparticles can also be tailored to have desirable characteristics, such as prolonged circulation in the blood stream, improved drug encapsulation, and sustained or triggered drug release. Currently, a growing number of nanoformulations with favorable pharmacological profiles and promising efficacy are being used in clinical trials for the treatment of various cancers. Building on the success of these encouraging clinical results, new engineering strategies have emerged that combine synthetic nanoparticles with natural biomaterials to create nature-inspired biomimetic delivery systems. The work presented in this dissertation focuses on the biointerfacing between synthetic and natural materials, namely in the manifestation of cell membrane-coated nanoparticles. By exploiting the natural functionalities of source cell membranes, cell membrane-cloaked nanoparticles have huge potential in the delivery of therapeutic agents for a variety of applications. The first portion of this thesis will focus on understanding the fundamentals underlying cell membrane coating on synthetic nanoparticles. First introduced in 2011, cell membrane-cloaked nanoparticles showed immediate promise in drug delivery applications, but further understanding was necessary to be able to harness the full potential of the membrane coating platform. The first section provides further insight into the interfacial

  1. Emerging therapeutic targets in metastatic progression: A focus on breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuo; Kang, Yibin

    2016-05-01

    Metastasis is the underlying cause of death for the majority of breast cancer patients. Despite significant advances in recent years in basic research and clinical development, therapies that specifically target metastatic breast cancer remain inadequate, and represents the single greatest obstacle to reducing mortality of late-stage breast cancer. Recent efforts have leveraged genomic analysis of breast cancer and molecular dissection of tumor-stromal cross-talk to uncover a number of promising candidates for targeted treatment of metastatic breast cancer. Rational combinations of therapeutic agents targeting tumor-intrinsic properties and microenvironmental components provide a promising strategy to develop precision treatments with higher specificity and less toxicity. In this review, we discuss the emerging therapeutic targets in breast cancer metastasis, from tumor-intrinsic pathways to those that involve the host tissue components, including the immune system. PMID:27000769

  2. Targeting PCSK9 as a promising new mechanism for lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Della Badia, Laura A; Elshourbagy, Nabil A; Mousa, Shaker A

    2016-08-01

    Statins and other lipid-lowering drugs have dominated the market for many years for achievement of recommended levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). However, a substantial number of high-risk patients are unable to achieve the LDL-C goal. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9) has recently emerged as a new, promising key therapeutic target for hypercholesterolemia. PCSK9 is a protease involved in chaperoning the low-density lipoprotein receptor to the process of degradation. PCSK9 inhibitors and statins effectively lower LDL-C. The PCSK9 inhibitors decrease the degradation of the LDL receptors, whereas statins mainly interfere with the synthetic machinery of cholesterol by inhibiting the key rate limiting enzyme, the HMG CoA reductase. PCSK9 inhibitors are currently being developed as monoclonal antibodies for their primary use in lowering LDL-C. They may be especially useful for patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, who at present receive minimal benefit from traditional statin therapy. The monoclonal antibody PCSK9 inhibitors, recently granted FDA approval, show the most promising safety and efficacy profile compared to other, newer LDL-C lowering therapies. This review will primarily focus on the safety and efficacy of monoclonal antibody PCSK9 inhibitors in comparison to statins. The review will also address new, alternative PCSK9 targeting drug classes such as small molecules, gene silencing agents, apolipoprotein B antisense oligonucleotides, and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein inhibitors. PMID:27133571

  3. NKG2D ligands as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Paul; Wu, Ming-Ru; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Sentman, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    The Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D) receptor plays an important role in protecting the host from infections and cancer. By recognizing ligands induced on infected or tumor cells, NKG2D modulates lymphocyte activation and promotes immunity to eliminate ligand-expressing cells. Because these ligands are not widely expressed on healthy adult tissue, NKG2D ligands may present a useful target for immunotherapeutic approaches in cancer. Novel therapies targeting NKG2D ligands for the treatment of cancer have shown preclinical success and are poised to enter into clinical trials. In this review, the NKG2D receptor and its ligands are discussed in the context of cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. In addition, therapies targeting NKG2D ligands in cancer are also reviewed. PMID:23833565

  4. Therapeutic targeting of splicing in cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stanley Chun-Wei; Abdel-Wahab, Omar

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have highlighted that splicing patterns are frequently altered in cancer and that mutations in genes encoding spliceosomal proteins, as well as mutations affecting the splicing of key cancer-associated genes, are enriched in cancer. In parallel, there is also accumulating evidence that several molecular subtypes of cancer are highly dependent on splicing function for cell survival. These findings have resulted in a growing interest in targeting splicing catalysis, splicing regulatory proteins, and/or specific key altered splicing events in the treatment of cancer. Here we present strategies that exist and that are in development to target altered dependency on the spliceosome, as well as aberrant splicing, in cancer. These include drugs to target global splicing in cancer subtypes that are preferentially dependent on wild-type splicing for survival, methods to alter post-translational modifications of splicing-regulating proteins, and strategies to modulate pathologic splicing events and protein-RNA interactions in cancer. PMID:27603132

  5. Functionally-defined Therapeutic Targets in Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Catherine S.; Tang, Yujie; Truffaux, Nathalene; Berlow, Noah E.; Liu, Lining; Debily, Marie-Anne; Quist, Michael J.; Davis, Lara E.; Huang, Elaine C.; Woo, Pamelyn J; Ponnuswami, Anitha; Chen, Spenser; Johung, Tessa B.; Sun, Wenchao; Kogiso, Mari; Du, Yuchen; Lin, Qi; Huang, Yulun; Hütt-Cabezas, Marianne; Warren, Katherine E.; Dret, Ludivine Le; Meltzer, Paul S.; Mao, Hua; Quezado, Martha; van Vuurden, Dannis G.; Abraham, Jinu; Fouladi, Maryam; Svalina, Matthew N.; Wang, Nicholas; Hawkins, Cynthia; Nazarian, Javad; Alonso, Marta M.; Raabe, Eric; Hulleman, Esther; Spellman, Paul T.; Li, Xiao-Nan; Keller, Charles; Pal, Ranadip; Grill, Jacques; Monje, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG) is a fatal childhood cancer. We performed a chemical screen in patient-derived DIPG cultures along with RNAseq analyses and integrated computational modeling to identify potentially effective therapeutic strategies. The multi-histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat demonstrated efficacy in vitro and in DIPG orthotopic xenograft models. Combination testing of panobinostat with histone demethylase inhibitor GSKJ4 revealed synergy. Together, these data suggest a promising therapeutic strategy for DIPG. PMID:25939062

  6. Antibody therapeutics targeting ion channels: are we there yet?

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Han; Li, Min

    2013-01-01

    The combination of technological advances, genomic sequences and market success is catalyzing rapid development of antibody-based therapeutics. Cell surface receptors and ion channel proteins are well known drug targets, but the latter has seen less success. The availability of crystal structures, better understanding of gating biophysics and validation of physiological roles now form an excellent foundation to pursue antibody-based therapeutics targeting ion channels to treat a variety of diseases. PMID:23381110

  7. Therapeutic Strategies for Targeting Ras Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gysin, Stephan; Salt, Megan; Young, Amy; McCormick, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Ras genes are frequently activated in cancer. Attempts to develop drugs that target mutant Ras proteins have, so far, been unsuccessful. Tumors bearing these mutations, therefore, remain among the most difficult to treat. Most efforts to block activated Ras have focused on pathways downstream. Drugs that inhibit Raf kinase have shown clinical benefit in the treatment of malignant melanoma. However, these drugs have failed to show clinical benefit in Ras mutant tumors. It remains unclear to what extent Ras depends on Raf kinase for transforming activity, even though Raf proteins bind directly to Ras and are certainly major effectors of Ras action in normal cells and in development. Furthermore, Raf kinase inhibitors can lead to paradoxical activation of the MAPK pathway. MEK inhibitors block the Ras-MAPK pathway, but often activate the PI3’-kinase, and have shown little clinical benefit as single agents. This activation is mediated by EGF-R and other receptor tyrosine kinases through relief of a negative feedback loop from ERK. Drug combinations that target multiple points within the Ras signaling network are likely to be necessary to achieve substantial clinical benefit. Other effectors may also contribute to Ras signaling and provide a source of targets. In addition, unbiased screens for genes necessary for Ras transformation have revealed new potential targets and have added to our understanding of Ras cancer biology. PMID:21779505

  8. Therapeutic approaches to drug targets in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jamkhande, Prasad G; Chandak, Prakash G; Dhawale, Shashikant C; Barde, Sonal R; Tidke, Priti S; Sakhare, Ram S

    2014-07-01

    Non-communicable diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis and diabetes are responsible for major social and health burden as millions of people are dying every year. Out of which, atherosclerosis is the leading cause of deaths worldwide. The lipid abnormality is one of the major modifiable risk factors for atherosclerosis. Both genetic and environmental components are associated with the development of atherosclerotic plaques. Immune and inflammatory mediators have a complex role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Understanding of all these processes will help to invent a range of new biomarkers and novel treatment modalities targeting various cellular events in acute and chronic inflammation that are accountable for atherosclerosis. Several biochemical pathways, receptors and enzymes are involved in the development of atherosclerosis that would be possible targets for improving strategies for disease diagnosis and management. Earlier anti-inflammatory or lipid-lowering treatments could be useful for alleviating morbidity and mortality of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. However, novel drug targets like endoglin receptor, PPARα, squalene synthase, thyroid hormone analogues, scavenger receptor and thyroid hormone analogues are more powerful to control the process of atherosclerosis. Therefore, the review briefly focuses on different novel targets that act at the starting stage of the plaque form to the thrombus formation in the atherosclerosis. PMID:25061401

  9. Therapeutic and predictive targets of AKI

    PubMed Central

    Yalavarthy, R.; Edelstein, C.L.

    2010-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a very common condition encountered in a hospital setting. AKI is an independent risk factor for in-hospital mortality. In this review, we discuss in detail about the tubular, inflammatory and vascular molecular targets of AKI which may result in therapies to improve mortality and biomarkers for earlier diagnosis of AKI. PMID:19049701

  10. Alzheimer's disease: molecular concepts and therapeutic targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassbender, K.; Masters, C.; Beyreuther, K.

    2001-06-01

    The beta amyloid peptide is the major component of the neuritic plaques, the characteristic lesions in Alzheimer's disease. Mutations in three genes (APP, PS-1, and PS-2) cause familial Alzheimer's disease by alteration of the rate of generation of amyloid peptide or the length of this peptide. However, in the 90% non-familial cases, other factors play a major pathogenetic role. These include the apolipoprotein E genotype, the "plaque-associated" proteins promoting the formation of toxic fibrillar aggregates or the chronic inflammatory responses. The aim of this review is to explain the steps in the complex cascade leading to Alzheimer's disease and, based on this, to report the current efforts to intervene in these different pathophysiological events in order to prevent progression of Alzheimer's disease. Whereas acetylcholine substitution is currently used in clinical practice, future therapeutical strategies to combat Alzheimer's disease may include anti-inflammatory treatments, vaccination against beta amyloid peptide, or treatment with cholesterol-lowering drugs.

  11. Dendritic cells as therapeutic targets in neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Lüssi, Felix; Zipp, Frauke; Witsch, Esther

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common chronic inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system characterized by infiltration of immune cells and progressive damage to myelin sheaths and neurons. There is still no cure for the disease, but drug regimens can reduce the frequency of relapses and slightly delay progression. Myeloid cells or antigen-presenting cells (APCs) such as dendritic cells (DC), macrophages, and resident microglia, are key players in both mediating immune responses and inducing immune tolerance. Mounting evidence indicates a contribution of these myeloid cells to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis and to the effects of treatment, the understanding of which might provide strategies for more potent novel therapeutic interventions. Here, we review recent insights into the role of APCs, with specific focus on DCs in the modulation of neuroinflammation in MS. PMID:26970979

  12. Mitochondrial ion channels as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto, Pablo M.; Ryu, Shin-Young; Kinnally, Kathleen W.

    2010-01-01

    The study of mitochondrial ion channels changed our perception of these double-wrapped organelles from being just the power house of a cell to the guardian of a cell's fate. Mitochondria communicate with the cell through these special channels. Most of the time, the message is encoded by ion flow across the mitochondrial outer and inner membranes. Potassium, sodium, calcium, protons, nucleotides, and proteins traverse the mitochondrial membranes in an exquisitely regulated manner to control a myriad of processes, from respiration and mitochondrial morphology to cell proliferation and cell death. This review is an update on both well established and putative mitochondrial channels regarding their composition, function, regulation, and therapeutic potential. PMID:20178788

  13. Autophagy: An Exposing Therapeutic Target in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yun; Lu, Shan; Zhou, Ping; Ai, Qi-Di; Sun, Gui-Bo; Sun, Xiao-Bo

    2016-03-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process whereby the cytoplasmic contents of a cell are sequestered within autophagosomes through a lysosome-dependent pathway. Increasing evidence shows that this process is of great importance in a wide range of diseases, including atherosclerosis (AS). Autophagy can be modulated in advanced AS plaques by cytokines, reactive lipids, lipopolysaccharides, advanced glycation end products, and microRNAs. Autophagy exerts both protective and detrimental functions in vascular disorders. However, despite an increasing interest in autophagy, it remains an underestimated and overlooked phenomenon in AS. Therefore, the precise role of autophagy and its relationship with apoptosis need to be described. This review highlights recent findings on the autophagy activities and signaling pathways in endothelial cells, macrophages, and smooth muscle cells that are accompanied by apoptosis in AS. We conclude with recent studies on autophagy modulation as a new therapeutic approach to treat AS. PMID:26580134

  14. Targeting PCSK9 for therapeutic gains.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Michael D; Fazio, Sergio; Tavori, Hagai

    2015-04-01

    Even though it is only a little over a decade from the discovery of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) as a plasma protein that associates with both hypercholesterolemia and low cholesterol syndromes, a rich literature has developed describing its unique physiology and the impact of antagonism of this molecule on cholesterol metabolism for therapeutic purposes. Indeed, the PCSK9 story is unfolding rapidly, with many answers and more questions. This review summarizes the most recent data from phase II/III clinical trials of PCSK9 inhibition with the three leading antibodies, highlights the clinical significance of the ongoing studies, and suggests future areas of investigation based on recent basic science discoveries on the physiology of PCSK9. PMID:25712137

  15. Novel therapeutic targets for erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Williams, Steve K; Melman, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a neurovascular phenomenon modulated by hormonal, local biochemical, and biomechanical/structural factors of the penis. The success of the orally active phosphodiesterase inhibitors for the treatment of ED has boosted research activities into the physiology of the erectile mechanism. Peripheral intracellular signal transduction in the penis as well as central brain and spinal cord pathways controlling penile erection have been investigated and are now better understood. The results of this ongoing research have provided the basis for the development and introduction of several novel therapeutic modalities into the management of ED. Many novel pharmacotherapeutic approaches under development including the use of melanocortins and Rho-kinase inhibitors as well as the introduction of gene therapy and tissue engineering have demonstrated efficacy in animal as well as early human trials. This review describes the major new and evolving pharmacological advances in the field of oral pharmacotherapy for the treatment of male ED. PMID:22154078

  16. Targeting B-cell receptor signaling kinases in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: the promise of entospletinib

    PubMed Central

    Sharman, Jeff; Di Paolo, Julie

    2016-01-01

    The B-cell receptor signaling pathway has emerged as an important therapeutic target in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell malignancies. Novel agents have been developed targeting the signaling enzymes spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK), Bruton’s tyrosine kinase, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase delta. This review discusses the rationale for targeting these enzymes, as well as the preclinical and clinical evidence supporting their role as therapeutic targets, with a particular focus on SYK inhibition with entospletinib. PMID:27247756

  17. Targeting B-cell receptor signaling kinases in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: the promise of entospletinib.

    PubMed

    Sharman, Jeff; Di Paolo, Julie

    2016-06-01

    The B-cell receptor signaling pathway has emerged as an important therapeutic target in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell malignancies. Novel agents have been developed targeting the signaling enzymes spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK), Bruton's tyrosine kinase, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase delta. This review discusses the rationale for targeting these enzymes, as well as the preclinical and clinical evidence supporting their role as therapeutic targets, with a particular focus on SYK inhibition with entospletinib. PMID:27247756

  18. [Therapeutical targets for revert liver fibrosis].

    PubMed

    García B, Leonel; Gálvez G, Javier; Armendáriz B, Juan

    2007-06-01

    Liver fibrosis is the common response to chronic liver injury, ultimately leading to cirrhosis and its complications: portal hypertension, liver failure, hepatic encephalopathy, and hepatocellular carcinoma and others. Efficient and well-tolerated antifibrotic drugs are still lacking, and current treatment of hepatic fibrosis is limited to withdrawal of the noxious agent. Efforts over the past decade have mainly focused on fibrogenic cells generating the scarring response, although promising data on inhibition of parenchymal injury or reduction of liver inflammation have also been obtained. A large number of approaches have been validated in culture studies and in animal models, and several clinical trials are underway or anticipated for a growing number of molecules. This review highlight recent advances in the molecular mechanisms of liver fibrosis and discusses mechanistically based strategies that have recently emerged. PMID:17728907

  19. Pathways and therapeutic targets in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Shtivelman, Emma; Davies, Michael Q A; Hwu, Patrick; Yang, James; Lotem, Michal; Oren, Moshe; Flaherty, Keith T; Fisher, David E

    2014-04-15

    This review aims to summarize the current knowledge of molecular pathways and their clinical relevance in melanoma. Metastatic melanoma was a grim diagnosis, but in recent years tremendous advances have been made in treatments. Chemotherapy provided little benefit in these patients, but development of targeted and new immune approaches made radical changes in prognosis. This would not have happened without remarkable advances in understanding the biology of disease and tremendous progress in the genomic (and other "omics") scale analyses of tumors. The big problems facing the field are no longer focused exclusively on the development of new treatment modalities, though this is a very busy area of clinical research. The focus shifted now to understanding and overcoming resistance to targeted therapies, and understanding the underlying causes of the heterogeneous responses to immune therapy. PMID:24743024

  20. Pathways and therapeutic targets in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Shtivelman, Emma; Davies, Michael A.; Hwu, Patrick; Yang, James; Lotem, Michal; Oren, Moshe; Flaherty, Keith T.; Fisher, David E.

    2014-01-01

    This review aims to summarize the current knowledge of molecular pathways and their clinical relevance in melanoma. Metastatic melanoma was a grim diagnosis, but in recent years tremendous advances have been made in treatments. Chemotherapy provided little benefit in these patients, but development of targeted and new immune approaches made radical changes in prognosis. This would not have happened without remarkable advances in understanding the biology of disease and tremendous progress in the genomic (and other “omics”) scale analyses of tumors. The big problems facing the field are no longer focused exclusively on the development of new treatment modalities, though this is a very busy area of clinical research. The focus shifted now to understanding and overcoming resistance to targeted therapies, and understanding the underlying causes of the heterogeneous responses to immune therapy. PMID:24743024

  1. Potential new therapeutic targets for pathological pruritus.

    PubMed

    Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Very few approved medications are indicated for the treatment of pruritus, and drug development for pruritic diseases is awaited. During the past two decades, progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of the physiology and pathophysiology of pruritus. Newly identified potential targets for pathological pruritus include receptors (histamine H4 receptor, leukotriene B4 receptors, interleukin-31 receptor A, bombesin BB2 receptor, toll-like receptor 3, α-adrenoceptor, and opioid μ- and κ-receptors), channels (transient receptor potential (TRP) V3 and TRPA1 channels), and enzymes (histidine decarboxylase, sphingomyelin glucosylceramide deacylase, 5-lipoxygenase, leukotriene A4 hydrolase, and autotaxin). The development of specific, effective blockers and agonists/antagonists of these targets is awaited. PMID:23902965

  2. Promises and pitfalls for recombinant oligoclonal antibodies-based therapeutics in cancer and infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Corti, Davide; Kearns, Jeffrey D

    2016-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of many human diseases and the application of combinations of mAbs has demonstrated improved therapeutic activity in both preclinical and clinical testing. Combinations of antibodies have several advantages such as the capacities to target multiple and mutating antigens in complex pathogens and to engage varied epitopes on multiple disease-related antigens (e.g. receptors) to overcome heterogeneity and plasticity. Oligoclonal antibodies are an emerging therapeutic format in which a novel antibody combination is developed as a single drug product. Here, we will provide historical context on the use of oligoclonal antibodies in oncology and infectious diseases and will highlight practical considerations related to their preclinical and clinical development programs. PMID:26995095

  3. Human Isoprenoid Synthase Enzymes as Therapeutic Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeok; Matralis, Alexios; Berghuis, Albert; Tsantrizos, Youla

    2014-07-01

    The complex biochemical network known as the mevalonate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of all isoprenoids in the human body, which consists of a vast array of metabolites that are vital for proper cellular functions. Two key isoprenoids, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) are responsible for the post-translational prenylation of small GTP-binding proteins, and serve as the biosynthetic precursors to numerous other biomolecules. The down-stream metabolite of FPP and GGPP is squalene, the precursor to steroids, bile acids, lipoproteins and vitamin D. In the past, interest in prenyl synthase inhibitors focused mainly on the role of the FPP in lytic bone diseases. More recently, pre-clinical and clinical studies have strongly implicated high levels of protein prenylation in a plethora of human diseases, including non-skeletal cancers, the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus mainly on the potential therapeutic value of down-regulating the biosynthesis of FPP, GGPP and squalene. We summarize the most recent drug discovery efforts and the structural data available that support the current on-going studies.

  4. Human isoprenoid synthase enzymes as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaeok; Matralis, Alexios N.; Berghuis, Albert M.; Tsantrizos, Youla S.

    2014-01-01

    In the human body, the complex biochemical network known as the mevalonate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of all isoprenoids, which consists of a vast array of metabolites that are vital for proper cellular functions. Two key isoprenoids, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) are responsible for the post-translational prenylation of small GTP-binding proteins, and serve as the biosynthetic precursors to numerous other biomolecules. The down-stream metabolite of FPP and GGPP is squalene, the precursor to steroids, bile acids, lipoproteins, and vitamin D. In the past, interest in prenyl synthase inhibitors focused mainly on the role of the FPP in lytic bone diseases. More recently pre-clinical and clinical studies have strongly implicated high levels of protein prenylation in a plethora of human diseases, including non-skeletal cancers, the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus mainly on the potential therapeutic value of down-regulating the biosynthesis of FPP, GGPP, and squalene. We summarize the most recent drug discovery efforts and the structural data available that support the current on-going studies. PMID:25101260

  5. Targeting TRP Channels For Novel Migraine Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is increasingly understood to be a disorder of the brain. In susceptible individuals, a variety of “triggers” may influence altered central excitability, resulting in the activation and sensitization of trigeminal nociceptive afferents surrounding blood vessels (i.e., the trigeminovascular system), leading to migraine pain. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are expressed in a subset of dural afferents, including those containing calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP). Activation of TRP channels promotes excitation of nociceptive afferent fibers and potentially lead to pain. In addition to pain, allodynia to mechanical and cold stimuli can result from sensitization of both peripheral afferents and of central pain pathways. TRP channels respond to a variety of endogenous conditions including chemical mediators and low pH. These channels can be activated by exogenous stimuli including a wide range of chemical and environmental irritants, some of which have been demonstrated to trigger migraine in humans. Activation of TRP channels can elicit CGRP release, and blocking the effects of CGRP through receptor antagonism or antibody strategies has been demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of migraine. Identification of approaches that can prevent activation of TRP channels provides an additional novel strategy for discovery of migraine therapeutics. PMID:25138211

  6. Inflammation and cardiovascular disease: from pathogenesis to therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Golia, Enrica; Limongelli, Giuseppe; Natale, Francesco; Fimiani, Fabio; Maddaloni, Valeria; Pariggiano, Ivana; Bianchi, Renatomaria; Crisci, Mario; D'Acierno, Ludovica; Giordano, Roberto; Di Palma, Gaetano; Conte, Marianna; Golino, Paolo; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Calabrò, Raffaele; Calabrò, Paolo

    2014-09-01

    Atherosclerosis represents the most common pathological substrate of coronary heart disease (CHD), and the characterization of the disease as a chronic low-grade inflammatory condition is now largely accepted. A number of mediators of inflammation have been widely studied, both as surrogate biomarkers and as causal agents, in the pathophysiological network of atherogenesis and plaque vulnerability. The epidemiological observation that biomarkers of inflammation are associated with clinical cardiovascular risk supports the theory that targeted anti-inflammatory treatment appears to be a promising strategy in reducing residual cardiovascular risk on the background of traditional medical therapy. A large number of randomized controlled trials have shown that drugs commonly used in cardiovascular disease (CVD), such as statins, may be effective in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events through an anti-inflammatory effect. Moreover, several anti-inflammatory drugs are being tested for their potential to reduce residual cardiovascular risk on the background of validated medical therapy for atherosclerotic disease. In this paper, we review relevant evidence with regard to the relationship between inflammation and CVD, from pathogenesis to therapeutic strategies. PMID:25037581

  7. Mitochondrial Quality Control as a Therapeutic Target.

    PubMed

    Suliman, Hagir B; Piantadosi, Claude A

    2016-01-01

    In addition to oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), mitochondria perform other functions such as heme biosynthesis and oxygen sensing and mediate calcium homeostasis, cell growth, and cell death. They participate in cell communication and regulation of inflammation and are important considerations in aging, drug toxicity, and pathogenesis. The cell's capacity to maintain its mitochondria involves intramitochondrial processes, such as heme and protein turnover, and those involving entire organelles, such as fusion, fission, selective mitochondrial macroautophagy (mitophagy), and mitochondrial biogenesis. The integration of these processes exemplifies mitochondrial quality control (QC), which is also important in cellular disorders ranging from primary mitochondrial genetic diseases to those that involve mitochondria secondarily, such as neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, inflammatory, and metabolic syndromes. Consequently, mitochondrial biology represents a potentially useful, but relatively unexploited area of therapeutic innovation. In patients with genetic OXPHOS disorders, the largest group of inborn errors of metabolism, effective therapies, apart from symptomatic and nutritional measures, are largely lacking. Moreover, the genetic and biochemical heterogeneity of these states is remarkably similar to those of certain acquired diseases characterized by metabolic and oxidative stress and displaying wide variability. This biologic variability reflects cell-specific and repair processes that complicate rational pharmacological approaches to both primary and secondary mitochondrial disorders. However, emerging concepts of mitochondrial turnover and dynamics along with new mitochondrial disease models are providing opportunities to develop and evaluate mitochondrial QC-based therapies. The goals of such therapies extend beyond amelioration of energy insufficiency and tissue loss and entail cell repair, cell replacement, and the prevention of fibrosis. This review

  8. Transmembrane mucins as novel therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Constantinou, Pamela E; Danysh, Brian P; Dharmaraj, Neeraja; Carson, Daniel D

    2011-01-01

    Membrane-tethered mucin glycoproteins are abundantly expressed at the apical surfaces of simple epithelia, where they play important roles in lubricating and protecting tissues from pathogens and enzymatic attack. Notable examples of these mucins are MUC1, MUC4 and MUC16 (also known as cancer antigen 125). In adenocarcinomas, apical mucin restriction is lost and overall expression is often highly increased. High-level mucin expression protects tumors from killing by the host immune system, as well as by chemotherapeutic agents, and affords protection from apoptosis. Mucin expression can increase as the result of gene duplication and/or in response to hormones, cytokines and growth factors prevalent in the tumor milieu. Rises in the normally low levels of mucin fragments in serum have been used as markers of disease, such as tumor burden, for many years. Currently, several approaches are being examined that target mucins for immunization or nanomedicine using mucin-specific antibodies. PMID:22201009

  9. Potential therapeutic targets in obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Saboisky, Julian P; Chamberlin, Nancy L; Malhotra, Atul

    2009-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a disease of ever-increasing importance due to its association with multiple impairments and rising prevalence in an increasingly susceptible demographic. The syndrome is linked with loud snoring, disrupted sleep and observed apnoeas. Serious co-morbidities associated with OSA appear to be reversed by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment; however, CPAP is variably tolerated leaving many patients untreated and emphasising the need for alternative treatments. Virtually all OSA patients have airways that are anatomically vulnerable to collapse, but numerous pathophysiological factors underlie when and how OSA is manifested. This review describes how the complexity of OSA requires multiple treatment approaches that are individually targeted. This approach may take the form of more specific diagnoses in terms of the mechanisms underlying OSA as well as rational pharmacological treatment directed toward such disparate ends as arousal threshold and ventilatory control/chemosensitivity, and mechanical treatment in the form of surgery and augmentation of lung volumes. PMID:19530985

  10. Novel therapeutic targets in myeloma bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Webb, S L; Edwards, C M

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a neoplastic disorder of plasma cells characterized by clonal proliferation within the bone marrow. One of the major clinical features of multiple myeloma is the destructive osteolytic bone disease that occurs in the majority of patients. Myeloma bone disease is associated with increased osteoclast activity and suppression of osteoblastogenesis. Bisphosphonates have been the mainstay of treatment for many years; however, their use is limited by their inability to repair existing bone loss. Therefore, research into novel approaches for the treatment of myeloma bone disease is of the utmost importance. This review will discuss the current advances in our understanding of osteoclast stimulation and osteoblast suppression mechanisms in myeloma bone disease and the treatments that are under development to target this destructive and debilitating feature of myeloma. PMID:24750110

  11. Discoidin Domains as Emerging Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Villoutreix, Bruno O; Miteva, Maria A

    2016-08-01

    Discoidin (DS) domains are found in eukaryotic and prokaryotic extracellular and transmembrane multidomain proteins. These small domains play different functional roles and can interact with phospholipids, glycans, and proteins, including collagens. DS domain-containing proteins are often involved in cellular adhesion, migration, proliferation, and matrix-remodeling events, while some play a major role in blood coagulation. Mutations in DS domains have been associated with various disease conditions. This review provides an update on the structure, function, and modulation of the DS domains, with a special emphasis on two circulating blood coagulation cofactors, factor V and factor VIII, and the transmembrane neuropilin receptors that have been targeted for inhibition by biologics and small chemical compounds. PMID:27372370

  12. Molecular targets in cerebral ischemia for developing novel therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Suresh L; Manhas, Namratta; Raghubir, Ram

    2007-04-01

    apoptosis proteins (IAPs), heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), receptor interacting protein (RIP), etc., besides targeting directly the genes itself. However, selecting promising targets from various signalling cascades, for drug discovery and development is very challenging, nevertheless such novel approaches may lead to the emergence of new avenues for therapeutic intervention in cerebral ischemia. PMID:17222914

  13. G protein-coupled receptors as promising cancer targets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; An, Su; Ward, Richard; Yang, Yang; Guo, Xiao-Xi; Li, Wei; Xu, Tian-Rui

    2016-07-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate an array of fundamental biological processes, such as growth, metabolism and homeostasis. Specifically, GPCRs are involved in cancer initiation and progression. However, compared with the involvement of the epidermal growth factor receptor in cancer, that of GPCRs have been largely ignored. Recent findings have implicated many GPCRs in tumorigenesis, tumor progression, invasion and metastasis. Moreover, GPCRs contribute to the establishment and maintenance of a microenvironment which is permissive for tumor formation and growth, including effects upon surrounding blood vessels, signaling molecules and the extracellular matrix. Thus, GPCRs are considered to be among the most useful drug targets against many solid cancers. Development of selective ligands targeting GPCRs may provide novel and effective treatment strategies against cancer and some anticancer compounds are now in clinical trials. Here, we focus on tumor related GPCRs, such as G protein-coupled receptor 30, the lysophosphatidic acid receptor, angiotensin receptors 1 and 2, the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors and gastrin releasing peptide receptor. We also summarize their tissue distributions, activation and roles in tumorigenesis and discuss the potential use of GPCR agonists and antagonists in cancer therapy. PMID:27000991

  14. Targeting and Therapeutic Peptides in Nanomedicine for Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eun Ji

    2016-01-01

    Peptides in atherosclerosis nanomedicine provide structural, targeting, and therapeutic functionality, and can assist in overcoming delivery barriers of traditional pharmaceuticals. Moreover, their inherent biocompatibility and biodegradability make them especially attractive as materials intended for use in vivo. In this review, an overview of nanoparticle-associated targeting and therapeutic peptides for atherosclerosis are provided, including peptides designed for cellular targets such as endothelial cells, monocytes, and macrophages as well as for plaque components such as collagen and fibrin. An emphasis is placed on recent advances in multimodal strategies and a discussion on current challenges and barriers for clinical applicability is presented. PMID:27022138

  15. Native functionality and therapeutic targeting of arenaviral glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Crispin, Max; Zeltina, Antra; Zitzmann, Nicole; Bowden, Thomas A

    2016-06-01

    Surface glycoproteins direct cellular targeting, attachment, and membrane fusion of arenaviruses and are the primary target for neutralizing antibodies. Despite significant conservation of the glycoprotein architecture across the arenavirus family, there is considerable variation in the molecular recognition mechanisms used during host cell entry. We review recent progress in dissecting these infection events and describe how arenaviral glycoproteins can be targeted by small-molecule antivirals, the natural immune response, and immunoglobulin-based therapeutics. Arenaviral glycoprotein-mediated assembly and infection pathways present numerous opportunities and challenges for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27104809

  16. Some Perspectives on Network Modeling in Therapeutic Target Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Reka; DasGupta, Bhaskar; Mobasheri, Nasim

    2013-01-01

    Drug target identification is of significant commercial interest to pharmaceutical companies, and there is a vast amount of research done related to the topic of therapeutic target identification. Interdisciplinary research in this area involves both the biological network community and the graph algorithms community. Key steps of a typical therapeutic target identification problem include synthesizing or inferring the complex network of interactions relevant to the disease, connecting this network to the disease-specific behavior, and predicting which components are key mediators of the behavior. All of these steps involve graph theoretical or graph algorithmic aspects. In this perspective, we provide modelling and algorithmic perspectives for therapeutic target identification and highlight a number of algorithmic advances, which have gotten relatively little attention so far, with the hope of strengthening the ties between these two research communities. PMID:25288898

  17. Is Estrogen a Therapeutic Target for Glaucoma?

    PubMed

    Dewundara, Samantha S; Wiggs, Janey L; Sullivan, David A; Pasquale, Louis R

    2016-01-01

    endothelial nitric oxide synthase, a gene receptive to estrogen regulation, are associated with glaucoma. The study concluded that increasing evidence suggests that lifetime exposure to estrogen may alter the pathogenesis of glaucoma. Estrogen exposure may have a neuroprotective effect on the progression of POAG but further studies need to confirm this finding. The role of sex-specific preventive and therapeutic treatment may be on the horizon. PMID:26959139

  18. Promises, facts and challenges for carbon nanotubes in imaging and therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostarelos, K.; Bianco, A.; Prato, M.

    2009-11-01

    The use of carbon nanotubes in medicine is now at the crossroads between a proof-of-principle concept and an established preclinical candidate for a variety of therapeutic and diagnostic applications. Progress towards clinical trials will depend on the outcomes of efficacy and toxicology studies, which will provide the necessary risk-to-benefit assessments for carbon-nanotube-based materials. Here we focus on carbon nanotubes that have been studied in preclinical animal models, and draw attention to the promises, facts and challenges of these materials as they transition from research to the clinical phase. We address common questions regarding the use of carbon nanotubes in disease imaging and therapy, and highlight the opportunities and challenges ahead.

  19. Novel promising therapeutics against chronic neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Venigalla, Madhuri; Sonego, Sandra; Gyengesi, Erika; Sharman, Matthew J; Münch, Gerald

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by deposition of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, as well as microglial and astroglial activation, and, finally, leading to neuronal dysfunction and death. Current treatments for AD primarily focus on enhancement of cholinergic transmission. However, these treatments are only symptomatic, and no disease-modifying drug is available for the treatment of AD patients. This review will provide an overview of the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-amyloidogenic, neuroprotective, and cognition-enhancing effects of a variety of nutraceuticals including curcumin, apigenin, docosahexaenoic acid, epigallocatechin gallate, α-lipoic acid and resveratrol and their potential for AD prevention and treatment. We suggest that therapeutic use of these compounds might lead to a safe strategy to delay the onset of AD or slow down its progression. The continuing investigation of the potential of these substances is necessary as they are promising compounds to yield a possible remedy for this pervasive disease. PMID:26529297

  20. Targeting the Fas/FasL system in Rheumatoid Arthritis therapy: Promising or risky?

    PubMed

    Calmon-Hamaty, Flavia; Audo, Rachel; Combe, Bernard; Morel, Jacques; Hahne, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting synovial joints. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α is a key component of RA pathogenesis and blocking this cytokine is the most common strategy to treat the disease. Though TNFα blockers are very efficient, one third of the RA patients are unresponsive or present side effects. Therefore, the development of novel therapeutic approaches is required. RA pathogenesis is characterized by the hyperplasia of the synovium, closely associated to the pseudo-tumoral expansion of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS), which invade and destroy the joint structure. Hence, depletion of RA FLS has been proposed as an alternative therapeutic strategy. The TNF family member Fas ligand (FasL) was reported to trigger apoptosis in FLS of arthritic joints by binding to its receptor Fas and therefore suggested as a promising candidate for targeting the hyperplastic synovial tissue. However, this cytokine is pleiotropic and recent data from the literature indicate that Fas activation might have a disease-promoting role in RA by promoting cell proliferation. Therefore, a FasL-based therapy for RA requires careful evaluation before being applied. In this review we aim to overview what is known about the apoptotic and non-apoptotic effects of Fas/FasL system and discuss its relevance in RA. PMID:25481649

  1. XRCC3 is a promising target to improve the radiotherapy effect of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jingjing; Liu, Weiran; Zeng, Xianliang; Zhang, Bin; Guo, Yihang; Qiu, Minghan; Jiang, Chao; Wang, Huanhuan; Wu, Zhiqiang; Meng, Maobin; Zhuang, Hongqing; Zhao, Lujun; Hao, Jihui; Cai, Qingqing; Xie, Dan; Pang, Qingsong; Wang, Ping; Yuan, Zhiyong; Qian, Dong

    2015-12-01

    Radiotherapy is widely applied for treatment of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). The Rad51-related protein XRCC3 plays roles in the recombinational repair of DNA double-strand breaks to maintain chromosome stability and repair DNA damage. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of XRCC3 on the radiotherapy response of ESCC and the underlying mechanisms of the roles of XRCC3 in ESCC radiosensitivity. XRCC3 expression in ESCC cells and tissues was higher than that in normal esophageal epithelial cells and corresponding adjacent noncancerous esophageal tissue. High XRCC3 expression was positively correlated with resistance to chemoradiotherapy in ESCC and an independent predictor for short disease-specific survival of ESCC patients. Furthermore, the therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapy in vitro and in vivo was substantially increased by knockdown of XRCC3 in ESCC cells. Ectopic overexpression of XRCC3 in both XRCC3-silenced ESCC cells dramatically enhanced ESCC cells' resistance to radiotherapy. Moreover, radiation resistance conferred by XRCC3 was attributed to enhancement of homologous recombination, maintenance of telomere stability, and a reduction of ESCC cell death by radiation-induced apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe. Our data suggest that XRCC3 protects ESCC cells from ionizing radiation-induced death by promoting DNA damage repair and/or enhancing telomere stability. XRCC3 may be a novel radiosensitivity predictor and promising therapeutic target for ESCC. PMID:26383967

  2. Polyethylenimine as a promising vector for targeted siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Nimesh, Surendra

    2012-05-01

    Recent discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) technology for gene therapy has triggered explosive research efforts towards development of small interfering RNA (siRNA) as therapeutic modality for gene silencing. Owing to its large molecular weight (~13 kDa), polyanionic nature (~40 negative phosphate groups) and rapid enzymatic degradation, delivery of siRNA remains an unresolved issue. Hence, there arises a need of an appropriate delivery vector to overcome the intrinsic, poor intracellular uptake and limited in vitro and in vivo stability. Amongst the various non-viral delivery vectors, the application of polymeric vectors such as polyethylenimine (PEI) or its derivatives has attracted much attention due to its high transfection efficiency and ease of manipulation. PEI has been extensively investigated for DNA delivery, only recently this polymer has been employed for siRNA delivery. This review will focus on studies done on PEI to deliver siRNA, with emphasis on the targeted, self-assembled polymeric nanoparticles with promising potential to evolve as therapeutic tool in gene therapy. PMID:22432843

  3. Iron Acquisition Mechanisms: Promising Target Against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, Saif; Pal, Rahul; Fatima, Zeeshan

    2015-01-01

    Continuous deployment of antitubercular drugs in treating Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) has led to the emergence of drug resistance resulting in cross-resistance to many unrelated drugs, a phenomenon termed as Multi-Drug Resistance (MDR-TB). Despite reasonable documentation of major factors which contribute to MDR mechanisms, it appears unavoidable to consider novel mechanisms combating MDR. The ability of pathogenic MTB, to sense and become accustomed to changes in the host environment is essential for its survival and confers the basis of their success as dreadful pathogen. One such significant environmental factor that MTB must surmount is iron limitation, since they encounter diverse anatomical sites during the establishment of infection within the host. Considering the importance of MTB, being the second most common cause of mortality, this review focuses on gaining insights of iron acquisition mechanisms in MTB and how it can be exploited as efficient anti-mycobacterial drug target. PMID:26464608

  4. Factor XI as a Therapeutic Target.

    PubMed

    Gailani, David; Gruber, Andras

    2016-07-01

    Factor XIa is a plasma serine protease that contributes to thrombin generation primarily through proteolytic activation of factor IX. Traditionally considered part of the intrinsic pathway of coagulation, several lines of evidence now suggest that factor XIa serves as an interface between the vitamin-K-dependent thrombin generation mechanism and the proinflammatory kallikrein-kinin system, allowing the 2 systems to influence each other. Work with animal models and results from epidemiological surveys of human populations support a role for factor XIa in thromboembolic disease. These data and the clinical observation that deficiency of factor XI, the zymogen of factor XIa, produces a relatively mild bleeding disorder suggest that drugs targeting factor XI or XIa could produce an antithrombotic effect while leaving hemostasis largely intact. Results of a recent trial comparing antisense-induced factor XI reduction to standard-dose low molecular-weight heparin as prophylaxis for venous thrombosis during knee replacement are encouraging in this regard. Here, we discuss recent findings on the biochemistry, physiology, and pathology of factor XI as they relate to thromboembolic disease. PMID:27174099

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm: potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Garima; Rao, Saloni; Bansal, Ankiti; Dang, Shweta; Gupta, Sanjay; Gabrani, Reema

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative pathogen that has become an important cause of infection, especially in patients with compromised host defense mechanisms. It is frequently related to nosocomial infections such as pneumonia, urinary tract infections (UTIs) and bacteremia. The biofilm formed by the bacteria allows it to adhere to any surface, living or non-living and thus Pseudomonal infections can involve any part of the body. Further, the adaptive and genetic changes of the micro-organisms within the biofilm make them resistant to all known antimicrobial agents making the Pseudomonal infections complicated and life threatening. Pel, Psl and Alg operons present in P. aeruginosa are responsible for the biosynthesis of extracellular polysaccharide which plays an important role in cell-cell and cell-surface interactions during biofilm formation. Understanding the bacterial virulence which depends on a large number of cell-associated and extracellular factors is essential to know the potential drug targets for future studies. Current novel methods like small molecule based inhibitors, phytochemicals, bacteriophage therapy, photodynamic therapy, antimicrobial peptides, monoclonal antibodies and nanoparticles to curtail the biofilm formed by P. aeruginosa are being discussed in this review. PMID:24309094

  6. RANK as a therapeutic target in cancer.

    PubMed

    González-Suárez, Eva; Sanz-Moreno, Adrián

    2016-06-01

    The RANK signaling pathway has emerged as a new target in breast cancer as receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) and its receptor RANK mediate the pro-tumorigenic role of progesterone in the mammary gland. Thousands of cancer patients worldwide are already taking RANKL inhibitors for the management of bone metastasis, given the relevance of this pathway in osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. RANK signaling also has multiple divergent effects in immunity and inflammation, both in the generation of active immune responses and in the induction of tolerance: it is required for lymph node organogenesis, thymic medullary epithelial development and self-tolerance, and regulates activation of several immune cells and inflammatory processes. The RANK pathway interferes with mammary epithelial differentiation and mediates the major proliferative response of mammary epithelium to progesterone and progesterone-driven expansion of mammary stem cells; it also controls hair follicle and epidermal stem cell homeostasis, pointing to RANK as a key regulator of epithelial stemness. Here we revisit the main functions of RANK signaling in bone remodeling, immune cells and epithelial differentiation. We also discuss the mechanistic evidence that supports its pleiotropic effects on cancer: from bone metastasis to immune and cancer-cell-dependent effects. PMID:26749530

  7. Allopregnanolone as regenerative therapeutic for Alzheimer's disease: translational development and clinical promise.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Ronald W; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2014-02-01

    Herein, we review a translational development plan to advance allopregnanolone to the clinic as a regenerative therapeutic for neurodegenerative diseases, in particular Alzheimer's. Allopregnanolone, an endogenous neurosteroid that declines with age and neurodegenerative disease, was exogenously administered and assessed for safety and efficacy to promote neuro-regeneration, cognitive function and reduction of Alzheimer's pathology. Allopregnanolone-induced neurogenesis correlated with restoration of learning and memory function in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease and was comparably efficacious in aged normal mice. Critical to success was a dosing and treatment regimen that was consistent with the temporal requirements of systems biology of regeneration in brain. A treatment regimen that adhered to regenerative requirements of brain was also efficacious in reducing Alzheimer's pathology. With an optimized dosing and treatment regimen, chronic allopregnanolone administration promoted neurogenesis, oligodendrogenesis, reduced neuroinflammation and beta-amyloid burden while increasing markers of white matter generation and cholesterol homeostasis. Allopregnanolone meets three of the four drug-like physicochemical properties described by Lipinski's rule that predict the success rate of drugs in development for clinical trials. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic outcomes, securing GMP material, development of clinically translatable formulations and acquiring regulatory approval are discussed. Investigation of allopregnanolone as a regenerative therapeutic has provided key insights into mechanistic targets for neurogenesis and disease modification, dosing requirements, optimal treatment regimen, route of administration and the appropriate formulation necessary to advance to proof of concept clinical studies to determine efficacy of allopregnanolone as a regenerative and disease modifying therapeutic for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24044981

  8. COGNITION AS A THERAPEUTIC TARGET IN LATE-LIFE DEPRESSION: POTENTIAL FOR NICOTINIC THERAPEUTICS

    PubMed Central

    Zurkovsky, Lilia; Taylor, Warren D.; Newhouse, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Depression is associated with impairments to cognition and brain function at any age, but such impairments in the elderly are particularly problematic because of the additional burden of normal cognitive aging and in some cases, structural brain pathology. Individuals with late-life depression exhibit impairments in cognition and brain structural integrity, alongside mood dysfunction. Antidepressant treatment improves symptoms in some but not all patients, and those who benefit may not return to the cognitive and functional level of nondepressed elderly. Thus, for comprehensive treatment of late-life depression, it may be necessary to address both the affective and cognitive deficits. In this review, we propose a model for the treatment of late-life depression in which nicotinic stimulation is used to improve cognitive performance and improve the efficacy of an antidepressant treatment of the syndrome of late-life depression. The cholinergic system is well-established as important to cognition. Although muscarinic stimulation may exacerbate depressive symptoms, nicotinic stimulation may improve cognition and neural functioning without a detriment to mood. While some studies of nicotinic subtype specific receptor agonists have shown promise in improving cognitive performance, less is known regarding how nicotinic receptor stimulation affects cognition in depressed elderly patients. Late-life depression thus represents a new therapeutic target for the development of nicotinic agonist drugs and parallel treatment of cognitive dysfunction along with medical and psychological approaches to treating mood dysfunction may be necessary to ensure full resolution of depressive illness in aging. PMID:23933385

  9. Short AntiMicrobial Peptides (SAMPs) as a class of extraordinary promising therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Suhas; Govender, Thavendran; Kruger, Hendrik G; de la Torre, Beatriz G; Albericio, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    The emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria has a direct impact on global public health because of the reduced potency of existing antibiotics against pathogens. Hence, there is a pressing need for new drugs with different modes of action that can kill microorganisms. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) can be regarded as an alternative tool for this purpose because they are proven to have therapeutic effects with broad-spectrum activities. There are some hurdles in using AMPs as clinical candidates such as toxicity, lack of stability and high budgets required for manufacturing. This can be overcome by developing shorter and more easily accessible AMPs, the so-called Short AntiMicrobial Peptides (SAMPs) that contain between two and ten amino acid residues. These are emerging as an attractive class of therapeutic agents with high potential for clinical use and possessing multifunctional activities. In this review we attempted to compile those SAMPs that have exhibited biological properties which are believed to hold promise for the future. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27352996

  10. Cholera: pathophysiology and emerging therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Muanprasat, Chatchai; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj

    2013-05-01

    Cholera is a diarrheal disease that remains an important global health problem with several hundreds of thousands of reported cases each year. This disease is caused by intestinal infection with Vibrio cholerae, which is a highly motile gram-negative bacterium with a single-sheathed flagellum. In the course of cholera pathogenesis, V. cholerae expresses a transcriptional activator ToxT, which subsequently transactivates expressions of two crucial virulence factors: toxin-coregulated pilus and cholera toxin (CT). These factors are responsible for intestinal colonization of V. cholerae and induction of fluid secretion, respectively. In intestinal epithelial cells, CT binds to GM1 ganglioside receptors on the apical membrane and undergoes retrograde vesicular trafficking to endoplasmic reticulum, where it exploits endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation systems to release a catalytic A1 subunit of CT (CT A1) into cytoplasm. CT A1, in turn, catalyzes ADP ribosylation of α subunits of stimulatory G proteins, leading to a persistent activation of adenylate cyclase and an elevation of intracellular cAMP. Increased intracellular cAMP in human intestinal epithelial cells accounts for pathogenesis of profuse diarrhea and severe fluid loss in cholera. This review provides an overview of the pathophysiology of cholera diarrhea and discusses emerging drug targets for cholera, which include V. cholerae virulence factors, V. cholerae motility, CT binding to GM1 receptor, CT internalization and intoxication, as well as cAMP metabolism and transport proteins involved in cAMP-activated Cl(-) secretion. Future directions and perspectives of research on drug discovery and development for cholera are discussed. PMID:23651092

  11. Therapeutic Targeting of Siglecs using Antibody- and Glycan-Based Approaches.

    PubMed

    Angata, Takashi; Nycholat, Corwin M; Macauley, Matthew S

    2015-10-01

    The sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs) are a family of immunomodulatory receptors whose functions are regulated by their glycan ligands. Siglecs are attractive therapeutic targets because of their cell type-specific expression pattern, endocytic properties, high expression on certain lymphomas/leukemias, and ability to modulate receptor signaling. Siglec-targeting approaches with therapeutic potential encompass antibody- and glycan-based strategies. Several antibody-based therapies are in clinical trials and continue to be developed for the treatment of lymphoma/leukemia and autoimmune disease, while the therapeutic potential of glycan-based strategies for cargo delivery and immunomodulation is a promising new approach. Here we review these strategies with special emphasis on emerging approaches and disease areas that may benefit from targeting the Siglec family. PMID:26435210

  12. The use of nanoparticles as a promising therapeutic approach in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Maryam; Haji-Fatahaliha, Mostafa; Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad; Majidi, Jafar; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2016-06-01

    Cancer is one of the most important causes of death all over the world, which has not yet been treated efficiently. Although several therapeutic approaches have been used, some side effects such as toxicity and drug resistance have been observed in patients, particularly with chemotherapy. The nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery systems (DDS) have a great potential to improve cancer treatment by transferring therapeutic factors directly to the tumor site. Such a treatment significantly decreases the adverse effects associated with cancer therapy on healthy tissues. Two main strategies, including passive and active methods, have been considered to be effective techniques which can target the drugs to the tumor sites. The current review sheds some light on the place of nanotechnology in cancer drug delivery, and introduces nanomaterials and their specific characteristics that can be used in tumor therapy. Moreover, passive and active targeting approaches focus on antibodies, particularly single chain variable fragments (scFv), as a novel and important ligand in a drug delivery system. PMID:25612903

  13. Dendrimers as a promising tool in ocular therapeutics: Latest advances and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Villanueva, Javier; Navarro, Manuel Guzmán; Rodríguez Villanueva, Laura

    2016-09-10

    Dendrimers have called the attention of scientists in the area of drug and gene delivery over the last two decades for their versatility, complexity and multibranching properties. Some strategies for optimizing drug pharmacokinetics and site-specific targeting using dendrimers have been proposed. Among them, those related to treating and managing ocular diseases are of special interest. Ocular therapies suffer from significant disadvantages, including frequent administration, poor penetration and/or rapid elimination. This review provides an overview of the recent and promising progress in the dendrimers field, focusing on both the anterior and posterior segments of the eye ocular targets, the use of dendrimers as a strategy for overcoming obstacles to the traditional treatment of ocular diseases and an outlook on future directions. Finally, a first approach to ocular safety with dendrimers is intended that accounts for the state-of-the-art science to date. PMID:27436708

  14. Cucurbitacins – A Promising Target for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alghasham, Abdullah A.

    2013-01-01

    During the last decades a large number of cucurbitacins have been isolated from various plant species belonging to other plant families than Cucurbitaceae. Although the roots and the fruits of plant belong to these Cucurbitaceae species are very bitter, they have been used as folk medicines in some countries because of their wide spectrum of pharmacological activities such as anti-inflammation and anticancer effects. In the last ten years, cucurbitacins had been shown to inhibit proliferation and induced apoptosis utilizing a long array of in vitro and in vivo cancer cell models. Several molecular targets for cucurbitacins have been discovered, such as fibrous-actin, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT), cyclooxygenase-2, etc. This review aimed at elucidating the natural sources of some cucurbitacin compounds, their chemical structure and derivatives, physical properties, biological activities and mechanism by which they reduce the proliferation human cancer cells. This widens our armaments against a devastating disease that we are failing to face. PMID:23559908

  15. RNA therapeutics targeting osteoclast-mediated excessive bone resorption

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuwei; Grainger, David W

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a sequence-specific post-transcriptional gene silencing technique developed with dramatically increasing utility for both scientific and therapeutic purposes. Short interfering RNA (siRNA) is currently exploited to regulate protein expression relevant to many therapeutic applications, and commonly used as a tool for elucidating disease-associated genes. Osteoporosis and their associated osteoporotic fragility fractures in both men and women are rapidly becoming a global healthcare crisis as average life expectancy increases worldwide. New therapeutics are needed for this increasing patient population. This review describes the diversity of molecular targets suitable for RNAi-based gene knock-down in osteoclasts to control osteoclast-mediated excessive bone resorption. We identify strategies for developing targeted siRNA delivery and efficient gene silencing, and describe opportunities and challenges of introducing siRNA as a therapeutic approach to hard and connective tissue disorders. PMID:21945356

  16. Autoimmune therapies targeting costimulation and emerging trends in multivalent therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Chittasupho, Chuda; Siahaan, Teruna J; Vines, Charlotte M; Berkland, Cory

    2011-01-01

    Proteins participating in immunological signaling have emerged as important targets for controlling the immune response. A multitude of receptor–ligand pairs that regulate signaling pathways of the immune response have been identified. In the complex milieu of immune signaling, therapeutic agents targeting mediators of cellular signaling often either activate an inflammatory immune response or induce tolerance. This review is primarily focused on therapeutics that inhibit the inflammatory immune response by targeting membrane-bound proteins regulating costimulation or mediating immune-cell adhesion. Many of these signals participate in larger, organized structures such as the immunological synapse. Receptor clustering and arrangement into organized structures is also reviewed and emerging trends implicating a potential role for multivalent therapeutics is posited. PMID:21984960

  17. Advances in sarcoma genomics and new therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Barry S.; Barretina, Jordi; Maki, Robert G.; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Singer, Samuel; Ladanyi, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Preface Increasingly, human mesenchymal malignancies are classified by the abnormalities that drive their pathogenesis. While many of these aberrations are highly prevalent within particular sarcoma subtypes, few are currently targeted therapeutically. Indeed, most subtypes of sarcoma are still treated with traditional therapeutic modalities and in many cases are resistant to adjuvant therapies. In this Review, we discuss the core molecular determinants of sarcomagenesis and emphasize the emerging genomic and functional genetic approaches that, coupled to novel therapeutic strategies, have the potential to transform the care of patients with sarcoma. PMID:21753790

  18. Sphaeropsidin A shows promising activity against drug-resistant cancer cells by targeting regulatory volume increase

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Véronique; Chantôme, Aurélie; Lefranc, Florence; Cimmino, Alessio; Miklos, Walter; Paulitschke, Verena; Mohr, Thomas; Maddau, Lucia; Kornienko, Alexander; Berger, Walter; Vandier, Christophe; Evidente, Antonio; Delpire, Eric; Kiss, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recent advances in the treatment of tumors with intrinsic chemotherapy resistance, such as melanoma and renal cancers, their prognosis remains poor and new chemical agents with promising activity against these cancers are urgently needed. Sphaeropsidin A, a fungal metabolite whose anticancer potential had previously received little attention, was isolated from Diplodia cupressi and found to display specific anticancer activity in vitro against melanoma and kidney cancer subpanels in the National Cancer Institute (NCI) 60-cell line screen. The NCI data revealed a mean LC50 of ca. 10 μM and a cellular sensitivity profile that did not match that of any other agent in the 765,000 compound database. Subsequent mechanistic studies in melanoma and other multidrug-resistant in vitro cancer models showed that sphaeropsidin A can overcome apoptosis as well as multidrug resistance by inducing a marked and rapid cellular shrinkage related to the loss of intracellular Cl− and the decreased HCO3− concentration in the culture supernatant. These changes in ion homeostasis and the absence of effects on the plasma membrane potential were attributed to the sphaeropsidin A-induced impairment of regulatory volume increase (RVI). Preliminary results also indicate that depending on the type of cancer, the sphaeropsidin A effects on RVI could be related to Na–K–2Cl electroneutral cotransporter or Cl−/HCO3− anion exchanger(s) targeting. This study underscores the modulation of ion-transporter activity as a promising therapeutic strategy to combat drug-resistant cancers and identifies the fungal metabolite, sphaeropsidin A, as a lead to develop anticancer agents targeting RVI in cancer cells. PMID:25868554

  19. Sphaeropsidin A shows promising activity against drug-resistant cancer cells by targeting regulatory volume increase.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Véronique; Chantôme, Aurélie; Lefranc, Florence; Cimmino, Alessio; Miklos, Walter; Paulitschke, Verena; Mohr, Thomas; Maddau, Lucia; Kornienko, Alexander; Berger, Walter; Vandier, Christophe; Evidente, Antonio; Delpire, Eric; Kiss, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Despite the recent advances in the treatment of tumors with intrinsic chemotherapy resistance, such as melanoma and renal cancers, their prognosis remains poor and new chemical agents with promising activity against these cancers are urgently needed. Sphaeropsidin A, a fungal metabolite whose anticancer potential had previously received little attention, was isolated from Diplodia cupressi and found to display specific anticancer activity in vitro against melanoma and kidney cancer subpanels in the National Cancer Institute (NCI) 60-cell line screen. The NCI data revealed a mean LC50 of ca. 10 µM and a cellular sensitivity profile that did not match that of any other agent in the 765,000 compound database. Subsequent mechanistic studies in melanoma and other multidrug-resistant in vitro cancer models showed that sphaeropsidin A can overcome apoptosis as well as multidrug resistance by inducing a marked and rapid cellular shrinkage related to the loss of intracellular Cl(-) and the decreased HCO3 (-) concentration in the culture supernatant. These changes in ion homeostasis and the absence of effects on the plasma membrane potential were attributed to the sphaeropsidin A-induced impairment of regulatory volume increase (RVI). Preliminary results also indicate that depending on the type of cancer, the sphaeropsidin A effects on RVI could be related to Na-K-2Cl electroneutral cotransporter or Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) anion exchanger(s) targeting. This study underscores the modulation of ion-transporter activity as a promising therapeutic strategy to combat drug-resistant cancers and identifies the fungal metabolite, sphaeropsidin A, as a lead to develop anticancer agents targeting RVI in cancer cells. PMID:25868554

  20. The Role of Steroid Receptor Coactivators in Hormone Dependent Cancers and Their Potential as Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Lonard, David M; O'Malley, Bert W

    2016-08-01

    Steroid receptor coactivator (SRC) family members (SRC-1, SRC-2, SRC-3) interact with nuclear receptors (NRs) and many transcription factors to enhance target gene transcription. Deregulation of SRCs is widely implicated in NR mediated diseases, especially hormone dependent cancers. By integrating steroid hormone signaling and growth factor pathways, SRC proteins exert multiple modes of oncogenic regulation in cancers and represent emerging targets for cancer therapeutics. Recent work has identified SRC-targeting agents that show promise in blocking tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, and have the potential to function as powerful and broadly encompassing treatments for different cancers. PMID:27125199

  1. In vitro study of deep capture of paramagnetic particle for targeting therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Ning; Huang, Zheyong; Ma, Wenli; Ge, Junbo; Zheng, Wenling

    2009-09-01

    Magnetic targeting, a promising therapeutic strategy for localizing systemically delivered drug to target tissue, is limited by magnetic attenuation. To satisfy the need of deep magnetic targeting, a special apparatus in which the magnetic flux density can be focused at a distance from the pole was designed. To test the aggregation property of this apparatus, we observed the accumulation of 500-nm paramagnetic particles as flowing through a tube served as a model of blood vessels. The relationship of the accumulation of the paramagnetic particles, the magnetic flux density, the magnetic field gradient and the fluid velocity was studied by theoretical considerations.

  2. Nanoparticle-Based Targeted Therapeutics in Head-And-Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ting-Ting; Zhou, Shui-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Head-and-neck cancer is a major form of the disease worldwide. Treatment consists of surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy, but these have not resulted in improved survival rates over the past few decades. Versatile nanoparticles, with selective tumor targeting, are considered to have the potential to improve these poor outcomes. Application of nanoparticle-based targeted therapeutics has extended into many areas, including gene silencing, chemotherapeutic drug delivery, radiosensitization, photothermal therapy, and has shown much promise. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the field of nanoparticle-mediated targeted therapeutics for head-and-neck cancer, with an emphasis on the description of targeting points, including future perspectives. PMID:25589895

  3. REOVIRUS: A TARGETED THERAPEUTIC – PROGRESS AND POTENTIAL

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Radhashree; Ghalib, Mohammad H.; Goel, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Medical therapy of patients with malignancy requires a paradigm shift through development of new drugs with a good safety record and novel mechanisms of activity. While there is no dearth of such molecules, one particular agent, “reovirus” is promising by its ability to target cancer cells with aberrant signaling pathways. This double stranded RNA virus has been therapeutically formulated and has rapidly progressed from pre-clinical validation of anti cancer activity to a phase III registration study in platinum refractory metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. During this process, reovirus has demonstrated safety both as a single agent when administered intratumorally and intravenously, as well as in combination therapy, with multiple chemotherapeutics such as gemcitabine, carboplatin/paclitaxel, and docetaxel; and similarly with radiation. The scientific rationale for its development as an anticancer agent stems from the fact that it preferentially replicates in and induces lyses of cells with an activated Kras pathway. As documented in many previous studies, the initial observation of greater tropism in Kras compromised situation might certainly not be the sole and possibly not even the predominant reason for enhanced virulence. All the same, scientists have emphasized on Kras optimistically due to its high prevalence in various types of cancers. Incidence of Kras mutation has been found to be highest in pancreatic cancer (85–90%) followed by colorectal (35–45%) and lung (25–30%). Reovirus, in fact has the potential not only as a therapy but also as a tool to unravel the aberrant cellular pathway leading to carcinogenicity. PMID:23038811

  4. β-secretase inhibitor; a promising novel therapeutic drug in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Menting, Kelly Willemijn; Claassen, Jurgen A H R

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia are responsible for up to 90% of dementia cases. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), a staggering number of 35.6 million people are currently diagnosed with dementia. Blocking disease progression or preventing AD altogether is desirable for both social and economic reasons and recently focus has shifted to a new and promising drug: the β-secretase inhibitor. Much of AD research has investigated the amyloid cascade hypothesis, which postulates that AD is caused by changes in amyloid beta (Aβ) stability and aggregation. Blocking Aβ production by inhibiting the first protease required for its generation, β-secretase/BACE1, may be the next step in blocking AD progression. In April 2012, promising phase I data on inhibitor MK-8931 was presented. This drug reduced Aβ cerebral spinal fluids (CSF) levels up to 92% and was well tolerated by patients. In March 2013 data was added from a one week trial in 32 mild to moderate AD patients, showing CSF Aβ levels decreased up to 84%. However, β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) inhibitors require further research. First, greatly reducing Aβ levels through BACE1 inhibition may have harmful side effects. Second, BACE1 inhibitors have yet to pass clinical trial phase II/III and no data on possible side effects on AD patients are available. And third, there remains doubt about the clinical efficacy of BACE1 inhibitors. In moderate AD patients, Aβ plaques have already been formed. BACE1 inhibitors prevent production of new Aβ plaques, but hypothetically do not influence already existing Aβ peptides. Therefore, BACE1 inhibitors are potentially better at preventing AD instead of having therapeutic use. PMID:25100992

  5. Galectins as therapeutic targets for hematological malignancies: a hopeful sweetness.

    PubMed

    Pena, Camilo; Mirandola, Leonardo; Figueroa, Jose A; Hosiriluck, Nattamol; Suvorava, Natallia; Trotter, Kayley; Reidy, Adair; Rakhshanda, Rahman; Payne, Drew; Jenkins, Marjorie; Grizzi, Fabio; Littlefield, Lauren; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Cobos, Everardo

    2014-09-01

    Galectins are family of galactose-binding proteins known to play critical roles in inflammation and neoplastic progression. Galectins facilitate the growth and survival of neoplastic cells by regulating their cross-talk with the extracellular microenvironment and hampering anti-neoplastic immunity. Here, we review the role of galectins in the biology of hematological malignancies and their promise as potential therapeutic agents in these diseases. PMID:25405162

  6. Galectins as therapeutic targets for hematological malignancies: a hopeful sweetness

    PubMed Central

    Pena, Camilo; Mirandola, Leonardo; Figueroa, Jose A.; Hosiriluck, Nattamol; Suvorava, Natallia; Trotter, Kayley; Reidy, Adair; Rakhshanda, Rahman; Payne, Drew; Jenkins, Marjorie; Grizzi, Fabio; Littlefield, Lauren; Cobos, Everardo

    2014-01-01

    Galectins are family of galactose-binding proteins known to play critical roles in inflammation and neoplastic progression. Galectins facilitate the growth and survival of neoplastic cells by regulating their cross-talk with the extracellular microenvironment and hampering anti-neoplastic immunity. Here, we review the role of galectins in the biology of hematological malignancies and their promise as potential therapeutic agents in these diseases. PMID:25405162

  7. New therapeutic targets in rare genetic skeletal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Michael D; Bell, Peter A; Wright, Michael J; Pirog, Katarzyna A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Genetic skeletal diseases (GSDs) are a diverse and complex group of rare genetic conditions that affect the development and homeostasis of the skeleton. Although individually rare, as a group of related diseases, GSDs have an overall prevalence of at least 1 per 4,000 children. There are currently very few specific therapeutic interventions to prevent, halt or modify skeletal disease progression and therefore the generation of new and effective treatments requires novel and innovative research that can identify tractable therapeutic targets and biomarkers of these diseases. Areas covered: Remarkable progress has been made in identifying the genetic basis of the majority of GSDs and in developing relevant model systems that have delivered new knowledge on disease mechanisms and are now starting to identify novel therapeutic targets. This review will provide an overview of disease mechanisms that are shared amongst groups of different GSDs and describe potential therapeutic approaches that are under investigation. Expert opinion: The extensive clinical variability and genetic heterogeneity of GSDs renders this broad group of rare diseases a bench to bedside challenge. However, the evolving hypothesis that clinically different diseases might share common disease mechanisms is a powerful concept that will generate critical mass for the identification and validation of novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers. PMID:26635999

  8. Elements toward novel therapeutic targeting of the adrenergic system.

    PubMed

    Ghanemi, Abdelaziz; Hu, Xintian

    2015-02-01

    Adrenergic receptors belong to the family of the G protein coupled receptors that represent important targets in the modern pharmacotherapies. Studies on different physiological and pathophysiological properties of the adrenergic system have led to novel evidences and theories that suggest novel possible targeting of such system in a variety of pathologies and disorders, even beyond the classical known therapeutic possibilities. Herein, those advances have been illustrated with selected concepts and different examples. Furthermore, we illustrated the applications and the therapeutic implications that such findings and advances might have in the contexts of experimental pharmacology, therapeutics and clinic. We hope that the content of this work will guide researches devoted to the adrenergic aspects that combine neurosciences with pharmacology. PMID:25481798

  9. Current progress on aptamer-targeted oligonucleotide therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Dassie, Justin P; Giangrande, Paloma H

    2014-01-01

    Exploiting the power of the RNAi pathway through the use of therapeutic siRNA drugs has remarkable potential for treating a vast array of human disease conditions. However, difficulties in delivery of these and similar nucleic acid-based pharmacological agents to appropriate organs or tissues, remains a major impediment to their broad clinical application. Synthetic nucleic acid ligands (aptamers) have emerged as effective delivery vehicles for therapeutic oligonucleotides, including siRNAs. In this review, we summarize recent attractive developments in creatively employing cell-internalizing aptamers to deliver therapeutic oligonucleotides (e.g., siRNAs, miRNAs, anti-miRs and antisense oligos) to target cells. We also discuss advancements in aptamer-siRNA chimera technology, as well as, aptamer-functionalized nanoparticles for siRNA delivery. In addition, the challenges and future prospects of aptamer-targeted oligonucleotide drugs for clinical translation are further highlighted. PMID:24304250

  10. Chromatin-modifying enzymes as therapeutic targets – Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Keppler, Brian R; Archer, Trevor K

    2009-01-01

    Background Part 1 of this review described the importance of histone acetylases, deacetylases, methylases and demethylases in transcriptional control and their potential as therapeutic targets. However, precise gene regulation requires the involvement of more than just the addition or removal of acetyl and methyl groups on histones. Histone phosphorylation, ubiquitylation, SUMOylation and poly-ADP-ribosylation, as well as ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling complexes, play equally pivotal roles in the maintenance of transcriptional fidelity. Accordingly, the enzymes responsible for these modifications are also misregulated in various disease states. Objective To review the complex roles of chromatin-modifying enzymes in gene regulation and to highlight their potential as therapeutic targets. Methods This review is based on recent published literature and online resources. Results/conclusion In this second and final part of the review, we discuss the importance of these other histone and nucleosome modifying enzymes in gene transcription as well as their therapeutic potential. PMID:18851700

  11. gp130 receptor ligands as potential therapeutic targets for obesity

    PubMed Central

    Febbraio, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    Obesity and its related cluster of pathophysiologic conditions including insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension are recognized as growing threats to world health. It is now estimated that 10% of the world’s population is overweight or obese. As a result, new therapeutic options for the treatment of obesity are clearly warranted. Recent research has focused on the role that gp130 receptor ligands may play as potential therapeutic targets in obesity. One cytokine in particular, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), acts both centrally and peripherally and mimics the biologic actions of the appetite control hormone leptin, but unlike leptin, CNTF appears to be effective in obesity and as such may have therapeutic potential. In addition, CNTF suppresses inflammatory signaling cascades associated with lipid accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle. This review examines the potential role of gp130 receptor ligands as part of a therapeutic strategy to treat obesity. PMID:17404609

  12. AMPA Receptors as Therapeutic Targets for Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kevin; Goodman, Lucy; Fourie, Chantelle; Schenk, Susan; Leitch, Beulah; Montgomery, Johanna M

    2016-01-01

    Almost every neurological disease directly or indirectly affects synapse function in the brain. However, these diseases alter synapses through different mechanisms, ultimately resulting in altered synaptic transmission and/or plasticity. Glutamate is the major neurotransmitter that mediates excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain through activation of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) receptors. These receptors have therefore been identified as a target for the development of therapeutic treatments for neurological disorders including epilepsy, neurodegenerative diseases, autism, and drug addiction. The fact that AMPA receptors play a dominant role throughout the brain raises the significant challenge of selectively targeting only those regions affected by disease, and clinical trials have raised doubt regarding the feasibility of specifically targeting AMPA receptors for new therapeutic options. Benzamide compounds that act as positive allosteric AMPA receptor modulators, known as AMPAkines, can act on specific brain regions and were initially proposed to revolutionize the treatment of cognitive deficits associated with neurological disorders. Their therapeutic potential has since declined due to inconsistent results in clinical trials. However, recent advances in basic biomedical research are significantly increasing our knowledge of AMPA receptor structure, binding sites, and interactions with auxiliary proteins. In particular, the large complex of postsynaptic proteins that interact with AMPA receptor subunits have been shown to control AMPA receptor insertion, location, pharmacology, synaptic transmission, and plasticity. These proteins are now being considered as alternative therapeutic target sites for modulating AMPA receptors in neurological disorders. PMID:26920691

  13. Special issue: Proteoglycans: signaling, targeting and therapeutics: introduction.

    PubMed

    Karamanos, Nikos K; Linhardt, Robert J

    2013-05-01

    This special issue of FEBS Journal contains 31 review and primary research articles reflecting the advancements covered at the 2012 Proteoglycans Gordon Research Conference and novel aspects from experts in the field. It is mainly focused on current status of the extracellular and cell surface proteoglycans' regulatory roles in cell signaling, molecular targeting, engineering attempts and potential therapeutic approaches. PMID:23530537

  14. Mesenchymal stem cell-based gene therapy: A promising therapeutic strategy.

    PubMed

    Mohammadian, Mozhdeh; Abasi, Elham; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stromal cells that exist in bone marrow, fat, and so many other tissues, and can differentiate into a variety of cell types including osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes, as well as myocytes and neurons. Moreover, they have great capacity for self-renewal while maintaining their multipotency. Their capacity for proliferation and differentiation, in addition to their immunomodulatory activity, makes them very promising candidates for cell-based regenerative medicine. Moreover, MSCs have the ability of mobilization to the site of damage; therefore, they can automatically migrate to the site of injury via their chemokine receptors following intravenous transplantation. In this respect, they can be applied for MSC-based gene therapy. In this new therapeutic method, genes of interest are introduced into MSCs via viral and non-viral-based methods that lead to transgene expression in them. Although stem cell-based gene therapy is a relatively new strategy, it lights a new hope for the treatment of a variety of genetic disorders. In the near future, MSCs can be of use in a vast number of clinical applications, because of their uncomplicated isolation, culture, and genetic manipulation. However, full consideration is still crucial before they are utilized for clinical trials, because the number of studies that signify the advantageous effects of MSC-based gene therapy are still limited. PMID:26148175

  15. Acupuncture Points Stimulation for Meniere's Disease/Syndrome: A Promising Therapeutic Approach

    PubMed Central

    He, Jiaojun; Jiang, Liyuan; Peng, Tianqiang; Xia, Meixia

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study aims to explore evidence for acupuncture points stimulation (APS) in treatment of Meniere's disease (MD). Method. A literature search was conducted in seven databases including EMBASE, Medline, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, CBM, CNKI, and WangFang database and the data analysis was performed by using the RevMan version 5.3. Results. 12 RCTs with 993 participants were acquired after the search. The quality of most eligible studies was very low which limited the value of the meta-analysis. Compared with western medicine comprehensive treatment (WMCT), the APS alone or in combination with WMCT had a significant positive effect in controlling vertigo; however, the result was negative in hearing improvement and DHI. No adverse events were reported in the studies. Conclusion. The APS might be a promising therapeutic approach for MD. However, the currently available evidence is insufficient to make a definitive conclusion for the poor quality of included studies. More high-quality researches with larger sample size are urgently needed to assess the effectiveness and safety. PMID:27547229

  16. Amphipathic tail-anchoring peptide is a promising therapeutic agent for prostate cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    De, Gejing; Ko, Jae-Kyun; Tan, Tao; Zhu, Hua; Li, Haichang; Ma, Jianjie

    2014-01-01

    Amphipathic tail-anchoring peptide (ATAP) derived from the human anti-apoptotic protein Bfl-1 is a potent inducer of apoptosis by targeting mitochondria permeability transition. By linking ATAP to an internalizing RGD peptide (iRGD), selective targeting for ATAP to tumor cell was achieved. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that ATAP-iRGD could penetrate into cancer cells and distribute along the mitochondria network. ATAP-iRGD triggered mitochondria-dependent cell death through release of cytochrome c. In an effort to promote ATAP-iRGD physiochemical properties to approach clinic application, amino acid substitution and chemical modification were made with ATAP-iRGD to improve its bioactivity. One of these modified peptides, ATAP-iRGD-M8, was with improved stability and aqueous solubility without compromising in vitro cytotoxicity in cultured cancer cells. In vivo xenograft studies with multiple prostate cancer cell lines showed that intravenous administration of ATAP-iRGD-M8 suppressed tumor growth. Toxicological studies revealed that repetitive intravenous administration of ATAP-iRGD-M8 did not produce significant toxicity in the SV129 mice. Our data suggest that ATAP-iRGD-M8 is a promising agent with high selectivity and limited systemic toxicity for prostate cancer treatment. PMID:25245280

  17. Bench-to-bedside review: Adenosine receptors – promising targets in acute lung injury?

    PubMed Central

    Schepp, Carsten P; Reutershan, Jörg

    2008-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are life-threatening disorders that have substantial adverse effects on outcomes in critically ill patients. ALI/ARDS develops in response to pulmonary or extrapulmonary injury and is characterized by increased leakage from the pulmonary microvasculature and excessive infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells into the lung. Currently, no therapeutic strategies are available to control these fundamental pathophysiological processes in human ALI/ARDS. In a variety of animal models and experimental settings, the purine nucleoside adenosine has been demonstrated to regulate both endothelial barrier integrity and polymorphonuclear cell trafficking in the lung. Adenosine exerts its effects through four G-protein-coupled receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3) that are expressed on leukocytes and nonhematopoietic cells, including endothelial and epithelial cells. Each type of adenosine receptor (AR) is characterized by a unique pharmacological and physiological profile. The development of selective AR agonists and antagonists, as well as the generation of gene-deficient mice, has contributed to a growing understanding of the cellular and molecular processes that are critically involved in the development of ALI/ARDS. Adenosine-dependent pathways are involved in both protective and proinflammatory effects, highlighting the need for a detailed characterization of the distinct pathways. This review summarizes current experimental observations on the role of adenosine signaling in the development of acute lung injury and illustrates that adenosine and ARs are promising targets that may be exploited in the development of innovative therapeutic strategies. PMID:18828873

  18. Drug Normalization for Cancer Therapeutic and Druggable Genome Target Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Guoqian; Sohn, Sunghwan; Zimmermann, Michael T.; Wang, Chen; Liu, Hongfang; Chute, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous drug data representation among different druggable genome knowledge resources and datasets delays effective cancer therapeutic target discovery within the broad scientific community. The objective of the present paper is to describe the challenges and lessons learned from our efforts in developing and evaluating a standards-based drug normalization framework targeting cancer druggable genome datasets. Our findings suggested that mechanisms need to be established to deal with spelling errors and irregularities in normalizing clinical drug data in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), whereas the annotations from NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) and PubChem are two layers of normalization that potentially bridge between the clinical phenotypes and the druggable genome knowledge for effective cancer therapeutic target discovery. PMID:26306243

  19. Breast cancer stem cells, EMT and therapeutic targets

    SciTech Connect

    Kotiyal, Srishti; Bhattacharya, Susinjan

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key molecules of signaling pathways can control growth of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). • Development of BCSCs also involves miRNA interactions. • Therapeutic achievement can be done by targeting identified targets in the BCSC pathways. - Abstract: A small heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells acts as seeds to induce new tumor growth. These seeds or breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) exhibit great phenotypical plasticity which allows them to undergo “epithelial to mesenchymal transition” (EMT) at the site of primary tumor and a future reverse transition. Apart from metastasis they are also responsible for maintaining the tumor and conferring it with drug and radiation resistance and a tendency for post-treatment relapse. Many of the signaling pathways involved in induction of EMT are involved in CSC generation and regulation. Here we are briefly reviewing the mechanism of TGF-β, Wnt, Notch, TNF-α, NF-κB, RTK signalling pathways which are involved in EMT as well as BCSCs maintenance. Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key/accessory players of these pathways could control growth of BCSCs and hence malignant cancer. Additionally several miRNAs are dysregulated in cancer stem cells indicating their roles as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. This review also lists the miRNA interactions identified in BCSCs and discusses on some newly identified targets in the BCSC regulatory pathways like SHIP2, nicastrin, Pin 1, IGF-1R, pro-inflammatory cytokines and syndecan which can be targeted for therapeutic achievements.

  20. MicroRNA Targeted Therapeutic Approach for Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yiwei; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the US and is expected to be the second leading cause of cancer-related death by 2030. Therefore, it is important to better understand the molecular pathogenesis, phenotypes and features of pancreatic cancer in order to design novel molecularly targeted therapies for achieving better therapeutic outcome of patients with pancreatic cancer. Recently, the roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the development and progression of pancreatic cancer became a hot topic in the scientific community of pancreatic cancer research. By conducting miRNA expression profiling, the aberrant expression of miRNAs was revealed in the serum and in cancer tissues from patients with pancreatic cancer. These aberrantly expressed miRNAs are critically correlated with the disease stage, drug resistance, and survival of pancreatic cancer patients. Hence, targeting these tiny molecules, the specific miRNAs, could provide an efficient and optimal approach in the therapy of pancreatic cancer. Indeed, the pre-clinical and in vivo experiments showed that nanoparticle delivery of synthetic oligonucleotides or treatment with natural agents could be useful to modulate the expression of miRNAs and thereby inhibit pancreatic cancer growth and progression, suggesting that targeting miRNAs combined with conventional anti-cancer therapeutics could be a novel therapeutic strategy for increasing drug sensitivity and achieving better therapeutic outcome of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. PMID:26929739

  1. Multiple Molecular Pathways in Melanomagenesis: Characterization of Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Giuseppe; Ombra, MariaNeve; Colombino, Maria; Casula, Milena; Sini, MariaCristina; Manca, Antonella; Paliogiannis, Panagiotis; Ascierto, Paolo Antonio; Cossu, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms involved in pathogenesis of malignant melanoma have been widely studied and novel therapeutic treatments developed in recent past years. Molecular targets for therapy have mostly been recognized in the RAS–RAF–MEK–ERK and PI3K–AKT signaling pathways; small-molecule inhibitors were drawn to specifically target key kinases. Unfortunately, these targeted drugs may display intrinsic or acquired resistance and various evidences suggest that inhibition of a single effector of the signal transduction cascades involved in melanoma pathogenesis may be ineffective in blocking the tumor growth. In this sense, a wider comprehension of the multiple molecular alterations accounting for either response or resistance to treatments with targeted inhibitors may be helpful in assessing, which is the most effective combination of such therapies. In the present review, we summarize the known molecular mechanisms underlying either intrinsic and acquired drug resistance either alternative roads to melanoma pathogenesis, which may become targets for innovative anticancer approaches. PMID:26322273

  2. Therapeutic potential of a peptide targeting BCL-2 cell guardians in cancer.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jerry M

    2012-06-01

    A promising approach to cancer therapy is to elicit apoptosis with "BH3 mimetic" drugs, which target proteins of the BCL-2 family. As of yet, however, such drugs can target only certain BCL-2 family proteins. Hence, in this issue of the JCI, LaBelle et al. assess instead the therapeutic potential of a "stapled" BH3 peptide from the BIM protein, which inactivates all its prosurvival relatives. The peptide killed cultured hematologic tumor cells and abated growth of a leukemia xenograft, without perturbing the hematopoietic compartment. Hence, such peptides might eventually provide a new way to treat refractory leukemias. PMID:22622043

  3. Histone deacetylase inhibitor givinostat: the small-molecule with promising activity against therapeutically challenging haematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ganai, Shabir Ahmad

    2016-08-01

    Histone acetyl transferases and histone deacetylases (HDACs) are counteracting epigenetic enzymes regulating the turnover of histone acetylation thereby regulating transcriptional events in a precise manner. Deregulation of histone acetylation caused by aberrant expression of HDACs plays a key role in tumour onset and progression making these enzymes as candidate targets for anticancer drugs and therapy. Small-molecules namely histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) modulating the biological function of HDACs have shown multiple biological effects including differentiation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in tumour models. HDACi in general have been described in plethora of reviews with respect to various cancers. However, no review article is available describing thoroughly the role of inhibitor givinostat (ITF2357 or [6-(diethylaminomethyl) naphthalen-2-yl] methyl N-[4-(hydroxycarbamoyl) phenyl] carbamate) in haematological malignancies. Thus, the present review explores the intricate role of novel inhibitor givinostat in the defined malignancies including multiple myeloma, acute myelogenous leukaemia, Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma apart from myeloproliferative neoplasms. The distinct molecular mechanisms triggered by this small-molecule inhibitor in these cancers to exert cytotoxic effect have also been dealt with. The article also highlights the combination strategy that can be used for enhancing the therapeutic efficiency of this inhibitor in the upcoming future. PMID:27121910

  4. A Quorum Sensing-Disrupting Brominated Thiophenone with a Promising Therapeutic Potential to Treat Luminescent Vibriosis

    PubMed Central

    Defoirdt, Tom; Benneche, Tore; Brackman, Gilles; Coenye, Tom; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Scheie, Anne Aamdal

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi is amongst the most important bacterial pathogens in aquaculture. Novel methods to control this pathogen are needed since many strains have acquired resistance to antibiotics. We previously showed that quorum sensing-disrupting furanones are able to protect brine shrimp larvae against vibriosis. However, a major problem of these compounds is that they are toxic toward higher organisms and therefore, they are not safe to be used in aquaculture. The synthesis of brominated thiophenones, sulphur analogues of the quorum sensing-disrupting furanones, has recently been reported. In the present study, we report that these compounds block quorum sensing in V. harveyi at concentrations in the low micromolar range. Bioluminescence experiments with V. harveyi quorum sensing mutants and a fluorescence anisotropy assay indicated that the compounds disrupt quorum sensing in this bacterium by decreasing the ability of the quorum sensing master regulator LuxR to bind to its target promoter DNA. In vivo challenge tests with gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae showed that thiophenone compound TF310, (Z)-4-((5-(bromomethylene)-2-oxo-2,5-dihydrothiophen-3-yl)methoxy)-4-oxobutanoic acid, completely protected the larvae from V. harveyi BB120 when dosed to the culture water at 2.5 µM or more, whereas severe toxicity was only observed at 250 µM. This makes TF310 showing the highest therapeutic index of all quorum sensing-disrupting compounds tested thus far in our brine shrimp model system. PMID:22848604

  5. Therapeutic target database update 2012: a resource for facilitating target-oriented drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Feng; Shi, Zhe; Qin, Chu; Tao, Lin; Liu, Xin; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Li; Song, Yang; Liu, Xianghui; Zhang, Jingxian; Han, Bucong; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Yuzong

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge and investigation of therapeutic targets (responsible for drug efficacy) and the targeted drugs facilitate target and drug discovery and validation. Therapeutic Target Database (TTD, http://bidd.nus.edu.sg/group/ttd/ttd.asp) has been developed to provide comprehensive information about efficacy targets and the corresponding approved, clinical trial and investigative drugs. Since its last update, major improvements and updates have been made to TTD. In addition to the significant increase of data content (from 1894 targets and 5028 drugs to 2025 targets and 17 816 drugs), we added target validation information (drug potency against target, effect against disease models and effect of target knockout, knockdown or genetic variations) for 932 targets, and 841 quantitative structure activity relationship models for active compounds of 228 chemical types against 121 targets. Moreover, we added the data from our previous drug studies including 3681 multi-target agents against 108 target pairs, 116 drug combinations with their synergistic, additive, antagonistic, potentiative or reductive mechanisms, 1427 natural product-derived approved, clinical trial and pre-clinical drugs and cross-links to the clinical trial information page in the ClinicalTrials.gov database for 770 clinical trial drugs. These updates are useful for facilitating target discovery and validation, drug lead discovery and optimization, and the development of multi-target drugs and drug combinations. PMID:21948793

  6. Atypical Protein Kinase Cι as a human oncogene and therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Peter J.; Justilien, Verline; Riou, Philippe; Linch, Mark; Fields, Alan P.

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinase inhibitors represent a major class of targeted therapeutics that has made a positive impact on treatment of cancer and other disease indications. Among the promising kinase targets for further therapeutic development are members of the Protein Kinase C (PKC) family.The PKCs are central components of many signaling pathways that regulate diverse cellular functions including proliferation, cell cycle, differentiation, survival, cell migration, and polarity. Genetic manipulation of individual PKC isozymes has demonstrated that they often fulfill distinct, nonredundant cellular functions.11 Participation of PKC members in different intracellular signaling pathways reflects responses to varying extracellular stimuli, intracellular localization, tissue distribution, phosphorylation status, and intermolecular interactions. PKC activity, localization, phosphorylation, and/or expression are often altered in human tumors, and PKC isozymes have been implicated in various aspects of transformation, including uncontrolled proliferation, migration, invasion, metastasis, angiogenesis, and resistance to apoptosis. Despite the strong relationship between PKC isozymes and cancer, to date only atypical PKCiota has been shown to function as a bona fide oncogene, and as such is a particularly attractive therapeutic target for cancer treatment. In this review, we discuss the role of PKCiota in transformation and describe mechanism-based approaches to therapeutically target oncogenic PKCiota signaling in cancer. PMID:24231509

  7. In vitro discovery of promising anti-cancer drug combinations using iterative maximisation of a therapeutic index

    PubMed Central

    Kashif, M.; Andersson, C.; Hassan, S.; Karlsson, H.; Senkowski, W.; Fryknäs, M.; Nygren, P.; Larsson, R.; Gustafsson, M.G.

    2015-01-01

    In vitro-based search for promising anti-cancer drug combinations may provide important leads to improved cancer therapies. Currently there are no integrated computational-experimental methods specifically designed to search for combinations, maximizing a predefined therapeutic index (TI) defined in terms of appropriate model systems. Here, such a pipeline is presented allowing the search for optimal combinations among an arbitrary number of drugs while also taking experimental variability into account. The TI optimized is the cytotoxicity difference (in vitro) between a target model and an adverse side effect model. Focusing on colorectal carcinoma (CRC), the pipeline provided several combinations that are effective in six different CRC models with limited cytotoxicity in normal cell models. Herein we describe the identification of the combination (Trichostatin A, Afungin, 17-AAG) and present results from subsequent characterisations, including efficacy in primary cultures of tumour cells from CRC patients. We hypothesize that its effect derives from potentiation of the proteotoxic action of 17-AAG by Trichostatin A and Afungin. The discovered drug combinations against CRC are significant findings themselves and also indicate that the proposed strategy has great potential for suggesting drug combination treatments suitable for other cancer types as well as for other complex diseases. PMID:26392291

  8. MicroRNAs as therapeutic targets in human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Maitri Y.; Calin, George A.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are evolutionarily conserved, small, regulatory RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression. Extensive research in the last decade has implicated miRNAs as master regulators of cellular processes with essential role in cancer initiation, progression and metastasis, making them promising therapeutic tools for cancer management. In this review, we will briefly review the structure, biogenesis, functions and mechanism of action of these miRNAs, followed by a detailed analysis of the therapeutic potential of these miRNAs. We will focus on the strategies presently used for miRNA therapy; discuss their use and drawbacks, and the challenges and future directions for development of miRNA-based therapy for human cancers. PMID:24687772

  9. Mitochondria: a therapeutic target in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Yu; Inagi, Reiko

    2016-07-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common clinical entity that is associated with high mortality and morbidity. It is a risk factor for the development and progression of chronic kidney disease. Presently, no effective treatment for AKI is available, and novel therapeutic approaches are desperately needed. Accumulating evidence highlights mitochondrial dysfunction as an important factor in the pathogenesis of AKI. Recent advances in our understanding of the molecules involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, fusion/fission, mitophagy and their pathophysiological roles will lead to the development of drugs that target mitochondria for the treatment of various diseases, including AKI. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of the contribution of mitochondria-related pathophysiology in AKI and the prospective benefits of mitochondria-targeting therapeutic approaches against AKI. PMID:26333547

  10. Therapeutic Targets of Triglyceride Metabolism as Informed by Human Genetics.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Robert C; Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Hand, Nicholas J; Rader, Daniel J

    2016-04-01

    Human genetics has contributed to the development of multiple drugs to treat hyperlipidemia and coronary artery disease (CAD), most recently including antibodies targeting PCSK9 to reduce LDL cholesterol. Despite these successes, a large burden of CAD remains. Genetic and epidemiological studies have suggested that circulating triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) are a causal risk factor for CAD, presenting an opportunity for novel therapeutic strategies. We discuss recent unbiased human genetics testing, including genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and whole-genome or -exome sequencing, that have identified the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hepatic lipogenesis pathways as important mechanisms in the regulation of circulating TRLs. Further strengthening the causal relationship between TRLs and CAD, findings such as these may provide novel targets for much-needed potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:26988439

  11. Emerging therapeutics and relevant targets for chronic Hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Song, Il Han

    2016-05-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a global health problem for the pursuit of complete virus eradication and immunity acquisition to prevent liver disease progression. Currently, interferon-alpha, with the underlying mechanism of host immunomodulation, and nucleos(t)ide analogs, with the underlying mechanism of inhibition of viral replication, are used for the treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis B. Despite remarkable improvement in the virological, serological, biochemical, and histological response to current therapeutics, we are still far from meeting the therapeutic goals, e.g., clearance of HBV DNA/covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) in the serum/liver tissue and seroconversion of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) to anti-HBs in the present antiviral era. Recently, HBV replication cycle-related, viral RNA interference-based, and host immune-mediated therapeutic targets and relevant anti-HBV agents have been newly introduced and investigated in the preclinical and clinical fields. This review discusses emerging therapeutics and relevant targets in the management of chronic hepatitis B. PMID:27210776

  12. Aquaporin 1, a potential therapeutic target for migraine with aura

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The pathophysiology of migraine remains largely unknown. However, evidence regarding the molecules participating in the pathophysiology of migraine has been accumulating. Water channel proteins, known as aquaporins (AQPs), notably AQP-1 and AQP-4, appears to be involved in the pathophysiology of several neurological diseases. This review outlines newly emerging evidence indicating that AQP-1 plays an important role in pain signal transduction and migraine and could therefore serve as a potential therapeutic target for these diseases. PMID:20969805

  13. Reprogrammed viruses as cancer therapeutics: targeted, armed and shielded

    PubMed Central

    Cattaneo, Roberto; Miest, Tanner; Shashkova, Elena V.; Barry, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Virotherapy is currently undergoing a renaissance, based on our improved understanding of virus biology and genetics and our better knowledge of many different types of cancer. Viruses can be reprogrammed into oncolytic vectors by combining three types of modification: targeting, arming and shielding. Targeting introduces multiple layers of cancer specificity and improves safety and efficacy; arming occurs through the expression of prodrug convertases and cytokines; and coating with polymers and the sequential usage of different envelopes or capsids provides shielding from the host immune response. Virus-based therapeutics are beginning to find their place in cancer clinical practice, in combination with chemotherapy and radiation. PMID:18552863

  14. From Toxins Targeting Ligand Gated Ion Channels to Therapeutic Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Nasiripourdori, Adak; Taly, Valérie; Grutter, Thomas; Taly, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels (LGIC) play a central role in inter-cellular communication. This key function has two consequences: (i) these receptor channels are major targets for drug discovery because of their potential involvement in numerous human brain diseases; (ii) they are often found to be the target of plant and animal toxins. Together this makes toxin/receptor interactions important to drug discovery projects. Therefore, toxins acting on LGIC are presented and their current/potential therapeutic uses highlighted. PMID:22069709

  15. Progress in Small Molecule and Biologic Therapeutics Targeting Ghrelin Signaling.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Kayleigh R; Darling, Joseph E; Hougland, James L

    2016-01-01

    Ghrelin is a circulating peptide hormone involved in regulation of a wide array of physiological processes. As an endogenous ligand for growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR1a), ghrelin is responsible for signaling involved in energy homeostasis, including appetite stimulation, glucose metabolism, insulin signaling, and adiposity. Ghrelin has also been implicated in modulation of several neurological processes. Dysregulation of ghrelin signaling is implicated in diseases related to these pathways, including obesity, type II diabetes, and regulation of appetite and body weight in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome. Multiple steps in the ghrelin signaling pathway are available for targeting in the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Agonists and antagonists of GHS-R1a have been widely studied and have shown varying levels of effectiveness within ghrelin-related physiological pathways. Agents targeting ghrelin directly, either through depletion of ghrelin levels in circulation or inhibitors of ghrelin O-acyltransferase whose action is required for ghrelin to become biologically active, are receiving increasing attention as potential therapeutic options. We discuss the approaches utilized to target ghrelin signaling and highlight the current challenges toward developing small-molecule agents as potential therapeutics for ghrelin-related diseases. PMID:26202202

  16. Pleiotropic effects of statins: new therapeutic targets in drug design.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Onkar; Dhawan, Veena; Sharma, P L; Kumar, Puneet

    2016-07-01

    The HMG Co-enzyme inhibitors and new lipid-modifying agents expand their new therapeutic target options in the field of medical profession. Statins have been described as the most effective class of drugs to reduce serum cholesterol levels. Since the discovery of the first statin nearly 30 years ago, these drugs have become the main therapeutic approach to lower cholesterol levels. The present scientific research demonstrates numerous non-lipid modifiable effects of statins termed as pleiotropic effects of statins, which could be beneficial for the treatment of various devastating disorders. The most important positive effects of statins are anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, antioxidant, immunomodulatory, neuroprotective, anti-diabetes, and antithrombotic, improving endothelial dysfunction and attenuating vascular remodeling besides many others which are discussed under the scope of this review. In particular, inhibition of Rho and its downstream target, Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase (ROCK), and their agonistic action on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) can be viewed as the principle mechanisms underlying the pleiotropic effects of statins. With gradually increasing knowledge of new therapeutic targets of statins, their use has also been advocated in chronic inflammatory disorders for example rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In the scope of review, we highlight statins and their pleiotropic effects with reference to their harmful and beneficial effects as a novel approach for their use in the treatment of devastating disorders. Graphical abstract Pleiotropic effect of statins. PMID:27146293

  17. Identification of potential glucocorticoid receptor therapeutic targets in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Alexandra L.; Coarfa, Cristian; Qian, Jun; Wilkerson, Joseph J.; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Krett, Nancy L.; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Rosen, Steven T.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are a cornerstone of combination therapies for multiple myeloma. However, patients ultimately develop resistance to GCs frequently based on decreased glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression. An understanding of the direct targets of GC actions, which induce cell death, is expected to culminate in potential therapeutic strategies for inducing cell death by regulating downstream targets in the absence of a functional GR. The specific goal of our research is to identify primary GR targets that contribute to GC-induced cell death, with the ultimate goal of developing novel therapeutics around these targets that can be used to overcome resistance to GCs in the absence of GR. Using the MM.1S glucocorticoid-sensitive human myeloma cell line, we began with the broad platform of gene expression profiling to identify glucocorticoid-regulated genes further refined by combination treatment with phosphatidylinositol-3’-kinase inhibition (PI3Ki). To further refine the search to distinguish direct and indirect targets of GR that respond to the combination GC and PI3Ki treatment of MM.1S cells, we integrated 1) gene expression profiles of combination GC treatment with PI3Ki, which induces synergistic cell death; 2) negative correlation between genes inhibited by combination treatment in MM.1S cells and genes over-expressed in myeloma patients to establish clinical relevance and 3) GR chromatin immunoprecipitation with massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq) in myeloma cells to identify global chromatin binding for the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Using established bioinformatics platforms, we have integrated these data sets to identify a subset of candidate genes that may form the basis for a comprehensive picture of glucocorticoid actions in multiple myeloma. As a proof of principle, we have verified two targets, namely RRM2 and BCL2L1, as primary functional targets of GR involved in GC-induced cell death. PMID:26715915

  18. The Nrf2-ARE pathway: a valuable therapeutic target for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Gururaj; Johnson, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Modulation of NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) has been shown in several neurodegenerative disorders. The overexpression of Nrf2 has become a potential therapeutic avenue for various neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Alzheimer’s disease. The expression of phase II detoxification enzymes is governed by the cis-acting regulatory element known as antioxidant response element (ARE). The transcription factor Nrf2 binds to ARE thereby transcribing multitude of antioxidant genes. Keap1, a culin 3-based E3 ligase that targets Nrf2 for degradation, sequesters Nrf2 in cytoplasm. Disruption of Keap1-Nrf2 interaction or genetic overexpression of Nrf2 can increase the endogenous antioxidant capacity of the brain thereby rendering protection against oxidative stress in neurodegenerative disorders. This review primarily focuses on targeted Nrf2 overexpression as a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:22742419

  19. The cytoskeleton as a novel therapeutic target for old neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Eira, Jessica; Silva, Catarina Santos; Sousa, Mónica Mendes; Liz, Márcia Almeida

    2016-06-01

    Cytoskeleton defects, including alterations in microtubule stability, in axonal transport as well as in actin dynamics, have been characterized in several unrelated neurodegenerative conditions. These observations suggest that defects of cytoskeleton organization may be a common feature contributing to neurodegeneration. In line with this hypothesis, drugs targeting the cytoskeleton are currently being tested in animal models and in human clinical trials, showing promising effects. Drugs that modulate microtubule stability, inhibitors of posttranslational modifications of cytoskeletal components, specifically compounds affecting the levels of tubulin acetylation, and compounds targeting signaling molecules which regulate cytoskeleton dynamics, constitute the mostly addressed therapeutic interventions aiming at preventing cytoskeleton damage in neurodegenerative disorders. In this review, we will discuss in a critical perspective the current knowledge on cytoskeleton damage pathways as well as therapeutic strategies designed to revert cytoskeleton-related defects mainly focusing on the following neurodegenerative disorders: Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, Huntington's Disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease. PMID:27095262

  20. The Pyk2 FERM domain: a Novel Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Lipinski, Christopher A.; Loftus, Joseph C.

    2009-01-01

    Importance of the field The focal adhesion tyrosine kinases FAK and Pyk2 are uniquely situated to act as critical mediators for the activation of signaling pathways that regulate cell migration, proliferation, and survival. By coordinating adhesion and cytoskeletal dynamics with survival and growth signaling, FAK and Pyk2 represent molecular therapeutic targets in cancer as malignant cells often exhibit defects in these processes. Areas covered in this review This review examines the structure and function of the focal adhesion kinase Pyk2 and intends to provide a rationale for the employ of modulating strategies that include both catalytic and extra-catalytic approaches that have been developed in the last 3–5 years. What the reader will gain Targeting tyrosine kinases in oncology has focused on the ATP binding pocket as means to inhibit catalytic activity and down-regulate pathways involved in tumor invasion. This review will discuss the available catalytic inhibitors and compare them to the alternative approach of targeting protein-protein interactions that regulate kinase activity Take home message Development of specific catalytic inhibitors of the focal adhesion kinases has improved but significant challenges remain. Thus, approaches that inhibit the effector function of Pyk2 by targeting regulatory modules can increase specificity and will be a welcome asset to the therapeutic arena. PMID:20001213

  1. Virus Maturation as a Novel HIV-1 Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Catherine S.; Salzwedel, Karl; Freed, Eric O.

    2009-01-01

    Development of novel therapeutic targets against HIV-1 is a high research priority due to the serious clinical consequences associated with acquisition of resistance to current antiretroviral drugs. The HIV-1 structural protein Gag represents a potential novel therapeutic target as it plays a central role in virus particle production, yet is not targeted by any of the currently approved antiretroviral drugs. The Gag polyprotein precursor multimerizes to form immature particles that bud from the infected cell. Concomitant with virus release, the Gag precursor undergoes proteolytic processing by the viral protease to generate the mature Gag proteins, which include capsid (CA). Once liberated from the Gag polyprotein precursor, CA molecules interact to reassemble into a condensed conical core, which organizes the viral RNA genome and several viral proteins to facilitate virus replication in the next round of infection. Correct Gag proteolytic processing and core assembly are therefore essential for virus infectivity. In this review, we discuss novel strategies to inhibit maturation by targeting proteolytic cleavage sites in Gag or CA-CA interactions required for core formation. The identification and development of lead maturation inhibitors are highlighted. PMID:19534569

  2. Bioreductive prodrugs as cancer therapeutics: targeting tumor hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Guise, Christopher P.; Mowday, Alexandra M.; Ashoorzadeh, Amir; Yuan, Ran; Lin, Wan-Hua; Wu, Dong-Hai; Smaill, Jeff B.; Patterson, Adam V.; Ding, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia, a state of low oxygen, is a common feature of solid tumors and is associated with disease progression as well as resistance to radiotherapy and certain chemotherapeutic drugs. Hypoxic regions in tumors, therefore, represent attractive targets for cancer therapy. To date, five distinct classes of bioreactive prodrugs have been developed to target hypoxic cells in solid tumors. These hypoxia-activated prodrugs, including nitro compounds, N-oxides, quinones, and metal complexes, generally share a common mechanism of activation whereby they are reduced by intracellular oxidoreductases in an oxygen-sensitive manner to form cytotoxins. Several examples including PR-104, TH-302, and EO9 are currently undergoing phase II and phase III clinical evaluation. In this review, we discuss the nature of tumor hypoxia as a therapeutic target, focusing on the development of bioreductive prodrugs. We also describe the current knowledge of how each prodrug class is activated and detail the clinical progress of leading examples. PMID:23845143

  3. Getting Syk: Spleen Tyrosine Kinase as a Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Geahlen, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Syk is a cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine kinase well known for its ability to couple immune cell receptors to intracellular signaling pathways that regulate cellular responses to extracellular antigens and antigen-immunoglobulin complexes of particular importance to the initiation of inflammatory responses. Thus, Syk is an attractive target for therapeutic kinase inhibitors designed to ameliorate symptoms and consequences of acute and chronic inflammation. Its more recently recognized role as a promoter of cell survival in numerous cancer cell types ranging from leukemia to retinoblastoma has attracted considerable interest as a target for a new generation of anticancer drugs. This review discusses the biological processes in which Syk participates that have made this kinase such a compelling drug target. PMID:24975478

  4. Long-acting antituberculous therapeutic nanoparticles target macrophage endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Edagwa, Benson J.; Guo, Dongwei; Puligujja, Pavan; Chen, Han; McMillan, JoEllyn; Liu, Xinming; Gendelman, Howard E.; Narayanasamy, Prabagaran

    2014-01-01

    Eradication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection requires daily administration of combinations of rifampin (RIF), isoniazid [isonicotinylhydrazine (INH)], pyrazinamide, and ethambutol, among other drug therapies. To facilitate and optimize MTB therapeutic selections, a mononuclear phagocyte (MP; monocyte, macrophage, and dendritic cell)-targeted drug delivery strategy was developed. Long-acting nanoformulations of RIF and an INH derivative, pentenyl-INH (INHP), were prepared, and their physicochemical properties were evaluated. This included the evaluation of MP particle uptake and retention, cell viability, and antimicrobial efficacy. Drug levels reached 6 μg/106 cells in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) for nanoparticle treatments compared with 0.1 μg/106 cells for native drugs. High RIF and INHP levels were retained in MDM for >15 d following nanoparticle loading. Rapid loss of native drugs was observed in cells and culture fluids within 24 h. Antimicrobial activities were determined against Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis). Coadministration of nanoformulated RIF and INHP provided a 6-fold increase in therapeutic efficacy compared with equivalent concentrations of native drugs. Notably, nanoformulated RIF and INHP were found to be localized in recycling and late MDM endosomal compartments. These were the same compartments that contained the pathogen. Our results demonstrate the potential of antimicrobial nanomedicines to simplify MTB drug regimens.—Edagwa, B. J., Guo, D., Puligujja, P., Chen, H., McMillan, J., Liu, X., Gendelman, H. E., Narayanasamy, P. Long-acting antituberculous therapeutic nanoparticles target macrophage endosomes. PMID:25122556

  5. miR-133 regulates Evi1 expression in AML cells as a potential therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Haruna; Lu, Jun; Oba, Shigeyoshi; Kawamata, Toyotaka; Yoshimi, Akihide; Kurosaki, Natsumi; Yokoyama, Kazuaki; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Kurokawa, Mineo; Tojo, Arinobu; Ando, Kiyoshi; Morishita, Kazuhiro; Katagiri, Koko; Kotani, Ai

    2016-01-01

    The Ecotropic viral integration site 1 (Evi1) is a zinc finger transcription factor, which is located on chromosome 3q26, over-expression in some acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Elevated Evi1 expression in AML is associated with unfavorable prognosis. Therefore, Evi1 is one of the strong candidate in molecular target therapy for the leukemia. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs, vital to many cell functions that negatively regulate gene expression by translation or inducing sequence-specific degradation of target mRNAs. As a novel biologics, miRNAs is a promising therapeutic target due to its low toxicity and low cost. We screened miRNAs which down-regulate Evi1. miR-133 was identified to directly bind to Evi1 to regulate it. miR-133 increases drug sensitivity specifically in Evi1 expressing leukemic cells, but not in Evi1-non-expressing cells The results suggest that miR-133 can be promising therapeutic target for the Evi1 dysregulated poor prognostic leukemia. PMID:26754824

  6. Molecular genetics and targeted therapeutics in biliary tract carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Eric I; Yee, Nelson S

    2016-01-01

    The primary malignancies of the biliary tract, cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer, often present at an advanced stage and are marginally sensitive to radiation and chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that molecularly targeted agents may provide new hope for improving treatment response in biliary tract carcinoma (BTC). In this article, we provide a critical review of the pathogenesis and genetic abnormalities of biliary tract neoplasms, in addition to discussing the current and emerging targeted therapeutics in BTC. Genetic studies of biliary tumors have identified the growth factors and receptors as well as their downstream signaling pathways that control the growth and survival of biliary epithelia. Target-specific monoclonal antibodies and small molecules inhibitors directed against the signaling pathways that drive BTC growth and invasion have been developed. Numerous clinical trials designed to test these agents as either monotherapy or in combination with conventional chemotherapy have been completed or are currently underway. Research focusing on understanding the molecular basis of biliary tumorigenesis will continue to identify for targeted therapy the key mutations that drive growth and invasion of biliary neoplasms. Additional strategies that have emerged for treating this malignant disease include targeting the epigenetic alterations of BTC and immunotherapy. By integrating targeted therapy with molecular profiles of biliary tumor, we hope to provide precision treatment for patients with malignant diseases of the biliary tract. PMID:26819503

  7. Emerging therapeutic targets and strategies in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Furfaro, Federica; Fiorino, Gionata; Allocca, Mariangela; Gilardi, Daniela; Danese, Silvio

    2016-06-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an immune-mediated inflammatory bowel disease, in which inflammation is driven by a complex interaction between the microbiota, immune cells, genes and mediators. New mechanisms of action and several cytokines have been identified as factors involved in the inflammatory process in CD, and many new molecules have been developed to treat this complex disease. New agents have been developed that target leukocyte trafficking, block or adhesion molecules for example, as well as the development of antibodies against classic inflammatory cytokines or therapies directed against IL-12/23 and Janus kinases. The development of selective mechanisms of action and targeting of different cytokines or inflammatory mediators for each patient presents the biggest challenge for the future in CD therapy. Such agents are currently at different phases of development. We aim to review the current literature data on a targeted approach in CD, which could be promising alternative approach for CD patients in the near future. PMID:26766496

  8. Promises, Promises.

    PubMed

    McLean, Haydn

    2016-03-01

    Presenting a pledge to another establishes expectation in the recipient for the commitment to be fulfilled, particularly when a promise is devoid of coercion. Defaulting on a commitment may damage relationships between people and may predispose the disenchanted recipient to distrust those who proffer succeeding commitments. God's advocates who have been disappointed by God's evident under-delivery may experience a crisis of faith, exemplified in attachment distress, when disappointment intimates God has over-promised his providence, which questions the nature and, ultimately, the relevance of God. PMID:26956758

  9. Cryptococcal therapies and drug targets: the old, the new and the promising.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Carolina; Casadevall, Arturo

    2016-06-01

    Half a century after the introduction of Amphotericin B the management of cryptococcosis remains unsatisfactory. The disease, caused primarily by the two fungal species Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii, remains responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality despite standard medical care. Current therapeutic options are limited to Amphotericin B, azoles and 5-flucytosine. However, this organism has numerous well-characterized virulence mechanisms that are amenable to pharmacological interference and are thus potential therapeutic targets. Here, we discuss existing approved antifungal drugs, resistance mechanisms to these drugs and non-standard antifungal drugs that have potential in treatment of cryptococcosis, including immunomodulatory strategies that synergize with antifungal drugs, such as cytokine administration or monoclonal antibodies. Finally, we summarize attempts to target well-described virulence factors of Cryptococcus, the capsule or fungal melanin. This review emphasizes the pressing need for new therapeutic alternatives for cryptococcosis. PMID:26990050

  10. Human neutrophil elastase: mediator and therapeutic target in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Peter A; Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2008-01-01

    Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) is present within atherosclerotic plaques where it contributes to matrix degradation and weakening of the vessel wall associated with the complications of aneurysm formation and plaque rupture. It is joined by other extracellular proteases in these actions but the broad range of substrates and potency of HNE coupled with the potential for rapid increases in HNE activity associated with neutrophil degranulation in acute coronary syndromes single this disruptive protease out as therapeutic target in atherosclerotic disease. This review summarises the role of HNE in neutrophil-mediated endothelial injury and the evidence for HNE as a mediator of atherosclerotic plaque development. The therapeutic potential of HNE neutralising antiproteases, alpha-1-antitrypsin and elafin, in atherosclerosis, is discussed. PMID:18289916

  11. Clinical development of cancer therapeutics that target metabolism.

    PubMed

    Clem, B F; O'Neal, J; Klarer, A C; Telang, S; Chesney, J

    2016-06-01

    Glucose and glutamine metabolism in cancer cells are markedly elevated relative to non-transformed normal cells. This metabolic reprogramming enables the production of adenosine triphosphate and the anabolic precursors needed for survival, growth and motility. The recent observations that mutant oncogenic proteins and the loss of tumor suppressors activate key metabolic enzymes suggest that selective inhibition of these enzymes may yield effective cancer therapeutics with acceptable toxicities. In support of this concept, pre-clinical studies of small molecule antagonists of several metabolic enzymes in tumor-bearing mice have demonstrated reasonable therapeutic indices. We will review the rationale for targeting metabolic enzymes as a strategy to treat cancer and will detail the results of several recent clinical trials of metabolic inhibitors in advanced cancer patients. PMID:26428335

  12. Engineering therapeutic antibodies targeting G-protein–coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Migyeong; Jung, Sang Taek

    2016-01-01

    G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the most attractive therapeutic target classes because of their critical roles in intracellular signaling and their clinical relevance to a variety of diseases, including cancer, infection and inflammation. However, high conformational variability, the small exposed area of extracellular epitopes and difficulty in the preparation of GPCR antigens have delayed both the isolation of therapeutic anti-GPCR antibodies as well as studies on the structure, function and biochemical mechanisms of GPCRs. To overcome the challenges in generating highly specific anti-GPCR antibodies with enhanced efficacy and safety, various forms of antigens have been successfully designed and employed for screening with newly emerged systems based on laboratory animal immunization and high-throughput-directed evolution. PMID:26846450

  13. Vitamin A-aldehyde adducts: AMD risk and targeted therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Janet R

    2016-04-26

    Although currently available treatment options for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are limited, particularly for atrophic AMD, the identification of predisposing genetic variations has informed clinical studies addressing therapeutic options such as complement inhibitors and anti-inflammatory agents. To lower risk of early AMD, recommended lifestyle interventions such as the avoidance of smoking and the intake of low glycemic antioxidant-rich diets have largely followed from the identification of nongenetic modifiable factors. On the other hand, the challenge of understanding the complex relationship between aging and cumulative damage leading to AMD has fueled investigations of the visual cycle adducts that accumulate in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and are a hallmark of aging retina. These studies have revealed properties of these compounds that provide insights into processes that may compromise RPE and could contribute to disease mechanisms in AMD. This work has also led to the design of targeted therapeutics that are currently under investigation. PMID:27071115

  14. Exosomal miRNAs as cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Thind, Arron; Wilson, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Intercommunication between cancer cells and with their surrounding and distant environments is key to the survival, progression and metastasis of the tumour. Exosomes play a role in this communication process. MicroRNA (miRNA) expression is frequently dysregulated in tumour cells and can be reflected by distinct exosomal miRNA (ex-miRNA) profiles isolated from the bodily fluids of cancer patients. Here, the potential of ex-miRNA as a cancer biomarker and therapeutic target is critically analysed. Exosomes are a stable source of miRNA in bodily fluids but, despite a number of methods for exosome extraction and miRNA quantification, their suitability for diagnostics in a clinical setting is questionable. Furthermore, exosomally transferred miRNAs can alter the behaviour of recipient tumour and stromal cells to promote oncogenesis, highlighting a role in cell communication in cancer. However, our incomplete understanding of exosome biogenesis and miRNA loading mechanisms means that strategies to target exosomes or their transferred miRNAs are limited and not specific to tumour cells. Therefore, if ex-miRNA is to be employed in novel non-invasive diagnostic approaches and as a therapeutic target in cancer, two further advances are necessary: in methods to isolate and detect ex-miRNA, and a better understanding of their biogenesis and functions in tumour-cell communication. PMID:27440105

  15. Therapeutically targeting mitochondrial redox signalling alleviates endothelial dysfunction in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Cathal; Kenny, Louise C

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant placentation generating placental oxidative stress is proposed to play a critical role in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. Unfortunately, therapeutic trials of antioxidants have been uniformly disappointing. There is provisional evidence implicating mitochondrial dysfunction as a source of oxidative stress in preeclampsia. Here we provide evidence that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species mediates endothelial dysfunction and establish that directly targeting mitochondrial scavenging may provide a protective role. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to 3% plasma from women with pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia resulted in a significant decrease in mitochondrial function with a subsequent significant increase in mitochondrial superoxide generation compared to cells exposed to plasma from women with uncomplicated pregnancies. Real-time PCR analysis showed increased expression of inflammatory markers TNF-α, TLR-9 and ICAM-1 respectively in endothelial cells treated with preeclampsia plasma. MitoTempo is a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant, pre-treatment of cells with MitoTempo protected against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death. Furthermore MitoTempo significantly reduced mitochondrial superoxide production in cells exposed to preeclampsia plasma by normalising mitochondrial metabolism. MitoTempo significantly altered the inflammatory profile of plasma treated cells. These novel data support a functional role for mitochondrial redox signaling in modulating the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and identifies mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants as potential therapeutic candidates. PMID:27604418

  16. Exosomal miRNAs as cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Thind, Arron; Wilson, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Intercommunication between cancer cells and with their surrounding and distant environments is key to the survival, progression and metastasis of the tumour. Exosomes play a role in this communication process. MicroRNA (miRNA) expression is frequently dysregulated in tumour cells and can be reflected by distinct exosomal miRNA (ex-miRNA) profiles isolated from the bodily fluids of cancer patients. Here, the potential of ex-miRNA as a cancer biomarker and therapeutic target is critically analysed. Exosomes are a stable source of miRNA in bodily fluids but, despite a number of methods for exosome extraction and miRNA quantification, their suitability for diagnostics in a clinical setting is questionable. Furthermore, exosomally transferred miRNAs can alter the behaviour of recipient tumour and stromal cells to promote oncogenesis, highlighting a role in cell communication in cancer. However, our incomplete understanding of exosome biogenesis and miRNA loading mechanisms means that strategies to target exosomes or their transferred miRNAs are limited and not specific to tumour cells. Therefore, if ex-miRNA is to be employed in novel non-invasive diagnostic approaches and as a therapeutic target in cancer, two further advances are necessary: in methods to isolate and detect ex-miRNA, and a better understanding of their biogenesis and functions in tumour-cell communication. PMID:27440105

  17. Therapeutically targeting mitochondrial redox signalling alleviates endothelial dysfunction in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Cathal; Kenny, Louise C.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant placentation generating placental oxidative stress is proposed to play a critical role in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. Unfortunately, therapeutic trials of antioxidants have been uniformly disappointing. There is provisional evidence implicating mitochondrial dysfunction as a source of oxidative stress in preeclampsia. Here we provide evidence that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species mediates endothelial dysfunction and establish that directly targeting mitochondrial scavenging may provide a protective role. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to 3% plasma from women with pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia resulted in a significant decrease in mitochondrial function with a subsequent significant increase in mitochondrial superoxide generation compared to cells exposed to plasma from women with uncomplicated pregnancies. Real-time PCR analysis showed increased expression of inflammatory markers TNF-α, TLR-9 and ICAM-1 respectively in endothelial cells treated with preeclampsia plasma. MitoTempo is a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant, pre-treatment of cells with MitoTempo protected against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death. Furthermore MitoTempo significantly reduced mitochondrial superoxide production in cells exposed to preeclampsia plasma by normalising mitochondrial metabolism. MitoTempo significantly altered the inflammatory profile of plasma treated cells. These novel data support a functional role for mitochondrial redox signaling in modulating the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and identifies mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants as potential therapeutic candidates. PMID:27604418

  18. Therapeutics targeting persistent inflammation in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Machowska, Anna; Carrero, Juan Jesus; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is a condition intrinsically linked to chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its other typical sequelae, such as acquired immune dysfunction, protein-energy wasting (PEW), and accelerated vascular aging that promote premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) and infections, the two leading causes of death in CKD patients. Inflammation is a major contributor to complications in CKD, and inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, correlate with underlying causes and consequences of the inflamed uremic phenotype, such as oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, CVD, PEW, and infections, and are sensitive and independent predictors of outcome in CKD. Therefore, inflammation appears to be a logical target for potential preventive and therapeutic interventions in patients with CKD. Putative anti-inflammatory therapy strategies aiming at preventing complications and improving outcomes in CKD span over several areas: (1) dealing with the source of inflammation (such as cardiovascular, gastrointestinal or periodontal disease and depression); (2) providing nonspecific immune modulatory effects by promoting healthy dietary habits and other lifestyle changes; (3) promoting increased use of recognized pharmacologic interventions that have pleiotropic effects; and, (4) introducing novel targeted anticytokine interventions. This review provides a brief update on inflammatory biomarkers and possible therapeutic approaches targeting inflammation and the uremic inflammatory milieu in patients with CKD. PMID:26173187

  19. Breast cancer stem cells, EMT and therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Kotiyal, Srishti; Bhattacharya, Susinjan

    2014-10-10

    A small heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells acts as seeds to induce new tumor growth. These seeds or breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) exhibit great phenotypical plasticity which allows them to undergo "epithelial to mesenchymal transition" (EMT) at the site of primary tumor and a future reverse transition. Apart from metastasis they are also responsible for maintaining the tumor and conferring it with drug and radiation resistance and a tendency for post-treatment relapse. Many of the signaling pathways involved in induction of EMT are involved in CSC generation and regulation. Here we are briefly reviewing the mechanism of TGF-β, Wnt, Notch, TNF-α, NF-κB, RTK signalling pathways which are involved in EMT as well as BCSCs maintenance. Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key/accessory players of these pathways could control growth of BCSCs and hence malignant cancer. Additionally several miRNAs are dysregulated in cancer stem cells indicating their roles as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. This review also lists the miRNA interactions identified in BCSCs and discusses on some newly identified targets in the BCSC regulatory pathways like SHIP2, nicastrin, Pin 1, IGF-1R, pro-inflammatory cytokines and syndecan which can be targeted for therapeutic achievements. PMID:25261721

  20. Targeted polymeric therapeutic nanoparticles: design, development and clinical translation†

    PubMed Central

    Kamaly, Nazila; Xiao, Zeyu; Valencia, Pedro M.; Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F.; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric materials have been used in a range of pharmaceutical and biotechnology products for more than 40 years. These materials have evolved from their earlier use as biodegradable products such as resorbable sutures, orthopaedic implants, macroscale and microscale drug delivery systems such as microparticles and wafers used as controlled drug release depots, to multifunctional nanoparticles (NPs) capable of targeting, and controlled release of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. These newer generations of targeted and controlled release polymeric NPs are now engineered to navigate the complex in vivo environment, and incorporate functionalities for achieving target specificity, control of drug concentration and exposure kinetics at the tissue, cell, and subcellular levels. Indeed this optimization of drug pharmacology as aided by careful design of multifunctional NPs can lead to improved drug safety and efficacy, and may be complimentary to drug enhancements that are traditionally achieved by medicinal chemistry. In this regard, polymeric NPs have the potential to result in a highly differentiated new class of therapeutics, distinct from the original active drugs used in their composition, and distinct from first generation NPs that largely facilitated drug formulation. A greater flexibility in the design of drug molecules themselves may also be facilitated following their incorporation into NPs, as drug properties (solubility, metabolism, plasma binding, biodistribution, target tissue accumulation) will no longer be constrained to the same extent by drug chemical composition, but also become in-part the function of the physicochemical properties of the NP. The combination of optimally designed drugs with optimally engineered polymeric NPs opens up the possibility of improved clinical outcomes that may not be achievable with the administration of drugs in their conventional form. In this critical review, we aim to provide insights into the design and development

  1. Targeted polymeric therapeutic nanoparticles: design, development and clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Kamaly, Nazila; Xiao, Zeyu; Valencia, Pedro M; Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F; Farokhzad, Omid C

    2012-04-01

    Polymeric materials have been used in a range of pharmaceutical and biotechnology products for more than 40 years. These materials have evolved from their earlier use as biodegradable products such as resorbable sutures, orthopaedic implants, macroscale and microscale drug delivery systems such as microparticles and wafers used as controlled drug release depots, to multifunctional nanoparticles (NPs) capable of targeting, and controlled release of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. These newer generations of targeted and controlled release polymeric NPs are now engineered to navigate the complex in vivo environment, and incorporate functionalities for achieving target specificity, control of drug concentration and exposure kinetics at the tissue, cell, and subcellular levels. Indeed this optimization of drug pharmacology as aided by careful design of multifunctional NPs can lead to improved drug safety and efficacy, and may be complimentary to drug enhancements that are traditionally achieved by medicinal chemistry. In this regard, polymeric NPs have the potential to result in a highly differentiated new class of therapeutics, distinct from the original active drugs used in their composition, and distinct from first generation NPs that largely facilitated drug formulation. A greater flexibility in the design of drug molecules themselves may also be facilitated following their incorporation into NPs, as drug properties (solubility, metabolism, plasma binding, biodistribution, target tissue accumulation) will no longer be constrained to the same extent by drug chemical composition, but also become in-part the function of the physicochemical properties of the NP. The combination of optimally designed drugs with optimally engineered polymeric NPs opens up the possibility of improved clinical outcomes that may not be achievable with the administration of drugs in their conventional form. In this critical review, we aim to provide insights into the design and development

  2. Systems approaches to design of targeted therapeutic delivery.

    PubMed

    Myerson, Jacob W; Brenner, Jacob S; Greineder, Colin F; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2015-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery aims to improve therapeutic effects and enable mechanisms that are not feasible for untargeted agents (e.g., due to impermeable biological barriers). To achieve targeting, a drug or its carrier should possess properties providing specific accumulation from circulation at the desired site. There are several examples of systems-inspired approaches that have been applied to achieve this goal. First, proteomics analysis of plasma membrane fraction of the vascular endothelium has identified a series of target molecules and their ligands (e.g., antibodies) that deliver conjugated cargoes to well-defined vascular cells and subcellular compartments. Second, selection of ligands binding to cells of interest using phage display libraries in vitro and in vivo has provided peptides and polypeptides that bind to normal and pathologically altered cells. Finally, large-scale high-throughput combinatorial synthesis and selection of lipid- and polymer-based nanocarriers varying their chemical components has yielded a series of carriers accumulating in diverse organs and delivering RNA interference agents to diverse cells. Together, these approaches offer a basis for systems-based design and selection of targets, targeting molecules, and targeting vehicles. Current studies focus on expanding the arsenal of these and alternative targeting strategies, devising drug delivery systems capitalizing on these strategies and evaluation of their benefit/risk ratio in adequate animal models of human diseases. These efforts, combined with better understanding of mechanisms and unintended consequences of these targeted interventions, need to be ultimately translated into industrial development and the clinical domain. PMID:25946066

  3. Systems approaches to design of targeted therapeutic delivery

    PubMed Central

    Myerson, Jacob W.; Brenner, Jacob S.; Greineder, Colin F.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.

    2016-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery aims to improve therapeutic effects and enable mechanisms that are not feasible for untargeted agents (e.g., due to impermeable biological barriers). To achieve targeting, a drug or its carrier should possess properties providing specific accumulation from circulation at the desired site. There are several examples of systems-inspired approaches that have been applied to achieve this goal. First, proteomics analysis of plasma membrane fraction of the vascular endothelium has identified a series of target molecules and their ligands (e.g., antibodies) that deliver conjugated cargoes to well-defined vascular cells and subcellular compartments. Second, selection of ligands binding to cells of interest using phage display libraries in vitro and in vivo has provided peptides and polypeptides that bind to normal and pathologically altered cells. Finally, large-scale high-throughput combinatorial synthesis and selection of lipid- and polymer-based nanocarriers varying their chemical components has yielded a series of carriers accumulating in diverse organs and delivering RNA interference agents to diverse cells. Together, these approaches offer a basis for systems-based design and selection of targets, targeting molecules, and targeting vehicles. Current studies focus on expanding the arsenal of these and alternative targeting strategies, devising drug delivery systems capitalizing on these strategies and evaluation of their benefit/risk ratio in adequate animal models of human diseases. These efforts, combined with better understanding of mechanisms and unintended consequences of these targeted interventions, need to be ultimately translated into industrial development and the clinical domain. PMID:25946066

  4. Therapeutic targeting of liver inflammation and fibrosis by nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Bartneck, Matthias; Warzecha, Klaudia Theresa; Tacke, Frank

    2014-12-01

    Nanomedicine constitutes the emerging field of medical applications for nanotechnology such as nanomaterial-based drug delivery systems. This technology may hold exceptional potential for novel therapeutic approaches to liver diseases. The specific and unspecific targeting of macrophages, hepatic stellate cells (HSC), hepatocytes, and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) using nanomedicine has been developed and tested in preclinical settings. These four major cell types in the liver are crucially involved in the complex sequence of events that occurs during the initiation and maintenance of liver inflammation and fibrosis. Targeting different cell types can be based on their capacity to ingest surrounding material, endocytosis, and specificity for a single cell type can be achieved by targeting characteristic structures such as receptors, sugar moieties or peptide sequences. Macrophages and especially the liver-resident Kupffer cells are in the focus of nanomedicine due to their highly efficient and unspecific uptake of most nanomaterials as well as due to their critical pathogenic functions during inflammation and fibrogenesis. The mannose receptor enables targeting macrophages in liver disease, but macrophages can also become activated by certain nanomaterials, such as peptide-modified gold nanorods (AuNRs) that render them proinflammatory. HSC, the main collagen-producing cells during fibrosis, are currently targeted using nanoconstructs that recognize the mannose 6-phosphate and insulin-like growth factor II, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor 1, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor β, or integrins. Targeting of the major liver parenchymal cell, the hepatocyte, has only recently been achieved with high specificity by mimicking apolipoproteins, naturally occurring nanoparticles of the body. LSEC were found to be targeted most efficiently using carboxy-modified micelles and their integrin receptors. This review will summarize important

  5. Therapeutic targeting of liver inflammation and fibrosis by nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Warzecha, Klaudia Theresa; Tacke, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Nanomedicine constitutes the emerging field of medical applications for nanotechnology such as nanomaterial-based drug delivery systems. This technology may hold exceptional potential for novel therapeutic approaches to liver diseases. The specific and unspecific targeting of macrophages, hepatic stellate cells (HSC), hepatocytes, and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) using nanomedicine has been developed and tested in preclinical settings. These four major cell types in the liver are crucially involved in the complex sequence of events that occurs during the initiation and maintenance of liver inflammation and fibrosis. Targeting different cell types can be based on their capacity to ingest surrounding material, endocytosis, and specificity for a single cell type can be achieved by targeting characteristic structures such as receptors, sugar moieties or peptide sequences. Macrophages and especially the liver-resident Kupffer cells are in the focus of nanomedicine due to their highly efficient and unspecific uptake of most nanomaterials as well as due to their critical pathogenic functions during inflammation and fibrogenesis. The mannose receptor enables targeting macrophages in liver disease, but macrophages can also become activated by certain nanomaterials, such as peptide-modified gold nanorods (AuNRs) that render them proinflammatory. HSC, the main collagen-producing cells during fibrosis, are currently targeted using nanoconstructs that recognize the mannose 6-phosphate and insulin-like growth factor II, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor 1, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor β, or integrins. Targeting of the major liver parenchymal cell, the hepatocyte, has only recently been achieved with high specificity by mimicking apolipoproteins, naturally occurring nanoparticles of the body. LSEC were found to be targeted most efficiently using carboxy-modified micelles and their integrin receptors. This review will summarize important

  6. Brain Arteriovenous Malformation Modeling, Pathogenesis and Novel Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wanqiu; Choi, Eun-Jung; McDougall, Cameron M.; Su, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Patients harboring brain arteriovenous malformation (bAVM) are at life-threatening risk of rupture and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). The pathogenesis of bAVM has not been completely understood. Current treatment options are invasive and ≈ 20% of patients are not offered interventional therapy because of excessive treatment risk. There are no specific medical therapies to treat bAVMs. The lack of validated animal models has been an obstacle for testing hypotheses of bAVM pathogenesis and testing new therapies. In this review, we summarize bAVM model development; and bAVM pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets that have been identified during model development. PMID:24723256

  7. Oxidative Stress in Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Sources, Mechanisms, and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xin; Tao, Chuanyuan; Gan, Qi; Zheng, Jun; Li, Hao; You, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is associated with the highest mortality and morbidity despite only constituting approximately 10–15% of all strokes. Complex underlying mechanisms consisting of cytotoxic, excitotoxic, and inflammatory effects of intraparenchymal blood are responsible for its highly damaging effects. Oxidative stress (OS) also plays an important role in brain injury after ICH but attracts less attention than other factors. Increasing evidence has demonstrated that the metabolite axis of hemoglobin-heme-iron is the key contributor to oxidative brain damage after ICH, although other factors, such as neuroinflammation and prooxidases, are involved. This review will discuss the sources, possible molecular mechanisms, and potential therapeutic targets of OS in ICH. PMID:26843907

  8. The emerging molecular machinery and therapeutic targets of metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yutong; Ma, Li

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is a 100-year-old research topic. Technological advancements during the past few decades have led to significant progress in our understanding of metastatic disease. However, metastasis remains the leading cause of cancer-related mortalities. The lack of appropriate clinical trials for metastasis preventive drugs and incomplete understanding of the molecular machinery are major obstacles in metastasis prevention and treatment. A number of processes, factors, and signaling pathways are involved in regulating metastasis. Here, we discuss recent progress in metastasis research, including epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity, cancer stem cells, emerging molecular determinants and therapeutic targets, and the link between metastasis and therapy resistance. PMID:25939811

  9. T cells as a therapeutic target in SLE

    PubMed Central

    Comte, Denis; Karampetsou, Maria P.; Tsokos, George C.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by a loss of tolerance to multiple endogenous antigens. SLE etiology remains largely unknown, despite recent insight into the immunopathogenesis of the disease. T cells are important in the development of the disease by amplifying the immune response and contributing to organ damage. Aberrant signaling, cytokine secretion and tissue homing displayed by SLE T cells have been extensively studied and the underlying pathogenic molecular mechanisms are starting to be elucidated. T-cell targeted treatments are being explored in SLE patients. This review is an update on the T-cell abnormalities and related therapeutic options in SLE. PMID:25801878

  10. Cholesterol catabolism as a therapeutic target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Hugues; Johnston, Jonathan B.; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is an intracellular pathogen that infects 10 million worldwide and kills 2 million people every year. The uptake and utilization of nutrients by Mtb within the host cell is still poorly understood, although lipids play an important role in Mtb persistence. The recent identification of a large regulon of cholesterol catabolic genes suggests that Mtb can use host sterol for infection and persistence. In this review, we report on recent progress in elucidation of the Mtb cholesterol catabolic reactions and their potential utility as targets for tuberculosis therapeutic agents. PMID:21924910

  11. MicroRNAs as potential therapeutic targets in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Ivan G; Grafals, Monica; Portilla, Didier; Duffield, Jeremy S

    2014-01-01

    One cornerstone of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is fibrosis, as kidneys are susceptible due to their high vascularity and predisposition to ischemia. Presently, only therapies targeting the angiotensin receptor are used in clinical practice to retard the progression of CKD. Thus, there is a pressing need for new therapies designed to treat the damaged kidney. Several independent laboratories have identified a number of microRNAs that are dysregulated in human and animal models of CKD. We will explore the evidence suggesting that by blocking the activity of such dysregulated microRNAs, new therapeutics could be developed to treat the progression of CKD. PMID:23660218

  12. Advances in targeted therapies and new promising targets in esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Belkhiri, Abbes; El-Rifai, Wael

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer, comprising squamous carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, is a leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Notably, the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma has increased at an alarming rate in the Western world. Unfortunately, the standard first-line chemo-radiotherapeutic approaches are toxic and of limited efficacy in the treatment of a significant number of cancer patients. The molecular analysis of cancer cells has uncovered key genetic and epigenetic alterations underlying the development and progression of tumors. These discoveries have paved the way for the emergence of targeted therapy approaches. This review will highlight recent progress in the development of targeted therapies in esophageal cancer. This will include a review of drugs targeting receptor tyrosine kinases and other kinases in esophageal cancer. Additional studies will be required to develop a rational integration of these targeted agents with respect to histologic types of esophageal cancer and the optimal selection of cancer patients who would most likely benefit from targeted therapy. Identification of AURKA and AXL as key molecular players in esophageal tumorigenesis and drug resistance strongly justifies the evaluation of the available drugs against these targets in clinical trials. PMID:25593196

  13. Therapeutically targeting SELF-reinforcing leukemic niches in acute myeloid leukemia: A worthy endeavor?

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, Paolo; Farina, Mirko; Boni, Marina; Dambruoso, Irene; Calvello, Celeste

    2016-05-01

    A tight relationship between the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) population and the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment has been convincingly established. The AML clone contains leukemic stem cells (LSCs) that compete with normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) for niche occupancy and remodel the niche; whereas, the BM microenvironment might promote AML development and progression not only through hypoxia and homing/adhesion molecules, but also through genetic defects. Although it is still unknown whether the niche influences treatment results or contains any potential target for treatment, this dynamic AML-niche interaction might be a promising therapeutic objective to significantly improve the AML cure rate. PMID:26822317

  14. Drug-loaded nano-microcapsules delivery system mediated by ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction: A promising therapy method

    PubMed Central

    MA, JING; DU, LIAN FANG; CHEN, MING; WANG, HANG HUI; XING, LING XI; JING, LI FANG; LI, YUN HUA

    2013-01-01

    The nano-microcapsules drug delivery system is currently a promising method for the treatment of many types of diseases, particularly tumors. However, the drug delivery efficiency does not reach a satisfactory level to meet treatment demands. Therefore, the effectiveness of delivery needs to be improved. Based on the alterations in the structure and modification of nano-microcapsules, ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD), a safe physical targeted method, may increase tissue penetration and cell membrane permeability, aiding the drug-loaded nano-microcapsules ingress the interior of targeted tissues and cells. The effectiveness and exact mechanism of action of the drug-loaded nano-microcapsules delivery system mediated by UTMD have yet to be fully elucidated. In this study, the latest advancement in UTMD-mediated drug loaded nano-microcapsules system technology was reviewed and the hindrances of UTMD-mediated drug delivery were assessed, in combination with a prospective study. The findings suggested that the drug delivery efficiency of nano-microcapsules mediated by UTMD was distinctly improved. Thus, the UTMD-mediated drug-loaded nano-microcapsules delivery system may significantly improve the efficiency of drug delivery, which may be a promising new therapeutic method. PMID:24648976

  15. Chemotherapeutic Compounds Targeting the DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Pathways: The Good, the Bad, and the Promising

    PubMed Central

    Jekimovs, Christian; Bolderson, Emma; Suraweera, Amila; Adams, Mark; O’Byrne, Kenneth J.; Richard, Derek J.

    2014-01-01

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is a critical cellular mechanism that exists to ensure genomic stability. DNA DSBs are the most deleterious type of insult to a cell’s genetic material and can lead to genomic instability, apoptosis, or senescence. Incorrectly repaired DNA DSBs have the potential to produce chromosomal translocations and genomic instability, potentially leading to cancer. The prevalence of DNA DSBs in cancer due to unregulated growth and errors in repair opens up a potential therapeutic window in the treatment of cancers. The cellular response to DNA DSBs is comprised of two pathways to ensure DNA breaks are repaired: homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining. Identifying chemotherapeutic compounds targeting proteins involved in these DNA repair pathways has shown promise as a cancer therapy for patients, either as a monotherapy or in combination with genotoxic drugs. From the beginning, there have been a number of chemotherapeutic compounds that have yielded successful responses in the clinic, a number that have failed (CGK-733 and iniparib), and a number of promising targets for future studies identified. This review looks in detail at how the cell responds to these DNA DSBs and investigates the chemotherapeutic avenues that have been and are currently being explored to target this repair process. PMID:24795863

  16. In Search of New Therapeutic Targets in Obesity Treatment: Sirtuins.

    PubMed

    Kurylowicz, Alina

    2016-01-01

    Most of the available non-invasive medical therapies for obesity are non-efficient in a long-term evaluation; therefore there is a constant need for new methods of treatment. Research on calorie restriction has led to the discovery of sirtuins (silent information regulators, SIRTs), enzymes regulating different cellular pathways that may constitute potential targets in the treatment of obesity. This review paper presents the role of SIRTs in the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism as well as in the differentiation of adipocytes. How disturbances of SIRTs' expression and activity may lead to the development of obesity and related complications is discussed. A special emphasis is placed on polymorphisms in genes encoding SIRTs and their possible association with susceptibility to obesity and metabolic complications, as well as on data regarding altered expression of SIRTs in human obesity. Finally, the therapeutic potential of SIRTs-targeted strategies in the treatment of obesity and related disorders is discussed. PMID:27104517

  17. Sphingosine kinase 1 as an anticancer therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ying; Gao, Fei; Chen, Kan; Tian, Mei-li; Zhao, Dong-li

    2015-01-01

    The development of chemotherapeutic resistance is a major challenge in oncology. Elevated sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) levels is predictive of a poor prognosis, and SK1 overexpression may confer resistance to chemotherapeutics. The SK/sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)/sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor (S1PR) signaling pathway has been implicated in the progression of various cancers and in chemotherapeutic drug resistance. Therefore, SK1 may represent an important target for cancer therapy. Targeting the SK/S1P/S1PR signaling pathway may be an effective anticancer therapeutic strategy, particularly in the context of overcoming drug resistance. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of SK/S1P/S1PR signaling in cancer and development of SK1 inhibitors. PMID:26150697

  18. Cancer stem cells: biological functions and therapeutically targeting.

    PubMed

    Ciurea, Marius Eugen; Georgescu, Ada Maria; Purcaru, Stefana Oana; Artene, Stefan-Alexandru; Emami, Ghazaleh Hooshyar; Boldeanu, Mihai Virgil; Tache, Daniela Elise; Dricu, Anica

    2014-01-01

    Almost all tumors are composed of a heterogeneous cell population, making them difficult to treat. A small cancer stem cell population with a low proliferation rate and a high tumorigenic potential is thought to be responsible for cancer development, metastasis and resistance to therapy. Stem cells were reported to be involved in both normal development and carcinogenesis, some molecular mechanisms being common in both processes. No less controversial, stem cells are considered to be important in treatment of malignant diseases both as targets and drug carriers. The efforts to understand the role of different signalling in cancer stem cells requires in depth knowledge about the mechanisms that control their self-renewal, differentiation and malignant potential. The aim of this paper is to discuss insights into cancer stem cells historical background and to provide a brief review of the new therapeutic strategies for targeting cancer stem cells. PMID:24821540

  19. In Search of New Therapeutic Targets in Obesity Treatment: Sirtuins

    PubMed Central

    Kurylowicz, Alina

    2016-01-01

    Most of the available non-invasive medical therapies for obesity are non-efficient in a long-term evaluation; therefore there is a constant need for new methods of treatment. Research on calorie restriction has led to the discovery of sirtuins (silent information regulators, SIRTs), enzymes regulating different cellular pathways that may constitute potential targets in the treatment of obesity. This review paper presents the role of SIRTs in the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism as well as in the differentiation of adipocytes. How disturbances of SIRTs’ expression and activity may lead to the development of obesity and related complications is discussed. A special emphasis is placed on polymorphisms in genes encoding SIRTs and their possible association with susceptibility to obesity and metabolic complications, as well as on data regarding altered expression of SIRTs in human obesity. Finally, the therapeutic potential of SIRTs-targeted strategies in the treatment of obesity and related disorders is discussed. PMID:27104517

  20. The human microbiome is a source of therapeutic drug targets.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Bret D; Redinbo, Matthew R

    2013-06-01

    It was appreciated early in drug discovery that the microbiota play an important role in the efficacy of therapeutic compounds. Indeed, the first antibiotic sulfa drugs were shown in the 1940s to be transformed by the bacteria that encode what we now call the intestinal microbiome. Here we briefly review the roles symbiotic bacteria play in the chemistry of human health, and we focus on the emerging appreciation that specific enzyme targets expressed by microbial symbiotes can be selectively disrupted to achieve clinical outcomes. We conclude that components of the microbiome should be considered 'druggable targets,' and we suggest that our rapidly evolving understanding of the chemical biology of mammalian-microbial symbiosis will translate into improved human health. PMID:23680493

  1. The GABAA Receptor as a Therapeutic Target for Neurodevelopmental Disorders.

    PubMed

    Braat, Sien; Kooy, R Frank

    2015-06-01

    Intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder, and epilepsy are prime examples of neurodevelopmental disorders that collectively affect a significant percentage of the world population. Recent technological breakthroughs allowed the elucidation of the genetic causes of many of these disorders. As neurodevelopmental disorders are genetically heterogeneous, the development of rational therapy is extremely challenging. Fortunately, many causative genes are interconnected and cluster in specific cellular pathways. Targeting a common node in such a network would allow us to interfere with a series of related neurodevelopmental disorders at once. Here, we argue that the GABAergic system is disturbed in many neurodevelopmental disorders, including fragile X syndrome, Rett syndrome, and Dravet syndrome, and is a key candidate target for therapeutic intervention. Many drugs that modulate the GABAergic system have already been tested in animal models with encouraging outcomes and are readily available for clinical trials. PMID:26050032

  2. The Human Microbiome is a Source of Therapeutic Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Bret D.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    It was appreciated early in drug discovery that the microbiota play an important role in the efficacy of therapeutic compounds. Indeed, the first antibiotic sulfa drugs were shown in the 1940s to be transformed by the bacteria that encode what we now call the intestinal microbiome. Here we briefly review the roles symbiotic bacteria play in the chemistry of human health, and we focus on the emerging appreciation that specific enzyme targets expressed by microbial symbiotes can be selectively disrupted to achieve clinical outcomes. We conclude that components of the microbiome should be considered “druggable targets,” and we suggest that our rapidly evolving understanding of the chemical biology of mammalian-microbial symbiosis will translate into improved human health. PMID:23680493

  3. Hsp90 as a Potential Therapeutic Target in Retinal Disease.

    PubMed

    Aguilà, Mònica; Cheetham, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a pivotal cellular regulator involved in the folding, activation and assembly of a wide range of proteins. Hsp90 has multiple roles in the retina and the use of different Hsp90 inhibitors has been shown to prevent retinal degeneration in models of retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. Hsp90 is also a potential target in uveal melanoma. Mechanistically, Hsp90 inhibition can evoke a dual response in the retina; stimulating a stress response with molecular chaperone expression. Thereby leading to an improvement in visual function and photoreceptor survival; however, prolonged inhibition can also stimulate the degradation of Hsp90 client proteins potentially deleteriously affect vision. Here, we review the multiple roles of Hsp90 in the retina and the therapeutic potential of Hsp90 as a target. PMID:26427407

  4. Improving peripheral nerve regeneration: from molecular mechanisms to potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Chan, K Ming; Gordon, Tessa; Zochodne, Douglas W; Power, Hollie A

    2014-11-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is common especially among young individuals. Although injured neurons have the ability to regenerate, the rate is slow and functional outcomes are often poor. Several potential therapeutic agents have shown considerable promise for improving the survival and regenerative capacity of injured neurons. These agents are reviewed within the context of their molecular mechanisms. The PI3K/Akt and Ras/ERK signaling cascades play a key role in neuronal survival. A number of agents that target these pathways, including erythropoietin, tacrolimus, acetyl-l-carnitine, n-acetylcysteine and geldanamycin have been shown to be effective. Trk receptor signaling events that up-regulate cAMP play an important role in enhancing the rate of axonal outgrowth. Agents that target this pathway including rolipram, testosterone, fasudil, ibuprofen and chondroitinase ABC hold considerable promise for human application. A tantalizing prospect is to combine different molecular targeting strategies in complementary pathways to optimize their therapeutic effects. Although further study is needed prior to human trials, these modalities could open a new horizon in the clinical arena that has so far been elusive. PMID:25220611

  5. Nucleo-cytoplasmic transport as a therapeutic target of cancer.

    PubMed

    Gravina, Giovanni Luca; Senapedis, William; McCauley, Dilara; Baloglu, Erkan; Shacham, Sharon; Festuccia, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Shuttling of specific proteins out of the nucleus is essential for the regulation of the cell cycle and proliferation of both normal and malignant tissues. Dysregulation of this fundamental process may affect many other important cellular processes such as tumor growth, inflammatory response, cell cycle, and apoptosis. It is known that XPO1 (Exportin-1/Chromosome Region Maintenance 1/CRM1) is the main mediator of nuclear export in many cell types. Nuclear proteins exported to the cytoplasm by XPO1 include the drug targets topoisomerase IIα (topo IIα) and BCR-ABL and tumor suppressor proteins such as Rb, APC, p53, p21, and p27. XPO1 can mediate cell proliferation through several pathways: (i) the sub-cellular localization of NES-containing oncogenes and tumor suppressor proteins, (ii) the control of the mitotic apparatus and chromosome segregation, and (iii) the maintenance of nuclear and chromosomal structures. The XPO1 protein is elevated in ovarian carcinoma, glioma, osteosarcoma, pancreatic and cervical cancer. There is a growing body of research indicating that XPO1 may have an important role as a prognostic marker in solid tumors. Because of this, nuclear export inhibition through XPO1 is a potential target for therapeutic intervention in many cancers. The best understood XPO1 inhibitors are the small molecule nuclear export inhibitors (NEIs; Leptomycin B and derivatives, ratjadones, PKF050-638, valtrate, ACA, CBS9106, selinexor/KPT-330, and verdinexor/KPT-335). Selinexor and verdinexor are orally bioavailable, highly potent, small molecules that are classified as Selective Inhibitors of Nuclear Export (SINE). KPT-330 is the only NEI currently in Phase I/II human clinical trials in hematological and solid cancers. Of all the potential targets in nuclear cytoplasmic transport, the nuclear export receptor XPO1 remains the best understood and most advanced therapeutic target for the treatment of cancer. PMID:25476752

  6. [Tumor vasculature as a therapeutic target in non-small cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Döme, Balázs; Magyar, Melinda

    2008-09-01

    Despite developments in conventional (chemo)radiotherapy and surgery, survival of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients remains poor. Treatments with targeted molecular drugs offer novel therapeutic strategies. Bevacizumab, a recombinant anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody, is the antiangiogenic drug at the most advanced stage of development in the therapy of NSCLC. However, a number of questions and future challenges relating to the use of bevacizumab in NSCLC remain. Furthermore, novel agents targeting the pre-existing NSCLC vasculature (i.e. vascular disrupting agents, VDAs) or multiple tyrosine kinase inhibitors have emerged as unique drug classes delivering promising results in several preclinical and clinical studies. Herein, we review the most recent data using these novel targeted agents either alone or in combination with chemotherapy in NSCLC. PMID:18845495

  7. Metformin and prostate cancer stem cells: a novel therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Mayer, M J; Klotz, L H; Venkateswaran, V

    2015-12-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in the world. Localized disease can be effectively treated with radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy. However, advanced prostate cancer is more difficult to treat and if metastatic, is incurable. There is a need for more effective therapy for advanced prostate cancer. One potential target is the cancer stem cell (CSC). CSCs have been described in several solid tumors, including prostate cancer, and contribute to therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence. Metformin, a common oral biguanide used to treat type 2 diabetes, has been demonstrated to have anti-neoplastic effects. Specifically, metformin targets CSCs in breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, glioblastoma and colon cancer. Metformin acts directly on the mitochondria to inhibit oxidative phosphorylation and reduce mitochondrial ATP production. This forces tumor cells to compensate by increasing the rate of glycolysis. CSCs rely heavily on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation for energy production. The glycolytic switch results in an energy crisis in these cells. Metformin could be used to exploit this metabolic weakness in CSCs. This would increase CSC sensitivity to conventional cancer therapies, circumventing treatment resistance and enhancing treatment efficacy. This review will explore the characteristics of prostate CSCs, their role in tumor propagation and therapeutic resistance and the role of metformin as a potential prostate CSC sensitizer to current anticancer therapies. PMID:26215782

  8. Functional differentiation of cytotoxic cancer drugs and targeted cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Gian C; Barle, Ester Lovsin; Galati, Giuseppe; Kluwe, William M

    2014-10-01

    There is no nationally or internationally binding definition of the term "cytotoxic drug" although this term is used in a variety of regulations for pharmaceutical development and manufacturing of drugs as well as in regulations for protecting medical personnel from occupational exposure in pharmacy, hospital, and other healthcare settings. The term "cytotoxic drug" is frequently used as a synonym for any and all oncology or antineoplastic drugs. Pharmaceutical companies generate and receive requests for assessments of the potential hazards of drugs regularly - including cytotoxicity. This publication is intended to provide functional definitions that help to differentiate between generically-cytotoxic cancer drugs of significant risk to normal human tissues, and targeted cancer therapeutics that pose much lesser risks. Together with specific assessments, it provides comprehensible guidance on how to assess the relevant properties of cancer drugs, and how targeted therapeutics discriminate between cancer and normal cells. The position of several regulatory agencies in the long-term is clearly to regulate all drugs regardless of classification, according to scientific risk based data. Despite ongoing discussions on how to replace the term "cytotoxic drugs" in current regulations, it is expected that its use will continue for the near future. PMID:24956585

  9. MERTK receptor tyrosine kinase is a therapeutic target in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Schlegel, Jennifer; Sambade, Maria J.; Sather, Susan; Moschos, Stergios J.; Tan, Aik-Choon; Winges, Amanda; DeRyckere, Deborah; Carson, Craig C.; Trembath, Dimitri G.; Tentler, John J.; Eckhardt, S. Gail; Kuan, Pei-Fen; Hamilton, Ronald L.; Duncan, Lyn M.; Miller, C. Ryan; Nikolaishvili-Feinberg, Nana; Midkiff, Bentley R.; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Weihe; Yang, Chao; Wang, Xiaodong; Frye, Stephen V.; Earp, H. Shelton; Shields, Janiel M.; Graham, Douglas K.

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma is one of the most aggressive forms of cutaneous cancers. Although recent therapeutic advances have prolonged patient survival, the prognosis remains dismal. C-MER proto-oncogene tyrosine kinase (MERTK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase with oncogenic properties that is often overexpressed or activated in various malignancies. Using both protein immunohistochemistry and microarray analyses, we demonstrate that MERTK expression correlates with disease progression. MERTK expression was highest in metastatic melanomas, followed by primary melanomas, while the lowest expression was observed in nevi. Additionally, over half of melanoma cell lines overexpressed MERTK compared with normal human melanocytes; however, overexpression did not correlate with mutations in BRAF or RAS. Stimulation of melanoma cells with the MERTK ligand GAS6 resulted in the activation of several downstream signaling pathways including MAPK/ERK, PI3K/AKT, and JAK/STAT. MERTK inhibition via shRNA reduced MERTK-mediated downstream signaling, reduced colony formation by up to 59%, and diminished tumor volume by 60% in a human melanoma murine xenograft model. Treatment of melanoma cells with UNC1062, a novel MERTK-selective small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor, reduced activation of MERTK-mediated downstream signaling, induced apoptosis in culture, reduced colony formation in soft agar, and inhibited invasion of melanoma cells. This work establishes MERTK as a therapeutic target in melanoma and provides a rationale for the continued development of MERTK-targeted therapies. PMID:23585477

  10. Genetic determinants and potential therapeutic targets for pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Reznik, Robert; Hendifar, Andrew E.; Tuli, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in both men and women in the United States, carrying a 5-year survival rate of approximately 5%, which is the poorest prognosis of any solid tumor type. Given the dismal prognosis associated with PDAC, a more thorough understanding of risk factors and genetic predisposition has important implications not only for cancer prevention, but also for screening techniques and the development of personalized therapies. While screening of the general population is not recommended or practicable with current diagnostic methods, studies are ongoing to evaluate its usefulness in people with at least 5- to 10-fold increased risk of PDAC. In order to help identify high-risk populations who would be most likely to benefit from early detection screening tests for pancreatic cancer, discovery of additional pancreatic cancer susceptibility genes is crucial. Thus, specific gene-based, gene-product, and marker-based testing for the early detection of pancreatic cancer are currently being developed, with the potential for these to be useful as potential therapeutic targets as well. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the genetic basis for PDAC with a focus on germline and familial determinants. A discussion of potential therapeutic targets and future directions in screening and treatment is also provided. PMID:24624093

  11. Mesenchymal Migration as a Therapeutic Target in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jessie; Paul, Andre; Kellie, Stewart J.; O'Neill, Geraldine M.

    2010-01-01

    Extensive infiltration of the surrounding healthy brain tissue is a cardinal feature of glioblastomas, highly lethal brain tumors. Deep infiltration by the glioblastoma cells renders complete surgical excision difficult and contemporary adjuvant therapies have had little impact on long-term survival. Thus, deep infiltration and resistance to irradiation and chemotherapy remain a major cause of patient mortality. Modern therapies specifically targeted to this unique aspect of glioblastoma cell biology hold significant promise to substantially improve survival rates for glioblastoma patients. In the present paper, we focus on the role of adhesion signaling molecules and the actin cytoskeleton in the mesenchymal mode of motility that characterizes invading glioblastoma cells. We then review current approaches to targeting these elements of the glioblastoma cell migration machinery and discuss other aspects of cell migration that may improve the treatment of infiltrating glioblastoma. PMID:20652056

  12. Alveolar bone loss: mechanisms, potential therapeutic targets, and interventions.

    PubMed

    Intini, G; Katsuragi, Y; Kirkwood, K L; Yang, S

    2014-05-01

    This article reviews recent research into mechanisms underlying bone resorption and highlights avenues of investigation that may generate new therapies to combat alveolar bone loss in periodontitis. Several proteins, signaling pathways, stem cells, and dietary supplements are discussed as they relate to periodontal bone loss and regeneration. RGS12 is a crucial protein that mediates osteoclastogenesis and bone destruction, and a potential therapeutic target. RGS12 likely regulates osteoclast differentiation through regulating calcium influx to control the calcium oscillation-NFATc1 pathway. A working model for RGS10 and RGS12 in the regulation of Ca(2+) oscillations during osteoclast differentiation is proposed. Initiation of inflammation depends on host cell-microbe interactions, including the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Oral p38 inhibitors reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bone destruction in a rat periodontitis model but showed unsatisfactory safety profiles. The p38 substrate MK2 is a more specific therapeutic target with potentially superior tolerability. Furthermore, MKP-1 shows anti-inflammatory activity, reducing inflammatory cytokine biosynthesis and bone resorption. Multipotent skeletal stem cell (SSC) populations exist within the bone marrow and periosteum of long bones. These bone-marrow-derived SSCs and periosteum-derived SSCs have shown therapeutic potential in several applications, including bone and periodontal regeneration. The existence of craniofacial bone-specific SSCs is suggested based on existing studies. The effects of calcium, vitamin D, and soy isoflavone supplementation on alveolar and skeletal bone loss in post-menopausal women were investigated. Supplementation resulted in stabilization of forearm bone mass density and a reduced rate of alveolar bone loss over 1 yr, compared with placebo. Periodontal attachment levels were also well-maintained and alveolar bone loss suppressed during 24 wk of

  13. Current and novel therapeutic molecules and targets in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashwini; Nisha, Chaluveelaveedu Murleedharan; Silakari, Chitrangda; Sharma, Isha; Anusha, Kanukanti; Gupta, Nityasha; Nair, Prateek; Tripathi, Timir; Kumar, Awanish

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder in which the death of brain cells causes memory loss and cognitive decline, i.e., dementia. The disease starts with mild symptoms and gradually becomes severe. AD is one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. Several different hallmarks of the disease have been reported such as deposits of β-amyloid around neurons, hyperphosphorylated tau protein, oxidative stress, dyshomeostasis of bio-metals, low levels of acetylcholine, etc. AD is not simple to diagnose since there is no single diagnostic test for it. Pharmacotherapy for AD currently provides only symptomatic relief and mostly targets cognitive revival. Computational biology approaches have proved to be reliable tools for the selection of novel targets and therapeutic ligands. Molecular docking is a key tool in computer-assisted drug design and development. Docking has been utilized to perform virtual screening on large libraries of compounds, and propose structural hypotheses of how the ligands bind with the target with lead optimization. Another potential application of docking is optimization stages of the drug-discovery cycle. This review summarizes the known drug targets of AD, in vivo active agents against AD, state-of-the-art docking studies done in AD, and future prospects of the docking with particular emphasis on AD. PMID:26220908

  14. Therapeutic strategies targeting B-cells in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Milo, Ron

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that traditionally has been considered to be mediated primarily by T-cells. Increasing evidence, however, suggests the fundamental role of B-cells in the pathogenesis of the disease. Recent strategies targeting B-cells in MS have demonstrated impressive and sometimes surprising results: B-cell depletion by monoclonal antibodies targeting the B-cell surface antigen CD20 (e.g. rituximab, ocrelizumab, ofatumumab) was shown to exert profound anti-inflammatory effect in MS with favorable risk-benefit ratio, with ocrelizumab demonstrating efficacy in both relapsing-remitting (RR) and primary-progressive (PP) MS in phase III clinical trials. Depletion of CD52 expressing T- and B-cells and monocytes by alemtuzumab resulted in impressive and durable suppression of disease activity in RRMS patients. On the other hand, strategies targeting B-cell cytokines such as atacicept resulted in increased disease activity. As our understanding of the biology of B-cells in MS is increasing, new compounds that target B-cells continue to be developed which promise to further expand the armamentarium of MS therapies and allow for more individualized therapy for patients with this complex disease. PMID:26970489

  15. Neuroendothelial NMDA receptors as therapeutic targets in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Macrez, Richard; Ortega, Maria C; Bardou, Isabelle; Mehra, Anupriya; Fournier, Antoine; Van der Pol, Susanne M A; Haelewyn, Benoit; Maubert, Eric; Lesept, Flavie; Chevilley, Arnaud; de Castro, Fernando; De Vries, Helga E; Vivien, Denis; Clemente, Diego; Docagne, Fabian

    2016-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis is among the most common causes of neurological disability in young adults. Here we provide the preclinical proof of concept of the benefit of a novel strategy of treatment for multiple sclerosis targeting neuroendothelial N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors. We designed a monoclonal antibody against N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, which targets a regulatory site of the GluN1 subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor sensitive to the protease tissue plasminogen activator. This antibody reverted the effect of tissue plasminogen activator on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor function without affecting basal N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activity (n = 21, P < 0.01). This antibody bound N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors on the luminal surface of neurovascular endothelium in human tissues and in mouse, at the vicinity of tight junctions of the blood-spinal cord barrier. Noteworthy, it reduced human leucocyte transmigration in an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier (n = 12, P < 0.05). When injected during the effector phase of MOG-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (n = 24), it blocked the progression of neurological impairments, reducing cumulative clinical score (P < 0.001) and mean peak score (P < 0.001). This effect was observed in wild-type animals but not in tissue plasminogen activator knock-out animals (n = 10). This therapeutic effect was associated to a preservation of the blood-spinal cord barrier (n = 6, P < 0.001), leading to reduced leucocyte infiltration (n = 6, P < 0.001). Overall, this study unveils a critical function of endothelial N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in multiple sclerosis, and highlights the therapeutic potential of strategies targeting the protease-regulated site of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor. PMID:27435092

  16. Novel Opportunities for Thymidylate Metabolism as a Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Peter M.; Fazzone, William; LaBonte, Melissa J.; Deng, Jinxia; Neamati, Nouri; Ladner, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    For over 40 years, the fluoropyrimidine 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has remained the central agent in therapeutic regimens employed in the treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) and is frequently combined with the DNA-damaging agent's oxaliplatin and irinotecan increasing response rates and improving overall survival. However, many patients will derive little or no benefit from treatment, highlighting the need to identify novel therapeutic targets to improve the efficacy of current 5-FU-based chemotherapeutic strategies. Deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase (dUTPase) catalyzes the hydrolysis of dUTP to dUMP and PPi providing substrate for thymidylate synthase (TS) and DNA synthesis and repair. Although dUTP is a normal intermediate in DNA synthesis, its accumulation and misincorporation into DNA as uracil is lethal. Importantly, uracil misincorporation represents an important mechanism of cytotoxicity induced by the TS-targeted class of chemotherapeutic agents including 5-FU. A growing body of evidence suggests that dUTPase is an important mediator of response to TS-targeted agents. In this manuscript we present further evidence demonstrating that elevated expression of dUTPase can protect breast cancer cells from the expansion of the intracellular uracil pool, translating to reduced growth inhibition following treatment with 5-FU. We therefore report the implementation of in silico drug development techniques to identify and develop small molecule inhibitors of dUTPase. As 5-FU and the oral 5-FU pro-drug capecitabine remain central agents in the treatment of a variety of malignancies, the clinical utility of a small molecule inhibitor to dUTPase represents a viable strategy to improve the clinical efficacy of these mainstay chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:18790783

  17. Immune Pathways in Atopic Dermatitis, and Definition of Biomarkers through Broad and Targeted Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Yasaman; Guttman-Yassky, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common inflammatory skin disease. Recent research findings have provided an insight into the complex pathogenic mechanisms involved in this disease. Despite a rising prevalence, effective and safe therapeutics for patients with moderate-to-severe AD are still lacking. Biomarkers of lesional, nonlesional skin, and blood have been developed for baseline as well as after treatment with broad and specific treatments (i.e., cyclosporine A and dupilumab). These biomarkers will help with the development of novel targeted therapeutics and assessment of disease reversal, with the promise of a more personalized treatment approach. Since AD involves more than one subtype (i.e., intrinsic/extrinsic, pediatric/adult, etc.), these molecular fingerprints needs to be validated in all subpopulations with AD. PMID:26239452

  18. Neurological disorders and therapeutics targeted to surmount the blood–brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Kanwar, Jagat R; Sriramoju, Bhasker; Kanwar, Rupinder K

    2012-01-01

    We are now in an aging population, so neurological disorders, particularly the neurodegenerative diseases, are becoming more prevalent in society. As per the epidemiological studies, Europe alone suffers 35% of the burden, indicating an alarming rate of disease progression. Further, treatment for these disorders is a challenging area due to the presence of the tightly regulated blood–brain barrier and its unique ability to protect the brain from xenobiotics. Conventional therapeutics, although effective, remain critically below levels of optimum therapeutic efficacy. Hence, methods to overcome the blood–brain barrier are currently a focus of research. Nanotechnological applications are gaining paramount importance in addressing this question, and yielding some promising results. This review addresses the pathophysiology of the more common neurological disorders and novel drug candidates, along with targeted nanoparticle applications for brain delivery. PMID:22848160

  19. The hippocampo-prefrontal pathway: a possible therapeutic target for negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Ayan; Conn, P Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampo-prefrontal (H-PFC) pathway has been linked to cognitive and emotional disturbances in several psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia. Preclinical evidence from the NMDA receptor antagonism rodent model of schizophrenia shows severe pathology selective to the H-PFC pathway. It is speculated that there is an increased excitatory drive from the hippocampus to the prefrontal cortex due to dysfunctions in the H-PFC plasticity, which may serve as the basis for the behavioral consequences observed in this rodent model. Thus, the H-PFC pathway is currently emerging as a promising therapeutic target for the negative and cognitive symptom clusters of schizophrenia. Here, we have reviewed the physiological, pharmacological and functional characteristics of the H-PFC pathway and we propose that allosteric activation of glutamatergic and cholinergic neurotransmission can serve as a plausible therapeutic approach. PMID:25825588

  20. G-quadruplex nucleic acids as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Shankar; Neidle, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Nucleic acid sequences containing several short runs of guanine nucleotides can form complex higher order structures, termed quadruplexes. Their occurrence has been most extensively characterised at the telomeric ends of eukaryotic chromosomes, whose DNA comprises such sequences, and where the extreme 3′ ends are single-stranded. This enables relatively facile formation of quadruplex arrangements under the influence of a quadruplex-selective small molecule to compete effectively with telomeric protein-DNA interactions. Occurrences of quadruplexes within the human and other genomes have been mapped by bioinformatics surveys, which have revealed over-representations in promoter regions, especially of genes involved in replication, such as oncogenes, as well as in 5′UTR regions. The highly distinctive nature of quadruplex topologies suggests that they can act as novel therapeutic targets, for example in the selective inhibition of transcription of a given oncogene, using designed small molecules to stabilise a particular quadruplex. This offers the prospect of an alternative to, for example, direct kinase targeting with small molecules, without the attendant issues of active-site resistance. We survey here the basis of these approaches, together with current progress, and discuss the mechanistic issues posed by quadruplex targeting. PMID:19515602

  1. Targeting NF-κB in glioblastoma: A therapeutic approach

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann-Morvinski, Dinorah; Narasimamurthy, Rajesh; Xia, Yifeng; Myskiw, Chad; Soda, Yasushi; Verma, Inder M.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal form of intracranial tumor. We have established a lentivirus-induced mouse model of malignant gliomas, which faithfully captures the pathophysiology and molecular signature of mesenchymal human GBM. RNA-Seq analysis of these tumors revealed high nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation showing enrichment of known NF-κB target genes. Inhibition of NF-κB by either depletion of IκB kinase 2 (IKK2), expression of a IκBαM super repressor, or using a NEMO (NF-κB essential modifier)–binding domain (NBD) peptide in tumor-derived cell lines attenuated tumor proliferation and prolonged mouse survival. Timp1, one of the NF-κB target genes significantly up-regulated in GBM, was identified to play a role in tumor proliferation and growth. Inhibition of NF-κB activity or silencing of Timp1 resulted in slower tumor growth in both mouse and human GBM models. Our results suggest that inhibition of NF-κB activity or targeting of inducible NF-κB genes is an attractive therapeutic approach for GBM. PMID:26824076

  2. Complement involvement in kidney diseases: From physiopathology to therapeutical targeting

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, Maurizio; Rosso, Giuseppina; Bertoni, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Complement cascade is involved in several renal diseases and in renal transplantation. The different components of the complement cascade might represent an optimal target for innovative therapies. In the first section of the paper the authors review the physiopathology of complement involvement in renal diseases and transplantation. In some cases this led to a reclassification of renal diseases moving from a histopathological to a physiopathological classification. The principal issues afforded are: renal diseases with complement over activation, renal diseases with complement dysregulation, progression of renal diseases and renal transplantation. In the second section the authors discuss the several complement components that could represent a therapeutic target. Even if only the anti C5 monoclonal antibody is on the market, many targets as C1, C3, C5a and C5aR are the object of national or international trials. In addition, many molecules proved to be effective in vitro or in preclinical trials and are waiting to move to human trials in the future. PMID:25949931

  3. TRPV4 as a Therapeutic Target for Joint Diseases

    PubMed Central

    McNulty, Amy L.; Leddy, Holly A.; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Guilak, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Biomechanical factors play a critical role in regulating the physiology as well as the pathology of multiple joint tissues, and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis. Therefore, the mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to mechanical signals may provide novel targets for the development of disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs (DMOADs). Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is a Ca2+-permeable cation channel that serves as a sensor of mechanical or osmotic signals in several musculoskeletal tissues, including cartilage, bone, and synovium. The importance of TRPV4 in joint homeostasis is apparent in patients harboring TRPV4 mutations, which result in the development of a spectrum of skeletal dysplasias and arthropathies. In addition, the genetic knockout of Trpv4 results in the development of osteoarthritis and decreased osteoclast function. In engineered cartilage replacements, chemical activation of TRPV4 can reproduce many of the anabolic effects of mechanical loading to accelerate tissue growth and regeneration. Overall, TRPV4 plays a key role in transducing mechanical, pain, and inflammatory signals within joint tissues, and thus is an attractive therapeutic target to modulate the effects of joint diseases. In pathological conditions in the joint, when the delicate balance of TRPV4 activity is altered, a variety of different tools could be utilized to directly or indirectly target TRPV4 activity. PMID:25519495

  4. Targeting NF-κB in glioblastoma: A therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Friedmann-Morvinski, Dinorah; Narasimamurthy, Rajesh; Xia, Yifeng; Myskiw, Chad; Soda, Yasushi; Verma, Inder M

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal form of intracranial tumor. We have established a lentivirus-induced mouse model of malignant gliomas, which faithfully captures the pathophysiology and molecular signature of mesenchymal human GBM. RNA-Seq analysis of these tumors revealed high nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation showing enrichment of known NF-κB target genes. Inhibition of NF-κB by either depletion of IκB kinase 2 (IKK2), expression of a IκBαM super repressor, or using a NEMO (NF-κB essential modifier)-binding domain (NBD) peptide in tumor-derived cell lines attenuated tumor proliferation and prolonged mouse survival. Timp1, one of the NF-κB target genes significantly up-regulated in GBM, was identified to play a role in tumor proliferation and growth. Inhibition of NF-κB activity or silencing of Timp1 resulted in slower tumor growth in both mouse and human GBM models. Our results suggest that inhibition of NF-κB activity or targeting of inducible NF-κB genes is an attractive therapeutic approach for GBM. PMID:26824076

  5. Mast cells: new therapeutic target in helminth immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Vukman, K V; Lalor, R; Aldridge, A; O'Neill, S M

    2016-01-01

    Helminth infection and their secreted antigens have a protective role in many immune-mediated inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. However, studies have focused primarily on identifying immune protective mechanisms of helminth infection and their secreted molecules on dendritic cells and macrophages. Given that mast cells have been shown to be implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of many inflammatory disorders, their role should also be examined and considered as cellular target for helminth-based therapies. As there is a dearth of studies examining the interaction of helminth-derived antigens and mast cells, this review will focus on the role of mast cells during helminth infection and examine our current understanding of the involvement of mast cells in TH 1/TH 17-mediated immune disorders. In this context, potential mechanisms by which helminths could target the TH 1/TH 17 promoting properties of mast cells can be identified to unveil novel therapeutic mast cell driven targets in combating these inflammatory disorders. PMID:26577605

  6. The application of gold nanoparticles as a promising therapeutic approach in breast and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kafshdooz, Leila; Kafshdooz, Taiebeh; Razban, Zohreh; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-08-01

    The development of specialized nanoparticles (NPs) for use in the detection and treatment of cancer is increasing. In the last few years, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been greatly studied in biological and photothermal therapeutic status. AuNPs can bind to a wide range of organic molecules, and their synthesis is easy. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of AuNPs, their contributions to tumor destruction, their toxicity, and their potential in the treatment of breast and ovarian cancer. PMID:25871281

  7. Mitochondrion: A Promising Target for Nanoparticle-Based Vaccine Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ru; Umeano, Afoma C.; Francis, Lily; Sharma, Nivita; Tundup, Smanla; Dhar, Shanta

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most popular technologies in disease prevention and eradication. It is promising to improve immunization efficiency by using vectors and/or adjuvant delivery systems. Nanoparticle (NP)-based delivery systems have attracted increasing interest due to enhancement of antigen uptake via prevention of vaccine degradation in the biological environment and the intrinsic immune-stimulatory properties of the materials. Mitochondria play paramount roles in cell life and death and are promising targets for vaccine delivery systems to effectively induce immune responses. In this review, we focus on NPs-based delivery systems with surfaces that can be manipulated by using mitochondria targeting moieties for intervention in health and disease. PMID:27258316

  8. Protein Kinases: Emerging Therapeutic Targets in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Kumudha; Gandhi, Varsha

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although protein kinases are primary targets for inhibition in hematological malignancies, until recently their contribution to chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) was poorly understood. Insights into B cell receptor (BCR) signaling and its role in regulating key cellular functions have shed light on candidate protein kinases that are aberrantly activated in CLL. In this regard, protein kinases are now considered as potential drug targets in CLL. Area covered This review has covered signaling pathways and associated protein kinases in CLL and the kinase inhibitors currently available in preclinical and clinical investigations. Individual protein kinases that are abnormally active in CLL and the functional consequences of their inhibition are discussed. Expert opinion A growing body of evidence suggests that protein kinases are druggable targets for patients with CLL. The emergence of novel and bio-available kinase inhibitors and their promising clinical activity in CLL underscore the oncogenic role of kinases in leukemogenesis. Further investigations directed towards their role as single agents or in combinations may provide insight into understanding the substantial role of kinase mediated signal transduction pathways and their inhibition in B- CLL. PMID:22409342

  9. Endothelins and their Receptors in Cancer: Identification of Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rong; Dashwood, Roderick H.

    2011-01-01

    Endothelins and their receptors are important in normal physiology, but have been implicated in various pathophysiological conditions. Members of the so-called “endothelin axis” are dysregulated in a wide range of human cancers, opening the door for novel anticancer therapies. Established cancer chemotherapeutic agents and drugs that target specific components of the endothelin axis have been combined with promising results, but more work is needed in this area. The endothelin axis affects numerous signaling pathways, including Ras, mitogen activated protein kinases, β-catenin/T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor, nuclear factor-κB (NFκB), SNAIL, and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). There is much still to learn about optimizing drug specificity in this area, while minimizing off-target effects. Selective agonists and antagonists of endothelins, their receptors, and upstream processing enzymes, as well as knockdown strategies in vitro, are providing valuable leads for testing in the clinical setting. The endothelin axis continues to be an attractive avenue of scientific endeavor, both in the cancer arena and for other important health-related disciplines. PMID:21251982

  10. Autophagy as a Therapeutic Target in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nemchenko, Andriy; Chiong, Mario; Turer, Aslan; Lavandero, Sergio; Hill, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    The epidemic of heart failure continues apace, and development of novel therapies with clinical efficacy has lagged. Now, important insights into the molecular circuitry of cardiovascular autophagy have raised the prospect that this cellular pathway of protein quality control may be a target of clinical relevance. Whereas basal levels of autophagy are required for cell survival, excessive levels – or perhaps distinct forms of autophagic flux – contribute to disease pathogenesis. Our challenge will be to distinguish mechanisms that drive adaptive versus maladaptive autophagy and to manipulate those pathways for therapeutic gain. Recent evidence suggests this may be possible. Here, we review the fundamental biology of autophagy and its role in a variety of forms of cardiovascular disease. We discuss ways in which this evolutionarily conserved catabolic mechanism can be manipulated, discuss studies presently underway in heart disease, and provide our perspective on where this exciting field may lead in the future. PMID:21723289

  11. Salivary epithelial cells: an unassuming target site for gene therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Paola; Rowzee, Anne M.; Zheng, Changyu; Adriaansen, Janik; Baum, Bruce J.

    2010-01-01

    Salivary glands are classical exocrine glands whose external secretions result in the production of saliva. However, in addition to the secretion of exocrine proteins, salivary epithelial cells are also capable of secreting proteins internally, into the bloodstream. This brief review examines the potential for using salivary epithelial cells as a target site for in situ gene transfer, with an ultimate goal of producing therapeutic proteins for treating both systemic and upper gastrointestinal tract disorders. The review discusses the protein secretory pathways reported to be present in salivary epithelial cells, the viral gene transfer vectors shown useful for transducing these cells, model transgenic secretory proteins examined, and some clinical conditions that might benefit from such salivary gland gene transfer. PMID:20219693

  12. [Mitochondrial dynamics: a potential new therapeutic target for heart failure].

    PubMed

    Kuzmicic, Jovan; Del Campo, Andrea; López-Crisosto, Camila; Morales, Pablo E; Pennanen, Christian; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Hechenleitner, Jonathan; Zepeda, Ramiro; Castro, Pablo F; Verdejo, Hugo E; Parra, Valentina; Chiong, Mario; Lavandero, Sergio

    2011-10-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles able to vary their morphology between elongated interconnected mitochondrial networks and fragmented disconnected arrays, through events of mitochondrial fusion and fission, respectively. These events allow the transmission of signaling messengers and exchange of metabolites within the cell. They have also been implicated in a variety of biological processes including embryonic development, metabolism, apoptosis, and autophagy. Although the majority of these studies have been confined to noncardiac cells, emerging evidence suggests that changes in mitochondrial morphology could participate in cardiac development, the response to ischemia-reperfusion injury, heart failure, and diabetes mellitus. In this article, we review how the mitochondrial dynamics are altered in different cardiac pathologies, with special emphasis on heart failure, and how this knowledge may provide new therapeutic targets for treating cardiovascular diseases. PMID:21820793

  13. PTP1B: a new therapeutic target for Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tautz, Lutz

    2015-08-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by successive loss of acquired cognitive, social, and motor skills and development of autistic behavior. RTT affects approximately 1 in 10,000 live female births and is the second most common cause of severe mental retardation in females, after Down syndrome. Currently, there is no cure or effective therapy for RTT. Approved treatment regimens are presently limited to supportive management of specific physical and mental disabilities. In this issue, Krishnan and colleagues reveal that the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B is upregulated in patients with RTT and in murine models and provide strong evidence that targeting PTP1B has potential as a viable therapeutic strategy for the treatment of RTT. PMID:26214520

  14. Oncogenic and Therapeutic Targeting of PTEN Loss in Bone Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yongming; Chen, Yan

    2015-09-01

    Being a tumor suppressor, PTEN functions as a dual-specificity protein and phospholipid phosphatase and regulates a variety of cellular processes and signal transduction pathways. Loss of PTEN function has been detected frequently in different forms of cancers, such as breast, prostate and lung cancer, gastric and colon cancer, skin cancer, as well as endometrial carcinoma. In this review, we provide a summary of PTEN and its role in bone malignancies including bone metastases, multiple myeloma, and osteosarcoma, etc. We highlight the importance of PTEN loss leading to activation of the oncogenic PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in tumorigenesis and progression, which can be attributed to both genetic and non-genetic alterations involving gene mutation, loss of heterozygosity, promoter hypermethylation, and microRNA mediated negative regulation. We also discuss the emerging therapeutic applications targeting PTEN loss for the treatment of these bone malignant diseases. PMID:25773992

  15. Tetraspanins as therapeutic targets in hematological malignancy: a concise review

    PubMed Central

    Beckwith, Kyle A.; Byrd, John C.; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2015-01-01

    Tetraspanins belong to a family of transmembrane proteins which play a major role in the organization of the plasma membrane. While all immune cells express tetraspanins, most of these are present in a variety of other cell types. There are a select few, such as CD37 and CD53, which are restricted to hematopoietic lineages. Tetraspanins associate with numerous partners involved in a diverse set of biological processes, including cell activation, survival, proliferation, adhesion, and migration. The historical view has assigned them a scaffolding role, but recent discoveries suggest some tetraspanins can directly participate in signaling through interactions with cytoplasmic proteins. Given their potential roles in supporting tumor survival and immune evasion, an improved understanding of tetraspanin activity could prove clinically valuable. This review will focus on emerging data in the study of tetraspanins, advances in the clinical development of anti-CD37 therapeutics, and the future prospects of targeting tetraspanins in hematological malignancy. PMID:25852576

  16. Hepatic macrophages in liver fibrosis: pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai; You, Hong; Fan, Xu; Jia, Jidong

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic macrophages account for the largest non-parenchymal cell population in the liver. Recent studies have found that hepatic macrophages have different functions in different stages of experimental liver fibrosis. Some studies found that there are different types of hepatic macrophages in the liver, although others have suggested that hepatic macrophages could switch to different phenotypes in different environments. Many studies demonstrated that while hepatic macrophages promoted fibrosis through the recruitment of proinflammatory immune cells, and the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the early stages, these also promoted the resolution of hepatic fibrosis through the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases in the late stages. This article will review the current role played by hepatic macrophages in liver fibrosis and the potential therapeutic targets that modulate hepatic macrophages. PMID:27252881

  17. Novel therapeutic approaches targeting matrix metalloproteinases in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Briasoulis, Alexandros; Tousoulis, Dimitris; Papageorgiou, Nikolaos; Kampoli, Anna-Maria; Androulakis, Emmanuel; Antoniades, Charalambos; Tsiamis, Eleftherios; Latsios, George; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2012-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), are proteinases that participate in extracellular matrix remodelling and degradation. Under normal physiological conditions, the activities of MMPs are regulated at the level of transcription, of activation of the pro-MMP precursor zymogens and of inhibition by endogenous inhibitors (tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases; TIMPs). Alteration in the regulation of MMP activity is implicated in atherosclerotic plaque development, coronary artery disease and heart failure. The pathological effects of MMPs and TIMPs in cardiovascular diseases involve vascular remodelling, atherosclerotic plaque instability and left ventricular remodelling after myocardial infarction. Since excessive tissue remodelling and increased matrix metalloproteinase activity have been demonstrated during atherosclerotic lesion progression, MMPs represent a potential target for therapeutic intervention aimed at modification of vascular pathology by restoring the physiological balance between MMPs and TIMPs. This review discusses pharmacological approaches to MMP inhibition. PMID:22519451

  18. Inflammation as a Therapeutic Target for Diabetic Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Pop-Busui, Rodica; Ang, Lynn; Holmes, Crystal; Gallagher, Katherine; Feldman, Eva L

    2016-03-01

    Diabetic neuropathies (DNs) are one of the most prevalent chronic complications of diabetes and a major cause of disability, high mortality, and poor quality of life. Given the complex anatomy of the peripheral nervous system and types of fiber dysfunction, DNs have a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. The treatment of DNs continues to be challenging, likely due to the complex pathogenesis that involves an array of systemic and cellular imbalances in glucose and lipids metabolism. These lead to the activation of various biochemical pathways, including increased oxidative/nitrosative stress, activation of the polyol and protein kinase C pathways, activation of polyADP ribosylation, and activation of genes involved in neuronal damage, cyclooxygenase-2 activation, endothelial dysfunction, altered Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase pump function, impaired C-peptide-related signaling pathways, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and low-grade inflammation. This review summarizes current evidence regarding the role of low-grade inflammation as a potential therapeutic target for DNs. PMID:26897744

  19. Functions of astrocytes and their potential as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Kimelberg, Harold K.; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2010-01-01

    Astrocytes are often referred to, and historically have been regarded as, support cells of the mammalian CNS. Work over the last decade suggests otherwise, that astrocytes may in fact play a more active role in higher neural processing than previously recognized. Because astrocytes can potentially serve as novel therapeutic targets, it is critical to understand how astrocytes execute their diverse supportive tasks while maintaining neuronal health. To that end, this review will focus on the supportive roles of astrocytes, a line of study relevant to essentially all acute and chronic neurological diseases. Furthermore, this review will critically re-evaluate our concepts of the functional properties of astrocytes and relate these tasks to their intricate morphology. PMID:20880499

  20. Reactive oxygen species-targeted therapeutic interventions for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Sovari, Ali A.; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia that requires medical attention, and its incidence is increasing. Current ion channel blockade therapies and catheter ablation have significant limitations in treatment of AF, mainly because they do not address the underlying pathophysiology of the disease. Oxidative stress has been implicated as a major underlying pathology that promotes AF; however, conventional antioxidants have not shown impressive therapeutic effects. A more careful design of antioxidant therapies and better selection of patients likely are required to treat effectively AF with antioxidant agents. Current evidence suggest inhibition of prominent cardiac sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase and targeting subcellular compartments with the highest levels of ROS may prove to be effective therapies for AF. Increased serum markers of oxidative stress may be an important guide in selecting the AF patients who will most likely respond to antioxidant therapy. PMID:22934062

  1. Macrophages associated with tumors as potential targets and therapeutic intermediates.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Serguei; Warren, Galya; Wei, Xin

    2014-04-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) form approximately 50% of tumor mass. TAMs were shown to promote tumor growth by suppressing immunocompetent cells, inducing neovascularization and supporting cancer stem cells. TAMs retain mobility in tumor mass, which can potentially be employed for better intratumoral biodistribution of nanocarriers and effective tumor growth inhibition. Due to the importance of TAMs, they are increasingly becoming principal targets of novel therapeutic approaches. In this review, we compare features of macrophages and TAMs that are essential for TAM-directed therapies, and illustrate the advantages of nanomedicine that are related to the preferential capture of nanocarriers by Mϕ in the process of drug delivery. We discuss recent efforts in reprogramming or inhibiting tumor-protecting properties of TAMs, and potential strategies to increase efficacy of conventional chemotherapy by combining with macrophage-associated delivery of nanodrugs. PMID:24827844

  2. Therapeutic potential of targeting acinar cell reprogramming in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chi-Hin; Li, You-Jia; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a common pancreatic cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Treating this life-threatening disease remains challenging due to the lack of effective prognosis, diagnosis and therapy. Apart from pancreatic duct cells, acinar cells may also be the origin of PDAC. During pancreatitis or combined with activating KRasG12D mutation, acinar cells lose their cellular identity and undergo a transdifferentiation process called acinar-to-ductal-metaplasia (ADM), forming duct cells which may then transform into pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually PDAC. During ADM, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, Wnt, Notch and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/Akt signaling inhibits the transcription of acinar-specific genes, including Mist and amylase, but promotes the expression of ductal genes, such as cytokeratin-19. Inhibition of this transdifferentiation process hinders the development of PanIN and PDAC. In addition, the transdifferentiated cells regain acinar identity, indicating ADM may be a reversible process. This provides a new therapeutic direction in treating PDAC through cancer reprogramming. Many studies have already demonstrated the success of switching PanIN/PDAC back to normal cells through the use of PD325901, the expression of E47, and the knockdown of Dickkopf-3. In this review, we discuss the signaling pathways involved in ADM and the therapeutic potential of targeting reprogramming in order to treat PDAC. PMID:27610015

  3. Cell migration in paediatric glioma; characterisation and potential therapeutic targeting

    PubMed Central

    Cockle, J V; Picton, S; Levesley, J; Ilett, E; Carcaboso, A M; Short, S; Steel, L P; Melcher, A; Lawler, S E; Brüning-Richardson, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Paediatric high grade glioma (pHGG) and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) are highly aggressive brain tumours. Their invasive phenotype contributes to their limited therapeutic response, and novel treatments that block brain tumour invasion are needed. Methods: Here, we examine the migratory characteristics and treatment effect of small molecule glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors, lithium chloride (LiCl) and the indirubin derivative 6-bromoindirubin-oxime (BIO), previously shown to inhibit the migration of adult glioma cells, on two pHGG cell lines (SF188 and KNS42) and one patient-derived DIPG line (HSJD-DIPG-007) using 2D (transwell membrane, immunofluorescence, live cell imaging) and 3D (migration on nanofibre plates and spheroid invasion in collagen) assays. Results: All lines were migratory, but there were differences in morphology and migration rates. Both LiCl and BIO reduced migration and instigated cytoskeletal rearrangement of stress fibres and focal adhesions when viewed by immunofluorescence. In the presence of drugs, loss of polarity and differences in cellular movement were observed by live cell imaging. Conclusions: Ours is the first study to demonstrate that it is possible to pharmacologically target migration of paediatric glioma in vitro using LiCl and BIO, and we conclude that these agents and their derivatives warrant further preclinical investigation as potential anti-migratory therapeutics for these devastating tumours. PMID:25628092

  4. Autobiographical Memory Disturbances in Depression: A Novel Therapeutic Target?

    PubMed

    Köhler, Cristiano A; Carvalho, André F; Alves, Gilberto S; McIntyre, Roger S; Hyphantis, Thomas N; Cammarota, Martín

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is characterized by a dysfunctional processing of autobiographical memories. We review the following core domains of deficit: systematic biases favoring materials of negative emotional valence; diminished access and response to positive memories; a recollection of overgeneral memories in detriment of specific autobiographical memories; and the role of ruminative processes and avoidance when dealing with autobiographical memories. Furthermore, we review evidence from functional neuroimaging studies of neural circuits activated by the recollection of autobiographical memories in both healthy and depressive individuals. Disruptions in autobiographical memories predispose and portend onset and maintenance of depression. Thus, we discuss emerging therapeutics that target memory difficulties in those with depression. We review strategies for this clinical domain, including memory specificity training, method-of-loci, memory rescripting, and real-time fMRI neurofeedback training of amygdala activity in depression. We propose that the manipulation of the reconsolidation of autobiographical memories in depression might represent a novel yet largely unexplored, domain-specific, therapeutic opportunity for depression treatment. PMID:26380121

  5. Sphingosine kinase-1--a potential therapeutic target in cancer.

    PubMed

    Cuvillier, Olivier

    2007-02-01

    Sphingolipid metabolites play critical functions in the regulation of a number of fundamental biological processes including cancer. Whereas ceramide and sphingosine mediate and trigger apoptosis or cell growth arrest, sphingosine 1-phosphate promotes proliferation and cell survival. The delicate equilibrium between the intracellular levels of each of these sphingolipids is controlled by the enzymes that either produce or degrade these metabolites. Sphingosine kinase-1 is a crucial regulator of this two-pan balance, because it produces the prosurvival sphingosine 1-phosphate, and reduces the content of both ceramide and sphingosine, the proapoptotic sphingolipids. Sphingosine kinase-1 controls the levels of sphingolipids having opposite effects on cell survival/death, its gene was found to be of oncogenic nature, its mRNA is overexpressed in many solid tumors, its overexpression protects cells from apoptosis and its activity is decreased during anticancer treatments. Therefore, sphingosine kinase-1 appears to be a target of interest for therapeutic manipulation via its pharmacological inhibition. Strategies to kill tumor cells by increasing their ceramide and/or sphingosine content while blocking sphingosine 1-phosphate generation should have a favorable therapeutic index. PMID:17159597

  6. Targeting Cell Death Pathways for Therapeutic Intervention in Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Garg, Jay P; Vucic, Domagoj

    2016-05-01

    Precise regulation of cell death and survival is essential for proper maintenance of organismal homeostasis, development, and the immune system. Deregulated cell death can lead to developmental defects, neuropathies, infections, and cancer. Kidney diseases, especially acute pathologies linked to ischemia-reperfusion injury, are among illnesses that profoundly are affected by improper regulation or execution of cell death pathways. Attempts to develop medicines for kidney diseases have been impacted by the complexity of these pathologies given the heterogeneous patient population and diverse etiologies. By analyzing cell death pathways activated in kidney diseases, we attempt to differentiate their importance for these pathologies with a goal of identifying those that have more profound impact and the best therapeutic potential. Although classic apoptosis still might be important, regulated necrosis pathways including necroptosis, ferroptosis, parthanatos, and mitochondrial permeability transition-associated cell death play a significantly role in kidney diseases, especially in acute kidney pathologies. Although targeting receptor-interacting protein 1 kinase appears to be the best therapeutic strategy, combination with inhibitors of other cell death pathways is likely to bring superior benefit and possible cure to patients suffering from kidney diseases. PMID:27339381

  7. Leptin, ghrelin, and endocannabinoids: potential therapeutic targets in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Støving, René Klinkby; Andries, Alin; Brixen, Kim; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Hørder, Kirsten; Frystyk, Jan

    2009-04-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) has the highest mortality rate between psychiatric disorders, and evidence for managing it is still very limited. So far, pharmacological treatment has focused on a narrow range of drugs and only a few controlled studies have been performed. Furthermore, the studies have been of short duration and included a limited number of subjects, often heterogenic with regard to stage and acute nutritive status. Thus, novel approaches are urgently needed. Body weight homeostasis is tightly regulated throughout life. With the discovery of orexigenic and anorectic signals, an array of new molecular targets to control eating behavior has emerged. This review focuses on recent advances in three important signal systems: leptin, ghrelin, and endocannabinoids toward the identification of potential therapeutical breakthroughs in AN. Our review of the current literature shows that leptin may have therapeutic potentials in promoting restoration of menstrual cycles in weight restored patients, reducing motor restlessness in severely hyperactive patients, and preventing osteoporosis in chronic patients. Ghrelin and endocannabinoids exert orexigenic effects which may facilitate nutritional restoration. Leptin and endocannabinoids may exert antidepressive and anxiolytic effects. Finally, monitoring serum concentration of leptin may be useful in order to prevent refeeding syndrome. PMID:18926548

  8. Glutamatergic dysfunctioning in Alzheimer's disease and related therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Zádori, Dénes; Veres, Gábor; Szalárdy, Levente; Klivényi, Péter; Toldi, József; Vécsei, László

    2014-01-01

    The impairment of glutamatergic neurotransmission plays an important role in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The pathological process, which involves the production of amyloid-β peptides and hyperphosphorylated tau proteins, spreads over well-delineated neuroanatomical circuits. The gradual deterioration of proper synaptic functioning (via GluN2A-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, NMDARs) and the development of excitotoxicity (via GluN2B-containing NMDARs) in these structures both accompany the disease pathogenesis. Although one of the most important therapeutic targets would be glutamate excitotoxicity, the application of conventional anti-glutamatergic agents could result in further deterioration of synaptic transmission and intolerable side-effects. With regard to NMDAR antagonists with tolerable side-effects, ion channel blockers with low affinity, glycine site agents, and specific antagonists of polyamine site and GluN2B subunit may come into play. However, in the mirror of experimental data, only the application of ion channel blockers with pronounced voltage dependency, low affinity, and rapid unblocking kinetics (e.g., memantine) and specific antagonists of the GluN2B subunit (e.g., ifenprodil and certain kynurenic acid amides) resulted in desirable symptom amelioration. Therefore we propose that these kinds of chemical agents may have therapeutic potential for present and future drug development. PMID:24670398

  9. Therapeutic potential of targeting acinar cell reprogramming in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi-Hin; Li, You-Jia; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-08-21

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a common pancreatic cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Treating this life-threatening disease remains challenging due to the lack of effective prognosis, diagnosis and therapy. Apart from pancreatic duct cells, acinar cells may also be the origin of PDAC. During pancreatitis or combined with activating KRas(G12D) mutation, acinar cells lose their cellular identity and undergo a transdifferentiation process called acinar-to-ductal-metaplasia (ADM), forming duct cells which may then transform into pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually PDAC. During ADM, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, Wnt, Notch and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/Akt signaling inhibits the transcription of acinar-specific genes, including Mist and amylase, but promotes the expression of ductal genes, such as cytokeratin-19. Inhibition of this transdifferentiation process hinders the development of PanIN and PDAC. In addition, the transdifferentiated cells regain acinar identity, indicating ADM may be a reversible process. This provides a new therapeutic direction in treating PDAC through cancer reprogramming. Many studies have already demonstrated the success of switching PanIN/PDAC back to normal cells through the use of PD325901, the expression of E47, and the knockdown of Dickkopf-3. In this review, we discuss the signaling pathways involved in ADM and the therapeutic potential of targeting reprogramming in order to treat PDAC. PMID:27610015

  10. ENaCs and ASICs as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Qadri, Yawar J.; Rooj, Arun K.

    2012-01-01

    The epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) and acid-sensitive ion channel (ASIC) branches of the ENaC/degenerin superfamily of cation channels have drawn increasing attention as potential therapeutic targets in a variety of diseases and conditions. Originally thought to be solely expressed in fluid absorptive epithelia and in neurons, it has become apparent that members of this family exhibit nearly ubiquitous expression. Therapeutic opportunities range from hypertension, due to the role of ENaC in maintaining whole body salt and water homeostasis, to anxiety disorders and pain associated with ASIC activity. As a physiologist intrigued by the fundamental mechanics of salt and water transport, it was natural that Dale Benos, to whom this series of reviews is dedicated, should have been at the forefront of research into the amiloride-sensitive sodium channel. The cloning of ENaC and subsequently the ASIC channels has revealed a far wider role for this channel family than was previously imagined. In this review, we will discuss the known and potential roles of ENaC and ASIC subunits in the wide variety of pathologies in which these channels have been implicated. Some of these, such as the role of ENaC in Liddle's syndrome are well established, others less so; however, all are related in that the fundamental defect is due to inappropriate channel activity. PMID:22277752

  11. Hypoxia inducible factor in hepatocellular carcinoma: A therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Daniel; Wu, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed and deadly cancers worldwide; its incidence has been rising in the United States due to the increase in hepatitis C associated cirrhosis and the growing epidemic of obesity. There have been no effective therapeutic options in the advanced disease setting beyond sorafenib, a multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor that showed significant survival benefit. Because of this, there is an urgent need to search for novel pathways in sorafenib experienced patients. This review will focus on the role of hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-1α) in cancer development, specifically in HCC. We will discuss the biology of HIF-1α, the pathways with which it interacts, and the function of HIF-1α in HCC. Furthermore, we will review studies highlighting the relevance of HIF-1α in the clinical setting, as well as the pre-clinical data supporting its further investigation. Finally, we will conclude with a discussion of the potential role of a HIF-1α mRNA antagonist for the treatment of HCC, and hypothesize the ways in which such an inhibitor may be best utilized in the management of advanced HCC. Hypoxia plays a significant role in the development of HCC. HIF-1α is a key transcription factor involved in the hypoxic response of cancer cells. It activates transcription of genes responsible for angiogenesis, glucose metabolism, proliferation, invasion and metastasis in HCC. Its involvement in multiple, essential tumor pathways makes it an attractive potential therapeutic target in HCC. PMID:26576101

  12. Pathogenic Inflammation and Its Therapeutic Targeting in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Timothy A.; Tsantikos, Evelyn; Hibbs, Margaret L.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, lupus) is a highly complex and heterogeneous autoimmune disease that most often afflicts women in their child-bearing years. It is characterized by circulating self-reactive antibodies that deposit in tissues, including skin, kidneys, and brain, and the ensuing inflammatory response can lead to irreparable tissue damage. Over many years, clinical trials in SLE have focused on agents that control B- and T-lymphocyte activation, and, with the single exception of an agent known as belimumab which targets the B-cell survival factor BAFF, they have been disappointing. At present, standard therapy for SLE with mild disease is the agent hydroxychloroquine. During disease flares, steroids are often used, while the more severe manifestations with major organ involvement warrant potent, broad-spectrum immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide or mycophenolate. Current treatments have severe and dose-limiting toxicities and thus a more specific therapy targeting a causative factor or signaling pathway would be greatly beneficial in SLE treatment. Moreover, the ability to control inflammation alongside B-cell activation may be a superior approach for disease control. There has been a recent focus on the innate immune system and associated inflammation, which has uncovered key players in driving the pathogenesis of SLE. Delineating some of these intricate inflammatory mechanisms has been possible with studies using spontaneous mouse mutants and genetically engineered mice. These strains, to varying degrees, exhibit hallmarks of the human disease and therefore have been utilized to model human SLE and to test new drugs. Developing a better understanding of the initiation and perpetuation of disease in SLE may uncover suitable novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we discuss the involvement of inflammation in SLE disease pathogenesis, with a focus on several key proinflammatory cytokines and myeloid growth factors, and review the known

  13. Therapeutic targeting of TRP channels--the TR(i)P to pain relief.

    PubMed

    Eid, Samer R

    2011-01-01

    Following the cloning and characterization of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), a growing body of research has identified the important role of TRPV1 and related channels in diverse physiological functions including temperature transduction and pain signalling. As a result, there has been a great deal of interest by the pharmaceutical industry to develop small molecule modulators of the activity of these channels for potential therapeutic use. While most of the efforts have focused on examining the role of TRPV1 in nociception, more recent work has begun to assess the therapeutic utility of targeting other TRP channels. This manuscript is aimed at introducing the reader of this special issue to the promising new developments and findings as well as emerging challenges in the targeting of the thermoTRP family of receptors for clinical therapeutic use. This chapter will focus on current efforts from the pharmaceutical industry to develop highly potent and efficacious compounds that modulate TRP channel function. In particular, this chapter will highlight recent drug discovery activities around the transient receptor potential vanilloid family members TRPV1, TRPV3, and TRPV4, the transient receptor potential ankyrin family member TRPA1, and the transient receptor potential melastatin family member TRPM8. The majority of the work included in this chapter will focus on recent findings in the development of TRP modulators for pain indications; however, for certain targets where data exist, other indications will be discussed. The increasing number of small biotech and pharmaceutical companies pursuing targets in these families of ion channels highlights the perceived importance of these targets in the treatment of a variety of disease states including inflammatory and neuropathic pain, urinary incontinence, painful bladder syndrome, and even types of prostate cancer. PMID:21671881

  14. Engineering Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Therapeutic Bionanofluids to Selectively Target Papillary Thyroid Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paliouras, Miltiadis; Mitmaker, Elliot J.; Trifiro, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) has risen steadily over the past few decades as well as the recurrence rates. It has been proposed that targeted ablative physical therapy could be a therapeutic modality in thyroid cancer. Targeted bio-affinity functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (BioNanofluid) act locally, to efficiently convert external light energy to heat thereby specifically killing cancer cells. This may represent a promising new cancer therapeutic modality, advancing beyond conventional laser ablation and other nanoparticle approaches. Methods Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor (TSHR) was selected as a target for PTC cells, due to its wide expression. Either TSHR antibodies or Thyrogen or purified TSH (Thyrotropin) were chemically conjugated to our functionalized Bionanofluid. A diode laser system (532 nm) was used to illuminate a PTC cell line for set exposure times. Cell death was assessed using Trypan Blue staining. Results TSHR-targeted BioNanofluids were capable of selectively ablating BCPAP, a TSHR-positive PTC cell line, while not TSHR-null NSC-34 cells. We determined that a 2:1 BCPAP cell:α-TSHR-BioNanofluid conjugate ratio and a 30 second laser exposure killed approximately 60% of the BCPAP cells, while 65% and >70% of cells were ablated using Thyrotropin- and Thyrogen-BioNanofluid conjugates, respectively. Furthermore, minimal non-targeted killing was observed using selective controls. Conclusion A BioNanofluid platform offering a potential therapeutic path for papillary thyroid cancer has been investigated, with our in vitro results suggesting the development of a potent and rapid method of selective cancer cell killing. Therefore, BioNanofluid treatment emphasizes the need for new technology to treat patients with local recurrence and metastatic disease who are currently undergoing either re-operative neck explorations, repeated administration of radioactive iodine and as a last resort external beam

  15. MDSCs in cancer: Conceiving new prognostic and therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    De Sanctis, Francesco; Solito, Samantha; Ugel, Stefano; Molon, Barbara; Bronte, Vincenzo; Marigo, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    The incomplete clinical efficacy of anti-tumor immunotherapy can depend on the presence of an immunosuppressive environment in the host that supports tumor progression. Tumor-derived cytokines and growth factors induce an altered hematopoiesis that modifies the myeloid cell differentiation process, promoting proliferation and expansion of cells with immunosuppressive skills, namely myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). MDSCs promote tumor growth not only by shaping immune responses towards tumor tolerance, but also by supporting several processes necessary for the neoplastic progression such as tumor angiogenesis, cancer stemness, and metastasis dissemination. Thus, MDSC targeting represents a promising tool to eliminate host immune dysfunctions and increase the efficacy of immune-based cancer therapies. PMID:26255541

  16. Future Lipid-Altering Therapeutic Options Targeting Residual Cardiovascular Risk.

    PubMed

    Farnier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Low-density lipoproteins (LDL) play a causal role in the development of atherosclerosis, and reduction of LDL cholesterol with a statin is a cornerstone in prevention of cardiovascular disease. However, it remains an unmet need to reduce the residual risk on maximally tolerated statin alone or in combination with other drugs such as ezetimibe. Among the new LDL-lowering therapies, PCSK9 inhibitors appear the most promising class. Genetic studies suggest that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are associated with cardiovascular risk and several promising triglyceride-lowering therapies are at various stages of development. At the opposite end, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol seems to not be causally associated with cardiovascular risk, and thus far, trials designed to reduce cardiovascular risk by mainly raising HDL cholesterol levels have been disappointing. Nevertheless, new drugs targeting HDL are still in development. This review describes the new drugs reducing LDL, apolipoprotein(a), and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, and the strategies to modulate HDL metabolism. PMID:27216845

  17. The potential utilizations of hydrogen as a promising therapeutic strategy against ocular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Ye; Geng, Lei; Xu, Wei-Wei; Qin, Li-Min; Peng, Guang-Hua; Huang, Yi-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen, one of the most well-known natural molecules, has been used in numerous medical applications owing to its ability to selectively neutralize cytotoxic reactive oxygen species and ameliorate hazardous inflammations. Hydrogen can exert protective effects on various reactive oxygen species-related diseases, including the transplantation-induced intestinal graft injury, chronic inflammation, ischemia–reperfusion injuries, and so on. Especially in the eye, hydrogen has been used to counteract multiple ocular pathologies in the ophthalmological models. Herein, the ophthalmological utilizations of hydrogen are systematically reviewed and the underlying mechanisms of hydrogen-induced beneficial effects are discussed. It is our hope that the protective effects of hydrogen, as evidenced by these pioneering studies, would enrich our pharmacological knowledge about this natural element and cast light into the discovery of a novel therapeutic strategy against ocular diseases. PMID:27279745

  18. Vasopressin receptors and pharmacological chaperones: from functional rescue to promising therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Mouillac, Bernard; Mendre, Christiane

    2014-05-01

    Conformational diseases result from protein misfolding and/or aggregation and constitute a major public health problem. Congenital Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus is a typical conformational disease. In most of the cases, it is associated to inactivating mutations of the renal arginine-vasopressin V2 receptor gene leading to misfolding and intracellular retention of the receptor, causing the inability of patients to concentrate their urine in response to the antidiuretic hormone. Cell-permeable pharmacological chaperones have been successfully challenged to restore plasma membrane localization of the receptor mutants and to rescue their function. Interestingly, different classes of specific ligands such as antagonists (vaptans), agonists as well as biased agonists of the V2 receptor have proven their usefulness as efficient pharmacochaperones. These compounds represent a potential therapeutic treatment of this X-linked genetic pathology. PMID:24239889

  19. The endothelin system as a therapeutic target in cardiovascular disease: great expectations or bleak house?

    PubMed Central

    Kirkby, N S; Hadoke, P W F; Bagnall, A J; Webb, D J

    2007-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that the potent vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 (ET-1) contributes to the pathogenesis of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. As such, pharmacological manipulation of the ET system might represent a promising therapeutic goal. Many clinical trials have assessed the potential of ET receptor antagonists in cardiovascular disease, the most positive of which have resulted in the licensing of the mixed ET receptor antagonist bosentan, and the selective ETA receptor antagonists, sitaxsentan and ambrisentan, for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In contrast, despite encouraging data from in vitro and animal studies, outcomes in human heart failure have been disappointing, perhaps illustrating the risk of extrapolating preclinical work to man. Many further potential applications of these compounds, including resistant hypertension, chronic kidney disease, connective tissue disease and sub-arachnoid haemorrhage are currently being investigated in the clinic. Furthermore, experience from previous studies should enable improved trial design and scope remains for development of improved compounds and alternative therapeutic strategies. Although ET-converting enzyme inhibitors may represent one such alternative, there have been relatively few suitable compounds developed, and consequently, clinical experience with these agents remains extremely limited. Recent advances, together with an increased understanding of the biology of the ET system provided by improved experimental tools (including cell-specific transgenic deletion of ET receptors), should allow further targeting of clinical trials to diseases in which ET is involved and allow the therapeutic potential for targeting the ET system in cardiovascular disease to be fully realized. PMID:17965745

  20. The endothelin system as a therapeutic target in cardiovascular disease: great expectations or bleak house?

    PubMed

    Kirkby, N S; Hadoke, P W F; Bagnall, A J; Webb, D J

    2008-03-01

    There is considerable evidence that the potent vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 (ET-1) contributes to the pathogenesis of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. As such, pharmacological manipulation of the ET system might represent a promising therapeutic goal. Many clinical trials have assessed the potential of ET receptor antagonists in cardiovascular disease, the most positive of which have resulted in the licensing of the mixed ET receptor antagonist bosentan, and the selective ET(A) receptor antagonists, sitaxsentan and ambrisentan, for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In contrast, despite encouraging data from in vitro and animal studies, outcomes in human heart failure have been disappointing, perhaps illustrating the risk of extrapolating preclinical work to man. Many further potential applications of these compounds, including resistant hypertension, chronic kidney disease, connective tissue disease and sub-arachnoid haemorrhage are currently being investigated in the clinic. Furthermore, experience from previous studies should enable improved trial design and scope remains for development of improved compounds and alternative therapeutic strategies. Although ET-converting enzyme inhibitors may represent one such alternative, there have been relatively few suitable compounds developed, and consequently, clinical experience with these agents remains extremely limited. Recent advances, together with an increased understanding of the biology of the ET system provided by improved experimental tools (including cell-specific transgenic deletion of ET receptors), should allow further targeting of clinical trials to diseases in which ET is involved and allow the therapeutic potential for targeting the ET system in cardiovascular disease to be fully realized. PMID:17965745

  1. Novel, potent anti-androgens of therapeutic potential: recent advances and promising developments.

    PubMed

    Vasaitis, Tadas S; Njar, Vincent C O

    2010-04-01

    The beneficial effect of androgen ablation has been well established in prostate cancer therapy. Despite the initial response, patients typically relapse with a more aggressive form described as castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRCP), driven by continued androgen receptor (AR) signaling. This review details the current state of anti-androgen therapy, mainly for CRPC, with major emphasis on the most potent and promising compounds under development. Anti-androgen failure has been linked to elevated AR expression, increased expression of coactivator proteins, AR mutations, ligand-independent AR activation and persistent intraprostatic androgens. MDV3100, BMS-641988 and VN/124-1 were developed to overcome these mechanisms. In CRCP, prostate cancer cells still rely on intracellular androgens and, to a greater extent, on active AR for growth and survival. Therefore, potent anti-androgens that efficiently disrupt the functions (signaling) of AR are envisioned to be effective drugs for all types of prostate cancers. PMID:21426013

  2. Mitochondria in traumatic brain injury and mitochondrial-targeted multipotential therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Gang; Kong, Rong-hua; Zhang, Lei-ming; Zhang, Jian-ning

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socioeconomic problem throughout the world. It is a complicated pathological process that consists of primary insults and a secondary insult characterized by a set of biochemical cascades. The imbalance between a higher energy demand for repair of cell damage and decreased energy production led by mitochondrial dysfunction aggravates cell damage. At the cellular level, the main cause of the secondary deleterious cascades is cell damage that is centred in the mitochondria. Excitotoxicity, Ca2+ overload, reactive oxygen species (ROS), Bcl-2 family, caspases and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) are the main participants in mitochondria-centred cell damage following TBI. Some preclinical and clinical results of mitochondria-targeted therapy show promise. Mitochondria- targeted multipotential therapeutic strategies offer new hope for the successful treatment of TBI and other acute brain injuries. PMID:23003569

  3. Pharmacological targeting of redox regulation systems as new therapeutic approach for psychiatric disorders: A literature overview.

    PubMed

    Schiavone, Stefania; Trabace, Luigia

    2016-05-01

    Redox dysregulation occurs following a disequilibrium between reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing and degrading systems, i.e. mitochondria, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) on one hand and the principal antioxidant system, the glutathione, on the other hand. Increasing recent evidence points towards a pathogenetic role of an altered redox state in the development of several mental disorders, such as anxiety, bipolar disorders, depression, psychosis, autism and post-traumaticstress disorders (PTSD). In this regard, pharmacological targeting of the redox state regulating systems in the brain has been proposed as an innovative and promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of these mental diseases. This review will summarize current knowledge obtained from both pre-clinical and clinical studies in order to descant "lights and shadows" of targeting pharmacologically both the producing and degrading reactive oxygen species (ROS) systems in psychiatric disorders. PMID:26995306

  4. Nuclear Receptors as Therapeutic Targets in Liver Disease: Are We There Yet?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NR) are ligand-modulated transcription factors that play diverse roles in cell differentiation, development, proliferation, and metabolism and are associated with numerous liver pathologies such as cancer, steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, cholestasis, and xenobiotic/drug-induced liver injury. The network of target proteins associated with NRs is extremely complex, comprising coregulators, small noncoding microRNAs, and long noncoding RNAs. The importance of NRs as targets of liver disease is exemplified by the number of NR ligands that are currently used in the clinics or in clinical trials with promising results. Understanding the regulation by NR during pathophysiological conditions, and identifying ligands for orphan NR, points to a potential therapeutic approach for patients with liver diseases. An overview of complex NR metabolic networks and their pharmacological implications in liver disease is presented here. PMID:26738480

  5. Exploring Internal Ribosome Entry Sites as Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Komar, Anton A.; Hatzoglou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Initiation of eukaryotic mRNA translation may proceed via several different routes, each requiring a different subset of factors and relying on different and specific interactions between the mRNA and the ribosome. Two modes predominate: (i) so-called cap-dependent initiation, which requires all canonical initiation factors and is responsible for about 95–97% of all initiation events in eukaryotic cells; and (ii) cap-independent internal initiation, which requires a reduced subset of initiation factors and accounts for up to 5% of the remaining initiation events. Internal initiation relies on the presence of so-called internal ribosome entry site (IRES) elements in the 5′ UTRs of some viral and cellular mRNAs. These elements (often possessing complex secondary and tertiary structures) promote efficient interaction of the mRNA with the 40S ribosome and allow for internal ribosome entry. Internal initiation of translation of specific mRNAs may contribute to development of severe disease and pathological states, such as hepatitis C and cancer. Therefore, this cellular mechanism represents an attractive target for pharmacological modulation. The purpose of this review is to provide insight into current strategies used to target viral and cellular IRESs and discuss the physiological consequences (and potential therapeutic implications) of abrogation/modulation of IRES-mediated translation. PMID:26539410

  6. Estrogen receptor beta is a novel therapeutic target for photoaging.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ken C N; Wang, Yihe; Oh, Inn Gyung; Jenkins, Susan; Freedman, Leonard P; Thompson, Catherine C; Chung, Jin Ho; Nagpal, Sunil

    2010-05-01

    One of the many harmful factors faced by the skin is solar UV radiation, which damages skin by inducing chronic low-grade inflammation through increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines, metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Estrogen receptors (ERs) alpha and beta are ligand-dependent transcription factors that are expressed in skin, and an ERbeta agonist has previously shown efficacy in vivo in models of pain and inflammation. Because ERbeta does not carry the breast and uterine proliferation liabilities of ERalpha, we decided to explore the possibility of using ERbeta as a target for photoaging. We show that ERbeta-selective compounds suppressed the expression of cytokines and MMPs in activated keratinocytes and fibroblast-based in vitro models of photoaging. Furthermore, in activated dermal fibroblasts, ERbeta-selective compounds also inhibited COX-2. These activities of ERbeta ligands in skin cells correlated with the expression levels of ERbeta and showed reversal by treatment with a potent synthetic ER antagonist. Furthermore, the pharmacology of ERbeta-selective compound was observed in wild-type but not in skin cells obtained from ERbeta knockout mice. Finally, we demonstrate that a synthetic ERbeta agonist inhibited UV-induced photodamage and skin wrinkle formation in a murine model of photoaging. Therefore, the potential of an ERbeta ligand to regulate multiple pathways underlying the cause of photoaging suggests ERbeta to be a novel therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of photoaging. PMID:20110405

  7. Autophagy: A Novel Therapeutic Target for Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kume, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end stage renal disease and its occurance is increasing worldwide. The most effective treatment strategy for the condition is intensive treatment to strictly control glycemia and blood pressure using renin-angiotensin system inhibitors. However, a fraction of patients still go on to reach end stage renal disease even under such intensive care. New therapeutic targets for diabetic nephropathy are, therefore, urgently needed. Autophagy is a major catabolic pathway by which mammalian cells degrade macromolecules and organelles to maintain intracellular homeostasis. The accumulation of damaged proteins and organelles is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Autophagy in the kidney is activated under some stress conditions, such as oxidative stress and hypoxia in proximal tubular cells, and occurs even under normal conditions in podocytes. These and other accumulating findings have led to a hypothesis that autophagy is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Here, we review recent findings underpinning this hypothesis and discuss the advantages of targeting autophagy for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26706914

  8. Molecular Strategies for Targeting Antioxidants to Mitochondria: Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondrial function and specifically its implication in cellular redox/oxidative balance is fundamental in controlling the life and death of cells, and has been implicated in a wide range of human pathologies. In this context, mitochondrial therapeutics, particularly those involving mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, have attracted increasing interest as potentially effective therapies for several human diseases. For the past 10 years, great progress has been made in the development and functional testing of molecules that specifically target mitochondria, and there has been special focus on compounds with antioxidant properties. In this review, we will discuss several such strategies, including molecules conjugated with lipophilic cations (e.g., triphenylphosphonium) or rhodamine, conjugates of plant alkaloids, amino-acid- and peptide-based compounds, and liposomes. This area has several major challenges that need to be confronted. Apart from antioxidants and other redox active molecules, current research aims at developing compounds that are capable of modulating other mitochondria-controlled processes, such as apoptosis and autophagy. Multiple chemically different molecular strategies have been developed as delivery tools that offer broad opportunities for mitochondrial manipulation. Additional studies, and particularly in vivo approaches under physiologically relevant conditions, are necessary to confirm the clinical usefulness of these molecules. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 686–729. PMID:25546574

  9. AMPK activation: a therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Coughlan, Kimberly A; Valentine, Rudy J; Ruderman, Neil B; Saha, Asish K

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a metabolic disease characterized by insulin resistance, β-cell dysfunction, and elevated hepatic glucose output. Over 350 million people worldwide have T2D, and the International Diabetes Federation projects that this number will increase to nearly 600 million by 2035. There is a great need for more effective treatments for maintaining glucose homeostasis and improving insulin sensitivity. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinase whose activation elicits insulin-sensitizing effects, making it an ideal therapeutic target for T2D. AMPK is an energy-sensing enzyme that is activated when cellular energy levels are low, and it signals to stimulate glucose uptake in skeletal muscles, fatty acid oxidation in adipose (and other) tissues, and reduces hepatic glucose production. There is substantial evidence suggesting that AMPK is dysregulated in animals and humans with metabolic syndrome or T2D, and that AMPK activation (physiological or pharmacological) can improve insulin sensitivity and metabolic health. Numerous pharmacological agents, natural compounds, and hormones are known to activate AMPK, either directly or indirectly – some of which (for example, metformin and thiazolidinediones) are currently used to treat T2D. This paper will review the regulation of the AMPK pathway and its role in T2D, some of the known AMPK activators and their mechanisms of action, and the potential for future improvements in targeting AMPK for the treatment of T2D. PMID:25018645

  10. CRADA Final Report: ErbB2 Targeted Cancer Therapeutics

    SciTech Connect

    Lupu, Ruth

    2002-08-27

    The aim of the study was to design novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of carcinomas which overexpress the erbB-2 oncogene product and/or the activator (HRG). erbB-2 is a tyrosine kinase growth factor receptor, that overexpression of which in invasive breast, prostate, ovarian and lung carcinomas correlates with poor prognosis and poor overall survival. In breast carcinomas, erbB-2 is overexpressed in 25%-30% of the invasive phenotype and in 70% of ductal carcinomas in situ. On the other hand, the erbB-2 activator, heregulin (HRG) is expressed in about 30% of invasive breast carcinomas and it is highly expressed in other carcinoIl1as including, ovarian, lung, and prostate. Interestingly, only 6% of invasive breast carcinomas co-express both HRG and erbB-2. It is known today that tumors that overexpress erbB-2 are a leading cause of death, making erbB-2 and its activator HRG critical targets for therapy. Targeting both the receptors and the activator would be beneficial for a significant number of cancer patients. At the final stages of the project we had obtained significant improvements over the peptide quality but not significant improvements were made towards the generation of humanized monoclonal antibodies.

  11. Hereditary cancer syndromes: utilizing DNA repair deficiency as therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Gaurav; Fan, Tiffany; Silberstein, Peter Todd

    2016-07-01

    Human cells have numerous repair mechanisms to counteract various insults incurred on the DNA. Any mutation in these repair mechanisms can lead to accumulation of DNA errors and carcinogenesis. This review aims to discuss the therapeutic options in the two most common DNA repair deficient cancer syndromes, namely Lynch syndrome (hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer) and breast cancer susceptibility gene (BRCA) associated ovarian and breast cancer. Deficiency in DNA repair mechanisms renders these tumors with increased sensitivity to platinum agents. There has been increasing amount of information on the utility of the defects in DNA repair as targets for cancer therapy in these syndromes. Novel therapies like poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors are one of such example where the induction of double stranded breaks in DNA leads to tumoricidal effect in patients with homologous DNA repair deficiency. Interestingly, patients with DNA repair deficiencies tend to have a more favorable prognosis than sporadic malignancies. In microsatellite high colorectal cancer patients, this has been attributed to increased recruitment of CD8+ T lymphocytes in tumor microenvironment. However, these tumors are able to limit the host immune response by activation of immune checkpoints that seem like attractive targets of therapy in the future. PMID:26873719

  12. Henipavirus mediated membrane fusion, virus entry and targeted therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Deborah L; Xu, Kai; Nikolov, Dimitar B; Broder, Christopher C

    2012-02-01

    The Paramyxoviridae genus Henipavirus is presently represented by the type species Hendra and Nipah viruses which are both recently emerged zoonotic viral pathogens responsible for repeated outbreaks associated with high morbidity and mortality in Australia, Southeast Asia, India and Bangladesh. These enveloped viruses bind and enter host target cells through the coordinated activities of their attachment (G) and class I fusion (F) envelope glycoproteins. The henipavirus G glycoprotein interacts with host cellular B class ephrins, triggering conformational alterations in G that lead to the activation of the F glycoprotein, which facilitates the membrane fusion process. Using the recently published structures of HeV-G and NiV-G and other paramyxovirus glycoproteins, we review the features of the henipavirus envelope glycoproteins that appear essential for mediating the viral fusion process, including receptor binding, G-F interaction, F activation, with an emphasis on G and the mutations that disrupt viral infectivity. Finally, recent candidate therapeutics for henipavirus-mediated disease are summarized in light of their ability to inhibit HeV and NiV entry by targeting their G and F glycoproteins. PMID:22470837

  13. Henipavirus Mediated Membrane Fusion, Virus Entry and Targeted Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Deborah L.; Xu, Kai; Nikolov, Dimitar B.; Broder, Christopher C.

    2012-01-01

    The Paramyxoviridae genus Henipavirus is presently represented by the type species Hendra and Nipah viruses which are both recently emerged zoonotic viral pathogens responsible for repeated outbreaks associated with high morbidity and mortality in Australia, Southeast Asia, India and Bangladesh. These enveloped viruses bind and enter host target cells through the coordinated activities of their attachment (G) and class I fusion (F) envelope glycoproteins. The henipavirus G glycoprotein interacts with host cellular B class ephrins, triggering conformational alterations in G that lead to the activation of the F glycoprotein, which facilitates the membrane fusion process. Using the recently published structures of HeV-G and NiV-G and other paramyxovirus glycoproteins, we review the features of the henipavirus envelope glycoproteins that appear essential for mediating the viral fusion process, including receptor binding, G-F interaction, F activation, with an emphasis on G and the mutations that disrupt viral infectivity. Finally, recent candidate therapeutics for henipavirus-mediated disease are summarized in light of their ability to inhibit HeV and NiV entry by targeting their G and F glycoproteins. PMID:22470837

  14. Positive allosteric modulators as an approach to nicotinic acetylcholine receptor- targeted therapeutics: advantages and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Dustin K.; Wang, Jingyi; Papke, Roger L.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR), recognized targets for drug development in cognitive and neuro-degenerative disorders, are allosteric proteins with dynamic interconversions between multiple functional states. Activation of the nAChR ion channel is primarily controlled by the binding of ligands (agonists, partial agonists, competitive antagonists) at conventional agonist binding sites, but is also regulated in either negative or positive ways by the binding of ligands to other modulatory sites. In this review, we discuss models for the activation and desensitization of nAChR, and the discovery of multiple types of ligands that influence those processes in both heteromeric nAChR, such as the high affinity nicotine receptors of the brain, and homomeric α7-type receptors. In recent years, α7 nAChRs have been identified as a potential target for therapeutic indications leading to the development of α7-selective agonists and partial agonists. However, unique properties of α7 nAChR, including low probability of channel opening and rapid desensitization, may limit the therapeutic usefulness of ligands binding exclusively to conventional agonist binding sites. New enthusiasm for the therapeutic targeting of α7 has come from the identification of α7-selective positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) that work effectively on the intrinsic factors that limit α7 ion channel activation. While these new drugs appear promising for therapeutic development, we also consider potential caveats and possible limitations for their use, including PAM-insensitive forms of desensitization and cytotoxicity issues. PMID:21575610

  15. Nuclear receptor coregulators: modulators of pathology and therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Lonard, David M.; O’Malley, Bert W.

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear receptor superfamily includes transcription factors that transduce steroid, thyroid and retinoid hormones and other ligands in conjunction with coregulators. To date, over 350 coregulators have been reported in the literature, and advances in proteomic analyses of coregulator protein complexes have revealed that a far greater number of coregulator-interacting proteins also exist. Coregulator dysfunction has been implicated in diverse pathological states, genetic syndromes and cancer. A hallmark of disease related to the disruption of normal coregulator function is the pleiotropic effect on animal physiology, which is frequently manifested as the dysregulation of metabolic and neurological systems. Coregulators have broad physiological and pathological functions that make them promising new drug targets for diseases such as hormone-dependent cancers. Advances in proteomics, genomics and transcriptomics have provided novel insights into the biology of coregulators at a system-wide level and will lead the way to a new understanding of how coregulators can be evaluated in the context of complex and multifaceted genetic factors, hormones, diet, the environment and stress. Ultimately, better knowledge of the associations that exist between coregulator function and human diseases is expected to expand the indications for the use of future coregulator-targeted drugs. PMID:22733267

  16. The molecular basis of targeting protein kinases in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Jung; Nussinov, Ruth

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we provide an overview of targeted anticancer therapies with small molecule kinase inhibitors. First, we discuss why a single constitutively active kinase emanating from a variety of aberrant genetic alterations is capable of transforming a normal cell, leading it to acquire the hallmarks of a cancer cell. To draw attention to the fact that kinase inhibition in targeted cancer therapeutics differs from conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, we exploit a conceptual framework explaining why suppressed kinase activity will selectively kill only the so-called oncogene 'addicted' cancer cell, while sparing the healthy cell. Second, we introduce the protein kinase superfamily in light of its common active conformation with precisely positioned structural elements, and the diversified auto-inhibitory conformations among the kinase families. Understanding the detailed activation mechanism of individual kinases is essential to relate the observed oncogenic alterations to the elevated constitutively active state, to identify the mechanism of consequent drug resistance, and to guide the development of the next-generation inhibitors. To clarify the vital importance of structural guidelines in studies of oncogenesis, we explain how somatic mutations in EGFR result in kinase constitutive activation. Third, in addition to the common theme of secondary (acquired) mutations that prevent drug binding from blocking a signaling pathway which is hijacked by the aberrant activated kinase, we discuss scenarios of drug resistance and relapse by compensating lesions that bypass the inactivated pathway in a vertical or horizontal fashion. Collectively, these suggest that the future challenge of cancer therapy with small molecule kinase inhibitors will rely on the discovery of distinct combinations of optimized drugs to target individual subtypes of different cancers. PMID:23651790

  17. Importins and exportins as therapeutic targets in cancer.

    PubMed

    Mahipal, Amit; Malafa, Mokenge

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear transport proteins, importins and exportins (karyopherin-β proteins), may play an important role in cancer by transporting key mediators of oncogenesis across the nuclear membrane in cancer cells. During nucleocytoplasmic transport of tumor suppressor proteins and cell cycle regulators during the processing of these proteins, aberrant cellular growth signaling and inactivation of apoptosis can occur, both critical to growth and development of tumors. Karyopherin-β proteins bind to these cargo proteins and RanGTP for active transport across the nuclear membrane through the nuclear pore complex. Importins and exportins are overexpressed in multiple tumors including melanoma, pancreatic, breast, colon, gastric, prostate, esophageal, lung cancer, and lymphomas. Furthermore, some of the karyopherin-β proteins such as exportin-1 have been implicated in drug resistance in cancer. Importin and exportin inhibitors are being considered as therapeutic targets against cancer and have shown preclinical anticancer activity. Moreover, synergistic activity has been observed with various chemotherapeutic and targeted agents. However, clinical development of the exportin-1 inhibitor leptomycin B was stopped due to adverse events, including vomiting, anorexia, and dehydration. Selinexor, a selective nuclear export inhibitor, is being tested in multiple clinical trials both as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy. Selinexor has demonstrated clinical activity in multiple cancers, especially acute myelogenous leukemia and multiple myeloma. The roles of other importin and exportin inhibitors still need to be investigated clinically. Targeting the key mediators of nucleocytoplasmic transport in cancer cells represents a novel strategy in cancer intervention with the potential to significantly affect outcomes. PMID:27113410

  18. Activin signaling as an emerging target for therapeutic interventions

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchida, Kunihiro; Nakatani, Masashi; Hitachi, Keisuke; Uezumi, Akiyoshi; Sunada, Yoshihide; Ageta, Hiroshi; Inokuchi, Kaoru

    2009-01-01

    After the initial discovery of activins as important regulators of reproduction, novel and diverse roles have been unraveled for them. Activins are expressed in various tissues and have a broad range of activities including the regulation of gonadal function, hormonal homeostasis, growth and differentiation of musculoskeletal tissues, regulation of growth and metastasis of cancer cells, proliferation and differentiation of embryonic stem cells, and even higher brain functions. Activins signal through a combination of type I and II transmembrane serine/threonine kinase receptors. Activin receptors are shared by multiple transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) ligands such as myostatin, growth and differentiation factor-11 and nodal. Thus, although the activity of each ligand is distinct, they are also redundant, both physiologically and pathologically in vivo. Activin receptors activated by ligands phosphorylate the receptor-regulated Smads for TGF-β, Smad2 and 3. The Smad proteins then undergo multimerization with the co-mediator Smad4, and translocate into the nucleus to regulate the transcription of target genes in cooperation with nuclear cofactors. Signaling through receptors and Smads is controlled by multiple mechanisms including phosphorylation and other posttranslational modifications such as sumoylation, which affect potein localization, stability and transcriptional activity. Non-Smad signaling also plays an important role in activin signaling. Extracellularly, follistatin and related proteins bind to activins and related TGF-β ligands, and control the signaling and availability of ligands. The functions of activins through activin receptors are pleiotrophic, cell type-specific and contextual, and they are involved in the etiology and pathogenesis of a variety of diseases. Accordingly, activin signaling may be a target for therapeutic interventions. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on activin signaling and discuss the potential roles of

  19. Ketamine: Promising Path or False Prophecy in the Development of Novel Therapeutics for Mood Disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Sanacora, Gerard; Schatzberg, Alan F

    2015-01-01

    Large ‘real world' studies demonstrating the limited effectiveness and slow onset of clinical response associated with our existing antidepressant medications has highlighted the need for the development of new therapeutic strategies for major depression and other mood disorders. Yet, despite intense research efforts, the field has had little success in developing antidepressant treatments with fundamentally novel mechanisms of action over the past six decades, leaving the field wary and skeptical about any new developments. However, a series of relatively small proof-of-concept studies conducted over the last 15 years has gradually gained great interest by providing strong evidence that a unique, rapid onset of sustained, but still temporally limited, antidepressant effects can be achieved with a single administration of ketamine. We are now left with several questions regarding the true clinical meaningfulness of the findings and the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant action. In this Circumspectives piece, Dr Sanacora and Dr Schatzberg share their opinions on these issues and discuss paths to move the field forward. PMID:25257213

  20. Endothelin receptor antagonists in sickle cell disease: A promising new therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Fox, Brandon M; Kasztan, Malgorzata

    2016-08-15

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetic hematologic disorder that is characterized by a variety of potentially life threatening acute and chronic complications. Currently, hydroxyurea is the only clinically approved pharmacological therapy for the treatment of SCD, and the continued prevalence of severe disease complications underscores the desperate need for the development of new therapeutic agents. Central features of the sickle cell disease milieu, including hypoxia, oxidative stress, and thrombosis, are established enhancers of endothelin-1 (ET-1) synthesis. This conceptual connection between ET-1 and SCD was confirmed by multiple studies that demonstrated markedly elevated plasma and urinary levels of ET-1 in SCD patients. Direct evidence for the involvement of ET-1 signaling in the development of SCD pathologies has come from studies using endothelin receptor antagonists in SCD mice. This review summarizes recent studies that have implicated ET-1 signaling as a mechanistic contributor to renal, vascular, pulmonary, and nociceptive complications of sickle cell disease and discusses the potential for the use of ET receptor antagonists in the treatment of SCD. PMID:27049871

  1. PIM1 kinase as a promise of targeted therapy in prostate cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    XIE, YINGQIU; BAYAKHMETOV, SAMAT

    2016-01-01

    Since the last decade, the PIM family serine/threonine kinases have become a focus in cancer research. Numerous clinical data supports that overexpression of PIM1 is associated with tumor formation in various tissues. However, little is known regarding the function of PIM1 in cancer stem cells. In cancer cells, PIM1 has essential roles in the regulation of the cell cycle, cell proliferation, cell survival and multiple drug resistance. In stem cells, PIM1 kinase exhibits a significant function in stem cell proliferation, self-renewal and expansion. Thus, PIM1 shows a great promise in cancer therapy by targeting stem cells. Furthermore, it is imperative to investigate Pim-1 targeting in cancer stem cells by applicable inhibitors for improving future outcomes. The present review investigated the potential of PIM1 as a therapy target in prostate cancer stem cells. PMID:26835011

  2. Combination of acamprosate and baclofen as a promising therapeutic approach for Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Hajj, Rodolphe; Milet, Aude; Toulorge, Damien; Cholet, Nathalie; Laffaire, Julien; Foucquier, Julie; Robelet, Sandra; Mitry, Richard; Guedj, Mickael; Nabirotchkin, Serguei; Chumakov, Ilya; Cohen, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterised by the loss of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons but which involves the loss of additional neurotransmitter pathways. Mono- or polytherapeutic interventions in PD patients have declining efficacy long-term and no influence on disease progression. The systematic analysis of available genetic and functional data as well as the substantial overlap between Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and PD features led us to repurpose and explore the effectiveness of a combination therapy (ABC) with two drugs – acamprosate and baclofen – that was already effective in AD animal models, for the treatment of PD. We showed in vitro that ABC strongly and synergistically protected neuronal cells from oxidative stress in the oxygen and glucose deprivation model, as well as dopaminergic neurons from cell death in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model. Furthermore, we showed that ABC normalised altered motor symptoms in vivo in 6-OHDA-treated rats, acting by protecting dopaminergic cell bodies and their striatal terminals. Interestingly, ABC also restored a normal behaviour pattern in lesioned rats suggesting a symptomatic effect, and did not negatively interact with L-dopa. Our results demonstrate the potential value of combining repurposed drugs as a promising new strategy to treat this debilitating disease. PMID:26542636

  3. Tetracyclines: a pleitropic family of compounds with promising therapeutic properties. Review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Michael O; Fricovsky, Eduardo; Ceballos, Guillermo; Villarreal, Francisco

    2010-09-01

    There must be something unique about a class of drugs (discovered and developed in the mid-1940s) where there are more than 130 ongoing clinical trials currently listed. Tetracyclines were developed as a result of the screening of soil samples for antibiotic organisms. The first of these compounds chlortetracycline was introduced in 1948. Soon after their development tetracyclines were found to be highly effective against various pathogens including rickettsiae, Gram-positive, and Gram-negative bacteria, thus, becoming a class of broad-spectrum antibiotics. The mechanism of action of tetracyclines is thought to be related to the inhibition of protein synthesis by binding to the 30S bacterial ribosome. Tetracyclines are also an effective anti-malarial drug. Over time, many other "protective" actions have been described for tetracyclines. Minocycline, which can readily cross cell membranes, is known to be a potent anti-apoptotic agent. Its mechanism of action appears to relate to specific effects exerted on apoptosis signaling pathways. Another tetracycline, doxycycline is known to exert antiprotease activities. Doxycycline can inhibit matrix metalloproteinases, which contribute to tissue destruction activities in diseases such as gingivitis. A large body of literature has provided additional evidence for the "beneficial" actions of tetracyclines, including their ability to act as oxygen radical scavengers and anti-inflammatory agents. This increasing volume of published work and ongoing clinical trials supports the notion that a more systematic examination of their possible therapeutic uses is warranted. This review provides a summary of tetracycline's multiple mechanisms of action and while using the effects on the heart as an example, this review also notes their potential to benefit patients suffering from various pathologies such as cancer, Rosacea, and Parkinson's disease. PMID:20592239

  4. Tetracyclines: a pleitropic family of compounds with promising therapeutic properties. Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Michael O.; Fricovsky, Eduardo; Ceballos, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    There must be something unique about a class of drugs (discovered and developed in the mid-1940s) where there are more than 130 ongoing clinical trials currently listed. Tetracyclines were developed as a result of the screening of soil samples for antibiotic organisms. The first of these compounds chlortetracycline was introduced in 1948. Soon after their development tetracyclines were found to be highly effective against various pathogens including rickettsiae, Gram-positive, and Gram-negative bacteria, thus, becoming a class of broad-spectrum antibiotics. The mechanism of action of tetracyclines is thought to be related to the inhibition of protein synthesis by binding to the 30S bacterial ribosome. Tetracyclines are also an effective anti-malarial drug. Over time, many other “protective” actions have been described for tetracyclines. Minocycline, which can readily cross cell membranes, is known to be a potent anti-apoptotic agent. Its mechanism of action appears to relate to specific effects exerted on apoptosis signaling pathways. Another tetracycline, doxycycline is known to exert antiprotease activities. Doxycycline can inhibit matrix metalloproteinases, which contribute to tissue destruction activities in diseases such as gingivitis. A large body of literature has provided additional evidence for the “beneficial” actions of tetracyclines, including their ability to act as oxygen radical scavengers and anti-inflammatory agents. This increasing volume of published work and ongoing clinical trials supports the notion that a more systematic examination of their possible therapeutic uses is warranted. This review provides a summary of tetracycline's multiple mechanisms of action and while using the effects on the heart as an example, this review also notes their potential to benefit patients suffering from various pathologies such as cancer, Rosacea, and Parkinson's disease. PMID:20592239

  5. Skeletal Muscle Homeostasis in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Modulating Autophagy as a Promising Therapeutic Strategy

    PubMed Central

    De Palma, Clara; Perrotta, Cristiana; Pellegrino, Paolo; Clementi, Emilio; Cervia, Davide

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are a group of genetic and heterogeneous neuromuscular disorders characterized by the primary wasting of skeletal muscle. In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most severe form of these diseases, the mutations in the dystrophin gene lead to muscle weakness and wasting, exhaustion of muscular regenerative capacity, and chronic local inflammation leading to substitution of myofibers by connective and adipose tissue. DMD patients suffer from continuous and progressive skeletal muscle damage followed by complete paralysis and death, usually by respiratory and/or cardiac failure. No cure is yet available, but several therapeutic approaches aiming at reversing the ongoing degeneration have been investigated in preclinical and clinical settings. Autophagy is an important proteolytic system of the cell and has a crucial role in the removal of proteins, aggregates, and organelles. Autophagy is constantly active in skeletal muscle and its role in tissue homeostasis is complex: at high levels, it can be detrimental and contribute to muscle wasting; at low levels, it can cause weakness and muscle degeneration, due to the unchecked accumulation of damaged proteins and organelles. The causal relationship between DMD pathogenesis and dysfunctional autophagy has been recently investigated. At molecular level, the Akt axis is one of the key dysregulated pathways, although the molecular events are not completely understood. The aim of this review is to describe and discuss the clinical relevance of the recent advances dissecting autophagy and its signaling pathway in DMD. The picture might pave the way for the development of interventions that are able to boost muscle growth and/or prevent muscle wasting. PMID:25104934

  6. Accumulation, internalization and therapeutic efficacy of neuropilin-1-targeted liposomes.

    PubMed

    Paoli, Eric E; Ingham, Elizabeth S; Zhang, Hua; Mahakian, Lisa M; Fite, Brett Z; Gagnon, M Karen; Tam, Sarah; Kheirolomoom, Azadeh; Cardiff, Robert D; Ferrara, Katherine W

    2014-03-28

    Advancements in liposomal drug delivery have produced long circulating and very stable drug formulations. These formulations minimize systemic exposure; however, unfortunately, therapeutic efficacy has remained limited due to the slow diffusion of liposomal particles within the tumor and limited release or uptake of the encapsulated drug. Here, the carboxyl-terminated CRPPR peptide, with affinity for the receptor neuropilin-1 (NRP), which is expressed on both endothelial and cancer cells, was conjugated to liposomes to enhance the tumor accumulation. Using a pH sensitive probe, liposomes were optimized for specific NRP binding and subsequent cellular internalization using in vitro cellular assays. Liposomes conjugated with the carboxyl-terminated CRPPR peptide (termed C-LPP liposomes) bound to the NRP-positive primary prostatic carcinoma cell line (PPC-1) but did not bind to the NRP-negative PC-3 cell line, and binding was observed with liposomal peptide concentrations as low as 0.16mol%. Binding of the C-LPP liposomes was receptor-limited, with saturation observed at high liposome concentrations. The identical peptide sequence bearing an amide terminus did not bind specifically, accumulating only with a high (2.5mol%) peptide concentration and adhering equally to NRP positive and negative cell lines. The binding of C-LPP liposomes conjugated with 0.63mol% of the peptide was 83-fold greater than liposomes conjugated with the amide version of the peptide. Cellular internalization was also enhanced with C-LPP liposomes, with 80% internalized following 3h incubation. Additionally, fluorescence in the blood pool (~40% of the injected dose) was similar for liposomes conjugated with 0.63mol% of carboxyl-terminated peptide and non-targeted liposomes at 24h after injection, indicating stable circulation. Prior to doxorubicin treatment, in vivo tumor accumulation and vascular targeting were increased for peptide-conjugated liposomes compared to non-targeted liposomes based

  7. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the Receptor Tyrosine Kinases: Promising Tools for Targeted Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Hojjat-Farsangi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic and cytotoxic drugs are widely used in the treatment of cancer. In spite of the improvements in the life quality of patients, their effectiveness is compromised by several disadvantages. This represents a demand for developing new effective strategies with focusing on tumor cells and minimum side effects. Targeted cancer therapies and personalized medicine have been defined as a new type of emerging treatments. Small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) are among the most effective drugs for targeted cancer therapy. The growing number of approved SMIs of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) i.e., tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in the clinical oncology imply the increasing attention and application of these therapeutic tools. Most of the current approved RTK–TKIs in preclinical and clinical settings are multi-targeted inhibitors with several side effects. Only a few specific/selective RTK–TKIs have been developed for the treatment of cancer patients. Specific/selective RTK–TKIs have shown less deleterious effects compared to multi-targeted inhibitors. This review intends to highlight the importance of specific/selective TKIs for future development with less side effects and more manageable agents. This article provides an overview of: (1) the characteristics and function of RTKs and TKIs; (2) the recent advances in the improvement of specific/selective RTK–TKIs in preclinical or clinical settings; and (3) emerging RTKs for targeted cancer therapies by TKIs. PMID:25110867

  8. [Tympanic membrane massage, origin and decline of a promising therapeutic concept].

    PubMed

    Feldmann, H

    1996-08-01

    the ossicular chain, such as alternating pressure on the tragus, or tubes to conduct pressure from the mouth or a rubber bag to the ear. With the aim of speeding up the frequency of the pressure impulses, mechanic pumps were constructed, which were first driven by hand, later on by electric power. CRITICAL EVALUATION: At the turn of the century numerous attempts were made to evaluate the effectiveness of the pneumatic massage of the middle ear and to specify the indication for this kind of treatment. Although no convincing and predictable results could be demonstrated and even harmful effects had been observed in animal experiments, the massage of the tympanic membrane continued its triumphant march for half a century. The reason for this seems to be the suggestive and plausible therapeutic approach to a well known pathology of the middle ear. Since the middle of this century it has been regarded as obsolete and is no longer mentioned in text books. The history of this episode is presented in detail. PMID:8962613

  9. TDO as a therapeutic target in brain diseases.

    PubMed

    Yu, Cheng-Peng; Pan, Ze-Zheng; Luo, Da-Ya

    2016-08-01

    Tryptophan-2, 3-dioxygenase (TDO) is a heme-containing protein catalyzing the first reaction in the kynurenine pathway, which incorporates oxygen into the indole moiety of tryptophan and catalyzes it into kynurenine (KYN). The activation of TDO results in the depletion of tryptophan and the accumulation of kynurenine and its metabolites. These metabolites can affect the function of neurons and inhibit the proliferation of T cells. Increasing evidence demonstrates that TDO is a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of brain diseases as well as in the antitumor and transplant fields. Despite its growing popularity, there are few reviews only focusing on TDO. Hence, we herein review TDO by providing a comprehensive overview of TDO, including its biological functions as well as the evolution, structure and catalytic process of TDO. Additionally, this review will focus on the role of TDO in the pathology of three groups of brain diseases: Schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Glioma. Finally, we will also provide an opinion regarding the future developmental directions of TDO in brain diseases, especially whether TDO has a potential role in other brain diseases as well as the development and applications of TDO inhibitors as treatments. PMID:27072164

  10. Cancer-Associated Myeloproliferation: Old Association, New Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Ryan A.

    2010-01-01

    The association between malignancy and development of a paraneoplastic leukocytosis, the so-called leukemoid reaction, has long been appreciated. Although a leukemoid reaction has conventionally been defined as a peripheral blood leukocytosis composed of both mature and immature granulocytes that exceeds 50,000/μL, a less profound leukocytosis may be appreciated in many patients harboring a malignant disease. More recent insights have shed new light on this long-recognized association, because research performed in both murine models and cancer patients has uncovered multiple mechanisms by which tumors both drive myelopoiesis, sometimes leading to a clinically apparent leukocytosis, and inhibit the differentiation of myeloid cells, resulting in a qualitative change in myelopoiesis. This qualitative change leads to the accumulation of immature myeloid cells, which due to their immune suppressive effects have been collectively called myeloid-derived suppressor cells. More recently, myeloid cells have been shown to promote tumor angiogenesis. Cancer-associated myeloproliferation is not merely a paraneoplastic phenomenon of questionable importance but leads to the suppression of host immunity and promotion of tumor angiogenesis, both of which play an integral part in tumorigenesis and metastasis. Therefore, cancer-associated myeloproliferation represents a novel therapeutic target in cancer that, decades after its recognition, is only now being translated into clinical practice. PMID:20592171

  11. Innate inflammatory responses in stroke: mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Youl; Kawabori, Masahito; Yenari, Midori A.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a frequent cause of long-term disability and death worldwide. Ischemic stroke is more commonly encountered compared to hemorrhagic stroke, and leads to tissue death by ischemia due to occlusion of a cerebral artery. Inflammation is known to result as a result of ischemic injury, long thought to be involved in initiating the recovery and repair process. However, work over the past few decades indicates that aspects of this inflammatory response may in fact be detrimental to stroke outcome. Acutely, inflammation appears to have a detrimental effect, and anti-inflammatory treatments have been been studied as a potential therapeutic target. Chronically, reports suggest that post-ischemic inflammation is also essential for the tissue repairing and remodeling. The majority of the work in this area has centered around innate immune mechanisms, which will be the focus of this review. This review describes the different key players in neuroinflammation and their possible detrimental and protective effects in stroke. A better understanding of the roles of the different immune cells and their temporal profile of damage versus repair will help to clarify more effective modulation of inflammation post stroke. Introduction Stroke refers to conditions caused by occlusion and/or rupture of blood vessels in the brain, and is a leading cause of death and disability in the industrialized world. PMID:24372209

  12. BRD4 is a novel therapeutic target for liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ning; Hah, Nasun; Yu, Ruth T.; Sherman, Mara H.; Benner, Chris; Leblanc, Mathias; He, Mingxiao; Liddle, Christopher; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is characterized by the persistent deposition of extracellular matrix components by hepatic stellate cell (HSC)-derived myofibroblasts. It is the histological manifestation of progressive, but reversible wound-healing processes. An unabated fibrotic response results in chronic liver disease and cirrhosis, a pathological precursor of hepatocellular carcinoma. We report here that JQ1, a small molecule inhibitor of bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4), a member of bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) proteins, abrogate cytokine-induced activation of HSCs. Cistromic analyses reveal that BRD4 is highly enriched at enhancers associated with genes involved in multiple profibrotic pathways, where BRD4 is colocalized with profibrotic transcription factors. Furthermore, we show that JQ1 is not only protective, but can reverse the fibrotic response in carbon tetrachloride-induced fibrosis in mouse models. Our results implicate that BRD4 can act as a global genomic regulator to direct the fibrotic response through its coordinated regulation of myofibroblast transcription. This suggests BRD4 as a potential therapeutic target for patients with fibrotic complications. PMID:26644586

  13. MPHOSPH1: a potential therapeutic target for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinran; Zhou, Yafan; Liu, Xinyuan; Peng, Anlin; Gong, Hao; Huang, Lizi; Ji, Kaige; Petersen, Robert B; Zheng, Ling; Huang, Kun

    2014-11-15

    MPHOSPH1 is a critical kinesin protein that functions in cytokinesis. Here, we show that MPHOSPH1 is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, where it is essential for proliferation. Attenuating MPHOSPH1 expression with a tumor-selective shRNA-expressing adenovirus (Ad-shMPP1) was sufficient to arrest HCC cell proliferation in a manner associated with an accumulation of multinucleated polyploid cells, induction of postmitotic apoptosis, and increased sensitivity to taxol cytotoxicity. Mechanistic investigations showed that attenuation of MPHOSPH1 stabilized p53, blocked STAT3 phosphorylation, and prolonged mitotic arrest. In a mouse subcutaneous xenograft model of HCC, tumoral injection of Ad-shMPP1 inhibited MPHOSPH1 expression and tumor growth in a manner correlated with induction of apoptosis. Combining Ad-shMPP1 injection with taxol administration enhanced antitumor efficacy relative to taxol alone. Furthermore, Ad-shMPP1 tail vein injection suppressed formation of orthotopic liver nodules and prevented hepatic dysfunction. Taken together, our results identify MPHOSPH1 as an oncogenic driver and candidate therapeutic target in HCC. PMID:25269478

  14. Succinate metabolism: a new therapeutic target for myocardial reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Pell, Victoria R; Chouchani, Edward T; Frezza, Christian; Murphy, Michael P; Krieg, Thomas

    2016-07-15

    Myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion (IR) injury is a major cause of death worldwide and remains a disease for which current clinical therapies are strikingly deficient. While the production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a critical driver of tissue damage upon reperfusion, the precise mechanisms underlying ROS production have remained elusive. More recently, it has been demonstrated that a specific metabolic mechanism occurs during ischaemia that underlies elevated ROS at reperfusion, suggesting a unifying model as to why so many different compounds have been found to be cardioprotective against IR injury. This review will discuss the role of the citric acid cycle intermediate succinate in IR pathology focusing on the mechanism by which this metabolite accumulates during ischaemia and how it can drive ROS production at Complex I via reverse electron transport. We will then examine the potential for manipulating succinate accumulation and metabolism during IR injury in order to protect the heart against IR damage and discuss targets for novel therapeutics designed to reduce reperfusion injury in patients. PMID:27194563

  15. Purinergic receptors as potential therapeutic targets in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Woods, Lucas T; Ajit, Deepa; Camden, Jean M; Erb, Laurie; Weisman, Gary A

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive loss of memory and cognitive ability and is a serious cause of mortality. Many of the pathological characteristics associated with AD are revealed post-mortem, including amyloid-β plaque deposition, neurofibrillary tangles containing hyperphosphorylated tau proteins and neuronal loss in the hippocampus and cortex. Although several genetic mutations and risk factors have been associated with the disease, the causes remain poorly understood. Study of disease-initiating mechanisms and AD progression in humans is inherently difficult as most available tissue specimens are from late-stages of disease. Therefore, AD researchers rely on in vitro studies and the use of AD animal models where neuroinflammation has been shown to be a major characteristic of AD. Purinergic receptors are a diverse family of proteins consisting of P1 adenosine receptors and P2 nucleotide receptors for ATP, UTP and their metabolites. This family of receptors has been shown to regulate a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological processes, including neuroinflammation, and may contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and AD. Experimental evidence from human AD tissue has suggested that purinergic receptors may play a role in AD progression and studies using selective purinergic receptor agonists and antagonists in vitro and in AD animal models have demonstrated that purinergic receptors represent novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of AD. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Purines in Neurodegeneration and Neuroregeneration'. PMID:26519903

  16. Targeting CBLB as a potential therapeutic approach for disseminated candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yun; Tang, Juan; Guo, Hui; Zhao, Yixia; Tang, Rong; Ouyang, Song; Zeng, Qiuming; Rappleye, Chad A; Rajaram, Murugesan V S; Schlesinger, Larry S; Tao, Lijian; Brown, Gordon D; Langdon, Wallace Y; Li, Belinda T; Zhang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Disseminated candidiasis has become one of the leading causes of hospital-acquired blood stream infections with high mobility and mortality. However, the molecular basis of host defense against disseminated candidiasis remains elusive, and treatment options are limited. Here we report that the E3 ubiquitin ligase CBLB directs polyubiquitination of dectin-1 and dectin-2, two key pattern-recognition receptors for sensing Candida albicans, and their downstream kinase SYK, thus inhibiting dectin-1- and dectin-2-mediated innate immune responses. CBLB deficiency or inactivation protects mice from systemic infection with a lethal dose of C. albicans, and deficiency of dectin-1, dectin-2, or both in Cblb(-/-) mice abrogates this protection. Notably, silencing the Cblb gene in vivo protects mice from lethal systemic C. albicans infection. Our data reveal that CBLB is crucial for homeostatic control of innate immune responses mediated by dectin-1 and dectin-2. Our data also indicate that CBLB represents a potential therapeutic target for protection from disseminated candidiasis. PMID:27428899

  17. MicroRNAs as therapeutic targets in chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Garofalo, Michela; Croce, Carlo M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite substantial progress in understanding the cancer signaling network, effective therapies remain scarce due to insufficient disruption of oncogenic pathways, drug resistance and drug-induced toxicity. New and more creative approaches are therefore required for the treatment of cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression by sequence-selective targeting of mRNAs, leading to a translational repression or mRNA degradation. Experimental evidence demonstrates that dysregulation of specific miRNAs leads to drug resistance in different cancers and correction of these miRNAs using miRNA mimics or antagomiRs can normalize the gene regulatory network and signaling pathways and sensitize cancerous cells to chemotherapy. Therefore, miRNA-based gene therapy provides an attractive anti-tumor approach for integrated cancer therapy. Here, we will discuss the involvement of microRNAs in chemotherapy resistance and focus on recent advancements in the development and delivery of miRNA-based cancer therapeutics. PMID:23757365

  18. SOCS3: A novel therapeutic target for cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Hideo; Nagata, Takanobu; Oba, Toyoharu; Imaizumi, Tsutomu

    2012-10-01

    The suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family of proteins are cytokine-inducible inhibitors of Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of the transcription (STAT) signaling pathways. Among the family, SOCS1 and SOCS3 potently suppress cytokine actions by inhibiting JAK kinase activities. The generation of mice lacking individual SOCS genes has been instrumental in defining the role of individual SOCS proteins in specific cytokine pathways in vivo; SOCS1 is an essential negative regulator of interferon-γ (IFNγ) and SOCS3 is an essential negative regulator of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). JAK-STAT3 activating cytokines have exhibited cardioprotective roles in the heart. The cardiac-specific deletion of SOCS3 enhances the activation of cardioprotective signaling pathways, inhibits myocardial apoptosis and fibrosis and results in the inhibition of left ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). We propose that myocardial SOCS3 is a key determinant of left ventricular remodeling after MI, and SOCS3 may serve as a novel therapeutic target to prevent left ventricular remodeling after MI. In this review, we discuss the signaling pathways mediated by JAK-STAT and SOCS proteins and their roles in the development of myocardial injury under stress (e.g., pressure overload, viral infection and ischemia). PMID:24058778

  19. GEMINs: potential therapeutic targets for spinal muscular atrophy?

    PubMed Central

    Borg, Rebecca; Cauchi, Ruben J.

    2014-01-01

    The motor neuron degenerative disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) remains one of the most frequently inherited causes of infant mortality. Afflicted patients loose the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene but retain one or more copies of SMN2, a homolog that is incorrectly spliced. Primary treatment strategies for SMA aim at boosting SMN protein levels, which are insufficient in patients. SMN is known to partner with a set of diverse proteins collectively known as GEMINs to form a macromolecular complex. The SMN-GEMINs complex is indispensible for chaperoning the assembly of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs), which are key for pre-mRNA splicing. Pharmaceutics that alleviate the neuromuscular phenotype by restoring the fundamental function of SMN without augmenting its levels are also crucial in the development of an effective treatment. Their use as an adjunct therapy is predicted to enhance benefit to patients. Inspired by the surprising discovery revealing a premier role for GEMINs in snRNP biogenesis together with in vivo studies documenting their requirement for the correct function of the motor system, this review speculates on whether GEMINs constitute valid targets for SMA therapeutic development. PMID:25360080

  20. [50 years of hepatology - from therapeutic nihilism to targeted therapies].

    PubMed

    Manns, Michael P

    2013-04-01

    Over the past 50 years significant progress has been made in the whole field of hepatology. Part of this is translation of basic research (biochemistry, immunology, virology, molecular biology and others) into clinical hepatology. This enabled us to understand more about the pathogenesis of liver diseases and led to the discovery of the five major hepatotropic viruses, the identification of hepatocellular autoantigens, and to the development of specific therapies for chronic hepatitis B, C and D. In addition, the molecular basis of most genetic liver diseases has been identified. Significant progress was made in the development of medical therapies for various liver diseases with different underlying etiologies. Surgery significantly contributed to the progress in the management of liver diseases; examples are laparoscopic cholecystectomy and the development of liver transplantation. A multimodal therapeutic algorithm has been established for the therapy of hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC); with Sorafenib "targeted therapy" has entered the area of HCC. The progress made over the last 50 years not only led to an aetiological differentiation of acute and chronic liver diseases but also to specific therapies based on the identification and understanding of the underlying etiology. PMID:23585265

  1. Risk Factors and Therapeutic Targets in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wörmann, Sonja Maria; Algül, Hana

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most challenging tumor entities worldwide, characterized as a highly aggressive disease with dismal overall prognosis and an incidence rate equalling mortality rate. Over the last decade, substantial progress has been made to define the morphological changes and key genetic events in pancreatic carcinogenesis. And yet, it is still unclear what factors trigger PC. Some risk factors appear to be associated with sex, age, race/ethnicity, or other rare genetic conditions. Additionally, modifying factors such as smoking, obesity, diabetes, occupational risk factors, etc., increase the potential for acquiring genetic mutations that may result in PC. Another hallmark of PC is its poor response to radio- and chemo-therapy. Current chemotherapeutic regimens could not provide substantial survival benefit with a clear increase in overall survival. Recently, several new approaches to significantly improve the clinical outcome of PC have been described involving downstream signaling cascades desmoplasia and stromal response as well as tumor microenvironment, immune response, vasculature, and angiogenesis. This review summarizes major risk factors for PC and tries to illuminate relevant targets considerable for new therapeutic approaches. PMID:24303367

  2. ASK1: a new therapeutic target for kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Tesch, Greg H; Ma, Frank Y; Nikolic-Paterson, David J

    2016-08-01

    Stress-induced activation of p38 MAPK and JNK signaling is a feature of both acute and chronic kidney disease and is associated with disease progression. Inhibitors of p38 MAPK or JNK activation provide protection against inflammation and fibrosis in animal models of kidney disease; however, clinical trials of p38 MAPK and JNK inhibitors in other diseases (rheumatoid arthritis and pulmonary fibrosis) have been disappointing. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) acts as an upstream regulator for the activation of p38 MAPK and JNK in kidney disease. Mice lacking the Ask1 gene are healthy with normal homeostatic functions and are protected from acute kidney injury induced by ischemia-reperfusion and from renal interstitial fibrosis induced by ureteric obstruction. Recent studies have shown that a selective ASK1 inhibitor substantially reduced renal p38 MAPK activation and halted the progression of nephropathy in diabetic mice, and this has led to a current clinical trial of an ASK1 inhibitor in patients with stage 3 or 4 diabetic kidney disease. This review explores the rationale for targeting ASK1 in kidney disease and the therapeutic potential of ASK1 inhibitors based on current experimental evidence. PMID:27226108

  3. Epigenetic targeting of histone deacetylase: therapeutic potential in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Harrison, Ian F; Dexter, David T

    2013-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common movement disorder affecting more than 4million people worldwide. The primary motor symptoms of the disease are due to degeneration of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons. Dopamine replacement therapies have therefore revolutionised disease management by partially controlling these symptoms. However these drugs can produce debilitating side effects when used long term and do not protect degenerating neurons against death. Recent evidence has highlighted a pathological imbalance in PD between the acetylation and deacetylation of the histone proteins around which deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is coiled, in favour of excessive histone deacetylation. This mechanism of adding/removing acetyl groups to histone lysine residues is one of many epigenetic regulatory processes which control the expression of genes, many of which will be essential for neuronal survival. Hence, such epigenetic modifications may have a pathogenic role in PD. It has therefore been hypothesised that if this pathological imbalance can be corrected with the use of histone deacetylase inhibiting agents then neurodegeneration observed in PD can be ameliorated. This article will review the current literature with regard to epigenetic changes in PD and the use of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) in PD: examining the evidence of the neuroprotective effects of numerous HDACIs in cellular and animal models of Parkinsonian cell death. Ultimately answering the question: does epigenetic targeting of histone deacetylases hold therapeutic potential in PD? PMID:23711791

  4. Mitochondria: A Therapeutic Target for Parkinson’s Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yu; Hoffer, Alan; Hoffer, Barry; Qi, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders. The exact causes of neuronal damage are unknown, but mounting evidence indicates that mitochondrial-mediated pathways contribute to the underlying mechanisms of dopaminergic neuronal cell death both in PD patients and in PD animal models. Mitochondria are organized in a highly dynamic tubular network that is continuously reshaped by opposing processes of fusion and fission. Defects in either fusion or fission, leading to mitochondrial fragmentation, limit mitochondrial motility, decrease energy production and increase oxidative stress, thereby promoting cell dysfunction and death. Thus, the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics processes, such as fusion, fission and mitophagy, represents important mechanisms controlling neuronal cell fate. In this review, we summarize some of the recent evidence supporting that impairment of mitochondrial dynamics, mitophagy and mitochondrial import occurs in cellular and animal PD models and disruption of these processes is a contributing mechanism to cell death in dopaminergic neurons. We also summarize mitochondria-targeting therapeutics in models of PD, proposing that modulation of mitochondrial impairment might be beneficial for drug development toward treatment of PD. PMID:26340618

  5. Estrogen related receptor α (ERRα) a promising target for the therapy of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC).

    PubMed

    Casaburi, Ivan; Avena, Paola; De Luca, Arianna; Chimento, Adele; Sirianni, Rosa; Malivindi, Rocco; Rago, Vittoria; Fiorillo, Marco; Domanico, Francesco; Campana, Carmela; Cappello, Anna Rita; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P; Pezzi, Vincenzo

    2015-09-22

    The pathogenesis of the adrenocortical cancer (ACC) involves integration of molecular signals and the interplay of different downstream pathways (i.e. IGFII/IGF1R, β-catenin, Wnt, ESR1). This tumor is characterized by limited therapeutic options and unsuccessful treatments. A useful strategy to develop an effective therapy for ACC is to identify a common downstream target of these multiple pathways. A good candidate could be the transcription factor estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα) because of its ability to regulate energy metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis and signalings related to cancer progression. In this study we tested the effect of ERRα inverse agonist, XCT790, on the proliferation of H295R adrenocortical cancer cell line. Results from in vitro and in vivo experiments showed that XCT790 reduced H295R cell growth. The inhibitory effect was associated with impaired cell cycle progression which was not followed by any apoptotic event. Instead, incomplete autophagy and cell death by a necrotic processes, as a consequence of the cell energy failure, induced by pharmacological reduction of ERRα was evidenced. Our results indicate that therapeutic strategies targeting key factors such as ERRα that control the activity and signaling of bioenergetics processes in high-energy demanding tumors could represent an innovative/alternative therapy for the treatment of ACC. PMID:26312764

  6. Estrogen related receptor α (ERRα) a promising target for the therapy of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC)

    PubMed Central

    Chimento, Adele; Sirianni, Rosa; Malivindi, Rocco; Rago, Vittoria; Fiorillo, Marco; Domanico, Francesco; Campana, Carmela; Cappello, Anna Rita; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.; Pezzi, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of the adrenocortical cancer (ACC) involves integration of molecular signals and the interplay of different downstream pathways (i.e. IGFII/IGF1R, β-catenin, Wnt, ESR1). This tumor is characterized by limited therapeutic options and unsuccessful treatments. A useful strategy to develop an effective therapy for ACC is to identify a common downstream target of these multiple pathways. A good candidate could be the transcription factor estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα) because of its ability to regulate energy metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis and signalings related to cancer progression. In this study we tested the effect of ERRα inverse agonist, XCT790, on the proliferation of H295R adrenocortical cancer cell line. Results from in vitro and in vivo experiments showed that XCT790 reduced H295R cell growth. The inhibitory effect was associated with impaired cell cycle progression which was not followed by any apoptotic event. Instead, incomplete autophagy and cell death by a necrotic processes, as a consequence of the cell energy failure, induced by pharmacological reduction of ERRα was evidenced. Our results indicate that therapeutic strategies targeting key factors such as ERRα that control the activity and signaling of bioenergetics processes in high-energy demanding tumors could represent an innovative/alternative therapy for the treatment of ACC. PMID:26312764

  7. The Meninges: New Therapeutic Targets For Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Russi, Abigail E.; Brown, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    The CNS is largely comprised of non-regenerating cells, including neurons and myelin-producing oligodendrocytes, which are particularly vulnerable to immune cell mediated damage. To protect the CNS, mechanisms exist that normally restrict the transit of peripheral immune cells into the brain and spinal cord, conferring an “immune specialized” status. Thus, there has been a long-standing debate as to how these restrictions are overcome in several inflammatory diseases of the CNS, including multiple sclerosis (MS). In this review, we highlight the role of the meninges, tissues that surround and protect the CNS and enclose the cerebral spinal fluid, in promoting chronic inflammation that leads to neuronal damage. Although the meninges have traditionally been considered structures that provide physical protection for the brain and spinal cord, new data has established these tissues as sites of active immunity. It has been hypothesized that the meninges are important players in normal immunosurveillance of the CNS but also serve as initial sites of anti-myelin immune responses. The resulting robust meningeal inflammation elicits loss of localized blood barrier integrity and facilitates a large-scale influx of immune cells into the CNS parenchyma. We propose that targeting of the cells and molecules mediating these inflammatory responses within the meninges offers promising therapies for MS that are free from the constraints imposed by the blood brain barrier. Importantly, such therapies may avoid the systemic immunosuppression often associated with the existing treatments. PMID:25241937

  8. MDM4 is a key therapeutic target in cutaneous melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Gembarska, Agnieszka; Luciani, Flavie; Fedele, Clare; Russell, Elisabeth A; Dewaele, Michael; Villar, Stéphanie; Zwolinska, Aleksandra; Haupt, Sue; de Lange, Job; Yip, Dana; Goydos, James; Haigh, Jody J; Haupt, Ygal; Larue, Lionel; Jochemsen, Aart; Shi, Hubing; Moriceau, Gatien; Lo, Roger S; Ghanem, Ghanem; Shackleton, Mark; Bernal, Federico; Marine, Jean-Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor pathway, which often occurs through mutations in TP53 (encoding tumor protein 53) is a common step in human cancer. However, in melanoma—a highly chemotherapy-resistant disease—TP53 mutations are rare, raising the possibility that this cancer uses alternative ways to overcome p53-mediated tumor suppression. Here we show that Mdm4 p53 binding protein homolog (MDM4), a negative regulator of p53, is upregulated in a substantial proportion (∼65%) of stage I–IV human melanomas and that melanocyte-specific Mdm4 overexpression enhanced tumorigenesis in a mouse model of melanoma induced by the oncogene Nras. MDM4 promotes the survival of human metastatic melanoma by antagonizing p53 proapoptotic function. Notably, inhibition of the MDM4-p53 interaction restored p53 function in melanoma cells, resulting in increased sensitivity to cytotoxic chemotherapy and to inhibitors of the BRAF (V600E) oncogene. Our results identify MDM4 as a key determinant of impaired p53 function in human melanoma and designate MDM4 as a promising target for antimelanoma combination therapy. PMID:22820643

  9. Identification of the Ki-1 antigen (CD30) as a novel therapeutic target in systemic mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Blatt, Katharina; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Schwaab, Juliana; Sotlar, Karl; Eisenwort, Gregor; Stefanzl, Gabriele; Hoermann, Gregor; Mayerhofer, Matthias; Schneeweiss, Mathias; Knapp, Sylvia; Rülicke, Thomas; Hadzijusufovic, Emir; Bauer, Karin; Smiljkovic, Dubravka; Willmann, Michael; Reiter, Andreas; Horny, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Ki-1 antigen (CD30) is an established therapeutic target in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. We have recently shown that CD30 is expressed abundantly in the cytoplasm of neoplastic mast cells (MCs) in patients with advanced systemic mastocytosis (SM). In the current study, we asked whether CD30 is expressed on the surface of neoplastic MCs in advanced SM, and whether this surface structure may serve as therapeutic target in SM. As assessed by flow cytometry, CD30 was found to be expressed on the surface of neoplastic MCs in 3 of 25 patients (12%) with indolent SM, 4 of 7 patients (57%) with aggressive SM, and 4 of 7 patients (57%) with MC leukemia. The immature RAS-transformed human MC line MCPV-1.1 also expressed cell surface CD30, whereas the KIT-transformed MC line HMC-1.2 expressed no detectable CD30. The CD30-targeting antibody-conjugate brentuximab-vedotin inhibited proliferation in neoplastic MCs, with lower IC50 values obtained in CD30+ MCPV-1.1 cells (10 µg/mL) compared with CD30− HMC-1.2 cells (>50 µg/mL). In addition, brentuximab-vedotin suppressed the engraftment of MCPV-1.1 cells in NSG mice. Moreover, brentuximab-vedotin produced apoptosis in all CD30+ MC lines tested as well as in primary neoplastic MCs in patients with CD30+ SM, but did not induce apoptosis in neoplastic MCs in patients with CD30− SM. Furthermore, brentuximab-vedotin was found to downregulate anti-IgE–induced histamine release in CD30+ MCs. Finally, brentuximab-vedotin and the KIT D816V-targeting drug PKC412 produced synergistic growth-inhibitory effects in MCPV-1.1 cells. Together, CD30 is a promising new drug target for patients with CD30+ advanced SM. PMID:26486787

  10. Cell to cell spreading of misfolded proteins as a therapeutic target in motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Livia; Lenzi, Paola; Biagioni, Francesca; Siciliano, Gabriele; Fornai, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Despite a number of genetic mutations and molecular mechanisms are recognized to participate in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), such a devastating neurological disorder still lacks a substantial cure. The present manuscript rather than a general overview of potential therapeutic approaches focuses on novel research findings detailing novel molecular mechanisms which appear to be promising for developing future ALS therapeutics. A special emphasis is given to the abnormal autophagy status and to those autophagy substrates which aggregate in the form of misfolded proteins. In fact, as reviewed in the first part of the manuscript, altered autophagy pathway is present in most genetic mutations responsible for familial ALS. These mutations impair clearance of autophagy substrates, which determines accumulation of giant altered mitochondria and misfolded proteins. Therefore, a considerable piece of the review is dedicated to unconventional processing of misfolded proteins leading to unconventional protein secretions which may underlie a prionoid cellto- cell spreading of ALS neuropathology. The intimate mechanisms regulating these steps are analyzed in order to comprehend which potential therapeutic targets might be considered in future studies. At the same time, negative findings concerning recent trials are explained in light of novel disease mechanisms. In the final part of the review the replacement therapy with focal stem cells implantation is discussed in relationship with toxic mechanisms operating in the intercellular space of the spinal cord and motor-related areas. PMID:24934358

  11. Therapeutic target database update 2016: enriched resource for bench to clinical drug target and targeted pathway information.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong; Qin, Chu; Li, Ying Hong; Tao, Lin; Zhou, Jin; Yu, Chun Yan; Xu, Feng; Chen, Zhe; Zhu, Feng; Chen, Yu Zong

    2016-01-01

    Extensive drug discovery efforts have yielded many approved and candidate drugs targeting various targets in different biological pathways. Several freely accessible databases provide the drug, target and drug-targeted pathway information for facilitating drug discovery efforts, but there is an insufficient coverage of the clinical trial drugs and the drug-targeted pathways. Here, we describe an update of the Therapeutic Target Database (TTD) previously featured in NAR. The updated contents include: (i) significantly increased coverage of the clinical trial targets and drugs (1.6 and 2.3 times of the previous release, respectively), (ii) cross-links of most TTD target and drug entries to the corresponding pathway entries of KEGG, MetaCyc/BioCyc, NetPath, PANTHER pathway, Pathway Interaction Database (PID), PathWhiz, Reactome and WikiPathways, (iii) the convenient access of the multiple targets and drugs cross-linked to each of these pathway entries and (iv) the recently emerged approved and investigative drugs. This update makes TTD a more useful resource to complement other databases for facilitating the drug discovery efforts. TTD is accessible at http://bidd.nus.edu.sg/group/ttd/ttd.asp. PMID:26578601

  12. Soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products: from disease marker to potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Geroldi, Diego; Falcone, Colomba; Emanuele, Enzo

    2006-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a cell-bound receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily which may be activated by a variety of proinflammatory ligands including advanced glycoxidation end products, S100/calgranulins, high mobility group box 1, and amyloid beta-peptide. RAGE has a secretory splice isoform, soluble RAGE (sRAGE), that lacks the transmembrane domain and therefore circulates in plasma. By competing with cell-surface RAGE for ligand binding, sRAGE may contribute to the removal/neutralization of circulating ligands thus functioning as a decoy. Clinical studies have recently shown that higher plasma levels of sRAGE are associated with a reduced risk of coronary artery disease, hypertension, the metabolic syndrome, arthritis and Alzheimer's disease. Increasing the production of plasma sRAGE is therefore considered to be a promising therapeutic target that has the potential to prevent vascular damage and neurodegeneration. This review presents the state of the art in the use of sRAGE as a disease marker and discusses the therapeutic potential of targeting sRAGE for the treatment of inflammation-related diseases such as atherosclerosis, arthritis and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:16842191

  13. Dietary pterostilbene is a novel MTA1-targeted chemopreventive and therapeutic agent in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liangfen; Rimando, Agnes M.; Lage, Janice M.; Lewin, Jack R.; Atfi, Azeddine; Zhang, Xu; Levenson, Anait S.

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of the epigenetic modifier metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1) is associated with aggressive human prostate cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine MTA1- targeted chemopreventive and therapeutic efficacy of pterostilbene, a natural potent analog of resveratrol, in pre-clinical models of prostate cancer. Here, we show that high levels of MTA1 expression in Pten-loss prostate cooperate with key oncogenes, including c-Myc and Akt among others, to promote prostate cancer progression. Loss-of-function studies using human prostate cancer cells indicated direct involvement of MTA1 in inducing inflammation and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of MTA1 by pterostilbene resulted in decreased proliferation and angiogenesis and increased apoptosis. This restrained prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) formation in prostate-specific Pten heterozygous mice and reduced tumor development and progression in prostate-specific Pten-null mice. Our findings highlight MTA1 as a key upstream regulator of prostate tumorigenesis and cancer progression. More significantly, it offers pre-clinical proof for pterostilbene as a promising lead natural agent for MTA1-targeted chemopreventive and therapeutic strategy to curb prostate cancer. PMID:26943043

  14. MicroRNAs in Osteoclastogenesis and Function: Potential Therapeutic Targets for Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiao; Chen, Xiang; Yu, Xijie

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal osteoclast formation and resorption play a fundamental role in osteoporosis pathogenesis. Over the past two decades, much progress has been made to target osteoclasts. The existing therapeutic drugs include bisphosphonates, hormone replacement therapy, selective estrogen receptor modulators, calcitonin and receptor activator of nuclear factor NF-κB ligand (RANKL) inhibitor (denosumab), etc. Among them, bisphosphonates are most widely used due to their low price and high efficiency in reducing the risk of fracture. However, bisphosphonates still have their limitations, such as the gastrointestinal side-effects, osteonecrosis of the jaw, and atypical subtrochanteric fracture. Based on the current situation, research for new drugs to regulate bone resorption remains relevant. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a new group of small, noncoding RNAs of 19–25 nucleotides, which negatively regulate gene expression after transcription. Recent studies discovered miRNAs play a considerable function in bone remodeling by regulating osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation and function. An increasing number of miRNAs have been identified to participate in osteoclast formation, differentiation, apoptosis, and resorption. miRNAs show great promise to serve as biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets for osteoporosis. In this review, we will summarize our current understanding of how miRNAs regulate osteoclastogenesis and function. We will further discuss the approach to develop drugs for osteoporosis based on these miRNA networks. PMID:27005616

  15. Nuclear Export as a Novel Therapeutic Target: The CRM1 Connection.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chuanwen; Figueroa, Jose A; Liu, Zhongwei; Konala, Venu; Aulakh, Amardeep; Verma, Rashmi; Cobos, Everardo; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Gao, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    The integrity of eukaryotic cellular function depends on molecular and biochemical compartmentalization. The transport of macromolecules between compartments requires specific and energydriven mechanisms. It occurs through a class of transport proteins known as karyopherins, which are divided in three different groups (exportins, importins, and transportins). The ubiquitous exportin Chromosome Region Maintenance 1 (CRM1) is involved in the transport of many proteins and RNA molecules from nucleus to cytoplasm. We have reviewed the available evidence supporting the relevance of CRM1 in the biology of several human neoplasms, its potential role in drug resistance, and its promise as a therapeutic target. Here we discuss different cancer related proteins (tumor suppressor genes, oncogenes, and enzymatic therapeutic targets), their function, and their association with CRM1, as well as agents that specifically inhibit CRM1, their mechanism of action, and their clinical relevance in certain human neoplasms. The directionality of nuclear transport and the specific molecular cargo in question are of paramount importance when examining the effects that CRM1 inhibition may have on cellular pathophysiology. The available data point out the potential role of CRM1-dependent nuclear export of regulatory proteins in the biology of certain human malignancies. Further studies should expand and clarify the importance of this mechanism in the pathobiology of human neoplasia. PMID:26324128

  16. The Actin Cytoskeleton as a Therapeutic Target for the Prevention of Relapse to Methamphetamine Use.

    PubMed

    Young, Erica J; Briggs, Sherri B; Miller, Courtney A

    2015-01-01

    A high rate of relapse is a defining characteristic of substance use disorder for which few treatments are available. Exposure to environmental cues associated with previous drug use can elicit relapse by causing the involuntary retrieval of deeply engrained associative memories that trigger a strong motivation to seek out drugs. Our lab is focused on identifying and disrupting mechanisms that support these powerful consolidated memories, with the goal of developing therapeutics. A particularly promising mechanism is regulation of synaptic dynamics by actin polymerization within dendritic spines. Emerging evidence indicates that memory is supported by structural and functional plasticity dendritic spines, for which actin polymerization is critical, and that prior drug use increases both spine and actin dynamics. Indeed we have found that inhibiting amygdala (AMY) actin polymerization immediately or twenty-four hours prior to testing disrupted methamphetamine (METH)-associated memories, but not food reward or fear memories. Furthermore, METH training increased AMY spine density which was reversed by actin depolymerization treatment. Actin dynamics were also shifted to a more dynamic state by METH training. While promising, actin polymerization inhibitors are not a viable therapeutic, as a multitude of peripheral process (e.g. cardiac function) rely on dynamic actin. For this reason, we have shifted our focus upstream of actin polymerization to nonmuscle myosin II. We and others have demonstrated that myosin IIb imparts a mechanical force that triggers spine actin polymerization in response to synaptic stimulation. Similar to an actin depolymerizing compound, pre-test inhibition of myosin II ATPase activity in the AMY produced a rapid and lasting disruption of drug-seeking behavior. While many questions remain, these findings indicate that myosin II represents a potential therapeutic avenue to target the actin cytoskeleton and disrupt the powerful, extinction

  17. Strategies and Advancement in Antibody-Drug Conjugate Optimization for Targeted Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunhee G.; Kim, Kristine M.

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates utilize the antibody as a delivery vehicle for highly potent cytotoxic molecules with specificity for tumor-associated antigens for cancer therapy. Critical parameters that govern successful antibody-drug conjugate development for clinical use include the selection of the tumor target antigen, the antibody against the target, the cytotoxic molecule, the linker bridging the cytotoxic molecule and the antibody, and the conjugation chemistry used for the attachment of the cytotoxic molecule to the antibody. Advancements in these core antibody-drug conjugate technology are reflected by recent approval of Adectris® (anti-CD30-drug conjugate) and Kadcyla® (anti-HER2 drug conjugate). The potential approval of an anti-CD22 conjugate and promising new clinical data for anti-CD19 and anti-CD33 conjugates are additional advancements. Enrichment of antibody-drug conjugates with newly developed potent cytotoxic molecules and linkers are also in the pipeline for various tumor targets. However, the complexity of antibody-drug conjugate components, conjugation methods, and off-target toxicities still pose challenges for the strategic design of antibody-drug conjugates to achieve their fullest therapeutic potential. This review will discuss the emergence of clinical antibody-drug conjugates, current trends in optimization strategies, and recent study results for antibody-drug conjugates that have incorporated the latest optimization strategies. Future challenges and perspectives toward making antibody-drug conjugates more amendable for broader disease indications are also discussed. PMID:26535074

  18. Kinesin family members KIF11 and KIF23 as potential therapeutic targets in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Kato, Tatsuya; Lee, Daiyoon; Wu, Licun; Patel, Priya; Young, Ahn Jin; Wada, Hironobu; Hu, Hsin-Pei; Ujiie, Hideki; Kaji, Mitsuhito; Kano, Satoshi; Matsuge, Shinichi; Domen, Hiromitsu; Kaga, Kichizo; Matsui, Yoshiro; Kanno, Hiromi; Hatanaka, Yutaka; Hatanaka, Kanako C; Matsuno, Yoshihiro; de Perrot, Marc; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare and aggressive form of cancer commonly associated with asbestos exposure that stems from the thoracic mesothelium with high mortality rate. Currently, treatment options for MPM are limited, and new molecular targets for treatments are urgently needed. Using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and an RNA interference-based screening, we screened two kinesin family members as potential therapeutic targets for MPM. Following in vitro investigation of the target silencing effects on MPM cells, a total of 53 MPMs were analyzed immunohistochemically with tissue microarray. KIF11 and KIF23 transcripts were found to be overexpressed in the majority of clinical MPM samples as well as human MPM cell lines as determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Gene knockdown in MPM cell lines identified growth inhibition following knockdown of KIF11 and KIF23. High expression of KIF11 (KIF11-H) and KIF23 (KIF23-H) were found in 43.4 and 50.9% of all the MPM cases, respectively. Patients who received curative resection with tumors displaying KIF23-H showed shorter overall survival (P=0.0194). These results provide that inhibition of KIF11 and KIF23 may hold promise for treatment of MPMs, raising the possibility that kinesin-based drug targets may be developed in the future. PMID:27279560

  19. Adrenomedullin: A potential therapeutic target for retinochoroidal disease.

    PubMed

    Iesato, Yasuhiro; Yuda, Kentaro; Chong, Kelvin Teo Yi; Tan, Xue; Murata, Toshinori; Shindo, Takayuki; Yanagi, Yasuo

    2016-05-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a 52-amino acid peptide with anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and anti-oxidative properties discovered in a human pheochromocytoma. It is a member of the calcitonin peptide superfamily, and its signal is mediated by calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR). CLR interacts with receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs), among which RAMP-2 and RAMP-3 carry CLR from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cellular membrane to confer high affinity for AM. In addition to being implicated in a variety of systemic diseases, AM is a critical contributor to the pathogenesis of retinochoroidal disease. It is robustly upregulated in retinochoroidal disease models of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) and laser-induced choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) as well as in human patients with retinochoroidal diseases. In this review, we discuss the most salient recent findings that strongly illustrate the role of AM in retinochoroidal disease. In the OIR model, AM was identified as a key angiogenic mediator of retinal vascularisation, and AM inhibition suppressed only pathological angiogenesis, not physiological angiogenesis. On the contrary, lesion size was larger in AM(+/-) CNV model mice, presumably due to the anti-inflammatory function of AM. Despite the success of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents for the treatment of retinochoroidal disease, therapeutic shortcomings remain. Finding ways to modulate AM activity will provide new treatment avenues. Potential treatment strategies modulating the action of AM and its signaling pathway have been studied extensively. AM and its signaling molecules are intriguing future treatment targets for retinochoroidal disease. PMID:26791747

  20. Pharmacology of nociceptin and its receptor: a novel therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Calo', Girolamo; Guerrini, Remo; Rizzi, Anna; Salvadori, Severo; Regoli, Domenico

    2000-01-01

    Nociceptin (NC), alias Orphanin FQ, has been recently identified as the endogenous ligand of the opioid receptor-like 1 receptor (OP4). This new NC/OP4 receptor system belongs to the opioid family and has been characterized pharmacologically with functional and binding assays on native (mouse, rat, guinea-pig) and recombinant (human) receptors, by using specific and selective agonists (NC, NC(1–13)NH2) and a pure and competitive antagonist, [Nphe1]NC(1–13)NH2. The similar order of potency of agonists and affinity values of the antagonist indicate that the same receptor is present in the four species. OP4 is expressed in neurons, where it reduces activation of adenylyl cyclase and Ca2+ channels while activating K+ channels in a manner similar to opioids. In this way, OP4 mediates inhibitory effects in the autonomic nervous system, but its activities in the central nervous system can be either similar or opposite to those of opioids. In vivo experiments have demonstrated that NC modulates a variety of biological functions ranging from nociception to food intake, from memory processes to cardiovascular and renal functions, from spontaneous locomotor activity to gastrointestinal motility, from anxiety to the control of neurotransmitter release at peripheral and central sites. These actions have been demonstrated using NC and various pharmacological tools, as antisense oligonucleotides targeting OP4 or the peptide precursor genes, antibodies against NC, an OP4 receptor selective antagonist and with data obtained from animals in which the receptor or the peptide precursor genes were knocked out. These new advances have contributed to better understanding of the pathophysiological role of the NC/OP4 system, and ultimately will help to identify the therapeutic potential of new OP4 receptor ligands. PMID:10742280

  1. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Mechanisms, Redox Considerations, and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Biasi, Fiorella; Leonarduzzi, Gabriella; Oteiza, Patricia I.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Oxidative stress is thought to play a key role in the development of intestinal damage in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), because of its primary involvement in intestinal cells' aberrant immune and inflammatory responses to dietary antigens and to the commensal bacteria. During the active disease phase, activated leukocytes generate not only a wide spectrum of pro-inflammatory cytokines, but also excess oxidative reactions, which markedly alter the redox equilibrium within the gut mucosa, and maintain inflammation by inducing redox-sensitive signaling pathways and transcription factors. Moreover, several inflammatory molecules generate further oxidation products, leading to a self-sustaining and auto-amplifying vicious circle, which eventually impairs the gut barrier. The current treatment of IBD consists of long-term conventional anti-inflammatory therapy and often leads to drug refractoriness or intolerance, limiting patients' quality of life. Immune modulators or anti-tumor necrosis factor α antibodies have recently been used, but all carry the risk of significant side effects and a poor treatment response. Recent developments in molecular medicine point to the possibility of treating the oxidative stress associated with IBD, by designing a proper supplementation of specific lipids to induce local production of anti-inflammatory derivatives, as well as by developing biological therapies that target selective molecules (i.e., nuclear factor-κB, NADPH oxidase, prohibitins, or inflammasomes) involved in redox signaling. The clinical significance of oxidative stress in IBD is now becoming clear, and may soon lead to important new therapeutic options to lessen intestinal damage in this disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1711–1747. PMID:23305298

  2. "Siglec"ting the allergic response for therapeutic targeting.

    PubMed

    Bochner, Bruce S

    2016-06-01

    As a physician-scientist, I have pursued research related to translational immunology with the goal of improving our ability to diagnose and treat allergic, immunologic and other diseases involving eosinophils, basophils and mast cells. We have tried to delineate novel mechanisms of human disease, working whenever possible with primary human cells and tissues, attempting to identify targets that might be amenable to the development of new therapies. As a general strategy, we have compared eosinophils, basophils, mast cells and neutrophils to look for pathways in inflammation that were unique to distinct subsets of these cells. In doing so, the concepts of glycobiology did not enter my mind until we began noticing some intriguing functional differences involving selectins and their ligands among these cell types. One simple observation, that neutrophils were coated with a glycan that allowed them to interact with an endothelial adhesion molecule while eosinophils lacked this structure, pried open the glyco-door for me. Fruitful collaborations with card-carrying glycobiologists soon followed that have forever positively influenced our science, and have enhanced our hypotheses, experimental design, research opportunities and discoveries. Within a few years, we helped to discover Siglec-8, an I-type lectin expressed only on human eosinophils, basophils, mast cells. This receptor, together with its closest mouse counterpart Siglec-F, has been the primary focus of our work now for over a decade. If not for those in the fields of glycobiology and glycoimmunology, my lab would not have made much progress toward the goal of leveraging Siglec-8 for therapeutic purposes. PMID:26911285

  3. GABAergic Signaling as Therapeutic Target for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cellot, Giada; Cherubini, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain, early in postnatal life exerts a depolarizing and excitatory action. This depends on accumulation of chloride inside the cell via the cation–chloride importer NKCC1, being the expression of the chloride exporter KCC2 very low at birth. The developmentally regulated expression of KCC2 results in extrusion of chloride with age and a shift of GABA from the depolarizing to the hyperpolarizing direction. The depolarizing action of GABA leads to intracellular calcium rise through voltage-dependent calcium channels and/or N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors. GABA-mediated calcium signals regulate a variety of developmental processes from cell proliferation migration, differentiation, synapse maturation, and neuronal wiring. Therefore, it is not surprising that some forms of neuro-developmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are associated with alterations of GABAergic signaling and impairment of the excitatory/inhibitory balance in selective neuronal circuits. In this review, we will discuss how changes of GABAA-mediated neurotransmission affect several forms of ASDs including the Fragile X, the Angelman, and Rett syndromes. Then, we will describe various animal models of ASDs with GABAergic dysfunctions, highlighting their behavioral deficits and the possibility to rescue them by targeting selective components of the GABAergic synapse. In particular, we will discuss how in some cases, reverting the polarity of GABA responses from the depolarizing to the hyperpolarizing direction with the diuretic bumetanide, a selective blocker of NKCC1, may have beneficial effects on ASDs, thus opening new therapeutic perspectives for the treatment of these devastating disorders. PMID:25072038

  4. Therapeutical Strategies for Spinal Cord Injury and a Promising Autologous Astrocyte-Based Therapy Using Efficient Reprogramming Techniques.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hao; Liu, Cui-Cui; Wang, Chun-Yu; Zhang, Qian; An, Jiang; Zhang, Lingling; Hao, Ding-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a traumatic event resulting in disturbances to normal sensory, motor, or autonomic functions, which ultimately impacts a patient's physical, psychological, and social well-being. Until now, no available therapy for SCI can effectively slow down or halt the disease progression. Compared to traditional treatments, e.g., medication, surgery, and functional electrical stimulation, stem cell replacement therapy shows high potential for repair and functional plasticity. Thus, stem cell therapy may provide a promising strategy in curative treatment of SCI, specifically when considering the requirement of neuron replenishment in the spinal cord after distinct acute injuries. However, the therapeutic application of neural stem cells (NSCs) still faces enormous challenges, such as ethical issues, possible inflammatory reactions, graft rejection, and tumor formation. Therefore, it is of vital interest to identify more suitable sources of cells with stem cell potential, which might potentially be harnessed for local neural repair. Due to abovementioned possible drawbacks, these cells should be autologous. Reprogramming of astrocytes to generate the desired neuronal cell types would open the door to autologous cell transplantation and treatment of SCI without possible severe side effects. In this paper, we review the relevant therapeutic strategies for SCI, and conversion of astrocyte into NSCs, suggesting this procedure as a possible treatment option. PMID:25863960

  5. RNAi screen identifies Brd4 as a therapeutic target in acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Zuber, Johannes; Shi, Junwei; Wang, Eric; Rappaport, Amy R.; Herrmann, Harald; Sison, Edward A.; Magoon, Daniel; Qi, Jun; Blatt, Katharina; Wunderlich, Mark; Taylor, Meredith J.; Johns, Christopher; Chicas, Agustin; Mulloy, James C.; Kogan, Scott C.; Brown, Patrick; Valent, Peter; Bradner, James E.; Lowe, Scott W.; Vakoc, Christopher R.

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic pathways can regulate gene expression by controlling and interpreting chromatin modifications. Cancer cells are characterized by altered epigenetic landscapes, and commonly exploit the chromatin regulatory machinery to enforce oncogenic gene expression programs1. Although chromatin alterations are, in principle, reversible and often amenable to drug intervention, the promise of targeting such pathways therapeutically has been limited by an incomplete understanding of cancer-specific dependencies on epigenetic regulators. Here we describe a non-biased approach to probe epigenetic vulnerabilities in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), an aggressive haematopoietic malignancy that is often associated with aberrant chromatin states2. By screening a custom library of small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting known chromatin regulators in a genetically defined AML mouse model, we identify the protein bromodomain-containing 4 (Brd4) as being critically required for disease maintenance. Suppression of Brd4 using shRNAs or the small-molecule inhibitor JQ1 led to robust antileukaemic effects in vitro and in vivo, accompanied by terminal myeloid differentiation and elimination of leukaemia stem cells. Similar sensitivities were observed in a variety of human AML cell lines and primary patient samples, revealing that JQ1 has broad activity in diverse AML subtypes. The effects of Brd4 suppression are, at least in part, due to its role in sustaining Myc expression to promote aberrant self-renewal, which implicates JQ1 as a pharmacological means to suppress MYC in cancer. Our results establish small-molecule inhibition of Brd4 as a promising therapeutic strategy in AML and, potentially, other cancers, and highlight the utility of RNA interference (RNAi) screening for revealing epigenetic vulnerabilities that can be exploited for direct pharmacological intervention. PMID:21814200

  6. Natural Products as Promising Antitumoral Agents in Breast Cancer: Mechanisms of Action and Molecular Targets.

    PubMed

    Bonofiglio, Daniela; Giordano, Cinzia; De Amicis, Francesca; Lanzino, Marilena; Andò, Sebastiano

    2016-01-01

    Extensive research over the past several decades has identified numerous dietary and phytochemical compounds that have chemopreventive potential and could represent an important source of anti-cancer lead molecules. In this scenario several nutritional factors have attracted considerable attention as modifiable risk factor in the prevention of breast cancer, the most frequently diagnosed cancer and a major cause of death among women worldwide. There is an immediate need for more effective and less toxic therapeutic and preventive strategies for breast cancers able also to counteract the recurrent phenomenon of resistance to hormonal and targeted therapy that represent the first-line treatment in the management of breast cancer patients. The present review focuses on chemopreventive and anti-cancer activities of different bioactive compounds obtained from dietary sources such as Omega-3 fatty acids, naturally present in fish, Resveratrol (3,5,40-trihydroxy-transstilbene), a phytoalexin found in grapes and Epigallocatechin Gallate, a polyphenolic compound found in green tea, or purified from medicinal plant (Oldenlandia Diffusa) and fruits (Ziziphus Jujube) highlighting their potential use in breast cancer treatment. Herein, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which the bioactive compounds can inhibit carcinogenesis by regulating antioxidant enzyme activities, and inducing antiproliferative and apoptotic effects in different breast cancer cell lines. Understanding the mechanism of action of dietary compounds or traditionally used herbs having potential preventive and therapeutic effects on cancer may provide a rationale for further translational studies. This review emphasizes the importance, in the next future, of a proper scientific validation of these natural bioactive compounds for clinical use in the therapeutic portfolio for breast cancer. PMID:26156544

  7. Pegylated polyelectrolyte nanoparticles containing paclitaxel as a promising candidate for drug carriers for passive targeting.

    PubMed

    Szczepanowicz, Krzysztof; Bzowska, Monika; Kruk, Tomasz; Karabasz, Alicja; Bereta, Joanna; Warszynski, Piotr

    2016-07-01

    Targeted drug delivery systems are of special importance in cancer therapies, since serious side effects resulting from unspecific accumulation of highly toxic chemotherapeutics in healthy tissues can restrict effectiveness of the therapy. In this work we present the method of preparing biocompatible, polyelectrolyte nanoparticles containing the anticancer drug that may serve as a vehicle for passive tumor targeting. The nanoparticles were prepared via direct encapsulation of emulsion droplets in a polyelectrolyte multilayer shell. The oil cores that contained paclitaxel were stabilized by docusate sodium salt/poly-l-lysine surface complex (AOT/PLL) and were encapsulated in shells formed by the LbL adsorption of biocompatible polyelectrolytes, poly-L-glutamic acid (PGA) and PLL up to 5 or 6 layers. The surface of the nanoparticles was pegylated through the adsorption of the pegylated polyelectrolyte (PGA-g-PEG) as the outer layer to prolong the persistence of the nanocarriers in the circulation. The synthesized nanoparticles were stable in cell culture medium containing serum and their average size was 100nm, which makes them promising candidates for passive targeted drug delivery. This notion was further confirmed by the results of studying the biological effects of nanoformulations on two tumor cell lines: mouse colon carcinoma cell line CT26-CEA and the mouse mammary carcinoma cell line 4T1. The empty polyelectrolyte nanoparticles did not affect the viability of the tested cells, whereas encapsulated paclitaxel retained its strong cytotoxic/cytostatic activity. PMID:27037784

  8. Cancer Prevention with Promising Natural Products: Mechanisms of Action and Molecular Targets

    PubMed Central

    Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Sreekala, Chakkenchath; Zhang, Zhuo; Budhraja, Amit; Ding, Songze; Son, Young-Ok; Wang, Xin; Hitron, Andrew; Hyun-Jung, Kim; Wang, Lei; Lee, Jeong-Chae; Shi, Xianglin

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death worldwide. There is greater need for more effective and less toxic therapeutic and preventive strategies. Natural products are becoming an important research area for novel and bioactive molecules for drug discovery. Phytochemicals and dietary compounds have been used for the treatment of cancer throughout history due to their safety, low toxicity, and general availability. Many active phytochemicals are in human clinical trials. Studies have indicated that daily consumption of dietary phytochemicals have cancer protective effects against carcinogens. They can inhibit, delay, or reverse carcinogenesis by inducing detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes systems, regulating inflammatory and proliferative signaling pathways, and inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Epidemiological studies have also revealed that high dietary intakes of fruits and vegetables reduce the risk of cancer. This review discusses potential natural cancer preventive compounds, their molecular targets, and their mechanisms of actions. PMID:22583402

  9. Targeted Therapeutic Nanotubes Influence the Viscoelasticity of Cancer Cells to Overcome Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is the primary cause of treatment failure in over 90% of cancer patients in the clinic. Research in nanotechnology-based therapeutic alternatives has helped provide innovative and promising strategies to overcome multidrug resistance (MDR). By targeting CD44-overexpressing MDR cancer cells, we have developed in a single-step a self-assembled, self-targetable, therapeutic semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (sSWCNT) drug delivery system that can deliver chemotherapeutic agents to both drug-sensitive OVCAR8 and resistant OVCAR8/ADR cancer cells. The novel nanoformula with a cholanic acid-derivatized hyaluronic acid (CAHA) biopolymer wrapped around a sSWCNT and loaded with doxorubicin (DOX), CAHA-sSWCNT-DOX, is much more effective in killing drug-resistant cancer cells compared to the free DOX and phospholipid PEG (PL-PEG)-modified sSWCNT formula, PEG-sSWCNT-DOX. The CAHA-sSWCNT-DOX affects the viscoelastic property more than free DOX and PL-PEG-sSWCNT-DOX, which in turn allows more drug molecules to be internalized. Intravenous injection of CAHA-sSWCNT-DOX (12 mg/kg DOX equivalent) followed by 808 nm laser irradiation (1 W/cm2, 90 s) led to complete tumor eradication in a subcutaneous OVCAR8/ADR drug-resistant xenograft model, while free DOX alone failed to delay tumor growth. Our newly developed CAHA-sSWCNT-DOX nanoformula, which delivers therapeutics and acts as a sensitizer to influence drug uptake and induce apoptosis with minimal resistance factor, provides a novel effective means of counteracting the phenomenon of multidrug resistance. PMID:24708375

  10. Targeted therapeutic nanotubes influence the viscoelasticity of cancer cells to overcome drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Bhirde, Ashwinkumar A; Chikkaveeraiah, Bhaskara V; Srivatsan, Avinash; Niu, Gang; Jin, Albert J; Kapoor, Ankur; Wang, Zhe; Patel, Sachin; Patel, Vyomesh; Gorbach, Alexander M; Leapman, Richard D; Gutkind, J Silvio; Hight Walker, Angela R; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-05-27

    Resistance to chemotherapy is the primary cause of treatment failure in over 90% of cancer patients in the clinic. Research in nanotechnology-based therapeutic alternatives has helped provide innovative and promising strategies to overcome multidrug resistance (MDR). By targeting CD44-overexpressing MDR cancer cells, we have developed in a single-step a self-assembled, self-targetable, therapeutic semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (sSWCNT) drug delivery system that can deliver chemotherapeutic agents to both drug-sensitive OVCAR8 and resistant OVCAR8/ADR cancer cells. The novel nanoformula with a cholanic acid-derivatized hyaluronic acid (CAHA) biopolymer wrapped around a sSWCNT and loaded with doxorubicin (DOX), CAHA-sSWCNT-DOX, is much more effective in killing drug-resistant cancer cells compared to the free DOX and phospholipid PEG (PL-PEG)-modified sSWCNT formula, PEG-sSWCNT-DOX. The CAHA-sSWCNT-DOX affects the viscoelastic property more than free DOX and PL-PEG-sSWCNT-DOX, which in turn allows more drug molecules to be internalized. Intravenous injection of CAHA-sSWCNT-DOX (12 mg/kg DOX equivalent) followed by 808 nm laser irradiation (1 W/cm(2), 90 s) led to complete tumor eradication in a subcutaneous OVCAR8/ADR drug-resistant xenograft model, while free DOX alone failed to delay tumor growth. Our newly developed CAHA-sSWCNT-DOX nanoformula, which delivers therapeutics and acts as a sensitizer to influence drug uptake and induce apoptosis with minimal resistance factor, provides a novel effective means of counteracting the phenomenon of multidrug resistance. PMID:24708375

  11. Micro-RNAs as clinical biomarkers and therapeutic targets in breast cancer: Quo vadis?

    PubMed

    Christodoulatos, Gerasimos Socrates; Dalamaga, Maria

    2014-05-10

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most frequent type of non skin cancer among women and a major leading cause of cancer-related deaths in Western countries. It is substantial to discover novel biomarkers with diagnostic, prognostic or predictive usefulness as well as therapeutic value for BC. Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) belong to a novel class of endogenous interfering RNAs that play a crucial role in post transcriptional gene silencing through mRNA targeting and, thus, are involved in many biological processes encompassing apoptosis, cell-cycle control, cell proliferation, DNA repair, immunity, metabolism, stress, aging, etc. MiRNAs exert their action mainly in a tumor suppressive or oncogenic manner. The specific aberrant expression patterns of miRNAs in BC that are detected with the use of high-throughput technologies reflect their key role in cancer initiation, progression, migration, invasion and metastasis. The detection of circulating extracellular miRNAs in plasma of BC patients may provide novel, non-invasive biomarkers in favor of BC diagnosis and prognosis and, at the same time, accumulating evidence has underscored the possible contribution of miRNAs as valuable biomarkers to predict response to chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Data from in vitro and in vivo studies on BC have revealed promising therapeutic approaches via miRNA delivery and miRNA inhibition. The purpose of this review is to explore the ontological role of miRNAs in BC etiopathogenesis as well as to highlight their potential, not only as non-invasive circulating biomarkers with diagnostic and prognostic significance, but also as treatment response predictors and therapeutic targets aiding BC management. PMID:24829853

  12. Nonmuscle myosin IIB as a therapeutic target for the prevention of relapse to methamphetamine use.

    PubMed

    Young, E J; Blouin, A M; Briggs, S B; Sillivan, S E; Lin, L; Cameron, M D; Rumbaugh, G; Miller, C A

    2016-05-01

    Memories associated with drug use increase vulnerability to relapse in substance use disorder (SUD), and there are no pharmacotherapies for the prevention of relapse. Previously, we reported a promising finding that storage of memories associated with methamphetamine (METH), but not memories for fear or food reward, is vulnerable to disruption by actin depolymerization in the basolateral amygdala complex (BLC). However, actin is not a viable therapeutic target because of its numerous functions throughout the body. Here we report the discovery of a viable therapeutic target, nonmuscle myosin IIB (NMIIB), a molecular motor that supports memory by directly driving synaptic actin polymerization. A single intra-BLC treatment with Blebbistatin (Blebb), a small-molecule inhibitor of class II myosin isoforms, including NMIIB, produced a long-lasting disruption of context-induced drug seeking (at least 30 days). Further, postconsolidation genetic knockdown of Myh10, the heavy chain of the most highly expressed NMII in the BLC, was sufficient to produce METH-associated memory loss. Blebb was found to be highly brain penetrant. A single systemic injection of the compound selectively disrupted the storage of METH-associated memory and reversed the accompanying increase in BLC spine density. This effect was specific to METH-associated memory, as it had no effect on an auditory fear memory. The effect was also independent of retrieval, as METH-associated memory was disrupted 24 h after a single systemic injection of Blebb delivered in the home cage. Together, these results argue for the further development of small-molecule inhibitors of NMII as potential therapeutics for the prevention of SUD relapse triggered by drug associations. PMID:26239291

  13. Neuropeptide Y receptors: a promising target for cancer imaging and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Tian, Yuchen; Wu, Aiguo

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) was first identified from porcine brain in 1982, and plays its biological functions in humans through NPY receptors (Y1, Y2, Y4 and Y5). NPY receptors are known to mediate various physiological functions and involve in a majority of human diseases, such as obesity, hypertension, epilepsy and metabolic disorders. Recently, NPY receptors have been found to be overexpressed in many cancers, so they emerged as promising target in cancer diagnosis and therapy. This review focuses on the latest research about NPY and NPY receptors, and summarizes the current knowledge on NPY receptors expression in cancers, selective ligands for NPY receptors and their application in cancer imaging and therapy. PMID:26816643

  14. Trace amine-associated receptor 1: a promising target for the treatment of psychostimulant addiction

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Li; Li, Jun-Xu

    2015-01-01

    Abuse of and addiction to psychostimulants remains a challenging clinical issue, yet no effective pharmacotherapy is available. Trace amine associated receptor 1 (TAAR 1) is increasingly recognized as a novel drug target that participates in the modulation of drug abuse. This review analyzed existing preclinical evidence from electrophysiological, biochemical to behavioral aspects regarding the functional interactions between TAAR 1 and dopaminergic system. TAAR 1 knockout mice demonstrate increased sensitivity to dopaminergic activation while TAAR 1 agonists reduce the neurochemical effects of cocaine and amphetamines, attenuate abuse- and addiction-related behavioral effects of cocaine and methamphetamine. It is concluded that TAAR 1 activation functionally modulate the dopaminergic activity and TAAR 1 agonists appear to be promising pharmacotherapies against psychostimulant addiction. PMID:26092759

  15. THE TRPV1 RECEPTOR: TARGET OF TOXICANTS AND THERAPEUTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the structural and functional complexities of the TRPV1 is essential to the therapeutic modulation of inflammation and pain. Because of its central role in initiating inflammatory processes and integrating painful stimuli, there is an understandable interest...

  16. Therapeutic Targets in the ARF Tumor Suppressor Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Saporita, Anthony J.; Maggi, Leonard B.; Apicelli, Anthony J.; Weber, Jason D.

    2008-01-01

    suppressors act coordinately to prevent unwarranted cell growth and proliferation. The aim of this review is to characterize the current knowledge in the field about both p53-dependent and independent functions of ARF as well as to summarize the present models for how ARF might control rates of cell proliferation and/or macromolecular synthesis. We will discuss potential therapeutic targets in the ARF pathway, and some preliminary attempts at enhancing or restoring the activity of this important tumor suppressor. PMID:17627519

  17. Reformulating Tylocrebrine in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Targeted Polymeric Nanoparticles Improves Its Therapeutic Index

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Several promising anticancer drug candidates have been sidelined owing to their poor physicochemical properties or unfavorable pharmacokinetics, resulting in high overall cost of drug discovery and development. Use of alternative formulation strategies that alleviate these issues can help advance new molecules to the clinic at a significantly lower cost. Tylocrebrine is a natural product with potent anticancer activity. Its clinical trial was discontinued following the discovery of severe central nervous system toxicities. To improve the safety and potency of tylocrebrine, we formulated the drug in polymeric nanoparticles targeted to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpressed on several types of tumors. Through in vitro studies in different cancer cell lines, we found that EGFR targeted nanoparticles were significantly more effective in killing tumor cells than the free drug. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies revealed that encapsulation in nanoparticles resulted in lower brain penetration and enhanced tumor accumulation of the drug. Further, targeted nanoparticles were characterized by significantly enhanced tumor growth inhibitory activity in a mouse xenograft model of epidermoid cancer. These results suggest that the therapeutic index of drugs that were previously considered unusable could be significantly improved by reformulation. Application of novel formulation strategies to previously abandoned drugs provides an opportunity to advance new molecules to the clinic at a lower cost. This can significantly increase the repertoire of treatment options available to cancer patients. PMID:26065924

  18. Identification of Therapeutic Targets for Quiescent, Chemotherapy-Resistant Human Leukemia Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Yoriko; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Hijikata, Atsushi; Tomizawa-Murasawa, Mariko; Tanaka, Satoshi; Takagi, Shinsuke; Uchida, Naoyuki; Suzuki, Nahoko; Sone, Akiko; Najima, Yuho; Ozawa, Hidetoshi; Wake, Atsushi; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Shultz, Leonard D.; Ohara, Osamu; Ishikawa, Fumihiko

    2010-01-01

    Human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) originates from rare leukemia stem cells (LSCs). Because these chemotherapy-resistant LSCs are thought to underlie disease relapse, effective therapeutic strategies specifically targeting these cells may be beneficial. Here, we report identification of a primary human LSC gene signature and functional characterization of human LSC-specific molecules in vivo in a mouse xenotransplantation model. In 32 of 61 (53%) patients with AML, either CD32 or CD25 or both were highly expressed in LSCs. CD32- or CD25-positive LSCs could initiate AML and were cell cycle–quiescent and chemotherapy-resistant in vivo. Normal human hematopoietic stem cells depleted of CD32- and CD25-positive cells maintained long-term multilineage hematopoietic reconstitution capacity in vivo, indicating the potential safety of treatments targeting these molecules. In addition to CD32 and CD25, quiescent LSCs within the bone marrow niche also expressed the transcription factor WT1 and the kinase HCK. These molecules are also promising targets for LSC-specific therapy. PMID:20371479

  19. Preclinical validation of interleukin 6 as a therapeutic target in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Rosean, Timothy R.; Tompkins, Van S.; Tricot, Guido; Holman, Carol J.; Olivier, Alicia K.; Zhan, Fenghuang; Janz, Siegfried

    2014-01-01

    Studies on the biologic and molecular genetic underpinnings of multiple myeloma (MM) have identified the pleiotropic, pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-6 (IL-6), as a factor crucial to the growth, proliferation and survival of myeloma cells. IL-6 is also a potent stimulator of osteoclastogenesis and a sculptor of the tumor microenvironment in the bone marrow of patients with myeloma. This knowledge has engendered considerable interest in targeting IL-6 for therapeutic purposes, using a variety of antibody- and small-molecule-based therapies. However, despite the early recognition of the importance of IL-6 for myeloma and the steady progress in our knowledge of IL-6 in normal and malignant development of plasma cells, additional efforts will be required to translate the promise of IL-6 as a target for new myeloma therapies into significant clinical benefits for patients with myeloma. This review summarizes published research on the role of IL-6 in myeloma development and describes ongoing efforts by the University of Iowa Myeloma Multidisciplinary Oncology Group to develop new approaches to the design and testing of IL-6-targeted therapies and preventions of MM. PMID:24845460

  20. The epigenetic regulators CBP and p300 facilitate leukemogenesis and represent therapeutic targets in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Giotopoulos, G; Chan, W-I; Horton, S J; Ruau, D; Gallipoli, P; Fowler, A; Crawley, C; Papaemmanuil, E; Campbell, P J; Göttgens, B; Van Deursen, J M; Cole, P A; Huntly, B J P

    2016-01-21

    Growing evidence links abnormal epigenetic control to the development of hematological malignancies. Accordingly, inhibition of epigenetic regulators is emerging as a promising therapeutic strategy. The acetylation status of lysine residues in histone tails is one of a number of epigenetic post-translational modifications that alter DNA-templated processes, such as transcription, to facilitate malignant transformation. Although histone deacetylases are already being clinically targeted, the role of histone lysine acetyltransferases (KAT) in malignancy is less well characterized. We chose to study this question in the context of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), where, using in vitro and in vivo genetic ablation and knockdown experiments in murine models, we demonstrate a role for the epigenetic regulators CBP and p300 in the induction and maintenance of AML. Furthermore, using selective small molecule inhibitors of their lysine acetyltransferase activity, we validate CBP/p300 as therapeutic targets in vitro across a wide range of human AML subtypes. We proceed to show that growth retardation occurs through the induction of transcriptional changes that induce apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in leukemia cells and finally demonstrate the efficacy of the KAT inhibitors in decreasing clonogenic growth of primary AML patient samples. Taken together, these data suggest that CBP/p300 are promising therapeutic targets across multiple subtypes in AML. PMID:25893291

  1. The epigenetic regulators CBP and p300 facilitate leukemogenesis and represent therapeutic targets in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Giotopoulos, G; Chan, W-I; Horton, SJ; Ruau, D; Gallipoli, P; Fowler, A; Crawley, C; Papaemmanuil, E; Campbell, PJ; Göttgens, B; Van Deursen, JM; Cole, PA; Huntly, BJP

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence links abnormal epigenetic control to the development of hematological malignancies. Accordingly, inhibition of epigenetic regulators is emerging as a promising therapeutic strategy. The acetylation status of lysine residues in histone tails is one of a number of epigenetic post-translational modifications that alter DNA-templated processes, such as transcription, to facilitate malignant transformation. Although histone deacetylases are already being clinically targeted, the role of histone lysine acetyltransferases (KAT) in malignancy is less well characterized. We chose to study this question in the context of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), where, using in vitro and in vivo genetic ablation and knockdown experiments in murine models, we demonstrate a role for the epigenetic regulators CBP and p300 in the induction and maintenance of AML. Furthermore, using selective small molecule inhibitors of their lysine acetyltransferase activity, we validate CBP/p300 as therapeutic targets in vitro across a wide range of human AML subtypes. We proceed to show that growth retardation occurs through the induction of transcriptional changes that induce apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in leukemia cells and finally demonstrate the efficacy of the KAT inhibitors in decreasing clonogenic growth of primary AML patient samples. Taken together, these data suggest that CBP/p300 are promising therapeutic targets across multiple subtypes in AML. PMID:25893291

  2. Bone Tumor Environment as a Potential Therapeutic Target in Ewing Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Redini, Françoise; Heymann, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is the second most common pediatric bone tumor, with three cases per million worldwide. In clinical terms, Ewing sarcoma is an aggressive, rapidly fatal malignancy that mainly develops not only in osseous sites (85%) but also in extra-skeletal soft tissue. It spreads naturally to the lungs, bones, and bone marrow with poor prognosis in the two latter cases. Bone lesions from primary or secondary (metastases) tumors are characterized by extensive bone remodeling, more often due to osteolysis. Osteoclast activation and subsequent bone resorption are responsible for the clinical features of bone tumors, including pain, vertebral collapse, and spinal cord compression. Based on the “vicious cycle” concept of tumor cells and bone resorbing cells, drugs, which target osteoclasts, may be promising agents as adjuvant setting for treating bone tumors, including Ewing sarcoma. There is also increasing evidence that cellular and molecular protagonists present in the bone microenvironment play a part in establishing a favorable “niche” for tumor initiation and progression. The purpose of this review is to discuss the potential therapeutic value of drugs targeting the bone tumor microenvironment in Ewing sarcoma. The first part of the review will focus on targeting the bone resorbing function of osteoclasts by means of bisphosphonates or drugs blocking the pro-resorbing cytokine receptor activator of NF-kappa B ligand. Second, the role of this peculiar hypoxic microenvironment will be discussed in the context of resistance to chemotherapy, escape from the immune system, or neo-angiogenesis. Therapeutic interventions based on these specificities could be then proposed in the context of Ewing sarcoma. PMID:26779435

  3. Bone Tumor Environment as a Potential Therapeutic Target in Ewing Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Redini, Françoise; Heymann, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is the second most common pediatric bone tumor, with three cases per million worldwide. In clinical terms, Ewing sarcoma is an aggressive, rapidly fatal malignancy that mainly develops not only in osseous sites (85%) but also in extra-skeletal soft tissue. It spreads naturally to the lungs, bones, and bone marrow with poor prognosis in the two latter cases. Bone lesions from primary or secondary (metastases) tumors are characterized by extensive bone remodeling, more often due to osteolysis. Osteoclast activation and subsequent bone resorption are responsible for the clinical features of bone tumors, including pain, vertebral collapse, and spinal cord compression. Based on the "vicious cycle" concept of tumor cells and bone resorbing cells, drugs, which target osteoclasts, may be promising agents as adjuvant setting for treating bone tumors, including Ewing sarcoma. There is also increasing evidence that cellular and molecular protagonists present in the bone microenvironment play a part in establishing a favorable "niche" for tumor initiation and progression. The purpose of this review is to discuss the potential therapeutic value of drugs targeting the bone tumor microenvironment in Ewing sarcoma. The first part of the review will focus on targeting the bone resorbing function of osteoclasts by means of bisphosphonates or drugs blocking the pro-resorbing cytokine receptor activator of NF-kappa B ligand. Second, the role of this peculiar hypoxic microenvironment will be discussed in the context of resistance to chemotherapy, escape from the immune system, or neo-angiogenesis. Therapeutic interventions based on these specificities could be then proposed in the context of Ewing sarcoma. PMID:26779435

  4. Injectable actarit-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles as passive targeting therapeutic agents for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jiesheng; Wang, Qun; Zhou, Xuefeng; Zhang, Na

    2008-03-20

    This work systematically studied the intravenous injection formulation of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) loaded with actarit, a poor water soluble anti-rheumatic drug. The goal of this study was to design passive targeting nanoparticles which could improve therapeutic efficacy and reduce side-effects such as nephrotoxicity and gastrointestinal disorders commonly associated with oral formulations of actarit. Based on the optimized results of single-factor and orthogonal design, actarit-loaded SLNs were prepared by a modified solvent diffusion-evaporation method. The formulated SLNs were found to be relatively uniform in size (241+/-23 nm) with a negative zeta potential (-17.14+/-1.6 mV). The average drug entrapment efficiency and loading were (50.87+/-0.25)% and (8.48+/-0.14)%, respectively. The actarit-loaded SLNs exhibited a longer mean retention time in vivo (t(1/2(beta)), 9.373 h; MRT, 13.53 h) compared with the actarit 50% propylene glycol solution (t(1/2(ke)), 0.917 h; MRT, 1.323 h) after intravenous injection to New Zealand rabbits. The area under curve of plasma concentration-time (AUC) of actarit-loaded SLNs was 1.88 times greater than that of the actarit in 50% propylene glycol solution. The overall targeting efficiency (TE(C)) of the actarit-loaded SLNs was enhanced from 6.31% to 16.29% in spleen while the renal distribution of actarit was significantly reduced as compared to that of the actarit solution after intravenous administration to mice. These results indicated that injectable actarit-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles were promising passive targeting therapeutic agents for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:18054182

  5. HIV-1 gp120 as a therapeutic target: Navigating a moving labyrinth

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Priyamvada; Lusvarghi, Sabrina; Bewley, Carole A.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The HIV-1 gp120 envelope (Env) glycoprotein mediates attachment of virus to human target cells that display requisite receptors, CD4 and co-receptor, generally CCR5. Despite high affinity interactions with host receptors and proof-of-principle by the drug maraviroc that interference with CCR5 provides therapeutic benefit, no licensed drug currently targets gp120. Areas covered An overview of the role of gp120 in HIV-1 entry and of sites of potential gp120 vulnerability to therapeutic inhibition is presented. Viral defenses that protect these sites and turn gp120 into a moving labyrinth are discussed together with strategies for circumventing these defenses to allow therapeutic targeting of gp120 sites of vulnerability. Expert opinion The gp120 envelope glycoprotein interacts with host proteins through multiple interfaces and has conserved structural features at these interaction sites. In spite of this, targeting gp120 for therapeutic purposes is challenging. Env mechanisms evolved to evade the humoral immune response also shield it from potential therapeutics. Nevertheless, substantial progress has been made in understanding HIV-1 gp120 structure and its interactions with host receptors, and in developing therapeutic leads that potently neutralize diverse HIV-1 strains. Synergies between advances in understanding, needs for therapeutics against novel viral targets, and characteristics of breadth and potency for a number of gp120-targetting lead molecules bodes well for gp120 as a HIV-1 therapeutic target. PMID:25724219

  6. Blockade of XBP1 splicing by inhibition of IRE1α is a promising therapeutic option in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Mimura, Naoya; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Gorgun, Gullu; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Cirstea, Diana; Santo, Loredana; Hu, Yiguo; Fabre, Claire; Minami, Jiro; Ohguchi, Hiroto; Kiziltepe, Tanyel; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Kawano, Yutaka; French, Maureen; Blumenthal, Martina; Tam, Victor; Kertesz, Nathalie L; Malyankar, Uriel M; Hokenson, Mark; Pham, Tuan; Zeng, Qingping; Patterson, John B; Richardson, Paul G; Munshi, Nikhil C; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2012-06-14

    Multiple myeloma (MM) cells are characterized by high protein synthesis resulting in chronic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which is adaptively managed by the unfolded protein response. Inositol-requiring enzyme 1α (IRE1α) is activated to splice X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA, thereby increasing XBP1s protein, which in turn regulates genes responsible for protein folding and degradation during the unfolded protein response. In this study, we examined whether IRE1α-XBP1 pathway is a potential therapeutic target in MM using a small-molecule IRE1α endoribonuclease domain inhibitor MKC-3946. MKC-3946 triggered modest growth inhibition in MM cell lines, without toxicity in normal mononuclear cells. Importantly, it significantly enhanced cytotoxicity induced by bortezomib or 17-AAG, even in the presence of bone marrow stromal cells or exogenous IL-6. Both bortezomib and 17-AAG induced ER stress, evidenced by induction of XBP1s, which was blocked by MKC-3946. Apoptosis induced by these agents was enhanced by MKC-3946, associated with increased CHOP. Finally, MKC-3946 inhibited XBP1 splicing in a model of ER stress in vivo, associated with significant growth inhibition of MM cells. Taken together, our results demonstrate that blockade of XBP1 splicing by inhibition of IRE1α endoribonuclease domain is a potential therapeutic option in MM. PMID:22538852

  7. Targeted Tumor Therapy with "Magnetic Drug Targeting": Therapeutic Efficacy of Ferrofluid Bound Mitoxantrone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexiou, Ch.; Schmid, R.; Jurgons, R.; Bergemann, Ch.; Arnold, W.; Parak, F.G.

    The difference between success or failure of chemotherapy depends not only on the drug itself but also on how it is delivered to its target. Biocompatible ferrofluids (FF) are paramagnetic nanoparticles, that may be used as a delivery system for anticancer agents in locoregional tumor therapy, called "magnetic drug targeting". Bound to medical drugs, such magnetic nanoparticles can be enriched in a desired body compartment (tumor) using an external magnetic field, which is focused on the area of the tumor. Through this form of target directed drug application, one attempts to concentrate a pharmacological agent at its site of action in order to minimize unwanted side effects in the organism and to increase its locoregional effectiveness. Tumor bearing rabbits (VX2 squamous cell carcinoma) in the area of the hind limb, were treated by a single intra-arterial injection (A. femoralis) of mitoxantrone bound ferrofluids (FF-MTX), while focusing an external magnetic field (1.7 Tesla) onto the tumor for 60 minutes. Complete tumor remissions could be achieved in these animals in a dose related manner (20% and 50% of the systemic dose of mitoxantrone), without any negative side effects, like e.g. leucocytopenia, alopecia or gastrointestinal disorders. The strong and specific therapeutic efficacy in tumor treatment with mitoxantrone bound ferrofluids may indicate that this system could be used as a delivery system for anticancer agents, like radionuclids, cancer-specific antibodies, anti-angiogenetic factors, genes etc.

  8. Neuron specific enolase: a promising therapeutic target in acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Haque, Azizul; Ray, Swapan K; Cox, April; Banik, Naren L

    2016-06-01

    Enolase is a multifunctional protein, which is expressed abundantly in the cytosol. Upon stimulatory signals, enolase can traffic to cell surface and contribute to different pathologies including injury, autoimmunity, infection, inflammation, and cancer. Cell-surface expression of enolase is often detected on activated macrophages, microglia/macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes, promoting extracellular matrix degradation, production of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines, and invasion of inflammatory cells in the sites of injury and inflammation. Inflammatory stimulation also induces translocation of enolase from the cytosolic pool to the cell surface where it can act as a plasminogen receptor and promote extracellular matrix degradation and tissue damage. Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating debilitating condition characterized by progressive pathological changes including complex and evolving molecular cascades, and insights into the role of enolase in multiple inflammatory events have not yet been fully elucidated. Neuronal damage following SCI is associated with an elevation of neuron specific enolase (NSE), which is also known to play a role in the pathogenesis of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. Thus, NSE is now considered as a biomarker in ischemic brain damage, and it has recently been suggested to be a biomarker in traumatic brain injury (TBI), stroke and anoxic encephalopathy after cardiac arrest and acute SCI as well. This review article gives an overview of the current basic research and clinical studies on the role of multifunctional enolase in neurotrauma, with a special emphasis on NSE in acute SCI. PMID:26847611

  9. Targeting Polo-Like Kinases: A Promising Therapeutic Approach for Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqi

    2015-06-01

    Polo-like kinases (Plks) are a family of serine-threonine kinases that regulate multiple intracellular processes including DNA replication, mitosis, and stress response. Plk1, the most well understood family member, regulates numerous stages of mitosis and is overexpressed in many cancers. Plk inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation, including phase III trials of volasertib, a Plk inhibitor, in acute myeloid leukemia and rigosertib, a dual inhibitor of Plk1/phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathways, in myelodysplastic syndrome. Other Plk inhibitors, including the Plk1 inhibitors GSK461364A, TKM-080301, GW843682, purpurogallin, and poloxin and the Plk4 inhibitor CFI-400945 fumarate, are in earlier clinical development. This review discusses the biologic roles of Plks in cell cycle progression and cancer, and the mechanisms of action of Plk inhibitors currently in development as cancer therapies. PMID:26055176

  10. Anticancer strategies based on the metabolic profile of tumor cells: therapeutic targeting of the Warburg effect

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi-sha; Li, Lan-ya; Guan, Yi-di; Yang, Jin-ming; Cheng, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells rely mainly on glycolysis for energy production even in the presence of sufficient oxygen, a phenomenon termed the Warburg effect, which is the most outstanding characteristic of energy metabolism in cancer cells. This metabolic adaptation is believed to be critical for tumor cell growth and proliferation, and a number of onco-proteins and tumor suppressors, including the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, Myc, hypoxia-inducible factor and p53, are involved in the regulation of this metabolic adaptation. Moreover, glycolytic cancer cells are often invasive and impervious to therapeutic intervention. Thus, altered energy metabolism is now appreciated as a hallmark of cancer and a promising target for cancer treatment. A better understanding of the biology and the regulatory mechanisms of aerobic glycolysis has the potential to facilitate the development of glycolysis-based therapeutic interventions for cancer. In addition, glycolysis inhibition combined with DNA damaging drugs or chemotherapeutic agents may be effective anticancer strategies through weakening cell damage repair capacity and enhancing drug cytotoxicity. PMID:27374491

  11. Protein Homeostasis as a Therapeutic Target for Diseases of Protein Conformation†

    PubMed Central

    Calamini, Barbara; Morimoto, Richard I.

    2013-01-01

    Protein misfolding and aggregation are widely implicated in an increasing number of human diseases providing for new therapeutic opportunities targeting protein homeostasis (proteostasis). The cellular response to proteotoxicity is highly regulated by stress signaling pathways, molecular chaperones, transport and clearance machineries that function as a proteostasis network (PN) to protect the stability and functional properties of the proteome. Consequently, the PN is essential at the cellular and organismal level for development and lifespan. However, when challenged during aging, stress, and disease, the folding and clearance machineries can become compromised leading to both gain-of-function and loss-of-function proteinopathies. Here, we assess the role of small molecules that activate the heat shock response, the unfolded protein response, and clearance mechanisms to increase PN capacity and protect cellular proteostasis against proteotoxicity. We propose that this strategy to enhance cell stress pathways and chaperone activity establishes a cytoprotective state against misfolding and/or aggregation and represents a promising therapeutic avenue to prevent the cellular damage associated with the variety of protein conformational diseases. PMID:23339312

  12. Therapeutic impact of erythropoietin-encapsulated liposomes targeted to bone marrow on renal anemia.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yuri; Taguchi, Kazuaki; Sou, Keitaro; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ishima, Yu; Miyakawa, Toshikazu; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Fukagawa, Masafumi; Otagiri, Masaki; Maruyama, Toru

    2014-11-01

    Bone marrow is a key element in the diagnosis of disorders of erythropoiesis, including anemia, and a potential target in their treatment. However, because efficient delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents to bone marrow is difficult, such delivery is achieved by administering drugs in large quantities that often have adverse effects. Here, we achieved selective delivery of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) to bone marrow, via its encapsulation in liposomes with l-glutamic acid, N-(3-carboxy-1-oxopropyl)-, 1,5-dihexadecyl ester (SA) (liposome-EPO). The result, in a rabbit model of renal anemia, was a beneficial effect on hematopoiesis, better than with rHuEPO alone. Also, we determined that liposome-EPO delivery to bone marrow depended on specific uptake by bone marrow macrophages because of the presence of SA. These results indicate both that liposome-EPO is a new, promising erythropoietin-stimulating agent and that liposomes with SA have potential for diagnostic and therapeutic applications in diseases originating from bone marrow. PMID:25255196

  13. Anticancer strategies based on the metabolic profile of tumor cells: therapeutic targeting of the Warburg effect.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi-Sha; Li, Lan-Ya; Guan, Yi-di; Yang, Jin-Ming; Cheng, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Tumor cells rely mainly on glycolysis for energy production even in the presence of sufficient oxygen, a phenomenon termed the Warburg effect, which is the most outstanding characteristic of energy metabolism in cancer cells. This metabolic adaptation is believed to be critical for tumor cell growth and proliferation, and a number of onco-proteins and tumor suppressors, including the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, Myc, hypoxia-inducible factor and p53, are involved in the regulation of this metabolic adaptation. Moreover, glycolytic cancer cells are often invasive and impervious to therapeutic intervention. Thus, altered energy metabolism is now appreciated as a hallmark of cancer and a promising target for cancer treatment. A better understanding of the biology and the regulatory mechanisms of aerobic glycolysis has the potential to facilitate the development of glycolysis-based therapeutic interventions for cancer. In addition, glycolysis inhibition combined with DNA damaging drugs or chemotherapeutic agents may be effective anticancer strategies through weakening cell damage repair capacity and enhancing drug cytotoxicity. PMID:27374491

  14. Therapeutic Targets for Management of Periodontitis and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sima, Corneliu; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing incidence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic periodontitis (CP) worldwide imposes a rethinking of individualized therapy for patients with both conditions. Central to bidirectional links between DM and CP is deregulated systemic inflammation and dysfunctional immune responses to altered-self and non-self. Control of blood glucose levels and metabolic imbalances associated with hyperglycemia in DM, and disruption of pathogenic subgingival biofilms in CP are currently the main therapeutic approaches for these conditions. Mounting evidence suggests the need to integrate immune modulatory therapeutics in treatment regimens that address the unresolved inflammation associated with DM and CP. The current review discusses the pathogenesis of DM and CP with emphasis on deregulated inflammation, current therapeutic approaches and the novel pro-resolution lipid mediators derived from n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. PMID:26881443

  15. Autophagy: a potential therapeutic target in lung diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nakahira, Kiichi

    2013-01-01

    Macroautophagy (hereafter referred to as autophagy) is an evolutionally conserved intracellular process to maintain cellular homeostasis by facilitating the turnover of protein aggregates, cellular debris, and damaged organelles. During autophagy, cytosolic constituents are engulfed into double-membrane-bound vesicles called “autophagosomes,” which are subsequently delivered to the lysosome for degradation. Accumulated evidence suggests that autophagy is critically involved not only in the basal physiological states but also in the pathogenesis of various human diseases. Interestingly, a diverse variety of clinically approved drugs modulate autophagy to varying extents, although they are not currently utilized for the therapeutic purpose of manipulating autophagy. In this review, we highlight the functional roles of autophagy in lung diseases with focus on the recent progress of the potential therapeutic use of autophagy-modifying drugs in clinical medicine. The purpose of this review is to discuss the merits, and the pitfalls, of modulating autophagy as a therapeutic strategy in lung diseases. PMID:23709618

  16. Targeted Interventions for Homeless Children at a Therapeutic Nursery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris-Shortle, Carole; Melley, Alison H.; Kiser, Laurel J.; Levey, Eric; Cosgrove, Kim; Leviton, Audrey

    2006-01-01

    PACT: Helping Children with Special Needs, an affiliate of the Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore, Maryland, operates a therapeutic nursery that serves families who have at least one child from birth to 3 years of age, and who are living in a Baltimore City homeless shelter. In partnership with the Martin Luther King Early Head Start Program…

  17. Nanotechnology-based cancer therapeutics--promise and challenge--lessons learned through the NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Dorothy; Ptak, Krzysztof; Panaro, Nicholas J; Grodzinski, Piotr

    2011-02-01

    The new generation of nanotechnology-based drug formulations is challenging the accepted ways of cancer treatment. Multi-functional nanomaterial constructs have the capability to be delivered directly to the tumor site and eradicate cancer cells selectively, while sparing healthy cells. Tailoring of the nano-construct design can result in enhanced drug efficacy at lower doses as compared to free drug treatment, wider therapeutic window, and lower side effects. Nanoparticle carriers can also address several drug delivery problems which could not be effectively solved in the past and include reduction of multi-drug resistance effects, delivery of siRNA, and penetration of the blood-brain-barrier. Although challenges in understanding toxicity, biodistribution, and paving an effective regulatory path must be met, nanoscale devices carry a formidable promise to change ways cancer is diagnosed and treated. This article summarizes current developments in nanotechnology-based drug delivery and discusses path forward in this field. The discussion is done in context of research and development occurring within the NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer program. PMID:20814720

  18. Conjugation of a nonspecific antiviral sapogenin with a specific HIV fusion inhibitor: a promising strategy for discovering new antiviral therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Lu, Lu; Na, Heya; Li, Xiangpeng; Wang, Qian; Jiang, Xifeng; Xu, Xiaoyu; Yu, Fei; Zhang, Tianhong; Li, Jinglai; Zhang, Zhenqing; Zheng, Baohua; Liang, Guodong; Cai, Lifeng; Jiang, Shibo; Liu, Keliang

    2014-09-11

    Triterpene saponins are a major group of active components in natural products with nonspecific antiviral activities, while T20 peptide (enfuvirtide), which contains a helix zone-binding domain (HBD), is a gp41-specific HIV-1 fusion inhibitor. In this paper, we report the design, synthesis, and structure-activity relationship (SAR) of a group of hybrid molecules in which bioactive triterpene sapogenins were covalently attached to the HBD-containing peptides via click chemistry. We found that either the triterpenes or peptide part alone showed weak activity against HIV-1 Env-mediated cell-cell fusion, while the hybrids generated a strong cooperative effect. Among them, P26-BApc exhibited anti-HIV-1 activity against both T20-sensitive and -resistant HIV-1 strains and improved pharmacokinetic properties. These results suggest that this scaffold design is a promising strategy for developing new HIV-1 fusion inhibitors and possibly novel antiviral therapeutics against other viruses with class I fusion proteins. PMID:25156906

  19. Frizzled7: A Promising Achilles' Heel for Targeting the Wnt Receptor Complex to Treat Cancer.

    PubMed

    Phesse, Toby; Flanagan, Dustin; Vincan, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Frizzled7 is arguably the most studied member of the Frizzled family, which are the cognate Wnt receptors. Frizzled7 is highly conserved through evolution, from Hydra through to humans, and is expressed in diverse organisms, tissues and human disease contexts. Frizzled receptors can homo- or hetero-polymerise and associate with several co-receptors to transmit Wnt signalling. Notably, Frizzled7 can transmit signalling via multiple Wnt transduction pathways and bind to several different Wnt ligands, Frizzled receptors and co-receptors. These promiscuous binding and functional properties are thought to underlie the pivotal role Frizzled7 plays in embryonic developmental and stem cell function. Recent studies have identified that Frizzled7 is upregulated in diverse human cancers, and promotes proliferation, progression and invasion, and orchestrates cellular transitions that underscore cancer metastasis. Importantly, Frizzled7 is able to regulate Wnt signalling activity even in cancer cells which have mutations to down-stream signal transducers. In this review we discuss the various aspects of Frizzled7 signalling and function, and the implications these have for therapeutic targeting of Frizzled7 in cancer. PMID:27196929

  20. Gut microorganisms as promising targets for the management of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Delzenne, Nathalie M; Cani, Patrice D; Everard, Amandine; Neyrinck, Audrey M; Bindels, Laure B

    2015-10-01

    Each human intestine harbours not only hundreds of trillions of bacteria but also bacteriophage particles, viruses, fungi and archaea, which constitute a complex and dynamic ecosystem referred to as the gut microbiota. An increasing number of data obtained during the last 10 years have indicated changes in gut bacterial composition or function in type 2 diabetic patients. Analysis of this 'dysbiosis' enables the detection of alterations in specific bacteria, clusters of bacteria or bacterial functions associated with the occurrence or evolution of type 2 diabetes; these bacteria are predominantly involved in the control of inflammation and energy homeostasis. Our review focuses on two key questions: does gut dysbiosis truly play a role in the occurrence of type 2 diabetes, and will recent discoveries linking the gut microbiota to host health be helpful for the development of novel therapeutic approaches for type 2 diabetes? Here we review how pharmacological, surgical and nutritional interventions for type 2 diabetic patients may impact the gut microbiota. Experimental studies in animals are identifying which bacterial metabolites and components act on host immune homeostasis and glucose metabolism, primarily by targeting intestinal cells involved in endocrine and gut barrier functions. We discuss novel approaches (e.g. probiotics, prebiotics and faecal transfer) and the need for research and adequate intervention studies to evaluate the feasibility and relevance of these new therapies for the management of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26224102

  1. Frizzled7: A Promising Achilles’ Heel for Targeting the Wnt Receptor Complex to Treat Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phesse, Toby; Flanagan, Dustin; Vincan, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Frizzled7 is arguably the most studied member of the Frizzled family, which are the cognate Wnt receptors. Frizzled7 is highly conserved through evolution, from Hydra through to humans, and is expressed in diverse organisms, tissues and human disease contexts. Frizzled receptors can homo- or hetero-polymerise and associate with several co-receptors to transmit Wnt signalling. Notably, Frizzled7 can transmit signalling via multiple Wnt transduction pathways and bind to several different Wnt ligands, Frizzled receptors and co-receptors. These promiscuous binding and functional properties are thought to underlie the pivotal role Frizzled7 plays in embryonic developmental and stem cell function. Recent studies have identified that Frizzled7 is upregulated in diverse human cancers, and promotes proliferation, progression and invasion, and orchestrates cellular transitions that underscore cancer metastasis. Importantly, Frizzled7 is able to regulate Wnt signalling activity even in cancer cells which have mutations to down-stream signal transducers. In this review we discuss the various aspects of Frizzled7 signalling and function, and the implications these have for therapeutic targeting of Frizzled7 in cancer. PMID:27196929

  2. The molecular effect of metastasis suppressors on Src signaling and tumorigenesis: new therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wensheng; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Peng, Zhihai; Jin, Runsen; Wang, Puxiongzhi; Yue, Fei; Zheng, Minhua; Huang, Michael L-H.; Jansson, Patric J.; Richardson, Vera; Kalinowski, Danuta S.; Lane, Darius J.R.; Merlot, Angelica M.; Sahni, Sumit; Richardson, Des R.

    2015-01-01

    A major problem for cancer patients is the metastasis of cancer cells from the primary tumor. This involves: (1) migration through the basement membrane; (2) dissemination via the circulatory system; and (3) invasion into a secondary site. Metastasis suppressors, by definition, inhibit metastasis at any step of the metastatic cascade. Notably, Src is a non-receptor, cytoplasmic, tyrosine kinase, which becomes aberrantly activated in many cancer-types following stimulation of plasma membrane receptors (e.g., receptor tyrosine kinases and integrins). There is evidence of a prominent role of Src in tumor progression-related events such as the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the development of metastasis. However, the precise molecular interactions of Src with metastasis suppressors remain unclear. Herein, we review known metastasis suppressors and summarize recent advances in understanding the mechanisms of how these proteins inhibit metastasis through modulation of Src. Particular emphasis is bestowed on the potent metastasis suppressor, N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) and its interactions with the Src signaling cascade. Recent studies demonstrated a novel mechanism through which NDRG1 plays a significant role in regulating cancer cell migration by inhibiting Src activity. Moreover, we discuss the rationale for targeting metastasis suppressor genes as a sound therapeutic modality, and we review several examples from the literature where such strategies show promise. Collectively, this review summarizes the essential interactions of metastasis suppressors with Src and their effects on progression of cancer metastasis. Moreover, interesting unresolved issues regarding these proteins as well as their potential as therapeutic targets are also discussed. PMID:26431493

  3. CD47 is an adverse prognostic factor and a therapeutic target in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kazumichi; Tsujimoto, Hironori; Matsumura, Kouji; Kinoshita, Manabu; Takahata, Risa; Matsumoto, Yusuke; Hiraki, Shuichi; Ono, Satoshi; Seki, Shuhji; Yamamoto, Junji; Hase, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    CD47 is an antiphagocytic molecule that acts via ligation to signal regulatory protein alpha on phagocytes; its enhanced expression and therapeutic targeting have recently been reported for several malignancies. However, CD47 expression in gastric cancer is not well documented. Immunohistochemical expression of CD47 in surgical specimens was investigated. Expression of CD47 and CD44, a known gastric cancer stem cell marker, were investigated in gastric cancer cell lines by flow cytometry. MKN45 and MKN74 gastric cancer cells were sorted by fluorescence-activated cell sorting according to CD44 and CD47 expression levels, and their in vitro proliferation, spheroid-forming capacity, and in vivo tumorigenicity were studied. In vitro phagocytosis of cancer cells by human macrophages in the presence of a CD47 blocking monoclonal antibody (B6H12) and the survival of immunodeficient mice intraperitoneally engrafted with MKN45 cells and B6H12 were compared to experiments using control antibodies. Immunohistochemistry of the clinical specimens indicated that CD47 was positive in 57 out of 115 cases, and its positivity was an independent adverse prognostic factor. Approximately 90% of the MKN45 and MKN74 cells expressed CD47 and CD44. CD47hi gastric cancer cells showed significantly higher proliferation and spheroid colony formation than CD47lo, and CD44hiCD47hi cells showed the highest proliferation in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. B6H12 significantly enhanced in vitro phagocytosis of cancer cells by human macrophages and prolonged the survival of intraperitoneal cancer dissemination in mice compared to control antibodies. In conclusion, CD47 is an adverse prognostic factor and promising therapeutic target in gastric cancer. PMID:26077800

  4. Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) as a novel therapeutic target in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Jiro; Suzuki, Rikio; Mazitschek, Ralph; Gorgun, Gullu; Ghosh, Balaram; Cirstea, Diana; Hu, Yiguo; Mimura, Naoya; Ohguchi, Hiroto; Cottini, Francesca; Jakubikova, Jana; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Richardson, Paul G.; Hideshima, Teru; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) represent novel molecular targets for the treatment of various types of cancers, including multiple myeloma (MM). Many HDAC inhibitors have already shown remarkable anti-tumor activities in the preclinical setting; however, their clinical utility is limited due to unfavorable toxicities associated with their broad range HDAC inhibitory effects. Isoform-selective HDAC inhibition may allow for MM cytotoxicity without attendant side effects. In this study, we demonstrated that HDAC3 knockdown and a small molecule HDAC3 inhibitor BG45 trigger significant MM cell growth inhibition via apoptosis, evidenced by caspase and PARP cleavage. Importantly, HDAC3 inhibition downregulates phosphorylation (tyrosine 705 and serine 727) of STAT3. Neither IL-6 nor bone marrow stromal cells overcome this inhibitory effect of HDAC3 inhibition on p-STAT3 and MM cell growth. Moreover, HDAC3 inhibition also triggers hyperacetylation of STAT3, suggesting crosstalk signaling between phosphorylation and acetylation of STAT3. Importantly, inhibition of HDAC3, but not HDAC1 or HDAC2, significantly enhances bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity. Finally, we confirm that BG45 alone and in combination with bortezomib trigger significant tumor growth inhibition in vivo in a murine xenograft model of human MM. Our results indicate that HDAC3 represents a promising therapeutic target, and validate a prototype novel HDAC3 inhibitor BG45 in MM. PMID:23913134

  5. Epigenetic Control and Cancer: The Potential of Histone Demethylases as Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Lizcano, Fernando; Garcia, Jeison

    2012-01-01

    The development of cancer involves an immense number of factors at the molecular level. These factors are associated principally with alterations in the epigenetic mechanisms that regulate gene expression profiles. Studying the effects of chromatin structure alterations, which are caused by the addition/removal of functional groups to specific histone residues, are of great interest as a promising way to identify markers for cancer diagnosis, classify the disease and determine its prognosis, and these markers could be potential targets for the treatment of this disease in its different forms. This manuscript presents the current point of view regarding members of the recently described family of proteins that exhibit histone demethylase activity; histone demethylases are genetic regulators that play a fundamental role in both the activation and repression of genes and whose expression has been observed to increase in many types of cancer. Some fundamental aspects of their association with the development of cancer and their relevance as potential targets for the development of new therapeutic strategies at the epigenetic level are discussed in the following manuscript. PMID:24280700

  6. The Keap1-Nrf2-ARE Pathway As a Potential Preventive and Therapeutic Target: An Update.

    PubMed

    Lu, Meng-Chen; Ji, Jian-Ai; Jiang, Zheng-Yu; You, Qi-Dong

    2016-09-01

    The Keap1-Nrf2-ARE ((Kelch-like ECH-Associating protein 1) nuclear factor erythroid 2 related factor 2-antioxidant response element) pathway is one of the most important defense mechanisms against oxidative and/or electrophilic stresses, and it is closely associated with inflammatory diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and aging. In recent years, progress has been made in strategies aimed at modulating the Keap1-Nrf2-ARE pathway. The Nrf2 activator DMF (Dimethylfumarates) has been approved by the FDA as a new first-line oral drug to treat patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis, while a phase 3 study of another promising candidate, CDDO-Me, was terminated for safety reasons. Directly inhibiting Keap1-Nrf2 protein-protein interactions as a novel Nrf2-modulating strategy has many advantages over using electrophilic Nrf2 activators. The development of Keap1-Nrf2 protein-protein interaction inhibitors has become a topic of intense research, and potent inhibitors of this target have been identified. In addition, inhibiting Nrf2 activity has attracted an increasing amount of attention because it may provide an alternative cancer therapy. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms and biological functions of the Keap1-Nrf2-ARE system. The main focus of this review is on recent progress in studies of agents that target the Keap1-Nrf2-ARE pathway and the therapeutic applications of such agents. PMID:27192495

  7. Purinergic System Dysfunction in Mood Disorders: A Key Target for Developing Improved Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Robin; Ulrich, Henning; Zarate, Carlos A; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Uric acid and purines (such as adenosine) regulate mood, sleep, activity, appetite, cognition, memory, convulsive threshold, social interaction, drive, and impulsivity. A link between purinergic dysfunction and mood disorders was first proposed a century ago. Interestingly, a recent nationwide population-based study showed elevated risk of gout in subjects with bipolar disorder (BD), and a recent meta-analysis and systematic review of placebo-controlled trials of adjuvant purinergic modulators confirmed their benefits in bipolar mania. Uric acid may modulate energy and activity levels, with higher levels associated with higher energy and BD spectrum. Several recent genetic studies suggest that the purinergic system particularly the modulation of P1 and P2 receptor subtypes—plays a role in mood disorders, lending credence to this model. Nucleotide concentrations can be measured using brain spectroscopy, and ligands for in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of adenosine (P1) receptors have been developed, thus allowing potential target engagement studies. This review discusses the key role of the purinergic system in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. Focusing on this promising therapeutic target may lead to the development of therapies with antidepressant, mood stabilization, and cognitive effects. PMID:25445063

  8. Short non-coding RNA biology and neurodegenerative disorders: novel disease targets and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Marc S.; Wood, Matthew J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Genomic studies in model organisms and in humans have shown that complexity in biological systems arises not from the absolute number of genes, but from the differential use of combinations of genetic programmes and the myriad ways in which these are regulated spatially and temporally during development, senescence and in disease. Nowhere is this lesson in biological complexity likely to be more apparent than in the human nervous system. Increasingly, the role of genomic non-protein coding small regulatory RNAs, in particular the microRNAs (miRNAs), in regulating cellular pathways controlling fundamental functions in the nervous system and in neurodegenerative disease is being appreciated. Not only might dysregulated expression of miRNAs serve as potential disease biomarkers but increasingly such short regulatory RNAs are being implicated directly in the pathogenesis of complex, sporadic neurodegenerative disease. Moreover, the targeting and exploitation of short RNA silencing pathways, commonly known as RNA interference, and the development of related tools, offers novel therapeutic approaches to target upstream disease components with the promise of providing future disease modifying therapies for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19297399

  9. Targeting MIF in Cancer: Therapeutic Strategies, Current Developments, and Future Opportunities.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Ciaran; Doroudian, Mohammad; Mawhinney, Leona; Donnelly, Seamas C

    2016-04-01

    Strong evidence has been presented linking chronic inflammation to the onset and pathogenesis of cancer. The multifunctional pro-inflammatory protein macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) occupies a central role in the inflammatory pathway and has been implicated in the tumorigenesis, angiogenesis, and metastasis of many cancer phenotypes. This review highlights the current state of the art, which presents MIF, and the second member of the MIF structural superfamily, d-DT (MIF2), as significant mediators in the inflammatory-cancer axis. Although the mechanism by which MIF asserts its biological activity has yet to be fully understood, it has become clear in recent years that for certain phenotypes of cancer, MIF represents a valid therapeutic target. Current research efforts have focused on small molecule approaches that target MIF's unique tautomerase active site and neutralization of MIF with anti-MIF antibodies. These approaches have yielded promising results in a number of preclinical murine cancer models and have helped to increase our understanding of MIF biological activity. More recently, MIF's involvement in a number of key protein-protein interactions, such as with CD74 and HSP90, has been highlighted and provides a novel platform for the development of anti-MIF chemotherapeutic strategies in the future. PMID:26777977

  10. New approaches to target the mycolic acid biosynthesis pathway for the development of tuberculosis therapeutics.

    PubMed

    North, E Jeffrey; Jackson, Mary; Lee, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    Mycolic acids are the major lipid components of the unique mycobacterial cell wall responsible for the protection of the tuberculosis bacilli from many outside threats. Mycolic acids are synthesized in the cytoplasm and transported to the outer membrane as trehalose- containing glycolipids before being esterified to the arabinogalactan portion of the cell wall and outer membrane glycolipids. The large size of these unique fatty acids is a result of a huge metabolic investment that has been evolutionarily conserved, indicating the importance of these lipids to the mycobacterial cellular survival. There are many key enzymes involved in the mycolic acid biosynthetic pathway, including fatty acid synthesis (KasA, KasB, MabA, InhA, HadABC), mycolic acid modifying enzymes (SAM-dependent methyltransferases, aNAT), fatty acid activating and condensing enzymes (FadD32, Acc, Pks13), transporters (MmpL3) and tranferases (Antigen 85A-C) all of which are excellent potential drug targets. Not surprisingly, in recent years many new compounds have been reported to inhibit specific portions of this pathway, discovered through both phenotypic screening and target enzyme screening. In this review, we analyze the new and emerging inhibitors of this pathway discovered in the post-genomic era of tuberculosis drug discovery, several of which show great promise as selective tuberculosis therapeutics. PMID:24245756

  11. New Approaches to Target the Mycolic Acid Biosynthesis Pathway for the Development of Tuberculosis Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    North, E. Jeffrey; Jackson, Mary; Lee, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Mycolic acids are the major lipid component of the unique mycobacterial cell wall responsible for the protection of the tuberculosis bacilli from many outside threats. Mycolic acids are synthesized in the cytoplasm and transported to the outer membrane as trehalose-containing glycolipids before being esterified to the arabinogalactan portion of the cell wall and outer membrane glycolipids. The large size of these unique fatty acids is a result of a huge metabolic investment that has been evolutionarily conserved, indicating the importance of these lipids to the mycobacterial cellular survival. There are many key enzymes involved in the mycolic acid biosynthetic pathway, including fatty acid synthesis (KasA, KasB, MabA, InhA, HadABC), mycolic acid modifying enzymes (SAM-dependent methyltransferases, aNAT), fatty acid activating and condensing enzymes (FadD32, Acc, Pks13), transporters (MmpL3) and tranferases (Antigen 85A-C) all of which are excellent potential drug targets. Not surprisingly, in recent years many new compounds have been reported to inhibit specific portions of this pathway, discovered through both phenotypic screening and target enzyme screening. In this review, we analyze the new and emerging inhibitors of this pathway discovered in the post-genomic era of tuberculosis drug discovery, several of which show great promise as selective tuberculosis therapeutics. PMID:24245756

  12. Therapeutic strategies for targeting excessive central sympathetic activation in human hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, James P.; Fadel, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hypertension and its mode of progression are complex, multifactoral and incompletely understood. However, there is accumulating evidence from humans and animal models of hypertension indicating that excessive central sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) plays a pathogenic role in triggering and sustaining the essential hypertensive state (the so-called “neuroadrenergic hypothesis”). Importantly, augmented central sympathetic outflow has also been implicated in the initiation and progression of a plethora of pathophysiological processes independent of any increase in blood pressure, such as left ventricular hypertrophy and cardiac arrhythmias. Thus, the sympathetic nervous system constitutes an important putative drug target in hypertension. However, traditional pharmacological approaches for the management of essential hypertension appear ineffective in reducing central sympathetic outflow. Recently, several new and promising therapeutic strategies targeting neurogenic hypertension have been developed. The present report will provide a brief update of this topic with a particular emphasis on human studies examining the efficacy of novel pharmacological approaches (central sympatholytics, statins), lifestyle modification (aerobic exercise training, weight loss, stress reduction) and surgical intervention (renal denervation, chronic carotid baroreflex stimulation, deep brain stimulation) in reducing excessive central sympathetic activation in hypertension. PMID:20304932

  13. Id-1 is a Key Transcriptional Regulator of Glioblastoma Aggressiveness and a Novel Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Soroceanu, Liliana; Murase, Ryuichi; Limbad, Chandani; Singer, Eric; Allison, Juanita; Adrados, Isabel; Kawamura, Rumi; Pakdel, Arash; Fukuyo, Yayoi; Nguyen, Daniel; Khan, Sabeena; Arauz, Robert; Yount, Garret L.; Moore, Dan H.; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; McAllister, Sean D.

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common form of primary adult brain tumors. A majority of GBMs grow invasively into distant brain tissue, leading to tumor recurrence, which is ultimately incurable. It is, therefore, essential to discover master regulators that control GBM invasiveness and target them therapeutically. We demonstrate here that the transcriptional regulator Id-1 plays a critical role in modulating the invasiveness of GBM cell lines and primary GBM cells. Id-1 expression levels positively correlate with glioma cell invasiveness in culture and with histopathological grades in patient biopsies. Id-1 knockdown dramatically reduces GBM cell invasion that is accompanied by profound morphological changes and robust reduction in expression levels of “mesenchymal” markers, as well as inhibition of self-renewal potential and down-regulation of glioma stem cell markers. Importantly, genetic knockdown of Id-1 leads to a significant increase in survival in an orthotopic model of human GBM. Furthermore, we show that a non-toxic compound, cannabidiol, significantly down-regulates Id-1 gene expression and associated glioma cell invasiveness and self-renewal. Additionally, cannabidiol significantly inhibits the invasion of GBM cells through an organotypic brain slice and glioma progression in vivo. Our results suggest that Id-1 regulates multiple tumor-promoting pathways in GBM, and that drugs targeting Id-1 represent a novel and promising strategy for improving the therapy and outcome of GBM patients. PMID:23243024

  14. Histone deacetylase 3 as a novel therapeutic target in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Minami, J; Suzuki, R; Mazitschek, R; Gorgun, G; Ghosh, B; Cirstea, D; Hu, Y; Mimura, N; Ohguchi, H; Cottini, F; Jakubikova, J; Munshi, N C; Haggarty, S J; Richardson, P G; Hideshima, T; Anderson, K C

    2014-03-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) represent novel molecular targets for the treatment of various types of cancers, including multiple myeloma (MM). Many HDAC inhibitors have already shown remarkable antitumor activities in the preclinical setting; however, their clinical utility is limited because of unfavorable toxicities associated with their broad range HDAC inhibitory effects. Isoform-selective HDAC inhibition may allow for MM cytotoxicity without attendant side effects. In this study, we demonstrated that HDAC3 knockdown and a small-molecule HDAC3 inhibitor BG45 trigger significant MM cell growth inhibition via apoptosis, evidenced by caspase and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. Importantly, HDAC3 inhibition downregulates phosphorylation (tyrosine 705 and serine 727) of signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3). Neither interleukin-6 nor bone marrow stromal cells overcome this inhibitory effect of HDAC3 inhibition on phospho-STAT3 and MM cell growth. Moreover, HDAC3 inhibition also triggers hyperacetylation of STAT3, suggesting crosstalk signaling between phosphorylation and acetylation of STAT3. Importantly, inhibition of HDAC3, but not HDAC1 or 2, significantly enhances bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity. Finally, we confirm that BG45 alone and in combination with bortezomib trigger significant tumor growth inhibition in vivo in a murine xenograft model of human MM. Our results indicate that HDAC3 represents a promising therapeutic target, and validate a prototype novel HDAC3 inhibitor BG45 in MM. PMID:23913134

  15. Evaluation of Acanthamoeba Myosin-IC as a Potential Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Reyes-Batlle, María; Piñero, José E.; Valladares, Basilio; Maciver, Sutherland K.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the genus Acanthamoeba are facultative pathogens of humans, causing a sight-threatening keratitis and a fatal encephalitis. We have targeted myosin-IC by using small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing as a therapeutic approach, since it is known that the function of this protein is vital for the amoeba. In this work, specific siRNAs against the Acanthamoeba myosin-IC gene were developed. Treated and control amoebae were cultured in growth and encystment media to evaluate the induced effects after myosin-IC gene knockdown, as we have anticipated that cyst formation may be impaired. The effects of myosin-IC gene silencing were inhibition of cyst formation, inhibition of completion of cytokinesis, inhibition of osmoregulation under osmotic stress conditions, and death of the amoebae. The finding that myosin-IC silencing caused incompletion of cytokinesis is in agreement with earlier suggestions that the protein plays a role in cell locomotion, which is necessary to pull daughter cells apart after mitosis in a process known as “traction-mediated cytokinesis”. We conclude that myosin-IC is a very promising potential drug target for the development of much-needed antiamoebal drugs and that it should be further exploited for Acanthamoeba therapy. PMID:24468784

  16. LPTS: A Novel Tumor Suppressor Gene and a Promising Drug Target for Cancer Intervention.

    PubMed

    Baichuan, Li; Cao, Songshen; Liu, Yunlai

    2015-01-01

    Liver-related putative tumor suppressor (lpts) is a liver-related tumor suppressor candidate gene initially isolated by positional candidate cloning method. Three translation products of lpts gene are found, that are LPTS-L, LPTS-S and LPTS-M respectively. The gene highly expresses in normal tissues but lowly in cancer tissues. The LPTS proteins can suppress the activity of telomerase and trigger apoptosis for tumor cells in vivo and in vitro, despite that the detailed anti-cancer mechanism remains undefined. This review successively describes the lpts genomic assembly, transcriptional regulation and structure-activity evaluation of different LPTS isoforms; then it represents the LPTS binding partners, for example Pin2/TRF1 and MCRS2, which play important roles in decreasing telomerase activity, which benefits to reveal the anticancer mechanism; subsequently, it surveys several patents of recombinant LPTS proteins such as TAT-LPTS-LC, PinX1/C-G4S-9R-G4S-mBAFF and PinX1/C-9R-mBAF that can inhibit the growth of tumor cells. Lpts gene is becoming a promising drug target for cancer intervention owing to its powerful inhibition efficacy on telomerase activity, and recombinant LPTS proteins claimed by a couple of patents seem to be potential anti-cancer agents. PMID:25479038

  17. A Review of the Most Promising Biomarkers in Colorectal Cancer: One Step Closer to Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baay, Marc; Specenier, Pol; Lardon, Filip; Vermorken, Jan B.

    2010-01-01

    Rapidly growing insights into the molecular biology of colorectal cancer (CRC) and recent developments in gene sequencing and molecular diagnostics have led to high expectations for the identification of molecular markers to be used in optimized and tailored treatment regimens. However, many of the published data on molecular biomarkers are contradictory in their findings and the current reality is that no molecular marker, other than the KRAS gene in the case of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)- targeted therapy for metastatic disease, has made it into clinical practice. Many markers investigated suffer from technical shortcomings, resulting from lack of quantitative techniques to capture the impact of the molecular alteration. This understanding has recently led to the more comprehensive approaches of global gene expression profiling or genome-wide analysis to determine prognostic and predictive signatures in tumors. In this review, an update of the most recent data on promising biological prognostic and/or predictive markers, including microsatellite instability, epidermal growth factor receptor, KRAS, BRAF, CpG island methylator phenotype, cytotoxic T lymphocytes, forkhead box P3–positive T cells, receptor for hyaluronic acid–mediated motility, phosphatase and tensin homolog, and T-cell originated protein kinase, in patients with CRC is provided. PMID:20584808

  18. Novel gene isolated from Caligus rogercresseyi: a promising target for vaccine development against sea lice.

    PubMed

    Carpio, Yamila; Basabe, Liliana; Acosta, Jannel; Rodríguez, Alina; Mendoza, Adriana; Lisperger, Angélica; Zamorano, Eugenio; González, Margarita; Rivas, Mario; Contreras, Sergio; Haussmann, Denise; Figueroa, Jaime; Osorio, Verónica N; Asencio, Gladys; Mancilla, Jorge; Ritchie, Gordon; Borroto, Carlos; Estrada, Mario Pablo

    2011-03-24

    Sea lice (Copepoda, Caligidae) are the most widely distributed marine pathogens in the salmon industry in the last 30 years. Caligus rogercresseyi is the most important species affecting Chile's salmon industry. Vaccines against caligid copepods have the potential to be a cost-effective means of controlling the infestation and avoid many of the disadvantages of medicine treatments. However, research in the development of such vaccines has begun only recently and approaches used thus far have met with little or no success. In the present study, we characterized a novel gene (denoted as my32) from C. rogercresseyi which has the highest identity with the Lepeophtheirus salmonis gene akirin-2. To assess the function of the gene an RNA interference experiment was developed and a reduction in the number of ectoparasites on fish in the my32-dsRNA treated group was observed. The recombinant my32 protein was used in a vaccination-challenge trial to evaluate its ability to protect against sea lice infestations. A significant reduction in the number of parasites per fish was observed at 24 days post-challenge. These results, together with the delay observed in the development of parasites from the vaccinated group suggest that the major effect of immunization was on the second parasite generation. The results of these experiments suggest that the my32 protein may be a promising target for vaccine development to control sea lice infestations in fish. PMID:21320542

  19. The therapeutic value of targeting inflammation in gastrointestinal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Beicheng; Karin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation has been implicated in the initiation and progression of gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. Inflammation also plays important roles in subverting immune tolerance, escape from immune surveillance, and conferring resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Targeting key regulators and mediators of inflammation represents an attractive strategy for GI cancer prevention and treatment. However, the targeting of inflammation in GI cancer is not straight-forward and sometimes inflammation may contribute to tumor regression. We discuss the origins and effects of inflammation in GI cancer and how to target it successfully. PMID:24881011

  20. The Therapeutic Potential of Targeting Cytokine Alarmins to Treat Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sy, Chandler B.; Siracusa, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disorder that results in recurrent attacks of breathlessness, coughing, and wheezing that affects millions of people worldwide. Although the precise causes of asthma are unclear, studies suggest that a combination of genetic predisposition and environmental exposure to various allergens and pathogens contribute to its development. Currently, the most common treatment to control asthma is a dual combination of β2-adrenergic receptor agonists and corticosteroids. However, studies have shown that some patients do not respond well to these medications, while others experience significant side effects. It is reported that the majority of asthmas are associated with T helper type 2 (TH2) responses. In these patients, allergen challenge initiates the influx of TH2 cells in the airways leading to an increased production of TH2-associated cytokines and the promotion of allergy-induced asthma. Therefore, biologics that target this pathway may provide an alternative method to treat the allergic airway inflammation associated with asthma. As of now, only two biologics (omalizumab and mepolizumab), which target immunoglobulin E and interleukin-5, respectively, are FDA-approved and being prescribed to asthmatics. However, recent studies have reported that targeting other components of the TH2 response also show great promise. In this review, we will briefly describe the immunologic mechanisms underlying allergic asthma. Furthermore, we will discuss the current therapeutic strategies used to treat asthma including their limitations. Finally, we will highlight the benefits of using biologics to treat asthma-associated allergic airway inflammation with an emphasis on the potential of targeting cytokine alarmins, especially thymic stromal lymphopoietin. PMID:27378934

  1. Notch signaling: an emerging therapeutic target for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xun; Wu, Hua; Xu, Hanxiao; Xiong, Huihua; Chu, Qian; Yu, Shiying; Wu, Gen Sheng; Wu, Kongming

    2015-12-01

    The Notch pathway is involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. The Notch signaling pathway is one of the most commonly activated signaling pathways in cancer. Alterations include activating mutations and amplification of the Notch pathway, which play key roles in the progression of cancer. Accumulating evidence suggests that the pharmacological inhibition of this pathway can overcome chemoresistance. Efforts have been taken to develop Notch inhibitors as a single agent or in combination with clinically used chemotherapeutics to treat cancer. Some Notch inhibitors have been demonstrated to have therapeutic efficacy in preclinical studies. This review summarizes the recent studies and clinical evaluations of the Notch inhibitors in cancer. PMID:26341688

  2. The Natural Flavonoid Pinocembrin: Molecular Targets and Potential Therapeutic Applications.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xi; Wang, Wenzhu; Li, Qiang; Wang, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Pinocembrin is a natural flavonoid compound extracted from honey, propolis, ginger roots, wild marjoram, and other plants. In preclinical studies, it has shown anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects as well as the ability to reduce reactive oxygen species, protect the blood-brain barrier, modulate mitochondrial function, and regulate apoptosis. Considering these pharmaceutical characteristics, pinocembrin has potential as a drug to treat ischemic stroke and other clinical conditions. In this review, we summarize its pharmacologic characteristics and discuss its mechanisms of action and potential therapeutic applications. PMID:25744566

  3. Targeting histone deacetylases: A novel therapeutic strategy for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lkhagva, Baigalmaa; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Chen, Yao-Chang; Chao, Tze-Fan; Chen, Shih-Ann; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2016-06-15

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac arrhythmia associated with high mortality and morbidity. Current treatments of AF have limited efficacy and considerable side effects. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play critical roles in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases and contribute to the genesis of AF. Therefore, HDAC inhibition may prove a novel therapeutic strategy for AF through upstream therapy and modifications of AF electrical and structural remodeling. In this review, we provide an update of the knowledge of the effects of HDACs and HDAC inhibitors on AF, and dissect potential underlying mechanisms. PMID:27089819

  4. Emerging therapeutic targets for the treatment of hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Fagone, Paolo; Mangano, Katia; Pesce, Antonio; Portale, Teresa Rosanna; Puleo, Stefano; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2016-02-01

    Fibrosis represents a response to chronic injury, aimed at maintaining organ integrity. Hepatic fibrosis is mainly related to chronic viral hepatitis B or C (HBV or HCV), alcoholic and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and biliary diseases. A deep understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying liver fibrosis has enabled the development of 'pathogenetic tailored' therapeutic interventions. However, effective drugs to prevent or revert hepatic fibrosis are still lacking. In this review, we discuss the cellular populations and the molecular pathways involved in liver fibrogenesis as well as the novel approaches currently being tested in clinical trials. PMID:26523773

  5. Inflammation and hypertension: new understandings and potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    De Miguel, Carmen; Rudemiller, Nathan P; Abais, Justine M; Mattson, David L

    2015-01-01

    Research studying the role of inflammation in hypertension and cardiovascular disease has flourished in recent years; however, the exact mechanisms by which the activated immune cells lead to the development and maintenance of hypertension remain to be elucidated. The objectives of this brief review are to summarize and discuss the most recent findings in the field, with special emphasis on potential therapeutics to treat or prevent hypertension. This review will cover novel immune cell subtypes recently associated to the disease including the novel role of cytokines, toll-like receptors, and inflammasomes in hypertension. PMID:25432899

  6. MMPs as therapeutic targets – still a viable option?

    PubMed Central

    Fingleton, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) appear to be ideal drug targets – they are disease-associated, extracellular enzymes with a dependence on zinc for activity. This apparently straightforward target, however, is much more complex than initially realized. Although disease associated, the roles for particular enzymes may be healing rather than harmful making broad-spectrum inhibition unwise; targeting the catalytic zinc with specificity is difficult, since other related proteases as well as non-related proteins can be affected by some chelating groups. While the failure of early-generation MMP inhibitors dampened enthusiasm for this type of drug, there has recently been a wealth of studies examining the basic biology of MMPs which will greatly inform new drug trials in this field. PMID:17693104

  7. Molecular pathways and therapeutic targets in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shtivelman, Emma; Hensing, Thomas; Simon, George R.; Dennis, Phillip A.; Otterson, Gregory A.; Bueno, Raphael; Salgia, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Both histologically and molecularly lung cancer is heterogeneous. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the pathways involved in the various types of lung cancer with an emphasis on the clinical implications of the increasing number of actionable molecular targets. It describes the major pathways and molecular alterations implicated in the development and progression of non-small cell lung cancer (adenocarcinoma and squamous cancer), and of small cell carcinoma, emphasizing the molecular alterations comprising the specific blueprints in each group. The approved and investigational targeted therapies as well as the immune therapies, and clinical trials exploring the variety of targeted approaches to treatment of lung cancer are the main focus of this review. PMID:24722523

  8. Actinium-225 in targeted alpha-particle therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Scheinberg, David A; McDevitt, Michael R

    2011-10-01

    Alpha particle-emitting isotopes are being investigated in radioimmunotherapeutic applications because of their unparalleled cytotoxicity when targeted to cancer and their relative lack of toxicity towards untargeted normal tissue. Actinium- 225 has been developed into potent targeting drug constructs and is in clinical use against acute myelogenous leukemia. The key properties of the alpha particles generated by 225Ac are the following: i) limited range in tissue of a few cell diameters; ii) high linear energy transfer leading to dense radiation damage along each alpha track; iii) a 10 day halflife; and iv) four net alpha particles emitted per decay. Targeting 225Ac-drug constructs have potential in the treatment of cancer. PMID:22202153

  9. Human Papillomaviruses As Therapeutic Targets in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hellner, Karin; Münger, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Cervical carcinomas are almost universally associated with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, and are a leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. HPV oncoproteins contribute to cancer initiation and progression and their expression is necessary for the maintenance of the transformed state. The fact that the initiating oncogenic insult, infection with a high-risk HPV and viral oncoprotein expression, is common to almost all cervical cancers offers unique opportunities for prevention, early detection, and therapy. The potential for prevention has been realized by introduction of prophylactic vaccines that are to prevent transmission of specific high-risk HPVs. Given, however, that these vaccines have no therapeutic efficacy and HPV-associated cervical cancers arise years if not decades after the initial infection, it has been estimated that there will be no measurable decline of HPV-associated tumors before 2040. Cervical cancer alone will be diagnosed in more than 375,000 US women between now and 2040. Other HPV-associated anogenital and head and neck cancers are predicted to afflict another 700,000 men and women over this time period. Hence, therapeutic efforts to combat high-risk HPV-associated disease remain of critical importance. PMID:21220591

  10. 1st Joint European Conference on Therapeutic Targets and Medicinal Chemistry (TTMC 2015)

    PubMed Central

    Le Borgne, Marc; Haidar, Samer; Duval, Olivier; Wünsch, Bernhard; Jose, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The European Conference on Therapeutic Targets and Medicinal Chemistry is a new two-day meeting on drug discovery that is focused on therapeutic targets and the use of tools to explore all fields of drug discovery and drug design such as molecular modelling, bioorganic chemistry, NMR studies, fragment screening, in vitro assays, in vivo assays, structure activity relationships, autodisplay. Abstracts of keynote lectures, plenary lectures, junior lectures, flash presentations, and posters presented during the meeting are collected in this report. PMID:26712767

  11. 1st Joint European Conference on Therapeutic Targets and Medicinal Chemistry (TTMC 2015).

    PubMed

    Le Borgne, Marc; Haidar, Samer; Duval, Olivier; Wünsch, Bernhard; Jose, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The European Conference on Therapeutic Targets and Medicinal Chemistry is a new two-day meeting on drug discovery that is focused on therapeutic targets and the use of tools to explore all fields of drug discovery and drug design such as molecular modelling, bioorganic chemistry, NMR studies, fragment screening, in vitro assays, in vivo assays, structure activity relationships, autodisplay. Abstracts of keynote lectures, plenary lectures, junior lectures, flash presentations, and posters presented during the meeting are collected in this report. PMID:26712767

  12. Selective targeting of the stress chaperome as a therapeutic strategy

    PubMed Central

    Taldone, Tony; Ochiana, Stefan O.; Patel, Pallav D.; Chiosis, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    Normal cellular function is maintained by coordinated proteome machinery that performs a vast array of activities. Helping the proteome in such roles is the chaperome, a network of molecular chaperones and folding enzymes. The stressed cell contains, at any time, a complex mixture of chaperome complexes; a majority performs “housekeeping functions” similarly to non-stressed, normal cells, but a finely-tuned fraction buffers the proteome altered by chronic stress. The stress chaperome is epigenetically distinct from its normal, housekeeping counterpart, providing a basis for its selective targeting by small molecules. Here we discuss development of chaperome inhibitors, and how agents targeting chaperome members in stressed cells are in fact being directed towards chaperome complexes and their effect is therefore determined by their ability to sample and engage such complexes. A new approach is needed to target and implement chaperome modulators in the investigation of diseases, and we propose that the classical thinking in drug discovery needs adjustment when developing chaperome-targeting drugs. PMID:25262919

  13. Therapeutic Targeting of the FKBP52 Co-Chaperone in Steroid Hormone Receptor-Regulated Physiology and Disease.

    PubMed

    Guy, Naihsuan C; Garcia, Yenni A; Cox, Marc B

    2015-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors are ligand-dependent transcription factors that require the dynamic, ordered assembly of multimeric chaperone complexes to reach a functional conformation. Heat shock protein (Hsp) 70 and Hsp90 serve as the central chaperones that mediate this process in conjunction with a variety of co-chaperones. Many of these cochaperones represent potential therapeutic targets for the disruption of Hsp90 client protein function. FKBP52 is an Hsp90-associated co-chaperone that has emerged as a promising therapeutic candidate due to its functional specificity for a small subset of Hsp90 client proteins including androgen (AR), glucocorticoid (GR), and progesterone (PR) receptors. Given its Hsp90-client protein specificity, the targeting of FKBP52 should be more specific and less toxic than the Hsp90- targeting drugs. Additionally, the fkbp52-deficient mice display specific phenotypes related to androgen, progesterone, and glucocorticoid insensitivity suggesting minimal off-target effects. Finally, the fact that FKBP52 is already a validated target of the clinically approved immunosuppressive drug, FK506 (Tacrolimus), indicates that FKBP52 is a "druggable" protein. Thus, the development of FKBP52-specific small molecule inhibitors is predicted to be a highly targeted strategy with potential for the treatment of any disease that is dependent on a functional AR, GR, and/or PR signaling pathway. Much progress has been made in understanding the residues and domains critical for FKBP52 function. The proline-rich loop overhanging the FKBP52 FK1 catalytic domain is functionally important and likely represents an interaction surface within the receptor-chaperone complex. Thus, the targeting of FKBP52 proline-rich loop interactions is the most attractive therapeutic approach to disrupt FKBP52 regulation of receptor activity in steroid hormone receptor-dependent physiology and disease. PMID:25986565

  14. Promises and Challenges of Two-Step Targets for Production of Neutron-rich RIBs

    SciTech Connect

    Talbert, W.L.; Drake, D.M.; Hsu, H.-H.; Wilson, M.T.

    2003-08-26

    Development of a prototype two-step target to produce neutron-rich RIBs is presented, with particular emphasis on thermal analysis under high-power operation. The two-step target is an attractive concept for production of fission-product activities without interference by high-energy spallation reactions which occur in direct production targets. In this concept, a high-energy production beam interacts with a primary target of refractory metal, depositing beam energy in the primary target and producing low-energy neutrons that cause fissions in a surrounding secondary target of mixed UC2 and excess C. Thermal analysis of the composite target presents challenges in cooling the primary target while maintaining the secondary target at temperatures suitable for release of the fission products. The effects of fission energy deposition in the secondary target are discussed, along with the complexities resulting from the thermally insulating character of the secondary target material.

  15. Mesenchymal stroma: primary determinant and therapeutic target for epithelial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goruppi, Sandro; Dotto, G. Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Multifocal and recurrent epithelial tumors, originating from either dormant or de novo cancer cells, are major causes of morbidity and mortality. The age-dependent increase of cancer incidence has long been assumed to result from the sequential accumulation of cancer driving or facilitating mutations with induction of cellular senescence as a protective mechanism. However, recent evidence suggests that the initiation and development of epithelial cancer results from a close interplay with its altered tissue microenvironment, with chronic inflammation, stromal senescence, autophagy, and activation of cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) playing possible primary roles. We will discuss recent progress in these areas, and highlight how this understanding may be used for devising novel preventive and therapeutic approaches to the epithelial cancer problem. PMID:24074947

  16. Superparamagnetic nanoparticles as targeted probes for diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chenjie; Sun, Shouheng

    2009-08-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) have been attractive for medical diagnostics and therapeutics due to their unique magnetic properties and their ability to interact with various biomolecules of interest. The solution phase based chemical synthesis provides a near precise control on NP size, and monodisperse magnetic NPs with standard deviation in diameter of less than 10% are now routinely available. Upon controlled surface functionalization and coupling with fragments of DNA strands, proteins, peptides or antibodies, these NPs can be well-dispersed in biological solutions and used for drug delivery, magnetic separation, magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement and magnetic fluid hyperthermia. This Perspective reviews the common syntheses and controlled surface functionalization of monodisperse Fe(3)O(4)-based superparamagnetic NPs. It further outlines the exciting application potentials of these NPs in magnetic resonance imaging and drug delivery. PMID:20449070

  17. Overview of Nrf2 as Therapeutic Target in Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana; Pérez-Cruz, Claudia; Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecilia; Granados-Rojas, Leticia; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Montesinos-Correa, Hortencia; Hernández-Damián, Jacqueline; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Sampieri, Aristides III; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a biochemical state of imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and antioxidant defenses. It is involved in the physiopathology of degenerative and chronic neuronal disorders, such as epilepsy. Experimental evidence in humans and animals support the involvement of oxidative stress before and after seizures. In the past few years, research has increasingly focused on the molecular pathways of this process, such as that involving transcription factor nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which plays a central role in the regulation of antioxidant response elements (ARE) and modulates cellular redox status. The aim of this review is to present experimental evidence on the role of Nrf2 in this neurological disorder and to further determine the therapeutic impact of Nrf2 in epilepsy. PMID:26262608

  18. Therapeutic targeting of autophagy in neurodegenerative and infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bento, Carla F.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a conserved process that uses double-membrane vesicles to deliver cytoplasmic contents to lysosomes for degradation. Although autophagy may impact many facets of human biology and disease, in this review we focus on the ability of autophagy to protect against certain neurodegenerative and infectious diseases. Autophagy enhances the clearance of toxic, cytoplasmic, aggregate-prone proteins and infectious agents. The beneficial roles of autophagy can now be extended to supporting cell survival and regulating inflammation. Autophagic control of inflammation is one area where autophagy may have similar benefits for both infectious and neurodegenerative diseases beyond direct removal of the pathogenic agents. Preclinical data supporting the potential therapeutic utility of autophagy modulation in such conditions is accumulating. PMID:26101267

  19. Schwann cells as a therapeutic target for peripheral neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Helmar C.; Höke, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Schwann cells, the myelin forming cells in the peripheral nervous system, play a key role in the pathology of various inflammatory, metabolic and hereditary polyneuropathies. Advances in identifying growth factors and signaling molecules that are expressed by Schwann cells have paved the way to development of new treatment strategies that are aimed to improve the protective and regenerative properties of Schwann cells in peripheral nerve disorders. These include the exogenous application of growth factors and neurohormones, which have been advanced into clinical trials in humans and transplantation paradigms that have been moved into late stage preclinical models. In this review we will discuss the latest developments in these therapeutic approaches with special regard to peripheral nerve disorders, in which the progress in basic research have already been translated into clinical trials including HIV-associated distal sensory polyneuropathy and diabetic neuropathy. PMID:20874704

  20. Autophagy: an emerging therapeutic target in vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Vindis, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular catabolic process responsible for the destruction of long-lived proteins and organelles via lysosome-dependent pathway. This process is of great importance in maintaining cellular homeostasis, and deregulated autophagy has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide range of diseases. A growing body of evidence suggests that autophagy can be activated in vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis. Autophagy occurs under basal conditions and mediates homeostatic functions in cells but in the setting of pathological states up-regulated autophagy can exert both protective and detrimental functions. Therefore, the precise role of autophagy and its relationship with the progression of the disease need to be clarified. This review highlights recent findings regarding autophagy activity in vascular cells and its potential contribution to vascular disorders with a focus on atherogenesis. Finally, whether the manipulation of autophagy represents a new therapeutic approach to treat or prevent vascular diseases is also discussed. PMID:25537552