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Sample records for promote t-cell binding

  1. IL-15 prolongs CD154 expression on human CD4 T cells via STAT5 binding to the CD154 transcriptional promoter

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, RM; Genin, A; Orgun, N; Cron, RQ

    2014-01-01

    Activation induced CD154 expression on CD4 T cells is prolonged in systemic lupus erythematosus but the mechanism(s) for its dysregulation are unknown. The studies reported herein demonstrate that IL-15 is capable of prolonging CD154 expression on PHA activated CD4 T cells. Since IL-15 signals through STAT5, predicted STAT5 binding sites in the human CD154 transcriptional promoter were identified, and STAT5 binding to the proximal CD154 promoter in vitro and in vivo following primary CD4 T cell activation was demonstrated. Moreover, overexpression of wild-type(WT) STAT5 in primary human CD4 T cells augmented CD154 transcription, whereas overexpression of a dominant negative (DN) STAT5 protein inhibited CD154 transcription. Mutation of the most proximal STAT5 binding site in the CD154 promoter resulted in diminished DNA binding and reduced CD154 transcriptional activity. Interestingly, STAT5-specific siRNA inhibited CD154 surface expression at 48 but not 24 hours after T cell activation. Thus, these findings provide some of the first evidence to support a possible mechanistic link to explain how the overexpression of IL-15 observed in lupus patients may be involved in the prolonged expression of CD154 that has also been observed on lupus CD4 T cells. PMID:24500400

  2. Anti-TNF drives regulatory T cell expansion by paradoxically promoting membrane TNF-TNF-RII binding in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Dao Xuan; Ehrenstein, Michael R

    2016-06-27

    The interplay between inflammatory and regulatory pathways orchestrates an effective immune response that provides protection from pathogens while limiting injury to host tissue. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a pivotal inflammatory cytokine, but there is conflicting evidence as to whether it boosts or inhibits regulatory T cells (T reg cells). In this study, we show that the therapeutic anti-TNF antibody adalimumab, but not the soluble TNF receptor etanercept, paradoxically promoted the interaction between monocytes and T reg cells isolated from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Adalimumab bound to monocyte membrane TNF from RA patients and unexpectedly enhanced its expression and its binding to TNF-RII expressed on T reg cells. As a consequence, adalimumab expanded functional Foxp3(+) T reg cells equipped to suppress Th17 cells through an IL-2/STAT5-dependent mechanism. Our data not only highlight the beneficial effect of membrane TNF on T reg cell numbers during chronic inflammation, but in addition reveal how a therapeutic antibody that is thought to act by simply blocking its target can enhance the regulatory properties of this proinflammatory cytokine. PMID:27270893

  3. Tumor-promoting function and prognostic significance of the RNA-binding protein T-cell intracellular antigen-1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Yuji; Naruto, Takuya; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Miyakami, Yuko; Watanabe, Miki; Kudo, Yasusei; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Otsuji, Eigo; Imoto, Issei

    2016-01-01

    T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA1) is an RNA-binding protein involved in many regulatory aspects of mRNA metabolism. Here, we report previously unknown tumor-promoting activity of TIA1, which seems to be associated with its isoform-specific molecular distribution and regulation of a set of cancer-related transcripts, in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Immunohistochemical overexpression of TIA1 ectopically localized in the cytoplasm of tumor cells was an independent prognosticator for worse overall survival in a cohort of 143 ESCC patients. Knockdown of TIA1 inhibited proliferation of ESCC cells. By exogenously introducing each of two major isoforms, TIA1a and TIA1b, only TIA1a, which was localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm, promoted anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent ESCC cell proliferation. Ribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitation, followed by microarray analysis or massive-parallel sequencing, identified a set of TIA1-binding mRNAs, including SKP2 and CCNA2. TIA1 increased SKP2 and CCNA2 protein levels through the suppression of mRNA decay and translational induction, respectively. Our findings uncover a novel oncogenic function of TIA1 in esophageal tumorigenesis, and implicate its use as a marker for prognostic evaluation and as a therapeutic target in ESCC. PMID:26958940

  4. β-Catenin Upregulates the Constitutive and Virus-Induced Transcriptional Capacity of the Interferon Beta Promoter through T-Cell Factor Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Marcato, Vasco; Luron, Lionel; Laqueuvre, Lucie M.; Simon, Dominique; Mansuroglu, Zeyni; Flamand, Marie; Panthier, Jean-Jacques; Souès, Sylvie; Massaad, Charbel

    2015-01-01

    Rapid upregulation of interferon beta (IFN-β) expression following virus infection is essential to set up an efficient innate antiviral response. Biological roles related to the antiviral and immune response have also been associated with the constitutive production of IFN-β in naive cells. However, the mechanisms capable of modulating constitutive IFN-β expression in the absence of infection remain largely unknown. In this work, we demonstrate that inhibition of the kinase glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) leads to the upregulation of the constitutive level of IFN-β expression in noninfected cells, provided that GSK-3 inhibition is correlated with the binding of β-catenin to the IFN-β promoter. Under these conditions, IFN-β expression occurred through the T-cell factor (TCF) binding sites present on the IFN-β promoter independently of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). Enhancement of the constitutive level of IFN-β per se was able to confer an efficient antiviral state to naive cells and acted in synergy with virus infection to stimulate virus-induced IFN-β expression. Further emphasizing the role of β-catenin in the innate antiviral response, we show here that highly pathogenic Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) targets the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and the formation of active TCF/β-catenin complexes at the transcriptional and protein level in RVFV-infected cells and mice. PMID:26459757

  5. PI3Kδ promotes CD4(+) T-cell interactions with antigen-presenting cells by increasing LFA-1 binding to ICAM-1.

    PubMed

    Garçon, Fabien; Okkenhaug, Klaus

    2016-05-01

    Activation of T lymphocytes by peptide/major histocompatibility complex on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) involves dynamic contacts between the two cells, during which T cells undergo marked morphological changes. These interactions are facilitated by integrins. Activation of the T cells increases the binding of the integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) expressed by T cells to intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and ICAM-2 expressed by APCs. The signalling pathways that control integrin affinities are incompletely defined. The phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) generate second-messenger signalling molecules that control cell growth, proliferation, differentiation and trafficking. Here we show that in T cells, PI3Kδ attenuates the activation of Rac1, but sustains the activation of Rap1. Consequently, PI3Kδ increases LFA-1-dependent adhesion to form stable conjugates with APCs. Increased Rap1 activity and LFA-1 adhesion were only in part mediated by the downstream kinase Akt, suggesting the involvement of additional phosphatidylinositol(3,4,5)P3-binding proteins. These results establish a link between PI3K activity, cytoskeletal changes and integrin binding and help explain the impaired T-cell-dependent immune responses in PI3Kδ-deficient mice. PMID:26740009

  6. PI3Kδ promotes CD4+ T-cell interactions with antigen-presenting cells by increasing LFA-1 binding to ICAM-1

    PubMed Central

    Garçon, Fabien; Okkenhaug, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Activation of T lymphocytes by peptide/major histocompatibility complex on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) involves dynamic contacts between the two cells, during which T cells undergo marked morphological changes. These interactions are facilitated by integrins. Activation of the T cells increases the binding of the integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) expressed by T cells to intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and ICAM-2 expressed by APCs. The signalling pathways that control integrin affinities are incompletely defined. The phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) generate second-messenger signalling molecules that control cell growth, proliferation, differentiation and trafficking. Here we show that in T cells, PI3Kδ attenuates the activation of Rac1, but sustains the activation of Rap1. Consequently, PI3Kδ increases LFA-1-dependent adhesion to form stable conjugates with APCs. Increased Rap1 activity and LFA-1 adhesion were only in part mediated by the downstream kinase Akt, suggesting the involvement of additional phosphatidylinositol(3,4,5)P3-binding proteins. These results establish a link between PI3K activity, cytoskeletal changes and integrin binding and help explain the impaired T-cell-dependent immune responses in PI3Kδ-deficient mice. PMID:26740009

  7. Nck Binds to the T Cell Antigen Receptor Using Its SH3.1 and SH2 Domains in a Cooperative Manner, Promoting TCR Functioning.

    PubMed

    Paensuwan, Pussadee; Hartl, Frederike A; Yousefi, O Sascha; Ngoenkam, Jatuporn; Wipa, Piyamaporn; Beck-Garcia, Esmeralda; Dopfer, Elaine P; Khamsri, Boonruang; Sanguansermsri, Donruedee; Minguet, Susana; Schamel, Wolfgang W; Pongcharoen, Sutatip

    2016-01-01

    Ligand binding to the TCR causes a conformational change at the CD3 subunits to expose the CD3ε cytoplasmic proline-rich sequence (PRS). It was suggested that the PRS is important for TCR signaling and T cell activation. It has been shown that the purified, recombinant SH3.1 domain of the adaptor molecule noncatalytic region of tyrosine kinase (Nck) can bind to the exposed PRS of CD3ε, but the molecular mechanism of how full-length Nck binds to the TCR in cells has not been investigated so far. Using the in situ proximity ligation assay and copurifications, we show that the binding of Nck to the TCR requires partial phosphorylation of CD3ε, as it is based on two cooperating interactions. First, the SH3.1(Nck) domain has to bind to the nonphosphorylated and exposed PRS, that is, the first ITAM tyrosine has to be in the unphosphorylated state. Second, the SH2(Nck) domain has to bind to the second ITAM tyrosine in the phosphorylated state. Likewise, mutations of the SH3.1 and SH2 domains in Nck1 resulted in the loss of Nck1 binding to the TCR. Furthermore, expression of an SH3.1-mutated Nck impaired TCR signaling and T cell activation. Our data suggest that the exact pattern of CD3ε phosphorylation is critical for TCR functioning. PMID:26590318

  8. The transcription factor NFAT promotes exhaustion of activated CD8⁺ T cells.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Gustavo J; Pereira, Renata M; Äijö, Tarmo; Kim, Edward Y; Marangoni, Francesco; Pipkin, Matthew E; Togher, Susan; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Zhang, Yi Chen; Crotty, Shane; Lamperti, Edward D; Ansel, K Mark; Mempel, Thorsten R; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Hogan, Patrick G; Rao, Anjana

    2015-02-17

    During persistent antigen stimulation, CD8(+) T cells show a gradual decrease in effector function, referred to as exhaustion, which impairs responses in the setting of tumors and infections. Here we demonstrate that the transcription factor NFAT controls the program of T cell exhaustion. When expressed in cells, an engineered form of NFAT1 unable to interact with AP-1 transcription factors diminished T cell receptor (TCR) signaling, increased the expression of inhibitory cell surface receptors, and interfered with the ability of CD8(+) T cells to protect against Listeria infection and attenuate tumor growth in vivo. We defined the genomic regions occupied by endogenous and engineered NFAT1 in primary CD8(+) T cells and showed that genes directly induced by the engineered NFAT1 overlapped with genes expressed in exhausted CD8(+) T cells in vivo. Our data show that NFAT promotes T cell anergy and exhaustion by binding at sites that do not require cooperation with AP-1. PMID:25680272

  9. Ethanol promotes T cell apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kapasi, Aditi A; Patel, Geeta; Goenka, Anuj; Nahar, Nilay; Modi, Neeraj; Bhaskaran, Madhu; Reddy, Krishna; Franki, Nicholas; Patel, Jaimita; Singhal, Pravin C

    2003-01-01

    Clinical reports suggest that acute ethanol intoxication is often associated with lymphopenia. Previously, ethanol was reported to invoke thymocyte apoptosis. We studied the effect of ethanol on T cell apoptosis. In addition, we evaluated the molecular mechanism of ethanol-induced T cell apoptosis. Human T cells harvested from healthy subjects after an alcohol drinking binge showed enhanced T cell apoptosis (before, 0·4 ± 0·2% versus after, 19·6 ± 2·5% apoptotic lymphocytes/field; P < 0·001). In in vitro studies, ethanol in a concentration of 50 mm and higher enhanced the apoptosis of Jurkat cells. DNA isolated from ethanol-treated Jurkat cells displayed integer multiples of 180 base pairs. Ethanol decreased Jurkat cell expression of Bcl-2, whereas ethanol increased Jurkat cell expression of Bax. Jurkat cells treated with ethanol also showed translocation of cytochrome C into cytosol. Moreover, a caspase-9 inhibitor partially inhibited ethanol-induced Jurkat cell apoptosis. In in vivo studies, after binge drinking, T cell expression of Bcl-2 also decreased. In addition, binge drinking induced the cleavage of caspase-3, suggesting activation of caspase-3 in T cells. These results suggest that ethanol promotes T cell apoptosis through the activation of intrinsic or mitochondrial pathway. PMID:12603597

  10. Dengue virus specific dual HLA binding T cell epitopes induce CD8+ T cell responses in seropositive individuals.

    PubMed

    Comber, Joseph D; Karabudak, Aykan; Huang, Xiaofang; Piazza, Paolo A; Marques, Ernesto T A; Philip, Ramila

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus infects an estimated 300 million people each year and even more are at risk of becoming infected as the virus continues to spread into new areas. Despite the increase in viral prevalence, no anti-viral medications or vaccines are approved for treating or preventing infection. CD8+ T cell responses play a major role in viral clearance. Therefore, effective vaccines that induce a broad, multi-functional T cell response with substantial cross-reactivity between all virus serotypes can have major impacts on reducing infection rates and infection related complications. Here, we took an immunoproteomic approach to identify novel MHC class I restricted T cell epitopes presented by dengue virus infected cells, representing the natural and authentic targets of the T cell response. Using this approach we identified 4 novel MHC-I restricted epitopes: 2 with the binding motif for HLA-A24 molecules and 2 with both HLA-A2 and HLA-A24 binding motifs. These peptides were able to activate CD8+ T cell responses in both healthy, seronegative individuals and in seropositive individuals who have previously been infected with dengue virus. Importantly, the dual binding epitopes activated pre-existing T cell precursors in PBMCs obtained from both HLA-A2+ and HLA-A24+ seropositive individuals. Together, the data indicate that these epitopes are immunologically relevant T cell activating peptides presented on infected cells during a natural infection and therefore may serve as candidate antigens for the development of effective multi-serotype specific dengue virus vaccines. PMID:25668665

  11. Dengue virus specific dual HLA binding T cell epitopes induce CD8+ T cell responses in seropositive individuals

    PubMed Central

    Comber, Joseph D; Karabudak, Aykan; Huang, Xiaofang; Piazza, Paolo A; Marques, Ernesto T A; Philip, Ramila

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus infects an estimated 300 million people each year and even more are at risk of becoming infected as the virus continues to spread into new areas. Despite the increase in viral prevalence, no anti-viral medications or vaccines are approved for treating or preventing infection. CD8+ T cell responses play a major role in viral clearance. Therefore, effective vaccines that induce a broad, multi-functional T cell response with substantial cross-reactivity between all virus serotypes can have major impacts on reducing infection rates and infection related complications. Here, we took an immunoproteomic approach to identify novel MHC class I restricted T cell epitopes presented by dengue virus infected cells, representing the natural and authentic targets of the T cell response. Using this approach we identified 4 novel MHC-I restricted epitopes: 2 with the binding motif for HLA-A24 molecules and 2 with both HLA-A2 and HLA-A24 binding motifs. These peptides were able to activate CD8+ T cell responses in both healthy, seronegative individuals and in seropositive individuals who have previously been infected with dengue virus. Importantly, the dual binding epitopes activated pre-existing T cell precursors in PBMCs obtained from both HLA-A2+ and HLA-A24+ seropositive individuals. Together, the data indicate that these epitopes are immunologically relevant T cell activating peptides presented on infected cells during a natural infection and therefore may serve as candidate antigens for the development of effective multi-serotype specific dengue virus vaccines. PMID:25668665

  12. The adenovirus e3 promoter is sensitive to activation signals in human T cells.

    PubMed

    Mahr, Jeffrey A; Boss, Jeremy M; Gooding, Linda R

    2003-01-01

    The group C adenoviruses typically cause acute respiratory disease in young children. In addition, a persistent phase of infection has been observed in which virus may be shed for years without producing overt pathology. Our laboratory recently reported that group C adenovirus DNA can be found in tonsil and adenoid T lymphocytes from the majority of pediatric donors (C. T. Garnett, D. Erdman, W. Xu, and L. R. Gooding, J. Virol. 76:10608-10616, 2002). This finding suggests that immune evasion strategies of human adenoviruses may be directed, in part, toward protection of persistently or latently infected T lymphocytes. Many of the adenoviral gene products implicated in prevention of immune destruction of virus-infected cells are encoded within the E3 transcription unit. In this study, the E3 promoter was evaluated for sensitivity to T-cell activation signals by using a promoter reporter plasmid. Indeed, this promoter is extremely sensitive to T-cell activation, with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) plus ionomycin increasing E3-directed transcription 100-fold. By comparison, in the same cells E1A expression leads to a 5.5-fold increase in transcription from the E3 promoter. In contrast to induction by E1A, activation by PMA plus ionomycin requires the two E3 NF-kappaB binding sites. Interestingly, expression of E1A inhibits induction of the E3 promoter in response to T-cell activation while increasing E3 promoter activity in unactivated cells. Collectively, these data suggest that the E3 promoter may have evolved the capacity to respond to T-cell activation in the absence of E1A expression and may act to upregulate antiapoptotic gene expression in order to promote survival of persistently infected T lymphocytes. PMID:12502827

  13. The DNA-binding inhibitor Id3 regulates IL-9 production in CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Nakatsukasa, Hiroko; Zhang, Dunfang; Maruyama, Takashi; Chen, Hua; Cui, Kairong; Ishikawa, Masaki; Deng, Lisa; Zanvit, Peter; Tu, Eric; Jin, Wenwen; Abbatiello, Brittany; Goldberg, Nathan; Chen, Qianming; Sun, Lingyun; Zhao, Keji; Chen, WanJun

    2015-10-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which signaling via transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and interleukin 4 (IL-4) control the differentiation of CD4(+) IL-9-producing helper T cells (TH9 cells) remain incompletely understood. We found here that the DNA-binding inhibitor Id3 regulated TH9 differentiation, as deletion of Id3 increased IL-9 production from CD4(+) T cells. Mechanistically, TGF-β1 and IL-4 downregulated Id3 expression, and this process required the kinase TAK1. A reduction in Id3 expression enhanced binding of the transcription factors E2A and GATA-3 to the Il9 promoter region, which promoted Il9 transcription. Notably, Id3-mediated control of TH9 differentiation regulated anti-tumor immunity in an experimental melanoma-bearing model in vivo and also in human CD4(+) T cells in vitro. Thus, our study reveals a previously unrecognized TAK1-Id3-E2A-GATA-3 pathway that regulates TH9 differentiation. PMID:26322481

  14. Promoting transplantation tolerance; adoptive regulatory T cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Safinia, N; Leech, J; Hernandez-Fuentes, M; Lechler, R; Lombardi, G

    2013-01-01

    Transplantation is a successful treatment for end-stage organ failure. Despite improvements in short-term outcome, long-term survival remains suboptimal because of the morbidity and mortality associated with long-term use of immunosuppression. There is, therefore, a pressing need to devise protocols that induce tolerance in order to minimize or completely withdraw immunosuppression in transplant recipients. In this review we will discuss how regulatory T cells (Tregs) came to be recognized as an attractive way to promote transplantation tolerance. We will summarize the preclinical data, supporting the importance of these cells in the induction and maintenance of immune tolerance and that provide the rationale for the isolation and expansion of these cells for cellular therapy. We will also describe the data from the first clinical trials, using Tregs to inhibit graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation and will address both the challenges and opportunities in human Treg cell therapy. PMID:23574313

  15. EMSA Eritin Drives Expansion of Regulatory T Cells and Promotes T Cells Differentiation in Irradiated Mice.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mansur; Widjajanto, Edi; Widodo, M Aris; Sumitro, Sutiman B

    2016-07-01

    Sublethal irradiation therapy in cancer treatment causes generalized immunosuppression, which results in a range of DNA damage. We examined the significance of a polyherbal medicine called "EMSA Eritin" on immunological responses in sublethally irradiated mice focusing on the involvement of Treg, naïve T cell, and also the development and differentiation of T cells in thymus. Normal BALB/c mice were sublethally irradiated with dose of 600 rad. The irradiated mice were then orally administered by EMSA Eritin once a day at different doses: 1.04, 3.12, 9.37 mg/g body weight. The treatment was performed for 14 days. On day 15, immunological responses were observed by analyzing the status of Treg and differentiation of T cells in thymus. The administration of EMSA Eritin to irradiated mice resulted in a significant increase of pre T cells, Treg cells, and naïve T cells, which in general could maintain and normalize healthy condition in mice. PMID:26170134

  16. Nuclear matrix binding protein SMAR1 regulates T-cell differentiation and allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Chemmannur, S V; Badhwar, A J; Mirlekar, B; Malonia, S K; Gupta, M; Wadhwa, N; Bopanna, R; Mabalirajan, U; Majumdar, S; Ghosh, B; Chattopadhyay, S

    2015-11-01

    Asthma is a complex airway allergic disease involving the interplay of various cell types, cytokines, and transcriptional factors. Though many factors contribute to disease etiology, the molecular control of disease phenotype and responsiveness is not well understood. Here we report an essential role of the matrix attachment region (MAR)-binding protein SMAR1 in regulating immune response during allergic airway disease. Conditional knockout of SMAR1 in T cells rendered the mice resistant to eosinophilic airway inflammation against ovalbumin (OVA) allergen with low immunoglobulin E (IgE) and interleukin-5 (IL-5) levels. Moreover, a lower IgE/IgG2a ratio and higher interferon-γ (IFN-γ) response suggested aberrant skewing of T-cell differentiation toward type 1 helper T cell (Th1) response. We show that SMAR1 functions as a negative regulator of Th1 and Th17 differentiation by interacting with two potential and similar MAR regions present on the promoters of T-bet and IL-17. Thus, we present SMAR1 as a regulator of T-cell differentiation that favors the establishment of Th2 cells by modulating Th1 and Th17 responses. PMID:25736456

  17. End-binding protein 1 controls signal propagation from the T cell receptor

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Cófreces, Noa B; Baixauli, Francesc; López, María J; Gil, Diana; Monjas, Alicia; Alarcón, Balbino; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    The role of microtubules (MTs) in the control and dynamics of the immune synapse (IS) remains unresolved. Here, we show that T cell activation requires the growth of MTs mediated by the plus-end specific protein end-binding 1 (EB1). A direct interaction of the T cell receptor (TCR) complex with EB1 provides the molecular basis for EB1 activity promoting TCR encounter with signalling vesicles at the IS. EB1 knockdown alters TCR dynamics at the IS and prevents propagation of the TCR activation signal to LAT, thus inhibiting activation of PLCγ1 and its localization to the IS. These results identify a role for EB1 interaction with the TCR in controlling TCR sorting and its connection with the LAT/PLCγ1 signalosome. PMID:22922463

  18. Binding of WIP to Actin Is Essential for T Cell Actin Cytoskeleton Integrity and Tissue Homing

    PubMed Central

    Massaad, Michel J.; Oyoshi, Michiko K.; Kane, Jennifer; Koduru, Suresh; Alcaide, Pilar; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Ramesh, Narayanaswamy; Luscinskas, Francis W.; Hartwig, John

    2014-01-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) is important for actin polymerization in T cells and for their migration. WASp-interacting protein (WIP) binds to and stabilizes WASp and also interacts with actin. Cytoskeletal and functional defects are more severe in WIP−/− T cells, which lack WASp, than in WASp−/− T cells, suggesting that WIP interaction with actin may be important for T cell cytoskeletal integrity and function. We constructed mice that lack the actin-binding domain of WIP (WIPΔABD mice). WIPΔABD associated normally with WASp but not F-actin. T cells from WIPΔABD mice had normal WASp levels but decreased cellular F-actin content, a disorganized actin cytoskeleton, impaired chemotaxis, and defective homing to lymph nodes. WIPΔABD mice exhibited a T cell intrinsic defect in contact hypersensitivity and impaired responses to cutaneous challenge with protein antigen. Adoptively transferred antigen-specific CD4+ T cells from WIPΔABD mice had decreased homing to antigen-challenged skin of wild-type recipients. These findings show that WIP binding to actin, independently of its binding to WASp, is critical for the integrity of the actin cytoskeleton in T cells and for their migration into tissues. Disruption of WIP binding to actin could be of therapeutic value in T cell-driven inflammatory diseases. PMID:25246631

  19. Spatial congregation of STAT binding directs selective nuclear architecture during T-cell functional differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Ofir; Sung, Myong-Hee; Nakayamada, Shingo; Voss, Ty C.; Baek, Songjoon; Hager, Gordon L.

    2013-01-01

    Higher-order genome organization shows tissue-specific patterns. However, functional relevance and the mechanisms shaping the genome architecture are poorly understood. Here we report a profound shift from promiscuous to highly selective genome organization that accompanies the effector lineage choice of differentiating T cells. As multipotent naive cells receive antigenic signals and commit to a T helper (Th) pathway, the genome-wide contacts of a lineage-specific cytokine locus are preferentially enriched for functionally relevant genes. Despite the establishment of divergent interactomes and global reprogramming of transcription in Th1 versus Th2, the overall expression status of the contact genes is surprisingly similar between the two lineages. Importantly, during differentiation, the genomic contacts are retained and strengthened precisely at DNA binding sites of the specific lineage-determining STAT transcription factor. In cells from the specific STAT knock-out mouse, the signature cytokine locus is unable to shed the promiscuous contacts established in the naive T cells, indicating the importance of genomic STAT binding. Altogether, the global aggregation of STAT binding loci from genic and nongenic regions highlights a new role for differentiation-promoting transcription factors in direct specification of higher-order nuclear architecture through interacting with regulatory regions. Such subnuclear environments have significant implications for efficient functioning of the mature effector lymphocytes. PMID:23212947

  20. Angiopoietin 2 stimulates TIE2-expressing monocytes to suppress T cell activation and to promote regulatory T cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Seth B; Chen, Yung-Yi; Muthana, Munitta; Welford, Abigail F; Tal, Andrea O; Scholz, Alexander; Plate, Karl H; Reiss, Yvonne; Murdoch, Craig; De Palma, Michele; Lewis, Claire E

    2011-04-01

    Angiopoietin 2 (ANGPT2) is a proangiogenic cytokine whose expression is often upregulated by endothelial cells in tumors. Expression of its receptor, TIE2, defines a highly proangiogenic subpopulation of myeloid cells in circulation and tumors called TIE2-expressing monocytes/macrophages (TEMs). Genetic depletion of TEMs markedly reduces tumor angiogenesis in various tumor models, emphasizing their essential role in driving tumor progression. Previously, we demonstrated that ANGPT2 augments the expression of various proangiogenic genes, the potent immunosuppressive cytokine, IL-10, and a chemokine for regulatory T cells (Tregs), CCL17 by TEMs in vitro. We now show that TEMs also express higher levels of IL-10 than TIE2(-) macrophages in tumors and that ANGPT2-stimulated release of IL-10 by TEMs suppresses T cell proliferation, increases the ratio of CD4(+) T cells to CD8(+) T cells, and promotes the expansion of CD4(+)CD25(high)FOXP3(+) Tregs. Furthermore, syngeneic murine tumors expressing high levels of ANGPT2 contained not only high numbers of TEMs but also increased numbers of Tregs, whereas genetic depletion of tumor TEMs resulted in a marked reduction in the frequency of Tregs in tumors. Taken together, our data suggest that ANGPT2-stimulated TEMs represent a novel, potent immunosuppressive force in tumors. PMID:21368233

  1. Promoting metastasis: neutrophils and T cells join forces.

    PubMed

    Fridlender, Zvi G; Albelda, Steven M; Granot, Zvi

    2015-07-01

    The role neutrophils play in cancer is a matter of debate as both pro- and anti-tumor functions have been documented. In a recent publication in Nature, Coffelt et al. identify a new mechanism where neutrophils and T cells cooperate to generate metastasis-supporting immune suppression. PMID:26138787

  2. Unusual features of Self-Peptide/MHC Binding by Autoimmune T Cell Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson,M.; Hahn, M.; Wucherpfennig, K.

    2005-01-01

    Structural studies on T cell receptors (TCRs) specific for foreign antigens demonstrated a remarkably similar topology characterized by a central, diagonal TCR binding mode that maximizes interactions with the MHC bound peptide. However, three recent structures involving autoimmune TCRs demonstrated unusual interactions with self-peptide/MHC complexes. Two TCRs from multiple sclerosis patients bind with unconventional topologies, and both TCRs are shifted toward the peptide N terminus and the MHC class II {beta} chain helix. A TCR from the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model binds in a conventional orientation, but the structure is unusual because the self-peptide only partially fills the binding site. For all three TCRs, interaction with the MHC bound self-peptide is suboptimal, and only two or three TCR loops contact the peptide. Optimal TCR binding modes confer a competitive advantage for antimicrobial T cells during an infection, whereas altered binding properties may permit survival of a subset of autoreactive T cells during thymic selection.

  3. Predictions of T-cell receptor- and major histocompatibility complex-binding sites on staphylococcal enterotoxin C1.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, M L; Jablonski, L M; Crum, K K; Hackett, S P; Chi, Y I; Stauffacher, C V; Stevens, D L; Bohach, G A

    1994-01-01

    We have focused on regions of staphylococcal enterotoxin C1 (SEC1) causing immunomodulation. N-terminal deletion mutants lacking residues 6 through 13 induced T-cell proliferation similar to that induced by native toxin. However, mutants with residues deleted between positions 19 and 33, although nonmitogenic themselves, were able to inhibit both SEC1-induced T-cell proliferation and binding of the native toxin to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II. Presumably, these deletions define a part of SEC1 that interacts with the T-cell receptor. Three synthetic peptides containing residues located in a region analogous to the alpha 5 groove of SEC3 had residual mitogenic activity or blocked T-cell proliferation induced by SEC1 and appear to recognize the same site as SEC1 on a receptor for the toxin, presumably MHC class II. We conclude that isolated portions of the SEC1 molecule can retain residual mitogenic activity but that the entire protein is needed to achieve maximal superantigenic stimulation. Our results, together with the results of other investigators, support a model in which SEC1 binds to an alpha helix of MHC class II through a central groove in the toxin and thereby promotes or stabilizes the interaction between antigen-presenting cells and T cells. Images PMID:8039910

  4. Immunopathology of experimental Chagas' disease: binding of T cells to Trypanosoma cruzi-infected heart tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Mortatti, R C; Maia, L C; de Oliveira, A V; Munk, M E

    1990-01-01

    The immunopathology of Chagas' disease was studied in the experimental model of chronic infection in C57BL/10JT or mice. Sublethal infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, Y strain, induced specific antibodies and a delayed hypersensitivity response to parasite antigens. Mice developed chronic chagasic myocarditis but not skeletal muscle myositis. Binding of T cells to infected heart tissue was investigated during short-term cocultivation of lymphocytes with heart cryostat sections. T cells from infected mice and from normal controls bound equally to myocardium and liver sections from both infected and normal mice. A search in depth was attempted with cells heavily tagged with 99mTc. Labeled T cells from chagasic mice bound to both normal and infected myocardium slices. 99mTc-labeled T cells from controls gave the same binding values. Glass-adherent spleen cells behaved identically to T cells. Prior treatment of the tissue with serum from chronically infected mice did not increase the number of binding cells. Peritoneal macrophages tagged with 99mTc-sulfur colloid also bound to infected myocardium slices. The binding of macrophages was not changed by pretreatment of infected tissue with anti-T, cruzi antibodies. In short, this work did not detect any population of T cells or macrophages which could bind specifically to infected heart tissue to initiate an autoreactive process. Images PMID:2228230

  5. MeCP2 enforces Foxp3 expression to promote regulatory T cells' resilience to inflammation.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaoran; Jiang, Shan; Liu, Si-Qi; Lykken, Erik; Zhao, Lin-tao; Sevilla, Jose; Zhu, Bo; Li, Qi-Jing

    2014-07-01

    Forkhead box P3(+) (Foxp3(+)) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are crucial for peripheral tolerance. During inflammation, steady Foxp3 expression in Tregs is essential for maintaining their lineage identity and suppressive function. However, the molecular machinery governing Tregs' resilience to inflammation-induced Foxp3 destabilization remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2), an eminent epigenetic regulator known primarily as the etiological factor of Rett syndrome, is critical to sustain Foxp3 expression in Tregs during inflammation. In response to inflammatory stimuli, MeCP2 is specifically recruited to the Conserved Non-Coding sequence 2 region of the foxp3 locus, where it collaborates with cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 to promote local histone H3 acetylation, thereby counteracting inflammation-induced epigenetic silencing of foxp3. Consequently, Treg-specific deletion of MeCP2 causes spontaneous immune activation in mice and failure in protection against autoimmunity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Foxp3 expression in MeCP2-deficient Tregs diminishes with time, resulting in their failure to suppress effector T-cell-mediated colitis. Thus, MeCP2 serves as a critical safeguard that confers Tregs with resilience against inflammation. PMID:24958888

  6. Differential interaction of nuclear factors with the leukocyte-specific pp52 promoter in B and T cells.

    PubMed

    Omori, S A; Smale, S; O'Shea-Greenfield, A; Wall, R

    1997-08-15

    The leukocyte-specific, cytoskeleton-binding pp52 (LSP-1, WP-34) protein is widely expressed in multiple leukocyte lineages, including B and T lymphocytes, granulocytes, and macrophages. We previously detected a tissue-specific promoter preceding the exon encoding the N terminus of the pp52 leukocyte protein. Here we describe the functional characterization of this promoter and identification of the factors in B and T cells that regulate its activity. The pp52 promoter contains an initiator specifying the unique 5' terminus of pp52 mRNA, tandem pairs of Ets and SP1 motifs, and a lone C/EBP motif. All these motifs are essential and collectively control transcriptional activity. DNA binding studies and Ab supershift assays revealed that different combinations of factors interact with these motifs in B cells vs T cells. The Ets motifs are preferentially bound by PU-1 in B cell extracts from all stages of development, whereas a different Ets family member reacts with these motifs in T cell extracts. The C/EBP motif is bound by Ig/EBP-1 in pre-B cell and T cell extracts, but is replaced by nuclear factor-IL-6beta or a nuclear factor-IL-6beta-Ig/EBP-1 heterodimer in plasmacytoma cell extracts. Despite its reported role as a negative regulator of transcription, Ig/EBP-1 appears to exert a stimulatory effect on this promoter. These findings reveal the features controlling the pp52 promoter in B and T cells and provide the foundation for determining the regulation of this promoter in other leukocyte lineages. PMID:9257843

  7. Functional analysis of the murine T-cell receptor beta enhancer and characteristics of its DNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, J; Cheng, A; Mauxion, F; Nelson, C A; Newberry, R D; Sha, W C; Sen, R; Loh, D Y

    1990-01-01

    The minimal T-cell receptor (TCR) beta-chain (TCR beta) enhancer has been identified by transfection into lymphoid cells. The minimal enhancer was active in T cells and in some B-lineage cells. When a larger fragment containing the minimal enhancer was used, its activity was apparent only in T cells. Studies with phytohemagglutinin and 4 beta-phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate revealed that the enhancer activity was increased by these agents. By a combination of DNase I footprinting, gel mobility shift assay, and methylation interference analysis, seven different motifs were identified within the minimal enhancer. Furthermore, competition experiments showed that some of these elements bound identical or similar factors that are known to bind to the TCR V beta promoter decamer or to the immunoglobulin enhancer kappa E2 or muEBP-E motif. These shared motifs may be important in the differential gene activity among the different lymphoid subsets. Images PMID:2144608

  8. A Unique DNA Binding Domain Converts T-Cell Factors into Strong Wnt Effectors▿

    PubMed Central

    Atcha, Fawzia A.; Syed, Adeela; Wu, Beibei; Hoverter, Nate P.; Yokoyama, Noriko N.; Ting, Ju-Hui T.; Munguia, Jesus E.; Mangalam, Harry J.; Marsh, J. Lawrence; Waterman, Marian L.

    2007-01-01

    Wnt regulation of gene expression requires binding of LEF/T-cell factor (LEF/TCF) transcription factors to Wnt response elements (WREs) and recruitment of the activator β-catenin. There are significant differences in the abilities of LEF/TCF family members to regulate Wnt target genes. For example, alternatively spliced isoforms of TCF-1 and TCF-4 with a C-terminal “E” tail are uniquely potent in their activation of LEF1 and CDX1. Here we report that the mechanism responsible for this unique activity is an auxiliary 30-amino-acid DNA interaction motif referred to here as the “cysteine clamp” (or C-clamp). The C-clamp contains invariant cysteine, aromatic, and basic residues, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies with recombinant C-clamp protein showed that it binds double-stranded DNA but not single-stranded DNA or RNA (equilibrium dissociation constant = 16 nM). CASTing (Cyclic Amplification and Selection of Targets) experiments were used to test whether this motif influences WRE recognition. Full-length LEF-1, TCF-1E, and TCF-1E with a mutated C-clamp all bind nearly identical WREs (TYYCTTTGATSTT), showing that the C-clamp does not alter WRE specificity. However, a GC element downstream of the WRE (RCCG) is enriched in wild-type TCF-1E binding sites but not in mutant TCF-1E binding sites. We conclude that the C-clamp is a sequence-specific DNA binding motif. C-clamp mutations destroy the ability of β-catenin to regulate the LEF1 promoter, and they severely impair the ability of TCF-1 to regulate growth in colon cancer cells. Thus, E-tail isoforms of TCFs utilize two DNA binding activities to access a subset of Wnt targets important for cell growth. PMID:17893322

  9. Itk Signals Promote Neuroinflammation by Regulating CD4+ T-Cell Activation and Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Arun K.; Kim, Do-Geun

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate that interleukin-2-inducible T-cell kinase (Itk) signaling in cluster of differentiation 4-positive (CD4+) T cells promotes experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). We show that Itk−/− mice exhibit reduced disease severity, and transfer of Itk−/− CD4+ T cells into T cell-deficient recipients results in lower disease severity. We observed a significant reduction of CD4+ T cells in the CNS of Itk−/− mice or recipients of Itk−/− CD4+ T cells during EAE, which is consistent with attenuated disease. Itk−/− CD4+ T cells exhibit defective response to myelin antigen stimulation attributable to displacement of filamentous actin from the CD4+ coreceptor. This results in inadequate transmigration of Itk−/− CD4+ T cells into the CNS and across brain endothelial barriers in vitro. Finally, Itk−/− CD4+ T cells show significant reduction in production of T-helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 cytokines and exhibit skewed T effector/T regulatory cell ratios. These results indicate that signaling by Itk promotes autoimmunity and CNS inflammation, suggesting that it may be a viable target for treatment of MS. PMID:25568116

  10. Mechanisms of SHP-1 P2 promoter regulation in hematopoietic cells and its silencing in HTLV-1-transformed T cells.

    PubMed

    Nakase, Koichi; Cheng, Jihua; Zhu, Quan; Marasco, Wayne A

    2009-01-01

    The Src homology-2-containing protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SHP-1), is a negative regulator of cell signaling. It is also considered a tumor suppressor gene because of its ability to antagonize the action of tyrosine kinases. Although SHP-1 is expressed strongly in hematopoietic cells, decreased expression has been observed in various hematological malignancies, which suggests a central involvement of SHP-1 in leukemogenesis. We have shown previously that human T cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) Tax-induced promoter silencing (TIPS) is an early event causing down-regulation of SHP-1 expression, which is dependent on NF-kappaB. In this study, DNase I footprinting and EMSA also revealed binding of transcription factors, specificity protein 1 (Sp1) and octamer-binding transcription factor 1 (Oct-1) to the P2 promoter, and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that these factors contribute to the basal P2 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIP) assays showed that Sp1, Oct-1, NF-kappaB, CREB-1, and RNA polymerase II interacted with the core SHP-1 P2 promoter in CD4+ T cells and Jurkat cells but not in HTLV-1-transformed MT-2 and HUT102 cells when HTLV-1 Tax is present. Furthermore, bisulfite sequencing of the SHP-1 P2 core region revealed heavy CpG methylation in HTLV-1-transformed cells compared with freshly isolated CD4+ T cells and HTLV-1-noninfected T cell lines. A significant inverse correlation between degree of CpG methylation and expression of SHP-1 mRNA or protein was observed. Taken together, our data support the notion that in HTLV-1-transformed CD4+ T cells, TIPS causes dissociation of transcription factors from the core SHP-1 P2 promoter, which in turn leads to subsequent DNA methylation, an important early step for leukemogenesis. PMID:18948549

  11. R-Ras Regulates Murine T Cell Migration and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Binding.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaocai; Yan, Mingfei; Guo, Yihe; Singh, Gobind; Chen, Yuhong; Yu, Mei; Wang, Demin; Hillery, Cheryl A; Chan, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    The trafficking of T-lymphocytes to peripheral draining lymph nodes is crucial for mounting an adaptive immune response. The role of chemokines in the activation of integrins via Ras-related small GTPases has been well established. R-Ras is a member of the Ras-subfamily of small guanosine-5'-triphosphate-binding proteins and its role in T cell trafficking has been investigated in R-Ras null mice (Rras-/-). An examination of the lymphoid organs of Rras-/- mice revealed a 40% reduction in the cellularity of the peripheral lymph nodes. Morphologically, the high endothelial venules of Rras-/- mice were more disorganized and less mature than those of wild-type mice. Furthermore, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from Rras-/- mice had approximately 42% lower surface expression of L-selectin/CD62L. These aberrant peripheral lymph node phenotypes were associated with proliferative and trafficking defects in Rras-/- T cells. Furthermore, R-Ras could be activated by the chemokine, CCL21. Indeed, Rras-/- T cells had approximately 14.5% attenuation in binding to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 upon CCL21 stimulation. Finally, in a graft-versus host disease model, recipient mice that were transfused with Rras-/- T cells showed a significant reduction in disease severity when compared with mice transplanted with wild-type T cells. These findings implicate a role for R-Ras in T cell trafficking in the high endothelial venules during an effective immune response. PMID:26710069

  12. Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 antisense-encoded gene, Hbz, promotes T-lymphocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Joshua; Zimmerman, Bevin; Li, Min; Lairmore, Michael D; Green, Patrick L

    2008-11-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) basic leucine zipper factor (HBZ) is dispensable for HTLV-1-mediated cellular transformation in cell culture, but is required for efficient viral infectivity and persistence in rabbits. In most adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cells, Tax oncoprotein expression is typically low or undetectable, whereas Hbz gene expression is maintained, suggesting that Hbz expression may support infected cell survival and, ultimately, leukemogenesis. Emerging data indicate that HBZ protein can interact with cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) and Jun family members, altering transcription factor binding and transactivation of both viral and cellular promoters. Herein, lentiviral vectors that express Hbz-specific short hairpin (sh)-RNA effectively decreased both Hbz mRNA and HBZ protein expression in transduced HTLV-1-transformed SLB-1 T cells. Hbz knockdown correlated with a significant decrease in T-cell proliferation in culture. Both SLB-1 and SLB-1-Hbz knockdown cells engrafted into inoculated NOD/SCID(gammachain-/-) mice to form solid tumors that also infiltrated multiple tissues. However, tumor formation and organ infiltration were significantly decreased in animals challenged with SLB-1-Hbz knockdown cells. Our data indicate that Hbz expression enhances the proliferative capacity of HTLV-1-infected T cells, playing a critical role in cell survival and ultimately HTLV-1 tumorigenesis in the infected host. PMID:18689544

  13. Activated T cell exosomes promote tumor invasion via Fas signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhijian; Yang, Fei; Yu, Lei; Yu, Zhou; Jiang, Lingling; Wang, Qingqing; Yang, Yunshan; Wang, Lie; Cao, Xuetao; Wang, Jianli

    2012-06-15

    Activated T cells release bioactive Fas ligand (FasL) in exosomes, which subsequently induce self-apoptosis of T cells. However, their potential effects on cell apoptosis in tumors are still unknown. In this study, we purified exosomes expressing FasL from activated CD8(+) T cell from OT-I mice and found that activated T cell exosomes had little effect on apoptosis and proliferation of tumor cells but promoted the invasion of B16 and 3LL cancer cells in vitro via the Fas/FasL pathway. Activated T cell exosomes increased the amount of cellular FLICE inhibitory proteins and subsequently activated the ERK and NF-κB pathways, which subsequently increased MMP9 expression in the B16 murine melanoma cells. In a tumor-invasive model in vivo, we observed that the activated T cell exosomes promoted the migration of B16 tumor cells to lung. Interestingly, pretreatment with FasL mAb significantly reduced the migration of B16 tumor cells to lung. Furthermore, CD8 and FasL double-positive exosomes from tumor mice, but not normal mice, also increased the expression of MMP9 and promoted the invasive ability of B16 murine melanoma and 3LL lung cancer cells. In conclusion, our results indicate that activated T cell exosomes promote melanoma and lung cancer cell metastasis by increasing the expression of MMP9 via Fas signaling, revealing a new mechanism of tumor immune escape. PMID:22573809

  14. LPA Promotes T Cell Recruitment through Synthesis of CXCL13

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Weili; Zhao, Chenqi; Bourgoin, Sylvain G.

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid playing an important role in various inflammatory diseases by inducing expression and secretion of many inflammatory cytokines/chemokines. Here we report in a murine air pouch model of inflammation that LPA induced CXCL13 secretion in a time-dependent manner and with exacerbation of the response when LPA was administered after a pretreatment with TNF-α, a key inflammatory cytokine. LPA mediates recruitment of leukocytes, including that of CD3+ cells into unprimed and TNF-α-primed air pouches. CXCL13 neutralization using a blocking antibody injected into air pouches prior to administration of LPA into TNF-α-primed air pouches decreased CD3+ cell influx. Our data highlight that LPA-mediated CXCL13 secretion plays a role in T cell recruitment and participates in regulation of the inflammatory response. PMID:26339130

  15. Signal strength regulates antigen-mediated T-cell deceleration by distinct mechanisms to promote local exploration or arrest

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Hélène D.; Lemaître, Fabrice; Garrod, Kym R.; Garcia, Zacarias; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria; Bousso, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    T lymphocytes are highly motile cells that decelerate upon antigen recognition. These cells can either completely stop or maintain a low level of motility, forming contacts referred to as synapses or kinapses, respectively. Whether similar or distinct molecular mechanisms regulate T-cell deceleration during synapses or kinapses is unclear. Here, we used microfabricated channels and intravital imaging to observe and manipulate T-cell kinapses and synapses. We report that high-affinity antigen induced a pronounced deceleration selectively dependent on Ca2+ signals and actin-related protein 2/3 complex (Arp2/3) activity. In contrast, low-affinity antigens induced a switch of migration mode that promotes T-cell exploratory behavior, characterized by partial deceleration and frequent direction changes. This switch depended on T-cell receptor binding but was largely independent of downstream signaling. We propose that distinct mechanisms of T-cell deceleration can be triggered during antigenic recognition to favor local exploration and signal integration upon suboptimal stimulus and complete arrest on the best antigen-presenting cells. PMID:26371316

  16. CD31 is required on CD4+ T cells to promote T cell survival during Salmonella infection

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Ewan A; Coughlan, Ruth E; Flores-Langarica, Adriana; Bobat, Saeeda; Marshall, Jennifer L; Hussain, Khiyam; Charlesworth, James; Abhyankar, Nikita; Hitchcock, Jessica; Gil, Cristina; López-Macías, Constantino; Henderson, Ian R; Khan, Mahmood; Watson, Steve P; MacLennan, Ian C M; Buckley, Christopher D; Cunningham, Adam F

    2011-01-01

    Haematopoietic cells constitutively express CD31/PECAM1 a signalling, adhesion receptor associated with controlling responses to inflammatory stimuli. Although expressed on CD4+ T cells, its function on these cells is unclear. To address this we have used a model of systemic Salmonella infection that induces high levels of T cell activation and depends upon CD4+ T cells for resolution. Infection of CD31-deficient (CD31KO) mice demonstrates that these mice fail to control infection effectively. During infection, CD31KO mice have diminished numbers of total CD4+ T cells and IFN-γ-secreting Th1 cells. This is despite a higher proportion of CD31KO CD4+ T cells exhibiting an activated phenotype, and an undiminished capacity to prime normally and polarize to Th1. Reduced numbers of T cells reflected the increased propensity of naive and activated CD31KO T cells to undergo apoptosis after infection compared to wild-type (WT) T cells. Using adoptive transfer experiments we show that loss of CD31 on CD4+ T cells alone is sufficient to account for the defective CD31KO T cell accumulation. These data are consistent with CD31 helping to control T cell activation as in its absence T cells have a greater propensity to become activated, resulting in increased susceptibility to become apoptotic. The impact of CD31 loss on T cell homeostasis becomes most pronounced during severe, inflammatory and immunological stresses such as those caused by systemic Salmonella infection. This identifies a novel role for CD31 in regulating CD4 T cell homeostasis. PMID:21734076

  17. R-Ras Regulates Murine T Cell Migration and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiaocai; Yan, Mingfei; Guo, Yihe; Singh, Gobind; Chen, Yuhong; Yu, Mei; Wang, Demin; Hillery, Cheryl A.; Chan, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    The trafficking of T-lymphocytes to peripheral draining lymph nodes is crucial for mounting an adaptive immune response. The role of chemokines in the activation of integrins via Ras-related small GTPases has been well established. R-Ras is a member of the Ras-subfamily of small guanosine-5’-triphosphate-binding proteins and its role in T cell trafficking has been investigated in R-Ras null mice (Rras−/−). An examination of the lymphoid organs of Rras−/− mice revealed a 40% reduction in the cellularity of the peripheral lymph nodes. Morphologically, the high endothelial venules of Rras−/− mice were more disorganized and less mature than those of wild-type mice. Furthermore, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from Rras−/− mice had approximately 42% lower surface expression of L-selectin/CD62L. These aberrant peripheral lymph node phenotypes were associated with proliferative and trafficking defects in Rras−/− T cells. Furthermore, R-Ras could be activated by the chemokine, CCL21. Indeed, Rras−/− T cells had approximately 14.5% attenuation in binding to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 upon CCL21 stimulation. Finally, in a graft-versus host disease model, recipient mice that were transfused with Rras−/− T cells showed a significant reduction in disease severity when compared with mice transplanted with wild-type T cells. These findings implicate a role for R-Ras in T cell trafficking in the high endothelial venules during an effective immune response. PMID:26710069

  18. Loss of PTEN promotes resistance to T cell-mediated immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Weiyi; Chen, Jie Qing; Liu, Chengwen; Malu, Shruti; Creasy, Caitlin; Tetzlaff, Michael T; Xu, Chunyu; McKenzie, Jodi A; Zhang, Chunlei; Liang, Xiaoxuan; Williams, Leila J; Deng, Wanleng; Chen, Guo; Mbofung, Rina; Lazar, Alexander J; Torres-Cabala, Carlos A; Cooper, Zachary A; Chen, Pei-Ling; Tieu, Trang N; Spranger, Stefani; Yu, Xiaoxing; Bernatchez, Chantale; Forget, Marie-Andree; Haymaker, Cara; Amaria, Rodabe; McQuade, Jennifer L; Glitza, Isabella C; Cascone, Tina; Li, Haiyan S; Kwong, Lawrence N; Heffernan, Timothy P; Hu, Jianhua; Bassett, Roland L; Bosenberg, Marcus W; Woodman, Scott E; Overwijk, Willem W; Lizée, Gregory; Roszik, Jason; Gajewski, Thomas F; Wargo, Jennifer A; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Radvanyi, Laszlo; Davies, Michael A; Hwu, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    T cell-mediated immunotherapies are promising cancer treatments. However, most patients still fail to respond to these therapies. The molecular determinants of immune resistance are poorly understood. We show that loss of PTEN in tumor cells in preclinical models of melanoma inhibits T cell-mediated tumor killing and decreases T cell trafficking into tumors. In patients, PTEN loss correlates with decreased T cell infiltration at tumor sites, reduced likelihood of successful T cell expansion from resected tumors, and inferior outcomes with PD-1 inhibitor therapy. PTEN loss in tumor cells increased the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines, resulting in decreased T cell infiltration in tumors, and inhibited autophagy, which decreased T cell-mediated cell death. Treatment with a selective PI3Kβ inhibitor improved the efficacy of both anti-PD-1 and anti-CTLA4 antibodies in murine models. Together these findings demonstrate that PTEN loss promotes immune resistance and support the rationale to explore combinations of immunotherapies and PI3K-AKT pathway inhibitors. PMID:26645196

  19. Hydrophobic CDR3 residues promote the development of self-reactive T cells.

    PubMed

    Stadinski, Brian D; Shekhar, Karthik; Gómez-Touriño, Iria; Jung, Jonathan; Sasaki, Katsuhiro; Sewell, Andrew K; Peakman, Mark; Chakraborty, Arup K; Huseby, Eric S

    2016-08-01

    Studies of individual T cell antigen receptors (TCRs) have shed some light on structural features that underlie self-reactivity. However, the general rules that can be used to predict whether TCRs are self-reactive have not been fully elucidated. Here we found that the interfacial hydrophobicity of amino acids at positions 6 and 7 of the complementarity-determining region CDR3β robustly promoted the development of self-reactive TCRs. This property was found irrespective of the member of the β-chain variable region (Vβ) family present in the TCR or the length of the CDR3β. An index based on these findings distinguished Vβ2(+), Vβ6(+) and Vβ8.2(+) regulatory T cells from conventional T cells and also distinguished CD4(+) T cells selected by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecule I-A(g7) (associated with the development of type 1 diabetes in NOD mice) from those selected by a non-autoimmunity-promoting MHC class II molecule I-A(b). Our results provide a means for distinguishing normal T cell repertoires versus autoimmunity-prone T cell repertoires. PMID:27348411

  20. Progesterone and HMOX-1 promote fetal growth by CD8+ T cell modulation

    PubMed Central

    Solano, María Emilia; Kowal, Mirka Katharina; O’Rourke, Greta Eugenia; Horst, Andrea Kristina; Modest, Kathrin; Plösch, Torsten; Barikbin, Roja; Remus, Chressen Catharina; Berger, Robert G.; Jago, Caitlin; Ho, Hoang; Sass, Gabriele; Parker, Victoria J.; Lydon, John P.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Hecher, Kurt; Karimi, Khalil; Arck, Petra Clara

    2015-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) affects up to 10% of pregnancies in Western societies. IUGR is a strong predictor of reduced short-term neonatal survival and impairs long-term health in children. Placental insufficiency is often associated with IUGR; however, the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of placental insufficiency and IUGR are largely unknown. Here, we developed a mouse model of fetal-growth restriction and placental insufficiency that is induced by a midgestational stress challenge. Compared with control animals, pregnant dams subjected to gestational stress exhibited reduced progesterone levels and placental heme oxygenase 1 (Hmox1) expression and increased methylation at distinct regions of the placental Hmox1 promoter. These stress-triggered changes were accompanied by an altered CD8+ T cell response, as evidenced by a reduction of tolerogenic CD8+CD122+ T cells and an increase of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. Using progesterone receptor– or Hmox1-deficient mice, we identified progesterone as an upstream modulator of placental Hmox1 expression. Supplementation of progesterone or depletion of CD8+ T cells revealed that progesterone suppresses CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity, whereas the generation of CD8+CD122+ T cells is supported by Hmox1 and ameliorates fetal-growth restriction in Hmox1 deficiency. These observations in mice could promote the identification of pregnancies at risk for IUGR and the generation of clinical interventional strategies. PMID:25774501

  1. Hotspot autoimmune T cell receptor binding underlies pathogen and insulin peptide cross-reactivity.

    PubMed

    Cole, David K; Bulek, Anna M; Dolton, Garry; Schauenberg, Andrea J; Szomolay, Barbara; Rittase, William; Trimby, Andrew; Jothikumar, Prithiviraj; Fuller, Anna; Skowera, Ania; Rossjohn, Jamie; Zhu, Cheng; Miles, John J; Peakman, Mark; Wooldridge, Linda; Rizkallah, Pierre J; Sewell, Andrew K

    2016-06-01

    The cross-reactivity of T cells with pathogen- and self-derived peptides has been implicated as a pathway involved in the development of autoimmunity. However, the mechanisms that allow the clonal T cell antigen receptor (TCR) to functionally engage multiple peptide-major histocompatibility complexes (pMHC) are unclear. Here, we studied multiligand discrimination by a human, preproinsulin reactive, MHC class-I-restricted CD8+ T cell clone (1E6) that can recognize over 1 million different peptides. We generated high-resolution structures of the 1E6 TCR bound to 7 altered peptide ligands, including a pathogen-derived peptide that was an order of magnitude more potent than the natural self-peptide. Evaluation of these structures demonstrated that binding was stabilized through a conserved lock-and-key-like minimal binding footprint that enables 1E6 TCR to tolerate vast numbers of substitutions outside of this so-called hotspot. Highly potent antigens of the 1E6 TCR engaged with a strong antipathogen-like binding affinity; this engagement was governed though an energetic switch from an enthalpically to entropically driven interaction compared with the natural autoimmune ligand. Together, these data highlight how T cell cross-reactivity with pathogen-derived antigens might break self-tolerance to induce autoimmune disease. PMID:27183389

  2. Hotspot autoimmune T cell receptor binding underlies pathogen and insulin peptide cross-reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Cole, David K.; Bulek, Anna M.; Dolton, Garry; Schauenberg, Andrea J.; Szomolay, Barbara; Trimby, Andrew; Jothikumar, Prithiviraj; Fuller, Anna; Skowera, Ania; Rossjohn, Jamie; Zhu, Cheng; Miles, John J.; Wooldridge, Linda; Rizkallah, Pierre J.; Sewell, Andrew K.

    2016-01-01

    The cross-reactivity of T cells with pathogen- and self-derived peptides has been implicated as a pathway involved in the development of autoimmunity. However, the mechanisms that allow the clonal T cell antigen receptor (TCR) to functionally engage multiple peptide–major histocompatibility complexes (pMHC) are unclear. Here, we studied multiligand discrimination by a human, preproinsulin reactive, MHC class-I–restricted CD8+ T cell clone (1E6) that can recognize over 1 million different peptides. We generated high-resolution structures of the 1E6 TCR bound to 7 altered peptide ligands, including a pathogen-derived peptide that was an order of magnitude more potent than the natural self-peptide. Evaluation of these structures demonstrated that binding was stabilized through a conserved lock-and-key–like minimal binding footprint that enables 1E6 TCR to tolerate vast numbers of substitutions outside of this so-called hotspot. Highly potent antigens of the 1E6 TCR engaged with a strong antipathogen-like binding affinity; this engagement was governed though an energetic switch from an enthalpically to entropically driven interaction compared with the natural autoimmune ligand. Together, these data highlight how T cell cross-reactivity with pathogen-derived antigens might break self-tolerance to induce autoimmune disease. PMID:27183389

  3. β-Catenin induces T-cell transformation by promoting genomic instability

    PubMed Central

    Dose, Marei; Emmanuel, Akinola Olumide; Chaumeil, Julie; Zhang, Jiangwen; Sun, Tianjiao; Germar, Kristine; Aghajani, Katayoun; Davis, Elizabeth M.; Keerthivasan, Shilpa; Bredemeyer, Andrea L.; Sleckman, Barry P.; Rosen, Steven T.; Skok, Jane A.; Le Beau, Michelle M.; Georgopoulos, Katia; Gounari, Fotini

    2014-01-01

    Deregulated activation of β-catenin in cancer has been correlated with genomic instability. During thymocyte development, β-catenin activates transcription in partnership with T-cell–specific transcription factor 1 (Tcf-1). We previously reported that targeted activation of β-catenin in thymocytes (CAT mice) induces lymphomas that depend on recombination activating gene (RAG) and myelocytomatosis oncogene (Myc) activities. Here we show that these lymphomas have recurring Tcra/Myc translocations that resulted from illegitimate RAG recombination events and resembled oncogenic translocations previously described in human T-ALL. We therefore used the CAT animal model to obtain mechanistic insights into the transformation process. ChIP-seq analysis uncovered a link between Tcf-1 and RAG2 showing that the two proteins shared binding sites marked by trimethylated histone-3 lysine-4 (H3K4me3) throughout the genome, including near the translocation sites. Pretransformed CAT thymocytes had increased DNA damage at the translocating loci and showed altered repair of RAG-induced DNA double strand breaks. These cells were able to survive despite DNA damage because activated β-catenin promoted an antiapoptosis gene expression profile. Thus, activated β-catenin promotes genomic instability that leads to T-cell lymphomas as a consequence of altered double strand break repair and increased survival of thymocytes with damaged DNA. PMID:24371308

  4. Differential utilization of binding loop flexibility in T cell receptor ligand selection and cross-reactivity.

    PubMed

    Ayres, Cory M; Scott, Daniel R; Corcelli, Steven A; Baker, Brian M

    2016-01-01

    Complementarity determining region (CDR) loop flexibility has been suggested to play an important role in the selection and binding of ligands by T cell receptors (TCRs) of the cellular immune system. However, questions remain regarding the role of loop motion in TCR binding, and crystallographic structures have raised questions about the extent to which generalizations can be made. Here we studied the flexibility of two structurally well characterized αβ TCRs, A6 and DMF5. We found that the two receptors utilize loop motion very differently in ligand binding and cross-reactivity. While the loops of A6 move rapidly in an uncorrelated fashion, those of DMF5 are substantially less mobile. Accordingly, the mechanisms of binding and cross-reactivity are very different between the two TCRs: whereas A6 relies on conformational selection to select and bind different ligands, DMF5 uses a more rigid, permissive architecture with greater reliance on slower motions or induced-fit. In addition to binding site flexibility, we also explored whether ligand-binding resulted in common dynamical changes in A6 and DMF5 that could contribute to TCR triggering. Although binding-linked motional changes propagated throughout both receptors, no common features were observed, suggesting that changes in nanosecond-level TCR structural dynamics do not contribute to T cell signaling. PMID:27118724

  5. Differential utilization of binding loop flexibility in T cell receptor ligand selection and cross-reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Ayres, Cory M.; Scott, Daniel R.; Corcelli, Steven A.; Baker, Brian M.

    2016-01-01

    Complementarity determining region (CDR) loop flexibility has been suggested to play an important role in the selection and binding of ligands by T cell receptors (TCRs) of the cellular immune system. However, questions remain regarding the role of loop motion in TCR binding, and crystallographic structures have raised questions about the extent to which generalizations can be made. Here we studied the flexibility of two structurally well characterized αβ TCRs, A6 and DMF5. We found that the two receptors utilize loop motion very differently in ligand binding and cross-reactivity. While the loops of A6 move rapidly in an uncorrelated fashion, those of DMF5 are substantially less mobile. Accordingly, the mechanisms of binding and cross-reactivity are very different between the two TCRs: whereas A6 relies on conformational selection to select and bind different ligands, DMF5 uses a more rigid, permissive architecture with greater reliance on slower motions or induced-fit. In addition to binding site flexibility, we also explored whether ligand-binding resulted in common dynamical changes in A6 and DMF5 that could contribute to TCR triggering. Although binding-linked motional changes propagated throughout both receptors, no common features were observed, suggesting that changes in nanosecond-level TCR structural dynamics do not contribute to T cell signaling. PMID:27118724

  6. Impaired T-cell survival promotes mucosal inflammatory disease in SHIP1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Park, M Y; Srivastava, N; Sudan, R; Viernes, D R; Chisholm, J D; Engelman, R W; Kerr, W G

    2014-11-01

    T cells have a critical role in immune surveillance at mucosal surfaces. SHIP1(-/-) mice succumb to mucosal inflammatory disease that afflicts the lung and small intestine (SI). The basis of this condition has not been defined. Here we show that SHIP1 is required for the normal persistence and survival of T cells in mucosal tissues. We find that CD4 and CD8 effector T cells are reduced; however, Treg cells are increased in the SI and lungs of SHIP1(-/-) and CD4CreSHIP(flox/flox) mice. Furthermore, a subset of T cells in the SI of SHIP1(-/-) mice are FasL(+) and are more susceptible to extrinsic cell death. Mechanistic analyses showed that SHIP1 associates with the death receptor CD95/Fas and treatment with a Caspase 8 inhibitor prevents SHIP1 inhibitor-mediated T-cell death. Notably, mucosal inflammation in SHIP1(-/-) mice is reduced by treatment with a Caspase 8 inhibitor. We also find that the incidence of Crohn's disease (CD) and pneumonia is significantly increased in mice with dual T and myeloid lineage SHIP1 deletion but not in single lineage-deleted mice. Thus, by promoting survival of protective T cells, thereby preventing an inflammatory myeloid response, SHIP1 maintains an appropriate balance of innate immune function at mucosal surfaces necessary for immune homeostasis. PMID:24781051

  7. PD-1 promotes immune exhaustion by inducing antiviral T cell motility paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Zinselmeyer, Bernd H.; Heydari, Sara; Sacristán, Catarina; Nayak, Debasis; Cammer, Michael; Herz, Jasmin; Cheng, Xiaoxiao; Davis, Simon J.; Dustin, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Immune responses to persistent viral infections and cancer often fail because of intense regulation of antigen-specific T cells—a process referred to as immune exhaustion. The mechanisms that underlie the induction of exhaustion are not completely understood. To gain novel insights into this process, we simultaneously examined the dynamics of virus-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells in the living spleen by two-photon microscopy (TPM) during the establishment of an acute or persistent viral infection. We demonstrate that immune exhaustion during viral persistence maps anatomically to the splenic marginal zone/red pulp and is defined by prolonged motility paralysis of virus-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. Unexpectedly, therapeutic blockade of PD-1–PD-L1 restored CD8+ T cell motility within 30 min, despite the presence of high viral loads. This result was supported by planar bilayer data showing that PD-L1 localizes to the central supramolecular activation cluster, decreases antiviral CD8+ T cell motility, and promotes stable immunological synapse formation. Restoration of T cell motility in vivo was followed by recovery of cell signaling and effector functions, which gave rise to a fatal disease mediated by IFN-γ. We conclude that motility paralysis is a manifestation of immune exhaustion induced by PD-1 that prevents antiviral CD8+ T cells from performing their effector functions and subjects them to prolonged states of negative immune regulation. PMID:23530125

  8. Interleukin-1-induced promotion of T-cell differentiation in mice immunized with killed Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, K; Mitsuyama, M; Muramori, K; Tsukada, H; Nomoto, K

    1990-01-01

    We studied the effects of administration of recombinant interleukin-1 alpha (rIL-1 alpha) to mice after immunization with killed Listeria monocytogenes cells on the promotion of the functional differentiation of T cells in vivo. Mice immunized with killed L. monocytogenes were unable to express cell-mediated immunity to specific antigen in vivo, as determined by delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and acquired cellular resistance (ACR), and splenic T cells obtained from such mice were unable to respond to rIL-2 and specific antigen and to produce IL-2 after antigenic restimulation in vitro. When rIL-1 alpha was given to mice after immunization with killed bacteria. T cells became capable of responding to rIL-2 and specific antigen in vitro. These functions of T cells were similar to those from mice immunized with viable listeriae. Moreover, using a local passive transfer system, it was found that effector T cells mediating DTH but not ACR to L. monocytogenes were generated in mice treated with rIL-1 alpha after immunization with killed bacteria. These T cells were able to produce macrophage chemotactic factor but not macrophage-activating factor or gamma interferon in vitro in response to stimulation with specific antigen. These results suggest that in vivo administration of rIL-1 alpha facilitates the maturation of antigen-specific T cells mediating DTH and that different effector T cells mediating DTH or ACR are involved in cell-mediated immunity to L. monocytogenes. PMID:2123829

  9. Fibrocyte and T cell interactions promote disease pathogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Galligan, Carole L; Keystone, Edward C; Fish, Eleanor N

    2016-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease. We previously identified a circulating cell population, fibrocytes, which is activated early in disease. As RA is characterized by the formation of autoantibodies and autoreactive T cells, which often precede symptom onset, the objective of these studies was to characterize fibrocyte activation in the context of T cell activation. Multidimensional flow cytometry was used to characterize the activation status of peripheral blood (PB) fibrocytes and T cells derived from RA patients with different levels of disease activity. Compared to healthy controls, fibrocytes from RA patients exhibited increased activation, denoted as elevated levels of phosphorylation of STAT3 and NF-κB. RA patients had higher numbers of circulating activated Th17 cells and Tregs compared with healthy controls, Th17 cell numbers being higher in patients with moderate to high disease activity. Additionally, increased numbers of FOXP3+ RORγt+ double positive CD4+ T cells were observed in RA patients with more severe disease. Our data confirm that circulating fibrocytes are expanded in RA and that there is a direct correlation between the increase in number of activated fibrocytes and increased number of CD4+ T cells. Moreover, our data suggest that interactions between circulating fibrocytes and activated T cells may promote disease activity. Specifically, we provide in vitro evidence that mouse-derived CD4+ T cells produce GM-CSF which induces fibrocyte proliferation. In turn, activated fibrocytes produce IL-6, promoting Th17 polarization. PMID:26948996

  10. Interplay between T Cell Receptor Binding Kinetics and the Level of Cognate Peptide Presented by Major Histocompatibility Complexes Governs CD8+ T Cell Responsiveness*

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Melita; Zoete, Vincent; Hebeisen, Michael; Schmid, Daphné; Baumgartner, Petra; Guillaume, Philippe; Romero, Pedro; Speiser, Daniel; Luescher, Immanuel; Rufer, Nathalie; Michielin, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Through a rational design approach, we generated a panel of HLA-A*0201/NY-ESO-1157–165-specific T cell receptors (TCR) with increasing affinities of up to 150-fold from the wild-type TCR. Using these TCR variants which extend just beyond the natural affinity range, along with an extreme supraphysiologic one having 1400-fold enhanced affinity, and a low-binding one, we sought to determine the effect of TCR binding properties along with cognate peptide concentration on CD8+ T cell responsiveness. Major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) expressed on the surface of various antigen presenting cells were peptide-pulsed and used to stimulate human CD8+ T cells expressing the different TCR via lentiviral transduction. At intermediate peptide concentration we measured maximum cytokine/chemokine secretion, cytotoxicity, and Ca2+ flux for CD8+ T cells expressing TCR within a dissociation constant (KD) range of ∼1–5 μm. Under these same conditions there was a gradual attenuation in activity for supraphysiologic affinity TCR with KD < ∼1 μm, irrespective of CD8 co-engagement and of half-life (t1/2 = ln 2/koff) values. With increased peptide concentration, however, the activity levels of CD8+ T cells expressing supraphysiologic affinity TCR were gradually restored. Together our data support the productive hit rate model of T cell activation arguing that it is not the absolute number of TCR/pMHC complexes formed at equilibrium, but rather their productive turnover, that controls levels of biological activity. Our findings have important implications for various immunotherapies under development such as adoptive cell transfer of TCR-engineered CD8+ T cells, as well as for peptide vaccination strategies. PMID:22549784

  11. Jun Kinase Phosphorylates and Regulates the DNA Binding Activity of an Octamer Binding Protein, T-Cell Factor β1†

    PubMed Central

    Kasibhatla, Shailaja; Tailor, Pankaj; Bonefoy-Berard, Nathalie; Mustelin, Tomas; Altman, Amnon; Fotedar, Arun

    1999-01-01

    POU domain proteins have been implicated as key regulators during development and lymphocyte activation. The POU domain protein T-cell factor β1 (TCFβ1), which binds octamer and octamer-related sequences, is a potent transactivator. In this study, we showed that TCFβ1 is phosphorylated following activation via the T-cell receptor or by stress-induced signals. Phosphorylation of TCFβ1 occurred predominantly at serine and threonine residues. Signals which upregulate Jun kinase (JNK)/stress-activated protein kinase activity also lead to association of JNK with TCFβ1. JNK associates with the activation domain of TCFβ1 and phosphorylates its DNA binding domain. The phosphorylation of recombinant TCFβ1 by recombinant JNK enhances the ability of TCFβ1 to bind to a consensus octamer motif. Consistent with this conclusion, TCFβ1 upregulates reporter gene transcription in an activation- and JNK-dependent manner. In addition, inhibition of JNK activity by catalytically inactive MEKK (in which methionine was substituted for the lysine at position 432) also inhibits the ability of TCFβ1 to drive inducible transcription from the interleukin-2 promoter. These results suggest that stress-induced signals and T-cell activation induce JNK, which then acts on multiple cis sequences by modulating distinct transactivators like c-Jun and TCFβ1. This demonstrates a coupling between the JNK activation pathway and POU domain proteins and implicates TCFβ1 as a physiological target in the JNK signal transduction pathway leading to coordinated biological responses. PMID:10022889

  12. Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin Proteins and Flotillins Cooperate to Promote Uropod Formation in T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Sibylla; Chen, Emily J. H.; Clarke, Fiona; Lyck, Ruth; Affentranger, Sarah; Burkhardt, Janis K.; Niggli, Verena

    2013-01-01

    T cell uropods are enriched in specific proteins including adhesion receptors such as P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), lipid raft-associated proteins such as flotillins and ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) proteins which associate with cholesterol-rich raft domains and anchor adhesion receptors to the actin cytoskeleton. Using dominant mutants and siRNA technology we have tested the interactions among these proteins and their role in shaping the T cell uropod. Expression of wild type (WT) ezrin-EGFP failed to affect the morphology of human T cells or chemokine-induced uropod recruitment of PSGL-1 and flotillin-1 and -2. In contrast, expression of constitutively active T567D ezrin-EGFP induced a motile, polarized phenotype in some of the transfected T cells, even in the absence of chemokine. These cells featured F-actin-rich ruffles in the front and uropod enrichment of PSGL-1 and flotillins. T567D ezrin-EGFP was itself strongly enriched in the rear of the polarized T cells. Uropod formation induced by T567D ezrin-EGFP was actin-dependent as it was attenuated by inhibition of Rho-kinase or myosin II, and abolished by disruption of actin filaments. While expression of constitutively active ezrin enhanced cell polarity, expression of a dominant-negative deletion mutant of ezrin, 1–310 ezrin-EGFP, markedly reduced uropod formation induced by the chemokine SDF-1, T cell front-tail polarity, and capping of PSGL-1 and flotillins. Transfection of T cells with WT or T567D ezrin did not affect chemokine-mediated chemotaxis whereas 1–310 ezrin significantly impaired spontaneous 2D migration and chemotaxis. siRNA-mediated downregulation of flotillins in murine T cells attenuated moesin capping and uropod formation, indicating that ERM proteins and flotillins cooperate in uropod formation. In summary, our results indicate that activated ERM proteins function together with flotillins to promote efficient chemotaxis of T cells by structuring the uropod of migrating T

  13. Tumor sialylation impedes T cell mediated anti-tumor responses while promoting tumor associated-regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Perdicchio, Maurizio; Cornelissen, Lenneke A M; Streng-Ouwehand, Ingeborg; Engels, Steef; Verstege, Marleen I; Boon, Louis; Geerts, Dirk; van Kooyk, Yvette; Unger, Wendy W J

    2016-02-23

    The increased presence of sialylated glycans on the tumor surface has been linked to poor prognosis, yet the effects on tumor-specific T cell immunity are hardly studied. We here show that hypersialylation of B16 melanoma substantially influences tumor growth by preventing the formation of effector T cells and facilitating the presence of high regulatory T cell (Treg) frequencies. Knock-down of the sialic acid transporter created "sialic acid low" tumors, that grew slower in-vivo than hypersialylated tumors, altered the Treg/Teffector balance, favoring immunological tumor control. The enhanced effector T cell response in developing "sialic acid low" tumors was preceded by and dependent on an increased influx and activity of Natural Killer (NK) cells. Thus, tumor hypersialylation orchestrates immune escape at the level of NK and Teff/Treg balance within the tumor microenvironment, herewith dampening tumor-specific T cell control. Reducing sialylation provides a therapeutic option to render tumors permissive to immune attack. PMID:26741508

  14. Tumor sialylation impedes T cell mediated anti-tumor responses while promoting tumor associated-regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Perdicchio, Maurizio; Cornelissen, Lenneke A. M.; Streng-Ouwehand, Ingeborg; Engels, Steef; Verstege, Marleen I.; Boon, Louis; Geerts, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    The increased presence of sialylated glycans on the tumor surface has been linked to poor prognosis, yet the effects on tumor-specific T cell immunity are hardly studied. We here show that hypersialylation of B16 melanoma substantially influences tumor growth by preventing the formation of effector T cells and facilitating the presence of high regulatory T cell (Treg) frequencies. Knock-down of the sialic acid transporter created “sialic acid low” tumors, that grew slower in-vivo than hypersialylated tumors, altered the Treg/Teffector balance, favoring immunological tumor control. The enhanced effector T cell response in developing “sialic acid low” tumors was preceded by and dependent on an increased influx and activity of Natural Killer (NK) cells. Thus, tumor hypersialylation orchestrates immune escape at the level of NK and Teff/Treg balance within the tumor microenvironment, herewith dampening tumor-specific T cell control. Reducing sialylation provides a therapeutic option to render tumors permissive to immune attack. PMID:26741508

  15. LMO2 Oncoprotein Stability in T-Cell Leukemia Requires Direct LDB1 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Layer, Justin H.; Alford, Catherine E.; McDonald, W. Hayes

    2015-01-01

    LMO2 is a component of multisubunit DNA-binding transcription factor complexes that regulate gene expression in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell development. Enforced expression of LMO2 causes leukemia by inducing hematopoietic stem cell-like features in T-cell progenitor cells, but the biochemical mechanisms of LMO2 function have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we systematically dissected the LMO2/LDB1-binding interface to investigate the role of this interaction in T-cell leukemia. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of the LIM interaction domain of LDB1 revealed a discrete motif, R320LITR, required for LMO2 binding. Most strikingly, coexpression of full-length, wild-type LDB1 increased LMO2 steady-state abundance, whereas coexpression of mutant proteins deficient in LMO2 binding compromised LMO2 stability. These mutant LDB1 proteins also exerted dominant negative effects on growth and transcription in diverse leukemic cell lines. Mass spectrometric analysis of LDB1 binding partners in leukemic lines supports the notion that LMO2/LDB1 function in leukemia occurs in the context of multisubunit complexes, which also protect the LMO2 oncoprotein from degradation. Collectively, these data suggest that the assembly of LMO2 into complexes, via direct LDB1 interaction, is a potential molecular target that could be exploited in LMO2-driven leukemias resistant to existing chemotherapy regimens. PMID:26598604

  16. CTLA-4 promotes Foxp3 induction and regulatory T cell accumulation in the intestinal lamina propria.

    PubMed

    Barnes, M J; Griseri, T; Johnson, A M F; Young, W; Powrie, F; Izcue, A

    2013-03-01

    Thymic induction of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells relies on CD28 costimulation and high-affinity T-cell receptor (TCR) signals, whereas Foxp3 (forkhead box P3) induction on activated peripheral CD4(+) T cells is inhibited by these signals. Accordingly, the inhibitory molecule CTLA-4 (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4) promoted, but was not essential for CD4(+) T-cell Foxp3 induction in vitro. We show that CTLA-4-deficient cells are equivalent to wild-type cells in the thymic induction of Foxp3 and maintenance of Foxp3 populations in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes, but their accumulation in the colon, where Treg cells specific for commensal bacteria accumulate, is impaired. In a T cell-transfer model of colitis, the two known CTLA-4 ligands, B7-1 and B7-2, had largely redundant roles in inducing inflammation and promoting Treg cell function. However, B7-2 proved more efficient than B7-1 in inducing Foxp3 in vitro and in vivo. Our data reveal an unappreciated role for CTLA-4 in establishing the Foxp3(+) compartment in the intestine. PMID:22910217

  17. Insulin promotes T cell recovery in a murine model of autoimmune myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Zhuang, R; Geng, C; Cai, X; Lei, W; Tian, N; Gao, F

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-insulin-potassium (GIK) is a useful adjunct to myocarditis. Besides its essential action in energy metabolism, insulin also exerts an anti-inflammatory effect. This study investigated the effect of insulin on myocardial inflammation in experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) in mice and its potential role in T cell regulation. Mice were divided randomly into a normal control group, a saline-treated EAM group and an insulin-treated EAM group. The histopathological changes of myocardium, α-myosin heavy chain (MyHCα)(614-629) antigen-specific autoantibody titre, the serum level of cardiac troponin I (cTnI), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members' activity and content were measured. Furthermore, the phenotype of T lymphocyte subsets in splenocytes was analysed to evaluate the immune status of mice. Insulin reduced serum cTnI of EAM mice on days 14 and 21 (P < 0·05) after immunization, with no changes in blood glucose and autoantibody production. Western blot revealed that extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2) may be a determining factor in this process. Total ERK1/2 and phospho-ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2) were both up-regulated in insulin-treated mice after immunization. We also found that insulin treatment promoted T cell recovery without changing the naive-to-memory T-cell ratio; in particular, CD3(+) T cells in insulin-treated mice proliferated more vigorously than in control mice (P < 0·05). We report here for the first time that insulin alleviates myocarditis in the EAM model. These data show that insulin has a direct effect on T cell proliferation in EAM. It is possible that GIK or insulin may assist T cell recovery towards normal in myocarditis, especially for diabetic or hyperglycaemic patients. PMID:23199322

  18. Controlled delivery of a metabolic modulator promotes regulatory T cells and restrains autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Gammon, Joshua M; Tostanoski, Lisa H; Adapa, Arjun R; Chiu, Yu-Chieh; Jewell, Christopher M

    2015-07-28

    Autoimmune disorders occur when the immune system abnormally recognizes and attacks self-molecules. Dendritic cells (DCs) play a powerful role in initiating adaptive immune response, and are therefore a recent target for autoimmune therapies. N-Phenyl-7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxamide (PHCCC), a small molecule glutamate receptor enhancer, alters how DCs metabolize glutamate, skewing cytokine secretion to bias T cell function. These effects provide protection in mouse models of multiple sclerosis (MS) by polarizing T cells away from inflammatory TH17 cells and toward regulatory T cells (TREG) when mice receive daily systemic injections of PHCCC. However, frequent, continued treatment is required to generate and maintain therapeutic benefits. Thus, the use of PHCCC is limited by poor solubility, the need for frequent dosing, and cell toxicity. We hypothesized that controlled release of PHCCC from degradable nanoparticles (NPs) might address these challenges by altering DC function to maintain efficacy with reduced treatment frequency and toxicity. This idea could serve as a new strategy for harnessing biomaterials to polarize immune function through controlled delivery of metabolic modulators. PHCCC was readily encapsulated in nanoparticles, with controlled release of 89% of drug into media over three days. Culture of primary DCs or DC and T cell co-cultures with PHCCC NPs reduced DC activation and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, while shifting T cells away from TH17 and toward TREG phenotypes. Importantly, PHCCC delivered to cells in NPs was 36-fold less toxic compared with soluble PHCCC. Treatment of mice with PHCCC NPs every three days delayed disease onset and decreased disease severity compared with mice treated with soluble drug at the same dose and frequency. These results highlight the potential to promote tolerance through controlled delivery of metabolic modulators that alter DC signaling to polarize T cells, and suggest future

  19. IL-15 promotes the survival of naive and memory phenotype CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Berard, Marion; Brandt, Katja; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia; Tough, David F

    2003-05-15

    IL-15 stimulates the proliferation of memory phenotype CD44(high)CD8(+) T cells and is thought to play a key role in regulating the turnover of these cells in vivo. We have investigated whether IL-15 also has the capacity to affect the life span of naive phenotype (CD44(low)) CD8(+) T cells. We report that IL-15 promotes the survival of both CD44(low) and CD44(high) CD8(+) T cells, doing so at much lower concentrations than required to induce proliferation of CD44(high) cells. Rescue from apoptosis was associated with the up-regulation of Bcl-2 in both cell types, whereas elevated expression of Bcl-x(L) was observed among CD44(high) but not CD44(low) CD8(+) cells. An investigation into the role of IL-15R subunits in mediating the effects of IL-15 revealed distinct contributions of the alpha- and beta- and gamma-chains. Most strikingly, IL-15R alpha was not essential for either induction of proliferation or promotion of survival by IL-15, but did greatly enhance the sensitivity of cells to low concentrations of IL-15. By contrast, the beta- and gamma-chains of the IL-15R were absolutely required for the proliferative and pro-survival effects of IL-15, although it was not necessary for CD44(high)CD8(+) cells to express higher levels of IL-15R beta than CD44(low) cells to proliferate in response to IL-15. These results show that IL-15 has multiple effects on CD8 T cells and possesses the potential to regulate the life span of naive as well as memory CD8(+) T cells. PMID:12734346

  20. trans activation of the tumor necrosis factor alpha promoter by the human T-cell leukemia virus type I Tax1 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, H; Shakhov, A N; Jongeneel, C V

    1992-01-01

    In a cotransfection assay, the human T-cell leukemia virus type I Tax1 gene product specifically activated transcription from the mouse tumor necrosis factor alpha promoter. The activation patterns of 5' deletion mutants, artificial enhancer constructs, and point mutations in the promoter indicate that the major Tax1-responsive element is a site at position -655 which binds the NF-kappa B/rel and NF-GMa transcription factors. Images PMID:1527856

  1. CTLA-4 blockade plus adoptive T cell transfer promotes optimal melanoma immunity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mahvi, David A.; Meyers, Justin V.; Tatar, Andrew J.; Contreras, Amanda; Suresh, M.; Leverson, Glen E.; Sen, Siddhartha; Cho, Clifford S.

    2014-01-01

    Immunotherapeutic approaches to the treatment of advanced melanoma have relied on strategies that augment the responsiveness of endogenous tumor-specific T cell populations (e.g., CTLA-4 blockade-mediated checkpoint inhibition) or introduce exogenously-prepared tumor-specific T cell populations (e.g., adoptive cell transfer). Although both approaches have shown considerable promise, response rates to these therapies remain suboptimal. We hypothesized that a combinatorial approach to immunotherapy using both CTLA-4 blockade and non-lymphodepletional adoptive cell transfer could offer additive therapeutic benefit. C57BL/6 mice were inoculated with syngeneic B16F10 melanoma tumors transfected to express low levels of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus peptide GP33 (B16GP33), and treated with no immunotherapy, CTLA-4 blockade, adoptive cell transfer, or combination immunotherapy of CTLA-4 blockade with adoptive cell transfer. Combination immunotherapy resulted in optimal control of B16GP33 melanoma tumors. Combination immunotherapy promoted a stronger local immune response reflected by enhanced tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte populations, as well as a stronger systemic immune responses reflected by more potent tumor antigen-specific T cell activity in splenocytes. In addition, whereas both CTLA-4 blockade and combination immunotherapy were able to promote long-term immunity against B16GP33 tumors, only combination immunotherapy was capable of promoting immunity against parental B16F10 tumors as well. Our findings suggest that a combinatorial approach using CTLA-4 blockade with non-lymphodepletional adoptive cell transfer may promote additive endogenous and exogenous T cell activities that enable greater therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of melanoma. PMID:25658614

  2. Single MHC Mutation Eliminates Enthalpy Associated with T Cell Receptor Binding

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Peter J.; Pazy, Yael; Conti, Brian; Riddle, David; Appella, Ettore; Collins, Edward J.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY The keystone of the adaptive immune response is T cell receptor (TCR) recognition of peptide presented by Major Histocompatibility Complex (pMHC) molecules. The co-crystal structure of AHIII TCR bound to the MHC, HLA-A2, showed a large interface with an atypical binding orientation. MHC mutations in the interface of the proteins were tested for changes in TCR recognition. From the range of responses observed, three representative HLA-A2 mutants, T163A, W167A, and K66A, was selected for further study. Binding constants and co-crystal structures of the AHIII TCR and the three mutants were determined. K66 in HLA-A2 makes contacts with both peptide and TCR and previously has been identified as a critical residue for recognition by numerous TCR. The K66A mutation resulted in the lowest AHIII T cell response and the lowest binding affinity, which suggests T cell response may correlate with affinity. Importantly, the K66A mutation does not affect the conformation of the peptide. The change in affinity appears to be due to a loss in hydrogen bonds in the interface as a result of a conformational change in the TCR complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) loop. Isothermal titration calorimetry confirmed the loss of hydrogen bonding by a large loss in enthalpy. Our findings are inconsistent with the notion that the CDR1 and CDR2 loops of the TCR are responsible for MHC restriction, while the CDR3 loops interact solely with the peptide. Instead, we present here a MHC mutation that does not change the conformation of the peptide, yet results in an altered conformation of a CDR3. PMID:17825839

  3. Characterization of human platelet binding of recombinant T cell receptor ligand

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTLs) are bio-engineered molecules that may serve as novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of neuroinflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS). RTLs contain membrane distal α1 plus β1 domains of class II major histocompatibility complex linked covalently to specific peptides that can be used to regulate T cell responses and inhibit experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The mechanisms by which RTLs impede local recruitment and retention of inflammatory cells in the CNS, however, are not completely understood. Methods We have recently shown that RTLs bind strongly to B cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells, but not to T cells, in an antigenic-independent manner, raising the question whether peripheral blood cells express a distinct RTL-receptor. Our study was designed to characterize the molecular mechanisms by which RTLs bind human blood platelets, and the ability of RTL to modulate platelet function. Results Our data demonstrate that human blood platelets support binding of RTL. Immobilized RTL initiated platelet intracellular calcium mobilization and lamellipodia formation through a pathway dependent upon Src and PI3 kinases signaling. The presence of RTL in solution reduced platelet aggregation by collagen, while treatment of whole blood with RTL prolonged occlusive thrombus formation on collagen. Conclusions Platelets, well-known regulators of hemostasis and thrombosis, have been implicated in playing a major role in inflammation and immunity. This study provides the first evidence that blood platelets express a functional RTL-receptor with a putative role in modulating pathways of neuroinflammation. PMID:21059245

  4. MicroRNA-155 promotes autoimmune inflammation by enhancing inflammatory T cell development.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Ryan M; Kahn, Daniel; Gibson, William S J; Round, June L; Scholz, Rebecca L; Chaudhuri, Aadel A; Kahn, Melissa E; Rao, Dinesh S; Baltimore, David

    2010-10-29

    Mammalian noncoding microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of gene regulators that have been linked to immune system function. Here, we have investigated the role of miR-155 during an autoimmune inflammatory disease. Consistent with a positive role for miR-155 in mediating inflammatory responses, Mir155(-/-) mice were highly resistant to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). miR-155 functions in the hematopoietic compartment to promote the development of inflammatory T cells including the T helper 17 (Th17) cell and Th1 cell subsets. Furthermore, the major contribution of miR-155 to EAE was CD4(+) T cell intrinsic, whereas miR-155 was also required for optimum dendritic cell production of cytokines that promoted Th17 cell formation. Our study shows that one aspect of miR-155 function is the promotion of T cell-dependent tissue inflammation, suggesting that miR-155 might be a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of autoimmune disorders. PMID:20888269

  5. T-cell hybridoma specific for a cytochrome c peptide: specific antigen binding and interleukin 2 production.

    PubMed Central

    Carel, S; Bron, C; Corradin, G

    1983-01-01

    T-cell hybridomas were obtained after fusion of BW 5147 thymoma and long-term cultured T cells specific for cytochrome c peptide 66-80 derivatized with a 2,4-dinitroaminophenyl (DNAP) group. The resulting hybridomas were selected for their capacity to specifically bind to soluble radiolabeled peptide antigen. One T-cell hybrid was positive for antigen binding. This hybrid T cell exhibits surface phenotypic markers of the parent antigen-specific T cells. The binding could be inhibited either by an excess of unlabeled homologous antigen or by cytochrome c peptide 11-25 derivatized with a 2-nitrophenylsulfenyl group. Several other peptide antigens tested failed to inhibit binding of the radioactive peptide. This suggests that a specific amino acid sequence, modified by a DNAP group, is the antigenic structure recognized by the putative T-cell receptor. In addition, direct interaction of DNAP-66-80 peptide with the hybridoma cell line induced production of the T-cell growth factor interleukin 2. Furthermore, supernatants derived from syngeneic macrophages pulsed with the relevant peptide also induced the antigen-specific hybridoma to produce interleukin 2. Images PMID:6192442

  6. T cell binding to B lymphoid cell lines in humans: a marker for T-B cell interaction?

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Fudenberg, H H

    1983-04-15

    Binding of human circulating T cells to established normal and malignant B cell lines results in rosette formation. The percentage of B cells, circulating T cells, and thymocytes able to bind to the B-LCL Raji were 0%, 59 +/- 4% and 61 +/- 6%, respectively. The percentage of rosettes formed between Raji cells and circulating mononuclear cells from 92 normal individuals was 27.8 +/- 5.3%, and remained stable over several months. This phenomenon seems to involve relatively mature B cells, and a T cell marker which appears early in T cell ontogeny. In the peripheral blood, most of the B-LCL binding T cells exhibit a 'helper-inducer' phenotype, as determined with the monoclonal antibodies Leu 3a and OKT4. However, a significant percentage of T cells with so-called 'cytotoxic-suppressor' markers (Leu 2a and OKT8) also bind to B-LCL. The T cells involved in this morphological interactive reaction with B cells might conceivably be specifically involved in regulating B cell functions. Enumeration of this particular subset may be useful in conditions where abnormal T-B cell interactions are suspected. PMID:6601166

  7. Testing for HLA/peptide tetramer-binding to the T cell receptor complex on human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Weder, Pauline; Schumacher, Ton N M; Spits, Hergen; Luiten, Rosalie M

    2012-01-01

    HLA/peptide tetramers are frequently used for ex vivo monitoring of disease- or vaccine-induced T cell immune responses and for T cell epitope identification. However, when low-levels HLA/peptide tetramer-positive T cell populations are encountered, it is difficult to ascertain whether this represents a true T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated interaction or background signal. To address this issue, we have developed a method for both HLA class I and class II tetramer assays to confirm tetramer-binding to the TCR/CD3 complex. Preincubation of T cells with anti-CD3 mAb SPV-T3b and subsequent crosslinking interferes with the binding of HLA/peptide tetramers to the TCR/CD3 complex and thereby indicates to what extent HLA/peptide tetramer binds through interaction with TCR/CD3 complex. SPV-T3b pretreatment results in a 2- to 10-fold decrease in tetramer-binding intensity to antigen-specific CD8+ or CD4+ T cells, whereas background reactivity of HLA/peptide tetramers containing HIV-derived peptide in HIV-negative donors remained unchanged. SPV-T3b pretreatment forms a valuable tool to verify tetramer-based detection of antigen-specific T cells during the monitoring of immune responses in clinical studies. PMID:24371571

  8. T Cell Immunoglobulin Mucin-3 Crystal Structure Reveals a Galectin-9-Independent Ligand-Binding Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Cao,E.; Zang, X.; Ramagopal, U.; Mukhopadhaya, A.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Zencheck, W.; Lary, J.; Cole, J.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    The T cell immunoglobulin mucin (Tim) family of receptors regulates effector CD4+ T cell functions and is implicated in autoimmune and allergic diseases. Tim-3 induces immunological tolerance, and engagement of the Tim-3 immunoglobulin variable (IgV) domain by galectin-9 is important for appropriate termination of T helper 1-immune responses. The 2 {angstrom} crystal structure of the Tim-3 IgV domain demonstrated that four cysteines, which are invariant within the Tim family, form two noncanonical disulfide bonds, resulting in a surface not present in other immunoglobulin superfamily members. Biochemical and biophysical studies demonstrated that this unique structural feature mediates a previously unidentified galectin-9-independent binding process and suggested that this structural feature is conserved within the entire Tim family. The current work provided a graphic example of the relationship between sequence, structure, and function and suggested that the interplay between multiple Tim-3-binding activities contributes to the regulated assembly of signaling complexes required for effective Th1-mediated immunity.

  9. Phase separation of signaling molecules promotes T cell receptor signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaolei; Ditlev, Jonathon A; Hui, Enfu; Xing, Wenmin; Banjade, Sudeep; Okrut, Julia; King, David S; Taunton, Jack; Rosen, Michael K; Vale, Ronald D

    2016-04-29

    Activation of various cell surface receptors triggers the reorganization of downstream signaling molecules into micrometer- or submicrometer-sized clusters. However, the functional consequences of such clustering have been unclear. We biochemically reconstituted a 12-component signaling pathway on model membranes, beginning with T cell receptor (TCR) activation and ending with actin assembly. When TCR phosphorylation was triggered, downstream signaling proteins spontaneously separated into liquid-like clusters that promoted signaling outputs both in vitro and in human Jurkat T cells. Reconstituted clusters were enriched in kinases but excluded phosphatases and enhanced actin filament assembly by recruiting and organizing actin regulators. These results demonstrate that protein phase separation can create a distinct physical and biochemical compartment that facilitates signaling. PMID:27056844

  10. ETS1 transactivates the human GM-CSF promoter in Jurkat T cells stimulated with PMA and ionomycin.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R S; Tymms, M J; Seth, A; Shannon, M F; Kola, I

    1995-11-16

    Activation of T helper cells results in coordinate expression of a number of cytokines involved in differentiation, proliferation and activation of the haematopoietic system. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is one such cytokine whose increased expression results partly from increases in transcription. Cis-acting elements with NF kappa B, AP-1 and ETS-like motifs have been identified in the promoter region of the GM-CSF gene, which are important for transcriptional activity following PMA and ionomycin stimulation. A number of the ETS family of transcription factors are expressed in T cells, including ETS1 and ELF1. Here we describe the ability of these factors to interact with a site (GM5), located within the CLE0 element, -47 to -40 upstream of the GM-CSF transcription initiation site. Exogenous ETS1, but not ELF1, can transactivate GM-CSF, through the GM5 site, in a PMA/ionomycin dependent manner. Other unidentified ETS-like factors present in Jurkat cells are also capable of binding GM5. Mutation of the core ETS binding site from -GGAA- to -GGAT- prevents the binding of ETS-like factors with the exception of ETS1. The GM-CSF promoter, modified in this way to be ETS1 specific, is fully responsive to PMA/ionomycin induction, in addition to ETS1 transactivation in the presence of PMA and ionomycin. Together these data suggest that ETS1 may be involved in mediating the increased GM-CSF production associated with T cell activation. PMID:7478534

  11. Galectin-8 promotes regulatory T cell differentiation by modulating IL-2 and TGFβ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, James F.; Suryawanshi, Amol; Chen, Wei-Sheng; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Panjwani, Noorjahan

    2015-01-01

    Galectins have emerged as potent immunoregulatory molecules that control chronic inflammation through distinct mechanisms. Galectin-8 (Gal-8), a tandem-repeat type galectin with unique preference for α2,3-sialylated glycans, is ubiquitously expressed, but little is known about its role in T cell differentiation. Here, we report that Gal-8 promotes the polyclonal differentiation of primary mouse Treg cells in vitro. We further show that Gal-8 also facilitates antigen-specific differentiation of regulatory T (Treg) cells, and that Treg cells polarized in the presence of Gal-8 express cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and IL-10 at a higher frequency than control Treg cells, and efficiently inhibit proliferation of activated T cells in vitro. Investigation of the mechanism by which Gal-8 promotes Treg conversion revealed that Gal-8 activates TGFβ signaling and promotes sustained IL-2R signaling. Taken together, these data suggest that Gal-8 promotes the differentiation of highly suppressive Treg cells, which has implications for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26282995

  12. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 and its analog TX527 promote a stable regulatory T cell phenotype in T cells from type 1 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Van Belle, Tom L; Vanherwegen, An-Sofie; Feyaerts, Dorien; De Clercq, Pierre; Verstuyf, Annemieke; Korf, Hannelie; Gysemans, Conny; Mathieu, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of regulatory T cells (Tregs) as central mediators of peripheral tolerance in the immune system has led to an important area of clinical investigation to target these cells for the treatment of autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes. We have demonstrated earlier that in vitro treatment of T cells from healthy individuals with TX527, a low-calcemic analog of bioactive vitamin D, can promote a CD4+ CD25high CD127low regulatory profile and imprint a migratory signature specific for homing to sites of inflammation. Towards clinical application of vitamin D-induced Tregs in autologous adoptive immunotherapy for type 1 diabetes, we show here that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] and TX527 similarly imprint T cells from type 1 diabetes patients with a CD4+ CD25high CD127low regulatory profile, modulate surface expression of skin- and inflammation-homing receptors, and increase expression of CTLA-4 and OX-40. Also, 1,25(OH)2D3 and TX527 treatment inhibit the production of effector cytokines IFN-γ, IL-9, and IL-17. Importantly, 1,25(OH)2D3 and TX527 promote the induction of IL-10-producing CD4+ CD25high CD127low T cells with a stable phenotype and the functional capacity to suppress proliferation of autologous responder T cells in vitro. These findings warrant additional validation of vitamin D-induced Tregs in view of future autologous adoptive immunotherapy in type 1 diabetes. PMID:25279717

  13. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 and Its Analog TX527 Promote a Stable Regulatory T Cell Phenotype in T Cells from Type 1 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    De Clercq, Pierre; Verstuyf, Annemieke; Korf, Hannelie; Gysemans, Conny; Mathieu, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of regulatory T cells (Tregs) as central mediators of peripheral tolerance in the immune system has led to an important area of clinical investigation to target these cells for the treatment of autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes. We have demonstrated earlier that in vitro treatment of T cells from healthy individuals with TX527, a low-calcemic analog of bioactive vitamin D, can promote a CD4+CD25highCD127low regulatory profile and imprint a migratory signature specific for homing to sites of inflammation. Towards clinical application of vitamin D-induced Tregs in autologous adoptive immunotherapy for type 1 diabetes, we show here that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] and TX527 similarly imprint T cells from type 1 diabetes patients with a CD4+CD25highCD127low regulatory profile, modulate surface expression of skin- and inflammation-homing receptors, and increase expression of CTLA-4 and OX-40. Also, 1,25(OH)2D3 and TX527 treatment inhibit the production of effector cytokines IFN-γ, IL-9, and IL-17. Importantly, 1,25(OH)2D3 and TX527 promote the induction of IL-10-producing CD4+CD25highCD127low T cells with a stable phenotype and the functional capacity to suppress proliferation of autologous responder T cells in vitro. These findings warrant additional validation of vitamin D-induced Tregs in view of future autologous adoptive immunotherapy in type 1 diabetes. PMID:25279717

  14. Class I T-cell epitope prediction: improvements using a combination of proteasome cleavage, TAP affinity, and MHC binding.

    PubMed

    Doytchinova, Irini A; Flower, Darren R

    2006-05-01

    Cleavage by the proteasome is responsible for generating the C terminus of T-cell epitopes. Modeling the process of proteasome cleavage as part of a multi-step algorithm for T-cell epitope prediction will reduce the number of non-binders and increase the overall accuracy of the predictive algorithm. Quantitative matrix-based models for prediction of the proteasome cleavage sites in a protein were developed using a training set of 489 naturally processed T-cell epitopes (nonamer peptides) associated with HLA-A and HLA-B molecules. The models were validated using an external test set of 227 T-cell epitopes. The performance of the models was good, identifying 76% of the C-termini correctly. The best model of proteasome cleavage was incorporated as the first step in a three-step algorithm for T-cell epitope prediction, where subsequent steps predicted TAP affinity and MHC binding using previously derived models. PMID:16524630

  15. Egr3 Induces a Th17 Response by Promoting the Development of γδ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, Rose M.; Collins, Samuel L.; Horton, Maureen R.; Powell, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor Early Growth Response 3 (Egr3) has been shown to play an important role in negatively regulating T cell activation and promoting T cell anergy in Th1 cells. However, its role in regulating other T helper subsets has yet to be described. We sought to determine the role of Egr3 in a Th17 response using transgenic mice that overexpress Egr3 in T cells (Egr3 TG). Splenocytes from Egr3 TG mice demonstrated more robust generation of Th17 cells even under non-Th17 skewing conditions. We found that while Egr3 TG T cells were not intrinsically more likely to become Th17 cells, the environment encountered by these cells was more conducive to Th17 development. Further analysis revealed a considerable increase in the number of γδ T cells in both the peripheral lymphoid organs and mucosal tissues of Egr3 TG mice, a cell type which normally accounts for only a small fraction of peripheral lymphocytes. Consistent with this marked increase in peripheral γδ T cells, thymocytes from Egr3 TG mice also appear biased toward γδ T cell development. Coculture of these Egr3-induced γδ T cells with wildtype CD4+ T cells increases Th17 differentiation, and Egr3 TG mice are more susceptible to bleomycin-induced lung inflammation. Overall our findings strengthen the role for Egr3 in promoting γδ T cell development and show that Egr3-induced γδ T cells are both functional and capable of altering the adaptive immune response in a Th17-biased manner. Our data also demonstrates that the role played by Egr3 in T cell activation and differentiation is more complex than previously thought. PMID:24475259

  16. Mcl-1 antagonizes Bax/Bak to promote effector CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, P; Koss, B; Opferman, J T; Hildeman, D A

    2013-01-01

    Members of the Bcl-2 family have critical roles in regulating tissue homeostasis by modulating apoptosis. Anti-apoptotic molecules physically interact and restrain pro-apoptotic family members preventing the induction of cell death. However, the specificity of the functional interactions between pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members remains unclear. The pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bcl-2 interacting mediator of death (Bim) has a critical role in promoting the death of activated, effector T cells following viral infections. Although Bcl-2 is an important Bim antagonist in effector T cells, and Bcl-xL is not required for effector T-cell survival, the roles of other anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members remain unclear. Here, we investigated the role of myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (Mcl-1) in regulating effector T-cell responses in vivo. We found, at the peak of the response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection, that Mcl-1 expression was increased in activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Retroviral overexpression of Mcl-1-protected activated T cells from death, whereas deletion of Mcl-1 during the course of infection led to a massive loss of LCMV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Interestingly, the co-deletion of Bim failed to prevent the loss of Mcl-1-deficient T cells. Furthermore, lck-driven overexpression of a Bcl-xL transgene only partially rescued Mcl-1-deficient effector T cells suggesting a lack of redundancy between the family members. In contrast, additional loss of Bax and Bak completely rescued Mcl-1-deficient effector T-cell number and function, without enhancing T-cell proliferation. These data suggest that Mcl-1 is critical for promoting effector T-cell responses, but does so by combating pro-apoptotic molecules beyond Bim. PMID:23558951

  17. Hypoxia promotes Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific up-regulation of granulysin in human T cells.

    PubMed

    Zenk, Sebastian F; Vollmer, Michael; Schercher, Esra; Kallert, Stephanie; Kubis, Jan; Stenger, Steffen

    2016-06-01

    Oxygen tension affects local immune responses in inflammation and infection. In tuberculosis mycobacteria avoid hypoxic areas and preferentially persist and reactivate in the oxygen-rich apex of the lung. Oxygen restriction activates antimicrobial effector mechanisms in macrophages and restricts growth of intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.Tb). The effect of oxygen restriction on T cell-mediated antimicrobial effector mechanisms is unknown. Therefore we determined the influence of hypoxia on the expression of granulysin, an antimicrobial peptide of lymphocytes. Hypoxia increased the antigen-specific up-regulation of granulysin mRNA and protein in human CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes. This observation was functionally relevant, because oxygen restriction supported the growth-limiting effect of antigen-specific T cells against virulent M.Tb residing in primary human macrophages. Our results provide evidence that oxygen restriction promotes the expression of granulysin and suggest that this effect-in conjunction with additional T cell-mediated immune responses-supports protection against mycobacteria. The therapeutic modulation of oxygen availability may offer a new strategy for the host-directed therapy of infectious diseases with intracellular pathogens. PMID:26613797

  18. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-binding epitopes dataset for the newly identified T-cell antigens of Mycobacterium immunogenum.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Harish; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2016-09-01

    The dataset described herein is related to our article entitled "T-cell antigens of Mycobacterium immunogenum (MI), an etiological agent of occupational hypersensitivity pneumonitis'' (Chandra and Yadav, 2016) [1]. The data include in silico-predicted T-cell epitopes of the T-cell antigens AgA and AgD of MI predicted to bind to HLA-I or HLA-II alleles. Data on two reference T-cell antigens ESAT-6 and CFP-10 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv are included for comparison. The data for each antigen include the predicted epitope׳s amino acid sequence, its first amino acid position, and its ability to bind HLA-I or HLA-II allele(s). PMID:27508266

  19. Promotion of regulatory T cell induction by immunomodulatory herbal medicine licorice and its two constituents

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ao; He, Dongming; Xu, Hong-Bo; Geng, Chang-An; Zhao, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a critical role to control immune responses and to prevent autoimmunity, thus selective increase of Treg cells in vivo has broad therapeutic implications for autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Licorice is a well-known herbal medicine used worldwide for over thousands of years, and accumulating evidence has shown its immunomodulatory potential. However, it is not clear whether licorice could regulate the induction and function of Treg cells. Here we found licorice extract could promote Treg cell induction, and then we used a rational approach to isolate its functional fractions and constituents. The results showed that two constituents, isoliquiritigenin and naringenin, promoted Treg cell induction both in vitro and in vivo. The effective fractions and two constituents of licorice also enhanced immune suppression of Treg cells, and they further reduced severity of DSS-induced colitis in mice. This study suggested that promotion of regulatory T cell induction could be an underlying mechanism of the historically and widely used herbal medicine licorice, providing its two effective molecules against autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:26370586

  20. Impaired memory CD8 T cell development in the absence of methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 2.

    PubMed

    Kersh, Ellen N

    2006-09-15

    Intracellular differentiation events that determine which cells develop into memory CD8 T cells are currently incompletely understood. Methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 2 (MBD2) is a transcriptional repressor that binds to methylated DNA and mediates the biological consequences of epigenetic gene methylation. The role of MBD2 during the differentiation of naive CD8 T cells into effector and memory cells was determined following acute infection of MBD2-deficient mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Despite rapid viral clearance and an efficient primary effector CD8 T cell response, reduced numbers of Ag-specific memory CD8 T cells were observed. Importantly, the appearance of precursor memory cells (IL-7Ralphahigh) was delayed. The remaining MBD2(-/-) memory cells were not fully protective during rechallenge, and memory cell characteristics were altered with regard to surface markers (IL-7Ralpha, KLRG-1, CD27, and others) and cytokine production. The defect was CD8 T cell intrinsic, because memory cell development was also delayed when MBD2(-/-) CD8 T cells were adoptively transferred into SCID mice. These data demonstrate that MBD2 is a previously unrecognized intracellular factor required for the efficient generation of protective memory CD8 T cells. PMID:16951344

  1. Stimulation of T-cells with OKT3 antibodies increases forskolin binding and cyclic AMP accumulation.

    PubMed

    Kvanta, A; Gerwins, P; Jondal, M; Fredholm, B B

    1990-01-01

    It has recently been shown that elevation of cAMP by adenosine receptor stimulation may be potentiated by stimulation of the T-cell receptor/CD3 complex on human T-cells with the monoclonal antibody OKT3, and that this is mimicked by activation of protein kinase C [Kvanta, A. et al. (1989) Naunyn-Schmeideberg's Arch. Pharmac. 340, 715-717]. In this study the diterpene forskolin, which binds to and activates the adenylate cyclase, has been used to examine further how the CD3 complex may influence the adenylate cyclase pathway. Stimulation with OKT3 alone was found to cause a small dose-dependent increase in basal cAMP accumulation. When combining OKT3 with a concentration of forskolin (10 microM), which by itself had little effect on the cyclase activity, the cAMP accumulation was markedly potentiated. This potentiation was paralleled by an increase in [3H]forskolin binding to saponine permeabilized Jurkat cells from 24 to 41 fmol/10(6) cells. The OKT3 effect on cAMP was blocked by chelating extracellular Ca2+ with EGTA or intracellular Ca2+ with BAPTA and also by W-7, an inhibitor of calmodulin, but was unaffected by H-7, an inhibitor of protein kinase C. Even though OKT3 caused an increase in inositolphosphate turnover, and activated protein kinase C, neither phorbol 12,13 dibutyrate (PDBu) nor the Ca2(+)-ionophore A23187 could mimic the OKT3 effect, whereas a combination of PDBu and A23187 at high concentrations could potentiate forskolin stimulated cyclase activity. Together, these results indicated that stimulation of the CD3 complex could influence the adenylate cyclase by two different mechanisms, one involving activation of protein kinase C and another which does not. PMID:2177619

  2. Kinetics of T-cell receptor binding to peptide/I-Ek complexes: correlation of the dissociation rate with T-cell responsiveness.

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, K; Boniface, J J; Steffner, P; Reay, P A; Davis, M M

    1994-01-01

    Recognition by T-cell antigen receptors (TCRs) of processed peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules is required for the initiation of most T-lymphocyte responses. Despite the availability of soluble forms of TCRs and MHC heterodimers, this interaction has proven difficult to study directly due to the very low affinity. We report here on the kinetics of TCR binding to peptide/MHC complexes in a cell-free system using surface plasmon resonance. The apparent association rates for the interactions of related peptide/MHC complexes to one such TCR are relatively slow (900-3000 M-1.s-1) and dissociation rates are very fast (0.3-0.06 s-1) with t1/2 of 2-12 s at 25 degrees C. The calculated affinity of the engineered soluble molecules compares well with previously reported competition data for native TCRs or competition data reported here for native peptide/MHC complexes, indicating that these soluble heterodimers bind in the same manner as the original molecules expressed on cells. We also find that the peptide variants which give weaker T-cell stimulatory responses have similar affinities but distinctly faster dissociation rates compared with the original peptide (when loaded onto the MHC molecule) and that this later property may be responsible for their lower activity. This has implications for both downstream signaling events and models of TCR-peptide antagonists. PMID:7809136

  3. Activation‐Induced Killer Cell Immunoglobulin‐like Receptor 3DL2 Binding to HLA–B27 Licenses Pathogenic T Cell Differentiation in Spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ridley, Anna; Hatano, Hiroko; Wong‐Baeza, Isabel; Shaw, Jacqueline; Matthews, Katherine K.; Al‐Mossawi, Hussein; Ladell, Kristin; Price, David A.; Bowness, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objective In the spondyloarthritides (SpA), increased numbers of CD4+ T cells express killer cell immunoglobulin‐like receptor 3DL2 (KIR‐3DL2). The aim of this study was to determine the factors that induce KIR‐3DL2 expression, and to characterize the relationship between HLA–B27 and the phenotype and function of KIR‐3DL2–expressing CD4+ T cells in SpA. Methods In total, 34 B27+ patients with SpA, 28 age‐ and sex‐matched healthy controls (20 B27− and 8 B27+), and 9 patients with rheumatoid arthritis were studied. KIR-3DL2 expression and other phenotypic characteristics of peripheral blood and synovial fluid CD4+ T cells were studied by flow cytometry, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting. T cell receptor clonality was determined by template‐switch anchored reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and sequencing analysis. Cytokines were measured by enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay. Results Cellular activation induced KIR‐3DL2 expression on both naive and effector CD4+ T cells. KIR‐3DL2 binding to B27+ cells promoted expression of KIR‐3DL2, the Th17‐specific transcription factor retinoic acid receptor–related orphan nuclear receptor γt, and the antiapoptotic factor B cell lymphoma 2. KIR‐3DL2+CD4+ T cells in patients with ankylosing spondylitis were oligoclonal and enriched for markers of T cell activation and for the gut homing receptor CCR9. In the presence of B27+ antigen‐presenting cells, KIR‐3DL2+CD4+ T cells produced less interleukin‐2 (IL‐2) but more IL‐17. This effect was blocked by HC10, an antibody that inhibits the binding of KIR‐3DL2 to B27 heavy chains. Conclusion KIR‐3DL2 binding to HLA–B27 licenses Th17 cell differentiation in SpA. These findings raise the therapeutic potential of targeting HLA–B27–KIR‐3DL2 interactions for the treatment of B27+ patients with SpA. PMID:26841353

  4. Defect density in multiwalled carbon nanotubes influences ovalbumin adsorption and promotes macrophage activation and CD4(+) T-cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Bai, Wei; Raghavendra, Achyut; Podila, Ramakrishna; Brown, Jared M

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are of great interest for the development of drugs and vaccines due to their unique physicochemical properties. The high surface area to volume ratio and delocalized pi-electron cloud of CNTs promote binding of proteins to the surface forming a protein corona. This unique feature of CNTs has been recognized for potential delivery of antigens for strong and long-lasting antigen-specific immune responses. Based on an earlier study that demonstrated increased protein binding, we propose that carboxylated multiwalled CNTs (MWCNTs) can function as an improved carrier to deliver antigens such as ovalbumin (OVA). To test this hypothesis, we coated carboxylated MWCNTs with OVA and measured uptake and activation of antigen-presenting cells (macrophages) and their ability to stimulate CD4(+) T-cell proliferation. We employed two types of carboxylated MWCNTs with different surface areas and defects (MWCNT-2 and MWCNT-30). MWCNT-2 and MWCNT-30 have surface areas of ~215 m(2)/g and 94 m(2)/g, respectively. The ratios of D- to G-band areas (I D/I G) were 0.97 and 1.37 for MWCNT-2 and MWCNT-30, respectively, samples showing that MWCNT-30 contained more defects. The increase in defects in MWCNT-30 led to increased binding of OVA as compared to MWCNT-2 (1,066±182 μg/mL vs 582±41 μg/mL, respectively). Both types of MWCNTs, along with MWCNT-OVA complexes, showed no observable toxicity to bone-marrow-derived macrophages up to 5 days. Surprisingly, we found that MWCNT-OVA complex significantly increased the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II on macrophages and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin 6), while MWCNTs without OVA protein corona did not. The coculture of MWCNT-OVA-complex-treated macrophages and OVA-specific CD4(+) T-cells isolated from OT-II mice demonstrated robust proliferation of CD4(+) T-cells. This study provides strong evidence for a role for defects in carboxylated MWCNTs

  5. Defect density in multiwalled carbon nanotubes influences ovalbumin adsorption and promotes macrophage activation and CD4+ T-cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Wei; Raghavendra, Achyut; Podila, Ramakrishna; Brown, Jared M

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are of great interest for the development of drugs and vaccines due to their unique physicochemical properties. The high surface area to volume ratio and delocalized pi-electron cloud of CNTs promote binding of proteins to the surface forming a protein corona. This unique feature of CNTs has been recognized for potential delivery of antigens for strong and long-lasting antigen-specific immune responses. Based on an earlier study that demonstrated increased protein binding, we propose that carboxylated multiwalled CNTs (MWCNTs) can function as an improved carrier to deliver antigens such as ovalbumin (OVA). To test this hypothesis, we coated carboxylated MWCNTs with OVA and measured uptake and activation of antigen-presenting cells (macrophages) and their ability to stimulate CD4+ T-cell proliferation. We employed two types of carboxylated MWCNTs with different surface areas and defects (MWCNT-2 and MWCNT-30). MWCNT-2 and MWCNT-30 have surface areas of ~215 m2/g and 94 m2/g, respectively. The ratios of D- to G-band areas (ID/IG) were 0.97 and 1.37 for MWCNT-2 and MWCNT-30, respectively, samples showing that MWCNT-30 contained more defects. The increase in defects in MWCNT-30 led to increased binding of OVA as compared to MWCNT-2 (1,066±182 μg/mL vs 582±41 μg/mL, respectively). Both types of MWCNTs, along with MWCNT–OVA complexes, showed no observable toxicity to bone-marrow-derived macrophages up to 5 days. Surprisingly, we found that MWCNT–OVA complex significantly increased the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II on macrophages and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin 6), while MWCNTs without OVA protein corona did not. The coculture of MWCNT–OVA-complex-treated macrophages and OVA-specific CD4+ T-cells isolated from OT-II mice demonstrated robust proliferation of CD4+ T-cells. This study provides strong evidence for a role for defects in carboxylated MWCNTs and

  6. Lung-resident tissue macrophages generate Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and promote airway tolerance.

    PubMed

    Soroosh, Pejman; Doherty, Taylor A; Duan, Wei; Mehta, Amit Kumar; Choi, Heonsik; Adams, Yan Fei; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Khorram, Naseem; Rosenthal, Peter; Broide, David H; Croft, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Airway tolerance is the usual outcome of inhalation of harmless antigens. Although T cell deletion and anergy are likely components of tolerogenic mechanisms in the lung, increasing evidence indicates that antigen-specific regulatory T cells (inducible Treg cells [iTreg cells]) that express Foxp3 are also critical. Several lung antigen-presenting cells have been suggested to contribute to tolerance, including alveolar macrophages (MØs), classical dendritic cells (DCs), and plasmacytoid DCs, but whether these possess the attributes required to directly promote the development of Foxp3(+) iTreg cells is unclear. Here, we show that lung-resident tissue MØs coexpress TGF-β and retinal dehydrogenases (RALDH1 and RALDH 2) under steady-state conditions and that their sampling of harmless airborne antigen and presentation to antigen-specific CD4 T cells resulted in the generation of Foxp3(+) Treg cells. Treg cell induction in this model depended on both TGF-β and retinoic acid. Transfer of the antigen-pulsed tissue MØs into the airways correspondingly prevented the development of asthmatic lung inflammation upon subsequent challenge with antigen. Moreover, exposure of lung tissue MØs to allergens suppressed their ability to generate iTreg cells coincident with blocking airway tolerance. Suppression of Treg cell generation required proteases and TLR-mediated signals. Therefore, lung-resident tissue MØs have regulatory functions, and strategies to target these cells might hold promise for prevention or treatment of allergic asthma. PMID:23547101

  7. V{delta}1 T cell receptor binds specifically to MHC I chain related A: Molecular and biochemical evidences

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Jianqing; Huang Jie; Chen Hui; Cui Lianxian; He Wei . E-mail: heweiimu@public.bta.net.cn

    2006-01-06

    Human MHC class I chain-related A (MICA) is a tumor-associated antigen that can be recognized by V{delta}1 subset of tumor-infiltrating {gamma}{delta} T cells. We previously reported that immobilized recombinant MICA protein could induce the proliferation of tumor-infiltrating V{delta}1 {gamma}{delta} T cells in vitro. But there has been no direct evidence showing the engagement of {gamma}{delta} T cell receptors (TCR) of the induced cells with MICA. In the current investigation, we show that MICA induces specific cytolytic activity of the expanded {gamma}{delta} T cells. We expressed the coupled V domains from the MICA-induced T cells as a single polypeptide chain V{delta}V{gamma} TCR ({gamma}{delta} scTCR). Such scTCR can specifically bind MICA of HeLa cells. Direct interaction of {gamma}{delta} scTCRs with in vitro expressed MICA was monitored using an IAsys biosensor. We found that the V{delta}1 scTCR can specifically bind to immobilized MICA molecule and MICA{alpha}1{alpha}2 domains are responsible for the binding reaction.

  8. A miRNA upregulated in asthma airway T cells promotes TH2 cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Laura J.; Patel, Sana; Bhakta, Nirav R.; Choy, David F.; Brightbill, Hans D.; Ren, Xin; Wang, Yanli; Pua, Heather H.; Baumjohann, Dirk; Montoya, Misty M.; Panduro, Marisella; Remedios, Kelly A.; Huang, Xiaozhu; Fahy, John V.; Arron, Joseph R.; Woodruff, Prescott G.; Ansel., Karl M.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) exert powerful effects on immune function by tuning networks of target genes that orchestrate cell behavior. We sought to uncover miRNAs and miRNA-regulated pathways that control the TH2 responses that drive pathogenic inflammation in asthma. Profiling miRNA expression in human airway-infiltrating T cells revealed miR-19a elevation in asthma. Modulating miR-19 activity altered TH2 cytokine production in both human and mouse T cells, and TH2 cell responses were markedly impaired in cells lacking the entire miR-17∼92 cluster. miR-19 promotes TH2 cytokine production and amplifies PI(3)K, JAK-STAT, and NF-κB signaling by direct targeting of PTEN, SOCS1, and A20. Thus, miR-19a up regulation in asthma may be an indicator and a cause of increased TH2 cytokine production in the airways. PMID:25362490

  9. MicroRNA-26a Promotes Regulatory T cells and Suppresses Autoimmune Diabetes in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui; Zhang, Shoutao; Shi, Doufei; Mao, Yanhua; Cui, Jianguo

    2016-02-01

    Type-1 diabetes (TID) is an autoimmune disease in which the body's own immune cells attack islet β cells, the cells in the pancreas that produce and release the hormone insulin. Mir-26a has been reported to play functions in cellular differentiation, cell growth, cell apoptosis, and metastasis. However, the role of microRNA-26a (Mir-26a) in autoimmune TID has never been investigated. In our current study, we found that pre-Mir-26a (LV-26a)-treated mice had significantly longer normoglycemic time and lower frequency of autoreactive IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) cells compared with an empty lentiviral vector (LV-Con)-treated non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Mir-26a suppresses autoreactive T cells and expands Tregs in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, in our adoptive transfer study, the groups receiving whole splenocytes and CD25-depleted splenocytes from LV-Con-treated diabetic NOD mice develop diabetes at 3 to 4 weeks of age. In comparison, mice injected with undepleted splenocytes obtained from LV-26a-treated reversal NOD mice develop diabetes after 6-8 weeks. And depletion of CD25(+) cells in the splenocytes of reversed mice abrogates the delay in diabetes onset. In conclusion, Mir-26a suppresses autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice in part through promoted regulatory T cells (Tregs) expression. PMID:26208605

  10. CD4-Negative Cells Bind Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Efficiently Transfer Virus to T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Olinger, Gene G.; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Spear, Gregory T.

    2000-01-01

    The ability of human immunodeficiency virus strain MN (HIVMN), a T-cell line-adapted strain of HIV, and X4 and R5 primary isolates to bind to various cell types was investigated. In general, HIVMN bound to cells at higher levels than did the primary isolates. Virus bound to both CD4-positive (CD4+) and CD4-negative (CD4−) cells, including neutrophils, Raji cells, tonsil mononuclear cells, erythrocytes, platelets, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), although virus bound at significantly higher levels to PBMC. However, there was no difference in the amount of HIV that bound to CD4-enriched or CD4-depleted PBMC. Virus bound to CD4− cells was up to 17 times more infectious for T cells in cocultures than was the same amount of cell-free virus. Virus bound to nucleated cells was significantly more infectious than virus bound to erythrocytes or platelets. The enhanced infection of T cells by virus bound to CD4− cells was not due to stimulatory signals provided by CD4− cells or infection of CD4− cells. However, anti-CD18 antibody substantially reduced the enhanced virus replication in T cells, suggesting that virus that bound to the surface of CD4− cells is efficiently passed to CD4+ T cells during cell-cell adhesion. These studies show that HIV binds at relatively high levels to CD4− cells and, once bound, is highly infectious for T cells. This suggests that virus binding to the surface of CD4− cells is an important route for infection of T cells in vivo. PMID:10954556

  11. Binding of Soluble Natural Ligands to a Soluble Human T-Cell Receptor Fragment Produced in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilyard, Katherine L.; Reyburn, Hugh; Chung, Shan; Bell, John I.; Strominger, Jack L.

    1994-09-01

    An Escherichia coli expression system has been developed to produce milligram quantities of the variable domains of a human T-cell receptor from a cytotoxic T cell that recognizes the HLA-A2-influenza matrix peptide complex as a single polypeptide chain. The recombinant protein was purified by metal-chelate chromatography and then refolded in a redox buffer system. The refolded protein was shown to directly bind both Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B and the major histocompatibility complex protein-peptide complex using a BIAcore biosensor. Thus this preparation of a single-chain, variable-domain, T-cell receptor fragment can bind both of its natural ligands and some of it is therefore a functional fragment of the receptor molecule.

  12. Transcriptional repressor ZEB2 promotes terminal differentiation of CD8+ effector and memory T cell populations during infection

    PubMed Central

    Omilusik, Kyla D.; Best, J. Adam; Yu, Bingfei; Goossens, Steven; Weidemann, Alexander; Nguyen, Jessica V.; Seuntjens, Eve; Stryjewska, Agata; Zweier, Christiane; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Gattinoni, Luca; Bird, Lynne M.; Higashi, Yujiro; Kondoh, Hisato; Huylebroeck, Danny; Haigh, Jody

    2015-01-01

    ZEB2 is a multi-zinc-finger transcription factor known to play a significant role in early neurogenesis and in epithelial-mesenchymal transition–dependent tumor metastasis. Although the function of ZEB2 in T lymphocytes is unknown, activity of the closely related family member ZEB1 has been implicated in lymphocyte development. Here, we find that ZEB2 expression is up-regulated by activated T cells, specifically in the KLRG1hi effector CD8+ T cell subset. Loss of ZEB2 expression results in a significant loss of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells after primary and secondary infection with a severe impairment in the generation of the KLRG1hi effector memory cell population. We show that ZEB2, which can bind DNA at tandem, consensus E-box sites, regulates gene expression of several E-protein targets and may directly repress Il7r and Il2 in CD8+ T cells responding to infection. Furthermore, we find that T-bet binds to highly conserved T-box sites in the Zeb2 gene and that T-bet and ZEB2 regulate similar gene expression programs in effector T cells, suggesting that T-bet acts upstream and through regulation of ZEB2. Collectively, we place ZEB2 in a larger transcriptional network that is responsible for the balance between terminal differentiation and formation of memory CD8+ T cells. PMID:26503445

  13. PKCθ and HIV-1 Transcriptional Regulator Tat Co-exist at the LTR Promoter in CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    López-Huertas, María Rosa; Li, Jasmine; Zafar, Anjum; Rodríguez-Mora, Sara; García-Domínguez, Carlota; Mateos, Elena; Alcamí, José; Rao, Sudha; Coiras, Mayte

    2016-01-01

    PKCθ is essential for the activation of CD4+ T cells. Upon TCR/CD28 stimulation, PKCθ is phosphorylated and migrates to the immunological synapse, inducing the activation of cellular transcription factors such as NF-κB and kinases as ERK that are critical for HIV-1 replication. We previously demonstrated that PKCθ is also necessary for HIV-1 replication but the precise mechanism is unknown. Efficient HIV-1 transcription and elongation are absolutely dependent on the synergy between NF-κB and the viral regulator Tat. Tat exerts its function by binding a RNA stem-loop structure proximal to the viral mRNA cap site termed TAR. Besides, due to its effect on cellular metabolic pathways, Tat causes profound changes in infected CD4+ T cells such as the activation of NF-κB and ERK. We hypothesized that the aberrant upregulation of Tat-mediated activation of NF-κB and ERK occurred through PKCθ signaling. In fact, Jurkat TetOff cells with stable and doxycycline-repressible expression of Tat (Jurkat-Tat) expressed high levels of mRNA for PKCθ. In these cells, PKCθ located at the plasma membrane was phosphorylated at T538 residue in undivided cells, in the absence of stimulation. Treatment with doxycycline inhibited PKCθ phosphorylation in Jurkat-Tat, suggesting that Tat expression was directly related to the activation of PKCθ. Both NF-κB and Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signaling pathway were significantly activated in Jurkat-Tat cells, and this correlated with high transactivation of HIV-1 LTR promoter. RNA interference for PKCθ inhibited NF-κB and ERK activity, as well as LTR-mediated transactivation even in the presence of Tat. In addition to Tat-mediated activation of PKCθ in the cytosol, we demonstrated by sequential ChIP that Tat and PKCθ coexisted in the same complex bound at the HIV-1 LTR promoter, specifically at the region containing TAR loop. In conclusion, PKCθ-Tat interaction seemed to be essential for HIV-1 replication in CD4+ T cells and could be used as a

  14. Natural killer cell activation enhances immune pathology and promotes chronic infection by limiting CD8+ T-cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Lang, Philipp A; Lang, Karl S; Xu, Haifeng C; Grusdat, Melanie; Parish, Ian A; Recher, Mike; Elford, Alisha R; Dhanji, Salim; Shaabani, Namir; Tran, Charles W; Dissanayake, Dilan; Rahbar, Ramtin; Ghazarian, Magar; Brüstle, Anne; Fine, Jason; Chen, Peter; Weaver, Casey T; Klose, Christoph; Diefenbach, Andreas; Häussinger, Dieter; Carlyle, James R; Kaech, Susan M; Mak, Tak W; Ohashi, Pamela S

    2012-01-24

    Infections with HIV, hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus can turn into chronic infections, which currently affect more than 500 million patients worldwide. It is generally thought that virus-mediated T-cell exhaustion limits T-cell function, thus promoting chronic disease. Here we demonstrate that natural killer (NK) cells have a negative impact on the development of T-cell immunity by using the murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. NK cell-deficient (Nfil3(-/-), E4BP4(-/-)) mice exhibited a higher virus-specific T-cell response. In addition, NK cell depletion caused enhanced T-cell immunity in WT mice, which led to rapid virus control and prevented chronic infection in lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus clone 13- and reduced viral load in DOCILE-infected animals. Further experiments showed that NKG2D triggered regulatory NK cell functions, which were mediated by perforin, and limited T-cell responses. Therefore, we identified an important role of regulatory NK cells in limiting T-cell immunity during virus infection. PMID:22167808

  15. Peptidoglycan-linked protein A promotes T cell-dependent antibody expansion during Staphylococcus aureus infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hwan Keun; Falugi, Fabiana; Missiakas, Dominique M.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of Staphylococcus aureus disease in humans is persistent infections without development of protective immune responses. Infected patients generate VH3 plasmablast expansions and increased VH3 idiotype Ig; however, the mechanisms for staphylococcal modification of immune responses are not known. We report here that S. aureus-infected mice generate VH3 antibody expansions via a mechanism requiring MHC-restricted antigen presentation to CD4+ T cells and staphylococcal protein A (SpA), a cell wall-anchored surface molecule that binds Fcγ and VH3 variant heavy chains of Ig. VH3 expansion occurred with peptidoglycan-linked SpA from the bacterial envelope but not with recombinant SpA, and optimally required five tandem repeats of its Ig-binding domains. Signaling via receptor-interacting serine/threonine protein kinase 2 (RIPK2) was essential for implementing peptidoglycan-linked SpA superantigen activity. VH3 clan IgG from S. aureus-infected or SpA-treated animals was not pathogen-specific, suggesting that SpA cross-linking of VH3 idiotype B-cell receptors and activation via attached peptidoglycan are the determinants of staphylococcal escape from adaptive immune responses. PMID:27140614

  16. Peptidoglycan-linked protein A promotes T cell-dependent antibody expansion during Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwan Keun; Falugi, Fabiana; Missiakas, Dominique M; Schneewind, Olaf

    2016-05-17

    A hallmark of Staphylococcus aureus disease in humans is persistent infections without development of protective immune responses. Infected patients generate VH3 plasmablast expansions and increased VH3 idiotype Ig; however, the mechanisms for staphylococcal modification of immune responses are not known. We report here that S. aureus-infected mice generate VH3 antibody expansions via a mechanism requiring MHC-restricted antigen presentation to CD4(+) T cells and staphylococcal protein A (SpA), a cell wall-anchored surface molecule that binds Fcγ and VH3 variant heavy chains of Ig. VH3 expansion occurred with peptidoglycan-linked SpA from the bacterial envelope but not with recombinant SpA, and optimally required five tandem repeats of its Ig-binding domains. Signaling via receptor-interacting serine/threonine protein kinase 2 (RIPK2) was essential for implementing peptidoglycan-linked SpA superantigen activity. VH3 clan IgG from S. aureus-infected or SpA-treated animals was not pathogen-specific, suggesting that SpA cross-linking of VH3 idiotype B-cell receptors and activation via attached peptidoglycan are the determinants of staphylococcal escape from adaptive immune responses. PMID:27140614

  17. Histamine type I (H/sub 1/) receptor radioligand binding studies on normal T cell subsets, B cells, and monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, W.; Doyle, K.; Rocklin, R.E.

    1986-03-15

    A single, specific binding site for (/sup 3/H)pyrilamine on normal human T helper, T suppressor, B cells, and monocytes was documented. The binding of the radioligand to its receptor is reversible with cold H/sub 1/ antagonist, saturates at 40 to 60 nM, and binding equilibrium is achieved in 2 to 4 min. Using a computer program (Ligand), the authors calculated the dissociation constants, binding capacities, and numbers of receptors per cell for each of the different cell types. Monocytes were found to have the highest affinity for (/sup 3/H)pyrilamine, followed by T helper cells, B cells and T suppressor cells (K/sub D/ = 44.6 +/- 49.4 nM). T suppressor cells were found to express the higher number of H/sub 1/ receptors per cell followed by B cells, T helper cells, and monocytes. The binding affinity for (/sup 3/H)pyrilamine increased over a 48-hr period, whereas the number of receptors per T cell was essentially unchanged. In contrast, T cells stimulated with Con A or PHA were shown to have a greater than fourfold increase in the number of receptors per cell, whereas the binding affinity for (/sup 3/H)pyrilamine decreased over the 48-hr period. Although the function of H/sub 1/ receptors on T cells, B cells, and monocytes has not been completely defined, this receptor has the potential of playing an important role in the modulating the immune response.

  18. Active role of T cells in promoting an in vitro autoantibody response to self erythrocytes in NZB mice.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R D; Calkins, C E

    1988-01-01

    The in vitro anti-self erythrocyte antibody response of NZB spleen cells appears to be influenced directly by T cells. Thy-1+, L3T4+ helper T cells are required for: (i) the generation in vitro of MRBC-specific IgM and IgG AFC by spleen cells from 'autoimmune' (9-12-month old) NZB mice and (ii) the generation in vitro of MRBC-specific IgM and IgG AFC by spleen cells depleted of suppressor cells from pre-autoimmune (2-3-months-old) NZB mice which show no clinical signs of an anti-MRBC response. It is evident from the present and previous studies that the anti-MRBC autoantibody response is regulated in pre-autoimmune spleen cell populations by Ly2+ T cells. Ly2-T cells from both pre-autoimmune and autoimmune mice in sufficient numbers can overcome this normal regulation and promote the anti-MRBC response in cultures of unfractionated pre-autoimmune spleen cells. Ly2- T cells isolated from autoimmune NZB mice were consistently more active in this than the Ly2- T cells isolated from pre-autoimmune mice, suggesting an enrichment of MRBC-reactive Ly2- T cells in autoimmune NZB mice. The Ly2- T cells from autoimmune NZB mice greatly enhance the autoimmune anti-MRBC response relative to a modest enhancement of the response to a foreign antigen, SRBC, produced by the same cells. These data indicate that T cells play an important role both in supporting the autoantibody response to MRBC and in disrupting tolerance, leading to autoimmunity in NZB mice. PMID:2966765

  19. The alarmin IL-33 promotes regulatory T-cell function in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Schiering, Chris; Krausgruber, Thomas; Chomka, Agnieszka; Fröhlich, Anja; Adelmann, Krista; Wohlfert, Elizabeth A; Pott, Johanna; Griseri, Thibault; Bollrath, Julia; Hegazy, Ahmed N; Harrison, Oliver J; Owens, Benjamin M J; Löhning, Max; Belkaid, Yasmine; Fallon, Padraic G; Powrie, Fiona

    2014-09-25

    FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are abundant in the intestine, where they prevent dysregulated inflammatory responses to self and environmental stimuli. It is now appreciated that Treg cells acquire tissue-specific adaptations that facilitate their survival and function; however, key host factors controlling the Treg response in the intestine are poorly understood. The interleukin (IL)-1 family member IL-33 is constitutively expressed in epithelial cells at barrier sites, where it functions as an endogenous danger signal, or alarmin, in response to tissue damage. Recent studies in humans have described high levels of IL-33 in inflamed lesions of inflammatory bowel disease patients, suggesting a role for this cytokine in disease pathogenesis. In the intestine, both protective and pathological roles for IL-33 have been described in murine models of acute colitis, but its contribution to chronic inflammation remains ill defined. Here we show in mice that the IL-33 receptor ST2 is preferentially expressed on colonic Treg cells, where it promotes Treg function and adaptation to the inflammatory environment. IL-33 signalling in T cells stimulates Treg responses in several ways. First, it enhances transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-mediated differentiation of Treg cells and, second, it provides a necessary signal for Treg-cell accumulation and maintenance in inflamed tissues. Strikingly, IL-23, a key pro-inflammatory cytokine in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, restrained Treg responses through inhibition of IL-33 responsiveness. These results demonstrate a hitherto unrecognized link between an endogenous mediator of tissue damage and a major anti-inflammatory pathway, and suggest that the balance between IL-33 and IL-23 may be a key controller of intestinal immune responses. PMID:25043027

  20. The sterol regulatory element binding proteins are essential for the metabolic programming of effector T cells and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kidani, Yoko; Elsaesser, Heidi; Hock, M Benjamin; Vergnes, Laurent; Williams, Kevin J; Argus, Joseph P; Marbois, Beth N; Komisopoulou, Evangelia; Wilson, Elizabeth B; Osborne, Timothy F; Graeber, Thomas G; Reue, Karen; Brooks, David G; Bensinger, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Newly activated CD8+ T cells reprogram their metabolism to meet the extraordinary biosynthetic demands of clonal expansion; however, the signals mediating metabolic reprogramming remain poorly defined. Herein, we demonstrate an essential role for sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) in the acquisition of effector cell metabolism. Without SREBP signaling, CD8+ T cells are unable to blast, resulting in markedly attenuated clonal expansion during viral infection. Mechanistic studies indicate that SREBPs are essential to meet the heightened lipid requirements of membrane synthesis during blastogenesis. SREBPs are dispensable for homeostatic proliferation, indicating a context-specific requirement for SREBPs in effector responses. These studies provide insights into the molecular signals underlying metabolic reprogramming of CD8+ T cells during the transition from quiescence to activation. PMID:23563690

  1. Targeting HIV Reservoir in Infected CD4 T Cells by Dual-Affinity Re-targeting Molecules (DARTs) that Bind HIV Envelope and Recruit Cytotoxic T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Derek D.; Lam, Chia-Ying Kao; Irrinki, Alivelu; Liu, Liqin; Tsai, Angela; Pace, Craig S.; Kaur, Jasmine; Murry, Jeffrey P.; Balakrishnan, Mini; Moore, Paul A.; Johnson, Syd; Nordstrom, Jeffrey L.; Cihlar, Tomas; Koenig, Scott

    2015-01-01

    HIV reservoirs and production of viral antigens are not eliminated in chronically infected participants treated with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Novel therapeutic strategies aiming at viral reservoir elimination are needed to address chronic immune dysfunction and non-AIDS morbidities that exist despite effective cART. The HIV envelope protein (Env) is emerging as a highly specific viral target for therapeutic elimination of the persistent HIV-infected reservoirs via antibody-mediated cell killing. Dual-Affinity Re-Targeting (DART) molecules exhibit a distinct mechanism of action via binding the cell surface target antigen and simultaneously engaging CD3 on cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). We designed and evaluated Env-specific DARTs (HIVxCD3 DARTs) derived from known antibodies recognizing diverse Env epitopes with or without broadly neutralizing activity. HIVxCD3 DARTs derived from PGT121, PGT145, A32, and 7B2, but not VRC01 or 10E8 antibodies, mediated potent CTL-dependent killing of quiescent primary CD4 T cells infected with diverse HIV isolates. Similar killing activity was also observed with DARTs structurally modified for in vivo half-life extension. In an ex vivo model using cells isolated from HIV-infected participants on cART, combinations of the most potent HIVxCD3 DARTs reduced HIV expression both in quiescent and activated peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures isolated from HIV-infected participants on suppressive cART. Importantly, HIVxCD3 DARTs did not induce cell-to-cell virus spread in resting or activated CD4 T cell cultures. Collectively, these results provide support for further development of HIVxCD3 DARTs as a promising therapeutic strategy for targeting HIV reservoirs. PMID:26539983

  2. CD8 T-cell recognition of acquired alloantigen promotes acute allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Simon J. F.; Ali, Jason M.; Wlodek, Elizabeth; Negus, Marg C.; Harper, Ines G.; Chhabra, Manu; Qureshi, M. Saeed; Mallik, Mekhola; Bolton, Eleanor; Bradley, J. Andrew; Pettigrew, Gavin J.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive CD8 T-cell immunity is the principal arm of the cellular alloimmune response, but its development requires help. This can be provided by CD4 T cells that recognize alloantigen “indirectly,” as self-restricted allopeptide, but this process remains unexplained, because the target epitopes for CD4 and CD8 T-cell recognition are “unlinked” on different cells (recipient and donor antigen presenting cells (APCs), respectively). Here, we test the hypothesis that the presentation of intact and processed MHC class I alloantigen by recipient dendritic cells (DCs) (the “semidirect” pathway) allows linked help to be delivered by indirect-pathway CD4 T cells for generating destructive cytotoxic CD8 T-cell alloresponses. We show that CD8 T-cell–mediated rejection of murine heart allografts that lack hematopoietic APCs requires host secondary lymphoid tissue (SLT). SLT is necessary because within it, recipient dendritic cells can acquire MHC from graft parenchymal cells and simultaneously present it as intact protein to alloreactive CD8 T cells and as processed peptide alloantigen for recognition by indirect-pathway CD4 T cells. This enables delivery of essential help for generating cytotoxic CD8 T-cell responses that cause rapid allograft rejection. In demonstrating the functional relevance of the semidirect pathway to transplant rejection, our findings provide a solution to a long-standing conundrum as to why SLT is required for CD8 T-cell allorecognition of graft parenchymal cells and suggest a mechanism by which indirect-pathway CD4 T cells provide help for generating effector cytotoxic CD8 T-cell alloresponses at late time points after transplantation. PMID:26420874

  3. Id1 expression promotes peripheral CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation and survival upon TCR activation without co-stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chen; Jin, Rong; Wang, Hong-Cheng; Tang, Hui; Liu, Yuan-Feng; Qian, Xiao-Ping; Sun, Xiu-Yuan; Ge, Qing; Sun, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Yu

    2013-06-21

    Highlights: •Id1 expression enables naïve T cell proliferation without anti-CD28 co-stimulation. •Id1 expression facilitates T cells survival when stimulated with anti-CD3. •Elevation of IL-2 production by Id1 contributes increased proliferation and survival. •Id1 potentiates NF-κB activation by anti-CD3 stimulation. -- Abstract: Although the role of E proteins in the thymocyte development is well documented, much less is known about their function in peripheral T cells. Here we demonstrated that CD4 promoter-driven transgenic expression of Id1, a naturally occurring dominant-negative inhibitor of E proteins, can substitute for the co-stimulatory signal delivered by CD28 to facilitate the proliferation and survival of naïve CD4{sup +} cells upon anti-CD3 stimulation. We next discovered that IL-2 production and NF-κB activity after anti-CD3 stimulation were significantly elevated in Id1-expressing cells, which may be, at least in part, responsible for the augmentation of their proliferation and survival. Taken together, results from this study suggest an important role of E and Id proteins in peripheral T cell activation. The ability of Id proteins to by-pass co-stimulatory signals to enable T cell activation has significant implications in regulating T cell immunity.

  4. Coupling of HIV-1 Antigen to the Selective Autophagy Receptor SQSTM1/p62 Promotes T-Cell-Mediated Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Aram Nikolai; Landsverk, Ole Jørgen; Simonsen, Anne; Bogen, Bjarne; Corthay, Alexandre; Øynebråten, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Vaccines aiming to promote T-cell-mediated immune responses have so far showed limited efficacy, and there is a need for novel strategies. Studies indicate that autophagy plays an inherent role in antigen processing and presentation for CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Here, we report a novel vaccine strategy based on fusion of antigen to the selective autophagy receptor sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1)/p62. We hypothesized that redirection of vaccine antigen from proteasomal degradation into the autophagy pathway would increase the generation of antigen-specific T cells. A hybrid vaccine construct was designed in which the antigen is fused to the C-terminus of p62, a signaling hub, and a receptor that naturally delivers ubiquitinated cargo for autophagic degradation. Fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 antigen Gagp24 to p62 resulted in efficient antigen delivery into the autophagy pathway. Intradermal immunization of mice revealed that, in comparison to Gagp24 delivered alone, fusion to p62 enhanced the number of Gagp24-specific interferon-γ-producing T cells, including CD8+ T cells. The strategy may also have the potential to modulate the antigenic peptide repertoire. Because p62 and autophagy are highly conserved between species, we anticipate this strategy to be a candidate for the development of T-cell-based vaccines in humans. PMID:27242780

  5. Integrin α1β1 Promotes Caveolin-1 Dephosphorylation by Activating T Cell Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase*

    PubMed Central

    Borza, Corina M.; Chen, Xiwu; Mathew, Sijo; Mont, Stacey; Sanders, Charles R.; Zent, Roy; Pozzi, Ambra

    2010-01-01

    Integrin α1β1 is a collagen receptor that down-regulates collagen and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and mice lacking this receptor show increased ROS levels and exacerbated glomerular sclerosis following injury. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a multifunctional protein that is tyrosine-phosphorylated in response to injury and has been implicated in ROS-mediated injury. Cav-1 interacts with integrins, and integrin α1β1 binds/activates T cell protein-tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP), which is homologous to the tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B known to dephosphorylate Cav-1. In this study, we analyzed whether phosphorylated Cav-1 (pCav-1) is a substrate of TCPTP and if integrin α1β1 is essential for promoting TCPTP-mediated Cav-1 dephosphorylation. We found that Cav-1 phosphorylation is significantly higher in cells lacking integrin α1β1 at base line and following oxidative stress. Overexpression of TCPTP leads to reduced pCav-1 levels only in cells expressing integrin α1β1. Using solid phase binding assays, we demonstrated that 1) purified Cav-1 directly interacts with TCPTP and the integrin α1 subunit, 2) pCav-1 is a substrate of TCPTP, and 3) TCPTP-mediated Cav-1 dephosphorylation is highly increased by the addition of purified integrin α1β1 or an integrin α1 cytoplasmic peptide to which TCPTP has been shown to bind. Thus, our results demonstrate that pCav-1 is a new substrate of TCPTP and that integrin α1β1 acts as a negative regulator of Cav-1 phosphorylation by activating TCPTP. This could explain the protective function of integrin α1β1 in oxidative stress-mediated damage and why integrin α1-null mice are more susceptible to fibrosis following injury. PMID:20940300

  6. Integrin {alpha}1{beta}1 promotes caveolin-1 dephosphorylation by activating T cell protein-tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Borza, Corina M; Chen, Xiwu; Mathew, Sijo; Mont, Stacey; Sanders, Charles R; Zent, Roy; Pozzi, Ambra

    2010-12-17

    Integrin α1β1 is a collagen receptor that down-regulates collagen and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and mice lacking this receptor show increased ROS levels and exacerbated glomerular sclerosis following injury. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a multifunctional protein that is tyrosine-phosphorylated in response to injury and has been implicated in ROS-mediated injury. Cav-1 interacts with integrins, and integrin α1β1 binds/activates T cell protein-tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP), which is homologous to the tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B known to dephosphorylate Cav-1. In this study, we analyzed whether phosphorylated Cav-1 (pCav-1) is a substrate of TCPTP and if integrin α1β1 is essential for promoting TCPTP-mediated Cav-1 dephosphorylation. We found that Cav-1 phosphorylation is significantly higher in cells lacking integrin α1β1 at base line and following oxidative stress. Overexpression of TCPTP leads to reduced pCav-1 levels only in cells expressing integrin α1β1. Using solid phase binding assays, we demonstrated that 1) purified Cav-1 directly interacts with TCPTP and the integrin α1 subunit, 2) pCav-1 is a substrate of TCPTP, and 3) TCPTP-mediated Cav-1 dephosphorylation is highly increased by the addition of purified integrin α1β1 or an integrin α1 cytoplasmic peptide to which TCPTP has been shown to bind. Thus, our results demonstrate that pCav-1 is a new substrate of TCPTP and that integrin α1β1 acts as a negative regulator of Cav-1 phosphorylation by activating TCPTP. This could explain the protective function of integrin α1β1 in oxidative stress-mediated damage and why integrin α1-null mice are more susceptible to fibrosis following injury. PMID:20940300

  7. Intestinal commensal bacteria promote T cell hyporesponsiveness and down-regulate the serum antibody responses induced by dietary antigen.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Masato; Hosono, Akira; Yanagibashi, Tsutomu; Kihara-Fujioka, Miran; Hachimura, Satoshi; Itoh, Kikuji; Hirayama, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Kyoko; Kaminogawa, Shuichi

    2010-08-16

    Colonization of the gut by commensal bacteria modulates the induction of oral tolerance and allergy. However, how these intestinal bacteria modulate antigen-specific T cell responses induced by oral antigens remains unclear. In order to investigate this, we used germ-free (GF) ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cell receptor transgenic (OVA23-3) mice. Conventional (CV) or GF mice were administered an OVA-containing diet. Cytokine production by CD4(+) cells from spleen (SP), mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and Peyer's patches (PP) was evaluated by ELISA, as was the peripheral antibody titer. T cell phenotype was assessed by flow cytometry. CD4(+) cells from the SP and MLN of CV and GF mice fed an OVA diet for 3 weeks produced significantly less IL-2 than the corresponding cells from mice receiving a control diet, suggesting that oral tolerance could be induced at the T cell level in the systemic and intestinal immune systems of both bacterial condition of mice. However, we also observed that the T cell hyporesponsiveness induced by dietary antigen was delayed in the systemic immune tissues and was weaker in the intestinal immune tissues of the GF mice. Intestinal MLN and PP CD4(+) T cells from these animals also produced lower levels of IL-10, had less activated/memory type CD45RB(low) cells, and expressed lower levels of CTLA-4 but not Foxp3 compared to their CV counterparts. Furthermore, GF mice produced higher serum levels of OVA-specific antibodies than CV animals. CD40L expression by SP CD4(+) cells from GF mice fed OVA was higher than that of CV mice. These results suggest that intestinal commensal bacteria promote T cell hyporesponsiveness and down-regulate serum antibody responses induced by dietary antigens through modulation of the intestinal and systemic T cell phenotype. PMID:20621647

  8. Delineation of a T-cell activation motif required for binding of protein tyrosine kinases containing tandem SH2 domains.

    PubMed Central

    Koyasu, S; Tse, A G; Moingeon, P; Hussey, R E; Mildonian, A; Hannisian, J; Clayton, L K; Reinherz, E L

    1994-01-01

    To define the T-cell receptor signal transduction motif, we have transfected human and murine T-cell lines with a chimeric receptor consisting of the extracellular and transmembrane domains of human CD8 alpha and the membrane-proximal portion of CD3 zeta containing at its C terminus either an 18-amino acid segment (NQLYNELNLGRREEYDVL) or alanine-scanning point mutant derivatives. Crosslinking of the extracellular domain of the chimera is sufficient to initiate Ca2+ flux, interleukin 2 production, and tyrosine phosphorylation of cellular proteins including the chimera. Subsequently, the chimera becomes associated with several tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins, among them the 70-kDa protein tyrosine kinase ZAP70. Mutational data identify the T-cell activation motif as Y(X)2L(X)7Y(X)2L and show that each of the four designated residues is necessary for the above activation events. Recombinant protein containing the two tandem SH2 domains derived from ZAP70 binds to a synthetic peptide corresponding to the above 18-amino acid motif but only when both tyrosines are phosphorylated; in contrast, little or no binding is observed to monophosphorylated or nonphosphorylated analogues. These results imply that after receptor crosslinking in T cells, and by inference also in B cells and mast cells, the motif is phosphorylated on both tyrosine residues, thereafter serving as a docking site for protein tyrosine kinases containing tandem SH2 domains. Images PMID:7517560

  9. 5-Azacytidine Promotes an Inhibitory T-Cell Phenotype and Impairs Immune Mediated Antileukemic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Stübig, Thomas; Luetkens, Tim; Hildebrandt, York; Atanackovic, Djordje; Binder, Thomas M. C.; Fehse, Boris; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2014-01-01

    Demethylating agent, 5-Azacytidine (5-Aza), has been shown to be active in treatment of myeloid malignancies. 5-Aza enhances anticancer immunity, by increasing expression of tumor-associated antigens. However, the impact of 5-Aza immune responses remains poorly understood. Here, T-cell mediated tumor immunity effects of 5-Aza, are investigated in vitro and in vivo. T-cells from healthy donors were treated with 5-Aza and analyzed by qRT-PCR and flow cytometry for changes in gene expression and phenotype. Functionality was assessed by a tumor lysis assay. Peripheral blood from patients treated with 5-Aza after alloSCT was monitored for changes in T-cell subpopulations. 5-Aza treatment resulted in a decrease in CD8+ T-cells, whereas CD4+ T-cells increased. Furthermore, numbers of IFN-γ+ T-helper 1 cells (Th1) were reduced, while Treg-cells showed substantial increase. Additionally, CD8+ T-cells exhibited limited killing capacity against leukemic target cells. In vivo data confirm the increase of Treg compartment, while CD8+ T-effector cell numbers were reduced. 5-Aza treatment results in a shift from cytotoxic to regulatory T-cells with a functional phenotype and a major reduction in proinflammatory Th1-cells, indicating a strong inhibition of tumor-specific T-cell immunity by 5-Aza. PMID:24757283

  10. 5-azacytidine promotes an inhibitory T-cell phenotype and impairs immune mediated antileukemic activity.

    PubMed

    Stübig, Thomas; Badbaran, Anita; Luetkens, Tim; Hildebrandt, York; Atanackovic, Djordje; Binder, Thomas M C; Fehse, Boris; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2014-01-01

    Demethylating agent, 5-Azacytidine (5-Aza), has been shown to be active in treatment of myeloid malignancies. 5-Aza enhances anticancer immunity, by increasing expression of tumor-associated antigens. However, the impact of 5-Aza immune responses remains poorly understood. Here, T-cell mediated tumor immunity effects of 5-Aza, are investigated in vitro and in vivo. T-cells from healthy donors were treated with 5-Aza and analyzed by qRT-PCR and flow cytometry for changes in gene expression and phenotype. Functionality was assessed by a tumor lysis assay. Peripheral blood from patients treated with 5-Aza after alloSCT was monitored for changes in T-cell subpopulations. 5-Aza treatment resulted in a decrease in CD8+ T-cells, whereas CD4+ T-cells increased. Furthermore, numbers of IFN-γ + T-helper 1 cells (Th1) were reduced, while Treg-cells showed substantial increase. Additionally, CD8+ T-cells exhibited limited killing capacity against leukemic target cells. In vivo data confirm the increase of Treg compartment, while CD8+ T-effector cell numbers were reduced. 5-Aza treatment results in a shift from cytotoxic to regulatory T-cells with a functional phenotype and a major reduction in proinflammatory Th1-cells, indicating a strong inhibition of tumor-specific T-cell immunity by 5-Aza. PMID:24757283

  11. Investigating potential exogenous tumor initiating and promoting factors for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphomas (CTCL), a rare skin malignancy.

    PubMed

    Litvinov, Ivan V; Shtreis, Anna; Kobayashi, Kenneth; Glassman, Steven; Tsang, Matthew; Woetmann, Anders; Sasseville, Denis; Ødum, Niels; Duvic, Madeleine

    2016-07-01

    Most skin malignancies are caused by external and often preventable environmental agents. Multiple reports demonstrated that cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) can occur in married couples and cluster in families. Furthermore, recent studies document geographic clustering of this malignancy in Texas as well as in other areas of the United States. Multiple infectious, occupational, and medication causes have been proposed as triggers or promoters of this malignancy including hydrochlorothiazide diuretics, Staphylococcus aureus, dermatophytes, Mycobacterium leprae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, human T-Cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV1), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and herpes simplex virus (HSV). In this report, we review recent evidence evaluating the involvement of these agents in cancer initiation/progression. Most importantly, recent molecular experimental evidence documented for the first time that S. aureus can activate oncogenic STAT3 signaling in malignant T cells. Specifically, S. aureus Enterotoxin type A (SEA) was recently shown to trigger non-malignant infiltrating T cells to release IL-2 and other cytokines. These signals upon binging to their cognate receptors on malignant T cells are then able to activate STAT3 and STAT5 oncogenic signaling and promote cancer progression and IL-17 secretion. In light of these findings, it might be important for patients with exacerbation of their CTCL symptoms to maintain high index of suspicion and treat these individuals for S. aureus colonization and/or sepsis with topical and systemic antibiotics. PMID:27622024

  12. RelB-Dependent Stromal Cells Promote T-Cell Leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Nuno R.; Williame, Maryvonne; Gachet, Stéphanie; Cormier, Françoise; Janin, Anne; Weih, Debra; Weih, Falk; Ghysdael, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Background The Rel/NF-κB transcription factors are often activated in solid or hematological malignancies. In most cases, NF-κB activation is found in malignant cells and results from activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway, leading to RelA and/or c-Rel activation. Recently, NF-κB activity in inflammatory cells infiltrating solid tumors has been shown to contribute to solid tumor initiation and progression. Noncanonical NF-κB activation, which leads to RelB activation, has also been reported in breast carcinoma, prostate cancer, and lymphoid leukemia. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report a novel role for RelB in stromal cells that promote T-cell leukemogenesis. RelB deficiency delayed leukemia onset in the TEL-JAK2 transgenic mouse model of human T acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Bone marrow chimeric mouse experiments showed that RelB is not required in the hematopoietic compartment. In contrast, RelB plays a role in radio-resistant stromal cells to accelerate leukemia onset and increase disease severity. Conclusions/Significance The present results are the first to uncover a role for RelB in the crosstalk between non-hematopoietic stromal cells and leukemic cells. Thus, besides its previously reported role intrinsic to specific cancer cells, the noncanonical NF-κB pathway may also play a pro-oncogenic role in cancer microenvironmental cells. PMID:18596915

  13. Fluorine substitutions in an antigenic peptide selectively modulate T-cell receptor binding in a minimally perturbing manner

    SciTech Connect

    Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Sommese, Ruth F.; Clemens, John; Armstrong, Kathryn M.; Desmond, Clare; Do, Priscilla; Baker, Brian M.

    2010-08-17

    TCR (T-cell receptor) recognition of antigenic peptides bound and presented by MHC (major histocompatibility complex) molecules forms the basis of the cellular immune response to pathogens and cancer. TCRs bind peptide - MHC complexes weakly and with fast kinetics, features which have hindered detailed biophysical studies of these interactions. Modified peptides resulting in enhanced TCR binding could help overcome these challenges. Furthermore, there is considerable interest in using modified peptides with enhanced TCR binding as the basis for clinical vaccines. In the present study, we examined how fluorine substitutions in an antigenic peptide can selectively impact TCR recognition. Using a structure-guided design approach, we found that fluorination of the Tax peptide [HTLV (human T-cell lymphotropic virus)-1 Tax] enhanced binding by the Tax-specific TCR A6, yet weakened binding by the Tax-specific TCR B7. The changes in affinity were consistent with crystallographic structures and fluorine chemistry, and with the A6 TCR independent of other substitutions in the interface. Peptide fluorination thus provides a means to selectively modulate TCR binding affinity without significantly perturbing peptide composition or structure. Lastly, we probed the mechanism of fluorine's effect on TCR binding and we conclude that our results were most consistent with a 'polar hydrophobicity' mechanism, rather than a purely hydrophobic- or electrostatic-based mechanism. This finding should have an impact on other attempts to alter molecular recognition with fluorine.

  14. The RNA-Binding Protein, Polypyrimidine Tract-Binding Protein 1 (PTBP1) Is a Key Regulator of CD4 T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Valentín-Acevedo, Aníbal

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that the RNA binding protein, polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTBP1) plays a critical role in regulating the expression of CD40L in activated CD4 T cells. This is achieved mechanistically through message stabilization at late times of activation as well as by altered distribution of CD40L mRNA within distinct cellular compartments. PTBP1 has been implicated in many different processes, however whether PTBP1 plays a broader role in CD4 T cell activation is not known. To examine this question, experiments were designed to introduce shRNA into primary human CD4 T cells to achieve decreased, but not complete ablation of PTBP1 expression. Analyses of shPTB-expressing CD4 T cells revealed multiple processes including cell proliferation, activation-induced cell death and expression of activation markers and cytokines that were regulated in part by PTBP1 expression. Although there was an overall decrease in the steady-state level of several activation genes, only IL-2 and CD40L appeared to be regulated by PTBP1 at the level of RNA decay suggesting that PTBP1 is critical at different regulatory steps of expression that is gene-specific. Importantly, even though the IL-2 protein levels were reduced in cells with lowered PTBP1, the steady-state level of IL-2 mRNA was significantly higher in these cells suggesting a block at the translational level. Evaluation of T cell activation in shPTB-expressing T cells revealed that PTBP1 was linked primarily to the activation of the PLCγ1/ERK1/2 and the NF-κB pathways. Overall, our results reveal the importance of this critical RNA binding protein in multiple steps of T cell activation. PMID:27513449

  15. Attenuation of microglial RANTES by NEMO-binding domain peptide inhibits the infiltration of CD8(+) T cells in the nigra of hemiparkinsonian monkey.

    PubMed

    Roy, A; Mondal, S; Kordower, J H; Pahan, K

    2015-08-27

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Despite intense investigations, little is known about its pathological mediators. Here, we report the marked upregulation of RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted) and eotaxin, chemokines that are involved in T cell trafficking, in the serum of hemiparkinsonian monkeys. Interestingly, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)), a Parkinsonian toxin, increased the expression of RANTES and eotaxin in mouse microglial cells. The presence of NF-κB binding sites in promoters of RANTES and eotaxin and down-regulation of these genes by NEMO-binding domain (NBD) peptide, selective inhibitor of induced NF-κB activation, in MPP(+)-stimulated microglial cells suggest that the activation of NF-κB plays an important role in the upregulation of these two chemokines. Consistently, serum enzyme-linked immuno assay (ELISA) and nigral immunohistochemistry further confirmed that these chemokines were strongly upregulated in MPTP-induced hemiparkinsonian monkeys and that treatment with NBD peptides effectively inhibited the level of these chemokines. Furthermore, the microglial upregulation of RANTES in the nigra of hemiparkinsonian monkeys could be involved in the altered adaptive immune response in the brain as we observed greater infiltration of CD8(+) T cells around the perivascular niche and deep brain parenchyma of hemiparkinsonian monkeys as compared to control. The treatment of hemiparkinsonian monkeys with NBD peptides decreased the microglial expression of RANTES and attenuated the infiltration of CD8(+) T cells in nigra. These results indicate the possible involvement of chemokine-dependent adaptive immune response in Parkinsonism. PMID:25783477

  16. Differential transactivation of the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 gene promoter by Tax1 and Tax2 of human T-cell leukemia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Y; Hayashi, M; Takagi, S; Yoshie, O

    1996-01-01

    Previously, we showed that surface expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) was strongly upregulated in T cells carrying proviral human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and that the viral transactivator protein Tax1 was capable of inducing the ICAM-1 gene. To determine the responsive elements in the human ICAM-1 gene promoter, a reporter construct in which the 5'-flanking 4.4-kb region of the ICAM-1 gene was linked to the promoterless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene was cotransfected with expression vectors for Tax1 and Tax2, both of which were separately confirmed to be potent transactivators of the HTLV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR). Tax1 strongly activated the ICAM-1 promoter in all the cell lines tested: three T-cell lines (Jurkat, MOLT-4, and CEM), one monocytoid cell line (U937), and HeLa. Unexpectedly, Tax2 activated the ICAM-1 promoter only in HeLa. By deletion and mutation analyses of the 1.3-kb 5'-flanking region, we found that Tax1 transactivated the ICAM-1 promoter mainly via a cyclic AMP-responsive element (CRE)-like site at -630 to -624 in the Jurkat T-cell line and via an NF-kappaB site at -185 to -177 and an SP-1 site at -59 to -54 in HeLa. On the other hand, Tax2 was totally inactive on the ICAM-1 promoter in Jurkat but transactivated the promoter via the NF-kappaB site at -185 to -177 in HeLa. Gel mobility shift assays demonstrated proteins specifically binding to the CRE-like site at -630 to -624 in Tax1-expressing T-cell lines. Stable expression of Tax1 but not Tax2 in Jurkat subclones enhanced the surface expression of ICAM-1. The differential ability of Tax1 and Tax2 in transactivation of the ICAM-1 gene may be related to the differential pathogenicity of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2. PMID:8970974

  17. Oral bacteria induce a differential activation of human immunodeficiency virus-1 promoter in T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, C. B.; Emerson, K. A.; Gonzalez, O. A.; Ebersole, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can integrate into T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells resulting in a latent infection. Reports have also demonstrated that various microbial and host cell factors can trigger HIV reactivation leading to HIV recrudescence, potentially undermining highly active antiretroviral therapies. Methods This study evaluated the capacity of oral bacteria associated with chronic periodontal infections to stimulate HIV promoter activation in various cell models of HIV latency. Results T cells (1G5) challenged with oral bacteria demonstrated a dose–response of HIV promoter activation with a subset of the bacteria, as well as kinetics that were generally similar irrespective of the stimuli. Direct bacterial challenge of the T cells resulted in increased activation of approximately 1.5- to 7-fold over controls. Challenge of macrophages (BF24) indicated different kinetics for individual bacteria and resulted in consistent increases in promoter activation of five fold to six fold over basal levels for all bacteria except Streptococcus mutans. Dendritic cells showed increases in HIV reactivation of 7- to 34-fold specific for individual species of bacteria. Conclusion These results suggested that oral bacteria have the capability to reactivate HIV from latently infected cells, showing a relationship of mature dendritic cells > immature dendritic cells > macrophages ≥ T cells. Expression of various pattern recognition receptors on these various cell types may provide insight into the primary receptors/signaling pathways used for reactivation by the bacteria. PMID:19702954

  18. Adhesion- and Degranulation-Promoting Adapter Protein Promotes CD8 T Cell Differentiation and Resident Memory Formation and Function during an Acute Infection.

    PubMed

    Fiege, Jessica K; Beura, Lalit K; Burbach, Brandon J; Shimizu, Yoji

    2016-09-15

    During acute infections, naive Ag-specific CD8 T cells are activated and differentiate into effector T cells, most of which undergo contraction after pathogen clearance. A small population of CD8 T cells persists as memory to protect against future infections. We investigated the role of adhesion- and degranulation-promoting adapter protein (ADAP) in promoting CD8 T cell responses to a systemic infection. Naive Ag-specific CD8 T cells lacking ADAP exhibited a modest expansion defect early after Listeria monocytogenes or vesicular stomatitis virus infection but comparable cytolytic function at the peak of response. However, reduced numbers of ADAP-deficient CD8 T cells were present in the spleen after the peak of the response. ADAP deficiency resulted in a greater frequency of CD127(+) CD8 memory precursors in secondary lymphoid organs during the contraction phase. Reduced numbers of ADAP-deficient killer cell lectin-like receptor G1(-) CD8 resident memory T (TRM) cell precursors were present in a variety of nonlymphoid tissues at the peak of the immune response, and consequently the total numbers of ADAP-deficient TRM cells were reduced at memory time points. TRM cells that did form in the absence of ADAP were defective in effector molecule expression. ADAP-deficient TRM cells exhibited impaired effector function after Ag rechallenge, correlating with defects in their ability to form T cell-APC conjugates. However, ADAP-deficient TRM cells responded to TGF-β signals and recruited circulating memory CD8 T cells. Thus, ADAP regulates CD8 T cell differentiation events following acute pathogen challenge that are critical for the formation and selected functions of TRM cells in nonlymphoid tissues. PMID:27521337

  19. Endothelial-binding, proinflammatory T cells identified by MCAM (CD146) expression: Characterization and role in human autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Dagur, Pradeep K; McCoy, J Philip

    2015-05-01

    A subset of T cells defined by the cell surface expression of MCAM (CD146) has been identified in the peripheral circulation of healthy individuals. These cells comprise approximately 3% of the pool of circulating T cells, have an effector memory phenotype, and are capable of producing several cytokines. Notably, the MCAM positive cells are enhanced for IL-17 production compared to MCAM negative effector memory T cells. These cells are committed to IL-17 production and do not require in vitro polarization with exogenous cytokines. MCAM positive T cells also demonstrate an increased ability to bind to endothelial monolayers. In numerous autoimmune diseases these cells are found at increased proportions in the peripheral circulation, and at the sites of active inflammation in patients with autoimmune disease, these cells appear in large numbers and are major contributors to IL-17 production. Studies to date have been performed with human subjects and it is uncertain if appropriate mouse models exist for this cell type. These cells could represent early components of the adaptive immune response and serve as targets of therapy in these diseases, although much work remains to be performed in order to discern the exact nature and function of these cells. PMID:25595133

  20. Oligoclonal CD4+ T Cells Promote Host Memory Immune Responses to Zwitterionic Polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae▿

    PubMed Central

    Groneck, Laura; Schrama, David; Fabri, Mario; Stephen, Tom Li; Harms, Fabian; Meemboor, Sonja; Hafke, Helena; Bessler, Martina; Becker, Jürgen C.; Kalka-Moll, Wiltrud M.

    2009-01-01

    Zwitterionic polysaccharides of the normal flora bacteria represent a novel class of antigens in that they correct systemic CD4+ T-cell deficiencies and direct lymphoid organogenesis during colonization of the host. Presentation of these polysaccharides to CD4+ T cells depends on major histocompatibility complex class II- and DM-dependent retrograde transport from lysosomes to the cell surface. Yet the phenotype and clonality of the immune response to the polysaccharide in the mature host immune system have not been studied. Using the zwitterionic capsular polysaccharide Sp1 of Streptococcus pneumoniae, a transient member of the bacterial flora, in an experimental mouse model of cellular immunity, we demonstrated the accumulation of TH1- and TH17-polarized CD4+ CD44high CD62low CD25− memory T cells. Subcutaneous immunization with Sp1 resulted in an increase of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG), predominantly of the IgG1 subclass, and suggested the presence of a humoral memory response to the polysaccharide. CD4+ T cells stimulated with polysaccharide in vitro and in vivo showed a nonrestricted pattern for the T-cell receptor (TCR) β-chain variable region, as demonstrated by semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR and flow cytometry. Clonotype mapping of in vivo and in vitro polysaccharide-activated CD4+ T cells revealed clonotypic TCR transcripts. Taken together, the data show the induction of clonal expansion of CD4+ T cells by polysaccharides of commensal bacteria. Cellular and humoral memory host responses imply the ability of these polysaccharides to mediate the expansion of T cells via recognition within the CDR3 region of the TCR. PMID:19546196

  1. T cell- but not tumor cell-produced TGF-β1 promotes the development of spontaneous mammary cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Abira; Donkor, Moses K.; Li, Ming O.

    2011-01-01

    During their development, tumors acquire multiple capabilities that enable them to proliferate, disseminate and evade immunosurveillance. A putative mechanism is through the production of the cytokine TGF-β1. We showed in our recent studies that T cell-produced TGF-β1 inhibits antitumor T cell responses to foster tumor growth raising the question of the precise function of TGF-β1 produced by tumor cells in tumor development. Here, using a transgenic model of mammary cancer, we report that deletion of TGF-β1 from tumor cells did not protect mice from tumor development. However, ablation of TGF-β1 from T cells significantly inhibited mammary tumor growth. Additionally, absence of TGF-β1 in T cells prevented tumors from advancing to higher pathological grades and further suppressed secondary tumor development in the lungs. These findings reveal T cells but not tumor cells as a critical source of TGF-β1 that promotes tumor development. PMID:22248703

  2. Schisandrin B inhibits Th1/Th17 differentiation and promotes regulatory T cell expansion in mouse lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaoyang; Guo, Min; Song, Guohua; Gao, Jiping; Zhang, Yinhong; Jing, Zhijie; Liu, Tianfu; Dong, Chuan

    2016-06-01

    Schisandrin B (Sch-B), the most abundant active ingredient of the fruit of Schisandra chinensis, has been proposed to have antioxidant, anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory effects. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of Sch-B on differentiation of T helper cells (Th). Using mouse splenic lymphocytes stimulated with concanavalin A (Con A) in vitro and ex vivo as inflammation models, we found that Sch-B significantly inhibited secretion of Th1 and Th17 related cytokines, such as IFN-γ and IL-17. In addition, we found that Sch-B suppressed the differentiation of naive CD4+ T cells into Th1 and Th17 cells, while promoted their differentiation into the regulatory T cells (Treg) in vitro. We further found that Sch-B suppressed transcription of Th1-related T-box transcription factor, T-bet, and Th17-related transcription factor, retinoid related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt), while enhanced transcription of Treg-related transcription factor forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) in naive CD4+ T cells under Th cell polarization conditions. Furthermore, the effect of Sch-B on the T cell differentiation was abrogated by heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin. Taken together, we conclude that Sch-B can modulate differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells into specific lineages of effector cells, which may have potential benefits for treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27085037

  3. ICOS Promotes the Function of CD4+ Effector T Cells during Anti-OX40-Mediated Tumor Rejection.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Todd C; Long, Hua; Potluri, Shobha; Pertel, Thomas; Bailey-Bucktrout, Samantha L; Lin, John C; Fu, Tihui; Sharma, Padmanee; Allison, James P; Feldman, Reid M R

    2016-07-01

    ICOS is a T-cell coregulatory receptor that provides a costimulatory signal to T cells during antigen-mediated activation. Antitumor immunity can be improved by ICOS-targeting therapies, but their mechanism of action remains unclear. Here, we define the role of ICOS signaling in antitumor immunity using a blocking, nondepleting antibody against ICOS ligand (ICOS-L). ICOS signaling provided critical support for the effector function of CD4(+) Foxp3(-) T cells during anti-OX40-driven tumor immune responses. By itself, ICOS-L blockade reduced accumulation of intratumoral T regulatory cells (Treg), but it was insufficient to substantially inhibit tumor growth. Furthermore, it did not impede antitumor responses mediated by anti-4-1BB-driven CD8(+) T cells. We found that anti-OX40 efficacy, which is based on Treg depletion and to a large degree on CD4(+) effector T cell (Teff) responses, was impaired with ICOS-L blockade. In contrast, the provision of additional ICOS signaling through direct ICOS-L expression by tumor cells enhanced tumor rejection and survival when administered along with anti-OX40 therapy. Taken together, our results showed that ICOS signaling during antitumor responses acts on both Teff and Treg cells, which have opposing roles in promoting immune activation. Thus, effective therapies targeting the ICOS pathway should seek to promote ICOS signaling specifically in effector CD4(+) T cells by combining ICOS agonism and Treg depletion. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3684-9. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197182

  4. Genetic absence of PD-1 promotes accumulation of terminally differentiated exhausted CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Odorizzi, Pamela M.; Pauken, Kristen E.; Paley, Michael A.; Sharpe, Arlene

    2015-01-01

    Programmed Death-1 (PD-1) has received considerable attention as a key regulator of CD8+ T cell exhaustion during chronic infection and cancer because blockade of this pathway partially reverses T cell dysfunction. Although the PD-1 pathway is critical in regulating established “exhausted” CD8+ T cells (TEX cells), it is unclear whether PD-1 directly causes T cell exhaustion. We show that PD-1 is not required for the induction of exhaustion in mice with chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection. In fact, some aspects of exhaustion are more severe with genetic deletion of PD-1 from the onset of infection. Increased proliferation between days 8 and 14 postinfection is associated with subsequent decreased CD8+ T cell survival and disruption of a critical proliferative hierarchy necessary to maintain exhausted populations long term. Ultimately, the absence of PD-1 leads to the accumulation of more cytotoxic, but terminally differentiated, CD8+ TEX cells. These results demonstrate that CD8+ T cell exhaustion can occur in the absence of PD-1. They also highlight a novel role for PD-1 in preserving TEX cell populations from overstimulation, excessive proliferation, and terminal differentiation. PMID:26034050

  5. Necroptosis of Dendritic Cells Promotes Activation of γδ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Collins, Cheryl C; Bashant, Kathleen; Erikson, Cuixia; Thwe, Phyu Myat; Fortner, Karen A; Wang, Hong; Morita, Craig T; Budd, Ralph C

    2016-01-01

    γδ T cells function at the interface between innate and adaptive immunity and have well-demonstrated roles in response to infection, autoimmunity and tumors. A common characteristic of these seemingly disparate conditions may be cellular stress or death. However, the conditions under which ligands for γδ T cells are induced or exposed remain largely undefined. We observed that induction of necroptosis of murine or human dendritic cells (DC) by inhibition of caspase activity paradoxically augments their ability to activate γδ T cells. Furthermore, upregulation of the stabilizer of caspase-8 activity, c-FLIP, by IL-4, not only greatly reduced the susceptibility of DC to necroptosis, but also considerably decreased their ability to activate γδ T cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that the induction of necroptosis in DC upregulates or exposes the expression of γδ T cell ligands, and they support the view that γδ T cells function in the immune surveillance of cell stress. PMID:27431410

  6. The MAR-binding protein SATB1 orchestrates temporal and spatial expression of multiple genes during T-cell development

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, John D.; Yasui, Dag H.; Niida, Hiroyuki; Joh, Tadashi; Loh, Dennis Y.; Kowhi-Shigematsu, Terumi

    2000-02-24

    SATB1 is expressed primarily in thymocytes and can act as a transcriptional repressor. SATB1 binds in vivo to the matrix attachment regions (MARs) of DNA, which are implicated in the loop domain organization of chromatin. The role of MAR-binding proteins in specific cell lineages is unknown. We generated SATB1-null mice to determine how SATB1 functions in the T-cell lineage. SATB1-null mice are small in size, have disproportionately small thymi and spleens, and die at 3 weeks of age. At the cellular level, multiple defects in T-cell development were observed. Immature CD3-CD4-CD8 triple negative (TN) thymocytes were greatly reduced in number, and thymocyte development was blocked mainly at the DP stage. The few peripheral CD4{sup +} single positive (SP) cells underwent apoptosis and failed to proliferate in response to activating stimuli. At the molecular level, among 589 genes examined, at least 2% of genes including a proto-oncogene, cytokine receptor genes, and apoptosis-related genes were derepressed at inappropriate stages of T-cell development in SATB1-null mice. For example, IL-2R{alpha} and IL-7R{alpha} genes were ectopically transcribed in CD4{sup 4+}-CD{sup 8+} double positive (DP) thymocytes. SATB1 appears to orchestrate the temporal and spatial expression of genes during T-cell development, thereby ensuring the proper development of this lineage. Our data provide the first evidence that MAR-binding proteins can act as global regulators of cell function in specific cell lineages.

  7. Soluble T cell receptor Vβ domains engineered for high-affinity binding to staphylococcal or streptococcal superantigens.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Preeti; Wang, Ningyan; Kranz, David M

    2014-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and group A Streptococcus secrete a collection of toxins called superantigens (SAgs), so-called because they stimulate a large fraction of an individual's T cells. One consequence of this hyperactivity is massive cytokine release leading to severe tissue inflammation and, in some cases, systemic organ failure and death. The molecular basis of action involves the binding of the SAg to both a T cell receptor (TCR) on a T cell and a class II product of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on an antigen presenting cell. This cross-linking leads to aggregation of the TCR complex and signaling. A common feature of SAgs is that they bind with relatively low affinity to the variable region (V) of the beta chain of the TCR. Despite this low affinity binding, SAgs are very potent, as each T cell requires only a small fraction of their receptors to be bound in order to trigger cytokine release. To develop high-affinity agents that could neutralize the activity of SAgs, and facilitate the development of detection assays, soluble forms of the Vβ regions have been engineered to affinities that are up to 3 million-fold higher for the SAg. Over the past decade, six different Vβ regions against SAgs from S. aureus (SEA, SEB, SEC3, TSST-1) or S. pyogenes (SpeA and SpeC) have been engineered for high-affinity using yeast display and directed evolution. Here we review the engineering of these high-affinity Vβ proteins, structural features of the six different SAgs and the Vβ proteins, and the specific properties of the engineered Vβ regions that confer high-affinity and specificity for their SAg ligands. PMID:24476714

  8. The MAR-binding protein SATB1 orchestrates temporal and spatial expression of multiple genes during T-cell development

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, John D.; Yasui, Dag H.; Niida, Hiroyuki; Joh, Tadashi; Loh, Dennis Y.; Kohwi-Shigematsu, Terumi

    2000-01-01

    SATB1 is expressed primarily in thymocytes and can act as a transcriptional repressor. SATB1 binds in vivo to the matrix attachment regions (MARs) of DNA, which are implicated in the loop domain organization of chromatin. The role of MAR-binding proteins in specific cell lineages is unknown. We generated SATB1-null mice to determine how SATB1 functions in the T-cell lineage. SATB1-null mice are small in size, have disproportionately small thymi and spleens, and die at 3 weeks of age. At the cellular level, multiple defects in T-cell development were observed. Immature CD3−CD4−CD8− triple negative (TN) thymocytes were greatly reduced in number, and thymocyte development was blocked mainly at the DP stage. The few peripheral CD4+ single positive (SP) cells underwent apoptosis and failed to proliferate in response to activating stimuli. At the molecular level, among 589 genes examined, at least 2% of genes including a proto-oncogene, cytokine receptor genes, and apoptosis-related genes were derepressed at inappropriate stages of T-cell development in SATB1-null mice. For example, IL-2Rα and IL-7Rα genes were ectopically transcribed in CD4+CD8+ double positive (DP) thymocytes. SATB1 appears to orchestrate the temporal and spatial expression of genes during T-cell development, thereby ensuring the proper development of this lineage. Our data provide the first evidence that MAR-binding proteins can act as global regulators of cell function in specific cell lineages. PMID:10716941

  9. Phosphoinositide binding by the SNX27 FERM domain regulates its localization at the immune synapse of activated T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Ghai, Rajesh; Tello-Lafoz, Maria; Norwood, Suzanne J.; Yang, Zhe; Clairfeuille, Thomas; Teasdale, Rohan D.; Mérida, Isabel; Collins, Brett M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sorting nexin 27 (SNX27) controls the endosomal-to-cell-surface recycling of diverse transmembrane protein cargos. Crucial to this function is the recruitment of SNX27 to endosomes which is mediated by the binding of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) by its phox homology (PX) domain. In T-cells, SNX27 localizes to the immunological synapse in an activation-dependent manner, but the molecular mechanisms underlying SNX27 translocation remain to be clarified. Here, we examined the phosphoinositide-lipid-binding capabilities of full-length SNX27, and discovered a new PtdInsP-binding site within the C-terminal 4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin (FERM) domain. This binding site showed a clear preference for bi- and tri-phosphorylated phophoinositides, and the interaction was confirmed through biophysical, mutagenesis and modeling approaches. At the immunological synapse of activated T-cells, cell signaling regulates phosphoinositide dynamics, and we find that perturbing phosphoinositide binding by the SNX27 FERM domain alters the SNX27 distribution in both endosomal recycling compartments and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-enriched domains of the plasma membrane during synapse formation. Our results suggest that SNX27 undergoes dynamic partitioning between different membrane domains during immunological synapse assembly, and underscore the contribution of unique lipid interactions for SNX27 orchestration of cargo trafficking. PMID:25472716

  10. Daratumumab depletes CD38+ immune regulatory cells, promotes T-cell expansion, and skews T-cell repertoire in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Krejcik, Jakub; Casneuf, Tineke; Nijhof, Inger S; Verbist, Bie; Bald, Jaime; Plesner, Torben; Syed, Khaja; Liu, Kevin; van de Donk, Niels W C J; Weiss, Brendan M; Ahmadi, Tahamtan; Lokhorst, Henk M; Mutis, Tuna; Sasser, A Kate

    2016-07-21

    Daratumumab targets CD38-expressing myeloma cells through a variety of immune-mediated mechanisms (complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis) and direct apoptosis with crosslinking. These mechanisms may also target nonplasma cells that express CD38, which prompted evaluation of daratumumab's effects on CD38-positive immune subpopulations. Peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) from patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma from 2 daratumumab monotherapy studies were analyzed before and during therapy and at relapse. Regulatory B cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, previously shown to express CD38, were evaluated for immunosuppressive activity and daratumumab sensitivity in the myeloma setting. A novel subpopulation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) expressing CD38 was identified. These Tregs were more immunosuppressive in vitro than CD38-negative Tregs and were reduced in daratumumab-treated patients. In parallel, daratumumab induced robust increases in helper and cytotoxic T-cell absolute counts. In PB and BM, daratumumab induced significant increases in CD8(+):CD4(+) and CD8(+):Treg ratios, and increased memory T cells while decreasing naïve T cells. The majority of patients demonstrated these broad T-cell changes, although patients with a partial response or better showed greater maximum effector and helper T-cell increases, elevated antiviral and alloreactive functional responses, and significantly greater increases in T-cell clonality as measured by T-cell receptor (TCR) sequencing. Increased TCR clonality positively correlated with increased CD8(+) PB T-cell counts. Depletion of CD38(+) immunosuppressive cells, which is associated with an increase in T-helper cells, cytotoxic T cells, T-cell functional response, and TCR clonality, represents possible additional mechanisms of action for daratumumab and deserves further exploration. PMID:27222480

  11. Daratumumab depletes CD38+ immune regulatory cells, promotes T-cell expansion, and skews T-cell repertoire in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Krejcik, Jakub; Casneuf, Tineke; Nijhof, Inger S.; Verbist, Bie; Bald, Jaime; Plesner, Torben; Syed, Khaja; Liu, Kevin; van de Donk, Niels W. C. J.; Weiss, Brendan M.; Ahmadi, Tahamtan; Lokhorst, Henk M.; Mutis, Tuna

    2016-01-01

    Daratumumab targets CD38-expressing myeloma cells through a variety of immune-mediated mechanisms (complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis) and direct apoptosis with crosslinking. These mechanisms may also target nonplasma cells that express CD38, which prompted evaluation of daratumumab’s effects on CD38-positive immune subpopulations. Peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) from patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma from 2 daratumumab monotherapy studies were analyzed before and during therapy and at relapse. Regulatory B cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, previously shown to express CD38, were evaluated for immunosuppressive activity and daratumumab sensitivity in the myeloma setting. A novel subpopulation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) expressing CD38 was identified. These Tregs were more immunosuppressive in vitro than CD38-negative Tregs and were reduced in daratumumab-treated patients. In parallel, daratumumab induced robust increases in helper and cytotoxic T-cell absolute counts. In PB and BM, daratumumab induced significant increases in CD8+:CD4+ and CD8+:Treg ratios, and increased memory T cells while decreasing naïve T cells. The majority of patients demonstrated these broad T-cell changes, although patients with a partial response or better showed greater maximum effector and helper T-cell increases, elevated antiviral and alloreactive functional responses, and significantly greater increases in T-cell clonality as measured by T-cell receptor (TCR) sequencing. Increased TCR clonality positively correlated with increased CD8+ PB T-cell counts. Depletion of CD38+ immunosuppressive cells, which is associated with an increase in T-helper cells, cytotoxic T cells, T-cell functional response, and TCR clonality, represents possible additional mechanisms of action for daratumumab and deserves further exploration. PMID:27222480

  12. T Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... or turn off the immune response. Cytotoxic or “killer” T cells directly attack and destroy cells bearing ... involve selective activation of helper T cells and killer T cells, with a corresponding decrease in regulatory ...

  13. Mst1 Kinase Regulates the Actin-Bundling Protein L-Plastin To Promote T Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaolu; Wang, Xinxin; Todd, Elizabeth M; Jaeger, Emily R; Vella, Jennifer L; Mooren, Olivia L; Feng, Yunfeng; Hu, Jiancheng; Cooper, John A; Morley, Sharon Celeste; Huang, Yina H

    2016-09-01

    Exploring the mechanisms controlling lymphocyte trafficking is essential for understanding the function of the immune system and the pathophysiology of immunodeficiencies. The mammalian Ste20-like kinase 1 (Mst1) has been identified as a critical signaling mediator of T cell migration, and loss of Mst1 results in immunodeficiency disease. Although Mst1 is known to support T cell migration through induction of cell polarization and lamellipodial formation, the downstream effectors of Mst1 are incompletely defined. Mice deficient for the actin-bundling protein L-plastin (LPL) have phenotypes similar to mice lacking Mst1, including decreased T cell polarization, lamellipodial formation, and cell migration. We therefore asked whether LPL functions downstream of Mst1. The regulatory N-terminal domain of LPL contains a consensus Mst1 phosphorylation site at Thr(89) We found that Mst1 can phosphorylate LPL in vitro and that Mst1 can interact with LPL in cells. Removal of the Mst1 phosphorylation site by mutating Thr(89) to Ala impaired localization of LPL to the actin-rich lamellipodia of T cells. Expression of the T89A LPL mutant failed to restore migration of LPL-deficient T cells in vitro. Furthermore, expression of T89A LPL in LPL-deficient hematopoietic cells, using bone marrow chimeras, failed to rescue the phenotype of decreased thymic egress. These results identify LPL as a key effector of Mst1 and establish a novel mechanism linking a signaling intermediate to an actin-binding protein critical to T cell migration. PMID:27465533

  14. The Regulatory T Cell Lineage Factor Foxp3 Regulates Gene Expression through Several Distinct Mechanisms Mostly Independent of Direct DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Kristian G.; Hebenstreit, Daniel; Teichmann, Sarah A.; Betz, Alexander G.

    2015-01-01

    The lineage factor Foxp3 is essential for the development and maintenance of regulatory T cells, but little is known about the mechanisms involved. Here, we demonstrate that an N-terminal proline-rich interaction region is crucial for Foxp3’s function. Subdomains within this key region link Foxp3 to several independent mechanisms of transcriptional regulation. Our study suggests that Foxp3, even in the absence of its DNA-binding forkhead domain, acts as a bridge between DNA-binding interaction partners and proteins with effector function permitting it to regulate a large number of genes. We show that, in one such mechanism, Foxp3 recruits class I histone deacetylases to the promoters of target genes, counteracting activation-induced histone acetylation and thereby suppressing their expression. PMID:26107960

  15. Characterization of palytoxin binding to HaCaT cells using a monoclonal anti-palytoxin antibody.

    PubMed

    Pelin, Marco; Boscolo, Sabrina; Poli, Mark; Sosa, Silvio; Tubaro, Aurelia; Florio, Chiara

    2013-03-01

    Palytoxin (PLTX) is the reference compound for a group of potent marine biotoxins, for which the molecular target is Na+/K+-ATPase. Indeed, ouabain (OUA), a potent blocker of the pump, is used to inhibit some PLTX effects in vitro. However, in an effort to explain incomplete inhibition of PLTX cytotoxicity, some studies suggest the possibility of two different binding sites on Na+/K+-ATPase. Hence, this study was performed to characterize PLTX binding to intact HaCaT keratinocytes and to investigate the ability of OUA to compete for this binding. PLTX binding to HaCaT cells was demonstrated by immunocytochemical analysis after 10 min exposure. An anti-PLTX monoclonal antibody-based ELISA showed that the binding was saturable and reversible, with a K(d) of 3 × 10-10 M. However, kinetic experiments revealed that PLTX binding dissociation was incomplete, suggesting an additional, OUA-insensitive, PLTX binding site. Competitive experiments suggested that OUA acts as a negative allosteric modulator against high PLTX concentrations (0.3-1.0 × 10-7 M) and possibly as a non-competitive antagonist against low PLTX concentrations (0.1-3.0 × 10-9 M). Antagonism was supported by PLTX cytotoxicity inhibition at OUA concentrations that displaced PLTX binding (1 × 10-5 M). However, this inhibition was incomplete, supporting the existence of both OUA-sensitive and -insensitive PLTX binding sites. PMID:23442788

  16. Binding of recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTL) to antigen presenting cells prevents upregulation of CD11b and inhibits T cell activation and transfer of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sushmita; Miller, Lisa; Subramanian, Sandhya; McCarty, Owen J T; Proctor, Thomas; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Huan, Jianya; Burrows, Gregory G; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Offner, Halina

    2010-08-25

    Recombinant T cell ligands (RTLs) ameliorate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in an antigen-specific manner. We evaluated effects of RTL401 (I-A(s) alpha1beta1+PLP-139-151) on splenocytes from SJL/J mice with EAE to study RTL-T cell tolerance-inducing mechanisms. RTLs bound to B, macrophages and DCs, through RTL-MHC-alpha1beta1 moiety. RTL binding reduced CD11b expression on splenic macrophages/DC, and RTL401-conditioned macrophages/DC, not B cells, inhibited T cell activation. Reduced ability of RTL- incubated splenocytes to transfer EAE was likely mediated through macrophages/DC, since B cells were unnecessary for RTL treatment of EAE. These results demonstrate a novel pathway of T cell regulation by RTL-bound APCs. PMID:20546940

  17. Binding of recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTL) to antigen presenting cells prevents upregulation of CD11b and inhibits T cell activation and transfer of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Sushmita; Miller, Lisa; Subramanian, Sandhya; McCarty, Owen; Proctor, Thomas; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Burrows, Gregory G.; Vandenbark, Arthur A.; Offner, Halina

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant T cell ligands (RTLs) ameliorate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in antigen specific manner. We evaluated effects of RTL401 (I-As α1β1 + PLP-139-151) on splenocytes from mice with EAE to study RTL- T cell-tolerance-inducing mechanisms. RTLs bound to B, macrophages and DCs, through RTL-MHC-α1β1 moiety. RTL binding reduced CD11b expression on splenic macrophages/DC, and RTL401-conditioned macrophages/DC, not B cells, inhibited T cell activation. Reduced ability of RTL- incubated splenocytes to transfer EAE was likely mediated through macrophages/DC, since B cells were unnecessary for RTL treatment of EAE. These results demonstrate novel pathway of T cell regulation by RTL bound APCs. PMID:20546940

  18. CIP2A Promotes T-Cell Activation and Immune Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cvrljevic, Anna; Khan, Mohd Moin; Treise, Irina; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Au-Yeung, Byron; Sittig, Eleonora; Laajala, Teemu Daniel; Chen, Yiling; Oeder, Sebastian; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Horsch, Marion; Aittokallio, Tero; Busch, Dirk H.; Ollert, Markus W.; Neff, Frauke; Beckers, Johannes; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Chen, Zhi; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Westermarck, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    The oncoprotein Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is overexpressed in most malignancies and is an obvious candidate target protein for future cancer therapies. However, the physiological importance of CIP2A-mediated PP2A inhibition is largely unknown. As PP2A regulates immune responses, we investigated the role of CIP2A in normal immune system development and during immune response in vivo. We show that CIP2A-deficient mice (CIP2AHOZ) present a normal immune system development and function in unchallenged conditions. However when challenged with Listeria monocytogenes, CIP2AHOZ mice display an impaired adaptive immune response that is combined with decreased frequency of both CD4+ T-cells and CD8+ effector T-cells. Importantly, the cell autonomous effect of CIP2A deficiency for T-cell activation was confirmed. Induction of CIP2A expression during T-cell activation was dependent on Zap70 activity. Thus, we reveal CIP2A as a hitherto unrecognized mediator of T-cell activation during adaptive immune response. These results also reveal CIP2AHOZ as a possible novel mouse model for studying the role of PP2A activity in immune regulation. On the other hand, the results also indicate that CIP2A targeting cancer therapies would not cause serious immunological side-effects. PMID:27100879

  19. CIP2A Promotes T-Cell Activation and Immune Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection.

    PubMed

    Côme, Christophe; Cvrljevic, Anna; Khan, Mohd Moin; Treise, Irina; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Au-Yeung, Byron; Sittig, Eleonora; Laajala, Teemu Daniel; Chen, Yiling; Oeder, Sebastian; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Horsch, Marion; Aittokallio, Tero; Busch, Dirk H; Ollert, Markus W; Neff, Frauke; Beckers, Johannes; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Fuchs, Helmut; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Chen, Zhi; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Westermarck, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    The oncoprotein Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is overexpressed in most malignancies and is an obvious candidate target protein for future cancer therapies. However, the physiological importance of CIP2A-mediated PP2A inhibition is largely unknown. As PP2A regulates immune responses, we investigated the role of CIP2A in normal immune system development and during immune response in vivo. We show that CIP2A-deficient mice (CIP2AHOZ) present a normal immune system development and function in unchallenged conditions. However when challenged with Listeria monocytogenes, CIP2AHOZ mice display an impaired adaptive immune response that is combined with decreased frequency of both CD4+ T-cells and CD8+ effector T-cells. Importantly, the cell autonomous effect of CIP2A deficiency for T-cell activation was confirmed. Induction of CIP2A expression during T-cell activation was dependent on Zap70 activity. Thus, we reveal CIP2A as a hitherto unrecognized mediator of T-cell activation during adaptive immune response. These results also reveal CIP2AHOZ as a possible novel mouse model for studying the role of PP2A activity in immune regulation. On the other hand, the results also indicate that CIP2A targeting cancer therapies would not cause serious immunological side-effects. PMID:27100879

  20. Local antigen in nonlymphoid tissue promotes resident memory CD8+ T cell formation during viral infection.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tahsin N; Mooster, Jana L; Kilgore, Augustus M; Osborn, Jossef F; Nolz, Jeffrey C

    2016-05-30

    Tissue-resident memory (Trm) CD8(+) T cells are functionally distinct from their circulating counterparts and are potent mediators of host protection against reinfection. Whether local recognition of antigen in nonlymphoid tissues during infection can impact the formation of Trm populations remains unresolved. Using skin infections with vaccinia virus (VacV)-expressing model antigens, we found that local antigen recognition had a profound impact on Trm formation. Activated CD8(+) T cells trafficked to VacV-infected skin in an inflammation-dependent, but antigen-independent, manner. However, after viral clearance, there was a subsequent ∼50-fold increase in Trm formation when antigen was present in the tissue microenvironment. Secondary antigen stimulation in nonlymphoid tissue caused CD8(+) T cells to rapidly express CD69 and be retained at the site of infection. Finally, Trm CD8(+) T cells that formed during VacV infection in an antigen-dependent manner became potent stimulators of localized antigen-specific inflammatory responses in the skin. Thus, our studies indicate that the presence of antigen in the nonlymphoid tissue microenvironment plays a critical role in the formation of functional Trm CD8(+) T cell populations, a finding with relevance for both vaccine design and prevention of inflammatory disorders. PMID:27217536

  1. IL-17-producing γδ T cells and neutrophils conspire to promote breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Seth B; Kersten, Kelly; Doornebal, Chris W; Weiden, Jorieke; Vrijland, Kim; Hau, Cheei-Sing; Verstegen, Niels J M; Ciampricotti, Metamia; Hawinkels, Lukas J A C; Jonkers, Jos; de Visser, Karin E

    2015-06-18

    Metastatic disease remains the primary cause of death for patients with breast cancer. The different steps of the metastatic cascade rely on reciprocal interactions between cancer cells and their microenvironment. Within this local microenvironment and in distant organs, immune cells and their mediators are known to facilitate metastasis formation. However, the precise contribution of tumour-induced systemic inflammation to metastasis and the mechanisms regulating systemic inflammation are poorly understood. Here we show that tumours maximize their chance of metastasizing by evoking a systemic inflammatory cascade in mouse models of spontaneous breast cancer metastasis. We mechanistically demonstrate that interleukin (IL)-1β elicits IL-17 expression from gamma delta (γδ) T cells, resulting in systemic, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-dependent expansion and polarization of neutrophils in mice bearing mammary tumours. Tumour-induced neutrophils acquire the ability to suppress cytotoxic T lymphocytes carrying the CD8 antigen, which limit the establishment of metastases. Neutralization of IL-17 or G-CSF and absence of γδ T cells prevents neutrophil accumulation and downregulates the T-cell-suppressive phenotype of neutrophils. Moreover, the absence of γδ T cells or neutrophils profoundly reduces pulmonary and lymph node metastases without influencing primary tumour progression. Our data indicate that targeting this novel cancer-cell-initiated domino effect within the immune system--the γδ T cell/IL-17/neutrophil axis--represents a new strategy to inhibit metastatic disease. PMID:25822788

  2. Non-small-cell lung cancer-induced immunosuppression by increased human regulatory T cells via Foxp3 promoter demethylation.

    PubMed

    Ke, Xing; Zhang, Shuping; Xu, Jian; Liu, Genyan; Zhang, Lixia; Xie, Erfu; Gao, Li; Li, Daqian; Sun, Ruihong; Wang, Fang; Pan, Shiyang

    2016-05-01

    Patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have immune defects that are poorly understood. Forkhead box protein P3 (Foxp3) is crucial for immunosuppression by CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). It is not well known how NSCLC induces Foxp3 expression and causes immunosuppression in tumor-bearing patients. Our study found a higher percentage of CD4(+) Tregs in the peripheral blood of NSCLC compared with healthy donors. NSCLC patients showed demethylation of eight CpG sites within the Foxp3 promoter with methylation ratios negatively correlated with CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T levels. Foxp3 expression in CD4(+) Tregs was directly regulated by Foxp3 promoter demethylation and was involved in immunosuppression by NSCLC. To verify the effect of tumor cells on the phenotype and function of CD4(+) Tregs, we established a coculture system using NSCLC cell line and healthy CD4(+) T cells and showed that SPC-A1 induced IL-10 and TGF-β1 secretion by affecting the function of CD4(+) Tregs. The activity of DNA methyltransferases from CD4(+) T was decreased during this process. Furthermore, eight CpG sites within the Foxp3 promoter also appeared to have undergone demethylation. Foxp3 is highly expressed in CD4(+) T cells, and this may be caused by gene promoter demethylation. These induced Tregs are highly immunosuppressive and dramatically inhibit the proliferative activity of naïve CD4(+) T cells. Our study provides one possible mechanism describing Foxp3 promoter demethylation changes by which NSCLC down-regulates immune responses and contributes to tumor progression. Foxp3 represents an important target for NSCLC anti-tumor immunotherapy. PMID:27000869

  3. CD4+ T Cells Promote Antibody Production but Not Sustained Affinity Maturation during Borrelia burgdorferi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Elsner, Rebecca A.; Hastey, Christine J.

    2014-01-01

    CD4 T cells are crucial for enhancing B cell-mediated immunity, supporting the induction of high-affinity, class-switched antibody responses, long-lived plasma cells, and memory B cells. Previous studies showed that the immune response to Borrelia burgdorferi appears to lack robust T-dependent B cell responses, as neither long-lived plasma cells nor memory B cells form for months after infection, and nonswitched IgM antibodies are produced continuously during this chronic disease. These data prompted us to evaluate the induction and functionality of B. burgdorferi infection-induced CD4 TFH cells. We report that CD4 T cells were effectively primed and TFH cells induced after B. burgdorferi infection. These CD4 T cells contributed to the control of B. burgdorferi burden and supported the induction of B. burgdorferi-specific IgG responses. However, while affinity maturation of antibodies against a prototypic T-dependent B. burgdorferi protein, Arthritis-related protein (Arp), were initiated, these increases were reversed later, coinciding with the previously observed involution of germinal centers. The cessation of affinity maturation was not due to the appearance of inhibitory or exhausted CD4 T cells or a strong induction of regulatory T cells. In vitro T-B cocultures demonstrated that T cells isolated from B. burgdorferi-infected but not B. burgdorferi-immunized mice supported the rapid differentiation of B cells into antibody-secreting plasma cells rather than continued proliferation, mirroring the induction of rapid short-lived instead of long-lived T-dependent antibody responses in vivo. The data further suggest that B. burgdorferi infection drives the humoral response away from protective, high-affinity, and long-lived antibody responses and toward the rapid induction of strongly induced, short-lived antibodies of limited efficacy. PMID:25312948

  4. HIRF: a novel nuclear factor that binds to the human T-cell leukemia virus type I internal regulatory element (HIRE).

    PubMed

    Ariumi, Y; Copeland, T D; Nosaka, T; Hatanaka, M

    1997-04-01

    The transcription of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) provirus starts from a promoter located in the 5' long terminal repeat (LTR). We have identified a second promoter at the 3' end of the pol gene. This internal promoter expresses the Tax transactivator protein, but does not require Tax for its activity. Furthermore, we have found the novel enhancer motif AGTTCTGCCC, which are located near the initiation site. We have named the sequence HIRE (HTLV-I internal regulatory element). The HIRE binding protein is a ubiquitous protein. We purified this protein from the HTLV-I producing cell line MT-2 cells by DNA affinity chromatography. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed four major bands (70, 85, 115 and more than 200 kDa) and some minor bands on the gel. We renatured each major protein and showed the 70 and 115 kDa proteins bind to DNA, although the 115 kDa protein seemed to bind nonspecifically. We have designated these components as HIRF (HTLV-I internal regulatory factor). PMID:9209287

  5. Glycan modification of antigen alters its intracellular routing in dendritic cells, promoting priming of T cells

    PubMed Central

    Streng-Ouwehand, Ingeborg; Ho, Nataschja I; Litjens, Manja; Kalay, Hakan; Boks, Martine Annemarie; Cornelissen, Lenneke AM; Kaur Singh, Satwinder; Saeland, Eirikur; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; Ossendorp, Ferry A; Unger, Wendy WJ; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2016-01-01

    Antigen uptake by dendritic cells and intracellular routing of antigens to specific compartments is regulated by C-type lectin receptors that recognize glycan structures. We show that the modification of Ovalbumin (OVA) with the glycan-structure LewisX (LeX) re-directs OVA to the C-type lectin receptor MGL1. LeX-modification of OVA favored Th1 skewing of CD4+ T cells and enhanced cross-priming of CD8+ T cells. While cross-presentation of native OVA requires high antigen dose and TLR stimuli, LeX modification reduces the required amount 100-fold and obviates its dependence on TLR signaling. The OVA-LeX-induced enhancement of T cell cross-priming is MGL1-dependent as shown by reduced CD8+ effector T cell frequencies in MGL1-deficient mice. Moreover, MGL1-mediated cross-presentation of OVA-LeX neither required TAP-transporters nor Cathepsin-S and was still observed after prolonged intracellular storage of antigen in Rab11+LAMP1+ compartments. We conclude that controlled neo-glycosylation of antigens can crucially influence intracellular routing of antigens, the nature and strength of immune responses and should be considered for optimizing current vaccination strategies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11765.001 PMID:26999763

  6. Tumor-associated macrophages promote tumor cell proliferation in nasopharyngeal NK/T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yixiong; Fan, Linni; Wang, Yingmei; Li, Peifeng; Zhu, Jin; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Weichen; Zhang, Yuehua; Huang, Gaosheng

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between the number of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and proliferative activity of tumor cells and the relationship between two macrophage biomarkers CD68 and CD163 in nasopharyngeal NK/T-cell lymphoma. Methods: Immunohistochemistry was used to reconfirm the diagnosis of nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma and detect the numbers of TAMs and the ki-67 label index of the tumor cells in all 31 cases. In addition, 12 cases of inflammatory cases were collected as controls, for which the immunostaining of CD68 and CD163 were done as well. Then staining results were analyzed with Pearson correlation and t test. Results: The number of TAMs was positively correlated with tumor proliferative activity (P = 0.024) in nasopharyngeal NK/T-cell lymphoma. The expression of CD68 and CD163 was closely related (P = 0.009), and the positive rate of CD68 was generally higher than CD163, however there is no statistical significance. Conclusion: The increase in numbers of TAMs in nasopharyngeal NK/T-cell lymphoma is related to higher proliferative index, indicating the TAMs play an important role in tumor proliferation. Meanwhile both CD68 and CD163 might be the markers for TAMs but CD163 would be the better one. PMID:25337185

  7. Pediatric T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia evolves into relapse by clonal selection, acquisition of mutations and promoter hypomethylation.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Joachim B; Rausch, Tobias; Bandapalli, Obul R; Eilers, Juliane; Pechanska, Paulina; Schuessele, Stephanie; Assenov, Yassen; Stütz, Adrian M; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Hof, Jana; Eckert, Cornelia; von Stackelberg, Arend; Schrappe, Martin; Stanulla, Martin; Koehler, Rolf; Avigad, Smadar; Elitzur, Sarah; Handgretinger, Rupert; Benes, Vladimir; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Korbel, Jan O; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Kulozik, Andreas E

    2015-11-01

    Relapsed precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is characterized by resistance against chemotherapy and is frequently fatal. We aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms resulting in relapse of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and analyzed 13 patients at first diagnosis, remission and relapse by whole exome sequencing, targeted ultra-deep sequencing, multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification and DNA methylation array. Compared to primary T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in relapse the number of single nucleotide variants and small insertions and deletions approximately doubled from 11.5 to 26. Targeted ultra-deep sequencing sensitively detected subclones that were selected for in relapse. The mutational pattern defined two types of relapses. While both are characterized by selection of subclones and acquisition of novel mutations, 'type 1' relapse derives from the primary leukemia whereas 'type 2' relapse originates from a common pre-leukemic ancestor. Relapse-specific changes included activation of the nucleotidase NT5C2 resulting in resistance to chemotherapy and mutations of epigenetic modulators, exemplified by SUZ12, WHSC1 and SMARCA4. While mutations present in primary leukemia and in relapse were enriched for known drivers of leukemia, relapse-specific changes revealed an association with general cancer-promoting mechanisms. This study thus identifies mechanisms that drive progression of pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia to relapse and may explain the characteristic treatment resistance of this condition. PMID:26294725

  8. Vitamin D Regulates Cytokine Patterns Secreted by Dendritic Cells to Promote Differentiation of IL-22-Producing T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Andrea; Fabri, Mario

    2015-01-01

    One central mechanism, by which vitamin D regulates human immune responses, is the direct modulation of dendritic cells (DCs). However, the effect of vitamin D on several key DC functions, such as the secretion of central inflammatory cytokines, remains controversial. Moreover, whether vitamin D treatment of DCs regulates their ability to promote differentiation of IL-17-/IL-22-producing T cell subsets, such as Th17 and Th22 cell, is not known. Here, we report that vitamin D treatment during differentiation of monocytes into DCs markedly enhanced their ability to secrete TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and IL-23. Cytokines secreted by vitamin D-treated DC were significantly more potent in driving differentiation of IL-22-producing T cells, but not IL-17-producing T cells, as compared to secreted cytokines of not-vitamin D-treated DCs. Finally, we found that the differentiation of IL-22-producing T cells mediated by supernatants of vitamin D-treated DCs was dependent on TNF-α IL-6 and IL-23. In summary, our study suggests a novel role of vitamin D in regulating DC-mediated immune responses in humans. PMID:26107738

  9. PD-1 alters T-cell metabolic reprogramming by inhibiting glycolysis and promoting lipolysis and fatty acid oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Patsoukis, Nikolaos; Bardhan, Kankana; Chatterjee, Pranam; Sari, Duygu; Liu, Bianling; Bell, Lauren N.; Karoly, Edward D.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Petkova, Victoria; Seth, Pankaj; Li, Lequn; Boussiotis, Vassiliki A.

    2015-01-01

    During activation, T cells undergo metabolic reprogramming, which imprints distinct functional fates. We determined that on PD-1 ligation, activated T cells are unable to engage in glycolysis or amino acid metabolism but have an increased rate of fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO). PD-1 promotes FAO of endogenous lipids by increasing expression of CPT1A, and inducing lipolysis as indicated by elevation of the lipase ATGL, the lipolysis marker glycerol and release of fatty acids. Conversely, CTLA-4 inhibits glycolysis without augmenting FAO, suggesting that CTLA-4 sustains the metabolic profile of non-activated cells. Because T cells utilize glycolysis during differentiation to effectors, our findings reveal a metabolic mechanism responsible for PD-1-mediated blockade of T-effector cell differentiation. The enhancement of FAO provides a mechanistic explanation for the longevity of T cells receiving PD-1 signals in patients with chronic infections and cancer, and for their capacity to be reinvigorated by PD-1 blockade. PMID:25809635

  10. Molecular analysis of tumor-promoting CD8+ T cells in two-stage cutaneous chemical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Bernice Y; Roberts, Scott J; Silberzahn, Tobias; Filler, Renata B; Neustadter, Jason H; Galan, Anjela; Reddy, Swapna; Lin, William M; Ellis, Peter D; Langford, Cordelia F; Hayday, Adrian C; Girardi, Michael

    2010-06-01

    T-pro are tumor-infiltrating TCRalphabeta(+)CD8(+) cells of reduced cytotoxic potential that promote experimental two-stage chemical cutaneous carcinogenesis. Toward understanding their mechanism of action, this study uses whole-genome expression analysis to compare T-pro with systemic CD8(+) T cells from multiple groups of tumor-bearing mice. T-pro show an overt T helper 17-like profile (high retinoic acid-related orphan receptor-(ROR)gammat, IL-17A, IL-17F; low T-bet and eomesodermin), regulatory potential (high FoxP3, IL-10, Tim-3), and transcripts encoding epithelial growth factors (amphiregulin, Gro-1, Gro-2). Tricolor flow cytometry subsequently confirmed the presence of TCRbeta(+) CD8(+) IL-17(+) T cells among tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). Moreover, a time-course analysis of independent TIL isolates from papillomas versus carcinomas exposed a clear association of the "T-pro phenotype" with malignant progression. This molecular characterization of T-pro builds a foundation for elucidating the contributions of inflammation to cutaneous carcinogenesis, and may provide useful biomarkers for cancer immunotherapy in which the widely advocated use of tumor-specific CD8(+) cytolytic T cells should perhaps accommodate the cells' potential corruption toward the T-pro phenotype. The data are also likely germane to psoriasis, in which the epidermis may be infiltrated by CD8(+) IL-17-producing T cells. PMID:19924136

  11. Pediatric T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia evolves into relapse by clonal selection, acquisition of mutations and promoter hypomethylation

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Joachim B.; Rausch, Tobias; Bandapalli, Obul R.; Eilers, Juliane; Pechanska, Paulina; Schuessele, Stephanie; Assenov, Yassen; Stütz, Adrian M.; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Hof, Jana; Eckert, Cornelia; von Stackelberg, Arend; Schrappe, Martin; Stanulla, Martin; Koehler, Rolf; Avigad, Smadar; Elitzur, Sarah; Handgretinger, Rupert; Benes, Vladimir; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Korbel, Jan O.; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Kulozik, Andreas E.

    2015-01-01

    Relapsed precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is characterized by resistance against chemotherapy and is frequently fatal. We aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms resulting in relapse of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and analyzed 13 patients at first diagnosis, remission and relapse by whole exome sequencing, targeted ultra-deep sequencing, multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification and DNA methylation array. Compared to primary T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in relapse the number of single nucleotide variants and small insertions and deletions approximately doubled from 11.5 to 26. Targeted ultra-deep sequencing sensitively detected subclones that were selected for in relapse. The mutational pattern defined two types of relapses. While both are characterized by selection of subclones and acquisition of novel mutations, ‘type 1’ relapse derives from the primary leukemia whereas ‘type 2’ relapse originates from a common pre-leukemic ancestor. Relapse-specific changes included activation of the nucleotidase NT5C2 resulting in resistance to chemotherapy and mutations of epigenetic modulators, exemplified by SUZ12, WHSC1 and SMARCA4. While mutations present in primary leukemia and in relapse were enriched for known drivers of leukemia, relapse-specific changes revealed an association with general cancer-promoting mechanisms. This study thus identifies mechanisms that drive progression of pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia to relapse and may explain the characteristic treatment resistance of this condition. PMID:26294725

  12. Characterization of a Putative Receptor Binding Surface on Skint-1, a Critical Determinant of Dendritic Epidermal T Cell Selection.

    PubMed

    Salim, Mahboob; Knowles, Timothy J; Hart, Rosie; Mohammed, Fiyaz; Woodward, Martin J; Willcox, Carrie R; Overduin, Michael; Hayday, Adrian C; Willcox, Benjamin E

    2016-04-22

    Dendritic epidermal T cells (DETC) form a skin-resident γδ T cell population that makes key contributions to cutaneous immune stress surveillance, including non-redundant contributions to protection from cutaneous carcinogens. How DETC become uniquely associated with the epidermis was in large part solved by the identification of Skint-1, the prototypic member of a novel B7-related multigene family. Expressed only by thymic epithelial cells and epidermal keratinocytes, Skint-1 drives specifically the development of DETC progenitors, making it the first clear candidate for a selecting ligand for non-MHC/CD1-restricted T cells. However, the molecular mechanisms underpinning Skint-1 activity are unresolved. Here, we provide evidence that DETC selection requires Skint-1 expression on the surface of thymic epithelial cells, and depends upon specific residues on the CDR3-like loop within the membrane-distal variable domain of Skint-1 (Skint-1 DV). Nuclear magnetic resonance of Skint-1 DV revealed a core tertiary structure conserved across the Skint family, but a highly distinct surface charge distribution, possibly explaining its unique function. Crucially, the CDR3-like loop formed an electrostatically distinct surface, featuring key charged and hydrophobic solvent-exposed residues, at the membrane-distal tip of DV. These results provide the first structural insights into the Skint family, identifying a putative receptor binding surface that directly implicates Skint-1 in receptor-ligand interactions crucial for DETC selection. PMID:26917727

  13. Characterization of a Putative Receptor Binding Surface on Skint-1, a Critical Determinant of Dendritic Epidermal T Cell Selection*

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Mahboob; Knowles, Timothy J.; Hart, Rosie; Mohammed, Fiyaz; Woodward, Martin J.; Willcox, Carrie R.; Overduin, Michael; Hayday, Adrian C.; Willcox, Benjamin E.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic epidermal T cells (DETC) form a skin-resident γδ T cell population that makes key contributions to cutaneous immune stress surveillance, including non-redundant contributions to protection from cutaneous carcinogens. How DETC become uniquely associated with the epidermis was in large part solved by the identification of Skint-1, the prototypic member of a novel B7-related multigene family. Expressed only by thymic epithelial cells and epidermal keratinocytes, Skint-1 drives specifically the development of DETC progenitors, making it the first clear candidate for a selecting ligand for non-MHC/CD1-restricted T cells. However, the molecular mechanisms underpinning Skint-1 activity are unresolved. Here, we provide evidence that DETC selection requires Skint-1 expression on the surface of thymic epithelial cells, and depends upon specific residues on the CDR3-like loop within the membrane-distal variable domain of Skint-1 (Skint-1 DV). Nuclear magnetic resonance of Skint-1 DV revealed a core tertiary structure conserved across the Skint family, but a highly distinct surface charge distribution, possibly explaining its unique function. Crucially, the CDR3-like loop formed an electrostatically distinct surface, featuring key charged and hydrophobic solvent-exposed residues, at the membrane-distal tip of DV. These results provide the first structural insights into the Skint family, identifying a putative receptor binding surface that directly implicates Skint-1 in receptor-ligand interactions crucial for DETC selection. PMID:26917727

  14. A77 1726, the active metabolite of leflunomide, attenuates lupus nephritis by promoting the development of regulatory T cells and inhibiting IL-17-producing double negative T cells.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Guilin; Yang, Lifen; Li, Zhenping; Williams, James W; Zhang, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a challenging problem that affects 50% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) without effective therapy. Here, we report that A77 1726, the active metabolite of leflunomide, effectively inhibits development of LN and attenuates the generalized autoimmune features. A77 1726 suppresses the expansion of double negative (DN) T cells, and inhibits T and B cell activation. Intriguingly, A77 1726 treatment significantly increases CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells but suppresses potential "pathogenic" IL-17-producing DN T cells in lymph nodes. In vitro experiment shows that A77 1726 potentiates the conversion of naive CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells into CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) inducible regulatory T cells (iTregs) by inhibiting Akt. Taken together, our data indicate that the therapeutic effects of A77 1726 in murine LN are mediated, at least in part, by augmenting iTregs which suppress pathogenic IL-17-producing DN T cells through an Akt-dependent mechanism. PMID:25638413

  15. CADM1 Interacts with Tiam1 and Promotes Invasive Phenotype of Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type I-transformed Cells and Adult T-cell Leukemia Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Mari; Maruyama, Tomoko; Ohta, Tsutomu; Ito, Akihiko; Hayashi, Tomayoshi; Tsukasaki, Kunihiko; Kamihira, Shimeru; Yamaoka, Shoji; Hoshino, Hiroo; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Watanabe, Toshiki; Stanbridge, Eric J.; Murakami, Yoshinori

    2010-01-01

    CADM1 encodes a multifunctional immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecule whose cytoplasmic domain contains a type II PSD95/Dlg/ZO-1 (PDZ)-binding motif (BM) for associating with other intracellular proteins. Although CADM1 lacks expression in T lymphocytes of healthy individuals, it is overexpressed in adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) cells. It has been suggested that the expression of CADM1 protein promotes infiltration of leukemic cells into various organs and tissues, which is one of the frequent clinical manifestations of ATL. Amino acid sequence alignment revealed that Tiam1 (T-lymphoma invasion and metastasis 1), a Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor, has a type II PDZ domain similar to those of membrane-associated guanylate kinase homologs (MAGUKs) that are known to bind to the PDZ-BM of CADM1. In this study, we demonstrated that the cytoplasmic domain of CADM1 directly interacted with the PDZ domain of Tiam1 and induced formation of lamellipodia through Rac activation in HTLV-I-transformed cell lines as well as ATL cell lines. Our results indicate that Tiam1 integrates signals from CADM1 to regulate the actin cytoskeleton through Rac activation, which may lead to tissue infiltration of leukemic cells in ATL patients. PMID:20215110

  16. Themis1 enhances T cell receptor signaling during thymocyte development by promoting Vav1 activity and Grb2 stability.

    PubMed

    Zvezdova, Ekaterina; Mikolajczak, Judith; Garreau, Anne; Marcellin, Marlène; Rigal, Lise; Lee, Jan; Choi, Seeyoung; Blaize, Gaëtan; Argenty, Jérémy; Familiades, Julien; Li, Liqi; Gonzalez de Peredo, Anne; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Love, Paul E; Lesourne, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    The T cell signaling protein Themis1 is essential for the positive and negative selection of thymocytes in the thymus. Although the developmental defect that results from the loss of Themis1 suggests that it enhances T cell receptor (TCR) signaling, Themis1 also recruits Src homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) to the vicinity of TCR signaling complexes, suggesting that it has an inhibitory role in TCR signaling. We used TCR signaling reporter mice and quantitative proteomics to explore the role of Themis1 in developing T cells. We found that Themis1 acted mostly as a positive regulator of TCR signaling in vivo when receptors were activated by positively selecting ligands. Proteomic analysis of the Themis1 interactome identified SHP-1, the TCR-associated adaptor protein Grb2, and the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav1 as the principal interacting partners of Themis1 in isolated mouse thymocytes. Analysis of TCR signaling in Themis1-deficient and Themis1-overexpressing mouse thymocytes demonstrated that Themis1 promoted Vav1 activity both in vitro and in vivo. The reduced activity of Vav1 and the impaired T cell development in Themis1(-/-) mice were due in part to increased degradation of Grb2, which suggests that Themis1 is required to maintain the steady-state abundance of Grb2 in thymocytes. Together, these data suggest that Themis1 acts as a positive regulator of TCR signaling in developing T cells, and identify a mechanism by which Themis1 regulates thymic selection. PMID:27188442

  17. T cell-intrinsic ASC critically promotes TH17-mediated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bradley N; Wang, Chenhui; Zhang, Cun-Jin; Kang, Zizhen; Gulen, Muhammet Fatih; Zepp, Jarod A; Zhao, Junjie; Bian, Guanglin; Do, Jeong-Su; Min, Booki; Pavicic, Paul G; El-Sanadi, Caroline; Fox, Paul L; Akitsu, Aoi; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Sarkar, Anasuya; Wewers, Mark D; Kaiser, William J; Mocarski, Edward S; Rothenberg, Marc E; Hise, Amy G; Dubyak, George R; Ransohoff, Richard M; Li, Xiaoxia

    2016-05-01

    Interleukin 1β (IL-1β) is critical for the in vivo survival, expansion and effector function of IL-17-producing helper T (TH17) cells during autoimmune responses, including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, the spatiotemporal role and cellular source of IL-1β during EAE pathogenesis are poorly defined. In the present study, we uncovered a T cell-intrinsic inflammasome that drives IL-1β production during TH17-mediated EAE pathogenesis. Activation of T cell antigen receptors induced expression of pro-IL-1β, whereas ATP stimulation triggered T cell production of IL-1β via ASC-NLRP3-dependent caspase-8 activation. IL-1R was detected on TH17 cells but not on type 1 helper T (TH1) cells, and ATP-treated TH17 cells showed enhanced survival compared with ATP-treated TH1 cells, suggesting autocrine action of TH17-derived IL-1β. Together these data reveal a critical role for IL-1β produced by a TH17 cell-intrinsic ASC-NLRP3-caspase-8 inflammasome during inflammation of the central nervous system. PMID:26998763

  18. A THEMIS:SHP1 complex promotes T-cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Paster, Wolfgang; Bruger, Annika M; Katsch, Kristin; Grégoire, Claude; Roncagalli, Romain; Fu, Guo; Gascoigne, Nicholas RJ; Nika, Konstantina; Cohnen, Andre; Feller, Stephan M; Simister, Philip C; Molder, Kelly C; Cordoba, Shaun-Paul; Dushek, Omer; Malissen, Bernard; Acuto, Oreste

    2015-01-01

    THEMIS is critical for conventional T-cell development, but its precise molecular function remains elusive. Here, we show that THEMIS constitutively associates with the phosphatases SHP1 and SHP2. This complex requires the adapter GRB2, which bridges SHP to THEMIS in a Tyr-phosphorylation-independent fashion. Rather, SHP1 and THEMIS engage with the N-SH3 and C-SH3 domains of GRB2, respectively, a configuration that allows GRB2-SH2 to recruit the complex onto LAT. Consistent with THEMIS-mediated recruitment of SHP to the TCR signalosome, THEMIS knock-down increased TCR-induced CD3-ζ phosphorylation, Erk activation and CD69 expression, but not LCK phosphorylation. This generalized TCR signalling increase led to augmented apoptosis, a phenotype mirrored by SHP1 knock-down. Remarkably, a KI mutation of LCK Ser59, previously suggested to be key in ERK-mediated resistance towards SHP1 negative feedback, did not affect TCR signalling nor ligand discrimination in vivo. Thus, the THEMIS:SHP complex dampens early TCR signalling by a previously unknown molecular mechanism that favours T-cell survival. We discuss possible implications of this mechanism in modulating TCR output signals towards conventional T-cell development and differentiation. PMID:25535246

  19. CD4+ T cells promote the pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Parker, Dane; Ryan, Chanelle L; Alonzo, Francis; Torres, Victor J; Planet, Paul J; Prince, Alice S

    2015-03-01

    We postulated that the activation of proinflammatory signaling by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strain USA300 is a major factor in the pathogenesis of severe pneumonia and a target for immunomodulation. Local activation of T cells in the lung was a conserved feature of multiple strains of S. aureus, in addition to USA300. The pattern of Vβ chain activation was consistent with known superantigens, but deletion of SelX or SEK and SEQ was not sufficient to prevent T-cell activation, indicating the participation of multiple genes. Using Rag2(-/-), Cd4(-/-), and Cd28(-/-) mice, we observed significantly improved clearance of MRSA from the airways and decreased lung pathology, compared with findings for wild-type controls. The improved outcome correlated with decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor, KC, interleukin 6, and interleukin 1β). Our data suggest that T-cell-mediated hypercytokinemia induced by infection with MRSA strain USA300 contributes to pathogenesis and may be a therapeutic target for improving outcomes of this common infection in a clinical setting. PMID:25240171

  20. Galectin-8 Ameliorates Murine Autoimmune Ocular Pathology and Promotes a Regulatory T Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, James F.; Hasegawa, Eiichi; Mulki, Lama; Suryawanshi, Amol; Jiang, Shuhong; Chen, Wei-Sheng; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Connor, Kip M.; Panjwani, Noorjahan

    2015-01-01

    Galectins have emerged as potent immunoregulatory agents that control chronic inflammation through distinct mechanisms. Here, we report that treatment with Galectin-8 (Gal-8), a tandem-repeat member of the galectin family, reduces retinal pathology and prevents photoreceptor cell damage in a murine model of experimental autoimmune uveitis. Gal-8 treatment increased the number of regulatory T cells (Treg) in both the draining lymph node (dLN) and the inflamed retina. Moreover, a greater percentage of Treg cells in the dLN and retina of Gal-8 treated animals expressed the inhibitory coreceptor cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen (CTLA)-4, the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10, and the tissue-homing integrin CD103. Treg cells in the retina of Gal-8-treated mice were primarily inducible Treg cells that lack the expression of neuropilin-1. In addition, Gal-8 treatment blunted production of inflammatory cytokines by retinal T helper type (TH) 1 and TH17 cells. The effect of Gal-8 on T cell differentiation and/or function was specific for tissues undergoing an active immune response, as Gal-8 treatment had no effect on T cell populations in the spleen. Given the need for rational therapies for managing human uveitis, Gal-8 emerges as an attractive therapeutic candidate not only for treating retinal autoimmune diseases, but also for other TH1- and TH17-mediated inflammatory disorders. PMID:26126176

  1. Epidermal Fatty Acid Binding Protein (E-FABP) Is Not Required for the Generation or Maintenance of Effector and Memory T Cells following Infection with Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Schmidt, Nathan W

    2016-01-01

    Following activation of naïve T cells there are dynamic changes in the metabolic pathways used by T cells to support both the energetic needs of the cell and the macromolecules required for growth and proliferation. Among other changes, lipid metabolism undergoes dynamic transitions between fatty acid oxidation and fatty acid synthesis as cells progress from naïve to effector and effector to memory T cells. The hydrophobic nature of lipids requires that they be bound to protein chaperones within a cell. Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) represent a large class of lipid chaperones, with epidermal FABP (E-FABP) expressed in T cells. The objective of this study was to determine the contribution of E-FABP in antigen-specific T cell responses. Following infection with Listeria monocytogenes, we observed similar clonal expansion, contraction and formation of memory CD8 T cells in WT and E-FABP-/- mice, which also exhibited similar phenotypic and functional characteristics. Analysis of Listeria-specific CD4 T cells also revealed no defect in the expansion, contraction, and formation of memory CD4 T cells in E-FABP-/- mice. These data demonstrate that E-FABP is dispensable for antigen-specific T cell responses following a bacterial infection. PMID:27588422

  2. Membrane binding mode of intrinsically disordered cytoplasmic domains of T cell receptor signaling subunits depends on lipid composition

    SciTech Connect

    Sigalov, Alexander B.; Hendricks, Gregory M.

    2009-11-13

    Intrinsically disordered cytoplasmic domains of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling subunits including {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} all contain one or more copies of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM), tyrosine residues of which are phosphorylated upon receptor triggering. Membrane binding-induced helical folding of {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} ITAMs is thought to control TCR activation. However, the question whether or not lipid binding of {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} is necessarily accompanied by a folding transition of ITAMs remains open. In this study, we investigate whether the membrane binding mechanisms of {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} depend on the membrane model used. Circular dichroic and fluorescence data indicate that binding of {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} to detergent micelles and unstable vesicles is accompanied by a disorder-to-order transition, whereas upon binding to stable vesicles these proteins remain unfolded. Using electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, we show that upon protein binding, unstable vesicles fuse and rupture. In contrast, stable vesicles remain intact under these conditions. This suggests different membrane binding modes for {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} depending on the bilayer stability: (1) coupled binding and folding, and (2) binding without folding. These findings explain the long-standing puzzle in the literature and highlight the importance of the choice of an appropriate membrane model for protein-lipid interactions studies.

  3. Components of chicken egg white extract smaller than 3 kDa in size promote 293T cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Guang-Ping; Yao, Xiang; Wang, Jin-Xiang; Liu, Ju-Fen; Shu, Fan; Li, Zi-An; Pang, Rong-Qing; Pan, Xing-Hua

    2016-08-01

    We previously found that chicken egg white extract could promote cell survival and proliferation. In the present study, we further separated this extract into its components to identify those primarily responsible for promoting cell proliferation. Components of differing molecular weight were separated from chicken egg white extract by ultrafiltration and 293T cell cultures were supplemented with various concentrations. The effects on cell proliferation were subsequently determined by a CellTiter 96 Aqueous One Solution Cell Proliferation Assay kit (Promega). We demonstrate that components from chicken egg white smaller than 3 kDa in size are able to function as active ingredients promoting cellular proliferation. This discovery may identify a new and convenient additive for cell culture media to promote cell growth and proliferation. PMID:26541834

  4. [Lipopolysaccharide promotes the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells by modulating the survive and cytokine secretion of dendritic cells].

    PubMed

    Chen, Song; Lu, Lisha; Wang, Weiqiang; Xue, Ting; Yu, Juan; Sun, Zhina; Zhao, Chunxiao; Liao, Fang

    2016-09-01

    Objective To explore the mechanism modulating the function of dendritic cells (DCs) and promoting the T cell response by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Methods Splenic DCs were purified with anti-CD11c immunomagnetic beads. After DCs were stimulated with LPS, the expressions of co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 on the DCs were detected by flow cytometry. The protein levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin 4 (IL-4), IL-5, IL-6, IL-12p40, IL-12p70 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in the culture supernatant were measured by ELISA. The apoptotic levels of DCs which were labeled with annexinV-FITC/PI were determined by flow cytometry. The phosphorylation level of nuclear factor κB P65 (NF-κB P65) was assessed by phos-flow. The mRNA levels of variable genes in microarray were determined by real-time PCR. The proliferation of CD4(+) T cells which were co-cultured with OVA323-329-treated DCs was analyzed by flow cytometry. Results The purity of DCs reached over 93% after isolation. LPS up-regulated the expressions of CD80 and CD86 and enhanced DCs-mediated proliferation of CD4(+) T cells. In addition, LPS increased the protein levels of IL-12p40, TNF-α and IL-6, and inhibited the apoptosis of DCs through the NF-κB signaling pathway. Conclusion LPS could enhance DC-mediated proliferation of CD4(+) T cells by modulating the DCs survival and cytokine secretion. PMID:27609566

  5. Nude mice produce a T cell-derived antigen-binding factor that mediates the early component of delayed-type hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Herzog, W R; Meade, R; Pettinicchi, A; Ptak, W; Askenase, P W

    1989-03-15

    The elicitation of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions in mice is caused by the sequential action of two different T cells. An early-acting, DTH-initiating T cell produces an Ag-specific T cell factor, that is analogous to IgE antibody and initiates DTH by sensitizing the local tissues for release of the vasoactive amine serotonin. In picryl chloride or oxazolone contact sensitivity, this T cell factor is Ag-specific, but MHC unrestricted. We, therefore, hypothesized that DTH-initiating T cells are primitive T cells with Ag receptors that can bind Ag without MHC restriction. In order to characterize the origin of this DTH-initiating T cell and the conditions that are necessary for its development, we contact-sensitized various strains of immunodeficient mice. Surprisingly, we found that the early phase of DTH was present in athymic nude mice. In contrast, the early component of DTH was absent in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency. These mice lack T and B cells, but have NK cells. These findings suggested that the early component of DTH was not caused by NK cells, and was caused by cells belonging to a lineage from a rearranging gene family. The early component of DTH in nude mice was Ag specific, was caused by MHC unrestricted Thy-1+ T cells, and was mediated by Ag-binding, Ag-specific T cell factors. We found that DTH-initiating, T cell-derived, Ag-binding molecules from nude mice and normal CBA/J mice had the same functional properties. The early component of DTH was elicited in two different systems (contact sensitivity and SRBC-specific DTH) in two strains of nude mice (BALB/c athymic nudes and CByB6F1/J-nu) from two different suppliers, but not in BALB/c and athymic nudes from a third supplier. From these findings we concluded that DTH-initiating T cells, which produce IgE-like Ag-specific T cell factors, are present in some strains of athymic nude mice and thus are relatively thymic independent T cells. PMID:2466077

  6. An Engineered Switch in T Cell Receptor Specificity Leads to an Unusual but Functional Binding Geometry.

    PubMed

    Harris, Daniel T; Singh, Nishant K; Cai, Qi; Smith, Sheena N; Vander Kooi, Craig W; Procko, Erik; Kranz, David M; Baker, Brian M

    2016-07-01

    Utilizing a diverse binding site, T cell receptors (TCRs) specifically recognize a composite ligand comprised of a foreign peptide and a major histocompatibility complex protein (MHC). To help understand the determinants of TCR specificity, we studied a parental and engineered receptor whose peptide specificity had been switched via molecular evolution. Altered specificity was associated with a significant change in TCR-binding geometry, but this did not impact the ability of the TCR to signal in an antigen-specific manner. The determinants of binding and specificity were distributed among contact and non-contact residues in germline and hypervariable loops, and included disruption of key TCR-MHC interactions that bias αβ TCRs toward particular binding modes. Sequence-fitness landscapes identified additional mutations that further enhanced specificity. Our results demonstrate that TCR specificity arises from the distributed action of numerous sites throughout the interface, with significant implications for engineering therapeutic TCRs with novel and functional recognition properties. PMID:27238970

  7. Preselection Thymocytes Are More Sensitive to T Cell Receptor Stimulation Than Mature T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Gayle M.; Schober, Sonya L.; Endrizzi, Bart T.; Dutcher, Angela K.; Jameson, Stephen C.; Hogquist, Kristin A.

    1998-01-01

    During T cell development, thymocytes which are tolerant to self-peptides but reactive to foreign peptides are selected. The current model for thymocyte selection proposes that self-peptide–major histocompatibility complex (MHC) complexes that bind the T cell receptor with low affinity will promote positive selection while those with high affinity will result in negative selection. Upon thymocyte maturation, such low affinity self-peptide–MHC ligands no longer provoke a response, but foreign peptides can incidentally be high affinity ligands and can therefore stimulate T cells. For this model to work, thymocytes must be more sensitive to ligand than mature T cells. Contrary to this expectation, several groups have shown that thymocytes are less responsive than mature T cells to anti-T cell receptor for antigen (TCR)/CD3 mAb stimulation. Additionally, the lower TCR levels on thymocytes, compared with T cells, would potentially correlate with decreased thymocyte sensitivity. Here we compared preselection thymocytes and mature T cells for early activation events in response to peptide–MHC ligands. Remarkably, the preselection thymocytes were more responsive than mature T cells when stimulated with low affinity peptide variants, while both populations responded equally well to the antigenic peptide. This directly demonstrates the increased sensitivity of thymocytes compared with T cells for TCR engagement by peptide–MHC complexes. PMID:9815264

  8. Restricting Glutamine or Glutamine-Dependent Purine and Pyrimidine Syntheses Promotes Human T Cells with High FOXP3 Expression and Regulatory Properties.

    PubMed

    Metzler, Barbara; Gfeller, Patrick; Guinet, Elisabeth

    2016-05-01

    T cell subsets differ in their metabolic requirements, and further insight into such differences might be harnessed to selectively promote regulatory T cells (Tregs) for therapies in autoimmunity and transplantation. We found that Gln restriction during human T cell activation favored CD4 T cells with high expression of the Treg transcription factor FOXP3. This resulted from shrinking numbers and reduced proliferation of activated FOXP3(lo/-)CD4 T cells while FOXP3(hi)CD4 T cell numbers increased. This gain was abolished by blocking Gln synthetase, an enzyme that responds to Gln and purine/pyrimidine deficiencies. The shift toward FOXP3(hi)CD4 T cells under Gln restriction was recapitulated with inhibitors of Gln-dependent pyrimidine and purine syntheses that together closely mimicked declining cell numbers and cell cycles, and by small interfering RNA knockdown of the respective rate-limiting Gln-consuming enzymes CAD and PPAT. FOXP3(hi)-enriched CD25(hi)CD4 T cells from these cultures inhibited proliferation, but they also produced effector cytokines, including IL-17A. The latter was largely confined to CTLA-4(hi)-expressing FOXP3(hi)-enriched CD25(hi)CD4 T cells that suppressed proliferation more weakly than did CTLA-4(lo/-)CD25(hi)FOXP3(hi)-enriched T cells. A causal link between high IL-17A production and impaired suppression of proliferation could not be demonstrated, however. Collectively, these results reveal a Gln synthetase-dependent increase and resilience of FOXP3(hi) cells under Gln restriction, and they demonstrate that impaired Gln-dependent nucleotide synthesis promotes FOXP3(hi) cells with regulator properties. It remains to be investigated to what extent the concomitant retention of IL-17A-producing CD4 T cells may limit the therapeutic potential of Tregs enriched through targeting these pathways in vivo. PMID:27022197

  9. Leptin directly promotes T-cell glycolytic metabolism to drive effector T-cell differentiation in a mouse model of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Gerriets, Valerie A; Danzaki, Keiko; Kishton, Rigel J; Eisner, William; Nichols, Amanda G; Saucillo, Donte C; Shinohara, Mari L; MacIver, Nancie J

    2016-08-01

    Upon activation, T cells require energy for growth, proliferation, and function. Effector T (Teff) cells, such as Th1 and Th17 cells, utilize high levels of glycolytic metabolism to fuel proliferation and function. In contrast, Treg cells require oxidative metabolism to fuel suppressive function. It remains unknown how Teff/Treg-cell metabolism is altered when nutrients are limited and leptin levels are low. We therefore examined the role of malnutrition and associated hypoleptinemia on Teff versus Treg cells. We found that both malnutrition-associated hypoleptinemia and T cell-specific leptin receptor knockout suppressed Teff-cell number, function, and glucose metabolism, but did not alter Treg-cell metabolism or suppressive function. Using the autoimmune mouse model EAE, we confirmed that fasting-induced hypoleptinemia altered Teff-cell, but not Treg-cell, glucose metabolism, and function in vivo, leading to decreased disease severity. To explore potential mechanisms, we examined HIF-1α, a key regulator of Th17 differentiation and Teff-cell glucose metabolism, and found HIF-1α expression was decreased in T cell-specific leptin receptor knockout Th17 cells, and in Teff cells from fasted EAE mice, but was unchanged in Treg cells. Altogether, these data demonstrate a selective, cell-intrinsic requirement for leptin to upregulate glucose metabolism and maintain function in Teff, but not Treg cells. PMID:27222115

  10. Pleural mesothelial cells promote expansion of IL-17-producing CD8+ T cells in tuberculous pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Zhou, Q; Yang, W B; Xiong, X Z; Du, R H; Zhang, J C

    2013-05-01

    IL-17-producing CD8(+) T lymphocytes (Tc17 cells) have recently been detected in many cancers and autoimmune diseases. However, the possible implication of Tc17 cells in tuberculous pleural effusion remains unclarified. In this study, distribution and phenotypic features of Tc17 cells in both tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE) and peripheral blood from patients with tuberculosis were determined. The effects of proinflammatory cytokines and local accessory cells (pleural mesothelial cells) on Tc17 cell expansion were also explored. We found that TPE contained more Tc17 cells than the blood. Compared with IFN-γ-producing CD8(+) T cells, Tc17 cells displayed higher expression of chemokine receptors (CCRs) and lower expression of cytotoxic molecules. In particularly, Tc17 cells in TPE exhibited high expression levels of CCR6, which could migrate in response to CCL20. Furthermore, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-23, or their various combinations could promote Tc17 cell expansion from CD8(+) T cells, whereas the proliferative response of Tc17 cells to above cytokines was lower than that of Th17 cells. Pleural mesothelial cells (PMCs) were able to stimulate Tc17 cell expansion via cell contact in an IL-1β/IL-6/IL-23 independent fashion. Thus this study demonstrates that Tc17 cells marks a subset of non-cytotoxic, CCR6(+) CD8(+) T lymphocytes with low proliferative capacity. The overrepresentation of Tc17 cells in TPE may be due to Tc17 cell expansion stimulated by pleural proinflammatory cytokines and to recruitment of Tc17 cells from peripheral blood. Additionally, PMCs may promote the production of IL-17 by CD8(+) T cells at sites of TPE via cell-cell interactions. PMID:23299924

  11. A DNA-binding mutant of TAL1 cooperates with LMO2 to cause T cell leukemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Draheim, K M; Hermance, N; Yang, Y; Arous, E; Calvo, J; Kelliher, M A

    2011-03-10

    The most common translocation in childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) involves the LMO2 locus, resulting in ectopic expression of the LMO2 gene in human thymocytes. The LMO2 gene was also activated in patients with X-linked Severe Combined Immune Deficiency treated with gene therapy because of retroviral insertion in the LMO2 locus. The LMO2 insertions predisposed these children to T-ALL, yet how LMO2 contributes to T cell transformation remains unclear. The LIM (Lin 11, Isl-1, Mec-3) domain containing LMO2 protein regulates erythropoiesis as part of a large transcriptional complex consisting of LMO2, TAL1, E47, GATA1 and LDB1 that recognizes bipartite E-box-GATA1 sites on target genes. Similarly, a TAL1/E47/LMO2/LDB1 complex is observed in human T-ALL and Tal1 and Lmo2 expression in mice results in disease acceleration. To address the mechanism(s) of Tal1/Lmo2 synergy in leukemia, we generated Lmo2 transgenic mice and mated them with mice that express wild-type Tal1 or a DNA-binding mutant of TAL1. Tal1/Lmo2 and MutTAL1/Lmo2 bitransgenic mice exhibit perturbations in thymocyte development due to reduced E47/HEB transcriptional activity and develop leukemia with identical kinetics. These data demonstrate that the DNA-binding activity of Tal1 is not required to cooperate with Lmo2 to cause leukemia in mice and suggest that Lmo2 may cooperate with Tal1 to interfere with E47/HEB function(s). PMID:21057528

  12. CD226 ligation protects against EAE by promoting IL-10 expression via regulation of CD4+ T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kun; Zhang, Chunmei; Song, Chaojun; Fang, Liang; Xu, Zhuwei; Yang, Kun; Jin, Boquan; Wang, Qintao; Chen, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Treatment targeting CD226 can ameliorate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the widely accepted model of MS. However, the mechanisms still need to be elucidated. Here we showed that CD226 blockage by anti-CD226 blocking mAb LeoA1 efficiently promoted IL-10 production in human peripheral blood monocytes (PBMC) or in mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) system, significantly induced the CD4+IL-10+ T cell differentiation while suppressing the generation of Th1 and Th17. Furthermore, CD226 pAb administration in vivo reduced the onset of EAE in mice by promoting IL-10 production and regulating T cell differentiation. Concomitantly, the onset and severity of EAE were reduced and the serum IL-10 expression levels were increased in CD226 knockout mice than that in control mice when both received EAE induction. These novel findings confirmed that CD226 played a pivotal role in mediating autoimmune diseases such as EAE. Furthermore, to our knowledge, we show for the first time that IL-10 is an important contributor in the inhibitory effects of CD226 ligation on EAE. PMID:26942885

  13. Disparate Degrees of Hypervariable Loop Flexibility Control T-Cell Receptor Cross-Reactivity, Specificity, and Binding Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Daniel R.; Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Corcelli, Steven A.; Baker, Brian M.

    2012-06-19

    {alpha}{beta} T-cell receptors (TCRs) recognize multiple antigenic peptides bound and presented by major histocompatibility complex molecules. TCR cross-reactivity has been attributed in part to the flexibility of TCR complementarity-determining region (CDR) loops, yet there have been limited direct studies of loop dynamics to determine the extent of its role. Here we studied the flexibility of the binding loops of the {alpha}{beta} TCR A6 using crystallographic, spectroscopic, and computational methods. A significant role for flexibility in binding and cross-reactivity was indicated only for the CDR3{alpha} and CDR3{beta} hypervariable loops. Examination of the energy landscapes of these two loops indicated that CDR3{beta} possesses a broad, smooth energy landscape, leading to rapid sampling in the free TCR of a range of conformations compatible with different ligands. The landscape for CDR3{alpha} is more rugged, resulting in more limited conformational sampling that leads to specificity for a reduced set of peptides as well as the major histocompatibility complex protein. In addition to informing on the mechanisms of cross-reactivity and specificity, the energy landscapes of the two loops indicate a complex mechanism for TCR binding, incorporating elements of both conformational selection and induced fit in a manner that blends features of popular models for TCR recognition.

  14. Plasticity in the contribution of T cell receptor variable region residues to binding of peptide-HLA-A2 complexes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sheena N.; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Blevins, Sydney J.; Bernhard, Helga; Uckert, Wolfgang; Baker, Brian M.; Kranz, David M.

    2013-01-01

    One hypothesis to account for MHC-restriction by T cell receptors (TCRs) holds that there are several evolutionary-conserved residues in TCR variable regions that contact MHC. While this ‘germline-codon’ hypothesis is supported by various lines of evidence, it has been difficult to test. The difficulty stems in part from the fact that TCRs exhibit low affinities for pep/MHC, thus limiting the range of binding energies that can be assigned to these key interactions using mutational analyses. To measure the magnitude of binding energies involved, here we used high-affinity TCRs engineered by mutagenesis of CDR3. The TCRs included a high-affinity, MART-1/HLA-A2-specific single-chain TCR and two other high-affinity TCRs that all contain the same Vα (HLA-A2), with different peptides and Vβ regions. Mutational analysis of residues in CDR1 and CDR2 of the three Vα2 regions showed the importance of the key ‘germline codon” residue Y51. However, two other proposed key residues showed significant differences among the TCRs in their relative contributions to binding. Using single-position, yeast-display libraries in two of the key residues, MART-1/HLA-A2 selections also revealed strong preferences for wild-type ‘germline codon’ residues, but several alternative residues could also accommodate binding and hence, MHC-restriction. Thus, although a single residue (Y51) could account for a proportion of the energy associated with positive selection (i.e. MHC-restriction), there is significant plasticity in requirements for particular side-chains in CDR1 and CDR2 and in their relative binding contributions among different TCRs. PMID:23954306

  15. T Cells Going Innate.

    PubMed

    Seyda, Midas; Elkhal, Abdallah; Quante, Markus; Falk, Christine S; Tullius, Stefan G

    2016-08-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell receptors (NKRs) play a crucial role in the homeostasis of antigen-experienced T cells. Indeed, prolonged antigen stimulation may induce changes in the receptor repertoire of T cells to a profile that features NKRs. Chronic antigen exposure, at the same time, has been shown to trigger the loss of costimulatory CD28 molecules with recently reported intensified antigen thresholds of antigen-experienced CD8(+) T cells. In transplantation, NKRs have been shown to assist allograft rejection in a CD28-independent fashion. We discuss here a role for CD28-negative T cells that have acquired the competency of the NKR machinery, potentially promoting allorecognition either through T cell receptor (TCR) crossreactivity or independently from TCR recognition. Collectively, NKRs can bring about innate-like T cells by providing alternative costimulatory pathways that gain relevance in chronic inflammation, potentially leading to resistance to CD28-targeting immunosuppressants. PMID:27402226

  16. Physical and functional interaction between the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 Tax1 protein and the CCAAT binding protein NF-Y.

    PubMed Central

    Pise-Masison, C A; Dittmer, J; Clemens, K E; Brady, J N

    1997-01-01

    Tax1, a potent activator of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) transcription, has been shown to modulate expression of many cellular genes. Tax1 does not bind DNA directly but regulates transcription through protein-protein interactions with sequence-specific transcription factors. Using the yeast two-hybrid system to screen for proteins which interact with Tax1, we isolated the B subunit of the CCAAT binding protein NF-Y from a HeLa cDNA library. The interaction of Tax1 with NF-YB was specific in that NF-YB did not interact with a variety of other transcription factors, including human immunodeficiency virus Tat, human papillomavirus E6, and Bicoid, or with the M7 (amino acids 29CP-AS) Tax1 mutant. However, NF-YB did interact with the C-terminal Tax1 mutants M22 (130TL-AS) and M47 (319LL-RS). We also show that in vitro-translated NF-YB specifically bound to a glutathione S-transferase-Tax1 fusion protein. Further, Tax1 coimmunoprecipitated with NF-Y from nuclear extracts of HTLV-1-transformed cells, providing evidence for in vivo interaction of Tax1 and NF-YB. We further demonstrate that Tax1 specifically activated the NF-Y-responsive DQbeta promoter, as well as a minimal promoter which contains only the Y-box element. In addition, mutation of the Y-box element alone abrogated Tax1-mediated activation. Taken together, these data indicate that Tax1 interacts with NF-Y through the B subunit and that this interaction results in activation of the major histocompatibility complex class II promoter. Through activation of this and other NF-Y driven promoters, the Tax1-NF-Y interaction may play a critical role in causing cellular transformation and HTLV-1 pathogenesis. PMID:9032250

  17. PSGL-1 Is an Immune Checkpoint Regulator that Promotes T Cell Exhaustion.

    PubMed

    Tinoco, Roberto; Carrette, Florent; Barraza, Monique L; Otero, Dennis C; Magaña, Jonathan; Bosenberg, Marcus W; Swain, Susan L; Bradley, Linda M

    2016-05-17

    Chronic viruses and cancers thwart immune responses in humans by inducing T cell dysfunction. Using a murine chronic virus that models human infections, we investigated the function of the adhesion molecule, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), that is upregulated on responding T cells. PSGL-1-deficient mice cleared the virus due to increased intrinsic survival of multifunctional effector T cells that had downregulated PD-1 as well as other inhibitory receptors. Notably, this response resulted in CD4(+)-T-cell-dependent immunopathology. Mechanistically, PSGL-1 ligation on exhausted CD8(+) T cells inhibited T cell receptor (TCR) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) signaling and upregulated PD-1, leading to diminished survival with TCR stimulation. In models of melanoma cancer in which T cell dysfunction occurs, PSGL-1 deficiency led to PD-1 downregulation, improved T cell responses, and tumor control. Thus, PSGL-1 plays a fundamental role in balancing viral control and immunopathology and also functions to regulate T cell responses in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27192578

  18. Relevance of regulatory T cell promotion of donor-specific tolerance in solid organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sagoo, Pervinder; Lombardi, Giovanna; Lechler, Robert I.

    2012-01-01

    Current clinical strategies to control the alloimmune response after transplantation do not fully prevent induction of the immunological processes which lead to acute and chronic immune-mediated graft rejection, and as such the survival of a solid organ allograft is limited. Experimental research on naturally occurring CD4+CD25highFoxP3+ Regulatory T cells (Tregs) has indicated their potential to establish stable long-term graft acceptance, with the promise of providing a more effective therapy for transplant recipients. Current approaches for clinical use are based on the infusion of freshly isolated or ex vivo polyclonally expanded Tregs into graft recipients with an aim to redress the in vivo balance of T effector cells to Tregs. However mounting evidence suggests that regulation of donor-specific immunity may be central to achieving immunological tolerance. Therefore, the next stages in optimizing translation of Tregs to organ transplantation will be through the refinement and development of donor alloantigen-specific Treg therapy. The altering kinetics and intensity of alloantigen presentation pathways and alloimmune priming following transplantation may indeed influence the specificity of the Treg required and the timing or frequency at which it needs to be administered. Here we review and discuss the relevance of antigen-specific regulation of alloreactivity by Tregs in experimental and clinical studies of tolerance and explore the concept of delivering an optimal Treg for the induction and maintenance phases of achieving transplantation tolerance. PMID:22811678

  19. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-17 Synergistically Promote Viral Persistence by Inhibiting Cellular Apoptosis and Cytotoxic T Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Wanqiu; Jin, Young-Hee; Kang, Hyun Seok

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interleukin-6 (IL-6) plays an important role in the development and progression of inflammatory responses, autoimmune diseases, and cancers. Many viral infections, including Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV), result in the vigorous production of IL-6. However, the role of IL-6 in the development of virus-induced inflammatory responses is unclear. The infection of susceptible mice with TMEV induces the development of chronic demyelinating disease, which is considered a relevant infectious model for multiple sclerosis. In this study, we demonstrate that resistant C57BL/6 mice carrying an IL-6 transgene (IL-6 Tg) develop a TMEV-induced demyelinating disease accompanied by an increase in viral persistence and an elevated Th17 cell response in the central nervous system. Either IL-6 or IL-17 induced the expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL at a high concentration. The upregulated expression of prosurvival molecules in turn inhibited target cell destruction by virus-specific CD8+ T cells. More interestingly, IL-6 and IL-17 synergistically promoted the expression of these prosurvival molecules, preventing cellular apoptosis at a much lower (<5-fold) concentration. The signals involved in the synergy appear to include the activation of both STAT3 and NF-κB via distinct cytokine-dependent pathways. Thus, the excessive IL-6 promotes the generation of Th17 cells, and the resulting IL-6 and IL-17 synergistically promote viral persistence by protecting virus-infected cells from apoptosis and CD8+ T cell-mediated target destruction. These results suggest that blocking both IL-6 and IL-17 functions are important considerations for therapies of chronic viral diseases, autoimmune diseases, and cancers. IMPORTANCE This study indicates that an excessive level of IL-6 cytokine produced following viral infection promotes the development of IL-17-producing pathogenic helper T cells. We demonstrate here for the first time that IL-6 together with IL-17 synergistically

  20. T-Cell Memory Responses Elicited by Yellow Fever Vaccine are Targeted to Overlapping Epitopes Containing Multiple HLA-I and -II Binding Motifs

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Andréa Barbosa; Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Braga-Neto, Ulisses; Dhalia, Rafael; Silva, Ana Maria; Oelke, Mathias; Schneck, Jonathan P.; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Montenegro, Silvia M. L.; Marques, Ernesto T. A.

    2013-01-01

    The yellow fever vaccines (YF-17D-204 and 17DD) are considered to be among the safest vaccines and the presence of neutralizing antibodies is correlated with protection, although other immune effector mechanisms are known to be involved. T-cell responses are known to play an important role modulating antibody production and the killing of infected cells. However, little is known about the repertoire of T-cell responses elicited by the YF-17DD vaccine in humans. In this report, a library of 653 partially overlapping 15-mer peptides covering the envelope (Env) and nonstructural (NS) proteins 1 to 5 of the vaccine was utilized to perform a comprehensive analysis of the virus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses. The T-cell responses were screened ex-vivo by IFN-γ ELISPOT assays using blood samples from 220 YF-17DD vaccinees collected two months to four years after immunization. Each peptide was tested in 75 to 208 separate individuals of the cohort. The screening identified sixteen immunodominant antigens that elicited activation of circulating memory T-cells in 10% to 33% of the individuals. Biochemical in-vitro binding assays and immunogenetic and immunogenicity studies indicated that each of the sixteen immunogenic 15-mer peptides contained two or more partially overlapping epitopes that could bind with high affinity to molecules of different HLAs. The prevalence of the immunogenicity of a peptide in the cohort was correlated with the diversity of HLA-II alleles that they could bind. These findings suggest that overlapping of HLA binding motifs within a peptide enhances its T-cell immunogenicity and the prevalence of the response in the population. In summary, the results suggests that in addition to factors of the innate immunity, “promiscuous” T-cell antigens might contribute to the high efficacy of the yellow fever vaccines. PMID:23383350

  1. Tax abolishes histone H1 repression of p300 acetyltransferase activity at the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 promoter.

    PubMed

    Konesky, Kasey L; Nyborg, Jennifer K; Laybourn, Paul J

    2006-11-01

    Upon infection of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), the provirus is integrated into the host cell genome and subsequently packaged into chromatin that contains histone H1. Consequently, transcriptional activation of the virus requires overcoming the environment of chromatin and H1. To efficiently activate transcription, HTLV-1 requires the virally encoded protein Tax and cellular transcription factor CREB. Together Tax and CREB interact with three cis-acting promoter elements called viral cyclic-AMP response elements (vCREs). Binding of Tax and CREB to the vCREs promotes association of p300/CBP into the complex and leads to transcriptional activation. Therefore, to fully understand the mechanism of Tax transactivation, it is necessary to examine transcriptional activation from chromatin assembled with H1. Using a DNA template harboring the complete HTLV-1 promoter sequence and a highly defined recombinant assembly system, we demonstrate proper incorporation of histone H1 into chromatin. Addition of H1 to the chromatin template reduces HTLV-1 transcriptional activation through a novel mechanism. Specifically, H1 does not inhibit CREB or Tax binding to the vCREs or p300 recruitment to the promoter. Rather, H1 directly targets p300 acetyltransferase activity. Interestingly, in determining the mechanism of H1 repression, we have discovered a previously undefined function of Tax, overcoming the repressive effects of H1-chromatin. Tax specifically abrogates the H1 repression of p300 enzymatic activity in a manner independent of p300 recruitment and without displacement of H1 from the promoter. PMID:16943293

  2. MicroRNA223 promotes pathogenic T-cell development and autoimmune inflammation in central nervous system in mice.

    PubMed

    Satoorian, Tiffany; Li, Bo; Tang, Xiaolei; Xiao, Jidong; Xing, Weirong; Shi, Weixing; Lau, Kin-Hing William; Baylink, David J; Qin, Xuezhong

    2016-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an incurable central nervous system autoimmune disease. Understanding MS pathogenesis is essential for the development of new MS therapies. In the present study, we identified a novel microRNA (miR) that regulates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. Expression of miR223 was up-regulated specifically in spinal cords and lymphoid organs but not in other examined tissues. A global miR223 knockout (miR223(-/-) ) in mice led to a significant delay in EAE onset, reduction in spinal cord lesion, and lessening of neurological symptoms. These protective effects could be reproduced in bone marrow chimeras reconstituted with miR223(-/-) haematopoietic stem cells. We also found that miR223 deficiency reduced T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th17 infiltration into spinal cords. To address underlying mechanisms, we investigated the role of miR223 in regulating the function, development and interaction of the major immune cells. Expression of the genes associated with dendritic cell (DC) activation (CD86 and MHC II) and Th1 and Th17 differentiation [interleukin-12 (IL-12) and IL-23, respectively] was significantly decreased in the spleens of miR223(-/-) mice bearing EAE. The miR223(-/-) DCs expressed significantly lower levels of basal and lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-12 and IL-23 compared with the wild-type DCs. These data are consistent with the observed lower efficiency of miR223(-/-) DCs to support Th1 and Th17 differentiation from naive T cells over-expressing an EAE antigen-specific T-cell receptor. Our data suggest that miR223 promotes EAE, probably through enhancing DC activation and subsequently the differentiation of naive T cells toward Th1 and Th17 effector cells. PMID:27083389

  3. Enhancing the Tumor Selectivity of a Picornavirus Virotherapy Promotes Tumor Regression and the Accumulation of Infiltrating CD8+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Bell, Michael P; Pavelko, Kevin D

    2016-03-01

    Picornaviruses have emerged as promising cancer therapies due to their ability to drive cytotoxic cellular immune responses and for promoting oncolysis. These properties include preferential replication in tumor cells, the induction of strong innate and adaptive immune responses, and the ease with which their genomes can be manipulated. We have developed Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) as an immunotherapy vector that promotes strong adaptive immune responses to tumor antigens embedded within its genome. To further explore its usefulness as cancer therapy, we investigated whether direct intratumoral delivery of TMEV could promote tumor regression. We generated several picornavirus hybrids using substrains of TMEV that have unique immunopathologic characteristics, despite their extensive sequence homology. These hybrids exhibit a unique propensity to infect and replicate in melanoma. We have identified GD7-KS1, a virus that is particularly effective at replicating and infecting B16 melanoma in vitro and provides benefit as an oncolytic therapy in vivo after intratumoral injection. In addition, this virus promotes the mobilization and accumulation of CD8(+) T cells within treated tumors. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that picornavirus substrains can be used to rationally design virus hybrids that promote antitumor responses and add to the known strategies identified by us and others to further enhance the therapeutic potential of vectors used to treat cancer. PMID:26823492

  4. Chitin Recognition via Chitotriosidase Promotes Pathologic Type-2 Helper T Cell Responses to Cryptococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Darin L.; Specht, Charles A.; Lee, Chrono K.; Smith, Kyle D.; Mukaremera, Liliane; Lee, S. Thera; Lee, Chun G.; Elias, Jack A.; Nielsen, Judith N.; Boulware, David R.; Bohjanen, Paul R.; Jenkins, Marc K.; Levitz, Stuart M.; Nielsen, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary mycoses are often associated with type-2 helper T (Th2) cell responses. However, mechanisms of Th2 cell accumulation are multifactorial and incompletely known. To investigate Th2 cell responses to pulmonary fungal infection, we developed a peptide-MHCII tetramer to track antigen-specific CD4+ T cells produced in response to infection with the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. We noted massive accruement of pathologic cryptococcal antigen-specific Th2 cells in the lungs following infection that was coordinated by lung-resident CD11b+ IRF4-dependent conventional dendritic cells. Other researchers have demonstrated that this dendritic cell subset is also capable of priming protective Th17 cell responses to another pulmonary fungal infection, Aspergillus fumigatus. Thus, higher order detection of specific features of fungal infection by these dendritic cells must direct Th2 cell lineage commitment. Since chitin-containing parasites commonly elicit Th2 responses, we hypothesized that recognition of fungal chitin is an important determinant of Th2 cell-mediated mycosis. Using C. neoformans mutants or purified chitin, we found that chitin abundance impacted Th2 cell accumulation and disease. Importantly, we determined Th2 cell induction depended on cleavage of chitin via the mammalian chitinase, chitotriosidase, an enzyme that was also prevalent in humans experiencing overt cryptococcosis. The data presented herein offers a new perspective on fungal disease susceptibility, whereby chitin recognition via chitotriosidase leads to the initiation of harmful Th2 cell differentiation by CD11b+ conventional dendritic cells in response to pulmonary fungal infection. PMID:25764512

  5. Decidual vascular endothelial cells promote maternal-fetal immune tolerance by inducing regulatory T cells through canonical Notch1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yanyi; Song, Jieping; Wang, Weipeng; Liu, Nian

    2016-05-01

    Adaptation of the maternal immune response to accommodate the semiallogeneic fetus is necessary for pregnancy success. However, the mechanisms by which the fetus avoids rejection despite expression of paternal alloantigens remain incompletely understood. Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are pivotal for maintaining immune homeostasis, preventing autoimmune disease and fetus rejection. In this study, we found that maternal decidual vascular endothelial cells (DVECs) sustained Foxp3 expression in resting Treg cells in vitro. Moreover, under in vitro Treg cell induction condition with agonistic antibodies and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, DVECs promoted Treg cell differentiation from non-Treg conventional T cells. Consistent with the promotion of Treg cell maintenance and differentiation, Treg cell-associated gene expression such as TGF-β, Epstein-Barr-induced gene-3, CD39 and glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor was also increased in the presence of DVECs. Further study revealed that DVECs expressed Notch ligands such as Jagged-1, Delta-like protein 1 (DLL-1) and DLL-4, while Treg cells expressed Notch1 on their surface. The effects of DVECs on Treg cells was inhibited by siRNA-induced knockdown of expression of Jagged-1 and DLL-1 in DVECs. Downregulation of Notch1 in Treg cells using lentiviral shRNA transduction decreased Foxp3 expression in Treg cells. Adoptive transfer of Notch1-deficient Treg cells increased abortion rate in a murine semiallogeneic pregnancy model. Taken together, our study suggests that maternal DVECs are able to maintain decidual Treg cell identity and promote Treg cell differentiation through activation of Notch1 signal pathway in Treg cells and subsequently inhibit the immune response against semiallogeneic fetuses and preventing spontaneous abortion. PMID:26714886

  6. MAR binding protein SMAR1 favors IL-10 mediated regulatory T cell function in acute colitis.

    PubMed

    Mirlekar, Bhalchandra; Patil, Sachin; Bopanna, Ramanamurthy; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2015-08-21

    Treg cells are not only crucial for controlling immune responses to autoantigens but also prevent those directed towards commensal pathogens. Control of effector immune responses by Treg cells depend on their capacity to accumulate at inflammatory site and accordingly accommodate to inflammatory environment. Till date, the factors associated with maintaining these aspects of Treg phenotype is not understood properly. Here we have shown that a known nuclear matrix binding protein SMAR1 is selectively expressed more in colonic Treg cells and is required for their ability to accumulate at inflammatory site and to sustain high levels of Foxp3 and IL-10 expression during acute colitis. Elimination of anti-inflammatory subsets revealed a protective role for IL-10 producing Treg cells in SMAR1(-/-) mice. Moreover, a combined action of Foxp3 and SMAR1 restricts effector cytokine production and enhance the production of IL-10 by colonic Treg cells that controls acute colitis. This data highlights a critical role of SMAR1 in maintaining Treg physiology during inflammatory disorders. PMID:26168735

  7. MAR binding protein SMAR1 favors IL-10 mediated regulatory T cell function in acute colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Mirlekar, Bhalchandra; Patil, Sachin; Bopanna, Ramanamurthy; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2015-08-21

    T{sub reg} cells are not only crucial for controlling immune responses to autoantigens but also prevent those directed towards commensal pathogens. Control of effector immune responses by T{sub reg} cells depend on their capacity to accumulate at inflammatory site and accordingly accommodate to inflammatory environment. Till date, the factors associated with maintaining these aspects of T{sub reg} phenotype is not understood properly. Here we have shown that a known nuclear matrix binding protein SMAR1 is selectively expressed more in colonic T{sub reg} cells and is required for their ability to accumulate at inflammatory site and to sustain high levels of Foxp3 and IL-10 expression during acute colitis. Elimination of anti-inflammatory subsets revealed a protective role for IL-10 producing T{sub reg} cells in SMAR1{sup −/−} mice. Moreover, a combined action of Foxp3 and SMAR1 restricts effector cytokine production and enhance the production of IL-10 by colonic T{sub reg} cells that controls acute colitis. This data highlights a critical role of SMAR1 in maintaining T{sub reg} physiology during inflammatory disorders. - Highlights: • SMAR1 is essential to sustain high level of Foxp3 and IL-10 in T{sub reg} cells. • SMAR1{sup −/−} T{sub reg} cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17 leads to inflammation. • IL-10 administration can control the inflammation in SMAR1{sup −/−} mice. • Both Foxp3 and SMAR1 maintain T{sub reg} phenotype that controls colitis.

  8. The intracellular B30.2 domain of Butyrophilin 3A1 binds phosphoantigens to mediate activation of human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Sandstrom, Andrew; Peigné, Cassie-Marie; Léger, Alexandra; Crooks, James E.; Konczak, Fabienne; Gesnel, Marie-Claude; Breathnach, Richard; Bonneville, Marc; Scotet, Emmanuel; Adams, Erin J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In humans, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells detect tumor cells and microbial infections including Mycobacterium tuberculosis through recognition of small pyrophosphate containing organic molecules known as phosphoantigens (pAgs). Key to pAg-mediated activation of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells is the butyrophilin 3A1 (BTN3A1) protein that contains an intracellular B30.2 domain critical to pAg reactivity. Here, we have demonstrated through structural, biophysical and functional approaches that the intracellular B30.2 domain of BTN3A1 directly binds pAg through a positively-charged surface pocket. Charge-reversal of pocket residues abrogates binding and Vγ9Vδ2 T cell activation. We have also identified a gain-of-function mutation within this pocket that when introduced into B30.2 domain of the non-stimulatory BTN3A3 isoform, transfers pAg binding ability and Vγ9Vδ2 T cell activation. These studies demonstrate that internal sensing of changes in pAg metabolite concentrations by BTN3A1 molecules is a critical step in Vγ9Vδ2 T cell detection of infection and tumorigenesis. PMID:24703779

  9. The intracellular B30.2 domain of butyrophilin 3A1 binds phosphoantigens to mediate activation of human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells.

    PubMed

    Sandstrom, Andrew; Peigné, Cassie-Marie; Léger, Alexandra; Crooks, James E; Konczak, Fabienne; Gesnel, Marie-Claude; Breathnach, Richard; Bonneville, Marc; Scotet, Emmanuel; Adams, Erin J

    2014-04-17

    In humans, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells detect tumor cells and microbial infections, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, through recognition of small pyrophosphate containing organic molecules known as phosphoantigens (pAgs). Key to pAg-mediated activation of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells is the butyrophilin 3A1 (BTN3A1) protein that contains an intracellular B30.2 domain critical to pAg reactivity. Here, we have demonstrated through structural, biophysical, and functional approaches that the intracellular B30.2 domain of BTN3A1 directly binds pAg through a positively charged surface pocket. Charge reversal of pocket residues abrogates binding and Vγ9Vδ2 T cell activation. We have also identified a gain-of-function mutation within this pocket that, when introduced into the B30.2 domain of the nonstimulatory BTN3A3 isoform, transfers pAg binding ability and Vγ9Vδ2 T cell activation. These studies demonstrate that internal sensing of changes in pAg metabolite concentrations by BTN3A1 molecules is a critical step in Vγ9Vδ2 T cell detection of infection and tumorigenesis. PMID:24703779

  10. Snail and Slug Promote Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition through β-Catenin–T-Cell Factor-4-dependent Expression of Transforming Growth Factor-β3

    PubMed Central

    Medici, Damian; Hay, Elizabeth D.

    2008-01-01

    Members of the Snail family of transcription factors have been shown to induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a fundamental mechanism of embryogenesis and progressive disease. Here, we show that Snail and Slug promote formation of β-catenin–T-cell factor (TCF)-4 transcription complexes that bind to the promoter of the TGF-β3 gene to increase its transcription. Subsequent transforming growth factor (TGF)-β3 signaling increases LEF-1 gene expression causing formation of β-catenin–lymphoid enhancer factor (LEF)-1 complexes that initiate EMT. TGF-β1 or TGF-β2 stimulates this signaling mechanism by up-regulating synthesis of Snail and Slug. TGF-β1- and TGF-β2-induced EMT were found to be TGF-β3 dependent, establishing essential roles for multiple TGF-β isoforms. Finally, we determined that β-catenin–LEF-1 complexes can promote EMT without upstream signaling pathways. These findings provide evidence for a unified signaling mechanism driven by convergence of multiple TGF-β and TCF signaling molecules that confers loss of cell–cell adhesion and acquisition of the mesenchymal phenotype. PMID:18799618

  11. Analyzing the effect of peptide-HLA-binding ability on the immunogenicity of potential CD8+ and CD4+ T cell epitopes in a large dataset.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shufeng; Li, Jintao; Chen, Xiaoling; Wang, Li; Liu, Wei; Wu, Yuzhang

    2016-08-01

    Immunogenicity is a key factor that influences whether a peptide presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) can be a T cell epitope. However, peptide immunization experiments have shown that approximately half of MHC class I-binding peptides cannot elicit a T cell response, indicating the importance of analyzing the variables affecting the immunogenicity of MHC-binding peptides. In this study, we hierarchically investigated the contribution of the binding stability and affinity of peptide-MHC complexes to immunogenicity based on the available quantitative data. We found that the immunogenicity of peptides presented by human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules was still predictable using the experimental binding affinity, although approximately one-third of the peptides with a binding affinity stronger than 500 nM were non-immunogenic, whereas the immunogenicity of HLA-II-presented peptides was predicted well using the experimental affinity and even the predicted affinity. The positive correlation between the binding affinity and stability was only observed in peptide-HLA-I complexes with a binding affinity stronger than 500 nM, which suggested that the stability alone could not be used for the prediction of immunogenicity. A characterization and comparison of the 'holes' in the CD8+ and CD4+ T cell repertoire provided an explanation for the observed differences between the immunogenicity of peptides presented by HLA class I and II molecules. We also provided the optimal affinity threshold for the potential CD4+ and CD8+ T cell epitopes. Our results provide important insights into the cellular immune response and the accurate prediction of T cell epitopes. PMID:27094547

  12. Lectin interactions with the Jurkat leukemic T-cell line: quantitative binding studies and interleukin-2 production

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuis, G.; Bastin, B.

    1988-03-01

    Phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), pea lectin, and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) have been used to investigate their binding properties to Jurkat 77 6.8 leukemic human T cells and their ability to induce these cells to produce interleukin-2 (IL-2). Binding studies showed that the Jurkat cells fixed 0.82 +/- 0.11 microgram pea lectin, 2.02 +/- 0.17 micrograms Con A, 1.85 +/- 0.07 micrograms PHA and 8.88 +/- 0.61 micrograms WGA. Scatchard plots were linear, indicating that the binding process was homogeneous with respect to the binding constant. PHA and Con A bound with the highest affinity (Kass (apparent) approximately equal to 9 x 10(9) M-1), followed by pea lectin and WGA (Kass (apparent) approximately equal to 3 x 10(9) M-1). The number of lectin binding sites was in agreement with the results of saturation experiments. We also evaluated the effect of the presence of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) on the binding process. Results show that there were no gross alterations in the value of (apparent) Kass in the case of PHA and WGA. In contrast, the presence of TPA decreased the affinity of Con A and modified the Scatchard profile for pea lectin, which was curvilinear with a concavity turned upward. In this case, data were (apparent) K1 = 17.7 x 10(9) M-1 (high-affinity sites) and (apparent) K2 = 2.6 x 10(9) M-1 (low-affinity sites). The four lectins shared the ability to stimulate Jurkat 77 6.8 cells to secrete IL-2. Optimal lectin concentrations were 20 micrograms/ml (PHA) and 50 micrograms/ml (WGA and Con A). Pea lectin failed to display a dose-response relationship, and IL-2 production increased proportionally with lectin concentration. Con A was the most efficient stimulator (250 U/ml), followed by WGA (160 U/ml) and PHA (108 U/ml).

  13. T cell intrinsic USP15 deficiency promotes excessive IFN-γ production and an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment in MCA-induced fibrosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Qiang; Jin, Jin; Xiao, Yichuan; Zhou, Xiaofei; Hu, Hongbo; Cheng, Xuhong; Kazimi, Nasser; Ullrich, Stephen E; Sun, Shao-Cong

    2015-01-01

    USP15 is a deubiquitinase that negatively regulates activation of naïve CD4+ T cells and generation of IFN-γ-producing T helper 1 (Th1) cells. USP15 deficiency in mice promotes antitumor T cell responses in a transplantable cancer model; however, it has remained unclear how deregulated T cell activation impacts primary tumor development during the prolonged interplay between tumors and the immune system. Here, we find that the USP15-deficient mice are hypersensitive to methylcholantrene (MCA)-induced fibrosarcomas. Excessive IFN-γ production in USP15-deficient mice promotes expression of the immunosuppressive molecule PD-L1 and the chemokine CXCL12, causing accumulation of T-bet+ regulatory T cells and CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells at tumor site. Mixed bone marrow adoptive transfer studies further reveals a T cell-intrinsic role for USP15 in regulating IFN-γ production and tumor development. These findings suggest that T cell intrinsic USP15 deficiency causes excessive production of IFN-γ, which promotes an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, during MCA-induced primary tumorigenesis. PMID:26686633

  14. Regulatory CD4+CD25+ T Cells Dampen Inflammatory Disease in Murine Mycoplasma Pneumonia and Promote IL-17 and IFN-γ Responses

    PubMed Central

    Odeh, Adam N.; Simecka, Jerry W.

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasmas cause respiratory diseases characterized by persistent infection and chronic airway inflammation. Mycoplasma lung disease is immunopathologic, with CD4+ Th cells determining both disease severity and resistance to infection. Th2 cell responses promote immunopathology, while Th1 cells confer resistance to infection. However, regulatory CD4+ T cells may also have a role in the pathogenesis of mycoplasma respiratory diseases. We hypothesized Treg cells control the severity of the inflammatory lesions and may also promote persistence of infection. To examine this, BALB/c mice were depleted of CD25+ cells, and had increased disease severity due to Mycoplasma pulmonis infection. Increases in mycoplasma antibody responses and lymphocyte infiltration into lungs also occurred after CD25+ cell depletion. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells promoted IFN-γ and IL-17 mycoplasma-specific CD4+ T cell responses in vitro and in vivo, while dampening IL-13+ Th responses. Neither IL-10 nor TGF-ß expression was detected in CD4+CD25+ T cells from lymph nodes. Thus, a regulatory T cell population plays an important role in controlling damaging immune responses in mycoplasma respiratory disease but does not contribute to persistence of infection. It appears that a regulatory T cell population preferentially dampens Th2 cell-mediated inflammatory responses to mycoplasma through a mechanism independent of IL-10 or TGF-ß characteristic of “classic” Treg cells. PMID:27175511

  15. [miR-126 knockdown enhances the activity of murine CD4(+);T cells in vivo and promotes their differentiation into Th1 cells].

    PubMed

    Cui, Panpan; Hu, Yan; Tao, Yijing; Chen, Chao; Zhao, Juanjuan; Guo, Mengmeng; Zhou, Ya; Xu, Lin

    2016-03-01

    Objective To investigate the change of CD4(+);T cell activity in microRNA-126 (miR-126) knockdown (KD) mice and explore its significance. Methods The expression level of mature miR-126 in CD4(+);CD62L(+);T cells purified by magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) was analyzed by real-time PCR using specific probe. Furthermore, the expression levels of CD69, CD62L and CD44 molecules, as well as intracellular proliferating nuclear antigen Ki-67, in CD4(+);T cells in miR-126 KD mice were detected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Moreover, the apoptosis of CD4(+);T cells was analyzed by annexin V/PI staining assay combined with flow cytometry. Finally, the relative expressions of function-related cytokines including interleukine 4 (IL-4), IL-10, IL-12, transforming growth factor (TGF-β), interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) in CD4(+);T cells were determined by real-time PCR. Results Compared with wild-type (WT) mice, the expression level of mature miR-126 in CD4(+);T cells in miR-126 KD mice was dramatically reduced. Furthermore, the proportion of CD62L(+); in CD4(+);T cells also decreased significantly, while the proportions of CD69(+);, CD44(+); and Ki-67(+); cells were remarkably elevated. Meanwhile, the apoptosis proportion of CD4(+);T cells in vivo dropped dramatically in miR-126 KD mice. Finally, the mRNA expressions of IL-4 and IL-10 in CD4(+);T cells were significantly downregulated, but IL-12, TGF-β, TNF-α and IFN-γ mRNAs were obviously up-regulated. Conclusion miR-126 knockdown could significantly enhance the functional activity of CD4(+); T cells in vivo and promote cell differentiation into Th1 cells. PMID:26927555

  16. Polyelectrolyte Multilayers Assembled Entirely from Immune Signals on Gold Nanoparticle Templates Promote Antigen-Specific T Cell Response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peipei; Chiu, Yu-Chieh; Tostanoski, Lisa H; Jewell, Christopher M

    2015-06-23

    Materials that allow modular, defined assembly of immune signals could support a new generation of rationally designed vaccines that promote tunable immune responses. Toward this goal, we have developed the first polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) coatings built entirely from immune signals. These immune-PEMs (iPEMs) are self-assembled on gold nanoparticle templates through stepwise electrostatic interactions between peptide antigen and polyanionic toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists that serve as molecular adjuvants. iPEMs do not require solvents or mixing, offer direct control over the composition and loading of vaccine components, and can be coated on substrates at any scale. These films also do not require other structural components, eliminating the potentially confounding effects caused by the inherent immune-stimulatory characteristics of many synthetic polymers. iPEM loading on gold nanoparticle substrates is tunable, and cryoTEM reveals iPEM shells coated on gold cores. These nanoparticles are efficiently internalized by primary dendritic cells (DCs), resulting in activation, selective triggering of TLR signaling, and presentation of the antigens used to assemble iPEMs. In coculture, iPEMs drive antigen-specific T cell proliferation and effector cytokines but not cytokines associated with more generalized inflammation. Compared to mice treated with soluble antigen and adjuvant, iPEM immunization promotes high levels of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells in peripheral blood after 1 week. These enhancements result from increased DC activation and antigen presentation in draining lymph nodes. iPEM-immunized mice also exhibit a potent recall response after boosting, supporting the potential of iPEMs for designing well-defined vaccine coatings that provide high cargo density and eliminate synthetic film components. PMID:26035231

  17. Transactivation of human osteopontin promoter by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-encoded Tax protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Yamada, Osamu; Matsushita, Yoshihisa; Chagan-Yasutan, Haorile; Hattori, Toshio

    2010-06-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a cytokine that contributes substantially to the growth and metastasis in a wide spectrum of malignancies. We report here that OPN gene is transactivated by Tax protein of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). Northern blot showed enhanced OPN gene expression in cells stably expressing Tax. Co-expression of Tax increased the reporter gene expression directed by OPN promoter. Tax-induced OPN activation was abrogated by treatment with LY294002 (PI3K inhibitor) or co-transfection with AKT siRNA, suggesting PI3K/AKT pathway is involved in Tax-mediated transactivation. Reporter assay with deletion mutants showed that the 5'-partial sequence between -765 and -660 of the OPN promoter is the region responsive to Tax, and further, disrupting the AP-1 site within this region abolished the OPN induction by Tax, indicating that Tax activation of OPN promoter is likely mediated by AP-1 site. This study suggests that OPN is one of the downstream mediators of aberrantly activated PI3K/AKT signaling by Tax, which may partially contribute to HTLV-1-associated leukemogenesis. PMID:19767100

  18. The Length Distribution of Class I-Restricted T Cell Epitopes Is Determined by Both Peptide Supply and MHC Allele-Specific Binding Preference.

    PubMed

    Trolle, Thomas; McMurtrey, Curtis P; Sidney, John; Bardet, Wilfried; Osborn, Sean C; Kaever, Thomas; Sette, Alessandro; Hildebrand, William H; Nielsen, Morten; Peters, Bjoern

    2016-02-15

    HLA class I-binding predictions are widely used to identify candidate peptide targets of human CD8(+) T cell responses. Many such approaches focus exclusively on a limited range of peptide lengths, typically 9 aa and sometimes 9-10 aa, despite multiple examples of dominant epitopes of other lengths. In this study, we examined whether epitope predictions can be improved by incorporating the natural length distribution of HLA class I ligands. We found that, although different HLA alleles have diverse length-binding preferences, the length profiles of ligands that are naturally presented by these alleles are much more homogeneous. We hypothesized that this is due to a defined length profile of peptides available for HLA binding in the endoplasmic reticulum. Based on this, we created a model of HLA allele-specific ligand length profiles and demonstrate how this model, in combination with HLA-binding predictions, greatly improves comprehensive identification of CD8(+) T cell epitopes. PMID:26783342

  19. A Cleavable N-Terminal Signal Peptide Promotes Widespread Olfactory Receptor Surface Expression in HEK293T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Blythe D.; Natarajan, Niranjana; Protzko, Ryan J.; Acres, Omar W.; Pluznick, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) are G protein-coupled receptors that detect odorants in the olfactory epithelium, and comprise the largest gene family in the genome. Identification of OR ligands typically requires OR surface expression in heterologous cells; however, ORs rarely traffic to the cell surface when exogenously expressed. Therefore, most ORs are orphan receptors with no known ligands. To date, studies have utilized non-cleavable rhodopsin (Rho) tags and/or chaperones (i.e. Receptor Transporting Protein, RTP1S, Ric8b and Gαolf) to improve surface expression. However, even with these tools, many ORs still fail to reach the cell surface. We used a test set of fifteen ORs to examine the effect of a cleavable leucine-rich signal peptide sequence (Lucy tag) on OR surface expression in HEK293T cells. We report here that the addition of the Lucy tag to the N-terminus increases the number of ORs reaching the cell surface to 7 of the 15 ORs (as compared to 3/15 without Rho or Lucy tags). Moreover, when ORs tagged with both Lucy and Rho were co-expressed with previously reported chaperones (RTP1S, Ric8b and Gαolf), we observed surface expression for all 15 receptors examined. In fact, two-thirds of Lucy-tagged ORs are able to reach the cell surface synergistically with chaperones even when the Rho tag is removed (10/15 ORs), allowing for the potential assessment of OR function with only an 8-amino acid Flag tag on the mature protein. As expected for a signal peptide, the Lucy tag was cleaved from the mature protein and did not alter OR-ligand binding and signaling. Our studies demonstrate that widespread surface expression of ORs can be achieved in HEK293T cells, providing promise for future large-scale deorphanization studies. PMID:23840901

  20. Thymic B cells promote thymus-derived regulatory T cell development and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fang-Ting; Yang, Wei; Wang, Yin-Hu; Ma, Hong-Di; Tang, Wei; Yang, Jing-Bo; Li, Liang; Ansari, Aftab A; Lian, Zhe-Xiong

    2015-07-01

    Thymic CD4(+) FoxP3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells are critical for the development of immunological tolerance and immune homeostasis and requires contributions of both thymic dendritic and epithelial cells. Although B cells have been reported to be present within the thymus, there has not hitherto been a definition of their role in immune cell development and, in particular, whether or how they contribute to the Treg cellular thymic compartment. Herein, using both phenotypic and functional approaches, we demonstrate that thymic B cells contribute to the maintenance of thymic Treg cells and, using an in vitro culture system, demonstrate that thymic B cells contribute to the size of the thymic Treg compartment via cell-cell MHC II contact and the involvement of two independent co-stimulatory pathways that include interactions between the CD40/CD80/CD86 co-stimulatory molecules. Our data also suggest that thymic B cells promote the generation of thymic Treg cell precursors (pre-Treg cells), but not the conversion of FoxP3(+) Treg cells from pre-Treg cells. In addition, thymic B cells directly promote the proliferation of thymic Treg cells that is MHC II contact dependent with a minimal if any role for co-stimulatory molecules including CD40/CD80/CD86. Both pathways are independent of TGFβ. In conclusion, we rigorously define the critical role of thymic B cells in the development of thymic Treg cells from non-Treg to precursor stage and in the proliferation of mature thymic Treg cells. PMID:26071985

  1. HTLV-1 bZIP factor protein targets the Rb/E2F-1 pathway to promote proliferation and apoptosis of primary CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Kawatsuki, A; Yasunaga, J-I; Mitobe, Y; Green, P L; Matsuoka, M

    2016-08-25

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an oncogenic retrovirus that induces a fatal T-cell malignancy, adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). Among several regulatory/accessory genes in HTLV-1, HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ) is the only viral gene constitutively expressed in infected cells. Our previous study showed that HBZ functions in two different molecular forms, HBZ protein and HBZ RNA. In this study, we show that HBZ protein targets retinoblastoma protein (Rb), which is a critical tumor suppressor in many types of cancers. HBZ protein interacts with the Rb/E2F-1 complex and activates the transcription of E2F-target genes associated with cell cycle progression and apoptosis. Mouse primary CD4(+) T cells transduced with HBZ show accelerated G1/S transition and apoptosis, and importantly, T cells from HBZ transgenic (HBZ-Tg) mice also demonstrate enhanced cell proliferation and apoptosis. To evaluate the functions of HBZ protein alone in vivo, we generated a new transgenic mouse strain that expresses HBZ mRNA altered by silent mutations but encoding intact protein. In these mice, the numbers of effector/memory and Foxp3(+) T cells were increased, and genes associated with proliferation and apoptosis were upregulated. This study shows that HBZ protein promotes cell proliferation and apoptosis in primary CD4(+) T cells through activation of the Rb/E2F pathway, and that HBZ protein also confers onto CD4(+) T-cell immunophenotype similar to those of ATL cells, suggesting that HBZ protein has important roles in dysregulation of CD4(+) T cells infected with HTLV-1. PMID:26804169

  2. IFNα/βR Signaling Promotes Regulatory T Cell Development and Function Under Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Metidji, Amina; Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Glass, Deborah Dacek; Cremer, Isabelle; Punkosdy, George A.; Shevach, Ethan M.

    2015-01-01

    Type I IFNs are a family of cytokines with antiviral and immunomodulatory properties. While the antiviral effects of IFNs are well characterized, their immunomodulatory properties are less clear. To specifically address the effects of type I IFNs on Treg, we studied mixed bone morrow (BM) chimeras between wild-type (WT) and IFNα/βR (IFNAR) knockout (KO) mice, and heterozygous female mice expressing a Treg-specific deletion of the IFNAR. In these two models, IFNAR signaling promotes the development of the Treg lineage in the thymus and their survival in the periphery. IFNAR KO Treg had a higher expression of the pro-apoptotic gene Bim and higher frequency of active caspase positive cells. IFNAR KO Treg from chimeric mice displayed a more naïve phenotype, accompanied by lower levels of CD25 and phosphorylated STAT5. Therefore, in Treg IFNAR signaling may directly or indirectly affect phosphorylation of STAT5. In mixed chimeras with Scurfy fetal liver, Treg derived from IFNAR KO BM were unable to control T effector cell activation and tissue inflammation. Under stress conditions or in a competitive environment, IFNAR signaling may be required to maintain Treg homeostasis and function. PMID:25795758

  3. Two Different Regulatory T Cell Populations That Promote Corneal Allograft Survival

    PubMed Central

    Cunnusamy, Khrishen; Paunicka, Kathryn; Reyes, Nancy; Yang, Wanhua; Chen, Peter W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To compare and contrast the T regulatory cells (Tregs) induced by anterior chamber (AC) injection of antigen with those induced by orthotopic corneal allografts. Methods. Anterior chamber–associated immune deviation (ACAID) Tregs were induced by injecting C57BL/6 spleen cells into the AC of BALB/c mice. Delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to C57BL/6 alloantigens were evaluated by a conventional ear swelling assay. Corneal allograft Tregs were induced by applying orthotopic C57BL/6 corneal allografts onto BALB/c hosts. The effects of anti-CD25, anti-CD8, anti-interferon-γ (IFN-γ), anti-IL-17A, or cyclophosphamide treatments on corneal allograft survival and ACAID were evaluated. Results. Administration of either anti-CD25 or anti-IFN-γ antibodies prevented the expression of ACAID and abolished the immune privilege of corneal allografts. By contrast, in vivo treatment with anti-CD8 antibody abrogated ACAID but had no effect on corneal allograft survival. Further discordance between ACAID and corneal allograft survival emerged in experiments in which the induction of allergic conjunctivitis or the administration of anti-IL-17A abolished the immune privilege of corneal allografts but had no effect on the induction or expression of ACAID. Conclusions. Although orthotopic corneal allografts are strategically located for the induction of ACAID by the sloughing of corneal cells into the AC, the results reported here indicate that the Tregs induced by orthotopic corneal allografts are remarkably different from the Tregs that are induced by AC injection of alloantigen. Although both of these Treg populations promote corneal allograft survival, they display distinctly different phenotypes. PMID:20702818

  4. XCR1+ dendritic cells promote memory CD8+ T cell recall upon secondary infections with Listeria monocytogenes or certain viruses

    PubMed Central

    Alexandre, Yannick O.; Ghilas, Sonia; Sanchez, Cindy; Le Bon, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    Naive CD8+ T cell priming during tumor development or many primary infections requires cross-presentation by XCR1+ dendritic cells (DCs). Memory CD8+ T lymphocytes (mCTLs) harbor a lower activation threshold as compared with naive cells. However, whether their recall responses depend on XCR1+ DCs is unknown. By using a new mouse model allowing fluorescent tracking and conditional depletion of XCR1+ DCs, we demonstrate a differential requirement of these cells for mCTL recall during secondary infections by different pathogens. XCR1+ DCs were instrumental to promote this function upon secondary challenges with Listeria monocytogenes, vesicular stomatitis virus, or Vaccinia virus, but dispensable in the case of mouse cytomegalovirus. We deciphered how XCR1+ DCs promote mCTL recall upon secondary infections with Listeria. By visualizing for the first time the in vivo choreography of XCR1+ DCs, NK cells and mCTLs during secondary immune responses, and by neutralizing in vivo candidate molecules, we demonstrate that, very early after infection, mCTLs are activated, and attracted in a CXCR3-dependent manner, by NK cell–boosted, IL-12–, and CXCL9-producing XCR1+ DCs. Hence, depending on the infectious agent, strong recall of mCTLs during secondary challenges can require cytokine- and chemokine-dependent cross-talk with XCR1+ DCs and NK cells. PMID:26694969

  5. XCR1+ dendritic cells promote memory CD8+ T cell recall upon secondary infections with Listeria monocytogenes or certain viruses.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Yannick O; Ghilas, Sonia; Sanchez, Cindy; Le Bon, Agnès; Crozat, Karine; Dalod, Marc

    2016-01-11

    Naive CD8(+) T cell priming during tumor development or many primary infections requires cross-presentation by XCR1(+) dendritic cells (DCs). Memory CD8(+) T lymphocytes (mCTLs) harbor a lower activation threshold as compared with naive cells. However, whether their recall responses depend on XCR1(+) DCs is unknown. By using a new mouse model allowing fluorescent tracking and conditional depletion of XCR1(+) DCs, we demonstrate a differential requirement of these cells for mCTL recall during secondary infections by different pathogens. XCR1(+) DCs were instrumental to promote this function upon secondary challenges with Listeria monocytogenes, vesicular stomatitis virus, or Vaccinia virus, but dispensable in the case of mouse cytomegalovirus. We deciphered how XCR1(+) DCs promote mCTL recall upon secondary infections with Listeria. By visualizing for the first time the in vivo choreography of XCR1(+) DCs, NK cells and mCTLs during secondary immune responses, and by neutralizing in vivo candidate molecules, we demonstrate that, very early after infection, mCTLs are activated, and attracted in a CXCR3-dependent manner, by NK cell-boosted, IL-12-, and CXCL9-producing XCR1(+) DCs. Hence, depending on the infectious agent, strong recall of mCTLs during secondary challenges can require cytokine- and chemokine-dependent cross-talk with XCR1(+) DCs and NK cells. PMID:26694969

  6. Eosinophilia of dystrophin-deficient muscle is promoted by perforin-mediated cytotoxicity by T cell effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, B.; Spencer, M. J.; Nakamura, G.; Tseng-Ong, L.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Previous investigations have shown that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) contribute to muscle pathology in the dystrophin-null mutant mouse (mdx) model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy through perforin-dependent and perforin-independent mechanisms. We have assessed whether the CTL-mediated pathology includes the promotion of eosinophilia in dystrophic muscle, and thereby provides a secondary mechanism through which CTLs contribute to muscular dystrophy. Quantitative immunohistochemistry confirmed that eosinophilia is a component of the mdx dystrophy. In addition, electron microscopic observations show that eosinophils traverse the basement membrane of mdx muscle fibers and display sites of close apposition of eosinophil and muscle membranes. The close membrane apposition is characterized by impingement of eosinophilic rods of major basic protein into the muscle cell membrane. Transfer of mdx splenocytes and mdx muscle extracts to irradiated C57 mice by intraperitoneal injection resulted in muscle eosinophilia in the recipient mice. Double-mutant mice lacking dystrophin and perforin showed less eosinophilia than was displayed by mdx mice that expressed perforin. Finally, administration of prednisolone, which has been shown previously to reduce the concentration of CTLs in dystrophic muscle, produced a significant reduction in eosinophilia. These findings indicate that eosinophilia is a component of the mdx pathology that is promoted by perforin-dependent cytotoxicity of effector T cells. However, some eosinophilia of mdx muscle is independent of perforin-mediated processes.

  7. Identification of a complex that binds to the CD154 3' untranslated region: implications for a role in message stability during T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Barnhart, B; Kosinski, P A; Wang, Z; Ford, G S; Kiledjian, M; Covey, L R

    2000-10-15

    CD154 expression is regulated throughout a time course of CD3-dependent T cell activation by differential mRNA decay. To understand the molecular basis of the "stability" phase of this pathway, experiments were conducted to identify sequences and specific complexes important in this regulation. Gel retardation assays using extracts from both Jurkat T cells and CD3-activated CD4(+) T cells revealed a major complex (complex I) that bound a 65-bp highly CU-rich region of the CD154 3' untranslated region. The specificity of the CU-rich element for complex-I formation was confirmed by disruption of this complex by oligo(dCT) competition. Formation of complex I strongly correlated with CD154 mRNA stability across a time course of T cell activation. UV cross-linking identified a major oligo(dCT)-sensitive species at approximately 90 kDa that showed induced and increased expression in extracts from 24- and 48-hr anti-CD3-activated T cells, respectively. This protein was absent in equivalent extracts from resting or 2-h-activated T cells. Using an in vitro decay assay, we found that a CD154-specific transcript was more rapidly degraded in 2-h-activated extract and stabilized in the 24- and 48-h extracts compared to extracts from resting T cells. Disruption of complex I resulted in the rapid decay of a CD154-specific transcript demonstrating a functional role for complex I in mRNA stabilization in vitro. These studies support a model of posttranscriptional regulation of CD154 expression being controlled in part by the interaction of a poly(CU)-binding complex with a specific sequence in the 3' untranslated region. PMID:11035087

  8. Synergy between IL-15 and Id2 promotes the expansion of human NK progenitor cells, which can be counteracted by the E protein HEB required to drive T cell development.

    PubMed

    Schotte, Remko; Dontje, Wendy; Nagasawa, Maho; Yasuda, Yuko; Bakker, Arjen Q; Spits, Hergen; Blom, Bianca

    2010-06-15

    The cytokine IL-15 and the inhibitor of DNA binding (Id)2, which negatively regulates the activity of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, have been shown to play key roles in NK cell development. Consistent with this, exogenous IL-15 added to human thymic progenitor cells stimulated their development into NK cells at the expense of T cells both in fetal thymic organ culture and in coculture with stromal cells expressing the Notch ligand Delta-like 1. Overexpression of Id2 in thymic progenitor cells stimulated NK cell development and blocked T cell development. This, in part, is attributed to inhibition of the transcriptional activity of the E protein HEB, which we show in this study is the only E protein that enhanced T cell development. Notably, Id2 increased a pool of lineage CD1a-CD5+ progenitor cells that in synergy with IL-15 furthered expansion and differentiation into NK cells. Taken together, our findings point to a dualistic function of Id2 in controlling T/NK cell lineage decisions; T cell development is impaired by Id2, most likely by sequestering HEB, whereas NK cell development is promoted by increasing a pool of CD1a-CD5+ NK cell progenitors, which together with IL-15 differentiate into mature NK cells. PMID:20483740

  9. Regulatory T Cells Promote β-Catenin–Mediated Epithelium-to-Mesenchyme Transition During Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Shanshan; Pan, Xiujie; Xu, Long; Yang, Zhihua; Guo, Renfeng; Gu, Yongqing; Li, Ruoxi; Wang, Qianjun; Xiao, Fengjun; Du, Li; Zhou, Pingkun; Zhu, Maoxiang

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis results from thoracic radiation therapy and severely limits radiation therapy approaches. CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}FoxP3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs) as well as epithelium-to-mesenchyme transition (EMT) cells are involved in pulmonary fibrosis induced by multiple factors. However, the mechanisms of Tregs and EMT cells in irradiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the influence of Tregs on EMT in radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Methods and Materials: Mice thoraxes were irradiated (20 Gy), and Tregs were depleted by intraperitoneal injection of a monoclonal anti-CD25 antibody 2 hours after irradiation and every 7 days thereafter. Mice were treated on days 3, 7, and 14 and 1, 3, and 6 months post irradiation. The effectiveness of Treg depletion was assayed via flow cytometry. EMT and β-catenin in lung tissues were detected by immunohistochemistry. Tregs isolated from murine spleens were cultured with mouse lung epithelial (MLE) 12 cells, and short interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of β-catenin in MLE 12 cells was used to explore the effects of Tregs on EMT and β-catenin via flow cytometry and Western blotting. Results: Anti-CD25 antibody treatment depleted Tregs efficiently, attenuated the process of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis, hindered EMT, and reduced β-catenin accumulation in lung epithelial cells in vivo. The coculture of Tregs with irradiated MLE 12 cells showed that Tregs could promote EMT in MLE 12 cells and that the effect of Tregs on EMT was partially abrogated by β-catenin knockdown in vitro. Conclusions: Tregs can promote EMT in accelerating radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. This process is partially mediated through β-catenin. Our study suggests a new mechanism for EMT, promoted by Tregs, that accelerates radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

  10. B cells promote inflammation in obesity and type 2 diabetes through regulation of T-cell function and an inflammatory cytokine profile.

    PubMed

    DeFuria, Jason; Belkina, Anna C; Jagannathan-Bogdan, Madhumita; Snyder-Cappione, Jennifer; Carr, Jordan David; Nersesova, Yanina R; Markham, Douglas; Strissel, Katherine J; Watkins, Amanda A; Zhu, Min; Allen, Jessica; Bouchard, Jacqueline; Toraldo, Gianluca; Jasuja, Ravi; Obin, Martin S; McDonnell, Marie E; Apovian, Caroline; Denis, Gerald V; Nikolajczyk, Barbara S

    2013-03-26

    Patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) have disease-associated changes in B-cell function, but the role these changes play in disease pathogenesis is not well established. Data herein show B cells from obese mice produce a proinflammatory cytokine profile compared with B cells from lean mice. Complementary in vivo studies show that obese B cell-null mice have decreased systemic inflammation, inflammatory B- and T-cell cytokines, adipose tissue inflammation, and insulin resistance (IR) compared with obese WT mice. Reduced inflammation in obese/insulin resistant B cell-null mice associates with an increased percentage of anti-inflammatory regulatory T cells (Tregs). This increase contrasts with the sharply decreased percentage of Tregs in obese compared with lean WT mice and suggests that B cells may be critical regulators of T-cell functions previously shown to play important roles in IR. We demonstrate that B cells from T2D (but not non-T2D) subjects support proinflammatory T-cell function in obesity/T2D through contact-dependent mechanisms. In contrast, human monocytes increase proinflammatory T-cell cytokines in both T2D and non-T2D analyses. These data support the conclusion that B cells are critical regulators of inflammation in T2D due to their direct ability to promote proinflammatory T-cell function and secrete a proinflammatory cytokine profile. Thus, B cells are potential therapeutic targets for T2D. PMID:23479618

  11. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 oncoprotein tax represses ZNF268 expression through the cAMP-responsive element-binding protein/activating transcription factor pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Guo, Ming-Xiong; Hu, Hai-Ming; Zhao, Zhou-Zhou; Qiu, Hong-Ling; Shao, Huan-Jie; Zhu, Chen-Gang; Xue, Lu; Shi, Yun-Bo; Li, Wen-Xin

    2008-06-13

    Expression of the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) oncoprotein Tax is correlated with cellular transformation, contributing to the development of adult T-cell leukemia. In this study, we investigated the role of Tax in the regulation of the ZNF268 gene, which plays a role in the differentiation of blood cells and the pathogenesis of leukemia. We demonstrated that ZNF268 mRNA was repressed in HTLV-1-infected cells. We also showed that stable and transient expression of HTLV-1 Tax led to repression of ZNF268. In addition, by using reporter constructs that bear the human ZNF268 promoter and its mutants, we showed that Tax repressed ZNF268 promoter in a process dependent on a functional cAMP-responsive element. By using Tax, cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB)-1, CREB-2, and their mutants, we further showed that Tax repressed ZNF268 through the CREB/activating transcription factor pathway. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated the formation of the complex of Tax.CREB-1 directly at the cAMP-responsive element both in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest a role for ZNF268 in aberrant T-cell proliferation observed in HTLV-1-associated diseases. PMID:18375384

  12. Donor treatment with pegylated G-CSF augments the generation of IL-10-producing regulatory T cells and promotes transplantation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Morris, Edward S; MacDonald, Kelli P A; Rowe, Vanessa; Johnson, Diana H; Banovic, Tatjana; Clouston, Andrew D; Hill, Geoffrey R

    2004-05-01

    We investigated whether the protection from graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) afforded by donor treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) could be enhanced by dose escalation. Donor treatment with human G-CSF prevented GVHD in the B6 --> B6D2F1 murine model in a dose-dependent fashion, and murine G-CSF provided equivalent protection from GVHD at 10-fold lower doses. Donor pretreatment with a single dose of pegylated G-CSF (peg-G-CSF) prevented GVHD to a significantly greater extent than standard G-CSF (survival, 75% versus 11%, P <.001). Donor T cells from peg-G-CSF-treated donors failed to proliferate to alloantigen and inhibited the responses of control T cells in an interleukin 10 (IL-10)-dependent fashion in vitro. T cells from peg-G-CSF-treated IL-10(-/-) donors induced lethal GVHD; T cells from peg-G-CSF-treated wild-type (wt) donors promoted long-term survival. Whereas T cells from peg-G-CSF wt donors were able to regulate GVHD induced by T cells from control-treated donors, T cells from G-CSF-treated wt donors and peg-G-CSF-treated IL-10(-/-) donors did not prevent mortality. Thus, peg-G-CSF is markedly superior to standard G-CSF for the prevention of GVHD following allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), due to the generation of IL-10-producing regulatory T cells. These data support prospective clinical trials of peg-G-CSF-mobilized allogeneic blood SCT. PMID:14726406

  13. Infiltrating T Cells Promote Bladder Cancer Progression via Increasing IL1→Androgen Receptor→HIF1α→VEGFa Signals.

    PubMed

    Tao, Le; Qiu, Jianxin; Jiang, Ming; Song, Wenbin; Yeh, Shuyuan; Yu, Hong; Zang, Lijuan; Xia, Shujie; Chang, Chawnshang

    2016-08-01

    The tumor microenvironment impacts tumor progression and individual cells, including CD4(+) T cells, which have been detected in bladder cancer tissues. The detailed mechanism of how these T cells were recruited to the bladder cancer tumor and their impact on bladder cancer progression, however, remains unclear. Using a human clinical bladder cancer sample survey and in vitro coculture system, we found that bladder cancer has a greater capacity to recruit T cells than surrounding normal bladder tissues. The consequences of higher levels of recruited T cells in bladder cancer included increased bladder cancer metastasis. Mechanism dissection revealed that infiltrating T cells might function through secreting the cytokine IL1, which increases the recruitment of T cells to bladder cancer and enhances the bladder cancer androgen receptor (AR) signaling that results in increased bladder cancer cell invasion via upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF1α)/VEGFa expression. Interruption of the IL1→AR→HIF1α→VEGFa signals with inhibitors of HIF1α or VEGFa partially reversed the enhanced bladder cancer cell invasion. Finally, in vivo mouse models of xenografted bladder cancer T24 cells with CD4(+) T cells confirmed in vitro coculture studies and concluded that infiltrating CD4(+) T cells can promote bladder cancer metastasis via modulation of the IL1→AR→HIF1α→VEGFa signaling. Future clinical trials using small molecules to target this newly identified signaling pathway may facilitate the development of new therapeutic approaches to better suppress bladder cancer metastasis. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1943-51. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196763

  14. Combination OX40 agonism/CTLA-4 blockade with HER2 vaccination reverses T-cell anergy and promotes survival in tumor-bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    Linch, Stefanie N.; Kasiewicz, Melissa J.; McNamara, Michael J.; Hilgart-Martiszus, Ian F.; Farhad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is gathering momentum as a primary therapy for cancer patients. However, monotherapies have limited efficacy in improving outcomes and benefit only a subset of patients. Combination therapies targeting multiple pathways can augment an immune response to improve survival further. Here, we demonstrate that dual aOX40 (anti-CD134)/aCTLA-4 (anti–cytotoxic T-lymphocyte–associated protein 4) immunotherapy generated a potent antigen-specific CD8 T-cell response, enhancing expansion, effector function, and memory T-cell persistence. Importantly, OX40 and CTLA-4 expression on CD8 T cells was critical for promoting their maximal expansion following combination therapy. Animals treated with combination therapy and vaccination using anti–DEC-205 (dendritic and epithelial cells, 205 kDa)–HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) had significantly improved survival in a mammary carcinoma model. Vaccination with combination therapy uniquely restricted Th2-cytokine production by CD4 cells, relative to combination therapy alone, and enhanced IFNγ production by CD8 and CD4 cells. We observed an increase in MIP-1α (macrophage inflammatory protein-1α)/CCL3 [chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 3], MIP-1β/CCL4, RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and excreted)/CCL5, and GM-CSF production by CD8 and CD4 T cells following treatment. Furthermore, this therapy was associated with extensive tumor destruction and T-cell infiltration into the tumor. Notably, in a spontaneous model of prostate adenocarcinoma, vaccination with combination therapy reversed anergy and enhanced the expansion and function of CD8 T cells recognizing a tumor-associated antigen. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the addition of a vaccine with combined aOX40/aCTLA-4 immunotherapy augmented antitumor CD8 T-cell function while limiting Th2 polarization in CD4 cells and improved overall survival. PMID:26729864

  15. Infiltrating T cells promote prostate cancer metastasis via modulation of FGF11→miRNA-541→androgen receptor (AR)→MMP9 signaling.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shuai; Li, Lei; Yeh, Shuyuan; Cui, Yun; Li, Xin; Chang, Hong-Chiang; Jin, Jie; Chang, Chawnshang

    2015-01-01

    Early clinical studies suggested infiltrating T cells might be associated with poor outcomes in prostate cancer (PCa) patients. The detailed mechanisms how T cells contribute to PCa progression, however, remained unclear. Here, we found PCa cells have a better capacity to recruit more CD4(+) T cells than the surrounding normal prostate cells via secreting more chemokines-CXCL9. The consequences of more recruited CD4(+) T cells to PCa might then lead to enhance PCa cell invasion. Mechanism dissection revealed that infiltrating CD4(+) T cells might function through the modulation of FGF11→miRNA-541 signals to suppress PCa androgen receptor (AR) signals. The suppressed AR signals might then alter the MMP9 signals to promote the PCa cell invasion. Importantly, suppressed AR signals via AR-siRNA or anti-androgen Enzalutamide in PCa cells also enhanced the recruitment of T cells and the consequences of this positive feed back regulation could then enhance the PCa cell invasion. Targeting these newly identified signals via FGF11-siRNA, miRNA-541 inhibitor or MMP9 inhibitor all led to partially reverse the enhanced PCa cell invasion. Results from in vivo mouse models also confirmed the in vitro cell lines in co-culture studies. Together, these results concluded that infiltrating CD4(+) T cells could promote PCa metastasis via modulation of FGF11→miRNA-541→AR→MMP9 signaling. Targeting these newly identified signals may provide us a new potential therapeutic approach to better battle PCa metastasis. PMID:25135278

  16. Chimeric Antigen Receptors With Mutated IgG4 Fc Spacer Avoid Fc Receptor Binding and Improve T Cell Persistence and Antitumor Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Jonnalagadda, Mahesh; Mardiros, Armen; Urak, Ryan; Wang, Xiuli; Hoffman, Lauren J; Bernanke, Alyssa; Chang, Wen-Chung; Bretzlaff, William; Starr, Renate; Priceman, Saul; Ostberg, Julie R; Forman, Stephen J; Brown, Christine E

    2015-01-01

    The success of adoptive therapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)–expressing T cells partly depends on optimal CAR design. CARs frequently incorporate a spacer/linker region based on the constant region of either IgG1 or IgG4 to connect extracellular ligand-binding with intracellular signaling domains. Here, we evaluated the potential for the IgG4-Fc linker to result in off-target interactions with Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs). As proof-of-principle, we focused on a CD19-specific scFv-IgG4-CD28-zeta CAR and found that, in contrast to CAR-negative cells, CAR+ T cells bound soluble FcγRs in vitro and did not engraft in NSG mice. We hypothesized that mutations to avoid FcγR binding would improve CAR+ T cell engraftment and antitumor efficacy. Thus, we generated CD19-specific CARs with IgG4-Fc spacers that had either been mutated at two sites (L235E; N297Q) within the CH2 region (CD19R(EQ)) or incorporated a CH2 deletion (CD19Rch2Δ). These mutations reduced binding to soluble FcγRs without altering the ability of the CAR to mediate antigen-specific lysis. Importantly, CD19R(EQ) and CD19Rch2Δ T cells exhibited improved persistence and more potent CD19-specific antilymphoma efficacy in NSG mice. Together, these studies suggest that optimal CAR function may require the elimination of cellular FcγR interactions to improve T cell persistence and antitumor responses. PMID:25366031

  17. Kaposi's-sarcoma-associated-herpesvirus-activated dendritic cells promote HIV-1 trans-infection and suppress CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wan; Qin, Yan; Bai, Lei; Lan, Ke; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2013-06-05

    Infection of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is commonly occurred in AIDS patients. KSHV and HIV-1 act cooperatively in regulating infection with each other and in human carcinogenesis. Dendritic cells (DCs), as the pivotal cells in host immunity, may be modulated by both viruses, for immunoevasion and dissemination, therefore, the interaction between DCs and each virus has been a prior focus for pathogenesis elucidation. Here, we assessed the potential effect of KSHV on DC–HIV-1 interaction. We found that KSHV stimulation could promote maturation of monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) and impaired the ability of MDDCs to drive proliferation of resting CD4{sup +} T cells, demonstrating the immunosuppression induced by KSHV. More importantly, KSHV-stimulated MDDCs could capture more HIV-1 and efficiently transferred these infectious viruses to Hut/CCR5 T cell line. Our results reveal the novel modulation of DC-mediated HIV-1 dissemination by KSHV, and highlight the importance of studying DC–HIV-1 interaction to elucidate HIV/AIDS pathogenesis. - Highlights: ► KSHV impaired the ability of MDDCs to drive proliferation of resting CD4{sup +} T cells. ► KSHV stimulation matured MDDCs and enhanced HIV-1 endocytosis. ► KSHV stimulated MDDCs increased ICAM-1 expression and tighten contact with T cells. ► KSHV-stimulated MDDCs promoted HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4{sup +} T cells.

  18. Nuclear lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase and its interaction with CR6-interacting factor 1 promote the survival of human leukemic T cells

    PubMed Central

    VAHEDI, SHAHROOZ; CHUEH, FU-YU; DUTTA, SUJOY; CHANDRAN, BALA; YU, CHAO-LAN

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression and hyperactivation of lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck) have been associated with leukemia development. We previously showed that, other than its known function as a cytoplasmic signal transducer, Lck also acts as a nuclear transcription factor in mouse leukemic cells. In the present study, we demonstrated the presence of nuclear Lck in human leukemic T cells and in primary cells. We further established a positive correlation between Lck nuclear localization and its kinase activity. Proteomic analysis identified CR6-interacting factor 1 (CRIF1) as one of the Lck-interacting proteins. CRIF1 and Lck association in the nucleus was confirmed both by immunofluorescence microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation in human leukemic T cells. Close-range interaction between Lck and CRIF1 was validated by in situ proximity ligation assay (PLA). Consistent with the role of nuclear CRIF1 as a tumor suppressor, CRIF1 silencing promotes leukemic T cell survival in the absence of growth factors. This protective effect can be recapitulated by endogenous Lck or reconstituted Lck in leukemic T cells. All together, our results support a novel function of nuclear Lck in promoting human leukemic T cell survival through interaction with a tumor suppressor. It has important implications in defining a paradigm shift of non-canonical protein tyrosine kinase signaling. PMID:25997448

  19. Neisseria gonorrhoeae triggers the PGE2/IL-23 pathway and promotes IL-17 production by human memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Stefanelli, Paola; Teloni, Raffaela; Carannante, Anna; Mariotti, Sabrina; Nisini, Roberto; Gagliardi, Maria Cristina

    2012-10-01

    PGE2 is a potent modulator of the T helper (Th)17 immune response that plays a critical role in the host defense against bacterial, fungal and viral infections. We recently showed high serum levels of interleukin (IL)-17 in patients with gonococcal infection and we hypothesized that Neisseria gonorrhoeae could exploit a PGE2 mediated mechanism to promote IL-17 production. Here we show that N. gonorrhoeae induces human dendritic cell (DC) maturation, secretion of prostaglandin E2 and proinflammatory cytokines, including the pro-Th17 cytokine IL-23. Blocking PGE2 endogenous synthesis selectively reduces IL-23 production by DC in response to gonococcal stimulation, confirming recent data on PGE2/IL-23 crosstalk. N. gonorrhoeae stimulated DC induce a robust IL-17 production by memory CD4(+) T cells and this function correlates with PGE2 production. Our findings delineate a previously unknown role for PGE2 in the immune response to N. gonorrhoeae, suggesting its contribute via Th17 cell expansion. PMID:22542425

  20. MAP Kinase Inhibition Promotes T Cell and Anti-tumor Activity in Combination with PD-L1 Checkpoint Blockade.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Peter J R; Cheung, Jeanne; Yang, Yagai; McNamara, Erin; Hong, Rebecca; Moskalenko, Marina; Gould, Stephen E; Maecker, Heather; Irving, Bryan A; Kim, Jeong M; Belvin, Marcia; Mellman, Ira

    2016-03-15

    Targeted inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MEK) can induce regression of tumors bearing activating mutations in the Ras pathway but rarely leads to tumor eradication. Although combining MEK inhibition with T-cell-directed immunotherapy might lead to more durable efficacy, T cell responses are themselves at least partially dependent on MEK activity. We show here that MEK inhibition did profoundly block naive CD8(+) T cell priming in tumor-bearing mice, but actually increased the number of effector-phenotype antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells within the tumor. MEK inhibition protected tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells from death driven by chronic TCR stimulation while sparing cytotoxic activity. Combining MEK inhibition with anti-programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) resulted in synergistic and durable tumor regression even where either agent alone was only modestly effective. Thus, despite the central importance of the MAP kinase pathway in some aspects of T cell function, MEK-targeted agents can be compatible with T-cell-dependent immunotherapy. PMID:26944201

  1. Transgelin-2 in B-Cells Controls T-Cell Activation by Stabilizing T Cell - B Cell Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Myoung-Won; Kim, Hye-Ran; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Jun, Chang-Duk; Park, Zee-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The immunological synapse (IS), a dynamic and organized junction between T-cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs), is critical for initiating adaptive immunity. The actin cytoskeleton plays a major role in T-cell reorganization during IS formation, and we previously reported that transgelin-2, an actin-binding protein expressed in T-cells, stabilizes cortical F-actin, promoting T-cell activation in response to antigen stimulation. Transgelin-2 is also highly expressed in B-cells, although no specific function has been reported. In this study, we found that deficiency in transgelin-2 (TAGLN2-/-) in B-cells had little effect on B-cell development and activation, as measured by the expression of CD69, MHC class II molecules, and CD80/86. Nevertheless, in B-cells, transgelin-2 accumulated in the IS during the interaction with T-cells. These results led us to hypothesize that transgelin-2 may also be involved in IS stability in B-cells, thereby influencing T-cell function. Notably, we found that transgelin-2 deficiency in B-cells reduced T-cell activation, as determined by the release of IL-2 and interferon-γ and the expression of CD69. Furthermore, the reduced T-cell activation was correlated with reduced B-cell–T-cell conjugate formation. Collectively, these results suggest that actin stability in B-cells during IS formation is critical for the initiation of adaptive T-cell immunity. PMID:27232882

  2. Antigen targeting to CD11b+ dendritic cells in association with TLR4/TRIF signaling promotes strong CD8+ T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Dadaglio, Gilles; Fayolle, Catherine; Zhang, Xiaoming; Ryffel, Bernard; Oberkampf, Marine; Felix, Tristan; Hervas-Stubbs, Sandra; Osicka, Radim; Sebo, Peter; Ladant, Daniel; Leclerc, Claude

    2014-08-15

    Deciphering the mechanisms that allow the induction of strong immune responses is crucial to developing efficient vaccines against infectious diseases and cancer. Based on the discovery that the adenylate cyclase from Bordetella pertussis binds to the CD11b/CD18 integrin, we developed a highly efficient detoxified adenylate cyclase-based vector (CyaA) capable of delivering a large variety of Ags to the APC. This vector allows the induction of protective and therapeutic immunity against viral and tumoral challenges as well as against transplanted tumors in the absence of any added adjuvant. Two therapeutic vaccine candidates against human papilloma viruses and melanoma have been developed recently, based on the CyaA vector, and are currently in clinical trials. We took advantage of one of these highly purified vaccines, produced under good manufacturing practice-like conditions, to decipher the mechanisms by which CyaA induces immune responses. In this study, we demonstrate that CyaA binds both human and mouse CD11b(+) dendritic cells (DCs) and induces their maturation, as shown by the upregulation of costimulatory and MHC molecules and the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Importantly, we show that DCs sense CyaA through the TLR4/Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adapter-inducing IFN-β pathway, independent of the presence of LPS. These findings show that CyaA possesses the intrinsic ability to not only target DCs but also to activate them, leading to the induction of strong immune responses. Overall, this study demonstrates that Ag delivery to CD11b(+) DCs in association with TLR4/Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adapter-inducing IFN-β activation is an efficient strategy to promote strong specific CD8(+) T cell responses. PMID:25024388

  3. CCR10 regulates balanced maintenance and function of resident regulatory and effector T cells to promote immune homeostasis in skin

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Mingcan; Hu, Shaomin; Fu, Yaoyao; Jin, Wensen; Yi, Qiyi; Matsui, Yurika; Yang, Jie; McDowell, Mary Ann; Sarkar, Surojit; Kalia, Vandana; Xiong, Na

    2014-01-01

    Background CCR10 and CCL27 are the most skin-specific chemokine receptor/ligand pair implicated in skin allergy and inflammatory diseases including atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. This pair is thought to regulate migration and/or maintenance of skin T cells and suggested as therapeutic targets for treatment of skin diseases. However, the functional importance of CCR10/CCL27 in vivo remains elusive. Objective We sought to determine expression and function of CCR10 in different subsets of skin T cells under both homeostatic and inflammatory conditions to gain a mechanistic insight into potential roles of CCR10 during skin inflammation. Methods Using heterozygous and homozygous CCR10-knockout/EGFP-knockin mice, we assessed expression of CCR10 on regulatory and effector T cells of healthy and inflamed skin induced by chemicals, pathogens and auto-reactive T cells. In addition, we assessed the effect of CCR10-knockout on the maintenance and functions of different T cells and inflammatory status in the skin during different phases of the immune response. Results CCR10 expression is preferentially induced on memory-like skin-resident T cells and their progenitors for their maintenance in homeostatic skin but not expressed on most skin-infiltrating effector T cells during inflammation. In CCR10-knockout mice, the imbalanced presence and dysregulated function of resident regulatory and effector T cells result in over-reactive and prolonged innate and memory responses in the skin, leading to increased clearance of Leishmamia infection in the skin. Conclusion CCR10 is a critical regulator of skin immune homeostasis. PMID:24767879

  4. Neuroinvasive West Nile Infection Elicits Elevated and Atypically Polarized T Cell Responses That Promote a Pathogenic Outcome

    PubMed Central

    James, Eddie A.; Gates, Theresa J.; LaFond, Rebecca E.; Yamamoto, Shinobu; Ni, Chester; Mai, Duy; Gersuk, Vivian H.; O’Brien, Kimberly; Nguyen, Quynh-Anh; Zeitner, Brad; Lanteri, Marion C.; Norris, Philip J.; Chaussabel, Damien; Malhotra, Uma; Kwok, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Most West Nile virus (WNV) infections are asymptomatic, but some lead to neuroinvasive disease with symptoms ranging from disorientation to paralysis and death. Evidence from animal models suggests that neuroinvasive infections may arise as a consequence of impaired immune protection. However, other data suggest that neurologic symptoms may arise as a consequence of immune mediated damage. We demonstrate that elevated immune responses are present in neuroinvasive disease by directly characterizing WNV-specific T cells in subjects with laboratory documented infections using human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II tetramers. Subjects with neuroinvasive infections had higher overall numbers of WNV-specific T cells than those with asymptomatic infections. Independent of this, we also observed age related increases in WNV-specific T cell responses. Further analysis revealed that WNV-specific T cell responses included a population of atypically polarized CXCR3+CCR4+CCR6- T cells, whose presence was highly correlated with neuroinvasive disease. Moreover, a higher proportion of WNV-specific T cells in these subjects co-produced interferon-γ and interleukin 4 than those from asymptomatic subjects. More globally, subjects with neuroinvasive infections had reduced numbers of CD4+FoxP3+ Tregs that were CTLA4 positive and exhibited a distinct upregulated transcript profile that was absent in subjects with asymptomatic infections. Thus, subjects with neuroinvasive WNV infections exhibited elevated, dysregulated, and atypically polarized responses, suggesting that immune mediated damage may indeed contribute to pathogenic outcomes. PMID:26795118

  5. Autoreactive natural killer T cells: promoting immune protection and immune tolerance through varied interactions with myeloid antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Subramanya; Fox, Lisa; Wang, Xiaohua; Gumperz, Jenny E

    2010-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are innate T lymphocytes that are restricted by CD1d antigen-presenting molecules and recognize lipids and glycolipids as antigens. NKT cells have attracted attention for their potent immunoregulatory effects. Like other types of regulatory lymphocytes, a high proportion of NKT cells appear to be autoreactive to self antigens. Thus, as myeloid antigen-presenting cells (APCs) such as monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) constitutively express CD1d, NKT cells are able to interact with these APCs not only during times of immune activation but also in immunologically quiescent periods. The interactions of NKT cells with myeloid APCs can have either pro-inflammatory or tolerizing outcomes, and a central question is how the ensuing response is determined. Here we bring together published results from a variety of model systems to highlight three critical factors that influence the outcome of the NKT–APC interaction: (i) the strength of the antigenic signal delivered to the NKT cell, as determined by antigen abundance and/or T-cell receptor (TCR) affinity; (ii) the presence or absence of cytokines that costimulate NKT cells [e.g. interleukin (IL)-12, IL-18 and interferon (IFN)-α]; (iii) APC intrinsic factors such as differentiation state (e.g. monocyte versus DC) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation. Together with recent findings that demonstrate new links between NKT cell activation and endogenous lipid metabolism, these results outline a picture in which the functions of NKT cells are closely attuned to the existing biological context. Thus, NKT cells may actively promote tolerance until a critical level of danger signals arises, at which point they switch to activating pro-inflammatory immune responses. PMID:20465577

  6. DHEA promotes osteoblast differentiation by regulating the expression of osteoblast-related genes and Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xuemin; Gui, Yuyan; Xu, Yingping; Li, Dajin; Wang, Ling

    2015-10-01

    Several studies have reported that dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) promotes osteoblast proliferation and inhibits osteoblast apoptosis and that DHEA inhibits osteoclast maturation. However, whether DHEA regulates osteoblast differentiation remains unclear. The present study first examined the effect of DHEA on bone morphology in vivo. DHEA was found to increase bone volume (BV), bone mineral density (BMD), and the number of trabeculae in bone (Th.N) and it was found to decrease trabecular spacing in bone (Th.sp) in ovariectomized (OVX) mice. Next, the effect of DHEA on osteoblast differentiation was examined in vitro and osteoblastogenesis-related marker genes, such as Runx2, Osterix, Collagen1, and Osteocalcin, were also detected. DHEA increased osteoblast production in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured in osteoblastogenic medium, and DHEA increased the expression of Runx2 and osterix, thereby increasing the expression of osteocalcin and collagen1. Immune cells and bone interact, so changes in immune cells were detected in vivo. DHEA increased the number of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the spleen but it did not affect CTLA-4 or IL-10. When MSCs were treated with DHEA in the presence of Tregs, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity increased. Osteoblasts and adipocytes are both generated by MSCs. If osteoblast differentiation increases, adipocyte differentiation will decrease, and the reverse also holds true. DHEA was found to increase the number of adipocytes in osteoblastogenic medium but it had no effect on the number of adipocytes and expression of PPARγ mRNA in adipogenic medium. This finding suggests that osteoblasts may be involved in adipocyte production. In conclusion, the current results suggest that DHEA can improve postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO) by up-regulating osteoblast differentiation via the up-regulation of the expression of osteoblastogenesis-related genes and via an increase in Foxp3(+) Tregs. PMID:26559023

  7. The human fetal placenta promotes tolerance against the semiallogeneic fetus by inducing regulatory T cells and homeostatic M2 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Svensson-Arvelund, Judit; Mehta, Ratnesh B; Lindau, Robert; Mirrasekhian, Elahe; Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto; Berg, Göran; Lash, Gendie E; Jenmalm, Maria C; Ernerudh, Jan

    2015-02-15

    A successful pregnancy requires that the maternal immune system is instructed to a state of tolerance to avoid rejection of the semiallogeneic fetal-placental unit. Although increasing evidence supports that decidual (uterine) macrophages and regulatory T cells (Tregs) are key regulators of fetal tolerance, it is not known how these tolerogenic leukocytes are induced. In this article, we show that the human fetal placenta itself, mainly through trophoblast cells, is able to induce homeostatic M2 macrophages and Tregs. Placental-derived M-CSF and IL-10 induced macrophages that shared the CD14(+)CD163(+)CD206(+)CD209(+) phenotype of decidual macrophages and produced IL-10 and CCL18 but not IL-12 or IL-23. Placental tissue also induced the expansion of CD25(high)CD127(low)Foxp3(+) Tregs in parallel with increased IL-10 production, whereas production of IFN-γ (Th1), IL-13 (Th2), and IL-17 (Th17) was not induced. Tregs expressed the suppressive markers CTLA-4 and CD39, were functionally suppressive, and were induced, in part, by IL-10, TGF-β, and TRAIL. Placental-derived factors also limited excessive Th cell activation, as shown by decreased HLA-DR expression and reduced secretion of Th1-, Th2-, and Th17-associated cytokines. Thus, our data indicate that the fetal placenta has a central role in promoting the homeostatic environment necessary for successful pregnancy. These findings have implications for immune-mediated pregnancy complications, as well as for our general understanding of tissue-induced tolerance. PMID:25560409

  8. Reduced Epithelial Na+/H+ Exchange Drives Gut Microbial Dysbiosis and Promotes Inflammatory Response in T Cell-Mediated Murine Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Midura-Kiela, Monica T.; Ramalingam, Rajalakshmy; Larmonier, Claire B.; Chase, John H.; Caporaso, J. Gregory; Besselsen, David G.; Ghishan, Fayez K.; Kiela, Pawel R.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with functional inhibition of epithelial Na+/H+ exchange. In mice, a selective disruption of NHE3 (Slc9a3), a major apical Na+/H+ exchanger, also promotes IBD-like symptoms and gut microbial dysbiosis. We hypothesized that disruption of Na+/H+ exchange is necessary for the development of dysbiosis, which promotes an exacerbated mucosal inflammatory response. Therefore, we performed a temporal analysis of gut microbiota composition, and mucosal immune response to adoptive T cell transfer was evaluated in Rag2-/- and NHE3-/-/Rag2-/- (DKO) mice with and without broad-spectrum antibiotics. Microbiome (16S profiling), colonic histology, T cell and neutrophil infiltration, mucosal inflammatory tone, and epithelial permeability were analyzed. In adoptive T cell transfer colitis model, Slc9a3 status was the most significant determinant of gut microbial community. In DKO mice, NHE3-deficiency and dysbiosis were associated with dramatically accelerated and exacerbated disease, with rapid body weight loss, increased mucosal T cell and neutrophil influx, increased mucosal cytokine expression, increased permeability, and expansion of CD25-FoxP3+ Tregs; this enhanced susceptibility was alleviated by oral broad-spectrum antibiotics. Based on these results and our previous work, we postulate that epithelial electrolyte homeostasis is an important modulator in the progression of colitis, acting through remodeling of the gut microbial community. PMID:27050757

  9. Reduced Epithelial Na+/H+ Exchange Drives Gut Microbial Dysbiosis and Promotes Inflammatory Response in T Cell-Mediated Murine Colitis.

    PubMed

    Laubitz, Daniel; Harrison, Christy A; Midura-Kiela, Monica T; Ramalingam, Rajalakshmy; Larmonier, Claire B; Chase, John H; Caporaso, J Gregory; Besselsen, David G; Ghishan, Fayez K; Kiela, Pawel R

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with functional inhibition of epithelial Na+/H+ exchange. In mice, a selective disruption of NHE3 (Slc9a3), a major apical Na+/H+ exchanger, also promotes IBD-like symptoms and gut microbial dysbiosis. We hypothesized that disruption of Na+/H+ exchange is necessary for the development of dysbiosis, which promotes an exacerbated mucosal inflammatory response. Therefore, we performed a temporal analysis of gut microbiota composition, and mucosal immune response to adoptive T cell transfer was evaluated in Rag2-/- and NHE3-/-/Rag2-/- (DKO) mice with and without broad-spectrum antibiotics. Microbiome (16S profiling), colonic histology, T cell and neutrophil infiltration, mucosal inflammatory tone, and epithelial permeability were analyzed. In adoptive T cell transfer colitis model, Slc9a3 status was the most significant determinant of gut microbial community. In DKO mice, NHE3-deficiency and dysbiosis were associated with dramatically accelerated and exacerbated disease, with rapid body weight loss, increased mucosal T cell and neutrophil influx, increased mucosal cytokine expression, increased permeability, and expansion of CD25-FoxP3+ Tregs; this enhanced susceptibility was alleviated by oral broad-spectrum antibiotics. Based on these results and our previous work, we postulate that epithelial electrolyte homeostasis is an important modulator in the progression of colitis, acting through remodeling of the gut microbial community. PMID:27050757

  10. RNA Binding of T-cell Intracellular Antigen-1 (TIA-1) C-terminal RNA Recognition Motif Is Modified by pH Conditions*

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Gallardo, Isabel; Aroca, Ángeles; Persson, Cecilia; Karlsson, B. Göran; Díaz-Moreno, Irene

    2013-01-01

    T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) is a DNA/RNA-binding protein that regulates critical events in cell physiology by the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA translation. TIA-1 is composed of three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and a glutamine-rich domain and binds to uridine-rich RNA sequences through its C-terminal RRM2 and RRM3 domains. Here, we show that RNA binding mediated by either isolated RRM3 or the RRM23 construct is controlled by slight environmental pH changes due to the protonation/deprotonation of TIA-1 RRM3 histidine residues. The auxiliary role of the C-terminal RRM3 domain in TIA-1 RNA recognition is poorly understood, and this work provides insight into its binding mechanisms. PMID:23902765

  11. MicroRNA-184 Promotes Proliferation and Inhibits Apoptosis in HaCaT Cells: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiaodong; Cao, Yu; Chen, Rixin; Liu, Chengyin; Chen, Jinghong; Min, Dongfang

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to investigate the role of miR-184 in the proliferation and apoptosis of keratinocyte (HaCaT cells). MATERIAL AND METHODS HaCaT cells were cultured in a growth medium. The miR-184 was transfected with siRNA, then cell viability and apoptosis were assayed by MTT and flow cytometry, respectively. The colony-forming efficacy of HaCaT cells were detected as well. mRNA expressions of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 were measured with RT-PCR. The expressions of apoptosis-related proteins caspase-3 and Bcl-x in HaCaT cells were determined by Western blot. RESULTS After miR-184 was transfected with siRNA, cell viability and colony forming ability decreased significantly, and apoptosis was significantly increased. The expressions of growth factors TGF-β1 and bFGF mRNAs, as well as apoptosis-related proteins Bcl-x, in HaCaT cells declined significantly after miR-184 was transfected with siRNA. In addition, the expression of pro-apoptotic protein caspase-3 increased significantly. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest distinct roles of miR-184 during the growth, proliferation, and apoptosis of keratinocytes. PMID:27571235

  12. Binding immunoglobulin protein-treated peripheral blood monocyte-derived dendritic cells are refractory to maturation and induce regulatory T-cell development.

    PubMed

    Corrigall, Valerie M; Vittecoq, Olivier; Panayi, Gabriel S

    2009-10-01

    Binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) has been shown previously to have immunomodulatory functions. Herein we investigated whether BiP could affect the differentiation of monocytes into dendritic cells (DCs) and thence the development of regulatory T cells. Peripheral blood monocyte-derived DCs were matured with lipopolysaccharide in the presence or absence of BiP. DC development and T-cell changes were monitored by flow cytometry and regulatory T-cell function was measured by uptake of tritiated thymidine. More BiP-treated DCs (DC((BiP))s) expressed amounts of intracellular indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and cell surface leucocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor subfamily B member 1 (LILRB1), retained CD14 expression but down-regulated expression of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR and CD86, and produced copious amounts of interleukin (IL)-10, when compared with control DCs. T cells co-cultured with DC((BiP))s developed regulatory function with increased surface expression of CD4(+) CD25(hi) CD27(hi) but with no concomitant increase in forkhead box P3 (Foxp3). These T cells also showed significantly higher levels of intracellular cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen (CTLA)-4. The latter could be inhibited by the presence of the IDO inhibitor 1 methyl tryptophan. The addition of neutralizing anti-IL-10 antibody or the specific mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 inhibitor SB203580 reversed the inhibition of DC differentiation by BiP. In conclusion, BiP is an immunomodulator able to arrest inflammation through induction of tolerogenic DCs and subsequent generation of T regulatory cells. PMID:19740378

  13. The NF-kappa B binding site is necessary for efficient replication of simian immunodeficiency virus of macaques in primary macrophages but not in T cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Bellas, R E; Hopkins, N; Li, Y

    1993-01-01

    We demonstrate here that the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) binding site in the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac) long terminal repeat is essential for efficient virus replication in primary alveolar macrophages but dispensable for efficient replication in primary T cells. Mutation of the NF-kappa B site does not seriously impair replication of a T-cell-tropic SIVmac239 or a macrophagetropic SIVmacEm* in peripheral blood lymphocytes or established CD4+ cell lines; however, mutation of the NF-kappa B site prevents efficient SIVmacEm* replication in primary alveolar macrophages. These data suggest that efficient replication in primary macrophages requires both envelope and long terminal repeat determinants. Images PMID:8474179

  14. Triple synergism of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1-encoded tax, GATA-binding protein, and AP-1 is required for constitutive expression of the interleukin-5 gene in adult T-cell leukemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yamagata, T; Mitani, K; Ueno, H; Kanda, Y; Yazaki, Y; Hirai, H

    1997-01-01

    Accumulated evidence demonstrates that adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is frequently associated with eosinophilia, and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected cells frequently express interleukin-5 (IL-5). However, the molecular mechanism of constitutive IL-5 expression in HTLV-1-infected cells remains unclear. To clarify the mechanism of aberrant IL-5 expression in HTLV-1-infected cells, we investigated the response of the human IL-5 promoter to the HTLV-1-encoded protein Tax. Cotransfection experiments using Jurkat cells revealed that Tax is incapable of activating the IL-5 promoter by itself but that it synergistically transactivates the promoter with GATA-binding protein (GATA-4) and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) stimulation. By introducing a series of mutations within the IL-5 promoter, we found that conserved lymphokine element 0 (CLE0) is responsible for mediating the signal induced by Tax-TPA. A deletion construct of the promoter indicated that the -75 GATA element and CLE0 are sufficient to mediate synergistic activation of the IL-5 promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays using Jurkat cell nuclear extracts demonstrated that TPA induces a transcription factor to bind CLE0, and an experiment using JPX-9 cell nuclear extracts showed that Tax enhances this binding activity. An antibody supershift experiment revealed that this band consists of c-Jun and JunD. However, among the Jun family members, only c-Jun is able to cooperate with Tax and GATA-4 to activate the IL-5 promoter. We have determined the minimum factors required for IL-5 gene activation by reconstituting the IL-5 promoter activity in F9 cells. This is the first report to demonstrate the functional involvement of Tax protein in IL-5 gene regulation and to suggest the functional triple synergism among Tax, GATA-4, and AP-1, which disrupts regulated control of the gene and leads to constitutive expression of the IL-5 gene. PMID:9234684

  15. SLAM-SAP signaling promotes differentiation of IL-17-producing T cells and progression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Tsai, Kevin; Ma, Caixia; Vallance, Bruce A; Priatel, John J; Tan, Rusung

    2014-12-15

    IL-17 plays critical roles in host defenses, combating bacterial and fungal infections, as well as the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The signaling adaptor SAP is essential for normal immune homeostasis and mutations within SH2D1A, the locus encoding this protein, result in serious and sometimes fatal syndromes, including X-linked lymphoproliferative disease and severe cases of common variable immunodeficiency. However, the precise cellular basis of how SAP deficiency contributes to immune dysfunction remains incompletely understood. In this study, we found that CD4 and CD8 T cells lacking SAP had a diminished capacity to differentiate into IL-17-producing Th17 and T cytotoxic (Tc17) cells relative to wild-type lymphocytes. The use of costimulating SLAM Abs was found to augment the differentiation of IL-17-secreting effectors in wild-type but not Sh2d1a(-/-) splenic T cells under IL-17-polarizing conditions. In addition, SAP's regulation of IL-17-secreting T cells was shown to be a T cell-intrinsic role, as purified naive Sh2d1a(-/-) CD4 and CD8 T cells were inherently defective at converting into Th17 and Tc17 cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, Sh2d1a(-/-) mice were protected from EAE and exhibited greatly decreased numbers of CNS-infiltrating Th17 and Tc17 effector T cells and reduced disease severity. Collectively, these results suggest that SLAM-SAP signaling drives the differentiation and function of Th17 and Tc17 cells in vitro and in vivo and contributes to the pathogenesis of autoimmunity in EAE. PMID:25362182

  16. The Extracellular Domain of CD83 Inhibits Dendritic Cell–mediated T Cell Stimulation and Binds to a Ligand on Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lechmann, Matthias; Krooshoop, Daniëlle J.E.B.; Dudziak, Diana; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Kuhnt, Christine; Figdor, Carl G.; Schuler, Gerold; Steinkasserer, Alexander

    2001-01-01

    CD83 is an immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily member that is upregulated during the maturation of dendritic cells (DCs). It has been widely used as a marker for mature DCs, but its function is still unknown. To approach its potential functional role, we have expressed the extracellular Ig domain of human CD83 (hCD83ext) as a soluble protein. Using this tool we could show that immature as well as mature DCs bind to CD83. Since CD83 binds a ligand also expressed on immature DCs, which do not express CD83, indicates that binding is not a homophilic interaction. In addition we demonstrate that hCD83ext interferes with DC maturation downmodulating the expression of CD80 and CD83, while no phenotypical effects were observed on T cells. Finally, we show that hCD83ext inhibits DC-dependent allogeneic and peptide-specific T cell proliferation in a concentration dependent manner in vitro. This is the first report regarding functional aspects of CD83 and the binding of CD83 to DCs. PMID:11748282

  17. Structure and Function of a Fungal Adhesin that Binds Heparin and Mimics Thrombospondin-1 by Blocking T Cell Activation and Effector Function

    PubMed Central

    Brandhorst, T. Tristan; Roy, René; Wüthrich, Marcel; Nanjappa, Som; Filutowicz, Hanna; Galles, Kevin; Tonelli, Marco; McCaslin, Darrell R.; Satyshur, Kenneth; Klein, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Blastomyces adhesin-1 (BAD-1) is a 120-kD surface protein on B. dermatitidis yeast. We show here that BAD-1 contains 41 tandem repeats and that deleting even half of them impairs fungal pathogenicity. According to NMR, the repeats form tightly folded 17-amino acid loops constrained by a disulfide bond linking conserved cysteines. Each loop contains a highly conserved WxxWxxW motif found in thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) type 1 heparin-binding repeats. BAD-1 binds heparin specifically and saturably, and is competitively inhibited by soluble heparin, but not related glycosaminoglycans. According to SPR analysis, the affinity of BAD-1 for heparin is 33 nM±14 nM. Putative heparin-binding motifs are found both at the N-terminus and within each tandem repeat loop. Like TSP-1, BAD-1 blocks activation of T cells in a manner requiring the heparan sulfate-modified surface molecule CD47, and impairs effector functions. The tandem repeats of BAD-1 thus confer pathogenicity, harbor motifs that bind heparin, and suppress T-cell activation via a CD47-dependent mechanism, mimicking mammalian TSP-1. PMID:23853587

  18. IFNγ Signaling Endows DCs with the Capacity to Control Type I Inflammation during Parasitic Infection through Promoting T-bet+ Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyang-Mi; Fleige, Anne; Forman, Ruth; Cho, Sunglim; Khan, Aly Azeem; Lin, Ling-Li; Nguyen, Duc T.; O'Hara-Hall, Aisling; Yin, Zhinan; Hunter, Christopher A.; Muller, Werner; Lu, Li-Fan

    2015-01-01

    IFNγ signaling drives dendritic cells (DCs) to promote type I T cell (Th1) immunity. Here, we show that activation of DCs by IFNγ is equally crucial for the differentiation of a population of T-bet+ regulatory T (Treg) cells specialized to inhibit Th1 immune responses. Conditional deletion of IFNγ receptor in DCs but not in Treg cells resulted in a severe defect in this specific Treg cell subset, leading to exacerbated immune pathology during parasitic infections. Mechanistically, IFNγ-unresponsive DCs failed to produce sufficient amount of IL-27, a cytokine required for optimal T-bet induction in Treg cells. Thus, IFNγ signalling endows DCs with the ability to efficiently control a specific type of T cell immunity through promoting a corresponding Treg cell population. PMID:25658840

  19. Interleukin-21 is associated with the severity of psoriasis vulgaris through promoting CD4+ T cells to differentiate into Th17 cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Li-Li; Yang, Hao-Yu; Wang, Fei-Fei; Zhang, Xue-Xiu; Bai, Yan-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-21 (IL-21) and T helper 17 (Th17) cells are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, but little is known about their relationship in psoriasis. Herein, we investigated whether IL-21 could regulate Th17 cell induction in patients with psoriasis vulgaris. 32 patients with psoriasis vulgaris and 13 healthy controls were recruited. Flow cytometry was used to detect the frequencies of cells mainly secreting IL-21 (including IL-21+CD4+ T and IL-21+ Th17 cells) and Th17 cells. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to determine the serum content of IL-21. Severity of the psoriasis was evaluated by a Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) score. In addition, the differentiation of CD4+ T cells with IL-21 and the different frequencies of IL-21+CD4+ T cells, IL-21+ Th17 cells and Th17 cells were assessed, as were serum levels of IL-21 in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis before and after treatment. Our results showed that the levels of IL-21, IL-21+CD4+ T cells, IL-21+ Th17 cells and Th17 cells were significantly increased in patients and positively associated with PASI score (P < 0.01). Moreover, the levels of IL-21, IL-21+CD4+ T cells and IL-21+ Th17 cells were positively correlated with the frequency of Th17 cells (P < 0.01). In vitro experiments demonstrated that IL-21 could promote CD4+ T cells to differentiate into Th17 cells. After a 4-week treatment of acitretin and a topical therapy, all the immune markers observed in patients decreased significantly (P < 0.01), but the levels remained higher than those in healthy controls (P < 0.01). These findings indicate that IL-21 might promote Th17 cell induction in psoriasis and might be a potential immune marker for targeting this disease. PMID:27508040

  20. Biphasic function of TLR3 adjuvant on tumor and spleen dendritic cells promotes tumor T cell infiltration and regression in a vaccine therapy.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Masahiro; Takeda, Yohei; Nakajima, Hiroko; Sugiyama, Haruo; Ebihara, Takashi; Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Misako; Seya, Tsukasa

    2016-08-01

    Successful cancer immunotherapy necessitates T cell proliferation and infiltration into tumor without exhaustion, a process closely links optimal maturation of dendritic cells (DC), and adjuvant promotes this process as an essential prerequisite. Poly(I:C) has contributed to adjuvant immunotherapy that evokes an antitumor response through the Toll-loke receptor 3 (TLR3)/TICAM-1 pathway in DC. However, the mechanism whereby Poly(I:C) acts on DC for T cell proliferation and migration remains undetermined. Subcutaneous injection of Poly(I:C) regressed implant tumors (WT1-C1498 or OVA-EG7) in C57BL/6 mice, which coincided with tumor-infiltration of CD8(+) T cells. Epitope-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) were increased in spleen by challenge with Poly(I:C)+Db126 WT-1 peptide but not Poly(I:C) alone, suggesting the need of an exogenous Ag density for cross-priming. In tumor, CXCR3 ligands were upregulated by Poly(I:C), which facilitated recruitment of CTL to the tumor. Thus, Poly(I:C) acts on splenic CD8α(+) DC to cross-prime T cells and on intratumor cells to attract CTLs. Besides CD8(+) T cell cross-priming, T cell recruitment into tumor was significantly dampened in Batf3 (-/-) mice, reflecting the importance of tumor Batf3-dependent DC rather than macrophages in T cell recruitment. Poly(I:C)-induced XCR1(hi) CD8α(+) DC with high TLR3 levels were markedly decreased in Batf3 (-/-) mice, which hampered the production of IL-12 and IL-12-mediated CD4(+)/CD8(+) T cell proliferation. Subcutaneous administration of Poly(I:C) and adoptive transfer of wild-type CD8α(+) DC largely recovered antitumor response in those Batf3 (-/-) mice. Collectively, Poly(I:C) tunes up proper maturation of CD8α(+) DC to establish TLR3-mediated IL-12 function and cross-presentation in spleen and lymphocyte-attractive antitumor microenvironment in tumor. PMID:27622060

  1. Increased expression of TLR2 in CD4(+) T cells from SLE patients enhances immune reactivity and promotes IL-17 expression through histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Liao, Jieyue; Zhao, Ming; Wu, Haijing; Yung, Susan; Chan, Tak Mao; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Lu, Qianjin

    2015-09-01

    The innate immune system has been shown to play an important pathologic role in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). TLR2, a PRR, recognizes exogenous PAMPs, and endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns and has been implicated in the initiation and maintenance of the perpetuated inflammatory reactions in autoimmune diseases. Here, we report increased expression of TLR2 in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, CD19(+) B cells, and CD14(+) monocytes from SLE patients. Conventional treatment, such as hydroxychloroquine and corticosteroids, showed no effect on TLR2 expression in CD4(+) T cells from SLE patients. In vitro stimulation of TLR2 in CD4(+) T cells from SLE patients increased CD40L and CD70 expression, as well as secretion of IL-6, IL-17A, IL-17F, and TNF-α, while Foxp3 transcription decreased. This effect was reversed by TLR2 siRNA. Moreover, TLR2 activation upregulated H3K4 tri-methylation and H4 acetylation levels while downregulated H3K9 tri-methylation level in the IL-17A promoter region. In addition, it also increased H4 acetylation levels and decreased H3K9 tri-methylation levels in the IL-17F promoter region. In summary, our findings demonstrate that increased expression of TLR2 contributes to immune reactivity and promotes IL-17A and IL-17F expression through histone modifications in SLE. PMID:26079624

  2. Gene Expression Driven by a Strong Viral Promoter in MVA Increases Vaccination Efficiency by Enhancing Antibody Responses and Unmasking CD8+ T Cell Epitope

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Pablo D.; Nörder, Miriam; Weissmann, Sebastian; Ljapoci, Ronny; Erfle, Volker; Drexler, Ingo; Guzmán, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    Viral vectors are promising tools for vaccination strategies and immunotherapies. However, CD8+ T cell responses against pathogen-derived epitopes are usually limited to dominant epitopes and antibody responses to recombinant encoded antigens (Ags) are mostly weak. We have previously demonstrated that the timing of viral Ag expression in infected professional Ag-presenting cells strongly shapes the epitope immunodominance hierarchy. T cells recognizing determinants derived from late viral proteins have a clear disadvantage to proliferate during secondary responses. In this work we evaluate the effect of overexpressing the recombinant Ag using the modified vaccinia virus early/late promoter H5 (mPH5). Although the Ag-expression from the natural promoter 7.5 (P7.5) and the mPH5 seemed similar, detailed analysis showed that mPH5 not only induces higher expression levels than P7.5 during early phase of infection, but also Ag turnover is enhanced. The strong overexpression during the early phase leads to broader CD8 T cell responses, while preserving the priming efficiency of stable Ags. Moreover, the increase in Ag-secretion favors the induction of strong antibody responses. Our findings provide the rationale to develop new strategies for fine-tuning the responses elicited by recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara by using selected promoters to improve the performance of this viral vector. PMID:26344747

  3. Up-regulation of Store-operated Ca2+ Entry and Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells Promote the Acinar Phenotype of the Primary Human Salivary Gland Cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Shyh-Ing; Ong, Hwei Ling; Liu, Xibao; Alevizos, Ilias; Ambudkar, Indu S

    2016-04-15

    The signaling pathways involved in the generation and maintenance of exocrine gland acinar cells have not yet been established. Primary human salivary gland epithelial cells, derived from salivary gland biopsies, acquired an acinar-like phenotype when the [Ca(2+)] in the serum-free medium (keratinocyte growth medium, KGM) was increased from 0.05 mm (KGM-L) to 1.2 mm (KGM-H). Here we examined the mechanism underlying this Ca(2+)-dependent generation of the acinar cell phenotype. Compared with cells in KGM-L, those in KGM-H display enhancement of Orai1, STIM1, STIM2, and nuclear factor of activated T cells 1 (NFAT1) expression together with an increase in store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), SOCE-dependent nuclear translocation of pGFP-NFAT1, and NFAT-dependent but not NFκB-dependent gene expression. Importantly, AQP5, an acinar-specific protein critical for function, is up-regulated in KGM-H via SOCE/NFAT-dependent gene expression. We identified critical NFAT binding motifs in the AQP5 promoter that are involved in Ca(2+)-dependent up-regulation of AQP5. These important findings reveal that the Ca(2+)-induced switch of salivary epithelial cells to an acinar-like phenotype involves remodeling of SOCE and NFAT signaling, which together control the expression of proteins critically relevant for acinar cell function. Our data provide a novel strategy for generating and maintaining acinar cells in culture. PMID:26903518

  4. Gamma delta T cells promote inflammation and insulin resistance during high fat diet-induced obesity in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gamma delta T cells are resident in adipose tissue and increase during diet-induced obesity. Their possible contribution to the inflammatory response that accompanies diet-induced obesity was investigated in mice after a 5-10 week high milk fat diet. The high milk fat diet resulted in significant in...

  5. LFA-1/ICAM-1 Ligation in Human T Cells Promotes Th1 Polarization through a GSK3β Signaling-Dependent Notch Pathway.

    PubMed

    Verma, Navin K; Fazil, M H U Turabe; Ong, Seow Theng; Chalasani, Madhavi Latha S; Low, Jian Hui; Kottaiswamy, Amuthavalli; P, Praseetha; Kizhakeyil, Atish; Kumar, Sunil; Panda, Aditya K; Freeley, Michael; Smith, Sinead M; Boehm, Bernhard O; Kelleher, Dermot

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we report that the integrin LFA-1 cross-linking with its ligand ICAM-1 in human PBMCs or CD4(+) T cells promotes Th1 polarization by upregulating IFN-γ secretion and T-bet expression. LFA-1 stimulation in PBMCs, CD4(+) T cells, or the T cell line HuT78 activates the Notch pathway by nuclear translocation of cleaved Notch1 intracellular domain (NICD) and upregulation of target molecules Hey1 and Hes1. Blocking LFA-1 by a neutralizing Ab or specific inhibition of Notch1 by a γ-secretase inhibitor substantially inhibits LFA-1/ICAM-1-mediated activation of Notch signaling. We further demonstrate that the Notch pathway activation is dependent on LFA-1/ICAM-1-induced inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), which is mediated via Akt and ERK. Furthermore, in silico analysis in combination with coimmunoprecipitation assays show an interaction between NICD and GSK3β. Thus, there exists a molecular cross-talk between LFA-1 and Notch1 through the Akt/ERK-GSK3β signaling axis that ultimately enhances T cell differentiation toward Th1. Although clinical use of LFA-1 antagonists is limited by toxicity related to immunosuppression, these findings support the concept that Notch inhibitors could be attractive for prevention or treatment of Th1-related immunologic disorders and have implications at the level of local inflammatory responses. PMID:27206767

  6. The Receptor Complex Associated with Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 3 (HTLV-3) Env-Mediated Binding and Entry Is Distinct from, but Overlaps with, the Receptor Complexes of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2▿

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kathryn S.; Huang, Ying K.; Chevalier, Sébastien A.; Afonso, Philippe V.; Petrow-Sadowski, Cari; Bertolette, Daniel C.; Gessain, Antoine; Ruscetti, Francis W.; Mahieux, Renaud

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the transmission or tropism of the newly discovered human retrovirus, human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 3 (HTLV-3). Here, we examine the entry requirements of HTLV-3 using independently expressed Env proteins. We observed that HTLV-3 surface glycoprotein (SU) binds efficiently to both activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. This contrasts with both HTLV-1 SU, which primarily binds to activated CD4+ T cells, and HTLV-2 SU, which primarily binds to activated CD8+ T cells. Binding studies with heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) and neuropilin-1 (NRP-1), two molecules important for HTLV-1 entry, revealed that these molecules also enhance HTLV-3 SU binding. However, unlike HTLV-1 SU, HTLV-3 SU can bind efficiently in the absence of both HSPGs and NRP-1. Studies of entry performed with HTLV-3 Env-pseudotyped viruses together with SU binding studies revealed that, for HTLV-1, glucose transporter 1 (GLUT-1) functions at a postbinding step during HTLV-3 Env-mediated entry. Further studies revealed that HTLV-3 SU binds efficiently to naïve CD4+ T cells, which do not bind either HTLV-1 or HTLV-2 SU and do not express detectable levels of HSPGs, NRP-1, and GLUT-1. These results indicate that the complex of receptor molecules used by HTLV-3 to bind to primary T lymphocytes differs from that of both HTLV-1 and HTLV-2. PMID:19279090

  7. The distal upstream promoter in Ly49 genes, Pro1, is active in mature NK cells and T cells, does not require TATA boxes, and displays enhancer activity1

    PubMed Central

    Gays, Frances; Taha, Sally; Brooks, Colin G.

    2016-01-01

    Missing self recognition of MHC class I molecules is mediated in murine species through the stochastic expression of CD94/NKG2 and Ly49 receptors on NK cells. Previous studies have suggested that the stochastic expression of Ly49 receptors is achieved through the use of an alternate upstream promoter, designated Pro1, that is active only in immature NK cells, and operates via the mutually exclusive binding of transcription initiation complexes to closely opposed forward and reverse TATA boxes, forward transcription being transiently required to activate the downstream promoters, Pro2/Pro3, that are subsequently responsible for transcription in mature NK cells. Here we report that Pro1 transcripts are not restricted to immature NK cells but are also found in mature NK cells and T cells, and that Pro1-fragments display strong promoter activity in mature NK cell and T cell lines as well as in immature NK cells. However, the strength of promoter activity in vitro does not correlate well with Ly49 expression in vivo and forward promoter activity is generally weak or undetectable, suggesting that components outside of Pro1 are required for efficient forward transcription. Indeed, conserved sequences immediately upstream and downstream of the core Pro1 region were found to inhibit or enhance promoter activity. Most surprisingly, promoter activity does not require either the forward or reverse TATA boxes, but is instead dependent on residues in the largely invariant central region of Pro1. Importantly, Pro1 displays strong enhancer activity suggesting that this may be its principal function in vivo. PMID:25926675

  8. Splenic Long-Lived Plasma Cells Promote the Development of Follicular Helper T Cells during Autoimmune Responses.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eunkyeong; Cho, Wang Sik; Oh, Yeon-Kyung; Cho, Mi-La; Kim, Jung Mogg; Paik, Doo-Jin; Youn, Jeehee

    2016-02-01

    Long-lived plasma cells (LLPCs) develop under the help of follicular helper T (Tfh) cells and reside mainly in the bone marrow. However, these cells are unusually abundant in the spleen of several autoimmune models including K/BxNsf mice, yet their pathogenic impact remains unknown. To investigate a previously unappreciated role of splenic LLPCs, we sorted splenic plasma cells (PCs) from K/BxNsf and K/BxN mice, corresponding to LLPCs and conventional short-lived PCs, respectively, and compared their phenotypes and ability to prime and induce the differentiation of naive CD4(+) T cells into effector cells in vitro and in vivo. We found that K/BxNsf PCs had lower levels of the Ag presentation machinery and costimulators than K/BxN PCs, and also a lower CD4(+) T cell priming capacity. Autoantigen-pulsed K/BxNsf PCs selectively polarized cognate CD4(+) T cells toward the expression of molecules necessary for Tfh development and function. As a result, the K/BxNsf PC-primed CD4(+) T cells were more effective in stimulating B cells to produce autoantigen-specific IgGs than K/BxN PCs or even dendritic cells. Adoptive transfer of K/BxNsf PCs, but not K/BxN PCs, to K/BxN mice increased numbers of Tfh cells in draining lymph nodes. These results propose that abnormal accumulation of LLPCs in the spleen of autoimmune models drives the differentiation of autoantigen-primed CD4(+) T cells to Tfh cells. This positive feedback loop between splenic LLPCs and Tfh cells may contribute to the persistence of humoral autoimmunity. PMID:26729802

  9. A Novel Copper Chelate Modulates Tumor Associated Macrophages to Promote Anti-Tumor Response of T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Paramita; Ganguly, Avishek; Adhikary, Arghya; Mukhopadhyay, Debanjan; Ganguli, Sudipta; Banerjee, Rajdeep; Ashraf, Mohammad; Biswas, Jaydip; Das, Pradeep K.; Sa, Gourisankar; Chatterjee, Mitali; Das, Tanya; Choudhuri, Soumitra Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Background At the early stages of carcinogenesis, the induction of tumor specific T cell mediated immunity seems to block the tumor growth and give protective anti-tumor immune response. However, tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) might play an immunosuppressive role and subvert this anti tumor immunity leading to tumor progression and metastasis. Methodology/Principal Findings The Cu (II) complex, (chelate), copper N-(2-hydroxy acetophenone) glycinate (CuNG), synthesized by us, has previously been shown to have a potential usefulness in immunotherapy of multiple drug resistant cancers. The current study demonstrates that CuNG treatment of TAMs modulates their status from immunosuppressive to proimmunogenic nature. Interestingly, these activated TAMs produced high levels of IL-12 along with low levels of IL-10 that not only allowed strong Th1 response marked by generation of high levels of IFN-γ but also reduced activation induced T cell death. Similarly, CuNG treatment of peripheral blood monocytes from chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy refractory cancer patients also modulated their cytokine status. Most intriguingly, CuNG treated TAMs could influence reprogramming of TGF-β producing CD4+CD25+ T cells toward IFN-γ producing T cells. Conclusion/Significance Our results show the potential usefulness of CuNG in immunotherapy of drug-resistant cancers through reprogramming of TAMs that in turn reprogram the T cells and reeducate the T helper function to elicit proper anti-tumorogenic Th1 response leading to effective reduction in tumor growth. PMID:19756150

  10. Endothelial CD47 promotes Vascular Endothelial-cadherin tyrosine phosphorylation and participates in T-cell recruitment at sites of inflammation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Azcutia, Veronica; Stefanidakis, Michael; Tsuboi, Naotake; Mayadas, Tanya; Croce, Kevin J.; Fukuda, Daiju; Aikawa, Masanori; Newton, Gail; Luscinskas, Francis W.

    2012-01-01

    At sites of inflammation, endothelial adhesion molecules bind leukocytes and transmit signals required for transendothelial migration (TEM). We previously reported that adhesive interactions between endothelial cell CD47 and leukocyte Signal Regulatory Proteinγ (SIRPγ) regulate human T-cell TEM. The role of endothelial CD47 in T-cell TEM in vivo, however, has not been explored. Here, CD47−/− mice showed reduced recruitment of blood T-cells as well as neutrophils and monocytes in a dermal air pouch model of TNF-α induced inflammation. Reconstitution of CD47−/− mice with wild type bone marrow (BM) cells did not restore leukocyte recruitment to the air pouch, indicating a role for endothelial CD47. The defect in leukocyte TEM in the CD47−/− endothelium was corroborated by intravital microscopy of inflamed cremaster muscle microcirculation in BM chimera mice. In an in vitro human system, CD47 on both HUVEC and T-cells were required for TEM. Although previous studies showed CD47-dependent signaling required Gαi coupled pathways, this was not the case for endothelial CD47 because pertussis toxin (PTX), which inactivates Gαi, had no inhibitory effect, whereas Gαi was required by the T-cell for TEM. We next investigated the endothelial CD47-dependent signaling events that accompany leukocyte TEM. Antibody-induced crosslinking of CD47 revealed robust actin cytoskeleton reorganization and Src and Pyk-2 kinase dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of the VE-cadherin cytoplasmic tail. This signaling was PTX insensitive suggesting that endothelial CD47 signaling is independent of Gαi. These findings suggest that engagement of endothelial CD47 by its ligands triggers “outside-in” signals in endothelium that facilitate leukocyte TEM. PMID:22815286