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Sample records for promote threshold-like shifts

  1. How Citation Boosts Promote Scientific Paradigm Shifts and Nobel Prizes

    PubMed Central

    Mazloumian, Amin; Eom, Young-Ho; Helbing, Dirk; Lozano, Sergi; Fortunato, Santo

    2011-01-01

    Nobel Prizes are commonly seen to be among the most prestigious achievements of our times. Based on mining several million citations, we quantitatively analyze the processes driving paradigm shifts in science. We find that groundbreaking discoveries of Nobel Prize Laureates and other famous scientists are not only acknowledged by many citations of their landmark papers. Surprisingly, they also boost the citation rates of their previous publications. Given that innovations must outcompete the rich-gets-richer effect for scientific citations, it turns out that they can make their way only through citation cascades. A quantitative analysis reveals how and why they happen. Science appears to behave like a self-organized critical system, in which citation cascades of all sizes occur, from continuous scientific progress all the way up to scientific revolutions, which change the way we see our world. Measuring the “boosting effect” of landmark papers, our analysis reveals how new ideas and new players can make their way and finally triumph in a world dominated by established paradigms. The underlying “boost factor” is also useful to discover scientific breakthroughs and talents much earlier than through classical citation analysis, which by now has become a widespread method to measure scientific excellence, influencing scientific careers and the distribution of research funds. Our findings reveal patterns of collective social behavior, which are also interesting from an attention economics perspective. Understanding the origin of scientific authority may therefore ultimately help to explain how social influence comes about and why the value of goods depends so strongly on the attention they attract. PMID:21573229

  2. How citation boosts promote scientific paradigm shifts and nobel prizes.

    PubMed

    Mazloumian, Amin; Eom, Young-Ho; Helbing, Dirk; Lozano, Sergi; Fortunato, Santo

    2011-01-01

    Nobel Prizes are commonly seen to be among the most prestigious achievements of our times. Based on mining several million citations, we quantitatively analyze the processes driving paradigm shifts in science. We find that groundbreaking discoveries of Nobel Prize Laureates and other famous scientists are not only acknowledged by many citations of their landmark papers. Surprisingly, they also boost the citation rates of their previous publications. Given that innovations must outcompete the rich-gets-richer effect for scientific citations, it turns out that they can make their way only through citation cascades. A quantitative analysis reveals how and why they happen. Science appears to behave like a self-organized critical system, in which citation cascades of all sizes occur, from continuous scientific progress all the way up to scientific revolutions, which change the way we see our world. Measuring the "boosting effect" of landmark papers, our analysis reveals how new ideas and new players can make their way and finally triumph in a world dominated by established paradigms. The underlying "boost factor" is also useful to discover scientific breakthroughs and talents much earlier than through classical citation analysis, which by now has become a widespread method to measure scientific excellence, influencing scientific careers and the distribution of research funds. Our findings reveal patterns of collective social behavior, which are also interesting from an attention economics perspective. Understanding the origin of scientific authority may therefore ultimately help to explain how social influence comes about and why the value of goods depends so strongly on the attention they attract. PMID:21573229

  3. Biochar Treatment Resulted in a Combined Effect on Soybean Growth Promotion and a Shift in Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Egamberdieva, Dilfuza; Wirth, Stephan; Behrendt, Undine; Abd_Allah, Elsayed F.; Berg, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    The application of biochar to soil is considered to have the potential for long-term soil carbon sequestration, as well as for improving plant growth and suppressing soil pathogens. In our study we evaluated the effect of biochar on the plant growth of soybeans, as well as on the community composition of root-associated bacteria with plant growth promoting traits. Two types of biochar, namely, maize biochar (MBC), wood biochar (WBC), and hydrochar (HTC) were used for pot experiments to monitor plant growth. Soybean plants grown in soil amended with HTC char (2%) showed the best performance and were collected for isolation and further characterization of root-associated bacteria for multiple plant growth promoting traits. Only HTC char amendment resulted in a statistically significant increase in the root and shoot dry weight of soybeans. Interestingly, rhizosphere isolates from HTC char amended soil showed higher diversity than the rhizosphere isolates from the control soil. In addition, a higher proportion of isolates from HTC char amended soil compared with control soil was found to express plant growth promoting properties and showed antagonistic activity against one or more phytopathogenic fungi. Our study provided evidence that improved plant growth by biochar incorporation into soil results from the combination of a direct effect that is dependent on the type of char and a microbiome shift in root-associated beneficial bacteria. PMID:26941730

  4. Biochar Treatment Resulted in a Combined Effect on Soybean Growth Promotion and a Shift in Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria.

    PubMed

    Egamberdieva, Dilfuza; Wirth, Stephan; Behrendt, Undine; Abd Allah, Elsayed F; Berg, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    The application of biochar to soil is considered to have the potential for long-term soil carbon sequestration, as well as for improving plant growth and suppressing soil pathogens. In our study we evaluated the effect of biochar on the plant growth of soybeans, as well as on the community composition of root-associated bacteria with plant growth promoting traits. Two types of biochar, namely, maize biochar (MBC), wood biochar (WBC), and hydrochar (HTC) were used for pot experiments to monitor plant growth. Soybean plants grown in soil amended with HTC char (2%) showed the best performance and were collected for isolation and further characterization of root-associated bacteria for multiple plant growth promoting traits. Only HTC char amendment resulted in a statistically significant increase in the root and shoot dry weight of soybeans. Interestingly, rhizosphere isolates from HTC char amended soil showed higher diversity than the rhizosphere isolates from the control soil. In addition, a higher proportion of isolates from HTC char amended soil compared with control soil was found to express plant growth promoting properties and showed antagonistic activity against one or more phytopathogenic fungi. Our study provided evidence that improved plant growth by biochar incorporation into soil results from the combination of a direct effect that is dependent on the type of char and a microbiome shift in root-associated beneficial bacteria. PMID:26941730

  5. Abstinence Promotion Under PEPFAR: The Shifting Focus of HIV Prevention For Youth

    PubMed Central

    Santelli, John S.; Speizer, Ilene S.; Edelstein, Zoe R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstinence-until-marriage (AUM) – strongly supported by religious conservatives in the U.S. - became a key element of initial HIV prevention efforts under the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). AUM programs have demonstrated limited efficacy in changing behaviors, promoted medically inaccurate information, and withheld life-saving information about risk reduction. A focus on AUM also undermined national efforts in Africa to create integrated youth HIV prevention programs. PEPFAR prevention efforts after 2008 shifted to science-based programming, however vestiges of AUM remain. Primary prevention programs within PEPFAR are essential and nations must be able to design HIV prevention based on local needs and prevention science. PMID:23327516

  6. Abstinence promotion under PEPFAR: the shifting focus of HIV prevention for youth.

    PubMed

    Santelli, John S; Speizer, Ilene S; Edelstein, Zoe R

    2013-01-01

    Abstinence-until-marriage (AUM) - strongly supported by religious conservatives in the USA - became a key element of initial human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention efforts under the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). AUM programmes have demonstrated limited efficacy in changing behaviours, promoted medically inaccurate information and withheld life-saving information about risk reduction. A focus on AUM also undermined national efforts in Africa to create integrated youth HIV prevention programmes. PEPFAR prevention efforts after 2008 shifted to science-based programming, however, vestiges of AUM remain. Primary prevention programmes within PEPFAR are essential and nations must be able to design HIV prevention based on local needs and prevention science. PMID:23327516

  7. Threshold-like complexation of conjugated polymers with small molecule acceptors in solution within the neighbor-effect model.

    PubMed

    Sosorev, Andrey Yu; Parashchuk, Olga D; Zapunidi, Sergey A; Kashtanov, Grigoriy S; Golovnin, Ilya V; Kommanaboyina, Srikanth; Perepichka, Igor F; Paraschuk, Dmitry Yu

    2016-02-14

    In some donor-acceptor blends based on conjugated polymers, a pronounced charge-transfer complex (CTC) forms in the electronic ground state. In contrast to small-molecule donor-acceptor blends, the CTC concentration in polymer:acceptor solution can increase with the acceptor content in a threshold-like way. This threshold-like behavior was earlier attributed to the neighbor effect (NE) in the polymer complexation, i.e., next CTCs are preferentially formed near the existing ones; however, the NE origin is unknown. To address the factors affecting the NE, we record the optical absorption data for blends of the most studied conjugated polymers, poly(2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene) (MEH-PPV) and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), with electron acceptors of fluorene series, 1,8-dinitro-9,10-antraquinone (), and 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane () in different solvents, and then analyze the data within the NE model. We have found that the NE depends on the polymer and acceptor molecular skeletons and solvent, while it does not depend on the acceptor electron affinity and polymer concentration. We conclude that the NE operates within a single macromolecule and stems from planarization of the polymer chain involved in the CTC with an acceptor molecule; as a result, the probability of further complexation with the next acceptor molecules at the adjacent repeat units increases. The steric and electronic microscopic mechanisms of NE are discussed. PMID:26799407

  8. Strength cues and blocking at test promote reliable within-list criterion shifts in recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Jason L; Starns, Jeffrey J

    2014-07-01

    In seven experiments, we explored the potential for strength-based, within-list criterion shifts in recognition memory. People studied a mix of target words, some presented four times (strong) and others studied once (weak). In Experiments 1, 2, 4A, and 4B, the test was organized into alternating blocks of 10, 20, or 40 trials. Each block contained lures intermixed with strong targets only or weak targets only. In strength-cued conditions, test probes appeared in a unique font color for strong and weak blocks. In the uncued conditions of Experiments 1 and 2, similar strength blocks were tested, but strength was not cued with font color. False alarms to lures were lower in blocks containing strong target words, as compared with lures in blocks containing weak targets, but only when strength was cued with font color. Providing test feedback in Experiment 2 did not alter these results. In Experiments 3A-3C, test items were presented in a random order (i.e., not blocked by strength). Of these three experiments, only one demonstrated a significant shift even though strength cues were provided. Overall, the criterion shift was larger and more reliable as block size increased, and the shift occurred only when strength was cued with font color. These results clarify the factors that affect participants' willingness to change their response criterion within a test list. PMID:24523046

  9. Identifying Teacher Needs for Promoting Education through Science as a Paradigm Shift in Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holbrook, J.; Rannikmae, M.; Valdmann, A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper identifies an "education through science" philosophy for school science teaching at the secondary level and determines its interrelationship with approaches to student acquisition of key educational competences and the identification of teacher needs to promote meaningful learning during science lessons. Based on the…

  10. Sub-threshold-like charge transport in organic field effect transistor: A study on effective channel thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavala, A. K.; Mukherjee, A. K.

    2015-09-01

    A short channel organic field effect transistors (OFET) based on Pentacene, having channel length in the range of sub-micrometer, has been numerically modelled for low values of drain voltage. The output characteristics show a nonlinear concave increase of drain current for all values of gate voltages. This anomalous current-voltage behavior, which resembles sub-threshold characteristics of silicon FETs, shows a good match with earlier experimental reports on OFET at low drain voltages. The sub-threshold-like characteristics has been interpreted in light of thermionic-emission model because of the presence of hole injection barrier at drain (gold)/Pentacene interface. The associated analysis has facilitated to obtain a significant parameter, effective channel thickness (teff), for the first time in case of OFETs. It came out to be roughly 4 nm and 8 nm for experimental devices of poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) and Pentacene, respectively, while the numerically modelled device yielded a value of about 60 nm. Increase of teff with transverse gate electric field is also observed. Physical explanation of the observations is also presented.

  11. Bacterial Community Shift Drives Antibiotic Resistance Promotion during Drinking Water Chlorination.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shuyu; Shi, Peng; Hu, Qing; Li, Bing; Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Xu-Xiang

    2015-10-20

    For comprehensive insights into the effects of chlorination, a widely used disinfection technology, on bacterial community and antibiotic resistome in drinking water, this study applied high-throughput sequencing and metagenomic approaches to investigate the changing patterns of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and bacterial community in a drinking water treatment and distribution system. At genus level, chlorination could effectively remove Methylophilus, Methylotenera, Limnobacter, and Polynucleobacter, while increase the relative abundance of Pseudomonas, Acidovorax, Sphingomonas, Pleomonas, and Undibacterium in the drinking water. A total of 151 ARGs within 15 types were detectable in the drinking water, and chlorination evidently increased their total relative abundance while reduced their diversity in the opportunistic bacteria (p < 0.05). Residual chlorine was identified as the key contributing factor driving the bacterial community shift and resistome alteration. As the dominant persistent ARGs in the treatment and distribution system, multidrug resistance genes (mainly encoding resistance-nodulation-cell division transportation system) and bacitracin resistance gene bacA were mainly carried by chlorine-resistant bacteria Pseudomonas and Acidovorax, which mainly contributed to the ARGs abundance increase. The strong correlation between bacterial community shift and antibiotic resistome alteration observed in this study may shed new light on the mechanism behind the chlorination effects on antibiotic resistance. PMID:26397118

  12. Bmp4 Promotes a Brown to White-like Adipocyte Shift.

    PubMed

    Modica, Salvatore; Straub, Leon G; Balaz, Miroslav; Sun, Wenfei; Varga, Lukas; Stefanicka, Patrik; Profant, Milan; Simon, Eric; Neubauer, Heike; Ukropcova, Barbara; Ukropec, Jozef; Wolfrum, Christian

    2016-08-23

    While Bmp4 has a well-established role in the commitment of mesenchymal stem cells into the adipogenic lineage, its role in brown adipocyte formation and activity is not well defined. Here, we show that Bmp4 has a dual function in adipogenesis by inducing adipocyte commitment while inhibiting the acquisition of a brown phenotype during terminal differentiation. Selective brown adipose tissue overexpression of Bmp4 in mice induces a shift from a brown to a white-like adipocyte phenotype. This effect is mediated by Smad signaling and might be in part due to suppression of lipolysis, via regulation of hormone sensitive lipase expression linked to reduced Ppar activity. Given that we observed a strong correlation between BMP4 levels and adipocyte size, as well as insulin sensitivity in humans, we propose that Bmp4 is an important factor in the context of obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27524617

  13. Coral transplantation triggers shift in microbiome and promotion of coral disease associated potential pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Jordan M.; Connolly, Sean R.; Ainsworth, Tracy D.

    2015-01-01

    By cultivating turf algae and aggressively defending their territories, territorial damselfishes in the genus Stegastes play a major role in shaping coral-algal dynamics on coral reefs. The epilithic algal matrix (EAM) inside Stegastes’ territories is known to harbor high abundances of potential coral disease pathogens. To determine the impact of territorial grazers on coral microbial assemblages, we established a coral transplant inside and outside of Stegastes’ territories. Over the course of one year, the percent mortality of transplanted corals was monitored and coral samples were collected for microbial analysis. As compared to outside damselfish territories, Stegastes were associated with a higher rate of mortality of transplanted corals. However, 16S rDNA sequencing revealed that territorial grazers do not differentially impact the microbial assemblage of corals exposed to the EAM. Regardless of Stegastes presence or absence, coral transplantation resulted in a shift in the coral-associated microbial community and an increase in coral disease associated potential pathogens. Further, transplanted corals that suffer low to high mortality undergo a microbial transition from a microbiome similar to that of healthy corals to that resembling the EAM. These findings demonstrate that coral transplantation significantly impacts coral microbial communities, and transplantation may increase susceptibility to coral disease. PMID:26144865

  14. Coral transplantation triggers shift in microbiome and promotion of coral disease associated potential pathogens.

    PubMed

    Casey, Jordan M; Connolly, Sean R; Ainsworth, Tracy D

    2015-01-01

    By cultivating turf algae and aggressively defending their territories, territorial damselfishes in the genus Stegastes play a major role in shaping coral-algal dynamics on coral reefs. The epilithic algal matrix (EAM) inside Stegastes' territories is known to harbor high abundances of potential coral disease pathogens. To determine the impact of territorial grazers on coral microbial assemblages, we established a coral transplant inside and outside of Stegastes' territories. Over the course of one year, the percent mortality of transplanted corals was monitored and coral samples were collected for microbial analysis. As compared to outside damselfish territories, Stegastes were associated with a higher rate of mortality of transplanted corals. However, 16S rDNA sequencing revealed that territorial grazers do not differentially impact the microbial assemblage of corals exposed to the EAM. Regardless of Stegastes presence or absence, coral transplantation resulted in a shift in the coral-associated microbial community and an increase in coral disease associated potential pathogens. Further, transplanted corals that suffer low to high mortality undergo a microbial transition from a microbiome similar to that of healthy corals to that resembling the EAM. These findings demonstrate that coral transplantation significantly impacts coral microbial communities, and transplantation may increase susceptibility to coral disease. PMID:26144865

  15. Immunomodulatory Device Promotes a Shift of Circulating Monocytes to a Less Inflammatory Phenotype in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Szamosfalvi, Balazs; Westover, Angela; Buffington, Deborah; Yevzlin, Alexander; Humes, H David

    2016-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on chronic hemodialysis (HD) suffer accelerated morbidity and mortality rates caused by cardiovascular disease and infections. Chronic inflammation plays a critical role in these poor outcomes. The activated monocyte (MO) has become a prime therapeutic target to modulate this inflammatory process. A selective cytopheretic device (SCD) was evaluated to assess its effects on the circulating MO pool. A pilot trial was undertaken in 15 ESRD patients on HD with C-reactive protein (CRP) levels greater than 5 mg/dl. An excellent safety profile was observed with no decline in leukocyte (LE) or platelet counts. The effect of SCD therapy on MO phenotypes in these patients was determined on peripheral blood MO utilizing flow cytometry. SCD therapy promoted a shift in MO phenotype from predominantly CD14 expressing MO at baseline/pre-SCD therapy to CD14 expressing MO post-SCD therapy. A significant shift in MO population phenotype afforded by a single SCD therapy session was observed (p < 0.013). In a subset of patients (n = 7) presenting with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), this persistent decline in MO CD14 expression was sustained as long as 2 weeks posttherapy. These results demonstrate that the SCD therapy has the potential to modulate the chronic proinflammatory state in ESRD patients. PMID:27258222

  16. Tandem processes promoted by a hydrogen shift in 6-arylfulvenes bearing acetalic units at ortho position: a combined experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Alajarin, Mateo; Marin-Luna, Marta; Sanchez-Andrada, Pilar; Vidal, Angel

    2016-01-01

    6-Phenylfulvenes bearing (1,3-dioxolan or dioxan)-2-yl substituents at ortho position convert into mixtures of 4- and 9-(hydroxy)alkoxy-substituted benz[f]indenes as result of cascade processes initiated by a thermally activated hydrogen shift. Structurally related fulvenes with non-cyclic acetalic units afforded mixtures of 4- and 9-alkoxybenz[f]indenes under similar thermal conditions. Mechanistic paths promoted by an initial [1,4]-, [1,5]-, [1,7]- or [1,9]-H shift are conceivable for explaining these conversions. Deuterium labelling experiments exclude the [1,4]-hydride shift as the first step. A computational study scrutinized the reaction channels of these tandem conversions starting by [1,5]-, [1,7]- and [1,9]-H shifts, revealing that this first step is the rate-determining one and that the [1,9]-H shift is the one with the lowest energy barrier. PMID:26977185

  17. Tandem processes promoted by a hydrogen shift in 6-arylfulvenes bearing acetalic units at ortho position: a combined experimental and computational study

    PubMed Central

    Alajarin, Mateo; Marin-Luna, Marta; Vidal, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Summary 6-Phenylfulvenes bearing (1,3-dioxolan or dioxan)-2-yl substituents at ortho position convert into mixtures of 4- and 9-(hydroxy)alkoxy-substituted benz[f]indenes as result of cascade processes initiated by a thermally activated hydrogen shift. Structurally related fulvenes with non-cyclic acetalic units afforded mixtures of 4- and 9-alkoxybenz[f]indenes under similar thermal conditions. Mechanistic paths promoted by an initial [1,4]-, [1,5]-, [1,7]- or [1,9]-H shift are conceivable for explaining these conversions. Deuterium labelling experiments exclude the [1,4]-hydride shift as the first step. A computational study scrutinized the reaction channels of these tandem conversions starting by [1,5]-, [1,7]- and [1,9]-H shifts, revealing that this first step is the rate-determining one and that the [1,9]-H shift is the one with the lowest energy barrier. PMID:26977185

  18. Hypoxia shifts activity of neuropeptide Y in Ewing sarcoma from growth-inhibitory to growth-promoting effects

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Susana; Izycka-Swieszewska, Ewa; Earnest, Joshua Patrick; Shabbir, Asim; Everhart, Lindsay M.; Wang, Shuo; Martin, Samantha; Horton, Meredith; Mahajan, Akanksha; Christian, David; O'Neill, Alison; Wang, Hongkun; Zhuang, Tingting; Czarnecka, Magdalena; Johnson, Michael D.; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.; Kitlinska, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma (ES) is an aggressive malignancy driven by an oncogenic fusion protein, EWS-FLI1. Neuropeptide Y (NPY), and two of its receptors, Y1R and Y5R are up-regulated by EWS-FLI1 and abundantly expressed in ES cells. Paradoxically, NPY acting via Y1R and Y5R stimulates ES cell death. Here, we demonstrate that these growth-inhibitory actions of NPY are counteracted by hypoxia, which converts the peptide to a growth-promoting factor. In ES cells, hypoxia induces another NPY receptor, Y2R, and increases expression of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV), an enzyme that cleaves NPY to a shorter form, NPY3-36. This truncated peptide no longer binds to Y1R and, therefore, does not stimulate ES cell death. Instead, NPY3-36 acts as a selective Y2R/Y5R agonist. The hypoxia-induced increase in DPPIV activity is most evident in a population of ES cells with high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity, rich in cancer stem cells (CSCs). Consequently, NPY, acting via Y2R/Y5Rs, preferentially stimulates proliferation and migration of hypoxic ALDHhigh cells. Hypoxia also enhances the angiogenic potential of ES by inducing Y2Rs in endothelial cells and increasing the release of its ligand, NPY3-36, from ES cells. In summary, hypoxia acts as a molecular switch shifting NPY activity away from Y1R/Y5R-mediated cell death and activating the Y2R/Y5R/DPPIV/NPY3-36 axis, which stimulates ES CSCs and promotes angiogenesis. Hypoxia-driven actions of the peptide such as these may contribute to ES progression. Due to the receptor-specific and multifaceted nature of NPY actions, these findings may inform novel therapeutic approaches to ES. PMID:24318733

  19. Bisphenol A delays the perinatal chloride shift in cortical neurons by epigenetic effects on the Kcc2 promoter

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Michele; Berglund, Ken; Hanna, Michael; Guo, Junjie U.; Kittur, Jaya; Torres, Maria D.; Abramowitz, Joel; Busciglio, Jorge; Gao, Yuan; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Liedtke, Wolfgang B.

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a ubiquitous compound that is emerging as a possible toxicant during embryonic development. BPA has been shown to epigenetically affect the developing nervous system, but the molecular mechanisms are not clear. Here we demonstrate that BPA exposure in culture led to delay in the perinatal chloride shift caused by significant decrease in potassium chloride cotransporter 2 (Kcc2) mRNA expression in developing rat, mouse, and human cortical neurons. Neuronal chloride increased correspondingly. Treatment with epigenetic compounds decitabine and trichostatin A rescued the BPA effects as did knockdown of histone deacetylase 1 and combined knockdown histone deacetylase 1 and 2. Furthermore, BPA evoked increase in tangential interneuron migration and increased chloride in migrating neurons. Interestingly, BPA exerted its effect in a sexually dimorphic manner, with a more accentuated effect in females than males. By chromatin immunoprecipitation, we found a significant increase in binding of methyl-CpG binding protein 2 to the “cytosine-phosphate-guanine shores” of the Kcc2 promoter, and decrease in binding of acetylated histone H3K9 surrounding the transcriptional start site. Methyl-CpG binding protein 2-expressing neurons were more abundant resulting from BPA exposure. The sexually dimorphic effect of BPA on Kcc2 expression was also demonstrated in cortical neurons cultured from the offspring of BPA-fed mouse dams. In these neurons and in cortical slices, decitabine was found to rescue the effect of BPA on Kcc2 expression. Overall, our results indicate that BPA can disrupt Kcc2 gene expression through epigenetic mechanisms. Beyond increase in basic understanding, our findings have relevance for identifying unique neurodevelopmental toxicity mechanisms of BPA, which could possibly play a role in pathogenesis of human neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:23440186

  20. Threshold-like dose of local beta irradiation repeated throughout the life span of mice for induction of skin and bone tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Ootsuyama, A.; Tanooka, H. )

    1991-01-01

    The backs of female ICR mice were irradiated with beta rays from 90Sr-90Y three times a week throughout life. Previously we observed 100% tumor incidence at five different dose levels ranging from 1.5 to 11.8 Gy per exposure, but no tumor on repeated irradiation with 1.35 Gy for 300 days. In the present study, delay of tumor development was again seen at a dose of 1.5 Gy per exposure, with further delay at 1.0 Gy. The final tumor incidence was 100% with these two doses. At 0.75 Gy per exposure, no tumor appeared within 790 days after the start of irradiation, but one osteosarcoma and one squamous cell carcinoma did finally appear. These findings indicate a threshold-like response of tumor induction in this repeated irradiation system and further suggest that the apparent threshold may be somewhat less than 0.75 Gy per exposure.

  1. Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Hasan B.

    2013-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the promotion process in an academic medical center. A description of different promotional tracks, tenure and endowed chairs, and the process of submitting an application is provided. Finally, some practical advice about developing skills and attributes that can help with academic growth and promotion is dispensed. PMID:24436683

  2. Shift Work or Food Intake during the Rest Phase Promotes Metabolic Disruption and Desynchrony of Liver Genes in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Salgado-Delgado, Roberto C.; Saderi, Nadia; Basualdo, María del Carmen; Guerrero-Vargas, Natali N.; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2013-01-01

    In the liver, clock genes are proposed to drive metabolic rhythms. These gene rhythms are driven by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) mainly by food intake and via autonomic and hormonal pathways. Forced activity during the normal rest phase, induces also food intake, thus neglecting the signals of the SCN, leading to conflicting time signals to target tissues of the SCN. The present study explored in a rodent model of night-work the influence of food during the normal sleep period on the synchrony of gene expression between clock genes and metabolic genes in the liver. Male Wistar rats were exposed to forced activity for 8 h either during the rest phase (day) or during the active phase (night) by using a slow rotating wheel. In this shift work model food intake shifts spontaneously to the forced activity period, therefore the influence of food alone without induced activity was tested in other groups of animals that were fed ad libitum, or fed during their rest or active phase. Rats forced to be active and/or eating during their rest phase, inverted their daily peak of Per1, Bmal1 and Clock and lost the rhythm of Per2 in the liver, moreover NAMPT and metabolic genes such as Pparα lost their rhythm and thus their synchrony with clock genes. We conclude that shift work or food intake in the rest phase leads to desynchronization within the liver, characterized by misaligned temporal patterns of clock genes and metabolic genes. This may be the cause of the development of the metabolic syndrome and obesity in individuals engaged in shift work. PMID:23565183

  3. Acute tryptophan depletion promotes an anterior-to-posterior fMRI activation shift during task switching in older adults.

    PubMed

    Lamar, Melissa; Craig, Michael; Daly, Eileen M; Cutter, William J; Tang, Christine; Brammer, Michael; Rubia, Katya; Murphy, Declan G M

    2014-02-01

    Studies have long reported that aging is associated with declines in several functions modulated by the prefrontal cortex, including executive functions like working memory, set shifting, and inhibitory control. The neurochemical basis to this is poorly understood, but may include the serotonergic system. We investigated the modulatory effect of serotonin using acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) during a cognitive switching task involving visual-spatial set shifting modified for a functional MRI environment. Ten healthy women over 55 years were tested on two separate occasions in this within-group double-blind sham-controlled crossover study to compare behavioral and physiological brain functioning following ATD and following a ("placebo") sham depletion condition. ATD did not significantly affect task performance. It did modulate brain functional recruitment. During sham depletion women significantly activated the expected task-relevant brain regions associated with the Switch task including prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices. In contrast, following ATD participants activated posterior regions of brain more during switch than repeat trials. In addition to the main effects of depletion condition, a comparison of the ATD relative to the sham condition confirmed this anterior-to-posterior shift in activation. The posterior (increased) activation clusters significantly and negatively correlated with the reduced prefrontal activation clusters suggesting a compensation mechanism for reduced prefrontal activation during ATD. Thus, serotonin modulates an anterior-to-posterior shift of activation during cognitive switching in older adults. Neural adaptation to serotonin challenge during cognitive control may prove useful in determining cognitive vulnerability in older adults with a predisposition for serontonergic down-regulation (e.g., in vascular or late life depression). PMID:23281064

  4. Focal adhesion kinase-promoted tumor glucose metabolism is associated with a shift of mitochondrial respiration to glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Gao, Q; Zhou, Y; Dier, U; Hempel, N; Hochwald, S N

    2016-04-14

    Cancer cells often gains a growth advantage by taking up glucose at a high rate and undergoing aerobic glycolysis through intrinsic cellular factors that reprogram glucose metabolism. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a key transmitter of growth factor and anchorage stimulation, is aberrantly overexpressed or activated in most solid tumors, including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs). We determined whether FAK can act as an intrinsic driver to promote aerobic glycolysis and tumorigenesis. FAK inhibition decreases and overexpression increases intracellular glucose levels during unfavorable conditions, including growth factor deficiency and cell detachment. Amplex glucose assay, fluorescence and carbon-13 tracing studies demonstrate that FAK promotes glucose consumption and glucose-to-lactate conversion. Extracellular flux analysis indicates that FAK enhances glycolysis and decreases mitochondrial respiration. FAK increases key glycolytic proteins, including enolase, pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), lactate dehydrogenase and monocarboxylate transporter. Furthermore, active/tyrosine-phosphorylated FAK directly binds to PKM2 and promotes PKM2-mediated glycolysis. On the other hand, FAK-decreased levels of mitochondrial complex I can result in reduced oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Attenuation of FAK-enhanced glycolysis re-sensitizes cancer cells to growth factor withdrawal, decreases cell viability and reduces growth of tumor xenografts. These observations, for the first time, establish a vital role of FAK in cancer glucose metabolism through alterations in the OXPHOS-to-glycolysis balance. Broadly targeting the common phenotype of aerobic glycolysis and more specifically FAK-reprogrammed glucose metabolism will disrupt the bioenergetic and biosynthetic supply for uncontrolled growth of tumors, particularly glycolytic PDAC. PMID:26119934

  5. Novel Comparative Pattern Count Analysis Reveals a Chronic Ethanol-Induced Dynamic Shift in Immediate Early NF-κB Genome-wide Promoter Binding During Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kuttippurathu, Lakshmi; Patra, Biswanath; Hoek, Jan B; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth

    2016-01-01

    Liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy is a clinically important process that is impaired by adaptation to chronic alcohol intake. We focused on the initial time points following partial hepatectomy (PHx) to analyze genome-wide binding activity of NF-κB, a key immediate early regulator. We investigated the effect of chronic alcohol intake on immediate early NF-κB genome-wide localization, in the adapted state as well as in response to partial hepatectomy, using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by promoter microarray analysis. We found many ethanol-specific NF-κB binding target promoters in the ethanol-adapted state, corresponding to regulation of biosynthetic processes, oxidation-reduction and apoptosis. Partial hepatectomy induced a diet-independent shift in NF-κB binding loci relative to the transcription start sites. We employed a novel pattern count analysis to exhaustively enumerate and compare the number of promoters corresponding to the temporal binding patterns in ethanol and pair-fed control groups. The highest pattern count corresponded to promoters with NF-κB binding exclusively in the ethanol group at 1h post PHx. This set was associated with regulation of cell death, response to oxidative stress, histone modification, mitochondrial function, and metabolic processes. Integration with the global gene expression profiles to identify putative transcriptional consequences of NF-κB binding patterns revealed that several of ethanol-specific 1h binding targets showed ethanol-specific differential expression through 6h post PHx. Motif analysis yielded co-incident binding loci for STAT3, AP-1, CREB, C/EBP-β, PPAR-γ and C/EBP-α, likely participating in co-regulatory modules with NF-κB in shaping the immediate early response to PHx. We conclude that adaptation to chronic ethanol intake disrupts the NF-κB promoter binding landscape with consequences for the immediate early gene regulatory response to the acute challenge of PHx. PMID:26847025

  6. An auxin-mediated shift toward growth isotropy promotes organ formation at the shoot meristem in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Massimiliano; Ali, Olivier; Boudon, Frédéric; Cloarec, Gladys; Abad, Ursula; Cellier, Coralie; Chen, Xu; Gilles, Benjamin; Milani, Pascale; Friml, Jiří; Vernoux, Teva; Godin, Christophe; Hamant, Olivier; Traas, Jan

    2014-10-01

    To control morphogenesis, molecular regulatory networks have to interfere with the mechanical properties of the individual cells of developing organs and tissues, but how this is achieved is not well known. We study this issue here in the shoot meristem of higher plants, a group of undifferentiated cells where complex changes in growth rates and directions lead to the continuous formation of new organs. Here, we show that the plant hormone auxin plays an important role in this process via a dual, local effect on the extracellular matrix, the cell wall, which determines cell shape. Our study reveals that auxin not only causes a limited reduction in wall stiffness but also directly interferes with wall anisotropy via the regulation of cortical microtubule dynamics. We further show that to induce growth isotropy and organ outgrowth, auxin somehow interferes with the cortical microtubule-ordering activity of a network of proteins, including AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN 1 and KATANIN 1. Numerical simulations further indicate that the induced isotropy is sufficient to amplify the effects of the relatively minor changes in wall stiffness to promote organogenesis and the establishment of new growth axes in a robust manner. PMID:25264254

  7. Shifts in Developmental Timing, and Not Increased Levels of Experience-Dependent Neuronal Activity, Promote Barrel Expansion in the Primary Somatosensory Cortex of Rats Enucleated at Birth

    PubMed Central

    Fetter-Pruneda, Ingrid; Ibarrarán-Viniegra, Ana Sofía; Martínez-Martínez, Eduardo; Sandoval-Velasco, Marcela; Uribe-Figueroa, Laura; Padilla-Cortés, Patricia; Mercado-Célis, Gabriela; Gutiérrez-Ospina, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Birth-enucleated rodents display enlarged representations of whiskers (i.e., barrels of the posteromedial subfield) in the primary somatosensory cortex. Although the historical view maintains that barrel expansion is due to incremental increases in neuronal activity along the trigeminal pathway during postnatal development, recent evidence obtained in experimental models of intramodal plasticity challenges this view. Here, we re-evaluate the role of experience-dependent neuronal activity on barrel expansion in birth-enucleated rats by combining various anatomical methods and sensory deprivation paradigms. We show that barrels in birth-enucleated rats were already enlarged by the end of the first week of life and had levels of metabolic activity comparable to those in control rats at different ages. Dewhiskering after the postnatal period of barrel formation did not prevent barrel expansion in adult, birth-enucleated rats. Further, dark rearing and enucleation after barrel formation did not lead to expanded barrels in adult brains. Because incremental increases of somatosensory experience did not promote barrel expansion in birth-enucleated rats, we explored whether shifts of the developmental timing could better explain barrel expansion during the first week of life. Accordingly, birth-enucleated rats show earlier formation of barrels, accelerated growth of somatosensory thalamocortical afferents, and an earlier H4 deacetylation. Interestingly, when H4 deacetylation was prevented with a histone deacetylases inhibitor (valproic acid), barrel specification timing returned to normal and barrel expansion did not occur. Thus, we provide evidence supporting that shifts in developmental timing modulated through epigenetic mechanisms, and not increased levels of experience dependent neuronal activity, promote barrel expansion in the primary somatosensory cortex of rats enucleated at birth. PMID:23372796

  8. The inverse agonist DG172 triggers a PPARβ/δ-independent myeloid lineage shift and promotes GM-CSF/IL-4-induced dendritic cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lieber, Sonja; Scheer, Frithjof; Finkernagel, Florian; Meissner, Wolfgang; Giehl, Gavin; Brendel, Cornelia; Diederich, Wibke E; Müller-Brüsselbach, Sabine; Müller, Rolf

    2015-02-01

    The stilbene derivative (Z)-2-(2-bromophenyl)-3-{[4-(1-methylpiperazine)amino]phenyl}acrylonitrile (DG172) was developed as a highly selective inhibitory peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)β/δ ligand. Here, we describe a novel PPARβ/δ-independent, yet highly specific, effect of DG172 on the differentiation of bone marrow cells (BMCs). DG172 strongly augmented granulocyte-macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-induced differentiation of primary BMCs from Ppard null mice into two specific populations, characterized as mature (CD11c(hi)MHCII(hi)) and immature (CD11c(hi)MHCII(lo)) dendritic cells (DCs). IL-4 synergized with DG172 to shift the differentiation from MHCII(lo) cells to mature DCs in vitro. The promotion of DC differentiation occurred at the expense of differentiation to granulocytic Gr1(+)Ly6B(+) cells. In agreement with these findings, transcriptome analyses showed a strong DG172-mediated repression of genes encoding neutrophilic markers in both differentiating wild-type and Ppard null cells, while macrophage/DC marker genes were up-regulated. DG172 also inhibited the expression of transcription factors driving granulocytic differentiation (Cebpe, Gfi1, and Klf5), and increased the levels of transcription factors promoting macrophage/DC differentiation (Irf4, Irf8, Spib, and Spic). DG172 exerted these effects only at an early stage of BMC differentiation induced by GM-CSF, did not affect macrophage-colony-stimulating factor-triggered differentiation to macrophages and had no detectable PPARβ/δ-independent effect on other cell types tested. Structure-function analyses demonstrated that the 4-methylpiperazine moiety in DG172 is required for its effect on DC differentiation, but is dispensable for PPARβ/δ binding. Based on these data we developed a new compound, (Z)-2-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-[4-(4-methylpiperazine-1-yl)phenyl]acrylonitrile (DG228), which enhances DC differentiation in the absence of significant PPARβ/δ binding. PMID

  9. Fibulin-5 localisation in human endometrial cancer shifts from epithelial to stromal with increasing tumour grade, and silencing promotes endometrial epithelial cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    WINSHIP, AMY LOUISE; RAINCZUK, KATE; TON, AMANDA; DIMITRIADIS, EVA

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common invasive gynaecological malignancy. While endocrine, genetic and inflammatory factors are thought to contribute to its pathogenesis, its precise etiology and molecular regulators remain poorly understood. Fibulin-5 is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that inhibits cell growth and invasion in several cancer cell types and is downregulated in a number of types of human cancer. However, it is unknown whether fibulin-5 plays a role in endometrial tumourigenesis. In the current report, the expression and localisation of fibulin-5 in type I endometrioid human endometrial cancers of grades (G) 1–3 was investigated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Fibulin-5 mRNA was found to be significantly reduced in whole tumour tissues from women across G1-3 compared with benign endometrium (P<0.0001). Consistently, fibulin-5 protein was also reduced in the tumour epithelial compartment across increasing tumour grades. By contrast, increased protein localisation to the tumour stroma was observed with increasing grade. Knockdown by small interfering RNA in Ishikawa endometrial epithelial cancer cells expressing fibulin-5 stimulated cell adhesion and proliferation in vitro. Fibulin-5 mRNA expression in Ishikawa cells was induced by transforming growth factor-β and fibulin-5 in turn activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), suggesting that it may act via the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. In summary, the present study identified fibulin-5 as a downregulated ECM gene in human endometrial cancer and observed a shift from epithelial to stromal protein localisation with increasing tumour grade in women. These data suggest that loss of fibulin-5 function may promote endometrial cancer progression by enhancing epithelial cell adhesion and proliferation. PMID:27347195

  10. Shifting tools

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, E.P.; Welch, W.R.

    1984-03-13

    An improved shifting tool connectable in a well tool string and useful to engage and position a slidable sleeve in a sliding sleeve device in a well flow conductor. The selectively profiled shifting tool keys provide better fit with and more contact area between keys and slidable sleeves. When the engaged slidable sleeve cannot be moved up and the shifting tool is not automatically disengaged, emergency disengagement means may be utilized by applying upward force to the shifting tool sufficient to shear pins and cause all keys to be cammed inwardly at both ends to completely disengage for removal of the shifting tool from the sliding sleeve device.

  11. Effect of Spacer Connecting the Secondary Electron Donor Phenothiazine in Subphthalocyanine-Fullerene Conjugates in Promoting Electron Transfer Followed by Hole Shift Process.

    PubMed

    Kc, Chandra B; Lim, Gary N; D'Souza, Francis

    2016-04-20

    Sequential electron/hole transfer between energetically well-positioned entities of photosynthetic reaction center models is one of the commonly employed mechanisms to generate long-lived charge-separated states. A wealth of information, applicable towards light energy harvesting and building optoelectronic devices, has been acquired from such studies. In the present study, we report on the effect of spacer (direct or via phenoxy linkage) connecting the hole shifting agent, phenothiazine (PTZ), on photoinduced charge stabilization in subphthalocyanine-fullerene donor-acceptor conjugates. In these conjugates, the subphthalocyanine (SubPc) and fullerene (C60 ) served as primary electron donor and acceptor, respectively, while the phenothiazine entities act as hole shifting agents. The newly synthesized compounds were characterized by optical absorption and emission, computational, and electrochemical methods. The redox potentials measured using differential pulse voltammetry were used to estimate free-energy changes for charge separation, hole migration, and charge recombination processes. Using femto- and nanosecond transient absorption techniques, evidence for charge separation, and kinetics of charge separation and recombination were obtained in polar benzonitrile and nonpolar toluene solvents. In the conjugate where the phenothiazine entities are directly linked to SubPc, evidence for sequential electron transfer followed by hole shift leading to long-lived charge separated state was weak, primarily due to the delocalization of HOMO on both SubPc and PTZ entities. However, in case of the conjugate where the PTZ and SubPc are linked via phenoxy spacers, sequential electron transfer/hole shift was observed leading to the formation of long-lived charge-separated states. The present study brings out the importance of the spacer group connecting the hole shifting agent in model donor-acceptor conjugates to generate long-lived charge-separated states. PMID:27037628

  12. Shifting Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, Jenni

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the shifts in attention and focus as one teacher introduces and explains an image that represents the processes involved in a numeric problem that his students have been working on. This paper takes a micro-analytic approach to examine how the focus of attention shifts through what the teacher and students do and say in the…

  13. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael B.; Hargens, Alan R.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Ebert, Douglas J.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Laurie, Steven S.; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Martin, David S.; Liu, John; Macias, Brandon R.; Arbeille, Philippe; Danielson, Richard; Chang, Douglas; Gunga, Hanns-Christian; Johnston, Smith L.; Westby, Christian M.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert J.; Smith, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesize that microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shifts elevate intracranial pressure (ICP) and contribute to VIIP. We will test this hypothesis and a possible countermeasure in ISS astronauts.

  14. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Laurie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Gunga, H.; Johnston, S.; Westby, C.; Ribeiro, L.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mechanisms responsible for the ocular structural and functional changes that characterize the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (ICP) syndrome (VIIP) are unclear, but hypothesized to be secondary to the cephalad fluid shift experienced in spaceflight. This study will relate the fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight with VIIP symptoms. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, can be predicted preflight with acute hemodynamic manipulations, and also if lower body negative pressure (LBNP) can reverse the VIIP effects. METHODS: Physiologic variables will be examined pre-, in- and post-flight in 10 International Space Station crewmembers including: fluid compartmentalization (D2O and NaBr dilution); interstitial tissue thickness (ultrasound); vascular dimensions and dynamics (ultrasound and MRI (including cerebrospinal fluid pulsatility)); ocular measures (optical coherence tomography, intraocular pressure, ultrasound); and ICP measures (tympanic membrane displacement, otoacoustic emissions). Pre- and post-flight measures will be assessed while upright, supine and during 15 deg head-down tilt (HDT). In-flight measures will occur early and late during 6 or 12 month missions. LBNP will be evaluated as a countermeasure during HDT and during spaceflight. RESULTS: The first two crewmembers are in the preflight testing phase. Preliminary results characterize the acute fluid shifts experienced from upright, to supine and HDT postures (increased stroke volume, jugular dimensions and measures of ICP) which are reversed with 25 millimeters Hg LBNP. DISCUSSION: Initial results indicate that acute cephalad fluid shifts may be related to VIIP symptoms, but also may be reversible by LBNP. The effect of a chronic fluid shift has yet to be evaluated. Learning Objectives: Current spaceflight VIIP research is described

  15. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Lauriie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Ribeiro, L.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Johnston, S.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2016-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low-Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 50% of ISS astronauts experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's preflight conditions and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. METHODS: We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by

  16. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Platts, S.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 30% of ISS astronauts experience more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the space flight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration space flight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during space flight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight condition and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound

  17. Human resources for health: task shifting to promote basic health service delivery among internally displaced people in ethnic health program service areas in eastern Burma/Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Low, Sharon; Tun, Kyaw Thura; Mhote, Naw Pue Pue; Htoo, Saw Nay; Maung, Cynthia; Kyaw, Saw Win; Shwe Oo, Saw Eh Kalu; Pocock, Nicola Suyin

    2014-01-01

    Background Burma/Myanmar was controlled by a military regime for over 50 years. Many basic social and protection services have been neglected, specifically in the ethnic areas. Development in these areas was led by the ethnic non-state actors to ensure care and the availability of health services for the communities living in the border ethnic-controlled areas. Political changes in Burma/Myanmar have been ongoing since the end of 2010. Given the ethnic diversity of Burma/Myanmar, many challenges in ensuring health service coverage among all ethnic groups lie ahead. Methods A case study method was used to document how existing human resources for health (HRH) reach the vulnerable population in the ethnic health organizations’ (EHOs) and community-based organizations’ (CBHOs) service areas, and their related information on training and services delivered. Mixed methods were used. Survey data on HRH, service provision, and training were collected from clinic-in-charges in 110 clinics in 14 Karen/Kayin townships through a rapid-mapping exercise. We also reviewed 7 organizational and policy documents and conducted 10 interviews and discussions with clinic-in-charges. Findings Despite the lack of skilled medical professionals, the EHOs and CBHOs have been serving the population along the border through task shifting to less specialized health workers. Clinics and mobile teams work in partnership, focusing on primary care with some aspects of secondary care. The rapid-mapping exercise showed that the aggregate HRH density in Karen/Kayin state is 2.8 per 1,000 population. Every mobile team has 1.8 health workers per 1,000 population, whereas each clinic has between 2.5 and 3.9 health workers per 1,000 population. By reorganizing and training the workforce with a rigorous and up-to-date curriculum, EHOs and CBHOs present a viable solution for improving health service coverage to the underserved population. Conclusion Despite the chronic conflict in Burma/Myanmar, this

  18. Psychopathology of Shift Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akinnawo, Ebenezer Olutope

    1989-01-01

    Examined incidence and nature of general psychopathology among Nigerian shift workers (N=320). Found shift workers more significantly psychopathological than non-shift workers (p<0.001). Prominent disorders among shift workers were intellectual, sleep, mood, and general somatic disorders. No significant difference could be attributed to gender and…

  19. Gear shift control mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Janson, D.A.

    1987-03-10

    A gear shift control mechanism is described comprising: multiple shift rods directed substantially parallel to one another, each rod carrying a shift fork for axial movement; a shift lever supported for pivotal movement about a first axis directed parallel to the axes of the shift rods and for pivotal movement about a second axis directed substantially perpendicular to the axes of the shift rods. The lever is moveable about the first axis and the second axis into engagement with a selected shift fork; interlock means located on each lateral side of the shift lever and mounted for pivotal movement about the first axis for blocking engagement with the shift forks; detent means for holding the shift lever in multiple predetermined angular positions about the second axis; and spring means located on a lateral side of the shift lever and mounted for pivotal movement about the first axis into interference contact with the shift forks for producing a force tending to resiliently bias the shift lever out of engagement with the selected shift fork.

  20. Shifting scintillator neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Clonts, Lloyd G; Cooper, Ronald G; Crow, Jr., Morris Lowell; Hannah, Bruce W; Hodges, Jason P; Richards, John D; Riedel, Richard A

    2014-03-04

    Provided are sensors and methods for detecting thermal neutrons. Provided is an apparatus having a scintillator for absorbing a neutron, the scintillator having a back side for discharging a scintillation light of a first wavelength in response to the absorbed neutron, an array of wavelength-shifting fibers proximate to the back side of the scintillator for shifting the scintillation light of the first wavelength to light of a second wavelength, the wavelength-shifting fibers being disposed in a two-dimensional pattern and defining a plurality of scattering plane pixels where the wavelength-shifting fibers overlap, a plurality of photomultiplier tubes, in coded optical communication with the wavelength-shifting fibers, for converting the light of the second wavelength to an electronic signal, and a processor for processing the electronic signal to identify one of the plurality of scattering plane pixels as indicative of a position within the scintillator where the neutron was absorbed.

  1. A single point mutation in the listerial betL σ(A)-dependent promoter leads to improved osmo- and chill-tolerance and a morphological shift at elevated osmolarity.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Roland F; McLernon, Susan; Feeney, Audrey; Hill, Colin; Sleator, Roy D

    2013-01-01

    Betaine uptake in Listeria monocytogenes is mediated by three independent transport systems, the simplest of which in genetic terms is the secondary transporter BetL. Using a random mutagenesis approach, based on the E. coli XL1 Red mutator strain, we identified a single point mutation in a putative promoter region upstream of the BetL coding region which leads to a significant increase in betL transcript levels under osmo- and chill-stress conditions and a concomitant increase in stress tolerance. Furthermore, the mutation appears to counter the heretofore unreported "twisted" cell morphology observed for L. monocytogenes grown at elevated osmolarities in tryptone soy broth. PMID:23478432

  2. Our World: Fluid Shift

    NASA Video Gallery

    Learn about the circulatory system and how gravity aids blood flow in our bodies here on Earth. Find out how NASA flight surgeons help the astronauts deal with the fluid shift that happens during s...

  3. Shape-Shifting Plastic

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-20

    A new plastic developed by ORNL and Washington State University transforms from its original shape through a series of temporary shapes and returns to its initial form. The shape-shifting process is controlled through changes in temperature

  4. A single point mutation in the listerial betL σA-dependent promoter leads to improved osmo- and chill-tolerance and a morphological shift at elevated osmolarity

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Roland F; McLernon, Susan; Feeney, Audrey; Hill, Colin; Sleator, Roy D

    2013-01-01

    Betaine uptake in Listeria monocytogenes is mediated by three independent transport systems, the simplest of which in genetic terms is the secondary transporter BetL. Using a random mutagenesis approach, based on the E. coli XL1 Red mutator strain, we identified a single point mutation in a putative promoter region upstream of the BetL coding region which leads to a significant increase in betL transcript levels under osmo- and chill-stress conditions and a concomitant increase in stress tolerance. Furthermore, the mutation appears to counter the heretofore unreported “twisted” cell morphology observed for L. monocytogenes grown at elevated osmolarities in tryptone soy broth. PMID:23478432

  5. Molecular Electronic Shift Registers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beratan, David N.; Onuchic, Jose N.

    1990-01-01

    Molecular-scale shift registers eventually constructed as parts of high-density integrated memory circuits. In principle, variety of organic molecules makes possible large number of different configurations and modes of operation for such shift-register devices. Several classes of devices and implementations in some specific types of molecules proposed. All based on transfer of electrons or holes along chains of repeating molecular units.

  6. Absorption driven focus shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrop, N.; Wolf, S.; Maerten, O.; Dudek, K.; Ballach, S.; Kramer, R.

    2016-03-01

    Modern high brilliance near infrared lasers have seen a tremendous growth in applications throughout the world. Increased productivity has been achieved by higher laser power and increased brilliance of lasers. Positive impacts on the performance and costs of parts are opposed to threats on process stability and quality, namely shift of focus position over time. A high initial process quality will be reduced by contamination of optics, eventually leading to a focus shift or even destruction of the optics. Focus analysis at full power of multi-kilowatt high brilliance lasers is a very demanding task because of high power densities in the spot and the high power load on optical elements. With the newly developed high power projection optics, the High-Power Micro-Spot Monitor High Brilliance (HP-MSM-HB) is able to measure focus diameter as low as 20 μm at power levels up to 10 kW at very low internal focus shift. A main driving factor behind thermally induced focus shift is the absorption level of the optical element. A newly developed measuring system is designed to determine the relative absorption level in reference to a gold standard. Test results presented show a direct correlation between absorption levels and focus shift. The ability to determine the absorption level of optical elements as well as their performance at full processing power before they are put to use, enables a high level of quality assurance for optics manufacturers and processing head manufacturers alike.

  7. Predicting catastrophic shifts.

    PubMed

    Weissmann, Haim; Shnerb, Nadav M

    2016-05-21

    Catastrophic shifts are known to pose a serious threat to ecology, and a reliable set of early warning indicators is desperately needed. However, the tools suggested so far have two problems. First, they cannot discriminate between a smooth transition and an imminent irreversible shift. Second, they aimed at predicting the tipping point where a state loses its stability, but in noisy spatial system the actual transition occurs when an alternative state invades. Here we suggest a cluster tracking technique that solves both problems, distinguishing between smooth and catastrophic transitions and to identify an imminent shift in both cases. Our method may allow for the prediction, and thus hopefully the prevention of such transitions, avoiding their destructive outcomes. PMID:26970446

  8. Isotope shift in chromium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furmann, B.; Jarosz, A.; Stefańska, D.; Dembczyński, J.; Stachowska, E.

    2005-01-01

    Thirty-three spectral lines of chromium atom in the blue-violet region (425-465 nm) have been investigated with the method of laser-induced resonance fluorescence on an atomic beam. For all the lines, the isotope shifts for every pair of chromium isotopes have been determined. The lines can be divided into six groups, according to the configuration of the upper and lower levels. Electronic factors of the field shift and the specific mass shift ( Fik and MikSMS, respectively) have been evaluated and the values for each pure configuration involved have been determined. Comparison of the values Fik and MikSMS to the ab initio calculations results has been performed. The presence of crossed second order (CSO) effects has been observed.

  9. Cellular cooperation with shift updating and repulsion

    PubMed Central

    Pavlogiannis, Andreas; Chatterjee, Krishnendu; Adlam, Ben; Nowak, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    Population structure can facilitate evolution of cooperation. In a structured population, cooperators can form clusters which resist exploitation by defectors. Recently, it was observed that a shift update rule is an extremely strong amplifier of cooperation in a one dimensional spatial model. For the shift update rule, an individual is chosen for reproduction proportional to fecundity; the offspring is placed next to the parent; a random individual dies. Subsequently, the population is rearranged (shifted) until all individual cells are again evenly spaced out. For large population size and a one dimensional population structure, the shift update rule favors cooperation for any benefit-to-cost ratio greater than one. But every attempt to generalize shift updating to higher dimensions while maintaining its strong effect has failed. The reason is that in two dimensions the clusters are fragmented by the movements caused by rearranging the cells. Here we introduce the natural phenomenon of a repulsive force between cells of different types. After a birth and death event, the cells are being rearranged minimizing the overall energy expenditure. If the repulsive force is sufficiently high, shift becomes a strong promoter of cooperation in two dimensions. PMID:26602306

  10. Shifting Up a Gear.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Shift workers are often excluded from educational opportunities on and off the job. General education and leisure learning needs are addressed less than job-specific training needs. Providers should consider open/distance learning, creative marketing, targeted funding, and consortia of employer-developed programs. (SK)

  11. Eluding catastrophic shifts

    PubMed Central

    Villa Martín, Paula; Bonachela, Juan A.; Levin, Simon A.; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Transitions between regimes with radically different properties are ubiquitous in nature. Such transitions can occur either smoothly or in an abrupt and catastrophic fashion. Important examples of the latter can be found in ecology, climate sciences, and economics, to name a few, where regime shifts have catastrophic consequences that are mostly irreversible (e.g., desertification, coral reef collapses, and market crashes). Predicting and preventing these abrupt transitions remains a challenging and important task. Usually, simple deterministic equations are used to model and rationalize these complex situations. However, stochastic effects might have a profound effect. Here we use 1D and 2D spatially explicit models to show that intrinsic (demographic) stochasticity can alter deterministic predictions dramatically, especially in the presence of other realistic features such as limited mobility or spatial heterogeneity. In particular, these ingredients can alter the possibility of catastrophic shifts by giving rise to much smoother and easily reversible continuous ones. The ideas presented here can help further understand catastrophic shifts and contribute to the discussion about the possibility of preventing such shifts to minimize their disruptive ecological, economic, and societal consequences. PMID:25825772

  12. Eluding catastrophic shifts.

    PubMed

    Villa Martín, Paula; Bonachela, Juan A; Levin, Simon A; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2015-04-14

    Transitions between regimes with radically different properties are ubiquitous in nature. Such transitions can occur either smoothly or in an abrupt and catastrophic fashion. Important examples of the latter can be found in ecology, climate sciences, and economics, to name a few, where regime shifts have catastrophic consequences that are mostly irreversible (e.g., desertification, coral reef collapses, and market crashes). Predicting and preventing these abrupt transitions remains a challenging and important task. Usually, simple deterministic equations are used to model and rationalize these complex situations. However, stochastic effects might have a profound effect. Here we use 1D and 2D spatially explicit models to show that intrinsic (demographic) stochasticity can alter deterministic predictions dramatically, especially in the presence of other realistic features such as limited mobility or spatial heterogeneity. In particular, these ingredients can alter the possibility of catastrophic shifts by giving rise to much smoother and easily reversible continuous ones. The ideas presented here can help further understand catastrophic shifts and contribute to the discussion about the possibility of preventing such shifts to minimize their disruptive ecological, economic, and societal consequences. PMID:25825772

  13. Trophic shift, not collapse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; Rutherford, Edward S.; Stow, Craig A.; Roseman, Edward F.; He, Ji X.

    2013-01-01

    scientists who are closely monitoring Lake Huron’s food web, we believe that the ongoing changes are more accurately characterized as a trophic shift in which benthic pathways have become more prominent. While decreases in abundance have occurred for some species, others are experiencing improved reproduction resulting in the restoration of several important native species.

  14. Ambiguous red shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulfman, Carl E.

    2010-12-01

    A one-parameter conformal invariance of Maxwell's equations allows the wavelengths of electromagnetic waves to change as they propagate, and do so even in otherwise field-free space. This produces an ambiguity in interpretations of stellar red shifts. Experiments that will determine the value of the group parameter, and thereby remove the ambiguity, are proposed. They are based on an analysis of the anomalous frequency shifts uncovered in the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft studies, and physical interpretation of an isomorphism discovered by E.L. Hill. If the group parameter is found to be non-zero, Hubble's relations will have to be reinterpreted and space-time metrics will have to be altered. The cosmological consequences of the transformations are even more extensive because, though they change frequencies they do not alter the energy and momentum conservation laws of classical and quantum-electrodynamical fields established by Cunningham and by Białynicki-Birula.

  15. Shifts that divide population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muneepeerakul, Rachata; Qubbaj, Murad; Aggarwal, Rimjhim; Anderies, John M.; Janssen, Marco

    2014-05-01

    How does a population of organisms in an ecosystem or of people in a society respond to rapid shifts in the environment? Answers to this question are critical to our ability to anticipate and cope with a changing ecohydrological system. We have developed a generic model of adaptation mechanisms, based on replicator dynamics, in which we derive a simple and insightful threshold condition that separates two important types of responses: 'cohesive transition' in which the whole population changes gradually together, and 'population-dividing transition' in which the population splits into two groups with one eventually dominating the other. The threshold depends on the magnitude of the shift and the shape of the fitness landscape. Division in populations can fundamentally alter the functioning of and induce subsequent feedbacks within the system; knowing the condition that gives rise to such division is thus fundamentally important.

  16. The shifted penalty method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavarise, Giorgio

    2015-07-01

    The method presented here is a variation of the classical penalty one, suited to reduce penetration of the contacting surfaces. The slight but crucial modification concerns the introduction of a shift parameter that moves the minimum point of the constrained potential toward the exact value, without any penalty increase. With respect to the classical augmentation procedures, the solution improvement is embedded within the original penalty contribution. The problem is almost consistently linearized, and the shift is updated before each Newton's iteration. However, adding few iterations, with respect to the original penalty method, a reduction of the penetration of several orders of magnitude can be achieved. The numerical tests have shown very attractive characteristics and very stable solution paths. This permits to foresee a wide area of applications, not only in contact mechanics, but for any problem, like e.g. incompressible materials, where a penalty contribution is required.

  17. Shifted genus expanded W ∞ algebra and shifted Hurwitz numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Quan

    2016-05-01

    We construct the shifted genus expanded W ∞ algebra, which is isomorphic to the central subalgebra A ∞ of infinite symmetric group algebra and to the shifted Schur symmetrical function algebra Λ* defined by Okounkov and Olshanskii. As an application, we get some differential equations for the generating functions of the shifted Hurwitz numbers; thus, we can express the generating functions in terms of the shifted genus expanded cut-and-join operators.

  18. Transmission shift control assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Dzioba, D.L.

    1989-04-18

    This patent describes a transmission shift control assembly mounted on a steering column having a longitudinal axis comprising: bracket means secured to the steering column; transmission shift cable means having a portion secured to the bracket means and a portion linearly movable relative to the secured portion; mounting means on the bracket cable drive arm means having an axis and being rotatably mounted on the rotary axis on the mounting means oblique to the longitudinal axis and including a cable connecting portion secured to the movable portion of the cable means and lever mounting means adjacent the mounting means; operator control means including lever means, pin means for pivotally mounting the lever means on the lever mounting means on an axis substantially perpendicular to the rotary axis and positioning arm means formed on the lever means and extending from the pin means; and detent gate means disposed on the bracket means in position to abut the positioning arm means for limiting the extent of pivotal movement of the lever means.

  19. Shifted nondiffractive Bessel beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Alexey A.; Kotlyar, Victor V.; Porfirev, Alexey A.

    2015-05-01

    Nondiffractive Bessel beams are well known to have infinite energy and infinite orbital angular momentum (OAM). However, when normalized to unity of energy, their OAM is finite. In this work, we derive an analytical relationship for calculating the normalized OAM of the superposition of off-axis Bessel beams characterized by the same topological charge. We show that if the constituent beams of the superposition have real-valued weight coefficients, the total OAM of the superposition of the Bessel beams equals that of an individual nonshifted Bessel beam. This property enables generating nondiffractive beams with different intensity distributions but identical OAM. The superposition of a set of identical Bessel beams centered on an arbitrary-radius circle is shown to be equivalent to an individual constituent Bessel beam put in the circle center. As a result of a complex shift of the Bessel beam, the transverse intensity distribution and OAM of the beam are also shown to change. We show that, in the superposition of two or more complex-shifted Bessel beams, the OAM may remain unchanged, while the intensity distribution is changed. Numerical simulation is in good agreement with theory.

  20. Shifting epidemiology of Flaviviridae.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Lyle R; Marfin, Anthony A

    2005-04-01

    The dengue, West Nile, Japanese encephalitis and yellow fever viruses are important mosquito-borne viruses whose epidemiology is shifting in response to changing societal factors, such as increasing commerce, urbanization of rural areas, and population growth. All four viruses are expanding geographically, as exemplified by the emergence of West Nile virus in the Americas and Japanese encephalitis virus in Australasia. The large, recent global outbreaks of severe neurological disease caused by West Nile virus, the increasing frequency of dengue hemorrhagic fever outbreaks in the Americas, and the emergence of yellow fever virus vaccination-associated viscerotropic disease, are new clinical epidemiologic trends. These worrisome epidemiologic trends will probably continue in coming decades, as a reversal of their societal and biological drivers is not in sight. Nevertheless, the substantial reductions in Japanese encephalitis virus incidence resulting from vaccination programs and economic development in some Asian countries provide some encouragement within this overall guarded outlook. PMID:16225801

  1. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    1996-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  2. Phase shifting interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1999-08-03

    An interferometer is disclosed which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. Whereas current interferometers illuminate the optic to be tested with an aberrated wavefront which also limits the accuracy of the measurement, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical measurement wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 11 figs.

  3. Phase shifting interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    1999-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. Whereas current interferometers illuminate the optic to be tested with an aberrated wavefront which also limits the accuracy of the measurement, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical measurement wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  4. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1996-08-29

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 8 figs.

  5. Hydraulically actuated well shifting tool

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, B.A.

    1992-10-20

    This patent describes a hydraulically actuated shifting tool for actuating a sliding member in a well tool. It comprises: a housing having a hydraulic fluid bore therein; shifting dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the housing; locking dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the body; shifting dog hydraulic actuating means in fluid communication with the bore for causing engagement of the shifting dogs with the sliding member; locking dog hydraulic actuating means in communication with the bore for causing engagement of the locking dogs with the locking means; and hydraulic shifting means in communication with the bore for causing relative movement between the shifting dog means and the locking dog means for shifting the sliding sleeve.

  6. Quantized beam shifts in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kort-Kamp, Wilton; Sinitsyn, Nikolai; Dalvit, Diego

    We show that the magneto-optical response of a graphene-on-substrate system in the presence of an external magnetic field strongly affects light beam shifts. In the quantum Hall regime, we predict quantized Imbert-Fedorov, Goos-Hänchen, and photonic spin Hall shifts. The Imbert-Fedorov and photonic spin Hall shifts are given in integer multiples of the fine structure constant α, while the Goos-Hänchen ones in discrete multiples of α2. Due to time-reversal symmetry breaking the IF shifts change sign when the direction of the applied magnetic field is reversed, while the other shifts remain unchanged. We investigate the influence on these shifts of magnetic field, temperature, and material dispersion and dissipation. An experimental demonstration of quantized beam shifts could be achieved at terahertz frequencies for moderate values of the magnetic field. We acknowledge the LANL LDRD program for financial support.

  7. Antiretroviral therapy: Shifting sands.

    PubMed

    Sashindran, V K; Chauhan, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    HIV/AIDS has been an extremely difficult pandemic to control. However, with the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV has now been transformed into a chronic illness in patients who have continued treatment access and excellent long-term adherence. Existing indications for ART initiation in asymptomatic patients were based on CD4 levels; however, recent evidence has broken the shackles of CD4 levels. Early initiation of ART in HIV patients irrespective of CD4 counts can have profound positive impact on morbidity and mortality. Early initiation of ART has been found not only beneficial for patients but also to community as it reduces the risk of transmission. There have been few financial concerns about providing ART to all HIV-positive people but various studies have proven that early initiation of ART not only proves to be cost-effective but also contributes to economic and social growth of community. A novel multidisciplinary approach with early initiation and availability of ART at its heart can turn the tide in our favor in future. Effective preexposure prophylaxis and postexposure prophylaxis can also lower transmission risk of HIV in community. New understanding of HIV pathogenesis is opening new vistas to cure and prevention. Various promising candidate vaccines and drugs are undergoing aggressive clinical trials, raising optimism for an ever-elusive cure for HIV. This review describes various facets of tectonic shift in management of HIV. PMID:26900224

  8. Shift Work and Cancer Screening: Do Females Who Work Alternative Shifts Undergo Recommended Cancer Screening?

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Rebecca J.; Luckhaupt, Sara E.; Sweeney, Marie Haring; Calvert, Geoffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Alternative shift work is classified as a probable human carcinogen. Certain cancer screening tests reduce cancer mortality. Methods The 2010 National Health Interview Survey was used to examine associations between adherence to breast, cervical, and colon cancer screening recommendations and alternative shift work among female workers. Results Workers on alternative shifts, compared to workers on daytime shifts, were more likely to be non-adherent to screening recommendations for breast (34% vs. 23%) and colorectal (55% vs. 48%) cancer (P <0.05). Workers on alternative shifts in two industries (“Manufacturing” and “Accommodation/Food Services”) and three occupations (“Food Preparation/Serving,” “Personal Care Services,” and “Production”) were more likely to be non-adherent to screening recommendations for at least two cancers (P <0.05). Conclusions The Affordable Care Act eliminates out-of-pocket screening expenses for these three cancers. Greater efforts are needed to promote this benefit, particularly among workers with demonstrated non-adherence. PMID:24488817

  9. Zoning should promote public health.

    PubMed

    Hirschhorn, Joel S

    2004-01-01

    Legally, governments use their police powers to protect public health, safety, and welfare through zoning. This paper presents a case for revisiting zoning on the basis of increasing evidence that certain types of community design promote public health, as opposed to the dominant pattern of sprawl development, which does not. Zoning, and the land use planning linked to it, that prohibits or disfavors health-promoting community designs contradicts the inherent public policy goal on which it is based. If there is a paradigm shift underway, from traditional sprawl to health-promoting community designs, then health professionals and others should understand why zoning must be reassessed. PMID:14748317

  10. Portable shift register

    SciTech Connect

    Halbig, J.K.; Bourret, S.C.; Hansen, W.J.; Hicks, D.V.; Klosterbuer, S.F.; Krick, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    An electronics package for a small, battery-operated, self-contained, neutron coincidence counter based on a portable shift-register (PSR) has been developed. The counter was developed for applications not adequately addressed by commercial packages, including in-plant measurements to demonstrate compliance with regulations (domestic and international), in-plant process control, and in-field measurements (environmental monitoring or safeguards). Our package's features, which address these applications, include the following: Small size for portability and ease of installation;battery or mains operation; a built-in battery to power the unit and a typical detector such as a small sample counter, for over 6 h if power lines are bad or noisy, if there is a temporary absence of power, or if portability is desired; complete support, including bias, for standard neutron detectors; a powerful communications package to easily facilitate robust external control over a serial port; and a C-library to simplify creating external control programs in computers or other controllers. Whereas the PSR specifically addresses the applications mentioned above, it also performs all the measurements made by previous electronics packages for neutron coincidence counters developed at Los Alamos and commercialized. The PSR electronics package, exclusive of carrying handle, is 8 by 10 by 20 cm; it contains the circuit boards, battery, and bias supply and weighs less than 2 kg. This instrument package is the second in an emerging family of portable measurement instruments being developed; the first was the Miniature and Modular Multichannel Analyzer (M[sup 3]CA). The PSR makes extensive use of hardware and software developed for the M[sup 3]CA; like the M[sup 3]CA, it is intended primarily for use with an external controller interfaced over a serial channel.

  11. Zero-shifted accelerometer outputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galef, Arnold

    1986-08-01

    It is claimed that the commonly appearing zero-shift in pyroshock data is usually a symptom of a malfunctioning measurement system, so that the data can not be repaired (by high-pass filtering or equivalent) unless tests can be devised that permit the demonstration that the system is operating in a linear mode in all respects other than the shift. The likely cause of the zero-shift and its prevention are discussed.

  12. Instrument Measures Shift In Focus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steimle, Lawrence J.

    1992-01-01

    Optical components tested at wavelengths from ultraviolet to infrared. Focus-shift-measuring instrument easy to use. Operated in lighted room, without having to make delicate adjustments while peering through microscope. Measures distance along which focal point of converging beam of light shifted by introduction of nominally plane parallel optical component into beam. Intended primarily for measuring focus shifts produced by windows and filters at wavelengths from 120 to 1,100 nanometers. Portable, compact, and relatively inexpensive for degree of precision.

  13. Quantized beam shifts in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    de Melo Kort-Kamp, Wilton Junior; Sinitsyn, Nikolai; Dalvit, Diego Alejandro Roberto

    2015-10-08

    We predict the existence of quantized Imbert-Fedorov, Goos-Hanchen, and photonic spin Hall shifts for light beams impinging on a graphene-on-substrate system in an external magnetic field. In the quantum Hall regime the Imbert-Fedorov and photonic spin Hall shifts are quantized in integer multiples of the fine structure constant α, while the Goos-Hanchen ones in multiples of α2. We investigate the influence on these shifts of magnetic field, temperature, and material dispersion and dissipation. An experimental demonstration of quantized beam shifts could be achieved at terahertz frequencies for moderate values of the magnetic field.

  14. Shifts in fisheries management: adapting to regime shifts

    PubMed Central

    King, Jacquelynne R.; McFarlane, Gordon A.; Punt, André E.

    2015-01-01

    For many years, fisheries management was based on optimizing yield and maintaining a target biomass, with little regard given to low-frequency environmental forcing. However, this policy was often unsuccessful. In the last two to three decades, fisheries science and management have undergone a shift towards balancing sustainable yield with conservation, with the goal of including ecosystem considerations in decision-making frameworks. Scientific understanding of low-frequency climate–ocean variability, which is manifested as ecosystem regime shifts and states, has led to attempts to incorporate these shifts and states into fisheries assessment and management. To date, operationalizing these attempts to provide tactical advice has met with limited success. We review efforts to incorporate regime shifts and states into the assessment and management of fisheries resources, propose directions for future investigation and outline a potential framework to include regime shifts and changes in ecosystem states into fisheries management.

  15. Synchrony of trend shifts in Sahel summer rainfall and global oceanic evaporation, 1950-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diawara, A.; Tachibana, Y.; Oshima, K.; Nishikawa, H.; Ando, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Between 1950 and 2012, summer (rainy season) rainfall in the Sahel changed from a multi-decadal decreasing trend to an increasing trend (positive trend shift) in the mid-1980s. We found that this trend shift was synchronous with similar trend shifts in global oceanic evaporation and in land precipitation in all continents except the Americas. The trend shift in oceanic evaporation occurred mainly in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) and the subtropical oceans of the Northern Hemisphere (NH). Because increased oceanic evaporation strengthens the atmospheric moisture transport toward land areas, the synchrony of oceanic evaporation and land precipitation is reasonable. Surface scalar winds over the SH oceans also displayed a positive trend shift. Sea surface temperature (SST) displayed a trend shift in the mid-1980s that was negative (increasing, then decreasing) in the SH and positive in the NH. Although SST had opposite trend shifts in both hemispheres, the trend shift in evaporation was positive in both hemispheres. We infer that because strong winds promote evaporative cooling, the trend shift in SH winds strengthened the trend shifts of both SST and evaporation in the SH. Because high SST promotes evaporation, the trend shift in NH SST strengthened the NH trend shift in evaporation. Thus differing oceanic roles in the SH and NH generated the positive trend shift in evaporation; however, the details of moisture transport toward the Sahel are still unclear.

  16. Rhetoric or Reality: Shifts in Graduate Career Management?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, Noeleen; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Interviews with human resource specialists at 20 companies that are major recruiters found most attempting to change the nature of the traditional employer-employee relationship. Subtle shifts are evident in the definition of a career culture, promotion and career development practices, and organizational expectations. (SK)

  17. Water-gas shift reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Newsome, D.S.

    1980-01-01

    A review covers the industrial applications of the water-gas shift reaction in hydrogen manufacturing, removing CO from ammonia synthesis feeds, and detoxifying town gas; and the catalyst characteristics, reaction kinetics, and reaction mechanisms of the water-gas shift reactions catalyzed by iron-based, copper-based, or sulfided cobalt-molybdenum catalysts.

  18. The Compton Effect Red Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kierein, John

    2004-05-01

    In 1923 (Phil Mag. 46, 897.) A. H. Compton noted that the Compton effect produces a red shift for all wavelengths when the scattered electron is free and not bound to an atom or molecule. He suggested that the red shift in the visible spectrum at the limb of the sun is larger than that at the center due to the Compton effect from the greater number of free electrons in the sun's atmosphere along the line of sight. Kierein and Sharp (1968, Solar Physics 3, 450) quantified this and showed a good correlation of red shift observations with the variation in the number of these electrons along the line of sight from center to limb and suggested that the quasar red shift and cosmological red shift could be similarly explained. Grote Reber mapped and measured the background hectometric radiation and found it to be unexpectedly bright. In 1968 (J. Franklin Inst. 285,1), while describing these measurements and maps he explained this brightness as being due to the Compton effect causing the cosmological red shift and accelerating intergalactic electrons. The resulting universe is static. The predicted red shift from the Compton effect deviates from Hubble's law only at large red shifts.

  19. Flexible Schedules and Shift Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beers, Thomas M.

    2000-01-01

    Flexible work hours have gained prominence, as more than 25 million workers (27.6% of all full-time workers) can now vary their schedules. However, there has been little change since the mid-1980s in the proportion who work a shift other than a regular daytime shift. (JOW)

  20. Chemical shift driven geometry optimization.

    PubMed

    Witter, Raiker; Priess, Wolfram; Sternberg, Ulrich

    2002-01-30

    A new method for refinement of 3D molecular structures by geometry optimization is presented. Prerequisites are a force field and a very fast procedure for the calculation of chemical shifts in every step of optimization. To the energy, provided by the force field (COSMOS force field), a pseudoenergy, depending on the difference between experimental and calculated chemical shifts, is added. In addition to the energy gradients, pseudoforces are computed. This requires the derivatives of the chemical shifts with respect to the coordinates. The pseudoforces are analytically derived from the integral expressions of the bond polarization theory. Single chemical shift values attributed to corresponding atoms are considered for structural correction. As a first example, this method is applied for proton position refinement of the D-mannitol X-ray structure. A crystal structure refinement with 13C chemical shift pseudoforces is carried out. PMID:11924742

  1. Dynamic phase-shifting photoelasticity.

    PubMed

    Asundi, A; Tong, L; Boay, C G

    2001-08-01

    The application of phase-shifting photoelasticity to a real-time dynamic event involves simultaneous recording of the four phase-shifted images. Here an instrument, believed to be novel, is developed and described for this purpose. Use of a Multispec Imager is introduced into digital photoelasticity for the first time to our knowledge. This device enables splitting the optical energy of an object into four identical paths, thus permitting recording of the required four phase-shifted images. Experimental demonstration is provided for validation. PMID:18360395

  2. Interpretations of cosmological spectral shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Østvang, Dag

    2013-03-01

    It is shown that for Robertson-Walker models with flat or closed space sections, all of the cosmological spectral shift can be attributed to the non-flat connection (and thus indirectly to space-time curvature). For Robertson-Walker models with hyperbolic space sections, it is shown that cosmological spectral shifts uniquely split up into "kinematic" and "gravitational" parts provided that distances are small. For large distances no such unique split-up exists in general. A number of common, but incorrect assertions found in the literature regarding interpretations of cosmological spectral shifts, is pointed out.

  3. Promoting Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qin; Zhao, Yongxin; Wu, Xiaofeng; Liu, Si

    There can be multitudinous models specifying aspects of the same system. Each model has a bias towards one aspect. These models often override in specific aspects though they have different expressions. A specification written in one model can be refined by introducing additional information from other models. The paper proposes a concept of promoting models which is a methodology to obtain refinements with support from cooperating models. It refines a primary model by integrating the information from a secondary model. The promotion principle is not merely an academic point, but also a reliable and robust engineering technique which can be used to develop software and hardware systems. It can also check the consistency between two specifications from different models. A case of modeling a simple online shopping system with the cooperation of the guarded design model and CSP model illustrates the practicability of the promotion principle.

  4. Refining the shifted topological vertex

    SciTech Connect

    Drissi, L. B.; Jehjouh, H.; Saidi, E. H.

    2009-01-15

    We study aspects of the refining and shifting properties of the 3d MacMahon function C{sub 3}(q) used in topological string theory and BKP hierarchy. We derive the explicit expressions of the shifted topological vertex S{sub {lambda}}{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}(q) and its refined version T{sub {lambda}}{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}(q,t). These vertices complete results in literature.

  5. Promoting Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mechanic, David

    1990-01-01

    Argues that culture change or modification of the social structure is necessary for effective health promotion because health behavior is closely tied to basic group structures and processes. Examines the health attitudes of Mormons, low income and minority groups, and developing Islamic nations, emphasizing attitudes towards education and women.…

  6. Integrated reformer and shift reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Clawson, Lawrence G.; Mitchell, William L.; Dorson, Matthew H.

    2006-06-27

    A hydrocarbon fuel reformer for producing diatomic hydrogen gas is disclosed. The reformer includes a first reaction vessel, a shift reactor vessel annularly disposed about the first reaction vessel, including a first shift reactor zone, and a first helical tube disposed within the first shift reactor zone having an inlet end communicating with a water supply source. The water supply source is preferably adapted to supply liquid-phase water to the first helical tube at flow conditions sufficient to ensure discharge of liquid-phase and steam-phase water from an outlet end of the first helical tube. The reformer may further include a first catalyst bed disposed in the first shift reactor zone, having a low-temperature shift catalyst in contact with the first helical tube. The catalyst bed includes a plurality of coil sections disposed in coaxial relation to other coil sections and to the central longitudinal axis of the reformer, each coil section extending between the first and second ends, and each coil section being in direct fluid communication with at least one other coil section.

  7. Schedule shifts, cancer and longevity

    PubMed Central

    Cornélissen, Germaine; Halberg, Julia; Halberg, Franz; de la Pena, Salvador Sanchez; Nelson, Walter; Schwartzkopff, Othild; Stoynev, Alexander; Haus, Erhard

    2008-01-01

    Prompted by a recent report of the possible carcinogenic effect of shiftwork focusing on the disruption of circadian rhythms, we review studies involving shifts in schedule implemented at varying intervals in unicells, insects and mammals, including humans. Results indicate the desirability to account for a broader-than-circadian view. They also suggest the possibility of optimizing schedule shifts by selecting intervals between consecutive shifts associated with potential side-effects such as an increase in cancer risk. Toward this goal, marker rhythmometry is most desirable. The monitoring of blood pressure and heart rate present the added benefit of assessing cardiovascular disease risks resulting not only from an elevated blood pressure but also from abnormal variability in blood pressure and/or heart rate of normotensive as well as hypertensive subjects. PMID:19227006

  8. Fracture toughness curve shift method

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, R.K.; Sokolov, M.A.; McCabe, D.E.

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this task is to examine the technical basis for the currently accepted methods for shifting fracture toughness curves to account for irradiation damage, and to work through national codes and standards bodies to revise those methods, if a change is warranted. During this reporting period, data from all the relevant HSSI Programs were acquired and stored in a database and evaluated. The results from that evaluation have been prepared in a draft letter report and are summarized here. A method employing Weibull statistics was applied to analyze fracture toughness properties of unirradiated and irradiated pressure vessel steels. Application of the concept of a master curve for irradiated materials was examined and used to measure shifts of fracture toughness transition curves. It was shown that the maximum likelihood approach gave good estimations of the reference temperature, T{sub o}, determined by rank method and could be used for analyzing of data sets where application of the rank method did not prove to be feasible. It was shown that, on average, the fracture toughness shifts generally exceeded the Charpy 41-J shifts; a linear least-squares fit to the data set yielded a slope of 1.15. The observed dissimilarity was analyzed by taking into account differences in effects of irradiation on Charpy impact and fracture toughness properties. Based on these comparisons, a procedure to adjust Charpy 41-J shifts for achieving a more reliable correlation with the fracture toughness shifts was evaluated. An adjustment consists of multiplying the 41-J energy level by the ratio of unirradiated to irradiated Charpy upper shelves to determine an irradiated transition temperature, and then subtracting the unirradiated transition temperature determined at 41 J. For LUS welds, however, an unirradiated level of 20 J (15 ft-1b) was used for the corresponding adjustment for irradiated material.

  9. Broadband optical serrodyne frequency shifting.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D M S; Hogan, J M; Chiow, S-w; Kasevich, M A

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate serrodyne frequency shifting of light from 200 MHz to 1.2 GHz with an efficiency of better than 60%. The frequency shift is imparted by an electro-optic phase modulator driven by a high-frequency high-fidelity sawtooth waveform that is passively generated by a commercially available nonlinear transmission line. We also implement a push-pull configuration using two serrodyne-driven phase modulators, allowing for continuous tuning between -1.6 GHz and +1.6 GHz. Compared with competing technologies, this technique is simple and robust, and it offers the largest available tuning range in this frequency band. PMID:20195339

  10. Foundation Shifts Tack on Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2006-01-01

    Five years into an eight-year study of its high school improvement efforts, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is shifting its strategy for evaluating the $1.3 billion grant program. The foundation's initiative, which is underwriting change efforts in more than 1,800 schools, is the nation's largest privately funded attempt to improve high…

  11. Leadership Shifts in Changing Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zubrzycki, Jaclyn

    2013-01-01

    As groups representing local and state education players struggle to remain relevant in a policy conversation often dominated by foundations, think tanks, new advocacy groups, and political and business figures, a shift in leadership has been under way at major associations. Most of the changes have come as part of the natural churn; former…

  12. Illinois Shifting Gears Policy Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weitzel, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    Illinois Shifting Gears is a multilevel initiative that has simultaneously created bridge programs in the field and altered state policy to facilitate the creation of more programs in the future. These efforts have informed each other, giving policymakers the opportunity to interact with practitioners, troubleshoot bridge programs, and make…

  13. The Shift Needed for Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Peter A. C.; Sharicz, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this action research is to begin to assess to what extent organizations have in practice begun to make the shift towards triple bottom line (TBL) sustainability. Design/methodology/approach: A definition of TBL sustainability is provided, and key elements of TBL sustainability considered necessary to success are identified…

  14. Technology Counts 2012: Virtual Shift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Week, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Virtual education is moving into that intersection where rising popularity meets calls for greater accountability. How the virtual education movement responds to those calls will have a significant impact on how it evolves in K-12 over the next five to 10 years. This report tackles this shift in the virtual education landscape. It examines the…

  15. Flexible shift scheduling of physicians.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Jens O; Bard, Jonathan F; Kolisch, Rainer

    2009-09-01

    This research addresses a shift scheduling problem in which physicians at a German university hospital are assigned to demand periods over a planning horizon that can extend up to several weeks. When performing the scheduling it is necessary to take into account a variety of legal and institutional constraints that are imposed by a national labor agreement, which governs all physicians in German university hospitals. Currently, most medical departments develop their staff schedules manually at great cost and time. To solve the problem, a new modeling approach is developed that requires shifts to be generated implicitly. Rather than beginning with a predetermined number of shift types and start times, shifts are allowed to start at every pre-defined period in the planning horizon and extend up to 13 h with an hour-long break included. The objective is to find an assignment such that the total hours that have to be paid out as overtime are minimal under the restrictions given by the labor agreement. The problem is formulated as a mixed-integer program and solved with CPLEX. During the solution process individual lines-of-work are constructed for each physician. Using data from an anesthesia department, computational results indicate that high quality schedules can be obtained much more quickly than by current practice. PMID:19739361

  16. Wavelength-shifted Cherenkov radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krider, E. P.; Jacobson, V. L.; Pifer, A. E.; Polakos, P. A.; Kurz, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The scintillation and Cherenkov responses of plastic Cherenkov radiators containing different wavelength-shifting fluors in varying concentrations have been studied in beams of low energy protons and pions. For cosmic ray applications, where large Cherenkov to scintillation ratios are desired, the optimum fluor concentrations are 0.000025 by weight or less.

  17. Shifting Patterns of Deadly Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiden, Richard H.; Freitas, Raymond P.

    1980-01-01

    While it is true that the total suicide rates has varied little, this composite figure masks a dramatic shift in the risk of suicide by age. In recent years there has been a reduction of suicide at older ages reciprocated by an unprecedented increase of suicide and homicide at younger ages. (Author)

  18. Spectral shifts near compact objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, K.; Myra, E.

    1981-10-01

    It is shown that radiation emitted from material freely falling toward a black hole or neutron star cannot be blue shifted as recently claimed by Cohen and Struble (1980). The relativistic corrections to the classical apparent limb angle are given explicitly for spherical sources in collapse.

  19. Anthropometric changes and fluid shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W. E.; Hoffler, G. W.; Rummel, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    Several observations of body size, shape, posture, and configuration were made to document changes resulting from direct effects of weightlessness during the Skylab 4 mission. After the crewmen were placed in orbit, a number of anatomical and anthropometric changes occurred including a straightening of the thoracolumbar spine, a general decrease in truncal girth, and an increase in height. By the time of the earliest in-flight measurement on mission day 3, all crewmen had lost more than two liters of extravascular fluid from the calf and thigh. The puffy facies, the bird legs effect, the engorgement of upper body veins, and the reduced volume of lower body veins were all documented with photographs. Center-of-mass measurements confirmed a fluid shift cephalad. This shift remained throughout the mission until recovery, when a sharp reversal occurred; a major portion of the reversal was completed in a few hours. The anatomical changes are of considerable scientific interest and of import to the human factors design engineer, but the shifts of blood and extravascular fluid are of more consequence. It is hypothesized that the driving force for the fluid shift is the intrinsic and unopposed lower limb elasticity that forces venous blood and then other fluid cephalad.

  20. Field shifts in hafnium II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aufmuth, P.; Henneberg, I.; Siminski, A.; Steudel, A.

    1991-03-01

    By means of classical interference spectroscopy, using enriched isotope samples, the isotope shift between178Hf and180Hf has been measured for 33 transitions in the Hf II spectrum. For the pure Russell-Saunders terms 5 d 26 s 4 F and2 F the parametric analysis yields a field-shift difference of 17(2) mK produced by the second-order interaction of the electrostatic operator and the field-shift operator. Semi-empirical calculations based on the non-relativistic Hartree-Fock method reproduce this value as well as the experimental field shifts if a factor of 1.68(6) is used to scale the ab initio electron densities at the nucleus. The corresponding factor for the Hf atom is much smaller. This leads to a re-evaluation of screening ratios for Hf and to a more accurate value of the nuclear parameter λ178,180 (Hf)=0.072(4) fm2.

  1. Guide to good practices for shift routines and operating practices

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This Guide to Good Practices is written to enhance understanding of, and provide direction for, ``Shift Routines and Operating Practices,`` Chapter 2 of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities. The practices in this guide should be considered when planning or reviewing shift routines and operating practices. ``Shift Routines and Operating Practices`` is an element of an effective Conduct of Operations program. The complexity and array of activities performed in DOE facilities dictate the necessity for a high standard of professional conduct and sound operating practices to promote safe and efficient operations. Recently, guidance pertaining to this element has been strengthened for nuclear power reactors. This additional guidance is given in Appendix C for information purposes. Though this guidance and good practices pertain to nuclear power reactors, DOE sites may choose to use a graded approach for implementing these in nuclear facilities.

  2. Shift control mechanism for a manual transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Gugin, D.G.

    1991-08-06

    This patent describes a shift control mechanism for a manual transmission having a transmission gear housing and a manual shift selecting lever. It comprises a shift selecting shaft mounted within the transmission gear housing for rotation and axial translation in response to selective manipulation of the shift selecting lever; a shift sleeve supported from the transmission gear housing; an actuating member secured to the shift selecting shaft for rotation and axial translation with the shift selecting shaft; synchronizer assemblies; the actuating member individually operating the synchronizer assemblies in response to selected manipulation of the shift selecting lever; alignment guide means interactive between the shift selecting shaft and the transmission gear housing to permit axial translation of the shift selecting shaft only when the shift selecting shaft has been rotated to align a locator means with a locating means.

  3. Size-Dependent Raman Shifts for nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yukun; Zhao, Xinmei; Yin, Penggang; Gao, Faming

    2016-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a very sensitive tool for probing semiconductor nanocrystals. The underlying mechanism behind the size-dependent Raman shifts is still quite controversial. Here we offer a new theoretical method for the quantum confinement effects on the Raman spectra of semiconductor nanocrystals. We propose that the shift of Raman spectra in nanocrystals can result from two overlapping effects: the quantum effect shift and surface effect shift. The quantum effect shift is extracted from an extended Kubo formula, the surface effect shift is determined via the first principles calculations. Fairly good prediction of Raman shifts can be obtained without the use of any adjustable parameter. Closer analysis shows that the size-dependent Raman shifts in Si nanocrystals mainly result from the quantum effect shifts. For nanodiamond, the proportion of surface effect shift in Raman shift is up to about 40%. Such model can also provide a good baseline for using Raman spectroscopy as a tool to measure size. PMID:27102066

  4. Looping through the Lamb Shift

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A U

    2007-02-06

    Sometimes in science, a small measurement can have big ramifications. For a team of Livermore scientists, such was the case when they measured a small shift in the spectrum of extremely ionized atoms of uranium. The measurement involves the Lamb shift, a subtle change in the energy of an electron orbiting an atom's nucleus. The precision of the Livermore result was 10 times greater than that of existing measurements, making it the best measurement to date of a complicated correction to the simplest quantum description of how atoms behave. The measurement introduces a new realm in the search for deviations between the theory of quantum electrodynamics (QED), which is an extension of quantum mechanics, and the real world. Such deviations, if discovered, would have far-reaching consequences, indicating that QED is not a fundamental theory of nature.

  5. Water-gas shift reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Newsome, D.S.

    1980-01-01

    Recent kinetic and mechanistic studies of the water-gas shift reaction, H/sub 2/O(g) + CO(g) reversible CO/sub 2/ + H/sub 2/(g), catalyzed by iron and copper catalysts are reviewed. Composition, structure, active sites, preparation methods, additives, and poisons are discussed relative to each catalyst. New water-gas shift reaction catalyst systems studied are Mo-magnesia, Ni - Mo, Co - Mo, sulfided Co - Mo - Cs, sulfided Co - Mo, sulfided Ni - Mo, Co - Mo - Ni with added alkaki, and Co - Mo with added alkali, Cesium carbonate - cesium acetate - potassium carbonate or potassium acetate - Co - Mo is claimed to be an especially active catalyst. These new catalyst systems are sulfur tolerant and hold promise as catalysts for hydrogenation of high-sulfur coals. (BLM)

  6. Josephson 32-bit shift register

    SciTech Connect

    Yuh, P.F.; Yao, C.T.; Bradley, P. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on a 32-bit shift register designed by edge-triggered gates tested with {plus minus}25% bias margin and {plus minus}81% input margin for the full array. Simulations have shown {plus minus}55% bias margin at 3.3 GHz and working up to a maximum frequency of 30 GHz with a junction current density of 2000A/cm{sup 2} although the shift register has only been tested up to 500 MHz, limited by instrumentation. This edge-triggered gate consisting of a pair of conventional Josephson logic gates in series has the advantages of wide margins, short reset time, and insensitivity to global parameter-variations.

  7. Lamb shift in muonic deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Gorchtein, Mikhail; Vanderhaeghen, Marc; Carlson, Carl E.

    2013-11-07

    We consider the two-photon exchange contribution to the 2P-2S Lamb shift in muonic deuterium in the framework of forward dispersion relations. The dispersion integrals are evaluated with minimal model dependence using experimental data on elastic deuteron form factors and inelastic electron-deuteron scattering, both in the quasielastic and hadronic range. The subtraction constant that is required to ensure convergence of the dispersion relation for the forward Compton amplitude T{sub 1} (ν,Q{sup 2}) is related to the deuteron magnetic polarizability β(Q{sup 2}) and represents the main source of uncertainty in our analysis. We obtain for the Lamb shift ΔE{sub 2P-2S} = 1.620±0.190 meV and discuss ways to further reduce this uncertainty.

  8. Metaphor shifts in stroke recovery.

    PubMed

    Boylstein, Craig; Rittman, Maude; Hinojosa, Ramon

    2007-01-01

    An illness event like stroke is generally believed to produce a biographical disruption in the individual, resulting in a reconstruction of one's self identity. One method of narrative reconstruction is the use of personal metaphor. Although previous research has illustrated a variety of illness metaphors, including that of war, there has been little research conducted on how these metaphors shift throughout a person's recovery period. The authors present data that indicate an intricate connection exists among changes in individuals' physical functioning, self-reported depression level, self-identity, and the metaphors they use to describe the stroke and stroke recovery experience. As the metaphor one uses to describe one's stroke experience shifts, so does one's sense of self. As one's self-identity changes, one's level of self-reported depression may also increase. PMID:17567259

  9. Anthropometric changes and fluid shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W. E.; Hoffler, G. W.; Rummel, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    In an effort to obtain the most comprehensive and coherent picture of changes under weightlessness, a set of measurements on Skylab 2 was initiated and at every opportunity, additional studies were added. All pertinent information from ancillary sources were gleaned and collated. On Skylab 2, the initial anthropometric studies were scheduled in conjunction with muscle study. A single set of facial photographs was made in-flight. Additional measurements were made on Skylab 3, with photographs and truncal and limb girth measurements in-flight. Prior to Skylab 4, it was felt there was considerable evidence for large and rapid fluid shifts, so a series of in-flight volume and center of mass measurements and infrared photographs were scheduled to be conducted in the Skylab 4 mission. A number of changes were properly documented for the first time, most important of which were the fluid shifts. The following description of Skylab anthropometrics address work done on Skylab 4 primarily.

  10. Multicolor Holography With Phase Shifting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vikram, Chandra S.

    1996-01-01

    Prototype apparatus constructed to test feasibility of two-color holographic interferometric scheme in which data for reconstructing holographic wavefront obtained with help of phase-shifting technique. Provides two sets of data needed to solve equations for effects of temperature and concentration. Concept extended to holography at three or more wavelengths to measure three or more phenomena associated with significant variations in index of refraction

  11. Does Learning-Centered Teaching Promote Grade Improvement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mostrom, Alison M.; Blumberg, Phyllis

    2012-01-01

    When the grade distribution within a course shifts towards higher grades, it may be due to grade inflation or grade improvement. If the positive shift is accompanied by an increase in achievement or learning, it should be considered grade improvement, "not" grade inflation. Effective learning-centered teaching is designed to promote student…

  12. Geometric phase shifting digital holography.

    PubMed

    Jackin, Boaz Jessie; Narayanamurthy, C S; Yatagai, Toyohiko

    2016-06-01

    A new phase shifting digital holographic technique using a purely geometric phase in Michelson interferometric geometry is proposed. The geometric phase in the system does not depend upon either optical path length or wavelength, unlike dynamic phase. The amount of geometric phase generated is controllable through a rotating wave plate. The new approach has unique features and major advantages in holographic measurement of transparent and reflecting three-dimensional (3D) objects. Experimental results on surface shape measurement and imaging of 3D objects are presented using the proposed method. PMID:27244436

  13. Cortisol shifts financial risk preferences.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Narayanan; Hardy, Ben; Page, Lionel; Schaffner, Markus; Graggaber, Johann; Powlson, Andrew S; Fletcher, Paul C; Gurnell, Mark; Coates, John

    2014-03-01

    Risk taking is central to human activity. Consequently, it lies at the focal point of behavioral sciences such as neuroscience, economics, and finance. Many influential models from these sciences assume that financial risk preferences form a stable trait. Is this assumption justified and, if not, what causes the appetite for risk to fluctuate? We have previously found that traders experience a sustained increase in the stress hormone cortisol when the amount of uncertainty, in the form of market volatility, increases. Here we ask whether these elevated cortisol levels shift risk preferences. Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over protocol we raised cortisol levels in volunteers over 8 d to the same extent previously observed in traders. We then tested for the utility and probability weighting functions underlying their risk taking and found that participants became more risk-averse. We also observed that the weighting of probabilities became more distorted among men relative to women. These results suggest that risk preferences are highly dynamic. Specifically, the stress response calibrates risk taking to our circumstances, reducing it in times of prolonged uncertainty, such as a financial crisis. Physiology-induced shifts in risk preferences may thus be an underappreciated cause of market instability. PMID:24550472

  14. Sectoral shifts and aggregate unemployment

    SciTech Connect

    Loungani, P.

    1986-01-01

    Some recent research has taken the view that sectoral or industry-specific shocks significantly affect aggregate unemployment by increasing the amount of inter-industry labor reallocation required. The empirical evidence for this view rests on the finding that during the 1950s - and again during the 1970s - there was a positive correlation between aggregate unemployment and the dispersion of employment growth rates. This thesis demonstrates that this correlation arises largely because oil price shocks affect both unemployment and the dispersion of employment growth. Once the dispersion due to oil shocks is accounted for, the residual dispersion in employment has very low explanatory power for unemployment. Since the dispersion index does not measure pure sectoral shifts, an alternate measure of dispersion is developed that serves as a better proxy for the amount of inter-industry labor reallocation required each period. Estimates using this measure suggest that, during the 1950s, temporary increases in the relative price of oil were responsible for generating the observed correlation. On the other hand, sectoral shifts were important during the 1970s; in particular, the 1973 oil price increase has had significant reallocative effects on the economy. This contention is subjected to further tests by looking at the time-series behavior of employment in durable-goods industries and also by following the inter-industry movements of workers over time through the use of panel data.

  15. Differential phase shift keyed signal resolver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, P. M.; Wallingford, W. M. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A differential phase shift keyed signal resolver resolves the differential phase shift in the incoming signal to determine the data content thereof overcoming phase uncertainty without requiring a transmitted reference signal.

  16. Shift register generators and applications to coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morakis, J. C.

    1968-01-01

    The most important properties of shift register generated sequences are exposed. The application of shift registers as multiplication and division circuits leads to the generation of some error correcting and detecting codes.

  17. Discrete radon transform with shift of coordinate

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, X.; Wu, L.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes the Radon transform with shift of coordinates. The appropriate shift value of spatial coordinate gives less alias in the data reconstruction and the appropriate shift value of frequency coordinate makes the reconstruction stable. The method is suitable to signal processing of seismogram, an example of wave field separation to practical VSP data is shown in the paper.

  18. Balmer line shifts in quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulentic, J. W.; Marziani, P.; Del Olmo, A.; Zamfir, S.

    2016-02-01

    We offer a broad review of Balmer line phenomenology in type 1 active galactic nuclei, briefly summarising luminosity and radio loudness effects, and discussing interpretation in terms of nebular physics along the 4D eigenvector 1 sequence of quasars. We stress that relatively rare, peculiar Balmer line profiles (i.e., with large shifts with respect to the rest frame or double and multiple peaked) that start attracted attentions since the 1970s are still passable of multiple dynamical interpretation. More mainstream objects are still not fully understood as well, since competing dynamical models and geometries are possible. Further progress may come from inter-line comparison across the 4D Eigenvector 1 sequence.

  19. From sedentary to active: Shifting the movement paradigm in workplaces.

    PubMed

    Das, Bhibha M; Mailey, Emily; Murray, Kate; Phillips, Siobhan M; Torres, Cam; King, Abby C

    2016-06-01

    Increased sedentary behavior and reduced physical activity are risk factors for morbidity and mortality. As adults spend a significant portion of their time at work where the default is to spend the majority of the day sitting, shifting workplace norms to decrease sedentary time and increase active time could have a public health impact. Workplaces offer a unique setting for multi-level interventions that can reach diverse populations. Traditional worksite wellness initiatives have produced equivocal results in terms of increasing physical activity. One reason for this may be the focus on corporate-fitness type programs and health education with little change in workplace culture. More innovative approaches combining theory-based worksite wellness components with behavioral economics approaches promoting incidental physical activity at the workplace to make activity the default may be necessary. This article discusses strategies to shift the workplace paradigm from being sedentary to more active using a range of approaches. PMID:27286083

  20. Gear-shift mechanism for manual transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuchi, H.

    1986-07-22

    This patent describes a gear-shift mechanism for a manual transmission comprising a housing for the transmission; a movable shaft mounted in place within the housing for both axial and rotary movements and being operatively connected to a manual shift lever to be axially shifted from its neutral position to a forward or reverse position in selecting operation of the manual shift lever and to be rotated at its shifted position in shifting operation of the manual shift lever; a shift-and-select lever fixed to an intermediate portion of the movable shaft; an interlock member rotatably mounted in place on the movable shaft and having a pair of interlock arms located at the opposite sides of the shift-and-select lever; means for restricting rotary movement of the interlock member and permitting axial movement of the same; a pair of resilient means for centering the movable shaft to retain the shift-and-select lever and the interlock member in their neutral positions; and first, second and third shift heads arranged in sequence within the housing.

  1. A novel phase shifting structured illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Veena; Dubey, Vishesh; Ahmad, Azeem; Singh, Gyanendra; Mehta, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a new and novel phase shifting technique for qualitative as well as quantitative measurement in microscopy. We have developed a phase shifting device which is robust, inexpensive and involves no mechanical movement. In this method, phase shifting is implemented using LED array, beam splitters and defocused projection of Ronchi grating. The light from the LEDs are made incident on the beam splitters at spatially different locations. Due to variation in the geometrical distances of LEDs from the Ronchi grating and by sequentially illuminating the grating by switching on one LED at a time the phase shifted grating patterns are generated. The phase shifted structured patterns are projected onto the sample using microscopic objective lens. The phase shifted deformed patterns are recorded by a CCD camera. The initial alignment of the setup involves a simple procedure for the calibration for equal fringe width and intensity such that the phase shifted fringes are at equal phase difference. Three frame phase shifting algorithm is employed for the reconstruction of the phase map. The method described here is fully automated so that the phase shifted images are recorded just by switching of LEDs and has been used for the shape measurement of microscopic industrial objects. The analysis of the phase shifted images provides qualitative as well as quantitative information about the sample. Thus, the method is simple, robust and low cost compared to PZT devices commonly employed for phase shifting.

  2. Shifting Baselines, Science, and Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, J. B.

    2006-12-01

    All of us have a deeply personal concept of nature based upon our childhood perceptions of the world around us, and of the subsequent degradation of nature by the experiences of our lifetimes. Yet even the most rudimentary knowledge of history clearly demonstrates that the modern rise of human population and consumption have wreaked havoc on global ecosystems to the extent that nowhere is close to natural or pristine and that most places have been increasingly degraded over many centuries. This disconnect between direct personal experience and abstract historical perspective is the problem of "shifting baselines" that is the fundamental impediment to basic scientific understanding and environmental policy, and affects scientists as much as the general public, business, and government. Scientists in particular suffer from the inability to directly observe and experimentally verify causes and effects of previous changes in ecosystems that now bear so little resemblance to their natural state. Under the circumstances, it is essential for scientists to draw scientific conclusions based on imperfect data and to publicly explain, defend, and discuss their conclusions as the best possible science given present information. The failure to do so makes science virtually irrelevant to social and environmental policy and government.

  3. Dealing with a Paradigm Shift

    PubMed Central

    Pack, Allan I.

    2015-01-01

    Recent changes in policies by insurance companies with respect to mandating home sleep apnea testing rather than in-laboratory studies have a large impact on the financial viability of clinical sleep centers. Coping with this disruptive change requires forward planning. First, it is important to be well positioned with respect to facilities so that these can be quickly downsized to control costs. There is also a need to develop, in advance, an accredited home sleep study program so that centers can respond to the rapidly changing environment. Following the change there is a need to control costs by rapidly downsizing the technology workforce. Technologists can be retrained for other essential roles. Centralizing the precertification process with knowledgeable, well-trained staff and a robust auditing process is an essential component. The approach taken at the University of Pennsylvania to this change is described as is how one can ensure continued financial viability of a comprehensive sleep center program in a major academic medical center. Citation: Pack AI. Dealing with a paradigm shift. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(8):925–929. PMID:26094918

  4. Shifting boundaries in professional care.

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, A; Solomon, J; Abelson, J

    1996-01-01

    The nature of the work undertaken by different health professionals and inter-professional boundaries are constantly shifting. The greater knowledge of users of health care, and the increasing technical and organizational complexity of modern medicine, have partly eroded the control of health professionals over the substance of their work. The definition of a field of work as lying within the province of any one profession is culturally rather than scientifically determined. It is evident that care of good quality should be delivered at the lowest possible cost. This might include delivery of care by a less trained person than heretofore, or by someone with limited but focused training. Sharing of skills is a more sensible subject for discussion than transfer of tasks. We review a number of studies which show the effectiveness of inter-professional substitution in various care settings, and also the effectiveness of substitution by those other than health professionals. The views of users of health services on inter-professional substitution need to be considered. Health professionals and others need to work together to devise innovative ways of delivering effective health care. The legal issues need clarification. PMID:8774532

  5. HU multimerization shift controls nucleoid compaction

    PubMed Central

    Hammel, Michal; Amlanjyoti, Dhar; Reyes, Francis E.; Chen, Jian-Hua; Parpana, Rochelle; Tang, Henry Y. H.; Larabell, Carolyn A.; Tainer, John A.; Adhya, Sankar

    2016-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms controlling functional bacterial chromosome (nucleoid) compaction and organization are surprisingly enigmatic but partly depend on conserved, histone-like proteins HUαα and HUαβ and their interactions that span the nanoscale and mesoscale from protein-DNA complexes to the bacterial chromosome and nucleoid structure. We determined the crystal structures of these chromosome-associated proteins in complex with native duplex DNA. Distinct DNA binding modes of HUαα and HUαβ elucidate fundamental features of bacterial chromosome packing that regulate gene transcription. By combining crystal structures with solution x-ray scattering results, we determined architectures of HU-DNA nucleoproteins in solution under near-physiological conditions. These macromolecular conformations and interactions result in contraction at the cellular level based on in vivo imaging of native unlabeled nucleoid by soft x-ray tomography upon HUβ and ectopic HUα38 expression. Structural characterization of charge-altered HUαα-DNA complexes reveals an HU molecular switch that is suitable for condensing nucleoid and reprogramming noninvasive Escherichia coli into an invasive form. Collective findings suggest that shifts between networking and cooperative and noncooperative DNA-dependent HU multimerization control DNA compaction and supercoiling independently of cellular topoisomerase activity. By integrating x-ray crystal structures, x-ray scattering, mutational tests, and x-ray imaging that span from protein-DNA complexes to the bacterial chromosome and nucleoid structure, we show that defined dynamic HU interaction networks can promote nucleoid reorganization and transcriptional regulation as efficient general microbial mechanisms to help synchronize genetic responses to cell cycle, changing environments, and pathogenesis. PMID:27482541

  6. The double jeopardy of sales promotions.

    PubMed

    Jones, J P

    1990-01-01

    The maturing of most consumer markets in the United States has put great pressure on manufacturers in their search for growth. They have concentrated on building sales and expanding share proportions in the stagnant markets with devices like niche products, product extensions, mergers, and international ventures. They have shifted emphasis to sales promotions at the expense of advertising. But promotions, when you come right down to it, mean price reductions. Trade promotions are almost always rebates, and consumer promotions are usually temporary price reductions or coupons. The cost in reduced profit, demonstrated mathematically through calculations of price elasticity, is severe. Besides, when the promotion is over, the manufacturer has not moved forward an inch in shoring up the brand franchise. Promotions bring volatile demand, whereas the producer seeks stable demand. By sustaining a brand image and building customer loyalty, on the other hand, theme advertising can stabilize demand. Moreover, this type of advertising is less likely than promotion is to invite destructive competitive retaliation. Calculation of the advertising elasticity of a brand indicates that sometimes even modest sales increases can produce healthy profit improvement. In a well-planned marketing campaign, there is often good reason to include trade or consumer promotion--to counter a leading competitor's moves, for example. But there is no point in carrying out wild swings at rivals in a struggle for market share. Mathematical techniques can aid the efficiency of marketing planning and put on a more rational basis the decision on where to put the dollars. PMID:10113338

  7. Host shifts and evolutionary radiations of butterflies

    PubMed Central

    Fordyce, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Ehrlich and Raven proposed a model of coevolution where major host plant shifts of butterflies facilitate a burst of diversification driven by their arrival to a new adaptive zone. One prediction of this model is that reconstructions of historical diversification of butterflies should indicate an increase in diversification rate following major host shifts. Using reconstructed histories of 15 butterfly groups, I tested this prediction and found general agreement with Ehrlich and Raven's model. Butterfly lineages with an inferred major historical host shift showed evidence of diversification rate variation, with a significant acceleration following the host shift. Lineages without an inferred major host shift generally agreed with a constant-rate model of diversification. These results are consistent with the view that host plant associations have played a profound role in the evolutionary history of butterflies, and show that major shifts to chemically distinct plant groups leave a historical footprint that remains detectable today. PMID:20610430

  8. Electromagnetic tracking of the pivot-shift.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Ryosuke; Hoshino, Yuichi

    2016-06-01

    The pivot-shift test is an important examination to assess the rotational laxity in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injured and reconstructed knees. Because this examination is related to subjective knee function, we may still see cases that have residual rotational laxity after ACL reconstruction. Quantitative evaluation of the pivot-shift test is preferable to the clinical pivot-shift test but is difficult to attain mainly due to complicated movements of the pivot-shift. The electromagnetic tracking system was developed to evaluate knee kinematics during the pivot-shift, providing information related to 6-degree-of-freedom knee kinematics with a high sampling rate. Through this device, the abnormal movement of the pivot-shift is characterized in two phases: an increased anterior tibial translation and a boosted acceleration of tibial posterior reduction. Since its invention, this system has been utilized to assess rotational laxity for clinical follow-up and research after the ACL reconstruction. PMID:27007473

  9. 12-hour shifts: job satisfaction of nurses.

    PubMed

    Todd, C; Robinson, G; Reid, N

    1993-09-01

    A before and after study was carried out amongst staff of 10 wards of a county hospital before and after the introduction of a 12-hour shift system for nurses. The purpose was to investigate the impact of the shift system on job satisfaction. Some 320 nurses covering all qualified and unqualified grades were surveyed using a standard job satisfaction attitude scale. It was found that under the 12-hour shift both intrinsic and extrinsic factors of job satisfaction had been detrimentally affected. Considerable dissatisfaction was expressed about hours of work, conditions of work and the impact of the shift on domestic and social arrangements. The vast majority (83%) reported that they did not want to go on working the shift and there was support for the view that recruitment to nursing would be adversely affected by the shift. PMID:8313062

  10. Developing health promoting practices: a transformative process.

    PubMed

    Hartrick, G

    1998-01-01

    For health care professionals to successfully make the transition from disease care to health promotion requires a reorientation of how such professionals think and behave in their practice. This paper describes a multidisciplinary team's transition from disease care to health promotion. The research was conducted to learn what is involved in developing health promotion practices and the major changes practitioners experience as they shift from disease care to health promotion. A large, acute care institution and public health agency collaborated to address the needs of families and children with asthma, allergies, and eczema, with the goal of changing the focus from inpatient care to ambulatory or community-based care. A team of 5 nurses, 1 physiotherapist, 1 respiratory technologist, and 1 nutritionist was formed to undertake the initiative. PMID:9805341

  11. Shift mechanism for engine starting apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, J.A.; Colvill, R.G.; Smock, A.L.

    1986-04-01

    This patent describes a shift lever mechanism for translating axial movement of the plunger of a starter solenoid into axial movement of a pinion of an engine starting apparatus. This apparatus consists of, a starter solenoid having an axially shiftable plunger and a coil winding, a spring opposing pull-in movement of the plunger and a solenoid switch operated to a closed condition when the plunger is completely pulled-in, a shift lever actuator carried by the plunger for axial movement therewith. The actuator has a pair of spaced surfaces, a pivotally mounted shift lever one end of which is adapted to be coupled to the pinion. The opposite end of the shift lever has a pair of opposed shift lever surfaces that respectively engage the surfaces on the actuator. The actuator surfaces and the shift lever surfaces are substantially engaged when the shift lever is in an at rest postion. The surfaces on the shift lever are at different radial distances from the pivot point of the shift lever and are arranged relative to the surfaces on the actuator such that when the solenoid plunger pulls-in the surface on the shift lever that is at the greater radial distance from the pivot point is moved by a surface of the actuator and the other surface on the shift lever becomes separated by a predetermined amount from its cooperating surface on the actuator. The amount of separation is sufficient to allow the solenoid switch to be actuated to an open condition when the solenoid coil winding is deenergized and the spring shifts and plunger to reengage the separated surfaces.

  12. Theory of the Helium Isotope Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachucki, Krzysztof; Yerokhin, V. A.

    2015-09-01

    Theory of the isotope shift of the centroid energies of light few-electron atoms is reviewed. Numerical results are presented for the isotope shift of the 23P-23S and 21S-23S transition energies of 3He and 4He. By comparing theoretical predictions for the isotope shift with the experimental results, the difference of the squares of the nuclear charge radii of 3He and 4He, δR2, is determined with high accuracy.

  13. Goos-Haenchen shift in complex crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Longhi, Stefano; Della Valle, Giuseppe; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2011-10-15

    The Goos-Haenchen (GH) effect for wave scattering from complex PT-symmetric periodic potentials (complex crystals) is theoretically investigated, with specific reference to optical GH shift in photonic crystal slabs with a sinusoidal periodic modulation of both real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant. The analysis highlights some distinct and rather unique features as compared to the GH shift found in ordinary crystals. In particular, as opposed to GH shift in ordinary crystals, which is large at the band gap edges, in complex crystals the GH shift can be large inside the reflection (amplification) band and becomes extremely large as the PT symmetry-breaking threshold is approached.

  14. Jet Lag and Shift Work Disorder.

    PubMed

    Reid, Kathryn J; Abbott, Sabra M

    2015-12-01

    Jet lag and shift work disorder are circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders resulting from behaviorally altering the sleep-wake schedule in relation to the external environment. Not everyone who experiences trans-meridian travel or performs shift work has a disorder. The prevalence of jet lag disorder is unclear, approximately 5%-10% of shift workers have shift work disorder. Treatment aims to realign the internal circadian clock with the external environment. Behavioral therapies include sleep hygiene and management of the light-dark and sleep schedule. Pharmacologic agents are used to treat insomnia and excessive sleepiness, and melatonin is used to facilitate sleep and circadian realignment. PMID:26568127

  15. The second-order gravitational red shift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, J.

    1973-01-01

    The direct measurement of the nonlinear term of the gravitational field equations by using very stable clocks is discussed along with measuring the perhelion advance of a planet or satellite. These are considered measurements of the second-order gravitational red shift. The exact expression for the frequency shift of light in a gravitational field is derived. Other topics discussed include: The Doppler-cancelling technique; the second-order red shift in a spherically symmetric gravitational field; finite signal transit time; and the reality and interpretation of coordinates in the second-order red shift experiment.

  16. Vibrational isotope shifts in hexafluoride molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, Robin S.

    Central-atom isotope frequency shifts for the v3 stretching fundamentals of octahedral hexafluorides are reviewed. Accurate shifts have been measured for the hexafluorides of S, Se, Mo, Te, W and U, and can be calculated from force fields for those of Rh, Ir, Pt, Np and Pu. A theoretical treatment of the relation between the vibrational frequency v3 and the central-atom mass m establishes the parametric dependence of the isotope shift Δ v3. This yields a semi-empirical formula Δ v3(cm -1amu -1) = -4.20 v3m-1.75, with v3 in cm -1 and m in amu. Frequency shifts calculated from this formula agree with measured shifts generally to within 5%, and it promises to be useful in estimating such shifts for Jahn—Teller hexafluorides and for hexafluoride ions. The relative precision of isotope frequency shifts and Coriolis constants in constraining the general quadratic force fields of XF 6 molecules has also been considered. For a given precision in measuring frequency shifts, Δ v3 is more effective than Δ v4, by the ratio v3/ v4, for determining the off-diagonal symmetry force constant F34. F34 is about equally well constrained by the Coriolis constants for all molecules, but the frequency shifts become much less effective for this purpose as the central-atom mass increases.

  17. EXAFS Energy Shift and Structural Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Shelly D.; Ravel, Bruce

    2007-02-01

    In EXAFS analysis, the energy shift parameter is used to align the theoretical calculated spectrum to the energy grid of the measured spectrum. Unrealistically large energy shift values, sometimes in excess of 20 eV, are at times published in research articles. We therefore see the need for a concise discussion of the EXAFS energy shift parameter. This paper is intended as a learning tool for the proper alignment of theory to measured EXAFS spectra and proper interpretation of the energy shift parameter.

  18. Rapid shift in sleep time and acrophase of melatonin secretion in short shift work schedule.

    PubMed

    Quera-Salva, M A; Defrance, R; Claustrat, B; De Lattre, J; Guilleminault, C

    1996-09-01

    Tolerance to shift work and adaptability to shifting schedules is an issue of growing importance in industrialized society. We studied 40 registered nurses, 20 on fixed day-shifts and 20 on fixed night-shifts, to assess whether workers with rapidly shifting schedules were able to adapt their melatonin secretion and sleep-wake cycles. The day-shift worked 5 days with 2 days off and the night-shift worked 3 nights with 2 off. All night-shift personnel acknowledged shifting back to daytime schedules on their days off. Sleep-wake was determined by sleep logs and actigraphy. To measure 6-sulfatoxymelatonin levels, urine was collected at 2-hour intervals on the last work day and on the last day off. Night-shift workers slept significantly more on days off. Napping on the job occurred in 9/20 night-shift workers (mean 114 minutes) between 3 and 6 a.m. The acrophase of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin in day-shift nurses occurred at similar times on workdays and off days. In night-shift nurses, the acrophase was about 7 a.m. on days off, but had a random distribution on workdays. Further analysis revealed two subgroups of night-shift nurses: six subjects (group A).demonstrated a rapid shift in melatonin secretion (acrophase at near 12 noon on work days and at near 7 a.m. on days off) while 14 nurses (group B) did not shift. Group A nurses slept more in the daytime on work days and their total sleep time was the same as day-shift nurses. Group A was slightly younger and was composed solely of women (there were nine women and five men in group B). Age may be a factor in the ability to adapt to rapidly shifting schedules. PMID:8899932

  19. Exercise, energy balance and the shift worker.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Greg; Fullick, Sarah; Grindey, Charlotte; Maclaren, Don

    2008-01-01

    Shift work is now common in society and is not restricted to heavy industry or emergency services, but is increasingly found amongst 'white collar' occupations and the growing number of service industries. Participation in shift work is associated with increased body mass index, prevalence of obesity and other health problems. We review the behavioural and biological disturbances that occur during shift work and discuss their impact on leisure-time physical activity and energy balance. Shift work generally decreases opportunities for physical activity and participation in sports. For those shift workers who are able to exercise, subjective and biological responses can be altered if the exercise is taken at unusual times of day and/or if the shift worker is sleep deprived. These altered responses may in turn impact on the longer-term adherence to an exercise programme. The favourable effects of exercise on body mass control and sleep quality in shift workers have not been confirmed. Similarly, recent reports of relationships between sleep duration and obesity have not been examined in a shift work context. There is no evidence that exercise can mediate certain circadian rhythm characteristics (e.g. amplitude or timing) for improved tolerance to shift work. Total energy intake and meal composition do not seem to be affected by participation in shift work. Meal frequency is generally reduced but snacking is increased on the night shift. Unavailability of preferred foods in the workplace, a lack of time, and a reduced desire to eat at night explain these findings. 'Normal' eating habits with the family are also disrupted. The metabolic responses to food are also altered by shift work-mediated disruptions to sleep and circadian rhythms. Whether any interactions on human metabolism exist between timing or content of food intake and physical activity during shift work is not known at present. There are very few randomized controlled studies on the efficacy of physical

  20. Exercise, Energy Balance and the Shift Worker

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Greg; Fullick, Sarah; Grindey, Charlotte; Maclaren, Don; Waterhouse, Jim

    2009-01-01

    Shift work is now common in society and is not restricted to heavy industry or emergency services, but is increasingly found amongst ‘white collar’ occupations and the growing number of service industries. Participation in shift work is associated with increased body mass index, prevalence of obesity and other health problems. We review the behavioural and biological disturbances that occur during shift work and discuss their impact on leisure-time physical activity and energy balance. Shift work generally decreases opportunities for physical activity and participation in sports. For those shift workers who are able to exercise, subjective and biological responses can be altered if the exercise is taken at unusual times of day and/or if the shift worker is sleep-deprived. These altered responses may in turn impact on the longer-term adherence to an exercise programme. The favourable effects of exercise on body mass control and sleep quality have not been confirmed in shift workers. Similarly, recent reports of relationships between sleep duration and obesity have not been examined in a shift work context. There is no evidence that exercise can mediate certain circadian rhythm characteristics (e.g. amplitude or timing) for improved tolerance to shift work. Total energy intake and meal composition do not seem to be affected by participation in shift work. Meal frequency is generally reduced but snacking is increased on the night shift. Unavailability of preferred foods in the workplace, a lack of time, and a reduced desire to eat at night explain these findings. ‘Normal’ eating habits with the family are also disrupted. The metabolic responses to food are also altered by shift work-mediated disruptions to sleep and circadian rhythms. Whether any interactions on human metabolism exist between timing or content of food intake and physical activity during shift work is not known at present. There are very few randomised controlled studies on the efficacy of

  1. In-line phase shift tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hammonds, Jeffrey C.; Price, Ronald R.; Pickens, David R.; Donnelly, Edwin F.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to (1) demonstrate laboratory measurements of phase shift images derived from in-line phase-contrast radiographs using the attenuation-partition based algorithm (APBA) of Yan et al.[Opt. Express 18(15), 16074–16089 (2010)], (2) verify that the APBA reconstructed images obey the linearity principle, and (3) reconstruct tomosynthesis phase shift images from a collection of angularly sampled planar phase shift images.Methods: An unmodified, commercially available cabinet x-ray system (Faxitron LX-60) was used in this experiment. This system contains a tungsten anode x-ray tube with a nominal focal spot size of 10 μm. The digital detector uses CsI/CMOS with a pixel size of 50 × 50 μm. The phantoms used consisted of one acrylic plate, two polystyrene plates, and a habanero pepper. Tomosynthesis images were reconstructed from 51 images acquired over a ±25° arc. All phase shift images were reconstructed using the APBA.Results: Image contrast derived from the planar phase shift image of an acrylic plate of uniform thickness exceeded the contrast of the traditional attenuation image by an approximate factor of two. Comparison of the planar phase shift images from a single, uniform thickness polystyrene plate with two polystyrene plates demonstrated an approximate linearity of the estimated phase shift with plate thickness (−1600 rad vs −2970 rad). Tomographic phase shift images of the habanero pepper exhibited acceptable spatial resolution and contrast comparable to the corresponding attenuation image.Conclusions: This work demonstrated the feasibility of laboratory-based phase shift tomosynthesis and suggests that phase shift imaging could potentially provide a new imaging biomarker. Further investigation will be needed to determine if phase shift contrast will be able to provide new tissue contrast information or improved clinical performance.

  2. Impact of shift work on the health and safety of nurses and patients.

    PubMed

    Berger, Ann M; Hobbs, Barbara B

    2006-08-01

    Shift work generally is defined as work hours that are scheduled outside of daylight. Shift work disrupts the synchronous relationship between the body's internal clock and the environment. The disruption often results in problems such as sleep disturbances, increased accidents and injuries, and social isolation. Physiologic effects include changes in rhythms of core temperature, various hormonal levels, immune functioning, and activity-rest cycles. Adaptation to shift work is promoted by reentrainment of the internally regulated functions and adjustment of activity-rest and social patterns. Nurses working various shifts can improve shift-work tolerance when they understand and adopt counter measures to reduce the feelings of jet lag. By learning how to adjust internal rhythms to the same phase as working time, nurses can improve daytime sleep and family functioning and reduce sleepiness and work-related errors. Modifying external factors such as the direction of the rotation pattern, the number of consecutive night shifts worked, and food and beverage intake patterns can help to reduce the negative health effects of shift work. Nurses can adopt counter measures such as power napping, eliminating overtime on 12-hour shifts, and completing challenging tasks before 4 am to reduce patient care errors. PMID:16927899

  3. Socioecological regime shifts in the setting of complex social interactions.

    PubMed

    Sugiarto, Hendrik Santoso; Chung, Ning Ning; Lai, Choy Heng; Chew, Lock Yue

    2015-06-01

    The coupling between social and ecological system has become more ubiquitous and predominant in the current era. The strong interaction between these systems can bring about regime shifts which in the extreme can lead to the collapse of social cooperation and the extinction of ecological resources. In this paper, we study the occurrence of such regime shifts in the context of a coupled social-ecological system where social cooperation is established by means of sanction that punishes local selfish act and promotes norms that prescribe nonexcessive resource extraction. In particular, we investigate the role of social networks on social-ecological regimes shift and the corresponding hysteresis effects caused by the local ostracism mechanism under different social and ecological parameters. Our results show that a lowering of network degree reduces the hysteresis effect and also alters the tipping point, which is duly verified by our numerical results and analytical estimation. Interestingly, the hysteresis effect is found to be stronger in scale-free network in comparison with random network even when both networks have the same average degree. These results provide deeper insights into the resilience of these systems, and can have important implications on the management of coupled social-ecological systems with complex social interactions. PMID:26172751

  4. Socioecological regime shifts in the setting of complex social interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiarto, Hendrik Santoso; Chung, Ning Ning; Lai, Choy Heng; Chew, Lock Yue

    2015-06-01

    The coupling between social and ecological system has become more ubiquitous and predominant in the current era. The strong interaction between these systems can bring about regime shifts which in the extreme can lead to the collapse of social cooperation and the extinction of ecological resources. In this paper, we study the occurrence of such regime shifts in the context of a coupled social-ecological system where social cooperation is established by means of sanction that punishes local selfish act and promotes norms that prescribe nonexcessive resource extraction. In particular, we investigate the role of social networks on social-ecological regimes shift and the corresponding hysteresis effects caused by the local ostracism mechanism under different social and ecological parameters. Our results show that a lowering of network degree reduces the hysteresis effect and also alters the tipping point, which is duly verified by our numerical results and analytical estimation. Interestingly, the hysteresis effect is found to be stronger in scale-free network in comparison with random network even when both networks have the same average degree. These results provide deeper insights into the resilience of these systems, and can have important implications on the management of coupled social-ecological systems with complex social interactions.

  5. New Teachers' Identity Shifts at the Boundary of Teacher Education and Initial Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beauchamp, Catherine; Thomas, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    As teachers enter the school communities of their initial practice, they experience identity shifts that reflect their learning. Throughout teacher education they have constructed an identity informed by their previous school experiences, the ideas and approaches promoted by their teacher education programs, and an ideal of the teachers they hope…

  6. Effects of extended work shifts and shift work on patient safety, productivity, and employee health.

    PubMed

    Keller, Simone M

    2009-12-01

    It is estimated 1.3 million health care errors occur each year and of those errors 48,000 to 98,000 result in the deaths of patients (Barger et al., 2006). Errors occur for a variety of reasons, including the effects of extended work hours and shift work. The need for around-the-clock staff coverage has resulted in creative ways to maintain quality patient care, keep health care errors or adverse events to a minimum, and still meet the needs of the organization. One way organizations have attempted to alleviate staff shortages is to create extended work shifts. Instead of the standard 8-hour shift, workers are now working 10, 12, 16, or more hours to provide continuous patient care. Although literature does support these staffing patterns, it cannot be denied that shifts beyond the traditional 8 hours increase staff fatigue, health care errors, and adverse events and outcomes and decrease alertness and productivity. This article includes a review of current literature on shift work, the definition of shift work, error rates and adverse outcomes related to shift work, health effects on shift workers, shift work effects on older workers, recommended optimal shift length, positive and negative effects of shift work on the shift worker, hazards associated with driving after extended shifts, and implications for occupational health nurses. PMID:20043622

  7. Apparatus for controlling transmission gear shift selection

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, T.M.

    1986-07-29

    In an automotive engine having an electrical power source and an automatic or semi-automatic transmission including a manually operated transmission gear shift lever having at least two forward drive positions, an apparatus is described which consists of: (a) a speed sensing means for sensing the rotation speed of the engine and generating an output signal when the engine reaches a preselected rotational speed; and (b) a gear shifting means for changing the shift positions of the gear shift lever from a first drive position to a second drive position automatically in response to the output signal from the speed sensing means, the gear shifting means including (i) a latch actuable between open and closed positions, (ii) a normally de-energized solenoid having a plunger connected to the latch and operable to move the latch to the open position when the solenoid is energized by the electrical power source, (iii) a relay means for allowing the energizing of the solenoid by the power source in response to the output signal from the speed sensing means, and (iv) an actuating means, including a spring biased linkage mechanism operably connected to the gear shift lever and the latch, for actuating the movement of the gear shift lever from the first drive position to the second drive position in response to movement of the latch from the closed to the open position, thereby causing gear shifting to occur when the engine reaches the preselected rotational speed.

  8. Lamb Shift in Nonrelativistic Quantum Electrodynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grotch, Howard

    1981-01-01

    The bound electron self-energy or Lamb shift is calculated in nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics. Retardation is retained and also an interaction previously dropped in other nonrelativistic approaches is kept. Results are finite without introducing a cutoff and lead to a Lamb shift in hydrogen of 1030.9 MHz. (Author/JN)

  9. Four-phase differential phase shift resolver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, P. M.; Wallingford, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    Two systems have been developed to resolve phase uncertainty without transmitting reference signals. In both methods signal is impressed on carrier as differential, rather than absolute, phase shift. At the receiver four-phase demodulation and logic process unambiguously resolves differential phase shift of input carrier.

  10. 29 CFR 102.171 - Cost shifting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cost shifting. 102.171 Section 102.171 Labor Regulations... By Federal Income Tax Refund Offset § 102.171 Cost shifting. Costs incurred by the Agency in... amount of the offset. Such costs may include administrative costs and attorneys fees....

  11. 29 CFR 102.165 - Cost shifting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cost shifting. 102.165 Section 102.165 Labor Regulations... by Administrative Offset § 102.165 Cost shifting. Costs incurred by the Agency in connection with... offset. Such costs may include administrative costs and attorneys fees....

  12. A Short History of Three Chemical Shifts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagaoka, Shin-ichi

    2007-01-01

    A short history of chemical shifts in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) and Mossbauer spectroscopy, which are useful for chemical studies, is described. The term chemical shift is shown to have originated in the mistaken assumption that nuclei of a given element would all undergo resonance at the…

  13. 29 CFR 102.165 - Cost shifting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cost shifting. 102.165 Section 102.165 Labor Regulations... by Administrative Offset § 102.165 Cost shifting. Costs incurred by the Agency in connection with... offset. Such costs may include administrative costs and attorneys fees....

  14. 29 CFR 102.165 - Cost shifting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cost shifting. 102.165 Section 102.165 Labor Regulations... by Administrative Offset § 102.165 Cost shifting. Costs incurred by the Agency in connection with... offset. Such costs may include administrative costs and attorneys fees....

  15. 29 CFR 102.165 - Cost shifting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cost shifting. 102.165 Section 102.165 Labor Regulations... by Administrative Offset § 102.165 Cost shifting. Costs incurred by the Agency in connection with... offset. Such costs may include administrative costs and attorneys fees....

  16. 29 CFR 102.171 - Cost shifting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cost shifting. 102.171 Section 102.171 Labor Regulations... By Federal Income Tax Refund Offset § 102.171 Cost shifting. Costs incurred by the Agency in... amount of the offset. Such costs may include administrative costs and attorneys fees....

  17. 29 CFR 102.171 - Cost shifting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cost shifting. 102.171 Section 102.171 Labor Regulations... By Federal Income Tax Refund Offset § 102.171 Cost shifting. Costs incurred by the Agency in... amount of the offset. Such costs may include administrative costs and attorneys fees....

  18. 29 CFR 102.171 - Cost shifting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cost shifting. 102.171 Section 102.171 Labor Regulations... By Federal Income Tax Refund Offset § 102.171 Cost shifting. Costs incurred by the Agency in... amount of the offset. Such costs may include administrative costs and attorneys fees....

  19. Dual-wavelength in-line phase-shifting interferometry based on two dc-term-suppressed intensities with a special phase shift for quantitative phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Yawei; Xu, Yuanyuan; Jin, Weifeng

    2016-06-01

    To efficiently promote the phase retrieval in quantitative phase imaging, a new approach of quantitative phase extraction is proposed based on two intensities with dual wavelength after filtering the corresponding dc terms for each wavelength, in which a special phase shift is used. In this approach, only the combination of the phase-shifting technique and subtraction procedures is needed, and no additional algorithms are required. The thickness of the phase object can be achieved from the phase image, which is related to the synthetic beat wavelength. The feasibility of this method is verified by the simulated experiments of the optically transparent objects. PMID:27244381

  20. Contributors to shift work tolerance in South Korean nurses working rotating shift.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hye-Sun; Lee, Bokim

    2015-05-01

    Shift workers have rapidly increased in South Korea; however, there is no published research exploring shift work tolerance among South Korean workers. This study aimed to investigate factors related to shift work tolerance in South Korean nurses. The sample comprised of 660 nurses who worked shifts in a large hospital in South Korea. A structured questionnaire included following comprehensive variables: demographic (age and number of children), individual (morningness and self-esteem), psychosocial (social support and job stress), lifestyle (alcohol consumption, physical activity, and BMI), and working condition factors (number of night shifts and working hours). Shift work tolerance was measured in terms of insomnia, fatigue, and depression. The results of hierarchical regressions indicate that all variables, except for three, number of children, BMI, and working hours, were related to at least one of the symptoms associated with shift work tolerance. Based on these results, we offer some practical implications to help improve shift work tolerance of workers. PMID:25448057

  1. Comment on the reference compound for chemical shift and Knight shift determination of (209)Bi nuclei.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    Several groups exploring the (209)Bi NMR in solids, including usual insulators, metallic and magnetic materials and recently diamagnetic topological materials, use different standards (usually old and invalid) for chemical shift (Knight shift) determination, ignoring IUPAC recommendations. As a consequence the published shift values exhibit considerable differences (up to 17,500 ppm). PMID:25534279

  2. South Asia's health promotion kaleidoscope.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Alok

    2007-01-01

    South Asia has 22 percent of the world's population but only 1.3 percent of the global income. Consequently 40 percent of the population is living in absolute poverty. However the health transition in some of its countries including India and Sri Lanka is a testimony to the fact that there are proven solutions to the problems of health and development within the region. The countries of the region have much in common, including a democratic political system, four major religions, a vibrant and living tradition of voluntarism and an extensive health infrastructure which is operating well below par. Despite the underlying unity, South Asia enjoys enormous cultural, linguistic and ethnic diversity. In this large, complex and vibrant region, health promotion is a challenging task, but it also holds the key to a dramatic change in the global health situation. Many of these solutions lie in wider areas of socio-political action. There are much needed shifts in the health promotion and development efforts, particularly in the area of poverty and social justice; gender inequity; population stabilisation; health and environment; control of communicable and non-communicable diseases; and urban health strategies. The principle of cooperation, partnership and intersectoral collaboration for health will be explored. Developing an appropriate, sustainable and people centred health and development strategy in the coming decades is an enormous challenge. There has been an attempt to focus on the emerging needs of the region, which call for health promotion, and involvement of civil society, private sector and the governments bestowed with the increased responsibility of ensuring health security for people. Strengthening the existing health systems, allocating adequate resources for health development and ensuring community participation are all prerequisites to the success of health promotion in the region. PMID:18372876

  3. Search for Higgs shifts in white dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Onofrio, Roberto; Wegner, Gary A. E-mail: gary.a.wegner@dartmouth.edu

    2014-08-20

    We report on a search for differential shifts between electronic and vibronic transitions in carbon-rich white dwarfs BPM 27606 and Procyon B. The absence of differential shifts within the spectral resolution and taking into account systematic effects such as space motion and pressure shifts allows us to set the first upper bound of astrophysical origin on the coupling between the Higgs field and the Kreschmann curvature invariant. Our analysis provides the basis for a more general methodology to derive bounds to the coupling of long-range scalar fields to curvature invariants in an astrophysical setting complementary to the ones available from high-energy physics or table-top experiments.

  4. Deterministic convergence in iterative phase shifting

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, Esteban; Salas, Luis; Sohn, Erika; Ruiz, Elfego; Nunez, Juan M.; Herrera, Joel

    2009-03-10

    Previous implementations of the iterative phase shifting method, in which the phase of a test object is computed from measurements using a phase shifting interferometer with unknown positions of the reference, do not provide an accurate way of knowing when convergence has been attained. We present a new approach to this method that allows us to deterministically identify convergence. The method is tested with a home-built Fizeau interferometer that measures optical surfaces polished to {lambda}/100 using the Hydra tool. The intrinsic quality of the measurements is better than 0.5 nm. Other possible applications for this technique include fringe projection or any problem where phase shifting is involved.

  5. Theory of the Helium Isotope Shift

    SciTech Connect

    Pachucki, Krzysztof; Yerokhin, V. A.

    2015-09-15

    Theory of the isotope shift of the centroid energies of light few-electron atoms is reviewed. Numerical results are presented for the isotope shift of the 2{sup 3}P-2{sup 3}S and 2{sup 1}S-2{sup 3}S transition energies of {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He. By comparing theoretical predictions for the isotope shift with the experimental results, the difference of the squares of the nuclear charge radii of {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He, δR{sup 2}, is determined with high accuracy.

  6. Novel Synthetic Promoters from the Cestrum Yellow Leaf Curling Virus.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Dipak Kumar; Sarkar, Shayan; Maiti, Indu B; Dey, Nrisingha

    2016-01-01

    Constitutive promoters direct gene expression uniformly in most tissues and cells at all stages of plant growth and development; they confer steady levels of transgene expression in plant cells and hence their demand is high in plant biology. The gene silencing due to promoter homology can be avoided by either using diverse promoters isolated from different plant and viral genomes or by designing synthetic promoters. The aim of this chapter was to describe the basic protocols needed to develop and analyze novel, synthetic, nearly constitutive promoters from Cestrum yellow leaf curling virus (CmYLCV) through promoter/leader deletion and activating cis-sequence analysis. We also describe the methods to evaluate the strength of the promoters efficiently in various transient expression systems like agroinfiltration assay, gene-gun method, and assay in tobacco protoplasts. Besides, the detailed methods for developing transgenic plants (tobacco and Arabidopsis) for evaluation of the promoter using the GUS reporter gene are also described. The detailed procedure for electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) coupled with super-shift EMSA analysis are also described for showing the binding of tobacco transcription factor, TGA1a to cis-elements in the CmYLCV distal promoter region. PMID:27557764

  7. Developing a Promotional Video

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epley, Hannah K.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for Extension professionals to show clientele the benefits of their program. This article shares how promotional videos are one way of reaching audiences online. An example is given on how a promotional video has been used and developed using iMovie software. Tips are offered for how professionals can create a promotional video and…

  8. Phylogenetic test of speciation by host shift in leaf cone moths (Caloptilia) feeding on maples (Acer).

    PubMed

    Nakadai, Ryosuke; Kawakita, Atsushi

    2016-07-01

    The traditional explanation for the exceptional diversity of herbivorous insects emphasizes host shift as the major driver of speciation. However, phylogenetic studies have often demonstrated widespread host plant conservatism by insect herbivores, calling into question the prevalence of speciation by host shift to distantly related plants. A limitation of previous phylogenetic studies is that host plants were defined at the family or genus level; thus, it was unclear whether host shifts predominate at a finer taxonomic scale. The lack of a statistical approach to test the hypothesis of host-shift-driven speciation also hindered studies at the species level. Here, we analyze the radiation of leaf cone moths (Caloptilia) associated with maples (Acer) using a newly developed, phylogeny-based method that tests the role of host shift in speciation. This method has the advantage of not requiring complete taxon sampling from an entire radiation. Based on 254 host plant records for 14 Caloptilia species collected at 73 sites in Japan, we show that major dietary changes are more concentrated toward the root of the phylogeny, with host shift playing a minor role in recent speciation. We suggest that there may be other roles for host shift in promoting herbivorous insect diversification rather than facilitating speciation per se. PMID:27547326

  9. Ottawa to Bangkok: changing health promotion discourse.

    PubMed

    Porter, Christine

    2007-03-01

    The discourse of the 2005 Bangkok Charter for Health Promotion in a Globalized World represents a radical departure from that of the Ottawa Charter that, in 1986, staked a place for the health promotion field in mainstream public health. Via a critical analysis of the discourse in these two Charters, this paper illustrates a shift from a 'new social movements' discourse of ecosocial justice in Ottawa to a 'new capitalist' discourse of law and economics in Bangkok. The Bangkok Charter's content may identify 'actions, commitments and pledges required to address the determinants of health in a globalized world through health promotion', but this paper shows how its discourse works to naturalize and perpetuate many of detrimental determinants associated with 'globalization'. PMID:17015407

  10. Postural Stability is Altered by Blood Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marais, M.; Denise, P.; Guincetre, J. Y.; Normand, H.

    2008-06-01

    Non-vestibular influences as shift in blood volume changed perception of body posture. Then, factors affecting blood shift may alter postural control. The purpose of our study was to investigate the effects of leg venous contention on postural stability. Twelve subjects were studied on a balance plate for 5 minutes with the eyes closed, in 3 conditions: with no leg venous contention or grade 1 and 3 support stockings. Standard deviation of x and y position was calculated before and after the closure of the eyes. Strong venous contention altered postural stability, after the eyes were closed, during the first 10 s of standing. As support stockings prevent blood shift induced by upright posture, this result is in line with the hypothesis that blood shifts influence the perception of body orientation and postural control among others factors as vision, vestibular inputs... This strong venous contention could induce an increase of fall.

  11. Tracking a phase-shift-keyed signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villarreal, S.; Lenett, S. D.; Kobayashi, H. S.; Pawlowski, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    In detector, phase shifter is used to generate negative phase shift opposing detected phase angle. This produces converted series sideband and component carrier, with residual carrier signal and converted series sideband and component carrier added together to produce tracking signal.

  12. Gradual regime shifts in fairy circles.

    PubMed

    Zelnik, Yuval R; Meron, Ehud; Bel, Golan

    2015-10-01

    Large responses of ecosystems to small changes in the conditions--regime shifts--are of great interest and importance. In spatially extended ecosystems, these shifts may be local or global. Using empirical data and mathematical modeling, we investigated the dynamics of the Namibian fairy circle ecosystem as a case study of regime shifts in a pattern-forming ecosystem. Our results provide new support, based on the dynamics of the ecosystem, for the view of fairy circles as a self-organization phenomenon driven by water-vegetation interactions. The study further suggests that fairy circle birth and death processes correspond to spatially confined transitions between alternative stable states. Cascades of such transitions, possible in various pattern-forming systems, result in gradual rather than abrupt regime shifts. PMID:26362787

  13. Data for phase angle shift with frequency.

    PubMed

    Paul, T; Banerjee, D; Kargupta, K

    2016-06-01

    Phase angle shift between the current and voltage with frequency has been reported for a single phosphoric acid fuel cell in the cell temperature from 100 °C to 160 °C and the humidifier temperature from 40 °C to 90 °C. An electrochemical workbench is employed to find the shift. The figure of phase angle shift shows a peak in high humidifier temperatures. The peak in phase angle shift directs to lower frequency side with decreasing humidifier temperature. The estimation of electrochemical reaction time is also evaluated in the humidifier temperature zone from 50 °C to 90 °C. PMID:27158655

  14. Data for phase angle shift with frequency

    PubMed Central

    Paul, T.; Banerjee, D.; Kargupta, K.

    2016-01-01

    Phase angle shift between the current and voltage with frequency has been reported for a single phosphoric acid fuel cell in the cell temperature from 100 °C to 160 °C and the humidifier temperature from 40 °C to 90 °C. An electrochemical workbench is employed to find the shift. The figure of phase angle shift shows a peak in high humidifier temperatures. The peak in phase angle shift directs to lower frequency side with decreasing humidifier temperature. The estimation of electrochemical reaction time is also evaluated in the humidifier temperature zone from 50 °C to 90 °C. PMID:27158655

  15. Amplitude dependence of the tune shift

    SciTech Connect

    Gelfand, N.M.

    1986-03-01

    Recent studies in the Tevatron have measured the tune shift as a function of the displacement from a closed orbit. The measured values of tune shift were found to be much smaller than one would expect from the measured distribution of the normal octupole moments in the Tevatron. Tracking studies performed to see if, and under what conditions, the observed results could be obtained are reported. The effect of linear coupling is taken into consideration, and is found to significantly reduce the coefficient of the tune shift. The dependence of the tune shift on the initial coordinate of a particle in the presence of a distribution of octupole moments is calculated. The ''smear'' is calculated as a function of linear coupling. (LEW)

  16. Shift Work and Child Behavioral Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wen-Jui

    2011-01-01

    Using a large, contemporary U.S. dataset, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth–Child Supplement, this paper explores the relationship between maternal shift work and the behavioral outcomes of children aged 4 to 10. Special attention was given to subgroups of children (e.g., based on family type, family income, and mother’s occupation and working hours) and the patterns of parental work schedules and work hours. Regression results suggest that maternal shift work may contribute to more behavioral problems. Of all children whose mothers worked non-day shifts, the strongest associations were found for children who lived in single-mother or low-income families, whose mothers worked in cashier or service occupations, and whose mothers worked non-day shifts full-time. Implications for future research are discussed. PMID:21666886

  17. Red Shifts with Obliquely Approaching Light Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Head, C. E.; Moore-Head, M. E.

    1988-01-01

    Refutes the Doppler effect as the explanation of large red shifts in the spectra of distant galaxies and explains the relativistic effects in which the light sources approach the observer obliquely. Provides several diagrams and graphs. (YP)

  18. Illuminating geographical patterns in species' range shifts.

    PubMed

    Grenouillet, Gaël; Comte, Lise

    2014-10-01

    Species' range shifts in response to ongoing climate change have been widely documented, but although complex spatial patterns in species' responses are expected to be common, comprehensive comparisons of species' ranges over time have undergone little investigation. Here, we outline a modeling framework based on historical and current species distribution records for disentangling different drivers (i.e. climatic vs. nonclimatic) and assessing distinct facets (i.e. colonization, extirpation, persistence, and lags) of species' range shifts. We used extensive monitoring data for stream fish assemblages throughout France to assess range shifts for 32 fish species between an initial period (1980-1992) and a contemporary one (2003-2009). Our results provide strong evidence that the responses of individual species varied considerably and exhibited complex mosaics of spatial rearrangements. By dissociating range shifts in climatically suitable and unsuitable habitats, we demonstrated that patterns in climate-driven colonization and extirpation were less marked than those attributed to nonclimatic drivers, although this situation could rapidly shift in the near future. We also found evidence that range shifts could be related to some species' traits and that the traits involved varied depending on the facet of range shift considered. The persistence of populations in climatically unsuitable areas was greater for short-lived species, whereas the extent of the lag behind climate change was greater for long-lived, restricted-range, and low-elevation species. We further demonstrated that nonclimatic extirpations were primarily related to the size of the species' range, whereas climate-driven extirpations were better explained by thermal tolerance. Thus, the proposed framework demonstrated its potential for markedly improving our understanding of the key processes involved in range shifting and also offers a template for informing management decisions. Conservation strategies

  19. Sleep deprivation due to shift work.

    PubMed

    Costa, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation due to shift work is related to perturbation of the sleep/wake cycle, associated with the modified activity/rest pattern. This may cause a significant disruption of circadian rhythms of biologic functions, driven by the body clock located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus. Shift and night workers have to change sleep times and strategies according to their duty periods; consequently, both sleep length and quality can be considerably affected depending on the variable start and finish times on different shifts. About 10% of night and rotating shift workers, aged between 18 and 65 years, have been estimated to have a diagnosable "shift-work sleep disorder," according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, version 2 (ICSD-2). In the long run, this may lead to persistent and severe disturbances of sleep, chronic fatigue and psychoneurotic syndromes, besides being a risk or aggravating factor for accidents, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and reproductive disorders, as well as, probably, for cancer. Preventive and corrective actions deal with the organization of shift schedules according to ergonomic criteria, careful health surveillance, appropriate education and training on effective countermeasures, in particular, sleep hygiene and napping. PMID:26563802

  20. Kinematics of the scaphoid shift test.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, S W; Gupta, A; Crisco, J J

    1997-09-01

    Twenty-five uninjured subjects (50 wrists) were examined clinically and fluoroscopically during performance of the scaphoid shift test. Wrists were placed into 3 groups on the basis of the degree of palpable carpal motion that occurred during the clinical examination. Kinematic parameters of rotation and displacement were calculated from digitized images of the carpals at rest and at maximum displacement. On clinical exam, 36% of normal individuals had positive findings on scaphoid shift test. Dorsal displacement of the scaphoid was not significantly associated with positive scaphoid shift test results in these subjects, while total displacement of the scaphoid (the sum of axial and dorsal displacement) was significantly associated with positive test results. The principle confounding factor appeared to be a high degree of displacement that occurred at the capitolunate joint in some individuals, termed a "midcarpal shift." The data demonstrate that despite a high prevalence of positive scaphoid shifts among uninjured individuals, the ability to accurately detect dorsal displacement of the scaphoid using the scaphoid shift test is limited. On the basis of their findings, the authors recommend that positive test results be confirmed fluoroscopically. PMID:9330136

  1. Effects of melatonin administration on daytime sleep after simulated night shift work

    PubMed Central

    SHARKEY, KATHERINE M.; FOGG, LOUIS F.; EASTMAN, CHARMANE I.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Disturbed sleep and on-the-job sleepiness are widespread problems among night shift workers. The pineal hormone melatonin may prove to be a useful treatment because it has both sleep-promoting and circadian phase-shifting effects. This study was designed to isolate melatonin’s sleep-promoting effects, and to determine whether melatonin could improve daytime sleep and thus improve night time alertness and performance during the night shift. The study utilized a placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over design. Subjects (n = 21, mean age = 27.0 ± 5.0 years) participated in two 6-day laboratory sessions. Each session included one adaptation night, two baseline nights, two consecutive 8-h night shifts followed by 8-h daytime sleep episodes and one recovery night. Subjects took 1.8 mg sustained-release melatonin 0.5 h before the two daytime sleep episodes during one session, and placebo before the daytime sleep episodes during the other session. Sleep was recorded using polysomnography. Sleepiness, performance, and mood during the night shifts were evaluated using the multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) and a computerized neurobehavioral testing battery. Melatonin prevented the decrease in sleep time during daytime sleep relative to baseline, but only on the first day of melatonin administration. Melatonin increased sleep time more in subjects who demonstrated difficulty in sleeping during the day. Melatonin had no effect on alertness on the MSLT, or performance and mood during the night shift. There were no hangover effects from melatonin administration. These findings suggest that although melatonin can help night workers obtain more sleep during the day, they are still likely to face difficulties working at night because of circadian rhythm misalignment. The possibility of tolerance to the sleep-promoting effects of melatonin across more than 1 day needs further investigation. PMID:11696071

  2. A holistic view of marine regime shifts

    PubMed Central

    Conversi, Alessandra; Dakos, Vasilis; Gårdmark, Anna; Ling, Scott; Folke, Carl; Mumby, Peter J.; Greene, Charles; Edwards, Martin; Blenckner, Thorsten; Casini, Michele; Pershing, Andrew; Möllmann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Understanding marine regime shifts is important not only for ecology but also for developing marine management that assures the provision of ecosystem services to humanity. While regime shift theory is well developed, there is still no common understanding on drivers, mechanisms and characteristic of abrupt changes in real marine ecosystems. Based on contributions to the present theme issue, we highlight some general issues that need to be overcome for developing a more comprehensive understanding of marine ecosystem regime shifts. We find a great divide between benthic reef and pelagic ocean systems in how regime shift theory is linked to observed abrupt changes. Furthermore, we suggest that the long-lasting discussion on the prevalence of top-down trophic or bottom-up physical drivers in inducing regime shifts may be overcome by taking into consideration the synergistic interactions of multiple stressors, and the special characteristics of different ecosystem types. We present a framework for the holistic investigation of marine regime shifts that considers multiple exogenous drivers that interact with endogenous mechanisms to cause abrupt, catastrophic change. This framework takes into account the time-delayed synergies of these stressors, which erode the resilience of the ecosystem and eventually enable the crossing of ecological thresholds. Finally, considering that increased pressures in the marine environment are predicted by the current climate change assessments, in order to avoid major losses of ecosystem services, we suggest that marine management approaches should incorporate knowledge on environmental thresholds and develop tools that consider regime shift dynamics and characteristics. This grand challenge can only be achieved through a holistic view of marine ecosystem dynamics as evidenced by this theme issue.

  3. Shift work and circadian dysregulation of reproduction.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Karen L; Resuehr, David; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2013-01-01

    Health impairments, including reproductive issues, are associated with working nights or rotating shifts. For example, shift work has been associated with an increased risk of irregular menstrual cycles, endometriosis, infertility, miscarriage, low birth weight or pre-term delivery, and reduced incidence of breastfeeding. Based on what is known about circadian regulation of endocrine rhythms in rodents (and much less in humans), the circadian clock is an integral regulatory part of the reproductive system. When this 24-h program is disordered by environmental perturbation (such as shift work) or genetic alterations, the endocrine system can be impaired. The purpose of this review is to explore the hypothesis that misalignment of reproductive hormones with the environmental light-dark cycle and/or sleep-wake rhythms can disrupt menstrual cycles, pregnancy, and parturition. We highlight the role of the circadian clock in regulating human reproductive physiology and shift work-induced pathology within each step of the reproductive axis while exploring potential mechanisms from the animal model literature. In addition to documenting the reproductive hazards of shift work, we also point out important gaps in our knowledge as critical areas for future investigation. For example, future studies should examine whether forced desynchronization disrupts gonadotropin secretion rhythms and whether there are sleep/wake schedules that are better or worse for the adaptation of the reproductive system to shift work. These studies are necessary in order to define not only whether or not shift work-induced circadian misalignment impairs reproductive capacity, but also to identify strategies for the future that can minimize this desynchronization. PMID:23966978

  4. Scalar Field Theories with Polynomial Shift Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Tom; Grosvenor, Kevin T.; Hořava, Petr; Yan, Ziqi

    2015-12-01

    We continue our study of naturalness in nonrelativistic QFTs of the Lifshitz type, focusing on scalar fields that can play the role of Nambu-Goldstone (NG) modes associated with spontaneous symmetry breaking. Such systems allow for an extension of the constant shift symmetry to a shift by a polynomial of degree P in spatial coordinates. These "polynomial shift symmetries" in turn protect the technical naturalness of modes with a higher-order dispersion relation, and lead to a refinement of the proposed classification of infrared Gaussian fixed points available to describe NG modes in nonrelativistic theories. Generic interactions in such theories break the polynomial shift symmetry explicitly to the constant shift. It is thus natural to ask: Given a Gaussian fixed point with polynomial shift symmetry of degree P, what are the lowest-dimension operators that preserve this symmetry, and deform the theory into a self-interacting scalar field theory with the shift symmetry of degree P? To answer this (essentially cohomological) question, we develop a new graph-theoretical technique, and use it to prove several classification theorems. First, in the special case of P = 1 (essentially equivalent to Galileons), we reproduce the known Galileon N-point invariants, and find their novel interpretation in terms of graph theory, as an equal-weight sum over all labeled trees with N vertices. Then we extend the classification to P > 1 and find a whole host of new invariants, including those that represent the most relevant (or least irrelevant) deformations of the corresponding Gaussian fixed points, and we study their uniqueness.

  5. Climate-driven regime shifts in Arctic marine benthos.

    PubMed

    Kortsch, Susanne; Primicerio, Raul; Beuchel, Frank; Renaud, Paul E; Rodrigues, João; Lønne, Ole Jørgen; Gulliksen, Bjørn

    2012-08-28

    Climate warming can trigger abrupt ecosystem changes in the Arctic. Despite the considerable interest in characterizing and understanding the ecological impact of rapid climate warming in the Arctic, few long time series exist that allow addressing these research goals. During a 30-y period (1980-2010) of gradually increasing seawater temperature and decreasing sea ice cover in Svalbard, we document rapid and extensive structural changes in the rocky-bottom communities of two Arctic fjords. The most striking component of the benthic reorganization was an abrupt fivefold increase in macroalgal cover in 1995 in Kongsfjord and an eightfold increase in 2000 in Smeerenburgfjord. Simultaneous changes in the abundance of benthic invertebrates suggest that the macroalgae played a key structuring role in these communities. The abrupt, substantial, and persistent nature of the changes observed is indicative of a climate-driven ecological regime shift. The ecological processes thought to drive the observed regime shifts are likely to promote the borealization of these Arctic marine communities in the coming years. PMID:22891319

  6. Climate-driven regime shifts in Arctic marine benthos

    PubMed Central

    Kortsch, Susanne; Primicerio, Raul; Beuchel, Frank; Renaud, Paul E.; Rodrigues, João; Lønne, Ole Jørgen; Gulliksen, Bjørn

    2012-01-01

    Climate warming can trigger abrupt ecosystem changes in the Arctic. Despite the considerable interest in characterizing and understanding the ecological impact of rapid climate warming in the Arctic, few long time series exist that allow addressing these research goals. During a 30-y period (1980–2010) of gradually increasing seawater temperature and decreasing sea ice cover in Svalbard, we document rapid and extensive structural changes in the rocky-bottom communities of two Arctic fjords. The most striking component of the benthic reorganization was an abrupt fivefold increase in macroalgal cover in 1995 in Kongsfjord and an eightfold increase in 2000 in Smeerenburgfjord. Simultaneous changes in the abundance of benthic invertebrates suggest that the macroalgae played a key structuring role in these communities. The abrupt, substantial, and persistent nature of the changes observed is indicative of a climate-driven ecological regime shift. The ecological processes thought to drive the observed regime shifts are likely to promote the borealization of these Arctic marine communities in the coming years. PMID:22891319

  7. Broad Shifts in Gene Expression during Early Postnatal Life Are Associated with Shifts in Histone Methylation Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Julian C.; Chen, Weiping; Cheung, Crystal S. F.; Baron, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    During early postnatal life, extensive changes in gene expression occur concomitantly in multiple major organs, indicating the existence of a common core developmental genetic program. This program includes hundreds of growth-promoting genes that are downregulated with age in liver, kidney, lung, and heart, and there is evidence that this component of the program drives the widespread decline in cell proliferation that occurs in juvenile life, as organs approach adult sizes. To investigate epigenetic changes that might orchestrate this program, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation-promoter tiling array to assess temporal changes in histone H3K4 and H3K27 trimethylation (me3) at promoter regions throughout the genome in kidney and lung, comparing 1- to 4-wk-old mice. We found extensive genome-wide shifts in H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 occurring with age in both kidney and lung. The number of genes with concordant changes in the two organs was far greater than expected by chance. Temporal changes in H3K4me3 showed a strong, positive association with changes in gene expression, assessed by microarray, whereas changes in H3K27me3 showed a negative association. Gene ontology analysis indicated that shifts in specific histone methylation marks were associated with specific developmental functions. Of particular interest, genes with decreases in H3K4me3 with age in both organs were strongly implicated in cell cycle and cell proliferation functions. Taken together, the findings suggest that the common core developmental program of gene expression which occurs in multiple organs during juvenile life is associated with a common core developmental program of histone methylation. In particular, declining H3K4me3 is strongly associated with gene downregulation and occurs in the promoter regions of many growth-regulating genes, suggesting that this change in histone methylation may contribute to the component of the genetic program that drives juvenile body growth deceleration

  8. Personality factors related to shift work tolerance in two- and three-shift workers.

    PubMed

    Natvik, Sylvia; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Moen, Bente Elisabeth; Magerøy, Nils; Sivertsen, Børge; Pallesen, Ståle

    2011-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether different personality variables were associated with shift work tolerance, and whether these potential associations were moderated by various types of shift work. The sample comprised 1505 nurses who worked either two or three rotating shifts. Personality traits were measured in terms of morningness, flexibility, languidity and hardiness. Morningness reflects the tendency to be alert relatively early in the morning and sleepy relatively early in the evening. Flexibility denotes the ability to both work and sleep at odd times of the day, while languidity concerns the tendency to become tired/sleepy when cutting down on sleep. Hardiness relates to resilience to stressful life events. The dependent variables in this study comprised of measures of insomnia, sleepiness, depression and anxiety. Hierarchical regression analyses, which controlled for demographic variables and work load, revealed that Morningness was significantly and negatively related to insomnia. The Morningness by Shift type interaction was overall significant for depressive symptoms. Morningness was near significantly associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms in three-shift workers, but unrelated to depressive symptoms in two-shift workers. Flexibility was associated with higher levels of depressive symptoms. Flexibility by Shift type interaction was significant for insomnia, indicating that flexibility was negatively associated with insomnia for three-shift workers and unrelated with insomnia for two-shift workers. Languidity was associated with higher levels of sleepiness, depressive and anxiety symptoms. Hardiness was associated with lower levels of all four dependent variables. PMID:21172694

  9. [Shifting path of industrial pollution gravity centers and its driving mechanism in Pan-Yangtze River Delta].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hai-Xia; Jiang, Xiao-Wei; Cui, Jian-Xin

    2014-11-01

    Shifting path of industrial pollution gravity centers is the response of environmental special formation during the industry transfer process, in order to prove the responding of industrial pollution gravity centers to industry transfer in economically developed areas, this paper calculates the gravity centers of industrial wastewater, gas and solid patterns and reveals the shifting path and its driving mechanism, using the data of industrial pollution in the Pan-Yangtze River Delta from 2000 to 2010. The results show that the gravity center of the industrial waste in Pan-Yangtze River Delta shifts for sure in the last 10 years, and gravity center of solid waste shifts the maximum distance within the three wastes, which was 180.18 km, and shifting distances for waste gas and waste water were 109.51 km and 85.92 km respectively. Moreover, the gravity center of the industrial waste in Pan-Yangtze River Delta shifts westwards, and gravity centers of waste water, gas and solid shift for 0.40 degrees, 0.17 degrees and 0.03 degrees respectively. The shifting of industrial pollution gravity centers is driven by many factors. The rapid development of the heavy industry in Anhui and Jiangxi provinces results in the westward shifting of the pollutions. The optimization and adjustment of industrial structures in Yangtze River Delta region benefit to alleviating industrial pollution, and high-polluting industries shifted to Anhui and Jiangxi provinces promotes pollution gravity center shifting to west. While the development of massive clean enterprise, strong environmental management efforts and better environmental monitoring system slow the shifting trend of industrial pollution to the east in Yangtze River Delta. The study of industrial pollution gravity shift and its driving mechanism provides a new angle of view to analyze the relationship between economic development and environmental pollution, and also provides academic basis for synthetical management and control of

  10. Isomer Shifts in Solid State Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, F. E.; Stievano, L.

    The isomer shift of the Mössbauer resonance is a rather unique quantity that cannot be obtained by any of the other techniques used for measuring hyperfine interactions in solids, such as NMR or perturbed angular correlations (TDPAC). It shifts the resonance pattern as a whole without affecting the magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole hyperfine splittings. Methods that measure only these hyperfine splittings are insensitive to the isomer shift. The magnitude of the observed shift is proportional to the product of a nuclear parameter, the change Δ⟨r 2⟩ of the nuclear radius that goes along with the Mössbauer transition, and to an electronic property of the material, the electron density ρ(0) at the Mössbauer nucleus or, more precisely, to the difference Δρ(0) of the electron densities at the Mössbauer nuclei in the materials of which the source and the absorber are made. The electron density at the nucleus is due to s-electrons and, to a lesser extent and mainly in heavy nuclei, to relativistic p1 / 2-electrons. All the other electrons have a vanishing density inside the nucleus and do not contribute. Thus, to a very good accuracy, the Mössbauer isomer shift enables one to obtain information on the s-electron density at the Mössbauer nuclei in solids.

  11. Social reasoning about 'second-shift' parenting.

    PubMed

    Sinno, Stefanie M; Killen, Melanie

    2011-06-01

    The present study investigated children's and adolescents' social reasoning about parenting roles in the home, specifically 'second-shift parenting' by a mother or father. Surveys were administered to children (age 10) and adolescents (age 13), nearly evenly divided by gender (N= 200) in which two hypothetical scenarios were evaluated. Participants were asked to evaluate and justify second-shift parenting arrangements for the family overall, for the parent in the role, and for the child in the family. Results showed that participants expected mothers rather than fathers to take on the second-shift role, and second-shift parenting was evaluated as more unfair for fathers than for mothers. Personal choice reasoning was used for justifying arrangements for the second-shift parent and moral reasoning was used for justifying arrangements for the child. Social reasoning about the context of parental caretaking roles was multifaceted and varied by age and gender of participant more so than by self-reported personal family arrangements. PMID:21592152

  12. Nozzle Aerodynamic Stability During a Throat Shift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawecki, Edwin J.; Ribeiro, Gregg L.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted on the internal aerodynamic stability of a family of two-dimensional (2-D) High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) nozzle concepts. These nozzles function during takeoff as mixer-ejectors to meet acoustic requirements, and then convert to conventional high-performance convergent-divergent (CD) nozzles at cruise. The transition between takeoff mode and cruise mode results in the aerodynamic throat and the minimum cross-sectional area that controls the engine backpressure shifting location within the nozzle. The stability and steadiness of the nozzle aerodynamics during this so called throat shift process can directly affect the engine aerodynamic stability, and the mechanical design of the nozzle. The objective of the study was to determine if pressure spikes or other perturbations occurred during the throat shift process and, if so, identify the caused mechanisms for the perturbations. The two nozzle concepts modeled in the test program were the fixed chute (FC) and downstream mixer (DSM). These 2-D nozzles differ principally in that the FC has a large over-area between the forward throat and aft throat locations, while the DSM has an over-area of only about 10 percent. The conclusions were that engine mass flow and backpressure can be held constant simultaneously during nozzle throat shifts on this class of nozzles, and mode shifts can be accomplished at a constant mass flow and engine backpressure without upstream pressure perturbations.

  13. Choice Shift in Opinion Network Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbay, Michael

    Choice shift is a phenomenon associated with small group dynamics whereby group discussion causes group members to shift their opinions in a more extreme direction so that the mean post-discussion opinion exceeds the mean pre-discussion opinion. Also known as group polarization, choice shift is a robust experimental phenomenon and has been well-studied within social psychology. In opinion network models, shifts toward extremism are typically produced by the presence of stubborn agents at the extremes of the opinion axis, whose opinions are much more resistant to change than moderate agents. However, we present a model in which choice shift can arise without the assumption of stubborn agents; the model evolves member opinions and uncertainties using coupled nonlinear differential equations. In addition, we briefly describe the results of a recent experiment conducted involving online group discussion concerning the outcome of National Football League games are described. The model predictions concerning the effects of network structure, disagreement level, and team choice (favorite or underdog) are in accord with the experimental results. This research was funded by the Office of Naval Research and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency.

  14. Nonlinear ferromagnetic resonance shift in nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng; Belova, Lyuba; McMichael, Robert

    2014-03-01

    In dynamic magnetic systems, various experiments have shown that the ferromagnetic resonance frequency can shift up or down with increasing driving power in the nonlinear regime. The resonance shift is important in understanding nonlinear physics in nanomagnets and for applications of spin-torque oscillators. Here, we present a systematic study on the sign of the nonlinear coefficient, i.e. the direction of the resonance field/frequency shift. We use ferromagnetic resonance force microscopy (FMRFM) to measure the ferromagnetic resonance of a series of submicron NiFe ellipses with varying aspect ratios. We find the sign of the resonance shift is determined by both the applied field and the anisotropy field. Our measurement and micromagnetic modeling results are in qualitative agreement with a macro-spin analysis developed by Slavin and Tiberkevich. However, both measurement and modeling results exhibit values of the nonlinear coefficient that are more positive (meaning that the resonance tends to shift toward low field direction) than are predicted by the macrospin model. We attribute the difference to the non-uniformity of the precession modes in the ellipses. By analogy with standing spin waves, we show that nonuniform precession tends to increase the nonlinear frequency coefficient through a magnetostatic mechanism.

  15. Energy shift due to anisotropic blackbody radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flambaum, V. V.; Porsev, S. G.; Safronova, M. S.

    2016-02-01

    In many applications a source of the blackbody radiation (BBR) can be highly anisotropic. This leads to the BBR shift that depends on tensor polarizability and on the projection of the total angular momentum of ions and atoms in a trap. We derived a formula for the anisotropic BBR shift and performed numerical calculations of this effect for Ca+and Yb+ transitions of experimental interest. These ions were used for a design of high-precision atomic clocks, fundamental physics tests such as the search for the Lorentz invariance violation and space-time variation of the fundamental constants, and quantum information. Anisotropic BBR shift may be one of the major systematic effects in these experiments.

  16. Gradual regime shifts in fairy circles

    PubMed Central

    Zelnik, Yuval R.; Meron, Ehud; Bel, Golan

    2015-01-01

    Large responses of ecosystems to small changes in the conditions—regime shifts—are of great interest and importance. In spatially extended ecosystems, these shifts may be local or global. Using empirical data and mathematical modeling, we investigated the dynamics of the Namibian fairy circle ecosystem as a case study of regime shifts in a pattern-forming ecosystem. Our results provide new support, based on the dynamics of the ecosystem, for the view of fairy circles as a self-organization phenomenon driven by water–vegetation interactions. The study further suggests that fairy circle birth and death processes correspond to spatially confined transitions between alternative stable states. Cascades of such transitions, possible in various pattern-forming systems, result in gradual rather than abrupt regime shifts. PMID:26362787

  17. Differential Stark shifts in the hydrogen maser

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, J.G.; Larson, D.J.; Ramsey, N.F.

    1980-11-01

    The theory of the Stark shift of hydrogen ground-state hyperfine levels has been tested at the 2.4% level of accuracy in a hydrogen maser. The quadratic-Stark-shift coefficient for the hyperfine-transition frequency was experimentally found to be delta..nu.. x 10/sup -14/ Hz (V/m)/sup -2/, where the electric field was perpendicular to the axis of quantization. The quoted uncertainty corresponds to one standard deviation. The uncertainty has contributions from the statistics of the data and from systematic effects. A number of possible sources of systematic error or unwanted frequency shifts has been tested. The theoretically predicted coefficient delta..nu.. x 10/sup -14/ Hz (V/m)/sup -2/ is in reasonable agreement with the present experimental result.

  18. The affective shift model of work engagement.

    PubMed

    Bledow, Ronald; Schmitt, Antje; Frese, Michael; Kühnel, Jana

    2011-11-01

    On the basis of self-regulation theories, the authors develop an affective shift model of work engagement according to which work engagement emerges from the dynamic interplay of positive and negative affect. The affective shift model posits that negative affect is positively related to work engagement if negative affect is followed by positive affect. The authors applied experience sampling methodology to test the model. Data on affective events, mood, and work engagement was collected twice a day over 9 working days among 55 software developers. In support of the affective shift model, negative mood and negative events experienced in the morning of a working day were positively related to work engagement in the afternoon if positive mood in the time interval between morning and afternoon was high. Individual differences in positive affectivity moderated within-person relationships. The authors discuss how work engagement can be fostered through affect regulation. PMID:21766997

  19. 12 hour shifts the Nambour Hospital experience.

    PubMed

    2007-08-01

    Union members have a lengthy history of campaigning for fair working hours and conditions. The success of such campaigns has led to the implementation of the eight hour working day and the 40 hour and then 38 hour week as industrial standards. More recently though, calls for greater flexibility in their shift arrangements by nurses at Nambour Hospital have led to a voluntary 12 hour shift being implemented in their Intensive Care Unit. While union members are protective of their hard won gains in achieving reduced working hours through the 8 hour day--ICU nurses at Nambour Hospital say the voluntary 12 hour shift initiative goes a way in addressing their work/life balance issues. PMID:17879604

  20. Shift symmetry and inflation in supergravity

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe; Martin, Jerome

    2005-07-15

    We consider models of inflation in supergravity with a shift symmetry. We focus on models with one modulus and one inflaton field. The presence of this symmetry guarantees the existence of a flat direction for the inflaton field. Mildly breaking the shift symmetry using a superpotential which depends not only on the modulus, but also on the inflaton field allows one to lift the inflaton flat direction. Along the inflaton direction, the {eta} problem is alleviated. Combining the KKLT mechanism for modulus stabilization and a shift symmetry breaking superpotential of the chaotic inflation type, we find models reminiscent of 'mutated hybrid inflation' where the inflationary trajectory is curved in the modulus-inflaton plane. We analyze the phenomenology of these models and stress their differences with both chaotic and hybrid inflation.

  1. Clock shifts in the Unitary Bose Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Richard; Man, Jay; Lopes, Raphael; Navon, Nir; Smith, Robert; Hadzibabic, Zoran

    2016-05-01

    Clock shifts are interaction-induced changes in the transition frequency between atomic spin states. So-called because of their importance as systematic errors in atomic clocks, they reveal details of both the interaction energy within a gas and the particle correlations. In this work, we employ a RF-injection technique to rapidly project a thermal Bose gas into the unitary regime on a timescale much shorter than three-body losses. Working with a two-state system, one of which exhibits strong intrastate interactions, we carry out Ramsey spectroscopy to extract the variation in the clock shift across a Feshbach resonance. Thanks to the relationship between these shifts and particle correlations, we use our measurements to infer the contact as a function of both interaction strength and degeneracy. This quantity plays a central role in the many-body physics of strongly correlated systems, offering a link between few-body and thermodynamic behaviour.

  2. Health promotion in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Buss, Paulo Marchiori; de Carvalho, Antonio Ivo

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of health promotion within the Brazilian health system is examined, including an assessment of the intersectoral and development policies that have influenced the process. Particular attention is paid to the legal characteristics of the Unified Health System. Human resources formation and research initiatives in health promotion are outlined, with a summary of the obstacles that need to be overcome in order to ensure the effective implementation of health promotion in the future. Up to the end of the 20th Century health promotion was not used as a term in the Brazilian public heath context. Health promoting activities were concentrated in the area of health education, although targeting the social determinants of health and the principle of intersectoral action were part of the rhetoric. The situation has changed during the last decade, with the publication of a national policy of health promotion, issued by the Ministry of Health and jointly implemented with the States and Municipals Health Secretaries. More recently there has been a re-emergence of the discourse on the social determinants of health and the formation of intersectoral public policies as the basis of a comprehensive health promotion. Health promotion infrastructure, particularly around human resources and financing, requires strengthening in order to ensure capacity and sustainability in health promotion practice. PMID:18372870

  3. Understanding and diagnosing shift work disorder.

    PubMed

    Thorpy, Michael

    2011-09-01

    A significant proportion of the workforce in industrialized countries (16%) are employed as shift workers. These workers may be susceptible to shift work disorder (SWD), a circadian rhythm sleep disorder, particularly those who work at night or on early-morning shifts. Shift work disorder remains an underdiagnosed and undertreated problem among this population. Patients with SWD have difficulty initiating sleep and waking up. Often, these patients have excessive sleepiness during their work shift. Shift work disorder has been associated with decreased productivity, impaired safety, diminished quality of life, and adverse effects on health. Several tools have been validated to assess excessive daytime sleepiness and are often used to assess excessive nighttime sleepiness, such as that experienced in patients with SWD, including the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and the Multiple Sleep Latency Test. The criteria for diagnosing SWD as established by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) and published in the International Classification of Sleep Disorders-Second Edition (ICSD-2) were most recently updated in 2005 and thus do not contain newer agents approved for use in patients with SWD. The symptoms of SWD can be treated using behavioral, prescription, and nonprescription therapies. Current treatment guidelines suggest nonpharmacologic interventions, such as exercise and exposure to light. In addition, medications that contain melatonin or caffeine may have clinical benefits in some patients with SWD. However, modafinil and armodafinil are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to improve wakefulness in patients with excessive sleepiness associated with SWD, and recent data suggest a clinical benefit. The use of these therapies can significantly improve sleep, performance, and quality of life for patients with SWD. PMID:21904091

  4. Shift work in a security environment

    SciTech Connect

    Longhouser, G.A. Jr.

    1993-12-31

    Human beings are diurnal species, normally active by day and asleep by night. Yet over thirty million Americans struggle with work schedules that include an off-normal work effort. The railroads, law enforcement, health services, Department of Defense, factory workers, chemical plants and public services, communications and utility workers must provide some form of around-the-clock effort. Shift work has been around since the advent of recorded history. There has always been a need for some type of off-normal service and assistance. The impact of shift work is replete with tales and factual evidence of an increased personnel error rate; disorders, both personal and family, and of course, increased accident events. In recent memory, the Three Mile Island Nuclear Plant incident, Union Carbide`s explosion in Bhopal, and the Chernobyl Nuclear Plant catastrophe all occurred during off-normal working hours. Yet management overall has done little to correct the production-driven twelve hour, seven day week shift mentality of the nineteenth century. Most schedules in use today are nothing more than cosmetic variations of the old production schedules. This could be driven by a management consideration of the worker`s response to change coupled with a reluctant buy-in of responsibility for the effects of change. Florida Power Corporation has developed for its nuclear security force, a unique work schedule which attempts to employ the sound principles of circadian rhythms coupled with a comprehensive training program to counter the problems associated with shift work. The results over the last four years have seen a marked reduction in the generic problems of personnel errors, absenteeism, unscheduled overtime and turnover rates. Utilization and understanding of this scheduling process for rotational shift work needs to be assessed to determine if the benefits are site specific or provide an expected response to the problems of shift work.

  5. Teachers' Roles in Promoting Students' Learner Autonomy in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fumin, Fang; Li, Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Since 2007, the Ministry of Education of China has been promoting a shift from traditional teaching models to a new teaching model where students' autonomous learning skills can be enhanced. In particular, college students are encouraged to learn English free from the constraints of time or place. While learner autonomy has been perceived as…

  6. The longer the shifts for hospital nurses, the higher the levels of burnout and patient dissatisfaction.

    PubMed

    Stimpfel, Amy Witkoski; Sloane, Douglas M; Aiken, Linda H

    2012-11-01

    Extended work shifts of twelve hours or longer are common and even popular with hospital staff nurses, but little is known about how such extended hours affect the care that patients receive or the well-being of nurses. Survey data from nurses in four states showed that more than 80 percent of the nurses were satisfied with scheduling practices at their hospital. However, as the proportion of hospital nurses working shifts of more than thirteen hours increased, patients' dissatisfaction with care increased. Furthermore, nurses working shifts of ten hours or longer were up to two and a half times more likely than nurses working shorter shifts to experience burnout and job dissatisfaction and to intend to leave the job. Extended shifts undermine nurses' well-being, may result in expensive job turnover, and can negatively affect patient care. Policies regulating work hours for nurses, similar to those set for resident physicians, may be warranted. Nursing leaders should also encourage workplace cultures that respect nurses' days off and vacation time, promote nurses' prompt departure at the end of a shift, and allow nurses to refuse to work overtime without retribution. PMID:23129681

  7. The Longer The Shifts For Hospital Nurses, The Higher The Levels Of Burnout And Patient Dissatisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Stimpfel, Amy Witkoski; Sloane, Douglas M.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2013-01-01

    Extended work shifts of twelve hours or longer are common and even popular with hospital staff nurses, but little is known about how such extended hours affect the care that patients receive or the well-being of nurses. Survey data from nurses in four states showed that more than 80 percent of the nurses were satisfied with scheduling practices at their hospital. However, as the proportion of hospital nurses working shifts of more than thirteen hours increased, patients’ dissatisfaction with care increased. Furthermore, nurses working shifts of ten hours or longer were up to two and a half times more likely than nurses working shorter shifts to experience burnout and job dissatisfaction and to intend to leave the job. Extended shifts undermine nurses’ well-being, may result in expensive job turnover, and can negatively affect patient care. Policies regulating work hours for nurses, similar to those set for resident physicians, may be warranted. Nursing leaders should also encourage workplace cultures that respect nurses’ days off and vacation time, promote nurses’ prompt departure at the end of a shift, and allow nurses to refuse to work overtime without retribution. PMID:23129681

  8. Energy phase shift as mechanism for catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beke-Somfai, Tamás; Feng, Bobo; Nordén, Bengt

    2012-05-01

    Catalysts are agents that by binding reactant molecules lower the energy barriers to chemical reaction. After reaction the catalyst is regenerated, its unbinding energy recruited from the environment, which is associated with an inevitable loss of energy. We show that combining several catalytic sites to become energetically and temporally phase-shifted relative to each other provides a possibility to sustain the overall reaction by internal 'energy recycling', bypassing the need for thermal activation, and in principle allowing the system to work adiabatically. Using an analytical model for superimposed, phase-shifted potentials of F1-ATP synthase provides a description integrating main characteristics of this rotary enzyme complex.

  9. Progress in speckle-shift strain measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lant, Christian T.; Barranger, John P.; Oberle, Lawrence G.; Greer, Lawrence C., III

    1991-01-01

    The Instrumentation and Control Technology Division of the Lewis Research Center has been developing an in-house capability to make one dimensional and two dimensional optical strain measurements on high temperature test specimens. The measurements are based on a two-beam speckle-shift technique. The development of composite materials for use in high temperature applications is generating interest in using the speckle-shift technique to measure strains on small diameter fibers and wires of various compositions. The results of preliminary speckle correlation tests on wire and fiber specimens are covered, and the advanced system currently under development is described.

  10. What are 12-hour shifts good for?

    PubMed

    In the UK many hospitals use 12-hour shifts, believing it to be a cost-efficient means of providing 24-hour nursing care on wards. While healthcare organisations need to find ways to deliver nursing care around the clock and efficiency is a key consideration, nurse leaders have raised concerns about ' whether nurses can function effectively and safely when working long hours (Calkin, 2012; Rogers et al, 2004). In this Policy Plus, we focus specifically on what is known about the impact of shift length on patient safety, employee health and quality of care. PMID:23696995

  11. Thermometry via Light Shifts in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, M.; McGuyer, B. H.; Iwata, G. Z.; Zelevinsky, T.

    2015-01-01

    For atoms or molecules in optical lattices, conventional thermometry methods are often unsuitable due to low particle numbers or a lack of cycling transitions. However, a differential spectroscopic light shift can map temperature onto the line shape with a low sensitivity to trap anharmonicity. We study narrow molecular transitions to demonstrate precise frequency-based lattice thermometry, as well as carrier cooling. This approach should be applicable down to nanokelvin temperatures. We also discuss how the thermal light shift can affect the accuracy of optical lattice clocks.

  12. Molecular implementation of molecular shift register memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beratan, David N. (Inventor); Onuchic, Jose N. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An electronic shift register memory (20) at the molecular level is described. The memory elements are based on a chain of electron transfer molecules (22) and the information is shifted by photoinduced (26) electron transfer reactions. Thus, multi-step sequences of charge transfer reactions are used to move charge with high efficiency down a molecular chain. The device integrates compositions of the invention onto a VLSI substrate (36), providing an example of a molecular electronic device which may be fabricated. Three energy level schemes, molecular implementation of these schemes, optical excitation strategies, charge amplification strategies, and error correction strategies are described.

  13. Isotope shifts in methane near 6000/cm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, K.; Halsey, G. W.; Jennings, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Isotope shifts for cleanly resolved vibrational-rotational absorption lines of CH4-12 and CH4-13 were measured by a 5-m focal length Littrow spectrometer in the 6000/cm range. The methane isotopes were held in separate absorption cells: 20 torr of CH4-13 in a 1-m cell, and 5 torr of CH4-12 in a White cell of 4-m optical path length. Measured shifts for the cleanly resolved singlets R(0), R(1), Q(1) and P(1) are summarized in tabular form.

  14. Shift-and-add for astronomical imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribak, Erez; Hege, E. Keith; Strobel, Nicolas V.; Christou, Julian C.

    1989-01-01

    Diffraction-limited astronomical images have been obtained utilizing a variant of the shift-and-add method. It is shown that the matched filter approach for extending the weighted shift-and-add method reduces specklegrams from extended objects and from an object dominated by photon noise. The method is aberration-insensitive and yields very high dynamic range results. The iterative method for arriving at the matched filter does not automatically converge in the case of photon-noisy specklegrams for objects with more than one maximum.

  15. Invertebrate community response to a shifting mosaic of habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engle, David M.; Fuhlendorf, S.D.; Roper, A.; Leslie, David M., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Grazing management has focused largely on promoting vegetation homogeneity through uniform distribution of grazing to minimize area in a pasture that is either heavily disturbed or undisturbed. An alternative management model that couples grazing and fire (i.e., patch burning) to promote heterogeneity argues that grazing and fire interact through a series of positive and negative feedbacks to cause a shifting mosaic of vegetation composition and structure across the landscape. We compared patch burning with traditional homogeneity-based management in tallgrass prairie to determine the influence of the two treatments on the aboveground invertebrate community. Patch burning resulted in a temporal flush of invertebrate biomass in patches transitional between unburned and patches burned in the current year. Total invertebrate mass was about 50% greater in these transitional patches within patch-burned pastures as compared to pastures under traditional, homogeneity-based management. Moreover, the mosaic of patches in patch-burned pastures contained a wider range of invertebrate biomass and greater abundance of some invertebrate orders than did the traditionally managed pastures. Patch burning provides habitat that meets requirements for a broad range of invertebrate species, suggesting the potential for patch burning to benefit other native animal assemblages in the food chain.

  16. Response-Based Strengthening in Task Shifting: Evidence from Shift Effects Produced by Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinhauser, Marco; Hubner, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    The hypothesis is introduced that 1 source of shift costs is the strengthening of task-related associations occurring whenever an overt response is produced. The authors tested this account by examining shift effects following errors and error compensation processes. The authors predicted that following a specific type of error, called task…

  17. Lack of Buffering by Composites Promotes Shift to More Cariogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nedeljkovic, I; De Munck, J; Slomka, V; Van Meerbeek, B; Teughels, W; Van Landuyt, K L

    2016-07-01

    Secondary caries (SC) remains a very important problem with composite restorations. The objectives of this study were to test the acid-buffering ability of several restorative materials and to evaluate whether buffering of the restorative material has an impact on the microbial composition of the biofilm. Disk-shaped specimens of conventional composite, composite with surface prereacted glass-ionomer filler particles (so-called giomer), glass-ionomer cement (GIC), amalgam, and hydroxyapatite (HAp) (control) were exposed to aqueous solutions with pH 4, 5, 6, and 7 and to the medium containing bacteria-produced acids, and pH changes were recorded over several days. Next, material specimens were immersed in bacterial growth medium with pH adjusted to 5. After a 24-h incubation, the extracts were collected and inoculated with a cariogenic (Streptococcus mutans) and a noncariogenic (Streptococcus sanguinis) species. The bacterial growth was monitored both in a single-species model by spectrophotometry and in a dual-species model by viability quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Amalgam and HAp showed the strongest acid-buffering ability, followed by the GIC and the giomer, while the conventional composite did not exhibit any buffering capacity. Furthermore, due to the lack of acid-buffering abilities, composite was not able to increase the pH of the medium (pH 5), which, in the absence of antibacterial properties, allowed the growth of S. mutans, while the growth of S. sanguinis, a less aciduric species, was completely inhibited. A similar effect was observed when bacteria were cultured together: there was a higher percentage of S. mutans and lower percentage of S. sanguinis with the conventional composite than with other materials and HAp. In conclusion, conventional composites lack the ability to increase the local pH, which leads to the outgrowth of more acidogenic/aciduric bacteria and higher cariogenicity of the biofilm. Together with lack of antibacterial properties, lack of buffering may account for the higher susceptibility of composites to SC. PMID:27146702

  18. Explorations in Promoting Conceptual Change in Electrical Concepts via Ontological Category Shift.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yeung; Law, Nancy

    2001-01-01

    Discusses difficulties encountered by students in learning physics concepts that arise because they attribute ontology of material substance to these concepts. Reports on a series of four studies that explored the usefulness of an ontological categorization framework in investigating students' alternative conceptions of electric circuits and…

  19. Promoting Shifts in Preservice Science Teachers' Thinking through Teaching and Action Research in Informal Science Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Carolyn S.

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of an integrated experiential learning and action research project on preservice science teachers' developing ideas about science teaching, learning, and action research itself. The qualitative, interpretive study examined the action research of 10 master's degree students who were involved in service learning with children in informal education settings. Results indicated that all of the participants enhanced their knowledge of children as diverse learners and the importance of prior knowledge in science learning. In-depth case studies for three of the participants indicated that two developed deeper understandings of science learners and learning. However, one participant was resistant to learning and gained more limited understandings.

  20. Nitrate Intake Promotes Shift in Muscle Fiber Type Composition during Sprint Interval Training in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    De Smet, Stefan; Van Thienen, Ruud; Deldicque, Louise; James, Ruth; Sale, Craig; Bishop, David J.; Hespel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the effect of sprint interval training (SIT) in normoxia, vs. SIT in hypoxia alone or in conjunction with oral nitrate intake, on buffering capacity of homogenized muscle (βhm) and fiber type distribution, as well as on sprint and endurance performance. Methods: Twenty-seven moderately-trained participants were allocated to one of three experimental groups: SIT in normoxia (20.9% FiO2) + placebo (N), SIT in hypoxia (15% FiO2) + placebo (H), or SIT in hypoxia + nitrate supplementation (HN). All participated in 5 weeks of SIT on a cycle ergometer (30-s sprints interspersed by 4.5 min recovery-intervals, 3 weekly sessions, 4–6 sprints per session). Nitrate (6.45 mmol NaNO3) or placebo capsules were administered 3 h before each session. Before and after SIT participants performed an incremental VO2max-test, a 30-min simulated cycling time-trial, as well as a 30-s cycling sprint test. Muscle biopsies were taken from m. vastus lateralis. Results: SIT decreased the proportion of type IIx muscle fibers in all groups (P < 0.05). The relative number of type IIa fibers increased (P < 0.05) in HN (P < 0.05 vs. H), but not in the other groups. SIT had no significant effect on βhm. Compared with H, SIT tended to enhance 30-s sprint performance more in HN than in H (P = 0.085). VO2max and 30-min time-trial performance increased in all groups to a similar extent. Conclusion: SIT in hypoxia combined with nitrate supplementation increases the proportion of type IIa fibers in muscle, which may be associated with enhanced performance in short maximal exercise. Compared with normoxic training, hypoxic SIT does not alter βhm or endurance and sprinting exercise performance. PMID:27378942

  1. Submerged vegetation removal promotes shift of dominant phytoplankton functional groups in a eutrophic lake.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jing; Yang, Kai; Li, Shuangshuang; Li, Genbao; Song, Lirong

    2014-08-01

    Historical data indicate that the dominance of submerged plants in Dianchi Lake in the 1960s was characterized by low algal density with dominance of non-toxic group J (Scenedesmus, Pediastrum, etc.). The removal of submerged plants, which began in the 1970s, resulted in the expansion of bloom-forming Microcystis (group M). Laboratory experiments suggested that Microcystis aeruginosa was inclined to grow and develop at elevated temperatures. The growth of Scenedesmus obliquus was slower than that of co-cultivated M. aeruginosa in the absence of Ceratophyllum demersum, especially at higher temperatures. The existence of submerged plant C. demersum could inhibit the growth of the harmful algae M. aeruginosa and this inhibitory effect by C. demersum was enhanced with an increase in temperature. Instead, with C. demersum, the growth of S. obliquus was not inhibited, but the co-cultivated M. aeruginosa was eliminated in a short time. Combined with the historical data and laboratory experiments, it was indicated that the submerged plants might play important roles in the dominance of the non-toxic group J in the historical succession. Consequently, the introduction of the submerged plant such as C. demersum might alter the dominant phytoplankton functional groups from M to J and benefit the restoration of the eutrophic lake. PMID:25108726

  2. Shift in precipitation regime promotes interspecific hybridization of introduced Coffea species.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Céline; Despinoy, Marc; Hamon, Serge; Hamon, Perla; Salmon, Danyela; Akaffou, Doffou Sélastique; Legnate, Hyacinthe; de Kochko, Alexandre; Mangeas, Morgan; Poncet, Valérie

    2016-05-01

    The frequency of plant species introductions has increased in a highly connected world, modifying species distribution patterns to include areas outside their natural ranges. These introductions provide the opportunity to gain new insight into the importance of flowering phenology as a component of adaptation to a new environment. Three Coffea species, C. arabica, C. canephora (Robusta), and C. liberica, native to intertropical Africa have been introduced to New Caledonia. On this archipelago, a secondary contact zone has been characterized where these species coexist, persist, and hybridize spontaneously. We investigated the impact of environmental changes undergone by each species following its introduction in New Caledonia on flowering phenology and overcoming reproductive barriers between sister species. We developed species distribution models and compared both environmental envelopes and climatic niches between native and introduced hybrid zones. Flowering phenology was monitored in a population in the hybrid zone along with temperature and precipitation sequences recorded at a nearby weather station. The extent and nature of hybridization events were characterized using chloroplast and nuclear microsatellite markers. The three Coffea species encountered weak environmental suitability compared to their native ranges when introduced to New Caledonia, especially C. arabica and C. canephora. The niche of the New Caledonia hybrid zone was significantly different from all three species' native niches based on identity tests (I Similarity and D Schoener's Similarity Indexes). This area appeared to exhibit intermediate conditions between the native conditions of the three species for temperature-related variables and divergent conditions for precipitation-related ones. Flowering pattern in these Coffea species was shown to have a strong genetic component that determined the time between the triggering rain and anthesis (flower opening), specific to each species. However, a precipitation regime different from those in Africa was directly involved in generating partial flowering overlap between species and thus in allowing hybridization and interspecific gene flow. Interspecific hybrids accounted for 4% of the mature individuals in the sympatric population and occurred between each pair of species with various level of introgression. Adaptation to new environmental conditions following introduction of Coffea species to New Caledonia has resulted in a secondary contact between three related species, which would not have happened in their native ranges, leading to hybridization and gene flow. PMID:27096083

  3. Glutathione-Induced Calcium Shifts in Chick Retinal Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Hercules R.; Ferraz, Gabriel; Ferreira, Gustavo C.; Ribeiro-Resende, Victor T.; Chiarini, Luciana B.; do Nascimento, José Luiz M.; Matos Oliveira, Karen Renata H.; Pereira, Tiago de Lima; Ferreira, Leonardo G. B.; Kubrusly, Regina C.; Faria, Robson X.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroglia interactions are essential for the nervous system and in the retina Müller cells interact with most of the neurons in a symbiotic manner. Glutathione (GSH) is a low-molecular weight compound that undertakes major antioxidant roles in neurons and glia, however, whether this compound could act as a signaling molecule in neurons and/or glia is currently unknown. Here we used embryonic avian retina to obtain mixed retinal cells or purified Müller glia cells in culture to evaluate calcium shifts induced by GSH. A dose response curve (0.1–10mM) showed that 5–10mM GSH, induced calcium shifts exclusively in glial cells (later labeled and identified as 2M6 positive cells), while neurons responded to 50mM KCl (labeled as βIII tubulin positive cells). BBG 100nM, a P2X7 blocker, inhibited the effects of GSH on Müller glia. However, addition of DNQX 70μM and MK-801 20μM, non-NMDA and NMDA blockers, had no effect on GSH calcium induced shift. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) at 5mM failed to induce calcium mobilization in glia cells, indicating that the antioxidant and/or structural features of GSH are essential to promote elevations in cytoplasmic calcium levels. Indeed, a short GSH pulse (60s) protects Müller glia from oxidative damage after 30 min of incubation with 0.1% H2O2. Finally, GSH induced GABA release from chick embryonic retina, mixed neuron-glia or from Müller cell cultures, which were inhibited by BBG or in the absence of sodium. GSH also induced propidium iodide uptake in Müller cells in culture in a P2X7 receptor dependent manner. Our data suggest that GSH, in addition to antioxidant effects, could act signaling calcium shifts at the millimolar range particularly in Müller glia, and could regulate the release of GABA, with additional protective effects on retinal neuron-glial circuit. PMID:27078878

  4. Glutathione-Induced Calcium Shifts in Chick Retinal Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Hercules R; Ferraz, Gabriel; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Ribeiro-Resende, Victor T; Chiarini, Luciana B; do Nascimento, José Luiz M; Matos Oliveira, Karen Renata H; Pereira, Tiago de Lima; Ferreira, Leonardo G B; Kubrusly, Regina C; Faria, Robson X; Herculano, Anderson Manoel; Reis, Ricardo A de Melo

    2016-01-01

    Neuroglia interactions are essential for the nervous system and in the retina Müller cells interact with most of the neurons in a symbiotic manner. Glutathione (GSH) is a low-molecular weight compound that undertakes major antioxidant roles in neurons and glia, however, whether this compound could act as a signaling molecule in neurons and/or glia is currently unknown. Here we used embryonic avian retina to obtain mixed retinal cells or purified Müller glia cells in culture to evaluate calcium shifts induced by GSH. A dose response curve (0.1-10 mM) showed that 5-10 mM GSH, induced calcium shifts exclusively in glial cells (later labeled and identified as 2M6 positive cells), while neurons responded to 50 mM KCl (labeled as βIII tubulin positive cells). BBG 100 nM, a P2X7 blocker, inhibited the effects of GSH on Müller glia. However, addition of DNQX 70 μM and MK-801 20 μM, non-NMDA and NMDA blockers, had no effect on GSH calcium induced shift. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) at 5 mM failed to induce calcium mobilization in glia cells, indicating that the antioxidant and/or structural features of GSH are essential to promote elevations in cytoplasmic calcium levels. Indeed, a short GSH pulse (60s) protects Müller glia from oxidative damage after 30 min of incubation with 0.1% H2O2. Finally, GSH induced GABA release from chick embryonic retina, mixed neuron-glia or from Müller cell cultures, which were inhibited by BBG or in the absence of sodium. GSH also induced propidium iodide uptake in Müller cells in culture in a P2X7 receptor dependent manner. Our data suggest that GSH, in addition to antioxidant effects, could act signaling calcium shifts at the millimolar range particularly in Müller glia, and could regulate the release of GABA, with additional protective effects on retinal neuron-glial circuit. PMID:27078878

  5. Health Promotion Education in India: Present Landscape and Future Vistas

    PubMed Central

    Pati, Sanghamitra; Sharma, Kavya; Zodpey, Sanjay; Chauhan, Kavita; Dobe, Madhumita

    2012-01-01

    ‘Health promotion is the process of enabling people to increase control over and to improve their health’. This stream of public health is emerging as a critical domain within the realm of disease prevention. Over the last two decades, the curative model of health care has begun a subtle shift towards a participatory model of health promotion emphasizing upon practice of healthy lifestyles and creating healthy communities. Health promotion encompasses five key strategies with health communication and education as its cornerstones. Present study is an attempt to explore the current situation of health promotion education in India with an aim to provide a background for capacity building in health promotion. A systematic predefined method was adopted to collect and compile information on existing academic programs pertaining to health promotion and health education/communication. Results of the study reveal that currently health promotion education in India is fragmented and not uniform across institutes. It is yet to be recognized as a critical domain of public health education. Mostly teaching of health promotion is limited to health education and communication. There is a need for designing programmes for short-term and long-term capacity building, with focus on innovative methods and approaches. Public health institutes and associations could play a proactive role in designing and imparting academic programs on health promotion. Enhancing alliances with various institutes involved in health promotion activities and networking among public health and medical institutes as well as health services delivery systems would be more productive. PMID:22980352

  6. High expression Zymomonas promoters

    DOEpatents

    Viitanen, Paul V.; Tao, Luan; Zhang, Yuying; Caimi, Perry G.; McCole, Laura : Zhang, Min; Chou, Yat-Chen; McCutchen, Carol M.; Franden, Mary Ann

    2011-08-02

    Identified are mutants of the promoter of the Z. mobilis glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene, which direct improved expression levels of operably linked heterologous nucleic acids. These are high expression promoters useful for expression of chimeric genes in Zymomonas, Zymobacter, and other related bacteria.

  7. Has the Education Paradigm Begun to Shift?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadwick, Clifton B.

    2014-01-01

    The author reviews various elements of what may be considered as evidence that the long-awaited shift in the education paradigm is actually happening. Concepts like student-centered learning, attainment-based evaluation, knowledge-based constructivism, and effort-based intelligence are growing, are being more widely recognized as important, and…

  8. Blackbody radiation shifts in optical atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Safronova, Marianna; Kozlov, Mikhail; Clark, Charles

    2012-03-01

    A review of recent theoretical calculations of blackbody radiation (BBR) shifts in optical atomic clocks is presented. We summarize previous results for monovalent ions that were obtained by a relativistic all-order single-double method, where all single and double excitations of the Dirac- Fock wave function are included to all orders of perturbation theory. A recently developed method for accurate calculations of BBR shifts in divalent atoms is then presented. This approach combines the relativistic all-order method and the configuration interaction method, which provides for accurate treatment of correlation corrections in atoms with two valence electrons. Calculations of the BBR shifts in B+, Al+, and In+ have enabled us to reduce the present fractional uncertainties in the frequencies of their clock transitions as measured at room temperature: to 4 × 10-19 for Al+ and 10-18 for B+ and In+. These uncertainties approach recent estimates of the limits of precision of currently proposed optical atomic clocks. We discuss directions of future theoretical developments for reducing clock uncertainties resulting from blackbody radiation shifts. PMID:22481777

  9. Paradigmatic Shift or Tinkering at the Edges?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    In their target paper, "Towards a systemic theory of gifted education," A. Ziegler and S. N. Phillipson present a long awaited call for a paradigmatic shift in thinking within the field of gifted education. The paper considers how educators and researchers within the field could bring about such a change. They challenge the prevailing…

  10. Prolonged Instability Prior to a Regime Shift

    PubMed Central

    Spanbauer, Trisha L.; Allen, Craig R.; Angeler, David G.; Eason, Tarsha; Fritz, Sherilyn C.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.; Nash, Kirsty L.; Stone, Jeffery R.

    2014-01-01

    Regime shifts are generally defined as the point of ‘abrupt’ change in the state of a system. However, a seemingly abrupt transition can be the product of a system reorganization that has been ongoing much longer than is evident in statistical analysis of a single component of the system. Using both univariate and multivariate statistical methods, we tested a long-term high-resolution paleoecological dataset with a known change in species assemblage for a regime shift. Analysis of this dataset with Fisher Information and multivariate time series modeling showed that there was a∼2000 year period of instability prior to the regime shift. This period of instability and the subsequent regime shift coincide with regional climate change, indicating that the system is undergoing extrinsic forcing. Paleoecological records offer a unique opportunity to test tools for the detection of thresholds and stable-states, and thus to examine the long-term stability of ecosystems over periods of multiple millennia. PMID:25280010

  11. A Paradigm Shift to Improve Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rulloda, Rudolfo B.

    2009-01-01

    A shift to computer skills for improving academic performances was investigated. The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 increased the amount of high school dropouts after the Act was enacted. At-risk students were included in this research study. Several models described using teachers for core subjects and mentors to built citizenship skills, along…

  12. Shifting Paradigms: From Flexner to Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carraccio, Carol; Wolfsthal, Susan D.; Englander, Robert; Ferentz, Kevin; Martin, Christine

    2002-01-01

    Reviewed the literature on competency-based medical education to: (1) understand the evolution of this educational paradigm; (2) assess the evidence to date of the efficacy of competency-based education; and (3) provide practical insights into how to accomplish full implementation and evaluation of the paradigm shift. (EV)

  13. Study Predicts Dramatic Shifts in Enrollments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evangelauf, Jean

    1991-01-01

    A new study detailing demographic shifts in the college-age population predicts growth in minority high school graduates and shrinkage or maintenance of White graduation rates. The report is the first to provide state-by-state figures on actual and projected graduates from 1986 through 1995 by racial and ethnic group. (MSE)

  14. Chain Shift in Second Language Phonological Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Shin-Sook

    2000-01-01

    Examines whether Korean students learning English as a Second Language show chain shift of a similar kind to that demonstrated in first language acquisition, and if so, whether there is any difference between first language acquisition and second language acquisition with respect to affected sounds. (Author/VWL)

  15. Improved phase-shift-keyed detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, J.

    1969-01-01

    Improved phase-shift-keyed detector contains an active filter circuit which uses an operational amplifier and resistor-capacitor network. The detector is used in the Saturn space vehicle and Apollo telescope mount command systems to translate an analog signal from the command receiver into digital information for the command decoder.

  16. The Phase Shift in the Jumping Ring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Amiri, Farhang

    2008-01-01

    The popular physics demonstration experiment known as Thomson's Jumping Ring (JR) has been variously explained as a simple example of Lenz's law, or as the result of a phase shift of the ring current relative to the induced emf. The failure of the first-quadrant Lenz's law explanation is shown by the time the ring takes to jump and by levitation.…

  17. A Tectonic Shift in Global Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, John; Kanwar, Asha; Uvalic-Trumbic, Stamenka

    2006-01-01

    Europeans lament that their universities are lagging behind those in the United States, while Americans worry that their academic leadership is threatened by complacency. Both groups, however, are missing the tectonic shift that will transform the map of higher education worldwide--the growth of universities in the developing world. Spreading…

  18. Gas composition shifts in Devonian shales

    SciTech Connect

    Schettler, P.D.; Parmely, C.R. )

    1989-08-01

    Analysis of the gas composition of Devonian shale wells indicates that the composition of produced gas shifts during the production history of the well. Possible mechanisms to explain this behavior are examined in light of field and laboratory data. Application of diffusion theory is made to explain adsorption-like behavior exhibited by some shales.

  19. Survey Detects Shifting Priorities of School Boards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    The author reports the results of a nationwide survey of school board members which show a shift in focus toward student achievement and away from district-management issues known as the "killer B's": buses, buildings, books, budgets, and bonds. But today's school board members appear not to be as interested in issues that many policy observers…

  20. Ambiguity Produces Attention Shifts in Category Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vadillo, Miguel A.; Orgaz, Cristina; Luque, David; Nelson, James Byron

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that people and nonhuman animals protect their knowledge from interference by shifting attention toward the context when presented with information that contradicts their previous beliefs. Despite that suggestion, no studies have directly measured changes in attention while participants are exposed to an interference…

  1. RQL Fuel Shifting Sector Rig Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, James D. (Technical Monitor); Haid, Daniel A.; Koopman, Frederick S.; Peschke, William O. T.; Siskind, Kenneth S.

    2004-01-01

    The low emissions potential of a Rich-Quench-Lean (RQL) combustor for use in the HIgh Speed Civil transport (HSCT) application was evaluated as part of the NASA Critical Propulsion Components (CPC) Program. Fuel shifting as an approach to combustor control was evaluated in a multiple bank RQL combustor, utilizing reduced scale quench technology implemented in a convoluted linear with quench plate concept.

  2. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R; Holmes, William M

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models. PMID:27111139

  3. Pedagogy of the Obsessed Shifting the Focus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correa, Elaine

    2006-01-01

    This paper will concentrate on the current shift from teaching to entitlement learning that has become a significant part of our educational discourse and culture. With increasing emphasis on accountability and high test score, students have become active recipients in "assessing" and "evaluating" the effectiveness of their learning experiences.…

  4. Shift of Meaning and Students' Alternative Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Hans-Jurgen; Volke, Dagmar

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to establish a relationship between the shift of meaning of the concept oxidation that has taken place during the historical development, and students' alternative concepts. First Examination Board papers were examined. The result enabled us to specify the research question. In the main part of the study,…

  5. Majors' Shift to Natural Gas, The

    EIA Publications

    2001-01-01

    The Majors' Shift to Natural Gas investigates the factors that have guided the United States' major energy producers' growth in U.S. natural gas production relative to oil production. The analysis draws heavily on financial and operating data from the Energy Information Administration's Financial Reporting System (FRS)

  6. Solvent stark effects and spectral shifts. II

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, M; Swain, J; Shum, Y Y; Merin, R; Chen, R H.H.

    1981-03-01

    Solvent shifts of the energies of the lowest /sup 1/L/sub a/ bands of the electronic absorption spectra of anthracene, chrysene, phenanthrene, and tetracene and of the lowest /sup 1/L/sub b/ bands of the electronic absorption spectra of naphthalene, phenanthrene, chrysene, and picene are reported. The origins of these shifts are analyzed in terms of theories developed by Baur and Nicol and by Abe. Satisfactory fits of the experimental data are obtained for theoretical expressions derived from both theories, but discrepancies are observed between the relative magnitudes assigned to the various contributions to the shifts by the two theories. The magnitudes of the parameters of the Baur and Nicol theory, relating solvent shifts to the dielectric constant and refractive index of the solvent, are found to be the same within experimental precision for the /sup 1/L/sub a/ transitions in all of the molecules studied; a similar regularity of the parameters for the /sup 1/L/sub b/ transitions also is observed.

  7. Design principles of shift current photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Ashley; Fregoso, Benjamin; de Juan, Fernando; Moore, Joel

    While the basic principles and limitations of conventional solar cells are well understood, relatively little attention has gone toward evaluating and maximizing the potential efficiency of photovoltaic devices based on shift currents. In this work, a sum rule approach is introduced and used to outline design principles for optimizing shift currents for photon energies near the band gap, which depend on wavefunctions via Berry connections as well as standard band structure. Using these we identify two new classes of shift current photovoltaics, ferroelectric polymer films and orthorhombic monochalcogenides, both of which exhibit peak photoresponsivities larger than predictions for previously-known photovoltaics of this type. Using physically-motivated tight-binding models, the full frequency dependent response of these materials is obtained. Exploring the phase space of these models, we find photoresponsivities that can exceed 100 mA/W. These results show that considering the microscopic origin of shift current via effective models allows one to improve the possible efficiency of devices using this mechanism and better grasp their potential to compete with conventional solar cells. This work was completed with the support of an NSERC Michael Smith Foreign Study Supplement.

  8. Implications of Shifting Technology in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Janet; Holland, John

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the implications of shifting technology trends by looking at what we've lost or are losing, where we are, and where we need to go for making the needed transitions in knowledge and skills. Areas of growth within new media and the tech industry are good indicators of our growing interests in mobility, improved quality,…

  9. Scientists detect shift in Arctic Ocean system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-12-01

    The Arctic Ocean system has shifted to a “new normal” since 2006, and there are now a sufficient number of years of data to indicate this shift, according to a new Arctic Report Card. The report card, issued on 1 December by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) along with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, other agencies, and an international team of researchers, indicates that 2011 saw significant changes to the Arctic atmosphere, sea ice and ocean, and hydrology and terrestrial cryosphere, as well as some changes to Arctic marine and terrestrial ecosystems, and this shift has widespread environmental and social implications. The report refers to 2006 because precursors that year led to dramatic sea ice loss in 2007. “The shift is characterized by the persistent decline in the thickness and summer extent of the sea ice cover and a warmer, fresher upper ocean,” according to the report, which also indicates a repeated occurrence of 2010 Arctic winter wind patterns this year that are different from the norm, among other concerns. “The 2011 report card shows that record-setting changes are occurring throughout the Arctic environmental system. Given the projection of continued global warming, it is very likely that major Arctic changes will continue in years to come, with increasing climatic, biological, and social impacts,” the report indicates.

  10. NMR crystallography: the use of chemical shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Robin K.

    2004-10-01

    Measurements of chemical shifts obtained from magic-angle spinning NMR spectra (together with quantum mechanical computations of shielding) can provide valuable information on crystallography. Examples are given of the determination of crystallographic asymmetric units, of molecular symmetry in the solid-state environment, and of crystallographic space group assignment. Measurements of full tensor components for 199Hg have given additional coordination information. The nature of intermolecular hydrogen bonding in cortisone acetate polymorphs and solvates is obtained from chemical shift information, also involving measurement of the full tensor parameters. The resulting data have been used as restraints, built into the computation algorithm, in the analysis of powder diffraction patterns to give full crystal structures. A combination of quantum mechanical computation of shielding and measurement of proton chemical shifts (obtained by high-speed MAS) leads to the determination of the position of a proton in an intermolecular hydrogen bond. A recently-developed computer program specifically based on crystallographic repetition has been shown to give acceptable results. Moreover, NMR chemical shifts can distinguish between static and dynamic disorder in crystalline materials and can be used to determine modes and rates of molecular exchange motion.

  11. Deindustrialization and the Shift to Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutscher, Ronald E.; Personick, Valerie A.

    1986-01-01

    Bureau of Labor Statistics data show the industrial sector as a whole in healthy shape, but a few manufacturing industries in deep trouble. These industries include tobacco manufacturers, iron and steel foundries, leather products, and steel manufacturers. Also examines shifts in employment and output, job quality, and outlook for the future. (CT)

  12. Hispanics Find Jobs that Shift Migration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilroy, Marilyn

    2007-01-01

    Economic opportunity, the force that has driven population shifts for years, is changing the face of migration as Hispanics move into parts of the nation beyond border states and traditional ports of entry. North Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, and Indiana are experiencing a steady growth in Hispanic population. In addition, West Virginia, Ohio, and…

  13. Using LEADS to shift to high performance.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Shauna; Hagge, Erna

    2016-03-01

    Health systems across Canada are tasked to measure results of all their strategic initiatives. Included in most strategic plans is leadership development. How to measure leadership effectiveness in relation to organizational objectives is key in determining organizational effectiveness. The following findings offer considerations for a 21(st)-century approach to shifting to high-performance systems. PMID:26872796

  14. Heart-rate pulse-shift detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, M.

    1974-01-01

    Detector circuit accurately separates and counts phase-shift pulses over wide range of basic pulse-rate frequency, and also provides reasonable representation of full repetitive EKG waveform. Single telemeter implanted in small animal monitors not only body temperature but also animal movement and heart rate.

  15. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R.; Holmes, William M.

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models.

  16. The acute effects of intranasal oxytocin on automatic and effortful attentional shifting to emotional faces.

    PubMed

    Ellenbogen, Mark A; Linnen, Anne-Marie; Grumet, Robin; Cardoso, Christopher; Joober, Ridha

    2012-01-01

    Oxytocin is known to promote social affiliation. The mechanism by which this occurs is unknown, but it may involve changes in social information processing. In a placebo-controlled study, we examined the influence of intranasal oxytocin on effortful and automatic attentional shifting in 57 participants using a spatial cueing task with emotional and neutral faces. For effortful processing, oxytocin decreased the speed of shifting attention to sad faces presented for 750 ms and facilitated disengagement from right hemifield sad and angry faces presented for 200 ms. For automatic processing, symptoms of depression moderated the relationship between drug and disengagement. Oxytocin attenuated an attentional bias to masked angry faces on disengagement trials in persons with high depression scores. Oxytocin's influence on social behavior may occur, in part, by eliciting flexible attentional shifting in the early stages of information processing. PMID:22092248

  17. Accessible surface area from NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Hafsa, Noor E; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S

    2015-07-01

    Accessible surface area (ASA) is the surface area of an atom, amino acid or biomolecule that is exposed to solvent. The calculation of a molecule's ASA requires three-dimensional coordinate data and the use of a "rolling ball" algorithm to both define and calculate the ASA. For polymers such as proteins, the ASA for individual amino acids is closely related to the hydrophobicity of the amino acid as well as its local secondary and tertiary structure. For proteins, ASA is a structural descriptor that can often be as informative as secondary structure. Consequently there has been considerable effort over the past two decades to try to predict ASA from protein sequence data and to use ASA information (derived from chemical modification studies) as a structure constraint. Recently it has become evident that protein chemical shifts are also sensitive to ASA. Given the potential utility of ASA estimates as structural constraints for NMR we decided to explore this relationship further. Using machine learning techniques (specifically a boosted tree regression model) we developed an algorithm called "ShiftASA" that combines chemical-shift and sequence derived features to accurately estimate per-residue fractional ASA values of water-soluble proteins. This method showed a correlation coefficient between predicted and experimental values of 0.79 when evaluated on a set of 65 independent test proteins, which was an 8.2 % improvement over the next best performing (sequence-only) method. On a separate test set of 92 proteins, ShiftASA reported a mean correlation coefficient of 0.82, which was 12.3 % better than the next best performing method. ShiftASA is available as a web server ( http://shiftasa.wishartlab.com ) for submitting input queries for fractional ASA calculation. PMID:26078090

  18. Early dynamics of the semantic priming shift

    PubMed Central

    Lavigne, Frédéric; Chanquoy, Lucile; Dumercy, Laurent; Vitu, Françoise

    2013-01-01

    Semantic processing of sequences of words requires the cognitive system to keep several word meanings simultaneously activated in working memory with limited capacity. The real- time updating of the sequence of word meanings relies on dynamic changes in the associates to the words that are activated. Protocols involving two sequential primes report a semantic priming shift from larger priming of associates to the first prime to larger priming of associates to the second prime, in a range of long SOAs (stimulus-onset asynchronies) between the second prime and the target. However, the possibility for an early semantic priming shift is still to be tested, and its dynamics as a function of association strength remain unknown. Three multiple priming experiments are proposed that cross-manipulate association strength between each of two successive primes and a target, for different values of short SOAs and prime durations. Results show an early priming shift ranging from priming of associates to the first prime only to priming of strong associates to the first prime and all of the associates to the second prime. We investigated the neural basis of the early priming shift by using a network model of spike frequency adaptive cortical neurons (e.g., Deco & Rolls, 2005), able to code different association strengths between the primes and the target. The cortical network model provides a description of the early dynamics of the priming shift in terms of pro-active and retro-active interferences within populations of excitatory neurons regulated by fast and unselective inhibitory feedback. PMID:23717346

  19. Current-induced spin wave Doppler shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailleul, Matthieu

    2010-03-01

    In metal ferromagnets -namely Fe, Co and Ni and their alloys- magnetism and electrical transport are strongly entangled (itinerant magnetism). This results in a number of properties such as the tunnel and giant magnetoresistance (i.e. the dependence of the electrical resistance on the magnetic state) and the more recently addressed spin transfer (i.e. the ability to manipulate the magnetic state with the help of an electrical current). The spin waves, being the low-energy elementary excitations of any ferromagnet, also exist in itinerant magnets, but they are expected to exhibit some peculiar properties due the itinerant character of the carriers. Accessing these specific properties experimentally could shed a new light on the microscopic mechanism governing itinerant magnetism, which -in turn- could help in optimizing material properties for spintronics applications. As a simple example of these specific properties, it was predicted theoretically that forcing a DC current through a ferromagnetic metal should induce a shift of the frequency of the spin waves [1,2]. This shift can be identified to a Doppler shift undergone by the electron system when it is put in motion by the electrical current. We will show how detailed spin wave measurements allow one to access this current-induced Doppler shift [3]. From an experimental point of view, we will discuss the peculiarities of propagating spin wave spectroscopy experiments carried out at a sub-micrometer length-scale and with MHz frequency resolution. Then, we will discuss the measured value of the Doppler shift in the context of both the old two-current model of spin-polarized transport and the more recent model of adiabatic spin transfer torque. [4pt] [1] P.Lederer and D.L. Mills, Phys.Rev. 148, 542 (1966).[0pt] [2] J. Fernandez-Rossier et al., Phys. Rev. B 69, 174412 (2004)[0pt] [3] V. Vlaminck and M. Bailleul, Science 322, 410 (2008).

  20. Body Size Shifts in Philippine Reef Fishes: Interfamilial Variation in Responses to Protection

    PubMed Central

    Fidler, Robert Y.; Maypa, Aileen; Apistar, Dean; White, Alan; Turingan, Ralph G.

    2014-01-01

    As a consequence of intense fishing pressure, fished populations experience reduced population sizes and shifts in body size toward the predominance of smaller and early maturing individuals. Small, early-maturing fish exhibit significantly reduced reproductive output and, ultimately, reduced fitness. As part of resource management and biodiversity conservation programs worldwide, no-take marine protected areas (MPAs) are expected to ameliorate the adverse effects of fishing pressure. In an attempt to advance our understanding of how coral reef MPAs meet their long-term goals, this study used visual census data from 23 MPAs and fished reefs in the Philippines to address three questions: (1) Do MPAs promote shifts in fish body size frequency distribution towards larger body sizes when compared to fished reefs? (2) Do MPA size and (3) age contribute to the efficacy of MPAs in promoting such shifts? This study revealed that across all MPAs surveyed, the distribution of fishes between MPAs and fished reefs were similar; however, large-bodied fish were more abundant within MPAs, along with small, young-of-the-year individuals. Additionally, there was a significant shift in body size frequency distribution towards larger body sizes in 12 of 23 individual reef sites surveyed. Of 22 fish families, eleven demonstrated significantly different body size frequency distributions between MPAs and fished reefs, indicating that shifts in the size spectrum of fishes in response to protection are family-specific. Family-level shifts demonstrated a significant, positive correlation with MPA age, indicating that MPAs become more effective at increasing the density of large-bodied fish within their boundaries over time. PMID:24833509

  1. Defining and explaining tropical deforestation: shifting cultivation and population growth in colonial Madagascar (1896-1940).

    PubMed

    Jarosz, L

    1993-10-01

    . During 1900-1941, population was below or at replacement level, but the government still blamed Malagasys. Shifting cultivation meant different things to the subsistence farmers, the state, and international agencies. Denial of context promotes an ideology of repression, fuels fear and prejudice, and promotes the wrong solutions. PMID:12318844

  2. Body size shifts in philippine reef fishes: interfamilial variation in responses to protection.

    PubMed

    Fidler, Robert Y; Maypa, Aileen; Apistar, Dean; White, Alan; Turingan, Ralph G

    2014-01-01

    As a consequence of intense fishing pressure, fished populations experience reduced population sizes and shifts in body size toward the predominance of smaller and early maturing individuals. Small, early-maturing fish exhibit significantly reduced reproductive output and, ultimately, reduced fitness. As part of resource management and biodiversity conservation programs worldwide, no-take marine protected areas (MPAs) are expected to ameliorate the adverse effects of fishing pressure. In an attempt to advance our understanding of how coral reef MPAs meet their long-term goals, this study used visual census data from 23 MPAs and fished reefs in the Philippines to address three questions: (1) Do MPAs promote shifts in fish body size frequency distribution towards larger body sizes when compared to fished reefs? (2) Do MPA size and (3) age contribute to the efficacy of MPAs in promoting such shifts? This study revealed that across all MPAs surveyed, the distribution of fishes between MPAs and fished reefs were similar; however, large-bodied fish were more abundant within MPAs, along with small, young-of-the-year individuals. Additionally, there was a significant shift in body size frequency distribution towards larger body sizes in 12 of 23 individual reef sites surveyed. Of 22 fish families, eleven demonstrated significantly different body size frequency distributions between MPAs and fished reefs, indicating that shifts in the size spectrum of fishes in response to protection are family-specific. Family-level shifts demonstrated a significant, positive correlation with MPA age, indicating that MPAs become more effective at increasing the density of large-bodied fish within their boundaries over time. PMID:24833509

  3. Sleep Loss and Fatigue in Shift Work and Shift Work Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2010-01-01

    Shift work is highly prevalent in industrialized societies (>20%) but, when it includes night work, it has pronounced negative effects on sleep, subjective and physiological sleepiness, performance, accident risk, as well as on health outcomes such as cardiovascular disease and certain forms of cancer. The reason is the conflict between the day oriented circadian physiology and the requirement for work and sleep at the “wrong” biological time of day. Other factors that negatively impact work shift sleepiness and accident risk include long duration shifts greater than 12 hours and individual vulnerability for phase intolerance that may lead to a diagnosis of shift work disorder; i.e., those shift workers with the greatest sleepiness and performance impairment during the biological night and insomnia during the biological day. Whereas some countermeasures may be used to ameliorate the negative impact of shift work on nighttime sleepiness and daytime insomnia (combined countermeasures may be the best available), there seems at present to be no way to eliminate most of the negative effects of shift work on human physiology and cognition. PMID:20640236

  4. Classical toy models for the monopole shift and the quadrupole shift.

    PubMed

    Rose, Katrin; Cottenier, Stefaan

    2012-08-28

    The penetration of s- and p(1/2)-electrons into the atomic nucleus leads to a variety of observable effects. The presence of s-electrons inside the nucleus gives rise to the isotope shift in atomic spectroscopy, and to the isomer shift in Mössbauer spectroscopy. Both well-known phenomena are manifestations of the more general monopole shift. In a recent paper (Koch et al., Phys. Rev. A, 2010, 81, 032507), we discussed the existence of the formally analogous quadrupole shift: a tensor correction to the electric quadrupole interaction due to the penetration of relativistic p(1/2)-electrons into the nucleus. The quadrupole shift is predicted to be observable by high-accuracy molecular spectroscopy on a set of 4 molecules (the quadrupole anomaly). The simple physics behind all these related phenomena is easily obscured by an elaborate mathematical formalism that is required for their derivation: a multipole expansion in combination with perturbation theory, invoking quantum physics and ideally relativity. In the present paper, we take a totally different approach. We consider three classical 'toy models' that can be solved by elementary calculus, and that nevertheless contain all essential physics of the monopole and quadrupole shifts. We hope that this intuitive (yet exact) analysis will increase the understanding about multipole shift phenomena in a broader community. PMID:22782015

  5. 77 FR 47820 - Invention Promoters/Promotion Firms Complaints

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office Invention Promoters/Promotion Firms Complaints ACTION: Proposed... concerning invention promoters and responses from the invention promoters to these complaints. An individual may submit a complaint concerning an invention promoter to the USPTO, which will forward the...

  6. Hospital pricing: cost shifting and competition.

    PubMed

    Morrisey, M A

    1993-05-01

    The issue of cost shifting has taken on enormous policy implications. It is estimated that unsponsored and undercompensated hospital costs--one measure of cost shifting--has totaled $21.5 billion in 1991. The health services research literature indicates that hospitals set different prices for different payers. However, the empirical evidence on hospitals' ability to raise prices to one payer to make up for unsponsored care or lower payments by other payers is mixed at best. No study has concluded that hospitals have raised prices to fully adjust for such actions. The extent of cost shifting is limited by the market. When a hospital has market power, it is able to set prices above marginal costs. However, when a buyer has enough patient/subscribers and a willingness to direct them to particular providers based on price considerations, hospitals have less flexibility in raising prices above costs. Thus, the extent of cost shifting is limited by the market. Cost shifting is not as easy as it may have been in the past because the nature of hospital and insurer competition has changed radically in the last decade. While hospital quality, services, and amenities still matter, some buyers are increasingly concerned about the price they pay. Evidence from studies of PPO and HMO negotiations with hospitals suggests that hospitals' market power is eroding, at least in some areas. In areas with relatively few hospital competitors and little PPO or HMO activity, Medicaid and Medicare price reductions and uncompensated care burdens will be partially absorbed by higher prices paid by private payers. In more price sensitive markets and in markets in which prices to private payers have risen to those commensurate with the market power of local hospitals, such cost shifting will not occur. A market-based approach in hospital pricing requires an explicit policy for the uninsured. In a competitive market, a hospital that traditionally cared for the uninsured by spending some of its

  7. Transitional Bubble in Periodic Flow Phase Shift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talan, M.; Hourmouziadis, Jean

    2004-01-01

    One particular characteristic observed in unsteady shear layers is the phase shift relative to the main flow. In attached boundary layers this will have an effect both on the instantaneous skin friction and heat transfer. In separation bubbles the contribution to the drag is dominated by the pressure distribution. However, the most significant effect appears to be the phase shift on the transition process. Unsteady transition behaviour may determine the bursting of the bubble resulting in an un-recoverable full separation. An early analysis of the phase shift was performed by Stokes for the incompressible boundary layer of an oscillating wall and an oscillating main flow. An amplitude overshoot within the shear layer as well as a phase shift were observed that can be attributed to the relatively slow diffusion of viscous stresses compared to the fast change of pressure. Experiments in a low speed facility with the boundary layer of a flat plate were evaluated in respect to phase shift. A pressure distribution similar to that on the suction surface of a turbomachinery aerofoil was superimposed generating a typical transitional separation bubble. A periodically unsteady main flow in the suction type wind tunnel was introduced via a rotating flap downstream of the test section. The experiments covered a range of the three similarity parameters of momentum-loss-thickness Reynolds-number of 92 to 226 and Strouhal-number (reduced frequency) of 0.0001 to 0.0004 at the separation point, and an amplitude range up to 19 %. The free stream turbulence level was less than 1% .Upstream of the separation point the phase shift in the laminar boundary layer does not appear to be affected significantly bay either of the three parameters. The trend perpendicular to the wall is similar to the Stokes analysis. The problem scales well with the wave velocity introduced by Stokes, however, the lag of the main flow near the wall is less than indicated analytically. The separation point

  8. Confocal simultaneous phase-shifting interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Chenguang; Tan Jiubin; Tang Jianbo; Liu Tao; Liu Jian

    2011-02-10

    In order to implement the ultraprecise measurement with large range and long working distance in confocal microscopy, confocal simultaneous phase-shifting interferometry (C-SPSI) has been presented. Four channel interference signals, with {pi}/2 phase shift between each other, are detected simultaneously in C-SPSI. The actual surface height is then calculated by combining the optical sectioning with the phase unwrapping in the main cycle of the interference phase response, and the main cycle is determined using the bipolar property of differential confocal microscopy. Experimental results showed that 1 nm of axial depth resolution was achieved for either low- or high-NA objective lenses. The reflectivity disturbance resistibility of C-SPSI was demonstrated by imaging a typical microcircuit specimen. C-SPSI breaks through the restriction of low NA on the axial depth resolution of confocal microscopy effectively.

  9. Phase-Shifting Zernike Interferometer Wavefront Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. Kent; Rao, Shanti; Jensen-Clem, Rebecca M.

    2011-01-01

    The canonical Zernike phase-contrast technique transforms a phase object in one plane into an intensity object in the conjugate plane. This is done by applying a static pi/2 phase shift to the central core (approx. lambda/diameter) of the PSF which is intermediate between the input and output plane. Here we present a new architecture for this sensor. First, the optical system is simple and all reflective, and second the phase shift in the central core of the PSF is dynamic and can be made arbitrarily large. This common-path, all-reflective design makes it minimally sensitive to vibration, polarization and wavelength. We review the theory of operation, describe the optical system, summarize numerical simulations and sensitivities and review results from a laboratory demonstration of this novel instrument.

  10. Phase-Shifting Zernike Interferometer Wavefront Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. Kent; Rao, Shanti; Jensen-Clemb, Rebecca M.; Serabyn, Gene

    2011-01-01

    The canonical Zernike phase-contrast technique1,2,3,4 transforms a phase object in one plane into an intensity object in the conjugate plane. This is done by applying a static pi/2 phase shift to the central core (approx. lambda/D) of the PSF which is intermediate between the input and output planes. Here we present a new architecture for this sensor. First, the optical system is simple and all reflective. Second, the phase shift in the central core of the PSF is dynamic and or arbitrary size. This common-path, all-reflective design makes it minimally sensitive to vibration, polarization and wavelength. We review the theory of operation, describe the optical system, summarize numerical simulations and sensitivities and review results from a laboratory demonstration of this novel instrument

  11. Shape-shifting colloids via stimulated dewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, Mena; Hueckel, Theodore; Yi, Gi-Ra; Sacanna, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    The ability to reconfigure elementary building blocks from one structure to another is key to many biological systems. Bringing the intrinsic adaptability of biological systems to traditional synthetic materials is currently one of the biggest scientific challenges in material engineering. Here we introduce a new design concept for the experimental realization of self-assembling systems with built-in shape-shifting elements. We demonstrate that dewetting forces between an oil phase and solid colloidal substrates can be exploited to engineer shape-shifting particles whose geometry can be changed on demand by a chemical or optical signal. We find this approach to be quite general and applicable to a broad spectrum of materials, including polymers, semiconductors and magnetic materials. This synthetic methodology can be further adopted as a new experimental platform for designing and rapidly prototyping functional colloids, such as reconfigurable micro swimmers, colloidal surfactants and switchable building blocks for self-assembly.

  12. Shape-shifting colloids via stimulated dewetting.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Mena; Hueckel, Theodore; Yi, Gi-Ra; Sacanna, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The ability to reconfigure elementary building blocks from one structure to another is key to many biological systems. Bringing the intrinsic adaptability of biological systems to traditional synthetic materials is currently one of the biggest scientific challenges in material engineering. Here we introduce a new design concept for the experimental realization of self-assembling systems with built-in shape-shifting elements. We demonstrate that dewetting forces between an oil phase and solid colloidal substrates can be exploited to engineer shape-shifting particles whose geometry can be changed on demand by a chemical or optical signal. We find this approach to be quite general and applicable to a broad spectrum of materials, including polymers, semiconductors and magnetic materials. This synthetic methodology can be further adopted as a new experimental platform for designing and rapidly prototyping functional colloids, such as reconfigurable micro swimmers, colloidal surfactants and switchable building blocks for self-assembly. PMID:27426418

  13. Shape-shifting colloids via stimulated dewetting

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, Mena; Hueckel, Theodore; Yi, Gi-Ra; Sacanna, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The ability to reconfigure elementary building blocks from one structure to another is key to many biological systems. Bringing the intrinsic adaptability of biological systems to traditional synthetic materials is currently one of the biggest scientific challenges in material engineering. Here we introduce a new design concept for the experimental realization of self-assembling systems with built-in shape-shifting elements. We demonstrate that dewetting forces between an oil phase and solid colloidal substrates can be exploited to engineer shape-shifting particles whose geometry can be changed on demand by a chemical or optical signal. We find this approach to be quite general and applicable to a broad spectrum of materials, including polymers, semiconductors and magnetic materials. This synthetic methodology can be further adopted as a new experimental platform for designing and rapidly prototyping functional colloids, such as reconfigurable micro swimmers, colloidal surfactants and switchable building blocks for self-assembly. PMID:27426418

  14. Promoting People's Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Colin

    1981-01-01

    Discusses problems associated with communication in rural areas to promote participation in development programs. Suggests that success of such programs depends on continued government policy in favor of citizen participation in agricultural and rural development. (SK)

  15. Promoting Your Web Site.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raeder, Aggi

    1997-01-01

    Discussion of ways to promote sites on the World Wide Web focuses on how search engines work and how they retrieve and identify sites. Appropriate Web links for submitting new sites and for Internet marketing are included. (LRW)

  16. Electricity pricing for conservation and load shifting

    SciTech Connect

    Orans, Ren; Woo, C.K.; Horii, Brian; Chait, Michele; DeBenedictis, Andrew

    2010-04-15

    The electricity industry is facing the challenge of increasing costs of reliably meeting demand growth and fully complying with legislative renewable portfolio standards and greenhouse gas reduction targets. However, an electric utility's existing tariffs often don't have rates that increase with consumption volume or vary by time of use, thus not fully exploiting the potential benefits from customer conservation and load shifting. (author)

  17. Fractal tiles associated with shift radix systems.

    PubMed

    Berthé, Valérie; Siegel, Anne; Steiner, Wolfgang; Surer, Paul; Thuswaldner, Jörg M

    2011-01-15

    Shift radix systems form a collection of dynamical systems depending on a parameter r which varies in the d-dimensional real vector space. They generalize well-known numeration systems such as beta-expansions, expansions with respect to rational bases, and canonical number systems. Beta-numeration and canonical number systems are known to be intimately related to fractal shapes, such as the classical Rauzy fractal and the twin dragon. These fractals turned out to be important for studying properties of expansions in several settings. In the present paper we associate a collection of fractal tiles with shift radix systems. We show that for certain classes of parameters r these tiles coincide with affine copies of the well-known tiles associated with beta-expansions and canonical number systems. On the other hand, these tiles provide natural families of tiles for beta-expansions with (non-unit) Pisot numbers as well as canonical number systems with (non-monic) expanding polynomials. We also prove basic properties for tiles associated with shift radix systems. Indeed, we prove that under some algebraic conditions on the parameter r of the shift radix system, these tiles provide multiple tilings and even tilings of the d-dimensional real vector space. These tilings turn out to have a more complicated structure than the tilings arising from the known number systems mentioned above. Such a tiling may consist of tiles having infinitely many different shapes. Moreover, the tiles need not be self-affine (or graph directed self-affine). PMID:24068835

  18. Exploring Insight: Focus on Shifts of Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palatnik, Alik; Koichu, Boris

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents and analyses a sequence of events that preceded an insight solution to a challenging problem in the context of numerical sequences. A three­week long solution process by a pair of ninth­-grade students is analysed by means of the theory of shifts of attention. The goal for this article is to reveal the potential of this theory…

  19. Written Language Shift among Norwegian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Özerk, Kamil; Todal, Jon

    2013-01-01

    In Norway there are two written Norwegian languages, Bokmâl and Nynorsk. Of these two written languages Bokmâl is being used by the majority of the people, and Bokmâl has the highest prestige in the society. This article is about the shift of written language from Nynorsk to Bokmâl among young people in a traditional Nynorsk district in the…

  20. A fast Josephson SFQ shift register

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, F.; Whiteley, S.R.; Faris, S.M.

    1989-03-01

    A novel Josephson shift register has been designed and fabricated. The main data latch is DC biased; the data storage is accomplished through the transfer of a single flux quantum in or out of a SQUID superconducting loop. A two-phase sinusoidal clock with offset is used to operate the circuit. Simulations verify that the operating frequency can go beyond 70 GHz, with operating margins exceeding 20%. Preliminary measurements indicate that the circuit operates as intended.

  1. Frontal Sinus Fractures: A Conservative Shift

    PubMed Central

    Weathers, William M.; Wolfswinkel, Erik M.; Hatef, Daniel A.; Lee, Edward I.; Brown, Rodger H.; Hollier, Larry H.

    2013-01-01

    This article reflects on the changing management of frontal sinus fractures. Severity of these injuries has decreased tremendously since the universal adoption of seat belts and air bags. Recently, there has been a shift from aggressive surgical management to more conservative management strategies, some forgoing surgery all together. New technologies, such as bioabsorbable plates and endoscopic sinus surgery, are leading the way in improved surgical management strategies and offer promising alternatives to the more traditional approaches. PMID:24436753

  2. Collisionally induced atomic clock shifts and correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Band, Y. B.; Osherov, I.

    2011-07-15

    We develop a formalism to incorporate exchange symmetry considerations into the calculation of collisional frequency shifts for atomic clocks using a density-matrix formalism. The formalism is developed for both fermionic and bosonic atomic clocks. Numerical results for a finite-temperature {sup 87}Sr {sup 1}S{sub 0} (F=9/2) atomic clock in a magic wavelength optical lattice are presented.

  3. Promoting Global Health

    PubMed Central

    Winker, Margaret A.; Ferris, Lorraine E.

    2015-01-01

    The Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of MCH and AIDS (IJMA) is a member of the World Association of Medical Editors (WAME). The Editorial Board of IJMA believes it is important that the statement on promoting global health and this accompanying editorial is brought to the attention of our readers. Medical journal editors have a social responsibility to promote global health by publishing, whenever possible, research that furthers health worldwide.

  4. Microscopic Theory of the Knight Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Bianca

    2015-03-01

    The Knight shift has been used for detecting possible parallel spin states, such as Sr2RuO4. However an improved theory of the Knight shift is needed to explain anomalies that have been found in a variety of superconductors below the superconducting transition temperature. The standard model includes the Zeeman and hyperfine interactions of the magnetic field and the electron-electron pairing interaction necessary for superconductivity. The new model now includes a term based on the Anderson model of local moments in metals. The local electron states in the original Anderson model now correspond to local atomic electron orbitals. When these orbital energies are singly occupied and close to the Fermi energy, the spins of the electrons can interact with the nuclear spins and the spins of the electrons in the conducting bands. Additionally, the paths of the electrons in the conduction bands depend on the direction and magnitude of the magnetic induction. With these new terms included, this model has the potential to describe the anomalous behavior seen in Knight shift measurements on unconventional superconductors.

  5. Semi-Supervised Kernel Mean Shift Clustering.

    PubMed

    Anand, Saket; Mittal, Sushil; Tuzel, Oncel; Meer, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Mean shift clustering is a powerful nonparametric technique that does not require prior knowledge of the number of clusters and does not constrain the shape of the clusters. However, being completely unsupervised, its performance suffers when the original distance metric fails to capture the underlying cluster structure. Despite recent advances in semi-supervised clustering methods, there has been little effort towards incorporating supervision into mean shift. We propose a semi-supervised framework for kernel mean shift clustering (SKMS) that uses only pairwise constraints to guide the clustering procedure. The points are first mapped to a high-dimensional kernel space where the constraints are imposed by a linear transformation of the mapped points. This is achieved by modifying the initial kernel matrix by minimizing a log det divergence-based objective function. We show the advantages of SKMS by evaluating its performance on various synthetic and real datasets while comparing with state-of-the-art semi-supervised clustering algorithms. PMID:26353281

  6. Set Shifting Training with Categorization Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Soveri, Anna; Waris, Otto; Laine, Matti

    2013-01-01

    The very few cognitive training studies targeting an important executive function, set shifting, have reported performance improvements that also generalized to untrained tasks. The present randomized controlled trial extends set shifting training research by comparing previously used cued training with uncued training. A computerized adaptation of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test was utilized as the training task in a pretest-posttest experimental design involving three groups of university students. One group received uncued training (n = 14), another received cued training (n = 14) and the control group (n = 14) only participated in pre- and posttests. The uncued training group showed posttraining performance increases on their training task, but neither training group showed statistically significant transfer effects. Nevertheless, comparison of effect sizes for transfer effects indicated that our results did not differ significantly from the previous studies. Our results suggest that the cognitive effects of computerized set shifting training are mostly task-specific, and would preclude any robust generalization effects with this training. PMID:24324717

  7. Set shifting training with categorization tasks.

    PubMed

    Soveri, Anna; Waris, Otto; Laine, Matti

    2013-01-01

    The very few cognitive training studies targeting an important executive function, set shifting, have reported performance improvements that also generalized to untrained tasks. The present randomized controlled trial extends set shifting training research by comparing previously used cued training with uncued training. A computerized adaptation of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test was utilized as the training task in a pretest-posttest experimental design involving three groups of university students. One group received uncued training (n = 14), another received cued training (n = 14) and the control group (n = 14) only participated in pre- and posttests. The uncued training group showed posttraining performance increases on their training task, but neither training group showed statistically significant transfer effects. Nevertheless, comparison of effect sizes for transfer effects indicated that our results did not differ significantly from the previous studies. Our results suggest that the cognitive effects of computerized set shifting training are mostly task-specific, and would preclude any robust generalization effects with this training. PMID:24324717

  8. Experience with the shift technical advisor position

    SciTech Connect

    Melber, B.D.; Olson, J.; Schreiber, R.E.; Winges, L.

    1984-03-01

    The provision of engineering expertise on shift at commercial nuclear power plants has mainly taken the form of the Shift Technical Advisor (STA). This person, acting in a capacity that is part engineer and part operator, is expected to advise the operations crew in the event of an emergency and review plant operating experience during normal circumstances. The position was mandated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission following the incident at Three Mile Island. This report expands on a growing body of knowledge regarding the effectiveness of the STA. The new data presented here come from interviews with plant personnel and utility officials from nine sites. Researchers from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) interviewed plant personnel, including the STA and immediate management, the shift supervisor and management, the training department, and ancillary staff, all of whom affect the intended performance of the STA. The conclusions of the report are that the design of the STA position results in limited contribution during emergencies; more comprehensive ways should be sought to provide the variety and specificity of engineering expertise needed during such times.

  9. Bashful Ballerina: Southward shifted Heliospheric Current Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mursula, K.; Hiltula, T.

    It is known since long (Rosenberg and Coleman, 1969) that one of the two sectors of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) observed at the Earth's orbit dominates at high heliographic latitudes during solar minimum times, reflecting the poloidal structure of the global solar magnetic field at these times. Here we find that while this latitudinal variation of the dominant IMF sector around the solar equator is valid for both solar hemispheres during the last four solar minima covered by direct observations, it is systematically more strongly developed in the northern heliographic hemisphere. This implies that the average heliospheric current sheet is shifted or coned southward during solar minimum times, suggesting that the temporary southward shift of the heliosheet found earlier by Ulysses observations in 1995 is a persistent pattern. This also implies that the open solar magnetic field is north-south asymmetric at these times, suggesting that the solar dynamo has an asymmetric component. Accordingly, the Sun with the heliosheet is like a bashful ballerina who is repeatedly trying to push her excessively high flaring skirt downward. However, the effective shift at 1 AU is only a few degrees, allowing the Rosenberg-Coleman rule to be valid, on an average, in both hemispheres during solar minima.

  10. Bashful ballerina: Southward shifted heliospheric current sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mursula, K.; Hiltula, T.

    2003-11-01

    It is known since long [Rosenberg and Coleman, 1969] that one of the two sectors of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) observed at the Earth's orbit dominates at high heliographic latitudes during solar minimum times, reflecting the poloidal structure of the global solar magnetic field at these times. Here we find that while this latitudinal variation of the dominant IMF sector around the solar equator is valid for both solar hemispheres during the last four solar minima covered by direct observations, it is systematically more strongly developed in the northern heliographic hemisphere. This implies that the average heliospheric current sheet is shifted or coned southward during solar minimum times, suggesting that the temporary southward shift of the heliosheet found earlier by Ulysses observations in 1995 is a persistent pattern. This also implies that the open solar magnetic field is north-south asymmetric at these times, suggesting that the solar dynamo has an asymmetric component. Accordingly, the Sun with the heliosheet is like a bashful ballerina who is repeatedly trying to push her excessively high flaring skirt downward. However, the effective shift at 1 AU is only a few degrees, allowing the Rosenberg-Coleman rule to be valid, on an average, in both hemispheres during solar minima.

  11. Photonic downconversion with tunable wideband phase shift.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tianwei; Yu, Song; Wu, Ruihuan; Wang, Dongsheng; Gu, Wanyi

    2016-06-01

    A microwave photonic frequency downconversion system with wideband and continuous phase-shift function is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In the proposed system, a radio frequency (RF) and a local oscillator (LO) signal drive two arms of a dual-drive Mach-Zehnder modulator (DMZM). A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is used for reflecting the first-order sidebands of both RF and LO signals. Due to phase independence between RF and LO optical sidebands, the phase-shifting operation for an output intermediate frequency (IF) signal can be implemented either by adjusting the bias voltage of DMZM or by controlling the optical wavelength of laser. Experimental results demonstrate a full 0° to 360° phase shift, while an RF signal between 12 GHz to 20 GHz is downconverted to IFs below 4 GHz. The phase deviation is measured less than 2°, and the fluctuation of magnitude response is measured less than ±1  dB over a wideband frequency range. PMID:27244434

  12. Leaf morphology shift linked to climate change

    PubMed Central

    Guerin, Greg R.; Wen, Haixia; Lowe, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Climate change is driving adaptive shifts within species, but research on plants has been focused on phenology. Leaf morphology has demonstrated links with climate and varies within species along climate gradients. We predicted that, given within-species variation along a climate gradient, a morphological shift should have occurred over time due to climate change. We tested this prediction, taking advantage of latitudinal and altitudinal variations within the Adelaide Geosyncline region, South Australia, historical herbarium specimens (n = 255) and field sampling (n = 274). Leaf width in the study taxon, Dodonaea viscosa subsp. angustissima, was negatively correlated with latitude regionally, and leaf area was negatively correlated with altitude locally. Analysis of herbarium specimens revealed a 2 mm decrease in leaf width (total range 1–9 mm) over 127 years across the region. The results are consistent with a morphological response to contemporary climate change. We conclude that leaf width is linked to maximum temperature regionally (latitude gradient) and leaf area to minimum temperature locally (altitude gradient). These data indicate a morphological shift consistent with a direct response to climate change and could inform provenance selection for restoration with further investigation of the genetic basis and adaptive significance of observed variation. PMID:22764114

  13. A phenomenological view of language shift.

    PubMed

    Tsitsipis, Lukas D

    2004-01-01

    Sociolinguistic studies of language shift have in their majority framed their research object in a horizon of theoretically received variables such as class, ethnicity, locality, attitudes etc. In spite of a limited usefulness of such conceptual variables, and of a recently emerging focus on agency, negotiation, and praxis the best results we obtain have not questioned in a coherent and theoretically sound manner the continuing hegemony of mechanistic-metaphorical models (language death, language suicide). In this paper I propose to examine language shift as a multifaceted phenomenon, joining in this respect work by other linguistic anthropologists researching similar areas. I specifically argue that by replacing vertical concepts such as age and generation, and dichotomous logics such as center and periphery with phenomenologically inspired concepts such as typifications, consociateship, contemporariness, and stream of consciousness we are in a better position to generalize about language shift dynamics. Data for this work is derived primarily from the Albanian speech communities of modern Greece, but also from other communities for comparative purposes. PMID:15156728

  14. Health promotion in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ivo de Carvalho, Antonio; Westphal, Marcia Faria; Pereira Lima, Vera Lucia Góes

    2007-01-01

    Brazil, a Latin American country of continental proportions and contrasts, demographic inequalities, and social inequities, concomitantly faces the challenge of preventing and controlling infectious diseases, injuries, and non-communicable diseases. The loss of strength of the biomedical paradigm, the change in epidemiological profile, and the sociopolitical and cultural challenges of recent decades have fostered the emergence of new formulations about public health thinking and practice. Among them, are the paradigms of Brazilian Collective Health and Health Promotion. The former provides philosophical support for Brazil's Unified Health System (SUS). The aim of this article is to discuss the development of public health within the country's history, and to analyze and compare the theoretical assumptions of Health Promotion and Collective Health. We conclude that health promotion, based on the principles and values disseminated by the international Charters and concerned with social actors and social determinants of the health-disease process, has significant potential to promote the improvement of living and health conditions of the population. This frame of reference guided the formulation of the National Policy of Health Promotion within the Unified Health System, which was institutionalized by a ministerial decree. The importance and application of evaluating the effectiveness of health promotion processes and methodologies in Brazil have been guided by various frames of reference, which we clarify in this article through describing historical processes. PMID:17596091

  15. Experimental Perturbations Modify the Performance of Early Warning Indicators of Regime Shift.

    PubMed

    Benedetti-Cecchi, Lisandro; Tamburello, Laura; Maggi, Elena; Bulleri, Fabio

    2015-07-20

    Ecosystems may shift abruptly between alternative states in response to environmental perturbations. Early warning indicators have been proposed to anticipate such regime shifts, but experimental field tests of their validity are rare. We exposed rocky intertidal algal canopies to a gradient of press perturbations and recorded the response of associated assemblages over 7 years. Reduced cover and biomass of algal canopies promoted the invasion of algal turfs, driving understory assemblages toward collapse upon total canopy removal. A dynamic model indicated the existence of a critical threshold separating the canopy- and turf-dominated states. We evaluated common indicators of regime shift as the system approached the threshold, including autocorrelation, SD, and skewness. These indicators captured changes in understory cover due to colonization of algal turfs. All indicators increased significantly as the system approached the critical threshold, in agreement with theoretical predictions. The performance of indicators changed when we superimposed a pulse disturbance on the press perturbation that amplified environmental noise. This treatment caused several experimental units to switch repeatedly between the canopy- and the turf-dominated state, resulting in a significant increase in overall variance of understory cover, a negligible effect on skewness and no effect on autocorrelation. Power analysis indicated that autocorrelation and SD were better suited at anticipating a regime shift under mild and strong fluctuations of the state variable, respectively. Our results suggest that regime shifts may be anticipated under a broad range of fluctuating conditions using the appropriate indicator. PMID:26166776

  16. White matter shifts in MRI: Rehabilitating the Lorentz sphere in magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbara, Thomas M.

    2016-09-01

    A thorough exposition and analysis of the role of the Lorentz sphere in magnetic resonance is presented from the fundamental standpoint of macroscopic magnetostatics. The analysis will be useful to those interested in understanding susceptibility and chemical shift contributions to frequency shifts in magnetic resonance. Though the topic is mature, recent research on white matter shifts in the brain promotes the notion of replacing the Lorentz sphere with a generalized Lorentzian cylinder, and has put into question the long standing spherical approach when elongated structures are present. The cavity shape issue can be resolved by applying Helmholtz's theorem, which can be expressed in a differential and an integral formulation. The general validity of the Lorentz sphere for any situation is confirmed. Furthermore, a clear exposition of the "generalized approach" is offered, using the language of Lorentz's theory. With the rehabilitation of the Lorentz sphere settled, one must consider alternative contributions to white matter shifts and a likely candidate is the effect of molecular environment on chemical shifts.

  17. Pterandra pyroidea: a case of pollination shift within Neotropical Malpighiaceae

    PubMed Central

    Cappellari, Simone C.; Haleem, Muhammad A.; Marsaioli, Anita J.; Tidon, Rosana; Simpson, Beryl B.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Most Neotropical species of Malpighiaceae produce floral fatty oils in calyx glands to attract pollinating oil-collecting bees, which depend on this resource for reproduction. This specialized type of pollination system tends to be lost in members of the family that occur outside the geographic distribution (e.g. Africa) of Neotropical oil-collecting bees. This study focused on the pollination ecology, chemical ecology and reproductive biology of an oil flower species, Pterandra pyroidea (Malpighiaceae) from the Brazilian Cerrado. Populations of this species consist of plants with oil-secreting (glandular) flowers, plants with non-oil-secreting flowers (eglandular) or a mix of both plant types. This study specifically aims to clarify the role of eglandular morphs in this species. Methods Data on pollinators were recorded by in situ observations. Breeding system experiments were conducted by isolating inflorescences and by enzymatic reactions. Floral resources, pollen and floral oils offered by this species were analysed by staining and a combination of various spectroscopic methods. Key Results Eglandular flowers of P. pyroidea do not act as mimics of their oil-producing conspecifics to attract pollinators. Instead, both oil-producing and oil-free flowers depend on pollen-collecting bees for reproduction, and their main pollinators are bumble-bees. Floral oils produced by glandular flowers are less complex than those described in closely related genera. Conclusions Eglandular flowers represent a shift in the pollination system in which oil is being lost and pollen is becoming the main reward of P. pyroidea flowers. Pollination shifts of this kind have hitherto not been demonstrated empirically within Neotropical Malpighiaceae and this species exhibits an unusual transition from a specialized towards a generalized pollination system in an area considered the hotspot of oil-collecting bee diversity in the Neotropics. Transitions of this type

  18. Ontogenetic shifts in trait-mediated mechanisms of plant community assembly.

    PubMed

    Lasky, Jesse R; Bachelot, Bénédicte; Muscarella, Robert; Schwartz, Naomi; Forero-Montaña, Jimena; Nytch, Christopher J; Swenson, Nathan G; Thompson, Jill; Zimmerman, Jess K; Uriarte, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Identifying the processes that maintain highly diverse plant communities remains a central goal in ecology. Species variation in growth and survival rates across ontogeny, represented by tree size classes and life history stage-specific niche partitioning, are potentially important mechanisms for promoting forest diversity. However, the role of ontogeny in mediating competitive dynamics and promoting functional diversity is not well understood, particular in high-diversity systems such as tropical forests. The interaction between interspecific functional trait variation and ontogenetic shifts in competitive dynamics may yield insights into the ecophysiological mechanisms promoting community diversity. We investigated how functional trait (seed size, maximum height, SLA, leaf N, and wood density) associations with growth, survival, and response to competing neighbors differ among seedlings and two size classes of trees in a subtropical rain forest in Puerto Rico. We used a hierarchical Bayes model of diameter growth and survival to infer trait relationships with ontogenetic change in competitive dynamics. Traits were more strongly associated with average growth and survival than with neighborhood interactions, and were highly consistent across ontogeny for most traits. The associations between trait values and tree responses to crowding by neighbors showed significant shifts as trees grew. Large trees exhibited greater growth as the difference in species trait values among neighbors increased, suggesting trait-associated niche partitioning was important for the largest size class. Our results identify potential axes of niche partitioning and performance-equalizing functional trade-offs across ontogeny, promoting species coexistence in this diverse forest community. PMID:26405741

  19. Regime shifts in the anthropocene: drivers, risks, and resilience.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Juan Carlos; Peterson, Garry D; Biggs, Reinette

    2015-01-01

    Many ecosystems can experience regime shifts: surprising, large and persistent changes in the function and structure of ecosystems. Assessing whether continued global change will lead to further regime shifts, or has the potential to trigger cascading regime shifts has been a central question in global change policy. Addressing this issue has, however, been hampered by the focus of regime shift research on specific cases and types of regime shifts. To systematically assess the global risk of regime shifts we conducted a comparative analysis of 25 generic types of regime shifts across marine, terrestrial and polar systems; identifying their drivers, and impacts on ecosystem services. Our results show that the drivers of regime shifts are diverse and co-occur strongly, which suggests that continued global change can be expected to synchronously increase the risk of multiple regime shifts. Furthermore, many regime shift drivers are related to climate change and food production, whose links to the continued expansion of human activities makes them difficult to limit. Because many regime shifts can amplify the drivers of other regime shifts, continued global change can also be expected to increase the risk of cascading regime shifts. Nevertheless, the variety of scales at which regime shift drivers operate provides opportunities for reducing the risk of many types of regime shifts by addressing local or regional drivers, even in the absence of rapid reduction of global drivers. PMID:26267896

  20. Regime Shifts in the Anthropocene: Drivers, Risks, and Resilience

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Juan Carlos; Peterson, Garry D.; Biggs, Reinette

    2015-01-01

    Many ecosystems can experience regime shifts: surprising, large and persistent changes in the function and structure of ecosystems. Assessing whether continued global change will lead to further regime shifts, or has the potential to trigger cascading regime shifts has been a central question in global change policy. Addressing this issue has, however, been hampered by the focus of regime shift research on specific cases and types of regime shifts. To systematically assess the global risk of regime shifts we conducted a comparative analysis of 25 generic types of regime shifts across marine, terrestrial and polar systems; identifying their drivers, and impacts on ecosystem services. Our results show that the drivers of regime shifts are diverse and co-occur strongly, which suggests that continued global change can be expected to synchronously increase the risk of multiple regime shifts. Furthermore, many regime shift drivers are related to climate change and food production, whose links to the continued expansion of human activities makes them difficult to limit. Because many regime shifts can amplify the drivers of other regime shifts, continued global change can also be expected to increase the risk of cascading regime shifts. Nevertheless, the variety of scales at which regime shift drivers operate provides opportunities for reducing the risk of many types of regime shifts by addressing local or regional drivers, even in the absence of rapid reduction of global drivers. PMID:26267896

  1. Aligning work and circadian time in shift workers improves sleep and reduces circadian disruption.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Céline; Fischer, Dorothee; Matera, Joana L; Roenneberg, Till

    2015-03-30

    Sleep loss and circadian disruption-a state of misalignment between physiological functions and imposed sleep/wake behavior-supposedly play central roles in the etiology of shift work-related pathologies [1-4]. Circadian entrainment is, however, highly individual [5], resulting in different chronotypes [6, 7]. Chronotype in turn modulates the effects of working times: compared to late chronotypes, earlier ones sleep worse and shorter and show higher levels of circadian misalignment during night shifts, while late types experience more sleep and circadian disruption than early types when working morning shifts [8]. To promote sleep and reduce the mismatch between circadian and working time, we implemented a chronotype-adjusted (CTA) shift schedule in a factory. We abolished the most strenuous shifts for extreme chronotypes (i.e., mornings for late chronotypes, nights for early ones) and examined whether sleep duration and quality, social jetlag [9, 10], wellbeing, subjective stress perception, and satisfaction with leisure time improved in this schedule. Intermediate chronotypes (quartiles 2 and 3) served as a control group, still working morning (6:00-14:00), evening (14:00-22:00), and night (22:00-6:00) shifts, with two strenuous shifts (out of twelve per month) replaced by evening ones. We observed a significant increase of self-reported sleep duration and quality, along with increased wellbeing ratings on workdays among extreme chronotypes. The CTA schedule reduced overall social jetlag by 1 hr, did not alter stress levels, and increased satisfaction with leisure time (early types only). Chronotype-based schedules thus can reduce circadian disruption and improve sleep; potential long-term effects on health and economic indicators need to be elucidated in future studies. PMID:25772446

  2. Drought-induced vegetation shifts in terrestrial ecosystems: The key role of regeneration dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi; Lloret, Francisco

    2016-09-01

    Ongoing climate change is modifying climatic conditions worldwide, with a trend towards drier conditions in most regions. Vegetation will respond to these changes, eventually adjusting to the new climate. It is unclear, however, how close different ecosystems are to climate-related tipping points and, thus, how dramatic these vegetation changes will be in the short- to mid-term, given the existence of strong stabilizing processes. Here, we review the published evidence for recent drought-induced vegetation shifts worldwide, addressing the following questions: (i) what are the necessary conditions for vegetation shifts to occur? (ii) How much evidence of drought-induced vegetation shifts do we have at present and where are they occurring? (iii) What are the main processes that favor/oppose the occurrence of shifts at different ecological scales? (iv) What are the complications in detecting and attributing drought-induced vegetation shifts? (v) What ecological factors can interact with drought to promote shifts or stability? We propose a demographic framework to classify the likely outcome of instances of drought-induced mortality, based upon the survival of adults of potential replacement species and the regeneration of both formerly dominant affected species and potential replacement species. Out of 35 selected case studies only eight were clearly consistent with the occurrence of a vegetation shift (species or biome shift), whereas three corresponded to self-replacements in which the affected, formerly dominant species was able to regenerate after suffering drought-induced mortality. The other 24 cases were classified as uncertain, either due to lack of information or, more commonly, because the initially affected and potential replacement species all showed similar levels of regeneration after the mortality event. Overall, potential vegetation transitions were consistent with more drought-resistant species replacing less resistant ones. However, almost half (44

  3. Ecohydrology by thinking outside the bog: Shifting paradigms in an era of shifting peatland ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waddington, James; Moore, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Large shifts in vegetation distributions are occurring worldwide and at unprecedented rates. The most extreme of these regime shifts are expected to occur at ecosystem boundaries of both semi-arid and semi-humid landscapes. Despite extensive hydrological research on the interactions between water and semi-arid ecosystems, research in peatlands on the wet end of ecosystem continuum has been "bogged down" (pun fully intended) by the traditional conceptual models (paradigms?) of peatland hydrology and ecology. The consequences of this "thinking" are large given that northern peatlands provide important global and regional ecosystem services (carbon storage, water storage, and biodiversity). This is especially true because peatlands face increases in the severity, areal extent, and frequency of climate-mediated (e.g., wildfire, drought) and land-use change (e.g., drainage, flooding, and mining) disturbances placing the future security of these critical ecosystem services in doubt. We use the word doubt because while numerical modelling studies predict peatland regime shifts and the demise of global peat stocks, there is growing evidence that peatlands are self-regulating ecosystems dominated by negative ecohydrological feedbacks that stabilize the aforementioned ecosystem services through high ecosystem resilience to disturbance. This raises several important hydrological questions? "Is there field evidence of peatland regime shifts? If so, what are the potential impacts of these shifts on water resources and watershed management? If not, are researchers actually looking in the right places (or times)? In this presentation we explore the need for a "thinking outside the bog" in order to understand the ecohydrological consequences of transformative landscape change caused by peatland regime shifts. With reference to over two decades of field research, recent advances with our Peatland Hydrological Impacts model and recent research examining primary peat formation, we

  4. Microbial shifts associated with necrotic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Antonissen, Gunther; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Van Driessche, Karolien; Onrust, Lonneke; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Moore, Robert J; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2016-06-01

    An outbreak of necrotic enteritis (NE) is a complex process requiring one or a number of predisposing factors rather than just the presence of pathogenic Clostridium perfringens. Examples are dietary influences, such as high levels of non-starch polysaccharides and fishmeal, and factors that evoke epithelial cell damage, such as Fusarium mycotoxins in feed and Eimeria infections. Recent studies have shown that different predisposing factors induce similar shifts in the intestinal microbiota composition. Butyrate-producing-strains of the Ruminococcaceae family are decreased in abundance by both fishmeal and Eimeria. Similarly, a decreased abundance of butyrate-producing-strains belonging to the Lachnospiraceae family has been induced by fishmeal. Also shifts are observed in the lactic acid-producing bacteria, such as decreased abundance of Lactobacillus johnsonii or Weissella confusa, when broilers were fed a fishmeal-based diet or a Fusarium mycotoxin contaminated diet. Finally, the abundance of Candidatus Savagella was decreased in broilers following Eimeria challenge or feeding a fumonisins contaminated diet. The nature of the microbiota shifts indicate that immune modulatory actions of the intestinal microbiota may play a critical role in the effect on the necrosis inducing activity of C. perfringens. Indeed, colonization with butyrate-producing bacteria plays a key role in counteracting inflammation in the gut and preserving intestinal integrity, while Candidatus Savagella is involved in stimulating Th17 and immunoglobulin A responses. Lactic acid bacteria stimulate colonization of lactate-utilizing and butyrate-producing Lachnospiraceae. Future research needs to clarify the role of the microbiota changes in the pathogenesis of NE. PMID:26950294

  5. Interferometric fiber Bragg grating shift demodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepien, Karol; Jóźwik, Michalina; Nasilowski, Tomasz

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present a fiber Bragg grating shift demodulator with changeable resolution based on an unbalanced fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Preliminary research proves phase sensitivity to Bragg wavelength changes of 6,83 rad/mɛ. Phase sensitivity can be modified by changing the optical path difference witch is only limited by the coherence length of light reflected by the fiber Bragg grating. This solution can be used as a single sensor or as a part of a more complex system.

  6. A tentative explanation of cosmological red shift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, T.; Torr, D. G.

    1990-01-01

    The authors suggest a possible alternative explanation of cosmological red shift. They consider that there exists a background field in the universe, and that light (the photon) has an extremely weak interaction with this background, and as result, experiences an energy loss. By analogy with damped oscillations, the authors introduce a dumping term with the first derivative with respect to time in the wave equation. The solution yields a linearly reduced frequency of the light with travel distance. The purpose of this exercise is to demonstrate how a simple alternative interpretation of the Hubble relation can be generated.

  7. Scaling Shift in Multicracked Fiber Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manca, Fabio; Giordano, Stefano; Palla, Pier Luca; Cleri, Fabrizio

    2014-12-01

    Bundles of fibers, wires, or filaments are ubiquitous structures in both natural and artificial materials. We investigate the bundle degradation induced by an external damaging action through a theoretical model describing an assembly of parallel fibers, progressively damaged by a random population of cracks. Fibers in our model interact by means of a lateral linear coupling, thus retaining structural integrity even after substantial damage. Monte Carlo simulations of the Young's modulus degradation for increasing crack density demonstrate a remarkable scaling shift between an exponential and a power-law regime. Analytical solutions of the model confirm this behavior, and provide a thorough understanding of the underlying physics.

  8. Scaling shift in multicracked fiber bundles.

    PubMed

    Manca, Fabio; Giordano, Stefano; Palla, Pier Luca; Cleri, Fabrizio

    2014-12-19

    Bundles of fibers, wires, or filaments are ubiquitous structures in both natural and artificial materials. We investigate the bundle degradation induced by an external damaging action through a theoretical model describing an assembly of parallel fibers, progressively damaged by a random population of cracks. Fibers in our model interact by means of a lateral linear coupling, thus retaining structural integrity even after substantial damage. Monte Carlo simulations of the Young's modulus degradation for increasing crack density demonstrate a remarkable scaling shift between an exponential and a power-law regime. Analytical solutions of the model confirm this behavior, and provide a thorough understanding of the underlying physics. PMID:25554893

  9. Ambiguity produces attention shifts in category learning.

    PubMed

    Vadillo, Miguel A; Orgaz, Cristina; Luque, David; Nelson, James Byron

    2016-04-01

    It has been suggested that people and nonhuman animals protect their knowledge from interference by shifting attention toward the context when presented with information that contradicts their previous beliefs. Despite that suggestion, no studies have directly measured changes in attention while participants are exposed to an interference treatment. In the present experiments, we adapted a dot-probe task to track participants' attention to cues and contexts while they were completing a simple category learning task. The results support the hypothesis that interference produces a change in the allocation of attention to cues and contexts. PMID:26980780

  10. Solar Doppler shifts - Sources of continuous spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Harvey, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    Oscillation observations can be used to study nonoscillatory solar phenomena that exhibit Doppler shifts. The paper discusses several effects of these phenomena and their associated temporal and spatial power spectra: (1) they limit the signal-to-noise ratio and sometimes detectability of oscillation modes; (2) there is the potential for better understanding and/or detection of solar phenomena; (3) large-scale convection may spatially modulate oscillation modes, leading to a continuous background spectrum; and (4) in regions of the spectrum where the resolution to separate modes is lacking one can determine upper limits for the integrated effects of modes.

  11. Polarization phase shifting dispersed fringe sensor.

    PubMed

    Olczak, Gene

    2012-02-13

    The dispersed fringe sensor (DFS) has been demonstrated as an effective means of measuring mirror segment piston error for telescopes with primary mirror apertures below 10 meters. With larger proposed telescopes such as The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) and The European Large Telescope (ELT) including ever more segments, there is a need for improvement in the co-phasing capability for segmented primary mirrors. In this paper a novel DFS that employs polarization phase shifting technology is introduced. This novel technology provides system designers and engineers with a new tool to extend the dynamic range of a DFS. PMID:22418128

  12. The Spectral Shift Function and Spectral Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azamov, N. A.; Carey, A. L.; Sukochev, F. A.

    2007-11-01

    At the 1974 International Congress, I. M. Singer proposed that eta invariants and hence spectral flow should be thought of as the integral of a one form. In the intervening years this idea has lead to many interesting developments in the study of both eta invariants and spectral flow. Using ideas of [24] Singer’s proposal was brought to an advanced level in [16] where a very general formula for spectral flow as the integral of a one form was produced in the framework of noncommutative geometry. This formula can be used for computing spectral flow in a general semifinite von Neumann algebra as described and reviewed in [5]. In the present paper we take the analytic approach to spectral flow much further by giving a large family of formulae for spectral flow between a pair of unbounded self-adjoint operators D and D + V with D having compact resolvent belonging to a general semifinite von Neumann algebra {mathcal{N}} and the perturbation V in {mathcal{N}} . In noncommutative geometry terms we remove summability hypotheses. This level of generality is made possible by introducing a new idea from [3]. There it was observed that M. G. Krein’s spectral shift function (in certain restricted cases with V trace class) computes spectral flow. The present paper extends Krein’s theory to the setting of semifinite spectral triples where D has compact resolvent belonging to {mathcal{N}} and V is any bounded self-adjoint operator in {mathcal{N}} . We give a definition of the spectral shift function under these hypotheses and show that it computes spectral flow. This is made possible by the understanding discovered in the present paper of the interplay between spectral shift function theory and the analytic theory of spectral flow. It is this interplay that enables us to take Singer’s idea much further to create a large class of one forms whose integrals calculate spectral flow. These advances depend critically on a new approach to the calculus of functions of non

  13. Resonance-shifting luminescent solar concentrators

    SciTech Connect

    Giebink, Noel Christopher; Wiederrecht, Gary P; Wasielewski, Michael R

    2014-09-23

    An optical system and method to overcome luminescent solar concentrator inefficiencies by resonance-shifting, in which sharply directed emission from a bi-layer cavity into a glass substrate returns to interact with the cavity off-resonance at each subsequent reflection, significantly reducing reabsorption loss en route to the edges. In one embodiment, the system comprises a luminescent solar concentrator comprising a transparent substrate, a luminescent film having a variable thickness; and a low refractive index layer disposed between the transparent substrate and the luminescent film.

  14. Pendulum Shifts, Context, Error, and Personal Accountability

    SciTech Connect

    Harold Blackman; Oren Hester

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes a series of tools that were developed to achieve a balance in under-standing LOWs and the human component of events (including accountability) as the INL continues its shift to a learning culture where people report, are accountable and interested in making a positive difference - and want to report because information is handled correctly and the result benefits both the reporting individual and the organization. We present our model for understanding these interrelationships; the initiatives that were undertaken to improve overall performance.

  15. Reducing gain shifts in photomultiplier tubes

    DOEpatents

    Cohn, Charles E.

    1976-01-01

    A means is provided for reducing gain shifts in multiplier tubes due to varying event count rates. It includes means for limiting the number of cascaded, active dynodes of the multiplier tube to a predetermined number with the last of predetermined number of dynodes being the output terminal of the tube. This output is applied to an amplifier to make up for the gain sacrificed by not totally utilizing all available active stages of the tube. Further reduction is obtained by illuminating the predetermined number of dynodes with a light source of such intensity that noise appearing at the output dynode associated with the illumination is negligible.

  16. Automatic Detection of Attention Shifts in Infancy: Eye Tracking in the Fixation Shift Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Kulke, Louisa; Atkinson, Janette; Braddick, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    This study measured changes in switches of attention between 1 and 9 months of age in 67 typically developing infants. Remote eye-tracking (Tobii X120) was used to measure saccadic latencies, related to switches of fixation, as a measure of shifts of attention, from a central stimulus to a peripheral visual target, measured in the Fixation Shift Paradigm. Fixation shifts occur later if the central fixation stimulus stays visible when the peripheral target appears (competition condition), than if the central stimulus disappears as the peripheral target appears (non-competition condition). This difference decreases with age. Our results show significantly faster disengagement in infants over 4 months than in the younger group, and provide more precise measures of fixation shifts, than behavioural observation with the same paradigm. Reduced saccadic latencies in the course of a test session indicate a novel learning effect. The Fixation Shift Paradigm combined with remote eye-tracking measures showed improved temporal and spatial accuracy compared to direct observation by a trained observer, and allowed an increased number of trials in a short testing time. This makes it an infant-friendly non-invasive procedure, involving minimal observational training, suitable for use in future studies of clinical populations to detect early attentional abnormalities in the first few months of life. PMID:26625161

  17. Focus shift and process latitude of contact holes on attenuated phase-shifting masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Alfred K. K.; Ferguson, Richard A.; Martino, Ronald M.; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    1995-05-01

    Focus shift and process latitude of contact features on both dark-field and light-field attenuated phase-shifting masks and binary intensity masks were examined using experimentally measured aerial images from the Ziess MSM-100 with IBM AIMS software, the scalar and thin-mask approximation in SPLAT, and the rigorous electromagnetic simulator TEMPEST. The dark-field attenuated phase-shifting mask (aPSM) contact holes show the most severe amount of focus shift, although the shift is not much different from that of space openings. Exposure latitude of dark field aPSM features shows a 12% improvement (from 33% to 45%) over conventional binary intensity mask. Depth-of-focus is also improved. under biasing of the mask features can also improve the process latitude of dark-field masks, whereas the contrary is true for light-field mask features. In general, the process latitude of light-field contact features is worse than that of dark-field features, indicating the need for positive deep-UV photoresist technology.

  18. Wideband Doppler frequency shift measurement and direction ambiguity resolution using optical frequency shift and optical heterodyning.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bing; Pan, Wei; Zou, Xihua; Yan, Xianglei; Yan, Lianshan; Luo, Bin

    2015-05-15

    A photonic approach for both wideband Doppler frequency shift (DFS) measurement and direction ambiguity resolution is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In the proposed approach, a light wave from a laser diode is split into two paths. In one path, the DFS information is converted into an optical sideband close to the optical carrier by using two cascaded electro-optic modulators, while in the other path, the optical carrier is up-shifted by a specific value (e.g., from several MHz to hundreds of MHz) using an optical-frequency shift module. Then the optical signals from the two paths are combined and detected by a low-speed photodetector (PD), generating a low-frequency electronic signal. Through a subtraction between the specific optical frequency shift and the measured frequency of the low-frequency signal, the value of DFS is estimated from the derived absolute value, and the direction ambiguity is resolved from the derived sign (i.e., + or -). In the proof-of-concept experiments, DFSs from -90 to 90 kHz are successfully estimated for microwave signals at 10, 15, and 20 GHz, where the estimation errors are lower than ±60  Hz. The estimation errors can be further reduced via the use of a more stable optical frequency shift module. PMID:26393729

  19. How orbital angular momentum affects beam shifts in optical reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Merano, M.; Hermosa, N.; Woerdman, J. P.; Aiello, A.

    2010-08-15

    It is well known that reflection of a Gaussian light beam (TEM{sub 00}) by a planar dielectric interface leads to four beam shifts when compared to the geometrical-optics prediction. These are the spatial Goos-Haenchen (GH) shift, the angular GH shift, the spatial Imbert-Fedorov (IF) shift, and the angular IF shift. We report here, theoretically and experimentally, that endowing the beam with orbital angular momentum leads to coupling of these four shifts; this is described by a 4x4 mixing matrix.

  20. The generation of promoter-mediated transcriptional noise in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mitarai, Namiko; Dodd, Ian B; Crooks, Michael T; Sneppen, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Noise in the expression of a gene produces fluctuations in the concentration of the gene product. These fluctuations can interfere with optimal function or can be exploited to generate beneficial diversity between cells; gene expression noise is therefore expected to be subject to evolutionary pressure. Shifts between modes of high and low rates of transcription initiation at a promoter appear to contribute to this noise both in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. However, models invoked for eukaryotic promoter noise such as stable activation scaffolds or persistent nucleosome alterations seem unlikely to apply to prokaryotic promoters. We consider the relative importance of the steps required for transcription initiation. The 3-step transcription initiation model of McClure is extended into a mathematical model that can be used to predict consequences of additional promoter properties. We show in principle that the transcriptional bursting observed at an E. coli promoter by Golding et al. (2005) can be explained by stimulation of initiation by the negative supercoiling behind a transcribing RNA polymerase (RNAP) or by the formation of moribund or dead-end RNAP-promoter complexes. Both mechanisms are tunable by the alteration of promoter kinetics and therefore allow the optimization of promoter mediated noise. PMID:18617999

  1. Promoting Vaccine Confidence.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Vaccine hesitancy incorporates a wide range of parental attitudes and behaviors surrounding vaccines. Ironically, the very success of the immunization program has fueled vaccine concerns; because vaccine-preventable diseases are no longer prevalent, attention has shifted to the safety and necessity of vaccines themselves. This article reviews some of the underlying themes of vaccine hesitancy as well as specific vaccine safety concerns. Strategies for discussing vaccines with concerned parents are also discussed. PMID:26337737

  2. Dynamics of Ionic Shifts in Cortical Spreading Depression.

    PubMed

    Enger, Rune; Tang, Wannan; Vindedal, Gry Fluge; Jensen, Vidar; Johannes Helm, P; Sprengel, Rolf; Looger, Loren L; Nagelhus, Erlend A

    2015-11-01

    Cortical spreading depression is a slowly propagating wave of near-complete depolarization of brain cells followed by temporary suppression of neuronal activity. Accumulating evidence indicates that cortical spreading depression underlies the migraine aura and that similar waves promote tissue damage in stroke, trauma, and hemorrhage. Cortical spreading depression is characterized by neuronal swelling, profound elevation of extracellular potassium and glutamate, multiphasic blood flow changes, and drop in tissue oxygen tension. The slow speed of the cortical spreading depression wave implies that it is mediated by diffusion of a chemical substance, yet the identity of this substance and the pathway it follows are unknown. Intercellular spread between gap junction-coupled neurons or glial cells and interstitial diffusion of K(+) or glutamate have been proposed. Here we use extracellular direct current potential recordings, K(+)-sensitive microelectrodes, and 2-photon imaging with ultrasensitive Ca(2+) and glutamate fluorescent probes to elucidate the spatiotemporal dynamics of ionic shifts associated with the propagation of cortical spreading depression in the visual cortex of adult living mice. Our data argue against intercellular spread of Ca(2+) carrying the cortical spreading depression wavefront and are in favor of interstitial K(+) diffusion, rather than glutamate diffusion, as the leading event in cortical spreading depression. PMID:25840424

  3. Urban Stormwater Governance: The Need for a Paradigm Shift.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Krishna P; Chevalier, Lizette R

    2016-05-01

    Traditional urban stormwater management involves rapid removal of stormwater through centralized conveyance systems of curb-gutter-pipe networks. This results in many adverse impacts on the environment including hydrological disruption, groundwater depletion, downstream flooding, receiving water quality degradation, channel erosion, and stream ecosystem damage. In order to mitigate these adverse impacts, urban stormwater managers are increasingly using green infrastructure that promote on-site infiltration, restore hydrological functions of the landscape, and reduce surface runoff. Existing stormwater governance, however, is centralized and structured to support the conventional systems. This governance approach is not suited to the emerging distributed management approach, which involves multiple stakeholders including parcel owners, government agencies, and non-governmental organizations. This incongruence between technology and governance calls for a paradigm shift in the governance from centralized and technocratic to distributed and participatory governance. This paper evaluates how five US cities have been adjusting their governance to address the discord. Finally, the paper proposes an alternative governance model, which provides a mechanism to involve stakeholders and implement distributed green infrastructure under an integrative framework. PMID:26837617

  4. Urban Stormwater Governance: The Need for a Paradigm Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Krishna P.; Chevalier, Lizette R.

    2016-05-01

    Traditional urban stormwater management involves rapid removal of stormwater through centralized conveyance systems of curb-gutter-pipe networks. This results in many adverse impacts on the environment including hydrological disruption, groundwater depletion, downstream flooding, receiving water quality degradation, channel erosion, and stream ecosystem damage. In order to mitigate these adverse impacts, urban stormwater managers are increasingly using green infrastructure that promote on-site infiltration, restore hydrological functions of the landscape, and reduce surface runoff. Existing stormwater governance, however, is centralized and structured to support the conventional systems. This governance approach is not suited to the emerging distributed management approach, which involves multiple stakeholders including parcel owners, government agencies, and non-governmental organizations. This incongruence between technology and governance calls for a paradigm shift in the governance from centralized and technocratic to distributed and participatory governance. This paper evaluates how five US cities have been adjusting their governance to address the discord. Finally, the paper proposes an alternative governance model, which provides a mechanism to involve stakeholders and implement distributed green infrastructure under an integrative framework.

  5. Dynamics of Ionic Shifts in Cortical Spreading Depression

    PubMed Central

    Enger, Rune; Tang, Wannan; Vindedal, Gry Fluge; Jensen, Vidar; Johannes Helm, P.; Sprengel, Rolf; Looger, Loren L.; Nagelhus, Erlend A.

    2015-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression is a slowly propagating wave of near-complete depolarization of brain cells followed by temporary suppression of neuronal activity. Accumulating evidence indicates that cortical spreading depression underlies the migraine aura and that similar waves promote tissue damage in stroke, trauma, and hemorrhage. Cortical spreading depression is characterized by neuronal swelling, profound elevation of extracellular potassium and glutamate, multiphasic blood flow changes, and drop in tissue oxygen tension. The slow speed of the cortical spreading depression wave implies that it is mediated by diffusion of a chemical substance, yet the identity of this substance and the pathway it follows are unknown. Intercellular spread between gap junction-coupled neurons or glial cells and interstitial diffusion of K+ or glutamate have been proposed. Here we use extracellular direct current potential recordings, K+-sensitive microelectrodes, and 2-photon imaging with ultrasensitive Ca2+ and glutamate fluorescent probes to elucidate the spatiotemporal dynamics of ionic shifts associated with the propagation of cortical spreading depression in the visual cortex of adult living mice. Our data argue against intercellular spread of Ca2+ carrying the cortical spreading depression wavefront and are in favor of interstitial K+ diffusion, rather than glutamate diffusion, as the leading event in cortical spreading depression. PMID:25840424

  6. Shift of meaning and students' alternative concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Hans-Jürgen; Volke, Dagmar

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to establish a relationship between the shift of meaning of the concept oxidation that has taken place during the historical development, and students' alternative concepts. First Examination Board papers were examined. The result enabled us to specify the research question. In the main part of the study, multiple-choice items were given to 3074 senior high school students. They were asked to select the correct answer and to justify their choices. Additional illustrative material was collected in four interviews with senior high school students. The analysis of the data revealed the mechanism that some students used to interpret the reactions from NO3m to NO and from CO32m to CO2. Students' interpretations were based on the concept of a transfer of oxide ions. The mechanism explains some correct and incorrect answers to the problems. The interview study also revealed that students were reluctant to accept water as a Brønsted base. It is suggested to use students' alternative concepts about oxidation reactions in class, helping them to better understand the half-reaction method. Students should also understand that the meaning of the concept oxidation has shifted in the course of time. In the area of acid-base reactions, further research is needed.

  7. Neural signals encoding shifts in beliefs.

    PubMed

    Schwartenbeck, Philipp; FitzGerald, Thomas H B; Dolan, Ray

    2016-01-15

    Dopamine is implicated in a diverse range of cognitive functions including cognitive flexibility, task switching, signalling novel or unexpected stimuli as well as advance information. There is also longstanding line of thought that links dopamine with belief formation and, crucially, aberrant belief formation in psychosis. Integrating these strands of evidence would suggest that dopamine plays a central role in belief updating and more specifically in encoding of meaningful information content in observations. The precise nature of this relationship has remained unclear. To directly address this question we developed a paradigm that allowed us to decompose two distinct types of information content, information-theoretic surprise that reflects the unexpectedness of an observation, and epistemic value that induces shifts in beliefs or, more formally, Bayesian surprise. Using functional magnetic-resonance imaging in humans we show that dopamine-rich midbrain regions encode shifts in beliefs whereas surprise is encoded in prefrontal regions, including the pre-supplementary motor area and dorsal cingulate cortex. By linking putative dopaminergic activity to belief updating these data provide a link to false belief formation that characterises hyperdopaminergic states associated with idiopathic and drug induced psychosis. PMID:26520774

  8. Shifting seasons, climate change and ecosystem consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thackeray, Stephen; Henrys, Peter; Hemming, Deborah; Huntingford, Chris; Bell, James; Leech, David; Wanless, Sarah

    2014-05-01

    In recent decades, the seasonal timing of many biological events (e.g. flowering, breeding, migration) has shifted. These phenological changes are believed to be one of the most conspicuous biological indicators of climate change. Rates and directions of phenological change have differed markedly among species, potentially threatening the seasonal synchrony of key species interactions and ultimately ecosystem functioning. Differences in phenological change among-species at different trophic levels, and with respect to other broad species traits, are likely to be driven by variations in the climatic sensitivity of phenological events. However, as yet, inconsistencies in analytical methods have hampered broad-scale assessments of variation in climate sensitivity among taxonomic and functional groups of organisms. In this presentation, results will be presented from a current collaborative project (http://www.ceh.ac.uk/sci_programmes/shifting-seasons-uk.html) in which many UK long-term data sets are being integrated in order to assess relationships between temperature/precipitation, and the timing of seasonal events for a wide range of plants and animals. Our aim is to assess which organism groups (in which locations/habitats) are most sensitive to climate. Furthermore, the role of anthropogenic climate change as a driver of phenological change is being assessed.

  9. The Underlying Social Dynamics of Paradigm Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Claro, Francisco; Fuentes, Miguel Angel

    2015-01-01

    We develop here a multi-agent model of the creation of knowledge (scientific progress or technological evolution) within a community of researchers devoted to such endeavors. In the proposed model, agents learn in a physical-technological landscape, and weight is attached to both individual search and social influence. We find that the combination of these two forces together with random experimentation can account for both i) marginal change, that is, periods of normal science or refinements on the performance of a given technology (and in which the community stays in the neighborhood of the current paradigm); and ii) radical change, which takes the form of scientific paradigm shifts (or discontinuities in the structure of performance of a technology) that is observed as a swift migration of the knowledge community towards the new and superior paradigm. The efficiency of the search process is heavily dependent on the weight that agents posit on social influence. The occurrence of a paradigm shift becomes more likely when each member of the community attaches a small but positive weight to the experience of his/her peers. For this parameter region, nevertheless, a conservative force is exerted by the representatives of the current paradigm. However, social influence is not strong enough to seriously hamper individual discovery, and can act so as to empower successful individual pioneers who have conquered the new and superior paradigm. PMID:26418255

  10. Metabolic Shifts during Aging and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yina; Li, Ji

    2016-01-01

    The heart is a very special organ in the body and has a high requirement for metabolism due to its constant workload. As a consequence, to provide a consistent and sufficient energy a high steady-state demand of metabolism is required by the heart. When delicately balanced mechanisms are changed by physiological or pathophysiological conditions, the whole system’s homeostasis will be altered to a new balance, which contributes to the pathologic process. So it is no wonder that almost every heart disease is related to metabolic shift. Furthermore, aging is also found to be related to the reduction in mitochondrial function, insulin resistance, and dysregulated intracellular lipid metabolism. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) functions as an energy sensor to detect intracellular ATP/AMP ratio and plays a pivotal role in intracellular adaptation to energy stress. During different pathology (like myocardial ischemia and hypertension), the activation of cardiac AMPK appears to be essential for repairing cardiomyocyte’s function by accelerating ATP generation, attenuating ATP depletion, and protecting the myocardium against cardiac dysfunction and apoptosis. In this overview, we will talk about the normal heart’s metabolism, how metabolic shifts during aging and different pathologies, and how AMPK regulates metabolic changes during these conditions. PMID:25880509

  11. Phase-Shifted Laser Feedback Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ovryn, Benjie

    1999-01-01

    Phase-shifted, laser feedback interferometry is a new diagnostic tool developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center under the Advanced Technology Development (ATD) Program directed by NASA Headquarters Microgravity Research Division. It combines the principles of phase-shifting interferometry (PSI) and laser-feedback interferometry (LFI) to produce an instrument that can quantify both optical path length changes and sample reflectivity variations. In a homogenous medium, the optical path length between two points is the product of the index of refraction and the geometric distance between the two points. LFI differs from other forms of interferometry by using the laser as both the source and the phase detector. In LFI, coherent feedback of the incident light either reflected directly from a surface or reflected after transmission through a region of interest will modulate the output intensity of the laser. The combination of PSI and LFI has produced a robust instrument, based on a low-power helium-neon (HeNe) gas laser, with a high dynamic range that can be used to measure either static or oscillatory changes of the optical path length. Small changes in optical path length are limited by the fraction of a fringe that can be measured; we can measure nonoscillatory changes with a root mean square (rms) error of the wavelength/1000 without averaging.

  12. Saturated Dispersive Extinction Theory of Red Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling Jun

    2012-03-01

    The Dispersive Extinction Theory (DET) proposed by WangfootnotetextWang, Ling Jun, Physics Essays, 18, No. 2, (2005). offers an alternative to the Big Bang. According to DET, the cosmic red shift is caused by the dispersive extinction of the star light during the propagation from the stars to the earth, instead of being caused by the Doppler shift due to the expansion of the universe.footnotetextHubble, E., Astrophys. J. 64, 321 (1926).^,footnotetextHubble, E., The Realm of the Nebulae, (Yale University Press, New Haven, 1936). DET allows an infinite, stable, non expanding universe, and is immune of the fundamental problems inherent to the Big Bang such as the horizon problem, the extreme violation of the conservation of mass, energy and charge, and the geocentric nature which violates the principle of relativity.footnotetextWang, Ling Jun, Physics Essays, 20, No. 2, (2007). The scenario dealt with in Reference (1) is a one in which the extinction by the space medium is not saturated. This work deals with a different scenario when the extinction is saturated. The saturated extinction causes limited energy loss, and the star light can travel a much greater distance than in the unsaturated scenario.

  13. Red and blue shifted hydridic bonds.

    PubMed

    Jabłoński, Mirosław

    2014-09-15

    By performing MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ ab initio calculations for a large set of dimer systems possessing a R-H hydridic bond involved in diverse types of intermolecular interactions (dihydrogen bonds, hydride halogen bonds, hydride hydrogen bonds, and charge-assisted hydride hydrogen bonds), we show that this is rather an elongation than a shortening that a hydride bond undergoes on interaction. Contrary to what might have been expected on the basis of studies in uniform electric field, this elongation is accompanied by a blue instead of red shift of the R-H stretching vibration frequency. We propose that the "additional" elongation of the R-H hydridic bond results from the significant charge outflow from the sigma bonding orbital of R-H that weakens this bond. The more standard red shift obtained for stronger complexes is explained by means of the Hermansson's formula and the particularly strong electric field produced by the H-acceptor molecule. PMID:25043253

  14. Testability and epistemic shifts in modern cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kragh, Helge

    2014-05-01

    During the last decade new developments in theoretical and speculative cosmology have reopened the old discussion of cosmology's scientific status and the more general question of the demarcation between science and non-science. The multiverse hypothesis, in particular, is central to this discussion and controversial because it seems to disagree with methodological and epistemic standards traditionally accepted in the physical sciences. But what are these standards and how sacrosanct are they? Does anthropic multiverse cosmology rest on evaluation criteria that conflict with and go beyond those ordinarily accepted, so that it constitutes an "epistemic shift" in fundamental physics? The paper offers a brief characterization of the modern multiverse and also refers to a few earlier attempts to introduce epistemic shifts in the science of the universe. It further discusses the several meanings of testability, addresses the question of falsifiability as a sine qua non for a theory being scientific, and briefly compares the situation in cosmology with the one in systematic biology. Multiverse theory is not generally falsifiable, which has led to proposals from some physicists to overrule not only Popperian standards but also other evaluation criteria of a philosophical nature. However, this is hardly possible and nor is it possible to get rid of explicit philosophical considerations in some other aspects of cosmological research, however advanced it becomes.

  15. Damage detection using frequency shift path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Longqi; Lie, Seng Tjhen; Zhang, Yao

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel concept called FREquency Shift (FRESH) path to describe the dynamic behavior of structures with auxiliary mass. FRESH path combines the effects of frequency shifting and amplitude changing into one space curve, providing a tool for analyzing structure health status and properties. A damage index called FRESH curvature is then proposed to detect local stiffness reduction. FRESH curvature can be easily adapted for a particular problem since the sensitivity of the index can be adjusted by changing auxiliary mass or excitation power. An algorithm is proposed to adjust automatically the contribution from frequency and amplitude in the method. Because the extraction of FRESH path requires highly accurate frequency and amplitude estimators; therefore, a procedure based on discrete time Fourier transform is introduced to extract accurate frequency and amplitude with the time complexity of O (n log n), which is verified by simulation signals. Moreover, numerical examples with different damage sizes, severities and damping are presented to demonstrate the validity of the proposed damage index. In addition, applications of FRESH path on two steel beams with different damages are presented and the results show that the proposed method is valid and computational efficient.

  16. Automated manual transmission shift sequence controller

    DOEpatents

    Lawrie, Robert E.; Reed, Richard G.; Rausen, David J.

    2000-02-01

    A powertrain system for a hybrid vehicle. The hybrid vehicle includes a heat engine, such as a diesel engine, and an electric machine, which operates as both, an electric motor and an alternator, to power the vehicle. The hybrid vehicle also includes a manual-style transmission configured to operate as an automatic transmission from the perspective of the driver. The engine and the electric machine drive an input shaft which in turn drives an output shaft of the transmission. In addition to driving the transmission, the electric machine regulates the speed of the input shaft in order to synchronize the input shaft during either an upshift or downshift of the transmission by either decreasing or increasing the speed of the input shaft. When decreasing the speed of the input shaft, the electric motor functions as an alternator to produce electrical energy which may be stored by a storage device. Operation of the transmission is controlled by a transmission controller which receives input signals and generates output signals to control shift and clutch motors to effect smooth launch, upshift shifts, and downshifts of the transmission, so that the transmission functions substantially as an automatic transmission from the perspective of the driver, while internally substantially functioning as a manual transmission.

  17. Language Lateralization Shifts with Learning by Adults

    PubMed Central

    Plante, Elena; Almryde, Kyle; Patterson, Dianne K.; Vance, Christopher J.; Asbjørnsen, Arve E.

    2014-01-01

    For the majority of the population, language is a left hemisphere lateralized function. During childhood, a pattern of increasing left lateralization for language has been described in brain imaging studies, suggesting this trait develops. This development could reflect change due to brain maturation or change due to skill acquisition, given that children acquire and refine language skills as they mature. We test the possibility that skill acquisition, independent of age-associated maturation can result in shifts in language lateralization in classic language cortex. We imaged adults exposed to unfamiliar language during three successive fMRI scans. Participants were then asked to identify specific words embedded in Norwegian sentences. Exposure to these sentences, relative to complex tones, resulted in consistent activation in the left and right superior temporal gyrus. Activation in this region became increasingly left lateralized with repeated exposure to the unfamiliar language. These results demonstrate that shifts in lateralization can be produced in the short-term within a learning context, independent of maturation. PMID:25285756

  18. Neural signals encoding shifts in beliefs

    PubMed Central

    Schwartenbeck, Philipp; FitzGerald, Thomas H.B.; Dolan, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine is implicated in a diverse range of cognitive functions including cognitive flexibility, task switching, signalling novel or unexpected stimuli as well as advance information. There is also longstanding line of thought that links dopamine with belief formation and, crucially, aberrant belief formation in psychosis. Integrating these strands of evidence would suggest that dopamine plays a central role in belief updating and more specifically in encoding of meaningful information content in observations. The precise nature of this relationship has remained unclear. To directly address this question we developed a paradigm that allowed us to decompose two distinct types of information content, information-theoretic surprise that reflects the unexpectedness of an observation, and epistemic value that induces shifts in beliefs or, more formally, Bayesian surprise. Using functional magnetic-resonance imaging in humans we show that dopamine-rich midbrain regions encode shifts in beliefs whereas surprise is encoded in prefrontal regions, including the pre-supplementary motor area and dorsal cingulate cortex. By linking putative dopaminergic activity to belief updating these data provide a link to false belief formation that characterises hyperdopaminergic states associated with idiopathic and drug induced psychosis. PMID:26520774

  19. Practical zero-shift tuning in geonium.

    PubMed Central

    Dehmelt, H; Van Dyck, R; Palmer, F

    1992-01-01

    Compositeness of the electron may show up in a very small deviation of the measured electron g factor from one calculated for a point electron by quantum electrodynamics. The precision of our g measurements is currently limited by an interaction of the cyclotron motion with standing waves in the trap cavity containing the electron. The important element introduced here is the systematic exploration of the trap cavity modes and the electron's coupling to them by measuring the shifted electron g factor gc = gc(omega e) as a function of the cyclotron frequency omega e. By measuring gc values at five different omega e values and modeling the trap cavity by six lumped LC circuits, the L values for the four most important modes may be determined and finally the unshifted g value may be extracted. Auxiliary experiments are relied upon only for the L values of the two least critical cavity modes. By designing the trap as a high-Q microwave cavity, an electron cyclotron and anomaly resonance linewidth one or even two orders of magnitude narrower than in free space may be approached without introducing appreciable frequency shifts. PMID:11607280

  20. Calculation of Chemical Shift Anisotropy in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Sishi; Case, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Individual peptide groups in proteins must exhibit some variation in the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) of their constituent atoms, but not much is known about the extent or origins of this dispersion. Direct spectroscopic measurement of CSA remains technically challenging, and theoretical methods can help to overcome these limitations by estimating shielding tensors for arbitrary structures. Here we use an automated fragmentation quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (AF-QM/MM) approach to compute 15N, 13C′ and 1H chemical shift tensors for human ubiquitin and the GB1 and GB3 fragments of staphylococcal protein G. The average and range of variation of the anisotropies is in good agreement with experimental estimates from solid-state NMR, and the variation among residues is somewhat smaller than that estimated from solution-state measurements. Hydrogen-bond effects account for much of the variation, both between helix and sheet regions, and within elements of secondary structure, but other effects (including variations in torsion angles) may play a role as well. PMID:21866436

  1. Theory of Lamb Shift in Muonic Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Karshenboim, Savely G.; Korzinin, Evgeny Yu.; Shelyuto, Valery A.; Ivanov, Vladimir G.

    2015-09-15

    There has been for a while a large discrepancy between the values of the proton charge radius measured by the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen and by other methods. It has already been clear that theory of muonic hydrogen is reliable at the level of this discrepancy and an error there cannot be a reason for the contradiction. Still the status of theory at the level of the uncertainty of the muonic-hydrogen experiment (which is two orders of magnitude below the discrepancy level) requires an additional clarification. Here, we revisit theory of the 2p − 2s Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen. We summarize all the theoretical contributions in order α{sup 5}m, including pure quantum electrodynamics (QED) ones as well as those which involve the proton-structure effects. Certain enhanced higher-order effects are also discussed. We basically confirm former QED calculations of other authors, present a review of recent calculations of the proton-structure effects, and treat self-consistently higher-order proton-finite-size corrections. We also overview theory of the 2p states. Eventually, we derive a value of the root-mean-square proton charge radius. It is found to be 0.840 29(55) fm, which is slightly different from that previously published in the literature (0.840 87(39) fm [Antognini et al., Science 339, 417 (2013)])

  2. Edge technique for measurement of laser frequency shifts including the Doppler shift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, Larry (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method is disclosed for determining the frequency shift in a laser system by transmitting an outgoing laser beam. An incoming laser beam having a frequency shift is received. A first signal is acquired by transmitting a portion of the incoming laser beam to an energy monitor detector. A second signal is acquired by transmitting a portion of the incoming laser beam through an edge filter to an edge detector, which derives a first normalized signal which is proportional to the transmission of the edge filter at the frequency of the incoming laser beam. A second normalized signal is acquired which is proportional to the transmission of the edge filter at the frequency of the outgoing laser beam. The frequency shift is determined by processing the first and second normalized signals.

  3. Red-Shifting versus Blue-Shifting Hydrogen Bonds: Perspective from Ab Initio Valence Bond Theory.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xin; Zhang, Yang; Weng, Xinzhen; Su, Peifeng; Wu, Wei; Mo, Yirong

    2016-05-01

    Both proper, red-shifting and improper, blue-shifting hydrogen bonds have been well-recognized with enormous experimental and computational studies. The current consensus is that there is no difference in nature between these two kinds of hydrogen bonds, where the electrostatic interaction dominates. Since most if not all the computational studies are based on molecular orbital theory, it would be interesting to gain insight into the hydrogen bonds with modern valence bond (VB) theory. In this work, we performed ab initio VBSCF computations on a series of hydrogen-bonding systems, where the sole hydrogen bond donor CF3H interacts with ten hydrogen bond acceptors Y (═NH2CH3, NH3, NH2Cl, OH(-), H2O, CH3OH, (CH3)2O, F(-), HF, or CH3F). This series includes four red-shifting and six blue-shifting hydrogen bonds. Consistent with existing findings in literature, VB-based energy decomposition analyses show that electrostatic interaction plays the dominating role and polarization plays the secondary role in all these hydrogen-bonding systems, and the charge transfer interaction, which denotes the hyperconjugation effect, contributes only slightly to the total interaction energy. As VB theory describes any real chemical bond in terms of pure covalent and ionic structures, our fragment interaction analysis reveals that with the approaching of a hydrogen bond acceptor Y, the covalent state of the F3C-H bond tends to blue-shift, due to the strong repulsion between the hydrogen atom and Y. In contrast, the ionic state F3C(-) H(+) leads to the red-shifting of the C-H vibrational frequency, owing to the attraction between the proton and Y. Thus, the relative weights of the covalent and ionic structures essentially determine the direction of frequency change. Indeed, we find the correlation between the structural weights and vibrational frequency changes. PMID:27074500

  4. Membrane localization of scaffold proteins promotes graded signaling in the yeast MAP kinase cascade

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Satoe; Pryciak, Peter M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background Signaling through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade pathways can show various input-output behaviors, including either switch-like or graded responses to increasing levels of stimulus. Prior studies suggest that switch-like behavior is promoted by positive feedback loops and nonprocessive phosphorylation reactions, but it is unclear whether graded signaling is a default behavior or if it must be enforced by separate mechanisms. Scaffold proteins have been hypothesized to promote graded behavior. Results Here, we experimentally probe the determinants of graded signaling in the yeast mating MAPK pathway. We find that graded behavior is robust, as it resists perturbation by loss of several negative feedback regulators. However, the pathway becomes switch-like when activated by a crosstalk stimulus that bypasses multiple upstream components. To dissect the contributing factors, we developed a method for gradually varying the signal input at different pathway steps in vivo. Input at the beginning of the kinase cascade produced a sharp, threshold-like response. Surprisingly, the scaffold protein Ste5 increased this threshold behavior when limited to the cytosol. However, signaling remained graded whenever Ste5 was allowed to function at the plasma membrane. Conclusions The results suggest that the MAPK cascade module is inherently ultrasensitive, but is converted to a graded system by the pathway-specific activation mechanism. Scaffold-mediated assembly of signaling complexes at the plasma membrane allows faithful propagation of weak signals, which consequently reduces pathway ultrasensitivity. These properties help shape the input-output properties of the system to fit the physiological context. PMID:18722124

  5. Act To Promote Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1970

    An act of the German Lower Saxony Parliament to promote adult education is presented. It has 24 general provisions relating to the following: purpose of adult education, principle for promotion, conditions for promotions of establishments, independence of adult education, prerequisites and form of acknowledgement of entitlement to promotion,…

  6. Promoting Healthy Dietary Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Cheryl L.; Story, Mary; Lytle, Leslie A.

    This chapter reviews the research on promoting healthy dietary behaviors in all youth, not just those who exhibit problems such as obesity or eating disorders. The first section of this chapter presents a rationale for addressing healthy dietary behavior with children and adolescents, on the basis of the impact of these behaviors on short- and…

  7. Health Promotion Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jason, Leonard A.; Curie, Carrie J.; Townsend, Stephanie M.; Pokorny, Steven B.; Katz, Richard B.; Sherk, Joseph L.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews four areas from the prevention science field, including: promoting healthy behavior; preventing substance abuse; preventing high-risk sexual behaviors; and preventing child abuse and sexual abuse. Recommendations are made regarding strategies for implementing empirically validated programs, supplementing school programs with ecological…

  8. Promoting La Cultura Hispana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pluviose, David

    2007-01-01

    Launched in 1985 at Arizona State University, the Hispanic Research Center's (HRC) efforts to promote Latino and Chicano art and issues have flourished in recent years. In 2004, the HRC hosted the Arizona International Latina/o Arts Festival in collaboration with the Mesa Southwest Museum. The HRC has also founded a mentoring institute for…

  9. Partners: Promoting Accessible Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sable, Janet; Gravink, Jill

    1995-01-01

    The Promoting Accessible Recreation through Networking, Education, Resources and Services (PARTNERS) Project, a partnership between Northeast Passage, the University of New Hampshire, and Granite State Independent Living Foundation, helps create barrier-free recreation for individuals with physical disabilities. The paper describes PARTNERS and…

  10. 50 Practical Promotion Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madeyski, Tom

    1997-01-01

    Includes 50 cost-effective ideas for promoting camp in the areas of recruiting new campers, encouraging returning campers, advertising strategies, printing brochures and other written materials, using photographs, targeting groups for camp facility rental, and effectively using the media. (LP)

  11. Homeopathy: promotion versus evidence.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E

    2006-01-01

    Homeopathy is a biologically implausible form of treatment. The best clinical evidence available to date fails to support its effectiveness. Nevertheless, it is gaining in popularity. One reason for this is that, at least in the UK, it is being promoted by influential people. PMID:19442345

  12. Quantitative Measurement of the Doppler Shift at an Ultrasonic Frequency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nerbun, R. C.; Leskovec, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Discussed is a Doppler shift laboratory experiment for an introductory college physics course. Ultrasonic transducers and a digital phase detector circuit "black box" are used to overcome room noise and "standing waves" and to produce an observable frequency shift. (SL)

  13. Topological Imbert-Fedorov Shift in Weyl Semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qing-Dong; Jiang, Hua; Liu, Haiwen; Sun, Qing-Feng; Xie, Xin-Cheng

    The Goos-Hänchen (GH) shift and the Imbert-Fedorov (IF) shift are optical phenomena which describe the longitudinal and transverse lateral shifts at the reflection interface, respectively. Here, we predict the GHIF shifts in Weyl semimetals (WSMs)--a promising material harboring low energy Weyl fermions, afermionic cousin of photons. Our results show that the GH shift in WSMs is valley independent,is analogous to that discovered in a 2D relativistic material--graphene. However, the IF shift hasbeen explored in nonoptical systems, and here we show that it is valley dependent. Furthermore, wethat the IF shift actually originates from the topological effect of the system. Experimentally, theIF shift can be utilized to characterize theWeyl semimetals, design valleytronic devices of high, and measure the Berry curvature. Morever, we investigate the transport properties of topological semimetal using the wave-packet dynamics, which give some interesting results. NBRP of China, NSF-China.

  14. Topological Imbert-Fedorov Shift in Weyl Semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qing-Dong; Jiang, Hua; Liu, Haiwen; Sun, Qing-Feng; Xie, X. C.

    2015-10-01

    The Goos-Hänchen (GH) shift and the Imbert-Fedorov (IF) shift are optical phenomena which describe the longitudinal and transverse lateral shifts at the reflection interface, respectively. Here, we predict the GH and IF shifts in Weyl semimetals (WSMs)—a promising material harboring low energy Weyl fermions, a massless fermionic cousin of photons. Our results show that the GH shift in WSMs is valley independent, which is analogous to that discovered in a 2D relativistic material—graphene. However, the IF shift has never been explored in nonoptical systems, and here we show that it is valley dependent. Furthermore, we find that the IF shift actually originates from the topological effect of the system. Experimentally, the topological IF shift can be utilized to characterize the Weyl semimetals, design valleytronic devices of high efficiency, and measure the Berry curvature.

  15. Night Shift Work May Be Tough on A Woman's Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158508.html Night Shift Work May Be Tough on a Woman's Heart But ... TUESDAY, April 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women who work rotating night shifts may face a slightly increased ...

  16. Protein conformation and proton nuclear-magnetic-resonance chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Pardi, A; Wagner, G; Wüthrich, K

    1983-12-15

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the polypeptide backbone protons in basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor from bovine organs and the inhibitors E and K from the venom of Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis have been analyzed. Using the corresponding shifts in model peptides, the chemical shifts observed in the proteins were decomposed into random-coil shifts and conformation-dependent shifts. Correlations between contributions to the latter term and the polypeptide conformation were investigated by using the crystal structure of the bovine inhibitor. In addition to the well-known ring-current effects, a correlation was found between chemical shifts of amide and C alpha protons and the length of the hydrogen bonds formed by these protons with nearby oxygen atoms as acceptor groups. There remain sizeable and as yet unexplained residual conformation shifts. Overall, the present treatment provides a satisfactory qualitative explanation for the outstandingly large shifts of backbone hydrogen atoms in these diamagnetic proteins. PMID:6198174

  17. Night Shift Work May Be Tough on A Woman's Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... April 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women who work rotating night shifts may face a slightly increased risk ... of heart disease associated with longer duration of rotating night shift work, which appears to wane after ...

  18. Evaluation of 12-hour shifts on a cardiology nursing development unit.

    PubMed

    Wootten, N

    The first part of this two-part article discussed the implementation of 12-hours shifts using a locally devised nursing development unit (NDU) framework (Vol 9(19): 2095-9). This article, the second part, discusses the results of a survey to evaluate the 12-hour shifts, the problems encountered during the implementation of 12-hours shifts, the solutions and the NDU framework as described in the first part of the article. A qualitative design to the postal survey was chosen with the resulting data being subjected to a content analysis. Data triangulation compared survey results with incident reports and sickness records. The limitations of the survey included having the change agent analysing the data, the sampling method and being unable to pilot the questionnaire. The results indicated an improvement in the quality of patient care, although this is difficult to measure, a pacing of workload throughout the day, and tiredness during, after and at the end of a stretch of shifts. Other results centred on staff morale, social life, student nurses' experience and night shifts. The solutions to identified problems included the employment of two twilight nurses to help the night staff during the busy early evening period. As a requirement of the NDU framework, standards were produced from the survey results, as this would allow subsequent audit of the 12-hour shift system. The recommendations from this survey included the dissemination of results both locally and nationally to expand the body of nursing knowledge and to promote practice based on the best available evidence. PMID:12271186

  19. Shifts in BMI Category and Associated Cardiometabolic Risk: Prospective Results From HEALTHY Study

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Gary D.; El ghormli, Laure; Baranowski, Tom; Goldberg, Linn; Jago, Russell; Linder, Barbara; Steckler, Allan; Treviño, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate shifts across BMI categories and associated changes in cardiometabolic risk factors over 2.5 years in an ethnically diverse middle school sample. METHODS: As part of HEALTHY, a multisite school-based study designed to mitigate risk for type 2 diabetes, 3993 children participated in health screenings at the start of sixth and end of eighth grades. Assessments included anthropometric measures, blood pressure, and glucose, insulin, and lipids. Students were classified as underweight, healthy weight, overweight, obese, or severely obese. Mixed models controlling for school intervention status and covariates were used to evaluate shifts in BMI category over time and the relation between these shifts and changes in risk factors. RESULTS: At baseline, students averaged 11.3 (±0.6) years; 47.6% were boys, 59.6% were Hispanic, and 49.8% were overweight or obese. Shifts in BMI category over time were common. For example, 35.7% of youth who were overweight moved to the healthy weight range, but 13% in the healthy weight range became overweight. BMI shifts were not associated with school intervention condition, household education, or youth gender, race/ethnicity, pubertal status, or changes in height. Increases in BMI category were associated with worsening of cardiometabolic risk factors, and decreases were associated with improvements. Boys who increased BMI category were more vulnerable to negative risk factor changes than girls. CONCLUSIONS: There are substantial shifts across BMI categories during middle school that are associated with clinically meaningful changes in cardiometabolic risk factors. Programs to promote decreases in BMI and prevent increases are clearly warranted. PMID:22430457

  20. Stress promotes Arabidopsis - Piriformospora indica interaction.

    PubMed

    Vahabi, Khabat; Dorcheh, Sedigheh Karimi; Monajembashi, Shamci; Westermann, Martin; Reichelt, Michael; Falkenberg, Daniela; Hemmerich, Peter; Sherameti, Irena; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2016-05-01

    The endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica colonizes Arabidopsis thaliana roots and promotes plant performance, growth and resistance/tolerance against abiotic and biotic stress. Here we demonstrate that the benefits for the plant increase when the two partners are co-cultivated under stress (limited access to nutrient, exposure to heavy metals and salt, light and osmotic stress, pathogen infection). Moreover, physical contact between P. indica and Arabidopsis roots is necessary for optimal growth promotion, and chemical communication cannot replace the physical contact. Lower nutrient availability down-regulates and higher nutrient availability up-regulates the plant defense system including the expression of pathogenesis-related genes in roots. High light, osmotic and salt stresses support the beneficial interaction between the plant and the fungus. P. indica reduces stomata closure and H2O2 production after Alternaria brassicae infection in leaves and suppresses the defense-related accumulation of the phytohormone jasmonic acid. Thus, shifting the growth conditions toward a stress promotes the mutualistic interaction, while optimal supply with nutrients or low stress diminishes the benefits for the plant in the symbiosis. PMID:27167761

  1. Relativistic calculations of isotope shifts in highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Tupitsyn, I.I.; Shabaev, V.M.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.; Soria Orts, R.; Ullrich, J.; Draganic, I.

    2003-08-01

    The isotope shifts of forbidden transitions in Be- and B-like argon ions are calculated. It is shown that only using the relativistic recoil operator can provide a proper evaluation of the mass isotope shift, which strongly dominates over the field isotope shift for the ions under consideration. Comparing the isotope shifts calculated with the current experimental uncertainties indicates very good perspectives for a first test of the relativistic theory of the recoil effect in middle-Z ions.

  2. Using rigorous selection criteria to investigate marine range shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przeslawski, Rachel; Falkner, Inke; Ashcroft, Michael B.; Hutchings, Pat

    2012-11-01

    We reassess whether range shifts in marine organisms are occurring in a direction predicted by causation due to climate using two different methods: a global meta-analysis and a regional analysis of museum records focussing on marine molluscs. Globally we used rigorous selection criteria to investigate studies describing range shifts in marine organisms, including exclusion of single-species studies and those that inferred range shifts through shifting abundance. For each species meeting these criteria (311 species from 13 studies), the distance in kilometres moved per year was calculated, and life history characteristics such as mobility, habitat, dispersal potential and trophic level were recorded to assess if these were linked to the shifts. We also examined the potential correlation between changing sea surface temperatures and range shifts. Regionally we analysed the intertidal mollusc collection of the Australian Museum and Museum of Victoria and consulted with mollusc experts to determine if museum records could be used to detect range shifts in marine invertebrates. The global meta-analysis showed that individual species shifted on average 8.9 km polewards per year. Range shifts were not significantly related to temperature change or life history characteristics with the exception of intertidal and nearshore subtidal fauna showing poleward shifts (6.8 and 14.3 km per decade, respectively) and shelf fauna showing a slight equatorial shift (2.7 km per decade). Our regional analysis showed that 54 of the 634 mollusc species examined shifted their range into or out of the well-surveyed Sydney region. However, closer examination by mollusc experts revealed that the evidence for these shifts was unreliable, and we conclude that caution is required when using museum records in range shift studies. Overall, our study supports previous research showing a poleward shift in response to climate change, although this is an order of magnitude less than values reported in

  3. Vegetation zones shift in changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belda, Michal; Halenka, Tomas; Kalvova, Jaroslava; Holtanova, Eva

    2016-04-01

    The analysis of climate patterns can be performed for each climate variable separately or the data can be aggregated using e.g. some kind of climate classification. These classifications usually correspond to vegetation distribution in the sense that each climate type is dominated by one vegetation zone or eco-region. In case of the Köppen-Trewartha classification it is integrated assessment of temperature and precipitation together with their annual cycle as well. This way climate classifications also represent a convenient tool for the assessment and validation of climate models and for the analysis of simulated future climate changes. The Köppen-Trewartha classification is used on full CMIP5 family of more than 40 GCM simulations and CRU dataset for comparison. This evaluation provides insight on the GCM performance and errors for simulations of the 20th century climate. Common regions are identified, such as Australia or Amazonia, where many state-of-the-art models perform inadequately. Furthermore, the analysis of the CMIP5 ensemble for RCP 4.5 and 8.5 is performed to assess the climate change for future. There are significant changes for some types in most models e.g. increase of savanna and decrease of tundra for the future climate. For some types significant shifts in latitude can be seen when studying their geographical location in selected continental areas, e.g. toward higher latitudes for boreal climate. For Europe, EuroCORDEX results for both 0.11 and 0.44 degree resolution are validated using Köppen-Trewartha types in comparison to E-OBS based classification. ERA-Interim driven simulations are compared to both present conditions of CMIP5 models as well as their downscaling by EuroCORDEX RCMs. Finally, the climate change signal assessment is provided using the individual climate types. In addition to the changes assessed similarly as for GCMs analysis in terms of the area of individual types, in the continental scale some shifts of boundaries

  4. Frequency shifting with a solid-state switching capacitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattauch, R. J.; Viola, T. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Frequency shifting, commonly used in electronic signal processing, is applied in tuning, automatic frequency control, antenna element switching, phase shifting, etc. Frequency shifting can be accomplished economically and reliably with simple circuit comprising conventional resistor and solid-state switching device which can be equivalent to two capacitors, depending on switching state.

  5. 12-hour shifts: an ethical dilemma for the nurse executive.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Susan G

    2008-06-01

    Flexible work hours, including 12-hour shifts, have become a common scheduling option for nurses. The author explores whether 12-hour shifts are an ethical scheduling option for nurses because recent research suggests that 12-hour shifts are a potential hazard to patients. A multistep model for ethical decision making, reflecting the concept of procedural justice, is used to examine this issue. PMID:18562834

  6. 30 CFR 56.19067 - Trips during shift changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Trips during shift changes. 56.19067 Section 56.19067 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Hoisting Procedures § 56.19067 Trips during shift changes. During shift changes, an authorized person...

  7. 30 CFR 57.19067 - Trips during shift changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trips during shift changes. 57.19067 Section 57.19067 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 57.19067 Trips during shift changes. During shift changes, an...

  8. 30 CFR 56.19073 - Hoisting during shift changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hoisting during shift changes. 56.19073 Section... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 56.19073 Hoisting during shift changes. Rock or supplies shall not be hoisted in the same shaft as persons during shift changes, unless the compartments and dumping bins...

  9. 30 CFR 57.19067 - Trips during shift changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Trips during shift changes. 57.19067 Section 57.19067 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 57.19067 Trips during shift changes. During shift changes, an...

  10. 30 CFR 56.19067 - Trips during shift changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trips during shift changes. 56.19067 Section 56.19067 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Hoisting Procedures § 56.19067 Trips during shift changes. During shift changes, an authorized person...

  11. 30 CFR 57.19073 - Hoisting during shift changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hoisting during shift changes. 57.19073 Section... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 57.19073 Hoisting during shift changes. Rock or supplies shall not be hoisted in the same shaft as persons during shift changes, unless the compartments and dumping bins...

  12. 30 CFR 56.19067 - Trips during shift changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Trips during shift changes. 56.19067 Section 56.19067 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Hoisting Procedures § 56.19067 Trips during shift changes. During shift changes, an authorized person...

  13. 30 CFR 57.19073 - Hoisting during shift changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hoisting during shift changes. 57.19073 Section... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 57.19073 Hoisting during shift changes. Rock or supplies shall not be hoisted in the same shaft as persons during shift changes, unless the compartments and dumping bins...

  14. 30 CFR 56.19073 - Hoisting during shift changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hoisting during shift changes. 56.19073 Section... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 56.19073 Hoisting during shift changes. Rock or supplies shall not be hoisted in the same shaft as persons during shift changes, unless the compartments and dumping bins...

  15. 30 CFR 57.19073 - Hoisting during shift changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hoisting during shift changes. 57.19073 Section... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 57.19073 Hoisting during shift changes. Rock or supplies shall not be hoisted in the same shaft as persons during shift changes, unless the compartments and dumping bins...

  16. 30 CFR 56.19073 - Hoisting during shift changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hoisting during shift changes. 56.19073 Section... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 56.19073 Hoisting during shift changes. Rock or supplies shall not be hoisted in the same shaft as persons during shift changes, unless the compartments and dumping bins...

  17. 30 CFR 57.19067 - Trips during shift changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Trips during shift changes. 57.19067 Section 57.19067 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 57.19067 Trips during shift changes. During shift changes, an...

  18. 30 CFR 57.9160 - Train movement during shift changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Train movement during shift changes. 57.9160 Section 57.9160 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND..., Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 57.9160 Train movement during shift changes. During shift...

  19. 30 CFR 57.9160 - Train movement during shift changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Train movement during shift changes. 57.9160 Section 57.9160 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND..., Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 57.9160 Train movement during shift changes. During shift...

  20. 30 CFR 57.9160 - Train movement during shift changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Train movement during shift changes. 57.9160 Section 57.9160 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND..., Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 57.9160 Train movement during shift changes. During shift...

  1. 30 CFR 57.9160 - Train movement during shift changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Train movement during shift changes. 57.9160 Section 57.9160 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND..., Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 57.9160 Train movement during shift changes. During shift...

  2. 30 CFR 57.9160 - Train movement during shift changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Train movement during shift changes. 57.9160 Section 57.9160 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND..., Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 57.9160 Train movement during shift changes. During shift...

  3. Pseudorevertants of a lac promoter mutation reveal overlapping nascent promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Karls, R; Schulz, V; Jovanovich, S B; Flynn, S; Pak, A; Reznikoff, W S

    1989-01-01

    Four pseudorevertants of a -10 region lacP mutation were isolated. Three of these mutations were found to activate nascent promoters. These mutations were: a -2 G/C----A/T change (-2A) promoting transcription at position +11, a +1 A/T----T/A change (+1T) promoting transcription initiation at position +13, and a +10 C/G----A/T change (+10A) promoting transcription initiation at a complex series of positions. The fourth mutation [a -12 T/A----A/T change (-12A)] promotes transcription initiation at -1. The promoters activated by mutations -12A, -2A and +1T resembled the canonical sigma 70 promoter sequences. The +10A promoter activity is also dependent upon the sigma 70 holoenzyme but can not be readily assigned to a specific promoter sequence. Images PMID:2499870

  4. Shifted power method for computing tensor eigenvalues.

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, Jackson R.; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2010-07-01

    Recent work on eigenvalues and eigenvectors for tensors of order m >= 3 has been motivated by applications in blind source separation, magnetic resonance imaging, molecular conformation, and more. In this paper, we consider methods for computing real symmetric-tensor eigenpairs of the form Ax{sup m-1} = lambda x subject to ||x||=1, which is closely related to optimal rank-1 approximation of a symmetric tensor. Our contribution is a shifted symmetric higher-order power method (SS-HOPM), which we show is guaranteed to converge to a tensor eigenpair. SS-HOPM can be viewed as a generalization of the power iteration method for matrices or of the symmetric higher-order power method. Additionally, using fixed point analysis, we can characterize exactly which eigenpairs can and cannot be found by the method. Numerical examples are presented, including examples from an extension of the method to finding complex eigenpairs.

  5. Paradigm Shifts in the Treatment of Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Mak, Grace Zee; Loeff, Deborah S

    2016-07-01

    Acute appendicitis is the most common cause of emergent surgery in children. Historically, surgical dogma dictated emergent appendectomy due to concern for impending perforation. Recently, however, there has been a paradigm shift in both the understanding of its pathophysiology as well as its treatment to more nonoperative management. No longer is it considered a spectrum from uncomplicated appendicitis inevitably progressing to complicated appendicitis over time. Rather, uncomplicated and complicated appendicitis are now considered two distinct pathophysiologic entities. This change requires not only educating the patients and their families but also the general practitioners who will be managing treatment expectations and caring for patients long term. In this article, we review the pathophysiology of appendicitis, including the differentiation between uncomplicated and complicated appendicitis, as well as the new treatment paradigms. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(7):e235-e240.]. PMID:27403670

  6. Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Medecki, Hector

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a point diffraction interferometer for evaluating the quality of a test optic. In operation, the point diffraction interferometer includes a source of radiation, the test optic, a beam divider, a reference wave pinhole located at an image plane downstream from the test optic, and a detector for detecting an interference pattern produced between a reference wave emitted by the pinhole and a test wave emitted from the test optic. The beam divider produces separate reference and test beams which focus at different laterally separated positions on the image plane. The reference wave pinhole is placed at a region of high intensity (e.g., the focal point) for the reference beam. This allows reference wave to be produced at a relatively high intensity. Also, the beam divider may include elements for phase shifting one or both of the reference and test beams.

  7. Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Medecki, H.

    1998-11-10

    Disclosed is a point diffraction interferometer for evaluating the quality of a test optic. In operation, the point diffraction interferometer includes a source of radiation, the test optic, a beam divider, a reference wave pinhole located at an image plane downstream from the test optic, and a detector for detecting an interference pattern produced between a reference wave emitted by the pinhole and a test wave emitted from the test optic. The beam divider produces separate reference and test beams which focus at different laterally separated positions on the image plane. The reference wave pinhole is placed at a region of high intensity (e.g., the focal point) for the reference beam. This allows reference wave to be produced at a relatively high intensity. Also, the beam divider may include elements for phase shifting one or both of the reference and test beams. 8 figs.

  8. Shifting environmental baselines in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Price, A R G; Ghazi, S J; Tkaczynski, P J; Venkatachalam, A J; Santillan, A; Pancho, T; Metcalfe, R; Saunders, J

    2014-01-15

    The Red Sea is among the world's top marine biodiversity hotspots. We re-examined coastal ecosystems at sites surveyed during the 1980s using the same methodology. Coral cover increased significantly towards the north, mirroring the reverse pattern for mangroves and other sedimentary ecosystems. Latitudinal patterns are broadly consistent across both surveys and with results from independent studies. Coral cover showed greatest change, declining significantly from a median score of 4 (1000-9999 m(2)) to 2 (10-99m(2)) per quadrat in 2010/11. This may partly reflect impact from coastal construction, which was evident at 40% of sites and has significantly increased in magnitude over 30 years. Beach oil has significantly declined, but shore debris has increased significantly. Although substantial, levels are lower than at some remote ocean atolls. While earlier reports have suggested that the Red Sea is generally healthy, shifting environmental baselines are evident from the current study. PMID:24246651

  9. Shifted power method for computing tensor eigenpairs.

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, Jackson R.; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2010-10-01

    Recent work on eigenvalues and eigenvectors for tensors of order m {>=} 3 has been motivated by applications in blind source separation, magnetic resonance imaging, molecular conformation, and more. In this paper, we consider methods for computing real symmetric-tensor eigenpairs of the form Ax{sup m-1} = {lambda}x subject to {parallel}x{parallel} = 1, which is closely related to optimal rank-1 approximation of a symmetric tensor. Our contribution is a novel shifted symmetric higher-order power method (SS-HOPM), which we showis guaranteed to converge to a tensor eigenpair. SS-HOPM can be viewed as a generalization of the power iteration method for matrices or of the symmetric higher-order power method. Additionally, using fixed point analysis, we can characterize exactly which eigenpairs can and cannot be found by the method. Numerical examples are presented, including examples from an extension of the method to fnding complex eigenpairs.

  10. Cooperative Lamb shift in an ellipsoid

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, Richard; Manassah, Jamal T.

    2010-06-15

    It has been long known that the global cooperative Lamb shift (CLS) in a large superradiantly emitting sphere has equal magnitude but opposite sign to that of a slab. This result was obtained from QED in 1973 for samples of uniform density. This change of sign holds as well for a Gaussian density distribution. The same result is also obtained for either density in the scalar simplification of QED now in frequent use. Since the CLS must be a continuous function of shape, and the slab resembles a limiting case of oblate ellipsoid, there must be some shape of ellipsoid for which the CLS is zero. We report a calculation of CLS for a Gaussian distribution of general azimuthally symmetric ellipsoidal shape. The CLS is found to vanish when the mean square radius is twice as great transversely as longitudinally.

  11. Using tensor light shifts to measure and cancel a cell's quadrupolar frequency shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peck, S. K.; Lane, N.; Ang, D. G.; Hunter, L. R.

    2016-02-01

    We have developed a technique that uses the tensor light shift to measure and cancel the frequency shift produced by the quadrupolar anisotropy of a vapor cell. We demonstrate the technique on the 6 S1 /2 ,F =4 level of Cs using the D1 transition. The method extends our ability to study quadrupolar wall interactions beyond diamagnetic atoms. We have deduced the twist angle per wall adhesion for cesium on an alkene coating to be θCs -alkene=1.4 mrad . This value is about 37 times larger than the twist angle observed in 131Xe, suggesting that it is not produced by the interaction of the nuclear quadrupole moment with a collisional electric-field gradient. Alternative mechanisms that may be responsible for the observed quadrupolar frequency shifts are discussed. By canceling the cell-induced quadrupole shift we have extended our cells' effective spin-relaxation times by as much as a factor of 2. This cancellation improves magnetometer sensitivity in highly anisotropic cells and could reduce systematic uncertainties in some precision measurements.

  12. Using Tensor Light Shifts to Measure and Cancel a Cell's Quadruopolar Frequency Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Larry; Peck, Stephen; Lane, Nathanael; Ang, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a new technique that uses the tensor light shift to measure and cancel the frequency shift produced by the quadrupolar anisotropy of a vapor cell. We demonstrate the technique on the 6 S1/2, F = 4 level of Cs using the D1 transition. The method extends our ability to study quadrupolar wall interactions beyond diamagnetic atoms. We have deduced the twist angle per wall adhesion for cesium on an alkene coating to be about 1.4 mrad. This value is about 37 times larger than the twist angle observed in 131 Xe, suggesting that it is not produced by the interaction of the nuclear quadrupole moment with a collisional electric-field gradient. Alternative mechanisms that may be responsible for the observed quadrupolar frequency shifts are discussed. By cancelling the cell-induced quadrupole shift we have extended our cells' effective spin-relaxation times by as much as a factor of two. This cancellation improves magnetometer sensitivity in highly anisotropic cells and could reduce systematic uncertainties in some precision measurements. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. PHY1205824 and No. PHY1519265.

  13. Nonsense codons trigger an RNA partitioning shift.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Angela D; Gudikote, Jayanthi P; Wang, Jun; Chan, Wai-Kin; Chang, Yao-Fu; Olivas, O Renee; Wilkinson, Miles F

    2009-02-13

    T-cell receptor-beta (TCRbeta) genes naturally acquire premature termination codons (PTCs) as a result of programmed gene rearrangements. PTC-bearing TCRbeta transcripts are dramatically down-regulated to protect T-cells from the deleterious effects of the truncated proteins that would otherwise be produced. Here we provide evidence that two responses collaborate to elicit this dramatic down-regulation. One is rapid mRNA decay triggered by the nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) RNA surveillance pathway. We demonstrate that this occurs in highly purified nuclei lacking detectable levels of three different cytoplasmic markers, but containing an outer nuclear membrane marker, suggesting that decay occurs either in the nucleoplasm or at the outer nuclear membrane. The second response is a dramatic partitioning shift in the nuclear fraction-to-cytoplasmic fraction mRNA ratio that results in few TCRbeta transcripts escaping to the cytoplasmic fraction of cells. Analysis of TCRbeta mRNA kinetics after either transcriptional repression or induction suggested that this nonsense codon-induced partitioning shift (NIPS) response is not the result of cytoplasmic NMD but instead reflects retention of PTC(+) TCRbeta mRNA in the nuclear fraction of cells. We identified TCRbeta sequences crucial for NIPS but found that NIPS is not exclusively a property of TCRbeta transcripts, and we identified non-TCRbeta sequences that elicit NIPS. RNA interference experiments indicated that NIPS depends on the NMD factors UPF1 and eIF4AIII but not the NMD factor UPF3B. We propose that NIPS collaborates with NMD to retain and degrade a subset of PTC(+) transcripts at the outer nuclear membrane and/or within the nucleoplasm. PMID:19091751

  14. Timing shifts due to NIF beam repointing

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J

    2007-08-15

    Repointing a NIF beam to hit a target position off target chamber center (TCC) will introduce a timing shift due to changes in the light pathlength. This shift could be important for target experiment requirements even for targets placed at TCC, since beam timing test shots will place beams up to 15 mm off TCC in order to spatially separate them on foil targets. In particular, timing errors due to beam repointing need to be considered against the 30 ps RMS timing requirement. Since the repointing process will keep the beam passing through a fixed point in the final optics assembly (the conversion crystal) by tip/tilt adjustments of two turning mirrors (LM5 and LM7), the problem naturally divides into two parts: Timing offsets past the conversion crystal due to target positioning changes, and timing offsets behind the fixed point on the conversion crystal due to turning mirror adjustments. Timing offsets past the conversion crystal can be significant, but are trivial to calculate exactly; however, an exact calculation of timing offsets behind the fixed point on the conversion crystal would require a three-dimensional optomechanical raytrace model to be developed for every beamline, and this would be difficult and expensive. In this memo, I estimate the magnitude of timing offsets due to pathlength changes behind the conversion crystal by analysis of a worst-case model. I conclude that these timing offsets are insignificant compared with the current allocation in the 30 ps RMS timing requirement, and that more detailed raytrace modeling of individual beams is not necessary.

  15. Phenological shifts and the fate of mutualisms

    PubMed Central

    Rafferty, Nicole E.; CaraDonna, Paul J.; Bronstein, Judith L.

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is altering the timing of life history events in a wide array of species, many of which are involved in mutualistic interactions. Because many mutualisms can form only if partner species are able to locate each other in time, differential phenological shifts are likely to influence their strength, duration and outcome. At the extreme, climate change-driven shifts in phenology may result in phenological mismatch: the partial or complete loss of temporal overlap of mutualistic species. We have a growing understanding of how, when, and why phenological change can alter one type of mutualism–pollination. However, as we show here, there has been a surprising lack of attention to other types of mutualism. We generate a set of predictions about the characteristics that may predispose mutualisms in general to phenological mismatches. We focus not on the consequences of such mismatches but rather on the likelihood that mismatches will develop. We explore the influence of three key characteristics of mutualism: 1) intimacy, 2) seasonality and duration, and 3) obligacy and specificity. We predict that the following characteristics of mutualism may increase the likelihood of phenological mismatch: 1) a non-symbiotic life history in which co-dispersal is absent; 2) brief, seasonal interactions; and 3) facultative, generalized interactions. We then review the limited available data in light of our a priori predictions and point to mutualisms that are more and less likely to be at risk of becoming phenologically mismatched, emphasizing the need for research on mutualisms other than plant–pollinator interactions. Future studies should explicitly focus on mutualism characteristics to determine whether and how changing phenologies will affect mutualistic interactions. PMID:25883391

  16. Government policies promote deforestation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    The well-documented loss of forest cover throughout the world has created a multitude of equally well-documented environmental problems, including soil erosion, water pollution, species extinctions, and the buildup of atmospheric carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas that is contributing to global warming. Recent discussions on the causes of deforestation have focused on inevitable consequences of poverty and population growth, such as clearing for agricultural, shifting cultivation, and fuel-wood gathering. But according to a recent report from the World Resources Institute (WRI) in Washington, DC, another important often unrecognized, cause of deforestation is bad economic policies in the countries that own forest resources.

  17. Exploring Australian health promotion and environmental sustainability initiatives.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Rebecca; Kingsley, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Issue addressed Health promotion practitioners have important roles in applying ecosystem approaches to health and actively promoting environmental sustainability within community-level practice. The present study identified the nature and scope of health promotion activities across Australia that tackle environmental sustainability. Methods A mixed-method approach was used, with 82 participants undertaking a quantitative survey and 11 undertaking a qualitative interview. Purposeful sampling strategies were used to recruit practitioners who were delivering community-level health promotion and sustainability programs in Australia. The data were analysed thematically and interpretation was guided by the principles of triangulation. Results Study participants were at various stages of linking health promotion and environmental sustainability. Initiatives focused on healthy and sustainable food, active transport, energy efficiency, contact with nature and capacity building. Conclusion Capacity building approaches were perceived as essential to strengthening this field of practice. Healthy and sustainable food and active transport were suitable platforms for simultaneously promoting community health and sustainability. There was potential for expansion of programs that emphasise contact with nature and energy issues, as well as interventions that emphasise systems thinking and interdisciplinary approaches. So what? It was promising that Australian health promotion programs have started to address complexity rather than single issues, as evidenced by explicit engagement with environmental sustainability. However, more effort is required to enable a shift towards ecosystem approaches to health. PMID:26650394

  18. Biohydrogen production from cellulosic hydrolysate produced via temperature-shift-enhanced bacterial cellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yung-Chung; Su, Yi-Chen; Chen, Chun-Yen; Chen, Wen-Ming; Lee, Kuo-Shing; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2009-12-01

    A "temperature-shift" strategy was developed to improve reducing sugar production from bacterial hydrolysis of cellulosic materials. In this strategy, production of cellulolytic enzymes with Cellulomonas uda E3-01 was promoted at a preferable temperature (35 degrees C), while more efficient enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis was achieved under an elevated culture temperature (45 degrees C), at which cell growth was inhibited to avoid consumption of reducing sugar. This temperature-shift strategy was shown to markedly increase the reducing sugar (especially, monosaccharide and disaccharide) concentration in the hydrolysate while hydrolyzing pure (carboxymethyl-cellulose, xylan, avicel and cellobiose) and natural (rice husk, rice straw, bagasse and Napier-grass) cellulosic materials. The cellulosic hydrolysates from CMC and xylan were successfully converted to H(2) via dark fermentation with Clostridium butyricum CGS5, attaining a maximum hydrogen yield of 4.79 mmol H(2)/g reducing sugar. PMID:19604692

  19. Species traits and climate velocity explain geographic range shifts in an ocean-warming hotspot.

    PubMed

    Sunday, Jennifer M; Pecl, Gretta T; Frusher, Stewart; Hobday, Alistair J; Hill, Nicole; Holbrook, Neil J; Edgar, Graham J; Stuart-Smith, Rick; Barrett, Neville; Wernberg, Thomas; Watson, Reg A; Smale, Dan A; Fulton, Elizabeth A; Slawinski, Dirk; Feng, Ming; Radford, Ben T; Thompson, Peter A; Bates, Amanda E

    2015-09-01

    Species' ranges are shifting globally in response to climate warming, with substantial variability among taxa, even within regions. Relationships between range dynamics and intrinsic species traits may be particularly apparent in the ocean, where temperature more directly shapes species' distributions. Here, we test for a role of species traits and climate velocity in driving range extensions in the ocean-warming hotspot of southeast Australia. Climate velocity explained some variation in range shifts, however, including species traits more than doubled the variation explained. Swimming ability, omnivory and latitudinal range size all had positive relationships with range extension rate, supporting hypotheses that increased dispersal capacity and ecological generalism promote extensions. We find independent support for the hypothesis that species with narrow latitudinal ranges are limited by factors other than climate. Our findings suggest that small-ranging species are in double jeopardy, with limited ability to escape warming and greater intrinsic vulnerability to stochastic disturbances. PMID:26189556

  20. Phase-shifting behaviour revisited: An alternative measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Bo Soo; Ryu, Doojin; Ryu, Doowon

    2014-05-01

    This study re-examines the recently documented phase-shifting behaviour of financial markets using an alternative measure, an intraday return-based measure. While most previous studies on phase-shifting behaviour adopt the volume-imbalance measure proposed by Plerou et al. (2003), we find that our return-based measure successfully captures phase-shifting behaviour, and moreover exhibits a unique pattern of phase-shifting that is not detected when the classical volume imbalance measure is used. By analysing a high-frequency dataset of KOSPI200 futures, we also find that large trades reveal phase-shifting behaviour more clearly and significantly than smaller trades.

  1. Effects of pharmacological agents on subcortical resistance shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klivington, K. A.

    1975-01-01

    Microliter quantities of tetrodotoxin, tetraethylammonium chloride, and picrotoxin injected into the inferior colliculus and superior olive of unanesthetized cats differentially affect the amplitude and waveform of click-evoked potentials and evoked resistance shifts. Tetrodotoxin simultaneously reduces the negative phase of the evoked potential and eliminates the evoked resistance shift. Tetraethylammonium enhances the negative evoked potential component, presumably of postsynaptic origin, without significantly altering evoked resistance shift amplitude. Picrotoxin also enhances the negative evoked potential wave but increases evoked resistance shift amplitude. These findings implicate events associated with postsynaptic membrane depolarization in the production of the evoked resistance shift.

  2. s-Wave collisional frequency shift of a fermion clock.

    PubMed

    Hazlett, Eric L; Zhang, Yi; Stites, Ronald W; Gibble, Kurt; O'Hara, Kenneth M

    2013-04-19

    We report an s-wave collisional frequency shift of an atomic clock based on fermions. In contrast to bosons, the fermion clock shift is insensitive to the population difference of the clock states, set by the first pulse area in Ramsey spectroscopy, θ(1). The fermion shift instead depends strongly on the second pulse area θ(2). It allows the shift to be canceled, nominally at θ(2)=π/2, but correlations perturb the null to slightly larger θ(2). The frequency shift is relevant for optical lattice clocks and increases with the spatial inhomogeneity of the clock excitation field, naturally larger at optical frequencies. PMID:23679589

  3. C IV Doppler shifts observed in active region filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    The Doppler shift properties of 21 active region filaments were studied using C IV Dopplergram data. Most are associated with corridors of weak magnetic field that separate opposite polarity strong fields seen in photospheric magnetograms. A majority of the filaments are relatively blue shifted, although several lie very close to the dividing lines between blue and red shift. Only one filament in the samples is clearly red shifted. A new calibration procedure for Dopplergrams indicates that sizable zero point offsets are often required. The center-to-limb behavior of the resulting absolute Doppler shifts suggests that filament flows are usually quite small. It is possible that they vanish.

  4. Dispositional factors and work mastery among shift workers.

    PubMed

    Foldal, Vegard; Langvik, Eva; Saksvik-Lehouillier, Ingvild

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate how broad personality dimensions and dispositional resistance to change are associated with mastery of work among shift workers. A total of 285 shift workers employed in rotating shifts with morning, evening and night work and night shift schedules in a municipality in Norway completed electronic questionnaires. The findings suggest that the broad personality dimensions neuroticism and conscientiousness were significant predictors of perceived work mastery among shift workers in this sample, whereas the narrow trait dispositional resistance to change was not. PMID:27093576

  5. Shift-multiplexed self-referential holographic data storage.

    PubMed

    Takabayashi, Masanori; Okamoto, Atsushi; Eto, Taisuke; Okamoto, Takashi

    2014-07-10

    The feasibility and the properties of shift-multiplexed self-referential holographic data storage (SR-HDS) were investigated. Although SR-HDS has attractive features as typified by referenceless holographic recording, its multiplexing properties, which are consummately important for holographic data storage, have not been clarified until now. The results of numerical and experimental evaluations of medium shift dependence in SR-HDS clarified that the shift selectivity is almost the same as in collinear holography. Furthermore, 25 datapages were successfully shift-multiplexed with the shift pitch of 8.3 μm by the numerical simulation. PMID:25090055

  6. Shifting tolerance for multilayer collinear holographic data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinqiu; Cao, Liangcai; He, Qingsheng; Jin, Guofan

    2014-09-01

    The shifting tolerance of the collinear holographic data storage system is discussed considering its influences on the quality of the reconstructed data pages and the precision of the holographic disk actuator. The diffractive efficiencies with shifting along the x-axis and the z-axis are calculated respectively based on the bit error rates of the reconstructed data pages. The numerical aperture of the objective lens and the recording wavelength show different impacts on the shifting tolerance and the storage density. The orthogonal reference pattern shift multiplexing method is investigated. It is proved that the method could improve the data storage density by keeping the shifting tolerance.

  7. [Promoting Living Kidney Transplantation].

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiu-Chu

    2016-04-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best approach for treating patients with end stage renal disease, offering patients the best chance of returning to normal health. While the techniques used in kidney transplantation surgery are mature and highly successful, there is a severe shortage of donor organs. Statistics show a serious imbalance between organ donations and patients on the waiting list for organ transplantation. Moreover, evidence from empirical studies has shown a better transplantation outcome for patients who receive living donor transplantation than for those who receive organs from cadavers. Although using relatives as donors offers an effective way to reduce the problem of organ shortage, this strategy faces many challenges and many other factors affect the promotion of living donor transplantation. This article elaborates how cultural and psychological factors, kidney transplantation awareness, and ethics and laws impact upon living kidney donations and then proposes coping strategies for promoting living kidney transplantation. PMID:27026555

  8. Human Promoters Are Intrinsically Directional

    PubMed Central

    Duttke, Sascha H.C.; Lacadie, Scott A.; Ibrahim, Mahmoud M.; Glass, Christopher K.; Corcoran, David L.; Benner, Christopher; Heinz, Sven; Kadonaga, James T.; Ohler, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Divergent transcription, in which reverse-oriented transcripts occur upstream of eukaryotic promoters in regions devoid of annotated genes, has been suggested to be a general property of active promoters. Here we show that the human basal RNA polymerase II transcriptional machinery and core promoter are inherently unidirectional, and that reverse-oriented transcripts originate from their own cognate reverse-directed core promoters. In vitro transcription analysis and mapping of nascent transcripts in cells revealed that sequences at reverse start sites are similar to those of their forward counterparts. The use of DNase I accessibility to define proximal promoter borders revealed that up to half of promoters are unidirectional and that unidirectional promoters are depleted at their upstream edges of reverse core promoter sequences and their associated chromatin features. Divergent transcription is thus not an inherent property of the transcription process, but rather the consequence of the presence of both forward- and reverse-directed core promoters. PMID:25639469

  9. The promotion of breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Tuluhungwa, R R; Yung, W

    1979-01-01

    To reverse the current trend of a significant decline worldwide in breast feeding means reeducation of medical and health personnel as well as the general public. Programs to promote breast feeding require the commitment of governments, with support from various ministries including health, education, labor, community development and judiciary. Examples of what 3 developing countries--Jamaica, Colombia and Thailand--are doing to promote breast feeding are reported. A large scale breast feeding campaign was launched in Jamaica in October 1977. The 3 phases of the campaign were: 1) preliminary surveys and research and motivation of professional, voluntary and extension groups through training seminars, panel discussions, and meetings; 2) promotion of breast feeding via mass media and motivation of target groups by trained personnel; and 3) evaluation of the campaign. A survey undertaken in 1978 showed that the breast feeding messages had achieved the desired effect--more mothers practiced breast feeding. In Colombia the breast feeding campaign emphasized non-formal education through the use of games and pictures. A game is used which is usually initiated by a health worker in the waiting room of a health center and involves the mothers, the general public, and sometimes the professional personnel. Through reading and interpreting rhymed breast feeding messages, the participants exchange opinions and experiences. Before starting a campaign to encourage low-income urban and semi-urban mothers to breast feed, the National Food and Nutrition Committee of Thailand pretested slogans and posters designed for the promotion of breast feeding. Posters develpoed in accordance with the suggestions made by the women were tested among 126 pregnant and lactating women. The Committee decided which picture to print for low-income and rural audiences and which to print for middle-class audiences. PMID:12336781

  10. Sleep and cognitive function of crewmembers and mission controllers working 24-h shifts during a simulated 105-day spaceflight mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, Laura K.; Wright, Kenneth P.; Burke, Tina M.; Chinoy, Evan D.; Ronda, Joseph M.; Lockley, Steven W.; Czeisler, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    The success of long-duration space missions depends on the ability of crewmembers and mission support specialists to be alert and maintain high levels of cognitive function while operating complex, technical equipment. We examined sleep, nocturnal melatonin levels and cognitive function of crewmembers and the sleep and cognitive function of mission controllers who participated in a high-fidelity 105-day simulated spaceflight mission at the Institute of Biomedical Problems (Moscow). Crewmembers were required to perform daily mission duties and work one 24-h extended duration work shift every sixth day. Mission controllers nominally worked 24-h extended duration shifts. Supplemental lighting was provided to crewmembers and mission controllers. Participants' sleep was estimated by wrist-actigraphy recordings. Overall, results show that crewmembers and mission controllers obtained inadequate sleep and exhibited impaired cognitive function, despite countermeasure use, while working extended duration shifts. Crewmembers averaged 7.04±0.92 h (mean±SD) and 6.94±1.08 h (mean±SD) in the two workdays prior to the extended duration shifts, 1.88±0.40 h (mean±SD) during the 24-h work shift, and then slept 10.18±0.96 h (mean±SD) the day after the night shift. Although supplemental light was provided, crewmembers' average nocturnal melatonin levels remained elevated during extended 24-h work shifts. Naps and caffeine use were reported by crewmembers during ˜86% and 45% of extended night work shifts, respectively. Even with reported use of wake-promoting countermeasures, significant impairments in cognitive function were observed. Mission controllers slept 5.63±0.95 h (mean±SD) the night prior to their extended duration work shift. On an average, 89% of night shifts included naps with mission controllers sleeping an average of 3.4±1.0 h (mean±SD) during the 24-h extended duration work shift. Mission controllers also showed impaired cognitive function during extended

  11. Promoter propagation in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Matus-Garcia, Mariana; Nijveen, Harm; van Passel, Mark W J

    2012-11-01

    Transcriptional activation or 'rewiring' of silent genes is an important, yet poorly understood, phenomenon in prokaryotic genomes. Anecdotal evidence coming from experimental evolution studies in bacterial systems has shown the promptness of adaptation upon appropriate selective pressure. In many cases, a partial or complete promoter is mobilized to silent genes from elsewhere in the genome. We term hereafter such recruited regulatory sequences as Putative Mobile Promoters (PMPs) and we hypothesize they have a large impact on rapid adaptation of novel or cryptic functions. Querying all publicly available prokaryotic genomes (1362) uncovered >4000 families of highly conserved PMPs (50 to 100 long with ≥80% nt identity) in 1043 genomes from 424 different genera. The genomes with the largest number of PMP families are Anabaena variabilis (28 families), Geobacter uraniireducens (27 families) and Cyanothece PCC7424 (25 families). Family size varied from 2 to 93 homologous promoters (in Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus). Some PMPs are present in particular species, but some are conserved across distant genera. The identified PMPs represent a conservative dataset of very recent or conserved events of mobilization of non-coding DNA and thus they constitute evidence of an extensive reservoir of recyclable regulatory sequences for rapid transcriptional rewiring. PMID:22933716

  12. Bicycle Promotion Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Simone, G. A.

    1981-03-09

    The objective of this Bicycle Promotion Plan is to outline a set of recommendations and supporting strategies for implementation by the US DOE toward increased use of the bicycle for energy conservation. The recommendations are designed in such a way as to function in concert with: (1) bicycle programs administered by other Federal government agencies; and (2) related programs and activities already sponsored by DOE. The approach to preparation of the Plan involved a review of all current and planned bicycle promotion programs at the Federal level as well as a review of the array of lierature on the subject. The UniWorld project staff also interacted with several DOE program offices, in order to determine the extent to which they might appropriately contribute to the implementation of bicycle promotional efforts. A synthesis of all the information gathered was published in January of 1981 as a part of the project (The Bicycle Program Review). Based upon this information and an examination of the barriers to bicycle use identified by bicycle transportation specialists in the field, UniWorld developed a series of the most potentially effective recommendations and program strategies for implementation by DOE. The recommendations address activities that could be undertaken in conjunction with existing DOE programs, new developments that might be considered to fulfill critical needs in the field, and interagency efforts that DOE could play a role in.

  13. Coherent control of the Goos-Haenchen shift

    SciTech Connect

    Ziauddin; Qamar, Sajid; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2010-02-15

    The behavior of the Goos-Haenchen (GH) shifts in the reflected and transmitted light beam which is incident on a cavity containing an intracavity medium of three-level or four-level atoms with electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is discussed. We report a coherent control of the GH shift in a fixed configuration or device via superluminal and subluminal wave propagation. For superluminal wave propagation, we observe negative GH shifts in the reflected part of the incident light whereas the shifts are positive in the transmitted light beam. This corresponds to the negative group index of the cavity in the former case and positive group index of the cavity in the latter. For subluminal wave propagation, the behavior of the GH shifts in the reflected light changes and positive shifts appear; however, the GH shifts in the transmitted light remains positive. The corresponding group index of the cavity is positive in both cases.

  14. Disturbed sleep in shift workers, day workers, and insomniacs.

    PubMed

    Akerstedt, Torbjörn; Ingre, Michael; Broman, Jan-Erik; Kecklund, Göran

    2008-04-01

    Very little is known about differences in sleep between day and shift workers in representative samples of the population. This study compared a national representative sample (N=3400) of shift (with night shifts) and day workers regarding the different types of sleep disturbances and also the level of sleep symptoms with that of insomnia patients. The results showed very few differences between shift and day workers; only "too little sleep" and "nodding off at work" were marginally higher among shift workers. The results also showed that the complaints of insomnia patients for most sleep disturbances corresponded to the 2nd-16th percentile of the shift workers' levels of complaints. The results suggest, at least with the present questionnaire methodology, that shift work does not appear to be a major source of sleep disturbances and that their complaint levels bear no resemblance to those seen in insomniac patients. PMID:18484368

  15. Vocal pitch shift in congenital amusia (pitch deafness).

    PubMed

    Hutchins, Sean; Peretz, Isabelle

    2013-04-01

    We tested whether congenital amusics, who exhibit pitch perception deficits, nevertheless adjust the pitch of their voice in response to a sudden pitch shift applied to vocal feedback. Nine amusics and matched controls imitated their own previously-recorded speech or singing, while the online feedback they received was shifted mid-utterance by 25 or 200 cents. While a few amusics failed to show pitch-shift effects, a majority showed a pitch-shift response and nearly half showed a normal response to both large and small shifts, with similar magnitudes and response times as controls. The size and presence of the shift response to small shifts were significantly predicted by participants' vocal pitch matching accuracy, rather than their ability to perceive small pitch changes. The observed dissociation between the ability to consciously perceive small pitch changes and to produce and monitor vocal pitch provides evidence for a dual-route model of pitch processing in the brain. PMID:23467261

  16. High-durability phase-shift film with variable transmittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, Osamu; Shishido, Hiroaki; Kajiwara, Takenori

    2015-10-01

    In order to maintain the lithographic margin and to have sufficient image resolution, attenuated phase shift masks are widely used as a resolution enhancement technique. To improve the radiation durability of the phase shift film, we have developed low oxidation MoSi shifters, such as A6L2, as one option for improving radiation durability. But to provide the best radiation durability, we have developed a new approach eliminating the molybdenum from the phase shift film and introduced a Silicon-Nitride (Si-N) based attenuated phase shift film. Traditionally the transmittance of the phase shift layer is usually around 6%. In the case of a pure Si3N4 film, the transmittance with 180 degree phase shift is around 18%. But, by controlling film structure with a combination of Si-N the transmittance can be tuned to the customers desired transmission value for high durability Mo free attenuated phase shift films.

  17. WATER-GAS SHIFT KINETICS OVER IRON OXIDE CATALYSTS AT MEMBRANE REACTOR CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R.F. Lund

    2002-08-02

    The kinetics of water-gas shift were studied over ferrochrome catalysts under conditions with high carbon dioxide partial pressures, such as would be expected in a membrane reactor. The catalyst activity is inhibited by increasing carbon dioxide partial pressure. A microkinetic model of the reaction kinetics was developed. The model indicated that catalyst performance could be improved by decreasing the strength of surface oxygen bonds. Literature data indicated that adding either ceria or copper to the catalyst as a promoter might impart this desired effect. Ceria-promoted ferrochrome catalysts did not perform any better than unpromoted catalyst at the conditions tested, but copper-promoted ferrochrome catalysts did offer an improvement over the base ferrochrome material. A different class of water-gas shift catalyst, sulfided CoMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is not affected by carbon dioxide and may be a good alternative to the ferrochrome system, provided other constraints, notably the requisite sulfur level and maximum temperature, are not too limiting. A model was developed for an adiabatic, high-temperature water-gas shift membrane reactor. Simulation results indicate that an excess of steam in the feed (three moles of water per mole of CO) is beneficial even in a membrane reactor as it reduces the rate of adiabatic temperature rise. The simulations also indicate that much greater improvement can be attained by improving the catalyst as opposed to improving the membrane. Further, eliminating the inhibition by carbon dioxide will have a greater impact than will increasing the catalyst activity (assuming inhibition is still operative). Follow-up research into the use of sulfide catalysts with continued kinetic and reactor modeling is suggested.

  18. Promoter occlusion: transcription through a promoter may inhibit its activity.

    PubMed

    Adhya, S; Gottesman, M

    1982-07-01

    Induction of prophage lambda inhibits the expression of the gal operon from its cognate promoters. The effect is observed only in cis, and is due to frequent transcription of the gal promoter region by RNA polymerase molecules initiating upstream at the prophage PL promoter. The frequency of transcription initiation at PL is some 30 times greater than that at the gal promoter, Pg1. PL is one of the strongest procaryotic promoters. This "promoter occlusion" is essentially complete when the distance between gal and PL is small (less than or equal to 10 kb); and when PL is fully active (that is, in the absence of the cl or cro repressors). We discuss the possibility that promoter occlusion at two lambda promoters, Pint and PR', might play a role in the sequential expression of viral functions. PMID:6217898

  19. Toward a post-Charter health promotion.

    PubMed

    Labonté, Ronald

    2011-12-01

    The past 25 years have seen enormous shifts in the environmental, political, economic and social landscapes that condition people's abilities to be healthy. Climate change is now a reality. China, India, Brazil and other 'developing' countries are emerging as new axes of political and economic power. Global capitalism has become increasingly predatory and crisis ridden, a result of unregulated and irresponsible greed of unimaginable scale. The elite response has been the increased erosion of the health and other social protection policies of redistribution that characterized the first-world run-up to the Ottawa Charter. These new realities challenge health promoters in ways unforeseen a quarter century ago. It is imperative that local determinants of health, to which health promoters give their attention, be traced to broader, even global levels of determinants. Support for groups acting at these levels should become a fundamental practice tenet. So, too, should advocacy for the social state, in which progressive taxation and hefty social investment blunt the health inequalities created by unfettered markets. As environmental and economic insecurities and inequalities increase in many of the world's countries, so does the risk of xenophobia and conflict. The roots of racism are complex; but weeding them out becomes another health promotion practice of the new millennium. There are some hopeful signs of health promoting political change, much of it emanating now from countries in the global South; but the threat of a return to health behaviourism in the face of the new global pandemic of chronic disease is real and must be confronted. PMID:22080072

  20. Sleep and satisfaction in 8- and 12-h forward-rotating shift systems: Industrial employees prefer 12-h shifts.

    PubMed

    Karhula, Kati; Härmä, Mikko; Ropponen, Annina; Hakola, Tarja; Sallinen, Mikael; Puttonen, Sampsa

    2016-01-01

    Twelve-hour shift systems have become more popular in industry. Survey data of shift length, shift rotation speed, self-rated sleep, satisfaction and perceived health were investigated for the associations among 599 predominantly male Finnish industrial employees. The studied forward-rotating shift systems were 12-h fast (12fast, DDNN------, n = 268), 8-h fast (8fast, MMEENN----, n = 161) and 8-h slow (8slow, MMMM-EEEE-NNNN, n = 170). Satisfaction with shift system differed between the groups (p < 0.01) after controlling for age, gender, shift work experience and self-rated stress. In the 12fast, 98% of employees were satisfied with their shift system (75% 8fast, 54% 8slow). Negative effects on sleep and alertness were rare (8%) in the 12fast group (53% 8fast, 66% 8 slow, p < 0.01) and self-reported sleep difficulties were less frequent than in the 8fast and 8slow groups (8%, 27%, 41%, respectively, p < 0.01). The self-reported average sleep duration (12fast 7:50, 8fast 7:24, 8slow 7:15, p < 0.01), and shift-specific sleep before and between morning shifts and after first night shift were longer in the 12fast group. Perceived negative effects of the current shift system on general health (12fast 4%, 8fast 30%, 8slow 41%, p < 0.001) and work-life balance (12fast 8%, 8fast 52%, 8slow 63%, p < 0.001) differed strongly between the groups. In conclusion, the perceived effects of shift work were dependent on both shift length and shift rotation speed: employees in the 12-h rapidly forward-rotating shift system were most satisfied, perceived better work-life balance and slept better than the employees in the 8fast or especially the employees in the 8-h slowly rotating systems. PMID:27077442

  1. Validation of a Cephalad Fluid Shift Countermeasure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macias, B.; Cole, C.; Kesari, S.; Hargens, A.; Stenger, M.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S. M. C.; Sargsyan, A.; Liu, J.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This project will provide critical data required to objectively determine how an optimized thigh cuff could be incorporated into the NASA integrated physiological countermeasure suite. This project will determine if thigh cuffs used during simulated spaceflight impact intracranial pressure (ICP), ocular structure and function, and intraocular pressure (IOP) using state of-the-art techniques. Additionally, some of the same methods, hardware, and protocols will be employed in the present investigation to enable direct comparisons to the International Space Station (ISS) "Fluid Shifts" experiment with Chibis-Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP). This study will determine the temporal physiological responses of thigh cuff application and removal on ocular and cerebral variables (including invasive ICP) in a microgravity analog. Furthermore, this proposed study will determine tissue pressure distribution applied by thigh cuffs in order to improve comfort, mobility, and efficacy of the countermeasure. Our specific aim is to determine the efficacy of a novel thigh cuff device to mitigate cephalad fluid shifts. We hypothesize that a thigh cuff countermeasure employed in a microgravity analog will temporarily reverse or attenuate ocular and cerebral-volume-pressure variables, approaching normal Earth-based seated posture, the most frequent posture assumed in daily life. In addition, we hypothesize that the magnitude of fluid and pressure redistribution using a thigh cuff countermeasure may require a longer exposure time than that of Chibis-LBNP (using ground-based data from our "Fluid Shifts" project). This project directly addresses Critical Path Roadmap Risks and Questions regarding "Risk of Spaceflight-Induced Intracranial Hypertension/Vision Alterations," and IRP Gap VIIP13: We need to identify preventative and treatment countermeasures to mitigate changes in ocular structure and function and intracranial pressure during spaceflight. METHODS: Noninvasive

  2. A review of the consequences of fluid and electrolyte shifts in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, C. S.

    1979-01-01

    This review describes the renal-endocrine mechanisms related to the early losses of fluid-electrolytes from the body during weightlessness as well as their contribution to longer term adaptation of fluid-electrolyte balance. The hypotheses presented were generated by a systematic analysis of body fluid and renal dynamics observed under conditions of actual and simulated spaceflight. These have increased our understanding of the effects of acute headward fluid shifts on renal excretion, the factors promoting excess sodium excretion and the regulation of extracellular fluid composition.

  3. A review of the consequences of fluid and electrolyte shifts in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, C. S.

    1978-01-01

    This review describes the renal-endocrine mechanisms related to the early losses of fluid-electrolytes from the body during weightlessness as well as their contribution to longer term adaptation of fluid-electrolyte balance. The hypotheses presented were generated by a systematic analysis of body fluid and renal dynamics observed under conditions of actual and simulated spaceflight. These have increased our understanding of the effects of acute headward fluid shifts on renal excretion, the factors promoting excess sodium excretion and the regulation of extracellular fluid composition.

  4. Circadian Rhythm Disruption Promotes Lung Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Bauer, Matthew R; Davidson, Shawn M; Heimann, Megan; Subbaraj, Lakshmipriya; Bhutkar, Arjun; Bartlebaugh, Jordan; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Jacks, Tyler

    2016-08-01

    Circadian rhythms are 24-hr oscillations that control a variety of biological processes in living systems, including two hallmarks of cancer, cell division and metabolism. Circadian rhythm disruption by shift work is associated with greater risk for cancer development and poor prognosis, suggesting a putative tumor-suppressive role for circadian rhythm homeostasis. Using a genetically engineered mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma, we have characterized the effects of circadian rhythm disruption on lung tumorigenesis. We demonstrate that both physiologic perturbation (jet lag) and genetic mutation of the central circadian clock components decreased survival and promoted lung tumor growth and progression. The core circadian genes Per2 and Bmal1 were shown to have cell-autonomous tumor-suppressive roles in transformation and lung tumor progression. Loss of the central clock components led to increased c-Myc expression, enhanced proliferation, and metabolic dysregulation. Our findings demonstrate that both systemic and somatic disruption of circadian rhythms contribute to cancer progression. PMID:27476975

  5. Health-promoting prisons: theory to practice.

    PubMed

    Baybutt, Michelle; Chemlal, Khadoudja

    2016-03-01

    As a setting, prisons offer a unique opportunity to invest in the health of disadvantaged and marginalised populations and address health inequalities and social exclusion - thereby achieving sustainable improvements in well-being for offenders and their families and in turn, helping to reduce rates of re-offending. This article draws on English and French experiences and doctoral research to advocate a shift from a pathogenic model towards a salutogenic model of health as a helpful way to address inequalities and thus, by promoting joined-up working across justice and wider systems, impact positively beyond 'health' for the effective resettlement of prisoners. The paper utilises examples from horticulture to further argue the powerful role of nature in the prison setting in mediating aspects of culture particularly relating to processes of socialisation. Critical success lies in bridging across systems and a commitment to joined-up working at all levels across and beyond prison. PMID:27199019

  6. A generalization of binary minimum shift keying and staggered quadriphase shift keying modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    A generalized modulation scheme, which includes minimum shift keying (MSK) and staggered quadriphase shift keying (SQPSK) as special cases, is analyzed. The general modulator is realized as a one-input, two-output sequence transducer whose outputs select the carrier signal for each band. This form of the modulator has the practical advantage of not requiring any RF filtering since there is no actual mixing of the carriers with the modulating signals. It is shown that the optimum demodulator (whether hard-decision or soft-decision) always can make its decisions from the received waveform over two bands when the interference is additive white Gaussian noise, thus generalizing a well-known result for hard decision demodulation of MSK and SQPSK signals. The power spectra of MSK and SQPSK signals are derived to isolate the role played by coherency between the modulating signals and the carriers.

  7. Plasmon Energy shift in Porous Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannella, Norman; Gabetta, Giuseppe; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2001-03-01

    In order to provide experimental support for quantum confinement models describing electronic effects in porous silicon (p-Si) [1], the Si2s and Si2p plasmon losses have been studied by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Although plasmon losses in the XPS core lines of p-Si have already been reported [2], the modality according to which we performed the experiment and the conclusions are remarkably different. In particular, the plasmon losses observed in the present experiment are representative of the real material (p-Si) since possible artifacts due to ion sputtering have been avoided. We discuss extensively the influence of the satellite structures relative to the oxidized-Silicon core lines, whose presence is expected since oxygen is an intrinsic component of the p-Si anodization process. The p-Si plasmon energy was found at a value 1.5 eV higher than that of bulk Si (17.4 eV), as measured on the cleaned Si substrate as a reference. The magnitude of this shift suggests possible quantum confinement effects ascribed to the p-Si nanostructures. [1]A. G. Cullis and L. T. Canham, Nature 353, 335 (1991) [2]S. Sato, S. Rath, S. Akiyama, S. Nozaki and H. Morisaki, J. Appl. Phys. 86, 1774 (1999)

  8. Model-based phase-shifting interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Zhang, Lei; Shi, Tu; Yang, Yongying; Chong, Shiyao; Miao, Liang; Huang, Wei; Shen, Yibing; Bai, Jian

    2015-10-01

    A model-based phase-shifting interferometer (MPI) is developed, in which a novel calculation technique is proposed instead of the traditional complicated system structure, to achieve versatile, high precision and quantitative surface tests. In the MPI, the partial null lens (PNL) is employed to implement the non-null test. With some alternative PNLs, similar as the transmission spheres in ZYGO interferometers, the MPI provides a flexible test for general spherical and aspherical surfaces. Based on modern computer modeling technique, a reverse iterative optimizing construction (ROR) method is employed for the retrace error correction of non-null test, as well as figure error reconstruction. A self-compiled ray-tracing program is set up for the accurate system modeling and reverse ray tracing. The surface figure error then can be easily extracted from the wavefront data in forms of Zernike polynomials by the ROR method. Experiments of the spherical and aspherical tests are presented to validate the flexibility and accuracy. The test results are compared with those of Zygo interferometer (null tests), which demonstrates the high accuracy of the MPI. With such accuracy and flexibility, the MPI would possess large potential in modern optical shop testing.

  9. Advanced Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sean Emerson; Thomas Vanderspurt; Susanne Opalka; Rakesh Radhakrishnan; Rhonda Willigan

    2009-01-07

    The overall objectives for this project were: (1) to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane with high stability and commercially relevant hydrogen permeation in the presence of trace amounts of carbon monoxide and sulfur; and (2) to identify and synthesize a water gas shift catalyst with a high operating life that is sulfur and chlorine tolerant at low concentrations of these impurities. This work successfully achieved the first project objective to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane composition, Pd{sub 0.47}Cu{sub 0.52}G5{sub 0.01}, that was selected based on atomistic and thermodynamic modeling alone. The second objective was partially successful in that catalysts were identified and evaluated that can withstand sulfur in high concentrations and at high pressures, but a long operating life was not achieved at the end of the project. From the limited durability testing it appears that the best catalyst, Pt-Re/Ce{sub 0.333}Zr{sub 0.333}E4{sub 0.333}O{sub 2}, is unable to maintain a long operating life at space velocities of 200,000 h{sup -1}. The reasons for the low durability do not appear to be related to the high concentrations of H{sub 2}S, but rather due to the high operating pressure and the influence the pressure has on the WGS reaction at this space velocity.

  10. Piezoelectric resonance shifting using tunable nonlinear stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reissman, Timothy; Wolff, Eric M.; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2009-03-01

    Piezoelectric cantilever devices for energy harvesting purposes have typically been tuned by manipulating beam dimensions or by placement of a tip mass. While these techniques do lend themselves well to designing a highly tuned resonance, the design is fixed and causes each system to be unique to a specific driving frequency. In this work, we demonstrate the design of a nonlinear tuning technique via a variable external, attractive magnetic force. With this design, the resonance of the piezoelectric energy harvester is able to be tuned with the adjustment of a slider mechanism. The magnetic design uses the well of attraction principle in order to create a varying nonlinear stiffness, which shifts the resonance of the coupled piezoelectric beam. The significance of this work is the design of a piezoelectric energy harvesting system with a variable resonance frequency that can be adjusted for changes in the driving frequencies over a wide range without the replacement of any system components; thus, extending the usefulness of these vibration energy harvesting devices over a larger frequency span.

  11. Electrostatic shape-shifting ion optics

    DOEpatents

    Dahl, David A.; Scott, Jill R.; Appelhans, Anthony D.

    2006-05-02

    Electrostatic shape-shifting ion optics includes an outer electrode that defines an interior region between first and second opposed open ends. A first inner electrode is positioned within the interior region of the outer electrode at about the first open end. A second inner electrode is positioned within the interior region of the outer electrode at about the second open end. A first end cap electrode is positioned at about a first open end of the first inner electrode so that the first end cap electrode substantially encloses the first open end of the first inner electrode. A second end cap electrode is positioned at about a second open end of the second inner electrode so that the second end cap electrode substantially encloses the second open end of the second inner electrode. A voltage source operatively connected to each of the electrodes applies voltage functions to each of the electrodes to produce an electric field within an interior space enclosed by the electrodes.

  12. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: time to shift?

    PubMed

    Papiris, Spyros A; Tsirigotis, Panagiotis; Kolilekas, Likurgos; Papadaki, Georgia; Papaioannou, Andriana I; Triantafillidou, Christina; Papaporfyriou, Anastasia; Karakatsani, Anna; Kagouridis, Konstantinos; Griese, Matthias; Manali, Effrosyni D

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is categorized into hereditary, secondary and autoimmune PAP (aPAP) types. The common pathogenesis is the ability of the alveolar macrophages to catabolize phagocytized surfactant is affected. Hereditary PAP is caused by mutations involving the GM-CSF signaling, particularly in genes for the GM-CSF receptor and sometimes by GATA2 mutations. Secondary PAP occurs in hematologic malignancies, other hematologic disorders, miscellaneous malignancies, fume and dust inhalation, drugs, autoimmune disorders and immunodeficiencies. aPAP is related to the production of GM-CSF autoantibodies. PAP is characterized morphologically by the inappropriate and progressive 'occupation' of the alveolar spaces by an excessive amount of unprocessed surfactant, limiting gas exchange and gradually exhausting the respiratory reserve. Myeloid cells' immunity deteriorates, increasing the risk of infections. Treatment of PAP is based on its etiology. In aPAP, recent therapeutic advances might shift the treatment option from the whole lung lavage procedure under general anesthesia to the inhalation of GM-CSF 'as needed'. PMID:25864717

  13. Shifting from preconceptions to pure wonderment.

    PubMed

    Porr, Caroline

    2005-07-01

    The author reflects upon her role as a public health nurse striving to attain practice authenticity. Client assessment and nursing interventions were seemingly sufficient until she became curious about 'Who is this person sitting across from me?' and 'What are her experiences in the world as a lone parent living in poverty at the margins of society?' The author begins to think that she could shift from mere client investigation to pure wonderment about the Other by imagining herself as a researcher, an explorer of another's life world. Ultimately this process enables her to enhance the 'caring' in her practice with the knowledge gained of the perceptions and meanings impoverished clients assigned to their everyday lives. Jurgen Habermas' theory of communicative competence serves as the reference map guiding exploration. The author uses Habermas' theoretical principles of intersubjective mutuality--the validity claims of comprehensibility, truth, sincerity, and legitimacy. Comprehensibility embodies understanding, an attitude of unconditional acceptance, and care respect of another's individual person and self-defined reality. Intersubjective mutuality also requires that one dwell in the moment with the Other, satisfied that communication is founded on truth. Sincerity implies fostering the Other's expression of authentic self apart from oppressive distracters. Lastly, legitimacy reconciles the author's altruistic pursuit to know the Other's ontological truth with the reality of the present world. PMID:15935084

  14. Scheduling Aircraft Landings under Constrained Position Shifting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, Hamsa; Chandran, Bala

    2006-01-01

    Optimal scheduling of airport runway operations can play an important role in improving the safety and efficiency of the National Airspace System (NAS). Methods that compute the optimal landing sequence and landing times of aircraft must accommodate practical issues that affect the implementation of the schedule. One such practical consideration, known as Constrained Position Shifting (CPS), is the restriction that each aircraft must land within a pre-specified number of positions of its place in the First-Come-First-Served (FCFS) sequence. We consider the problem of scheduling landings of aircraft in a CPS environment in order to maximize runway throughput (minimize the completion time of the landing sequence), subject to operational constraints such as FAA-specified minimum inter-arrival spacing restrictions, precedence relationships among aircraft that arise either from airline preferences or air traffic control procedures that prevent overtaking, and time windows (representing possible control actions) during which each aircraft landing can occur. We present a Dynamic Programming-based approach that scales linearly in the number of aircraft, and describe our computational experience with a prototype implementation on realistic data for Denver International Airport.

  15. Sublithographic Architecture: Shifting the Responsibility for Perfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehon, A.

    In the past, processing had orders of magnitude between devices and atoms (e.g., with silicon atom lattice spacing around 0.5 nm, a minimum size feature was roughly 2000 atoms wide when we had 1 μm feature sizes). It was the process engineer's job to craft this large collection of atoms into "perfect" devices. The circuit designer and architect could then design systems knowing the process engineer would always give them a set of perfect devices. As we continue to shrink our devices, we no longer have orders of magnitude between the devices and the atoms. As a result, the circuit designers and architects are beginning to work within a similar realm of atoms. Consequently, they must assume some of the responsibilities for dealing with atomic-scale imperfections and uncertainty. This demands a significant shift in our abstraction hierarchy, the responsibilities and expectations at each level in this hierarchy, our fabrication techniques, our testing strategies, and our approaches to design for these atomic-scale computing systems.

  16. Science Advocacy in a Shifting Policy Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickford, E. E.

    2013-12-01

    In the last 50 years, federal investment in research as a share of total spending has declined from a little more than 10% in 1963 to less than 4% in 2013 (AAAS, 2013). In an era of sequestration and shrinking budgets, more and more scientists are advocating directly to policymakers (and their staff) to gain support for research programs and funding. The best advocates understand the political and policy processes, and anticipate policy shifts that may affect them. While scientists are trained with the technical skills to conduct their science, teach it to others, and market their work in order to win grants and publish papers, the policy advocacy arena is unfamiliar territory to many. Acquiring yet another area of expertise mid-career can be daunting, but science advocacy need not require another academic degree. Connecting with policymakers is the first step, and then an understanding of each policymaker's issue history and top priorities will inform the sales pitch. Here, I present some experiences on both the pitching and receiving ends of science advocacy from my year in the US Senate as an AGU/AAAS Congressional Science Fellow, and some guidance for meeting with policymakers and successful science advocacy.

  17. Evaluating Outcomes of Electronic Tools Supporting Physician Shift-to-Shift Handoffs: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Joshua; Riesenberg, Lee Ann; Mardis, Matthew; Donnelly, John; Benningfield, Branden; Youngstrom, Mallory; Vetter, Imelda

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple organizations have recognized that handoffs are prone to errors, and there has been an increase in the use of electronic health records and computerized tools in health care. Objective This systematic review evaluates the current evidence on the effectiveness of electronic solutions used to support shift-to-shift handoffs. Methods We searched the English-language literature for research studies published between January 1, 2008, and September 19, 2014, using National Library of Medicine PubMed, EBSCO CINAHL, OvidSP All Journals, and ProQuest PsycINFO. Included studies focused on the evaluation of physician shift-to-shift handoffs and an electronic solution designed to support handoffs. We assessed articles using a quality scoring system, conducted a review of barriers and strategies, and categorized study outcomes into self-report, process, and outcome measures. Results Thirty-seven articles met inclusion criteria, including 20 single group pre- and posttest studies; 8 posttest only or cross-sectional studies; 4 nonrandomized controlled trials; 1 cohort study; 1 randomized crossover study; and 3 qualitative studies. Quality scores ranged from 3.5 to 14 of a possible 16. Most articles documented some positive outcomes, with 2 of the 3 studies evaluating patient outcomes yielding statistically significant improvements. The only other study that analyzed patient outcomes showed that interventions other than the electronic tool were responsible for most of the significant improvements. Conclusions The majority of studies supported using an electronic tool, yet few measured patient outcomes, and numerous studies suffered from methodology issues. Future studies should evaluate patient outcomes, improve study design, assess the role of faculty oversight, and broaden the focus to recognize the role of human factors. PMID:26221430

  18. Science to Practice: Highly Shifted Proton MR imaging—A Shift toward Better Cell Tracking?

    PubMed Central

    Bulte, Jeff W. M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A “hot spot” magnetic resonance (MR) imaging cell tracking technique has been developed that allows direct detection of dysprosium- or thulium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-α,α′,α″,α‴-tetramethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTMA)–labeled protons inside cells. These highly shifted protons may allow specific detection of multiple cell types because it does not rely on acquiring the proton signal from bulk water. PMID:25153271

  19. Interventions to promote cycling: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Sahlqvist, Shannon; McMinn, Alison; Griffin, Simon J

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine what interventions are effective in promoting cycling, the size of the effects of interventions, and evidence of any associated benefits on overall physical activity or anthropometric measures. Design Systematic review. Data sources Published and unpublished reports in any language identified by searching 13 electronic databases, websites, reference lists, and existing systematic reviews, and papers identified by experts in the field. Review methods Controlled “before and after” experimental or observational studies of the effect of any type of intervention on cycling behaviour measured at either individual or population level. Results Twenty five studies (of which two were randomised controlled trials) from seven countries were included. Six studies examined interventions aimed specifically at promoting cycling, of which four (an intensive individual intervention in obese women, high quality improvements to a cycle route network, and two multifaceted cycle promotion initiatives at town or city level) were found to be associated with increases in cycling. Those studies that evaluated interventions at population level reported net increases of up to 3.4 percentage points in the population prevalence of cycling or the proportion of trips made by bicycle. Sixteen studies assessing individualised marketing of “environmentally friendly” modes of transport to interested households reported modest but consistent net effects equating to an average of eight additional cycling trips per person per year in the local population. Other interventions that targeted travel behaviour in general were not associated with a clear increase in cycling. Only two studies assessed effects of interventions on physical activity; one reported a positive shift in the population distribution of overall physical activity during the intervention. Conclusions Community-wide promotional activities and improving infrastructure for cycling have the potential to

  20. Frequency-shift vs phase-shift characterization of in-liquid quartz crystal microbalance applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagut, Y. J.; García, J. V.; Jiménez, Y.; March, C.; Montoya, A.; Arnau, A.

    2011-06-01

    The improvement of sensitivity in quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) applications has been addressed in the last decades by increasing the sensor fundamental frequency, following the increment of the frequency/mass sensitivity with the square of frequency predicted by Sauerbrey. However, this sensitivity improvement has not been completely transferred in terms of resolution. The decrease of frequency stability due to the increase of the phase noise, particularly in oscillators, made impossible to reach the expected resolution. A new concept of sensor characterization at constant frequency has been recently proposed. The validation of the new concept is presented in this work. An immunosensor application for the detection of a low molecular weight contaminant, the insecticide carbaryl, has been chosen for the validation. An, in principle, improved version of a balanced-bridge oscillator is validated for its use in liquids, and applied for the frequency shift characterization of the QCM immunosensor application. The classical frequency shift characterization is compared with the new phase-shift characterization concept and system proposed.

  1. Frequency-shift vs phase-shift characterization of in-liquid quartz crystal microbalance applications.

    PubMed

    Montagut, Y J; García, J V; Jiménez, Y; March, C; Montoya, A; Arnau, A

    2011-06-01

    The improvement of sensitivity in quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) applications has been addressed in the last decades by increasing the sensor fundamental frequency, following the increment of the frequency/mass sensitivity with the square of frequency predicted by Sauerbrey. However, this sensitivity improvement has not been completely transferred in terms of resolution. The decrease of frequency stability due to the increase of the phase noise, particularly in oscillators, made impossible to reach the expected resolution. A new concept of sensor characterization at constant frequency has been recently proposed. The validation of the new concept is presented in this work. An immunosensor application for the detection of a low molecular weight contaminant, the insecticide carbaryl, has been chosen for the validation. An, in principle, improved version of a balanced-bridge oscillator is validated for its use in liquids, and applied for the frequency shift characterization of the QCM immunosensor application. The classical frequency shift characterization is compared with the new phase-shift characterization concept and system proposed. PMID:21721715

  2. An isotropic chemical shift-chemical shift anisotropic correlation experiment using discrete magic angle turning.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Sears, Jesse A; Kwak, Ja Hun; Hoyt, David W; Wang, Yong; Peden, Charles H F

    2009-05-01

    An isotropic-anisotropic shift 2D correlation spectroscopy is introduced that combines the advantages of both magic angle turning (MAT) and magic angle hopping (MAH) technologies. In this new approach, denoted DMAT for "discrete magic angle turning", the sample rotates clockwise followed by an anticlockwise rotation of exactly the same amount with each rotation less or equal than 360 degrees but greater than 240 degrees , with the rotation speed being constant only for times related to the evolution dimension. This back and forth rotation is repeated and synchronized with a special radio frequency (RF) pulse sequence to produce an isotropic-anisotropic shift 2D correlation spectrum. For any spin-interaction of rank-2 such as chemical shift anisotropy, isotropic magnetic susceptibility interaction, and residual homo-nuclear dipolar interaction in biological fluid samples, the projection along the isotropic dimension is a high resolution spectrum. Since a less than 360 degrees sample rotation is involved, the design potentially allows for in situ control over physical parameters such as pressure, flow conditions, feed compositions, and temperature so that true in situ NMR investigations can be carried out. PMID:19246221

  3. Characterization of Microbial Population Shifts during Sample Storage

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Heath J.; Reese, Brandi Kiel; Peter, Cruz St.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine shifts in the microbial community structure and potential function based on standard Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) storage procedures for sediment cores. Standard long-term storage protocols maintain sediment temperature at 4°C for mineralogy, geochemical, and/or geotechnical analysis whereas standard microbiological sampling immediately preserves sediments at −80°C. Storage at 4°C does not take into account populations may remain active over geologic time scales at temperatures similar to storage conditions. Identification of active populations within the stored core would suggest geochemical and geophysical conditions within the core change over time. To test this potential, the metabolically active fraction of the total microbial community was characterized from IODP Expedition 325 Great Barrier Reef sediment cores prior to and following a 3-month storage period. Total RNA was extracted from complementary 2, 20, and 40 m below sea floor sediment samples, reverse transcribed to complementary DNA and then sequenced using 454 FLX sequencing technology, yielding over 14,800 sequences from the six samples. Interestingly, 97.3% of the sequences detected were associated with lineages that changed in detection frequency during the storage period including key biogeochemically relevant lineages associated with nitrogen, iron, and sulfur cycling. These lineages have the potential to permanently alter the physical and chemical characteristics of the sediment promoting misleading conclusions about the in situ biogeochemical environment. In addition, the detection of new lineages after storage increases the potential for a wider range of viable lineages within the subsurface that may be underestimated during standard community characterizations. PMID:22363327

  4. PROMOTIONS: PROper MOTION Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caleb Wherry, John; Sahai, R.

    2009-05-01

    We report on the development of a software tool (PROMOTIONS) to streamline the process of measuring proper motions of material in expanding nebulae. Our tool makes use of IDL's widget programming capabilities to design a unique GUI that is used to compare images of the objects from two epochs. The software allows us to first orient and register the images to a common frame of reference and pixel scale, using field stars in each of the images. We then cross-correlate specific morphological features in order to determine their proper motions, which consist of the proper motion of the nebula as a whole (PM-neb), and expansion motions of the features relative to the center. If the central star is not visible (quite common in bipolar nebulae with dense dusty waists), point-symmetric expansion is assumed and we use the average motion of high-quality symmetric pairs of features on opposite sides of the nebular center to compute PM-neb. This is then subtracted out to determine the individual movements of these and additional features relative to the nebular center. PROMOTIONS should find wide applicability in measuring proper motions in astrophysical objects such as the expanding outflows/jets commonly seen around young and dying stars. We present first results from using PROMOTIONS to successfully measure proper motions in several pre-planetary nebulae (transition objects between the red giant and planetary nebula phases), using images taken 7-10 years apart with the WFPC2 and ACS instruments on board HST. The authors are grateful to NASA's Undergradute Scholars Research Program (USRP) for supporting this research.

  5. Promoting women's health.

    PubMed

    Doyal, L

    1991-01-01

    The male-dominated medical establishment continues to make health promotion policies for women. Women must have access to a more accurate information base about women's health and the link between their health and socioeconomic roles. They must be full partners in formulating and implementing health promotion strategies. Yet, such a database does not exist due to systemic bias in research. For example, research shows alcoholism affects men and women differently, but prevention and treatment strategies and evaluation of their outcomes do not take this into account. Further, men do not understand subjective aspects of female conditions. In addition, even though women provide most care in our society, health promotion policies do not incorporate their knowledge. Moreover, care of the sick can damage the health of the care giver. Statistics on women's health are lacking, e.g., exhaustion and depression as consequences of child care and housework, especially among poor women. Developed countries continue to use maternal mortality as a means of measuring reproductive hazard, but maternal death is a rarity. In fact, a reproductive mortality rate would be more applicable, which would include deaths from abortions, pregnancy, and contraception. Besides, birth control has real disadvantages, e.g., a painful medical procedure is needed to insert IUDs and they increase the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease. Paid employment has positive and negative effects depending on whether women are alone or have a partner and have children, their income, and educational level. Women in industry face considerable health hazards, e.g., textile workers at increased risk of several lung diseases. Appropriate expenditure on health and social services and sound economic policies at the central level will benefit women's health. Besides, when society values and supports all aspects of women's work and roles, women's health will achieve its potential. PMID:1817541

  6. Promoting healthy sleep.

    PubMed

    Price, Bob

    2016-03-01

    Nurses are accustomed to helping others with their sleep problems and dealing with issues such as pain that may delay or interrupt sleep. However, they may be less familiar with what constitutes a healthy night's sleep. This article examines what is known about the process and purpose of sleep, and examines the ways in which factors that promote wakefulness and sleep combine to help establish a normal circadian rhythm. Theories relating to the function of sleep are discussed and research is considered that suggests that sleep deficit may lead to metabolic risks, including heart disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and several types of cancer. PMID:26959472

  7. TUMOR PROMOTION IN RAT LIVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    An initiation promotion bioassay for chemical carcinogens and tumor promoters has been developed in rat liver using presumed preneoplastic lesions, foci of gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGTase)-positive hepatocytes, as the endpoint. To evaluate the tumor-promoting activity of phe...

  8. Characterization of the human 5-lipoxygenase gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshiko, S.; Radmark, O.; Samuelsson, B. )

    1990-12-01

    Nucleotide sequences that direct transcription of the human 5-lipoxygenase gene have been examined by ligation to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity in transfected HeLa and HL-60 cells. Various lengths of 5{prime}-flanking sequences up to 5.9 kilobase pairs 5{prime} of the transcriptional initiation sites were tested. Two positive and two negative apparent regulatory regions were seen. Part of the promoter sequence ({minus}179 to {minus}56 from ATG), which includes five repeated GC boxes (the putative Spl binding sequence) was essential for transcription in both HeLa and HL-60 cells. Gel-shift assays (using the DNA fragment {minus}212 to {minus}88) revealed that the transcriptional factor Spl could bind to this region of the 5-lipoxygenase promoter. Furthermore, HL-60 nuclear extracts contained specific nuclear factor(s) binding to 5-lipoxygenase promoter DNA, which could not be detected in HeLa cell nuclear extracts.

  9. Six essential roles of health promotion research centres: the Atlantic Canada experience.

    PubMed

    Langille, Lynn L; Crowell, Sandra J; Lyons, Renée F

    2009-03-01

    Over the past 20 years, the federal government and universities across Canada have directed resources towards the development of university-based health promotion research centres. Researchers at health promotion research centres in Canada have produced peer-reviewed papers and policy documents based on their work, but no publications have emerged that focus on the specific roles of the health promotion research centres themselves. The purpose of this paper is to propose a framework, based on an in-depth examination of one centre, to help identify the unique roles of health promotion research centres and to clarify the value they add to promoting health and advancing university goals. Considering the shifting federal discourse on health promotion over time and the vulnerability of social and health sciences to changes in research funding priorities, health promotion research centres in Canada and elsewhere may need to articulate their unique roles and contributions in order to maintain a critical focus on health promotion research. The authors briefly describe the Atlantic Health Promotion Research Centre (AHPRC), propose a framework that illustrates six essential roles of health promotion research centres and describe the policy contexts and challenges of health promotion research centres. The analysis of research and knowledge translation activities over 15 years at AHPRC sheds light on the roles that health promotion research centres play in applied research. The conclusion raises questions regarding the value of university-based research centres and challenges to their sustainability. PMID:19171668

  10. Heart rate variability in shift workers: responses to orthostatism and relationships with anthropometry, body composition, and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Monteze, Nayara Mussi; Souza, Breno Bernardes; Alves, Henrique José de Paula; de Oliveira, Fernando Luiz Pereira; de Oliveira, José Magalhães; de Freitas, Silvia Nascimento; do Nascimento Neto, Raimundo Marques; Sales, Maria Lilian; Souza, Gabriela Guerra Leal

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the response of heart rate variability (HRV) components to postural change and their association with cardiovascular risk factors in shift workers, a cross-sectional study with 438 Brazilian males rotating shift workers was done. Anthropometric, body composition, and clinical measures were collected. Electrocardiogram was recorded for 3 minutes, in the supine and orthostatic position, and HRV components were extracted. Descriptive analyses showed that mean values of body mass index, waist circumference (WC), waist-to-height ratio, visceral fat area (VFA), and blood pressure (BP) were higher than the reference values. In the regression model, age, WC, VFA, and systolic BP showed negative association with HRV components. These findings suggest the need for determining effective strategies for the evaluation and promotion of health among shift workers focused on the altered variables. PMID:26495293

  11. Heart Rate Variability in Shift Workers: Responses to Orthostatism and Relationships with Anthropometry, Body Composition, and Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Monteze, Nayara Mussi; Souza, Breno Bernardes; Alves, Henrique José de Paula; de Oliveira, Fernando Luiz Pereira; de Oliveira, José Magalhães; de Freitas, Silvia Nascimento; do Nascimento Neto, Raimundo Marques; Sales, Maria Lilian; Souza, Gabriela Guerra Leal

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the response of heart rate variability (HRV) components to postural change and their association with cardiovascular risk factors in shift workers, a cross-sectional study with 438 Brazilian males rotating shift workers was done. Anthropometric, body composition, and clinical measures were collected. Electrocardiogram was recorded for 3 minutes, in the supine and orthostatic position, and HRV components were extracted. Descriptive analyses showed that mean values of body mass index, waist circumference (WC), waist-to-height ratio, visceral fat area (VFA), and blood pressure (BP) were higher than the reference values. In the regression model, age, WC, VFA, and systolic BP showed negative association with HRV components. These findings suggest the need for determining effective strategies for the evaluation and promotion of health among shift workers focused on the altered variables. PMID:26495293

  12. Anomalous phase shifts in drift wave fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diallo, Ahmed; Skiff, Fred

    2003-10-01

    Ion phase space density fluctuation measurements are performed in a linearly magnetized device using Laser Induced Fluorescence(LIF). An ICP source produces an 8cm diameter plasma column that drifts in a cylindrical vessel whose diameter and length are 40 cm and 3 m, respectively. These experiments are performed using a CW singly ionized Argon plasma that is immersed in a 1kG magnetic field along the axis of the cylinder. A density of the order of 10^9 cm-3 is obtained under a regulated neutral background pressure of 2.× 10-4 torr. The electron and ion temperature are respectively 2 eV and 0.1 eV. LIF is carried out by pumping the Ar II metastable (3d^1)^2G_9/2, using a CW tunable laser centered at 611.6653 nm scanned over 6 GHz, to metastable (4p^1)F_7/2, and then detecting the 460nm photons emitted from its transition to (4s^1)^2F_5/2. This collection is made possible using two low f-umber periscopes that are directed to PMTs. Here we present measurements of the complex two-point correlation function < f(v_i_allel),z_1,ω)f(v_i_allel,z_2,ω)> as a function of the spatial separation of two LIF detection systems Δ d = z_2-z_1, the ion parallel velocity v_i_allel and the frequency ω. Preliminary results show ion particle velocity dependent phase shifts at the drift wave frequency.

  13. Butterfly community shifts over two centuries.

    PubMed

    Habel, Jan Christian; Segerer, Andreas; Ulrich, Werner; Torchyk, Olena; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Schmitt, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Environmental changes strongly impact the distribution of species and subsequently the composition of species assemblages. Although most community ecology studies represent temporal snap shots, long-term observations are rather rare. However, only such time series allow the identification of species composition shifts over several decades or even centuries. We analyzed changes in the species composition of a southeastern German butterfly and burnet moth community over nearly 2 centuries (1840-2013). We classified all species observed over this period according to their ecological tolerance, thereby assessing their degree of habitat specialisation. This classification was based on traits of the butterfly and burnet moth species and on their larval host plants. We collected data on temperature and precipitation for our study area over the same period. The number of species declined substantially from 1840 (117 species) to 2013 (71 species). The proportion of habitat specialists decreased, and most of these are currently endangered. In contrast, the proportion of habitat generalists increased. Species with restricted dispersal behavior and species in need of areas poor in soil nutrients had severe losses. Furthermore, our data indicated a decrease in species composition similarity between different decades over time. These data on species composition changes and the general trends of modifications may reflect effects from climate change and atmospheric nitrogen loads, as indicated by the ecological characteristics of host plant species and local changes in habitat configuration with increasing fragmentation. Our observation of major declines over time of currently threatened and protected species shows the importance of efficient conservation strategies. PMID:26743786

  14. TAp73 promotes anabolism

    PubMed Central

    Amelio, Ivano; Antonov, Alexey A.; Catani, Maria Valeria; Massoud, Renato; Bernassola, Francesca; Knight, Richard A.; Melino, Gerry; Rufini, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic adaptation has emerged as a hallmark of cancer and a promising therapeutic target, as rapidly proliferating cancer cells adapt their metabolism increasing nutrient uptake and reorganizing metabolic fluxes to support biosynthesis. The transcription factor p73 belongs to the p53-family and regulates tumorigenesis via its two N-terminal isoforms, with (TAp73) or without (ΔNp73) a transactivation domain. TAp73 acts as tumor suppressor, at least partially through induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and through regulation of genomic stability. Here, we sought to investigate whether TAp73 also affects metabolic profiling of cancer cells. Using high throughput metabolomics, we unveil a thorough and unexpected role for TAp73 in promoting Warburg effect and cellular metabolism. TAp73-expressing cells show increased rate of glycolysis, higher amino acid uptake and increased levels and biosynthesis of acetyl-CoA. Moreover, we report an extensive TAp73-mediated upregulation of several anabolic pathways including polyamine and synthesis of membrane phospholipids. TAp73 expression also increases cellular methyl-donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), possibly influencing methylation and epigenetics, and promotes arginine metabolism, suggestive of a role in extracellular matrix (ECM) modeling. In summary, our data indicate that TAp73 regulates multiple metabolic pathways that impinge on numerous cellular functions, but that, overall, converge to sustain cell growth and proliferation. PMID:25514460

  15. Nonlinear Pressure Shifts of Rubidium in Inert Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuyer, Bart; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, William

    2009-05-01

    Vapor-cell atomic frequency standards are based on the hyperfine (microwave) magnetic-resonance frequencies of optically pumped alkali-metal atoms in inert buffer gas. Through the hyperfine-shift interaction, buffer gas induces pressure shift and broadening in these microwave resonances. Previous work uncovered nonlinear dependence in the pressure shifts of ^87Rb and Cs atoms to the pressure of buffer gases Ar and Kr, but not He or N2. The nonlinearity is thought to result from alteration to the hyperfine-shift interaction due to temporary van der Waals molecules formed between alkali-metal and buffer-gas atoms. We investigate nonlinear pressure shifts for both isotopes of Rb, ^87Rb and ^85Rb. This study will test the current model for nonlinear pressure shifts of alkali metals in inert gases.

  16. 4D prediction of protein (1)H chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Lehtivarjo, Juuso; Hassinen, Tommi; Korhonen, Samuli-Petrus; Peräkylä, Mikael; Laatikainen, Reino

    2009-12-01

    A 4D approach for protein (1)H chemical shift prediction was explored. The 4th dimension is the molecular flexibility, mapped using molecular dynamics simulations. The chemical shifts were predicted with a principal component model based on atom coordinates from a database of 40 protein structures. When compared to the corresponding non-dynamic (3D) model, the 4th dimension improved prediction by 6-7%. The prediction method achieved RMS errors of 0.29 and 0.50 ppm for Halpha and HN shifts, respectively. However, for individual proteins the RMS errors were 0.17-0.34 and 0.34-0.65 ppm for the Halpha and HN shifts, respectively. X-ray structures gave better predictions than the corresponding NMR structures, indicating that chemical shifts contain invaluable information about local structures. The (1)H chemical shift prediction tool 4DSPOT is available from http://www.uku.fi/kemia/4dspot . PMID:19876601

  17. Twelve-hour shift on ITU: a nursing evaluation.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Annette; Dabner, Nichola; Curtis, Sarah

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the introduction and subsequent evaluation of a 12-h shift system in a large ITU in the northeast of UK. To date, only a small number of studies has evaluated nurses working the 12-h shifts in critical care areas. To evaluate the level of staff satisfaction, data were collected by means of a questionnaire involving 41 nurses, at 3 months following the introduction of the 12-h shifts. The responses from the evaluation advocated the continuation of 12-h shifts with alternative shift patterns for nurses who felt dissatisfied with the current system. Twelve-hour shifts can be seen as a flexible system for nurses working in intensive care and may assist with staff satisfaction and improving nurse recruitment and retention. PMID:12859080

  18. Change remains--paradigm shifts in modern surgery.

    PubMed

    Scheingraber, Stefan; O'Brien, Ben; Machens, Andreas; Hirner, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    This article aims to describe underlying principles of paradigm shifts in clinical medicine by means of analysis of typical examples. Retrospectively, profound shifts of ruling paradigms can be shown in diverse fields such as outcome research, in the redefining of patients' and doctor's autonomies, in the challenges presented by consumer medicine and the free market economy. This has provoked controversy between doctors, patients and the community. The judgement on whether recent shifts in paradigms in medicine have improved the health care delivered today is by no means uncontroversial. Aiming to demonstrate how shifts of paradigms in medicine occur and what consequences can result from such shifts we reflect on the works of Thomas S. Kuhn, the eminent philosopher of science. An analysis of his theories lends important insight into the observed shifts in paradigms. PMID:15379194

  19. Promoter polymorphisms regulating corticotrophin-releasing hormone transcription in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wagner, U; Wahle, M; Moritz, F; Wagner, U; Häntzschel, H; Baerwald, C G O

    2006-02-01

    To investigate whether polymorphisms in the corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) promoter are associated with altered CRH gene regulation, we studied the reactivity of three recently described promoter variants in vitro. The 3625 bp variants A1B1, A2B1 and A2B2 of the human CRH promoter were cloned in the 5' region to a luciferase reporter gene and transiently transfected into both mouse anterior pituitary cells AtT-20D16vF2 and pheochromocytoma cells PC12. Incubation with 8-Br-cAMP alone or in combination with cytokines significantly enhanced the promoter activity in both cell lines studied by up to 22-fold. However, dexamethasone antagonised cAMP effects on CRH expression in AtT-20 cells while showing no effect on PC12 cells, indicating that tissue-specific factors play a crucial role. Among the haplotypes studied, A1B1 exhibited the greatest reactivity on various stimuli. Electric mobility shift assay (EMSA) was performed to study whether the described polymorphic nucleotide sequences in the 5' region of the hCRH gene interfere with binding of nuclear proteins. A specific DNA protein complex was detected at position -2353 bp for the wild type sequence only, possibly interfering with a binding site for the activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). Taken together, this is the first study to demonstrate that CRH promoter reactivity varies between the compound promoter alleles. PMID:16523405

  20. Etched-multilayer phase shifting masks for EUV lithography

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Henry N.; Taylor, John S.

    2005-04-05

    A method is disclosed for the implementation of phase shifting masks for EUV lithography. The method involves directly etching material away from the multilayer coating of the mask, to cause a refractive phase shift in the mask. By etching into the multilayer (for example, by reactive ion etching), rather than depositing extra material on the top of the multilayer, there will be minimal absorption loss associated with the phase shift.

  1. Shifting Of Image Fields For Better Stereoscopic TV Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, Daniel B.

    1988-01-01

    Concept for shifting horizontal positions of TV image fields of stereoscopic TV display reduces stereoscopic depth distorting while increasing stereoscopic depth resolution of images. Applicable to form of stereoscopic TV in which two views of scene presented by two video cameras to different fields of one monitor. According to concept, view of left camera shifts to left, and right camera, to right. Images made to overlap, so observed comfortably. Shifting done by inexpensive electronic circuitry.

  2. 30 CFR 75.362 - On-shift examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false On-shift examination. 75.362 Section 75.362 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.362 On-shift examination. (a)(1) At least once during each shift, or more...

  3. Synchronous marine pelagic regime shifts in the Northern Hemisphere

    PubMed Central

    Beaugrand, G.; Conversi, A.; Chiba, S.; Edwards, M.; Fonda-Umani, S.; Greene, C.; Mantua, N.; Otto, S. A.; Reid, P. C.; Stachura, M. M.; Stemmann, L.; Sugisaki, H.

    2015-01-01

    Regime shifts are characterized by sudden, substantial and temporally persistent changes in the state of an ecosystem. They involve major biological modifications and often have important implications for exploited living resources. In this study, we examine whether regime shifts observed in 11 marine systems from two oceans and three regional seas in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) are synchronous, applying the same methodology to all. We primarily infer marine pelagic regime shifts from abrupt shifts in zooplankton assemblages, with the exception of the East Pacific where ecosystem changes are inferred from fish. Our analyses provide evidence for quasi-synchronicity of marine pelagic regime shifts both within and between ocean basins, although these shifts lie embedded within considerable regional variability at both year-to-year and lower-frequency time scales. In particular, a regime shift was detected in the late 1980s in many studied marine regions, although the exact year of the observed shift varied somewhat from one basin to another. Another regime shift was also identified in the mid- to late 1970s but concerned less marine regions. We subsequently analyse the main biological signals in relation to changes in NH temperature and pressure anomalies. The results suggest that the main factor synchronizing regime shifts on large scales is NH temperature; however, changes in atmospheric circulation also appear important. We propose that this quasi-synchronous shift could represent the variably lagged biological response in each ecosystem to a large-scale, NH change of the climatic system, involving both an increase in NH temperature and a strongly positive phase of the Arctic Oscillation. Further investigation is needed to determine the relative roles of changes in temperature and atmospheric pressure patterns and their resultant teleconnections in synchronizing regime shifts at large scales.

  4. Shift in power to hospital accountants.

    PubMed

    Rayburn, L G; Rayburn, J M

    1996-01-01

    With the introduction of the Prospective Payment System, hospital accountants' role changed from reimbursement maximizers to an important role in decision making. Faced with increased competition, many hospitals are installing financial controls. Many hospitals are engaging in promotion and health awareness campaigns and expanding their services to stabilize income and reduce the effects of a changing environment. Thus, hospitals operate in a more competitive environment with much uncertainty. When faced with uncertainty, organizations often believe that they must convince society that their existence is legitimate. Increasing specialization and organizational complexity in healthcare professions have made the expert important. Experts, such as the role assumed by hospital accountants, maintain power because the organization depends on them for their special skills and information. Scarce resources coupled with uncertainty move hospital accountants as experts into the power equation in the changing control of the U.S. healthcare system. Since accountants often serve as monitors of scarce resources, information about the resource allocation directly affects the distribution of power. This places hospital accountants in a critical role of assisting their institutions in adapting to a new environment. PMID:10164119

  5. Computation of Mössbauer isomer shifts from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwanziger, J. W.

    2009-05-01

    Computation of the observables of a Mössbauer spectrum, primarily the isomer shift, from a first-principles approach is described. The framework used is density functional theory using the projector augmented wave formalism (DFT PAW), which enables efficient computation even of many-electron solids such as SnCl2. The proper PAW version of the isomer shift is derived and shown to be correct through comparison of computed shifts and experiment in a variety of compounds based on tin, germanium and zinc. The effects of pressure are considered as well as motional effects including the Lamb-Mössbauer factor and the second-order Doppler shift.

  6. Shift work at a modern offshore drilling rig.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, V F; Fischer, F M; Brito, M J

    2001-12-01

    The oil and gas exploration and production offshore units are classified as hazardous installations. Work in these facilities is complex, confined and associated with a wide range of risks. The continuous operation is secured by various shift work patterns. The objective of this study was to evaluate how offshore drilling workers perceived shift work at high seas and its impacts on their life and working conditions. The main features of the studied offshore shift work schedules are: long time on board (14 to 28 days), extended shifts (12 hours or more per day), slow rotation (7 to 14 days in the same shift), long sequence of days on the night shift (7 to 14 days in a row) and the extra-long extended journey (18 hours) on shift change and landing days. Interviews revealed a wide range of stressors caused by the offshore shift work, as well as difficulties to conciliate work with family life. It was observed that changes of the family model, leading to role conflicts and social isolation, work in a hazardous environment, perceiving poor sleep when working at night shifts and the imbalance between the expected and actual rewards are the major stressors for the offshore drilling workers. PMID:14564877

  7. Competition between the tensor light shift and nonlinear Zeeman effect

    SciTech Connect

    Chalupczak, W.; Wojciechowski, A.; Pustelny, S.; Gawlik, W.

    2010-08-15

    Many precision measurements (e.g., in spectroscopy, atomic clocks, quantum-information processing, etc.) suffer from systematic errors introduced by the light shift. In our experimental configuration, however, the tensor light shift plays a positive role enabling the observation of spectral features otherwise masked by the cancellation of the transition amplitudes and creating resonances at a frequency unperturbed either by laser power or beam inhomogeneity. These phenomena occur thanks to the special relation between the nonlinear Zeeman and light shift effects. The interplay between these two perturbations is systematically studied and the cancellation of the nonlinear Zeeman effect by the tensor light shift is demonstrated.

  8. Plate motion and the secular shift of the mean pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H.; Carpenter, L.; Agreen, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The global plate motion indicates that changes in the products of inertia of the earth due to tectonic plate movement may provide a secular shift of the mean pole. A mathematical procedure for calculating this shift based on the plate theory is presented. Explicit expressions were obtained for the dependence of the secular polar shift on the dimensions and locations of the plate boundaries. Numerical results show that the secular motion of the mean pole is 0.0002 sec/year in the direction of 67 W. Hence, it is deduced that the influence of the plate motion on the secular polar shift may account for 10% of the observed value.

  9. Random phase-shifting interferometry based on independent component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaofei; Lu, Xiaoxu; Tian, Jindong; Shou, Junwei; Zheng, Dejin; Zhong, Liyun

    2016-07-01

    In random phase-shifting interferometry, a novel phase retrieval algorithm is proposed based on the independent component analysis (ICA). By performing the recombination of pixel position, a sequence of phase-shifting interferograms with random phase shifts are decomposed into a group of mutual independent components, and then the background and the measured phase of interferogram can obtained with a simple arctangent operation. Compared with the conventional advanced iterative algorithm (AIA) with high accuracy, both the simulation and the experimental results demonstrate that the proposed ICA algorithm reveals high accuracy, rapid convergence, and good noise-tolerance in random phase-shifting interferometry.

  10. Simultaneous correction of functional posterior cross bite and midline shift

    PubMed Central

    Arvinth, R.; Rana, Shailendra Singh; Duggal, Ritu; Kharbanda, Om Prakash

    2016-01-01

    The most frequent cause of functional posterior crossbite is the reduction in width of the maxillary dental arch. This posterior crossbite is associated with anterior crowding which is presented as an infrapositioned canine or a palatally positioned lateral incisor on one side; this leads to an upper midline shift toward the crowded side. The present case report shows the management of posterior crossbite with functional shift and upper midline shift simultaneously without adverse side effects. In this case, rapid maxillary expansion along with fixed appliance is used to correct posterior crossbite with the upper dental midline shift using reciprocal action of elastic transseptal fibers.

  11. Assessment of the pivot shift using inertial sensors.

    PubMed

    Zaffagnini, Stefano; Signorelli, Cecilia; Grassi, Alberto; Yue, Han; Raggi, Federico; Urrizola, Francisco; Bonanzinga, Tommaso; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2016-06-01

    The pivot shift test is an important clinical tool used to assess the stability of the knee following an injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Previous studies have shown that significant variability exists in the performance and interpretation of this manoeuvre. Accordingly, a variety of techniques aimed at standardizing and quantifying the pivot shift test have been developed. In recent years, inertial sensors have been used to measure the kinematics of the pivot shift. The goal of this study is to present a review of the literature and discuss the principles of inertial sensors and their use in quantifying the pivot shift test. PMID:26970757

  12. Marine regime shifts: drivers and impacts on ecosystems services

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, J.; Yletyinen, J.; Biggs, R.; Blenckner, T.; Peterson, G.

    2015-01-01

    Marine ecosystems can experience regime shifts, in which they shift from being organized around one set of mutually reinforcing structures and processes to another. Anthropogenic global change has broadly increased a wide variety of processes that can drive regime shifts. To assess the vulnerability of marine ecosystems to such shifts and their potential consequences, we reviewed the scientific literature for 13 types of marine regime shifts and used networks to conduct an analysis of co-occurrence of drivers and ecosystem service impacts. We found that regime shifts are caused by multiple drivers and have multiple consequences that co-occur in a non-random pattern. Drivers related to food production, climate change and coastal development are the most common co-occurring causes of regime shifts, while cultural services, biodiversity and primary production are the most common cluster of ecosystem services affected. These clusters prioritize sets of drivers for management and highlight the need for coordinated actions across multiple drivers and scales to reduce the risk of marine regime shifts. Managerial strategies are likely to fail if they only address well-understood or data-rich variables, and international cooperation and polycentric institutions will be critical to implement and coordinate action across the scales at which different drivers operate. By better understanding these underlying patterns, we hope to inform the development of managerial strategies to reduce the risk of high-impact marine regime shifts, especially for areas of the world where data are not available or monitoring programmes are not in place.

  13. Mitigating Doppler shift effect in HF multitone data modem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonlu, Yasar

    1989-09-01

    Digital communications over High Frequency (HF) radio channels are getting important in recent years. Current HF requirements are for data transmission at rates 2.4 kbps or more to accommodate computer data links and digital secure voice. HF modems which were produced to meet these speeds are, serial modems and parallel modems. On the other hand, the HF sky-wave communication medium, the ionosphere, has some propagation problems such as multipath and Doppler shift. The effect of Doppler shift in a parallel modem which employs Differential Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (DQPSK) modulation is considered and a correction method to mitigate the Doppler Shift effect is introduced.

  14. Global regime shift dynamics of catastrophic sea urchin overgrazing

    PubMed Central

    Ling, S. D.; Scheibling, R. E.; Rassweiler, A.; Johnson, C. R.; Shears, N.; Connell, S. D.; Salomon, A. K.; Norderhaug, K. M.; Pérez-Matus, A.; Hernández, J. C.; Clemente, S.; Blamey, L. K.; Hereu, B.; Ballesteros, E.; Sala, E.; Garrabou, J.; Cebrian, E.; Zabala, M.; Fujita, D.; Johnson, L. E.

    2015-01-01

    A pronounced, widespread and persistent regime shift among marine ecosystems is observable on temperate rocky reefs as a result of sea urchin overgrazing. Here, we empirically define regime-shift dynamics for this grazing system which transitions between productive macroalgal beds and impoverished urchin barrens. Catastrophic in nature, urchin overgrazing in a well-studied Australian system demonstrates a discontinuous regime shift, which is of particular management concern as recovery of desirable macroalgal beds requires reducing grazers to well below the initial threshold of overgrazing. Generality of this regime-shift dynamic is explored across 13 rocky reef systems (spanning 11 different regions from both hemispheres) by compiling available survey data (totalling 10 901 quadrats surveyed in situ) plus experimental regime-shift responses (observed during a total of 57 in situ manipulations). The emergent and globally coherent pattern shows urchin grazing to cause a discontinuous ‘catastrophic’ regime shift, with hysteresis effect of approximately one order of magnitude in urchin biomass between critical thresholds of overgrazing and recovery. Different life-history traits appear to create asymmetry in the pace of overgrazing versus recovery. Once shifted, strong feedback mechanisms provide resilience for each alternative state thus defining the catastrophic nature of this regime shift. Importantly, human-derived stressors can act to erode resilience of desirable macroalgal beds while strengthening resilience of urchin barrens, thus exacerbating the risk, spatial extent and irreversibility of an unwanted regime shift for marine ecosystems.

  15. A scoping study on task shifting; the case of Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Task shifting has been implemented in Uganda for decades with little documentation. This study’s objectives were to; gather evidence on task-shifting experiences in Uganda, establish its acceptability and perceptions among health managers and policymakers, and make recommendations. Methods This was a qualitative study. Data collection involved; review of published and gray literature, and key informant interviews of stakeholders in health policy and decision making in Uganda. Data was analyzed by thematic content analysis. Results Task shifting was the mainstay of health service delivery in Uganda. Lower cadre of health workers performed duties of specialized health workers. However, Uganda has no task shifting policy and guidelines, and task shifting was practiced informally. Lower cadre of health workers were deemed to be incompetent to handle shifted roles and already overworked, and support supervision was poor. Advocates of task shifting argued that lower cadre of health workers already performed the roles of highly trained health workers. They needed a supporting policy and support supervision. Opponents argued that lower cadre of health workers were; incompetent, overworked, and task shifting was more expensive than recruiting appropriately trained health workers. Conclusions Task shifting was unacceptable to most health managers and policy makers because lower cadres of health workers were; incompetent, overworked and support supervision was poor. Recruitment of existing unemployed well trained health workers, implementation of human resource motivation and retention strategies, and government sponsored graduates to work for a defined mandatory period of time were recommended. PMID:24754917

  16. Oxytocin promotes group-serving dishonesty.

    PubMed

    Shalvi, Shaul; De Dreu, Carsten K W

    2014-04-15

    To protect and promote the well-being of others, humans may bend the truth and behave unethically. Here we link such tendencies to oxytocin, a neuropeptide known to promote affiliation and cooperation with others. Using a simple coin-toss prediction task in which participants could dishonestly report their performance levels to benefit their group's outcome, we tested the prediction that oxytocin increases group-serving dishonesty. A double-blind, placebo-controlled experiment allowing individuals to lie privately and anonymously to benefit themselves and fellow group members showed that healthy males (n = 60) receiving intranasal oxytocin, rather than placebo, lied more to benefit their group, and did so faster, yet did not necessarily do so because they expected reciprocal dishonesty from fellow group members. Treatment effects emerged when lying had financial consequences and money could be gained; when losses were at stake, individuals in placebo and oxytocin conditions lied to similar degrees. In a control condition (n = 60) in which dishonesty only benefited participants themselves, but not fellow group members, oxytocin did not influence lying. Together, these findings fit a functional perspective on morality revealing dishonesty to be plastic and rooted in evolved neurobiological circuitries, and align with work showing that oxytocin shifts the decision-maker's focus from self to group interests. These findings highlight the role of bonding and cooperation in shaping dishonesty, providing insight into when and why collaboration turns into corruption. PMID:24706799

  17. Oxytocin promotes group-serving dishonesty

    PubMed Central

    Shalvi, Shaul; De Dreu, Carsten K. W.

    2014-01-01

    To protect and promote the well-being of others, humans may bend the truth and behave unethically. Here we link such tendencies to oxytocin, a neuropeptide known to promote affiliation and cooperation with others. Using a simple coin-toss prediction task in which participants could dishonestly report their performance levels to benefit their group’s outcome, we tested the prediction that oxytocin increases group-serving dishonesty. A double-blind, placebo-controlled experiment allowing individuals to lie privately and anonymously to benefit themselves and fellow group members showed that healthy males (n = 60) receiving intranasal oxytocin, rather than placebo, lied more to benefit their group, and did so faster, yet did not necessarily do so because they expected reciprocal dishonesty from fellow group members. Treatment effects emerged when lying had financial consequences and money could be gained; when losses were at stake, individuals in placebo and oxytocin conditions lied to similar degrees. In a control condition (n = 60) in which dishonesty only benefited participants themselves, but not fellow group members, oxytocin did not influence lying. Together, these findings fit a functional perspective on morality revealing dishonesty to be plastic and rooted in evolved neurobiological circuitries, and align with work showing that oxytocin shifts the decision-maker’s focus from self to group interests. These findings highlight the role of bonding and cooperation in shaping dishonesty, providing insight into when and why collaboration turns into corruption. PMID:24706799

  18. Operating principle, saturable loss, and self-frequency shift in Kerr-shift mode-locked lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, J.; Müller, M.

    1995-01-01

    The operating principle of a recently demonstrated new Kerr-induced ultrashort-pulse-generation technique called Kerr-shift mode locking is analyzed. It is shown that in Kerr-shift mode-locked lasers an intensity-dependent red shift of the central laser frequency is caused by the combined action of the self-phase modulation that is due to the nonlinear index laser host medium and the Lorentzian-shaped profile of the homogeneously broadened gain. The introduction of a long-pass wavelength filter (knife-edge) transforms this intensity-dependent frequency shift into fast self-amplitude modulation (SAM), which is accompanied by an additional linear red shift of the central laser frequency. The SAM parameter and the linear frequency shift are calculated and compared with the experimental results.

  19. Tryptophan promotes charitable donating

    PubMed Central

    Steenbergen, Laura; Sellaro, Roberta; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2014-01-01

    The link between serotonin (5-HT) and one of the most important elements of prosocial behavior, charity, has remained largely uninvestigated. In the present study, we tested whether charitable donating can be promoted by administering the food supplement L-Tryptophan (TRP), the biochemical precursor of 5-HT. Participants were compared with respect to the amount of money they donated when given the opportunity to make a charitable donation. As expected, compared to a neutral placebo, TRP appears to increase the participants’ willingness to donate money to a charity. This result supports the idea that the food we eat may act as a cognitive enhancer modulating the way we think and perceive the world and others. PMID:25566132

  20. Changing the Waveform of Circadian Rhythms: Considerations for Shift-Work

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Elizabeth M.; Gorman, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Circadian disruption in shift-work is common and has deleterious effects on health and performance. Current efforts to mitigate these harms reasonably focus on the phase of the circadian pacemaker, which unfortunately in humans, shifts slowly and often incompletely. Temporal reorganization of rhythmic waveform (i.e., the shape of its 24 h oscillation), rather than phase, however, may better match performance demands of shift-workers and can be quickly and feasibly implemented in animals. In fact, a bifurcated pacemaker waveform may permit stable entrainment of a bimodal sleep/wake rhythm promoting alertness in both night and daylight hours. Although bifurcation has yet to be formally assessed in humans, evidence of conserved properties of circadian organization and plasticity predict its occurrence: humans respond to conventional manipulations of waveform (e.g., photoperiodism); behaviorally, the sleep/wake rhythm is adaptable; and finally, the human circadian system likely derives from the same multiple cellular oscillators that permit waveform flexibility in the rodent pacemaker. In short, investigation into untried manipulations of waveform in humans to facilitate adjustment to challenging schedules is justified. PMID:22557994

  1. Microbial and sponge loops modify fish production in phase-shifting coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Cynthia B; Silva-Lima, Arthur W; Francini-Filho, Ronaldo B; Marques, Jomar S M; Almeida, Marcelo G; Thompson, Cristiane C; Rezende, Carlos E; Paranhos, Rodolfo; Moura, Rodrigo L; Salomon, Paulo S; Thompson, Fabiano L

    2015-10-01

    Shifts from coral to algae dominance of corals reefs have been correlated to fish biomass loss and increased microbial metabolism. Here we investigated reef benthic and planktonic primary production, benthic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release and bacterial growth efficiency in the Abrolhos Bank, South Atlantic. Benthic DOC release rates are higher while water column bacterial growth efficiency is lower at impacted reefs. A trophic model based on the benthic and planktonic primary production was able to predict the observed relative fish biomass in healthy reefs. In contrast, in impacted reefs, the observed omnivorous fish biomass is higher, while that of the herbivorous/coralivorous fish is lower than predicted by the primary production-based model. Incorporating recycling of benthic-derived carbon in the model through microbial and sponge loops explains the difference and predicts the relative fish biomass in both reef types. Increased benthic carbon release rates and bacterial carbon metabolism, but decreased bacterial growth efficiency could lead to carbon losses through respiration and account for the uncoupling of benthic and fish production in phase-shifting reefs. Carbon recycling by microbial and sponge loops seems to promote an increase of small-bodied fish productivity in phase-shifting coral reefs. PMID:25817914

  2. Role of the SV40 enhancer in the early to late shift in viral transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, J J; Wildeman, A G

    1991-01-01

    Simian virus 40 large tumor antigen is a multifunctional protein, with two of its roles being the promotion of viral DNA replication and replication-independent activation of viral transcription. Replication leads to a shift in transcription from the early-early to the late and late-early cap sites, through mechanisms poorly understood. The viral transcription enhancer contains sequences important for both early and late transcription, and we therefore have carried out experiments to evaluate its role in these events. We find that the ability of replication to lead to a shift diminishes when early-early transcription is made increasingly stronger by multimerizing the enhancer, and suggest that replication might lead to the shift by interfering with the ability of the enhancer to direct initiation to those sites. The natural situation in the virus of having two copies of this element might represent a compromise between maximizing both T antigen expression early in infection and late gene expression after replication begins. We also show that replication-independent transcription activation by T antigen is bidirectional and involves at least in part elements to which the factor TEF-1 binds. Images PMID:1662364

  3. "Shift-and-Persist" Strategies: Why Low Socioeconomic Status Isn't Always Bad for Health.

    PubMed

    Chen, Edith; Miller, Gregory E

    2012-03-01

    Some individuals, despite facing recurrent, severe adversities in life such as low socioeconomic status (SES), are nonetheless able to maintain good physical health. This article explores why these individuals deviate from the expected association of low SES and poor health and outlines a "shift-and-persist" model to explain the psychobiological mechanisms involved. This model proposes that, in the midst of adversity, some children find role models who teach them to trust others, better regulate their emotions, and focus on their futures. Over a lifetime, these low-SES children develop an approach to life that prioritizes shifting oneself (accepting stress for what it is and adapting the self through reappraisals) in combination with persisting (enduring life with strength by holding on to meaning and optimism). This combination of shift-and-persist strategies mitigates sympathetic-nervous-system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical responses to the barrage of stressors that low-SES individuals confront. This tendency vectors individuals off the trajectory to chronic disease by forestalling pathogenic sequelae of stress reactivity, like insulin resistance, high blood pressure, and systemic inflammation. We outline evidence for the model and argue that efforts to identify resilience-promoting processes are important in this economic climate, given limited resources for improving the financial circumstances of disadvantaged individuals. PMID:23144651

  4. Shifted cosmological parameter and shifted dust matter in a two-phase tachyonic field universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Murli Manohar; Pathak, Shankar Dayal

    2013-04-01

    We propose a model of the evolution of the tachyonic scalar field over two phases in the universe. The field components do not interact in phase I, while in the subsequent phase II, they change flavours due to relative suppression of the radiation contribution. In phase II, we allow them to interact mutually with time-independent perturbation in their equations of state, as Shifted Cosmological Parameter (SCP) and Shifted Dust Matter (SDM). We determine the solutions of their scaling with the cosmic redshift in both phases. We further suggest the normalised Hubble function diagnostic, which, together with the low- and high-redshift H( z) data and the concordance values of the present density parameters from the CMBR, BAO statistics etc., constrain the strength of interaction by imposing the viable conditions to break degeneracy in 3-parameter (γ, \\varepsilon, dot{φ}2) space. The range of redshifts ( z=0.1 to z=1.75) is chosen to highlight the role of interaction during structure formation, and it may lead to a future analysis of power spectrum in this model vis a vis Warm Dark Matter (WDM) or ΛCDM models. We further calculate the influence of interaction in determining the age of the universe at the present epoch, within the degeneracy space of model parameters.

  5. Absolute surface metrology by differencing spatially shifted maps from a phase-shifting interferometer.

    PubMed

    Bloemhof, E E

    2010-07-15

    Surface measurements of precision optics are commonly made with commercially available phase-shifting Fizeau interferometers that provide data relative to flat or spherical reference surfaces whose unknown errors are comparable to those of the surface being tested. A number of ingenious techniques provide surface measurements that are "absolute," rather than relative to any reference surface. Generally, these techniques require numerous measurements and the introduction of additional surfaces, but still yield absolute information only along certain lines over the surface of interest. A very simple alternative is presented here, in which no additional optics are required beyond the surface under test and the transmission flat (or sphere) defining the interferometric reference surface. The optic under test is measured in three positions, two of which have small lateral shifts along orthogonal directions, nominally comparable to the transverse spatial resolution of the interferometer. The phase structure in the reference surface then cancels out when these measurements are subtracted in pairs, providing a grid of absolute surface height differences between neighboring resolution elements of the surface under test. The full absolute surface, apart from overall phase and tip/tilt, is then recovered by standard wavefront reconstruction techniques. PMID:20634825

  6. Relations among early postexposure noise-induced threshold shifts and permanent threshold shifts in the chinchilla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamernik, Roger P.; Ahroon, William A.; Patterson, James H.; Qiu, Wei

    2002-01-01

    Threshold shifts (TS) were measured at various times following a wide variety of noise exposures on over 900 chinchillas. An analysis of postexposure TS measures and noise-induced permanent threshold shift (PTS) showed that, across audiometric test frequency, there was a consistent relation between these variables of the form PTS (dB)=α(eTS/β-1), where, for a given test frequency, α (dB) and β (dB) are constants. TSs were measured immediately following exposure (TS0), 24 h after exposure (TS24), and at several intermediate times in order to estimate the maximum TS (TSmax). Correlation between TS and PTS at the various test frequencies was highest for TS24. An analysis of the 90th-percentile PTS showed a linear growth of PTS with TS24 of approximately 0.7 dB PTS/dB TS24. These data provide some support, in the chinchilla model, for a variation of the three postulates originally presented by Kryter et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 39, 451 (1966)]. Specifically: (i) TS24 is a consistent measure of the effects of a traumatic noise exposure. (ii) All exposures that produce a given TS24 will be equally hazardous. (iii) Noise-induced PTS in the most susceptible animals, following many years of exposure, is approximately equal to (0.7)TS24 measured after an 8-h exposure to the same noise.

  7. Improving the resolution in phase-shifting Gabor holography by CCD shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granero, L.; Micó, V.; Zalevsky, Z.; García, J.; Javidi, B.

    2015-05-01

    Holography dates back to the year when Dennis Gabor reported on a method to avoid spherical aberration and to improve image quality in electron microscopy. Gabor's two-step holographic method was pioneer but suffered from three major drawbacks: the reconstructed image is affected by coherent noise, the twin image problem of holography that also affects the final image quality, and a restricted sample range (weak diffraction assumption) for preserving the holographic behavior of the method. Nowadays, most of those drawbacks have been overcome and new capabilities have been added due to the replacement of the classical recording media (photographic plate) by digital sensors (CCD and CMOS cameras). But in the Gabor' regime, holography is restricted to weak diffraction assumptions because otherwise, diffraction prevents an accurate recovery of the object's complex wavefront. In this contribution, we present an experimental approach to overcome such limitation and improve final image resolution. We use the phase-shifting Gabor configuration while the CCD camera is shifted to different off-axis positions in order to capture a bigger portion of the diffracted wavefront. Thus, once the whole image set is recorded and digitally processed for each camera's position, we merge the resulting band-pass images into one image by assembling a synthetic aperture. Finally, a superresolved image is recovered by Fourier transformation of the information contained in the generated synthetic aperture. Experimental results are provided using a USAF resolution test target and validating our concepts for a gain in resolution of close to 2.

  8. Positive nonlinear pressure shift of Cs in Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Tian; McGuyer, Bart; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, William

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate that the hyperfine resonance frequency of ground state Cs atoms have a nonlinear dependence on the pressure of the buffer gas Ne at a fixed temperature. The hyperfine resonance frequency of alkali-metal atoms is shifted by an amount, which had long been assumed to be linear with the buffer gas pressure until Fei Gong discovered that the shift of Rb and Cs hyperfine resonance frequency has a nonlinear dependence on the pressure of the buffer gas Ar and Kr. While the nonlinear pressure shift of Cs in Ar and Kr is negative, we found that the nonlinear pressure shift of Cs hyperfine frequency in Ne is positive. The reason of the nonlinear shift is the three body collision(eg: Cs-Ne-Ne) and the formation of Van der Waals molecules of a Cs atom and a buffer gas atom of Ar, Kr, or Ne. The hyperfine precession rate of a Cs atom bound in molecule has a shift respect to a free Cs atom. The reversal sign of this nonlinear pressure shift of Cs in Ne respect to Ar and Kr demonstrate that the shift of the hyperfine precession rate of Cs in CsNe is reversed respect to CsAr and CsKr.

  9. Optical resonance shifts in thermal and cold Rb atomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruostekoski, Janne; Jenkins, S. D.; Javanainen, J.; Bourgain, R.; Jennewein, S.; Sortais, Y. R. P.; Browaeys, A.; University of Southampton Collaboration; University of Connecticut Collaboration; Institut d'Optique, CNRS, Univ Paris Sud Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    We show that the resonance shifts in fluorescence of a cold gas of rubidium atoms substantially differ from those of thermal atomic ensembles that obey the standard continuous medium electrodynamics. The analysis is based on large-scale microscopic numerical simulations and experimental measurements of the resonance shifts in light propagation.

  10. Reading Times and the Detection of Event Shift Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radvansky, Gabriel A.; Copeland, David E.

    2010-01-01

    When people read narratives, they often need to update their situation models as the described events change. Previous research has shown little to no increases in reading times for spatial shifts but consistent increases for temporal shifts. On this basis, researchers have suggested that spatial updating does not regularly occur, whereas temporal…

  11. Relative Configuration of Natural Products Using NMR Chemical Shifts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    By comparing calculated with experimental NMR chemical shifts, we were able to determine the relative configurations of three monoterpene diastereomers produced by the walkingstick Anisomorpha buprestoides. The combined RMSDs of both 1H and 13C quantum chemically calculated shifts were able to predi...

  12. Vocal Pitch Shift in Congenital Amusia (Pitch Deafness)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Sean; Peretz, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    We tested whether congenital amusics, who exhibit pitch perception deficits, nevertheless adjust the pitch of their voice in response to a sudden pitch shift applied to vocal feedback. Nine amusics and matched controls imitated their own previously-recorded speech or singing, while the online feedback they received was shifted mid-utterance by 25…

  13. Attentional Set-Shifting in Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Molen, M. J. W.; Van der Molen, M. W.; Ridderinkhof, K. R.; Hamel, B. C. J.; Curfs, L. M. G.; Ramakers, G. J. A.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to flexibly adapt to the changing demands of the environment is often reported as a core deficit in fragile X syndrome (FXS). However, the cognitive processes that determine this attentional set-shifting deficit remain elusive. The present study investigated attentional set-shifting ability in fragile X syndrome males with the…

  14. Researching Style: Epistemology, Paradigm Shifts and Research Interest Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayner, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    This paper identifies the need for a deliberate approach to theory building in the context of researching cognitive and learning style differences in human performance. A case for paradigm shift and a focus upon research epistemology is presented, building upon a recent critique of style research. A proposal for creating paradigm shift is made,…

  15. Shift work, health, the working time regulations and health assessments.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, P J; D'Auria, D A

    1999-04-01

    Shift work and night work in particular have been associated with sleep difficulties, general malaise, fatigue, peptic ulceration, ischaemic heart disease, cigarette smoking and adverse pregnancy outcome. The medical conditions previously regarded as making individuals unsuitable for shift work show wide ranging patho-physiological activity and there is no published evidence for any such condition to be regarded an absolute reason to exclude an individual from shift work. The fulfilment of the legal obligations of the Working Time Regulations 1998 is neither prescribed nor constrained in any way. It is advisable therefore to build on existing health procedures where they are in effect. Periodic health questionnaires can offer health professionals an opportunity to detect any disorder likely to be aggravated by shift work or by a combination of shift work, job demands and workplace conditions. A further purpose of the questionnaire is the assessment of ability to undertake shift work duties. However, health questionnaires are neither sensitive nor specific enough to be used to select applicants or employees for shift work, since they do not consistently predict tolerance of shift work or subsequent health problems. Whether employers should offer anything more than a simple questionnaire will depend on the culture of the company and accessibility of health services. Screening programmes affect many people relative to the few who benefit and with existing knowledge, periodic general health examinations performed in asymptomatic subjects have limited predictive or preventive value. PMID:10451593

  16. AUDITORY-VISUAL PERCEPTUAL SHIFTING IN SPEECH HANDICAPPED CHILDREN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FLOWERS, ARTHUR

    INTERACTION BETWEEN VISION AND HEARING WERE STUDIED IN 35 SPEECH HANDICAPPED FIRST-GRADE CHILDREN. THE ABILITY TO SHIFT ATTENTION FROM ONE SENSORY MODALITY TO ANOTHER WAS LABELED AS "PERCEPTUAL SHIFTING." A DEVICE DEVELOPED BY EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGISTS PRESENTED VARIOUS STIMULI TO EACH SUBJECT AND RECORDED THE SUBJECT'S REACTION TIME. STIMULI…

  17. Peak Shift Phenomenon: A Teaching Activity for Basic Learning Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, Kenneth D.

    2002-01-01

    Stimulus discrimination is a standard subject in undergraduate courses presenting basic principles of learning, and a particularly interesting aspect of discrimination is the peak shift phenomenon. Peak shift occurs in generalization tests following intradimensional discrimination training as a displacement of peak responding away from the S+ (a…

  18. Role of Overtraining in Reversal and Conceptual Shift Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richman, Charles L.

    1973-01-01

    Sixty college students formed mixed conceptual categories in original learning (e.g., PEACH, SHIRT, PANTS, and PEAR; and SHOE, ORANGE, DRESS, and APPLE). They were then required to perform either a reversal shift or a conceptual shift. Results are discussed in relation with mediation theory. (Editor/RK)

  19. ac Stark shift of the Cs microwave atomic clock transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbusch, P.; Ghezali, S.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; Beloy, K.; Derevianko, A.

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the ac Stark shift of the Cs microwave atomic clock transition theoretically and experimentally. Theoretical and experimental data are in good agreement with each other. Results indicate the absence of a magic wavelength at which there would be no differential shift of the clock states having zero projections of the total angular momentum.

  20. 93Nb NMR chemical shift scale for niobia systems.

    PubMed

    Lapina, Olga B; Khabibulin, Dzhalil F; Romanenko, Konstantin V; Gan, Zhehong; Zuev, Mikhail G; Krasil'nikov, Vladimir N; Fedorov, Vladimir E

    2005-09-01

    93Nb solid-state NMR spectra of a series of inorganic niobates with Nb in different oxygen coordination environments were measured. For all studied compounds the chemical shielding and quadrupole tensor parameters were determined using conventional and ultrahigh field NMR facilities, ultrahigh speed MAS, DQ STMAS, solid-echo and computer modeling. It has been demonstrated that the 93Nb isotropic chemical shift is sensitive to the coordination number of Nb sites. For the first time the 93Nb NMR chemical shift scale for NbOx polyhedra in solid materials has been proposed: for four-coordinated Nb sites, the isotropic shifts occur from -650 to -950 ppm; five-coordinated Nb sites have the isotropic shifts in the range of -900 to -980 ppm; for six-coordinated Nb sites the isotropic shifts vary from -900 to -1360 ppm; the shifts from -1200 to -1600 ppm are typical for seven-coordinated Nb sites; for eight-coordinated Nb sites the shifts are higher than -1400 ppm. The possible correlation between the value of the isotropic chemical shift and the ionic character of the NbOx-MOy polyhedra association has been suggested. The magnitude of the 93Nb quadrupole coupling constant depends on the local symmetry of Nb sites and may vary from hundreds of kHz to hundreds of MHz. PMID:16216475