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Sample records for promoting proteasomal degradation

  1. Prefoldin Promotes Proteasomal Degradation of Cytosolic Proteins with Missense Mutations by Maintaining Substrate Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Young, Barry P.; Loewen, Christopher J.; Mayor, Thibault

    2016-01-01

    Misfolded proteins challenge the ability of cells to maintain protein homeostasis and can accumulate into toxic protein aggregates. As a consequence, cells have adopted a number of protein quality control pathways to prevent protein aggregation, promote protein folding, and target terminally misfolded proteins for degradation. In this study, we employed a thermosensitive allele of the yeast Guk1 guanylate kinase as a model misfolded protein to investigate degradative protein quality control pathways. We performed a flow cytometry based screen to identify factors that promote proteasomal degradation of proteins misfolded as the result of missense mutations. In addition to the E3 ubiquitin ligase Ubr1, we identified the prefoldin chaperone subunit Gim3 as an important quality control factor. Whereas the absence of GIM3 did not impair proteasomal function or the ubiquitination of the model substrate, it led to the accumulation of the poorly soluble model substrate in cellular inclusions that was accompanied by delayed degradation. We found that Gim3 interacted with the Guk1 mutant allele and propose that prefoldin promotes the degradation of the unstable model substrate by maintaining the solubility of the misfolded protein. We also demonstrated that in addition to the Guk1 mutant, prefoldin can stabilize other misfolded cytosolic proteins containing missense mutations. PMID:27448207

  2. Prefoldin Promotes Proteasomal Degradation of Cytosolic Proteins with Missense Mutations by Maintaining Substrate Solubility.

    PubMed

    Comyn, Sophie A; Young, Barry P; Loewen, Christopher J; Mayor, Thibault

    2016-07-01

    Misfolded proteins challenge the ability of cells to maintain protein homeostasis and can accumulate into toxic protein aggregates. As a consequence, cells have adopted a number of protein quality control pathways to prevent protein aggregation, promote protein folding, and target terminally misfolded proteins for degradation. In this study, we employed a thermosensitive allele of the yeast Guk1 guanylate kinase as a model misfolded protein to investigate degradative protein quality control pathways. We performed a flow cytometry based screen to identify factors that promote proteasomal degradation of proteins misfolded as the result of missense mutations. In addition to the E3 ubiquitin ligase Ubr1, we identified the prefoldin chaperone subunit Gim3 as an important quality control factor. Whereas the absence of GIM3 did not impair proteasomal function or the ubiquitination of the model substrate, it led to the accumulation of the poorly soluble model substrate in cellular inclusions that was accompanied by delayed degradation. We found that Gim3 interacted with the Guk1 mutant allele and propose that prefoldin promotes the degradation of the unstable model substrate by maintaining the solubility of the misfolded protein. We also demonstrated that in addition to the Guk1 mutant, prefoldin can stabilize other misfolded cytosolic proteins containing missense mutations. PMID:27448207

  3. BRK Targets Dok1 for Ubiquitin-Mediated Proteasomal Degradation to Promote Cell Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Miah, Sayem; Goel, Raghuveera Kumar; Dai, Chenlu; Kalra, Natasha; Beaton-Brown, Erika; Bagu, Edward T.; Bonham, Keith; Lukong, Kiven E.

    2014-01-01

    Breast tumor kinase (BRK), also known as protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6), is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase overexpressed in more that 60% of human breast carcinomas. The overexpression of BRK has been shown to sensitize mammary epithelial cells to mitogenic signaling and to promote cell proliferation and tumor formation. The molecular mechanisms of BRK have been unveiled by the identification and characterization of BRK target proteins. Downstream of tyrosine kinases 1 or Dok1 is a scaffolding protein and a substrate of several tyrosine kinases. Herein we show that BRK interacts with and phosphorylates Dok1 specifically on Y362. We demonstrate that this phosphorylation by BRK significantly downregulates Dok1 in a ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated mechanism. Together, these results suggest a novel mechanism of action of BRK in the promotion of tumor formation, which involves the targeting of tumor suppressor Dok1 for degradation through the ubiquitin proteasomal pathway. PMID:24523872

  4. Phosphorylation of Kif26b promotes its polyubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation during kidney development.

    PubMed

    Terabayashi, Takeshi; Sakaguchi, Masaji; Shinmyozu, Kaori; Ohshima, Toshio; Johjima, Ai; Ogura, Teru; Miki, Hiroaki; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi

    2012-01-01

    Kif26b, a member of the kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs), is essential for kidney development. Kif26b expression is restricted to the metanephric mesenchyme, and its transcription is regulated by a zinc finger transcriptional regulator Sall1. However, the mechanism(s) by which Kif26b protein is regulated remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate phosphorylation and subsequent polyubiquitination of Kif26b in the developing kidney. We find that Kif26b interacts with an E3 ubiquitin ligase, neural precursor cell expressed developmentally down-regulated protein 4 (Nedd4) in developing kidney. Phosphorylation of Kif26b at Thr-1859 and Ser-1962 by the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) enhances the interaction of Kif26b with Nedd4. Nedd4 polyubiquitinates Kif26b and thereby promotes degradation of Kif26b via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Furthermore, Kif26b lacks ATPase activity but does associate with microtubules. Nocodazole treatment not only disrupts the localization of Kif26b to microtubules but also promotes phosphorylation and polyubiquitination of Kif26b. These results suggest that the function of Kif26b is microtubule-based and that Kif26b degradation in the metanephric mesenchyme via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway may be important for proper kidney development. PMID:22768111

  5. RHOBTB3 promotes proteasomal degradation of HIFα through facilitating hydroxylation and suppresses the Warburg effect

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chen-Song; Liu, Qi; Li, Mengqi; Lin, Shu-Yong; Peng, Yongying; Wu, Di; Li, Terytty Yang; Fu, Qiang; Jia, Weiping; Wang, Xinjun; Ma, Teng; Zong, Yue; Cui, Jiwen; Pu, Chengfei; Lian, Guili; Guo, Huiling; Ye, Zhiyun; Lin, Sheng-Cai

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are master regulators of adaptive responses to low oxygen, and their α-subunits are rapidly degraded through the ubiquitination-dependent proteasomal pathway after hydroxylation. Aberrant accumulation or activation of HIFs is closely linked to many types of cancer. However, how hydroxylation of HIFα and its delivery to the ubiquitination machinery are regulated remains unclear. Here we show that Rho-related BTB domain-containing protein 3 (RHOBTB3) directly interacts with the hydroxylase PHD2 to promote HIFα hydroxylation. RHOBTB3 also directly interacts with the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) protein, a component of the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, facilitating ubiquitination of HIFα. Remarkably, RHOBTB3 dimerizes with LIMD1, and constructs a RHOBTB3/LIMD1-PHD2-VHL-HIFα complex to effect the maximal degradation of HIFα. Hypoxia reduces the RHOBTB3-centered complex formation, resulting in an accumulation of HIFα. Importantly, the expression level of RHOBTB3 is greatly reduced in human renal carcinomas, and RHOBTB3 deficiency significantly elevates the Warburg effect and accelerates xenograft growth. Our work thus reveals that RHOBTB3 serves as a scaffold to organize a multi-subunit complex that promotes the hydroxylation, ubiquitination and degradation of HIFα. PMID:26215701

  6. CHIP promotes proteasomal degradation of familial ALS-linked mutant SOD1 by ubiquitinating Hsp/Hsc70.

    PubMed

    Urushitani, Makoto; Kurisu, Junko; Tateno, Minako; Hatakeyama, Shigetsugu; Nakayama, Kei-Ichi; Kato, Shinsuke; Takahashi, Ryosuke

    2004-07-01

    Over 100 mutants in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) are reported in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, the precise mechanism by which they are degraded through a ubiquitin-proteasomal pathway (UPP) remains unclear. Here, we report that heat-shock protein (Hsp) or heat-shock cognate (Hsc)70, and the carboxyl terminus of the Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP), are involved in proteasomal degradation of mutant SOD1. Only mutant SOD1 interacted with Hsp/Hsc70 in vivo, and in vitro experiments revealed that Hsp/Hsc70 preferentially interacted with apo-SOD1 or dithiothreitol (DTT)-treated holo-SOD1, compared with metallated or oxidized forms. CHIP, a binding partner of Hsp/Hsc70, interacted only with mutant SOD1 and promoted its degradation. Both Hsp70 and CHIP promoted polyubiquitination of mutant SOD1-associated molecules, but not of mutant SOD1, indicating that mutant SOD1 is not a substrate of CHIP. Moreover, mutant SOD1-associated Hsp/Hsc70, a known substrate of CHIP, was polyubiquitinated in vivo, and polyubiquitinated Hsc70 by CHIP interacted with the S5a subunit of the 26S proteasome in vitro. Furthermore, CHIP was predominantly expressed in spinal neurons, and ubiquitinated inclusions in the spinal motor neurons of hSOD1(G93A) transgenic mice were CHIP-immunoreactive. Taken together, we propose a novel pathway in which ubiquitinated Hsp/Hsc70 might deliver mutant SOD1 to, and facilitate its degradation, at the proteasome. PMID:15198682

  7. Arctigenin promotes degradation of inducible nitric oxide synthase through CHIP-associated proteasome pathway and suppresses its enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiangyang; Li, Guilan; Lü, Chaotian; Xu, Hui; Yin, Zhimin

    2012-10-01

    Arctigenin, a natural dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan compound, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. Previous works showed that arctigenin decreased lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced iNOS at transcription level. However, whether arctigenin could regulate iNOS at the post-translational level is still unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that arctigenin promoted the degradation of iNOS which is expressed under LPS stimulation in murine macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells. Such degradation of iNOS protein is due to CHIP-associated ubiquitination and proteasome-dependency. Furthermore, arctigenin decreased iNOS phosphorylation through inhibiting ERK and Src activation, subsequently suppressed iNOS enzyme activity. In conclusion, our research displays a new finding that arctigenin can promote the ubiqitination and degradation of iNOS after LPS stimulation. iNOS activity regulated by arctigenin is likely to involve a multitude of crosstalking mechanisms. PMID:22770942

  8. TRB3 links insulin/IGF to tumour promotion by interacting with p62 and impeding autophagic/proteasomal degradations

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Fang; Li, Ke; Yu, Jiao-Jiao; Lv, Xiao-Xi; Yan, Jun; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Sun, Wei; Lin, Heng; Shang, Shuang; Wang, Feng; Cui, Bing; Mu, Rong; Huang, Bo; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Hu, Zhuo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    High insulin/IGF is a biologic link between diabetes and cancers, but the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here we report a previously unrecognized tumour-promoting mechanism for stress protein TRB3, which mediates a reciprocal antagonism between autophagic and proteasomal degradation systems and connects insulin/IGF to malignant promotion. We find that several human cancers express higher TRB3 and phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate 1, which correlates negatively with patient's prognosis. TRB3 depletion protects against tumour-promoting actions of insulin/IGF and attenuates tumour initiation, growth and metastasis in mice. TRB3 interacts with autophagic receptor p62 and hinders p62 binding to LC3 and ubiquitinated substrates, which causes p62 deposition and suppresses autophagic/proteasomal degradation. Several tumour-promoting factors accumulate in cancer cells to support tumour metabolism, proliferation, invasion and metastasis. Interrupting TRB3/p62 interaction produces potent antitumour efficacies against tumour growth and metastasis. Our study opens possibility of targeting this interaction as a potential novel strategy against cancers with diabetes. PMID:26268733

  9. E6-AP promotes misfolded polyglutamine proteins for proteasomal degradation and suppresses polyglutamine protein aggregation and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Amit; Dikshit, Priyanka; Purkayastha, Sudarshana; Sharma, Jaiprakash; Nukina, Nobuyuki; Jana, Nihar Ranjan

    2008-03-21

    The accumulation of intracellular protein deposits as inclusion bodies is the common pathological hallmark of most age-related neurodegenerative disorders including polyglutamine diseases. Appearance of aggregates of the misfolded mutant disease proteins suggest that cells are unable to efficiently degrade them, and failure of clearance leads to the severe disturbances of the cellular quality control system. Recently, the quality control ubiquitin ligase CHIP has been shown to suppress the polyglutamine protein aggregation and toxicity. Here we have identified another ubiquitin ligase, called E6-AP, which is able to promote the proteasomal degradation of misfolded polyglutamine proteins and suppress the polyglutamine protein aggregation and polyglutamine protein-induced cell death. E6-AP interacts with the soluble misfolded polyglutamine protein and associates with their aggregates in both cellular and transgenic mouse models. Partial knockdown of E6-AP enhances the rate of aggregate formation and cell death mediated by the polyglutamine protein. Finally, we have demonstrated the up-regulation of E6-AP in the expanded polyglutamine protein-expressing cells as well as cells exposed to proteasomal stress. These findings suggest that E6-AP is a critical mediator of the neuronal response to misfolded polyglutamine proteins and represents a potential therapeutic target in the polyglutamine diseases. PMID:18201976

  10. A-type lamins regulate retinoblastoma protein function by promoting subnuclear localization and preventing proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brett R; Nitta, Ryan T; Frock, Richard L; Mounkes, Leslie; Barbie, David A; Stewart, Colin L; Harlow, Ed; Kennedy, Brian K

    2004-06-29

    The retinoblastoma protein (pRB) is a critical regulator of cell proliferation and differentiation and an important tumor suppressor. In the G(1) phase of the cell cycle, pRB localizes to perinucleolar sites associated with lamin A/C intranuclear foci. Here, we examine pRB function in cells lacking lamin A/C, finding that pRB levels are dramatically decreased and that the remaining pRB is mislocalized. We demonstrate that A-type lamins protect pRB from proteasomal degradation. Both pRB levels and localization are restored upon reintroduction of lamin A. Lmna(-/-) cells resemble Rb(-/-) cells, exhibiting altered cell-cycle properties and reduced capacity to undergo cell-cycle arrest in response to DNA damage. These findings establish a functional link between a core nuclear structural component and an important cell-cycle regulator. They further raise the possibility that altered pRB function may be a contributing factor in dystrophic syndromes arising from LMNA mutation. PMID:15210943

  11. The Homeodomain Transcription Factor Hoxa2 Interacts with and Promotes the Proteasomal Degradation of the E3 Ubiquitin Protein Ligase RCHY1

    PubMed Central

    Bergiers, Isabelle; Bridoux, Laure; Nguyen, Nathan; Twizere, Jean-Claude; Rezsöhazy, René

    2013-01-01

    Hox proteins are conserved homeodomain transcription factors known to be crucial regulators of animal development. As transcription factors, the functions and modes of action (co-factors, target genes) of Hox proteins have been very well studied in a multitude of animal models. However, a handful of reports established that Hox proteins may display molecular activities distinct from gene transcription regulation. Here, we reveal that Hoxa2 interacts with 20S proteasome subunits and RCHY1 (also known as PIRH2), an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets p53 for degradation. We further show that Hoxa2 promotes proteasome-dependent degradation of RCHY1 in an ubiquitin-independent manner. Correlatively, Hoxa2 alters the RCHY1-mediated ubiquitination of p53 and promotes p53 stabilization. Together, our data establish that Hoxa2 can regulate the proteasomal degradation of RCHY1 and stabilization of p53. PMID:24244684

  12. CDK11{sup p58} represses vitamin D receptor-mediated transcriptional activation through promoting its ubiquitin-proteasome degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Yayun; Hong, Yi; Zong, Hongliang; Wang, Yanlin; Zou, Weiying; Yang, Junwu; Kong, Xiangfei; Yun, Xiaojing; Gu, Jianxin

    2009-08-28

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and regulates transcription of target genes. In this study, we identified CDK11{sup p58} as a novel protein involved in the regulation of VDR. CDK11{sup p58}, a member of the large family of p34cdc2-related kinases, is associated with cell cycle progression, tumorigenesis, and apoptotic signaling. Our study demonstrated that CDK11{sup p58} interacted with VDR and repressed VDR-dependent transcriptional activation. Furthermore, overexpression of CDK11{sup p58} decreased the stability of VDR through promoting its ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation. Taken together, these results suggest that CDK11{sup p58} is involved in the negative regulation of VDR.

  13. Arachidonic acid downregulates acyl-CoA synthetase 4 expression by promoting its ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation[S

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Chin Fung Kelvin; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Stafforini, Diana M.; Azhar, Salman; Liu, Jingwen

    2014-01-01

    ACSL4 is a member of the long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) family with a marked preference for arachidonic acid (AA) as its substrate. Although an association between elevated levels of ACSL4 and hepatosteatosis has been reported, the function of ACSL4 in hepatic FA metabolism and the regulation of its functional expression in the liver remain poorly defined. Here we provide evidence that AA selectively downregulates ACSL4 protein expression in hepatic cells. AA treatment decreased the half-life of ACSL4 protein in HepG2 cells by approximately 4-fold (from 17.3 ± 1.8 h to 4.2 ± 0.4 h) without causing apoptosis. The inhibitory action of AA on ACSL4 protein stability could not be prevented by rosiglitazone or inhibitors that interfere with the cellular pathways involved in AA metabolism to biologically active compounds. In contrast, treatment of cells with inhibitors specific for the proteasomal degradation pathway largely prevented the AA-induced ACSL4 degradation. We further show that ACSL4 is intrinsically ubiquitinated and that AA treatment can enhance its ubiquitination. Collectively, our studies have identified a novel substrate-induced posttranslational regulatory mechanism by which AA downregulates ACSL4 protein expression in hepatic cells. PMID:24879802

  14. PIAS1-mediated sumoylation promotes STUbL-dependent proteasomal degradation of the human telomeric protein TRF2.

    PubMed

    Her, Joonyoung; Jeong, Yu Young; Chung, In Kwon

    2015-10-24

    The human telomeric protein TRF2 protects chromosome ends by facilitating their organization into the protective capping structure. Here we show that the stability of TRF2 is regulated via modification by the small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMO). TRF2 specifically interacts with and is sumoylated by PIAS1 in mammalian cells. The proteasome inhibitor stabilizes SUMO-conjugated TRF2 without affecting the level of unmodified TRF2, suggesting that SUMO conjugation is required for proteasomal degradation of TRF2. We also show that RNF4, a mammalian SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase, interacts with TRF2 in a SUMO-dependent manner and preferentially targets SUMO-conjugated TRF2 for ubiquitination. Collectively, our data demonstrate that the PIAS1-mediated sumoylation status of TRF2 serves as a molecular switch that controls the level of TRF2 at telomeres. PMID:26450775

  15. Exposure of hydrophobic moieties promotes the selective degradation of hydrogen peroxide-modified hemoglobin by the multicatalytic proteinase complex, proteasome.

    PubMed

    Giulivi, C; Pacifici, R E; Davies, K J

    1994-06-01

    The physiologically relevant stress of a flux of H2O2 increased hemoglobin (Hb) degradation in red blood cells (RBC) and increased the proteolytic susceptibility of Hb in vitro. After exposure to low H2O2 flux rates (6-32 microM/min) Hb exhibited increased exposure of hydrophobic (Trp, Met) and basic (Lys) amino acid R groups, increased hydrophobicity, and increased proteolytic susceptibility during subsequent incubation with RBC extracts, a partially purified preparation called Fraction II (which retains all of the proteolytic activities of RBC extracts), or the purified 670-kDa RBC multicatalytic proteinase complex proteasome. Hydrophobicity was measured by butyl-Sepharose hydrophobic interaction chromatography, by the free energy of transfer from water to ethanol, and by heat denaturation assays. Proteolytic susceptibility was measured by release of free alanine, by fluorescamine-reactive free amino groups, and by release of acid-soluble radioactivity from radiolabeled Hb. Low H2O2 flux rates also caused significant charge changes in Hb (isoelectric focusing gels) and extensive noncovalent aggregation (presumably due to increased hydrophobic interactions) but only limited covalent cross-linking (comparison of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and nondenaturing PAGE). Exposure to higher H2O2 flux rates (56-120 microM/min) caused progressive oxidative destruction of exposed hydrophobic amino acids, decreased hydrophobicity as judged by butyl-Sepharose chromatography and heat denaturation assays, increased hydrophilicity as judged by measurements of the free energy of transfer (delta G') from water to ethanol, and decreased proteolytic susceptibility during incubation with RBC extracts, Fraction II, or purified proteasome. High H2O2 flux rates also caused further charge changes and the extensive formation of covalently cross-linked Hb molecules. Linear regression analyses revealed correlations of 0.8-0.99 for the relationship

  16. HUWE1 interacts with BRCA1 and promotes its degradation in the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway (Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, v. 444, isse 4)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaozhen; Lu, Guang; Li, Li; Yi, Juan; Yan, Kaowen; Wang, Yaqing; Zhu, Baili; Kuang, Jingyu; Lin, Ming; Zhang, Sha; Shao, Genze

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • The 2000–2634aa region of HUWE1 mediates the interaction with BRCA1 degron. • HUWE1 promotes the degradation of BRCA1 through the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. • HUWE1 expression is inversely correlated with BRCA1 in breast cancer cells. • RNAi inhibition of HUWE1 confers increased resistance of MCF-10F cells to IR and MMC. - Abstract: The cellular BRCA1 protein level is essential for its tumor suppression activity and is tightly regulated through multiple mechanisms including ubiquitn–proteasome system. E3 ligases are involved to promote BRCA1 for ubiquitination and degradation. Here, we identified HUWE1/Mule/ARF-BP1 as a novel BRCA1-interacting protein involved in the control of BRCA1 protein level. HUWE1 binds BRCA1 through its N-terminus degron domain. Depletion of HUWE1 by siRNA-mediated interference significantly increases BRCA1 protein levels and prolongs the half-life of BRCA1. Moreover, exogenous expression of HUWE1 promotes BRCA1 degradation through the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway, which could explain an inverse correlation between HUWE1 and BRCA1 levels in MCF10F, MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Consistent with a functional role for HUWE1 in regulating BRCA1-mediated cellular response to DNA damage, depletion of HUWE1 by siRNA confers increased resistance to ionizing radiation and mitomycin. These data indicate that HUWE1 is a critical negative regulator of BRCA1 and suggest a new molecular mechanism for breast cancer pathogenesis.

  17. HUWE1 interacts with BRCA1 and promotes its degradation in the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway (Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, v. 444 issue 3)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaozhen; Lu, Guang; Li, Li; Yi, Juan; Yan, Kaowen; Wang, Yaqing; Zhu, Baili; Kuang, Jingyu; Lin, Ming; Zhang, Sha; Shao, Genze

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • The 2000–2634 aa region of HUWE1 mediates the interaction with BRCA1 degron. • HUWE1 promotes the degradation of BRCA1 through the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. • HUWE1 expression is inversely correlated with BRCA1 in breast cancer cells. • RNAi inhibition of HUWE1 confers increased resistance of MCF-10F cells to IR and MMC. - Abstract: The cellular BRCA1 protein level is essential for its tumor suppression activity and is tightly regulated through multiple mechanisms including ubiquitn–proteasome system. E3 ligases are involved to promote BRCA1 for ubiquitination and degradation. Here, we identified HUWE1/Mule/ARF-BP1 as a novel BRCA1-interacting protein involved in the control of BRCA1 protein level. HUWE1binds BRCA1 through its N-terminus degron domain. Depletion of HUWE1 by siRNA-mediated interference significantly increases BRCA1 protein levels and prolongs the half-life of BRCA1. Moreover, exogenous expression of HUWE1 promotes BRCA1 degradation through the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway, which could explain an inverse correlation between HUWE1 and BRCA1 levels in MCF10F, MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Consistent with a functional role for HUWE1 in regulating BRCA1-mediated cellular response to DNA damage, depletion of HUWE1 by siRNA confers increased resistance to ionizing radiation and mitomycin. These data indicate that HUWE1 is a critical negative regulator of BRCA1 and suggest a new molecular mechanism for breast cancer pathogenesis.

  18. Conditioned Media from Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Inhibits Melanogenesis by Promoting Proteasomal Degradation of MITF

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hoon; Shin, Ji Hyun; Park, So Jung; Jo, Yoon Kyung; Oh, Wonil; Yang, Yoon Sun; Cho, Dong-Hyung; Kim, Ju-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) secrete various beneficial molecules, which have anti-apoptotic activity and cell proliferation. However, the effect of hUCB-MSCs in melanogenesis is largely unclear. In this study, we show that conditioned media (CM) derived from hUCB-MSCs inhibit melanogenesis by regulating microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) expression via the ERK signalling pathway. Treatment of hUCB-MSC-CM strongly inhibited the alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone-induced hyperpigmentation in melanoma cells as well as melanocytes. Treatment of hUCB-MSC-CM induced ERK1/2 activation in melanocytes. In addition, inhibition of ERK1/2 suppressed the anti-pigmentation activity of the hUCB-MSC-CM in melanocytes and in vitro artificial skin models. We also found that the expression of MITF was appreciably diminished while expression of phosphorylated MITF, which leads to its proteasomal degradation, was increased in cells treated with hUCB-MSC-CM. These results suggested that hUCB-MSC-CM significantly suppresses melanin synthesis via MITF degradation by the ERK pathway activation. PMID:26024475

  19. Structural disorder and its role in proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Aufderheide, Antje; Unverdorben, Pia; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Förster, Friedrich

    2015-09-14

    The ubiquitin proteasome system is responsible for the controlled degradation of a vast number of intracellular proteins. It targets misfolded or otherwise aberrant proteins as well as proteins no longer needed at a given point in time. The 26S proteasome is a large macromolecular machine comprising 33 distinct subunits as well as a number of transiently associating cofactors. Being essentially a non-specific protease, specificity is conferred by the ubiquitin system, which selects and marks substrates for degradation. Here, we review our current understanding of the structure and function of the 26S proteasome; in doing so we highlight the role of disordered protein regions. Disordered segments in substrates promote their degradation, whereas low complexity regions prevent their proteolysis. In the 26S proteasome itself a main role of disordered segments seems to be rendering the ubiquitin receptors mobile, possibly supporting recruitment of polyubiquitylated substrates. Thus, these structural features of substrates as well as of the 26S proteasome itself likely play important roles at different stages of the protein degradation process. PMID:26226424

  20. Pupylation-dependent and -independent proteasomal degradation in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Imkamp, Frank; Ziemski, Michal; Weber-Ban, Eilika

    2015-08-01

    Bacteria make use of compartmentalizing protease complexes, similar in architecture but not homologous to the eukaryotic proteasome, for the selective and processive removal of proteins. Mycobacteria as members of the actinobacteria harbor proteasomes in addition to the canonical bacterial degradation complexes. Mycobacterial proteasomal degradation, although not essential during normal growth, becomes critical for survival under particular environmental conditions, like, for example, during persistence of the pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis in host macrophages or of environmental mycobacteria under starvation. Recruitment of protein substrates for proteasomal degradation is usually mediated by pupylation, the post-translational modification of lysine side chains with the prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein Pup. This substrate recruitment strategy is functionally reminiscent of ubiquitination in eukaryotes, but is the result of convergent evolution, relying on chemically and structurally distinct enzymes. Pupylated substrates are recognized by the ATP-dependent proteasomal regulator Mpa that associates with the 20S proteasome core. A pupylation-independent proteasome degradation pathway has recently been discovered that is mediated by the ATP-independent bacterial proteasome activator Bpa (also referred to as PafE), and that appears to play a role under stress conditions. In this review, mechanistic principles of bacterial proteasomal degradation are discussed and compared with functionally related elements of the eukaryotic ubiquitin-proteasome system. Special attention is given to an understanding on the molecular level based on structural and biochemical analysis. Wherever available, discussion of in vivo studies is included to highlight the biological significance of this unusual bacterial degradation pathway. PMID:26352358

  1. Cooh-Terminal Truncations Promote Proteasome-Dependent Degradation of Mature Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator from Post-Golgi Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Benharouga, Mohamed; Haardt, Martin; Kartner, Norbert; Lukacs, Gergely L.

    2001-01-01

    Impaired biosynthetic processing of the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-regulated chloride channel, constitutes the most common cause of CF. Recently, we have identified a distinct category of mutation, caused by premature stop codons and frameshift mutations, which manifests in diminished expression of COOH-terminally truncated CFTR at the cell surface. Although the biosynthetic processing and plasma membrane targeting of truncated CFTRs are preserved, the turnover of the complex-glycosylated mutant is sixfold faster than its wild-type (wt) counterpart. Destabilization of the truncated CFTR coincides with its enhanced susceptibility to proteasome-dependent degradation from post-Golgi compartments globally, and the plasma membrane specifically, determined by pulse–chase analysis in conjunction with cell surface biotinylation. Proteolytic cleavage of the full-length complex-glycosylated wt and degradation intermediates derived from both T70 and wt CFTR requires endolysosomal proteases. The enhanced protease sensitivity in vitro and the decreased thermostability of the complex-glycosylated T70 CFTR in vivo suggest that structural destabilization may account for the increased proteasome susceptibility and the short residence time at the cell surface. These in turn are responsible, at least in part, for the phenotypic manifestation of CF. We propose that the proteasome-ubiquitin pathway may be involved in the peripheral quality control of other, partially unfolded membrane proteins as well. PMID:11381082

  2. Jak-STAT3 pathway triggers DICER1 for proteasomal degradation by ubiquitin ligase complex of CUL4A(DCAF1) to promote colon cancer development.

    PubMed

    Ren, Weiguo; Shen, Shourong; Sun, Zhenqiang; Shu, Peng; Shen, Xiaohua; Bu, Chibin; Ai, Feiyan; Zhang, Xuemei; Tang, Anliu; Tian, Li; Li, Guiyuan; Li, Xiayu; Ma, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Chronic intestinal inflammation is closely associated with colon cancer development and STAT3 seems to take center stage in bridging chronic inflammation to colon cancer progress. Here, we discovered that DICER1 was significantly downregulated in response to IL-6 or LPS stimulation and identified a novel mechanism for DICER1 downregulation via proteasomal degradation by ubiquitin ligase complex of CUL4A(DCAF1) in colon cancer cells. Meanwhile, PI3K-AKT signaling pathway phosphorylated DICER1 and contributed to its proteasomal degradation. The regulation of DICER1 by CUL4A(DCAF1) affected cell growth and apoptosis which is controlled by IL-6 activated Jak-STAT3 pathway. Intervention of CUL4A(DCAF1) ubiquitin ligase complex led to fluctuation in expression levels of DICER1 and microRNAs, and thus affected tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. A panel of microRNAs that were downregulated by IL-6 stimulation was rescued by siRNA-CUL4A, and their predicated functions are involved in regulation of cell proliferation, apoptosis and motility. Furthermore, clinical specimen analysis revealed that decreased DICER1 expression was negatively correlated with STAT3 activation and cancer progression in human colon cancers. DICER1 and p-STAT3 expression levels correlated with 5-year overall survival of colon cancer patients. Consequently, this study proposes that inflammation-induced Jak-STAT3 signaling leads to colon cancer development through proteasomal degradation of DICER1 by ubiquitin ligase complex of CUL4A(DCAF1), which suggests a novel therapeutic opportunity for colon cancer. PMID:26965998

  3. Hsp90 Enhances Degradation of Oxidized Calmodulin by the 20S Proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Whittier, Jennifer E.; Xiong, Yijia; Rechsteiner, Martin C.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2004-10-29

    The 20S proteasome has been suggested to play a critical role in mediating the degradation of abnormal proteins under conditions of oxidative stress, and has been found in tight association with the molecular chaperone Hsp90. To elucidate the role of Hsp90 in promoting the degradation of oxidized calmodulin (CaMox), which accumulates in senescent brain during normal biological aging, we have purified the 20S proteasome free of Hsp90 from red blood cells and assessed its ability to recognize and degrade CaMox in the absence and presence of added Hsp90. The purified 20S proteasome does not degrade CaMox to any appreciable extent. However, following association with Hsp90, the 20S proteasome selectively degrades CaMox. This degradation is sensitive to both proteasome and Hsp90-specific inhibitors, and is further enhanced in the presence of 2 mM ATP. Irrespective of the presence of Hsp90 we find that unoxidized CaM is not significantly degraded. Furthermore, the ability of the proteasome to degrade commonly used fluorogenic peptides is not affected by Hsp90, indicating that there is no change in the accessibility of the catalytic core. Direct binding measurements demonstrate that Hsp90 selectively associates with CaMox; essentially no binding is observed between Hsp90 and unoxidized CaM. Since oxidation has previously been shown to induce both global conformational changes and a reduction in helical content of CaM, these results suggest that Hsp90 in association with the 20S proteasome selectively associates with partially unfolded proteins to promote their degradation by the proteasome.

  4. Ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of ATG12 regulates its proapoptotic activity

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Martina; Hock, Andreas K; Giampazolias, Evangelos; Oberst, Andrew; Green, Douglas R; Debnath, Jayanta; Ryan, Kevin M; Vousden, Karen H; Tait, Stephen W G

    2015-01-01

    During macroautophagy, conjugation of ATG12 to ATG5 is essential for LC3 lipidation and autophagosome formation. Additionally, ATG12 has ATG5-independent functions in diverse processes including mitochondrial fusion and mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the regulation of free ATG12. In stark contrast to the stable ATG12–ATG5 conjugate, we find that free ATG12 is highly unstable and rapidly degraded in a proteasome-dependent manner. Surprisingly, ATG12, itself a ubiquitin-like protein, is directly ubiquitinated and this promotes its proteasomal degradation. As a functional consequence of its turnover, accumulation of free ATG12 contributes to proteasome inhibitor-mediated apoptosis, a finding that may be clinically important given the use of proteasome inhibitors as anticancer agents. Collectively, our results reveal a novel interconnection between autophagy, proteasome activity, and cell death mediated by the ubiquitin-like properties of ATG12. PMID:25629932

  5. Dinaciclib, a Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor Promotes Proteasomal Degradation of Mcl-1 and Enhances ABT-737-Mediated Cell Death in Malignant Human Glioma Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Jane, Esther P; Premkumar, Daniel R; Cavaleri, Jonathon M; Sutera, Philip A; Rajasekar, Thatchana; Pollack, Ian F

    2016-02-01

    ; phosphatidylserine exposure on the plasma membrane surface and activation of caspases and poly ADP-ribose polymerase. Mechanistic studies revealed that dinaciclib promoted proteasomal degradation of Mcl-1. These observations may have important clinical implications for the design of experimental treatment protocols for malignant human glioma. PMID:26585571

  6. Enhanced proteasome degradation extends Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan and alleviates aggregation-related pathologies.

    PubMed

    Chondrogianni, Niki; Georgila, Konstantina; Kourtis, Nikos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Gonos Efstathios, S

    2014-10-01

    Collapse of proteostasis and accumulation of damaged macromolecules have been recognized as hallmarks of aging and age-related diseases. The proteasome is the major cellular protease responsible for intracellular protein degradation, having an impaired function during aging. We have previously shown that proteasome activation through overexpression of β5 proteasome subunit delays replicative senescence and confers resistance to oxidative stress in primary fibroblasts. Herein, we have investigated the impact of enhanced proteasome function on organismal longevity and aggregation-related pathologies by employing Caenorhabditis elegans as a model system. We have found that overexpression of a core 20S proteasome subunit in wild type worms extends lifespan, healthspan and survival under proteotoxic conditions. The longevity prolonging effect of the proteasome subunit overexpression was found to depend on the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 and was associated with its elevated transcriptional activity. We have also uncovered a major role of enhanced proteasome activity in aggregation-related pathologies underlying neurodegenerative diseases. Genetic activation of the proteasome minimized the detrimental effect of polyglutamine-induced toxicity mimicking Huntington's disease, whereas knock-down of the proteasome component exaggerated the disease phenotypes. Similar results were obtained by using a C.elegans model of Amyloid beta (Αβ) -induced toxicity mimicking Alzheimer's disease. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that enhanced proteasome function alleviates proteotoxicity and promotes longevity in synergy with other nodes of lifespan regulation in C.elegans. Understanding the mechanism by which preservation of proteostasis via enhancement of proteasome function, decelerates the aging process and alleviates age-related pathologies may assist in the rational design of therapeutic and anti-aging interventions. PMID:26461298

  7. Emerging Mechanistic Insights into AAA Complexes Regulating Proteasomal Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Friedrich; Schuller, Jan M.; Unverdorben, Pia; Aufderheide, Antje

    2014-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is an integral element of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and, as such, responsible for regulated degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells. It consists of the core particle, which catalyzes the proteolysis of substrates into small peptides, and the regulatory particle, which ensures specificity for a broad range of substrates. The heart of the regulatory particle is an AAA-ATPase unfoldase, which is surrounded by non-ATPase subunits enabling substrate recognition and processing. Cryo-EM-based studies revealed the molecular architecture of the 26S proteasome and its conformational rearrangements, providing insights into substrate recognition, commitment, deubiquitylation and unfolding. The cytosol proteasomal degradation of polyubiquitylated substrates is tuned by various associating cofactors, including deubiquitylating enzymes, ubiquitin ligases, shuttling ubiquitin receptors and the AAA-ATPase Cdc48/p97. Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors function upstream of the 26S proteasome, and their modular organization exhibits some striking analogies to the regulatory particle. In archaea PAN, the closest regulatory particle homolog and Cdc48 even have overlapping functions, underscoring their intricate relationship. Here, we review recent insights into the structure and dynamics of the 26S proteasome and its associated machinery, as well as our current structural knowledge on the Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors that function in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). PMID:25102382

  8. Emerging mechanistic insights into AAA complexes regulating proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Förster, Friedrich; Schuller, Jan M; Unverdorben, Pia; Aufderheide, Antje

    2014-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is an integral element of the ubiquitin-proteasome system(UPS) and, as such, responsible for regulated degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells.It consists of the core particle, which catalyzes the proteolysis of substrates into small peptides, and the regulatory particle, which ensures specificity for a broad range of substrates.The heart of the regulatory particle is an AAA-ATPase unfoldase, which is surrounded by non-ATPase subunits enabling substrate recognition and processing. Cryo-EM-based studies revealed the molecular architecture of the 26S proteasome and its conformational rearrangements, providing insights into substrate recognition, commitment, deubiquitylation and unfolding. The cytosol proteasomal degradation of polyubiquitylated substrates is tuned by various associating cofactors, including deubiquitylating enzymes, ubiquitin ligases,shuttling ubiquitin receptors and the AAA-ATPase Cdc48/p97. Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors function upstream of the 26S proteasome, and their modular organization exhibits some striking analogies to the regulatory particle. In archaea PAN, the closest regulatory particle homolog and Cdc48 even have overlapping functions, underscoring their intricate relationship.Here, we review recent insights into the structure and dynamics of the 26S proteasome and its associated machinery, as well as our current structural knowledge on the Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors that function in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). PMID:25102382

  9. The cAMP signaling system inhibits the repair of {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage by promoting Epac1-mediated proteasomal degradation of XRCC1 protein in human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Eun-Ah; Juhnn, Yong-Sung

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system inhibits repair of {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system inhibits DNA damage repair by decreasing XRCC1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system decreases XRCC1 expression by promoting its proteasomal degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The promotion of XRCC1 degradation by cAMP signaling system is mediated by Epac1. -- Abstract: Cyclic AMP is involved in the regulation of metabolism, gene expression, cellular growth and proliferation. Recently, the cAMP signaling system was found to modulate DNA-damaging agent-induced apoptosis by regulating the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins and inhibitors of apoptosis. Thus, we hypothesized that the cAMP signaling may modulate DNA repair activity, and we investigated the effects of the cAMP signaling system on {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage repair in lung cancer cells. Transient expression of a constitutively active mutant of stimulatory G protein (G{alpha}sQL) or treatment with forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator, augmented radiation-induced DNA damage and inhibited repair of the damage in H1299 lung cancer cells. Expression of G{alpha}sQL or treatment with forskolin or isoproterenol inhibited the radiation-induced expression of the XRCC1 protein, and exogenous expression of XRCC1 abolished the DNA repair-inhibiting effect of forskolin. Forskolin treatment promoted the ubiquitin and proteasome-dependent degradation of the XRCC1 protein, resulting in a significant decrease in the half-life of the protein after {gamma}-ray irradiation. The effect of forskolin on XRCC1 expression was not inhibited by PKA inhibitor, but 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP, an Epac-selective cAMP analog, increased ubiquitination of XRCC1 protein and decreased XRCC1 expression. Knockdown of Epac1 abolished the effect of 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP and restored XRCC1 protein level following {gamma}-ray irradiation. From

  10. ASB2 targets filamins A and B to proteasomal degradation

    PubMed Central

    Heuzé, Mélina L.; Lamsoul, Isabelle; Baldassarre, Massimiliano; Lad, Yatish; Lévêque, Sophie; Razinia, Ziba; Moog-Lutz, Christel; Calderwood, David A.

    2008-01-01

    The ordered series of proliferation and differentiation from hematopoietic progenitor cells is disrupted in leukemia, resulting in arrest of differentiation at immature proliferative stages. Characterizing the molecular basis of hematopoietic differentiation is therefore important for understanding and treating disease. Retinoic acid induces expression of ankyrin repeat-containing protein with a suppressor of cytokine signaling box 2 (ASB2) in acute promyelocytic leukemia cells, and ASB2 expression inhibits growth and promotes commitment, recapitulating an early step critical for differentiation. ASB2 is the specificity subunit of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and is proposed to exert its effects by regulating the turnover of specific proteins; however, no ASB2 substrates had been identified. Here, we report that ASB2 targets the actin-binding proteins filamin A and B for proteasomal degradation. Knockdown of endogenous ASB2 in leukemia cells delays retinoic acid-induced differentiation and filamin degradation; conversely, ASB2 expression in leukemia cells induces filamin degradation. ASB2 expression inhibits cell spreading, and this effect is recapitulated by knocking down both filamin A and filamin B. Thus, we suggest that ASB2 may regulate hematopoietic cell differentiation by modulating cell spreading and actin remodeling through targeting of filamins for degradation. PMID:18799729

  11. Acetylation-Mediated Proteasomal Degradation of Core Histones during DNA Repair and Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Min-Xian; Pang, Ye; Liu, Cui Hua; Haratake, Kousuke; Du, Bo-Yu; Ji, Dan-Yang; Wang, Guang-Fei; Zhu, Qian-Qian; Song, Wei; Yu, Yadong; Zhang, Xiao-Xu; Huang, Hai-Tao; Miao, Shiying; Chen, Lian-Bin; Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liang, Ya-Nan; Liu, Shan; Cha, Hwangho; Yang, Dong; Zhai, Yonggong; Komatsu, Takuo; Tsuruta, Fuminori; Li, Haitao; Cao, Cheng; Li, Wei; Li, Guo-Hong; Cheng, Yifan; Chiba, Tomoki; Wang, Linfang; Goldberg, Alfred L.; Shen, Yan; Qiu, Xiao-Bo

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Histone acetylation plays critical roles in chromatin remodeling, DNA repair, and epigenetic regulation of gene expression, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Proteasomes usually catalyze ATP- and polyubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. Here we show that the proteasomes containing the activator PA200 catalyze the polyubiquitin-independent degradation of histones. Most proteasomes in mammalian testes (“spermatoproteasomes”) contain a spermatid/sperm-specific α-subunit α4s/PSMA8 and/or the catalytic β-subunits of immunoproteasomes in addition to PA200. Deletion of PA200 in mice abolishes acetylation-dependent degradation of somatic core histones during DNA double-strand breaks, and delays core histone disappearance in elongated spermatids. Purified PA200 greatly promotes ATP-independent proteasomal degradation of the acetylated core histones, but not polyubiquitinated proteins. Furthermore, acetylation on histones is required for their binding to the bromodomain-like regions in PA200 and its yeast ortholog, Blm10. Thus, PA200/Blm10 specifically targets the core histones for acetylation-mediated degradation by proteasomes, providing mechanisms by which acetylation regulates histone degradation, DNA repair, and spermatogenesis. PMID:23706739

  12. E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP interacts with C-type lectin-like receptor CLEC-2 and promotes its ubiquitin-proteasome degradation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Miaomiao; Li, Lili; Song, Shushu; Wu, Weicheng; Peng, Peike; Yang, Caiting; Zhang, Mingming; Duan, Fangfang; Jia, Dongwei; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Hao; Zhao, Ran; Wang, Lan; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Gu, Jianxin

    2016-10-01

    C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) was originally identified as a member of non-classical C-type lectin-like receptors in platelets and immune cells. Activation of CLEC-2 is involved in thrombus formation, lymphatic/blood vessel separation, platelet-mediated tumor metastasis and immune response. Nevertheless, the regulation of CLEC-2 expression is little understood. In this study, we identified that the C terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) interacted with CLEC-2 by mass spectrometry analysis, and CHIP decreased the protein expression of CLEC-2 through lysine-48-linked ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Deleted and point mutation also revealed that CHIP controlled CLEC-2 protein expression via both tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) domain and Ubox domain in a HSP70/90-independent manner. Moreover, reduced CHIP expression was associated with decreased CLEC-2 polyubiquitination and increased CLEC-2 protein levels in PMA-induced differentiation of THP-1 monocytes into macrophages. These results indicate that CLEC-2 is the target substrate of E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP, and suggest that the CHIP/CLEC-2 axis may play an important role in the modulation of immune response. PMID:27443248

  13. The Ubiquitin Ligase Hul5 Promotes Proteasomal Processivity▿

    PubMed Central

    Aviram, Sharon; Kornitzer, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a large cytoplasmic protease that degrades polyubiquitinated proteins to short peptides in a processive manner. The proteasome 19S regulatory subcomplex tethers the target protein via its polyubiquitin adduct and unfolds the target polypeptide, which is then threaded into the proteolytic site-containing 20S subcomplex. Hul5 is a 19S subcomplex-associated ubiquitin ligase that elongates ubiquitin chains on proteasome-bound substrates. We isolated hul5Δ as a mutation with which fusions of an unstable cyclin to stable reporter proteins accumulate as partially processed products. These products appear transiently in the wild type but are strongly stabilized in 19S ATPase mutants and in the hul5Δ mutant, supporting a role for the ATPase subunits in the unfolding of proteasome substrates before insertion into the catalytic cavity and suggesting a role for Hul5 in the processive degradation of proteins that are stalled on the proteasome. PMID:20008553

  14. Proteasomal degradation of glutamine synthetase regulates schwann cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Fuminori; Araki, Toshiyuki

    2010-01-27

    Rapid saltatory nerve conduction is facilitated by myelin structure, which is composed of Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system. Schwann cells drastically change their phenotype following peripheral nerve injury. These phenotypic changes are required for efficient degeneration/regeneration. We previously identified ZNRF1 as an E3 ubiquitin ligase containing a RING finger motif, whose expression is upregulated in the Schwann cells following nerve injury. This suggested that posttranscriptional regulation of protein expression in Schwann cells may be involved in their phenotypic changes during nerve degeneration/regeneration. Here we report the identification of glutamine synthetase (GS), an enzyme that synthesizes glutamine using glutamate and ammonia, as a substrate for E3 activity of ZNRF1 in Schwann cells. GS is known to be highly expressed in differentiated Schwann cells, but its functional significance has remained unclear. We found that during nerve degeneration/regeneration, GS expression is controlled mostly by ZNRF1-dependent proteasomal degradation. We also found that Schwann cells increase oxidative stress upon initiation of nerve degeneration, which promotes carbonylation and subsequent degradation of GS. Surprisingly, we discovered that GS expression regulates Schwann cell differentiation; i.e., increased GS expression promotes myelination via its enzymatic activity. Among the substrates and products of GS, increased glutamate concentration inhibited myelination and yet promoted Schwann cell proliferation by activating metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling. This would suggest that GS may exert its effect on Schwann cell differentiation by regulating glutamate concentration. These results indicate that the ZNRF1-GS system may play an important role in correlating Schwann cell metabolism with its differentiation. PMID:20107048

  15. Unconventional secretion of misfolded proteins promotes adaptation to proteasome dysfunction in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Gu; Takahama, Shokichi; Zhang, Guofeng; Tomarev, Stanislav I; Ye, Yihong

    2016-07-01

    To safeguard proteomic integrity, cells rely on the proteasome to degrade aberrant polypeptides, but it is unclear how cells remove defective proteins that have escaped degradation owing to proteasome insufficiency or dysfunction. Here we report a pathway termed misfolding-associated protein secretion, which uses the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated deubiquitylase USP19 to preferentially export aberrant cytosolic proteins. Intriguingly, the catalytic domain of USP19 possesses an unprecedented chaperone activity, allowing recruitment of misfolded proteins to the ER surface for deubiquitylation. Deubiquitylated cargos are encapsulated into ER-associated late endosomes and secreted to the cell exterior. USP19-deficient cells cannot efficiently secrete unwanted proteins, and grow more slowly than wild-type cells following exposure to a proteasome inhibitor. Together, our findings delineate a protein quality control (PQC) pathway that, unlike degradation-based PQC mechanisms, promotes protein homeostasis by exporting misfolded proteins through an unconventional protein secretion process. PMID:27295555

  16. Exploring the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Protein Degradation Pathway in Yeast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Will, Tamara J.; McWatters, Melissa K.; McQuade, Kristi L.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory investigating the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in yeast. In this exercise, the enzyme beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) is expressed in yeast under the control of a stress response promoter. Following exposure to heat stress to induce beta-gal expression, cycloheximide is added to halt…

  17. Proteasomal Degradation of TRIM5α during Retrovirus Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Rold, Christopher James; Aiken, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    The host protein TRIM5α inhibits retroviral infection at an early post-penetration stage by targeting the incoming viral capsid. While the detailed mechanism of restriction remains unclear, recent studies have implicated the activity of cellular proteasomes in the restriction of retroviral reverse transcription imposed by TRIM5α. Here, we show that TRIM5α is rapidly degraded upon encounter of a restriction-susceptible retroviral core. Inoculation of TRIM5α-expressing human 293T cells with a saturating level of HIV-1 particles resulted in accelerated degradation of the HIV-1-restrictive rhesus macaque TRIM5α protein but not the nonrestrictive human TRIM5α protein. Exposure of cells to HIV-1 also destabilized the owl monkey restriction factor TRIMCyp; this was prevented by addition of the inhibitor cyclosporin A and was not observed with an HIV-1 virus containing a mutation in the capsid protein that relieves restriction by TRIMCyp IVHIV. Likewise, human TRIM5α was rapidly degraded upon encounter of the restriction-sensitive N-tropic murine leukemia virus (N-MLV) but not the unrestricted B-MLV. Pretreatment of cells with proteasome inhibitors prevented the HIV-1-induced loss of both rhesus macaque TRIM5α and TRIMCyp proteins. We also detected degradation of endogenous TRIM5α in rhesus macaque cells following HIV-1 infection. We conclude that engagement of a restriction-sensitive retrovirus core results in TRIM5α degradation by a proteasome-dependent mechanism. PMID:18497858

  18. The proteasome and the degradation of oxidized proteins: Part III—Redox regulation of the proteasomal system

    PubMed Central

    Höhn, Tobias Jung Annika; Grune, Tilman

    2014-01-01

    Here, we review shortly the current knowledge on the regulation of the proteasomal system during and after oxidative stress. After addressing the components of the proteasomal system and the degradation of oxidatively damaged proteins in part I and II of this series, we address here which changes in activity undergo the proteasome and the ubiquitin-proteasomal system itself under oxidative conditions. While several components of the proteasomal system undergo direct oxidative modification, a number of redox-regulated events are modulating the proteasomal activity in a way it can address the major tasks in an oxidative stress situation: the removal of oxidized proteins and the adaptation of the cellular metabolism to the stress situation. PMID:24563857

  19. Ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation of keratin intermediate filaments in mechanically stimulated A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Jaitovich, Ariel; Mehta, Semil; Na, Ni; Ciechanover, Aaron; Goldman, Robert D; Ridge, Karen M

    2008-09-12

    We previously reported that shear stress induces phosphorylation and disassembly of keratin intermediate filaments (IFs). Shear stress also induces a time- and strain-dependent degradation of keratin IFs, and the current study examines the mechanisms involved in degradation of keratin proteins in human A549 cells exposed to 0-24 h of shear stress (7.5-30 dynes/cm(2)). Ubiquitin was found to be covalently associated with keratin proteins immunoprecipitated from shear-stressed cells, and pretreatment with the proteasomal inhibitor MG132 prevented the degradation of the keratin IF network. Importantly, phosphorylation of K8 Ser-73 is required for the shear stress-mediated ubiquitination, disassembly, and degradation of the keratin IF network. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that shear stress caused the thin array of keratin fibrils observed in control cells to be reorganized into a perinuclear aggregate, known as an aggresome, and that ubiquitin was also associated with this structure. Finally, the E2 enzymes, UbcH5b, -c, and Ubc3, but not E2-25K are required for the shear stress-mediated ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation of keratin proteins. These data suggest that shear stress promotes the disassembly and degradation of the keratin IF network via phosphorylation and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. PMID:18617517

  20. Coupling caspase cleavage and proteasomal degradation of proteins carrying PEST motif.

    PubMed

    Belizario, José E; Alves, Juliano; Garay-Malpartida, Miguel; Occhiucci, João Marcelo

    2008-06-01

    The degradation is critical to activation and deactivation of regulatory proteins involved in signaling pathways to cell growth, differentiation, stress responses and physiological cell death. Proteins carry domains and sequence motifs that function as prerequisite for their proteolysis by either individual proteases or the 26S multicomplex proteasomes. Two models for entry of substrates into the proteasomes have been considered. In one model, it is proposed that the ubiquitin chain attached to the protein serves as recognition element to drag them into the 19S regulatory particle, which promotes the unfolding required to its access into the 20S catalytic chamber. In second model, it is proposed that an unstructured tail located at amino or carboxyl terminus directly track proteins into the 26S/20S proteasomes. Caspases are cysteinyl aspartate proteases that control diverse signaling pathways, promoting the cleavage at one or two sites of hundreds of structural and regulatory protein substrates. Caspase cleavage sites are commonly found within PEST motifs, which are segments rich in proline (P), glutamic acid (D), aspartic acid (E) and serine (S) or threonine (T) residues. Considering that N- and C- terminal peptide carrying PEST motifs form disordered loops in the globular proteins after caspase cleavage, it is postulated here that these exposed termini serve as unstructured initiation site, coupling caspase cleavage and ubiquitin-proteasome dependent and independent degradation of short-lived proteins. This could explain the inherent susceptibility to proteolysis among proteins containing PEST motif. PMID:18537676

  1. CHIP: a co-chaperone for degradation by the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Edkins, Adrienne L

    2015-01-01

    Protein homeostasis relies on a balance between protein folding and protein degradation. Molecular chaperones like Hsp70 and Hsp90 fulfil well-defined roles in protein folding and conformational stability via ATP dependent reaction cycles. These folding cycles are controlled by associations with a cohort of non-client protein co-chaperones, such as Hop, p23 and Aha1. Pro-folding co-chaperones facilitate the transit of the client protein through the chaperone mediated folding process. However, chaperones are also involved in ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation of client proteins. Similar to folding complexes, the ability of chaperones to mediate protein degradation is regulated by co-chaperones, such as the C terminal Hsp70 binding protein (CHIP). CHIP binds to Hsp70 and Hsp90 chaperones through its tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain and functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase using a modified RING finger domain (U-box). This unique combination of domains effectively allows CHIP to network chaperone complexes to the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This chapter reviews the current understanding of CHIP as a co-chaperone that switches Hsp70/Hsp90 chaperone complexes from protein folding to protein degradation. PMID:25487024

  2. JMJ24 targets CHROMOMETHYLASE3 for proteasomal degradation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shulin; Jang, In-Cheol; Su, Linlin; Xu, Jun; Chua, Nam-Hai

    2016-01-01

    H3K9 methylation is usually associated with DNA methylation, and together they symbolize transcriptionally silenced heterochromatin. A number of proteins involved in epigenetic processes have been characterized. However, how the stability of these proteins is regulated at the post-translational level is largely unknown. Here, we show that an Arabidopsis JmjC domain protein, JMJ24, possesses ubiquitin E3 ligase activity. JMJ24 directly targets a DNA methyltransferase, CHROMOMETHYLASE 3 (CMT3), for proteasomal degradation to initiate destabilization of the heterochromatic state of endogenous silenced loci. Our results uncover an additional connection between two conserved epigenetic modifications: histone modification and DNA methylation. PMID:26798133

  3. Proteasome-mediated degradation of FRIGIDA modulates flowering time in Arabidopsis during vernalization.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiangyang; Kong, Xiangxiang; Wang, Chuntao; Ma, Lan; Zhao, Jinjie; Wei, Jingjing; Zhang, Xiaoming; Loake, Gary J; Zhang, Ticao; Huang, Jinling; Yang, Yongping

    2014-12-01

    Winter-annual accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana require either exposure to cold stress or vernalization to initiate flowering via FRIGIDA (FRI). FRI acts as a scaffold protein to recruit several chromatin modifiers that epigenetically modify flowering genes. Here, we report that proteasome-mediated FRI degradation regulates flowering during vernalization in Arabidopsis. Our genetic and biochemical experiments demonstrate that FRI directly interacts with the BTB (Bric-a-Brac/Tramtrack/Broad Complex) proteins LIGHT-RESPONSE BTB1 (LRB1) and LRB2 as well as the CULLIN3A (CUL3A) ubiquitin-E3 ligase in vitro and in vivo, leading to proteasomal degradation of FRI during vernalization. The degradation of FRI is accompanied by an increase in the levels of the long noncoding RNA ColdAIR, which reduces the level of histone H3Lys4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) in FLOWERING LOCUS C chromatin to promote flowering. Furthermore, we found that the cold-induced WRKY34 transcription factor binds to the W-box in the promoter region of CUL3A to modulate CUL3A expression. Deficiency of WRKY34 suppressed CUL3A transcription to enhance FRI protein stability and led to late flowering after vernalization. Conversely, overexpression of WRK34 promoted FRI degradation and early flowering through inducing CUL3A accumulation. Together, these data suggest that WRKY34-induced and CUL3A-dependent proteolysis of FRI modulate flowering in response to vernalization. PMID:25538183

  4. Proteasome-Mediated Degradation of FRIGIDA Modulates Flowering Time in Arabidopsis during Vernalization[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangxiang; Wang, Chuntao; Ma, Lan; Zhao, Jinjie; Wei, Jingjing; Zhang, Xiaoming; Loake, Gary J.; Zhang, Ticao; Huang, Jinling; Yang, Yongping

    2014-01-01

    Winter-annual accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana require either exposure to cold stress or vernalization to initiate flowering via FRIGIDA (FRI). FRI acts as a scaffold protein to recruit several chromatin modifiers that epigenetically modify flowering genes. Here, we report that proteasome-mediated FRI degradation regulates flowering during vernalization in Arabidopsis. Our genetic and biochemical experiments demonstrate that FRI directly interacts with the BTB (Bric-a-Brac/Tramtrack/Broad Complex) proteins LIGHT-RESPONSE BTB1 (LRB1) and LRB2 as well as the CULLIN3A (CUL3A) ubiquitin-E3 ligase in vitro and in vivo, leading to proteasomal degradation of FRI during vernalization. The degradation of FRI is accompanied by an increase in the levels of the long noncoding RNA ColdAIR, which reduces the level of histone H3Lys4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) in FLOWERING LOCUS C chromatin to promote flowering. Furthermore, we found that the cold-induced WRKY34 transcription factor binds to the W-box in the promoter region of CUL3A to modulate CUL3A expression. Deficiency of WRKY34 suppressed CUL3A transcription to enhance FRI protein stability and led to late flowering after vernalization. Conversely, overexpression of WRK34 promoted FRI degradation and early flowering through inducing CUL3A accumulation. Together, these data suggest that WRKY34-induced and CUL3A-dependent proteolysis of FRI modulate flowering in response to vernalization. PMID:25538183

  5. Open-gate mutants of the mammalian proteasome show enhanced ubiquitin-conjugate degradation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won Hoon; de Poot, Stefanie A. H.; Lee, Jung Hoon; Kim, Ji Hyeon; Han, Dong Hoon; Kim, Yun Kyung; Finley, Daniel; Lee, Min Jae

    2016-01-01

    When in the closed form, the substrate translocation channel of the proteasome core particle (CP) is blocked by the convergent N termini of α-subunits. To probe the role of channel gating in mammalian proteasomes, we deleted the N-terminal tail of α3; the resulting α3ΔN proteasomes are intact but hyperactive in the hydrolysis of fluorogenic peptide substrates and the degradation of polyubiquitinated proteins. Cells expressing the hyperactive proteasomes show markedly elevated degradation of many established proteasome substrates and resistance to oxidative stress. Multiplexed quantitative proteomics revealed ∼200 proteins with reduced levels in the mutant cells. Potentially toxic proteins such as tau exhibit reduced accumulation and aggregate formation. These data demonstrate that the CP gate is a key negative regulator of proteasome function in mammals, and that opening the CP gate may be an effective strategy to increase proteasome activity and reduce levels of toxic proteins in cells. PMID:26957043

  6. Open-gate mutants of the mammalian proteasome show enhanced ubiquitin-conjugate degradation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won Hoon; de Poot, Stefanie A H; Lee, Jung Hoon; Kim, Ji Hyeon; Han, Dong Hoon; Kim, Yun Kyung; Finley, Daniel; Lee, Min Jae

    2016-01-01

    When in the closed form, the substrate translocation channel of the proteasome core particle (CP) is blocked by the convergent N termini of α-subunits. To probe the role of channel gating in mammalian proteasomes, we deleted the N-terminal tail of α3; the resulting α3ΔN proteasomes are intact but hyperactive in the hydrolysis of fluorogenic peptide substrates and the degradation of polyubiquitinated proteins. Cells expressing the hyperactive proteasomes show markedly elevated degradation of many established proteasome substrates and resistance to oxidative stress. Multiplexed quantitative proteomics revealed ∼ 200 proteins with reduced levels in the mutant cells. Potentially toxic proteins such as tau exhibit reduced accumulation and aggregate formation. These data demonstrate that the CP gate is a key negative regulator of proteasome function in mammals, and that opening the CP gate may be an effective strategy to increase proteasome activity and reduce levels of toxic proteins in cells. PMID:26957043

  7. Calcium-dependent proteasome activation is required for axonal neurofilament degradation.

    PubMed

    Park, Joo Youn; Jang, So Young; Shin, Yoon Kyung; Suh, Duk Joon; Park, Hwan Tae

    2013-12-25

    Even though many studies have identified roles of proteasomes in axonal degeneration, the molecular mechanisms by which axonal injury regulates proteasome activity are still unclear. In the present study, we found evidence indicating that extracellular calcium influx is an upstream regulator of proteasome activity during axonal degeneration in injured peripheral nerves. In degenerating axons, the increase in proteasome activity and the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins were significantly suppressed by extracellular calcium chelation. In addition, electron microscopic findings revealed selective inhibition of neurofilament degradation, but not microtubule depolymerization or mitochondrial swelling, by the inhibition of calpain and proteasomes. Taken together, our findings suggest that calcium increase and subsequent proteasome activation are an essential initiator of neurofilament degradation in Wallerian degeneration. PMID:25206662

  8. Disease-proportional proteasomal degradation of missense dystrophins

    PubMed Central

    Talsness, Dana M.; Belanto, Joseph J.; Ervasti, James M.

    2015-01-01

    The 427-kDa protein dystrophin is expressed in striated muscle where it physically links the interior of muscle fibers to the extracellular matrix. A range of mutations in the DMD gene encoding dystrophin lead to a severe muscular dystrophy known as Duchenne (DMD) or a typically milder form known as Becker (BMD). Patients with nonsense mutations in dystrophin are specifically targeted by stop codon read-through drugs, whereas out-of-frame deletions and insertions are targeted by exon-skipping therapies. Both treatment strategies are currently in clinical trials. Dystrophin missense mutations, however, cause a wide range of phenotypic severity in patients. The molecular and cellular consequences of such mutations are not well understood, and there are no therapies specifically targeting this genotype. Here, we have modeled two representative missense mutations, L54R and L172H, causing DMD and BMD, respectively, in full-length dystrophin. In vitro, the mutation associated with the mild phenotype (L172H) caused a minor decrease in tertiary stability, whereas the L54R mutation associated with a severe phenotype had a more dramatic effect. When stably expressed in mammalian muscle cells, the mutations caused steady-state decreases in dystrophin protein levels inversely proportional to the tertiary stability and directly caused by proteasomal degradation. Both proteasome inhibitors and heat shock activators were able to increase mutant dystrophin to WT levels, establishing the new cell lines as a platform to screen for potential therapeutics personalized to patients with destabilized dystrophin. PMID:26392559

  9. Disease-proportional proteasomal degradation of missense dystrophins.

    PubMed

    Talsness, Dana M; Belanto, Joseph J; Ervasti, James M

    2015-10-01

    The 427-kDa protein dystrophin is expressed in striated muscle where it physically links the interior of muscle fibers to the extracellular matrix. A range of mutations in the DMD gene encoding dystrophin lead to a severe muscular dystrophy known as Duchenne (DMD) or a typically milder form known as Becker (BMD). Patients with nonsense mutations in dystrophin are specifically targeted by stop codon read-through drugs, whereas out-of-frame deletions and insertions are targeted by exon-skipping therapies. Both treatment strategies are currently in clinical trials. Dystrophin missense mutations, however, cause a wide range of phenotypic severity in patients. The molecular and cellular consequences of such mutations are not well understood, and there are no therapies specifically targeting this genotype. Here, we have modeled two representative missense mutations, L54R and L172H, causing DMD and BMD, respectively, in full-length dystrophin. In vitro, the mutation associated with the mild phenotype (L172H) caused a minor decrease in tertiary stability, whereas the L54R mutation associated with a severe phenotype had a more dramatic effect. When stably expressed in mammalian muscle cells, the mutations caused steady-state decreases in dystrophin protein levels inversely proportional to the tertiary stability and directly caused by proteasomal degradation. Both proteasome inhibitors and heat shock activators were able to increase mutant dystrophin to WT levels, establishing the new cell lines as a platform to screen for potential therapeutics personalized to patients with destabilized dystrophin. PMID:26392559

  10. Heat Shock Proteins Regulate Activation-induced Proteasomal Degradation of the Mature Phosphorylated Form of Protein Kinase C*

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Michelle A.; Balaburski, Gregor M.; Murphy, Maureen E.; Black, Adrian R.; Black, Jennifer D.

    2013-01-01

    Although alterations in stimulus-induced degradation of PKC have been implicated in disease, mechanistic understanding of this process remains limited. Evidence supports the existence of both proteasomal and lysosomal mechanisms of PKC processing. An established pathway involves rate-limiting priming site dephosphorylation of the activated enzyme and proteasomal clearance of the dephosphorylated protein. However, here we show that agonists promote down-regulation of endogenous PKCα with minimal accumulation of a nonphosphorylated species in multiple cell types. Furthermore, proteasome and lysosome inhibitors predominantly protect fully phosphorylated PKCα, pointing to this form as a substrate for degradation. Failure to detect substantive dephosphorylation of activated PKCα was not due to rephosphorylation because inhibition of Hsp70/Hsc70, which is required for re-priming, had only a minor effect on agonist-induced accumulation of nonphosphorylated protein. Thus, PKC degradation can occur in the absence of dephosphorylation. Further analysis revealed novel functions for Hsp70/Hsc70 and Hsp90 in the control of agonist-induced PKCα processing. These chaperones help to maintain phosphorylation of activated PKCα but have opposing effects on degradation of the phosphorylated protein; Hsp90 is protective, whereas Hsp70/Hsc70 activity is required for proteasomal processing of this species. Notably, down-regulation of nonphosphorylated PKCα shows little Hsp70/Hsc70 dependence, arguing that phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated species are differentially targeted for proteasomal degradation. Finally, lysosomal processing of activated PKCα is not regulated by phosphorylation or Hsps. Collectively, these data demonstrate that phosphorylated PKCα is a direct target for agonist-induced proteasomal degradation via an Hsp-regulated mechanism, and highlight the existence of a novel pathway of PKC desensitization in cells. PMID:23900841

  11. Multiple Sclerosis Autoantigen Myelin Basic Protein Escapes Control by Ubiquitination during Proteasomal Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Belogurov, Alexey; Kudriaeva, Anna; Kuzina, Ekaterina; Smirnov, Ivan; Bobik, Tatyana; Ponomarenko, Natalia; Kravtsova-Ivantsiv, Yelena; Ciechanover, Aaron; Gabibov, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of cellular proteins are degraded by the 26S proteasome after their ubiquitination. Here, we report that the major component of the myelin multilayered membrane sheath, myelin basic protein (MBP), is hydrolyzed by the 26S proteasome in a ubiquitin-independent manner both in vitro and in mammalian cells. As a proteasomal substrate, MBP reveals a distinct and physiologically relevant concentration range for ubiquitin-independent proteolysis. Enzymatic deimination prevents hydrolysis of MBP by the proteasome, suggesting that an abnormally basic charge contributes to its susceptibility toward proteasome-mediated degradation. To our knowledge, our data reveal the first case of a pathophysiologically important autoantigen as a ubiquitin-independent substrate of the 26S proteasome. PMID:24739384

  12. Ubiquitin-Proteasome System Inhibition Promotes Long-Term Depression and Synaptic Tagging/Capture.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin; Korte, Martin; Sajikumar, Sreedharan

    2016-06-01

    A balance of protein synthesis and degradation is critical for the dynamic regulation and implementation of long-term memory storage. The role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in regulating the plasticity at potentiated synapses is well studied, but its roles in depressed synaptic populations remain elusive. In this study, we probed the possibility of regulating the UPS by inhibiting the proteasome function during the induction of protein synthesis-independent form of hippocampal long-term depression (early-LTD), an important component of synaptic plasticity. Here, we show that protein degradation is involved in early-LTD induction and interfering with this process facilitates early-LTD to late-LTD. We provide evidence here that under the circumstances of proteasome inhibition brain-derived neurotrophic factor is accumulated as plasticity-related protein and it drives the weakly depressed or potentiated synapses to associativity. Thus, UPS inhibition promotes LTD and establishes associativity between weakly depressed or potentiated synapses through the mechanisms of synaptic tagging/capture or cross-capture. PMID:25924950

  13. ORF2 protein of porcine circovirus type 2 promotes phagocytic activity of porcine macrophages by inhibiting proteasomal degradation of complement component 1, q subcomponent binding protein (C1QBP) through physical interaction.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang-Yong; Oh, Hae-Na; Lee, Suk Jun; Chun, Taehoon

    2015-11-01

    Defining how each ORF of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) manipulates the host immune system may be helpful to understand the disease progression of post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome. In this study, we demonstrated a direct interaction between the PCV2 ORF2 and complement component 1, q subcomponent binding protein (C1QBP) within the cytoplasm of host macrophages. The physical interaction between PCV2 ORF2 and C1QBP inhibited ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation of C1QBP in macrophages. Increased stability of C1QBP by the interaction with PCV2 ORF2 further enhanced the phagocytic activity of porcine macrophages through the phosphoinositol 3-kinase signalling pathway. This may explain the molecular basis of how PCV2 ORF2 enhances the phagocytic activity of host macrophages. PMID:26361775

  14. Ubiquitin–Proteasome-dependent Degradation of a Mitofusin, a Critical Regulator of Mitochondrial Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Mickael M.J.; Leboucher, Guillaume P.; Livnat-Levanon, Nurit

    2008-01-01

    The mitochondrion is a dynamic membranous network whose morphology is conditioned by the equilibrium between ongoing fusion and fission of mitochondrial membranes. In the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transmembrane GTPase Fzo1p controls fusion of mitochondrial outer membranes. Deletion or overexpression of Fzo1p have both been shown to alter the mitochondrial fusion process indicating that maintenance of steady-state levels of Fzo1p are required for efficient mitochondrial fusion. Cellular levels of Fzo1p are regulated through degradation of Fzo1p by the F-box protein Mdm30p. How Mdm30p promotes degradation of Fzo1p is currently unknown. We have now determined that during vegetative growth Mdm30p mediates ubiquitylation of Fzo1p and that degradation of Fzo1p is an ubiquitin-proteasome–dependent process. In vivo, Mdm30p associates through its F-box motif with other core components of Skp1-Cullin-F-box (SCF) ubiquitin ligases. We show that the resulting SCFMdm30p ligase promotes ubiquitylation of Fzo1p at mitochondria and its subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome. These results provide the first demonstration that a cytosolic ubiquitin ligase targets a critical regulatory molecule at the mitochondrial outer membrane. This study provides a framework for developing an understanding of the function of Mdm30p-mediated Fzo1p degradation in the multistep process of mitochondrial fusion. PMID:18353967

  15. Facilitated Tau Degradation by USP14 Aptamers via Enhanced Proteasome Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Hoon; Shin, Seung Kyun; Jiang, Yanxialei; Choi, Won Hoon; Hong, Chaesun; Kim, Dong-Eun; Lee, Min Jae

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is the primary mechanism by which intracellular proteins, transcription factors, and many proteotoxic proteins with aggregation-prone structures are degraded. The UPS is reportedly downregulated in various neurodegenerative disorders, with increased proteasome activity shown to be beneficial in many related disease models. Proteasomes function under tonic inhibitory conditions, possibly via the ubiquitin chain-trimming function of USP14, a proteasome-associated deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB). We identified three specific RNA aptamers of USP14 (USP14-1, USP14-2, and USP14-3) that inhibited its deubiquitinating activity. The nucleotide sequences of these non-cytotoxic USP14 aptamers contained conserved GGAGG motifs, with G-rich regions upstream, and similar secondary structures. They efficiently elevated proteasomal activity, as determined by the increased degradation of small fluorogenic peptide substrates and physiological polyubiquitinated Sic1 proteins. Additionally, proteasomal degradation of tau proteins was facilitated in the presence of the UPS14 aptamers in vitro. Our results indicate that these novel inhibitory UPS14 aptamers can be used to enhance proteasome activity, and to facilitate the degradation of proteotoxic proteins, thereby protecting cells from various neurodegenerative stressors. PMID:26041011

  16. Curcumin inhibits HIV-1 by promoting Tat protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Ali, Amjad; Banerjea, Akhil C

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat is an intrinsically unfolded protein playing a pivotal role in viral replication by associating with TAR region of viral LTR. Unfolded proteins are degraded by 20S proteasome in an ubiquitin independent manner. Curcumin is known to activate 20S proteasome and promotes the degradation of intrinsically unfolded p53 tumor suppressor protein. Since HIV-1 Tat protein is largerly unfolded, we hypothesized that Tat may also be targeted through this pathway. Curcumin treated Tat transfected HEK-293T cells showed a dose and time dependent degradation of Tat protein. Contrary to this HIV-1 Gag which is a properly folded protein, remained unaffected with curcumin. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that curcumin treatment did not affect Tat gene transcription. Curcumin increased the rate of Tat protein degradation as shown by cycloheximide (CHX) chase assay. Degradation of the Tat protein is accomplished through proteasomal pathway as proteasomal inhibitor MG132 blocked Tat degradation. Curcumin also decreased Tat mediated LTR promoter transactivation and inhibited virus production from HIV-1 infected cells. Taken together our study reveals a novel observation that curcumin causes potent degradation of Tat which may be one of the major mechanisms behind its anti HIV activity. PMID:27283735

  17. Curcumin inhibits HIV-1 by promoting Tat protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Amjad; Banerjea, Akhil C.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat is an intrinsically unfolded protein playing a pivotal role in viral replication by associating with TAR region of viral LTR. Unfolded proteins are degraded by 20S proteasome in an ubiquitin independent manner. Curcumin is known to activate 20S proteasome and promotes the degradation of intrinsically unfolded p53 tumor suppressor protein. Since HIV-1 Tat protein is largerly unfolded, we hypothesized that Tat may also be targeted through this pathway. Curcumin treated Tat transfected HEK-293T cells showed a dose and time dependent degradation of Tat protein. Contrary to this HIV-1 Gag which is a properly folded protein, remained unaffected with curcumin. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that curcumin treatment did not affect Tat gene transcription. Curcumin increased the rate of Tat protein degradation as shown by cycloheximide (CHX) chase assay. Degradation of the Tat protein is accomplished through proteasomal pathway as proteasomal inhibitor MG132 blocked Tat degradation. Curcumin also decreased Tat mediated LTR promoter transactivation and inhibited virus production from HIV-1 infected cells. Taken together our study reveals a novel observation that curcumin causes potent degradation of Tat which may be one of the major mechanisms behind its anti HIV activity. PMID:27283735

  18. The mycobacterial Mpa–proteasome unfolds and degrades pupylated substrates by engaging Pup's N-terminus

    PubMed Central

    Striebel, Frank; Hunkeler, Moritz; Summer, Heike; Weber-Ban, Eilika

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, along with other actinobacteria, harbours proteasomes in addition to members of the general bacterial repertoire of degradation complexes. In analogy to ubiquitination in eukaryotes, substrates are tagged for proteasomal degradation with prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup) that is recognized by the N-terminal coiled-coil domain of the ATPase Mpa (also called ARC). Here, we reconstitute the entire mycobacterial proteasome degradation system for pupylated substrates and establish its mechanistic features with respect to substrate recruitment, unfolding and degradation. We show that the Mpa–proteasome complex unfolds and degrades Pup-tagged proteins and that this activity requires physical interaction of the ATPase with the proteasome. Furthermore, we establish the N-terminal region of Pup as the structural element required for engagement of pupylated substrates into the Mpa pore. In this process, Mpa pulls on Pup to initiate unfolding of substrate proteins and to drag them toward the proteasome chamber. Unlike the eukaryotic ubiquitin, Pup is not recycled but degraded with the substrate. This assigns a dual function to Pup as both the Mpa recognition element as well as the threading determinant. PMID:20203624

  19. Degradation of oxidized proteins by the proteasome: Distinguishing between the 20S, 26S, and immunoproteasome proteolytic pathways.

    PubMed

    Raynes, Rachel; Pomatto, Laura C D; Davies, Kelvin J A

    2016-08-01

    The proteasome is a ubiquitous and highly plastic multi-subunit protease with multi-catalytic activity that is conserved in all eukaryotes. The most widely known function of the proteasome is protein degradation through the 26S ubiquitin-proteasome system, responsible for the vast majority of protein degradation during homeostasis. However, the proteasome also plays an important role in adaptive immune responses and adaptation to oxidative stress. The unbound 20S proteasome, the core common to all proteasome conformations, is the main protease responsible for degrading oxidized proteins. During periods of acute stress, the 19S regulatory cap of the 26S proteasome disassociates from the proteolytic core, allowing for immediate ATP/ubiquitin-independent protein degradation by the 20S proteasome. Despite the abundance of unbound 20S proteasome compared to other proteasomal conformations, many publications fail to distinguish between the two proteolytic systems and often regard the 26S proteasome as the dominant protease. Further confounding the issue are the differential roles these two proteolytic systems have in adaptation and aging. In this review, we will summarize the increasing evidence that the 20S core proteasome constitutes the major conformation of the proteasome system and that it is far from a latent protease requiring activation by binding regulators. PMID:27155164

  20. SOCS3 Drives Proteasomal Degradation of TBK1 and Negatively Regulates Antiviral Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Sheng, Chunjie; Gao, Shijuan; Yao, Chen; Li, Jiandong; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Huiming; Wu, Jiaoxiang; Pan, Changchuan; Chen, Shuai; Huang, Wenlin

    2015-07-01

    TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1)-mediated induction of type I interferon (IFN) plays a critical role in host antiviral responses and immune homeostasis. The negative regulation of TBK1 activity is largely unknown. We report that suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) inhibits the IFN-β signaling pathway by promoting proteasomal degradation of TBK1. Overexpression and knockdown experiments indicated that SOCS3 is a negative regulator of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) phosphorylation and IFN-β transcription. Moreover, SOCS3 directly associates with TBK1, and they colocalize in the cytoplasm. SOCS3 catalyzes K48-linked polyubiquitination of TBK1 at Lys341 and Lys344 and promotes subsequent TBK1 degradation. On the contrary, SOCS3 knockdown markedly increases the abundance of TBK1. Interestingly, both the BOX domain of SOCS3 and Ser172 phosphorylation of TBK1 are indispensable for the processes of ubiquitination and degradation. Ectopic expression of SOCS3 significantly inhibits vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and influenza A virus strain A/WSN/33 (WSN)-induced IRF3 phosphorylation and facilitates the replication of WSN virus by detecting the transcription of its viral RNA (vRNA). Knockdown of SOCS3 represses WSN replication. Collectively, these results demonstrate that SOCS3 acts as a negative regulator of IFN-β signal by ubiquitinating and degrading TBK1, shed light on the understanding of antiviral innate immunity, and provide a potential target for developing antiviral agents. PMID:25939384

  1. Proteasome Activity Is Affected by Fluctuations in Insulin-Degrading Enzyme Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Sbardella, Diego; Tundo, Grazia Raffaella; Sciandra, Francesca; Bozzi, Manuela; Gioia, Magda; Ciaccio, Chiara; Tarantino, Umberto; Brancaccio, Andrea; Coletta, Massimo; Marini, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-Degrading-Enzyme (IDE) is a Zn2+-dependent peptidase highly conserved throughout evolution and ubiquitously distributed in mammalian tissues wherein it displays a prevalent cytosolic localization. We have recently demonstrated a novel Heat Shock Protein-like behaviour of IDE and its association with the 26S proteasome. In the present study, we examine the mechanistic and molecular features of IDE-26S proteasome interaction in a cell experimental model, extending the investigation also to the effect of IDE on the enzymatic activities of the 26S proteasome. Further, kinetic investigations indicate that the 26S proteasome activity undergoes a functional modulation by IDE through an extra-catalytic mechanism. The IDE-26S proteasome interaction was analyzed during the Heat Shock Response and we report novel findings on IDE intracellular distribution that might be of critical relevance for cell metabolism. PMID:26186340

  2. The ORF3 protein of porcine circovirus type 2 promotes secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 in porcine epithelial cells by facilitating proteasomal degradation of regulator of G protein signalling 16 through physical interaction.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang-Yong; Rho, Seung Bae; Kim, Hyun-Sook; Han, Jihye; Bae, Joonbeom; Lee, Suk Jun; Jung, Woon-Won; Chun, Taehoon

    2015-05-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is the main aetiological agent of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome. The mechanism of pathogenicity associated with PCV2 infection is still not fully understood. Nevertheless, the fact that large amounts of proinflammatory cytokines within lymphoid tissues are released during the early stage of PCV2 infection may induce chronic inflammatory responses followed by the destruction of lymphoid tissues. However, how PCV2 infection causes an excessive inflammatory response in the host immune system during the early stage of PCV2 infection has still not been elucidated. In this study, we show that direct interaction between the PCV2 ORF3 and regulator of G protein signalling 16 (RGS16) within the cytoplasm of host cells leads to ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation of RGS16. Facilitated degradation of the RGS16 by PCV2 ORF3 further enhances NFκB translocation into the nucleus through the ERK1/2 signalling pathway and increased IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA transcripts. Consequently, more severe inflammatory responses and leukocyte infiltration occur around host cells. This evidence may be the first clue explaining the molecular basis of how excessive amounts of proinflammatory cytokines within lymphoid tissues are released during the early stage of PCV2 infection. PMID:25575706

  3. Ciliopathy proteins regulate paracrine signaling by modulating proteasomal degradation of mediators

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yangfan P.; Tsai, I-Chun; Morleo, Manuela; Oh, Edwin C.; Leitch, Carmen C.; Massa, Filomena; Lee, Byung-Hoon; Parker, David S.; Finley, Daniel; Zaghloul, Norann A.; Franco, Brunella; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Cilia are critical mediators of paracrine signaling; however, it is unknown whether proteins that contribute to ciliopathies converge on multiple paracrine pathways through a common mechanism. Here, we show that loss of cilopathy-associated proteins Bardet-Biedl syndrome 4 (BBS4) or oral-facial-digital syndrome 1 (OFD1) results in the accumulation of signaling mediators normally targeted for proteasomal degradation. In WT cells, several BBS proteins and OFD1 interacted with proteasomal subunits, and loss of either BBS4 or OFD1 led to depletion of multiple subunits from the centrosomal proteasome. Furthermore, overexpression of proteasomal regulatory components or treatment with proteasomal activators sulforaphane (SFN) and mevalonolactone (MVA) ameliorated signaling defects in cells lacking BBS1, BBS4, and OFD1, in morphant zebrafish embryos, and in induced neurons from Ofd1-deficient mice. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that other proteasome-dependent pathways not known to be associated with ciliopathies are defective in the absence of ciliopathy proteins. We found that loss of BBS1, BBS4, or OFD1 led to decreased NF-κB activity and concomitant IκBβ accumulation and that these defects were ameliorated with SFN treatment. Taken together, our data indicate that basal body proteasomal regulation governs paracrine signaling pathways and suggest that augmenting proteasomal function might benefit ciliopathy patients. PMID:24691443

  4. Aggresome-like structure induced by isothiocyanates is novel proteasome-dependent degradation machinery

    SciTech Connect

    Mi, Lixin; Gan, Nanqin; Chung, Fung-Lung

    2009-10-16

    Unwanted or misfolded proteins are either refolded by chaperones or degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). When UPS is impaired, misfolded proteins form aggregates, which are transported along microtubules by motor protein dynein towards the juxta-nuclear microtubule-organizing center to form aggresome, a single cellular garbage disposal complex. Because aggresome formation results from proteasome failure, aggresome components are degraded through the autophagy/lysosome pathway. Here we report that small molecule isothiocyanates (ITCs) can induce formation of aggresome-like structure (ALS) through covalent modification of cytoplasmic {alpha}- and {beta}-tubulin. The formation of ALS is related to neither proteasome inhibition nor oxidative stress. ITC-induced ALS is a proteasome-dependent assembly for emergent removal of misfolded proteins, suggesting that the cell may have a previously unknown strategy to cope with misfolded proteins.

  5. ELL targets c-Myc for proteasomal degradation and suppresses tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Zhou, Chi; Ji, Wei; Mei, Zhichao; Hu, Bo; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Dawei; Wang, Jing; Liu, Xing; Ouyang, Gang; Zhou, Jiangang; Xiao, Wuhan

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports that ELL (eleven–nineteen lysine-rich leukaemia) is a key regulator of transcriptional elongation, but the physiological function of Ell in mammals remains elusive. Here we show that ELL functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase and targets c-Myc for proteasomal degradation. In addition, we identify that UbcH8 serves as a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme in this pathway. Cysteine 595 of ELL is an active site of the enzyme; its mutation to alanine (C595A) renders the protein unable to promote the ubiquitination and degradation of c-Myc. ELL-mediated c-Myc degradation inhibits c-Myc-dependent transcriptional activity and cell proliferation, and also suppresses c-Myc-dependent xenograft tumour growth. In contrast, the ELL(C595A) mutant not only loses the ability to inhibit cell proliferation and xenograft tumour growth, but also promotes tumour metastasis. Thus, our work reveals a previously unrecognized function for ELL as an E3 ubiquitin ligase for c-Myc and a potential tumour suppressor. PMID:27009366

  6. CRL3IBTK Regulates the Tumor Suppressor Pdcd4 through Ubiquitylation Coupled to Proteasomal Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Pisano, Antonio; Ceglia, Simona; Palmieri, Camillo; Vecchio, Eleonora; Fiume, Giuseppe; de Laurentiis, Annamaria; Mimmi, Selena; Falcone, Cristina; Iaccino, Enrico; Scialdone, Annarita; Pontoriero, Marilena; Masci, Francesca Fasanella; Valea, Rosanna; Krishnan, Shibu; Gaspari, Marco; Cuda, Giovanni; Scala, Giuseppe; Quinto, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    The human inhibitor of Bruton's tyrosine kinase isoform α (IBtkα) is a BTB protein encoded by the IBTK gene, which maps to chromosomal locus 6q14.1, a mutational hot spot in lymphoproliferative disorders. Here, we demonstrate that IBtkα forms a CRL3IBTK complex promoting its self-ubiquitylation. We identified the tumor suppressor Pdcd4 as IBtkα interactor and ubiquitylation substrate of CRL3IBTK for proteasomal degradation. Serum-induced degradation of Pdcd4 required both IBtkα and Cul3, indicating that CRL3IBTK regulated the Pdcd4 stability in serum signaling. By promoting Pdcd4 degradation, IBtkα counteracted the suppressive effect of Pdcd4 on translation of reporter luciferase mRNAs with stem-loop structured or unstructured 5′-UTR. IBtkα depletion by RNAi caused Pdcd4 accumulation and decreased the translation of Bcl-xL mRNA, a well known target of Pdcd4 repression. By characterizing CRL3IBTK as a novel ubiquitin ligase, this study provides new insights into regulatory mechanisms of cellular pathways, such as the Pdcd4-dependent translation of mRNAs. PMID:25882842

  7. CRL3IBTK Regulates the Tumor Suppressor Pdcd4 through Ubiquitylation Coupled to Proteasomal Degradation.

    PubMed

    Pisano, Antonio; Ceglia, Simona; Palmieri, Camillo; Vecchio, Eleonora; Fiume, Giuseppe; de Laurentiis, Annamaria; Mimmi, Selena; Falcone, Cristina; Iaccino, Enrico; Scialdone, Annarita; Pontoriero, Marilena; Masci, Francesca Fasanella; Valea, Rosanna; Krishnan, Shibu; Gaspari, Marco; Cuda, Giovanni; Scala, Giuseppe; Quinto, Ileana

    2015-05-29

    The human inhibitor of Bruton's tyrosine kinase isoform α (IBtkα) is a BTB protein encoded by the IBTK gene, which maps to chromosomal locus 6q14.1, a mutational hot spot in lymphoproliferative disorders. Here, we demonstrate that IBtkα forms a CRL3(IBTK) complex promoting its self-ubiquitylation. We identified the tumor suppressor Pdcd4 as IBtkα interactor and ubiquitylation substrate of CRL3(IBTK) for proteasomal degradation. Serum-induced degradation of Pdcd4 required both IBtkα and Cul3, indicating that CRL3(IBTK) regulated the Pdcd4 stability in serum signaling. By promoting Pdcd4 degradation, IBtkα counteracted the suppressive effect of Pdcd4 on translation of reporter luciferase mRNAs with stem-loop structured or unstructured 5'-UTR. IBtkα depletion by RNAi caused Pdcd4 accumulation and decreased the translation of Bcl-xL mRNA, a well known target of Pdcd4 repression. By characterizing CRL3(IBTK) as a novel ubiquitin ligase, this study provides new insights into regulatory mechanisms of cellular pathways, such as the Pdcd4-dependent translation of mRNAs. PMID:25882842

  8. Redox modulation of cellular metabolism through targeted degradation of signaling proteins by the proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-02-01

    Under conditions of oxidative stress, the 20S proteasome plays a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis through the selective degradation of oxidized and damaged proteins. This adaptive stress response is distinct from ubiquitin-dependent pathways in that oxidized proteins are recognized and degraded in an ATP-independent mechanism, which can involve the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Like the regulatory complexes 19S and 11S REG, Hsp90 tightly associates with the 20S proteasome to mediate the recognition of aberrant proteins for degradation. In the case of the calcium signaling protein calmodulin, proteasomal degradation results from the oxidation of a single surface exposed methionine (i.e., Met145); oxidation of the other eight methionines has a minimal effect on the recognition and degradation of calmodulin by the proteasome. Since cellular concentrations of calmodulin are limiting, the targeted degradation of this critical signaling protein under conditions of oxidative stress will result in the downregulation of cellular metabolism, serving as a feedback regulation to diminish the generation of reactive oxygen species. The targeted degradation of critical signaling proteins, such as calmodulin, can function as sensors of oxidative stress to downregulate global rates of metabolism and enhance cellular survival.

  9. Is insulin signaling molecules misguided in diabetes for ubiquitin-proteasome mediated degradation?

    PubMed

    Balasubramanyam, Muthuswamy; Sampathkumar, Rangasamy; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2005-07-01

    Recent mining of the human and mouse genomes, use of yeast genetics, and detailed analyses of several biochemical pathways, have resulted in the identification of many new roles for ubiquitin-proteasome mediated degradation of proteins. In the context of last year's award of Noble Prize (Chemistry) work, the ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifications are increasingly recognized as key regulatory events in health and disease. Although the ATP-dependent ubiquitin-proteasome system has evolved as premier cellular proteolytic machinery, dysregulation of this system by several different mechanisms leads to inappropriate degradation of specific proteins and pathological consequences. While aberrations in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway have been implicated in certain malignancies and neurodegenerative disorders, recent studies indicate a role for this system in the pathogenesis of diabetes and its complications. Inappropriate degradation of insulin signaling molecules such as insulin receptor substrates (IRS-1 and IRS-2) has been demonstrated in experimental diabetes, mediated in part through the up-regulation of suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS). It appears that altered ubiquitin-proteasome system might be one of the molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance in many pathological situations. Drugs that modulate the SOCS action and/or proteasomal degradation of proteins could become novel agents for the treatment of insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes. PMID:16335791

  10. Autophagic Degradation of the 26S Proteasome Is Mediated by the Dual ATG8/Ubiquitin Receptor RPN10 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Richard S; Li, Faqiang; Gemperline, David C; Book, Adam J; Vierstra, Richard D

    2015-06-18

    Autophagic turnover of intracellular constituents is critical for cellular housekeeping, nutrient recycling, and various aspects of growth and development in eukaryotes. Here we show that autophagy impacts the other major degradative route involving the ubiquitin-proteasome system by eliminating 26S proteasomes, a process we termed proteaphagy. Using Arabidopsis proteasomes tagged with GFP, we observed their deposition into vacuoles via a route requiring components of the autophagy machinery. This transport can be initiated separately by nitrogen starvation and chemical or genetic inhibition of the proteasome, implying distinct induction mechanisms. Proteasome inhibition stimulates comprehensive ubiquitylation of the complex, with the ensuing proteaphagy requiring the proteasome subunit RPN10, which can simultaneously bind both ATG8 and ubiquitin. Collectively, we propose that Arabidopsis RPN10 acts as a selective autophagy receptor that targets inactive 26S proteasomes by concurrent interactions with ubiquitylated proteasome subunits/targets and lipidated ATG8 lining the enveloping autophagic membranes. PMID:26004230

  11. Calpains and proteasomes mediate degradation of ryanodine receptors in a model of cardiac ischemic reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Pedrozo, Zully; Sánchez, Gina; Torrealba, Natalia; Valenzuela, Rodrigo; Fernández, Carolina; Hidalgo, Cecilia; Lavandero, Sergio; Donoso, Paulina

    2010-03-01

    Type-2 ryanodine receptors (RyR2)--the calcium release channels of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum--have a central role in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. In the heart, ischemia/reperfusion causes a rapid and significant decrease in RyR2 content but the mechanisms responsible for this effect are not fully understood. We have studied the involvement of three proteolytic systems--calpains, the proteasome and autophagy--on the degradation of RyR2 in rat neonatal cardiomyocyte cultures subjected to simulated ischemia/reperfusion (sI/R). We found that 8h of ischemia followed by 16h of reperfusion decreased RyR2 content by 50% without any changes in RyR2 mRNA. Specific inhibitors of calpains and the proteasome prevented the decrease of RyR2 caused by sI/R, implicating both pathways in its degradation. Proteasome inhibitors also prevented the degradation of calpastatin, the endogenous calpain inhibitor, hindering the activation of calpain induced by calpastatin degradation. Autophagy was activated during sI/R as evidenced by the increase in LC3-II and beclin-1, two proteins involved in autophagosome generation, and in the emergence of GFP-LC3 containing vacuoles in adenovirus GFP-LC3 transduced cardiomyocytes. Selective autophagy inhibition, however, induced even further RyR2 degradation, making unlikely the participation of autophagy in sI/R-induced RyR2 degradation. Our results suggest that calpain activation as a result of proteasome-induced degradation of calpastatin initiates RyR2 proteolysis, which is followed by proteasome-dependent degradation of the resulting RyR2 fragments. The decrease in RyR2 content during ischemia/reperfusion may be relevant to the decrease of heart contractility after ischemia. PMID:20026269

  12. E11/Podoplanin Protein Stabilization Through Inhibition of the Proteasome Promotes Osteocyte Differentiation in Murine in Vitro Models.

    PubMed

    Staines, Katherine A; Prideaux, Matt; Allen, Steve; Buttle, David J; Pitsillides, Andrew A; Farquharson, Colin

    2016-06-01

    The transmembrane glycoprotein E11 is considered critical in early osteoblast-osteocyte transitions (osteocytogenesis), however its function and regulatory mechanisms are still unknown. Using the late osteoblast MLO-A5 cell line we reveal increased E11 protein/mRNA expression (P < 0.001) concomitant with extensive osteocyte dendrite formation and matrix mineralization (P < 0.001). Transfection with E11 significantly increased mRNA levels (P < 0.001), but immunoblotting failed to detect any correlative increases in E11 protein levels, suggestive of post-translational degradation. We found that exogenous treatment of MLO-A5 and osteocytic IDG-SW3 cells with 10 μM ALLN (calpain and proteasome inhibitor) stabilized E11 protein levels and induced a profound increase in osteocytic dendrite formation (P < 0.001). Treatment with other calpain inhibitors failed to promote similar osteocytogenic changes, suggesting that these effects of ALLN rely upon its proteasome inhibitor actions. Accordingly we found that proteasome-selective inhibitors (MG132/lactacystin/ Bortezomib/Withaferin-A) produced similar dose-dependent increases in E11 protein levels in MLO-A5 and primary osteoblast cells. This proteasomal targeting was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of ubiquitinylated proteins, which included E11, and by increased levels of ubiquitinylated E11 protein upon addition of the proteasome inhibitors MG132/Bortezomib. Activation of RhoA, the small GTPase, was found to be increased concomitant with the peak in E11 levels and its downstream signaling was also observed to promote MLO-A5 cell dendrite formation. Our data indicate that a mechanism reliant upon blockade of proteasome-mediated E11 destabilization contributes to osteocytogenesis and that this may involve downstream targeting of RhoA. This work adds to our mechanistic understanding of the factors regulating bone homeostasis, which may lead to future therapeutic approaches. PMID:26639105

  13. Sperm proteasomes degrade sperm receptor on the egg zona pellucida during mammalian fertilization.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Shawn W; Manandhar, Gaurishankar; Yi, Young-Joo; Gupta, Satish K; Sutovsky, Miriam; Odhiambo, John F; Powell, Michael D; Miller, David J; Sutovsky, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the mechanism by which the fertilizing spermatozoon penetrates the mammalian vitelline membrane, the zona pellucida (ZP) remains one of the unexplained fundamental events of human/mammalian development. Evidence has been accumulating in support of the 26S proteasome as a candidate for echinoderm, ascidian and mammalian egg coat lysin. Monitoring ZP protein degradation by sperm during fertilization is nearly impossible because those few spermatozoa that penetrate the ZP leave behind a virtually untraceable residue of degraded proteins. We have overcome this hurdle by designing an experimentally consistent in vitro system in which live boar spermatozoa are co-incubated with ZP-proteins (ZPP) solubilized from porcine oocytes. Using this assay, mimicking sperm-egg interactions, we demonstrate that the sperm-borne proteasomes can degrade the sperm receptor protein ZPC. Upon coincubation with motile spermatozoa, the solubilized ZPP, which appear to be ubiquitinated, adhered to sperm acrosomal caps and induced acrosomal exocytosis/formation of the acrosomal shroud. The degradation of the sperm receptor protein ZPC was assessed by Western blotting band-densitometry and proteomics. A nearly identical pattern of sperm receptor degradation, evident already within the first 5 min of coincubation, was observed when the spermatozoa were replaced with the isolated, enzymatically active, sperm-derived proteasomes. ZPC degradation was blocked by proteasomal inhibitors and accelerated by ubiquitin-aldehyde(UBAL), a modified ubiquitin protein that stimulates proteasomal proteolysis. Such a degradation pattern of ZPC is consistent with in vitro fertilization studies, in which proteasomal inhibitors completely blocked fertilization, and UBAL increased fertilization and polyspermy rates. Preincubation of intact zona-enclosed ova with isolated active sperm proteasomes caused digestion, abrasions and loosening of the exposed zonae, and significantly reduced

  14. Withaferin A: a proteasomal inhibitor promotes healing after injury and exerts anabolic effect on osteoporotic bone.

    PubMed

    Khedgikar, V; Kushwaha, P; Gautam, J; Verma, A; Changkija, B; Kumar, A; Sharma, S; Nagar, G K; Singh, D; Trivedi, P K; Sangwan, N S; Mishra, P R; Trivedi, R

    2013-01-01

    Withania somnifera or Ashwagandha is a medicinal herb of Ayurveda. Though the extract and purified molecules, withanolides, from this plant have been shown to have different pharmacological activities, their effect on bone formation has not been studied. Here, we show that one of the withanolide, withaferin A (WFA) acts as a proteasomal inhibitor (PI) and binds to specific catalytic β subunit of the 20S proteasome. It exerts positive effect on osteoblast by increasing osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. WFA increased expression of osteoblast-specific transcription factor and mineralizing genes, promoted osteoblast survival and suppressed inflammatory cytokines. In osteoclast, WFA treatment decreased osteoclast number directly by decreasing expression of tartarate-resistant acid phosphatase and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B (RANK) and indirectly by decreasing osteoprotegrin/RANK ligand ratio. Our data show that in vitro treatment of WFA to calvarial osteoblast cells decreased expression of E3 ubiquitin ligase, Smad ubiquitin regulatory factor 2 (Smurf2), preventing degradation of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RunX2) and relevant Smad proteins, which are phosphorylated by bone morphogenetic protein 2. Increased Smurf2 expression due to exogenous treatment of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) to primary osteoblast cells was decreased by WFA treatment. This was corroborated by using small interfering RNA against Smurf2. Further, WFA also blocked nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-kB) signaling as assessed by tumor necrosis factor stimulated nuclear translocation of p65-subunit of NF-kB. Overall data show that in vitro proteasome inhibition by WFA simultaneously promoted osteoblastogenesis by stabilizing RunX2 and suppressed osteoclast differentiation, by inhibiting osteoclastogenesis. Oral administration of WFA to osteopenic ovariectomized mice increased osteoprogenitor cells in the bone marrow and increased expression of osteogenic genes. WFA

  15. TSGΔ154-1054 splice variant increases TSG101 oncogenicity by inhibiting its E3-ligase-mediated proteasomal degradation

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Pei-Lun; Yeh, Te-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Tumor susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101) elicits an array of cellular functions, including promoting cytokinesis, cell cycle progression and proliferation, as well as facilitating endosomal trafficking and viral budding. TSG101 protein is highly and aberrantly expressed in various human cancers. Specifically, a TSG101 splicing variant missing nucleotides 154 to 1054 (TSGΔ154-1054), which is linked to progressive tumor-stage and metastasis, has puzzled investigators for more than a decade. TSG101-associated E3 ligase (Tal)- and MDM2-mediated proteasomal degradation are the two major routes for posttranslational regulation of the total amount of TSG101. We reveal that overabundance of TSG101 results from TSGΔ154-1054 stabilizing the TSG101 protein by competitively binding to Tal, but not MDM2, thereby perturbing the Tal interaction with TSG101 and impeding subsequent polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of TSG101. TSGΔ154-1054 therefore specifically enhances TSG101-stimulated cell proliferation, clonogenicity, and tumor growth in nude mice. This finding shows the functional significance of TSGΔ154-1054 in preventing the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolysis of TSG101, which increases tumor malignancy and hints at its potential as a therapeutic target in cancer treatment. PMID:26811492

  16. The ATP costs and time required to degrade ubiquitinated proteins by the 26 S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Peth, Andreas; Nathan, James A; Goldberg, Alfred L

    2013-10-01

    The degradation of ubiquitinated proteins by 26 S proteasomes requires ATP hydrolysis. To investigate if the six proteasomal ATPases function independently or in a cyclic manner, as proposed recently, we used yeast mutants that prevent ATP binding to Rpt3, Rpt5, or Rpt6. Although proteasomes contain six ATPase subunits, each of these single mutations caused a 66% reduction in basal ATP hydrolysis, and each blocked completely the 2-3-fold stimulation of ATPase activity induced by ubiquitinated substrates. Therefore, the ATPase subunits must function in a ordered manner, in which each is required for the stimulation of ATPase activity by substrates. Although ATP is essential for multiple steps in proteasome function, when the rate of ATP hydrolysis was reduced incrementally, the degradation of Ub5-DHFR (where Ub is ubiquitin and DHFR is dihydrofolate reductase) decreased exactly in parallel. This direct proportionality implies that a specific number of ATPs is consumed in degrading a ubiquitinated protein. When the ubiquitinated DHFR was more tightly folded (upon addition of the ligand folate), the rate of ATP hydrolysis was unchanged, but the time to degrade a Ub5-DHFR molecule (∼13 s) and the energy expenditure (50-80 ATPs/Ub5-DHFR) both increased by 2-fold. With a mutation in the ATPase C terminus that reduced gate opening into the 20 S proteasome, the energy costs and time required for conjugate degradation also increased. Thus, different ubiquitin conjugates activate similarly the ATPase subunit cycle that drives proteolysis, but polypeptide structure determines the time required for degradation and thus the energy cost. PMID:23965995

  17. Protein Degradation by Ubiquitin-Proteasome System in Formation and Labilization of Contextual Conditioning Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fustiñana, María Sol; de la Fuente, Verónica; Federman, Noel; Freudenthal, Ramiro; Romano, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) of protein degradation has been evaluated in different forms of neural plasticity and memory. The role of UPS in such processes is controversial. Several results support the idea that the activation of this system in memory consolidation is necessary to overcome negative constrains for plasticity. In this…

  18. Bacterial Proteasomes

    PubMed Central

    Jastrab, Jordan B.; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-01-01

    Interest in bacterial proteasomes was sparked by the discovery that proteasomal degradation is required for the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, one of the world's deadliest pathogens. Although bacterial proteasomes are structurally similar to their eukaryotic and archaeal homologs, there are key differences in their mechanisms of assembly, activation, and substrate targeting for degradation. In this article, we compare and contrast bacterial proteasomes with their archaeal and eukaryotic counterparts, and we discuss recent advances in our understanding of how bacterial proteasomes function to influence microbial physiology. PMID:26488274

  19. Numerous proteins with unique characteristics are degraded by the 26S proteasome following monoubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Braten, Ori; Livneh, Ido; Ziv, Tamar; Admon, Arie; Kehat, Izhak; Caspi, Lilac H; Gonen, Hedva; Bercovich, Beatrice; Godzik, Adam; Jahandideh, Samad; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Sommer, Thomas; Kwon, Yong Tae; Guharoy, Mainak; Tompa, Peter; Ciechanover, Aaron

    2016-08-01

    The "canonical" proteasomal degradation signal is a substrate-anchored polyubiquitin chain. However, a handful of proteins were shown to be targeted following monoubiquitination. In this study, we established-in both human and yeast cells-a systematic approach for the identification of monoubiquitination-dependent proteasomal substrates. The cellular wild-type polymerizable ubiquitin was replaced with ubiquitin that cannot form chains. Using proteomic analysis, we screened for substrates that are nevertheless degraded under these conditions compared with those that are stabilized, and therefore require polyubiquitination for their degradation. For randomly sampled representative substrates, we confirmed that their cellular stability is in agreement with our screening prediction. Importantly, the two groups display unique features: monoubiquitinated substrates are smaller than the polyubiquitinated ones, are enriched in specific pathways, and, in humans, are structurally less disordered. We suggest that monoubiquitination-dependent degradation is more widespread than assumed previously, and plays key roles in various cellular processes. PMID:27385826

  20. Proteasome Failure Promotes Positioning of Lysosomes around the Aggresome via Local Block of Microtubule-Dependent Transport

    PubMed Central

    Zaarur, Nava; Meriin, Anatoli B.; Bejarano, Eloy; Xu, Xiaobin; Gabai, Vladimir L.; Cuervo, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Ubiquitinated proteins aggregate upon proteasome failure, and the aggregates are transported to the aggresome. In aggresomes, protein aggregates are actively degraded by the autophagy-lysosome pathway, but why targeting the aggresome promotes degradation of aggregated species is currently unknown. Here we report that the important factor in this process is clustering of lysosomes around the aggresome via a novel mechanism. Proteasome inhibition causes formation of a zone around the centrosome where microtubular transport of lysosomes is suppressed, resulting in their entrapment and accumulation. Microtubule-dependent transport of other organelles, including autophagosomes, mitochondria, and endosomes, is also blocked in this entrapment zone (E-zone), while movement of organelles at the cell periphery remains unaffected. Following the whole-genome small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen for proteins involved in aggresome formation, we defined the pathway that regulates formation of the E-zone, including the Stk11 protein kinase, the Usp9x deubiquitinating enzyme, and their substrate kinase MARK4. Therefore, upon proteasome failure, targeting of aggregated proteins of the aggresome is coordinated with lysosome positioning around this body to facilitate degradation of the abnormal species. PMID:24469403

  1. The poxvirus encoded ubiquitin ligase, p28, is regulated by proteasomal degradation and autoubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Mottet, Kelly; Bareiss, Bettina; Milne, Craig D; Barry, Michele

    2014-11-01

    Virus manipulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system has become increasingly apparent. Ubiquitin is a 76 amino acid protein that is post-translationally conjugated to target proteins, while poly-ubiquitination subsequently leads to degradation via the 26S proteasome. Target specificity is determined by a large family of ubiquitin ligases. Poxviruses encode p28, a highly conserved ubiquitin ligase expressed in a wide range of poxviruses (J. Virol. 79:597). Here we investigate the relationship between p28 and ubiquitination. Confocal microscopy indicated that orthologs of p28 co-localized with ubiquitin at the virus factory. Flow cytometry assays further demonstrated that p28 was regulated by proteasomal degradation. Moreover, when the ubiquitin ligase activity of p28 was disrupted by mutating the RING domain conjugated ubiquitin still localized to the viral factories, indicating that an unknown ubiquitin ligase(s) was responsible for regulating p28. Our observations indicate that p28 is a ubiquitin ligase that is regulated by ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. PMID:25240226

  2. HUWE1 ubiquitinates MyoD and targets it for proteasomal degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Noy, Tahel; Suad, Oded; Taglicht, Daniel; Ciechanover, Aaron

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HUWE1 ubiquitinates MyoD in vitro and in cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ubiquitination by HUWE1 targets MyoD for proteasomal degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HUWE1 can modify MyoD on its N-terminal residue. -- Abstract: MyoD is a tissue-specific transcriptional activator that acts as a master switch for muscle development. It activates a broad array of muscle-specific genes, which leads to conversion of proliferating myoblasts into mature myotubes. The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) plays an important role in controlling MyoD. Both its N-terminal residue and internal lysines can be targeted by ubiquitin, and both modifications appear to direct it for proteasomal degradation. The protein is short-lived and has a half-life of {approx}45 min in different cells. It was reported that MyoD can be ubiquitinated by MAFbx/AT-1, but accumulating lines of experimental evidence showed that other ligase(s) may also participate in its targeting. Here we describe the involvement of HUWE1 in the ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of MyoD. Furthermore, we show that the ligase can ubiquitinate the protein in its N-terminal residue.

  3. Interaction with Pyruvate Kinase M2 Destabilizes Tristetraprolin by Proteasome Degradation and Regulates Cell Proliferation in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Liangqian; Yu, Zhenhai; Zhang, Zhenchao; Ma, Wenjing; Song, Shaoli; Huang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), which is predominantly expressed in most cancers, plays a key role in the Warburg effect. However, how PKM2 functions as a tumor supportive protein has not been fully elucidated. Here, we identified tristetraprolin (TTP), an AU-rich, element-binding protein that regulates mRNA stability, as a new binding partner of PKM2. Our data reveal that PKM2 suppresses TTP protein levels by promoting its phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and proteasome degradation, reducing its mRNA turnover ability and ultimately impairing cell viability in breast cancer cells. The p38/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway might be involved in PKM2-mediated TTP degradation, while treatment with the p38 inhibitor or siRNA abolished PKM2-induced TTP protein degradation. These findings demonstrate that PKM2–TTP association is crucial for regulating breast cancer cell proliferation and is therefore a potential therapeutic target in cancer. PMID:26926077

  4. Controlled Access of p53 to the Nucleus Regulates its Proteasomal Degradation by MDM2

    PubMed Central

    Davis, James R.; Mossalam, Mohanad; Lim, Carol S.

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 can be sent to the proteasome for degradation by placing its nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling under ligand control. Endogenous p53 is ubiquitinated by MDM2 in the nucleus, and controlling the access of p53 to the nuclear compartment regulates its ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. This was accomplished by the use of a “protein switch” that places nuclear translocation under the control of externally applied dexamethasone. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that sending protein switch p53 (PS-p53) to the nucleus produces a distinct punctate distribution in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. The nuclear role in accessing the proteasome was investigated by inhibiting classical nuclear export with leptomycin B. Trapping PS-p53 in the nucleus only allows this punctate staining in that compartment, suggesting that PS-p53 must translocate first to the nuclear compartment for cytoplasmic punctate staining to occur. The role of MDM2 binding was explored by inhibiting MDM2/p53 binding with nutlin-3. Inhibition of this interaction blocked both nuclear export and cytoplasmic and nuclear punctate staining, providing evidence that any change in localization after nuclear translocation is due to MDM2 binding. Further, blocking the proteolytic activity of the proteasome maintained the nuclear localization of the construct. Truncations of p53 were made to determine smaller constructs still capable of interacting with MDM2, and their subcellular localization and degradation potential was observed. PS-p53 and a smaller construct, construct containing the two MDM2 binding regions of p53 (Box I+V) were indeed degraded by the proteasome as measured by loss of enhanced green fluorescent protein that was also fused to the construct. The influence of these constructs on p53 gene transactivation function was assessed, and revealed that PS-p53 decreased gene transactivation, while PS-p53(BoxI+V) did not significantly change baseline gene transactivation. PMID

  5. The Xanthomonas campestris Type III Effector XopJ Proteolytically Degrades Proteasome Subunit RPT61[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many animal and plant pathogenic bacteria inject type III effector (T3E) proteins into their eukaryotic host cells to suppress immunity. The Yersinia outer protein J (YopJ) family of T3Es is a widely distributed family of effector proteins found in both animal and plant pathogens, and its members are highly diversified in virulence functions. Some members have been shown to possess acetyltransferase activity; however, whether this is a general feature of YopJ family T3Es is currently unknown. The T3E Xanthomonas outer protein J (XopJ), a YopJ family effector from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria, interacts with the proteasomal subunit Regulatory Particle AAA-ATPase6 (RPT6) in planta to suppress proteasome activity, resulting in the inhibition of salicylic acid-related immune responses. Here, we show that XopJ has protease activity to specifically degrade RPT6, leading to reduced proteasome activity in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus. Proteolytic degradation of RPT6 was dependent on the localization of XopJ to the plasma membrane as well as on its catalytic triad. Mutation of the Walker B motif of RPT6 prevented XopJ-mediated degradation of the protein but not XopJ interaction. This indicates that the interaction of RPT6 with XopJ is dependent on the ATP-binding activity of RPT6, but proteolytic cleavage additionally requires its ATPase activity. Inhibition of the proteasome impairs the proteasomal turnover of Nonexpressor of Pathogenesis-Related1 (NPR1), the master regulator of salicylic acid responses, leading to the accumulation of ubiquitinated NPR1, which likely interferes with the full induction of NPR1 target genes. Our results show that YopJ family T3Es are not only highly diversified in virulence function but also appear to possess different biochemical activities. PMID:25739698

  6. Ter94 ATPase complex targets k11-linked ubiquitinated ci to proteasomes for partial degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhao; Lv, Xiangdong; Yin, Wen-chi; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Feng, Jing; Wu, Wenqing; Hui, Chi-chung; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Yun

    2013-06-24

    The Cubitus interruptus (Ci)/Gli family of transcription factors can be degraded either completely or partially from a full-length form (Ci155/Gli(FL)) to a truncated repressor (Ci75/Gli(R)) by proteasomes to mediate Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. The mechanism by which proteasomes distinguish ubiquitinated Ci/Gli to carry out complete versus partial degradation is not known. Here, we show that Ter94 ATPase and its mammalian counterpart, p97, are involved in processing Ci and Gli3 into Ci75 and Gli3(R), respectively. Ter94 regulates the partial degradation of ubiquitinated Ci by Cul1-Slimb-based E3 ligase through its adaptors Ufd1-like and dNpl4. We demonstrate that Cul1-Slimb-based E3 ligase, but not Cul3-Rdx-based E3 ligase, modifies Ci by efficient addition of K11-linked ubiquitin chains. Ter94(Ufd1-like/dNpl4) complex interacts directly with Cul1-Slimb, and, intriguingly, it prefers K11-linked ubiquitinated Ci. Thus, Ter94 ATPase and K11-linked ubiquitination in Ci contribute to the selectivity by proteasomes for partial degradation. PMID:23747190

  7. Hyposmotic stress induces cell growth arrest via proteasome activation and cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase degradation.

    PubMed

    Tao, Guo-Zhong; Rott, Lusijah S; Lowe, Anson W; Omary, M Bishr

    2002-05-31

    Ordered cell cycle progression requires the expression and activation of several cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). Hyperosmotic stress causes growth arrest possibly via proteasome-mediated degradation of cyclin D1. We studied the effect of hyposmotic conditions on three colonic (Caco2, HRT18, HT29) and two pancreatic (AsPC-1 and PaCa-2) cell lines. Hyposmosis caused reversible cell growth arrest of the five cell lines in a cell cycle-independent fashion, although some cell lines accumulated at the G(1)/S interface. Growth arrest was followed by apoptosis or by formation of multinucleated giant cells, which is consistent with cell cycle catastrophe. Hyposmosis dramatically decreased Cdc2, Cdk2, Cdk4, cyclin B1, and cyclin D3 expression in a time-dependent fashion, in association with an overall decrease in cellular protein synthesis. However, some protein levels remained unaltered, including cyclin E and keratin 8. Selective proteasome inhibition prevented Cdk and cyclin degradation and reversed hyposmotic stress-induced growth arrest, whereas calpain and lysosome enzyme inhibitors had no measurable effect on cell cycle protein degradation. Therefore, hyposmotic stress inhibits cell growth and, depending on the cell type, causes cell cycle catastrophe with or without apoptosis. The growth arrest is due to decreased protein synthesis and proteasome activation, with subsequent degradation of several cyclins and Cdks. PMID:11897780

  8. Tripartite degrons confer diversity and specificity on regulated protein degradation in the ubiquitin-proteasome system

    PubMed Central

    Guharoy, Mainak; Bhowmick, Pallab; Sallam, Mohamed; Tompa, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Specific signals (degrons) regulate protein turnover mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here we systematically analyse known degrons and propose a tripartite model comprising the following: (1) a primary degron (peptide motif) that specifies substrate recognition by cognate E3 ubiquitin ligases, (2) secondary site(s) comprising a single or multiple neighbouring ubiquitinated lysine(s) and (3) a structurally disordered segment that initiates substrate unfolding at the 26S proteasome. Primary degron sequences are conserved among orthologues and occur in structurally disordered regions that undergo E3-induced folding-on-binding. Posttranslational modifications can switch primary degrons into E3-binding-competent states, thereby integrating degradation with signalling pathways. Degradation-linked lysines tend to be located within disordered segments that also initiate substrate degradation by effective proteasomal engagement. Many characterized mutations and alternative isoforms with abrogated degron components are implicated in disease. These effects result from increased protein stability and interactome rewiring. The distributed nature of degrons ensures regulation, specificity and combinatorial control of degradation. PMID:26732515

  9. Incomplete proteasomal degradation of green fluorescent proteins in the context of tandem fluorescent protein timers.

    PubMed

    Khmelinskii, Anton; Meurer, Matthias; Ho, Chi-Ting; Besenbeck, Birgit; Füller, Julia; Lemberg, Marius K; Bukau, Bernd; Mogk, Axel; Knop, Michael

    2016-01-15

    Tandem fluorescent protein timers (tFTs) report on protein age through time-dependent change in color, which can be exploited to study protein turnover and trafficking. Each tFT, composed of two fluorescent proteins (FPs) that differ in maturation kinetics, is suited to follow protein dynamics within a specific time range determined by the maturation rates of both FPs. So far, tFTs have been constructed by combining slower-maturing red fluorescent proteins (redFPs) with the faster-maturing superfolder green fluorescent protein (sfGFP). Toward a comprehensive characterization of tFTs, we compare here tFTs composed of different faster-maturing green fluorescent proteins (greenFPs) while keeping the slower-maturing redFP constant (mCherry). Our results indicate that the greenFP maturation kinetics influences the time range of a tFT. Moreover, we observe that commonly used greenFPs can partially withstand proteasomal degradation due to the stability of the FP fold, which results in accumulation of tFT fragments in the cell. Depending on the order of FPs in the timer, incomplete proteasomal degradation either shifts the time range of the tFT toward slower time scales or precludes its use for measurements of protein turnover. We identify greenFPs that are efficiently degraded by the proteasome and provide simple guidelines for the design of new tFTs. PMID:26609072

  10. Incomplete proteasomal degradation of green fluorescent proteins in the context of tandem fluorescent protein timers

    PubMed Central

    Khmelinskii, Anton; Meurer, Matthias; Ho, Chi-Ting; Besenbeck, Birgit; Füller, Julia; Lemberg, Marius K.; Bukau, Bernd; Mogk, Axel; Knop, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Tandem fluorescent protein timers (tFTs) report on protein age through time-dependent change in color, which can be exploited to study protein turnover and trafficking. Each tFT, composed of two fluorescent proteins (FPs) that differ in maturation kinetics, is suited to follow protein dynamics within a specific time range determined by the maturation rates of both FPs. So far, tFTs have been constructed by combining slower-maturing red fluorescent proteins (redFPs) with the faster-maturing superfolder green fluorescent protein (sfGFP). Toward a comprehensive characterization of tFTs, we compare here tFTs composed of different faster-maturing green fluorescent proteins (greenFPs) while keeping the slower-maturing redFP constant (mCherry). Our results indicate that the greenFP maturation kinetics influences the time range of a tFT. Moreover, we observe that commonly used greenFPs can partially withstand proteasomal degradation due to the stability of the FP fold, which results in accumulation of tFT fragments in the cell. Depending on the order of FPs in the timer, incomplete proteasomal degradation either shifts the time range of the tFT toward slower time scales or precludes its use for measurements of protein turnover. We identify greenFPs that are efficiently degraded by the proteasome and provide simple guidelines for the design of new tFTs. PMID:26609072

  11. VRK1 regulates Cajal body dynamics and protects coilin from proteasomal degradation in cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Cantarero, Lara; Sanz-García, Marta; Vinograd-Byk, Hadar; Renbaum, Paul; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Lazo, Pedro A.

    2015-01-01

    Cajal bodies (CBs) are nuclear organelles associated with ribonucleoprotein functions and RNA maturation. CBs are assembled on coilin, its main scaffold protein, in a cell cycle dependent manner. The Ser-Thr VRK1 (vaccinia-related kinase 1) kinase, whose activity is also cell cycle regulated, interacts with and phosphorylates coilin regulating assembly of CBs. Coilin phosphorylation is not necessary for its interaction with VRK1, but it occurs in mitosis and regulates coilin stability. Knockdown of VRK1 or VRK1 inactivation by serum deprivation causes a loss of coilin phosphorylation in Ser184 and of CBs formation, which are rescued with an active VRK1, but not by kinase-dead VRK1. The phosphorylation of coilin in Ser184 occurs during mitosis before assembly of CBs. Loss of coilin phosphorylation results in disintegration of CBs, and of coilin degradation that is prevented by proteasome inhibitors. After depletion of VRK1, coilin is ubiquitinated in nuclei, which is partly mediated by mdm2, but its proteasomal degradation occurs in cytosol and is prevented by blocking its nuclear export. We conclude that VRK1 is a novel regulator of CBs dynamics and stability in cell cycle by protecting coilin from ubiquitination and degradation in the proteasome, and propose a model of CB dynamics. PMID:26068304

  12. Direct cellular delivery of human proteasomes to delay tau aggregation.

    PubMed

    Han, Dong Hoon; Na, Hee-Kyung; Choi, Won Hoon; Lee, Jung Hoon; Kim, Yun Kyung; Won, Cheolhee; Lee, Seung-Han; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Kuret, Jeff; Min, Dal-Hee; Lee, Min Jae

    2014-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is the primary machinery that degrades ubiquitin (Ub)-conjugated proteins, including many proteotoxic proteins implicated in neurodegeneraton. It has been suggested that the elevation of proteasomal activity is tolerable to cells and may be beneficial to prevent the accumulation of protein aggregates. Here we show that purified proteasomes can be directly transported into cells through mesoporous silica nanoparticle-mediated endocytosis. Proteasomes that are loaded onto nanoparticles through non-covalent interactions between polyhistidine tags and nickel ions fully retain their proteolytic activity. Cells treated with exogenous proteasomes are more efficient in degrading overexpressed human tau than endogenous proteasomal substrates, resulting in decreased levels of tau aggregates. Moreover, exogenous proteasome delivery significantly promotes cell survival against proteotoxic stress caused by tau and reactive oxygen species. These data demonstrate that increasing cellular proteasome activity through the direct delivery of purified proteasomes may be an effective strategy for reducing cellular levels of proteotoxic proteins. PMID:25476420

  13. Cdx2 represses Oct4 function via inducing its proteasome-dependent degradation in early porcine embryos.

    PubMed

    Bou, Gerelchimeg; Liu, Shichao; Guo, Jia; Zhao, Yueming; Sun, Mingju; Xue, Binghua; Wang, Jiaqiang; Wei, Yanchang; Kong, Qingran; Liu, Zhonghua

    2016-02-01

    Reciprocal repression of inner cell mass specific factor OCT4 and trophectoderm specific factor CDX2 promotes mouse first lineage segregation. Studies in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells revealed that they bind to each other's regulatory regions to reciprocally suppress transcription, additionally they form protein complex for mutual antagonism. However, so far the molecular interaction of Oct4 and Cdx2 in other mammal's early embryo is not yet investigated. Here, over-expression of Cdx2 in early porcine embryo showed CDX2 represses Oct4 through neither the transcriptional repression nor forming repressive complex, but promoting OCT4 nuclear export and proteasomal degradation. The results showed novel molecular regulation of CDX2 on Oct4, and provided important clues for clarifying the mechanism of interaction between CDX2 and Oct4 in embryo of mammals other than mouse. PMID:26708097

  14. An Inducible System for Rapid Degradation of Specific Cellular Proteins Using Proteasome Adaptors

    PubMed Central

    Wilmington, Shameika R.; Matouschek, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    A common way to study protein function is to deplete the protein of interest from cells and observe the response. Traditional methods involve disrupting gene expression but these techniques are only effective against newly synthesized proteins and leave previously existing and stable proteins untouched. Here, we introduce a technique that induces the rapid degradation of specific proteins in mammalian cells by shuttling the proteins to the proteasome for degradation in a ubiquitin-independent manner. We present two implementations of the system in human culture cells that can be used individually to control protein concentration. Our study presents a simple, robust, and flexible technology platform for manipulating intracellular protein levels. PMID:27043013

  15. Retinoblastoma protein co-purifies with proteasomal insulin-degrading enzyme: Implications for cell proliferation control

    SciTech Connect

    Radulescu, Razvan T.; Duckworth, William C.; Levy, Jennifer L.; Fawcett, Janet

    2010-04-30

    Previous investigations on proteasomal preparations containing insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE; EC 3.4.24.56) have invariably yielded a co-purifying protein with a molecular weight of about 110 kDa. We have now found both in MCF-7 breast cancer and HepG2 hepatoma cells that this associated molecule is the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB). Interestingly, the amount of RB in this protein complex seemed to be lower in HepG2 vs. MCF-7 cells, indicating a higher (cytoplasmic) protein turnover in the former vs. the latter cells. Moreover, immunofluorescence showed increased nuclear localization of RB in HepG2 vs. MCF-7 cells. Beyond these subtle differences between these distinct tumor cell types, our present study more generally suggests an interplay between RB and IDE within the proteasome that may have important growth-regulatory consequences.

  16. Isoform-specific proteasomal degradation of Rbfox3 during chicken embryonic development

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kee K.; Adelstein, Robert S.; Kawamoto, Sachiyo

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Protein stability of Rbfox3 splice isoforms is differentially regulated. • Rbfox3-d31, an Rbfox3 isoform lacking the RRM, is highly susceptible to degradation. • The protein stability of Rbfox3-d31 is regulated by the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. • Rbfox3-d31 inhibits the nuclear localization of Rbfox2. • Rbfox3-d31 inhibits the splicing activity of Rbfox2. - Abstract: Rbfox3, a neuron-specific RNA-binding protein, plays an important role in neuronal differentiation during development. An isoform Rbfox3-d31, which excludes the 93-nucleotide cassette exon within the RNA recognition motif of chicken Rbfox3, has been previously identified. However, the cellular functions of Rbfox3-d31 remain largely unknown. Here we find that Rbfox3-d31 mRNA is highly expressed during the early developmental stages of the chicken embryo, while Rbfox3-d31 protein is barely detected during the same stage due to its rapid degradation mediated by the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. Importantly, this degradation is specific to the Rbfox3-d31 isoform and it does not occur with full-length Rbfox3. Furthermore, suppression of Rbfox3-d31 protein degradation with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 attenuates the splicing activity of another Rbfox family member Rbfox2 by altering the subcellular localization of Rbfox2. These results suggest that Rbfox3-d31 functions as a repressor for the splicing activity of the Rbfox family and its protein level is regulated in an isoform-specific manner in vivo.

  17. Does inactivation of USP14 enhance degradation of proteasomal substrates that are associated with neurodegenerative diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Ortuno, Daniel; Carlisle, Holly J.; Miller, Silke

    2016-01-01

    A common pathological hallmark of age-related neurodegenerative diseases is the intracellular accumulation of protein aggregates such as α-synuclein in Parkinson’s disease, TDP-43 in ALS, and tau in Alzheimer’s disease. Enhancing intracellular clearance of aggregation-prone proteins is a plausible strategy for slowing progression of neurodegenerative diseases and there is great interest in identifying molecular targets that control protein turnover. One of the main routes for protein degradation is through the proteasome, a multisubunit protease that degrades proteins that have been tagged with a polyubiquitin chain by ubiquitin activating and conjugating enzymes. Published data from cellular models indicate that Ubiquitin-specific protease 14 (USP14), a deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB), slows the degradation of tau and TDP-43 by the proteasome and that an inhibitor of USP14 increases the degradation of these substrates. We conducted similar experiments designed to evaluate tau, TDP-43, or α-synuclein levels in cells after overexpressing USP14 or knocking down endogenous expression by siRNA. PMID:26998235

  18. UV Irradiation Triggers Cylindromatosis Translocation, Modification, and Degradation in a Proteasome-Independent Manner.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ping; Hao, Ziwei; Wang, Xincheng; Gao, Jinmin; Li, Dengwen; Xie, Songbo; Zhang, Tong-Cun

    2016-03-01

    The tumor suppressor, cylindromatosis (CYLD), is a negative regulator of NF-κB signaling by removing lysine 63-linked ubiquitin chains from multiple NF-κB signaling components, including TRAF2, TRAF6, and NEMO. How CYLD itself is regulated, however, remains yet to be characterized. In this study, we present the first evidence that UV irradiation is able to induce CYLD translocation from the cytoplasm to microtubules and that the cytoskeleton-associated CYLD is subject to posttranslational modification and degradation in a proteasome-independent manner. By immunostaining, we found that CYLD displayed microtubule-like filament localization under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Further studies revealed that the cytoskeleton-associated CYLD underwent posttranslational modification, which in turn contributed to CYLD degradation in an unknown manner, distinct from proteasome-mediated degradation under normal conditions. Collectively, our data suggest that UV-induced CYLD degradation might serve as an underlying mechanism for UV-induced NF-κB pathway activation. PMID:26717101

  19. Ribosomal proteins produced in excess are degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Sung, Min-Kyung; Reitsma, Justin M; Sweredoski, Michael J; Hess, Sonja; Deshaies, Raymond J

    2016-09-01

    Ribosome assembly is an essential process that consumes prodigious quantities of cellular resources. Ribosomal proteins cannot be overproduced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae because the excess proteins are rapidly degraded. However, the responsible quality control (QC) mechanisms remain poorly characterized. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of multiple proteins of the small and large yeast ribosomal subunits is suppressed. Rpl26 overexpressed from a plasmid can be detected in the nucleolus and nucleoplasm, but it largely fails to assemble into ribosomes and is rapidly degraded. However, if the endogenous RPL26 loci are deleted, plasmid-encoded Rpl26 assembles into ribosomes and localizes to the cytosol. Chemical and genetic perturbation studies indicate that overexpressed ribosomal proteins are degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system and not by autophagy. Inhibition of the proteasome led to accumulation of multiple endogenous ribosomal proteins in insoluble aggregates, consistent with the operation of this QC mechanism in the absence of ribosomal protein overexpression. Our studies reveal that ribosomal proteins that fail to assemble into ribosomes are rapidly distinguished from their assembled counterparts and ubiquitinated and degraded within the nuclear compartment. PMID:27385339

  20. The Role of the Ubiquitin Proteasome Pathway in Keratin Intermediate Filament Protein Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Rogel, Micah R.; Jaitovich, Ariel; Ridge, Karen M.

    2010-01-01

    Lung injury, whether caused by hypoxic or mechanical stresses, elicits a variety of responses at the cellular level. Alveolar epithelial cells respond and adapt to such injurious stimuli by reorganizing the cellular cytoskeleton, mainly accomplished through modification of the intermediate filament (IF) network. The structural and mechanical integrity in epithelial cells is maintained through this adaptive reorganization response. Keratin, the predominant IF expressed in epithelial cells, displays highly dynamic properties in response to injury, sometimes in the form of degradation of the keratin IF network. Post-translational modification, such as phosphorylation, targets keratin proteins for degradation in these circumstances. As with other structural and regulatory proteins, turnover of keratin is regulated by the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome pathway. The degradation process begins with activation of Ub by the Ub-activating enzyme (E1), followed by the exchange of Ub to the Ub-conjugating enzyme (E2). E2 shuttles the Ub molecule to the substrate-specific Ub ligase (E3), which then delivers the Ub to the substrate protein, thereby targeting it for degradation. In some cases of injury and IF-related disease, aggresomes form in epithelial cells. The mechanisms that regulate aggresome formation are currently unknown, although proteasome overload may play a role. Therefore, a more complete understanding of keratin degradation—causes, mechanisms, and consequences—will allow for a greater understanding of epithelial cell biology and lung pathology alike. PMID:20160151

  1. Proteasome activator REGgamma enhances coxsackieviral infection by facilitating p53 degradation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guang; Wong, Jerry; Zhang, Jingchun; Mao, Ivy; Shravah, Jayant; Wu, Yan; Xiao, Allen; Li, Xiaotao; Luo, Honglin

    2010-11-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is a small RNA virus associated with diseases such as myocarditis, meningitis, and pancreatitis. We have previously demonstrated that proteasome inhibition reduces CVB3 replication and attenuates virus-induced myocarditis. However, the underlying mechanisms by which the ubiquitin/proteasome system regulates CVB replication remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of REGγ, a member of the 11S proteasome activator, in CVB3 replication. We showed that overexpression of REGγ promoted CVB3 replication but that knockdown of REGγ led to reduced CVB3 replication. We further demonstrated that REGγ-mediated p53 proteolysis contributes, as least in part, to the proviral function of REGγ. Although total protein levels of REGγ remained unaltered after CVB3 infection, virus infection induced a redistribution of REGγ from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, rendering an opportunity for a direct interaction of REGγ with viral proteins and/or host proteins (e.g., p53), which controls viral growth and thereby enhances viral infectivity. Further analyses suggested a potential modification of REGγ by SUMO following CVB3 infection, which was verified by both in vitro and in vivo sumoylation assays. Sumoylation of REGγ may play a role in its nuclear export during CVB3 infection. Taken together, our results present the first evidence that the host REGγ pathway is utilized and modified during CVB3 infection to promote efficient viral replication. PMID:20719955

  2. APC/CCdh1 Targets Brain-Specific Kinase 2 (BRSK2) for Degradation via the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Wang, Yingli; Luo, Ting; Gu, Xiuting; Chen, Fang; Yu, Long

    2012-01-01

    Studies of brain-specific kinase 2 (BRSK2), an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-related kinase, and its homologs suggest that they are multifunctional regulators of cell-cycle progression. BRSK2, which contains a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain, is polyubiquitinated in cells. However, the regulatory mechanisms and exact biological function of BRSK2 remain unclear. Herein, we show that BRSK2 co-localizes with the centrosomes during mitosis. We also demonstrate that BRSK2 protein levels fluctuate during the cell cycle, peaking during mitosis and declining in G1 phase. Furthermore, Cdh1, rather than Cdc20, promotes the degradation of BRSK2 in vivo. Consistent with this finding, knock-down of endogenous Cdh1 blocks BRSK2 degradation during the G1 phase. The conserved KEN box of BRSK2 is required for anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome-Cdh1 (APC/CCdh1)-dependent degradation. Additionally, overexpression of either BRSK2(WT) or BRSK2(ΔKEN) increases the percentage of cells in G2/M. Thus, our results provide the first evidence that BRSK2 regulates cell-cycle progression controlled by APC/CCdh1 through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. PMID:23029325

  3. CHIP stabilizes amyloid precursor protein via proteasomal degradation and p53-mediated trans-repression of β-secretase.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amir Kumar; Pati, Uttam

    2015-08-01

    In patient with Alzheimer's disease (AD), deposition of amyloid-beta Aβ, a proteolytic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β-secretase/BACE1, forms senile plaque in the brain. BACE1 activation is caused due to oxidative stresses and dysfunction of ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), which is linked to p53 inactivation. As partial suppression of BACE1 attenuates Aβ generation and AD-related pathology, it might be an ideal target for AD treatment. We have shown that both in neurons and in HEK-APP cells, BACE1 is a new substrate of E3-ligase CHIP and an inverse relation exists between CHIP and BACE1 level. CHIP inhibits ectopic BACE1 level by promoting its ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, thus reducing APP processing; it stabilizes APP in neurons, thus reducing Aβ. CHIP(U) (box) domain physically interacts with BACE1; however, both U-box and TPR domain are essential for ubiquitination and degradation of BACE1. Further, BACE1 is a downstream target of p53 and overexpression of p53 decreases BACE1 level. In HEK-APP cells, CHIP is shown to negatively regulate BACE1 promoter through stabilization of p53's DNA-binding conformation and its binding upon 5' UTR element (+127 to +150). We have thus discovered that CHIP regulates p53-mediated trans-repression of BACE1 at both transcriptional and post-translational level. We propose that a CHIP-BACE1-p53 feedback loop might control APP stabilization, which could further be utilized for new therapeutic intervention in AD. PMID:25773675

  4. CHIP stabilizes amyloid precursor protein via proteasomal degradation and p53-mediated trans-repression of β-secretase

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amir Kumar; Pati, Uttam

    2015-01-01

    In patient with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), deposition of amyloid-beta Aβ, a proteolytic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β-secretase/BACE1, forms senile plaque in the brain. BACE1 activation is caused due to oxidative stresses and dysfunction of ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS), which is linked to p53 inactivation. As partial suppression of BACE1 attenuates Aβ generation and AD-related pathology, it might be an ideal target for AD treatment. We have shown that both in neurons and in HEK-APP cells, BACE1 is a new substrate of E3-ligase CHIP and an inverse relation exists between CHIP and BACE1 level. CHIP inhibits ectopic BACE1 level by promoting its ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, thus reducing APP processing; it stabilizes APP in neurons, thus reducing Aβ. CHIPUbox domain physically interacts with BACE1; however, both U-box and TPR domain are essential for ubiquitination and degradation of BACE1. Further, BACE1 is a downstream target of p53 and overexpression of p53 decreases BACE1 level. In HEK-APP cells, CHIP is shown to negatively regulate BACE1 promoter through stabilization of p53’s DNA-binding conformation and its binding upon 5′ UTR element (+127 to +150). We have thus discovered that CHIP regulates p53-mediated trans-repression of BACE1 at both transcriptional and post-translational level. We propose that a CHIP–BACE1–p53 feedback loop might control APP stabilization, which could further be utilized for new therapeutic intervention in AD. PMID:25773675

  5. Lipopolysaccharide Induces Degradation of Connexin43 in Rat Astrocytes via the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Proteolytic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chih-Kai; Jeng, Chung-Jiuan; Wang, Hwai-Shi; Wang, Shu-Huei; Wu, Jiahn-Chun

    2013-01-01

    The astrocytic syncytium plays a critical role in maintaining the homeostasis of the brain through the regulation of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC). Changes to GJIC in response to inflammatory stimuli in astrocytes may have serious effects on the brain. We have previously shown that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reduces connexin43 (Cx43) expression and GJIC in cultured rat astrocytes via a toll-like receptor 4-mediated signaling pathway. In the present study, treatment of astrocytes with LPS resulted in a significant increase in levels of the phosphorylated forms of stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) -1, -2, and -3 for up to 18 h. An increase in nuclear transcription factor NF-κB levels was also observed after 8 h of LPS treatment and was sustained for up to 18 h. The LPS-induced decrease in Cx43 protein levels and inhibition of GJIC were blocked by the SAPK/JNK inhibitor SP600125, but not by the NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082. Following blockade of de novo protein synthesis by cycloheximide, LPS accelerated Cx43 degradation. Moreover, the LPS-induced downregulation of Cx43 was blocked following inhibition of 26S proteasome activity using the reversible proteasome inhibitor MG132 or the irreversible proteasome inhibitor lactacystin. Immunoprecipitation analyses revealed an increased association of Cx43 with both ubiquitin and E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4 in astrocytes after LPS stimulation for 6 h and this effect was prevented by SP600125. Taken together, these results suggest that LPS stimulation leads to downregulation of Cx43 expression and GJIC in rat astrocytes by activation of SAPK/JNK and the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway. PMID:24236122

  6. Dietary apigenin potentiates the inhibitory effect of interferon-α on cancer cell viability through inhibition of 26S proteasome-mediated interferon receptor degradation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sheng; Yang, Li-juan; Wang, Ping; He, Yu-jiao; Huang, Jun-mei; Liu, Han-wei; Shen, Xiao-fei; Wang, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Background Type I interferons (IFN-α/β) have broad and potent immunoregulatory and antiproliferative activities. However, it is still known whether the dietary flavonoids exhibit their antiviral and anticancer properties by modulating the function of type I IFNs. Objective This study aimed at determining the role of apigenin, a dietary plant flavonoid abundant in common fruits and vegetables, on the type I IFN-mediated inhibition of cancer cell viability. Design Inhibitory effect of apigenin on human 26S proteasome, a known negative regulator of type I IFN signaling, was evaluated in vitro. Molecular docking was conducted to know the interaction between apigenin and subunits of 26S proteasome. Effects of apigenin on JAK/STAT pathway, 26S proteasome-mediated interferon receptor stability, and cancer cells viability were also investigated. Results Apigenin was identified to be a potent inhibitor of human 26S proteasome in a cell-based assay. Apigenin inhibited the chymotrypsin-like, caspase-like, and trypsin-like activities of the human 26S proteasome and increased the ubiquitination of endogenous proteins in cells. Results from computational modeling of the potential interactions of apigenin with the chymotrypsin site (β5 subunit), caspase site (β1 subunit), and trypsin site (β2 subunit) of the proteasome were consistent with the observed proteasome inhibitory activity. Apigenin enhanced the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins (STAT1 and STAT2) and promoted the endogenous IFN-α-regulated gene expression. Apigenin inhibited the IFN-α-stimulated ubiquitination and degradation of type I interferon receptor 1 (IFNAR1). Apigenin also sensitized the inhibitory effect of IFN-α on viability of cervical carcinoma HeLa cells. Conclusion These results suggest that apigenin potentiates the inhibitory effect of IFN-α on cancer cell viability by activating JAK/STAT signaling pathway through inhibition of 26S proteasome

  7. A novel domain mediates insulin-induced proteasomal degradation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1).

    PubMed

    Boura-Halfon, Sigalit; Shuster-Meiseles, Timor; Beck, Avital; Petrovich, Katia; Gurevitch, Diana; Ronen, Denise; Zick, Yehiel

    2010-11-01

    Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) plays a pivotal role in insulin signaling, therefore its degradation is exquisitely regulated. Here, we show that insulin-stimulated degradation of IRS-1 requires the presence of a highly conserved Ser/Thr-rich domain that we named domain involved in degradation of IRS-1 (DIDI). DIDI (amino acids 386-430 of IRS-1) was identified by comparing the intracellular degradation rate of several truncated forms of IRS-1 transfected into CHO cells. The isolated DIDI domain underwent insulin-stimulated Ser/Thr phosphorylation, suggesting that it serves as a target for IRS-1 kinases. The effects of deletion of DIDI were studied in Fao rat hepatoma and in CHO cells expressing Myc-IRS-1(WT) or Myc-IRS-1(Δ386-430). Deletion of DIDI maintained the ability of IRS-1(Δ386-434) to undergo ubiquitination while rendering it insensitive to insulin-induced proteasomal degradation, which affected IRS-1(WT) (80% at 8 h). Consequently, IRS-1(Δ386-434) mediated insulin signaling (activation of Akt and glycogen synthesis) better than IRS-1(WT). IRS-1(Δ386-434) exhibited a significant greater preference for nuclear localization, compared with IRS-1(WT). Higher nuclear localization was also observed when cells expressing IRS-1(WT) were incubated with the proteasome inhibitor MG-132. The sequence of DIDI is conserved more than 93% across species, from fish to mammals, as opposed to approximately 40% homology of the entire IRS-1. These findings implicate DIDI as a novel, highly conserved domain of IRS-1, which mediates its cellular localization, rate of degradation, and biological activity, with a direct impact on insulin signal transduction. PMID:20843941

  8. The Proteasome Is Involved in the Degradation of Different Aquaporin-2 Mutants Causing Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Kiyoko; Zuber, Christian; Roth, Jürgen; Ziak, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Mutations in the water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2) can cause congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. To reveal the possible involvement of the protein quality control system in processing AQP2 mutants, we created an in vitro system of clone 9 hepatocytes stably expressing endoplasmic reticulum-retained T126M AQP2 and misrouted E258K AQP2 as well as wild-type AQP2 and studied their biosynthesis, degradation, and intracellular distribution. Mutant and wild-type AQP2 were synthesized as 29-kd nonglycosylated and 32-kd core-glycosylated forms in the endoplasmic reticulum. The wild-type AQP2 had a t1/2 of 4.6 hours. Remarkable differences in the degradation kinetics were observed for the glycosylated and nonglycosylated T126M AQP2 (t1/2 = 2.0 hours versus 0.9 hours). Moreover, their degradation was depending on proteasomal activity as demonstrated in inhibition studies. Degradation of E258K AQP2 also occurred rapidly (t1/2 = 1.8 hours) but in a proteasome- and lysosome-dependent manner. By triple confocal immunofluorescence microscopy misrouting of E258K to lysosomes via the Golgi apparatus could be demonstrated. Notwithstanding the differences in degradation kinetics and subcellular distribution such as endoplasmic reticulum-retention and misrouting to lysosomes, both T126M and E258K AQP2 were efficiently degraded. This implies the involvement of different protein quality control processes in the processing of these AQP2 mutants. PMID:12819016

  9. Hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits E6AP expression via DNA methylation to escape from ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Juri; Shim, Joo Hee; Tiwari, Indira; Jang, Kyung Lib

    2016-09-28

    The E6-associated protein (E6AP) is a ubiquitin ligase that mediates ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein. Given the role of HCV core protein as a major component of the viral nucleocapsid, as well as a multifunctional protein involved in viral pathogenesis and hepatocarcinogenesis, HCV has likely evolved a strategy to counteract the host anti-viral defense mechanism of E6AP and maximize its potential to produce infectious virus particles. In the present study, we found that HCV core protein derived from either ectopic expression or HCV infection inhibits E6AP expression via promoter hypermethylation in human hepatocytes. As a result, the potential of E6AP to ubiquitinate and degrade HCV core protein through the ubiquitin-proteasome system was severely impaired, which in turn led to stimulation of virus propagation. The effects of HCV core protein were almost completely abolished when the E6AP level was restored by ectopic expression of E6AP, treatment with a universal DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor, 5-Aza-2'dC, or knock-down of DNMT1. In conclusion, HCV core protein inhibits E6AP expression via DNA methylation to protect itself from ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation and stimulate virus propagation, providing a potential target for the development of anti-viral drugs against HCV. PMID:27317649

  10. A splice variant of the human phosphohistidine phosphatase 1 (PHPT1) is degraded by the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Inturi, Raviteja; Wäneskog, Marcus; Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Ali, Yeasmeen; Ek, Pia; Punga, Tanel; Bjerling, Pernilla

    2014-12-01

    Regulation of protein activity by phosphorylation is central in many cellular processes. Phosphorylation of serine, threonine and tyrosine residues is well documented and studied. In addition, other amino acids, like histidine can be phosphorylated, but neither the mechanism nor the function of this modification is well understood. Nevertheless, there is a 14 kDa enzyme with phosphohistidine phosphatase activity, named PHPT1, found in most animals, but not in bacteria, plant or fungi. There are a few splice variant transcripts formed from the human PHPT1 locus and some of them are predicted to form variant proteins, but studies of these proteins are lacking. In order to get insight into the possible function of the variant transcripts encoded at the PHPT1 locus, ectopic expression of PHPT1 transcript variant 6, predicted to be degraded by the non-sense mediated mRNA decay pathway, in HeLa cells was undertaken. In HeLa cells the splice variant protein was degraded by the proteasome, unlike the wild type protein. Using an in silico modeling approach the variant C-terminal end of the proteins were predicted to form different secondary structures that might explain the different properties of the two proteins. The specific degradation of the PHPT1 splice variant indicates that at least for the PHPT1 protein, the quality control and the self-guarding of the cellular system works at two levels, first at the RNA level, aberrant transcripts are degraded by the non-sense mediated mRNA decay pathway, and the small amount of proteins that are formed will be degraded by the proteasome. PMID:25450458

  11. Two waves of proteasome-dependent protein degradation in the hippocampus are required for recognition memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Luciana S; Dornelles, Arethuza S; Petry, Fernanda S; Falavigna, Lucio; Dargél, Vinicius A; Köbe, Luiza M; Aguzzoli, Cristiano; Roesler, Rafael; Schröder, Nadja

    2015-04-01

    Healthy neuronal function and synaptic modification require a concert of synthesis and degradation of proteins. Increasing evidence indicates that protein turnover mediated by proteasome activity is involved in long-term synaptic plasticity and memory. However, its role in different phases of memory remains debated, and previous studies have not examined the possible requirement of protein degradation in recognition memory. Here, we show that the proteasome inhibitor, lactacystin (LAC), infused into the CA1 area of the hippocampus at two specific time points during consolidation, impairs 24-retention of memory for object recognition in rats. Administration of LAC after retrieval did not affect retention. These findings provide the first evidence for a requirement of proteasome activity in recognition memory, indicate that protein degradation in the hippocampus is necessary during selective time windows of memory consolidation, and further our understanding of the role of protein turnover in memory formation. PMID:25687693

  12. Histone deacetylase 4 promotes ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation of Sp3 in SH-SY5Y cells treated with di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP), determining neuronal death

    SciTech Connect

    Guida, Natascia; Laudati, Giusy; Galgani, Mario; Santopaolo, Marianna; Montuori, Paolo; Triassi, Maria; Di Renzo, Gianfranco; Canzoniero, Lorella M.T.; Formisano, Luigi

    2014-10-01

    Phthalates, phthalic acid esters, are widely used as plasticizers to produce polymeric materials in industrial production of plastics and daily consumable products. Animal studies have shown that di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) may cause toxic effects in the rat brain. In the present study, chronic exposure to DEHP (0.1–100 μM) caused dose-dependent cell death via the activation of caspase-3 in neuroblastoma cells. Intriguingly, this harmful effect was prevented by the pan-histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor trichostatin A, by the class II HDAC inhibitor MC-1568, but not by the class I HDAC inhibitor MS-275. Furthermore, DEHP reduced specificity protein 3 (Sp3) gene expression, but not Sp3 mRNA, after 24 and 48 h exposures. However, Sp3 protein reduction was prevented by pre-treatment with MC-1568, suggesting the involvement of class II HDACs in causing this effect. Then, we investigated the possible relationship between DEHP-induced neuronal death and the post-translational mechanisms responsible for the down-regulation of Sp3. Interestingly, DEHP-induced Sp3 reduction was associated to its deacetylation and polyubiquitination. Co-immunoprecipitation studies showed that Sp3 physically interacted with HDAC4 after DEHP exposure, while HDAC4 inhibition by antisense oligodeoxynucleotide reverted the DEHP-induced degradation of Sp3. Notably, Sp3 overexpression was able to counteract the detrimental effect induced by DEHP. Taken together, these results suggest that DEHP exerts its toxic effect by inducing deacetylation of Sp3 via HDAC4, and afterwards, Sp3-polyubiquitination. - Highlights: • Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) is cytotoxic to SH-SY5Y cells and cortical neurons. • DEHP-induced cytotoxicity is mediated by apoptosis. • DEHP-induced apoptotic cell death is inhibited by class II HDAC MC-1568. • DEHP neurotoxicity is caused by HDAC4-mediated Sp3 degradation by ubiquitin.

  13. Geldanamycin-induced degradation of Chk1 is mediated by proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, M.; E-mail: nomura413jp@yahoo.co.jp; Nomura, N.; Yamashita, J.

    2005-09-30

    Checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) is a cell cycle regulator and a heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) client. It is essential for cell proliferation and survival. In this report, we analyzed the mechanisms of Chk1 regulation in U87MG glioblastoma cells using Geldanamycin (GA), which interferes with the function of Hsp90. GA reduced Chk1 protein level but not its mRNA level in glioblastoma cells. Co-treatment with GA and cycloheximide (CHX), a protein synthesis inhibitor, induced a decrease of half-life of the Chk1 protein to 3 h and resulted in Chk1 down-regulation. CHX alone induced only 32% reduction of Chk1 protein even after 24 h. These findings indicated that reduction of Chk1 by GA was due to destabilization and degradation of the protein. In addition, GA-induced down-regulation of Chk1 was reversed by MG132, a specific proteasome inhibitor. And it was revealed that Chk1 was ubiquitinated by GA. These results have indicated that degradation of Chk1 by GA was mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in U87MG glioblastoma cells.

  14. Inhibition of Stat5a/b enhances proteasomal degradation of androgen receptor liganded by antiandrogens in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, David T.; Gu, Lei; Liao, Zhiyong; Talati, Pooja G.; Shen, Feng; Koptyra, Mateusz; Tan, Shyh-Han; Ellsworth, Elyse; Gupta, Shilpa; Montie, Heather; Dagvadorj, Ayush; Savolainen, Saija; Leiby, Benjamin; Mirtti, Tuomas; Merry, Diane E.; Nevalainen, Marja T.

    2015-01-01

    Although poorly understood, androgen receptor (AR) signaling is sustained despite treatment of prostate cancer with antiandrogens and potentially underlies development of incurable castrate-resistant prostate cancer. However, therapies targeting the AR signaling axis eventually fail when prostate cancer progresses to the castrate-resistant stage. Stat5a/b, a candidate therapeutic target protein in prostate cancer, synergizes with AR to reciprocally enhance signaling of both proteins. In this work, we demonstrate that Stat5a/b sequesters antiandrogen-liganded (MDV3100, Bicalutamide, Flutamide) AR in prostate cancer cells and protects it against proteasomal degradation in prostate cancer. Active Stat5a/b increased nuclear levels of both unliganded and antiandrogen-liganded AR, as demonstrated in prostate cancer cell lines, xenograft tumors and clinical patient-derived prostate cancer samples. Physical interaction between Stat5a/b and AR in prostate cancer cells was mediated by the DNA-binding domain of Stat5a/b and the N-terminal domain of AR. Moreover, active Stat5a/b increased AR occupancy of the Prostate Specific Antigen promoter and AR-regulated gene expression in prostate cancer cells. Mechanistically, both Stat5a/b genetic knockdown and antiandrogen treatment induced proteasomal degradation of AR in prostate cancer cells, with combined inhibition of Stat5a/b and AR leading to maximal loss of AR protein and prostate cancer cell viability. Our results indicate that therapeutic targeting of AR in prostate cancer using antiandrogens may be substantially improved by targeting of Stat5a/b. PMID:25552366

  15. Endoplasmic Reticulum-associated Degradation of Pca1p, a Polytopic Protein, via Interaction with the Proteasome at the Membrane.

    PubMed

    Smith, Nathan; Adle, David J; Zhao, Miaoyun; Qin, Xiaojuan; Kim, Heejeong; Lee, Jaekwon

    2016-07-15

    Endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) plays a critical role in the destruction of terminally misfolded proteins at the secretory pathway. The system also regulates expression levels of several proteins such as Pca1p, a cadmium exporter in yeast. To gain better insight into the mechanisms underlying ERAD of Pca1p and other polytopic proteins by the proteasome in the cytosol, our study determined the roles for the molecular factors of ERAD in dislodging Pca1p from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Inactivation of the 20S proteasome leads to accumulation of ubiquitinated Pca1p in the ER membrane, suggesting a role for the proteasome in extraction of Pca1p from the ER. Pca1p formed a complex with the proteasome at the membrane in a Doa10p E3 ligase-dependent manner. Cdc48p is required for recruiting the proteasome to Pca1p. Although the Ufd2p E4 ubiquitin chain extension enzyme is involved in efficient degradation of Pca1p, Ufd2p-deficient cells did not affect the formation of a complex between Pca1p and the proteasome. Two other polytopic membrane proteins undergoing ERAD, Ste6*p and Hmg2p, also displayed the same outcomes observed for Pca1p. However, poly-ubiquitinated Cpy1*p, a luminal ERAD substrate, was detected in the cytosol independent of proteolytic activities of the proteasome. These results indicate that extraction and degradation of polytopic membrane proteins at the ER is a coupled event. This mechanism would relieve the cost of exposed hydrophobic domains in the cytosol during ERAD. PMID:27226596

  16. [Proteasome inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Yagi, Hideo

    2014-06-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system plays an essential role in degradation of eukaryotic intracellular protein, including cell cycle regulation, cell growth and proliferation, and survival. Cancer cells generally have higher level of proteasome activity compared with normal cells, suggesting proteasome inhibition could be therapeutic target in oncology. Bortezomib, the first proteasome inhibitor introduced into the clinic, is approved for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Although it was approved as single agent in the relapsed setting, bortezomib is now predominantly used in combination with conventional and novel targeted agents because bortezomib has demonstrated additive and synergistic activity in preclinical studies. Recently, several second-generation proteasome inhibitors, such as carfilzomib and MLN9708, have been developed and entered into clinical trials. These agents were investigated in frontline MM in combination with lenalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone. These studies demonstrated positive efficacy and safety, and it is expected that they will be approved in near future. PMID:25016815

  17. PRESERVING MITOCHONDRIAL FUNCTION PREVENTS THE PROTEASOMAL DEGRADATION OF GTP CYCLOHYDROLASE I

    PubMed Central

    SHARMA, SHRUTI; SUN, XUTONG; KUMAR, SANJIV; RAFIKOV, RUSLAN; ARAMBURO, ANGELA; KALKAN, GOKHAN; TIAN, JING; REHMANI, IMRAN; KALLARACKAL, SUPHIN; FINEMAN, JEFFERY R.; BLACK, STEPHEN M.

    2012-01-01

    The development of pulmonary hypertension is a common accompaniment of congenital heart disease (CHD) with increased pulmonary blood flow. Our recent evidence suggests that asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction causes endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling secondary to a proteasome-dependent degradation of GTP cyclohydrolase I (GCH1) that results in a decrease in the NOS co-factor, tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). Decreases in NO signaling are thought to be an early hallmark of endothelial dysfunction. As L-carnitine plays an important role in maintaining mitochondrial function in this study we examined the protective mechanisms and the therapeutic potential of L-carnitine on NO signaling in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAEC) and in a lamb model of CHD and increased pulmonary blood flow (Shunt). Acetyl L-carnitine (ALC) attenuated the ADMA-mediated proteasomal degradation of GCH1. This preservation was associated with a decrease in the association of GCH1 with the Hsp70 and the C-terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) and a decrease in its ubiquitination. This in turn prevented the decrease in BH4 levels induced by ADMA and preserved NO signaling. Treatment of Shunt lambs with L-carnitine also reduced GCH1/CHIP interactions, attenuated the ubiquitination and degradation of GCH1, and increased BH4 levels compared to vehicle treated Shunt lambs. The increases in BH4 were associated with decreased NOS uncoupling and enhanced NO generation. Thus, we conclude that L-carnitine may have a therapeutic potential in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension in children with CHD with increased pulmonary blood flow. PMID:22583703

  18. Preserving mitochondrial function prevents the proteasomal degradation of GTP cyclohydrolase I.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shruti; Sun, Xutong; Kumar, Sanjiv; Rafikov, Ruslan; Aramburo, Angela; Kalkan, Gokhan; Tian, Jing; Rehmani, Imran; Kallarackal, Suphin; Fineman, Jeffrey R; Black, Stephen M

    2012-07-15

    The development of pulmonary hypertension is a common accompaniment of congenital heart disease (CHD) with increased pulmonary blood flow. Our recent evidence suggests that asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction causes endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling secondary to a proteasome-dependent degradation of GTP cyclohydrolase I (GCH1) that results in a decrease in the NOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)). Decreases in NO signaling are thought to be an early hallmark of endothelial dysfunction. As l-carnitine plays an important role in maintaining mitochondrial function, in this study we examined the protective mechanisms and the therapeutic potential of l-carnitine on NO signaling in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells and in a lamb model of CHD and increased pulmonary blood flow (Shunt). Acetyl-l-carnitine attenuated the ADMA-mediated proteasomal degradation of GCH1. This preservation was associated with a decrease in the association of GCH1 with Hsp70 and the C-terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) and a decrease in its ubiquitination. This in turn prevented the decrease in BH(4) levels induced by ADMA and preserved NO signaling. Treatment of Shunt lambs with l-carnitine also reduced GCH1/CHIP interactions, attenuated the ubiquitination and degradation of GCH1, and increased BH(4) levels compared to vehicle-treated Shunt lambs. The increases in BH(4) were associated with decreased NOS uncoupling and enhanced NO generation. Thus, we conclude that L-carnitine may have a therapeutic potential in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension in children with CHD with increased pulmonary blood flow. PMID:22583703

  19. REGγ regulates ERα degradation via ubiquitin–proteasome pathway in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, Fan; Liang, Yan; Bi, Jiong; Chen, Li; Zhang, Fan; Cui, Youhong; Jiang, Jun

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • High expression of REGγ is correlated with ERα status and poor clinical features. • Cell growth, mobility and invasion are significantly impaired by REGγ knockdown. • REGγ indirectly regulates ERα protein expression. - Abstract: REGγ is a proteasome coactivator which regulates proteolytic activity in eukaryotic cells. Abundant lines of evidence have showed that REGγ is over expressed in a number of human carcinomas. However, its precise role in the pathogenesis of cancer is still unclear. In this study, by examining 200 human breast cancer specimens, we demonstrated that REGγ was highly expressed in breast cancers, and the expression of REGγ was positively correlated with breast cancer patient estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) status. Moreover, the expression of REGγ was found positively associated with poor clinical features and low survival rates in ERα positive breast cancer patients. Further cell culture studies using MCF7 and BT474 breast cancer cell lines showed that cell proliferation, motility, and invasion capacities were decreased significantly by REGγ knockdown. Lastly, we demonstrated that REGγ indirectly regulates the degradation of ERα protein via ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. In conclusion, our findings provide the evidence that REGγ expression was positively correlated with ERα status and poor clinical prognosis in ERα positive breast cancer patients. As well, we disclose a new connection between the two molecules that are both highly expressed in most breast cancer cases.

  20. E11/Podoplanin Protein Stabilization Through Inhibition of the Proteasome Promotes Osteocyte Differentiation in Murine in Vitro Models

    PubMed Central

    Prideaux, Matt; Allen, Steve; Buttle, David J.; Pitsillides, Andrew A.; Farquharson, Colin

    2015-01-01

    The transmembrane glycoprotein E11 is considered critical in early osteoblast–osteocyte transitions (osteocytogenesis), however its function and regulatory mechanisms are still unknown. Using the late osteoblast MLO‐A5 cell line we reveal increased E11 protein/mRNA expression (P < 0.001) concomitant with extensive osteocyte dendrite formation and matrix mineralization (P < 0.001). Transfection with E11 significantly increased mRNA levels (P < 0.001), but immunoblotting failed to detect any correlative increases in E11 protein levels, suggestive of post‐translational degradation. We found that exogenous treatment of MLO‐A5 and osteocytic IDG‐SW3 cells with 10 μM ALLN (calpain and proteasome inhibitor) stabilized E11 protein levels and induced a profound increase in osteocytic dendrite formation (P < 0.001). Treatment with other calpain inhibitors failed to promote similar osteocytogenic changes, suggesting that these effects of ALLN rely upon its proteasome inhibitor actions. Accordingly we found that proteasome‐selective inhibitors (MG132/lactacystin/ Bortezomib/Withaferin‐A) produced similar dose‐dependent increases in E11 protein levels in MLO‐A5 and primary osteoblast cells. This proteasomal targeting was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of ubiquitinylated proteins, which included E11, and by increased levels of ubiquitinylated E11 protein upon addition of the proteasome inhibitors MG132/Bortezomib. Activation of RhoA, the small GTPase, was found to be increased concomitant with the peak in E11 levels and its downstream signaling was also observed to promote MLO‐A5 cell dendrite formation. Our data indicate that a mechanism reliant upon blockade of proteasome‐mediated E11 destabilization contributes to osteocytogenesis and that this may involve downstream targeting of RhoA. This work adds to our mechanistic understanding of the factors regulating bone homeostasis, which may lead to future therapeutic approaches. J. Cell

  1. Proteasomal Degradation of Nod2 Protein Mediates Tolerance to Bacterial Cell Wall Components*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyoung-Hee; Biswas, Amlan; Liu, Yuen-Joyce; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune system serves as the first line of defense by detecting microbes and initiating inflammatory responses. Although both Toll-like receptor (TLR) and nucleotide binding domain and leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins are important for this process, their excessive activation is hazardous to hosts; thus, tight regulation is required. Endotoxin tolerance is refractory to repeated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation and serves as a host defense mechanism against septic shock caused by an excessive TLR4 response during Gram-negative bacterial infection. Gram-positive bacteria as well as their cell wall components also induce shock. However, the mechanism underlying tolerance is not understood. Here, we show that activation of Nod2 by its ligand, muramyl dipeptide (MDP) in the bacterial cell wall, induces rapid degradation of Nod2, which confers MDP tolerance in vitro and in vivo. Nod2 is constitutively associated with a chaperone protein, Hsp90, which is required for Nod2 stability and protects Nod2 from degradation. Upon MDP stimulation, Hsp90 rapidly dissociates from Nod2, which subsequently undergoes ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. The SOCS-3 protein induced by Nod2 activation further facilitates this degradation process. Therefore, Nod2 protein stability is a key factor in determining responsiveness to MDP stimulation. This indicates that TLRs and NLRs induce a tolerant state through distinct molecular mechanisms that protect the host from septic shock. PMID:23019338

  2. Degradation Signals for Ubiquitin-Proteasome Dependent Cytosolic Protein Quality Control (CytoQC) in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Matthew J; Spear, Eric D; Yu, Allen T; Lee, Evan J; Shahzad, Saba; Michaelis, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Cellular protein quality control (PQC) systems selectively target misfolded or otherwise aberrant proteins for degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). How cells discern abnormal from normal proteins remains incompletely understood, but involves in part the recognition between ubiquitin E3 ligases and degradation signals (degrons) that are exposed in misfolded proteins. PQC is compartmentalized in the cell, and a great deal has been learned in recent years about ER-associated degradation (ERAD) and nuclear quality control. In contrast, a comprehensive view of cytosolic quality control (CytoQC) has yet to emerge, and will benefit from the development of a well-defined set of model substrates. In this study, we generated an isogenic "degron library" in Saccharomyces cerevisiae consisting of short sequences appended to the C-terminus of a reporter protein, Ura3 About half of these degron-containing proteins are substrates of the integral membrane E3 ligase Doa10, which also plays a pivotal role in ERAD and some nuclear protein degradation. Notably, some of our degron fusion proteins exhibit dependence on the E3 ligase Ltn1/Rkr1 for degradation, apparently by a mechanism distinct from its known role in ribosomal quality control of translationally paused proteins. Ubr1 and San1, E3 ligases involved in the recognition of some misfolded CytoQC substrates, are largely dispensable for the degradation of our degron-containing proteins. Interestingly, the Hsp70/Hsp40 chaperone/cochaperones Ssa1,2 and Ydj1, are required for the degradation of all constructs tested. Taken together, the comprehensive degron library presented here provides an important resource of isogenic substrates for testing candidate PQC components and identifying new ones. PMID:27172186

  3. Degradation Signals for Ubiquitin-Proteasome Dependent Cytosolic Protein Quality Control (CytoQC) in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Matthew J.; Spear, Eric D.; Yu, Allen T.; Lee, Evan J.; Shahzad, Saba; Michaelis, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Cellular protein quality control (PQC) systems selectively target misfolded or otherwise aberrant proteins for degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). How cells discern abnormal from normal proteins remains incompletely understood, but involves in part the recognition between ubiquitin E3 ligases and degradation signals (degrons) that are exposed in misfolded proteins. PQC is compartmentalized in the cell, and a great deal has been learned in recent years about ER-associated degradation (ERAD) and nuclear quality control. In contrast, a comprehensive view of cytosolic quality control (CytoQC) has yet to emerge, and will benefit from the development of a well-defined set of model substrates. In this study, we generated an isogenic “degron library” in Saccharomyces cerevisiae consisting of short sequences appended to the C-terminus of a reporter protein, Ura3. About half of these degron-containing proteins are substrates of the integral membrane E3 ligase Doa10, which also plays a pivotal role in ERAD and some nuclear protein degradation. Notably, some of our degron fusion proteins exhibit dependence on the E3 ligase Ltn1/Rkr1 for degradation, apparently by a mechanism distinct from its known role in ribosomal quality control of translationally paused proteins. Ubr1 and San1, E3 ligases involved in the recognition of some misfolded CytoQC substrates, are largely dispensable for the degradation of our degron-containing proteins. Interestingly, the Hsp70/Hsp40 chaperone/cochaperones Ssa1,2 and Ydj1, are required for the degradation of all constructs tested. Taken together, the comprehensive degron library presented here provides an important resource of isogenic substrates for testing candidate PQC components and identifying new ones. PMID:27172186

  4. mTOR inhibition activates overall protein degradation by the ubiquitin proteasome system as well as by autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinghui; Zhai, Bo; Gygi, Steven P.; Goldberg, Alfred Lewis

    2015-01-01

    Growth factors and nutrients enhance protein synthesis and suppress overall protein degradation by activating the protein kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Conversely, nutrient or serum deprivation inhibits mTOR and stimulates protein breakdown by inducing autophagy, which provides the starved cells with amino acids for protein synthesis and energy production. However, it is unclear whether proteolysis by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS), which catalyzes most protein degradation in mammalian cells, also increases when mTOR activity decreases. Here we show that inhibiting mTOR with rapamycin or Torin1 rapidly increases the degradation of long-lived cell proteins, but not short-lived ones, by stimulating proteolysis by proteasomes, in addition to autophagy. This enhanced proteasomal degradation required protein ubiquitination, and within 30 min after mTOR inhibition, the cellular content of K48-linked ubiquitinated proteins increased without any change in proteasome content or activity. This rapid increase in UPS-mediated proteolysis continued for many hours and resulted primarily from inhibition of mTORC1 (not mTORC2), but did not require new protein synthesis or key mTOR targets: S6Ks, 4E-BPs, or Ulks. These findings do not support the recent report that mTORC1 inhibition reduces proteolysis by suppressing proteasome expression [Zhang Y, et al. (2014) Nature 513(7518):440–443]. Several growth-related proteins were identified that were ubiquitinated and degraded more rapidly after mTOR inhibition, including HMG-CoA synthase, whose enhanced degradation probably limits cholesterol biosynthesis upon insulin deficiency. Thus, mTOR inhibition coordinately activates the UPS and autophagy, which provide essential amino acids and, together with the enhanced ubiquitination of anabolic proteins, help slow growth. PMID:26669439

  5. Nucleotide excision repair and the 26S proteasome function together to promote trinucleotide repeat expansions.

    PubMed

    Concannon, Claire; Lahue, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion underpins a number of inheritable neurological human disorders. Multiple mechanisms are thought to contribute to the expansion process. The incorrect processing of the repeat tract by DNA repair proteins can drive this mutation process forward, as expansions are suppressed following ablation of certain repair factors in mouse models and cell models of disease. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is one repair pathway implicated in TNR instability, although most previous work focussed on TNR contractions, not expansions. Here we investigated the role of NER in modulating expansions of threshold-length (CTG·CAG) repeats in yeast. We show that both the global genome and transcription-coupled repair subpathways promote expansions of threshold-length TNRs. Furthermore, NER works with the 26S proteasome to drive expansions, based on analysis of double mutants defective in both pathways, and of Rad23, a protein involved in both NER and the shuttling of ubiquitinated proteins to the proteasome. This work provides the first evidence that both subpathways of NER can promote threshold-length TNR expansions and that NER interacts with the proteasome to drive expansions. PMID:24359926

  6. Cytokinin inhibits the proteasome-mediated degradation of carbonylated proteins in Arabidopsis leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Under normal conditions, plants contain numerous carbonylated proteins, which are thought to be indicative of oxidative stress damage. Conditions that promote formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) enhance protein carbonylation, and protein degradation is required to reverse the damage. However,...

  7. It's all about talking: two-way communication between proteasomal and lysosomal degradation pathways via ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Liebl, Martina P; Hoppe, Thorsten

    2016-08-01

    Selective degradation of proteins requires a fine-tuned coordination of the two major proteolytic pathways, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy. Substrate selection and proteolytic activity are defined by a plethora of regulatory cofactors influencing each other. Both proteolytic pathways are initiated by ubiquitylation to mark substrate proteins for degradation, although the size and/or topology of the modification are different. In this context E3 ubiquitin ligases, ensuring the covalent attachment of activated ubiquitin to the substrate, are of special importance. The regulation of E3 ligase activity, competition between different E3 ligases for binding E2 conjugation enzymes and substrates, as well as their interplay with deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) represent key events in the cross talk between the UPS and autophagy. The coordination between both degradation routes is further influenced by heat shock factors and ubiquitin-binding proteins (UBPs) such as p97, p62, or optineurin. Mutations in enzymes and ubiquitin-binding proteins or a general decline of both proteolytic systems during aging result in accumulation of damaged and aggregated proteins. Thus further mechanistic understanding of how UPS and autophagy communicate might allow therapeutic intervention especially against age-related diseases. PMID:27225656

  8. Enhanced ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of catalytically deficient human choline acetyltransferase mutants.

    PubMed

    Morey, Trevor M; Albers, Shawn; Shilton, Brian H; Rylett, R Jane

    2016-05-01

    the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Mutation of a highly conserved N-terminal proline-rich motif in human 69-kDa ChAT reduces both cellular ChAT protein levels, through enhanced ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, and enzyme activity. Ubiquitination of catalytically deficient congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS)-mutant ChAT is increased in cells, and importantly proteasome inhibition partially restores steady-state protein levels as well as cellular activity of some CMS-mutant ChAT proteins. PMID:26871972

  9. Apoptosis inducer NGFI-B is degraded by the proteasome and stabilized by treatment with EGF

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Bjorn O.; Paulsen, Ragnhild E.

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NGFI-B is a molecular target for some anti-cancer drugs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NGFI-B turnover may be important for their anti-cancer action. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NGFI-B is degraded by the proteasome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NGFI-B is stabilized by treatment with EGF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mimicking the EGF-induced phosphorylation also stabilizes the protein. -- Abstract: NGFI-B is a nuclear receptor and immediate early gene that is upregulated in many different tumour cell lines. As it is involved in cell death and survival, it has been suggested as a target for anti-cancer drugs. The protein level of NGFI-B is important for its functions and may be regulated through induction or stabilization. NGFI-B protein stability was studied using the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide in CV1 cells transiently transfected with NGFI-B. Inhibiting the proteasome with MG132 stabilized NGFI-B, indicating that the proteasome is responsible for break-down of NGFI-B, as it is for many nuclear receptors. In order to determine regions responsible for the break-down of NGFI-B two N-terminal regions with high PEST-scores were deleted. Deletion of amino acids 122-195 containing a PEST-sequence which includes an ERK2 phosphorylation target, gave a more stable protein. In addition, treatment of the cells with the ERK2 activator EGF increased the stability of wild type NGFI-B. We then tested whether a mutation at threonine 142 influenced the stability of NGFI-B. We found that the phosphorylation-mimicking mutant NGFI-B T142E had an increased stability, while the non-phosphorylable mutant (T142A) showed similar stability to the wild type. Thus, EGF-stimulation of cells may be a mechanism for priming the cells for effects of NGFI-B by increasing its stability.

  10. NITRIC OXIDE-DEPENDENT PROTEASOMAL DEGRADATION OF CYTOCHROME P450 2B PROTEINS*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Choon-Myung; Kim, Bong-Yoon; Li, Lian; Morgan, Edward T.

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to inflammatory agents or cytokines causes the suppression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme activities and expression in liver and primary hepatocyte cultures. We showed previously that phenobarbital-induced CYP2B protein is down-regulated in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes following exposure to bacterial endotoxin (LPS) in a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent manner. In the present study, we found that CYP2B proteins in primary rat hepatocyte cultures were suppressed more than 60% after 6h treatment with interleukin-1β (IL-1). This effect was NO-dependent, and treatment of cells with the NO-donors (Z)-1-[2-(2-aminoethyl)-N-(2-ammonioethyl)amino] diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (NOC-18), S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), and S-nitroso, N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) also suppressed CYP2B proteins. However, the down-regulation by IL-1 was insensitive to inhibition of cGMP-dependent protein kinases. The down-regulation by IL-1 or NO donors was abolished by treatments with the proteasome inhibitors MG132 and lactacystin that did not affect NO production. The calpain inhibitor E64-d or the lysosomal protease inhibitors NH4Cl and chloroquine did not attenuate the down-regulation of CYP2B by IL-1. Treatment of HeLa cells expressing c-myc-tagged CYP2B1 with NOC-18 down-regulated its expression and enhanced its ubiquitination. Treatment of rat liver microsomes with GSNO caused S-nitrosylation of CYP2B protein, and enhanced the ubiquitination pattern of CYP2B compared to unmodified CYP2B in an in vitro ubiquitination assay. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that NO-dependent CYP2B ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation are dependent on protein modification by reactive nitrogen species. PMID:17993647

  11. Ubiquitin-dependent Proteasomal Degradation of Human Liver Cytochrome P450 2E1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, YongQiang; Guan, Shenheng; Acharya, Poulomi; Koop, Dennis R.; Liu, Yi; Liao, Mingxiang; Burlingame, Alma L.; Correia, Maria Almira

    2011-01-01

    Human liver CYP2E1 is a monotopic, endoplasmic reticulum-anchored cytochrome P450 responsible for the biotransformation of clinically relevant drugs, low molecular weight xenobiotics, carcinogens, and endogenous ketones. CYP2E1 substrate complexation converts it into a stable slow-turnover species degraded largely via autophagic lysosomal degradation. Substrate decomplexation/withdrawal results in a fast turnover CYP2E1 species, putatively generated through its futile oxidative cycling, that incurs endoplasmic reticulum-associated ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation (UPD). CYP2E1 thus exhibits biphasic turnover in the mammalian liver. We now show upon heterologous expression of human CYP2E1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that its autophagic lysosomal degradation and UPD pathways are evolutionarily conserved, even though its potential for futile catalytic cycling is low due to its sluggish catalytic activity in yeast. This suggested that other factors (i.e. post-translational modifications or “degrons”) contribute to its UPD. Indeed, in cultured human hepatocytes, CYP2E1 is detectably ubiquitinated, and this is enhanced on its mechanism-based inactivation. Studies in Ubc7p and Ubc5p genetically deficient yeast strains versus corresponding isogenic wild types identified these ubiquitin-conjugating E2 enzymes as relevant to CYP2E1 UPD. Consistent with this, in vitro functional reconstitution analyses revealed that mammalian UBC7/gp78 and UbcH5a/CHIP E2-E3 ubiquitin ligases were capable of ubiquitinating CYP2E1, a process enhanced by protein kinase (PK) A and/or PKC inclusion. Inhibition of PKA or PKC blocked intracellular CYP2E1 ubiquitination and turnover. Here, through mass spectrometric analyses, we identify some CYP2E1 phosphorylation/ubiquitination sites in spatially associated clusters. We propose that these CYP2E1 phosphorylation clusters may serve to engage each E2-E3 ubiquitination complex in vitro and intracellularly. PMID:21209460

  12. 26S Proteasome: Hunter and Prey in Auxin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangpei; Zhang, Liangran; Ding, Zhaojun

    2016-07-01

    Auxin binds to TRANSPORT INHIBITOR RESPONSE 1 and AUXIN SIGNALLING F-BOX proteins (TIR1/AFBs) and promotes the degradation of Aux/IAA transcriptional repressors. The proteasome regulator PROTEASOME REGULATOR1 (PTRE1) has now been shown to be required for auxin-mediated repression of 26S proteasome activity, thus providing new insights into the fine-tuning of the homoeostasis of Aux/IAA proteins and auxin signaling. PMID:27246455

  13. Could inhibition of the proteasome cause mad cow disease?

    PubMed

    Hooper, Nigel M

    2003-04-01

    The proteasome is the cellular machinery responsible for the degradation of normal and misfolded proteins. Inhibitors of the proteasome are being evaluated as therapeutic agents and recent work suggests that such inhibition might promote the neurotoxic properties of the prion protein (the causative agent of mad cow disease) and its conformational conversion to the infectious form, thus raising the question as to whether proteasome inhibitors might facilitate the development of prion diseases. PMID:12679058

  14. A conserved serine residue regulates the stability of Drosophila Salvador and human WW domain-containing adaptor 45 through proteasomal degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Di Wu, Shian

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Ser-17 is key for the stability of Drosophila Sav. •Ala mutation of Ser-17 promotes the proteasomal degradation of Sav. •Ser-17 residue is not the main target of Hpo-induced Sav stabilization. •Hpo-dependent and -independent mechanisms regulate Sav stability. •This mechanism is conserved in the homologue of Sav, human WW45. -- Abstract: The Hippo (Hpo) pathway is a conserved tumor suppressor pathway that controls organ size through the coordinated regulation of apoptosis and proliferation. Drosophila Salvador (Sav), which limits organ size, is a core component of the Hpo pathway. In this study, Ser-17 was shown to be important for the stability of Sav. Alanine mutation of Ser-17 promoted the proteasomal degradation of Sav. Destabilization and stabilization of the Sav protein mediated by alanine mutation of Ser-17 and by Hpo, respectively, were independent of each other. This implies that the stability of Sav is controlled by two mechanisms, one that is Ser-17-dependent and Hpo-independent, and another that is Ser-17-independent and Hpo-dependent. These dual mechanisms also regulated the human counterpart of Drosophila Sav, WW domain-containing adaptor 45 (WW45). The conservation of this regulation adds to its significance in normal physiology and tumorigenesis.

  15. Proteasome-mediated degradation of IκBα and processing of p105 in Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Visekruna, Alexander; Joeris, Thorsten; Seidel, Daniel; Kroesen, Anjo; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Zeitz, Martin; Kaufmann, Stefan H.E.; Schmidt-Ullrich, Ruth; Steinhoff, Ulrich

    2006-01-01

    Enhanced NF-κB activity is involved in the pathology of both forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Here we analyzed the mechanism of proteasome-mediated NF-κB activation in CD and UC. Our studies demonstrate that the subunit composition and the proteolytic function of proteasomes differ between UC and CD. High expression of the immunoproteasome subunits β1i and β2i is characteristic of the inflamed mucosa of CD. In line with this, we found enhanced processing of NF-κB precursor p105 and degradation of inhibitor of NF-κB, IκBα, by immunoproteasomes isolated from the mucosa of CD patients. In comparison with healthy controls and CD patients, UC patients exhibited an intermediate phenotype regarding the proteasome-mediated processing/degradation of NF-κB components. Finally, increased expression of the NF-κB family member c-Rel in the inflamed mucosa of CD patients suggests that p50/c-Rel is important for IFN-γ–mediated induction of immunoproteasomes via IL-12–driven Th1 responses. These findings suggest that distinct proteasome subunits influence the intensity of NF-κB–mediated inflammation in IBD patients. PMID:17124531

  16. Tobacco RING E3 Ligase NtRFP1 Mediates Ubiquitination and Proteasomal Degradation of a Geminivirus-Encoded βC1.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qingtang; Hu, Tao; Bao, Min; Cao, Linge; Zhang, Huawei; Song, Fengmin; Xie, Qi; Zhou, Xueping

    2016-06-01

    The βC1 protein encoded by the Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus-associated betasatellite functions as a pathogenicity determinant. To better understand the molecular basis whereby βC1 functions in pathogenicity, a yeast two-hybrid screen of a tobacco cDNA library was carried out using βC1 as the bait. The screen revealed that βC1 interacts with a tobacco RING-finger protein designated NtRFP1, which was further confirmed by the bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation assays in Nicotiana benthamiana cells. Expression of NtRFP1 was induced by βC1, and in vitro ubiquitination assays showed that NtRFP1 is a functional E3 ubiquitin ligase that mediates βC1 ubiquitination. In addition, βC1 was shown to be ubiquitinated in vivo and degraded by the plant 26S proteasome. After viral infection, plants overexpressing NtRFP1 developed attenuated symptoms, whereas plants with silenced expression of NtRFP1 showed severe symptoms. Other lines of evidence showed that NtRFP1 attenuates βC1-induced symptoms through promoting its degradation by the 26S proteasome. Taken together, our results suggest that tobacco RING E3 ligase NtRFP1 attenuates disease symptoms by interacting with βC1 to mediate its ubiquitination and degradation via the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system. PMID:27018391

  17. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway mediates the regulated degradation of mammalian 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase.

    PubMed

    Ravid, T; Doolman, R; Avner, R; Harats, D; Roitelman, J

    2000-11-17

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), the key regulatory enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, is rapidly degraded in mammalian cells supplemented with sterols or MVA. This accelerated turnover was blocked by N-acetyl-leucyl-leucyl-norleucinal (ALLN), MG-132, and lactacystin, and to a lesser extent by N-acetyl-leucyl-leucyl-methional (ALLM), indicating the involvement of the 26 S proteasome. Proteasome inhibition led to enhanced accumulation of high molecular weight polyubiquitin conjugates of HMGR and of HMGal, a chimera between the membrane domain of HMGR and beta-galactosidase. Importantly, increased amounts of polyubiquitinated HMGR and HMGal were observed upon treating cells with sterols or MVA. Cycloheximide inhibited the sterol-stimulated degradation of HMGR concomitantly with a marked reduction in polyubiquitination of the enzyme. Inhibition of squalene synthase with zaragozic acid blocked the MVA- but not sterol-stimulated ubiquitination and degradation of HMGR. Thus, similar to yeast, the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is involved in the metabolically regulated turnover of mammalian HMGR. Yet, the data indicate divergence between yeast and mammals and suggest distinct roles for sterol and nonsterol metabolic signals in the regulated ubiquitination and degradation of mammalian HMGR. PMID:10964918

  18. Perturbation of Hsp90 interaction with nascent CFTR prevents its maturation and accelerates its degradation by the proteasome.

    PubMed Central

    Loo, M A; Jensen, T J; Cui, L; Hou, Y; Chang, X B; Riordan, J R

    1998-01-01

    Maturation of wild-type CFTR nascent chains at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) occurs inefficiently; many disease-associated mutant forms do not mature but instead are eliminated by proteolysis involving the cytosolic proteasome. Although calnexin binds nascent CFTR via its oligosaccharide chains in the ER lumen and Hsp70 binds CFTR cytoplasmic domains, perturbation of these interactions alone is without major influence on maturation or degradation. We show that the ansamysin drugs, geldanamycin and herbimycin A, which inhibit the assembly of some signaling molecules by binding to specific sites on Hsp90 in the cytosol or Grp94 in the ER lumen, block the maturation of nascent CFTR and accelerate its degradation. The immature CFTR molecule was detected in association with Hsp90 but not with Grp94, and geldanamycin prevented the Hsp90 association. The drug-enhanced degradation was decreased by lactacystin and other proteasome inhibitors. Therefore, consistent with other examples of countervailing effects of Hsp90 and the proteasome, it would seem that this chaperone may normally contribute to CFTR folding and, when this function is interfered with by an ansamycin, there is a further shift to proteolytic degradation. This is the first direct evidence of a role for Hsp90 in the maturation of a newly synthesized integral membrane protein by interaction with its cytoplasmic domains on the ER surface. PMID:9843494

  19. Perturbation of Hsp90 interaction with nascent CFTR prevents its maturation and accelerates its degradation by the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Loo, M A; Jensen, T J; Cui, L; Hou, Y; Chang, X B; Riordan, J R

    1998-12-01

    Maturation of wild-type CFTR nascent chains at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) occurs inefficiently; many disease-associated mutant forms do not mature but instead are eliminated by proteolysis involving the cytosolic proteasome. Although calnexin binds nascent CFTR via its oligosaccharide chains in the ER lumen and Hsp70 binds CFTR cytoplasmic domains, perturbation of these interactions alone is without major influence on maturation or degradation. We show that the ansamysin drugs, geldanamycin and herbimycin A, which inhibit the assembly of some signaling molecules by binding to specific sites on Hsp90 in the cytosol or Grp94 in the ER lumen, block the maturation of nascent CFTR and accelerate its degradation. The immature CFTR molecule was detected in association with Hsp90 but not with Grp94, and geldanamycin prevented the Hsp90 association. The drug-enhanced degradation was decreased by lactacystin and other proteasome inhibitors. Therefore, consistent with other examples of countervailing effects of Hsp90 and the proteasome, it would seem that this chaperone may normally contribute to CFTR folding and, when this function is interfered with by an ansamycin, there is a further shift to proteolytic degradation. This is the first direct evidence of a role for Hsp90 in the maturation of a newly synthesized integral membrane protein by interaction with its cytoplasmic domains on the ER surface. PMID:9843494

  20. Depletion of guanine nucleotides leads to the Mdm2-dependent proteasomal degradation of nucleostemin.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Itahana, Koji; Zhang, Yanping; Mitchell, Beverly S

    2009-04-01

    Nucleostemin is a positive regulator of cell proliferation and is highly expressed in a variety of stem cells, tumors, and tumor cell lines. The protein shuttles between the nucleolus and the nucleus in a GTP-dependent fashion. Selective depletion of intracellular guanine nucleotides by AVN-944, an inhibitor of the de novo purine synthetic enzyme, IMP dehydrogenase, leads to the rapid disappearance of nucleostemin protein in tumor cell lines, an effect that does not occur with two other nucleolar proteins, nucleophosmin or nucleolin. Endogenous nucleostemin protein is completely stabilized by MG132, an inhibitor of the 26S proteasome, as are the levels of expressed enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged nucleostemin, both wild-type protein and protein containing mutations at the G(1) GTP binding site. Nutlin-3a, a small molecule that disrupts the binding of the E3 ubiquitin ligase, Mdm2, to p53, stabilizes nucleostemin protein in the face of guanine nucleotide depletion, as does siRNA-mediated knockdown of Mdm2 expression and overexpression of a dominant-negative form of Mdm2. Neither Doxorubicin nor Actinomycin D, which cause the release of nucleostemin from the nucleolus, results in nucleostemin degradation. We conclude that nucleostemin is a target for Mdm2-mediated ubiquitination and degradation when not bound to GTP. Because this effect does not occur with other chemotherapeutic agents, the induction of nucleostemin protein degradation in tumor cells by IMP dehydrogenase inhibition or by other small molecules that disrupt GTP binding may offer a new approach to the treatment of certain neoplastic diseases. PMID:19318567

  1. Cytosolic PINK1 promotes the targeting of ubiquitinated proteins to the aggresome-autophagy pathway during proteasomal stress.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ju; Li, Mengen; Qin, Siyue; Zhang, Ting; Jiang, Sicong; Hu, Yuan; Deng, Yongkang; Zhang, Chenliang; You, Dujuan; Li, Hongchang; Mu, Dezhi; Zhang, Zhuohua; Jiang, Changan

    2016-04-01

    During proteasomal stress, cells can alleviate the accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins by targeting them to perinuclear aggresomes for autophagic degradation, but the mechanism underlying the activation of this compensatory pathway remains unclear. Here we report that PINK1-s, a short form of Parkinson disease (PD)-related protein kinase PINK1 (PTEN induced putative kinase 1), is a major regulator of aggresome formation. PINK1-s is extremely unstable due to its recognition by the N-end rule pathway, and tends to accumulate in the cytosol during proteasomal stress. Overexpression of PINK1-s induces aggresome formation in cells with normal proteasomal activities, while loss of PINK1-s function leads to a significant decrease in the efficiency of aggresome formation induced by proteasomal inhibition. PINK1-s exerts its effect through phosphorylation of the ubiquitin-binding protein SQSTM1 (sequestosome 1) and increasing its ability to sequester polyubiquitinated proteins into aggresomes. These findings pinpoint PINK1-s as a sensor of proteasomal activities that transduces the proteasomal impairment signal to the aggresome formation machinery. PMID:27050454

  2. Disease-associated mutations of TDP-43 promote turnover of the protein through the proteasomal pathway.

    PubMed

    Araki, Wataru; Minegishi, Seiji; Motoki, Kazumi; Kume, Hideaki; Hohjoh, Hirohiko; Araki, Yumiko M; Tamaoka, Akira

    2014-12-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP-43) is a major component of most ubiquitin-positive neuronal and glial inclusions of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). A number of missense mutations in the TARDBP gene have been identified in patients with familial and sporadic ALS, as well as familial FTLD with ALS. In the diseased states, TDP-43 proteins exhibit characteristic alterations, including truncation, abnormal phosphorylation, and altered subcellular distribution. However, the mechanisms by which TDP-43 mutations induce neurodegeneration remain unclear at present. In the current study, we analyzed protein turnover and subcellular distribution of wild-type TDP-43 and two disease-associated mutants (G298S and A382T) in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells stably expressing TDP-43 with a C-terminal tag. Cycloheximide chase experiments revealed more rapid turnover of TDP-43 mutant proteins than their wild-type counterpart. The decrease in the TDP-43 level after cycloheximide treatment was partially recovered upon co-treatment with the proteasome inhibitor, epoxomicin, but not the lysosomotropic agent, chloroquine, suggesting involvement of the proteasomal pathway in TDP-43 degradation. Analysis of the subcellular distribution of TDP-43 revealed predominant localization in the nuclear fraction, whereas the relative level in the cytoplasm remained unaltered in cells expressing either mutant protein, compared with wild-type protein. Our results suggest that higher turnover of disease-associated mutant TDP-43 proteins through the ubiquitin proteasome system is pathogenetically relevant and highlight the significance of proteolysis in the pathogenetic mechanism of TDP-43 proteinopathy. PMID:24477737

  3. The Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus ORF34 Protein Binds to HIF-1α and Causes Its Degradation via the Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kousoulas, Konstantin G.

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent for Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and two other lymphoproliferative disorders, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD). Kaposi's sarcoma is a highly vascular tumor, and recently both hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and HIF-2α were detected in KS samples, indicating a role of HIFs in the KSHV life cycle. Previously, we showed that ORF34, a lytic gene of unassigned function, was activated by hypoxia and that ORF34 transcription was upregulated by both HIFs (M. Haque, D. A. Davis, V. Wang, I. Widmer, and R. Yarchoan, J Virol. 77:6761–6768, 2003). In the present study, we show that coexpression of ORF34 with HIF-1αm (degradation-resistant HIF-1α) caused substantial reduction in HIF-1α-dependent transcription, as evidenced by reporter assays. Two-way immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that ORF34 physically interacted with HIF-1αm in transient expression experiments. Deletion analysis revealed that three different ORF34 domains interacted with the amino-terminal domain of HIF-1α. Also, purified HIF-1α and ORF34 proteins interacted with each other. The observed transcriptional inhibition of HIF-1α-dependent promoters was attributed to degradation of HIF-1α after binding with ORF34, since the overall amount of wild-type HIF-1α but not the degradation-resistant one (HIF-1αm) was reduced in the presence of ORF34. Moreover, ORF34 caused degradation of HIF-1α in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of the ubiquitin-dependent pathway by the chemical proteasome inhibitor MG132 prevented HIF-1α degradation in the presence of ORF34. These results show that ORF34 binds to HIF-1α, leading to its degradation via the proteasome-dependent pathway. PMID:23221556

  4. The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus ORF34 protein binds to HIF-1α and causes its degradation via the proteasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Haque, Muzammel; Kousoulas, Konstantin G

    2013-02-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent for Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and two other lymphoproliferative disorders, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD). Kaposi's sarcoma is a highly vascular tumor, and recently both hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and HIF-2α were detected in KS samples, indicating a role of HIFs in the KSHV life cycle. Previously, we showed that ORF34, a lytic gene of unassigned function, was activated by hypoxia and that ORF34 transcription was upregulated by both HIFs (M. Haque, D. A. Davis, V. Wang, I. Widmer, and R. Yarchoan, J Virol. 77:6761-6768, 2003). In the present study, we show that coexpression of ORF34 with HIF-1αm (degradation-resistant HIF-1α) caused substantial reduction in HIF-1α-dependent transcription, as evidenced by reporter assays. Two-way immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that ORF34 physically interacted with HIF-1αm in transient expression experiments. Deletion analysis revealed that three different ORF34 domains interacted with the amino-terminal domain of HIF-1α. Also, purified HIF-1α and ORF34 proteins interacted with each other. The observed transcriptional inhibition of HIF-1α-dependent promoters was attributed to degradation of HIF-1α after binding with ORF34, since the overall amount of wild-type HIF-1α but not the degradation-resistant one (HIF-1αm) was reduced in the presence of ORF34. Moreover, ORF34 caused degradation of HIF-1α in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of the ubiquitin-dependent pathway by the chemical proteasome inhibitor MG132 prevented HIF-1α degradation in the presence of ORF34. These results show that ORF34 binds to HIF-1α, leading to its degradation via the proteasome-dependent pathway. PMID:23221556

  5. MDM2 promotes p21waf1/cip1 proteasomal turnover independently of ubiquitylation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yetao; Lee, Hunjoo; Zeng, Shelya X; Dai, Mu-Shui; Lu, Hua

    2003-12-01

    The CDK inhibitor p21waf1/cip1 is degraded by a ubiquitin-independent proteolytic pathway. Here, we show that MDM2 mediates this degradation process. Overexpression of wild-type or ring finger-deleted, but not nuclear localization signal (NLS)-deleted, MDM2 decreased p21waf1/cip1 levels without ubiquitylating this protein and affecting its mRNA level in p53(-/-) cells. This decrease was reversed by the proteasome inhibitors MG132 and lactacystin, by p19(arf), and by small interfering RNA (siRNA) against MDM2. p21waf1/cip1 bound to MDM2 in vitro and in cells. The p21waf1/cip1-binding-defective mutant of MDM2 was unable to degrade p21waf1/cip1. MDM2 shortened the half-life of both exogenous and endogenous p21waf1/cip1 by 50% and led to the degradation of its lysine-free mutant. Consequently, MDM2 suppressed p21waf1/cip1-induced cell growth arrest of human p53(-/-) and p53(-/-)/Rb(-/-)cells. These results demonstrate that MDM2 directly inhibits p21waf1/cip1 function by reducing p21waf1/cip1 stability in a ubiquitin-independent fashion. PMID:14633995

  6. The E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP mediates ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of PRMT5.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huan-Tian; Zeng, Ling-Fei; He, Qing-Yu; Tao, W Andy; Zha, Zhen-Gang; Hu, Chang-Deng

    2016-02-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is an important member of the protein arginine methyltransferase family that regulates many cellular processes through epigenetic control of target gene expression. Because of its overexpression in a number of human cancers and its essential role in cell proliferation, transformation, and cell cycle progression, PRMT5 has been recently proposed to function as an oncoprotein in cancer cells. However, how its expression is regulated in cancer cells remains largely unknown. We have previously demonstrated that the transcription of PRMT5 can be negatively regulated by the PKC/c-Fos signaling pathway through modulating the transcription factor NF-Y in prostate cancer cells. In the present study, we demonstrated that PRMT5 undergoes polyubiquitination, possibly through multiple lysine residues. We also identified carboxyl terminus of heat shock cognate 70-interacting protein (CHIP), an important chaperone-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase that couples protein folding/refolding to protein degradation, as an interacting protein of PRMT5 via mass spectrometry. Their interaction was further verified by co-immuoprecipitation, GST pull-down, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay. In addition, we provided evidence that the CHIP/chaperone system is essential for the negative regulation of PRMT5 expression via K48-linked ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation. Given that down-regulation of CHIP and overexpression of PRMT5 have been observed in several human cancers, our finding suggests that down-regulation of CHIP may be one of the mechanisms underlying PRMT5 overexpression in these cancers. PMID:26658161

  7. Protein degradation by ubiquitin–proteasome system in formation and labilization of contextual conditioning memory

    PubMed Central

    Sol Fustiñana, María; de la Fuente, Verónica; Federman, Noel; Freudenthal, Ramiro

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) of protein degradation has been evaluated in different forms of neural plasticity and memory. The role of UPS in such processes is controversial. Several results support the idea that the activation of this system in memory consolidation is necessary to overcome negative constrains for plasticity. In this case, the inhibition of the UPS during consolidation impairs memory. Similar results were reported for memory reconsolidation. However, in other cases, the inhibition of UPS had no effect on memory consolidation and reconsolidation but impedes the amnesic action of protein synthesis inhibition after retrieval. The last finding suggests a specific action of the UPS inhibitor on memory labilization. However, another interpretation is possible in terms of the synthesis/degradation balance of positive and negative elements in neural plasticity, as was found in the case of long-term potentiation. To evaluate these alternative interpretations, other reconsolidation-interfering drugs than translation inhibitors should be tested. Here we analyzed initially the UPS inhibitor effect in contextual conditioning in crabs. We found that UPS inhibition during consolidation impaired long-term memory. In contrast, UPS inhibition did not affect memory reconsolidation after contextual retrieval but, in fact, impeded memory labilization, blocking the action of drugs that does not affect directly the protein synthesis. To extend these finding to vertebrates, we performed similar experiments in contextual fear memory in mice. We found that the UPS inhibitor in hippocampus affected memory consolidation and blocked memory labilization after retrieval. These findings exclude alternative interpretations to the requirement of UPS in memory labilization and give evidence of this mechanism in both vertebrates and invertebrates. PMID:25135196

  8. Protein degradation by ubiquitin-proteasome system in formation and labilization of contextual conditioning memory.

    PubMed

    Sol Fustiñana, María; de la Fuente, Verónica; Federman, Noel; Freudenthal, Ramiro; Romano, Arturo

    2014-09-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) of protein degradation has been evaluated in different forms of neural plasticity and memory. The role of UPS in such processes is controversial. Several results support the idea that the activation of this system in memory consolidation is necessary to overcome negative constrains for plasticity. In this case, the inhibition of the UPS during consolidation impairs memory. Similar results were reported for memory reconsolidation. However, in other cases, the inhibition of UPS had no effect on memory consolidation and reconsolidation but impedes the amnesic action of protein synthesis inhibition after retrieval. The last finding suggests a specific action of the UPS inhibitor on memory labilization. However, another interpretation is possible in terms of the synthesis/degradation balance of positive and negative elements in neural plasticity, as was found in the case of long-term potentiation. To evaluate these alternative interpretations, other reconsolidation-interfering drugs than translation inhibitors should be tested. Here we analyzed initially the UPS inhibitor effect in contextual conditioning in crabs. We found that UPS inhibition during consolidation impaired long-term memory. In contrast, UPS inhibition did not affect memory reconsolidation after contextual retrieval but, in fact, impeded memory labilization, blocking the action of drugs that does not affect directly the protein synthesis. To extend these finding to vertebrates, we performed similar experiments in contextual fear memory in mice. We found that the UPS inhibitor in hippocampus affected memory consolidation and blocked memory labilization after retrieval. These findings exclude alternative interpretations to the requirement of UPS in memory labilization and give evidence of this mechanism in both vertebrates and invertebrates. PMID:25135196

  9. Cysteine-specific ubiquitination protects the peroxisomal import receptor Pex5p against proteasomal degradation

    PubMed Central

    Schwartzkopff, Benjamin; Platta, Harald W.; Hasan, Sohel; Girzalsky, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisomal matrix protein import is mediated by dynamic import receptors, which cycle between the peroxisomal membrane and the cytosol. Proteins with a type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS1) are bound by the import receptor Pex5p in the cytosol and guided to the peroxisomal membrane. After cargo translocation into the peroxisomal matrix, the receptor is released from the membrane back to the cytosol in an ATP-dependent manner by the AAA-type ATPases Pex1p and Pex6p. These mechanoenzymes recognize ubiquitinated Pex5p-species as substrates for membrane extraction. The PTS1-receptor is either polyubiquitinated via peptide bonds at two certain lysines and results in proteasomal degradation or monoubiquitinated via a thioester-bond at a conserved cysteine, which enables the recycling of Pex5p and further rounds of matrix protein import. To investigate the physiological relevance of the conserved N-terminal cysteine of Pex5p, the known target amino acids for ubiquitination were substituted by site-directed mutagenesis. In contrast with Pex5pC6A, Pex5pC6K turned out to be functional in PTS1 import and utilization of oleic acid, independent of the lysines at position 18 and 24. In contrast with wild-type Pex5p, Pex5pC6K displays an ubiquitination pattern, similar to the polyubiquitination pattern of Pex4p or Pex22p mutant strains. Moreover, Pex5pC6K displays a significantly reduced steady-state level when the deubiquitinating enzyme Ubp15p is missing. Thus, our results indicate that not the cysteine residue but the position of ubiquitination is important for Pex5p function. The presence of the cysteine prevents polyubiquitination and rapid degradation of Pex5p. PMID:26182377

  10. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Controls Lung Proteasomal Degradation and Nuclear Factor-κB Activity in Conditions of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Boncoeur, Emilie; Roque, Telma; Bonvin, Elise; Saint-Criq, Vinciane; Bonora, Monique; Clement, Annick; Tabary, Olivier; Henrion-Caude, Alexandra; Jacquot, Jacky

    2008-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a lethal inherited disorder caused by mutations in a single gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, resulting in progressive oxidative lung damage. In this study, we evaluated the role of CFTR in the control of ubiquitin-proteasome activity and nuclear factor (NF)-κB/IκB-α signaling after lung oxidative stress. After a 64-hour exposure to hyperoxia-mediated oxidative stress, CFTR-deficient (cftr−/−) mice exhibited significantly elevated lung proteasomal activity compared with wild-type (cftr+/+) animals. This was accompanied by reduced lung caspase-3 activity and defective degradation of NF-κB inhibitor IκB-α. In vitro, human CFTR-deficient lung cells exposed to oxidative stress exhibited increased proteasomal activity and decreased NF-κB-dependent transcriptional activity compared with CFTR-sufficient lung cells. Inhibition of the CFTR Cl− channel by CFTRinh-172 in the normal bronchial immortalized cell line 16HBE14o− increased proteasomal degradation after exposure to oxidative stress. Caspase-3 inhibition by Z-DQMD in CFTR-sufficient lung cells mimicked the response profile of increased proteasomal degradation and reduced NF-κB activity observed in CFTR-deficient lung cells exposed to oxidative stress. Taken together, these results suggest that functional CFTR Cl− channel activity is crucial for regulation of lung proteasomal degradation and NF-κB activity in conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:18372427

  11. Virus-Dependent Phosphorylation of the IRF-3 Transcription Factor Regulates Nuclear Translocation, Transactivation Potential, and Proteasome-Mediated Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Rongtuan; Heylbroeck, Christophe; Pitha, Paula M.; Hiscott, John

    1998-01-01

    The interferon regulatory factors (IRF) consist of a growing family of related transcription proteins first identified as regulators of the alpha beta interferon (IFN-α/β) gene promoters, as well as the interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE) of some IFN-stimulated genes. IRF-3 was originally identified as a member of the IRF family based on homology with other IRF family members and on binding to the ISRE of the ISG15 promoter. IRF-3 is expressed constitutively in a variety of tissues, and the relative levels of IRF-3 mRNA do not change in virus-infected or IFN-treated cells. In the present study, we demonstrate that following Sendai virus infection, IRF-3 is posttranslationally modified by protein phosphorylation at multiple serine and threonine residues, which are located in the carboxy terminus of IRF-3. A combination of IRF-3 deletion and point mutations localized the inducible phosphorylation sites to the region -ISNSHPLSLTSDQ- between amino acids 395 and 407; point mutation of residues Ser-396 and Ser-398 eliminated virus-induced phosphorylation of IRF-3 protein, although residues Ser-402, Thr-404, and Ser-405 were also targets. Phosphorylation results in the cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation of IRF-3, DNA binding, and increased transcriptional activation. Substitution of the Ser-Thr sites with the phosphomimetic Asp generated a constitutively active form of IRF-3 that functioned as a very strong activator of promoters containing PRDI-PRDIII or ISRE regulatory elements. Phosphorylation also appears to represent a signal for virus-mediated degradation, since the virus-induced turnover of IRF-3 was prevented by mutation of the IRF-3 Ser-Thr cluster or by proteasome inhibitors. Interestingly, virus infection resulted in the association of IRF-3 with the CREB binding protein (CBP) coactivator, as detected by coimmunoprecipitation with anti-CBP antibody, an interaction mediated by the C-terminal domains of both proteins. Mutation of residues Ser-396 and

  12. Bacterial itaconate degradation promotes pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Sasikaran, Jahminy; Ziemski, Michał; Zadora, Piotr K; Fleig, Angela; Berg, Ivan A

    2014-05-01

    Itaconate (methylenesuccinate) was recently identified as a mammalian metabolite whose production is substantially induced during macrophage activation. This compound is a potent inhibitor of isocitrate lyase, a key enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, which is a pathway required for the survival of many pathogens inside the eukaryotic host. Here we show that numerous bacteria, notably many pathogens such as Yersinia pestis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have three genes for itaconate degradation. They encode itaconate coenzyme A (CoA) transferase, itaconyl-CoA hydratase and (S)-citramalyl-CoA lyase, formerly referred to as CitE-like protein. These genes are known to be crucial for survival of some pathogens in macrophages. The corresponding enzymes convert itaconate into the cellular building blocks pyruvate and acetyl-CoA, thus enabling the bacteria to metabolize itaconate and survive in macrophages. The itaconate degradation and detoxification pathways of Yersinia and Pseudomonas are the result of convergent evolution. This work revealed a common persistence factor operating in many pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24657929

  13. Mutant glucocerebrosidase in Gaucher disease recruits Hsp27 to the Hsp90 chaperone complex for proteasomal degradation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunzhang; Wang, Herui; Zhu, Dongwang; Hong, Christopher S.; Dmitriev, Pauline; Zhang, Chao; Li, Yan; Ikejiri, Barbara; Brady, Roscoe O.; Zhuang, Zhengping

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease is caused by mutations of the GBA1 gene, which encodes the lysosomal anchored gluococerebrosidase (GCase). GBA1 mutations commonly result in protein misfolding, abnormal chaperone recognition, and premature degradation, but are less likely to affect catalytic activity. In the present study, we demonstrate that the Hsp90/HOP/Cdc37 complex recruits Hsp27 after recognition of GCase mutants with subsequent targeting of GCase mutant peptides to degradation mechanisms such as VCP and the 26S proteasome. Inhibition of Hsp27 not only increased the quantity of enzyme but also enhanced GCase activity in fibroblasts derived from patients with Gaucher disease. These findings provide insight into a possible therapeutic strategy for protein misfolding diseases by correcting chaperone binding and altering subsequent downstream patterns of protein degradation. PMID:25583479

  14. Proteasome-mediated degradation of integral inner nuclear membrane protein emerin in fibroblasts lacking A-type lamins

    SciTech Connect

    Muchir, Antoine; Massart, Catherine; Engelen, Baziel G. van; Lammens, Martin; Bonne, Gisele; Worman, Howard J. . E-mail: hjw14@columbia.edu

    2006-12-29

    We previously identified and characterized a homozygous LMNA nonsense mutation leading to the absence of A-type lamins in a premature neonate who died at birth. We show here that the absence of A-type lamins is due to degradation of the aberrant mRNA transcript with a premature termination codon. In cultured fibroblasts from the subject with the homozygous LMNA nonsense mutation, there was a decreased steady-state expression of the integral inner nuclear membrane proteins emerin and nesprin-1{alpha} associated with their mislocalization to the bulk endoplasmic reticulum and a hyperphosphorylation of emerin. To determine if decreased emerin expression occurred post-translationally, we treated cells with a selective proteasome inhibitor and observed an increase in expression. Our results show that mislocalization of integral inner nuclear membrane proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum in human cells lacking A-type lamins leads to their degradation and provides the first evidence that their degradation is mediated by the proteasome.

  15. Proteasome inhibitor PS-341 limits macrophage necroptosis by promoting cIAPs-mediated inhibition of RIP1 and RIP3 activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuchen; Cheng, Junjun; Zhang, Junmeng; Wu, Xiaofan; Chen, Fang; Ren, Xuejun; Wang, Yunlong; Li, Quan; Li, Yu

    2016-09-01

    Apoptotic and necrotic macrophages have long been known for their existence in atherosclerotic lesions. However, the mechanisms underlying the choice of their death pattern have not been fully elucidated. Here, we report the effects of PS-341, a potent and specific proteasome inhibitor, on the cell death of primary bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) in vitro. The results showed that PS-341 could not induce macrophage apoptosis or promote TNF-induced macrophage apoptosis, on the other hand, PS-341 could significantly inhibit macrophage necroptosis induced by TNF and pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD treatment. Remarkably, high-dose of PS-341 showed similar inhibitory effects on macrophage necroptosis comparable to that of kinase inhibition of RIP1 through specific inhibitor Nec-1 or inhibition of RIP3 via specific genetical ablation. Furthermore, the degradation of cellular inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (cIAPs) was suppressed by PS-341, which could antagonize the activation of RIP1 kinase via post-translational mechanism. Further evidences demonstrated reduced levels of both RIP1 and RIP 3 upon PS-341 treatment, concomitantly, a more strong association of RIP1 with cIAPs and less with RIP3 was found following PS-341 treatment, these findings suggested that PS-341 may disrupt the formation of RIP1-RIP3 complex (necrosome) through stabilizing cIAPs. Collectively, our results indicated that the proteasome-mediated degradation of cIAPs could be inhibited by PS-341 and followed by limited RIP1 and RIP3 kinase activities, which were indispensable for necroptosis, thus eliciting a significant necroptosis rescue in BMDMs in vitro. Overall, our study has identified a new role of PS-341 in the cell death of BMDMs and provided a novel insight into the atherosclerotic inflammation caused by proteasome-mediated macrophage necroptosis. PMID:27363341

  16. Ubiquitin proteasome pathway-mediated degradation of proteins: effects due to site-specific substrate deamidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The accumulation, aggregation, and precipitation of proteins are etiologic for age-related diseases, particularly cataract, because the precipitates cloud the lens. Deamidation of crystallins is associated with protein precipitation, aging, and cataract. Among the roles of the ubiquitin proteasome p...

  17. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD-1C) mutants of caveolin-3 undergo ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Treatment with proteasomal inhibitors blocks the dominant negative effect of LGMD-1C mutanta and rescues wild-type caveolin-3.

    PubMed

    Galbiati, F; Volonte, D; Minetti, C; Bregman, D B; Lisanti, M P

    2000-12-01

    Caveolin-3 is the principal structural protein of caveolae in striated muscle. Autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD-1C) in humans is due to mutations (DeltaTFT and Pro --> Leu) within the CAV3 gene. We have shown that LGMD-1C mutations lead to formation of unstable aggregates of caveolin-3 that are retained intracellularly and are rapidly degraded. The mechanism by which LGMD-1C mutants of caveolin-3 are degraded remains unknown. Here, we show that LGMD-1C mutants of caveolin-3 undergo ubiquitination-proteasomal degradation. Treatment with proteasomal inhibitors (MG-132, MG-115, lactacystin, or proteasome inhibitor I), but not lysosomal inhibitors, prevented degradation of LGMD-1C caveolin-3 mutants. In the presence of MG-132, LGMD-1C caveolin-3 mutants accumulated within the endoplasmic reticulum and did not reach the plasma membrane. LGMD-1C mutants of caveolin-3 behave in a dominant negative fashion, causing intracellular retention and degradation of wild-type caveolin-3. Interestingly, in cells co-expressing wild-type and mutant forms of caveolin-3, MG-132 treatment rescued wild-type caveolin-3; wild-type caveolin-3 was not degraded and reached the plasma membrane. These results may have clinical implications for treatment of patients with LGMD-1C. PMID:10973975

  18. Role of Promyelocytic Leukemia (Pml) Sumolation in Nuclear Body Formation, 11s Proteasome Recruitment, and as2O3-Induced Pml or Pml/Retinoic Acid Receptor α Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Lallemand-Breitenbach, Valérie; Zhu, Jun; Puvion, Francine; Koken, Marcel; Honoré, Nicole; Doubeikovsky, Alexandre; Duprez, Estelle; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Puvion, Edmond; Freemont, Paul; de Thé, Hugues

    2001-01-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia (PML) is the organizer of nuclear matrix domains, PML nuclear bodies (NBs), with a proposed role in apoptosis control. In acute promyelocytic leukemia, PML/retinoic acid receptor (RAR) α expression disrupts NBs, but therapies such as retinoic acid or arsenic trioxide (As2O3) restore them. PML is conjugated by the ubiquitin-related peptide SUMO-1, a process enhanced by As2O3 and proposed to target PML to the nuclear matrix. We demonstrate that As2O3 triggers the proteasome-dependent degradation of PML and PML/RARα and that this process requires a specific sumolation site in PML, K160. PML sumolation is dispensable for its As2O3-induced matrix targeting and formation of primary nuclear aggregates, but is required for the formation of secondary shell-like NBs. Interestingly, only these mature NBs harbor 11S proteasome components, which are further recruited upon As2O3 exposure. Proteasome recruitment by sumolated PML only likely accounts for the failure of PML-K160R to be degraded. Therefore, studying the basis of As2O3-induced PML/RARα degradation we show that PML sumolation directly or indirectly promotes its catabolism, suggesting that mature NBs could be sites of intranuclear proteolysis and opening new insights into NB alterations found in viral infections or transformation. PMID:11413191

  19. The Proteasome Inhibitor, MG132, Attenuates Diabetic Nephropathy by Inhibiting SnoN Degradation In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Yang, Chen; Nan, Qinling; Gao, Chenlin; Feng, Hong; Gou, Fang; Chen, Guo; Zhang, Zhihong; Yan, Pijun; Peng, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) has been shown to be involved in diabetic nephropathy (DN). The SnoN protein can regulate TGF-β signaling through interaction with Smad proteins. Recent studies have shown that SnoN is mainly degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. However, the role of SnoN in the regulation of TGF-β/Smad signaling in DN is still unclear. In this study, diabetic rats were randomly divided into a diabetic control group (DC group) and a proteasome inhibitor (MG132) diabetes therapy group (DT group). Kidney damage parameters and the expression of SnoN, Smurf2, and TGF-β were observed. Simultaneously, we cultured rat glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs) stimulated with high glucose, and SnoN and Arkadia expression were measured. Results demonstrated that 24-hour urine protein, ACR, BUN, and the expression of Smurf2 and TGF-β were significantly increased (P < 0.05), whereas SnoN was significantly decreased in the DC group (P < 0.05). However, these changes diminished after treatment with MG132. SnoN expression in GMCs decreased significantly (P < 0.05), but Arkadia expression gradually increased due to high glucose stimulation (P < 0.05), which could be almost completely reversed by MG132 (P < 0.05). The present results support the hypothesis that MG132 may alleviate kidney damage by inhibiting SnoN degradation and TGF-β activation, suggesting that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway may become a new therapeutic target for DN. PMID:25003128

  20. Catabolism of endogenous and overexpressed APH1a and PEN2: evidence for artifactual involvement of the proteasome in the degradation of overexpressed proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dunys, Julie; Kawarai, Toshitaka; Wilk, Sherwin; St. George-Hyslop, Peter; Alves Da Costa, Cristine; Checler, Frédéric

    2005-01-01

    PS (presenilin)-dependent γ-secretase occurs as a high-molecular-mass complex composed of either PS1 or PS2 associated with Nct (nicastrin), PEN2 (presenilin enhancer 2 homologue) and APH1 (anterior pharynx defective 1 homologue). Numerous reports have documented the very complicated physical and functional cross-talk between these proteins that ultimately governs the biological activity of the γ-secretase, but very few studies examined the fate of the components of the complex. We show that, in both HEK-293 cells and the TSM1 neuronal cell line, the immunoreactivities of overexpressed myc-tagged-APH1a and -PEN2 were enhanced by the proteasome inhibitors ZIE and lactacystin, whereas a broad range of protease inhibitors had no effect. By contrast, proteasome inhibitors were totally unable to affect the cellular expression of endogenous APH1aL and PEN2 in HEK-293 cells, TSM1 and primary cultured cortical neurons. To explain this apparent discrepancy, we examined the degradation of myc-tagged-APH1a and -PEN2, in vitro, by cell extracts containing endogenous proteasome and by purified 20S proteasome. Strikingly, myc-tagged-APH1a and -PEN2 resist proteolysis by endogenous proteasome and purified 20S proteasome. We also show that endogenous PEN2 expression was drastically higher in wild-type than in PS- and Nct-deficient fibroblasts and was enhanced by proteasome inhibitors only in the two deficient cell systems. However, here again, purified 20S proteasome appeared unable to cleave endogenous PEN2 present in PS-deficient fibroblasts. The levels of endogenous APH1aL-like immunoreactivity were not modified by proteasome inhibitors and were unaffected by PS deficiency. Altogether, our results indicate that endogenous PEN2 and APH1aL do not undergo proteasomal degradation under physiological conditions in HEK-293 cells, TSM1 cells and fibroblasts and that the clearance of PEN2 in PS- and Nct-deficient fibroblasts is not mediated by 20S proteasome. Whether the 26S

  1. E6AP, an E3 ubiquitin ligase negatively regulates granulopoiesis by targeting transcription factor C/EBPα for ubiquitin-mediated proteasome degradation.

    PubMed

    Pal, P; Lochab, S; Kanaujiya, J K; Kapoor, I; Sanyal, S; Behre, G; Trivedi, A K

    2013-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) is an important transcription factor involved in granulocytic differentiation. Here, for the first time we demonstrate that E6-associated protein (E6AP), an E3 ubiquitin ligase targets C/EBPα for ubiquitin-mediated proteasome degradation and thereby negatively modulates its functions. Wild-type E6AP promotes ubiquitin dependent proteasome degradation of C/EBPα, while catalytically inactive E6-associated protein having cysteine replaced with alanine at amino-acid position 843 (E6AP-C843A) rather stabilizes it. Further, these two proteins physically associate both in non-myeloid (overexpressed human embryonic kidney epithelium) and myeloid cells. We show that E6AP-mediated degradation of C/EBPα protein expression curtails its transactivation potential on its target genes. Noticeably, E6AP degrades both wild-type 42 kDa CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein alpha (p42C/EBPα) and mutant isoform 30 kDa CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein alpha (p30C/EBPα), this may explain perturbed p42C/EBPα/p30C/EBPα ratio often observed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We show that overexpression of catalytically inactive E6AP-C843A in C/EBPα inducible K562- p42C/EBPα-estrogen receptor (ER) cells inhibits β-estradiol (E2)-induced C/EBPα degradation leading to enhanced granulocytic differentiation. This enhanced granulocytic differentiation upon E2-induced activation of C/EBPα in C/EBPα stably transfected cells (β-estradiol inducible K562 cells stably expressing p42C/EBPα-ER (K562-C/EBPα-p42-ER)) was further substantiated by siE6AP-mediated knockdown of E6AP in both K562-C/EBPα-p42-ER and 32dcl3 (32D clone 3, a cell line widely used model for in vitro study of hematopoietic cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis) cells. Taken together, our data suggest that E6AP targeted C/EBPα protein degradation may provide a possible explanation for both loss of expression and/or functional inactivation of C/EBPα often

  2. E6AP, an E3 ubiquitin ligase negatively regulates granulopoiesis by targeting transcription factor C/EBPα for ubiquitin-mediated proteasome degradation

    PubMed Central

    Pal, P; Lochab, S; Kanaujiya, J K; Kapoor, I; Sanyal, S; Behre, G; Trivedi, A K

    2013-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) is an important transcription factor involved in granulocytic differentiation. Here, for the first time we demonstrate that E6-associated protein (E6AP), an E3 ubiquitin ligase targets C/EBPα for ubiquitin-mediated proteasome degradation and thereby negatively modulates its functions. Wild-type E6AP promotes ubiquitin dependent proteasome degradation of C/EBPα, while catalytically inactive E6-associated protein having cysteine replaced with alanine at amino-acid position 843 (E6AP-C843A) rather stabilizes it. Further, these two proteins physically associate both in non-myeloid (overexpressed human embryonic kidney epithelium) and myeloid cells. We show that E6AP-mediated degradation of C/EBPα protein expression curtails its transactivation potential on its target genes. Noticeably, E6AP degrades both wild-type 42 kDa CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein alpha (p42C/EBPα) and mutant isoform 30 kDa CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein alpha (p30C/EBPα), this may explain perturbed p42C/EBPα/p30C/EBPα ratio often observed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We show that overexpression of catalytically inactive E6AP-C843A in C/EBPα inducible K562- p42C/EBPα-estrogen receptor (ER) cells inhibits β-estradiol (E2)-induced C/EBPα degradation leading to enhanced granulocytic differentiation. This enhanced granulocytic differentiation upon E2-induced activation of C/EBPα in C/EBPα stably transfected cells (β-estradiol inducible K562 cells stably expressing p42C/EBPα-ER (K562-C/EBPα-p42-ER)) was further substantiated by siE6AP-mediated knockdown of E6AP in both K562-C/EBPα-p42-ER and 32dcl3 (32D clone 3, a cell line widely used model for in vitro study of hematopoietic cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis) cells. Taken together, our data suggest that E6AP targeted C/EBPα protein degradation may provide a possible explanation for both loss of expression and/or functional inactivation of C/EBPα often

  3. Silymarin induces cyclin D1 proteasomal degradation via its phosphorylation of threonine-286 in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Eo, Hyun Ji; Park, Gwang Hun; Song, Hun Min; Lee, Jin Wook; Kim, Mi Kyoung; Lee, Man Hyo; Lee, Jeong Rak; Koo, Jin Suk; Jeong, Jin Boo

    2015-01-01

    Silymarin from milk thistle (Silybum marianum) plant has been reported to show anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and hepatoprotective effects. For anti-cancer activity, silymarin is known to regulate cell cycle progression through cyclin D1 downregulation. However, the mechanism of silymarin-mediated cyclin D1 downregulation still remains unanswered. The current study was performed to elucidate the molecular mechanism of cyclin D1 downregulation by silymarin in human colorectal cancer cells. The treatment of silymarin suppressed the cell proliferation in HCT116 and SW480 cells and decreased cellular accumulation of exogenously-induced cyclin D1 protein. However, silymarin did not change the level of cyclin D1 mRNA. Inhibition of proteasomal degradation by MG132 attenuated silymarin-mediated cyclin D1 downregulation and the half-life of cyclin D1 was decreased in the cells treated with silymarin. In addition, silymarin increased phosphorylation of cyclin D1 at threonine-286 and a point mutation of threonine-286 to alanine attenuated silymarin-mediated cyclin D1 downregulation. Inhibition of NF-κB by a selective inhibitor, BAY 11-7082 suppressed cyclin D1 phosphorylation and downregulation by silymarin. From these results, we suggest that silymarin-mediated cyclin D1 downregulation may result from proteasomal degradation through its threonine-286 phosphorylation via NF-κB activation. The current study provides new mechanistic link between silymarin, cyclin D1 downregulation and cell growth in human colorectal cancer cells. PMID:25479723

  4. Ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation of antiapoptotic survivin facilitates induction of apoptosis in prostate cancer cells by pristimerin

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YONG BO; GAO, XIAOHUA; DEEB, DORAH; BRIGOLIN, CHRIS; ZHANG, YIGUAN; SHAW, JIAJIU; PINDOLIA, KIRIT; GAUTAM, SUBHASH C.

    2014-01-01

    Pristimerin (PM), a quinonemethide triterpenoid, is a promising anticancer agent with potent antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing activities against cancer cell lines. However, the anticancer activity and mechanisms of PM in prostate cancer cells have not been adequately investigated. Here we report that the degradation of survivin plays an important role in the antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects of PM in carcinoma of the prostate (CaP) cell lines. Treatment with PM inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in LNCaP and PC-3 cells as characterized by the loss of cell viability and an increase in Annexin V-binding and cleavage of PARP-1, respectively. The antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects of PM were associated with the inhibition of cell cycle regulatory proteins, antiapoptotic survivin and members of the Bcl-2 family. Data showed that response to PM is regulated by survivin since overexpression of survivin rendered CaP cells resistant to PM. Furthermore, downregulation of survivin by PM was mediated through the ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation. Together, these data demonstrate that pristimerin inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in CaP cells by abolishing survivin through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. PMID:25175770

  5. Atypical ubiquitination by E3 ligase WWP1 inhibits the proteasome-mediated degradation of mutant huntingtin.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li; Jin, Zhenzhen; Tan, Huiping; Xu, Qiaoqiao; Peng, Ting; Li, He

    2016-07-15

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by the expansion of CAG trinucleotide repeats in exon 1 of HD gene encoding huntingtin (Htt), which is characterized by aggregation and formation of mutant Htt containing expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) repeats. Dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of HD. As the linkage mediator between ubiquitin and specific target proteins, E3 ubiquitin ligases have been suggested to be involved in mHtt degradation and HD pathology. However, the potential involvement of the E3 ligase WWP1 in HD has not been explored. The present study determined whether WWP1 is involved in the development of HD in both in vivo and in vitro models. The results showed that in contrast to several other E3 ligases, expression of WWP1 is enhanced in mice and N2a cells expressing mutant Htt (160Q) and co-localized with mHtt protein aggregates. In addition, expression of WWP1 positively regulates mutan Htt levels, aggregate formation, and cell toxicity. Further analysis revealed that WWP1 ubiquitinated mHtt at an atypical position of Lys-63, which may have inhibited degradation of mutant Htt through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. In conclusion, these results suggested that the E3 ligase WWP1 is involved in the pathogenesis of HD; therefore, it may be a novel target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27107943

  6. RNF4 and VHL regulate the proteasomal degradation of SUMO-conjugated Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-2alpha.

    PubMed

    van Hagen, Martijn; Overmeer, René M; Abolvardi, Sharareh S; Vertegaal, Alfred C O

    2010-04-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are critical transcription factors that mediate cell survival during reduced oxygen conditions (hypoxia). At regular oxygen conditions (normoxia), HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha are continuously synthesized in cells and degraded via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. During hypoxia, these proteins are stabilized and translocate to the nucleus to activate transcription of target genes that enable cell survival at reduced oxygen levels. HIF proteins are tightly regulated via post-translational modifications including phosphorylation, acetylation, prolyl-hydroxylation and ubiquitination. Here we show for the first time that exogenous and endogenous HIF-2alpha are also regulated via the ubiquitin-like modifier small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMO). Using mutational analysis, we found that K394, which is situated in the sumoylation consensus site LKEE, is the major SUMO acceptor site in HIF-2alpha. Functionally, sumoylation reduced the transcriptional activity of HIF-2alpha. Similar to HIF-1alpha, HIF-2alpha is regulated by the SUMO protease SENP1. The proteasome inhibitor MG132 strongly stabilized SUMO-2-conjugated HIF-2alpha during hypoxia but did not affect the total level of HIF-2alpha. The ubiquitin E3 ligases von Hippel-Lindau and RNF4 control the levels of sumoylated HIF-2alpha, indicating that sumoylated HIF-2alpha is degraded via SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases. PMID:20026589

  7. SIAH-1 interacts with alpha-tubulin and degrades the kinesin Kid by the proteasome pathway during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Germani, A; Bruzzoni-Giovanelli, H; Fellous, A; Gisselbrecht, S; Varin-Blank, N; Calvo, F

    2000-12-01

    SIAH-1, a human homologue of the Drosophila seven in absentia (Sina), has been implicated in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of different target proteins through its N-terminal RING finger domain. SIAH-1 is also induced during p53-mediated apoptosis. Furthermore, SIAH-1-transfected breast cancer cell line MCF-7 exhibits an altered mitotic process resulting in multinucleated giant cells. Now, using the two-hybrid system, we identified two new SIAH interacting proteins: Kid (kinesin like DNA binding protein) and alpha-tubulin. We demonstrate that SIAH is involved in the degradation of Kid via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Our results suggest that SIAH-1 but not its N-terminal deletion mutant, affects the mitosis by an enhanced reduction of kinesin levels. Our results imply, for the first time, SIAH-1 in regulating the degradation of proteins directly implicated in the mitotic process. PMID:11146551

  8. Central insulin signaling is attenuated by long-term insulin exposure via insulin receptor substrate-1 serine phosphorylation, proteasomal degradation, and lysosomal insulin receptor degradation.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Christopher M; Belsham, Denise D

    2010-01-01

    Central insulin signaling is critical for the prevention of insulin resistance. Hyperinsulinemia contributes to insulin resistance, but it is not yet clear whether neurons are subject to cellular insulin resistance. We used an immortalized, hypothalamic, clonal cell line, mHypoE-46, which exemplifies neuronal function and expresses the components of the insulin signaling pathway, to determine how hyperinsulinemia modifies neuronal function. Western blot analysis indicated that prolonged insulin treatment of mHypoE-46 cells attenuated insulin signaling through phospho-Akt. To understand the mechanisms involved, time-course analysis was performed. Insulin exposure for 4 and 8 h phosphorylated Akt and p70-S6 kinase (S6K1), whereas 8 and 24 h treatment decreased insulin receptor (IR) and IR substrate 1 (IRS-1) protein levels. Insulin phosphorylation of S6K1 correlated with IRS-1 ser1101 phosphorylation and the mTOR-S6K1 pathway inhibitor rapamycin prevented IRS-1 serine phosphorylation. The proteasomal inhibitor epoxomicin and the lysosomal pathway inhibitor 3-methyladenine prevented the degradation of IRS-1 and IR by insulin, respectively, and pretreatment with rapamycin, epoxomicin, or 3-methyladenine prevented attenuation of insulin signaling by long-term insulin exposure. Thus, a sustained elevation of insulin levels diminishes neuronal insulin signaling through mTOR-S6K1-mediated IRS-1 serine phosphorylation, proteasomal degradation of IRS-1 and lysosomal degradation of the IR. PMID:19887566

  9. The Adenovirus E4-ORF3 Protein Stimulates SUMOylation of General Transcription Factor TFII-I to Direct Proteasomal Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Rebecca G.; Sohn, Sook-Young; Wright, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Modulation of host cell transcription, translation, and posttranslational modification processes is critical for the ability of many viruses to replicate efficiently within host cells. The human adenovirus (Ad) early region 4 open reading frame 3 (E4-ORF3) protein forms unique inclusions throughout the nuclei of infected cells and inhibits the antiviral Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 DNA repair complex through relocalization. E4-ORF3 also induces SUMOylation of Mre11 and Nbs1. We recently identified additional cellular targets of E4-ORF3 and found that E4-ORF3 stimulates ubiquitin-like modification of 41 cellular proteins involved in a wide variety of processes. Among the proteins most abundantly modified in an E4-ORF3-dependent manner was the general transcription factor II–I (TFII-I). Analysis of Ad-infected cells revealed that E4-ORF3 induces TFII-I relocalization and SUMOylation early during infection. In the present study, we explored the relationship between E4-ORF3 and TFII-I. We found that Ad infection or ectopic E4-ORF3 expression leads to SUMOylation of TFII-I that precedes a rapid decline in TFII-I protein levels. We also show that E4-ORF3 is required for ubiquitination of TFII-I and subsequent proteasomal degradation. This is the first evidence that E4-ORF3 regulates ubiquitination. Interestingly, we found that E4-ORF3 modulation of TFII-I occurs in diverse cell types but only E4-ORF3 of Ad species C regulates TFII-I, providing critical insight into the mechanism by which E4-ORF3 targets TFII-I. Finally, we show that E4-ORF3 stimulates the activity of a TFII-I-repressed viral promoter during infection. Our results characterize a novel mechanism of TFII-I regulation by Ad and highlight how a viral protein can modulate a critical cellular transcription factor during infection. PMID:26814176

  10. NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 inhibits the proteasomal degradation of homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum protein.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Tomoji; Tanabe-Fujimura, Chiaki; Fujita, Yu; Abe, Chihiro; Nanakida, Yoshino; Zou, Kun; Liu, Junjun; Liu, Shuyu; Nakajima, Toshihiro; Komano, Hiroto

    2016-05-13

    Homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein (Herp) is an ER stress-inducible key regulatory component of ER-associated degradation (ERAD) that has been implicated in insulin hypersecretion in diabetic mouse models. Herp expression is tightly regulated. Additionally, Herp is a highly labile protein and interacts with various proteins, which are characteristic features of ubiquitinated protein. Previously, we reported that ubiquitination is not required for Herp degradation. In addition, we found that the lysine residues of Herp (which are ubiquitinated by E3 ubiquitin ligase) are not sufficient for regulation of Herp degradation. In this study, we found that NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1)-mediated targeting of Herp to the proteasome was involved in Herp degradation. In addition, we found that Herp protein levels were markedly elevated in synoviolin-null cells. The E3 ubiquitin ligase synoviolin is a central component of ERAD and is involved in the degradation of nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2), which regulates cellular reactive oxygen species. Additionally, NQO1 is a target of Nrf2. Thus, our findings indicated that NQO1 could stabilize Herp protein expression via indirect regulation of synoviolin. PMID:27084451

  11. Downregulation of 26S proteasome catalytic activity promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    van Baarsel, Eric D.; Metz, Patrick J.; Fisch, Kathleen; Widjaja, Christella E.; Kim, Stephanie H.; Lopez, Justine; Chang, Aaron N.; Geurink, Paul P.; Florea, Bogdan I.; Overkleeft, Hermen S.; Ovaa, Huib; Bui, Jack D.; Yang, Jing; Chang, John T.

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) endows carcinoma cells with phenotypic plasticity that can facilitate the formation of cancer stem cells (CSCs) and contribute to the metastatic cascade. While there is substantial support for the role of EMT in driving cancer cell dissemination, less is known about the intracellular molecular mechanisms that govern formation of CSCs via EMT. Here we show that β2 and β5 proteasome subunit activity is downregulated during EMT in immortalized human mammary epithelial cells. Moreover, selective proteasome inhibition enabled mammary epithelial cells to acquire certain morphologic and functional characteristics reminiscent of cancer stem cells, including CD44 expression, self-renewal, and tumor formation. Transcriptomic analyses suggested that proteasome-inhibited cells share gene expression signatures with cells that have undergone EMT, in part, through modulation of the TGF-β signaling pathway. These findings suggest that selective downregulation of proteasome activity in mammary epithelial cells can initiate the EMT program and acquisition of a cancer stem cell-like phenotype. As proteasome inhibitors become increasingly used in cancer treatment, our findings highlight a potential risk of these therapeutic strategies and suggest a possible mechanism by which carcinoma cells may escape from proteasome inhibitor-based therapy. PMID:26930717

  12. USP15 stabilizes the transcription factor Nrf1 in the nucleus, promoting the proteasome gene expression.

    PubMed

    Fukagai, Kousuke; Waku, Tsuyoshi; Chowdhury, A M Masudul Azad; Kubo, Kaori; Matsumoto, Mariko; Kato, Hiroki; Natsume, Tohru; Tsuruta, Fuminori; Chiba, Tomoki; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Akira

    2016-09-01

    The transcriptional factor Nrf1 (NF-E2-related factor 1) sustains protein homeostasis (proteostasis) by regulating the expression of proteasome genes. Under physiological conditions, the transcriptional activity of Nrf1 is repressed by its sequestration into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and furthermore by two independent ubiquitin-proteasome pathways, comprising Hrd1 and β-TrCP in the cytoplasm and nucleus, respectively. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying Nrf1 activation remain unclear. Here, we report that USP15 (Ubiquitin-Specific Protease 15) activates Nrf1 in the nucleus by stabilizing it through deubiquitination. We first identified USP15 as an Nrf1-associated factor through proteome analysis. USP15 physically interacts with Nrf1, and it markedly stabilizes Nrf1 by removing its ubiquitin moieties. USP15 activates the Nrf1-mediated expression of a proteasome gene luciferase reporter and endogenous proteasome activity. The siRNA-mediated knockdown of USP15 diminishes the Nrf1-induced proteasome gene expression in response to proteasome inhibition. These results uncover a new regulatory mechanism that USP15 activates Nrf1 against the β-TrCP inhibition to maintain proteostasis. PMID:27416755

  13. The degradation of p53 and its major E3 ligase Mdm2 is differentially dependent on the proteasomal ubiquitin receptor S5a

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, A; Dayal, S; Das, J; Robertson, P; Menendez, S; Saville, M K

    2014-01-01

    p53 and its major E3 ligase Mdm2 are both ubiquitinated and targeted to the proteasome for degradation. Despite the importance of this in regulating the p53 pathway, little is known about the mechanisms of proteasomal recognition of ubiquitinated p53 and Mdm2. In this study, we show that knockdown of the proteasomal ubiquitin receptor S5a/PSMD4/Rpn10 inhibits p53 protein degradation and results in the accumulation of ubiquitinated p53. Overexpression of a dominant-negative deletion of S5a lacking its ubiquitin-interacting motifs (UIM)s, but which can be incorporated into the proteasome, also causes the stabilization of p53. Furthermore, small-interferring RNA (siRNA) rescue experiments confirm that the UIMs of S5a are required for the maintenance of low p53 levels. These observations indicate that S5a participates in the recognition of ubiquitinated p53 by the proteasome. In contrast, targeting S5a has no effect on the rate of degradation of Mdm2, indicating that proteasomal recognition of Mdm2 can be mediated by an S5a-independent pathway. S5a knockdown results in an increase in the transcriptional activity of p53. The selective stabilization of p53 and not Mdm2 provides a mechanism for p53 activation. Depletion of S5a causes a p53-dependent decrease in cell proliferation, demonstrating that p53 can have a dominant role in the response to targeting S5a. This study provides evidence for alternative pathways of proteasomal recognition of p53 and Mdm2. Differences in recognition by the proteasome could provide a means to modulate the relative stability of p53 and Mdm2 in response to cellular signals. In addition, they could be exploited for p53-activating therapies. This work shows that the degradation of proteins by the proteasome can be selectively dependent on S5a in human cells, and that this selectivity can extend to an E3 ubiquitin ligase and its substrate. PMID:24121268

  14. Rapid Proteasomal Degradation of Mutant Proteins Is the Primary Mechanism Leading to Tumorigenesis in Patients With Missense AIP Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C.; Martucci, Federico; Morgan, Rhodri M. L.; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Tilley, Daniel; Ramos-Guajardo, Nancy; Iacovazzo, Donato; D'Acquisto, Fulvio; Prodromou, Chrisostomos

    2016-01-01

    Context: The pathogenic effect of mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene (AIPmuts) in pituitary adenomas is incompletely understood. We have identified the primary mechanism of loss of function for missense AIPmuts. Objective: This study sought to analyze the mechanism/speed of protein turnover of wild-type and missense AIP variants, correlating protein half-life with clinical parameters. Design and Setting: Half-life and protein–protein interaction experiments and cross-sectional analysis of AIPmut positive patients' data were performed in a clinical academic research institution. Patients: Data were obtained from our cohort of pituitary adenoma patients and literature-reported cases. Interventions: Protein turnover of endogenous AIP in two cell lines and fifteen AIP variants overexpressed in HEK293 cells was analyzed via cycloheximide chase and proteasome inhibition. Glutathione-S-transferase pull-down and quantitative mass spectrometry identified proteins involved in AIP degradation; results were confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and gene knockdown. Relevant clinical data was collected. Main Outcome Measures: Half-life of wild-type and mutant AIP proteins and its correlation with clinical parameters. Results: Endogenous AIP half-life was similar in HEK293 and lymphoblastoid cells (43.5 and 32.7 h). AIP variants were divided into stable proteins (median, 77.7 h; interquartile range [IQR], 60.7–92.9 h), and those with short (median, 27 h; IQR, 21.6–28.7 h) or very short (median, 7.7 h; IQR, 5.6–10.5 h) half-life; proteasomal inhibition rescued the rapid degradation of mutant proteins. The experimental half-life significantly correlated with age at diagnosis of acromegaly/gigantism (r = 0.411; P = .002). The FBXO3-containing SKP1–CUL1–F-box protein complex was identified as the E3 ubiquitin-ligase recognizing AIP. Conclusions: AIP is a stable protein, driven to ubiquitination by the SKP1–CUL1–F-box protein complex

  15. Nedd8 targets ubiquitin ligase Smurf2 for neddylation and promote its degradation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jingyi; Liu, Chao; Wei, Rongfei; Xie, Ping; He, Shan; Zhang, Lingqiang

    2016-05-20

    E3 ubiquitin ligases are pivotal effectors of the ubiquitin-proteasome system as they determine the substrate specificity and transfer ubiquitin to the substrate. HECT-type ubiquitin ligase Smad ubiquitination regulatory factor 2 (Smurf2) has been demonstrated functions as a tumor suppressor. However, the mechanisms underlying regulation of Smurf2 is still unclear. Here we show that ubiquitin-like protein Nedd8 targets the HECT-type ubiquitin ligase Smurf2 for neddylation, and promotes Smurf2 degradation. Neddylation of Smurf1 activates its ubiquitin ligase activity and Smurf2 exerts Nedd8 ligase activity. This study provided new clues of Smurf2 activation regulation. PMID:27086113

  16. An adenosine triphosphate-independent proteasome activator contributes to the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jastrab, Jordan B.; Wang, Tong; Murphy, J. Patrick; Bai, Lin; Hu, Kuan; Merkx, Remco; Huang, Jessica; Chatterjee, Champak; Ovaa, Huib; Gygi, Steven P.; et al

    2015-03-23

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes a proteasome that is highly similar to eukaryotic proteasomes and is required to cause lethal infections in animals. The only pathway known to target proteins for proteasomal degradation in bacteria is pupylation, which is functionally analogous to eukaryotic ubiquitylation. However, evidence suggests that the M. tuberculosis proteasome contributes to pupylation-independent pathways as well. To identify new proteasome cofactors that might contribute to such pathways, we isolated proteins that bound to proteasomes overproduced in M. tuberculosis and found a previously uncharacterized protein, Rv3780, which formed rings and capped M. tuberculosis proteasome core particles. Rv3780 enhanced peptide and proteinmore » degradation by proteasomes in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-independent manner. We identified putative Rv3780-dependent proteasome substrates and found that Rv3780 promoted robust degradation of the heat shock protein repressor, HspR. Importantly, an M. tuberculosis Rv3780 mutant had a general growth defect, was sensitive to heat stress, and was attenuated for growth in mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATP-independent proteasome activators are not confined to eukaryotes and can contribute to the virulence of one the world’s most devastating pathogens.« less

  17. An adenosine triphosphate-independent proteasome activator contributes to the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Jastrab, Jordan B.; Wang, Tong; Murphy, J. Patrick; Bai, Lin; Hu, Kuan; Merkx, Remco; Huang, Jessica; Chatterjee, Champak; Ovaa, Huib; Gygi, Steven P.; Li, Huilin; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-03-23

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes a proteasome that is highly similar to eukaryotic proteasomes and is required to cause lethal infections in animals. The only pathway known to target proteins for proteasomal degradation in bacteria is pupylation, which is functionally analogous to eukaryotic ubiquitylation. However, evidence suggests that the M. tuberculosis proteasome contributes to pupylation-independent pathways as well. To identify new proteasome cofactors that might contribute to such pathways, we isolated proteins that bound to proteasomes overproduced in M. tuberculosis and found a previously uncharacterized protein, Rv3780, which formed rings and capped M. tuberculosis proteasome core particles. Rv3780 enhanced peptide and protein degradation by proteasomes in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-independent manner. We identified putative Rv3780-dependent proteasome substrates and found that Rv3780 promoted robust degradation of the heat shock protein repressor, HspR. Importantly, an M. tuberculosis Rv3780 mutant had a general growth defect, was sensitive to heat stress, and was attenuated for growth in mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATP-independent proteasome activators are not confined to eukaryotes and can contribute to the virulence of one the world’s most devastating pathogens.

  18. Microtubule disrupting chemotherapeutics result in enhanced proteasome-mediated degradation and disappearance of tubulin in neural cells

    PubMed Central

    Huff, Lyn M.; Sackett, Dan L.; Poruchynsky, Marianne S.; Fojo, Tito

    2010-01-01

    We sought to examine the effects of microtubule targeting agents (MTAs) on neural cells to better understand the problem of neurotoxicity, their principal side effect, and to possibly develop a model of clinical toxicity. Studies showed that microtubule-depolymerizing agents (MDAs) not only disassembled microtubules in neural HCN2 cells but also led to rapid disappearance of tubulin and that this was specific for MDAs. Tubulin levels fell to 20% as early as 8 hours after adding vincristine and to 1–30% (mean, 9.8 ± 7.6%; median of 7%) after 100 nM VCR for 24 hours. This disappearance was reversible. An increase in both glu-terminated and acetylated tubulin, markers of stable tubulin, preceded re-accumulation of soluble tubulin, suggesting a priority for stabilizing tubulin first as microtubules, prior to replenishing the soluble pool. Similar results were demonstrated with other MDAs. Furthermore, microtubule reassembly did not arise from a central focus but instead appeared to involve dispersed nucleation, as evidenced by the appearance of small stable microtubule stubs throughout the cytoplasm. In contrast, experiments with four non-neural “normal” cell lines and four cancer cell lines resulted in microtubule de-stabilization but only modest tubulin degradation. Evidence for proteasome-mediated degradation was obtained by demonstrating that adding a proteasome inhibitor prior to vincristine prevented tubulin disappearance. In summary, MDAs lead to rapid disappearance of tubulin in neural but not other normal cells or cancer cells. These results underscore the fine control that occurs in neural cells and may further our understanding of neurotoxicity following MDAs. PMID:20587529

  19. Activity and regulation of the centrosome-associated proteasome.

    PubMed

    Fabunmi, R P; Wigley, W C; Thomas, P J; DeMartino, G N

    2000-01-01

    Regulated proteolysis is important for maintaining appropriate cellular levels of many proteins. The bulk of intracellular protein degradation is catalyzed by the proteasome. Recently, the centrosome was identified as a novel site for concentration of the proteasome and associated regulatory proteins (Wigley, W. C., Fabunmi, R. P., Lee, M. G., Marino, C. R., Muallem, S., DeMartino, G. N., and Thomas, P. J. (1999) J. Cell Biol. 145, 481-490). Here we provide evidence that centrosomes contain the active 26 S proteasome that degrades ubiquitinated-protein and proteasome-specific peptide substrates. Moreover, the centrosomes contain an ubiquitin isopeptidase activity. The proteolytic activity is ATP-dependent and is inhibited by proteasome inhibitors. Notably, treatment of cells with inhibitors of proteasome activity promotes redistribution of the proteasome and associated regulatory proteins to the centrosome independent of an intact microtubule system. These data provide biochemical evidence for active proteasomal complexes at the centrosome, highlighting a novel function for this organizing structure. PMID:10617632

  20. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) targets {beta}-catenin for phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun-A; Kim, Ji Eon; Sung, Ki Sa; Choi, Dong Wook; Lee, Byeong Jae; Choi, Cheol Yong

    2010-04-16

    The regulation of intracellular {beta}-catenin levels is central in the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling cascade and the activation of the Wnt target genes. Here, we show that homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) acts as a negative regulator of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway. Knock-down of endogenous HIPK2 increases the stability of {beta}-catenin and results in the accumulation of {beta}-catenin in the nucleus, consequently enhancing the expression of Wnt target genes and cell proliferation both in vivo and in cultured cells. HIPK2 inhibits TCF/LEF-mediated target gene activation via degradation of {beta}-catenin. HIPK2 phosphorylates {beta}-catenin at its Ser33 and Ser37 residues without the aid of a priming kinase. Substitutions of Ser33 and Ser37 for alanines abolished the degradation of {beta}-catenin associated with HIPK2. In ex vivo mouse model, HIPK2 knock-down resulted in accumulation of {beta}-catenin, thereby potentiated {beta}-catenin-mediated cell proliferation and tumor formation. Furthermore, the axis duplication induced by the ectopic expression of {beta}-catenin was blocked by co-injection of HIPK2 mRNAs into Xenopus embryos. Taken together, HIPK2 appears to function as a novel negative regulator of {beta}-catenin through its phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation.

  1. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) targets beta-catenin for phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-A; Kim, Ji Eon; Sung, Ki Sa; Choi, Dong Wook; Lee, Byeong Jae; Choi, Cheol Yong

    2010-04-16

    The regulation of intracellular beta-catenin levels is central in the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling cascade and the activation of the Wnt target genes. Here, we show that homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) acts as a negative regulator of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway. Knock-down of endogenous HIPK2 increases the stability of beta-catenin and results in the accumulation of beta-catenin in the nucleus, consequently enhancing the expression of Wnt target genes and cell proliferation both in vivo and in cultured cells. HIPK2 inhibits TCF/LEF-mediated target gene activation via degradation of beta-catenin. HIPK2 phosphorylates beta-catenin at its Ser33 and Ser37 residues without the aid of a priming kinase. Substitutions of Ser33 and Ser37 for alanines abolished the degradation of beta-catenin associated with HIPK2. In ex vivo mouse model, HIPK2 knock-down resulted in accumulation of beta-catenin, thereby potentiated beta-catenin-mediated cell proliferation and tumor formation. Furthermore, the axis duplication induced by the ectopic expression of beta-catenin was blocked by co-injection of HIPK2 mRNAs into Xenopus embryos. Taken together, HIPK2 appears to function as a novel negative regulator of beta-catenin through its phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation. PMID:20307497

  2. Role of 26S proteasome and HRD genes in the degradation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, an integral endoplasmic reticulum membrane protein.

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, R Y; Gardner, R G; Rine, J

    1996-01-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-R), a key enzyme of sterol synthesis, is an integral membrane protein of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In both humans and yeast, HMG-R is degraded at or in the ER. The degradation of HMG-R is regulated as part of feedback control of the mevalonate pathway. Neither the mechanism of degradation nor the nature of the signals that couple the degradation of HMG-R to the mevalonate pathway is known. We have launched a genetic analysis of the degradation of HMG-R in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a selection for mutants that are deficient in the degradation of Hmg2p, an HMG-R isozyme. The underlying genes are called HRD (pronounced "herd"), for HMG-CoA reductase degradation. So far we have discovered mutants in three genes: HRD1, HRD2, and HRD3. The sequence of the HRD2 gene is homologous to the p97 activator of the 26S proteasome. This p97 protein, also called TRAP-2, has been proposed to be a component of the mature 26S proteasome. The hrd2-1 mutant had numerous pleiotropic phenotypes expected for cells with a compromised proteasome, and these phenotypes were complemented by the human TRAP-2/p97 coding region. In contrast, HRD1 and HRD3 genes encoded previously unknown proteins predicted to be membrane bound. The Hrd3p protein was homologous to the Caenorhabditis elegans sel-1 protein, a negative regulator of at least two different membrane proteins, and contained an HRD3 motif shared with several other proteins. Hrd1p had no full-length homologues, but contained an H2 ring finger motif. These data suggested a model of ER protein degradation in which the Hrd1p and Hrd3p proteins conspire to deliver HMG-R to the 26S proteasome. Moreover, our results lend in vivo support to the proposed role of the p97/TRAP-2/Hrd2p protein as a functionally important component of the 26S proteasome. Because the HRD genes were required for the degradation of both regulated and unregulated substrates of ER degradation, the HRD genes are the

  3. Genetics of proteasome diseases.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Aldrin V

    2013-01-01

    The proteasome is a large, multiple subunit complex that is capable of degrading most intracellular proteins. Polymorphisms in proteasome subunits are associated with cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, neurological diseases, and cancer. One polymorphism in the proteasome gene PSMA6 (-8C/G) is associated with three different diseases: type 2 diabetes, myocardial infarction, and coronary artery disease. One type of proteasome, the immunoproteasome, which contains inducible catalytic subunits, is adapted to generate peptides for antigen presentation. It has recently been shown that mutations and polymorphisms in the immunoproteasome catalytic subunit PSMB8 are associated with several inflammatory and autoinflammatory diseases including Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome, CANDLE syndrome, and intestinal M. tuberculosis infection. This comprehensive review describes the disease-related polymorphisms in proteasome genes associated with human diseases and the physiological modulation of proteasome function by these polymorphisms. Given the large number of subunits and the central importance of the proteasome in human physiology as well as the fast pace of detection of proteasome polymorphisms associated with human diseases, it is likely that other polymorphisms in proteasome genes associated with diseases will be detected in the near future. While disease-associated polymorphisms are now readily discovered, the challenge will be to use this genetic information for clinical benefit. PMID:24490108

  4. A novel mechanism for the inhibition of type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase by tumor necrosis factor α: involvement of proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Ogiwara, Takayuki; Araki, Osamu; Morimura, Tadashi; Tsunekawa, Katsuhiko; Mori, Masatomo; Murakami, Masami

    2013-01-01

    Thyroxine (T₄) needs to be converted to 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T₃) by iodothyronine deiodinase to exert its biological activity. Recent studies revealed the presence of type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase (D2) in human thyroid tissue, human skeletal muscle and other tissues, suggesting that D2 is involved in maintaining plasma T₃ level in human. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) is an inflammatory cytokine of which production is elevated in patients with nonthyroidal illness. Although several lines of evidence suggest the causal role of TNFα in nonthyroidal illness, detailed nature of the effect of TNFα on D2 remains unclear. In the present study, we identified D2 activity and D2 mRNA in TCO-1 cells, which were derived from human anaplastic thyroid carcinoma, and studied the mechanisms involved in the regulation of D2 expression by TNFα. The characteristics of the deiodinating activity in TCO-1 cells were compatible with those of D2 and Northern analysis demonstrated that D2 mRNA was expressed in TCO-1cells. D2 activity and D2 mRNA expression were rapidly increased by dibutyryl cAMP ((Bu)₂cAMP). TNFα showed an inhibitory effect on (Bu)₂cAMP-stimulated D2 activity in spite of little effect on (Bu)₂cAMP-stimulated D2 mRNA expression. MG132, a proteasome inhibitor abolished TNFα suppression of D2 activity whereas BAY11-7082 or 6-amino-4-(4-phenoxyphenylethylamino) quinazoline, inhibitors of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) failed to attenuate the effect of TNFα on D2 activity. These data suggest that a posttranslational mechanism through proteasomal degradation but not NF-κB activation is involved in the suppression of D2 by TNFα. PMID:23719846

  5. Proteasomal degradation of preemptive quality control (pQC) substrates is mediated by an AIRAPL-p97 complex.

    PubMed

    Braunstein, Ilana; Zach, Lolita; Allan, Susanne; Kalies, Kai-Uwe; Stanhill, Ariel

    2015-11-01

    The initial folding of secreted proteins occurs in the ER lumen, which contains specific chaperones and where posttranslational modifications may occur. Therefore lack of translocation, regardless of entry route or protein identity, is a highly toxic event, as the newly synthesized polypeptide is misfolded and can promiscuously interact with cytosolic factors. Mislocalized proteins bearing a signal sequence that did not successfully translocate through the translocon complex are subjected to a preemptive quality control (pQC) pathway and are degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). In contrast to UPS-mediated, ER-associated degradation, few components involved in pQC have been identified. Here we demonstrate that on specific translocation inhibition, a p97-AIRAPL complex directly binds and regulates the efficient processing of polyubiquitinated pQC substrates by the UPS. We also demonstrate p97's role in pQC processing of preproinsulin in cases of naturally occurring mutations within the signal sequence of insulin. PMID:26337389

  6. Proteasomal degradation of preemptive quality control (pQC) substrates is mediated by an AIRAPL–p97 complex

    PubMed Central

    Braunstein, Ilana; Zach, Lolita; Allan, Susanne; Kalies, Kai-Uwe; Stanhill, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    The initial folding of secreted proteins occurs in the ER lumen, which contains specific chaperones and where posttranslational modifications may occur. Therefore lack of translocation, regardless of entry route or protein identity, is a highly toxic event, as the newly synthesized polypeptide is misfolded and can promiscuously interact with cytosolic factors. Mislocalized proteins bearing a signal sequence that did not successfully translocate through the translocon complex are subjected to a preemptive quality control (pQC) pathway and are degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). In contrast to UPS-mediated, ER-associated degradation, few components involved in pQC have been identified. Here we demonstrate that on specific translocation inhibition, a p97–AIRAPL complex directly binds and regulates the efficient processing of polyubiquitinated pQC substrates by the UPS. We also demonstrate p97’s role in pQC processing of preproinsulin in cases of naturally occurring mutations within the signal sequence of insulin. PMID:26337389

  7. Binding-induced folding of prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein on the mycobacterium proteasomal ATPase targets substrates for degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.; Li, H.; Darwin, K. H.

    2010-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis uses a proteasome system that is analogous to the eukaryotic ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and is required for pathogenesis. However, the bacterial analog of ubiquitin, prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup), is an intrinsically disordered protein that bears little sequence or structural resemblance to the highly structured ubiquitin. Thus, it was unknown how pupylated proteins were recruited to the proteasome. Here, we show that the Mycobacterium proteasomal ATPase (Mpa) has three pairs of tentacle-like coiled coils that recognize Pup. Mpa bound unstructured Pup through hydrophobic interactions and a network of hydrogen bonds, leading to the formation of an {alpha}-helix in Pup. Our work describes a binding-induced folding recognition mechanism in the Pup-proteasome system that differs mechanistically from substrate recognition in the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This key difference between the prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems could be exploited for the development of a small molecule-based treatment for tuberculosis.

  8. Binding-induced Folding of Prokaryotic Ubiquitin-like Protein on the Mycobacterium Proteasomal ATPase Targets Substrates for Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    T Wang; K Heran Darwin; H Li

    2011-12-31

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis uses a proteasome system that is analogous to the eukaryotic ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and is required for pathogenesis. However, the bacterial analog of ubiquitin, prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup), is an intrinsically disordered protein that bears little sequence or structural resemblance to the highly structured ubiquitin. Thus, it was unknown how pupylated proteins were recruited to the proteasome. Here, we show that the Mycobacterium proteasomal ATPase (Mpa) has three pairs of tentacle-like coiled coils that recognize Pup. Mpa bound unstructured Pup through hydrophobic interactions and a network of hydrogen bonds, leading to the formation of an {alpha}-helix in Pup. Our work describes a binding-induced folding recognition mechanism in the Pup-proteasome system that differs mechanistically from substrate recognition in the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This key difference between the prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems could be exploited for the development of a small molecule-based treatment for tuberculosis.

  9. Light-Regulated Hypocotyl Elongation Involves Proteasome-Dependent Degradation of the Microtubule Regulatory Protein WDL3 in Arabidopsis[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaomin; Qin, Tao; Ma, Qianqian; Sun, Jingbo; Liu, Ziqiang; Yuan, Ming; Mao, Tonglin

    2013-01-01

    Light significantly inhibits hypocotyl cell elongation, and dark-grown seedlings exhibit elongated, etiolated hypocotyls. Microtubule regulatory proteins function as positive or negative regulators that mediate hypocotyl cell elongation by altering microtubule organization. However, it remains unclear how plants coordinate these regulators to promote hypocotyl growth in darkness and inhibit growth in the light. Here, we demonstrate that WAVE-DAMPENED 2–LIKE3 (WDL3), a microtubule regulatory protein of the WVD2/WDL family from Arabidopsis thaliana, functions in hypocotyl cell elongation and is regulated by a ubiquitin-26S proteasome–dependent pathway in response to light. WDL3 RNA interference Arabidopsis seedlings grown in the light had much longer hypocotyls than controls. Moreover, WDL3 overexpression resulted in overall shortening of hypocotyl cells and stabilization of cortical microtubules in the light. Cortical microtubule reorganization occurred slowly in cells from WDL3 RNA interference transgenic lines but was accelerated in cells from WDL3-overexpressing seedlings subjected to light treatment. More importantly, WDL3 protein was abundant in the light but was degraded through the 26S proteasome pathway in the dark. Overexpression of WDL3 inhibited etiolated hypocotyl growth in regulatory particle non-ATPase subunit-1a mutant (rpn1a-4) plants but not in wild-type seedlings. Therefore, a ubiquitin-26S proteasome–dependent mechanism regulates the levels of WDL3 in response to light to modulate hypocotyl cell elongation. PMID:23653471

  10. Toscana virus NSs protein promotes degradation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kalveram, Birte; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2013-04-01

    Toscana virus (TOSV), which is transmitted by Phlebotomus spp. sandflies, is a major etiologic agent of aseptic meningitis and encephalitis in the Mediterranean. Like other members of the genus Phlebovirus of the family Bunyaviridae, TOSV encodes a nonstructural protein (NSs) in its small RNA segment. Although the NSs of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) has been identified as an important virulence factor, which suppresses host general transcription, inhibits transcription from the beta interferon promoter, and promotes the proteasomal degradation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR), little is known about the functions of NSs proteins encoded by less-pathogenic members of this genus. In this study we report that TOSV is able to downregulate PKR with similar efficiency as RVFV, while infection with the other phleboviruses-i.e., Punta Toro virus, sandfly fever Sicilian virus, or Frijoles virus-has no effect on cellular PKR levels. In contrast to RVFV, however, cellular transcription remains unaffected during TOSV infection. TOSV NSs protein promotes the proteasome-dependent downregulation of PKR and is able to interact with kinase-inactive PKR in infected cells. PMID:23325696

  11. Toscana Virus NSs Protein Promotes Degradation of Double-Stranded RNA-Dependent Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Kalveram, Birte

    2013-01-01

    Toscana virus (TOSV), which is transmitted by Phlebotomus spp. sandflies, is a major etiologic agent of aseptic meningitis and encephalitis in the Mediterranean. Like other members of the genus Phlebovirus of the family Bunyaviridae, TOSV encodes a nonstructural protein (NSs) in its small RNA segment. Although the NSs of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) has been identified as an important virulence factor, which suppresses host general transcription, inhibits transcription from the beta interferon promoter, and promotes the proteasomal degradation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR), little is known about the functions of NSs proteins encoded by less-pathogenic members of this genus. In this study we report that TOSV is able to downregulate PKR with similar efficiency as RVFV, while infection with the other phleboviruses—i.e., Punta Toro virus, sandfly fever Sicilian virus, or Frijoles virus—has no effect on cellular PKR levels. In contrast to RVFV, however, cellular transcription remains unaffected during TOSV infection. TOSV NSs protein promotes the proteasome-dependent downregulation of PKR and is able to interact with kinase-inactive PKR in infected cells. PMID:23325696

  12. The Cytoplasmic Hsp70 Chaperone Machinery Subjects Misfolded and Endoplasmic Reticulum Import-incompetent Proteins to Degradation via the Ubiquitin–Proteasome System

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sae-Hun; Bolender, Natalia; Eisele, Frederik; Kostova, Zlatka; Takeuchi, Junko; Coffino, Philip

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism of protein quality control and elimination of misfolded proteins in the cytoplasm is poorly understood. We studied the involvement of cytoplasmic factors required for degradation of two endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-import–defective mutated derivatives of carboxypeptidase yscY (ΔssCPY* and ΔssCPY*-GFP) and also examined the requirements for degradation of the corresponding wild-type enzyme made ER-import incompetent by removal of its signal sequence (ΔssCPY). All these protein species are rapidly degraded via the ubiquitin–proteasome system. Degradation requires the ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes Ubc4p and Ubc5p, the cytoplasmic Hsp70 Ssa chaperone machinery, and the Hsp70 cochaperone Ydj1p. Neither the Hsp90 chaperones nor Hsp104 or the small heat-shock proteins Hsp26 and Hsp42 are involved in the degradation process. Elimination of a GFP fusion (GFP-cODC), containing the C-terminal 37 amino acids of ornithine decarboxylase (cODC) directing this enzyme to the proteasome, is independent of Ssa1p function. Fusion of ΔssCPY* to GFP-cODC to form ΔssCPY*-GFP-cODC reimposes a dependency on the Ssa1p chaperone for degradation. Evidently, the misfolded protein domain dictates the route of protein elimination. These data and our further results give evidence that the Ssa1p-Ydj1p machinery recognizes misfolded protein domains, keeps misfolded proteins soluble, solubilizes precipitated protein material, and escorts and delivers misfolded proteins in the ubiquitinated state to the proteasome for degradation. PMID:17065559

  13. Rapid Proteasomal Degradation of Posttranscriptional Regulators of the TIS11/Tristetraprolin Family Is Induced by an Intrinsically Unstructured Region Independently of Ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Ngoc, Long Vo; Wauquier, Corinne; Soin, Romuald; Bousbata, Sabrina; Twyffels, Laure; Kruys, Véronique

    2014-01-01

    The TIS11/tristetraprolin (TTP) CCCH tandem zinc finger proteins are major effectors in the destabilization of mRNAs bearing AU-rich elements (ARE) in their 3′ untranslated regions. In this report, we demonstrate that the Drosophila melanogaster dTIS11 protein is short-lived due to its rapid ubiquitin-independent degradation by the proteasome. Our data indicate that this mechanism is tightly associated with the intrinsically unstructured, disordered N- and C-terminal domains of the protein. Furthermore, we show that TTP, the mammalian TIS11/TTP protein prototype, shares the same three-dimensional characteristics and is degraded by the same proteolytic pathway as dTIS11, thereby indicating that this mechanism has been conserved across evolution. Finally, we observed a phosphorylation-dependent inhibition of dTIS11 and TTP degradation by the proteasome in vitro, raising the possibility that such modifications directly affect proteasomal recognition for these proteins. As a group, RNA-binding proteins (RNA-BPs) have been described as enriched in intrinsically disordered regions, thus raising the possibility that the mechanism that we uncovered for TIS11/TTP turnover is widespread among other RNA-BPs. PMID:25246635

  14. Zinc-induced structural changes of the disordered tppp/p25 inhibits its degradation by the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Lehotzky, Attila; Oláh, Judit; Szunyogh, Sándor; Szabó, Adél; Berki, Tímea; Ovádi, Judit

    2015-01-01

    Tubulin Polymerization Promoting Protein/p25 (TPPP/p25), a neomorphic moonlighting protein displaying both physiological and pathological functions, plays a crucial role in the differentiation of the zinc-rich oligodendrocytes, the major constituent of myelin sheath; and it is enriched and co-localizes with α-synuclein in brain inclusions hallmarking Parkinson's disease and other synucleinopathies. In this work we showed that the binding of Zn(2+) to TPPP/p25 promotes its dimerization resulting in increased tubulin polymerization promoting activity. We also demonstrated that the Zn(2+) increases the intracellular TPPP/p25 level resulting in a more decorated microtubule network in CHO10 and CG-4 cells expressing TPPP/p25 ectopically and endogenously, respectively. This stabilization effect is crucial for the differentiation and aggresome formation under physiological and pathological conditions, respectively. The Zn(2+)-mediated effect was similar to that produced by treatment of the cells with MG132, a proteasome inhibitor or Zn(2+) plus MG132 as quantified by cellular ELISA. The enhancing effect of zinc ion on the level of TPPP/p25 was independent of the expression level of the protein produced by doxycycline induction at different levels or inhibition of the protein synthesis by cycloheximide. Thus, we suggest that the zinc as a specific divalent cation could be involved in the fine-tuning of the physiological TPPP/p25 level counteracting both the enrichment and the lack of this protein leading to distinct central nervous system diseases. PMID:25445539

  15. The long N-terminus of the human monocarboxylate transporter 8 is a target of ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation which regulates protein expression and oligomerization capacity.

    PubMed

    Zwanziger, Denise; Schmidt, Mathias; Fischer, Jana; Kleinau, Gunnar; Braun, Doreen; Schweizer, Ulrich; Moeller, Lars Christian; Biebermann, Heike; Fuehrer, Dagmar

    2016-10-15

    Monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) equilibrates thyroid hormones between the extra- and the intracellular sides. MCT8 exists either with a short or a long N-terminus, but potential functional differences between both variants are yet not known. We, therefore, generated MCT8 constructs which are different in N-terminal length: MCT8(1-613), MCT8(25-613), MCT8(49-613) and MCT8(75-613). The M75G substitution prevents translation of MCT8(75-613) and ensures expression of full-length MCT8 protein. The K56G substitution was made to prevent ubiquitinylation. Cell-surface expression, localization and proteasomal degradation were investigated using C-terminally GFP-tagged MCT8 constructs (HEK293 and MDCK1 cells) and oligomerization capacity was determined using N-terminally HA- and C-terminally FLAG-tagged MCT8 constructs (COS7 cells). MCT8(1-613)-GFP showed a lower protein expression than the shorter MCT8(75-613)-GFP protein. The proteasome inhibitor lactacystin increased MCT8(1-613)-GFP protein amount, suggesting proteasomal degradation of MCT8 with the long N-terminus. Ubiquitin conjugation of MCT8(1-613)-GFP was found by immuno-precipitation. A diminished ubiquitin conjugation caused by K56G substitution resulted in increased MCT8(1-613)-GFP protein expression. Sandwich ELISA was performed to investigate if the bands at higher molecular weight observed in Western blot analysis are due to MCT8 oligomerization, which was indeed shown. Our data imply a role of the long N-terminus of MCT8 as target of ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation affecting MCT8 amount and subsequently oligomerization capacity. PMID:27222294

  16. Degradation of the Retinoblastoma Tumor Suppressor by the Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E7 Oncoprotein Is Important for Functional Inactivation and Is Separable from Proteasomal Degradation of E7

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Sonia L.; Stremlau, Matt; He, Xi; Basile, John R.; Münger, Karl

    2001-01-01

    The steady-state level and metabolic half-life of retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein pRB are decreased in cells that express high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 proteins. Here we show that pRB degradation is a direct activity of E7 and does not reflect a property of cell lines acquired during the selection process for E7 expression. An amino-terminal domain of E7 that does not directly contribute to pRB binding but is required for transformation is also necessary for E7-mediated pRB degradation. Treatment with inhibitors of the 26S proteasome not only blocks E7-mediated pRB degradation but also causes the stabilization of E7. Mutagenic analyses, however, reveal that the processes of proteasomal degradation of E7 and pRB are not linked processes. HPV type 16 E7 also targets the pRB-related proteins p107 and p130 for destabilization by a proteasome-dependent mechanism. Using the SAOS2 flat-cell assay as a biological indicator for pRB function, we demonstrate that pRB degradation, not solely binding, is important for the E7-induced inactivation of pRB. PMID:11462030

  17. The co-chaperone carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) mediates alpha-synuclein degradation decisions between proteasomal and lysosomal pathways.

    PubMed

    Shin, Youngah; Klucken, Jochen; Patterson, Cam; Hyman, Bradley T; McLean, Pamela J

    2005-06-24

    Alpha-synuclein is a major component of Lewy bodies, the pathological hallmark of Parkinson disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and related disorders. Misfolding and aggregation of alpha-synuclein is thought to be a critical cofactor in the pathogenesis of certain neurodegenerative diseases. In the current study, we investigate the role of the carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) in alpha-synuclein aggregation. We demonstrate that CHIP is a component of Lewy bodies in the human brain, where it colocalizes with alpha-synuclein and Hsp70. In a cell culture model, endogenous CHIP colocalizes with alpha-synuclein and Hsp70 in intracellular inclusions, and overexpression of CHIP inhibits alpha-synuclein inclusion formation and reduces alpha-synuclein protein levels. We demonstrate that CHIP can mediate alpha-synuclein degradation by two discrete mechanisms that can be dissected using deletion mutants; the tetratricopeptide repeat domain is critical for proteasomal degradation, whereas the U-box domain is sufficient to direct alpha-synuclein toward the lysosomal degradation pathway. Furthermore, alpha-synuclein, synphilin-1, and Hsp70 all coimmunoprecipitate with CHIP, raising the possibility of a direct alpha-synuclein-CHIP interaction. The fact that the tetratricopeptide repeat domain is required for the effects of CHIP on alpha-synuclein inclusion morphology, number of inclusions, and proteasomal degradation as well as the direct interaction of CHIP with Hsp70 implicates a cooperation of CHIP and Hsp70 in these processes. Taken together, these data suggest that CHIP acts a molecular switch between proteasomal and lysosomal degradation pathways. PMID:15845543

  18. Additive loss-of-function proteasome subunit mutations in CANDLE/PRAAS patients promote type I IFN production.

    PubMed

    Brehm, Anja; Liu, Yin; Sheikh, Afzal; Marrero, Bernadette; Omoyinmi, Ebun; Zhou, Qing; Montealegre, Gina; Biancotto, Angelique; Reinhardt, Adam; Almeida de Jesus, Adriana; Pelletier, Martin; Tsai, Wanxia L; Remmers, Elaine F; Kardava, Lela; Hill, Suvimol; Kim, Hanna; Lachmann, Helen J; Megarbane, Andre; Chae, Jae Jin; Brady, Jilian; Castillo, Rhina D; Brown, Diane; Casano, Angel Vera; Gao, Ling; Chapelle, Dawn; Huang, Yan; Stone, Deborah; Chen, Yongqing; Sotzny, Franziska; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Kastner, Daniel L; Torrelo, Antonio; Zlotogorski, Abraham; Moir, Susan; Gadina, Massimo; McCoy, Phil; Wesley, Robert; Rother, Kristina I; Rother, Kristina; Hildebrand, Peter W; Brogan, Paul; Krüger, Elke; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2015-11-01

    Autosomal recessive mutations in proteasome subunit β 8 (PSMB8), which encodes the inducible proteasome subunit β5i, cause the immune-dysregulatory disease chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE), which is classified as a proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome (PRAAS). Here, we identified 8 mutations in 4 proteasome genes, PSMA3 (encodes α7), PSMB4 (encodes β7), PSMB9 (encodes β1i), and proteasome maturation protein (POMP), that have not been previously associated with disease and 1 mutation in PSMB8 that has not been previously reported. One patient was compound heterozygous for PSMB4 mutations, 6 patients from 4 families were heterozygous for a missense mutation in 1 inducible proteasome subunit and a mutation in a constitutive proteasome subunit, and 1 patient was heterozygous for a POMP mutation, thus establishing a digenic and autosomal dominant inheritance pattern of PRAAS. Function evaluation revealed that these mutations variably affect transcription, protein expression, protein folding, proteasome assembly, and, ultimately, proteasome activity. Moreover, defects in proteasome formation and function were recapitulated by siRNA-mediated knockdown of the respective subunits in primary fibroblasts from healthy individuals. Patient-isolated hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells exhibited a strong IFN gene-expression signature, irrespective of genotype. Additionally, chemical proteasome inhibition or progressive depletion of proteasome subunit gene transcription with siRNA induced transcription of type I IFN genes in healthy control cells. Our results provide further insight into CANDLE genetics and link global proteasome dysfunction to increased type I IFN production. PMID:26524591

  19. Additive loss-of-function proteasome subunit mutations in CANDLE/PRAAS patients promote type I IFN production

    PubMed Central

    Brehm, Anja; Liu, Yin; Sheikh, Afzal; Marrero, Bernadette; Omoyinmi, Ebun; Zhou, Qing; Montealegre, Gina; Biancotto, Angelique; Reinhardt, Adam; Almeida de Jesus, Adriana; Pelletier, Martin; Tsai, Wanxia L.; Remmers, Elaine F.; Kardava, Lela; Hill, Suvimol; Kim, Hanna; Lachmann, Helen J.; Megarbane, Andre; Chae, Jae Jin; Brady, Jilian; Castillo, Rhina D.; Brown, Diane; Casano, Angel Vera; Gao, Ling; Chapelle, Dawn; Huang, Yan; Stone, Deborah; Chen, Yongqing; Sotzny, Franziska; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Kastner, Daniel L.; Torrelo, Antonio; Zlotogorski, Abraham; Moir, Susan; Gadina, Massimo; McCoy, Phil; Wesley, Robert; Rother, Kristina; Hildebrand, Peter W.; Brogan, Paul; Krüger, Elke; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive mutations in proteasome subunit β 8 (PSMB8), which encodes the inducible proteasome subunit β5i, cause the immune-dysregulatory disease chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE), which is classified as a proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome (PRAAS). Here, we identified 8 mutations in 4 proteasome genes, PSMA3 (encodes α7), PSMB4 (encodes β7), PSMB9 (encodes β1i), and proteasome maturation protein (POMP), that have not been previously associated with disease and 1 mutation in PSMB8 that has not been previously reported. One patient was compound heterozygous for PSMB4 mutations, 6 patients from 4 families were heterozygous for a missense mutation in 1 inducible proteasome subunit and a mutation in a constitutive proteasome subunit, and 1 patient was heterozygous for a POMP mutation, thus establishing a digenic and autosomal dominant inheritance pattern of PRAAS. Function evaluation revealed that these mutations variably affect transcription, protein expression, protein folding, proteasome assembly, and, ultimately, proteasome activity. Moreover, defects in proteasome formation and function were recapitulated by siRNA-mediated knockdown of the respective subunits in primary fibroblasts from healthy individuals. Patient-isolated hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells exhibited a strong IFN gene-expression signature, irrespective of genotype. Additionally, chemical proteasome inhibition or progressive depletion of proteasome subunit gene transcription with siRNA induced transcription of type I IFN genes in healthy control cells. Our results provide further insight into CANDLE genetics and link global proteasome dysfunction to increased type I IFN production. PMID:26524591

  20. Proteasomal Degradation of Mcl-1 by Maritoclax Induces Apoptosis and Enhances the Efficacy of ABT-737 in Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Kenichiro; Sharma, Arun K.; Wang, Hong-Gang; Amin, Shantu

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Metastatic melanoma remains one of the most invasive and highly drug resistant cancers. The over expression of anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 has been associated with inferior survival, poor prognosis and chemoresistance of malignant melanoma. A BH3 mimetic, ABT-737, has demonstrated efficacy in several forms of cancers. However, the efficacy of ABT-737 depends on Mcl-1. Because the over expression of Mcl-1 is frequently observed in melanoma, specifically targeting of Mcl-1 may overcome the resistance of ABT-737. In this study, we investigated the effects of Maritoclax, a novel Mcl-1-selective inhibitor, alone and in combination with ABT-737, on the survival of human melanoma cells. Experimental approach For cell viability assessment we performed MTT assay. Apoptosis was determined using western blot and flow cytometric analysis. Key results The treatment of Maritoclax reduced the cell viability of melanoma cells with an IC50 of between 2.2–5.0 µM. Further, treatment of melanoma cells with Maritoclax showed significant decrease in Mcl-1 expression. We found that Maritoclax was able to induce apoptosis in melanoma cells in a caspase-dependent manner. Moreover, Maritoclax induced Mcl-1 degradation via the proteasome system, which was associated with its pro-apoptotic activity. We also found that Maritoclax treatment increased mitochondrial translocation of Bim and Bmf. Importantly, Maritoclax markedly enhanced the efficacy of ABT-737 against melanoma cells in both two- and three-dimensional spheroids. Conclusions and implications Taken together, these results suggest that targeting of Mcl-1 by Maritoclax may represent a new therapeutic strategy for melanoma treatment that warrants further investigation as a single therapy or in combination with other agents such as Bcl-2 inhibitors. PMID:24223823

  1. Building up and knocking down: an emerging role for epigenetics and proteasomal degradation in systems consolidation.

    PubMed

    Walters, B J; Zovkic, I B

    2015-08-01

    Memory formation is a protracted process in which recently acquired events are consolidated to produce stable and specific associations. Initially, newly acquired information undergoes cellular consolidation in the hippocampus, which transiently supports the storage of recently acquired memories. In contrast, remote, or "old" memories are maintained in the cortex and show almost complete independence from the hippocampus. Memories are transferred from the hippocampus to the cortex through a process termed systems consolidation. Emerging evidence suggests that recurrent activation, or "training" of the cortex by the hippocampus is vital to systems consolidation. This process involves prolonged waves of memory-related gene activity in the hippocampus and cortex long after the learning event has terminated. Indeed, molecular events occurring within hours and days of fear conditioning are essential for stabilizing and eventually transitioning the memory to the cortex. It is increasingly evident that molecular mechanisms that exhibit a capacity for prolonged activation may underlie systems consolidation. Processes that have the capacity to control protein abundance over long time scales, such as epigenetic modifications, are prime candidates for the molecular mechanism of systems consolidation. Indeed, recent work has established two types of epigenetic modifications as integral for systems consolidation. First, localized nucleosomal histone variant exchange and histone modifications are integral for early stages of systems consolidation, whereas DNA methylation appears to be utilized to form stable marks that support memory maintenance. Since systems consolidation also requires discrete and time-sensitive changes in protein abundance, additional mechanisms, such as protein degradation, need also be considered, although their role in systems consolidation has yet to be investigated. Here, we discuss the role of molecular mechanisms in systems consolidation and their

  2. Proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Teicher, Beverly A; Tomaszewski, Joseph E

    2015-07-01

    Proteasome inhibitors have a 20 year history in cancer therapy. The first proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib (Velcade, PS-341), a break-through multiple myeloma treatment, moved rapidly through development from bench in 1994 to first approval in 2003. Bortezomib is a reversible boronic acid inhibitor of the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome. Next generation proteasome inhibitors include carfilzomib and oprozomib which are irreversible epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors; and ixazomib and delanzomib which are reversible boronic acid proteasome inhibitors. Two proteasome inhibitors, bortezomib and carfilzomib are FDA approved drugs and ixazomib and oprozomib are in late stage clinical trials. All of the agents are potent cytotoxics. The disease focus for all the proteasome inhibitors is multiple myeloma. This focus arose from clinical observations made in bortezomib early clinical trials. Later preclinical studies confirmed that multiple myeloma cells were indeed more sensitive to proteasome inhibitors than other tumor cell types. The discovery and development of the proteasome inhibitor class of anticancer agents has progressed through a classic route of serendipity and scientific investigation. These agents are continuing to have a major impact in their treatment of hematologic malignancies and are beginning to be explored as potential treatment agent for non-cancer indications. PMID:25935605

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cif Protein Enhances the Ubiquitination and Proteasomal Degradation of the Transporter Associated with Antigen Processing (TAP) and Reduces Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I Antigen Presentation*

    PubMed Central

    Bomberger, Jennifer M.; Ely, Kenneth H.; Bangia, Naveen; Ye, Siying; Green, Kathy A.; Green, William R.; Enelow, Richard I.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Cif (PA2934), a bacterial virulence factor secreted in outer membrane vesicles by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, increases the ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of some, but not all, plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC), including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and P-glycoprotein. The goal of this study was to determine whether Cif enhances the ubiquitination and degradation of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP1 and TAP2), members of the ABC transporter family that play an essential role in antigen presentation and intracellular pathogen clearance. Cif selectively increased the amount of ubiquitinated TAP1 and increased its degradation in the proteasome of human airway epithelial cells. This effect of Cif was mediated by reducing USP10 deubiquitinating activity, resulting in increased polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of TAP1. The reduction in TAP1 abundance decreased peptide antigen translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum, an effect that resulted in reduced antigen available to MHC class I molecules for presentation at the plasma membrane of airway epithelial cells and recognition by CD8+ T cells. Cif is the first bacterial factor identified that inhibits TAP function and MHC class I antigen presentation. PMID:24247241

  4. Smad3 recruits the anaphase-promoting complex for ubiquitination and degradation of SnoN

    SciTech Connect

    Stroschein, Shannon L.; Bonni, Shirin; Wrana, Jeffrey L.; Luo, Kunxin

    2001-09-11

    Smad proteins mediate transforming growth factor-b signaling to regulate cell growth and differentiation. SnoN is an important negative regulator of TGFb signaling that functions to maintain the repressed state of TGFb target genes in the absence of ligand. Upon TGFb stimulation, Smad3 and Smad2 translocate into the nucleus and induce a rapid degradation of SnoN, allowing activation of TGFb target genes. Here we show that Smad2- or Smad3-induced degradation of SnoN requires the ubiquitin-dependent proteasome and can be mediated by the anaphase promoting complex (APC) and the UbcH5 family of ubiquitin conjugating enzymes. Smad3 and to a lesser extent, Smad2, interact with both the APC and SnoN, resulting in the recruitment of the APC to SnoN and subsequent ubiquitination of SnoN in a destruction box-dependent manner. In addition to the destruction box, efficient degradation of SnoN also requires the Smad3 binding site in SnoN as well as key lysine residues necessary for ubiquitin attachment. Mutation of either the Smad3 binding site or lysine residues results in stabilization of SnoN and in enhanced antagonism of TGFb signaling. Our studies elucidate an important pathway for the degradation of SnoN and reveal a novel role of the APC in regulation of TGFb signaling.

  5. IRF3 inhibition by rotavirus NSP1 is host cell and virus strain dependent but independent of NSP1 proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Sen, Adrish; Feng, Ningguo; Ettayebi, Khalil; Hardy, Michele E; Greenberg, Harry B

    2009-10-01

    Rotavirus host range restriction forms a basis for strain attenuation although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. In mouse fibroblasts, the inability of rotavirus NSP1 to mediate interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) degradation correlates with IFN-dependent restricted replication of the bovine UK strain but not the mouse EW and simian RRV strains. We found that UK NSP1 is unable to degrade IRF3 when expressed in murine NIH 3T3 cells in contrast to the EW and RRV NSP1 proteins. Surprisingly, UK NSP1 expression led to IRF3 degradation in simian COS7 cells, indicating that IRF3 degradation by NSP1 is host cell dependent, a finding further supported using adenovirus-expressed NSP1 from NCDV bovine rotavirus. By expressing heterologous IRF3 proteins in complementary host cells, we found that IRF3 is the minimal host factor constraining NSP1 IRF3-degradative ability. NSP1-mediated IRF3 degradation was enhanced by transfection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in a host cell-specific manner, and in IRF3-dependent positive regulatory domain III reporter assays, NSP1 inhibited IRF3 function in response to pathway activation by dsRNA, TBK-1, IRF3, or constitutively activated IRF3-5D. An interesting observation arising from these experiments is the ability of transiently expressed UK NSP1 to inhibit poly(I:C)-directed IRF3 activity in NIH 3T3 cells in the absence of detectable IRF3 degradation, an unexpected finding since UK virus infection was unable to block IFN secretion, and UK NSP1 expression did not result in suppression of IRF3-directed activation of the pathway. RRV and EW but not UK NSP1 was proteasomally degraded, requiring E1 ligase activity, although NSP1 degradation was not required for IRF3 degradation. Using a chimeric RRV NSP1 protein containing the carboxyl 100 residues derived from UK NSP1, we found that the RRV NSP1 carboxyl 100 residues are critical for its IRF3 inhibition in murine cells but are not essential for NSP1 degradation. Thus, NSP1's

  6. Intracellular Protein Degradation: From a Vague Idea through the Lysosome and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System and onto Human Diseases and Drug Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Ciechanover, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Between the 1950s and 1980s, scientists were focusing mostly on how the genetic code was transcribed to RNA and translated to proteins, but how proteins were degraded had remained a neglected research area. With the discovery of the lysosome by Christian de Duve it was assumed that cellular proteins are degraded within this organelle. Yet, several independent lines of experimental evidence strongly suggested that intracellular proteolysis was largely non-lysosomal, but the mechanisms involved have remained obscure. The discovery of the ubiquitin-proteasome system resolved the enigma. We now recognize that degradation of intracellular proteins is involved in regulation of a broad array of cellular processes, such as cell cycle and division, regulation of transcription factors, and assurance of the cellular quality control. Not surprisingly, aberrations in the system have been implicated in the pathogenesis of human disease, such as malignancies and neurodegenerative disorders, which led subsequently to an increasing effort to develop mechanism-based drugs. PMID:23908826

  7. Dopamine or biopterin deficiency potentiates phosphorylation at (40)Ser and ubiquitination of tyrosine hydroxylase to be degraded by the ubiquitin proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Kawahata, Ichiro; Ohtaku, Shiori; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Ichinose, Hiroshi; Yamakuni, Tohru

    2015-09-11

    The protein amount of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), that is the rate-limiting enzyme for the biosynthesis of dopamine (DA), should be tightly regulated, whereas its degradation pathway is largely unknown. In this study, we analyzed how the TH protein is chemically modified and subsequently degraded under deficiencies of DA and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a cofactor for TH, by using pharmacological agents in PC12D cells and cultured mesencephalic neurons. When inhibition of DA- or BH4-synthesizing enzymes greatly reduced the DA contents in PC12D cells, a marked and persistent increase in phosphorylated TH at (40)Ser (p40-TH) was concomitantly observed. This phosphorylation was mediated by D2 dopamine auto-receptor and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Our immunoprecipitation experiments showed that the increase in the p40-TH level was accompanied with its poly-ubiquitination. Treatment of PC12D cells with cycloheximide showed that total-TH protein level was reduced by the DA- or BH4-depletion. Notably, this reduction in the total-TH protein level was sensitive not only to a 26S proteasomal inhibitor, MG-132, but also to a PKA inhibitor, H-89. These data demonstrated that DA deficiency should induce compensatory activation of TH via phosphorylation at (40)Ser through D2-autoreceptor and PKA-mediated pathways, which in turn give a rise to its degradation through an ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, resulting in a negative spiral of DA production when DA deficiency persists. PMID:26225746

  8. Increased S-Nitrosylation and Proteasomal Degradation of Caspase-3 during Infection Contribute to the Persistence of Adherent Invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) in Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dunne, Karl A.; Allam, Amr; McIntosh, Anne; Houston, Stephanie A.; Cerovic, Vuk; Goodyear, Carl S.; Roe, Andrew J.; Beatson, Scott A.; Milling, Simon W.; Walker, Daniel; Wall, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    Adherent invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) have been implicated as a causative agent of Crohn’s disease (CD) due to their isolation from the intestines of CD sufferers and their ability to persist in macrophages inducing granulomas. The rapid intracellular multiplication of AIEC sets it apart from other enteric pathogens such as Salmonella Typhimurium which after limited replication induce programmed cell death (PCD). Understanding the response of infected cells to the increased AIEC bacterial load and associated metabolic stress may offer insights into AIEC pathogenesis and its association with CD. Here we show that AIEC persistence within macrophages and dendritic cells is facilitated by increased proteasomal degradation of caspase-3. In addition S-nitrosylation of pro- and active forms of caspase-3, which can inhibit the enzymes activity, is increased in AIEC infected macrophages. This S-nitrosylated caspase-3 was seen to accumulate upon inhibition of the proteasome indicating an additional role for S-nitrosylation in inducing caspase-3 degradation in a manner independent of ubiquitination. In addition to the autophagic genetic defects that are linked to CD, this delay in apoptosis mediated in AIEC infected cells through increased degradation of caspase-3, may be an essential factor in its prolonged persistence in CD patients. PMID:23861899

  9. Human ASPL/TUG interacts with p97 and complements the proteasome mislocalization of a yeast ubx4 mutant, but not the ER-associated degradation defect

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In mammalian cells, ASPL is involved in insulin-stimulated redistribution of the glucose transporter GLUT4 and assembly of the Golgi apparatus. Its putative yeast orthologue, Ubx4, is important for proteasome localization, endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation (ERAD), and UV-induced degradation of RNA polymerase. Results Here, we show that ASPL is a cofactor of the hexameric ATPase complex, known as p97 or VCP in mammals and Cdc48 in yeast. In addition, ASPL interacts in vitro with NSF, another hexameric ATPase complex. ASPL localizes to the ER membrane. The central area in ASPL, containing both a SHP box and a UBX domain, is required for binding to the p97 N-domain. Knock-down of ASPL does not impair degradation of misfolded secretory proteins via the ERAD pathway. Deletion of UBX4 in yeast causes cycloheximide sensitivity, while ubx4 cdc48-3 double mutations cause proteasome mislocalization. ASPL alleviates these defects, but not the impaired ERAD. Conclusions In conclusion, ASPL and Ubx4 are homologous proteins with only partially overlapping functions. Both interact with p97/Cdc48, but while Ubx4 is important for ERAD, ASPL appears not to share this function. PMID:25078495

  10. HRD1 suppresses the growth and metastasis of breast cancer cells by promoting IGF-1R degradation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ying; Shen, Ya-Chen; Li, Min; Xuan, Wen-Ying; Liu, Lin-Hui; Wang, Jia; Wang, Xue-Rong; Gao, Ze-Jun; Liang, Xiu-Bin; Su, Dong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    HRD1 (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl reductase degradation) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase. We found that HRD1 was significantly downregulated in 170 breast cancer tissues. Low tumoral HRD1 expression was correlated with clinicopathological characteristics and a shorter survival in breast cancer patients. P65 specifically bound to the HRD1 promoter and inhibited HRD1 expression. Suppression of NF-κB activity reversed IL-6-induced downregulation of HRD1 expression. HRD1 interacted with IGF-1R and promoted its ubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome. Overexpression of HRD1 resulted in the inhibition of growth, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, HRD1 attenuated IL-6-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in MCF10A cells. These findings uncover a novel role for HRD1 in breast cancer. PMID:26536657

  11. Vitamin D Up-Regulates the Vitamin D Receptor by Protecting It from Proteasomal Degradation in Human CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kongsbak, Martin; von Essen, Marina R.; Boding, Lasse; Levring, Trine B.; Schjerling, Peter; Lauritsen, Jens P. H.; Woetmann, Anders; Ødum, Niels; Bonefeld, Charlotte M.; Geisler, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    The active form of vitamin D3, 1,25(OH)2D3, has significant immunomodulatory properties and is an important determinant in the differentiation of CD4+ effector T cells. The biological actions of 1,25(OH)2D3 are mediated by the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and are believed to correlate with the VDR protein expression level in a given cell. The aim of this study was to determine if and how 1,25(OH)2D3 by itself regulates VDR expression in human CD4+ T cells. We found that activated CD4+ T cells have the capacity to convert the inactive 25(OH)D3 to the active 1,25(OH)2D3 that subsequently up-regulates VDR protein expression approximately 2-fold. 1,25(OH)2D3 does not increase VDR mRNA expression but increases the half-life of the VDR protein in activated CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, 1,25(OH)2D3 induces a significant intracellular redistribution of the VDR. We show that 1,25(OH)2D3 stabilizes the VDR by protecting it from proteasomal degradation. Finally, we demonstrate that proteasome inhibition leads to up-regulation of VDR protein expression and increases 1,25(OH)2D3-induced gene activation. In conclusion, our study shows that activated CD4+ T cells can produce 1,25(OH)2D3, and that 1,25(OH)2D3 induces a 2-fold up-regulation of the VDR protein expression in activated CD4+ T cells by protecting the VDR against proteasomal degradation. PMID:24792400

  12. Inhibition of PCSK9 Transcription by Berberine Involves Down-regulation of Hepatic HNF1α Protein Expression through the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Degradation Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Bin; Li, Hai; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Cao, Aiqin; Liu, Jingwen

    2015-01-01

    Our previous in vitro studies have identified hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF1α) as an obligated trans-activator for PCSK9 gene expression and demonstrated its functional involvement in the suppression of PCSK9 expression by berberine (BBR), a natural cholesterol-lowering compound. In this study, we investigated the mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect of BBR on HNF1α-mediated PCSK9 transcription. Administration of BBR to hyperlipidemic mice and hamsters lowered circulating PCSK9 concentrations and hepatic PCSK9 mRNA levels without affecting the gene expression of HNF1α. However, hepatic HNF1α protein levels were markedly reduced in BBR-treated animals as compared with the control. Using HepG2 cells as a model system, we obtained evidence that BBR treatment let to accelerated degradation of HNF1α protein. By applying inhibitors to selectively block the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy-lysosomal pathway, we show that HNF1α protein content in HepG2 cells was not affected by bafilomycin A1 treatment, but it was dose-dependently increased by UPS inhibitors bortezomib and MG132. Bortezomib treatment elevated HNF1α and PCSK9 cellular levels with concomitant reductions of LDL receptor protein. Moreover, HNF1α protein displayed a multiubiquitination ladder pattern in cells treated with BBR or overexpressing ubiquitin. By expressing GFP-HNF1α fusion protein in cells, we observed that blocking UPS resulted in accumulation of GFP-HNF1α in cytoplasm. Importantly, we show that the BBR reducing effects on HNF1α protein and PCSK9 gene transcription can be eradicated by proteasome inhibitors. Altogether, our studies using BBR as a probe uncovered a new aspect of PCSK9 regulation by ubiquitin-induced proteasomal degradation of HNF1α. PMID:25540198

  13. Degradation of cAMP-Responsive Element–Binding Protein by the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway Contributes to Glucotoxicity in β-Cells and Human Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Costes, Safia; Vandewalle, Brigitte; Tourrel-Cuzin, Cécile; Broca, Christophe; Linck, Nathalie; Bertrand, Gyslaine; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Portha, Bernard; Pattou, François; Bockaert, Joel; Dalle, Stéphane

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In type 2 diabetes, chronic hyperglycemia is detrimental to β-cells, causing apoptosis and impaired insulin secretion. The transcription factor cAMP-responsive element–binding protein (CREB) is crucial for β-cell survival and function. We investigated whether prolonged exposure of β-cells to high glucose affects the functional integrity of CREB. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS INS-1E cells and rat and human islets were used. Gene expression was analyzed by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Apoptosis was detected by cleaved caspase-3 emergence, DNA fragmentation, and electron microscopy. RESULTS Chronic exposure of INS-1E cells and rat and human islets to high glucose resulted in decreased CREB protein expression, phosphorylation, and transcriptional activity associated with apoptosis and impaired β-cell function. High-glucose treatment increased CREB polyubiquitination, while treatment of INS-1E cells with the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 prevented the decrease in CREB content. The emergence of apoptosis in INS-1E cells with decreased CREB protein expression knocked down by small interfering RNA suggested that loss of CREB protein content induced by high glucose contributes to β-cell apoptosis. Loading INS-1E cells or human islets with a cell-permeable peptide mimicking the proteasomal targeting sequence of CREB blocked CREB degradation and protected INS-1E cells and human islets from apoptosis induced by high glucose. The insulin secretion in response to glucose and the insulin content were preserved in human islets exposed to high glucose and loaded with the peptide. CONCLUSIONS These studies demonstrate that the CREB degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway contributes to β-cell dysfunction and death upon glucotoxicity and provide new insight into the cellular mechanisms of glucotoxicity. PMID:19223597

  14. Disulfiram promotes the conversion of carcinogenic cadmium to a proteasome inhibitor with pro-apoptotic activity in human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li Lihua; Yang Huanjie; Chen Di; Cui, Cindy; Ping Dou, Q.

    2008-06-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system is involved in various cellular processes, including transcription, apoptosis, and cell cycle. In vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies suggest the potential use of proteasome inhibitors as anticancer drugs. Cadmium (Cd) is a widespread environmental pollutant that has been classified as a human carcinogen. Recent study in our laboratory suggested that the clinically used anti-alcoholism drug disulfiram (DSF) could form a complex with tumor cellular copper, resulting in inhibition of the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity and induction of cancer cell apoptosis. In the current study, we report, for the first time, that DSF is able to convert the carcinogen Cd to a proteasome-inhibitor and cancer cell apoptosis inducer. Although the DSF-Cd complex inhibited the chymotrypsin-like activity of a purified 20S proteasome with an IC{sub 50} value of 32 {mu}mol/L, this complex was much more potent in inhibiting the chymotrypsin-like activity of prostate cancer cellular 26S proteasome. Inhibition of cellular proteasome activity by the DSF-Cd complex resulted in the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and the natural proteasome substrate p27, which was followed by activation of calpain and induction of apoptosis. Importantly, human breast cancer MCF10DCIS cells were much more sensitive to the DSF-Cd treatment than immortalized but non-tumorigenic human breast MCF-10A cells, demonstrating that the DSF-Cd complex could selectively induce proteasome inhibition and apoptosis in human tumor cells. Our work suggests the potential use of DSF for treatment of cells with accumulated levels of carcinogen Cd.

  15. HSF-1 activates the ubiquitin proteasome system to promote non-apoptotic developmental cell death in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kinet, Maxime J; Malin, Jennifer A; Abraham, Mary C; Blum, Elyse S; Silverman, Melanie R; Lu, Yun; Shaham, Shai

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis is a prominent metazoan cell death form. Yet, mutations in apoptosis regulators cause only minor defects in vertebrate development, suggesting that another developmental cell death mechanism exists. While some non-apoptotic programs have been molecularly characterized, none appear to control developmental cell culling. Linker-cell-type death (LCD) is a morphologically conserved non-apoptotic cell death process operating in Caenorhabditis elegans and vertebrate development, and is therefore a compelling candidate process complementing apoptosis. However, the details of LCD execution are not known. Here we delineate a molecular-genetic pathway governing LCD in C. elegans. Redundant activities of antagonistic Wnt signals, a temporal control pathway, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase signaling control heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1), a conserved stress-activated transcription factor. Rather than protecting cells, HSF-1 promotes their demise by activating components of the ubiquitin proteasome system, including the E2 ligase LET-70/UBE2D2 functioning with E3 components CUL-3, RBX-1, BTBD-2, and SIAH-1. Our studies uncover design similarities between LCD and developmental apoptosis, and provide testable predictions for analyzing LCD in vertebrates. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12821.001 PMID:26952214

  16. Cigarette smoke induces proteasomal-mediated degradation of DNA methyltransferases and methyl CpG-/CpG domain-binding proteins in embryonic orofacial cells.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Greene, Robert M; Pisano, M Michele

    2015-12-01

    Orofacial clefts, the most prevalent of developmental anomalies, occur with a frequency of 1 in 700 live births. Maternal cigarette smoking during pregnancy represents a risk factor for having a child with a cleft lip and/or cleft palate. Using primary cultures of first branchial arch-derived cells (1-BA cells), which contribute to the formation of the lip and palate, the present study addressed the hypothesis that components of cigarette smoke alter global DNA methylation, and/or expression of DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts) and various methyl CpG-binding proteins. Primary cultures of 1-BA cells, exposed to 80μg/mL cigarette smoke extract (CSE) for 24h, exhibited a >13% decline in global DNA methylation and triggered proteasomal-mediated degradation of Dnmts (DNMT-1 and -3a), methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) and methyl-CpG binding domain protein 3 (MBD-3). Pretreatment of 1-BA cells with the proteasomal inhibitor MG-132 completely reversed such degradation. Collectively, these data allow the suggestion of a potential epigenetic mechanism underlying maternal cigarette smoke exposure-induced orofacial clefting. PMID:26482727

  17. Conjugation of the Ubiquitin Activating Enzyme UBE1 with the Ubiquitin-Like Modifier FAT10 Targets It for Proteasomal Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Bialas, Johanna; Groettrup, Marcus; Aichem, Annette

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitin-like modifier HLA-F adjacent transcript 10 (FAT10) directly targets its substrates for proteasomal degradation by becoming covalently attached via its C-terminal diglycine motif to internal lysine residues of its substrate proteins. The conjugation machinery consists of the bispecific E1 activating enzyme Ubiquitin-like modifier activating enzyme 6 (UBA6), the likewise bispecific E2 conjugating enzyme UBA6-specific E2 enzyme 1 (USE1), and possibly E3 ligases. By mass spectrometry analysis the ubiquitin E1 activating enzyme ubiquitin-activating enzyme 1 (UBE1) was identified as putative substrate of FAT10. Here, we confirm that UBE1 and FAT10 form a stable non-reducible conjugate under overexpression as well as under endogenous conditions after induction of endogenous FAT10 expression with proinflammatory cytokines. FAT10ylation of UBE1 depends on the diglycine motif of FAT10. By specifically downregulating FAT10, UBA6 or USE1 with siRNAs, we show that UBE1 modification depends on the FAT10 conjugation pathway. Furthermore, we confirm that UBE1 does not act as a second E1 activating enzyme for FAT10 but that FAT10ylation of UBE1 leads to its proteasomal degradation, implying a putative regulatory role of FAT10 in the ubiquitin conjugation pathway. PMID:25768649

  18. The Pallbearer E3 Ligase Promotes Actin Remodeling via RAC in Efferocytosis by Degrading the Ribosomal Protein S6

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Hui; Wang, Hui; Silva, Elizabeth; Thompson, James; Guillou, Aurélien; Yates, John R.; Buchon, Nicolas; Franc, Nathalie C.

    2014-01-01

    Clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) is achieved through phagocytosis by professional or amateur phagocytes. It is critical for tissue homeostasis and remodeling in all animals. Failure in this process can contribute to the development of inflammatory autoimmune or neurodegenerative diseases. We previously found that the PALL-SCF E3-Ubiquitin ligase complex promotes apoptotic cell clearance, yet it remained unclear as to how it did so. Here, we show that the F-Box protein PALL interacts with phosphorylated Ribosomal protein S6 (RpS6) to promote its ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation. This leads to RAC2 GTPase up-regulation and activation and F-actin remodeling that promotes efferocytosis. We further show that the specific role of PALL in efferocytosis is driven by its apoptotic cell-induced nuclear export. Finding a role for RpS6 in negatively regulating efferocytosis provides the opportunity to develop new strategies to regulate this process. PMID:25533207

  19. The Pallbearer E3 ligase promotes actin remodeling via RAC in efferocytosis by degrading the ribosomal protein S6.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hui; Wang, Hui; Silva, Elizabeth A; Thompson, James; Guillou, Aurélien; Yates, John R; Buchon, Nicolas; Franc, Nathalie C

    2015-01-12

    Clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) is achieved through phagocytosis by professional or amateur phagocytes. It is critical for tissue homeostasis and remodeling in all animals. Failure in this process can contribute to the development of inflammatory autoimmune or neurodegenerative diseases. We found previously that the PALL-SCF E3-ubiquitin ligase complex promotes apoptotic cell clearance, but it remained unclear how it did so. Here we show that the F-box protein PALL interacts with phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (RpS6) to promote its ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation. This leads to RAC2 GTPase upregulation and activation and F-actin remodeling that promotes efferocytosis. We further show that the specific role of PALL in efferocytosis is driven by its apoptotic cell-induced nuclear export. Finding a role for RpS6 in the negative regulation of efferocytosis provides the opportunity to develop new strategies to regulate this process. PMID:25533207

  20. Disulfiram promotes the conversion of carcinogenic cadmium to a proteasome inhibitor with pro-apoptotic activity in human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lihua; Yang, Huanjie; Chen, Di; Cui, Cindy; Dou, Q. Ping

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitinproteasome system is involved in various cellular processes, including transcription, apoptosis, and cell cycle. In vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies suggest the potential use of proteasome inhibitors as anticancer drugs. Cadmium (Cd) is a widespread environmental pollutant that has been classified as a human carcinogen. Recent study in our laboratory suggested that the clinically used anti-alcoholism drug disulfiram (DSF) could form a complex with tumor cellular copper, resulting in inhibition of the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity and induction of cancer cell apoptosis. In the current study, we report, for the first time, that DSF is able to convert the carcinogen Cd to a proteasome-inhibitor and cancer cell apoptosis inducer. Although the DSF–Cd complex inhibited the chymotrypsin-like activity of a purified 20S proteasome with an IC50 value of 32 μmol/L, this complex was much more potent in inhibiting the chymotrypsin-like activity of prostate cancer cellular 26S proteasome. Inhibition of cellular proteasome activity by the DSF–Cd complex resulted in the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and the natural proteasome substrate p27, which was followed by activation of calpain and induction of apoptosis. Importantly, human breast cancer MCF10DCIS cells were much more sensitive to the DSF–Cd treatment than immortalized but non-tumorigenic human breast MCF-10A cells, demonstrating that the DSF–Cd complex could selectively induce proteasome inhibition and apoptosis in human tumor cells. Our work suggests the potential use of DSF for treatment of cells with accumulated levels of carcinogen Cd. PMID:18304598

  1. Degradation of the encephalomyocarditis virus and hepatitis A virus 3C proteases by the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system in vivo.

    PubMed

    Schlax, Peter E; Zhang, Jin; Lewis, Elizabeth; Planchart, Antonio; Lawson, T Glen

    2007-04-10

    We have isolated stably transfected mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines that inducibly express either the mature encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) or hepatitis A virus (HAV) 3C protease and have used these cells to demonstrate that both proteins are subject to degradation in vivo by the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system. The detection of 3C protease expression in these cells requires inducing conditions and the presence of one of several proteasome inhibitors. Both 3C proteases are incorporated into conjugates with ubiquitin in vivo. HAV 3C protease expression has deleterious effects on cell viability, as determined by observation and counting of cells cultured in the absence or presence of inducing conditions. The EMCV 3C protease was found to be preferentially localized to the nucleus of induced cells, while the HAV 3C protease remains in the cytoplasm. The absence of polyubiquitinated EMCV 3C protease conjugates in nuclear fraction preparations suggests that localization to the nucleus can protect this protein from ubiquitination. PMID:17150238

  2. Degradation of the encephalomyocarditis virus and hepatitis A virus 3C proteases by the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Schlax, Peter E.; Zhang Jin; Lewis, Elizabeth; Planchart, Antonio; Lawson, T. Glen . E-mail: tlawson@bates.edu

    2007-04-10

    We have isolated stably transfected mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines that inducibly express either the mature encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) or hepatitis A virus (HAV) 3C protease and have used these cells to demonstrate that both proteins are subject to degradation in vivo by the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system. The detection of 3C protease expression in these cells requires inducing conditions and the presence of one of several proteasome inhibitors. Both 3C proteases are incorporated into conjugates with ubiquitin in vivo. HAV 3C protease expression has deleterious effects on cell viability, as determined by observation and counting of cells cultured in the absence or presence of inducing conditions. The EMCV 3C protease was found to be preferentially localized to the nucleus of induced cells, while the HAV 3C protease remains in the cytoplasm. The absence of polyubiquitinated EMCV 3C protease conjugates in nuclear fraction preparations suggests that localization to the nucleus can protect this protein from ubiquitination.

  3. Hinokitiol inhibits vasculogenic mimicry activity of breast cancer stem/progenitor cells through proteasome-mediated degradation of epidermal growth factor receptor

    PubMed Central

    TU, DOM-GENE; YU, YUN; LEE, CHE-HSIN; KUO, YU-LIANG; LU, YIN-CHE; TU, CHI-WEN; CHANG, WEN-WEI

    2016-01-01

    Hinokitiol, alternatively known as β-thujaplicin, is a tropolone-associated natural compound with antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and antitumor activity. Breast cancer stem/progenitor cells (BCSCs) are a subpopulation of breast cancer cells associated with tumor initiation, chemoresistance and metastatic behavior, and may be enriched by mammosphere cultivation. Previous studies have demonstrated that BCSCs exhibit vasculogenic mimicry (VM) activity via the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway. The present study investigated the anti-VM activity of hinokitiol in BCSCs. At a concentration below the half maximal inhibitory concentration, hinokitiol inhibited VM formation of mammosphere cells derived from two human breast cancer cell lines. Hinokitiol was additionally indicated to downregulate EGFR protein expression in mammosphere-forming BCSCs without affecting the expression of messenger RNA. The protein stability of EGFR in BCSCs was also decreased by hinokitiol. The EGFR protein expression and VM formation capability of hinokitiol-treated BCSCs were restored by co-treatment with MG132, a proteasome inhibitor. In conclusion, the present study indicated that hinokitiol may inhibit the VM activity of BCSCs through stimulating proteasome-mediated EGFR degradation. Hinokitiol may act as an anti-VM agent, and may be useful for the development of novel breast cancer therapeutic agents. PMID:27073579

  4. 1,10-Phenanthroline promotes copper complexes into tumor cells and induces apoptosis by inhibiting the proteasome activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Bi, Caifeng; Schmitt, Sara M; Fan, Yuhua; Dong, Lili; Zuo, Jian; Dou, Q Ping

    2012-12-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid and indole-3-propionic acid, two potent natural plant growth hormones, have attracted attention as promising prodrugs in cancer therapy. Copper is known to be a cofactor essential for tumor angiogenesis. We have previously reported that taurine, L-glutamine, and quinoline-2-carboxaldehyde Schiff base copper complexes inhibit cell proliferation and proteasome activity in human cancer cells. In the current study, we synthesized two types of copper complexes, dinuclear complexes and ternary complexes, to investigate whether a certain structure could easily carry copper into cancer cells and consequently inhibit tumor proteasome activity and induce apoptosis. We observed that ternary complexes binding with 1,10-phenanthroline are more potent proteasome inhibitors and apoptosis inducers than dinuclear complexes in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, the ternary complexes potently inhibit proteasome activity before induction of apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells, but not in nontumorigenic MCF-10A cells. Our results suggest that copper complexes binding with 1,10-phenanthroline as the third ligand could serve as potent, selective proteasome inhibitors and apoptosis inducers in tumor cells, and that the ternary complexes may be good potential anticancer drugs. PMID:23053530

  5. Characterizing the Dynamics of Proteasome Complexes by Proteomics Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Kaake, Robyn M.; Kao, Athit; Yu, Clinton

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The proteasome is the degradation machine of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, which is critical in controlling many essential biological processes. Aberrant regulation of proteasome-dependent protein degradation can lead to various human diseases, and general proteasome inhibitors have shown efficacy for cancer treatments. Though clinically effective, current proteasome inhibitors have detrimental side effects and, thus, better therapeutic strategies targeting proteasomes are needed. Therefore, a comprehensive characterization of proteasome complexes will provide the molecular details that are essential for developing new and improved drugs. Recent Advances: New mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics approaches have been developed to study protein interaction networks and structural topologies of proteasome complexes. The results have helped define the dynamic proteomes of proteasome complexes, thus providing new insights into the mechanisms underlying proteasome function and regulation. Critical Issues: The proteasome exists as heterogeneous populations in tissues/cells, and its proteome is highly dynamic and complex. In addition, proteasome complexes are regulated by various mechanisms under different physiological conditions. Consequently, complete proteomic profiling of proteasome complexes remains a major challenge for the field. Future Directions: We expect that proteomic methodologies enabling full characterization of proteasome complexes will continue to evolve. Further advances in MS instrumentation and protein separation techniques will be needed to facilitate the detailed proteomic analysis of low-abundance components and subpopulations of proteasome complexes. The results will help us understand proteasome biology as well as provide new therapeutic targets for disease diagnostics and treatment. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2444–2456. PMID:24423446

  6. Exchange Factor TBL1 and Arginine Methyltransferase PRMT6 Cooperate in Protecting G Protein Pathway Suppressor 2 (GPS2) from Proteasomal Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiawen; Cardamone, M. Dafne; Johnson, Holly E.; Neault, Mathieu; Chan, Michelle; Floyd, Z. Elizabeth; Mallette, Frédérick A.; Perissi, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    G protein pathway suppressor 2 (GPS2) is a multifunctional protein involved in the regulation of a number of metabolic organs. First identified as part of the NCoR-SMRT corepressor complex, GPS2 is known to play an important role in the nucleus in the regulation of gene transcription and meiotic recombination. In addition, we recently reported a non-transcriptional role of GPS2 as an inhibitor of the proinflammatory TNFα pathway in the cytosol. Although this suggests that the control of GPS2 localization may be an important determinant of its molecular functions, a clear understanding of GPS2 differential targeting to specific cellular locations is still lacking. Here we show that a fine balance between protein stabilization and degradation tightly regulates GPS2 nuclear function. Our findings indicate that GPS2 is degraded upon polyubiquitination by the E3 ubiquitin ligase Siah2. Unexpectedly, interaction with the exchange factor TBL1 is required to protect GPS2 from degradation, with methylation of GPS2 by arginine methyltransferase PRMT6 regulating the interaction with TBL1 and inhibiting proteasome-dependent degradation. Overall, our findings indicate that regulation of GPS2 by posttranslational modifications provides an effective strategy for modulating its molecular function within the nuclear compartment. PMID:26070566

  7. The Arabidopsis F-Box Protein CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 Is Stabilized by SCFCOI1 and Degraded via the 26S Proteasome Pathway[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jianbin; Li, Haiou; Li, Shuhua; Yao, Ruifeng; Deng, Haiteng; Xie, Qi; Xie, Daoxin

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonate regulates critical aspects of plant development and defense. The F-box protein CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 (COI1) functions as a jasmonate receptor and forms Skp1/Cullin1/F-box protein COI1 (SCFCOI1) complexes with Arabidopsis thaliana Cullin1 and Arabidopsis Skp1-like1 (ASK1) to recruit its substrate jasmonate ZIM-domain proteins for ubiquitination and degradation. Here, we reveal a mechanism regulating COI1 protein levels in Arabidopsis. Genetic and biochemical analysis and in vitro degradation assays demonstrated that the COI1 protein was initially stabilized by interacting with ASK1 and further secured by assembly into SCFCOI1 complexes, suggesting a function for SCFCOI1 in the stabilization of COI1 in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, we show that dissociated COI1 is degraded through the 26S proteasome pathway, and we identified the 297th Lys residue as an active ubiquitination site in COI1. Our data suggest that the COI1 protein is strictly regulated by a dynamic balance of SCFCOI1-mediated stabilization and 26S proteasome–mediated degradation and thus maintained at a protein level essential for proper biological functions in Arabidopsis development and defense responses. PMID:23386265

  8. Thiostrepton interacts covalently with Rpt subunits of the 19S proteasome and proteasome substrates

    PubMed Central

    Sandu, Cristinel; Chandramouli, Nagaranjan; Glickman, Joseph Fraser; Molina, Henrik; Kuo, Chueh-Ling; Kukushkin, Nikolay; Goldberg, Alfred L; Steller, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report a novel mechanism of proteasome inhibition mediated by Thiostrepton (Thsp), which interacts covalently with Rpt subunits of the 19S proteasome and proteasome substrates. We identified Thsp in a cell-based high-throughput screen using a fluorescent reporter sensitive to degradation by the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. Thiostrepton behaves as a proteasome inhibitor in several paradigms, including cell-based reporters, detection of global ubiquitination status, and proteasome-mediated labile protein degradation. In vitro, Thsp does not block the chymotrypsin activity of the 26S proteasome. In a cell-based IκBα degradation assay, Thsp is a slow inhibitor and 4 hrs of treatment achieves the same effects as MG-132 at 30 min. We show that Thsp forms covalent adducts with proteins in human cells and demonstrate their nature by mass spectrometry. Furthermore, the ability of Thsp to interact covalently with the cysteine residues is essential for its proteasome inhibitory function. We further show that a Thsp modified peptide cannot be degraded by proteasomes in vitro. Importantly, we demonstrate that Thsp binds covalently to Rpt subunits of the 19S regulatory particle and forms bridges with a proteasome substrate. Taken together, our results uncover an important role of Thsp in 19S proteasome inhibition. PMID:26033448

  9. Mule Regulates the Intestinal Stem Cell Niche via the Wnt Pathway and Targets EphB3 for Proteasomal and Lysosomal Degradation.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Brauer, Carmen; Hao, Zhenyue; Elia, Andrew J; Fortin, Jérôme M; Nechanitzky, Robert; Brauer, Patrick M; Sheng, Yi; Mana, Miyeko D; Chio, Iok In Christine; Haight, Jillian; Pollett, Aaron; Cairns, Robert; Tworzyanski, Leanne; Inoue, Satoshi; Reardon, Colin; Marques, Ana; Silvester, Jennifer; Cox, Maureen A; Wakeham, Andrew; Yilmaz, Omer H; Sabatini, David M; van Es, Johan H; Clevers, Hans; Sato, Toshiro; Mak, Tak W

    2016-08-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase Mule is often overexpressed in human colorectal cancers, but its role in gut tumorigenesis is unknown. Here, we show in vivo that Mule controls murine intestinal stem and progenitor cell proliferation by modulating Wnt signaling via c-Myc. Mule also regulates protein levels of the receptor tyrosine kinase EphB3 by targeting it for proteasomal and lysosomal degradation. In the intestine, EphB/ephrinB interactions position cells along the crypt-villus axis and compartmentalize incipient colorectal tumors. Our study thus unveils an important new avenue by which Mule acts as an intestinal tumor suppressor by regulation of the intestinal stem cell niche. PMID:27184401

  10. Murine Cytomegalovirus US22 Protein pM140 Protects Its Binding Partner, pM141, from Proteasome-Dependent but Ubiquitin-Independent Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Bolin, Lisa L.; Hanson, Laura K.; Slater, Jacquelyn S.; Kerry, Julie A.; Campbell, Ann E.

    2010-01-01

    Stable assembly of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) virions in differentiated macrophages is dependent upon the expression of US22 family gene M140. The M140 protein (pM140) exists in complex with products of neighboring US22 genes. Here we report that pM140 protects its binding partner, pM141, from ubiquitin-independent proteasomal degradation. Protection is conferred by a stabilization domain mapping to amino acids 306 to 380 within pM140, and this domain is functionally independent from the region that confers binding of pM140 to pM141. The M140 protein thus contains multiple domains that collectively confer a structure necessary to function in virion assembly in macrophages. PMID:19955315

  11. Novel sphingosine-containing analogues selectively inhibit sphingosine kinase (SK) isozymes, induce SK1 proteasomal degradation and reduce DNA synthesis in human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Hoe-Sup; Pyne, Susan; MacRitchie, Neil; Pyne, Nigel J.

    2013-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is involved in hyper-proliferative diseases such as cancer and pulmonary arterial hypertension. We have synthesized inhibitors that are selective for the two isoforms of sphingosine kinase (SK1 and SK2) that catalyze the synthesis of S1P. A thiourea adduct of sphinganine (F02) is selective for SK2 whereas the 1-deoxysphinganines 55-21 and 77-7 are selective for SK1. (2S,3R)-1-Deoxysphinganine (55-21) induced the proteasomal degradation of SK1 in human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells and inhibited DNA synthesis, while the more potent SK1 inhibitors PF-543 and VPC96091 failed to inhibit DNA synthesis. These findings indicate that moderate potency inhibitors such as 55-21 are likely to have utility in unraveling the functions of SK1 in inflammatory and hyperproliferative disorders. PMID:24396570

  12. Characterization of the ORF YBR264c in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which encodes a new yeast Ypt that is degraded by a proteasome-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Louvet, O; Roumanie, O; Barthe, C; Peypouquet, M F; Schaeffer, J; Doignon, F; Crouzet, M

    1999-06-01

    We identified the ORF YBR264c during the systematic sequencing of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. It encodes a putative protein of 218 amino acids. We demonstrate here that the gene is indeed expressed and encodes a new Ypt in yeast. This protein specifically binds guanine nucleotides and interacts via its C-terminal end with the unique Rab GDP Dissociation Inhibitor (RabGDI). In accordance with a recent proposal, the gene is now designated YPT10. No mutant phenotype could be associated with inactivation of the gene. However, overexpression of YPT10 resulted in defects in growth; microscopic examination of such cells revealed an overabundance of vesicular and tubular structures, suggesting some alteration in the function of the Golgi apparatus. In addition, degradation of the Ypt10 protein, which possesses a PEST sequence, is shown to be dependent on proteasome activity. PMID:10394895

  13. Resistance Gene-Guided Genome Mining: Serial Promoter Exchanges in Aspergillus nidulans Reveal the Biosynthetic Pathway for Fellutamide B, a Proteasome Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Hsu-Hua; Ahuja, Manmeet; Chiang, Yi-Ming; Oakley, C Elizabeth; Moore, Shauna; Yoon, Olivia; Hajovsky, Heather; Bok, Jin-Woo; Keller, Nancy P; Wang, Clay C C; Oakley, Berl R

    2016-08-19

    Fungal genome projects are revealing thousands of cryptic secondary metabolism (SM) biosynthetic gene clusters that encode pathways that potentially produce valuable compounds. Heterologous expression systems should allow these clusters to be expressed and their products obtained, but approaches are needed to identify the most valuable target clusters. The inp cluster of Aspergillus nidulans contains a gene, inpE, that encodes a proteasome subunit, leading us to hypothesize that the inp cluster produces a proteasome inhibitor and inpE confers resistance to this compound. Previous efforts to express this cluster have failed, but by sequentially replacing the promoters of the genes of the cluster with a regulatable promotor, we have expressed them successfully. Expression reveals that the product of the inp cluster is the proteasome inhibitor fellutamide B, and our data allow us to propose a biosynthetic pathway for the compound. By deleting inpE and activating expression of the inp cluster, we demonstrate that inpE is required for resistance to internally produced fellutamide B. These data provide experimental validation for the hypothesis that some fungal SM clusters contain genes that encode resistant forms of the enzymes targeted by the compound produced by the cluster. PMID:27294372

  14. Long-term morphine treatment enhances proteasome-dependent degradation of G beta in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells: correlation with onset of adenylate cyclase sensitization.

    PubMed

    Moulédous, Lionel; Neasta, Jérémie; Uttenweiler-Joseph, Sandrine; Stella, Alexandre; Matondo, Mariette; Corbani, Maïthé; Monsarrat, Bernard; Meunier, Jean-Claude

    2005-08-01

    The initial aim of this study was to identify protein changes associated with long-term morphine treatment in a recombinant human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y clone (sc2) stably overexpressing the human mu-opioid (MOP) receptor. In MOP receptor-overexpressing sc2 cells, short-term morphine exposure was found to be much more potent and efficacious in inhibiting forskolin-elicited production of cAMP, and long-term morphine exposure was shown to induce a substantially higher degree of opiate dependence, as reflected by adenylate cyclase sensitization, than it did in wild-type neuroblastoma cells. Differential proteomic analysis of detergent-resistant membrane rafts isolated from untreated and chronically morphine-treated sc2 cells revealed long-term morphine exposure to have reliably induced a 30 to 40% decrease in the abundance of five proteins, subsequently identified by mass spectrometry as G protein subunits alphai(2), alphai(3), beta(1), and beta(2), and prohibitin. Quantitative Western blot analyses of whole-cell extracts showed that long-term morphine treatment-induced down-regulation of Gbeta but not of the other proteins is highly correlated (r(2) = 0.96) with sensitization of adenylate cyclase. Down-regulation of Gbeta and adenylate cyclase sensitization elicited by long-term morphine treatment were suppressed in the presence of carbobenzoxy-l-leucyl-l-leucyl-l-norvalinal (MG-115) or lactacystin. Thus, sustained activation of the MOP receptor by morphine in sc2 cells seems to promote proteasomal degradation of Gbeta to sensitize adenylate cyclase. Together, our data suggest that the long-term administration of opiates may elicit dependence by altering the neuronal balance of heterotrimeric G proteins and adenylate cyclases, with the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway playing a pivotal role. PMID:15901846

  15. WSB1 promotes tumor metastasis by inducing pVHL degradation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Jin; Lee, Seung Baek; Jang, Jinsung; Yi, Sang-Yeop; Kim, Sun-Hyun; Han, Sang-Ah; Lee, Jong-Min; Tong, Seo-Yun; Vincelette, Nicole D; Gao, Bowen; Yin, Ping; Evans, Debra; Choi, Dong Wook; Qin, Bo; Liu, Tongzheng; Zhang, Haoxing; Deng, Min; Jen, Jin; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Liewei; Lou, Zhenkun

    2015-11-01

    The von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor pVHL is an E3 ligase that targets hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Mutation of VHL results in HIF up-regulation and contributes to processes related to tumor progression such as invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis. However, very little is known with regard to post-transcriptional regulation of pVHL. Here we show that WD repeat and SOCS box-containing protein 1 (WSB1) is a negative regulator of pVHL through WSB1's E3 ligase activity. Mechanistically, WSB1 promotes pVHL ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, thereby stabilizing HIF under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. As a consequence, WSB1 up-regulates the expression of HIF-1α's target genes and promotes cancer invasion and metastasis through its effect on pVHL. Consistent with this, WSB1 protein level negatively correlates with pVHL level and metastasis-free survival in clinical samples. This work reveals a new mechanism of pVHL's regulation by which cancer acquires invasiveness and metastatic tendency. PMID:26545811

  16. WSB1 promotes tumor metastasis by inducing pVHL degradation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Jin; Lee, Seung Baek; Jang, Jinsung; Yi, Sang-Yeop; Kim, Sun-Hyun; Han, Sang-Ah; Lee, Jong-Min; Tong, Seo-Yun; Vincelette, Nicole D.; Gao, Bowen; Yin, Ping; Evans, Debra; Choi, Dong Wook; Qin, Bo; Liu, Tongzheng; Zhang, Haoxing; Deng, Min; Jen, Jin; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Liewei; Lou, Zhenkun

    2015-01-01

    The von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor pVHL is an E3 ligase that targets hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Mutation of VHL results in HIF up-regulation and contributes to processes related to tumor progression such as invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis. However, very little is known with regard to post-transcriptional regulation of pVHL. Here we show that WD repeat and SOCS box-containing protein 1 (WSB1) is a negative regulator of pVHL through WSB1's E3 ligase activity. Mechanistically, WSB1 promotes pVHL ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, thereby stabilizing HIF under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. As a consequence, WSB1 up-regulates the expression of HIF-1α’s target genes and promotes cancer invasion and metastasis through its effect on pVHL. Consistent with this, WSB1 protein level negatively correlates with pVHL level and metastasis-free survival in clinical samples. This work reveals a new mechanism of pVHL's regulation by which cancer acquires invasiveness and metastatic tendency. PMID:26545811

  17. Pristimerin Induces Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells by Down-regulating Bcl-2 through ROS-dependent Ubiquitin-proteasomal Degradation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong Bo; Gao, Xiaohua; Deeb, Dorrah; Arbab, Ali S; Gautam, Subhash C

    2014-01-01

    Pristimerin is a quinonemethide triterpenoid with the potential of a promising anticancer agent. Pristimerin (PM) has shown anticancer activity against a range of cancer cell lines, but its activity for prostate cancer has not been adequately investigated. In the present study we have examined the underlying mechanisms of the apoptotic response of the hormone-sensitive (LNCaP) and hormone-refractory (PC-3) prostate cancer cell lines to PM. Treatment with PM induced apoptosis in both cell lines as characterized by increased annexin V-binding and cleavage of PARP-1 and procaspases-3 and -9. It also induced mitochondrial depolarization, cytochrome c release from mitochondria and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Response to PM is regulated by Bcl-2 since it down-regulated Bcl-2 expression and overexpression of Bcl-2 rendered prostate cancer cells resistant to PM. ROS plays a role in down-regulation of Bcl-2, since treatment with PM in the presence of various ROS modulators, e.g., n-acetylcysteine (NAC), a general purpose antioxidant; diphenylene iodonium (DPI), a NADPH inhibitor; rotenone (ROT), a mitochondrial electron transport chain interrupter rotenone or MnTBAP, a O2 scavenger, attenuated the down-regulation of Bcl-2. Furthermore, ROS is also involved in the ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of Bcl-2 as both of these events were blocked by O 2− scavenger MnTBAP. Thus, pristimerin induces apoptosis in prostate cancer cells predominately through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway by inhibiting antiapoptic Bcl-2 through a ROS-dependent ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation pathway. PMID:24877026

  18. Proteasome function shapes innate and adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kammerl, Ilona E; Meiners, Silke

    2016-08-01

    The proteasome system degrades more than 80% of intracellular proteins into small peptides. Accordingly, the proteasome is involved in many essential cellular functions, such as protein quality control, transcription, immune responses, cell signaling, and apoptosis. Moreover, degradation products are loaded onto major histocompatibility class I molecules to communicate the intracellular protein composition to the immune system. The standard 20S proteasome core complex contains three distinct catalytic active sites that are exchanged upon stimulation with inflammatory cytokines to form the so-called immunoproteasome. Immunoproteasomes are constitutively expressed in immune cells and have different proteolytic activities compared with standard proteasomes. They are rapidly induced in parenchymal cells upon intracellular pathogen infection and are crucial for priming effective CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immune responses against infected cells. Beyond shaping these adaptive immune reactions, immunoproteasomes also regulate the function of immune cells by degradation of inflammatory and immune mediators. Accordingly, they emerge as novel regulators of innate immune responses. The recently unraveled impairment of immunoproteasome function by environmental challenges and by genetic variations of immunoproteasome genes might represent a currently underestimated risk factor for the development and progression of lung diseases. In particular, immunoproteasome dysfunction will dampen resolution of infections, thereby promoting exacerbations, may foster autoimmunity in chronic lung diseases, and possibly contributes to immune evasion of tumor cells. Novel pharmacological tools, such as site-specific inhibitors of the immunoproteasome, as well as activity-based probes, however, hold promises as innovative therapeutic drugs for respiratory diseases and biomarker profiling, respectively. PMID:27343191

  19. Endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide-II modulates endothelial cell responses by degrading hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha through interaction with PSMA7, a component of the proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Tandle, Anita T.; Calvani, Maura; Uranchimeg, Badarch; Zahavi, David; Melillo, Giovanni; Libutti, Steven K.

    2009-07-01

    The majority of human tumors are angiogenesis dependent. Understanding the specific mechanisms that contribute to angiogenesis may offer the best approach to develop therapies to inhibit angiogenesis in cancer. Endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide-II (EMAP-II) is an anti-angiogenic cytokine with potent effects on endothelial cells (ECs). It inhibits EC proliferation and cord formation, and it suppresses primary and metastatic tumor growth in-vivo. However, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms behind the anti-angiogenic activity of EMAP-II. In the present study, we explored the molecular mechanism behind the anti-angiogenic activity exerted by this protein on ECs. Our results demonstrate that EMAP-II binds to the cell surface {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin receptor. The cell surface binding of EMAP-II results in its internalization into the cytoplasmic compartment where it interacts with its cytoplasmic partner PSMA7, a component of the proteasome degradation pathway. This interaction increases hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1{alpha}) degradation under hypoxic conditions. The degradation results in the inhibition of HIF-1{alpha} mediated transcriptional activity as well as HIF-1{alpha} mediated angiogenic sprouting of ECs. HIF-1{alpha} plays a critical role in angiogenesis by activating a variety of angiogenic growth factors. Our results suggest that one of the major anti-angiogenic functions of EMAP-II is exerted through its inhibition of the HIF-1{alpha} activities.

  20. Cellular prion protein promotes post-ischemic neuronal survival, angioneurogenesis and enhances neural progenitor cell homing via proteasome inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Doeppner, T R; Kaltwasser, B; Schlechter, J; Jaschke, J; Kilic, E; Bähr, M; Hermann, D M; Weise, J

    2015-01-01

    Although cellular prion protein (PrPc) has been suggested to have physiological roles in neurogenesis and angiogenesis, the pathophysiological relevance of both processes remain unknown. To elucidate the role of PrPc in post-ischemic brain remodeling, we herein exposed PrPc wild type (WT), PrPc knockout (PrP−/−) and PrPc overexpressing (PrP+/+) mice to focal cerebral ischemia followed by up to 28 days reperfusion. Improved neurological recovery and sustained neuroprotection lasting over the observation period of 4 weeks were observed in ischemic PrP+/+ mice compared with WT mice. This observation was associated with increased neurogenesis and angiogenesis, whereas increased neurological deficits and brain injury were noted in ischemic PrP−/− mice. Proteasome activity and oxidative stress were increased in ischemic brain tissue of PrP−/− mice. Pharmacological proteasome inhibition reversed the exacerbation of brain injury induced by PrP−/−, indicating that proteasome inhibition mediates the neuroprotective effects of PrPc. Notably, reduced proteasome activity and oxidative stress in ischemic brain tissue of PrP+/+ mice were associated with an increased abundance of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and PACAP-38, which are known stimulants of neural progenitor cell (NPC) migration and trafficking. To elucidate effects of PrPc on intracerebral NPC homing, we intravenously infused GFP+ NPCs in ischemic WT, PrP−/− and PrP+/+ mice, showing that brain accumulation of GFP+ NPCs was greatly reduced in PrP−/− mice, but increased in PrP+/+ animals. Our results suggest that PrPc induces post-ischemic long-term neuroprotection, neurogenesis and angiogenesis in the ischemic brain by inhibiting proteasome activity. PMID:26673668

  1. A mechanistic insight into a proteasome-independent constitutive inhibitor kappaBalpha (IkappaBalpha) degradation and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation pathway in WEHI-231 B-cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shumway, Stuart D; Miyamoto, Shigeki

    2004-01-01

    Inducible activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB (nuclear factor kappaB) is classically mediated by proteasomal degradation of its associated inhibitors, IkappaBalpha (inhibitory kappaBalpha) and IkappaBbeta. However, certain B-lymphocytes maintain constitutively nuclear NF-kappaB activity (a p50-c-Rel heterodimer) which is resistant to inhibition by proteasome inhibitors. This activity in the WEHI-231 B-cell line is associated with continual and preferential degradation of IkappaBalpha, which is also unaffected by proteasome inhibitors. Pharmacological studies indicated that there was a correlation between inhibition of IkappaBalpha degradation and constitutive p50-c-Rel activity. Domain analysis of IkappaBalpha by deletion mutagenesis demonstrated that an N-terminal 36-amino-acid sequence of IkappaBalpha represented an instability determinant for constitutive degradation. Moreover, domain grafting studies indicated that this sequence was sufficient to cause IkappaBbeta, but not chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, to be rapidly degraded in WEHI-231 B-cells. However, this sequence was insufficient to target IkappaBbeta to the non-proteasome degradation pathway, suggesting that there was an additional cis-element(s) in IkappaBalpha that was required for complete targeting. Nevertheless, the NF-kappaB pool associated with IkappaBbeta now became constitutively active by virtue of IkappaBbeta instability in these cells. These findings further support the notion that IkappaB instability governs the maintenance of constitutive p50-c-Rel activity in certain B-cells via a unique degradation pathway. PMID:14763901

  2. An evolutionarily conserved pathway controls proteasome homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Adrien; Bertolotti, Anne

    2016-08-11

    The proteasome is essential for the selective degradation of most cellular proteins, but how cells maintain adequate amounts of proteasome is unclear. Here we show that there is an evolutionarily conserved signalling pathway controlling proteasome homeostasis. Central to this pathway is TORC1, the inhibition of which induced all known yeast 19S regulatory particle assembly-chaperones (RACs), as well as proteasome subunits. Downstream of TORC1 inhibition, the yeast mitogen-activated protein kinase, Mpk1, acts to increase the supply of RACs and proteasome subunits under challenging conditions in order to maintain proteasomal degradation and cell viability. This adaptive pathway was evolutionarily conserved, with mTOR and ERK5 controlling the levels of the four mammalian RACs and proteasome abundance. Thus, the central growth and stress controllers, TORC1 and Mpk1/ERK5, endow cells with a rapid and vital adaptive response to adjust proteasome abundance in response to the rising needs of cells. Enhancing this pathway may be a useful therapeutic approach for diseases resulting from impaired proteasomal degradation. PMID:27462806

  3. c-Myc is targeted to the proteasome for degradation in a SUMOylation-dependent manner, regulated by PIAS1, SENP7 and RNF4.

    PubMed

    González-Prieto, Román; Cuijpers, Sabine Ag; Kumar, Ramesh; Hendriks, Ivo A; Vertegaal, Alfred Co

    2015-01-01

    c-Myc is the most frequently overexpressed oncogene in tumors, including breast cancer, colon cancer and lung cancer. Post-translational modifications comprising phosphorylation, acetylation and ubiquitylation regulate the activity of c-Myc. Recently, it was shown that c-Myc-driven tumors are strongly dependent on the SUMO pathway. Currently, the relevant SUMO target proteins in this pathway are unknown. Here we show that c-Myc is a target protein for SUMOylation, and that SUMOylated c-Myc is subsequently ubiquitylated and degraded by the proteasome. SUMO chains appeared to be dispensable for this process, polymerization-deficient SUMO mutants supported proteolysis of SUMOylated c-Myc. These results indicate that multiple SUMO monomers conjugated to c-Myc could be sufficient to direct SUMOylated c-Myc to the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Knocking down the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 enhanced the levels of SUMOylated c-Myc, indicating that RNF4 could recognize a multi-SUMOylated protein as a substrate in addition to poly-SUMOylated proteins. Knocking down the SUMO E3 ligase PIAS1 resulted in reduced c-Myc SUMOylation and increased c-Myc transcriptional activity, indicating that PIAS1 mediates c-Myc SUMOylation. Increased SUMOylation of c-Myc was noted upon knockdown of the SUMO protease SENP7, indicating that it also could regulate a multi-SUMOylated protein in addition to poly-SUMOylated proteins. C-Myc lacks KxE-type SUMOylation consensus motifs. We used mass spectrometry to identify 10 SUMO acceptor lysines: K52, K148, K157, K317, K323, K326, K389, K392, K398 and K430. Intriguingly, mutating all 10 SUMO acceptor lysines did not reduce c-Myc SUMOylation, suggesting that SUMO acceptor lysines in c-Myc act promiscuously. Our results provide novel insight into the complexity of c-Myc post-translational regulation. PMID:25895136

  4. [Proteasome inhibitors in cancer therapy].

    PubMed

    Romaniuk, Wioletta; Ołdziej, Agnieszka Ewa; Zińczuk, Justyna; Kłoczko, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Proteasomes are multisubunit enzyme complexes. They contain three enzymatic active sites which are termed chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and caspase-like. The elementary function of the proteasomes is degradation of damaged proteins. Proteasome inhibition leads to accumulation of damaged protein, which leads to caspase activation and cell death. This relationship is used in cancer therapy. Bortezomib is the first proteasome inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. Carfilzomib belongs to the second generation of drugs, which was approved by the US FDA in 2012. Currently in the study phase there are four new inhibitors: ixazomib (MLN9780/MLN2238), delanzomib (CEP-18770), oprozomib (ONX0912/PR-047) and marizomib (NPI-0052). PMID:27259216

  5. Structural Biology of the Proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Kish-Trier, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome refers to a collection of complexes centered on the 20S proteasome core particle, a complex of 28 subunits that houses proteolytic sites in its hollow interior. Proteasomes are found in eukaryotes, archaea, and some eubacteria, and their activity is critical for many cellular pathways. Important advances include inhibitor binding studies and the structure of the immunoproteasome, whose specificity is altered by incorporation of inducible catalytic subunits. The inherent repression of the 20S CP is relieved by the ATP-independent activators, 11S and Blm10/PA200, whose structures reveal principles of proteasome mechanism. The structure of the ATP-dependent 19S regulatory particle, which mediates degradation of polyubiquitylated proteins, is being revealed by a combination of crystal or NMR structures of individual subunits and electron microscopy reconstruction of the intact complex. Other recent structural advances inform about mechanisms of assembly and the role of conformational changes in the functional cycle. PMID:23414347

  6. Substrate Ubiquitination Controls the Unfolding Ability of the Proteasome.

    PubMed

    Reichard, Eden L; Chirico, Giavanna G; Dewey, William J; Nassif, Nicholas D; Bard, Katelyn E; Millas, Nickolas E; Kraut, Daniel A

    2016-08-26

    In eukaryotic cells, proteins are targeted to the proteasome for degradation by polyubiquitination. These proteins bind to ubiquitin receptors, are engaged and unfolded by proteasomal ATPases, and are processively degraded. The factors determining to what extent the proteasome can successfully unfold and degrade a substrate are still poorly understood. We find that the architecture of polyubiquitin chains attached to a substrate affects the ability of the proteasome to unfold and degrade the substrate, with K48- or mixed-linkage chains leading to greater processivity than K63-linked chains. Ubiquitin-independent targeting of substrates to the proteasome gave substantially lower processivity of degradation than ubiquitin-dependent targeting. Thus, even though ubiquitin chains are removed early in degradation, during substrate engagement, remarkably they dramatically affect the later unfolding of a protein domain. Our work supports a model in which a polyubiquitin chain associated with a substrate switches the proteasome into an activated state that persists throughout the degradation process. PMID:27405762

  7. Glycogen synthase kinase-3-mediated phosphorylation of serine 73 targets sterol response element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) for proteasomal degradation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qingming; Giorgianni, Francesco; Beranova-Giorgianni, Sarka; Deng, Xiong; O'Meally, Robert N.; Bridges, Dave; Park, Edwards A.; Cole, Robert N.; Elam, Marshall B.; Raghow, Rajendra

    2015-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) is a key transcription factor that regulates genes involved in the de novo lipid synthesis and glycolysis pathways. The structure, turnover and transactivation potential of SREBP-1c are regulated by macronutrients and hormones via a cascade of signalling kinases. Using MS, we have identified serine 73 as a novel glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) phosphorylation site in the rat SREBP-1c purified from McA-RH7777 hepatoma cells. Our site-specific mutagenesis strategy revealed that the turnover of SREBP-1c, containing wild type, phospho-null (serine to alanine) or phospho-mimetic (serine to aspartic acid) substitutions, was differentially regulated. We show that the S73D mutant of pSREBP-1c, that mimicked a state of constitutive phosphorylation, dissociated from the SREBP-1c–SCAP complex more readily and underwent GSK-3-dependent proteasomal degradation via SCFFbw7 ubiquitin ligase pathway. Pharmacologic inhibition of GSK-3 or knockdown of GSK-3 by siRNA prevented accelerated degradation of SREBP-1c. As demonstrated by MS, SREBP-1c was phosphorylated in vitro by GSK-3β at serine 73. Phosphorylation of serine 73 also occurs in the intact liver. We propose that GSK-3-mediated phosphorylation of serine 73 in the rat SREBP-1c and its concomitant destabilization represents a novel mechanism involved in the inhibition of de novo lipid synthesis in the liver. PMID:26589965

  8. Glycogen synthase kinase-3-mediated phosphorylation of serine 73 targets sterol response element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) for proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qingming; Giorgianni, Francesco; Beranova-Giorgianni, Sarka; Deng, Xiong; O'Meally, Robert N; Bridges, Dave; Park, Edwards A; Cole, Robert N; Elam, Marshall B; Raghow, Rajendra

    2016-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) is a key transcription factor that regulates genes involved in the de novo lipid synthesis and glycolysis pathways. The structure, turnover and transactivation potential of SREBP-1c are regulated by macronutrients and hormones via a cascade of signalling kinases. Using MS, we have identified serine 73 as a novel glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) phosphorylation site in the rat SREBP-1c purified from McA-RH7777 hepatoma cells. Our site-specific mutagenesis strategy revealed that the turnover of SREBP-1c, containing wild type, phospho-null (serine to alanine) or phospho-mimetic (serine to aspartic acid) substitutions, was differentially regulated. We show that the S73D mutant of pSREBP-1c, that mimicked a state of constitutive phosphorylation, dissociated from the SREBP-1c-SCAP complex more readily and underwent GSK-3-dependent proteasomal degradation via SCF(Fbw7) ubiquitin ligase pathway. Pharmacologic inhibition of GSK-3 or knockdown of GSK-3 by siRNA prevented accelerated degradation of SREBP-1c. As demonstrated by MS, SREBP-1c was phosphorylated in vitro by GSK-3β at serine 73. Phosphorylation of serine 73 also occurs in the intact liver. We propose that GSK-3-mediated phosphorylation of serine 73 in the rat SREBP-1c and its concomitant destabilization represents a novel mechanism involved in the inhibition of de novo lipid synthesis in the liver. PMID:26589965

  9. Chronic oxidative stress promotes H2AX protein degradation and enhances chemosensitivity in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Gruosso, Tina; Mieulet, Virginie; Cardon, Melissa; Bourachot, Brigitte; Kieffer, Yann; Devun, Flavien; Dubois, Thierry; Dutreix, Marie; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Miller, Kyle Malcolm; Mechta-Grigoriou, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Anti-cancer drugs often increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cause DNA damage. Here, we highlight a new cross talk between chronic oxidative stress and the histone variant H2AX, a key player in DNA repair. We observe that persistent accumulation of ROS, due to a deficient JunD-/Nrf2-antioxidant response, reduces H2AX protein levels. This effect is mediated by an enhanced interaction of H2AX with the E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF168, which is associated with H2AX poly-ubiquitination and promotes its degradation by the proteasome. ROS-mediated H2AX decrease plays a crucial role in chemosensitivity. Indeed, cycles of chemotherapy that sustainably increase ROS reduce H2AX protein levels in Triple-Negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients. H2AX decrease by such treatment is associated with an impaired NRF2-antioxidant response and is indicative of the therapeutic efficiency and survival of TNBC patients. Thus, our data describe a novel ROS-mediated regulation of H2AX turnover, which provides new insights into genetic instability and treatment efficacy in TNBC patients. PMID:27006338

  10. Parkin Protects against Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation/Reperfusion Insult by Promoting Drp1 Degradation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiayu; Hu, Zhiping; Tan, Jieqiong; Yang, Sonlin; Zeng, Liuwang

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke results in severe brain damage and remains one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. Effective neuroprotective therapies are needed to reduce brain damage resulting from ischemic stroke. Mitochondria are crucial for cellular energy production and homeostasis. Modulation of mitochondrial function mediates neuroprotection against ischemic brain damage. Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) and parkin play a key role in regulating mitochondrial dynamics. They are potential therapeutic targets for neuroprotection in ischemic stroke. Protective effects of parkin-Drp1 pathway on mitochondria were assessed in a cellular ischemia-reperfusion injury model. Mouse neuroblastoma Neuro2a (N2a) cells were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGDR) insult. OGDR induces mitochondrial fragmentation. The expression of Drp1 protein is increased after OGDR insult, while the parkin protein level is decreased. The altered protein level of Drp1 after OGDR injury is mediated by parkin through ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Drp1 depletion protects against OGDR induced mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. Meanwhile, parkin overexpression protects against OGDR induced apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction, which is attenuated by increased expression of Drp1. Our data demonstrate that parkin protects against OGDR insult through promoting degradation of Drp1. This neuroprotective potential of parkin-Drp1 pathway against OGDR insult will pave the way for developing novel neuroprotective agents for cerebral ischemia-reperfusion related disorders. PMID:27597885