Science.gov

Sample records for prong energy distributions

  1. Electrical grounding prong socket

    DOEpatents

    Leong, Robert

    1991-01-01

    The invention is a socket for a grounding prong used in a three prong electrical plug and a receptacle for the three prong plug. The socket being sufficiently spacious to prevent the socket from significantly stretching when a larger, U-shaped grounding prong is inserted into the socket, and having a ridge to allow a snug fit when a smaller tubular shape grounding prong is inserted into the socket.

  2. A three pronged approach to community scale renewable energy: Education, incremental capital investment and smart grid technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demeo, Anna E.

    ; first hand exposure to technology, providing a sense of independence that strengthens communities, and developing a direct link between the energy people use and how that energy is created. Ultimately community scale renewable energy projects help bolster support for large-scale projects that are imperative to making real and lasting progress towards reducing emissions. Finally, technological advancements in renewable energy generation, energy storage and distribution systems, are imperative to replacing fossil fuels. The shift towards a higher penetration of renewable energy into the electric grid can be realized with the implementation of a more sophisticated smart grid, which uses dynamic demand response to alter demand to follow generation. Introduction of tidal power can serve to further stabilize the grid and reduce the amount of storage required. This work describes an interdisciplinary approach to addressing issues of energy, and thereby climate, through substantive efforts in three concentrations; energy literacy education, community driven renewable energy projects based on incremental capital investment and a smart, micro grid encompassing tidal power and other renewable energy source.

  3. A Three Pronged Approach to Community Scale Renewable Energy: Education, Incremental Capital Investment and Smart Grid Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demeo, Anna E.

    2013-01-01

    The reality of global climate change, due to anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide and other gases, is upon us. A significant source of emissions comes from the burning of fossil fuels to produce energy that is consumed in every aspect of daily life. As such, the human ecological link between how we live and our impact on the planet is at the…

  4. Geology of the reading prong

    SciTech Connect

    Schutz, D.

    1987-03-01

    For over a billion years the geological terrain now called New Jersey has been the site of unusually high uranium concentrations. Although the highest of these concentrations occurs in the Reading Prong, the area is itself only part of a larger geologic province extending to the northeast and southwest. The rocks in the Reading Prong are not uniformly radioactive. High uranium concentrations tend to be associated with magnetite deposits - metamorphic equivalents of iron-rich formations - and with pegmatites - rocks formed by precipitation from mineralizing solutions in the late phases of granite emplacement. Because of the way they were formed, the uranium-bearing magnetite and pegmatite bodies tend to be long and narrow, and the resulting patterns of radon occurrence can be expected to be the same. This may explain why, in some places, adjacent houses have very different radon concentrations.

  5. Study of High-multiplicity 3-prong and 5-prong Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P

    2012-06-01

    We present measurements of the branching fractions of 3-prong and 5-prong {tau} decay modes using a sample of 430 million {tau} lepton pairs, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 468 fb{sup -1}, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. The {tau}{sup -} {yields} (3{pi}){sup -} {eta}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup -} {yields} (3{pi}){sup -} {yields} {omega}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -} f{sub 1}(1285){nu}{sub {tau}} branching fractions are presented as well as a new limit on the branching fraction of the isospin-forbidden, second-class current {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -} {eta}{prime}(958){nu}{sub {tau}} decay. We find no evidence for charged kaons in these decay modes and place the first upper limits on their branching fractions.

  6. Machining Three Prongs on a Shaft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewitt, C.

    1983-01-01

    Simple tool reduces set-up and machining time by more than 70 percent. Unorthodox tooling arrangement used to machine three prongs on end of specialpurpose wrench. Modified carbide-tipped spot-facing tool rotated at 1,400 to 1,600 revolutions per minute in small milling machine and applied to work piece, held with its corners in spaces of three-cornered collect.

  7. A Four-Prong Model for Intellectual-Skills Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternberg, Robert J.; Davidson, Janet E.

    1989-01-01

    A four-prong instructional model for intellectual-skills development is described. The four prongs are: familiarization, intra-group problem solving, inter-group problem solving, and individual problem solving. A psychological model of what is to be taught, the triarchic theory of human intelligence, provides the underpinning of the instructional…

  8. Two-Pronged Chemo Helps Some with Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Two-Pronged Chemo Helps Some With Advanced Ovarian Cancer Study found using both abdomen drip and ... 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Some women with advanced ovarian cancer may fare better if chemotherapy is dripped ...

  9. Columella erosion secondary to nasal prongs in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Ewan; Pacifico, Marc D

    2016-01-01

    There is limited awareness of the risks of pressure necrosis to the columella when using nasal prongs in the neonate. Previous studies have found that signs of skin damage can occur rapidly-within days. This case report aims to illustrate a simple technique of prophylactically lowering the risk of septal injury (if prolonged use of nasal prongs is envisaged), as well as a way of conservatively treating already damaged skin areas. Routine daily skin inspections are also recommended. PMID:27317758

  10. NASA's Three Pronged Approach to Hurricane Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakar, R. K.

    2006-12-01

    The direct question: How can weather forecast duration and reliability be improved and guide research within NASA's Weather Focus Area? A mandate of the Weather Focus Area is to investigate high impact weather events, such as severe tropical storms, through a combination of new and improved space-based observations, high-altitude research aircraft and sophisticated numerical models. The field experiments involving the NASA research aircraft are vital components of this three-pronged approach. The Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX) - 3 studied inner core dynamics, synoptic flow environment, land falling intensity change and the genesis environment for several hurricanes in a field experiment carried out during the 1998 season. CAMEX-4 studied rapid intensification, storm structure and dynamics, scale interactions and intercomparison of remote sensing techniques during the 2001 hurricane season. Several state of the art remote sensing instruments were used in these studies from the NASA DC-8 and ER-2 aircraft. During July 2005, NASA conducted its Tropical Cloud Systems and Processes (TCSP) experiment from San Jose, Costa Rica. The purpose of TCSP was to investigate the genesis and intensification of tropical cyclones primarily in the eastern North Pacific. This ocean basin was chosen because climatologically it represents the most concentrated region of cyclone formation on the planet and is within range of research aircraft deploying from Costa Rica. In 2005, however, the Caribbean was particularly active instead. We were greeted by two of the strongest July hurricanes on record for the Caribbean. The NASA ER-2 high altitude research aircraft flew twelve separate missions, carrying a payload of several remote sensing instruments. Many of these missions were flown in coordination with the NOAA Hurricane Research Division (HRD) P-3 Orion research aircraft as part of NOAA's 2005 Intensity Forecast Experiment. TCSP's successor program, the NAMMA-06 (NASA African

  11. [Mensurement of airflow resistance in neonatal prongs of nasal CPAP

    PubMed

    Sampietro, V I; Azevedo, M P; Resende, J G

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure airflow resistance in prongs of nasal CPAP, making use of different gas admission flow (GAF) in the ventilation circuit, in different internal diameters of the nasal prongs, besides verifying whether a GAF responding only to the demand of three times the minute-volume(MV) is enough to the circuit not to be cause of CO(2) retention. METHODOLOGY: Nasal prongs, assembled in the original circuits, were used, having their prongs kept open to the atmosphere. Pressure was read at a pressure monitor, in water centimeters, connected to the appropriate entrance of the circuit. A flowmeter balanced to the pressure was used, gauged at 50 psi, installed to the oxygen net of the Hospital, connected to the assessing set of the CPAP circuit. Initially, making use of the 8 l/min flow and keeping the exhaling set of the circuit closed, it was possible to eliminate the nasal prongs larger than two once the measured resistance was equal to zero. Having nasal parts number zero, 1 and 2 selected for this study, the system was then assembled as for the neonate: the inhaling set to the gas source and the exhaling set sunk into different depths in the water seal (2, 4, 6 and 8 centimeters). At the level of patient analysis, in order to assess the CO(2) retention, a mechanical pulmonary ventilation device was used as gas source and a nasal CPAP circuit was assembled to the device in adequate places. GAF values and FiO(2) were determined in the commands of the mechanical ventilation device. The assessment of gas concentration in the ventilation circuit was made while assisting two newborns. Gas samples were obtained within the ventilation circuit in the system assessing set (samples A), and right after the distal prong to the gas entrance (samples B). To determine MV the Tidal Volume (considered 10ml/kg) was multiplied by the respiratory frequency of the patient; GAF was three times MV. RESULTS: To a maximum GAF of 8 litres/min, only prongs sized zero, 1 and 2 showed

  12. Distributed Wind Energy in Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, John; Johnson, Kathryn; Haynes, Todd; Seifert, Gary

    2009-01-31

    This project is a research and development program aimed at furthering distributed wind technology. In particular, this project addresses some of the barriers to distributed wind energy utilization in Idaho.

  13. Nasal septum injury in preterm infants using nasal prongs 1

    PubMed Central

    Bonfim, Suely de Fátima Santos Freire; de Vasconcelos, Maria Gorete Lucena; de Sousa, Nayara Francisca Cabral; da Silva, Daiana Vieira Câmara; Leal, Luciana Pedrosa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to assess the incidence and risk factors associated with nasal septum injury in premature infants using reused and new nasal prongs. METHOD: the study was a cohort from an open therapeutic intervention. The sample included 70 infants with a gestational age inferior to 37 weeks, who used nasal prongs and were hospitalized at the neonatal service of a hospital in Recife-PE, in the Northeast of Brazil. The data were collected in patient files through the assessment of the application of the device and of the nasal septum. Multinomial Logistic Regression and Survival analyses were applied. RESULTS: the incidence of nasal injury corresponded to 62.9%. In the multiple analysis, only the length of the infant's treatment was a determinant factor for the occurrence and severity of the injuries. CONCLUSION: the type of nasal prong does not serve as a risk factor for the nasal injury. The high incidence of nasal injury indicates the need to adapt the nursing care with emphasis on prevention. PMID:25493679

  14. One-prong τ decays into charged kaons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; Casper, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Ariztizabal, F.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Martinez, M.; Mattison, T.; Ortue, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Teubert, F.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Chai, Y.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Blucher, E.; Bonvicini, G.; Boudreau, J.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Ganis, G.; Gay, C.; Girone, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Maggi, M.; Markou, C.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Perlas, J. A.; Perrodo, P.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Rothberg, J.; Ruan, T.; Saich, M.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Sefkow, F.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Veenhof, R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wasserbaech, S.; Widenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Johnson, S. D.; Møllerud, R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Badier, J.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Fouque, G.; Passalacqua, L.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Focardi, E.; Moneta, L.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Delfino, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Levinthal, D.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Salomone, S.; Colrain, P.; Ten Have, I.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Hassard, J. F.; Konstantinidis, N.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Payne, D. G.; San Martin, G.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Wright, A. G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Vogl, R.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Walther, S. M.; Wanke, R.; Wolf, B.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Nicod, D.; Payre, P.; Roos, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schwemling, P.; Talby, M.; Adlung, S.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Cattaneo, P.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Frank, M.; Halley, A. W.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Stiegler, U.; St. Denis, R.; Wolf, G.; Alemany, R.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Janot, P.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Musolino, G.; Park, H.-J.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Abbaneo, D.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Martin, E. B.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Valassi, A.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Johnson, D. L.; March, P. V.; Medcalf, T.; Mir, Ll. M.; Quasi, I. S.; Strong, J. A.; Bertin, V.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Edwards, M.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Beddall, A.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Dawson, I.; Koksal, A.; Rankin, C.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Feigl, E.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Schäfer, U.; Smolik, L.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Pitis, L.; Ragusa, F.; Bellantoni, L.; Chen, W.; Conway, J. S.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Nachtman, J. M.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I.; Sharma, V.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Lan Wu, Sau; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1994-07-01

    Form a sample of about 75000 τ decays measured in the ALEPH detector, 1-prong charged kaon decays are identified by the dE/ dx measurement in the central detector. The resulting branching ratios for the inclusive and exclusive modes are: B( τ → ντK- ≥ 0 π0 ≥ 0 K0) = (1.60±0.07±0.12)%, B( τ → ντK- = (0.64±0.05±0.05)%, B( τ → ντ-π0 = (0.53±0.05±0.07)% and B( τ → ντK-π0π0) = (0.04±0.03±0.02)%. Exclusive modes are corrected for measured KL0 production. The rate for τ → ντK- agrees well with the prediction based on τ - μ universality.

  15. A novel inhaled multi-pronged attack against respiratory bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sie Huey; Teo, Jeanette; Heng, Desmond; Zhao, Yanli; Ng, Wai Kiong; Chan, Hak-Kim; Tan, Li Teng; Tan, Reginald B H

    2015-04-01

    Airway mucus hypersecretion is a common clinical feature of many severe respiratory diseases, and when complicated by a recalcitrant bacterial infection, the whole treatment regimen thereby becomes more challenging and protracted. The accumulation of thickened mucus secretions in the lower airways provides a nutrient-rich breeding ground for bacteria that promotes their growth and limits the ease of effective eradication. Unfortunately, no direct-inhaled dry powder formulation to treat these respiratory mucoid infections more effectively is available commercially. This work therefore seeks to develop a highly-efficacious ternary dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulation (ciprofloxacin hydrochloride (CIP), gatifloxacin hydrochloride (GAT) and ambroxol hydrochloride (AMB)) capable of delivering a novel multi-pronged attack (synergy, quorum quenching and mucociliary clearance) on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common respiratory bacteria found in mucoid infections. The powders were prepared via spray drying, evaluated on their aerosol performance via a multi-stage liquid impinger (MSLI) and tested for their efficacies in bacteria-spiked artificial sputum medium (ASM). The optimized particles were of respirable-size (d50 of ∼1.61±0.03μm) and slightly corrugated. When dispersed via an Aerolizer® inhaler at 60L/min, the powder showed concomitant in vitro deposition, minimal capsule, device and throat retention, and highly promising and uniform fine particle fractions (of the loaded dose) of ∼64-69%, which was a vast improvement over the singly-delivered actives. Favourably, when tested on bacteria-spiked ASM, the optimized ternary formulation (with AMB) was more effective at killing bacteria (i.e. faster rate of killing) than just the synergistic antibiotics alone (binary formulation; without AMB). In conclusion, a ternary antibiotic-(non-antibiotic) DPI formulation involving a unique multi-pronged attack mechanism was successfully pioneered and optimized for mucoid

  16. Tectonics and metallogenesis of Proterozoic rocks of the Reading Prong

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gundersen, L.C.S.

    2004-01-01

    Detailed geologic mapping, petrography, and major and trace-element analyses of Proterozoic rocks from the Greenwood Lake Quadrangle, New York are compared with chemical analyses and stratigraphic information compiled for the entire Reading Prong. A persistent regional stratigraphy is evident in the mapped area whose geochemistry indicates protoliths consistent with a back-arc marginal basin sequence. The proposed marginal basin may have been floored by an older sialic basement and overlain by a basin-fill sequence consisting of a basal tholeiitic basalt, basic to intermediate volcanic or volcaniclastic rocks and carbonate sediments, a bimodal calc-alkaline volcanic sequence, and finally volcaniclastic, marine, and continental sediments. The presence of high-chlorine biotite and scapolite may indicate circulation of brine fluids or the presence of evaporite layers in the sequence. Abundant, stratabound magnetite deposits with a geologic setting very unlike that of cratonic, Proterozoic banded-iron formations are found throughout the proposed basin sequence. Associated with many of the magnetite deposits is unusual uranium and rare-earth element mineralization. It is proposed here that these deposits formed in an exhalative, volcanogenic, depositional environment within an extensional back-arc marginal basin. Such a tectonic setting is consistent with interpretations of protoliths in other portions of the Reading Prong, the Central Metasedimentary Belt of the Canadian Grenville Province, and recent interpretation of the origin of the Franklin lead-zinc deposits, suggesting a more cohesive evolving arc/back-arc tectonic model for the entire Proterozoic margin of the north-eastern portion of the North American craton. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Probability distributions of turbulent energy.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Mahdi; Müller, Wolf-Christian

    2008-05-01

    Probability density functions (PDFs) of scale-dependent energy fluctuations, P[deltaE(l)] , are studied in high-resolution direct numerical simulations of Navier-Stokes and incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. MHD flows with and without a strong mean magnetic field are considered. For all three systems it is found that the PDFs of inertial range energy fluctuations exhibit self-similarity and monoscaling in agreement with recent solar-wind measurements [Hnat, Geophys. Res. Lett. 29, 86 (2002)]. Furthermore, the energy PDFs exhibit similarity over all scales of the turbulent system showing no substantial qualitative change of shape as the scale of the fluctuations varies. This is in contrast to the well-known behavior of PDFs of turbulent velocity fluctuations. In all three cases under consideration the P[deltaE(l)] resemble Lévy-type gamma distributions approximately Delta;{-1} exp(-|deltaE|/Delta)|deltaE|;{-gamma} The observed gamma distributions exhibit a scale-dependent width Delta(l) and a system-dependent gamma . The monoscaling property reflects the inertial-range scaling of the Elsässer-field fluctuations due to lacking Galilei invariance of deltaE . The appearance of Lévy distributions is made plausible by a simple model of energy transfer. PMID:18643170

  18. Enhanced distributed energy resource system

    DOEpatents

    Atcitty, Stanley; Clark, Nancy H.; Boyes, John D.; Ranade, Satishkumar J.

    2007-07-03

    A power transmission system including a direct current power source electrically connected to a conversion device for converting direct current into alternating current, a conversion device connected to a power distribution system through a junction, an energy storage device capable of producing direct current connected to a converter, where the converter, such as an insulated gate bipolar transistor, converts direct current from an energy storage device into alternating current and supplies the current to the junction and subsequently to the power distribution system. A microprocessor controller, connected to a sampling and feedback module and the converter, determines when the current load is higher than a set threshold value, requiring triggering of the converter to supply supplemental current to the power transmission system.

  19. Energy conservation in electric distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chong-Jin

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses the potential for energy and power savings that exist in electric power delivery systems. These savings translate into significant financial and environmental benefits for electricity producers and consumers as well as for society in general. AlliedSignal`s knowledge and perspectives on this topic are the result of discussions with hundreds of utility executives, government officials and other industry experts over the past decade in conjunction with marketing our Amorphous Metal technology for electric distribution transformers. Amorphous metal is a technology developed by AlliedSignal that significantly reduces the energy lost in electric distribution transformers at an incremental cost of just a few cents per kilo-Watt-hour. The purpose of this paper is to discuss: Amorphous Metal Alloy Technology; Energy Savings Opportunity; The Industrial Barriers and Remedies; Worldwide Demand; and A Low Risk Strategy. I wish this presentation will help KEPCO achieve their stated aims of ensuring sound development of the national economy and enhancement of public life through the economic and stable supply of electric power. AlliedSignal Korea Ltd. in conjunction with AlliedSignal Amorphous Metals in the U.S. are here to work with KEPCO, transformer manufacturers, industry, and government agencies to achieve greater efficiency in power distribution.

  20. Atlas of quasar energy distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin; Wilkes, Belinda J.; Mcdowell, Jonathan C.; Green, Richard F.; Bechtold, Jill; Willner, S. P.; Oey, M. S.; Polomski, Elisha; Cutri, Roc

    1994-01-01

    We present an atlas of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of normal, nonblazar, quasars over the whole available range (radio to 10 keV X-rays) of the electromagnetic spectrum. The primary (UVSX) sample includes 47 quasars for which the spectral energy distributions include X-ray spectral indices and UV data. Of these, 29 are radio quiet, and 18 are radio loud. The SEDs are presented both in figures and in tabular form, with additional tabular material published on CD-ROM. Previously unpublished observational data for a second set of quasars excluded from the primary sample are also tabulated. The effects of host galaxy starlight contamination and foreground extinction on the UVSX sample are considered and the sample is used to investigate the range of SED properties. Of course, the properties we derive are influenced strongly by the selection effects induced by quasar discovery techniques. We derive the mean energy distribution (MED) for radio-loud and radio-quiet objects and present the bolometric corrections derived from it. We note, however, that the dispersion about this mean is large (approximately one decade for both the infrared and ultraviolet components when the MED is normalized at the near-infrared inflection). At least part of the dispersion in the ultraviolet may be due to time variability, but this is unlikely to be important in the infrared. The existence of such a large dispersion indicates that the MED reflects only some of the properties of quasars and so should be used only with caution.

  1. K0 production in one-prong τ decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; Casper, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Ariztizabal, F.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Martinez, M.; Mattison, T.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Teubert, F.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Chai, Y.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Blucher, E.; Bonvicini, G.; Boudreau, J.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Ganis, G.; Gay, C.; Girone, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Maggi, M.; Markou, C.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Perlas, J. A.; Perrodo, P.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Rothberg, J.; Ruan, T.; Saich, M.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Sefkow, F.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Veenhof, R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wasserbaech, S.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Johnson, S. D.; Møllerud, R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Badier, J.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Fouque, G.; Passalacqua, L.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Focardi, E.; Moneta, L.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Delfino, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Levinthal, D.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Salomone, S.; Colrain, P.; Have, I. Ten; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Hassard, J. F.; Konstantinidis, N.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Payne, D. G.; San Martin, G.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Wright, A. G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Vogl, R.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Walther, S. M.; Wanke, R.; Wolf, B.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Nicod, D.; Payre, P.; Roos, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schwemling, P.; Talby, M.; Adlung, S.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Cattaneo, P.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Frank, M.; Halley, A. W.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Stiegler, U.; St. Denis, R.; Wolf, G.; Alemany, R.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Janot, P.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Musolino, G.; Park, H.-J.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Abbaneo, D.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Martin, E. B.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Valassi, A.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Johnson, D. L.; March, P. V.; Medcalf, T.; Mir, Ll. M.; Quazi, I. S.; Strong, J. A.; Bertin, V.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Edwards, M.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Beddall, A.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Dawson, I.; Koksal, A.; Rankin, C.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhler, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Feigl, E.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Schäfer, U.; Smolik, L.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Pitis, L.; Ragusa, F.; Bellantoni, L.; Chen, W.; Conway, J. S.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Nachtman, J. M.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I.; Sharma, V.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Sau Lan Wu; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1994-07-01

    From a sample of about 75000 τ decays identified with the ALEPH detector, K0 production in 1-prong hadronic decays is investigated by tagging the KL0 component in a hadronic calorimeter. Results are given for the final states ντh-K0 and ντh-π0K0 where the h- is separated into π and K contributions by means of the dE/ dx measurement in in the central detector. The resulting branching ratios are: ( Bτ → ντπ-K0) = (0.88±0.14±0.09)%, ( Bτ → ντK-K0) = (0.29±0.12±0.03)%, ( Bτ → ντπ-π0K0) = (0.33±0.14±0.07)% aand ( Bτ → ντK-π0K0) = (0.05±0.05±0.01)%. The K ∗ decay rate in the K0π channel agrees with that in the Kπ0 mode: the combined value for the branching ratio is (Bτ → ν τK ∗-) = (1.45±0.13±0.11)% .

  2. Geology of the Trenton Prong, west-central New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Volkert, R.A. ); Drake, A.A.Jr. )

    1993-03-01

    The Trenton Prong in New Jersey is underlain by a heterogeneous sequence of rocks that is divisible into northern and southern belts separated by the steeply southeast-dipping Huntingdon Valley fault (HVF). The northern belt contains metagabbro, charnockite, and dacite/tonalite, upon which biotite-bearing quartzofeldspathic gneiss, calc-silicate gneiss, and minor marble may rest unconformably. The mineralogy and geochemistry of these rocks are remarkably similar to those of Middle Proterozoic rocks in the New Jersey Highlands, and the authors interpret them to be correlative. Northern belt rocks are unconformably overlain by the Cambrian Chickies Quartzite, which is cut off to the northeast by the HVF. The southern belt contains felsic to intermediate quartzofeldspathic gneiss and schist and minor amounts of metavolcanic rocks, all of which may be at slightly lower metamorphic grade than those in the northern belt. High TiO[sub 2] metabasalt is chemically identical to diabase dikes that intrude Middle Proterozoic rocks in the New Jersey Highlands; it is interpreted to be Late Proterozoic in age. Rocks in the southern belt have been thrust northwestward over the Chickies and Middle Proterozoic rocks along the HVF. South of the southern belt, biotite schist and gneiss of the Wissahickon Formation are thrust onto both belts of basement rocks on the HVF and a splay from the HVF, the Morrisville thrust fault. Both faults are marked by augen gneiss that shows evidence of dextral shear.

  3. A protocol for quantum energy distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotta, Masahiro

    2008-08-01

    In this Letter, a protocol called quantum energy distribution (QED) is proposed in which multi-parties can simultaneously extract positive energy on average from spin chains by use of common secret keys shared by an energy supplier. QED is robust against impersonation. An adversary, who does not have common secret keys and attempts to get energy, cannot obtain but give energy to spin chains. Total amount of energy transfer gives a lower bound of residual energy of a local cooling process by the energy supplier.

  4. A direct correlation among indoor Rn, soil gas Rn and geology in the Reading Prong near Boyertown, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimer, G.M.; Gundersen, L.C.S.

    1989-01-01

    We feel that this study suggests a relationship among geology, soil gas Rn and the potential for indoor Rn accumulation in this portion of the Reading Prong. There are deviations from a perfect correlation but these are related to inhomogeneities in the geologic environment and perhaps variations in construction techniques of homes in the area. This study also demonstrates that several analyses in a small area may be necessary to adequately determine the Rn distribution for a particular geologic unit. That scale would be determined by the complexity of the local geology. Where no discrete source of elevated Rn supply is found for dwellings having a significant Rn accumulation, the implication is that overall gross permeability may be sufficient to supply Rn from a larger volume of soil and rock.

  5. Resilient Core Networks for Energy Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Kuntze, Nicolai; Rudolph, Carsten; Leivesley, Sally; Manz, David O.; Endicott-Popovsky, Barbara E.

    2014-07-28

    Abstract—Substations and their control are crucial for the availability of electricity in today’s energy distribution. Ad- vanced energy grids with Distributed Energy Resources require higher complexity in substations, distributed functionality and communication between devices inside substations and between substations. Also, substations include more and more intelligent devices and ICT based systems. All these devices are connected to other systems by different types of communication links or are situated in uncontrolled environments. Therefore, the risk of ICT based attacks on energy grids is growing. Consequently, security measures to counter these risks need to be an intrinsic part of energy grids. This paper introduces the concept of a Resilient Core Network to interconnected substations. This core network provides essen- tial security features, enables fast detection of attacks and allows for a distributed and autonomous mitigation of ICT based risks.

  6. Distribution System Voltage Regulation by Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Ceylan, Oguzhan; Liu, Guodong; Xu, Yan; Tomsovic, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a control method to regulate voltages in 3 phase unbalanced electrical distribution systems. A constrained optimization problem to minimize voltage deviations and maximize distributed energy resource (DER) active power output is solved by harmony search algorithm. IEEE 13 Bus Distribution Test System was modified to test three different cases: a) only voltage regulator controlled system b) only DER controlled system and c) both voltage regulator and DER controlled system. The simulation results show that systems with both voltage regulators and DER control provide better voltage profile.

  7. Production of four-prong final states in photon-photon collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aihara, H.; Alston-Garnjost, M.; Avery, R. E.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barker, A. R.; Barnes, A. V.; Barnett, B. A.; Bauer, D. A.; Bengtsson, H.-U.; Bintinger, D. L.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bolognese, T. S.; Bross, A. D.; Buchanan, C. D.; Buijs, A.; Caldwell, D. O.; Clark, A. R.; Cowan, G. D.; Crane, D. A.; Dahl, O. I.; Derby, K. A.; Eastman, J. J.; Eberhard, P. H.; Edberg, T. K.; Eisner, A. M.; Enomoto, R.; Erné, F. C.; Fujii, T.; Gary, J. W.; Gorn, W.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hofmann, W.; Huth, J. E.; Hylen, J.; Kamae, T.; Kaye, H. S.; Kees, K. H.; Kenney, R. W.; Kerth, L. T.; Ko, Winston; Koda, R. I.; Kofler, R. R.; Kwong, K. K.; Lander, R. L.; Langeveld, W. G.; Layter, J. G.; Linde, F. L.; Lindsey, C. S.; Loken, S. C.; Lu, A.; Lu, X.-Q.; Lynch, G. R.; Madaras, R. J.; Maeshima, K.; Magnuson, B. D.; Marx, J. N.; Masek, G. E.; Mathis, L. G.; Matthews, J. A.; Maxfield, S. J.; Melnikoff, S. O.; Miller, E. S.; Moses, W.; McNeil, R. R.; Nemethy, P.; Nygren, D. R.; Oddone, P. J.; Paar, H. P.; Park, D. A.; Park, S. K.; Pellett, D. E.; Pripstein, M.; Ronan, M. T.; Ross, R. R.; Rouse, F. R.; Schwitkis, K. A.; Sens, J. C.; Shapiro, G.; Shapiro, M. D.; Shen, B. C.; Slater, W. E.; Smith, J. R.; Steinman, J. S.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stork, D. H.; Strauss, M. G.; Sullivan, M. K.; Takahashi, T.; Thompson, J. R.; Toge, N.; Toutounchi, S.; van Tyen, R.; van Uitert, B.; Vandalen, G. J.; van Daalen Wetters, R. F.; Vernon, W.; Wagner, W.; Wang, E. M.; Wang, Y. X.; Wayne, M. R.; Wenzel, W. A.; White, J. T.; Williams, M. C.; Wolf, Z. R.; Wolf, Z. R.; Yamamoto, H.; Yellin, S. J.; Zeitlin, C.; Zhangj, W.-M.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented on the exclusive production of four-prong final states in photon-photon collisions from the TPC/Two-Gamma detector at the SLAC e+e- storage ring PEP. Measurement of dE/dx and momentum in the time-projection chamber (TPC) provides identification of the final states 2π+2π-, K+K-π+π-, and 2K+2K-. For two quasireal incident photons, both the 2π+2π- and K+K-π+π- cross sections show a steep rise from threshold to a peak value, followed by a decrease at higher mass. Cross sections for the production of the final states ρ0ρ0, ρ0π+π-, and φπ+π- are presented, together with upper limits for φρ0, φφ, and K*0K¯ *0. The ρ0ρ0 contribution dominates the four-pion cross section at low masses, but falls to nearly zero above 2 GeV. Such behavior is inconsistent with expectations from vector dominance but can be accommodated by four-quark resonance models or by t-channel factorization. Angular distributions for the part of the data dominated by ρ0ρ0 final states are consistent with the production of JP=2+ or 0+ resonances but also with isotropic (nonresonant) production. When one of the virtual photons has mass (m2γ=-Q2≠0), the four-pion cross section is still dominated by ρ0ρ0 at low final-state masses Wγγ and by 2π+2π- at higher mass. Further, the dependence of the cross section on Q2 becomes increasingly flat as Wγγ increases.

  8. Distributed energy store railguns experiment and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, L.D.

    1984-01-01

    Electromagnetic acceleration of projectiles holds the potential for achieving higher velocities than yet achieved by any other means. A railgun is the simplest form of electromagnetic macroparticle accelerator and can generate the highest sustained accelerating force. The practical length of conventional railguns is limited by the impedance of the rails because current must be carried along the entire length of the rails. A railgun and power supply system called the distributed energy store railgun was proposed as a solution to this limitation. The distributed energy store railgun used multiple current sources connected to the rails of a railgun at points distributed along the bore. These current sources (energy stores) are turned on in sequence as the projectile moves down the bore so that current is fed to the railgun from behind the armature. In this system the length of the rails that carry the full armature current is less than the total length of the railgun. If a sufficient number of energy stores is used, this removes the limitation on the length of a railgun. An additional feature of distributed energy store type railguns is that they can be designed to maintain a constant pressure on the projectile being accelerated. A distributed energy store railgun was constructed and successfully operated. In addition to this first demonstration of the distributed energy store railgun principle, a theoretical model of the system was also constructed.

  9. Basic Training: A Two-Pronged Approach to Term Paper Assistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wales, Barbara; Littlejohn, Nancy

    Academic libraries have traditionally provided some kind of term paper assistance to patrons. Central Missouri State University's Ward Edwards Library designed a two-pronged approach to a term paper clinic (TPC), using traditional group instruction and one-on-one walk-in assistance. The primary goals of the TPC are to teach the student to: (1)…

  10. ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY DISTRIBUTED ENERGY STORAGE BATTERY

    SciTech Connect

    LANDI, J.T.; PLIVELICH, R.F.

    2006-04-30

    Electro Energy, Inc. conducted a research project to develop an energy efficient and environmentally friendly bipolar Ni-MH battery for distributed energy storage applications. Rechargeable batteries with long life and low cost potentially play a significant role by reducing electricity cost and pollution. A rechargeable battery functions as a reservoir for storage for electrical energy, carries energy for portable applications, or can provide peaking energy when a demand for electrical power exceeds primary generating capabilities.

  11. Energy optimization of water distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    Energy costs associated with pumping treated water into the distribution system and boosting water pressures where necessary is one of the largest expenditures in the operating budget of a municipality. Due to the size and complexity of Detroit`s water transmission system, an energy optimization project has been developed to better manage the flow of water in the distribution system in an attempt to reduce these costs.

  12. Extent of areal inundation of riverine wetlands along Cypress Creek and the Peace, Alafia, North Prong Alafia, and South Prong Alafia Rivers, west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewelling, B.R.

    2003-01-01

    Riverine and palustrine system wetlands are a major ecological component of river basins in west-central Florida. Healthy wetlands are dependent upon the frequency and duration of periodic flooding or inundation. This report assesses the extent, area, depth, frequency, and duration of periodic flooding and the effects of potential surface-water withdrawals on the wetlands along Cypress Creek and the Peace, Alafia, North Prong Alafia, and South Prong Alafia Rivers. Results of the study were derived from step-backwater analysis performed at each of the rivers using the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center-River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) one-dimensional model. The step-backwater analysis was performed using selected daily mean discharges at the 10th, 50th, 70th, 80th, 90th, 98th, 99.5th, and 99.9th percentiles to compute extent of areal inundation, area of inundation, and hydraulic depth to assess the net reduction of areal inundation if 10 percent of the total river flow were diverted for potential withdrawals. The extent of areal inundation is determined by cross-sectional topography and the degree to which the channel is incised. Areal inundation occurs along the broad, low relief of the Cypress Creek floodplain during all selected discharge percentiles. However, areal inundation of the Peace and Alafia Rivers floodplains, which generally have deeply incised channels, occurs at or above discharges at the 80th percentile. The greatest area of inundation along the three rivers generally occurs between the 90th and 98th percentile discharges. The decrease in inundated area resulting from a potential 10-percent withdrawal in discharge ranged as follows: Cypress Creek, 22 to 395 acres (1.7 to 8.4 percent); Peace River, 17 to 1,900 acres (2.1 to 13.6 percent); Alafia River, 1 to 90 acres (1 to 19.6 percent); North Prong Alafia River, 1 to 46 acres (0.7 to 23.4 percent); and South Prong Alafia River, 1 to 75 acres (1.5 to 13.4 percent).

  13. Tailored ion energy distributions on plasma electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Economou, Demetre J.

    2013-09-15

    As microelectronic device features continue to shrink approaching atomic dimensions, control of the ion energy distribution on the substrate during plasma etching and deposition becomes increasingly critical. The ion energy should be high enough to drive ion-assisted etching, but not too high to cause substrate damage or loss of selectivity. In many cases, a nearly monoenergetic ion energy distribution (IED) is desired to achieve highly selective etching. In this work, the author briefly reviews: (1) the fundamentals of development of the ion energy distribution in the sheath and (2) methods to control the IED on plasma electrodes. Such methods include the application of “tailored” voltage waveforms on an electrode in continuous wave plasmas, or the application of synchronous bias on a “boundary electrode” during a specified time window in the afterglow of pulsed plasmas.

  14. Energy distribution in the quantum spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Siwen

    2015-11-01

    At first this paper summarizes the current situation and historical development of the spectrum research, the difficulties and demand background. Then it introduces the research status of quantum spectrum and research ideas of energy distribution in quantum spectrum. We explain the concept of quantum spectrum, the difference between quantum spectrum and spectrum. We elaborate energy distribution in quantum spectrum from three aspects, which are representation, feature and mechanism of quantum spectrum energy distribution. Finally we describe the application of monochrome quantum spectrum about imaging and detection aspects and give an overview of the quantum spectrum. Based on above research results we continue to study and achieve the detection of multi-spectral imaging, which provide the technical basis for the application. We try access to an advanced stage of quantum spectrum study as soon as possible.

  15. Analysis of τ 1-prong exclusive branching ratios using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, J. M.; Matorras, F.; Ruiz, A.

    1997-02-01

    A FFNN has been used to identify six different 1-prong τ decays among the τ+τ- events collected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP. The method operates with better efficiency-purity than the classical methods for the previously studied channels and allows the possibility of analysing a new one. It has been applied to 1993 and 1994 data to obtain the branching fractions of these channels. A first estimation of the systematic errors has been performed.

  16. A Fossilized Energy Distribution of Lightning.

    PubMed

    Pasek, Matthew A; Hurst, Marc

    2016-01-01

    When lightning strikes soil, it may generate a cylindrical tube of glass known as a fulgurite. The morphology of a fulgurite is ultimately a consequence of the energy of the lightning strike that formed it, and hence fulgurites may be useful in elucidating the energy distribution frequency of cloud-to-ground lightning. Fulgurites from sand mines in Polk County, Florida, USA were collected and analyzed to determine morphologic properties. Here we show that the energy per unit length of lightning strikes within quartz sand has a geometric mean of ~1.0 MJ/m, and that the distribution is lognormal with respect to energy per length and frequency. Energy per length is determined from fulgurites as a function of diameter, and frequency is determined both by cumulative number and by cumulative length. This distribution parallels those determined for a number of lightning parameters measured in actual atmospheric discharge events, such as charge transferred, voltage, and action integral. This methodology suggests a potential useful pathway for elucidating lightning energy and damage potential of strikes. PMID:27466230

  17. A Fossilized Energy Distribution of Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasek, Matthew A.; Hurst, Marc

    2016-07-01

    When lightning strikes soil, it may generate a cylindrical tube of glass known as a fulgurite. The morphology of a fulgurite is ultimately a consequence of the energy of the lightning strike that formed it, and hence fulgurites may be useful in elucidating the energy distribution frequency of cloud-to-ground lightning. Fulgurites from sand mines in Polk County, Florida, USA were collected and analyzed to determine morphologic properties. Here we show that the energy per unit length of lightning strikes within quartz sand has a geometric mean of ~1.0 MJ/m, and that the distribution is lognormal with respect to energy per length and frequency. Energy per length is determined from fulgurites as a function of diameter, and frequency is determined both by cumulative number and by cumulative length. This distribution parallels those determined for a number of lightning parameters measured in actual atmospheric discharge events, such as charge transferred, voltage, and action integral. This methodology suggests a potential useful pathway for elucidating lightning energy and damage potential of strikes.

  18. A Fossilized Energy Distribution of Lightning

    PubMed Central

    Pasek, Matthew A.; Hurst, Marc

    2016-01-01

    When lightning strikes soil, it may generate a cylindrical tube of glass known as a fulgurite. The morphology of a fulgurite is ultimately a consequence of the energy of the lightning strike that formed it, and hence fulgurites may be useful in elucidating the energy distribution frequency of cloud-to-ground lightning. Fulgurites from sand mines in Polk County, Florida, USA were collected and analyzed to determine morphologic properties. Here we show that the energy per unit length of lightning strikes within quartz sand has a geometric mean of ~1.0 MJ/m, and that the distribution is lognormal with respect to energy per length and frequency. Energy per length is determined from fulgurites as a function of diameter, and frequency is determined both by cumulative number and by cumulative length. This distribution parallels those determined for a number of lightning parameters measured in actual atmospheric discharge events, such as charge transferred, voltage, and action integral. This methodology suggests a potential useful pathway for elucidating lightning energy and damage potential of strikes. PMID:27466230

  19. Electron energy-distribution functions in gases

    SciTech Connect

    Pitchford, L.C.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical calculation of the electron energy distribution functions in the regime of drift tube experiments is discussed. The discussion is limited to constant applied fields and values of E/N (ratio of electric field strength to neutral density) low enough that electron growth due to ionization can be neglected. (GHT)

  20. The energy distribution of Sirius B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, E.

    1979-01-01

    The origin of the X-ray emission observed from the DA white dwarf Sirius B is investigated on the basis of low-resolution short wavelength IUE spectrum. Following a correction for the influence of scattered light from Sirius A, the intensity distribution of Sirius B is obtained as a function of wavelength. Comparison of the continuous energy distribution with model atmosphere energy distributions indicates an effective temperature of 25,500 K, which is not high enough to explain the observed X rays as normal photospheric radiation. In addition, with the exception of an unusual feature in the neighborhood of the C I 1657 line, no clear evidence is found of emission lines indicative of a corona, chromosphere or disk, and the origin of the X rays remains unknown.

  1. Energy Storage and Distributed Energy Generation Project, Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwank, Johannes; Mader, Jerry; Chen, Xiaoyin; Mi, Chris; Linic, Suljo; Sastry, Ann Marie; Stefanopoulou, Anna; Thompson, Levi; Varde, Keshav

    2008-03-31

    This report serves as a Final Report under the “Energy Storage and Distribution Energy Generation Project” carried out by the Transportation Energy Center (TEC) at the University of Michigan (UM). An interdisciplinary research team has been working on fundamental and applied research on: -distributed power generation and microgrids, -power electronics, and -advanced energy storage. The long-term objective of the project was to provide a framework for identifying fundamental research solutions to technology challenges of transmission and distribution, with special emphasis on distributed power generation, energy storage, control methodologies, and power electronics for microgrids, and to develop enabling technologies for novel energy storage and harvesting concepts that can be simulated, tested, and scaled up to provide relief for both underserved and overstressed portions of the Nation’s grid. TEC’s research is closely associated with Sections 5.0 and 6.0 of the DOE "Five-year Program Plan for FY2008 to FY2012 for Electric Transmission and Distribution Programs, August 2006.”

  2. Stepwise assembling of polypeptide chain energy distributions.

    PubMed

    Jacchieri, S G

    2001-03-01

    The principles and application of conformational analysis software that makes use of a new algorithm are described. It is known that the existence of a local energy minimum in the energy landscape is in general related to the clustering of polypeptide chain conformations near that energy value or, in other words, to a high density of states. A criterion based on this principle is part of an algorithm employed to select subsets of polypeptide chain conformations in broad energy ranges. Chain fragments belonging to these subsets are then combined to build larger polypeptide chains and the corresponding energy distributions. The functionality of the various operations employed in the process is described and the FORTRAN 77 source code that defines the algorithm is listed. The methodology is illustrated with a calculation involving three chain fragments belonging to the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)). PMID:11219430

  3. Energy distribution in disordered elastic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza, Gustavo R.

    2010-09-01

    Disordered networks are found in many natural and artificial materials, from gels or cytoskeletal structures to metallic foams or bones. Here, the energy distribution in this type of networks is modeled, taking into account the orientation of the struts. A correlation between the orientation and the energy per unit volume is found and described as a function of the connectivity in the network and the relative bending stiffness of the struts. If one or both parameters have relatively large values, the struts aligned in the loading direction present the highest values of energy. On the contrary, if these have relatively small values, the highest values of energy can be reached in the struts oriented transversally. This result allows explaining in a simple way remodeling processes in biological materials, for example, the remodeling of trabecular bone and the reorganization in the cytoskeleton. Additionally, the correlation between the orientation, the affinity, and the bending-stretching ratio in the network is discussed.

  4. Distributed energy store railgun; The limiting case

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, R.A. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that when the limiting case of a distributed energy store railgun is analyzed, i.e., the case where the space between adjacent energy stores become indefinitely small, three important results are obtained. First, the shape of the current pulse delivered by each store is sinusoidal and an exponential tail. Second, the rail-to-rail voltage behind the rear-most active store approaches zero. Third, it is not possible to choose parameters in such a way that capacitor crowbars can be eliminated.

  5. The spectral energy distribution of NGC 1275

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, G. A.; Oke, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    An analysis of absolute spectral energy distributions of interstellar gas for a galaxy (NGC 1275) is presented. Infrared spectra data shows heavy reddening. It is proposed that the interstellar gas may be ionized by shock waves or by nonthermal or stellar radiation. It is suggested, that high velocity, emission-line knots are H2 regions in a Perseus cluster galaxy or intergalactic gas cloud seen in projection against NGC 1275.

  6. Non multa, sed multum: Future lessons from two-prong, two-body decays of beauty

    SciTech Connect

    Bigi, I.I.; Stech, B.

    1987-12-01

    There are four two-body, two-prong decays modes of B mesons and two for beauty baryons and they are quite rare, i.e., their branching ratios are not expected to exceed the script O(10/sup -4/) level. Yet a detailed study of their relative rates with a sensitivity level of 10/sup -5/ can yield unique and important information on strong interactions. If the evolution of these reactions in proper time can be traced then, under favorable conditions, one can analyze B/sup 0/ - anti B/sup 0/ mixing and CP invariance in a detailed way. 4 refs.

  7. Distributed Energy Communications & Controls, Lab Activities - Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Rizy, D Tom

    2010-01-01

    The purpose is to develop controls for inverter-based renewable and non-renewable distributed energy systems to provide local voltage, power and power quality support for loads and the power grid. The objectives are to (1) develop adaptive controls for inverter-based distributed energy (DE) systems when there are multiple inverters on the same feeder and (2) determine the impact of high penetration high seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER) air conditioning (A/C) units on power systems during sub-transmission faults which can result in an A/C compressor motor stall and assess how inverter-based DE can help to mitigate the stall event. The Distributed Energy Communications & Controls Laboratory (DECC) is a unique facility for studying dynamic voltage, active power (P), non-active power (Q) and power factor control from inverter-based renewable distributed energy (DE) resources. Conventionally, inverter-based DE systems have been designed to provide constant, close to unity power factor and thus not provide any voltage support. The DECC Lab interfaces with the ORNL campus distribution system to provide actual power system testing of the controls approach. Using mathematical software tools and the DECC Lab environment, we are developing and testing local, autonomous and adaptive controls for local voltage control and P & Q control for inverter-based DE. We successfully tested our active and non-active power (P,Q) controls at the DECC laboratory along with voltage regulation controls. The new PQ control along with current limiter controls has been tested on our existing inverter test system. We have tested both non-adaptive and adaptive control modes for the PQ control. We have completed several technical papers on the approaches and results. Electric power distribution systems are experiencing outages due to a phenomenon known as fault induced delayed voltage recovery (FIDVR) due to air conditioning (A/C) compressor motor stall. Local voltage collapse from FIDVR is

  8. Dynamic Voltage Regulation Using Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yan; Rizy, D Tom; Li, Fangxing; Kueck, John D

    2007-01-01

    Many distributed energy resources (DE) are near load centres and equipped with power electronics converters to interface with the grid, therefore it is feasible for DE to provide ancillary services such as voltage regulation, nonactive power compensation, and power factor correction. A synchronous condenser and a microturbine with an inverter interface are implemented in parallel in a distribution system to regulate the local voltage. Voltage control schemes of the inverter and the synchronous condenser are developed. The experimental results show that both the inverter and the synchronous condenser can regulate the local voltage instantaneously, while the dynamic response of the inverter is faster than the synchronous condenser; and that integrated voltage regulation (multiple DE perform voltage regulation) can increase the voltage regulation capability, increase the lifetime of the equipment, and reduce the capital and operation costs.

  9. Infrared Spectral Energy Distributions of Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, D. A.; Bendo, G. J.; Engelbracht, C. W.; Gordon, K. D.; Regan, M. W.; Armus, L.; Cannon, J. M.; Calzetti, D.; Draine, B. T.; Helou, G.; Joseph, R. D.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Li, A.; Murphy, E. J.; Roussel, H.; Walter, F.; Hanson, H. M.; Hollenbach, D. J.; Jarrett, T. H.; Kewley, L. J.; Lamanna, C. A.; Leitherer, C.; Meyer, M.; Rieke, G. H.; Rieke, M. J.; Sheth, K.; Smith, J. D. T.; Thornley, M. D.

    2005-05-01

    The Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) is carrying out a comprehensive multi-wavelength survey on a sample of 75 nearby galaxies. The 1-850 \\micron\\ spectral energy distributions are presented for the first portion of the SINGS sample using broadband imaging data from Spitzer, 2MASS, ISO, IRAS, and SCUBA. The infrared colors derived from the globally-integrated Spitzer data are generally consistent with the previous generation of models that were developed based on global data for normal star-forming galaxies, though significant deviations are observed. Spitzer's excellent sensitivity and resolution also allow a detailed investigation of the infrared spectral energy distributions for various locations within the three large, nearby galaxies NGC 3031 (M 81), NGC 5194 (M 51), and NGC 7331. A wide variety of spectral shapes are found within each galaxy, especially for NGC 3031, the closest of the three targets and thus the galaxy for which the smallest spatial scales can be explored. The local star formation rate, as gauged by Hα emission, is shown to strongly correlate with local infrared fluxes and colors. If the galaxy-to-galaxy variations in spectral energy distributions seen in our sample are representative of the range present at high redshift then extrapolations of total infrared luminosities and star formation rates from the observed 24 \\micron\\ flux will be uncertain at the factor-of-five level. The corresponding uncertainties in the redshifted 8.0 \\micron\\ flux (e.g. observed 24 \\micron\\ flux for a z = 2 source) are factors of 5--10. Considerable caution should be used when interpreting such extrapolated infrared luminosities. Support for this work, part of the Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy Science Program, was provided by NASA through Contract Number 1224769 issued by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under NASA contract 1407.

  10. On the energy distribution in Sirius B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, E.; Dettmann, T.; Kapranidis, S.

    1979-01-01

    A spectrum of Sirius B in the wavelength region 1100-1900 A taken with the IUE satellite shows an absolute flux and spectral energy distribution in the continuum in agreement with theoretical white-dwarf models with T(eff) of 26,000 K plus or minus 1000 K for log g equals 8.65 and R equals 5.08 x 10 to the 8th cm. The Lyman-alpha profile is also in agreement with these parameters. No obvious emission lines in the spectrum of Sirius B or A which could indicate the presence of a chromosphere or corona in either of the stars are observed.

  11. Smart Operations in Distributed Energy Resources System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Li; Jie, Shu; Zhang-XianYong; Qing, Zhou

    Smart grid capabilities are being proposed to help solve the challenges concerning system operations due to that the trade-offs between energy and environmental needs will be constantly negotiated while a reliable supply of electricity needs even greater assurance in case of that threats of disruption have risen. This paper mainly explores models for distributed energy resources system (DG, storage, and load),and also reviews the evolving nature of electricity markets to deal with this complexity and a change of emphasis on signals from these markets to affect power system control. Smart grid capabilities will also impact reliable operations, while cyber security issues must be solved as a culture change that influences all system design, implementation, and maintenance. Lastly, the paper explores significant questions for further research and the need for a simulation environment that supports such investigation and informs deployments to mitigate operational issues as they arise.

  12. Kaon content of three-prong decays of the tau lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Eastman, J.J.

    1990-12-01

    We present a series of measurements involving the production of charged kaons in three-prong hadronic decays of the {tau} lepton. The data sample was obtained with the TPC/Two-Gamma detector facility at PEP. We set a limit on the branching fraction BR({tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sup {minus}}K{sup 0}) < 0.26% at the 95% confidence level. The process {tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sup {minus}}K{sup 0} is related via SU(3) to the second-class current decay {tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}{pi}{sup {minus}}{eta}. We also present new measurements of the three-prong branching fractions BR({tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} + neutrals) = 0.70 (+0.20/{minus}0.17)% and BR({tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sup {minus}}K{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} + neutrals) = 0.16 (+0.10/{minus}0.07)%. 68 refs., 29 figs., 15 tabs.

  13. Distributed Energy Resources Market Diffusion Model

    SciTech Connect

    Maribu, Karl Magnus; Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui,Afzal S.

    2006-06-16

    Distributed generation (DG) technologies, such as gas-fired reciprocating engines and microturbines, have been found to be economically beneficial in meeting commercial-sector electrical, heating, and cooling loads. Even though the electric-only efficiency of DG is lower than that offered by traditional central stations, combined heat and power (CHP) applications using recovered heat can make the overall system energy efficiency of distributed energy resources (DER) greater. From a policy perspective, however, it would be useful to have good estimates of penetration rates of DER under various economic and regulatory scenarios. In order to examine the extent to which DER systems may be adopted at a national level, we model the diffusion of DER in the US commercial building sector under different technical research and technology outreach scenarios. In this context, technology market diffusion is assumed to depend on the system's economic attractiveness and the developer's knowledge about the technology. The latter can be spread both by word-of-mouth and by public outreach programs. To account for regional differences in energy markets and climates, as well as the economic potential for different building types, optimal DER systems are found for several building types and regions. Technology diffusion is then predicted via two scenarios: a baseline scenario and a program scenario, in which more research improves DER performance and stronger technology outreach programs increase DER knowledge. The results depict a large and diverse market where both optimal installed capacity and profitability vary significantly across regions and building types. According to the technology diffusion model, the West region will take the lead in DER installations mainly due to high electricity prices, followed by a later adoption in the Northeast and Midwest regions. Since the DER market is in an early stage, both technology research and outreach programs have the potential to increase

  14. Determination of the surface energy distributions of different processed lactose.

    PubMed

    Thielmann, Frank; Burnett, Daniel J; Heng, Jerry Y Y

    2007-11-01

    Particulate interactions between drug and lactose carrier in dry powder inhaler formulations are affected by the heterogenous energy distribution on the surface of the individual compounds. A new method based on Inverse Gas Chromatography at finite concentration is applied to study the energy heterogeneity of untreated, milled, and recrystallized lactose of similar particle size distribution. Energy distributions for the dispersive surface energy and the specific free energy of ethanol are obtained. Milling causes an increase in surface energy due to formation of amorphous regions. Untreated and recrystallized materials have similar surface energies at low surface coverages but show clear differences in energy distribution. PMID:18058321

  15. Coordinated Collaboration between Heterogeneous Distributed Energy Resources

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abdollahy, Shahin; Lavrova, Olga; Mammoli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    A power distribution feeder, where a heterogeneous set of distributed energy resources is deployed, is examined by simulation. The energy resources include PV, battery storage, natural gas GenSet, fuel cells, and active thermal storage for commercial buildings. The resource scenario considered is one that may exist in a not too distant future. Two cases of interaction between different resources are examined. One interaction involves a GenSet used to partially offset the duty cycle of a smoothing battery connected to a large PV system. The other example involves the coordination of twenty thermal storage devices, each associated with a commercial building.more » Storage devices are intended to provide maximum benefit to the building, but it is shown that this can have a deleterious effect on the overall system, unless the action of the individual storage devices is coordinated. A network based approach is also introduced to calculate some type of effectiveness metric to all available resources which take part in coordinated operation. The main finding is that it is possible to achieve synergy between DERs on a system; however this required a unified strategy to coordinate the action of all devices in a decentralized way.« less

  16. Advanced Energy Storage Management in Distribution Network

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Ceylan, Oguzhan; Xiao, Bailu; Starke, Michael R; Ollis, T Ben; King, Daniel J; Irminger, Philip; Tomsovic, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    With increasing penetration of distributed generation (DG) in the distribution networks (DN), the secure and optimal operation of DN has become an important concern. In this paper, an iterative mixed integer quadratic constrained quadratic programming model to optimize the operation of a three phase unbalanced distribution system with high penetration of Photovoltaic (PV) panels, DG and energy storage (ES) is developed. The proposed model minimizes not only the operating cost, including fuel cost and purchasing cost, but also voltage deviations and power loss. The optimization model is based on the linearized sensitivity coefficients between state variables (e.g., node voltages) and control variables (e.g., real and reactive power injections of DG and ES). To avoid slow convergence when close to the optimum, a golden search method is introduced to control the step size and accelerate the convergence. The proposed algorithm is demonstrated on modified IEEE 13 nodes test feeders with multiple PV panels, DG and ES. Numerical simulation results validate the proposed algorithm. Various scenarios of system configuration are studied and some critical findings are concluded.

  17. Energy Efficiency of Distributed Environmental Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Khalifa, H. Ezzat; Isik, Can; Dannenhoffer, John F. III

    2011-02-23

    In this report, we present an analytical evaluation of the potential of occupant-regulated distributed environmental control systems (DECS) to enhance individual occupant thermal comfort in an office building with no increase, and possibly even a decrease in annual energy consumption. To this end we developed and applied several analytical models that allowed us to optimize comfort and energy consumption in partitioned office buildings equipped with either conventional central HVAC systems or occupant-regulated DECS. Our approach involved the following interrelated components: 1. Development of a simplified lumped-parameter thermal circuit model to compute the annual energy consumption. This was necessitated by the need to perform tens of thousands of optimization calculations involving different US climatic regions, and different occupant thermal preferences of a population of ~50 office occupants. Yearly transient simulations using TRNSYS, a time-dependent building energy modeling program, were run to determine the robustness of the simplified approach against time-dependent simulations. The simplified model predicts yearly energy consumption within approximately 0.6% of an equivalent transient simulation. Simulations of building energy usage were run for a wide variety of climatic regions and control scenarios, including traditional “one-size-fits-all” (OSFA) control; providing a uniform temperature to the entire building, and occupant-selected “have-it-your-way” (HIYW) control with a thermostat at each workstation. The thermal model shows that, un-optimized, DECS would lead to an increase in building energy consumption between 3-16% compared to the conventional approach depending on the climate regional and personal preferences of building occupants. Variations in building shape had little impact in the relative energy usage. 2. Development of a gradient-based optimization method to minimize energy consumption of DECS while keeping each occupant

  18. Characterizing the energy distribution around GPR antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamanti, Nectaria; Annan, A. Peter

    2013-12-01

    Antenna height, orientation, shielding and subsurface properties all impact GPR responses. Although the basic concepts are generally understood, clarifying the key relationships can aid interpretation. Our long term goal is to develop easily parameterized models of transmitting and receiving components of GPR systems that will provide for quantitative interpretation of data acquired with real systems. Our first step was to develop modeling capacity and response presentation tools to help with development; the initial results have been both informative and forced a better understanding of near and far field. We are using three-dimensional (3D) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) modeling. Model results can be presented in a variety of forms. In this paper, we focus on presenting the emitted energy characteristics and use radiation pattern display format for infinitesimal dipoles, resistively loaded dipoles and shielded dipoles. Patterns are computed for a range of environments such as free-space and over loss-less half-spaces with various properties. The energy distribution patterns are presented to investigate the behavior with distance away from the transmitter feed point, and as a function of height above the ground surface. The numerical simulations provide expected insights plus demonstrate the benefit of ground-coupling and the impact of shielding on GPR responses. Further, using the total radiated energy parameter is a novel method for displaying directivity, for GPR transient emissions.

  19. Classical trajectory study of internal energy distributions in unimolecular processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, J. D.; Marcus, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Energy flow in a molecular system such as CD3Cl or CD3H representing a chemical activation experiment is studied by the method of classical trajectories. A correlation function method is used to obtain energy distributions before and after the breakup of the activated molecule. The energy distribution in the final product is found to be randomly distributed for a surface with no exit channel barrier or strong intermode couplings. Nonrandom energy distributions result when these special forces are present. Product channel barriers result in an excess of translational energy and exit channel intermode couplings result in nonrandom vibrational distributions.

  20. Distributed activation energy model parameters of some Turkish coals

    SciTech Connect

    Gunes, M.; Gunes, S.K.

    2008-07-01

    A multi-reaction model based on distributed activation energy has been applied to some Turkish coals. The kinetic parameters of distributed activation energy model were calculated via computer program developed for this purpose. It was observed that the values of mean of activation energy distribution vary between 218 and 248 kJ/mol, and the values of standard deviation of activation energy distribution vary between 32 and 70 kJ/mol. The correlations between kinetic parameters of the distributed activation energy model and certain properties of coal have been investigated.

  1. Advanced Energy Efficiency and Distributed Renewables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovins, Amory

    2007-04-01

    The US now wrings twice the GDP from each unit of energy that it did in 1975. Reduced energy intensity since then now provides more than twice as much service as burning oil does. Yet still more efficient end-use of energy -- explained more fully in a companion workshop offered at 1245 -- is the largest, fastest, cheapest, most benign, least understood, and least harnessed energy resource available. For example, existing technologies could save half of 2000 US oil and gas and three-fourths of US electricity, at lower cost than producing and delivering that energy from existing facilities. Saving half the oil through efficiency and replacing the other half with saved natural gas and advanced biofuels would cost an average of only 15/barrel and could eliminate US oil use by the 2040s, led by business for profit. Efficiency techniques and ways to combine and apply them continue to improve faster than they're applied, so the ``efficiency resource'' is becoming ever larger and cheaper. As for electricity, ``micropower'' (distributed renewables plus low-carbon cogeneration) is growing so quickly that by 2005 it provided a sixth of the world's electricity and a third of its new electricity, and was adding annually 4x the capacity and 11x the capacity added by nuclear power, which it surpassed in capacity in 2002 and in output in 2006. Together, micropower and ``negawatts'' (saved electricity) now provide upwards half the world's new electrical services, due to their far lower cost and lower financial risk than the central thermal power stations that still dominate policy discussions. For oil and electricity, each of which adds about two-fifths of the world's energy-related carbon dioxide emissions, efficiency plus competitive alternative supplies can stabilize the earth's climate at a profit, as well as solving the oil and (largely) the nuclear proliferation problems. Conversely, costlier and slower options, notably nuclear power, would displace less carbon emission per

  2. Confined energy distribution for charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Jason, Andrew J.; Blind, Barbara

    1990-01-01

    A charged particle beam is formed to a relatively larger area beam which is well-contained and has a beam area which relatively uniformly deposits energy over a beam target. Linear optics receive an accelerator beam and output a first beam with a first waist defined by a relatively small size in a first dimension normal to a second dimension. Nonlinear optics, such as an octupole magnet, are located about the first waist and output a second beam having a phase-space distribution which folds the beam edges along the second dimension toward the beam core to develop a well-contained beam and a relatively uniform particle intensity across the beam core. The beam may then be expanded along the second dimension to form the uniform ribbon beam at a selected distance from the nonlinear optics. Alternately, the beam may be passed through a second set of nonlinear optics to fold the beam edges in the first dimension. The beam may then be uniformly expanded along the first and second dimensions to form a well-contained, two-dimensional beam for illuminating a two-dimensional target with a relatively uniform energy deposition.

  3. Nanofacilitated synergistic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis: A 'three-pronged' approach.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Shweta; Rai, Nishant; Rawat, Purnima; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees; Talegaonkar, Sushama

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, inflammatory, autoimmune disease of unidentified etiology that affects the joints and causes pain, swelling, stiffness and redness in the joints. The exact cause of rheumatoid arthritis has not yet been discovered and, consequently, treatment methods have not been optimally effective. It has long been treated with anti-inflammatory and immunosupressants including modern biologics either alone or in combination but all of the drugs have severe life threatening consequences with impaired immune function due to nonspecific targeting. Therefore, a three-pronged approach of local, active and synergistic targeting can be used to optimize delivery of therapeutic agents to reduce toxicity and patient outcome without compromising patient's immunity. PMID:27241253

  4. Small Deflection Energy Analyzer for Energy and Angular Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrero, Federico A.

    2009-01-01

    The development of the Small Deflection Energy Analyzer (SDEA) charged-particle spectrometer for energy and angle distributions responds to a longstanding need to measure the wind velocity vector in Earth s thermosphere, and to obtain the ion-drift vector in the ionosphere. The air and ions above 120 km are endowed with bulk velocities and temperatures just like air near the ground, but with separate spatial and temporal variations. It is important to understand these not only for study of the physics and chemistry of the Sun-Earth connection, but also for spacecraft orbit predictions, and communications through the ionosphere. The SDEA consists of a pair of parallel conducting plates separated by a small distance, with an entrance slit on one end, and an exit slit on the other. A voltage applied to these plates develops an electric field between the plates, and this field deflects ions passing through it. If an ion has too little energy, it will strike one of the plates. If it has too much, it will strike the back wall. An ion with the amount of energy being searched for will have its trajectory bent just enough to exit the back slit. The SDEA units are compact, rectangular, and operate with low voltages. The units can be built up into small arrays. These arrays could be used either to widen the field of view or to sharpen an existing one. This approach can also be used to obtain angular distributions in two planes simultaneously, thus cutting down the ion source power requirements in half. This geometry has enabled a new mass-spectrometer concept that can provide miniaturized mass spectrometers for use in industrial plants, air-pollution monitoring, and noxious-gas detection.

  5. If it quacks like a duck: reviewing health care providers' speech restrictions under the first prong of Central Hudson.

    PubMed

    Fultz, Shawn L

    2013-01-01

    The First Amendment protects the speech of health care providers. This protection can limit states' abilities to protect patients from harmful therapies involving speech, such as sexual orientation change efforts. Because providers' speech is more similar to commercial speech than traditional political discourse, it is possible to create a First Amendment review analysis that better balances states' police powers with providers' First Amendment rights. Under a "single-prong" approach, the first prong of Central Hudson can be used to identify quackery, which is analogous to false or misleading commercial speech and would therefore be outside the protection of the First Amendment. Because health care must be tailored to individual patients, restrictions on speech that survive the first prong of Central Hudson would be subject to strict scrutiny in order to leave the therapeutic decision to the provider and her patient, and maintain consistency with current jurisprudence. This Comment examines litigation from California's attempted ban on sexual orientation change therapy to illustrate the conflicts created by the current approach to First Amendment review of health care provider speech. This Comment then demonstrates the benefit of the proposed single-prong approach, including how it simultaneously protects patients from harm while protecting health care providers' speech. PMID:25335201

  6. Controlling electron energy distributions for plasma technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, Mark

    2009-10-01

    The basic function of low temperature plasmas in society benefiting technologies is to channel power into specific modes of atoms and molecules to excite desired states or produce specified radicals. This functionality ultimately depends on the ability to craft an electron energy distribution (EED) to match cross sections. Given electric fields, frequencies, gas mixtures and pressures, predicting EEDs and excitation rates can in large part be reliably done. The inverse problem, specifying the conditions that produce a given EED, is less well understood. Early strategies to craft EEDs include adjusting gas mixtures, such as the rare gas-Hg mixtures in fluorescent lamps, and externally sustained discharges, such as electron-beam sustained plasmas for molecular lasers. More recent strategies include spiker-sustainer circuitry which produces desired EEDs in non-self-sustained plasmas; and adjusting frequency in capacitively coupled plasmas. In this talk, past strategies for customizing EEDs in low pressure plasmas will be reviewed and prospects for improved control of plasma kinetics will be discussed using results from 2-dimensional computer models.

  7. The spectral energy distribution of NGC 1275

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, G. A.; Oke, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    An analysis of absolute spectral energy distributions for NGC 1275 (Per A) covering the wavelength interval from 3300 A to 10,800 A is presented. The data are consistent with the heavy reddening discovered by Wampler (1971). The H-alpha intensity varied by less than 10% between the times of Wampler's earlier measurements and the two occasions of the present observations. The line-emitting region has a characteristic density of about 10 to the 4.5 power per cu cm, a mass of about 10 to the 5.5 power solar masses, and a volume filling factor of about 10 to the -6th power. The gas may be ionized by shock waves or by nonthermal or stellar radiation. It is suggested, in the vein of Minkowski's (1957) original proposal, that the high-velocity emission-line knots described by Minkowski are H II regions in a Perseus-cluster galaxy or intergalactic gas cloud seen in projection against NGC 1275.

  8. Evolution of Quasar Spectral Energy Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Amanda; Kennefick, J.; Mahmood, A.

    2012-05-01

    A common practice when formulating quasar luminosity functions (QLF) has been to adopt an average spectral index, $\\alpha$, for the sample even though it is well known that quasars exhibit a broad range of spectral energy distributions (SED.) We have investigated the possible evolution of $\\alpha$ as a function of redshift, as any evolution in this parameter would introduce or mask evolution in the QLF. We imaged 103 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars in the optical and near-infrared bands, near in time to mitigate the effects of variability, in three redshift bins centered at $z\\approx 1.9$, $2.7$, and $4.0$, corresponding to look-back times of 10-12 billion years. We present restframe UV-optical SED’s and spectral indices and discuss possible evolution in our sample. We also use single epoch spectra of the quasars to estimate the mass of the central black hole and discuss possible correlations of quasar properties such as mass, luminosity, and spectral shape.

  9. Panchromatic spectral energy distributions of Herschel sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta, S.; Lutz, D.; Santini, P.; Wuyts, S.; Rosario, D.; Brisbin, D.; Cooray, A.; Franceschini, A.; Gruppioni, C.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Hwang, H. S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magnelli, B.; Nordon, R.; Oliver, S.; Page, M. J.; Popesso, P.; Pozzetti, L.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.; Rodighiero, G.; Roseboom, I.; Scott, D.; Symeonidis, M.; Valtchanov, I.; Viero, M.; Wang, L.

    2013-03-01

    Combining far-infrared Herschel photometry from the PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP) and Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) guaranteed time programs with ancillary datasets in the GOODS-N, GOODS-S, and COSMOS fields, it is possible to sample the 8-500 μm spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies with at least 7-10 bands. Extending to the UV, optical, and near-infrared, the number of bands increases up to 43. We reproduce the distribution of galaxies in a carefully selected restframe ten colors space, based on this rich data-set, using a superposition of multivariate Gaussian modes. We use this model to classify galaxies and build median SEDs of each class, which are then fitted with a modified version of the magphys code that combines stellar light, emission from dust heated by stars and a possible warm dust contribution heated by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). The color distribution of galaxies in each of the considered fields can be well described with the combination of 6-9 classes, spanning a large range of far- to near-infrared luminosity ratios, as well as different strength of the AGN contribution to bolometric luminosities. The defined Gaussian grouping is used to identify rare or odd sources. The zoology of outliers includes Herschel-detected ellipticals, very blue z ~ 1 Ly-break galaxies, quiescent spirals, and torus-dominated AGN with star formation. Out of these groups and outliers, a new template library is assembled, consisting of 32 SEDs describing the intrinsic scatter in the restframe UV-to-submm colors of infrared galaxies. This library is tested against L(IR) estimates with and without Herschel data included, and compared to eightother popular methods often adopted in the literature. When implementing Herschel photometry, these approaches produce L(IR) values consistent with each other within a median absolute deviation of 10-20%, the scatter being dominated more by fine tuning of the codes, rather than by the choice of

  10. Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, L.; Hedman, B.; Knowles, D.; Freedman, S. I.; Woods, R.; Schweizer, T.

    2003-11-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is directing substantial programs in the development and encouragement of new energy technologies. Among them are renewable energy and distributed energy resource technologies. As part of its ongoing effort to document the status and potential of these technologies, DOE EERE directed the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to lead an effort to develop and publish Distributed Energy Technology Characterizations (TCs) that would provide both the department and energy community with a consistent and objective set of cost and performance data in prospective electric-power generation applications in the United States. Toward that goal, DOE/EERE - joined by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) - published the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations in December 1997.As a follow-up, DOE EERE - joined by the Gas Research Institute - is now publishing this document, Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations.

  11. The ultraviolet energy distributions of late A stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, E.

    1981-01-01

    Observed late A star energy distributions for the wavelength range 1400-2500 A are compared. No difference is found between energy distributions of Am stars and those of normal slowly rotating A stars. The fluxes of rapidly rotating stars, however, appear to be increased for wavelengths smaller than 1530 A; this cannot be understood as an effect of pole heating or reduced gravity. In addition, the comparison of the UV energy distributions with model atmosphere energy distributions of Kurucz indicates some problems with the theoretical Si I absorption edges at 1530 A.

  12. Electro-optic measurement of terahertz pulse energy distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J. H.; Gallacher, J. G.; Brussaard, G. J. H.; Lemos, N.; Issac, R.; Huang, Z. X.; Dias, J. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2009-11-01

    An accurate and direct measurement of the energy distribution of a low repetition rate terahertz electromagnetic pulse is challenging because of the lack of sensitive detectors in this spectral range. In this paper, we show how the total energy and energy density distribution of a terahertz electromagnetic pulse can be determined by directly measuring the absolute electric field amplitude and beam energy density distribution using electro-optic detection. This method has potential use as a routine method of measuring the energy density of terahertz pulses that could be applied to evaluating future high power terahertz sources, terahertz imaging, and spatially and temporarily resolved pump-probe experiments.

  13. Spectral Energy Distributions of Type 1 AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Heng

    The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are essential to understand the physics of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies. This thesis present a detailed study of AGN SED shapes in the optical-near infrared bands (0.3--3microm) for 413 X-ray selected Type 1 AGNs from the XMM-COSMOS Survey. We define a useful near-IR/optical index-index ('color-color') diagram to investigate the mixture of AGN continuum, host galaxy and reddening contributions. We found that ˜90% of the AGNs lie on mixing curves between the Elvis et al. (1994) mean AGN SED (E94) and a host galaxy, with only the modest reddening [E(B-V)=0.1--0.2] expected in type 1 AGNs. Lower luminosity and Eddington ratio objects have more host galaxy, as expected. The E94 template is remarkably good in describing the SED shape in the 0.3--3microrn decade of the spectrum over a range of 3.2 dex in LOPT, 2.7 dex in L/LEdd, and for redshifts up to 3. The AGN phenomenon is thus insensitive to absolute or relative accretion rate and to cosmic time. However, 10% of the AGNs are inconsistent with any AGN+host+reddening mix. These AGNs have weak or non-existent near-IR bumps, suggesting a lack of the hot dust characteristic of AGNs. The fraction of these hot-dust-poor AGNs evolves with redshift from 6% at low redshift (z < 2) to 20% at moderately high redshift (2 < z < 3.5). A similar fraction of HDP quasars are found in the Elvis et al. 1994 (BQS) and Richards et al. 2006 (SDSS) samples. The 1--3microm emission of the HDP quasars is a factor 2--4 smaller than the typical E94 AGN SED. The implied torus covering factor is 2%--29%, well below the 75% required by unified models. The weak hot dust emission seems to expose an extension of the accretion disk continuum in some of AGNs. For these, we estimate the outer edge of their accretion disks to lie at ˜104 Schwarzschild radii, more than ten times the gravitational stability radii. Either the host-dust is destroyed

  14. Infrared Spectral Energy Distributions of Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, D. A.; Bendo, G. J.; Engelbracht, C. W.; Gordon, K. D.; Regan, M. W.; Armus, L.; Cannon, J. M.; Calzetti, D.; Draine, B. T.; Helou, G.; Joseph, R. D.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Li, A.; Murphy, E. J.; Roussel, H.; Walter, F.; Hanson, H. M.; Hollenbach, D. J.; Jarrett, T. H.; Kewley, L. J.; Lamanna, C. A.; Leitherer, C.; Meyer, M. J.; Rieke, G. H.; Rieke, M. J.; Sheth, K.; Smith, J. D. T.; Thornley, M. D.

    2005-11-01

    The Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) is carrying out a comprehensive multiwavelength survey on a sample of 75 nearby galaxies. The 1-850 μm spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are presented using broadband imaging data from Spitzer, 2MASS, ISO, IRAS, and SCUBA. The infrared colors derived from the globally integrated Spitzer data are generally consistent with the previous generation of models that were developed using global data for normal star-forming galaxies, although significant deviations are observed. Spitzer's excellent sensitivity and resolution also allow a detailed investigation of the infrared SEDs for various locations within the three large, nearby galaxies NGC 3031 (M81), NGC 5194 (M51), and NGC 7331. A wide variety of spectral shapes is found within each galaxy, especially for NGC 3031, the closest of the three targets and thus the galaxy for which the smallest spatial scales can be explored. Strong correlations exist between the local star formation rate and the infrared colors fν(70 μm)/fν(160 μm) and fν(24 μm)/fν(160 μm), suggesting that the 24 and 70 μm emission are useful tracers of the local star formation activity level. Preliminary evidence indicates that variations in the 24 μm emission, and not variations in the emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at 8 μm, drive the variations in the fν(8.0 μm)/fν(24 μm) colors within NGC 3031, NGC 5194, and NGC 7331. If the galaxy-to-galaxy variations in SEDs seen in our sample are representative of the range present at high redshift, then extrapolations of total infrared luminosities and star formation rates from the observed 24 μm flux will be uncertain at the factor of 5 level (total range). The corresponding uncertainties using the redshifted 8.0 μm flux (e.g., observed 24 μm flux for a z=2 source) are factors of 10-20. Considerable caution should be used when interpreting such extrapolated infrared luminosities.

  15. Two jet energy and rapidity distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Blazey, G.C.; For the D {O} Collaboration

    1992-11-01

    The D0 detector has been recording data at the Tevatron {bar p}p Collider since May 1992. Because the D0 calorimeter is hermetic and has large acceptance it is well suited for semi-exclusive final state jet studies. We present a primary measurement of the distribution d{sup 3}N/dE{sub t1}/d{eta}{sub 1}/d{eta}{sub 2} at {radical}s TeV over a large range of {eta}. The sensitivity of this cross-section to parton momentum distributions and the ability of D0 to discriminate between possible parton distributions is discussed.

  16. Energy Inputs Uncertainty: Total Amount, Distribution and Correlation Between Different Forms of Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deng, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Describes solar energy inputs contributing to ionospheric and thermospheric weather processes, including total energy amounts, distributions and the correlation between particle precipitation and Poynting flux.

  17. Species identification in cell culture: a two-pronged molecular approach.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jason K; Sykes, Greg; King, Steve; Cottrill, Karin; Ivanova, Natalia V; Hanner, Robert; Ikonomi, Pranvera

    2007-01-01

    Species identification of cell lines and detection of cross-contamination are crucial for scientific research accuracy and reproducibility. Whereas short tandem repeat profiling offers a solution for a limited number of species, primarily human and mouse, the standard method for species identification of cell lines is enzyme polymorphism. Isoezymology, however, has its own drawbacks; it is cumbersome and the data interpretation is often difficult. Furthermore, the detection sensitivity for cross-contamination is low; it requires large amounts of the contaminant present and cross-contamination within closely related species may go undetected. In this paper, we describe a two-pronged molecular approach that addresses these issues by targeting the mitochondrial genome. First, we developed a multiplex PCR-based assay to rapidly identify the most common cell culture species and quickly detect cross-contaminations among these species. Second, for speciation and identification of a wider variety of cell lines, we amplified and sequenced a 648-bp region, often described as the "barcode region" by using a universal primer mix targeted at conserved sequences of the cytochrome C oxidase I gene (COI). This method was challenged with a panel of 67 cell lines from 45 diverse species. Implementation of these assays will accurately determine the species of cell lines and will reduce the problems of misidentification and cross-contamination that plague research efforts. PMID:17934781

  18. Energy distribution among reaction products. VII - H + F2.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanyi, J. C.; Sloan, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    The 'arrested relaxation' variant of the IR chemiluminescence technique is used in a study of the distribution of vibrational, rotational and translational energies between the products of the reaction by which H + F2 yields HF + F. Diagrams are plotted and numerical values are obtained for the energy distribution rate constants.

  19. Effects of Distributed Energy Resources on Conservation Voltage Reduction (CVR)

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ruchi; Tuffner, Francis K.; Fuller, Jason C.; Schneider, Kevin P.

    2011-10-10

    Conservation Voltage Reduction (CVR) is one of the cheapest technologies which can be intelligently leveraged to provide considerable energy savings. The addition of renewables in the form of distributed resources can affect the entire power system, but more importantly, affects the traditional substation control schemes at the distribution level. This paper looks at the effect on energy consumption, peak load reduction, and voltage profile changes due to the addition of distributed generation in a distribution feeder using combinations of volt var control. An IEEE 13-node system is used to simulate the various cases. Energy savings and peak load reduction for different simulation scenarios are compared.

  20. Distribution of energy in corn plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Influenced by recent events in fossil fuel prices, both economic and environmental, as well as increased concerns about both climate change and energy independence, there is a growing interest in the development of renewable energy biomass feedstocks. These feedstocks include perennial grasses, timb...

  1. Energy distribution in parallel plate plasma accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicapua, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    A parallel plate accelerator operated in the quasi-steady regime of argon mass flow discharges permits, on account of its geometry, the appraisal of the initial ratio of energy disposition into the kinetic and thermal modes of the plasma while retaining the essential features of coaxial high power self-field MPD accelerators. The energy disposition ratio, calculated as the ratio of kinetic energy to enthalpy in the exhaust flow, shows reasonable agreement with the ratio of the induced emf in the accelerator to resistive voltage drop. Both these ratios indicate that the discharge imparts more energy to the flow by resistive heating than by direct body force acceleration. This is turn suggests that other acceleration mechanisms must be responsible for the high performance of conventional MPD arcs.

  2. Distributed energy storage: Time-dependent tree flow design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejan, A.; Ziaei, S.; Lorente, S.

    2016-05-01

    This article proposes "distributed energy storage" as a basic design problem of distributing energy storage material on an area. The energy flows by fluid flow from a concentrated source to points (users) distributed equidistantly on the area. The flow is time-dependent. Several scenarios are analyzed: sensible-heat storage, latent-heat storage, exergy storage vs energy storage, and the distribution of a finite supply of heat transfer surface between the source fluid and the distributed storage material. The chief conclusion is that the finite amount of storage material should be distributed proportionally with the distribution of the flow rate of heating agent arriving on the area. The total time needed by the source stream to "invade" the area is cumulative (the sum of the storage times required at each storage site) and depends on the energy distribution paths and the sequence in which the users are served by the source stream. Directions for future designs of distributed storage and retrieval are outlined in the concluding section.

  3. Energy Distributions in Small Populations: Pascal versus Boltzmann

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kugel, Roger W.; Weiner, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    The theoretical distributions of a limited amount of energy among small numbers of particles with discrete, evenly-spaced quantum levels are examined systematically. The average populations of energy states reveal the pattern of Pascal's triangle. An exact formula for the probability that a particle will be in any given energy state is derived.…

  4. Kappa distribution in the presence of a potential energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, George

    2015-02-01

    The present paper develops the theory and formulations of the kappa distributions that describe particle systems characterized by a nonzero potential energy. As yet, kappa distributions were used for the statistical description of the velocity or kinetic energy of particles but not of the potential energy. With the results provided here, it is straightforward to use the developed kappa distributions to describe any particle population of space plasmas subject to a nonnegligible potential energy. Starting from the kappa distribution of the Hamiltonian function, we develop the distributions that describe either the complete phase space or the marginal spaces of positions and velocities. The study shows, among others: (a) The kappa distributions of velocities that describe space plasmas can be vastly different from the standard formulation of the kappa distribution, because of the presence of a potential energy; the correct formulation should be given by the marginal kappa distribution of velocities by integrating the distribution of the Hamiltonian over the potential energy. (b) The long-standing problem of the divergence of the Boltzmannian exponential distribution for bounded radial potentials is solved using kappa distributions of negative kappa index. (c) Anisotropic distributions of velocities can exist in the presence of a velocity-dependent potential. (d) A variety of applications, including derivations/verifications of the following: (i) the Jeans', the most frequent, and the maximum radii in spherical/linear gravitational potentials; (ii) the Virial theorem for power law potentials; (iii) the generalized barometric formula, (iv) the plasma density profiles in Saturnian magnetosphere, and (v) the average electron magnetic moment in Earth's magnetotail.

  5. Energy optimization of water distribution system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    In order to analyze pump operating scenarios for the system with the computer model, information on existing pumping equipment and the distribution system was collected. The information includes the following: component description and design criteria for line booster stations, booster stations with reservoirs, and high lift pumps at the water treatment plants; daily operations data for 1988; annual reports from fiscal year 1987/1988 to fiscal year 1991/1992; and a 1985 calibrated KYPIPE computer model of DWSD`s water distribution system which included input data for the maximum hour and average day demands on the system for that year. This information has been used to produce the inventory database of the system and will be used to develop the computer program to analyze the system.

  6. Taking a Multi-pronged Approach to Expand the Reach of Climate Research Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, R.; Unger, M.; Eastburn, T.; Rockwell, A.; Laursen, K. K.; National CenterAtmospheric Research

    2011-12-01

    Recognizing the importance of tailoring content to a variety of audiences, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) takes a multi-pronged approach to expand the reach of climate research results. The center's communications and education and outreach teams leverage Web 1.0 and 2.0 functionality - Google searches, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube - as well as face-to-face interactions and traditional media outlets to ensure climate change messages effectively connect with multiple audiences. Key to these efforts, NCAR seeks to frame messages that emphasize cultural cognition, that is, in a manner that recognizes and resonates with different audiences' values and thus their identities. Among the basic communications approaches NCAR uses to engage the public are one-on-one interactions with the visiting public, which ranges from school children and tourists, to dignitaries and journalists. As an example, the NCAR Journalism Fellowship brings a competitively selected group of internatoinal journalists to NCAR. During a week-long visit and ongoing contact, journalists are provided with a close-up, nuanced view of the science and individuals working on the bigger-picture research that drives climate-related sound bites reported by the press. NCAR provides media training for its scientists, giving them tools and practice in effectively handling interviews for print, Web and radio outlets. The institution hosts public events like "Super Science Saturday," and NCAR staff participate in external activities such as school science fairs, community events and continuing education sessions. In addition to interactive displays that allow the public to "experience" science directly and informally, NCAR develops educational programs and curricula targeted to specific age groups and levels of expertise. We will explore the importance of analogies, images and anecdotes in explaining complicated subjects to such a varied set of audiences, and identify key concepts in simplifying

  7. Subtleties in obtaining the electrostatic energy of continuous distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, M.; Souza, Reinaldo de Melo e.; Kort-Kamp, W. J. M.; Farina, C.

    2014-11-01

    The mathematical steps that generalize the expression for the electrostatic energy of a set of point charges to the corresponding expression for a continuous charge distribution involve a few subtleties that are not usually discussed in standard introductory or advanced electromagnetic textbooks. In this paper, we point out such subtleties and discuss how to deal with them in cases of volume and surface charge distributions. We also show explicitly that it is not possible to define electrostatic energy for a linear charge distribution, since this energy would be divergent. Finally, we use dimensional analysis to recover our results in a simpler and more elegant form.

  8. Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-05-01

    The era of publicly mandated GHG emissions restrictions inthe United States has begun with recent legislation in California andseven northeastern states. Commercial and industrial buildings canimprove the carbon-efficiency of end-use energy consumption by installingtechnologies such as on-site cogeneration of electricity and useful heatin combined heat and power systems, thermally-activated cooling, solarelectric and thermal equipment, and energy storage -- collectively termeddistributed energy resources (DER). This research examines a collectionof buildings in California, the Northeast, and the southern United Statesto demonstrate the effects of regional characteristics such as the carbonintensity of central electricity grid, the climate-driven demand forspace heating and cooling, and the availability of solar insolation. Theresults illustrate that the magnitude of a realistic carbon tax ($100/tC)is too small to incent significant carbon-reducing effects oneconomically optimal DER adoption. In large part, this is because costreduction and carbon reduction objectives are roughly aligned, even inthe absence of a carbon tax.

  9. Distributed Energy Communications & Controls, Lab Activities - Synopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Rizy, D Tom

    2010-01-01

    Electric power distribution systems are experiencing outages due to a phenomenon known as fault induced delayed voltage recovery (FIDVR) due to air conditioning (A/C) compressor motor stall. Local voltage collapse from FIDVR is occurring in part because modern air-conditioner and heat pump compressor motors are much more susceptible to stalling during a voltage sag or dip than older motors. These motors can stall in less than three cycles (0.05 s) when a fault, for example, on the sub-transmission system, causes voltage on the distribution system to sag to 70% or less of nominal. We completed a new test system for A/C compressor motor stall testing at the DECC Lab. The A/C Stall test system is being used to characterize when and how compressor motors stall under low voltage and high compressor pressure conditions. However, instead of using air conditioners, we are using high efficiency heat pumps. We have gathered A/C stall characterization data for both sustained and momentary voltage sags of the test heat pump. At low enough voltage, the heat pump stalls (compressor motor stops and draws 5-6 times normal current in trying to restart) due to low inertia and low torque of the motor. For the momentary sag, we are using a fast acting contactor/switch to quickly switch from nominal to the sagged voltage in cycles.

  10. Electric Transport Traction Power Supply System With Distributed Energy Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, E. Y.; Schurov, N. I.; Rozhkova, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    The paper states the problem of traction substation (TSS) leveling of daily-load curve for urban electric transport. The circuit of traction power supply system (TPSS) with distributed autonomous energy source (AES) based on photovoltaic (PV) and energy storage (ES) units is submitted here. The distribution algorithm of power flow for the daily traction load curve leveling is also introduced in this paper. In addition, it illustrates the implemented experiment model of power supply system.

  11. Energy distribution among reaction products. V.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anlauf, K. G.; Horne, D. S.; Macdonald, R. G.; Polanyi, J. C.; Woodall, K. B.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of three reactions, one point of theoretical interest being the predicted correlation between barrier height and barrier location. The H + Br 2 reaction having a lower activation barrier than H + Cl 2, should have an earlier barrier, and hence a greater percentage attractive energy release and higher efficiency of vibrational excitation. Information is developed concerning the effect of isotopic substitution in the pair of reactions H + Cl 2 and D + Cl 2. The 'arrested relaxation' method was used. Essentially, the method involves reacting two diffuse reagent beams in a reaction vessel with background pressure less than 0.001 torr, and with walls cooled by liquid nitrogen or liquid helium.

  12. Development of a high-energy distributed energy source electromagnetic railgun with improved energy conversion efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Tower, M.M.; Haight, C.H.

    1984-03-01

    Vought Corporation in cooperation with the Center for Electromechanics at the University of Texas (CEM-UT) has developed under sponsorship by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the Army Armament, Munitions, and Chemical Command (AMCCOM) a high-energy distributed energy source (DES) electromagnetic (EM) railgun accelerator. This paper discusses the development and current status of the DES railgun which has the design capability to launch projectile masses up to 60 grams to the 3-4 km/sec velocity regime with energy conversion efficiencies above 35 percent. These goals are being accomplished through utilization of scaled-energy CEM-UT railgun experiments for sequenced timing/staging and a full energy (575 kJ) design at Vought for high efficiency capability. The operational Vought single-pulse railgun forms the baseline for the full energy testing.

  13. Optimal Operation of Energy Storage in Power Transmission and Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhavan Hejazi, Seyed Hossein

    In this thesis, we investigate optimal operation of energy storage units in power transmission and distribution grids. At transmission level, we investigate the problem where an investor-owned independently-operated energy storage system seeks to offer energy and ancillary services in the day-ahead and real-time markets. We specifically consider the case where a significant portion of the power generated in the grid is from renewable energy resources and there exists significant uncertainty in system operation. In this regard, we formulate a stochastic programming framework to choose optimal energy and reserve bids for the storage units that takes into account the fluctuating nature of the market prices due to the randomness in the renewable power generation availability. At distribution level, we develop a comprehensive data set to model various stochastic factors on power distribution networks, with focus on networks that have high penetration of electric vehicle charging load and distributed renewable generation. Furthermore, we develop a data-driven stochastic model for energy storage operation at distribution level, where the distribution of nodal voltage and line power flow are modelled as stochastic functions of the energy storage unit's charge and discharge schedules. In particular, we develop new closed-form stochastic models for such key operational parameters in the system. Our approach is analytical and allows formulating tractable optimization problems. Yet, it does not involve any restricting assumption on the distribution of random parameters, hence, it results in accurate modeling of uncertainties. By considering the specific characteristics of random variables, such as their statistical dependencies and often irregularly-shaped probability distributions, we propose a non-parametric chance-constrained optimization approach to operate and plan energy storage units in power distribution girds. In the proposed stochastic optimization, we consider

  14. General theory for apparent energy distribution of sea waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ke-Jian; Sun, Fu

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents a general theory for the apparent energy distribution of sea waves. Using the joint distribution of wave periods and heights proposed earlier by the second author, the authors define the generalized apparent energy distribution and derive the analytical form of the so called generalized outer frequency spectrum or nth-order frequency spectrum. Some possible relationships between it and the Fourier frequency spectrum are discussed. It is shown that the widely used Bretschneider spectrum can be easily obtained from the above definition and that generalized outer frequency spectrum has equilibrium range with exponent -( n+3) whose upper limit is -3.

  15. IBP's Four-Prong Approach for Broadening Participation in the STEM Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricciardi, L.; Fauver, A.; Johnson, A.; Detrick, L.; Siegfried, D.; Thomas, S.; Valaitis, S.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of the Institute for Broadening Participation (IBP) is to increase diversity in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) workforce. As a freestanding non-profit dedicated to this work IBP is uniquely positioned to provide resources to faculty and students that individual institutions and disciplinary based programs cannot. Through its initial work with the NSF Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT), Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU), and Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP) programs, IBP developed a four-pronged approach open to all members of the STEM community nationally for addressing the problem of underrepresentation: Synthesizing information - compiling and translating best practices into materials and resources accessible and useful to a broad national audience; Creating and maintaining strategic web resources - making information on programs, best practices, and references easily available to a wide audience including students, faculty, and administrators; Extensive face-to-face and virtual outreach - drawing constituents to the resources available via IBP that support students and faculty through the entire STEM pathway; and Catalyzing partnerships - cultivating a community of practice and culture of diversity, to reduce isolation among diversity practitioners, and to increase information sharing. IBP is also home to several successful initiatives that use both virtual and face-to-face components to bring together underrepresented students with established underrepresented and other scientists in academia, government and industry. These connections provide underrepresented students with supportive mentoring, networking opportunities, and professional skill development contributing to an overall improved retention rate of underrepresented students majoring in STEM degrees. IBP's initiatives include the NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative (NASA OSSI), Pathways to Ocean

  16. Distributed Sensor Coordination for Advanced Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tumer, Kagan

    2013-07-31

    The ability to collect key system level information is critical to the safe, efficient and reli- able operation of advanced energy systems. With recent advances in sensor development, it is now possible to push some level of decision making directly to computationally sophisticated sensors, rather than wait for data to arrive to a massive centralized location before a decision is made. This type of approach relies on networked sensors (called “agents” from here on) to actively collect and process data, and provide key control deci- sions to significantly improve both the quality/relevance of the collected data and the as- sociating decision making. The technological bottlenecks for such sensor networks stem from a lack of mathematics and algorithms to manage the systems, rather than difficulties associated with building and deploying them. Indeed, traditional sensor coordination strategies do not provide adequate solutions for this problem. Passive data collection methods (e.g., large sensor webs) can scale to large systems, but are generally not suited to highly dynamic environments, such as ad- vanced energy systems, where crucial decisions may need to be reached quickly and lo- cally. Approaches based on local decisions on the other hand cannot guarantee that each agent performing its task (maximize an agent objective) will lead to good network wide solution (maximize a network objective) without invoking cumbersome coordination rou- tines. There is currently a lack of algorithms that will enable self-organization and blend the efficiency of local decision making with the system level guarantees of global decision making, particularly when the systems operate in dynamic and stochastic environments. In this work we addressed this critical gap and provided a comprehensive solution to the problem of sensor coordination to ensure the safe, reliable, and robust operation of advanced energy systems. The differentiating aspect of the proposed work is in shift- ing

  17. Recent Ion Energy Distribution Observations on MST RFP Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Jerry; Titus, J. B.; Mezonlin, E. D.; Johnson, J. A., III; Almagri, A. F.; Andeson, J. A.

    2015-11-01

    Ion energy distribution and temperature measurements have been made on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) using the Florida A&M University compact neutral particle analyzer (CNPA). The CNPA is a low energy (0.34-5.2 keV), high energy resolution (25 channels) neutral particle analyzer, with a radial view on MST. Recently, a retarding potential system was built to allow CNPA measurements to ensemble a complete ion energy distribution with high-energy resolution, providing insight into the dynamics of the bulk and fast ion populations. Recent work has also been done to improve the analysis techniques used to infer the ion temperature measurements, allowing us to understand temperature dynamics better during global magnetic reconnection events. Work supported in part by grants to FAMU and to UW from NSF and from Fusion Energy Sciences at DOE.

  18. Parallel Harmony Search Based Distributed Energy Resource Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Ceylan, Oguzhan; Liu, Guodong; Tomsovic, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a harmony search based parallel optimization algorithm to minimize voltage deviations in three phase unbalanced electrical distribution systems and to maximize active power outputs of distributed energy resources (DR). The main contribution is to reduce the adverse impacts on voltage profile during a day as photovoltaics (PVs) output or electrical vehicles (EVs) charging changes throughout a day. The IEEE 123- bus distribution test system is modified by adding DRs and EVs under different load profiles. The simulation results show that by using parallel computing techniques, heuristic methods may be used as an alternative optimization tool in electrical power distribution systems operation.

  19. Distributed sensor coordination for advanced energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tumer, Kagan

    2015-03-12

    Motivation: The ability to collect key system level information is critical to the safe, efficient and reliable operation of advanced power systems. Recent advances in sensor technology have enabled some level of decision making directly at the sensor level. However, coordinating large numbers of sensors, particularly heterogeneous sensors, to achieve system level objectives such as predicting plant efficiency, reducing downtime or predicting outages requires sophisticated coordination algorithms. Indeed, a critical issue in such systems is how to ensure the interaction of a large number of heterogenous system components do not interfere with one another and lead to undesirable behavior. Objectives and Contributions: The long-term objective of this work is to provide sensor deployment, coordination and networking algorithms for large numbers of sensors to ensure the safe, reliable, and robust operation of advanced energy systems. Our two specific objectives are to: 1. Derive sensor performance metrics for heterogeneous sensor networks. 2. Demonstrate effectiveness, scalability and reconfigurability of heterogeneous sensor network in advanced power systems. The key technical contribution of this work is to push the coordination step to the design of the objective functions of the sensors, allowing networks of heterogeneous sensors to be controlled. By ensuring that the control and coordination is not specific to particular sensor hardware, this approach enables the design and operation of large heterogeneous sensor networks. In addition to the coordination coordination mechanism, this approach allows the system to be reconfigured in response to changing needs (e.g., sudden external events requiring new responses) or changing sensor network characteristics (e.g., sudden changes to plant condition). Impact: The impact of this work extends to a large class of problems relevant to the National Energy Technology Laboratory including sensor placement, heterogeneous sensor

  20. Calculation of energy deposition distributions for simple geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, J. W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    When high-energy charged particles pass through a thin detector, the ionization energy loss in that detector is subject to fluctuations or straggling which must be considered in interpreting the data. Under many conditions, which depend upon the charge and energy of the incident particle and the detector geometry, the ionization energy lost by the particle is significantly different from the energy deposited in the detector. This problem divides naturally into a calculation of the energy loss that results in excitation and low-energy secondary electrons which do not travel far from their production points, and a calculation of energy loss that results in high-energy secondary electrons which can escape from the detector. The first calculation is performed using a modification of the Vavilov energy loss distribution. A cutoff energy is introduced above which all electrons are ignored and energy transferred to low energy particles is assumed to be equivalent to the energy deposited by them. For the second calculation, the trajectory of the primary particle is considered as a source of secondary high-energy electrons. The electrons from this source are transported using Monte Carlo techniques and multiple scattering theory, and the energy deposited by them in the detector is calculated. The results of the two calculations are then combined to predict the energy deposition distribution. The results of these calculations are used to predict the charge resolution of parallel-plate pulse ionization chambers that are being designed to measure the charge spectrum of heavy nuclei in the galactic cosmic-ray flux.

  1. Laser energy distribution on detector under the different incident angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Wang, G.; Chen, Q.; Hao, Y.; Zhang, W.; Li, H.; Ren, G.; Zhu, R.

    2015-11-01

    Laser active suppressing jamming is one of the most important technologies in the domain of electro-optical countermeasures. The propagation direction of laser is not always in the same line with the principal axis of electro-optical imaging system, so it is necessary to investigate laser energy distribution on detector under the different incident angle. This paper toke optical system with wide field of view for example. We firstly analyzed the system's structure based on the inverting prism and evaluated image quality. Laser energy distribution caused by diffraction effect of optical system was secondly simulated based on Kirchhoff 's diffraction theory. Thirdly, we built the system's analysis model of stray light, traced a large number of light propagation, and obtained laser energy distribution on detector caused by scattering effect. At last, combine the above two kinds of energy distribution into total laser energy distribution on detector. According to the detector's saturated threshold, we can count up the saturated number and evaluate laser disturbing effect. The research results can provide theoretical reference and technical support for evaluating laser disturbing effect of electro-optical imaging system.

  2. Exploring Distributed Energy Alternatives to Electrical Distribution Grid Expansion in Souhern California Edison Service Territory

    SciTech Connect

    Stovall, Therese K; Kingston, Tim

    2005-12-01

    Distributed energy (DE) technologies have received much attention for the energy savings and electric power reliability assurances that may be achieved by their widespread adoption. Fueling the attention have been the desires to globally reduce greenhouse gas emissions and concern about easing power transmission and distribution system capacity limitations and congestion. However, these benefits may come at a cost to the electric utility companies in terms of lost revenue and concerns with interconnection on the distribution system. This study assesses the costs and benefits of DE to both consumers and distribution utilities and expands upon a precursory study done with Detroit Edison (DTE)1, by evaluating the combined impact of DE, energy-efficiency, photovoltaics (a use of solar energy), and demand response that will shape the grid of the future. This study was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Gas Research Institute (GRI), American Electric Power (AEP), and Gas Technology Institute's (GTI) Distributed Energy Collaborative Program (DECP). It focuses on two real Southern California Edison (SCE) circuits, a 13 MW suburban circuit fictitiously named Justice on the Lincoln substation, and an 8 MW rural circuit fictitiously named Prosper on the Washington Substation. The primary objectives of the study were threefold: (1) Evaluate the potential for using advanced energy technologies, including DE, energy-efficiency (EE), demand response, electricity storage, and photovoltaics (PV), to reshape electric load curves by reducing peak demand, for real circuits. (2) Investigate the potential impact on guiding technology deployment and managing operation in a way that benefits both utilities and their customers by: (a) Improving grid load factor for utilities; (b) Reducing energy costs for customers; and (c) Optimizing electric demand growth. (3) Demonstrate benefits by reporting on a recently installed advanced energy system at a utility customer site. This

  3. High-energy tail distributions and resonant wave particle interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leubner, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    High-energy tail distributions (k distributions) are used as an alternative to a bi-Lorentzian distribution to study the influence of energetic protons on the right- and left-hand cyclotron modes in a hot two-temperature plasma. Although the parameters are chosen to be in a range appropriate to solar wind or magnetospheric configurations, the results apply not only to specific space plasmas. The presence of energetic particles significantly alters the behavior of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron modes, leading to a wide range of unstable frequencies and increased growth rates. From the strongly enhanced growth rates it can be concluded that high-energy tail distributions should not show major temperature anisotropies, which is consistent with observations.

  4. Radial Distribution of Electron Spectra from High-Energy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Katz, Robert; Wilson, John W.

    1998-01-01

    The average track model describes the response of physical and biological systems using radial dose distribution as the key physical descriptor. We report on an extension of this model to describe the average distribution of electron spectra as a function of radial distance from an ion. We present calculations of these spectra for ions of identical linear energy transfer (LET), but dissimilar charge and velocity to evaluate the differences in electron spectra from these ions. To illustrate the usefulness of the radial electron spectra for describing effects that are not described by electron dose, we consider the evaluation of the indirect events in microdosimetric distributions for ions. We show that folding our average electron spectra model with experimentally determined frequency distributions for photons or electrons provides a good representation of radial event spectra from high-energy ions in 0.5-2 micrometer sites.

  5. Energy distributions of sputtered copper neutrals and ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, T. R.

    1978-01-01

    Direct quantitative analysis of surfaces by secondary ion mass spectrometry will depend on an understanding of the yield ratio of ions to neutrals. This ratio as a function of the energy of the sputtered particles has been obtained for a clean polycrystalline copper surface sputtered by 1000-3000 eV Ar(+). The energy distributions of both neutral and ionized copper were measured with a retarding potential analyzer using potential modulation differentiation and signal averaging. The maximum for both distributions is identical and occurs near 2.5 eV. The energy distributions of neutrals is more sharply peaked than that of the ions, presumably as a consequence of more efficient nutralization of slow escaping ions by the mobile electrons of copper. The ion-neutral ratio is compared with results from various ionization models.

  6. Intensity distribution analysis of cathodoluminescence using the energy loss distribution of electrons.

    PubMed

    Fukuta, Masahiro; Inami, Wataru; Ono, Atsushi; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2016-01-01

    We present an intensity distribution analysis of cathodoluminescence (CL) excited with a focused electron beam in a luminescent thin film. The energy loss distribution is applied to the developed analysis method in order to determine the arrangement of the dipole locations along the path of the electron traveling in the film. Propagating light emitted from each dipole is analyzed with the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. CL distribution near the film surface is evaluated as a nanometric light source. It is found that a light source with 30 nm widths is generated in the film by the focused electron beam. We also discuss the accuracy of the developed analysis method by comparison with experimental results. The analysis results are brought into good agreement with the experimental results by introducing the energy loss distribution. PMID:26550930

  7. Multiple thermal events in the Grenvillian orogenic cycle: geochronologic evidence from the northern Reading Prong, New York-New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Grauch, R.I.; Aleinikoff, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    The Grenville terrane of the northern Reading Prong, New York-New Jersey, has a far more complex thermal history than previously recognized. U-Pb zircon ages record at least five discrete thermal events between about 1300 and 900 Ma: (1) 1230 +/- 20 Ma--metamorphism of paragneiss; (2) 1150 +/- 30 Ma--crystallization of Storm King-type granite, protoliths of a leucogneiss, and a member of the Fordham Gneiss; (3) 1090 +/- 10 Ma--crystallization of a hornblende gneiss and the Canopus pluton; (4) 1015 +/- Ma--regional metamorphism, crystallization of the Canada Hill granite and pegmatitic alaskites; (5) 965 +/- 10 Ma--crystallization of pegmatites, formation of a monazite-xenotime rock, and closure of the U-Pb whole-rock system. Another problem that arises from these results is the past correlation throughout the Reading Prong of lithologic sequences whose zircon ages apparently do not agree. This complex sequence of Middle Proterozoic thermal events in the central Appalachians correlates fairly well with events recorded in the Grenville terrane of eastern Ontario, where at least two major orogenic events between 1300 and 900 Ma have been identified. The fit with identified events in the Adirondacks of northern New York and with Precambrian events of the southern Appalachians is not as good, but the early approx. = 1230 Ma and the late approx. = 960 Ma events seem to be present in both regions.

  8. Energy distribution of nanoflares in the quiet solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulyanov, Artyom

    2012-07-01

    We present a detailed statistical analysis of flare-like events in low layer of solar corona detected with TESIS instrument onboard CORONAS-PHOTON satellite in 171 {Å} during high-cadence (5 sec) time-series. The estimated thermal energies of these small events amount to 10^{23} - 10^{26} erg. According to modern classification flare-like events with such energies are usually referred to as nanoflares. The big number of registered events (above 2000) allowed us to obtain precise distributions of geometric and physical parameters of nanoflares, the most intriguing being energy distribution. Following Aschwanden et al. (2000) and other authors we approximated the calculated energy distribution with a single power law slope: N(E)dE ˜ N^{-α}dE. The power law index was derived to be α = 2.4 ± 0.2, which is very close to the value reported by Krucker & Benz (1998): α ≈ 2.3 - 2.4. The total energy input from registered events constitute about 10^4 erg \\cdot cm^{-2} \\cdot s^{-1}, which is well beyond net losses in quiet corona (3 \\cdot 10^5 erg \\cdot cm^{-2} \\cdot s^{-1}). However, the value of α > 2 indicates that nanoflares with lower energies dominate over nanoflares with bigger energies and could contribute considerably to quiet corona heating.

  9. Velocity and energy distributions in microcanonical ensembles of hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Scalas, Enrico; Gabriel, Adrian T; Martin, Edgar; Germano, Guido

    2015-08-01

    In a microcanonical ensemble (constant NVE, hard reflecting walls) and in a molecular dynamics ensemble (constant NVEPG, periodic boundary conditions) with a number N of smooth elastic hard spheres in a d-dimensional volume V having a total energy E, a total momentum P, and an overall center of mass position G, the individual velocity components, velocity moduli, and energies have transformed beta distributions with different arguments and shape parameters depending on d, N, E, the boundary conditions, and possible symmetries in the initial conditions. This can be shown marginalizing the joint distribution of individual energies, which is a symmetric Dirichlet distribution. In the thermodynamic limit the beta distributions converge to gamma distributions with different arguments and shape or scale parameters, corresponding respectively to the Gaussian, i.e., Maxwell-Boltzmann, Maxwell, and Boltzmann or Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution. These analytical results agree with molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations with different numbers of hard disks or spheres and hard reflecting walls or periodic boundary conditions. The agreement is perfect with our Monte Carlo algorithm, which acts only on velocities independently of positions with the collision versor sampled uniformly on a unit half sphere in d dimensions, while slight deviations appear with our molecular dynamics simulations for the smallest values of N. PMID:26382376

  10. Velocity and energy distributions in microcanonical ensembles of hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalas, Enrico; Gabriel, Adrian T.; Martin, Edgar; Germano, Guido

    2015-08-01

    In a microcanonical ensemble (constant N V E , hard reflecting walls) and in a molecular dynamics ensemble (constant N V E PG , periodic boundary conditions) with a number N of smooth elastic hard spheres in a d -dimensional volume V having a total energy E , a total momentum P , and an overall center of mass position G , the individual velocity components, velocity moduli, and energies have transformed beta distributions with different arguments and shape parameters depending on d , N , E , the boundary conditions, and possible symmetries in the initial conditions. This can be shown marginalizing the joint distribution of individual energies, which is a symmetric Dirichlet distribution. In the thermodynamic limit the beta distributions converge to gamma distributions with different arguments and shape or scale parameters, corresponding respectively to the Gaussian, i.e., Maxwell-Boltzmann, Maxwell, and Boltzmann or Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution. These analytical results agree with molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations with different numbers of hard disks or spheres and hard reflecting walls or periodic boundary conditions. The agreement is perfect with our Monte Carlo algorithm, which acts only on velocities independently of positions with the collision versor sampled uniformly on a unit half sphere in d dimensions, while slight deviations appear with our molecular dynamics simulations for the smallest values of N .

  11. Energy Distributions and spectra of Orion B stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schild, R. E.; Chaffee, F.

    1972-01-01

    New MK spectral types and energy distributions are presented for B stars in Orion for which far ultraviolet flux excesses have recently been discovered. Significant differences between HD spectral energy distributions show the Orion late B stars to have smaller Balmer discontinuities than do field stars of the same spectral types. For the late B stars, these effects cause the 1500 A fluxes to be under-estimated by approximately 0.5 mag. No comparable systematic effects were found for the early B stars.

  12. Comparison of Measured Dark Current Distributions with Calculated Damage Energy Distributions in HgCdTe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, C. J.; Marshall, P. W.; Howe, C. L.; Reed, R. A.; Weller, R. A.; Mendenhall, M.; Waczynski, A.; Ladbury, R.; Jordan, T. M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a combined Monte Carlo and analytic approach to the calculation of the pixel-to-pixel distribution of proton-induced damage in a HgCdTe sensor array and compares the results to measured dark current distributions after damage by 63 MeV protons. The moments of the Coulombic, nuclear elastic and nuclear inelastic damage distributions were extracted from Monte Carlo simulations and combined to form a damage distribution using the analytic techniques first described in [1]. The calculations show that the high energy recoils from the nuclear inelastic reactions (calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX [2]) produce a pronounced skewing of the damage energy distribution. While the nuclear elastic component (also calculated using the MCNPX) contributes only a small fraction of the total nonionizing damage energy, its inclusion in the shape of the damage across the array is significant. The Coulombic contribution was calculated using MRED [3-5], a Geant4 [4,6] application. The comparison with the dark current distribution strongly suggests that mechanisms which are not linearly correlated with nonionizing damage produced according to collision kinematics are responsible for the observed dark current increases. This has important implications for the process of predicting the on-orbit dark current response of the HgCdTe sensor array.

  13. A Petri Net model for distributed energy system

    SciTech Connect

    Konopko, Joanna

    2015-12-31

    Electrical networks need to evolve to become more intelligent, more flexible and less costly. The smart grid is the next generation power energy, uses two-way flows of electricity and information to create a distributed automated energy delivery network. Building a comprehensive smart grid is a challenge for system protection, optimization and energy efficient. Proper modeling and analysis is needed to build an extensive distributed energy system and intelligent electricity infrastructure. In this paper, the whole model of smart grid have been proposed using Generalized Stochastic Petri Nets (GSPN). The simulation of created model is also explored. The simulation of the model has allowed the analysis of how close the behavior of the model is to the usage of the real smart grid.

  14. A Petri Net model for distributed energy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopko, Joanna

    2015-12-01

    Electrical networks need to evolve to become more intelligent, more flexible and less costly. The smart grid is the next generation power energy, uses two-way flows of electricity and information to create a distributed automated energy delivery network. Building a comprehensive smart grid is a challenge for system protection, optimization and energy efficient. Proper modeling and analysis is needed to build an extensive distributed energy system and intelligent electricity infrastructure. In this paper, the whole model of smart grid have been proposed using Generalized Stochastic Petri Nets (GSPN). The simulation of created model is also explored. The simulation of the model has allowed the analysis of how close the behavior of the model is to the usage of the real smart grid.

  15. Comparison of Measured Leakage Current Distributions with Calculated Damage Energy Distributions in HgCdTe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, C. J.; Ladbury, R.; Marshall, P. W.; Reed, R. A.; Howe, C.; Weller, B.; Mendenhall, M.; Waczynski, A.; Jordan, T. M.; Fodness, B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a combined Monte Carlo and analytic approach to the calculation of the pixel-to-pixel distribution of proton-induced damage in a HgCdTe sensor array and compares the results to measured dark current distributions after damage by 63 MeV protons. The moments of the Coulombic, nuclear elastic and nuclear inelastic damage distribution were extracted from Monte Carlo simulations and combined to form a damage distribution using the analytic techniques first described in [I]. The calculations show that the high energy recoils from the nuclear inelastic reactions (calculated using the Monte Car10 code MCNPX [2]) produce a pronounced skewing of the damage energy distribution. The nuclear elastic component (also calculated using the MCNPX) has a negligible effect on the shape of the damage distribution. The Coulombic contribution was calculated using MRED [3,4], a Geant4 [4,5] application. The comparison with the dark current distribution strongly suggests that mechanisms which are not linearly correlated with nonionizing damage produced according to collision kinematics are responsible for the observed dark current increases. This has important implications for the process of predicting the on-orbit dark current response of the HgCdTe sensor array.

  16. A Bio-Based Fuel Cell for Distributed Energy Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony Terrinoni; Sean Gifford

    2008-06-30

    The technology we propose consists primarily of an improved design for increasing the energy density of a certain class of bio-fuel cell (BFC). The BFCs we consider are those which harvest electrons produced by microorganisms during their metabolism of organic substrates (e.g. glucose, acetate). We estimate that our technology will significantly enhance power production (per unit volume) of these BFCs, to the point where they could be employed as stand-alone systems for distributed energy generation.

  17. Thermal electron energy distribution measurements in the ionosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, P. B.; Nagy, A. F.

    1973-01-01

    A recoverable payload instrumented for twilight airglow studies was launched by an Aerobee 150 from the White Sands Test Range on Feb. 8, 1971 at 13.56 UT. The payload included a low energy electron spectrometer (HARP) and a cylindrical Langmuir probe. The HARP electron spectrometer is a new device designed to make high resolution differential electron flux measurements. Measurements of ionospheric electron energy distribution in the range from about 0.2 to 4.0 eV are presented.

  18. How to buy energy-efficient distribution transformer

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    Section 161 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) encourages energy-efficient federal procurement. Executive Order 12902 and FAR section 23.704 direct agencies to purchase products in the upper 25% of energy efficiency. Agencies that use these guidelines to buy efficient products can realize substantial operating cost savings and help prevent pollution. As the world`s largest consumer, the federal government can help pull the entire US market towards greater energy efficiency, while saving taxpayer dollars. The efficiency levels in this Recommendation are the same as those in NEMA`s TP-1 standard. Additionally, the EPA/DOE ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program identifies efficient low-voltage distribution transformers with the ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} label. Complying models meet the same efficiency criteria specified in this Recommendation (and TP-1).

  19. Review of Test Facilities for Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect

    AKHIL,ABBAS ALI; MARNAY,CHRIS; KIPMAN,TIMOTHY

    2003-05-01

    Since initiating research on integration of distributed energy resources (DER) in 1999, the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) has been actively assessing and reviewing existing DER test facilities for possible demonstrations of advanced DER system integration concepts. This report is a compendium of information collected by the CERTS team on DER test facilities during this period.

  20. Multi-objective optimal dispatch of distributed energy resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longe, Ayomide

    This thesis is composed of two papers which investigate the optimal dispatch for distributed energy resources. In the first paper, an economic dispatch problem for a community microgrid is studied. In this microgrid, each agent pursues an economic dispatch for its personal resources. In addition, each agent is capable of trading electricity with other agents through a local energy market. In this paper, a simple market structure is introduced as a framework for energy trades in a small community microgrid such as the Solar Village. It was found that both sellers and buyers benefited by participating in this market. In the second paper, Semidefinite Programming (SDP) for convex relaxation of power flow equations is used for optimal active and reactive dispatch for Distributed Energy Resources (DER). Various objective functions including voltage regulation, reduced transmission line power losses, and minimized reactive power charges for a microgrid are introduced. Combinations of these goals are attained by solving a multiobjective optimization for the proposed ORPD problem. Also, both centralized and distributed versions of this optimal dispatch are investigated. It was found that SDP made the optimal dispatch faster and distributed solution allowed for scalability.

  1. Automated Energy Distribution and Reliability System (AEDR): Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Buche, D. L.

    2008-07-01

    This report describes Northern Indiana Public Service Co. project efforts to develop an automated energy distribution and reliability system. The purpose of this project was to implement a database-driven GIS solution that would manage all of the company's gas, electric, and landbase objects.

  2. Automated Energy Distribution and Reliability System Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Buche, D. L.; Perry, S.

    2007-10-01

    This report describes Northern Indiana Public Service Co. project efforts to develop an automated energy distribution and reliability system. The purpose of this project was to implement a database-driven GIS solution that would manage all of the company's gas, electric, and landbase objects.

  3. Energy loss analysis of an integrated space power distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kankam, M. D.; Ribeiro, P. F.

    1992-01-01

    The results of studies related to conceptual topologies of an integrated utility-like space power system are described. The system topologies are comparatively analyzed by considering their transmission energy losses as functions of mainly distribution voltage level and load composition. The analysis is expedited by use of a Distribution System Analysis and Simulation (DSAS) software. This recently developed computer program by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) uses improved load models to solve the power flow within the system. However, present shortcomings of the software with regard to space applications, and incompletely defined characteristics of a space power system make the results applicable to only the fundamental trends of energy losses of the topologies studied. Accountability, such as included, for the effects of the various parameters on the system performance can constitute part of a planning tool for a space power distribution system.

  4. Distributed Frequency Control of Prosumer-Based Electric Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nazari, MH; Costello, Z; Feizollahi, MJ; Grijalva, S; Egerstedt, M

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a distributed frequency regulation framework for prosumer-based electric energy systems, where a prosumer (producer-consumer) is defined as an intelligent agentwhich can produce, consume, and/or store electricity. Despite the frequency regulators being distributed, stability can be ensured while avoiding inter-area oscillations using a limited control effort. To achieve this, a fully distributed one-step model-predictive control protocol is proposed and analyzed, whereby each prosumer communicates solely with its neighbors in the network. The efficacy of the proposed frequency regulation framework is shown through simulations on two real-world electric energy systems of different scale and complexity. We show that prosumers can indeed bring frequency and power deviations to their desired values after small perturbations.

  5. Transient electron energy distribution in supported Ag nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merschdorf, M.; Kennerknecht, C.; Willig, K.; Pfeiffer, W.

    2002-11-01

    The electron relaxation in Ag nanoparticles supported on graphite is investigated by time-resolved multiphoton photoemission spectroscopy. The photoemission spectra map the transient electron energy distribution in the nanoparticles and reveal the internal thermalization and cooling of the electron gas. The excess energy stored in the electron gas is calculated using the free-electron model. In contrast to the behaviour of isolated nanoparticles the energy loss rate from the electron gas increases with the pump fluence. This indicates that the electron gas equilibration in Ag nanoparticles on graphite is modified by excited electron transport.

  6. Electron energy distribution in a dusty plasma: analytical approach.

    PubMed

    Denysenko, I B; Kersten, H; Azarenkov, N A

    2015-09-01

    Analytical expressions describing the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in a dusty plasma are obtained from the homogeneous Boltzmann equation for electrons. The expressions are derived neglecting electron-electron collisions, as well as transformation of high-energy electrons into low-energy electrons at inelastic electron-atom collisions. At large electron energies, the quasiclassical approach for calculation of the EEDF is applied. For the moderate energies, we account for inelastic electron-atom collisions in the dust-free case and both inelastic electron-atom and electron-dust collisions in the dusty plasma case. Using these analytical expressions and the balance equation for dust charging, the electron energy distribution function, the effective electron temperature, the dust charge, and the dust surface potential are obtained for different dust radii and densities, as well as for different electron densities and radio-frequency (rf) field amplitudes and frequencies. The dusty plasma parameters are compared with those calculated numerically by a finite-difference method taking into account electron-electron collisions and the transformation of high-energy electrons at inelastic electron-neutral collisions. It is shown that the analytical expressions can be used for calculation of the EEDF and dusty plasma parameters at typical experimental conditions, in particular, in the positive column of a direct-current glow discharge and in the case of an rf plasma maintained by an electric field with frequency f=13.56MHz. PMID:26465570

  7. Strain energy release rate distributions for double cantilever beam specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crews, J. H., Jr.; Shivakumar, K. N.; Raju, I. S.

    1991-01-01

    A 24-ply composite double cantilever-beam specimen under mode I (opening) loading has been analyzed by a 3D FEM code that calculated along a straight delamination starter for several different specimen materials. An isotropic specimen was found to have a strain-energy release rate distribution which varied along its delamination front due to the boundary-layer effect and another effect associated with the anticlastic curvature of the bent specimen arms. A 0-deg graphite-reinforced epoxy specimen had a nearly-uniform strain-energy release rate distribution which dropped only near the edge, due to the boundary-layer effect, and a +/- 45-deg graphite/epoxy specimen exhibited a pronounced strain-energy release rate variation across the specimen width.

  8. Benefits of Power Electronic Interfaces for Distributed Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kroposki, B.; Pink, C.; DeBlasio, R.; Thomas, H.; Simoes, M.; Sen, P. K.

    2006-01-01

    Optimization of overall electrical system performance is important for the long-term economic viability of distributed energy (DE) systems. With the increasing use of DE systems in industry and its technological advancement, it is becoming more important to understand the integration of these systems with the electric power systems. New markets and benefits for distributed energy applications include the ability to provide ancillary services, improve energy efficiency, enhance power system reliability, and allow customer choice. Advanced power electronic (PE) interfaces will allow DE systems to provide increased functionality through improved power quality and voltage/VAR support, increase electrical system compatibility by reducing the fault contributions, and flexibility in operations with various other DE sources, while reducing overall interconnection costs. This paper examines the system integration and optimization issues associated with DE systems and show the benefits of using PE interfaces for such applications.

  9. 78 FR 23335 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Distribution Transformers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ...The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 (EPCA), as amended, prescribes energy conservation standards for various consumer products and certain commercial and industrial equipment, including distribution transformers. EPCA also requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine whether more-stringent standards would be technologically feasible and economically justified, and would......

  10. Determination of energy distribution for photon and neutron microdosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todo, A. S.

    This work was undertaken to provide basic physical data for use in both microdosimetry and dosimetry of high energy photons and also in the neutron radiation field. Described is the formalism to determine the initial electron energy spectra in water irradiated by photons with energies up to 1 GeV. Calculations were performed with a Monte Carlo computer code, PHOEL-3, which is also described. The code treats explicitly the production of electron-positron pairs, Compton scattering, photoelectric absorption, and the emission of Auger electrons following the occurrence of K-shell vacancies in oxygen. The tables give directly the information needed to specify the absolute single-collision kerma in water, which approximates tissue, at each photon energy. Results for continuous photon energy spectra can be obtained by using linear interpolation with the tables. The conditions under which first-collision kerma approximate absorbed dose are discussed. A formula is given for estimating bremsstrahlung energy loss, one of the principal differences between kerma and absorbed dose in practical cases. A study has been carried out, on the use of cylindrical, energy-proportional pulse-height detector for determining microdosimetric quantities, as neutron fractional dose spectra, D (L), in the function of linear energy transfer (LET). In the present study the Hurst detector was used; this device satisfies the requirement of the Bragg-Gray principle. A Monte Carlo Method was developed to obtain the D(L) spectrum from a measured pulse-height spectrum H(h), and the knowledge of the distribution of recoil-particle track lenght, P(T) in the sensitive volume of the detector. These developed programs to find P(T) and D(L) are presented. The distribution of D(L) in LET were obtained using a known distribution of P(T) and the measured H(h) spectrum fromthe Cf-2 52 neutron source. All the results are discussed and the conclusions are presented.

  11. Optimal Voltage Regulation for Unbalanced Distribution Networks Considering Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Ceylan, Oguzhan; Xu, Yan; Tomsovic, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    With increasing penetration of distributed generation in the distribution networks (DN), the secure and optimal operation of DN has become an important concern. In this paper, an iterative quadratic constrained quadratic programming model to minimize voltage deviations and maximize distributed energy resource (DER) active power output in a three phase unbalanced distribution system is developed. The optimization model is based on the linearized sensitivity coefficients between controlled variables (e.g., node voltages) and control variables (e.g., real and reactive power injections of DERs). To avoid the oscillation of solution when it is close to the optimum, a golden search method is introduced to control the step size. Numerical simulations on modified IEEE 13 nodes test feeders show the efficiency of the proposed model. Compared to the results solved by heuristic search (harmony algorithm), the proposed model converges quickly to the global optimum.

  12. The spectral energy distribution of Zeta Puppis and HD 50896

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm, A. V.; Cassinelli, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    The ultraviolet spectral energy distribution of the O5f star Zeta Pup and the WN5 star HD 50896 are derived from OAO-2 observations with the calibration of Bless, Code, and Fairchild (1976). An estimate of the interstellar reddening (0.12 magnitude) of the Wolf-Rayet star is determined from the size of the characteristic interstellar extinction bump at 4.6 inverse microns. After correction for extinction, both stars show a flat energy distribution in the ultraviolet. The distribution of HD 50896 from 1100 A to 2 microns is in good agreement with results of extended model atmospheres, but some uncertainty remains because of the interstellar-extinction correction. The absolute energy distribution of Zeta Pup is fitted by a 42,000-K plane-parallel model if the model's flux is adjusted for the effects of electron scattering in the stellar wind and for UV line blanketing that was determined empirically from high-resolution Copernicus satellite observations. To achieve this fit, it is necessary to push both the spectroscopically determined temperature and the ultraviolet calibration to the limits of their probable errors.

  13. Distributed energy resources at naval base ventura county building 1512

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Owen C.; Marnay, Chris

    2004-10-01

    This paper reports the findings of a preliminary assessment of the cost effectiveness of distributed energy resources at Naval Base Ventura County (NBVC) Building 1512. This study was conducted in response to the base's request for design assistance to the Federal Energy Management Program. Given the current tariff structure there are two main decisions facing NBVC: whether to install distributed energy resources (DER), or whether to continue the direct access energy supply contract. At the current effective rate, given assumptions about the performance and structure of building energy loads and available generating technology characteristics, the results of this study indicate that if the building installed a 600 kW DER system with absorption cooling and heat capabilities chosen by cost minimization, the energy cost savings would be about 14 percent, or $55,000 per year. However, under current conditions, this study also suggests that significant savings could be obtained if Building 1 512 changed from the direct access contract to a SCE TOU-8 (Southern California Edison time of use tariff number 8) rate without installing a DER system. At current SCE TOU-8 tariffs, the potential savings from installation of a DER system would be about 4 percent, or $15,000 per year.

  14. Steam distribution and energy delivery optimization using wireless sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Olama, Mohammed M; Allgood, Glenn O; Kuruganti, Phani Teja; Sukumar, Sreenivas R; Djouadi, Seddik M; Lake, Joe E

    2011-01-01

    The Extreme Measurement Communications Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) explores the deployment of a wireless sensor system with a real-time measurement-based energy efficiency optimization framework in the ORNL campus. With particular focus on the 12-mile long steam distribution network in our campus, we propose an integrated system-level approach to optimize the energy delivery within the steam distribution system. We address the goal of achieving significant energy-saving in steam lines by monitoring and acting on leaking steam valves/traps. Our approach leverages an integrated wireless sensor and real-time monitoring capabilities. We make assessments on the real-time status of the distribution system by mounting acoustic sensors on the steam pipes/traps/valves and observe the state measurements of these sensors. Our assessments are based on analysis of the wireless sensor measurements. We describe Fourier-spectrum based algorithms that interpret acoustic vibration sensor data to characterize flows and classify the steam system status. We are able to present the sensor readings, steam flow, steam trap status and the assessed alerts as an interactive overlay within a web-based Google Earth geographic platform that enables decision makers to take remedial action. We believe our demonstration serves as an instantiation of a platform that extends implementation to include newer modalities to manage water flow, sewage and energy consumption.

  15. Steam distribution and energy delivery optimization using wireless sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olama, Mohammed M.; Allgood, Glenn O.; Kuruganti, Teja P.; Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Djouadi, Seddik M.; Lake, Joe E.

    2011-05-01

    The Extreme Measurement Communications Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) explores the deployment of a wireless sensor system with a real-time measurement-based energy efficiency optimization framework in the ORNL campus. With particular focus on the 12-mile long steam distribution network in our campus, we propose an integrated system-level approach to optimize the energy delivery within the steam distribution system. We address the goal of achieving significant energy-saving in steam lines by monitoring and acting on leaking steam valves/traps. Our approach leverages an integrated wireless sensor and real-time monitoring capabilities. We make assessments on the real-time status of the distribution system by mounting acoustic sensors on the steam pipes/traps/valves and observe the state measurements of these sensors. Our assessments are based on analysis of the wireless sensor measurements. We describe Fourier-spectrum based algorithms that interpret acoustic vibration sensor data to characterize flows and classify the steam system status. We are able to present the sensor readings, steam flow, steam trap status and the assessed alerts as an interactive overlay within a web-based Google Earth geographic platform that enables decision makers to take remedial action. We believe our demonstration serves as an instantiation of a platform that extends implementation to include newer modalities to manage water flow, sewage and energy consumption.

  16. Initial energy and perihelion distributions of Oort-cloud comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, P. R.

    1977-01-01

    A Monte Carlo model of stellar perturbations of the Oort cloud is used to study the distributions in energy and perihelion of comets entering the planetary region for the first time. The model is run for a variety of initial states and a range of velocity perturbations. In all cases the resulting orbits are uniformly distributed in perihelion distance in the planetary region, q less than 20 AU. Most orbits are confined to a fairly narrow range in 1/a and hyperbolic orbits are rare.

  17. Energy management and control of active distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariatzadeh, Farshid

    Advancements in the communication, control, computation and information technologies have driven the transition to the next generation active power distribution systems. Novel control techniques and management strategies are required to achieve the efficient, economic and reliable grid. The focus of this work is energy management and control of active distribution systems (ADS) with integrated renewable energy sources (RESs) and demand response (DR). Here, ADS mean automated distribution system with remotely operated controllers and distributed energy resources (DERs). DER as active part of the next generation future distribution system includes: distributed generations (DGs), RESs, energy storage system (ESS), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) and DR. Integration of DR and RESs into ADS is critical to realize the vision of sustainability. The objective of this dissertation is the development of management architecture to control and operate ADS in the presence of DR and RES. One of the most challenging issues for operating ADS is the inherent uncertainty of DR and RES as well as conflicting objective of DER and electric utilities. ADS can consist of different layers such as system layer and building layer and coordination between these layers is essential. In order to address these challenges, multi-layer energy management and control architecture is proposed with robust algorithms in this work. First layer of proposed multi-layer architecture have been implemented at the system layer. Developed AC optimal power flow (AC-OPF) generates fair price for all DR and non-DR loads which is used as a control signal for second layer. Second layer controls DR load at buildings using a developed look-ahead robust controller. Load aggregator collects information from all buildings and send aggregated load to the system optimizer. Due to the different time scale at these two management layers, time coordination scheme is developed. Robust and deterministic controllers

  18. Energy efficient wireless sensor networks using asymmetric distributed source coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Abhishek; Kulkarni, Murlidhar

    2013-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are networks of sensor nodes deployed over a geographical area to perform a specific task. WSNs pose many design challenges. Energy conservation is one such design issue. In literature a wide range of solutions addressing this issue have been proposed. Generally WSNs are densely deployed. Thus the nodes with the close proximity are more likely to have the same data. Transmission of such non-aggregated data may lead to an inefficient energy management. Hence the data fusion has to be performed at the nodes so as to combine the edundant information into a single data unit. Distributed Source Coding is an efficient approach in achieving this task. In this paper an attempt has been made in modeling such a system. Various energy efficient codes were considered for the analysis. System performance in terms of energy efficiency has been made.

  19. On Measuring Cosmic Ray Energy Spectra with the Rapidity Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bashindzhagyan, G.; Adams, J.; Chilingarian, A.; Drury, L.; Egorov, N.; Golubkov, S.; Korotkova, N.; Panasyuk, M.; Podorozhnyi, D.; Procqureur, J.

    2000-01-01

    An important goal of cosmic ray research is to measure the elemental energy spectra of galactic cosmic rays up to 10(exp 16) eV. This goal cannot be achieved with an ionization calorimeter because the required instrument is too massive for space flight. An alternate method will be presented. This method is based on measuring the primary particle energy by determining the angular distribution of secondaries produced in a target layer. The proposed technique can be used over a wide range of energies (10 (exp 11) -10 (exp 16) eV) and gives an energy resolution of 60% or better. Based on this technique, a conceptual design for a new instrument (KLEM) will be presented. Due to its light weight, this instrument can have a large aperture enabling the direct measurement of cosmic rays to 1016 eV.

  20. Multi-pronged assessment of land degradation in West Africa to assess the importance of atmospheric fertilization in masking the processes involved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Quang Bao; Tamene, Lulseged; Vlek, Paul L. G.

    2012-07-01

    Separating human-induced land degradation from that caused by natural processes in the world of global climate and atmospheric change is a challenging task, but important for developing mitigation strategies. Current remote-sensing data and spatio-temporal analyses allow the distinction of climate and human-induced land degradation on a sub-continental scale, but the underlying processes cannot be discerned at this scale. This study is conducted at a river-basin scale to (1) identify land degradation hotspots in a basin or sub-basin, and (2) assess the correspondence and divergence of land degradation assessed by NDVI shifts with and without accounting for atmospheric fertilization with that based on soil erosion assessment at a sub-basin scale. Long-term remote sensing (NDVI) and rainfall data were used to identify human-induced land degradation hotspot areas in the Volta basin. The results were compared with the critical zone of soil loss in the White Volta sub-basin derived from a spatially distributed soil erosion model, validated by field-measured data. A spatial comparison of the above studies revealed that the biomass productivity (NDVI)-based land degradation assessment grossly underestimated the extent to which soil is being lost, unless a correction was included to account for atmospheric fertilization. Based on inter-annual NDVI signals land degradation was evident in about 8% of the Volta basin's landmass, but when accounting for atmospheric fertilization, as much as 65% of the land is losing some of its vital attributes such as soil quality or vegetation productivity. The study demonstrates the need for using a multi-pronged assessment strategy in land degradation assessment that offers an insight of the processes involved in land degradation.

  1. A bolometer array for the spectral energy distribution (SPEED) camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverberg, R. F.; Ali, S.; Bier, A.; Campano, B.; Chen, T. C.; Cheng, E. S.; Cottingham, D. A.; Crawford, T. M.; Downes, T.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Fixsen, D. J.; Logan, D.; Meyer, S. S.; O'dell, C.; Perera, T.; Sharp, E. H.; Timbie, P. T.; Wilson, G. W.

    2004-03-01

    The Spectral Energy Distribution (SPEED) Camera is being developed to study the spectral energy distributions of high redshift galaxies. Its initial use will be on the Heinrich Hertz Telescope and eventually on the Large Millimeter Telescope. SPEED requires a small cryogenic detector array of 2×2 pixels with each pixel having four frequency bands in the 150-375GHz range. Here we describe the development of the detector array of these high-efficiency Frequency Selective Bolometers (FSB). The FSB design provides the multi-pixel, multi-spectral band capability required for SPEED in a compact stackable array. The SPEED bolometers will use proximity effect superconducting transition edge sensors as their temperature-sensing element, allowing for higher levels of electronic multiplexing in future applications.

  2. Consistent energy barrier distributions in magnetic particle chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laslett, O.; Ruta, S.; Chantrell, R. W.; Barker, J.; Friedman, G.; Hovorka, O.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate long-time thermal activation behaviour in magnetic particle chains of variable length. Chains are modelled as Stoner-Wohlfarth particles coupled by dipolar interactions. Thermal activation is described as a hopping process over a multidimensional energy landscape using the discrete orientation model limit of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert dynamics. The underlying master equation is solved by diagonalising the associated transition matrix, which allows the evaluation of distributions of time scales of intrinsic thermal activation modes and their energy representation. It is shown that as a result of the interaction dependence of these distributions, increasing the particle chain length can lead to acceleration or deceleration of the overall relaxation process depending on the initialisation procedure.

  3. Detecting energy dependent neutron capture distributions in a liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmer, Matthew J. I.; Gamage, Kelum A. A.; Taylor, Graeme C.

    2015-03-01

    A novel technique is being developed to estimate the effective dose of a neutron field based on the distribution of neutron captures in a scintillator. Using Monte Carlo techniques, a number of monoenergetic neutron source energies and locations were modelled and their neutron capture response was recorded. Using back propagation Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) the energy and incident direction of the neutron field was predicted from the distribution of neutron captures within a 6Li-loaded liquid scintillator. Using this proposed technique, the effective dose of 252Cf, 241AmBe and 241AmLi neutron fields was estimated to within 30% for four perpendicular angles in the horizontal plane. Initial theoretical investigations show that this technique holds some promise for real-time estimation of the effective dose of a neutron field.

  4. Modeling Plasmas with a Kappa Electron Energy Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Michael; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2016-05-01

    Nonthermal kappa electron energy distributions have been observed in the Earth's magnetosphere and the solar wind, and are likely also present in the solar corona and in solar flares. In order to model the spectra of these plasmas, it is necessary to obtain the appropriate collision rate coefficients. We show that this can be done simply by summing appropriately weighted Maxwellian rate coefficients. The resulting data have similar or better accuracies than are obtained with other approaches. Summing Maxwellians has the additional advantages of being easy to implement and extendable to many different collision processes. We apply this technique to modeling the charge state distribution (CSD) of kappa-distribution plasmas. In particular, we examine the influence of electron impact multiple ionization on the equilibrium CSD and calculate the time variation of the CSD during a solar flare.

  5. Modeling Plasmas with a Kappa Electron Energy Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Michael; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2016-06-01

    Nonthermal kappa electron energy distributions have been observed in the Earth's magnetosphere and the solar wind, and are likely also present in the solar corona and in solar flares. In order to model the spectra of these plasmas, it is necessary to obtain the appropriate collision rate coefficients. We show that this can be done simply by summing appropriately weighted Maxwellian rate coefficients. The resulting data have similar or better accuracies than are obtained with other approaches. Summing Maxwellians has the additional advantages of being easy to implement and extendable to many different collision processes. We apply this technique to modeling the charge state distribution (CSD) of kappa-distribution plasmas. In particular, we examine the influence of electron impact multiple ionization on the equilibrium CSD and calculate the time variation of the CSD during a solar flare.

  6. Healthcare decision-tools a growing Web trend: three-pronged public relations campaign heightens presence, recognition for online healthcare information provider.

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    Schwartz Communications, LLC, executes a successful PR campaign to position Subimo, a provider of online healthcare decision tools, as a leader in the industry that touts names such as WebMD.com and HealthGrades.com. Through a three-pronged media relations strategy, Schwartz and Subimo together branded the company as an industry thought-leader. PMID:16509388

  7. A Detailed Level Kinetics Model of NO Vibrational Energy Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Surendra P.; Gilmore, John; Cavolowsky, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Several contemporary problems have pointed to the desirability of a detailed level kinetics approach to modeling the distribution of vibrational energy in NO. Such a model is necessary when vibrational redistribution reactions are insufficient to maintain a Boltzmann distribution over the vibrational energy states. Recent calculations of the rate constant for the first reaction of the Zeldovich mechanism (N2 + O (goes to) NO + N) have suggested that the product NO is formed in high vibrational states. In shock layer flowfields, the product NO molecules may experience an insufficient number of collisions to establish a Boltzmann distribution over vibrational states, thus necessitating a level kinetics model. In other flows, such as expansions of high temperature air, fast, near-resonance vibrational energy exchanges with N2 and O2 may also require a level specific model for NO because of the relative rates of vibrational exchange and redistribution. The proposed report will integrate computational and experimental components to construct such a model for the NO molecule.

  8. Determination of the polar and total surface energy distributions of particulates by inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Das, Shyamal C; Larson, Ian; Morton, David A V; Stewart, Peter J

    2011-01-18

    This Letter reports a technique of measuring polar surface energy distributions of lactose using inverse gas chromatography (IGC). The significance of this study is that the total surface energy distributions can now be characterized by combining the already known dispersive surface energy distribution with polar surface energy distribution determined in this study. The polar surface energy was calculated from the specific free energies for surface interactions with a monopolar basic probe, ethyl acetate, and a monopolar acidic probe, dichloromethane. PMID:21174410

  9. Network Capacity Assessment of CHP-based Distributed Generation on Urban Energy Distribution Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianjun

    The combined heat and power (CHP)-based distributed generation (DG) or dis-tributed energy resources (DERs) are mature options available in the present energy market, considered to be an effective solution to promote energy efficiency. In the urban environment, the electricity, water and natural gas distribution networks are becoming increasingly interconnected with the growing penetration of the CHP-based DG. Subsequently, this emerging interdependence leads to new topics meriting serious consideration: how much of the CHP-based DG can be accommodated and where to locate these DERs, and given preexisting constraints, how to quantify the mutual impacts on operation performances between these urban energy distribution networks and the CHP-based DG. The early research work was conducted to investigate the feasibility and design methods for one residential microgrid system based on existing electricity, water and gas infrastructures of a residential community, mainly focusing on the economic planning. However, this proposed design method cannot determine the optimal DG sizing and siting for a larger test bed with the given information of energy infrastructures. In this context, a more systematic as well as generalized approach should be developed to solve these problems. In the later study, the model architecture that integrates urban electricity, water and gas distribution networks, and the CHP-based DG system was developed. The proposed approach addressed the challenge of identifying the optimal sizing and siting of the CHP-based DG on these urban energy networks and the mutual impacts on operation performances were also quantified. For this study, the overall objective is to maximize the electrical output and recovered thermal output of the CHP-based DG units. The electricity, gas, and water system models were developed individually and coupled by the developed CHP-based DG system model. The resultant integrated system model is used to constrain the DG's electrical

  10. Energy distribution of elastically scattered electrons from double layer samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tőkési, K.; Varga, D.

    2016-02-01

    We present a theoretical description of the spectra of electrons elastically scattered from thin double layered Au-C samples. The analysis is based on the Monte Carlo simulation of the recoil and Doppler effects in reflection and transmission geometries of the scattering at a fixed angle of 44.3 ° and a primary energy of 40 keV. The relativistic correction is taken into account. Besides the experimentally measurable energy distributions the simulations give many partial distributions separately, depending on the number of elastic scatterings (single, and multiple scatterings of different types). Furthermore, we present detailed analytical calculations for the main parameters of the single scattering, taking into account both the ideal scattering geometry, i.e. infinitesimally small angular range, and the effect of the real, finite angular range used in the measurements. We show our results for intensity ratios, peak shifts and broadenings for four cases of measurement geometries and layer thicknesses. While in the peak intensity ratios of gold and carbon for transmission geometries were found to be in good agreement with the results of the single scattering model, especially large deviations were obtained in reflection geometries. The separation of the peaks, depending on the geometry and the thickness, generally smaller, and the peak width generally larger than it can be expected from the nominal values of the primary energy, scattering angle, and mean kinetic energy of the atoms. We also show that the peaks are asymmetric even for the case of the single scattering due to the finite solid angle. Finally, we present a qualitative comparison with the experimental data. We find our resulting energy distribution of elastically scattered electrons to be in good agreement with recent measurements.

  11. Topography, energy and the global distribution of bird species richness

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Richard G; Orme, C. David L; Storch, David; Olson, Valerie A; Thomas, Gavin H; Ross, Simon G; Ding, Tzung-Su; Rasmussen, Pamela C; Bennett, Peter M; Owens, Ian P.F; Blackburn, Tim M; Gaston, Kevin J

    2007-01-01

    A major goal of ecology is to determine the causes of the latitudinal gradient in global distribution of species richness. Current evidence points to either energy availability or habitat heterogeneity as the most likely environmental drivers in terrestrial systems, but their relative importance is controversial in the absence of analyses of global (rather than continental or regional) extent. Here we use data on the global distribution of extant continental and continental island bird species to test the explanatory power of energy availability and habitat heterogeneity while simultaneously addressing issues of spatial resolution, spatial autocorrelation, geometric constraints upon species' range dynamics, and the impact of human populations and historical glacial ice-cover. At the finest resolution (1°), topographical variability and temperature are identified as the most important global predictors of avian species richness in multi-predictor models. Topographical variability is most important in single-predictor models, followed by productive energy. Adjusting for null expectations based on geometric constraints on species richness improves overall model fit but has negligible impact on tests of environmental predictors. Conclusions concerning the relative importance of environmental predictors of species richness cannot be extrapolated from one biogeographic realm to others or the globe. Rather a global perspective confirms the primary importance of mountain ranges in high-energy areas. PMID:17311781

  12. Validated modeling of distributed energy resources at distribution voltages : LDRD project 38672.

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph, Mark E.; Ginn, Jerry W.

    2004-03-01

    A significant barrier to the deployment of distributed energy resources (DER) onto the power grid is uncertainty on the part of utility engineers regarding impacts of DER on their distribution systems. Because of the many possible combinations of DER and local power system characteristics, these impacts can most effectively be studied by computer simulation. The goal of this LDRD project was to develop and experimentally validate models of transient and steady state source behavior for incorporation into utility distribution analysis tools. Development of these models had not been prioritized either by the distributed-generation industry or by the inverter industry. A functioning model of a selected inverter-based DER was developed in collaboration with both the manufacturer and industrial power systems analysts. The model was written in the PSCAD simulation language, a variant of the ElectroMagnetic Transients Program (EMTP), a code that is widely used and accepted by utilities. A stakeholder team was formed and a methodology was established to address the problem. A list of detailed DER/utility interaction concerns was developed and prioritized. The list indicated that the scope of the problem significantly exceeded resources available for this LDRD project. As this work progresses under separate funding, the model will be refined and experimentally validated. It will then be incorporated in utility distribution analysis tools and used to study a variety of DER issues. The key next step will be design of the validation experiments.

  13. Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources using Model Predictive Control

    SciTech Connect

    Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Shuai; Samaan, Nader A.; Butler-Purry, Karen

    2012-07-22

    In an isolated power system (rural microgrid), Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) such as renewable energy resources (wind, solar), energy storage and demand response can be used to complement fossil fueled generators. The uncertainty and variability due to high penetration of wind makes reliable system operations and controls challenging. In this paper, an optimal control strategy is proposed to coordinate energy storage and diesel generators to maximize wind penetration while maintaining system economics and normal operation. The problem is formulated as a multi-objective optimization problem with the goals of minimizing fuel costs and changes in power output of diesel generators, minimizing costs associated with low battery life of energy storage and maintaining system frequency at the nominal operating value. Two control modes are considered for controlling the energy storage to compensate either net load variability or wind variability. Model predictive control (MPC) is used to solve the aforementioned problem and the performance is compared to an open-loop look-ahead dispatch problem. Simulation studies using high and low wind profiles, as well as, different MPC prediction horizons demonstrate the efficacy of the closed-loop MPC in compensating for uncertainties in wind and demand.

  14. Controlling the Electron Energy Distribution Function Using an Anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baalrud, Scott D.; Barnat, Edward V.; Hopkins, Mathew M.

    2014-10-01

    Positively biased electrodes inserted into plasmas influence the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) by providing a sink for low energy electrons that would otherwise be trapped by ion sheaths at the chamber walls. We develop a model for the EEDF in a hot filament generated discharge in the presence of positively biased electrodes of various surface areas, and compare the model results with experimental Langmuir probe measurements and particle-in-cell simulations. In the absence of an anode, the EEDF is characterized by a cool trapped population at energies below the sheath energy, and a comparatively warm tail population associated with the filament primaries. Anodes that are small enough to collect a negligible fraction of the electrons exiting the plasma have little affect on the EEDF, but as the anode area approaches √{me /mi }Aw , where Aw is the chamber wall area, the anode collects most of the electrons leaving the plasma. This drastically reduces the density of the otherwise trapped population, causing an effective heating of the electrons and a corresponding density decrease. A global model is developed based on the EEDF model and current balance, which shows the interconnected nature of the electron temperature, density and the plasma potential. This work was supported by the Office of Fusion Energy Science at the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94SL85000, and by the University of Iowa Old Gold Program.

  15. Effect of the electron energy distribution on total energy loss with argon in inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, June Young; Kim, Young-Cheol; Kim, Yu-Sin; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-01-15

    The total energy lost per electron-ion pair lost ε{sub T} is investigated with the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). The EEDFs are measured at various argon powers in RF inductively coupled plasma, and the EEDFs show a depleted distribution (a discontinuity occurring at the minimum argon excitation threshold energy level) with the bulk temperature and the tail temperature. The total energy loss per electron-ion pair lost ε{sub T} is calculated from a power balance model with the Maxwellian EEDFs and the depleted EEDFs and then compared with the measured ε{sub T} from the floating probe. It is concluded that the small population of the depleted high energy electrons dramatically increases the collisional energy loss, and the calculated ε{sub T} from the depleted EEDFs has a value that is similar to the measured ε{sub T}.

  16. Effect of the electron energy distribution on total energy loss with argon in inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, June Young; Kim, Young-Cheol; Kim, Yu-Sin; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-01-01

    The total energy lost per electron-ion pair lost ɛT is investigated with the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). The EEDFs are measured at various argon powers in RF inductively coupled plasma, and the EEDFs show a depleted distribution (a discontinuity occurring at the minimum argon excitation threshold energy level) with the bulk temperature and the tail temperature. The total energy loss per electron-ion pair lost ɛT is calculated from a power balance model with the Maxwellian EEDFs and the depleted EEDFs and then compared with the measured ɛT from the floating probe. It is concluded that the small population of the depleted high energy electrons dramatically increases the collisional energy loss, and the calculated ɛT from the depleted EEDFs has a value that is similar to the measured ɛT.

  17. Modeling of customer adoption of distributed energy resources

    SciTech Connect

    Marnay, Chris; Chard, Joseph S.; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Lipman, Timothy; Moezzi, Mithra M.; Ouaglal, Boubekeur; Siddiqui, Afzal S.

    2001-08-01

    This report describes work completed for the California Energy Commission (CEC) on the continued development and application of the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). This work was performed at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) between July 2000 and June 2001 under the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Distributed Energy Resources Integration (DERI) project. Our research on distributed energy resources (DER) builds on the concept of the microgrid ({mu}Grid), a semiautonomous grouping of electricity-generating sources and end-use sinks that are placed and operated for the benefit of its members. Although a {mu}Grid can operate independent of the macrogrid (the utility power network), the {mu}Grid is usually interconnected, purchasing energy and ancillary services from the macrogrid. Groups of customers can be aggregated into {mu}Grids by pooling their electrical and other loads, and the most cost-effective combination of generation resources for a particular {mu}Grid can be found. In this study, DER-CAM, an economic model of customer DER adoption implemented in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS) optimization software is used, to find the cost-minimizing combination of on-site generation customers (individual businesses and a {mu}Grid) in a specified test year. DER-CAM's objective is to minimize the cost of supplying electricity to a specific customer by optimizing the installation of distributed generation and the self-generation of part or all of its electricity. Currently, the model only considers electrical loads, but combined heat and power (CHP) analysis capability is being developed under the second year of CEC funding. The key accomplishments of this year's work were the acquisition of increasingly accurate data on DER technologies, including the development of methods for forecasting cost reductions for these technologies, and the creation of a credible

  18. A Two-Pronged Approach to Promote Food Science in U.S. High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEntire, Jennifer Cleveland; Rollins, Mary

    2007-01-01

    The Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), the IFT Foundation, and Discovery Education partnered to create and distribute food science information to science department and school counselor chairs in all 18,000 U.S. high schools in January 2006. Two multimedia "kits" were generated for teachers and counselors, each consisting of DVDs with food…

  19. Modelling Framework and the Quantitative Analysis of Distributed Energy Resources in Future Distribution Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xue; Sandels, Claes; Zhu, Kun; Nordström, Lars

    2013-08-01

    There has been a large body of statements claiming that the large-scale deployment of Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) could eventually reshape the future distribution grid operation in numerous ways. Thus, it is necessary to introduce a framework to measure to what extent the power system operation will be changed by various parameters of DERs. This article proposed a modelling framework for an overview analysis on the correlation between DERs. Furthermore, to validate the framework, the authors described the reference models of different categories of DERs with their unique characteristics, comprising distributed generation, active demand and electric vehicles. Subsequently, quantitative analysis was made on the basis of the current and envisioned DER deployment scenarios proposed for Sweden. Simulations are performed in two typical distribution network models for four seasons. The simulation results show that in general the DER deployment brings in the possibilities to reduce the power losses and voltage drops by compensating power from the local generation and optimizing the local load profiles.

  20. Patterns of inequality: Dynamics of income distribution in USA and global energy consumption distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Anand; Yakovenko, Victor

    2010-03-01

    Applying the principle of entropy maximization, we argued that the distribution of money in a closed economic system should be exponential [1], see also recent review [2]. In this talk, we show that income distribution in USA is exponential for the majority of population (about 97%). However, the high-income tail follows a power law and is highly dynamical, i.e., out of equilibrium. The fraction of income going to the tail swelled to 20% of all income in 2000 and 2006 at the peaks of speculative bubbles followed by spectacular crashes. Next, we analyze the global distribution of energy consumption per capita among different countries. In the first approximation, it is reasonably well captured by the exponential function. Comparing the data for 1990 and 2005, we observe that the distribution is getting closer to the exponential, presumably as a result of globalization of the world economy.[4pt] [1] A. A. Dragulescu and V. M. Yakovenko, Eur. Phys. J. B 17, 723 (2000). [2] V. M. Yakovenko and J. B. Rosser, to appear in Rev. Mod. Phys. (2009), arXiv:0905.1518.

  1. Energy and angular distributions of hyperthermal-energy Li{sup +} scattered from Cu(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Behringer, E.R.; McLean, J.G.; Cooper, B.H.

    1996-03-01

    We have measured the in-plane energy and angular distributions of scattered Li{sup +} ions that result when Li{sup +} ion beams with incident energies {ital E}{sub {ital i}}=100 and 400 eV impinge on Cu(001) with an incident angle {theta}{sub {ital i}}=65{degree} and along the {l_angle}100{r_angle} azimuth. By comparing the energy and angular distributions with those generated by classical trajectory simulations, we extract information about the ion-surface interaction potential. A model ion-surface potential consisting of a sum of Hartree-Fock pair potentials and an attractive term produces good agreement with the measured distributions at both incident energies, while the universal potential of Ziegler, Biersack, and Littmarck does so only for {ital E}{sub {ital i}} = 400 eV. Analysis of the simulated distributions enables us to correlate different types of scattering events with features of the measured distributions (e.g., rainbows) and so obtain a detailed understanding of the scattering of Li{sup +}, which is more complex than has been previously observed for heavier alkali ions (e.g., Na{sup +} and K{sup +}). We find that the energy loss of the Li{sup +} ions can be mostly accounted for by momentum transfer to the surface atoms and that inelastic losses are small but significant for this system at these incident energies. We also find that the thermal vibrations of the surface atoms have dramatic effects on the simulated energy and angular distributions. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. Planck/LFI measures of Planets Spectral Energy Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maris, Michele; Romelli, Erik; Gregorio, Anna; Zacchei, Andrea; Tomasi, Maurizio; Vassallo, Thomas; Sandri, Maura

    2015-08-01

    The spectral energy distribution at millimetric wavelengths of planets is an important benchmark to inter-calibrate different CMB experiments and a source of information on the atmospheric structure of planets. Planck/LFI observed Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune from three to eight times during its mission. In particular, as a calibrator Jupiter allows accurate comparison due to its high S/N ratio. Since planets are moving objects, the measure must account for their proper motion as well as a number of second order effects. Here we present the results of accurate measurements of brightness temperature Tb of planets, and we compare them with WMAP.

  3. Adoption and supply of a distributed energy technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, Neil Douglas

    2000-12-01

    Technical and economic developments in distributed generation (DG) represent an opportunity for a radically different energy market paradigm, and potentially significant cuts in global carbon emissions. This thesis investigates DG along two interrelated themes: (1) Early adoption and supply of the DG technology of internal combustion (IC) engine cogeneration. (2) Private and social cost implications of DG for private investors and within an energy system. IC engine cogeneration of both power and heat has been a remarkable success in the Netherlands with over 5,000 installations and 1,500MWe of installed capacity by 1997. However, the technology has struggled in the UK with an installed capacity of 110Mwe, fulfilling only 10% of its large estimated potential. An investment simulation model of DG investments in the UK and Netherlands was used, together with analysis of site level data on all DG adoptions from 1985 through 1997. In the UK over 60% of the early installations were sized too small (<140kWe) to be economically attractive (suppliers made their money with maintenance contracts). In the Netherlands, most facilities were sized well above the economic size threshold of 100kWe (lower due to reduced operating and grid connection costs). Institutional players were key in improved sizing of DG. Aided by energy market and CO2 reduction regulatory policy, Dutch distributions utilities played a proactive role in DG. This involved joint ventures with engine cogen suppliers and users, offering improved electricity buy-back tariffs and lower connection costs. This has allowed flexible operation of distributed generation, especially in electricity sales to the grid. Larger units can be sized for on-site heat requirements with electricity export providing revenue and aiding in management of energy networks. A comparison of internal and external costs of three distributed and three centralized generation technologies over a range of heat to power ratios (HPR) was made

  4. Terahertz absorption spectra and potential energy distribution of liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zezhang; Jiang, Yurong; Jiang, Lulu; Ma, Heng

    2016-01-15

    In this work, the terahertz (THz) absorption spectra of a set of nematic liquid crystals were studied using the density functional theories (DFT). An accurate assignment of the vibrational modes corresponding to absorption frequencies were performed using potential energy distribution (PED) in a frequency range of 0-3 THz. The impacts of different core structures on THz absorption spectra were discussed. The results indicate that scope of application must be considered in the LC-based THz device designing. This proposed work may give a useful suggestion on the design of novel liquid crystal material in THz wave. PMID:26476072

  5. Energy dependent pitch angle distributions of auroral primary electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.

    1988-01-01

    Double-layer/parallel-electric field accelerations and the subsequent electron-beam plasma interactions involving Cerenkov and anomalous cyclotron resonances are considered. It is found that these phenomena yield pitch angle distributions as noted from rocket and satellite studies. Although the electron acceleration by weak parallel electric fields forming a runaway electron tail is limited to a critical parallel energy determined by the anomalous cyclotron resonance, such a limitation does not occur with acceleration by a localized parallel electric field such as that in a double layer.

  6. Calculating fusion neutron energy spectra from arbitrary reactant distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, J.; Conroy, S.; Andersson Sundén, E.; Hellesen, C.

    2016-02-01

    The Directional Relativistic Spectrum Simulator (DRESS) code can perform Monte-Carlo calculations of reaction product spectra from arbitrary reactant distributions, using fully relativistic kinematics. The code is set up to calculate energy spectra from neutrons and alpha particles produced in the D(d, n)3He and T(d, n)4He fusion reactions, but any two-body reaction can be simulated by including the corresponding cross section. The code has been thoroughly tested. The kinematics calculations have been benchmarked against the kinematics module of the ROOT Data Analysis Framework. Calculated neutron energy spectra have been validated against tabulated fusion reactivities and against an exact analytical expression for the thermonuclear fusion neutron spectrum, with good agreement. The DRESS code will be used as the core of a detailed synthetic diagnostic framework for neutron measurements at the JET and MAST tokamaks.

  7. Energy distribution of proton microbeam transmitted through two flat plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, G. U. L.; Rajta, I.; Bereczky, R. J.; Tőkési, K.

    2015-07-01

    The transmission of 1 MeV proton microbeam passing between two parallel flat plates was investigated. Three different materials were used in our experiments. As insulators we used Polytetrafluoroethylene and borosilicate glass plates and glass with gold layer on the surface as conductor. The surface of the plates was parallel to the beam axis and one of the plates was moved towards the beam. The energy distribution and the deflection of the transmitted beam were measured as the function of the sample distance relative to the beam. We found systematic differences between the behaviour of the metallic and insulator samples. The proton microbeam suffered significant deflection towards the sample surface due to the image acceleration when using conductor material. In case of the glass and Polytetrafluoroethylene plates the beam was deflected into the opposite direction, and the incident protons did not suffer significant energy loss, which is the consequence of the guiding effect.

  8. Long-distance distribution of genuine energy-time entanglement

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas, A.; Carvacho, G.; Saavedra, G.; Cariñe, J.; Nogueira, W.A.T.; Figueroa, M.; Cabello, A.; Mataloni, P.; Lima, G.; Xavier, G.B.

    2013-01-01

    Any practical realization of entanglement-based quantum communication must be intrinsically secure and able to span long distances avoiding the need of a straight line between the communicating parties. The violation of Bell’s inequality offers a method for the certification of quantum links without knowing the inner workings of the devices. Energy-time entanglement quantum communication satisfies all these requirements. However, currently there is a fundamental obstacle with the standard configuration adopted: an intrinsic geometrical loophole that can be exploited to break the security of the communication, in addition to other loopholes. Here we show the first experimental Bell violation with energy-time entanglement distributed over 1 km of optical fibres that is free of this geometrical loophole. This is achieved by adopting a new experimental design, and by using an actively stabilized fibre-based long interferometer. Our results represent an important step towards long-distance secure quantum communication in optical fibres. PMID:24287678

  9. Broad band spectral energy distribution studies of Fermi bright blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monte, C.; Giommi, P.; Cavazzuti, E.; Gasparrini, D.; Rainò, S.; Fuhrmann, L.; Angelakis, E.; Villata, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Perri, M.; Richards, J.

    2011-02-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was successfully launched on June 11, 2008 and has already opened a new era for gamma-ray astronomy. The Large Area Telescope (LAT), the main instrument on board Fermi, presents a significant improvement in sensitivity over its predecessor EGRET, due to its large field of view and effective area, combined with its excellent timing capabilities. The preliminary results of the Spectral Energy Distribution Analysis performed on a sample of bright blazars are presented. For this study, the data from the first three months of data collection of Fermi have been used. The analysis is extended down to radio, mm, near-IR, optical, UV and X-ray bands and up to TeV energies based on unprecedented sample of simultaneous multi-wavelength observations by GASP-WEBT.

  10. Advanced Communication and Control Solutions of Distributed Energy Resources (DER)

    SciTech Connect

    Asgeirsson, Haukur; Seguin, Richard; Sherding, Cameron; de Bruet, Andre, G.; Broadwater, Robert; Dilek, Murat

    2007-01-10

    This report covers work performed in Phase II of a two phase project whose objective was to demonstrate the aggregation of multiple Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) and to offer them into the energy market. The Phase I work (DE-FC36-03CH11161) created an integrated, but distributed, system and procedures to monitor and control multiple DERs from numerous manufacturers connected to the electric distribution system. Procedures were created which protect the distribution network and personnel that may be working on the network. Using the web as the communication medium for control and monitoring of the DERs, the integration of information and security was accomplished through the use of industry standard protocols such as secure SSL,VPN and ICCP. The primary objective of Phase II was to develop the procedures for marketing the power of the Phase I aggregated DERs in the energy market, increase the number of DER units, and implement the marketing procedures (interface with ISOs) for the DER generated power. The team partnered with the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO), the local ISO, to address the energy market and demonstrate the economic dispatch of DERs in response to market signals. The selection of standards-based communication technologies offers the ability of the system to be deployed and integrated with other utilities’ resources. With the use of a data historian technology to facilitate the aggregation, the developed algorithms and procedures can be verified, audited, and modified. The team has demonstrated monitoring and control of multiple DERs as outlined in phase I report including procedures to perform these operations in a secure and safe manner. In Phase II, additional DER units were added. We also expanded on our phase I work to enhance communication security and to develop the market model of having DERs, both customer and utility owned, participate in the energy market. We are proposing a two-part DER energy market model--a utility

  11. On Energy Trading Decision Methods in Distributed Energy Management Systems with Multiple Customers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Toshiyuki; Sugimoto, Yohei; Mori, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Shoichi; Yamamoto, Takaya

    This paper addresses an operation and energy purchase planning problem under the CO2 emissions regulation for corporate entities. Considering energy trading, more efficient energy consumption may be possible. We have studied an agent-based planning system, called Distributed Energy Management Systems (DEMSs), which intends to reduce energy consumption. In the DEMSs, CO2 emissions regulation is imposed on each corporate entity, and electrical and thermal energy trading among the entities are allowed. We have proposed an energy trading decision method based on the Market Oriented Programming (MOP). In this paper, we propose trading decision methods for the group composed of several customers and several suppliers. Experimental results show effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Role for Distributed Energy Resources (DER) in the Digital Economy

    SciTech Connect

    Key, Thomas S

    2007-11-01

    A large, and growing, part of the Nation's economy either serves or depends upon the information technology industry. These high-tech or "digital" enterprises are characterized by a dependence on electronic devices, need for completely reliable power supply, and intolerance to any power quality problems. In some cases these enterprises are densely populated with electronic loads and have very high energy usage per square foot. Serving these enterprises presents both electric power and equipment cooling challenges. Traditional electric utilities are often hard-pressed to deliver power that meets the stringent requirements of digital customers, and the economic and social consequences of a service quality or reliability problem can be large. New energy delivery and control options must be developed to effectively serve a digital economy. This report explores how distributed energy resources, partnerships between utility and customer to share the responsibility for service quality, innovative facility designs, higher energy efficiencies and waste-heat utilization can be coupled to meet the needs of a growing digital economy.

  13. Measurement of Gamma Energy Distributions and Multiplicities Using STEFF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, E.; Smith, A. G.; Pollitt, A. J.; Matarranz, J.; Tsekhanovich, I.; Soldner, T.; Koster, U.; Biswas, D. C.

    2014-05-01

    Prompt gamma-ray energy distributions and multiplicities released during thermally induced fission of 235U have been measured using STEFF (SpecTrometer for Exotic Fission Fragments). Thermal neutrons are provided by the high-flux reactor at the ILL, Grenoble. STEFF is a unique 2E2v device that uses a coincidence timing method to measure the emission of prompt gamma rays as a function of the fragment mass and energy. Following scission, the fission fragments contain excitation energy that is released via prompt neutron and gamma-ray emission as the fragment decays to the ground state. STEFF contains an array of 11 NaI detectors surrounding the uranium target providing a 6.8% photopeak detection efficiency for gamma rays released within 1 ns of the scission time. STEFF also consists of 7 NE213 detectors, which detect the emission of prompt neutrons, the release of which is associated with reduction of fragment energy and, to a lesser extent, fragment spin. This experiment acts as a direct response to the NEA high priority demand which requires more accurate knowledge of heating caused by gamma emission in the next generation of nuclear reactors.

  14. Low energy ion distribution measurements in Madison Symmetric Torus plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, J. B. Mezonlin, E. D.; Johnson, J. A.

    2014-06-15

    Charge-exchange neutrals contain information about the contents of a plasma and can be detected as they escape confinement. The Florida A and M University compact neutral particle analyzer (CNPA), used to measure the contents of neutral particle flux, has been reconfigured, calibrated, and installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) for high temperature deuterium plasmas. The energy range of the CNPA has been extended to cover 0.34–5.2 keV through an upgrade of the 25 detection channels. The CNPA has been used on all types of MST plasmas at a rate of 20 kHz throughout the entire discharge (∼70 ms). Plasma parameter scans show that the ion distribution is most dependent on the plasma current. Magnetic reconnection events throughout these scans produce stronger poloidal electric fields, stronger global magnetic modes, and larger changes in magnetic energy all of which heavily influence the non-Maxwellian part of the ion distribution (the fast ion tail)

  15. SPHERICALLY SYMMETRIC STELLAR CLUSTERS WITH ANISOTROPY AND CUTOFF ENERGY IN MOMENTUM DISTRIBUTION. I. THE NEWTONIAN REGIME

    SciTech Connect

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, Gennady S.

    2009-09-20

    We construct numerical models of spherically symmetric Newtonian stellar clusters with anisotropic distribution functions. These models generalize solutions obtained earlier for isotropic Maxwellian distribution functions with an energy cutoff and take into account distributions with different levels of anisotropy.

  16. The angular and energy distribution of the primary electron beam.

    PubMed

    Keall, P J; Hoban, P W

    1994-09-01

    The angular distribution for electron beams produced by the Siemens KD-2 linear accelerator has been found by simulating electron transport through the scattering foils and air using two methods: Fermi-Eyges multiple Coulomb scattering calculations, and EGS4 Monte Carlo simulations. Fermi-Eyges theory gives solutions where both the angular and spatial fluence distributions are Gaussian, with the angular standard deviation being invariant with off-axis distance. The EGS4 results show slightly non-Gaussian angular and lateral distributions as a result of the use of Moliére theory rather than Fermi-Eyges multiple scattering theory, as well as the simulation of discrete bremsstrahlung and Møller interactions. However, the results from both methods are very similar. The angular standard deviations obtained by these methods agree very closely with those found experimentally. The similar shape of the Monte Carlo and Fermi-Eyges results indicate that a Gaussian approximation to the incident angular distribution will be adequate for use in treatment planning algorithms. Furthermore, the angular standard deviation may be determined using Fermi-Eyges theory as an alternative to experimental methods. Both Monte Carlo simulations, and Fermi-Eyges theory predict that the mean electron angle is proportional to off axis distance for all useful field sizes. For a 15 MeV electron beam, an effective source position of 99 cm and 98 cm from the nominal 100 SSD plane was obtained from Fermi-Eyges and Monte Carlo results respectively for a 15 MeV beam. The effective source position found experimentally for this energy was 98 cm.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7980200

  17. Product energy distributions and energy partitioning in O atom reactions on surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Bret; Kori, Moris

    1987-01-01

    Surface reactions involving O atoms are likely to be highly exoergic, with different consequences if energy is channeled mostly to product molecules or surface modes. Thus the surface may become a source of excited species which can react elsewhere, or a sink for localized heat deposition which may disrupt the surface. The vibrational energy distribution of the product molecule contains strong clues about the flow of released energy. Two instructive examples of energy partitioning at surfaces are the Pt catalyzed oxidations: (1) C(ads) + O(ads) yields CO* (T is greater than 1000 K); and (2) CO(ads) + O(gas) yields CO2* (T is approx. 300 K). The infrared emission spectra of the excited product molecules were recorded and the vibrational population distributions were determined. In reaction 1, energy appeared to be statistically partitioned between the product CO and several Pt atoms. In reaction 2, partitioning was non-statistical; the CO2 asymmetric stretch distribution was inverted. In gas reactions these results would indicate a long lived and short lived activated complex. The requirement that Pt be heated in O atoms to promote reaction of atomic O and CO at room temperature is specifically addressed. Finally, the fraction of released energy that is deposited in the catalyst is estimated.

  18. 77 FR 10997 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Distribution Transformers; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... distribution transformers (72 FR 58190). The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005), Public Law 109-25, amended... transformers (77 FR 7282). Need for Correction As published, values in certain tables of the proposed rule are... February 10 NOPR. Corrections In proposed rule FR Doc. 2012-2642 appearing on page 7282 in the issue...

  19. Thylakoid protein phosphorylation: Regulation of light energy distribution in photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlan, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    It has become apparent that green plants possess the ability to adapt to changes in the spectral quality of ambient light. This phenomenon, state transitions, involves a reversible distribution of light energy between the two photosystems in response to changes in the excitation state of photosystems 1 and 2. Thus, the quantum efficiency of photosynthetic electron transport is maintained under different illumination conditions, and damage caused by excessive energetic input of light (photoinhibition) is prevented. This model comprises a phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycle of three major components: substrates, the protein kinase(s) and protein phosphatase(s) responsible for the specific phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of these of substrates, and the control mechanisms whereby the protein kinase(s) is activated/deactivated in response to redox and /or conformational changes in the thylakoid. This report considers the three components in some detail.

  20. A bolometer array for the SPEctral Energy Distribution (SPEED) Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverberg, Robert F.; Campano, Barbara; Chen, Tina C.; Cheng, Edward; Cottingham, David A.; Crawford, Thomas M.; Downes, Tom; Finkbeiner, Fred M.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Logan, Dan; Meyer, Stephan S.; Perera, Thushara; Sharp, Elmer H.; Wilson, Grant W.

    2004-10-01

    The SPEED camera is being developed to study the spectral energy distributions of high redshift galaxies, Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in X-ray clusters and other cold objects in the universe. Its initial runs will be done on the 10 m Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope (HHSMT), with later runs using the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT). SPEED requires a 2x2 pixel cryogenic detector array of Frequency Selective Bolometers (FSB). Each of the pixels will have four frequency bands in the ~150-350 GHz range. Here we describe the development of the detector array of these high efficiency FSBs. The FSB design provides the multi-pixel multi-spectral band capability required for SPEED in a compact, light weight, stackable array. The SPEED FSB bolometers will use proximity effect superconducting transition edge sensors (TES) as their temperature-sensing element permitting significantly higher levels of electronic multiplexing in future applications where larger numbers of detectors may be required.

  1. Vibrational Energy Distribution Analysis (VEDA): Scopes and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamróz, Michał H.

    2013-10-01

    The principle of operations of the VEDA program written by the author for Potential Energy Distribution (PED) analysis of theoretical vibrational spectra is described. Nowadays, the PED analysis is indispensible tool in serious analysis of the vibrational spectra. To perform the PED analysis it is necessary to define 3N-6 linearly independent local mode coordinates. Already for 20-atomic molecules it is a difficult task. The VEDA program reads the input data automatically from the Gaussian program output files. Then, VEDA automatically proposes an introductory set of local mode coordinates. Next, the more adequate coordinates are proposed by the program and optimized to obtain maximal elements of each column (internal coordinate) of the PED matrix (the EPM parameter). The possibility for an automatic optimization of PED contributions is a unique feature of the VEDA program absent in any other programs performing PED analysis.

  2. Optimal smoothing of site-energy distributions from adsorption isotherms

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.F.; Travis, B.J.

    1983-01-01

    The equation for the adsorption isotherm on a heterogeneous surface is a Fredholm integral equation. In solving it for the site-energy distribution (SED), some sort of smoothing must be carried out. The optimal amount of smoothing will give the most information that is possible without introducing nonexistent structure into the SED. Recently, Butler, Reeds, and Dawson proposed a criterion (the BRD criterion) for choosing the optimal smoothing parameter when using regularization to solve Fredholm equations. The BRD criterion is tested for its suitability in obtaining optimal SED's. This criterion is found to be too conservative. While using it never introduces nonexistent structure into the SED, significant information is often lost. At present, no simple criterion for choosing the optimal smoothing parameter exists, and a modeling approach is recommended.

  3. Evaluation Framework and Tools for Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Gumerman, Etan Z.; Bharvirkar, Ranjit R.; LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Marnay , Chris

    2003-02-01

    The Energy Information Administration's (EIA) 2002 Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) forecast anticipates the need for 375 MW of new generating capacity (or about one new power plant) per week for the next 20 years, most of which is forecast to be fueled by natural gas. The Distributed Energy and Electric Reliability Program (DEER) of the Department of Energy (DOE), has set a national goal for DER to capture 20 percent of new electric generation capacity additions by 2020 (Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 2000). Cumulatively, this amounts to about 40 GW of DER capacity additions from 2000-2020. Figure ES-1 below compares the EIA forecast and DEER's assumed goal for new DER by 2020 while applying the same definition of DER to both. This figure illustrates that the EIA forecast is consistent with the overall DEER DER goal. For the purposes of this study, Berkeley Lab needed a target level of small-scale DER penetration upon which to hinge consideration of benefits and costs. Because the AEO2002 forecasted only 3.1 GW of cumulative additions from small-scale DER in the residential and commercial sectors, another approach was needed to estimate the small-scale DER target. The focus here is on small-scale DER technologies under 500 kW. The technology size limit is somewhat arbitrary, but the key results of interest are marginal additional costs and benefits around an assumed level of penetration that existing programs might achieve. Berkeley Lab assumes that small-scale DER has the same growth potential as large scale DER in AEO2002, about 38 GW. This assumption makes the small-scale goal equivalent to 380,000 DER units of average size 100 kW. This report lays out a framework whereby the consequences of meeting this goal might be estimated and tallied up. The framework is built around a list of major benefits and a set of tools that might be applied to estimate them. This study lists some of the major effects of an emerging paradigm shift away from central

  4. Spectrophotometry of Wolf-Rayet stars. I - Continuum energy distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Patrick W.; Brownsberger, Kenneth R.; Conti, Peter S.; Massey, Philip; Vacca, William D.

    1993-01-01

    All available low-resolution IUE spectra are assembled for Galactic, LMC, and SMC W-R stars and are merged with ground-based optical and NIR spectra in order to collate in a systematic fashion the shapes of these energy distributions over the wavelength range 0.1-1 micron. They can be consistently fitted by a power law of the form F(lambda) is approximately equal to lambda exp -alpha over the range 1500-9000 A to derive color excesses E(B-V) and spectral indices by removing the 2175-A interstellar absorption feature. The WN star color excesses derived are found to be in good agreement with those of Schmutz and Vacca (1991) and Koesterke et al. (1991). Significant heterogeneity in spectral index values was generally seen with any given subtype, but the groups consisting of the combined set of Galactic and LMC W-R stars, the separate WN and WC sequences, and the Galactic and LMC W-R stars all showed a striking and consistent Gaussian-like frequency distribution of values.

  5. The Far-Infrared Spectral Energy Distributions of Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; West, Donald K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The origin of the infrared emission in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), whose strength is comparable to the optical/ultraviolet (OUV) emission, is generally thought to be a combination of thermal emission from dust and non-thermal, synchrotron emission. Although data are sparse, particularly in the far-infrared, the broad wavelength range of this emission suggests a wide range of temperatures and a combination of AGN and starburst heating mechanisms. The strength of the non-thermal emission is expected to be related to the radio emission. While this scenario is well-established, basic questions, such as the spatial and temperature distribution of the dust, the relative importance of AGN and starburst heating, and the significance of the non-thermal contribution remain largely undetermined. The wide wavelength range of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) combined with its arcmin spatial resolution and increased sensitivity facilitated the observation of a larger subset of the AGN population than previously covered, allowing these questions to be investigated in more detail. This paper will review the spectral energy distributions (SED) of AGN with particular emphasis on the infrared emission and on ISO's contributions to our knowledge. Preliminary results from ISO observations of X-ray selected and high-redshift AGN will be described.

  6. The Spectral Energy Distributions of Interacting Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liss, Sandra; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Kallivayalil, Nitya; Besla, Gurtina; Patton, David R.; Privon, George C.

    2016-01-01

    We present spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for the TiNy Titans survey, the first systematic study of interactions between dwarf galaxies. Galaxy interactions are known to be of fundamental importance to the evolution of massive galaxies -- they have been observed to impact morphology, star formation rates, and ISM composition. Such interactions also occur frequently between low mass dwarf galaxies, but this process is poorly understood and largely overlooked in comparison. Although the majority of mergers at all redshifts are expected to take place between low mass galaxies, until now there have not been comparable systematic studies of dwarf galaxy interactions, leaving open the question of whether interactions between low mass galaxies can strongly affect their own evolution. The TiNy Titans survey, a complete sample of isolated dwarf galaxy pairs selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), is specifically designed to address this gap in our understanding of galaxy evolution. The SEDs presented here, generated from archival WISE, SDSS, and GALEX photometric data, allow us to characterize the typical interacting dwarf galaxy, as well as quantify the deviations from this average distribution. We also present trends in the SEDs as a function of projected radial separation, a proxy for interaction stage.

  7. A modal approach to modeling spatially distributed vibration energy dissipation.

    SciTech Connect

    Segalman, Daniel Joseph

    2010-08-01

    The nonlinear behavior of mechanical joints is a confounding element in modeling the dynamic response of structures. Though there has been some progress in recent years in modeling individual joints, modeling the full structure with myriad frictional interfaces has remained an obstinate challenge. A strategy is suggested for structural dynamics modeling that can account for the combined effect of interface friction distributed spatially about the structure. This approach accommodates the following observations: (1) At small to modest amplitudes, the nonlinearity of jointed structures is manifest primarily in the energy dissipation - visible as vibration damping; (2) Correspondingly, measured vibration modes do not change significantly with amplitude; and (3) Significant coupling among the modes does not appear to result at modest amplitudes. The mathematical approach presented here postulates the preservation of linear modes and invests all the nonlinearity in the evolution of the modal coordinates. The constitutive form selected is one that works well in modeling spatially discrete joints. When compared against a mathematical truth model, the distributed dissipation approximation performs well.

  8. Data intensive high energy physics analysis in a distributed cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, A.; Agarwal, A.; Anderson, M.; Armstrong, P.; Fransham, K.; Gable, I.; Harris, D.; Impey, R.; Leavett-Brown, C.; Paterson, M.; Podaima, W.; Sobie, R. J.; Vliet, M.

    2012-02-01

    We show that distributed Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) compute clouds can be effectively used for the analysis of high energy physics data. We have designed a distributed cloud system that works with any application using large input data sets requiring a high throughput computing environment. The system uses IaaS-enabled science and commercial clusters in Canada and the United States. We describe the process in which a user prepares an analysis virtual machine (VM) and submits batch jobs to a central scheduler. The system boots the user-specific VM on one of the IaaS clouds, runs the jobs and returns the output to the user. The user application accesses a central database for calibration data during the execution of the application. Similarly, the data is located in a central location and streamed by the running application. The system can easily run one hundred simultaneous jobs in an efficient manner and should scale to many hundreds and possibly thousands of user jobs.

  9. SATMC: Spectral energy distribution Analysis Through Markov Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. P.; Wilson, G. W.; Tang, Y.; Scott, K. S.

    2013-12-01

    We present the general purpose spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting tool SED Analysis Through Markov Chains (SATMC). Utilizing Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) algorithms, SATMC fits an observed SED to SED templates or models of the user's choice to infer intrinsic parameters, generate confidence levels and produce the posterior parameter distribution. Here, we describe the key features of SATMC from the underlying MCMC engine to specific features for handling SED fitting. We detail several test cases of SATMC, comparing results obtained from traditional least-squares methods, which highlight its accuracy, robustness and wide range of possible applications. We also present a sample of submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) that have been fitted using the SED synthesis routine GRASIL as input. In general, these SMGs are shown to occupy a large volume of parameter space, particularly in regards to their star formation rates which range from ˜30 to 3000 M⊙ yr-1 and stellar masses which range from ˜1010 to 1012 M⊙. Taking advantage of the Bayesian formalism inherent to SATMC, we also show how the fitting results may change under different parametrizations (i.e. different initial mass functions) and through additional or improved photometry, the latter being crucial to the study of high-redshift galaxies.

  10. Distributed generation capabilities of the national energy modeling system

    SciTech Connect

    LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2003-01-01

    This report describes Berkeley Lab's exploration of how the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) models distributed generation (DG) and presents possible approaches for improving how DG is modeled. The on-site electric generation capability has been available since the AEO2000 version of NEMS. Berkeley Lab has previously completed research on distributed energy resources (DER) adoption at individual sites and has developed a DER Customer Adoption Model called DER-CAM. Given interest in this area, Berkeley Lab set out to understand how NEMS models small-scale on-site generation to assess how adequately DG is treated in NEMS, and to propose improvements or alternatives. The goal is to determine how well NEMS models the factors influencing DG adoption and to consider alternatives to the current approach. Most small-scale DG adoption takes place in the residential and commercial modules of NEMS. Investment in DG ultimately offsets purchases of electricity, which also eliminates the losses associated with transmission and distribution (T&D). If the DG technology that is chosen is photovoltaics (PV), NEMS assumes renewable energy consumption replaces the energy input to electric generators. If the DG technology is fuel consuming, consumption of fuel in the electric utility sector is replaced by residential or commercial fuel consumption. The waste heat generated from thermal technologies can be used to offset the water heating and space heating energy uses, but there is no thermally activated cooling capability. This study consists of a review of model documentation and a paper by EIA staff, a series of sensitivity runs performed by Berkeley Lab that exercise selected DG parameters in the AEO2002 version of NEMS, and a scoping effort of possible enhancements and alternatives to NEMS current DG capabilities. In general, the treatment of DG in NEMS is rudimentary. The penetration of DG is determined by an economic cash-flow analysis that determines adoption based on the

  11. Distributed Energy Alternative to Electrical Distribution Grid Expansion in Consolidated Edison Service Territory

    SciTech Connect

    Kingston, Tim; Kelly, John

    2008-08-01

    The nation's power grid, specifically the New York region, faces burgeoning energy demand and suffers from congested corridors and aging equipment that cost New York consumers millions of dollars. Compounding the problem is high-density buildup in urban areas that limits available space to expand grid capacity. Coincidently, these urban areas are precisely where additional power is required. DER in this study refers to combined heat and power (CHP) technology, which simultaneously generates heat and electricity at or near the point where the energy will be consumed. There are multiple CHP options available that, combined with a portfolio of other building energy efficiency (EE) strategies, can help achieve a more efficient supply-demand balance than what the grid can currently provide. As an alternative to expanding grid capacity, CHP and EE strategies can be deployed in a flexible manner at virtually any point on the grid to relieve load. What's more, utilities and customers can install them in a variety of potentially profitable applications that are more environmentally friendly. Under the auspices of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory representing the Office of Electricity of the U.S. Department of Energy, Gas Technology Institute (GTI) conducted this study in cooperation with Consolidated Edison to help broaden the market penetration of EE and DER. This study provides realistic load models and identifies the impacts that EE and DER can have on the electrical distribution grid; specifically within the current economic and regulatory environment of a high load growth area of New York City called Hudson Yards in Midtown Manhattan. These models can be used to guide new policies that improve market penetration of appropriate CHP and EE technologies in new buildings. The following load modeling scenarios were investigated: (1) Baseline: All buildings are built per the Energy Conservation

  12. Optical Diagnostics of Electron Energy Distributions in Low Temperature Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, Amy

    2011-05-01

    Passive, non-invasive optical emission measurements provide a means of probing important plasma parameters without introducing contaminants into plasma systems. We investigate the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in argon containing inductively-coupled plasmas due to dominant role in rates of gas-phase reactions for processing plasmas. EEDFs are determined using measurements of 3p5 4 p --> 3p5 4 s emissions in the 650-1150 nm wavelength range and measured metastable and resonant level concentrations, in conjunction with a radiation model that includes contributions from often neglected but critical processes such as radiation trapping and electron-impact excitation from metastable and resonant levels. Measurements over a wide range of operating conditions (pressure, RF power, Ar/Ne/N2 gas mixtures) show a depletion of the EEDF relative to the Maxwell- Boltzmann form at higher electron energy, in good agreement with measurements made with Langmuir probes and predictions of a global discharge model. This result is consistent with predictions of electron kinetics and can be explained in terms of reduced life times for energetic electrons due to wall losses and inelastic collisions. This example highlights the potential utility of this method as a tool for probing kinetics of many types of low-temperature plasma systems, which are typically characterized by non-Maxwellian EEDFs. This work was supported by the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF) and by NSF Grant CBET 0714600.

  13. Ion energy distribution functions in a supersonic plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldirola, S.; Roman, H. E.; Riccardi, C.

    2014-11-01

    Starting from experimental measurements of ion energy distribution functions (IEDFs) in a low pressure supersonic plasma jet, we propose a model to simulate them numerically from first principles calculations. Experimentally we acquired IEDFs with a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) collecting the argon ions produced from a inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and driven into a supersonic free gas expansion. From the discussion of these results and the physics of our system we developed a simulation code. Integrating the equations of motion the code evolves the trajectory of a single ion across the jet. Ar+- Ar collisions are modelled with a 12-4 Lennard-Jones potential which considers induced dipole interactions. IEDFs were simulated at different positions along the jet and compared with the experimental data showing good agreement. We have also implemented a charge transfer mechanism in which the ion releases its charge to a neutral atom which can take place at sufficiently close distances and is a function of the impact energy.

  14. The Spectral Energy Distribution of HH 100 IRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siebenmorgen, Ralf

    1996-01-01

    Recent progress in the modeling of the radiative transfer in star forming regions has lead to improved dusty envelope models. Such models can now explain in great detail the observed infrared spectrum. The success of such models suggests that input parameters correspond to the true physical situation of the environment of the young stellar object. However, so far only minor attention has been given to models which include the spectroscopic signature of ice bands. Such models are applied to the Herbig-Haro energy source HH100 IRS. Calculations have been performed to interpret the spectral energy distribution as a function of dust parameters such as the grain size, the ice volume fraction, and the 'fluffiness' of the particles. The infrared spectrum together with the strength of the water ice band of HH 100 IRS is successfully reproduced if an upper limit of the grain size below 1 micron is used. Comet-like grains, with sizes above 1 micron, result in a poor fit of the observations.

  15. Equilibrium distribution of the wave energy in a carbyne chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovriguine, D. A.; Nikitenkova, S. P.

    2016-03-01

    The steady-state energy distribution of thermal vibrations at a given ambient temperature has been investigated based on a simple mathematical model that takes into account central and noncentral interactions between carbon atoms in a one-dimensional carbyne chain. The investigation has been performed using standard asymptotic methods of nonlinear dynamics in terms of the classical mechanics. In the first-order nonlinear approximation, there have been revealed resonant wave triads that are formed at a typical nonlinearity of the system under phase matching conditions. Each resonant triad consists of one longitudinal and two transverse vibration modes. In the general case, the chain is characterized by a superposition of similar resonant triplets of different spectral scales. It has been found that the energy equipartition of nonlinear stationary waves in the carbyne chain at a given temperature completely obeys the standard Rayleigh-Jeans law due to the proportional amplitude dispersion. The possibility of spontaneous formation of three-frequency envelope solitons in carbyne has been demonstrated. Heat in the form of such solitons can propagate in a chain of carbon atoms without diffusion, like localized waves.

  16. Water-quality conditions and streamflow gain and loss of the South Prong of Spavinaw Creek basin, Benton County, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joseph, Robert L.; Green, W. Reed

    1994-01-01

    A study of the South Prong of Spavinaw Creek Basin conducted baween July 14 and July 23. 1993. described the surface- and ground-water quality of the basin and the streamflow gain and loss. Water samples were collected from 10 sites on the mainstem of the South Prong of Spavinaw Creek and from 4 sites on tributaries during periods of low to moderate streamflow (less than 11 cubic feet per second). Water samples were collected from 4 wells and 10 springs located in the basin. In 14 surface-water samples, nitrite plus nitrate concentrations ranged from 0.75 to 4.2 milligrams per liter as nitrogen (mg/L). Orthophosphorus concentrations ranged from 0 03 to O. 15 mg/L as phosphorus. Fecal coliform bacteria counts ranged from 61 to 1,400 colonies per 100 milliliters (col/lOO mL), with a median of 120 col/100 mL. Fecal streptococci bacteria counts ranged from 70 to greater than 2,000 col/100 mL with a median of 185 col/lOO mL. Analysis for selected metals collected at one surface-water sites indicates that concentrations were usually below the reporting limit. Diel dissolved oxygen concentrations and temperatures were measured at an upstream and downstream site on the mainstem of the stream. At the upstream site, dissolved oxygen concentrations ranged from 7.2 to 83 mg/L and temperatures ranged from 15.5 to 17.0 C. Dissolved oxygen concentrations were higher and temperature values were lower at lhe upstream site, which is located close to two springs that produce all of the flow at that site. Dissolved nitrite plus nitrate was present in all four wells sampled in the basin with concentrations ranging from 0.04 to 3.5 mg/L as nitrogen. Orthophosphorus was present in concentrations ranging from less than 0.01 to 0.07 mg/L as phosphorus. Volatile organic compound analyses in two wells indicate that toluene was present in both wells and chloroform was present in one well. All other volatile organic compounds were found to be below the reporting limits. Analysis for common

  17. Variable post-Paleozoic deformation detected by seismic reflection profiling across the northwestern "prong" of New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, J.H.; Pugin, Andre J.M.; Nelson, W.J.; Larson, T.H.; Sargent, S.L.; Devera, J.A.; Denny, F.B.; Woolery, E.W.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution shallow seismic reflection profiles across the northwesternmost part of the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) and northwestern margin of the Reelfoot rift, near the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers in the northern Mississippi embayment, reveal intense structural deformation that apparently took place during the late Paleozoic and/or Mesozoic up to near the end of the Cretaceous Period. The seismic profiles were sited on both sides of the northeast-trending Olmsted fault, defined by varying elevations of the top of Mississippian (locally base of Cretaceous) bedrock. The trend of this fault is close to and parallel with an unusually straight segment of the Ohio River and is approximately on trend with the westernmost of two groups of northeast-aligned epicenters ("prongs") in the NMSZ. Initially suspected on the basis of pre-existing borehole data, the deformation along the fault has been confirmed by four seismic reflection profiles, combined with some new information from drilling. The new data reveal (1) many high-angle normal and reverse faults expressed as narrow grabens and anticlines (suggesting both extensional and compressional regimes) that involved the largest displacements during the late Cretaceous (McNairy); (2) a different style of deformation involving probably more horizontal displacements (i.e., thrusting) that occurred at the end of this phase near the end of McNairy deposition, with some fault offsets of Paleocene and younger units; (3) zones of steeply dipping faults that bound chaotic blocks similar to that observed previously from the nearby Commerce geophysical lineament (CGL); and (4) complex internal deformation stratigraphically restricted to the McNairy, suggestive of major sediment liquefaction or landsliding. Our results thus confirm the prevalence of complex Cretaceous deformations continuing up into Tertiary strata near the northern terminus of the NMSZ. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Geophysical modeling of the structural relationships between the Precambrian Reading Prong rocks and the Paleozoic sedimentary sequence, Easton quadrangle, PA

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D.M.; Malinconico, L.L. Jr. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    This project involves the geophysical modeling of the structural relationships between the Precambrian Reading Prong rocks and the Paleozoic sedimentary cover rocks near Easton, Pennsylvania. The Precambrian rocks have generally been assumed to have been emplaced on the Paleozoic sequence along a shallow thrust fault. However, at present time the attitude of the faults bordering the Precambrian terranes are all very steeply dipping. This was explained by the subsequent folding of the whole sequence during later orogenic activity. The objective of this work is to determine the attitude and depth of the fault contact between the Precambrian crystalline rocks and the Paleozoic sedimentary rocks. A series of traverses (each separated by approximately one mile) were established perpendicular to the strike of the Precambrian rocks. Along each traverse both gravity and magnetic readings were taken at 0.2 kilometer intervals. The data were reduced and presented as profiles and contour maps. Both the magnetic and gravity data show positive anomalies that correlate spatially with the location of the Precambrian rocks. The gravity data have a long wavelength regional trend increasing to the north with a shorter wavelength anomaly of 2 milligals which coincides with the Precambrian rocks. The magnetic data have a single positive anomaly of almost 1,000 gammas which also coincides with the Precambrian terrane. These data will now be used to develop two dimensional density and susceptibility models of the area. From these models, the thickness of each formation and the structural relationships between them, as well as the attitude and depth of the fault contact will be determined.

  19. Direct Energy Exchange Enhancement in Distributed Injection Light Gas Launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Alger, T W; Finucane, R G; Hall, J P; Penetrante, B M; Uphaus, T M

    2000-04-06

    initially contained in the reservoir. This results deserves emphasis: whereas conventional guns apply a few percent of the reservoir pressure to a fast moving projectile, our design is paradoxically capable of applying nearly double the contained pressure. We later confirmed this experimental result analytically and related it to a type of direct energy exchange between unsteady fluid flows. This physical approach was the basis for the German V-1 ''buzz bomb'' of World War II; it has been applied to a limited number of commercial applications. (This work should not be confused with the German WWII distributed injection missile launchers.) Direct fluid-energy exchange has not previously been applied to any gas-launcher technology. As a result of these discoveries, we estimate that a practical, 15 km/s, high-velocity launcher could be built using our direct-energy-exchange, distributed-injection approach. However, the radical nature of the results, the lack of confirming or allied work being carried out anywhere else, and the fact that it would take extensive time and resources to demonstrate targeted performance precluded further development. We plan to submit the results to a refereed journal to ensure that the work will not be lost to the launcher community.

  20. The Spectral Energy Distribution of Fermi Bright Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Agudo, I.; Ajello, M.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Angelakis, E.; Arkharov, A. A.; Axelsson, M.; Bach, U.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Benitiez, E.; Berdyugin, A.; Gehrels, N.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Marshall, F.; Scargle, J. D.; Thompson, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    We have conducted a detailed investigation of the broadband spectral properties of the gamma-ray selected blazars of the Fermi LAT Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). By combining our accurately estimated Fermi gamma-ray spectra with Swift, radio, infra-red, optical, and other hard X-ray /gamma-ray data, collected within 3 months of the LBAS data taking period, we were able to assemble high-quality and quasi-simultaneous spectral energy distributions (SED) for 48 LBAS blazars. The SED of these gamma-ray sources is similar to that of blazars discovered at other wavelengths, clearly showing, in the usual log v-log v Fv representation, the typical broadband spectral signatures normally attributed to a combination of low-energy synchrotron radiation followed by inverse Compton emission of one or more components. We have used these SED to characterize the peak intensity of both the low- and the high-energy components. The results have been used to derive empirical relationships that estimate the position of the two peaks from the broadband colors (i.e., the radio to optical, alpha(sub ro) , and optical to X-ray, alpha(sub ox), spectral slopes) and from the gamma-ray spectral index. Our data show that the synchrotron peak frequency (v(sup S) (sub peak)) is positioned between 10(exp 12.5) and 10(exp 14) Hz in broad-lined flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) and between 10(exp 13) and 10(exp 17) Hz in featureless BL Lacertae objects. We find that the gamma-ray spectral slope is strongly correlated with the synchrotron peak energy and with the X-ray spectral index, as expected at first order in synchrotron-inverse Compton scenarios. However, simple homogeneous, one-zone, synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) models cannot explain most of our SED, especially in the case of FSRQs and low energy peaked (LBL) BL Lacs. More complex models involving external Compton radiation or multiple SSC components are required to reproduce the overall SED and the observed spectral variability. While more than

  1. Quasar Spectral Energy Distributions As A Function Of Physical Property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Shonda; Ganguly, R.; Stark, M. A.; Derseweh, J. A.; Richmond, J. M.

    2012-05-01

    Galaxy evolution models have shown that quasars are a crucial ingredient in the evolution of massive galaxies. Outflows play a key role in the story of quasars and their host galaxies, by helping regulate the accretion process, the star-formation rate and mass of the host galaxy (i.e., feedback). The prescription for modeling outflows as a contributor to feedback requires knowledge of the outflow velocity, geometry, and column density. In particular, we need to understand how these depend on physical parameters and how much is determined stochastically (and with what distribution). In turn, models of outflows have shown particular sensitivity to the shape of the spectral energy distribution (SED), depending on the UV luminosity to transfer momentum to the gas, the X-ray luminosity to regulate how efficiently that transfer can be, etc. To investigate how SED changes with physical properties, we follow up on Richards et al. (2006), who constructed SEDs with varying luminosity. Here, we construct SEDs as a function of redshift, and physical property (black hole mass, bolometric luminosity, Eddington ratio) for volume limited samples drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, with photometry supplemented from 2MASS, WISE, GALEX, ROSAT, and Chandra. To estimate black hole masses, we adopt the scaling relations from Greene & Ho (2005) based on the H-alpha emission line FWHM. This requires redshifts less than 0.4. To construct volume-limited subsamples, we begin by adopting g=19.8 as a nominal limiting magnitude over which we are guaranteed to detect z<0.4 quasars. At redshift 0.4, we are complete down to Mg=-21.8, which yields 3300 objects from Data Release 7. At z=0.1, we are complete down to Mg=-18.5. This material is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. 09-ADP09-0016 issued through the Astrophysics Data Analysis Program.

  2. Space and energy. [space systems for energy generation, distribution and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, I.

    1976-01-01

    Potential contributions of space to energy-related activities are discussed. Advanced concepts presented include worldwide energy distribution to substation-sized users using low-altitude space reflectors; powering large numbers of large aircraft worldwide using laser beams reflected from space mirror complexes; providing night illumination via sunlight-reflecting space mirrors; fine-scale power programming and monitoring in transmission networks by monitoring millions of network points from space; prevention of undetected hijacking of nuclear reactor fuels by space tracking of signals from tagging transmitters on all such materials; and disposal of nuclear power plant radioactive wastes in space.

  3. Design, modeling, simulation and evaluation of a distributed energy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cultura, Ambrosio B., II

    This dissertation presents the design, modeling, simulation and evaluation of distributed energy resources (DER) consisting of photovoltaics (PV), wind turbines, batteries, a PEM fuel cell and supercapacitors. The distributed energy resources installed at UMass Lowell consist of the following: 2.5kW PV, 44kWhr lead acid batteries and 1500W, 500W & 300W wind turbines, which were installed before year 2000. Recently added to that are the following: 10.56 kW PV array, 2.4 kW wind turbine, 29 kWhr Lead acid batteries, a 1.2 kW PEM fuel cell and 4-140F supercapacitors. Each newly added energy resource has been designed, modeled, simulated and evaluated before its integration into the existing PV/Wind grid-connected system. The Mathematical and Simulink model of each system was derived and validated by comparing the simulated and experimental results. The Simulated results of energy generated from a 10.56kW PV system are in good agreement with the experimental results. A detailed electrical model of a 2.4kW wind turbine system equipped with a permanent magnet generator, diode rectifier, boost converter and inverter is presented. The analysis of the results demonstrates the effectiveness of the constructed simulink model, and can be used to predict the performance of the wind turbine. It was observed that a PEM fuel cell has a very fast response to load changes. Moreover, the model has validated the actual operation of the PEM fuel cell, showing that the simulated results in Matlab Simulink are consistent with the experimental results. The equivalent mathematical equation, derived from an electrical model of the supercapacitor, is used to simulate its voltage response. The model is completely capable of simulating its voltage behavior, and can predict the charge time and discharge time of voltages on the supercapacitor. The bi-directional dc-dc converter was designed in order to connect the 48V battery bank storage to the 24V battery bank storage. This connection was

  4. Infrared Spectral Energy Distributions of Nearby Dwarf Carbon Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowrance, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    The discovery of G77-61 (Dahn et al. 1977) -- a star with a carbon-rich spectrum a mere 58 pc away and therefore of relatively low luminosity -- led to the recognition that _dwarf_ carbon (dC) stars exist. As more dCs are now known, the accepted paradigm of the presence of atmospheric carbon is that dCs must contain a white dwarf secondary. While the white dwarf companion was going through an AGB stage, it deposited carbon-rich material in the atmosphere of the lower-mass (and now brighter) dwarf star. Indeed, a handful of the dC's have exhibited radial velocity signatures consistent with this picture. To allow for the carbon to still be present in the atmosphere past the AGB stage, a replenishing outer shell or disk has been proposed. Current understanding of the formation and evolution of a dC is, however, limited by the small number of objects and observations. We present a full range of fluxes and flux limits from 1 - 160 um including 2MASS, WISE, Spitzer, and Herschel observations for a list of the nearest carbon dwarfs. We reconstruct the spectral energy distribution exploring the mid-infrared region where any residual debris disks would be detectable. The carbon dwarfs have been historically studied in the visible, and these new infrared observations provide a picture of the circumstellar dust.

  5. Electron energy distributions in a magnetized inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Sang-Heon E-mail: Sang-Heon.Song@us.tel.com; Yang, Yang; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-09-15

    Optimizing and controlling electron energy distributions (EEDs) is a continuing goal in plasma materials processing as EEDs determine the rate coefficients for electron impact processes. There are many strategies to customize EEDs in low pressure inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs), for example, pulsing and choice of frequency, to produce the desired plasma properties. Recent experiments have shown that EEDs in low pressure ICPs can be manipulated through the use of static magnetic fields of sufficient magnitudes to magnetize the electrons and confine them to the electromagnetic skin depth. The EED is then a function of the local magnetic field as opposed to having non-local properties in the absence of the magnetic field. In this paper, EEDs in a magnetized inductively coupled plasma (mICP) sustained in Ar are discussed with results from a two-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics model. Results are compared with experimental measurements. We found that the character of the EED transitions from non-local to local with application of the static magnetic field. The reduction in cross-field mobility increases local electron heating in the skin depth and decreases the transport of these hot electrons to larger radii. The tail of the EED is therefore enhanced in the skin depth and depressed at large radii. Plasmas densities are non-monotonic with increasing pressure with the external magnetic field due to transitions between local and non-local kinetics.

  6. Simulated galaxy interactions as probes of merger spectral energy distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Lanz, Lauranne; Zezas, Andreas; Smith, Howard A.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Hernquist, Lars; Hayward, Christopher C.; Brassington, Nicola

    2014-04-10

    We present the first systematic comparison of ultraviolet-millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of observed and simulated interacting galaxies. Our sample is drawn from the Spitzer Interacting Galaxy Survey and probes a range of galaxy interaction parameters. We use 31 galaxies in 14 systems which have been observed with Herschel, Spitzer, GALEX, and 2MASS. We create a suite of GADGET-3 hydrodynamic simulations of isolated and interacting galaxies with stellar masses comparable to those in our sample of interacting galaxies. Photometry for the simulated systems is then calculated with the SUNRISE radiative transfer code for comparison with the observed systems. For most of the observed systems, one or more of the simulated SEDs match reasonably well. The best matches recover the infrared luminosity and the star formation rate of the observed systems, and the more massive systems preferentially match SEDs from simulations of more massive galaxies. The most morphologically distorted systems in our sample are best matched to the simulated SEDs that are close to coalescence, while less evolved systems match well with the SEDs over a wide range of interaction stages, suggesting that an SED alone is insufficient for identifying the interaction stage except during the most active phases in strongly interacting systems. This result is supported by our finding that the SEDs calculated for simulated systems vary little over the interaction sequence.

  7. Energy Distribution of Electrons in Radiation Induced-Helium Plasmas. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Energy distribution of high energy electrons as they slow down and thermalize in a gaseous medium is studied. The energy distribution in the entire energy range from source energies down is studied analytically. A helium medium in which primary electrons are created by the passage of heavy-charged particles from nuclear reactions is emphasized. A radiation-induced plasma is of interest in a variety of applications, such as radiation pumped lasers and gaseous core nuclear reactors.

  8. 16 CFR Table 4 to Part 1512 - Relative Energy Distribution of Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Relative Energy Distribution of Sources 4... SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Table 4 Table 4 to Part 1512—Relative Energy Distribution of Sources Wave length (nanometers) Relative energy 380 9.79 390 12.09 400 14.71 410 17.68 420...

  9. 16 CFR Table 4 to Part 1512 - Relative Energy Distribution of Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Relative Energy Distribution of Sources 4... SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Table 4 Table 4 to Part 1512—Relative Energy Distribution of Sources Wave length (nanometers) Relative energy 380 9.79 390 12.09 400 14.71 410 17.68 420...

  10. 16 CFR Table 4 to Part 1512 - Relative Energy Distribution of Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Relative Energy Distribution of Sources 4... SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Table 4 Table 4 to Part 1512—Relative Energy Distribution of Sources Wave length (nanometers) Relative energy 380 9.79 390 12.09 400 14.71 410 17.68 420...

  11. 16 CFR Table 4 to Part 1512 - Relative Energy Distribution of Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Relative Energy Distribution of Sources 4... SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Table 4 Table 4 to Part 1512—Relative Energy Distribution of Sources Wave length (nanometers) Relative energy 380 9.79 390 12.09 400 14.71 410 17.68 420...

  12. 16 CFR Table 4 to Part 1512 - Relative Energy Distribution of Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Relative Energy Distribution of Sources 4... SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Table 4 Table 4 to Part 1512—Relative Energy Distribution of Sources Wave length (nanometers) Relative energy 380 9.79 390 12.09 400 14.71 410 17.68 420...

  13. 10 CFR 431.193 - Test procedures for measuring energy consumption of distribution transformers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... procedures for measuring the energy efficiency of distribution transformers for purposes of EPCA are... EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Distribution Transformers Test Procedures... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Test procedures for measuring energy consumption...

  14. 10 CFR 431.193 - Test procedures for measuring energy consumption of distribution transformers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... procedures for measuring the energy efficiency of distribution transformers for purposes of EPCA are... EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Distribution Transformers Test Procedures... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Test procedures for measuring energy consumption...

  15. 10 CFR 431.193 - Test procedures for measuring energy consumption of distribution transformers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... procedures for measuring the energy efficiency of distribution transformers for purposes of EPCA are... EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Distribution Transformers Test Procedures... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Test procedures for measuring energy consumption...

  16. 10 CFR 431.193 - Test procedures for measuring energy consumption of distribution transformers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... procedures for measuring the energy efficiency of distribution transformers for purposes of EPCA are... EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Distribution Transformers Test Procedures... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Test procedures for measuring energy consumption...

  17. 10 CFR 431.193 - Test procedures for measuring energy consumption of distribution transformers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... procedures for measuring the energy efficiency of distribution transformers for purposes of EPCA are... EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Distribution Transformers Test Procedures... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Test procedures for measuring energy consumption...

  18. 76 FR 50148 - Notice of Intent to Negotiate Proposed Rule on Energy Efficiency Standards for Distribution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-12

    ... Part 431 RIN 1904-AC62 Notice of Intent to Negotiate Proposed Rule on Energy Efficiency Standards for Distribution Transformers AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy... Negotiated Rulemaking Act (NRA) to negotiate proposed Federal standards for the energy efficiency of...

  19. Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices

    DOEpatents

    Chassin, David P.; Donnelly, Matthew K.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2006-12-12

    Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices are described. In one aspect, an electrical power distribution control method includes providing electrical energy from an electrical power distribution system, applying the electrical energy to a load, providing a plurality of different values for a threshold at a plurality of moments in time and corresponding to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy, and adjusting an amount of the electrical energy applied to the load responsive to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy triggering one of the values of the threshold at the respective moment in time.

  20. Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices

    DOEpatents

    Chassin, David P.; Donnelly, Matthew K.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2011-12-06

    Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices are described. In one aspect, an electrical power distribution control method includes providing electrical energy from an electrical power distribution system, applying the electrical energy to a load, providing a plurality of different values for a threshold at a plurality of moments in time and corresponding to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy, and adjusting an amount of the electrical energy applied to the load responsive to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy triggering one of the values of the threshold at the respective moment in time.

  1. Advanced Power Electronics Interfaces for Distributed Energy Workshop Summary: August 24, 2006, Sacramento, California

    SciTech Connect

    Treanton, B.; Palomo, J.; Kroposki, B.; Thomas, H.

    2006-10-01

    The Advanced Power Electronics Interfaces for Distributed Energy Workshop, sponsored by the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research program and organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, was held Aug. 24, 2006, in Sacramento, Calif. The workshop provided a forum for industry stakeholders to share their knowledge and experience about technologies, manufacturing approaches, markets, and issues in power electronics for a range of distributed energy resources. It focused on the development of advanced power electronic interfaces for distributed energy applications and included discussions of modular power electronics, component manufacturing, and power electronic applications.

  2. Lifetime optimization of wireless sensor network by a better nodes positioning and energy distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebreton, J. M.; Murad, N. M.

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to propose a method of energy distribution on a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN). Nodes are randomly positioned and the sink is placed at the centre of the surface. Simulations show that relay nodes around the sink are too much requested to convey data, which substantially reduces their lifetime. So, several algorithmic solutions are presented to optimize the energy distribution on each node, compared to the classical uniform energy distribution. Their performance is discussed in terms of failure rate of data transmission and network lifetime. Moreover, the total energy distributed on all nodes before the deployment is invariable and some non-uniform energy distributions are created. Finally, simulations show that every energy distributions greatly improve the WSN lifetime and decrease the failure rate of data transmission.

  3. Evaluation of a multi-pronged intervention to improve access to safe abortion care in two districts in Jharkhand

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the adoption of the Medical Termination of Pregnancy Act in 1972, access to safe abortion services remains limited in India. Awareness of the legality of abortion also remains low, leading many women to seek services outside the health system. Medical abortion (MA) is an option that has the potential to expand access to safe abortion services. A multi-pronged intervention covering a population of 161,000 in 253 villages in the Silli and Khunti blocks of Jharkhand was conducted between 2007 and 2009, seeking to improve medical abortion services and create awareness at the community level by providing information through community intermediaries and creating an enabling environment through a behavior change communication campaign. The study evaluates the changes in knowledge about abortion-related issues, changes in abortion care-seeking, and service utilization as a result of this intervention. Methods A baseline cross-sectional survey was conducted pre-intervention (n = 1,253) followed by an endline survey (n = 1,290) one year after the completion of the intervention phase. In addition, monitoring data from intervention facilities was collected monthly over the study period. Results Nearly 85% of respondents reported being exposed to safe abortion messaging as a result of the intervention. Awareness of the legality of abortion increased significantly from 19.7% to 57.6% for women, as did awareness of the specific conditions for which abortion is allowed. Results were similar for men. There was also a significant increase in the proportion of men and women who knew of a legal and safe provider and place from where abortion services could be obtained. Multivariate analysis showed positive associations between exposure to any component of the intervention and increased knowledge about legality and gestational age limits, however only interpersonal communication was associated with a significant increase in knowledge of where to obtain safe

  4. Development of a High-Speed Static Switch for Distributed Energy and Microgrid Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kroposki, B.; Pink, C.; Lynch, J.; John, V.; Meor Daniel, S.; Benedict, E.; Vihinen, I.

    2007-01-01

    Distributed energy resources can provide power to local loads in the electric distribution system and benefits such as improved reliability. Microgrids are intentional islands formed at a facility or in an electrical distribution system that contains at least one distributed resource and associated loads. Microgrids that operate both electrical generation and loads in a coordinated manner can offer additional benefits to the customer and local utility. The loads and energy sources can be disconnected from and reconnected to the area or local utility with minimal disruption to the local loads, thereby improving reliability. This paper details the development and testing of a highspeed static switch for distributed energy and microgrid applications.

  5. The Effect of Distributed Energy Resource Competition with Central Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, SW

    2003-12-10

    Distributed Energy Resource (DER) has been touted as a clean and efficient way to generate electricity at end-use sites, potentially allowing the exhaust heat to be put to good use as well. However, despite its environmental acceptability compared to many other types of generation, it has faced some disapproval because it may displace other, cleaner generation technologies. The end result could be more pollution than if the DER were not deployed. On the other hand, the DER may be competing against older power plants. If the DER is built then these other plants may be retired sooner, reducing their emissions. Or it may be that DER does not directly compete against either new or old plant capacity at the decision-maker level, and increased DER simply reduces the amount of time various plants operate. The key factor is what gets displaced if DER is added. For every kWh made by DER a kWh (or more with losses) of other production is not made. If enough DER is created, some power plants will get retired or not get built so not only their production but their capacity is displaced. Various characteristics of the power system in a region will influence how DER impacts the operation of the grid. The growth in demand in the region may influence whether new plants are postponed or old plants retired. The generation mix, including the fuel types, efficiencies, and emission characteristics of the plants in the region will factor into the overall competition. And public policies such as ease of new construction, emissions regulations, and fuel availability will also come into consideration.

  6. Constructing and Analyzing Spectral Energy Distributions with the Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurino, Omar; Busko, I.; Cresitello-Dittmar, M.; D'Abrusco, R.; Doe, S.; Evans, J.; Pevunova, O.; Norris, P.

    2013-01-01

    Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are a common and useful means of assessing the relative contributions of different emission processes occurring within an object. Iris, the Virtual Astronomical Observatory (VAO) SED tool, seamlessly combines key features of several existing astronomical software applications to streamline and enhance the SED analysis process. With Iris, users may build and display SEDs, browse data and metadata and apply filters to them, fit models to SEDs, and calculate confidence limits on best-fit parameters. SED data may be built from a number of sources using the SED Builder. Iris supports the Simple Application Messaging Protocol for interoperability with other Virtual Observatory applications, like the VAO Data Discovery tool, and can directly fetch SEDs from the NASA Extragalactic Database SED service. Particular attention has been paid to the integration of user spectrophotometric data from files in several different formats. File readers for custom formats can be provided at runtime, as well as custom models to fit the data, as template libraries for template fitting or arbitrary python functions. New functionalities can be added by installing plugins, i.e. third party components that are developed using the Iris Software Development Kit. The VAO was established as a partnership of the Associated Universities, Inc. and the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. Iris Individual components have also been supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) through the Chandra X-ray Center, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for and on behalf of the NASA contract NAS8-03060, and by the Space Telescope Science Institute, operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. This research has made use of the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of

  7. Assessment of soil-gas and soil contamination at the South Prong Creek Disposal Area, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2009-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caldwell, Andral W.; Falls, W. Fred; Guimaraes, Wladmir B.; Ratliff, W. Hagan; Wellborn, John B.; Landmeyer, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Soil gas and soil were assessed for contaminants at the South Prong Creek Disposal Area at Fort Gordon, Georgia, from October 2009 to September 2010. The assessment included identifying and delineating organic contaminants present in soil-gas and inorganic contaminants present in soil samples collected from the area estimated to be the South Prong Creek Disposal Area, including two seeps and the hyporheic zone. This assessment was conducted to provide environmental contamination data to Fort Gordon personnel pursuant to requirements for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B Hazardous Waste Permit process. All soil-gas samplers in the two seeps and the hyporheic zone contained total petroleum hydrocarbons above the method detection level. The highest total petroleum hydrocarbon concentration detected from the two seeps was 54.23 micrograms per liter, and the highest concentration in the hyporheic zone was 344.41 micrograms per liter. The soil-gas samplers within the boundary of the South Prong Creek Disposal Area and along the unnamed road contained total petroleum hydrocarbon mass above the method detection level. The highest total petroleum hydrocarbon mass detected was 147.09 micrograms in a soil-gas sampler near the middle of the unnamed road that traverses the South Prong Creek Disposal Area. The highest undecane mass detected was 4.48 micrograms near the location of the highest total petroleum hydrocarbon mass. Some soil-gas samplers detected undecane mass greater than the method detection level of 0.04 micrograms, with the highest detection of toluene mass of 109.72 micrograms in the same location as the highest total petroleum hydrocarbon mass. Soil-gas samplers installed in areas of high contaminant mass had no detections of explosives and chemical agents above their respective method detection levels. Inorganic concentrations in five soil samples did not exceed regional screening levels established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

  8. Optimal Combination of Distributed Energy System in an Eco-Campusof Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yongwen; Gao, Weijun; Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris

    2006-06-14

    In this study, referring to the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) which was developed by the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), E-GAMS programmer is developed with a research of database of energy tariffs, DER (Distributed Energy Resources) technology cost and performance characteristics, and building energy consumption in Japan. E-GAMS is a tool designed to find the optimal combination of installed equipment and an idealized operating schedule to minimize a site's energy bills. In this research, by using E-GAMS, we present a tool to select the optimal combination of distributed energy system for an Ecological-Campus, Kitakyushu, Science and Research Park (KSRP). We discuss the effects of the combination of distributed energy technologies on the energy saving, economic efficiency and environmental benefits.

  9. Variations of Low-energy Ion Distributions Measured in the Heliosheath

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, R. B.; Roelof, E. C.; Hill, M. E.; Krimigis, S. M.

    2010-12-30

    This report is an update of low-energy ion intensities and angular distributions measured recently by the Low Energy Charged Particle instruments on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft in the inner heliosheath.

  10. Charge state dependence of cathodic vacuum arc ion energy andvelocity distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, Johanna; Schneider, Jochen M.; Anders, Andre

    2006-08-15

    In the literature, conflicting conclusions are reported concerning the charge state dependence of cathodic arc ion energy and velocity distributions. It appears that data from electrostatic energy analyzers indicate charge state dependence of ion energy, whereas time-of-flight methods support charge state independence of ion velocity. Here we present charge-state-resolved ion energy distributions and calculate the corresponding ion velocity distributions in aluminum vacuum arc plasma. We show that the conflicting conclusions reported in the literature for the two different characterization techniques may originate from the commonly employed data interpretation of energy and velocity, in which peak values and average values are not carefully distinguished.

  11. 76 FR 45471 - Energy Efficiency Standards for Distribution Transformers; Notice of Intent To Negotiate Proposed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Chapter II RIN 1904-AC04 Energy Efficiency Standards for Distribution Transformers; Notice of Intent To Negotiate Proposed Rule AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable... Act (NRA) to negotiate proposed Federal standards for the energy efficiency of liquid immersed...

  12. The Spectral Energy Distribution of the Coldest Known Brown Dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhman, K. L.; Esplin, T. L.

    2016-09-01

    WISE J085510.83–071442.5 (hereafter WISE 0855–0714) is the coldest known brown dwarf (∼250 K) and the fourth-closest known system to the Sun (2.2 pc). It has been previously detected only in the J band and two mid-IR bands. To better measure its spectral energy distribution (SED), we have performed deep imaging of WISE 0855–0714 in six optical and near-IR bands with Gemini Observatory, the Very Large Telescope, and the Hubble Space Telescope. Five of the bands show detections, although one detection is marginal (S/N ∼ 3). We also have obtained two epochs of images with the Spitzer Space Telescope for use in refining the parallax of the brown dwarf. By combining astrometry from this work and previous studies, we have derived a parallax of 0.449 ± 0.008″ (2.23 ± 0.04 pc). We have compared our photometry for WISE 0855–0714 to data for known Y dwarfs and to the predictions of three suites of models by Saumon et al. and Morley et al. that are defined by the presence or absence of clouds and nonequilibrium chemistry. Our estimates of Y ‑ J and J ‑ H for WISE 0855–0714 are redder than colors of other Y dwarfs, confirming a predicted reversal of near-IR colors to redder values at temperatures below 300–400 K. In color–magnitude diagrams, no single suite of models provides a clearly superior match to the sequence formed by WISE 0855–0714 and other Y dwarfs. Instead, the best-fitting model changes from one diagram to the next. Similarly, all of the models have substantial differences from the SED of WISE 0855–0714. As a result, we are currently unable to constrain the presence of clouds or nonequilibrium chemistry in its atmosphere. Based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, Gemini Observatory, and the ESO Telescopes at Paranal Observatory.

  13. MEAN SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS AND BOLOMETRIC CORRECTIONS FOR LUMINOUS QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczyk, Coleman M.; Richards, Gordon T.; Mehta, Sajjan S.; Vogeley, Michael S.; Gallagher, S. C.; Leighly, Karen M.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2013-05-01

    We explore the mid-infrared (mid-IR) through ultraviolet (UV) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 119,652 luminous broad-lined quasars with 0.064 < z < 5.46 using mid-IR data from Spitzer and WISE, near-infrared data from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and UKIDSS, optical data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and UV data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The mean SED requires a bolometric correction (relative to 2500 A) of BC{sub 2500A} =2.75 {+-} 0.40 using the integrated light from 1 {mu}m-2 keV, and we further explore the range of bolometric corrections exhibited by individual objects. In addition, we investigate the dependence of the mean SED on various parameters, particularly the UV luminosity for quasars with 0.5 {approx}< z {approx}< 3 and the properties of the UV emission lines for quasars with z {approx}> 1.6; the latter is a possible indicator of the strength of the accretion disk wind, which is expected to be SED-dependent. Luminosity-dependent mean SEDs show that, relative to the high-luminosity SED, low-luminosity SEDs exhibit a harder (bluer) far-UV spectral slope ({alpha}{sub UV}), a redder optical continuum, and less hot dust. Mean SEDs constructed instead as a function of UV emission line properties reveal changes that are consistent with known Principal Component Analysis trends. A potentially important contribution to the bolometric correction is the unseen extreme UV (EUV) continuum. Our work suggests that lower-luminosity quasars and/or quasars with disk-dominated broad emission lines may require an extra continuum component in the EUV that is not present (or much weaker) in high-luminosity quasars with strong accretion disk winds. As such, we consider four possible models and explore the resulting bolometric corrections. Understanding these various SED-dependent effects will be important for accurate determination of quasar accretion rates.

  14. Energy distribution functions of kilovolt ions in a modified Penning discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    The distribution function of ion energy parallel to the magnetic field of a Penning discharge was measured with a retarding potential energy analyzer. Simultaneous measurements of the ion energy distribution function perpendicular to the magnetic field were made with a charge-exchange neutral detector. The ion energy distribution functions are approximately Maxwellian, and their kinetic temperatures are equal within experimental error. This suggests that turbulent processes previously observed Maxwellianize the velocity distribution along a radius in velocity space, and result in an isotropic energy distribution. The kinetic temperatures are on the order of kilovolts, and the tails of the ion energy distribution functions are Maxwellian up to a factor of 7 e-folds in energy. When the distributions depart from Maxwellian, they are enhanced above the Maxwellian tail. Above densities of about 10 to the 10th power particles/cc, this enhancement appears to be the result of a second, higher temperature Maxwellian distribution. At these high particle energies, only the ions perpendicular to the magnetic field lines were investigated.

  15. VAR Support from Distributed Wind Energy Resources: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Romanowitz, H.; Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Yinger, R.

    2004-07-01

    As the size and quantity of wind farms and other distributed generation facilities increase, especially in relation to local grids, the importance of a reactive power compensator or VAR support from these facilities becomes more significant. Poorly done, it can result in cycling or inadequate VAR support, and the local grid could experience excessive voltage regulation and, ultimately, instability. Improved wind turbine and distributed generation power control technologies are creating VAR support capabilities that can be used to enhance the voltage regulation and stability of local grids. Locating VAR support near the point of consumption, reducing step size, and making the control active all improve the performance of the grid. This paper presents and discusses alternatives for improving the integration of VAR support from distributed generation facilities such as wind farms. We also examine the relative effectiveness of distributed VAR support on the local grid and how it can b e integrated with the VAR support of the grid operator.

  16. Low-energy ion distribution functions on a magnetically quiet day at geostationary altitude /L = 7/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Raitt, W. J.; Yasuhara, F.

    1982-01-01

    Ion energy and pitch angle distribution functions are examined for a magnetically quiet day using averaged data from ATS 6. For both field-aligned and perpendicular fluxes, the populations have a mixture of characteristic energies, and the distribution functions can be fairly well approximated by Maxwellian distributions over three different energy bands in the range 3-600 eV. Pitch angle distributions varying with local time, and energy distributions are used to compute total ion density. Pitch angle scattering mechanisms responsible for the observed transformation of pitch angle distribution are examined, and it is found that a magnetic noise of a certain power spectral density belonging to the electromagnetic ion cyclotron mode near the ion cyclotron frequency can be effective in trapping the field aligned fluxes by pitch angle scattering.

  17. Energy storage management system with distributed wireless sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Bandhauer, Todd M.

    2015-12-08

    An energy storage system having a multiple different types of energy storage and conversion devices. Each device is equipped with one or more sensors and RFID tags to communicate sensor information wirelessly to a central electronic management system, which is used to control the operation of each device. Each device can have multiple RFID tags and sensor types. Several energy storage and conversion devices can be combined.

  18. Terminal energy distribution of blast waves from bursting spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, A. A.; Strehlow, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    The calculation results for the total energy delivered to the surroundings by the burst of an idealized massless sphere containing an ideal gas are presented. The logic development of various formulas for sphere energy is also presented. For all types of sphere bursts the fraction of the total initial energy available in the sphere that is delivered to the surroundings is shown to lie between that delivered for the constant pressure addition of energy to a source region and that delivered by isentropic expansion of the sphere. The relative value of E sub/Q increases at fixed sphere pressure/surrounding pressure as sphere temperature increases because the velocity of sound increases.

  19. Measurement of energy distribution in flowing hydrogen microwave plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R.; Morin, T.; Finzel, M.; Hawley, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    An electrothermal propulsion concept utilizing a microwave plasma system as the mechanism to convert electromagnetic energy into kinetic energy of a flowing gas is investigated. A calorimetry system enclosing a microwave plasma system has been developed to accurately measure the energy inputs and outputs of the microwave plasma system. The rate of energy transferred to the gas can be determined to within + or - 1.8 W from an energy balance around the microwave plasma system. The percentage of the power absorbed by the microwave plasma system transferred to the hydrogen gas as it flows through the system is found to increase with the increasing flow rate, to decrease with the increasing pressure, and to be independent of the absorbed power. An upper bound for the hydrogen gas temperature is estimated from the energy content, heat capacity, and flow rate of the gas stream. A lower bound for an overall heat-transfer coefficient is then calculated, characterizing the energy loss from the hydrogen gas stream to the air cooling of the plasma discharge tube wall. The heat-transfer coefficient is found to increase with the increasing flow rate and pressure and to be independent of the absorbed power. This result indicates that a convective-type mechanism is responsible for the energy transfer.

  20. High-energy lasers by using distributed reflection: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saffren, M. M.

    1975-01-01

    Lasers may be made with higher energy photons than heretofore possible. It has been proposed that vacuum ultraviolet lasing can be obtained by bombarding superfluid helium with electron beam, while coupling acoustic energy into helium to set up standing waves in fluid.

  1. Optimum irradiance distribution of concentrated sunlight for photovoltaic energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benítez, Pablo; Mohedano, Rubén

    1999-04-01

    The irradiance distribution on a concentration photovoltaic cell that produces maximum conversion efficiency has been found with the tools of Variational Calculus. The analysis is two dimensional and can be applied to a comb-like double busbar solar cell illuminated by a line-focus concentrator. The optimum distribution is, in general, nonuniform, and depends on the internal parameters of the solar cell: the higher the contribution of the grid to the global cell series resistance, the lower the uniformity of the optimum irradiance distribution. In practical cases, the efficiency for uniform illumination is close to that of the optimum, but in the latter the irradiance close to the busbar may be noticeable higher than the average.

  2. Electron-energy distribution in silicon under pulsed-laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensoussan, M.; Moison, J. M.

    1983-04-01

    By yield and energy-distribution measurements, we identify two photoemission regimes from silicon under nanosecond laser irradiation. At low fluence and high photon energy, two- and three-quantum processes are the main emission mechanisms; effects of initial and intermediate states are the dominant spectral features. At high fluence and low photon energy, thermoemission prevails and is characterized by a Maxwellian distribution with a temperature different from that of the lattice during the excitation pulse.

  3. Measurement Of Kinetic Energy Distribution Of Positive Ions From Electron Induced Dissociation Of Pyrimidine Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milosavljevic, A. R.; Maljkovic, J. B.; Sevic, D.; Cadez, I.; Marinkovic, B. P.

    2010-07-01

    We report preliminary results on measurements of kinetic energy distribution of positive ions formed upon electron induced dissociative ionization of gaseous pyrimidine molecule (C4H4N2). The kinetic energy spectra were recorded without precedent mass/charge analysis, for different incident electron energies (50-250 eV) and different detection angles (40-90) with respect to the incident beam direction. An influence of the residual gas background to the recorded distributions has been investigated.

  4. Model for radial dependence of frequency distributions for energy imparted in nanometer volumes from HZE particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Nikjoo, H.; Goodhead, D. T.; Decillo, J. F. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    This paper develops a deterministic model of frequency distributions for energy imparted (total energy deposition) in small volumes similar to DNA molecules from high-energy ions of interest for space radiation protection and cancer therapy. Frequency distributions for energy imparted are useful for considering radiation quality and for modeling biological damage produced by ionizing radiation. For high-energy ions, secondary electron (delta-ray) tracks originating from a primary ion track make dominant contributions to energy deposition events in small volumes. Our method uses the distribution of electrons produced about an ion's path and incorporates results from Monte Carlo simulation of electron tracks to predict frequency distributions for ions, including their dependence on radial distance. The contribution from primary ion events is treated using an impact parameter formalism of spatially restricted linear energy transfer (LET) and energy-transfer straggling. We validate our model by comparing it directly to results from Monte Carlo simulations for proton and alpha-particle tracks. We show for the first time frequency distributions of energy imparted in DNA structures by several high-energy ions such as cosmic-ray iron ions. Our comparison with results from Monte Carlo simulations at low energies indicates the accuracy of the method.

  5. Model for radial dependence of frequency distributions for energy imparted in nanometer volumes from HZE particles.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, F A; Nikjoo, H; Goodhead, D T

    2000-04-01

    This paper develops a deterministic model of frequency distributions for energy imparted (total energy deposition) in small volumes similar to DNA molecules from high-energy ions of interest for space radiation protection and cancer therapy. Frequency distributions for energy imparted are useful for considering radiation quality and for modeling biological damage produced by ionizing radiation. For high-energy ions, secondary electron (delta-ray) tracks originating from a primary ion track make dominant contributions to energy deposition events in small volumes. Our method uses the distribution of electrons produced about an ion's path and incorporates results from Monte Carlo simulation of electron tracks to predict frequency distributions for ions, including their dependence on radial distance. The contribution from primary ion events is treated using an impact parameter formalism of spatially restricted linear energy transfer (LET) and energy-transfer straggling. We validate our model by comparing it directly to results from Monte Carlo simulations for proton and alpha-particle tracks. We show for the first time frequency distributions of energy imparted in DNA structures by several high-energy ions such as cosmic-ray iron ions. Our comparison with results from Monte Carlo simulations at low energies indicates the accuracy of the method. PMID:10761008

  6. Bayes Node Energy Polynomial Distribution to Improve Routing in Wireless Sensor Network.

    PubMed

    Palanisamy, Thirumoorthy; Krishnasamy, Karthikeyan N

    2015-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Network monitor and control the physical world via large number of small, low-priced sensor nodes. Existing method on Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) presented sensed data communication through continuous data collection resulting in higher delay and energy consumption. To conquer the routing issue and reduce energy drain rate, Bayes Node Energy and Polynomial Distribution (BNEPD) technique is introduced with energy aware routing in the wireless sensor network. The Bayes Node Energy Distribution initially distributes the sensor nodes that detect an object of similar event (i.e., temperature, pressure, flow) into specific regions with the application of Bayes rule. The object detection of similar events is accomplished based on the bayes probabilities and is sent to the sink node resulting in minimizing the energy consumption. Next, the Polynomial Regression Function is applied to the target object of similar events considered for different sensors are combined. They are based on the minimum and maximum value of object events and are transferred to the sink node. Finally, the Poly Distribute algorithm effectively distributes the sensor nodes. The energy efficient routing path for each sensor nodes are created by data aggregation at the sink based on polynomial regression function which reduces the energy drain rate with minimum communication overhead. Experimental performance is evaluated using Dodgers Loop Sensor Data Set from UCI repository. Simulation results show that the proposed distribution algorithm significantly reduce the node energy drain rate and ensure fairness among different users reducing the communication overhead. PMID:26426701

  7. Bayes Node Energy Polynomial Distribution to Improve Routing in Wireless Sensor Network

    PubMed Central

    Palanisamy, Thirumoorthy; Krishnasamy, Karthikeyan N.

    2015-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Network monitor and control the physical world via large number of small, low-priced sensor nodes. Existing method on Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) presented sensed data communication through continuous data collection resulting in higher delay and energy consumption. To conquer the routing issue and reduce energy drain rate, Bayes Node Energy and Polynomial Distribution (BNEPD) technique is introduced with energy aware routing in the wireless sensor network. The Bayes Node Energy Distribution initially distributes the sensor nodes that detect an object of similar event (i.e., temperature, pressure, flow) into specific regions with the application of Bayes rule. The object detection of similar events is accomplished based on the bayes probabilities and is sent to the sink node resulting in minimizing the energy consumption. Next, the Polynomial Regression Function is applied to the target object of similar events considered for different sensors are combined. They are based on the minimum and maximum value of object events and are transferred to the sink node. Finally, the Poly Distribute algorithm effectively distributes the sensor nodes. The energy efficient routing path for each sensor nodes are created by data aggregation at the sink based on polynomial regression function which reduces the energy drain rate with minimum communication overhead. Experimental performance is evaluated using Dodgers Loop Sensor Data Set from UCI repository. Simulation results show that the proposed distribution algorithm significantly reduce the node energy drain rate and ensure fairness among different users reducing the communication overhead. PMID:26426701

  8. The mapping of electronic energy distributions using experimental electron density.

    PubMed

    Tsirelson, Vladimir G

    2002-08-01

    It is demonstrated that the approximate kinetic energy density calculated using the second-order gradient expansion with parameters of the multipole model fitted to experimental structure factors reproduces the main features of this quantity in a molecular or crystal position space. The use of the local virial theorem provides an appropriate derivation of approximate potential energy density and electronic energy density from the experimental (model) electron density and its derivatives. Consideration of these functions is not restricted by the critical points in the electron density and provides a comprehensive characterization of bonding in molecules and crystals. PMID:12149553

  9. Amorphous metal distribution transformers: The energy-efficient alternative

    SciTech Connect

    Garrity, T.F.

    1994-12-31

    Amorphous metal distribution transformers have been commercially available for the past 13 years. During that time, they have realized the promise of exceptionally high core efficiency as compared to silicon steel transformer cores. Utility planners today must consider all options available to meet the requirements of load growth. While additional generation capacity will be added, many demand-side initiatives are being undertaken as complementary programs to generation expansion. The efficiency improvement provided by amorphous metal distribution transformers deserves to be among the demand-side options. The key to understanding the positive impact of amorphous metal transformer efficiency is to consider the aggregate contribution those transformers can make towards demand reduction. It is estimated that distribution transformer core losses comprise at least 1% of the utility`s peak demand. Because core losses are continuous, any significant reduction in their magnitude is of great significance to the planner. This paper describes the system-wide economic contributions amorphous metal distribution transformers can make to a utility and suggests evaluation techniques that can be used. As a conservation tool, the amorphous metal transformer contributes to reduced power plant emissions. Calibration of those emissions reductions is also discussed in the paper.

  10. Radial Flux Distribution of Low-Energy Neutrons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higinbotham, J.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to illustrate the basic principle involved in the process of moderation of fast neutrons by water, and the monitoring of the low-energy neutron flux using indium as a probe. (GA)

  11. Control of ions energy distribution in dual-frequency magnetron sputtering discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Chao He, Haijie; Huang, Fupei; Liu, Yi; Wang, Xiangying

    2014-04-15

    The ion energy distributions (IEDs) in the dual-frequency magnetron sputtering discharges were investigated by retarding field energy analyzer. Increasing power ratio of 2 MHz to 13.56 (27.12 or 60) MHz led to the evolution of IEDs from a uni-modal distribution towards a uni-modal distribution with high-energy peak shoulder and a bi-modal distribution. While increasing power ratio of 13.56 MHz to 27.12 MHz and 27.12 MHz to 60 MHz, led to the increase of peak energy. The evolution of IEDs shape and the increase of peak energy are due to the change of ions responding to the average field of high-frequency period towards the instantaneous sheath potential of low-frequency period.

  12. Characterizing the energy distribution of laser-generated relativistic electrons in cone-wire targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, H.; Beg, F. N.; Higginson, D. P.; Ma, T.; Link, A.; Wilks, S. C.; McLean, H. S.; Perez, F.; Patel, P. K.

    2012-10-15

    Transport of relativistic electrons in a solid Cu wire target has been modeled with the implicit hybrid particle-in-cell code LSP to investigate the electron energy distribution and energy coupling from the high-intensity, short-pulse laser to electrons entering to the wire. Experiments were performed on the TITAN laser using a 1.5 mm long Cu wire attached to a Au cone tip at the laser intensity of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2} which was irradiated into the cone. The simulated Cu K{alpha} wire profile and yields matched the measurements using a two-temperature energy distribution. These modeling results show that the cold component of the energy spectrum can be determined with {+-}100 keV accuracy from the fit to the initial experimental fall-off of the K{alpha} emission while the simulated profiles were relatively insensitive to the hotter component of the electron distribution (>4 MeV). The slope of measured escaped electrons was used to determine the hotter temperature. Using exponential energy distributions, the laser-to-electron-in-wire coupling efficiencies inferred from the fits decreased from 3.4% to 1.5% as the prepulse energy increases up to 1 J. The comparison of the energy couplings using the exponential and Relativistic Maxwellian distribution functions showed that the energy inferred in the cold component is independent of the type of the distribution function.

  13. Model Etch Profiles for Ion Energy Distribution Functions in an Inductively Coupled Plasma Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham-Shrauner, B.; Chen, W.; Woodworth, J.R.

    1998-12-14

    Rectangular trench profiles are modeled with analytic etch rates determined from measured ion distribution functions. The pattern transfer step for this plasma etch is for trilayer lithography. Argon and chlorine angular ion energy distribution functions measured by a spherical collector ring analyzer are fit to a sum of drifting Maxwellian velocity distribution functions with anisotropic temperatures. The fit of the model ion distribution functions by a simulated annealing optimization procedure converges adequately for only two drifting Maxwellians. The etch rates are proportional to analytic expressions for the ion energy flux. Numerical computation of the etch profiles by integration of the characteristic equations for profile points and connection of the profiles points is efficient.

  14. Energy distributions and radiation transport in uranium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miley, G. H.; Bathke, C.; Maceda, E.; Choi, C.

    1976-01-01

    An approximate analytic model, based on continuous electron slowing, has been used for survey calculations. Where more accuracy is required, a Monte Carlo technique is used which combines an analytic representation of Coulombic collisions with a random walk treatment of inelastic collisions. The calculated electron distributions have been incorporated into another code that evaluates both the excited atomic state densities within the plasma and the radiative flux emitted from the plasma.

  15. Stepanian's star - The energy distribution reveals a nontypical cataclysmic variable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szkody, P.

    1981-01-01

    Einstein, IUE, optical multichannel spectrophotometry, and IR observations of Stepanian's star are discussed in terms of other known cataclysmics. While the X-ray flux and IUE emission-line data are similar to that of dwarf novae, the total continuum flux distribution from uv-IR is cooler (peaking near a 10,000 K blackbody) and is unlike either a stellar component or a classic steady-state disk. The IR data show no evidence for a late-type component.

  16. Anomalous broadening of energy distributions in photoemitted electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidi, Vincenzo

    1996-06-01

    Photoemission is widely used to generate electron beams with an energy spread lower than by thermoemission. However, when a photocathode is illuminated by a multimode laser this feature is lost and an electron beam with several eV of energy spread is produced. We have developed an explanation for this anomalous behavior pointing out its origin in the combined effect of charge relaxation, taking place within the beam, together with the modulation of the laser power imposed by laser modes. The model permits a correct interpretation overall experimental evidences.

  17. Distributed Power Flow Control: Distributed Power Flow Control using Smart Wires for Energy Routing

    SciTech Connect

    2012-04-24

    GENI Project: Smart Wire Grid is developing a solution for controlling power flow within the electric grid to better manage unused and overall transmission capacity. The 300,000 miles of high-voltage transmission line in the U.S. today are congested and inefficient, with only around 50% of all transmission capacity utilized at any given time. Increased consumer demand should be met in part with more efficient and an economical power flow. Smart Wire Grid’s devices clamp onto existing transmission lines and control the flow of power within—much like how internet routers help allocate bandwidth throughout the web. Smart wires could support greater use of renewable energy by providing more consistent control over how that energy is routed within the grid on a real-time basis. This would lessen the concerns surrounding the grid’s inability to effectively store intermittent energy from renewables for later use.

  18. Site energy distribution analysis of Cu (Ⅱ) adsorption on sediments and residues by sequential extraction method.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qiang; Yang, Yan; Dong, Xianbin; Fang, Jimin

    2016-01-01

    Many models (e.g., Langmuir model, Freundlich model and surface complexation model) have been successfully used to explain the mechanism of metal ion adsorption on the pure mineral materials. These materials usually have a homogeneous surface where all sites have the same adsorption energies. However, it's hardly appropriate for such models to describe the adsorption on heterogeneous surfaces (e.g., sediment surface), site energy distribution analysis can be to. In the present study, the site energy distribution analysis was used to describe the surface properties and adsorption behavior of the non-residual and residual components extracted from the natural aquatic sediment samples. The residues were prepared "in-situ" by using the sequential extraction procedure. The present study is intended to investigate the roles of different components and the change of site energy distribution at different temperatures of the sediment samples in controlling Cu (Ⅱ) adsorption. The results of the site energy distribution analysis indicated firstly, that the sorption sites of iron/manganese hydrous oxides (IMHO) and organic matter (OM) have higher energy. Secondly, light fraction (LF) and carbonates have little influence on site energy distribution. Finally, there was increase in site energies with the increase of temperature. Specially, low temperature (5 °C) significantly influenced the site energies of IMHO and OM, and also had obvious effect on the energy distribution of the sediments after removing target components. The site energy distribution analysis proved to be a useful method for us to further understand the energetic characteristics of sediment in comparison with those previously obtained. PMID:26552542

  19. Fuzzy Performance between Surface Fitting and Energy Distribution in Turbulence Runner

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhongwei; Liu, Xiaochu; Ye, Bangyan; Brauwer, Richard Kars

    2012-01-01

    Because the application of surface fitting algorithms exerts a considerable fuzzy influence on the mathematical features of kinetic energy distribution, their relation mechanism in different external conditional parameters must be quantitatively analyzed. Through determining the kinetic energy value of each selected representative position coordinate point by calculating kinetic energy parameters, several typical algorithms of complicated surface fitting are applied for constructing microkinetic energy distribution surface models in the objective turbulence runner with those obtained kinetic energy values. On the base of calculating the newly proposed mathematical features, we construct fuzzy evaluation data sequence and present a new three-dimensional fuzzy quantitative evaluation method; then the value change tendencies of kinetic energy distribution surface features can be clearly quantified, and the fuzzy performance mechanism discipline between the performance results of surface fitting algorithms, the spatial features of turbulence kinetic energy distribution surface, and their respective environmental parameter conditions can be quantitatively analyzed in detail, which results in the acquirement of final conclusions concerning the inherent turbulence kinetic energy distribution performance mechanism and its mathematical relation. A further turbulence energy quantitative study can be ensured. PMID:23213287

  20. Energy, ecology and the distribution of microbial life

    PubMed Central

    Macalady, Jennifer L.; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Grettenberger, Christen L.; Jones, Daniel S.; Tsao, Leah E.; Burgos, William D.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms that govern the coexistence of multiple biological species have been studied intensively by ecologists since the turn of the nineteenth century. Microbial ecologists in the meantime have faced many fundamental challenges, such as the lack of an ecologically coherent species definition, lack of adequate methods for evaluating population sizes and community composition in nature, and enormous taxonomic and functional diversity. The accessibility of powerful, culture-independent molecular microbiology methods offers an opportunity to close the gap between microbial science and the main stream of ecological theory, with the promise of new insights and tools needed to meet the grand challenges humans face as planetary engineers and galactic explorers. We focus specifically on resources related to energy metabolism because of their direct links to elemental cycling in the Earth's history, engineering applications and astrobiology. To what extent does the availability of energy resources structure microbial communities in nature? Our recent work on sulfur- and iron-oxidizing autotrophs suggests that apparently subtle variations in the concentration ratios of external electron donors and acceptors select for different microbial populations. We show that quantitative knowledge of microbial energy niches (population-specific patterns of energy resource use) can be used to predict variations in the abundance of specific taxa in microbial communities. Furthermore, we propose that resource ratio theory applied to micro-organisms will provide a useful framework for identifying how environmental communities are organized in space and time. PMID:23754819

  1. Analysis of swarm coefficients in a gas for bi-modal electron energy distribution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govinda-Raju, Gorur

    2015-03-01

    Cross sections for collision between electrons and neutrals in a gas discharge are essential for theoretical and computational developments. They are also required to interpret and analyze the results of experimental studies on swarm parameters namely drift velocity, characteristic energy, and ionization and attachment coefficients. The cross sections and swarm coefficients are interconnected through the most important electron energy distribution function. The traditional method of solving the Boltzmann equation numerically yields the required distribution (EEDF). However there are many situations where a simpler approach is desirable for deriving the energy distribution analytically. Energy distribution in non-uniform electric fields, in crossed electric and magnetic fields, breakdown in mixtures of gases for electrical power or plasma applications, calculation of longitudinal diffusion coefficients are examples. In other studies the swarm parameters are employed to derive the cross sections in an unfolding procedure that also involves the energy distribution function. Application of Boltzmann solution method, though more rigorous, consumes enormous efforts in time and technical expertise. In an attempt to provide a simpler method the present author has previously suggested a bimodal electron energy distribution in gases. In this paper the author has generalized the idea of bi-modal energy distribution by considering a model gas with representative cross sections and adopted numerical methods for greater accuracy. The parameters considered are the nature of the two distributions, their relative ratio, and the dependence of cross sections on electron energy. A new method for determining the combination of distributions has been shown to be adequate for calculation of swarm parameters. The results for argon are shown to yield very good agreement with available experimental and theoretical values.

  2. Distributed Energy Resources and Dynamic Microgrid: An Integrated Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Duo Rick

    The overall goal of this thesis is to improve understanding in terms of the benefit of DERs to both utility and to electricity end-users when integrated in power distribution system. To achieve this goal, a series of two studies was conducted to assess the value of DERs when integrated with new power paradigms. First, the arbitrage value of DERs was examined in markets with time-variant electricity pricing rates (e.g., time of use, real time pricing) under a smart grid distribution paradigm. This study uses a stochastic optimization model to estimate the potential profit from electricity price arbitrage over a five-year period. The optimization process involves two types of PHEVs (PHEV-10, and PHEV-40) under three scenarios with different assumptions on technology performance, electricity market and PHEV owner types. The simulation results indicate that expected arbitrage profit is not a viable option to engage PHEVs in dispatching and in providing ancillary services without more favorable policy and PHEV battery technologies. Subsidy or change in electricity tariff or both are needed. Second, it examined the concept of dynamic microgrid as a measure to improve distribution resilience, and estimates the prices of this emerging service. An economic load dispatch (ELD) model is developed to estimate the market-clearing price in a hypothetical community with single bid auction electricity market. The results show that the electricity market clearing price on the dynamic microgrid is predominantly decided by power output and cost of electricity of each type of DGs. At circumstances where CHP is the only source, the electricity market clearing price in the island is even cheaper than the on-grid electricity price at normal times. Integration of PHEVs in the dynamic microgrid will increase electricity market clearing prices. It demonstrates that dynamic microgrid is an economically viable alternative to enhance grid resilience.

  3. Assessment of grid-friendly collective optimization framework for distributed energy resources

    SciTech Connect

    Pensini, Alessandro; Robinson, Matthew; Heine, Nicholas; Stadler, Michael; Mammoli, Andrea

    2015-11-04

    Distributed energy resources have the potential to provide services to facilities and buildings at lower cost and environmental impact in comparison to traditional electric-gridonly services. The reduced cost could result from a combination of higher system efficiency and exploitation of electricity tariff structures. Traditionally, electricity tariffs are designed to encourage the use of ‘off peak’ power and discourage the use of ‘onpeak’ power, although recent developments in renewable energy resources and distributed generation systems (such as their increasing levels of penetration and their increased controllability) are resulting in pressures to adopt tariffs of increasing complexity. Independently of the tariff structure, more or less sophisticated methods exist that allow distributed energy resources to take advantage of such tariffs, ranging from simple pre-planned schedules to Software-as-a-Service schedule optimization tools. However, as the penetration of distributed energy resources increases, there is an increasing chance of a ‘tragedy of the commons’ mechanism taking place, where taking advantage of tariffs for local benefit can ultimately result in degradation of service and higher energy costs for all. In this work, we use a scheduling optimization tool, in combination with a power distribution system simulator, to investigate techniques that could mitigate the deleterious effect of ‘selfish’ optimization, so that the high-penetration use of distributed energy resources to reduce operating costs remains advantageous while the quality of service and overall energy cost to the community is not affected.

  4. Distributed SUSY breaking: dark energy, Newton's law and the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, C. P.; van Nierop, L.; Williams, M.

    2014-07-01

    We identify the underlying symmetry mechanism that suppresses the low-energy effective 4D cosmological constant within some 6D supergravity models, generically leading to results suppressed by powers of the KK scale, m {/K K 2}, relative to the much larger size, m 4, associated with mass- m particles localized in these models on codimension-2 branes. These models are examples for which the local conditions for unbroken supersymmetry can be satisfied locally everywhere within the extra dimensions, but are obstructed only by global conditions like flux quantization or by the mutual inconsistency of the boundary conditions required at the various branes. Consequently quantities (like vacuum energies) forbidden by supersymmetry cannot become nonzero until wavelengths of order the KK scale are integrated out, since only such long wavelength modes can see the entire space and so `know' that supersymmetry has broken. We verify these arguments by extending earlier rugby-ball calculations of one-loop vacuum energies within these models to more general pairs of branes within two warped extra dimensions. For the Standard Model confined to one of two otherwise identical branes, the predicted effective 4D vacuum energy density is of order ρ vac ⋍ C( mM g /4 πM p )4 = C(5 .6 × 10-5 eV)4, where M g ≳ 10 TeV (corresponding to extra-dimensional size r ≲ 1 μm) and M p = 2 .44 × 1018 GeV are the 6D and 4D rationalized Planck scales, and m is the heaviest brane-localized particle. (For numerical purposes we take m to be the top-quark mass and take M g as small as possible, consistent with energy-loss bounds from supernovae.) C is a constant depending on the details of the bulk spectrum, which could easily be of order 500 for each of hundreds of fields in the bulk. The value C ˜ 6 × 106 would give the observed Dark Energy density.

  5. Effects of energy distribution of interface traps on recombination dc current-voltage line shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zuhui; Jie, Bin B.; Sah, Chih-Tang

    2006-12-01

    The effects of energy distributions of Si /SiO2 interface traps in the energy gap of oxidized silicon on the current versus voltage line shape of the electron-hole recombination current are analyzed using the steady-state Shockley-Read-Hall kinetics. Slater's [Insulators, Semiconductors and Metals; Quantum Theory of Molecules and Solids (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1967)] localized bulk perturbation theory applied by us to the interface anticipates U-shaped energy distributions of the density of neutral electron and hole interface traps from random variations of the Si:Si and Si:O bond angles and lengths. Conservation in dissipative transition energy anticipates the rate of electron capture into neutral electron trap to be faster for electron trap energy levels nearer the conduction band edge, and similarly, the rate of hole capture into neutral hole trap to be faster for hole trap energy levels nearer the valence band edge. Line shape broadening is analyzed for discrete and U-shaped energy distributions of interface trap energy levels. The broadened line shapes observed in past experiments, previously attributed to spatial variations of surface dopant impurity concentrations, could also arise from energy distributions of interface trap energy levels.

  6. FEL and Optical Klystron Gain for an Electron Beam with Oscillatory Energy Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; Ding, Y.; Huang, Z.; /SLAC

    2009-12-09

    If the energy spread of a beam is larger then the Pierce parameter, the FEL gain length increases dramatically and the FEL output gets suppressed. We show that if the energy distribution of such a beam is made oscillatory on a small scale, the gain length can be considerably decreased. Such an oscillatory energy distribution is generated by first modulating the beam energy with a laser via the mechanism of inverse FEL, and then sending it through a strong chicane. We show that this approach also works for the optical klystron enhancement scheme. Our analytical results are corroborated by numerical simulations.

  7. Electron energy distributions in uranium helium mixtures. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makowski, M. A.

    1977-01-01

    The high energy portion of the electron energy distribution for mixtures of uranium and helium at 1 atm, 5000 K, and a neutron flux of 2x10 to the 12th power/sq cm-sec have been calculated. The addition of He improves the heat transport characteristics of the plasma and has the feature that the He energy levels lie in the high energy portion of the electron distribution, potentially allowing non maxwellian excitation. It is concluded, however, that the resulting reaction rates are marginal relative to achieving inversion in He.

  8. Measurement of the B hadron energy distribution in Z0 decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Abe, K.; Akagi, T.; Allen, N. J.; Ash, W. W.; Aston, D.; Baird, K. G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H. R.; Barakat, M. B.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T. L.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Bazarko, A. O.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bilei, G. M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J. R.; Bolen, B.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G. R.; Brau, J. E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W. M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T. H.; Burrows, P. N.; Busza, W.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Chou, A.; Church, E.; Cohn, H. O.; Coller, J. A.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R. F.; Coyne, D. G.; Crawford, G.; D'Oliveira, A.; Damerell, C. J.; Daoudi, M.; de Groot, N.; de Sangro, R.; dell'Orso, R.; Dervan, P. J.; Dima, M.; Dong, D. N.; Du, P. Y.; Dubois, R.; Einsenstein, B. I.; Elia, R.; Etzion, E.; Fahey, S.; Falciai, D.; Fan, C.; Fernandez, J. P.; Fero, M. J.; Frey, R.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Hart, E. L.; Harton, J. L.; Hasan, A.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasuko, K.; Hedges, S. J.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Hildreth, M. D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M. E.; Hughes, E. W.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jackson, D. J.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J. A.; Jiang, Z. Y.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, J. R.; Johnson, R. A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Kang, H. J.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kendall, H. W.; Kim, Y. D.; King, M. E.; King, R.; Kofler, R. R.; Krishna, N. M.; Kroeger, R. S.; Labs, J. F.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J. A.; Leith, D. W.; Lia, V.; Liu, M. X.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H. L.; Ma, J.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T. W.; Maruyama, T.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A. K.; Meadows, B. T.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P. M.; Moffeit, K. C.; Moore, T. B.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Narita, S.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Ohnishi, Y.; Oishi, N.; Onoprienko, D.; Osborne, L. S.; Panvini, R. S.; Park, C. H.; Park, H.; Pavel, T. J.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K. T.; Plano, R. J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C. Y.; Punkar, G. D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Reeves, T. W.; Reidy, J.; Reinertsen, P. L.; Rensing, P. E.; Rochester, L. S.; Rowson, P. C.; Russell, J. J.; Saxton, O. H.; Schalk, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schumm, B. A.; Schwiening, J.; Sen, S.; Serbo, V. V.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, G.; Sherden, D. J.; Shmakov, K. D.; Simopoulos, C.; Sinev, N. B.; Smith, S. R.; Smy, M. B.; Snyder, J. A.; Staengle, H.; Stamer, P.; Steiner, H.; Steiner, R.; Strauss, M. G.; Su, D.; Suekane, F.; Sugiyama, A.; Suzuki, S.; Swartz, M.; Szumilo, A.; Takahashi, T.; Taylor, F. E.; Torrence, E.; Trandafir, A. I.; Turk, J. D.; Usher, T.; Va'Vra, J.; Vannini, C.; Vella, E.; Venuti, J. P.; Verdier, R.; Verdini, P. G.; Wagner, D. L.; Wagner, S. R.; Waite, A. P.; Watts, S. J.; Weidemann, A. W.; Weiss, E. R.; Whitaker, J. S.; White, S. L.; Wickens, F. J.; Williams, D. C.; Williams, S. H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, R. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Woods, M.; Word, G. B.; Wyss, J.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Yamartino, J. M.; Yang, X.; Yashima, J.; Yellin, S. J.; Young, C. C.; Yuta, H.; Zapalac, G.; Zdarko, R. W.; Zhou, J.

    1997-11-01

    We have measured the B hadron energy distribution in Z0 decays using a sample of semileptonic B decays recorded in the SLD experiment at SLAC. The energy of each tagged B hadron was reconstructed using information from the lepton and a partially reconstructed charm-decay vertex. We compared the scaled energy distribution with several models of heavy quark fragmentation. The average scaled energy of primary B hadrons was found to be =0.716+/-0.011(stat)+0.021-0.022(syst).

  9. An Application of the Market-Oriented Programming to Energy Trading Decision Method in Distributed Energy Management Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakire, Koji; Miyamoto, Toshiyuki; Kumagai, Sadatoshi; Mori, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Shoichi; Yamamoto, Takaya

    A control of CO2 emissions which is the main factor of global warming is one of the most important problems in the 21st century about preservation of earth environment. Therefore, efficient supply and use of energy are indispensable. We have proposed distributed energy management systems (DEMSs), where we are to obtain optimal plans that minimize both of costs and CO2 emissions through electrical and thermal energy trading. A DEMS consists of the plural entities that seek their own economic profits. In this paper, we propose a trading method that gives competitive equilibrium resource distribution by applying the market-oriented programming (MOP) to DEMSs.

  10. Energy dependence of mass, charge, isotopic, and energy distributions in neutron-induced fission of 235U and 239Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasca, H.; Andreev, A. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Kim, Y.

    2016-05-01

    The mass, charge, isotopic, and kinetic-energy distributions of fission fragments are studied within an improved scission-point statistical model in the reactions 235U+n and 239Pu+n at different energies of the incident neutron. The charge and mass distributions of the electromagnetic- and neutron-induced fission of 214,218Ra, 230,232,238U are also shown. The available experimental data are well reproduced and the energy-dependencies of the observable characteristics of fission are predicted for future experiments.

  11. Quartz enhanced photoacoustic H2S gas sensor based on a fiber-amplifier source and a custom tuning fork with large prong spacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hongpeng; Sampaolo, Angelo; Dong, Lei; Patimisco, Pietro; Liu, Xiaoli; Zheng, Huadan; Yin, Xukun; Ma, Weiguang; Zhang, Lei; Yin, Wangbao; Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Jia, Suotang; Tittel, Frank K.

    2015-09-01

    A quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) sensor, employing an erbium-doped fiber amplified laser source and a custom quartz tuning fork (QTF) with its two prongs spaced ˜800 μm apart, is reported. The sensor employs an acoustic micro-resonator (AmR) which is assembled in an "on-beam" QEPAS configuration. Both length and vertical position of the AmR are optimized in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, significantly improving the QEPAS detection sensitivity by a factor of ˜40, compared to the case of a sensor using a bare custom QTF. The fiber-amplifier-enhanced QEPAS sensor is applied to H2S trace gas detection, reaching a sensitivity of ˜890 ppb at 1 s integration time, similar to those obtained with a power-enhanced QEPAS sensor equipped with a standard QTF, but with the advantages of easy optical alignment, simple installation, and long-term stability.

  12. 5 to 160 keV continuous-wave x-ray spectral energy distribution and energy flux density measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tallon, R.W.; Koller, D.C.; Pelzl, R.M.; Pugh, R.D.; Bellem, R.D. . Microelectronics and Photonics Research Branch)

    1994-12-01

    In 1991, the USAF Phillips Laboratory Microelectronics and Photonics Research Branch installed a low energy x-ray facility (LEXR) for use in microelectronics radiation-effects analysis and research. Techniques developed for measuring the x-ray spectral energy distribution (differential intensity) from a tungsten-target bremsstrahlung x-ray source are reported. Spectra with end-point energies ranging from 20 to 160 keV were recorded. A separate effort to calibrate the dosimetry for the Phillips Laboratory low-energy x-ray facility established a need to know the spectral energy distributions at some point within the facility (previous calibration efforts had relies on spectra obtained from computer simulations). It was discovered that the primary discrepancy between the simulated and measured spectra was in the L- K-line data. The associated intensity (energy flux density) of the measured distributions was found to be up to 30% higher. Based on the measured distributions, predicted device responses were within 10% of the measured response as compared to about 30% accuracy obtained with simulated distributions.

  13. Photofragment energy distributions and dissociation pathways in dimethyl sulfoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Thorson, G.M.; Cheatum, C.M.; Coffey, M.J.; Fleming Crim, F.

    1999-06-01

    Photolysis of dimethyl sulfoxide in a molecular beam with 210 and 222 nm photons reveals the decomposition mechanism and energy disposal in the products. Using vacuum ultraviolet light and a time-of-flight spectrometer, we identify CH{sub 3} and CH{sub 3}SO as primary fragments and CH{sub 3} and SO as secondary fragments. From CH{sub 3} quantum yield measurements, we find that secondary decomposition is minor for 222 nm photolysis, occurring in only about 10{percent} of the fragments, but it increases to about 30{percent} in the 210 nm photolysis. Laser-induced fluorescence measurements on the B{sup 3}{Sigma}{sup {minus}}{l_arrow}X{sup 3}{Sigma}{sup {minus}} transition of SO in the 235 to 280 nm region determine the internal energy of that photoproduct. We compare our results to a simple statistical model that captures the essential features of the decomposition, predicting both the extent of secondary decomposition and the recoil energy of the primary and secondary methyl fragments. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Theoretical modeling for neutron elastic scattering angular distribution in the fast energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Toshihiko

    2010-12-07

    One of the major issues of neutron scattering modeling in the fast energy range is the contribution of compound elastic and inelastic scattering to the total scattering process. The compound component may become large at very low energies where the angular distribution becomes 90-degree symmetric in the center-of-mass system. Together with the shape elastic component, the elastic scattering gives slightly forward-peaked angular distributions in the fast energy range. This anisotropic angular distribution gives high sensitivities to many important nuclear reactor characteristics, such as criticality and neutron shielding. In this talk we describe how the anisotropic angular distributions are calculated within the statistical model framework, including the case where strongly coupled channels exist, by combining the coupled-channels theory with the Hauser-Feshbach model. This unique capability extension will have significant advantages in understanding the neutron scattering process for deformed nuclei, like uranium or plutonium, on which advanced nuclear energy applications center.

  15. The Energy Distribution of a Noncommutative Reissner—Nordström Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourosh, Nozari; Yazdani, A.

    2013-09-01

    We study the energy distribution of a noncommutative Reissner—Nordström black hole. We consider both Einstein and Møller prescriptions, and compare our results with the corresponding results obtained recently for a Schwarzschild black hole.

  16. Energy Efficiency of Distributed Signal Processing in Wireless Networks: A Cross-Layer Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraci, Giovanni; Wildemeersch, Matthias; Quek, Tony Q. S.

    2016-02-01

    In order to meet the growing mobile data demand, future wireless networks will be equipped with a multitude of access points (APs). Besides the important implications for the energy consumption, the trend towards densification requires the development of decentralized and sustainable radio resource management techniques. It is critically important to understand how the distribution of signal processing operations affects the energy efficiency of wireless networks. In this paper, we provide a cross-layer framework to evaluate and compare the energy efficiency of wireless networks under different levels of distribution of the signal processing load: (i) hybrid, where the signal processing operations are shared between nodes and APs, (ii) centralized, where signal processing is entirely implemented at the APs, and (iii) fully distributed, where all operations are performed by the nodes. We find that in practical wireless networks, hybrid signal processing exhibits a significant energy efficiency gain over both centralized and fully distributed approaches.

  17. Unfolding the fission prompt gamma-ray energy and multiplicity distribution measured by DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Chyzh, A; Wu, C Y; Bredeweg, T; Couture, A; Jandel, M; Ullmann, J; Laptev, A

    2010-10-16

    The nearly energy independence of the {gamma}-ray efficiency and multiplicity response for the DANCE array, the unusual characteristic elucidated in our early technical report (LLNL-TR-452298), gives one a unique opportunity to derive the true prompt {gamma}-ray energy and multiplicity distribution in fission from the measurement. This unfolding procedure for the experimental data will be described in details and examples will be given to demonstrate the feasibility of reconstruction of the true distribution.

  18. Ultrahigh energy neutrino-nucleon scattering and parton distributions at small x

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, Ernest M.; Jalilian-Marian, Jamal

    2006-05-01

    The cross section for ultrahigh energy neutrino-nucleon scattering is very sensitive to the parton distributions at very small values of Bjorken x (x{<=}10{sup -4}). We numerically investigate the effects of modifying the behavior of the gluon distribution function at very small x in the DGLAP evolution equation. We then use the Color Glass Condensate formalism to calculate the neutrino-nucleon cross section at ultrahigh energies and compare the result with those based on modification of DGLAP evolution equation.

  19. New algorithms for the Vavilov distribution calculation and the corresponding energy loss sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Chibani, O. |

    1998-10-01

    Two new algorithms for the fast calculation of the Vavilov distribution within the interval 0.01 {le} {kappa} {le} 10, where neither the Gaussian approximation nor the Landau distribution may be used, are presented. These algorithms are particularly convenient for the sampling of the corresponding random energy loss. A comparison with the exact Vavilov distribution for the case of protons traversing Al slabs is given.

  20. A method for the assessment of specific energy distribution in a model tumor system

    SciTech Connect

    Noska, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    Due to the short range of alpha particles in tissue, the calculation of dose from internally deposited alpha emitters requires a detailed analysis of the microscopic distribution of the radionuclide in order to determine the spatial distribution of energy emission events and, from this, the spatial distribution of dose. In the present study, the authors used quantitative autoradiography (QAR) to assess the microdistribution of a radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (MAb) fragment in human glioma xenografts in mice.

  1. Cross Section Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis Including Secondary Neutron Energy and Angular Distributions.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1991-03-12

    Version 00 SUSD calculates sensitivity coefficients for one- and two-dimensional transport problems. Variance and standard deviation of detector responses or design parameters can be obtained using cross-section covariance matrices. In neutron transport problems, this code can perform sensitivity-uncertainty analysis for secondary angular distribution (SAD) or secondary energy distribution (SED).

  2. Electron energy distribution in a helium plasma created by nuclear radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, R. H.; Miley, G. H.

    1974-01-01

    An integral balance technique for calculation of the electron energy distribution in a radiation-induced plasma is described. Results predict W-values reasonably well and compare favorably with more complicated Monte-Carlo calculations. The distribution found differs from that in a normal electrical discharge and is of interest in radiation-pumped laser research.

  3. Extrapolation of multiplicity distribution in p+p(\\bar{p}) collisions to LHC energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Ajay Kumar; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2010-02-01

    The multiplicity (Nch) and pseudorapidity distribution (dNch/dη) of primary charged particles in p + p collisions at Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies of \\sqrt{s} = 10 and 14 TeV are obtained from extrapolation of existing measurements at lower \\sqrt{s}. These distributions are then compared to calculations from PYTHIA and PHOJET models. The existing \\sqrt{s} measurements are unable to distinguish between a logarithmic and power law dependence of the average charged particle multiplicity (langNchrang) on \\sqrt{s}, and their extrapolation to energies accessible at LHC give very different values. Assuming a reasonably good description of inclusive charged particle multiplicity distributions by negative binomial distribution (NBD) at lower \\sqrt{s} to hold for LHC energies, we observe that the logarithmic \\sqrt{s} dependences of langNchrang are favored by the models at midrapidity. The dNch/dη versus η distributions for the existing measurements are found to be reasonably well described by a function with three parameters which accounts for the basic features of the distribution, height at midrapidity, central rapidity plateau and the higher rapidity fall-off. Extrapolation of these parameters as a function of \\sqrt{s} is used to predict the pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles at LHC energies. dNch/dη calculations from PYTHIA and PHOJET models are found to be lower compared to those obtained from the extrapolated dNch/dη versus η distributions for a broad η range.

  4. Effects of the Electron Energy Distribution Function on Modeled X-ray Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Shlyaptseva, A S; Hansen, S B

    2004-02-19

    This paper presents the results of a broad investigation into the effects of the electron energy distribution function on the predictions of non-LTE collisional-radiative atomic kinetics models. The effects of non-Maxwellian and suprathermal (''hot'') electron distributions on collisional rates (including three-body recombination) are studied. It is shown that most collisional rates are fairly insensitive to the functional form and characteristic energy of the electron distribution function as long as the characteristic energy is larger than the threshold energy for the collisional process. Collisional excitation and ionization rates, however, are highly sensitive to the fraction of hot electrons. This permits the development of robust spectroscopic diagnostics that can be used to characterize the electron density, bulk electron temperature, and hot electron fraction of plasmas with non-equilibrium electron distribution functions (EDFs). Hot electrons are shown to increase and spread out plasma charge state distributions, amplify the intensities of emission lines fed by direct collisional excitation and radiative cascades, and alter the structure of satellite features in both K- and L-shell spectra. The characteristic energy, functional form, and spatial properties of hot electron distributions in plasmas are open to characterization through their effects on high-energy continuum and line emission and on the polarization of spectral lines.

  5. The Integration of Renewable Energy Sources into Electric Power Distribution Systems, Vol. II Utility Case Assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Zaininger, H.W.

    1994-01-01

    Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: the local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics, renewable energy source penetration level, whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied, and local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kW-scale applications may be connected to three+phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and y-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms, or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. In any case, the installation of small, distributed renewable energy sources is expected to have a significant impact on local utility distribution primary and secondary system economics. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications. The

  6. Quantitative analysis of the energy distributions of electrons backscattered elastically from polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tőkési, K.; Varga, D.; Berényi, Z.

    2015-07-01

    We present results of theoretical and experimental studies of the spectra of electrons backscattered elastically from polyethylene in the primary energy range between 1 and 5 keV. The experiments were performed using a high energy resolution electron spectroscopy. The theoretical interpretation is based on a Monte Carlo simulation of the recoil and Doppler effects. The separation between the carbon and hydrogen peak in the energy distributions is shown as a function of the primary electron energy. The simulations give many partial distributions separately, depending on the number of elastic scatterings (single, and multiple scatterings of different types). We show our results for intensity ratios, peak shifts and broadenings. We also present detailed analytical calculations for the main parameters of a single scattering. Finally, we present a qualitative comparison with the experimental data. We find our resulting energy distribution of elastically scattered electrons to be in good agreement with our measurements.

  7. The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems. Volume 2, Utility case assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Zaininger, H.W.; Ellis, P.R.; Schaefer, J.C.

    1994-06-01

    Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: (1) The local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics; (2) renewable energy source penetration level; (3) whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied; and (4) local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kw-scale applications may be connected to three-phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and MW-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications.

  8. Improving Power Quality in Low-Voltage Networks Containing Distributed Energy Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumder, Sumit; Ghosh, Arindam; Zare, Firuz

    2013-05-01

    Severe power quality problems can arise when a large number of single-phase distributed energy resources (DERs) are connected to a low-voltage power distribution system. Due to the random location and size of DERs, it may so happen that a particular phase generates excess power than its load demand. In such an event, the excess power will be fed back to the distribution substation and will eventually find its way to the transmission network, causing undesirable voltage-current unbalance. As a solution to this problem, the article proposes the use of a distribution static compensator (DSTATCOM), which regulates voltage at the point of common coupling (PCC), thereby ensuring balanced current flow from and to the distribution substation. Additionally, this device can also support the distribution network in the absence of the utility connection, making the distribution system work as a microgrid. The proposals are validated through extensive digital computer simulation studies using PSCADTM.

  9. On the Electron Energy Distribution Index of Swift Gamma-ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, P. A.; Evans, P. A.; de Pasquale, M.; Page, M. J.; van der Horst, A. J.

    2010-06-01

    The electron energy distribution index, p, is a fundamental parameter of the synchrotron emission from a range of astronomical sources. Here we examine one such source of synchrotron emission, gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows observed by the Swift satellite. Within the framework of the blast wave model, we examine the constraints placed on the distribution of p by the observed X-ray spectral indices and parameterize the distribution. We find that the observed distribution of spectral indices are inconsistent with an underlying distribution of p composed of a single discrete value but consistent with a Gaussian distribution centered at p = 2.36 and having a width of 0.59. Furthermore, accepting that the underlying distribution is a Gaussian, we find that the majority (gsim94%) of GRB afterglows in our sample have cooling break frequencies less than the X-ray frequency.

  10. Effects of wind-energy facilities on grassland bird distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaffer, Jill A.; Buhl, Deb

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of renewable energy to meet worldwide demand continues to grow. Wind energy is one of the fastest growing renewable sectors, but new wind facilities are often placed in prime wildlife habitat. Long-term studies that incorporate a rigorous statistical design to evaluate the effects of wind facilities on wildlife are rare. We conducted a before-after-control-impact (BACI) assessment to determine if wind facilities placed in native mixed-grass prairies displaced breeding grassland birds. During 2003–2012, we monitored changes in bird density in 3 study areas in North Dakota and South Dakota (U.S.A.). We examined whether displacement or attraction occurred 1 year after construction (immediate effect) and the average displacement or attraction 2–5 years after construction (delayed effect). We tested for these effects overall and within distance bands of 100, 200, 300, and >300 m from turbines. We observed displacement for 7 of 9 species. One species was unaffected by wind facilities and one species exhibited attraction. Displacement and attraction generally occurred within 100 m and often extended up to 300 m. In a few instances, displacement extended beyond 300 m. Displacement and attraction occurred 1 year after construction and persisted at least 5 years. Our research provides a framework for applying a BACI design to displacement studies and highlights the erroneous conclusions that can be made without the benefit of adopting such a design. More broadly, species-specific behaviors can be used to inform management decisions about turbine placement and the potential impact to individual species. Additionally, the avoidance distance metrics we estimated can facilitate future development of models evaluating impacts of wind facilities under differing land-use scenarios.

  11. Momentum Distribution and Ground-State Energy of Liquid 4He at the Absolute Zero Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, T.; Watanabe, Y.

    1980-11-01

    In the scheme of the density and phase operator approach, the momentum distribution nk and the ground-state energy E0 are obtained by employing the structure factor and the radial distribution function calculated by Chang and Campbell for the Morse dipole-dipole potential. The condensate fraction, the ratio of the occupation number of the single-particle zero-momentum state N0/N amounts to 0.096. The momentum distribution diverges as k-1 in the low-wave number limit. The ground-state energy becomes E0=-6.9NK at the mean density ρ0=0.02185Å-3.

  12. Power Hardware-in-the-Loop (PHIL) Testing Facility for Distributed Energy Storage (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer.J.; Lundstrom, B.; Simpson, M.; Pratt, A.

    2014-06-01

    The growing deployment of distributed, variable generation and evolving end-user load profiles presents a unique set of challenges to grid operators responsible for providing reliable and high quality electrical service. Mass deployment of distributed energy storage systems (DESS) has the potential to solve many of the associated integration issues while offering reliability and energy security benefits other solutions cannot. However, tools to develop, optimize, and validate DESS control strategies and hardware are in short supply. To fill this gap, NREL has constructed a power hardware-in-the-loop (PHIL) test facility that connects DESS, grid simulator, and load bank hardware to a distribution feeder simulation.

  13. THE ROLE AND DISTRIBUTION OF WRITTEN INFORMAL COMMUNICATION IN THEORETICAL HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LIBBEY, MILES A.; ZALTMAN, GERALD

    THIS STUDY OF "PREPRINT" DISTRIBUTION IN THEORECTICAL HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS USED A QUESTIONNAIRE CIRCULATED TO ALL KNOWN HIGH ENERGY THEORISTS. A SECOND QUESTIONNAIRE WAS SENT TO A REPRESENTATIVE SAMPLE OF "PREPRINT LIBRARIANS" AT VARIOUS INSTITUTIONS IN THE U.S. AND ABROAD. BASED ON THIS DATA, THE STUDY CONCLUDED THAT AN EXPERIMENT WITH CENTRALIZED…

  14. Laser-produced relativistic electron energy and angular distributions in thin foils

    SciTech Connect

    Rastunkov, V.S.; Krainov, V.P.

    2006-02-15

    Energy and angular distributions are obtained for electrons at the rear surface of thin foils irradiated by an oblique relativistic laser pulse. Vacuum heating at the front surface in the summary field of incident and reflected laser waves is considered as a main mechanism of electron heating up to relativistic ponderomotive energies.

  15. Suprathermal plasma analyzer for the measurement of low-energy electron distribution in the ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoyama, M.; Yau, A. W.; Oyama, K.-I.; Abe, T.

    2011-07-15

    It is commonly believed that an energy transfer from thermal to suprathermal electrons (energy budget of the ionosphere. However, observation of electron energy spectrum in this energy range is quite limited because of technical difficulties of measurement. We have developed an instrument to measure electron energy distribution from thermal to suprathermal energy continuously with high-energy resolution of about 0.15 eV. The measurement principle is based on the combination of a retarding potential analyzer with a channel electron multiplier (CEM) and the Druyvesteyn method, which derives energy distribution from the current-voltage characteristics. The capability of detecting plasma space potential enables absolute calibration of electron energy. The instrument with a small vacuum pump, which is required for the CEM to work in low-vacuum region, was first successfully tested by a sounding rocket S-310-37 in the ionospheric E region. The instrument is expected to provide new opportunities to measure energy distribution of thermal and non-thermal electrons in low-density plasma, where a Langmuir probe cannot measure electron temperature because of low plasma density.

  16. Suprathermal plasma analyzer for the measurement of low-energy electron distribution in the ionosphere.

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, M; Oyama, K-I; Abe, T; Yau, A W

    2011-07-01

    It is commonly believed that an energy transfer from thermal to suprathermal electrons (energy budget of the ionosphere. However, observation of electron energy spectrum in this energy range is quite limited because of technical difficulties of measurement. We have developed an instrument to measure electron energy distribution from thermal to suprathermal energy continuously with high-energy resolution of about 0.15 eV. The measurement principle is based on the combination of a retarding potential analyzer with a channel electron multiplier (CEM) and the Druyvesteyn method, which derives energy distribution from the current-voltage characteristics. The capability of detecting plasma space potential enables absolute calibration of electron energy. The instrument with a small vacuum pump, which is required for the CEM to work in low-vacuum region, was first successfully tested by a sounding rocket S-310-37 in the ionospheric E region. The instrument is expected to provide new opportunities to measure energy distribution of thermal and non-thermal electrons in low-density plasma, where a Langmuir probe cannot measure electron temperature because of low plasma density. PMID:21806205

  17. Suprathermal plasma analyzer for the measurement of low-energy electron distribution in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoyama, M.; Oyama, K.-I.; Abe, T.; Yau, A. W.

    2011-07-01

    It is commonly believed that an energy transfer from thermal to suprathermal electrons (energy budget of the ionosphere. However, observation of electron energy spectrum in this energy range is quite limited because of technical difficulties of measurement. We have developed an instrument to measure electron energy distribution from thermal to suprathermal energy continuously with high-energy resolution of about 0.15 eV. The measurement principle is based on the combination of a retarding potential analyzer with a channel electron multiplier (CEM) and the Druyvesteyn method, which derives energy distribution from the current-voltage characteristics. The capability of detecting plasma space potential enables absolute calibration of electron energy. The instrument with a small vacuum pump, which is required for the CEM to work in low-vacuum region, was first successfully tested by a sounding rocket S-310-37 in the ionospheric E region. The instrument is expected to provide new opportunities to measure energy distribution of thermal and non-thermal electrons in low-density plasma, where a Langmuir probe cannot measure electron temperature because of low plasma density.

  18. Energy spreading and angular distribution of a beam of electrons in molecular hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, M. G.; Green, A. E. S.

    1975-01-01

    A Monte Carlo approach is used to obtain the energy spreading and angular distribution of initially monoenergetic and monodirectional beams of electron incident on a gas of molecular hydrogen. Several beams of primary electrons and the resultant secondaries are degraded in a step-by-step procedure which utilizes a detailed set of cross sections, together with reasonable approximations for the creation of secondary electrons. Particular attention is paid to the initial angular distribution of secondary electrons. An analytic function which characterizes current experimental differential cross-section data is used to provide realistic inputs into our calculations. The results for energy distribution as a function of distance and angular distribution at selected energies and distances are illustrated.

  19. Inferring the Energy Distribution of Accelerated Electrons in Solar Flares from X-ray Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Sui, Linhui; Su, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge of the energy distribution of electrons accelerated in solar flares is important for constraining possible acceleration mechanisms and for understanding the relationships between flare X-ray sources, radio sources, and particles observed in space. Solar flare hard X-rays are primarily emitted from dense, thick-target regions in the lower atmosphere, but the electrons are understood to be accelerated higher in the corona. Various processes can distort the X-ray spectrum or the energy distribution of electrons before they reach the thick-target region. After briefly reviewing the processes that affect the X-ray spectrum and the electron distribution, I will describe recent results from a study of flare spectra from RHESSI to determine the importance of these processes in inferring the energy distribution of accelerated electrons.

  20. Electron energy distribution function by using probe method in electron cyclotron resonance multicharged ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kumakura, Sho Kurisu, Yosuke; Kimura, Daiju; Yano, Keisuke; Imai, Youta; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-15

    We are constructing a tandem type electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source (ECRIS). High-energy electrons in ECRIS plasma affect electron energy distribution and generate multicharged ion. In this study, we measure electron energy distribution function (EEDF) of low energy region (≦100 eV) in ECRIS plasma at extremely low pressures (10{sup −3}–10{sup −5} Pa) by using cylindrical Langmuir probe. From the result, it is found that the EEDF correlates with the electron density and the temperature from the conventional probe analysis. In addition, we confirm that the tail of EEDF spreads to high energy region as the pressure rises and that there are electrons with high energy in ECR multicharged ion source plasma. The effective temperature estimated from the experimentally obtained EEDF is larger than the electron temperature obtained from the conventional method.

  1. Implication of radiative forcing distribution for energy transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Radiative forcing of a homogeneous greenhouse gas can be very inhomogeneous because the forcing is dependent on other atmospheric and surface variables. In the case of doubling CO2, the mean instantaneous forcing at the top of the atmosphere is found to vary geographically and temporally from positive to negative values, with the range being more than three times the magnitude of the global mean value. The vertical temperature change across the atmospheric column (temperature lapse rate) is found to be the best single predictor for explaining forcing variation. In addition, the masking effects of clouds and water vapor also contribute to forcing inhomogeneity. A regression model that predicts forcing from geophysical variables is constructed. This model can explain more than 90% of the variance of the forcing. Applying this model to analyzing the forcing variation in the CMIP5 models, we find that inter-model discrepancy in CO2 forcing caused by model climatology leads to considerable discrepancy in their projected change in poleward energy transport.

  2. Tsallis nonextensive entropy and the multiplicity distributions in high energy leptonic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, Sandeep

    2016-06-01

    The nonextensive behavior of entropy is exploited to explain the regularity in multiplicity distributions in e+e‑ collisions at high energies. The experimental data are analyzed by using Tsallis q-statistics. We propose a new approach of applying Tsallis q-statistics, wherein the multiplicity distribution is divided into two components; two-jet and multijet components. A convoluted Tsallis distribution is fitted to the data. It is shown that this method gives the best fits which are several orders better than the conventional fit of Tsallis distribution.

  3. K-Eigenvalue sensitivities of secondary distributions of continuous-energy data

    SciTech Connect

    Kiedrowski, B. C.; Brown, F. B.

    2013-07-01

    MCNP6 has the capability to produce energy-resolved sensitivity profiles for secondary distributions (fission {Chi} and scattering laws). Computing both unconstrained and constrained profiles are possible. Verification is performed with analytic test problems and a comparison to TSUNAMI-3D, and the comparisons show MCNP6 calculates correct or consistent results. Continuous-energy calculations are performed for three fast critical experiments: Jezebel, Flattop, and copper-reflected Zeus. The sensitivities to the secondary distributions (integrated over chosen energy ranges) are of similar magnitude to those of many of the cross sections, demonstrating the possibility that integral experiments are useful for assessing the fidelity of these data as well. (authors)

  4. Spatial measurements of electron energy distribution and plasma parameters in a weakly magnetized inductive discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Do; Lee, Young-Kwang; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2013-02-15

    Spatial characteristics of plasma parameters such as electron temperature, plasma density, plasma potential, and electron energy distribution (EED) were studied in inductively coupled plasma with an axial dc magnetic field. With dc magnetic field, the measured EEDs in the total electron energy scale are spatially coincided except cutting of the low electron energy part indicating the conserved non-local electron kinetics in an axial direction, even though the dc magnetic field is applied. Spatial distributions of the plasma densities at axial positions have almost same trends with various magnetic field strengths. We also discuss the reduction of the ambipolar potential along the axial direction as the applied magnetic field increased.

  5. Ion energy and angular distributions in inductively driven RF discharges in chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    Woodworth, J.R.; Riley, M.E.; Hamilton, T.W.

    1996-03-01

    In this paper, the authors report values of ion energy distributions and ion angular distributions measured at the grounded electrode of an inductively-coupled discharge in pure chlorine gas. The inductive drive in the GEC reference cell produced high plasma densities (10{sup 11}/cm{sup 3} electron densities) and stable plasma potentials. As a result, ion energy distributions typically consisted of a single peak well separated from zero energy. Mean ion energy varied inversely with pressure, decreasing from 13 to 9 eV as the discharge pressure increased from 20 to 60 millitorr. Half-widths of the ion angular distributions in these experiments varied from 6 to 7.5 degrees, corresponding to transverse energies from 0.13 to 0.21 eV. Ion energies gradually dropped with time, probably due to the buildup of contaminants on the chamber walls. Cell temperature also was an important variable, with ion fluxes to the lower electrode increasing and the ion angular distribution narrowing as the cell temperature increased. Plasmas discharges are widely used to etch semiconductors, oxides and metals in the fabrication of integrated circuits.

  6. An Evaluation of Trading Methods for a Distributed Energy Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakire, Koji; Miyamoto, Toshiyuki; Kumagai, Sadatoshi; Mori, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Shoichi; Yamamoto, Takaya

    Control of CO2 emissions which is the main factor of global warming is one of the most important problems in the 21st century about preservation of earth environment. Therefore, efficient supply and use of energy are indispensable. We have proposed distributed energy management systems (DEMSs), where we are to obtain optimal plans that minimize both of costs and of CO2 emissions through electrical and thermal energy trading. In this paper, we evaluate trading methods for the DEMSs by computational experiments.

  7. Angular distribution, kinetic energy distributions, and excitation functions of fast metastable oxygen fragments following electron impact of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misakian, M.; Mumma, M. J.; Faris, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Dissociative excitation of CO2 by electron impact was studied using the methods of translational spectroscopy and angular distribution analysis. Earlier time of flight studies revealed two overlapping spectra, the slower of which was attributed to metastable CO(a3 pi) fragments. The fast peak is the focus of this study. Threshold energy, angular distribution, and improve time of flight measurements indicate that the fast peak actually consists of five overlapping features. The slowest of the five features is found to consist of metastable 0(5S) produced by predissociation of a sigma u + state of CO2 into 0(5S) + CO(a3 pi). Oxygen Rydberg fragments originating directly from a different sigma u + state are believed to make up the next fastest feature. Mechanisms for producing the three remaining features are discussed.

  8. Dipole-strength distributions up to the particle-separation energies and photodissociation of Mo isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwengner, R.; Benouaret, N.; Beyer, R.; Dönau, F.; Erhard, M.; Frauendorf, S.; Grosse, E.; Junghans, A. R.; Klug, J.; Kosev, K.; Nair, C.; Nankov, N.; Rusev, G.; Schilling, K. D.; Wagner, A.

    2007-05-01

    Dipole-strength distributions in the nuclides 92Mo, 98Mo and 100Mo have been investigated in photon-scattering experiments with bremsstrahlung at the superconducting electron accelerator ELBE of the Forschungszentrum Rossendorf. A simulation of γ cascades was performed in order to estimate the distribution of inelastic transitions to low-lying states and thus to deduce the primary dipole-strength distribution up to the neutron-separation energies. The absorption cross sections obtained connect smoothly to ( γ, n) cross sections and give novel information about the low-energy tail of the Giant Dipole Resonance below the neutron-separation energies. The experimental cross sections are compared with predictions of a Quasiparticle-Random-Phase Approximation (QRPA) in a deformed basis. Photoactivation experiments were performed at various electron energies to study the 92Mo( γ, n), 92Mo( γ, p), 92Mo( γ, α) and 100Mo( γ, n) reactions. The deduced activation yields are compared with theoretical predictions.

  9. Efficient first-principles calculation of the quantum kinetic energy and momentum distribution of nuclei.

    PubMed

    Ceriotti, Michele; Manolopoulos, David E

    2012-09-01

    Light nuclei at room temperature and below exhibit a kinetic energy which significantly deviates from the predictions of classical statistical mechanics. This quantum kinetic energy is responsible for a wide variety of isotope effects of interest in fields ranging from chemistry to climatology. It also furnishes the second moment of the nuclear momentum distribution, which contains subtle information about the chemical environment and has recently become accessible to deep inelastic neutron scattering experiments. Here, we show how, by combining imaginary time path integral dynamics with a carefully designed generalized Langevin equation, it is possible to dramatically reduce the expense of computing the quantum kinetic energy. We also introduce a transient anisotropic Gaussian approximation to the nuclear momentum distribution which can be calculated with negligible additional effort. As an example, we evaluate the structural properties, the quantum kinetic energy, and the nuclear momentum distribution for a first-principles simulation of liquid water. PMID:23005275

  10. Two Instruments for Measuring Distributions of Low-Energy Charged Particles in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bader, Michel; Fryer, Thomas B.; Witteborn, Fred C.

    1961-01-01

    Current estimates indicate that the bulk of interplanetary gas consists of protons with energies between 0 and 20 kev and concentrations of 1 to 105 particles/cu cm. Methods and instrumentation for measuring the energy and density distribution of such a gas are considered from the standpoint of suitability for space vehicle payloads. It is concluded that electrostatic analysis of the energy distribution can provide sufficient information in initial experiments. Both magnetic and electrostatic analyzers should eventually be used. Several instruments designed and constructed at the Ames Research Center for space plasma measurements, and the methods of calibration and data reduction are described. In particular, the instrument designed for operation on solar cell power has the following characteristics: weight, 1.1 pounds; size, 2 by 3 by 4 inches; and power consumption, 145 mw. The instrument is designed to yield information on the concentration, energy distribution, and the anisotropy of ion trajectories in the 0.2 to 20 kev range.

  11. An APL program for the distribution of energy deposition by charged particles passing through thin absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    An APL program which numerically evaluates the probability density function (PDF) for the energy deposited in a thin absorber by a charged particle is proposed, with application to the construction, pointing, and control of spacecraft. With this program, the PDF of the restricted energy loss distribution of Watts (1973) is derived, and Vavilov's (1957) distribution is obtained by proper parameter selection. The method is demonstrated with the example of the effect of charged particle induced radiation on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) pointing accuracy. A Monte Carlo study simulates the photon noise caused by charged particles passing through the photomultiplier tube window, and the stochastic variation of energy loss is introduced into the simulation by generating random energy losses from a power law distribution. The program eliminates annoying loop procedures, and model parameter sensitivity can be studied using the graphical output.

  12. Visual discomfort and the spatial distribution of Fourier energy.

    PubMed

    Penacchio, Olivier; Wilkins, Arnold J

    2015-03-01

    Quite independently of what they represent, some images provoke discomfort, and even headaches and seizures in susceptible individuals. The visual system has adapted to efficiently process the images it typically experiences, and in nature these images are usually scale-invariant. In this work, we sought to characterize the images responsible for discomfort in terms of their adherence to low-level statistical properties typically seen in natural scenes. It has been conventional to measure scale invariance in terms of the one-dimensional Fourier amplitude spectrum, by averaging amplitude over orientations in the Fourier domain. However, this loses information on the evenness with which information at various orientations is represented. We therefore fitted a two-dimensional surface (regular circular cone 1/f in logarithmic coordinates) to the two-dimensional amplitude spectrum. The extent to which the cone fitted the spectrum explained an average of 18% of the variance in judgments of discomfort from images including rural and urban scenes, works of non-representational art, images of buildings and animals, and images generated from randomly disposed discs of varying contrast and size. Weighting the spectrum prior to fitting the surface to allow for the spatial frequency tuning of contrast sensitivity explained an average of 27% of the variance. Adjusting the shape of the cone to take account of the generally greater energy in horizontal and vertical orientations improved the fit, but only slightly. Taken together, our findings show that a simple measure based on first principles of efficient coding and human visual sensitivity explained more variance than previously published algorithms. The algorithm has a low computational cost and we show that it can identify the images involved in cases that have reached the media because of complaints. We offer the algorithm as a tool for designers rather than as a simulation of the biological processes involved. PMID:25576380

  13. Advanced Communication and Control of Distributed Energy Resources at Detroit Edison

    SciTech Connect

    Haukur Asgeirsson; Richard Seguin

    2004-01-31

    The project objective was to create the communication and control system, the process and the economic procedures that will allow owners (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial, manufacturing, etc.) of Distributed Energy Resources (DER) connected in parallel to the electric distribution to have their resources operated in a manner that protects the electric utility distribution network and personnel that may be working on the network. The Distribution Engineering Workstation (DEW) (a power flow and short circuit modeling tool) was modified to calculate the real-time characteristics of the distribution network based on the real-time electric distribution network information and provide DER operating suggestions to the Detroit Edison system operators so that regional electric stability is maintained. Part of the suggestion algorithm takes into account the operational availability of DER’s, which is known by the Energy Aggregator, DTE Energy Technologies. The availability information will be exchanged from DTE Energy Technologies to Detroit Edison. For the calculated suggestions to be used by the Detroit Edison operators, procedures were developed to allow an operator to operate a DER by requesting operation of the DER through DTE Energy Technologies. Prior to issuing control of a DER, the safety of the distribution network and personnel needs to be taken into account. This information will be exchanged from Detroit Edison to DTE Energy Technologies. Once it is safe to control the DER, DTE Energy Technologies will issue the control signal. The real-time monitoring of the DECo system will reflect the DER control. Multi-vendor DER technologies’ representing approximately 4 MW of capacity was monitored and controlled using a web-based communication path. The DER technologies included are a photovoltaic system, energy storage, fuel cells and natural gas/diesel internal combustion engine generators. This report documents Phase I result for the Detroit Edison

  14. Deriving star formation histories from photometry using energy balance spectral energy distribution modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Daniel J. B.; Hayward, Christopher C.

    2015-10-01

    Panchromatic spectral energy distribution fitting is a critical tool for determining the physical properties of distant galaxies, such as their stellar mass and star formation rate. One widely used method is the publicly available MAGPHYS code. We build on our previous analysis by presenting some modifications which enable MAGPHYS to automatically estimate galaxy star formation histories (SFHs), including uncertainties, based on ultraviolet to far-infrared photometry. We use state-of-the art synthetic photometry derived by performing three-dimensional dust radiative transfer on hydrodynamic simulations of isolated disc and merging galaxies to test how well the modified MAGPHYS is able to recover SFHs under idealized conditions, where the true SFH is known. We find that while the SFH of the model with the best fit to the synthetic photometry is a poor representation of the true SFH (showing large variations with the line of sight to the galaxy and spurious bursts of star formation), median-likelihood SFHs generated by marginalizing over the default MAGPHYS libraries produce robust estimates of the smoothly varying isolated disc simulation SFHs. This preference for the median-likelihood SFH is quantitatively underlined by our estimates of χ ^2_SFH (analogous to the χ2 goodness-of-fit estimator) and Δ M / M (the integrated absolute mass discrepancy between the model and true SFH) that strongly prefer the median-likelihood SFHs over those that best fit the UV-to-far-IR photometry. In contrast, we are unable to derive a good estimate of the SFH for the merger simulations (either best fit or median likelihood) despite being able to obtain a reasonable fit to the simulated photometry, likely because the analytic SFHs with bursts superposed in the standard MAGPHYS library are insufficiently general/realistic.

  15. Ion energy and angular distributions in inductively coupled Argon RF discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Woodworth, J.R.; Riley, M.E.; Meister, D.C.

    1996-03-01

    We report measurements of the energies and angular distributions of positive ions in an inductively coupled argon plasma in a GEC reference cell. Use of two separate ion detectors allowed measurement of ion energies and fluxes as a function of position as well as ion angular distributions on the discharge centerline. The inductive drive on our system produced high plasma densities (up to 10{sup 12}/cm{sup 3} electron densities) and relatively stable plasma potentials. As a result, ion energy distributions typically consisted of a single feature well separated from zero energy. Mean ion energy was independent of rf power and varied inversely with pressure, decreasing from 29 eV to 12 eV as pressure increased form 2.4 m Torr to 50 mTorr. Half-widths of the ion angular distributions in these experiments varied from 5 degrees to 12.5 degrees, or equivalently, transverse temperatures varied form 0.2 to 0.5 eV with the distributions broadening as either pressure or RF power were increased.

  16. Beam energy distribution influences on density modulation efficiency in seeded free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guanglei; Zhang, Weiqing; Wu, Guorong; Dai, Dongxu; Yang, Xueming; Feng, Chao; Zhang, Meng; Deng, Haixiao; Wang, Dong; Zhao, Zhentang

    2015-06-01

    The beam energy spread at the entrance of an undulator system is of paramount importance for efficient density modulation in high-gain seeded free-electron lasers (FELs). In this paper, the dependences of high harmonic bunching efficiency in high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG), echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) and phase-merging enhanced harmonic generation (PEHG) schemes on the electron beam energy spread distribution are studied. Theoretical investigations and multidimensional numerical simulations are applied to the cases of uniform and saddle beam energy distributions and compared to a traditional Gaussian distribution. It shows that the uniform and saddle electron energy distributions significantly enhance the bunching performance of HGHG FELs, while they almost have no influence on EEHG and PEHG schemes. A further start-to-end simulation example demonstrated that, with the saddle distribution of sliced beam energy spread controlled by a laser heater, the 30th harmonic can be directly generated by a single-stage HGHG scheme for a soft x-ray FEL facility.

  17. Effects of Home Energy Management Systems on Distribution Utilities and Feeders Under Various Market Structure; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, M.; Pratt, A.; Lunacek, M.; Mittal, S.; Wu, H.; Jones, W.

    2015-06-15

    The combination of distributed energy resources (DER) and retail tariff structures to provide benefits to both utility consumers and the utilities is not well understood. To improve understanding, an Integrated Energy System Model (IESM) is being developed to simulate the physical and economic aspects of DER technologies, the buildings where they reside, and feeders servicing them. The IESM was used to simulate 20 houses with home energy management systems on a single feeder under a time-of-use (TOU) tariff to estimate economic and physical impacts on both the households and the distribution utilities. Home energy management systems (HEMS) reduce consumers’ electric bills by precooling houses in the hours before peak electricity pricing. Utilization of HEMS reduce peak loads during high price hours but shifts it to hours with off-peak and shoulder prices, resulting in a higher peak load. used to simulate 20 houses with home energy management systems on a single feeder under a time-of-use (TOU) tariff to estimate economic and physical impacts on both the households and the distribution utilities. Home energy management systems (HEMS) reduce consumers’ electric bills by precooling houses in the hours before peak electricity pricing. Utilization of HEMS reduce peak loads during high price hours but shifts it to hours with off-peak and shoulder prices, resulting in a higher peak load.

  18. Quasi-linear simulations of inner radiation belt electron pitch angle and energy distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Jay M.; Starks, Michael J.; Horne, Richard B.; Meredith, Nigel P.; Glauert, Sarah A.

    2016-03-01

    "Peculiar" or "butterfly" electron pitch angle distributions (PADs), with minima near 90°, have recently been observed in the inner radiation belt. These electrons are traditionally treated by pure pitch angle diffusion, driven by plasmaspheric hiss, lightning-generated whistlers, and VLF transmitter signals. Since this leads to monotonic PADs, energy diffusion by magnetosonic waves has been proposed to account for the observations. We show that the observed PADs arise readily from two-dimensional diffusion at L = 2, with or without magnetosonic waves. It is necessary to include cross diffusion, which accounts for the relationship between pitch angle and energy changes. The distribution of flux with energy is also in good agreement with observations between 200 keV and 1 MeV, dropping to very low levels at higher energy. Thus, at this location radial diffusion may be negligible at subrelativistic as well as ultrarelativistic energy.

  19. Analysis of dose-LET distribution in the human body irradiated by high energy hadrons.

    PubMed

    Sato, T; Tsuda, S; Sakamoto, Y; Yamaguchi, Y; Niita, K

    2003-01-01

    For the purposes of radiological protection, it is important to analyse profiles of the particle field inside a human body irradiated by high energy hadrons, since they can produce a variety of secondary particles which play an important role in the energy deposition process, and characterise their radiation qualities. Therefore Monte Carlo calculations were performed to evaluate dose distributions in terms of the linear energy transfer of ionising particles (dose-LET distribution) using a newly developed particle transport code (Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System, PHITS) for incidences of neutrons, protons and pions with energies from 100 MeV to 200 GeV. Based on these calculations, it was found that more than 80% and 90% of the total deposition energies are attributed to ionisation by particles with LET below 10 keV microm(-1) for the irradiations of neutrons and the charged particles, respectively. PMID:14653335

  20. Surface anisotropy broadening of the energy barrier distribution in magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pérez, N; Guardia, P; Roca, A G; Morales, M P; Serna, C J; Iglesias, O; Bartolomé, F; García, L M; Batlle, X; Labarta, A

    2008-11-26

    The effect of surface anisotropy on the distribution of energy barriers in magnetic fine particles of nanometer size is discussed within the framework of the Tln(t/τ(0)) scaling approach. The comparison between the distributions of the anisotropy energy of the particle cores, calculated by multiplying the volume distribution by the core anisotropy, and of the total anisotropy energy, deduced by deriving the master curve of the magnetic relaxation with respect to the scaling variable Tln(t/τ(0)), enables the determination of the surface anisotropy as a function of the particle size. We show that the contribution of the particle surface to the total anisotropy energy can be well described by a size-independent value of the surface energy per unit area which permits the superimposition of the distributions corresponding to the particle core and effective anisotropy energies. The method is applied to a ferrofluid composed of non-interacting Fe(3-x)O(4) particles of 4.9 nm average size and x about 0.07. Even though the size distribution is quite narrow in this system, a relatively small value of the effective surface anisotropy constant K(s) = 2.9 × 10(-2) erg cm(-2) gives rise to a dramatic broadening of the total energy distribution. The reliability of the average value of the effective anisotropy constant, deduced from magnetic relaxation data, is verified by comparing it to that obtained from the analysis of the shift of the ac susceptibility peaks as a function of the frequency. PMID:21836285

  1. A Multiple Period Problem in Distributed Energy Management Systems Considering CO2 Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muroda, Yuki; Miyamoto, Toshiyuki; Mori, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Shoichi; Yamamoto, Takaya

    Consider a special district (group) which is composed of multiple companies (agents), and where each agent responds to an energy demand and has a CO2 emission allowance imposed. A distributed energy management system (DEMS) optimizes energy consumption of a group through energy trading in the group. In this paper, we extended the energy distribution decision and optimal planning problem in DEMSs from a single period problem to a multiple periods one. The extension enabled us to consider more realistic constraints such as demand patterns, the start-up cost, and minimum running/outage times of equipment. At first, we extended the market-oriented programming (MOP) method for deciding energy distribution to the multiple periods problem. The bidding strategy of each agent is formulated by a 0-1 mixed non-linear programming problem. Secondly, we proposed decomposing the problem into a set of single period problems in order to solve it faster. In order to decompose the problem, we proposed a CO2 emission allowance distribution method, called an EP method. We confirmed that the proposed method was able to produce solutions whose group costs were close to lower-bound group costs by computational experiments. In addition, we verified that reduction in computational time was achieved without losing the quality of solutions by using the EP method.

  2. Correlation energy, structure factor, radial distribution function, and momentum distribution of the spin-polarized uniform electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, G.; Ballone, P.

    1994-07-01

    The properties of the three-dimensional uniform electron gas in the Fermi liquid regime are analyzed using variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo methods. Our study extends those of Ceperley [Phys. Rev. B 18, 3126 (1978)] and Ceperley and Alder [Phys. Rev. Lett. 45, 566 (1980)] to larger system sizes with improved statistics and, more importantly, to partial spin polarization. The density range 0.8<=rs<=10, which is the most relevant for density functional computations, is studied in detail. We analyze the size dependence of the simulation results and present an extended set of correlation energies extrapolated to the thermodynamic limit. Using the VMC method we analyze the spin dependence of the correlation energy, and we compare our results to several interpolation formulas used in density functional calculations. We summarize our results by a simple interpolation formula. In addition, we present results for the radial distribution function, the structure factor, the momentum distribution, and triplet correlation functions, and we discuss the comparison with many-body semianalytic theories.

  3. Observation of nonthermal energy distributions during the impulsive phase of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seely, J. F.; Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.

    1987-01-01

    The Fe XXV resonance line and dielectronic satellite intensities have been measured as functions of time for several flares recorded by the Naval Research Laboratory crystal spectrometer (SOLFLEX) flown on the US Air Force P78-I spacecraft. The intensity ratios of the Fe XXV resonance line, the Fe XXIV n = 2 satellite line j, and the Fe XXIV n = 3 satellite line d13 indicate that nonthermal electron energy distributions occur during the impulsive phase of the flares. For the electron energies at which the j and d13 satellites are formed (4.7 and 5.8 keV, respectively), the electron energy distributions during the impulsive phase are observed to have a bump or to be nearly flat. For all of the flares that were studied, hard X-ray bursts occurred near the time of the nonthermal distributions observed in the SOLFLEX data.

  4. Analysis of electron energy distribution function in the Linac4 H⁻ source.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, S; Mattei, S; Nishida, K; Hatayama, A; Lettry, J

    2016-02-01

    To understand the Electron Energy Distribution Function (EEDF) in the Radio Frequency Inductively Coupled Plasmas (RF-ICPs) in hydrogen negative ion sources, the detailed analysis of the EEDFs using numerical simulation and the theoretical approach based on Boltzmann equation has been performed. It is shown that the EEDF of RF-ICPs consists of two parts, one is the low energy part which obeys Maxwellian distribution and the other is high energy part deviated from Maxwellian distribution. These simulation results have been confirmed to be reasonable by the analytical approach. The results suggest that it is possible to enhance the dissociation of molecules and the resultant H(-) negative ion production by reducing the gas pressure. PMID:26931990

  5. Retarding field analyzer for ion energy distribution measurements at a radio-frequency biased electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Gahan, D.; Hopkins, M. B.; Dolinaj, B.

    2008-03-15

    A retarding field energy analyzer designed to measure ion energy distributions impacting a radio-frequency biased electrode in a plasma discharge is examined. The analyzer is compact so that the need for differential pumping is avoided. The analyzer is designed to sit on the electrode surface, in place of the substrate, and the signal cables are fed out through the reactor side port. This prevents the need for modifications to the rf electrode--as is normally the case for analyzers built into such electrodes. The capabilities of the analyzer are demonstrated through experiments with various electrode bias conditions in an inductively coupled plasma reactor. The electrode is initially grounded and the measured distributions are validated with the Langmuir probe measurements of the plasma potential. Ion energy distributions are then given for various rf bias voltage levels, discharge pressures, rf bias frequencies - 500 kHz to 30 MHz, and rf bias waveforms - sinusoidal, square, and dual frequency.

  6. Development, Demonstration, and Field Testing of Enterprise-Wide Distributed Generation Energy Management System: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, S.; Cooley, C.

    2005-01-01

    This report details progress on subcontract NAD-1-30605-1 between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and RealEnergy (RE), the purpose of which is to describe RE's approach to the challenges it faces in the implementation of a nationwide fleet of clean cogeneration systems to serve contemporary energy markets. The Phase 2 report covers: utility tariff risk and its impact on market development; the effect on incentives on distributed energy markets; the regulatory effectiveness of interconnection in California; a survey of practical field interconnection issues; trend analysis for on-site generation; performance of dispatch systems; and information design hierarchy for combined heat and power.

  7. Initial energy density and gluon distribution from the glasma in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Hirotsugu; Fukushima, Kenji; Hidaka, Yoshimasa

    2009-02-01

    We estimate the energy density and the gluon distribution associated with the classical fields describing the early-time dynamics of heavy-ion collisions. In the McLerran-Venugopalan model, we first decompose the energy density into the momentum components exactly, with the use of the Wilson line correlators. Then we evolve the energy density with the free-field equation, which is justified by the dominance of the ultraviolet modes near the collision point. We also discuss the improvement that occurs with the inclusion of nonlinear terms into the time evolution. Our numerical results at RHIC energy are fairly consistent with the empirical values.

  8. Initial energy density and gluon distribution from the glasma in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Hirotsugu; Fukushima, Kenji; Hidaka, Yoshimasa

    2009-02-15

    We estimate the energy density and the gluon distribution associated with the classical fields describing the early-time dynamics of heavy-ion collisions. In the McLerran-Venugopalan model, we first decompose the energy density into the momentum components exactly, with the use of the Wilson line correlators. Then we evolve the energy density with the free-field equation, which is justified by the dominance of the ultraviolet modes near the collision point. We also discuss the improvement that occurs with the inclusion of nonlinear terms into the time evolution. Our numerical results at RHIC energy are fairly consistent with the empirical values.

  9. Experimental electron energy distribution function investigation at initial stage of electron cyclotron resonance discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Golubev, S. V.; Izotov, I. V.; Mansfeld, D. A.; Semenov, V. E.

    2012-02-15

    Experimental investigation is undertaken to study formation of electron energy distribution function (EEDF) at the initial stage of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge inside magnetic mirror trap. In experiment, where discharge was initiated by high power radiation of gyrotron operated in the mm-wavelength range, electrons were revealed to leave the trap having EEDF be quite different from Maxwellian one. Specifically, the EEDF was found to decrease slowly with energy up to 400-500 keV and drops abruptly further. The possible physical mechanisms are discussed to explain losses of high energy electrons from the trap and a limitation of their energy.

  10. Experimental electron energy distribution function investigation at initial stage of electron cyclotron resonance discharge.

    PubMed

    Golubev, S V; Izotov, I V; Mansfeld, D A; Semenov, V E

    2012-02-01

    Experimental investigation is undertaken to study formation of electron energy distribution function (EEDF) at the initial stage of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge inside magnetic mirror trap. In experiment, where discharge was initiated by high power radiation of gyrotron operated in the mm-wavelength range, electrons were revealed to leave the trap having EEDF be quite different from Maxwellian one. Specifically, the EEDF was found to decrease slowly with energy up to 400-500 keV and drops abruptly further. The possible physical mechanisms are discussed to explain losses of high energy electrons from the trap and a limitation of their energy. PMID:22380303

  11. The writhe distribution in DNA plasmids as derived from the free energy of supercoiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, Irwin

    2000-10-01

    In theoretical work on the molecule, DNA is often treated, approximately, as a naturally straight, inextensible, isotropic elastic rod of circular cross section. It is shown that, consistent with this level of approximation, there exists a general connection between the free energy of supercoiling of plasmids formed by the DNA, and the writhe distribution in plasmids having a given value of the linking number difference, ΔLk. In particular, the writhe distribution in a collection of torsionally relaxed (ΔLk=0), but non-nicked, plasmids is completely determined once the free energy of supercoiling as a function of ΔLk is known. The writhe distribution in the supercoiled plasmids characterized by any other value of ΔLk, we shall also show, is simply related to the distribution in the relaxed plasmid, and, therefore, it, too, is completely determined. These general results are illustrated for two cases: Large plasmids for which the measured free energy of supercoiling, a quadratic function of ΔLk, implies a normal writhe distribution, and miniplasmids for which a theoretical expression for the free energy of supercoiling involving the frequencies of the normal modes of vibration of a circular elastic ring has recently become available. In this latter case, the writhe distribution for supercoiled plasmids is not normal, but shows a skewness related to a property of elastic rings, namely, the loss of stability of the circular equilibrium configuration of the rings when they are twisted beyond a critical value. Such a skewed writhe distribution for miniplasmids is, according to the model, associated with a free energy of supercoiling which is not, as has been assumed, a rigorously quadratic function of ΔLk.

  12. Evaluation of eruptive energy of a pyroclastic deposit applying fractal geometry to fragment size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes Marino, Joali; Morgavi, Daniele; Di Vito, Mauro; de Vita, Sandro; Sansivero, Fabio; Perugini, Diego

    2016-04-01

    Fractal fragmentation theory has been applied to characterize the particle size distribution of pyroclastic deposits generated by volcanic explosions. Recent works have demonstrated that fractal dimension on grain size distributions can be used as a proxy for estimating the energy associated with volcanic eruptions. In this work we seek to establish a preliminary analytical protocol that can be applied to better characterize volcanic fall deposits and derive the potential energy for fragmentation that was stored in the magma prior/during an explosive eruption. The methodology is based on two different techniques for determining the grain-size distribution of the pyroclastic samples: 1) dry manual sieving (particles larger than 297μm), and 2) automatic grain size analysis via a CamSizer-P4®device, the latter measure the distribution of projected area, obtaining a cumulative distribution based on volume fraction for particles up to 30mm. Size distribution data have been analyzed by applying the fractal fragmentation theory estimating the value of Df, i.e. the fractal dimension of fragmentation. In order to test our protocol we studied the Cretaio eruption, Ischia island, Italy. Results indicate that size distributions of pyroclastic fall deposits follow a fractal law, indicating that the fragmentation process of these deposits reflects a scale-invariant fragmentation mechanism. Matching the results from manual and automated techniques allows us to obtain a value of the "fragmentation energy" from the explosive eruptive events that generate the Cretaio deposits. We highlight the importance of these results, based on fractal statistics, as an additional volcanological tool for addressing volcanic risk based on the analyses of grain size distributions of natural pyroclastic deposits. Keywords: eruptive energy, fractal dimension of fragmentation, pyroclastic fallout.

  13. Using field emission to control the electron energy distribution in high-pressure microdischarges at microscale dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yingjie; Go, David B.

    2013-12-02

    Particle simulations of high-pressure microdischarges at gaps below 10 μm show that the electron energy distribution becomes non-continuous, with discrete peaks corresponding to specific inelastic collisions. The relative magnitude of these peaks and shape of the energy distribution can be directly controlled by the parameter pressure times distance (pd) and the applied potential across the gap. These parameters dictate inelastic collisions experienced by electrons and as both increase the distribution smooths into a Maxwellian-like distribution. By capitalizing on field emission at these dimensions, it is possible to control the energy distribution of free electrons to target specific, energy dependent reactions.

  14. Modeling of thermal storage systems in MILP distributed energy resource models

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, David; Stadler, Michael; Cardoso, Gonçalo; Groissböck, Markus; DeForest, Nicholas; Marnay, Chris

    2014-08-04

    Thermal energy storage (TES) and distributed generation technologies, such as combined heat and power (CHP) or photovoltaics (PV), can be used to reduce energy costs and decrease CO2 emissions from buildings by shifting energy consumption to times with less emissions and/or lower energy prices. To determine the feasibility of investing in TES in combination with other distributed energy resources (DER), mixed integer linear programming (MILP) can be used. Such a MILP model is the well-established Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM); however, it currently uses only a simplified TES model to guarantee linearity and short run-times. Loss calculations are based only on the energy contained in the storage. This paper presents a new DER-CAM TES model that allows improved tracking of losses based on ambient and storage temperatures, and compares results with the previous version. A multi-layer TES model is introduced that retains linearity and avoids creating an endogenous optimization problem. The improved model increases the accuracy of the estimated storage losses and enables use of heat pumps for low temperature storage charging. Ultimately,results indicate that the previous model overestimates the attractiveness of TES investments for cases without possibility to invest in heat pumps and underestimates it for some locations when heat pumps are allowed. Despite a variation in optimal technology selection between the two models, the objective function value stays quite stable, illustrating the complexity of optimal DER sizing problems in buildings and microgrids.

  15. Observations of the directional distribution of the wind energy input function over swell waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabani, Behnam; Babanin, Alex V.; Baldock, Tom E.

    2016-02-01

    Field measurements of wind stress over shallow water swell traveling in different directions relative to the wind are presented. The directional distribution of the measured stresses is used to confirm the previously proposed but unverified directional distribution of the wind energy input function. The observed wind energy input function is found to follow a much narrower distribution (β∝cos⁡3.6θ) than the Plant (1982) cosine distribution. The observation of negative stress angles at large wind-wave angles, however, indicates that the onset of negative wind shearing occurs at about θ≈ 50°, and supports the use of the Snyder et al. (1981) directional distribution. Taking into account the reverse momentum transfer from swell to the wind, Snyder's proposed parameterization is found to perform exceptionally well in explaining the observed narrow directional distribution of the wind energy input function, and predicting the wind drag coefficients. The empirical coefficient (ɛ) in Snyder's parameterization is hypothesised to be a function of the wave shape parameter, with ɛ value increasing as the wave shape changes between sinusoidal, sawtooth, and sharp-crested shoaling waves.

  16. Finite-temperature local protein sequence alignment: percolation and free-energy distribution.

    PubMed

    Wolfsheimer, S; Melchert, O; Hartmann, A K

    2009-12-01

    Sequence alignment is a tool in bioinformatics that is used to find homological relationships in large molecular databases. It can be mapped on the physical model of directed polymers in random media. We consider the finite-temperature version of local sequence alignment for proteins and study the transition between the linear phase and the biologically relevant logarithmic phase, where the free energy grows linearly or logarithmically with the sequence length. By means of numerical simulations and finite-size-scaling analysis, we determine the phase diagram in the plane that is spanned by the gap costs and the temperature. We use the most frequently used parameter set for protein alignment. The critical exponents that describe the parameter-driven transition are found to be explicitly temperature dependent. Furthermore, we study the shape of the (free-) energy distribution close to the transition by rare-event simulations down to probabilities on the order 10(-64). It is well known that in the logarithmic region, the optimal score distribution (T=0) is described by a modified Gumbel distribution. We confirm that this also applies for the free-energy distribution (T>0). However, in the linear phase, the distribution crosses over to a modified Gaussian distribution. PMID:20365196

  17. PHEV Energy Use Estimation: Validating the Gamma Distribution for Representing the Random Daily Driving Distance

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhenhong; Dong, Jing; Liu, Changzheng; Greene, David L

    2012-01-01

    The petroleum and electricity consumptions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are sensitive to the variation of daily vehicle miles traveled (DVMT). Some studies assume DVMT to follow a Gamma distribution, but such a Gamma assumption is yet to be validated. This study finds the Gamma assumption valid in the context of PHEV energy analysis, based on continuous GPS travel data of 382 vehicles, each tracked for at least 183 days. The validity conclusion is based on the found small prediction errors, resulting from the Gamma assumption, in PHEV petroleum use, electricity use, and energy cost. The finding that the Gamma distribution is valid and reliable is important. It paves the way for the Gamma distribution to be assumed for analyzing energy uses of PHEVs in the real world. The Gamma distribution can be easily specified with very few pieces of driver information and is relatively easy for mathematical manipulation. Given the validation in this study, the Gamma distribution can now be used with better confidence in a variety of applications, such as improving vehicle consumer choice models, quantifying range anxiety for battery electric vehicles, investigating roles of charging infrastructure, and constructing online calculators that provide personal estimates of PHEV energy use.

  18. Environmental variation, vegetation distribution, carbon dynamics and water/energy exchange at high latitudes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGuire, A.D.; Wirth, C.; Apps, M.; Beringer, J.; Clein, J.; Epstein, H.; Kicklighter, D.W.; Bhatti, J.; Chapin, F. S., III; De Groot, B.; Efremov, D.; Eugster, W.; Fukuda, M.; Gower, T.; Hinzman, L.; Huntley, B.; Jia, G.J.; Kasischke, E.; Melillo, J.; Romanovsky, V.; Shvidenko, A.; Vaganov, E.; Walker, D.

    2002-01-01

    The responses of high latitude ecosystems to global change involve complex interactions among environmental variables, vegetation distribution, carbon dynamics, and water and energy exchange. These responses may have important consequences for the earth system. In this study, we evaluated how vegetation distribution, carbon stocks and turnover, and water and energy exchange are related to environmental variation spanned by the network of the IGBP high latitude transects. While the most notable feature of the high latitude transects is that they generally span temperature gradients from southern to northern latitudes, there are substantial differences in temperature among the transects. Also, along each transect temperature co-varies with precipitation and photosynthetically active radiation, which are also variable among the transects. Both climate and disturbance interact to influence latitudinal patterns of vegetation and soil carbon storage among the transects, and vegetation distribution appears to interact with climate to determine exchanges of heat and moisture in high latitudes. Despite limitations imposed by the data we assembled, the analyses in this study have taken an important step toward clarifying the complexity of interactions among environmental variables, vegetation distribution, carbon stocks and turnover, and water and energy exchange in high latitude regions. This study reveals the need to conduct coordinated global change studies in high latitudes to further elucidate how interactions among climate, disturbance, and vegetation distribution influence carbon dynamics and water and energy exchange in high latitudes.

  19. Compact floating ion energy analyzer for measuring energy distributions of ions bombarding radio-frequency biased electrode surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelberg, Erik A.; Perry, Andrew; Benjamin, Neil; Aydil, Eray S.

    1999-06-01

    A compact floating retarding-field ion energy analyzer and the accompanying electronics have been designed and built to measure the energy distribution of ions bombarding radio-frequency (rf) biased electrodes in high-density plasma reactors. The design consists of two main components, a compact retarding field vacuum probe and an integrated stack of floating electronics for providing output voltages, measuring currents and voltages and transmitting data to a computer. The operation and capabilities of the energy analyzer are demonstrated through ion energy distribution measurements conducted on a 4 MHz rf-biased electrostatic chuck in a 13.56 MHz high-density transformer coupled plasma (TCP) reactor. The analyzer is capable of operating while floating on several hundreds of volts of rf bias and at pressures up to 30 mTorr without differential pumping. The effects of pressure (2-30 mTorr), TCP power (500-1500 W), rf-bias power (0-800 W), gas composition, and ion mass on the ion energy distributions are demonstrated through Ar, Ne, and Ar/Ne discharges.

  20. Results on the neutron energy distribution measurements at the RECH-1 Chilean nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera, P.; Molina, F.; Romero-Barrientos, J.

    2016-07-01

    Neutron activations experiments has been perform at the RECH-1 Chilean Nuclear Reactor to measure its neutron flux energy distribution. Samples of pure elements was activated to obtain the saturation activities for each reaction. Using - ray spectroscopy we identify and measure the activity of the reaction product nuclei, obtaining the saturation activities of 20 reactions. GEANT4 and MCNP was used to compute the self shielding factor to correct the cross section for each element. With the Expectation-Maximization algorithm (EM) we were able to unfold the neutron flux energy distribution at dry tube position, near the RECH-1 core. In this work, we present the unfolding results using the EM algorithm.

  1. HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING BASED ON REALISTIC SIX-DIMENSIONAL DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRONS

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV,A.; BEN-ZVI, I.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The high-energy electron cooling system for RHIC-II is unique compared to standard coolers. It requires bunched electron beam. Electron bunches are produced by an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL), and cooling is planned without longitudinal magnetic field. To address unique features of the RHIC cooler, a generalized treatment of cooling force was introduced in BETACOOE code which allows us to calculate friction force for an arbitrary distribution of electrons. Simulations for RHIC cooler based on electron distribution from ERL are presented.

  2. ENERGY SAVINGS POTENTIALS IN RESIDENTIAL AND SMALL COMMERCIAL THERMAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS - AN UPDATE

    SciTech Connect

    ANDREWS,J.W.

    2003-10-31

    This is an update of a report (Andrews and Modera 1991) that quantified the amounts of energy that could be saved through better thermal distribution systems in residential and small commercial buildings. Thermal distribution systems are the ductwork, piping, or other means used to transport heat or cooling from the space-conditioning equipment to the conditioned space. This update involves no basic change in methodology relative to the 1991 report, but rather a review of the additional information available in 2003 on the energy-use patterns in residential and small commercial buildings.

  3. High-frequency spectral distribution of the equilibrium radiation energy in a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrov, V. B.; Trigger, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    We establish that the difference of the spectral distribution of the equilibrium radiation energy in matter from the Planck formula in the high-frequency range is determined by the imaginary part of the transverse dielectric permittivity of the matter. Based on this, we show that in a rarified high-temperature fully ionized nonrelativistic plasma, the high-frequency spectral distribution of the equilibrium radiation energy differs essentially from the Planck formula because of the power-law character of the decrease in the frequency, which is due to the presence of matter.

  4. Expansion-free evolving spheres must have inhomogeneous energy density distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, L.; Le Denmat, G.; Santos, N. O.

    2009-04-15

    In a recent paper a systematic study on shearing expansion-free spherically symmetric distributions was presented. As a particular case of such systems, the Skripkin model was mentioned, which corresponds to a nondissipative perfect fluid with a constant energy density. Here we show that such a model is inconsistent with junction conditions. It is shown that in general for any nondissipative fluid distribution, the expansion-free condition requires the energy density to be inhomogeneous. As an example we consider the case of dust, which allows for a complete integration.

  5. Energy and mass distributions of impact ejecta blankets on the moon and Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, T. J.; Okeefe, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The paper applies previously calculated impact-induced flow fields (O'Keefe and Ahrens, 1977) resulting from interaction of 5-cm radius gabbroic anorthosite impactor with a half-space of the same material, at various velocities, to obtain mass and energy ejecta distributions. Whereas earlier results described the ejecta distribution from a 15 km/s impact of an iron object on the moon in terms of mass vs. distance, the present results describe, at a given distance from the impact, the energy content as a function of depth, i.e., the thermal structure of ejecta blankets. Pertinent computational methods are included, and several tables and plots supplement the text.

  6. Ultra-High Energy Neutrino-Nucleon Scattering and Parton Distributions at Small x

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, Ernest M.; Jalilian-Marian, Jamal

    2006-11-17

    The cross section for ultra-high energy neutrino-nucleon scattering is very sensitive to the parton distributions at very small values of Bjorken x (x {<=} 10-4). We numerically investigate the effects of modifying the behavior of the gluon distribution function at very small x in the DGLAP evolution equation. We then use the Color Glass Condensate formalism to calculate the neutrino-nucleon cross section at ultra-high energies and compare the result with those based on modification of DGLAP evolution equation.

  7. Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. From 1982 through 1993, the Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS) was used by the EIA for its analyses, and the Gas Analysis Modeling System (GAMS) was used within IFFS to represent natural gas markets. Prior to 1982, the Midterm Energy Forecasting System (MEFS), also referred to as the Project Independence Evaluation System (PIES), was employed. NEMS was developed to enhance and update EIA`s modeling capability by internally incorporating models of energy markets that had previously been analyzed off-line. In addition, greater structural detail in NEMS permits the analysis of a broader range of energy issues. The time horizon of NEMS is the midterm period (i.e., through 2015). In order to represent the regional differences in energy markets, the component models of NEMS function at regional levels appropriate for the markets represented, with subsequent aggregation/disaggregation to the Census Division level for reporting purposes.

  8. Investigation of pore size and energy distributions by statistical physics formalism applied to agriculture products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aouaini, Fatma; Knani, Salah; Yahia, Manel Ben; Bahloul, Neila; Ben Lamine, Abdelmottaleb; Kechaou, Nabil

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present a new investigation that allows determining the pore size distribution (PSD) in a porous medium. This PSD is achieved by using the desorption isotherms of four varieties of olive leaves. This is by the means of statistical physics formalism and Kelvin's law. The results are compared with those obtained with scanning electron microscopy. The effect of temperature on the distribution function of pores has been studied. The influence of each parameter on the PSD is interpreted. A similar function of adsorption energy distribution, AED, is deduced from the PSD.

  9. Optimized Switch Allocation to Improve the Restoration Energy in Distribution Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezaki, Hamed H.; Abyaneh, Hossein A.; Agheli, Ali; Mazlumi, Kazem

    2012-01-01

    In distribution networks switching devices play critical role in energy restoration and improving reliability indices. This paper presents a novel objective function to optimally allocate switches in electric power distribution systems. Identifying the optimized location of the switches is a nonlinear programming problem (NLP). In the proposed objective function a new auxiliary function is used to simplify the calculation of the objective function. The output of the auxiliary function is binary. The genetic algorithm (GA) optimization method is used to solve this optimization problem. The proposed method is applied to a real distribution network and the results reveal that the method is successful.

  10. Beam energy dependence of pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sumit; Nayak, Tapan K.; Datta, Kaustuv

    2016-06-01

    Heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Large Hadron Collider at CERN probe matter at extreme conditions of temperature and energy density. Most of the global properties of the collisions can be extracted from the measurements of charged-particle multiplicity and pseudorapidity (η ) distributions. We have shown that the available experimental data on beam energy and centrality dependence of η distributions in heavy-ion (Au +Au or Pb +Pb ) collisions from √{sNN}=7.7 GeV to 2.76 TeV are reasonably well described by the AMPT model, which is used for further exploration. The nature of the η distributions has been described by a double Gaussian function using a set of fit parameters, which exhibit a regular pattern as a function of beam energy. By extrapolating the parameters to a higher energy of √{sNN}=5.02 TeV, we have obtained the charged-particle multiplicity densities, η distributions, and energy densities for various centralities. Incidentally, these results match well with some of the recently published data by the ALICE Collaboration.

  11. Investigation of Cost and Energy Optimization of Drinking Water Distribution Systems.

    PubMed

    Cherchi, Carla; Badruzzaman, Mohammad; Gordon, Matthew; Bunn, Simon; Jacangelo, Joseph G

    2015-11-17

    Holistic management of water and energy resources through energy and water quality management systems (EWQMSs) have traditionally aimed at energy cost reduction with limited or no emphasis on energy efficiency or greenhouse gas minimization. This study expanded the existing EWQMS framework and determined the impact of different management strategies for energy cost and energy consumption (e.g., carbon footprint) reduction on system performance at two drinking water utilities in California (United States). The results showed that optimizing for cost led to cost reductions of 4% (Utility B, summer) to 48% (Utility A, winter). The energy optimization strategy was successfully able to find the lowest energy use operation and achieved energy usage reductions of 3% (Utility B, summer) to 10% (Utility A, winter). The findings of this study revealed that there may be a trade-off between cost optimization (dollars) and energy use (kilowatt-hours), particularly in the summer, when optimizing the system for the reduction of energy use to a minimum incurred cost increases of 64% and 184% compared with the cost optimization scenario. Water age simulations through hydraulic modeling did not reveal any adverse effects on the water quality in the distribution system or in tanks from pump schedule optimization targeting either cost or energy minimization. PMID:26461069

  12. High energy angular distribution measurements of the exclusive deuteron photodisintegration reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Elaine Schulte; et. Al.

    2002-10-01

    The first complete measurements of the angular distributions of the two-body deuteron photodisintegration differential cross section at photon energies above 1.6 GeV were performed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The results show a persistent forward-backward asymmetry up to Egamma = 2.4 GeV, the highest-energy measured in this experiment. The Hard Rescattering and the Quark-Gluon string models are in fair agreement with the results.

  13. Energy distributions of constituent atoms of cluster impacts on solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamura, Yasunori

    1991-12-01

    Using the time-evolution Monte Carlo simulation code DYACAT, the energy distributions of constituent atoms due to big cluster impacts on amorphous targets have been investigated, where the (Ag) n and (Al) n cluster (n being 10 to 500) with energies a few 100 eV/atom to keV/atom are bombarded on amorphous carbon and gold targets, respectively. It is found that the energy distribution of constituent atoms is strongly affected by the mass ratio M 2/M 1 (M 1 and M 2 being the atomic masses of the constituent atom and the target atom, respectively), the size of the cluster, and the cluster energy. In the case of the 1 keV/atom (Ag) 500 cluster impacts on C (M 2/M 1 < 1) the shape of the energy distribution of constituent atoms is trapezoidal, while in the case of the Al cluster impacts on Au (M 2/M 1 > 1) the high-energy tail of the energy distribution of Al atoms due to the big cluster impact ( n > 100) can be well described in terms of the Maxwell-Boltzmann function, and its temperature is linearly proportional to the energy. In the case of 1 keV/atom (Al) 500 cluster impact on Au, the quasi-equilibrium state continues for more than 0.6×10 -13 s, but the temperature of the cluster impact region decreases as time passes. The present simulation supports the recent Echenique, Manson and Ritchie's Ansatz in their theory of cluster impact fusion.

  14. Decoding Group Vocalizations: The Acoustic Energy Distribution of Chorus Howls Is Useful to Determine Wolf Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Vicente; López-Bao, José Vicente; Llaneza, Luis; Fernández, Carlos; Font, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Population monitoring is crucial for wildlife management and conservation. In the last few decades, wildlife researchers have increasingly applied bioacoustics tools to obtain information on several essential ecological parameters, such as distribution and abundance. One such application involves wolves (Canis lupus). These canids respond to simulated howls by emitting group vocalizations known as chorus howls. These responses to simulated howls reveal the presence of wolf litters during the breeding period and are therefore often used to determine the status of wolf populations. However, the acoustic structure of chorus howls is complex and discriminating the presence of pups in a chorus is sometimes difficult, even for experienced observers. In this study, we evaluate the usefulness of analyses of the acoustic energy distribution in chorus howls to identify the presence of pups in a chorus. We analysed 110 Iberian wolf chorus howls with known pack composition and found that the acoustic energy distribution is concentrated at higher frequencies when there are pups vocalizing. We built predictive models using acoustic energy distribution features to determine the presence of pups in a chorus, concluding that the acoustic energy distribution in chorus howls can be used to determine the presence of wolf pups in a pack. The method we outline here is objective, accurate, easily implemented, and independent of the observer's experience. These advantages are especially relevant in the case of broad scale surveys or when many observers are involved. Furthermore, the analysis of the acoustic energy distribution can be implemented for monitoring other social canids that emit chorus howls such as jackals or coyotes, provides an easy way to obtain information on ecological parameters such as reproductive success, and could be useful to study other group vocalizations. PMID:27144887

  15. Decoding Group Vocalizations: The Acoustic Energy Distribution of Chorus Howls Is Useful to Determine Wolf Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    López-Bao, José Vicente; Llaneza, Luis; Fernández, Carlos; Font, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Population monitoring is crucial for wildlife management and conservation. In the last few decades, wildlife researchers have increasingly applied bioacoustics tools to obtain information on several essential ecological parameters, such as distribution and abundance. One such application involves wolves (Canis lupus). These canids respond to simulated howls by emitting group vocalizations known as chorus howls. These responses to simulated howls reveal the presence of wolf litters during the breeding period and are therefore often used to determine the status of wolf populations. However, the acoustic structure of chorus howls is complex and discriminating the presence of pups in a chorus is sometimes difficult, even for experienced observers. In this study, we evaluate the usefulness of analyses of the acoustic energy distribution in chorus howls to identify the presence of pups in a chorus. We analysed 110 Iberian wolf chorus howls with known pack composition and found that the acoustic energy distribution is concentrated at higher frequencies when there are pups vocalizing. We built predictive models using acoustic energy distribution features to determine the presence of pups in a chorus, concluding that the acoustic energy distribution in chorus howls can be used to determine the presence of wolf pups in a pack. The method we outline here is objective, accurate, easily implemented, and independent of the observer's experience. These advantages are especially relevant in the case of broad scale surveys or when many observers are involved. Furthermore, the analysis of the acoustic energy distribution can be implemented for monitoring other social canids that emit chorus howls such as jackals or coyotes, provides an easy way to obtain information on ecological parameters such as reproductive success, and could be useful to study other group vocalizations. PMID:27144887

  16. Electron energy distribution functions in low-pressure oxygen plasma columns sustained by propagating surface waves

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, L.; Margot, J.; Moisan, M.; Khare, R.; Donnelly, V. M.

    2009-01-12

    Electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) were measured in a 50 mTorr oxygen plasma column sustained by propagating surface waves. Trace-rare-gas-optical-emission spectroscopy was used to derive EEDFs by selecting lines to extract ''electron temperature''(T{sub e}) corresponding to either lower energy electrons that excite high-lying levels through stepwise excitation via metastable states or higher energy electrons that excite emission directly from the ground state. Lower energy T{sub e}'s decreased from 8 to 5.5 eV with distance from the wave launcher, while T{sub e}{approx_equal}6 eV for higher energy electrons and T{sub e}>20 eV for a high-energy tail. Mechanisms for such EEDFs are discussed.

  17. Long space missions, gene therapy, and the vital role of magnesium: a three-pronged plan for the next 50 years

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, William J

    2010-01-01

    Since pharmaceuticals cannot be used in space until liver and kidney dysfunctions are corrected, and with invariable malabsorption, it appears there is no alternative other than to use subcutaneous magnesium (Mg) replacements in the presence of deficiencies and use of gene therapy. I suggest beginning with the correction of as many as four gene deficiencies: atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), nitric oxide (NO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and erythropoietin (EPO), all as well as Mg related to perfusion and angiogenesis. There is no evidence of significant lunar radiation levels in the absence of a solar storm. It could then be determined whether this has resulted in correction of liver and kidney dysfunction. If this persists, serial additions of gene therapy will be required determining the effect of each individual gene trial on organ function. Microgravity and endothelial gaps with leaks trigger reduced plasma volume. Partial correction by use of a plasma volume substitute and development of a delivery device may reduce complexity of gene therapy. Research would be conducted both on Earth and in microgravity, with the development of subcutaneous pharmaceuticals and Mg, and a space walk-reliable subcutaneous silicon device, given that no replenishable subcutaneous device is presently available. A three-pronged approach provides a plan for the next 50 years: A. complete correction of a Mg deficit; B. partial replacement with plasma volume substitutes, and C. multiple gene factor strategy. PMID:21694938

  18. Quartz enhanced photoacoustic H{sub 2}S gas sensor based on a fiber-amplifier source and a custom tuning fork with large prong spacing

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hongpeng; Liu, Xiaoli; Zheng, Huadan; Yin, Xukun; Ma, Weiguang; Zhang, Lei; Yin, Wangbao; Jia, Suotang; Sampaolo, Angelo; Dong, Lei; Patimisco, Pietro; Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Tittel, Frank K.

    2015-09-14

    A quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) sensor, employing an erbium-doped fiber amplified laser source and a custom quartz tuning fork (QTF) with its two prongs spaced ∼800 μm apart, is reported. The sensor employs an acoustic micro-resonator (AmR) which is assembled in an “on-beam” QEPAS configuration. Both length and vertical position of the AmR are optimized in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, significantly improving the QEPAS detection sensitivity by a factor of ∼40, compared to the case of a sensor using a bare custom QTF. The fiber-amplifier-enhanced QEPAS sensor is applied to H{sub 2}S trace gas detection, reaching a sensitivity of ∼890 ppb at 1 s integration time, similar to those obtained with a power-enhanced QEPAS sensor equipped with a standard QTF, but with the advantages of easy optical alignment, simple installation, and long-term stability.

  19. Observation of a power-law energy distribution in atom-ion hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meir, Ziv; Akerman, Nitzan; Sikorsky, Tomas; Ben-Shlomi, Ruti; Dallal, Yehonatan; Ozeri, Roee

    2016-05-01

    Understanding atom-ion collision dynamics is at the heart of the growing field of ultra-cold atom-ion physics. The naive picture of a hot ion sympathetically-cooled by a cold atomic bath doesn't hold due to the time dependent potentials generated by the ion Paul trap. The energy scale of the atom-ion system is determined by a combination of the atomic bath temperature, the ion's excess micromotion (EMM) and the back action of the atom-ion attraction on the ion's position in the trap. However, it is the position dependent ion's inherent micromotion which acts as an amplifier for the ion's energy during random consecutive collisions. Due to this reason, the ion's energy distribution deviates from Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) characterized by an exponential tail to one with power-law tail described by Tsallis q-exponential function. Here we report on the observation of a strong deviation from MB to Tsallis energy distribution of a trapped ion. In our experiment, a ground-state cooled 88 Sr+ ion is immersed in an ultra-cold cloud of 87 Rb atoms. The energy scale is determined by either EMM or solely due to the back action on the ion position during a collision with an atom in the trap. Energy distributions are obtained using narrow optical clock spectroscopy.

  20. Distribution of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface

    SciTech Connect

    Chempath, Shaji; Pratt, Lawrence R

    2008-01-01

    Distributions of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface are obtained on the basis of molecular simulation with the SPC/E model of water. These binding energies together with the observed interfacial density profile are used to test a minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical statistical thermodynamic theory. Binding energy distributions for water molecules in that interfacial region clearly exhibit a composite structure. A minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical model that is accurate for the free energy of bulk liquid water breaks down for water molecules in the liquid-vapor interfacial region. This breakdown is associated with the fact that this minimally conditioned Gaussian model would be inaccurate for the statistical thermodynamics of a dilute gas. Aggressive conditioning greatly improves the performance of that Gaussian quasi-chemical model. The analogy between the Gaussian quasi-chemical model and dielectric models of hydration free energies suggests that naive dielectric models without the conditioning features of quasi-chemical theory will be unreliable for these interfacial problems. Multi-Gaussian models that address the composite nature of the binding energy distributions observed in the interfacial region might provide a mechanism for correcting dielectric models for practical applications.

  1. Internal energy distribution of the NCO fragment from near-threshold photolysis of isocyanic acid, HNCO

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.S.; Berghout, H.L.; Crim, F.F.

    1996-05-09

    We report the first measurement of the vibrational- and rotational-state distributions in the NCO fragment resulting from photolysis of HNCO. Recent studies have drawn conclusions about the photochemistry of HNCO and the vibrational distribution in the NCO fragment from observations of kinetic energy distribution of the H atom produced in this photolysis; however, there has been no direct observation of the NCO fragment itself. We use laser-induced fluorescence to detect the nascent NCO photoproducts and spectral simulations to extract vibrational-state populations. The rotational distributions, where we can measure them, show little excitation, and the vibrational energy preferentially appears in the bending mode. The vibrational-state distribution results directly from the excited-state geometry of the HNCO parent, in which the NCO group is bent. The dissociation proceeds from this bent NCO group to a linear NCO fragment, strongly exciting the bending mode. We find about 65% of the total energy in relative translation of the fragments, while 30% goes into vibration and 5% into rotation of NCO. 49 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Target normal sheath acceleration sheath fields for arbitrary electron energy distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, Holger

    2012-08-15

    Relativistic electrons, generated by ultraintense laser pulses, travel through the target and form a space charge sheath at the rear surface which can be used to accelerate ions to high energies. If the laser pulse duration is comparable or shorter than the time needed for the electrons to travel through the target, the electrons will not have the chance to form an equilibrium distribution but must be described by a non-equilibrium distribution. We present a kinetic theory of the rear sheath for arbitrary electron distribution function f(E), where E is the electron energy, and evaluate it for different shapes of f(E). We find that the far field is mainly determined by the high energy tail of the distribution, a steep decay of f(E) for high energies results in a small electric field and vice versa. The model is extended to account for electrons escaping the sheath region thereby allowing a finite potential drop over the sheath. The consequences of the model for the acceleration of ions are discussed.

  3. Evaluation of distributed hydrologic impacts of temperature-index and energy-based snow models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proper characterizations of snow melt and accumulation processes in the snow-dominated mountain environment are needed to understand and predict spatiotemporal distribution of water cycle components. Two commonly used strategies in modeling of snow accumulation and melt are the full energy based and...

  4. DYNAMIC ENERGY SAVING IN BUILDINGS WITH UNDERFLOOR AIR DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM – EXPERIMENTAL AND SIMULATION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study is aimed at seeking a better understanding of the thermodynamics involved with the air distribution strategies associated with UFAD systems and its impact on the energy saving dynamics.
    Thus objectives are:

    • Experiment...

    • Automated Energy Distribution and Reliability System: Validation Integration - Results of Future Architecture Implementation

      SciTech Connect

      Buche, D. L.

      2008-06-01

      This report describes Northern Indiana Public Service Co. project efforts to develop an automated energy distribution and reliability system. The purpose of this project was to implement a database-driven GIS solution that would manage all of the company's gas, electric, and landbase objects. This report is second in a series of reports detailing this effort.

    • Distributions of deposited energy and ionization clusters around ion tracks studied with Geant4 toolkit

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Burigo, Lucas; Pshenichnov, Igor; Mishustin, Igor; Hilgers, Gerhard; Bleicher, Marcus

      2016-05-01

      The Geant4-based Monte Carlo model for Heavy-Ion Therapy (MCHIT) was extended to study the patterns of energy deposition at sub-micrometer distance from individual ion tracks. Dose distributions for low-energy 1H, 4He, 12C and 16O ions measured in several experiments are well described by the model in a broad range of radial distances, from 0.5 to 3000 nm. Despite the fact that such distributions are characterized by long tails, a dominant fraction of deposited energy (∼80%) is confined within a radius of about 10 nm. The probability distributions of clustered ionization events in nanoscale volumes of water traversed by 1H, 2H, 4He, 6Li, 7Li, and 12C ions are also calculated. A good agreement of calculated ionization cluster-size distributions with the corresponding experimental data suggests that the extended MCHIT can be used to characterize stochastic processes of energy deposition to sensitive cellular structures.

    • Void Probability Enhanced Multiplicity Distribution of Produced Hadrons in p-p Collision at Lhc Energies

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Dutta, S.; Chan, A. H.; Oh, C. H.

      2012-08-01

      This paper studies the multiplicity distribution of hadrons produced in p-p collisions at 0.9 and 2.36 TeV using ALICE as a detector. The multiplicity distribution exhibits enhanced void probability. They are also found to satisfy the void probability scaling. The scaling of χ with \\bar n\\bar k2 is studied using the generalized hypergeometric model. The variation of the parameter "a" of the hyper geometric model with energy and type of events is also studied. The parameter "a" distinguishes between various theoretical models, e.g. Lorentz/Catalan, negative binomial, geometric distribution etc. Finally a comparison is made with the p--\\bar p collisions at 200, 546 and 900 GeV. It is observed both for p-p and p--\\bar p data, the value of "a" decreases with increase in collision energy and approach towards the upper bound or the NB model of the void probability scaling.

    • Secondary electron emission from lunar soil: Yields, energy distributions, and charging effects

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Dukes, Catherine A.; Baragiola, Raúl A.

      2013-12-01

      We report the electron emission and charging of sub-mature lunar highland soil 61241 by electron impact under ultra-high vacuum for 40-2000 eV electrons. The energy distribution of emitted secondary electrons was measured as a function of primary electron energy under neutral charging conditions, and electron energy loss spectroscopy was used to determine the ˜8 eV band gap. Total electron yields were obtained with low electron fluxes. Imaging the soil with a Scanning Auger Microprobe using 10 keV electrons revealed differential grain motion induced by charging in ultra-high vacuum.

    • Amplitude distribution and energy balance of small disturbances in plate flow

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Schlichting, H

      1950-01-01

      The distribution of the correlation coefficient and of the amplitude of the disturbance velocities is calculated as a function of the distance from the wall for two neutral disturbances, one at the lower and one at the upper branch of the neutral stability curve. The energy balance of the disturbance motion is also investigated and it is found that as required for neutral stability the energy of the disturbance motion that is dissipated by viscosity is equal to the energy transferred to the disturbance motion from the main flow during one cycle.

    • Smart grids: A paradigm shift on energy generation and distribution with the emergence of a new energy management business model

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Cardenas, Jesus Alvaro

      An energy and environmental crisis will emerge throughout the world if we continue with our current practices of generation and distribution of electricity. A possible solution to this problem is based on the Smart grid concept, which is heavily influenced by Information and Communication Technology (ICT). Although the electricity industry is mostly regulated, there are global models used as roadmaps for Smart Grids' implementation focusing on technologies and the basic generation-distribution-transmission model. This project aims to further enhance a business model for a future global deployment. It takes into consideration the many factors interacting in this energy provision process, based on the diffusion of technologies and literature surveys on the available documents in the Internet as well as peer-reviewed publications. Tariffs and regulations, distributed energy generation, integration of service providers, consumers becoming producers, self-healing devices, and many other elements are shifting this industry into a major change towards liberalization and deregulation of this sector, which has been heavily protected by the government due to the importance of electricity for consumers. We propose an Energy Management Business Model composed by four basic elements: Supply Chain, Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Stakeholders Response, and the resulting Green Efficient Energy (GEE). We support the developed model based on the literature survey, we support it with the diffusion analysis of these elements, and support the overall model with two surveys: one for peers and professionals, and other for experts in the field, based on the Smart Grid Carnegie Melon Maturity Model (CMU SEI SGMM). The contribution of this model is a simple path to follow for entities that want to achieve environmental friendly energy with the involvement of technology and all stakeholders.

    • Cross-sections of two-prong exclusive reactions in ¯pp Interactions at22.4 GeV/c: Alma Ata-Dubna-Helsinki-Moscow-Prague Collaboration

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Batyunya, B. V.; Boguslavsky, I. V.; Bruncko, D.; Gramenitsky, I. M.; Lednický, R.; Medved, K. S.; Vrba, V.; Boos, E. G.; Ermilova, D. I.; Temiraliev, T.; Dementiev, R. K.; Rud, V. I.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Tikhonova, L. A.; Levonian, S. V.; Herynek, I.; Lokajíček, M.; Řídký, J.; Šimák, V.; Valkárová, A.; Kanazirsky, H.; Zlatanov, Z.; Villanen, P.; Walck, E.

      1988-03-01

      The results of the cross-section determination of some two-prong final states with one neutral particle (1 C-fits) in ¯ pp-interactions at 22.4 GeV/ c are presented. These results have been obtained from pictures of the HBC “Ludmila”. The methodical problems of the reaction selection are presented, the fulfilling of CP-invariance channels is demonstrated and the energetic behaviour of their cross-sections is analysed.

    • Model documentation: Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

      SciTech Connect

      1995-02-17

      The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The methodology employed allows the analysis of impacts of regional capacity constraints in the interstate natural gas pipeline network and the identification of pipeline capacity expansion requirements. There is an explicit representation of core and noncore markets for natural gas transmission and distribution services, and the key components of pipeline tariffs are represented in a pricing algorithm. Natural gas pricing and flow patterns are derived by obtaining a market equilibrium across the three main elements of the natural gas market: the supply element, the demand element, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. The NGTDM consists of four modules: the Annual Flow Module, the Capacity F-expansion Module, the Pipeline Tariff Module, and the Distributor Tariff Module. A model abstract is provided in Appendix A.

    • Energy distribution and local fluctuations in strongly coupled open quantum systems: The extended resonant level model

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Ochoa, Maicol A.; Bruch, Anton; Nitzan, Abraham

      2016-07-01

      We study the energy distribution in the extended resonant level model at equilibrium. Previous investigations [Phys. Rev. B 89, 161306 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.89.161306; Phys. Rev. B 93, 115318 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.115318] have found, for a resonant electronic level interacting with a thermal free-electron wide-band bath, that the expectation value for the energy of the interacting subsystem can be correctly calculated by considering a symmetric splitting of the interaction Hamiltonian between the subsystem and the bath. However, the general implications of this approach were questioned [Phys. Rev. B 92, 235440 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.235440]. Here, we show that, already at equilibrium, such splitting fails to describe the energy fluctuations, as measured here by the second and third central moments (namely, width and skewness) of the energy distribution. Furthermore, we find that when the wide-band approximation does not hold, no splitting of the system-bath interaction can describe the system thermodynamics. We conclude that in general no proper division subsystem of the Hamiltonian of the composite system can account for the energy distribution of the subsystem. This also implies that the thermodynamic effects due to local changes in the subsystem cannot in general be described by such splitting.

    • Ion Energy Distributions and their Relative Abundance in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Kim, J. S.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Cappelli, M. A.; Sharma, S. P.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

      1998-01-01

      Study of kinetics of ions and neutrals produced in high density inductively coupled plasma (ICP) discharges is of great importance for achieving a high degree of plasma assisted deposition and etching. In this paper, we present the ion energy distributions (IEDs) of various ions arriving at the grounded lower electrode. The ions were energy as well as mass analyzed by a combination of electrostatic analyzer-quadrupole mass spectrometer for pure Ar and CF4/Ar mixtures. The measurements have been made at gas pressures ranging from 30 to 100 mTorr. In addition, the IEDs were measured when the wafer-supporting electrode was also rf-powered and the effect of the self-bias was observed in the energy distributions of ions. The shapes of the IEDs are discussed an related to the sheath properties and measured electrical waveforms, as a function of pressure and applied power. Relative ion intensities were obtained by integration of each ion kinetic energy distribution function over its energy range.

    • Ion energy distribution near a plasma meniscus with beam extraction for multi element focused ion beams

      SciTech Connect

      Mathew, Jose V.; Paul, Samit; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

      2010-05-15

      An earlier study of the axial ion energy distribution in the extraction region (plasma meniscus) of a compact microwave plasma ion source showed that the axial ion energy spread near the meniscus is small ({approx}5 eV) and comparable to that of a liquid metal ion source, making it a promising candidate for focused ion beam (FIB) applications [J. V. Mathew and S. Bhattacharjee, J. Appl. Phys. 105, 96101 (2009)]. In the present work we have investigated the radial ion energy distribution (IED) under the influence of beam extraction. Initially a single Einzel lens system has been used for beam extraction with potentials up to -6 kV for obtaining parallel beams. In situ measurements of IED with extraction voltages upto -5 kV indicates that beam extraction has a weak influence on the energy spread ({+-}0.5 eV) which is of significance from the point of view of FIB applications. It is found that by reducing the geometrical acceptance angle at the ion energy analyzer probe, close to unidirectional distribution can be obtained with a spread that is smaller by at least 1 eV.

    • Connecting global and local energy distributions in quantum spin models on a lattice

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Arad, Itai; Kuwahara, Tomotaka; Landau, Zeph

      2016-03-01

      Local interactions in many-body quantum systems are generally non-commuting and consequently the Hamiltonian of a local region cannot be measured simultaneously with the global Hamiltonian. The connection between the probability distributions of measurement outcomes of the local and global Hamiltonians will depend on the angles between the diagonalizing bases of these two Hamiltonians. In this paper we characterize the relation between these two distributions. On one hand, we upperbound the probability of measuring an energy τ in a local region, if the global system is in a superposition of eigenstates with energies ε <τ . On the other hand, we bound the probability of measuring a global energy ɛ in a bipartite system that is in a tensor product of eigenstates of its two subsystems. Very roughly, we show that due to the local nature of the governing interactions, these distributions are identical to what one encounters in the commuting cases, up to exponentially small corrections. Finally, we use these bounds to study the spectrum of a locally truncated Hamiltonian, in which the energies of a contiguous region have been truncated above some threshold energy. We show that the lower part of the spectrum of this Hamiltonian is exponentially close to that of the original Hamiltonian. A restricted version of this result in 1D was a central building block in a recent improvement of the 1D area-law.

    • Statistical Measurement of the Gamma-Ray Source-count Distribution as a Function of Energy

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Zechlin, Hannes-S.; Cuoco, Alessandro; Donato, Fiorenza; Fornengo, Nicolao; Regis, Marco

      2016-08-01

      Statistical properties of photon count maps have recently been proven as a new tool to study the composition of the gamma-ray sky with high precision. We employ the 1-point probability distribution function of six years of Fermi-LAT data to measure the source-count distribution dN/dS and the diffuse components of the high-latitude gamma-ray sky as a function of energy. To that aim, we analyze the gamma-ray emission in five adjacent energy bands between 1 and 171 GeV. It is demonstrated that the source-count distribution as a function of flux is compatible with a broken power law up to energies of ˜50 GeV. The index below the break is between 1.95 and 2.0. For higher energies, a simple power-law fits the data, with an index of {2.2}-0.3+0.7 in the energy band between 50 and 171 GeV. Upper limits on further possible breaks as well as the angular power of unresolved sources are derived. We find that point-source populations probed by this method can explain {83}-13+7% ({81}-19+52%) of the extragalactic gamma-ray background between 1.04 and 1.99 GeV (50 and 171 GeV). The method has excellent capabilities for constraining the gamma-ray luminosity function and the spectra of unresolved blazars.

    • Multiplicities in high energy interactions

      SciTech Connect

      Derrick, M.

      1984-01-01

      Charged particle multiplicities in hadronic collision have been measured for all energies up to ..sqrt..s = 540 GeV in the center of mass. Similar measurements in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation cover the much smaller range - up to ..sqrt..s = 40 GeV. Data are also available from deep inelastic neutrino scattering up to ..sqrt..s approx. 10 GeV. The experiments measure the mean charged multiplicity , the rapidity density at y = O, and the distributions in prong number. The mean number of photons associated with the events can be used to measure the ..pi../sup 0/ and eta/sup 0/ multiplicities. Some information is also available on the charged pion, kaon, and nucleon fractions as well as the K/sup 0/ and ..lambda../sup 0/ rates and for the higher energy data, the identically equal fraction. We review this data and consider the implications of extrapolations to SSC energies. 13 references.

    • Distribution function for the system of galaxies for any ratio of gravitational potential to kinetic energies

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Ahmad, Farooq; Malik, Manzoor A.; Mir, Hameeda

      2014-02-01

      We evaluate a distribution function for the system of galaxies clustering gravitationally in an expanding universe on the basis of statistical mechanics. We extend our previous work to incorporate the effect of any ratio of gravitational potential to kinetic energies. We determine the cosmological many-body partition function inclusive of higher order terms and calculate all thermodynamic quantities and the distribution function from it. We find that our new results are consistent with the previous ones, particularly in the large bar{N} (average number of galaxies) limit. We also investigate the effect on clustering parameter b and find our new results in very good agreement with the previous ones in the small b limit. We find that for large b, the departure from the original distribution function is greater. We also observe that the effect of softening on the distribution function is consistent with our previous work.

    • Reliability Performance Optimization of Meshed Electrical Distribution System Considering Customer and Energy based Reliability Indices

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Arya, L. D.; Kela, K. B.

      2013-12-01

      This paper describes a methodology for determination of optimum failure rate and repair time for each component of a meshed distribution system. In this paper the reliability indices for a sample meshed network are optimized. An objective function incorporating customer and energy based reliability indices and their target values is formulated. These indices are function of failure rate and repair time of a section of a distribution network. Modification of failure rate and repair time modifies the cost attached to them. Hence the optimization of the objective function is achieved by modifying the failure rate and repair time of each section of the meshed distribution system accounting constraint on budget allocated. The problem has been solved using population based differential evolution and bare bones particle swarm optimization techniques and results have been compared for a sample meshed distribution system.

  1. Radiation safety assessment of a system of small reactors for distributed energy.

    PubMed

    Odano, N; Ishida, T

    2005-01-01

    A passively safe small reactor for a distributed energy system, PSRD, is an integral type of light-water reactor with a thermal output of 100 or 300 MW aimed to be used for supplying district heat, electricity to small grids, and so on. Candidate locations for the PSRD as a distributed energy source are on-ground, deep underground, and in a seaside pit in the vicinity of the energy consumption area. Assessments of the radiation safety of a PSRD were carried out for three cases corresponding to normal operation, shutdown and a hypothetical postulated accident for several siting candidates. Results of the radiation safety assessment indicate that the PSRD design has sufficient shielding performance and capability and that the exposure to the general public is very low in the case of a hypothetical accident. PMID:16381690

  2. United States Supports Distributed Wind Technology Improvements; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Karin

    2015-06-15

    This presentation provides information on the activities conducted through the Competitiveness Improvement Project (CIP), initiated in 2012 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and executed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to support the distributed wind industry. The CIP provides research and development funding and technical support to improve distributed wind turbine technology and increase the competitiveness of U.S. small and midsize wind turbine manufacturers. Through this project, DOE/NREL assists U.S. manufacturers to lower the levelized cost of energy of wind turbines through component improvements, manufacturing process upgrades, and turbine testing. Ultimately, this support is expected to lead to turbine certification through testing to industry-recognized wind turbine performance and safety standards.

  3. Effects of Home Energy Management Systems on Distribution Utilities and Feeders Under Various Market Structures: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, Mark; Pratt, Annabelle; Lunacek, Monte; Mittal, Saurabh; Wu, Hongyu; Jones, Wesley

    2015-07-17

    The combination of distributed energy resources (DER) and retail tariff structures to provide benefits to both utility consumers and the utilities is poorly understood. To improve understanding, an Integrated Energy System Model (IESM) is being developed to simulate the physical and economic aspects of DER technologies, the buildings where they reside, and feeders servicing them. The IESM was used to simulate 20 houses with home energy management systems on a single feeder under a time of use tariff to estimate economic and physical impacts on both the households and the distribution utilities. HEMS reduce consumers’ electric bills by precooling houses in the hours before peak electricity pricing. Household savings are greater than the reduction utility net revenue indicating that HEMS can provide a societal benefit providing tariffs are structured so that utilities remain solvent. Utilization of HEMS reduce peak loads during high price hours but shifts it to hours with off-peak and shoulder prices and resulting in a higher peak load.

  4. Installation of the first Distributed Energy Storage System (DESS) at American Electric Power (AEP).

    SciTech Connect

    Nourai, Ali

    2007-06-01

    AEP studied the direct and indirect benefits, strengths, and weaknesses of distributed energy storage systems (DESS) and chose to transform its entire utility grid into a system that achieves optimal integration of both central and distributed energy assets. To that end, AEP installed the first NAS battery-based, energy storage system in North America. After one year of operation and testing, AEP has concluded that, although the initial costs of DESS are greater than conventional power solutions, the net benefits justify the AEP decision to create a grid of DESS with intelligent monitoring, communications, and control, in order to enable the utility grid of the future. This report details the site selection, construction, benefits and lessons learned of the first installation, at Chemical Station in North Charleston, WV.

  5. A numerical method for determining highly precise electron energy distribution functions from Langmuir probe characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Jin-Young; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2010-12-15

    Electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) were determined from probe characteristics using a numerical ac superimposed method with a distortion correction of high derivative terms by varying amplitude of a sinusoidal perturbation voltage superimposed onto the dc sweep voltage, depending on the related electron energy. Low amplitude perturbation applied around the plasma potential represented the low energy peak of the EEDF exactly, and high amplitude perturbation applied around the floating potential was effective to suppress noise or distortion of the probe characteristic, which is fatal to the tail electron distribution. When a small random noise was imposed over the stabilized prove characteristic, the numerical differentiation method was not suitable to determine the EEDF, while the numerical ac superimposed method was able to obtain a highly precise EEDF.

  6. Size distributions of air showers accompanied with high energy gamma ray bundles observed at Mt. Chacaltaya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matano, T.; Machida, M.; Tsuchima, I.; Kawasumi, N.; Honda, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Martinic, N.; Zapata, J.; Navia, C. E.; Aquirre, C.

    1985-01-01

    Size distributions of air showers accompanied with bundle of high energy gamma rays and/or large size bursts under emulsion chambers, to study the composition of primary cosmic rays and also characteristics of high energy nuclear interaction. Air showers initiated by particles with a large cross section of interaction may develop from narrow region of the atmosphere near the top. Starting levels of air showers by particles with smaller cross section fluctuate in wider region of the atmosphere. Air showers of extremely small size accompanied with bundle of gamma rays may be ones initiated by protons at lower level after penetrating deep atmosphere without interaction. It is determined that the relative size distribution according to the total energy of bundle of gamma rays and the total burst size observed under 15 cm lead absorber.

  7. Free energy calculations, enhanced by a Gaussian ansatz, for the "chemical work" distribution.

    PubMed

    Boulougouris, Georgios C

    2014-05-15

    The evaluation of the free energy is essential in molecular simulation because it is intimately related with the existence of multiphase equilibrium. Recently, it was demonstrated that it is possible to evaluate the Helmholtz free energy using a single statistical ensemble along an entire isotherm by accounting for the "chemical work" of transforming each molecule, from an interacting one, to an ideal gas. In this work, we show that it is possible to perform such a free energy perturbation over a liquid vapor phase transition. Furthermore, we investigate the link between a general free energy perturbation scheme and the novel nonequilibrium theories of Crook's and Jarzinsky. We find that for finite systems away from the thermodynamic limit the second law of thermodynamics will always be an inequality for isothermal free energy perturbations, resulting always to a dissipated work that may tend to zero only in the thermodynamic limit. The work, the heat, and the entropy produced during a thermodynamic free energy perturbation can be viewed in the context of the Crooks and Jarzinsky formalism, revealing that for a given value of the ensemble average of the "irreversible" work, the minimum entropy production corresponded to a Gaussian distribution for the histogram of the work. We propose the evaluation of the free energy difference in any free energy perturbation based scheme on the average irreversible "chemical work" minus the dissipated work that can be calculated from the variance of the distribution of the logarithm of the work histogram, within the Gaussian approximation. As a consequence, using the Gaussian ansatz for the distribution of the "chemical work," accurate estimates for the chemical potential and the free energy of the system can be performed using much shorter simulations and avoiding the necessity of sampling the computational costly tails of the "chemical work." For a more general free energy perturbation scheme that the Gaussian ansatz may not be

  8. Model Predictive Control-based Optimal Coordination of Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Lian, Jianming; Elizondo, Marcelo A.

    2013-04-03

    Distributed energy resources, such as renewable energy resources (wind, solar), energy storage and demand response, can be used to complement conventional generators. The uncertainty and variability due to high penetration of wind makes reliable system operations and controls challenging, especially in isolated systems. In this paper, an optimal control strategy is proposed to coordinate energy storage and diesel generators to maximize wind penetration while maintaining system economics and normal operation performance. The goals of the optimization problem are to minimize fuel costs and maximize the utilization of wind while considering equipment life of generators and energy storage. Model predictive control (MPC) is used to solve a look-ahead dispatch optimization problem and the performance is compared to an open loop look-ahead dispatch problem. Simulation studies are performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the closed loop MPC in compensating for uncertainties and variability caused in the system.

  9. Model Predictive Control-based Optimal Coordination of Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Lian, Jianming; Elizondo, Marcelo A.

    2013-01-07

    Distributed energy resources, such as renewable energy resources (wind, solar), energy storage and demand response, can be used to complement conventional generators. The uncertainty and variability due to high penetration of wind makes reliable system operations and controls challenging, especially in isolated systems. In this paper, an optimal control strategy is proposed to coordinate energy storage and diesel generators to maximize wind penetration while maintaining system economics and normal operation performance. The goals of the optimization problem are to minimize fuel costs and maximize the utilization of wind while considering equipment life of generators and energy storage. Model predictive control (MPC) is used to solve a look-ahead dispatch optimization problem and the performance is compared to an open loop look-ahead dispatch problem. Simulation studies are performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the closed loop MPC in compensating for uncertainties and variability caused in the system.

  10. Optimal location through distributed algorithm to avoid energy hole in mobile sink WSNs.

    PubMed

    Qing-hua, Li; Wei-hua, Gui; Zhi-gang, Chen

    2014-01-01

    In multihop data collection sensor network, nodes near the sink need to relay on remote data and, thus, have much faster energy dissipation rate and suffer from premature death. This phenomenon causes energy hole near the sink, seriously damaging the network performance. In this paper, we first compute energy consumption of each node when sink is set at any point in the network through theoretical analysis; then we propose an online distributed algorithm, which can adjust sink position based on the actual energy consumption of each node adaptively to get the actual maximum lifetime. Theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the proposed algorithms significantly improve the lifetime of wireless sensor network. It lowers the network residual energy by more than 30% when it is dead. Moreover, the cost for moving the sink is relatively smaller. PMID:24895668

  11. Construction of energy landscapes can clarify the movement and distribution of foraging animals

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Rory P.; Quintana, Flavio; Hobson, Victoria J.

    2012-01-01

    Variation in the physical characteristics of the environment should impact the movement energetics of animals. Although cognizance of this may help interpret movement ecology, determination of the landscape-dependent energy expenditure of wild animals is problematic. We used accelerometers in animal-attached tags to derive energy expenditure in 54 free-living imperial cormorants Phalacrocorax atriceps and construct an energy landscape of the area around a breeding colony. Examination of the space use of a further 74 birds over 4 years showed that foraging areas selected varied considerably in distance from the colony and water depth, but were characterized by minimal power requirements compared with other areas in the available landscape. This accords with classic optimal foraging concepts, which state that animals should maximize net energy gain by minimizing costs where possible and show how deriving energy landscapes can help understand how and why animals distribute themselves in space. PMID:21900327

  12. Fast Calculations of Electrostatic Solvation Free Energy from Reconstructed Solvent Density using proximal Radial Distribution Functions

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bin; Wong, Ka-Yiu; Hu, Char; Kokubo, Hironori; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2011-01-01

    Although detailed atomic models may be applied for a full description of solvation, simpler phenomenological models are particularly useful to interpret the results for scanning many, large, complex systems where a full atomic model is too computationally expensive to use. Among the most costly are solvation free energy evaluations by simulation. Here we develop a fast way to calculate electrostatic solvation free energy while retaining much of the accuracy of explicit solvent free energy simulation. The basis of our method is to treat the solvent not as a structureless dielectric continuum, but as a structured medium by making use of universal proximal radial distribution functions. Using a deca-alanine peptide as a test case, we compare the use of our theory with free energy simulations and traditional continuum estimates of the electrostatic solvation free energy. PMID:21765968

  13. Fast Calculations of Electrostatic Solvation Free Energy from Reconstructed Solvent Density Using Proximal Radial Distribution Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Bin; Wong, Ka-Yiu; Hu, Char Y.; Kokubo, Hironori; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2011-07-07

    Although detailed atomic models may be applied for a full description of solvation, simpler phenomenologicalmodels are particularly useful to interpret the results for scanning many large, complex systems, where a full atomic model is too computationally expensive to use. Among the most costly are solvation free-energy evaluations by simulation. Here we develop a fast way to calculate electrostatic solvation free energy while retaining much of the accuracy of explicit solvent free-energy simulation. The basis of our method is to treat the solvent not as a structureless dielectric continuum but as a structured medium by making use of universal proximal radial distribution functions. Using a deca-alanine peptide as a test case, we compare the use of our theory with free-energy simulations and traditional continuum estimates of the electrostatic solvation free energy.

  14. From radio to TeV: the surprising spectral energy distribution of AP Librae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, D. A.; Giebels, B.; Fortin, P.; Horan, D.; Szostek, A.; Fegan, S.; Baczko, A.-K.; Finke, J.; Kadler, M. L.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Lister, M. L.; Pushkarev, A. B.; Savolainen, T.

    2015-12-01

    Following the discovery of high-energy (HE; E > 10 MeV) and very-high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) γ-ray emission from the low-frequency-peaked BL Lac (LBL) object AP Librae, its electromagnetic spectrum is studied over 60 octaves in energy. Contemporaneous data in radio, optical and UV together with the (non-simultaneous) γ-ray data are used to construct the most precise spectral energy distribution of this source. The data have been found to be modelled with difficulties with single-zone homogeneous leptonic synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) radiative scenarios due to the unprecedented width of the HE component when compared to the lower-energy component. The two other LBL objects also detected at VHE appear to have similar modelling difficulties. Nevertheless, VHE γ-rays produced in the extended jet could account for the VHE flux observed by HESS.

  15. Distributed energy resources customer adoption modeling with combined heat and power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2003-07-01

    In this report, an economic model of customer adoption of distributed energy resources (DER) is developed. It covers progress on the DER project for the California Energy Commission (CEC) at Berkeley Lab during the period July 2001 through Dec 2002 in the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Distributed Energy Resources Integration (DERI) project. CERTS has developed a specific paradigm of distributed energy deployment, the CERTS Microgrid (as described in Lasseter et al. 2002). The primary goal of CERTS distributed generation research is to solve the technical problems required to make the CERTS Microgrid a viable technology, and Berkeley Lab's contribution is to direct the technical research proceeding at CERTS partner sites towards the most productive engineering problems. The work reported herein is somewhat more widely applicable, so it will be described within the context of a generic microgrid (mGrid). Current work focuses on the implementation of combined heat and power (CHP) capability. A mGrid as generically defined for this work is a semiautonomous grouping of generating sources and end-use electrical loads and heat sinks that share heat and power. Equipment is clustered and operated for the benefit of its owners. Although it can function independently of the traditional power system, or macrogrid, the mGrid is usually interconnected and exchanges energy and possibly ancillary services with the macrogrid. In contrast to the traditional centralized paradigm, the design, implementation, operation, and expansion of the mGrid is meant to optimize the overall energy system requirements of participating customers rather than the objectives and requirements of the macrogrid.

  16. Investigating Possible Departures from Maxwellian Energy Distributions in Nebulae using High-Resolution Emission Line Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turbyfill, Amanda; Dinerstein, H. L.; Sterling, N. C.

    2014-01-01

    The derivation of ionic abundance ratios from collisionally excited emission lines in gaseous nebulae requires knowledge of the physical state of the gas, particularly the electron kinetic temperature, Te, to which the resulting abundances are highly sensitive. A long-standing problem in nebular analyses has been pervasive discrepancies among values of Te obtained from different diagnostic ratios for a single nebula. Recently, Nicholls et al. (2012, ApJ, 752, 148) have suggested that the nebular electrons may not obey an equilibrium Maxwell-Boltzmann (M-B) energy distribution, but instead follow a “κ distribution” seen in many solar system plasmas, a family of distributions for which the M-B distribution is the limiting case where κ → ∞. The high-energy tail of supra-thermal electrons in κ distributions have a disproportionate effect on strongly energy dependent quantities, such as Te diagnostics, for even modest departures from M-B distributions. We apply prescriptions given by Nicholls et al. (2013, ApJS, 207, 21) to high-resolution (R=36,700) optical spectra of 10 planetary nebulae obtained with the 2d-coudé echelle spectrograph on the 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory. The advantages of these data include their broad spectral coverage and sufficiently high spectral resolution to separate blended lines and assess possible atmospheric absorption issues. The line fluxes were obtained using ROBOSPECT, an automated spectral line measurement package developed by Waters & Hollek (2013, PASP, 125, 1164). We solve both for Te under the assumption of M-B distributions, and the parameters of κ distributions consistent with the data. Our goal is to test whether the κ distribution hypothesis provides a better fit to the observed line ratios. Finally, we discuss effects on the derived ionic abundances under this alternate description of the particle energy distributions. This research was supported by NSF grant AST 0708245 and the John W

  17. Real-time measurement of RFR energy distribution in the Macaca mulatta head

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, J.G.; Krupp, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Temperature increases due to absorption of 1.2 GHz, CW, 70 mW/cm2, radio frequency (RF) energy, were measured in 3.3-cm-radius homogeneous muscle-equivalent spheres, M. mulatta cadaver heads (both detached from and attached to the body) and living, anesthetized M. mulatta heads. Temperatures were measured with a Vitek, Model 101 Electrothermia Monitor and temperature distributions were compared to theoretical predictions from a thermal-response model of a simulated cranial structure. The results show that the thermal response model accurately predicts the temperature distribution in muscle-equivalent spheres, the distribution of temperature in detached M. mulatta heads when exposed from the back of the head, and the distribution of temperature in attached M. mulatta cadaver heads for animals oriented with body parallel to the H-field. The temperature distribution in the detached M. mulatta heads varies markedly with exposure orientation, ie, facing forward, backward, or to the side. The orientation of the M. mulatta cadaver body significantly affects the temperature distribution in the head - with H-field orientation showing high, nonuniform values, and E-field orientation showing low, uniform values. In live animals blood flow produces a significant short-term effect on the temperature distribution in the midbrain, but not the cortex. Midbrain temperatures are both significantly higher and lower than the comparable cadaver measurements, depending on location.

  18. Cosmic-ray propagation in the Galaxy and in the heliosphere - The path-length distribution at low energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Munoz, M.; Simpson, J. A.; Guzik, T. G.; Wefel, J. P.; Margolis, S. H.

    1987-01-01

    The energy dependence of the path-length distribution of cosmic rays at low energies, below relativistic velocities, is studied, and its implications for models of cosmic-ray confinement and propagation in the Galaxy and Galactic halo, including the effects of a possible Galactic wind, are studied. It is found that the mean free path in Galactic propagation must be fully energy-dependent, with the mean of an exponential path-length distribution increasing with increasing energy below 1 GeV per nucleon and decreasing with increasing energy above 1 GeV per nucleon. This indicates that, at low energies, diffusion is not the controlling process. The path-length distribution is not purely exponential but is depleted in short path lengths at low energies. This depletion is energy-dependent, being largest at low energies and decreasing with increasing energy.

  19. Energy distribution functions of kilovolt ions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field of a modified Penning discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    The distribution function of ion energy parallel to the magnetic field of a modified Penning discharge has been measured with a retarding potential energy analyzer. These ions escaped through one of the throats of the magnetic mirror geometry. Simultaneous measurements of the ion energy distribution function perpendicular to the magnetic field have been made with a charge exchange neutral detector. The ion energy distribution functions are approximately Maxwellian, and the parallel and perpendicular kinetic temperatures are equal within experimental error. These results suggest that turbulent processes previously observed in this discharge Maxwellianize the velocity distribution along a radius in velocity space and cause an isotropic energy distribution. When the distributions depart from Maxwellian, they are enhanced above the Maxwellian tail.

  20. Distributed simulation of snowcover mass- and energy-balance in the boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, Timothy; Marks, Danny

    1999-10-01

    The accurate distributed simulation of snowpack deposition and ablation beneath forest canopies is complicated by the fact that vegetation canopies strongly affect the snow surface energy balance. The canopy alters the radiation balance of the snowcover and reduces the wind speed at the snow surface. Simple canopy adjustment algorithms for solar and thermal radiation and wind speed are used in conjunction with commonly available land cover classifications to spatially distribute sub-canopy solar and thermal radiation, air and soil temperature, humidity, wind speed, and precipitation. The distributed climate surfaces are used to drive a two-layer coupled energy- and mass-balance snowmelt model over two areas within the BOREAS study region for the 1994-1995 snow season. Model results are validated using both automatic and manually collected snow depth data. The simulated timing and rate of snowpack development and ablation at both study areas are well represented beneath the canopy types where validation data are present. Rigorous evaluation of model performance beneath the full range of canopy types requires information regarding the spatial distribution of snow covered area during the ablation period. This study demonstrates that given basic landcover parameters, relatively simple canopy adjustments coupled with an energy balance model can be used to estimate climate conditions and snowcover processes across a range of boreal forest covers.

  1. Ion energy distribution near a plasma meniscus for multielement focused ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Jose V.; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2009-05-01

    The axial ion energy spread near a plasma meniscus for multielement focused ion beams is investigated experimentally in atomic and molecular gaseous plasmas of krypton, argon, and hydrogen by tailoring the magnetic field in the region. In the case of magnetic end plugging, the ion energy spread reduces by approx50% near the meniscus as compared to the bulk plasma, thereby facilitating beam focusing. A quadrupole filter can be used to control the mean energy of the ions. Comparison with standard Maxwellian and Druyvesteyn distributions with the same mean energy indicates that the ion energy distribution in the meniscus is deficient in the population of low and high energy tail ions, resulting in a Gaussian-like profile with a spread of approx4 and approx5 eV for krypton and argon ions, respectively. By carefully tuning the wave power, plasma collisionality, and the magnetic field in the meniscus, the spread can be made lower than that of liquid metal ion sources, for extracting focused ion beams of other elements with adequate current density, for research and applications in nanosystems

  2. Time evolution of the electron energy distribution function in pulsed microwave magnetoplasma in H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauberteau, J. L.; Jauberteau, I.; Cortázar, O. D.; Megía-Macías, A.

    2016-03-01

    Time evolution of the Electron Energy Distribution Function (EEDF) is measured in pulsed hydrogen microwave magnetoplasma working at 2.45 GHz. Analysis is performed both in resonance (B = 0.087 T) and off-resonance conditions (B = 0.120 T), at two pressures (0.38 Pa and 0.62 Pa), respectively, and for different incident microwave powers. The important effect of the magnetic field on the electron kinetic is discussed, and a critical analysis of Langmuir probe measurements is given. The Electron Energy Distribution Function is calculated using the Druyvesteyn theory (EEDF) and is corrected using the theory developed by Arslanbekov in the case of magnetized plasma. Three different components are observed in the EEDF, whatever the theory used. They are: (a) a low electron energy component at energy lower than 10 eV, which is ascribed to the electron having inelastic collisions with heavy species (H2, H, ions), (b) a high energy component with a mean energy ranging from 10 to 20 eV, which is generally ascribed to the heating of the plasma by the incident microwave power, and (c) a third component observed between the two other ones, mainly at low pressure and in resonance conditions, has been correlated to the electron rotation in the magnetic field.

  3. Electron energy distributions measured during electron beam/plasma interactions. [in E region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jost, R. J.; Anderson, H. R.; Mcgarity, J. O.

    1980-01-01

    In the large vacuum facility at the NASA-Johnson Space Center an electron beam was projected 20 m parallel to B from a gun with variable accelerating potential (1.0 to 2.5 kV) to an aluminum target. The ionospheric neutral pressure and field were approximated. Beam electron energy distributions were measured directly using an electrostatic deflection analyzer and indirectly with a detector that responded to the X-rays produced by electron impact on the target. At low currents the distribution is sharply peaked at the acceleration potential. At high currents a beam plasma discharge occurs and electrons are redistributed in energy so that the former energy peak broadens to 10-15 percent FWHM with a strongly enhanced low energy tail. At the 10% of maximum point the energy spectrum ranges from less than 1/2 to 1.2 times the gun energy. The effect is qualitatively the same at all pitch angles and locations sampled.

  4. Modeling of thermal storage systems in MILP distributed energy resource models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Steen, David; Stadler, Michael; Cardoso, Gonçalo; Groissböck, Markus; DeForest, Nicholas; Marnay, Chris

    2014-08-04

    Thermal energy storage (TES) and distributed generation technologies, such as combined heat and power (CHP) or photovoltaics (PV), can be used to reduce energy costs and decrease CO2 emissions from buildings by shifting energy consumption to times with less emissions and/or lower energy prices. To determine the feasibility of investing in TES in combination with other distributed energy resources (DER), mixed integer linear programming (MILP) can be used. Such a MILP model is the well-established Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM); however, it currently uses only a simplified TES model to guarantee linearity and short run-times. Loss calculations aremore » based only on the energy contained in the storage. This paper presents a new DER-CAM TES model that allows improved tracking of losses based on ambient and storage temperatures, and compares results with the previous version. A multi-layer TES model is introduced that retains linearity and avoids creating an endogenous optimization problem. The improved model increases the accuracy of the estimated storage losses and enables use of heat pumps for low temperature storage charging. Ultimately,results indicate that the previous model overestimates the attractiveness of TES investments for cases without possibility to invest in heat pumps and underestimates it for some locations when heat pumps are allowed. Despite a variation in optimal technology selection between the two models, the objective function value stays quite stable, illustrating the complexity of optimal DER sizing problems in buildings and microgrids.« less

  5. Spatiotemporal Modeling for Assessing Complementarity of Renewable Energy Sources in Distributed Energy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez Camargo, L.; Zink, R.; Dorner, W.

    2015-07-01

    Spatial assessments of the potential of renewable energy sources (RES) have become a valuable information basis for policy and decision-making. These studies, however, do not explicitly consider the variability in time of RES such as solar energy or wind. Until now, the focus is usually given to economic profitability based on yearly balances, which do not allow a comprehensive examination of RES-technologies complementarity. Incrementing temporal resolution of energy output estimation will permit to plan the aggregation of a diverse pool of RES plants i.e., to conceive a system as a virtual power plant (VPP). This paper presents a spatiotemporal analysis methodology to estimate RES potential of municipalities. The methodology relies on a combination of open source geographic information systems (GIS) processing tools and the in-memory array processing environment of Python and NumPy. Beyond the typical identification of suitable locations to build power plants, it is possible to define which of them are the best for a balanced local energy supply. A case study of a municipality, using spatial data with one square meter resolution and one hour temporal resolution, shows strong complementarity of photovoltaic and wind power. Furthermore, it is shown that a detailed deployment strategy of potential suitable locations for RES, calculated with modest computational requirements, can support municipalities to develop VPPs and improve security of supply.

  6. mHealthMon: toward energy-efficient and distributed mobile health monitoring using parallel offloading.

    PubMed

    Ahnn, Jong Hoon; Potkonjak, Miodrag

    2013-10-01

    Although mobile health monitoring where mobile sensors continuously gather, process, and update sensor readings (e.g. vital signals) from patient's sensors is emerging, little effort has been investigated in an energy-efficient management of sensor information gathering and processing. Mobile health monitoring with the focus of energy consumption may instead be holistically analyzed and systematically designed as a global solution to optimization subproblems. This paper presents an attempt to decompose the very complex mobile health monitoring system whose layer in the system corresponds to decomposed subproblems, and interfaces between them are quantified as functions of the optimization variables in order to orchestrate the subproblems. We propose a distributed and energy-saving mobile health platform, called mHealthMon where mobile users publish/access sensor data via a cloud computing-based distributed P2P overlay network. The key objective is to satisfy the mobile health monitoring application's quality of service requirements by modeling each subsystem: mobile clients with medical sensors, wireless network medium, and distributed cloud services. By simulations based on experimental data, we present the proposed system can achieve up to 10.1 times more energy-efficient and 20.2 times faster compared to a standalone mobile health monitoring application, in various mobile health monitoring scenarios applying a realistic mobility model. PMID:23897403

  7. Toward energy-efficient and distributed mobile health monitoring using parallel offloading.

    PubMed

    Ahnn, Jong Hoon; Potkonjak, Miodrag

    2013-01-01

    Although mobile health monitoring where mobile sensors continuously gather, process, and update sensor readings (e.g. vital signals) from patient's sensors is emerging, little effort has been investigated in an energy-efficient management of sensor information gathering and processing. Mobile health monitoring with the focus of energy consumption may instead be holistically analyzed and systematically designed as a global solution to optimization subproblems. We propose a distributed and energy-saving mobile health platform, called mHealthMon where mobile users publish/access sensor data via a cloud computing-based distributed P2P overlay network. The key objective is to satisfy the mobile health monitoring application's quality of service requirements by modeling each subsystem: mobile clients with medical sensors, wireless network medium, and distributed cloud services. By simulations based on experimental data, we present the proposed system can achieve up to 10.1 times more energy-efficient and 20.2 times faster compared to a standalone mobile health monitoring application, in various mobile health monitoring scenarios applying a realistic mobility model. PMID:24111420

  8. Distribution in energies and acceleration times in DSA, and their effect on the cut-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, A.; Protheroe, R. J.

    2001-08-01

    We have conducted Monte Carlo simulations of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) to determine the distribution of times since injection taken to reach energy E > E0. This distribution of acceleration times for the case of momentum dependent diffusion is compared with that given by Drury and Forman (1983) based on extrapolation of the exact result (Toptygin 1980) for the case of the diffusion coefficient being independent of momentum. As a result of this distribution we find, as suggested by Drury et al. (1999), that Monte Carlo simulations result in smoother cut-offs and pile-ups in spectra of accelerated particles than expected from simple "box model" treatments of shock acceleration (e.g., Protheroe and Stanev 1999, Drury et al. 1999). This is particularly so for the case synchrotron pile-ups, which we find are replaced by a small bump at an energy about a factor of 2 below the expected cut-off, followed by a smooth cut-off with particles extending to energies well beyond the expected cut-off energy.

  9. Analysis of Fast Electron Energy Distribution by Measuring Hard X-ray Bremsstrahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daykin, Tyler; Sawada, Hiroshi; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Bass, Anthony; Griffin, Brandon; Pandit, Rishi; Beg, Farhat; Chen, Hui; McLean, Harry; Link, Anthony; Patel, Prav; Ping, Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Characterization of intense, short-pulse laser-produced fast electrons is important for fundamental understanding and applications. We carried out an experiment to characterize the fast electron energy distribution by measuring angular-dependent high-energy bremsstrahlung x-rays. A 100 μm thick metal foil (Al, Cu, and Ag) mounted on a plastic backing was irradiated by the 0.35 ps, 15 J Leopard Laser at the Nevada Terawatt Facility. The bremsstrahlung x-rays and the escaping electrons from the target were recorded using differential filter stack spectrometers at 22° and 45° off laser axis and a magnet-based electron spectrometer along the laser axis. The electron spectrum inferred from two different diagnostics had single slope temperature of ~ 1.5 MeV for the Cu foil. The results were compared to an analytic calculation and a 2-D Particle-in-cell code, PICLS. The analysis of the electron energy distribution and angular distribution will be presented. This work was supported by the UNR Office of the Provost and by DOE/OFES under Contract No. DE-SC0008827. This collaborative work was partially supported under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Con.

  10. Energy Distribution of a Prototype KSTAR Neutral Beam Ion Source for 300 s Arc Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Doo-Hee; Jeong, Seung Ho; Oh, Byung-Hoon

    2008-02-01

    A neutral beam test-stand (NBTS) system has been developed for the extraction of a 300 s deuterium beam of 120 kV/65 A as an auxiliary heating system of Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR). The prototype long pulse ion source (LPIS) consists of a plasma generator and a set of tetrode accelerators. Beam extraction for 300 s was achieved at a maximum hydrogen beam power of 1.6 MW (70 kV/23 A) with an arc discharge power of 63 kW. The energy distribution of the ion source was analyzed by water-flow calorimetry (WFC) by monitoring the cooling-water temperature during the arc discharge. The power dissipation rate on the accelerator column was 0.97% of the total extracted ion beam power with a power loss of 0.2% caused by the collision of back stream electrons with the electron dump plate of the plasma generator. 74.2% of the total energy of was estimated to be distributed in the plasma generator and the accelerator for an arc discharge of 300 s. Also, 75.6% of the total energy was distributed in the ion source for an arc discharge of 2 s. The remaining energy was lost through the structures around the water-cooling path.

  11. Density and energy distribution of interface states in the grain boundaries of polysilicon nanowire.

    PubMed

    Amit, Iddo; Englander, Danny; Horvitz, Dror; Sasson, Yaniv; Rosenwaks, Yossi

    2014-11-12

    Wafer-scale fabrication of semiconductor nanowire devices is readily facilitated by lithography-based top-down fabrication of polysilicon nanowire (P-SiNW) arrays. However, free carrier trapping at the grain boundaries of polycrystalline materials drastically changes their properties. We present here transport measurements of P-SiNW array devices coupled with Kelvin probe force microscopy at different applied biases. By fitting the measured P-SiNW surface potential using electrostatic simulations, we extract the longitudinal dopant distribution along the nanowires as well as the density of grain boundaries interface states and their energy distribution within the band gap. PMID:25299928

  12. Visualization study of the shrinkage void distribution in thermal energy storage capsules of different geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Revankar, Shripad T.; Croy, Travis

    2007-01-15

    The presence of concentrated shrinkage voids in thermal energy storage systems employing encapsulated phase change material can cause serious problems when one attempts to melt the solidified phase change material for the next thermal cycle. Experiments were performed and void-formation phenomena with rectangular flat plate, spherical, and torus shape capsules were investigated. The initial void growth, distribution and the total void in the capsule were photographically studied from transparent capsules using cyclohexane, hexadecane, butanediol and octadecane as phase change materials. The observations on freezing process and the shrinkage void distribution are presented. (author)

  13. Magnetized retarding field energy analyzer measuring the particle flux and ion energy distribution of both positive and negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Aanesland, Ane; Dudin, Stanislav

    2015-05-15

    This paper presents the development of a magnetized retarding field energy analyzer (MRFEA) used for positive and negative ion analysis. The two-stage analyzer combines a magnetic electron barrier and an electrostatic ion energy barrier allowing both positive and negative ions to be analyzed without the influence of electrons (co-extracted or created downstream). An optimal design of the MRFEA for ion-ion beams has been achieved by a comparative study of three different MRFEA configurations, and from this, scaling laws of an optimal magnetic field strength and topology have been deduced. The optimal design consists of a uniform magnetic field barrier created in a rectangular channel and an electrostatic barrier consisting of a single grid and a collector placed behind the magnetic field. The magnetic barrier alone provides an electron suppression ratio inside the analyzer of up to 6000, while keeping the ion energy resolution below 5 eV. The effective ion transparency combining the magnetic and electrostatic sections of the MRFEA is measured as a function of the ion energy. It is found that the ion transparency of the magnetic barrier increases almost linearly with increasing ion energy in the low-energy range (below 200 eV) and saturates at high ion energies. The ion transparency of the electrostatic section is almost constant and close to the optical transparency of the entrance grid. We show here that the MRFEA can provide both accurate ion flux and ion energy distribution measurements in various experimental setups with ion beams or plasmas run at low pressure and with ion energies above 10 eV.

  14. A multi-pronged approach to the search for an alternative to formaldehyde as an egg disinfectant without affecting worker health, hatching, or broiler production parameters.

    PubMed

    Keïta, A; Huneau-Salaün, A; Guillot, A; Galliot, P; Tavares, M; Puterflam, J

    2016-07-01

    Research was carried out to determine the effectiveness of 4 hatching eggs disinfection processes (i.e., disinfecting products and administration method) using a multi-pronged approach assessing the reduction of microbial eggshell contamination, the effects on worker exposure, hatching results and broiler performance, and, finally, suitability for use in commercial hatcheries. The 4 disinfection processes were: sodium dichlorocyanurate (DC) by thermonebulization, hydrogen peroxide 6% by nebulization (HP6), electrolyzed oxidizing water (EOW) by fogging, and hydrogen peroxide 30% vapor (HP30). In order to meet commercial hatchery conditions, the tested products were applied in an experimental hatchery by aerial disinfection in a dedicated room, not sprayed directly onto the eggs. Compared to the untreated control group, eggshell microbial load was significantly decreased by over 1 log10 cfu per egg in groups DC and HP30. These results were confirmed during a second experiment. In addition, these 2 products comply with legal requirements on worker exposure. Fertility and hatching results were significantly higher in group HP30 than in group DC, with no impact on chick quality and subsequent broiler performance. Under these study conditions, the disinfection process (i.e., administration of the product, contact with the eggs and aeration) lasted 65 min in group DC vs. 135 min in group HP30. When considering commercial hatchery conditions, this difference in application time confers a clear advantage on the DC process. Moreover, the investment required for HP30 is much higher than for DC. Overall, HP30 presented a clear advantage for hatching results whereas DC is a relatively more practical and less expensive disinfection process. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the use of hydrogen peroxide vapor as an egg disinfection process. Further research is needed to confirm the results of this study under commercial hatchery conditions. PMID:26944969

  15. Late Neoproterozoic felsite (602.3 +/- 2 Ma) and associated metadiabase dikes in the Reading Prong, Pennsylvania, and rifting of Laurentia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.C., II

    2003-01-01

    Felsite dikes in the Rittenhouse Gap iron mine district of the Reading Prong, eastern Pennsylvania, have a close geochemical affinity with the peralkaline Battle Mountain Member of the Robertson River Igneous Suite (RRIS), northern Virginia. These newly recognized Rittenhouse Gap Felsite dikes of the Swabia Creek Igneous Suite (SCIS) of eastern Pennsylvania plot as within-plate, A-type, A1 granites on various discriminant diagrams, but are quite distinct from late Neoproterozoic Catoctin Metarhyolite of Pennsylvania which has lower Ga/Al and Nb, but higher Eu. Newly recognized metadiabase dikes, also found in the Rittenhouse Gap district and proposed as Tunnel Mine Metadiabase of the SCIS, classify as alkali within-plate or continental initial rifting alkali tholeiites. They are quite distinct chemically and mineralogically from Catoctin Metabasalt flows and equivalent metadiabase dikes in Pennsylvania, which have lower Nb. Sr and Nd isotopic data indicate that the Tunnel Mine Metadiabase and Rittenhouse Gap Felsite are of mantle origin, but that the latter also includes a crustal component. The SCIS bimodal volcanics in Pennsylvania suggest a previously unrecognized rift environment in Pennsylvania at 602 Ma, somewhat predating the recognized, latest Neoproterozoic Catoctin event in Pennsylvania. As such, they fill in both temporal and geographic gaps for the rifting of Laurentia in Pennsylvania. It is proposed that the SCIS melt developed from a remnant ember of the northeastward trace of the older Mount Rogers-RRIS hotspot as Laurentia rotated clockwise. However, release and intrusion of the SCIS may have been related to younger Catoctin event crustal thinning that slightly predated the mafic dike phase of the Catoctin as Laurentia later migrated northward over a second hotspot. Eventually, the mafic phase associated with this second hotspot sufficiently attenuated the crust to allow introduction of Catoctin volcanics.

  16. The Quebec Rural Emergency Department Project: A Cross-Sectional Study of a Potential Two-Pronged Strategy in the Knowledge Transfer Process

    PubMed Central

    Poitras, Julien; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Lévesque, Jean-Frédéric; Ouimet, Mathieu; Dupuis, Gilles; Tanguay, Alain; Simard-Racine, Geneviève

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Health services research generates useful knowledge. Promotion of implementation of this knowledge in medical practice is essential. Prior to initiation of a major study on rural emergency departments (EDs), we deployed two knowledge transfer strategies designed to generate interest and engagement from potential knowledge users. The objective of this paper was to review: 1) a combined project launch and media press release strategy, and 2) a pre-study survey designed to survey potential knowledge users’ opinions on the proposed study variables. Materials and Methods We evaluated the impact of the project launch (presentation at two conferences hosted by key stakeholders) and media press release via a survey of participants/stakeholders and by calculating the number of media interview requests and reports generated. We used a pre-study survey to collect potential key stakeholder’ opinions on the study variables. Results Twenty-one of Quebec’s 26 rural EDs participated in the pre-study survey (81% participation rate). The press release about the study generated 51 press articles and 20 media request for interviews, and contributed to public awareness of a major rural research initiative. In the pre-study survey, thirteen participants (46%) mentioned prior knowledge of the research project. Results from the pre-study survey revealed that all of the potential study variables were considered to be relevant for inclusion in the research project. Respondents also proposed additional variables of interest, including factors promoting retention of human resources. Conclusions The present study demonstrated the potential utility of a two-pronged knowledge transfer strategy, including a combined formal launch and press release, and a pre-study survey designed to ensure that the included variables were of interest to participants and stakeholders. PMID:25849328

  17. Binding Energy Distribution Analysis Method: Hamiltonian Replica Exchange with Torsional Flattening for Binding Mode Prediction and Binding Free Energy Estimation.

    PubMed

    Mentes, Ahmet; Deng, Nan-Jie; Vijayan, R S K; Xia, Junchao; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M

    2016-05-10

    Molecular dynamics modeling of complex biological systems is limited by finite simulation time. The simulations are often trapped close to local energy minima separated by high energy barriers. Here, we introduce Hamiltonian replica exchange (H-REMD) with torsional flattening in the Binding Energy Distribution Analysis Method (BEDAM), to reduce energy barriers along torsional degrees of freedom and accelerate sampling of intramolecular degrees of freedom relevant to protein-ligand binding. The method is tested on a standard benchmark (T4 Lysozyme/L99A/p-xylene complex) and on a library of HIV-1 integrase complexes derived from the SAMPL4 blind challenge. We applied the torsional flattening strategy to 26 of the 53 known binders to the HIV Integrase LEDGF site found to have a binding energy landscape funneled toward the crystal structure. We show that our approach samples the conformational space more efficiently than the original method without flattening when starting from a poorly docked pose with incorrect ligand dihedral angle conformations. In these unfavorable cases convergence to a binding pose within 2-3 Å from the crystallographic pose is obtained within a few nanoseconds of the Hamiltonian replica exchange simulation. We found that torsional flattening is insufficient in cases where trapping is due to factors other than torsional energy, such as the formation of incorrect intramolecular hydrogen bonds and stacking. Work is in progress to generalize the approach to handle these cases and thereby make it more widely applicable. PMID:27070865

  18. Energy distribution of massless particles on black hole backgrounds with generalized uncertainty principle

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhongheng

    2009-10-15

    We derive new formulas for the spectral energy density and total energy density of massless particles in a general spherically symmetric static metric from a generalized uncertainty principle. Compared with blackbody radiation, the spectral energy density is strongly damped at high frequencies. For large values of r, the spectral energy density diminishes when r grows, but at the event horizon, the spectral energy density vanishes and therefore thermodynamic quantities near a black hole, calculated via the generalized uncertainty principle, do not require any cutoff parameter. We find that the total energy density can be expressed in terms of Hurwitz zeta functions. It should be noted that at large r (low local temperature), the difference between the total energy density and the Stefan-Boltzmann law is too small to be observed. However, as r approaches an event horizon, the effect of the generalized uncertainty principle becomes more and more important, which may be observable. As examples, the spectral energy densities in the background metric of a Schwarzschild black hole and of a Schwarzschild black hole plus quintessence are discussed. It is interesting to note that the maximum of the distribution shifts to higher frequencies when the quintessence equation of state parameter w decreases.

  19. Conical pitch angle distributions of very-low energy ion fluxes observed by ISEE 1

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, J.L.; Baugher, C.R.; Chappell, C.R.; Shelley, E.G.; Young, D.T.

    1982-04-01

    Observations of low-energy ionospheric ions by the plasma composition experiment abroad ISEE 1 often show conical pitch angle distributions, that is, peak fluxes between 0/sup 0/ and 90/sup 0/ to the directions parallel or antiparallel to the magnetic field. Frequently, all three primary ionospheric ion species (H/sup +/, He/sup +/, and O/sup +/) simultaneously exhibit conical distributions with peak fluxes at essentially the same pitch angle. A distinction is made here between unidirectional, or streaming, distributions, in which ions are traveling essentially from only one hemisphere, and symmetrical distributions, in which significant fluxes are observed traveling from both hemispheres. The orbital coverage for this survey was largely restricted to the night sector, approximately 2100--0600 LT, and moderate geomagnetic latitudes of 20/sup 0/--40/sup 0/. Also, lack of complete pitch angle coverage at all times may have reduced detection for conics with small cone angles. However, we may conclude that the unidirectional conical distributions observed in the northern hemisphere are always observed to be traveling from the northern hemisphere and that they exhibit the following characteristics relative to the symmetric distributions, in that they (1) are typically observed on higher L shells (that is, higher geomagnetic latitudes or larger geocentric distances or both), (2) tend to have significantly larger cone angles, and (3), are associated with higher magnetic activity levels.

  20. Dayside pickup oxygen ion precipitation at Venus and Mars - Spatial distributions, energy deposition and consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Kozyra, J. U.

    1991-04-01

    The fluxes and energy spectra of picked-up planetary O(+) ions incident on the dayside atmospheres of Venus and Mars are calculated. Maps of precipitating ion number flux and energy flux are presented which show the asymmetrical distribution of dayside energy deposition expected from this source. Although the associated heating of the atmosphere and ionosphere is found to be negligible compared to that from the usual sources, backscattered or sputtered neutral oxygen atoms are produced at energies which exceed that needed for escape from the gravitational fields of both planets. These neutral 'winds', driven by pickup ion precipitation, represent a possibly significant loss of atmospheric constituents over the age of the solar system.

  1. Interactions of satellite-speed helium atoms with satellite surfaces. 2: Energy distributions of reflected helium atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, S. M.; Knuth, E. L.

    1976-01-01

    Energy transfer in collisions of satellite-speed (7,000 m/sec) helium atoms with a cleaned 6061-T6 satellite-type aluminum surface was investigated using the molecular-beam technique. The amount of energy transferred was determined from the measured energy of the molecular-beam and the measured spatial and energy distributions of the reflected atoms. Spatial distributions of helium atoms scattered from a 6061-T6 aluminum surface were measured. The scattering pattern exhibits a prominent backscattering, probably due to the gross surface roughness and/or the relative lattice softness of the aluminum surface. Energy distributions of reflected helium atoms from the same surface were measured for six different incidence angles. For each incidence angle, distributions were measured at approximately sixty scattering positions. At a given scattering position, the energy spectra of the reflected helium atoms and the background gas were obtained using the retarding-field energy analyzer.

  2. Spatial distribution of seismic energy rate of tectonic tremors in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, Suguru; Ide, Satoshi

    2014-11-01

    The sizes of deep tectonic tremors have never been accurately evaluated as a physical quantity. Here we estimate tremor size as the band-limited seismic energy rate at 2-8 Hz, with accurate evaluation of the path attenuation and site amplification of seismic waves in four subduction zones: Nankai, Cascadia, Jalisco, and South Chile. The size-frequency statistics of seismic energy rate, which are characterized by the median measure for each subregion, are spatially variable. The spatial variations are categorized into three types, with each type corresponding to a different tremor migration behavior. In type A regions where tremor zone is wider, seismic energy rates are highly variable in the dip direction, and tremor activities are usually initiated in the less energetic tremor zone. Some of them further penetrate into the energetic tremor zone and subsequently migrate for long distances in the strike direction. Type B regions are characterized by relatively narrow tremor zones, minor variations in energy rates in the dip direction, and long-distance migration in the strike direction. Type C regions are characterized by isolated clusters of tremor activities without migration and by independent failure of each small tremor cluster. Given that the spatial distributions of tremor energy rates reflect heterogeneities in the strength of the plate interface, such distributions, which would be controlled by the width of tremor zone, may determine the regional style of slow-earthquake behavior. Some energetic tremor regions act as switches that trigger large slow slip events, especially in type A regions.

  3. Electric Industry Structure and Regulatory Responses in a High Distributed Energy Resources Future

    SciTech Connect

    Corneli, Steve; Kihm, Steve; Schwartz, Lisa

    2015-11-01

    The emergence of distributed energy resources (DERs) that can generate, manage and store energy on the customer side of the electric meter is widely recognized as a transformative force in the power sector. This report focuses on two key aspects of that transformation: structural changes in the electric industry and related changes in business organization and regulation that are likely to result from them. Both industry structure and regulation are inextricably linked. History shows that the regulation of the power sector has responded primarily to innovation in technologies and business models that created significant structural changes in the sector’s cost and organizational structure.

  4. Ultraviolet photometry from the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory. XXI - Absolute energy distribution of stars in the ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, R. C.; Code, A. D.; Fairchild, E. T.

    1976-01-01

    The absolute energy distribution in the ultraviolet is given for the stars alpha Vir, eta UMa, and alpha Leo. The calibration is based on absolute heterochromatic photometry between 2920 and 1370 A carried out with an Aerobee sounding rocket. The fundamental radiation standard is the synchrotron radiation from 240-MeV electrons in a certain synchrotron storage ring. On the basis of the sounding-rocket calibration, the preliminary OAO-2 spectrometer calibration has been revised; the fluxes for the three program stars are tabulated in energy per second per square centimeter per unit wavelength interval.

  5. 40 CFR Table E-2 to Subpart E of... - Spectral Energy Distribution and Permitted Tolerance for Conducting Radiative Tests

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Spectral Energy Distribution and... REFERENCE AND EQUIVALENT METHODS Procedures for Testing Physical (Design) and Performance Characteristics of..., Table E-2 Table E-2 to Subpart E of Part 53—Spectral Energy Distribution and Permitted Tolerance...

  6. 40 CFR Table E-2 to Subpart E of... - Spectral Energy Distribution and Permitted Tolerance for Conducting Radiative Tests

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Spectral Energy Distribution and... REFERENCE AND EQUIVALENT METHODS Procedures for Testing Physical (Design) and Performance Characteristics of... E-2 Table E-2 to Subpart E of Part 53—Spectral Energy Distribution and Permitted Tolerance...

  7. 40 CFR Table E-2 to Subpart E of... - Spectral Energy Distribution and Permitted Tolerance for Conducting Radiative Tests

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Spectral Energy Distribution and... REFERENCE AND EQUIVALENT METHODS Procedures for Testing Physical (Design) and Performance Characteristics of..., Table E-2 Table E-2 to Subpart E of Part 53—Spectral Energy Distribution and Permitted Tolerance...

  8. Energy dependence of fission fragment angular distributions for 19F, 24Mg and 28Si induced reactions on 208Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, M. B.; Utsunomiya, H.; Gelbke, C. K.; Lynch, W. G.; Back, B. B.; Saini, S.; Baisden, P. A.; McMahan, M. A.

    1983-09-01

    The energy dependence of fission fragment angular distributions was measured for reaction induced by 19F, 24Mg, and 28Si on 208Pb over the range of incident energies of {E}/{A} = 5.6-10 MeV. For all three systems the angular distributions are inconsistent with the saddle point deformations of the rotating liquid drop model.

  9. Integrating Renewable Energy into the Transmission and Distribution System of the U. S. Virgin Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Burman, K.; Olis, D.; Gevorgian, V.; Warren, A.; Butt, R.; Lilienthal, P.; Glassmire, J.

    2011-09-01

    This report focuses on the economic and technical feasibility of integrating renewable energy technologies into the U.S. Virgin Islands transmission and distribution systems. The report includes three main areas of analysis: 1) the economics of deploying utility-scale renewable energy technologies on St. Thomas/St. John and St. Croix; 2) potential sites for installing roof- and ground-mount PV systems and wind turbines and the impact renewable generation will have on the electrical subtransmission and distribution infrastructure, and 3) the feasibility of a 100- to 200-megawatt power interconnection of the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA), Virgin Islands Water and Power Authority (WAPA), and British Virgin Islands (BVI) grids via a submarine cable system.

  10. Risk Assessment of Investment Strategy in Distributed Energy System under Uncertainty of Fuel and Electricity Prices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariki, Wakako; Asano, Hiroshi; Koda, Eiich; Bando, Shigeru

    This paper discusses investment strategies in distributed energy system consisting of cogeneration system and renewable power generation, under uncertainty in the natural gas and the electricity prices as well as related risk assessment of investment strategies. Although incentives for introducing distributed energy system increase these days, volatile natural gas prices make its investment risky. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the risk under uncertainty and find strategies which reduce the exposure to volatility. We take the real option approach to analyze investment decision. By varying the parameters of prices volatility and correlation between uncertainty of natural gas price with that of electricity price, we find that the optimal investment strategy depends on the level of uncertainty and correlation. When volatility is large and correlation is small, strategies with installation option of small renewable power generation, here, photovoltaic generation, and small cogeneration system become attractive in terms of risk reduction.

  11. The energy distributions of B supergiants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, E. L.

    1986-09-01

    It is shown that line-blanketed, LTE, plane-parallel model atmosphere calculations provide excellent fits to the ultraviolet-through-visual energy distributions of B supergiants in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The models were computed using Kurucz's (1979) ATLAS atmosphere program, but with lower gravities than were contained in Kurucz's published model grid. The ultraviolet continua of low gravity stars are found to be sensitive to changes in temperature and gravity. Measurements of Teff and log g for ten LMC B supergiants from model atmosphere fits to the energy distributions yield estimates of their radii, luminosities, and masses. Model atmosphere fits suggest that the late B supergiants have significantly lower masses than the earlier B types of the same luminosity, contrary to stellar evolution theory which predicts that B supergiants are in a post-core hydrogen burning phase and should evolve very quickly and at essentially constant mass.

  12. The energy distributions of B supergiants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, Edward L.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that line-blanketed, LTE, plane-parallel model atmosphere calculations provide excellent fits to the ultraviolet-through-visual energy distributions of B supergiants in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The models were computed using Kurucz's (1979) ATLAS atmosphere program, but with lower gravities than were contained in Kurucz's published model grid. The ultraviolet continua of low gravity stars are found to be sensitive to changes in temperature and gravity. Measurements of Teff and log g for ten LMC B supergiants from model atmosphere fits to the energy distributions yield estimates of their radii, luminosities, and masses. Model atmosphere fits suggest that the late B supergiants have significantly lower masses than the earlier B types of the same luminosity, contrary to stellar evolution theory which predicts that B supergiants are in a post-core hydrogen burning phase and should evolve very quickly and at essentially constant mass.

  13. Optimal investment and scheduling of distributed energy resources with uncertainty in electric vehicles driving schedules

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoso, Goncalo; Stadler, Michael; Bozchalui, Mohammed C.; Sharma, Ratnesh; Marnay, Chris; Barbosa-Povoa, Ana; Ferrao, Paulo

    2013-12-06

    The large scale penetration of electric vehicles (EVs) will introduce technical challenges to the distribution grid, but also carries the potential for vehicle-to-grid services. Namely, if available in large enough numbers, EVs can be used as a distributed energy resource (DER) and their presence can influence optimal DER investment and scheduling decisions in microgrids. In this work, a novel EV fleet aggregator model is introduced in a stochastic formulation of DER-CAM [1], an optimization tool used to address DER investment and scheduling problems. This is used to assess the impact of EV interconnections on optimal DER solutions considering uncertainty in EV driving schedules. Optimization results indicate that EVs can have a significant impact on DER investments, particularly if considering short payback periods. Furthermore, results suggest that uncertainty in driving schedules carries little significance to total energy costs, which is corroborated by results obtained using the stochastic formulation of the problem.

  14. The time-varying electron energy distribution function in the plume of a Hall thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannenmayer, K.; Mazouffre, S.; Kudrna, P.; Tichý, M.

    2014-12-01

    Time-resolved Langmuir probe measurements have been performed in the plume of the 1.5 kW class PPS®1350-ML Hall thruster. The time-dependent electron energy distribution function (EEDF) has been inferred from the probe current-voltage characteristic curves obtained after active stabilization of the discharge. The distribution function changes in the course of time at the breathing oscillation frequency (13.8 kHz). The EEDF is Maxwellian with a depleted tail above the xenon ionization energy whatever the location and the time. The electron density and temperature computed from the EEDF also oscillate at the breathing mode frequency. Experimental outcomes indicate the existence of a low-frequency plasma wave that propagates axially. The wave front speed (2700 m s-1) was found to be compatible with the ion acoustic speed (2300 m s-1).

  15. Industrial Use of Distributed Generation in Real-Time Energy and Ancillary Service Markets

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, C.R.

    2001-10-24

    Industrial consumers of energy now have the opportunity to participate directly in electricity generation. This report seeks to give the reader (1) insights into the various types of generation services that distributed generation (DG) units could provide, (2) a mechanism to evaluate the economics of using DG, (3) an overview of the status of DG deployment in selected states, and (4) a summary of the communication technologies involved with DG and what testing activities are needed to encourage industrial application of DG. Section 1 provides details on electricity markets and the types of services that can be offered. Subsequent sections in the report address the technical requirements for participating in such markets, the economic decision process that an industrial energy user should go through in evaluating distributed generation, the status of current deployment efforts, and the requirements for test-bed or field demonstration projects.

  16. Raman distributed temperature measurement at CERN high energy accelerator mixed field radiation test facility (CHARM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toccafondo, Iacopo; Nannipieri, Tiziano; Signorini, Alessandro; Guillermain, Elisa; Kuhnhenn, Jochen; Brugger, Markus; Di Pasquale, Fabrizio

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present a validation of distributed Raman temperature sensing (RDTS) at the CERN high energy accelerator mixed field radiation test facility (CHARM), newly developed in order to qualify electronics for the challenging radiation environment of accelerators and connected high energy physics experiments. By investigating the effect of wavelength dependent radiation induced absorption (RIA) on the Raman Stokes and anti-Stokes light components in radiation tolerant Ge-doped multi-mode (MM) graded-index optical fibers, we demonstrate that Raman DTS used in loop configuration is robust to harsh environments in which the fiber is exposed to a mixed radiation field. The temperature profiles measured on commercial Ge-doped optical fibers is fully reliable and therefore, can be used to correct the RIA temperature dependence in distributed radiation sensing systems based on P-doped optical fibers.

  17. The influence of wave energy and sediment transport on seagrass distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, Andrew W.; Lacy, Jessica R.

    2012-01-01

    A coupled hydrodynamic and sediment transport model (Delft3D) was used to simulate the water levels, waves, and currents associated with a seagrass (Zostera marina) landscape along a 4-km stretch of coast in Puget Sound, WA, USA. A hydroacoustic survey of seagrass percent cover and nearshore bathymetry was conducted, and sediment grain size was sampled at 53 locations. Wave energy is a primary factor controlling seagrass distribution at the site, accounting for 73% of the variability in seagrass minimum depth and 86% of the variability in percent cover along the shallow, sandy portions of the coast. A combination of numerical simulations and a conceptual model of the effect of sea-level rise on the cross-shore distribution of seagrass indicates that the area of seagrass habitat may initially increase and that wave dynamics are an important factor to consider in predicting the effect of sea-level rise on seagrass distributions in wave-exposed areas.

  18. Nonlinear dust acoustic waves in a mixed nonthermal high energy-tail electron distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Younsi, Smain; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2008-07-15

    Large amplitude as well as weakly nonlinear dust acoustic waves in a mixed nonthermal high-energy-tail electron distribution are investigated. The effects of charge variation and electron deviation from Boltzmann distribution on the large amplitude dust acoustic soliton are then considered. The dust charge variation leads to an additional enlargement of the dust acoustic soliton, which is more pronounced as the electrons evolve far away from Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. Under certain conditions, the dust charge fluctuation may provide an alternate physical mechanism causing anomalous dissipation, the strength of which becomes important and may prevail over that of dispersion as the suprathermal character of the plasma becomes important. The results complement and provide new insights into our previously published results on this problem [K. Aoutou, M. Tribeche, and T. H. Zerguini, Phys. Plasmas 15, 013702 (2008)].

  19. Measurement of fragment mass distributions in neutron-induced fission reactions at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simutkin, V. D.; Ryzhov, I. V.; Tutin, G. A.; Vaishnene, L. A.; Blomgren, J.; Pomp, S.; Österlund, M.; Andersson, P.; Bevilacqua, R.; Meulders, J. P.; Prieels, R.

    2009-10-01

    Fragment mass distributions from neutron-induced fission of 232Th and 238U have been measured at quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam of the Louvain-la-Neuve cyclotron facility CYCLONE. The measurements have been carried out making use of a multi-section Frisch-gridded ionization chamber. The measurement technique as well as the data processing is described. Preliminary data on primary fragment mass yields are given for an incident neutron energy of 32.8 MeV.

  20. Novel algorithm for calculating the time evolution of the electron energy distribution function in gaseous discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Drallos, P.J.; Wadehra, J.M.

    1988-06-01

    We are presenting a novel numerical technique for obtaining the time evolution of the electron velocity and electron energy distribution functions in the presence of a uniform electric field. Using this technique, the various swarm parameters can be evolved for sufficiently long times so that equilibrium can be reached without incurring any numerical instabilities. Results are presented for electron swarms in gaseous neon for various values of E/N.

  1. Absolute energy distribution in the spectra of 32 Cygni. Eclipses of 1987 and 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnashev, V. I.; Burnasheva, B. A.

    2011-06-01

    The photometric observations during 1953-1994 were used for the construction of the summary light curve for 32 Cygni in the photometric UBV-system. On the basis of energy distribution data, the spectral classes and luminosities of the components of this binary system were obtained. The column density of HI during several ingresses and egresses was estimated, suggesting that the depression at λ 3650 Å was caused by hydrogen absorption.

  2. Peculiarities of gamma-quanta distribution at 20 TeV energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loktionov, A. A.; Ermakov, P. M.; Lukin, Y. T.; Sadykov, T. K.

    1985-01-01

    The angular distribution of protons from the fragmentational region is analyzed. The gamma-quanta families are generated in a dense target by cosmic ray particles at 20 Tev energy. Families were found which had dense groups (spikes) of gamma-quanta where the rapidity/density is 3 times more than the average value determined for all registered families. The experimental data is compared with the results of artificial families simulation.

  3. Parameter estimation of magnetospheric particle distributions in the energy range 20 to 500 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torkar, K. M.

    1982-04-01

    A computer program which analyzes the energy spectra of energetic magnetospheric particles is described. The instrument characteristics and experimental design of the geostationary satellite GEOS-2 which provided the raw data are indicated. The program is designed to run on a UNIVAC 1100/81 computer and requires a plotter and a terminal with basic display enhancement features. Three dimensional charts showing the spectral distribution of energetic electrons are included.

  4. Numerical investigation of ion energy distribution and ion angle distribution in a dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasma with a hybrid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai; Xu, Xiang; Wang, You-Nian

    2007-11-01

    A one-dimensional hybrid model is developed to study the characteristics of energy and angular distributions of the ions and fast neutrals impinging on the rf-biased electrode in a dual-frequency capacitively coupled Ar discharge. The hybrid model consists of a fluid model that determines the spatiotemporal evolution of the discharge, and a Monte-Carlo model that, including the electron-neutral, ion-neutral, and fast neutral-neutral collisions, predicts the energy and angular distributions of the ions and fast neutrals on the rf-biased electrode. The influence of pressure, voltage amplitude, and frequencies of the two rf sources on the energy and angular distributions is discussed. The ion energy distributions (IEDs) appear to have multiple peaks in the dual-frequency capacitively coupled rf discharge rather than bimodal shape in a conventional single-frequency rf discharge. The ion angle distributions (IADs) have a significant peak at a small angle, and most ions strike to the process surface with the angle less than 4°. With the increase of the pressure, the maximum energy of IEDs and the peaks of IADs decrease. The structures of IEDs are controlled mainly by the voltage and frequency applied to the two rf sources. By decreasing the frequency or adding the voltage applied to the low-frequency (LF) source, the width of IEDs and the maximum energy increase. More ions strike to the electrode with a small angle by increasing either the voltage of LF source or the frequency of high-frequency source. The energy and angular distributions of the fast neutrals are correlative with those of the ions. Compared with the ions, the fast neutrals have a much lower energy and the scattering effect becomes more prominent.

  5. Community Energy: Analysis of Hydrogen Distributed Energy Systems with Photovoltaics for Load Leveling and Vehicle Refueling

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, D.; Zuboy, J.

    2014-10-01

    Energy storage could complement PV electricity generation at the community level. Because PV generation is intermittent, strategies must be implemented to integrate it into the electricity system. Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies offer possible PV integration strategies, including the community-level approaches analyzed in this report: (1) using hydrogen production, storage, and reconversion to electricity to level PV generation and grid loads (reconversion scenario); (2) using hydrogen production and storage to capture peak PV generation and refuel hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) (hydrogen fueling scenario); and (3) a comparison scenario using a battery system to store electricity for EV nighttime charging (electric charging scenario).

  6. Ion energy distribution functions of low energy beams formed by wire extraction electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Tokumura, S.; Kasuya, T.; Vasquez, M. Jr.; Maeno, S.; Wada, M.

    2012-02-15

    The two-electrode extractor system made of 0.1 mm diameter tungsten wires separated by 0.7 mm has formed an argon ion beam with 50 V extraction potential. Energy spreads of the extracted beams were typically less than 2 eV when the beam current density was low. The beam intensity rapidly decreased as the distance between the extractor and the beam detector increased, indicating space charge limited transport of the beam. Problems associated with the emittance measurements are also discussed.

  7. Plasma-Surface Interactions and Impact on Electron Energy Distribution Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox-Lyon, N. A.; Oehrlein, G. S.; Ning, N.; Graves, D. B.; Godyak, V.

    2011-10-01

    The goal of this work is to explore the role of surface processes in influencing characteristic electron energy distribution functions (EEDF).As a model system, we use a well characterized, inductively coupled plasma system to examine Ar/H2 (or D2) discharges interacting with a-C:H films. The modification/erosion of a-C:H surfaces is monitored in real time by ellipsometry and the effects of gas mixtures and surface generated carbon on plasma parameters (Te, plasma density, EEDF) are probed with Langmuir probe measurements. We find that plasma density decreased greatly (from 1011 to 109 per cm3) with small H2 additions to Ar plasma (conditions: 10-30 mTorr, 300-600 W source power). The electron temperature was shown to increase with H2 flow. At high H2 flows, the electron energy distribution transitions from Maxwellian distribution to a two-temperature distribution. The addition of 1-20 % CH4 into H2 plasma shows an increase in plasma density and a change in the electron temperature. The hydrocarbon erosion products of a-C:H films in H2 plasma are found to cause a similar effect on plasma properties as CH4 addition. These observations indicate that prediction/control of EEDF for plasmas interacting with reactive bounding surfaces requires an understanding of the consequences of the plasma-surface interactions.

  8. Fluorescence energy transfer in two dimensions. A numeric solution for random and nonrandom distributions.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, B; Freire, E

    1982-01-01

    A method of Monte Carlo calculations has been applied to the problem of fluorescence energy transfer in two dimensions in order to provide a quantitative measure of the effects of nonideal mixing of lipid and protein molecules on the quenching profiles of membrane systems. These numerical techniques permit the formulation of a detailed set of equations that describes in a precise manner the quenching and depolarization properties of planar donor-acceptor distributions as a function of specific spectroscopic and organizational parameters. Because of the exact nature of the present numeric method, these results are used to evaluate critically the validity of previous approximate treatments existing in the literature. This method is also used to examine the effects of excluded volume interactions and distinct lattice structures on the expected transfer efficiencies. As a specific application, representative quenching profiles for protein-lipid mixtures, in which donor groups are covalently linked to the protein molecules and acceptor species are randomly distributed within lipid domains, have been obtained. It is found that the existence of phase-separated protein domains gives rise to a shielding effect that significantly decreases the transfer efficiencies with respect to those expected for an ideal distribution of protein molecules. The results from the present numerical study indicate that the experimental application of fluorescence energy transfer measurements in multicomponent membrane systems can be used to obtain organizational parameters that accurately reflect the lateral distribution of protein and lipid molecules within the bilayer membrane. PMID:7171709

  9. Local time variations of high-energy plasmaspheric ion pitch angle distributions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sarno-Smith, Lois K.; Liemohn, Michael W.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Larsen, Brian Arthur; Moldwin, Mark B.; Katus, Roxanne M.; Wygant, John R.

    2016-07-05

    Recent observations from the Van Allen Probes Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) instrument revealed a persistent depletion in the 1–10 eV ion population in the postmidnight sector during quiet times in the 2 < L < 3 region. This study explores the source of this ion depletion by developing an algorithm to classify 26 months of pitch angle distributions measured by the HOPE instrument. We correct the HOPE low energy fluxes for spacecraft potential using measurements from the Electric Field and Waves (EFW) instrument. A high percentage of low count pitch angle distributions is found in the postmidnight sector coupledmore » with a low percentage of ion distributions peaked perpendicular to the field line. A peak in loss cone distributions in the dusk sector is also observed. Here, these results characterize the nature of the dearth of the near 90° pitch angle 1–10 eV ion population in the near-Earth postmidnight sector. This study also shows, for the first time, low-energy HOPE differential number fluxes corrected for spacecraft potential and 1–10 eV H+ fluxes at different levels of geomagnetic activity.« less

  10. Economic optimization of the energy transport component of a large distributed solar power plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    A solar thermal power plant with a field of collectors, each locally heating some transport fluid, requires a pipe network system for eventual delivery of energy power generation equipment. For a given collector distribution and pipe network geometry, a technique is herein developed which manipulates basic cost information and physical data in order to design an energy transport system consistent with minimized cost constrained by a calculated technical performance. For a given transport fluid and collector conditions, the method determines the network pipe diameter and pipe thickness distribution and also insulation thickness distribution associated with minimum system cost; these relative distributions are unique. Transport losses, including pump work and heat leak, are calculated operating expenses and impact the total system cost. The minimum cost system is readily selected. The technique is demonstrated on six candidate transport fluids to emphasize which parameters dominate the system cost and to provide basic decision data. Three different power plant output sizes are evaluated in each case to determine severity of diseconomy of scale.

  11. An Atlas of Galaxy Spectral Energy Distributions from the Ultraviolet to the Mid-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael J. I.; Moustakas, John; Smith, J.-D. T.; da Cunha, Elisabete; Jarrett, T. H.; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Armus, Lee; Brandl, Bernhard R.; Peek, J. E. G.

    2014-06-01

    We present an atlas of 129 spectral energy distributions for nearby galaxies, with wavelength coverage spanning from the ultraviolet to the mid-infrared. Our atlas spans a broad range of galaxy types, including ellipticals, spirals, merging galaxies, blue compact dwarfs, and luminous infrared galaxies. We have combined ground-based optical drift-scan spectrophotometry with infrared spectroscopy from Spitzer and Akari with gaps in spectral coverage being filled using Multi-wavelength Analysis of Galaxy Physical Properties spectral energy distribution models. The spectroscopy and models were normalized, constrained, and verified with matched-aperture photometry measured from Swift, Galaxy Evolution Explorer, Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Two Micron All Sky Survey, Spitzer, and Wide-field Infrared Space Explorer images. The availability of 26 photometric bands allowed us to identify and mitigate systematic errors present in the data. Comparison of our spectral energy distributions with other template libraries and the observed colors of galaxies indicates that we have smaller systematic errors than existing atlases, while spanning a broader range of galaxy types. Relative to the prior literature, our atlas will provide improved K-corrections, photometric redshifts, and star-formation rate calibrations.

  12. Baseline measures for net-proton distributions in high energy heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netrakanti, P. K.; Luo, X. F.; Mishra, D. K.; Mohanty, B.; Mohanty, A.; Xu, N.

    2016-03-01

    We report a systematic comparison of the recently measured cumulants of the net-proton distributions for 0-5% central Au + Au collisions in the first phase of the Beam Energy Scan (BES) Program at the Relativistic Heavy Collider facility to various kinds of possible baseline measures. These baseline measures correspond to an assumption that the proton and anti-proton distributions follow Poisson statistics, Binomial statistics, obtained from a transport model calculation and from a hadron resonance gas model. The higher order cumulant net-proton data for the center of mass energies (√{sNN}) of 19.6 and 27 GeV are observed to deviate from most of the baseline measures studied. The deviations are predominantly due to the difference in shape of the proton distributions between data and those obtained in the baseline measures. We also present a detailed study on the relevance of the independent production approach as a baseline for comparison with the measurements at various beam energies. Our studies point to the need of either more detailed baseline models for the experimental measurements or a description via QCD calculations in order to extract the exact physics process that leads to deviation of the data from the baselines presented.

  13. Where-Fi: a dynamic energy-efficient multimedia distribution framework for MANETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Shivajit; Carbunar, Bogdan; Pearce, Michael; Chaudhri, Rohit; Vasudevan, Venu

    2008-01-01

    Next generation mobile ad-hoc applications will revolve around users' need for sharing content/presence information with co-located devices. However, keeping such information fresh requires frequent meta-data exchanges, which could result in significant energy overheads. To address this issue, we propose distributed algorithms for energy efficient dissemination of presence and content usage information between nodes in mobile ad-hoc networks. First, we introduce a content dissemination protocol (called CPMP) for effectively distributing frequent small meta-data updates between co-located devices using multicast. We then develop two distributed algorithms that use the CPMP protocol to achieve "phase locked" wake up cycles for all the participating nodes in the network. The first algorithm is designed for fully-connected networks and then extended in the second to handle hidden terminals. The "phase locked" schedules are then exploited to adaptively transition the network interface to a deep sleep state for energy savings. We have implemented a prototype system (called "Where-Fi") on several Motorola Linux-based cell phone models. Our experimental results show that for all network topologies our algorithms were able to achieve "phase locking" between nodes even in the presence of hidden terminals. Moreover, we achieved battery lifetime extensions of as much as 28% for fully connected networks and about 20% for partially connected networks.

  14. Measuring the ion energy distribution using a retarding field energy analyzer in a plasma material interaction test stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christenson, Michael; Jung, Soonwook; Andruczyk, Daniel; Curreli, Davide; Ruzic, David

    2013-10-01

    The Divertor Erosion and Vapor Shielding eXperiment (DEVeX) at the University of Illinois is a gas-puff driven, theta pinch plasma source that is used as a test stand for off-normal plasma events incident on materials in the edge and divertor regions of a tokamak. Ion temperatures and the resulting energy distribution are of vital importance in DEVeX, indicating the level of edge simulation. For this reason, a theta pinch has been applied as a source of external heating, along with a coaxial plasma accelerator as a pre-ionization source. In its most recent iteration, the accurate diagnosis of ion temperature will prove difficult using conventional methods, since diagnostics are difficult in a pulsed device for measuring the ion temperature range produced in DEVeX (~10-100 eV). A retarding field energy analyzer (RFEA) has been proposed to measure the ion energy distribution and will be compared to theoretical predictions for the ion temperature in the upgraded DEVeX system. Such a diagnostic tool would be less susceptible to external fields and would be suitable for ion temperatures on the order of 100 eV. The RFEA will serve as a diagnostic for the ThermoElectric-driven Liquid-metal plasma-facing Structures (TELS), and its further applications are discussed. In residence at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory.

  15. Mode-space energy distribution in instability-driven plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P. W.; Makwana, K. D.; Pueschel, M. J.; Hatch, D. R.; Jenko, F.; Merz, F.

    2014-12-15

    Energy transfer to damped modes in gyrokinetic ion temperature gradient driven turbulence is studied to understand the transfer dynamics and find scaling representations for the heavily populated mode space. Proper orthogonal and linear eigenmode decompositions are introduced and examined to assess whether modes are well-resolved and what scales they encompass. It is observed that damped modes across a range of inhomogeneous scales receive energy simultaneously and directly from the unstable mode, constituting a form of parallel transfer, distinct from the serial mode-to-mode transfer of the wavenumber cascade of hydrodynamic turbulence. Controlling for modes that are well resolved and labeling the modes of the linear decomposition in order of damping rate, energy transfer in the mode space satisfies an equipartition of the energy dissipation rate, leading to a simple rule for the distribution of energy in the space of damped modes. Energy dissipation rate equipartition is the form that the canonical nonlinear invariance of energy transfer assumes in a dissipation range with parallel rather than serial transfer.

  16. The use of nested chevron rails in a distributed energy store railgun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, R. A.

    1984-03-01

    It is pointed out that the large amounts of energy required by electromagnetic launchers will necessitate that energy stores be distributed along their length. The nested chevron rail construction will make it possible for a railgun launcher to be produced in which most of the switching requirements for the launcher/energy store system will be met automatically. Each nested chevron-shaped conductor will be electrically insulated from its neighbors, and each opposing chevron pair (one on each rail) will be connected to the terminals of one energy store (Marshall, 1982). It is explained that as the projectile moves down the railgun the chevrons and associated energy stores at first are unaffected by the approach. At this time the inductors can be charged, and any other preliminary operation can be performed. When the armature comes into contact with the Nth chevron, charge begins to flow from the Nth energy storage system; it flows through one chevron, into the armature, out of the armature into the other chevron, and from that chevron back to the energy storage system.

  17. High-energy tail formation in an ion energy distribution function in the cylindrical Hall thruster plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Youbong; Kim, Holak; Park, Jaesun; Seon, Jongho; Choe, Wonho

    2014-10-01

    Ion energy distribution functions (IEDFs) of individual ion species having different charge states (i.e. Xe+, Xe2+, Xe3+, etc.) in the Hall thruster plasma are obtained from the measured E × B probe spectrum by a novel inversion technique using the iterative Tikhonov regularization method. The obtained IEDFs show the existence of a high-energy tail in the cylindrical Hall thruster plasmas that is mainly due to Xe+ ions despite the presence of Xe2+ and Xe3+ ions with a large fraction. Ion dynamics inside the plasma was numerically investigated to demonstrate that the high-energy tail is due to nonlinear ion acceleration in the plasma oscillating at typically 100 to 500 kHz. We found that this oscillation driven by transit-time instability is responsible for the shift of the IEDF of the Xe+ ions toward the high-energy side, showing the formation of high-energy tail in the overall IEDF. It was also found that the Xe flow rate raised from 4 to 10 sccm increases the oscillation strength at the same frequency of 360 kHz, which can be applied to control of the shape of the IEDF.

  18. Model documentation: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System; Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1994-02-24

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is a component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. This report documents the archived version of NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts used in support of the Annual Energy Outlook 1994, DOE/EIA-0383(94). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. It is intended to fulfill the legal obligation of the EIA to provide adequate documentation in support of its models (Public Law 94-385, Section 57.b.2). This report represents Volume 1 of a two-volume set. (Volume 2 will report on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues.) Subsequent chapters of this report provide: (1) an overview of the NGTDM (Chapter 2); (2) a description of the interface between the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and the NGTDM (Chapter 3); (3) an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM (Chapter 4); (4) the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module (Chapter 5); (5) the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module (Chapter 6); (6) the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module (Chapter 7); (7) the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module (Chapter 8); and (8) a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs (Chapter 9).

  19. Longitudinal dose distribution and energy absorption in PMMA and water cylinders undergoing CT scans

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: The knowledge of longitudinal dose distribution provides the most direct view of the accumulated dose in computed tomography (CT) scanning. The purpose of this work was to perform a comprehensive study of dose distribution width and energy absorption with a wide range of subject sizes and beam irradiated lengths. Methods: Cumulative dose distribution along the z-axis was calculated based on the previously published CT dose equilibration data by Li, Zhang, and Liu [Med. Phys. 40, 031903 (10pp.) (2013)] and a mechanism for computing dose on axial lines by Li, Zhang, and Liu [Med. Phys. 39, 5347–5352 (2012)]. Full width at half maximum (FWHM), full width at tenth maximum (FWTM), the total energy (E) absorbed in a small cylinder of unit mass per centimeter square about the central or peripheral axis, and the energy (E{sub in}) absorbed inside irradiated length (L) were subsequently extracted from the dose distribution. Results: Extensive results of FWHM, FWTM, and E{sub in}/E were presented on the central and peripheral axes of infinitely long PMMA (diameters 6–50 cm) and water (diameters 6–55 cm) cylinders with L < 100 cm. FWHM was greater than the primary beam width only on the central axes of large phantoms and also with L ranging from a few centimeter to about 33 cm. FWTM generally increased with phantom diameter, and could be up to 32 cm longer than irradiated length, depending on L, phantom diameter and axis, but was insensitive to phantom material (PMMA or water). E{sub in}/E increased with L and asymptotically approached unity for large L. As phantom diameter increased, E{sub in}/E generally decreased, but asymptotically approached constant levels on the peripheral axes of large phantoms. A heuristic explanation of dose distribution width results was presented. Conclusions: This study enables the reader to gain a comprehensive view of dose distribution width and energy absorption and provides useful data for estimating doses to organs inside or

  20. The importance of geospatial data to calculate the optimal distribution of renewable energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Paula; Masó, Joan

    2013-04-01

    Specially during last three years, the renewable energies are revolutionizing the international trade while they are geographically diversifying markets. Renewables are experiencing a rapid growth in power generation. According to REN21 (2012), during last six years, the total renewables capacity installed grew at record rates. In 2011, the EU raised its share of global new renewables capacity till 44%. The BRICS nations (Brazil, Russia, India and China) accounted for about 26% of the total global. Moreover, almost twenty countries in the Middle East, North Africa, and sub-Saharan Africa have currently active markets in renewables. The energy return ratios are commonly used to calculate the efficiency of the traditional energy sources. The Energy Return On Investment (EROI) compares the energy returned for a certain source and the energy used to get it (explore, find, develop, produce, extract, transform, harvest, grow, process, etc.). These energy return ratios have demonstrated a general decrease of efficiency of the fossil fuels and gas. When considering the limitations of the quantity of energy produced by some sources, the energy invested to obtain them and the difficulties of finding optimal locations for the establishment of renewables farms (e.g. due to an ever increasing scarce of appropriate land) the EROI becomes relevant in renewables. A spatialized EROI, which uses variables with spatial distribution, enables the optimal position in terms of both energy production and associated costs. It is important to note that the spatialized EROI can be mathematically formalized and calculated the same way for different locations in a reproducible way. This means that having established a concrete EROI methodology it is possible to generate a continuous map that will highlight the best productive zones for renewable energies in terms of maximum energy return at minimum cost. Relevant variables to calculate the real energy invested are the grid connections between

  1. Distribution of RF energy emitted by mobile phones in anatomical structures of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardis, E.; Deltour, I.; Mann, S.; Moissonnier, M.; Taki, M.; Varsier, N.; Wake, K.; Wiart, J.

    2008-06-01

    The rapid worldwide increase in mobile phone use in the last decade has generated considerable interest in possible carcinogenic effects of radio frequency (RF). Because exposure to RF from phones is localized, if a risk exists it is likely to be greatest for tumours in regions with greatest energy absorption. The objective of the current paper was to characterize the spatial distribution of RF energy in the brain, using results of measurements made in two laboratories on 110 phones used in Europe or Japan. Most (97-99% depending on frequency) appears to be absorbed in the brain hemisphere on the side where the phone is used, mainly (50-60%) in the temporal lobe. The average relative SARSAR is the specific energy absorption rate i.e. energy absorption rate per unit mass (measured in W kg-1). is highest in the temporal lobe (6-15%, depending on frequency, of the spatial peak SAR in the most exposed region of the brain) and the cerebellum (2-10%) and decreases very rapidly with increasing depth, particularly at higher frequencies. The SAR distribution appears to be fairly similar across phone models, between older and newer phones and between phones with different antenna types and positions. Analyses of risk by location of tumour are therefore important for the interpretation of results of studies of brain tumours in relation to mobile phone use.

  2. Ion energy distributions at the electrodes of high pressure capacitive dual-frequency hydrogen discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüngel, Edmund; Mohr, Sebastian; Schulze, Julian; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2012-10-01

    Capacitively coupled radio frequency (CCRF) discharges are widely used for surface processing applications, such as thin film solar cell manufacturing. In order to optimize the plasma surface interactions, the fluxes and energy distributions of radicals and ions at the substrate need to be controlled. In particular, the ion energy distribution function (IEDF) plays a crucial role. Previous investigations have shown that the mean ion energy can be changed in low pressure argon discharges via the Electrical Asymmetry Effect (EAE). Here, two consecutive harmonics are applied to the powered electrode. The main control parameter is the phase angle between the frequencies, which allows to adjust the symmetry of the discharge, the DC self bias, and the sheath voltages. In this work, the EAE is investigated in a parallel plate CCRF discharge operated in pure hydrogen at pressures of several hundred Pa. The axial component of the IEDF of the dominant ion species, H3^+, is measured at the grounded electrode using a plasma process monitor. The results focus on the question how the shape of the IEDF, the mean ion energy, and the total ion flux change as a function of the phase angle. Funded by the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (0325210B).

  3. Diffuse gamma radiation. [intensity, energy spectrum and spatial distribution from SAS 2 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Simpson, G. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Results are reported for an investigation of the intensity, energy spectrum, and spatial distribution of the diffuse gamma radiation detected by SAS 2 away from the galactic plane in the energy range above 35 MeV. The gamma-ray data are compared with relevant data obtained at other wavelengths, including 21-cm emission, radio continuum radiation, and the limited UV and radio information on local molecular hydrogen. It is found that there are two quite distinct components to the diffuse radiation, one of which shows a good correlation with the galactic matter distribution and continuum radiation, while the other has a much steeper energy spectrum and appears to be isotropic at least on a coarse scale. The galactic component is interpreted in terms of its implications for both local and more distant regions of the Galaxy. The apparently isotropic radiation is discussed partly with regard to the constraints placed on possible models by the steep energy spectrum, the observed intensity, and an upper limit on the anisotropy.

  4. Ion Flux and Ion Energy Distributions in an Inductively Coupled GEC Rf Refererence Cell in Chlorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radovanov, Svetlana; Forrister, Ray; Anderson, Harold

    1996-10-01

    Ion flux and energy distribution measurements in pure chlorine were performed in an inductively coupled Gaseous Electronics Reference Cell 13.56 MHz radiofrequency discharge . Measurements were made using miniaturized gridded energy analyzer. This detector was developed at the University of New Mexico, based on earlier design of the small size energy analyzers at MIT. The detector was mounted on a 12 inch water cooled carrier to suppress probe heating. The probe could be radially moved in the discharge cell to monitor the radial uniformity of the plasma. In addition, the detector was protected with a ceramic coating to supress for the electron saturation current of unshielded probe areas. The measurements were done in the "bright " mode dominated by inductive coupling at different pressures and powers. The radial variation of the ion flux in pure chlorine and argon show similar strongly nonuniform profile. As expected, absolute ion flux values in chlorine are substantially decreased compared to pure argon discharge. The spatial nonuniformity across the 16 cm diameter surface of the grounded electrode is in agreement with the Langmuir probe measurements done by Miller and MIT measurements in pure argon. The ion energy distribution functions (IEDs) measured exhibit a complex structure indicative of both light Cl^+ and heavier Cl_2^+ ions. The IEDs in chlorine are much broder than those measured in pure argon plasma. The radial profile of IEDs found in the GEC/ICP chlorine discharge indicate large changes are occuring in the nature of power coupling to the discharge moving center to edge.

  5. Energy distribution and heat transfer mechanisms in atmospheric pressure non-equilibrium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Miyazaki, Yu; Unno, Yasuko; Okazaki, Ken

    2001-12-01

    Energy distribution and heat transfer mechanisms in atmospheric pressure non-equilibrium plasmas were investigated extensively through energy balance analysis, emission spectroscopy of the rotational band of CH (A2Δ→X2Π), and gas chromatographic analysis. Two plasma sources were examined: methane-fed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) and atmospheric pressure glow-discharge (APG). The DBD features filamentary microdischarges accompanied by surface discharge along a dielectric barrier. As a result, 60% of the input power was measured as heat transfer to the dielectric electrode, whereas 20% was to the metallic electrode. Consequently, feed gas average temperature was increased only by 20-40 K. On the other hand, rotational temperature of the corresponding emission region exceeded average gas temperature by 100 K. In APG, heat transfer to electrodes was dominated by formation of negative glow regardless of whether the electrode was covered by a dielectric. However, negative glow tended to be thinner and more intense when it formed on a metallic electrode, leading to slightly higher metallic heating. Rotational temperature in APG was close to average gas temperature since APG does not show radial localization of plasma. Energy efficiency for methane decomposition process to produce ethane, ethylene, and hydrogen was about 1% regardless of the plasma source. Energy distribution and heat transfer mechanisms depend strongly on the plasma spatial structure rather than flow fields or feed gas physical properties.

  6. IEEE 1547 and 2030 Standards for Distributed Energy Resources Interconnection and Interoperability with the Electricity Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Basso, T.

    2014-12-01

    Public-private partnerships have been a mainstay of the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (DOE/NREL) approach to research and development. These partnerships also include technology development that enables grid modernization and distributed energy resources (DER) advancement, especially renewable energy systems integration with the grid. Through DOE/NREL and industry support of Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) standards development, the IEEE 1547 series of standards has helped shape the way utilities and other businesses have worked together to realize increasing amounts of DER interconnected with the distribution grid. And more recently, the IEEE 2030 series of standards is helping to further realize greater implementation of communications and information technologies that provide interoperability solutions for enhanced integration of DER and loads with the grid. For these standards development partnerships, for approximately $1 of federal funding, industry partnering has contributed $5. In this report, the status update is presented for the American National Standards IEEE 1547 and IEEE 2030 series of standards. A short synopsis of the history of the 1547 standards is first presented, then the current status and future direction of the ongoing standards development activities are discussed.

  7. Distributed Energy Resources at Naval Base Ventura County Building1512: A Sensitivity Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Owen C.; Marnay, Chris

    2005-06-05

    This report is the second of a two-part study by BerkeleyLab of a DER (distributed energy resources) system at Navy Base VenturaCounty (NBVC). First, a preliminary assessment ofthe cost effectivenessof distributed energy resources at Naval Base Ventura County (NBVC)Building 1512 was conducted in response to the base s request for designassistance to the Federal Energy Management Program (Bailey and Marnay,2004). That report contains a detailed description of the site and theDER-CAM (Consumer Adoption Model) parameters used. This second reportcontains sensitivity analyses of key parameters in the DER system modelof Building 1512 at NBVC and additionally considers the potential forabsorption-powered refrigeration.The prior analysis found that under thecurrent tariffs, and given assumptions about the performance andstructure of building energy loads and available generating technologycharacteristics, installing a 600 kW DER system with absorption coolingand recovery heat capabilities could deliver cost savings of about 14percent, worth $55,000 per year. However, under current conditions, thisstudy also suggested that significant savings could be obtained ifBuilding 1512 changed from its current direct access contract to a SCETOU-8 (Southern California Edison time of use tariff number 8) ratewithout installing a DER system. Evaluated on this tariff, the potentialsavings from installation of a DER system would be about 4 percent of thetotal bill, or $16,000 per year.

  8. The influence of the directional energy distribution on the nonlinear dispersion relation in a random gravity wave field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, N. E.; Tung, C.-C.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of the directional distribution of wave energy on the dispersion relation is calculated numerically using various directional wave spectrum models. The results indicate that the dispersion relation varies both as a function of the directional energy distribution and the direction of propagation of the wave component under consideration. Furthermore, both the mean deviation and the random scatter from the linear approximation increase as the energy spreading decreases. Limited observational data are compared with the theoretical results. The agreement is favorable.

  9. Apparatus and method for data communication in an energy distribution network

    DOEpatents

    Hussain, Mohsin; LaPorte, Brock; Uebel, Udo; Zia, Aftab

    2014-07-08

    A system for communicating information on an energy distribution network is disclosed. In one embodiment, the system includes a local supervisor on a communication network, wherein the local supervisor can collect data from one or more energy generation/monitoring devices. The system also includes a command center on the communication network, wherein the command center can generate one or more commands for controlling the one or more energy generation devices. The local supervisor can periodically transmit a data signal indicative of the data to the command center via a first channel of the communication network at a first interval. The local supervisor can also periodically transmit a request for a command to the command center via a second channel of the communication network at a second interval shorter than the first interval. This channel configuration provides effective data communication without a significant increase in the use of network resources.

  10. Control and measurement of ion-energy distributions in a beam-plasma system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zi-An, Wei; Jin-Xiu, Ma; CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment; Department of Modern Physics Team

    2015-11-01

    A double plasma device is divided by two grids separating source and experimental chambers. Ions are accelerated by the voltage drop between two grids. To study the ion-energy in the experimental region, the ion distribution function (IDF) was probed using a retarding field energy analyzer, also the correlation between the IDF and discharge parameters was studied. It is shown that the IDF in the experimental region exhibits a double-peak structure containing a background and a high-energy streaming-ion groups. The proportion of the ion groups can be controlled by the filament current. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11175177 and J1103207).

  11. Model documentation Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-26

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) of the National Energy Modeling System is developed and maintained by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. This report documents the archived version of the NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1996, (DOE/EIA-0383(96)). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic approach, and provides detail on the methodology employed. Previously this report represented Volume I of a two-volume set. Volume II reported on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues.

  12. Quasar energy distributions. I - Soft X-ray spectra of quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Elvis, Martin

    1987-01-01

    As the initial stage of a study of quasar energy distributions (QEDs), Einstein IPC spectra of 24 quasars are presented. These are combined with previously reported IPC spectra to form a sample of 33 quasars with well-determined soft X-ray slopes. A correlation analysis shows that radio loudness, rather than redshift or luminosity, is fundamentally related to the X-ray slope. This correlation is not followed by higher energy spectra of active galaxies. Two components are required to explain both sets of results. The best-fit column densities are systematically smaller than the Galactic values. The same effect is not present in a sample of BL Lac objects, implying that the effect is intrinsic to the quasars and is caused by a low-energy turnup in the quasar spectra.

  13. Importance of neutron energy distribution in borehole activation analysis in relatively dry, low-porosity rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Moxham, R.M.; Tanner, A.B.; Philbin, P.W.; Boynton, G.R.; Wager, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    To evaluate the importance of variations in the neutron energy distribution in borehole activation analysis, capture gamma-ray measurements were made in relatively dry, low-porosity gabbro of the Duluth Complex. Although sections of over a meter of solid rock were encountered in the borehole, there was significant fracturing with interstitial water leading to a substantial variation of water with depth in the borehole. The linear-correlation coefficients calculated for the peak intensities of several elements compared to the chemical core analyses were generally poor throughout the depth investigated. The data suggest and arguments are given which indicate that the variation of the thermal-to-intermediate-to-fast neutron flux density as a function of borehole depth is a serious source of error and is a major cause of the changes observed in the capture gamma-ray peak intensities. These variations in neutron energy may also cause a shift in the observed capture gamma-ray energy.

  14. Modification of a nonlocal electron energy distribution in a bounded plasma.

    PubMed

    DeJoseph, C A; Demidov, V I; Kudryavtsev, A A

    2005-09-01

    It is demonstrated experimentally, in a pulsed discharge, that it is possible to modify the "tail" of a nonlocal electron energy distribution (EED) without significantly changing the electron density and temperature (mean energy). The EED tail is modified by changing the potential of a small portion of the plasma boundary and/or by changing the volume creation rate of electrons with energies in the range of the tail of the EED. The discussed effects are a direct result of the nonlocal nature of the EED and have applications to a number of basic research issues associated with discharges under nonequilibrium conditions. As an example, we discuss the possibility of utilizing these methods to measure electron impact excitation cross sections from the metastable states of atoms, which are difficult to measure by other means. The experiments have been conducted in an argon and argon-nitrogen pulsed rf inductively coupled plasma discharge. PMID:16241582

  15. An optimization model for energy generation and distribution in a dynamic facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, F. L.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical model is described using linear programming for the optimum generation and distribution of energy demands among competing energy resources and different economic criteria. The model, which will be used as a general engineering tool in the analysis of the Deep Space Network ground facility, considers several essential decisions for better design and operation. The decisions sought for the particular energy application include: the optimum time to build an assembly of elements, inclusion of a storage medium of some type, and the size or capacity of the elements that will minimize the total life-cycle cost over a given number of years. The model, which is structured in multiple time divisions, employ the decomposition principle for large-size matrices, the branch-and-bound method in mixed-integer programming, and the revised simplex technique for efficient and economic computer use.

  16. Observation of a high-energy tail in ion energy distribution in the cylindrical Hall thruster plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Youbong; Kim, Holak; Choe, Wonho Lee, Seung Hun; Seon, Jongho; Lee, Hae June

    2014-10-15

    A novel method is presented to determine populations and ion energy distribution functions (IEDFs) of individual ion species having different charge states in an ion beam from the measured spectrum of an E × B probe. The inversion of the problem is performed by adopting the iterative Tikhonov regularization method with the characteristic matrices obtained from the calculated ion trajectories. In a cylindrical Hall thruster plasma, an excellent agreement is observed between the IEDFs by an E × B probe and those by a retarding potential analyzer. The existence of a high-energy tail in the IEDF is found to be mainly due to singly charged Xe ions, and is interpreted in terms of non-linear ion acceleration.

  17. Observation of a high-energy tail in ion energy distribution in the cylindrical Hall thruster plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Youbong; Kim, Holak; Choe, Wonho; Lee, Seung Hun; Seon, Jongho; Lee, Hae June

    2014-10-01

    A novel method is presented to determine populations and ion energy distribution functions (IEDFs) of individual ion species having different charge states in an ion beam from the measured spectrum of an E × B probe. The inversion of the problem is performed by adopting the iterative Tikhonov regularization method with the characteristic matrices obtained from the calculated ion trajectories. In a cylindrical Hall thruster plasma, an excellent agreement is observed between the IEDFs by an E × B probe and those by a retarding potential analyzer. The existence of a high-energy tail in the IEDF is found to be mainly due to singly charged Xe ions, and is interpreted in terms of non-linear ion acceleration.

  18. Connecting Distributed Energy Resources to the Grid: Their Benefits to the DER Owner etc.

    SciTech Connect

    Poore, WP

    2003-07-09

    The vision of the Distributed Energy Research Program (DER) program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is that the United States will have the cleanest and most efficient and reliable energy system in the world by maximizing the use of affordable distributed energy resources. Electricity consumers will be able to choose from a diverse number of efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly distributed energy options and easily connect them into the nation's energy infrastructure while providing benefits to their owners and other stakeholders. The long-term goal of this vision is that DER will achieve a 20% share of new electric capacity additions in the United States by 2010, thereby helping to make the nation's electric power generation and delivery system more efficient, reliable, secure, clean, economical, and diverse in terms of fuel use (oil, natural gas, solar, hydroelectric, etc.) and prime mover resource (solar, wind, gas turbines, etc.). Near- and mid-term goals are to develop new technologies for implementing and operating DER and address barriers associated with DER usage and then to reduce costs and emissions and improve the efficiency and reliability of DER. Numerous strategies for meeting these goals have been developed into a research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program that supports generation and delivery systems architecture, including modeling and simulation tools. The benefits associated with DER installations are often significant and numerous. They almost always provide tangible economic benefits, such as energy savings or transmission and distribution upgrade deferrals, as well as intangible benefits, such as power quality improvements that lengthen maintenance or repair intervals for power equipment. Also, the benefits routinely are dispersed among end users, utilities, and the public. For instance, an end user may use the DER to reduce their peak demand and save money due to lower demand charges. Reduced end user

  19. Multi-agent coordination algorithms for control of distributed energy resources in smart grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes, Andres

    Sustainable energy is a top-priority for researchers these days, since electricity and transportation are pillars of modern society. Integration of clean energy technologies such as wind, solar, and plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs), is a major engineering challenge in operation and management of power systems. This is due to the uncertain nature of renewable energy technologies and the large amount of extra load that PEVs would add to the power grid. Given the networked structure of a power system, multi-agent control and optimization strategies are natural approaches to address the various problems of interest for the safe and reliable operation of the power grid. The distributed computation in multi-agent algorithms addresses three problems at the same time: i) it allows for the handling of problems with millions of variables that a single processor cannot compute, ii) it allows certain independence and privacy to electricity customers by not requiring any usage information, and iii) it is robust to localized failures in the communication network, being able to solve problems by simply neglecting the failing section of the system. We propose various algorithms to coordinate storage, generation, and demand resources in a power grid using multi-agent computation and decentralized decision making. First, we introduce a hierarchical vehicle-one-grid (V1G) algorithm for coordination of PEVs under usage constraints, where energy only flows from the grid in to the batteries of PEVs. We then present a hierarchical vehicle-to-grid (V2G) algorithm for PEV coordination that takes into consideration line capacity constraints in the distribution grid, and where energy flows both ways, from the grid in to the batteries, and from the batteries to the grid. Next, we develop a greedy-like hierarchical algorithm for management of demand response events with on/off loads. Finally, we introduce distributed algorithms for the optimal control of distributed energy resources, i

  20. Electron Energy Distributions at Relativistic Shock Sites: Observational Constraints from the Cygnus A Hotspots

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, C.C.Teddy; Stawarz, L.; Harris, D.E.; Ostrowski, M.

    2007-10-15

    We report new detections of the hotspots in Cygnus A at 4.5 and 8.0 microns with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Together with detailed published radio observations and synchrotron self-Compton modeling of previous X-ray detections, we reconstruct the underlying electron energy spectra of the two brightest hotspots (A and D). The low-energy portion of the electron distributions have flat power-law slopes (s {approx} 1.5) up to the break energy which corresponds almost exactly to the mass ratio between protons and electrons; we argue that these features are most likely intrinsic rather than due to absorption effects. Beyond the break, the electron spectra continue to higher energies with very steep slopes s>3. Thus, there is no evidence for the 'canonical' s=2 slope expected in 1st order Fermi-type shocks within the whole observable electron energy range. We discuss the significance of these observations and the insight offered into high-energy particle acceleration processes in mildly relativistic shocks.

  1. Extraction of Clan Model Parameters from Multiplicity Distributions Measured in pp Collisions at Lhc Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, S.; Jasvantlal, J. K.; Dewanto, A.; Chan, A. H.; Oh, C. H.

    This paper presents the variation of clan model parameters nc and bar N with energy for p-p collisions at √ {s} = 900 and 2360 GeV using ALICE and CMS as the detectors. The data for multiplicity distribution was reported by the ALICE and CMS collaborations. The values of bar nc and bar N are evaluated from the NBD fit parameters bar n and k. Hegyi [Phys. Lett. B 274, 214 (1992)] suggested an alternative method for determination of clan model parameters from void probability. A comparison of values obtained from the two methods is also done. A close agreement of values obtained from the two methods was observed for 546 GeV p--bar p collisions. However for LHC data the agreement is not very well. Void probability overestimates the value of bar nc and underestimates the value of bar N compared to that obtained from NBD. bar nc is found to increase with energy for both ALICE and CMS data. Contrary to the observation at lower energies that bar N does not depend on energy, it is found to vary with energy. The variation of bar N with energy is more prominent for CMS data. The results are discussed in detail. For CMS data, comparison of the results with the 7000 GeV data is also shown.

  2. Spatial distributions of magnetic field in the RHIC and LHC energy regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yang; Yang, Chun-Bin; Cai, Xu; Feng, Sheng-Qin

    2015-10-01

    Relativistic heavy-ion collisions can produce extremely strong magnetic fields in the collision regions. The spatial variation features of the magnetic fields are analyzed in detail for non-central Pb-Pb collisions at LHC at \\sqrt{s_NN}=900, 2760 and 7000 GeV and Au-Au collisions at RHIC at \\sqrt{s_NN}=62.4, 130 and 200 GeV. The dependencies of magnetic field on proper time, collision energies and impact parameters are investigated in this paper. It is shown that an enormous and highly inhomogeneous spatial distribution magnetic field can indeed be created in off-centre relativistic heavy-ion collisions in RHIC and LHC energy regions. The enormous magnetic field is produced just after the collision, and the magnitude of magnetic field of the LHC energy region is larger than that of the RHIC energy region at small proper time. It is found that the magnetic field in the LHC energy region decreases more quickly with the increase of proper time than that of the RHIC energy region. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375069, 11435054, 11075061, 11221504) and Key Laboratory foundation of Quark and Lepton Physics (Hua-Zhong Normal University) (QLPL2014P01)

  3. CompatPM: enabling energy efficient multimedia workloads for distributed mobile platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathuji, Ripal; O'Hara, Keith J.; Schwan, Karsten; Balch, Tucker

    2007-01-01

    The computation and communication abilities of modern platforms are enabling increasingly capable cooperative distributed mobile systems. An example is distributed multimedia processing of sensor data in robots deployed for search and rescue, where a system manager can exploit the application's cooperative nature to optimize the distribution of roles and tasks in order to successfully accomplish the mission. Because of limited battery capacities, a critical task a manager must perform is online energy management. While support for power management has become common for the components that populate mobile platforms, what is lacking is integration and explicit coordination across the different management actions performed in a variety of system layers. This papers develops an integration approach for distributed multimedia applications, where a global manager specifies both a power operating point and a workload for a node to execute. Surprisingly, when jointly considering power and QoS, experimental evaluations show that using a simple deadline-driven approach to assigning frequencies can be non-optimal. These trends are further affected by certain characteristics of underlying power management mechanisms, which in our research, are identified as groupings that classify component power management as "compatible" (VFC) or "incompatible" (VFI) with voltage and frequency scaling. We build on these findings to develop CompatPM, a vertically integrated control strategy for power management in distributed mobile systems. Experimental evaluations of CompatPM indicate average energy improvements of 8% when platform resources are managed jointly rather than independently, demonstrating that previous attempts to maximize battery life by simply minimizing frequency are inappropriate from a platform-level perspective.

  4. Complexity of the tensegrity structure for dynamic energy and force distribution of cytoskeleton during cell spreading.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting-Jung; Wu, Chia-Ching; Tang, Ming-Jer; Huang, Jong-Shin; Su, Fong-Chin

    2010-01-01

    Cytoskeleton plays important roles in intracellular force equilibrium and extracellular force transmission from/to attaching substrate through focal adhesions (FAs). Numerical simulations of intracellular force distribution to describe dynamic cell behaviors are still limited. The tensegrity structure comprises tension-supporting cables and compression-supporting struts that represent the actin filament and microtubule respectively, and has many features consistent with living cells. To simulate the dynamics of intracellular force distribution and total stored energy during cell spreading, the present study employed different complexities of the tensegrity structures by using octahedron tensegrity (OT) and cuboctahedron tensegrity (COT). The spreading was simulated by assigning specific connection nodes for radial displacement and attachment to substrate to form FAs. The traction force on each FA was estimated by summarizing the force carried in sounding cytoskeletal elements. The OT structure consisted of 24 cables and 6 struts and had limitations soon after the beginning of spreading by declining energy stored in struts indicating the abolishment of compression in microtubules. The COT structure, double the amount of cables and struts than the OT structure, provided sufficient spreading area and expressed similar features with documented cell behaviors. The traction force pointed inward on peripheral FAs in the spread out COT structure. The complex structure in COT provided further investigation of various FA number during different spreading stages. Before the middle phase of spreading (half of maximum spreading area), cell attachment with 8 FAs obtained minimized cytoskeletal energy. The maximum number of 12 FAs in the COT structure was required to achieve further spreading. The stored energy in actin filaments increased as cells spread out, while the energy stored in microtubules increased at initial spreading, peaked in middle phase, and then declined as

  5. Assessment of (mu)grid distributed energy resource potential using DER-CAM and GIS

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris; Bartholomew, Emily; Ouaglal, Boubekeur; Siddiqui, Afzal S.; LaCommare, Kristina S.H.

    2002-01-01

    This report outlines an approach to assess the local potential for deployment of distributed energy resources (DER), small power-generation installations located close to the point where the energy they produce will be consumed. Although local restraints, such as zoning, building codes, and on-site physical barriers are well-known frustrations to DER deployment, no analysis method has been developed to address them within a broad economic analysis framework. The approach developed here combines established economic optimization techniques embedded in the Distributed Energy Resource Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) with a geographic information system (GIS) analysis of local land-use constraint. An example case in the San Diego area is developed from a strictly customer perspective, based on the premise that future development of DER may take the form of microgrids ((mu)Grids) under the control of current utility customers. Beginning with assumptions about which customer combinations h ave complementary energy loads, a GIS was used to locate specific neighborhoods in the San Diego area with promising customer combinations. A detailed energy analysis was conducted for the commercial/residential area chosen covering both electrical and heat energy requirements. Under various scenarios, different combinations of natural gas reciprocating engines were chosen by DER-CAM, ranging in size from 25 kW to 500 kW, often with heat recovery or absorption cooling. These generators typically operate throughout the day and are supplemented by purchased electricity during late-night and early-morning hours, when utility time-of-use prices are lowest. Typical (mu)Grid scenarios displaced about 80 percent of their annual gas heat load through CHP. Self-generation together with absorption cooling dramatically reduce electricity purchases, which usually only occur during nighttime hours.

  6. Uncovering the Spectral Energy Distribution in Active Galaxies Using High Ionization Mid-Infrared Emission Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melendez, M.; Kraemer, S. B.; Weaver, K. A.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    2011-01-01

    The shape of the spectral energy distribution of active galaxies in the EUV soft X-ray band (13.6 eV to 1 keV) is uncertain because obscuration by dust and gas can hamper our view of the continuum. To investigate the shape of the spectral energy distribution in this energy band, we have generated a set of photoionization models which reproduce the small dispersion found in correlations between high-ionization mid-infrared emission lines in a sample of hard X-ray selected AGN. Our calculations show that a broken power-law continuum model is sufficient to reproduce the [Ne V]14.32 microns/[Ne III], [Ne V]24.32 microns/[O IV]25.89 micron and [O IV] 25.89 microns/[Ne III] ratios, and does not require the addition of a "big bump" EUV model component. We constrain the EUV-soft X-ray slope, alpha(sub i), to be between 1.5 - 2.0 and derive a best fit of alpha(sub i) approx. 1.9 for Seyfert 1 galaxies, consistent with previous studies of intermediate redshift quasars. If we assume a blue bump model, most sources in our sample have derived temperatures between T(sub BB) = 10(exp 5.18) K to 10(exp 5.7) K, suggesting that the peak of this component spans a large range of energies extending from approx. (Lambda)600 A to > (Lambda)1900 A. In this case, the best fitting peak energy that matches the mid-infrared line ratios of Seyfert 1 galaxies occurs between approx. (Lambda)700-(Lambda)1000 A. Despite the fact that our results do not rule out the presence of an EUV bump, we conclude that our power-law model produces enough photons with energies > 4 Ry to generate the observed amount of mid-infrared emission in our sample of BAT AGN.

  7. Energy efficient wireless sensor network for structural health monitoring using distributed embedded piezoelectric transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Olmi, Claudio; Song, Gangbing

    2010-04-01

    Piezoceramic based transducers are widely researched and used for structural health monitoring (SHM) systems due to the piezoceramic material's inherent advantage of dual sensing and actuation. Wireless sensor network (WSN) technology benefits from advances made in piezoceramic based structural health monitoring systems, allowing easy and flexible installation, low system cost, and increased robustness over wired system. However, piezoceramic wireless SHM systems still faces some drawbacks, one of these is that the piezoceramic based SHM systems require relatively high computational capabilities to calculate damage information, however, battery powered WSN sensor nodes have strict power consumption limitation and hence limited computational power. On the other hand, commonly used centralized processing networks require wireless sensors to transmit all data back to the network coordinator for analysis. This signal processing procedure can be problematic for piezoceramic based SHM applications as it is neither energy efficient nor robust. In this paper, we aim to solve these problems with a distributed wireless sensor network for piezoceramic base structural health monitoring systems. Three important issues: power system, waking up from sleep impact detection, and local data processing, are addressed to reach optimized energy efficiency. Instead of sweep sine excitation that was used in the early research, several sine frequencies were used in sequence to excite the concrete structure. The wireless sensors record the sine excitations and compute the time domain energy for each sine frequency locally to detect the energy change. By comparing the data of the damaged concrete frame with the healthy data, we are able to find out the damage information of the concrete frame. A relative powerful wireless microcontroller was used to carry out the sampling and distributed data processing in real-time. The distributed wireless network dramatically reduced the data

  8. Light Energy Distribution in the Brown Alga Macrocystis pyrifera (Giant Kelp) 1

    PubMed Central

    Fork, David C.; Herbert, Stephen K.; Malkin, Shmuel

    1991-01-01

    The brown alga Macrocystis pyrifera (giant kelp) was studied by a combination of fluorescence spectroscopy at 77 kelvin, room temperature modulated fluorimetry, and photoacoustic techniques to determine how light energy is partitioned between photosystems I and II in states 1 and 2. Preillumination with farred light induced the high fluorescence state (state 1) as determined by fluorescence emission spectra measured at 77K and preillumination with green light produced a low fluorescence state (state 2). Upon transition from state 1 to state 2, there was an almost parallel decrease of all of the fluorescence bands at 693, 705, and 750 nanometers and not the expected decrease of fluorescence of photosystem II and increase of fluorescence in photosystem I. The momentary level of room temperature fluorescence (fluorescence in the steady state, Fs), as well as the fluorescence levels corresponding to all closed (Fm) or all open (Fo) reaction-center states were measured following the kinetics of the transition between states 1 and 2. Calculation of the distribution of light 2 (540 nanometers) between the two photosystems was done assuming both the `separate package' and `spill-over' models. Unlike green plants, red algae, and cyanobacteria, the changes here of the light distribution were rather small in Macrocystis so that there was approximately an even distribution of the photosystem II light at 540 nanometers to photosystem I and photosystem II in both states 1 and 2. Photoacoustic measurements confirmed the conclusions reached as a result of fluorescence measurements, i.e. an almost equal distribution of light-2 quanta to both photosystems in each state. This conclusion was reached by analyzing the enhancement phenomenon by light 2 of the energy storage measured in far red light. The effect of light 1 in decreasing the energy storage measured in light 2 is also consistent with this conclusion. The photoacoustic experiments showed that there was a significant energy

  9. Revealing β-relaxation mechanism based on energy distribution of flow units in metallic glass.

    PubMed

    Lu, Z; Shang, B S; Sun, Y T; Zhu, Z G; Guan, P F; Wang, W H; Bai, H Y

    2016-04-14

    The β-relaxation, which is the source of the dynamics in glass state and has practical significance to relaxation and mechanical properties of glasses, has been an open question for decades. Here, we propose a flow unit perspective to explain the structural origin and evolution of β-relaxation based on experimentally obtained energy distribution of flow units using stress relaxation method under isothermal and linear heating modes. Through the molecular dynamics simulations, we creatively design various artificial metallic glass systems and build a direct relation between β-relaxation behavior and features of flow units. Our results demonstrate that the β-relaxation in metallic glasses originates from flow units and is modulated by the energy distribution of flow units, and the density and distribution of flow units can effectively regulate the β-relaxation behavior. The results provide a better understanding of the structural origin of β-relaxation and also afford a method for designing metallic glasses with obvious β-relaxation and better mechanical properties. PMID:27083732

  10. Revealing β-relaxation mechanism based on energy distribution of flow units in metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; Shang, B. S.; Sun, Y. T.; Zhu, Z. G.; Guan, P. F.; Wang, W. H.; Bai, H. Y.

    2016-04-01

    The β-relaxation, which is the source of the dynamics in glass state and has practical significance to relaxation and mechanical properties of glasses, has been an open question for decades. Here, we propose a flow unit perspective to explain the structural origin and evolution of β-relaxation based on experimentally obtained energy distribution of flow units using stress relaxation method under isothermal and linear heating modes. Through the molecular dynamics simulations, we creatively design various artificial metallic glass systems and build a direct relation between β-relaxation behavior and features of flow units. Our results demonstrate that the β-relaxation in metallic glasses originates from flow units and is modulated by the energy distribution of flow units, and the density and distribution of flow units can effectively regulate the β-relaxation behavior. The results provide a better understanding of the structural origin of β-relaxation and also afford a method for designing metallic glasses with obvious β-relaxation and better mechanical properties.

  11. Method for Determining the Activation Energy Distribution Function of Complex Reactions by Sieving and Thermogravimetric Measurements.

    PubMed

    Bufalo, Gennaro; Ambrosone, Luigi

    2016-01-14

    A method for studying the kinetics of thermal degradation of complex compounds is suggested. Although the method is applicable to any matrix whose grain size can be measured, herein we focus our investigation on thermogravimetric analysis, under a nitrogen atmosphere, of ground soft wheat and ground maize. The thermogravimetric curves reveal that there are two well-distinct jumps of mass loss. They correspond to volatilization, which is in the temperature range 298-433 K, and decomposition regions go from 450 to 1073 K. Thermal degradation is schematized as a reaction in the solid state whose kinetics is analyzed separately in each of the two regions. By means of a sieving analysis different size fractions of the material are separated and studied. A quasi-Newton fitting algorithm is used to obtain the grain size distribution as best fit to experimental data. The individual fractions are thermogravimetrically analyzed for deriving the functional relationship between activation energy of the degradation reactions and the particle size. Such functional relationship turns out to be crucial to evaluate the moments of the activation energy distribution, which is unknown in terms of the distribution calculated by sieve analysis. From the knowledge of moments one can reconstruct the reaction conversion. The method is applied first to the volatilization region, then to the decomposition region. The comparison with the experimental data reveals that the method reproduces the experimental conversion with an accuracy of 5-10% in the volatilization region and of 3-5% in the decomposition region. PMID:26671287

  12. Common patterns of energy flow and biomass distribution on weighted food webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiang; Feng, Yuanjing

    2014-07-01

    Weights of edges and nodes on food webs which are available from the empirical data hide much information about energy flows and biomass distributions in ecosystem. We define a set of variables related to weights for each species i, including the throughflow Ti, the total biomass Xi, and the dissipated flow Di (output to the environment) to uncover the following common patterns in 19 empirical weighted food webs: (1) DGBD distributions (Discrete version of a Generalized Beta Distribution), a kind of deformed Zipf's law, of energy flow and storage biomass; (2) The allometric scaling law Ti∝Xiα, which can be viewed as the counterpart of the Kleiber's 3/4 law at the population level; (3) The dissipation law Di∝Tiβ; and (4) The gravity law, including univariate version f∝( and bivariate approvement f∝Tiγ1Tjγ2. These patterns are very common and significant in all collected webs, as a result, some remarkable regularities are hidden in weights.

  13. Multi-term approximation to the Boltzmann transport equation for electron energy distribution functions in nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yue

    Plasma is currently a hot topic and it has many significant applications due to its composition of both positively and negatively charged particles. The energy distribution function is important in plasma science since it characterizes the ability of the plasma to affect chemical reactions, affect physical outcomes, and drive various applications. The Boltzmann Transport Equation is an important kinetic equation that provides an accurate basis for characterizing the distribution function---both in energy and space. This dissertation research proposes a multi-term approximation to solve the Boltzmann Transport Equation by treating the relaxation process using an expansion of the electron distribution function in Legendre polynomials. The elastic and 29 inelastic cross sections for electron collisions with nitrogen molecules (N2) and singly ionized nitrogen molecules ( N+2 ) have been used in this application of the Boltzmann Transport Equation. Different numerical methods have been considered to compare the results. The numerical methods discussed in this thesis are the implicit time-independent method, the time-dependent Euler method, the time-dependent Runge-Kutta method, and finally the implicit time-dependent relaxation method by generating the 4-way grid with a matrix solver. The results show that the implicit time-dependent relaxation method is the most accurate and stable method for obtaining reliable results. The results were observed to match with the published experimental data rather well.

  14. 10 CFR Appendix A to Subpart K of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Distribution Transformers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Distribution... Loading Level Adjustment. If the output loading level for energy efficiency is different from the level at... energy efficiency load level, Plc2 is as calculated in section 4.5.3.3, Por is the rated...

  15. 10 CFR Appendix A to Subpart K of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Distribution Transformers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Distribution... Loading Level Adjustment. If the output loading level for energy efficiency is different from the level at... energy efficiency load level, Plc2 is as calculated in section 4.5.3.3, Por is the rated...

  16. 10 CFR Appendix A to Subpart K of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Distribution Transformers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Distribution... Loading Level Adjustment. If the output loading level for energy efficiency is different from the level at... energy efficiency load level, Plc2 is as calculated in section 4.5.3.3, Por is the rated...

  17. 10 CFR Appendix A to Subpart K of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Distribution Transformers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Distribution... Loading Level Adjustment. If the output loading level for energy efficiency is different from the level at... energy efficiency load level, Plc2 is as calculated in section 4.5.3.3, Por is the rated...

  18. 10 CFR Appendix A to Subpart K of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Distribution Transformers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Distribution... Loading Level Adjustment. If the output loading level for energy efficiency is different from the level at... energy efficiency load level, Plc2 is as calculated in section 4.5.3.3, Por is the rated...

  19. Transverse energy and multiplicity distributions of p-p and A+A interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Data from AGS-E802 have been presented at the percent HIPAGS workshop at BNL, published in journals and in conference proceedings (St. Malo, Moriond), to which the reader is referred. Two results are mentioned here. The Lead Glass distribution dE{sub T}{sup 0}/dn from central O + Au collisions can be compared to the spectrometer dn ({pi}{minus})/dy from central Si + Au collisions. The agreement of the two distributions is excellent and confirms that the estimated position and value of the maximum in the distribution {eta}{vert bar}max, dE{sub T}/d{eta}{vert bar}max, and the width {Delta}{eta}{sub FWHM}, from the PbGl data are reasonable, and that nothing exceptional is occurring outside of the PbGl acceptance. Additionally, these data, and previous measurements of pseudorapidity distributions of multiplicity and Transverse Energy at both the AGS and CERN are analyzed in an acceptance-independent and model-independent method, with the conclusion that simple considerations of nuclear geometry do not provide an explanation of the different {radical}{sup s}NN dependences observed in {sup 16}O + Au and p-p reactions. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Methodology to model the energy and greenhouse gas emissions of electronic software distributions.

    PubMed

    Williams, Daniel R; Tang, Yinshan

    2012-01-17

    A new electronic software distribution (ESD) life cycle analysis (LCA) methodology and model structure were constructed to calculate energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In order to counteract the use of high level, top-down modeling efforts, and to increase result accuracy, a focus upon device details and data routes was taken. In order to compare ESD to a relevant physical distribution alternative, physical model boundaries and variables were described. The methodology was compiled from the analysis and operational data of a major online store which provides ESD and physical distribution options. The ESD method included the calculation of power consumption of data center server and networking devices. An in-depth method to calculate server efficiency and utilization was also included to account for virtualization and server efficiency features. Internet transfer power consumption was analyzed taking into account the number of data hops and networking devices used. The power consumed by online browsing and downloading was also factored into the model. The embedded CO(2)e of server and networking devices was proportioned to each ESD process. Three U.K.-based ESD scenarios were analyzed using the model which revealed potential CO(2)e savings of 83% when ESD was used over physical distribution. Results also highlighted the importance of server efficiency and utilization methods. PMID:22107078