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Sample records for pronounced purine sequence

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Purine-Degrading Gottschalkia purinilyticum (Formerly Clostridium purinilyticum) WA1 (DSM 1384)

    PubMed Central

    Poehlein, Anja; Bengelsdorf, Frank R.; Schiel-Bengelsdorf, Bettina; Daniel, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Gottschalkia purinilyticum (formerly Clostridium purinilyticum) WA1, an anaerobic bacterium specialized on degradation of purines (including adenine) and glycine, which uses the selenoprotein glycine reductase for substrate degradation. The genome consists of a single chromosome (3.40 Mb). PMID:26404607

  2. A Short Sequence within Two Purine-Rich Enhancers Determines 5′ Splice Site Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Elrick, Leslie L.; Humphrey, Mary Beth; Cooper, Thomas A.; Berget, Susan M.

    1998-01-01

    Purine-rich enhancers are exon sequences that promote inclusion of alternative exons, usually via activation of weak upstream 3′ splice sites. A recently described purine-rich enhancer from the caldesmon gene has an additional activity by which it directs selection of competing 5′ splice sites within an alternative exon. In this study, we have compared the caldesmon enhancer with another purine-rich enhancer from the chicken cardiac troponin T (cTNT) gene for the ability to regulate flanking splice sites. Although similar in sequence and length, the two enhancers demonstrated strikingly different specificities towards 5′ splice site choice when placed between competing 5′ splice sites in an internal exon. The 32-nucleotide caldesmon enhancer caused effective usage of the exon-internal 5′ splice site, whereas the 30-nucleotide cTNT enhancer caused effective usage of the exon-terminal 5′ splice site. Both enhancer-mediated splicing pathways represented modulation of the default pathway in which both 5′ splice sites were utilized. Each enhancer is multipartite, consisting of two purine-rich sequences of a simple (GAR)n repeat interdigitated with two enhancer-specific sequences. The entire enhancer was necessary for maximal splice site selectivity; however, a 5- to 7-nucleotide region from the 3′ end of each enhancer dictated splice site selectivity. Mutations that interchanged this short region of the two enhancers switched specificity. The portion of the cTNT enhancer determinative for 5′ splice site selectivity was different than that shown to be maximally important for activation of a 3′ splice site, suggesting that enhancer environment can have a major impact on activity. These results are the first indication that individual purine-rich enhancers can differentiate between flanking splice sites. Furthermore, localization of the specificity of splice site choice to a short region within both enhancers indicates that subtle differences in

  3. Pronounced population genetic differentiation in the rock bream Oplegnathus fasciatus inferred from mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yongshuang; Li, Jun; Ren, Guijing; Ma, Daoyuan; Wang, Yanfeng; Xiao, ZhiZhong; Xu, Shihong

    2016-05-01

    The population genetic structure of the rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus) along the coastal waters of China was estimated based on three mtDNA fragments (D-loop, COI, and Cytb). A total of 112 polymorphic sites were checked, which defined 63 haplotypes. A pattern with high levels of haplotype diversity (hCOI = 0.886 ± 0.034, hCytb = 0.874 ± 0.023) and low levels of nucleotide diversity (лCOI = 0.009 ± 0.005, лCytb = 0.006 ± 0.003) was detected based on the COI and Cytb fragments, and high levels of genetic diversity (hD-loop = 0.995 ± 0.007, лD-loop = 0.021 ± 0.011) were detected from the mtDNA D-loop. The population genetic diversity of O. fasciatus in south China was significantly higher than those of north China. Three genealogical clades were checked in the O. fasciatus populations based on the NJ and MST analyses of mtDNA COI gene sequence, and the genetic distances among the clades ranged from 0.018 to 0.025. Significant population genetic differentiation was also checked based on the Fst (0.331, p = 0.000) and exact p (0.000) test analyses. No significant population differentiations were checked based on mtDNA D-loop and Cytb fragments. Using a variety of phylogenetic methods, coalescent reasoning, and molecular dating interpreted in conjunction with paleoclimatic and physiographic evidences, we inferred that the genetic make-up of extant populations of O. fasciatus was shaped by Pleistocene environmental impacts on the historical demography of this species. Coalescent analyses (neutrality tests, mismatch distribution analysis, and Bayesian skyline analyses) showed that the species along coastline of China has experienced population expansions originated in its most recent history at about 169-175 kya before present. PMID:25427804

  4. The Purine Bias of Coding Sequences is Determined by Physicochemical Constraints on Proteins

    PubMed Central

    de Leon, Miguel Ponce; de Miranda, Antonio Basilio; Alvarez-Valin, Fernando; Carels, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    For this report, we analyzed protein secondary structures in relation to the statistics of three nucleotide codon positions. The purpose of this investigation was to find which properties of the ribosome, tRNA or protein level, could explain the purine bias (Rrr) as it is observed in coding DNA. We found that the Rrr pattern is the consequence of a regularity (the codon structure) resulting from physicochemical constraints on proteins and thermodynamic constraints on ribosomal machinery. The physicochemical constraints on proteins mainly come from the hydropathy and molecular weight (MW) of secondary structures as well as the energy cost of amino acid synthesis. These constraints appear through a network of statistical correlations, such as (i) the cost of amino acid synthesis, which is in favor of a higher level of guanine in the first codon position, (ii) the constructive contribution of hydropathy alternation in proteins, (iii) the spatial organization of secondary structure in proteins according to solvent accessibility, (iv) the spatial organization of secondary structure according to amino acid hydropathy, (v) the statistical correlation of MW with protein secondary structures and their overall hydropathy, (vi) the statistical correlation of thymine in the second codon position with hydropathy and the energy cost of amino acid synthesis, and (vii) the statistical correlation of adenine in the second codon position with amino acid complexity and the MW of secondary protein structures. Amino acid physicochemical properties and functional constraints on proteins constitute a code that is translated into a purine bias within the coding DNA via tRNAs. In that sense, the Rrr pattern within coding DNA is the effect of information transfer on nucleotide composition from protein to DNA by selection according to the codon positions. Thus, coding DNA structure and ribosomal machinery co-evolved to minimize the energy cost of protein coding given the functional

  5. Fast method of homology and purine-pyrimidine mutual relations between DNA sequences search.

    PubMed

    Korotkov, E V

    1994-01-01

    A new algorithm for scanning sequences is described. This algorithm uses the boolean operators AND and OR. The mutual information between the sequences is used as a measure of sequence interrelation. It allows evaluation of the probability of accidental sequence interrelation in a quantitative manner. The proposed algorithm was used for searching for MB1 repeats in human and other mammalian sequences. PMID:7841466

  6. Transferring the purine 2-amino group from guanines to adenines in DNA changes the sequence-specific binding of antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Bailly, C; Waring, M J

    1995-01-01

    The proposition that the 2-amino group of guanine plays a critical role in determining how antibiotics recognise their binding sites in DNA has been tested by relocating it, using tyrT DNA derivative molecules substituted with inosine plus 2,6-diaminopurine (DAP). Irrespective of their mode of interaction with DNA, such GC-specific antibiotics as actinomycin, echinomycin, mithramycin and chromomycin find new binding sites associated with DAP-containing sequences and are excluded from former canonical sites containing I.C base pairs. The converse is found to be the case for a group of normally AT-selective ligands which bind in the minor groove of the helix, such as netropsin: their preferred sites become shifted to IC-rich clusters. Thus the binding sites of all these antibiotics strictly follow the placement of the purine 2-amino group, which accordingly must serve as both a positive and negative effector. The footprinting profile of the 'threading' intercalator nogalamycin is potentiated in DAP plus inosine-substituted DNA but otherwise remains much the same as seen with natural DNA. The interaction of echinomycin with sites containing the TpDAP step in doubly substituted DNA appears much stronger than its interaction with CpG-containing sites in natural DNA. Images PMID:7731800

  7. Pur-1, a zinc-finger protein that binds to purine-rich sequences, transactivates an insulin promoter in heterologous cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, G C; Rutter, W J

    1992-01-01

    Purine-rich stretches of nucleotides (GAGA boxes) are often found just upstream of transcription start sites in many genes, including insulin. Mutational analysis suggests that the GAGA box plays an important role in transcription of the rat insulin I gene. We identify here at least four different proteins that bind specifically to the insulin GAGA box. Using a GAGA oligonucleotide, we have isolated a cDNA encoding a sequence-specific protein from a HIT (hamster insulinoma cell line) lambda gt11 library. This protein, which we designate Pur-1 (for purine binding), binds to the GAGA boxes of the rat insulin I and II genes and the human islet amyloid polypeptide gene. Pur-1 is a potent transactivator in both pancreatic and nonpancreatic cells. Furthermore, Pur-1 is able to activate an intact insulin promoter in HeLa cells, where it is normally inactive. Images PMID:1454839

  8. Identification and sequence analysis of Escherichia coli purE and purK genes encoding 5'-phosphoribosyl-5-amino-4-imidazole carboxylase for de novo purine biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, W; Sampei, G; Aiba, A; Mizobuchi, K

    1989-01-01

    It has been shown that the Escherichia coli purE locus specifying 5'-phosphoribosyl-5-amino-4-imidazole carboxylase in de novo purine nucleotide synthesis is divided into two cistrons. We cloned and determined a 2,449-nucleotide sequence including the purE locus. This sequence contains two overlapped open reading frames, ORF-18 and ORF-39, encoding proteins with molecular weights of 18,000 and 39,000, respectively. The purE mutations of CSH57A and DCSP22 were complemented by plasmids carrying ORF-18, while that of NK6051 was complemented by plasmids carrying ORF-39. Thus, the purE locus consists of two distinct genes, designated purE and purK for ORF-18 and ORF-39, respectively. These genes constitute a single operon. A highly conserved 16-nucleotide sequence, termed the PUR box, was found in the upstream region of purE by comparing the sequences of the purF and purMN operons. We also found three entire and one partial repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) sequences in the downstream region of purK. Roles of the PUR box and REP sequences are discussed in relation to the genesis of the purEK operon. Images PMID:2644189

  9. Structure/Function Analysis of DNA-glycosylases That Repair Oxidized Purines and Pyrimidines and the Influence of Surrounding DNA Sequence on Their Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Susan S.

    2005-08-22

    The overall goal of this project was to elucidate the structure/function relationships between oxidized DNA bases and the DNA repair enzymes that recognize and remove them. The NMR solution structure of formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) that recognizes oxidized DNA purines was to be determined. Furthermore, the solution structures of DNA molecules containing specific lesions recognized by Fpg was to be determined in sequence contexts that either facilitate or hinder this recognition. These objectives were in keeping with the long-term goals of the Principal Investigator's laboratory, that is, to understand the basic mechanisms that underpin base excision repair processing of oxidative DNA lesions and to elucidate the interactions of unrepaired lesions with DNA polymerases. The results of these two DNA transactions can ultimately determine the fate of the cell. These objectives were also in keeping with the goals of our collaborator, Dr. Michael Kennedy, who is studying the repair and recognition of damaged DNA. Overall the goals of this project were congruent with those of the Department of Energy's Health Effects and Life Sciences Research Program, especially to the Structural Biology, the Human Genome and the Health Effects Programs. The mission of the latter Program includes understanding the biological effects and consequences of DNA damages produced by toxic agents in the many DOE waste sites so that cleanup can be accomplished in a safe, effective and timely manner.

  10. [Purine nucleoside phosphorylase].

    PubMed

    Pogosian, L G; Akopian, Zh I

    2013-01-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is one of the most important enzymes of the purine metabolism, wich promotes the recycling of purine bases. Nowadays is the actual to search for effective inhibitors of this enzyme which is necessary for creation T-cell immunodeficient status of the organism in the organs and tissues transplantation, and chemotherapy of a number pathologies as well. For their successful practical application necessary to conduct in-depth and comprehensive study of the enzyme, namely a structure, functions, and an affinity of the reaction mechanism. In the review the contemporary achievements in the study of PNP from various biological objects are presented. New data describing the structure of PNP are summarised and analysed. The physiological role of the enzyme is discussed. The enzyme basic reaction mechanisms and actions are considered. The studies on enzyme physicochemical, kinetic, and catalytic research are presented. PMID:24479338

  11. Parallel-stranded duplex DNA containing blocks of trans purine-purine and purine-pyrimidine base pairs.

    PubMed Central

    Evertsz, E M; Rippe, K; Jovin, T M

    1994-01-01

    A 30 base pair parallel-stranded (ps) duplex ps-L1.L2 composed of two adjoined purine-purine and purine-pyrimidine sequence blocks has been characterized thermodynamically and spectroscopically. The 5'-terminal 15 residues in both strands ('left-half') consisted of the alternating d(GA)7G sequence that forms a ps homoduplex secondary structure stabilized by d(G.G) and d(A.A) base pairs. The 3'-terminal 15 positions of the sequence ('right-half') were combinations of A and T with complementary reverse Watson-Crick d(A.T) base pairing between the two strands. The characteristics of the full length duplex were compared to those of the constituent left and right halves in order to determine the compatibility of the two ps helical forms. The thermal denaturation curves and hyperchromicity profiles of all three duplexes determined by UV absorption spectroscopy were characteristic of ps-DNA, in accordance with previous studies. The thermodynamic properties of the 30 bp duplex corresponded within experimental error to the linear combination of the two 15-mers. Thus, the Tm and delta HvH of ps-L1.L2 in 10 mM MgCl2, derived from analyses according to a statistical mechanical formulation for the helix-coil transition, were 43 degrees C and 569 kJ mol-1, compared to 21 degrees C, 315 kJ mol-1 (ps-F5.F6) and 22 degrees C, 236 kJ mol-1 (ps-GA15). The UV absorption and CD spectra of ps-L1.L2 and the individual 15-mer ps motifs were also compared quantitatively. The sums of the two constituent native spectra (left+right halves) accurately matched that of the 30 bp duplex, with only small deviations in the 195-215 nm (CD) and 220-240 nm (absorption) regions. Based on analysis by native gel electrophoresis, the sequences studied formed duplex structures exclusively; there were no indications of higher order species. Chemical modification with diethyl pyrocarbonate showed no hyperreactivity of the junctional bases, indicating a smooth transition between the two parallel

  12. Basis for the control of purine biosynthesis by purine ribonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Itakura, M; Sabina, R L; Heald, P W; Holmes, E W

    1981-01-01

    An animal model was used to determine the basis for the increase in purine biosynthesis that results from hepatic depletion of purine nucleotides, such as seen in patients with type I glycogen storage disease or following fructose administration. Mice were injected intravenously with glucose or fructose, 2.5 mg/g of body weight, and the animals were killed at 0, 3, and 30 min following carbohydrate infusion. Fructose, but not glucose, administration led to a threefold increase in [14C]glycine incorporation into hepatic purine nucleotides documenting an increase in the rate of purine biosynthesis in the liver of fructose-treated animals. In the fructose, but not the glucose-treated animals, there was a reduction in the hepatic content of purine nucleotides that are inhibitory for amidophosphoribosyltransferase, the enzyme that catalyzes the first reaction unique to the pathway of purine biosynthesis. PP-ribose-P, an important metabolite in the control of purine biosynthesis, was increased 2,3-fold in liver following fructose, but not glucose administration. In conjunction with the decrease in inhibitory nucleotides and increase in PP-ribose-P 29% of amidophosphoribosyltransferase was shifted from the large inactive to the small active form of the enzyme. Results of these studies demonstrate that the end-products of the pathway, purine nucleotides, control the activity of the enzyme that catalyzes the first reaction leading to purine nucleotide synthesis either through a direct effect of purine nucleotides on the enzyme, through an indirect effect of the change in nucleotides on PP-ribose-P synthesis, or a combination of these effects. The resultant changes in amidophosphoribosyltransferase conformation and activity provide a basis for understanding the increase in purine biosynthesis that results from hepatic depletion of purine nucleotides. PMID:6162862

  13. The sequence and binding specificity of UaY, the specific regulator of the purine utilization pathway in Aspergillus nidulans, suggest an evolutionary relationship with the PPR1 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, T; de Queiroz, M V; Oestreicher, N; Scazzocchio, C

    1995-01-01

    The uaY gene codes for a transcriptional activator mediating the induction of a number of unlinked genes involved in purine utilization in Aspergillus nidulans. Here we present the complete genomic and cDNA nucleotide sequence of this gene. The gene contains two introns. The derived polypeptide of 1060 residues contains a typical zinc binuclear cluster domain and shows a number of similarities with the PPR1 regulatory gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These similarities are most striking in the putative linker and dimerization regions following the zinc cluster. Gel-shift and DNase I footprinting experiments have been carried out for three genes subject to UaY-mediated induction. The binding sequence is 5'-TCGG-6X-CCGA, which is identical to the proposed PPR1 binding sites. Nevertheless, the identity of the base immediately 3' of the 5'-TCGG sequence clearly affects the affinity of the site. The site upstream of the uapA gene has been shown to be active in vivo. Binding to this site has been analysed by a number of interference techniques. There is an interesting chemical similarity between the co-inducer of the purine utilization pathway (uric acid) and that of the genes of the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway (dihydroorotic acid) and we show that dihydroorotic acid can act as a poor inducer of at least one activity under UaY control. These striking similarities, together with the unique pattern of regulation of pyrimidine biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae, suggest that PPR1 evolved through recruitment into the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway of an ancestral gene related to uaY. Images PMID:7729421

  14. Metabolism and ecology of purine alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Anaya, Ana Luisa; Cruz-Ortega, Rocio; Waller, George R

    2006-01-01

    In this review, the biosynthesis, catabolism, ecological significance, and modes of action of purine alkaloids particularly, caffeine, theobromine and theophylline in plants are discussed. In the biosynthesis of caffeine, progress has been made in enzymology, the amino acid sequence of the enzymes, and in the genes encoding N-methyltransferases. In addition, caffeine-deficient plants have been produced. The ecology of purine alkaloids has not proved to be particularly promising. However, advances have been made in insecticidal and allelopathic fields, and in the role of microorganisms play in the changes that these compounds undergo in the soil. Caffeine inhibits cell plate formation during telophase throughout the development of coffee plants and other species. PMID:16720319

  15. Purine Salvage Pathways among Borrelia Species▿

    PubMed Central

    Pettersson, Jonas; Schrumpf, Merry E.; Raffel, Sandra J.; Porcella, Stephen F.; Guyard, Cyril; Lawrence, Kevin; Gherardini, Frank C.; Schwan, Tom G.

    2007-01-01

    Genome sequencing projects on two relapsing fever spirochetes, Borrelia hermsii and Borrelia turicatae, revealed differences in genes involved in purine metabolism and salvage compared to those in the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. The relapsing fever spirochetes contained six open reading frames that are absent from the B. burgdorferi genome. These genes included those for hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hpt), adenylosuccinate synthase (purA), adenylosuccinate lyase (purB), auxiliary protein (nrdI), the ribonucleotide-diphosphate reductase alpha subunit (nrdE), and the ribonucleotide-diphosphate reductase beta subunit (nrdF). Southern blot assays with multiple Borrelia species and isolates confirmed the presence of these genes in the relapsing fever group of spirochetes but not in B. burgdorferi and related species. TaqMan real-time reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated that the chromosomal genes (hpt, purA, and purB) were transcribed in vitro and in mice. Phosphoribosyltransferase assays revealed that, in general, B. hermsii exhibited significantly higher activity than did the B. burgdorferi cell lysate, and enzymatic activity was observed with adenine, hypoxanthine, and guanine as substrates. B. burgdorferi showed low but detectable phosphoribosyltransferase activity with hypoxanthine even though the genome lacks a discernible ortholog to the hpt gene in the relapsing fever spirochetes. B. hermsii incorporated radiolabeled hypoxanthine into RNA and DNA to a much greater extent than did B. burgdorferi. This complete pathway for purine salvage in the relapsing fever spirochetes may contribute, in part, to these spirochetes achieving high cell densities in blood. PMID:17502392

  16. Evidence from CD spectra that d(purine).r(pyrimidine) and r(purine).d(pyrimidine) hybrids are in different structural classes.

    PubMed Central

    Hung, S H; Yu, Q; Gray, D M; Ratliff, R L

    1994-01-01

    CD spectra and difference CD spectra of four d(oligopurine).r(oligopyrimidine) and four r(oligopurine).d(oligopyrimidine) hybrid duplexes containing mixed A.T(U) and G.C base pairs were compared with the spectra of four DNA.DNA and four RNA.RNA oligomer duplexes of similar repeating sequences. The 16 duplexes were formed by mixing oligomers that were 24 nucleotides long. The buffer was 0.05 M Na+ (phosphate), pH 7.0. DNA.DNA and RNA.RNA oligomer duplexes were used as reference B-form and A-form structures. We found that the CD spectra of d(purine).r(pyrimidine) and r(purine).d(pyrimidine) hybrid duplexes were different from the CD spectra of either DNA.DNA or RNA.RNA duplexes. The data suggested that these hybrids have intermediate structures between A-form RNA and B-form DNA structures. The CD spectra of d(purine).r(pyrimidine) and r(purine).d(pyrimidine) hybrid duplexes were different from each other, but the hybrids in each class had consistent CD spectra as indicated by nearest-neighbor comparisons. Thus, it appeared that the two types of hybrids belonged to different structural classes. The negative 210 nm band found in difference CD spectra was correlated with the presence of an r(purine) strand in the hybrid duplexes. The melting temperatures (Tm values) of these hybrids were compared with the Tm values of the DNA.DNA and RNA.RNA duplexes. The order of the thermal stability was: RNA.RNA duplex > r(purine).d(pyrimidine) hybrid > DNA.DNA duplex > d(purine).r(pyrimidine) hybrid, when comparing analogous sequences. PMID:7937162

  17. T.C.G triplet in an antiparallel purine.purine.pyrimidine DNA triplex. Conformational studies by NMR.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, K; Gu, J; Tinder, R; Hogan, M; Gao, X

    1994-04-12

    The antiparallel purine.purine.pyrimidine DNA triplex, RRY6, which contains a T.C.G inverted triplet in the center of the sequence, was examined by proton and phosphorous two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The local conformation of the T.C.G triplet (T4.C11.G18) and the effect of this triplet on the global helical structure were analyzed in detail. The formation of the T.C.G triplet is confirmed by a set of cross-strand NOEs, including unusual cross-strand NOEs between the third strand and the pyrimidine strand as opposed to the purine strand of the duplex. NMR data suggest that the T.C.G triplet may be present in an equilibrium between a non-hydrogen-bonded form and a T(O4)-C(NH2) hydrogen-bonded form and that there is a distortion of the in-plane alignment of the three bases. The flanking G.G.C base triplets are well-defined on the 5'-side of T4, but somewhat interrupted on the 3'-side of T4. The effect of the third strand binding on the Watson-Crick duplex was probed by an NMR study of the free duplex RY6. NMR parameters are affected mostly around the T.C.G inversion site. The perturbations extend to at least two adjacent base triplets on either side. The binding of the third purine strand and the accommodation of a central T.C.G inversion in RRY6 does not require a readjustment in sugar pucker, which remains in the range of C2'-endo. 31P resonances of RRY6 distribute over a range of 2.2 ppm. The H-P coupling patterns of the third strand differ from those of the duplex. General spectral patterns defined by the marker protons of the RRY and YRY triplexes are compared. PMID:8155628

  18. Purine Catabolism in Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Guranowski, Andrzej

    1982-01-01

    Inosine nucleosidase (EC 3.2.2.2), the enzyme which hydrolyzes inosine to hypoxanthine and ribose, has been partially purified from Lupinus luteus L. cv. Topaz seeds by extraction of the seed meal with low ionic strength buffer, ammonium sulfate fractionation, and chromatography on aminohexyl-Sepharose, Sephadex G-100, and hydroxyapatite. Molecular weight of the native enzyme is 62,000 as judged by gel filtration. The inosine nucleosidase exhibits optimum activity around pH 8. Energy of activation for inosine hydrolysis estimated from Arrhenius plot is 14.2 kilocalories per mole. The Km value computed for inosine is 65 micromolar. Among the inosine analogs tested, the following nucleosides are substrates for the lupin inosine nucleosidase: xanthosine, purine riboside (nebularine), 6-mercaptopurine riboside, 8-azainosine, adenosine, and guanosine. The ratio of the velocities measured at 500 micromolar concentration of inosine, adenosine, and guanosine was 100:11:1, respectively. Specificity (Vmax/Km) towards adenosine is 48 times lower than that towards inosine. In contrast to the adenosine nucleosidase activity which is absent from lupin seeds and appears in the cotyledons during germination (Guranowski, Pawełkiewicz 1978 Planta 139: 245-247), the inosine nucleosidase is present in both lupin seeds and seedlings. PMID:16662492

  19. Riboswitch Structure: an Internal Residue Mimicking the Purine Ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Delfosse, V.; Bouchard, P; Bonneau, E; Dagenais, P; Lemay, J; Lafontaine, D; Legault, P

    2009-01-01

    The adenine and guanine riboswitches regulate gene expression in response to their purine ligand. X-ray structures of the aptamer moiety of these riboswitches are characterized by a compact fold in which the ligand forms a Watson-Crick base pair with residue 65. Phylogenetic analyses revealed a strict restriction at position 39 of the aptamer that prevents the G39-C65 and A39-U65 combinations, and mutational studies indicate that aptamers with these sequence combinations are impaired for ligand binding. In order to investigate the rationale for sequence conservation at residue 39, structural characterization of the U65C mutant from Bacillus subtilis pbuE adenine riboswitch aptamer was undertaken. NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography studies demonstrate that the U65C mutant adopts a compact ligand-free structure, in which G39 occupies the ligand-binding site of purine riboswitch aptamers. These studies present a remarkable example of a mutant RNA aptamer that adopts a native-like fold by means of ligand mimicking and explain why this mutant is impaired for ligand binding. Furthermore, this work provides a specific insight into how the natural sequence has evolved through selection of nucleotide identities that contribute to formation of the ligand-bound state, but ensures that the ligand-free state remains in an active conformation.

  20. Riboswitch structure: an internal residue mimicking the purine ligand

    PubMed Central

    Delfosse, Vanessa; Bouchard, Patricia; Bonneau, Eric; Dagenais, Pierre; Lemay, Jean-François; Lafontaine, Daniel A.; Legault, Pascale

    2010-01-01

    The adenine and guanine riboswitches regulate gene expression in response to their purine ligand. X-ray structures of the aptamer moiety of these riboswitches are characterized by a compact fold in which the ligand forms a Watson–Crick base pair with residue 65. Phylogenetic analyses revealed a strict restriction at position 39 of the aptamer that prevents the G39–C65 and A39–U65 combinations, and mutational studies indicate that aptamers with these sequence combinations are impaired for ligand binding. In order to investigate the rationale for sequence conservation at residue 39, structural characterization of the U65C mutant from Bacillus subtilis pbuE adenine riboswitch aptamer was undertaken. NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography studies demonstrate that the U65C mutant adopts a compact ligand-free structure, in which G39 occupies the ligand-binding site of purine riboswitch aptamers. These studies present a remarkable example of a mutant RNA aptamer that adopts a native-like fold by means of ligand mimicking and explain why this mutant is impaired for ligand binding. Furthermore, this work provides a specific insight into how the natural sequence has evolved through selection of nucleotide identities that contribute to formation of the ligand-bound state, but ensures that the ligand-free state remains in an active conformation. PMID:20022916

  1. Prebiotic syntheses of purines and pyrimidines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile, B.; Lazcano, A.; Oró, J.

    The work done in many laboratories during the last two decades has confirmed that hydrogen cyanide and cyanoacetylene are the two major precursors for the prebiotic synthesis of purines and pyrimidines, respectively. Although several different pathways for the synthesis of purines have been described, they are all variations of the initial mechanism proposed by Oró and Kimball, where hydrogen cyanide leads first to the formation of a 4,5-disubstituted imidazole derivative, and then to the closing of the purine ring with a C1 compound. A number of experiments have shown that purines and pyrimidines can also be obtained from methane, ammonia (nitrogen), and water mixtures, provided an activating source of energy (radiation, electric discharges, etc.) is available. However, in this case the yields are lower by about two orders of magnitude because of the intermediate formation of hydrogen cyanide and cyanoacetylene. The latter two compounds have been found in interstellar space, Titan and other bodies of the solar system. They were probably present in the primordial parent bodies from the solar nebula in concentrations of 10-2 to 10-3 M as inferred from recent calculations by Miller and coworkers obtained for the Murchison meteorite. These concentrations should have been sufficient to generate relatively large amounts of purine and pyrimidine bases on the primitive Earth.

  2. Quantitative analysis of purine nucleotides indicates that purinosomes increase de novo purine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong; Chiaro, Christopher R; Zhang, Limin; Smith, Philip B; Chan, Chung Yu; Pedley, Anthony M; Pugh, Raymond J; French, Jarrod B; Patterson, Andrew D; Benkovic, Stephen J

    2015-03-13

    Enzymes in the de novo purine biosynthesis pathway are recruited to form a dynamic metabolic complex referred to as the purinosome. Previous studies have demonstrated that purinosome assembly responds to purine levels in culture medium. Purine-depleted medium or 2-dimethylamino-4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole (DMAT) treatment stimulates the purinosome assembly in HeLa cells. Here, several metabolomic technologies were applied to quantify the static cellular levels of purine nucleotides and measure the de novo biosynthesis rate of IMP, AMP, and GMP. Direct comparison of purinosome-rich cells (cultured in purine-depleted medium) and normal cells showed a 3-fold increase in IMP concentration in purinosome-rich cells and similar levels of AMP, GMP, and ratios of AMP/GMP and ATP/ADP for both. In addition, a higher level of IMP was also observed in HeLa cells treated with DMAT. Furthermore, increases in the de novo IMP/AMP/GMP biosynthetic flux rate under purine-depleted condition were observed. The synthetic enzymes, adenylosuccinate synthase (ADSS) and inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), downstream of IMP were also shown to be part of the purinosome. Collectively, these results provide further evidence that purinosome assembly is directly related to activated de novo purine biosynthesis, consistent with the functionality of the purinosome. PMID:25605736

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Purine Nucleotides Indicates That Purinosomes Increase de Novo Purine Biosynthesis*♦

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hong; Chiaro, Christopher R.; Zhang, Limin; Smith, Philip B.; Chan, Chung Yu; Pedley, Anthony M.; Pugh, Raymond J.; French, Jarrod B.; Patterson, Andrew D.; Benkovic, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes in the de novo purine biosynthesis pathway are recruited to form a dynamic metabolic complex referred to as the purinosome. Previous studies have demonstrated that purinosome assembly responds to purine levels in culture medium. Purine-depleted medium or 2-dimethylamino-4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole (DMAT) treatment stimulates the purinosome assembly in HeLa cells. Here, several metabolomic technologies were applied to quantify the static cellular levels of purine nucleotides and measure the de novo biosynthesis rate of IMP, AMP, and GMP. Direct comparison of purinosome-rich cells (cultured in purine-depleted medium) and normal cells showed a 3-fold increase in IMP concentration in purinosome-rich cells and similar levels of AMP, GMP, and ratios of AMP/GMP and ATP/ADP for both. In addition, a higher level of IMP was also observed in HeLa cells treated with DMAT. Furthermore, increases in the de novo IMP/AMP/GMP biosynthetic flux rate under purine-depleted condition were observed. The synthetic enzymes, adenylosuccinate synthase (ADSS) and inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), downstream of IMP were also shown to be part of the purinosome. Collectively, these results provide further evidence that purinosome assembly is directly related to activated de novo purine biosynthesis, consistent with the functionality of the purinosome. PMID:25605736

  4. Prebiotic syntheses of purines and pyrimidines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basile, B.; Oro, J.; Lazcano, A.

    1984-01-01

    The results of experimental and theoretical investigations of the prebiotic synthesis of purines and pyramidines are surveyed. Topics examined include the synthesis of purines from HCN via 4,5-disubstituted imidazole derivatives in aqueous solutions or liquid NH3, simultaneous formation of amino acids and purines by electron irradiation of CH4-NH3-H2O mixtures, synthesis of pyrimadines from cynoacetylene, energetics, formation of bases under anhydrous or concentrated conditions, formation of bases under dilute conditions, Fischer-Tropsch-type reactions, and the role of activated intermediates. It is pointed out that the precursor compounds have been detected in the interstellar medium, on Titan, and in other solar-system bodies, and that solar-nebula HCN concentrations of the order of 1-10 mM have been estimated on the basis of meteorite measurements.

  5. Role of long purine stretches in controlling the expression of genes associated with neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Singh, Himanshu Narayan; Rajeswari, Moganty R

    2015-11-10

    Purine repeat sequences present in the human genome are known to act as hotspots for mutations leading to chromosomal imbalances. It is established that large purine repeats (PRs) form stable DNA triplex structure which can inhibit gene expression. Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA), the autosomal neurodegenerative disorder is the only human disease known so far, where a large purine (GAA) repeat in the FXN gene is known to inhibit the expression of frataxin protein. We explored the hidden purine repeats (PRn with n ≥ 200) if any, in the human genome to find out how they are associated with neurological disorders. The results showed 28 PRs, which are mostly restricted to the intronic regions. Interestingly, the transcriptome expression analysis of PR-carrying genes (PR-genes) revealed that most of them are down-regulated in neurological disorders (autism, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, epilepsy, mental retardation, Parkinson's disease, brain tumor) as compared to that in healthy controls. The altered gene expression in brain disorders can be interpreted in terms of a possible expansion of purine repeats leading to formation of very stable DNA-triplex and/or alleviation of the repair enzymes and/or other unknown cellular factors. Interactome analysis identified four PR-genes in signaling pathways whose dysregulation is correlated directly with pathogenesis: GRK5 and KLK6 in Alzheimer's disease; FGF14 in craniosynostosis, mental retardation and FLT1 in neuroferritinopathy. By virtue of being mutational hotspots and their ability to form DNA-triplex, purine repeats in genome disturb the genome integrity and interfere with the transcriptional regulation. However, validation of the disease linkage of PR-genes can be validated using knock-out techniques. PMID:26149656

  6. [BLOOD AND CEREBROSPINAL FLUID PURINES IN PREGNANT].

    PubMed

    Oreshnikov, E V; Oreshnikov, S F

    2015-01-01

    The research includes 88 pregnant women, that had their purine basis and malondialdehyde in water thermocoagulate extract of venous blood and cerebrospinal fluid examined (along with common standards clinical-laboratory tests) before the spinal anesthesia for the caesarian section was provided It was detected that preeclampsy and HELLP-syndine feature the increased adenine guanine hypoxantine and uric acid levels in cerebrospinal fluid, as well as increased concentrations of blood malondyaldehyde (higher than upper normal level), accompany with the increased hemotaencephalic barrier permeability for adenine, guanine and hypoxantine. It's demonstrated that level of guanine in blood serum can be used as a prognostic factor of spinal anesthesia quality in obstetrics. It is supposed to examine purine levels in pregnant women not only in blood but also in cere brospinal fluid. PMID:26596029

  7. Targeting Purine and Pyrimidine Metabolism in Human Apicomplexan Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Synthesis de novo, acquisition by salvage and interconversion of purines and pyrimidines represent the fundamental requirements for their eventual assembly into nucleic acids as nucleotides and the deployment of their derivatives in other biochemical pathways. A small number of drugs targeted to nucleotide metabolism, by virtue of their effect on folate biosynthesis and recycling, have been successfully used against apicomplexan parasites such as Plasmodium and Toxoplasma for many years, although resistance is now a major problem in the prevention and treatment of malaria. Many targets not involving folate metabolism have also been explored at the experimental level. However, the unravelling of the genome sequences of these eukaryotic unicellular organisms, together with increasingly sophisticated molecular analyses, opens up possibilities of introducing new drugs that could interfere with these processes. This review examines the status of established drugs of this type and the potential for further exploiting the vulnerability of apicomplexan human pathogens to inhibition of this key area of metabolism. PMID:17266529

  8. Purine and pyrimidine excretion in psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Simmonds, H. A.; Bowyer, A.

    1974-01-01

    1 Urinary purine excretion has been investigated in two healthy controls and two patients with psoriasis, one a hyperuricaemic, one a normouricaemic. No difference was detected between the patients and controls. Therapy with allopurinol effectively lowered blood and urinary uric acid levels and produced a deficit in total urinary oxypurine excretion in both controls and patients with psoriasis. The concomitant increase in xanthine excretion was greater than the increase in hypoxanthine excretion and xanthine/hypoxanthine ratios (average 0.70 and 1.0 prior to therapy) were increased by allopurinol to an average of 3.0 and 3.8 respectively in the two groups. Allopurinol also reduced the excretion of 8-hydroxy-7-methyl guanine but no effect on the excretion levels of other minor purine bases was noted. 2 Allopurinol was metabolized similarly by both patients and controls, 84% of the administered allopurinol being accounted for as urinary metabolites. 74% of the drug in the urine was excreted as oxipurinol, 26% as unchanged allopurinol plus allopurinol riboside, the remainder being oxipurinol riboside. 3 Pseudouridine excretion in 25 healthy controls was 86.5 ± 17.8 mg/24 hours. Pseudouridine excretion was not excessive in the patients with psoriasis and was not altered by allopurinol therapy. 4 No abnormality or difference in purine or pyrimidine excretion in either patient was detected prior to or during therapy which could be related to the epidermal lesion. PMID:22454896

  9. Purines: forgotten mediators in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Edwin K; Boison, Detlev; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Kochanek, Patrick M

    2016-04-01

    Recently, the topic of traumatic brain injury has gained attention in both the scientific community and lay press. Similarly, there have been exciting developments on multiple fronts in the area of neurochemistry specifically related to purine biology that are relevant to both neuroprotection and neurodegeneration. At the 2105 meeting of the National Neurotrauma Society, a session sponsored by the International Society for Neurochemistry featured three experts in the field of purine biology who discussed new developments that are germane to both the pathomechanisms of secondary injury and development of therapies for traumatic brain injury. This included presentations by Drs. Edwin Jackson on the novel 2',3'-cAMP pathway in neuroprotection, Detlev Boison on adenosine in post-traumatic seizures and epilepsy, and Michael Schwarzschild on the potential of urate to treat central nervous system injury. This mini review summarizes the important findings in these three areas and outlines future directions for the development of new purine-related therapies for traumatic brain injury and other forms of central nervous system injury. In this review, novel therapies based on three emerging areas of adenosine-related pathobiology in traumatic brain injury (TBI) were proposed, namely, therapies targeting 1) the 2',3'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) pathway, 2) adenosine deficiency after TBI, and 3) augmentation of urate after TBI. PMID:26809224

  10. Anopheles gambiae Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase: Catalysis, Structure, and Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor,E.; Rinaldo-Matthis, A.; Li, L.; Ghanem, M.; Hazleton, K.; Cassera, M.; Almo, S.; Schramm, V.

    2007-01-01

    The purine salvage pathway of Anopheles gambiae, a mosquito that transmits malaria, has been identified in genome searches on the basis of sequence homology with characterized enzymes. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is a target for the development of therapeutic agents in humans and purine auxotrophs, including malarial parasites. The PNP from Anopheles gambiae (AgPNP) was expressed in Escherichia coli and compared to the PNPs from Homo sapiens (HsPNP) and Plasmodium falciparum (PfPNP). AgPNP has kcat values of 54 and 41 s-1 for 2'-deoxyinosine and inosine, its preferred substrates, and 1.0 s-1 for guanosine. However, the chemical step is fast for AgPNP at 226 s-1 for guanosine in pre-steady-state studies. 5'-Deaza-1'-aza-2'-deoxy-1'-(9-methylene)-Immucillin-H (DADMe-ImmH) is a transition-state mimic for a 2'-deoxyinosine ribocation with a fully dissociated N-ribosidic bond and is a slow-onset, tight-binding inhibitor with a dissociation constant of 3.5 pM. This is the tightest-binding inhibitor known for any PNP, with a remarkable Km/Ki* of 5.4 x 107, and is consistent with enzymatic transition state predictions of enhanced transition-state analogue binding in enzymes with enhanced catalytic efficiency. Deoxyguanosine is a weaker substrate than deoxyinosine, and DADMe-Immucillin-G is less tightly bound than DADMe-ImmH, with a dissociation constant of 23 pM for AgPNP as compared to 7 pM for HsPNP. The crystal structure of AgPNP was determined in complex with DADMe-ImmH and phosphate to a resolution of 2.2 Angstroms to reveal the differences in substrate and inhibitor specificity. The distance from the N1' cation to the phosphate O4 anion is shorter in the AgPNP{center_dot}DADMe-ImmH{center_dot}PO4 complex than in HsPNP{center_dot}DADMe-ImmH{center_dot}SO4, offering one explanation for the stronger inhibitory effect of DADMe-ImmH for AgPNP.

  11. Purines in neurite growth and astroglia activation.

    PubMed

    Heine, Claudia; Sygnecka, Katja; Franke, Heike

    2016-05-01

    The mammalian nervous system is a complex, functional network of neurons, consisting of local and long-range connections. Neuronal growth is highly coordinated by a variety of extracellular and intracellular signaling molecules. Purines turned out to be an essential component of these processes. Here, we review the current knowledge about the involvement of purinergic signaling in the regulation of neuronal development. We particularly focus on its role in neuritogenesis: the formation and extension of neurites. In the course of maturation mammals generally lose their ability to regenerate the central nervous system (CNS) e.g. after traumatic brain injury; although, spontaneous regeneration still occurs in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Thus, it is crucial to translate the knowledge about CNS development and PNS regeneration into novel approaches to enable neurons of the mature CNS to regenerate. In this context we give a general overview of growth-inhibitory and growth-stimulatory factors and mechanisms involved in neurite growth. With regard to neuronal growth, astrocytes are an important cell population. They provide structural and metabolic support to neurons and actively participate in brain signaling. Astrocytes respond to injury with beneficial or detrimental reactions with regard to axonal growth. In this review we present the current knowledge of purines in these glial functions. Moreover, we discuss organotypic brain slice co-cultures as a model which retains neuron-glia interactions, and further presents at once a model for CNS development and regeneration. In summary, the purinergic system is a pivotal factor in neuronal development and in the response to injury. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Purines in Neurodegeneration and Neuroregeneration'. PMID:26498067

  12. Distinct Purine Distribution in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, Michael P.; Smith, Karen E.; Cleaves, Henderson J.; Ruzicka, Josef; Stern, Jennifer C.; Glavin, Daniel P.; House, Christopher H.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2011-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrite meteorites are known to contain a diverse suite of organic compounds, many of which are essential components of biochemistry. Amino acids, which are the monomers of proteins, have been extensively studied in such meteorites (e.g. Botta and Bada 2002; Pizzarello et aI., 2006). The origin of amino acids in meteorites has been firmly established as extraterrestrial based on their detection typically as racemic mixtures of amino acids, the presence of many non-protein amino acids, and non-terrestrial values for compound-specific deuterium, carbon, and nitrogen isotopic measurements. In contrast to amino acids, nucleobases in meteorites have been far less studied. Nucleobases are substituted one-ring (pyrimidine) or two-ring (purine) nitrogen heterocyclic compounds and serve as the information carriers of nucleic acids and in numerous coenzymes. All of the purines (adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, and xanthine) and pyrimidines (uracil) previously reported in meteorites are biologically common and could be interpreted as the result of terrestrial contamination (e.g. van del' Velden and Schwartz, 1974.) Unlike other meteoritic organics, there have been no observations of stochastic molecular diversity of purines and pyrimidines in meteorites, which has been a criterion for establishing extraterrestrial origin. Maltins et al. (2008) performed compound-specific stable carbon isotope measurements for uracil and xanthine in the Murchison meteorite. They assigned a non-terrestrial origin for these nucleobases; however, the possibility that interfering indigenous molecules (e.g. carboxylic acids) contributed to the 13C-enriched isotope values for these nucleobases cannot be completely ruled out. Thus, the origin of these meteoritic nucleobases has never been established unequivocally. Here we report on our investigation of extracts of II different carbonaceous chondrites covering various petrographic types (Cl, CM, and CR) and degrees of aqueous alteration

  13. Structure, stability, and thermodynamics of a short intermolecular purine-purine-pyrimidine triple helix

    SciTech Connect

    Pilch, D.S.; Shafer, R.H. ); Levenson, C. )

    1991-06-25

    The authors have investigated the structure and physical chemistry of the d(C{sub 3}T{sub 4}C{sub 3}){center dot}2(d(G{sub 3}A{sub 4}G{sub 3})) triple helix by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), {sup 1}H NMR, and ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectroscopy. The triplex was stabilized with MgCl{sub 2} at neutral pH. PAGE studies verify the stoichiometry of the strands comprising the triplex and indicate that the orientation of the third strand in purine-purine-pyrimidine (pur-pur-pyr) triplexes is antiparallel with respect to the purine strand of the underlying duplex. Imino proton NMR spectra provide evidence for the existence of new purine-purine (pur{center dot}pur) hydrogen bonds, in addition to those of the Watson-Crick (W-C) base pairs, in the triplex structure. These new hydrogen bonds are likely to correspond to the interaction between third-strand guanine NH1 imino protons and the N7 atoms of guanine residues on the puring strand of the underlying duplex. Thermal denaturation of the triplex proceeds to single strands in one step, under the conditions used in this study. Binding of the third strand appears to enhance the thermal stability of the duplex by 1-3 C, depending on the DNA concentration. This marked enhancement in stability, coupled with the lack of an acidic pH requirement, suggests that pur-pur-pyr triplexes are appealing choices for use in applications involving oligonucleotide targeting of duplex DNA in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Nathanael S.; Schultz, Peter; Kim, Sung-Hou; Meijer, Laurent

    2001-07-03

    The present invention relates to purine analogs that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such purine analogs to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  15. Arginylation regulates purine nucleotide biosynthesis by enhancing the activity of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fangliang; Patel, Devang M; Colavita, Kristen; Rodionova, Irina; Buckley, Brian; Scott, David A; Kumar, Akhilesh; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Saha, Sougata; Chernov, Mikhail; Osterman, Andrei L; Kashina, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Protein arginylation is an emerging post-translational modification that targets a number of metabolic enzymes; however, the mechanisms and downstream effects of this modification are unknown. Here we show that lack of arginylation renders cells vulnerable to purine nucleotide synthesis inhibitors and affects the related glycine and serine biosynthesis pathways. We show that the purine nucleotide biosynthesis enzyme PRPS2 is selectively arginylated, unlike its close homologue PRPS1, and that arginylation of PRPS2 directly facilitates its biological activity. Moreover, selective arginylation of PRPS2 but not PRPS1 is regulated through a coding sequence-dependent mechanism that combines elements of mRNA secondary structure with lysine residues encoded near the N-terminus of PRPS1. This mechanism promotes arginylation-specific degradation of PRPS1 and selective retention of arginylated PRPS2 in vivo. We therefore demonstrate that arginylation affects both the activity and stability of a major metabolic enzyme. PMID:26175007

  16. Prolonged fasting increases purine recycling in post-weaned northern elephant seals

    PubMed Central

    Soñanez-Organis, José Guadalupe; Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Aguilar, Andres; Crocker, Daniel E.; Ortiz, Rudy M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Northern elephant seals are naturally adapted to prolonged periods (1–2 months) of absolute food and water deprivation (fasting). In terrestrial mammals, food deprivation stimulates ATP degradation and decreases ATP synthesis, resulting in the accumulation of purines (ATP degradation byproducts). Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) salvages ATP by recycling the purine degradation products derived from xanthine oxidase (XO) metabolism, which also promotes oxidant production. The contributions of HGPRT to purine recycling during prolonged food deprivation in marine mammals are not well defined. In the present study we cloned and characterized the complete and partial cDNA sequences that encode for HGPRT and xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) in northern elephant seals. We also measured XO protein expression and circulating activity, along with xanthine and hypoxanthine plasma content in fasting northern elephant seal pups. Blood, adipose and muscle tissue samples were collected from animals after 1, 3, 5 and 7 weeks of their natural post-weaning fast. The complete HGPRT and partial XOR cDNA sequences are 771 and 345 bp long and encode proteins of 218 and 115 amino acids, respectively, with conserved domains important for their function and regulation. XOR mRNA and XO protein expression increased 3-fold and 1.7-fold with fasting, respectively, whereas HGPRT mRNA (4-fold) and protein (2-fold) expression increased after 7 weeks in adipose tissue and muscle. Plasma xanthine (3-fold) and hypoxanthine (2.5-fold) levels, and XO (1.7- to 20-fold) and HGPRT (1.5- to 1.7-fold) activities increased during the last 2 weeks of fasting. Results suggest that prolonged fasting in elephant seal pups is associated with increased capacity to recycle purines, which may contribute to ameliorating oxidant production and enhancing the supply of ATP, both of which would be beneficial during prolonged food deprivation and appear to be adaptive in this species. PMID

  17. Purine salvage in the apicomplexan Sarcocystis neurona, and generation of hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase-deficient clones for positive-negative selection of transgenic parasites.

    PubMed

    Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Zhang, Zijing; Howe, Daniel K

    2014-09-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is an apicomplexan parasite that causes severe neurological disease in horses and marine mammals. The Apicomplexa are all obligate intracellular parasites that lack purine biosynthesis pathways and rely on the host cell for their purine requirements. Hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HXGPRT) and adenosine kinase (AK) are key enzymes that function in two complementary purine salvage pathways in apicomplexans. Bioinformatic searches of the S. neurona genome revealed genes encoding HXGPRT, AK and all of the major purine salvage enzymes except purine nucleoside phosphorylase. Wild-type S. neurona were able to grow in the presence of mycophenolic acid (MPA) but were inhibited by 6-thioxanthine (6-TX), suggesting that the pathways involving either HXGPRT or AK are functional in this parasite. Prior work with Toxoplasma gondii demonstrated the utility of HXGPRT as a positive-negative selection marker. To enable the use of HXGPRT in S. neurona, the SnHXGPRT gene sequence was determined and a gene-targeting plasmid was transfected into S. neurona. SnHXGPRT-deficient mutants were selected with 6-TX, and single-cell clones were obtained. These Sn∆HXG parasites were susceptible to MPA and could be complemented using the heterologous T. gondii HXGPRT gene. In summary, S. neurona possesses both purine salvage pathways described in apicomplexans, thus allowing the use of HXGPRT as a positive-negative drug selection marker in this parasite. PMID:24923662

  18. Cobalamin inactivation decreases purine and methionine synthesis in cultured lymphoblasts.

    PubMed

    Boss, G R

    1985-07-01

    The megaloblastic anemia of cobalamin deficiency appears secondary to decreased methionine synthetase activity. Decreased activity of this enzyme should cause 5-methyltetrahydrofolate to accumulate intracellularly, and consequently, decrease purine and DNA synthesis; this is the basis of the "methylfolate trap" hypothesis of cobalamin deficiency. However, only some of the clinical and biochemical manifestations of cobalamin deficiency can be explained by the methylfolate trap. We investigated cobalamin deficiency by treating cultured human lymphoblasts with N2O since N2O inhibits methionine synthetase activity by inactivating cobalamin. We found that 4 h of N2O exposure reduced rates of methionine synthesis by 89%. Rates of purine synthesis were not significantly reduced by N2O when folate and methionine were present at 100 microM in the medium; however, at the physiologic methionine concentration of 10 microM, N2O decreased rates of purine synthesis by 33 and 57% in the presence of 100 microM folate and in the absence of folate, respectively. The dependency of rates of purine synthesis on methionine availability would be expected in cells with restricted methionine synthetic capacity because methionine is the immediate precursor of S-adenosylmethionine, a potent inhibitor of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate synthesis; methionine serves as a source of formate for purine synthesis; and rates of purine synthesis are dependent on the intracellular availability of essential amino acids. We conclude that cobalamin inactivation decreases purine synthesis by both methylfolate trapping and reduction of intracellular methionine synthesis. PMID:2862163

  19. Purine metabolism in adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, G C; Schmalstieg, F C; Trimmer, K B; Goldman, A S; Goldblum, R M

    1976-01-01

    Purine and pyrimidine metabolites were measured in erythrocytes, plasma, and urine of a 5-month-old infant with adenosine deaminase (adenosine aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.4) deficiency. Adenosine and adenine were measured using newly devised ion exchange separation techniques and a sensitive fluorescence assay. Plasma adenosine levels were increased, whereas adenosine was normal in erythrocytes and not detectable in urine. Increased amounts of adenine were found in erythrocytes and urine as well as in the plasma. Erythrocyte adenosine 5'-monophosphate and adenosine diphosphate concentrations were normal, but adenosine triphosphate content was greatly elevated. Because of the possibility of pyrimidine starvation, pyrimidine nucleotides (pyrimidine coenzymes) in erythrocytes and orotic acid in urine were measured. Pyrimidine nucleotide concentrations were normal, while orotic acid was not detected. These studies suggest that the immune deficiency associated with adenosine deaminase deficiency may be related to increased amounts of adenine, adenosine, or adenine nucleotides. PMID:1066699

  20. Acceleration of purine degradation by periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Barnes, V M; Teles, R; Trivedi, H M; Devizio, W; Xu, T; Mitchell, M W; Milburn, M V; Guo, L

    2009-09-01

    Periodontal diseases, such as gingivitis and periodontitis, are characterized by bacterial plaque accumulation around the gingival crevice and the subsequent inflammation and destruction of host tissues. To test the hypothesis that cellular metabolism is altered as a result of host-bacteria interaction, we performed an unbiased metabolomic profiling of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) collected from healthy, gingivitis, and periodontitis sites in humans, by liquid and gas chromatography mass spectrometry. The purine degradation pathway, a major biochemical source for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, was significantly accelerated at the disease sites. This suggests that periodontal-disease-induced oxidative stress and inflammation are mediated through this pathway. The complex host-bacterial interaction was further highlighted by depletion of anti-oxidants, degradation of host cellular components, and accumulation of bacterial products in GCF. These findings provide new mechanistic insights and a panel of comprehensive biomarkers for periodontal disease progression. PMID:19767584

  1. Determination and profiling of purines in foods by using HPLC and LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Inazawa, K; Sato, A; Kato, Y; Yamaoka, N; Fukuuchi, T; Yasuda, M; Mawatari, K; Nakagomi, K; Kaneko, K

    2014-01-01

    Purines in food are known to raise serum uric acid levels. We determined the purine content of sweet potato and beef by high-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The purine content of the samples was 118-1,034 μmol/100 g. The total purine content was also divided into purine bases, nucleosides, nucleotides, and nucleic acids. Our results suggest that differences in total purine content and in the ratio of purine types between vegetables and beef cause a difference in elevation of serum uric acid levels. PMID:24940702

  2. Thermodynamic examination of 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loops in RNA and DNA constructs

    PubMed Central

    Strom, Shane; Shiskova, Evgenia; Hahm, Yaeeun

    2015-01-01

    Bulge loops are common features of RNA structures that are involved in the formation of RNA tertiary structures and are often sites for interactions with proteins and ions. Minimal thermodynamic data currently exist on the bulge size and sequence effects. Using thermal denaturation methods, thermodynamic properties of 1- to 5-nt adenine and guanine bulge loop constructs were examined in 10 mM MgCl2 or 1 M KCl. The ΔG37∘ loop parameters for 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loops in RNA constructs were between 3.07 and 5.31 kcal/mol in 1 M KCl buffer. In 10 mM magnesium ions, the ΔΔG° values relative to 1 M KCl were 0.47–2.06 kcal/mol more favorable for the RNA bulge loops. The ΔG37∘ loop parameters for 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loops in DNA constructs were between 4.54 and 5.89 kcal/mol. Only 4- and 5-nt guanine constructs showed significant change in stability for the DNA constructs in magnesium ions. A linear correlation is seen between the size of the bulge loop and its stability. New prediction models are proposed for 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loops in RNA and DNA in 1 M KCl. We show that a significant stabilization is seen for small bulge loops in RNA in the presence of magnesium ions. A prediction model is also proposed for 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loop RNA constructs in 10 mM magnesium chloride. PMID:26022248

  3. Synthetic strategies toward carbocyclic purine-pyrimidine hybrid nucleosides.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Joshua M; Mosley, Sylvester L; Dorgan, Kathleen M; Zhou, Zhaohui Sunny; Seley-Radtke, Katherine L

    2009-08-01

    The blending of key structural features from the purine and pyrimidine nucleobase scaffolds gives rise to a new class of hybrid nucleosides. The purine-pyrimidine hybrid nucleosides can be viewed as either N-3 ribosylated purines or 5,6-disubstituted pyrimidines, thus recognition by both purine- and pyrimidine-metabolizing enzymes is possible. Given the increasing reports of the development of resistance in many enzymatic systems, a drug that could be recognized by more than one enzyme could prove highly advantageous in overcoming resistance mechanisms related to binding site mutations. In that regard, the design, synthesis and results of preliminary biological activity for a series of carbocyclic uracil derivatives with either a fused imidazole or thiazole ring are presented herein. PMID:19592260

  4. Synthetic Strategies Toward Carbocyclic Purine-Pyrimidine Hybrid Nucleosides

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, Joshua M.; Mosley, Sylvester L.; Dorgan, Kathleen M.; Zhou, Zhaohui Sunny; Seley-Radtke, Katherine L.

    2009-01-01

    The blending of key structural features from the purine and pyrimidine nucleobase scaffolds gives rise to a new class of hybrid nucleosides. The purine-pyrimidine hybrid nucleosides can be viewed as either N-3 ribosylated purines or 5,6-disubstituted pyrimidines, thus recognition by both purine- and pyrimidine-metabolizing enzymes is possible. Given the increasing reports of the development of resistance in many enzymatic systems, a drug that could be recognized by more than one enzyme could prove highly advantageous in overcoming resistance mechanisms related to binding site mutations. In that regard, the design, synthesis and results of preliminary biological activity for a series of carbocyclic uracil derivatives with either a fused imidazole or thiazole ring are presented herein. PMID:19592260

  5. Purines and pyrimidines in sediments from lake erie.

    PubMed

    Van Der Velden, W; Schwartz, A W

    1974-08-23

    Quantitative analyses of purines and pyrimidines in sequential sections of cores from the central and eastern basins of Lake Erie show steeply increasing concentrations in the youngest sediments. This may be related to increased loading of nutrients and recent cultural eutrophication of the lake. The purine and pyrimidine distributions suggest the operation of a specific degradative process for uracil at an extremely early stage in, or prior to, sediment formation. PMID:17736373

  6. Regulation of Purine Metabolism in Intact Leaves of Coffea arabica.

    PubMed Central

    Nazario, G. M.; Lovatt, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    The capacity of Coffea arabica leaves (5- x 5-mm pieces) to synthesize de novo and catabolize purine nucleotides to provide precursors for caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) was investigated. Consistent with de novo synthesis, glycine, bicarbonate, and formate were incorporated into the purine ring of inosine 5[prime]-monophosphate (IMP) and adenine nucleotides ([sigma]Ade); azaserine, a known inhibitor of purine de novo synthesis, inhibited incorporation. Activity of the de novo pathway in C. arabica per g fresh weight of leaf tissue during a 3-h incubation period was 8 [plus or minus] 4 nmol of formate incorporated into IMP, 61 [plus or minus] 7 nmol into [sigma]Ade, and 150 nmol into caffeine (the latter during a 7-h incubation). Coffee leaves exhibited classical purine catabolism. Radiolabeled formate, inosine, adenosine, and adenine were incorporated into hypoxanthine and xanthine, which were catabolized to allantoin and urea. Urease activity was demonstrated. Per g fresh weight, coffee leaf squares incorporated 90 [plus or minus] 22 nmol of xanthine into caffeine in 7 h but degraded 102 [plus or minus] 1 nmol of xanthine to allantoin in 3 h. Feedback control of de novo purine biosynthesis was contrasted in C. arabica and Cucurbita pepo, a species that does not synthesize purine alkaloids. End-product inhibition was demonstrated to occur in both species but at different enzyme reactions. PMID:12232012

  7. Metabolic Reprogramming During Purine Stress in the Protozoan Pathogen Leishmania donovani

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jessica L.; Yates, Phillip A.; Soysa, Radika; Alfaro, Joshua F.; Yang, Feng; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Weitz, Karl K.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Wilmarth, Phillip A.; David, Larry L.; Ramasamy, Gowthaman; Myler, Peter J.; Carter, Nicola S.

    2014-02-27

    The ability of Leishmania to survive in their insect or mammalian host is dependent upon an ability to sense and adapt to changes in the microenvironment. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the parasite response to environmental changes, such as nutrient availability. To elucidate nutrient stress response pathways in Leishmania donovani, we have used purine starvation as the paradigm. The salvage of purines from the host milieu is obligatory for parasite replication; nevertheless, purine-starved parasites can persist in culture without supplementary purine for over 3 months, indicating that the response to purine starvation is robust and engenders parasite survival under conditions of extreme scarcity. To understand metabolic reprogramming during purine starvation we have employed global approaches. Whole proteome comparisons between purine-starved and purine-replete parasites over a 6-48 h span have revealed a temporal and coordinated response to purine starvation. Purine transporters and enzymes involved in acquisition at the cell surface are upregulated within a few hours of purine removal from the media, while other key purine salvage components are upregulated later in the time-course and more modestly. After 48 h, the proteome of purine-starved parasites is extensively remodeled and adaptations to purine stress appear tailored to deal with both purine deprivation and general stress. To probe the molecular mechanisms affecting proteome remodeling in response to purine starvation, comparative RNA-seq analyses, qRT-PCR, and luciferase reporter assays were performed on purine-starved versus purine-replete parasites. While the regulation of a minority of proteins tracked with changes at the mRNA level, for many regulated proteins it appears that proteome remodeling during purine stress occurs primarily via translational and/or post-translational mechanisms.

  8. People with Easier to Pronounce Names Promote Truthiness of Claims

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Eryn J.; Sanson, Mevagh; Miller, Emily K.; Quigley-McBride, Adele; Foster, Jeffrey L.; Bernstein, Daniel M.; Garry, Maryanne

    2014-01-01

    When people make judgments about the truth of a claim, related but nonprobative information rapidly leads them to believe the claim–an effect called “truthiness” [1]. Would the pronounceability of others’ names also influence the truthiness of claims attributed to them? We replicated previous work by asking subjects to evaluate people’s names on a positive dimension, and extended that work by asking subjects to rate those names on negative dimensions. Then we addressed a novel theoretical issue by asking subjects to read that same list of names, and judge the truth of claims attributed to them. Across all experiments, easily pronounced names trumped difficult names. Moreover, the effect of pronounceability produced truthiness for claims attributed to those names. Our findings are a new instantiation of truthiness, and extend research on the truth effect as well as persuasion by showing that subjective, tangential properties such as ease of processing can matter when people evaluate information attributed to a source. PMID:24586368

  9. Purines and sensory neuropeptides in human asthma.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, J A

    1987-01-01

    Mediators acting on different cells in the lung may produce features of asthma such as bronchoconstriction, plasma leakage from the tracheobronchial microcirculation and mucus secretion. The clinical effectiveness of anticholinergic agents has stimulated the search for mediators other than acetyolcholine and the hope that specific antagonists would improve asthma therapy. The purine, nucleoside adenosine, produces certain asthma-like signs such as bronchoconstriction in asthmatics. Studies with theophylline and nonadenosine-blocking bronchodilator xanthines have, however, demonstrated that adenosine is unlikely to be an asthma mediator, although it may still possess significant extrapulmonary actions. Sensory nerves within the lung show immunoreactivity to a wide variety of peptides, including substance P and other tachykinins. Tachykinins produce bronchoconstriction and plasma extravasation in guinea-pig and rat lungs. In asthmatic subjects, nebulized neurokinin A reduces specific airways conductance. Inhalation of capsaicin, which presumably acts through stimulation of chemosensitive afferent C-fibres, produces cough and a transient upper airway constriction. Elucidation of a role in asthma must await the development of a clinically useful tachykinin antagonist. Accumulating data seems to indicate that asthma pathology is caused by released substances acting in conjunction on target cells in the lung. Functional antagonism, rather than inhibition of a single mediator, thus appears to be essential for clinically effective antiasthma drugs. PMID:2822185

  10. Targeting a Novel Plasmodium falciparum Purine Recycling Pathway with Specific Immucillins

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, L; Shi, W; Lewandowicz, A; Singh, V; Mwakingwe, A; Birck, M R; Taylor Ringia, E A; Bench, G; Madrid, D C; Tyler, P C; Evans, G B; Furneaux, R H; Schramm, V L; Kim, K

    2004-05-19

    Plasmodium falciparum is unable to synthesize purine bases and relies upon purine salvage and purine recycling to meet its purine needs. We report that purines formed as products of the polyamine pathway are recycled in a novel pathway in which 5'-methylthioinosine is generated by adenosine deaminase. The action of P. falciparum purine nucleoside phosphorylase is a convergent step of purine salvage, converting both 5'-methylthioinosine and inosine to hypoxanthine. We used accelerator mass spectrometry to verify that 5'-methylthioinosine is an active nucleic acid precursor in P. falciparum. Prior studies have shown that inhibitors of purine salvage enzymes kill malaria, but potent malaria-specific inhibitors of these enzymes have not previously been described. 5'-methylthio-Immucillin-H, a transition state analogue inhibitor that is selective for malarial over human purine nucleoside phosphorylase, kills P. falciparum in culture. Immucillins are currently in clinical trials for other indications and may have application as antimalarials.

  11. A role for adenine nucleotides in the sensing mechanism to purine starvation in Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jessica L; Yates, Phillip A; Boitz, Jan M; Koop, Dennis R; Fulwiler, Audrey L; Cassera, Maria Belen; Ullman, Buddy; Carter, Nicola S

    2016-07-01

    Purine salvage by Leishmania is an obligatory nutritional process that impacts both cell viability and growth. Previously, we have demonstrated that the removal of purines in culture provokes significant metabolic changes that enable Leishmania to survive prolonged periods of purine starvation. In order to understand how Leishmania sense and respond to changes in their purine environment, we have exploited several purine pathway mutants, some in which adenine and guanine nucleotide metabolism is uncoupled. While wild type parasites grow in any one of a variety of naturally occurring purines, the proliferation of these purine pathway mutants requires specific types or combinations of exogenous purines. By culturing purine pathway mutants in high levels of extracellular purines that are either permissive or non-permissive for growth and monitoring for previously defined markers of the adaptive response to purine starvation, we determined that adaptation arises from a surveillance of intracellular purine nucleotide pools rather than from a direct sensing of the extracellular purine content of the environment. Specifically, our data suggest that perturbation of intracellular adenine-containing nucleotide pools provides a crucial signal for inducing the metabolic changes necessary for the long-term survival of Leishmania in a purine-scarce environment. PMID:27062185

  12. Polyamine effects on purine-purine-pyrimidine triple helix formation by phosphodiester and phosphorothioate oligodeoxyribonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Musso, M; Van Dyke, M W

    1995-01-01

    Utilization of oligodeoxyribonucleotides to inhibit specific gene transcription in vivo (antigene strategy) requires the efficient formation of triple helices under physiological conditions. However, pyrimidine-motif triplexes are not favored at physiological pH, and physiological concentrations of potassium cations hamper purine-motif triplex formation. Here we investigated the effects of polyamines on promoting triplex formation by G/T-rich oligodeoxyribonucleotides containing either phosphodiester or a diastereomeric mixture of phosphorothioate linkages. Compared with Mg2+, equimolar concentrations of polyamines greatly facilitated purine-motif triplex formation with the following order of effectiveness: spermine > spermidine > putrescine. At low polyamine concentrations, phosphorothioate oligonucleotides were better at triplex formation than the corresponding phosphodiester oligonucleotides. Kinetic studies indicated that polyamines facilitated triplex formation by increasing the rate of oligonucleotide-duplex DNA association. However, triplex accumulation with either oligonucleotide was still low under physiological conditions (140 mM K+, 10 mM Mg2+, 1 mM spermine). The inhibitory effects of K+ could be partially overcome with high concentrations of Mg2+ or spermine, with phosphodiester oligonucleotides being better able to form triplexes than phosphorothioates under these conditions. Images PMID:7610062

  13. Isolation of Purines and Pyrimidines from the Murchison Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. K.

    2003-01-01

    The origin of life on Earth, and possibly on other planets such as Mars, would have required the presence of liquid water and a continuous supply of prebiotic organic compounds. The delivery of organic matter by asteroids, comets, and carbonaceous meteorites could have contributed to the early Earth's prebiotic inventory by seeding the planet with biologically important organic compounds. A wide variety of prebiotic organic compounds have previously been detected in the Murchison CM type carbonaceous chondrite including amino acids, purines and pyrimidines'. These compounds play a major role in terrestrial biochemistry and are integral components of proteins, DNA and RNA. In this study we developed a new extraction technique using sublimation in order to isolate purines and pyrimidines from Murchison2, which is cleaner and more time efficient that traditional methods3. Several purines including adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine and xanthine were positively identified by high performance liquid chromatography and ultraviolet absorption detection in our Murchison extracts. The purines detected in Murchison do not correlate with the distribution of nucleobases found in geological environments on Earth4. Moreover, the abundance of extraterrestrial amino acids and the low level of terrestrial amino acid contaminants found in Murchison', support the idea that the purines in t h s meteorite are extraterrestrial in origin.

  14. Transmural distribution of extracellular purines in isolated guinea pig heart.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Q Y; Headrick, J P; Berne, R M

    1991-01-01

    The purine adenosine appears to be involved in regulation of coronary vascular tone. Little is known concerning the levels and distribution of adenosine and related purines in the extracellular fluid of the heart. We have measured epicardial and endocardial levels of adenosine, inosine, hypoxanthine, AMP, and IMP in isolated constant flow perfused guinea pig hearts by using a recently developed technique with porous nylon sampling discs. Venous effluent purine levels were also measured. Concentrations of all purines measured, excluding IMP, were significantly higher in endocardial fluid samples than in epicardial fluid samples (P less than 0.05). Conversely, IMP levels were significantly lower in endocardial than in epicardial samples. The magnitude of the endocardial/epicardial ratios for adenosine, inosine, hypoxanthine, AMP, and IMP were approximately 12:1, 4:1, 5:1, 4:1, and 1:2, respectively. To assess cellular damage, lactate dehydrogenase activity was measured in all fluid samples and was not significantly different in endocardial and epicardial fluid. These data support the existence of significant transmural gradients for extracellular purine levels in crystalloid perfused guinea pig hearts. Transmural differences in vasoactive adenosine levels may be partially due to the greater endocardial oxygen consumption and metabolism and may be involved in maintaining relatively high subendocardial blood flows in the face of high intramyocardial pressures. Images PMID:1988961

  15. Double functionalization of carbon nanotubes with purine and pyrimidine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prabhpreet; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Battigelli, Alessia; Toma, Francesca Maria; Raya, Jesus; Kumar, Jitendra; Nidamanuri, Nagapradeep; Verma, Sandeep; Bianco, Alberto

    2013-07-01

    Herein, we have developed a synthetic strategy for the covalent double functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a combination of purine-pyrimidine and purine-purine nucleobase systems. The nucleobases were introduced on the sidewall of oxidized SWCNTs through 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition and by amidation of the carboxylic acids located at the tips and defect sites of the nanotubes. The new nanohybrids were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, and Kaiser test. The nucleobase/SWCNT conjugates can be envisaged for the modulation of the interactions with nucleic acids by means of base pairing, thereby opening new possibilities in the development of DNA/CNT nanobioconjugates. PMID:23703975

  16. Phylogenetic Analysis and Comparative Genomics of Purine Riboswitch Distribution in Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Payal; Sengupta, Supratim

    2012-01-01

    Riboswitches are regulatory RNA that control gene expression by undergoing conformational changes on ligand binding. Using phylogenetic analysis and comparative genomics we have been able to identify the class of genes/operons regulated by the purine riboswitch and obtain a high-resolution map of purine riboswitch distribution across all bacterial groups. In the process, we are able to explain the absence of purine riboswitches upstream to specific genes in certain genomes. We also identify the point of origin of various purine riboswitches and argue that not all purine riboswitches are of primordial origin, and that some purine riboswitches must have originated after the divergence of certain Firmicute orders in the course of evolution. Our study also reveals the role of horizontal transfer events in accounting for the presence of purine riboswitches in some gammaproteobacterial species. Our work provides significant insights into the origin, distribution and regulatory role of purine riboswitches in prokaryotes. PMID:23170063

  17. Acquired Hemochromatosis with Pronounced Pigment Deposition of the Upper Eyelids

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Brian; Hu, Shasa

    2013-01-01

    Hemochromatosis may be classified into two groups: primary (hereditary) or secondary (acquired). The acquired type most commonly occurs after massive intake of iron supplements or blood transfusions and is also known as transfusional iron overload. In the past, hemochromatosis was usually recognized at an advanced stage by the classic triad of hyperpigmentation, diabetes mellitus (“bronze diabetes”), and hepatic cirrhosis. Cutaneous hyperpigmentation is present in 70 percent of patients due to two different mechanisms: (1) hemosiderin deposition resulting in diffuse, slate-gray darkening and (2) increased production of melanin in the epidermis. A 47-year-old woman who receives regular transfusions due to low iron and chronic, unresolving anemia and who subsequently developed pronounced hyperpigmentation of the upper eyelids is described. The presentation, diagnosis, pathogenesis, and treatment options of hyperpigmentation due to secondary hemochromatosis are discussed. PMID:24155994

  18. Inborn errors of purine metabolism: clinical update and therapies.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, Shanti; Duley, John A; Christodoulou, John

    2014-09-01

    Inborn errors of purine metabolism exhibit broad neurological, immunological, haematological and renal manifestations. Limited awareness of the phenotypic spectrum, the recent descriptions of newer disorders and considerable genetic heterogeneity, have contributed to long diagnostic odysseys for affected individuals. These enzymes are widely but not ubiquitously distributed in human tissues and are crucial for synthesis of essential nucleotides, such as ATP, which form the basis of DNA and RNA, oxidative phosphorylation, signal transduction and a range of molecular synthetic processes. Depletion of nucleotides or accumulation of toxic intermediates contributes to the pathogenesis of these disorders. Maintenance of cellular nucleotides depends on the three aspects of metabolism of purines (and related pyrimidines): de novo synthesis, catabolism and recycling of these metabolites. At present, treatments for the clinically significant defects of the purine pathway are restricted: purine 5'-nucleotidase deficiency with uridine; familial juvenile hyperuricaemic nephropathy (FJHN), adenine phosphoribosyl transferase (APRT) deficiency, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) deficiency and phosphoribosyl-pyrophosphate synthetase superactivity (PRPS) with allopurinol; adenosine deaminase (ADA) and purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) deficiencies have been treated by bone marrow transplantation (BMT), and ADA deficiency with enzyme replacement with polyethylene glycol (PEG)-ADA, or erythrocyte-encapsulated ADA; myeloadenylate deaminase (MADA) and adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL) deficiencies have had trials of oral ribose; PRPS, HPRT and adenosine kinase (ADK) deficiencies with S-adenosylmethionine; and molybdenum cofactor deficiency of complementation group A (MOCODA) with cyclic pyranopterin monophosphate (cPMP). In this review we describe the known inborn errors of purine metabolism, their phenotypic presentations, established diagnostic methodology and recognised

  19. Beyond Crystallography: Investigating the Conformational Dynamics of the Purine Riboswitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoddard, Colby D.; Batey, Robert T.

    Riboswitches are structured elements located in the 5'-untranslated regions of numerous bacterial mRNAs that serve to regulate gene expression via their ability to specifically bind metabolites. The purine riboswitch ligand-binding domain has emerged as an important model system for investigating the relationship between RNA structure and function. Directed by NMR and crystallographically generated structures of this RNA, a variety of biophysical and biochemical techniques have been utilized to understand its dynamic nature. In this review, we describe these various approaches and what they reveal about the purine riboswitch.

  20. The Purine-Utilizing Bacterium Clostridium acidurici 9a: A Genome-Guided Metabolic Reconsideration

    PubMed Central

    Hartwich, Katrin; Poehlein, Anja; Daniel, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium acidurici is an anaerobic, homoacetogenic bacterium, which is able to use purines such as uric acid as sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. Together with the two other known purinolytic clostridia C. cylindrosporum and C. purinilyticum, C. acidurici serves as a model organism for investigation of purine fermentation. Here, we present the first complete sequence and analysis of a genome derived from a purinolytic Clostridium. The genome of C. acidurici 9a consists of one chromosome (3,105,335 bp) and one small circular plasmid (2,913 bp). The lack of candidate genes encoding glycine reductase indicates that C. acidurici 9a uses the energetically less favorable glycine-serine-pyruvate pathway for glycine degradation. In accordance with the specialized lifestyle and the corresponding narrow substrate spectrum of C. acidurici 9a, the number of genes involved in carbohydrate transport and metabolism is significantly lower than in other clostridia such as C. acetobutylicum, C. saccharolyticum, and C. beijerinckii. The only amino acid that can be degraded by C. acidurici is glycine but growth on glycine only occurs in the presence of a fermentable purine. Nevertheless, the addition of glycine resulted in increased transcription levels of genes encoding enzymes involved in the glycine-serine-pyruvate pathway such as serine hydroxymethyltransferase and acetate kinase, whereas the transcription levels of formate dehydrogenase-encoding genes decreased. Sugars could not be utilized by C. acidurici but the full genetic repertoire for glycolysis was detected. In addition, genes encoding enzymes that mediate resistance against several antimicrobials and metals were identified. High resistance of C. acidurici towards bacitracin, acriflavine and azaleucine was experimentally confirmed. PMID:23240052

  1. 40 CFR 721.4685 - Substituted purine metal salt (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted purine metal salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4685 Substituted purine metal salt (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a substituted purine metal salt (PMN P-95-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  2. 40 CFR 721.4685 - Substituted purine metal salt (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted purine metal salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4685 Substituted purine metal salt (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a substituted purine metal salt (PMN P-95-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  3. 40 CFR 721.4685 - Substituted purine metal salt (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted purine metal salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4685 Substituted purine metal salt (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a substituted purine metal salt (PMN P-95-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  4. 40 CFR 721.4685 - Substituted purine metal salt (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted purine metal salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4685 Substituted purine metal salt (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a substituted purine metal salt (PMN P-95-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  5. Pronounced kidney hypoxia precedes albuminuria in type 1 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Franzén, Stephanie; Pihl, Liselotte; Khan, Nadeem; Gustafsson, Håkan; Palm, Fredrik

    2016-05-01

    Intrarenal tissue hypoxia has been proposed as a unifying mechanism for the development of chronic kidney disease, including diabetic nephropathy. However, hypoxia has to be present before the onset of kidney disease to be the causal mechanism. To establish whether hypoxia precedes the onset of diabetic nephropathy, we implemented a minimally invasive electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry technique using implanted oxygen sensing probes for repetitive measurements of in vivo kidney tissue oxygen tensions in mice. Kidney cortex oxygen tensions were measured before and up to 15 days after the induction of insulinopenic diabetes in male mice and compared with normoglycemic controls. On day 16, urinary albumin excretions and conscious glomerular filtration rates were determined to define the temporal relationship between intrarenal hypoxia and disease development. Diabetic mice developed pronounced intrarenal hypoxia 3 days after the induction of diabetes, which persisted throughout the study period. On day 16, diabetic mice had glomerular hyperfiltration, but normal urinary albumin excretion. In conclusion, intrarenal tissue hypoxia in diabetes precedes albuminuria thereby being a plausible cause for the onset and progression of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26936871

  6. Distinct Distribution of Purines in CM and CR Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, Michael P.; Stern, Jennifer C.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Smith, Karen E.; Martin, Mildred G.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2010-01-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites contain a diverse suite of organic molecules and delivered pre biotic organic compounds, including purines and pyrimidines, to the early Earth (and other planetary bodies), seeding it with the ingredients likely required for the first genetic material. We have investigated the distribution of nucleobases in six different CM and CR type carbonaceous chondrites, including fivc Antarctic meteorites never before analyzed for nucleobases. We employed a traditional formic acid extraction protocol and a recently developed solid phase extraction method to isolate nucleobases. We analyzed these extracts by high performance liquid chromatography with UV absorbance detection and tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-UV -MS/MS) targeting the five canonical RNAIDNA bases and hypoxanthine and xanthine. We detected parts-per-billion levels of nucleobases in both CM and CR meteorites. The relative abundances of the purines found in Antarctic CM and CR meteorites were clearly distinct from each other suggesting that these compounds are not terrestrial contaminants. One likely source of these purines is formation by HCN oligomerization (with other small molecules) during aqueous alteration inside the meteorite parent body. The detection of the purines adenine (A), guanine (0), hypoxanthine (HX), and xanthine (X) in carbonaceous meteorites indicates that these compounds should have been available on the early Earth prior to the origin of the first genetic material.

  7. Copper-catalyzed synthesis of purine-fused polycyclics.

    PubMed

    Qu, Gui-Rong; Liang, Lei; Niu, Hong-Ying; Rao, Wei-Hao; Guo, Hai-Ming; Fossey, John S

    2012-09-01

    A novel protocol for a Cu-catalyzed direct C((sp(2)))-H activation/intramolecular amination reaction of 6-anilinopurine nucleosides has been developed. This approach provides a new access to a variety of multiheterocyclic compounds from purine compounds via Cu-catalyzed intramolecular N-H bond tautomerism which are endowed with fluorescence. PMID:22900616

  8. Purines and neuronal excitability: links to the ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Masino, S A; Kawamura, M; Ruskin, D N; Geiger, J D; Boison, D

    2012-07-01

    ATP and adenosine are purines that play dual roles in cell metabolism and neuronal signaling. Acting at the A(1) receptor (A(1)R) subtype, adenosine acts directly on neurons to inhibit excitability and is a powerful endogenous neuroprotective and anticonvulsant molecule. Previous research showed an increase in ATP and other cell energy parameters when an animal is administered a ketogenic diet, an established metabolic therapy to reduce epileptic seizures, but the relationship among purines, neuronal excitability and the ketogenic diet was unclear. Recent work in vivo and in vitro tested the specific hypothesis that adenosine acting at A(1)Rs is a key mechanism underlying the success of ketogenic diet therapy and yielded direct evidence linking A(1)Rs to the antiepileptic effects of a ketogenic diet. Specifically, an in vitro mimic of a ketogenic diet revealed an A(1)R-dependent metabolic autocrine hyperpolarization of hippocampal neurons. In parallel, applying the ketogenic diet in vivo to transgenic mouse models with spontaneous electrographic seizures revealed that intact A(1)Rs are necessary for the seizure-suppressing effects of the diet. This is the first direct in vivo evidence linking A(1)Rs to the antiepileptic effects of a ketogenic diet. Other predictions of the relationship between purines and the ketogenic diet are discussed. Taken together, recent research on the role of purines may offer new opportunities for metabolic therapy and insight into its underlying mechanisms. PMID:21880467

  9. Molecular and biochemical characterization of caffeine synthase and purine alkaloid concentration in guarana fruit.

    PubMed

    Schimpl, Flávia Camila; Kiyota, Eduardo; Mayer, Juliana Lischka Sampaio; Gonçalves, José Francisco de Carvalho; da Silva, José Ferreira; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2014-09-01

    Guarana seeds have the highest caffeine concentration among plants accumulating purine alkaloids, but in contrast with coffee and tea, practically nothing is known about caffeine metabolism in this Amazonian plant. In this study, the levels of purine alkaloids in tissues of five guarana cultivars were determined. Theobromine was the main alkaloid that accumulated in leaves, stems, inflorescences and pericarps of fruit, while caffeine accumulated in the seeds and reached levels from 3.3% to 5.8%. In all tissues analysed, the alkaloid concentration, whether theobromine or caffeine, was higher in young/immature tissues, then decreasing with plant development/maturation. Caffeine synthase activity was highest in seeds of immature fruit. A nucleotide sequence (PcCS) was assembled with sequences retrieved from the EST database REALGENE using sequences of caffeine synthase from coffee and tea, whose expression was also highest in seeds from immature fruit. The PcCS has 1083bp and the protein sequence has greater similarity and identity with the caffeine synthase from cocoa (BTS1) and tea (TCS1). A recombinant PcCS allowed functional characterization of the enzyme as a bifunctional CS, able to catalyse the methylation of 7-methylxanthine to theobromine (3,7-dimethylxanthine), and theobromine to caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine), respectively. Among several substrates tested, PcCS showed higher affinity for theobromine, differing from all other caffeine synthases described so far, which have higher affinity for paraxanthine. When compared to previous knowledge on the protein structure of coffee caffeine synthase, the unique substrate affinity of PcCS is probably explained by the amino acid residues found in the active site of the predicted protein. PMID:24856135

  10. Solution structure of ligands involved in purine salvage pathway.

    PubMed

    Karnawat, Vishakha; Puranik, Mrinalini

    2015-12-01

    Analogues of intermediates involved in the purine salvage pathway can be exploited as potential drug molecules against enzymes of protozoan parasites. To develop such analogues we need knowledge of the solution structures, predominant tautomer at physiological pH and protonation-state of the corresponding natural ligand. In this regard, we have employed ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRR) in combination with density functional theory (DFT) to study the solution structures of two relatively unexplored intermediates, 6-phosphoryl IMP (6-pIMP) and succinyl adenosine-5'-monophosphate (sAMP), of purine salvage pathway. These molecules are intermediates in a two step enzymatic process that converts inosine-5'-monpophosphate (IMP) to adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP). Experimental data on the molecular structure of these ligands is lacking. We report UVRR spectra of these two ligands, obtained at an excitation wavelength of 260 nm. Using isotope induced shifts and DFT calculations we assigned observed spectra to computed normal modes. We find that sAMP exists as neutral species at physiological pH and the predominant tautomer in solution bears proton at N10 position of purine ring. Though transient in solution, 6-pIMP is captured in the enzyme-bound form. This work provides the structural information of these ligands in solution state at physiological pH. We further compare these structures with the structures of AMP and IMP. Despite the presence of similar purine rings in AMP and sAMP, their UVRR spectra are found to be very different. Similarly, though the purine ring in 6-pIMP resembles that of IMP, UVRR spectra of the two molecules are distinct. These differences in the vibrational spectra provide direct information on the effects of exocyclic groups on the skeletal structures of these molecules. Our results identify key bands in the vibrational spectra of these ligands which may serve as markers of hydrogen bonding interactions upon binding to the active

  11. Cloning, expression and preliminary crystallographic studies of the potential drug target purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Humberto M; Cleasby, Anne; Pena S, Sérgio D J; Franco G, Glória R; Garratt, Richard C

    2003-06-01

    The parasite Schistosoma mansoni, unlike its mammalian hosts, lacks the de novo pathway for purine biosynthesis and depends on salvage pathways for its purine requirements. The gene encoding one enzyme of this pathway, purine nucleoside phosphorylase from S. mansoni (SmPNP) was identified, fully sequenced and cloned into the bacterial expression vector pMAL c2G to produce a protein in fusion with maltose-binding protein. The recombinant fusion protein was expressed at high levels and was purified in a single step by amylose resin affinity chromatography. After factor Xa cleavage, SmPNP was purified using a cation-exchange column and crystallized by hanging-drop vapour diffusion using polyethylene glycol 1500 as precipitant in the presence of 20% glycerol in acetate buffer. The use of the non-detergent sulfobetaine 195 (NDSB 195) as an additive had a marked effect on the size of the resulting crystals. Two data sets were obtained, one from a crystal grown in the absence of NDSB 195 and one from a crystal grown in its presence. The crystals are isomorphous and belong to the space group P2(1)2(1)2(1). It is intended to use the structures in the discovery and development of specific inhibitors of SmPNP. PMID:12777786

  12. Polypurine sequences within a downstream exon function as a splicing enhancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kenji; Watakabe, Akiya; Shimura, Yoshiro

    1994-02-01

    We have previously shown that a purine-rich sequence located within exon M2 of the mouse immunoglobulin {mu} gene functions as a splicing enhancer, as judged by its ability to stimulate splicing of a distant upstream intron. This sequence element has been designated ERS (exon recognition sequence). In this study, we investigated the stimulatory effects of various ERS-like sequences, using the in vitro splicing system with HeLa cell nuclear extracts. Here, we show that purine-rich sequences of several natural exons that have previously been shown to be required for splicing function as a splicing enhancer like the ERS of the immunoglobulin {mu} gene. Moreover, even synthetic polypurine sequences had stimulatory effects on the upstream splicing. Evaluation of the data obtained from the analyses of both natural and synthetic purine-rich sequences shows that (i) alternating purine sequences can stimulate splicing, while poly(A) or poly(G) sequences cannot, and (ii) the presence of U residues within the polypurine sequence greatly reduces the level of stimulation. Competition experiments strongly suggest that the stimulatory effects of various purine-rich sequences are mediated by the same trans-acting factor(s). We conclude from these results that the purine-rich sequences that we examined in this study also represent examples of ERS. Thus, ERS is considered a general splicing element that is present in various exons and plays an important role in splice site selection. 50 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Infrared Spectroscopy of Charge Transfer Complexes of Purines and Pyrimidines

    SciTech Connect

    Rathod, Pravinsinh I.; Oza, A. T.

    2011-10-20

    The FTIR spectra of charge transfer complexes of purines and pyrimidines with organic acceptors such as TCNQ, TCNE, DDQ, chloranil and iodine are obtained and studied in the present work. Adenine, guanine, thymine, cytosine and uracil are the purines and pyrimidines which are found as constituent of DNA and RNA. Charge transfer induced hydrogen bonding is concluded on the basis of indirect transitions observed in the infrared range in these CTCs. Some CTCs show gaussian bands revealing delocalization of charge carriers. The CTCs show interband transition in three-dimensions rather than two-dimensions unlike CTCs of amino acids. There is no extended hydrogen bonded network spanning the whole crystal. This leads to indirect transition due to locally deformed lattice furnishing a phonon-assisted transition.

  14. Purine Synthesis and Catabolism in Soybean Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Polayes, Deborah A.; Schubert, Karel R.

    1984-01-01

    The ureides, allantoin and allantoic acid, are the major nitrogenous substances transported within the xylem of N2-fixing soybeans (Glycine max L. Merr. cv Amsoy 71). The ureides accumulated in the cotyledons, roots and shoots of soybean seedlings inoculated with Rhizobium or grown in the presence of 10 millimolar nitrate. The patterns of activity for uricase and allantoinase, enzymes involved in ureide synthesis, were positively correlated with the accumulation of ureides in the roots and cotyledons. Allopurinol and azaserine inhibited ureide production in 3-day-old cotyledons while no inhibition was observed in the roots. Incubation of 4-day-old seedlings with [14C]serine indicated that in the cotyledons ureides arose via de novo synthesis of purines. The source of ureides in both 3- and 4-day-old roots was probably the cotyledons. The inhibition of ureide accumulation by allopurinol but not azaserine in 8-day-old cotyledons suggested that ureides in these older cotyledons arose via nucleotide breakdown. Incubation of 8-day-old plants with [14C]serine suggested that the roots had acquired the capability to synthesize ureides via de novo synthesis of purines. These data indicate that both de novo purine synthesis and nucleotide breakdown are involved in the production of ureides in young soybean seedlings. PMID:16663743

  15. Experimental and theoretical dipole moments of purines in their ground and lowest excited singlet states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaron, Jean-Jacques; Diabou Gaye, Mame; Párkányi, Cyril; Cho, Nam Sook; Von Szentpály, László

    1987-01-01

    The ground-state dipole moments of seven biologically important purines (purine, 6-chloropurine, 6-mercaptopurine, hypoxanthine, theobromine, theophylline and caffeine) were determined at 25°C in acetic acid (all the above compounds with the exception of purine) and in ethyl acetate (purine, theophylline and caffeine). Because of its low solubility, it was not possible to measure the dipole moment of uric acid. The first excited singlet-state dipole moments were obtained on the basis of the Bakhshiev and Chamma—Viallet equations using the variation of the Stokes shift with the solvent dielectric constant-refractive index term. The theoretical dipole moments for all the purines listed above and including uric acid were calculated by combining the use of the PPP (π-LCI-SCF-MO) method for the π-contribution to the overall dipole moment with the σ-contribution obtained as a vector sum of the σbond moments and group moments. The experimental and theoretical values were compared with the data available in the literature for some of the purines under study. For several purines, the calculations were carried out for different tautomeric forms. Excited singlet-state dipole moments are smaller than the ground-state values by 0.8 to 2.2 Debye units for all purines under study with the exception of 6-chloropurine. The effects of the structure upon the ground- and excited-state dipole moments of the purines are discussed.

  16. Determination of purine contents of alcoholic beverages using high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kiyoko; Yamanobe, Tomoyo; Fujimori, Shin

    2009-08-01

    The purine contents of alcoholic beverages were determined in order to utilize them in the dietary care of gout and hyperuricemia. In the management of these diseases, restriction of both alcohol and purine intake are important. The method employed in this study is a quantitative determination of purine contents by HPLC. Alcoholic beverages were hydrolyzed to corresponding purine bases, which were then separated by HPLC, and base peaks were identified using an enzymatic peak-shift technique. This method is sufficiently accurate and reproducible to examine the purine contents of various alcoholic beverages that patients consume. Purine contents were as follows: spirits, 0.7-26.4 micromol/L; regular beer, 225.0-580.2 micromol/L; low-malt beer, 193.4-267.9 micromol/L; low-malt and low-purine beer, 13.3 micromol/L; other liquors, 13.1-818.3 micromol/L. Some local and low-alcohol beers were found to contain about 2.5 times more purines than regular beer. As some alcoholic beverages contain considerable amounts of purines, we recommend that excess consumption of these beverages be avoided. These data should be useful in the management of hyperuricemia and gout, not only for patients but also for physicians. PMID:19353717

  17. Homochiral Selectivity in RNA Synthesis: Montmorillonite-catalyzed Quaternary Reactions of D, L-Purine with D, L- Pyrimidine Nucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Prakash C.; Aldersley, Michael F.; Ferris, James P.

    2011-06-01

    Selective adsorption of D, L-ImpA with D, L-ImpU on the platelets of montmorillonite demonstrates an important reaction pathway for the origin of homochirality in RNA synthesis. Our earlier studies have shown that the individual reactions of D, L-ImpA or D, L-ImpU on montmorillonite catalyst produced oligomers which were only partially inhibited by the incorporation of both D- and L-enantiomers. Homochirality in these reactions was largely due to the formation of cyclic dimers that cannot elongate. We investigated the quaternary reactions of D, L-ImpA with D, L-ImpU on montmorillonite. The chain length of these oligomers increased from 9-mer to 11-mer as observed by HPLC, with a concominant increase in the yield of linear dimers and higher oligomers in the reactions involving D, L-ImpA with D, L-ImpU as compared to the similar reactions carried out with D-enantiomers only. The formation of cyclic dimers of U was completely inhibited in the quaternary reactions. The yield of cyclic dimers of A was reduced from 60% to 10% within the dimer fraction. 12 linear dimers and 3 cyclic dimers were isolated and characterized from the quaternary reaction. The homochirality and regioselectivity of dimers were 64.1% and 71.7%, respectively. Their sequence selectivity was shown by the formation of purine-pyrimidine (54-59%) linkages, followed by purine-purine (29-32%) linkages and pyrimidine-pyrimidine (9-13%) linkages. Of the 16 trimers detected, 10 were homochiral with an overall homochirality of 73-76%. In view of the greater homochirality, sequence- and regio- selectivity, the quaternary reactions on montmorillonite demonstrate an unexpectedly favorable route for the prebiotic synthesis of homochiral RNA compared with the separate reactions of enantiomeric activated mononucleotides.

  18. Genetic and metabolomic analysis of AdeD and AdeI mutants of de novo purine biosynthesis: cellular models of de novo purine biosynthesis deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Duval, Nathan; Luhrs, Kyleen; Wilkinson, Terry G; Baresova, Veronika; Skopova, Vaclava; Kmoch, Stanislav; Vacano, Guido N; Zikanova, Marie; Patterson, David

    2013-03-01

    Purines are molecules essential for many cell processes, including RNA and DNA synthesis, regulation of enzyme activity, protein synthesis and function, energy metabolism and transfer, essential coenzyme function, and cell signaling. Purines are produced via the de novo purine biosynthesis pathway. Mutations in purine biosynthetic genes, for example phosphoribosylaminoimidazole carboxylase/phosphoribosylaminoimidazole succinocarboxamide synthetase (PAICS, E.C. 6.3.2.6/E.C. 4.1.1.21), can lead to developmental anomalies in lower vertebrates. Alterations in PAICS expression in humans have been associated with various types of cancer. Mutations in adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL, E.C. 4.3.2.2) or 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase/IMP cyclohydrolase (ATIC, E.C. 2.1.2.3/E.C. 3.5.4.10) lead to inborn errors of metabolism with a range of clinical symptoms, including developmental delay, severe neurological symptoms, and autistic features. The pathogenetic mechanism is unknown for these conditions, and no effective treatments exist. The study of cells carrying mutations in the various de novo purine biosynthesis pathway genes provides one approach to analysis of purine disorders. Here we report the characterization of AdeD Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, which carry genetic mutations encoding p.E177K and p.W363* variants of PAICS. Both mutations impact PAICS structure and completely abolish its biosynthesis. Additionally, we describe a sensitive and rapid analytical method for detection of purine de novo biosynthesis intermediates based on high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Using this technique we detected accumulation of AIR in AdeD cells. In AdeI cells, mutant for the ADSL gene, we detected accumulation of SAICAR and SAMP and, somewhat unexpectedly, accumulation of AIR. This method has great potential for metabolite profiling of de novo purine biosynthesis pathway mutants, identification of novel genetic

  19. Computer-generated Model of Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (PNP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (PNP) is an important target enzyme for the design of anti-cancer and immunosuppressive drugs. Bacterial PNP, which is slightly different from the human enzyme, is used to synthesize chemotherapuautic agents. Knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of the bacterial PNP molecule is useful in efforts to engineer different types of PNP enzymes, that can be used to produce new chemotherapeutic agents. This picture shows a computer model of bacterial PNP, which looks a lot like a display of colorful ribbons. Principal Investigator was Charles Bugg.

  20. Purine import into malaria parasites as a target for antimalarial drug development.

    PubMed

    Frame, I J; Deniskin, Roman; Arora, Avish; Akabas, Myles H

    2015-04-01

    Infection with Plasmodium species parasites causes malaria. Plasmodium parasites are purine auxotrophs. In all life cycle stages, they require purines for RNA and DNA synthesis and other cellular metabolic processes. Purines are imported from the host erythrocyte by equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs). They are processed via purine salvage pathway enzymes to form the required purine nucleotides. The Plasmodium falciparum genome encodes four putative ENTs (PfENT1-4). Genetic, biochemical, and physiologic evidence suggest that PfENT1 is the primary purine transporter supplying the purine salvage pathway. Protein mass spectrometry shows that PfENT1 is expressed in all parasite stages. PfENT1 knockout parasites are not viable in culture at purine concentrations found in human blood (<10 μM). Thus, PfENT1 is a potential target for novel antimalarial drugs, but no PfENT1 inhibitors have been identified to test the hypothesis. Identifying inhibitors of PfENT1 is an essential step to validate PfENT1 as a potential antimalarial drug target. PMID:25424653

  1. 40 CFR 721.4685 - Substituted purine metal salt (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4685 Substituted purine metal salt (generic name). (a) Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted purine metal salt...

  2. Purine import into malaria parasites as a target for antimalarial drug development

    PubMed Central

    Frame, I.J.; Deniskin, Roman; Arora, Avish; Akabas, Myles H.

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Plasmodium species parasites causes malaria. Plasmodium parasites are purine auxotrophs. In all life cycle stages, they require purines for RNA and DNA synthesis and other cellular metabolic processes. Purines are imported from the host erythrocyte by equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs). They are processed via purine salvage–pathway enzymes to form the required purine nucleotides. The P. falciparum genome encodes four putative ENTs (PfENT1–4). Genetic, biochemical, and physiologic evidence suggest that PfENT1 is the primary purine transporter supplying the purine-salvage pathway. Protein mass spectrometry shows that PfENT1 is expressed in all parasite stages. PfENT1 knockout parasites are not viable in culture at purine concentrations found in human blood (< 10 µM). Thus, PfENT1 is a potential target for novel antimalarial drugs, but no PfENT1 inhibitors have been identified to test the hypothesis. Identifying inhibitors of PfENT1 is an essential step to validate PfENT1 as a potential antimalarial drug target. PMID:25424653

  3. The electrochemical properties of the purine bases : at the interface between biological conjugates to inorganic surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Charles C.

    2003-01-01

    The study of the charge transfer and interfacial reactions of the purine bases in physiological solutions provides valuable knowledge, as these processes are relevant to the origins of life. It has been proposed that the adsorption of the adsorption of the purine bases on an inorganic surface could serve as a template for specifying the arrangement of amino acids in peptides.

  4. Morphine enhances the release of /sup 3/H-purines from rat brain cerebral cortical prisms

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, P.H.; Phillis, J.W.; Yuen, H.

    1982-10-01

    In vitro experiments have shown that /sup 3/H-purines can be released from /sup 3/H-adenosine preloaded rat brain cortical prisms by a KCl-evoked depolarization. The KCl-evoked release of /sup 3/H-purines is dependent on the concentration of KCl present in the superfusate. At concentrations of 10(-7) approximately 10(-5)M morphine did not influence the basal release of /sup 3/H-purines from the prisms, although it enhanced the KCl-evoked release of /sup 3/H-purines. The enhancement of KCl-evoked /sup 3/H-purine release by morphine was concentration-dependent and was antagonized by naloxone, suggesting the involvement of opiate receptors. Uptake studies with rat brain cerebral cortical synaptosomes show that morphine is a very weak inhibitor of adenosine uptake. Comparisons with dipyridamole, a potent inhibitor of adenosine uptake, suggest that this low level of inhibition of the uptake did not contribute significantly to the release of /sup 3/H-purine by morphine seen in our experiments. It is therefore suggested that morphine enhances KCl-evoked /sup 3/H-purine release by an interaction with opiate receptors and that the resultant increase in extracellular purine (adenosine) levels may account for some of the actions of morphine.

  5. Deregulation of purine pathway in Bacillus subtilis and its use in riboflavin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Purine nucleotides are essential metabolites for living organisms because they are involved in many important processes, such as nucleic acid synthesis, energy supply, and biosynthesis of several amino acids and riboflavin. Owing to the pivotal roles of purines in cell physiology, the pool of intracellular purine nucleotides must be maintained under strict control, and hence the de novo purine biosynthetic pathway is tightly regulated by transcription repression and inhibition mechanism. Deregulation of purine pathway is essential for this pathway engineering in Bacillus subtilis. Results Deregulation of purine pathway was attempted to improve purine nucleotides supply, based on a riboflavin producer B. subtilis strain with modification of its rib operon. To eliminate transcription repression, the pur operon repressor PurR and the 5’-UTR of pur operon containing a guanine-sensing riboswitch were disrupted. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that the relative transcription levels of purine genes were up-regulated about 380 times. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis was successfully introduced into PRPP amidotransferase (encoded by purF) to remove feedback inhibition by homologous alignment and analysis. Overexpression of the novel mutant PurF (D293V, K316Q and S400W) significantly increased PRPP amidotransferase activity and triggered a strong refractory effect on purine nucleotides mediated inhibition. Intracellular metabolite target analysis indicated that the purine nucleotides supply in engineered strains was facilitated by a stepwise gene-targeted deregulation. With these genetic manipulations, we managed to enhance the metabolic flow through purine pathway and consequently increased riboflavin production 3-fold (826.52 mg/L) in the purF-VQW mutant strain. Conclusions A sequential optimization strategy was applied to deregulate the rib operon and purine pathway of B. subtilis to create genetic diversities and to improve riboflavin production

  6. Purine derivative excretion in dairy cows: endogenous excretion and the effect of exogenous nucleic acid supply.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Ronquillo, M; Balcells, J; Guada, J A; Vicente, F

    2003-04-01

    An experiment was conducted with dairy cows to study the partitioning of excreted purine derivatives between urine and milk and to quantify the endogenous contribution following the isotopic labeling of microbial purine bases. Three lactating cows in their second lactation that had been cannulated in the rumen and the duodenum were fed a mixed diet (48:52, roughage/concentrate ratio) distributed in equal fractions every 2 h, and duodenal flow of purine bases was determined by the dual-phase marker system. Nitrogen-15 was infused continuously into the rumen to label microbial purine bases, and the endogenous fraction was determined from the isotopic dilution in urinary purine derivatives. Urinary and milk recovery of duodenal purine bases were estimated at early (wk 10) and late (wk 33) lactation by the duodenal infusion of incremental doses (75 and 150 mmol purine bases/d) of RNA from Torula yeast. Each period was 6 d, with RNA being infused during the last 4 d, followed by measurement of the flow of purine bases to the duodenum. The isotope dilution of purine derivatives in urine samples confirmed the presence of an endogenous fraction (512 +/- 36.43 micromol/W0.75 or 56.86 mmol/d) amounting to 26 +/- 3.8% of total renal excretion. Total excretion of purine derivatives in urine plus milk was linearly related to the duodenal input of purine bases, but the slopes differed (P < 0.005) between lactation stages resulting in a lower equimolar recovery in early (y = 58.86 (+/-3.89) +0.56 (+/-0.0164) x; r = 0.90) than late lactation (y = 58.86 (+/-3.89) + 0.70 (+/-0.046) x; r = 0.80). Excretion of purine derivatives through milk represented a minimum fraction of total excretion but responded significantly to the duodenal input of purine bases. No differences between lactation stages were detected, and variations in milk yield did modify significantly the amount of purine derivatives excreted through the milk. PMID:12741553

  7. [Uric acid and purine plasma levels as plausible markers for placental dysfunction in pre-eclampsia].

    PubMed

    Escudero, Carlos; Bertoglia, Patricio; Muñoz, Felipe; Roberts, James M

    2013-07-01

    Uric acid is the final metabolite of purine break down, such as ATP, ADP, AMP, adenosine, inosine and hypoxanthine. The metabolite has been used broadly as a renal failure marker, as well as a risk factor for maternal and neonatal morbidity during pre-eclamptic pregnancies. High purine levels are observed in pre-eclamptic pregnancies, but the sources of these purines are unknown. However, there is evidence that pre-eclampsia (mainly severe pre-eclampsia) is associated with an increased release of cellular fragments (or microparticles) from the placenta to the maternal circulation. These in fact could be the substrate for purine metabolism. Considering this background, we propose that purines and uric acid are part of the same physiopathological phenomenon in pre-eclampsia (i.e., placental dysfunction) and could become biomarkers for placental dysfunction and postnatal adverse events. PMID:24356738

  8. Chemoselective Multicomponent One-Pot Assembly of Purine Precursors in Water

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The recent development of a sequential, high-yielding route to activated pyrimidine nucleotides, under conditions thought to be prebiotic, is an encouraging step toward the greater goal of a plausible prebiotic pathway to RNA and the potential for an RNA world. However, this synthesis has led to a disparity in the methodology available for stepwise construction of the canonical pyrimidine and purine nucleotides. To address this problem, and further explore prebiotically accessible chemical systems, we have developed a high-yielding, aqueous, one-pot, multicomponent reaction that tethers masked-sugar moieties to prebiotically plausible purine precursors. A pH-dependent three-component reaction system has been discovered that utilizes key nucleotide synthons 2-aminooxazole and 5-aminoimidazoles, which allows the first divergent purine/pyrimidine synthesis to be proposed. Due to regiospecific aminoimidazole tethering, the pathway allows N9 purination only, thus suggesting the first prebiotically plausible mechanism for regiospecific N9 purination. PMID:21043502

  9. The Drosophila melanogaster ade5 gene encodes a bifunctional enzyme for two steps in the de novo purine synthesis pathway.

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, A F; Tiong, S; Nash, D; Clark, D V

    2000-01-01

    Steps 6 and 7 of de novo purine synthesis are performed by 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide carboxylase (AIRc) and 4-[(N-succinylamino)carbonyl]-5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthetase (SAICARs), respectively. In vertebrates, a single gene encodes AIRc-SAICARs with domains homologous to Escherichia coli PurE and PurC. We have isolated an AIRc-SAICARs cDNA from Drosophila melanogaster via functional complementation with an E. coli purC purine auxotroph. This cDNA encodes AIRc yet is unable to complement an E. coli purE mutant, suggesting functional differences between Drosophila and E. coli AIRc. In vertebrates, the AIRc-SAICARs gene shares a promoter region with the gene encoding phosphoribosylamidotransferase, which performs the first step in de novo purine synthesis. In Drosophila, the AIRc-SAICARs gene maps to section 11B4-14 of the X chromosome, while the phosphoribosylamidotransferase gene (Prat) maps to chromosome 3; thus, the close linkage of these two genes is not conserved in flies. Three EMS-induced X-linked adenine auxotrophic mutations, ade4(1), ade5(1), and ade5(2), were isolated. Two gamma-radiation-induced (ade5(3) and ade5(4)) and three hybrid dysgenesis-induced (ade5(5), ade5(6), and ade5(8)) alleles were also isolated. Characterization of the auxotrophy and the finding that the hybrid dysgenesis-induced mutations all harbor P transposon sequences within the AIRc-SAICARs gene show that ade5 encodes AIRc-SAICARs. PMID:10757766

  10. Identification of genes containing expanded purine repeats in the human genome and their apparent protective role against cancer.

    PubMed

    Singh, Himanshu Narayan; Rajeswari, Moganty R

    2016-01-01

    Purine repeat sequences present in a gene are unique as they have high propensity to form unusual DNA-triple helix structures. Friedreich's ataxia is the only human disease that is well known to be associated with DNA-triplexes formed by purine repeats. The purpose of this study was to recognize the expanded purine repeats (EPRs) in human genome and find their correlation with cancer pathogenesis. We developed "PuRepeatFinder.pl" algorithm to identify non-overlapping EPRs without pyrimidine interruptions in the human genome and customized for searching repeat lengths, n ≥ 200. A total of 1158 EPRs were identified in the genome which followed Wakeby distribution. Two hundred and ninety-six EPRs were found in geneic regions of 282 genes (EPR-genes). Gene clustering of EPR-genes was done based on their cellular function and a large number of EPR-genes were found to be enzymes/enzyme modulators. Meta-analysis of 282 EPR-genes identified only 63 EPR-genes in association with cancer, mostly in breast, lung, and blood cancers. Protein-protein interaction network analysis of all 282 EPR-genes identified proteins including those in cadherins and VEGF. The two observations, that EPRs can induce mutations under malignant conditions and that identification of some EPR-gene products in vital cell signaling-mediated pathways, together suggest the crucial role of EPRs in carcinogenesis. The new link between EPR-genes and their functionally interacting proteins throws a new dimension in the present understanding of cancer pathogenesis and can help in planning therapeutic strategies. Validation of present results using techniques like NGS is required to establish the role of the EPR genes in cancer pathology. PMID:25990537

  11. Interaction of purine bases and nucleosides with serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sułkowska, A.; Michnik, A.

    1997-06-01

    The proton NMR spectra of alkyl derivatives of adenine and adenosine have been studied. High-resolution (400 MHz) proton spectra were recorded at 300 K at increasing concentrations of serum albumin. The dependence of the chemical shifts and the line width of the individual spectral lines on the protein concentration provides some detailed information about the nature of the complexes between the purine derivatives and albumin. Comparison of data for the methylated and non-methylated purine bases and nucleosides indicates the formation of non-specific complexes with serum albumin. However, the presence of the ethyl group in 8-ethyl-9 N-methyladenine means that in the adenine derivative-serum albumin complex the ethyl chain preserves its dominant role in binding. An advantage of our model is that the π-π interaction between the adenine ring and the amino acids of the protein can be replaced by hydrophobic interaction in the case of complexation of the ethyl adenine derivative.

  12. Leishmania Metacyclogenesis Is Promoted in the Absence of Purines

    PubMed Central

    Serafim, Tiago Donatelli; Figueiredo, Amanda Braga; Costa, Pedro Augusto Carvalho; Marques-da-Silva, Eduardo Almeida; Gonçalves, Ricardo; de Moura, Sandra Aparecida Lima; Gontijo, Nelder Figueiredo; da Silva, Sydnei Magno; Michalick, Marilene Suzan Marques; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto; de Carvalho, Roberto Paes; Uliana, Silvia Reni Bortolin; Fietto, Juliana Lopes Rangel; Afonso, Luís Carlos Crocco

    2012-01-01

    Leishmania parasites, the causative agent of leishmaniasis, are transmitted through the bite of an infected sand fly. Leishmania parasites present two basic forms known as promastigote and amastigote which, respectively, parasitizes the vector and the mammalian hosts. Infection of the vertebrate host is dependent on the development, in the vector, of metacyclic promastigotes, however, little is known about the factors that trigger metacyclogenesis in Leishmania parasites. It has been generally stated that “stressful conditions” will lead to development of metacyclic forms, and with the exception of a few studies no detailed analysis of the molecular nature of the stress factor has been performed. Here we show that presence/absence of nucleosides, especially adenosine, controls metacyclogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. We found that addition of an adenosine-receptor antagonist to in vitro cultures of Leishmania amazonensis significantly increases metacyclogenesis, an effect that can be reversed by the presence of specific purine nucleosides or nucleobases. Furthermore, our results show that proliferation and metacyclogenesis are independently regulated and that addition of adenosine to culture medium is sufficient to recover proliferative characteristics for purified metacyclic promastigotes. More importantly, we show that metacyclogenesis was inhibited in sand flies infected with Leishmania infantum chagasi that were fed a mixture of sucrose and adenosine. Our results fill a gap in the life cycle of Leishmania parasites by demonstrating how metacyclogenesis, a key point in the propagation of the parasite to the mammalian host, can be controlled by the presence of specific purines. PMID:23050028

  13. Antiparasitic chemotherapy: tinkering with the purine salvage pathway.

    PubMed

    Datta, Alok Kumar; Datta, Rupak; Sen, Banibrata

    2008-01-01

    Distinguishable differences between infectine organisms and their respective hosts with respect to metabolism and macromolecular structure provide scopes for detailed characterization of target proteins and/or macromolecules as the focus for the development of selective inhibitors. In order to develop a rational approach to antiparasitic chemotherapy, finding differences in the biochemical pathways of the parasite with respect to the host it infects is therefore of primary importance. Like most parasitic protozoan, the genus Leishmania is an obligate auxotroph of purines and hence for requirement of purine bases depends on its own purine salvage pathways. Among various purine acquisition routes used by the parasite, the pathway involved in assimilation of adenosine nucleotide is unique and differs significantly in the extracellular form of the parasite (promastigotes) from its corresponding intracellular form (amastigotes). Adenosine kinase (AdK) is the gateway enzyme of this pathway and displays stage-specific activity pattern. Therefore, understanding the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme, its structural complexities and mode of its regulation have emerged as one of the major areas of investigation. This review, in general, discusses possible strategies to validate several purine salvage enzymes as targets for chemotherapeutic manipulation with special reference to adenosine kinase of Leishmania donovani. Systemic endotheliosis, commonly known as Kala-azar in India, is caused by the parasitic protozoon Leishmania donovani. The spread of leishmaniases follows the distribution of these vectors in the temperate, tropical and subtropical regions of the world leading to loss of thousands of human lives.' WHO has declared leishmaniasis among one of the six major diseases namely leishmaniasis, malaria, amoebiasis, filariasis, Chagas disease and schistosomiasis in its Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases. Strategies for better prophylaxis and

  14. PRESENCE OF PURINE METABOLITES IN OMASAL DIGESTA AND BACTERIA: NEW ANALYTICAL METHOD AND EFFECTS ON MICROBIAL FLOWS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new HPLC method was developed to determine concentrations of purines [adenine (A) and guanine (G)], and their metabolites [xanthine (X) and hypoxanthine (HX)] in omasal digesta and bacterial samples and to assess the effect of using either purines (TP) or purines plus their metabolites (PM) as mic...

  15. Placental Hypomethylation Is More Pronounced in Genomic Loci Devoid of Retroelements

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Aniruddha; Macaulay, Erin C.; Rodger, Euan J.; Stockwell, Peter A.; Parry, Matthew F.; Roberts, Hester E.; Slatter, Tania L.; Hung, Noelyn A.; Devenish, Celia J.; Morison, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    The human placenta is hypomethylated compared to somatic tissues. However, the degree and specificity of placental hypomethylation across the genome is unclear. We assessed genome-wide methylation of the human placenta and compared it to that of the neutrophil, a representative homogeneous somatic cell. We observed global hypomethylation in placenta (relative reduction of 22%) compared to neutrophils. Placental hypomethylation was pronounced in intergenic regions and gene bodies, while the unmethylated state of the promoter remained conserved in both tissues. For every class of repeat elements, the placenta showed lower methylation but the degree of hypomethylation differed substantially between these classes. However, some retroelements, especially the evolutionarily younger Alu elements, retained high levels of placental methylation. Surprisingly, nonretrotransposon-containing sequences showed a greater degree of placental hypomethylation than retrotransposons in every genomic element (intergenic, introns, and exons) except promoters. The differentially methylated fragments (DMFs) in placenta and neutrophils were enriched in gene-poor and CpG-poor regions. The placentally hypomethylated DMFs were enriched in genomic regions that are usually inactive, whereas hypermethylated DMFs were enriched in active regions. Hypomethylation of the human placenta is not specific to retroelements, indicating that the evolutionary advantages of placental hypomethylation go beyond those provided by expression of retrotransposons and retrogenes. PMID:27172225

  16. Placental Hypomethylation Is More Pronounced in Genomic Loci Devoid of Retroelements.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Aniruddha; Macaulay, Erin C; Rodger, Euan J; Stockwell, Peter A; Parry, Matthew F; Roberts, Hester E; Slatter, Tania L; Hung, Noelyn A; Devenish, Celia J; Morison, Ian M

    2016-01-01

    The human placenta is hypomethylated compared to somatic tissues. However, the degree and specificity of placental hypomethylation across the genome is unclear. We assessed genome-wide methylation of the human placenta and compared it to that of the neutrophil, a representative homogeneous somatic cell. We observed global hypomethylation in placenta (relative reduction of 22%) compared to neutrophils. Placental hypomethylation was pronounced in intergenic regions and gene bodies, while the unmethylated state of the promoter remained conserved in both tissues. For every class of repeat elements, the placenta showed lower methylation but the degree of hypomethylation differed substantially between these classes. However, some retroelements, especially the evolutionarily younger Alu elements, retained high levels of placental methylation. Surprisingly, nonretrotransposon-containing sequences showed a greater degree of placental hypomethylation than retrotransposons in every genomic element (intergenic, introns, and exons) except promoters. The differentially methylated fragments (DMFs) in placenta and neutrophils were enriched in gene-poor and CpG-poor regions. The placentally hypomethylated DMFs were enriched in genomic regions that are usually inactive, whereas hypermethylated DMFs were enriched in active regions. Hypomethylation of the human placenta is not specific to retroelements, indicating that the evolutionary advantages of placental hypomethylation go beyond those provided by expression of retrotransposons and retrogenes. PMID:27172225

  17. A purine-rich intronic element enhances alternative splicing of thyroid hormone receptor mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, M L; Wilson, C M; Munroe, S H

    2001-01-01

    The mammalian thyroid hormone receptor gene c-erbAalpha gives rise to two mRNAs that code for distinct isoforms, TRalpha1 and TRalpha2, with antagonistic functions. Alternative processing of these mRNAs involves the mutually exclusive use of a TRalpha1-specific polyadenylation site or TRalpha2-specific 5' splice site. A previous investigation of TRalpha minigene expression defined a critical role for the TRalpha2 5' splice site in directing alternative processing. Mutational analysis reported here shows that purine residues within a highly conserved intronic element, SEa2, enhance splicing of TRalpha2 in vitro as well as in vivo. Although SEalpha2 is located within the intron of TRalpha2 mRNA, it activates splicing of a heterologous dsx pre-mRNA when located in the downstream exon. Competition with wild-type and mutant RNAs indicates that SEalpha2 functions by binding trans-acting factors in HeLa nuclear extract. Protein-RNA crosslinking identifies several proteins, including SF2/ASF and hnRNP H, that bind specifically to SEalpha2. SEalpha2 also includes an element resembling a 5' splice site consensus sequence that is critical for splicing enhancer activity. Mutations within this pseudo-5' splice site sequence have a dramatic effect on splicing and protein binding. Thus SEa2 and its associated factors are required for splicing of TRalpha2 pre-mRNA. PMID:11421362

  18. Structural and catalytic effects of an invariant purine substitution in the hammerhead ribozyme: implications for the mechanism of acid-base catalysis.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Eric P; Vasquez, Ernesto E; Scott, William G

    2014-09-01

    The hammerhead ribozyme catalyzes RNA cleavage via acid-base catalysis. Whether it does so by general acid-base catalysis, in which the RNA itself donates and abstracts protons in the transition state, as is typically assumed, or by specific acid-base catalysis, in which the RNA plays a structural role and proton transfer is mediated by active-site water molecules, is unknown. Previous biochemical and crystallographic experiments implicate an invariant purine in the active site, G12, as the general base. However, G12 may play a structural role consistent with specific base catalysis. To better understand the role of G12 in the mechanism of hammerhead catalysis, a 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of a hammerhead ribozyme from Schistosoma mansoni with a purine substituted for G12 in the active site of the ribozyme was obtained. Comparison of this structure (PDB entry 3zd4), in which A12 is substituted for G, with three previously determined structures that now serve as important experimental controls, allows the identification of structural perturbations that are owing to the purine substitution itself. Kinetic measurements for G12 purine-substituted schistosomal hammerheads confirm a previously observed dependence of rate on the pK(a) of the substituted purine; in both cases inosine, which is similar to G in pK(a) and hydrogen-bonding properties, is unexpectedly inactive. Structural comparisons indicate that this may primarily be owing to the lack of the exocyclic 2-amino group in the G12A and G12I substitutions and its structural effect upon both the nucleotide base and phosphate of A9. The latter involves the perturbation of a previously identified and well characterized metal ion-binding site known to be catalytically important in both minimal and full-length hammerhead ribozyme sequences. The results permit it to be suggested that G12 plays an important role in stabilizing the active-site structure. This result, although not inconsistent with the potential

  19. Structural and catalytic effects of an invariant purine substitution in the hammerhead ribozyme: implications for the mechanism of acid–base catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Eric P.; Vasquez, Ernesto E.; Scott, William G.

    2014-01-01

    The hammerhead ribozyme catalyzes RNA cleavage via acid–base catalysis. Whether it does so by general acid–base catalysis, in which the RNA itself donates and abstracts protons in the transition state, as is typically assumed, or by specific acid–base catalysis, in which the RNA plays a structural role and proton transfer is mediated by active-site water molecules, is unknown. Previous biochemical and crystallographic experiments implicate an invariant purine in the active site, G12, as the general base. However, G12 may play a structural role consistent with specific base catalysis. To better understand the role of G12 in the mechanism of hammerhead catalysis, a 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of a hammerhead ribozyme from Schistosoma mansoni with a purine substituted for G12 in the active site of the ribozyme was obtained. Comparison of this structure (PDB entry 3zd4), in which A12 is substituted for G, with three previously determined structures that now serve as important experimental controls, allows the identification of structural perturbations that are owing to the purine substitution itself. Kinetic measurements for G12 purine-substituted schistosomal hammerheads confirm a previously observed dependence of rate on the pK a of the substituted purine; in both cases inosine, which is similar to G in pK a and hydrogen-bonding properties, is unexpectedly inactive. Structural comparisons indicate that this may primarily be owing to the lack of the exocyclic 2-amino group in the G12A and G12I substitutions and its structural effect upon both the nucleotide base and phosphate of A9. The latter involves the perturbation of a previously identified and well characterized metal ion-binding site known to be catalytically important in both minimal and full-length hammerhead ribozyme sequences. The results permit it to be suggested that G12 plays an important role in stabilizing the active-site structure. This result, although not inconsistent with the

  20. Purine nucleoside modulation of functions of human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Priebe, T; Platsoucas, C D; Seki, H; Fox, F E; Nelson, J A

    1990-09-01

    The accumulation of endogenous substrates in patients with adenosine deaminase deficiency or purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency is believed to be responsible for the immunodeficiency observed in these patients. To identify the lymphocyte populations that are most susceptible to these substrates, we investigated the effect of their nucleoside analogs on a number of T and B cell functions of human lymphocytes. We found that tubercidin (Tub), 2-chloro 2'deoxyadenosine (2CldA), 2-fluoro adenine arabinoside-5'phosphate (FaraAMP), and 9-beta-D-arabinosyl guanine (AraGua) inhibited the proliferative responses of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to polyclonal activators (PHA, OKT3 mab) or to allogeneic PBMC in mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLC). Addition of recombinant IL-2 from the beginning of the culture did not alter the inhibition by Tub of the proliferative responses of PBMC. These purine nucleoside analogs also inhibited the proliferative responses of purified human peripheral blood CD4+ and CD8+ T cells to PHA and of purified B cells to SAC. The concentrations of these nucleosides required to achieve a given degree of inhibition of proliferative responses of T lymphocyte subpopulations or B cells was similar, suggesting that these analogs do not exhibit any selectivity for these purified lymphocyte populations. Tub and FaraAMP, respectively, inhibited and enhanced, at the effector phase, both NK cytotoxicity and specific T cell-mediated cytotoxicity. In contrast to these findings, LAK cytotoxicity at the effector phase was not significantly inhibited by Tub, and was not enhanced by FaraAMP. Both analogs inhibited rIL-2-induced proliferative responses of PBMC, but did not affect the generation of LAK cytotoxicity (induction phase) against the K562 targets when added at the beginning of the culture. This suggests that DNA synthesis is not required for LAK cell induction. Both Tub and FaraAMP inhibited immunoglobulin production (IgG and IgM) by

  1. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase as a cytosolic arsenate reductase.

    PubMed

    Gregus, Zoltán; Németi, Balázs

    2002-11-01

    The findings of the accompanying paper (Németi and Gregus, Toxicol: Sci. 70, 4-12) indicate that the arsenate (AsV) reductase activity of rat liver cytosol is due to an SH enzyme that uses phosphate (or its analogue, arsenate, AsV) and a purine nucleoside (guanosine or inosine) as substrates. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is such an enzyme. It catalyzes the phosphorolytic cleavage of 6-oxopurine nucleosides according to the following scheme: guanosine (or inosine) + phosphate <--> guanine (or hypoxanthine) + ribose-1-phosphate. Therefore, we have tested the hypothesis that PNP is responsible for the thiol- and purine nucleoside-dependent reduction of AsV to AsIII by rat liver cytosol. AsIII formed from AsV was quantified by HPLC-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry analysis of the deproteinized incubates. The following findings support the conclusion that PNP reduces AsV to AsIII, using AsV instead of phosphate in the reaction above: (1) Specific PNP inhibitors (CI-1000, BCX-1777) at a concentration of 1 microM completely inhibited cytosolic AsV reductase activity. (2) During anion-exchange chromatography of cytosolic proteins, PNP activity perfectly coeluted with the AsV reductase activity, suggesting that both activities belong to the same protein. (3) PNP purified from calf spleen catalyzed reduction of AsV to AsIII in the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT) and a 6-oxopurine nucleoside (guanosine or inosine). (4) AsV reductase activity of purified PNP, like the cytosolic AsV reductase activity, was inhibited by phosphate (a substrate of PNP alternative to AsV), guanine and hypoxanthine (products of PNP favoring the reverse reaction), mercurial thiol reagents (nonspecific inhibitors of PNP), as well as CI-1000 and BCX-1777 (specific PNP inhibitors). Thus, PNP appears to be responsible for the AsV reductase activity of rat liver cytosol in the presence of DTT. Further research should clarify the mechanism and the in vivo significance of PNP

  2. High-Frequency Variation of Purine Biosynthesis Genes Is a Mechanism of Success in Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Andrew; Huynh, Steven; Scott, Nichollas E.; Frirdich, Emilisa; Apel, Dmitry; Foster, Leonard J.; Parker, Craig T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Phenotypic variation is prevalent in the zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter jejuni, the leading agent of enterocolitis in the developed world. Heterogeneity enhances the survival and adaptive malleability of bacterial populations because variable phenotypes may allow some cells to be protected against future stress. Exposure to hyperosmotic stress previously revealed prevalent differences in growth between C. jejuni strain 81-176 colonies due to resistant or sensitive phenotypes, and these isolated colonies continued to produce progeny with differential phenotypes. In this study, whole-genome sequencing of isolated colonies identified allelic variants of two purine biosynthesis genes, purF and apt, encoding phosphoribosyltransferases that utilize a shared substrate. Genetic analyses determined that purF was essential for fitness, while apt was critical. Traditional and high-depth amplicon-sequencing analyses confirmed extensive intrapopulation genetic variation of purF and apt that resulted in viable strains bearing alleles with in-frame insertion duplications, deletions, or missense polymorphisms. Different purF and apt alleles were associated with various stress survival capabilities under several niche-relevant conditions and contributed to differential intracellular survival in an epithelial cell infection model. Amplicon sequencing revealed that intracellular survival selected for stress-fit purF and apt alleles, as did exposure to oxygen and hyperosmotic stress. Putative protein recognition direct repeat sequences were identified in purF and apt, and a DNA-protein affinity screen captured a predicted exonuclease that promoted the global spontaneous mutation rate. This work illustrates the adaptive properties of high-frequency genetic variation in two housekeeping genes, which influences C. jejuni survival under stress and promotes its success as a pathogen. PMID:26419875

  3. Sequestration-Mediated Downregulation of de Novo Purine Biosynthesis by AMPK.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Danielle L; Cheng, Yun-Ju; Park, Junyong; An, Songon

    2016-07-15

    Dynamic partitioning of de novo purine biosynthetic enzymes into multienzyme compartments, purinosomes, has been associated with increased flux of de novo purine biosynthesis in human cells. However, we do not know of a mechanism by which de novo purine biosynthesis would be downregulated in cells. We have investigated the functional role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the regulation of de novo purine biosynthesis because of its regulatory action on lipid and carbohydrate biosynthetic pathways. Using pharmacological AMPK activators, we have monitored subcellular localizations of six pathway enzymes tagged with green fluorescent proteins under time-lapse fluorescence single-cell microscopy. We revealed that only one out of six pathway enzymes, formylglycinamidine ribonucleotide synthase (FGAMS), formed spatially distinct cytoplasmic granules after treatment with AMPK activators, indicating the formation of single-enzyme self-assemblies. In addition, subsequent biophysical studies using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching showed that the diffusion kinetics of FGAMS were slower when it localized inside the self-assemblies than within the purinosomes. Importantly, high-performance liquid chromatographic studies revealed that the formation of AMPK-promoted FGAMS self-assembly caused the reduction of purine metabolites in HeLa cells, indicating the downregulation of de novo purine biosynthesis. Collectively, we demonstrate here that the spatial sequestration of FGAMS by AMPK is a mechanism by which de novo purine biosynthesis is downregulated in human cells. PMID:27128383

  4. Probing the reactivity of singlet oxygen with purines.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Elise; Grüber, Raymond; Bignon, Emmanuelle; Morell, Christophe; Moreau, Yohann; Monari, Antonio; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    The reaction of singlet molecular oxygen with purine DNA bases is investigated by computational means. We support the formation of a transient endoperoxide for guanine and by classical molecular dynamics simulations we demonstrate that the formation of this adduct does not affect the B-helicity. We thus identify the guanine endoperoxide as a key intermediate, confirming a low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance proof of its existence, and we delineate its degradation pathway, tracing back the preferential formation of 8-oxoguanine versus spiro-derivates in B-DNA. Finally, the latter oxidized 8-oxodGuo product exhibits an almost barrierless reaction profile, and hence is found, coherently with experience, to be much more reactive than guanine itself. On the contrary, in agreement with experimental observations, singlet-oxygen reactivity onto adenine is kinetically blocked by a higher energy transition state. PMID:26656495

  5. Probing the reactivity of singlet oxygen with purines

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Elise; Grüber, Raymond; Bignon, Emmanuelle; Morell, Christophe; Moreau, Yohann; Monari, Antonio; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    The reaction of singlet molecular oxygen with purine DNA bases is investigated by computational means. We support the formation of a transient endoperoxide for guanine and by classical molecular dynamics simulations we demonstrate that the formation of this adduct does not affect the B-helicity. We thus identify the guanine endoperoxide as a key intermediate, confirming a low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance proof of its existence, and we delineate its degradation pathway, tracing back the preferential formation of 8-oxoguanine versus spiro-derivates in B-DNA. Finally, the latter oxidized 8-oxodGuo product exhibits an almost barrierless reaction profile, and hence is found, coherently with experience, to be much more reactive than guanine itself. On the contrary, in agreement with experimental observations, singlet-oxygen reactivity onto adenine is kinetically blocked by a higher energy transition state. PMID:26656495

  6. Basal Ganglia Dopamine Loss Due to Defect in Purine Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Egami, Kiyoshi; Yitta, Silaja; Kasim, Suhail; Lewers, J. Chris; Roberts, Rosalinda C.; Lehar, Mohamed; Jinnah, H. A.

    2007-01-01

    Several rare inherited disorders have provided valuable experiments of nature highlighting specific biological processes of particular importance to the survival or function of midbrain dopamine neurons. In both humans and mice, deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) is associated with profound loss of striatal dopamine, with relative preservation of other neurotransmitters. In the current studies of knockout mice, no morphological signs of abnormal development or degeneration were found in an exhaustive battery that included stereological and morphometric measures of midbrain dopamine neurons, electron microscopic studies of striatal axons and terminals, and stains for degeneration or gliosis. A novel culture model involving HPRT-deficient dopaminergic neurons also exhibited significant loss of dopamine without a morphological correlate. These results suggest dopamine loss in HPRT deficiency has a biochemical rather than anatomical basis, and imply purine recycling to be a biochemical process of particular importance to the function of dopaminergic neurons. PMID:17374562

  7. [Metformin impact on purine metabolism in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Shatova, O P; Butenko, Eu V; Khomutov, Eu V; Kaplun, D S; Sedakov, I Eu; Zinkovych, I I

    2016-03-01

    Large-scale epidemiological and clinical studies have demonstrated the efficacy of metformin in oncology practice. However, the mechanisms of implementation of the anti-tumor effect of this drug there is still need understanding. In this study we have investigated the effect of metformin on the activity of adenosine deaminase and respectively adenosinergic immunosuppression in tumors and their microenvironment. The material of the study was taken during surgery of breast cacer patients receiveing metformin, and also patients which did not take this drug. The adenosine deaminase activity and substrate (adenosine) and products (inosine, hypoxanthine) concentrations were determined by HPLC. Results of this study suggest that metformin significantly alters catabolism of purine nucleotides in the node breast adenocarcinoma tisue. However, the metformin-induced increase in the adenosine deaminase activity is not sufficient to reduce the level of adenosine in cancer tissue. Thus, in metformin treated patients the adenosine concentration remained unchanged, and inosine and hypoxanthine concentration significantly increased. PMID:27420623

  8. Structure of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (DeoD) from Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Grenha, Rosa; Levdikov, Vladimir M.; Fogg, Mark J.; Blagova, Elena V.; Brannigan, James A.; Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Wilson, Keith S.

    2005-01-01

    Protein structures from the causative agent of anthrax (Bacillus anthracis) are being determined as part of a structural genomics programme. Amongst initial candidates for crystallographic analysis are enzymes involved in nucleotide biosynthesis, since these are recognized as potential targets in antibacterial therapy. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase is a key enzyme in the purine-salvage pathway. The crystal structure of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (DeoD) from B. anthracis has been solved by molecular replacement at 2.24 Å resolution and refined to an R factor of 18.4%. This is the first report of a DeoD structure from a Gram-positive bacterium. PMID:16511068

  9. Application of crystallographic and modeling methods in the design of purine nucleoside phosphorylase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Ealick, S E; Babu, Y S; Bugg, C E; Erion, M D; Guida, W C; Montgomery, J A; Secrist, J A

    1991-01-01

    Competitive inhibitors of the salvage pathway enzyme purine-nucleoside phosphorylase (purine-nucleoside:orthophosphate ribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.1) have been designed by using the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme as determined by x-ray crystallography. The process was an iterative one that utilized interactive computer graphics, Monte Carlo-based conformational searching, energy minimization, and x-ray crystallography. The proposed compounds were synthesized and tested by an in vitro assay. Among the compounds designed and synthesized are the most potent competitive inhibitors of purine nucleoside phosphorylase thus far reported. Images PMID:1763067

  10. Novel developments in metabolic disorders of purine and pyrimidine metabolism and therapeutic applications of their analogs.

    PubMed

    Torres, Rosa J; Peters, Godefridus J; Puig, Juan G

    2014-01-01

    The biennial 15th symposium on Purine and Pyrimidine metabolism was held in Madrid, June 2013 (PP13). During the meeting, several novel developments on the diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment of several inborn errors of purine and pyrimidine metabolism were presented. These ranged from new drugs for gout to enzyme replacement therapies for mitochondrial diseases. A relatively novel aspect in this meeting was the interest in purine and pyrimidine metabolism in nonmammalian systems, such as parasites, mycoplasms, and bacteria. Development of novel analogs for parasite infections, cardiovascular diseases, inflammatory diseases, and cancer were also discussed. PMID:24940665

  11. Genetic and metabolomic analysis of AdeD and AdeI mutants of de novo purine biosynthesis: cellular models of de novo purine biosynthesis deficiency disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Terry G.; Baresova, Veronika; Skopova, Vaclava; Kmoch, Stanislav; Vacano, Guido N.; Zikanova, Marie; Patterson, David

    2014-01-01

    Purines are molecules essential for many cell processes, including RNA and DNA synthesis, regulation of enzyme activity, protein synthesis and function, energy metabolism and transfer, essential coenzyme function, and cell signaling. Purines are produced via the de novo purine biosynthesis pathway. Mutations in purine biosynthetic genes, for example phosphoribosylaminoimidazole carboxylase/phosphoribosylaminoimidazole succinocarboxamide synthetase (PAICS, E.C. 6.3.2.6/E.C. 4.1.1.21), can lead to developmental anomalies in lower vertebrates. Alterations in PAICS expression in humans have been associated with various types of cancer. Mutations in adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL, E.C. 4.3.2.2) or 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase/IMP cyclohydrolase (ATIC, E.C. 2.1.2.3/E.C. 3.5.4.10) lead to inborn errors of metabolism with a range of clinical symptoms, including developmental delay, severe neurological symptoms, renal stones, combined immunodeficiency, and autistic features. The pathogenetic mechanism is unknown for any of these conditions, and no effective treatments exist. The study of cells carrying mutations in the various de novo purine biosynthesis pathway genes provides one approach to analysis of purine disorders. Here we report the characterization of AdeD Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, which carry genetic mutations encoding p.E177K and p.W363* variants of PAICS. Both mutations impact PAICS structure and completely abolish its biosynthesis. Additionally, we describe a sensitive and rapid analytical method for detection of purine de novo biosynthesis intermediates based on high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Using this technique we detected accumulation of AIR in AdeD cells. In AdeI cells, mutant for the ADSL gene, we detected accumulation of SAICAR and SAMP and, somewhat unexpectedly, accumulation of AIR. This method has great potential for metabolite profiling of de novo purine biosynthesis

  12. Purines are required at the 5' ends of newly initiated RNAs for optimal RNA polymerase III gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Zecherle, G N; Whelen, S; Hall, B D

    1996-01-01

    We have made specific alterations in the CAACAA element at the transcription start site of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae suppressor tRNA gene. The mutant genes were tested for their ability to suppress the ochre nonsense alleles ade2-1, lys4-1, and met4-1. Many of the mutants showed either no phenotypic change or a weak loss of suppression relative to that of SUP4-o. A 2-bp change, CTCCAA, which alters bases encoding the +1 and +2 nucleotides of pre-tRNA Tyr, had a strong deleterious effect in vivo, as did the more extensive change CTCCTC. In contrast, mutant genes bearing each of the possible single changes at nucleotide +1 retained normal suppression levels. The transcription start point could be shifted in a limited fashion in response to the specific sequences encountered by RNA polymerase III at the start site. ATP was preferentially utilized as the 5' nucleotide in the growing RNA chain, while with start site sequences that precluded utilization of a purine, CTP was greatly preferred to UTP as the +1 nucleotide. Short oligopyrimidine RNAs formed on the CTCCTC allele could be repositioned in the active center of the newly formed ternary complex. Early postinitiation complexes containing short nascent RNAs formed on the CTCCTC mutant were more sensitive to the effects of heparin and produced more abortive transcripts than similar complexes formed on SUP4-o. Our results suggest that the purine-rich sequences at the 5' ends of the nascent transcripts of many genes act to stabilize the early ternary complex. PMID:8816494

  13. Cloning of three human multifunctional de novo purine biosynthetic genes by functional complementation of yeast mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Schild, D; Brake, A J; Kiefer, M C; Young, D; Barr, P J

    1990-01-01

    Functional complementation of mutations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used to clone three multifunctional human genes involved in de novo purine biosynthesis. A HepG2 cDNA library constructed in a yeast expression vector was used to transform yeast strains with mutations in adenine biosynthetic genes. Clones were isolated that complement mutations in the yeast ADE2, ADE3, and ADE8 genes. The cDNA that complemented the ade8 (phosphoribosylglycinamide formyltransferase, GART) mutation, also complemented the ade5 (phosphoribosylglycinamide synthetase) and ade7 [phosphoribosylaminoimidazole synthetase (AIRS; also known as PAIS)] mutations, indicating that it is the human trifunctional GART gene. Supporting data include homology between the AIRS and GART domains of this gene and the published sequence of these domains from other organisms, and localization of the cloned gene to human chromosome 21, where the GART gene has been shown to map. The cDNA that complemented ade2 (phosphoribosylaminoimidazole carboxylase) also complemented ade1 (phosphoribosylaminoimidazole succinocarboxamide synthetase), supporting earlier data suggesting that in some organisms these functions are part of a bifunctional protein. The cDNA that complemented ade3 (formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase) is different from the recently isolated human cDNA encoding this enzyme and instead appears to encode a related mitochondrial enzyme. Images PMID:2183217

  14. Versatile synthesis and biological evaluation of novel 3’-fluorinated purine nucleosides

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hang; Hatala, Paul J; Stevens, William C; He, Baicheng

    2015-01-01

    Summary A unified synthetic strategy accessing novel 3'-fluorinated purine nucleoside derivatives and their biological evaluation were achieved. Novel 3’-fluorinated analogues were constructed from a common 3’-deoxy-3’-fluororibofuranose intermediate. Employing Suzuki and Stille cross-coupling reactions, fifteen 3’-fluororibose purine nucleosides 1–15 and eight 3’-fluororibose 2-chloro/2-aminopurine nucleosides 16–23 with various substituents at position 6 of the purine ring were efficiently synthesized. Furthermore, 3’-fluorine analogs of natural products nebularine and 6-methylpurine riboside were constructed via our convergent synthetic strategy. Synthesized nucleosides were tested against HT116 (colon cancer) and 143B (osteosarcoma cancer) tumor cell lines. We have demonstrated 3’-fluorine purine nucleoside analogues display potent tumor cell growth inhibition activity at sub- or low micromolar concentration. PMID:26734098

  15. Transition State Analogues of Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase: the Work of Vernon L. Schramm

    PubMed Central

    Kresge, Nicole; Simoni, Robert D.; Hill, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Transition State Analogue Inhibitors of Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase from Plasmodium falciparum (Kicska, G. A., Tyler, P. C., Evans, G. B., Furneaux, R. H., Kim, K., and Schramm, V. L. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 3219–3225) Purine-less Death in Plasmodium falciparum Induced by Immucillin-H, a Transition State Analogue of Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (Kicska, G. A., Tyler, P. C., Evans, G. B., Furneaux, R. H., Schramm, V. L., and Kim, K. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 3226–3231) Achieving the Ultimate Physiological Goal in Transition State Analogue Inhibitors for Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (Lewandowicz, A., Tyler, P. C., Evans, G. B., Furneaux, R. H., and Schramm, V. L. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 31465–31468)

  16. Structure of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (DeoD) from Bacillus anthracis

    SciTech Connect

    Grenha, Rosa; Levdikov, Vladimir M.; Fogg, Mark J.; Blagova, Elena V.; Brannigan, James A. Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Wilson, Keith S.

    2005-05-01

    The crystal structure of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (DeoD) from B. anthracis was solved by X-ray crystallography using molecular replacement and refined at a resolution of 2.24 Å. Protein structures from the causative agent of anthrax (Bacillus anthracis) are being determined as part of a structural genomics programme. Amongst initial candidates for crystallographic analysis are enzymes involved in nucleotide biosynthesis, since these are recognized as potential targets in antibacterial therapy. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase is a key enzyme in the purine-salvage pathway. The crystal structure of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (DeoD) from B. anthracis has been solved by molecular replacement at 2.24 Å resolution and refined to an R factor of 18.4%. This is the first report of a DeoD structure from a Gram-positive bacterium.

  17. mTORC1 Induces Purine Synthesis Through Control of the Mitochondrial Tetrahydrofolate Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Ricoult, Stéphane J.H.; Asara, John M.; Manning, Brendan D.

    2016-01-01

    In response to growth signals, mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) stimulates anabolic processes underlying cell growth. We found that mTORC1 increases metabolic flux through the de novo purine synthesis pathway in various mouse and human cells, thereby influencing the nucleotide pool available for nucleic acid synthesis. mTORC1 had transcriptional effects on multiple enzymes contributing to purine synthesis, with expression of the mitochondrial tetrahydrofolate (mTHF) cycle enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 2 (MTHFD2) being closely associated with mTORC1 signaling in both normal and cancer cells. MTHFD2 expression and purine synthesis were stimulated by ATF4, which was activated by mTORC1 independent of its canonical induction downstream of eIF2α phosphorylation. Thus, mTORC1 stimulates the mTHF cycle, which contributes one-carbon units to enhance production of purine nucleotides in response to growth signals. PMID:26912861

  18. Borrelia burgdorferi Harbors a Transport System Essential for Purine Salvage and Mammalian Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sunny; Sutchu, Selina; Rosa, Patricia A.; Byram, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is the tick-borne bacterium that causes the multistage inflammatory disease Lyme disease. B. burgdorferi has a reduced genome and lacks the enzymes required for de novo synthesis of purines for synthesis of RNA and DNA. Therefore, this obligate pathogen is dependent upon the tick vector and mammalian host environments for salvage of purine bases for nucleic acid biosynthesis. This pathway is vital for B. burgdorferi survival throughout its infectious cycle, as key enzymes in the purine salvage pathway are essential for the ability of the spirochete to infect mice and critical for spirochete replication in the tick. The transport of preformed purines into the spirochete is the first step in the purine salvage pathway and may represent a novel therapeutic target and/or means to deliver antispirochete molecules to the pathogen. However, the transport systems critical for purine salvage by B. burgdorferi have yet to be identified. Herein, we demonstrate that the genes bbb22 and bbb23, present on B. burgdorferi's essential plasmid circular plasmid 26 (cp26), encode key purine transport proteins. BBB22 and/or BBB23 is essential for hypoxanthine transport and contributes to the transport of adenine and guanine. Furthermore, B. burgdorferi lacking bbb22-23 was noninfectious in mice up to a dose of 1 × 107 spirochetes. Together, our data establish that bbb22-23 encode purine permeases critical for B. burgdorferi mammalian infectivity, suggesting that this transport system may serve as a novel antimicrobial target for the treatment of Lyme disease. PMID:22710875

  19. The Role of Gene Duplication in the Evolution of Purine Nucleotide Salvage Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, Arturo; Lazcano, Antonio

    1998-10-01

    Purine nucleotides are formed de novo by a widespread biochemical route that may be of monophyletic origin, or are synthesized from preformed purine bases and nucleosides through different salvage pathways. Three monophyletic sets of purine salvage enzymes, each of which catalyzes mechanistically similar reactions, can be identified: (a) adenine-, xanthine-, hypoxanthine- and guanine-phosphoribosyltransferases, which are all homologous among themselves, as well as to nucleoside phosphorylases; (b) adenine deaminase, adenosine deaminase, and adenosine monophophate deaminase; and (c) guanine reductase and inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase. These homologies support the idea that substrate specificity is the outcome of gene duplication, and that the purine nucleotide salvage pathways were assembled by a patchwork process that probably took place before the divergence of the three cell domains (Bacteria, Archaea, and Eucarya). Based on the ability of adenine PRTase to catalyze the condensation of PRPP with 4-aminoimidazole-5-carboxamide (AICA), a simpler scheme of purine nucleotide biosynthesis is presented. This hypothetical route requires the prior evolution of PRPP biosynthesis. Since it has been argued that PRPP, nucleosides, and nucleotides are susceptible to hydrolysis, they are very unlikely prebiotic compounds. If this is the case, it implies that many purine salvage pathways appeared only after the evolution of phosphorylated sugar biosynthetic pathways made ribosides available.

  20. Deprotonated purine dissociation: experiments, computations, and astrobiological implications.

    PubMed

    Cole, Callie A; Wang, Zhe-Chen; Snow, Theodore P; Bierbaum, Veronica M

    2015-01-15

    A central focus of astrobiology is the determination of abiotic formation routes to important biomolecules. The dissociation mechanisms of these molecules lend valuable insights into their synthesis pathways. Because of the detection of organic anions in the interstellar medium (ISM), it is imperative to study their role in these syntheses. This work aims to experimentally and computationally examine deprotonated adenine and guanine dissociation in an effort to illuminate potential anionic precursors to purine formation. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) products and their branching fractions are experimentally measured using an ion trap mass spectrometer. Deprotonated guanine dissociates primarily by deammoniation (97%) with minor losses of carbodiimide (HNCNH) and/or cyanamide (NH2CN), and isocyanic acid (HNCO). Deprotonated adenine fragments by loss of hydrogen cyanide and/or isocyanide (HCN/HNC; 90%) and carbodiimide (HNCNH) and/or cyanamide (NH2CN; 10%). Tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)) experiments reveal that deprotonated guanine fragments lose additional HCN and CO, while deprotonated adenine fragments successively lose HNC and HCN. Every neutral fragment observed in this study has been detected in the ISM, highlighting the potential for nucleobases such as these to form in such environments. Lastly, the acidity of abundant fragment ions is experimentally bracketed. Theoretical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory are performed to delineate the mechanisms of dissociation and analyze the energies of reactants, intermediates, transition states, and products of these CID processes. PMID:25559322

  1. From formamide to purine: an energetically viable mechanistic reaction pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Gu, Jiande; Nguyen, Minh Tho; Springsteen, Greg; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2013-02-28

    A step-by-step mechanistic pathway following the transformation of formamide to purine through a five-membered ring intermediate has been explored by density functional theory computations. The highlight of the mechanistic route detailed here is that the proposed pathway represents the simplest reaction pathway. All necessary reactants are generated from a single starting compound, formamide, through energetically viable reactions. Several important reaction steps are involved in this mechanistic route: formylation-dehydration, Leuckart reduction, five- and six-membered ring-closure, and deamination. On the basis of the study of noncatalytic pathways, catalytic water has been found to provide energetically viable step-by-step mechanistic pathways. Among these reaction steps, five-member ring-closure is the rate-determining step. The energy barrier (ca. 42 kcal/mol) of this rate-control step is somewhat lower than the rate-determining step (ca. 44 kcal/mol) for a pyrimidine-based pathway reported previously. The mechanistic pathway reported herein is less energetically demanding than for previously proposed routes to adenine. PMID:23347082

  2. 6-(2-Methoxy­benzyl­amino)purine

    PubMed Central

    Trávníček, Zdeněk; Matiková-Maľarová, Miroslava; Mikulík, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    The title compound, C13H13N5O, consists of discrete mol­ecules connected by N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds to form infinite chains, with N⋯N separations of 3.0379 (15) and 2.8853 (15) Å. The benzene and purine ring systems make a dihedral angle of 77.58 (3)°. The crystal structure is further stabilized by intra­molecular N⋯O inter­actions [2.9541 (12) Å] and inter­molecular C—H⋯C and C⋯C contacts [3.304 (2), 3.368 (2), 3.667 (2), 3.618 (2) and 3.512 (2) Å] which arrange the mol­ecules into graphite-like layers. The inter­layer separations are 3.248 and 3.256 Å. PMID:21202313

  3. Dynamic architecture of the purinosome involved in human de novo purine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kyoung, Minjoung; Russell, Sarah J; Kohnhorst, Casey L; Esemoto, Nopondo N; An, Songon

    2015-01-27

    Enzymes in human de novo purine biosynthesis have been demonstrated to form a reversible, transient multienzyme complex, the purinosome, upon purine starvation. However, characterization of purinosomes has been limited to HeLa cells and has heavily relied on qualitative examination of their subcellular localization and reversibility under wide-field fluorescence microscopy. Quantitative approaches, which are particularly compatible with human disease-relevant cell lines, are necessary to explicitly understand the purinosome in live cells. In this work, human breast carcinoma Hs578T cells have been utilized to demonstrate the preferential utilization of the purinosome under purine-depleted conditions. In addition, we have employed a confocal microscopy-based biophysical technique, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, to characterize kinetic properties of the purinosome in live Hs578T cells. Quantitative characterization of the diffusion coefficients of all de novo purine biosynthetic enzymes reveals the significant reduction of their mobile kinetics upon purinosome formation, the dynamic partitioning of each enzyme into the purinosome, and the existence of three intermediate species in purinosome assembly under purine starvation. We also demonstrate that the diffusion coefficient of the purine salvage enzyme, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase 1, is not sensitive to purine starvation, indicating exclusion of the salvage pathway from the purinosome. Furthermore, our biophysical characterization of nonmetabolic enzymes clarifies that purinosomes are spatiotemporally different cellular bodies from stress granules and cytoplasmic protein aggregates in both Hs578T and HeLa cells. Collectively, quantitative analyses of the purinosome in Hs578T cells led us to provide novel insights for the dynamic architecture of the purinosome assembly. PMID:25540829

  4. Learning to Read: Developing Processes for Recognizing, Understanding and Pronouncing Written Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Morag

    2006-01-01

    Major theories of how skilled readers recognize, understand and pronounce written words include processes for phonological recoding (i.e., translating segments of print to their corresponding segments of sound) and processes by which direct access is achieved from printed words to their meanings. If these are the processes employed in skilled…

  5. Autoimmune Dysregulation and Purine Metabolism in Adenosine Deaminase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Aisha Vanessa; Brigida, Immacolata; Carriglio, Nicola; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Genetic defects in the adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene are among the most common causes for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). ADA-SCID patients suffer from lymphopenia, severely impaired cellular and humoral immunity, failure to thrive, and recurrent infections. Currently available therapeutic options for this otherwise fatal disorder include bone marrow transplantation (BMT), enzyme replacement therapy with bovine ADA (PEG-ADA), or hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy (HSC-GT). Although varying degrees of immune reconstitution can be achieved by these treatments, breakdown of tolerance is a major concern in ADA-SCID. Immune dysregulation such as autoimmune hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus, hemolytic anemia, and immune thrombocytopenia are frequently observed in milder forms of the disease. However, several reports document similar complications also in patients on long-term PEG-ADA and after BMT or GT treatment. A skewed repertoire and decreased immune functions have been implicated in autoimmunity observed in certain B-cell and/or T-cell immunodeficiencies, but it remains unclear to what extent specific mechanisms of tolerance are affected in ADA deficiency. Herein we provide an overview about ADA-SCID and the autoimmune manifestations reported in these patients before and after treatment. We also assess the value of the ADA-deficient mouse model as a useful tool to study both immune and metabolic disease mechanisms. With focus on regulatory T- and B-cells we discuss the lymphocyte subpopulations particularly prone to contribute to the loss of self-tolerance and onset of autoimmunity in ADA deficiency. Moreover we address which aspects of immune dysregulation are specifically related to alterations in purine metabolism caused by the lack of ADA and the subsequent accumulation of metabolites with immunomodulatory properties. PMID:22969765

  6. Identification of a chemoreceptor that specifically mediates chemotaxis toward metabolizable purine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Matilde; Morel, Bertrand; Corral-Lugo, Andrés; Krell, Tino

    2016-01-01

    Chemotaxis is an essential mechanism that enables bacteria to move toward favorable ecological niches. Escherichia coli, the historical model organism for studying chemotaxis, has five well-studied chemoreceptors. However, many bacteria with different lifestyle have more chemoreceptors, most of unknown function. Using a high throughput screening approach, we identified a chemoreceptor from Pseudomonas putida KT2440, named McpH, which specifically recognizes purine and its derivatives, adenine, guanine, xanthine, hypoxanthine and uric acid. The latter five compounds form part of the purine degradation pathway, permitting their use as sole nitrogen sources. Isothermal titration calorimetry studies show that these six compounds bind McpH-Ligand Binding Domain (LBD) with very similar affinity. In contrast, non-metabolizable purine derivatives (caffeine, theophylline, theobromine), nucleotides, nucleosides or pyrimidines are unable to bind McpH-LBD. Mutation of mcpH abolished chemotaxis toward the McpH ligands identified - a phenotype that is restored by complementation. This is the first report on bacterial chemotaxis to purine derivatives and McpH the first chemoreceptor described that responds exclusively to intermediates of a catabolic pathway, illustrating a clear link between metabolism and chemotaxis. The evolution of McpH may reflect a saprophytic lifestyle, which would have exposed the studied bacterium to high concentrations of purines produced by nucleic acid degradation. PMID:26355499

  7. Genetic and physiological characterization of Bacillus subtilis mutants resistant to purine analogs.

    PubMed Central

    Saxild, H H; Nygaard, P

    1987-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis mutants defective in purine metabolism have been isolated by selecting for resistance to purine analogs. Mutants resistant to 2-fluoroadenine were found to be defective in adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (apt) activity and slightly impaired in adenine uptake. By making use of apt mutants and mutants defective in adenosine phosphorylase activity, it was shown that adenine deamination is an essential step in the conversion of both adenine and adenosine to guanine nucleotides. Mutants resistant to 8-azaguanine, pbuG mutants, appeared to be defective in hypoxanthine and guanine transport and normal in hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity. Purine auxotrophic pbuG mutants grew in a concentration-dependent way on hypoxanthine, while normal growth was observed on inosine as the purine source. Inosine was taken up by a different transport system and utilized after conversion to hypoxanthine. Two mutants resistant to 8-azaxanthine were isolated: one was defective in xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (xpt) activity and xanthine transport, and another had reduced GMP synthetase activity. The results obtained with the various mutants provide evidence for the existence of specific purine base transport systems. The genetic lesions causing the mutant phenotypes, apt, pbuG, and xpt, have been located on the B. subtilis linkage map at 243, 55, and 198 degrees, respectively. PMID:3110131

  8. Which Electronic and Structural Factors Control the Photostability of DNA and RNA Purine Nucleobases?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollum, Marvin; Reichardt, Christian; Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E.; Martínez-Fernández, Lara; Corral, Inés; Rauer, Clemens; Mai, Sebastian; Marquetand, Philipp; González, Leticia

    2015-06-01

    Following ultraviolet excitation, the canonical purine nucleobases, guanine and adenine, are able to efficiently dissipate the absorbed energy within hundreds of femtoseconds. This property affords these nucleobases with great photostability. Conversely, non-canonical purine nucleobases exhibit high fluorescence quantum yields or efficiently populate long-lived triplet excited states from which chemistry can occur. Using femtosecond broadband transient absorption spectroscopy in combination with ab initio static and surface hopping dynamics simulations we have determined the electronic and structural factors that regulate the excited state dynamics of the purine nucleobase derivatives. Importantly, we have uncovered that the photostability of the guanine and adenine nucleobases is not due to the structure of the purine core itself and that the substituent at the C6 position of the purine nucleobase plays a more important role than that at the C2 position in the ultrafast relaxation of deleterious electronic energy. [The authors acknowledge the CAREER program of the National Science Foundation (Grant No. CHE-1255084) for financial support.

  9. Structural determinants of the 5'-methylthioinosine specificity of Plasmodium purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Teraya M; Ting, Li-Min; Zhan, Chenyang; Shi, Wuxian; Zheng, Renjian; Almo, Steven C; Kim, Kami

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium parasites rely upon purine salvage for survival. Plasmodium purine nucleoside phosphorylase is part of the streamlined Plasmodium purine salvage pathway that leads to the phosphorylysis of both purines and 5'-methylthiopurines, byproducts of polyamine synthesis. We have explored structural features in Plasmodium falciparum purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PfPNP) that affect efficiency of catalysis as well as those that make it suitable for dual specificity. We used site directed mutagenesis to identify residues critical for PfPNP catalytic activity as well as critical residues within a hydrophobic pocket required for accommodation of the 5'-methylthio group. Kinetic analysis data shows that several mutants had disrupted binding of the 5'-methylthio group while retaining activity for inosine. A triple PfPNP mutant that mimics Toxoplasma gondii PNP had significant loss of 5'-methylthio activity with retention of inosine activity. Crystallographic investigation of the triple mutant PfPNP with Tyr160Phe, Val66Ile, andVal73Ile in complex with the transition state inhibitor immucillin H reveals fewer hydrogen bond interactions for the inhibitor in the hydrophobic pocket. PMID:24416224

  10. Triple helix formation with purine-rich phosphorothioate-containing oligonucleotides covalently linked to an acridine derivative.

    PubMed Central

    Lacoste, J; François, J C; Hélène, C

    1997-01-01

    Purine-rich (GA)- and (GT)-containing oligophosphorothioates were investigated for their triplex-forming potential on a 23 bp DNA duplex target. In our system, GA-containing oligophosphorothioates (23mer GA-PS) were capable of triplex formation with binding affinities lower than (GA)-containing oligophosphodiesters (23mer GA-PO). The orientation of the third strand 23mers GA-PS and GA-PO was antiparallel to the purine strand of the duplex DNA target. In contrast, (GT)-containing oligophosphorothioates (23mer GT-PS) did not support triplex formation in either orientation, whereas the 23mer GT-PO oligophosphodiester demonstrated triplex formation in the antiparallel orientation. GA-PS oligonucleotides, in contrast to GT-PS oligonucleotides, were capable of self-association, but these self-associated structures exhibited lower stabilities than those formed with GA-PO oligonucleotides, suggesting that homoduplex formation (previously described for the 23mer GA-PO sequence by Noonberg et al.) could not fully account for the decrease in triplex stability when phosphorothioate linkages were used. The 23mer GA-PS oligonucleotide was covalently linked via its 5'-end to an acridine derivative (23mer Acr-GA-PS). In the presence of potassium cations, this conjugate demonstrated triplex formation with higher binding affinity than the unmodified 23mer GA-PS oligonucleotide and even than the 23mer GA-PO oligonucleotide. A (GA)-containing oligophosphodiester with two phosphorothioate linkages at both the 5'- and 3'-ends exhibited similar binding affinity to duplex DNA compared with the unmodified GA-PO oligophosphodiester. This capped oligonucleotide was more resistant to nucleases than the GA-PO oligomer and thus represents a good alternative for ex vivo applications of (GA)-containing, triplex-forming oligonucleotides, allowing a higher binding affinity for its duplex target without rapid cellular degradation. PMID:9115367

  11. 39 CFR 211.3 - Executive orders and other executive pronouncements; circulars, bulletins, and other issuances of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... pronouncements; circulars, bulletins, and other issuances of the Office of Management and Budget. 211.3 Section... REGULATIONS § 211.3 Executive orders and other executive pronouncements; circulars, bulletins, and other... executive orders, and other executive pronouncements and certain circulars, bulletins, and other...

  12. 39 CFR 211.3 - Executive orders and other executive pronouncements; circulars, bulletins, and other issuances of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... pronouncements; circulars, bulletins, and other issuances of the Office of Management and Budget. 211.3 Section... REGULATIONS § 211.3 Executive orders and other executive pronouncements; circulars, bulletins, and other... executive orders, and other executive pronouncements and certain circulars, bulletins, and other...

  13. Primary structure and functional expression of a cDNA encoding the bile canalicular, purine-specific Na(+)-nucleoside cotransporter.

    PubMed

    Che, M; Ortiz, D F; Arias, I M

    1995-06-01

    We previously characterized a purine-specific Na(+)-nucleoside cotransport system in bile canalicular membrane. The function of this transport system may be related to conserving nucleosides and preventing cholestasis. We report here the isolation of a cDNA encoding a Na(+)-dependent nucleoside transporter from rat liver using an expression cloning strategy. The substrate specificities and kinetic characteristics of the cloned cotransporter are consistent with the properties of the Na(+)-dependent, purine-selective nucleoside transporter in bile canalicular membranes. The nucleotide sequence predicts a protein of 659 amino acids (72 kDa) with 14 putative membrane-spanning domains. Northern blot analysis showed that the transcripts are present in liver and several other tissues. Data base searches indicate significant sequence similarity to the pyrimidine-selective nucleoside transporter (cNT1) of rat jejunum. Although these two subtypes of Na(+)-nucleoside cotransporter have different substrate specificities and tissue localizations, they are members of a single gene family. PMID:7775409

  14. AMPK Activation via Modulation of De Novo Purine Biosynthesis with an Inhibitor of ATIC Homodimerization.

    PubMed

    Asby, Daniel J; Cuda, Francesco; Beyaert, Maxime; Houghton, Franchesca D; Cagampang, Felino R; Tavassoli, Ali

    2015-07-23

    5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (known as ZMP) is a metabolite produced in de novo purine biosynthesis and histidine biosynthesis, but only utilized in the cell by a homodimeric bifunctional enzyme (called ATIC) that catalyzes the last two steps of de novo purine biosynthesis. ZMP is known to act as an allosteric activator of the cellular energy sensor adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), when exogenously administered as the corresponding cell-permeable ribonucleoside. Here, we demonstrate that endogenous ZMP, produced by the aforementioned metabolic pathways, is also capable of activating AMPK. Using an inhibitor of ATIC homodimerization to block the ninth step of de novo purine biosynthesis, we demonstrate that the subsequent increase in endogenous ZMP activates AMPK and its downstream signaling pathways. We go on to illustrate the viability of using this approach to AMPK activation as a therapeutic strategy with an in vivo mouse model for metabolic disorders. PMID:26144885

  15. Adaptive ligand binding by the purine riboswitch in the recognition of guanine and adenine analogs

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Sunny D.; Reyes, Francis E.; Edwards, Andrea L.; Batey, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Purine riboswitches discriminate between guanine and adenine by at least 10,000-fold based on the identity of a single pyrimidine (Y74) that forms a Watson-Crick base pair with the ligand. To understand how this high degree of specificity for closely related compounds is achieved through simple pairing, we investigated their interaction with purine analogs with varying functional groups at the 2- and 6-positions that have the potential to alter interactions with Y74. Using a combination of crystallographic and calorimetric approaches, we find that binding these purines is often facilitated by either small structural changes in the RNA or tautomeric changes in the ligand. This work also reveals that, along with base pairing, conformational restriction of Y74 significantly contributes to nucleobase selectivity. These results reveal that compounds that exploit the inherent local flexibility within riboswitch binding pockets can alter their ligand specificity. PMID:19523903

  16. Functionalized Solid Electrodes for Electrochemical Biosensing of Purine Nucleobases and Their Analogues: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vimal Kumar; Jelen, Frantisek; Trnkova, Libuse

    2015-01-01

    Interest in electrochemical analysis of purine nucleobases and few other important purine derivatives has been growing rapidly. Over the period of the past decade, the design of electrochemical biosensors has been focused on achieving high sensitivity and efficiency. The range of existing electrochemical methods with carbon electrode displays the highest rate in the development of biosensors. Moreover, modification of electrode surfaces based on nanomaterials is frequently used due to their extraordinary conductivity and surface to volume ratio. Different strategies for modifying electrode surfaces facilitate electron transport between the electrode surface and biomolecules, including DNA, oligonucleotides and their components. This review aims to summarize recent developments in the electrochemical analysis of purine derivatives, as well as discuss different applications. PMID:25594595

  17. Preliminary crystallographic studies of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from the cariogenic pathogen Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Qiao-Ming; Liu, Xiang; Brostromer, Erik; Li, Lan-Fen; Su, Xiao-Dong

    2009-01-01

    The punA gene of the cariogenic pathogen Streptococcus mutans encodes purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP), which is a pivotal enzyme in the nucleotide-salvage pathway, catalyzing the phosphorolysis of purine nucleosides to generate purine bases and α-ribose 1-phosphate. In the present work, the PNP protein was expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) in a soluble form at a high level. After purification of the PNP enzyme, the protein was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique; the crystals diffracted to 1.6 Å resolution at best. The crystals belonged to space group H3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 113.0, c = 60.1 Å. PMID:20054131

  18. Three-dimensional structure of E. Coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase at 0.99 Å resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, V. I.; Abramchik, Yu. A.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Muravieva, T. I.; Esipov, R. S.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2016-03-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylases (PNPs) catalyze the reversible phosphorolysis of nucleosides and are key enzymes involved in nucleotide metabolism. They are essential for normal cell function and can catalyze the transglycosylation. Crystals of E. coli PNP were grown in microgravity by the capillary counterdiffusion method through a gel layer. The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme was determined by the molecular-replacement method at 0.99 Å resolution. The structural features are considered, and the structure of E. coli PNP is compared with the structures of the free enzyme and its complexes with purine base derivatives established earlier. A comparison of the environment of the purine base in the complex of PNP with formycin A and of the pyrimidine base in the complex of uridine phosphorylase with thymidine revealed the main structural features of the base-binding sites. Coordinates of the atomic model determined with high accuracy were deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB_ID: 4RJ2).

  19. Pronounced palatal and mandibular tori observed in a patient with chronic phenytoin therapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, H; Ikedo, D; Kataoka, M; Kido, J; Kitamura, S; Nagata, T

    1999-04-01

    Phenytoin, an anticonvulsant drug for epileptic patients, has many adverse effects, including calvarial thickening and coarsening of the facial features. Previous studies have demonstrated that phenytoin has an anabolic action on bone cells. This report describes pronounced palatal and mandibular tori found in a 45-year-old Japanese man undergoing chronic phenytoin therapy. The tori were extremely large, lobular, and symmetrical. A palatal torus appeared along the middle of the hard palate and mandibular tori consisted of 2 pairs of nodular masses extensively filling the lingual floor of the oral cavity. Pronounced osseous outgrowth occurred for the duration of a dose-increase of phenytoin from 1985 to 1997. His parents did not have any palatal or mandibular tori. These facts suggest that these unusual tori may have been the result of chronic phenytoin therapy, rather than association with the familial background. PMID:10328658

  20. The role of purine degradation in methane biosynthesis and energy production in Methanococcus vannielii. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    DeMoll, E.

    1998-11-01

    Firstly, characterization of a purine degrading pathway in Methanococcus vannielii was determined. The pathway is similar to that described for Clostridia. The M. vannielli pathway differs in a few respects from the Clostridial pathway. The pathway of Clostridia uses tetrahydrofolic acid (THF), whereas the pathway of M. vannielii uses tetrahydromethanopterin (H{sub 4}MPt) as a cofactor in the transfer of both the formimino moiety of formiminoglycine and apparently in the cleavage of glycine by a glycin decarboxylase type mechanism that is dependent upon at least H{sub 4}MPt and either NAD{sup +} or NADP{sup +}. Secondly, the relationship of purine degradation to methanogenesis was investigated.

  1. Anti-flavivirus Activity of Different Tritylated Pyrimidine and Purine Nucleoside Analogues.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, Christopher; Serpi, Michaela; Slusarczyk, Magdalena; Ferrari, Valentina; Pertusati, Fabrizio; Meneghesso, Silvia; Derudas, Marco; Farleigh, Laura; Zanetta, Paola; Bugert, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    A series of tritylated and dimethoxytritylated analogues of selected pyrimidine and purine nucleosides were synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro inhibitory activity against two important members of the genus Flavivirus in the Flaviviridae family, the yellow fever (YFV) and dengue viruses (DENV). Among all compounds tested, the 5'-O-tritylated and the 5'-O-dimethoxytritylated 5-fluorouridine derivatives exerted potency against YFV. Interestingly in the series of purine analogues, the 5'O, N-bis-tritylated fludarabine derivative revealed strong inhibitory activity against DENV at μm concentrations, however significantly weaker potency against YFV. PMID:27551659

  2. Synthesis of cycloalkyl substituted purine nucleosides via a metal-free radical route.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong-Chao; Xia, Ran; Xie, Ming-Sheng; Qu, Gui-Rong; Guo, Hai-Ming

    2016-05-01

    An efficient route to synthesize cycloalkyl substituted purine nucleosides was developed. This metal-free C-H activation was accomplished by a tBuOOtBu initiated radical reaction. By adjusting the amount of tBuOOtBu and reaction time, the selective synthesis of C6-monocycloalkyl or C6,C8-dicycloalkyl substituted purine nucleosides could be realized. Furthermore, uracil and related nucleosides were also suitable substrates, giving the C5-cyclohexyl substituted uracil derivatives in good yields with excellent regioselectivities. PMID:27101306

  3. Purine salvage pathways of Bacillus subtilis and effect of guanine on growth of GMP reductase mutants.

    PubMed

    Endo, T; Uratani, B; Freese, E

    1983-07-01

    We have isolated numerous mutants containing mutations in the salvage pathways of purine synthesis. The mutations cause deficiencies in adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (adeF), in hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (guaF), in adenine deaminase (adeC), in inosine-guanosine phosphorylase, (guaP), and in GMP reductase (guaC). The physiological properties of mutants containing one or more of these mutations and corresponding enzyme measurements have been used to derive a metabolic chart of the purine salvage pathway of Bacillus subtilis. PMID:6408059

  4. Purine salvage pathways of Bacillus subtilis and effect of guanine on growth of GMP reductase mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Endo, T; Uratani, B; Freese, E

    1983-01-01

    We have isolated numerous mutants containing mutations in the salvage pathways of purine synthesis. The mutations cause deficiencies in adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (adeF), in hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (guaF), in adenine deaminase (adeC), in inosine-guanosine phosphorylase, (guaP), and in GMP reductase (guaC). The physiological properties of mutants containing one or more of these mutations and corresponding enzyme measurements have been used to derive a metabolic chart of the purine salvage pathway of Bacillus subtilis. PMID:6408059

  5. Anti‐flavivirus Activity of Different Tritylated Pyrimidine and Purine Nucleoside Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Serpi, Michaela; Slusarczyk, Magdalena; Ferrari, Valentina; Pertusati, Fabrizio; Meneghesso, Silvia; Derudas, Marco; Farleigh, Laura; Zanetta, Paola; Bugert, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A series of tritylated and dimethoxytritylated analogues of selected pyrimidine and purine nucleosides were synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro inhibitory activity against two important members of the genus Flavivirus in the Flaviviridae family, the yellow fever (YFV) and dengue viruses (DENV). Among all compounds tested, the 5′‐O‐tritylated and the 5′‐O‐dimethoxytritylated 5‐fluorouridine derivatives exerted potency against YFV. Interestingly in the series of purine analogues, the 5′O, N‐bis‐tritylated fludarabine derivative revealed strong inhibitory activity against DENV at μm concentrations, however significantly weaker potency against YFV. PMID:27551659

  6. Copper-catalyzed intramolecular cyclization of N-propargyl-adenine: synthesis of purine-fused tricyclics.

    PubMed

    Li, Ren-Long; Liang, Lei; Xie, Ming-Sheng; Qu, Gui-Rong; Niu, Hong-Ying; Guo, Hai-Ming

    2014-04-18

    A novel protocol to construct fluorescent purine-fused tricyclic products via intramolecular cyclization of N-propargyl-adenine has been developed. With CuBr as the catalyst, a series of purine-fused tricyclic products were obtained in good to excellent yields (19 examples, 75-89% yields). When R2 was a hydrogen atom in N-propargyl-adenines, the reactions only afforded the endocyclic double bond products. When R2 was an aryl group, the electron-donating groups favored the endocyclic double bond products, while the electron-withdrawing groups favored the exocyclic double bond products. PMID:24678722

  7. Influence of prime lexicality, frequency, and pronounceability on the masked onset priming effect.

    PubMed

    Dimitropoulou, Maria; Duñabeitia, Jon Andoni; Carreiras, Manuel

    2010-09-01

    The present study investigates the origins of the masked onset priming effect (MOPE). There are two alternative interpretations that account for most of the evidence reported on the MOPE, so far. The speech planning account (SP) identifies the locus of the MOPE in the preparation of the speech response. In contrast, the dual-route theory proposes that the effect arises as a result of the processing of the prime by the nonlexical route. In a series of masked onset priming word naming experiments we test the validity of these accounts by manipulating the primes' frequency, their lexical status, and pronounceability. We found consistent MOPEs of similar magnitude with high- and low-frequency prime words as well as with pronounceable nonwords. Contrarily, when primes consisted of unpronounceable consonantal strings the effect disappeared, suggesting that pronounceability of the prime is a prerequisite for the emergence of the MOPE. These results are in accordance with the predictions of the SP account. The pattern of effects obtained in the present study further defines the origins of the MOPE. PMID:20221948

  8. Screening and characterization of purine nucleoside degrading lactic acid bacteria isolated from Chinese sauerkraut and evaluation of the serum uric acid lowering effect in hyperuricemic rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Yang, Dianbin; Mei, Lu; Yuan, Lin; Xie, Ao; Yuan, Jieli

    2014-01-01

    Hyperuricemia is well known as the cause of gout. In recent years, it has also been recognized as a risk factor for arteriosclerosis, cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases, and nephropathy in diabetic patients. Foods high in purine compounds are more potent in exacerbating hyperuricemia. Therefore, the development of probiotics that efficiently degrade purine compounds is a promising potential therapy for the prevention of hyperuricemia. In this study, fifty-five lactic acid bacteria isolated from Chinese sauerkraut were evaluated for the ability to degrade inosine and guanosine, the two key intermediates in purine metabolism. After a preliminary screening based on HPLC, three candidate strains with the highest nucleoside degrading rates were selected for further characterization. The tested biological characteristics of candidate strains included acid tolerance, bile tolerance, anti-pathogenic bacteria activity, cell adhesion ability, resistance to antibiotics and the ability to produce hydrogen peroxide. Among the selected strains, DM9218 showed the best probiotic potential compared with other strains despite its poor bile resistance. Analysis of 16S rRNA sequences showed that DM9218 has the highest similarity (99%) to Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1. The acclimated strain DM9218-A showed better resistance to 0.3% bile salt, and its survival in gastrointestinal tract of rats was proven by PCR-DGGE. Furthermore, the effects of DM9218-A in a hyperuricemia rat model were evaluated. The level of serum uric acid in hyperuricemic rat can be efficiently reduced by the intragastric administration of DM9218-A (P<0.05). The preventive treatment of DM9218-A caused a greater reduction in serum uric acid concentration in hyperuricemic rats than the later treatment (P<0.05). Our results suggest that DM9218-A may be a promising candidate as an adjunctive treatment in patients with hyperuricemia during the onset period of disease. DM9218-A also has potential as a probiotic

  9. Electrostatic and Hydrophobic Interactions Mediate Single-Stranded DNA Recognition and Acta2 Repression by Purine-Rich Element-Binding Protein B.

    PubMed

    Rumora, Amy E; Ferris, Lauren A; Wheeler, Tamar R; Kelm, Robert J

    2016-05-17

    Myofibroblast differentiation is characterized by an increased level of expression of cytoskeletal smooth muscle α-actin. In human and murine fibroblasts, the gene encoding smooth muscle α-actin (Acta2) is tightly regulated by a network of transcription factors that either activate or repress the 5' promoter-enhancer in response to environmental cues signaling tissue repair and remodeling. Purine-rich element-binding protein B (Purβ) suppresses the expression of Acta2 by cooperatively interacting with the sense strand of a 5' polypurine sequence containing an inverted MCAT cis element required for gene activation. In this study, we evaluated the chemical basis of nucleoprotein complex formation between the Purβ repressor and the purine-rich strand of the MCAT element in the mouse Acta2 promoter. Quantitative single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding assays conducted in the presence of increasing concentrations of monovalent salt or anionic detergent suggested that the assembly of a high-affinity nucleoprotein complex is driven by a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Consistent with the results of pH titration analysis, site-directed mutagenesis revealed several basic amino acid residues in the intermolecular (R267) and intramolecular (K82 and R159) subdomains that are essential for Purβ transcriptional repressor function in Acta2 promoter-reporter assays. In keeping with their diminished Acta2 repressor activity in fibroblasts, purified Purβ variants containing an R267A mutation exhibited reduced binding affinity for purine-rich ssDNA. Moreover, certain double and triple-point mutants were also defective in binding to the Acta2 corepressor protein, Y-box-binding protein 1. Collectively, these findings establish the repertoire of noncovalent interactions that account for the unique structural and functional properties of Purβ. PMID:27064749

  10. Structure-activity relationships and molecular studies of novel arylpiperazinylalkyl purine-2,4-diones and purine-2,4,8-triones with antidepressant and anxiolytic-like activity.

    PubMed

    Zagórska, Agnieszka; Kołaczkowski, Marcin; Bucki, Adam; Siwek, Agata; Kazek, Grzegorz; Satała, Grzegorz; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Partyka, Anna; Wesołowska, Anna; Pawłowski, Maciej

    2015-06-01

    A novel series of arylpiperazinylalkyl purine-2,4-diones (4-27) and purine-2,4,8-triones (31-38) was synthesized and tested to evaluated their affinity for the serotoninergic (5-HT1A, 5-HT6, 5-HT7) and dopaminergic (D2) receptors. Compounds with purine-2,4-dione nucleus generally had affinity values higher than the corresponding purine-2,4,8-trione compounds. A spectrum of receptor activities was observed for compounds with a substituent at the 7-position of the imidazo[2,1-f]purine-2,4-dione system and some potent 5-HT1A (18, 25), 5-HT7 (14) and mixed 5-HT1A/5-HT7 (8, 9) receptor ligands with additional affinity for dopamine D2 receptors (15) has been identified. Moreover, docking studies proved that a substituent at the 7-position of 1,3-dimethyl-(1H,8H)-imidazo[2,1-f]purine-2,4-dione could be essential for receptor affinity and selectivity, especially towards 5-HT1A and 5-HT7. The results of the preliminary pharmacological in vivo studies of selected derivatives of 1,3-dimethyl-(1H,8H)-imidazo[2,1-f]purine-2,4-dione, including 9 as a potential anxiolytic, 8 and 15 as potential antidepressants, and 18 and 25 as potential antidepressant and anxiolytic agents. PMID:25965777

  11. mTORC1 induces purine synthesis through control of the mitochondrial tetrahydrofolate cycle.

    PubMed

    Ben-Sahra, Issam; Hoxhaj, Gerta; Ricoult, Stéphane J H; Asara, John M; Manning, Brendan D

    2016-02-12

    In response to growth signals, mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) stimulates anabolic processes underlying cell growth. We found that mTORC1 increases metabolic flux through the de novo purine synthesis pathway in various mouse and human cells, thereby influencing the nucleotide pool available for nucleic acid synthesis. mTORC1 had transcriptional effects on multiple enzymes contributing to purine synthesis, with expression of the mitochondrial tetrahydrofolate (mTHF) cycle enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 2 (MTHFD2) being closely associated with mTORC1 signaling in both normal and cancer cells. MTHFD2 expression and purine synthesis were stimulated by activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), which was activated by mTORC1 independent of its canonical induction downstream of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α eIF2α phosphorylation. Thus, mTORC1 stimulates the mTHF cycle, which contributes one-carbon units to enhance production of purine nucleotides in response to growth signals. PMID:26912861

  12. Structure and electronic spectra of purine-methyl viologen charge transfer complexes.

    PubMed

    Jalilov, Almaz S; Patwardhan, Sameer; Singh, Arunoday; Simeon, Tomekia; Sarjeant, Amy A; Schatz, George C; Lewis, Frederick D

    2014-01-01

    The structure and properties of the electron donor-acceptor complexes formed between methyl viologen and purine nucleosides and nucleotides in water and the solid state have been investigated using a combination of experimental and theoretical methods. Solution studies were performed using UV-vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Theoretical calculations were performed within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). Energy decomposition analysis indicates that dispersion and induction (charge-transfer) interactions dominate the total binding energy, whereas electrostatic interactions are largely repulsive. The appearance of charge transfer bands in the absorption spectra of the complexes are well-described by time-dependent DFT and are further explained in terms of the redox properties of purine monomers and solvation effects. Crystal structures are reported for complexes of methyl viologen with the purines 2'-deoxyguanosine 3'-monophosphate (DAD'DAD' type) and 7-deazaguanosine (DAD'ADAD' type). Comparison of the structures determined in the solid state and by theoretical methods in solution provides valuable insights into the nature of charge-transfer interactions involving purine bases as electron donors. PMID:24294996

  13. A First Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of a New Class of Purine and Guanine Thioglycoside Analogs.

    PubMed

    Elgemeie, Galal; Abu-Zaied, Mamdouh; Hebishy, Ali; Abbas, Nermen; Hamed, Mai

    2016-09-01

    A first microwave-assisted synthesis of a new class of novel purine thioglycoside analogs from readily available starting materials has been described. The key step of this protocol is the formation of sodium pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-7-thiolate and 7-mercaptopyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine derivatives via condensation of 5-amino-1H-pyrazoles with sodium 2,2-dicyanoethene-1,1-bis(thiolate) salts or 2-(dimercaptomethylene)malononitrile, respectively, under microwave irradiation, followed by coupling with halo sugars to give the corresponding purine thioglycoside analogs. The obtained purines and purines thioglycosides derivatives were evaluated in vitro against lung (A549), colon (HCT116), liver (HEPG2), and prostate (PC3) cancer cell lines. Some of these compounds (5b, 5d, 5f, and 9a-d) exhibited little potency toward the four cell lines. On the other hand, compound 5a elicited higher cytotoxicity on both prostate (PC3) and colon (HCT116), respectively, while it was found moderate on lung (A549), and inactive on liver (HEPG2). Moreover, compound 5c was found moderate with LC50 values 52.0-88.9 μM for almost all the cell lines. PMID:27556784

  14. Analysis of purine metabolites in maternal serum for evaluating the risk of gestosis.

    PubMed

    Senyavina, N V; Khaustova, S A; Grebennik, T K; Pavlovich, S V

    2013-09-01

    Metabolome analysis of the serum from pregnant patients aimed at detection of low-molecular-weight biomarkers of gestation process disorders indicated a relationship between the metabolic profile of maternal serum and risk of gestosis. In women with pre-eclampsia or preterm delivery, analysis of serum purine metabolites revealed changes in the metabolite concentrations, associated with pregnancy complications. PMID:24288739

  15. Stressed-Out HSCs Turn Up p38α and Purine to Proliferate.

    PubMed

    Essers, Marieke A G

    2016-08-01

    Changes in cellular metabolism drive hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) behavior during homeostasis, although whether they control HSC behavior during stress conditions is unclear. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Karigane et al. (2016) identify a p38α-dependent pathway that alters purine metabolism in HSCs during stress hematopoiesis, promoting hematopoietic recovery. PMID:27494667

  16. From Purines to Basic Biochemical Concepts: Experiments for High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marini, Isabella; Ipata, Piero Luigi

    2007-01-01

    Many high school biology courses address mainly the molecular and cellular basis of life. The complexity that underlies the most essential processes is often difficult for the students to understand; possibly, in part, because of the inability to see and explore them. Six simple practical experiments on purine catabolism as a part of a…

  17. A Dual-Route Model that Learns to Pronounce English Words

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, Roger W.; Miller, Craig S.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a model that learns to pronounce English words. Learning occurs in two modules: 1) a rule-based module that constructs pronunciations by phonetic analysis of the letter string, and 2) a whole-word module that learns to associate subsets of letters to the pronunciation, without phonetic analysis. In a simulation on a corpus of over 300 words the model produced pronunciation latencies consistent with the effects of word frequency and orthographic regularity observed in human data. Implications of the model for theories of visual word processing and reading instruction are discussed.

  18. Plasma Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase Activity in Bottlenose Dolphins Contributes to Avoiding Accumulation of Non-recyclable Purines.

    PubMed

    López-Cruz, Roberto I; Crocker, Daniel E; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal, Jaime A; Real-Valle, Roberto A; Lugo-Lugo, Orlando; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Marine mammals are exposed to ischemia/reperfusion and hypoxia/reoxygenation during diving. During oxygen deprivation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) breakdown implies purine metabolite accumulation, which in humans is associated with pathological conditions. Purine recycling in seals increases in response to prolonged fasting and ischemia. Concentrations of metabolites and activities of key enzymes in purine metabolism were examined in plasma and red blood cells from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and humans. Hypoxanthine and inosine monophosphate concentrations were higher in plasma from dolphins than humans. Plasma hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) activity in dolphins suggests an elevated purine recycling rate, and a mechanism for avoiding accumulation of non-recyclable purines (xanthine and uric acid). Red blood cell concentrations of hypoxanthine, adenosine diphosphate, ATP and guanosine triphosphate were lower in dolphins than in humans; adenosine monophosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations were higher in dolphins. HGPRT activity in red blood cells was higher in humans than in dolphins. The lower concentrations of purine catabolism and recycling by-products in plasma from dolphins could be beneficial in providing substrates for recovery of ATP depleted during diving or vigorous swimming. These results suggest that purine salvage in dolphins could be a mechanism for delivering nucleotide precursors to tissues with high ATP and guanosine triphosphate requirements. PMID:27375492

  19. Plasma Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase Activity in Bottlenose Dolphins Contributes to Avoiding Accumulation of Non-recyclable Purines

    PubMed Central

    López-Cruz, Roberto I.; Crocker, Daniel E.; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal, Jaime A.; Real-Valle, Roberto A.; Lugo-Lugo, Orlando; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Marine mammals are exposed to ischemia/reperfusion and hypoxia/reoxygenation during diving. During oxygen deprivation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) breakdown implies purine metabolite accumulation, which in humans is associated with pathological conditions. Purine recycling in seals increases in response to prolonged fasting and ischemia. Concentrations of metabolites and activities of key enzymes in purine metabolism were examined in plasma and red blood cells from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and humans. Hypoxanthine and inosine monophosphate concentrations were higher in plasma from dolphins than humans. Plasma hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) activity in dolphins suggests an elevated purine recycling rate, and a mechanism for avoiding accumulation of non-recyclable purines (xanthine and uric acid). Red blood cell concentrations of hypoxanthine, adenosine diphosphate, ATP and guanosine triphosphate were lower in dolphins than in humans; adenosine monophosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations were higher in dolphins. HGPRT activity in red blood cells was higher in humans than in dolphins. The lower concentrations of purine catabolism and recycling by-products in plasma from dolphins could be beneficial in providing substrates for recovery of ATP depleted during diving or vigorous swimming. These results suggest that purine salvage in dolphins could be a mechanism for delivering nucleotide precursors to tissues with high ATP and guanosine triphosphate requirements. PMID:27375492

  20. Molecular Dissection of a Borrelia burgdorferi In Vivo Essential Purine Transport System

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sunny; Showman, Adrienne C.

    2015-01-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi is dependent on purine salvage from the host environment for survival. The genes bbb22 and bbb23 encode purine permeases that are essential for B. burgdorferi mouse infectivity. We now demonstrate the unique contributions of each of these genes to purine transport and murine infection. The affinities of spirochetes carrying bbb22 alone for hypoxanthine and adenine were similar to those of spirochetes carrying both genes. Spirochetes carrying bbb22 alone were able to achieve wild-type levels of adenine saturation but not hypoxanthine saturation, suggesting that maximal hypoxanthine uptake requires the presence of bbb23. Moreover, the purine transport activity conferred by bbb22 was dependent on an additional distal transcriptional start site located within the bbb23 open reading frame. The initial rates of uptake of hypoxanthine and adenine by spirochetes carrying bbb23 alone were below the level of detection. However, these spirochetes demonstrated a measurable increase in hypoxanthine uptake over a 30-min time course. Our findings indicate that bbb22-dependent adenine transport is essential for B. burgdorferi survival in mice. The bbb23 gene was dispensable for B. burgdorferi mouse infectivity, yet its presence was required along with that of bbb22 for B. burgdorferi to achieve maximal spirochete loads in infected mouse tissues. These data demonstrate that both genes, bbb22 and bbb23, are critical for B. burgdorferi to achieve wild-type infection of mice and that the differences in the capabilities of the two transporters may reflect distinct purine salvage needs that the spirochete encounters throughout its natural infectious cycle. PMID:25776752

  1. Sequence-dependent dynamics of duplex DNA: the applicability of a dinucleotide model.

    PubMed Central

    Okonogi, T M; Alley, S C; Reese, A W; Hopkins, P B; Robinson, B H

    2002-01-01

    The short-time (submicrosecond) bending dynamics of duplex DNA were measured to determine the effect of sequence on dynamics. All measurements were obtained from a single site on duplex DNA, using a single, site-specific modified base containing a rigidly tethered, electron paramagnetic resonance active spin probe. The observed dynamics are interpreted in terms of single-step sequence-dependent bending force constants, determined from the mean squared amplitude of bending relative to the end-to-end vector using the modified weakly bending rod model. The bending dynamics at a single site are a function of the sequence of the nucleotides constituting the duplex DNA. We developed and examined several dinucleotide-based models for flexibility. The models indicate that the dominant feature of the dynamics is best explained in terms of purine- and pyrimidine-type steps, although distinction is made among all 10 unique steps: It was found that purine-purine steps (which are the same as pyrimidine-pyrimidine steps) were near average in flexibility, but the pyrimidine-purine steps (5' to 3') were nearly twice as flexible, whereas purine-pyrimidine steps were more than half as flexible as average DNA. Therefore, the range of stepwise flexibility is approximately fourfold and is characterized by both the type of base pair step (pyrimidine/purine combination) and the identity of the bases within the pair (G, A, T, or C). All of the four models considered here underscore the complexity of the dependence of dynamics on DNA sequence with certain sequences not satisfactorily explainable in terms of any dinucleotide model. These findings provide a quantitative basis for interpreting the dynamics and kinetics of DNA-sequence-dependent biological processes, including protein recognition and chromatin packaging. PMID:12496111

  2. SPAD chlorophyll meter reading can be pronouncedly affected by chloroplast movement.

    PubMed

    Nauš, Jan; Prokopová, Jitka; Rebíček, Jiří; Spundová, Martina

    2010-09-01

    Non-destructive assessment of chlorophyll content has recently been widely done by chlorophyll meters based on measurement of leaf transmittance (e.g. the SPAD-502 chlorophyll meter measures the leaf transmittance at 650 and 940 nm). However, the leaf transmittance depends not only on the content of chlorophylls but also on their distribution in leaves. The chlorophyll distribution within leaves is co-determined by chloroplast arrangement in cells that depends on light conditions. When tobacco leaves were exposed to a strong blue light (about 340 μmol of photons m⁻² s⁻¹), a very pronounced increase in the leaf transmittance was observed as chloroplasts migrated from face position (along cell walls perpendicular to the incident light) to side position (along cell walls parallel to the incoming light) and the SPAD reading decreased markedly. This effect was more pronounced in the leaves of young tobacco plants compared with old ones; the difference between SPAD values in face and side position reached even about 35%. It is shown how the chloroplast movement changes a relationship between the SPAD readings and real chlorophyll content. For an elimination of the chloroplast movement effect, it can be recommended to measure the SPAD values in leaves with a defined chloroplasts arrangement. PMID:20661644

  3. Diseases associated with pronounced eosinophilia: a study of 105 dogs in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Lilliehöök, I; Gunnarsson, L; Zakrisson, G; Tvedten, H

    2000-06-01

    Records of 105 dogs with pronounced eosinophilia (>2.2 x 10(9) eosinophils/litre) were evaluated in a retrospective study to determine diseases associated with the abnormality in dogs in Sweden. Inflammatory disease in organs with large epithelial surfaces, such as the gut, lungs or skin, was found in 36 per cent of the dogs. A further one-quarter of the 105 cases were placed in the 'miscellaneous' category, which comprised various diseases found at low frequency. The most well defined diagnosis was pulmonary infiltrates with eosinophils in 12 per cent of the dogs. A further 11 per cent had parasitic disease caused by either sarcoptic mange or nasal mite. No atopic dog was found and rottweilers were over-represented in most disease groups. Pronounced eosinophilia, in many cases transient, seems to be associated with a variety of disorders in dogs. In the present study, rottweilers appeared to be more prone to a high eosinophil response than other breeds. PMID:10879402

  4. Pronounced minimum of the thermodynamic Casimir forces of O(n) symmetric film systems: Analytic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohm, Volker

    2014-09-01

    Thermodynamic Casimir forces of film systems in the O(n) universality classes with Dirichlet boundary conditions are studied below bulk criticality. Substantial progress is achieved in resolving the long-standing problem of describing analytically the pronounced minimum of the scaling function observed experimentally in He4 films (n=2) by Garcia and Chan [Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 1187 (1999), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.83.1187] and in Monte Carlo simulations for the three-dimensional Ising model (n =1) by O. Vasilyev et al. [Europhys. Lett. 80, 60009 (2007), 10.1209/0295-5075/80/60009]. Our finite-size renormalization-group approach describes the film systems as the limit of finite-slab systems with vanishing aspect ratio. This yields excellent agreement with the depth and the position of the minimum for n =1 and semiquantitative agreement with the minimum for n =2. Our theory also predicts a pronounced minimum for the n =3 Heisenberg universality class.

  5. Equivalence class formation as a function of the pronounceability of the sample stimulus.

    PubMed

    Mandell, C; Sheen, V

    1994-06-01

    The role of naming in stimulus equivalence was studied by varying the pronounceability of sample stimulus pseudowords. Experiment 1 compared three conditions: in the first, sample stimuli consisted of phonologically correct pseudowords; in the second, sample stimuli consisted of phonologically incorrect words; in the last, sample stimuli consisted of punctuation marks. Subjects exposed to pronounceable stimuli demonstrated equivalence class formation more quickly and with fewer errors than did other subjects. In Experiment 2, subjects were trained in equivalence-class formation using only non-phonological sample stimuli. Half the subjects were exposed to a pretraining procedure in which they read a list of non-phonological pseudowords aloud. Remaining subjects transcribed the same list of pseudowords - a procedure which equated exposure to the pseudowords, but did not necessarily encourage subjects to name them. Subjects who were pretrained with the read-aloud task made significantly fewer errors than those who transcribed the words. These data are consistent with the theory that equivalence class formation is mediated by verbal behavior. PMID:24925111

  6. Excessive chemotherapy-related granulocytopenia in a child with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and a congenital abnormality of purine salvage.

    PubMed

    Blatt, J

    1990-01-01

    A girl with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and immunodeficiency based on absence of the purine salvage pathway enzyme purine nucleoside phosphorylase experienced profound neutropenia while receiving combination chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, methotrexate, and prednisone (COMP). Neutropenia was most severe following courses that included either systemic or intrathecal methotrexate, even in the face of major dose reductions. Delays in the development of neutropenia-during periods of leucovorin administration also implicate methotrexate as the primary responsible agent. This case suggests that certain immunodeficiency states predispose patients to extensive chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression and supports the concept that purine salvage is a clinically important mechanism for modulating methotrexate toxicity. PMID:2113161

  7. Synthesis and antimycobacterial activity of N-(2-aminopurin-6-yl) and N-(purin-6-yl) amino acids and dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Krasnov, Victor P; Vigorov, Alexey Yu; Musiyak, Vera V; Nizova, Irina A; Gruzdev, Dmitry A; Matveeva, Tatyana V; Levit, Galina L; Kravchenko, Marionella A; Skornyakov, Sergey N; Bekker, Olga B; Danilenko, Valery N; Charushin, Valery N

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic routes to novel N-(purin-6-yl)- and N-(2-aminopurin-6-yl) conjugates with amino acids and glycine-containing dipeptides were developed. In vitro testing of 42 new and known compounds made it possible to reveal a series of N-(purin-6-yl)- and N-(2-aminopurin-6-yl) conjugates exhibiting significant antimycobacterial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium terrae, and multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis strain isolated from tuberculosis patients in the Ural region (Russia). N-(2-Aminopurin-6-yl)- and N-(purin-6-yl)-glycyl-(S)-glutamic acids were the most active compounds. PMID:27107949

  8. Correction of point mutations at the endogenous locus of the dihydrofolate reductase gene using repair-PolyPurine Reverse Hoogsteen hairpins in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Solé, Anna; Ciudad, Carlos J; Chasin, Lawrence A; Noé, Véronique

    2016-06-15

    Correction of point mutations that lead to aberrant transcripts, often with pathological consequences, has been the focus of considerable research. In this work, repair-PPRHs are shown to be a new powerful tool for gene correction. A repair-PPRH consists of a PolyPurine Reverse Hoogsteen hairpin core bearing an extension sequence at one end, homologous to the DNA strand to be repaired but containing the wild type nucleotide instead of the mutation. Previously, we had corrected a single-point mutation with repair-PPRHs using a mutated version of a dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) minigene. To further evaluate the utility of these molecules, different repair-PPRHs were designed to correct insertions, deletions, substitutions and a double substitution present in a collection of mutants at the endogenous locus of the dhfr gene, the product of which is the target of the chemotherapeutic agent methotrexate. We also describe an approach to use when the point mutation is far away from the homopyrimidine target domain. This strategy consists in designing Long-Distance- and Short-Distance-Repair-PPRHs where the PPRH core is bound to the repair tail by a five-thymidine linker. Surviving colonies in a DHFR selective medium, lacking glycine and sources of purines and thymidine, were analyzed by DNA sequencing, and by mRNA, protein and enzymatic measurements, confirming that all the dhfr mutants had been corrected. These results show that repair-PPRHs can be effective tools to accomplish a permanent correction of point mutations in the DNA sequence of mutant mammalian cells. PMID:27063945

  9. Computational design of donor-bridge-acceptor systems exhibiting pronounced quantum interference effects.

    PubMed

    Gorczak, Natalie; Renaud, Nicolas; Galan, Elena; Eelkema, Rienk; Siebbeles, Laurens D A; Grozema, Ferdinand C

    2016-03-01

    Quantum interference is a well-known phenomenon that dictates charge transport properties of single molecule junctions. However, reports on quantum interference in donor-bridge-acceptor molecules are scarce. This might be due to the difficulties in meeting the conditions for the presence of quantum interference in a donor-bridge-acceptor system. The electronic coupling between the donor, bridge, and acceptor moieties must be weak in order to ensure localised initial and final states for charge transfer. Yet, it must be strong enough to allow all bridge orbitals to mediate charge transfer. We present the computational route to the design of a donor-bridge-acceptor molecule that features the right balance between these contradicting requirements and exhibits pronounced interference effects. PMID:26878200

  10. The Fiber Contractility and Cytoskeleton Losses in Space are Less Pronounced in Mongolian Gerbils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipets, E. N.; Ponomareva, E. V.; Ogneva, I. V.; Vikhliantsev, I. M.; Karaduleva, E. V.; Kartashkina, N. L.; Kuznetsov, S. L.; Podlubnaia, Z. A.; Shenkman, B. S.

    2008-06-01

    This work was purposed on the comparison of space flight effects on m. soleus and m. tibialis anterior of Mongolian gerbils. The animals have been flown onboard biosatellite Foton-M3 for 12 days. Contractile properties of single skinned muscle fibers were studied. It was revealed that diameter of m. soleus skinned fibers and maximal isometric tension were decreased by 19.7% and 21.8% respectively. The Ca-sensitivity reduction wasn't significant, that was in accordance with absence of changes of titin and nebulin relative content in soleus and minor manifestations in slow-to-fast fiber ratio (9%, p<0.05). There weren't observed significant changes of the same parameters in m. tibialis anterior. Ultimately the fiber contractility and cytoskeleton losses in space are less pronounced in Mongolian gerbils than in rats.

  11. Hypouricemic effects of novel concentrative nucleoside transporter 2 inhibitors through suppressing intestinal absorption of purine nucleosides.

    PubMed

    Hiratochi, Masahiro; Tatani, Kazuya; Shimizu, Kazuo; Kuramochi, Yu; Kikuchi, Norihiko; Kamada, Noboru; Itoh, Fumiaki; Isaji, Masayuki

    2012-09-01

    We have developed concentrative nucleoside transporter 2 (CNT2) inhibitors as a novel pharmacological approach for improving hyperuricemia by inhibiting intestinal absorption of purines. Dietary purine nucleosides are absorbed in the small intestines by CNTs expressed in the apical membrane. In humans, the absorbed purine nucleosides are rapidly degraded to their final end product, uric acid, by xanthine oxidase. Based on the expression profile of human CNTs in digestive tract tissues, we established a working hypothesis that mainly CNT2 contributes to the intestinal absorption of purine nucleosides. In order to confirm this possibility, we developed CNT2 inhibitors and found that (2R,3R,4S,5R)-2-(6-amino-8-{[3'-(3-aminopropoxy)-biphenyl-4-ylmethyl]-amino}-9H-purin-9-yl)-5-hydroxymethyl-tetrahydrofuran-3,4-diol (KGO-2142) and 1-[3-(5-{[1-((2R,3R,4S,5R)-3,4-dihydroxy-5-hydroxymethyl-tetrahydrofuran-2-yl)-1H-benzimidazol-2-ylamino]-methyl}-2-ethoxyphenoxy)-propyl]-piperidine-4-carboxylic acid amide (KGO-2173) were inhibitory. These CNT2 inhibitors had potent inhibitory activity against inosine uptake via human CNT2, but they did not potently interfere with nucleoside uptake via human CNT1, CNT3 or equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs) in vitro. After oral administration of KGO-2173 along with [(14)C]-inosine, KGO-2173 significantly decreased the urinary excretion of radioactivity at 6 and 24h in rats. Since dietary purine nucleosides are not utilized in the body and are excreted into the urine rapidly, this decrease in radioactivity in the urine represented the inhibitory activity of KGO-2173 toward the absorption of [(14)C]-inosine in the small intestines. KGO-2142 almost completely inhibited dietary RNA-induced hyperuricemia and the increase in urinary excretion of uric acid in cebus monkeys. These novel CNT2 inhibitors, KGO-2142 and KGO-2173, could be useful therapeutic options for the treatment of hyperuricemia. PMID:22709993

  12. Molecular cloning, functional expression and chromosomal localization of a cDNA encoding a human Na+/nucleoside cotransporter (hCNT2) selective for purine nucleosides and uridine.

    PubMed

    Ritzel, M W; Yao, S Y; Ng, A M; Mackey, J R; Cass, C E; Young, J D

    1998-01-01

    Two Na(+)-dependent nucleoside transporters implicated in adenosine and uridine transport in mammalian cells are distinguished functionally on the basis of substrate specificity: CNT1 is selective for pyrimidine nucleosides but also transports adenosine; CNT2 (also termed SPNT) is selective for purine nucleosides but also transports uridine. Both proteins belong to a gene family that includes the NupC proton/nucleoside symporter of E. coli. cDNAs encoding members of the CNT family have been isolated from rat tissues (jejunum, brain, liver; rCNT1 and rCNT2/SPNT) and, most recently, human kidney (hCNT1 and hSPNT1). Here, the molecular cloning and functional characterization of a CNT2/SPNT-type transporter from human small intestine are described. The encoded 658-residue protein (hCNT2 in the nomenclature) had the same predicted amino acid sequence as human kidney hSPNT1, except for a polymorphism at residue 75 (Arg substituted by Ser), and was 83 and 72% identical to rCNT2 and hCNT1, respectively. Sequence differences between hCNT2 and rCNT2 were greatest at the N-terminus. In Xenopus oocytes, recombinant hCNT2 exhibited the functional characteristics of a Na(+)-dependent nucleoside transporter with selectivity for adenosine, other purine nucleosides and uridine (adenosine and uridine K(m) app values 8 and 40 microM, respectively). hCNT2 transcripts were found in kidney and small intestine but, unlike rCNT2, were not detected in liver. Deoxyadenosine, which undergoes net renal secretion in humans, was less readily transported than adenosine. hCNT2 also mediated small, but significant, fluxes of the antiviral purine nucleoside analogue 2',3'-dideoxyinosine. hCNT2 is, therefore potentially involved in both the intestinal absorption and renal handling of purine nucleosides (including adenosine), uridine and purine nucleoside drugs. The gene encoding hCNT2 was mapped to chromosome 15q15. PMID:10087507

  13. Purine twisted-intercalating nucleic acids: a new class of anti-gene molecules resistant to potassium-induced aggregation.

    PubMed

    Paramasivam, Manikandan; Cogoi, Susanna; Filichev, Vyacheslav V; Bomholt, Niels; Pedersen, Erik B; Xodo, Luigi E

    2008-06-01

    Sequence-specific targeting of genomic DNA by triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) is a promising strategy to modulate in vivo gene expression. Triplex formation involving G-rich oligonucleotides as third strand is, however, strongly inhibited by potassium-induced TFO self-association into G-quartet structures. We report here that G-rich TFOs with bulge insertions of (R)-1-O-[4-(1-pyrenylethynyl)-phenylmethyl] glycerol (called twisted intercalating nucleic acids, TINA) show a much lower tendency to aggregate in potassium than wild-type analogues do. We designed purine-motif TINA-TFOs for binding to a regulatory polypurine-polypyrimidine (pur/pyr) motif present in the promoter of the KRAS proto-oncogene. The binding of TINA-TFOs to the KRAS target has been analysed by electrophoresis mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting experiments. We discovered that in the presence of potassium the wild-type TFOs did not bind to the KRAS target, differently from the TINA analogues, whose binding was observed up to 140 mM KCl. The designed TINA-TFOs were found to abrogate the formation of a DNA-protein complex at the pur/pyr site and to down-regulate the transcription of CAT driven by the murine KRAS promoter. Molecular modelling of the DNA/TINA-TFO triplexes are also reported. This study provides a new and promising approach to create TFOs to target in vivo the genome. PMID:18456705

  14. The purinosome, a multi-protein complex involved in the de novo biosynthesis of purines in humans

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hong; French, Jarrod B.; Fang, Ye; Benkovic, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Purine nucleotides are ubiquitous molecules that play vital roles in all kingdoms of life, not only as components of nucleic acids, but also participating in signaling and energy storage. Cellular pools of purines are maintained by the tight control of several complementary and sometimes competing processes including de novo biosynthesis, salvage and catabolism of nucleotides. While great strides have been made over the past sixty years in understanding the biosynthesis of purines, we are experiencing a renaissance in this field. In this feature article we discuss the most recent discoveries relating to purine biosynthesis, with particular emphasis upon the dynamic multi-protein complex called the purinosome. In particular we highlight advances made towards understanding the assembly, control and function of this protein complex and the attempts made to exploit this knowledge for drug discovery. PMID:23575936

  15. Akt phosphorylation and regulation of transketolase is a nodal point for amino acid control of purine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Saha, Arindam; Connelly, Stephen; Jiang, Jingjing; Zhuang, Shunhui; Amador, Deron T; Phan, Tony; Pilz, Renate B; Boss, Gerry R

    2014-07-17

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway integrates environmental clues to regulate cell growth and survival. We showed previously that depriving cells of a single essential amino acid rapidly and reversibly arrests purine synthesis. Here we demonstrate that amino acids via mammalian target of rapamycin 2 and IκB kinase regulate Akt activity and Akt association and phosphorylation of transketolase (TKT), a key enzyme of the nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Akt phosphorylates TKT on Thr382, markedly enhancing enzyme activity and increasing carbon flow through the nonoxidative PPP, thereby increasing purine synthesis. Mice fed a lysine-deficient diet for 2 days show decreased Akt activity, TKT activity, and purine synthesis in multiple organs. These results provide a mechanism whereby Akt coordinates amino acid availability with glucose utilization, purine synthesis, and RNA and DNA synthesis. PMID:24981175

  16. Sequence context effect for hMSH2-hMSH6 mismatch-dependent activation

    PubMed Central

    Mazurek, Anthony; Johnson, Christopher N.; Germann, Markus W.; Fishel, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Numerous DNA mismatches and lesions activate MutS homologue (MSH) ATPase activity that is essential for mismatch repair (MMR). We have found that a mismatch embedded in a nearest-neighbor sequence context containing symmetric 3′-purines (2 × 3′-purines) enhanced, whereas symmetric 3′-pyrimidines (2 × 3′-pyrimidines) reduced, hMSH2-hMSH6 ATPase activation. The 3′-purine/pyrimidine effect was most evident for G-containing mispairs. A similar trend pervaded mismatch binding (KD) and the melting of unbound oligonucleotides (Tm; ΔG). However, these latter measures did not accurately predict the hierarchy of MSH ATPase activation. NMR studies of imino proton lifetime, solvent accessibility, and NOE connectivity suggest that sequence contexts that provoke improved MSH-activation displayed enhanced localized DNA flexibility: a dynamic DNA signature that may account for the wide range of lesions that activate MSH functions. PMID:19237577

  17. Purine oversecretion in cultured murine lymphoma cells deficient in adenylosuccinate synthetase: genetic model for inherited hyperuricemia and gout.

    PubMed Central

    Ullman, B; Wormsted, M A; Cohen, M B; Martin, D W

    1982-01-01

    Alterations in several specific enzymes have been associated with increased rates of purine synthesis de novo in human and other mammalian cells. However, these recognized abnormalities in humans account for only a few percent of the clinical cases of hyperuricemia and gout. We have examined in detail the rates of purine production de novo and purine excretion by normal and by mutant (AU-100) murine lymphoma T cells (S49) 80% deficient in adenylosuccinate synthetase [IMP:L-aspartate ligase (GDP-forming), EC 6.3.4.4]. The intracellular ATP concentration of the mutant cells is slightly diminished, but their GTP is increased 50% and their IMP, four-fold. Compared to wild-type cells, the AU-100 cells excrete into the culture medium 30- to 50-fold greater amounts of purine metabolites consisting mainly of inosine. Moreover, the AU-100 cell line overproduces total purines. In an AU-100-derived cell line, AU-TG50B, deficient in adenylosuccinate synthetase and hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (IMP:pyrophosphate phosphoribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.8), purine nucleoside excretion is increased 50- to 100-fold, and de novo synthesis is even greater than that for AU-100 cells. The overexcretion of purine metabolites by the AU-100 cells seems to be due to the primary genetic deficiency of adenylosuccinate synthetase, a deficiency that requires the cell to increase intracellular IMP in an attempt to maintain ATP levels. As a consequence of elevated IMP pools, large amounts of inosine are secreted into the culture medium. We propose that a similar primary genetic defect may account for the excessive purine excretion in some patients with dominantly inherited hyperuricemia and gout. Images PMID:6957854

  18. Coexpression of two closely linked avian genes for purine nucleotide synthesis from a bidirectional promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Gavalas, A; Dixon, J E; Brayton, K A; Zalkin, H

    1993-01-01

    Two avian genes encoding essential steps in the purine nucleotide biosynthetic pathway are transcribed divergently from a bidirectional promoter element. The bidirectional promoter, embedded in a CpG island, directs coexpression of GPAT and AIRC genes from distinct transcriptional start sites 229 bp apart. The bidirectional promoter can be divided in half, with each half retaining partial activity towards the cognate gene. GPAT and AIRC genes encode the enzymes that catalyze step 1 and steps 6 plus 7, respectively, in the de novo purine biosynthetic pathway. This is the first report of genes coding for structurally unrelated enzymes of the same pathway that are tightly linked and transcribed divergently from a bidirectional promoter. This arrangement has the potential to provide for regulated coexpression comparable to that in a prokaryotic operon. Images PMID:8336716

  19. Direct Isolation of Purines and Pyrimidines from Nucleic Acids Using Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Schubert, Michael; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    A sublimation technique was developed to isolate purines and pyrimidines directly from lambda-deoxyribonucleic acid (lambda-DNA) and Escherichia coli cells. The sublimation of adenine, cytosine, guanine, and thymine from lambda-DNA was tested under reduced pressure (approx. 0.5 Torr) at temperatures of >150 C. With the exception of guanine, approximately 60 -75% of each base was sublimed directly from the lambda-DNA and recovered on a coldfinger of the sublimation apparatus after heating to 450 C. Several nucleobases including adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil were also recovered from E. coli bacteria after heating the cells to the same temperature, although some thermal decomposition of the bases also occurred. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using sublimation to isolate purines and pyrimidines from native E. coli DNA and RNA without any chemical treatment of the cells.

  20. Purine pathway implicated in mechanism of resistance to aspirin therapy: pharmacometabolomics-informed pharmacogenomics.

    PubMed

    Yerges-Armstrong, L M; Ellero-Simatos, S; Georgiades, A; Zhu, H; Lewis, J P; Horenstein, R B; Beitelshees, A L; Dane, A; Reijmers, T; Hankemeier, T; Fiehn, O; Shuldiner, A R; Kaddurah-Daouk, R

    2013-10-01

    Although aspirin is a well-established antiplatelet agent, the mechanisms of aspirin resistance remain poorly understood. Metabolomics allows for measurement of hundreds of small molecules in biological samples, enabling detailed mapping of pathways involved in drug response. We defined the metabolic signature of aspirin exposure in subjects from the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention Heart Study. Many metabolites, including known aspirin catabolites, changed on exposure to aspirin, and pathway enrichment analysis identified purine metabolism as significantly affected by drug exposure. Furthermore, purines were associated with aspirin response, and poor responders had higher postaspirin adenosine and inosine levels than did good responders (n = 76; both P < 4 × 10(-3)). Using our established "pharmacometabolomics-informed pharmacogenomics" approach, we identified genetic variants in adenosine kinase associated with aspirin response. Combining metabolomics and genomics allowed for more comprehensive interrogation of mechanisms of variation in aspirin response--an important step toward personalized treatment approaches for cardiovascular disease. PMID:23839601

  1. Purification, crystallization, and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Abramchik, Yu. A. Timofeev, V. I. Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Muravieva, T. I.; Esipov, R. S.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2015-07-15

    Crystals of E. coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase were grown in microgravity by the capillary counter-diffusion method through a gel layer. The X-ray diffraction data set suitable for the determination of the three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution was collected from one crystal at the Spring-8 synchrotron facility to 0.99 Å resolution. The crystals belong to sp. gr. P2{sub 1} and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = 74.1 Å, b = 110.2 Å, c = 88.2 Å, α = γ = 90°, β = 111.08°. The crystal contains six subunits of the enzyme comprising a hexamer per asymmetric unit. The hexamer is the biological active form of E. coli. purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

  2. A high-yielding, strictly regioselective prebiotic purine nucleoside formation pathway.

    PubMed

    Becker, Sidney; Thoma, Ines; Deutsch, Amrei; Gehrke, Tim; Mayer, Peter; Zipse, Hendrik; Carell, Thomas

    2016-05-13

    The origin of life is believed to have started with prebiotic molecules reacting along unidentified pathways to produce key molecules such as nucleosides. To date, a single prebiotic pathway to purine nucleosides had been proposed. It is considered to be inefficient due to missing regioselectivity and low yields. We report that the condensation of formamidopyrimidines (FaPys) with sugars provides the natural N-9 nucleosides with extreme regioselectivity and in good yields (60%). The FaPys are available from formic acid and aminopyrimidines, which are in turn available from prebiotic molecules that were also detected during the Rosetta comet mission. This nucleoside formation pathway can be fused to sugar-forming reactions to produce pentosides, providing a plausible scenario of how purine nucleosides may have formed under prebiotic conditions. PMID:27174989

  3. Mass Modulation of Protein Dynamics Associated with Barrier Crossing in Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Dimitri; Ge, Xiaoxia; Schramm, Vern L.; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2012-01-01

    The role of protein dynamics on different time scales in enzyme catalysis remains an area of active debate. The connection between enzyme dynamics on the femtosecond time scale and transition state formation has been demonstrated in human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) through the study of a mass-altered enzyme. Isotopic substitution in human PNP (heavy PNP) decreased the rate of on-enzyme chemistry but did not alter either the transition state structure or steady-state kinetic parameters. Here we investigate the underlying atomic motions associated with altered barrier crossing probability for heavy PNP. Transition path sampling was employed to illuminate the molecular differences between barrier crossing in light and heavy enzymes. The mass effect is apparent in promoting vibrations that polarize the N-ribosidic bond, and that promote the stability of the purine leaving group. These motions facilitate barrier crossing. PMID:24496053

  4. Synthesis of novel substituted purine derivatives and identification of the cell death mechanism.

    PubMed

    Demir, Zeynep; Guven, Ebru Bilget; Ozbey, Suheyla; Kazak, Canan; Atalay, Rengul Cetin; Tuncbilek, Meral

    2015-01-01

    Novel 9-(substituted amino/piperazinoethyl)adenines (4-12), 6-(substituted piperazino/amino)purines (15-27), 9-(p-toluenesulfonyl/cyclopentyl/ethoxycarbonylmethyl)-6-(substituted amino/piperazino)purines (28-34, 36, 37, 38-41) were synthesized and evaluated initially for their cytotoxic activities on liver Huh7, breast T47D and colon HCT116 carcinoma cells. N(6)-(4-Trifluoromethylphenyl)piperazine derivative (17) and its 9-(p-toluene-sulfonyl)/9-cyclopentyl analogues (28, 36) had promising cytotoxic activities. Compounds 17, 28 and 36 were further analysed for their cytotoxicity in a panel of a liver cancer cell lines. The compound 36 had better cytotoxic activities (IC50 ≤ 1 μM) than the nucleobase 5-FU and nucleosides fludarabine, cladribine, and pentostatine on Huh7 cells. Cytotoxicity induced by 36 was later identified as senescence associated cell death by SA-β-Gal assay. PMID:25462277

  5. 9H-Purine Scaffold Reveals Induced-Fit Pocket Plasticity of the BRD9 Bromodomain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The 2-amine-9H-purine scaffold was identified as a weak bromodomain template and was developed via iterative structure based design into a potent nanomolar ligand for the bromodomain of human BRD9 with small residual micromolar affinity toward the bromodomain of BRD4. Binding of the lead compound 11 to the bromodomain of BRD9 results in an unprecedented rearrangement of residues forming the acetyllysine recognition site, affecting plasticity of the protein in an induced-fit pocket. The compound does not exhibit any cytotoxic effect in HEK293 cells and displaces the BRD9 bromodomain from chromatin in bioluminescence proximity assays without affecting the BRD4/histone complex. The 2-amine-9H-purine scaffold represents a novel template that can be further modified to yield highly potent and selective tool compounds to interrogate the biological role of BRD9 in diverse cellular systems. PMID:25703523

  6. The prebiotic synthesis of modified purines and their potential role in the RNA world

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, M.; Miller, S. L.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Modified purines are found in all organisms in the tRNA, rRNA, and even DNA, raising the possibility of an early role for these compounds in the evolution of life. These include N6-methyladenine, 1-methyladenine, N6,N6-dimethyladenine, 1-methylhypoxanthine, 1-methylguanine, and N2-methylguanine. We find that these bases as well as a number of nonbiological modified purines can be synthesized from adenine and guanine by the simple reaction of an amine or an amino group with adenine and guanine under the concentrated conditions of the drying-lagoon or drying-beach model of prebiotic synthesis with yields as high as 50%. These compounds are therefore as prebiotic as adenine and guanine and could have played an important role in the RNA world by providing additional functional groups in ribozymes, especially for the construction of hydrophobic binding pockets.

  7. [Determination of individual purine and pyrimidine bases in carbohydrate-rich food].

    PubMed

    Lassek, E; Montag, A

    1987-05-01

    The following method was developed for the qualitative and quantitative determination of purine and pyrimidine bases in carbohydrate rich food: The bases were liberated from nucleic acids, nucleotides or nucleosides by acid hydrolysis in a pressure digestion vessel. A complete liberation without losses of purine bases occurs upon hydrolysis for 15 min at 240 degrees C with trifluoroacetic and formic acids (1+1; V + V), pyrimidine bases need 45 min at 240 degrees C. The products arising from side reactions (such as hydroxymethylfurfural from hexoses and furfural from pentoses) could be removed from the hydrolysate by extraction with dichlormethane. The liberated bases could be separated upon stepwise elution by cation exchange chromatography. They were detected and determined by UV-measurements, continuously monitoring at lambda = 260 nm, and integrating electronically. The evaluation was carried out by a method with internal standard. PMID:3604458

  8. Determination of Caffeine and Other Purine Compounds in Food and Pharmaceuitcals by Micellar Electrokinetic Chrmoatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Carla; Contradi, S.; Rohde, E.

    1997-09-01

    Capillary elctrophoresis is a modern separation technique, especially the extremely high efficiencies and minimal requirements with regard to buffers, samples and solvents lead to a dramatic increase of applications in the last few years. This paper offers an introduction to the technique of micellar elektrokinetic chromatography as a special kind of capillary electrophoresis. Caffeine and other purine compounds have been determined in foodstuff (tea, coffee, cocoa) as well as in pharmaceutical formulations. Different sample preparation procedures which have been developed with regard to the special properties of the sample matrices are discussed in the paper.This preparation facilitates the separation in many cases. So students have to solve a relatively simple separation problem by variation of buffer pH, buffer components and separation parameters. By doing a calibration for the analyzed purine compounds they will learn about reproducibility in capillary electrophoresis.

  9. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase and xanthine oxidase activities in erythrocytes and plasma from marine, semiaquatic and terrestrial mammals.

    PubMed

    López-Cruz, Roberto I; Pérez-Milicua, Myrna Barjau; Crocker, Daniel E; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal-Vertiz, Jaime A; de la Rosa, Alejandro; Vázquez-Medina, José P; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2014-05-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) and xanthine oxidase (XO) are key enzymes involved in the purine salvage pathway. PNP metabolizes purine bases to synthetize purine nucleotides whereas XO catalyzes the oxidation of purines to uric acid. In humans, PNP activity is reported to be high in erythrocytes and XO activity to be low in plasma; however, XO activity increases after ischemic events. XO activity in plasma of northern elephant seals has been reported during prolonged fasting and rest and voluntary associated apneas. The objective of this study was to analyze circulating PNP and XO activities in marine mammals adapted to tolerate repeated cycles of ischemia/reperfusion associated with diving (bottlenose dolphin, northern elephant seal) in comparison with semiaquatic (river otter) and terrestrial mammals (human, pig). PNP activities in plasma and erythrocytes, as well as XO activity in plasma, from all species were quantified by spectrophotometry. No clear relationship in circulating PNP or XO activity could be established between marine, semiaquatic and terrestrial mammals. Erythrocytes from bottlenose dolphins and humans are highly permeable to nucleosides and glucose, intraerythrocyte PNP activity may be related to a release of purine nucleotides from the liver. High-energy costs will probably mean a higher ATP degradation rate in river otters, as compared to northern elephant seals or dolphins. Lower erythrocyte PNP activity and elevated plasma XO activity in northern elephant seal could be associated with fasting and/or sleep- and dive-associated apneas. PMID:24530799

  10. Purine salvage in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii: Elucidating the role of a conserved cysteine in adenine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Miller, Danielle V; Brown, Anne M; Xu, Huimin; Bevan, David R; White, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    Adenine deaminases (Ade) and hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferases (Hpt) are widely distributed enzymes involved in purine salvage. Characterization of the previously uncharacterized Ade (MJ1459 gene product) and Hpt (MJ1655 gene product) are discussed here and provide insight into purine salvage in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. Ade was demonstrated to use either Fe(II) and/or Mn(II) as the catalytic metal. Hpt demonstrated no detectable activity with adenine, but was equally specific for hypoxanthine and guanine with a kcat /KM of 3.2 × 10(7) and 3.0 × 10(7) s(- 1) M(- 1) , respectively. These results demonstrate that hypoxanthine and IMP are the central metabolites in purine salvage in M. jannaschii for AMP and GMP production. A conserved cysteine (C127, M. jannaschii numbering) was examined due to its high conservation in bacterial and archaeal homologues. To assess the role of this highly conserved cysteine in M. jannaschii Ade, site-directed mutagenesis was performed. It was determined that mutation to serine (C127S) completely abolished Ade activity and mutation to alanine (C127A) exhibited 10-fold decrease in kcat over the wild type Ade. To further investigate the role of C127, detailed molecular docking and dynamics studies were performed and revealed adenine was unable to properly orient in the active site in the C127A and C127S Ade model structures due to distinct differences in active site conformation and rotation of D261. Together this work illuminates purine salvage in M. jannaschii and the critical role of a cysteine residue in maintaining active site conformation of Ade. Proteins 2016; 84:828-840. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990095

  11. 76 FR 80955 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Use of Methanocarba Analogues of Purine and Pyrimidine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... (1'S,2R,3S,4'R,5'S)-4- (6-amino-2-chloro-9H-purin-9-yl)-1- bicycle hexane-2,3-diol) (MRS2339) to... is notice, in accordance with 35 U.S.C. 209(c)(1) and 37 CFR 404.7(a)(1)(i), that the National... law, will not be released under the Freedom of Information Act, 5 U.S.C. 552. Dated: December 20,...

  12. Endonucleolytic activity directed towards 8-(2-hydroxy-2-propyl) purines in double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Livneh, Z; Elad, D; Sperling, J

    1979-11-01

    Photoalkylation of circular covalently closed DNA from phage PM2 with isopropyl alcohol by using a free radical photoinitiator and UV light of lambda greater than 305 nm led to the specific 8-substitution of purine moieties in the DNA, yielding 8-(2-hydroxy-2-propyl)adenine and 8-(2-hydroxy-2-propyl)guanine as the only detectable damage in the DNA. Using this specifically photoalkylated DNA as a substrate, we discovered in extracts of Micrococcus luteus an endonucleolytic activity that is directed towards 8-(2-hydroxy-2-propyl) purines in DNA. The activity is not a combination of a DNA-glycosylase and an apurinic site endonuclease. It is not inhibited by single-stranded DNA, by UV- or gamma-irradiated single-stranded DNA, or by normal or depurinated double-stranded DNA. however, gamma- or UV-(254 nm) irradiated double-stranded DNAs to inhibit the activity, hinting at the possibility of a common type of lesion in these damaged DNAs. Divalent cations are not required for the incising activity, and it is fully active in 1 mM EDTA, whereas caffeine and ATP cause inhibition. Extracts of mutant M. luteus lacking pyrimidine-dimer-directed endonucleases were found to contain the endonucleolytic activity in levels comparable to those present in the wild type. After the incision, we could demonstrate the specific excision of the 8-alkylated purines from the damaged DNA. The special conformational consequences of the 8-alkylation of purines, at the nucleotide level, namely their nonregular syn conformation, suggest that it is the distortion in the DNA that is recognized by the endonuclease. PMID:293658

  13. Electronic and Structural Elements That Regulate the Excited-State Dynamics in Purine Nucleobase Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The excited-state dynamics of the purine free base and 9-methylpurine are investigated using experimental and theoretical methods. Femtosecond broadband transient absorption experiments reveal that excitation of these purine derivatives in aqueous solution at 266 nm results primarily in ultrafast conversion of the S2(ππ*) state to the vibrationally excited 1nπ* state. Following vibrational and conformational relaxation, the 1nπ* state acts as a doorway state in the efficient population of the triplet manifold with an intersystem crossing lifetime of hundreds of picoseconds. Experiments show an almost 2-fold increase in the intersystem crossing rate on going from polar aprotic to nonpolar solvents, suggesting that a solvent-dependent energy barrier must be surmounted to access the singlet-to-triplet crossing region. Ab initio static and surface-hopping dynamics simulations lend strong support to the proposed relaxation mechanism. Collectively, the experimental and computational results demonstrate that the accessibility of the nπ* states and the topology of the potential energy surfaces in the vicinity of conical intersections are key elements in controlling the excited-state dynamics of the purine derivatives. From a structural perspective, it is shown that the purine chromophore is not responsible for the ultrafast internal conversion in the adenine and guanine monomers. Instead, C6 functionalization plays an important role in regulating the rates of radiative and nonradiative relaxation. C6 functionalization inhibits access to the 1nπ* state while simultaneously facilitating access to the 1ππ*(La)/S0 conical intersection, such that population of the 1nπ* state cannot compete with the relaxation pathways to the ground state involving ring puckering at the C2 position. PMID:25763596

  14. Endonucleolytic activity directed towards 8-(2-hydroxy-2-propyl) purines in double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Livneh, Z; Elad, D; Sperling, J

    1979-01-01

    Photoalkylation of circular covalently closed DNA from phage PM2 with isopropyl alcohol by using a free radical photoinitiator and UV light of lambda greater than 305 nm led to the specific 8-substitution of purine moieties in the DNA, yielding 8-(2-hydroxy-2-propyl)adenine and 8-(2-hydroxy-2-propyl)guanine as the only detectable damage in the DNA. Using this specifically photoalkylated DNA as a substrate, we discovered in extracts of Micrococcus luteus an endonucleolytic activity that is directed towards 8-(2-hydroxy-2-propyl) purines in DNA. The activity is not a combination of a DNA-glycosylase and an apurinic site endonuclease. It is not inhibited by single-stranded DNA, by UV- or gamma-irradiated single-stranded DNA, or by normal or depurinated double-stranded DNA. however, gamma- or UV-(254 nm) irradiated double-stranded DNAs to inhibit the activity, hinting at the possibility of a common type of lesion in these damaged DNAs. Divalent cations are not required for the incising activity, and it is fully active in 1 mM EDTA, whereas caffeine and ATP cause inhibition. Extracts of mutant M. luteus lacking pyrimidine-dimer-directed endonucleases were found to contain the endonucleolytic activity in levels comparable to those present in the wild type. After the incision, we could demonstrate the specific excision of the 8-alkylated purines from the damaged DNA. The special conformational consequences of the 8-alkylation of purines, at the nucleotide level, namely their nonregular syn conformation, suggest that it is the distortion in the DNA that is recognized by the endonuclease. PMID:293658

  15. Stacking of purines in water: the role of dipolar interactions in caffeine.

    PubMed

    Tavagnacco, L; Di Fonzo, S; D'Amico, F; Masciovecchio, C; Brady, J W; Cesàro, A

    2016-05-11

    During the last few decades it has been ascertained that base stacking is one of the major contributions stabilizing nucleic acid conformations. However, the understanding of the nature of the interactions involved in the stacking process remains under debate and it is a subject of theoretical and experimental studies. Structural similarity between purine bases (guanine and adenine) in DNA and the caffeine molecule makes caffeine an excellent model for the purine bases. The present study clearly shows that dipolar interactions play a fundamental role in determining stacking of purine molecules in solution. In order to reach this achievement, polarized ultraviolet Raman resonant scattering experiments have been carried out on caffeine aqueous solutions as a function of concentration and temperature. The investigation pointed out at the aggregation and solvation properties, particularly at elevated temperatures. Kubo-Anderson theory was used as a framework to investigate the non-coincidence effect (NCE) occurring in the totally symmetric breathing modes of the purine rings, and in the bending modes of the methyl groups of caffeine. The NCE concentration dependence shows that caffeine aggregation at 80 °C occurs by planar stacking of the hydrophobic faces. The data clearly indicate that dipolar interactions determine the reorientational motion of the molecules in solution and are the driving force for the stacking of caffeine. In parallel, the observed dephasing times imply a change in caffeine interactions as a function of temperature and concentration. A decrease, at low water content, of the dephasing time for the ring breathing vibration mode indicates that self-association alters the solvation structure that is detectable at low concentration. These results are in agreement with simulation predictions and serve as an important validation of the models used in those calculations. PMID:27127808

  16. Evidence for incorporation of intact dietary pyrimidine (but not purine) nucleosides into hepatic RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Berthold, H K; Crain, P F; Gouni, I; Reeds, P J; Klein, P D

    1995-01-01

    The absorption and metabolism of dietary nucleic acids have received less attention than those of other organic nutrients, largely because of methodological difficulties. We supplemented the rations of poultry and mice with the edible alga Spirulina platensis, which had been uniformly labeled with 13C by hydroponic culture in 13CO2. The rations were ingested by a hen for 4 wk and by four mice for 6 days; two mice were fed a normal diet and two were fed a nucleic acid-deficient diet. The animals were killed and nucleosides were isolated from hepatic RNA. The isotopic enrichment of all mass isotopomers of the nucleosides was analyzed by selected ion monitoring of the negative chemical ionization mass spectrum and the labeling pattern was deconvoluted by reference to the enrichment pattern of the tracer material. We found a distinct difference in the 13C enrichment pattern between pyrimidine and purine nucleosides; the isotopic enrichment of uniformly labeled [M + 9] isotopomers of pyrimidines exceeded that of purines [M + 10] by > 2 orders of magnitude in the avian nucleic acids and by 7- and 14-fold in the murine nucleic acids. The purines were more enriched in lower mass isotopomers, those less than [M + 3], than the pyrimidines. Our results suggest that large quantities of dietary pyrimidine nucleosides and almost no dietary purine nucleosides are incorporated into hepatic nucleic acids without hydrolytic removal of the ribose moiety. In addition, our results support a potential nutritional role for nucleosides and suggest that pyrimidines are conditionally essential organic nutrients. PMID:7479738

  17. [Degradation of purine nucleotides in patients with chronic obstruction to airflow].

    PubMed

    Mateos Antón, F; García Puig, J; Gómez Fernández, P; Ramos Hernández, T; López Jiménez, M

    1989-03-11

    The increase in hypoxanthine (Hx), xanthine (X), uric acid (VA) and total purines (TP) that may be found in several clinical conditions associated with tissue hypoxia has been attributed to an increase in adenine nucleotides degradation by a reduced ATP synthesis caused by oxygen deprivation. To test this hypothesis we have investigated the urinary excretion of Hx, X, VA, TP and radioactivity elimination after labeling the adenine nucleotides with adenine (8-14C) in 5 patients with chronic airflow obstruction (CAFO), in the basal state and after oxygen therapy (FiO2, 24%). The results were compared with those from 4 normal individuals. Patients with COFA showed an increase of the renal elimination of Hx, X, VA, TP and radioactivity, which was significantly different from the control group (p less than 0.05). Oxygen administration was associated with a significant reduction in the excretion of purines and radioactivity (p less than 0.01), which decreased to values similar to those found in normal individuals. These findings suggest that in patients with COFA and severe hypoxemia there is a marked increase in the degradation of adenine nucleotides. The normalization of the purine and radioactivity excretion after oxygen therapy points to a basic role of oxygen in the catabolism of adenine nucleotides. PMID:2716427

  18. Purine biosynthetic genes are required for cadmium tolerance in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Speiser, D.M.; Ortiz, D.F.; Kreppel, L.; Scheel, G.; McDonald, G.; Ow, D.W. Univ. of California, Berkeley )

    1992-12-01

    Phytochelatins (PCs) are metal-chelating peptides produced in plants and some fungi in response to heavy metal exposure. A Cd-sensitive mutant of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, defective in production of a PC-Cd-sulfide complex essential for metal tolerance, was found to harbor mutations in specific genes of the purine biosynthetic pathway. Genetic analysis of the link between metal complex accumulation and purine biosynthesis enzymes revealed that genetic lesions blocking two segments of the pathway, before and after the IMP branchpoint, are required to produce the Cd-sensitive phenotype. The biochemical functions of these two segments of the pathway are similar, and a model based on the alternate use of a sulfur analog substrate is presented. The novel participation of purine biosynthesis enzymes in the conversion of the PC-Cd complex to the PC-Cd-sulfide complex in the fission yeast raises an intriguing possibility that these same enzymes might have a role in sulfur metabolism in the fission yeast S. pombe, and perhaps in other biological systems. 41 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Schistosoma mansoni in complex with ribose-1-phosphate

    PubMed Central

    D’Muniz Pereira, Humberto; Oliva, Glaucius; Garratt, Richard Charles

    2011-01-01

    Schistosomes are blood flukes which cause schistosomiasis, a disease affecting approximately 200 million people worldwide. Along with several other important human parasites including trypanosomes and Plasmodium, schistosomes lack the de novo pathway for purine synthesis and depend exclusively on the salvage pathway for their purine requirements, making the latter an attractive target for drug development. Part of the pathway involves the conversion of inosine (or guanosine) into hypoxanthine (or guanine) together with ribose-1-phosphate (R1P) or vice versa. This inter-conversion is undertaken by the enzyme purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) which has been used as the basis for the development of novel anti-malarials, conceptually validating this approach. It has been suggested that, during the reverse reaction, R1P binding to the enzyme would occur only as a consequence of conformational changes induced by hypoxanthine, thus making a binary PNP–R1P complex unlikely. Contradictory to this statement, a crystal structure of just such a binary complex involving the Schistosoma mansoni enzyme has been successfully obtained. The ligand shows an intricate hydrogen-bonding network in the phosphate and ribose binding sites and adds a further chapter to our knowledge which could be of value in the future development of selective inhibitors. PMID:21169694

  20. Mutations in the Chinese hamster ovary cell GART gene of de novo purine synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Knox, Aaron J.; Graham, Christine; Bleskan, John; Brodsky, Gary; Patterson, David

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in several steps of de novo purine synthesis lead to human inborn errors of metabolism often characterized by mental retardation, hypotonia, sensorineural hearing loss, optic atrophy, and other features. In animals, the phosphoribosylglycinamide transformylase (GART) gene encodes a trifunctional protein carrying out 3 steps of de novo purine synthesis, phosphoribosylglycinamide synthase (GARS), phosphoribosylglycinamide transformylase (also abbreviated as GART), and phosphoribosylaminoimidazole synthetase (AIRS) and a smaller protein that contains only the GARS domain of GART as a functional protein. The GART gene is located on human chromosome 21 and is aberrantly regulated and overexpressed in individuals with Down syndrome (DS), and may be involved in the phenotype of DS. The GART activity of GART requires 10-formyltetrahydrofolate and has been a target for anti-cancer drugs. Thus, a considerable amount of information is available about GART, while less is known about the GARS and AIRS domains. Here we demonstrate that the amino acid residue glu75 is essential for the activity of the GARS enzyme and that the gly684 residue is essential for the activity of the AIRS enzyme by analysis of mutations in the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cell that require purines for growth. We report the effects of these mutations on mRNA and protein content for GART and GARS. Further, we discuss the likely mechanisms by which mutations inactivating the GART protein might arise in CHO-K1 cells. PMID:19007868

  1. Ab initio molecular orbital study of the structures of purine hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Colson, A.O.; Sevilla, M.D.

    1996-03-14

    The structures of the isomers of purine hydrates [4(5)-hydroxy-5(4)-hydropurines] have been geometry optimized with ab initio quantum chemical methods at the 6-31G{sup *} basis set and with the semiempirical method PM3. These hydrates which can result from reduction of radical species formed by attack of hydroxyl radical at the 4,5 double bond in the purines, show significant geometrical distortion when compared to the natural bases. More specifically, the cis isomers adopt a `butterfly` conformation, while in the trans isomers, the pyrimidine and imidazole rings tilt opposite to each other. Our results predict the cis purine hydrate isomers are far more stable than the trans isomers by 10-18 kcal/mol at the 6-31G{sup *} level, whereas the 4-hydroxy-5-hydropurines are found to be slightly more energetically stable than the 5-hydroxy-4-hydropurines. The `butterfly` conformation of the cis isomers constitutes a bulky lesion which will result in a significant distortion of the DNA helix. 33 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. The Formation of Nucleobases from the Irradiation of Purine in Astophysical Ices and Comparisons with Meteorites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, S. A.; Materese, C. K.; Nuevo, M.

    2016-01-01

    N-heterocycles have been identified in meteorites and their extraterrestrial origins are suggested by isotopic ratio measurements. Although small N- heterocycles have not been detected in the interstellar medium (ISM), recent experiments in our lab have shown that the irradiation of the aromatic molecules like benzene (C6H6) and naphthalene (C10H8) in mixed molecular ices leads to the formation of O- and N-heterocyclic molecules. Among the class of N-heterocycles are the nucleobases, which are of astrobiological interest because they are the information bearing units of DNA and RNA. Nucleobases have been detected in meteorites [3-5], with isotopic signatures that are also consistent with an extraterrestrial origin. Three of the biologically relevant nucleobases (uracil, cytosine, and guanine) have a pyrimidine core structure while the remaining two (adenine and guanine) possess a purine core. Previous experiments in our lab have demonstrated that all of the bio-logical nucleobases (and numerous other molecules) with a pyrimidine core structure can be produced by irradiating pyrimidine in mixed molecular ices of several compositions [6-8]. In this work, we study the formation of purine-based molecules, including the nucleobases adenine, and guanine, from the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of purine in ices consisting mixtures of H2O and NH3 at low temperature. The experiments are designed to simulate the astrophysical conditions under which these species may be formed in dense molecular clouds, protoplanetary disks, or on the surfaces of icy bodies in planetary systems.

  3. Isolation of Purines and Pyrimidines from the Murchison Meteorite Using Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.

    2004-01-01

    The origin of life on Earth, and possibly on other planets such as Mars, would have required the presence of liquid water and a continuous supply of prebiotic organic compounds. The exogenous delivery of organic matter by asteroids, comets, and carbonaceous meteorites could have contributed to the early Earth s prebiotic inventory by seeding the planet with biologically important organic compounds. A wide variety of prebiotic organic compounds have previously been detected in the Murchison CM type carbonaceous chondrite including amino acids, purines and pyrimidines. These compounds dominate terrestrial biochemistry and are integral components of proteins, DNA and RNA. Several purines including adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, and xanthine, as well as the pyrimidine uracil, have previously been detected in water or formic acid extracts of Murchison using ion-exclusion chromatography and ultraviolet spectroscopy. However, even after purification of these extracts, the accurate identification and quantification of nucleobases is difficult due to interfering UV absorbing compounds. In order to reduce these effects, we have developed an extraction technique using sublimation to isolate purines and pyrimidines from other non-volatile organic compounds in Murchison acid extracts.

  4. Hypercrosslinked strong cation-exchange polymers for selective extraction of serum purine metabolites associated with gout.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yating; Liu, Ju; Zhang, Hongyang; Jiang, Min; Cao, Lingling; Zhang, Min; Sun, Wei; Ruan, Shengli; Hu, Ping

    2016-05-01

    In this study, hypercrosslinked strong cation-exchange polymer resins (HXLPP-SCX) were synthesized and employed as selective sorbents for the solid-phase extraction (SPE) of basic purine metabolites associated with gout. The HXLPP-SCX material was prepared based on hypercrosslinking reactions and sulfonated with concentrated H2SO4. This synthetic procedure is facile and efficient without using highly toxic reagent. The resulting resins were characterized in the form of monodisperse microspheres (mean diameters of 3‒5μm) with narrow pore size (2.1nm) and relatively high specific surface areas (801m(2)/g). The polymers also possess high ion-exchange capacity (IEC, 2.22mmol/g) and good adsorption and selectivity performances for basic compounds. The resins used as SPE sorbents permit the selective enrichment of three pivotal purine metabolites (hypoxanthine, xanthine and inosine) in human serum followed by HPLC analysis. Method validation including linearity range, sensitivity, accuracy and reproducibility were evaluated. This method was exemplarily applied in the analysis of serum purines in gout patients and healthy controls. The present results demonstrate a promising potential of this HXLPP-SCX material for the clinical sample pretreatment. PMID:26946024

  5. Pronounced Fixation, Strong Population Differentiation and Complex Population History in the Canary Islands Blue Tit Subspecies Complex

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, Bengt; Ljungqvist, Marcus; Illera, Juan-Carlos; Kvist, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary molecular studies of island radiations may lead to insights in the role of vicariance, founder events, population size and drift in the processes of population differentiation. We evaluate the degree of population genetic differentiation and fixation of the Canary Islands blue tit subspecies complex using microsatellite markers and aim to get insights in the population history using coalescence based methods. The Canary Island populations were strongly genetically differentiated and had reduced diversity with pronounced fixation including many private alleles. In population structure models, the relationship between the central island populations (La Gomera, Tenerife and Gran Canaria) and El Hierro was difficult to disentangle whereas the two European populations showed consistent clustering, the two eastern islands (Fuerteventura and Lanzarote) and Morocco weak clustering, and La Palma a consistent unique lineage. Coalescence based models suggested that the European mainland forms an outgroup to the Afrocanarian population, a split between the western island group (La Palma and El Hierro) and the central island group, and recent splits between the three central islands, and between the two eastern islands and Morocco, respectively. It is clear that strong genetic drift and low level of concurrent gene flow among populations have shaped complex allelic patterns of fixation and skewed frequencies over the archipelago. However, understanding the population history remains challenging; in particular, the pattern of extreme divergence with low genetic diversity and yet unique genetic material in the Canary Island system requires an explanation. A potential scenario is population contractions of a historically large and genetically variable Afrocanarian population, with vicariance and drift following in the wake. The suggestion from sequence-based analyses of a Pleistocene extinction of a substantial part of North Africa and a Pleistocene/Holocene eastward

  6. A Source Area Approach Demonstrates Moderate Predictive Ability but Pronounced Variability of Invasive Species Traits.

    PubMed

    Klonner, Günther; Fischer, Stefan; Essl, Franz; Dullinger, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The search for traits that make alien species invasive has mostly concentrated on comparing successful invaders and different comparison groups with respect to average trait values. By contrast, little attention has been paid to trait variability among invaders. Here, we combine an analysis of trait differences between invasive and non-invasive species with a comparison of multidimensional trait variability within these two species groups. We collected data on biological and distributional traits for 1402 species of the native, non-woody vascular plant flora of Austria. We then compared the subsets of species recorded and not recorded as invasive aliens anywhere in the world, respectively, first, with respect to the sampled traits using univariate and multiple regression models; and, second, with respect to their multidimensional trait diversity by calculating functional richness and dispersion metrics. Attributes related to competitiveness (strategy type, nitrogen indicator value), habitat use (agricultural and ruderal habitats, occurrence under the montane belt), and propagule pressure (frequency) were most closely associated with invasiveness. However, even the best multiple model, including interactions, only explained a moderate fraction of the differences in invasive success. In addition, multidimensional variability in trait space was even larger among invasive than among non-invasive species. This pronounced variability suggests that invasive success has a considerable idiosyncratic component and is probably highly context specific. We conclude that basing risk assessment protocols on species trait profiles will probably face hardly reducible uncertainties. PMID:27187616

  7. A Source Area Approach Demonstrates Moderate Predictive Ability but Pronounced Variability of Invasive Species Traits

    PubMed Central

    Essl, Franz; Dullinger, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The search for traits that make alien species invasive has mostly concentrated on comparing successful invaders and different comparison groups with respect to average trait values. By contrast, little attention has been paid to trait variability among invaders. Here, we combine an analysis of trait differences between invasive and non-invasive species with a comparison of multidimensional trait variability within these two species groups. We collected data on biological and distributional traits for 1402 species of the native, non-woody vascular plant flora of Austria. We then compared the subsets of species recorded and not recorded as invasive aliens anywhere in the world, respectively, first, with respect to the sampled traits using univariate and multiple regression models; and, second, with respect to their multidimensional trait diversity by calculating functional richness and dispersion metrics. Attributes related to competitiveness (strategy type, nitrogen indicator value), habitat use (agricultural and ruderal habitats, occurrence under the montane belt), and propagule pressure (frequency) were most closely associated with invasiveness. However, even the best multiple model, including interactions, only explained a moderate fraction of the differences in invasive success. In addition, multidimensional variability in trait space was even larger among invasive than among non-invasive species. This pronounced variability suggests that invasive success has a considerable idiosyncratic component and is probably highly context specific. We conclude that basing risk assessment protocols on species trait profiles will probably face hardly reducible uncertainties. PMID:27187616

  8. Strenuous exercise induces a hyperreactive rebalanced haemostatic state that is more pronounced in men.

    PubMed

    Huskens, Dana; Roest, Mark; Remijn, Jasper A; Konings, Joke; Kremers, Romy M W; Bloemen, Saartje; Schurgers, Evelien; Selmeczi, Anna; Kelchtermans, Hilde; van Meel, Rinaldo; Meex, Steven J; Kleinegris, Marie-Claire; de Groot, Philip G; Urbanus, Rolf T; Ninivaggi, Marisa; de Laat, Bas

    2016-06-01

    Physical exercise is recommended for a healthy lifestyle. Strenuous exercise, however, may trigger the haemostatic system, increasing the risk of vascular thrombotic events and the incidence of primary cardiac arrest. Our goal was to study the effects of strenuous exercise on risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Blood was collected from 92 healthy volunteers who participated in the amateur version of the pro-tour Amstel Gold cycling race, before and directly after the race. Thrombin generation showed a shortening of the lag time and time to peak and an increase of the velocity index. Interestingly, the endogenous thrombin potential measured in plasma decreased due to reduced prothrombin conversion. Platelet reactivity increased and this effect was stronger in men than in women. Lower fibrinogen and higher D-dimer levels after exercise indicated higher fibrin formation. On the other hand, fibrinolysis was also elevated as indicated by a shortening of the clot lysis time. Exercise activated the endothelium (von Willebrand factor (VWF) and active VWF levels were elevated) and the immune system (concentrations IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, RANTES and PDGF increased). Additionally, an increased cardiac troponin T level was measured post-exercise. Strenuous exercise induces a temporary hyperreactive state in the body with enhanced pro- and anticoagulant responses. As strenuous exercise has a more pronounced effect on platelet function in male subjects, this gives a possible explanation for the higher incidence of sudden cardiac death during exercise compared to women. This trial is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02048462. PMID:26864794

  9. Resolution of pronounced painless weakness arising from radiculopathy and disk extrusion.

    PubMed

    Lipetz, Jason S; Misra, Neelam; Silber, Jeff S

    2005-07-01

    In this retrospective, consecutive case series, we report the nonsurgical and rehabilitation outcomes of consecutive patients who presented with pronounced painless weakness arising from disk extrusion. Seven consecutive patients who chose physiatric care were followed clinically, and strength return was monitored. Each presented with predominantly painless radiculopathy, functionally significant strength loss, and radiographic evidence of disk extrusion or sequestration. Each patient participated in a targeted strengthening program, and in some cases, transforaminal injection therapy was employed. Each patient demonstrated an eventual full functional recovery. In most cases, electrodiagnostic studies were performed and included a needle examination of the affected limb and compound muscle action potentials from the most clinically relevant and weakened limb muscle. The electrodiagnostic findings and, in particular, the quantitative compound muscle action potential data seemed to correlate with the timing of motor recovery. Patients with predominantly painless and significant weakness arising from disk extrusion can demonstrate successful rehabilitation outcomes. Despite a relative absence of pain, such patients can present with a more rapidly reversible neurapraxic type of weakness. The more quantitative compound muscle action potential data obtained through electrodiagnostic studies may offer the treating physician an additional means of characterizing the type of neuronal injury at play and the likelihood and timing of strength return. PMID:15973090

  10. Pronounced and prevalent intersexuality does not impede the ‘Demon Shrimp’ invasion

    PubMed Central

    Green Etxabe, Amaia; Short, Stephen; Flood, Tim; Johns, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Crustacean intersexuality is widespread and often linked to infection by sex-distorting parasites. However, unlike vertebrate intersexuality, its association with sexual dysfunction is unclear and remains a matter of debate. The ‘Demon Shrimp,’ Dikerogammarus haemobaphes, an amphipod that has invaded continental waterways, has recently become widespread in Britain. Intersexuality has been noted in D. haemobaphes but not investigated further. We hypothesise that a successful invasive population should not display a high prevalence of intersexuality if this condition represents a truly dysfunctional phenotype. In addition, experiments have indicated that particular parasite burdens in amphipods may facilitate invasions. The rapid and ongoing invasion of British waterways represents an opportunity to determine whether these hypotheses are consistent with field observations. This study investigates the parasites and sexual phenotypes of D. haemobaphes in British waterways, characterising parasite burdens using molecular screening, and makes comparisons with the threatened Gammarus pulex natives. We reveal that invasive and native populations have distinct parasitic profiles, suggesting the loss of G. pulex may have parasite-mediated eco-system impacts. Furthermore, the parasite burdens are consistent with those previously proposed to facilitate biological invasions. Our study also indicates that while no intersexuality occurs in the native G. pulex, approximately 50% of D. haemobaphes males present pronounced intersexuality associated with infection by the microsporidian Dictyocoela berillonum. This unambiguously successful invasive population presents, to our knowledge, the highest reported prevalence of male intersexuality. This is the clearest evidence to date that such intersexuality does not represent a form of debilitating sexual dysfunction that negatively impacts amphipod populations. PMID:25699206

  11. Pronounced zonal heterogeneity in Eocene southern high-latitude sea surface temperatures.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Peter M J; Affek, Hagit P; Ivany, Linda C; Houben, Alexander J P; Sijp, Willem P; Sluijs, Appy; Schouten, Stefan; Pagani, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Paleoclimate studies suggest that increased global warmth during the Eocene epoch was greatly amplified at high latitudes, a state that climate models cannot fully reproduce. However, proxy estimates of Eocene near-Antarctic sea surface temperatures (SSTs) have produced widely divergent results at similar latitudes, with SSTs above 20 °C in the southwest Pacific contrasting with SSTs between 5 and 15 °C in the South Atlantic. Validation of this zonal temperature difference has been impeded by uncertainties inherent to the individual paleotemperature proxies applied at these sites. Here, we present multiproxy data from Seymour Island, near the Antarctic Peninsula, that provides well-constrained evidence for annual SSTs of 10-17 °C (1σ SD) during the middle and late Eocene. Comparison of the same paleotemperature proxy at Seymour Island and at the East Tasman Plateau indicate the presence of a large and consistent middle-to-late Eocene SST gradient of ∼7 °C between these two sites located at similar paleolatitudes. Intermediate-complexity climate model simulations suggest that enhanced oceanic heat transport in the South Pacific, driven by deep-water formation in the Ross Sea, was largely responsible for the observed SST gradient. These results indicate that very warm SSTs, in excess of 18 °C, did not extend uniformly across the Eocene southern high latitudes, and suggest that thermohaline circulation may partially control the distribution of high-latitude ocean temperatures in greenhouse climates. The pronounced zonal SST heterogeneity evident in the Eocene cautions against inferring past meridional temperature gradients using spatially limited data within given latitudinal bands. PMID:24753570

  12. Pronounced and prevalent intersexuality does not impede the 'Demon Shrimp' invasion.

    PubMed

    Green Etxabe, Amaia; Short, Stephen; Flood, Tim; Johns, Tim; Ford, Alex T

    2015-01-01

    Crustacean intersexuality is widespread and often linked to infection by sex-distorting parasites. However, unlike vertebrate intersexuality, its association with sexual dysfunction is unclear and remains a matter of debate. The 'Demon Shrimp,' Dikerogammarus haemobaphes, an amphipod that has invaded continental waterways, has recently become widespread in Britain. Intersexuality has been noted in D. haemobaphes but not investigated further. We hypothesise that a successful invasive population should not display a high prevalence of intersexuality if this condition represents a truly dysfunctional phenotype. In addition, experiments have indicated that particular parasite burdens in amphipods may facilitate invasions. The rapid and ongoing invasion of British waterways represents an opportunity to determine whether these hypotheses are consistent with field observations. This study investigates the parasites and sexual phenotypes of D. haemobaphes in British waterways, characterising parasite burdens using molecular screening, and makes comparisons with the threatened Gammarus pulex natives. We reveal that invasive and native populations have distinct parasitic profiles, suggesting the loss of G. pulex may have parasite-mediated eco-system impacts. Furthermore, the parasite burdens are consistent with those previously proposed to facilitate biological invasions. Our study also indicates that while no intersexuality occurs in the native G. pulex, approximately 50% of D. haemobaphes males present pronounced intersexuality associated with infection by the microsporidian Dictyocoela berillonum. This unambiguously successful invasive population presents, to our knowledge, the highest reported prevalence of male intersexuality. This is the clearest evidence to date that such intersexuality does not represent a form of debilitating sexual dysfunction that negatively impacts amphipod populations. PMID:25699206

  13. Pronounced zonal heterogeneity in Eocene southern high-latitude sea surface temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Peter M. J.; Affek, Hagit P.; Ivany, Linda C.; Houben, Alexander J. P.; Sijp, Willem P.; Sluijs, Appy; Schouten, Stefan; Pagani, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Paleoclimate studies suggest that increased global warmth during the Eocene epoch was greatly amplified at high latitudes, a state that climate models cannot fully reproduce. However, proxy estimates of Eocene near-Antarctic sea surface temperatures (SSTs) have produced widely divergent results at similar latitudes, with SSTs above 20 °C in the southwest Pacific contrasting with SSTs between 5 and 15 °C in the South Atlantic. Validation of this zonal temperature difference has been impeded by uncertainties inherent to the individual paleotemperature proxies applied at these sites. Here, we present multiproxy data from Seymour Island, near the Antarctic Peninsula, that provides well-constrained evidence for annual SSTs of 10–17 °C (1σ SD) during the middle and late Eocene. Comparison of the same paleotemperature proxy at Seymour Island and at the East Tasman Plateau indicate the presence of a large and consistent middle-to-late Eocene SST gradient of ∼7 °C between these two sites located at similar paleolatitudes. Intermediate-complexity climate model simulations suggest that enhanced oceanic heat transport in the South Pacific, driven by deep-water formation in the Ross Sea, was largely responsible for the observed SST gradient. These results indicate that very warm SSTs, in excess of 18 °C, did not extend uniformly across the Eocene southern high latitudes, and suggest that thermohaline circulation may partially control the distribution of high-latitude ocean temperatures in greenhouse climates. The pronounced zonal SST heterogeneity evident in the Eocene cautions against inferring past meridional temperature gradients using spatially limited data within given latitudinal bands. PMID:24753570

  14. On the origin of pronounced O3 gradients in the thunderstorm outflow region during DC3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntrieser, H.; Lichtenstern, M.; Scheibe, M.; Aufmhoff, H.; Schlager, H.; Pucik, T.; Minikin, A.; Weinzierl, B.; Heimerl, K.; Fütterer, D.; Rappenglück, B.; Ackermann, L.; Pickering, K. E.; Cummings, K. A.; Biggerstaff, M. I.; Betten, D. P.; Honomichl, S.; Barth, M. C.

    2016-06-01

    Unique in situ measurements of CO, O3, SO2, CH4, NO, NOx, NOy, VOC, CN, and rBC were carried out with the German Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR)-Falcon aircraft in the central U.S. thunderstorms during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry experiment in summer 2012. Fresh and aged anvil outflow (9-12 km) from supercells, mesoscale convective systems, mesoscale convective complexes, and squall lines were probed over Oklahoma, Texas, Colorado, and Kansas. For three case studies (30 May and 8 and 12 June) a combination of trace species, radar, lightning, and satellite information, as well as model results, were used to analyze and design schematics of major trace gas transport pathways within and in the vicinity of the probed thunderstorms. The impact of thunderstorms on the O3 composition in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (LS) region was analyzed. Overshooting cloud tops injected high amounts of biomass burning and lightning-produced NOx emissions into the LS, in addition to low O3 mixing ratios from the lower troposphere. As a dynamical response, O3-rich air from the LS was transported downward into the anvil and also surrounded the outflow. The ΔO3/ΔCO ratio was determined in the anvil outflow region. A pronounced in-mixing of O3-rich stratospheric air masses was observed in the outflow indicated by highly positive or even negative ΔO3/ΔCO ratios (+1.4 down to -3.9). Photochemical O3 production (ΔO3/ΔCO = +0.1) was found to be minor in the recently lofted pollution plumes. O3 mixing ratios within the aged anvil outflow were mainly enhanced due to dynamical processes.

  15. The purine degradation pathway: possible role in paralytic shellfish toxin metabolism in the cyanobacterium Planktothrix sp. FP1.

    PubMed

    Pomati, F; Manarolla, G; Rossi, O; Vigetti, D; Rossetti, C

    2001-12-01

    The paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) are potent neurotoxic alkaloids and their major biological effect is due to the blockage of voltage-gated sodium channels in excitable cells. They have been recognised as an important health risk for humans, animals, and ecosystems worldwide. The metabolic pathways that lead to the production and the degradation of these toxic metabolites are still unknown. In this study, we investigated the possible link between PST accumulation and the activation of the metabolism that leads to purine degradation in the filamentous freshwater cyanobacterium Planktothrix sp. FP1. The purine catabolic pathway is related to the nitrogen microcycle in water environments, in which cyanobacteria use traces of purines and ureides as a nitrogen source for growth. Thus, the activity of allantoicase, a key inducible enzyme of this metabolism, was used as tool for assaying the activation of the purine degradation pathway. The enzyme and the pathway were induced by allantoic acid, the direct substrate of allantoicase, as well as by adenine and, to a lower degree, by urea, one of the main products of purine catabolism. Crude cell extract of Escherichia coli was also employed and showed the best induction of allantoicase activity. In culture, Planktothrix sp. FP1 showed a differential accumulation of PST in consequence of the induction with different substrates. The cyanobacterial culture induced with allantoic acid accumulated 61.7% more toxins in comparison with the control. On the other hand, the cultures induced with adenine, urea, and the E. coli extract showed low PST accumulation, respectively, 1%, 38%, and 5% of the total toxins content detected in the noninduced culture. A degradation pathway for the PSTs can be hypothesised: as suggested for purine alkaloids in higher plants, saxitoxin (STX) and derivatives may also be converted into xanthine, urea, and further to CO2 and NH4+ or recycled in the primary metabolism through the purine degradation

  16. The genomes of the South American opossum (Monodelphis domestica) and platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) encode a more complete purine catabolic pathway than placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Keebaugh, Alaine C; Thomas, James W

    2009-09-01

    The end product of purine catabolism varies amongst vertebrates and is a consequence of independent gene inactivation events that have truncated the purine catabolic pathway. Mammals have traditionally been grouped into two classes based on their end product of purine catabolism: most mammals, whose end product is allantoin due to an ancient loss of allantoinase (ALLN), and the hominoids, whose end product is uric acid due to recent inactivations of urate oxidase (UOX). However little is known about purine catabolism in marsupials and monotremes. Here we report the results of a comparative genomics study designed to characterize the purine catabolic pathway in a marsupial, the South American opossum (Monodelphis domestica), and a monotreme, the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus). We found that both genomes encode a more complete set of genes for purine catabolism than do eutherians and conclude that a near complete purine catabolic pathway was present in the common ancestor of all mammals, and that the loss of ALLN is specific to placental mammals. Our results therefore provide a revised history for gene loss in the purine catabolic pathway and suggest that marsupials and monotremes represent a third class of mammals with respect to their end products of purine catabolism. PMID:20161190

  17. [open quotes]Cryptic[close quotes] repeating triplets of purines and pyrimidines (cRRY(i)) are frequent and polymorphic: Analysis of coding cRRY(i) in the proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and TATA-binding protein (TBP) genes

    SciTech Connect

    Gostout, B.; Qiang Liu; Sommer, S.S. )

    1993-06-01

    Triplets of the form of purine, purine, pyrimidine (RRY(i)) are enhanced in frequency in the genomes of primates, rodents, and bacteria. Some RRY(i) are [open quotes]cryptic[close quotes] repeats (cRRY(i)) in which no one tandem run of a trinucleotide predominates. A search of human GenBank sequence revealed that the sequences of cRRY(i) are highly nonrandom. Three randomly chosen human cRRY(i) were sequenced in search of polymorphic alleles. Multiple polymorphic alleles were found in cRRY(i) in the coding regions of the genes for proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and TATA-binding protein (TBP). The highly polymorphic TBP cRRY(i) was characterized in detail. Direct sequencing of 157 unrelated human alleles demonstrated the presence of 20 different alleles which resulted in 29--40 consecutive glutamines in the amino-terminal region of TBP. These alleles are differently distributed among the races. PCR was used to screen 1,846 additional alleles in order to characterize more fully the range of variation in the population. Three additional alleles were discovered, but there was no example of a substantial sequence amplification as is seen in the repeat sequences associated with X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, myotonic dystrophy, or the fragile-X syndrome. The structure of the TBP cRRY(i) is conserved in the five monkey species examined. In the chimpanzee, examination of four individuals revealed that the cRRY(i) was highly polymorphic, but the pattern of polymorphism differed from that in humans. The TBP cRRY(i) displays both similarities with and differences from the previously described RRY(i) in the coding sequence of the androgen receptor. The data suggest how simple tandem repeats could evolve from cryptic repeats. 18 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Fertility and Pregnancy Outcome after Myoma Enucleation by Minilaparotomy under Microsurgical Conditions in Pronounced Uterus Myomatosus

    PubMed Central

    Floss, K.; Garcia-Rocha, G.-J.; Kundu, S.; von Kaisenberg, C. S.; Hillemanns, P.; Schippert, C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Besides the typical complaints and symptoms, myomas can cause sterility, infertility and complications during pregnancy. Laparoscopic interventions reach their limits with regard to organ preservation and the simultaneous desire to have children in the removal of multiple and larger intramural myoma nodes. The aim of this study is to examine fertility status and pregnancy outcome after myoma removal by minilaparotomy (skin incision maximal 8 cm) in women with pronounced uterus myomatosus. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study makes use of the data from 160 patients with an average age of 34.6 years. Factors analysed include number, size and localisation of the myomas, complaints due to the myoma, pre- and postoperative gravidity, mode of delivery, and complications of birth. Results: Indications for organ-sparing myoma enucleation were the desire to have children (72.5 %), bleeding disorders (60 %) and pressure discomfort (36.5 %). On average 4.95 (SD ± 0.41), maximally 46 myomas were removed. The largest myoma had a diameter of 6.64 cm (SD ± 2.74). 82.5 % of the patients had transmural myomas, in 17.5 % the uterine cavity was inadvertently opened. On average the operating time was 163 minutes (SD ± 45.47), the blood loss 1.59 g/dL (SD ± 0.955). 60.3 % of the patients with the desire to have children became pregnant postoperatively. 75.3 % of the pregnancies were on average carried through to the 38th week (28.4 % vaginal deliveries, 71.6 % Caesarean sections). In the postoperative period there was one case of uterine rupture in the vicinity of a previous scar. Discussion: By means of the microsurgical “mini-laparotomy” even extensive myomatous uterine changes can, in the majority of cases, be operated in an organ-sparing manner with retention of the ability to conceive and to carry a pregnancy through to maturity of the infant. The risk for a postoperative uterine rupture in a subsequent pregnancy and

  19. GMP synthase is essential for viability and infectivity of Trypanosoma brucei despite a redundant purine salvage pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiong; Leija, Christopher; Rijo-Ferreira, Filipa; Chen, Jun; Cestari, Igor; Stuart, Kenneth; Tu, Benjamin P.; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis, Trypanosoma brucei, lacks de novo purine biosynthesis and depends on purine salvage from the host. The purine salvage pathway is redundant and contains two routes to guanosine-5′-monophosphate (GMP) formation: conversion from xanthosine-5′-monophosphate (XMP) by GMP synthase (GMPS) or direct salvage of guanine by hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT). We show recombinant T. brucei GMPS efficiently catalyzes GMP formation. Genetic knockout of GMPS in bloodstream parasites led to depletion of guanine nucleotide pools and was lethal. Growth of gmps null cells was only rescued by supraphysiological guanine concentrations (100 μM) or by expression of an extrachromosomal copy of GMPS. Hypoxanthine was a competitive inhibitor of guanine rescue, consistent with a common uptake/metabolic conversion mechanism. In mice, gmps null parasites were unable to establish an infection demonstrating that GMPS is essential for virulence and that plasma guanine is insufficient to support parasite purine requirements. These data validate GMPS as a potential therapeutic target for treatment of HAT. The ability to strategically inhibit key metabolic enzymes in the purine pathway unexpectedly bypasses its functional redundancy by exploiting both the nature of pathway flux and the limited nutrient environment of the parasite's extracellular niche. PMID:26043892

  20. Functional identification of SLC43A3 as an equilibrative nucleobase transporter involved in purine salvage in mammals.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Junji; Inoue, Katsuhisa; Maeda, Junya; Yasujima, Tomoya; Ohta, Kinya; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Takada, Tappei; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Yuasa, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The purine salvage pathway plays a major role in the nucleotide production, relying on the supply of nucleobases and nucleosides from extracellular sources. Although specific transporters have been suggested to be involved in facilitating their transport across the plasma membrane in mammals, those which are specifically responsible for utilization of extracellular nucleobases remain unknown. Here we present the molecular and functional characterization of SLC43A3, an orphan transporter belonging to an amino acid transporter family, as a purine-selective nucleobase transporter. SLC43A3 was highly expressed in the liver, where it was localized to the sinusoidal membrane of hepatocytes, and the lung. In addition, SLC43A3 expressed in MDCKII cells mediated the uptake of purine nucleobases such as adenine, guanine, and hypoxanthine without requiring typical driving ions such as Na(+) and H(+), but it did not mediate the uptake of nucleosides. When SLC43A3 was expressed in APRT/HPRT1-deficient A9 cells, adenine uptake was found to be low. However, it was markedly enhanced by the introduction of SLC43A3 with APRT. In HeLa cells, knock-down of SLC43A3 markedly decreased adenine uptake. These data suggest that SLC43A3 is a facilitative and purine-selective nucleobase transporter that mediates the cellular uptake of extracellular purine nucleobases in cooperation with salvage enzymes. PMID:26455426

  1. GMP synthase is essential for viability and infectivity of Trypanosoma brucei despite a redundant purine salvage pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiong; Leija, Christopher; Rijo-Ferreira, Filipa; Chen, Jun; Cestari, Igor; Stuart, Kenneth; Tu, Benjamin P; Phillips, Margaret A

    2015-09-01

    The causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis, Trypanosoma brucei, lacks de novo purine biosynthesis and depends on purine salvage from the host. The purine salvage pathway is redundant and contains two routes to guanosine-5'-monophosphate (GMP) formation: conversion from xanthosine-5'-monophosphate (XMP) by GMP synthase (GMPS) or direct salvage of guanine by hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT). We show recombinant T. brucei GMPS efficiently catalyzes GMP formation. Genetic knockout of GMPS in bloodstream parasites led to depletion of guanine nucleotide pools and was lethal. Growth of gmps null cells was only rescued by supraphysiological guanine concentrations (100 μM) or by expression of an extrachromosomal copy of GMPS. Hypoxanthine was a competitive inhibitor of guanine rescue, consistent with a common uptake/metabolic conversion mechanism. In mice, gmps null parasites were unable to establish an infection demonstrating that GMPS is essential for virulence and that plasma guanine is insufficient to support parasite purine requirements. These data validate GMPS as a potential therapeutic target for treatment of human African trypanosomiasis. The ability to strategically inhibit key metabolic enzymes in the purine pathway unexpectedly bypasses its functional redundancy by exploiting both the nature of pathway flux and the limited nutrient environment of the parasite's extracellular niche. PMID:26043892

  2. 1,3,5-Triazine-based analogues of purine: from isosteres to privileged scaffolds in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lim, Felicia Phei Lin; Dolzhenko, Anton V

    2014-10-01

    Purines can be considered as the most ubiquitous and functional N-heterocyclic compounds in nature. Structural modifications of natural purines, particularly using isosteric ring systems, have been in the focus of many drug discovery programs. Fusion of 1,3,5-triazine ring with pyrrole, pyrazole, imidazole, 1,2,3-triazole or 1,2,4-triazole results in seven bicyclic heterocyclic systems isosteric to purine. Application of the isosterism concept for the development of new compounds with therapeutic potential in areas involving purinergic regulation or purine metabolism led to significant advances in medicinal chemistry of the azolo[1,3,5]triazines. These 1,3,5-triazine-based purine-like scaffolds significantly increase level of molecular diversity and allow covering chemical space in the important areas of medicinal chemistry. Some of these azolo[1,3,5]triazine systems have become privileged scaffolds in the development of inhibitors of various kinases, phosphodiesterase, xanthine oxidase, and thymidine phosphorylase, antagonists of adenosine and corticotropin-releasing hormone receptors, anticancer and antiviral agents. PMID:25105925

  3. Functional identification of SLC43A3 as an equilibrative nucleobase transporter involved in purine salvage in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Junji; Inoue, Katsuhisa; Maeda, Junya; Yasujima, Tomoya; Ohta, Kinya; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Takada, Tappei; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Yuasa, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The purine salvage pathway plays a major role in the nucleotide production, relying on the supply of nucleobases and nucleosides from extracellular sources. Although specific transporters have been suggested to be involved in facilitating their transport across the plasma membrane in mammals, those which are specifically responsible for utilization of extracellular nucleobases remain unknown. Here we present the molecular and functional characterization of SLC43A3, an orphan transporter belonging to an amino acid transporter family, as a purine-selective nucleobase transporter. SLC43A3 was highly expressed in the liver, where it was localized to the sinusoidal membrane of hepatocytes, and the lung. In addition, SLC43A3 expressed in MDCKII cells mediated the uptake of purine nucleobases such as adenine, guanine, and hypoxanthine without requiring typical driving ions such as Na+ and H+, but it did not mediate the uptake of nucleosides. When SLC43A3 was expressed in APRT/HPRT1-deficient A9 cells, adenine uptake was found to be low. However, it was markedly enhanced by the introduction of SLC43A3 with APRT. In HeLa cells, knock-down of SLC43A3 markedly decreased adenine uptake. These data suggest that SLC43A3 is a facilitative and purine-selective nucleobase transporter that mediates the cellular uptake of extracellular purine nucleobases in cooperation with salvage enzymes. PMID:26455426

  4. Distally pronounced infantile spinal muscular atrophy with severe axonal and demyelinating neuropathy associated with the S230L mutation of SMN1.

    PubMed

    Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Barisić, Nina; Eggermann, Katja; Ortiz Brüchle, Nadina; Grđan, Petra; Zerres, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    Two Croatian siblings with atypical clinical findings in the presence of SMN1 gene mutations are reported. The girl presented with delayed motor development and weakness in hands and feet in her first year of life. She never stood or walked and developed scoliosis and joint contractures during childhood. Her hands and feet were non-functional when last seen at age 14 years. Her 4-year-old brother was more severely affected and had a clinical picture resembling infantile spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) type 1. He also showed unusual distally pronounced weakness and facial weakness. Both patients had no sensory deficits but gave evidence of a mixed axonal and demyelinating neuropathy with pronounced slowing in the distal nerve segments. Unexpectedly, both siblings showed a compound heterozygous SMN1 mutation (heterozygous deletion and missense mutation c.689C > T; p.S230L), thus confirming infantile SMA. In addition, next generation sequencing of 52 genes for hereditary neuropathies revealed a heterozygous missense mutation c.505T > C; p.Y169H in the SH3TC2 gene that was transmitted by the healthy father. Our observations widen the phenotypic consequences of SMN1 gene mutations and support the notion to look for additional genetic factors which may modify the clinical picture in atypical cases. PMID:26794302

  5. ATP and related purines stimulate motility, spatial congregation, and coalescence in red algal spores.

    PubMed

    Huidobro-Toro, Juan P; Donoso, Verónica; Flores, Verónica; Santelices, Bernabé

    2015-04-01

    Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is a versatile extracellular signal along the tree of life, whereas cAMP plays a major role in vertebrates as an intracellular messenger for hormones, transmitters, tastants, and odorants. Since red algal spore coalescence may be considered analogous to the congregation process of social amoeba, which is stimulated by cAMP, we ascertained whether exogenous applications of ATP, cAMP, adenine, or adenosine modified spore survival and motility, spore settlement and coalescence. Concentration-response studies were performed with carpospores of Mazzaella laminarioides (Gigartinales), incubated with and without added purines. Stirring of algal blades released ADP/ATP to the cell media in a time-dependent manner. 10-300 μM ATP significantly increased spore survival; however, 1,500 μM ATP, cAMP or adenine induced 100% mortality within less than 24 h; the exception was adenosine, which up to 3,000 μM, did not alter spore survival. ATP exposure elicited spore movement with speeds of 2.2-2.5 μm · s(-1) . 14 d after 1,000 μM ATP addition, spore abundance in the central zone of the plaques was increased 2.7-fold as compared with parallel controls. Likewise, 1-10 μM cAMP or 30-100 μM adenine also increased central zone spore abundance, albeit these purines were less efficacious than ATP; adenosine up to 3,000 μM did not influence settlement. Moreover, 1,000 μM ATP markedly accelerated coalescence, the other purines caused a variable effect. We conclude that exogenous cAMP, adenine, but particularly ATP, markedly influence red algal spore physiology; effects are compatible with the expression of one or more membrane purinoceptor(s), discarding adenosine receptor participation. PMID:26986520

  6. Targeting the Parasite's DNA with Methyltriazenyl Purine Analogs Is a Safe, Selective, and Efficacious Antitrypanosomal Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Wanner, Martin J.; Alkhaldi, Abdulsalam A. M.; Ebiloma, Godwin U.; Barnes, Rebecca L.; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto; McCulloch, Richard; Koomen, Gerrit-Jan

    2015-01-01

    The human and veterinary disease complex known as African trypanosomiasis continues to inflict significant global morbidity, mortality, and economic hardship. Drug resistance and toxic side effects of old drugs call for novel and unorthodox strategies for new and safe treatment options. We designed methyltriazenyl purine prodrugs to be rapidly and selectively internalized by the parasite, after which they disintegrate into a nontoxic and naturally occurring purine nucleobase, a simple triazene-stabilizing group, and the active toxin: a methyldiazonium cation capable of damaging DNA by alkylation. We identified 2-(3-acetyl-3-methyltriazen-1-yl)-6-hydroxypurine (compound 1) as a new lead compound, which showed submicromolar potency against Trypanosoma brucei, with a selectivity index of >500, and it demonstrated a curative effect in animal models of acute trypanosomiasis. We investigated the mechanism of action of this lead compound and showed that this molecule has significantly higher affinity for parasites over mammalian nucleobase transporters, and it does not show cross-resistance with current first-line drugs. Once selectively accumulated inside the parasite, the prodrug releases a DNA-damaging methyldiazonium cation. We propose that ensuing futile cycles of attempted mismatch repair then lead to G2/M phase arrest and eventually cell death, as evidenced by the reduced efficacy of this purine analog against a mismatch repair-deficient (MSH2−/−) trypanosome cell line. The observed absence of genotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, and cytotoxicity against mammalian cells revitalizes the idea of pursuing parasite-selective DNA alkylators as a safe chemotherapeutic option for the treatment of human and animal trypanosomiasis. PMID:26282430

  7. Hepatic and seric levels of purines in rats experimentally infected by Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed

    Baldissera, Matheus D; Mendes, Ricardo E; Doleski, Pedro H; Bottari, Nathieli B; Casali, Emerson A; Moritz, Cesar Eduardo Jacintho; Cardoso, Valesca V; Henker, Luan C; Christ, Ricardo; Stedille, Fernanda A; Stefani, Lenita M; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate hepatic and seric levels of purines, as well as their breakdown products in rats infected by Fasciola hepatica on days 15 and 87 post-infection (PI). Rats were divided into two groups: uninfected (n = 10) and infected (n = 20). On day 15 (n = 5 for uninfected group and n = 10 for infected group) and 87 PI (n = 5 for uninfected group and n = 10 for infected group), animals were euthanized for sampling to evaluate levels of purines by high-performance liquid chromatography. In serum, ATP increased (P < 0.05) and ADP decreased (P < 0.05) on days 15 and 87 PI, while AMP increased (P < 0.05) only on day 15 PI. Hypoxanthine levels increased (P < 0.05) on days 15 and 87 PI, while adenosine and xanthine levels decreased and increased (P < 0.05), respectively, on day 87 PI. No difference was observed regarding seric inosine and uric acid (P > 0.05). Hepatic ATP, adenosine, and uric acid levels decreased (P < 0.05) on days 15 and 87 PI. AMP levels decreased (P < 0.05) on day 87 PI, while xanthine levels increased (P < 0.05) on day 15 PI in the liver. Also in the liver, hypoxanthine levels increased (P < 0.05) on day 15 PI and decreased (P < 0.05) on day 87 PI. On the other hand, there was no difference on hepatic ADP and inosine levels (P > 0.05). Therefore, it is possible to conclude that F. hepatica infection can change purine levels, which may be associated with an inflammatory process, and these alterations may influence fasciolosis pathogenesis. PMID:26971323

  8. Targeting the parasite's DNA with methyltriazenyl purine analogs is a safe, selective, and efficacious antitrypanosomal strategy.

    PubMed

    Rodenko, Boris; Wanner, Martin J; Alkhaldi, Abdulsalam A M; Ebiloma, Godwin U; Barnes, Rebecca L; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto; McCulloch, Richard; Koomen, Gerrit-Jan; de Koning, Harry P

    2015-11-01

    The human and veterinary disease complex known as African trypanosomiasis continues to inflict significant global morbidity, mortality, and economic hardship. Drug resistance and toxic side effects of old drugs call for novel and unorthodox strategies for new and safe treatment options. We designed methyltriazenyl purine prodrugs to be rapidly and selectively internalized by the parasite, after which they disintegrate into a nontoxic and naturally occurring purine nucleobase, a simple triazene-stabilizing group, and the active toxin: a methyldiazonium cation capable of damaging DNA by alkylation. We identified 2-(3-acetyl-3-methyltriazen-1-yl)-6-hydroxypurine (compound 1) as a new lead compound, which showed submicromolar potency against Trypanosoma brucei, with a selectivity index of >500, and it demonstrated a curative effect in animal models of acute trypanosomiasis. We investigated the mechanism of action of this lead compound and showed that this molecule has significantly higher affinity for parasites over mammalian nucleobase transporters, and it does not show cross-resistance with current first-line drugs. Once selectively accumulated inside the parasite, the prodrug releases a DNA-damaging methyldiazonium cation. We propose that ensuing futile cycles of attempted mismatch repair then lead to G2/M phase arrest and eventually cell death, as evidenced by the reduced efficacy of this purine analog against a mismatch repair-deficient (MSH2(-/-)) trypanosome cell line. The observed absence of genotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, and cytotoxicity against mammalian cells revitalizes the idea of pursuing parasite-selective DNA alkylators as a safe chemotherapeutic option for the treatment of human and animal trypanosomiasis. PMID:26282430

  9. QSAR studies on benzodiazepine receptor binding of purines and amino acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Saha, R N; Meera, J; Agrawal, N; Gupta, S P

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies are reported on the benzodiazepine receptor binding of a series of substituted 9-benzyl-6-dimethylamino-9H-purines and N-(indol-3-ylglyoxylyl)amino acid derivatives. The nitrogen of the five membered heterocyclic ring and the polar substituent in the aromatic ring, present in both series of compounds, form important centres in the binding interaction. We conclude that the receptor must possess a strong nucleophilic centre and a polar site, and that a hydrophobic pocket exists to accommodate hydrophobic moieties. PMID:1654919

  10. Inhibition and structure of Trichomonas vaginalis purine nucleoside phosphorylase with picomolar transition state analogues.

    PubMed

    Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes; Wing, Corin; Ghanem, Mahmoud; Deng, Hua; Wu, Peng; Gupta, Arti; Tyler, Peter C; Evans, Gary B; Furneaux, Richard H; Almo, Steven C; Wang, Ching C; Schramm, Vern L

    2007-01-23

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a parasitic protozoan purine auxotroph possessing a unique purine salvage pathway consisting of a bacterial type purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) and a purine nucleoside kinase. Thus, T. vaginalis PNP (TvPNP) functions in the reverse direction relative to the PNPs in other organisms. Immucillin-A (ImmA) and DADMe-Immucillin-A (DADMe-ImmA) are transition state mimics of adenosine with geometric and electrostatic features that resemble early and late transition states of adenosine at the transition state stabilized by TvPNP. ImmA demonstrates slow-onset tight-binding inhibition with TvPNP, to give an equilibrium dissociation constant of 87 pM, an inhibitor release half-time of 17.2 min, and a Km/Kd ratio of 70,100. DADMe-ImmA resembles a late ribooxacarbenium ion transition state for TvPNP to give a dissociation constant of 30 pM, an inhibitor release half-time of 64 min, and a Km/Kd ratio of 203,300. The tight binding of DADMe-ImmA supports a late SN1 transition state. Despite their tight binding to TvPNP, ImmA and DADMe-ImmA are weak inhibitors of human and P. falciparum PNPs. The crystal structures of the TvPNP x ImmA x PO4 and TvPNP x DADMe-ImmA x PO4 ternary complexes differ from previous structures with substrate analogues. The tight binding with DADMe-ImmA is in part due to a 2.7 A ionic interaction between a PO4 oxygen and the N1' cation of the hydroxypyrrolidine and is weaker in the TvPNP x ImmA x PO4 structure at 3.5 A. However, the TvPNP x ImmA x PO4 structure includes hydrogen bonds between the 2'-hydroxyl and the protein that are not present in TvPNP x DADMe-ImmA x PO4. These structures explain why DADMe-ImmA binds tighter than ImmA. Immucillin-H is a 12 nM inhibitor of TvPNP but a 56 pM inhibitor of human PNP. And this difference is explained by isotope-edited difference infrared spectroscopy with [6-18O]ImmH to establish that O6 is the keto tautomer in TvPNP x ImmH x PO4, causing an unfavorable leaving-group interaction

  11. HCN - A plausible source of purines, pyrimidines and amino acids on the primitive earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, J.-P.; Joshi, P. C.; Edelson, E. H.; Lawless, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    Dilute (0.1 M) solutions of HCN condense to oligomers at pH 9.2, and hydrolysis of these oligomers yields 4,5-dihydroxypyrimidine, orotic acid, 5-hydroxyuracil, adenine, 4-aminoimidazole-5-carboxamide, and amino acids. It is suggested that the three main classes of nitrogen-containing biomolecules - purines, pyrimidines, and amino acids may have originated from HCN on the primitive earth. It is also suggested that the presence of orotic acid and 4-aminoimidazole-5-carboxamide might indicate that contemporary biosynthetic pathways for nucleotides evolved from the compounds released on hydrolysis of HCN oligomers.

  12. 2,6,9-Trisubstituted purines as CRK3 kinase inhibitors with antileishmanial activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Řezníčková, Eva; Popa, Alexandr; Gucký, Tomáš; Zatloukal, Marek; Havlíček, Libor; Bazgier, Václav; Berka, Karel; Jorda, Radek; Popa, Igor; Nasereddin, Abdelmajeed; Jaffe, Charles L; Kryštof, Vladimír; Strnad, Miroslav

    2015-06-01

    Here we describe the leishmanicidal activities of a library of 2,6,9-trisubstituted purines that were screened for interaction with Cdc2-related protein kinase 3 (CRK3) and subsequently for activity against parasitic Leishmania species. The most active compound inhibited recombinant CRK3 with an IC50 value of 162 nM and was active against Leishmania major and Leishmania donovani at low micromolar concentrations in vitro. Its mode of binding to CRK3 was investigated by molecular docking using a homology model. PMID:25937014

  13. Analysis of purine metabolic enzymes in human CD4 Leu 8- and CD4 Leu 8+ lymphocyte subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Mejia, C; Polmar, S H; Peralta-Zaragoza, O; Madrid-Marina, V

    1993-02-01

    1. Specific activities of adenosine deaminase, purine nucleoside phosphorylase, adenosine kinase, 5'-nucleotidase, S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase, AMP deaminase, adenine phosphoribosyl transferase, and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase were analyzed in human CD4 T-lymphocyte subsets. 2. CD4 Leu 8- (helper/inducer) and CD4 Leu 8+ (suppressor/inducer) subpopulations were obtained by panning or fluorescence activated cell sorting techniques using specific monoclonal antibodies. 3. A 45% decrease of 5'-NT AMP activity in the CD4 Leu 8- cells (suppressor/inducer) compared with CD4 total cell population. 4. No statistical significant differences in enzyme activity were found between the subsets analyzed in other purine enzymes. 5. These results suggest that the distribution of purine metabolic enzymes is homogeneous in CD4 Leu 8- and CD4 Leu 8+ T-lymphocyte subpopulations. PMID:8444317

  14. Osmylated DNA, a novel concept for sequencing DNA using nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia

    2015-03-01

    Saenger sequencing has led the advances in molecular biology, while faster and cheaper next generation technologies are urgently needed. A newer approach exploits nanopores, natural or solid-state, set in an electrical field, and obtains base sequence information from current variations due to the passage of a ssDNA molecule through the pore. A hurdle in this approach is the fact that the four bases are chemically comparable to each other which leads to small differences in current obstruction. ‘Base calling’ becomes even more challenging because most nanopores sense a short sequence and not individual bases. Perhaps sequencing DNA via nanopores would be more manageable, if only the bases were two, and chemically very different from each other; a sequence of 1s and 0s comes to mind. Osmylated DNA comes close to such a sequence of 1s and 0s. Osmylation is the addition of osmium tetroxide bipyridine across the C5-C6 double bond of the pyrimidines. Osmylation adds almost 400% mass to the reactive base, creates a sterically and electronically notably different molecule, labeled 1, compared to the unreactive purines, labeled 0. If osmylated DNA were successfully sequenced, the result would be a sequence of osmylated pyrimidines (1), and purines (0), and not of the actual nucleobases. To solve this problem we studied the osmylation reaction with short oligos and with M13mp18, a long ssDNA, developed a UV-vis assay to measure extent of osmylation, and designed two protocols. Protocol A uses mild conditions and yields osmylated thymidines (1), while leaving the other three bases (0) practically intact. Protocol B uses harsher conditions and effectively osmylates both pyrimidines, but not the purines. Applying these two protocols also to the complementary of the target polynucleotide yields a total of four osmylated strands that collectively could define the actual base sequence of the target DNA.

  15. Pronounced and extensive microtubule defects in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae DIS3 mutant.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sarah B; Kiss, Daniel L; Turk, Edward; Tartakoff, Alan M; Andrulis, Erik D

    2011-11-01

    Subunits of the RNA processing exosome assemble into structurally distinct protein complexes that function in disparate cellular compartments and RNA metabolic pathways. Here, in a genetic, cell biological and transcriptomic analysis, we examined the role of Dis3, an essential polypeptide with endo- and 3'→5' exo-ribonuclease activity, in cell cycle progression. We present several lines of evidence that perturbation of DIS3 affects microtubule (MT) localization and structure in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells with a DIS3 mutant: (a) accumulate anaphase and pre-anaphase mitotic spindles; (b) exhibit spindles that are misorientated and displaced from the bud neck; (c) harbour elongated spindle-associated astral MTs; (d) have an increased G1 astral MT length and number; and (e) are hypersensitive to MT poisons. Mutations in the core exosome genes RRP4 and MTR3 and the exosome cofactor gene MTR4, but not other exosome subunit gene mutants, also elicit MT phenotypes. RNA deep sequencing analysis (RNA-seq) shows broad changes in the levels of cell cycle- and MT-related transcripts in mutant strains. Collectively, the data presented in this study suggest an evolutionarily conserved role for Dis3 in linking RNA metabolism, MTs and cell cycle progression. PMID:21919057

  16. Frameshift Deletion by Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 DNA Polymerase Dpo4 T239W Is Selective for Purines and Involves Normal Conformational Change Followed by Slow Phosphodiester Bond Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huidong; Beckman, Jeff W.; Guengerich, F. Peter

    2009-01-01

    The human DNA polymerase κ homolog Sulfolobus solfataricus DNA polymerase IV (Dpo4) produces “−1” frameshift deletions while copying unmodified DNA and, more frequently, when bypassing DNA adducts. As judged by steady-state kinetics and mass spectrometry, bypass of purine template bases to produce these deletions occurred rarely but with 10-fold higher frequency than with pyrimidines. The DNA adduct 1,N2-etheno-2′-deoxyguanosine, with a larger stacking surface than canonical purines, showed the highest frequency of formation of −1 frameshift deletions. Dpo4 T239W, a mutant we had previously shown to produce fluorescence changes attributed to conformational change following dNTP binding opposite cognate bases (Beckman, J. W., Wang, Q., and Guengerich, F. P. (2008) J. Biol. Chem. 283, 36711–36723), reported similar conformational changes when the incoming dNTP complemented the base following a templating purine base or bulky adduct (i.e. the “+1” base). However, in all mispairing cases, phosphodiester bond formation was inefficient. The frequency of −1 frameshift events and the associated conformational changes were not dependent on the context of the remainder of the sequence. Collectively, our results support a mechanism for −1 frameshift deletions by Dpo4 that involves formation of active complexes via a favorable conformational change that skips the templating base, without causing slippage or flipping out of the base, to incorporate a complementary residue opposite the +1 base, in a mechanism previously termed “dNTP-stabilized incorporation.” The driving force is attributed to be the stacking potential between the templating base and the incoming dNTP base. PMID:19837980

  17. Frameshift deletion by Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 DNA polymerase Dpo4 T239W is selective for purines and involves normal conformational change followed by slow phosphodiester bond formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huidong; Beckman, Jeff W; Guengerich, F Peter

    2009-12-11

    The human DNA polymerase kappa homolog Sulfolobus solfataricus DNA polymerase IV (Dpo4) produces "-1" frameshift deletions while copying unmodified DNA and, more frequently, when bypassing DNA adducts. As judged by steady-state kinetics and mass spectrometry, bypass of purine template bases to produce these deletions occurred rarely but with 10-fold higher frequency than with pyrimidines. The DNA adduct 1,N(2)-etheno-2'-deoxyguanosine, with a larger stacking surface than canonical purines, showed the highest frequency of formation of -1 frameshift deletions. Dpo4 T239W, a mutant we had previously shown to produce fluorescence changes attributed to conformational change following dNTP binding opposite cognate bases (Beckman, J. W., Wang, Q., and Guengerich, F. P. (2008) J. Biol. Chem. 283, 36711-36723), reported similar conformational changes when the incoming dNTP complemented the base following a templating purine base or bulky adduct (i.e. the "+1" base). However, in all mispairing cases, phosphodiester bond formation was inefficient. The frequency of -1 frameshift events and the associated conformational changes were not dependent on the context of the remainder of the sequence. Collectively, our results support a mechanism for -1 frameshift deletions by Dpo4 that involves formation of active complexes via a favorable conformational change that skips the templating base, without causing slippage or flipping out of the base, to incorporate a complementary residue opposite the +1 base, in a mechanism previously termed "dNTP-stabilized incorporation." The driving force is attributed to be the stacking potential between the templating base and the incoming dNTP base. PMID:19837980

  18. Xanthine metabolism in Bacillus subtilis: characterization of the xpt-pbuX operon and evidence for purine- and nitrogen-controlled expression of genes involved in xanthine salvage and catabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, L C; Schou, S; Nygaard, P; Saxild, H H

    1997-01-01

    The xpt and pbuX genes from Bacillus subtilis were cloned, and their nucleotide sequences were determined. The xpt gene encodes a specific xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase, and the pbuX gene encodes a xanthine-specific purine permease. The genes have overlapping coding regions, and Northern (RNA) blot analysis indicated an operon organization. The translation of the second gene, pbuX, was strongly dependent on the translation of the first gene, xpt. Expression of the operon was repressed by purines, and the effector molecules appear to be hypoxanthine and guanine. When hypoxanthine and guanine were added together, a 160-fold repression was observed. The regulation of expression was at the level of transcription, and we propose that a transcription termination-antitermination control mechanism similar to the one suggested for the regulation of the purine biosynthesis operon exists. The expression of the xpt-pbuX operon was reduced when hypoxanthine served as the sole nitrogen source. Under these conditions, the level of the hypoxanthine- and xanthine-degrading enzyme, xanthine dehydrogenase, was induced more than 80-fold. The xanthine dehydrogenase level was completely derepressed in a glnA (glutamine synthetase) genetic background. Although the regulation of the expression of the xpt-pbuX operon was found to be affected by the nitrogen source, it was normal in a glnA mutant strain. This result suggests the existence of different signalling pathways for repression of the transcription of the xpt-pbuX operon and the induction of xanthine dehydrogenase. PMID:9098051

  19. Myc-dependent purine biosynthesis affects nucleolar stress and therapy response in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barfeld, Stefan J.; Fazli, Ladan; Persson, Margareta; Marjavaara, Lisette; Urbanucci, Alfonso; Kaukoniemi, Kirsi M.; Rennie, Paul S.; Ceder, Yvonne; Chabes, Andrei; Visakorpi, Tapio; Mills, Ian G.

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor is a key transcription factor contributing to the development of all stages of prostate cancer (PCa). In addition, other transcription factors have been associated with poor prognosis in PCa, amongst which c-Myc (MYC) is a well-established oncogene in many other cancers. We have previously reported that the AR promotes glycolysis and anabolic metabolism; many of these metabolic pathways are also MYC-regulated in other cancers. In this study, we report that in PCa cells de novo purine biosynthesis and the subsequent conversion to XMP is tightly regulated by MYC and independent of AR activity. We characterized two enzymes, PAICS and IMPDH2, within the pathway as PCa biomarkers in tissue samples and report increased efficacy of established anti-androgens in combination with a clinically approved IMPDH inhibitor, mycophenolic acid (MPA). Treatment with MPA led to a significant reduction in cellular guanosine triphosphate (GTP) levels accompanied by nucleolar stress and p53 stabilization. In conclusion, targeting purine biosynthesis provides an opportunity to perturb PCa metabolism and enhance tumour suppressive stress responses. PMID:25869206

  20. Purification and characterization of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from developing embryos of Hyalomma dromedarii.

    PubMed

    Kamel, M Y; Fahmy, A S; Ghazy, A H; Mohamed, M A

    1991-04-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Hyalomma dromedarii, the camel tick, was purified to apparent homogeneity. A molecular weight of 56,000 - 58,000 was estimated for both the native and denatured enzyme, suggesting that the enzyme is monomeric. Unlike purine nucleoside phosphorylase preparations from other tissues, the H. dromedarii enzyme was unstable in the presence of beta-mercaptoethanol. The enzyme had a sharp pH optimum at pH 6.5. It catalyzed the phosphorolysis and arsenolysis of ribo- and deoxyribo-nucleosides of hypoxanthine and guanine, but not of adenine or pyrimidine nucleosides. The Km values of the enzyme at the optimal pH for inosine, deoxyinosine, guanosine, and deoxyguanosine were 0.31, 0.67, 0.55, and 0.33 mM, respectively. Inactivation and kinetic studies suggested that histidine and cysteine residues were essential for activity. The pKa values determined for catalytic ionizable groups were 6-7 and 8-9. The enzyme was completely inactivated by thiol reagents and reactivated by excess beta-mercaptoethanol. The enzyme was also susceptible to pH-dependent photooxidation in the presence of methylene blue, implicating histidine. Initial velocity studies showed an intersecting pattern of double-reciprocal plots of the data, consistent with a sequential mechanism. PMID:1905141

  1. Structural Phylogenomics Reveals Gradual Evolutionary Replacement of Abiotic Chemistries by Protein Enzymes in Purine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Caetano-Anollés, Kelsey; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    The origin of metabolism has been linked to abiotic chemistries that existed in our planet at the beginning of life. While plausible chemical pathways have been proposed, including the synthesis of nucleobases, ribose and ribonucleotides, the cooption of these reactions by modern enzymes remains shrouded in mystery. Here we study the emergence of purine metabolism. The ages of protein domains derived from a census of fold family structure in hundreds of genomes were mapped onto enzymes in metabolic diagrams. We find that the origin of the nucleotide interconversion pathway benefited most parsimoniously from the prebiotic formation of adenine nucleosides. In turn, pathways of nucleotide biosynthesis, catabolism and salvage originated ∼300 million years later by concerted enzymatic recruitments and gradual replacement of abiotic chemistries. Remarkably, this process led to the emergence of the fully enzymatic biosynthetic pathway ∼3 billion years ago, concurrently with the appearance of a functional ribosome. The simultaneous appearance of purine biosynthesis and the ribosome probably fulfilled the expanding matter-energy and processing needs of genomic information. PMID:23516625

  2. Sustainable synthesis and automated deposition: an accessible discovery screening library of fragment-like purines.

    PubMed

    Kamper, Christoph; Korpis, Katharina; Specker, Edgar; Anger, Lennart; Neuenschwander, Martin; Bednarski, Patrick J; Link, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    A sub-library of 88 information-rich lead-like purine derivatives were prepared and deposited in an open access academic screening facility. The rationale for the synthesis of these rigid low complexity structures was the privileged character of the purine heterocycle associated with its inherent probability of interactions with multiple adenine-related targets. Although generally expected to be weak binders in many assays, such fragment-like compounds are estimated to match diverse binding sites. It is suggested that heterocycles with many anchor points for hydrogen bonds can be anticipated to undergo very specific interactions to produce more negative enthalpies and thus provide superior starting points for lead optimization than compounds that owe their activity to entropic effects. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the small compounds on a panel of human cancer cell lines has been investigated and some of them showed marked unselective or selective toxicity. This data may be useful if these fragments are to be incorporated into drug-like structures via metabolically cleavable connections. The sub-library will be implemented as part of the ChemBioNet ( www.chembionet.info ) library, and it is open to screening campaigns of academic research groups striving for a fragment-based approach in their biological assays. PMID:22890959

  3. Genetic Screen Reveals the Role of Purine Metabolism in Staphylococcus aureus Persistence to Rifampicin

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Rebecca; Cui, Peng; Shi, Wanliang; Feng, Jie; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Chronic infections with Staphylococcus aureus such as septicemia, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, and biofilm infections are difficult to treat because of persisters. Despite many efforts in understanding bacterial persistence, the mechanisms of persister formation in S. aureus remain elusive. Here, we performed a genome-wide screen of a transposon mutant library to study the molecular mechanisms involved in persistence of community-acquired S. aureus. Screening of the library for mutants defective in persistence or tolerance to rifampicin revealed many genes involved in metabolic pathways that are important for antibiotic persistence. In particular, the identified mutants belonged to metabolic pathways involved in carbohydrate, amino acid, lipid, vitamin and purine biosynthesis. Five mutants played a role in purine biosynthesis and two mutants, purB, an adenylosuccinate lyase, and purM, a phosphoribosylaminoimidazole synthetase, were selected for further confirmation. Mutants purB and purM showed defective persistence compared to the parental strain USA300 in multiple stress conditions including various antibiotics, low pH, and heat stress. The defect in persistence was restored by complementation with the wildtype purB and purM gene in the respective mutants. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of persistence in S. aureus and provide novel therapeutic targets for developing more effective treatment for persistent infections due to S. aureus. PMID:27025643

  4. Immobilized purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Schistosoma mansoni for specific inhibition studies.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Marcela Cristina; Cardoso, Carmen L; Cass, Quezia B

    2013-05-01

    The parasite Schistosoma mansoni (Sm) depends exclusively on the salvage pathway for its purine requirements. The enzyme purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is, therefore, a promising target for development of antischistosomal agents and an assay for screening of inhibitors. To enable this, immobilized SmPNP reactors were produced. By quantification of hypoxanthine by liquid chromatography, kinetic constants (K M) for the substrate inosine were determined for the free and immobilized enzyme as 110 ± 6.90 μmol L (-1) and 164 ± 13.4 μmol L (-1), respectively, indicating that immobilization did not affect enzyme activity. Furthermore, the enzyme retained 25 % of its activity after four months. Non-Michaelis kinetics for the phosphate substrate, and capacity for Pi-independent hydrolysis were also demonstrated, despite the low rate of enzymatic catalysis. Use of an SmPNP immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER) for inhibitor-screening assays was demonstrated with a small library of 9-deazaguanine analogues. The method had high selectivity and specificity compared with screening by use of the free enzyme by the Kalckar method, and furnished results without the need for verification of the absence of false positives. PMID:23535739

  5. Gout and hyperuricemia in Japan: perspectives for international research on purines and pyrimidines in man.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Tatsuo; Ohno, Iwao; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Peters, Godefridus J

    2011-12-01

    One of the best-known disorders in purine metabolism is accumulation of uric acid leading to gout. Gout is a lifestyle disease, which was nicely illustrated in the joint symposium of the Japanese Society of Gout and Nucleic Acid Metabolism and of the Purine and Pyrimidine Society held in February 2011 in Tokyo, Japan. The westernization of the Japanese diet led to an increase in hyperuricemia in Japanese, which subsequently boosted research in this field, as illustrated in this symposium. As a consequence, Japanese nucleotide research also expanded, leading to the development of not only new drugs for treatment of gout, but also for other diseases such as cancer, viral infections, and cardiovascular diseases. The research on inborn errors led to the identification of various genetic polymorphisms affecting drug metabolism, revealing differences between Asians and non-Asians. Such genetic differences may also affect the enzymatic properties of an enzyme or a transporter, necessitating specific inhibitors. This knowledge will help to introduce personalization of treatment. In this symposium, the interaction between various specialties formed an excellent basis for translational research between these specialties but also from the bench to the clinic. PMID:22132949

  6. Purine-benzimidazole hybrids: synthesis, single crystal determination and in vitro evaluation of antitumor activities.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Alka; Luxami, Vijay; Paul, Kamaldeep

    2015-03-26

    In an effort to identify novel compounds for the treatment of cancer, a diverse array of potential bioactive hybrid, purine-benzimidazole was synthesized in good yields through nucleophilic substitution at C6 position of purine ring with versatile cyclic amines at C2 position. The structures of newly prepared compounds were confirmed by IR, (1)H, (13)C NMR, mass spectroscopy and, in case of 19, by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The newly synthesized compounds were evaluated against 60 human tumour cell lines at one dose concentration level. Compound 6 exhibited significant growth inhibition and was evaluated as 60 cell panel at five dose concentration levels. Compound 6 proved to be 1.25 fold more active than the positive control 5-FU, with GI50 value of 18.12 μM (MG-MID). Interaction of the compounds with Aurora-A enzyme involved in the process of propagation of cancer, has also been investigated. Compound 6 showed selectivity towards Aurora-A kinase inhibition with IC50 value of 0.0l μM. Molecular docking studies in the active binding site provided theoretical support for the experimental biological data acquired. PMID:25728022

  7. Docking and small angle X-ray scattering studies of purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Filgueira de Azevedo, Walter; dos Santos, Giovanni César; dos Santos, Denis Marangoni; Olivieri, Johnny Rizzieri; Canduri, Fernanda; Silva, Rafael Guimarães; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Renard, Gaby; da Fonseca, Isabel Osório; Mendes, Maria Anita; Palma, Mário Sérgio; Santos, Diógenes Santiago

    2003-10-01

    Docking simulations have been used to assess protein complexes with some success. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is a well-established technique to investigate protein spatial configuration. This work describes the integration of geometric docking with SAXS to investigate the quaternary structure of recombinant human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP). This enzyme catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of N-ribosidic bonds of purine nucleosides and deoxynucleosides. A genetic deficiency due to mutations in the gene encoding for PNP causes gradual decrease in T-cell immunity. Inappropriate activation of T-cells has been implicated in several clinically relevant human conditions such as transplant rejection, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and T-cell lymphomas. PNP is therefore a target for inhibitor development aiming at T-cell immune response modulation and has been submitted to extensive structure-based drug design. The present analysis confirms the trimeric structure observed in the crystal. The potential application of the present procedure to other systems is discussed. PMID:13679062

  8. An Ancient Riboswitch Class in Bacteria Regulates Purine Biosynthesis and One-carbon Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Peter B.; Nelson, James W.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Over thirty years ago, ZTP (5-amino-4-imidazole carboxamide riboside 5'-triphosphate), a modified purine biosynthetic intermediate, was proposed to signal 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate (10f-THF) deficiency in bacteria. However, the mechanisms by which this putative alarmone or its precursor ZMP (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide, also known as AICAR) brings about any metabolic changes remain unexplained. Herein we report the existence of a widespread riboswitch class that is most commonly associated with genes related to de novo purine biosynthesis and one carbon metabolism. Biochemical data confirms that members of this riboswitch class selectively bind ZMP and ZTP with nanomolar affinity, while strongly rejecting numerous natural analogs. Indeed, increases in the ZMP/ZTP pool, caused by folate stress in bacterial cells, trigger changes in the expression of a reporter gene fused to representative ZTP riboswitches in vivo. The wide distribution of this riboswitch class suggests that ZMP/ZTP signaling is important for species in numerous bacterial lineages. PMID:25616067

  9. The purine nucleotide cycle. A pathway for ammonia production in the rat kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Bogusky, R T; Lowenstein, L M; Lowenstein, J M

    1976-01-01

    Particle-free extracts prepared from kidney cortex of rat catalyze the formation of ammonia via the purine nucleotide cycle. The cycle generates ammonia and fumarate from aspartate, using catalytic amounts of inosine monophosphate, adenylosuccinate, and adenosine monophosphate. The specific activities of the enzymes of the cycle are 1.27+/-0.27 nmol/mg protein per min (SE) for adenoylosuccinate synthetase, 1.38+/-0.16 for adenylosuccinase, and 44.0+/-3.3 for AMP deaminase. Compared with controls, extracts prepared from kidneys of rats fed ammonium chloride for 2 days show a 60% increase in adenylosuccinate synthetase and a threefold increase in adenylosuccinase activity, and a greater and more rapid synthesis of ammonia and adenine nucleotide from aspartate and inosine monophosphate. Extracts prepared from kidneys of rats fed a potassium-deficient diet show a twofold increase in adenylosuccinate synthetase and a threefold increase in adenylosuccinase activity. In such extracts the rate of synthesis of ammonia and adenine nucleotide from aspartate and inosine monophosphate is also increased. These results show that the reactions of the purine nucleotide cycle are present and can operate in extracts of kidney cortex. The operational capacity of the cycle is accelerated by ammonium chloride feeding and potassium depletion, conditions known to increase renal ammonia excretion. Extracts of kidney cortex convert inosine monophosphate to uric acid. This is prevented by addition of allopurinol of 1-pyrophosphoryl ribose 5-phosphate to the reaction mixture. PMID:821968

  10. Survival of Purines and Pyrimidines Adsorbed on a Solid Surface in a High Radiation Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman-Marmolejo, A.; Ramos-Bernal, S.; Negrón-Mendoza, A.

    2009-12-01

    According to astronomical data, organic molecules are abundant in interstellar space. These molecules have arisen from non-equilibrium processes driven by the energy of photons and cosmic rays. The presence of dirty ices show that a rich low temperature solid phase chemistry takes place in such environments. These chemical evolution reactions have been assumed to proceed mainly within solid surfaces of interstellar dust particles, as well as on macrobodies. Among solid surfaces for chemical processes, alumino-silicates are widely distributed in terrestrial and extraterrestrial bodies, such as meteorites, and the Martian soil, which showed the presence of carbonates and clays. Therefore, alumino-silicates are considered a likely inorganic material to promote organic reactions that might have played a role in the survival of organic molecules adsorbed on their surfaces. It is also known that they have a high surface area and a high affinity for organic compounds. Purines and pyrimidines are important organic compounds due to their role in biological processes. Their synthesis and stability are of paramount importance in chemical evolution. In this work we propose a mechanism to account for the survival of purines and pyrimidines adsorbed in a solid surface in a high radiation field.