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Sample records for propagating low-frequency slow

  1. Low frequency propagation in the earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, Brian; Ananthakrishnan, S.; Desch, M.; Kaiser, M. L.; Weiler, K. W.

    1990-01-01

    Using a model to simulate wave propagation, estimates were obtained on the effect of the earth's magnetosphere on the imaging potential of the Low-Frequency Space Array mission for observations above the ionosphere at frequencies below about 10 MHz. Results of this simulation show that, for imaging at 1.5 MHz, large orbital radii will be required. It is concluded that successful imaging from within the plasmasphere may depend upon the feasibility of correction schemes.

  2. Low Frequency Guided Plate Waves Propagation in Fiber Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lih, S-S.; Bar-Cohen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Conventional destructive techniques for the determination of the elastic stiffness constants of composite materials can be costly and often inaccurate. Reliable nondestructive evaluation methods for monitoring the integrity of composite materials and structures are needed. Guided wave propagation in isotropic plate have been studied. Studies on the low frequency symmetric guide waves are presented.

  3. Long range downwind propagation of low-frequency sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, W. L., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The propagation of low-frequency noise outdoors was studied using as the source a large (80-m diameter) 4-megawatt horizontal axis wind turbine. Acoustic measurements were made with low-frequency microphone systems placed on the ground at five downwind sites ranging from 300 m to 10,000 m (6.3 mile) away from the wind turbine. The wind turbine fundamental was 1 Hz and the wind speed was generally 12 - 15 m/s at the hub height (80 m). The harmonic levels, when plotted versus propagation distance, exhibit a 3 dB per doubling of distance divergence. Two plausible explanations identified for this cylindrical spreading behavior were propagation of the low frequency wind turbine noise via a surface wave and downwind refraction. Surface was amplitude predictions were found to be more than 20 dB smaller than the measured levels. Ray-tracing results were used to qualitatively explain measured trends. A normal mode approach was identified as a candidate method for low-frequency acoustic refraction prediction.

  4. Propagation of a low-frequency rectangular pulse in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Ronold W. P.

    1993-05-01

    As a necessary preliminary to the determination of the electromagnetic field scattered by a metal cylinder submerged in the ocean, the propagation of a low frequency pulse with a rectangular envelope is evaluated numerically as a function of the distance of travel. Graphs of the three component terms and their sum are shown for four distances. The very significant changes in shape and amplitude of the pulse are discussed.

  5. Universality of Slow Earthquakes in the Very Low Frequency Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide, S.; Yabe, S.

    2014-12-01

    Deep tectonic tremors have been observed together with signals in the very low frequency (VLF) band from 0.02 to 0.05 Hz, which have been identified as VLF events in limited regions of subduction zones. By stacking broadband seismograms relative to the timing of tremors, we can detect similar signals in all regions where tremors occur in western Japan. These signals are inverted to obtain the moment tensor, and the fault-normal and slip vectors are generally consistent with the geometry of the plate interface and the direction of plate motion. Therefore, these signals are probably radiated by shear slip on the plate interface. The ratio between the seismic energy rate estimated from the tremors and seismic moment rate in the VLF band is almost proportional, with a proportionality constant (i.e., scaled energy) of around 10-10. The spatial distribution of scaled energy may reflect spatial variations in the frequency-dependent characteristics of slow deformation. This method is broadly applicable if abundant data are available. We demonstrate that focal mechanisms can be determined using VLF signals for Cascadia and Mexican subduction zones.

  6. Studies of the propagation of Low Frequency (LF) radio waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrington, E. M.; Jones, T. B.

    1993-05-01

    Low frequency (30-300 kHz) radio waves can propagate to great distances with little attenuation in the cavity formed by the earth and the ionosphere. Because of the relatively high frequency at LF, many active propagation modes can occur between the transmitter and receiver. Changes in the ionospheric conductivity or reflection height can influence the phase and amplitude of these modes and, hence, produce mutual interference. Because of these interference effects, the propagation is less stable than at VLF and the received field strength becomes more difficult to predict. In the present investigation, the WAVEHOP program was employed in conjunction with a range of ionospheric models to estimate the receiver field strength over a number of experimental paths. The predicted values were compared with those measured in an attempt to validate the ionospheric models and the method of calculation.

  7. Low-frequency dilatational wave propagation through unsaturated porous media containing two immiscible fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, W.-C.; Sposito, G.; Majer, E.

    2007-02-01

    An analytical theory is presented for the low-frequency behavior of dilatational waves propagating through a homogeneous elastic porous medium containing two immiscible fluids. The theory is based on the Berryman-Thigpen-Chin (BTC) model, in which capillary pressure effects are neglected. We show that the BTC model equations in the frequency domain can be transformed, at sufficiently low frequencies, into a dissipative wave equation (telegraph equation) and a propagating wave equation in the time domain. These partial differential equations describe two independent modes of dilatational wave motion that are analogous to the Biot fast and slow compressional waves in a single-fluid system. The equations can be solved analytically under a variety of initial and boundary conditions. The stipulation of 'low frequency' underlying the derivation of our equations in the time domain is shown to require that the excitation frequency of wave motions be much smaller than a critical frequency. This frequency is shown to be the inverse of an intrinsic time scale that depends on an effective kinematic shear viscosity of the interstitial fluids and the intrinsic permeability of the porous medium. Numerical calculations indicate that the critical frequency in both unconsolidated and consolidated materials containing water and a nonaqueous phase liquid ranges typically from kHz to MHz. Thus engineering problems involving the dynamic response of an unsaturated porous medium to low excitation frequencies (e.g. seismic wave stimulation) should be accurately modeled by our equations after suitable initial and boundary conditions are imposed.

  8. Obliquely propagating low frequency electromagnetic shock waves in two dimensional quantum magnetoplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, W.

    2009-04-15

    Linear and nonlinear propagation characteristics of low frequency magnetoacoustic waves in quantum magnetoplasmas are studied employing the quantum magnetohydrodynamic model. In this regard, a quantum Kadomtsev-Petviashvili-Burgers (KPB) equation is derived using the small amplitude expansion method. The dissipation is introduced by taking into account the kinematic viscosity among the plasma constituents. Furthermore, the solution of KPB equation is presented using the tangent hyperbolic (tanh) method. The variation in the fast and slow magnetoacoustic shock profiles with the quantum Bohm potential via increasing number density, obliqueness angle {theta}, magnetic field, and the resistivity are also investigated. It is observed that the aforementioned plasma parameters significantly modify the propagation characteristics of nonlinear magnetoacoustic shock waves in quantum magnetoplasmas. The relevance of the present investigation with regard to dense astrophysical environments is also pointed out.

  9. Low frequency acoustic pulse propagation in temperate forests.

    PubMed

    Albert, Donald G; Swearingen, Michelle E; Perron, Frank E; Carbee, David L

    2015-08-01

    Measurements of acoustic pulse propagation for a 30-m path were conducted in an open field and in seven different forest stands in the northeastern United States consisting of deciduous, evergreen, or mixed tree species. The waveforms recorded in forest generally show the pulse elongation characteristic of propagation over a highly porous ground surface, with high frequency scattered arrivals superimposed on the basic waveform shape. Waveform analysis conducted to determine ground properties resulted in acoustically determined layer thicknesses of 4-8 cm in summer, within 2 cm of the directly measured thickness of the litter layers. In winter the acoustic thicknesses correlated with the site-specific snow cover depths. Effective flow resistivity values of 50-88 kN s m(-4) were derived for the forest sites in summer, while lower values typical for snow were found in winter. Reverberation times (T60) were typically around 2 s, but two stands (deciduous and pruned spruce planted on a square grid) had lower values of about 1.2 s. One site with a very rough ground surface had very low summer flow resistivity value and also had the longest reverberation time of about 3 s. These measurements can provide parameters useful for theoretical predictions of acoustic propagation within forests. PMID:26328690

  10. Low-Frequency Acoustic Signals Propagation in Buried Pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, A. L.; Lapshin, B. M.

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with the issues concerning acoustic signals propagation in the large-diameter oil pipelines caused by mechanical action on the pipe body. Various mechanisms of signals attenuation are discussed. It is shown that the calculation of the attenuation caused only by internal energy loss, i.e, the presence of viscosity, thermal conductivity and liquid pipeline wall friction lead to low results. The results of experimental studies, carried out using the existing pipeline with a diameter of 1200 mm. are shown. It is experimentally proved that the main mechanism of signal attenuation is the energy emission into the environment. The numerical values of attenuation coefficients that are 0,14- 0.18 dB/m for the pipeline of 1200 mm in diameter, in the frequency range from 50 Hz to 500 Hz, are determined.

  11. Using Low Frequency Earthquakes to Examine Slow Slip Beneath the Olympic Peninsula, WA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chestler, S.; Creager, K. C.; Sweet, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Using data from the Array of Arrays (AofA) and Cascadia Arrays for Earthscope (CAFE) experiments we found 61 families of low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) beneath the Olympic Peninsula, Washington. Detections within each family range from Mw1-2. We cross-correlated 6-second long windows within 99 separate hours of tremor data during the 2010 and 2011 Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS) events. For each hour, we stacked the autocorrelation functions from a set of 7 three-component base stations chosen for their high signal-to-noise ratios. We extracted windows with correlation coefficients higher than 9 times the median absolute deviation. These time windows contain our preliminary LFE detections. We clustered the time windows and produced template waveforms by stacking the waveforms corresponding to a given cluster. By scanning templates through the entire time period when the AofA network was active (June 2009 - September 2010 and August 2011), we identify bursts of LFE activity lasting 2-10 days during times of known tremor [Wech, 2010], including the August 2010 and 2011 ETS events and three tremor swarms in November 2009, March 2010, and July 2010, each of which is assumed to signify a slow-slip event (SSE). During the larger ETS events, we can identify the passage of the main rupture front, rapid tremor reversals and/or dip-parallel streaks. These alternate propagation modes are less obvious during smaller SSEs. We examine the spatial extent of the SSEs by determining which families were active during each event. While all families were active during the 2010 and 2011 ETS events, fewer families were active during the smaller SSEs. The families active during smaller SSEs are located farther down dip. Finally, we are applying double-difference methods to obtain more robust LFE locations, which will shed light on the patchy structure of the plate interface.

  12. Study of low-frequency-acoustic- and seismic-wave energy propagation on the shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutenko, A. N.; Manul'chev, D. S.; Solov'ev, A. A.

    2013-05-01

    The paper presents the results of field and numerical studies on the features of low-frequency-acoustic- and seismic-wave energy propagation on the shelf of the Sea of Japan. Measurements were conducted with the Mollusk-07 autonomous vertical acousto-hydrophysical measurement system, an electromagnetic low-frequency resonance emitter, and a pulsed pneumoemitter lowered from the ship, as well as a shore-based resonance seismoemitter.

  13. Low frequency sound attenuation in a flow duct using a thin slow sound material.

    PubMed

    Aurégan, Yves; Farooqui, Maaz; Groby, Jean-Philippe

    2016-05-01

    A thin subwavelength material that can be flush mounted in a duct and that gives an attenuation band at low frequencies in air flow channels is presented. To decrease the material thickness, the sound is slowed in the material using folded side branch tubes. The impedance of the material is compared to the optimal value given by the Cremer condition, which can differ greatly from the air characteristic impedance. Grazing flow on this material increases the losses at the interface between the flow and the material. PMID:27250200

  14. Low frequency sound attenuation in a flow duct using a thin slow sound material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurégan, Yves; Farooqui, Maaz; Groby, Jean-Philippe

    2016-05-01

    We present a thin subwavelength material that can be flush mounted to a duct and which gives a large wide band attenuation at remarkably low frequencies in air flow channels. To decrease the material thickness, the sound is slowed in the material using folded side branch tubes. The impedance of the material is compared to the optimal value, which differs greatly from the characteristic impedance. In particular, the viscous and thermal effects have to be very small to have high transmission losses. Grazing flow on this material increases the losses at the interface between the flow and the material.

  15. Scattering resonance of elastic wave and low-frequency equivalent slow wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, X.; Liu, H.; Hu, T.; Yang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Transmitted wave occurs as fast p-wave and slow p-wave in certain conditions when seismic waves travel through inhomogeneous layers. Energy of slow p-waves is strongest at some frequency band, but rather weak at both high frequency band and low frequency band, called scattering resonance. For practical seismic exploration, the frequency of slow p-wave occurs is below 10Hz, which cannot be explained by Biot's theory which predicts existence of the slow p-wave at ultrasonic band in the porous media. The slow p-wave equation have been derived, but which only adapted to explaining slow p-wave in the ultrasonic band. Experimental observations exhibit that slow p-wave also exists in nonporous media but with enormous low-velocity interbeds. When vertical incidence, elastic wave is simplified as compressing wave, the generation of slow waves is independent on shear wave. In the case of flat interbed and gas bubble, Liu (2006) has studied the transmission of acoustic waves, and found that the slow waves below the 10Hz frequency band can be explained. In the case of general elastic anisotropy medium, the tiheoretical research on the generation of slow waves is insufficient. Aiming at this problem, this paper presents an exponential mapping method based on transmitted wave (Magnus 1954), which can successfully explain the generation of the slow wave transmission in that case. Using the prediction operator (Claerbout 1985) to represent the transmission wave, this can be derived as first order partial differential equation. Using expansions in the frequency domain and the wave number domain, we find that the solutions have different expressions in the case of weak scattering and strong scattering. Besides, the method of combining the prediction operator and the exponential map is needed to extend to the elastic wave equation. Using the equation (Frazer and Fryer 1984, 1987), we derive the exponential mapping solution for the prediction operator of the general elastic medium

  16. Multipath propagation of low-frequency radio waves inferred from high-resolution array analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füllekrug, Martin; Smith, Nathan; Mezentsev, Andrew; Watson, Robert; Astin, Ivan; Gaffet, Stéphane; Evans, Adrian; Rycroft, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The low-frequency radio sky shows the locations of electromagnetic radio sources with a characteristic dilution of precision. Here we report a thorough high-resolution analysis of radio waves from low-frequency (˜20-150 kHz) radio communication transmitters which are recorded with a small aperture array of radio receivers during the day. It is found that the observed dilution of precision results from the array geometry of the radio receivers, a birefringent wave propagation, and the correlated multipath propagation of low-frequency radio waves. The influence of the array geometry on the dilution of precision is reduced by taking into account the impulse response of the array. This procedure reveals for the very first time the splitting of one single radio source into two distinct source locations separated by ˜0.2°-1.9° which result from a birefringent wave propagation. The two locations are yet more clearly identified by using the polarity of the modulated wave number vectors of the radio waves. This polarity is also used to quantify the dilution of precision arising from correlated multipath propagation which is discriminated against wave number fluctuations arising from the timing accuracy of the radio receivers. It is found that ˜69% of the wave number variability is of natural origin and ˜31% originates from the timing accuracy of the receivers. The wave number variability from correlated multipath propagation results in a standard deviation ˜2-8% relative to the source location. This compact measurement of correlated multipath propagation is used to characterize the uncertainty of source locations in the radio sky. The identification of correlated multipath propagation strongly suggests the existence of very fast processes acting on time scales <1 ms in the D region ionosphere with physically meaningful effects on low-frequency radio wave propagation. This important result has implications for practical applications in that the observed multipath

  17. Unlocking the Secrets of Slow Slip in Cascadia Using Low-Frequency Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweet, Justin R.

    Recent discoveries in subduction zones worldwide---including here in Cascadia---have illuminated the once shrouded process of plate convergence below the seismogenic zone. Early geodetic [Dragert, et al., 2001] and seismic [Obara, 2002] signals were observed to correlate in space and time, and were associated with periodic episodes of deep slow slip, termed Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS) [Rogers and Dragert, 2003]. In this dissertation, I present evidence further detailing the process of where, how, and how often deep slow slip occurs using several catalogs of low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) as slow slip indicators. In the first section I compare four distinct LFE families that span the range of the ETS zone beneath western Washington State. I find that LFE behavior varies systematically with depth: LFE moments, swarm durations, and swarm recurrence intervals are all largest in the updip portion of the ETS zone, and smallest in the downdip portion. I interpret these systematic differences as a result of variation in fault strength on the subduction interface---with the strongest coupling found updip (near the seismogenic zone), and the weakest coupling found downdip. In the second section I look within individual LFE families and perform double-difference event relocations to map out the spatial extent of the LFE patch (or patches) responsible for LFE generation. I determine LFE locking efficiency from estimates of LFE density and released seismic moment. I also track LFE migrations over time in an effort to map the progression of slow slip fronts, rapid tremor reversals (RTRs), and other phenomena.

  18. Suspended Matter in the Ocean: Does It Impact Low Frequency Sound Propagation ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, D. G.; Scheifele, P. M.

    2001-05-01

    In littoral waters the outflow of rivers may play the same role for lidar propagation as fronts and eddys have for sonar propagation. River outflows generally produce a runoff lens, which results in refraction effects similar to fronts and eddys but with associated suspended matter.The key question is whether this suspended matter, which would severely degrade lidar propagation, would also have an impact on the logical alternative - low frequency sound propagation ? Two recent studies in the Kara and Laptev Seas have provided an excellent data base for the distribution, density, and composition of the suspended matter outflow from rivers into the sea. The vertical distribution is more complex than the temperature profile and horizontally can still be significant 500 km from the delta. Both these examples are highly seasonally dependent, peaking during the Spring runoff. This data is used to give predictions from previously reported theories on the scattering and absorption of low frequency sound by particulates and dilute sediments. The diverse predictions indicate that at-sea measurements are needed to resole this question.

  19. Modeling of the propagation of low-frequency electromagnetic radiation in the Earth’s magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, N. V. Rudenko, V. V.

    2015-06-15

    A numerical algorithm for solving the set of differential equations describing the propagation of low-frequency electromagnetic radiation in the magnetospheric plasma, including in the presence of geomagnetic waveguides in the form of large-scale plasma density inhomogeneities stretched along the Earth’s magnetic field, has been developed. Calculations of three-dimensional ray trajectories in the magnetosphere and geomagnetic waveguide with allowance for radiation polarization have revealed characteristic tendencies in the behavior of electromagnetic parameters along the ray trajectory. The results of calculations can be used for magnetospheric plasma diagnostics.

  20. Slow-Slip Propagation Speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, A. M.; Ampuero, J.

    2007-12-01

    Combined seismic and geodetic data from subduction zones and the Salton Trough have revealed slow slip events with reasonably well-defined propagation speeds. This in turn is suggestive of a more-or-less well- defined front separating nearly locked regions outside the slipping zone from interior regions that slide much more rapidly. Such crack-like nucleation fronts arise naturally in models of rate-and-state friction for lab-like values of a/b, where a and b are the coefficients of the velocity- and state-dependence of the frictional strength (with the surface being velocity-neutral for a/b=1). If the propagating front has a quasi-steady shape, the propagation and slip speeds are kinematically tied via the local slip gradient. Given a sufficiently sharp front, the slip gradient is given dimensionally by Δτp- r/μ', where Δτp-r is the peak-to-residual stress drop at the front and μ' the effective elastic shear modulus. Rate-and-state simulations indicate that Δτp-r is given reasonably accurately by bσ\\ln(Vmaxθi/Dc), where σ is the effective normal stress, Vmax is the maximum slip speed behind the propagating front, θi is the the value of "state" ahead of the propagating front, and Dc is the characteristic slip distance for state evolution. Except for a coefficient of order unity, Δτp-r is independent of the evolution law. This leads to Vprop/Vmax ~μ'/[bσ\\ln(Vmaxθi/Dc)]. For slip speeds a few orders of magnitude above background, \\ln(Vmaxθi/Dc) can with reasonable accuracy be assigned some representative value (~4-5, for example). Subduction zone transients propagate on the order of 10 km/day or 10-1 m/s. Geodetic data constrain the average slip speed to be a few times smaller than 1 cm/day or 10-7 m/s. However, numerical models indicate that the maximum slip speed at the front may be several times larger than the average, over a length scale that is probably too small to resolve geodetically, so a representative value of Vprop/Vmax may be ~106

  1. Higher order contribution to the propagation characteristics of low frequency transverse waves in a dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, A. P.; Chowdhury, A. Roy; Paul, S. N.

    2004-09-01

    Characteristic features of low frequency transverse wave propagating in a magnetised dusty plasma have been analysed considering the effect of dust-charge fluctu- ation. The distinctive behaviours of both the left circularly polarised and right circularly polarised waves have been exhibited through the analysis of linear and non-linear disper- sion relations. The phase velocity, group velocity, and group travel time for the waves have been obtained and their propagation characteristics have been shown graphically with the variations of wave frequency, dust density and amplitude of the wave. The change in non-linear wave number shift and Faraday rotation angle have also been exhibited with respect to the plasma parameters. It is observed that the effects of dust particles are significant only when the higher order contributions are considered. This may be referred to as the `dust regime' in plasma.

  2. Low-frequency sound propagation modeling over a locally-reacting boundary using the parabolic approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, J. S.; Siegman, W. L.; Jacobson, M. J.

    1989-01-01

    There is substantial interest in the analytical and numerical modeling of low-frequency, long-range atmospheric acoustic propagation. Ray-based models, because of frequency limitations, do not always give an adequate prediction of quantities such as sound pressure or intensity levels. However, the parabolic approximation method, widely used in ocean acoustics, and often more accurate than ray models for lower frequencies of interest, can be applied to acoustic propagation in the atmosphere. Modifications of an existing implicit finite-difference implementation for computing solutions to the parabolic approximation are discussed. A locally-reacting boundary is used together with a one-parameter impedance model. Intensity calculations are performed for a number of flow resistivity values in both quiescent and windy atmospheres. Variations in the value of this parameter are shown to have substantial effects on the spatial variation of the acoustic signal.

  3. Comparison of FFP predictions with measurements of a low-frequency signal propagated in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, K. Keith; Thomson, Dennis W.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental study of low-frequency propagation over a distance of 770 m was previously reported (J. Acoust. Soc. Am. Suppl. 1 86, S120 (1989)). For that study, sound speed profiles were reconstructed entirely from surface-layer micrometeorological data. When the acoustic data were compared with theoretical predictions from a fast field program (FFP), it was found that the FFP underpredicted sound levels measured in a shadow zone. Here, the effect on the predictions of including meteorological data for heights greater than the surface layer, i.e., wind profiles measured by a Doppler sodar, is discussed. Vertical structure of turbulence is simulated by stochastically perturbing the mean profiles, and the agreement between the acoustic data and FFP predictions is improved.

  4. MAVEN observation of an obliquely propagating low-frequency wave upstream of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhunusiri, Suranga; Halekas, J. S.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J. R.; McFadden, J. P.; Mazelle, C.; Brain, D.; Collinson, G.; Harada, Y.; Larson, D. E.; Mitchell, D. L.; Livi, R.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2016-03-01

    We report Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN mission observations of a large amplitude low-frequency plasma wave that propagated oblique to the ambient magnetic field upstream of Mars along with a non-solar-wind plasma component that had a flow velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field. We consider nine possibilities for this wave that include various combinations of its propagation direction, polarization in the solar wind frame, and ion source responsible for its generation. Using the observed wave parameters and the measured plasma parameters as constraints, we uniquely identify the wave by systematically discarding these possibilities. We determine that the wave is a right-hand polarized wave that propagated upstream in the solar wind frame. We find two possibilities for the ion source that can be responsible for this wave generation. They are either newly born pickup protons or reflected solar wind protons from the bow shock. We determine that the observed non-solar-wind component is not responsible for the wave generation, and it is likely that the non-solar-wind component was merely perturbed by the passage of the wave.

  5. Application of ray theory to propagation of low frequency noise from wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, James A.

    1987-01-01

    Ray theory is used to explain data from two experiments (1985 and 1985) on the propagation of low frequency sound generated by the WTS-4 wind turbine. Emphasis is on downwind data, but some upwind measurements taken during the 1985 experiment are also considered. General ray theory for a moving medium is reviewed and ray equations obtained. Restrictions are introduced simplifying the equations and permitting the use of a ray theory program MEDUSA, the computed propagation loss curve of which is compared to the measurements. Good qualitative agreement is obtained with 1984 downwind data. The results indicate that the downwind sound field is that of a near-ground sound channel. Although more scatter is seen in the 1985 data, agreement between theory and data is also good. In particular, the position and magnitude of the jump in the sound levels associated with the beginning of the sound channel is correctly predicted. The theoretical explanation of the upwind data is less successful. Ray theory calculations indicate the formation of a shadow zone that, in fact, does not occur. While no sharp shadow zone is apparent in the data, the general expectation (based on ray theory) that sound levels should be much reduced upwind is confirmed by the data.

  6. A numerical study of transcranial focused ultrasound beam propagation at low frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiangtao; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2005-04-01

    The feasibility of transcranial ultrasound focusing with a non-moving phased array and without skull-specific aberration correction was investigated using computer simulations. Three cadaver skull CT image data sets were incorporated into an acoustic wave transmission model to simulate transskull ultrasound wave propagation. Using a 0.25 MHz hemispherical array (125 mm radius of curvature, 250 mm diameter, 24 255 elements), the simulated beams could be focused and steered with transducer element driving phases and amplitude adjusted for focal beam steering in water (water-path). A total of 82 foci, spanning wide ranges of distance in the three orthogonal dimensions, were simulated to test the focal beam steering capability inside the three skulls. The acoustic pressure distribution in a volume of 20 × 20 × 20 mm3 centred at each focus was calculated with a 0.5 mm spacing in each axis. Clearly defined foci were retained through the skulls (skull-path) in most cases. The skull-path foci were on average 1.6 ± 0.8 mm shifted from their intended locations. The -3 dB skull-path beam width and length were on average 4.3 ± 1.0 mm and 7.7 ± 1.8 mm, respectively. The skull-path sidelobe levels ranged from 25% to 55% of the peak pressure values. The skull-path peak pressure levels were about 10%-40% of their water-path counterparts. Focusing low-frequency beam through skull without skull-specific aberration correction is possible. This method may be useful for applying ultrasound to disrupt the blood-brain barrier for targeted delivery of therapeutic or diagnostic agents, or to induce microbubbles, or for other uses of ultrasound in brain where the required power levels are low and the sharp focusing is not needed.

  7. Illuminating the Transition Between Steady Sliding and Episodic Tremor and Slow Slip Using Low Frequency Earthquakes at the Downdip Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creager, K. C.; Sweet, J.; Vidale, J. E.; Houston, H.

    2012-12-01

    Using data from the Array of Arrays and CAFE experiments, we have identified eight Low-Frequency Earthquake (LFE) families on the subduction plate interface, under the Olympic Peninsula, Washington State. We analyze the time history of each during the time interval 2007-2012. The updip-most family (LFE1) only lights up during the well-known northern Cascadia Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS) events that recur every 15 months. The recurrence intervals shorten from updip LFE1 to the downdip-most family (LFE4), which repeats every 14 days; 30 times more frequently. This presentation focuses on the downdip family. See the Sweet presentation, this session, for an analysis of the updip-most LFE family. LFEs from family 4 typically have durations of about one hour, with as many as 100 repeats during that time. Unlike their updip counterparts, they occur as discrete events without other LFEs or tremor visible during that time. They are strongly modulated by tidal shear stress. Twice as many LFEs occur during encouraging shear stress as during discouraging times. In contrast, these same LFEs occur when tidal normal stress is compressive which should inhibit slip. To reconcile LFE occurrence with favorable tidal Coulomb stress requires that the friction coefficient be less than 0.2 .This extreme sensitivity to very small shear stresses also suggests near lithostatic pore fluid pressures. We propose that the bursts of LFEs in this family correspond to discrete slow-slip events that occur with remarkable regularity. To add up to plate rates, each burst would correspond to a little more than 1 mm of slip, and each individual LFE to a little less than 0.1 mm, assuming all the slip occurs in the form of LFE activity and each LFE ruptures the same spot. One of these event sequences was captured by our 1-km aperture 80-element Big Skidder Array in 2008. Careful stacked correlation functions from 32 LFEs relative to a reference event showed S-P times varied only up to 0.02s, which

  8. Unraveling the Intricacies of Cascadia Slow-Slip Rupture Using Repeating Low-Frequency Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creager, K. C.; Sweet, J. R.; Chestler, S.; Houston, H.; Vidale, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Using data from the 2-year Array of Arrays and the 6-year CAFE seismic experiments on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington, we have identified and located nine groups (families) of repeating Low-Frequency Earthquakes (LFEs). Each family locates within a few km of the plate interface as estimated by active-source wide-angle reflections (Preston et al., Science, 2003) and repeats 100s to 10,000 times in intriguing temporal patterns. At the down-dip end they light up every 1-2 weeks, each with 10s to 100s of LFE repeats, during typical time scales of about one hour. Double-difference locations indicate the LFEs are constrained to a linear patch 2 km long, on the plate interface elongated in the direction of relative plate motion. In contrast, the up-dip-most LFE family lights up primarily during the big 14-month Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS) events. It repeatedly exhibits a pattern of being quiet for 14 months, then lighting up with hundreds of repeats during a few hour period, which we interpret as the main ETS rupture front passing the location of the LFE family. This is followed by a five-day period of quiescence punctuated by about a dozen short-duration episodes of frenzied LFE activity. Monitoring LFE families within 20 km of each other, we find their bursts of activity correlate roughly with each other, but with time lags of 10s of minutes to hours. We interpret this activity as the passage of streaks and Rapid Tremor Reversals that occur during the 5 days after the main rupture front passes. After this time, either the stress is relieved, or the fault has healed and the LFE family is quiet for another 14 months. The magnitudes of the down-dip LFEs, based on S-wave amplitudes, range from -1 to 1. In the limited magnitude range over which our LFE catalog is complete (0.6 magnitude units) they appear to follow a Gutenberg-Richter distribution with a very large b-value of 4. There is a systematic pattern of short-duration LFE activity happening often (every 1

  9. Status report on environment, propagation and system modeling for an elf/vlf/lf(extremely low frequency/very low frequency/low frequency) ionospheric dependent propagation code. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, R.R.; Knapp, W.S.

    1983-06-28

    This report describes the continuing work on WEDCOM during the 1982 contractual period. Environmental models were updated and efficient propagation computational procedures were implemented to reduce execution time. Procedures were developed to provide the WEDCOM user with an automated method of selecting calculation times and ionization profile locations consistent with nuclear environmental sensitivities. VLF/LF signal processing models were adapted for use in WEDCOM and procedures for including atmospheric noise were developed.

  10. Instabilities of low frequency, parallel propagating electromagnetic waves in the earth's foreshock region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sentman, D. D.; Edmiston, J. P.; Frank, L. A.

    1981-01-01

    An instability analysis is presented for parallel and antiparallel propagating electromagnetic waves generated by reflected and diffuse suprathermal ions upstream of the earth's bow shock. Calculations are performed on the basis of upstream particle observations made by the ISEE 1 Quadrispheric Lepedea instrument and low-energy electron measurements made by the ISEE 1 electron spectrometer for a single period. The electromagnetic dispersion relation is computed and the unstable modes and growth times of the fastest growing waves are determined. It is found that the reflected ions destabilize the plasma most strongly at a wave frequency 0.1 that of the ion gyrofrequency by a resonant ion beam instability for waves propagating upstream and by a nonresonant firehose-like instability for waves propagating downstream. The diffuse ions also destabilize the plasma most strongly at the same frequency by means of resonant instabilities of both right- and left-hand polarized waves propagating away from the bow shock.

  11. Acoustical effects of a large ridge on low-frequency sound propagation in stationary and moving atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, J. S.; Jacobson, M. J.; Siegmann, W. L.; Santandrea, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of a ridge on a low-frequency acoustic propagation in quiescent and windy atmospheres are investigated using a parabolic approximation. A logarithmic wind-speed profile, commonly employed to model atmospheric wind currents, is modified and used to model two-dimensional atmospheric flow over a triangularly-shaped hill. The parabolic equation is solved using an implicit finite-difference algorithm. Several examples are examined to determine the combined effects of source-ridge distance, ridge dimensions, wind-speed profile, and CW source frequency on the received acoustic field.

  12. Effect of environmental uncertainty on low frequency sonar propagation in a shallow sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng; Shapiro, Georgy; Thain, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Underwater acoustics is widely used in navigational, scientific and military areas. The technique of coupled ocean-acoustic modelling has been of interest for many years. The predictive capability of acoustic propagation modelling is highly dependent on the marine environment and seabed properties. The direction and intensity of sound propagation is determined by the sound speed gradients in the water column, which in turn are dependent upon variations in temperature and salinity. These variations occur on a range of scales - from climatic (tens of years) to the mesoscale (days and weeks) in time and from hundreds of meters to tens of kilometres in space, especially on the continental shelf. In shallow water, extremely dynamic features such as strong density fronts, intense stratifications, eddies, filaments and other mesoscale features exist persistently. These features described above have significant impacts on underwater sound propagation and therefore must be investigated in order to improve the predictive accuracy of acoustic modelling. Uncertainties in the ocean model simulations are transferred to the acoustic field due to the usage of coupled ocean-acoustic system. The area selected for this study is the Celtic Sea, which is typical European continental shelf shallow water. It is filled with mesoscale eddies which contribute to the formation of the residual (tidally averaged) circulation pattern. The sea is strongly stratified from April to November along with bottom fronts, which adds to the formation of density driven currents. In this paper we employ the ocean model POLCOMS which has been validated for different regions of the world ocean and also been used operationally by the UK Met Office for the European Shelf seas to construct the environmental condition for the acoustic model and the sonar performance model HARCAM, which has been validated formally by the U.K. Ministry of Defence over a variety of frequencies, to generate acoustic propagation data

  13. Study of the propagation characteristics of Very Low Frequency Signal as observed from Indian Permanent station Maitri and Bharati

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasmal, Sudipta; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Pal, Sujay; Palit, Sourav; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-07-01

    Propagation of Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio signal through the Earth-ionosphere waveguide strongly depends on the plasma properties of the ionospheric D layer. Solar extreme ultraviolet radiation plays the central role in controlling physical and chemical properties of the lower ionospheric layers and hence determining the quality and propagation characteristics of a VLF signal. The nature of interference among different propagating modes varies widely with the length of the propagation path. For a very long path, exposure of solar radiation and thus the degree of ionization vary by a large amount along the path. Study of radio signal characteristics in the Antarctic region during summer period in the Southern Hemisphere gives us a unique opportunity to explore such a possibility. In addition, there is an extra feature in this path - the presence of solar radiation and hence the D region for the whole day during summer in at least some sections of the path. We present long-distance propagation characteristics of VLF signals transmitted from VTX (18.2 kHz) and NWC (19.8 kHz) transmitters recorded simultaneously at Indian permanent stations Maitri (latitude 70 ^{o}45 ^{'}S, longitude 11 ^{o}40 ^{'}E) and Bharati (69 ^{o}24 ^{'}S, 76 ^{o}10 ^{'}E). A very stable diurnal variation of the signal (both amplitude and phase) has been obtained with no signature of nighttime fluctuation due the presence of 24 h of sunlight for both the stations. We present the attenuation rate of the dominant waveguide modes corresponding to those propagation conditions where the effects of the Antarctic polar ice on the attenuation of different propagating waveguide modes are visible. VLF signals show the effects of high energetic solar events. Using ion production and recombination profiles by solar irradiance and incorporating D region ion chemistry processes, we calculate the electron density profile at different heights. Using this profile in the Long Wavelength Propagation Capability

  14. A Probe of Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling using the Propagation Characteristics of Very Low Frequency Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwankwo, V. U. J.; Chakrabarti, S. K.; Ogunmodimu, O. A.

    2015-12-01

    The amplitude and phase of VLF/LF radio signal are sensitive to changes in the electrical conductivity of the lower ionosphere when propagated in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. This unique characteristic makes it useful in studying sudden ionospheric disturbances and/or anomaly especially those related to prompt X-ray flux output from solar flares and gamma ray bursts (GRBs). However, strong geomagnetic disturbances and/or storm conditions are known to produce large and global ionospheric disturbances, which can significantly affect VLF radio propagation in the D region ionosphere. Other than X-ray flux enhancement of amplitude and phase, diurnal VLF signature may convey other important information especially those related to geomagnetic disturbance/storm induced ionospheric changes. In this paper, using the data of three propagation paths (at latitudes 40-54), we performed detail analysis of the trend of variations of aspects VLF diurnal signal under varying solar and/or geomagnetic space environmental conditions for identification of possible geomagnetic footprint on the ionosphere. We found that trend of variations significantly reflected the prevailing space weather conditions of various time scales. The `dipping' of the signal diurnal amplitude have shown noteworthy consistency with significantly geomagnetic perturbed and/or storm conditions in the time scale of 1-2 days. We also found that dipping of most MDP signal occurred irrespective of the time (of the day), which an event happened, while those of MBSR, MASS, SRT and SST appear to largely depend on event occurrence time and/or duration. Pre-sunset event had more influence on the SST and MASS (dusk signal), while pre-sunrise event had more influence on the SRT and MBSR (dawn signal), and depending on the duration of the event, impact could be extended to the neighbouring point/component in succession. The induced dipping varied with geomagnetic activity/event intensity and/or duration, as well as the

  15. ION HEATING BY A SPECTRUM OF OBLIQUELY PROPAGATING LOW-FREQUENCY ALFVEN WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Quanming; Chen Liu

    2009-10-10

    Ion stochastic heating by a monochromatic Alfven wave, which propagates obliquely to the background magnetic field, has been studied by Chen et al. It is shown that ions can be resonantly heated at frequencies a fraction of the ion cyclotron frequency when the wave amplitude is sufficiently large. In this paper, the monochromatic wave is extended to a spectrum of left-hand polarized Alfven waves. When the amplitude of the waves is small, the components of the ion velocity have several distinct frequencies, and their motions are quasi-periodic. However, when the amplitude of the waves is sufficiently large, the components of the ion velocity have a spectrum of continuous frequencies near the ion cyclotron frequency due to the nonlinear coupling between the Alfven waves and the ion gyromotion, and the ion motions are stochastic. Compared with the case of a monochromatic Alfven wave, the threshold of the ion stochastic heating by a spectrum of Alfven waves is much lower. Even when their frequencies are only several percent of the ion cyclotron frequency, the ions can also be stochastically heated. The relevance of this heating mechanism to solar corona is also discussed.

  16. Difference in Simulated Low-Frequency Sound Propagation in the Various Species of Baleen Whale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Toshio; Naoi, Jun; Futa, Koji; Kikuchi, Toshiaki

    2004-05-01

    Whales found in the north Pacific are known to migrate over several thousand kilometers, from the Alaskan coast where they heartily feed during the summer to low latitude waters where they breed during the winter. Therefore, it is assumed that whales are using the “deep sound channel” for their long-distance communication. The main objective of this study is to clarify the behaviors of baleen whales from the standpoint of acoustical oceanography. Hence, authors investigated the possibility of long distance communication in various species of baleen whales, by simulating the long-distance propagation of their sound transmission, by applying the mode theory to actual sound speed profiles and by simulating their transmission frequencies. As a result, the possibility of long distance communication among blue whales using the deep sound channel was indicated. It was also indicated that communication among fin whales and blue whales can be made possible by coming close to shore slopes such as the Island of Hawaii.

  17. Observations and transport theory analysis of low frequency, acoustic mode propagation in the Eastern North Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Chandrayadula, Tarun K; Colosi, John A; Worcester, Peter F; Dzieciuch, Matthew A; Mercer, James A; Andrew, Rex K; Howe, Bruce M

    2013-10-01

    Second order mode statistics as a function of range and source depth are presented from the Long Range Ocean Acoustic Propagation EXperiment (LOAPEX). During LOAPEX, low frequency broadband signals were transmitted from a ship-suspended source to a mode-resolving vertical line array. Over a one-month period, the ship occupied seven stations from 50 km to 3200 km distance from the receiver. At each station broadband transmissions were performed at a near-axial depth of 800 m and an off-axial depth of 350 m. Center frequencies at these two depths were 75 Hz and 68 Hz, respectively. Estimates of observed mean mode energy, cross mode coherence, and temporal coherence are compared with predictions from modal transport theory, utilizing the Garrett-Munk internal wave spectrum. In estimating the acoustic observables, there were challenges including low signal to noise ratio, corrections for source motion, and small sample sizes. The experimental observations agree with theoretical predictions within experimental uncertainty. PMID:24116512

  18. Rupture propagation patterns of deep low-frequency earthquakes depending on source structure and frictional property: numerical analysis based on dynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, R.; Ando, R.; Hori, T.; Ide, S.

    2010-12-01

    Deep nonvolcanic tremor and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) occurred along the subduction zones in southwest Japan and Cascadia are explained as shear slips on the plate interface [Ide et al., 2007a], and are considered as ruptures of relatively unstable patches within the region where slow slip event (SSE) occurs [Ito et al., 2007]. The tremor sources migrate with the velocity of about 10 km/day along strike [Obara, 2002], and 100 km/hour along dip [Shelly et al., 2007]. Further, the moment rate spectra of the LFEs have a tendency that decay at the inverse proportional to the frequency [Ide et al., 2007b]. To explain these anisotropies of migration speed and spectral property, Ando et al. [2010] proposed a dynamic model that unstable patches rupture by passing stress pulse of SSE over the patches. The aim of this study is to investigate the frictional properties and detailed structure of LFE source to explain the spectral characteristics and moment rate function based on their model. The LFE source model comprises clustered unstable patches. To model the source process, which radiates seismic waves, we employed the dynamic boundary integral equation method [Ando and Yamashita, 2007] in a 3D full space with a triangular mesh [Tada, 2006]. Within these clusters, some fluctuations are added so that the locations and sizes of their constituent patches follow a Gaussian distribution. We present physical quantities in nondimensionalized form. In this study, we modeled an LFE source with many small patches or large several patches distributed in dense or sparse. For each patch distributions, we calculated rupture propagation with various values of the patch viscosity, background viscosity, and background frictional strength. In the simulations, both passive and spontaneous ruptures appear depending on the viscosity, frictional strength, and patch distribution. The former is caused by the assumed stress pulse and the latter is by interaction between the patches and

  19. ON THE LOW-FREQUENCY BOUNDARY OF SUN-GENERATED MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE IN THE SLOW SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Shergelashvili, Bidzina M.; Fichtner, Horst

    2012-06-20

    New aspects of the slow solar wind turbulent heating and acceleration are investigated. A physical meaning of the lower boundary of the Alfven wave turbulent spectra in the solar atmosphere and the solar wind is studied and the significance of this natural parameter is demonstrated. Via an analytical and quantitative treatment of the problem we show that a truncation of the wave spectra from the lower frequency side, which is a consequence of the solar magnetic field structure and its cyclic changes, results in a significant reduction of the heat production and acceleration rates. An appropriate analysis is presented regarding the link of the considered problem with existing observational data and slow solar wind initiation scenarios.

  20. Low-frequency stimulation induces long-term depression and slow onset long-term potentiation at perforant path-dentate gyrus synapses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Jossina; Morales, Isaiah S; Villarreal, Desiree M; Derrick, Brian E

    2014-03-01

    The expression of homosynaptic long-term depression (LTD) is thought to mediate a crucial role in sustaining memory function. Our in vivo investigations of LTD expression at lateral (LPP) and medial perforant path (MPP) synapses in the dentate gyrus (DG) corroborate prior demonstrations that PP-DG LTD is difficult to induce in intact animals. In freely moving animals, LTD expression occurred inconsistently among LPP-DG and MPP-DG responses. Interestingly, following acute electrode implantation in anesthetized rats, low-frequency stimulation (LFS; 900 pulses, 1 Hz) promotes slow-onset LTP at both MPP-DG and LPP-DG synapses that utilize distinct induction mechanisms. Systemic administration of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist (+/-)-cyclopiperidine-6-piperiperenzine (CPP; 10 mg/kg) 90 min before LFS selectively blocked MPP-DG but not LPP-DG slow onset LTP, suggesting MPP-DG synapses express a NMDA receptor-dependent slow onset LTP whereas LPP-DG slow onset LTP induction is NMDA receptor independent. In experiments where paired-pulse LFS (900 paired pulses, 200-ms paired-pulse interval) was used to induce LTD, paired-pulse LFS of the LPP resulted in rapid onset LTP of DG responses, whereas paired-pulse LFS of the MPP induced slow onset LTP of DG responses. Although LTD observations were very rare following acute electrode implantation in anesthetized rats, LPP-DG LTD was demonstrated in some anesthetized rats with previously implanted electrodes. Together, our data indicate in vivo PP-DG LTD expression is an inconsistent phenomenon that is primarily observed in recovered animals, suggesting perturbation of the dentate through surgery-related tissue trauma influences both LTD incidence and LTP induction at PP-DG synapses in vivo. PMID:24335215

  1. Propagated infra-slow intrinsic brain activity reorganizes across wake and slow wave sleep

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Anish; Snyder, Abraham Z; Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Laufs, Helmut; Raichle, Marcus E

    2015-01-01

    Propagation of slow intrinsic brain activity has been widely observed in electrophysiogical studies of slow wave sleep (SWS). However, in human resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI), intrinsic activity has been understood predominantly in terms of zero-lag temporal synchrony (functional connectivity) within systems known as resting state networks (RSNs). Prior rs-fMRI studies have found that RSNs are generally preserved across wake and sleep. Here, we use a recently developed analysis technique to study propagation of infra-slow intrinsic blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals in normal adults during wake and SWS. This analysis reveals marked changes in propagation patterns in SWS vs. wake. Broadly, ordered propagation is preserved within traditionally defined RSNs but lost between RSNs. Additionally, propagation between cerebral cortex and subcortical structures reverses directions, and intra-cortical propagation becomes reorganized, especially in visual and sensorimotor cortices. These findings show that propagated rs-fMRI activity informs theoretical accounts of the neural functions of sleep. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10781.001 PMID:26551562

  2. The propagation characteristics of electromagnetic waves through plasma in the near-field region of low-frequency loop antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, DongLin; Li, XiaoPing; Xie, Kai; Liu, ZhiWei

    2015-10-01

    A high-speed vehicle flying through the atmosphere between 100 and 20 km may suffer from a "communication blackout." In this paper, a low frequency system with an on-board loop antenna to receive signals is presented as a potential blackout mitigation method. Because the plasma sheath is in the near-field region of the loop antenna, the traditional scattering matrix method that is developed for the far-field region may overestimate the electromagnetic (EM) wave's attenuation. To estimate the EM wave's attenuation in the near-field region, EM interference (EMI) shielding theory is introduced. Experiments are conducted, and the results verify the EMI shielding theory's effectiveness. Simulations are also conducted with different plasma parameters, and the results obtained show that the EM wave's attenuation in the near-field region is far below than that in the far-field region. The EM wave's attenuation increases with the increase in electron density and decreases with the increase in collision frequency. The higher the frequency, the larger is the EM wave's attenuation. During the entire re-entry phase of a RAM-C module, the EM wave's attenuations are below 10 dB for EM waves with a frequency of 1 MHz and below 1 dB for EM waves with a frequency of 100 kHz. Therefore, the low frequency systems (e.g., Loran-C) may provide a way to transmit some key information to high-speed vehicles even during the communication "blackout" period.

  3. The propagation characteristics of electromagnetic waves through plasma in the near-field region of low-frequency loop antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, DongLin Li, XiaoPing; Xie, Kai; Liu, ZhiWei

    2015-10-15

    A high-speed vehicle flying through the atmosphere between 100 and 20 km may suffer from a “communication blackout.” In this paper, a low frequency system with an on-board loop antenna to receive signals is presented as a potential blackout mitigation method. Because the plasma sheath is in the near-field region of the loop antenna, the traditional scattering matrix method that is developed for the far-field region may overestimate the electromagnetic (EM) wave's attenuation. To estimate the EM wave's attenuation in the near-field region, EM interference (EMI) shielding theory is introduced. Experiments are conducted, and the results verify the EMI shielding theory's effectiveness. Simulations are also conducted with different plasma parameters, and the results obtained show that the EM wave's attenuation in the near-field region is far below than that in the far-field region. The EM wave's attenuation increases with the increase in electron density and decreases with the increase in collision frequency. The higher the frequency, the larger is the EM wave's attenuation. During the entire re-entry phase of a RAM-C module, the EM wave's attenuations are below 10 dB for EM waves with a frequency of 1 MHz and below 1 dB for EM waves with a frequency of 100 kHz. Therefore, the low frequency systems (e.g., Loran-C) may provide a way to transmit some key information to high-speed vehicles even during the communication “blackout” period.

  4. The Propagation of Slow Wave Potentials in Pea Epicotyls.

    PubMed Central

    Stahlberg, R.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    Slow wave potentials are considered to be electric long-distance signals specific for plants, although there are conflicting ideas about a chemical, electrical, or hydraulic mode of propagation. These ideas were tested by comparing the propagation of hydraulic and electric signals in epicotyls of pea (Pisum sativum L). A hydraulic signal in the form of a defined step increase in xylem pressure (Px) was applied to the root of intact seedlings and propagated nearly instantly through the epicotyl axis while its amplitude decreased with distance from the pressure chamber. This decremental propagation was caused by a leaky xylem and created an axial Px gradient in the epicotyl. Simultaneously along the epicotyl surface, depolarizations appeared with lag times that increased acropetally with distance from the pressure chamber from 5 s to 3 min. When measured at a constant distance, the lag times increased as the size of the applied pressure steps decreased. We conclude that the Px gradient in the epicotyl caused local depolarizations with acropetally increasing lag times, which have the appearance of an electric signal propagating with a rate of 20 to 30 mm min-1. This static description of the slow wave potentials challenges its traditional classification as a propagating electric signal. PMID:12223601

  5. Slow and fast light propagation in nonlinear Kerr media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiguang; Ma, Seongmin; Wang, Huitian; Jung, S. S.

    2005-04-01

    Sub- and superluminal propagation of light pulse in Kerr materials has been investigated. Group velocities as slow as much less than 1 millimeter per second to as fast as negative several hundreds meters per second can be easily obtained in Kerr medium, which possesses large nonlinear refractive index and long relaxation time, such as Cr doped Alexandrite, Ruby, and GdAlO3. The physical mechanism is the strong highly dispersive coupling between different frequency components of the pulse. The new mechanism of slowing down pulses as well as producing superluminal pulses enlarges the very specific materials to all kinds of nonlinear optical materials.

  6. Low-Frequency Type-II Radio Detections and Coronagraph Data Employed to Describe and Forecast the Propagation of 71 CMEs/Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremades, H.; Iglesias, F. A.; St. Cyr, O. C.; Xie, H.; Kaiser, M. L.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2015-09-01

    Motivated by improving predictions of arrival times at Earth of shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we have analyzed 71 Earth-directed events in different stages of their propagation. The study is primarily based on approximated locations of interplanetary (IP) shocks derived from Type-II radio emissions detected by the Wind/WAVES experiment during 1997 - 2007. Distance-time diagrams resulting from the combination of white-light corona, IP Type-II radio, and in-situ data lead to the formulation of descriptive profiles of each CME's journey toward Earth. Furthermore, two different methods for tracking and predicting the location of CME-driven IP shocks are presented. The linear method, solely based on Wind/WAVES data, arises after key modifications to a pre-existing technique that linearly projects the drifting low-frequency Type-II emissions to 1 AU. This upgraded method improves forecasts of shock-arrival times by almost 50 %. The second predictive method is proposed on the basis of information derived from the descriptive profiles and relies on a single CME height-time point and on low-frequency Type-II radio emissions to obtain an approximate value of the shock arrival time at Earth. In addition, we discuss results on CME-radio emission associations, characteristics of IP propagation, and the relative success of the forecasting methods.

  7. Low-Frequency Type II Radio Detections and Coronagraph Data to Describe and Forecast the Propagation of 71 CMEs/Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St Cyr, O. C.; Cremades, H.; Iglesias, F. A.; Xie, H.; Kaiser, M. L.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2015-12-01

    Motivated by improving predictions of arrival times at Earth of shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we have analyzed 71 Earth-directed events in different stages of their propagation. The study is primarily based on approximated locations of interplanetary (IP) shocks derived from Type-II radio emissions detected by the Wind/WAVES experiment during 1997-2007. Distance-time diagrams resulting from the combination of white-light corona, IP Type-II radio, and in situ data lead to the formulation of descriptive profiles of each CME's journey toward Earth. Furthermore, two different methods to track and predict the location of CME-driven IP shocks are presented. The linear method, solely based on Wind/WAVES data, arises after key modifications to a pre-existing technique that linearly projects the drifting low-frequency Type-II emissions to 1 AU. This upgraded method improves forecasts of shock arrival time by almost 50%. The second predictive method is proposed on the basis of information derived from the descriptive profiles, and relies on a single CME height-time point and on low-frequency Type-II radio emissions to obtain an approximate value of the shock arrival time at Earth. In addition, we discuss results on CME-radio emission associations, characteristics of IP propagation, and the relative success of the forecasting methods.

  8. Shift of the interference extrema of low-frequency acoustic propagations near the axis of a deep sound channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seongwook; Na, Jungyul; Yoo, Jae Myung; Jurng, Moon-Sub; Oh, Suntaek

    2015-07-01

    Broadband interference patterns measured from acoustic propagations near the axis of a deep sound channel are interpreted. Analyses using mode theory for the waveguide with bilinear sound speed profiles show that the increase in sound speed without gradient variation shifts the positions of intensity maxima to higher frequencies in a fixed range whereas the increase in the gradient shifts the maxima to lower frequencies. Analytic results imply that the frequency shift of intensity extrema appearing in the measurements could be explained by the increase in the sound speed gradient above the axis of the deep sound channel.

  9. Elephant low-frequency vocalizations propagate in the ground and seismic playbacks of these vocalizations are detectable by wild African elephants (Loxodonta africana)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell-Rodwell, Caitlin E.; Wood, Jason D.; Gunther, Roland; Klemperer, Simon; Rodwell, Timothy C.; Puria, Sunil; Sapolsky, Robert; Kinzley, Colleen; Arnason, Byron T.; Hart, Lynette A.

    2001-05-01

    Seismic correlates of low-frequency vocalizations in African and Asian elephants propagate in the ground at different velocities, with the potential of traveling farther than their airborne counterparts. A semblance technique applied to linear moveouts on narrow-bandpass-filtered data, coupled with forward modeling, demonstrates that the complex waves observed are the interference of an air wave and a Rayleigh wave traveling at the appropriate velocities. The Rayleigh wave appears to be generated at or close to the elephant, either by coupling through the elephant's body or through the air near the body to the ground. Low-frequency elephant vocalizations were reproduced seismically and played back to both a captive elephant and to elephant breeding herds in the wild, monitoring the elephants' behavioral responses, spacing between herd members and time spent at the water hole as an index of heightened vigilance. Breeding herds detected and responded appropriately to seismically transmitted elephant warning calls. The captive studies promise to elucidate a vibrotactile threshold of sensitivity for the elephant foot. Elephants may benefit from the exploitation of seismic cues as an additional communication modality, thus expanding their signaling repertoire and extending their range of potential communication and eavesdropping beyond that possible with airborne sound.

  10. Investigation into the propagation of Omega very low frequency signals and techniques for improvement of navigation accuracy including differential and composite omega

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    An analysis of Very Low Frequency propagation in the atmosphere in the 10-14 kHz range leads to a discussion of some of the more significant causes of phase perturbation. The method of generating sky-wave corrections to predict the Omega phase is discussed. Composite Omega is considered as a means of lane identification and of reducing Omega navigation error. A simple technique for generating trapezoidal model (T-model) phase prediction is presented and compared with the Navy predictions and actual phase measurements. The T-model prediction analysis illustrates the ability to account for the major phase shift created by the diurnal effects on the lower ionosphere. An analysis of the Navy sky-wave correction table is used to provide information about spatial and temporal correlation of phase correction relative to the differential mode of operation.

  11. Low-Frequency Radioastronomy Basics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarka, P.

    2011-04-01

    With the many large instruments in construction or in project, the present epoch corresponds to a renewal of low-frequency radioastronomy. The field will attract new researchers and students not expert of the radioastronomy techniques. With this audience in mind, we present here a very brief introduction to radioastronomy basics, including propagation and polarization of low-frequency radio waves as well as instrumental aspects. Basic formulas are given. The references and internet links will allow the interested reader to go further.

  12. On whether azimuthal isotropy and alongshelf translational invariance are present in low-frequency acoustic propagation along the New Jersey shelfbreak.

    PubMed

    Lynch, James F; Emerson, Chris; Abbot, Philip A; Gawarkiewicz, Glen G; Newhall, Arthur E; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Duda, Timothy F

    2012-02-01

    To understand the issues associated with the presence (or lack) of azimuthal isotropy and horizontal (along isobath) invariance of low-frequency (center frequencies of 600 Hz and 900 Hz) acoustic propagation in a shelfbreak environment, a series of experiments were conducted under the Autonomous Wide-Aperture Cluster for Surveillance component of the Shallow Water 2006 experiment. Transmission loss data reported here were from two mobile acoustic sources executing (nearly) circular tracks transmitting to sonobuoy receivers in the circle centers, and from one 12.5 km alongshelf acoustic track. The circle radii were 7.5 km. Data are from September 8, 2006. Details of the acoustic and environmental measurements are presented. Simple analytic and computer models are used to assess the variability expected due to the ocean and seabed conditions encountered. A comparison of model results and data is made, which shows preliminary consistency between the data and the models, but also points towards further work that should be undertaken specifically in enlarging the range and frequency parameter space, and in looking at integrated transmission loss. PMID:22352604

  13. Slow crack propagation in glass and creep prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, Celine; Fortin, Jerome; Gueguen, Yves

    2013-04-01

    The context of our study is the observation of the time-dependent deformation of cracked glass. The aim of our study is to observe the slow crack propagation, to quantify it and to predict finally the creep behavior. We performed creep experiments in compaction conditions in a triaxial cell, on cracked boro-silicate glass samples. The chemical composition of the investigated glass is very close to the composition of waste vitrified packages. The matrix of the original glass (OG) is perfectly amorphous, without porosity. A few isolated air bubbles are trapped during the glass flow. Cracks are introduced in the OG through thermal shocks. Strain and acoustic emission (AE) are recorded. Several experiments are performed at different confining pressures (15 or 25 MPa), different pore fluid conditions (with argon gas, considered as the dry case, with tap water saturated porosity, or with distilled water) and different temperatures (ambiant temperature, 50oC or 80oC). Linear increase of the volumetric strain is first observed. A dilatancy increase is recorded. Note that dilatancy does not appear in constant strain rate tests. Constant stress tests show that dilatancy develops during a time interval that depends on the stress level. In addition AE rate are recorded. A non zero AE rate is an evidence of crack propagation. We use a micro-mechanical model that gives the stress intensity factor at the crack tips. This factor depends on stress and geometrical parameters (all known). An exponential law describe the rate of crack propagation, as a function of temperature, environment and applied stresses. This model allows us to predict the creep rate in glass. Assuming a constant crack aspect ratio, crack length and volumetric strain are related. The volumetric strain rate is calculated from model and compared to the data.

  14. Modeling of slow crack propagation in heterogeneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengliné, Olivier; Stormo, Arne; Hansen, Alex; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2015-04-01

    Crack propagation in heterogeneous media is a rich problem which involves the interplay of various physical processes. The problem has been intensively investigated theoretically, numerically, and experimentally, but a unifying model capturing all the experimental features has not been entirely achieved despite its broad range of implications in Earth sciences problems. The slow propagation of a crack front where long range elastic interactions are dominant, is of crucial importance to fill the gap between experiments and models. Several theoretical and numerical works have been devoted to quasi-static models. Such models give rise to an intermittent local activity characterized by a depinning transition and can be viewed as a critical phenomenon. However these models fail to reproduce all experimental conditions, notably the front morphology does not display any cross-over length with two different roughness exponents above and below the cross-over as observed experimentally. Here, we compare experimental observations of a slow interfacial crack propagation along an heterogeneous interface to numerical simulations from a cantilever fiber bundle model. The model consists of a planar set of brittle fibers between an elastic half-space and a rigid square root shaped plate which loads the system in a cantilever configuration. The latter is shown to provide an improved opening and stress field in the process zone around the crack tip. The model shares a similar scale invariant roughening of the crack front both at small and large scales and a similar power law distribution of the local velocity of the crack front to experiments. Implications for induced seismicity at the brittle-creep transition are discussed. We show that a creep route for induced seismicity is possible when heterogeneities exist along the fault. Indeed, seismic event occurrences in time and space are in strong relation with the development of the aseismic motion recorded during the experiment and the

  15. Crowdsourcing a Spatial Temporal Study of Low Frequency (LF) Propagation Effects Due to a Total Solar Eclipse: Engaging Students and Citizens in STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumsden, N. A.; Lukes, L.; Nelson, J.; Liles, W. C.; Kerby, K. C.; Crowov, F.; Rockway, J.

    2015-12-01

    The first experiments to study the effects of a solar eclipse on radio wave propagation were done in 1912 utilizing Low Frequency (LF; 30 - 300 kHz) radio waves at a handful of sites across Europe before any theory of the ionosphere had been confirmed and even before the word "ionosphere" existed. In the 1920s, a large cooperative experiment was promoted in the U.S. by Scientific American magazine. They collected over 2000 reports of AM broadcast stations from throughout the U.S. Unfortunately, many of the submissions were unusable because they lacked critical information such as date, time or location. We propose to use the 2017 solar eclipse over the continental U.S. to conduct the first wide-area LF propagation study. To perform this study, we plan to crowdsource the collection of the data by engaging student groups, citizens, and the scientific community. The tools for the different collection stations will consist of a simple homemade antenna, a simple receiver to convert the radio frequency (RF) signals to audio frequencies and a smart phone app. By using the time, date and location features of the smart phone, the problems experienced in the Scientific American experiment will be minimized. By crowdsourcing the observation sites, a number of different short, medium and long-paths studies can be obtained as the total eclipse crosses the continental U.S. The transmitter for this experiment will be WWVB located near Fort Collins, Colorado on 60.000 kHz. This is a U.S. frequency standard that is operated by NIST and transmits time codes. A second frequency, 55.500 kHz transmitted by a LF station in Dixon, CA is also being considered for this experiment. We will present an overall strategy for recruiting participants/crowdsourcing the RF collections during the 2017 total solar eclipse. Preliminary coverage calculations will be presented for WWVB and Dixon, as well as path loss calculations that can be expected during the solar eclipse condition. We will also

  16. Propagation and damping of slow MHD waves in a flowing viscous coronal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nagendra; Kumar, Anil; Murawski, K.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the propagation of slow MHD waves in a flowing viscous solar coronal plasma. The compressive viscosity and steady flow along and opposite to the wave propagation are taken into account to study the damping of slow waves. We numerically solve the MHD equations by MacCormack method to examine the effect of steady flow on the damping of slow MHD waves in viscous solar coronal plasma. Amplitude of velocity perturbation and damping time of slow waves decrease with the increase in the value of Mach number. Flow causes a phase shift in the perturbed velocity amplitude and an increase in wave period. The damping of slow waves in flowing viscous plasma is stronger than the damping of waves in viscous plasma. Slow wave in backward flow damps earlier than the wave in forward flow.

  17. Superluminal and Ultra-Slow Light Propagation in Room-Temperature Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Robert W.; Bigelow, Matthew S.; Lepeshkin, Nick N.

    2004-12-01

    We have observed ultra-slow light propagation (57 m s-1) in ruby and superluminal (-800 m s-1) light propagation in alexandrite at room temperature. The modified light speed results from the rapid variation in refractive index associated with spectral holes and antiholes produced by the process of coherent population oscillations.

  18. Correlations between Kilohertz Quasi-periodic Oscillations and Low-Frequency Features Attributed to Radial Oscillations and Diffusive Propagation in the Viscous Boundary Layer around a Neutron Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Osherovich, Vladimir

    1999-06-01

    We present a dimensional analysis of two characteristic timescales in the boundary layer where the disk adjusts to the rotating neutron star (NS). The boundary layer is treated as a transition region between the NS surface and the first Keplerian orbit. The radial transport of the angular momentum in this layer is controlled by a viscous force defined by the Reynolds number, which in turn is related to the mass accretion rate. We show that the observed low-Lorentzian frequency is associated with radial oscillations in the boundary layer, where the observed break frequency is determined by the characteristic diffusion time of the inward motion of the matter in the accretion flow. Predictions of our model regarding relations between those two frequencies and the frequencies of kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) compare favorably with recent observations of the source 4U 1728-34. This Letter contains a theoretical classification of kHz QPOs in NS binaries and the related low-frequency features. Thus, results concerning the relationship between the low-Lorentzian frequency of viscous oscillations and the break frequency are presented in the framework of our model of kHz QPOs viewed as Keplerian oscillations in a rotating frame of reference.

  19. Influence of finite bandwidth on the propagation of information in fast- and slow-light media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Heisuke; Tomita, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    We examined the propagation of information encoded as nonanalytical points on temporally Gaussian-shaped optical pulses in fast- and slow-light systems. The bandwidth of the input pulses determined the sharpness of the nonanalytical points. A sharp bending nonanalytical point propagated with luminal velocity in both fast- and slow-light systems, in good agreement with relativistic causality. As the bandwidth was reduced, the bending point became broad and propagated with the relevant group velocities. This transition was, however, qualitatively different in the fast- and slow-light systems. We also examined the predictability of the future pulse shape beyond the practical nonanalytical point on the basis of the expansion. When the bandwidth was reduced below a critical value, the expansion well predicted the future pulse shape.

  20. Probing geomagnetic storm-driven magnetosphere-ionosphere dynamics in D-region via propagation characteristics of very low frequency radio signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwankwo, Victor U. J.; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Ogunmodimu, Olugbenga

    2016-07-01

    The amplitude and phase of VLF/LF radio signals are sensitive to changes in electrical conductivity of the lower ionosphere which imprints its signature on the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. This characteristic makes it useful in studying sudden ionospheric disturbances, especially those related to prompt X-ray flux output from solar flares and gamma ray bursts (GRBs). However, strong geomagnetic disturbance and storm conditions are known to produce large and global ionospheric disturbances, which can significantly affect VLF radio propagation in the D region of the ionosphere. In this paper, using the data of three propagation paths at mid-latitudes (40-54°), we analyse the trend in variation of aspects of VLF diurnal signal under varying solar and geomagnetic space environmental conditions in order to identify possible geomagnetic footprints on the D region characteristics. We found that the trend of variations generally reflected the prevailing space weather conditions in various time scales. In particular, the 'dipping' of mid-day signal amplitude peak (MDP) occurs after significant geomagnetic perturbed or storm conditions in the time scale of 1-2 days. The mean signal amplitude before sunrise (MBSR) and mean signal amplitude after sunset (MASS) also exhibit storm-induced dipping, but they appear to be influenced by event's exact occurrence time and the highly variable conditions of dusk-to-dawn ionosphere. We also observed few cases of the signals rise (e.g., MDP, MBSR or MASS) following a significant geomagnetic event. This effect may be related to storms associated phenomena or effects arising from sources other than solar origin. The magnitude of induced dipping (or rise) significantly depends on the intensity and duration of event(s), as well as the propagation path of the signal. The post-storm day signal (following a main event, with lesser or significantly reduced geomagnetic activity) exhibited a tendency of recovery to pre-storm day level. In the

  1. Low frequency cultural noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, Dong-Hoon; Shin, Jin Soo; Kang, Tae-Seob; Baag, Chang-Eob

    2009-09-01

    Abnormal cultural seismic noise is observed in the frequency range of 0.01-0.05 Hz. Cultural noise generated by human activities is generally observed in frequencies above 1 Hz, and is greater in the daytime than at night. The low-frequency noise presented in this paper exhibits a characteristic amplitude variation and can be easily identified from time domain seismograms in the frequency range of interest. The amplitude variation is predominantly in the vertical component, but the horizontal components also show variations. Low-frequency noise is markedly periodic, which reinforces its interpretation as cultural noise. Such noise is observed world-wide, but is limited to areas in the vicinity of railways. The amplitude variation in seismograms correlates strongly with railway timetables, and the waveform shows a wavelength shift associated with the Doppler effect, which indicates that the origin of seismic background noise in the frequency range 0.01-0.05 Hz is railways.

  2. Rate and rhythm dependency of propagation from normal myocardium to a Ba++, K+-induced slow response zone in rabbit left atrium.

    PubMed

    Masuda, M O; de Carvalho, A P

    1982-03-01

    Strips of rabbit atrium 2-3 mm wide and 10-12 mm long were used to study how normal propagating action potentials excite a region where slow responses are the only form of electrical activity. One end of the preparation was bathed in normal Tyrode's solution. The rest was exposed to Tyrode's solution with high K+ (12.7 mM) and Ba++ (1 mM) (TKBa solution). The normal end was electrically stimulated and activity was monitored extra- and intracellularly (3 M KCl microelectrodes) as it propagated into the TKBa-treated region. We observed that the slow response could be elicited optimally by the normal action potential only within a limited range of stimulation frequencies (from around 0.3 to 1 Hz). At higher frequencies, progressive "fatigue" of slow response was observed. At frequencies lower than this range, normal action potentials were unable to stimulate slow response. To clarify the mechanism under this behavior, slow responses were directly elicited by electrical stimulation of strips wholly bathed in TKBa. Rate dependency of slow response excitability was again observed. Conclusions are: slow response excitability is enhanced transiently at each stimulation; the enhanced excitability state subsides very slowly and may take as long as 10 seconds to disappear; the enhanced state is cumulative from cycle to cycle so that excitability increases with increasing frequencies of stimulation above 0.1 Hz; and high frequency block due to fatigue and block due to excitability depression at low frequency delimit an optimal frequency window for slow response excitation and conduction. PMID:7060236

  3. Superluminal and slow light propagation in a room-temperature solid.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, Matthew S; Lepeshkin, Nick N; Boyd, Robert W

    2003-07-11

    We have observed both superluminal and ultraslow light propagation in an alexandrite crystal at room temperature. Group velocities as slow as 91 meters per second to as fast as -800 meters per second were measured and attributed to the influence of coherent population oscillations involving chromium ions in either mirror or inversion sites within the crystal lattice. Namely, ions in mirror sites are inversely saturable and cause superluminal light propagation, whereas ions in inversion sites experience conventional saturable absorption and produce slow light. This technique for producing large group indices is considerably easier than the existing methods to implement and is therefore suitable for diverse applications. PMID:12855803

  4. Low-frequency pulse propagation over 510 km in the Philippine Sea: A comparison of observed and theoretical pulse spreading.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Rex K; Ganse, Andrew; White, Andrew W; Mercer, James A; Dzieciuch, Matthew A; Worcester, Peter F; Colosi, John A

    2016-07-01

    Observations of the spread of wander-corrected averaged pulses propagated over 510 km for 54 h in the Philippine Sea are compared to Monte Carlo predictions using a parabolic equation and path-integral predictions. Two simultaneous m-sequence signals are used, one centered at 200 Hz, the other at 300 Hz; both have a bandwidth of 50 Hz. The internal wave field is estimated at slightly less than unity Garrett-Munk strength. The observed spreads in all the early ray-like arrivals are very small, <1 ms (for pulse widths of 17 and 14 ms), which are on the order of the sampling period. Monte Carlo predictions show similar very small spreads. Pulse spread is one consequence of scattering, which is assumed to occur primarily at upper ocean depths where scattering processes are strongest and upward propagating rays refract downward. If scattering effects in early ray-like arrivals accumulate with increasing upper turning points, spread might show a similar dependence. Real and simulation results show no such dependence. Path-integral theory prediction of spread is accurate for the earliest ray-like arrivals, but appears to be increasingly biased high for later ray-like arrivals, which have more upper turning points. PMID:27475148

  5. Energetic Particle Propagation in the Inner Heliosphere as Deduced from Low Frequency (less than 100 kHz) Observations of Type III Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Erickson, W. C.

    2003-01-01

    Solar energetic particle (SEP) events are well-associated with solar flares. It is observed that the delay between the time of the flare and the first-arriving particles at a spacecraft increases with increasing difference between the flare longitude and the footpoint of the field line on which the spacecraft is located. This difference we call the "connection angle" and can be as large as approximately 120 deg. Recently it has been found that all SEP events are preceded by type III radio bursts. These bursts are plasma emission caused by the propagation of 2-50 keV flare electrons through the solar corona and into the solar wind. The drift of these type III radio bursts to lower and lower frequencies enables the propagation of the flare electrons to be traced from the Sun to about 1 AU. We have made an extensive analysis of the type III bursts associated with greater than 20 MeV proton events and find that, in most cases, the radio emission extends to the local plasma frequency when the energetic particles arrive within a few hours of the flare. We conclude that this emission at the lowest possible frequency is generated close to the spacecraft. We then use the time from when the burst started at the Sun to when it reached the local plasma frequency to infer the time it took the radio producing electrons to travel to the spacecraft. We find that these delay times are organized by the connection angle and correlate with the proton delay times. We also find that the differences between the radio delays at Wind and Ulysses are matched by differences in the relative arrival times of the energetic particles at the two spacecraft. The consistent timing between the relative arrival times of energetic electrons and protons and the start of the lowest frequency radio emissions suggests that the first arriving particles of both species are accelerated as part of the flare process and that they propagate to the spacecraft along trajectories similar to those of the lower

  6. Low Frequency Sky Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, Philip M.

    2015-08-01

    We propose to survey the sky from 10-100 GHz covering greater than 50% of the sky in intensity and polarizatiton. This will allow us to mep out the synchrotron and free - free background as well as the spinning dust component to sufficient sensitivity to allow detailed modeling and removal of the galactic foregrounds allowing for deeper polarization surveys searching for signatures of inflation. While most measurements have concentrated on the region above 100 GHz this reggion is more complex in dust contmination that originally thought. Dust is best measured at high frequencies but the atmosphere greatly hinders extremely deep dust surveys due to water vapor. Surveys ar low frequency will be complimentary to the higher frequency measurements.

  7. Modeling of Reflective Propagating Slow-mode Wave in a Flaring Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, X.; Yuan, D.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Keppens, R.; Xia, C.

    2015-11-01

    Quasi-periodic propagating intensity disturbances have been observed in large coronal loops in extreme ultraviolet images over a decade, and are widely accepted to be slow magnetosonic waves. However, spectroscopic observations from Hinode/EIS revealed their association with persistent coronal upflows, making this interpretation debatable. We perform a 2.5D magnetohydrodynamic simulation to imitate the chromospheric evaporation and the following reflected patterns in a flare loop. Our model encompasses the corona, transition region, and chromosphere. We demonstrate that the quasi periodic propagating intensity variations captured by the synthesized Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 131, 94 Å emission images match the previous observations well. With particle tracers in the simulation, we confirm that these quasi periodic propagating intensity variations consist of reflected slow mode waves and mass flows with an average speed of 310 km s‑1 in an 80 Mm length loop with an average temperature of 9 MK. With the synthesized Doppler shift velocity and intensity maps of the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation Fe xix line emission, we confirm that these reflected slow mode waves are propagating waves.

  8. Simulating Reflective Propagating Slow-wave/flow in a Flaring Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, X.

    2015-12-01

    Quasi-periodic propagating intensity disturbances have been observed in large coronal loops in EUV images over a decade, and are widely accepted to be slow magnetosonic waves. However, spectroscopic observations from Hinode/EIS revealed their association with persistent coronal upflows, making this interpretation debatable. We perform a 2.5D magnetohydrodynamic simulation to imitate the chromospheric evaporation and the following reflected patterns in a post flare loop. Our model encompasses the corona, transition region, and chromosphere. We demonstrate that the quasi periodic propagating intensity variations captured by our synthesized AIA 131, 94~Å~emission images match the previous observations well. With particle tracers in the simulation, we confirm that these quasi periodic propagating intensity variations consist of reflected slow mode waves and mass flows with an average speed of 310 km/s in an 80 Mm length loop with an average temperature of 9 MK. With the synthesized Doppler shift velocity and intensity maps in SUMER Fe XIX line emission, we confirm that these reflected slow mode waves are propagating waves.

  9. Rapid high-amplitude circumferential slow wave propagation during normal gastric pacemaking and dysrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    O'Grady, Gregory; Du, Peng; Paskaranandavadivel, Nira; Angeli, Timothy R.; Lammers, Wim JEP; Asirvatham, Samuel J.; Windsor, John A.; Farrugia, Gianrico; Pullan, Andrew J.; Cheng, Leo K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Gastric slow waves propagate aborally as rings of excitation. Circumferential propagation does not normally occur, except at the pacemaker region. We hypothesized that: i) the unexplained high-velocity, high-amplitude activity associated with the pacemaker region is a consequence of circumferential propagation; ii) rapid, high-amplitude circumferential propagation emerges during gastric dysrhythmias; iii) the driving network conductance might switch between ICC-MP and circular ICC-IM during circumferential propagation; iv) extracellular amplitudes and velocities are correlated. Methods An experimental-theoretical study was performed. HR gastric mapping was performed in pigs during normal activation, pacing and dysrhythmia. Activation profiles, velocities and amplitudes were quantified. ICC pathways were theoretically evaluated in a bidomain model. Extracellular potentials were modelled as a function of membrane potentials. Key Results High-velocity, high-amplitude activation was only recorded in the pacemaker region when circumferential conduction occurred. Circumferential propagation accompanied dysrhythmia in 8/8 experiments, was faster than longitudinal propagation (8.9 vs 6.9 mm/s; p=0.004), and of higher amplitude (739 vs 528 μV; p=0.007). Simulations predicted that ICC-MP could be the driving network during longitudinal propagation, whereas during ectopic pacemaking, ICC-IM could outpace and activate ICC-MP in the circumferential axis. Experimental and modeling data demonstrated a linear relationship between velocities and amplitudes (p<0.001). Conclusions & Inferences The high-velocity and high-amplitude profile of the normal pacemaker region is due to localized circumferential propagation. Rapid circumferential propagation also emerges during a range of gastric dysrhythmias, elevating extracellular amplitudes and organizing transverse wavefronts. One possible explanation for these findings is bidirectional coupling between ICC-MP and circular

  10. Measurement of the information velocity in fast- and slow-light optical pulse propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenner, Michael David

    This thesis describes a study of the velocity of information on optical pulses propagating through fast- and slow-light media. In fast- and slow-light media, the group velocity vg is faster than the speed of light in vacuum c (vg > c or vg < 0) or slower than c (0 < vg < c) respectively. While it is largely accepted that optical pulses can travel at these extreme group velocities, the velocity of information encoded on them is still the subject of considerable debate. There are many contradictory theories describing the velocity of information on optical pulses, but no accepted techniques for its experimental measurement. The velocity of information has broad implications for the principle of relativistic causality (which requires that information travels no faster than c) and for modern communications and computation. In this thesis, a new technique for measuring the information velocity vi is described and implemented for fast- and slow-light media. The fast- and slow-light media are generated using modern dispersion-tailoring techniques that use large atomic coherences to generate strong normal and anomalous dispersion. The information velocity in these media can then be measured using information-theoretic concepts by creating an alphabet of two distinct pulse symbols and transmitting the symbols through the media. By performing a detailed statistical analysis of the received information as a function of time, it is possible to calculate vi. This new technique makes it possible for the first time to measure the velocity of information on optical pulses. Applying this technique to fast-light pulses, where vg/c = -0.051 +/- 0.002, it is found that vi /c = 0.4(+0.7--0.2). In the slow-light case, where vg/c = 0.0097 +/- 0.0003, information is found to propagate at vi/c = 0.6. In the slow-light case, the error bars are slightly more complicated. The fast bound is -0.5c (which is faster than positive values) and the slow bound is 0.2c . These results represent the

  11. Propagation of Long-Wavelength Nonlinear Slow Sausage Waves in Stratified Magnetic Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbulescu, M.; Erdélyi, R.

    2016-05-01

    The propagation of nonlinear, long-wavelength, slow sausage waves in an expanding magnetic flux tube, embedded in a non-magnetic stratified environment, is discussed. The governing equation for surface waves, which is akin to the Leibovich-Roberts equation, is derived using the method of multiple scales. The solitary wave solution of the equation is obtained numerically. The results obtained are illustrative of a solitary wave whose properties are highly dependent on the degree of stratification.

  12. Multi-channel wireless mapping of gastrointestinal serosal slow wave propagation

    PubMed Central

    Paskaranandavadivel, Niranchan; Wang, Rui; Sathar, Shameer; O’Grady, Gregory; Cheng, Leo K; Farajidavar, Aydin

    2015-01-01

    Background High-resolution (HR) extracellular mapping allows accurate profiling of normal and dysrhythmic slow wave patterns. A current limitation is that cables traverse the abdominal wall or a natural orifice, risking discomfort, dislodgement or infection. Wireless approaches offer advantages, but a multi-channel system is required, capable of recording slow waves and mapping propagation with high fidelity. Methods A novel multi-channel (n=7) wireless mapping system was developed and compared to a wired commercial system. Slow wave signals were recorded from the porcine gastric and intestinal serosa in-vivo. Signals were simultaneously acquired using both systems, and were filtered and processed to map activation wavefronts. For validation, the frequency and amplitude of detected events were compared, together with the speed and direction of mapped wavefronts. Key Results The wireless device achieved comparable signal quality to the reference device, and slow wave frequencies were identical. Amplitudes of the acquired gastric and intestinal slow wave signals were consistent between the devices. During normal propagation, spatiotemporal mapping remained accurate in the wireless system, however, during ectopic dysrhythmic pacemaking, the lower sampling resolution of the wireless device led to reduced accuracy in spatiotemporal mapping. Conclusions and Inferences A novel multichannel wireless device is presented for mapping slow wave activity. The device achieved high quality signals, and has the potential to facilitate chronic monitoring studies and clinical translation of spatiotemporal mapping. The current implementation may be applied to detect normal patterns and dysrhythmia onset, but HR mapping with finely spaced arrays currently remains necessary to accurately define dysrhythmic patterns. PMID:25599978

  13. Propagation of quasisolitons in a fiber Bragg grating written in a slow saturable fiber amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, Yuval P.; Horowitz, Moshe

    2011-05-15

    We show, by using numerical simulations, that quasisolitons can propagate over a long distance in a fiber Bragg grating that is written in a slow saturable fiber amplifier, such as an erbium-doped fiber amplifier. During the pulse propagation, the front end of the pulse experiences a net gain while the rear end of pulse is attenuated due to the combination of gain saturation and loss. However, the pulse profile almost does not change after propagating over a length of 5 m that is approximately 2500 times larger than the spatial pulse width. The pulse amplitude has an approximately hyperbolic secant profile. We develop a reduced model by using a multiscale analysis to study solitary-wave propagation when nonlinearity and gain are small. When gain saturation also becomes small we find analytically a new family of solitary-wave hyperbolic-secant solutions that approximately solve the reduced model. The solitary waves propagate slightly faster than Bragg solitons that propagate in fiber Bragg gratings without gain and loss.

  14. Low Frequency Radio Experiment (LORE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoharan, P. K.; Naidu, Arun; Joshi, B. C.; Roy, Jayashree; Kate, G.; Pethe, Kaiwalya; Galande, Shridhar; Jamadar, Sachin; Mahajan, S. P.; Patil, R. A.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present a case study of Low Frequency Radio Experiment (LORE) payload to probe the corona and the solar disturbances at solar offsets greater than 2 solar radii, i.e., at frequencies below 30 MHz. The LORE can be complimentary to the planned Indian solar mission, “Aditya-L1” and its other payloads as well as synergistic to ground-based interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations, which are routinely carried out by the Ooty Radio Telescope. We discuss the baseline design and technical details of the proposed LORE and its particular suitability for providing measurements on the detailed time and frequency structure of fast drifting type-III and slow drifting type-II radio bursts with unprecedented time and frequency resolutions. We also brief the gonio-polarimetry, which is possible with better-designed antennas and state-of-the-art electronics, employing FPGAs and an intelligent data management system. These would enable us to make a wide range of studies, such as nonlinear plasma processes in the Sun-Earth distance, in-situ radio emission from coronal mass ejections (CMEs), interplanetary CME driven shocks, nature of ICMEs driving decelerating IP shocks and space weather effects of solar wind interaction regions.

  15. Oscillatory instability in slow crack propagation in rubber under large deformation.

    PubMed

    Endo, Daiki; Sato, Katsuhiko; Hayakawa, Yoshinori

    2012-07-01

    We performed experiments to investigate slow fracture in thin rubber films under uniaxial tension using high-viscosity oils. In this system we observed an oscillating instability in slowly propagating cracks for small applied strains. The transition between oscillatory and straight patterns occurred near the characteristic strain at which rubber exhibits a nonlinear stress-strain relation. This suggests that nonlinear elasticity plays an important role in the formation of the observed pattern. This was confirmed by numerical simulation for neo-Hookean and linear elasticity models. PMID:23005490

  16. Oscillatory instability in slow crack propagation in rubber under large deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Daiki; Sato, Katsuhiko; Hayakawa, Yoshinori

    2012-07-01

    We performed experiments to investigate slow fracture in thin rubber films under uniaxial tension using high-viscosity oils. In this system we observed an oscillating instability in slowly propagating cracks for small applied strains. The transition between oscillatory and straight patterns occurred near the characteristic strain at which rubber exhibits a nonlinear stress-strain relation. This suggests that nonlinear elasticity plays an important role in the formation of the observed pattern. This was confirmed by numerical simulation for neo-Hookean and linear elasticity models.

  17. Low Frequency Radio Experiment (LORE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoharan, Periasamy K.; Joshi, Bhal Chandra; Naidu, Arun Kumar

    High temporal and frequency resolution observations of solar generated disturbances below 15 MHz in the near-Sun region and at Sun-Earth distances in conjunction with optical and high energy observations of Sun are essential to understand the structure and evolution of eruptions, such as, flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and their associated solar wind disturbances at heights above the photosphere and their consequences in the interplanetary medium. This talk presents a case study of Low Frequency Radio Experiment (LORE) payload to probe the corona and the solar disturbances at solar offsets greater than 2 solar radii below 30 MHz. The LORE, although not part of Aditya-L1 mission, can be complimentary to planned Aditya-L1 coronagraph and its other on-board payloads as well as synergistic to ground based observations, which are routinely carried out by Ooty Radio Telescope. We discuss the baseline design and technical details of the proposed LORE and it is particularly suitable for providing data on the detailed time and frequency structure of fast drifting Type-III and slow drifting Type-II radio bursts with unprecedented time and frequency resolution as well as goniopolarimetry, made possible with better designed antennas and state-of-art electronics, employing FPGAs and an intelligent data management system. This would enable wide ranging studies such as studies of nonlinear plasma processes, CME in-situ radio emission, CME driven phenomena, interplanetary CME driven shocks, ICMEs driven by decelerating IP shocks and space weather effects of Solar Wind interaction regions. The talk will highlight the science objectives as well as the proposed technical design features.

  18. 'Burst-Like' Slow Slip Propagation on Frictional Faults in the Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, J.; Selvadurai, P. A.; Glaser, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    We present laboratory findings on burst-like premonitory slip propagation that leads to fault rupture. The experiments take place on a PMMA-PMMA interface in a direct shear configuration, where the effective strength heterogeneity is controlled by the non-uniform distribution of asperities throughout the fault. A pressure sensitive film was used to locate, size and measure normal stress on individual asperities. Prior to rapid sliding, we observed slow premonitory slip which accumulated non-uniformly along the fault. Slow displacement was measured using slip sensors placed at seven locations along the fault strike and showed intermittent, 'burst-like' increases in spectral power between the frequencies of 60 to 150 Hz. Each burst event lasted between 5 to 12 seconds, and a local increase in the extended fault slip rate was observed after its cessation. The 'burst-like' features migrated along the fault at speeds between Vprop ~ 1.3 mm/s to 9.3 mm/s. Propagation speed of the 'burst-like' front Vprop was dependent on the normal stress confining the fault σn- increased normal stress caused the rupture to move slower by increasing 'effective fault strength'. Finally, foreshocks were recorded using absolutely calibrated acoustic emission sensors and occurred at the later stages of the slow slip phase. The source radii of the foreshocks [Brune, 1970] ranged from 0.21 to 1.09 mm and their ruptures occurred over timescales ~5-7 orders of magnitude faster than the 'burst-like' slow slip signals. Observations of similar variations in time scales have been made between regular earthquakes and aseismic transients in the field [Ide, 2007]. These results will help develop a mechanistic understanding of the effective fault strength heterogeneity necessary for the development of slow earthquakes and tremor-like shaking. References: Ide, S., D. R. Beroza, G. C. Shelly & T. Uchide (2007), 'A scaling law for slow earthquakes', Nature 447, 76-79. Brune, J. N. (1970), 'Tectonic stress

  19. Local propagation speed constrained estimation of the slowness vector from non-planar array observations.

    PubMed

    Nouvellet, Adrien; Roueff, François; Le Pichon, Alexis; Charbit, Maurice; Vergoz, Julien; Kallel, Mohamed; Mejri, Chourouq

    2016-01-01

    The estimation of the slowness vector of infrasound waves propagating across an array is a critical process leading to the determination of parameters of interest such as the direction of arrival. The sensors of an array are often considered to be located in a horizontal plane. However, due to topography, the altitudes of the sensors are not identical and introduce a bias on the estimate if neglected. However, the unbiased 3D estimation procedure, while suppressing the bias, leads to an increase of the variance. Accounting for an a priori constraint on the slowness vector significantly reduces the variance and could therefore improve the performance of the estimation if the introduced bias by incorrect a priori information remains negligible. This study focuses on measuring the benefits of this approach with a thorough investigation of the bias and variance of the constrained 3D estimator, which is not available in the existing literature. This contribution provides such computations based on an asymptotic Gaussian approximation. Simulations are carried out to assess the theoretical results both with synthetic and real data. Thus, a constrained 3D estimator is proposed yielding the best bias/variance compromise if good knowledge of the propagation wave speed is accessible. PMID:26827049

  20. Analysis of Jovian low frequency radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    The density of ions in the Io plasma torus and the scattering of these ions by low frequency electromagnetic emissions detected by Voyager 1 were studied. The ion density profile was investigated using whistler dispersion measurements provided by the Voyager plasma instrument. The scale height and absolute density of H+ ions in the vicinity of the plasma torus were determined by combining the measured plasma densities with the whistler dispersion measurements. A theoretical analysis of the modes of propagation of low frequency electromagnetic emissions in the torus was undertaken. Polarization reversal effects and rough estimates of the ion diffusion coefficient were utilized. Numerical evaluation of the ion diffusion coefficients in the torus were made using the observed Voyager 1 wave intensities. Results show that the observed wave intensities produce significant ion diffusion effects in the ion torus.

  1. Frequency-dependent damping in propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, S. Krishna; Banerjee, D.; Van Doorsselaere, T.

    2014-07-10

    Propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves are often observed in polar plumes and active region fan loops. The observed periodicities of these waves range from a few minutes to a few tens of minutes and their amplitudes were found to decay rapidly as they travel along the supporting structure. Previously, thermal conduction, compressive viscosity, radiation, density stratification, and area divergence were identified to be some of the causes for change in the slow wave amplitude. Our recent studies indicate that the observed damping in these waves is frequency-dependent. We used imaging data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly to study this dependence in detail and for the first time via observations we attempted to deduce a quantitative relation between the damping length and frequency of these oscillations. We developed a new analysis method to obtain this relation. The observed frequency dependence does not seem to agree with the current linear wave theory and it was found that the waves observed in the polar regions show a different dependence from those observed in the on-disk loop structures despite the similarity in their properties.

  2. Compared propagation characteristics of superluminal and slow light in SOA and EDFA based on rectangle signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fu; Wang, Zhi; Wu, Chongqing; Sun, Zhenchao; Mao, Yaya; Liu, Lanlan; Li, Qiang

    2015-10-01

    Based on the general mechanism of the coherent population oscillations (CPO) in the Semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA) and Erbium doped fiber amplifiers (EDFA), the group time delay of rectangle signal propagating in the active media is deduced. Compared with the sinusoidal signal, the time delay difference between the fundamental harmonics (FHFD: fundamental harmonic fractional delay) is first investigated in detail for the rectangle signal which is more popularly used in the digital signal systems. The plenty of simulations based on the propagation equations and some experiments for the sinusoidal and rectangle signals are used to analyze the differences and evaluate the slow and superluminal light effects. Furthermore, the time delay/advance always takes place accompanying with the signal distortion, which is evaluated by the total harmonic distortion (THD). The distortion caused by the SOA is smaller than that by the EDFA. A factor Q which is defined to evaluate the trade-off between the FHFD and the THD, shows that higher input power or higher optical gain is better for optical signal processing and optical telecommunications, and the SOA is more suitable for the higher modulation frequency (>10 GHz).

  3. Superconducting microwave parametric amplifier based on a quasi-fractal slow propagation line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamyan, A. A.; de Graaf, S. E.; Kubatkin, S. E.; Danilov, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    Quantum limited amplifiers are sought after for a wide range of applications within quantum technologies and sensing. One promising candidate is the travelling wave parametric amplifier which exploits the non-linear kinetic inductance of a superconducting transmission line. This type of microwave amplifier promises to deliver a high gain, a quantum limited noise performance over several GHz bandwidth, and a high dynamic range. However, practical realizations of this type of device have so far been limited by fabrication defects, since the length of the superconducting transmission line required for achieving substantial parametric gain is on the order of ˜1 m. Here, we report on a design for a microwave traveling wave amplifier based on a slow propagation line comprising a central strip with high kinetic inductance and quasi-fractal line-to-ground capacitors. Due to an enhanced per unit length inductance (73 nH cm-1) and capacitance (15 pF cm-1), the line has a microwave propagation velocity as low as 9.8 × 108 cm s-1. This translates into parametric gain up to 0.5 dB cm-1 and a total gain of 6 dB for just a ˜10 cm long transmission line. Moreover, the flexibility of the presented design allows balancing the line inductance and capacitance in order to keep the characteristic impedance close to 50 Ω and to suppress standing waves, both factors being essential in order to implement a practical parametric amplifier in the microwave domain.

  4. Identification of low-frequency fluctuations in the terrestrial magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, P.; Russell, C. T.; Gary, S. P.

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory we develop a scheme for distinguishing among the four low-frequency modes which may propagate in a high-beta anisotropic plasma such as the magnetosheath: the fast and slow magnetosonic, the Alfven, and mirror modes. We use four parameters: the ratio of transverse to compressional powers in the magnetic field, the ratio of the wave powers in the thermal pressure and in the magnetic field, the ratio of the perturbations in the thermal and magnetic pressures, and the ratio of the wave powers in the velocity and in the magnetic field. In the test case of an Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers/Ion Release Module (AMPTE/IRM) magnetosheath pass near the Sun-Earth line downstream of a quasi-perpendicular shock, the four modes can be clearly distinguished both spatially and spectrally. Near the bow shock, the waves are Alfvenic in a large frequency range, 1 to 100 mHz. In the middle and inner magnetosheath, the waves below 10 mHz are Alfvenic. The fast mode waves occur in the higher-frequency end of the enhanced spectrum, 80 mHz for the middle magnetosheath and 55 mHz for the inner sheath. The wave enhancement in the intermediate frequencies is slow modes in the inner sheath and mirror modes in the middle sheath. This confirms the earlier report of the existence of the slow mode waves near the magnetopause. These slow waves provide evidence that the magnetopause is an active source of the waves in the sheath. We also show that the measured frequency of a wave is close to an invariant if the magnetosheath flow is in a steady state. Therefore changes in the frequencies of enhanced waves indicate emergence, or damping, or mode conversion of the waves.

  5. Low-frequency VLBI in space and interstellar refraction

    SciTech Connect

    Dennison, B.; Booth, R.S.

    1986-08-01

    The proposed orbiting Quasat antenna, equipped with a low-frequency capability (e.g. 327 MHz), would be uniquely suited for studying refractive focusing (slow scintillation) in the interstellar medium, which is suspected of being responsible for at least some apparent low-frequency variability of extragalactic sources. The authors consider in some detail various technical considerations, including the decorrelating effects of the ionosphere and interplanetary medium, and conclude that low-frequency VLBI observations involving Quasat and Earth-based antennas would be feasible, particularly if sources are observed when they are in the anti-solar hemisphere.

  6. Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Investigation on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozakiewicz, Joanna; Kulak, Andrzej; Kubisz, Jerzy; Zietara, Krzysztof

    2016-07-01

    Natural electromagnetic (EM) signals of extremely low frequencies (ELF, 3 Hz-3 kHz) can be used to study many of the electromagnetic processes and properties occurring in the Martian environment. Sources of these signals, related to electrical activity in the atmosphere, are very significant since they can influence radio wave propagation on the planet, the atmospheric composition, and the ionospheric structure. In addition, such EM signals can be employed in many purposes such as: surveying the subsurface of Mars or studying the impact of the space weather on the Martian ionosphere. As ELF waves propagate on very long distances, it is possible to explore properties of the entire planet using single-station recordings. In this study, we propose an experiment that allows measuring ELF signals from the Martian surface. Such measurements can be used for detection of electric discharges in the atmosphere and water reservoirs in the planetary subsurface.

  7. Experimental evidence of dynamical propagation for solitary waves in ultra slow stochastic non-local Kerr medium.

    PubMed

    Louis, H; Tlidi, M; Louvergneaux, E

    2016-07-11

    We perform a statistical analysis of the optical solitary wave propagation in an ultra-slow stochastic non-local focusing Kerr medium such as liquid crystals. Our experimental results show that the localized beam trajectory presents a dynamical random walk whose beam position versus the propagation distance z depicts two different kind of evolutions A power law is found for the beam position standard deviation during the first stage of propagation. It obeys approximately z3/2 up to ten times the power threshold for solitary wave generation. PMID:27410886

  8. Experimental evidence of dynamical propagation for solitary waves in ultra slow stochastic non-local Kerr medium.

    PubMed

    Louis, H; Tlidi, M; Louvergneaux, E

    2016-07-11

    We perform a statistical analysis of the optical solitary wave propagation in an ultra-slow stochastic non-local focusing Kerr medium such as liquid crystals. Our experimental results show that the localized beam trajectory presents a dynamical random walk whose beam position versus the propagation distance z depicts two different kind of evolutions A power law is found for the beam position standard deviation during the first stage of propagation. It obeys approximately z3/2 up to ten times the power threshold for solitary wave generation. PMID:27410887

  9. LOFAR, the low frequency array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeulen, R. C.

    2012-09-01

    LOFAR, the Low Frequency Array, is a next-generation radio telescope designed by ASTRON, with antenna stations concentrated in the north of the Netherlands and currently spread into Germany, France, Sweden and the United Kingdom; plans for more LOFAR stations exist in several other countries. Utilizing a novel, phased-array design, LOFAR is optimized for the largely unexplored low frequency range between 30 and 240 MHz. Digital beam-forming techniques make the LOFAR system agile and allow for rapid re-pointing of the telescopes as well as the potential for multiple simultaneous observations. Processing (e.g. cross-correlation) takes place in the LOFAR BlueGene/P supercomputer, and associated post-processing facilities. With its dense core (inner few km) array and long (more than 1000 km) interferometric baselines, LOFAR reaches unparalleled sensitivity and resolution in the low frequency radio regime. The International LOFAR Telescope (ILT) is now issuing its first call for observing projects that will be peer reviewed and selected for observing starting in December. Part of the allocations will be made on the basis of a fully Open Skies policy; there are also reserved fractions assigned by national consortia in return for contributions from their country to the ILT. In this invited talk, the gradually expanding complement of operationally verified observing modes and capabilities are reviewed, and some of the exciting first astronomical results are presented.

  10. PROPAGATING SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES IN CORONAL LOOPS OBSERVED BY HINODE/EIS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T. J.; Ofman, L.; Davila, J. M.

    2009-05-10

    We present the first Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer observations of 5 minute quasi-periodic oscillations detected in a transition-region line (He II) and five coronal lines (Fe X, Fe XII, Fe XIII, Fe XIV, and Fe XV) at the footpoint of a coronal loop. The oscillations exist throughout the whole observation, characterized by a series of wave packets with nearly constant period, typically persisting for 4-6 cycles with a lifetime of 20-30 minutes. There is an approximate in-phase relation between Doppler shift and intensity oscillations. This provides evidence for slow magnetoacoustic waves propagating upward from the transition region into the corona. We find that the oscillations detected in the five coronal lines are highly correlated, and the amplitude decreases with increasing temperature. The amplitude of Doppler shift oscillations decrease by a factor of about 3, while that of relative intensity decreases by a factor of about 4 from Fe X to Fe XV. These oscillations may be caused by the leakage of the photospheric p-modes through the chromosphere and transition region into the corona, which has been suggested as the source for intensity oscillations previously observed by Transition Region and Coronal Explorer. The temperature dependence of the oscillation amplitudes can be explained by damping of the waves traveling along the loop with multithread structure near the footpoint. Thus, this property may have potential value for coronal seismology in diagnostic of temperature structure in a coronal loop.

  11. On Sun-to-Earth Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections: II. Slow Events and Comparison with Others

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying D.; Hu, Huidong; Wang, Chi; Luhmann, Janet G.; Richardson, John D.; Yang, Zhongwei; Wang, Rui

    2016-02-01

    As a follow-up study on Sun-to-Earth propagation of fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we examine the Sun-to-Earth characteristics of slow CMEs combining heliospheric imaging and in situ observations. Three events of particular interest, the 2010 June 16, 2011 March 25, and 2012 September 25 CMEs, are selected for this study. We compare slow CMEs with fast and intermediate-speed events, and obtain key results complementing the attempt of Liu et al. to create a general picture of CME Sun-to-Earth propagation: (1) the Sun-to-Earth propagation of a typical slow CME can be approximately described by two phases, a gradual acceleration out to about 20-30 solar radii, followed by a nearly invariant speed around the average solar wind level; (2) comparison between different types of CMEs indicates that faster CMEs tend to accelerate and decelerate more rapidly and have shorter cessation distances for the acceleration and deceleration; (3) both intermediate-speed and slow CMEs would have speeds comparable to the average solar wind level before reaching 1 au; (4) slow CMEs have a high potential to interact with other solar wind structures in the Sun-Earth space due to their slow motion, providing critical ingredients to enhance space weather; and (5) the slow CMEs studied here lack strong magnetic fields at the Earth but tend to preserve a flux-rope structure with an axis generally perpendicular to the radial direction from the Sun. We also suggest a “best” strategy for the application of a triangulation concept in determining CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics, which helps to clarify confusions about CME geometry assumptions in the triangulation and to improve CME analysis and observations.

  12. Spectroscopic observations of propagating disturbances in a polar coronal hole: evidence of slow magneto-acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, G. R.; Teriaca, L.; Marsch, E.; Solanki, S. K.; Banerjee, D.

    2012-10-01

    Aims: We focus on detecting and studying quasi-periodic propagating features that have been interpreted in terms of both slow magneto-acoustic waves and of high-speed upflows. Methods: We analyzed long-duration spectroscopic observations of the on-disk part of the south polar coronal hole taken on 1997 February 25 by the SUMER spectrometer onboard SOHO. We calibrated the velocity with respect to the off-limb region and obtained time-distance maps in intensity, Doppler velocity, and line width. We also performed a cross-correlation analysis on different time series curves at different latitudes. We studied average spectral line profiles at the roots of propagating disturbances and along the propagating ridges, and performed a red-blue asymmetry analysis. Results: We clearly find propagating disturbances in intensity and Doppler velocity with a projected propagation speed of about 60 ± 4.8 km s-1 and a periodicity of ≈14.5 min. To our knowledge, this is the first simultaneous detection of propagating disturbances in intensity as well as in Doppler velocity in a coronal hole. During the propagation, an intensity enhancement is associated with a blueshifted Doppler velocity. These disturbances are clearly seen in intensity also at higher latitudes (i.e., closer to the limb), while disturbances in Doppler velocity become faint there. The spectral line profiles averaged along the propagating ridges are found to be symmetric, to be well fitted by a single Gaussian, and have no noticeable red-blue asymmetry. Conclusions: Based on our analysis, we interpret these disturbances in terms of propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves.

  13. Low-Frequency Waves in Space Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiling, Andreas; Lee, Dong-Hun; Nakariakov, Valery

    2016-02-01

    Low-frequency waves in space plasmas have been studied for several decades, and our knowledge gain has been incremental with several paradigm-changing leaps forward. In our solar system, such waves occur in the ionospheres and magnetospheres of planets, and around our Moon. They occur in the solar wind, and more recently, they have been confirmed in the Sun's atmosphere as well. The goal of wave research is to understand their generation, their propagation, and their interaction with the surrounding plasma. Low-frequency Waves in Space Plasmas presents a concise and authoritative up-to-date look on where wave research stands: What have we learned in the last decade? What are unanswered questions? While in the past waves in different astrophysical plasmas have been largely treated in separate books, the unique feature of this monograph is that it covers waves in many plasma regions, including: Waves in geospace, including ionosphere and magnetosphere Waves in planetary magnetospheres Waves at the Moon Waves in the solar wind Waves in the solar atmosphere Because of the breadth of topics covered, this volume should appeal to a broad community of space scientists and students, and it should also be of interest to astronomers/astrophysicists who are studying space plasmas beyond our Solar System.

  14. Low Frequency Interstellar Scattering and Pulsar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordes, James M.

    1992-01-01

    Radio astronomy at frequencies from 2 to 30 MHz challenges time tested methods for extracting usable information from observations. One fundamental reason for this is that propagation effects due to the magnetoionic ionosphere, interplanetary medium, and interstellar matter (ISM) increase strongly with wavelength. The problems associated with interstellar scattering off of small scale irregularities in the electron density are addressed. What is known about interstellar scattering is summarized on the basis of high frequency observations, including scintillation and temporal broadening of pulsars and angular broadening of various galactic and extragalactic radio sources. Then those high frequency phenomena are addressed that are important or detectable at low frequencies. The radio sky becomes much simpler at low frequencies, most pulsars will not be seen as time varying sources, intensity variations will be quenched or will occur on time scales much longer than a human lifetime, and many sources will be angularly broadened and/or absorbed into the noise. Angular broadening measurements will help delineate the galactic distribution and power spectrum of small scale electron density irregularities.

  15. Generation of unusually low frequency plasmaspheric hiss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lunjin; Thorne, Richard M.; Bortnik, Jacob; Li, Wen; Horne, Richard B.; Reeves, G. D.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Spence, H. E.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.

    2014-08-01

    It has been reported from Van Allen Probe observations that plasmaspheric hiss intensification in the outer plasmasphere, associated with a substorm injection on 30 September 2012, occurred with a peak frequency near 100 Hz, well below the typical plasmaspheric hiss frequency range, extending down to ˜20 Hz. We examine this event of unusually low frequency plasmaspheric hiss to understand its generation mechanism. Quantitative analysis is performed by simulating wave raypaths via the HOTRAY ray tracing code with measured plasma density and calculating raypath-integrated wave gain evaluated using the measured energetic electron distribution. We demonstrate that the growth rate due to substorm-injected electrons is positive but rather weak, leading to small wave gain (˜10 dB) during a single equatorial crossing. Propagation characteristics aided by the sharp density gradient associated with the plasmapause, however, can enable these low-frequency waves to undergo cyclic raypaths, which return to the unstable region leading to repeated amplification to yield sufficient net wave gain (>40 dB) to allow waves to grow from the thermal noise.

  16. Earthquake triggering by slow earthquake propagation: the case of the large 2014 slow slip event in Guerrero, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radiguet, M.; Perfettini, H.; Cotte, N.; Gualandi, A.; Kostoglodov, V.; Lhomme, T.; Walpersdorf, A.; Campillo, M.; Valette, B.

    2015-12-01

    Since their discovery nearly two decades ago, the importance of slow slip events (SSEs) in the processes of strain accommodation in subduction zones has been revealed. Nevertheless, the influence of slow aseismic slip on the nucleation of large earthquakes remains unclear. In this study, we focus on the Guerrero region of the Central American subduction zone in Mexico, where large SSEs have been observed since 1998, with a recurrence period of about 4 years, and produce aseismic slip in the Guerrero seismic gap. We investigate the large 2014 SSE (equivalent Mw=7.7), which initiated in early 2014 and lasted until the end of October 2014. During this time period, the 18 April Papanoa earthquake (Mw7.2) occurred on the western limit of the Guerrero gap. We invert the continuous GPS time series using the PCAIM (Principal Component Analysis Inversion Method) to assess the space and time evolution of slip on the subduction. To focus on the aseismic processes, we correct the cGPS time series from the co-seismic offsets. Our results show that the slow slip event initiated in the Guerrero gap region, as already observed during the previous SSEs. The Mw7.2 Papanoa earthquake occurred on the western limit of the region that was slipping aseismically before the earthquake. After the Papanoa earthquake, the aseismic slip rate increases. This geodetic signal consists of both the ongoing SSE and the postseismic (afterslip) response due to the Papanoa earthquake. The majority of the post-earthquake aseismic slip is concentrated downdip from the main earthquake asperity, but significant slip is also observed in the Guerrero gap region. Compared to previous SSEs in that region, the 2014 SSE produced a larger aseismic slip and the maximum slip is located downdip from the main brittle asperity corresponding to the Papanoa earthquake, a region that was not identified as active during the previous SSEs. Since the Mw 7.2 Papanoa earthquake occurred about 2 months after the onset of the

  17. Characterization and Impact of Low Frequency Wind Turbine Noise Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finch, James

    Wind turbine noise is a complex issue that requires due diligence to minimize any potential impact on quality of life. This study enhances existing knowledge of wind turbine noise through focused analyses of downwind sound propagation, directionality, and the low frequency component of the noise. Measurements were conducted at four wind speeds according to a design of experiments at incremental distances and angles. Wind turbine noise is shown to be highly directional, while downwind sound propagation is spherical with limited ground absorption. The noise is found to have a significant low frequency component that is largely independent of wind speed over the 20-250 Hz range. The generated low frequency noise is shown to be audible above 40 Hz at the MOE setback distance of 550 m. Infrasound levels exhibit higher dependency on wind speed, but remain below audible levels up to 15 m/s.

  18. [Low-Frequency Flow Oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Michael B.

    1997-01-01

    The results of the research conducted under this grant are presented in detail in three Master theses, by Heinrich, Balow, and Broeren. Additional analysis of the experimental data can be found in two AIAA Journal articles and two conference papers. Citations for all of the studies' publications can be found in the bibliography which is attached. The objective of Heinrich's study was to document the low-frequency flow oscillation on the LRN-1007 airfoil, which had been previously observed at low Reynolds number, to determine its origin, and explore the phenomenon at higher Reynolds number. Heinrich performed detailed flow visualization on the airfoil using surface fluorescent oil and laser-sheet off-body visualization. A large leading-edge separation bubble and trailing-edge separation was identified on the airfoil just prior to the onset of the unsteady stall flow oscillation. From the laser-sheet data, the unsteady flow appeared as a massive boundary-layer separation followed by flow reattachment. Hot-wire data were taken in the wake to identify the presence of the flow oscillation and the dominant frequency. The oscillation was found in the flow from a Reynolds number of 0.3 to 1.3 x 10 exp 6. The Strouhal number based on airfoil projected height was nominally 0.02 and increased slightly with increasing Reynolds number and significantly with increasing airfoil angle of attack. Balow focused his research on the leading-edge separation bubble which was hypothesized to be the origin of the low-frequency oscillation. Initially, experimental measurements in the bubble at the onset of the low-frequency oscillation were attempted to study the characteristics of the bubble and explain possible relationships to the shear-layer-flapping phenomena. Unfortunately, the bubble proved to be extremely sensitive to the probe interference and it drastically reduced the size of the bubble. These detailed measurements were then abandoned by Balow. However, this led to a series of

  19. Low frequency AC waveform generator

    DOEpatents

    Bilharz, Oscar W.

    1986-01-01

    Low frequency sine, cosine, triangle and square waves are synthesized in circuitry which allows variation in the waveform amplitude and frequency while exhibiting good stability and without requiring significant stabilization time. A triangle waveform is formed by a ramped integration process controlled by a saturation amplifier circuit which produces the necessary hysteresis for the triangle waveform. The output of the saturation circuit is tapped to produce the square waveform. The sine waveform is synthesized by taking the absolute value of the triangular waveform, raising this absolute value to a predetermined power, multiplying the raised absolute value of the triangle wave with the triangle wave itself and properly scaling the resultant waveform and subtracting it from the triangular waveform itself. The cosine is synthesized by squaring the triangular waveform, raising the triangular waveform to a predetermined power and adding the squared waveform raised to the predetermined power with a DC reference and subtracting the squared waveform therefrom, with all waveforms properly scaled. The resultant waveform is then multiplied with a square wave in order to correct the polarity and produce the resultant cosine waveform.

  20. Low frequency ac waveform generator

    DOEpatents

    Bilharz, O.W.

    1983-11-22

    Low frequency sine, cosine, triangle and square waves are synthesized in circuitry which allows variation in the waveform amplitude and frequency while exhibiting good stability and without requiring significant stablization time. A triangle waveform is formed by a ramped integration process controlled by a saturation amplifier circuit which produces the necessary hysteresis for the triangle waveform. The output of the saturation circuit is tapped to produce the square waveform. The sine waveform is synthesized by taking the absolute value of the triangular waveform, raising this absolute value to a predetermined power, multiplying the raised absolute value of the triangle wave with the triangle wave itself and properly scaling the resultant waveform and subtracting it from the triangular waveform to a predetermined power and adding the squared waveform raised to the predetermined power with a DC reference and subtracting the squared waveform therefrom, with all waveforms properly scaled. The resultant waveform is then multiplied with a square wave in order to correct the polarity and produce the resultant cosine waveform.

  1. Reflection of Propagating Slow Magneto-acoustic Waves in Hot Coronal Loops: Multi-instrument Observations and Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Sudip; Yuan, Ding; Fang, Xia; Banerjee, Dipankar; Pant, Vaibhav; Van Doorsselaere, Tom

    2016-09-01

    Slow MHD waves are important tools for understanding coronal structures and dynamics. In this paper, we report a number of observations from the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) on board HINODE and Solar Dynamic Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) of reflecting longitudinal waves in hot coronal loops. To our knowledge, this is the first report of this kind as seen from the XRT and simultaneously with the AIA. The wave appears after a micro-flare occurs at one of the footpoints. We estimate the density and temperature of the loop plasma by performing differential emission measure (DEM) analysis on the AIA image sequence. The estimated speed of propagation is comparable to or lower than the local sound speed, suggesting it to be a propagating slow wave. The intensity perturbation amplitude, in every case, falls very rapidly as the perturbation moves along the loop and eventually vanishes after one or more reflections. To check the consistency of such reflection signatures with the obtained loop parameters, we perform a 2.5D MHD simulation, which uses the parameters obtained from our observation as inputs, and perform forward modeling to synthesize AIA 94 Å images. Analyzing the synthesized images, we obtain the same properties of the observables as for the real observation. From the analysis we conclude that a footpoint heating can generate a slow wave which then reflects back and forth in the coronal loop before fading. Our analysis of the simulated data shows that the main agent for this damping is anisotropic thermal conduction.

  2. Ionospheric very low frequency transmitter

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2015-02-15

    The theme of this paper is to establish a reliable ionospheric very low frequency (VLF) transmitter, which is also broad band. Two approaches are studied that generate VLF waves in the ionosphere. The first, classic approach employs a ground-based HF heater to directly modulate the high latitude ionospheric, or auroral electrojet. In the classic approach, the intensity-modulated HF heater induces an alternating current in the electrojet, which serves as a virtual antenna to transmit VLF waves. The spatial and temporal variations of the electrojet impact the reliability of the classic approach. The second, beat-wave approach also employs a ground-based HF heater; however, in this approach, the heater operates in a continuous wave mode at two HF frequencies separated by the desired VLF frequency. Theories for both approaches are formulated, calculations performed with numerical model simulations, and the calculations are compared to experimental results. Theory for the classic approach shows that an HF heater wave, intensity-modulated at VLF, modulates the electron temperature dependent electrical conductivity of the ionospheric electrojet, which, in turn, induces an ac electrojet current. Thus, the electrojet becomes a virtual VLF antenna. The numerical results show that the radiation intensity of the modulated electrojet decreases with an increase in VLF radiation frequency. Theory for the beat wave approach shows that the VLF radiation intensity depends upon the HF heater intensity rather than the electrojet strength, and yet this approach can also modulate the electrojet when present. HF heater experiments were conducted for both the intensity modulated and beat wave approaches. VLF radiations were generated and the experimental results confirm the numerical simulations. Theory and experimental results both show that in the absence of the electrojet, VLF radiation from the F-region is generated via the beat wave approach. Additionally, the beat wave approach

  3. Tunable phase control of slow and fast light propagation in a slab doped by four-level quantum dot nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarzadeh, Hossein; Sangachin, Elnaz Ahmadi; Asadpour, Seyyed Hossein

    2015-12-01

    Tunable phase control of the slow and fast light propagation through a defect slab medium doped by four-level InGaN/GaN quantum dot structure is demonstrated. By solving the Schrödinger and Poisson’s equations self-consistently, a spherical InGaN quantum dot with GaN barrier shell which can interact by terahertz (THz) signal field is designed numerically. It is found that the phase variation of THz signal field imparts the tunability in the group velocity of the transmitted and reflected pulses through a dielectric slab.

  4. Theory for accelerated slow crack propagation in polyethylene fuel pipes. Annual report, 1987-1988

    SciTech Connect

    Moet, A.; Chudnovsky, A.; Chaoui, K.; Strebel, J.

    1988-06-01

    The report describes a test for assessing the resistance of polyethylene fuel gas pipe materials to brittle crack propagation. The test employs fatigue loading to a notched specimen. Pipe specimens prepared from 2306-IIC and 2306-IA exhibit an initial stage of brittle crack propagation which becomes progressively ductile as it approaches ultimate failure by tearing. The complete test duration is extremely short in comparison to others currently employed, yet it similarly ranks both materials tested. Further, crack layer analysis is employed to evaluate the specific energy of fracture, gamma, a fundamental parameter characteristic of the material's resistance to brittle-crack propagation. It is also found from microscopic examinations that brittle fatigue involves a crazing mechanism known to occur under creep condition.

  5. Spatial structure of low-frequency wind noise.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D Keith; Greenfield, Roy J; White, Michael J

    2007-12-01

    The distinguishing spatial properties of low-frequency microphone wind noise (turbulent pressure disturbances) are examined with a planar, 49-element array. Individual, propagating transient pressure disturbances are imaged by wavelet processing to the array data. Within a given frequency range, the wind disturbances are much smaller and less spatially coherent than sound waves. Conventional array processing techniques are particularly sensitive to wind noise when sensor separations are small compared to the acoustic wavelengths of interest. PMID:18247645

  6. Anomalous sound propagation and slow kinetics in dynamically compressed amorphous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Evan J.; Maiti, Amitesh; Fried, Laurence E.

    2010-01-01

    We have performed molecular-dynamics simulations of dynamic compression waves propagating through amorphous carbon using the Tersoff potential and find that a variety of dynamic compression features appear for two different initial densities. These features include steady elastic shocks, steady chemically reactive shocks, unsteady elastic waves, and unsteady chemically reactive waves. We show how these features can be distinguished by analyzing time-dependent propagation speeds, time-dependent sound speeds, and comparison to multiscale shock technique (MSST) simulations. Understanding such features is a key challenge in quasi-isentropic experiments involving phase transformations. In addition to direct simulations of dynamic compression, we employ the MSST and find agreement with the direct method for this system for the shocks observed. We show how the MSST can be extended to include explicit material viscosity and demonstrate on an amorphous Lennard-Jones system.

  7. Low-frequency oscillations in Hall thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Li-Qiu; Han, Liang; Yu, Da-Ren; Guo, Ning

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we summarize the research development of low-frequency oscillations in the last few decades. The findings of physical mechanism, characteristics and stabilizing methods of low-frequency oscillations are discussed. It shows that it is unreasonable and incomplete to model an ionization region separately to analyze the physical mechanism of low-frequency oscillations. Electro-dynamics as well as the formation conditions of ionization distribution play an important role in characteristics and stabilizing of low-frequency oscillations. Understanding the physical mechanism and characteristics of low- frequency oscillations thoroughly and developing a feasible method stabilizing this instability are still important research subjects. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51477035), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. HIT.NSRIF 2015064), and the Open Research Fund Program of State Key Laboratory of Cryogenic Vacuum Technology and Physics, China (Grant No. ZDK201304).

  8. Slow-light propagation using mode locking of spin precession in quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Shabaev, A.; Dutton, Z.; Kennedy, T. A.; Efros, Al. L.

    2010-11-15

    We propose using mode locking to enable coherent nonlinear optical effects in inhomogenously broadened spin ensembles. We carry out detailed calculations for quantum dot systems in which increased spin coherence via mode locking has been recently observed [A. Greilich et al., Science 313, 341 (2006); 317, 1896 (2007)]. We show how, in the presence of spin locking, a strong pulse-matching effect occurs, providing a powerful tool for high-bandwidth linear optical processing. We then go on to study 'slow light' in this system and show that high-bandwidth pulses can be controllably delayed by a time comparable to the pulse width.

  9. Low frequency hybrid instability in quantum magneto semiconductor plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, A.; Jamil, M.; Areeb, F.; Siddique, M.; Salimullah, M.

    2016-05-01

    The excitation of electrostatic, comparatively low frequency, lower-hybrid waves (LHWs) induced by electron beam in semiconductor plasma is examined using a quantum hydrodynamic model. Various quantum effects are taken into account including the recoil effect, Fermi degenerate pressure, and exchange-correlation potential. The effects of different parameters like the electron-to-hole number density ratio, scaled electron beam temperature and streaming speed, propagation angle and cyclotron frequency over the growth, and phase speed of LHWs are investigated. It is noticed that an increase in the electron number density and streaming speed enhance the instability. Similar effects are observed on decreasing the propagation angle with magnetic field.

  10. Achilles tendon loading patterns during barefoot walking and slow running on a treadmill: An ultrasonic propagation study.

    PubMed

    Wulf, M; Wearing, S C; Hooper, S L; Smeathers, J E; Horstmann, T; Brauner, T

    2015-12-01

    Measurement of tendon loading patterns during gait is important for understanding the pathogenesis of tendon "overuse" injury. Given that the speed of propagation of ultrasound in tendon is proportional to the applied load, this study used a noninvasive ultrasonic transmission technique to measure axial ultrasonic velocity in the right Achilles tendon of 27 healthy adults (11 females and 16 males; age, 26 ± 9 years; height, 1.73 ± 0.07 m; weight, 70.6 ± 21.2 kg), walking at self-selected speed (1.1 ± 0.1 m/s), and running at fixed slow speed (2 m/s) on a treadmill. Synchronous measures of ankle kinematics, spatiotemporal gait parameters, and vertical ground reaction forces were simultaneously measured. Slow running was associated with significantly higher cadence, shorter step length, but greater range of ankle movement, higher magnitude and rate of vertical ground reaction force, and higher ultrasonic velocity in the tendon than walking (P < 0.05). Ultrasonic velocity in the Achilles tendon was highly reproducible during walking and slow running (mean within-subject coefficient of variation < 2%). Ultrasonic maxima (P1, P2) and minima (M1, M2) were significantly higher and occurred earlier in the gait cycle (P1, M1, and M2) during running than walking (P < 0.05). Slow running was associated with higher and earlier peaks in loading of the Achilles tendon than walking. PMID:25913324

  11. Dispersion relations and polarizations of low-frequency waves in two-fluid plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jinsong

    2015-04-15

    Analytical expressions for the dispersion relations and polarizations of low-frequency waves in magnetized plasmas based on two-fluid model are obtained. The properties of waves propagating at different angles (to the ambient magnetic field B{sub 0}) and β (the ratio of the plasma to magnetic pressures) values are investigated. It is shown that two linearly polarized waves—namely, the fast and Alfvén modes in the low-β (β≪1) plasmas, the fast and slow modes in the β∼1 plasmas, and the Alfvén and slow modes in the high-β (β≫1) plasmas—become circularly polarized at the near-parallel (to B{sub 0}) propagation. The negative magnetic-helicity of the Alfvén mode occurs only at small or moderate angles in the low-β plasmas, and the ion cross-helicity of the slow mode is nearly the same as that of the Alfvén mode in the high-β plasmas. It is also shown that the electric polarization δE{sub z}/δE{sub y} decreases with the temperature ratio T{sub e}/T{sub i} for the long-wavelength waves, and the transition between left- and right-hand polarizations of the Alfvén mode in T{sub e}/T{sub i}≠0 plasmas can disappear when T{sub e}/T{sub i}=0. The approximate dispersion relations in the near-perpendicular propagation, low-β, and high-β limits can quite accurately describe the three modes.

  12. Investigating Low-Frequency Earthquake Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweet, J. R.; Creager, K. C.

    2013-12-01

    Low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) have been associated with tectonic tremor and slow slip on the deep extension of subduction zones faults and major strike-slip faults. These tiny earthquakes are thought to represent small amounts of slip on the plate interface in places with high pore fluid pressure and low effective stress. Some tectonic tremor has been shown to consist of the superposition of many LFEs occurring at nearly the same time [Shelly et al., 2007]. In northern Cascadia, we use data from the Array of Arrays and CAFE experiments to detect and study properties of a curious LFE family on the downdip extension of the transition zone. This family--the deepest we've yet discovered in Cascadia--occurs in small swarms of ~1 hour duration every 1 to 2 weeks. Over our 6-year dataset we have identified ~9000 individual repeats of this LFE. Using double-difference techniques on one swarm, we have found that the LFEs lie on a dipping plane (<300m thick) that locates on the inferred plate interface [McCrory et al., 2012; Preston et al., 2003]. Individual LFE locations have errors of order 100m. Interestingly, we also find that over the course of an hour the LFEs migrate updip over a distance of ~2km in a narrow channel parallel to the plate convergence direction. We suggest this migration represents the movement of a slow slip front, and may be similar to previously described tremor streaks, also seen in Cascadia [Ghosh et al., 2010]; however our migration velocity of 2km/hr would be intermediate between the slower reported velocities of rapid tremor reversals [Houston et al., 2010] and the much faster tremor streaks. We find that amplitudes for this LFE family occupy a relatively narrow range, with louder events equally likely to occur at the beginning, middle, or end of a swarm of LFEs. We estimate LFE magnitudes of -0.8 to +0.8 by comparing peak-to-peak amplitudes and PNSN assigned magnitudes for 8 small earthquakes within 10km of the LFEs. Amplitudes below about

  13. Low-frequency cosmology from the moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein Wolt, M.; Aminaei, A.; Pourshaghaghi, H.; Koopmans, L.; Falcke, H.

    2013-09-01

    From a low-frequency point of view, the moon provides excess to the virtually unexplored radio frequency domain below 30 MHz that is not accessible from Earth due to the atmospheric cutoff and interference from man-made RFI. We show that with a single low-frequency radio antenna the detection of the 21-cm Dark Ages signal is possible within integration times of months, and address the size and integration times required for a future low-frequency array to perform detailed tomography and power spectral analysis of the Dark Ages signal.

  14. Implementation of dispersion-free slow acoustic wave propagation and phase engineering with helical-structured metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xuefeng; Li, Kun; Zhang, Peng; Zhu, Jie; Zhang, Jintao; Tian, Chao; Liu, Shengchun

    2016-05-01

    The ability to slow down wave propagation in materials has attracted significant research interest. A successful solution will give rise to manageable enhanced wave-matter interaction, freewheeling phase engineering and spatial compression of wave signals. The existing methods are typically associated with constructing dispersive materials or structures with local resonators, thus resulting in unavoidable distortion of waveforms. Here we show that, with helical-structured acoustic metamaterials, it is now possible to implement dispersion-free sound deceleration. The helical-structured metamaterials present a non-dispersive high effective refractive index that is tunable through adjusting the helicity of structures, while the wavefront revolution plays a dominant role in reducing the group velocity. Finally, we numerically and experimentally demonstrate that the helical-structured metamaterials with designed inhomogeneous unit cells can turn a normally incident plane wave into a self-accelerating beam on the prescribed parabolic trajectory. The helical-structured metamaterials will have profound impact to applications in explorations of slow wave physics.

  15. Implementation of dispersion-free slow acoustic wave propagation and phase engineering with helical-structured metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuefeng; Li, Kun; Zhang, Peng; Zhu, Jie; Zhang, Jintao; Tian, Chao; Liu, Shengchun

    2016-01-01

    The ability to slow down wave propagation in materials has attracted significant research interest. A successful solution will give rise to manageable enhanced wave–matter interaction, freewheeling phase engineering and spatial compression of wave signals. The existing methods are typically associated with constructing dispersive materials or structures with local resonators, thus resulting in unavoidable distortion of waveforms. Here we show that, with helical-structured acoustic metamaterials, it is now possible to implement dispersion-free sound deceleration. The helical-structured metamaterials present a non-dispersive high effective refractive index that is tunable through adjusting the helicity of structures, while the wavefront revolution plays a dominant role in reducing the group velocity. Finally, we numerically and experimentally demonstrate that the helical-structured metamaterials with designed inhomogeneous unit cells can turn a normally incident plane wave into a self-accelerating beam on the prescribed parabolic trajectory. The helical-structured metamaterials will have profound impact to applications in explorations of slow wave physics. PMID:27198887

  16. Implementation of dispersion-free slow acoustic wave propagation and phase engineering with helical-structured metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuefeng; Li, Kun; Zhang, Peng; Zhu, Jie; Zhang, Jintao; Tian, Chao; Liu, Shengchun

    2016-01-01

    The ability to slow down wave propagation in materials has attracted significant research interest. A successful solution will give rise to manageable enhanced wave-matter interaction, freewheeling phase engineering and spatial compression of wave signals. The existing methods are typically associated with constructing dispersive materials or structures with local resonators, thus resulting in unavoidable distortion of waveforms. Here we show that, with helical-structured acoustic metamaterials, it is now possible to implement dispersion-free sound deceleration. The helical-structured metamaterials present a non-dispersive high effective refractive index that is tunable through adjusting the helicity of structures, while the wavefront revolution plays a dominant role in reducing the group velocity. Finally, we numerically and experimentally demonstrate that the helical-structured metamaterials with designed inhomogeneous unit cells can turn a normally incident plane wave into a self-accelerating beam on the prescribed parabolic trajectory. The helical-structured metamaterials will have profound impact to applications in explorations of slow wave physics. PMID:27198887

  17. Comparison of optical and acoustical monitoring during a crack propagation, implication for slow earthquake dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengliné, Olivier; Schmittbuhl, Jean; Elkhoury, Jean; Toussaint, Renaud; Daniel, Guillaume; Maloy, Knut Jurgen

    2010-05-01

    Observations of aseismic transients in several tectonic context suggest that they might be linked to seismicity. However a clear observation and description of these phenomena and their interaction is lacking. This owes to the difficulty of characterizing with a sufficient resolution processes taking place at depth. Here we aim to study these interactions between aseismic and seismic slip taking advantage of an unique experimental setup. We conducted a series of mode I crack propagation experiments on transparent materials (PMMA). The crack advance is trapped in a weakness plane which is the interface between two previously sandblasted and annealed plexiglass plates. A fast video camera taking up to 500 frames per second ensures the tracking of the front rupture. The acoustic system is composed of a maximum of 44 channels continuously recording at 5 MHz for a few tens of seconds. Piezo-electric sensors are composed of a 32 elements linear array and individual sensors surrounding the crack front. An automatic detection and localization procedure allows us to obtain the position of acoustic emission (A.E.) that occurred during the crack advance. Crack front image processing reveals an intermittent opening which might be linked to the time and space clustering of the AE. An analogy between the mode I (opening) and the mode III (antiplane slip) allows us to interpret our results in term of slip on faults. Our experiment thus helps to reveal the interplay between seismic and aseismic slip on faults.

  18. Low-Frequency Waves in HF Heating of the Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A. S.; Eliasson, B.; Milikh, G. M.; Najmi, A.; Papadopoulos, K.; Shao, X.; Vartanyan, A.

    2016-02-01

    Ionospheric heating experiments have enabled an exploration of the ionosphere as a large-scale natural laboratory for the study of many plasma processes. These experiments inject high-frequency (HF) radio waves using high-power transmitters and an array of ground- and space-based diagnostics. This chapter discusses the excitation and propagation of low-frequency waves in HF heating of the ionosphere. The theoretical aspects and the associated models and simulations, and the results from experiments, mostly from the HAARP facility, are presented together to provide a comprehensive interpretation of the relevant plasma processes. The chapter presents the plasma model of the ionosphere for describing the physical processes during HF heating, the numerical code, and the simulations of the excitation of low-frequency waves by HF heating. It then gives the simulations of the high-latitude ionosphere and mid-latitude ionosphere. The chapter also briefly discusses the role of kinetic processes associated with wave generation.

  19. The influence of cochlear shape on low-frequency hearing

    PubMed Central

    Manoussaki, Daphne; Chadwick, Richard S.; Ketten, Darlene R.; Arruda, Julie; Dimitriadis, Emilios K.; O'Malley, Jen T.

    2008-01-01

    The conventional theory about the snail shell shape of the mammalian cochlea is that it evolved essentially and perhaps solely to conserve space inside the skull. Recently, a theory proposed that the spiral's graded curvature enhances the cochlea's mechanical response to low frequencies. This article provides a multispecies analysis of cochlear shape to test this theory and demonstrates that the ratio of the radii of curvature from the outermost and innermost turns of the cochlear spiral is a significant cochlear feature that correlates strongly with low-frequency hearing limits. The ratio, which is a measure of curvature gradient, is a reflection of the ability of cochlear curvature to focus acoustic energy at the outer wall of the cochlear canal as the wave propagates toward the apex of the cochlea. PMID:18413615

  20. Low-frequency oscillations in radiative-convective systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, QI; Randall, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Although eastward propagation has long been considered one of the essential features of the Madden-Julian waves, recent observations have revealed a stationary or quasi-stationary component in the oscillations, particularly in measures of the diabatic heating rate. Wave-CISK theories of the low-frequency oscillations have struggled to explain the observed period and vertical structure of the waves. On the other hand, theoretical and numerical studies have shown that low-frequency waves strongly resembling the observed oscillations can be excited by specified low-frequency oscillations of the convective heating. A problem with the latter set of theories is that the cause of the oscillatory heating has not been satisfactorily explained. It is proposed here that the observed low-frequency wave motions are the response to forcing by an essentially stationary, self-excited oscillating heat source that is produced by nonlinear interactions among radiation, cumulus convection, and the surface fluxes of sensible heat and moisture. Feedback of the large-scale motions on the latent heating is not required. Results from two very different one-dimensional models are presented to support this hypothesis. The physical processes included in the models are essentially the same, that is, radiation, cumulus convection, and the surface fluxes of sensible heat and moisture; the first model is highly simplified, however, while the second includes relatively sophisticated parameterizations of all the relevant physical processes. Results from both models show low-frequency oscillations of the latent heating, temperature, and moisture. Experiments show that the oscillations are favored by a warm sea surface and weak surface wind speeds, consistent with the observed conditions over the Indian Ocean and the tropical western Pacific Ocean.

  1. External potassium and action potential propagation in rat fast and slow twitch muscles.

    PubMed

    Kössler, F; Lange, F; Caffier, G; Küchler, G

    1991-10-01

    The role of extracellular K+ concentration in the propagation velocity of action potential was tested in isolated rat skeletal muscles. Different K+ concentrations were produced by KCl additions to extracellular solution. Action potentials were measured extracellularly by means of two annular platinum electrodes. Fibre bundles of m. soleus (SOL), m. extensor digitorum longus (EDL), red (SMR) and white (SMW) part of m. sternomastoideus were maximum stimulated. The conduction velocity (c.v.) was calculated from the distance between the electrodes and the time delay of the potentials measured at 22 degrees C. In Tyrode solution containing 5 mmol/l K+, the c.v. was close to 1 m.s-1. Bundles of the fast muscle type seemed to have a somewhat higher c.v. The differences observed in these studies were not significant. At higher temperatures, the c.v. increased (Q10 of approx. 2) and a dissociation between SMR and SMW muscles appeared. An elevation of K+ concentration to 10 mmol/l induced a drop of the c.v. by approx. 25% and 15% in EDL and SOL muscles, respectively. After return to normal solution, the recovery was not complete within 30 min. In K+ free solution the c.v. of EDL and SM muscles rose by a factor of 1.5, but less in SOL muscles. The weaker response of SOL to K+ modification was related to the higher resistance of this muscle to fatigue. This suggestion was supported by experiments on fatigued fibre bundles. Immediately after a tetanic stimulation producing fatigue, the c.v. of EDL and SOL muscles dropped similarly as in 10 mmol/l K+; again, the drop was less for SOL muscles. Adrenaline (0.5-10.0 mumol/l) enhanced both the c.v. and the twitch amplitude. The results support the suggestion that extracellular K+ accumulation during activity is an essential factor of muscle fatigue. PMID:1816028

  2. Kerr Non-linerity in Slow Light Propagation for Quantum Teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombesi, Paolo

    2001-05-01

    -linearity can be obtained using the recently demonstrated ultraslow light propagation,(hau)L.V. Hau et al., Nature (London) 397, 594 (1999). achieved via electromagnetically induced transparency (E. Arimondo, in Progress in Optics) XXXV, ed. by E. Wolf, (Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1996);S.E. Harris, Phys. Today 50, 36 (1997); M.O. Scully and M.S. Zubairy, Quantum Optics (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 1997). in ensembles of cold atoms.

  3. Very low frequency earthquakes in Cascadia migrate with tremor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Huesca-Pérez, Eduardo; Brodsky, Emily; Ito, Yoshihiro

    2015-05-01

    We find very low frequency earthquakes (VLFEs) in Cascadia under northern Washington during 2011 episodic tremor and slip event. VLFEs are rich in low-frequency energy (20-50 s) and depleted in higher frequencies (higher than 1 Hz) compared to local earthquakes. Based on a grid search centroid moment tensor inversion, we find that VLFEs are located near the plate interface in the zone where tremor and slow slip are observed. In addition, they migrate along strike with tremor activity. Their moment tensor solutions show double-couple sources with shallow thrust mechanisms, consistent with shear slip at the plate interface. Their magnitude ranges between Mw 3.3 and 3.7. Seismic moment released by a single VLFE is comparable to the total cumulative moment released by tremor activity during an entire episodic tremor and slip event. The VLFEs contribute more seismic moment to this episodic tremor and slip event than cumulative tremor activity and indicate a higher seismic efficiency of slow earthquakes in Cascadia than previously thought. Spatiotemporal correlation of VLFE and tremor activity suggests that they are the results of the same physical processes governing slow earthquakes.

  4. On apparent temperature in low-frequency Alfvenic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Nariyuki, Yasuhiro

    2012-08-15

    Low-frequency, parallel propagating Alfvenic turbulence in collisionless plasmas is theoretically studied. Alfvenic turbulence is derived as an equilibrium state (Beltrami field) in the magnetohydrodynamic equations with the pressure anisotropy and multi-species of ions. It is shown that the conservation of the total 'apparent temperature' corresponds to the Bernoulli law. A simple model of the radially expanding solar wind including Alfvenic turbulence is also discussed. The conversion of the wave energy in the 'apparent temperature' into the 'real temperature' is facilitated with increasing radial distance.

  5. Improved low frequency stability of bolometric detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbanks, T.; Devlin, M.; Lange, A. E.; Beeman, J. W.; Sato, S.

    1990-01-01

    An ac bridge readout system has been developed that greatly improves the low-frequency stability of bolometric detectors. The readout can be implemented with a simple circuit appropriate for use in space applications. A matched pair of detectors was used in the readout to achieve system noise within a factor of two of the fundamental noise limit of the detectors at frequencies as low as 10 mHz. The low-frequency stability of the readout system allows slower, more sensitive detectors to be used in many applications, and it facilitates observing strategies that are well suited to spaceborne observations.

  6. Low frequency acoustic and electromagnetic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Maccamy, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper deals with two classes of problems arising from acoustics and electromagnetics scattering in the low frequency stations. The first class of problem is solving Helmholtz equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions on an arbitrary two dimensional body while the second one is an interior-exterior interface problem with Helmholtz equation in the exterior. Low frequency analysis show that there are two intermediate problems which solve the above problems accurate to 0(k/2/ log k) where k is the frequency. These solutions greatly differ from the zero frequency approximations. For the Dirichlet problem numerical examples are shown to verify the theoretical estimates.

  7. Low frequency acoustic and electromagnetic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Maccamy, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    This paper deals with two classes of problems arising from acoustics and electromagnetics scattering in the low frequency stations. The first class of problem is solving Helmholtz equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions on an arbitrary two dimensional body while the second one is an interior-exterior interface problem with Helmholtz equation in the exterior. Low frequency analysis show that there are two intermediate problems which solve the above problems accurate to 0(k(2) log k) where k is the frequency. These solutions greatly differ from the zero frequency approximations. For the Dirichlet problem numerical examples are shown to verify the theoretical estimates.

  8. Low-frequency sound exposure causes reversible long-term changes of cochlear transfer characteristics.

    PubMed

    Drexl, Markus; Otto, Larissa; Wiegrebe, Lutz; Marquardt, Torsten; Gürkov, Robert; Krause, Eike

    2016-02-01

    Intense, low-frequency sound presented to the mammalian cochlea induces temporary changes of cochlear sensitivity, for which the term 'Bounce' phenomenon has been coined. Typical manifestations are slow oscillations of hearing thresholds or the level of otoacoustic emissions. It has been suggested that these alterations are caused by changes of the mechano-electrical transducer transfer function of outer hair cells (OHCs). Shape estimates of this transfer function can be derived from low-frequency-biased distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE). Here, we tracked the transfer function estimates before and after triggering a cochlear Bounce. Specifically, cubic DPOAEs, modulated by a low-frequency biasing tone, were followed over time before and after induction of the cochlear Bounce. Most subjects showed slow, biphasic changes of the transfer function estimates after low-frequency sound exposure relative to the preceding control period. Our data show that the operating point changes biphasically on the transfer function with an initial shift away from the inflection point followed by a shift towards the inflection point before returning to baseline values. Changes in transfer function and operating point lasted for about 180 s. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that intense, low-frequency sound disturbs regulatory mechanisms in OHCs. The homeostatic readjustment of these mechanisms after low-frequency offset is reflected in slow oscillations of the estimated transfer functions. PMID:26706707

  9. Hearing Foreign Languages through Low Frequencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberge, Claude

    A study to assess the feasibility of the use of low frequencies for teaching foreign language to the hearing impaired is described. The subjects were unimpaired Japanese students, aged 18 and 19, in beginning French language study. Recorded sentences translated into English, French, and Mandarin Chinese were combined in various ways and presented…

  10. Is low frequency ocean sound increasing globally?

    PubMed

    Miksis-Olds, Jennifer L; Nichols, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    Low frequency sound has increased in the Northeast Pacific Ocean over the past 60 yr [Ross (1993) Acoust. Bull. 18, 5-8; (2005) IEEE J. Ocean. Eng. 30, 257-261; Andrew, Howe, Mercer, and Dzieciuch (2002) J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 129, 642-651; McDonald, Hildebrand, and Wiggins (2006) J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 120, 711-717; Chapman and Price (2011) J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 129, EL161-EL165] and in the Indian Ocean over the past decade, [Miksis-Olds, Bradley, and Niu (2013) J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 134, 3464-3475]. More recently, Andrew, Howe, and Mercer's [(2011) J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 129, 642-651] observations in the Northeast Pacific show a level or slightly decreasing trend in low frequency noise. It remains unclear what the low frequency trends are in other regions of the world. In this work, data from the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty Organization International Monitoring System was used to examine the rate and magnitude of change in low frequency sound (5-115 Hz) over the past decade in the South Atlantic and Equatorial Pacific Oceans. The dominant source observed in the South Atlantic was seismic air gun signals, while shipping and biologic sources contributed more to the acoustic environment at the Equatorial Pacific location. Sound levels over the past 5-6 yr in the Equatorial Pacific have decreased. Decreases were also observed in the ambient sound floor in the South Atlantic Ocean. Based on these observations, it does not appear that low frequency sound levels are increasing globally. PMID:26827043

  11. Slow earthquakes coincident with episodic tremors and slow slip events.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoshihiro; Obara, Kazushige; Shiomi, Katsuhiko; Sekine, Shutaro; Hirose, Hitoshi

    2007-01-26

    We report on the very-low-frequency earthquakes occurring in the transition zone of the subducting plate interface along the Nankai subduction zone in southwest Japan. Seismic waves generated by very-low-frequency earthquakes with seismic moment magnitudes of 3.1 to 3.5 predominantly show a long period of about 20 seconds. The seismicity of very-low-frequency earthquakes accompanies and migrates with the activity of deep low-frequency tremors and slow slip events. The coincidence of these three phenomena improves the detection and characterization of slow earthquakes, which are thought to increase the stress on updip megathrust earthquake rupture zones. PMID:17138867

  12. The AKR emission cone at low frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.

    1981-01-01

    It is noted that certain of the ISEE-1 observations between the plasmasphere and the auroral zone have revealed the emission cone of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) unaffected by plasmaspheric refraction. At some distance from the source, the cone produced a sharp low-frequency boundary in the AKR signals, which was displaced above the cyclotron frequency. The variation of this boundary, together with other aspects of the AKR signals, suggested that the AKR emission cone closed toward a hollow, roughly 45 deg limit cone with decreasing frequency, duplicating the behavior previously found with ISIS-1 at the opposite end of the AKR spectrum. It is pointed out that the hollow limit cone at low frequencies is a new feature, not previously reported.

  13. Extreme low frequency acoustic measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention is an extremely low frequency (ELF) microphone and acoustic measurement system capable of infrasound detection in a portable and easily deployable form factor. In one embodiment of the invention, an extremely low frequency electret microphone comprises a membrane, a backplate, and a backchamber. The backchamber is sealed to allow substantially no air exchange between the backchamber and outside the microphone. Compliance of the membrane may be less than ambient air compliance. The backplate may define a plurality of holes and a slot may be defined between an outer diameter of the backplate and an inner wall of the microphone. The locations and sizes of the holes, the size of the slot, and the volume of the backchamber may be selected such that membrane motion is substantially critically damped.

  14. Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Backscattering from Tunnels

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, K; Pao, H

    2007-01-16

    Low-frequency electromagnetic scattering from one or more tunnels in a lossy dielectric half-space is considered. The tunnel radii are assumed small compared to the wavelength of the electromagnetic field in the surrounding medium; a tunnel can thus be modeled as a thin scatterer, described by an equivalent impedance per unit length. We examine the normalized backscattering width for cases in which the air-ground interface is either smooth or rough.

  15. LOFAR: The LOw-Frequency ARray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Haarlem, M. P.; Wise, M. W.; Gunst, A. W.; Heald, G.; McKean, J. P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Nijboer, R.; Swinbank, J.; Fallows, R.; Brentjens, M.; Nelles, A.; Beck, R.; Falcke, H.; Fender, R.; Hörandel, J.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Mann, G.; Miley, G.; Röttgering, H.; Stappers, B. W.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Zaroubi, S.; van den Akker, M.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Anderson, K.; van Ardenne, A.; Arts, M.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, I. M.; Batejat, F.; Bähren, L.; Bell, M. E.; Bell, M. R.; van Bemmel, I.; Bennema, P.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Bîrzan, L.; Bonafede, A.; Boonstra, A.-J.; Braun, R.; Bregman, J.; Breitling, F.; van de Brink, R. H.; Broderick, J.; Broekema, P. C.; Brouw, W. N.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H. R.; van Cappellen, W.; Ciardi, B.; Coenen, T.; Conway, J.; Coolen, A.; Corstanje, A.; Damstra, S.; Davies, O.; Deller, A. T.; Dettmar, R.-J.; van Diepen, G.; Dijkstra, K.; Donker, P.; Doorduin, A.; Dromer, J.; Drost, M.; van Duin, A.; Eislöffel, J.; van Enst, J.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Gankema, H.; Garrett, M. A.; de Gasperin, F.; Gerbers, M.; de Geus, E.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Grit, T.; Gruppen, P.; Hamaker, J. P.; Hassall, T.; Hoeft, M.; Holties, H. A.; Horneffer, A.; van der Horst, A.; van Houwelingen, A.; Huijgen, A.; Iacobelli, M.; Intema, H.; Jackson, N.; Jelic, V.; de Jong, A.; Juette, E.; Kant, D.; Karastergiou, A.; Koers, A.; Kollen, H.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kooistra, E.; Koopman, Y.; Koster, A.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kramer, M.; Kuper, G.; Lambropoulos, P.; Law, C.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lemaitre, J.; Loose, M.; Maat, P.; Macario, G.; Markoff, S.; Masters, J.; McFadden, R. A.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; Meijering, H.; Meulman, H.; Mevius, M.; Middelberg, E.; Millenaar, R.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Mohan, R. N.; Mol, J. D.; Morawietz, J.; Morganti, R.; Mulcahy, D. D.; Mulder, E.; Munk, H.; Nieuwenhuis, L.; van Nieuwpoort, R.; Noordam, J. E.; Norden, M.; Noutsos, A.; Offringa, A. R.; Olofsson, H.; Omar, A.; Orrú, E.; Overeem, R.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pandey, V. N.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A.; Rafferty, D.; Rawlings, S.; Reich, W.; de Reijer, J.-P.; Reitsma, J.; Renting, G. A.; Riemers, P.; Rol, E.; Romein, J. W.; Roosjen, J.; Ruiter, M.; Scaife, A.; van der Schaaf, K.; Scheers, B.; Schellart, P.; Schoenmakers, A.; Schoonderbeek, G.; Serylak, M.; Shulevski, A.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Sobey, C.; Spreeuw, H.; Steinmetz, M.; Sterks, C. G. M.; Stiepel, H.-J.; Stuurwold, K.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Thomas, I.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, M. C.; van der Tol, B.; Usov, O.; van Veelen, M.; van der Veen, A.-J.; ter Veen, S.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Vermeulen, R.; Vermaas, N.; Vocks, C.; Vogt, C.; de Vos, M.; van der Wal, E.; van Weeren, R.; Weggemans, H.; Weltevrede, P.; White, S.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Wilhelmsson, T.; Wucknitz, O.; Yatawatta, S.; Zarka, P.; Zensus, A.; van Zwieten, J.

    2013-08-01

    LOFAR, the LOw-Frequency ARray, is a new-generation radio interferometer constructed in the north of the Netherlands and across europe. Utilizing a novel phased-array design, LOFAR covers the largely unexplored low-frequency range from 10-240 MHz and provides a number of unique observing capabilities. Spreading out from a core located near the village of Exloo in the northeast of the Netherlands, a total of 40 LOFAR stations are nearing completion. A further five stations have been deployed throughout Germany, and one station has been built in each of France, Sweden, and the UK. Digital beam-forming techniques make the LOFAR system agile and allow for rapid repointing of the telescope as well as the potential for multiple simultaneous observations. With its dense core array and long interferometric baselines, LOFAR achieves unparalleled sensitivity and angular resolution in the low-frequency radio regime. The LOFAR facilities are jointly operated by the International LOFAR Telescope (ILT) foundation, as an observatory open to the global astronomical community. LOFAR is one of the first radio observatories to feature automated processing pipelines to deliver fully calibrated science products to its user community. LOFAR's new capabilities, techniques and modus operandi make it an important pathfinder for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). We give an overview of the LOFAR instrument, its major hardware and software components, and the core science objectives that have driven its design. In addition, we present a selection of new results from the commissioning phase of this new radio observatory.

  16. Low Frequency Seiche in a Large Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMahan, J. H.; Thornton, E. B.; Gallagher, E. L.; Reniers, A.

    2014-12-01

    Short-term observations of sea surface elevations (η) along the 10m isobath, and long-term observations inside and outside of a large bay (Monterey Bay, CA) were obtained to describe the nodal structure of the mode 0-3 seiches within the bay and the low frequency (<346 cpd) seiche forcing mechanism. The measured nodal pattern validates previous numerical estimates associated with a northern amplitude bias, though variability exists across the modal frequency band, particularly for mode 0 and 1. Low frequency oceanic η white noise within seiche frequency bands (24-69 cpd) provides a continuous forcing of the bay seiche with a η2 (variance) amplification of 16-40 for the different modes. The temporal variation of the oceanic η white noise is significantly correlated (R2=0.86) at the 95% confidence interval with the bay seiche η that varies seasonally. The oceanic η white noise is hypothesized as being from low frequency, free, infragravity waves that are forced by short waves. This work was funded by NPS, ONR, & NSF.

  17. Rectification of low-frequency thermal waves in graded SicGe1 - c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jou, D.; Carlomagno, I.; Cimmelli, V. A.

    2016-05-01

    We study propagation of low-frequency thermal waves in graded SicGe1-c. We show that in some ranges of stoichiometry variation one obtains rectification of thermal waves, i.e., the system allows the propagation of waves in one direction but not in the opposite one through the graded system, or through a thin graded layer separating two different systems. The rectification of low-frequency thermal waves could be switched by imposing on the graded layer a suitable temperature gradient.

  18. Ultra low frequency electromagnetic fire alarm system for underground mines

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    During an underground mine fire, air can be rapidly depleted of oxygen and contaminated with smoke and toxic fire gases. Any delay in warning miners could have disastrous consequences. Unfortunately, present mine fire alarm systems, such as stench, audible or visual alarms, telephones, and messengers, are often slow, unreliable, and limited in mine area coverage. Recent research by the U.S. Bureau of Mines has demonstrated that ultra-low-frequency electromagnetic signaling can be used for an underground mine fire alarm. In field tests of prototype equipment at five mines, electromagnetic signals from 630 to 2,000 Hz were transmitted through mine rock for distances as great as 1,645 m to an intrinsically safe receiver. The prototype system uses off-the-shelf components and state-of-the-art technology to ensure high reliability and low cost. When utilized, this technology would enable simultaneous and instantaneous warning of all underground personnel, regardless of their location or work activity, thereby increasing the likelihood of their successfully escaping a mine disaster. This paper presents the theoretical basis for through-the-rock ultra-low-frequency electromagnetic transmission, design of the prototype transmitter and receiver, and the results of in-mine tests of the prototype system.

  19. Low frequency electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaniol, Craig

    1989-01-01

    Following preliminary investigations of the low frequency electric and magnetic fields that may exists in the Earth-ionospheric cavity, measurements were taken with state-of-the art spectrum analyzers. As a follow up to this activity, an investigation was initiated to determine sources and values for possible low frequency signal that would appear in the cavity. The lowest cavity resonance is estimated at about 8 Hz, but lower frequencies may be an important component of our electromagnetic environment. The potential field frequencies produced by the electron were investigated by a classical model that included possible cross coupling of the electric and gravitation fields. During this work, an interesting relationship was found that related the high frequency charge field with the extremely low frequency of the gravitation field. The results of numerical calculations were surprisingly accurate and this area of investigation is continuing. The work toward continued development of a standardized monitoring facility is continuing with the potential of installing the prototype at West Virginia State College early in 1990. This installation would be capable of real time monitoring of ELF signals in the Earth-ionoshpere cavity and would provide some directional information. A high gain, low noise, 1/f frequency corrected preamplifier was designed and tested for the ferrite core magnetic sensor. The potential application of a super conducting sensor for the ELF magnetic field detection is under investigation. It is hoped that a fully operational monitoring network could pinpoint the location of ELF signal sources and provide new information on where these signals originate and what causes them, assuming that they are natural in origin.

  20. Analyzing low frequency waves associated with plasma sheet flow channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, X.; Liang, J.; Wang, C. P.; Lyons, L. R.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2014-12-01

    Low frequency (0.006~0.02 Hz) magnetic oscillations are frequently observed to be associated with the substorm-related dipolarization in the near-Earth plasma sheet. It has been suggested that these oscillations are possibly triggered by ballooning instability in the transition region. However, our multi-point observations using THEMIS spacecraft have shown that similar oscillations are observed to be associated with the earthward moving flow channels as they penetrate from middle tail to the transition region. Linear MHD wave analysis suggested that these oscillations ahead of the dipolarization front are magnetosonic waves. For most of the cases, the thermal pressure and magnetic pressures variations are anti-phase, indicating slow mode waves. However, by taking advantage of the spacecraft located very close in X-Y plane and slightly away from the central plasma sheet, we found that for many events the phase relation between the thermal and magnetic pressure variations is Z-dependent, which suggests that the observational evidence for slow mode may not be applicable. In order to further examine these waves, we performed a MHD analysis in inhomogeneous plasma sheet. The calculation shows that for Harris Sheet configuration, the thermal and magnetic pressures variations can be anti-phase for any wave other than slow mode waves where the vertical velocity disturbance reaches its maximum, thus this phase relation may not be used as an identifier of magnetosonic wave modes. We will show the dispersion relation and wave generated disturbances obtained from the numerical calculations.

  1. Minimization of nanosatellite low frequency magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Belyayev, S M; Dudkin, F L

    2016-03-01

    Small weight and dimensions of the micro- and nanosatellites constrain researchers to place electromagnetic sensors on short booms or on the satellite body. Therefore the electromagnetic cleanliness of such satellites becomes a central question. This paper describes the theoretical base and practical techniques for determining the parameters of DC and very low frequency magnetic interference sources. One of such sources is satellite magnetization, the reduction of which improves the accuracy and stability of the attitude control system. We present design solutions for magnetically clean spacecraft, testing equipment, and technology for magnetic moment measurements, which are more convenient, efficient, and accurate than the conventional ones. PMID:27036801

  2. Minimization of nanosatellite low frequency magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyayev, S. M.; Dudkin, F. L.

    2016-03-01

    Small weight and dimensions of the micro- and nanosatellites constrain researchers to place electromagnetic sensors on short booms or on the satellite body. Therefore the electromagnetic cleanliness of such satellites becomes a central question. This paper describes the theoretical base and practical techniques for determining the parameters of DC and very low frequency magnetic interference sources. One of such sources is satellite magnetization, the reduction of which improves the accuracy and stability of the attitude control system. We present design solutions for magnetically clean spacecraft, testing equipment, and technology for magnetic moment measurements, which are more convenient, efficient, and accurate than the conventional ones.

  3. Gauribidanur Low-Frequency Solar Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, P.; Kathiravan, C.; Ramesh, R.; Rajalingam, M.; Barve, Indrajit V.

    2014-10-01

    A new radio spectrograph, dedicated to observe the Sun, has been recently commissioned by the Indian Institute of Astrophysics (IIA) at the Gauribidanur Radio Observatory, about 100 km North of Bangalore. The instrument, called the Gauribidanur Low-frequency Solar Spectrograph (GLOSS), operates in the frequency range≈40 - 440 MHz. Radio emission in this frequency range originates close to the Sun, typically in the radial distance range r≈1.1 - 2.0 R⊙. This article describes the characteristics of the GLOSS and the first results.

  4. Experimental study of low frequency drift instability

    SciTech Connect

    Ioffe, M.S.; Kanaev, B.I.; Pastukhov, V.P.

    1994-05-01

    Experimental studies of nondissipative low frequency drift instability are reported; the plasma of a long mirror trap with edge casp anchors was investigated. The instability growth was found to take place only in a limited number of operation modes even in the case of all the growth requirements being satisfied. Furthermore, the instability development is rather moderate, and the associated anomalous losses appear to be small compared to the classical Coulomb losses. Possible factors accounting for the {open_quotes}soft{close_quotes} instability evolution are discussed. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Low-frequency vibrational modes of glutamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Ning; Wang, Guo; Zhang, Yan

    2011-12-01

    High-resolution terahertz absorption and Raman spectra of glutamine in the frequency region 0.2 THz-2.8 THz are obtained by using THz time domain spectroscopy and low-frequency Raman spectroscopy. Based on the experimental and the computational results, the vibration modes corresponding to the terahertz absorption and Raman scatting peaks are assigned and further verified by the theoretical calculations. Spectral investigation of the periodic structure of glutamine based on the sophisticated hybrid density functional B3LYP indicates that the vibrational modes come mainly from the inter-molecular hydrogen bond in this frequency region.

  6. Pulsar timing sensitivity to very-low-frequency gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenet, Fredrick A.; Armstrong, J. W.; Tinto, Massimo

    2011-04-01

    We compute the sensitivity, constrained by instrumental, propagation, and other fundamental noises, of pulsar timing to very-low-frequency gravitational waves (GWs). Reaching predicted GW signal strengths will require suppression of time-of-arrival fluctuations caused by interstellar plasma turbulence and a reduction of white rms timing noise to ≲100ns. Assuming negligible intrinsic pulsar rotational noise, perfect time transfer from time standard to observatory, and stable pulse profiles, the resulting single-pulsar signal-to-noiseratio=1 sensitivity is limited by terrestrial time standards at hrms˜2×10-16[f/(1cycle/year)]-1/2 for f<3×10-8Hz, where f is the Fourier frequency and a bandwidth of 1 cycle/(10 years) is assumed. Since this sensitivity is comparable to predicted GW signal levels, a reliable detection will require substantial signal-to-noise ratio improvement via pulsar timing array.

  7. Pulsar timing sensitivity to very-low-frequency gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Jenet, Fredrick A.; Armstrong, J. W.; Tinto, Massimo

    2011-04-15

    We compute the sensitivity, constrained by instrumental, propagation, and other fundamental noises, of pulsar timing to very-low-frequency gravitational waves (GWs). Reaching predicted GW signal strengths will require suppression of time-of-arrival fluctuations caused by interstellar plasma turbulence and a reduction of white rms timing noise to < or approx. 100 ns. Assuming negligible intrinsic pulsar rotational noise, perfect time transfer from time standard to observatory, and stable pulse profiles, the resulting single-pulsar signal-to-noise ratio=1 sensitivity is limited by terrestrial time standards at h{sub rms}{approx}2x10{sup -16} [f/ (1 cycle/year)]-1/2 for f<3x10{sup -8} Hz, where f is the Fourier frequency and a bandwidth of 1 cycle/(10 years) is assumed. Since this sensitivity is comparable to predicted GW signal levels, a reliable detection will require substantial signal-to-noise ratio improvement via pulsar timing array.

  8. Low-Frequency Radio Bursts and Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.

    2016-01-01

    Low-frequency radio phenomena are due to the presence of nonthermal electrons in the interplanetary (IP) medium. Understanding these phenomena is important in characterizing the space environment near Earth and other destinations in the solar system. Substantial progress has been made in the past two decades, because of the continuous and uniform data sets available from space-based radio and white-light instrumentation. This paper highlights some recent results obtained on IP radio phenomena. In particular, the source of type IV radio bursts, the behavior of type III storms, shock propagation in the IP medium, and the solar-cycle variation of type II radio bursts are considered. All these phenomena are closely related to solar eruptions and active region evolution. The results presented were obtained by combining data from the Wind and SOHO missions.

  9. A new low-frequency backward mode in inhomogeneous plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Vranjes, J.

    2014-07-15

    When an electromagnetic transverse wave propagates through an inhomogeneous plasma so that its electric field has a component in the direction of the background density gradient, there appears a disbalance of charge in every plasma layer, caused by the density gradient. Due to this, some additional longitudinal electric field component appears in the direction of the wave vector. This longitudinal field may couple with the usual electrostatic longitudinal perturbations like the ion acoustic, electron Langmuir, and ion plasma waves. As a result, these standard electrostatic waves are modified and in addition to this a completely new low-frequency mode appears. Some basic features of the coupling and modification of the ion acoustic wave, and properties of the new mode are discussed here, in ordinary electron-ion and in pair plasmas.

  10. Resonant interactions between cometary ions and low frequency electromagnetic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, Richard M.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1987-01-01

    The conditions for resonant wave amplification in a plasma with a ring-beam distribution which is intended to model pick-up ions in a cometary environment are investigated. The inclination between the interplanetary field and the solar wind is found to play a crucial role in governing both the resonant frequency and the growth rate of any unstable mode. It is suggested that the low-frequency MHD mode should experience the most rapid amplification for intermediate inclination. In the frame of the solar wind, such waves should propagate along the field in the direction upstream toward the sun with a phase speed lower than the beaming velocity of the pick-up ions. This mechanism may account for the presence of the interior MHD waves noted by satellites over a region surrounding comets Giacobini-Zinner and Halley.

  11. Low-frequency earthquakes at the southern Cascadia margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plourde, Alexandre P.; Bostock, Michael G.; Audet, Pascal; Thomas, Amanda M.

    2015-06-01

    We use seismic waveform data from the Mendocino Experiment to detect low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) beneath Northern California during the April 2008 tremor-and-slip episode. In southern Cascadia, 59 templates were generated using iterative network cross correlation and stacking and grouped into 34 distinct LFE families. The main front of tremor epicenters migrates along strike at 9 km d-1; we also find one instance of rapid tremor reversal, observed to propagate in the opposite direction at 10-20 km h-1. As in other regions of Cascadia, LFE hypocenters from this study lie several kilometers above a recent plate interface model. South of Cascadia, LFEs were discovered on the Maacama and Bucknell Creek faults. The Bucknell Creek Fault may be the youngest fault yet observed to host LFEs. These fault zones also host shallow earthquake swarms with repeating events that are distinct from LFEs in their spectral and recurrence characteristics.

  12. Low-frequency electromagnetic plasma waves at comet P/Grigg-Skjellerup: Analysis and interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neubauer, Fritz M.; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Coates, A. J.; Johnstone, A. D.

    1993-01-01

    The propagation and polarization characteristic of low-frequency electromagnetic wave fields near comet P/Grigg-Skjellerup (P/GS) are analyzed using magnetic field and plasma observations obtained by the Giotto magnetometer experiment and the Johnstone plasma analyzer during the encounter at the comet on July 10, 1992. The results have been physically interpreted.

  13. Low-frequency electrostatic waves in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeraj, T.; Singh, Satyavir; Singh Lakhina, Gurbax

    2016-07-01

    Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves are one of the ubiquitous features in space and laboratory plasmas. Here we present a linear study of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in the solar wind. We model the solar wind by three-component magnetised plasma consisting of hot electrons with kappa distribution and fluid cold protons and doubly charged Helium ions. A numerical analysis of the linear electrostatic dispersion relation has been carried out for slow solar wind parameters and for -oblique wave propagation. The system supports four different modes i.e., fast and slow acoustic modes, and proton and Helium cyclotron modes. It has to be emphasised that for parallel propagation, physically acceptable solution to the dispersion relation are those of fast and slow acoustic modes. For oblique propagation, the coupling between various modes can be seen. Moreover, when the angle of propagation is increased the separation between acoustic modes and cyclotron modes increases and at perpendicular propagation, only proton and Helium-cyclotron modes can exist. The effect of various parameters like number density and temperature of Helium ions and kappa index on the dispersive properties has also been investigated. As the number density of helium ions increases, frequency of proton cyclotron mode decreases and frequency of Helium cyclotron mode increases at a fixed wave number. When the value of kappa increases, the frequency of the proton cyclotron mode increases but it does not have significant effect on the frequency of the Helium cyclotron mode. Likewise, when the temperature of Helium ions increases, the frequency of Helium cyclotron mode increases, however, the frequency of proton cyclotron mode remains more or less unchanged.

  14. Model helicopter rotor low frequency broadband noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humbad, N. G.; Harris, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of low frequency broadband noise (LFBN) radiated from model helicopter rotors are presented. The results up to tip Mach number of 0.50 suggest that the peak sound pressure level (SPL) of LFBN appears to follow tip Mach number to a fourth power law and rms velocity of turbulence to a second power law. The experimental results on the effect of tip speed and advance ratio on the peak SPL of LFBN can be explained on the basis of a simple scaling law. However, the experimental results on the effect of blade loading on the peak SPL of LFBN is still not clearly understood. A simple peak SPL scaling law for noise from a helicopter in forward flight encountering a sinusoidal gust is also developed. The trends predicted by the scaling law with the experimental results are found satisfactory for the cases of variation of the peak SPL of LFBN with tip speed and advance ratio.

  15. On helicopter rotor low frequency broadband noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Morgan; Harris, Wesley L.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of shear-layer-type inflow turbulence on the low-frequency broadband noise of a model helicopter rotor is experimentally studied. The measurements and the one-dimensional energy spectral density indicate that the upstream airfoil wake turbulence is nonisotropic, but approaches isotropy at high wavenumbers. Turbulence measurements also indicate that the wake turbulence is weak. The effect of the inflow turbulence intensity on the peak sound pressure level follows an intensity-velocity squared scaling law. A number of length scales and turbulence intensities exist which can be measured in the airfoil wake depending on the position at which the measurements are taken. Comparison of experimental and theoretical sound pressure power spectral densities indicates that the initial anisotropy of the inflow turbulence does not invalidate the isotropic turbulence assumption made in noise prediction models as long as measured turbulence intensities and length scales are used.

  16. Low-frequency radio navigation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, D. E. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method of continuous wave navigation using four transmitters operating at sufficiently low frequencies to assure essentially pure groundwave operation is described. The transmitters are keyed to transmit constant bursts (1/4 sec) in a time-multiplexed pattern with phase modulation of at least one transmitter for identification of the transmitters and with the ability to identify the absolute phase of the modulated transmitter and the ability to modulate low rate data for transmission. The transmitters are optimally positioned to provide groundwave coverage over a service region of about 50 by 50 km for the frequencies selected in the range of 200 to 500 kHz, but their locations are not critical because of the beneficial effect of overdetermination of position of a receiver made possible by the fourth transmitter. Four frequencies are used, at least two of which are selected to provide optimal resolution. All transmitters are synchronized to an average phase as received by a monitor receiver.

  17. Low Frequency Electromagnetic Pulse and Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, J J

    2011-02-01

    This paper reviews and summarizes prior work related to low frequency (< 100 Hz) EMP (ElectroMagnetic Pulse) observed from explosions. It focuses on how EMP signals might, or might not, be useful in monitoring underground nuclear tests, based on the limits of detection, and physical understanding of these signals. In summary: (1) Both chemical and nuclear explosions produce an EMP. (2) The amplitude of the EMP from underground explosions is at least two orders of magnitude lower than from above ground explosions and higher frequency components of the signal are rapidly attenuated due to ground conductivity. (3) In general, in the near field, that is distances (r) of less than 10s of kilometers from the source, the amplitude of the EMP decays approximately as 1/r{sup 3}, which practically limits EMP applications to very close (<{approx}1km) distances. (4) One computational model suggests that the EMP from a decoupled nuclear explosion may be enhanced over the fully coupled case. This has not been validated with laboratory or field data. (5) The magnitude of the EMP from an underground nuclear explosion is about two orders of magnitude larger than that from a chemical explosion, and has a larger component of higher frequencies. In principle these differences might be used to discriminate a nuclear from a chemical explosion using sensors at very close (<{approx}1 km) distances. (6) Arming and firing systems (e.g. detonators, exploding bridge wires) can also produce an EMP from any type of explosion. (7) To develop the understanding needed to apply low frequency EMP to nuclear explosion monitoring, it is recommended to carry out a series of controlled underground chemical explosions with a variety of sizes, emplacements (e.g. fully coupled and decoupled), and arming and firing systems.

  18. Low-frequency Stoneley energy for stratigraphic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Hlaing, K.K.; Lemoy, C.; Maret, J.P.; Kremer, Y.; Borland, W.H.; Maw, M.

    1994-07-01

    Conventional sonic measurements of shear and compressional slowness are body waves that travel within the formation and are commonly used for petrophysical analysis of a well. Low-frequency Stoneley waves travel within the well bore and are traditionally used to interpret fractures and formation permeability, usually by analyzing the energy losses and, to a lesser extent, the slowness. The authors have found that Stoneley energy has been very useful in the identification of vuggy carbonate facies linked to paleokarstic surfaces in the Upper Burman limestone reservoir of Miocene age, in the YADANA gas deposit, offshore Myanmar. One good example is seen in well YAD-1 where the carbonate reservoir has been cored, allowing precise facies and porosity type determination. Matching Stoneley energy and core description show a striking correlation between loss of energy and vuggy carbonate facies due to karstic diagenetic processes, always in relation with reefal or near reefal facies. Accordingly, facies interpretation has tentatively been done in the deeper, noncored reservoir zone, where losses of energy are important and considered as indicating karstic influence and the specific environment.

  19. Interim prediction method for low frequency core engine noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, R. G.; Clark, B. J.; Dorsch, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    A literature survey on low-frequency core engine noise is presented. Possible sources of low frequency internally generated noise in core engines are discussed with emphasis on combustion and component scrubbing noise. An interim method is recommended for predicting low frequency core engine noise that is dominant when jet velocities are low. Suggestions are made for future research on low frequency core engine noise that will aid in improving the prediction method and help define possible additional internal noise sources.

  20. Imaging Jupiter Radiation Belts At Low Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, J. N.; de Pater, I.; Zarka, P.; Santos-Costa, D.; Sault, R.; Hess, S.; Cecconi, B.; Fender, R.; Pewg, Lofar

    2014-04-01

    , at different epochs only provided, each time, glimpses of the spectral content in different observational configurations. As the synchrotron emission frequency peaks at Vmax / E2B (with Vmax in MHz, E, the electron energy in MeV and B, the magnetic field in Gauss), the low frequency content of this emission is associated with low energy electron populations inside the inner belt and the energetic electrons located in regions of weaker magnetic field (at few jovian radii). Therefore, there is much interest in extending and completing the current knowledge of the synchrotron emission from the belts, with low frequency resolved observations. LOFAR, the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) [6], is a giant flexible and digital ground-based radio interferometer operating in the 30-250 MHz band. It brings very high time (~ μs), frequency (~ kHz) and angular resolutions (~1") and huge sensitivity (mJy). In November 2011, a single 10-hour track enabled to cover an entire planetary rotation and led to the first resolved image of the radiation belts between 127- 172 MHz [7,8]. In Feb 2013, an 2×5h30 joint LOFAR/ WSRT observing campaign seized the state of the radiation belts from 45 MHz up to 5 GHz. We will present the current state of the study (imaging, reconstruction method and modeling) of the radiation belts dynamic with this current set of observations. LOFAR can contribute to the understanding of the physics taking place in the inner belt as well as possibly providing a fast and a systematic "diagnostic" of the state of the belts. The latter represents an opportunity to give context and ground-based support for the arrival of JUNO (NASA) scheduled in July 2016 and also for future missions, such as JUICE (ESA), at the vicinity of Jupiter by the exploration of its icy satellites.

  1. Low-frequency oscillations in radiative-convective models

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qi; Randall, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    Although eastward propagation is usually regarded as an essential feature of the low-frequency ``Madden-Julian oscillation`` observed in the tropical atmosphere, many observations indicate that there is an important stationary or quasi-stationary component of the oscillation. Yasunari (1979), for example, investigated the stationary 30--60 day variation in upper tropospheric cloudiness in the Asian summer monsoon region. In a case study of the 30--60 day oscillation. Hsu et al. (1990) found a strong stationary oscillation of the divergence, outgoing longwave mdiadon and other fields. A recent observational study by Weickmann and Khalsa (1990) offers further evidence that the Madden-Julian oscillation has an important stationary component. In this paper, we present evidence that intraseasonal oscillations can be produced by local radiative and convective processes. This suggests that the observed propagating Madden-Julian wave is produced by interactions between these local processes and the large scale motion field, and is not essential for the existence of the observed oscillation.

  2. Low-frequency oscillations in radiative-convective models

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qi; Randall, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    Although eastward propagation is usually regarded as an essential feature of the low-frequency Madden-Julian oscillation'' observed in the tropical atmosphere, many observations indicate that there is an important stationary or quasi-stationary component of the oscillation. Yasunari (1979), for example, investigated the stationary 30--60 day variation in upper tropospheric cloudiness in the Asian summer monsoon region. In a case study of the 30--60 day oscillation. Hsu et al. (1990) found a strong stationary oscillation of the divergence, outgoing longwave mdiadon and other fields. A recent observational study by Weickmann and Khalsa (1990) offers further evidence that the Madden-Julian oscillation has an important stationary component. In this paper, we present evidence that intraseasonal oscillations can be produced by local radiative and convective processes. This suggests that the observed propagating Madden-Julian wave is produced by interactions between these local processes and the large scale motion field, and is not essential for the existence of the observed oscillation.

  3. The LWA1 Low Frequency Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowell, Jayce; Taylor, Gregory B.; LWA Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The LWA1 Low Frequency Sky Survey is a survey of the sky visible from the first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1) across the frequency range of 35 to 80 MHz. The primary motivation behind this effort is to improve our understanding of the sky at these frequencies. In particular, an understanding of the low frequency foreground emission is necessary for work on detecting the epoch of reionization and the cosmic dark ages where the foreground signal dwarfs the expected redshifted HI signal by many orders of magnitude (Pritchard & Loeb 2012, Rep. Prog. Phys., 75, 086901). The leading model for the sky in the frequency range of 20 to 200 MHz is the Global Sky Model (GSM) by de Oliveria-Costas et al. (2008, MNRAS, 288, 247). This model is based upon a principle component analysis of 11 sky maps ranging in frequency from 10 MHz to 94 GHz. Of these 11 maps, only four are below 1 GHz; 10 MHz from Caswell (1976, MNRAS, 177, 601), 22 MHz from Roger et al. (1999, A&AS, 137, 7), 45 MHz from Alvarez et al. (1997, A&AS, 124, 315) and Maeda et al. (1999, A&AS, 140, 145), and 408 MHz from Haslam et al. (1982, A&AS, 47, 1). Thus, within this model, the region of interest to both cosmic dawn and the epoch of reionization is largely unconstrained based on the available survey data, and are also limited in terms of the spatial coverage and calibration. A self-consistent collection of maps is necessary for both our understanding of the sky and the removal of the foregrounds that mask the redshifted 21-cm signal.We present the current state of the survey and discuss the imaging and calibration challenges faced by dipole arrays that are capable of imaging nearly 2π steradians of sky simultaneously over a large fractional bandwidth.Construction of the LWA has been supported by the Office of Naval Research under Contract N00014-07-C-0147. Support for operations and continuing development of the LWA1 is provided by the National Science Foundation under grants AST-1139963 and AST

  4. Energy scavenging from low frequency vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galchev, Tzeno V.

    The development of three energy conversion devices that are able to transform vibrations in their surroundings to electrical energy is discussed in this thesis. These energy harvesters are based upon a newly invented architecture called the Parametric Frequency Increased Generator (PFIG). The PFIG structure is designed to efficiently convert low frequency and non-periodic vibrations into electrical power. The three PFIG devices have a combined operating range covering two orders of magnitude in acceleration (0.54--19.6m/s 2) and a frequency range spanning up to 60Hz; making them some of the most versatile generators in existence. The PFIG utilizes a bi-stable mechanical structure to initiate high-frequency mechanical oscillations in an electromechanical scavenger. By up-converting the ambient vibration frequency to a higher internal operation frequency, the PFIG achieves better electromechanical coupling. The fixed internal displacement and dynamics of the PFIG allow it to operate more efficiently than resonant generators when the ambient vibration amplitude is higher than the internal displacement limit of the device. The PFIG structure is capable of efficiently converting mechanical vibrations with variable characteristics including amplitude and frequency, into electrical power. The first electromagnetic harvester can generate a peak power of 163microW and an average power of 13.6microW from an input acceleration of 9.8m/s 2 at 10Hz, and it can operate up to 60Hz. The internal volume of the generator is 2.12cm3 (3.75 including casing). It sets the state-of-the-art in efficiency in the <20Hz range. The volume figure of merit is 0.068%, which is a 10x improvement over other published works. It has a record high bandwidth figure of merit (0.375%). A second piezoelectric implementation generates 3.25microW of average power under the same excitation conditions, while the volume of the generator is halved (1.2cm3). A third PFIG was developed for critical

  5. An autocorrelation method to detect low frequency earthquakes within tremor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, J.R.; Beroza, G.C.; Shelly, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that deep tremor in the Nankai Trough under western Shikoku consists of a swarm of low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) that occur as slow shear slip on the down-dip extension of the primary seismogenic zone of the plate interface. The similarity of tremor in other locations suggests a similar mechanism, but the absence of cataloged low frequency earthquakes prevents a similar analysis. In this study, we develop a method for identifying LFEs within tremor. The method employs a matched-filter algorithm, similar to the technique used to infer that tremor in parts of Shikoku is comprised of LFEs; however, in this case we do not assume the origin times or locations of any LFEs a priori. We search for LFEs using the running autocorrelation of tremor waveforms for 6 Hi-Net stations in the vicinity of the tremor source. Time lags showing strong similarity in the autocorrelation represent either repeats, or near repeats, of LFEs within the tremor. We test the method on an hour of Hi-Net recordings of tremor and demonstrates that it extracts both known and previously unidentified LFEs. Once identified, we cross correlate waveforms to measure relative arrival times and locate the LFEs. The results are able to explain most of the tremor as a swarm of LFEs and the locations of newly identified events appear to fill a gap in the spatial distribution of known LFEs. This method should allow us to extend the analysis of Shelly et al. (2007a) to parts of the Nankai Trough in Shikoku that have sparse LFE coverage, and may also allow us to extend our analysis to other regions that experience deep tremor, but where LFEs have not yet been identified. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Observations of a low-frequency cutoff in magnetospheric radio noise received on Imp 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vesecky, J. F.; Frankel, M. S.

    1975-01-01

    The quasi-continuous component of the magnetospheric noise observed by Imp 6, lying between 30 and 110 kHz, often exhibits a low-frequency cutoff when the spacecraft is in the interplanetary medium or the magnetosheath. A hypothesis is considered in which this low-frequency cutoff, f-co, is caused by overdense plasma situated somewhere along the noise-source-to-satellite path. The plasma is assumed to have a plasma frequency approximately equal to f-co, thus cutting off propagation below f-co.

  7. Low frequency dynamical stabilisation in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Christopher J.; Smart, Thomas J.; Jones, Philip H.; Cubero, David

    2015-08-01

    It is well known that a rigid pendulum with minimal friction will occupy a stable equilibrium position vertically upwards when its suspension point is oscillated at high frequency. The phenomenon of the inverted pendulum was explained by Kapitza by invoking a separation of timescales between the high frequency modulation and the much lower frequency pendulum motion, resulting in an effective potential with a minimum in the inverted position. We present here a study of a microscopic optical analogue of Kapitza's pendulum that operates in different regimes of both friction and driving frequency. The pendulum is realized using a microscopic particle held in a scanning optical tweezers and subject to a viscous drag force. The motion of the optical pendulum is recorded and analyzed by digital video microscopy and particle tracking to extract the trajectory and stable orientation of the particle. In these experiments we enter the regime of low driving frequency, where the period of driving is comparable to the characteristic relaxation time of the radial motion of the pendulum with finite stiffness. In this regime we find stabilization of the pendulum at angles other than the vertical (downwards) is possible for modulation amplitudes exceeding a threshold value where, unlike the truly high frequency case studied previously, both the threshold amplitude and equilibrium position are found to be functions of friction. Experimental results are complemented by an analytical theory for induced stability in the low frequency driving regime with friction.

  8. Very low frequency earthquakes spatiotemporally asynchronous with strong tremor during the 2014 episodic tremor and slip event in Cascadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, Alexandra A.; Ghosh, Abhijit

    2016-07-01

    We find very low frequency earthquakes (VLFEs) in Cascadia during the 2014 episodic tremor and slip event under Washington and Vancouver Island using a grid search centroid moment tensor inversion method. The very low frequency earthquakes occur when and where there is no strong tremor detected, contrasting with previous findings where tremor and very low frequency earthquakes have a clear spatiotemporal relationship. This challenges our current understanding of the dynamic relationship between the different types of slow earthquakes and their relationship to slow slip. We interpret these findings to suggest that VLFEs and tremor may have their own "seismic cycles," resulting from asperities of different sizes or characteristics that respond pseudo-independently to stress loading. We propose that very low frequency earthquakes and tremor are subject to asynchronous seismic cycles.

  9. Human Hippocampal Increases in Low-Frequency Power during Associative Prediction Violations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Janice; Dastjerdi, Mohammad; Foster, Brett L.; LaRocque, Karen F.; Rauschecker, Andreas M.; Parvizi, Josef; Wagner, Anthony D.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental cues often trigger memories of past events (associative retrieval), and these memories are a form of prediction about imminent experience. Learning is driven by the detection of prediction violations, when the past and present diverge. Using intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG), we show that associative prediction violations elicit increased low-frequency power (in the slow-theta range) in human hippocampus, that this low-frequency power increase is modulated by whether conditions allow predictions to be generated, that the increase rapidly onsets after the moment of violation, and that changes in low-frequency power are not present in adjacent perirhinal cortex. These data suggest that associative mismatch is computed within hippocampus when cues trigger predictions that are violated by imminent experience. PMID:23571081

  10. Low-Frequency Earthquakes in Cascadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweet, J. R.; Creager, K. C.; Ghosh, A.; Vidale, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    Low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) are a recently identified class of earthquakes that have been observed to occur coincidentally with non-volcanic tremor in time and space. These LFEs also have a frequency spectra that is nearly identical to that of tremor—implying a common source for these two phenomena. Indeed, it has been proposed that tremor may simply be a superposition of many individual LFEs (Shelly et al., 2006, 2007, Nature). As such, LFEs have been used to constrain the location of tremor. We first reported LFEs in Cascadia last year, following the deployment of an 80-station, 1-km aperture seismic array on the Olympic Peninsula of western Washington State. This past year we have deployed 8 small aperture, 3-component seismic arrays across the northern Olympic Peninsula in the hopes of recording and locating additional tremor and LFEs. These arrays are composed of 10 3-component and 10 vertical component EarthScope seismometers. We use a combination of methods to identify and locate LFEs in our new, expanded dataset. Potential LFEs are first flagged by searching for peaks in the cross correlation of vertical and horizontal components that correspond to S minus P times of arriving energy (La Rocca, 2009, Science). These targets are then used as template events and are cross correlated with several hours of continuous data to find matching events. Using stacking and correlation we obtain accurate S minus P times for some arrays, and differential S and P times between arrays. We use these times to obtain robust estimates of LFE hypocenters. Unfortunately none of the 2009 data from the array of arrays covers a period of Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS), but several smaller tremor bursts were recorded.

  11. Mode properties of low-frequency waves: Kinetic theory versus Hall-MHD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauss-Varban, D.; Omidi, N.; Quest, K. B.

    1994-01-01

    In fluid theory, the ordering of low-frequency modes in a homogeneous plasma is based on the phase velocity, since modes do not intersect each other in dispersion diagrams as a function of wavenumber or other parameters. In linear kinetic theory, modes cross each other. Thus a consistent and useful classification should be based on the physical properties of the modes instead. This paper attempts such a classification by documeting the dispersion and general mode properties of the low-frequency waves (omega much less than (OMEGA(sub ci) OMEGA(sub ce) (exp 1/2)), where OMEGA(sub ci), OMEGA(sub ce) are the cyclotron frequencies of the ions and electrons, respectively) in kinetic theory, and by comparing them to the results of two-fluid theory. Kinetic theory gives a seperate Alfven/ion-cyclotron (A/IC) wave with phase speed Omega/k approximately = v(sub A) cos theta for omega much less than OMEGA(sub ci), where v(sub A) is the Alfven velocity and theta the angle of propagation between wave vector k and background magnetic field B(sub o). For a given wavenumber, the magnetosonic mode is a double-valued solution with a singular point in theta, beta parameter space, where beta is the ratio of thermal pressure to magnetic pressure. It is shown that a branch cut starting at the singular point theta approximately 30 deg, beta approximately 3 and leading to larger beta gives a practical and consitent seperation of this double-valued magnetosonic solution. Selection of this branch cut results in a moderately damped fast/magnetos onic and a heavily damped slow/sound wave. A comprehensive review of the polarization, compressibility and other mode properties is given and shown to be consistent with the selected branch cut. At small wavenumbers, the kinetic mode properties typically start to deviate significantly from their fluid counterparts at beta approximately 0.5. At larger beta, there is no longer a consistent correspondence between the fluid and kinetic modes. Kinetic

  12. Ray tracing of Jovian low frequency radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Six, N. Frank

    1987-01-01

    The radio emission from Jupiter in the decametric range (2 to 40 MHz) has been studied for three decades. It is known that this emission is correlated with particular longitude regions on the planet and with the position of the satellite Io. The Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft observed this emission, obtaining valuable new information. The objectives of this study are as follows: (1) calculate raypaths for decametric wavelength radiation in Jupiter's magnetosphere; (2) compare the model-dependent raypaths with the Voyager observations; and (3) deduce characteristics of the source regions and the influence of propagation effects.

  13. Undulations from amplified low frequency surface waves

    SciTech Connect

    Coutant, Antonin; Parentani, Renaud

    2014-04-15

    We study the linear scattering of gravity waves in longitudinal inhomogeneous stationary flows. When the flow becomes supercritical, it is known that counterflow propagating shallow waves are blocked and converted into deep waves. Here we show that in the zero-frequency limit, the reflected waves are amplified in such a way that the free surface develops an undulation, i.e., a zero-frequency wave of large amplitude with nodes located at specific places. This amplification involves negative energy waves and implies that flat surfaces are unstable against incoming perturbations of arbitrary small amplitude. The relation between this instability and black hole radiation (the Hawking effect) is established.

  14. Constraints on Subduction Zone Processes from Low Frequency Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostock, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of tectonic tremor and constituent low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) offers seismologists new opportunities to study both deformational processes and structure within the subduction zone forearc. This assertion is especially true for northern Cascadia where i) regular seismicity is sparse, and ii) a relatively transparent overriding plate inflicts minimal distortion upon direct P and S wave arrivals from LFEs. Despite low signal-to-noise ratios, LFEs are highly repetitive and signal can be enhanced through construction of stacked templates. Studies in both Cascadia and Nankai reveal an association between LFE hypocenters and a high Vp/Vs, low-velocity zone (LVZ) that is inferred to represent overpressured upper oceanic crust. Scattered signals within Vancouver Island templates, interpreted to originate at boundaries of the LVZ, place LFEs within the LVZ and suggest that this structure may define a distributed (several km) zone of deformation. A recent analysis of LFE magnitudes indicates that LFEs exhibit scaling relations distinct from both regular earthquakes and longer period (10's of seconds to days) phenomena associated with slow slip. Regular earthquakes generally obey a scaling of moment proportional to duration cubed consistent with self similarity, whereas long period slow slip phenomena exhibit a linear scaling between moment and duration that can be accommodated through constant slip or constant stress drop models. In contrast, LFE durations are nearly constant suggesting that moment is governed by slip alone and that asperity size remains approximately constant. The implied dimensions (~1 km2), the persistance of LFEs in time and their stationarity in space point to structural heterogeneity, perhaps related to pockets of upper oceanic crust impervious to hydrothermal circulation, as a fundamental control.

  15. Low-frequency fluctuations in the magnetosheath near the magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denton, Richard E.; Gary, S. Peter; Li, Xinlin; Anderson, Brian J.; Labelle, James W.; Lessard, Marc

    1995-01-01

    There are four low-frequency modes which may propagate in a high-beta nearly bi-Maxwellian plasma. These are the magnetosonic, Alfven, ion acoustic, and mirror modes. This manuscript defines a procedure based on linear Vlasov theory for the unique identification of these modes by use of transport ratios, dimensionless ratios of the fluctuating field and plasma quantities. A single parameter, the mode deviation is calculated using the plasma and magnetic field data gathered by the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers/Ion Release Module (AMPTE/IRM) spacecraft to identify the modes observed in the terrestial magnetosheath near the magnetopause. As well as determining the mode which best describes the observed fluctuations, it gives us a measure of whether or not the resulting identification is unique. Using 17 time periods temporally close to a magnetopause crossing, and confining our study to the frequency range from 0.01 to 0.04 Hz, we find that the only clearly identified mode in this frequency range is the mirror mode. Most commonly, the quasi-perpendicular mirror mode (with wave vector k roughly perpendicular to the background magnetic field B(sub zero) is observed. In two events the quasi-parallel mirror mode k parallel B(sub zero) was identified.

  16. New observations of the low frequency interplanetary radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    Recent Voyager 1 observations reveal reoccurrences of the low frequency interplanetary radio emissions. Three of the new events are weak transient events which rise in frequency from the range of 2-2.5 kHz to about 3 kHz with drift rates of approximately 1.5 kHz/year. The first of the transient events begins in mid-1989 and the more recent pair of events both were first detected in late 1991. In addition, there is an apparent onset of a 2-kHz component of the emission beginning near day 70 of 1991. The new transient emissions are barely detectable on Voyager 1 and are below the threshold of detectability on Voyager 2, which is less sensitive than Voyager 1. The new activity provides new opportunities to test various theories of the triggering, generation, and propagation of the outer heliospheric radio emissions and may signal a response of the source of the radio emissions to the increased solar activity associated with the recent peak in the solar cycle.

  17. Low frequency radioastronomy of the inner heliosphere: the way forward.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, Baptiste; Zarka, Philippe; Bergman, Jan; Falcke, Heino; Boonstra, Albert-Jan; Briand, Carine; Girard, Julien; Klein Wolt, Marc; Baan, Willem; Segret, Boris; Maksimovic, Milan

    Low frequency radioastronomy observatories for the heliosphere have been using similar instrumentation for decades. The Cassini, STEREO, and the future Solar Orbiter mission are embarking goniopolarmetric radio receiver connected to 3 electric antennas. Such instrument provides the spectral matrix (or part of it) from which the wave parameters can be derived. With a point source assumption (plane wave), we derive the direction of arrival of the wave, the polarization and the flux density. In case of a spatially extended source (disk shaped, with a given radial profile), the source centroid direction and the apparent source size is provided. This type of instrumentation cannot provide much more parameters, as there is a maximum of to 9 independent measurements for each time-frequency step. We propose a concept of radioastronomy instrumentation using a swarm of small satellites (possibly cubesats) with sensitive radio receivers measuring the wave front and phase of the radio waves on each spacecraft. This instrument will also provide 3-dimensional interferometric measurement. Such resolved imaging capabilities of the inner heliosphere would be a real step forward to better understand the radio emissions mechanisms and the propagation processes. We will present the various existing projects and the roadmap to reach the goal.

  18. The Low-Frequency Variability of the Tropical Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haekkinen, Sirpa; Mo, Kingtse C.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Upper ocean temperature variability in the tropical Atlantic is examined from the Comprehensive Ocean Atmosphere Data Set (COADS) as well as from an ocean model simulation forced by COADS anomalies appended to a monthly climatology. Our findings are as follows: Only the sea surface temperatures (SST) in the northern tropics are driven by heat fluxes, while the southern tropical variability arises from wind driven ocean circulation changes. The subsurface temperatures in the northern and southern tropics are found to have a strong linkage to buoyancy forcing changes in the northern North Atlantic. Evidence for Kelvin-like boundary wave propagation from the high latitudes is presented from the model simulation. This extratropical influence is associated with wintertime North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) forcing and manifests itself in the northern and southern tropical temperature anomalies of the same sign at depth of 100-200 meters as result of a Rossby wave propagation away from the eastern boundary in the wake of the boundary wave passage. The most apparent association of the southern tropical sea surface temperature anomalies (STA) arises with the anomalous cross-equatorial winds which can be related to both NAO and the remote influence from the Pacific equatorial region. These teleconnections are seasonal so that the NAO impact on the tropical SST is the largest it mid-winter but in spring and early summer the Pacific remote influence competes with NAO. However, NAO appears to have a more substantial role than the Pacific influence at low frequencies during the last 50 years. The dynamic origin of STA is indirectly confirmed from the SST-heat flux relationship using ocean model experiments which remove either anomalous wind stress forcing or atmospheric forcing anomalies contributing to heat exchange.

  19. New families of low frequency earthquakes beneath the Olympic Peninsula, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chestler, S.; Creager, K. C.; Sweet, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Using data from the Array of Arrays (AofA) and Cascadia Arrays for Earthscope (CAFÉ) experiments we search for new families of low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) beneath the Olympic Peninsula, Washington. LFE families are clusters of repeating LFEs that occur in approximately the same location. Following methodology similar to Bostock et al. [2012, G3], we cross correlate 6-second long windows within an hour of data during the 2010 and 2011 ETS events. We apply this to 99 hours of tremor data. For each hour, we stack the autocorrelation functions from a set of 7 3-component base stations chosen for their high signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). We extract a maximum of 10 windows per hour with correlation coefficients higher than 9 times the median absolute deviation (MAD). These time windows contain our preliminary LFE detections. We then cross correlate these data and group them using a hierarchical clustering algorithm. We produce template waveforms by stacking the waveforms corresponding to a given cluster. To strengthen the templates we scan them through on day of tremor and stack all waveforms that correlate with the original template. Our efforts have yielded dozens of new families scattered beneath the AofA stations. These additional LFE families add to the 9 known families beneath the Olympic Peninsula [Sweet et al., AGU fall meeting, 2012]. The detection of more LFE families will allow us to (1) interpolate the pattern of stress transfer through the transition zone [Wech et al., Nature Geoscie., 2011], (2) gain insight into the distribution of asperities, or sticky spots, on the plate interface [Ghosh et al., JGR, 2012], and (3) track slow slip rupture propagation with unprecedented spatial and temporal accuracy.

  20. Low-frequency earthquakes in Shikoku, Japan, and their relationship to episodic tremor and slip.

    PubMed

    Shelly, David R; Beroza, Gregory C; Ide, Satoshi; Nakamula, Sho

    2006-07-13

    Non-volcanic seismic tremor was discovered in the Nankai trough subduction zone in southwest Japan and subsequently identified in the Cascadia subduction zone. In both locations, tremor is observed to coincide temporally with large, slow slip events on the plate interface downdip of the seismogenic zone. The relationship between tremor and aseismic slip remains uncertain, however, largely owing to difficulty in constraining the source depth of tremor. In southwest Japan, a high quality borehole seismic network allows identification of coherent S-wave (and sometimes P-wave) arrivals within the tremor, whose sources are classified as low-frequency earthquakes. As low-frequency earthquakes comprise at least a portion of tremor, understanding their mechanism is critical to understanding tremor as a whole. Here, we provide strong evidence that these earthquakes occur on the plate interface, coincident with the inferred zone of slow slip. The locations and characteristics of these events suggest that they are generated by shear slip during otherwise aseismic transients, rather than by fluid flow. High pore-fluid pressure in the immediate vicinity, as implied by our estimates of seismic P- and S-wave speeds, may act to promote this transient mode of failure. Low-frequency earthquakes could potentially contribute to seismic hazard forecasting by providing a new means to monitor slow slip at depth. PMID:16838019

  1. Sausage Mode Propagation in a Thick Magnetic Flux Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardi, A.; Ballai, I.; Marcu, A.; Orza, B.

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to model the propagation of slow magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) sausage waves in a thick expanding magnetic flux tube in the context of the quiescent (VAL-C) solar atmosphere. The propagation of these waves is found to be described by the Klein-Gordon equation. Using the governing MHD equations and the VAL-C atmosphere model we study the variation of the cut-off frequency along and across the magnetic tube guiding the waves. Due to the radial variation of the cut-off frequency the flux tubes act as low frequency filters for the waves.

  2. High energy, low frequency, ultrasonic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Albert E.

    2000-01-01

    A wide bandwidth, ultrasonic transducer to generate nondispersive, extensional, pulsed acoustic pressure waves into concrete reinforced rods and tendons. The wave propagation distance is limited to double the length of the rod. The transducer acoustic impedance is matched to the rod impedance for maximum transfer of acoustic energy. The efficiency of the transducer is approximately 60 percent, depending upon the type of active elements used in the transducer. The transducer input energy is, for example, approximately 1 mJ. Ultrasonic reflections will occur at points along the rod where there are changes of one percent of a wavelength in the rod diameter. A reduction in the rod diameter will reflect a phase reversed echo, as compared with the reflection from an incremental increase in diameter. Echo signal processing of the stored waveform permits a reconstruction of those echoes into an image of the rod. The ultrasonic transducer has use in the acoustic inspection of long (40+foot) architectural reinforcements and structural supporting members, such as in bridges and dams.

  3. Subsurface Ice Detection via Low Frequency Surface Electromagnetic Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillman, D. E.; Grimm, R. E.; Mcginnis, R. N.

    2014-12-01

    The geophysical detection of ice in the Cryosphere is typically conducted by measuring the absence of water. These interpretations can become non-unique in dry soils or in clay- and silt-rich soils that contain significant quantities of unfrozen water. Extensive laboratory measurements of electrical properties were made on permafrost samples as a function of frequency, temperature, and water content. These laboratory measurements show that the amount of ice can be uniquely obtained by measuring a frequency dependence of the electrical properties over a large frequency range (20 kHz - 10 Hz). In addition, the electrical properties of permafrost are temperature dependent, which can allow for an estimate of subsurface temperature. In order to test this approach in the field, we performed field surveys at four locations in Alaska. We used three low frequency electromagnetic methods: Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP: 20 kHz - 10 Hz), Capacively Coupled Resistivity (CCR: OhmMapper - 16.5 kHz), and DC Resistivity (Syscal ~ 8 Hz). At the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory permafrost tunnel near Fox, AK, we used SIP to measure the average ice concentration of 80 v% and determined the temperature to be -3±1°C by matching survey results to lab data. SIP data acquisition is very slow; therefore, at three sites near Tok, AK, we used CCR to perform reconnaissance of the area. Then SIP and DC resistivity were performed at anomalous areas. The three survey types give very similar absolute resistivity values. We found that while SIP gives the most quantitative results, the frequency dependence from the CCR and DC resistivity surveys is all that are needed to determine ice content in permafrost.

  4. Low-frequency otolith and semicircular canal interactions after canal inactivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelaki, D. E.; Merfeld, D. M.; Hess, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    During sustained constant velocity and low-frequency off-vertical axis rotations (OVAR), otolith signals contribute significantly to slow-phase eye velocity. The adaptive plasticity of these responses was investigated here after semicircular canal plugging. Inactivation of semicircular canals results in a highly compromised and deficient vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). Based on the VOR enhancement hypothesis, one could expect an adaptive increase of otolith-borne angular velocity signals due to combined otolith/canal inputs after inactivation of the semicircular canals. Contrary to expectations, however, the steady-state slow-phase velocity during constant velocity OVAR decreased in amplitude over time. A similar progressive decrease in VOR gain was also observed during low-frequency off-vertical axis oscillations. This response deterioration was present in animals with either lateral or vertical semicircular canals inactivated and was limited to the plane(s) of the plugged canals. The results are consistent with the idea that the low-frequency otolith signals do not simply enhance VOR responses. Rather, the nervous system appears to correlate vestibular sensory information from the otoliths and the semicircular canals to generate an integral response to head motion.

  5. Geophysics. Migrating tremor off southern Kyushu as evidence for slow slip of a shallow subduction interface.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Y; Yakiwara, H; Asano, Y; Shimizu, H; Uchida, K; Hirano, S; Umakoshi, K; Miyamachi, H; Nakamoto, M; Fukui, M; Kamizono, M; Kanehara, H; Yamada, T; Shinohara, M; Obara, K

    2015-05-01

    Detection of shallow slow earthquakes offers insight into the near-trench part of the subduction interface, an important region in the development of great earthquake ruptures and tsunami generation. Ocean-bottom monitoring of offshore seismicity off southern Kyushu, Japan, recorded a complete episode of low-frequency tremor, lasting for 1 month, that was associated with very-low-frequency earthquake (VLFE) activity in the shallow plate interface. The shallow tremor episode exhibited two migration modes reminiscent of deep tremor down-dip of the seismogenic zone in some other subduction zones: a large-scale slower propagation mode and a rapid reversal mode. These similarities in migration properties and the association with VLFEs strongly suggest that both the shallow and deep tremor and VLFE may be triggered by the migration of episodic slow slip events. PMID:25954006

  6. Low-frequency radio observations of SN 2011dh and the evolution of its post-shock plasma properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Naveen; Ray, Alak; Chakraborti, Sayan

    2016-06-01

    We present late time, low-frequency observations of SN 2011dh made using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). Our observations at 325, 610 and 1280 MHz conducted between 93 and 421 d after the explosion supplement the millimeter and centimetre wave observations conducted between 4 and 15 d after explosion using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) and extensive radio observations (1.0-36.5 GHz) conducted between 16 and 93 d after explosion using Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA). We fit a synchrotron self absorption model (SSA) to the 610 and 1280 MHz radio light curves. We use it to determine the radius (Rp) and magnetic field (Bp) at 173 and 323 d after the explosion. A comparison of the peak radio luminosity Lop with the product of the peak frequency νp and time to peak tp shows that the supernova evolves between the epochs of CARMA, JVLA and GMRT observations. It shows a general slowing down of the expansion speed of the radio emitting region on a time-scale of several hundred days during which the shock is propagating through a circumstellar medium set up by a wind with a constant mass-loss parameter, dot{M}/{v}_w. We derive the mass-loss parameter (A⋆) based on 610 and 1280 MHz radio light curves, which are found to be consistent with each other within error limits.

  7. Frequency-specific alternations in the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in chronic tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Chen; Xia, Wenqing; Luo, Bin; Muthaiah, Vijaya P. K.; Xiong, Zhenyu; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Jian; Salvi, Richard; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Tinnitus, a phantom ringing, buzzing, or hissing sensation with potentially debilitating consequences, is thought to arise from aberrant spontaneous neural activity at one or more sites within the central nervous system; however, the location and specific features of these oscillations are poorly understood with respect to specific tinnitus features. Recent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies suggest that aberrant fluctuations in spontaneous low-frequency oscillations (LFO) of the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal may be an important factor in chronic tinnitus; however, the role that frequency-specific components of LFO play in subjective tinnitus remains unclear. A total of 39 chronic tinnitus patients and 41 well-matched healthy controls participated in the resting-state fMRI scans. The LFO amplitudes were investigated using the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and fractional ALFF (fALFF) in two different frequency bands (slow-4: 0.027–0.073 Hz and slow-5: 0.01–0.027 Hz). We observed significant differences between tinnitus patients and normal controls in ALFF/fALFF in the two bands (slow-4 and slow-5) in several brain regions including the superior frontal gyrus (SFG), inferior frontal gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, angular gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, and middle occipital gyrus. Across the entire subject pool, significant differences in ALFF/fALFF between the two bands were found in the midbrain, basal ganglia, hippocampus and cerebellum (Slow 4 > Slow 5), and in the middle frontal gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex, and precuneus (Slow 5 > Slow 4). We also observed significant interaction between frequency bands and patient groups in the orbitofrontal gyrus. Furthermore, tinnitus distress was positively correlated with the magnitude of ALFF in right SFG and the magnitude of fALFF slow-4 band in left SFG, whereas tinnitus duration was positively correlated with the magnitude of ALFF in

  8. Long term estimations of low frequency noise levels over water from an off-shore wind farm.

    PubMed

    Bolin, Karl; Almgren, Martin; Ohlsson, Esbjörn; Karasalo, Ilkka

    2014-03-01

    This article focuses on computations of low frequency sound propagation from an off-shore wind farm. Two different methods for sound propagation calculations are combined with meteorological data for every 3 hours in the year 2010 to examine the varying noise levels at a reception point at 13 km distance. It is shown that sound propagation conditions play a vital role in the noise impact from the off-shore wind farm and ordinary assessment methods can become inaccurate at longer propagation distances over water. Therefore, this paper suggests that methodologies to calculate noise immission with realistic sound speed profiles need to be combined with meteorological data over extended time periods to evaluate the impact of low frequency noise from modern off-shore wind farms. PMID:24606254

  9. Low-frequency broadband noise generated by a model rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aravamudan, K. S.; Harris, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    Low-frequency broadband noise generated by model rotors is attributed to the interaction of ingested turbulence with the rotor blades. The influence of free-stream turbulence in the low-frequency broadband noise radiation from model rotors has been experimentally investigated. The turbulence was generated in the M.I.T. anechoic wind tunnel facility with the aid of bipolar grids of various sizes. The spectra and the intensity of the low-frequency broadband noise have been studied as a function of parameters which characterize the turbulence and of helicopter performance parameters. The location of the peak intensity was observed to be strongly dependent on the rotor-tip velocity and on the longitudinal integral scale of turbulence. The size scale of turbulence had negligible effect on the intensity of low-frequency broadband noise. The experimental data show good agreement with an ad hoc model based on unsteady aerodynamics.

  10. 7. Survivable low frequency communication system pathway, looking east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Survivable low frequency communication system pathway, looking east - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Control Facility, County Road CS23A, North of Exit 127, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  11. Structure of the tsunamigenic plate boundary and low-frequency earthquakes in the southern Ryukyu Trench

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Ryuta; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Kodaira, Shuichi; Kaiho, Yuka; Nakanishi, Ayako; Fujie, Gou; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Yamamoto, Yojiro; Ishihara, Yasushi; Miura, Seiichi; Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that even weakly coupled subduction zones may cause large interplate earthquakes leading to destructive tsunamis. The Ryukyu Trench is one of the best fields to study this phenomenon, since various slow earthquakes and tsunamis have occurred; yet the fault structure and seismic activity there are poorly constrained. Here we present seismological evidence from marine observation for megathrust faults and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs). On the basis of passive observation we find LFEs occur at 15–18 km depths along the plate interface and their distribution seems to bridge the gap between the shallow tsunamigenic zone and the deep slow slip region. This suggests that the southern Ryukyu Trench is dominated by slow earthquakes at any depths and lacks a typical locked zone. The plate interface is overlaid by a low-velocity wedge and is accompanied by polarity reversals of seismic reflections, indicating fluids exist at various depths along the plate interface. PMID:27447546

  12. Structure of the tsunamigenic plate boundary and low-frequency earthquakes in the southern Ryukyu Trench.

    PubMed

    Arai, Ryuta; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Kodaira, Shuichi; Kaiho, Yuka; Nakanishi, Ayako; Fujie, Gou; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Yamamoto, Yojiro; Ishihara, Yasushi; Miura, Seiichi; Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that even weakly coupled subduction zones may cause large interplate earthquakes leading to destructive tsunamis. The Ryukyu Trench is one of the best fields to study this phenomenon, since various slow earthquakes and tsunamis have occurred; yet the fault structure and seismic activity there are poorly constrained. Here we present seismological evidence from marine observation for megathrust faults and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs). On the basis of passive observation we find LFEs occur at 15-18 km depths along the plate interface and their distribution seems to bridge the gap between the shallow tsunamigenic zone and the deep slow slip region. This suggests that the southern Ryukyu Trench is dominated by slow earthquakes at any depths and lacks a typical locked zone. The plate interface is overlaid by a low-velocity wedge and is accompanied by polarity reversals of seismic reflections, indicating fluids exist at various depths along the plate interface. PMID:27447546

  13. Structure of the tsunamigenic plate boundary and low-frequency earthquakes in the southern Ryukyu Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Ryuta; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Kodaira, Shuichi; Kaiho, Yuka; Nakanishi, Ayako; Fujie, Gou; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Yamamoto, Yojiro; Ishihara, Yasushi; Miura, Seiichi; Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2016-07-01

    It has been recognized that even weakly coupled subduction zones may cause large interplate earthquakes leading to destructive tsunamis. The Ryukyu Trench is one of the best fields to study this phenomenon, since various slow earthquakes and tsunamis have occurred; yet the fault structure and seismic activity there are poorly constrained. Here we present seismological evidence from marine observation for megathrust faults and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs). On the basis of passive observation we find LFEs occur at 15-18 km depths along the plate interface and their distribution seems to bridge the gap between the shallow tsunamigenic zone and the deep slow slip region. This suggests that the southern Ryukyu Trench is dominated by slow earthquakes at any depths and lacks a typical locked zone. The plate interface is overlaid by a low-velocity wedge and is accompanied by polarity reversals of seismic reflections, indicating fluids exist at various depths along the plate interface.

  14. Searching for Low-Frequency Radio Transients from Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai-Wei, Jr.; Cutchin, Sean; Kothari, Manthan; Schmitt, Christian; Kavic, Michael; Simonetti, John

    2011-10-01

    Supernovae events may be accompanied by prompt emission of a low-frequency electromagnetic transient. These transient events are created by the interaction of a shock wave of charged particles created by SN core-collapse with a stars ambient magnetic field. Such events can be detected in low-frequency radio array. Here we discuss an ongoing search for such events using two radio arrays: the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) and Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA).

  15. Compensation Low-Frequency Errors in TH-1 Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianrong; Wang, Renxiang; Hu, Xin

    2016-06-01

    The topographic mapping products at 1:50,000 scale can be realized using satellite photogrammetry without ground control points (GCPs), which requires the high accuracy of exterior orientation elements. Usually, the attitudes of exterior orientation elements are obtained from the attitude determination system on the satellite. Based on the theoretical analysis and practice, the attitude determination system exists not only the high-frequency errors, but also the low-frequency errors related to the latitude of satellite orbit and the time. The low-frequency errors would affect the location accuracy without GCPs, especially to the horizontal accuracy. In SPOT5 satellite, the latitudinal model was proposed to correct attitudes using approximately 20 calibration sites data, and the location accuracy was improved. The low-frequency errors are also found in Tian Hui 1 (TH-1) satellite. Then, the method of compensation low-frequency errors is proposed in ground image processing of TH-1, which can detect and compensate the low-frequency errors automatically without using GCPs. This paper deal with the low-frequency errors in TH-1: First, the analysis about low-frequency errors of the attitude determination system is performed. Second, the compensation models are proposed in bundle adjustment. Finally, the verification is tested using data of TH-1. The testing results show: the low-frequency errors of attitude determination system can be compensated during bundle adjustment, which can improve the location accuracy without GCPs and has played an important role in the consistency of global location accuracy.

  16. Low-frequency flute instabilities of self-pinched ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2005-12-15

    The stability properties of the low-frequency flute instabilities in a self-pinched ion beam propagating through a preformed plasma channel are investigated for long-wavelength and low-frequency perturbations. Consistent with the flute instabilities, the stability analysis is restricted to the surface perturbations on the ion beam. A closed algebraic dispersion relation of the flute instabilities for Bennett [Phys. Rev. 45, 890 (1934)] density profile is obtained, by making use of the energy group model. From the analytical and numerical calculations of the dispersion relation for highly collisional plasma, we find the necessary condition for instability in terms of the fractional current neutralization f. Threshold values of the fractional current neutralization for instability are tabulated for each azimuthal mode number l.

  17. The oblique behavior of low-frequency electromagnetic waves excited by newborn cometary ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinca, Armando L.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1989-01-01

    The free energy in oxygen or hydrogen ions freshly created in the solar wind stimulates low-frequency electromagnetic waves whose growth does not always maximize at parallel propagation. Exploration of the wave vector plane discloses the frequent occurrence of islets of oblique growth unconnected to the unstable parallel modes. Contour plots of the growth rate, real frequency, polarization, and magnetic compression characterize the oblique wave behavior for large values of the initial pitch angle of the cometary particles. Although wave-particle (Landau and cyclotron) resonances feed most of the surveyed oblique instabilities, some are seemingly fluidlike. The results, obtained from the numerical solution of the kinetic dispersion and wave equations, imply that newborn ions can easily excite significant oblique hydromagnetic wave activity. Cometary environments provide the adopted plasma model, but the study is helpful in the interpretation of other low-frequency wave observations in space.

  18. Parametric excitation of coupled fast and slow upper hybrid waves by counter-propagating circularly polarized lasers in a magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Kanika; Baliyan, Sweta; Sajal, Vivek; Kumar, Ravindra; Sharma, Navneet K.

    2016-07-01

    The parametric decay of large amplitude non-resonant beating mode of counter-propagating lasers (having a frequency difference ≥ 2 ω p ) into a pair of upper hybrid waves is studied in magnetized plasma. One of the excited upper hybrid waves (known as fast wave) having phase velocity close to c , can be utilized for electron acceleration. The coupled mode equations of fast and slow upper hybrid waves are modelled by solving equation of motion and continuity equation simultaneously (using the density perturbation technique) to derive the dispersion relation for two plasmon decay process. The growth rate of the present excitation process using right circularly polarized beating lasers is higher as compared with the growth rates of the excitation processes using ordinary and extraordinary beating lasers. However, the growth rate is not significant in the case of left circularly polarized beating lasers. The growth rate ˜ 0.15 ω p s - 1 is achieved for right circularly polarized beating lasers having v 1 , 2 / c = 0.1 for scattering angle θ s ˜ 160 ° and applied magnetic field ˜ 90 T. The growth rate of fast upper hybrid wave was reduced with the applied axial magnetic field in the present case. The present work is not only significant for the electron acceleration by fast upper hybrid wave but also for diagnostic purpose.

  19. Low-frequency EEG oscillations associated with information processing in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bates, Alan T; Kiehl, Kent A; Laurens, Kristin R; Liddle, Peter F

    2009-12-01

    Numerous studies have described attenuated event-related potential (ERP) component amplitudes in schizophrenia (e.g., P300, Mismatch Negativity (MMN), Error Negativity/Error-Related Negativity (Ne/ERN)). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have typically shown decreased recruitment of diverse brain areas during performance of tasks that elicit the above ERP components. Recent research suggests that phase-resetting of slow-oscillations (e.g., in the delta and theta bands) underlies the potentials observed in ERP averages. Several studies have reported that slow-oscillations are increased in amplitude in people with schizophrenia at rest. Few studies have examined event-related low-frequency oscillations in schizophrenia. We examined event-related evoked and induced delta and theta activity in 17 people with schizophrenia and 17 healthy controls in two go/no-go task variants. We analyzed stimulus-related and response-related oscillations associated with correct-hits, correct-rejects and false-alarms. Our results reveal a pattern of reduced delta and theta activity for task-relevant events in schizophrenia. The findings indicate that while low-frequency oscillations are increased in amplitude at rest, they are not coordinated effectively in schizophrenia during various information processing tasks including target-detection, response-inhibition and error-detection. This slow-oscillation coordination abnormality may help explain the decreased recruitment of brain areas seen in fMRI studies. PMID:19850450

  20. Manipulating neuronal activity with low frequency transcranial ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Michele Elizabeth

    neurons impose temporal constraints on their response to stimulation. If ultrasound-mediated responses are, in fact, ion channel mediated responses, ultrasound-induced responses should exhibit time-dependence characteristics similar to those of optogenetically-triggered responses. Minimal stimulus duration thresholds and the temporal limits of paired pulse facilitation for ultrasound stimulation were identical to those of optogenetic stimulation. Collectively, these experiments demonstrate an electrophysiological basis for low-frequency transcranial ultrasound stimulation of cerebral cortical neuronal activity.

  1. EDITORIAL: Slow light Slow light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Robert; Hess, Ortwin; Denz, Cornelia; Paspalakis, Emmanuel

    2010-10-01

    storage, optical memories, quantum information devices, and optical communication systems in which the use of slow light will allow all-optical processing with less wasted heat. To implement these applications, devices such as buffers, memories, interferometers and switches that utilize slow light need to be developed. Future challenges include the need for improved coupling of light into slow light modes, overcoming propagation losses, and mitigating the influence of large dispersion of the group velocity. The collection of papers in this special issue of Journal of Optics features a broad spectrum of articles that highlight actual developments in many of the material types and schemes described above. It represents therefore an excellent up to date snapshot of the current state of the field of slow light research. References [1] Lorentz H A 1880 Uber die Beziehung zwischen der Fortpflanzung des Lichtes und der Körperdichte Wiedemann Ann. 9 641-64 [2] McCall S L and Hahn E L 1967 Self-induced transparency by pulsed coherent light Phys. Rev. Lett. 18 908-11 [3] Vestergaard Hau L, Harris S E, Dutton Z and Behroozi C H 1999 Nature 397 594 [4] Philips D F, Fleischhauer A, Mair A, Walsworth R L and Lukin M D 2001 Storage of light in atomic vapor Phys. Rev. Lett. 86 783-6

  2. A Review of Low Frequency Electromagnetic Wave Phenomena Related to Tropospheric-Ionospheric Coupling Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoes, Fernando; Pfaff, Robert; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Klenzing, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of coupling mechanisms between the troposphere and the ionosphere requires a multidisciplinary approach involving several branches of atmospheric sciences, from meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, and fulminology to aeronomy, plasma physics, and space weather. In this work, we review low frequency electromagnetic wave propagation in the Earth-ionosphere cavity from a troposphere-ionosphere coupling perspective. We discuss electromagnetic wave generation, propagation, and resonance phenomena, considering atmospheric, ionospheric and magnetospheric sources, from lightning and transient luminous events at low altitude to Alfven waves and particle precipitation related to solar and magnetospheric processes. We review in situ ionospheric processes as well as surface and space weather phenomena that drive troposphere-ionosphere dynamics. Effects of aerosols, water vapor distribution, thermodynamic parameters, and cloud charge separation and electrification processes on atmospheric electricity and electromagnetic waves are reviewed. We also briefly revisit ionospheric irregularities such as spread-F and explosive spread-F, sporadic-E, traveling ionospheric disturbances, Trimpi effect, and hiss and plasma turbulence. Regarding the role of the lower boundary of the cavity, we review transient surface phenomena, including seismic activity, earthquakes, volcanic processes and dust electrification. The role of surface and atmospheric gravity waves in ionospheric dynamics is also briefly addressed. We summarize analytical and numerical tools and techniques to model low frequency electromagnetic wave propagation and solving inverse problems and summarize in a final section a few challenging subjects that are important for a better understanding of tropospheric-ionospheric coupling mechanisms.

  3. Low-frequency sound affects active micromechanics in the human inner ear

    PubMed Central

    Kugler, Kathrin; Wiegrebe, Lutz; Grothe, Benedikt; Kössl, Manfred; Gürkov, Robert; Krause, Eike; Drexl, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss is one of the most common auditory pathologies, resulting from overstimulation of the human cochlea, an exquisitely sensitive micromechanical device. At very low frequencies (less than 250 Hz), however, the sensitivity of human hearing, and therefore the perceived loudness is poor. The perceived loudness is mediated by the inner hair cells of the cochlea which are driven very inadequately at low frequencies. To assess the impact of low-frequency (LF) sound, we exploited a by-product of the active amplification of sound outer hair cells (OHCs) perform, so-called spontaneous otoacoustic emissions. These are faint sounds produced by the inner ear that can be used to detect changes of cochlear physiology. We show that a short exposure to perceptually unobtrusive, LF sounds significantly affects OHCs: a 90 s, 80 dB(A) LF sound induced slow, concordant and positively correlated frequency and level oscillations of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions that lasted for about 2 min after LF sound offset. LF sounds, contrary to their unobtrusive perception, strongly stimulate the human cochlea and affect amplification processes in the most sensitive and important frequency range of human hearing. PMID:26064536

  4. Low-frequency sound affects active micromechanics in the human inner ear.

    PubMed

    Kugler, Kathrin; Wiegrebe, Lutz; Grothe, Benedikt; Kössl, Manfred; Gürkov, Robert; Krause, Eike; Drexl, Markus

    2014-10-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss is one of the most common auditory pathologies, resulting from overstimulation of the human cochlea, an exquisitely sensitive micromechanical device. At very low frequencies (less than 250 Hz), however, the sensitivity of human hearing, and therefore the perceived loudness is poor. The perceived loudness is mediated by the inner hair cells of the cochlea which are driven very inadequately at low frequencies. To assess the impact of low-frequency (LF) sound, we exploited a by-product of the active amplification of sound outer hair cells (OHCs) perform, so-called spontaneous otoacoustic emissions. These are faint sounds produced by the inner ear that can be used to detect changes of cochlear physiology. We show that a short exposure to perceptually unobtrusive, LF sounds significantly affects OHCs: a 90 s, 80 dB(A) LF sound induced slow, concordant and positively correlated frequency and level oscillations of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions that lasted for about 2 min after LF sound offset. LF sounds, contrary to their unobtrusive perception, strongly stimulate the human cochlea and affect amplification processes in the most sensitive and important frequency range of human hearing. PMID:26064536

  5. Directivity and prediction of low frequency rotor noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, C. L.; Marcolini, M. A.; Jones, H. E.; Splettstoesser, W. R.

    1991-01-01

    Acoustic data obtained over a large horizontal plane under the model rotor and digitally filtered in order to determine the low-frequency content near the blade passage frequency is analyzed. Focus is placed on the directivity of low-frequency noise, and the changes in directivity as a function of the descent glide slope angle and advance ratio are presented and compared with predicted directivity results. The differences between the data and prediction are discussed for two observer positions, one below and on the rotor axis, and the other 60 degrees down from the horizontal. It is demonstrated that for the latter position, blade-vortex interaction noise is strong when it occurs, and the loading at the low frequencies is significantly affected during blade-vortex interactions.

  6. Atomic Oxygen Energy in Low Frequency Hyperthermal Plasma Ashers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K R.; Kneubel, Christian A.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental and analytical analysis of the atomic oxygen erosion of pyrolytic graphite as well as Monte Carlo computational modeling of the erosion of Kapton H (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) polyimide was performed to determine the hyperthermal energy of low frequency (30 to 35 kHz) plasma ashers operating on air. It was concluded that hyperthermal energies in the range of 0.3 to 0.9 eV are produced in the low frequency air plasmas which results in texturing similar to that in low Earth orbit (LEO). Monte Carlo computational modeling also indicated that such low energy directed ions are fully capable of producing the experimentally observed textured surfaces in low frequency plasmas.

  7. Minimal basilar membrane motion in low-frequency hearing.

    PubMed

    Warren, Rebecca L; Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Ciganović, Nikola; Zhang, Yuan; Wilson, Teresa M; Petrie, Tracy; Wang, Ruikang K; Jacques, Steven L; Reichenbach, Tobias; Nuttall, Alfred L; Fridberger, Anders

    2016-07-26

    Low-frequency hearing is critically important for speech and music perception, but no mechanical measurements have previously been available from inner ears with intact low-frequency parts. These regions of the cochlea may function in ways different from the extensively studied high-frequency regions, where the sensory outer hair cells produce force that greatly increases the sound-evoked vibrations of the basilar membrane. We used laser interferometry in vitro and optical coherence tomography in vivo to study the low-frequency part of the guinea pig cochlea, and found that sound stimulation caused motion of a minimal portion of the basilar membrane. Outside the region of peak movement, an exponential decline in motion amplitude occurred across the basilar membrane. The moving region had different dependence on stimulus frequency than the vibrations measured near the mechanosensitive stereocilia. This behavior differs substantially from the behavior found in the extensively studied high-frequency regions of the cochlea. PMID:27407145

  8. Minimal basilar membrane motion in low-frequency hearing

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Rebecca L.; Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Ciganović, Nikola; Zhang, Yuan; Wilson, Teresa M.; Petrie, Tracy; Wang, Ruikang K.; Jacques, Steven L.; Reichenbach, Tobias; Nuttall, Alfred L.; Fridberger, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Low-frequency hearing is critically important for speech and music perception, but no mechanical measurements have previously been available from inner ears with intact low-frequency parts. These regions of the cochlea may function in ways different from the extensively studied high-frequency regions, where the sensory outer hair cells produce force that greatly increases the sound-evoked vibrations of the basilar membrane. We used laser interferometry in vitro and optical coherence tomography in vivo to study the low-frequency part of the guinea pig cochlea, and found that sound stimulation caused motion of a minimal portion of the basilar membrane. Outside the region of peak movement, an exponential decline in motion amplitude occurred across the basilar membrane. The moving region had different dependence on stimulus frequency than the vibrations measured near the mechanosensitive stereocilia. This behavior differs substantially from the behavior found in the extensively studied high-frequency regions of the cochlea. PMID:27407145

  9. Present and Future Modes of Low Frequency Climate Variability

    SciTech Connect

    Cane, Mark A.

    2014-02-20

    This project addressed area (1) of the FOA, “Interaction of Climate Change and Low Frequency Modes of Natural Climate Variability”. Our overarching objective is to detect, describe and understand the changes in low frequency variability between model simulations of the preindustrial climate and simulations of a doubled CO2 climate. The deliverables are a set of papers providing a dynamical characterization of interannual, decadal, and multidecadal variability in coupled models with attention to the changes in this low frequency variability between pre-industrial concentrations of greenhouse gases and a doubling of atmospheric concentrations of CO2. The principle mode of analysis, singular vector decomposition, is designed to advance our physical, mechanistic understanding. This study will include external natural variability due to solar and volcanic aerosol variations as well as variability internal to the climate system. An important byproduct is a set of analysis tools for estimating global singular vector structures from the archived output of model simulations.

  10. Internal Rot Detection with the Use of Low-Frequency Flaw Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proskórnicki, Marek; Ligus, Grzegorz

    2014-12-01

    The issue of rot detection in standing timber or stocked wood is very important in forest management. Rot flaw detection used for that purpose is represented by invasive and non-invasive devices. Non-invasive devices are very accurate, but due to the cost and complicated operation they have not been applied on a large scale in forest management. Taking into account the practical needs of foresters a prototype of low-frequency flaw was developed. The principle of its operation is based on the difference in acoustic wave propagation in sound wood and wood with rot.

  11. Nonlinear low-frequency electrostatic wave dynamics in a two-dimensional quantum plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Samiran; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2016-08-01

    The problem of two-dimensional arbitrary amplitude low-frequency electrostatic oscillation in a quasi-neutral quantum plasma is solved exactly by elementary means. In such quantum plasmas we have treated electrons quantum mechanically and ions classically. The exact analytical solution of the nonlinear system exhibits the formation of dark and black solitons. Numerical simulation also predicts the possible periodic solution of the nonlinear system. Nonlinear analysis reveals that the system does have a bifurcation at a critical Mach number that depends on the angle of propagation of the wave. The small-amplitude limit leads to the formation of weakly nonlinear Kadomstev-Petviashvili solitons.

  12. Low frequency electric field variations during HF transmissions on a mother-daughter rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, T. J.; Maynard, M. C.; Holtet, J. A.; Karlsen, N. O.; Egeland, A.; Moe, T. E.; Troim, J.

    1977-01-01

    HF wave propagation experiments were conducted on Mother-Daughter rockets in the polar ionosphere. Swept frequency transmissions from the Mother, nominally covering the range from 0.5 to 5 MHz in both CW and pulse modes, are received by the Daughter. In the most recent rocket of the series, the Mother also contained an AC electric field spectrometer covering the frequency range from 10 Hz to 100 kHz in four decade bands. The low frequency response of the ionosphere with respect to waves emitted from the onboard HF transmitter is examined.

  13. Remote sensing planetary waves in the midlatitude mesosphere using low frequency transmitter signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitter, E. D.

    2011-07-01

    Very low and low radio frequency (VLF/LF) propagation responds sensitively to the electron density distribution in the lower ionosphere (upper mesosphere). Whereas propagation paths crossing subpolar and polar regions are frequently affected by forcing from above by particle precipitations, mid- and lowlatitude paths let forcing from below be more prominent. Our observations (2009-2011) show, that the low frequency propagation conditions along the midlatitude path from Sicily to Germany (52° N 8° E) using the NSY 45.9 kHz transmitter (37° N 14° E) prove to be a good proxy of mesosphere planetary wave activity along the propagation path. High absorption events with VLF/LF propagation correlate to the well known winter time D-layer anomaly observed with high frequency (HF) radio waves. VLF/LF propagation calculations are presented which show that the radio signal amplitude variations can be modeled by planetary wave modulated collison frequency and electron density profiles. The other way around wave pressure amplitudes can be inferred from the VLF/LF data.

  14. Listening to the low-frequency gravitational-wave band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Scott

    2016-03-01

    Ground-based gravitational-wave detectors are beginning to explore the high-frequency band of roughly 10 to 1000 Hz. These three decades in frequency represent one of several astrophysically important wavebands. In this talk, I will focus on the astrophysics of the low-frequency band, from roughly 30 microhertz to 0.1 Hz. This band is expected to be particularly rich with very loud sources. I will survey what we expect to be important sources of low-frequency gravitational waves, and review the scientific payoff that would come from measuring them.

  15. Improvement of the low frequency oscillation model for Hall thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunsheng; Wang, Huashan

    2016-08-01

    The low frequency oscillation of the discharge current in Hall thrusters is a major aspect of these devices that requires further study. While the existing model captures the ionization mechanism of the low frequency oscillation, it unfortunately fails to express the dynamic characteristics of the ion acceleration. The analysis in this paper shows this is because of the simplification of the electron equation, which affects both the electric field distribution and the ion acceleration process. Additionally, the electron density equation is revised and a new model that is based on the physical properties of ion movement is proposed.

  16. Excitation of low-frequency waves by auroral electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. S.; Wong, H. K.; Koga, J.; Burch, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    The electron distribution functions measured by the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite during an auroral pass in 1981 are used in a linear instability analysis of low-frequency electromagnetic and electrostatic waves near and below the hydrogen gyrofrequency. It is suggested that the low-frequency electric and magnetic noise in the auroral zone might be explained by O and H electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves excited by energetic electron beams. An instability analysis suggests that upward and downward streaming electrons throughout the central plasma sheet region provide the free energy for heating oxygen ion through oxygen electrostatic ion cyclotron waves.

  17. Hemodynamic responses can modulate the brain oscillations in low frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Feng-Mei; Wang, Yi-Feng; Yuan, Zhen

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have showed that the steady-state responses were able to be used as an effective index for modulating the neural oscillations in the high frequency ranges (> 1 Hz). However, the neural oscillations in low frequency ranges (<1 Hz) remain unknown. In this study, a series of fNIRS experimental tests were conducted to validate if the low frequency bands (0.1 Hz - 0.8 Hz) steady-state hemoglobin responses (SSHbRs) could be evoked and modulate the neural oscillation during a serial reaction time (SRT) task.

  18. Improvement of Space Shuttle Main Engine Low Frequency Acceleration Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stec, Robert C.

    1999-01-01

    The noise floor of low frequency acceleration data acquired on the Space Shuttle Main Engines is higher than desirable. Difficulties of acquiring high quality acceleration data on this engine are discussed. The approach presented in this paper for reducing the acceleration noise floor focuses on a search for an accelerometer more capable of measuring low frequency accelerations. An overview is given of the current measurement system used to acquire engine vibratory data. The severity of vibration, temperature, and moisture environments are considered. Vibratory measurements from both laboratory and rocket engine tests are presented.

  19. Low-frequency vibrational modes of riboflavin and related compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Masae; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Nishizawa, Jun-ichi; Ito, Hiromasa

    2005-01-01

    The low-frequency vibrations of riboflavin and related compounds (alloxazine, lumichrome, lumiflavin as the ring system and D-mannitol as the side-chain system) were observed by far-infrared (terahertz) spectroscopy. Vibrational mode assignments in this spectrally congested range were made using high precision quantum chemical calculations. These resonance frequencies located below 200 cm -1 indicate the existence of motions important for biological reactions. The observed absorption bands in the low-frequency region of riboflavin are assigned to the in-plane and out-of-plane-ring deformations of pyrimidine and isoalloxazine, and to the torsion modes of the ribityl chain.

  20. The global atmospheric response to low-frequency tropical forcing: Zonally averaged basic states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Long; Nathan, Terrence R.

    1994-01-01

    The extratropical response to localized, low-frequency tropical forcing is examined using a linearized, non-divergent barotropic model on a sphere. Zonal-mean basic states characterized by solid-body rotation or critical latitudes are considered. An analytical analysis based on WKB and ray tracing methods shows that, in contrast to stationary Rossby waves, westward moving, low-frequency Rossby waves can propagate through the tropical easterlies into the extratropics. It is shown analytically that the difference between the stationary and low-frequency ray paths is proportional to the forcing frequency and inversely proportional to the zonal wavenumber cubed. An expression for the disturbance amplitude is derived that shows the ability of the forced waves to maintain their strength well into middle latitudes depends on their meridional wave scale and northward group velocity, both of which are functions of the slowly varying background flow. A local energetics analysis shows that the combination of energy dispersion from the forcing region and energy extraction from the equatorward flank of the midlatitude jet produces disturbances that have the greatest impact on the extratropical circulation. Under the assumption that the forcing amplitude is independent of frequency, this impact is largest when the tropical forcing period is in the range 10-20 days.

  1. Detection and Analysis of Low-Frequency Sperm Whale Vocalizations with a Towed Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, Alexander

    Sperm whale vocalizations recorded during a sea test and calibration experiment in the Gulf of Maine on a single towed, horizontal, densely sampled, low-frequency (< 2500 Hz), coherent hydrophone array system are detected and analyzed for signal energy level and other characteristics. The vocalizing individuals are localized in bearing, range, and depth. An algorithm is developed to achieve automatic detection of vocalizations. This analysis is shown to have potential utility despite restriction to only the low-frequency component of the vocalizations by sampling theory. In addition, transmission loss in the New England continental shelf and slope environment is accounted for with an ocean waveguide-acoustic propagation model. Multiple averaged realizations of this model are used to estimate transmission loss as a function of range and depth for transects between the receiver array and vocalizing whales. Comparison of the vocalizations and background noise levels and the estimated transmission loss suggests the sperm whale detection range after coherent array processing exceeds 60 km in low-to-moderate sea states. Low-frequency source levels of vocalizations are estimated using the received levels and the estimated transmission loss, and applications of both this estimate and the receiver-side statistics are discussed.

  2. Constraints on the source parameters of low-frequency earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Amanda M.; Beroza, Gregory C.; Shelly, David R.

    2016-02-01

    Low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) are small repeating earthquakes that occur in conjunction with deep slow slip. Like typical earthquakes, LFEs are thought to represent shear slip on crustal faults, but when compared to earthquakes of the same magnitude, LFEs are depleted in high-frequency content and have lower corner frequencies, implying longer duration. Here we exploit this difference to estimate the duration of LFEs on the deep San Andreas Fault (SAF). We find that the M ~ 1 LFEs have typical durations of ~0.2 s. Using the annual slip rate of the deep SAF and the average number of LFEs per year, we estimate average LFE slip rates of ~0.24 mm/s. When combined with the LFE magnitude, this number implies a stress drop of ~104 Pa, 2 to 3 orders of magnitude lower than ordinary earthquakes, and a rupture velocity of 0.7 km/s, 20% of the shear wave speed. Typical earthquakes are thought to have rupture velocities of ~80-90% of the shear wave speed. Together, the slow rupture velocity, low stress drops, and slow slip velocity explain why LFEs are depleted in high-frequency content relative to ordinary earthquakes and suggest that LFE sources represent areas capable of relatively higher slip speed in deep fault zones. Additionally, changes in rheology may not be required to explain both LFEs and slow slip; the same process that governs the slip speed during slow earthquakes may also limit the rupture velocity of LFEs.

  3. The evolving interaction of low-frequency earthquakes during transient slip

    PubMed Central

    Frank, William B.; Shapiro, Nikolaï M.; Husker, Allen L.; Kostoglodov, Vladimir; Gusev, Alexander A.; Campillo, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Observed along the roots of seismogenic faults where the locked interface transitions to a stably sliding one, low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) primarily occur as event bursts during slow slip. Using an event catalog from Guerrero, Mexico, we employ a statistical analysis to consider the sequence of LFEs at a single asperity as a point process, and deduce the level of time clustering from the shape of its autocorrelation function. We show that while the plate interface remains locked, LFEs behave as a simple Poisson process, whereas they become strongly clustered in time during even the smallest slow slip, consistent with interaction between different LFE sources. Our results demonstrate that bursts of LFEs can result from the collective behavior of asperities whose interaction depends on the state of the fault interface. PMID:27152345

  4. The evolving interaction of low-frequency earthquakes during transient slip.

    PubMed

    Frank, William B; Shapiro, Nikolaï M; Husker, Allen L; Kostoglodov, Vladimir; Gusev, Alexander A; Campillo, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Observed along the roots of seismogenic faults where the locked interface transitions to a stably sliding one, low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) primarily occur as event bursts during slow slip. Using an event catalog from Guerrero, Mexico, we employ a statistical analysis to consider the sequence of LFEs at a single asperity as a point process, and deduce the level of time clustering from the shape of its autocorrelation function. We show that while the plate interface remains locked, LFEs behave as a simple Poisson process, whereas they become strongly clustered in time during even the smallest slow slip, consistent with interaction between different LFE sources. Our results demonstrate that bursts of LFEs can result from the collective behavior of asperities whose interaction depends on the state of the fault interface. PMID:27152345

  5. Low-frequency scattering from two-dimensional perfect conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Thorkild B.; Yaghjian, Arthur D.

    1992-11-01

    Exact expressions are derived for the leading terms in the low-frequency expansions of the far field scattered by an arbitrarily shaped cylinder with finite cross section, an arbitrarily shaped cylindrical bump on a ground plane, and arbitrarily shaped cylindrical dent in a ground plane. For the cylinder with finite cross section, an expression that is independent of the cylinder shape is derived to describe the leading term in the low-frequency expansion of the TM scattered far field. The explicit expression for the low-frequency TE scattered far field is based on three constants that depend only on the shape of the cylinder. The explicit expressions for the low-frequency diffracted fields of a bump or dent contain one constant that depends only on the shape of the bump or dent. It is noted, that this single constant is the same for both TM and TE polarization and can be derived from the solution to either electrostatic or magnetostatic problem.

  6. Is Reaction Time Variability in ADHD Mainly at Low Frequencies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karalunas, Sarah L.; Huang-Pollock, Cynthia L.; Nigg, Joel T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Intraindividual variability in reaction times (RT variability) has garnered increasing interest as an indicator of cognitive and neurobiological dysfunction in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Recent theory and research has emphasized specific low-frequency patterns of RT variability. However, whether…

  7. Low-frequency switching voltage regulators for terrestrial photovoltaic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delombard, R.

    1984-01-01

    The photovoltaic technology project and the stand alone applications project are discussed. Two types of low frequency switching type regulators were investigated. The design, operating characteristics and field application of these regulators is described. The regulators are small in size, low in cost, very low in power dissipation, reliable and allow considerable flexibility in system design.

  8. Intrinsic low-frequency variability of the Gulf Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quattrocchi, G.; Pierini, S.; Dijkstra, H. A.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper a process study aimed at analyzing the low-frequency variability of intrinsically oceanic origin of the Gulf Stream (GS) and GS extension (GSE) is presented. An eddy-permitting reduced-gravity nonlinear shallow water model is implemented in an idealized North Atlantic Ocean, with schematic boundaries including the essential geometric features of the coastline and a realistic zonal basin width at all latitudes. The forcing is provided by a time-independent climatological surface wind stress obtained from 41 years of monthly ECMWF fields. The model response yields strong intrinsic low-frequency fluctuations on the interannual to decadal time scales. The modelled time-averaged GS/GSE flows are found to exhibit several features that can also be deduced from satellite altimeter data, such as the Florida Current seaward deflection, the GS separation at Cape Hatteras, and the overall structure of the GSE. The intrinsic low-frequency variability yields two preferred states of the GSE differing in latitudinal location that also have their counterpart in the altimeter data. A preliminary analysis of the variability in terms of dynamical systems theory is carried out by using the lateral eddy viscosity as the control parameter. A complex transition sequence from a steady state to irregular low-frequency variability emerges, in which Hopf and global bifurcations can be identified.

  9. Very Low Frequency Earthquakes (VLFEs) in Cascadia and Their Interactions with Tremor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, A.

    2014-12-01

    Very low frequency earthquakes (VLFEs) are discrete seismic events rich in low frequencies (20 - 50 sec) and depleted in high frequencies compared to similar size local events. They are associated with slow earthquakes and so far found in only a handful of subduction zones worldwide. I systematically search and find VLFEs in the Cascadia subduction zone. I use a grid-search moment tensor inversion method to scan for VLFEs in 3-D space and time, locate them and determine their source parameters. They are located downdip of the locked zone, where non-volcanic tremor occurs (Fig. 1). The best estimates of VLFE depths put them near the plate interface. Their focal mechanisms indicate double couple sources and are consistent with shallow dipping thrust movement. Their moment magnitude ranges between 3.3 and 3.5 suggesting that a significant part of seismic moment may be released by such VLFEs during slow earthquakes. Interestingly, most of the VLFEs are located where the slip is the largest in an ETS event. Generally, VLFEs correlates with tremor quite well in space and time. They slowly migrate alongstrike form south to north with tremor. In detail, VLFEs appear to be tracking tremor even during tremor migration of shorter time scales. I am currently expanding the VLFE catalog in space and time to better characterize their spatiotemporal distribution, moment release, and their role in slow earthquakes. VLFEs and their interaction with tremor is providing new insights to the physics of slow earthquakes, underlying processes governing them and fault properties in Cascadia.

  10. Tectonic Tremor and the Collective Behavior of Low-Frequency Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, W.; Shapiro, N.; Husker, A. L.; Kostoglodov, V.; Campillo, M.; Gusev, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Tectonic tremor, a long duration, emergent seismic signal observed along the deep roots of plate interfaces, is thought to be the superposition of repetitive shear events called low-frequency earthquakes (LFE) [e.g. Shelly et al., Nature, 2007]. We use a catalog of more than 1.8 million LFEs regrouped into more than 1000 families observed over 2 years in the Guerrero subduction zone in Mexico, considering each family as an individual repetitive source or asperity. We develop a statistical analysis to determine whether the subcatalogs corresponding to different sources represent random Poisson processes or if they exhibit scale-invariant clustering in time, which we interpret as a manifestation of collective behavior. For each individual LFE source, we compare their level of collective behavior during two time periods: during the six-month-long 2006 Mw 7.5 slow-slip event and during a calm period with no observed slow slip. We find that the collective behavior of LFEs depends on distance from the trench and increases when the subduction interface is slowly slipping. Our results suggest that the occurrence of strong episodes of tectonic tremors cannot be simply explained by increased rates of low frequency earthquakes at every individual LFE source but correspond to an enhanced collective behavior of the ensemble of LFE asperities.

  11. Modeling broadband poroelastic propagation using an asymptotic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, Donald W.

    2009-05-01

    An asymptotic method, valid in the presence of smoothly-varying heterogeneity, is used to derive a semi-analytic solution to the equations for fluid and solid displacements in a poroelastic medium. The solution is defined along trajectories through the porous medium model, in the manner of ray theory. The lowest order expression in the asymptotic expansion provides an eikonal equation for the phase. There are three modes of propagation, two modes of longitudinal displacement and a single mode of transverse displacement. The two longitudinal modes define the Biot fast and slow waves which have very different propagation characteristics. In the limit of low frequency, the Biot slow wave propagates as a diffusive disturbance, in essence a transient pressure pulse. Conversely, at low frequencies the Biot fast wave and the transverse mode are modified elastic waves. At intermediate frequencies the wave characteristics of the longitudinal modes are mixed. A comparison of the asymptotic solution with analytic and numerical solutions shows reasonably good agreement for both homogeneous and heterogeneous Earth models.

  12. Localization of ultra-low frequency waves in multi-ion plasmas of the planetary magnetosphere

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Eun -Hwa; Johnson, Jay R.; Lee, Dong -Hun

    2015-01-01

    By adopting a 2D time-dependent wave code, we investigate how mode-converted waves at the Ion-Ion Hybrid (IIH) resonance and compressional waves propagate in 2D density structures with a wide range of field-aligned wavenumbers to background magnetic fields. The simulation results show that the mode-converted waves have continuous bands across the field line consistent with previous numerical studies. These waves also have harmonic structures in frequency domain and are localized in the field-aligned heavy ion density well. Lastly, our results thus emphasize the importance of a field-aligned heavy ion density structure for ultra-low frequency wave propagation, and suggest that IIH wavesmore » can be localized in different locations along the field line.« less

  13. Localization of ultra-low frequency waves in multi-ion plasmas of the planetary magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun -Hwa; Johnson, Jay R.; Lee, Dong -Hun

    2015-01-01

    By adopting a 2D time-dependent wave code, we investigate how mode-converted waves at the Ion-Ion Hybrid (IIH) resonance and compressional waves propagate in 2D density structures with a wide range of field-aligned wavenumbers to background magnetic fields. The simulation results show that the mode-converted waves have continuous bands across the field line consistent with previous numerical studies. These waves also have harmonic structures in frequency domain and are localized in the field-aligned heavy ion density well. Lastly, our results thus emphasize the importance of a field-aligned heavy ion density structure for ultra-low frequency wave propagation, and suggest that IIH waves can be localized in different locations along the field line.

  14. Implicit approximate-factorization schemes for the low-frequency transonic equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, W. F.; Steger, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    Two- and three-level implicit finite-difference algorithms for the low-frequency transonic small disturbance-equation are constructed using approximate factorization techniques. The schemes are unconditionally stable for the model linear problem. For nonlinear mixed flows, the schemes maintain stability by the use of conservatively switched difference operators for which stability is maintained only if shock propagation is restricted to be less than one spatial grid point per time step. The shock-capturing properties of the schemes were studied for various shock motions that might be encountered in problems of engineering interest. Computed results for a model airfoil problem that produces a flow field similar to that about a helicopter rotor in forward flight show the development of a shock wave and its subsequent propagation upstream off the front of the airfoil.

  15. Global model of low-frequency chorus (fLHR

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Nigel P; Horne, Richard B; Li, Wen; Thorne, Richard M; Sicard-Piet, Angélica

    2014-01-01

    Whistler mode chorus is an important magnetospheric emission, playing a dual role in the acceleration and loss of relativistic electrons in the Earth's outer radiation belt. Chorus is typically generated in the equatorial region in the frequency range 0.1–0.8 fce, where fce is the local electron gyrofrequency. However, as the waves propagate to higher latitudes, significant wave power can occur at frequencies below 0.1fce. Since this wave power is largely omitted in current radiation belt models, we construct a global model of low-frequency chorus, fLHRlow-frequency chorus is strongest, with an average intensity of 200 pT2, in the prenoon sector during active conditions at midlatitudes (20°<|λm|<50°) from 4low-frequency chorus wave power will contribute to the acceleration and loss of relativistic electrons and should be taken into account in radiation belt models. Key Points Strong chorus waves can extend below 0.1 times local electron gyrofrequency Low frequency chorus strongest at mid-latitudes in pre-noon sector for L*=4 to 8 Low frequency chorus should be included in radiation belt models PMID:25821274

  16. Low-frequency thermohaline variability in the Subtropical South Atlantic pycnocline during 2002-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodziejczyk, Nicolas; Reverdin, Gilles; Gaillard, Fabienne; Lazar, Alban

    2014-09-01

    Low-frequency variability of spiciness is observed in the Subtropical South Atlantic over the period 2002-2013 with the Argo gridded product In Situ Analysis System. Within the pycnocline, spiciness anomalies propagate at a mean speed of 0.04 ± 0.02 m s-1, the same speed as the gyre mean circulation, from the Agulhas Retroflection region off South Africa (~35°S-20°E) toward the South American coast (~18°S-35°W). After 2010, propagation is still found, but stationary local spiciness generation is also found over the Subtropical South Atlantic. This spiciness increase is associated with high values of vertical Turner angle below the mixed layer base during late winter. This suggests spice injection resulting from penetrative convective mixing due to air-sea buoyancy loss. These features may have an impact on the low-frequency warm and salty signal produced by the Agulhas leakage in Subtropical South Atlantic and the upper branch of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation.

  17. Low-frequency thermohaline variability in the Subtropical South Atlantic pycnocline during 2002-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodziejczyk, Nicolas; Reverdin, Gilles; Gaillard, Fabienne; Lazar, Alban

    2015-04-01

    Low-frequency variability of spiciness is observed in the Subtropical South Atlantic over the period 2002-2013 with the Argo gridded product ISAS. Within the pycnocline, spiciness anomalies propagate at a mean speed of 0.04±0.02 m.s-1, the same speed as the gyre mean circulation, from the Agulhas Retroflection region off South Africa (~35°S-20°E) towards the South American coast (~18°S-35°W). After 2010, propagation is still found, but stationary local spiciness generation is also found over the Subtropical South Atlantic. This spiciness increase is associated with high values of vertical Turner angle below the mixed layer base during late winter. This suggests spice injection resulting from penetrative convective mixing due to air-sea buoyancy loss. These features may have an impact on the low-frequency warm and salty signal produced by the Agulhas leakage in Subtropical South Atlantic and the upper branch of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation.

  18. Composite 3D-printed metastructures for low-frequency and broadband vibration absorption.

    PubMed

    Matlack, Kathryn H; Bauhofer, Anton; Krödel, Sebastian; Palermo, Antonio; Daraio, Chiara

    2016-07-26

    Architected materials that control elastic wave propagation are essential in vibration mitigation and sound attenuation. Phononic crystals and acoustic metamaterials use band-gap engineering to forbid certain frequencies from propagating through a material. However, existing solutions are limited in the low-frequency regimes and in their bandwidth of operation because they require impractical sizes and masses. Here, we present a class of materials (labeled elastic metastructures) that supports the formation of wide and low-frequency band gaps, while simultaneously reducing their global mass. To achieve these properties, the metastructures combine local resonances with structural modes of a periodic architected lattice. Whereas the band gaps in these metastructures are induced by Bragg scattering mechanisms, their key feature is that the band-gap size and frequency range can be controlled and broadened through local resonances, which are linked to changes in the lattice geometry. We demonstrate these principles experimentally, using advanced additive manufacturing methods, and inform our designs using finite-element simulations. This design strategy has a broad range of applications, including control of structural vibrations, noise, and shock mitigation. PMID:27410042

  19. Low-frequency spatial wave manipulation via phononic crystals with relaxed cell symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Celli, Paolo; Gonella, Stefano

    2014-03-14

    Phononic crystals enjoy unique wave manipulation capabilities enabled by their periodic topologies. On one hand, they feature frequency-dependent directivity, which allows directional propagation of selected modes even at low frequencies. However, the stellar nature of the propagation patterns and the inability to induce single-beam focusing represent significant limitations of this functionality. On the other hand, one can realize waveguides by defecting the periodic structure of a crystal operating in bandgap mode along some desired path. Waveguides of this type are only activated in the relatively high and narrow frequency bands corresponding to total bandgaps, which limits their potential technological applications. In this work, we introduce a class of phononic crystals with relaxed cell symmetry and we exploit symmetry relaxation of a population of auxiliary microstructural elements to achieve spatial manipulation of elastic waves at very low frequencies, in the range of existence of the acoustic modes. By this approach, we achieve focusing without modifying the default static properties of the medium and by invoking mechanisms that are well suited to envision adaptive configurations for semi-active wave control.

  20. A low-frequency asymptotic model of seismic reflection from a high-permeability layer

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, Dmitriy; Goloshubin, Gennady

    2009-03-01

    Analysis of compression wave propagation through a high-permeability layer in a homogeneous poroelastic medium predicts a peak of reflection in the low-frequency end of the spectrum. An explicit formula expresses the resonant frequency through the elastic moduli of the solid skeleton, the permeability of the reservoir rock, the fluid viscosity and compressibility, and the reservoir thickness. This result is obtained through a low-frequency asymptotic analysis of the Biot's model of poroelasticity. A new physical interpretation of some coefficients of the classical poroelasticity is a result of the derivation of the main equations from the Hooke's law, momentum and mass balance equations, and the Darcy's law. The velocity of wave propagation, the attenuation factor, and the wave number, are expressed in the form of power series with respect to a small dimensionless parameter. The latter is equal to the product of the kinematic reservoir fluid mobility, an imaginary unit, and the frequency of the signal. Retaining only the leading terms of the series leads to explicit and relatively simple expressions for the reflection and transmission coefficients for a planar wave crossing an interface between two permeable media, as well as wave reflection from a thin highly-permeable layer (a lens). The practical implications of the theory developed here are seismic modeling, inversion, and attribute analysis.

  1. Detection and location of shallow very low frequency earthquakes along the Nankai trough and the Ryukyu trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Y.; Matsuzawa, T.; Obara, K.

    2013-12-01

    We have investigated spatiotemporal distribution of shallow very low frequency earthquakes (VLFEs) along the Nankai trough and the Ryukyu trench. Three component seismograms recorded at broadband stations of the NIED F-net were analyzed by using waveform-correlation and back-projection techniques after processing a band-pass filter (0.02 to 0.05 Hz). Here we used known VLFEs and regular interplate earthquakes near the trench axis as template events. Time series of cross-correlation function (CC) at each station was calculated from continuous waveform data and triggered seismograms of template events with a length of 180 s. Assuming surface wave propagation with a velocity of 3.8 km/s, CCs are back-propagated onto possible origin times and horizontal locations. We obtained VLFE epicenters by performing a grid search in time and space domains with spacing of 1 s and 0.025 degrees, respectively, to maximize the averaged CCs from all stations. At first, we choose grid points with averaged CCs larger than 0.5. If these grid points have similar origin times within 180 s, we assume that these grid points reflect a same event and choose the VLFE candidate having the largest averaged CC. If some grid points are detected in the same time window from different template events, we choose the VLFE candidate with the largest averaged CC from grid points located within 100 km from the template event. VLFEs were finally identified by removing regular earthquakes listed in the JMA catalogue from all candidates. As a result of the analysis for data from October, 2009 to February, 2010, two episodes of VLFE activity were detected. One episode was located east of the M6.8 interplate earthquake which occurred on October 30, 2009 along the Ryukyu trench. The VLFE seismicity was quite active just after the M6.8 earthquake and had been smoothly decreasing with the elapsed time. Such time dependent seismicity may be related to the post-seismic slip following the M6.8 earthquake. Another

  2. Parametric study of a Schamel equation for low-frequency dust acoustic waves in dusty electronegative plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabetkar, Akbar; Dorranian, Davoud

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, our attention is first concentrated on obliquely propagating properties of low-frequency (ω ≪ ωcd) "fast" and "slow" dust acoustic waves, in the linear regime, in dusty electronegative plasmas with Maxwellian electrons, kappa distributed positive ions, negative ions (following the combination of kappa-Schamel distribution), and negatively charged dust particles. So, an explicit expression for dispersion relation is derived by linearizing a set of dust-fluid equations. The results show that wave frequency ω in long and short-wavelengths limit is conspicuously affected by physical parameters, namely, positive to negative temperature ion ratio (βp), trapping parameter of negative ions (μ), magnitude of the magnetic field B0 (via ωcd), superthermal index ( κn,κp ), and positive ion to dust density ratio (δp). The signature of the penultimate parameter (i.e., κn) on wave frequency reveals that the frequency gap between the modes reduces (escalates) for k kc r ), where kcr is critical wave number. Alternatively, for weakly nonlinear analysis, reductive perturbation theory has been used to construct 1D and 3D Schamel Korteweg-de Vries (S-KdV) equations, whose nonlinearity coefficient prescribes only compressive soliton for all parameter values of interest. The survey manifests that deviation of ions from Maxwellian behavior leads intrinsic properties of solitary waves to be evolved in opposite trend. Additionally, at lower proportion of trapped negative ions, solitary wave amplitude mitigates, whilst the trapping parameter has no effect on both spatial width and the linear wave. The results are discussed in the context of the Earth's mesosphere of dusty electronegative plasma.

  3. Diatom response to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Parkinson, W.C.; Sulik, G.L. )

    1992-06-01

    Reports that extremely low-frequency magnetic fields can interfere with normal biological cell function continue to stimulate experimental activity as well as investigations into the possible mechanism of the interaction. The cyclotron resonance' model of Liboff has been tested by Smith et al. using as the biological test system the diatom Amphora coffeiformis. They report enhanced motility of the diatom in response to a low-frequency electromagnetic field tuned to the cyclotron resonance condition for calcium ions. We report here an attempt to reproduce their results. Following their protocol diatoms were seeded onto agar plates containing varying amounts of calcium and exposed to colinear DC and AC magnetic fields tuned to the cyclotron resonant condition for frequencies of 16, 30, and 60 Hz. The fractional motility was compared with that of control plates seeded at the same time from the same culture. We find no evidence of a cyclotron resonance effect.

  4. The very low frequency power spectrum of Centaurus X-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    The long-term variability of Cen X-3 on time scales ranging from days to years has been examined by combining data obtained by the HEAO 1 A-4 instrument with data from Vela 5B. A simple interpretation of the data is made in terms of the standard alpha-disk model of accretion disk structure and dynamics. Assuming that the low-frequency variance represents the inherent variability of the mass transfer from the companion, the decline in power at higher frequencies results from the leveling of radial structure in the accretion disk through viscous mixing. The shape of the observed power spectrum is shown to be in excellent agreement with a calculation based on a simplified form of this model. The observed low-frequency power spectrum of Cen X-3 is consistent with a disk in which viscous mixing occurs about as rapidly as possible and on the largest scale possible.

  5. Theory of low frequency noise transmission through turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matta, R. K.; Mani, R.

    1979-01-01

    Improvements of the existing theory of low frequency noise transmission through turbines and development of a working prediction tool are described. The existing actuator-disk model and a new finite-chord model were utilized in an analytical study. The interactive effect of adjacent blade rows, higher order spinning modes, blade-passage shocks, and duct area variations were considered separately. The improved theory was validated using the data acquired in an earlier NASA program. Computer programs incorporating the improved theory were produced for transmission loss prediction purposes. The programs were exercised parametrically and charts constructed to define approximately the low frequency noise transfer through turbines. The loss through the exhaust nozzle and flow(s) was also considered.

  6. An evolutionary sequence of low frequency radio astronomy missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Dayton L.

    1990-01-01

    Many concepts for space-based low frequency radio astronomy missions are being developed, ranging from simple single-satellite experiments to large arrays on the far side of the moon. Each concept involves a different tradeoff between the range of scientific questions it can answer and the technical complexity of the experiment. Since complexity largely determines the development time, risk, launch vehicle requirements, cost, and probability of approval, it is important to see where the ability to expand the scientific return justifies a major increase in complexity. An evolutionary series of increasingly capable missions, similar to the series of missions for infrared or X-ray astronomy, is advocated. These would range from inexpensive 'piggy-back' experiments on near-future missions to a dedicated low frequency array in earth orbit (or possibly on the lunar nearside) and eventually to an array on the lunar farside.

  7. Low-frequency noise reduction of lightweight airframe structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Getline, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    The results of an experimental study to determine the noise attenuation characteristics of aircraft type fuselage structural panels were presented. Of particular interest was noise attenuation at low frequencies, below the fundamental resonances of the panels. All panels were flightweight structures for transport type aircraft in the 34,050 to 45,400 kg (75,000 to 100,000 pounds) gross weight range. Test data include the results of vibration and acoustic transmission loss tests on seven types of isotropic and orthotropically stiffened, flat and curved panels. The results show that stiffness controlled acoustically integrated structures can provide very high noise reductions at low frequencies without significantly affecting their high frequency noise reduction capabilities.

  8. Method for sputtering with low frequency alternating current

    DOEpatents

    Timberlake, John R.

    1996-01-01

    Low frequency alternating current sputtering is provided by connecting a low frequency alternating current source to a high voltage transformer having outer taps and a center tap for stepping up the voltage of the alternating current. The center tap of the transformer is connected to a vacuum vessel containing argon or helium gas. Target electrodes, in close proximity to each other, and containing material with which the substrates will be coated, are connected to the outer taps of the transformer. With an applied potential, the gas will ionize and sputtering from the target electrodes onto the substrate will then result. The target electrodes can be copper or boron, and the substrate can be stainless steel, aluminum, or titanium. Copper coatings produced are used in place of nickel and/or copper striking.

  9. Computer simulation of low-frequency electromagnetic data acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    SanFilipo, W.A.; Hohmann, G.W.

    1982-02-01

    Computer simulation of low frequency electromagnetic (LFEM) digital data acquisition in the presence of natural field noise demonstrates several important limitations and considerations. Without the use of a remote reference noise removal scheme it is difficult to obtain an adequate ratio of signal to noise below 0.1 Hz for frequency domain processing and below 0.3 Hz base frequency for time domain processing for a typical source-receiver configuration. A digital high-pass filter substantially facilitates rejection of natural field noise above these frequencies but, at lower frequencies where much longer stacking times are required, it becomes ineffective. Use of a remote reference to subtract natural field noise extends these low-frequency limits a decade, but this technique is limited by the resolution and dynamic range of the instrumentation. Gathering data in short segments so that natural field drift can be offset for each segment allows a higher gain setting to minimize dynamic range problems.

  10. Method for sputtering with low frequency alternating current

    DOEpatents

    Timberlake, J.R.

    1996-04-30

    Low frequency alternating current sputtering is provided by connecting a low frequency alternating current source to a high voltage transformer having outer taps and a center tap for stepping up the voltage of the alternating current. The center tap of the transformer is connected to a vacuum vessel containing argon or helium gas. Target electrodes, in close proximity to each other, and containing material with which the substrates will be coated, are connected to the outer taps of the transformer. With an applied potential, the gas will ionize and sputtering from the target electrodes onto the substrate will then result. The target electrodes can be copper or boron, and the substrate can be stainless steel, aluminum, or titanium. Copper coatings produced are used in place of nickel and/or copper striking. 6 figs.