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Sample records for proprioceptive deafferentation slows

  1. Trigeminal Proprioception Evoked by Strong Stretching of the Mechanoreceptors in Müller's Muscle Induces Reflex Contraction of the Orbital Orbicularis Oculi Slow-Twitch Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Ryokuya; Ban, Midori; Yuzuriha, Shunsuke

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The mixed orbicularis oculi muscle lacks an intramuscular proprioceptive system such as muscle spindles, to induce reflex contraction of its slow-twitch fibers. We evaluated whether the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle function as extrinsic mechanoreceptors to induce reflex contraction of the slow-twitch fibers of the orbicularis oculi in addition to those of the levator and frontalis muscles. Methods: We evaluated in patients with aponeurosis-disinserted blepharoptosis whether strong stretching of the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle from upgaze with unilateral lid load induced reflex contraction of the orbicularis oculi slow-twitch fibers and whether anesthesia of Müller's muscle precluded the contraction. We compared the electromyographic responses of the bilateral orbicularis oculi muscles to unilateral intraoperative direct stimulation of the trigeminal proprioceptive nerve with those to unilateral transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the supraorbital nerve. Results: Upgaze with a unilateral 3-g lid load induced reflex contraction of the bilateral orbicularis oculi muscles with ipsilateral dominance. Anesthesia of Müller's muscle precluded the reflex contraction. The orbicularis oculi reflex evoked by stimulation of the trigeminal proprioceptive nerve differed from that by electrical stimulation of the supraorbital nerve in terms of the intensity of current required to induce the reflex, the absence of R1, and duration. Conclusions: The mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle functions as an extramuscular proprioceptive system to induce reflex contraction of the orbital orbicularis oculi slow-twitch fibers. Whereas reflex contraction of the pretarsal orbicularis fast-twitch fibers functions in spontaneous or reflex blinking, that of the orbital orbicularis oculi slow-twitch fibers may factor in grimacing and blepharospasm. PMID:25210572

  2. A neuroplastic deafferentation hypothesis for bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Jonathan; Mirams, Jamie; Patel, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder, characterised by extreme cyclical variations in mood between depression and mania, is a common, debilitating and sometimes fatal psychiatric condition with an unclear aetiology. In this paper we propose a hypothesis for the development of bipolar disorder through which neuroplastic changes in response to an index depressive episode leads to the amplification of subthreshold pleasurable stimuli that then drive conversion into a manic state. This ‘pleasure deafferentation hypothesis’ is reached through a discussion of the neuroscientific basis of deafferentation at the level of the neuron and its role in the development of various neurological and psychiatric phenomena before a case for deafferentation as applied to bipolar disorder is justified and its implications discussed. PMID:26459976

  3. Proprioceptive isokinetic exercise test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempster, P. T.; Bernauer, E. M.; Bond, M.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    Proprioception, the reception of stimuli within the body that indicates position, is an important mechanism for optimal human performance. People exposed to prolonged bed rest, microgravity, or other deconditioning situations usually experience reduced proprioceptor and kinesthetic stimuli that compromise body balance, posture, and equilibrium. A new proprioceptive test is described that utilizes the computer-driven LIDO isokinetic ergometer. An overview of the computer logic, software, and testing procedure for this proprioceptive test, which can be performed with the arms or legs, is described.

  4. Proprioception Is Necessary for Body Schema Plasticity: Evidence from a Deafferented Patient.

    PubMed

    Cardinali, Lucilla; Brozzoli, Claudio; Luauté, Jacques; Roy, Alice C; Farnè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The ability of using a large variety of tools is important in our daily life. Behind human tool-use abilities lays the brain capacity to incorporate tools into the body representation for action (Body Schema, BS), thought to rely mainly on proprioceptive information. Here, we tested whether tool incorporation is possible in absence of proprioception by studying a patient with right upper-limb deafferentation. We adopted a paradigm sensitive to changes of the BS and analyzed the kinematics of free-hand movements before and after tool-use, in three sessions over a period of 2 years. In the first session, before tool-use, the kinematics of the deafferented hand was disrupted. Similarly, the first movements with the tool (a mechanical grabber elongating the arm by ~40 cm) showed an abnormal profile that tended to normalize at the end of the session. Subsequent free-hand movements were also normalized. At session 2, 6 months later, the patient exhibited normal free-hand kinematic profiles, additionally showing changes in grasping kinematics after tool-use, but no sign of tool incorporation. A follow-up 2 years later, further confirmed the normalized kinematic profile but the absence of tool incorporation. This first description of tool-use in absence of proprioception shows the fundamental role of proprioception in the update of the BS. These results provide an important further step in understanding human motor control and have implications for future development of rehabilitation programs for patients with sensory deficits. PMID:27378879

  5. Proprioception Is Necessary for Body Schema Plasticity: Evidence from a Deafferented Patient

    PubMed Central

    Cardinali, Lucilla; Brozzoli, Claudio; Luauté, Jacques; Roy, Alice C.; Farnè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The ability of using a large variety of tools is important in our daily life. Behind human tool-use abilities lays the brain capacity to incorporate tools into the body representation for action (Body Schema, BS), thought to rely mainly on proprioceptive information. Here, we tested whether tool incorporation is possible in absence of proprioception by studying a patient with right upper-limb deafferentation. We adopted a paradigm sensitive to changes of the BS and analyzed the kinematics of free-hand movements before and after tool-use, in three sessions over a period of 2 years. In the first session, before tool-use, the kinematics of the deafferented hand was disrupted. Similarly, the first movements with the tool (a mechanical grabber elongating the arm by ~40 cm) showed an abnormal profile that tended to normalize at the end of the session. Subsequent free-hand movements were also normalized. At session 2, 6 months later, the patient exhibited normal free-hand kinematic profiles, additionally showing changes in grasping kinematics after tool-use, but no sign of tool incorporation. A follow-up 2 years later, further confirmed the normalized kinematic profile but the absence of tool incorporation. This first description of tool-use in absence of proprioception shows the fundamental role of proprioception in the update of the BS. These results provide an important further step in understanding human motor control and have implications for future development of rehabilitation programs for patients with sensory deficits. PMID:27378879

  6. Stimulation of primary motor cortex for intractable deafferentation pain.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Y; Yoshimine, T

    2007-01-01

    The stimulation of the primary motor cortex (M1) has proved to be an effective treatment for intractable deafferentation pain. This treatment started in 1990, and twenty-eight studies involving 271 patients have been reported so far. The patients who have been operated on were suffering from post-stroke pain (59%), trigeminal neuropathic pain, brachial plexus injury, spinal cord injury, peripheral nerve injury and phantom-limb pain. The method of stimulation was: a) epidural, b) subdural, and c) within the central sulcus. Overall, considering the difficulty in treating central neuropathic pain, trigeminal neuropathic pain and certain types of refractory peripheral pain, the electrical stimulation of M1 is a very promising technique; nearly 60% of the treated patients improved with a higher than 50% pain relief after several months of follow-up and sometimes of a few years in most reports. The mechanism of pain relief by the electrical stimulation of M1 has been under investigation. Recently, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of M1 has been reported to be effective on deafferentation pain. In the future, rTMS may take over from electrical stimulation as a treatment for deafferentation pain. PMID:17691289

  7. Shoulder proprioception in baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Safran, M R; Borsa, P A; Lephart, S M; Fu, F H; Warner, J J

    2001-01-01

    We examined proprioceptive differences between the dominant and nondominant shoulders of 21 collegiate baseball pitchers without a history of shoulder instability or surgery. A proprioceptive testing device was used to measure kinesthesia and joint position sense. Joint position sense was significantly (P =.05) more accurate in the nondominant shoulder than in the dominant shoulder when starting at 75% of maximal external rotation and moving into internal rotation. There were no significant differences for proprioception in the other measured positions or with kinesthesia testing. Six pitchers with recent shoulder pain had a significant (P =.04) kinesthetic deficit in the symptomatic dominant shoulder compared with the asymptomatic shoulder, as measured in neutral rotation moving into internal rotation. The net effect of training, exercise-induced laxity, and increased external rotation in baseball pitchers does not affect proprioception, although shoulder pain, possibly due to rotator cuff inflammation or tendinitis, is associated with reduced kinesthetic sensation. PMID:11641701

  8. Differences in somatosensory and motor improvement during temporary functional deafferentation in stroke patients and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sens, Elisabeth; Knorr, Christin; Preul, Christoph; Meissner, Winfried; Witte, Otto W; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Weiss, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Temporary functional deafferentation is of interest to become an additional tool in neurorehabilitative treatments. Temporary functional deafferentation is known to improve sensory and motor outcomes in chronic stroke patients and healthy subjects. The present study soughts to indicate differences in the efficiency of pharmacologically induced temporary functional deafferentation between chronic stroke patients and matched healthy subjects. 46 chronic stroke patients and 20 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects were deafferented on one forearm by an anesthetic cream. Somatosensory performance was assessed using von-Frey Hair testing and Grating orientation task; motor performance was assessed by means of a shape-sorter-drum task. Grating orientation task and shape-sorter-drum task were significantly improved during temporary functional deafferentation in stroke patients but not in healthy subjects. Von-Frey Hair testing revealed no improvement of absolute tactile thresholds during temporary functional deafferentation in both groups. Furthermore, the stroke patients showed deficits at baseline measurement in all assessments except the von-Frey Hair test. Temporary functional deafferentation of a forearm by an anesthetic cream results in improvements of motor performance and somatosensory discrimination in stroke patients but not in healthy subjects. Therefore, it is reasonable to test in a next step whether temporary functional deafferentation might become an additional tool in motor rehabilitation of post stroke patients. PMID:23735321

  9. The changes of c-Fos expression by motor cortex stimulation in the deafferentation pain model.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Kanae; Takahashi, Toshio; Suzuki, Shigeharu

    2014-01-01

    The effect of motor cortex stimulation (MCS) therapy for deafferentation pain was evaluated based on c-Fos, a known pain marker. Nineteen mature cats weighing 1.5-3.5 kg were used. Cats were divided into three groups: a deafferentation pain group in which the left trigeminal ganglion was destroyed, an MCS group in which MCS was used following destruction of the trigeminal ganglion, and a control group. Sites and levels of c-Fos expression were examined immunohistochemically. The percentage of c-Fos-positive cells in the left spinal nucleus of the trigeminus, the bilateral insula, and the bilateral operculum increased in both the deafferentation pain and the MCS groups. There were no statistically significant differences between these groups. In the cingulate gyrus, the percentage of c-Fos-positive cells increased bilaterally in the deafferentation pain group and the MCS group, but the increase was greater in the MCS group. The increase in c-Fos-positive cells in the left spinal nucleus of the trigeminus in the deafferentation group may reflect reported electrical hyperactivity. The cingulate gyrus, insula, and parietal operculum were activated after deafferentation. This change (increase in c-Fos positive cells) is related to the development of deafferentation pain. Pain relief due to MCS is not dependent on the suppression of the activated left spinal nucleus of the trigeminus or the descending analgesic mechanism of the brain stem. Activation of the cingulate gyrus appears to be a factor in the analgesic mechanism of MCS. PMID:24965534

  10. Proprioceptive contribution to distance estimation by motion parallax in a praying mantid

    PubMed

    Pabst; Kral

    1998-05-01

    The behavioural experiments described here examined, in the praying mantis Tenodera sinensis, the manner in which the proprioceptive cervical hair plate sensilla are involved in the measurement of the distance to a jump target with the aid of motion parallax actively produced by translatory head motion. Various combinations of surgical deafferentation of the cervical hair plate sensilla had no influence on the linearisation of head motion. However, the measurement of relative and absolute distance and the jump frequency were impaired by these interventions. From the results, it is concluded that the cervical hair plate sensilla are involved in the distance measurement mechanism, probably by allowing the nervous system to compare retinal image motion with head motion.

    PMID:9547327

  11. Proprioceptive information processing in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Arnfred, Sidse M H

    2012-03-01

    This doctoral thesis focuses on brain activity in response to proprioceptive stimulation in schizophrenia. The works encompass methodological developments substantiated by investigations of healthy volunteers and two clinical studies of schizophrenia spectrum patients. American psychiatrist Sandor Rado (1890-1972) suggested that one of two un-reducible deficits in schizophrenia was a disorder of proprioception. Exploration of proprioceptive information processing is possible through the measurement of evoked and event related potentials. Event related EEG can be analyzed as conventional time-series averages or as oscillatory averages transformed into the frequency domain. Gamma activity evoked by electricity or by another type of somatosensory stimulus has not been reported before in schizophrenia. Gamma activity is considered to be a manifestation of perceptual integration. A new load stimulus was constructed that stimulated the proprioceptive dimension of recognition of applied force. This load stimulus was tested both in simple and several types of more complex stimulus paradigms, with and without tasks, in total in 66 healthy volunteers. The evoked potential (EP) resulting from the load stimulus was named the proprioceptive EP. The later components of the proprioceptive EP (> 150 ms) were modulated similarly to previously reported electrical somatosensory EPs by repetition and cognitive task. The earlier activity was further investigated through decomposition of the time-frequency transformed data by a new non-negative matrix analysis, and previous research and visual inspection validated these results. Several time-frequency components emerged in the proprioceptive EP. The contra-lateral parietal gamma component (60-70 ms; 30-41 Hz) had not previously been described in the somatosensory modality without electrical stimulation. The parietal beta component (87-103 ms; 19-22 Hz) was increased when the proprioceptive stimulus appeared in a predictable sequence in

  12. Three dimensional kinematics of rapid compensatory eye movements in humans with unilateral vestibular deafferentation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jun-Ru; Crane, Benjamin T; Ishiyama, Akira; Demer, Joseph L

    2007-09-01

    Saccades executed with the head stationary have kinematics conforming to Listing's law (LL), confining the ocular rotational axis to Listing's plane (LP). In unilateral vestibular deafferentation (UVD), the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), which does not obey LL, has at high head acceleration a slow phase that has severely reduced velocity during ipsilesional rotation, and mildly reduced velocity during contralesional rotation. Studying four subjects with chronic UVD using 3D magnetic search coils, we investigated kinematics of stereotypic rapid eye movements that supplement the impaired VOR. We defined LP with the head immobile, and expressed eye and head movements as quaternions in LP coordinates. Subjects underwent transient whole body yaw at peak acceleration 2,800 degrees /s(2) while fixating targets centered, or 20 degrees up or down prior to rotation. The VOR shifted ocular torsion out of LP. Vestibular catch-up saccades (VCUS) occurred with mean latency 90 +/- 44 ms (SD) from ipsilesional rotation onset, maintained initial non-LL torsion so that their quaternion trajectories paralleled LP, and had velocity axes changing by half of eye position. During contralesional rotation, rapid eye movements occurred at mean latency 135 +/- 36 ms that were associated with abrupt decelerations (ADs) of the horizontal slow phase correcting 3D deviations in its velocity axis, with quaternion trajectories not paralleling LP. Rapid eye movements compensating for UVD have two distinct kinematics. VCUS have velocity axis dependence on eye position consistent with LL, so are probably programmed in 2D by neural circuits subserving visual saccades. ADs have kinematics that neither conform to LL nor match the VOR axis, but appear instead programmed in 3D to correct VOR axis errors. PMID:17549461

  13. Patterns of olfactory bulb neurogenesis in the adult zebrafish are altered following reversible deafferentation.

    PubMed

    Trimpe, Darcy M; Byrd-Jacobs, Christine A

    2016-09-01

    Adult brain plasticity can be investigated using reversible methods that remove afferent innervation but allow return of sensory input. Repeated intranasal irrigation with Triton X-100 in adult zebrafish diminishes innervation to the olfactory bulb, resulting in a number of alterations in bulb structure and function, and cessation of the treatment allows for reinnervation and recovery. Using bromodeoxyuridine, Hu, and caspase-3 immunoreactivity we examined cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival under conditions of acute and chronic deafferentation and reafferentation. Cell proliferation within the olfactory bulb was not influenced by acute or chronic deafferentation or reafferentation, but cell fate (including differentiation, migration, and/or survival of newly formed cells) was affected. We found that chronic deafferentation caused a bilateral increase in the number of newly formed cells that migrated into the bulb, although the amount of cell death of these new cells was significantly increased compared to untreated fish. Reafferentation also increased the number of newly formed cells migrating into both bulbs, suggesting that the deafferentation effect on cell fate was maintained. Reafferentation resulted in a decrease in newly formed cells that became neurons and, although death of newly formed cells was not altered from control levels, survival was reduced in relation to that seen in chronically deafferented fish. The potential effect of age on cell genesis was also examined. While the amount of cell migration into the olfactory bulbs was not affected by fish age, more of the newly formed cells became neurons in older fish. Younger fish displayed more cell death under conditions of chronic deafferentation. In sum, our results show that reversible deafferentation affects several aspects of cell fate, including cell differentiation, migration, and survival, and age of the fish influences the response to deafferentation. PMID:27343831

  14. The Changes of c-Fos Expression by Motor Cortex Stimulation in the Deafferentation Pain Model

    PubMed Central

    KUDO, Kanae; TAKAHASHI, Toshio; SUZUKI, Shigeharu

    2014-01-01

    The effect of motor cortex stimulation (MCS) therapy for deafferentation pain was evaluated based on c-Fos, a known pain marker. Nineteen mature cats weighing 1.5–3.5 kg were used. Cats were divided into three groups: a deafferentation pain group in which the left trigeminal ganglion was destroyed, an MCS group in which MCS was used following destruction of the trigeminal ganglion, and a control group. Sites and levels of c-Fos expression were examined immunohistochemically. The percentage of c-Fos-positive cells in the left spinal nucleus of the trigeminus, the bilateral insula, and the bilateral operculum increased in both the deafferentation pain and the MCS groups. There were no statistically significant differences between these groups. In the cingulate gyrus, the percentage of c-Fos-positive cells increased bilaterally in the deafferentation pain group and the MCS group, but the increase was greater in the MCS group. The increase in c-Fos-positive cells in the left spinal nucleus of the trigeminus in the deafferentation group may reflect reported electrical hyperactivity. The cingulate gyrus, insula, and parietal operculum were activated after deafferentation. This change (increase in c-Fos positive cells) is related to the development of deafferentation pain. Pain relief due to MCS is not dependent on the suppression of the activated left spinal nucleus of the trigeminus or the descending analgesic mechanism of the brain stem. Activation of the cingulate gyrus appears to be a factor in the analgesic mechanism of MCS. PMID:24965534

  15. Defining proprioceptive behaviors for autonomous mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overholt, James L.; Hudas, Greg R.; Gerhart, Grant R.

    2002-07-01

    Proprioception is a sense of body position and movement that supports the control of many automatic motor functions such as posture and locomotion. This concept, normally relegated to the fields of neural physiology and kinesiology, is being utilized in the field of unmanned mobile robotics. This paper looks at developing proprioceptive behaviors for use in controlling an unmanned ground vehicle. First, we will discuss the field of behavioral control of mobile robots. Next, a discussion of proprioception and the development of proprioceptive sensors will be presented. We will then focus on the development of a unique neural-fuzzy architecture that will be used to incorporate the control behaviors coming directly from the proprioceptive sensors. Finally we will present a simulation experiment where a simple multi-sensor robot, utilizing both external and proprioceptive sensors, is presented with the task of navigating an unknown terrain to a known target position. Results of the mobile robot utilizing this unique fusion methodology will be discussed.

  16. Extending human proprioception to cyber-physical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Kevin; Robinson, Ethan; Dickstein, Leah; Hahn, Heidi A.; Cattaneo, Alessandro; Mascareñas, David

    2016-04-01

    Despite advances in computational cognition, there are many cyber-physical systems where human supervision and control is desirable. One pertinent example is the control of a robot arm, which can be found in both humanoid and commercial ground robots. Current control mechanisms require the user to look at several screens of varying perspective on the robot, then give commands through a joystick-like mechanism. This control paradigm fails to provide the human operator with an intuitive state feedback, resulting in awkward and slow behavior and underutilization of the robot's physical capabilities. To overcome this bottleneck, we introduce a new human-machine interface that extends the operator's proprioception by exploiting sensory substitution. Humans have a proprioceptive sense that provides us information on how our bodies are configured in space without having to directly observe our appendages. We constructed a wearable device with vibrating actuators on the forearm, where frequency of vibration corresponds to the spatial configuration of a robotic arm. The goal of this interface is to provide a means to communicate proprioceptive information to the teleoperator. Ultimately we will measure the change in performance (time taken to complete the task) achieved by the use of this interface.

  17. The Effects of Cryotherapy on Proprioception System

    PubMed Central

    Furmanek, Mariusz Paweł; Słomka, Kajetan; Juras, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Proprioception plays an important role in the complex mechanism of joint control. Contemporary sport activities impose extremely high physical demands on athletes. Winter sports are played in areas with excessively low temperatures. Moreover, many athletes are subjected to treatments that involve local lowering of the body temperature before, during, and after physical activity. This work reviews the current knowledge regarding the influence of local cryotherapy on the proprioception system. The reviewed literature identified several tests that evaluate different aspects of proprioception. There is no universally agreed protocol, or clear set of criteria for test conditions. The outcomes of different tests and assessments of cryotherapy procedures using different cold modalities are poorly correlated. In general, the published results on the mechanism of cryotherapy effects on proprioception are not uniquely conclusive and are frequently contradictory. Additional high-quality research is required to explicitly answer the following questions: (1) whether local cryotherapy influences all aspects of proprioception; (2) whether the current methods of evaluation are adequate for the exploration of the relationship between cryotherapy and proprioception; and (3) whether the application of local cryotherapy is safe for athletes regarding proprioception. The review clearly showed that there is no comprehensive model relating cryotherapy and proprioception. PMID:25478573

  18. COLCHICINE INDUCED DEAFFERENTATION OF THE HIPPOCAMPUS SELECTIVELY DISRUPTS CHOLINERGIC RHYTHMICAL SLOW WAVE ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been proposed that hippocampal theta rhythm (RSA)is generated by the cholinergic septo-hippocampal system. Although ablations of the septum or its projections to the hippocampus disrupt hippocampal RSA, such non-selective lesions damage both cholinergic and noncholinergic ...

  19. Eyelid Opening with Trigeminal Proprioceptive Activation Regulates a Brainstem Arousal Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Ban, Ryokuya; Hama, Yuki; Yuzuriha, Shunsuke

    2015-01-01

    Eyelid opening stretches mechanoreceptors in the supratarsal Müller muscle to activate the proprioceptive fiber supplied by the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus. This proprioception induces reflex contractions of the slow-twitch fibers in the levator palpebrae superioris and frontalis muscles to sustain eyelid and eyebrow positions against gravity. The cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons in the mesencephalon potentially make gap-junctional connections with the locus coeruleus neurons. The locus coeruleus is implicated in arousal and autonomic function. Due to the relationship between arousal, ventromedial prefrontal cortex, and skin conductance, we assessed whether upgaze with trigeminal proprioceptive evocation activates sympathetically innervated sweat glands and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Specifically, we examined whether 60° upgaze induces palmar sweating and hemodynamic changes in the prefrontal cortex in 16 subjects. Sweating was monitored using a thumb-mounted perspiration meter, and prefrontal cortex activity was measured with 45-channel, functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) and 2-channel NIRS at Fp1 and Fp2. In 16 subjects, palmar sweating was induced by upgaze and decreased in response to downgaze. Upgaze activated the ventromedial prefrontal cortex with an accumulation of integrated concentration changes in deoxyhemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin, and total hemoglobin levels in 12 subjects. Upgaze phasically and degree-dependently increased deoxyhemoglobin level at Fp1 and Fp2, whereas downgaze phasically decreased it in 16 subjects. Unilateral anesthetization of mechanoreceptors in the supratarsal Müller muscle used to significantly reduce trigeminal proprioceptive evocation ipsilaterally impaired the increased deoxyhemoglobin level by 60° upgaze at Fp1 or Fp2 in 6 subjects. We concluded that upgaze with strong trigeminal proprioceptive evocation was sufficient to phasically activate sympathetically innervated sweat glands

  20. On the bimanual integration of proprioceptive information.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Esther; De Havas, Jack; Silkoset, Emilie; Gomi, Hiroaki; Haggard, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Proprioception can be defined as the sense for body movement and position. While most sensory information can be successfully integrated across hemispheres, little is known about the bilateral integration of proprioceptive information. In two behavioural experiments, we investigated whether estimates of the position of one hand are influenced by simultaneous proprioceptive information from the other hand. We further investigated whether such putative bimanual proprioceptive integration would differ between expert dancers and non-dancer controls. Either one hand or both hands were passively moved to novel positions, and participants indicated the perceived location of the index finger tip of the designated target hand, by orienting a visible laser beam mounted on a cap. Synchronized bimanual movements compared to unimanual movements significantly improved proprioceptive position sense. In particular, we found a bias reduction to perceive the target hand's index finger tip as shifted away from the midline in the bimanual condition, compared to the unimanual condition. Expert dancers, in contrast, did not show this change in proprioceptive position sense after bimanual movements. We suggest that bimanual movements may improve proprioception due to interhemispheric integration in controls, but not in expert dancers. PMID:25618007

  1. Neuromechanical models for insect locomotion: Stability, maneuverability, and proprioceptive feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukillaya, R.; Proctor, J.; Holmes, P.

    2009-06-01

    We describe a hierarchy of models for legged locomotion, emphasizing relationships among feedforward (preflexive) stability, maneuverability, and reflexive feedback. We focus on a hexapedal geometry representative of insect locomotion in the ground plane that includes a neural central pattern generator circuit, nonlinear muscles, and a representative proprioceptive sensory pathway. Although these components of the model are rather complex, neglect of leg mass yields a neuromechanical system with only three degrees of freedom, and numerical simulations coupled with a Poincaré map analysis shows that the feedforward dynamics is strongly stable, apart from one relatively slow mode and a neutral mode in body yaw angle. These modes moderate high frequency perturbations, producing slow heading changes that can be corrected by a stride-to-stride steering strategy. We show that the model's response to a lateral impulsive perturbation closely matches that of a cockroach subject to a similar impulse. We also describe preliminary studies of proprioceptive leg force feedback, showing how a reflexive pathway can reinforce the preflexive stability inherent in the system.

  2. Strength Training and Shoulder Proprioception

    PubMed Central

    Salles, José Inácio; Velasques, Bruna; Cossich, Victor; Nicoliche, Eduardo; Ribeiro, Pedro; Amaral, Marcus Vinicius; Motta, Geraldo

    2015-01-01

    Context: Proprioception is essential to motor control and joint stability during daily and sport activities. Recent studies demonstrated that athletes have better joint position sense (JPS) when compared with controls matched for age, suggesting that physical training could have an effect on proprioception. Objective: To evaluate the result of an 8-week strength-training program on shoulder JPS and to verify whether using training intensities that are the same or divergent for the shoulder's dynamic-stabilizer muscles promote different effects on JPS. Design: Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting: We evaluated JPS in a research laboratory and conducted training in a gymnasium. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 90 men, right handed and asymptomatic, with no history of any type of injury or shoulder instability. Intervention(s): For 8 weeks, the participants performed the strength-training program 3 sessions per week. We used 4 exercises (bench press, lat pull down, shoulder press, and seated row), with 2 sets each. Main Outcome Measure(s): We measured shoulder JPS acuity by calculating the absolute error. Results: We found an interaction between group and time. To examine the interaction, we conducted two 1-way analyses of variance comparing groups at each time. The groups did not differ at pretraining; however, a difference among groups was noted posttraining. Conclusions: Strength training using exercises at the same intensity produced an improvement in JPS compared with exercises of varying intensity, suggesting that the former resulted in improvements in the sensitivity of muscle spindles and, hence, better neuromuscular control in the shoulder. PMID:25594912

  3. Proprioception and ankle injuries in soccer.

    PubMed

    Ergen, Emin; Ulkar, Bülent

    2008-01-01

    Because soccer attracts many participants and leads to a substantial number of injuries, especially of the lower extremities, it is important to study possibilities for injury prevention and proper rehabilitation to return safely to activities. Ankle sprains can be prevented by external ankle supports and proprioceptive-coordination training, especially in athletes with previous ankle sprains. Proprioception is a broad concept that includes balance and postural control with visual and vestibular contributions, joint kinesthesia, position sense, and muscle reaction time. Proprioceptive feedback is crucial in the conscious and unconscious awareness of a joint or limb in motion. Enhancement of functional joint stability by proprioceptive (or neuromuscular) training is important both in prevention and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. PMID:18206575

  4. Minimally assistive robot training for proprioception enhancement.

    PubMed

    Casadio, Maura; Morasso, Pietro; Sanguineti, Vittorio; Giannoni, Psiche

    2009-04-01

    In stroke survivors, motor impairment is frequently associated with degraded proprioceptive and/or somatosensory functions. Here we address the question of how to use robots to improve proprioception in these patients. We used an 'assist-as-needed' protocol, in which robot assistance was kept to a minimum and was continuously adjusted during exercise. To specifically train proprioceptive functions, we alternated blocks of trials with and without vision. A total of nine chronic stroke survivors participated in the study, which consisted of a total of ten 1-h exercise sessions. We used a linear mixed-effects statistical model to account for the effects of exercise, vision and the degree of assistance on the overall performance, and to capture both the systematic effects and the individual variations. Although there was not always a complete recovery of autonomous movements, all subjects exhibited an increased amount of voluntary control. Moreover, training with closed eyes appeared to be beneficial for patients with abnormal proprioception. Our results indicate that training by alternating vision and no-vision blocks may improve the ability to use proprioception as well as the ability to integrate it with vision. We suggest that the approach may be useful in the more general case of motor skill acquisition, in which enhancing proprioception may improve the ability to physically interact with the external world. PMID:19139867

  5. Stochastic undersampling steepens auditory threshold/duration functions: implications for understanding auditory deafferentation and aging

    PubMed Central

    Marmel, Frédéric; Rodríguez-Mendoza, Medardo A.; Lopez-Poveda, Enrique A.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known that some listeners experience hearing difficulties out of proportion with their audiometric losses. Notably, some older adults as well as auditory neuropathy patients have temporal-processing and speech-in-noise intelligibility deficits not accountable for by elevated audiometric thresholds. The study of these hearing deficits has been revitalized by recent studies that show that auditory deafferentation comes with aging and can occur even in the absence of an audiometric loss. The present study builds on the stochastic undersampling principle proposed by Lopez-Poveda and Barrios (2013) to account for the perceptual effects of auditory deafferentation. Auditory threshold/duration functions were measured for broadband noises that were stochastically undersampled to various different degrees. Stimuli with and without undersampling were equated for overall energy in order to focus on the changes that undersampling elicited on the stimulus waveforms, and not on its effects on the overall stimulus energy. Stochastic undersampling impaired the detection of short sounds (<20 ms). The detection of long sounds (>50 ms) did not change or improved, depending on the degree of undersampling. The results for short sounds show that stochastic undersampling, and hence presumably deafferentation, can account for the steeper threshold/duration functions observed in auditory neuropathy patients and older adults with (near) normal audiometry. This suggests that deafferentation might be diagnosed using pure-tone audiometry with short tones. It further suggests that the auditory system of audiometrically normal older listeners might not be “slower than normal”, as is commonly thought, but simply less well afferented. Finally, the results for both short and long sounds support the probabilistic theories of detectability that challenge the idea that auditory threshold occurs by integration of sound energy over time. PMID:26029098

  6. Extrahippocampal gray matter loss and hippocampal deafferentation in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Bonilha, Leonardo; Edwards, Jonathan C.; Kinsman, Stephen L.; Morgan, Paul S.; Fridriksson, Julius; Rorden, Chris; Rumboldt, Zoran; Roberts, Donna R.; Eckert, Mark A.; Halford, Jonathan J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Purpose Medial temporal epilepsy (MTLE) is associated with extrahippocampal brain atrophy. The mechanisms underlying brain damage in MTLE are unknown. Seizures may lead to neuronal damage, but another possible explanation is deafferentation from loss of hippocampal connections. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between hippocampal deafferentation and brain atrophy in MTLE. Methods Three different MRI studies were performed involving 23 patients with unilateral MTLE (8 left and 15 right) and 34 healthy controls: (1) voxel-based morphometry (VBM), (2) diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and (3) probabilistic tractography (PT). VBM was employed to define differences in regional gray matter volume (GMV) between controls and patients. Voxel-wise analyses of DTI evaluated differences in fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD) and hippocampal PT. Z-scores were computed for regions-of-interest (ROI) GMV and perihippocampal FA and MD (to quantify hippocampal fiber integrity). The relationship between hippocampal deafferentation and regional GMV was investigated through the association between ROI Z scores and hippocampal fiber integrity. Results Patients with MTLE exhibited a significant reduction in GMV and FA in perihippocampal and limbic areas. There was a decrease in hippocampal PT in patients with MTLE in limbic areas. A significant relationship between loss of hippocampal connections and regional GMV atrophy was found involving the putamen, pallidum, middle and inferior temporal areas, amygdala and ceberellar hemisphere. Discussion There is a relationship between hippocampal disconnection and regional brain atrophy in MTLE. These results indicate that hippocampal deafferentation plays a contributory role in extrahippocampal brain damage in MTLE. PMID:20163442

  7. Temporary deafferentation evoked by cutaneous anesthesia: behavioral and electrophysiological findings in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sehle, Aida; Büsching, Imke; Vogt, Eva; Liepert, Joachim

    2016-05-01

    Motor function and motor excitability can be modulated by changes of somatosensory input. Here, we performed a randomized single-blind trial to investigate behavioral and neurophysiological changes during temporary deafferentation of left upper arm and forearm in 31 right-handed healthy adults. Lidocaine cream was used to anesthetize the skin from wrist to shoulder, sparing the hand. As control condition, on a different day, a neutral cream was applied to the same skin area. The sequence (first Lidocaine, then placebo or vice versa) was randomized. Behavioral measures included the Grating Orientation Task, the Von Frey hair testing and the Nine-hole-peg-test. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to investigate short-interval intracortical inhibition, stimulus response curves, motor evoked potential amplitudes during pre-innervation and the cortical silent period (CSP). Recordings were obtained from left first dorsal interosseous muscle and from left flexor carpi radialis muscle. During deafferentation, the threshold of touch measured at the forearm was significantly worse. Other behavioral treatment-related changes were not found. The CSP showed a significant interaction between treatment and time in first dorsal interosseous muscle. CSP duration was longer during Lidocaine application and shorter during placebo exposure. We conclude that, in healthy subjects, temporary cutaneous deafferentation of upper and lower arm may have minor effects on motor inhibition, but not on sensory or motor function for the adjacent non-anesthetized hand. PMID:26983925

  8. Dynamic Flexibility and Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Lew; Jones, David

    1986-01-01

    Two experiments are described which investigated whether results obtained in studies of static flexibility tranfer to dynamic flexibility. In both experiments, subjects were assigned to a group receiving proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation training, ballistic stretching technique training or a control group. Results are presented and…

  9. Proprioceptive versus Visual Control in Autistic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masterton, B. A.; Biederman, G. B.

    1983-01-01

    The autistic children's presumed preference for proximal over distal sensory input was studied by requiring that "autistic," retarded, and "normal" children (7-15 years old) adapt to lateral displacement of the visual field. Only autistic Ss demonstrated transfer of adaptation to the nonadapted hand, indicating reliance on proprioception rather…

  10. Cooling Does Not Affect Knee Proprioception

    PubMed Central

    Ozmun, John C.; Thieme, Heather A.; Ingersoll, Christopher D.; Knight, Kenneth L.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of cooling on proprioception of the knee has not been studied extensively. In this study, we investigated the movement reproduction (timing and accuracy) aspect of proprioception. Subjects were tested under two conditions: a 20-minute application of ice and control. Proprioceptive accuracy and timing were measured by passively moving the knee, then comparing the subject's active reproduction of the passive movement. Subjects were blindfolded, then tested in three sectors of the knee's range of motion: 90° to 60°, 60° to 30°, and 30° to full extension. Ice application had no apparent effect on the subject's ability to perform accurate movement reproductions in the sectors tested. However, accuracy of the subject's final angle reproduction varied between the sectors as did the total time of the movement. One possible explanation for the difference between sectors is that different receptors are active at different points in the knee's range of motion. We conclude that cooling the knee joint for 20 minutes does not have an adverse effect on proprioception. PMID:16558379

  11. Adaptive Staircase Measurement of Hand Proprioception

    PubMed Central

    Hoseini, Najmeh; Sexton, Brandon M.; Kurtz, Karl; Liu, Yang; Block, Hannah J.

    2015-01-01

    Clinicians and researchers often need to measure proprioception (position sense), for example to monitor the progress of disease, to identify the cause of movement or balance problems, or to ascertain the effects of an intervention. While researchers can use sophisticated equipment to estimate proprioceptive acuity with good precision, clinicians lack this option and must rely on the subjective and imprecise methods currently available in the clinic. Here we describe a novel technique that applies psychometric adaptive staircase procedures to hand proprioception with a simple tablet-style apparatus that could easily be adapted for the clinic. We report test-retest reliability, inter-rater reliability, and construct validity of the adaptive staircase method vs. two other methods that are commonly used in clinical settings: passive motion direction discrimination (PMDD) and matching. As a first step, we focus on healthy adults. Subjects ages 18–82 had their proprioception measured with each of the three techniques, at the metacarpophalangeal joint in the second finger of the right hand. A subset completed a second session in which the measures were repeated, to assess test-retest reliability. Another subset had the measurements done by two different testers to assess inter-rater reliability. Construct validity was assessed using stepwise regression on age and activity level, and correlations calculated across the three methods. Results suggest that of the three methods, the adaptive staircase method yields the best test-retest reliability, inter-rater reliability, and construct validity. The adaptive staircase method may prove to be a valuable clinical tool where more accurate assessment of proprioception is needed. PMID:26274824

  12. Pattern of olfactory bulb innervation returns after recovery from reversible peripheral deafferentation.

    PubMed

    Cummings, D M; Emge, D K; Small, S L; Margolis, F L

    2000-06-01

    The olfactory epithelium (OE) is unusual in its ability to regenerate and reinnervate its target, the olfactory bulb (OB), after deafferentation. To address the question of whether olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) axons preserve their topographic organization when they reestablish synaptic contact with the OB, the authors examined the pattern of ORN axon reinnervation into the bulb of adult H-OMP-lacZ-6 transgenic mice during and after recovery from chemical deafferentation. In the H-OMP-lacZ-6 mouse strain, lacZ expression is limited to a subset of ORNs that are distributed bilaterally in the OE and project primarily to a few glomeruli in the ventromedial region of the OB. The OE was lesioned by intranasal irrigation with Triton X-100, and the distribution of 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside (X-gal)-stained cells was examined in the OE along with beta-galactosidase-immunoreactive (beta-gal-ir) axonal processes in the OB after short (1 week), intermediate (3 week), and long (6-7 weeks) recovery times. One week after the lesion, immunostaining for beta-gal and olfactory marker protein was virtually eliminated in the bulb. After 3 weeks of recovery, beta-gal-containing axons appeared to target many of the same locations innervated in bulbs of unlesioned mice. The region that received the highest density of axonal innervation in controls, however, contained only a few processes at that time. After 6-7 week recovery periods, the pattern of X-gal staining in the OE and beta-gal-ir axons in the OB closely resembled that of unlesioned mice. These results demonstrate that the topographic distribution of ORNs in the OE and the pattern of axon innervation in the OB can be reconstituted after chemical deafferentation. PMID:10813792

  13. [Effect of stress on the development of deafferentation pain syndrome in rats after sciatic nerve transection].

    PubMed

    Osipov, A V; Kukushkin, M L

    1993-05-01

    Effect of immobilization and painful stress on the development of deafferentation pain syndrome, appeared after sciatic nerve section, has been studied in Wistar rats. It has been determined that both immobilization and painful stress favour the appearance of pain syndrome in rats without clinical signs of pain syndrome up to the moment of stress influence. There has been made a conclusion that both immobilization and painful stress favour the appearance of pathologic algic system, which is the basis of pain syndrome. The fact that stress can cause analgesia in normal animals in contrast to those with potential pain syndrome is explained to different mechanisms of physiological and pathological pain. PMID:8043822

  14. Relationship between chronic pain and brain reorganization after deafferentation: A systematic review of functional MRI findings☆

    PubMed Central

    Jutzeler, C.R.; Curt, A.; Kramer, J.L.K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mechanisms underlying the development of phantom limb pain and neuropathic pain after limb amputation and spinal cord injury, respectively, are poorly understood. The goal of this systematic review was to assess the robustness of evidence in support of “maladaptive plasticity” emerging from applications of advanced functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods Using MeSH heading search terms in PubMed and SCOPUS, a systematic review was performed querying published manuscripts. Results From 146 candidate publications, 10 were identified as meeting the inclusion criteria. Results from fMRI investigations provided some level of support for maladaptive cortical plasticity, including longitudinal studies that demonstrated a change in functional organization related to decreases in pain. However, a number of studies have reported no relationship between reorganization, pain and deafferentation, and emerging evidence has also suggested the opposite — that is, chronic pain is associated with preserved cortical function. Conclusion Based solely on advanced functional neuroimaging results, there is only limited evidence for a relationship between chronic pain intensity and reorganization after deafferentation. The review demonstrates the need for additional neuroimaging studies to clarify the relationship between chronic pain and reorganization. PMID:26740913

  15. The effects of acute cortical somatosensory deafferentation on grip force control.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Andrew G; Attiah, Mark A; Berman, Jeffrey I; Chen, H Isaac; Liu, Xilin; Zhang, Milin; Van der Spiegel, Jan; Lucas, Timothy H

    2016-01-01

    Grip force control involves mechanisms to adjust to unpredictable and predictable changes in loads during manual manipulation. Somatosensory feedback is critical not just to reactive, feedback control but also to updating the internal representations needed for proactive, feedforward control. The role of primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in these control strategies is not well established. Here we investigated grip force control in a rare case of acute central deafferentation following resection of S1. The subject had complete loss of somatosensation in the right arm without any deficit in muscle strength or reflexes. In the first task, the subject was asked to maintain a constant grip force with and without visual feedback. The subject was able to attain the target force with visual feedback but not maintain that force for more than a few seconds after visual feedback was removed. In the second task, the subject was asked to grip and move an instrumented object. The induced acceleration-dependent loads were countered by adjustments in grip force. Both amplitude and timing of the grip force modulation were not affected by deafferentation. The dissociation of these effects demonstrates the differential contribution of S1 to the mechanisms of grip force control. PMID:26587914

  16. Diminution of early environmental control through perinatal and prenatal somatosensory deafferentation.

    PubMed

    Taub, E; Perrella, P N; Miller, E A; Barro, G

    1975-12-01

    Six monkeys subjected to forelimb deafferentation on day of birth (two blinded and four not blinded) spontaneously developed use of the affected limbs for support of body weight, ambulation, and clasping objects. The sighted animals also used them for climbing and reaching toward objects. Thumb-forefinger prehension did not emerge spontaneously but could be brought into existence through training. In another series of experiments, 5 of 11 monkey fetuses, exteriorized two-thirds of the way through gestation and given forelimb deafferentation, survived through caesarian delivery and at least 5 months of infancy. Although all were quadriparetic due to postoperative mechanical deformation of the cervical region, they were able to use the affected limbs to make postural adjustments and for standing and rudimentary ambulation. The results indicate that, after birth, neither spinal reflexes nor local somatosensory feedback and vision are necessary for the development of most types of movement performed by the forelimb musculature in monkeys. Continuance of the prenatal research should permit determination of the role of somatic sensation in the intrauterine development of behavior. PMID:811268

  17. Cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons that transmit reflex contraction of the levator muscle are located in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus in rats.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kenya; Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Yuzuriha, Shunsuke; Kawagishi, Kyutaro; Moriizumi, Tetsuji

    2012-12-01

    Since the levator and frontalis muscles lack interior muscle spindles despite being antigravity mixed muscles to involuntarily sustain eyelid opening and eyebrow lifting, this study has proposed a hypothetical mechanism to compensate for this anatomical defect. The voluntary contraction of fast-twitch fibres of the levator muscle stretches the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle to evoke proprioception, which continuously induces reflex contraction of slow-twitch fibres of the levator and frontalis muscles. This study confirmed the presence of cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons that transmit reflex contraction of the levator and frontalis muscles. After confirming that severing the trigeminal proprioceptive fibres that innervate the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle induced ipsilateral eyelid ptosis, Fluorogold was applied as a tracer to the proximal stump of the trigeminal proprioceptive nerve in rats. Fluorogold labelled the cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons, not in any regions of the rat brain including the trigeminal ganglion, but in the ipsilateral mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus neighbouring the locus ceruleus. Some Fluorogold particles accumulated in the area of the locus ceruleus. The trigeminal proprioceptive neurons could be considered centrally displaced ganglion cells to transmit afferent signal from the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle to the mesencephalon, where they may be able to make excitatory synaptic connections with both the oculomotor neurons and the frontalis muscle motoneurons for the involuntary coordination of the eyelid and eyebrow activities, and potentially to the locus ceruleus. PMID:23157498

  18. Basal dendritic length is reduced in the rat hippocampus following bilateral vestibular deafferentation.

    PubMed

    Balabhadrapatruni, Sangeeta; Zheng, Yiwen; Napper, Ruth; Smith, Paul F

    2016-05-01

    Some previous studies in humans have shown that bilateral loss of vestibular function is associated with a significant bilateral atrophy of the hippocampus, which correlated with the patients' spatial memory deficits. By contrast, studies in rats have failed to detect any changes in hippocampal volume following bilateral vestibular loss. Therefore, in this study we investigated whether bilateral vestibular deafferentation (BVD) might result in more subtle morphological changes in the rat hippocampus, involving alterations in dendritic intersections, using Golgi staining and Sholl analysis. We found that at 1month following BVD, there was a significant decrease in basal (P⩽0.0001) but not apical dendritic intersections in the CA1 region of the hippocampus compared to sham-operated animals and anaesthetic controls. However, dendritic branching was not significantly affected. These results suggest that the rat hippocampus does undergo subtle morphological changes following bilateral vestibular loss, and that they may be in the form of alterations in dendritic structure. PMID:26976094

  19. Effects of cholinergic deafferentation of the rhinal cortex on visual recognition memory in monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Turchi, Janita; Saunders, Richard C.; Mishkin, Mortimer

    2005-01-01

    Excitotoxic lesion studies have confirmed that the rhinal cortex is essential for visual recognition ability in monkeys. To evaluate the mnemonic role of cholinergic inputs to this cortical region, we compared the visual recognition performance of monkeys given rhinal cortex infusions of a selective cholinergic immunotoxin, ME20.4-SAP, with the performance of monkeys given control infusions into this same tissue. The immunotoxin, which leads to selective cholinergic deafferentation of the infused cortex, yielded recognition deficits of the same magnitude as those produced by excitotoxic lesions of this region, providing the most direct demonstration to date that cholinergic activation of the rhinal cortex is essential for storing the representations of new visual stimuli and thereby enabling their later recognition. PMID:15684066

  20. Experimental tonic hand pain modulates the corticospinal plasticity induced by a subsequent hand deafferentation.

    PubMed

    Mavromatis, N; Gagné, M; Voisin, J I A V; Reilly, K T; Mercier, C

    2016-08-25

    Sensorimotor reorganization is believed to play an important role in the development and maintenance of phantom limb pain, but pain itself might modulate sensorimotor plasticity induced by deafferentation. Clinical and basic research support this idea, as pain prior to amputation increases the risk of developing post-amputation pain. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of experimental tonic cutaneous hand pain on the plasticity induced by temporary ischemic hand deafferentation. Sixteen healthy subjects participated in two experimental sessions (Pain, No Pain) in which transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to assess corticospinal excitability in two forearm muscles (flexor carpi radialis and flexor digitorum superficialis) before (T0, T10, T20, and T40) and after (T60 and T75) inflation of a cuff around the wrist. The cuff was inflated at T45 in both sessions and in the Pain session capsaicin cream was applied on the dorsum of the hand at T5. Corticospinal excitability was significantly greater during the Post-inflation phase (p=0.002) and increased similarly in both muscles (p=0.861). Importantly, the excitability increase in the Post-inflation phase was greater for the Pain than the No-Pain condition (p=0.006). Post-hoc analyses revealed a significant difference between the two conditions during the Post-inflation phase (p=0.030) but no difference during the Pre-inflation phase (p=0.601). In other words, the corticospinal facilitation was greater when pain was present prior to cuff inflation. These results indicate that pain can modulate the plasticity induced by another event, and could partially explain the sensorimotor reorganization often reported in chronic pain populations. PMID:27291642

  1. Reversible Deafferentation of the Adult Zebrafish Olfactory Bulb Affects Glomerular Distribution and Olfactory-Mediated Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Paskin, Taylor R.; Byrd-Jacobs, Christine A.

    2012-01-01

    The olfactory system is a useful model for studying central nervous system recovery from damage due to its neuroplasticity. We recently developed a novel method of deafferentation by repeated exposure of Triton X-100 to the olfactory organ of adult zebrafish. This long-term, reversible method of deafferentation allows both degeneration and regeneration to be observed in the olfactory bulb. The aim of the present study is to examine olfactory bulb innervation, glomerular patterns, and olfactory-mediated behavior with repeated Triton X-100 treatment and the potential for recovery following cessation of treatment. Olfactory bulbs of control, chronic-treated, and recovery animals were examined for the presence or absence of glomeruli that have been identified in the zebrafish glomerular map. Following chronic treatment, the number of glomeruli was dramatically reduced; however, partial innervation remained in the lateral region of the bulb. When animals were given time to recover, complete glomerular distribution returned. A behavioral assay was developed to determine if innervation remaining correlated with behavior of the fish. Chronic-treated fish did not respond to odorants involved with social behavior but continued to react to odorants that mediate feeding behavior. Following recovery, responses to odorants involved with social behavior returned. The morphological and behavioral effects of chronic Triton X-100 treatment in the olfactory system suggest there may be differential susceptibility or resistance to external damage in a subset of sensory neurons. The results of this study demonstrate the remarkable regenerative ability of the olfactory system following extensive and long-term injury. PMID:22963994

  2. Reversible deafferentation of the adult zebrafish olfactory bulb affects glomerular distribution and olfactory-mediated behavior.

    PubMed

    Paskin, Taylor R; Byrd-Jacobs, Christine A

    2012-12-01

    The olfactory system is a useful model for studying central nervous system recovery from damage due to its neuroplasticity. We recently developed a novel method of deafferentation by repeated exposure of Triton X-100 to the olfactory organ of adult zebrafish. This long-term, reversible method of deafferentation allows both degeneration and regeneration to be observed in the olfactory bulb. The aim of the present study is to examine olfactory bulb innervation, glomerular patterns, and olfactory-mediated behavior with repeated Triton X-100 treatment and the potential for recovery following cessation of treatment. Olfactory bulbs of control, chronic-treated, and recovery animals were examined for the presence or absence of glomeruli that have been identified in the zebrafish glomerular map. Following chronic treatment, the number of glomeruli was dramatically reduced; however, partial innervation remained in the lateral region of the bulb. When animals were given time to recover, complete glomerular distribution returned. A behavioral assay was developed to determine if innervation remaining correlated with behavior of the fish. Chronic-treated fish did not respond to odorants involved with social behavior but continued to react to odorants that mediate feeding behavior. Following recovery, responses to odorants involved with social behavior returned. The morphological and behavioral effects of chronic Triton X-100 treatment in the olfactory system suggest there may be differential susceptibility or resistance to external damage in a subset of sensory neurons. The results of this study demonstrate the remarkable regenerative ability of the olfactory system following extensive and long-term injury. PMID:22963994

  3. Visual and proprioceptive interaction in patients with bilateral vestibular loss.

    PubMed

    Cutfield, Nicholas J; Scott, Gregory; Waldman, Adam D; Sharp, David J; Bronstein, Adolfo M

    2014-01-01

    Following bilateral vestibular loss (BVL) patients gradually adapt to the loss of vestibular input and rely more on other sensory inputs. Here we examine changes in the way proprioceptive and visual inputs interact. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate visual responses in the context of varying levels of proprioceptive input in 12 BVL subjects and 15 normal controls. A novel metal-free vibrator was developed to allow vibrotactile neck proprioceptive input to be delivered in the MRI system. A high level (100 Hz) and low level (30 Hz) control stimulus was applied over the left splenius capitis; only the high frequency stimulus generates a significant proprioceptive stimulus. The neck stimulus was applied in combination with static and moving (optokinetic) visual stimuli, in a factorial fMRI experimental design. We found that high level neck proprioceptive input had more cortical effect on brain activity in the BVL patients. This included a reduction in visual motion responses during high levels of proprioceptive input and differential activation in the midline cerebellum. In early visual cortical areas, the effect of high proprioceptive input was present for both visual conditions but in lateral visual areas, including V5/MT, the effect was only seen in the context of visual motion stimulation. The finding of a cortical visuo-proprioceptive interaction in BVL patients is consistent with behavioural data indicating that, in BVL patients, neck afferents partly replace vestibular input during the CNS-mediated compensatory process. An fMRI cervico-visual interaction may thus substitute the known visuo-vestibular interaction reported in normal subject fMRI studies. The results provide evidence for a cortical mechanism of adaptation to vestibular failure, in the form of an enhanced proprioceptive influence on visual processing. The results may provide the basis for a cortical mechanism involved in proprioceptive substitution of vestibular

  4. Visual and proprioceptive interaction in patients with bilateral vestibular loss☆

    PubMed Central

    Cutfield, Nicholas J.; Scott, Gregory; Waldman, Adam D.; Sharp, David J.; Bronstein, Adolfo M.

    2014-01-01

    Following bilateral vestibular loss (BVL) patients gradually adapt to the loss of vestibular input and rely more on other sensory inputs. Here we examine changes in the way proprioceptive and visual inputs interact. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate visual responses in the context of varying levels of proprioceptive input in 12 BVL subjects and 15 normal controls. A novel metal-free vibrator was developed to allow vibrotactile neck proprioceptive input to be delivered in the MRI system. A high level (100 Hz) and low level (30 Hz) control stimulus was applied over the left splenius capitis; only the high frequency stimulus generates a significant proprioceptive stimulus. The neck stimulus was applied in combination with static and moving (optokinetic) visual stimuli, in a factorial fMRI experimental design. We found that high level neck proprioceptive input had more cortical effect on brain activity in the BVL patients. This included a reduction in visual motion responses during high levels of proprioceptive input and differential activation in the midline cerebellum. In early visual cortical areas, the effect of high proprioceptive input was present for both visual conditions but in lateral visual areas, including V5/MT, the effect was only seen in the context of visual motion stimulation. The finding of a cortical visuo-proprioceptive interaction in BVL patients is consistent with behavioural data indicating that, in BVL patients, neck afferents partly replace vestibular input during the CNS-mediated compensatory process. An fMRI cervico-visual interaction may thus substitute the known visuo-vestibular interaction reported in normal subject fMRI studies. The results provide evidence for a cortical mechanism of adaptation to vestibular failure, in the form of an enhanced proprioceptive influence on visual processing. The results may provide the basis for a cortical mechanism involved in proprioceptive substitution of vestibular

  5. Proprioceptive feedback determines visuomotor gain in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bartussek, Jan; Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Multisensory integration is a prerequisite for effective locomotor control in most animals. Especially, the impressive aerial performance of insects relies on rapid and precise integration of multiple sensory modalities that provide feedback on different time scales. In flies, continuous visual signalling from the compound eyes is fused with phasic proprioceptive feedback to ensure precise neural activation of wing steering muscles (WSM) within narrow temporal phase bands of the stroke cycle. This phase-locked activation relies on mechanoreceptors distributed over wings and gyroscopic halteres. Here we investigate visual steering performance of tethered flying fruit flies with reduced haltere and wing feedback signalling. Using a flight simulator, we evaluated visual object fixation behaviour, optomotor altitude control and saccadic escape reflexes. The behavioural assays show an antagonistic effect of wing and haltere signalling on visuomotor gain during flight. Compared with controls, suppression of haltere feedback attenuates while suppression of wing feedback enhances the animal's wing steering range. Our results suggest that the generation of motor commands owing to visual perception is dynamically controlled by proprioception. We outline a potential physiological mechanism based on the biomechanical properties of WSM and sensory integration processes at the level of motoneurons. Collectively, the findings contribute to our general understanding how moving animals integrate sensory information with dynamically changing temporal structure. PMID:26909184

  6. Proprioceptive Actuation Design for Dynamic Legged locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sangbae; Wensing, Patrick; Biomimetic Robotics Lab Team

    Designing an actuator system for highly-dynamic legged locomotion exhibited by animals has been one of the grand challenges in robotics research. Conventional actuators designed for manufacturing applications have difficulty satisfying challenging requirements for high-speed locomotion, such as the need for high torque density and the ability to manage dynamic physical interactions. It is critical to introduce a new actuator design paradigm and provide guidelines for its incorporation in future mobile robots for research and industry. To this end, we suggest a paradigm called proprioceptive actuation, which enables highly- dynamic operation in legged machines. Proprioceptive actuation uses collocated force control at the joints to effectively control contact interactions at the feet under dynamic conditions. In the realm of legged machines, this paradigm provides a unique combination of high torque density, high-bandwidth force control, and the ability to mitigate impacts through backdrivability. Results show that the proposed design provides an impact mitigation factor that is comparable to other quadruped designs with series springs to handle impact. The paradigm is shown to enable the MIT Cheetah to manage the application of contact forces during dynamic bounding, with results given down to contact times of 85ms and peak forces over 450N. As a result, the MIT Cheetah achieves high-speed 3D running up to 13mph and jumping over an 18-inch high obstacle. The project is sponsored by DARPA M3 program.

  7. Proprioceptive feedback determines visuomotor gain in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Bartussek, Jan; Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Multisensory integration is a prerequisite for effective locomotor control in most animals. Especially, the impressive aerial performance of insects relies on rapid and precise integration of multiple sensory modalities that provide feedback on different time scales. In flies, continuous visual signalling from the compound eyes is fused with phasic proprioceptive feedback to ensure precise neural activation of wing steering muscles (WSM) within narrow temporal phase bands of the stroke cycle. This phase-locked activation relies on mechanoreceptors distributed over wings and gyroscopic halteres. Here we investigate visual steering performance of tethered flying fruit flies with reduced haltere and wing feedback signalling. Using a flight simulator, we evaluated visual object fixation behaviour, optomotor altitude control and saccadic escape reflexes. The behavioural assays show an antagonistic effect of wing and haltere signalling on visuomotor gain during flight. Compared with controls, suppression of haltere feedback attenuates while suppression of wing feedback enhances the animal’s wing steering range. Our results suggest that the generation of motor commands owing to visual perception is dynamically controlled by proprioception. We outline a potential physiological mechanism based on the biomechanical properties of WSM and sensory integration processes at the level of motoneurons. Collectively, the findings contribute to our general understanding how moving animals integrate sensory information with dynamically changing temporal structure. PMID:26909184

  8. Eye muscle proprioception is represented bilaterally in the sensorimotor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Balslev, Daniela; Albert, Neil B.; Miall, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The cortical representation of eye position is still uncertain. In the monkey a proprioceptive representation of the extraocular muscles (EOM) of an eye were recently found within the contralateral central sulcus. In humans, we have previously shown a change in the perceived position of the right eye after a virtual lesion with rTMS over the left somatosensory area. However, it is possible that the proprioceptive representation of the EOM extends to other brain sites, which were not examined in these previous studies. The aim of this fMRI study was to sample the whole brain to identify the proprioceptive representation for the left and the right eye separately. Data were acquired while passive eye movement was used to stimulate EOM proprioceptors in the absence of a motor command. We also controlled for the tactile stimulation of the eyelid by removing from the analysis voxels activated by eyelid touch alone. For either eye, the brain area commonly activated by passive and active eye movement was located bilaterally in the somatosensory area extending into the motor and premotor cytoarchitectonic areas. We suggest this is where EOM proprioception is processed. The bilateral representation for either eye contrasts with the contralateral representation of hand proprioception. We suggest that the proprioceptive representation of the two eyes next to each other in either somatosensory cortex and extending into the premotor cortex reflects the integrative nature of the eye position sense, which combines proprioceptive information across the two eyes with the efference copy of the oculomotor command. PMID:21391252

  9. Age-related differences in EEG beta activity during an assessment of ankle proprioception.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Diana R; Barela, José A; Manzano, Gilberto M; Kohn, André F

    2016-05-27

    The aim of this work was to compare cortical beta oscillatory activity between young (YA) and older (OA) adults during the assessment of ankle proprioception. We analyzed the response time (RT) to kinesthetic perception and beta event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) in response to passive ankle movement applied at a slow speed, 0.5°/s. The relationship between ERD/ERS and RT was investigated by classifying the signals into fast-, medium-, and slow-RT. The results showed a temporal relationship between beta oscillation changes and RT for both groups, i.e., earlier ERD and ERS were obtained for trials with faster response time. ERD was larger and delayed in OA compared to the YA, and beta ERS was present only for OA. These findings suggest that a less efficient proprioceptive signaling reaching the brain of OA requires a higher level of brain processing and hence the differences in ERD potentials between YA and OA. Furthermore, the occurrence of ERS in OA might represent a compensatory strategy of active cortical resetting for adequate sensorimotor behavior due to the age-related reduced peripheral input and neuromuscular impairments. Altered balance between excitatory and inhibitory intracortical activity in older adults presumably explains the changes in beta oscillations. PMID:27085535

  10. Spatiotemporal distribution of proteoglycans in the developing rat's barrel field and the effects of early deafferentation.

    PubMed

    Bahia, Carlomagno Pacheco; Houzel, Jean-Christophe; Picanço-Diniz, Cristovam Wanderley; Pereira, Antonio

    2008-09-10

    The isolectin Vicia villosa B(4) (VV) selectively recognizes N-acetyl-galactosamine-terminal glycoconjugates that form perineuronal nets (PNNs) around a subset of neurons in the cerebral cortex. PNNs are thought to participate in the guidance of incoming thalamic axons and in the posterior stabilization and maintenance of synaptic contacts. Here we examine the spatial and temporal distribution of biotinylated VV in tangential sections through layer IV of the posteromedial barrel subfield in the primary somatosensory cortex (PMBSF) of rats ranging from postnatal day (P)3 to P60, which underwent unilateral deafferentation of whiskers at birth. In the afferented hemisphere, labeling first appears at P5, with a diffuse distribution, probably associated with neuropil, inside PMBSF barrels. VV distribution remains diffuse during the following week, and declines around P17. From P24 onward, however, proteoglycans form PNNs around cell bodies preferentially localized in septal regions of the PMBSF. In the contralateral, deafferented PMBSF the diffuse labeling also appears on P5, but first develops into elongated, homogeneous stripes, which disappear after P24, leaving only scattered cell bodies along layer IV. Our results indicate that proteoglycans appear simultaneous to barrel formation in the developing rat while segregation of PNNs to septal cells might be driven by afferent activity. PMID:18615535

  11. Prism adaptation changes the subjective proprioceptive localization of the hands.

    PubMed

    Scarpina, Federica; Van der Stigchel, Stefan; Nijboer, Tanja Cornelia Wilhelmina; Dijkerman, Hendrik Christiaan

    2015-03-01

    Prism adaptation involves a proprioceptive, a visual and a motor component. As the existing paradigms are not able to distinguish between these three components, the contribution of the proprioceptive component remains unclear. In the current study, a proprioceptive judgement task, in the absence of motor responses, was used to investigate how prism adaptation would specifically influences the felt position of the hands in healthy participants. The task was administered before and after adaptation to left and right displacing prisms using either the left or the right hand during the adaptation procedure. The results appeared to suggest that the prisms induced a drift in the felt position of the hands, although the after-effect depended on the combination of the pointing hand and the visual deviation induced by prisms. The results are interpreted as in line with the hypothesis of an asymmetrical neural architecture of somatosensory processing. Moreover, the passive proprioception of the hand position revealed different effects of proprioceptive re-alignment compared to active pointing straight ahead: different mechanisms about how visuo-proprioceptive discrepancy is resolved were hypothesized. PMID:24266883

  12. The effects of exercise on limb proprioceptive signals.

    PubMed

    Fortier, Sylvie; Basset, Fabien A

    2012-12-01

    The definition of proprioception in the literature is equivocal, therefore it is desirable for communication and comprehension purposes that all authors who use proprioception and its related terms reach a consensus as to their meaning. This review aims to clarify these terms and to improve the understanding of the proprioceptive system. Over the years, many different views have been put forward on the origin of proprioception. The present-day view is that, in the absence of vision, we are able to determine the location of our limbs by signals of both peripheral and central origin. Nonetheless, recent research findings argue that the centrally generated sense of effort may not be well-suited to signal position sense and suggest revising the sense of effort hypothesis. This paper enlightens the latest views on the role of peripheral afferents and central signals involved in the proprioceptive system. It also describes the most common experimental protocols used to evaluate proprioception. The paper's final section describes in detail the effect of different muscle contraction types on kinaesthetic sense-in particular, on the sense of limb position. PMID:22579804

  13. The consequences of gustatory deafferentation on body mass and feeding patterns in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Colbert, Connie L.; Garcea, Mircea; Smith, James C.; Spector, Alan C.

    2012-01-01

    The contribution of orosensory signals, especially taste, on body mass, and feeding and drinking patterns in the rat was examined. Gustatory deafferentation was produced by bilateral transection of the chorda tympani, glossopharyngeal, and greater superficial petrosal nerves. Total calories consumed from sweetened-milk diet and oil-chow mash by the nerve-transected rats significantly decreased relative to sham-operated controls, mostly attributable to decreases in bout number, but not size. Nevertheless, caloric intake steadily increased over the postsurgical observation period, but body mass remained below both presurgical baseline and control levels and did not significantly increase over this time. After the sweetened-milk diet/oil-chow mash phase, rats received a series of sucrose preference tests. Interestingly, the nerve-transected rats preferred sucrose, and intake did not differ from controls, likely due to the stimulus sharing some nontaste chemosensory properties with the sweetened-milk diet. The neurotomized rats initiated a greater number of sucrose-licking bouts that were smaller in size and slower in licking rate, compared with control rats, and, unlike in control rats, the latter two bout parameters did not vary across concentration. Thus, in the absence of gustatory neural input, body mass is more stable compared with the progressive trajectory of weight gain seen in intact rats, and caloric intake initially decreases but recovers. The consequences of gustatory neurotomy on processes that determine meal initiation (bout number) and meal termination (bout size) are not fixed and appear to be influenced by presurgical experience with food stimuli coupled with its nongustatory chemosensory properties. PMID:22785426

  14. Phosphacan and Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase β Expression Mediates Deafferentation-Induced Synaptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Janna L.; Reeves, Thomas M.; Phillips, Linda L.

    2009-01-01

    This study documents the spatial and temporal expression of three structurally related chondroitin sulfated proteoglycans (CSPGs) during synaptic regeneration induced by brain injury. Using the unilateral entorhinal cortex lesion model of adaptive synaptogenesis, we documented mRNA and protein profiles of phosphacan and its two splice variants, full length receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase β (RPTPβ) and the short transmembrane receptor form (sRPTPβ), at 2, 7, and 15 d postlesion. We report that whole hippocampal sRPTPβ protein and mRNA are persistently elevated over the first two weeks after UEC. As predicted, this transmembrane family member was localized adjacent to synaptic sites in the deafferented neuropil and showed increased distribution over that zone following lesion. By contrast, whole hippocampal phosphacan protein was not elevated with deafferentation, however, its mRNA was increased during the period of sprouting and synapse formation (7d). When the zone of synaptic reorganization was sampled using molecular layer/granule cell (ML/GCL) enriched dissections, we observed an increase in phosphacan protein at 7d, concurrent with the observed hippocampal mRNA elevation. Immunohistochemistry also showed a shift in phosphacan distribution from granule cell bodies to the deafferented ML at 2 and 7d postlesion. Phosphacan and sRPTPβ were not co-localized with glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP), suggesting that reactive astrocytes were not a major source of either proteoglycan. While transcript for the developmentally prominent full length RPTPβ was also increased at 2 and 15d, its protein was not detected in our adult samples. These results indicate that phosphacan and RPTPβ splice variants participate in both the acute degenerative and long-term regenerative phases of reactive synaptogenesis. These results suggest that increase in the transmembrane sRPTPβ tyrosine phosphatase activity is critical to this plasticity, and that local elevation of

  15. Temporal dynamics of semicircular canal and otolith function following acute unilateral vestibular deafferentation in humans.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jun-ru; Ishiyama, Akira; Demer, Joseph L

    2007-04-01

    Dynamic changes of deficits in canal and otolith vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VORs) to high acceleration, eccentric yaw rotations were investigated in five subjects aged 25-65 years before and at frequent intervals 3-451 days following unilateral vestibular deafferentation (UVD) due to labyrinthectomy or vestibular neurectomy. Eye and head movements were recorded using magnetic search coils during transients of directionally random, whole-body rotation in darkness at peak acceleration 2,800 degrees/s2. Canal VORs were characterized during rotation about a mid-otolith axis, viewing a target 500 cm distant until rotation onset in darkness. Otolith VOR responses were characterized by the increase in VOR gain during identical rotation about an axis 13 cm posterior to the otoliths, initially viewing a target 15 cm distant. Pre-UVD canal gain was directionally symmetrical, averaging 0.87 +/- 0.02 (+/-SEM). Contralesional canal gain declined from pre-UVD by an average of 22% in the first 3-5 days post-UVD, before recovering to an asymptote of close 90% of pre-UVD level at 1-3 months. This recovery corresponded to resolution of spontaneous nystagmus. Ipsilesional gain declined to 59%, and showed no consistent recovery afterwards. Pre-UVD otolith gain was directionally symmetrical, averaging 0.56 +/- 0.02. Immediately after UVD, the contralesional otolith gain declined to 0.30 +/- 0.02, and did not recover. Ipsilesional otolith gain declined profoundly to 0.08 +/- 0.03 (P < 0.01), and never recovered. In contrast to the modest and directionally symmetrical effect of UVD on the human otolith VOR during pure translational acceleration, otolith gain during eccentric yaw rotation exhibited a profound and lasting deficit that might be diagnostically useful in lateralizing otolith pathology. Most recovery of the human canal gain to high acceleration transients following UVD is for contralesional head rotation, occurring within 3 months as spontaneous nystagmus resolves. PMID

  16. Dendritic regression dissociated from neuronal death but associated with partial deafferentation in aging rat supraoptic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Flood, D G; Coleman, P D

    1993-01-01

    As neurons are lost in normal aging, the dendrites of surviving neighbor neurons may proliferate, regress, or remain unchanged. In the case of age-related dendritic regression, it has been difficult to distinguish whether the regression precedes neuronal death or whether it is a consequence of loss of afferent supply. The rat supraoptic nucleus (SON) represents a model system in which there is no age-related loss of neurons, but in which there is an age-related loss of afferents. The magnocellular neurosecretory neurons of the SON, that produce vasopressin and oxytocin for release in the posterior pituitary, were studied in male Fischer 344 rats at 3, 12, 20, 27, 30, and 32 months of age. Counts in Nissl-stained sections showed no neuronal loss with age, and confirmed similar findings in other strains of rat and in mouse and human. Nucleolar size increased between 3 and 12 months of age, due, in part, to nucleolar fusion, and was unchanged between 12 and 32 months of age, indicating maintenance of general cellular function in old age. Dendritic extent quantified in Golgi-stained tissue increased between 3 and 12 months of age, was stable between 12 and 20 months, and decreased between 20 and 27 months. We interpret the increase between 3 and 12 months as a late maturational change. Dendritic regression between 20 and 27 months was probably the result of deafferentation due to the preceding age-related loss of the noradrenergic input to the SON from the ventral medulla. PMID:7507575

  17. Effects of temporary functional deafferentation on the brain, sensation, and behavior of stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Sens, Elisabeth; Teschner, Ulrike; Meissner, Winfried; Preul, Christoph; Huonker, Ralph; Witte, Otto W; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Weiss, Thomas

    2012-08-22

    Following stroke, many patients suffer from chronic motor impairment and reduced somatosensation in the stroke-affected body parts. Recent experimental studies suggest that temporary functional deafferentation (TFD) of parts of the stroke-affected upper limb or of the less-affected contralateral limb might improve the sensorimotor capacity of the stroke-affected hand. The present study sought evidence of cortical reorganization and related sensory and motor improvements following pharmacologically induced TFD of the stroke-affected forearm. Examination was performed during 2 d of Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy. Thirty-six human patients were deafferented on the stroke-affected forearm by an anesthetic cream (containing lidocaine and prilocaine) on one of the 2 d, and a placebo cream was applied on the other. The order of TFD and placebo treatment was counterbalanced across patients. Somatosensory and motor performance were assessed using a Grating orienting task and a Shape-sorter-drum task, and with somatosensory-evoked magnetic fields. Evoked magnetic fields showed significant pre- to postevaluation magnitude increases in response to tactile stimulation of the thumb of the stroke-affected hand during TFD but not following placebo treatment. We also observed a rapid extension of the distance between cortical representations of the stroke-affected thumb and little finger following TFD but not following placebo treatment. Moreover, somatosensory and motor performance of the stroke-affected hand was significantly enhanced during TFD but not during placebo treatment. Thus, pharmacologically induced TFD of a stroke-affected forearm might improve the somatosensory and motor functions of the stroke-affected upper limb, accompanied by cortical plasticity. PMID:22915119

  18. Compensatory saccades benefit from prediction during head impulse testing in early recovery from vestibular deafferentation.

    PubMed

    Mantokoudis, Georgios; Agrawal, Yuri; Newman-Toker, David E; Xie, Li; Saber Tehrani, Ali S; Wong, Aaron; Schubert, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    The head impulse test (HIT) can identify a deficient vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) by the compensatory saccade (CS) generated once the head stops moving. The inward HIT is considered safer than the outward HIT, yet might have an oculomotor advantage given that the subject would presumably know the direction of head rotation. Here, we compare CS latencies following inward (presumed predictable) and outward (more unpredictable) HITs after acute unilateral vestibular nerve deafferentation. Seven patients received inward and outward HITs delivered at six consecutive postoperative days (POD) and again at POD 30. All head impulses were recorded by portable video-oculography. CS included those occurring during (covert) or after (overt) head rotation. Inward HITs included mean CS latencies (183.48 ms ± 4.47 SE) that were consistently shorter than those generated during outward HITs in the first 6 POD (p = 0.0033). Inward HITs induced more covert saccades compared to outward HITs, acutely. However, by POD 30 there were no longer any differences in latencies or proportions of CS and direction of head rotation. Patients with acute unilateral vestibular loss likely use predictive cues of head direction to elicit early CS to keep the image centered on the fovea. In acute vestibular hypofunction, inwardly applied HITs may risk a preponderance of covert saccades, yet this difference largely disappears within 30 days. Advantages of inwardly applied HITs are discussed and must be balanced against the risk of a false-negative HIT interpretation. PMID:26088345

  19. Scapholunate Instability: Proprioception and Neuromuscular Control

    PubMed Central

    Salva-Coll, Guillem; Garcia-Elias, Marc; Hagert, Elisabet

    2013-01-01

    From a kinetic point of view, the wrist is considered stable when it is capable of resisting load without suffering injury. Several prerequisites are necessary for the wrist to be kinetically stable: bone morphology, normal articulating surfaces, ligaments, the sensorimotor system, the muscles crossing the wrist, and all nerves connecting to ligaments and muscles. Failure of any one of these factors may result in carpal instability. The terms “scapholunate (SL) dissociation” and “SL instability” refer to one of the most frequent types of wrist instability, resulting from rupture or attenuation of the SL supporting ligaments. From a radiologic point of view, SL instability may be dynamic or static. Unlike static instabilities, which tend to be painful and dysfunctional, a good proportion of dynamic SL instabilities remain asymptomatic and stable for prolonged periods of time. Such a lack of symptoms suggests that a ligament rupture, in itself, is not enough for a joint to become unstable. Certainly, the process of achieving stability is multifactorial and involves normal joint surfaces, ligaments, muscles, and a complex network of neural connections linking all these elements. In this article, we will review the neuromuscular stabilization of the SL joint and the proprioceptive mechanisms that contribute to the dynamic carpal stabilization. PMID:24436806

  20. Piezo2 is the principal mechanotransduction channel for proprioception

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Seung-Hyun; Lukacs, Viktor; de Nooij, Joriene C.; Zaytseva, Dasha; Criddle, Connor R.; Francisco, Allain; Jessell, Thomas M.; Wilkinson, Katherine A.; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-01-01

    Proprioception, the perception of body and limb position, is mediated by proprioceptors, specialized mechanosensory neurons that convey information about the stretch and tension experienced by muscles, tendons, skin, and joints. In mammals, the molecular identity of the stretch-sensitive channel that mediates proprioception is unknown. Here we show that the mechanically activated (MA) nonselective cation channel Piezo2 is expressed in sensory endings of proprioceptors innervating muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs in mice. Two independent mouse lines that lack Piezo2 in proprioceptive neurons show severely uncoordinated body movements and abnormal limb positions. Moreover, the mechanosensitivity of Pvalb+ neurons that predominantly mark proprioceptors are dependent on Piezo2 in vitro, and the stretch-induced firing of proprioceptors in muscle-nerve recordings is dramatically reduced in Piezo2-deficient mice. Together, our results indicate that Piezo2 is the major mechanotransducer of mammalian proprioceptors. PMID:26551544

  1. The function of fin rays as proprioceptive sensors in fish.

    PubMed

    Williams, Richard; Neubarth, Nicole; Hale, Melina E

    2013-01-01

    The sensation of movement and position of the limbs is critical for normal behaviours in tetrapods. In the bony fishes it is unclear what proprioceptive feedback is provided from the paired fins, the piscine homologues of the tetrapod limbs. Here we test mechanosensory abilities of afferent nerves in the pectoral fin rays, limb structures used by many fish species in propulsion and manoeuvreing. We examine the bluegill sunfish, a fish that uses its pectoral fins extensively in locomotion. We find that the activity of fin ray nerve fibres reflects the amplitude and velocity of fin ray bending. Spike sorting analyses demonstrate the presence of both slowly and rapidly adapting afferent nerve fibres. The fin sensory abilities we describe substantially expand the diversity of known vertebrate proprioceptive capabilities, and suggest that the pectoral fins need to be considered as possible proprioceptive sensors in studies of their functional morphology, movement and evolution. PMID:23591896

  2. Ventilatory responses during electrically induced muscular work in anesthetized dogs, after both deafferentation and cross circulation of hindlimbs.

    PubMed

    Da-Silva, A C; Russo, A K; Leite-de-Barros-Neto, T; Tarasantchi, J; Piçarro, I C; Griggio, M A

    1982-07-01

    1. The role of the neural afferent component from moving limbs during exercise hyperpnea has been studied in dogs. The influence of neural and humoral effects was evaluated by dorsal root section and limb cross-circulation. 2. Respiratory minute volume (Ve), frequency (f), tidal volume (VT) and oxygen consumption (VO2) were measured in anesthetized dogs submitted to light electrically-induced exercise (ventral root stimulation of L6 or L7), both before and after deafferentation. 3. In control experiments the increase of respiratory minute volume (Ve) was directly proportional to VO2, and primarily due to changes in frequency. After dorsal root section (L1 to S1), VO2 increased, but no significant changes were observed in the other respiratory parameters. 4. In contrast to the deafferentation experiments, no changes were detected either in Ve or in f during exercise in the cross-circulation experiments. 5. It is concluded that during light exercise reflexes generated by moving limbs are important for triggering the exercise tachypneic response. PMID:7150822

  3. Deafferentation causes a loss of presynaptic bombesin receptors and supersensitivity of substance P receptors in the dorsal horn of the cat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Massari, V J; Shults, C W; Park, C H; Tizabi, Y; Moody, T W; Chronwall, B M; Culver, M; Chase, T N

    1985-09-23

    Bombesin (BN)- and substance P (SP)-containing neurons are found in the dorsal root ganglia, and project to the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. The present study was undertaken to determine if chronic deafferentation of the cat spinal cord would affect BN or SP receptors in the spinal cord. Ten and 30 days after a unilateral lumbosacral dorsal rhizotomy, BN and SP receptor binding was evaluated autoradiographically using iodinated ligands to bind to these receptors in vitro. The normal distribution of BN receptors detected by this method was restricted to the head of the dorsal horn. Deafferentation caused a 38% and 22% decline in BN receptor binding in laminae I-IV at 10 or 30 days postoperatively, respectively. These data suggest that 'presynaptic' BN receptors are found on the central nervous system terminals of primary sensory afferents. Normal SP receptor distribution was most dense in lamina X, not in the superficial laminae of the dorsal horn. Deafferentation caused an initial decline in SP receptor binding in laminae I-II, followed by a 14% increase at 30 days in comparison to the unoperated side of the spinal cord. This delayed supersensitivity of SP receptors was confirmed in a separate experiment using a homogenate binding assay. These data are discussed with respect to the potential roles of receptor supersensitivity or subsensitivity in the development of deafferentation-induced changes in reactivity of dorsal horn neurons to nociceptive and non-nociceptive stimuli. PMID:2413960

  4. Proprioceptive Rehabilitation of Upper Limb Dysfunction in Movement Disorders: A Clinical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Trompetto, Carlo; Mori, Laura; Pelosin, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    Movement disorders (MDs) are frequently associated with sensory abnormalities. In particular, proprioceptive deficits have been largely documented in both hypokinetic (Parkinson’s disease) and hyperkinetic conditions (dystonia), suggesting a possible role in their pathophysiology. Proprioceptive feedback is a fundamental component of sensorimotor integration allowing effective planning and execution of voluntary movements. Rehabilitation has become an essential element in the management of patients with MDs, and there is a strong rationale to include proprioceptive training in rehabilitation protocols focused on mobility problems of the upper limbs. Proprioceptive training is aimed at improving the integration of proprioceptive signals using “task-intrinsic” or “augmented feedback.” This perspective article reviews the available evidence on the effects of proprioceptive stimulation in improving upper limb mobility in patients with MDs and highlights the emerging innovative approaches targeted to maximizing the benefits of exercise by means of enhanced proprioception. PMID:25505402

  5. The Role of Ankle Proprioception for Balance Control in relation to Sports Performance and Injury

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jia; Anson, Judith; Waddington, Gordon; Adams, Roger; Liu, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Balance control improvement is one of the most important goals in sports and exercise. Better balance is strongly positively associated with enhanced athletic performance and negatively associated with lower limb sports injuries. Proprioception plays an essential role in balance control, and ankle proprioception is arguably the most important. This paper reviews ankle proprioception and explores synergies with balance control, specifically in a sporting context. Central processing of ankle proprioceptive information, along with other sensory information, enables integration for balance control. When assessing ankle proprioception, the most generalizable findings arise from methods that are ecologically valid, allow proprioceptive signals to be integrated with general vision in the central nervous system, and reflect the signal-in-noise nature of central processing. Ankle proprioceptive intervention concepts driven by such a central processing theory are further proposed and discussed for the improvement of balance control in sport. PMID:26583139

  6. Proprioceptive precision is impaired in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Holly A; Jones, Stephanie A H; Henriques, Denise Y P

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that people with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), or other similar connective tissue disorders, may have proprioceptive impairments, the reason for which is still unknown. We recently found that EDS patients were less precise than healthy controls when estimating their felt hand's position relative to visible peripheral reference locations, and that this deficit was positively correlated with the severity of joint hypermobility. We further explore proprioceptive abilities in EDS by having patients localize their non-dominant left hand at a greater number of workspace locations than in our previous study. Additionally, we explore the relationship between chronic pain and proprioceptive sensitivity. We found that, although patients were just as accurate as controls, they were not as precise. Patients showed twice as much scatter than controls at all locations, but the degree of scatter did not positively correlate with chronic pain scores. This further supports the idea that a proprioceptive impairment pertaining to precision is present in EDS, but may not relate to the magnitude of chronic pain. PMID:26180743

  7. Proprioception in motor learning: lessons from a deafferented subject.

    PubMed

    Yousif, N; Cole, J; Rothwell, J; Diedrichsen, J

    2015-08-01

    Proprioceptive information arises from a variety of channels, including muscle, tendon, and skin afferents. It tells us where our static limbs are in space and how they are moving. It remains unclear however, how these proprioceptive modes contribute to motor learning. Here, we studied a subject (IW) who has lost large myelinated fibres below the neck and found that he was strongly impaired in sensing the static position of his upper limbs, when passively moved to an unseen location. When making reaching movements however, his ability to discriminate in which direction the trajectory had been diverted was unimpaired. This dissociation allowed us to test the involvement of static and dynamic proprioception in motor learning. We found that IW showed a preserved ability to adapt to force fields when visual feedback was present. He was even sensitive to the exact form of the force perturbation, responding appropriately to a velocity- or position-dependent force after a single perturbation. The ability to adapt to force fields was also preserved when visual feedback about the lateral perturbation of the hand was withdrawn. In this experiment, however, he did not exhibit a form of use-dependent learning, which was evident in the control participants as a drift of the intended direction of the reaching movement in the perturbed direction. This suggests that this form of learning may depend on static position sense at the end of the movement. Our results indicate that dynamic and static proprioception play dissociable roles in motor learning. PMID:25990821

  8. Proprioceptive recalibration arises slowly compared to reach adaptation.

    PubMed

    Zbib, Basel; Henriques, Denise Y P; Cressman, Erin K

    2016-08-01

    When subjects reach in a novel visuomotor environment (e.g. while viewing a cursor representing their hand that is rotated from their hand's actual position), they typically adjust their movements (i.e. bring the cursor to the target), thus reducing reaching errors. Additionally, research has shown that reaching with altered visual feedback of the hand results in sensory changes, such that proprioceptive estimates of hand position are shifted in the direction of the visual feedback experienced (Cressman and Henriques in J Neurophysiol 102:3505-3518, 2009). This study looked to establish the time course of these sensory changes. Additionally, the time courses of implicit sensory and motor changes were compared. Subjects reached to a single visual target while seeing a cursor that was either aligned with their hand position (50 trials) or rotated 30° clockwise relative to their hand (150 trials). Reach errors and proprioceptive estimates of felt hand position were assessed following the aligned reach training trials and at seven different times during the rotated reach training trials by having subjects reach to the target without visual feedback, and provide estimates of their hand relative to a visual reference marker, respectively. Results revealed a shift in proprioceptive estimates throughout the rotated reach training trials; however, significant sensory changes were not observed until after 70 trials. In contrast, results showed a greater change in reaches after a limited number of reach training trials with the rotated cursor. These findings suggest that proprioceptive recalibration arises more slowly than reach adaptation. PMID:27014777

  9. Effects of Pivoting Neuromuscular Training on Pivoting Control and Proprioception

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Song Joo; Ren, Yupeng; Chang, Alison H.; Geiger, François; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Pivoting neuromuscular control and proprioceptive acuity may play an important role in ACL injuries. The goal of this study was to investigate whether pivoting neuromuscular training on an offaxis elliptical trainer (POINT) could improve pivoting neuromuscular control, proprioceptive acuity, and functional performance. Methods Among 41 subjects, 21 subjects participated in 18 sessions of POINT (3 sessions/week for 6 weeks), and 20 subjects served as controls who did their regular workout. Both groups received pre-, mid-, and post-intervention evaluations. Propensity score analysis with multivariable regression adjustment was used to investigate the effect of training on pivoting neuromuscular control (pivoting instability, leg pivoting stiffness, maximum internal and external pivoting angles), proprioceptive acuity, and functional performance in both groups. Results Compared to the control group, the training group significantly improved pivoting neuromuscular control as reduced pivoting instability, reduced maximum internal and external pivoting angles, increased leg pivoting stiffness, and decreased entropy of time to peak EMG in the gluteus maximus and lateral gastrocnemius under pivoting perturbations. Furthermore, the training group enhanced weight-bearing proprioceptive acuity and improved the single leg hop distance. Conclusion Improvement of pivoting neuromuscular control in functional weight-bearing activities and task performances following POINT may help develop lower limb injury prevention and rehabilitation methods to reduce ACL and other musculoskeletal injuries associated with pivoting sports. PMID:24389517

  10. PROPRIOCEPTION, BODY BALANCE AND FUNCTIONALITY IN INDIVIDUALS WITH ACL RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    Furlanetto, Tássia Silveira; Peyré-Tartaruga, Leonardo Alexandre; do Pinho, Alexandre Severo; Bernardes, Emanuele da Silva; Zaro, Milton Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Objective : To evaluate and compare proprioception, body balance and knee functionality of individuals with or without unilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Methods : Forty individuals were divided in two groups: Experimental group, 20 individuals with ACL reconstruction at six months postoperative, and control group, 20 individuals with no history of lower limb pathologies. In the experimental group, we assessed lower limbs with reconstructed ACL and contralateral limb; in the control group the dominant and the non-dominant lower limbs were assessed. All subjects were submitted to joint position sense test to evaluate proprioception, postural control measure in single-limb, and step up and down (SUD) test for functional assessment. Results : There were no deficits in proprioception and postural control. In the SUD test, a 5% decrease in lift up force was found in reconstructed ACL lower limbs, however, a statistically not significant difference. The impact and step down force during the course of test were 30% greater in anatomic ACL than in control lower limbs. Conclusion : The individuals with ACL reconstruction at six months postoperative did not show changes in proprioception and postural control, but showed motor control changes, influencing knee functionality. Level of Evidence IV, Prognostic Studies. PMID:26981038

  11. Neck Proprioception Shapes Body Orientation and Perception of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Pettorossi, Vito Enrico; Schieppati, Marco

    2014-01-01

    This review article deals with some effects of neck muscle proprioception on human balance, gait trajectory, subjective straight-ahead (SSA), and self-motion perception. These effects are easily observed during neck muscle vibration, a strong stimulus for the spindle primary afferent fibers. We first remind the early findings on human balance, gait trajectory, SSA, induced by limb, and neck muscle vibration. Then, more recent findings on self-motion perception of vestibular origin are described. The use of a vestibular asymmetric yaw-rotation stimulus for emphasizing the proprioceptive modulation of motion perception from the neck is mentioned. In addition, an attempt has been made to conjointly discuss the effects of unilateral neck proprioception on motion perception, SSA, and walking trajectory. Neck vibration also induces persistent aftereffects on the SSA and on self-motion perception of vestibular origin. These perceptive effects depend on intensity, duration, side of the conditioning vibratory stimulation, and on muscle status. These effects can be maintained for hours when prolonged high-frequency vibration is superimposed on muscle contraction. Overall, this brief outline emphasizes the contribution of neck muscle inflow to the construction and fine-tuning of perception of body orientation and motion. Furthermore, it indicates that tonic neck-proprioceptive input may induce persistent influences on the subject’s mental representation of space. These plastic changes might adapt motion sensitiveness to lasting or permanent head positional or motor changes. PMID:25414660

  12. Haptic interaction of touch and proprioception: implications for neuroprosthetics.

    PubMed

    Rincon-Gonzalez, Liliana; Warren, Jay P; Meller, David M; Tillery, Stephen Helms

    2011-10-01

    Somatosensation is divided into multiple discrete modalities that we think of separably: e.g., tactile, proprioceptive, and temperature sensation. However, in processes such as haptics,those modalities all interact. If one intended to artificially generate a sensation that could be used for stereognosis, for example, it would be crucial to understand these interactions. We are presently examining the relationship between tactile and proprioceptive modalities in this context. In this overview of some of our recent work, we show that signals that would normally be attributed to two of these systems separately, tactile contact and self-movement, interact both perceptually and physiologically in ways that complicate the understanding of haptic processing. In the first study described here, we show that a tactile illusion on the fingertips, the cutaneous rabbit effect, can be abolished by changing the posture of the fingers. We then discuss activity in primary somatosensory cortical neurons illustrating the interrelationship of tactile and postural signals. In this study, we used a robot-enhanced virtual environment to show that many neurons in primary somatosensory cortex with cutaneous receptive fields encode elements both of tactile contact and self-motion. We then show the results of studies examining the structure of the process which extracts the spatial location of the hand from proprioceptive signals. The structure of the spatial errors in these maps indicates that the proprioceptive-spatial map is stable but individually constructed.These seemingly disparate studies lead us to suggest that tactile sensation is encoded in a 2-D map, but one which undergoes continual dynamic modification by an underlying proprioceptive map. Understanding how the disparate signals that comprise the somatosensory system are processed to produce sensation is an important step in realizing the kind of seamless integration aspired to in neuroprosthetics. PMID:21984518

  13. EDITORIAL: Slow light Slow light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Robert; Hess, Ortwin; Denz, Cornelia; Paspalakis, Emmanuel

    2010-10-01

    Research into slow light began theoretically in 1880 with the paper [1] of H A Lorentz, who is best known for his work on relativity and the speed of light. Experimental work started some 60 years later with the work of S L McCall and E L Hahn [2] who explored non-linear self-induced transparency in ruby. This field of research has burgeoned in the last 10 years, starting with the work of L Vestergaard Hau and coworkers on slow light via electromagnetically induced transparency in a Bose-Einstein condensate [3]. Many groups are now able to slow light down to a few metres per second or even stop the motion of light entirely [4]. Today, slow light - or more often `slow and fast light' - has become its own vibrant field with a strongly increasing number of publications. In broad scope, slow light research can be categorized in terms of the sort of physical mechanism used to slow down the light. One sort of slow light makes use of material dispersion. This dispersion can be the natural dispersion of the ordinary refractive index or can be the frequency dependence of some nonlinear optical process, such as electromagnetically induced transparency, coherent population oscillations, stimulated light scattering, or four-wave mixing processes. The second sort of slow light makes use of the wavelength dependence of artificially structured materials, such as photonic crystals, optical waveguides, and collections of microresonators. Material systems in which slow light has been observed include metal vapours, rare-earth-doped materials, Raman and Brillioun gain media, photonic crystals, microresonators and, more recently, metamaterials. A common feature of all of these schemes is the presence of a sharp single resonance or multiple resonances produced by an atomic transition, a resonance in a photonic structure, or in a nonlinear optical process. Current applications of slow light include a series of attractive topics in optical information processing, such as optical data

  14. Tentonin 3/TMEM150c Confers Distinct Mechanosensitive Currents in Dorsal-Root Ganglion Neurons with Proprioceptive Function.

    PubMed

    Hong, Gyu-Sang; Lee, Byeongjun; Wee, Jungwon; Chun, Hyeyeon; Kim, Hyungsup; Jung, Jooyoung; Cha, Joo Young; Riew, Tae-Ryong; Kim, Gyu Hyun; Kim, In-Beom; Oh, Uhtaek

    2016-07-01

    Touch sensation or proprioception requires the transduction of mechanical stimuli into electrical signals by mechanoreceptors in the periphery. These mechanoreceptors are equipped with various transducer channels. Although Piezo1 and 2 are mechanically activated (MA) channels with rapid inactivation, MA molecules with other inactivation kinetics have not been identified. Here we report that heterologously expressed Tentonin3 (TTN3)/TMEM150C is activated by mechanical stimuli with distinctly slow inactivation kinetics. Genetic ablation of Ttn3/Tmem150c markedly reduced slowly adapting neurons in dorsal-root ganglion neurons. The MA TTN3 currents were inhibited by known blockers of mechanosensitive ion channels. Moreover, TTN3 was localized in muscle spindle afferents. Ttn3-deficient mice exhibited the loss of coordinated movements and abnormal gait. Thus, TTN3 appears to be a component of a mechanosensitive channel with a slow inactivation rate and contributes to motor coordination. Identification of this gene advances our understanding of the various types of mechanosensations, including proprioception. PMID:27321926

  15. Motor output variability, deafferentation, and putative deficits in kinesthetic reafference in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Elizabeth B.; Cole, Jonathan; Poizner, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder defined by motor impairments that include rigidity, systemic slowdown of movement (bradykinesia), postural problems, and tremor. While the progressive decline in motor output functions is well documented, less understood are impairments linked to the continuous kinesthetic sensation emerging from the flow of motions. There is growing evidence in recent years that kinesthetic problems are also part of the symptoms of PD, but objective methods to readily quantify continuously unfolding motions across different contexts have been lacking. Here we present evidence from a deafferented subject (IW) and a new statistical platform that enables new analyses of motor output variability measured as a continuous flow of kinesthetic reafferent input. Systematic increasing similarities between the patterns of motor output variability in IW and the participants with increasing degrees of PD severity suggest potential deficits in kinesthetic sensing in PD. We propose that these deficits may result from persistent, noisy, and random motor patterns as the disorder progresses. The stochastic signatures from the unfolding motions revealed levels of noise in the motor output fluctuations of these patients bound to decrease the kinesthetic signal’s bandwidth. The results are interpreted in light of the concept of kinesthetic reafference ( Von Holst and Mittelstaedt, 1950). In this context, noisy motor output variability from voluntary movements in PD leads to a returning stream of noisy afference caused, in turn, by those faulty movements themselves. Faulty efferent output re-enters the CNS as corrupted sensory motor input. We find here that severity level in PD leads to the persistence of such patterns, thus bringing the statistical signatures of the subjects with PD systematically closer to those of the subject without proprioception. PMID:25374524

  16. Proprioceptive-Visual Integration and Embodied Cognition: A Developmental Perspective.

    PubMed

    Manoel, Edison de J; Viana Felicio, Pedro Fernando; Makida-Dionísio, Cristiane; Nascimento Soares, Rafael Do; Freitas, Alessandro; Gimenez, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    The present study addressed whether a spatial matching task relying on inter-sensory judgments might be influenced by the transition between egocentric and decentered mode of thinking. Thirty-six children aged 5, 7, or 9 years performed a paramedian correspondence task with conditions requiring inter-sensory integration (visual-proprioceptive) and a problem-solving task. The visual information was given through a mirror that perturbed the sensory judgments in the paramedian correspondence task. The results did not corroborate the hypotheses; nevertheless, the increasing importance of proprioception in the perceptual judgments for older children suggests that although younger children may be body centered (egocentric mode of thinking), older children seemed more able to use body to mediate their perceptual judgments. PMID:27597780

  17. Proprioceptive gait and speed selection in a slender inertial swimmer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argentina, Mederic; Gazzola, Mattia; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-11-01

    We study the dynamics of a slender inertial swimmer accounting for hydrodynamics, mechanics, muscle activity and sensory feedbacks. Our theory elucidates how elastic properties and proprioception contribute to selecting swimming speed and locomotion gait. Swimmers are shown to take advantage of resonance phenomena to enhance speed and efficiency. Furthermore, we demonstrate how a minimal proprioceptive model, in which the local muscle activation is function of body curvature, is sufficient to exploit hydro-mechanic properties and drive elastic instabilities associated with thrust production. Our results quantitatively agree with live fish experiments and provide a mechanistic basis for the relation U/L ~ f between the swimmer's speed U, length L and tail beat frequency f determined empirically by Bainbridge more than half a century ago.

  18. Effect of ankle proprioceptive training on static body balance.

    PubMed

    Karakaya, Mehmet Gürhan; Rutbİl, Hilal; Akpinar, Ercan; Yildirim, Alİ; Karakaya, İlkİm Çitak

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of ankle proprioceptive training on static body balance. [Subjects and Methods] In this randomized-controlled, single-blind study, 59 university students (35 females, 24 males) were randomized into study (n=29) and control (n=30) groups. The study group received a foot and ankle proprioceptive exercise program including stretching, strengthening (plantar and dorsi-flexors, invertor and evertor muscles), and balance board exercises, each with 10 repetitions per session, 5 days a week, for a total of 10 sessions. The control group did not receive any intervention. Static body balance was evaluated by a kinesthetic ability trainer, which showed the balance index scores under both single foot and both feet conditions. This evaluation was repeated at the end of two weeks for both groups. [Results] Outcome measures of the groups were similar at the baseline. Balance index scores of both groups improved at the end of two weeks, and the study group had significantly lower index scores than those of the control group, indicating better balance. [Conclusion] Ankle proprioceptive training had positive effects on static body balance parameters in healthy individuals, and it is worth investigating the effects of this type of training in patients with balance disorders. PMID:26644697

  19. Intrathecal rimantadine induces motor, proprioceptive, and nociceptive blockades in rats.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Jann-Inn; Wang, Jieh-Neng; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chen, Yu-Wen; Hung, Ching-Hsia

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the experiment was to evaluate the local anesthetic effect of rimantadine in spinal anesthesia. Rimantadine in a dose-dependent fashion was constructed after intrathecally injecting the rats with four different doses. The potency and duration of rimantadine were compared with that of the local anesthetic lidocaine at producing spinal motor, nociceptive, and proprioceptive blockades. We demonstrated that intrathecal rimantadine dose-dependently produced spinal motor, nociceptive, and proprioceptive blockades. On the 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the ranks of potencies at inducing spinal motor, nociceptive, and proprioceptive blockades was lidocaine>rimantadine (P<0.01). Rimantadine exhibited more nociceptive block (ED50) than motor block (P<0.05). At equi-anesthetic doses (ED25, ED50, and ED75), the spinal block duration produced by rimantadine was longer than that produced by lidocaine (P<0.01). Furthermore, rimantadine (26.52μmol/kg) prolonged the nociceptive nerve block more than the motor block (P<0.001). Our preclinical data showed that rimantadine, with a more sensory-selective action over motor block, was less potent than lidocaine. Rimantadine produced longer duration in spinal anesthesia when compared with lidocaine. PMID:26949181

  20. Reactive Neurogenesis and Down-Regulation of the Potassium-Chloride Cotransporter KCC2 in the Cochlear Nuclei after Cochlear Deafferentation

    PubMed Central

    Tighilet, Brahim; Dutheil, Sophie; Siponen, Marina I.; Noreña, Arnaud J.

    2016-01-01

    While many studies have been devoted to investigating the homeostatic plasticity triggered by cochlear hearing loss, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in these central changes remain elusive. In the present study, we investigated the possibility of reactive neurogenesis after unilateral cochlear nerve section in the cochlear nucleus (CN) of cats. We found a strong cell proliferation in all the CN sub-divisions ipsilateral to the lesion. Most of the newly generated cells survive up to 1 month after cochlear deafferentation in all cochlear nuclei (except the dorsal CN) and give rise to a variety of cell types, i.e., microglial cells, astrocytes, and neurons. Interestingly, many of the newborn neurons had an inhibitory (GABAergic) phenotype. This result is intriguing since sensory deafferentation is usually accompanied by enhanced excitation, consistent with a reduction in central inhibition. The membrane potential effect of GABA depends, however, on the intra-cellular chloride concentration, which is maintained at low levels in adults by the potassium chloride co-transporter KCC2. The KCC2 density on the plasma membrane of neurons was then assessed after cochlear deafferentation in the cochlear nuclei ipsilateral and contralateral to the lesion. Cochlear deafferentation is accompanied by a strong down-regulation of KCC2 ipsilateral to the lesion at 3 and 30 days post-lesion. This study suggests that reactive neurogenesis and down-regulation of KCC2 is part of the vast repertoire involved in homeostatic plasticity triggered by hearing loss. These central changes may also play a role in the generation of tinnitus and hyperacusis.

  1. Deafferentation is insufficient to induce sprouting of A-fibre central terminals in the rat dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Mannion, R J; Doubell, T P; Gill, H; Woolf, C J

    1998-04-01

    The mechanism by which A-fibres sprout into lamina II of the dorsal horn of the adult rat after peripheral nerve injury, a region which normally receives input from noci- and thermoreceptive C-fibres alone, is not known. Recent findings indicating that selective C-fibre injury and subsequent degenerative changes in this region are sufficient to induce sprouting of uninjured A-fibres have raised the possibility that the structural reorganisation of A-fibre terminals is an example of collateral sprouting, in that deafferentation of C-fibre terminals alone in lamina II may be sufficient to cause A-fibre sprouting. Primary afferents of the sciatic nerve have their cell bodies located predominantly in the L4 and L5 dorsal root ganglia (DRGs), and the A-fibres of each DRG have central termination fields that show an extensive rostrocaudal overlap in lamina III in the L4 and L5 spinal segments. In this study, we have found that C-fibres from either DRG have central terminal fields that overlap much less in lamina II than A-fibres in lamina III. We have exploited this differential terminal organisation to produce deafferentation in lamina II of the L5 spinal segment, by an L5 rhizotomy, and then test whether A-fibres of the intact L4 dorsal root ganglion, which terminate within the L5 segment, sprout into the denervated lamina II in the L5 spinal segment. Neither intact nor peripherally injured A-fibres were seen to sprout into denervated lamina II after L5 rhizotomy. Sprouting was only ever seen into regions of lamina II containing the terminals of peripherally injured C-fibres. Therefore, it seems that the creation of synaptic space within lamina II is not the explanation for A-fibre sprouting after peripheral nerve section or crush, emphasising that injury-induced changes in C-fibres and subsequent chemotrophic effects in the superficial dorsal horn are the likely explanation. PMID:9548693

  2. No Proprioceptive Deficits in Autism despite Movement-Related Sensory and Execution Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuentes, Christina T.; Mostofsky, Stewart H.; Bastian, Amy J.

    2011-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often involves sensory and motor problems, yet the proprioceptive sense of limb position has not been directly assessed. We used three tasks to assess proprioception in adolescents with ASD who had motor and sensory perceptual abnormalities, and compared them to age- and IQ-matched controls. Results showed no group…

  3. Deficits in the Ability to Use Proprioceptive Feedback in Children with Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goble, Daniel J.; Hurvitz, Edward A.; Brown, Susan H.

    2009-01-01

    Compared with motor impairment in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP), less attention has been paid to sensory feedback processing deficits. This includes, especially, proprioceptive information regarding arm position. This study examined the ability of children with hemiplegic CP to use proprioceptive feedback during a goal-directed…

  4. Upper Extremity Proprioception in Healthy Aging and Stroke Populations, and the Effects of Therapist- and Robot-Based Rehabilitation Therapies on Proprioceptive Function

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Charmayne Mary Lee; Tommasino, Paolo; Budhota, Aamani; Campolo, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    The world’s population is aging, with the number of people ages 65 or older expected to surpass 1.5 billion people, or 16% of the global total. As people age, there are notable declines in proprioception due to changes in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Moreover, the risk of stroke increases with age, with approximately two-thirds of stroke-related hospitalizations occurring in people over the age of 65. In this literature review, we first summarize behavioral studies investigating proprioceptive deficits in normally aging older adults and stroke patients, and discuss the differences in proprioceptive function between these populations. We then provide a state of the art review the literature regarding therapist- and robot-based rehabilitation of the upper extremity proprioceptive dysfunction in stroke populations and discuss avenues of future research. PMID:25784872

  5. Proprioceptive feedback and brain computer interface (BCI) based neuroprostheses.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Murguialday, Ander; Schürholz, Markus; Caggiano, Vittorio; Wildgruber, Moritz; Caria, Andrea; Hammer, Eva Maria; Halder, Sebastian; Birbaumer, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Brain computer interface (BCI) technology has been proposed for motor neurorehabilitation, motor replacement and assistive technologies. It is an open question whether proprioceptive feedback affects the regulation of brain oscillations and therefore BCI control. We developed a BCI coupled on-line with a robotic hand exoskeleton for flexing and extending the fingers. 24 healthy participants performed five different tasks of closing and opening the hand: (1) motor imagery of the hand movement without any overt movement and without feedback, (2) motor imagery with movement as online feedback (participants see and feel their hand, with the exoskeleton moving according to their brain signals, (3) passive (the orthosis passively opens and closes the hand without imagery) and (4) active (overt) movement of the hand and rest. Performance was defined as the difference in power of the sensorimotor rhythm during motor task and rest and calculated offline for different tasks. Participants were divided in three groups depending on the feedback receiving during task 2 (the other tasks were the same for all participants). Group 1 (n = 9) received contingent positive feedback (participants' sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) desynchronization was directly linked to hand orthosis movements), group 2 (n = 8) contingent "negative" feedback (participants' sensorimotor rhythm synchronization was directly linked to hand orthosis movements) and group 3 (n = 7) sham feedback (no link between brain oscillations and orthosis movements). We observed that proprioceptive feedback (feeling and seeing hand movements) improved BCI performance significantly. Furthermore, in the contingent positive group only a significant motor learning effect was observed enhancing SMR desynchronization during motor imagery without feedback in time. Furthermore, we observed a significantly stronger SMR desynchronization in the contingent positive group compared to the other groups during active and passive

  6. The effect of experimentally-induced subacromial pain on proprioception.

    PubMed

    Sole, Gisela; Osborne, Hamish; Wassinger, Craig

    2015-02-01

    Shoulder injuries may be associated with proprioceptive deficits, however, it is unknown whether these changes are due to the experience of pain, tissue damage, or a combination of these. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of experimentally-induced sub-acromial pain on proprioceptive variables. Sub-acromial pain was induced via hypertonic saline injection in 20 healthy participants. Passive joint replication (PJR) and threshold to detection of movement direction (TTDMD) were assessed with a Biodex System 3 Pro isokinetic dynamometer for baseline control, experimental pain and recovery control conditions with a starting position of 60° shoulder abduction. The target angle for PJR was 60° external rotation, starting from 40°. TTDMD was tested from a position of 20° external rotation. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to determine differences between PJR absolute and variable errors and TTDMD for the control and experimental conditions. Pain was elicited with a median 7 on the Numeric Pain Rating Scale. TTDMD was significantly decreased for the experimental pain condition compared to baseline and recovery conditions (≈30%, P = 0.003). No significant differences were found for absolute (P = 0.152) and variable (P = 0.514) error for PJR. Movement sense was enhanced for the experimental sub-acromial pain condition, which may reflect protective effects of the central nervous system in response to the pain. Where decreased passive proprioception is observed in shoulders with injuries, these may be due to a combination of peripheral tissue injury and neural adaptations that differ from those due to acute pain. PMID:25261091

  7. Head-controlled assistive telerobot with extended physiological proprioception capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salganicoff, Marcos; Rahman, Tariq; Mahoney, Ricardo; Pino, D.; Jayachandran, Vijay; Kumar, Vijay; Chen, Shoupu; Harwin, William S.

    1995-12-01

    People with disabilities such as quadriplegia can use mouth-sticks and head-sticks as extension devices to perform desired manipulations. These extensions provide extended proprioception which allows users to directly feel forces and other perceptual cues such as texture present at the tip of the mouth-stick. Such devices are effective for two principle reasons: because of their close contact with the user's tactile and proprioceptive sensing abilities; and because they tend to be lightweight and very stiff, and can thus convey tactile and kinesthetic information with high-bandwidth. Unfortunately, traditional mouth-sticks and head-sticks are limited in workspace and in the mechanical power that can be transferred because of user mobility and strength limitations. We describe an alternative implementation of the head-stick device using the idea of a virtual head-stick: a head-controlled bilateral force-reflecting telerobot. In this system the end-effector of the slave robot moves as if it were at the tip of an imaginary extension of the user's head. The design goal is for the system is to have the same intuitive operation and extended proprioception as a regular mouth-stick effector but with augmentation of workspace volume and mechanical power. The input is through a specially modified six DOF master robot (a PerForceTM hand-controller) whose joints can be back-driven to apply forces at the user's head. The manipulation tasks in the environment are performed by a six degree-of-freedom slave robot (the Zebra-ZEROTM) with a built-in force sensor. We describe the prototype hardware/software implementation of the system, control system design, safety/disability issues, and initial evaluation tasks.

  8. Somatosensory evoked potentials following proprioceptive stimulation of finger in man.

    PubMed

    Mima, T; Terada, K; Maekawa, M; Nagamine, T; Ikeda, A; Shibasaki, H

    1996-09-01

    Brisk passive flexion of the proximal interphalangeal joint of the middle finger, produced by using a newly devised instrument, elicited evoked potentials on the scalp. The present study carefully excluded the possible contribution of sensory modalities other than proprioception. The initial part of cortical response was a positive deflexion at the contralateral central area (P1 at 34.6 ms after the stimulus). This was followed by a midfrontal negative wave (N1 at 44.8 ms) and a clear positivity at the contralateral centroparietal area (P2 at 48.0 ms). The evoked responses persisted in spite of the abolition of cutaneous and joint afferents of the finger caused by ischemic anesthesia, but they were lost by ischemic anesthesia of the forearm. Thus, the cortical evoked responses obtained in this study most probably reflect muscle afferent inputs. The scalp distribution of P1 suggested that its cortical generator source was different from that of the N20-P20 components of evoked potentials to electrical median nerve stimulation. Brodmann areas 2 and 3a of human brain, which are known to receive deep receptor inputs, are the most plausible generator sites for the early components of the proprioception-related evoked responses. The amplitude of P2 was related to the velocity but not to the magnitude of movement. In conclusion, the present study established a method for recording the evoked responses to the brisk passive movement of the finger joint, which mainly reflect the dynamic aspects of proprioception mediated through muscle afferent. PMID:8891653

  9. Conducting polymer actuators: From basic concepts to proprioceptive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Gil, Jose Gabriel

    Designers and engineers have been dreaming for decades of motors sensing, by themselves, working and surrounding conditions, as biological muscles do originating proprioception. Here bilayer full polymeric artificial muscles were checked up to very high cathodic potential limits (-2.5 V) in aqueous solution by cyclic voltammetry. The electrochemical driven exchange of ions from the conducting polymer film, and the concomitant Faradaic bending movement of the muscle, takes place in the full studied potential range. The presence of trapped counterion after deep reduction was corroborated by EDX determinations giving quite high electronic conductivity to the device. The large bending movement was used as a tool to quantify the amount of water exchanged per reaction unit (exchanged electron or ion). The potential evolutions of self-supported films of conducting polymers or conducting polymers (polypyrrole, polyaniline) coating different microfibers, during its oxidation/reduction senses working mechanical, thermal, chemical or electrical variables. The evolution of the muscle potential from electrochemical artificial muscles based on electroactive materials such as intrinsically conducting polymers and driven by constant currents senses, while working, any variation of the mechanical (trailed mass, obstacles, pressure, strain or stress), thermal or chemical conditions of work. One physically uniform artificial muscle includes one electrochemical motor and several sensors working simultaneously under the same driving reaction. Actuating (current and charge) and sensing (potential and energy) magnitudes are present, simultaneously, in the only two connecting wires and can be read by the computer at any time. From basic polymeric, mechanical and electrochemical principles a physicochemical equation describing artificial proprioception has been developed. It includes and describes, simultaneously, the evolution of the muscle potential during actuation as a function of the

  10. Neck Proprioceptive Training for Balance Function in Patients with Chronic Poststroke Hemiparesis: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gyoung-Mo; Oh, Duck-Won

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of neck proprioceptive training on the balance of patients with chronic poststroke hemiparesis. [Subjects] Three patients with chronic stroke were recruited for this study. [Methods] The subjects underwent neck proprioceptive training using the red light of a laser pointer (30 min daily, five times per week for 4 weeks). Outcome measures included the stability and weight distribution indices measured with a Tetrax system and Timed Up and Go (TUG) and proprioception tests. [Results] For all subjects, the stability and weight distribution indices increased by 1.87–9.66% in the eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions, and the TUG and proprioception test scores improved by 2.49–15.27%. [Conclusion] Neck proprioceptive training may be a good option for improving the balance function of patients with chronic poststroke hemiparesis. PMID:25364136

  11. Neck proprioceptive training for balance function in patients with chronic poststroke hemiparesis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gyoung-Mo; Oh, Duck-Won

    2014-10-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of neck proprioceptive training on the balance of patients with chronic poststroke hemiparesis. [Subjects] Three patients with chronic stroke were recruited for this study. [Methods] The subjects underwent neck proprioceptive training using the red light of a laser pointer (30 min daily, five times per week for 4 weeks). Outcome measures included the stability and weight distribution indices measured with a Tetrax system and Timed Up and Go (TUG) and proprioception tests. [Results] For all subjects, the stability and weight distribution indices increased by 1.87-9.66% in the eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions, and the TUG and proprioception test scores improved by 2.49-15.27%. [Conclusion] Neck proprioceptive training may be a good option for improving the balance function of patients with chronic poststroke hemiparesis. PMID:25364136

  12. THE WORKING MEMORY BENEFITS OF PROPRIOCEPTIVELY DEMANDING TRAINING: A PILOT STUDY (.).

    PubMed

    Alloway, Ross G; Alloway, Tracy Packiam

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of proprioception on working memory. It was also of interest whether an acute and highly intensive period of exercise would yield working memory gains. The training group completed a series of proprioceptively demanding exercises. There were also control classroom and yoga groups. Working memory was measured using a backward digit recall test. The data indicated that active, healthy adults who undertook acute, proprioceptively demanding training improved working memory scores compared to the classroom and yoga groups. One possible reason that the training yielded significant working memory gains could be that the training was proprioceptively dynamic, requiring proprioception and at least one other factor-such as locomotion or navigation-at the same time, which may have contributed to the improvements in working memory performance. PMID:26029969

  13. Generalization of force-field adaptation in proprioceptively-deafferented subjects.

    PubMed

    Lefumat, Hannah Z; Miall, R Chris; Cole, Jonathan D; Bringoux, Lionel; Bourdin, Christophe; Vercher, Jean-Louis; Sarlegna, Fabrice R

    2016-03-11

    Humans have the remarkable ability to adapt their motor behaviour to changes in body properties and/or environmental conditions, based on sensory feedback such as vision and proprioception. The role of proprioception has been highlighted for the adaptation to new upper-limb dynamics, which is known to generalize to the opposite, non-adapted limb in healthy individuals. Such interlimb transfer seems to depend on sensory feedback, and the present study assessed whether the chronic loss of proprioception precludes interlimb transfer of dynamic adaptation by testing two well-characterized proprioceptively-deafferented subjects. These had to reach toward visual targets with vision of the limb. For both deafferented subjects, we observed adaptation of the dominant arm to Coriolis forces and after-effects on non-dominant arm movements in different movement directions, thus indicating interlimb transfer. Overall, our findings show that motor learning can generalize across limbs and movement directions despite the loss of proprioceptive afferents. PMID:26826606

  14. Reaching to proprioceptively defined targets in Parkinson's disease: effects of deep brain stimulation therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, D; Henriques, D Y; Snider, J; Song, D; Poizner, H

    2013-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) provides a unique window into human brain function since it can reversibly alter the functioning of specific brain circuits. Basal ganglia-cortical circuits are thought to be excessively noisy in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), based in part on the lack of specificity of proprioceptive signals in basal ganglia-thalamic-cortical circuits in monkey models of the disease. PD patients are known to have deficits in proprioception, but the effects are often subtle, with paradigms typically restricted to one or two joint movements in a plane. Moreover, the effects of STN DBS on proprioception are virtually unexplored. We tested the following hypotheses: first, that PD patients will show substantial deficits in unconstrained, multi-joint proprioception, and, second, that STN DBS will improve multi-joint proprioception. Twelve PD patients with bilaterally implanted electrodes in the subthalamic nucleus and 12 age-matched healthy subjects were asked to position the left hand at a location that was proprioceptively defined in 3D space with the right hand. In a second condition, subjects were provided visual feedback during the task so that they were not forced to rely on proprioception. Overall, with STN DBS switched off, PD patients showed significantly larger proprioceptive localization errors, and greater variability in endpoint localizations than the control subjects. Visual feedback partially normalized PD performance, and demonstrated that the errors in proprioceptive localization were not simply due to a difficulty in executing the movements or in remembering target locations. Switching STN DBS on significantly reduced localization errors from those of control subjects when patients moved without visual feedback relative to when they moved with visual feedback (when proprioception was not required). However, this reduction in localization errors without vision came at the cost of increased localization

  15. The effectiveness of proprioceptive training for improving motor function: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Aman, Joshua E.; Elangovan, Naveen; Yeh, I-Ling; Konczak, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Numerous reports advocate that training of the proprioceptive sense is a viable behavioral therapy for improving impaired motor function. However, there is little agreement of what constitutes proprioceptive training and how effective it is. We therefore conducted a comprehensive, systematic review of the available literature in order to provide clarity to the notion of training the proprioceptive system. Methods: Four major scientific databases were searched. The following criteria were subsequently applied: (1) A quantified pre- and post-treatment measure of proprioceptive function. (2) An intervention or training program believed to influence or enhance proprioceptive function. (3) Contained at least one form of treatment or outcome measure that is indicative of somatosensory function. From a total of 1284 articles, 51 studies fulfilled all criteria and were selected for further review. Results: Overall, proprioceptive training resulted in an average improvement of 52% across all outcome measures. Applying muscle vibration above 30 Hz for longer durations (i.e., min vs. s) induced outcome improvements of up to 60%. Joint position and target reaching training consistently enhanced joint position sense (up to 109%) showing an average improvement of 48%. Cortical stroke was the most studied disease entity but no clear evidence indicated that proprioceptive training is differentially beneficial across the reported diseases. Conclusions: There is converging evidence that proprioceptive training can yield meaningful improvements in somatosensory and sensorimotor function. However, there is a clear need for further work. Those forms of training utilizing both passive and active movements with and without visual feedback tended to be most beneficial. There is also initial evidence suggesting that proprioceptive training induces cortical reorganization, reinforcing the notion that proprioceptive training is a viable method for improving sensorimotor function

  16. Restoring tactile and proprioceptive sensation through a brain interface.

    PubMed

    Tabot, Gregg A; Kim, Sung Shin; Winberry, Jeremy E; Bensmaia, Sliman J

    2015-11-01

    Somatosensation plays a critical role in the dexterous manipulation of objects, in emotional communication, and in the embodiment of our limbs. For upper-limb neuroprostheses to be adopted by prospective users, prosthetic limbs will thus need to provide sensory information about the position of the limb in space and about objects grasped in the hand. One approach to restoring touch and proprioception consists of electrically stimulating neurons in somatosensory cortex in the hopes of eliciting meaningful sensations to support the dexterous use of the hands, promote their embodiment, and perhaps even restore the affective dimension of touch. In this review, we discuss the importance of touch and proprioception in everyday life, then describe approaches to providing artificial somatosensory feedback through intracortical microstimulation (ICMS). We explore the importance of biomimicry--the elicitation of naturalistic patterns of neuronal activation--and that of adaptation--the brain's ability to adapt to novel sensory input, and argue that both biomimicry and adaptation will play a critical role in the artificial restoration of somatosensation. We also propose that the documented re-organization that occurs after injury does not pose a significant obstacle to brain interfaces. While still at an early stage of development, sensory restoration is a critical step in transitioning upper-limb neuroprostheses from the laboratory to the clinic. PMID:25201560

  17. Phantom limb pain--a phenomenon of proprioceptive memory?

    PubMed

    Anderson-Barnes, Victoria C; McAuliffe, Caitlin; Swanberg, Kelley M; Tsao, Jack W

    2009-10-01

    Despite the amount of research that has been conducted on phantom limb pain (PLP), the etiology of the condition remains unknown, and treatment options are limited. After an individual loses a limb, the brain continues to detect the presence of the missing limb even though it is no longer attached to the body, likely through proprioceptive signals. The majority of patients with amputations either report the feeling of volitional control over their phantom or a phantom limb that is frozen in a specific position. Many patients also experience PLP. Here we propose a new theory, termed "proprioceptive memory," which may explain some of the unique experiences amputees encounter. We also suggest that memories of the limb's position prior to amputation remain embedded within an individual's subconscious, and pain memories that may be associated with each limb position contribute not only to PLP, but to the experience of a fixed or frozen limb. We suspect that there are memory networks for pain--and other sensations, either positive or negative--that are associated with each limb position, and propose that these memories evolved to protect our bodies from repeated injury. A discussion of mirror therapy as a treatment option for PLP is also provided, as well as an explanation for the efficacy of mirror therapy. The paper offers a unique insight into how and why amputees experience these unusual phenomena. PMID:19556069

  18. Proprioceptive Body Illusions Modulate the Visual Perception of Reaching Distance

    PubMed Central

    Petroni, Agustin; Carbajal, M. Julia; Sigman, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    The neurobiology of reaching has been extensively studied in human and non-human primates. However, the mechanisms that allow a subject to decide—without engaging in explicit action—whether an object is reachable are not fully understood. Some studies conclude that decisions near the reach limit depend on motor simulations of the reaching movement. Others have shown that the body schema plays a role in explicit and implicit distance estimation, especially after motor practice with a tool. In this study we evaluate the causal role of multisensory body representations in the perception of reachable space. We reasoned that if body schema is used to estimate reach, an illusion of the finger size induced by proprioceptive stimulation should propagate to the perception of reaching distances. To test this hypothesis we induced a proprioceptive illusion of extension or shrinkage of the right index finger while participants judged a series of LEDs as reachable or non-reachable without actual movement. Our results show that reach distance estimation depends on the illusory perceived size of the finger: illusory elongation produced a shift of reaching distance away from the body whereas illusory shrinkage produced the opposite effect. Combining these results with previous findings, we suggest that deciding if a target is reachable requires an integration of body inputs in high order multisensory parietal areas that engage in movement simulations through connections with frontal premotor areas. PMID:26110274

  19. Slow Pseudotachylites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pec, M.; Stunitz, H.; Heilbronner, R.

    2011-12-01

    Tectonic pseudotachylites as solidified, friction induced melts are believed to be the only unequivocal evidence for paleo-earthquakes. Earthquakes occur when fast slip (1 - 3 m/s) propagates on a localized failure plane and are always related with stress drops. The mechanical work expended, together with the rock composition and the efficiency of thermal dissipation, controls whether the temperature increase on a localized slip plane will be sufficient to induce fusion. We report the formation of pseudotachylites during steady-state plastic flow at slow bulk shear strain rates (~10^-3 to ~10^-5 /s corresponding to slip rates of ~10^-6 to ~10^-8 m/s) in experiments performed at high confining pressures (500 MPa) and temperatures (300°C) corresponding to a depth of ~15 km. Crushed granitioid rock (Verzasca gneiss), grain size ≤ 200 μm, with 0.2 wt% water added was placed between alumina forcing blocks pre-cut at 45°, weld-sealed in platinum jackets and deformed with a constant displacement rate in a solid medium deformation apparatus (modified Griggs rig). Microstructural observations show the development of a S-C-C' fabric with C' slip zones being the dominant feature. Strain hardening in the beginning of the experiment is accompanied with compaction which is achieved by closely spaced R1 shears pervasively cutting the whole gouge zone and containing fine-grained material (d < 100 nm). The peak strength is achieved at γ ~ 2 at shear stress levels of 1350-1450 MPa when compaction ceases. During further deformation, large local displacements (γ > 10) are localized in less densely spaced, ~10 μm thick C'-C slip zones which develop predominantly in feldspars and often contain micas. In TEM, they appear to have no porosity consisting of partly amorphous material and small crystalline fragments with the average grain size of 20 nm. After the peak strength, the samples weaken by ~20 MPa and continue deforming up to γ ~ 4 without any stress drops. Strain

  20. Emotional proprioception: Treatment of depression with afferent facial feedback.

    PubMed

    Finzi, Eric; Rosenthal, Norman E

    2016-09-01

    We develop the concept of emotional proprioception, whereby the muscles of facial expression play a central role in encoding and transmitting information to the brain's emotional circuitry, and describe its underlying neuroanatomy. We explore the role of facial expression in both reflecting and influencing depressed mood. The circuitry involved in this latter effect is a logical target for treatment with botulinum toxin, and we review the evidence in support of this strategy. Clinical trial data suggest that botulinum toxin is effective in treating depression. We discuss the clinical and theoretical implications of these data. This novel treatment approach is just one example of the potential importance of the cranial nerves in the treatment of depression. PMID:27344227

  1. Proprioceptive bimanual test in intrinsic and extrinsic coordinates.

    PubMed

    Iandolo, Riccardo; Squeri, Valentina; De Santis, Dalia; Giannoni, Psiche; Morasso, Pietro; Casadio, Maura

    2015-01-01

    Is there any difference between matching the position of the hands by asking the subjects to move them to the same spatial location or to mirror-symmetric locations with respect to the body midline? If the motion of the hands were planned in the extrinsic space, the mirror-symmetric task would imply an additional challenge, because we would need to flip the coordinates of the target on the other side of the workspace. Conversely, if the planning were done in intrinsic coordinates, in order to move both hands to the same spot in the workspace, we should compute different joint angles for each arm. Even if both representations were available to the subjects, the two tasks might lead to different results, providing some cue on the organization of the "body schema". In order to answer such questions, the middle fingertip of the non-dominant hand of a population of healthy subjects was passively moved by a manipulandum to 20 different target locations. Subjects matched these positions with the middle fingertip of their dominant hand. For most subjects, the matching accuracy was higher in the extrinsic modality both in terms of systematic error and variability, even for the target locations in which the configuration of the arms was the same for both modalities. This suggests that the matching performance of the subjects could be determined not only by proprioceptive information but also by the cognitive representation of the task: expressing the goal as reaching for the physical location of the hand in space is apparently more effective than requiring to match the proprioceptive representation of joint angles. PMID:25741268

  2. Morphologic Indication for Proprioception in the Human Ciliary Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Flügel-Koch, Cassandra; Neuhuber, Winfried L.; Kaufman, Paul L.; Lütjen-Drecoll, Elke

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To search for proprioceptive nerve terminals in human ciliary muscle. Methods In 48 human donor eyes, histologic and ultrathin sections cut in different planes and wholemounts of the ciliary muscle were studied. Immunohistochemical staining with antibodies against pan-neuronal antigens and antigens reported as markers for sensory terminals in other organs was performed. Results Among the markers for proprioceptive terminals, only calretinin was present in the ciliary body. Calretinin-immunoreactive (IR) nerve terminals surrounded the posterior and reticular ciliary muscle tips and their elastic tendons. Terminals in that region contained mitochondria and neurofilaments. At the anterior tips larger terminals with numerous membrane-filled vesicles were located between the muscle fibers. The most elaborate network of calretinin-IR nerve fibers was present in the ground plate covering the circular muscle portion. Here calretinin-IR neurons with morphologic features of mechanoreception were present. Within the circular muscle portion numerous calretinin-IR ganglion cells were found. Their processes were connected to the calretinin-IR network but also surrounded ciliary muscle cells and NADPH-diaphorase-positive ganglion cells. Conclusions These morphologic findings indicate that there are proprioreceptors in the ciliary muscle that morphologically and presumably functionally differ at different locations. At the posterior muscle tips, the receptors could measure stretch of the tendons, whereas the large receptor organs located at the anterior muscle tips morphologically resemble mechanoreceptors measuring shear stress. The presence of the numerous intrinsic nerve cells indicates that contraction of the circular muscle portion can be modulated locally via a self-contained reflex arc. PMID:19578020

  3. Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Techniques in Sports Medicine: A Reassessment

    PubMed Central

    Surburg, Paul R.; Schrader, John W.

    1997-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this survey was for comparison with a similar 1981 survey to determine if proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) techniques are being implemented in the same manner today. Design and Setting: The survey was made available at the 1993 NATA Clinical Symposium. Subjects: The subjects were 131 athletic trainers representing all major national athletic conferences who attended the 1993 NATA Clinical Symposium and who stated that they used PNF exercise in their practice. Measurements: The survey consisted of 15 questions dealing with academic preparation, years of practice, scope and method of preparation in PNF, application of nine PNF techniques to various joints and regions of the body, and the most successful use of PNF techniques. Results: PNF techniques are most frequently applied during rehabilitation of the knee, shoulder, and hip, similar to 1981 except that the use of these techniques during ankle rehabilitation has increased. In both studies, the most frequently used techniques were contract-relax and hold-relax. Two techniques not surveyed in 1981, contract-relax-contract and hold-relax-contract, are becoming techniques of choice for elbow, wrist, hip, and knee rehabilitation. The use of PNF techniques in the muscle re-education phase of rehabilitation is an application identified in this survey not cited by athletic trainers in the 1981 survey. Conclusions: Proprioceptive and kinesthetic deficits are known to occur after certain types of injuries, and the use of PNF techniques to correct these problems is a natural application A contemporary trend in exercise rehabilitation is multiplanar exercises, which are typified by PNF techniques. PMID:16558430

  4. Proprioceptive Bimanual Test in Intrinsic and Extrinsic Coordinates

    PubMed Central

    Iandolo, Riccardo; Squeri, Valentina; De Santis, Dalia; Giannoni, Psiche; Morasso, Pietro; Casadio, Maura

    2015-01-01

    Is there any difference between matching the position of the hands by asking the subjects to move them to the same spatial location or to mirror-symmetric locations with respect to the body midline? If the motion of the hands were planned in the extrinsic space, the mirror-symmetric task would imply an additional challenge, because we would need to flip the coordinates of the target on the other side of the workspace. Conversely, if the planning were done in intrinsic coordinates, in order to move both hands to the same spot in the workspace, we should compute different joint angles for each arm. Even if both representations were available to the subjects, the two tasks might lead to different results, providing some cue on the organization of the “body schema”. In order to answer such questions, the middle fingertip of the non-dominant hand of a population of healthy subjects was passively moved by a manipulandum to 20 different target locations. Subjects matched these positions with the middle fingertip of their dominant hand. For most subjects, the matching accuracy was higher in the extrinsic modality both in terms of systematic error and variability, even for the target locations in which the configuration of the arms was the same for both modalities. This suggests that the matching performance of the subjects could be determined not only by proprioceptive information but also by the cognitive representation of the task: expressing the goal as reaching for the physical location of the hand in space is apparently more effective than requiring to match the proprioceptive representation of joint angles. PMID:25741268

  5. Can textured insoles improve ankle proprioception and performance in dancers?

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Nili; Waddington, Gordon; Adams, Roger; Karin, Janet; Begg, Rezaul; Tirosh, Oren

    2016-08-01

    With the aim of determining both the acute and the chronic effects of textured insoles on the ankle discrimination and performance ability of dancers, 60 ballet dancers from the Australian Ballet School, aged 14-19 years, were divided into three groups (two intervention groups and a control group), age- and level-matched. In the first 5 weeks (weeks 1 to 5), the first intervention group (GRP1) was asked to wear textured insoles in their ballet shoes and the second intervention group (GRP2) was not given textured insoles to wear. In the next 5 weeks (weeks 6 to 10), GRP2 was asked to wear the same type of textured insoles and GRP1 did not wear the textured insoles. The control group (CTRL) did not wear textured insoles during the whole 10 weeks. All participants were tested preintervention, after 5 weeks and after 10 weeks for ankle discrimination score (AUC scores). Dance performance was assessed by 5-7 dance teachers. Pre-to-post change in AUC scores was significantly greater for the groups wearing insoles than for the controls (P = .046) and the size of pre-to-post changes did not differ between the two intervention groups (P = .834). Significant correlation was found between ankle discrimination score and performance scores, using the textured insoles (r = .412; P = .024). In conclusion, the stimulation to the proprioceptive system arising from textured insoles worn for five weeks was sufficient to improve the proprioceptive ability and performance ability of ballet dancers. PMID:26618395

  6. The Right Supramarginal Gyrus Is Important for Proprioception in Healthy and Stroke-Affected Participants: A Functional MRI Study.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shabat, Ettie; Matyas, Thomas A; Pell, Gaby S; Brodtmann, Amy; Carey, Leeanne M

    2015-01-01

    Human proprioception is essential for motor control, yet its central processing is still debated. Previous studies of passive movements and illusory vibration have reported inconsistent activation patterns related to proprioception, particularly in high-order sensorimotor cortices. We investigated brain activation specific to proprioception, its laterality, and changes following stroke. Twelve healthy and three stroke-affected individuals with proprioceptive deficits participated. Proprioception was assessed clinically with the Wrist Position Sense Test, and participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning. An event-related study design was used, where each proprioceptive stimulus of passive wrist movement was followed by a motor response of mirror -copying with the other wrist. Left (LWP) and right (RWP) wrist proprioception were tested separately. Laterality indices (LIs) were calculated for the main cortical regions activated during proprioception. We found proprioception-related brain activation in high-order sensorimotor cortices in healthy participants especially in the supramarginal gyrus (SMG LWP z = 4.51, RWP z = 4.24) and the dorsal premotor cortex (PMd LWP z = 4.10, RWP z = 3.93). Right hemispheric dominance was observed in the SMG (LI LWP mean 0.41, SD 0.22; RWP 0.29, SD 0.20), and to a lesser degree in the PMd (LI LWP 0.34, SD 0.17; RWP 0.13, SD 0.25). In stroke-affected participants, the main difference in proprioception-related brain activation was reduced laterality in the right SMG. Our findings indicate that the SMG and PMd play a key role in proprioception probably due to their role in spatial processing and motor control, respectively. The findings from stroke--affected individuals suggest that decreased right SMG function may be associated with decreased proprioception. We recommend that clinicians pay particular attention to the assessment and rehabilitation of proprioception following right hemispheric

  7. The Right Supramarginal Gyrus Is Important for Proprioception in Healthy and Stroke-Affected Participants: A Functional MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Shabat, Ettie; Matyas, Thomas A.; Pell, Gaby S.; Brodtmann, Amy; Carey, Leeanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Human proprioception is essential for motor control, yet its central processing is still debated. Previous studies of passive movements and illusory vibration have reported inconsistent activation patterns related to proprioception, particularly in high-order sensorimotor cortices. We investigated brain activation specific to proprioception, its laterality, and changes following stroke. Twelve healthy and three stroke-affected individuals with proprioceptive deficits participated. Proprioception was assessed clinically with the Wrist Position Sense Test, and participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning. An event-related study design was used, where each proprioceptive stimulus of passive wrist movement was followed by a motor response of mirror ­copying with the other wrist. Left (LWP) and right (RWP) wrist proprioception were tested separately. Laterality indices (LIs) were calculated for the main cortical regions activated during proprioception. We found proprioception-related brain activation in high-order sensorimotor cortices in healthy participants especially in the supramarginal gyrus (SMG LWP z = 4.51, RWP z = 4.24) and the dorsal premotor cortex (PMd LWP z = 4.10, RWP z = 3.93). Right hemispheric dominance was observed in the SMG (LI LWP mean 0.41, SD 0.22; RWP 0.29, SD 0.20), and to a lesser degree in the PMd (LI LWP 0.34, SD 0.17; RWP 0.13, SD 0.25). In stroke-affected participants, the main difference in proprioception-related brain activation was reduced laterality in the right SMG. Our findings indicate that the SMG and PMd play a key role in proprioception probably due to their role in spatial processing and motor control, respectively. The findings from stroke-­affected individuals suggest that decreased right SMG function may be associated with decreased proprioception. We recommend that clinicians pay particular attention to the assessment and rehabilitation of proprioception following right hemispheric

  8. A critical role for Piezo2 channels in the mechanotransduction of mouse proprioceptive neurons

    PubMed Central

    Florez-Paz, Danny; Bali, Kiran Kumar; Kuner, Rohini; Gomis, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Proprioceptors are responsible for the conscious sensation of limb position and movement, muscle tension or force, and balance. Recent evidence suggests that Piezo2 is a low threshold mechanosensory receptor in the peripheral nervous system, acting as a transducer for touch sensation and proprioception. Thus, we characterized proprioceptive neurons in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus that are involved in processing proprioceptive information from the face and oral cavity. This is a specific population of neurons that produce rapidly adapting mechanically-activated currents that are fully dependent on Piezo2. As such, we analyzed the deficits in balance and coordination caused by the selective deletion of the channel in proprioceptors (conditional knockout). The data clearly shows that Piezo2 fulfills a critical role in a defined homogeneous population of proprioceptor neurons that innervate the head muscles, demonstrating that this ion channel is essential for mammalian proprioceptive mechanotransduction. PMID:27184818

  9. A critical role for Piezo2 channels in the mechanotransduction of mouse proprioceptive neurons.

    PubMed

    Florez-Paz, Danny; Bali, Kiran Kumar; Kuner, Rohini; Gomis, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Proprioceptors are responsible for the conscious sensation of limb position and movement, muscle tension or force, and balance. Recent evidence suggests that Piezo2 is a low threshold mechanosensory receptor in the peripheral nervous system, acting as a transducer for touch sensation and proprioception. Thus, we characterized proprioceptive neurons in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus that are involved in processing proprioceptive information from the face and oral cavity. This is a specific population of neurons that produce rapidly adapting mechanically-activated currents that are fully dependent on Piezo2. As such, we analyzed the deficits in balance and coordination caused by the selective deletion of the channel in proprioceptors (conditional knockout). The data clearly shows that Piezo2 fulfills a critical role in a defined homogeneous population of proprioceptor neurons that innervate the head muscles, demonstrating that this ion channel is essential for mammalian proprioceptive mechanotransduction. PMID:27184818

  10. Investigation of rotational skin stretch for proprioceptive feedback with application to myoelectric systems.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Jason; Bark, Karlin; Savall, Joan; Cutkosky, Mark

    2010-02-01

    We present a new wearable haptic device that provides a sense of position and motion by inducing rotational skin stretch on the user's skin. In the experiments described in this paper, the device was used to provide proprioceptive feedback from a virtual prosthetic arm controlled with myoelectric sensors on the bicep and tricep muscles in 15 able-bodied participants. Targeting errors in blind movements with the haptic device were compared to cases where no feedback and contralateral proprioception were provided. Average errors were lower with the device than with no feedback but larger than with contralateral proprioceptive feedback. Participants also had lower visual demand with the device than with no feedback while tracking a 30 ( degrees ) moving range. The results indicate that the rotational skin stretch may ultimately be effective for proprioceptive feedback in myoelectric prostheses, particularly when vision is otherwise occupied. PMID:20071271

  11. Interhemispheric neuroplasticity following limb deafferentation detected by resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)

    PubMed Central

    Pawela, Christopher P.; Biswal, Bharat B.; Hudetz, Anthony G.; Li, Rupeng; Jones, Seth R.; Cho, Younghoon R.; Matloub, Hani S.; Hyde, James S.

    2009-01-01

    Functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) studies in rat brain show brain reorganization following peripheral nerve injury. Subacute neuroplasticity was observed two weeks following transection of the four major nerves of the brachial plexus. Direct functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) stimulation of the intact radial nerve reveals an activation pattern in the forelimb regions of the sensory and motor cortices that is significantly different from that observed in normal rats. Results of this fMRI experiment were used to determine seed voxel regions for fcMRI analysis. Intrahemispheric connectivities in the sensorimotor forelimb representations in both hemispheres are largely unaffected by deafferentation, whereas substantial disruption of interhemispheric sensorimotor cortical connectivity occurs. In addition, significant intra- and interhemispheric changes in connectivities of thalamic nuclei were found. These are the central findings of the study. They could not have been obtained from fMRI studies alone—both fMRI and fcMRI are needed. The combination provides a general marker for brain plasticity. The rat visual system was studied in the same animals as a control. No neuroplastic changes in connectivities were found in the primary visual cortex upon forelimb deafferentation. Differences were noted in regions responsible for processing multisensory visual-motor information. This incidental discovery is considered to be significant. It may provide insight into phantom limb epiphenomena. PMID:19796693

  12. Successful Graded Mirror Therapy in a Patient with Chronic Deafferentation Pain in Whom Traditional Mirror Therapy was Ineffective: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mibu, Akira; Nishigami, Tomohiko; Tanaka, Katsuyoshi; Osumi, Michihiro; Tanabe, Akihito

    2016-04-01

    A 43-year-old man had deafferentation pain in his right upper extremity secondary to brachial plexus avulsion from a traffic accident 23 years previously. On our initial examination, he had severe tingling pain with numbness in the right fingers rated 10 on the numerical rating scale. The body perception of the affected third and fourth fingers was distorted in the flexed position. Although he performed traditional mirror therapy (TMT) for 4 weeks in the same methods as seen in previous studies, he could not obtain willed motor imagery and pain-alleviation effect. Therefore, we modified the task of TMT: Graded mirror therapy (GMT). GMT consisted of five stages: (1) observation of the mirror reflection of the unaffected side without imagining any movements of the affected side; (2) observation of the mirror reflection of the third and fourth fingers changing shape gradually adjusted from a flexed position to a extended position; (3) observation of the mirror reflection of passive movement; (4) motor imagery of affected fingers with observation of the mirror reflection (similar to TMT); (5) motor imagery of affected fingers without mirror. Each task was performed for 3 to 4 weeks. As a result, pain intensity during mirror therapy gradually decreased and finally disappeared. The body perception of the affected fingers also improved, and he could imagine the movement of the fingers with or without mirror. We suggested that GMT starting from the observation task without motor imagery may effectively decrease deafferentation pain compared to TMT. PMID:26914841

  13. Disruption in proprioception from long-term thalamic deep brain stimulation: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Semrau, Jennifer A.; Herter, Troy M.; Kiss, Zelma H.; Dukelow, Sean P.

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an excellent treatment for tremor and is generally thought to be reversible by turning off stimulation. For tremor, DBS is implanted in the ventrointermedius (Vim) nucleus of the thalamus, a region that relays proprioceptive information for movement sensation (kinaesthesia). Gait disturbances have been observed with bilateral Vim DBS, but the long-term effects on proprioceptive processing are unknown. We aimed to determine whether Vim DBS surgical implantation or stimulation leads to proprioceptive deficits in the upper limb. We assessed two groups of tremor subjects on measures of proprioception (kinaesthesia, position sense) and motor function using a robotic exoskeleton. In the first group (Surgery), we tested patients before and after implantation of Vim DBS, but before DBS was turned on to determine if proprioceptive deficits were inherent to tremor or caused by DBS implantation. In the second group (Stim), we tested subjects with chronically implanted Vim DBS ON and OFF stimulation. Compared to controls, there were no proprioceptive deficits before or after DBS implantation in the Surgery group. Surprisingly, those that received chronic long-term stimulation (LT-stim, 3–10 years) displayed significant proprioceptive deficits ON and OFF stimulation not present in subjects with chronic short-term stimulation (ST-stim, 0.5–2 years). LT-stim had significantly larger variability and reduced workspace area during the position sense assessment. During the kinesthetic assessment, LT-stim made significantly larger directional errors and consistently underestimated the speed of the robot, despite generating normal movement speeds during motor assessment. Chronic long-term Vim DBS may potentially disrupt proprioceptive processing, possibly inducing irreversible plasticity in the Vim nucleus and/or its network connections. Our findings in the upper limb may help explain some of the gait disturbances seen by others following Vim DBS

  14. Degeneration of proprioceptive sensory nerve endings in mice harboring amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-causing mutations.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Sydney K; Kemp, Zachary; Hatzipetros, Theo; Vieira, Fernando; Valdez, Gregorio

    2015-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that primarily targets the motor system. Although much is known about the effects of ALS on motor neurons and glial cells, little is known about its effect on proprioceptive sensory neurons. This study examines proprioceptive sensory neurons in mice harboring mutations associated with ALS, in SOD1(G93A) and TDP43(A315T) transgenic mice. In both transgenic lines, we found fewer proprioceptive sensory neurons containing fluorescently tagged cholera toxin in their soma five days after injecting this retrograde tracer into the tibialis anterior muscle. We asked whether this is due to neuronal loss or selective degeneration of peripheral nerve endings. We found no difference in the total number and size of proprioceptive sensory neuron soma between symptomatic SOD1(G93A) and control mice. However, analysis of proprioceptive nerve endings in muscles revealed early and significant alterations at Ia/II proprioceptive nerve endings in muscle spindles before the symptomatic phase of the disease. Although these changes occur alongside those at α-motor axons in SOD1(G93A) mice, Ia/II sensory nerve endings degenerate in the absence of obvious alterations in α-motor axons in TDP43(A315T) transgenic mice. We next asked whether proprioceptive nerve endings are similarly affected in the spinal cord and found that nerve endings terminating on α-motor neurons are affected during the symptomatic phase and after peripheral nerve endings begin to degenerate. Overall, we show that Ia/II proprioceptive sensory neurons are affected by ALS-causing mutations, with pathological changes starting at their peripheral nerve endings. PMID:26136049

  15. Proprioception rehabilitation training system for stroke patients using virtual reality technology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun I; Song, In-Ho; Cho, Sangwoo; Kim, In Young; Ku, Jeonghun; Kang, Youn Joo; Jang, Dong Pyo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated a virtual reality (VR) proprioceptive rehabilitation system that could manipulate the visual feedback of upper-limb during training and could do training by relying on proprioception feedback only. Virtual environments were designed in order to switch visual feedback on/off during upper-limb training. Two types of VR training tasks were designed for evaluating the effect of the proprioception focused training compared to the training with visual feedback. In order to evaluate the developed proprioception feedback virtual environment system, we recruited ten stroke patients (age: 54.7± 7.83years, on set: 3.29± 3.83 years). All patients performed three times PFVE task in order to check the improvement of proprioception function just before training session, after one week training, and after all training. In a comparison between FMS score and PFVE, the FMS score had a significant relationship with the error distance(r = -.662, n=10, p = .037) and total movement distance(r = -.726, n=10, p = .018) in PFVE. Comparing the training effect between in virtual environment with visual feedback and with proprioception, the click count, error distance and total error distance was more reduced in PFVE than VFVE. (Click count: p = 0.005, error distance: p = 0.001, total error distance: p = 0.007). It suggested that the proprioception feedback rather than visual feedback could be effective means to enhancing motor control during rehabilitation training. The developed VR system for rehabilitation has been verified in that stroke patients improved motor control after VR proprioception feedback training. PMID:24110764

  16. Robot-Aided Mapping of Wrist Proprioceptive Acuity across a 3D Workspace

    PubMed Central

    Marini, Francesca; Squeri, Valentina; Morasso, Pietro; Konczak, Jürgen; Masia, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Proprioceptive signals from peripheral mechanoreceptors form the basis for bodily perception and are known to be essential for motor control. However we still have an incomplete understanding of how proprioception differs between joints, whether it differs among the various degrees-of-freedom (DoFs) within a particular joint, and how such differences affect motor control and learning. We here introduce a robot-aided method to objectively measure proprioceptive function: specifically, we systematically mapped wrist proprioceptive acuity across the three DoFs of the wrist/hand complex with the aim to characterize the wrist position sense. Thirty healthy young adults performed an ipsilateral active joint position matching task with their dominant wrist using a haptic robotic exoskeleton. Our results indicate that the active wrist position sense acuity is anisotropic across the joint, with the abduction/adduction DoF having the highest acuity (the error of acuity for flexion/extension is 4.64 ± 0.24°; abduction/adduction: 3.68 ± 0.32°; supination/pronation: 5.15 ± 0.37°) and they also revealed that proprioceptive acuity decreases for smaller joint displacements. We believe this knowledge is imperative in a clinical scenario when assessing proprioceptive deficits and for understanding how such sensory deficits relate to observable motor impairments. PMID:27536882

  17. Robot-Aided Mapping of Wrist Proprioceptive Acuity across a 3D Workspace.

    PubMed

    Marini, Francesca; Squeri, Valentina; Morasso, Pietro; Konczak, Jürgen; Masia, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Proprioceptive signals from peripheral mechanoreceptors form the basis for bodily perception and are known to be essential for motor control. However we still have an incomplete understanding of how proprioception differs between joints, whether it differs among the various degrees-of-freedom (DoFs) within a particular joint, and how such differences affect motor control and learning. We here introduce a robot-aided method to objectively measure proprioceptive function: specifically, we systematically mapped wrist proprioceptive acuity across the three DoFs of the wrist/hand complex with the aim to characterize the wrist position sense. Thirty healthy young adults performed an ipsilateral active joint position matching task with their dominant wrist using a haptic robotic exoskeleton. Our results indicate that the active wrist position sense acuity is anisotropic across the joint, with the abduction/adduction DoF having the highest acuity (the error of acuity for flexion/extension is 4.64 ± 0.24°; abduction/adduction: 3.68 ± 0.32°; supination/pronation: 5.15 ± 0.37°) and they also revealed that proprioceptive acuity decreases for smaller joint displacements. We believe this knowledge is imperative in a clinical scenario when assessing proprioceptive deficits and for understanding how such sensory deficits relate to observable motor impairments. PMID:27536882

  18. Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF): Its Mechanisms and Effects on Range of Motion and Muscular Function

    PubMed Central

    Hindle, Kayla B.; Whitcomb, Tyler J.; Briggs, Wyatt O.; Hong, Junggi

    2012-01-01

    Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) is common practice for increasing range of motion, though little research has been done to evaluate theories behind it. The purpose of this study was to review possible mechanisms, proposed theories, and physiological changes that occur due to proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation techniques. Four theoretical mechanisms were identified: autogenic inhibition, reciprocal inhibition, stress relaxation, and the gate control theory. The studies suggest that a combination of these four mechanisms enhance range of motion. When completed prior to exercise, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation decreases performance in maximal effort exercises. When this stretching technique is performed consistently and post exercise, it increases athletic performance, along with range of motion. Little investigation has been done regarding the theoretical mechanisms of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, though four mechanisms were identified from the literature. As stated, the main goal of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation is to increase range of motion and performance. Studies found both of these to be true when completed under the correct conditions. These mechanisms were found to be plausible; however, further investigation needs to be conducted. All four mechanisms behind the stretching technique explain the reasoning behind the increase in range of motion, as well as in strength and athletic performance. Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation shows potential benefits if performed correctly and consistently. PMID:23487249

  19. The role of differential delays in integrating transient visual and proprioceptive information

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Brendan D.; de la Malla, Cristina; López-Moliner, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Many actions involve limb movements toward a target. Visual and proprioceptive estimates are available online, and by optimally combining (Ernst and Banks, 2002) both modalities during the movement, the system can increase the precision of the hand estimate. The notion that both sensory modalities are integrated is also motivated by the intuition that we do not consciously perceive any discrepancy between the felt and seen hand's positions. This coherence as a result of integration does not necessarily imply realignment between the two modalities (Smeets et al., 2006). For example, the two estimates (visual and proprioceptive) might be different without either of them (e.g., proprioception) ever being adjusted after recovering the other (e.g., vision). The implication that the felt and seen positions might be different has a temporal analog. Because the actual feedback from the hand at a given instantaneous position reaches brain areas at different times for proprioception and vision (shorter for proprioception), the corresponding instantaneous unisensory position estimates will be different, with the proprioceptive one being ahead of the visual one. Based on the assumption that the system integrates optimally and online the available evidence from both senses, we introduce a temporal mechanism that explains the reported overestimation of hand positions when vision is occluded for active and passive movements (Gritsenko et al., 2007) without the need to resort to initial feedforward estimates (Wolpert et al., 1995). We set up hypotheses to test the validity of the model, and we contrast simulation-based predictions with empirical data. PMID:24550870

  20. Ankle proprioception is not targeted by exercises on an unstable surface.

    PubMed

    Kiers, Henri; Brumagne, Simon; van Dieën, Jaap; van der Wees, Philip; Vanhees, Luc

    2012-04-01

    Laboratory study using a repeated measures design. The aim of this study was to determine if ankle proprioception is targeted in exercises on unstable surfaces. Lateral ankle sprain (LAS) has recurrence rates over 70%, which are believed to be due to a reduced accuracy of proprioceptive signals from the ankle. Proprioceptive exercises in rehabilitation of LAS mostly consist of balancing activities on an unstable surface. The methods include 100 healthy adults stood barefoot on a solid surface and a foam pad over a force plate, with occluded vision. Mechanical vibration was used to stimulate proprioceptive output of muscle spindles of triceps surae and lumbar paraspinal musculature. Each trial lasted for 60 s; vibration was applied from the 15th till the 30th second. Changes in mean velocity and mean position of the center of pressure (CoP) as a result of muscle vibration were calculated. Results show that on foam, the effect of triceps surae vibration on mean CoP velocity was significantly smaller than on a solid surface, while for paraspinal musculature vibration the effect was bigger on foam than on solid surface. Similar effects were seen for mean CoP displacement as outcome. Exercises on unstable surfaces appear not to target peripheral ankle proprioception. Exercises on an unstable surface may challenge the capacity of the central nervous system to shift the weighting of sources of proprioceptive signals on balance. PMID:21858665

  1. The co-constitution of the self and the world: action and proprioceptive coupling

    PubMed Central

    Gapenne, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes a theoretical reflection on the conditions for the constitution of a distinction between the self and the world by a cognitive system. The main hypothesis is the following: proprioception, as a sensory system that is habitually dedicated essentially to experience of the body, is conceived here as a coupling which is necessary for the dual and concomitant constitution of a bodily self and of a distal perceptual field. After recalling the singular characteristics of proprioceptive coupling, three lines of thought are developed. The first, which is notably inspired by research on sensory substitution, aims at emphasizing the indispensable role of action in the context of such perceptual learning. In a second part, this hypothesis is tested against opposing arguments. In particular, we shall discuss, in the context of what Braitenberg called a synthetic psychology, the emergence of oriented behaviors in simple robots that can be regulated by sensory regulations which are strictly external, since these robots do not have any form of “proprioception.” In the same vein, this part also provides the opportunity to discuss the argument concerning a bijective relation between action and proprioception; it has been argued by others that because of this strict bijection it is not possible for proprioception to be the basis for the constitution of an exteriority. The third part, which is more prospective, suggests that it is important to take the measure of the phylogenetic history of this exteriority, starting from unicellular organisms. Taking into account the literature which attests the existence of proprioception even amongst the most elementary living organisms, this leads us to propose that the coupling of proprioception to action is very primitive, and that the role we propose for it in the co-constitution of an exteriority and self is probably already at work in the simplest living organisms. PMID:24971073

  2. Increasing cutaneous afferent feedback improves proprioceptive accuracy at the knee in patients with sensory ataxia.

    PubMed

    Macefield, Vaughan G; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Goulding, Niamh; Palma, Jose-Alberto; Fuente Mora, Cristina; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type III (HSAN III) features disturbed proprioception and a marked ataxic gait. We recently showed that joint angle matching error at the knee is positively correlated with the degree of ataxia. Using intraneural microelectrodes, we also documented that these patients lack functional muscle spindle afferents but have preserved large-diameter cutaneous afferents, suggesting that patients with better proprioception may be relying more on proprioceptive cues provided by tactile afferents. We tested the hypothesis that enhancing cutaneous sensory feedback by stretching the skin at the knee joint using unidirectional elasticity tape could improve proprioceptive accuracy in patients with a congenital absence of functional muscle spindles. Passive joint angle matching at the knee was used to assess proprioceptive accuracy in 25 patients with HSAN III and 9 age-matched control subjects, with and without taping. Angles of the reference and indicator knees were recorded with digital inclinometers and the absolute error, gradient, and correlation coefficient between the two sides calculated. Patients with HSAN III performed poorly on the joint angle matching test [mean matching error 8.0 ± 0.8° (±SE); controls 3.0 ± 0.3°]. Following application of tape bilaterally to the knee in an X-shaped pattern, proprioceptive performance improved significantly in the patients (mean error 5.4 ± 0.7°) but not in the controls (3.0 ± 0.2°). Across patients, but not controls, significant increases in gradient and correlation coefficient were also apparent following taping. We conclude that taping improves proprioception at the knee in HSAN III, presumably via enhanced sensory feedback from the skin. PMID:26655817

  3. Impact of Parkinson's disease on proprioceptively based on-line movement control.

    PubMed

    Mongeon, David; Blanchet, Pierre; Bergeron, Stéphanie; Messier, Julie

    2015-09-01

    Evidence suggests that Parkinson's disease (PD) patients produce large spatial errors when reaching to proprioceptively defined targets. Here, we examined whether these movement inaccuracies result mainly from impaired use of proprioceptive inputs for movement planning mechanisms or from on-line movement guidance. Medicated and non-medicated PD patients and healthy controls performed three-dimensional reaching movements in four sensorimotor conditions that increase proprioceptive processing requirements. We assessed the influence of these sensorimotor conditions on the final accuracy and initial kinematics of the movements. If the patterns of final errors are primarily determined by planning processes before the initiation of the movement, the initial kinematics of reaching movements should show similar trends and predict the pattern of final errors. Medicated and non-medicated PD patients showed a greater mean level of final 3D errors than healthy controls when proprioception was the sole source of information guiding the movement, but this difference reached significance only for medicated PD patients. However, the pattern of initial kinematics and final spatial errors were markedly different both between sensorimotor conditions and between groups. Furthermore, medicated and non-medicated PD patients were less efficient than healthy controls in compensating for their initial spatial errors (hand distance from target location at peak velocity) when aiming at proprioceptively defined compared to visually defined targets. Considered together, the results are consistent with a selective deficit in proprioceptively based movement guidance in PD. Furthermore, dopaminergic medication did not improve proprioceptively guided movements in PD patients, indicating that dopaminergic dysfunction within the basal ganglia is not solely responsible for these deficits. PMID:26055990

  4. Modelling muscle spindle dynamics for a proprioceptive prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ian; Constandinou, Timothy G

    2013-01-01

    Muscle spindles are found throughout our skeletal muscle tissue and continuously provide us with a sense of our limbs' position and motion (proprioception). This paper advances a model for generating artificial muscle spindle signals for a prosthetic limb, with the aim of one day providing amputees with a sense of feeling in their artificial limb. By utilising the Opensim biomechanical modelling package the relationship between a joint's angle and the length of surrounding muscles is estimated for a prosthetic limb. This is then applied to the established Mileusnic model to determine the associated muscle spindle firing pattern. This complete system model is then reduced to allow for a computationally efficient hardware implementation. This reduction is achieved with minimal impact on accuracy by selecting key mono-articular muscles and fitting equations to relate joint angle to muscle length. Parameter values fitting the Mileusnic model to human spindles are then proposed and validated against previously published human neural recordings. Finally, a model for fusimotor signals is also proposed based on data previously recorded from reduced animal experiments. PMID:24110089

  5. Development of a BIONic muscle spindle for prosthetic proprioception.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Nicholas A; Loeb, Gerald E

    2007-06-01

    The replacement of proprioceptive function, whether for conscious sensation or feedback control, is likely to be an important aspect of neural prosthetic restoration of limb movements. Thus far, however, it has been hampered by the absence of unobtrusive sensors. We propose a method whereby fully implanted, telemetrically operated BIONs monitor muscle movement, and thereby detect changes in joint angle(s) and/or limb posture without requiring the use of secondary components attached to limb segments or external reference frames. The sensor system is designed to detect variations in the electrical coupling between devices implanted in neighboring muscles that result from changes in their relative position as the muscles contract and stretch with joint motion. The goal of this study was to develop and empirically validate mathematical models of the sensing scheme and to use computer simulations to provide an early proof of concept and inform design of the overall sensor system. Results from experiments using paired dipoles in a saline bath and finite element simulations have given insight into the current distribution and potential gradients exhibited within bounded anisotropic environments similar to a human limb segment and demonstrated an anticipated signal to noise ratio of at least 8:1 for submillimeter resolution of relative implant movement over a range of implant displacements up to 15 cm. PMID:17554822

  6. Proprioceptive Training and Injury Prevention in a Professional Men's Basketball Team: A Six-Year Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Roberto; Rocca, Flavio; Mamo, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Riva, D, Bianchi, R, Rocca, F, and Mamo, C. Proprioceptive training and injury prevention in a professional men's basketball team: A six-year prospective study. J Strength Cond Res 30(2): 461–475, 2016—Single limb stance instability is a risk factor for lower extremity injuries. Therefore, the development of proprioception may play an important role in injury prevention. This investigation considered a professional basketball team for 6 years, integrating systematic proprioceptive activity in the training routine. The purpose was to assess the effectiveness of proprioceptive training programs based on quantifiable instability, to reduce ankle sprains, knee sprains, and low back pain through developing refined and long-lasting proprioceptive control. Fifty-five subjects were studied. In the first biennium (2004–2006), the preventive program consisted of classic proprioceptive exercises. In the second biennium (2006–2008), the proprioceptive training became quantifiable and interactive by means of electronic proprioceptive stations. In the third biennium (2008–2010), the intensity and the training volume increased while the session duration became shorter. Analysis of variance was used to analyze the differences in proprioceptive control between groups, years, and bienniums. Injury rates and rate ratios of injury during practices and games were estimated. The results showed a statistically significant reduction in the occurrence of ankle sprains by 81% from the first to the third biennium (p < 0.001). Low back pain showed similar results with a reduction of 77.8% (p < 0.005). The reduction in knee sprains was 64.5% (not significant). Comparing the third biennium with the level of all new entry players, proprioceptive control improved significantly by 72.2% (p < 0.001). These findings indicate that improvements in proprioceptive control in single stance may be a key factor for an effective reduction in ankle sprains, knee sprains, and low back pain

  7. Preserved motor learning after stroke is related to the degree of proprioceptive deficit

    PubMed Central

    Vidoni, Eric D; Boyd, Lara A

    2009-01-01

    Background Most motor learning theories posit that proprioceptive sensation serves an important role in acquiring and performing movement patterns. However, we recently demonstrated that experimental disruption of proprioception peripherally altered motor performance but not motor learning in humans. Little work has considered humans with central nervous system damage. The purpose of the present study was to specifically consider the relationship between proprioception and motor learning at the level of the central nervous system in humans. Methods Individuals with chronic (> 6mo) stroke and similarly aged healthy participants performed a continuous tracking task with an embedded repeating segment over two days and returned on a third day for retention testing. A limb-position matching task was used to quantify proprioception. Results Individuals with chronic stroke demonstrated the ability to learn to track a repeating segment; however, the magnitude of behavioral change associated with repeated segment-specific learning was directly related to the integrity of central proprioceptive processing as indexed by our limb-position matching task. Conclusion These results support the importance of central sensory processing for motor learning. The confirmation of central sensory processing dependent motor learning in humans is discussed in the context of our prior report of preserved motor learning when sensation is disrupted peripherally. PMID:19715593

  8. Spatially valid proprioceptive cues improve the detection of a visual stimulus

    PubMed Central

    Miall, R. Chris; Balslev, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    Vision and proprioception are the main sensory modalities that convey hand location and direction of movement. Fusion of these sensory signals into a single robust percept is now well documented. However, it is not known whether these modalities also interact in the spatial allocation of attention, which has been demonstrated for other modality pairings. The aim of this study was to test whether proprioceptive signals can spatially cue a visual target to improve its detection. Participants were instructed to use a planar manipulandum in a forward reaching action and determine during this movement whether a near-threshold visual target appeared at either of two lateral positions. The target presentation was followed by a masking stimulus, which made its possible location unambiguous, but not its presence. Proprioceptive cues were given by applying a brief lateral force to the participant’s arm, either in the same direction (validly cued) or in the opposite direction (invalidly cued) to the on-screen location of the mask. The d′ detection rate of the target increased when the direction of proprioceptive stimulus was compatible with the location of the visual target compared to when it was incompatible. These results suggest that proprioception influences the allocation of attention in visual space. PMID:20567807

  9. A quantitative and standardized robotic method for the evaluation of arm proprioception after stroke.

    PubMed

    Simo, Lucia S; Ghez, Claude; Botzer, Lior; Scheidt, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    Stroke often results in both motor and sensory deficits, which may interact in the manifested functional impairment. Proprioception is known to play important roles in the planning and control of limb posture and movement; however, the impact of proprioceptive deficits on motor function has been difficult to elucidate due in part to the qualitative nature of available clinical tests. We present a quantitative and standardized method for evaluating proprioception in tasks directly relevant to those used to assess motor function. Using a robotic manipulandum that exerted controlled displacements of the hand, stroke participants were evaluated, and compared with a control group, in their ability to detect such displacements in a 2-alternative, forced-choice paradigm. A psychometric function parameterized the decision process underlying the detection of the hand displacements. The shape of this function was determined by a signal detection threshold and by the variability of the response about this threshold. Our automatic procedure differentiates between participants with and without proprioceptive deficits and quantifies functional proprioceptive sensation on a magnitude scale that is meaningful for ongoing studies of degraded motor function in comparable horizontal movements. PMID:22256252

  10. Upper limb asymmetries in the matching of proprioceptive versus visual targets.

    PubMed

    Goble, Daniel J; Brown, Susan H

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine the extent to which "sensory dominance" exists in right-handers with respect to the utilization of proprioceptive versus visual feedback. Thirteen right-handed adults performed two target-matching tasks using instrumented manipulanda. In the proprioceptive matching task, the left or right elbow of blindfolded subjects was passively extended by a torque motor system to a target position and held for 3 s before being returned to the start position. The target angle was then matched with either the ipsilateral or contralateral arm. In the second task, visual matching, circular targets were briefly projected to either side of a visual fixation point located in front of the subject. Subjects then matched the target positions with a laser pointer by moving either the ipsilateral or contralateral arm. Overall, marked arm differences in accuracy were seen based on the type of sensory feedback used for target presentation. For the proprioceptive matching task errors were smaller for the nonpreferred left arm, whereas during the visual matching task smaller errors were found for the preferred right arm. These results suggest a left arm/right hemisphere advantage for proprioceptive feedback processing and a right arm/left hemisphere advantage for visual information processing. Such asymmetries may reflect fundamental differences between the two arm/hemisphere systems during the performance of bimanual tasks where the preferred arm requires visual guidance to manipulate an object, whereas the nonpreferred stabilizes that object on the basis of proprioceptive feedback. PMID:18436632

  11. Proprioceptive Dysfunction in Focal Dystonia: From Experimental Evidence to Rehabilitation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Avanzino, Laura; Fiorio, Mirta

    2014-01-01

    Dystonia has historically been considered a disorder of the basal ganglia, mainly affecting planning and execution of voluntary movements. This notion comes from the observation that most lesions responsible for secondary dystonia involve the basal ganglia. However, what emerges from recent research is that dystonia is linked to the dysfunction of a complex neural network that comprises basal ganglia–thalamic–frontal cortex, but also the inferior parietal cortex and the cerebellum. While dystonia is clearly a motor problem, it turned out that sensory aspects are also fundamental, especially those related to proprioception. We outline experimental evidence for proprioceptive dysfunction in focal dystonia from intrinsic sensory abnormalities to impaired sensorimotor integration, which is the process by which sensory information is used to plan and execute volitional movements. Particularly, we will focus on proprioceptive aspects of dystonia, including: (i) processing of vibratory input, (ii) temporal discrimination of two passive movements, (iii) multimodal integration of visual-tactile and proprioceptive inputs, and (iv) motor control in the absence of visual feedback. We suggest that these investigations contribute not only to a better understanding of dystonia pathophysiology, but also to develop rehabilitation strategies aimed at facilitating the processing of proprioceptive input. PMID:25538612

  12. Computationally efficient modeling of proprioceptive signals in the upper limb for prostheses: a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ian; Constandinou, Timothy G.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate models of proprioceptive neural patterns could 1 day play an important role in the creation of an intuitive proprioceptive neural prosthesis for amputees. This paper looks at combining efficient implementations of biomechanical and proprioceptor models in order to generate signals that mimic human muscular proprioceptive patterns for future experimental work in prosthesis feedback. A neuro-musculoskeletal model of the upper limb with 7 degrees of freedom and 17 muscles is presented and generates real time estimates of muscle spindle and Golgi Tendon Organ neural firing patterns. Unlike previous neuro-musculoskeletal models, muscle activation and excitation levels are unknowns in this application and an inverse dynamics tool (static optimization) is integrated to estimate these variables. A proprioceptive prosthesis will need to be portable and this is incompatible with the computationally demanding nature of standard biomechanical and proprioceptor modeling. This paper uses and proposes a number of approximations and optimizations to make real time operation on portable hardware feasible. Finally technical obstacles to mimicking natural feedback for an intuitive proprioceptive prosthesis, as well as issues and limitations with existing models, are identified and discussed. PMID:25009463

  13. Movement - uncontrolled or slow

    MedlinePlus

    ... leg movements - uncontrollable; Slow involuntary movements of large muscle groups; Athetoid movements ... The slow twisting movements of muscles (athetosis) or jerky muscle ... including: Cerebral palsy Drug side effects Encephalitis ...

  14. Self-Supervised Learning of Terrain Traversability from Proprioceptive Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajracharya, Max; Howard, Andrew B.; Matthies, Larry H.

    2009-01-01

    Robust and reliable autonomous navigation in unstructured, off-road terrain is a critical element in making unmanned ground vehicles a reality. Existing approaches tend to rely on evaluating the traversability of terrain based on fixed parameters obtained via testing in specific environments. This results in a system that handles the terrain well that it trained in, but is unable to process terrain outside its test parameters. An adaptive system does not take the place of training, but supplements it. Whereas training imprints certain environments, an adaptive system would imprint terrain elements and the interactions amongst them, and allow the vehicle to build a map of local elements using proprioceptive sensors. Such sensors can include velocity, wheel slippage, bumper hits, and accelerometers. Data obtained by the sensors can be compared to observations from ranging sensors such as cameras and LADAR (laser detection and ranging) in order to adapt to any kind of terrain. In this way, it could sample its surroundings not only to create a map of clear space, but also of what kind of space it is and its composition. By having a set of building blocks consisting of terrain features, a vehicle can adapt to terrain that it has never seen before, and thus be robust to a changing environment. New observations could be added to its library, enabling it to infer terrain types that it wasn't trained on. This would be very useful in alien environments, where many of the physical features are known, but some are not. For example, a seemingly flat, hard plain could actually be soft sand, and the vehicle would sense the sand and avoid it automatically.

  15. Deficits in the ability to use proprioceptive feedback in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Goble, Daniel J; Hurvitz, Edward A; Brown, Susan H

    2009-09-01

    Compared with motor impairment in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP), less attention has been paid to sensory feedback processing deficits. This includes, especially, proprioceptive information regarding arm position. This study examined the ability of children with hemiplegic CP to use proprioceptive feedback during a goal-directed target-matching task. Eight children with hemiplegic CP and eight typically developing children performed proprioceptively guided matching of elbow position with either arm. Between groups, it was found that matching errors were significantly greater for the affected arm of children with hemiplegic CP. With respect to the side of brain injury, deficits were only seen for children with right hemisphere damage. These results provide valuable information that may assist in the development of more effective sensorimotor rehabilitation and training paradigms. PMID:19318973

  16. Pyridoxine treatment alters embryonic motility in chicks: Implications for the role of proprioception.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Andrew A; Bekoff, Anne

    2015-03-01

    Somatosensory feedback is important for the modulation of normal locomotion in adult animals, but we do not have a good understanding of when somatosensory information is first used to modulate motility during embryogenesis or how somatosensation is first used to regulate motor output. We used pyridoxine administration (vitamin B6 ), which is known to mostly kill proprioceptive neurons in adult mammals and embryonic chicks, to explore the role of proprioceptive feedback during early embryonic motility in the chick. Injection of pyridoxine on embryonic day 7 (E7) and E8 reduced the amplitude of leg movements recorded on E9 and the number of large, healthy neurons in the ventral-lateral portion of the DRGs. We conclude that proprioception is initially used during embryogenesis to modulate the strength of motor output, but that it is not incorporated into other aspects of pattern generation until later in development as poly-synaptic pathways develop. PMID:25645095

  17. The effects of static friction and backlash on extended physiological proprioception control of a powered prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Todd R; Weir, Richard F; Heckathorne, Craig W; Childress, Dudley S

    2005-01-01

    In general, externally powered prostheses do not provide proprioceptive feedback and thus require the user to rely on cognitively expensive visual feedback to effectively control the prosthesis. Applying the concept of extended physiological proprioception (EPP) to externally powered prostheses provides direct feedback to the user's proprioceptive system regarding the position, velocity, and forces applied to the prosthesis. However, electric elbows with EPP controllers developed at the Northwestern University Prosthetics Research Laboratory have exhibited unexplained "jerky" behavior in both clinical fittings and bench-top operation. In addition, the development of limit cycles, a specific type of constant-amplitude oscillation, had been observed in bench-top use of these elbows. Backlash and static friction within the EPP system were found to be primarily responsible for the development of limit cycles. Reducing static friction and backlash improved the system's performance. These results suggest that to most effectively implement EPP, prosthesis manufacturers should design prosthetic components that minimize static friction and backlash. PMID:16187245

  18. Proprioceptive Training and Injury Prevention in a Professional Men's Basketball Team: A Six-Year Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Riva, Dario; Bianchi, Roberto; Rocca, Flavio; Mamo, Carlo

    2016-02-01

    Single limb stance instability is a risk factor for lower extremity injuries. Therefore, the development of proprioception may play an important role in injury prevention. This investigation considered a professional basketball team for 6 years, integrating systematic proprioceptive activity in the training routine. The purpose was to assess the effectiveness of proprioceptive training programs based on quantifiable instability, to reduce ankle sprains, knee sprains, and low back pain through developing refined and long-lasting proprioceptive control. Fifty-five subjects were studied. In the first biennium (2004-2006), the preventive program consisted of classic proprioceptive exercises. In the second biennium (2006-2008), the proprioceptive training became quantifiable and interactive by means of electronic proprioceptive stations. In the third biennium (2008-2010), the intensity and the training volume increased while the session duration became shorter. Analysis of variance was used to analyze the differences in proprioceptive control between groups, years, and bienniums. Injury rates and rate ratios of injury during practices and games were estimated. The results showed a statistically significant reduction in the occurrence of ankle sprains by 81% from the first to the third biennium (p < 0.001). Low back pain showed similar results with a reduction of 77.8% (p < 0.005). The reduction in knee sprains was 64.5% (not significant). Comparing the third biennium with the level of all new entry players, proprioceptive control improved significantly by 72.2% (p < 0.001). These findings indicate that improvements in proprioceptive control in single stance may be a key factor for an effective reduction in ankle sprains, knee sprains, and low back pain. PMID:26203850

  19. Manually controlled human balancing using visual, vestibular and proprioceptive senses involves a common, low frequency neural process

    PubMed Central

    Lakie, Martin; Loram, Ian D

    2006-01-01

    Ten subjects balanced their own body or a mechanically equivalent unstable inverted pendulum by hand, through a compliant spring linkage. Their balancing process was always characterized by repeated small reciprocating hand movements. These bias adjustments were an observable sign of intermittent alterations in neural output. On average, the adjustments occurred at intervals of ∼400 ms. To generate appropriate stabilizing bias adjustments, sensory information about body or load movement is needed. Subjects used visual, vestibular or proprioceptive sensation alone and in combination to perform the tasks. We first ask, is the time between adjustments (bias duration) sensory specific? Vision is associated with slow responses. Other senses involved with balance are known to be faster. Our second question is; does bias duration depend on sensory abundance? An appropriate bias adjustment cannot occur until unplanned motion is unambiguously perceived (a sensory threshold). The addition of more sensory data should therefore expedite action, decreasing the mean bias adjustment duration. Statistical analysis showed that (1) the mean bias adjustment duration was remarkably independent of the sensory modality and (2) the addition of one or two sensory modalities made a small, but significant, decrease in the mean bias adjustment duration. Thus, a threshold effect can alter only a very minor part of the bias duration. The bias adjustment duration in manual balancing must reflect something more than visual sensation and perceptual thresholds; our suggestion is that it is a common central motor planning process. We predict that similar processes may be identified in the control of standing. PMID:16959857

  20. The Rubber Hand Illusion Reveals Proprioceptive and Sensorimotor Differences in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paton, Bryan; Hohwy, Jakob; Enticott, Peter G.

    2012-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterised by differences in unimodal and multimodal sensory and proprioceptive processing, with complex biases towards local over global processing. Many of these elements are implicated in versions of the rubber hand illusion (RHI), which were therefore studied in high-functioning individuals with ASD and a…

  1. Changes in proprioception and pain in patients with neck pain after upper thoracic manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jinmo; Lee, Byoungkwon; Kim, Changbeom

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to conduct cervical stability training and upper thoracic manipulation for patients with chronic neck pain and then investigate the changes of cervical proprioception and pain. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were 30 workers with mechanical neck pain, who were randomly divided into an upper thoracic manipulation group and a cervical stability training group. Upper thoracic manipulation after cervical stability training was conducted for the upper thoracic manipulation group, and only stability training was conducted for the cervical stability training group. The intervention period was six weeks, and consisted of three sessions a week, each of which lasted for 30 minutes. For proprioception measurement, an electro-goniometer was used to measure reposition sense before and after the intervention. The visual analogue scale was used to assess pain. [Results] After the intervention, the error angle was significantly smaller in flexion and right left side-bending, and pain was significantly reduced in the upper thoracic manipulation group. According to the post intervention comparison of the two groups, there were significant differences in the proprioception and pain values. [Conclusion] Conducting both cervical stability training and upper thoracic manipulation for patients with chronic neck pain was more helpful for the improvement of proprioception and pain than cervical stability training alone. PMID:25931733

  2. Infant Reactivity to Redundant Proprioceptive and Auditory Stimulation: A Twin Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van den Daele, Leland D.

    The role of genetic factors in infant response to redundancy was evaluated through observation of the behavior of three sets of same-sex fraternal twins and six sets of same-sex identical twins to combinations of redundant proprioceptive and auditory stimulation. The twins ranged in age from 6 weeks to 24 weeks. One member of each twin set was…

  3. Effects of proprioception training with exercise imagery on balance ability of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyungjin; Kim, Heesoo; Ahn, Myunghwan; You, Youngyoul

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine and compare the effects of proprioceptive training accompanied by motor imagery training and general proprioceptive training on the balance of stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-six stroke patients were randomly assigned to either an experimental group of 18 patients or a control group of 18 patients. The experimental group was given motor imagery training for 5 minutes and proprioceptive training for 25 minutes, while the control group was given proprioceptive training for 30 minutes. Each session and training program was implemented 5 times a week for 8 weeks. The Korean version of the Berg Balance Scale (K-BBS), Timed Up and Go test (TUG), weight bearing ratio (AFA-50, Alfoots, Republic of Korea), and joint position sense error (Dualer IQ Inclinometer, JTECH Medical, USA) were measured. [Results] Both groups showed improvements in K-BBS, TUG, weight bearing ratio, and joint position sense error. The measures of the experimental group showed greater improvement than the control group. [Conclusion] Motor imagery training, which is not subject to time restrictions, is not very risky and can be used as an effective treatment method for improving the balance ability of stroke patients. PMID:25642023

  4. Developmental changes in the visual-proprioceptive integration threshold of children.

    PubMed

    Jaime, Mark; Longard, Julie; Moore, Chris

    2014-09-01

    The ability to detect artificially induced visual-proprioceptive asynchrony reflects an awareness of the first-person experience of self-generated movement. The current study assessed children's (5- to 8-year-olds) and adults' ability to integrate asynchronous visual and proprioceptive stimulation by delaying the visual feedback of self-generated action in videos. Children and adults observed a monitor showing their movements of a joystick at varying delay durations and were then asked to make judgments on whether their movements appeared to be delayed or live. Children demonstrated age-related differences in their reporting of delay judgments across all delay conditions. Adults' performances on the same task exceeded those of children. The results of this study provide a mapping of visual-proprioceptive integration abilities in 5 to 8 year old children. The age-related increase in sensitivity to visual-proprioceptive asynchrony is suggestive of increasing sensitivity to the temporal properties of multisensory feedback of self-generated movement with development. PMID:24814203

  5. Comparison of Trunk Proprioception Between Patients With Low Back Pain and Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Angela S.; Cholewicki, Jacek; Reeves, N. Peter; Zazulak, Bohdanna T.; Mysliwiec, Lawrence W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine if proprioceptive impairments exist in patients with low back pain (LBP). We hypothesized that patients with LBP would exhibit larger trunk proprioception errors than healthy controls. Design Case-control study. Setting University laboratory. Participants 24 patients with non-specific LBP and 24 age-matched healthy controls. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures We measured trunk proprioception in all 3 anatomical planes using motion perception threshold, active repositioning, and passive repositioning tests. Results LBP patients had significantly greater motion perception threshold than controls (P<0.001)(1.3±0.9 vs. 0.8±0.6 degrees). Furthermore, all subjects had the largest motion perception threshold in the transverse plane (P<0.001) (1.2±0.7 vs. 1.0±0.8 degrees for all other planes averaged). There was no significant difference between LBP and healthy control groups in the repositioning tasks. Errors in active repositioning test were significantly smaller than in passive repositioning test (P=0.032) (1.9±1.2 vs. 2.3±1.4 degrees). Conclusions These findings suggest that impairments in proprioception may be detected in patients with LBP when assessed with a motion perception threshold measure. PMID:20801248

  6. Do Ankle Orthoses Improve Ankle Proprioceptive Thresholds or Unipedal Balance in Older Persons with Peripheral Neuropathy?

    PubMed Central

    Son, Jaebum; Ashton-Miller, James A.; Richardson, James K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether ankle orthoses that provide medial and lateral support, and have been found to decrease gait variability in older persons with peripheral neuropathy, decrease (improve) frontal plane ankle proprioceptive thresholds or increase unipedal stance time in that same population. Design Observational study in which unipedal stance time was determined with a stopwatch, and frontal plane ankle (inversion and eversion) proprioceptive thresholds were quantified during bipedal stance with and without the ankle orthoses, in 11 older diabetic subjects with peripheral neuropathy (8 men; age 72 ± 7.1 years) using a foot cradle system which presented a series of 100 rotational stimuli. Results The subjects demonstrated no change in combined frontal plane (inversion + eversion) proprioceptive thresholds or unipedal stance time with versus without the orthoses (1.06 ± 0.56 versus 1.13 ± 0.39 degrees, respectively; p = 0.955 and 6.1 ± 6.5 versus 6.2 ± 5.4 seconds, respectively; p = 0.922). Conclusion Ankle orthoses which provide medial-lateral support do not appear to change ankle inversion/eversion proprioceptive thresholds or unipedal stance time in older persons with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Previously identified improvements in gait variability using orthoses in this population are therefore likely related to an orthotically-induced stiffening of the ankle rather than a change in ankle afferent function. PMID:20407302

  7. Immediate effect of stretching and ultrasound on hamstring flexibility and proprioception.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Hak; Kim, Soo-Han

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This research explored the positive effects of self-myofascial release on hamstring muscular flexibility and proprioception and investigated the effectiveness of the stretch combined with therapeutic ultrasound. [Subjects and Methods] This study included 30 healthy university students with no history of pain in the Achilles tendon or hamstring within the recent 6 months. Each participant completed two experiments. In the first experiment (MS), they completed self-myofascial stretching using a foam roller for 7 days. In the second experiment (MSU), the same participants performed the self-myofascial stretching after the 15-minute application of ultrasound. This study involved a pre- and post-test on hamstring muscle flexibility and hip joint proprioception. [Results] The use of self-myofascial stretching in the MS experiment had a significant effect on hamstring muscle flexibility and hip joint proprioception. However, the addition of ultrasound in the MSU experiment had no additive effect. [Conclusion] Self-myofascial stretching immediately increased hamstring muscle flexibility and improved hip joint proprioception, but the addition of pre-stretch ultra sound provided no further benefit. PMID:27390420

  8. Immediate effect of stretching and ultrasound on hamstring flexibility and proprioception

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung-Hak; Kim, Soo-Han

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This research explored the positive effects of self-myofascial release on hamstring muscular flexibility and proprioception and investigated the effectiveness of the stretch combined with therapeutic ultrasound. [Subjects and Methods] This study included 30 healthy university students with no history of pain in the Achilles tendon or hamstring within the recent 6 months. Each participant completed two experiments. In the first experiment (MS), they completed self-myofascial stretching using a foam roller for 7 days. In the second experiment (MSU), the same participants performed the self-myofascial stretching after the 15-minute application of ultrasound. This study involved a pre- and post-test on hamstring muscle flexibility and hip joint proprioception. [Results] The use of self-myofascial stretching in the MS experiment had a significant effect on hamstring muscle flexibility and hip joint proprioception. However, the addition of ultrasound in the MSU experiment had no additive effect. [Conclusion] Self-myofascial stretching immediately increased hamstring muscle flexibility and improved hip joint proprioception, but the addition of pre-stretch ultra sound provided no further benefit. PMID:27390420

  9. Upper Limb Asymmetries in the Perception of Proprioceptively Determined Dynamic Position Sense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goble, Daniel J.; Brown, Susan H.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies of position-related proprioceptive sense have provided evidence of a nonpreferred left arm advantage in right-handed individuals. The present study sought to determine whether similar asymmetries might exist in "dynamic position" sense. Thirteen healthy, right-handed adults were blindfolded and seated with arms placed on…

  10. Mobile Phone-Based Joint Angle Measurement for Functional Assessment and Rehabilitation of Proprioception

    PubMed Central

    Mourcou, Quentin; Fleury, Anthony; Diot, Bruno; Franco, Céline; Vuillerme, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of joint functional and proprioceptive abilities is essential for balance, posture, and motor control rehabilitation. Joint functional ability refers to the capacity of movement of the joint. It may be evaluated thereby measuring the joint range of motion (ROM). Proprioception can be defined as the perception of the position and of the movement of various body parts in space. Its role is essential in sensorimotor control for movement acuity, joint stability, coordination, and balance. Its clinical evaluation is commonly based on the assessment of the joint position sense (JPS). Both ROM and JPS measurements require estimating angles through goniometer, scoliometer, laser-pointer, and bubble or digital inclinometer. With the arrival of Smartphones, these costly clinical tools tend to be replaced. Beyond evaluation, maintaining and/or improving joint functional and proprioceptive abilities by training with physical therapy is important for long-term management. This review aims to report Smartphone applications used for measuring and improving functional and proprioceptive abilities. It identifies that Smartphone applications are reliable for clinical measurements and are mainly used to assess ROM and JPS. However, there is lack of studies on Smartphone applications which can be used in an autonomous way to provide physical therapy exercises at home. PMID:26583101

  11. Mobile Phone-Based Joint Angle Measurement for Functional Assessment and Rehabilitation of Proprioception.

    PubMed

    Mourcou, Quentin; Fleury, Anthony; Diot, Bruno; Franco, Céline; Vuillerme, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of joint functional and proprioceptive abilities is essential for balance, posture, and motor control rehabilitation. Joint functional ability refers to the capacity of movement of the joint. It may be evaluated thereby measuring the joint range of motion (ROM). Proprioception can be defined as the perception of the position and of the movement of various body parts in space. Its role is essential in sensorimotor control for movement acuity, joint stability, coordination, and balance. Its clinical evaluation is commonly based on the assessment of the joint position sense (JPS). Both ROM and JPS measurements require estimating angles through goniometer, scoliometer, laser-pointer, and bubble or digital inclinometer. With the arrival of Smartphones, these costly clinical tools tend to be replaced. Beyond evaluation, maintaining and/or improving joint functional and proprioceptive abilities by training with physical therapy is important for long-term management. This review aims to report Smartphone applications used for measuring and improving functional and proprioceptive abilities. It identifies that Smartphone applications are reliable for clinical measurements and are mainly used to assess ROM and JPS. However, there is lack of studies on Smartphone applications which can be used in an autonomous way to provide physical therapy exercises at home. PMID:26583101

  12. Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Flexibility Techniques: Acute Effects on Arterial Blood Pressure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornelius, William L.; Craft-Hamm, Kelley

    1988-01-01

    The effects of stretching techniques on arterial blood pressure (ABP) were studied in three groups of 20 men each. Each group performed one of three proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) techniques. Results are presented. The study indicates that the benefits of stretching may outweigh the risk of elevated ABP. (JL)

  13. The mirror illusion: does proprioceptive drift go hand in hand with sense of agency?

    PubMed Central

    Tajima, Daisuke; Mizuno, Tota; Kume, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Takako

    2015-01-01

    Vection can be regarded as the illusion of “whole-body” position perception. In contrast, the mirror illusion is that of “body-part” position perception. When participants viewed their left hands in a mirror positioned along the midsaggital axis while moving both hands synchronously, they hardly noticed the spatial offset between the hand in the mirror and the obscured real right hand. This illusion encompasses two phenomena: proprioceptive drift and sense of agency. Proprioceptive drift represented a perceptual change in the position of the obscured hand relative to that of the hand in the mirror. Sense of agency referred to the participants' subjective sense of controlling body image as they would their own bodies. We examined the spatial offset between these two phenomena. Participants responded to a two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) question regarding the subjective position of their right hands and questionnaires regarding sense of agency at various positions of the right hand. We analyzed the 2AFC data using a support vector machine and compared its classification result and the questionnaire results. Our data analysis suggested that the two phenomena were observed in concentric space, but the estimated range of the proprioceptive drift was slightly narrower than the range of agency. Although this outcome can be attributed to differences in measurement or analysis, to our knowledge, this is the first report to suggest that proprioceptive drift and sense of agency are concentric and almost overlap. PMID:25774145

  14. Proprioceptive acuity predicts muscle co-contraction of the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius medialis in older adults' dynamic postural control.

    PubMed

    Craig, C E; Goble, D J; Doumas, M

    2016-05-13

    Older adults use a different muscle strategy to cope with postural instability, in which they 'co-contract' the muscles around the ankle joint. It has been suggested that this is a compensatory response to age-related proprioceptive decline however this view has never been assessed directly. The current study investigated the association between proprioceptive acuity and muscle co-contraction in older adults. We compared muscle activity, by recording surface electromyography (EMG) from the bilateral tibialis anterior (TA) and gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscles, in young (aged 18-34) and older adults (aged 65-82) during postural assessment on a fixed and sway-referenced surface at age-equivalent levels of sway. We performed correlations between muscle activity and proprioceptive acuity, which was assessed using an active contralateral matching task. Despite successfully inducing similar levels of sway in the two age groups, older adults still showed higher muscle co-contraction. A stepwise regression analysis showed that proprioceptive acuity measured using variable error was the best predictor of muscle co-contraction in older adults. However, despite suggestions from previous research, proprioceptive error and muscle co-contraction were negatively correlated in older adults, suggesting that better proprioceptive acuity predicts more co-contraction. Overall, these results suggest that although muscle co-contraction may be an age-specific strategy used by older adults, it is not to compensate for age-related proprioceptive deficits. PMID:26905952

  15. Do Gravity-Related Sensory Information Enable the Enhancement of Cortical Proprioceptive Inputs When Planning a Step in Microgravity?

    PubMed Central

    Saradjian, Anahid H.; Paleressompoulle, Dany; Louber, Didier; Coyle, Thelma; Blouin, Jean; Mouchnino, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    We recently found that the cortical response to proprioceptive stimulation was greater when participants were planning a step than when they stood still, and that this sensory facilitation was suppressed in microgravity. The aim of the present study was to test whether the absence of gravity-related sensory afferents during movement planning in microgravity prevented the proprioceptive cortical processing to be enhanced. We reestablished a reference frame in microgravity by providing and translating a horizontal support on which the participants were standing and verified whether this procedure restored the proprioceptive facilitation. The slight translation of the base of support (lateral direction), which occurred prior to step initiation, stimulated at least cutaneous and vestibular receptors. The sensitivity to proprioceptive stimulation was assessed by measuring the amplitude of the cortical somatosensory-evoked potential (SEP, over the Cz electrode) following the vibration of the leg muscle. The vibration lasted 1 s and the participants were asked to either initiate a step at the vibration offset or to remain still. We found that the early SEP (90–160 ms) was smaller when the platform was translated than when it remained stationary, revealing the existence of an interference phenomenon (i.e., when proprioceptive stimulation is preceded by the stimulation of different sensory modalities evoked by the platform translation). By contrast, the late SEP (550 ms post proprioceptive stimulation onset) was greater when the translation preceded the vibration compared to a condition without pre-stimulation (i.e., no translation). This suggests that restoring a body reference system which is impaired in microgravity allowed a greater proprioceptive cortical processing. Importantly, however, the late SEP was similarly increased when participants either produced a step or remained still. We propose that the absence of step-induced facilitation of proprioceptive cortical

  16. Knee-joint proprioception during 30-day 6 degrees head-down bed rest with isotonic and isokinetic exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernauer, E. M.; Walby, W. F.; Ertl, A. C.; Dempster, P. T.; Bond, M.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    To determine if daily isotonic exercise or isokinetic exercise training coupled with daily leg proprioceptive training, would influence leg proprioceptive tracking responses during bed rest (BR), 19 men (36 +/- SD 4 years, 178 +/- 7 cm, 76.8 +/- 7.8 kg) were allocated into a no-exercise (NOE) training control group (n = 5), and isotonic exercise (ITE, n = 7) and isokinetic exercise (IKE, n = 7) training groups. Exercise training was conducted during BR for two 30-min periods.d-1, 5 d.week-1. Only the IKE group performed proprioceptive training using a new isokinetic procedure with each lower extremity for 2.5 min before and after the daily exercise training sessions; proprioceptive testing occurred weekly for all groups. There were no significant differences in proprioceptive tracking scores, expressed as a percentage of the perfect score of 100, in the pre-BR ambulatory control period between the three groups. Knee extension and flexion tracking responses were unchanged with NOE during BR, but were significantly greater (*p < 0.05) at the end of BR in both exercise groups when compared with NOE responses (extension: NOE 80.7 +/- 0.7%, ITE 82.9* +/- 0.6%, IKE 86.5* +/- 0.7%; flexion: NOE 77.6 +/- 1.5%, ITE 80.0 +/- 0.8% (NS), IKE 83.6* +/- 0.8%). Although proprioceptive tracking was unchanged during BR with NOE, both isotonic exercise training (without additional proprioceptive training) and especially isokinetic exercise training when combined with daily proprioceptive training, significantly improved knee proprioceptive tracking responses after 30 d of BR.

  17. Slow liner fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, M.J.

    1997-08-01

    {open_quotes}Slow{close_quotes} liner fusion ({approximately}10 ms compression time) implosions are nondestructive and make repetitive ({approximately} 1 Hz) pulsed liner fusion reactors possible. This paper summarizes a General Atomics physics-based fusion reactor study that showed slow liner feasibility, even with conservative open-line axial magnetic field confinement and Bohm radial transport.

  18. Reliable and Rapid Robotic Assessment of Wrist Proprioception Using a Gauge Position Matching Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Rinderknecht, Mike D.; Popp, Werner L.; Lambercy, Olivier; Gassert, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative assessments of position sense are essential for the investigation of proprioception, as well as for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment planning for patients with somatosensory deficits. Despite the development and use of various paradigms and robotic tools, their clinimetric properties are often poorly evaluated and reported. A proper evaluation of the latter is essential to compare results between different studies and to identify the influence of possible confounds on outcome measures. The aim of the present study was to perform a comprehensive evaluation of a rapid robotic assessment of wrist proprioception using a passive gauge position matching task. Thirty-two healthy subjects undertook six test-retests of proprioception of the right wrist on two different days. The constant error (CE) was 0.87°, the absolute error (AE) was 5.87°, the variable error (VE) was 4.59° and the total variability (E) was 6.83° in average for the angles presented in the range from 10° to 30°. The intraclass correlation analysis provided an excellent reliability for CE (0.75), good reliability for AE (0.68) and E (0.68), and fair reliability for VE (0.54). Tripling the assessment length had negligible effects on the reliabilities. Additional analysis revealed significant trends of larger overestimation (constant errors), as well as larger absolute and variable errors with increased flexion angles. No proprioceptive learning occurred, despite increased familiarity with the task, which was reflected in significantly decreased assessment duration by 30%. In conclusion, the proposed automated assessment can provide sensitive and reliable information on proprioceptive function of the wrist with an administration time of around 2.5 min, demonstrating the potential for its application in research or clinical settings. Moreover, this study highlights the importance of reporting the complete set of errors (CE, AE, VE, and E) in a matching experiment for the identification of

  19. Role of proprioceptive information to control balance during gait in healthy and hemiparetic individuals.

    PubMed

    Mullie, Yannick; Duclos, Cyril

    2014-09-01

    Proprioceptive information is important for balance control yet little is known about how it is used during gait or how a stroke affects its use. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of proprioception in controlling balance during gait in healthy participants and after stroke. Twelve healthy and 9 hemiparetic participants walked on an instrumented treadmill in a fully lit room, while whole-body, three-dimensional kinematics were quantified. Vibration was applied continuously or during the stance phase only, on the posterior neck muscles and triceps surae tendon on the non-dominant/paretic side. Difficulty in maintaining dynamic and postural balance was evaluated using stabilizing and destabilizing forces, respectively. Continuous and stance phase vibration of the triceps surae reduced the difficulty in maintaining both dynamic and postural balance in healthy participants (p<.05), with a greater distance between the center of pressure and the limit of the potential base of support, a more backward body position, and no change in spatio-temporal gait parameters. No effect of neck muscle vibration was observed on balance (p=.63 and above). None of the vibration conditions affected balance or gait parameters among stroke participants. The results confirmed that proprioceptive information was not used to control balance during gait in stroke participants. The importance of proprioceptive information may depend on other factors such as walking and visual conditions. Changes in sensory integration ability likely explain the results after stroke. Further study is needed to understand the integration of proprioceptive and visual information to control balance during gait after stroke. PMID:25127297

  20. Elderly adults delay proprioceptive reweighting during the anticipation of collision avoidance when standing.

    PubMed

    Eikema, D J A; Hatzitaki, V; Konstantakos, V; Papaxanthis, C

    2013-03-27

    The ability to reweight visual and proprioceptive information is critical for maintaining postural stability in a dynamic environment. In this study, we examined whether visual anticipation of collision avoidance (AV) while standing could facilitate the down-weighting of altered proprioception in young and elderly adults. Twelve young (24.91±6.44years) and 12 elderly (74.8±6.42years) participants stood upright for 180s under two task conditions: (a) quiet stance (QS) and (b) standing while anticipating virtual objects to be avoided. In order to disrupt the accuracy of proprioceptive input participants were exposed to bilateral Achilles tendon vibration during the middle 60s of standing in both tasks. Visual field dependence was assessed using the Rod and Frame Test (RFT). Elderly demonstrated significantly higher visual field dependence compared to the young participants. Analysis of the normalized Root Mean Square (RMS) of the Center of Pressure velocity (dCoP) revealed that young participants immediately reduced the sway velocity variability induced by tendon vibration during the anticipation of collision AV compared to the QS task. In the elderly, however, the modulating influence of visual anticipation was delayed and became significant only in the last two time intervals of the vibration phase. These results suggest that volitionally shifting reliance on vision when anticipating a collision AV event facilitates the down-weighting of altered proprioception. Elderly adults seem to be unable to dynamically exploit visual anticipation in order to down weight the altered proprioception possibly as a result of their more permanent up-weighting of the visual modality. Sensory reweighting seems to be a more time consuming process in aging which may have important clinical implications for falling. PMID:23305764

  1. The Role of Limb Torque, Muscle Action and Proprioception During Closed Kinetic Chain Rehabilitation of The Lower Extremity

    PubMed Central

    Bunton, Edwin E.; Pitney, William A.; Cappaert, Thomas A.; Kane, Alexander W.

    1993-01-01

    This paper defines the differences between open and closed kinetic chain exercise and explains the role of limb torque, muscle action, and proprioception during rehabilitation of the lower extremity. Closed kinetic chain rehabilitation is shown to decrease shear forces, increase proprioception, and increase muscle group coordination through examples of progressive exercises. The authors conclude that closed kinetic chain rehabilitation is an economical, efficient, and effective means of rehabilitation, with the ultimate goal of enhancing proprioception, thus gaining lower extremity joint stability. ImagesFig 9a-b.Fig 1.Fig 2.Fig 3a-b.Fig 4a-b.Fig 5.Fig 6.Fig 7.Fig 8. PMID:16558197

  2. Cortical Auditory Deafferentation Induces Long-Term Plasticity in the Inferior Colliculus of Adult Rats: Microarray and qPCR Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Clarkson, Cheryl; Herrero-Turrión, M. Javier; Merchán, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    The cortico-collicular pathway is a bilateral excitatory projection from the cortex to the inferior colliculus (IC). It is asymmetric and predominantly ipsilateral. Using microarrays and RT-qPCR we analyzed changes in gene expression in the IC after unilateral lesions of the auditory cortex, comparing the ICs ipsi- and contralateral to the lesioned side. At 15 days after surgery there were mainly changes in gene expression in the IC ipsilateral to the lesion. Regulation primarily involved inflammatory cascade genes, suggesting a direct effect of degeneration rather than a neuronal plastic reorganization. Ninety days after the cortical lesion the ipsilateral IC showed a significant up-regulation of genes involved in apoptosis and axonal regeneration combined with a down-regulation of genes involved in neurotransmission, synaptic growth, and gap junction assembly. In contrast, the contralateral IC at 90 days post-lesion showed an up-regulation in genes primarily related to neurotransmission, cell proliferation, and synaptic growth. There was also a down-regulation in autophagy and neuroprotection genes. These findings suggest that the reorganization in the IC after descending pathway deafferentation is a long-term process involving extensive changes in gene expression regulation. Regulated genes are involved in many different neuronal functions, and the number and gene rearrangement profile seems to depend on the density of loss of the auditory cortical inputs. PMID:23233834

  3. [Syndrome of partial cholinergic deafferentation of the cortical mantle--a concept for describing the brain-behavior relationship in dementia diseases].

    PubMed

    Arendt, T

    1991-03-01

    The identification of morphological and biochemical changes in neurodegenerative disorders with both common and different patterns of neuropsychological dysfunction may help to define the neurobiological substrate of amnesic and dementing disorders, and, furthermore, will give some insight into the neuronal organisation of memory processes. The concept of "subcortical and cortical dementia" and the "cholinergic hypothesis of memory dysfunction" reflect two different theoretical approaches which relate psychopathological disturbances in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Korsakoff's psychosis and related conditions either to structurally or to chemically defined systems of the brain. In order to overcome limitations arising from this dichotomy of structural and chemical approaches to the brain-behaviour-relationship, the concept of a "syndrome of partial cholinergic deafferentation of the cortical mantle" is suggested in the present paper. This concept is supported by evidence derived from the biochemical, morphological and behavioural sequelae of acute and chronic experimental interference with the cholinergic afferentation of the cortical mantle by the application of neurotoxins, by pharmacological intervention and by neurotransplantation in rat. Regarding the cholinergic projection neurons of the basal forebrain and upper brainstem as components of the reticular activating system, the involvement of the cholinergic afferentation of the cortical mantle in the mediation of memory processes and their dysfunction under the conditions of neurodegenerative disorders can be explained on the basis of the "Hippocampal Memory Indexing Theory" of Teyler and DiScenna. PMID:2050315

  4. Transformer Industry Productivity Slows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otto, Phyllis Flohr

    1981-01-01

    Annual productivity increases averaged 2.4 percent during 1963-79, slowing since 1972 to 1.5 percent; computer-assisted design and product standardization aided growth in output per employee-hour. (Author)

  5. Knee-Joint Proprioception During 30-Day 6 deg Head-Down Bed Rest with Isotonic and Isokinetic Exercise Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernauer, E. M.; Walby, W. F.; Ertl, A. C.; Dempster, P. T.; Bond, M.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    To determine if daily isotonic exercise or isokinetic exercise training coupled with daily log proprioceptive training, would influence log proprioceptive tracking responses during Bed Rest (BR), 19 men (36 +/- SD 4 years, 178 +/- 7 cm, 76.8 +/- 7.8 kg) were allocated into a NO-Exercise (NOE) training control group (n = 5), and IsoTanic Exercise (ITE, n = 7) and IsoKinetic Exercise (IKE, n = 7) training groups. Exercise training was conducted during BR for two 30-min period / d, 5 d /week. Only the IKE group performed proprioceptive training using a now isokinetic procedure with each lower extremity for 2.5 min before and after the daily exercise training sessions; proprioceptive testing occurred weekly for all groups. There were no significant differences in proprioceptive tracking scores, expressed as a percentage of the perfect score of 100, in the pro-BR ambulatory control period between the three groups. Knee extension and flexion tracking responses were unchanged with NOE during BR, but were significantly greater (*p less than 0.05) at the end of BR in both exercise groups when compared with NOE responses (extension: NOE 80.7 +/- 0.7%, ITE 82.9 +/- 0.6%, IKE 86.5* +/- 0.7%; flexion: NOE 77.6 +/- 1.50, ITE 80.0 +/- 0.8% (NS), IKE 83.6* +/- 0.8%). Although proprioceptive tracking was unchanged during BR with NOE, both lsotonic exercise training (without additional propriaceptive training) and especially isokinetic exercise training when combined with daily proprioceptive training, significantly improved knee proprioceptive tracking responses after 30 d of BR.

  6. Slow medical education.

    PubMed

    Wear, Delese; Zarconi, Joseph; Kumagai, Arno; Cole-Kelly, Kathy

    2015-03-01

    Slow medical education borrows from other "slow" movements by offering a complementary orientation to medical education that emphasizes the value of slow and thoughtful reflection and interaction in medical education and clinical care. Such slow experiences, when systematically structured throughout the curriculum, offer ways for learners to engage in thoughtful reflection, dialogue, appreciation, and human understanding, with the hope that they will incorporate these practices throughout their lives as physicians. This Perspective offers several spaces in the medical curriculum where slowing down is possible: while reading and writing at various times in the curriculum and while providing clinical care, focusing particularly on conducting the physical exam and other dimensions of patient care. Time taken to slow down in these ways offers emerging physicians opportunities to more fully incorporate their experiences into a professional identity that embodies reflection, critical awareness, cultural humility, and empathy. The authors argue that these curricular spaces must be created in a very deliberate manner, even on busy ward services, throughout the education of physicians. PMID:25426738

  7. Relationship between paraspinal muscle cross-sectional area and relative proprioceptive weighting ratio of older persons with lumbar spondylosis

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tadashi; Sakai, Yoshihito; Nakamura, Eishi; Yamazaki, Kazunori; Yamada, Ayaka; Sato, Noritaka; Morita, Yoshifumi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the paraspinal muscle cross-sectional area and the relative proprioceptive weighting ratio during local vibratory stimulation of older persons with lumbar spondylosis in an upright position. [Subjects] In all, 74 older persons hospitalized for lumbar spondylosis were included. [Methods] We measured the relative proprioceptive weighting ratio of postural sway using a Wii board while vibratory stimulations of 30, 60, or 240 Hz were applied to the subjects’ paraspinal or gastrocnemius muscles. Back strength, abdominal muscle strength, and erector spinae muscle (L1/L2, L4/L5) and lumbar multifidus (L1/L2, L4/L5) cross-sectional areas were evaluated. [Results] The erector spinae muscle (L1/L2) cross-sectional area was associated with the relative proprioceptive weighting ratio during 60Hz stimulation. [Conclusion] These findings show that the relative proprioceptive weighting ratio compared to the erector spinae muscle (L1/L2) cross-sectional area under 60Hz proprioceptive stimulation might be a good indicator of trunk proprioceptive sensitivity. PMID:26311962

  8. Agency elicits body-ownership: proprioceptive drift toward a synchronously acting external proxy.

    PubMed

    Asai, Tomohisa

    2016-05-01

    Awareness of our own bodies (sense of body-ownership) and actions (sense of agency) is fundamental for self-consciousness. In the rubber hand illusion, watching a rubber hand being stroked synchronously as one's own unseen hand is also stroked causes the observer to attribute the rubber hand to their own body. The findings of the series of experiments reported here suggest that body-ownership, measured using proprioceptive drift, is elicited by the external acting proxy that drives the sense of agency. While participants clasped and unclasped their left hand for 60 s, they focused on video feedback on a monitor in front of them. Proprioceptive drift was observed only under the conditions, including synchronized conditions, where the sense of agency for the acting proxy occurred, suggesting an essential interaction between body-ownership and agency. PMID:25716612

  9. Remodelling of spared proprioceptive circuit involving a small number of neurons supports functional recovery

    PubMed Central

    Hollis, Edmund R.; Ishiko, Nao; Pessian, Maysam; Tolentino, Kristine; Lee-Kubli, Corinne A.; Calcutt, Nigel A.; Zou, Yimin

    2016-01-01

    Studies show that limited functional recovery can be achieved by plasticity and adaptation of the remaining circuitry in partial injuries in the central nervous system, although the new circuits that arise in these contexts have not been clearly identified or characterized. We show here that synaptic contacts from dorsal root ganglions to a small number of dorsal column neurons, a caudal extension of nucleus gracilis, whose connections to the thalamus are spared in a precise cervical level 1 lesion, underwent remodeling over time. These connections support proprioceptive functional recovery in a conditioning lesion paradigm, as silencing or eliminating the remodelled circuit completely abolishes the recovered proprioceptive function of the hindlimb. Furthermore, we show that blocking repulsive Wnt signalling increases axon plasticity and synaptic connections that drive greater functional recovery. PMID:25597627

  10. Beneficial effect of proprioceptive physical activities on balance control in elderly human subjects.

    PubMed

    Gauchard, G C; Jeandel, C; Tessier, A; Perrin, P P

    1999-10-01

    Age and lack of physical activities may both be responsible for poor balance control. Conversely, physical activities may modulate postural control in elderly individuals. We examined which type of exercise might prove most beneficial to retain or regain proper balance. Nineteen healthy subjects, aged over 60, regularly practicing proprioceptive (group I) or bioenergetic (group II) physical activities and 21 controls only walking on a regular basis, were studied. All were submitted to a dynamic posturographic test and to a test evaluating lower limbs muscular strength. Control individuals displayed the poorest balance and muscular performance. Group I subjects had the best postural control with average muscular strength. In group II, muscular strength was significantly increased, but balance control was of poor quality. Proprioceptive exercise therefore appears to have the best impact on balance control. PMID:10505621

  11. A model of a flexible anguilliform swimmer driven by a central pattern generator with proprioceptive feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlet, Christina; Tytell, Eric; Hoffman, Kathleen; Fauci, Lisa

    2015-11-01

    The swimming of a simple vertebrate, the lamprey, can shed light on how a flexible body can couple with a fluid environment to swim rapidly and efficiently. Animals use proprioceptive sensory information to sense how their bodies are bending, and then adjust the neural signals to their muscles to improve performance. We will present recent progress in the development of a computational model of a lamprey swimming in a Navier-Stokes fluid where a simple central pattern generator model, based on phase oscillators, is coupled to the evolving body dynamics of the swimmer through curvature and curvature derivative feedback. Such feedback can be positive (frequency decreasing), negative (frequency increasing), or mixed (positive to one side of the body and negative to the other, or vice versa). We will examine how the emergent swimming behavior and cost of transport depends upon these functional forms of proprioceptive feedback chosen in the model.

  12. Recovery of locomotion after injury in Drosophila melanogaster depends on proprioception.

    PubMed

    Isakov, Alexander; Buchanan, Sean M; Sullivan, Brian; Ramachandran, Akshitha; Chapman, Joshua K S; Lu, Edward S; Mahadevan, L; de Bivort, Benjamin

    2016-06-01

    Locomotion is necessary for survival in most animal species. However, injuries to the appendages mediating locomotion are common. We assess the recovery of walking in Drosophila melanogaster following leg amputation. Whereas flies pre-amputation explore open arenas in a symmetric fashion on average, foreleg amputation induces a strong turning bias away from the side of the amputation. However, we find that unbiased walking behavior returns over time in wild-type flies, while recovery is significantly impaired in proprioceptive mutants. To identify the biomechanical basis of this locomotor impairment and recovery, we then examine individual leg motion (gait) at a fine scale. A minimal mathematical model that links neurodynamics to body mechanics during walking shows that redistributing leg forces between the right and left side enables the observed recovery. Altogether, our study suggests that proprioceptive input from the intact limbs plays a crucial role in the behavioral plasticity associated with locomotor recovery after injury. PMID:26994176

  13. Defensive activation during the rubber hand illusion: Ownership versus proprioceptive drift.

    PubMed

    Riemer, Martin; Bublatzky, Florian; Trojan, Jörg; Alpers, Georg W

    2015-07-01

    A strong link between body perception and emotional experience has been proposed. To examine the interaction between body perception and anticipatory anxiety, two well-established paradigms were combined: The rubber hand illusion (RHI) and the threat-of-shock paradigm. An artificial hand and the participants' own hand (hidden from sight) were touched synchronously or asynchronously, while either threat-of-shock or safety was cued. Potentiated startle reflexes and enhanced skin conductance responses were observed during threat as compared to safety conditions, but threat conditions did not interact with illusory body perceptions. Thus, defense system activation was not modulated by altered body representations. Physiological responses increased with the sense of ownership for the artificial limb, but not with proprioceptive drift towards its location. The results indicate that ownership ratings and proprioceptive drift capture different aspects of the RHI. The study presents a new approach to investigate the relationship between body representations and emotional states. PMID:25960069

  14. Adaptation to visual and proprioceptive rearrangement - Origin of the differential effectiveness of active and passive movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to measure and compare the accuracy with which subjects pointed to visual targets before and after an exposure period in which they received systematic proprioceptive misinformation about the locations of visual targets. The crucial factor determining whether adaptation will be elicited is shown to be the presence of a discordance in the positional information being conveyed over two different sensory modalities. Another experiment was carried out to study the effectiveness of active and passive movements in eliciting adaptation when the subjects were exposed to a systematic discordance between the visual and proprioceptive locations of external targets without being permitted sight of their hands. Superiority of active over passive movements in producing adaptation to visual rearrangement is due to the greater accuracy of position sense information about voluntarily moved limbs, partly derived from the contribution of muscle afferent signals.

  15. Generalization patterns for reach adaptation and proprioceptive recalibration differ after visuomotor learning.

    PubMed

    Cressman, Erin K; Henriques, Denise Y P

    2015-07-01

    Visuomotor learning results in changes in both motor and sensory systems (Cressman EK, Henriques DY. J Neurophysiol 102: 3505-3518, 2009), such that reaches are adapted and sense of felt hand position recalibrated after reaching with altered visual feedback of the hand. Moreover, visuomotor learning has been shown to generalize such that reach adaptation achieved at a trained target location can influence reaches to novel target directions (Krakauer JW, Pine ZM, Ghilardi MF, Ghez C. J Neurosci 20: 8916-8924, 2000). We looked to determine whether proprioceptive recalibration also generalizes to novel locations. Moreover, we looked to establish the relationship between reach adaptation and changes in sense of felt hand position by determining whether proprioceptive recalibration generalizes to novel targets in a similar manner as reach adaptation. On training trials, subjects reached to a single target with aligned or misaligned cursor-hand feedback, in which the cursor was either rotated or scaled in extent relative to hand movement. After reach training, subjects reached to the training target and novel targets (including targets from a second start position) without visual feedback to assess generalization of reach adaptation. Subjects then performed a proprioceptive estimation task, in which they indicated the position of their hand relative to visual reference markers placed at similar locations as the trained and novel reach targets. Results indicated that shifts in hand position generalized across novel locations, independent of reach adaptation. Thus these distinct sensory and motor generalization patterns suggest that reach adaptation and proprioceptive recalibration arise from independent error signals and that changes in one system cannot guide adjustments in the other. PMID:25972587

  16. Impaired varus-valgus proprioception and neuromuscular stabilization in medial knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Alison H; Lee, Song Joo; Zhao, Heng; Ren, Yupeng; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2014-01-22

    Impaired proprioception and poor muscular stabilization in the frontal plane may lead to knee instability during functional activities, a common complaint in persons with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Understanding these frontal plane neuromechanical properties in KOA will help elucidate the factors contributing to knee instability and aid in the development of targeted intervention strategies. The objectives of the study were to compare knee varus-valgus proprioception, isometric muscle strength, and active muscular contribution to stability between persons with medial KOA and healthy controls. We evaluated knee frontal plane neuromechanical parameters in 14 participants with medial KOA and 14 age- and gender-matched controls, using a joint driving device (JDD) with a customized motor and a 6-axis force sensor. Analysis of covariance with BMI as a covariate was used to test the differences in varus-valgus neuromechanical parameters between these two groups. The KOA group had impaired varus proprioception acuity (1.08±0.59° vs. 0.69±0.49°, p<0.05), decreased normalized varus muscle strength (1.31±0.75% vs. 1.79±0.84% body weight, p<0.05), a trend toward decreased valgus strength (1.29±0.67% vs. 1.88±0.99%, p=0.054), and impaired ability to actively stabilize the knee in the frontal plane during external perturbation (4.67±2.86 vs. 8.26±5.95 Nm/degree, p<0.05). The knee frontal plane sensorimotor control system is compromised in persons with medial KOA. Our findings suggest varus-valgus control deficits in both the afferent input (proprioceptive acuity) and muscular effectors (muscle strength and capacity to stabilize the joint). PMID:24321442

  17. Impaired Varus-Valgus Proprioception and Neuromuscular Stabilization in Medial Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alison H.; Lee, Song Joo; Zhao, Heng; Ren, Yupeng; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2014-01-01

    Impaired proprioception and poor muscular stabilization in the frontal plane may lead to knee instability during functional activities, a common complaint in persons with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Understanding these frontal plane neuromechanical properties in KOA will help elucidate the factors contributing to knee instability and aid in the development of targeted intervention strategies. The study objectives were to compare knee varus-valgus proprioception, isometric muscle strength, and active muscular contribution to stability between persons with medial KOA and healthy controls. We evaluated knee frontal plane neuromechanical parameters in 14 participants with medial KOA and 14 age- and gender-matched controls, using a joint driving device (JDD) with a customized motor and a 6-axis force sensor. Analysis of covariance with BMI as a covariate was used to test the differences in varus-valgus neuromechanical parameters between these two groups. The KOA group had impaired varus proprioception acuity (1.08 ± 0.59° vs. 0.69 ± 0.49°, p < 0.05), decreased normalized varus muscle strength (1.31 ± 0.75% vs. 1.79 ± 0.84% body weight, p < 0.05), a trend toward decreased valgus strength (1.29 ± 0.67% vs. 1.88 ± 0.99%, p = 0.054), and impaired ability to actively stabilize the knee in the frontal plane during external perturbation (4.67 ± 2.86 vs. 8.26 ± 5.95 Nm/degree, p < 0.05). The knee frontal plane sensorimotor control system is compromised in persons with medial KOA. Our findings suggest varus-valgus control deficits in both the afferent input (proprioceptive acuity) and muscular effectors (muscle strength and capacity to stabilize the joint). PMID:24321442

  18. Mixed body- and gaze-centered coding of proprioceptive reach targets after effector movement.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Stefanie; Fiehler, Katja

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that an effector movement intervening between encoding and reaching to a proprioceptive target determines the underlying reference frame: proprioceptive reach targets are represented in a gaze-independent reference frame if no movement occurs but are represented with respect to gaze after an effector movement (Mueller and Fiehler, 2014a). The present experiment explores whether an effector movement leads to a switch from a gaze-independent, body-centered reference frame to a gaze-dependent reference frame or whether a gaze-dependent reference frame is employed in addition to a gaze-independent, body-centered reference frame. Human participants were asked to reach in complete darkness to an unseen finger (proprioceptive target) of their left target hand indicated by a touch. They completed 2 conditions in which the target hand remained either stationary at the target location (stationary condition) or was actively moved to the target location, received a touch and was moved back before reaching to the target (moved condition). We dissociated the location of the movement vector relative to the body midline and to the gaze direction. Using correlation and regression analyses, we estimated the contribution of each reference frame based on horizontal reach errors in the stationary and moved conditions. Gaze-centered coding was only found in the moved condition, replicating our previous results. Body-centered coding dominated in the stationary condition while body- and gaze-centered coding contributed equally strong in the moved condition. Our results indicate a shift from body-centered to combined body- and gaze-centered coding due to an effector movement before reaching towards proprioceptive targets. PMID:27157885

  19. Effects of Massage on Muscular Strength and Proprioception After Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage.

    PubMed

    Shin, Mal-Soon; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2015-08-01

    Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD), which is commonly associated with eccentric exercise, unaccustomed exercise, and resistance training, may lead to delayed onset muscle soreness, swelling, decreased muscle strength, and range of motion. Many researchers have evaluated various interventions to treat the signs and symptoms of EIMD. However, the effects of massage after EIMD are unclear. Here, we investigated the effect of massage on muscle strength and proprioception after EIMD. All subjects randomly were divided into an EIMD-treated control group (n = 10) and a massage-treated after EIMD experimental group (n = 11). Exercise-induced muscle damage was induced by repeated exercise. Massage treatment was provided by physiotherapist for 15 minutes. It consists of light stroking, milking, friction, and skin rolling. Lactate was evaluated by Lactate Pro analyzer in pre- and postexercise. Surface electromyography (muscle activity) and sonography (muscle thickness) were used to confirm the muscular characteristics. Proprioception was investigated by dual inclinometer. As a result, massage treatment on the gastrocnemius after EIMD increased activation of the medial gastrocnemius during contraction (p ≤ 0.05). In the lateral and medial gastrocnemius, the θs, which is the angle between muscle fibers and superficial aponeurosis, showed a significant change (p ≤ 0.05). However, there are no differences in the θd, which is the angle between muscle fibers and deep aponeurosis. We also found that proprioceptive acuity in the ankle joint was significantly greater in the massage-treated experimental group compared with that in the control group (p ≤ 0.05). These findings suggest that massage of the gastrocnemius after EIMD can improve muscle strength and proprioception by influencing the superficial layer of the gastrocnemius. PMID:25226328

  20. Lumbar Repositioning Accuracy as a Measure of Proprioception in Patients with Back Dysfunction and Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Study Design A control group cross-sectional design. Purpose To compare the difference in repositioning accuracy, as a measure of lumbar proprioception, between patients with back dysfunction and healthy subjects. Overview of Literature Evidence suggests that spinal stability might be compromised in patients with back dysfunction. Lumbar proprioception in back dysfunction has not, however, been adequately investigated. Methods Forty-five participants, representing three groups, took part in the study. Subjects in group one (n = 15) were healthy subjects. Subjects in group two (n = 15) had a history of non-specific mechanical back dysfunction, while subjects in group three (n = 15) had discogenic back dysfunction. Subjects were required to reproduce a target position of 30° lumbar flexion and the absolute error (AE) was calculated. Results The AEs between target and reproduced positions were calculated. The average repositioning AEs were 2.8, 7.5, and 7.1° for the control, mechanical, and discogenic back dysfunction groups respectively. Analysis of variance revealed significant difference between the three groups (p < 0.0002). The AEs were greater in the two back dysfunction groups compared to the control group. Post-hoc tests revealed significant difference in AEs between the control and mechanical group (p < 0.0003), and discogenic group (p < 0.0001), while there was no significant difference between the mechanical and discogenic back dysfunction groups (p = 0.73). Conclusions Differences in proprioception do exist between subjects with back dysfunction and normal subjects. The proprioceptive deficits do exist regardless of the cause of the back dysfunction, and may represent an important aspect of the patho-physiology of such a condition. PMID:22164313

  1. Robot-Assisted Training of the Kinesthetic Sense: Enhancing Proprioception after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    De Santis, Dalia; Zenzeri, Jacopo; Casadio, Maura; Masia, Lorenzo; Riva, Assunta; Morasso, Pietro; Squeri, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Proprioception has a crucial role in promoting or hindering motor learning. In particular, an intact position sense strongly correlates with the chances of recovery after stroke. A great majority of neurological patients present both motor dysfunctions and impairments in kinesthesia, but traditional robot and virtual reality training techniques focus either in recovering motor functions or in assessing proprioceptive deficits. An open challenge is to implement effective and reliable tests and training protocols for proprioception that go beyond the mere position sense evaluation and exploit the intrinsic bidirectionality of the kinesthetic sense, which refers to both sense of position and sense of movement. Modulated haptic interaction has a leading role in promoting sensorimotor integration, and it is a natural way to enhance volitional effort. Therefore, we designed a preliminary clinical study to test a new proprioception-based motor training technique for augmenting kinesthetic awareness via haptic feedback. The feedback was provided by a robotic manipulandum and the test involved seven chronic hemiparetic subjects over 3 weeks. The protocol included evaluation sessions that consisted of a psychometric estimate of the subject’s kinesthetic sensation, and training sessions, in which the subject executed planar reaching movements in the absence of vision and under a minimally assistive haptic guidance made by sequences of graded force pulses. The bidirectional haptic interaction between the subject and the robot was optimally adapted to each participant in order to achieve a uniform task difficulty over the workspace. All the subjects consistently improved in the perceptual scores as a consequence of training. Moreover, they could minimize the level of haptic guidance in time. Results suggest that the proposed method is effective in enhancing kinesthetic acuity, but the level of impairment may affect the ability of subjects to retain their improvement in time

  2. Robot-assisted training of the kinesthetic sense: enhancing proprioception after stroke.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Dalia; Zenzeri, Jacopo; Casadio, Maura; Masia, Lorenzo; Riva, Assunta; Morasso, Pietro; Squeri, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Proprioception has a crucial role in promoting or hindering motor learning. In particular, an intact position sense strongly correlates with the chances of recovery after stroke. A great majority of neurological patients present both motor dysfunctions and impairments in kinesthesia, but traditional robot and virtual reality training techniques focus either in recovering motor functions or in assessing proprioceptive deficits. An open challenge is to implement effective and reliable tests and training protocols for proprioception that go beyond the mere position sense evaluation and exploit the intrinsic bidirectionality of the kinesthetic sense, which refers to both sense of position and sense of movement. Modulated haptic interaction has a leading role in promoting sensorimotor integration, and it is a natural way to enhance volitional effort. Therefore, we designed a preliminary clinical study to test a new proprioception-based motor training technique for augmenting kinesthetic awareness via haptic feedback. The feedback was provided by a robotic manipulandum and the test involved seven chronic hemiparetic subjects over 3 weeks. The protocol included evaluation sessions that consisted of a psychometric estimate of the subject's kinesthetic sensation, and training sessions, in which the subject executed planar reaching movements in the absence of vision and under a minimally assistive haptic guidance made by sequences of graded force pulses. The bidirectional haptic interaction between the subject and the robot was optimally adapted to each participant in order to achieve a uniform task difficulty over the workspace. All the subjects consistently improved in the perceptual scores as a consequence of training. Moreover, they could minimize the level of haptic guidance in time. Results suggest that the proposed method is effective in enhancing kinesthetic acuity, but the level of impairment may affect the ability of subjects to retain their improvement in time

  3. Evaluation of knee joint proprioception and balance of young female volleyball players: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Şahin, Neşe; Bianco, Antonino; Patti, Antonino; Paoli, Antonio; Palma, Antonio; Ersöz, Gülfem

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The main purpose of our study was the evaluation of the effects of long-term volleyball practice on knee joint proprioception and balance of young female athletes. [Subjects and Methods] An observational case-control study was performed. The study enrolled 19 female volleyball players in the experimental group and 19 sedentary counterparts as controls. A Biodex balance system and dynamometer were used for the evaluations. The paired t-test was used to determine the significance of differences between the performance of athletes and controls. [Results] The knee proprioception analysis showed a significant difference at 60° joint position in active and passive tests. A similar trend, but without significance, was found for the 20° joint position. In the postural stability tests both groups showed similar results with no significant differences between them. [Conclusion] In conclusion, the results indicate a significant influence on joint proprioception is elicited by long-term exposure to a team sport like volleyball. However, the postural stability indexes showed similar trends in both groups, highlighting the analogous ontogenesis of the subjects investigated and the low influence of volleyball practice on postural stability. PMID:25729185

  4. The combined effects of action observation and passive proprioceptive training on adaptive motor learning.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yuming; Bao, Shancheng; Wang, Jinsung

    2016-09-01

    Sensorimotor adaptation can be induced by action observation, and also by passive training. Here, we investigated the effect of a protocol that combined action observation and passive training on visuomotor adaptation, by comparing it with the effect of action observation or passive training alone. Subjects were divided into five conditions during the training session: (1) action observation, in which the subjects watched a video of a model who adapted to a novel visuomotor rotation; (2) proprioceptive training, in which the subject's arm was moved passively to target locations that were associated with desired trajectories; (3) combined training, in which the subjects watched the video of a model during a half of the session and experienced passive movements during the other half; (4) active training, in which the subjects adapted actively to the rotation; and (5) a control condition, in which the subjects did not perform any task. Following that session, all subjects adapted to the same visuomotor rotation. Results showed that the subjects in the combined training condition adapted to the rotation significantly better than those in the observation or proprioceptive training condition, although their performance was not as good as that of those who adapted actively. These findings suggest that although a protocol that combines action observation and passive training consists of all the processes involved in active training (error detection and correction, effector-specific and proprioceptively based reaching movements), these processes in that protocol may work differently as compared to a protocol in which the same processes are engaged actively. PMID:27298007

  5. Isolating Visual and Proprioceptive Components of Motor Sequence Learning in ASD.

    PubMed

    Sharer, Elizabeth A; Mostofsky, Stewart H; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Oberman, Lindsay M

    2016-05-01

    In addition to defining impairments in social communication skills, individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) also show impairments in more basic sensory and motor skills. Development of new skills involves integrating information from multiple sensory modalities. This input is then used to form internal models of action that can be accessed when both performing skilled movements, as well as understanding those actions performed by others. Learning skilled gestures is particularly reliant on integration of visual and proprioceptive input. We used a modified serial reaction time task (SRTT) to decompose proprioceptive and visual components and examine whether patterns of implicit motor skill learning differ in ASD participants as compared with healthy controls. While both groups learned the implicit motor sequence during training, healthy controls showed robust generalization whereas ASD participants demonstrated little generalization when visual input was constant. In contrast, no group differences in generalization were observed when proprioceptive input was constant, with both groups showing limited degrees of generalization. The findings suggest, when learning a motor sequence, individuals with ASD tend to rely less on visual feedback than do healthy controls. Visuomotor representations are considered to underlie imitative learning and action understanding and are thereby crucial to social skill and cognitive development. Thus, anomalous patterns of implicit motor learning, with a tendency to discount visual feedback, may be an important contributor in core social communication deficits that characterize ASD. Autism Res 2016, 9: 563-569. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26442448

  6. Single stance stability and proprioceptive control in older adults living at home: gender and age differences.

    PubMed

    Riva, Dario; Mamo, Carlo; Fanì, Mara; Saccavino, Patrizia; Rocca, Flavio; Momenté, Manuel; Fratta, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    In developed countries, falls in older people represent a rising problem. As effective prevention should start before the risk becomes evident, an early predictor is needed. Single stance instability would appear as a major risk factor. Aims of the study were to describe single stance stability, its sensory components, and their correlation with age and gender. A random sample of 597 older adults (319 men, 278 women) living at home, aged 65-84, was studied. Stability tests were performed with an electronic postural station. The single stance test showed the impairment of single stance stability in older individuals (75-84 yrs). The significant decline of stability in the older subjects may be explained by the impairment of proprioceptive control together with the decrease in compensatory visual stabilization and emergency responses. Younger subjects (65-74 yrs) exhibited better, but still inadequate, proprioceptive control with compensatory visual stabilization. Gender differences appeared in older subjects: women were significantly less stable than men. The measurement of the sensory components of single stance stability could aid in the early detection of a decay in antigravity movements many years before the risk of falling becomes evident. Adequate proprioceptive control could mitigate the effects of all other risks of falling. PMID:23984068

  7. Proprioceptive deficit in patients with complete tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Pedro; Nicoliche, Eduardo; Cossich, Victor; de Sousa, Eduardo Branco; Velasques, Bruna; Salles, José Inácio

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the existence of proprioceptive deficits between the injured limb and the uninjured (i.e. contralateral normal) limb, in individuals who suffered complete tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), using a strength reproduction test. Methods Sixteen patients with complete tearing of the ACL participated in the study. A voluntary maximum isometric strength test was performed, with reproduction of the muscle strength in the limb with complete tearing of the ACL and the healthy contralateral limb, with the knee flexed at 60°. The meta-intensity was used for the procedure of 20% of the voluntary maximum isometric strength. The proprioceptive performance was determined by means of absolute error, variable error and constant error values. Results Significant differences were found between the control group and ACL group for the variables of absolute error (p = 0.05) and constant error (p = 0.01). No difference was found in relation to variable error (p = 0.83). Conclusion Our data corroborate the hypothesis that there is a proprioceptive deficit in subjects with complete tearing of the ACL in an injured limb, in comparison with the uninjured limb, during evaluation of the sense of strength. This deficit can be explained in terms of partial or total loss of the mechanoreceptors of the ACL. PMID:26229870

  8. Contributions of vision and proprioception to arm movement planning in the vertical plane.

    PubMed

    Apker, G A; Karimi, C P; Buneo, C A

    2011-10-10

    The roles of visual and somatosensory information in arm movement planning remain enigmatic. Previous studies have examined these roles by dissociating visual and somatosensory cues about limb position prior to movement onset and examining the resulting effects on movements performed in the horizontal plane. Here we examined the effects of misaligned limb position cues prior to movement onset as reaches were planned and executed along different directions in the vertical plane. Movements were planned with somatosensory and visual feedback aligned at the starting position of the reach or with visual feedback displaced horizontally (Experiment 1) or vertically (Experiment 2). As in the horizontal plane, changes in movement directions induced by misaligned feedback indicated that vision and proprioception were both generally taken into account when planning vertical plane movements. However, we also found evidence that the contributions of vision and proprioception differed across target directions and between directions of displaced visual feedback. These findings suggest that the contributions of vision and proprioception to movement planning in the vertical plane reflect the unique multisensory and biomechanical demands associated with moving against gravity. PMID:21889576

  9. Effects of proprioceptive training program on core stability and center of gravity control in sprinters.

    PubMed

    Romero-Franco, Natalia; Martínez-López, Emilio; Lomas-Vega, Rafael; Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Martínez-Amat, Antonio

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determinate the effect of a 6-week specific-sprinter proprioceptive training program on core stability and gravity center control in sprinters. Thirty-three athletes (age = 21.82 ± 4.84 years, height = 1.76 ± 0.07 m, weight = 67.82 ± 08.04 kg, body mass index = 21.89 ± 2.37 kg · m(-2)) from sprint disciplines were divided into a control (n = 17) and experimental (n = 16) groups. A 30-minute proprioceptive training program was included in the experimental group training sessions, and it was performed for 6 weeks, 3 times each week. This program included 5 exercises with the BOSU and Swiss ball as unstable training tools that were designed to reproduce different moments of the technique of a sprint race. Stability with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed, postural stability, and gravity center control were assessed before and after the training program. Analyses of covariance (α = 0.05) revealed significant differences in stability in the medial-lateral plane with EO, gravity center control in the right direction and gravity center control in the back direction after the exercise intervention in the experimental athletes. Nevertheless, no other significant differences were demonstrated. A sprinter-specific proprioceptive training program provided postural stability with EO and gravity center control measures improvements, although it is not clear if the effect of training would transfer to the general population. PMID:21997455

  10. Sequential [(18)F]FDG µPET whole-brain imaging of central vestibular compensation: a model of deafferentation-induced brain plasticity.

    PubMed

    Zwergal, Andreas; Schlichtiger, Julia; Xiong, Guoming; Beck, Roswitha; Günther, Lisa; Schniepp, Roman; Schöberl, Florian; Jahn, Klaus; Brandt, Thomas; Strupp, Michael; Bartenstein, Peter; Dieterich, Marianne; Dutia, Mayank B; la Fougère, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Unilateral inner ear damage is followed by a rapid behavioural recovery due to central vestibular compensation. In this study, we utilized serial [(18)F]Fluoro-deoxyglucose ([(18)F]FDG)-µPET imaging in the rat to visualize changes in brain glucose metabolism during behavioural recovery after surgical and chemical unilateral labyrinthectomy, to determine the extent and time-course of the involvement of different brain regions in vestibular compensation and test previously described hypotheses of underlying mechanisms. Systematic patterns of relative changes of glucose metabolism (rCGM) were observed during vestibular compensation. A significant asymmetry of rCGM appeared in the vestibular nuclei, vestibulocerebellum, thalamus, multisensory vestibular cortex, hippocampus and amygdala in the acute phase of vestibular imbalance (4 h). This was followed by early vestibular compensation over 1-2 days where rCGM re-balanced between the vestibular nuclei, thalami and temporoparietal cortices and bilateral rCGM increase appeared in the hippocampus and amygdala. Subsequently over 2-7 days, rCGM increased in the ipsilesional spinal trigeminal nucleus and later (7-9 days) rCGM increased in the vestibulocerebellum bilaterally and the hypothalamus and persisted in the hippocampus. These systematic dynamic rCGM patterns during vestibular compensation, were confirmed in a second rat model of chemical unilateral labyrinthectomy by serial [(18)F]FDG-µPET. These findings show that deafferentation-induced plasticity after unilateral labyrinthectomy involves early mechanisms of re-balancing predominantly in the brainstem vestibular nuclei but also in thalamo-cortical and limbic areas, and indicate the contribution of spinocerebellar sensory inputs and vestibulocerebellar adaptation at the later stages of behavioural recovery. PMID:25269833

  11. Proprioceptive ability at the lips and jaw measured using the same psychophysical discrimination task.

    PubMed

    Frayne, Ellie; Coulson, Susan; Adams, Roger; Croxson, Glen; Waddington, Gordon

    2016-06-01

    In the human face, the muscles and joints that generate movement have different properties. Whereas the jaw is a conventional condyle joint, the facial musculature has neither distinct origin nor insertion points, and the muscles do not contain muscle spindle proprioceptors. This current study aims to compare the proprioceptive ability at the orofacial muscles with that of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in 21 neuro-typical people aged between 18 and 65 years. A novel psychophysical task was devised for use with both structures that involved a fixed 30.5 mm start separation followed by closure onto stimuli of 5, 6, 7, 8 mm diameter. The mean proprioceptive score when using the lips was 0.84 compared to 0.79 at the jaw (p < 0.001), and response error was lower by 0.1 mm. The greater accuracy in discrimination of lip movement is significant because, unlike the muscles controlling the TMJ, the orbicularis oris muscle controlling the lips inserts on to connective tissue and other muscle, and contains no muscle spindles, implying a different more effective, proprioceptive mechanism. Additionally, unlike the lack of correlation previously observed between joints in the upper and lower limbs, at the face the scores from performing the task with the two different structures were significantly correlated (r = 0.5, p = 0.018). These data extend the understanding of proprioception being correlated for the same left and right joints and correlated within the same structure (e.g. ankle dorsiflexion and inversion), to include use-dependant proprioception, with performance in different structures being correlated through extended coordinated use. At the lips and jaw, it is likely that this arises from extensive coordinated use. This informs clinical assessment and suggests a potential for coordinated post-injury training of the lips and jaw, as well as having the potential to predict premorbid function via measurement of the uninjured structure, when monitoring

  12. Compromised encoding of proprioceptively determined joint angles in older adults: the role of working memory and attentional load.

    PubMed

    Goble, Daniel J; Mousigian, Marianne A; Brown, Susan H

    2012-01-01

    Perceiving the positions and movements of one's body segments (i.e., proprioception) is critical for movement control. However, this ability declines with older age as has been demonstrated by joint angle matching paradigms in the absence of vision. The aim of the present study was to explore the extent to which reduced working memory and attentional load influence older adult proprioceptive matching performance. Older adults with relatively HIGH versus LOW working memory ability as determined by backward digit span and healthy younger adults, performed memory-based elbow position matching with and without attentional load (i.e., counting by 3 s) during target position encoding. Even without attentional load, older adults with LOW digit spans (i.e., 4 digits or less) had larger matching errors than younger adults. Further, LOW older adults made significantly greater errors when attentional loads were present during proprioceptive target encoding as compared to both younger and older adults with HIGH digit span scores (i.e., 5 digits or greater). These results extend previous position matching results that suggested greater errors in older adults were due to degraded input signals from peripheral mechanoreceptors. Specifically, the present work highlights the role cognitive factors play in the assessment of older adult proprioceptive acuity using memory-based matching paradigms. Older adults with LOW working memory appear prone to compromised proprioceptive encoding, especially when secondary cognitive tasks must be concurrently executed. This may ultimately result in poorer performance on various activities of daily living. PMID:22006273

  13. Balance Ability and Proprioception after Single-Bundle, Single-Bundle Augmentation, and Double-Bundle ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yubao; Iwaki, Daisuke; Asaeda, Makoto; Adachi, Nobuo; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The present study sought to determine the influences of single-bundle (SB), single-bundle augmentation (SBA), and double-bundle (DB) reconstructions on balance ability and proprioceptive function. Methods. 67 patients who underwent a single- or double-bundle ACL reconstruction or a SBA using multistranded autologous hamstring tendons were included in this study with a 1-year follow-up. Body sway and knee kinesthesia (using the threshold to detect passive motion test (TTDPM)) were measured to indicate balance ability and proprioceptive function, respectively. Additionally, within-subject differences in anterior-posterior stability of the tibia and lower extremity muscle strength were evaluated before and after surgery. Results. At 6 and 12 months after surgery, DB reconstruction resulted in better balance and proprioceptive function than SB reconstruction (P < 0.05). Although no significant difference was observed in balance ability or proprioceptive function between the SBA and DB reconstructions, knee stability was significantly better with SBA and DB reconstructions than SB reconstruction (P < 0.05). No significant differences were found in quadriceps and hamstrings strength among the three reconstruction techniques. Conclusions. Our findings consider that joint stability, proprioceptive function, and balance ability were superior with SBA and DB reconstructions compared to SB reconstruction at 6 and 12 months after surgery. PMID:25614884

  14. The Kinematic Control During the Backward Gait and Knee Proprioception: Insights from Lesions of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Viggiano, Davide; Corona, Katia; Cerciello, Simone; Vasso, Michele; Schiavone-Panni, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    An already existing large volume of work on kinematics documents a reduction of step length during unusual gaits, such as backward walking. This is mainly explained in terms of modifications of some biomechanical properties. In the present study, we propose that the proprioceptive information from the knee may be involved in this change of motor strategy. Specifically, we show that a non-automated condition such as backward walking can elicit different motor strategies in subjects with reduced proprioceptive feedback after anterior cruciate ligament lesion (ACL). For this purpose, the kinematic parameters during forward and backward walking in subjects with ACL deficit were compared to two control groups: a group with intact ACL and a group with surgically reconstructed ACL. The knee proprioception was tested measuring the threshold for detection of passive knee motion. Subjects were asked to walk on a level treadmill at five different velocities (1–5km/h) in forward and backward direction, thereby calculating the cadence and step length. Results showed that forward walking parameters were largely unaffected in subjects with ACL damage. However, they failed to reduce step length during backward walking, a correction that was normally observed in all control subjects and in subjects with normal proprioceptive feedback after ACL reconstruction. The main result of the present study is that knee proprioception is an important signal used by the brain to reduce step length during the backward gait. This can have a significant impact on clinical evaluation and rehabilitation. PMID:25114731

  15. The effect of instability training on knee joint proprioception and core strength.

    PubMed

    Cuğ, Mutlu; Ak, Emre; Ozdemir, Recep Ali; Korkusuz, Feza; Behm, David G

    2012-01-01

    Although there are many studies demonstrating increased trunk activation under unstable conditions, it is not known whether this increased activation would translate into meaningful trunk strength with a prolonged training program. Additionally, while balance-training programs have been shown to improve stability, their effect on specific joint proprioception is not clear. Thus the objective of this study was to examine training adaptations associated with a 10-week instability-training program. Participants were tested pre- and post-training for trunk extension and flexion strength and knee proprioception. Forty-three participants participated in either a 10-week (3 days per week) instability-training program using Swiss balls and body weight as resistance or a control group (n = 17). The trained group increased (p < 0. 05) trunk extension peak torque/body weight (23.6%) and total work output (20.1%) from pre- to post-training while the control group decreased by 6.8% and 6.7% respectively. The exercise group increased their trunk flexion peak torque/body weight ratios by 18.1% while the control group decreased by 0.4%. Knee proprioception (combined right and left joint repositioning) improved 44.7% from pre- to post-training (p = 0.0006) and persisted (21.5%) for 9 months post-training. In addition there was a side interaction with the position sense of the right knee at 9 months showing 32.1% (p = 0.03) less deviation from the reference angle than the right knee during pre-testing. An instability-training program using Swiss balls with body weight as resistance can provide prolonged improvements in joint proprioception and core strength in previously untrained individuals performing this novel training stress which would contribute to general health. Key pointsAlthough traditional free weight resistance exercises have been recommended as most beneficial for improving strength and power in athletes (Behm et al., 2010b), an IT program using Swiss balls and body

  16. Processing of proprioceptive and vestibular body signals and self-transcendence in Ashtanga yoga practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Fiori, Francesca; David, Nicole; Aglioti, Salvatore M.

    2014-01-01

    In the rod and frame test (RFT), participants are asked to set a tilted visual linear marker (i.e., a rod), embedded in a square, to the subjective vertical, irrespective of the surrounding frame. People not influenced by the frame tilt are defined as field-independent, while people biased in their rod verticality perception are field-dependent. Performing RFT requires the integration of proprioceptive, vestibular and visual signals with the latter accounting for field-dependency. Studies indicate that motor experts in body-related, balance-improving disciplines tend to be field-independent, i.e., better at verticality perception, suggesting that proprioceptive and vestibular expertise acquired by such exercise may weaken the influence of irrelevant visual signals. What remains unknown is whether the effect of body-related expertise in weighting perceptual information might also be mediated by personality traits, in particular those indexing self-focusing abilities. To explore this issue, we tested field-dependency in a class of body experts, namely yoga practitioners and in non-expert participants. Moreover we explored any link between performance on RFT and self-transcendence (ST), a complex personality construct, which refers to tendency to experience spiritual feelings and ideas. As expected, yoga practitioners (i) were more accurate in assessing the rod's verticality on the RFT, and (ii) expressed significantly higher ST. Interestingly, the performance in these two tests was negatively correlated. More specifically, when asked to provide verticality judgments, highly self-transcendent yoga practitioners were significantly less influenced by a misleading visual context. Our results suggest that being highly self-transcendent may enable yoga practitioners to optimize verticality judgment tasks by relying more on internal (vestibular and proprioceptive) signals coming from their own body, rather than on exteroceptive, visual cues. PMID:25278866

  17. Correlation study of knee joint proprioception test results using common test methods

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Ji, Zhong-Qiu; Li, Yan-Xia; Liu, Wei-Tong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To study the correlation of the results obtained from different proprioception test methods, namely, the joint angle reset method, the motion minimum threshold measurement method, and the force sense reproduction method, performed on the same subjects’ knees. [Subjects and Methods] Different proprioception test methods, the joint angle reset method, the motion minimum threshold measurement method and the force sense reproduction method were used to test the knees of 30 healthy young men. [Results] Correlations were found in the following descending order from strong to weak: the correlation between the joint angle reset method and the force sense reproduction method (correlation coefficient of 0.41), the correlation between the joint angle reset method and the motion minimum threshold measurement method (correlation coefficient of 0.29), the correlation between the motion minimum threshold measurement method and the force sense reproduce method (correlation coefficient of 0.15). [Conclusion] No correlation was found among the results obtained using the joint angle reset method, the motion minimum threshold measurement method and the force sense reproduction method. Therefore, no correlation was found among the position sense, the motion sense and the force sense represented by these methods. Using the results of only one of the test methods to represent proprioception is one-sided. Force sensation depends more on the sensory input of information from the Golgi tendon organs, motion sense depends more on the input information of the muscle spindles, and position sense relies on the double input information of the muscle spindles and the Golgi tendon organs. PMID:27065533

  18. Trigger Point Dry Needling and Proprioceptive Exercises for the Management of Chronic Ankle Instability: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Ayuso-Casado, Blanca; Tamaral-Costa, Beatriz; Sánchez-Milá, Zacarías; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare the effects of combined trigger point dry needling (TrP-DN) and proprioceptive/strengthening exercises to proprioceptive/strengthening exercises on pain and function in ankle instability. Methods. Twenty-seven (44% female, mean age: 33 ± 3 years) individuals with unilateral ankle instability were randomly assigned to an experimental group who received proprioceptive/strengthening exercises combined with TrP-DN into the lateral peroneus muscle and a comparison group receiving the same proprioceptive/strengthening exercise program alone. Outcome included function assessed with the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) and ankle pain intensity assessed with a numerical pain rate scale (NPRS). They were captured at baseline and 1-month follow-up after the intervention. Results. The ANOVAs found significant Group ∗ Time Interactions for both subscales of the FAAM (ADL: F = 8.211; P = 0.008; SPORTS: F = 13.943; P < 0.001) and for pain (F = 44.420; P < 0.001): patients receiving TrP-DN plus proprioceptive/strengthening exercises experienced greater improvements in function and pain than those receiving the exercise program alone. Between-groups effect sizes were large in all outcomes (SMD > 2.1) in favor of the TrP-DN group. Conclusions. This study provides evidence that the inclusion of TrP-DN within the lateral peroneus muscle into a proprioceptive/strengthening exercise program resulted in better outcomes in pain and function 1 month after the therapy in ankle instability. PMID:26064172

  19. Trigger Point Dry Needling and Proprioceptive Exercises for the Management of Chronic Ankle Instability: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Ayuso-Casado, Blanca; Tamaral-Costa, Beatriz; Sánchez-Milá, Zacarías; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare the effects of combined trigger point dry needling (TrP-DN) and proprioceptive/strengthening exercises to proprioceptive/strengthening exercises on pain and function in ankle instability. Methods. Twenty-seven (44% female, mean age: 33 ± 3 years) individuals with unilateral ankle instability were randomly assigned to an experimental group who received proprioceptive/strengthening exercises combined with TrP-DN into the lateral peroneus muscle and a comparison group receiving the same proprioceptive/strengthening exercise program alone. Outcome included function assessed with the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) and ankle pain intensity assessed with a numerical pain rate scale (NPRS). They were captured at baseline and 1-month follow-up after the intervention. Results. The ANOVAs found significant Group ∗ Time Interactions for both subscales of the FAAM (ADL: F = 8.211; P = 0.008; SPORTS: F = 13.943; P < 0.001) and for pain (F = 44.420; P < 0.001): patients receiving TrP-DN plus proprioceptive/strengthening exercises experienced greater improvements in function and pain than those receiving the exercise program alone. Between-groups effect sizes were large in all outcomes (SMD > 2.1) in favor of the TrP-DN group. Conclusions. This study provides evidence that the inclusion of TrP-DN within the lateral peroneus muscle into a proprioceptive/strengthening exercise program resulted in better outcomes in pain and function 1 month after the therapy in ankle instability. PMID:26064172

  20. Ankle proprioceptive acuity is associated with objective as well as self-report measures of balance, mobility, and physical function.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Nandini; Simonsick, Eleanor; Metter, E Jeffrey; Ko, Seunguk; Ferrucci, Luigi; Studenski, Stephanie

    2016-06-01

    Ankle proprioceptive information is integrated by the central nervous system to generate and modulate muscle contractions for maintaining standing balance. This study evaluated the association of ankle joint proprioception with objective and self-report measures of balance, mobility, and physical function across the adult life span. Seven hundred and ninety participants (age range 24-97 years, 362 women) who completed ankle proprioception assessment between 2010 and 2014 were included in the present study from the population-based cohort of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA), USA. Outcome measures included ankle joint proprioception measured as threshold for perception of passive movement (TPPM); single leg stance time; perceived difficulty for standing balance; usual, fastest, and narrow-path gait speed; walking index; short physical performance battery score; and self-reported activity restriction due to fear of falling. Descriptive variables included age, sex, body mass index, education, strength, and cognition. Analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) in general linear model (GLM) or multinomial logistic regression analyses were performed, as appropriate, to test the hypothesis that balance, mobility, and physical function were significantly different according to TPPM quintiles even after adjusting for relevant covariates. Those with TPPM >2.2° consistently demonstrated poor balance, mobility, and physical function. However, with increase in challenge (single leg stance, fastest walking speed, and SPPB), TPPM >1.4° was associated with significantly worse performance. In conclusion, ankle proprioceptive acuity has an overall graded relationship with objective and self-report measures of balance, mobility, and physical function. However, the cutoff proprioceptive acuity associated with substantial decline or inability to perform could depend on the challenge induced. PMID:27146830

  1. Go, Slow, and Whoa Foods

    MedlinePlus

    ... quick tips for seasonal health, safety and fun Go, Slow, and Whoa Foods Past Issues / Summer 2007 ... of California and Flaghouse, Inc. 2002 Food Group GO Almost anytime foods SLOW Sometimes foods WHOA Once ...

  2. Slow Transit Constipation.

    PubMed

    Wald, Arnold

    2002-08-01

    The diagnosis of slow transit functional constipation is based upon diagnostic testing of patients with idiopathic constipation who responded poorly to conservative measures such as fiber supplements, fluids, and stimulant laxatives. These tests include barium enema or colonoscopy, colonic transit of radio-opaque markers, anorectal manometry, and expulsion of a water-filled balloon. Plain abdominal films can identify megacolon, which can be further characterized by barium or gastrografin studies. Colonic transit of radio-opaque markers identifies patients with slow transit with stasis of markers in the proximal colon. However, anorectal function should be characterized to exclude outlet dysfunction, which may coexist with colonic inertia. Because slow colonic transit is defined by studies during which patients consume a high-fiber diet, fiber supplements are generally not effective, nor are osmotic laxatives that consist of unabsorbed sugars. Stimulant laxatives are considered first-line therapy, although studies often show a diminished colonic motor response to such agents. There is no evidence to suggest that chronic use of such laxatives is harmful if they are used two to three times per week. Polyethylene glycol with or without electrolytes may be useful in a minority of patients, often combined with misoprostol. I prefer to start with misoprostol 200 mg every other morning and increase to tolerance or efficacy. I see no advantage in prescribing misoprostol on a TID or QID basis or even daily because it increases cramping unnecessarily. This drug is not acceptable in young women who wish to become pregnant. An alternative may be colchicine, which is reported to be effective when given as 0.6 mg TID. Long-term efficacy has not been studied. Finally, biofeedback is a risk-free approach that has been reported as effective in approximately 60% of patients with slow transit constipation in the absence of outlet dysfunction. Although difficult to understand

  3. Abnormal Pressure Pain, Touch Sensitivity, Proprioception, and Manual Dexterity in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Riquelme, Inmaculada; Hatem, Samar M.

    2016-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) often display an abnormal reactivity to tactile stimuli, altered pain perception, and lower motor skills than healthy children. Nevertheless, these motor and sensory deficits have been mostly assessed by using clinical observation and self-report questionnaires. The present study aims to explore somatosensory and motor function in children with ASD by using standardized and objective testing procedures. Methods. Tactile and pressure pain thresholds in hands and lips, stereognosis, proprioception, and fine motor performance of the upper limbs were assessed in high-functioning children with ASD (n = 27) and compared with typically developing peers (n = 30).  Results. Children with ASD showed increased pain sensitivity, increased touch sensitivity in C-tactile afferents innervated areas, and diminished fine motor performance and proprioception compared to healthy children. No group differences were observed for stereognosis. Conclusion. Increased pain sensitivity and increased touch sensitivity in areas classically related to affective touch (C-tactile afferents innervated areas) may explain typical avoiding behaviors associated with hypersensitivity. Both sensory and motor impairments should be assessed and treated in children with ASD. PMID:26881091

  4. Effects of fusion between tactile and proprioceptive inputs on tactile perception.

    PubMed

    Warren, Jay P; Santello, Marco; Helms Tillery, Stephen I

    2011-01-01

    Tactile perception is typically considered the result of cortical interpretation of afferent signals from a network of mechanical sensors underneath the skin. Yet, tactile illusion studies suggest that tactile perception can be elicited without afferent signals from mechanoceptors. Therefore, the extent that tactile perception arises from isomorphic mapping of tactile afferents onto the somatosensory cortex remains controversial. We tested whether isomorphic mapping of tactile afferent fibers onto the cortex leads directly to tactile perception by examining whether it is independent from proprioceptive input by evaluating the impact of different hand postures on the perception of a tactile illusion across fingertips. Using the Cutaneous Rabbit Effect, a well studied illusion evoking the perception that a stimulus occurs at a location where none has been delivered, we found that hand posture has a significant effect on the perception of the illusion across the fingertips. This finding emphasizes that tactile perception arises from integration of perceived mechanical and proprioceptive input and not purely from tactile interaction with the external environment. PMID:21464943

  5. Somatic experiencing: using interoception and proprioception as core elements of trauma therapy

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Peter; Levine, Peter A.; Crane-Godreau, Mardi A.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a theory of human trauma and chronic stress, based on the practice of Somatic Experiencing® (SE), a form of trauma therapy that emphasizes guiding the client's attention to interoceptive, kinesthetic, and proprioceptive experience. SE™ claims that this style of inner attention, in addition to the use of kinesthetic and interoceptive imagery, can lead to the resolution of symptoms resulting from chronic and traumatic stress. This is accomplished through the completion of thwarted, biologically based, self-protective and defensive responses, and the discharge and regulation of excess autonomic arousal. We present this theory through a composite case study of SE treatment; based on this example, we offer a possible neurophysiological rationale for the mechanisms involved, including a theory of trauma and chronic stress as a functional dysregulation of the complex dynamical system formed by the subcortical autonomic, limbic, motor and arousal systems, which we term the core response network (CRN). We demonstrate how the methods of SE help restore functionality to the CRN, and we emphasize the importance of taking into account the instinctive, bodily based protective reactions when dealing with stress and trauma, as well as the effectiveness of using attention to interoceptive, proprioceptive and kinesthetic sensation as a therapeutic tool. Finally, we point out that SE and similar somatic approaches offer a supplement to cognitive and exposure therapies, and that mechanisms similar to those discussed in the paper may also be involved in the benefits of meditation and other somatic practices. PMID:25699005

  6. Somatic experiencing: using interoception and proprioception as core elements of trauma therapy.

    PubMed

    Payne, Peter; Levine, Peter A; Crane-Godreau, Mardi A

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a theory of human trauma and chronic stress, based on the practice of Somatic Experiencing(®) (SE), a form of trauma therapy that emphasizes guiding the client's attention to interoceptive, kinesthetic, and proprioceptive experience. SE™ claims that this style of inner attention, in addition to the use of kinesthetic and interoceptive imagery, can lead to the resolution of symptoms resulting from chronic and traumatic stress. This is accomplished through the completion of thwarted, biologically based, self-protective and defensive responses, and the discharge and regulation of excess autonomic arousal. We present this theory through a composite case study of SE treatment; based on this example, we offer a possible neurophysiological rationale for the mechanisms involved, including a theory of trauma and chronic stress as a functional dysregulation of the complex dynamical system formed by the subcortical autonomic, limbic, motor and arousal systems, which we term the core response network (CRN). We demonstrate how the methods of SE help restore functionality to the CRN, and we emphasize the importance of taking into account the instinctive, bodily based protective reactions when dealing with stress and trauma, as well as the effectiveness of using attention to interoceptive, proprioceptive and kinesthetic sensation as a therapeutic tool. Finally, we point out that SE and similar somatic approaches offer a supplement to cognitive and exposure therapies, and that mechanisms similar to those discussed in the paper may also be involved in the benefits of meditation and other somatic practices. PMID:25699005

  7. Postural muscle atrophy prevention and recovery and bone remodelling through high frequency proprioception for astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, Dario; Rossitto, Franco; Battocchio, Luciano

    2009-09-01

    The difficulty in applying active exercises during space flights increases the importance of passive countermeasures, but coupling load and instability remains indispensable for generating high frequency (HF) proprioceptive flows and preventing muscle atrophy and osteoporosis. The present study, in microgravity conditions during a parabolic flight, verified whether an electronic system, composed of a rocking board, a postural reader and a bungee-cord loading apparatus creates HF postural instability comparable to that reachable on the Earth. Tracking the subject, in single stance, to real-time visual signals is necessary to obtain HF instability situations. The bungee-cord loading apparatus allowed the subject to manage the 81.5% body weight load (100% could easily be exceeded). A preliminary training programme schedule on the Earth and in space is suggested. Comparison with a pathological muscle atrophy is presented. The possibility of generating HF proprioceptive flows could complement current countermeasures for the prevention and recovery of muscle atrophy and osteoporosis in terrestrial and space environments. These exercises combine massive activation of spindles and joint receptors, applying simultaneously HF variations of pressure to different areas of the sole of the foot. This class of exercises could improve the effectiveness of current countermeasures, reducing working time and fatigue.

  8. Does Wearing Textured Insoles during Non-class Time Improve Proprioception in Professional Dancers?

    PubMed

    Steinberg, N; Tirosh, O; Adams, R; Karin, J; Waddington, G

    2015-11-01

    This study sought to determine whether textured insoles inserted in the sports shoes of young dancers improved their inversion and eversion ankle movement discrimination. 26 ballet dancers (14 female, 12 male) from the Australian Ballet School, ages 14-19 years, were divided into 2 groups according to sex and class levels. During the first 4 weeks, the first intervention group (GRP1) was asked to wear textured insoles in their sports shoes during non-class periods, and the second intervention group (GRP2) followed standard practice. In the next 4 weeks, GRP2 was asked to wear the textured insoles and GRP1 did not wear the textured insoles. Participants were tested pre-intervention, after 4 weeks, and at 8 weeks for both inversion and eversion ankle discrimination. In both inversion and eversion testing positions, interaction was found between the 2 groups and the 3 testing times (p<0.001), with significant differences between the first testing and the second testing (p=0.038 and p=0.019, respectively), and between the third testing and the second testing (p=0.003 and p=0.029, respectively). In conclusion, the stimulation to the proprioceptive system arising from textured insoles worn for 4 weeks was sufficient to improve the ankle proprioception of ballet dancers, in both inversion and eversion movements. PMID:26332901

  9. Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation does not increase blood pressure of healthy elderly women.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Marcelo Pinto

    2012-07-01

    Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) is an attractive method to increase strength and proprioception of elderly individuals. However, a major clinical concern about the prescription of PNF is the belief that it can cause a cardiovascular overload, because it involves close-to-maximal loads and isometric contractions. Yet the acute effect of a PNF training session on cardiovascular response in elderly individuals is still unknown. Hence, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of PNF on diastolic and systolic blood pressure of healthy elderly people. Fifteen older women (mean age 72.40±6.82 years) performed three sets (five repetitions each) of three different PNF techniques (rhythmic initiation, dynamic reversion, and isotonic combination), executing a single movement pattern. Diastolic and systolic blood pressure (DBP and SBP) were evaluated by means of a manual sphygmomanometer immediately before and during the last two repetitions (last set) of each technique. A two-way ANOVA test (time and technique) was performed to investigate the PNF effect on blood pressure. No time (preexercise to postexercise) (p=0.33 for DBP; p=0.06 for SBP) or PNF technique (p=0.75; p=0.81) effect were observed. In conclusion, we can state that the execution of these PNF techniques is safe for the cardiovascular system of healthy elderly women, because no blood pressure increases were found. PMID:22007735

  10. Influence of Local Cooling on Proprioceptive Acuity in the Quadriceps Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Estephan, Lorein; Legendre, Martine; Sulpher, Stéphanie

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To test the influence of cooling on proprioceptive acuity as reflected in the ability to discriminate weights. Design and Setting: Participants were trained to perform a weight-discrimination task. Their ability to correctly report small increments in weight was compared before and after local cooling (a 20-minute application of a crushed-ice pack) of the quadriceps muscle group. Data were collected at a university research laboratory. Subjects: Twenty young, physically active adults (undergraduate students; 14 men, 6 women; mean age, 22.1 ± 2.6 years). Measurements: We calculated overall performance in the weight-discrimination task (percentage of discrimination correct) for each participant to estimate the differential threshold (ie, minimal increment in weight that yields a probability of 75% correct responses). Results: Before local cooling, participants discriminated increments in the order of 4% to 10% from the standard weight (mean threshold, 0.17 ± 0.06 kg). After local cooling, the discriminative performance remained, on average, very similar to that seen before cooling (mean threshold, 0.17 ± 0.08 kg; paired t test: t = 0.24, P = .81). Only a small group of participants (n = 5) showed evidence of a decreased ability to discriminate weight after cooling. Conclusions: The perception of force signals required for weight discrimination does not appear to be affected by local cooling of the quadriceps muscle group. This finding provides additional evidence for the relative safety of cold applications and their effect on proprioceptive perceptual abilities. PMID:12937450

  11. Memantine elicits spinal blockades of motor function, proprioception, and nociception in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Chiu, Chong-Chi; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2015-12-01

    Although memantine blocks sodium currents and produces local skin anesthesia, spinal anesthesia with memantine is unknown. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the local anesthetic effect of memantine in spinal anesthesia and its comparison with a widely used local anesthetic lidocaine. After intrathecally injecting the rats with five doses of each drug, the dose-response curves of memantine and lidocaine were constructed. The potencies of the drugs and durations of spinal anesthetic effects on motor function, proprioception, and nociception were compared with those of lidocaine. We showed that memantine produced dose-dependent spinal blockades in motor function, proprioception, and nociception. On a 50% effective dose (ED50 ) basis, the rank of potency was lidocaine greater than memantine (P < 0.05 for the differences). At the equipotent doses (ED25 , ED50 , ED75 ), the block duration produced by memantine was longer than that produced by lidocaine (P < 0.05 for the differences). Memantine, but not lidocaine, displayed more sensory/nociceptive block than motor block. The preclinical data demonstrated that memantine is less potent than lidocaine, whereas memantine produces longer duration of spinal anesthesia than lidocaine. Memantine shows a more sensory-selective action over motor blockade. PMID:26301611

  12. Quantification of responses from proprioceptive neurons in the limbs of the crab, Cancer magister.

    PubMed

    Cooper, R L; Hartman, H B

    1999-11-01

    In the limbs of crustaceans, proprioception is monitored by chordotonal organs. One in particular, MC1, is arranged in a manner that is accessible for single unit recording of primary sensory neurons while simulating joint movement. The movement-sensitive cells are of two types, those sensitive to relaxation or to elongation of the chordotonal strand which corresponds to flexion or extension of the meropodite-carpopodite joint, respectively. A statistical method for the quantification of these movement-sensitive proprioceptive neuronal responses was implemented. This statistical index, eta(2), should allow neuronal responses recorded in different laboratories to be easily and quantitatively compared. In addition, an eta(2) value can be assigned to individual cells which represents a cell's consistency and degree to which the response is related to the stimulus. We found some cells to have a high eta(2) and to be consistent in their activity while other cells had a high degree of variability with low eta(2) values. J. Exp. Zool. 284:629-636, 1999. PMID:10531549

  13. Effect of Time after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears on Proprioception and Postural Stability.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Lee, Jin-Hyuck; Ahn, Sung-Eun; Park, Min-Ji

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to compare proprioception and postural stability in patients with acute (time from injury ≤ 3 months) and chronic (time from injury > 3 months) ACL tears, and to evaluate the correlation between time interval after ACL injury and proprioception. Thigh muscle strength, postural stability, and joint position sense were compared in 48 patients with acute ACL tears and in 28 with chronic ACL tears. Maximal torque (60°/sec) of the quadriceps and hamstring was evaluated using an isokinetic testing device. Postural stability was determined from the anterior-posterior (APSI), medial-lateral (MLSI), and overall (OSI) stability indices using stabilometry. Joint position sense was also tested by reproduction of passive positioning (RPP). Muscle strengths and stability indices on both the involved and uninvolved sides were similar in the acute and chronic ACL tear groups. RPP on the involved side was significantly greater in the chronic than in the acute ACL tear group (7.8° vs. 5.6°, P = 0.041). Two of three stability indices (APSI, OSI) and RPP were significantly greater on the involved than the uninvolved side in the chronic ACL tear group. PMID:26422800

  14. Effect of Time after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears on Proprioception and Postural Stability

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Lee, Jin-Hyuck; Ahn, Sung-Eun; Park, Min-Ji

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to compare proprioception and postural stability in patients with acute (time from injury ≤ 3 months) and chronic (time from injury > 3 months) ACL tears, and to evaluate the correlation between time interval after ACL injury and proprioception. Thigh muscle strength, postural stability, and joint position sense were compared in 48 patients with acute ACL tears and in 28 with chronic ACL tears. Maximal torque (60°/sec) of the quadriceps and hamstring was evaluated using an isokinetic testing device. Postural stability was determined from the anterior-posterior (APSI), medial-lateral (MLSI), and overall (OSI) stability indices using stabilometry. Joint position sense was also tested by reproduction of passive positioning (RPP). Muscle strengths and stability indices on both the involved and uninvolved sides were similar in the acute and chronic ACL tear groups. RPP on the involved side was significantly greater in the chronic than in the acute ACL tear group (7.8° vs. 5.6°, P = 0.041). Two of three stability indices (APSI, OSI) and RPP were significantly greater on the involved than the uninvolved side in the chronic ACL tear group. PMID:26422800

  15. Slow Scan Telemedicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Originally developed under contract for NASA by Ball Bros. Research Corporation for acquiring visual information from lunar and planetary spacecraft, system uses standard closed circuit camera connected to a device called a scan converter, which slows the stream of images to match an audio circuit, such as a telephone line. Transmitted to its destination, the image is reconverted by another scan converter and displayed on a monitor. In addition to assist scans, technique allows transmission of x-rays, nuclear scans, ultrasonic imagery, thermograms, electrocardiograms or live views of patient. Also allows conferencing and consultation among medical centers, general practitioners, specialists and disease control centers. Commercialized by Colorado Video, Inc., major employment is in business and industry for teleconferencing, cable TV news, transmission of scientific/engineering data, security, information retrieval, insurance claim adjustment, instructional programs, and remote viewing of advertising layouts, real estate, construction sites or products.

  16. Effects of age and non-oropharyngeal proprioceptive and exteroceptive sensation on the magnitude of anticipatory mouth opening during eating.

    PubMed

    Shune, S E; Moon, J B

    2016-09-01

    To best prevent and treat eating/swallowing problems, it is essential to understand how components of oral physiology contribute to the preservation and/or degradation of eating/swallowing in healthy ageing. Anticipatory, pre-swallow motor movements may be critical to safe and efficient eating/swallowing, particularly for older adults. However, the nature of these responses is relatively unknown. This study compared the magnitude of anticipatory mouth opening during eating in healthy older (aged 70-85) and younger (aged 18-30) adults under four eating conditions: typical self-feeding, typical assisted feeding (being fed by a research assistant resulting in proprioceptive loss), sensory loss self-feeding (wearing blindfold/headphones resulting in exteroceptive loss) and sensory loss assisted feeding (proprioceptive and exteroceptive loss). Older adults opened their mouths wider than younger adults in anticipation of food intake under both typical and most non-oropharyngeal sensory loss conditions. Further, the loss of proprioceptive and exteroceptive cues resulted in decreased anticipatory mouth opening for all participants. Greater mouth opening in older adults may be a protective compensation, contributing to the preservation of function associated with healthy ageing. Our finding that the loss of non-oropharyngeal sensory cues resulted in decreased anticipatory mouth opening highlights how important proprioception, vision, and hearing are in pre-swallow behaviour. Age- and disease-related changes in vision, hearing, and the ability to self-feed may reduce the effectiveness of these pre-swallow strategies. PMID:27377757

  17. Acute effect of scapular proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) techniques and classic exercises in adhesive capsulitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Balcı, Nilay Comuk; Yuruk, Zeliha Ozlem; Zeybek, Aslican; Gulsen, Mustafa; Tekindal, Mustafa Agah

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of our study was to compare the initial effects of scapular proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation techniques and classic exercise interventions with physiotherapy modalities on pain, scapular dyskinesis, range of motion, and function in adhesive capsulitis. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-three subjects were allocated to 3 groups: scapular proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercies and physiotherapy modalities, classic exercise and physiotherapy modalities, and only physiotherapy modalities. The intervention was applied in a single session. The Visual Analog Scale, Lateral Scapular Slide Test, range of motion and Simple Shoulder Test were evaluated before and just after the one-hour intervention in the same session (all in one session). [Results] All of the groups showed significant differences in shoulder flexion and abduction range of motion and Simple Shoulder Test scores. There were statistically significant differences in Visual Analog Scale scores in the proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation and control groups, and no treatment method had significant effect on the Lateral Scapular Slide Test results. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups before and after the intervention. [Conclusion] Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, classic exercise, and physiotherapy modalities had immediate effects on adhesive capsulitis in our study. However, there was no additional benefit of exercises in one session over physiotherapy modalities. Also, an effective treatment regimen for shoulder rehabilitation of adhesive capsulitis patients should include scapular exercises. PMID:27190456

  18. Acute effect of scapular proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) techniques and classic exercises in adhesive capsulitis: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Balcı, Nilay Comuk; Yuruk, Zeliha Ozlem; Zeybek, Aslican; Gulsen, Mustafa; Tekindal, Mustafa Agah

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of our study was to compare the initial effects of scapular proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation techniques and classic exercise interventions with physiotherapy modalities on pain, scapular dyskinesis, range of motion, and function in adhesive capsulitis. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-three subjects were allocated to 3 groups: scapular proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercies and physiotherapy modalities, classic exercise and physiotherapy modalities, and only physiotherapy modalities. The intervention was applied in a single session. The Visual Analog Scale, Lateral Scapular Slide Test, range of motion and Simple Shoulder Test were evaluated before and just after the one-hour intervention in the same session (all in one session). [Results] All of the groups showed significant differences in shoulder flexion and abduction range of motion and Simple Shoulder Test scores. There were statistically significant differences in Visual Analog Scale scores in the proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation and control groups, and no treatment method had significant effect on the Lateral Scapular Slide Test results. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups before and after the intervention. [Conclusion] Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, classic exercise, and physiotherapy modalities had immediate effects on adhesive capsulitis in our study. However, there was no additional benefit of exercises in one session over physiotherapy modalities. Also, an effective treatment regimen for shoulder rehabilitation of adhesive capsulitis patients should include scapular exercises. PMID:27190456

  19. The Relationship of Selected Measures of Proprioception to Physical Growth, Motor Performance, and Academic Achievement in Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haubenstricker, John L.; Milne, D. Conrad

    This study investigates the relationship of selected measures of proprioception to measures of physical growth, motor performance, and academic achievement in young children. Measures were obtained from 321 boys and girls attending kindergarten and first and second grade. Sample correlation matrices were computed on all variables at each grade…

  20. The Relative Efficacy of Vestibular-Proprioceptive Stimulation and the Upright Position in Enhancing Visual Pursuit in Neonates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Claudette L.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Forty-eight neonates were randomly assigned to view a moving stimulus either in the horizontal or the upright position, with or without added vestibular stimulation and with or without pacifier sucking. Results indicate that vestibular proprioceptive stimulation, provided horizontally or semi-vertically, significantly enhanced visual tracking.…

  1. A Simple Experimentally Based Model Using Proprioceptive Regulation of Motor Primitives Captures Adjusted Trajectory Formation in Spinal Frogs

    PubMed Central

    Kargo, William J.; Ramakrishnan, Arun; Hart, Corey B.; Rome, Lawrence C.

    2010-01-01

    Spinal circuits may organize trajectories using pattern generators and synergies. In frogs, prior work supports fixed-duration pulses of fixed composition synergies, forming primitives. In wiping behaviors, spinal frogs adjust their motor activity according to the starting limb position and generate fairly straight and accurate isochronous trajectories across the workspace. To test whether a compact description using primitives modulated by proprioceptive feedback could reproduce such trajectory formation, we built a biomechanical model based on physiological data. We recorded from hindlimb muscle spindles to evaluate possible proprioceptive input. As movement was initiated, early skeletofusimotor activity enhanced many muscle spindles firing rates. Before movement began, a rapid estimate of the limb position from simple combinations of spindle rates was possible. Three primitives were used in the model with muscle compositions based on those observed in frogs. Our simulations showed that simple gain and phase shifts of primitives based on published feedback mechanisms could generate accurate isochronous trajectories and motor patterns that matched those observed. Although on-line feedback effects were omitted from the model after movement onset, our primitive-based model reproduced the wiping behavior across a range of starting positions. Without modifications from proprioceptive feedback, the model behaviors missed the target in a manner similar to that in deafferented frogs. These data show how early proprioception might be used to make a simple estimate initial limb state and to implicitly plan a movement using observed spinal motor primitives. Simulations showed that choice of synergy composition played a role in this simplicity. To generate froglike trajectories, a hip flexor synergy without sartorius required motor patterns with more proprioceptive knee flexor control than did patterns built with a more natural synergy including sartorius. Such synergy

  2. Development of Proprioceptive Acuity in Typically Developing Children: Normative Data on Forearm Position Sense.

    PubMed

    Holst-Wolf, Jessica M; Yeh, I-Ling; Konczak, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    This study mapped the development of proprioception in healthy, typically developing children by objectively measuring forearm position sense acuity. We assessed position sense acuity in a cross-sectional sample of 308 children (5-17 years old; M/F = 127/181) and a reference group of 26 healthy adults (18-25 years old; M/F = 12/14) using a body-scalable bimanual manipulandum that allowed forearm flexion/extension in the horizontal plane. The non-dominant forearm was passively displaced to one of three target positions. Then participants actively matched the target limb position with their dominant forearm. Each of three positions was matched five times. Position error (PE), calculated as the mean difference between the angular positions of the matching and reference arms, measured position sense bias or systematic error. The respective standard deviation of the differences between the match and reference arm angular positions (SDPdiff) indicated position sense precision or random error. The main results are as follows: First, systematic error, measured by PE, did not change significantly from early childhood to late adolescence (Median PE at 90° target: -2.85° in early childhood; -2.28° in adolescence; and 1.30° in adults). Second, response variability as measured by SDPdiff significantly decreased with age (Median SDPdiff at 90° target: 9.66° in early childhood; 5.30° in late adolescence; and 3.97° in adults). The data of this large cross-sectional sample of children document that proprioceptive development in typically developing children is characterized as an age-related improvement in precision, not as a development or change in bias. In other words, it is the reliability of the perceptual response that improves between early childhood and adulthood. This study provides normative data against which position sense acuity in pediatric patient populations can be compared. The underlying neurophysiological processes that could explain the observed

  3. "Proprioceptive signature" of cursive writing in humans: a multi-population coding.

    PubMed

    Roll, Jean-Pierre; Albert, Frédéric; Ribot-Ciscar, Edith; Bergenheim, Mikael

    2004-08-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate the firing behavior of populations of muscle spindle afferents in all the muscles acting on the ankle while this joint was being subjected to "writing-like" movements. First it was proposed to determine whether the ensemble of muscle spindles give rise to a unique, specific, and reproducible feedback information characterizing each letter, number or short word. Secondly, we analyzed how the proprioceptive feedback on the whole encodes the spatial and temporal characteristics of writing movements using the "vector population model". The unitary activity of 51 primary and secondary muscle spindle afferents was recorded in the tibial and common peroneal nerves at the level of the popliteal fossea, using the microneurographic method. The units recorded from belonged to the tibialis anterior, the extensor digitorum longus, the extensor hallucis longus, the peroneus lateralis, the gastrocnemius-soleus and the tibialis posterior muscles. The "writing-like" movements were randomly imposed at a "natural" velocity via a computer-controlled machine in a two-dimensional space. In general, muscle spindle afferents from any of the six muscles responded according to the tuning properties of the parent muscle, i.e. increasing their discharge rate during the phases where the direction of movement was within the preferred sensory sector of the parent muscle. The whole trajectory of the writing movements was coded in turn by the activity of Ia afferents arising from all the muscles acting on the joint. Both single afferent responses and population responses were found to be highly specific and reproducible with each graphic sign. The complex multi-muscle afferent pattern involved, with its timing and distribution in the muscle space, seems to constitute a true "proprioceptive signature" for each graphic symbol. The ensemble of muscle spindle afferents were therefore found to encode the instantaneous direction and velocity of writing

  4. The role of vestibular and support-tactile-proprioceptive inputs in visual-manual tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilova, Ludmila; Naumov, Ivan; Glukhikh, Dmitriy; Khabarova, Ekaterina; Pavlova, Aleksandra; Ekimovskiy, Georgiy; Sagalovitch, Viktor; Smirnov, Yuriy; Kozlovskaya, Inesa

    Sensorimotor disorders in weightlessness are caused by changes of functioning of gravity-dependent systems, first of all - vestibular and support. The question arises, what’s the role and the specific contribution of the support afferentation in the development of observed disorders. To determine the role and effects of vestibular, support, tactile and proprioceptive afferentation on characteristics of visual-manual tracking (VMT) we conducted a comparative analysis of the data obtained after prolonged spaceflight and in a model of weightlessness - horizontal “dry” immersion. Altogether we examined 16 Russian cosmonauts before and after prolonged spaceflights (129-215 days) and 30 subjects who stayed in immersion bath for 5-7 days to evaluate the state of the vestibular function (VF) using videooculography and characteristics of the visual-manual tracking (VMT) using electrooculography & joystick with biological visual feedback. Evaluation of the VF has shown that both after immersion and after prolonged spaceflight there were significant decrease of the static torsional otolith-cervical-ocular reflex (OCOR) and simultaneous significant increase of the dynamic vestibular-cervical-ocular reactions (VCOR) with a revealed negative correlation between parameters of the otoliths and canals reactions, as well as significant changes in accuracy of perception of the subjective visual vertical which correlated with changes in OCOR. Analyze of the VMT has shown that significant disorders of the visual tracking (VT) occurred from the beginning of the immersion up to 3-4 day after while in cosmonauts similar but much more pronounced oculomotor disorders and significant changes from the baseline were observed up to R+9 day postflight. Significant changes of the manual tracking (MT) were revealed only for gain and occurred on 1 and 3 days in immersion while after spaceflight such changes were observed up to R+5 day postflight. We found correlation between characteristics

  5. Development of Proprioceptive Acuity in Typically Developing Children: Normative Data on Forearm Position Sense

    PubMed Central

    Holst-Wolf, Jessica M.; Yeh, I-Ling; Konczak, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    This study mapped the development of proprioception in healthy, typically developing children by objectively measuring forearm position sense acuity. We assessed position sense acuity in a cross-sectional sample of 308 children (5–17 years old; M/F = 127/181) and a reference group of 26 healthy adults (18–25 years old; M/F = 12/14) using a body-scalable bimanual manipulandum that allowed forearm flexion/extension in the horizontal plane. The non-dominant forearm was passively displaced to one of three target positions. Then participants actively matched the target limb position with their dominant forearm. Each of three positions was matched five times. Position error (PE), calculated as the mean difference between the angular positions of the matching and reference arms, measured position sense bias or systematic error. The respective standard deviation of the differences between the match and reference arm angular positions (SDPdiff) indicated position sense precision or random error. The main results are as follows: First, systematic error, measured by PE, did not change significantly from early childhood to late adolescence (Median PE at 90° target: −2.85° in early childhood; −2.28° in adolescence; and 1.30° in adults). Second, response variability as measured by SDPdiff significantly decreased with age (Median SDPdiff at 90° target: 9.66° in early childhood; 5.30° in late adolescence; and 3.97° in adults). The data of this large cross-sectional sample of children document that proprioceptive development in typically developing children is characterized as an age-related improvement in precision, not as a development or change in bias. In other words, it is the reliability of the perceptual response that improves between early childhood and adulthood. This study provides normative data against which position sense acuity in pediatric patient populations can be compared. The underlying neurophysiological processes that could explain the observed

  6. Slow frictional waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    Stick-slip, manifest as intermittent tangential motion between two dry solid surfaces, is a friction instability that governs diverse phenomena from automobile brake squeals to earthquakes. We show, using high-speed in situ imaging of an adhesive polymer interface, that low velocity stick-slip is fundamentally of three kinds, corresponding to passage of three different surface waves -- separation pulses, slip pulses and the well-known Schallamach waves. These waves, traveling much slower than elastic waves, have clear distinguishing properties. Separation pulses and Schallamach waves involve local interface separation, and propagate in opposite directions while slip pulses are characterized by a sharp stress front and do not display any interface detachment. A change in the stick-slip mode from separation to slip pulse is effected simply by increasing the normal force. Together, these three waves constitute all possible stick-slip modes in adhesive friction and are shown to have direct analogues in muscular locomotory waves in soft bodied invertebrates. A theory for slow wave propagation is also presented which is capable of explaining the attendant interface displacements, velocities and stresses.

  7. Slow inactivation of Na(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged depolarizing pulses that last seconds to minutes cause slow inactivation of Na(+) channels, which regulates neuron and myocyte excitability by reducing availability of inward current. In neurons, slow inactivation has been linked to memory of previous excitation and in skeletal muscle it ensures myocytes are able to contract when K(+) is elevated. The molecular mechanisms underlying slow inactivation are unclear even though it has been studied for 50+ years. This chapter reviews what is known to date regarding the definition, measurement, and mechanisms of voltage-gated Na(+) channel slow inactivation. PMID:24737231

  8. Sleep Disruption and Proprioceptive Delirium due to Acetaminophen in a Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Carnovale, Carla; Pozzi, Marco; Nisic, Andrea Angelo; Scrofani, Elisa; Perrone, Valentina; Antoniazzi, Stefania; Radice, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    We present the case of a 7-year-old boy, who received acetaminophen for the treatment of hyperpyrexia, due to an infection of the superior airways. 13 mg/kg (260 mg) of acetaminophen was administered orally before bedtime, and together with the expected antipyretic effect, the boy experienced sleep disruption and proprioceptive delirium. The symptoms disappeared within one hour. In the following six months, acetaminophen was administered again twice, and the reaction reappeared with similar features. Potential alternative explanations were excluded, and analysis with the Naranjo algorithm indicated a “probable” relationship between acetaminophen and this adverse reaction. We discuss the potential mechanisms involved, comprising imbalances in prostaglandin levels, alterations of dopamine, and cannabinoid and serotonin signalings. PMID:23573447

  9. Is muscle spindle proprioceptive function spared in muscular dystrophies? A muscle tendon vibration study.

    PubMed

    Ribot-Ciscar, Edith; Tréfouret, Sylvie; Aimonetti, Jean-Marc; Attarian, Shahram; Pouget, Jean; Roll, Jean-Pierre

    2004-06-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) are characterized by the degeneration of skeletal muscle fibers. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the intrafusal fibers of muscle spindles are also affected in MD. The functional integrity of muscle spindles was tested by analyzing their involvement in the perception of body segment movements and in the control of posture. Twenty MD patients (4 with dystrophinopathy, 5 with myotonic dystrophies, 5 with fascioscapulohumeral MD, and 6 with limb-girdle dystrophies) and 10 healthy subjects participated in the study. The MD patients perceived passive movements and experienced illusory movements similar to those perceived by healthy subjects in terms of their direction and velocity. Vibratory stimulation applied to the neck and ankle muscle tendons induced postural responses in MD patients with spatial and temporal characteristics similar to those produced by healthy subjects. These results suggest that the proprioceptive function of muscle spindles is spared in muscular dystrophies. PMID:15170619

  10. Correlation between head posture and proprioceptive function in the cervical region

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Min-Sik; Lee, Hae-Yong; Lee, Mi-Young

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate correlation between head posture and proprioceptive function in the cervical region. [Subjects and Methods] Seventy-two subjects (35 males and 37 females) participated in this study. For measurement of head posture, the craniovertebral angle was calculated based on the angle between a horizontal line passing through C7 and a line extending from the tragus of the ear to C7. The joint position sense was evaluated using a dual digital inclinometer (Acumar, Lafayette Instrument, Lafayette, IN, USA), which was used to measure the joint position error for cervical flexion and extension. [Results] A significant negative correlation was observed between the craniovertebral angle and position sense error for flexion and extension. [Conclusion] Forward head posture is correlated with greater repositioning error than a more upright posture, and further research is needed to determine whether correction of forward head posture has any impact on repositioning error. PMID:27134372

  11. Differences in proprioceptive senses between children with diplegic and children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hyo Jeong; Song, Gui-bin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] In the present study, in order to examine the differences in proprioceptive senses between children with diplegic CP and children with hemiplegic CP, neck reposition errors were measured. [Subjects and Methods] Head reposition senses were measured after neck flexion, extension, and left-right rotation, using head repositioning accuracy tests. These tests were done with 12 children with diplegic CP and nine children with hemiplegic CP. [Results] The results indicated that children with diplegic CP had poorer head repositioning senses after movements in all directions compared to children with hemiplegic CP. [Conclusion] The results indicated that children with diplegic CP had poorer head repositioning senses after movements in all directions as compared to children with hemiplegic CP. PMID:27065559

  12. Multisensory Tracking of Objects in Darkness: Capture of Positive Afterimages by the Tactile and Proprioceptive Senses

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Brian W.; Tinker, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on three experiments investigating the contribution of different sensory modalities to the tracking of objects moved in total darkness. Participants sitting in the dark were exposed to a brief, bright flash which reliably induced a positive visual afterimage of the scene so illuminated. If the participants subsequently move their hand in the darkness, the visual afterimage of that hand fades or disappears; this is presumably due to conflict between the illusory visual afterimage (of the hand in its original location) and other information (e.g., proprioceptive) from a general mechanism for tracking body parts. This afterimage disappearance effect also occurs for held objects which are moved in the dark, and some have argued that this represents a case of body schema extension, i.e. the rapid incorporation of held external objects into the body schema. We demonstrate that the phenomenon is not limited to held objects and occurs in conditions where incorporation into the body schema is unlikely. Instead, we propose that the disappearance of afterimages of objects moved in darkness comes from a general mechanism for object tracking which integrates input from multiple sensory systems. This mechanism need not be limited to tracking body parts, and thus we need not invoke body schema extension to explain the afterimage disappearance. In this series of experiments, we test whether auditory feedback of object movement can induce afterimage disappearance, demonstrate that the disappearance effect scales with the magnitude of proprioceptive feedback, and show that tactile feedback alone is sufficient for the effect. Together, these data demonstrate that the visual percept of a positive afterimage is constructed not just from visual input of the scene when light reaches the eyes, but in conjunction with input from multiple other senses. PMID:26959233

  13. Haptic stabilization of posture: changes in arm proprioception and cutaneous feedback for different arm orientations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, E.; Bortolami, S. B.; DiZio, P.; Lackner, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    Postural sway during quiet stance is attenuated by actively maintained contact of the index finger with a stationary surface, even if the level of applied force (<1 N) cannot provide mechanical stabilization. In this situation, changes in force level at the fingertip lead changes in center of foot pressure by approximately 250 ms. These and related findings indicate that stimulation of the fingertip combined with proprioceptive information about the hand and arm can serve as an active sensor of body position relative to the point of contact. A geometric analysis of the relationship between hand and torso displacement during body sway led to the prediction that arm and hand proprioceptive and finger somatosensory information about body sway would be maximized with finger contact in the plane of body sway. Therefore, the most postural stabilization should be possible with such contact. To test this analysis, subjects touched a laterally versus anteriorly placed surface while in each of two stances: the heel-to-toe tandem Romberg stance that reduces medial-lateral stability and the heel-to-heel, toes-outward, knees-bent, "duck stance" that reduces fore-aft stability. Postural sway was always least with finger contact in the unstable plane: for the tandem stance, lateral fingertip contact was significantly more effective than frontal contact, and, for the duck stance, frontal contact was more effective than lateral fingertip contact. Force changes at the fingertip led changes in center of pressure of the feet by approximately 250 ms for both fingertip contact locations for both test stances. These results support the geometric analysis, which showed that 1) arm joint angles change by the largest amount when fingertip contact is maintained in the plane of greatest sway, and 2) the somatosensory cues at the fingertip provide both direction and amplitude information about sway when the finger is contacting a surface in the unstable plane.

  14. Dependence of auditory spatial updating on vestibular, proprioceptive, and efference copy signals.

    PubMed

    Genzel, Daria; Firzlaff, Uwe; Wiegrebe, Lutz; MacNeilage, Paul R

    2016-08-01

    Humans localize sounds by comparing inputs across the two ears, resulting in a head-centered representation of sound-source position. When the head moves, information about head movement must be combined with the head-centered estimate to correctly update the world-centered sound-source position. Spatial updating has been extensively studied in the visual system, but less is known about how head movement signals interact with binaural information during auditory spatial updating. In the current experiments, listeners compared the world-centered azimuthal position of two sound sources presented before and after a head rotation that depended on condition. In the active condition, subjects rotated their head by ∼35° to the left or right, following a pretrained trajectory. In the passive condition, subjects were rotated along the same trajectory in a rotating chair. In the cancellation condition, subjects rotated their head as in the active condition, but the chair was counter-rotated on the basis of head-tracking data such that the head effectively remained fixed in space while the body rotated beneath it. Subjects updated most accurately in the passive condition but erred in the active and cancellation conditions. Performance is interpreted as reflecting the accuracy of perceived head rotation across conditions, which is modeled as a linear combination of proprioceptive/efference copy signals and vestibular signals. Resulting weights suggest that auditory updating is dominated by vestibular signals but with significant contributions from proprioception/efference copy. Overall, results shed light on the interplay of sensory and motor signals that determine the accuracy of auditory spatial updating. PMID:27169504

  15. Weight-shift training improves trunk control, proprioception, and balance in patients with chronic hemiparetic stroke.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyoungsim; Kim, Young; Chung, Yijung; Hwang, Sujin

    2014-01-01

    Trunk instability is one of main problems in survivors following stroke. We investigated the effects of weight-shift training (WST) on an unstable surface in sitting position on trunk control, proprioception, and balance in individuals with chronic hemiparetic stroke. Eighteen participants with chronic hemiparetic stroke were recruited and were allocated to either WST or control group. The WST group received a weight-shift training program for 30 min and then received a conventional exercise program for 30 min, while the control group received conventional exercise program for 60 min, five times a week for four weeks for both groups. In this randomized control study, we used three outcome measures: trunk reposition error (TRE), Trunk Impairment Scale (TIS), and Timed Up and Go (TUG) test. TRE was measured by each participant's reposition error to the target angle during his/her active trunk movement. TIS and TUG were examined for trunk control abilities and dynamic balance abilities, respectively. After training, TRE showed significantly greater improvement in the WST group (mean change, 1.67 ± 1.45˚) than the control group (mean change, 0.08 ± 1.05˚). The TIS score was significantly higher in the WST group (mean change, 2.33 ± 1.50) than the control group (mean change, 0.13 ± 0.83). The TUG test also showed a significant improvement in the WST group (mean change, 5.03 ± 1.88 sec) than the control group (mean change, 2.59 ± 1.86 sec). Our findings indicate that weight-shift training is beneficial for improving trunk control and proprioception in patients with chronic hemiparetic stroke. PMID:24646921

  16. Sensory reweighting dynamics following removal and addition of visual and proprioceptive cues.

    PubMed

    Assländer, Lorenz; Peterka, Robert J

    2016-08-01

    Removing or adding sensory cues from one sensory system during standing balance causes a change in the contribution of the remaining sensory systems, a process referred to as sensory reweighting. While reweighting changes have been described in many studies under steady-state conditions, less is known about the temporal dynamics of reweighting following sudden transitions to different sensory conditions. The present study changed sensory conditions by periodically adding or removing visual (lights On/Off) or proprioceptive cues (surface sway referencing On/Off) in 12 young, healthy subjects. Evidence for changes in sensory contributions to balance was obtained by measuring the time course of medial-lateral sway responses to a constant-amplitude 0.56-Hz sinusoidal stimulus, applied as support surface tilt (proprioceptive contribution), as visual scene tilt (visual contribution), or as binaural galvanic vestibular stimulation (vestibular contribution), and by analyzing the time course of sway variability. Sine responses and variability of body sway velocity showed significant changes following transitions and were highly correlated under steady-state conditions. A dependence of steady-state responses on upcoming transitions was observed, suggesting that knowledge of impending changes can influence sensory weighting. Dynamic changes in sway in the period immediately following sensory transitions were very inhomogeneous across sway measures and in different experimental tests. In contrast to steady-state results, sway response and variability measures were not correlated with one another in the dynamic transition period. Several factors influence sway responses following addition or removal of sensory cues, partly instigated by but also obscuring the effects of reweighting dynamics. PMID:27075544

  17. Source modeling sleep slow waves

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Michael; Riedner, Brady A.; Huber, Reto; Massimini, Marcello; Ferrarelli, Fabio; Tononi, Giulio

    2009-01-01

    Slow waves are the most prominent electroencephalographic (EEG) feature of sleep. These waves arise from the synchronization of slow oscillations in the membrane potentials of millions of neurons. Scalp-level studies have indicated that slow waves are not instantaneous events, but rather they travel across the brain. Previous studies of EEG slow waves were limited by the poor spatial resolution of EEGs and by the difficulty of relating scalp potentials to the activity of the underlying cortex. Here we use high-density EEG (hd-EEG) source modeling to show that individual spontaneous slow waves have distinct cortical origins, propagate uniquely across the cortex, and involve unique subsets of cortical structures. However, when the waves are examined en masse, we find that there are diffuse hot spots of slow wave origins centered on the lateral sulci. Furthermore, slow wave propagation along the anterior−posterior axis of the brain is largely mediated by a cingulate highway. As a group, slow waves are associated with large currents in the medial frontal gyrus, the middle frontal gyrus, the inferior frontal gyrus, the anterior cingulate, the precuneus, and the posterior cingulate. These areas overlap with the major connectional backbone of the cortex and with many parts of the default network. PMID:19164756

  18. A Single-Session Preliminary Evaluation of an Affordable BCI-Controlled Arm Exoskeleton and Motor-Proprioception Platform

    PubMed Central

    Elnady, Ahmed Mohamed; Zhang, Xin; Xiao, Zhen Gang; Yong, Xinyi; Randhawa, Bubblepreet Kaur; Boyd, Lara; Menon, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Traditional, hospital-based stroke rehabilitation can be labor-intensive and expensive. Furthermore, outcomes from rehabilitation are inconsistent across individuals and recovery is hard to predict. Given these uncertainties, numerous technological approaches have been tested in an effort to improve rehabilitation outcomes and reduce the cost of stroke rehabilitation. These techniques include brain–computer interface (BCI), robotic exoskeletons, functional electrical stimulation (FES), and proprioceptive feedback. However, to the best of our knowledge, no studies have combined all these approaches into a rehabilitation platform that facilitates goal-directed motor movements. Therefore, in this paper, we combined all these technologies to test the feasibility of using a BCI-driven exoskeleton with FES (robotic training device) to facilitate motor task completion among individuals with stroke. The robotic training device operated to assist a pre-defined goal-directed motor task. Because it is hard to predict who can utilize this type of technology, we considered whether the ability to adapt skilled movements with proprioceptive feedback would predict who could learn to control a BCI-driven robotic device. To accomplish this aim, we developed a motor task that requires proprioception for completion to assess motor-proprioception ability. Next, we tested the feasibility of robotic training system in individuals with chronic stroke (n = 9) and found that the training device was well tolerated by all the participants. Ability on the motor-proprioception task did not predict the time to completion of the BCI-driven task. Both participants who could accurately target (n = 6) and those who could not (n = 3), were able to learn to control the BCI device, with each BCI trial lasting on average 2.47 min. Our results showed that the participants’ ability to use proprioception to control motor output did not affect their ability to use the BCI

  19. Microstructural Integrity of the Superior Cerebellar Peduncle Is Associated with an Impaired Proprioceptive Weighting Capacity in Individuals with Non-Specific Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pijnenburg, Madelon; Caeyenberghs, Karen; Janssens, Lotte; Goossens, Nina; Swinnen, Stephan P.; Sunaert, Stefan; Brumagne, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Postural control is a complex sensorimotor task that requires an intact network of white matter connections. The ability to weight proprioceptive signals is crucial for postural control. However, research into central processing of proprioceptive signals for postural control is lacking. This is specifically of interest in individuals with non-specific low back pain (NSLBP), because impairments in postural control have been observed as possible underlying mechanisms of NSLBP. Therefore, the objective was to investigate potential differences in sensorimotor white matter microstructure between individuals with NSLBP and healthy controls, and to determine whether the alterations in individuals with NSLBP are associated with the capacity to weight proprioceptive signals for postural control. Methods The contribution of proprioceptive signals from the ankle and back muscles to postural control was evaluated by local muscle vibration in 18 individuals with NSLBP and 18 healthy controls. Center of pressure displacement in response to muscle vibration was determined during upright standing on a stable and unstable support surface. Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging was applied to examine whether this proprioceptive contribution was associated with sensorimotor white matter microstructure. Results Individuals with NSLBP showed a trend towards a reduced fractional anisotropy along the left superior cerebellar peduncle compared to healthy controls (p = 0.039). The impaired microstructural integrity of the superior cerebellar peduncle in individuals with NSLBP was significantly correlated with the response to ankle muscle vibration (p<0.003). Conclusions In individuals with NSLBP, a decreased integrity of the superior cerebellar peduncle was associated with an increased reliance on ankle muscle proprioception, even on unstable support surface, which implies an impaired proprioceptive weighting capacity. Our findings emphasize the importance of the superior

  20. Effects of Tai Chi versus Proprioception Exercise Program on Neuromuscular Function of the Ankle in Elderly People: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Xue-Qiang; Zheng, Jie-Jiao; Pan, Yu-Jian; Hua, Ying-Hui; Zhao, Shang-Min; Shen, Li-Yan; Fan, Shuai; Zhong, Jiu-Gen

    2012-01-01

    Background. Tai Chi is a traditional Chinese medicine exercise used for improving neuromuscular function. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Tai Chi versus proprioception exercise program on neuromuscular function of the ankle in elderly people. Methods. Sixty elderly subjects were randomly allocated into three groups of 20 subjects per group. For 16 consecutive weeks, subjects participated in Tai Chi, proprioception exercise, or no structured exercise. Primary outcome measures included joint position sense and muscle strength of ankle. Subjects completed a satisfaction questionnaire upon study completion in Tai Chi and proprioception groups. Results. (1) Both Tai Chi group and proprioception exercise group were significantly better than control group in joint position sense of ankle, and there were no significant differences in joint position sense of ankle between TC group and PE group. (2) There were no significant differences in muscle strength of ankle among groups. (3) Subjects expressed more satisfaction with Tai Chi than with proprioception exercise program. Conclusions. None of the outcome measures on neuromuscular function at the ankle showed significant change posttraining in the two structured exercise groups. However, the subjects expressed more interest in and satisfaction with Tai Chi than proprioception exercise. PMID:23346195

  1. Slow bars in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridman, A. M.; Khoruzhii, O. V.

    2000-11-01

    Here we put forward some arguments in favour of the existence of slow bars. More then a half of spiral galaxies have in their central regions a bar - a structure in the form of triaxial ellipsoid. Historically two models of the bar were developed - those of the so called ``slow'' and ``fast'' bars. In both cases the bar is in some resonance with the galactic disc region near the bar ends - it is the corotation resonance for a fast bar and the inner Lindblad resonance for a slow bar. For the same angular velocity the fast bar would be larger then the slow bar. Alternatively, for the same size the fast bar would have much higher angular velocity, that being the reason for the terminology used. Up till now, the direct measurement of angular velocity of a bar has been an open problem. This is why all arguments on the nature of bar observed in some particular galaxy are inevitably indirect. Despite the fact that the model of slow bars was developed slightly earlier, the main part of attention was focused on the fast bars. Presently many researchers believe in the existence of the fast bars in real galaxies, while discussions on the existence of the slow bars continue so far. In this Letter we demonstrate that the bar detected in the grand design spiral galaxy NGC 157 is the slow bar.

  2. The effects of prone bridge exercise on the Oswestry disability index and proprioception of patients with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yong-Soo; Jang, Gwon-Uk; Park, Seol

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of bridge exercises on the Oswestry disability index (ODI) scores and proprioception among patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP). [Subjects and Methods] A total of 38 patients participated in this study. After eight weeks of bridge exercise, the joint position angle of the body trunk was measured and the ODI was used in survey form to investigate the intensity of the patients’ low back pain. [Results] After eight weeks of exercise, the ODI showed significant differences in all three groups. Subjects’ joint position sense of the trunk in both lumbar flexion and extension was also significantly different after completing the exercise program; this was true for all three groups. [Conclusion] Performing the prone bridge exercise for eight weeks improved proprioceptive function and reduced pain and impediment of activity, showing it a more effective exercise than other bridge exercises. PMID:26504285

  3. Visual discrimination of delayed self-generated movement reveals the temporal limit of proprioceptive-visual intermodal integration.

    PubMed

    Jaime, Mark; O'Driscoll, Kelly; Moore, Chris

    2016-07-01

    This study examined the intermodal integration of visual-proprioceptive feedback via a novel visual discrimination task of delayed self-generated movement. Participants performed a goal-oriented task in which visual feedback was available only via delayed videos displayed on two monitors-each with different delay durations. During task performance, delay duration was varied for one of the videos in the pair relative to a standard delay, which was held constant. Participants were required to identify and use the video with the lesser delay to perform the task. Visual discrimination of the lesser-delayed video was examined under four conditions in which the standard delay was increased for each condition. A temporal limit for proprioceptive-visual intermodal integration of 3-5s was revealed by subjects' inability to reliably discriminate video pairs. PMID:27208649

  4. Comparison of the effects of hamstring stretching using proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation with prior application of cryotherapy or ultrasound therapy

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Francisco Elezier Xavier; Junior, Arlindo Rodrigues de Mesquita; Meneses, Harnold’s Tyson de Sousa; Moreira dos Santos, Rayele Pricila; Rodrigues, Ezaine Costa; Gouveia, Samara Sousa Vasconcelos; Gouveia, Guilherme Pertinni de Morais; Orsini, Marco; Bastos, Victor Hugo do Vale; Machado, Dionis de Castro Dutra

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Stretching using proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation involve physiological reflex mechanisms through submaximal contraction of agonists which activate Golgi organ, promoting the relaxation reflex. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation alone and with prior application of cryotherapy and thermotherapy on hamstring stretching. [Subjects and Methods] The sample comprised of 32 young subjects with hamstring retraction of the right limb. The subjects were randomly allocated to four groups: the control, flexibility PNF, flexibility PNF associated with cryotherapy, flexibility PNF in association with ultrasound therapy. [Results] After 12 stretching sessions, experimental groups showed significant improvements compared to the control group. Moreover, we did not find any significant differences among the experimental groups indicating PNF stretching alone elicits similar results to PNF stretching with prior administration of cryotherapy or thermotherapy. [Conclusion] PNF without other therapy may be a more practical and less expensive choice for clinical care. PMID:26157261

  5. Sensorimotor control of gait: a novel approach for the study of the interplay of visual and proprioceptive feedback

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Ryan; Skidmore, Jeffrey; Santello, Marco; Artemiadis, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    Sensorimotor control theories propose that the central nervous system exploits expected sensory consequences generated by motor commands for movement planning, as well as online sensory feedback for comparison with expected sensory feedback for monitoring and correcting, if needed, ongoing motor output. In our study, we tested this theoretical framework by quantifying the functional role of expected vs. actual proprioceptive feedback for planning and regulation of gait in humans. We addressed this question by using a novel methodological approach to deliver fast perturbations of the walking surface stiffness, in conjunction with a virtual reality system that provided visual feedback of upcoming changes of surface stiffness. In the “predictable” experimental condition, we asked subjects to learn associating visual feedback of changes in floor stiffness (sand patch) during locomotion to quantify kinematic and kinetic changes in gait prior to and during the gait cycle. In the “unpredictable” experimental condition, we perturbed floor stiffness at unpredictable instances during the gait to characterize the gait-phase dependent strategies in recovering the locomotor cycle. For the “unpredictable” conditions, visual feedback of changes in floor stiffness was absent or inconsistent with tactile and proprioceptive feedback. The investigation of these perturbation-induced effects on contralateral leg kinematics revealed that visual feedback of upcoming changes in floor stiffness allows for both early (preparatory) and late (post-perturbation) changes in leg kinematics. However, when proprioceptive feedback is not available, the early responses in leg kinematics do not occur while the late responses are preserved although in a, slightly attenuated form. The methods proposed in this study and the preliminary results of the kinematic response of the contralateral leg open new directions for the investigation of the relative role of visual, tactile, and

  6. Impact of altered lower limb proprioception produced by tendon vibration on adaptation to split-belt treadmill walking.

    PubMed

    Layne, Charles S; Chelette, Amber M; Pourmoghaddam, Amir

    2015-01-01

    It has been proposed that proprioceptive input is essential to the development of a locomotor body schema that is used to guide the assembly of successful walking. Proprioceptive information is used to signal the need for, and promotion of, locomotor adaptation in response to environmental or internal modifications. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if tendon vibration applied to either the hamstrings or quadriceps of participants experiencing split-belt treadmill walking modified lower limb kinematics during the early adaptation period. Modifications in the adaptive process in response to vibration would suggest that the sensory-motor system had been unsuccessful in down weighting the disruptive proprioceptive input resulting from vibration. Ten participants experienced split-belt walking, with and without vibration, while gait kinematics were obtained with a 12-camera collection system. Bilateral hip, knee, and ankle joint angles were calculated and the first five strides after the split were averaged for each subject to create joint angle waveforms for each of the assessed joints, for each experimental condition. The intralimb variables of stride length, percent stance time, and relative timing between various combinations of peak joint angles were assessed using repeated measures MANOVA. Results indicate that vibration had very little impact on the split-belt walking adaptive process, although quadriceps vibration did significantly reduce percent stance time by 1.78% relative to the no vibration condition. The data suggest that the perceptual-motor system was able to down weight the disrupted proprioceptive input such that the locomotor body schema was able to effectively manage the lower limb patterns of motion necessary to adapt to the changing belt speed. Complementary explanations for the current findings are also discussed. PMID:25162146

  7. Single-subject-based whole-brain MEG slow-wave imaging approach for detecting abnormality in patients with mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ming-Xiong; Nichols, Sharon; Baker, Dewleen G.; Robb, Ashley; Angeles, Annemarie; Yurgil, Kate A.; Drake, Angela; Levy, Michael; Song, Tao; McLay, Robert; Theilmann, Rebecca J.; Diwakar, Mithun; Risbrough, Victoria B.; Ji, Zhengwei; Huang, Charles W.; Chang, Douglas G.; Harrington, Deborah L.; Muzzatti, Laura; Canive, Jose M.; Christopher Edgar, J.; Chen, Yu-Han; Lee, Roland R.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of sustained impairment in military and civilian populations. However, mild TBI (mTBI) can be difficult to detect using conventional MRI or CT. Injured brain tissues in mTBI patients generate abnormal slow-waves (1–4 Hz) that can be measured and localized by resting-state magnetoencephalography (MEG). In this study, we develop a voxel-based whole-brain MEG slow-wave imaging approach for detecting abnormality in patients with mTBI on a single-subject basis. A normative database of resting-state MEG source magnitude images (1–4 Hz) from 79 healthy control subjects was established for all brain voxels. The high-resolution MEG source magnitude images were obtained by our recent Fast-VESTAL method. In 84 mTBI patients with persistent post-concussive symptoms (36 from blasts, and 48 from non-blast causes), our method detected abnormalities at the positive detection rates of 84.5%, 86.1%, and 83.3% for the combined (blast-induced plus with non-blast causes), blast, and non-blast mTBI groups, respectively. We found that prefrontal, posterior parietal, inferior temporal, hippocampus, and cerebella areas were particularly vulnerable to head trauma. The result also showed that MEG slow-wave generation in prefrontal areas positively correlated with personality change, trouble concentrating, affective lability, and depression symptoms. Discussion is provided regarding the neuronal mechanisms of MEG slow-wave generation due to deafferentation caused by axonal injury and/or blockages/limitations of cholinergic transmission in TBI. This study provides an effective way for using MEG slow-wave source imaging to localize affected areas and supports MEG as a tool for assisting the diagnosis of mTBI. PMID:25009772

  8. Single-subject-based whole-brain MEG slow-wave imaging approach for detecting abnormality in patients with mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-Xiong; Nichols, Sharon; Baker, Dewleen G; Robb, Ashley; Angeles, Annemarie; Yurgil, Kate A; Drake, Angela; Levy, Michael; Song, Tao; McLay, Robert; Theilmann, Rebecca J; Diwakar, Mithun; Risbrough, Victoria B; Ji, Zhengwei; Huang, Charles W; Chang, Douglas G; Harrington, Deborah L; Muzzatti, Laura; Canive, Jose M; Christopher Edgar, J; Chen, Yu-Han; Lee, Roland R

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of sustained impairment in military and civilian populations. However, mild TBI (mTBI) can be difficult to detect using conventional MRI or CT. Injured brain tissues in mTBI patients generate abnormal slow-waves (1-4 Hz) that can be measured and localized by resting-state magnetoencephalography (MEG). In this study, we develop a voxel-based whole-brain MEG slow-wave imaging approach for detecting abnormality in patients with mTBI on a single-subject basis. A normative database of resting-state MEG source magnitude images (1-4 Hz) from 79 healthy control subjects was established for all brain voxels. The high-resolution MEG source magnitude images were obtained by our recent Fast-VESTAL method. In 84 mTBI patients with persistent post-concussive symptoms (36 from blasts, and 48 from non-blast causes), our method detected abnormalities at the positive detection rates of 84.5%, 86.1%, and 83.3% for the combined (blast-induced plus with non-blast causes), blast, and non-blast mTBI groups, respectively. We found that prefrontal, posterior parietal, inferior temporal, hippocampus, and cerebella areas were particularly vulnerable to head trauma. The result also showed that MEG slow-wave generation in prefrontal areas positively correlated with personality change, trouble concentrating, affective lability, and depression symptoms. Discussion is provided regarding the neuronal mechanisms of MEG slow-wave generation due to deafferentation caused by axonal injury and/or blockages/limitations of cholinergic transmission in TBI. This study provides an effective way for using MEG slow-wave source imaging to localize affected areas and supports MEG as a tool for assisting the diagnosis of mTBI. PMID:25009772

  9. Allocation of Attentional Resources toward a Secondary Cognitive Task Leads to Compromised Ankle Proprioceptive Performance in Healthy Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Sato, Yuki; Iimura, Naoyuki; Iwata, Hiroyasu

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine whether increased attentional demands influence the assessment of ankle joint proprioceptive ability in young adults. We used a dual-task condition, in which participants performed an ankle ipsilateral position-matching task with and without a secondary serial auditory subtraction task during target angle encoding. Two experiments were performed with two different cohorts: one in which the auditory subtraction task was easy (experiment 1a) and one in which it was difficult (experiment 1b). The results showed that, compared with the single-task condition, participants had higher absolute error under dual-task conditions in experiment 1b. The reduction in position-matching accuracy with an attentionally demanding cognitive task suggests that allocation of attentional resources toward a difficult second task can lead to compromised ankle proprioceptive performance. Therefore, these findings indicate that the difficulty level of the cognitive task might be the possible critical factor that decreased accuracy of position-matching task. We conclude that increased attentional demand with difficult cognitive task does influence the assessment of ankle joint proprioceptive ability in young adults when measured using an ankle ipsilateral position-matching task. PMID:24523966

  10. Computational Modeling Reinforces that Proprioceptive Cues May Augment Compliance Discrimination When Elasticity Is Decoupled From Radius of Curvature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuxiang; Gerling, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Our capability to discriminate object compliance is based on cues both tactile and proprioceptive, in addition to visual. To understand how the mechanics of the fingertip skin and bone might encode such information, we used finite element models to simulate the task of differentiating spherical indenters of radii (4, 6 and 8 mm) and elasticity (initial shear modulus of 10, 50 and 90 kPa). In particular, we considered two response variables, the strain energy density (SED) at the epidermal-dermal interface where Merkel cell end-organs of slowly adapting type I afferents reside, and the displacement of the fingertip bone necessary to achieve certain surface contact force. The former variable ties to tactile cues while the latter ties to proprioceptive cues. The results indicate that distributions of SED are clearly distinct for most combinations of object radii and elasticity. However, for certain combinations – e.g., between 4 mm spheres of 10 kPa and 8 mm of 90 kPa – spatial distributions of SED are nearly identical. In such cases where tactile-only cues are non-differentiable, we may rely on proprioceptive cues to discriminate compliance. PMID:25699293