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Sample records for prospero homolog prox1

  1. Caenorhabditis elegans homologue of Prox1/Prospero is expressed in the glia and is required for sensory behavior and cold tolerance.

    PubMed

    Kage-Nakadai, Eriko; Ohta, Akane; Ujisawa, Tomoyo; Sun, Simo; Nishikawa, Yoshikazu; Kuhara, Atsushi; Mitani, Shohei

    2016-09-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) amphid sensory organ contains only 4 glia-like cells and 24 sensory neurons, providing a simple model for analyzing glia or neuron-glia interactions. To better characterize glial development and function, we carried out RNA interference screening for transcription factors that regulate the expression of an amphid sheath glial cell marker and identified pros-1, which encodes a homeodomain transcription factor homologous to Drosophila prospero/mammalian Prox1, as a positive regulator. The functional PROS-1::EGFP fusion protein was localized in the nuclei of the glia and the excretory cell but not in the amphid sensory neurons. pros-1 deletion mutants exhibited larval lethality, and rescue experiments showed that pros-1 and human Prox1 transgenes were able to rescue the larval lethal phenotype, suggesting that pros-1 is a functional homologue of mammalian Prox1, at least partially. We further found that the structure and functions of sensory neurons, such as the morphology of sensory endings, sensory behavior and sensory-mediated cold tolerance, appeared to be affected by the pros-1 RNAi. Together, our results show that the C. elegans PROS-1 is a transcriptional regulator in the glia but is involved not only in sensory behavior but also in sensory-mediated physiological tolerance. PMID:27402188

  2. Prospero-related homeobox 1 (Prox1) functions as a novel modulator of retinoic acid-related orphan receptors α- and γ-mediated transactivation

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Yukimasa; Jetten, Anton M.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we identify Prospero-related homeobox 1 (Prox1) as a novel co-repressor of the retinoic acid-related orphan receptors, RORα and RORγ. Prox1 interacts directly with RORγ and RORα and negatively regulates their transcriptional activity. The AF2 domain of RORs is essential for the interaction, whereas Prox1 interacts with RORs through either its 28 amino acids N-terminal region or its C-terminal prospero-like domain. RORγ antagonists stabilize the interaction between RORγ and Prox1. The homeodomain and the interaction through the prospero-like domain of Prox1 are critical for its repression of ROR transcriptional activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that in liver, Prox1 is recruited to the ROR response element sites of the clock genes, brain and muscle Arnt-like protein 1 (Bmal1), neuronal PAS domain protein 2 (Npas2) and cryptochrome 1 (Cry1), as part of the same complex as RORs. Knockdown of Prox1 by siRNAs in human hepatoma Huh-7 cells increased the expression of RORγ and several ROR-target genes, along with increased histone acetylation at these ROR response element sites. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing analysis suggests that Prox1 is a potential ROR target gene in liver, which is supported by the regulation of the rhythmic expression of Prox1 by RORγ. Our data suggest that Prox1 is part of a feedback loop that negatively regulates the transcriptional control of clock and metabolic networks by RORs. PMID:23723244

  3. Prospero-related homeobox 1 (Prox1) at the crossroads of diverse pathways during adult neural fate specification

    PubMed Central

    Stergiopoulos, Athanasios; Elkouris, Maximilianos; Politis, Panagiotis K.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, adult neurogenesis in the central nervous system (CNS) has emerged as a fundamental process underlying physiology and disease. Recent evidence indicates that the homeobox transcription factor Prox1 is a critical intrinsic regulator of neurogenesis in the embryonic CNS and adult dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus, acting in multiple ways and instructed by extrinsic cues and intrinsic factors. In the embryonic CNS, Prox1 is mechanistically involved in the regulation of proliferation vs. differentiation decisions of neural stem cells (NSCs), promoting cell cycle exit and neuronal differentiation, while inhibiting astrogliogenesis. During the complex differentiation events in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, Prox1 is required for maintenance of intermediate progenitors (IPs), differentiation and maturation of glutamatergic interneurons, as well as specification of DG cell identity over CA3 pyramidal fate. The mechanism by which Prox1 exerts multiple functions involves distinct signaling pathways currently not fully highlighted. In this mini-review, we thoroughly discuss the Prox1-dependent phenotypes and molecular pathways in adult neurogenesis in relation to different upstream signaling cues and cell fate determinants. In addition, we discuss the possibility that Prox1 may act as a cross-talk point between diverse signaling cascades to achieve specific outcomes during adult neurogenesis. PMID:25674048

  4. Prospero-related homeobox 1 (Prox1) at the crossroads of diverse pathways during adult neural fate specification.

    PubMed

    Stergiopoulos, Athanasios; Elkouris, Maximilianos; Politis, Panagiotis K

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades, adult neurogenesis in the central nervous system (CNS) has emerged as a fundamental process underlying physiology and disease. Recent evidence indicates that the homeobox transcription factor Prox1 is a critical intrinsic regulator of neurogenesis in the embryonic CNS and adult dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus, acting in multiple ways and instructed by extrinsic cues and intrinsic factors. In the embryonic CNS, Prox1 is mechanistically involved in the regulation of proliferation vs. differentiation decisions of neural stem cells (NSCs), promoting cell cycle exit and neuronal differentiation, while inhibiting astrogliogenesis. During the complex differentiation events in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, Prox1 is required for maintenance of intermediate progenitors (IPs), differentiation and maturation of glutamatergic interneurons, as well as specification of DG cell identity over CA3 pyramidal fate. The mechanism by which Prox1 exerts multiple functions involves distinct signaling pathways currently not fully highlighted. In this mini-review, we thoroughly discuss the Prox1-dependent phenotypes and molecular pathways in adult neurogenesis in relation to different upstream signaling cues and cell fate determinants. In addition, we discuss the possibility that Prox1 may act as a cross-talk point between diverse signaling cascades to achieve specific outcomes during adult neurogenesis. PMID:25674048

  5. PROX1 promotes hepatocellular carcinoma proliferation and sorafenib resistance by enhancing β-catenin expression and nuclear translocation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Ye, X; Zhang, J-B; Ouyang, H; Shen, Z; Wu, Y; Wang, W; Wu, J; Tao, S; Yang, X; Qiao, K; Zhang, J; Liu, J; Fu, Q; Xie, Y

    2015-10-29

    Aberrant activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is frequent in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and contributes to HCC initiation and progression. This abnormal activation may result from somatic mutations in the genes of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and/or dysregulation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. The mechanism for the latter remains poorly understood. Prospero-related homeobox 1 (PROX1) is a downstream target of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in human colorectal cancer and elevated PROX1 expression promotes malignant progression. However, the Wnt/β-catenin pathway does not regulate PROX1 expression in the liver and HCC cells. Here we report that PROX1 promotes HCC cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in HCC xenograft mice. PROX1 and β-catenin levels are positively correlated in tumor tissues as well as in cultured HCC cells. PROX1 can upregulate β-catenin transcription by stimulating the β-catenin promoter and enhance the nuclear translocation of β-catenin in HCC cells, which leads to the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Moreover, we show that increase in PROX1 expression renders HCC cells more resistant to sorafenib treatment, which is the standard therapy for advanced HCC. Overall, we have pinpointed PROX1 as a critical factor activating the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in HCC, which promotes HCC proliferation and sorafenib resistance. PMID:25684142

  6. Prox1 Inhibits Proliferation and Is Required for Differentiation of the Oligodendrocyte Cell Lineage in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kentaro; Konno, Daijiro; Berry, Martin; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Logan, Ann; Hidalgo, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system injury induces a regenerative response in ensheathing glial cells comprising cell proliferation, spontaneous axonal remyelination, and limited functional recovery, but the molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. In Drosophila, this involves the genes prospero and Notch controlling the balance between glial proliferation and differentiation, and manipulating their levels in glia can switch the response to injury from prevention to promotion of repair. In the mouse, Notch1 maintains NG2 oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) in a progenitor state, but what factor may enable oligodendrocyte (OL) differentiation and functional remyelination is not understood. Here, we asked whether the mammalian homologue of prospero, Prox1, is involved. Our data show that Prox1 is distributed in NG2+ OPCs and in OLs in primary cultured cells, and in the mouse spinal cord in vivo. siRNA prox1 knockdown in primary OPCs increased cell proliferation, increased NG2+ OPC cell number and decreased CC1+ OL number. Prox1 conditional knockout in the OL cell lineage in mice increased NG2+ OPC cell number, and decreased CC1+ OL number. Lysolecithin-induced demyelination injury caused a reduction in CC1+ OLs in homozygous Prox1-/- conditional knockout mice compared to controls. Remarkably, Prox1-/- conditional knockout mice had smaller lesions than controls. Altogether, these data show that Prox1 is required to inhibit OPC proliferation and for OL differentiation, and could be a relevant component of the regenerative glial response. Therapeutic uses of glia and stem cells to promote regeneration and repair after central nervous system injury would benefit from manipulating Prox1. PMID:26709696

  7. The expression of Prox1 during mouse cochlear development

    PubMed Central

    Bermingham-McDonogh, Olivia; Oesterle, Elizabeth C.; Stone, Jennifer S.; Hume, Clifford R.; Huynh, Huy M.; Hayashi, Toshinori

    2008-01-01

    We have carried out an analysis of the expression of Prox1, a homeodomain transcription factor, during mouse inner ear development with particular emphasis on the auditory system. Prox1 is expressed in the otocyst beginning at embryonic day 11, in the developing vestibular sensory patches. Expression is down-regulated in maturing (myosin VIIA immunoreactive) vestibular hair cells and subsequently in the underlying support cell layer by E16.5. In the auditory sensory epithelium, Prox1 is initially expressed at embryonic day 14.5 in a narrow stripe of cells at the base of the cochlea. This stripe encompasses the full thickness of the sensory epithelium, including developing hair cells and support cells. Over the next several days, the stripe of expression extends to the apex, and as the sensory epithelium differentiates, Prox1 becomes restricted to a subset of support cells. Double labeling for Prox1 and cell-type specific markers revealed that the outer hair cells transiently express Prox1. After E18, Prox1 protein is no longer detectable in hair cells, but it continues to be expressed in support cells for the rest of embryogenesis and into the second postnatal week. During this time, Prox1 is not expressed in all support cell types in the organ of Corti, but is restricted to developing Deiters’ and pillar cells. The expression is maintained in these cells into the second week of postnatal life, at which time Prox1 is dynamically down-regulated. These studies form a baseline from which we can analyze the role of Prox1 in vertebrate sensory development. PMID:16538679

  8. Prox1 Directly Interacts with LSD1 and Recruits the LSD1/NuRD Complex to Epigenetically Co-Repress CYP7A1 Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanfeng; Xie, Youhua; Liu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step in the classical pathway of bile acids synthesis in liver and is crucial for maintaining lipid homeostasis. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) and α1-fetoprotein transcription factor (FTF) are two major transcription factors driving CYP7A1 promoter activity in hepatocytes. Previous researches have shown that Prospero-related homeobox (Prox1) directly interacts with both HNF4α and FTF and potently co-represses CYP7A1 transcription and bile acid synthesis through unidentified mechanisms. In this work, mechanisms involved in Prox1-mediated co-repression were explored by identifying Prox1-associated proteins using immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry (IP-MS) methodology. Multiple components of the epigenetically repressive lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1)/nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD) complex, most notably LSD1 and histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2), were found to be associated with Prox1 and GST pulldown assay demonstrated that Prox1 directly interacts with LSD1. Sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays showed that Prox1 co-localizes with HNF4α, LSD1 and HDAC2 on CYP7A1 promoter in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, by using ChIP assay on HepG2 cells with endogenous Prox1 knocked down by RNA interference, Prox1 was shown to recruit LSD1 and HDAC2 onto CYP7A1 promoter and cause increased H3K4 demethylation. Finally, bile acids treatment of HepG2 cells, which significantly repressed CYP7A1 transcription, resulted in increased Prox1 and LSD1/NuRD complex occupancy on CYP7A1 promoter with a concurrent increase in H3K4 demethylation and H3/H4 deacetylation. These results showed that Prox1 interacts with LSD1 to recruit the repressive LSD1/NuRD complex to CYP7A1 promoter and co-represses transcription through epigenetic mechanisms. In addition, such Prox1-mediated epigenetic repression is involved in the physiologically essential negative feedback

  9. PROX1 is involved in progression of rectal neuroendocrine tumors, NETs.

    PubMed

    Jernman, Juha; Kallio, Pauliina; Hagström, Jaana; Välimäki, Matti J; Haapasalo, Hannu; Alitalo, Kari; Arola, Johanna; Haglund, Caj

    2015-09-01

    PROX1 is a homeobox transcription factor involved in the development of the lens, liver and heart and found upregulated in colorectal cancers. We studied PROX1 expression by immunohistochemistry in rectal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Approximately 10 to 15 % of gastroenteropancreatic NETs occur in the rectum, and some may metastasize. Yet little is known about the molecular pathogenesis of rectal NETs or their metastasis propensity. The objectives were to find out whether PROX1 plays a role in progression of rectal NETs and whether it has value as prognostic marker. In grading of rectal NETs, we applied the WHO 2010 classification. We carried out immunohistochemical staining of PROX1 on 72 primary tumors and six metastases and evaluated nuclear positivity in each tumor. Correlation between PROX1 expression, metastasis and patient survival was then assessed. Annexin A1, a downstream target of PROX1, was immunohistochemically assessed in 18 tumors. PROX1 protein was detected in about half of the tumors, with stronger expression in metastasized cases. PROX1 expression correlated with tumor metastasis and patient prognosis. Annexin A1 was negative in most of the high-grade tumors correlating strongly with grade and metastatic potential. Our results indicate that immunohistochemical detection of PROX1 correlates with a more malignant phenotype in rectal NETs. High PROX1 expression was associated with increased metastatic potential and poor patient survival but not as strongly as grade by the WHO 2010 classification. PROX1 may be involved in progression of rectal NETs as a part of the Wnt pathway. PMID:26063416

  10. Restoration of lymphatic function rescues obesity in Prox1-haploinsufficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Escobedo, Noelia; Proulx, Steven T.; Karaman, Sinem; Dillard, Miriam E.; Johnson, Nicole; Detmar, Michael; Oliver, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Prox1 heterozygous mice have a defective lymphatic vasculature and develop late-onset obesity. Chyle abnormally leaks from those vessels, accumulates in the surrounding tissues, and causes an increase in adipose tissue. We characterized the lymphatics of Prox1+/− mice to determine whether the extent of obesity correlated with the severity of lymphatic defects. The lymphatic vasculature in Prox1+/− mice exhibited reduced tracer clearance from the ear skin, dysfunctional perfusion of the lower legs, and reduced tracer uptake into the deep lymphatic collectors during mechanostimulation prior to the onset of obesity. Ear lymphatic vessels and leg collectors in Prox1+/− mice were disorganized and irregular, further confirming that defective lymphatic vessels are associated with obesity in Prox1+/− mice. We now provide conclusive in vivo evidence that demonstrates that leaky lymphatics mediate obesity in Prox1+/− mice, as restoration of lymphatic vasculature function was sufficient to rescue the obesity features in Prox1+/− mice. Finally, depth-lipomic profiling of lymph contents showed that free fatty acids induce adipogenesis in vitro. PMID:26973883

  11. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human homeobox gene Prox 1

    SciTech Connect

    Zinovieva, R.D.; Duncan, M.K.; Johnson, T.R.

    1996-08-01

    The genomic organization and nucleotide sequence of the human homeobox gene Prox 1 as well as its chromosomal localization have been determined. This gene spans more than 40 kb, consists of at least 5 exons, and encodes an 83-kDa protein. It shows 89% identity with the chicken sequence at the nucleotide level in the coding region, while the human and chicken proteins are 94% identical. Among the embryonic tissues analyzed (lens, brain, lung, liver, and kidney), the human Prox 1 gene is most actively expressed i the developing lens, similar to the expression pattern of the chicken Prox 1 gene. The Prox 1 gene was mapped to human chromosome 1q32.2-q32.3. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Prox1-Heterozygosis Sensitizes the Pancreas to Oncogenic Kras-Induced Neoplastic Transformation12

    PubMed Central

    Drosos, Yiannis; Neale, Geoffrey; Ye, Jianming; Paul, Leena; Kuliyev, Emin; Maitra, Anirban; Means, Anna L; Washington, M Kay; Rehg, Jerold; Finkelstein, David B; Sosa-Pineda, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    The current paradigm of pancreatic neoplastic transformation proposes an initial step whereby acinar cells convert into acinar-to-ductal metaplasias, followed by progression of these lesions into neoplasias under sustained oncogenic activity and inflammation. Understanding the molecular mechanisms driving these processes is crucial to the early diagnostic and prevention of pancreatic cancer. Emerging evidence indicates that transcription factors that control exocrine pancreatic development could have either, protective or facilitating roles in the formation of preneoplasias and neoplasias in the pancreas. We previously identified that the homeodomain transcription factor Prox1 is a novel regulator of mouse exocrine pancreas development. Here we investigated whether Prox1 function participates in early neoplastic transformation using in vivo, in vitro and in silico approaches. We found that Prox1 expression is transiently re-activated in acinar cells undergoing dedifferentiation and acinar-to-ductal metaplastic conversion. In contrast, Prox1 expression is largely absent in neoplasias and tumors in the pancreas of mice and humans. We also uncovered that Prox1-heterozygosis markedly increases the formation of acinar-to-ductal-metaplasias and early neoplasias, and enhances features associated with inflammation, in mouse pancreatic tissues expressing oncogenic Kras. Furthermore, we discovered that Prox1-heterozygosis increases tissue damage and delays recovery from inflammation in pancreata of mice injected with caerulein. These results are the first demonstration that Prox1 activity protects pancreatic cells from acute tissue damage and early neoplastic transformation. Additional data in our study indicate that this novel role of Prox1 involves suppression of pathways associated with inflammatory responses and cell invasiveness. PMID:26992918

  13. Aberrant Activation of Notch Signaling Inhibits PROX1 Activity to Enhance the Malignant Behavior of Thyroid Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dongwon; Ramu, Swapnika; Park, Eunkyung; Jung, Eunson; Yang, Sara; Jung, Wonhyeuk; Choi, Inho; Lee, Sunju; Kim, Kyu Eui; Seong, Young Jin; Hong, Mingu; Daghlian, George; Kim, Daniel; Shin, Eugene; Seo, Jung In; Khatchadourian, Vicken; Zou, Mengchen; Li, Wei; De Filippo, Roger; Kokorowski, Paul; Chang, Andy; Kim, Steve; Bertoni, Ana; Furlanetto, Tania Weber; Shin, Sung; Li, Meng; Chen, Yibu; Wong, Alex; Koh, Chester; Geliebter, Jan; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2016-02-01

    Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is one of the most common endocrine malignancies associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Although multiple studies have contributed to a better understanding of the genetic alterations underlying this frequently arising disease, the downstream molecular effectors that impact PTC pathogenesis remain to be further defined. Here, we report that the regulator of cell fate specification, PROX1, becomes inactivated in PTC through mRNA downregulation and cytoplasmic mislocalization. Expression studies in clinical specimens revealed that aberrantly activated NOTCH signaling promoted PROX1 downregulation and that cytoplasmic mislocalization significantly altered PROX1 protein stability. Importantly, restoration of PROX1 activity in thyroid carcinoma cells revealed that PROX1 not only enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signaling but also regulated several genes known to be associated with PTC, including thyroid cancer protein (TC)-1, SERPINA1, and FABP4. Furthermore, PROX1 reexpression suppressed the malignant phenotypes of thyroid carcinoma cells, such as proliferation, motility, adhesion, invasion, anchorage-independent growth, and polyploidy. Moreover, animal xenograft studies demonstrated that restoration of PROX1 severely impeded tumor formation and suppressed the invasiveness and the nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio of PTC cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that NOTCH-induced PROX1 inactivation significantly promotes the malignant behavior of thyroid carcinoma and suggest that PROX1 reactivation may represent a potential therapeutic strategy to attenuate disease progression. PMID:26609053

  14. Role of Prox1 in the Transforming Ascending Thin Limb of Henle's Loop during Mouse Kidney Development

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu-mi; Kim, Wan-Young; Nam, Sun Ah; Choi, A-Rum; Kim, Hyang; Kim, Yong-Kyun; Kim, Hak-Soo; Kim, Jin

    2015-01-01

    The homeobox transcription factor Prox1 is critical to the development of many embryonic organs and tissues, although current understanding of its expression in the developing renal medulla is limited. We examined the functional role of Prox1 during mouse kidney development with particular emphasis on the developing loop of Henle. Our data show that Prox1 is expressed in the transdifferentiating region from the NKCC2-positive thick ascending limb, into the CLC-K1-positive ascending thin limb of Henle’s loop beginning at embryonic day 18. From 1 to 14 days of age, Prox1-positive cells gradually disappeared from the papillary tip, and remained in the initial part of inner medulla after 21 days. In this transforming area, no Prox1 was observed in cells undergoing apoptosis but was expressed strongly in the remaining cells, which differentiated into ascending thin limb epithelial cells. In vitro and in vivo approaches showed that Prox1 expression increases where the osmolality is near optimal range, but decreases at below- or above-optimal ranges. Renal hypoosmolality induced by furosemide (NKCC2 inhibitor) inhibited Prox1 expression and delayed maturation of the ascending limb of Henle’s loop. Together, these studies suggest that Prox1 appears to be a critical stage specific regulator of specifying ascending thin limb cell fate and that its expression is regulated by osmolality. PMID:25993027

  15. Prox1 physically and functionally interacts with COUP-TFII to specify lymphatic endothelial cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sunju; Kang, Jinjoo; Yoo, Jaehyuk; Ganesan, Sathish K.; Cook, Sarah C.; Aguilar, Berenice; Ramu, Swapnika; Lee, Juneyong

    2009-01-01

    Specification of endothelial cell (EC) fate during vascular development is controlled by distinct key regulators. While Notch plays an essential role in induction of arterial phenotypes, COUP-TFII is required to maintain the venous EC identity. Homeodomain transcription factor Prox1 functions to reprogram venous ECs to lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). Here, we report that the venous EC fate regulator COUP-TFII is expressed in LECs throughout development and physically interacts with Prox1 to form a stable complex in various cell types including LECs. We found that COUP-TFII functions as a coregulator of Prox1 to control several lineage-specific genes including VEGFR-3, FGFR-3, and neuropilin-1 and is required along with Prox1 to maintain LEC phenotype. Together, we propose that the physical and functional interactions of the 2 proteins constitute an essential part in the program specifying LEC fate and may provide the molecular basis for the hypothesis of venous EC identity being the prerequisite for LEC specification. PMID:18815287

  16. Expression of Prox1 defines regions of the avian otocyst that give rise to sensory or neural cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Jennifer S.; Shang, Jia-Lin; Tomarev, Stanislav

    2003-01-01

    The simple primordium of the inner ear (otocyst) differentiates into many cell types, including sensory neurons and hair cells. We examined expression of the divergent homeobox transcription factor, cProx1, during otocyst development in chickens. Nuclear cProx1 protein is not evident in the otic placode but emerges in the otic cup by stage 12. At stage 16, cProx1-positive nuclei are scattered continuously throughout the neuroepithelium, from anteroventral to posteromedial. These labeled cells are neural precursors; they express betaIII-tubulin and migrate to the cochleovestibular ganglion between stages 13 and 21. By stage 18, two areas develop a dense pattern of cProx1 expression in which every nucleus is labeled. These areas emerge at the anterior and posterior extremes of the band of scattered cProx1 expression and express the sensory markers cSerrate1 and Cath1 by stage 23. Four discrete patches of dense cProx1 expression appear by stage 23 that correspond to the future superior crista, lateral crista, saccular macula, and posterior crista, as confirmed by immunolabeling for hair cell antigen (HCA) by stage 29. The remaining sensory epithelia display a dense pattern of cProx1 expression and label for HCA by stage 29. In the basilar papilla, nuclear cProx1 expression is down-regulated in most hair cells by stage 37 and in many supporting cells by stage 40. Our findings show that regions of the otocyst that give rise to neurons or hair cells are distinguished by their relative density of cProx1-positive nuclei, and suggest a role for cProx1 in the genesis of these cell types.

  17. Prox1 Is Required for Oligodendrocyte Cell Identity in Adult Neural Stem Cells of the Subventricular Zone.

    PubMed

    Bunk, Eva C; Ertaylan, Gökhan; Ortega, Felipe; Pavlou, Maria A; Gonzalez Cano, Laura; Stergiopoulos, Athanasios; Safaiyan, Shima; Völs, Sandra; van Cann, Marianne; Politis, Panagiotis K; Simons, Mikael; Berninger, Benedikt; Del Sol, Antonio; Schwamborn, Jens C

    2016-08-01

    Adult neural stem cells with the ability to generate neurons and glia cells are active throughout life in both the dentate gyrus (DG) and the subventricular zone (SVZ). Differentiation of adult neural stem cells is induced by cell fate determinants like the transcription factor Prox1. Evidence has been provided for a function of Prox1 as an inducer of neuronal differentiation within the DG. We now show that within the SVZ Prox1 induces differentiation into oligodendrocytes. Moreover, we find that loss of Prox1 expression in vivo reduces cell migration into the corpus callosum, where the few Prox1 deficient SVZ-derived remaining cells fail to differentiate into oligodendrocytes. Thus, our work uncovers a novel function of Prox1 as a fate determinant for oligodendrocytes in the adult mammalian brain. These data indicate that the neurogenic and oligodendrogliogenic lineages in the two adult neurogenic niches exhibit a distinct requirement for Prox1, being important for neurogenesis in the DG but being indispensable for oligodendrogliogenesis in the SVZ. Stem Cells 2016;34:2115-2129. PMID:27068685

  18. Genomic Convergence among ERRα, PROX1, and BMAL1 in the Control of Metabolic Clock Outputs

    PubMed Central

    Dufour, Catherine R.; Levasseur, Marie-Pier; Pham, Nguyen Hoai Huong; Eichner, Lillian J.; Wilson, Brian J.; Charest-Marcotte, Alexis; Duguay, David; Poirier-Héon, Jean-François; Cermakian, Nicolas; Giguère, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis and circadian rhythms are closely intertwined biological processes. Nuclear receptors, as sensors of hormonal and nutrient status, are actively implicated in maintaining this physiological relationship. Although the orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα, NR3B1) plays a central role in the control of energy metabolism and its expression is known to be cyclic in the liver, its role in temporal control of metabolic networks is unknown. Here we report that ERRα directly regulates all major components of the molecular clock. ERRα-null mice also display deregulated locomotor activity rhythms and circadian period lengths under free-running conditions, as well as altered circulating diurnal bile acid and lipid profiles. In addition, the ERRα-null mice exhibit time-dependent hypoglycemia and hypoinsulinemia, suggesting a role for ERRα in modulating insulin sensitivity and glucose handling during the 24-hour light/dark cycle. We also provide evidence that the newly identified ERRα corepressor PROX1 is implicated in rhythmic control of metabolic outputs. To help uncover the molecular basis of these phenotypes, we performed genome-wide location analyses of binding events by ERRα, PROX1, and BMAL1, an integral component of the molecular clock. These studies revealed the existence of transcriptional regulatory loops among ERRα, PROX1, and BMAL1, as well as extensive overlaps in their target genes, implicating these three factors in the control of clock and metabolic gene networks in the liver. Genomic convergence of ERRα, PROX1, and BMAL1 transcriptional activity thus identified a novel node in the molecular circuitry controlling the daily timing of metabolic processes. PMID:21731503

  19. Prospero - A tool for organizing Internet resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuman, B. C.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes Prospero, a distributed file system based on the Virtual System Model. Prospero provides tools to help users organize Internet resources. These tools allow users to construct customized views of available resources, while taking advantage of the structure imposed by others. Prospero provides a framework that can tie together various indexing services producing the fabric on which resource discovery techniques can be applied.

  20. Visualization of lymphatic vessels by Prox1-promoter directed GFP reporter in a bacterial artificial chromosome-based transgenic mouse

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Inho; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Ramu, Swapnika; Lee, Ha Neul; Kim, Kyu Eui; Lee, Sunju; Yoo, Jaehyuk; Choi, Dongwon; Lee, Yong Suk; Aguilar, Berenice

    2011-01-01

    Although the blood vessel-specific fluorescent transgenic mouse has been an excellent tool to study vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, a lymphatic-specific fluorescent mouse model has not been established to date. Here we report a transgenic animal model that expresses the green fluorescent protein under the promoter of Prox1, a master control gene in lymphatic development. Generated using an approximately 200-kb-long bacterial artificial chromosome harboring the entire Prox1 gene, this Prox1-green fluorescent protein mouse was found to faithfully recapitulate the expression pattern of the Prox1 gene in lymphatic endothelial cells and other Prox1-expressing organs, and enabled us to conveniently visualize detailed structure and morphology of lymphatic vessels and networks throughout development. Our data demonstrate that this novel transgenic mouse can be extremely useful for detection, imaging, and isolation of lymphatic vessels and monitoring wound-associated lymphangiogenesis. Together, this Prox1-green fluorescent protein transgenic mouse will be a great tool for the lymphatic research. PMID:20962325

  1. Opposing Regulation of PROX1 by Interleukin-3 Receptor and NOTCH Directs Differential Host Cell Fate Reprogramming by Kaposi Sarcoma Herpes Virus

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Inho; Choi, Dongwon; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Kim, Kyu Eui; Lee, Sunju; Aguilar, Berenice; Kang, Jinjoo; Park, Eunkyung; Lee, Yong Suk; Maeng, Yong-Sun; Kim, Nam Yoon; Koh, Chester J.; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2012-01-01

    Lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) are differentiated from blood vascular endothelial cells (BECs) during embryogenesis and this physiological cell fate specification is controlled by PROX1, the master regulator for lymphatic development. When Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) infects host cells, it activates the otherwise silenced embryonic endothelial differentiation program and reprograms their cell fates. Interestingly, previous studies demonstrated that KSHV drives BECs to acquire a partial lymphatic phenotype by upregulating PROX1 (forward reprogramming), but stimulates LECs to regain some BEC-signature genes by downregulating PROX1 (reverse reprogramming). Despite the significance of this KSHV-induced bidirectional cell fate reprogramming in KS pathogenesis, its underlying molecular mechanism remains undefined. Here, we report that IL3 receptor alpha (IL3Rα) and NOTCH play integral roles in the host cell type-specific regulation of PROX1 by KSHV. In BECs, KSHV upregulates IL3Rα and phosphorylates STAT5, which binds and activates the PROX1 promoter. In LECs, however, PROX1 was rather downregulated by KSHV-induced NOTCH signal via HEY1, which binds and represses the PROX1 promoter. Moreover, PROX1 was found to be required to maintain HEY1 expression in LECs, establishing a reciprocal regulation between PROX1 and HEY1. Upon co-activation of IL3Rα and NOTCH, PROX1 was upregulated in BECs, but downregulated in LECs. Together, our study provides the molecular mechanism underlying the cell type-specific endothelial fate reprogramming by KSHV. PMID:22719258

  2. Prox1 Regulates the Subtype-Specific Development of Caudal Ganglionic Eminence-Derived GABAergic Cortical Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Young, Allison; Petros, Timothy; Karayannis, Theofanis; McKenzie Chang, Melissa; Lavado, Alfonso; Iwano, Tomohiko; Nakajima, Miho; Taniguchi, Hiroki; Huang, Z. Josh; Heintz, Nathaniel; Oliver, Guillermo; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Machold, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Neurogliaform (RELN+) and bipolar (VIP+) GABAergic interneurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex provide critical inhibition locally within the superficial layers. While these subtypes are known to originate from the embryonic caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE), the specific genetic programs that direct their positioning, maturation, and integration into the cortical network have not been elucidated. Here, we report that in mice expression of the transcription factor Prox1 is selectively maintained in postmitotic CGE-derived cortical interneuron precursors and that loss of Prox1 impairs the integration of these cells into superficial layers. Moreover, Prox1 differentially regulates the postnatal maturation of each specific subtype originating from the CGE (RELN, Calb2/VIP, and VIP). Interestingly, Prox1 promotes the maturation of CGE-derived interneuron subtypes through intrinsic differentiation programs that operate in tandem with extrinsically driven neuronal activity-dependent pathways. Thus Prox1 represents the first identified transcription factor specifically required for the embryonic and postnatal acquisition of CGE-derived cortical interneuron properties. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Despite the recognition that 30% of GABAergic cortical interneurons originate from the caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE), to date, a specific transcriptional program that selectively regulates the development of these populations has not yet been identified. Moreover, while CGE-derived interneurons display unique patterns of tangential and radial migration and preferentially populate the superficial layers of the cortex, identification of a molecular program that controls these events is lacking. Here, we demonstrate that the homeodomain transcription factor Prox1 is expressed in postmitotic CGE-derived cortical interneuron precursors and is maintained into adulthood. We found that Prox1 function is differentially required during both embryonic and postnatal stages of development to

  3. Structure and decoy-mediated inhibition of the SOX18/Prox1-DNA interaction

    PubMed Central

    Klaus, Miriam; Prokoph, Nina; Girbig, Mathias; Wang, Xuecong; Huang, Yong-Heng; Srivastava, Yogesh; Hou, Linlin; Narasimhan, Kamesh; Kolatkar, Prasanna R.; Francois, Mathias; Jauch, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor (TF) SOX18 drives lymphatic vessel development in both embryogenesis and tumour-induced neo-lymphangiogenesis. Genetic disruption of Sox18 in a mouse model protects from tumour metastasis and established the SOX18 protein as a molecular target. Here, we report the crystal structure of the SOX18 DNA binding high-mobility group (HMG) box bound to a DNA element regulating Prox1 transcription. The crystals diffracted to 1.75Å presenting the highest resolution structure of a SOX/DNA complex presently available revealing water structure, structural adjustments at the DNA contact interface and non-canonical conformations of the DNA backbone. To explore alternatives to challenging small molecule approaches for targeting the DNA-binding activity of SOX18, we designed a set of five decoys based on modified Prox1-DNA. Four decoys potently inhibited DNA binding of SOX18 in vitro and did not interact with non-SOX TFs. Serum stability, nuclease resistance and thermal denaturation assays demonstrated that a decoy circularized with a hexaethylene glycol linker and terminal phosphorothioate modifications is most stable. This SOX decoy also interfered with the expression of a luciferase reporter under control of a SOX18-dependent VCAM1 promoter in COS7 cells. Collectively, we propose SOX decoys as potential strategy for inhibiting SOX18 activity to disrupt tumour-induced neo-lymphangiogenesis. PMID:26939885

  4. Structure and decoy-mediated inhibition of the SOX18/Prox1-DNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Miriam; Prokoph, Nina; Girbig, Mathias; Wang, Xuecong; Huang, Yong-Heng; Srivastava, Yogesh; Hou, Linlin; Narasimhan, Kamesh; Kolatkar, Prasanna R; Francois, Mathias; Jauch, Ralf

    2016-05-01

    The transcription factor (TF) SOX18 drives lymphatic vessel development in both embryogenesis and tumour-induced neo-lymphangiogenesis. Genetic disruption of Sox18 in a mouse model protects from tumour metastasis and established the SOX18 protein as a molecular target. Here, we report the crystal structure of the SOX18 DNA binding high-mobility group (HMG) box bound to a DNA element regulating Prox1 transcription. The crystals diffracted to 1.75Å presenting the highest resolution structure of a SOX/DNA complex presently available revealing water structure, structural adjustments at the DNA contact interface and non-canonical conformations of the DNA backbone. To explore alternatives to challenging small molecule approaches for targeting the DNA-binding activity of SOX18, we designed a set of five decoys based on modified Prox1-DNA. Four decoys potently inhibited DNA binding of SOX18 in vitro and did not interact with non-SOX TFs. Serum stability, nuclease resistance and thermal denaturation assays demonstrated that a decoy circularized with a hexaethylene glycol linker and terminal phosphorothioate modifications is most stable. This SOX decoy also interfered with the expression of a luciferase reporter under control of a SOX18-dependent VCAM1 promoter in COS7 cells. Collectively, we propose SOX decoys as potential strategy for inhibiting SOX18 activity to disrupt tumour-induced neo-lymphangiogenesis. PMID:26939885

  5. PROS-1/Prospero Is a Major Regulator of the Glia-Specific Secretome Controlling Sensory-Neuron Shape and Function in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Sean W; Singhvi, Aakanksha; Liang, Yupu; Lu, Yun; Shaham, Shai

    2016-04-19

    Sensory neurons are an animal's gateway to the world, and their receptive endings, the sites of sensory signal transduction, are often associated with glia. Although glia are known to promote sensory-neuron functions, the molecular bases of these interactions are poorly explored. Here, we describe a post-developmental glial role for the PROS-1/Prospero/PROX1 homeodomain protein in sensory-neuron function in C. elegans. Using glia expression profiling, we demonstrate that, unlike previously characterized cell fate roles, PROS-1 functions post-embryonically to control sense-organ glia-specific secretome expression. PROS-1 functions cell autonomously to regulate glial secretion and membrane structure, and non-cell autonomously to control the shape and function of the receptive endings of sensory neurons. Known glial genes controlling sensory-neuron function are PROS-1 targets, and we identify additional PROS-1-dependent genes required for neuron attributes. Drosophila Prospero and vertebrate PROX1 are expressed in post-mitotic sense-organ glia and astrocytes, suggesting conserved roles for this class of transcription factors. PMID:27068465

  6. PROS-1/Prospero Is a Major Regulator of the Glia-Specific Secretome Controlling Sensory-Neuron Shape and Function in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Sean W.; Singhvi, Aakanksha; Liang, Yupu; Lu, Yun; Shaham, Shai

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Sensory neurons are an animal’s gateway to the world, and their receptive endings, the sites of sensory signal transduction, are often associated with glia. While glia are known to promote sensory-neuron functions, the molecular bases of these interactions are poorly explored. Here we describe a post-developmental glial role for the PROS-1/Prospero/PROX1 homeodomain protein in sensory-neuron function in C. elegans. Using glia expression profiling, we demonstrate that, unlike previously characterized cell fate roles, PROS-1 functions post-embryonically to control sense-organ glia-specific secretome expression. PROS-1 functions cell autonomously to regulate glial secretion and membrane structure, and non-cell autonomously to control the shape and function of the receptive endings of sensory neurons. Known glial genes controlling sensory-neuron function are PROS-1 targets, and we identify additional PROS-1-dependent genes required for neuron attributes. Drosophila Prospero and vertebrate PROX1 are expressed in post-mitotic sense-organ glia and in astrocytes, suggesting conserved roles for this class of transcription factors. PMID:27068465

  7. Kaposin-B Enhances the PROX1 mRNA Stability during Lymphatic Reprogramming of Vascular Endothelial Cells by Kaposi's Sarcoma Herpes Virus

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jaehyuk; Kang, Jinjoo; Lee, Ha Neul; Aguilar, Berenice; Kafka, Darren; Lee, Sunju; Choi, Inho; Lee, Juneyong; Ramu, Swapnika; Haas, Juergen; Koh, Chester J.; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is the most common cancer among HIV-positive patients. Histogenetic origin of KS has long been elusive due to a mixed expression of both blood and lymphatic endothelial markers in KS tumor cells. However, we and others discovered that Kaposi's sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) induces lymphatic reprogramming of blood vascular endothelial cells by upregulating PROX1, which functions as the master regulator for lymphatic endothelial differentiation. Here, we demonstrate that the KSHV latent gene kaposin-B enhances the PROX1 mRNA stability and plays an important role in KSHV-mediated PROX1 upregulation. We found that PROX1 mRNA contains a canonical AU-rich element (ARE) in its 3′-untranslated region that promotes PROX1 mRNA turnover and that kaposin-B stimulates cytoplasmic accumulation of the ARE-binding protein HuR through activation of the p38/MK2 pathway. Moreover, HuR binds to and stabilizes PROX1 mRNA through its ARE and is necessary for KSHV-mediated PROX1 mRNA stabilization. Together, our study demonstrates that kaposin-B plays a key role in PROX1 upregulation during lymphatic reprogramming of blood vascular endothelial cells by KSHV. PMID:20730087

  8. Threading analysis of prospero-type homeodomains.

    PubMed

    Banerjee-Basu, S; Landsman, D; Baxevanis, A D

    1999-01-01

    The homeodomain is a common structural motif found in many transcription factors involved in cell fate determination during development. We have used threading analysis techniques to predict whether the atypical homeodomain of prospero (pros) family members could form the three-helical homeodomain structural motif, even though these proteins are not statistically similar to canonical homeodomains as assessed by BLAST searches. Amino acid sequences of these divergent homeodomain proteins were threaded through the X-ray coordinates of the Drosophila engrailed homeodomain protein [23]. The analysis confirms that the prospero class of homeodomain proteins is indeed capable of forming the homeodomain structure despite its low degree of sequence identity to the canonical homeodomain. Energy calculations indicate that the homeodomain structure is stabilized primarily by hydrophobic interactions between residues at the helical interfaces. Although the atypical prospero-type homeodomain shows very little sequence similarity when compared to other homeodomain proteins, the critical amino acids responsible for maintaining the three-dimensional structure are highly conserved. A number of other homeodomain proteins, such as PHO2p from Saccharomyces and Pax6 from human, were also included in the threading analysis and were shown to be able to form the engrailed structure, indicating that there are no rigid overall sequence requirements for the formation of the homeodomain structural motif. Based on the threading experiments and the subsequent structural alignment, a new amino acid signature that unambiguously identifies the prospero-type proteins was deduced. PMID:11471237

  9. Separation of the PROX1 gene from upstream conserved elements in a complex inversion/translocation patient with hypoplastic left heart.

    PubMed

    Gill, Harinder K; Parsons, Sian R; Spalluto, Cosma; Davies, Angela F; Knorz, Victoria J; Burlinson, Clare E G; Ng, Bee Ling; Carter, Nigel P; Ogilvie, Caroline Mackie; Wilson, David I; Roberts, Roland G

    2009-11-01

    Hypoplastic left heart (HLH) occurs in at least 1 in 10 000 live births but may be more common in utero. Its causes are poorly understood but a number of affected cases are associated with chromosomal abnormalities. We set out to localize the breakpoints in a patient with sporadic HLH and a de novo translocation. Initial studies showed that the apparently simple 1q41;3q27.1 translocation was actually combined with a 4-Mb inversion, also de novo, of material within 1q41. We therefore localized all four breakpoints and found that no known transcription units were disrupted. However we present a case, based on functional considerations, synteny and position of highly conserved non-coding sequence elements, and the heterozygous Prox1(+/-) mouse phenotype (ventricular hypoplasia), for the involvement of dysregulation of the PROX1 gene in the aetiology of HLH in this case. Accordingly, we show that the spatial expression pattern of PROX1 in the developing human heart is consistent with a role in cardiac development. We suggest that dysregulation of PROX1 gene expression due to separation from its conserved upstream elements is likely to have caused the heart defects observed in this patient, and that PROX1 should be considered as a potential candidate gene for other cases of HLH. The relevance of another breakpoint separating the cardiac gene ESRRG from a conserved downstream element is also discussed. PMID:19471316

  10. The rs340874 PROX1 type 2 diabetes mellitus risk variant is associated with visceral fat accumulation and alterations in postprandial glucose and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kretowski, Adam; Adamska, Edyta; Maliszewska, Katarzyna; Wawrusiewicz-Kurylonek, Natalia; Citko, Anna; Goscik, Joanna; Bauer, Witold; Wilk, Juliusz; Golonko, Anna; Waszczeniuk, Magdalena; Lipinska, Danuta; Hryniewicka, Justyna; Niemira, Magdalena; Paczkowska, Magdalena; Ciborowski, Michal; Gorska, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Large-scale meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies have recently confirmed that the rs340874 single-nucleotide polymorphism in PROX1 gene is associated with fasting glycemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus; however, the mechanism of this link was not well established. The aim of our study was to evaluate the functional/phenotypic differences related to rs340874 PROX1 variants. The study group comprised 945 subjects of Polish origin (including 634 with BMI > 25) without previously known dysglycemia. We analyzed behavioral patterns (diet, physical activity), body fat distribution and glucose/fat metabolism after standardized meals and during the oral glucose tolerance test. We found that the carriers of the rs340874 PROX1 CC genotype had higher nonesterified fatty acids levels after high-fat meal (p = 0.035) and lower glucose oxidation (p = 0.014) after high-carbohydrate meal in comparison with subjects with other PROX1 genotypes. Moreover, in subjects with CC variant, we found higher accumulation of visceral fat (p < 0.02), but surprisingly lower daily food consumption (p < 0.001). We hypothesize that lipid metabolism alterations in subjects with the PROX1 CC genotype may be a primary cause of higher glucose levels after glucose load, since the fatty acids can inhibit insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by decreasing carbohydrate oxidation. Our observations suggest that the PROX1 variants have pleiotropic effect on disease pathways and it seem to be a very interesting goal of research on prevention of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The study may help to understand the mechanisms of visceral obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus risk development. PMID:25601634

  11. Histone Deacetylase Rpd3 Regulates Olfactory Projection Neuron Dendrite Targeting via the Transcription Factor Prospero

    PubMed Central

    Tea, Joy S.; Chihara, Takahiro; Luo, Liqun

    2010-01-01

    Compared to the mechanisms of axon guidance, relatively little is known about the transcriptional control of dendrite guidance. The Drosophila olfactory system with its stereotyped organization provides an excellent model to study the transcriptional control of dendrite wiring specificity. Each projection neuron (PN) targets its dendrites to a specific glomerulus in the antennal lobe and its axon stereotypically to higher brain centers. Using a forward genetic screen, we identified a mutation in Rpd3 that disrupts PN targeting specificity. Rpd3 encodes a class I histone deacetylase (HDAC) homologous to mammalian HDAC1 and HDAC2. Rpd3−/− PN dendrites that normally target to a dorsolateral glomerulus mistarget to medial glomeruli in the antennal lobe, and axons exhibit a severe overbranching phenotype. These phenotypes can be rescued by postmitotic expression of Rpd3 but not HDAC3, the only other class I HDAC in Drosophila. Furthermore, disruption of the atypical homeodomain transcription factor Prospero (Pros) yields similar phenotypes, which can be rescued by Pros expression in postmitotic neurons. Strikingly, overexpression of Pros can suppress Rpd3−/− phenotypes. Our study suggests a specific function for the general chromatin remodeling factor Rpd3 in regulating dendrite targeting in neurons, largely through the postmitotic action of the Pros transcription factor. PMID:20660276

  12. Minibrain drives the Dacapo-dependent cell cycle exit of neurons in the Drosophila brain by promoting asense and prospero expression.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Mirja N; Gutierrez-Aviño, Francisco; Colonques, Jordi; Ceron, Julian; Hämmerle, Barbara; Tejedor, Francisco J

    2016-09-01

    A key aim of neurodevelopmental research is to understand how precursor cells decide to stop dividing and commence their terminal differentiation at the correct time and place. Here, we show that minibrain (mnb), the Drosophila ortholog of the Down syndrome candidate gene DYRK1A, is transiently expressed in newborn neuronal precursors known as ganglion cells (GCs). Mnb promotes the cell cycle exit of GCs through a dual mechanism that regulates the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor Dacapo, the homolog of vertebrate p27(Kip1) (Cdkn1b). Mnb upregulates the expression of the proneural transcription factor (TF) Asense, which promotes Dacapo expression. Mnb also induces the expression of Prospero, a homeodomain TF that in turn inhibits the expression of Deadpan, a pan-neural TF that represses dacapo In addition to its effects on Asense and Prospero, Mnb also promotes the expression of the neuronal-specific RNA regulator Elav, strongly suggesting that Mnb facilitates neuronal differentiation. These actions of Mnb ensure the precise timing of neuronal birth, coupling the mechanisms that regulate neurogenesis, cell cycle control and terminal differentiation of neurons. PMID:27510975

  13. Combinatorial expression of Lef1, Lhx2, Lhx5, Lhx9, Lmo3, Lmo4, and Prox1 helps to identify comparable subdivisions in the developing hippocampal formation of mouse and chicken

    PubMed Central

    Abellán, Antonio; Desfilis, Ester; Medina, Loreta

    2014-01-01

    We carried out a study of the expression patterns of seven developmental regulatory genes (Lef1, Lhx2, Lhx9, Lhx5, Lmo3, Lmo4, and Prox1), in combination with topological position, to identify the medial pallial derivatives, define its major subdivisions, and compare them between mouse and chicken. In both species, the medial pallium is defined as a pallial sector adjacent to the cortical hem and roof plate/choroid tela, showing moderate to strong ventricular zone expression of Lef1, Lhx2, and Lhx9, but not Lhx5. Based on this, the hippocampal formation (indusium griseum, dentate gyrus, Ammon's horn fields, and subiculum), the medial entorhinal cortex, and part of the amygdalo-hippocampal transition area of mouse appeared to derive from the medial pallium. In the chicken, based on the same position and gene expression profile, we propose that the hippocampus (including the V-shaped area), the parahippocampal area (including its caudolateral part), the entorhinal cortex, and the amygdalo-hippocampal transition area are medial pallial derivatives. Moreover, the combinatorial expression of Lef1, Prox1, Lmo4, and Lmo3 allowed the identification of dentate gyrus/CA3-like, CA1/subicular-like, and medial entorhinal-like comparable sectors in mouse and chicken, and point to the existence of mostly conserved molecular networks involved in hippocampal complex development. Notably, while the mouse medial entorhinal cortex derives from the medial pallium (similarly to the hippocampal formation, both being involved in spatial navigation and spatial memory), the lateral entorhinal cortex (involved in processing non-spatial, contextual information) appears to derive from a distinct dorsolateral caudal pallial sector. PMID:25071464

  14. Chromosomal diversification and karyotype evolution of diploids in the cytologically diverse genus Prospero (Hyacinthaceae)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prospero (Hyacinthaceae) provides a unique system to assess the impact of genome rearrangements on plant diversification and evolution. The genus exhibits remarkable chromosomal variation but very little morphological differentiation. Basic numbers of x = 4, 5, 6 and 7, extensive polyploidy, and numerous polymorphic chromosome variants were described, but only three species are commonly recognized: P. obtusifolium, P. hanburyi, and P. autumnale s.l., the latter comprising four diploid cytotypes. The relationship between evolutionary patterns and chromosomal variation in diploids, the basic modules of the extensive cytological diversity, is presented. Results Evolutionary inferences were derived from fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 5S and 35S rDNA, genome size estimations, and phylogenetic analyses of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of 35S rDNA of 49 diploids in the three species and all cytotypes of P. autumnale s.l. All species and cytotypes possess a single 35S rDNA locus, interstitial except in P. hanburyi where it is sub-terminal, and one or two 5S rDNA loci (occasionally a third in P. obtusifolium) at fixed locations. The localization of the two rDNA types is unique for each species and cytotype. Phylogenetic data in the P. autumnale complex enable tracing of the evolution of rDNA loci, genome size, and direction of chromosomal fusions: mixed descending dysploidy of x = 7 to x = 6 and independently to x = 5, rather than successive descending dysploidy, is proposed. Conclusions All diploid cytotypes are recovered as well-defined evolutionary lineages. The cytogenetic and phylogenetic approaches have provided excellent phylogenetic markers to infer the direction of chromosomal change in Prospero. Evolution in Prospero, especially in the P. autumnale complex, has been driven by differentiation of an ancestral karyotype largely unaccompanied by morphological change. These new results provide a framework for detailed

  15. A new Prospero and microRNA-279 pathway restricts CO2 receptor neuron formation.

    PubMed

    Hartl, Marion; Loschek, Laura F; Stephan, Daniel; Siju, K P; Knappmeyer, Christiane; Kadow, Ilona C Grunwald

    2011-11-01

    CO(2) sensation represents an interesting example of nervous system and behavioral evolutionary divergence. The underlying molecular mechanisms, however, are not understood. Loss of microRNA-279 in Drosophila melanogaster leads to the formation of a CO(2) sensory system partly similar to the one of mosquitoes. Here, we show that a novel allele of the pleiotropic transcription factor Prospero resembles the miR-279 phenotype. We use a combination of genetics and in vitro and in vivo analysis to demonstrate that Pros participates in the regulation of miR-279 expression, and that reexpression of miR-279 rescues the pros CO(2) neuron phenotype. We identify common target molecules of miR-279 and Pros in bioinformatics analysis, and show that overexpression of the transcription factors Nerfin-1 and Escargot (Esg) is sufficient to induce formation of CO(2) neurons on maxillary palps. Our results suggest that Prospero restricts CO(2) neuron formation indirectly via miR-279 and directly by repressing the shared target molecules, Nerfin-1 and Esg, during olfactory system development. Given the important role of Pros in differentiation of the nervous system, we anticipate that miR-mediated signal tuning represents a powerful method for olfactory sensory system diversification during evolution. PMID:22049409

  16. Differential amplification of satellite PaB6 in chromosomally hypervariable Prospero autumnale complex (Hyacinthaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Emadzade, Khatere; Jang, Tae-Soo; Macas, Jiří; Kovařík, Ales; Novák, Petr; Parker, John; Weiss-Schneeweiss, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Chromosomal evolution, including numerical and structural changes, is a major force in plant diversification and speciation. This study addresses genomic changes associated with the extensive chromosomal variation of the Mediterranean Prospero autumnale complex (Hyacinthaceae), which includes four diploid cytotypes each with a unique combination of chromosome number (x = 5, 6, 7), rDNA loci and genome size. Methods A new satellite repeat PaB6 has previously been identified, and monomers were reconstructed from next-generation sequencing (NGS) data of P. autumnale cytotype B6B6 (2n = 12). Monomers of all other Prospero cytotypes and species were sequenced to check for lineage-specific mutations. Copy number, restriction patterns and methylation levels of PaB6 were analysed using Southern blotting. PaB6 was localized on chromosomes using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Key Results The monomer of PaB6 is 249 bp long, contains several intact and truncated vertebrate-type telomeric repeats and is highly methylated. PaB6 is exceptional because of its high copy number and unprecedented variation among diploid cytotypes, ranging from 104 to 106 copies per 1C. PaB6 is always located in pericentromeric regions of several to all chromosomes. Additionally, two lineages of cytotype B7B7 (x = 7), possessing either a single or duplicated 5S rDNA locus, differ in PaB6 copy number; the ancestral condition of a single locus is associated with higher PaB6 copy numbers. Conclusions Although present in all Prospero species, PaB6 has undergone differential amplification only in chromosomally variable P. autumnale, particularly in cytotypes B6B6 and B5B5. These arose via independent chromosomal fusions from x = 7 to x = 6 and 5, respectively, accompanied by genome size increases. The copy numbers of satellite DNA PaB6 are among the highest in angiosperms, and changes of PaB6 are exceptionally dynamic in this group of closely related cytotypes of a single

  17. LLNL Results from CALIBAN-PROSPERO Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Experiments in September 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Lobaugh, M. L.; Hickman, D. P.; Wong, C. W.; Wysong, A. R.; Merritt, M. J.; Heinrichs, D. P.; Topper, J. D.

    2015-05-21

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses thin neutron activation foils, sulfur, and threshold energy shielding to determine neutron component doses and the total dose from neutrons in the event of a nuclear criticality accident. The dosimeter also uses a DOELAP accredited Panasonic UD-810 (Panasonic Industrial Devices Sales Company of America, 2 Riverfront Plaza, Newark, NJ 07102, U.S.A.) thermoluminescent dosimetery system (TLD) for determining the gamma component of the total dose. LLNL has participated in three international intercomparisons of nuclear accident dosimeters. In October 2009, LLNL participated in an exercise at the French Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives (Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission- CEA) Research Center at Valduc utilizing the SILENE reactor (Hickman, et.al. 2010). In September 2010, LLNL participated in a second intercomparison at CEA Valduc, this time with exposures at the CALIBAN reactor (Hickman et al. 2011). This paper discusses LLNL’s results of a third intercomparison hosted by the French Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety- IRSN) with exposures at two CEA Valduc reactors (CALIBAN and PROSPERO) in September 2014. Comparison results between the three participating facilities is presented elsewhere (Chevallier 2015; Duluc 2015).

  18. Mild mutations in the pan neural gene prospero affect male-specific behaviour in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Grosjean, Yaël; Savy, Mathilde; Soichot, Julien; Everaerts, Claude; Cézilly, Frank; Ferveur, Jean François

    2004-01-30

    The fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most appropriate model organisms to study the genetics of behaviour. Here, we focus on prospero (pros), a key gene for the development of the nervous system which specifies multiple aspects from the early formation of the embryonic central nervous system to the formation of larval and adult sensory organs. We studied the effects on locomotion, courtship and mating behaviour of three mild pros mutations. These newly isolated pros mutations were induced after the incomplete excision of a transposable genomic element that, before excision, caused a lethal phenotype during larval development. Strikingly, these mutant strains, but not the strains with a clean excision, produced a high frequency of heterozygous flies, after more than 50 generations in the lab. We investigated the factors that could decrease the fitness of homozygotes relatively to heterozygous pros mutant flies. Flies of both genotypes had slightly different levels of fertility. More strikingly, homozygous mutant males had a lower sexual activity than heterozygous males and failed to mate in a competitive situation. No similar effect was detected in mutant females. These findings suggest that mild mutations in pros did not alter vital functions during development but drastically changed adult male behaviour and reproductive fitness. PMID:14744542

  19. Alcohol homologation

    DOEpatents

    Wegman, Richard W.; Moloy, Kenneth G.

    1988-01-01

    A process for the homologation of an alkanol by reaction with synthesis gas in contact with a system containing rhodium atom, ruthenium atom, iodine atom and a bis(diorganophosphino) alkane to selectivity produce the next higher homologue.

  20. Alcohol homologation

    DOEpatents

    Wegman, R.W.; Moloy, K.G.

    1988-02-23

    A process is described for the homologation of an alkanol by reaction with synthesis gas in contact with a system containing rhodium atom, ruthenium atom, iodine atom and a bis(diorganophosphino) alkane to selectivity produce the next higher homologue.

  1. Homology, Analogy, and Ethology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beer, Colin G.

    1984-01-01

    Because the main criterion of structural homology (the principle of connections) does not exist for behavioral homology, the utility of the ethological concept of homology has been questioned. The confidence with which behavioral homologies can be claimed varies inversely with taxonomic distance. Thus, conjectures about long-range phylogenetic…

  2. Nitrogenase and Homologs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogenase catalyzes biological nitrogen fixation, a key step in the global nitrogen cycle. Three homologous nitrogenases have been identified to date, along with several structural and/or functional homologs of this enzyme that are involved in nitrogenase assembly, bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis and methanogenic process, respectively. In this article, we provide an overview of the structures and functions of nitrogenase and its homologs, which highlights the similarity and disparity of this uniquely versatile group of enzymes. PMID:25491285

  3. Homological stabilizer codes

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Jonas T.

    2013-03-15

    In this paper we define homological stabilizer codes on qubits which encompass codes such as Kitaev's toric code and the topological color codes. These codes are defined solely by the graphs they reside on. This feature allows us to use properties of topological graph theory to determine the graphs which are suitable as homological stabilizer codes. We then show that all toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. We show that the topological color codes and toric codes correspond to two distinct classes of graphs. We define the notion of label set equivalencies and show that under a small set of constraints the only homological stabilizer codes without local logical operators are equivalent to Kitaev's toric code or to the topological color codes. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that Kitaev's toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that toric codes and color codes correspond to homological stabilizer codes on distinct graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find and classify all 2D homological stabilizer codes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find optimal codes among the homological stabilizer codes.

  4. Homology, convergence and parallelism.

    PubMed

    Ghiselin, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    Homology is a relation of correspondence between parts of parts of larger wholes. It is used when tracking objects of interest through space and time and in the context of explanatory historical narratives. Homologues can be traced through a genealogical nexus back to a common ancestral precursor. Homology being a transitive relation, homologues remain homologous however much they may come to differ. Analogy is a relationship of correspondence between parts of members of classes having no relationship of common ancestry. Although homology is often treated as an alternative to convergence, the latter is not a kind of correspondence: rather, it is one of a class of processes that also includes divergence and parallelism. These often give rise to misleading appearances (homoplasies). Parallelism can be particularly hard to detect, especially when not accompanied by divergences in some parts of the body. PMID:26598721

  5. Braid Floer homology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, J. B.; Ghrist, R.; Vandervorst, R. C.; Wójcik, W.

    2015-09-01

    Area-preserving diffeomorphisms of a 2-disc can be regarded as time-1 maps of (non-autonomous) Hamiltonian flows on R / Z ×D2. The periodic flow-lines define braid (conjugacy) classes, up to full twists. We examine the dynamics relative to such braid classes and define a new invariant for such classes, the BRAID FLOER HOMOLOGY. This refinement of Floer homology, originally used for the Arnol'd Conjecture, yields a Morse-type forcing theory for periodic points of area-preserving diffeomorphisms of the 2-disc based on braiding. Contributions of this paper include (1) a monotonicity lemma for the behavior of the nonlinear Cauchy-Riemann equations with respect to algebraic lengths of braids; (2) establishment of the topological invariance of the resulting braid Floer homology; (3) a shift theorem describing the effect of twisting braids in terms of shifting the braid Floer homology; (4) computation of examples; and (5) a forcing theorem for the dynamics of Hamiltonian disc maps based on braid Floer homology.

  6. Homology, homoplasy, novelty, and behavior.

    PubMed

    Hall, Brian K

    2013-01-01

    Richard Owen coined the modern definition of homology in 1843. Owen's conception of homology was pre-evolutionary, nontransformative (homology maintained basic plans or archetypes), and applied to the fully formed structures of animals. I sketch out the transition to an evolutionary approach to homology in which all classes of similarity are interpreted against the single branching tree of life, and outline the evidence for the application of homology across all levels and features of the biological hierarchy, including behavior. Owen contrasted homology with analogy. While this is not incorrect it is a pre-evolutionary contrast. Lankester [Lankester [1870] Journal of Natural History, 6 (31), 34-43] proposed homoplasy as the class of homology applicable to features formed by independent evolution. Today we identify homology, convergence, parallelism, and novelties as patterns of evolutionary change. A central issue in homology [Owen [1843] Lectures on comparative anatomy and physiology of the invertebrate animals, delivered at the Royal College of Surgeons in 1843. London: Longman, Brown, Green & Longmans] has been whether homology of features-the "same" portion of the brain in different species, for example-depends upon those features sharing common developmental pathways. Owen did not require this criterion, although he observed that homologues often do share developmental pathways (and we now know, often share gene pathways). A similar situation has been explored in the study of behavior, especially whether behaviors must share a common structural, developmental, neural, or genetic basis to be classified as homologous. However, and importantly, development and genes evolve. As shown with both theory and examples, morphological and behavioral features of the phenotype can be homologized as structural or behavioral homologues, respectively, even when their developmental or genetic bases differ (are not homologous). PMID:22711423

  7. Evolving the Concept of Homology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naples, Virginia L.; Miller, Jon S.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding homology is fundamental to learning about evolution. The present study shows an exercise that can be varied in complexity, for which students compile research illustrating the fate of homologous fish skull elements, and assemble a mural to serve as a learning aid. The skull of the most primitive living Actinopterygian (bony fish),…

  8. Abelian link invariants and homology

    SciTech Connect

    Guadagnini, Enore; Mancarella, Francesco

    2010-06-15

    We consider the link invariants defined by the quantum Chern-Simons field theory with compact gauge group U(1) in a closed oriented 3-manifold M. The relation of the Abelian link invariants with the homology group of the complement of the links is discussed. We prove that, when M is a homology sphere or when a link--in a generic manifold M--is homologically trivial, the associated observables coincide with the observables of the sphere S{sup 3}. Finally, we show that the U(1) Reshetikhin-Turaev surgery invariant of the manifold M is not a function of the homology group only, nor a function of the homotopy type of M alone.

  9. Object-oriented persistent homology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bao; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Persistent homology provides a new approach for the topological simplification of big data via measuring the life time of intrinsic topological features in a filtration process and has found its success in scientific and engineering applications. However, such a success is essentially limited to qualitative data classification and analysis. Indeed, persistent homology has rarely been employed for quantitative modeling and prediction. Additionally, the present persistent homology is a passive tool, rather than a proactive technique, for classification and analysis. In this work, we outline a general protocol to construct object-oriented persistent homology methods. By means of differential geometry theory of surfaces, we construct an objective functional, namely, a surface free energy defined on the data of interest. The minimization of the objective functional leads to a Laplace-Beltrami operator which generates a multiscale representation of the initial data and offers an objective oriented filtration process. The resulting differential geometry based object-oriented persistent homology is able to preserve desirable geometric features in the evolutionary filtration and enhances the corresponding topological persistence. The cubical complex based homology algorithm is employed in the present work to be compatible with the Cartesian representation of the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The proposed Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology method is extensively validated. The consistence between Laplace-Beltrami flow based filtration and Euclidean distance based filtration is confirmed on the Vietoris-Rips complex for a large amount of numerical tests. The convergence and reliability of the present Laplace-Beltrami flow based cubical complex filtration approach are analyzed over various spatial and temporal mesh sizes. The Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology approach is utilized to study the intrinsic topology of proteins and fullerene molecules. Based on a

  10. Genomic homologous recombination in planta.

    PubMed Central

    Gal, S; Pisan, B; Hohn, T; Grimsley, N; Hohn, B

    1991-01-01

    A system for monitoring intrachromosomal homologous recombination in whole plants is described. A multimer of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) sequences, arranged such that CaMV could only be produced by recombination, was integrated into Brassica napus nuclear DNA. This set-up allowed scoring of recombination events by the appearance of viral symptoms. The repeated homologous regions were derived from two different strains of CaMV so that different recombinant viruses (i.e. different recombination events) could be distinguished. In most of the transgenic plants, a single major virus species was detected. About half of the transgenic plants contained viruses of the same type, suggesting a hotspot for recombination. The remainder of the plants contained viruses with cross-over sites distributed throughout the rest of the homologous sequence. Sequence analysis of two recombinant molecules suggest that mismatch repair is linked to the recombination process. Images PMID:2026150

  11. ISHAN: sequence homology analysis package.

    PubMed

    Shil, Pratip; Dudani, Niraj; Vidyasagar, Pandit B

    2006-01-01

    Sequence based homology studies play an important role in evolutionary tracing and classification of proteins. Various methods are available to analyze biological sequence information. However, with the advent of proteomics era, there is a growing demand for analysis of huge amount of biological sequence information, and it has become necessary to have programs that would provide speedy analysis. ISHAN has been developed as a homology analysis package, built on various sequence analysis tools viz FASTA, ALIGN, CLUSTALW, PHYLIP and CODONW (for DNA sequences). This JAVA application offers the user choice of analysis tools. For testing, ISHAN was applied to perform phylogenetic analysis for sets of Caspase 3 DNA sequences and NF-kappaB p105 amino acid sequences. By integrating several tools it has made analysis much faster and reduced manual intervention. PMID:17274766

  12. Homologies in Physics and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, David F.; Cumalat, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    The genes of humans and chimpanzees are homologs. These genes are - in large measure - identical. From this detailed observation, we naturally suppose that both species evolved from a common ancestor. In particle physics the ordinary observed particles and their superymmetric partners are thought to be homologs, generated by a common "ancestor” , the Higgs particle. Experiments at CERN currently are testing this comfortable analogy of physics with biology. Neither the Higgs boson nor any supersymmetric particle has yet been found. We speculate that a variety of objects are homologs - evidence of an as yet undeveloped quantum theory of gravity to replace Dark Matter. A purely astronomical homology is the Vc - σ o relation which places nearly spherical elliptical galaxies just above well-formed spirals (SA & SB). Here the asymptotically- flat, circular velocity Vc is observed to be between 1 and 2 times the central bulge velocity dispersion σo over the range 60 km/s< σo <400 km/s (Ferrarese 2002, Fig 3). The Vc - σ o relation is difficult to explain with self-consistent equilibrium galaxy models (Courteau et al 2007). Here we give an explanation based on the Sinusoidal Potential, a non-Newtonian potential in which φ =-GM Cos[ko r]/r and ko=2 π /400 pc. We relate the lower limit of 60 km/s to the thermal velocity of protons at the” Broadhurst/Hirano & Hartnett” lookback redshift Z=105.6. This is the redshift where what was 400 pc then expands to 128 h-1 Mpc today. Further, at this Z the temperature of the universe was close to the Hartree Energy of 2 times 13.6 eV, an energy where protons have an rms speed of about 60 km/s.

  13. Symplectic homology product via Legendrian surgery.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Frédéric; Ekholm, Tobias; Eliashberg, Yakov

    2011-05-17

    This research announcement continues the study of the symplectic homology of Weinstein manifolds undertaken by the authors [Bourgeois F, Ekholm T, Eliashberg Y (2009) arXiv:0911.0026] where the symplectic homology, as a vector space, was expressed in terms of the Legendrian homology algebra of the attaching spheres of critical handles. Here, we express the product and Batalin-Vilkovisky operator of symplectic homology in that context. PMID:21518898

  14. Establishing homologies in protein sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayhoff, M. O.; Barker, W. C.; Hunt, L. T.

    1983-01-01

    Computer-based statistical techniques used to determine homologies between proteins occurring in different species are reviewed. The technique is based on comparison of two protein sequences, either by relating all segments of a given length in one sequence to all segments of the second or by finding the best alignment of the two sequences. Approaches discussed include selection using printed tabulations, identification of very similar sequences, and computer searches of a database. The use of the SEARCH, RELATE, and ALIGN programs (Dayhoff, 1979) is explained; sample data are presented in graphs, diagrams, and tables and the construction of scoring matrices is considered.

  15. Homologous gene replacement in Physarum

    SciTech Connect

    Burland, T.G.; Pallotta, D.

    1995-01-01

    The protist Physarum polycephalum is useful for analysis of several aspects of cellular and developmental biology. To expand the opportunities for experimental analysis of this organism, we have developed a method for gene replacement. We transformed Physarum amoebae with plasmid DNA carrying a mutant allele, ardD{Delta}1, of the ardD actin gene; ardD{Delta}1 mutates the critical carboxy-terminal region of the gene product. Because ardD is not expressed in the amoeba, replacement of ardD{sup +} with ardD{Delta}1 should not be lethal for this cell type. Transformants were obtained only when linear plasmid DNA was used. Most transformants carried one copy of ardD{Delta}1 in addition to ardD{sup +}, but in two (5%), ardD{sup +} was replaced by a single copy of ardD{Delta}1. This is the first example of homologous gene replacement in Physarum. ardD{Delta}1 was stably maintained in the genome through growth, development and meiosis. We found no effect of ardD{Delta}l on viability, growth, or development of any of the various cell types of Physarum. Thus, the carboxy-terminal region of the ardD product appears not to perform a unique essential role in growth or development. Nevertheless, this method for homologous gene replacement can be applied to analyze the function of any cloned gene. 38 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Persistent homology and string vacua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirafici, Michele

    2016-03-01

    We use methods from topological data analysis to study the topological features of certain distributions of string vacua. Topological data analysis is a multi-scale approach used to analyze the topological features of a dataset by identifying which homological characteristics persist over a long range of scales. We apply these techniques in several contexts. We analyze {N}=2 vacua by focusing on certain distributions of Calabi-Yau varieties and Landau-Ginzburg models. We then turn to flux compactifications and discuss how we can use topological data analysis to extract physical information. Finally we apply these techniques to certain phenomenologically realistic heterotic models. We discuss the possibility of characterizing string vacua using the topological properties of their distributions.

  17. Chromosomally-retained RNA mediates homologous pairing.

    PubMed

    Ding, Da-Qiao; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    Pairing and recombination of homologous chromosomes are essential for ensuring correct segregation of chromosomes in meiosis. In S. pombe, chromosomes are first bundled at the telomeres (forming a telomere bouquet) and then aligned by oscillatory movement of the elongated "horsetail" nucleus. Telomere clustering and subsequent chromosome alignment promote pairing of homologous chromosomes. However, this telomere-bundled alignment of chromosomes cannot be responsible for the specificity of chromosome pairing. Thus, there must be some mechanism to facilitate recognition of homologous partners after telomere clustering. Recent studies in S. pombe have shown that RNA transcripts retained on the chromosome, or RNA bodies, may play a role in recognition of homologous chromosomes for pairing. Acting as fiducial markers of homologous loci they would abrogate the need for direct DNA sequence homology searching. PMID:23117617

  18. Homology-independent metrics for comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Tarcisio José Domingos; Franco, Glória Regina; Lobo, Francisco Pereira

    2015-01-01

    A mainstream procedure to analyze the wealth of genomic data available nowadays is the detection of homologous regions shared across genomes, followed by the extraction of biological information from the patterns of conservation and variation observed in such regions. Although of pivotal importance, comparative genomic procedures that rely on homology inference are obviously not applicable if no homologous regions are detectable. This fact excludes a considerable portion of "genomic dark matter" with no significant similarity - and, consequently, no inferred homology to any other known sequence - from several downstream comparative genomic methods. In this review we compile several sequence metrics that do not rely on homology inference and can be used to compare nucleotide sequences and extract biologically meaningful information from them. These metrics comprise several compositional parameters calculated from sequence data alone, such as GC content, dinucleotide odds ratio, and several codon bias metrics. They also share other interesting properties, such as pervasiveness (patterns persist on smaller scales) and phylogenetic signal. We also cite examples where these homology-independent metrics have been successfully applied to support several bioinformatics challenges, such as taxonomic classification of biological sequences without homology inference. They where also used to detect higher-order patterns of interactions in biological systems, ranging from detecting coevolutionary trends between the genomes of viruses and their hosts to characterization of gene pools of entire microbial communities. We argue that, if correctly understood and applied, homology-independent metrics can add important layers of biological information in comparative genomic studies without prior homology inference. PMID:26029354

  19. Buoyancy instability of homologous implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Bryan

    2015-11-01

    Hot spot turbulence is a potential contributor to yield degradation in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules, although its origin, if present, remains unclear. In this work, a perturbation analysis is performed of an analytical homologous solution that mimics the hot spot and surrounding cold fuel during the late stages of an ICF implosion. It is shown that the flow is governed by the Schwarzschild criterion for buoyant stability, and that during stagnation, short wavelength entropy and vorticity fluctuations amplify by a factor exp (π |N0 | ts) , where N0 is the buoyancy frequency at stagnation and ts is the stagnation time scale. This amplification factor is exponentially sensitive to mean flow gradients and varies from 103-107 for realistic gradients. Comparisons are made with a Lagrangian hydrodynamics code, and it is found that a numerical resolution of ~ 30 zones per wavelength is required to capture the evolution of vorticity accurately. This translates to an angular resolution of ~(12 / l) ∘ , or ~ 0 .1° to resolve the fastest growing modes (Legendre mode l > 100).

  20. Gene Sequence Homology of Chemokines Across Species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The abundance of expressed gene and protein sequences available in the biological information databases facilitates comparison of protein homologies. A high degree of sequence similarity typically implies homology regarding structure and function and may provide clues to antibody cross-reactivities...

  1. GENE SEQUENCE HOMOLOGY OF CHEMOKINES ACROSS SPECIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The abundance of expressed gene and protein sequences available in the biological information databases facilitates comparison of protein homologies. A high degree of sequence similarity typically implies homology regarding structure and function and may provide clues to antibody cross-react...

  2. DNA Sequence Alignment during Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Greene, Eric C

    2016-05-27

    Homologous recombination allows for the regulated exchange of genetic information between two different DNA molecules of identical or nearly identical sequence composition, and is a major pathway for the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. A key facet of homologous recombination is the ability of recombination proteins to perfectly align the damaged DNA with homologous sequence located elsewhere in the genome. This reaction is referred to as the homology search and is akin to the target searches conducted by many different DNA-binding proteins. Here I briefly highlight early investigations into the homology search mechanism, and then describe more recent research. Based on these studies, I summarize a model that includes a combination of intersegmental transfer, short-distance one-dimensional sliding, and length-specific microhomology recognition to efficiently align DNA sequences during the homology search. I also suggest some future directions to help further our understanding of the homology search. Where appropriate, I direct the reader to other recent reviews describing various issues related to homologous recombination. PMID:27129270

  3. Homology-Independent Metrics for Comparative Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Tarcisio José Domingos; Franco, Glória Regina; Lobo, Francisco Pereira

    2015-01-01

    A mainstream procedure to analyze the wealth of genomic data available nowadays is the detection of homologous regions shared across genomes, followed by the extraction of biological information from the patterns of conservation and variation observed in such regions. Although of pivotal importance, comparative genomic procedures that rely on homology inference are obviously not applicable if no homologous regions are detectable. This fact excludes a considerable portion of “genomic dark matter” with no significant similarity — and, consequently, no inferred homology to any other known sequence — from several downstream comparative genomic methods. In this review we compile several sequence metrics that do not rely on homology inference and can be used to compare nucleotide sequences and extract biologically meaningful information from them. These metrics comprise several compositional parameters calculated from sequence data alone, such as GC content, dinucleotide odds ratio, and several codon bias metrics. They also share other interesting properties, such as pervasiveness (patterns persist on smaller scales) and phylogenetic signal. We also cite examples where these homology-independent metrics have been successfully applied to support several bioinformatics challenges, such as taxonomic classification of biological sequences without homology inference. They where also used to detect higher-order patterns of interactions in biological systems, ranging from detecting coevolutionary trends between the genomes of viruses and their hosts to characterization of gene pools of entire microbial communities. We argue that, if correctly understood and applied, homology-independent metrics can add important layers of biological information in comparative genomic studies without prior homology inference. PMID:26029354

  4. Buoyancy instability of homologous implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B. M.

    2015-06-15

    With this study, I consider the hydrodynamic stability of imploding ideal gases as an idealized model for inertial confinement fusion capsules, sonoluminescent bubbles and the gravitational collapse of astrophysical gases. For oblate modes (short-wavelength incompressive modes elongated in the direction of the mean flow), a second-order ordinary differential equation is derived that can be used to assess the stability of any time-dependent flow with planar, cylindrical or spherical symmetry. Upon further restricting the analysis to homologous flows, it is shown that a monatomic gas is governed by the Schwarzschild criterion for buoyant stability. Under buoyantly unstable conditions, both entropy and vorticity fluctuations experience power-law growth in time, with a growth rate that depends upon mean flow gradients and, in the absence of dissipative effects, is independent of mode number. If the flow accelerates throughout the implosion, oblate modes amplify by a factor (2C)|N0|ti, where C is the convergence ratio of the implosion, N0 is the initial buoyancy frequency and ti is the implosion time scale. If, instead, the implosion consists of a coasting phase followed by stagnation, oblate modes amplify by a factor exp(π|N0|ts), where N0 is the buoyancy frequency at stagnation and ts is the stagnation time scale. Even under stable conditions, vorticity fluctuations grow due to the conservation of angular momentum as the gas is compressed. For non-monatomic gases, this additional growth due to compression results in weak oscillatory growth under conditions that would otherwise be buoyantly stable; this over-stability is consistent with the conservation of wave action in the fluid frame. The above analytical results are verified by evolving the complete set of linear equations as an initial value problem, and it is demonstrated that oblate modes are the fastest

  5. Buoyancy instability of homologous implosions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Johnson, B. M.

    2015-06-15

    With this study, I consider the hydrodynamic stability of imploding ideal gases as an idealized model for inertial confinement fusion capsules, sonoluminescent bubbles and the gravitational collapse of astrophysical gases. For oblate modes (short-wavelength incompressive modes elongated in the direction of the mean flow), a second-order ordinary differential equation is derived that can be used to assess the stability of any time-dependent flow with planar, cylindrical or spherical symmetry. Upon further restricting the analysis to homologous flows, it is shown that a monatomic gas is governed by the Schwarzschild criterion for buoyant stability. Under buoyantly unstable conditions, both entropy andmore » vorticity fluctuations experience power-law growth in time, with a growth rate that depends upon mean flow gradients and, in the absence of dissipative effects, is independent of mode number. If the flow accelerates throughout the implosion, oblate modes amplify by a factor (2C)|N0|ti, where C is the convergence ratio of the implosion, N0 is the initial buoyancy frequency and ti is the implosion time scale. If, instead, the implosion consists of a coasting phase followed by stagnation, oblate modes amplify by a factor exp(π|N0|ts), where N0 is the buoyancy frequency at stagnation and ts is the stagnation time scale. Even under stable conditions, vorticity fluctuations grow due to the conservation of angular momentum as the gas is compressed. For non-monatomic gases, this additional growth due to compression results in weak oscillatory growth under conditions that would otherwise be buoyantly stable; this over-stability is consistent with the conservation of wave action in the fluid frame. The above analytical results are verified by evolving the complete set of linear equations as an initial value problem, and it is demonstrated that oblate modes are the fastest-growing modes and that high mode numbers are required to reach this limit (Legendre mode ℓ ≳ 100

  6. New phosphonate reagents for aldehyde homologation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New phosphonate reagents were developed for the two-carbon homologation of aldehydes to unbranched- or methyl-branched unsaturated aldehydes. The phosphonate reagents, diethyl methylformyl-2-phosphonate dimethylhydrazone and diethyl ethylformyl-2-phosphonate dimethylhydrazone, contained a protected...

  7. Dualities in Persistent (Co)Homology

    SciTech Connect

    de Silva, Vin; Morozov, Dmitriy; Vejdemo-Johansson, Mikael

    2011-09-16

    We consider sequences of absolute and relative homology and cohomology groups that arise naturally for a filtered cell complex. We establishalgebraic relationships between their persistence modules, and show that they contain equivalent information. We explain how one can use the existingalgorithm for persistent homology to process any of the four modules, and relate it to a recently introduced persistent cohomology algorithm. Wepresent experimental evidence for the practical efficiency of the latter algorithm.

  8. Persistent homology analysis of phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donato, Irene; Gori, Matteo; Pettini, Marco; Petri, Giovanni; De Nigris, Sarah; Franzosi, Roberto; Vaccarino, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    Persistent homology analysis, a recently developed computational method in algebraic topology, is applied to the study of the phase transitions undergone by the so-called mean-field XY model and by the ϕ4 lattice model, respectively. For both models the relationship between phase transitions and the topological properties of certain submanifolds of configuration space are exactly known. It turns out that these a priori known facts are clearly retrieved by persistent homology analysis of dynamically sampled submanifolds of configuration space.

  9. On the hodological criterion for homology.

    PubMed

    Faunes, Macarena; Francisco Botelho, João; Ahumada Galleguillos, Patricio; Mpodozis, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Owen's pre-evolutionary definition of a homolog as "the same organ in different animals under every variety of form and function" and its redefinition after Darwin as "the same trait in different lineages due to common ancestry" entail the same heuristic problem: how to establish "sameness."Although different criteria for homology often conflict, there is currently a generalized acceptance of gene expression as the best criterion. This gene-centered view of homology results from a reductionist and preformationist concept of living beings. Here, we adopt an alternative organismic-epigenetic viewpoint, and conceive living beings as systems whose identity is given by the dynamic interactions between their components at their multiple levels of composition. We posit that there cannot be an absolute homology criterion, and instead, homology should be inferred from comparisons at the levels and developmental stages where the delimitation of the compared trait lies. In this line, we argue that neural connectivity, i.e., the hodological criterion, should prevail in the determination of homologies between brain supra-cellular structures, such as the vertebrate pallium. PMID:26157357

  10. On the hodological criterion for homology

    PubMed Central

    Faunes, Macarena; Francisco Botelho, João; Ahumada Galleguillos, Patricio; Mpodozis, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Owen's pre-evolutionary definition of a homolog as “the same organ in different animals under every variety of form and function” and its redefinition after Darwin as “the same trait in different lineages due to common ancestry” entail the same heuristic problem: how to establish “sameness.”Although different criteria for homology often conflict, there is currently a generalized acceptance of gene expression as the best criterion. This gene-centered view of homology results from a reductionist and preformationist concept of living beings. Here, we adopt an alternative organismic-epigenetic viewpoint, and conceive living beings as systems whose identity is given by the dynamic interactions between their components at their multiple levels of composition. We posit that there cannot be an absolute homology criterion, and instead, homology should be inferred from comparisons at the levels and developmental stages where the delimitation of the compared trait lies. In this line, we argue that neural connectivity, i.e., the hodological criterion, should prevail in the determination of homologies between brain supra-cellular structures, such as the vertebrate pallium. PMID:26157357

  11. Homologs of Breast Cancer Genes in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Trapp, Oliver; Seeliger, Katharina; Puchta, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Since the initial discovery of genes involved in hereditary breast cancer in humans, a vast wealth of information has been published. Breast cancer proteins were shown to work as tumor suppressors primarily through their involvement in DNA-damage repair. Surprisingly, homologs of these genes can be found in plant genomes, as well. Here, we want to give an overview of the identification and characterization of the biological roles of these proteins, in plants. In addition to the conservation of their function in DNA repair, new plant-specific characteristics have been revealed. BRCA1 is required for the efficient repair of double strand breaks (DSB) by homologous recombination in somatic cells of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Bioinformatic analysis indicates that, whereas most homologs of key components of the different mammalian BRCA1 complexes are present in plant genomes, homologs of most factors involved in the recruitment of BRCA1 to the DSB cannot be identified. Thus, it is not clear at the moment whether differences exist between plants and animals at this important step. The most conserved region of BRCA1 and BARD1 homologs in plants is a PHD domain which is absent in mammals and which, in AtBARD1, might be involved in the transcriptional regulation of plant development. The presence of a plant-specific domain prompted us to reevaluate the current model for the evolution of BRCA1 homologs and to suggest a new hypothesis, in which we postulate that plant BRCA1 and BARD1 have one common predecessor that gained a PHD domain before duplication. Furthermore, work in Arabidopsis demonstrates that – as in animals – BRCA2 homologs are important for meiotic DNA recombination. Surprisingly, recent research has revealed that AtBRCA2 also has an important role in systemic acquired resistance. In Arabidopsis, BRCA2 is involved in the transcriptional regulation of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes via its interaction with the strand exchange protein RAD51. PMID

  12. Investigating homology between proteins using energetic profiles.

    PubMed

    Wrabl, James O; Hilser, Vincent J

    2010-03-01

    Accumulated experimental observations demonstrate that protein stability is often preserved upon conservative point mutation. In contrast, less is known about the effects of large sequence or structure changes on the stability of a particular fold. Almost completely unknown is the degree to which stability of different regions of a protein is generally preserved throughout evolution. In this work, these questions are addressed through thermodynamic analysis of a large representative sample of protein fold space based on remote, yet accepted, homology. More than 3,000 proteins were computationally analyzed using the structural-thermodynamic algorithm COREX/BEST. Estimated position-specific stability (i.e., local Gibbs free energy of folding) and its component enthalpy and entropy were quantitatively compared between all proteins in the sample according to all-vs.-all pairwise structural alignment. It was discovered that the local stabilities of homologous pairs were significantly more correlated than those of non-homologous pairs, indicating that local stability was indeed generally conserved throughout evolution. However, the position-specific enthalpy and entropy underlying stability were less correlated, suggesting that the overall regional stability of a protein was more important than the thermodynamic mechanism utilized to achieve that stability. Finally, two different types of statistically exceptional evolutionary structure-thermodynamic relationships were noted. First, many homologous proteins contained regions of similar thermodynamics despite localized structure change, suggesting a thermodynamic mechanism enabling evolutionary fold change. Second, some homologous proteins with extremely similar structures nonetheless exhibited different local stabilities, a phenomenon previously observed experimentally in this laboratory. These two observations, in conjunction with the principal conclusion that homologous proteins generally conserved local stability, may

  13. Multilabel immunofluorescence and antigen reprobing on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections: novel applications for precision pathology diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jie; Thoeni, Cornelia; Muise, Aleixo; Yeger, Herman; Cutz, Ernest

    2016-06-01

    We report new methods for multilabel immunofluorescence (MIF) and reprobing of antigen epitopes on the same formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) sections. The MIF method includes an antigen-retrieval step followed by multilabel immunostaining and examination by confocal microscopy. As examples, we illustrate epitopes localized to the apical and basolateral membranes, and the cytoplasm of enterocytes of normal small intestine and in cases of congenital enteropathies (microvillous inclusion disease and congenital tufting enteropathy). We also demonstrate localization of the bile salt excretion pump protein (BSEP) in bile canalicular membrane of normal hepatocytes and in cases of primary sclerosing cholangitis. To demonstrate colocalization of cytoplasmic and nuclear epitopes we analyzed normal control and hyperplastic pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNEC) and neuroepithelial bodies (NEBs), presumed airway sensors in the lungs of infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). As cytoplasmic markers we used anti-bombesin or anti-synaptic vesicle protein 2 (SV2) antibody, respectively, and for nuclear localization, antibodies against neurogenic genes mammalian achaete-scute homolog (Mash1) and prospero homeobox 1 (Prox1), essential for NEB cells differentiation and maturation, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) a downstream modulator of hypoxia response and a proliferation marker Ki67. The reprobing method consisted of removal of the previously immunolabeled target and immunostaining with different antibodies, facilitating colocalization of enterocyte brush border epitopes as well as HIF1α, Mash1 and Prox1 in PNEC/NEB PNEC and NEBs. As these methods are suitable for routine FFPE pathology samples from various tissues, allowing visualization of multiple epitopes in the same cells/sections with superior contrast and resolution, they are suitable for a wide range of applications in diagnostic pathology and may be particularly well suited for precision medicine

  14. Homological scaffolds of brain functional networks.

    PubMed

    Petri, G; Expert, P; Turkheimer, F; Carhart-Harris, R; Nutt, D; Hellyer, P J; Vaccarino, F

    2014-12-01

    Networks, as efficient representations of complex systems, have appealed to scientists for a long time and now permeate many areas of science, including neuroimaging (Bullmore and Sporns 2009 Nat. Rev. Neurosci. 10, 186-198. (doi:10.1038/nrn2618)). Traditionally, the structure of complex networks has been studied through their statistical properties and metrics concerned with node and link properties, e.g. degree-distribution, node centrality and modularity. Here, we study the characteristics of functional brain networks at the mesoscopic level from a novel perspective that highlights the role of inhomogeneities in the fabric of functional connections. This can be done by focusing on the features of a set of topological objects-homological cycles-associated with the weighted functional network. We leverage the detected topological information to define the homological scaffolds, a new set of objects designed to represent compactly the homological features of the correlation network and simultaneously make their homological properties amenable to networks theoretical methods. As a proof of principle,we apply these tools to compare resting state functional brain activity in 15 healthy volunteers after intravenous infusion of placebo and psilocybin-the main psychoactive component of magic mushrooms. The results show that the homological structure of the brain's functional patterns undergoes a dramatic change post-psilocybin, characterized by the appearance of many transient structures of low stability and of a small number of persistent ones that are not observed in the case of placebo. PMID:25401177

  15. Homological scaffolds of brain functional networks

    PubMed Central

    Petri, G.; Expert, P.; Turkheimer, F.; Carhart-Harris, R.; Nutt, D.; Hellyer, P. J.; Vaccarino, F.

    2014-01-01

    Networks, as efficient representations of complex systems, have appealed to scientists for a long time and now permeate many areas of science, including neuroimaging (Bullmore and Sporns 2009 Nat. Rev. Neurosci. 10, 186–198. (doi:10.1038/nrn2618)). Traditionally, the structure of complex networks has been studied through their statistical properties and metrics concerned with node and link properties, e.g. degree-distribution, node centrality and modularity. Here, we study the characteristics of functional brain networks at the mesoscopic level from a novel perspective that highlights the role of inhomogeneities in the fabric of functional connections. This can be done by focusing on the features of a set of topological objects—homological cycles—associated with the weighted functional network. We leverage the detected topological information to define the homological scaffolds, a new set of objects designed to represent compactly the homological features of the correlation network and simultaneously make their homological properties amenable to networks theoretical methods. As a proof of principle, we apply these tools to compare resting-state functional brain activity in 15 healthy volunteers after intravenous infusion of placebo and psilocybin—the main psychoactive component of magic mushrooms. The results show that the homological structure of the brain's functional patterns undergoes a dramatic change post-psilocybin, characterized by the appearance of many transient structures of low stability and of a small number of persistent ones that are not observed in the case of placebo. PMID:25401177

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis expresses two chaperonin-60 homologs.

    PubMed Central

    Kong, T H; Coates, A R; Butcher, P D; Hickman, C J; Shinnick, T M

    1993-01-01

    A 65-kDa protein and a 10-kDa protein are two of the more strongly immunoreactive components of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis. The 65-kDa antigen has homology with members of the GroEL or chaperonin-60 (Cpn60) family of heat shock proteins. The 10-kDa antigen has homology with the GroES or chaperonin-10 family of heat shock proteins. These two proteins are encoded by separate genes in M. tuberculosis. The studies reported here reveal that M. tuberculosis contains a second Cpn60 homolog located 98 bp downstream of the 10-kDa antigen gene. The second Cpn60 homolog (Cpn60-1) displays 61% amino acid sequence identity with the 65-kDa antigen (Cpn60-2) and 53% and 41% identity with the Escherichia coli GroEL protein and the human P60 protein, respectively. Primer-extension analysis revealed that transcription starts 29 bp upstream of the translation start of the Cpn60-1 homolog and protein purification studies indicate that the cpn60-1 gene is expressed as an approximately 60-kDa polypeptide. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:7681982

  17. Irradiated homologous costal cartilage for augmentation rhinoplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Lefkovits, G. )

    1990-10-01

    Although the ideal reconstructive material for augmentation rhinoplasty continues to challenge plastic surgeons, there exists no report in the literature that confines the use of irradiated homologous costal cartilage, first reported by Dingman and Grabb in 1961, to dorsal nasal augmentation. The purpose of this paper is to present a retrospective analysis of the author's experience using irradiated homologous costal cartilage in augmentation rhinoplasty. Twenty-seven dorsal nasal augmentations were performed in 24 patients between 16 and 49 years of age with a follow-up ranging from 1 to 27 months. Good-to-excellent results were achieved in 83.3% (20 of 24). Poor results requiring revision were found in 16.7% (4 of 24). Complication rates included 7.4% infection (2 of 27) and 14.8% warping (4 of 27). The resorption rate was zero. These results compare favorably with other forms of nasal augmentation. Advantages and disadvantages of irradiated homologous costal cartilage are discussed.

  18. Solar core homology, solar neutrinos and helioseismology

    SciTech Connect

    Bludman, S.A.; Kennedy, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    Precise numerical standard solar models (SSMs) now agree with one another and with helioseismological observations in the convective and outer radiative zones. Nevertheless these models obscure how luminosity, neutrino production and g-mode core helioseismology depend on such inputs as opacity and nuclear cross sections. Although the Sun is not homologous, its inner core by itself is chemically evolved and almost homologous, because of its compactness, radiative energy transport, and ppI-dominated luminosity production. We apply luminosity-fixed homology transformations to the core to estimate theoretical uncertainties in the SSM and to obtain a broad class of non-SSMs, parameterized by central temperature and density and purely radiative energy transport in the core. 25 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Flare build-up study: Homologous flares group - Interim report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodgate, B. E.

    1982-01-01

    When homologous flares are broadly defined as having footpoint structures in common, it is found that a majority of flares fall into homologous sets. Filament eruptions and mass ejection in members of an homologous flare set show that maintainance of the magnetic structure is not a necessary condition for homology.

  20. Biochemistry of homologous recombination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczykowski, S C; Dixon, D A; Eggleston, A K; Lauder, S D; Rehrauer, W M

    1994-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a fundamental biological process. Biochemical understanding of this process is most advanced for Escherichia coli. At least 25 gene products are involved in promoting genetic exchange. At present, this includes the RecA, RecBCD (exonuclease V), RecE (exonuclease VIII), RecF, RecG, RecJ, RecN, RecOR, RecQ, RecT, RuvAB, RuvC, SbcCD, and SSB proteins, as well as DNA polymerase I, DNA gyrase, DNA topoisomerase I, DNA ligase, and DNA helicases. The activities displayed by these enzymes include homologous DNA pairing and strand exchange, helicase, branch migration, Holliday junction binding and cleavage, nuclease, ATPase, topoisomerase, DNA binding, ATP binding, polymerase, and ligase, and, collectively, they define biochemical events that are essential for efficient recombination. In addition to these needed proteins, a cis-acting recombination hot spot known as Chi (chi: 5'-GCTGGTGG-3') plays a crucial regulatory function. The biochemical steps that comprise homologous recombination can be formally divided into four parts: (i) processing of DNA molecules into suitable recombination substrates, (ii) homologous pairing of the DNA partners and the exchange of DNA strands, (iii) extension of the nascent DNA heteroduplex; and (iv) resolution of the resulting crossover structure. This review focuses on the biochemical mechanisms underlying these steps, with particular emphases on the activities of the proteins involved and on the integration of these activities into likely biochemical pathways for recombination. Images PMID:7968921

  1. Redesigning Aldolase Stereoselectivity by Homologous Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Henßen, Birgit; Metz, Alexander; Gohlke, Holger; Pietruszka, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    The 2-deoxy-d-ribose-5-phosphate aldolase (DERA) offers access to highly desirable building blocks for organic synthesis by catalyzing a stereoselective C-C bond formation between acetaldehyde and certain electrophilic aldehydes. DERA´s potential is particularly highlighted by the ability to catalyze sequential, highly enantioselective aldol reactions. However, its synthetic use is limited by the absence of an enantiocomplementary enzyme. Here, we introduce the concept of homologous grafting to identify stereoselectivity-determining amino acid positions in DERA. We identified such positions by structural analysis of the homologous aldolases 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate aldolase (KDPG) and the enantiocomplementary enzyme 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogalactonate aldolase (KDPGal). Mutation of these positions led to a slightly inversed enantiopreference of both aldolases to the same extent. By transferring these sequence motifs onto DERA we achieved the intended change in enantioselectivity. PMID:27327271

  2. Homologous Pairing between Long DNA Double Helices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Alexey K.

    2016-04-01

    Molecular recognition between two double stranded (ds) DNA with homologous sequences may not seem compatible with the B-DNA structure because the sequence information is hidden when it is used for joining the two strands. Nevertheless, it has to be invoked to account for various biological data. Using quantum chemistry, molecular mechanics, and hints from recent genetics experiments, I show here that direct recognition between homologous dsDNA is possible through the formation of short quadruplexes due to direct complementary hydrogen bonding of major-groove surfaces in parallel alignment. The constraints imposed by the predicted structures of the recognition units determine the mechanism of complexation between long dsDNA. This mechanism and concomitant predictions agree with the available experimental data and shed light upon the sequence effects and the possible involvement of topoisomerase II in the recognition.

  3. Redesigning Aldolase Stereoselectivity by Homologous Grafting.

    PubMed

    Bisterfeld, Carolin; Classen, Thomas; Küberl, Irene; Henßen, Birgit; Metz, Alexander; Gohlke, Holger; Pietruszka, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    The 2-deoxy-d-ribose-5-phosphate aldolase (DERA) offers access to highly desirable building blocks for organic synthesis by catalyzing a stereoselective C-C bond formation between acetaldehyde and certain electrophilic aldehydes. DERA´s potential is particularly highlighted by the ability to catalyze sequential, highly enantioselective aldol reactions. However, its synthetic use is limited by the absence of an enantiocomplementary enzyme. Here, we introduce the concept of homologous grafting to identify stereoselectivity-determining amino acid positions in DERA. We identified such positions by structural analysis of the homologous aldolases 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate aldolase (KDPG) and the enantiocomplementary enzyme 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogalactonate aldolase (KDPGal). Mutation of these positions led to a slightly inversed enantiopreference of both aldolases to the same extent. By transferring these sequence motifs onto DERA we achieved the intended change in enantioselectivity. PMID:27327271

  4. Homologous Pairing between Long DNA Double Helices.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Alexey K

    2016-04-15

    Molecular recognition between two double stranded (ds) DNA with homologous sequences may not seem compatible with the B-DNA structure because the sequence information is hidden when it is used for joining the two strands. Nevertheless, it has to be invoked to account for various biological data. Using quantum chemistry, molecular mechanics, and hints from recent genetics experiments, I show here that direct recognition between homologous dsDNA is possible through the formation of short quadruplexes due to direct complementary hydrogen bonding of major-groove surfaces in parallel alignment. The constraints imposed by the predicted structures of the recognition units determine the mechanism of complexation between long dsDNA. This mechanism and concomitant predictions agree with the available experimental data and shed light upon the sequence effects and the possible involvement of topoisomerase II in the recognition. PMID:27127987

  5. Khovanov homology of graph-links

    SciTech Connect

    Nikonov, Igor M

    2012-08-31

    Graph-links arise as the intersection graphs of turning chord diagrams of links. Speaking informally, graph-links provide a combinatorial description of links up to mutations. Many link invariants can be reformulated in the language of graph-links. Khovanov homology, a well-known and useful knot invariant, is defined for graph-links in this paper (in the case of the ground field of characteristic two). Bibliography: 14 titles.

  6. Homology and phylogeny and their automated inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuellen, Georg

    2008-06-01

    The analysis of the ever-increasing amount of biological and biomedical data can be pushed forward by comparing the data within and among species. For example, an integrative analysis of data from the genome sequencing projects for various species traces the evolution of the genomes and identifies conserved and innovative parts. Here, I review the foundations and advantages of this “historical” approach and evaluate recent attempts at automating such analyses. Biological data is comparable if a common origin exists (homology), as is the case for members of a gene family originating via duplication of an ancestral gene. If the family has relatives in other species, we can assume that the ancestral gene was present in the ancestral species from which all the other species evolved. In particular, describing the relationships among the duplicated biological sequences found in the various species is often possible by a phylogeny, which is more informative than homology statements. Detecting and elaborating on common origins may answer how certain biological sequences developed, and predict what sequences are in a particular species and what their function is. Such knowledge transfer from sequences in one species to the homologous sequences of the other is based on the principle of ‘my closest relative looks and behaves like I do’, often referred to as ‘guilt by association’. To enable knowledge transfer on a large scale, several automated ‘phylogenomics pipelines’ have been developed in recent years, and seven of these will be described and compared. Overall, the examples in this review demonstrate that homology and phylogeny analyses, done on a large (and automated) scale, can give insights into function in biology and biomedicine.

  7. COMPASS server for remote homology inference.

    PubMed

    Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Tang, Ming; Kim, Bong-Hyun; Grishin, Nick V

    2007-07-01

    COMPASS is a method for homology detection and local alignment construction based on the comparison of multiple sequence alignments (MSAs). The method derives numerical profiles from given MSAs, constructs local profile-profile alignments and analytically estimates E-values for the detected similarities. Until now, COMPASS was only available for download and local installation. Here, we present a new web server featuring the latest version of COMPASS, which provides (i) increased sensitivity and selectivity of homology detection; (ii) longer, more complete alignments; and (iii) faster computational speed. After submission of the query MSA or single sequence, the server performs searches versus a user-specified database. The server includes detailed and intuitive control of the search parameters. A flexible output format, structured similarly to BLAST and PSI-BLAST, provides an easy way to read and analyze the detected profile similarities. Brief help sections are available for all input parameters and output options, along with detailed documentation. To illustrate the value of this tool for protein structure-functional prediction, we present two examples of detecting distant homologs for uncharacterized protein families. Available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/compass. PMID:17517780

  8. Recombineering homologous recombination constructs in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Carreira-Rosario, Arnaldo; Scoggin, Shane; Shalaby, Nevine A; Williams, Nathan David; Hiesinger, P Robin; Buszczak, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The continued development of techniques for fast, large-scale manipulation of endogenous gene loci will broaden the use of Drosophila melanogaster as a genetic model organism for human-disease related research. Recent years have seen technical advancements like homologous recombination and recombineering. However, generating unequivocal null mutations or tagging endogenous proteins remains a substantial effort for most genes. Here, we describe and demonstrate techniques for using recombineering-based cloning methods to generate vectors that can be used to target and manipulate endogenous loci in vivo. Specifically, we have established a combination of three technologies: (1) BAC transgenesis/recombineering, (2) ends-out homologous recombination and (3) Gateway technology to provide a robust, efficient and flexible method for manipulating endogenous genomic loci. In this protocol, we provide step-by-step details about how to (1) design individual vectors, (2) how to clone large fragments of genomic DNA into the homologous recombination vector using gap repair, and (3) how to replace or tag genes of interest within these vectors using a second round of recombineering. Finally, we will also provide a protocol for how to mobilize these cassettes in vivo to generate a knockout, or a tagged gene via knock-in. These methods can easily be adopted for multiple targets in parallel and provide a means for manipulating the Drosophila genome in a timely and efficient manner. PMID:23893070

  9. Weak homological dimensions and biflat Koethe algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Pirkovskii, A Yu

    2008-06-30

    The homological properties of metrizable Koethe algebras {lambda}(P) are studied. A criterion for an algebra A={lambda}(P) to be biflat in terms of the Koethe set P is obtained, which implies, in particular, that for such algebras the properties of being biprojective, biflat, and flat on the left are equivalent to the surjectivity of the multiplication operator A otimes-hat A{yields}A. The weak homological dimensions (the weak global dimension w.dg and the weak bidimension w.db) of biflat Koethe algebras are calculated. Namely, it is shown that the conditions w.db {lambda}(P)<=1 and w.dg {lambda}(P)<=1 are equivalent to the nuclearity of {lambda}(P); and if {lambda}(P) is non-nuclear, then w.dg {lambda}(P)=w.db {lambda}(P)=2. It is established that the nuclearity of a biflat Koethe algebra {lambda}(P), under certain additional conditions on the Koethe set P, implies the stronger estimate db {lambda}(P), where db is the (projective) bidimension. On the other hand, an example is constructed of a nuclear biflat Koethe algebra {lambda}(P) such that db {lambda}(P)=2 (while w.db {lambda}(P)=1). Finally, it is shown that many biflat Koethe algebras, while not being amenable, have trivial Hochschild homology groups in positive degrees (with arbitrary coefficients). Bibliography: 37 titles.

  10. Homologous Series of Liquid Crystalline Steroidal Lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Thiemann, T.; Vill, V.

    1997-03-01

    Steroids are an important source of chiral mesophases. The melting behavior and mesomorphic properties of homologous series of steroidal derivatives have been extracted from the literature, tabulated, and discussed. The tables provide the reader with an evaluated compilation of the type of mesophases found for the individual compounds, including their transition temperatures. Where the literature gives more than one set of data for a specific substance, one has been chosen as the main reference, but all alternatives are listed in the footnotes. The data can be used for statistical analysis to show the specific role of substructures within the steroidal framework. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital American Institute of Physics and American Chemical Society}

  11. Towards Alignment Independent Quantitative Assessment of Homology Detection

    PubMed Central

    Kliger, Yossef

    2006-01-01

    Identification of homologous proteins provides a basis for protein annotation. Sequence alignment tools reliably identify homologs sharing high sequence similarity. However, identification of homologs that share low sequence similarity remains a challenge. Lowering the cutoff value could enable the identification of diverged homologs, but also introduces numerous false hits. Methods are being continuously developed to minimize this problem. Estimation of the fraction of homologs in a set of protein alignments can help in the assessment and development of such methods, and provides the users with intuitive quantitative assessment of protein alignment results. Herein, we present a computational approach that estimates the amount of homologs in a set of protein pairs. The method requires a prevalent and detectable protein feature that is conserved between homologs. By analyzing the feature prevalence in a set of pairwise protein alignments, the method can estimate the number of homolog pairs in the set independently of the alignments' quality. Using the HomoloGene database as a standard of truth, we implemented this approach in a proteome-wide analysis. The results revealed that this approach, which is independent of the alignments themselves, works well for estimating the number of homologous proteins in a wide range of homology values. In summary, the presented method can accompany homology searches and method development, provides validation to search results, and allows tuning of tools and methods. PMID:17205117

  12. SANSparallel: interactive homology search against Uniprot.

    PubMed

    Somervuo, Panu; Holm, Liisa

    2015-07-01

    Proteins evolve by mutations and natural selection. The network of sequence similarities is a rich source for mining homologous relationships that inform on protein structure and function. There are many servers available to browse the network of homology relationships but one has to wait up to a minute for results. The SANSparallel webserver provides protein sequence database searches with immediate response and professional alignment visualization by third-party software. The output is a list, pairwise alignment or stacked alignment of sequence-similar proteins from Uniprot, UniRef90/50, Swissprot or Protein Data Bank. The stacked alignments are viewed in Jalview or as sequence logos. The database search uses the suffix array neighborhood search (SANS) method, which has been re-implemented as a client-server, improved and parallelized. The method is extremely fast and as sensitive as BLAST above 50% sequence identity. Benchmarks show that the method is highly competitive compared to previously published fast database search programs: UBLAST, DIAMOND, LAST, LAMBDA, RAPSEARCH2 and BLAT. The web server can be accessed interactively or programmatically at http://ekhidna2.biocenter.helsinki.fi/cgi-bin/sans/sans.cgi. It can be used to make protein functional annotation pipelines more efficient, and it is useful in interactive exploration of the detailed evidence supporting the annotation of particular proteins of interest. PMID:25855811

  13. Homology modelling of human P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Domicevica, Laura; Biggin, Philip C

    2015-10-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an ATP-binding cassette transporter that exports a huge range of compounds out of cells and is thus one of the key proteins in conferring multi-drug resistance in cancer. Understanding how it achieves such a broad specificity and the series of conformational changes that allow export to occur form major, on-going, research objectives around the world. Much of our knowledge to date has been derived from mutagenesis and assay data. However, in recent years, there has also been great progress in structural biology and although the structure of human P-gp has not yet been solved, there are now a handful of related structures on which homology models can be built to aid in the interpretation of the vast amount of experimental data that currently exists. Many models for P-gp have been built with this aim, but the situation is complicated by the apparent flexibility of the system and by the fact that although many potential templates exist, there is large variation in the conformational state in which they have been crystallized. In this review, we summarize how homology modelling has been used in the past, how models are typically selected and finally illustrate how MD simulations can be used as a means to give more confidence about models that have been generated via this approach. PMID:26517909

  14. SANSparallel: interactive homology search against Uniprot

    PubMed Central

    Somervuo, Panu; Holm, Liisa

    2015-01-01

    Proteins evolve by mutations and natural selection. The network of sequence similarities is a rich source for mining homologous relationships that inform on protein structure and function. There are many servers available to browse the network of homology relationships but one has to wait up to a minute for results. The SANSparallel webserver provides protein sequence database searches with immediate response and professional alignment visualization by third-party software. The output is a list, pairwise alignment or stacked alignment of sequence-similar proteins from Uniprot, UniRef90/50, Swissprot or Protein Data Bank. The stacked alignments are viewed in Jalview or as sequence logos. The database search uses the suffix array neighborhood search (SANS) method, which has been re-implemented as a client-server, improved and parallelized. The method is extremely fast and as sensitive as BLAST above 50% sequence identity. Benchmarks show that the method is highly competitive compared to previously published fast database search programs: UBLAST, DIAMOND, LAST, LAMBDA, RAPSEARCH2 and BLAT. The web server can be accessed interactively or programmatically at http://ekhidna2.biocenter.helsinki.fi/cgi-bin/sans/sans.cgi. It can be used to make protein functional annotation pipelines more efficient, and it is useful in interactive exploration of the detailed evidence supporting the annotation of particular proteins of interest. PMID:25855811

  15. Towards Scalable Optimal Sequence Homology Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, Jeffrey A.; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Kalyanaraman, Anantharaman

    2012-12-26

    Abstract—The field of bioinformatics and computational biol- ogy is experiencing a data revolution — experimental techniques to procure data have increased in throughput, improved in accuracy and reduced in costs. This has spurred an array of high profile sequencing and data generation projects. While the data repositories represent untapped reservoirs of rich information critical for scientific breakthroughs, the analytical software tools that are needed to analyze large volumes of such sequence data have significantly lagged behind in their capacity to scale. In this paper, we address homology detection, which is a funda- mental problem in large-scale sequence analysis with numerous applications. We present a scalable framework to conduct large- scale optimal homology detection on massively parallel super- computing platforms. Our approach employs distributed memory work stealing to effectively parallelize optimal pairwise alignment computation tasks. Results on 120,000 cores of the Hopper Cray XE6 supercomputer demonstrate strong scaling and up to 2.42 × 107 optimal pairwise sequence alignments computed per second (PSAPS), the highest reported in the literature.

  16. Homologous Recombination—Experimental Systems, Analysis and Significance

    PubMed Central

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination is the most complex of all recombination events that shape genomes and produce material for evolution. Homologous recombination events are exchanges between DNA molecules in the lengthy regions of shared identity, catalyzed by a group of dedicated enzymes. There is a variety of experimental systems in E. coli and Salmonella to detect homologous recombination events of several different kinds. Genetic analysis of homologous recombination reveals three separate phases of this process: pre-synapsis (the early phase), synapsis (homologous strand exchange) and post-synapsis (the late phase). In E. coli, there are at least two independent pathway of the early phase and at least two independent pathways of the late phase. All this complexity is incongruent with the originally ascribed role of homologous recombination as accelerator of genome evolution: there is simply not enough duplication and repetition in enterobacterial genomes for homologous recombination to have a detectable evolutionary role, and therefore not enough selection to maintain such a complexity. At the same time, the mechanisms of homologous recombination are uniquely suited for repair of complex DNA lesions called chromosomal lesions. In fact, the two major classes of chromosomal lesions are recognized and processed by the two individual pathways at the early phase of homologous recombination. It follows, therefore, that homologous recombination events are occasional reflections of the continual recombinational repair, made possible in cases of natural or artificial genome redundancy. PMID:26442506

  17. Homologies among Coniferophyte cones: further observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grauvogel-Stamm, Léa; Galtier, Jean

    1998-04-01

    A reinvestigation of the Triassic conifer pollen cone of Darneya shows evidence that clusters of pollen sacs are attached (adnate), at regular intervals, to the upper side of the stalk and that the distribution of stomata is restricted to the apical part of the abaxial side of the peltate scale. These features and others, such as the commissure visible on the stalk and the scale, suggest a dual nature of the male scale complex of Darneya which therefore is interpreted as an abaxial bract fused with an adaxial fertile shoot bearing several clusters of pollen sacs. This conifer pollen cone is thus considered as a compound strobilus (inflorescence) homologous with the female cone of the conifers and therefore with the cones, both male and female, of the cordaites.

  18. HOMOLOGOUS CYCLONES IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xinting; Zhang, Jun; Li, Ting; Zhang, Yuzong; Yang, Shuhong E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn E-mail: yuzong@nao.cas.cn

    2014-02-20

    Through observations with the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, we tracked one rotating network magnetic field (RNF) near the solar equator. It lasted for more than 100 hr, from 2013 February 23 to 28. During its evolution, three cyclones were found to be rooted in this structure. Each cyclone event lasted for about 8 to 10 hr. While near the polar region, another RNF was investigated. It lasted for a shorter time (∼70 hr), from 2013 July 7 to 9. There were two cyclones rooted in the RNF and each lasted for 8 and 11 hr, respectively. For the two given examples, the cyclones have a similar dynamic evolution, and thus we put forward a new term: homologous cyclones. The detected brightening in AIA 171 Å maps indicates the release of energy, which is potentially available to heat the corona.

  19. Chatter detection in turning using persistent homology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasawneh, Firas A.; Munch, Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a new approach for ascertaining the stability of stochastic dynamical systems in their parameter space by examining their time series using topological data analysis (TDA). We illustrate the approach using a nonlinear delayed model that describes the tool oscillations due to self-excited vibrations in turning. Each time series is generated using the Euler-Maruyama method and a corresponding point cloud is obtained using the Takens embedding. The point cloud can then be analyzed using a tool from TDA known as persistent homology. The results of this study show that the described approach can be used for analyzing datasets of delay dynamical systems generated both from numerical simulation and experimental data. The contributions of this paper include presenting for the first time a topological approach for investigating the stability of a class of nonlinear stochastic delay equations, and introducing a new application of TDA to machining processes.

  20. CIRCULAR RIBBON FLARES AND HOMOLOGOUS JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Haimin; Liu Chang

    2012-12-01

    Solar flare emissions in the chromosphere often appear as elongated ribbons on both sides of the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL), which has been regarded as evidence of a typical configuration of magnetic reconnection. However, flares having a circular ribbon have rarely been reported, although it is expected in the fan-spine magnetic topology involving reconnection at a three-dimensional (3D) coronal null point. We present five circular ribbon flares with associated surges, using high-resolution and high-cadence H{alpha} blue wing observations obtained from the recently digitized films of Big Bear Solar Observatory. In all the events, a central parasitic magnetic field is encompassed by the opposite polarity, forming a circular PIL traced by filament material. Consequently, a flare kernel at the center is surrounded by a circular flare ribbon. The four homologous jet-related flares on 1991 March 17 and 18 are of particular interest, as (1) the circular ribbons brighten sequentially, with cospatial surges, rather than simultaneously, (2) the central flare kernels show an intriguing 'round-trip' motion and become elongated, and (3) remote brightenings occur at a region with the same magnetic polarity as the central parasitic field and are co-temporal with a separate phase of flare emissions. In another flare on 1991 February 25, the circular flare emission and surge activity occur successively, and the event could be associated with magnetic flux cancellation across the circular PIL. We discuss the implications of these observations combining circular flare ribbons, homologous jets, and remote brightenings for understanding the dynamics of 3D magnetic restructuring.

  1. Modeling Non-homologous End Joining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Yongfeng

    2013-01-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is the dominant DNA double strand break (DSB) repair pathway and involves several NHEJ proteins such as Ku, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4, Ligase IV and so on. Once DSBs are generated, Ku is first recruited to the DNA end, followed by other NHEJ proteins for DNA end processing and ligation. Because of the direct ligation of break ends without the need for a homologous template, NHEJ turns out to be an error-prone but efficient repair pathway. Some mechanisms have been proposed of how the efficiency of NHEJ repair is affected. The type of DNA damage is an important factor of NHEJ repair. For instance, the length of DNA fragment may determine the recruitment efficiency of NHEJ protein such as Ku [1], or the complexity of the DNA breaks [2] is accounted for the choice of NHEJ proteins and subpathway of NHEJ repair. On the other hand, the chromatin structure also plays a role of the accessibility of NHEJ protein to the DNA damage site. In this talk, some mathematical models of NHEJ, that consist of series of biochemical reactions complying with the laws of chemical reaction (e.g. mass action, etc.), will be introduced. By mathematical and numerical analysis and parameter estimation, the models are able to capture the qualitative biological features and show good agreement with experimental data. As conclusions, from the viewpoint of modeling, how the NHEJ proteins are recruited will be first discussed for connection between the classical sequential model [4] and recently proposed two-phase model [5]. Then how the NHEJ repair pathway is affected, by the length of DNA fragment [6], the complexity of DNA damage [7] and the chromatin structure [8], will be addressed

  2. Teleman localization of Hochschild homology in a singular setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasselet, J.-P.; Legrand, A.

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to generalize the Hochschild-Kostant-Rosenberg theorem to the case of singular varieties, more precisely, to manifolds with boundary and to varieties with isolated singularities. In these situations, we define suitable algebras of functions and study the localization of the corresponding Hochschild homology. The tool we use is the Teleman localization process. In the case of isolated singularities, the closed Hochschild homology corresponds to the intersection complex which relates the objects defined here to intersection homology.

  3. [Homologous recombination among bacterial genomes: the measurement and identification].

    PubMed

    Xianwei, Yang; Ruifu, Yang; Yujun, Cui

    2016-02-01

    Homologous recombination is one of important sources in shaping the bacterial population diversity, which disrupts the clonal relationship among different lineages through horizontal transferring of DNA-segments. As consequence of blurring the vertical inheritance signals, the homologous recombination raises difficulties in phylogenetic analysis and reconstruction of population structure. Here we discuss the impacts of homologous recombination in inferring phylogenetic relationship among bacterial isolates, and summarize the tools and models separately used in recombination measurement and identification. We also highlight the merits and drawbacks of various approaches, aiming to assist in the practical application for the analysis of homologous recombination in bacterial evolution research. PMID:26907777

  4. GLSM's, gerbes, and Kuznetsov's homological projective duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Eric

    2013-12-01

    In this short note we give an overview of recent work on string propagation on stacks and applications to gauged linear sigma models. We begin by outlining noneffective orbifolds (orbifolds in which a subgroup acts trivially) and related phenomena in two-dimensional gauge theories, which realize string propagation on gerbes. We then discuss the 'decomposition conjecture,' equating conformal field theories of strings on gerbes and strings on disjoint unions of spaces. Finally, we apply these ideas to gauged linear sigma models for complete intersections of quadrics, and use the decomposition conjecture to show that the Landau-Ginzburg points of those models have a geometric interpretation in terms of a (sometimes noncommutative resolution of) a branched double cover, realized via nonperturbative effects rather than as the vanishing locus of a superpotential. These examples violate old unproven lore on GLSM's (namely, that geometric phases must be related by birational transformations), and we conclude by observing that in these examples (and conjecturing more generally in GLSM's), the phases are instead related by Kuznetsov's 'homological projective duality.'

  5. Homologous recombination deficiency and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Ledermann, Jonathan A; Drew, Yvette; Kristeleit, Rebecca S

    2016-06-01

    The discovery that PARP inhibitors block an essential pathway of DNA repair in cells harbouring a BRCA mutation has opened up a new therapeutic avenue for high-grade ovarian cancers. BRCA1 and BRCA2 proteins are essential for high-fidelity repair of double-strand breaks of DNA through the homologous recombination repair (HRR) pathway. Deficiency in HRR (HRD) is a target for PARP inhibitors. The first PARP inhibitor, olaparib, has now been licensed for BRCA-mutated ovarian cancers. While mutated BRCA genes are individually most commonly associated with HRD other essential HRR proteins may be mutated or functionally deficient potentially widening the therapeutic opportunities for PARP inhibitors. HRD is the first phenotypically defined predictive marker for therapy with PARP inhibitors in ovarian cancer. Several different PARP inhibitors are being trialled in ovarian cancer and this class of drugs has been shown to be a new selective therapy for high-grade ovarian cancer. Around 20% of high-grade serous ovarian cancers harbour germline or somatic BRCA mutations and testing for BRCA mutations should be incorporated into routine clinical practice. The expanded use of PARP inhibitors in HRD deficient (non-BRCA mutant) tumours using a signature of HRD in clinical practice requires validation. PMID:27065456

  6. CBH1 homologs and varian CBH1 cellulase

    SciTech Connect

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Neefe, Paulien

    2014-07-01

    Disclosed are a number of homologs and variants of Hypocrea jecorina Cel7A (formerly Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I or CBH1), nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The homologs and variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted and/or deleted.

  7. CBH1 homologs and variant CBH1 cellulases

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Neefe, Paulien

    2011-05-31

    Disclosed are a number of homologs and variants of Hypocrea jecorina Cel7A (formerly Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I or CBH1), nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The homologs and variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted and/or deleted.

  8. CBH1 homologs and variant CBH1 cellulases

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Neefe, Paulien

    2008-11-18

    Disclosed are a number of homologs and variants of Hypocrea jecorina Cel7A (formerly Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I or CBH1), nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The homologs and variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted and/or deleted.

  9. Flare build-up study - Homologous flares group. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martres, M.-J.; Mein, N.; Mouradian, Z.; Rayrole, J.; Schmieder, B.; Simon, G.; Soru-Escaut, I.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1984-01-01

    Solar Maximum Mission observations have been used to study the origin and amount of energy, mechanism of storage and release, and conditions for the occurrence of solar flares, and some results of these studies as they pertain to homologous flares are briefly discussed. It was found that every set of flares produced 'rafales' of homologous flares, i.e., two, three, four, or more flares separated in time by an hour or less. No great changes in macroscopic photospheric patterns were observed during these flaring periods. A quantitative brightness parameter of the relation between homologous flares is defined. Scale changes detected in the dynamic spectrum of flare sites are in good agreement with a theoretical suggestion by Sturrock. Statistical results for different homologous flare active regions show the existence in homologous flaring areas of a 'pivot' of previous filaments interpreted as a signature of an anomaly in the solar rotation.

  10. Homology modelling and spectroscopy, a never-ending love story.

    PubMed

    Venselaar, Hanka; Joosten, Robbie P; Vroling, Bas; Baakman, Coos A B; Hekkelman, Maarten L; Krieger, Elmar; Vriend, Gert

    2010-03-01

    Homology modelling is normally the technique of choice when experimental structure data are not available but three-dimensional coordinates are needed, for example, to aid with detailed interpretation of results of spectroscopic studies. Herein, the state of the art of homology modelling will be described in the light of a series of recent developments, and an overview will be given of the problems and opportunities encountered in this field. The major topic, the accuracy and precision of homology models, will be discussed extensively due to its influence on the reliability of conclusions drawn from the combination of homology models and spectroscopic data. Three real-world examples will illustrate how both homology modelling and spectroscopy can be beneficial for (bio)medical research. PMID:19718498

  11. Multiple overlapping homologies between two rheumatoid antigens and immunosuppressive viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Douvas, A; Sobelman, S

    1991-01-01

    Amino acid (aa) sequence homologies between viruses and autoimmune nuclear antigens are suggestive of viral involvement in disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and scleroderma. We analyzed the frequency of exact homologies of greater than or equal to 5 aa between 61 viral proteins (19,827 aa), 8 nuclear antigens (3813 aa), and 41 control proteins (11,743 aa). Both pentamer and hexamer homologies between control proteins and viruses are unexpectedly abundant, with hexamer matches occurring in 1 of 3 control proteins (or once every 769 aa). However, 2 nuclear antigens, the SLE-associated 70-kDa antigen and the scleroderma-associated CENP-B protein, are highly unusual in containing multiple homologies to a group of synergizing immunosuppressive viruses. Two viruses, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1), contain sequences exactly duplicated at 15 sites in the 70-kDa antigen and at 10 sites in CENP-B protein. The immediate-early (IE) protein of HSV-1, which activates HIV-1 regulatory functions, contains three homologies to the 70-kDa antigen (two hexamers and a pentamer) and two to CENP-B (a hexamer and pentamer). There are four homologies (including a hexamer) common to the 70-kDa antigen and Epstein-Barr virus, and three homologies (including two hexamers) common to CENP-B and cytomegalovirus. The majority of homologies in both nuclear antigens are clustered in highly charged C-terminal domains containing epitopes for human autoantibodies. Furthermore, most homologies have a contiguous or overlapping distribution, thereby creating a high density of potential epitopes. In addition to the exact homologies tabulated, motifs of matching sequences are repeated frequently in these domains. Our analysis suggests that coexpression of heterologous viruses having common immunosuppressive functions may generate autoantibodies cross-reacting with certain nuclear proteins. PMID:1712488

  12. Peridinialean dinoflagellate plate patterns, labels and homologies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Tabulation patterns for peridinialean dinoflagellate thecae and cysts have been traditionally expressed using a plate labelling system described by C.A. Kofoid in the early 1900's. This system can obscure dinoflagellate plate homologies and has not always been strictly applied. The plate-labelling system presented here introduces new series labels but incorporates key features and ideas from the more recently proposed systems of G.L. Eaton and F.J.R. Taylor, as modified by W.R. Evitt. Plate-series recognition begins with the cingulum (C-series) and proceeds from the cingulum toward the apex for the three series of the epitheca/epicyst and proceeds from the cingulum toward the antapex for the two series of the hypotheca/hypocyst. The epithecal/epicystal model consists of eight plates that touch the anterior margin of the cingulum (E-series: plates E1-E7, ES), seven plates toward the apex that touch the E-series plates (M-series: R, M1-M6), and up to seven plates near the apex that do not touch E-series plates (D-series: Dp-Dv). The hypothecal/hypocystal model consists of eight plates that touch the posterior margin of the cingulum (H-series: H1-H6,HR,HS) and three plates toward the antapex (T1-T3). Epithecal/epicystal tabulation patterns come in both 8- and 7- models, corresponding to eight and seven plates, respectively, in the E-series. Hypothecal/hypocystal tabulation patterns also come in both 8- and 7-models, corresponding to eight and seven plates, respectively, in the H-series. By convention, the 7-model epitheca/epicyst has no plates E1 and M1; the 7-model hypotheca/hypocyst has no plate H6. Within an 8-model or 7-model, the system emphasizes plates that are presumed to be homologous by giving them identical labels. I introduce the adjectives "monothigmate", "dithigmate," and "trithigmate" to designate plates touching one, two, and three plates, respectively, of the adjacent series. The term "thigmation" applies to the analysis of plate contacts between

  13. The history of the homology concept and the "Phylogenetisches Symposium".

    PubMed

    Hossfeld, Uwe; Olsson, Lennart

    2005-11-01

    The homology concept has had a long and varied history, starting out as a geometrical term in ancient Greece. Here we describe briefly how a typological use of homology to designate organs and body parts in the same position anatomically in different organisms was changed by Darwin's theory of evolution into a phylogenetic concept. We try to indicate the diversity of opinions on how to define and test for homology that has prevailed historically, before the important books by Hennig (1950. Grundzüge einer Theorie der Phylogenetischen Systematik. Deutscher Zentralverlag, Berlin) and Remane (1952. Die Grundlagen des Natürlichen Systems, der Vergleichenden Anatomie und der Phylogenetik. Geest & Portig, Leipzig) brought more rigor into both the debate on homology and into the usage of the term homology among systematists. Homology as a theme has recurred repeatedly throughout the history of the "Phylogenetisches Symposium" and we give a very brief overview of the different aspects of homology that have been discussed at specific symposia over the last 48 years. We also honour the fact that the 2004 symposium was held in Jena by pointing to the roles played by biologists active in Jena, such as Ernst Haeckel and Carl Gegenbaur, in starting the development towards a homology concept concordant with an evolutionary world view. As historians of biology, we emphasize the importance of major treatises on homology and its history that may be little read by systematists active today, and have sometimes also received less attention by historians of biology than they deserve. Prominent among these are the works of Dietrich Starck, who also happened to be both a student, and later a benefactor, of systematics at Jena University. PMID:17046358

  14. Benchmarking the next generation of homology inference tools

    PubMed Central

    Saripella, Ganapathi Varma; Sonnhammer, Erik L. L.; Forslund, Kristoffer

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Over the last decades, vast numbers of sequences were deposited in public databases. Bioinformatics tools allow homology and consequently functional inference for these sequences. New profile-based homology search tools have been introduced, allowing reliable detection of remote homologs, but have not been systematically benchmarked. To provide such a comparison, which can guide bioinformatics workflows, we extend and apply our previously developed benchmark approach to evaluate the ‘next generation’ of profile-based approaches, including CS-BLAST, HHSEARCH and PHMMER, in comparison with the non-profile based search tools NCBI-BLAST, USEARCH, UBLAST and FASTA. Method: We generated challenging benchmark datasets based on protein domain architectures within either the PFAM + Clan, SCOP/Superfamily or CATH/Gene3D domain definition schemes. From each dataset, homologous and non-homologous protein pairs were aligned using each tool, and standard performance metrics calculated. We further measured congruence of domain architecture assignments in the three domain databases. Results: CSBLAST and PHMMER had overall highest accuracy. FASTA, UBLAST and USEARCH showed large trade-offs of accuracy for speed optimization. Conclusion: Profile methods are superior at inferring remote homologs but the difference in accuracy between methods is relatively small. PHMMER and CSBLAST stand out with the highest accuracy, yet still at a reasonable computational cost. Additionally, we show that less than 0.1% of Swiss-Prot protein pairs considered homologous by one database are considered non-homologous by another, implying that these classifications represent equivalent underlying biological phenomena, differing mostly in coverage and granularity. Availability and Implementation: Benchmark datasets and all scripts are placed at (http://sonnhammer.org/download/Homology_benchmark). Contact: forslund@embl.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at

  15. Homology Groups of High-Resolution Temporal Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vásquez Aguilar, R.; Carsteanu, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Using high-resolution temporal rainfall intensities from Iowa City, IA (IIHR, U of Iowa), we perform an analysis of the homology groups generated by data connectivity in state space, and attempt a qualitative interpretation of the first and second homology groups. Let us note that homology groups are generated, in the context of topological data analysis (TDA), by representing the data in n-dimensional state space and building a connectivity diagram according to the respective distances between the data points. Subsequently, the topological invariants of the resulting connected structures are being analyzed.

  16. HOMOLOGY, CORRESPONDENCE, AND CONTINUITY ACROSS DEVELOPMENT: THE CASE OF SLEEP

    PubMed Central

    Blumberg, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    The developmental relations among different behaviors can take many forms. At one extreme, two behaviors emerge independently of one another and, at the other extreme, the emergence of one behavior depends on the prior emergence of the other. Whether the two behaviors in the latter case should be designated as developmentally homologous is explored in this essay by reviewing differing approaches to conceptualizing the development of sleep. It is argued that whereas the concept of developmental homology may offer little new to the understanding of sleep development, the conventional notion of evolutionary homology remains to be fully exploited. Identifying homologous sleep processes will benefit from the adoption of a developmental comparative approach that emphasizes real-time sleep dynamics and individual sleep components. Because evolution occurs through the modification of developmental processes, a new commitment to a developmental comparative approach to sleep is a necessary next step toward a better understanding of its evolution. PMID:22711221

  17. Homologous gene targeting in Caenorhabditis elegans by biolistic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Berezikov, Eugene; Bargmann, Cornelia I.; Plasterk, Ronald H. A.

    2004-01-01

    Targeted homologous recombination is a powerful approach for genome manipulation that is widely used for gene alteration and knockouts in mouse and yeast. In Caenorhabditis elegans, several methods of target-selected mutagenesis have been implemented but none of them provides the opportunity of introducing exact predefined changes into the genome. Although anecdotal cases of homologous gene targeting in C.elegans have been reported, no practical technique of gene targeting has been developed so far. In this work we demonstrate that transformation of C.elegans by microparticle bombardment (biolistic transformation) can result in homologous recombination between introduced DNA and the chromosomal locus. We describe a scaled up version of biolistic transformation that can be used as a method for homologous gene targeting in the worm. PMID:14982959

  18. Worst case estimation of homology design by convex analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshikawa, N.; Elishakoff, Isaac; Nakagiri, S.

    1998-01-01

    The methodology of homology design is investigated for optimum design of advanced structures. for which the achievement of delicate tasks by the aid of active control system is demanded. The proposed formulation of homology design, based on the finite element sensitivity analysis, necessarily requires the specification of external loadings. The formulation to evaluate the worst case for homology design caused by uncertain fluctuation of loadings is presented by means of the convex model of uncertainty, in which uncertainty variables are assigned to discretized nodal forces and are confined within a conceivable convex hull given as a hyperellipse. The worst case of the distortion from objective homologous deformation is estimated by the Lagrange multiplier method searching the point to maximize the error index on the boundary of the convex hull. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated in a numerical example using the eleven-bar truss structure.

  19. Homological properties of rings of functional-analytic type.

    PubMed Central

    Wodzicki, M

    1990-01-01

    Strong flatness properties are established for a large class of functional-analytic rings including all C*-algebras. This is later used to prove that all those rings satisfy excision in Hochschild and in cyclic homology over almost arbitrary rings of coefficients and that, for stable C*-algebras, the Hochschild and cyclic homology groups defined over an arbitrary coefficient ring k subset C of complex numbers (e.g., k = Z or Q) vanish in all dimensions. PMID:11607088

  20. MRFalign: protein homology detection through alignment of Markov random fields.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianzhu; Wang, Sheng; Wang, Zhiyong; Xu, Jinbo

    2014-03-01

    Sequence-based protein homology detection has been extensively studied and so far the most sensitive method is based upon comparison of protein sequence profiles, which are derived from multiple sequence alignment (MSA) of sequence homologs in a protein family. A sequence profile is usually represented as a position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM) or an HMM (Hidden Markov Model) and accordingly PSSM-PSSM or HMM-HMM comparison is used for homolog detection. This paper presents a new homology detection method MRFalign, consisting of three key components: 1) a Markov Random Fields (MRF) representation of a protein family; 2) a scoring function measuring similarity of two MRFs; and 3) an efficient ADMM (Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers) algorithm aligning two MRFs. Compared to HMM that can only model very short-range residue correlation, MRFs can model long-range residue interaction pattern and thus, encode information for the global 3D structure of a protein family. Consequently, MRF-MRF comparison for remote homology detection shall be much more sensitive than HMM-HMM or PSSM-PSSM comparison. Experiments confirm that MRFalign outperforms several popular HMM or PSSM-based methods in terms of both alignment accuracy and remote homology detection and that MRFalign works particularly well for mainly beta proteins. For example, tested on the benchmark SCOP40 (8353 proteins) for homology detection, PSSM-PSSM and HMM-HMM succeed on 48% and 52% of proteins, respectively, at superfamily level, and on 15% and 27% of proteins, respectively, at fold level. In contrast, MRFalign succeeds on 57.3% and 42.5% of proteins at superfamily and fold level, respectively. This study implies that long-range residue interaction patterns are very helpful for sequence-based homology detection. The software is available for download at http://raptorx.uchicago.edu/download/. A summary of this paper appears in the proceedings of the RECOMB 2014 conference, April 2-5. PMID:24675572

  1. Metagenomic gene annotation by a homology-independent approach

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, Jeff; Zhang, Tao; Salmeen, Annette; Hess, Matthias; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Wang, Zhong; Du, Changbin

    2011-06-02

    Fully understanding the genetic potential of a microbial community requires functional annotation of all the genes it encodes. The recently developed deep metagenome sequencing approach has enabled rapid identification of millions of genes from a complex microbial community without cultivation. Current homology-based gene annotation fails to detect distantly-related or structural homologs. Furthermore, homology searches with millions of genes are very computational intensive. To overcome these limitations, we developed rhModeller, a homology-independent software pipeline to efficiently annotate genes from metagenomic sequencing projects. Using cellulases and carbonic anhydrases as two independent test cases, we demonstrated that rhModeller is much faster than HMMER but with comparable accuracy, at 94.5percent and 99.9percent accuracy, respectively. More importantly, rhModeller has the ability to detect novel proteins that do not share significant homology to any known protein families. As {approx}50percent of the 2 million genes derived from the cow rumen metagenome failed to be annotated based on sequence homology, we tested whether rhModeller could be used to annotate these genes. Preliminary results suggest that rhModeller is robust in the presence of missense and frameshift mutations, two common errors in metagenomic genes. Applying the pipeline to the cow rumen genes identified 4,990 novel cellulases candidates and 8,196 novel carbonic anhydrase candidates.In summary, we expect rhModeller to dramatically increase the speed and quality of metagnomic gene annotation.

  2. Enhancing radiotherapy through a greater understanding of homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Christopher A.; Powell, Simon N.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy for the treatment of cancer can cause a wide range of cellular effects, the most biologically potent of which is the double strand break in DNA. The process of repairing DNA double strand breaks involves one of two major mechanisms: non-homologous end-joining or homologous recombination. In this review, we review the molecular mechanisms of homologous recombination, in particular as it relates to the repair of DNA damage from ionizing radiation. We also present specific situations where homologous recombination may be dysfunctional in human cancers, and how this functional abnormality can be recognized. We also discuss the therapeutic opportunities that can be exploited based on deficiencies in homologous recombination at various steps in the DNA repair pathway. Side-by-side with these potential therapeutic opportunities, we review the contemporary clinical trials in which strategies to exploit these defects in homologous recombination can be enhanced by the use of radiotherapy in conjunction with biologically-targeted agents. We conclude that the field of radiation oncology has only scratched the surface of a potentially highly efficacious therapeutic strategy. PMID:20832019

  3. Multiscale analysis of nonlinear systems using computational homology

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantin Mischaikow; Michael Schatz; William Kalies; Thomas Wanner

    2010-05-24

    This is a collaborative project between the principal investigators. However, as is to be expected, different PIs have greater focus on different aspects of the project. This report lists these major directions of research which were pursued during the funding period: (1) Computational Homology in Fluids - For the computational homology effort in thermal convection, the focus of the work during the first two years of the funding period included: (1) A clear demonstration that homology can sensitively detect the presence or absence of an important flow symmetry, (2) An investigation of homology as a probe for flow dynamics, and (3) The construction of a new convection apparatus for probing the effects of large-aspect-ratio. (2) Computational Homology in Cardiac Dynamics - We have initiated an effort to test the use of homology in characterizing data from both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations of arrhythmia in the heart. Recently, the use of high speed, high sensitivity digital imaging in conjunction with voltage sensitive fluorescent dyes has enabled researchers to visualize electrical activity on the surface of cardiac tissue, both in vitro and in vivo. (3) Magnetohydrodynamics - A new research direction is to use computational homology to analyze results of large scale simulations of 2D turbulence in the presence of magnetic fields. Such simulations are relevant to the dynamics of black hole accretion disks. The complex flow patterns from simulations exhibit strong qualitative changes as a function of magnetic field strength. Efforts to characterize the pattern changes using Fourier methods and wavelet analysis have been unsuccessful. (4) Granular Flow - two experts in the area of granular media are studying 2D model experiments of earthquake dynamics where the stress fields can be measured; these stress fields from complex patterns of 'force chains' that may be amenable to analysis using computational homology. (5) Microstructure Characterization

  4. Multiscale analysis of nonlinear systems using computational homology

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantin Mischaikow, Rutgers University /Georgia Institute of Technology, Michael Schatz, Georgia Institute of Technology, William Kalies, Florida Atlantic University, Thomas Wanner,George Mason University

    2010-05-19

    This is a collaborative project between the principal investigators. However, as is to be expected, different PIs have greater focus on different aspects of the project. This report lists these major directions of research which were pursued during the funding period: (1) Computational Homology in Fluids - For the computational homology effort in thermal convection, the focus of the work during the first two years of the funding period included: (1) A clear demonstration that homology can sensitively detect the presence or absence of an important flow symmetry, (2) An investigation of homology as a probe for flow dynamics, and (3) The construction of a new convection apparatus for probing the effects of large-aspect-ratio. (2) Computational Homology in Cardiac Dynamics - We have initiated an effort to test the use of homology in characterizing data from both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations of arrhythmia in the heart. Recently, the use of high speed, high sensitivity digital imaging in conjunction with voltage sensitive fluorescent dyes has enabled researchers to visualize electrical activity on the surface of cardiac tissue, both in vitro and in vivo. (3) Magnetohydrodynamics - A new research direction is to use computational homology to analyze results of large scale simulations of 2D turbulence in the presence of magnetic fields. Such simulations are relevant to the dynamics of black hole accretion disks. The complex flow patterns from simulations exhibit strong qualitative changes as a function of magnetic field strength. Efforts to characterize the pattern changes using Fourier methods and wavelet analysis have been unsuccessful. (4) Granular Flow - two experts in the area of granular media are studying 2D model experiments of earthquake dynamics where the stress fields can be measured; these stress fields from complex patterns of 'force chains' that may be amenable to analysis using computational homology. (5) Microstructure Characterization

  5. Tocopherol and tocotrienol homologs in parenteral lipid emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhidong; Harvey, Kevin A; Pavlina, Thomas M; Zaloga, Gary P; Siddiqui, Rafat A

    2015-01-01

    Parenteral lipid emulsions, which are made of oils from plant and fish sources, contain different types of tocopherols and tocotrienols (vitamin E homologs). The amount and types of vitamin E homologs in various lipid emulsions vary considerably and are not completely known. The objective of this analysis was to develop a quantitative method to determine levels of all vitamin E homologs in various lipid emulsions. An HPLC system was used to measure vitamin E homologs using a Pinnacle DB Silica normal phase column and an isocratic, n-hexane:1,4 dioxane (98:2) mobile phase. An optimized protocol was used to report vitamin E homolog concentrations in soybean oil-based (Intralipid®, Ivelip®, Lipofundin® N, Liposyn® III, and Liposyn® II), medium- and long-chain fatty acid-based (Lipofundin®, MCT and Structolipid®), olive oil-based (ClinOleic®), and fish oil-based (Omegaven®) and mixture of these oils-based (SMOFlipid®, Lipidem®) commercial parenteral lipid emulsions. Total content of all vitamin E homologs varied greatly between different emulsions, ranging from 57.9 to 383.9 µg/mL. Tocopherols (α, β, γ, δ) were the predominant vitamin E homologs for all emulsions, with tocotrienol content < 0.3%. In all of the soybean emulsions, except for Lipofundin® N, the predominant vitamin E homolog was γ-tocopherol, which ranged from 57–156 µg/mL. ClinOleic® predominantly contained α-tocopherol (32 µg/mL), whereas α-tocopherol content in Omegaven® was higher than most of the other lipid emulsions (230 µg/mL). Practical applications The information on the types and quantity of vitamin E homologs in various lipid emulsions will be extremely useful to physicians and healthcare personnel in selecting appropriate lipid emulsions that are exclusively used in patients with inadequate gastrointestinal function, including hospitalized and critically ill patients. Some emulsions may require vitamin E supplementation in order to meet minimal human requirements

  6. RPA homologs and ssDNA processing during meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Jonathan; Abby, Emilie; Livera, Gabriel; Martini, Emmanuelle

    2016-06-01

    Meiotic homologous recombination is a specialized process that involves homologous chromosome pairing and strand exchange to guarantee proper chromosome segregation and genetic diversity. The formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during meiotic recombination differs from those during mitotic recombination in that the homologous chromosome rather than the sister chromatid is the preferred repair template. The processing of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) formed on intermediate recombination structures is central to driving the specific outcomes of DSB repair during meiosis. Replication protein A (RPA) is the main ssDNA-binding protein complex involved in DNA metabolism. However, the existence of RPA orthologs in plants and the recent discovery of meiosis specific with OB domains (MEIOB), a widely conserved meiosis-specific RPA1 paralog, strongly suggest that multiple RPA complexes evolved and specialized to subdivide their roles during DNA metabolism. Here we review ssDNA formation and maturation during mitotic and meiotic recombination underlying the meiotic specific features. We describe and discuss the existence and properties of MEIOB and multiple RPA subunits in plants and highlight how they can provide meiosis-specific fates to ssDNA processing during homologous recombination. Understanding the functions of these RPA homologs and how they interact with the canonical RPA subunits is of major interest in the fields of meiosis and DNA repair. PMID:26520106

  7. Fold homology detection using sequence fragment composition profiles of proteins.

    PubMed

    Solis, Armando D; Rackovsky, Shalom R

    2010-10-01

    The effectiveness of sequence alignment in detecting structural homology among protein sequences decreases markedly when pairwise sequence identity is low (the so-called "twilight zone" problem of sequence alignment). Alternative sequence comparison strategies able to detect structural kinship among highly divergent sequences are necessary to address this need. Among them are alignment-free methods, which use global sequence properties (such as amino acid composition) to identify structural homology in a rapid and straightforward way. We explore the viability of using tetramer sequence fragment composition profiles in finding structural relationships that lie undetected by traditional alignment. We establish a strategy to recast any given protein sequence into a tetramer sequence fragment composition profile, using a series of amino acid clustering steps that have been optimized for mutual information. Our method has the effect of compressing the set of 160,000 unique tetramers (if using the 20-letter amino acid alphabet) into a more tractable number of reduced tetramers (approximately 15-30), so that a meaningful tetramer composition profile can be constructed. We test remote homology detection at the topology and fold superfamily levels using a comprehensive set of fold homologs, culled from the CATH database that share low pairwise sequence similarity. Using the receiver-operating characteristic measure, we demonstrate potentially significant improvement in using information-optimized reduced tetramer composition, over methods relying only on the raw amino acid composition or on traditional sequence alignment, in homology detection at or below the "twilight zone". PMID:20635424

  8. Homology Modeling a Fast Tool for Drug Discovery: Current Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, V. K.; Ukawala, R. D.; Ghate, M.; Chintha, C.

    2012-01-01

    Major goal of structural biology involve formation of protein-ligand complexes; in which the protein molecules act energetically in the course of binding. Therefore, perceptive of protein-ligand interaction will be very important for structure based drug design. Lack of knowledge of 3D structures has hindered efforts to understand the binding specificities of ligands with protein. With increasing in modeling software and the growing number of known protein structures, homology modeling is rapidly becoming the method of choice for obtaining 3D coordinates of proteins. Homology modeling is a representation of the similarity of environmental residues at topologically corresponding positions in the reference proteins. In the absence of experimental data, model building on the basis of a known 3D structure of a homologous protein is at present the only reliable method to obtain the structural information. Knowledge of the 3D structures of proteins provides invaluable insights into the molecular basis of their functions. The recent advances in homology modeling, particularly in detecting and aligning sequences with template structures, distant homologues, modeling of loops and side chains as well as detecting errors in a model contributed to consistent prediction of protein structure, which was not possible even several years ago. This review focused on the features and a role of homology modeling in predicting protein structure and described current developments in this field with victorious applications at the different stages of the drug design and discovery. PMID:23204616

  9. DNA sequence alignment by microhomology sampling during homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Zhi; Redding, Sy; Lee, Ja Yil; Gibb, Bryan; Kwon, YoungHo; Niu, Hengyao; Gaines, William A.; Sung, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Summary Homologous recombination (HR) mediates the exchange of genetic information between sister or homologous chromatids. During HR, members of the RecA/Rad51 family of recombinases must somehow search through vast quantities of DNA sequence to align and pair ssDNA with a homologous dsDNA template. Here we use single-molecule imaging to visualize Rad51 as it aligns and pairs homologous DNA sequences in real-time. We show that Rad51 uses a length-based recognition mechanism while interrogating dsDNA, enabling robust kinetic selection of 8-nucleotide (nt) tracts of microhomology, which kinetically confines the search to sites with a high probability of being a homologous target. Successful pairing with a 9th nucleotide coincides with an additional reduction in binding free energy and subsequent strand exchange occurs in precise 3-nt steps, reflecting the base triplet organization of the presynaptic complex. These findings provide crucial new insights into the physical and evolutionary underpinnings of DNA recombination. PMID:25684365

  10. Mesodermal expression of the C. elegans HMX homolog mls-2 requires the PBC homolog CEH-20

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuan; Shi, Herong; Amin, Nirav M.; Sultan, Ibrahim; Liu, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Metazoan development proceeds primarily through the regulated expression of genes encoding transcription factors and components of cell signaling pathways. One way to decipher the complex developmental programs is to assemble the underlying gene regulatory networks by dissecting the cis-regulatory modules that direct temporal-spatial expression of developmental genes and identify corresponding trans-regulatory factors. Here, we focus on the regulation of a HMX homoebox gene called mls-2, which functions at the intersection of a network that regulates cleavage orientation, cell proliferation and fate specification in the C. elegans postembryonic mesoderm. In addition to its transient expression in the postembryonic mesodermal lineage, the M lineage, mls-2 expression is detected in a subset of embryonic cells, in three pairs of head neurons and transiently in the somatic gonad. Through mutational analysis of the mls-2 promoter, we identified two elements (E1 and E2) involved in regulating the temporal-spatial expression of mls-2. In particular, we showed that one of the elements (E1) required for mls-2 expression in the M lineage contains two critical putative PBC-Hox binding sites that are evolutionarily conserved in C. briggsae and C. remanei. Furthermore, the C. elegans PBC homolog CEH-20 is required for mls-2 expression in the M lineage. Our data suggests that mls-2 might be a direct target of CEH-20 in the M lineage and that the regulation of CEH-20 on mls-2 is likely Hox-independent. PMID:18316179

  11. Protein Remote Homology Detection Based on an Ensemble Learning Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junjie; Liu, Bingquan; Huang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Protein remote homology detection is one of the central problems in bioinformatics. Although some computational methods have been proposed, the problem is still far from being solved. In this paper, an ensemble classifier for protein remote homology detection, called SVM-Ensemble, was proposed with a weighted voting strategy. SVM-Ensemble combined three basic classifiers based on different feature spaces, including Kmer, ACC, and SC-PseAAC. These features consider the characteristics of proteins from various perspectives, incorporating both the sequence composition and the sequence-order information along the protein sequences. Experimental results on a widely used benchmark dataset showed that the proposed SVM-Ensemble can obviously improve the predictive performance for the protein remote homology detection. Moreover, it achieved the best performance and outperformed other state-of-the-art methods. PMID:27294123

  12. Bacterial actin and tubulin homologs in cell growth and division.

    PubMed

    Busiek, Kimberly K; Margolin, William

    2015-03-16

    In contrast to the elaborate cytoskeletal machines harbored by eukaryotic cells, such as mitotic spindles, cytoskeletal structures detectable by typical negative stain electron microscopy are generally absent from bacterial cells. As a result, for decades it was thought that bacteria lacked cytoskeletal machines. Revolutions in genomics and fluorescence microscopy have confirmed the existence not only of smaller-scale cytoskeletal structures in bacteria, but also of widespread functional homologs of eukaryotic cytoskeletal proteins. The presence of actin, tubulin, and intermediate filament homologs in these relatively simple cells suggests that primitive cytoskeletons first arose in bacteria. In bacteria such as Escherichia coli, homologs of tubulin and actin directly interact with each other and are crucial for coordinating cell growth and division. The function and direct interactions between these proteins will be the focus of this review. PMID:25784047

  13. Using Persistent Homology to Describe Rayleigh-Bénard Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tithof, Jeffrey; Suri, Balachandra; Xu, Mu; Kramar, Miroslav; Levanger, Rachel; Mischaikow, Konstantin; Paul, Mark; Schatz, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Complex spatial patterns that exhibit aperiodic dynamics commonly arise in a wide variety of systems in nature and technology. Describing, understanding, and predicting the behavior of such patterns is an open problem. We explore the use of persistent homology (a branch of algebraic topology) to characterize spatiotemporal dynamics in a canonical fluid mechanics problem, Rayleigh Bénard convection. Persistent homology provides a powerful mathematical formalism in which the topological characteristics of a pattern (e.g. the midplane temperature field) are encoded in a so-called persistence diagram. By applying a metric to measure the pairwise distances across multiple persistence diagrams, we can quantify the similarities between different states in a time series. Our results show that persistent homology yields new physical insights into the complex dynamics of large spatially extended systems that are driven far-from-equilibrium. This work is supported under NSF grant DMS-1125302.

  14. Quantization of gauge fields, graph polynomials and graph homology

    SciTech Connect

    Kreimer, Dirk; Sars, Matthias; Suijlekom, Walter D. van

    2013-09-15

    We review quantization of gauge fields using algebraic properties of 3-regular graphs. We derive the Feynman integrand at n loops for a non-abelian gauge theory quantized in a covariant gauge from scalar integrands for connected 3-regular graphs, obtained from the two Symanzik polynomials. The transition to the full gauge theory amplitude is obtained by the use of a third, new, graph polynomial, the corolla polynomial. This implies effectively a covariant quantization without ghosts, where all the relevant signs of the ghost sector are incorporated in a double complex furnished by the corolla polynomial–we call it cycle homology–and by graph homology. -- Highlights: •We derive gauge theory Feynman from scalar field theory with 3-valent vertices. •We clarify the role of graph homology and cycle homology. •We use parametric renormalization and the new corolla polynomial.

  15. Homologous flares and the evolution of NOAA Active Region 2372

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, K. T.; Smith, J. B., Jr.; Mccabe, M. K.; Machado, M. E.; Saba, J. L. R.; Simnett, G. M.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed record of the evolution of NOAA Active Region 2372 has been compiled by the FBS Homology Study Group. It was one of the most prolific flare-producing regions observed by SMM. The flares occurred in distinct stages which corresponded to particular evolutionary phases in the development of the active region magnetic field. By comparison with a similar but less productive active region, it is found that the activity seems to be related to the magnetic complexity of the region and the amount of shear in the field. Further, the soft X-ray emission in the quiescent active region is related to its flare rate. Within the broader definition of homology adopted, there was a degree of homology between the events within each stage of evolution of AR2372.

  16. Homology in the development of triadic interaction and language.

    PubMed

    Moore, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Conceiving of development with reference to homology can help identify developmental continuity where surface form shows considerable variation across age. I argue that there is a homology of structure between the object-centred, or triadic, interactions that emerge in infancy and later language. The structure of triadic interaction in infancy is first described as involving joint attention and joint engagement about a shared topic, and then a case is made that this structure is maintained through three levels of complexity in language-single word utterances, multiword utterances, and finally complex constructions. A focus on the homological relation between these social interactive structures may be useful in revealing developmental continuities where these may be obscured by quite different surface forms. PMID:22711264

  17. Data bank homology search algorithm with linear computation complexity.

    PubMed

    Strelets, V B; Ptitsyn, A A; Milanesi, L; Lim, H A

    1994-06-01

    A new algorithm for data bank homology search is proposed. The principal advantages of the new algorithm are: (i) linear computation complexity; (ii) low memory requirements; and (iii) high sensitivity to the presence of local region homology. The algorithm first calculates indicative matrices of k-tuple 'realization' in the query sequence and then searches for an appropriate number of matching k-tuples within a narrow range in database sequences. It does not require k-tuple coordinates tabulation and in-memory placement for database sequences. The algorithm is implemented in a program for execution on PC-compatible computers and tested on PIR and GenBank databases with good results. A few modifications designed to improve the selectivity are also discussed. As an application example, the search for homology of the mouse homeotic protein HOX 3.1 is given. PMID:7922689

  18. Remote homology and the functions of metagenomic dark matter.

    PubMed

    Lobb, Briallen; Kurtz, Daniel A; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Doxey, Andrew C

    2015-01-01

    Predicted open reading frames (ORFs) that lack detectable homology to known proteins are termed ORFans. Despite their prevalence in metagenomes, the extent to which ORFans encode real proteins, the degree to which they can be annotated, and their functional contributions, remain unclear. To gain insights into these questions, we applied sensitive remote-homology detection methods to functionally analyze ORFans from soil, marine, and human gut metagenome collections. ORFans were identified, clustered into sequence families, and annotated through profile-profile comparison to proteins of known structure. We found that a considerable number of metagenomic ORFans (73,896 of 484,121, 15.3%) exhibit significant remote homology to structurally characterized proteins, providing a means for ORFan functional profiling. The extent of detected remote homology far exceeds that obtained for artificial protein families (1.4%). As expected for real genes, the predicted functions of ORFans are significantly similar to the functions of their gene neighbors (p < 0.001). Compared to the functional profiles predicted through standard homology searches, ORFans show biologically intriguing differences. Many ORFan-enriched functions are virus-related and tend to reflect biological processes associated with extreme sequence diversity. Each environment also possesses a large number of unique ORFan families and functions, including some known to play important community roles such as gut microbial polysaccharide digestion. Lastly, ORFans are a valuable resource for finding novel enzymes of interest, as we demonstrate through the identification of hundreds of novel ORFan metalloproteases that all possess a signature catalytic motif despite a general lack of similarity to known proteins. Our ORFan functional predictions are a valuable resource for discovering novel protein families and exploring the boundaries of protein sequence space. All remote homology predictions are available at http

  19. Remote homology and the functions of metagenomic dark matter

    PubMed Central

    Lobb, Briallen; Kurtz, Daniel A.; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Doxey, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Predicted open reading frames (ORFs) that lack detectable homology to known proteins are termed ORFans. Despite their prevalence in metagenomes, the extent to which ORFans encode real proteins, the degree to which they can be annotated, and their functional contributions, remain unclear. To gain insights into these questions, we applied sensitive remote-homology detection methods to functionally analyze ORFans from soil, marine, and human gut metagenome collections. ORFans were identified, clustered into sequence families, and annotated through profile-profile comparison to proteins of known structure. We found that a considerable number of metagenomic ORFans (73,896 of 484,121, 15.3%) exhibit significant remote homology to structurally characterized proteins, providing a means for ORFan functional profiling. The extent of detected remote homology far exceeds that obtained for artificial protein families (1.4%). As expected for real genes, the predicted functions of ORFans are significantly similar to the functions of their gene neighbors (p < 0.001). Compared to the functional profiles predicted through standard homology searches, ORFans show biologically intriguing differences. Many ORFan-enriched functions are virus-related and tend to reflect biological processes associated with extreme sequence diversity. Each environment also possesses a large number of unique ORFan families and functions, including some known to play important community roles such as gut microbial polysaccharide digestion. Lastly, ORFans are a valuable resource for finding novel enzymes of interest, as we demonstrate through the identification of hundreds of novel ORFan metalloproteases that all possess a signature catalytic motif despite a general lack of similarity to known proteins. Our ORFan functional predictions are a valuable resource for discovering novel protein families and exploring the boundaries of protein sequence space. All remote homology predictions are available at http

  20. Homologous beta-adrenergic desensitization in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    García-Sáinz, J A; Michel, B

    1987-01-01

    Hepatocytes from hypothyroid rats have a marked beta-adrenergic responsiveness. Preincubation of these hepatocytes with isoprenaline induced a time-dependent and concentration-dependent desensitization of the beta-adrenergic responsiveness without altering that to glucagon (homologous desensitization). The desensitization was evidenced both in the cyclic AMP accumulation and in the stimulation of ureagenesis induced by the beta-adrenergic agonists. Under the same conditions, preincubation with glucagon induced no desensitization. Propranolol was also unable to induce desensitization, but blocked that induced by isoprenaline. Pertussis-toxin treatment did not alter the homologous beta-adrenergic desensitization induced by isoprenaline. PMID:2825633

  1. Macdonald operators and homological invariants of the colored Hopf link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awata, Hidetoshi; Kanno, Hiroaki

    2011-09-01

    Using a power sum (boson) realization for the Macdonald operators, we investigate the Gukov, Iqbal, Kozçaz and Vafa (GIKV) proposal for the homological invariants of the colored Hopf link, which include Khovanov-Rozansky homology as a special case. We prove the polynomiality of the invariants obtained by GIKV’s proposal for arbitrary representations. We derive a closed formula of the invariants of the colored Hopf link for antisymmetric representations. We argue that a little amendment of GIKV’s proposal is required to make all the coefficients of the polynomial non-negative integers.

  2. Simplified computer programs for search of homology within nucleotide sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, M; Kröger-Block, A

    1984-01-01

    Four new computer programs for search of homology within nucleotide sequences are presented. The main scope of the program design is flexibility, independence of sequence length and the capability to be used by any molecular biologist without any prior computer experience. The programs offer a linear search, a search for maximal identity, an alignment along a given sequence and a search based on homology within the amino acid coding capacity of nucleotide sequences. The language is Fortran V. Copies are available on request. PMID:6546417

  3. Using intron position conservation for homology-based gene prediction

    PubMed Central

    Keilwagen, Jens; Wenk, Michael; Erickson, Jessica L.; Schattat, Martin H.; Grau, Jan; Hartung, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Annotation of protein-coding genes is very important in bioinformatics and biology and has a decisive influence on many downstream analyses. Homology-based gene prediction programs allow for transferring knowledge about protein-coding genes from an annotated organism to an organism of interest. Here, we present a homology-based gene prediction program called GeMoMa. GeMoMa utilizes the conservation of intron positions within genes to predict related genes in other organisms. We assess the performance of GeMoMa and compare it with state-of-the-art competitors on plant and animal genomes using an extended best reciprocal hit approach. We find that GeMoMa often makes more precise predictions than its competitors yielding a substantially increased number of correct transcripts. Subsequently, we exemplarily validate GeMoMa predictions using Sanger sequencing. Finally, we use RNA-seq data to compare the predictions of homology-based gene prediction programs, and find again that GeMoMa performs well. Hence, we conclude that exploiting intron position conservation improves homology-based gene prediction, and we make GeMoMa freely available as command-line tool and Galaxy integration. PMID:26893356

  4. Multiresolution persistent homology for excessively large biomolecular datasets.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kelin; Zhao, Zhixiong; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-10-01

    Although persistent homology has emerged as a promising tool for the topological simplification of complex data, it is computationally intractable for large datasets. We introduce multiresolution persistent homology to handle excessively large datasets. We match the resolution with the scale of interest so as to represent large scale datasets with appropriate resolution. We utilize flexibility-rigidity index to access the topological connectivity of the data set and define a rigidity density for the filtration analysis. By appropriately tuning the resolution of the rigidity density, we are able to focus the topological lens on the scale of interest. The proposed multiresolution topological analysis is validated by a hexagonal fractal image which has three distinct scales. We further demonstrate the proposed method for extracting topological fingerprints from DNA molecules. In particular, the topological persistence of a virus capsid with 273 780 atoms is successfully analyzed which would otherwise be inaccessible to the normal point cloud method and unreliable by using coarse-grained multiscale persistent homology. The proposed method has also been successfully applied to the protein domain classification, which is the first time that persistent homology is used for practical protein domain analysis, to our knowledge. The proposed multiresolution topological method has potential applications in arbitrary data sets, such as social networks, biological networks, and graphs. PMID:26450288

  5. Using intron position conservation for homology-based gene prediction.

    PubMed

    Keilwagen, Jens; Wenk, Michael; Erickson, Jessica L; Schattat, Martin H; Grau, Jan; Hartung, Frank

    2016-05-19

    Annotation of protein-coding genes is very important in bioinformatics and biology and has a decisive influence on many downstream analyses. Homology-based gene prediction programs allow for transferring knowledge about protein-coding genes from an annotated organism to an organism of interest.Here, we present a homology-based gene prediction program called GeMoMa. GeMoMa utilizes the conservation of intron positions within genes to predict related genes in other organisms. We assess the performance of GeMoMa and compare it with state-of-the-art competitors on plant and animal genomes using an extended best reciprocal hit approach. We find that GeMoMa often makes more precise predictions than its competitors yielding a substantially increased number of correct transcripts. Subsequently, we exemplarily validate GeMoMa predictions using Sanger sequencing. Finally, we use RNA-seq data to compare the predictions of homology-based gene prediction programs, and find again that GeMoMa performs well.Hence, we conclude that exploiting intron position conservation improves homology-based gene prediction, and we make GeMoMa freely available as command-line tool and Galaxy integration. PMID:26893356

  6. Non-homologous end joining: emerging themes and unanswered questions

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Sarvan Kumar; Jette, Nicholas; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2014-01-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is the major pathway for the repair of ionizing radiation induced DNA double strand breaks in human cells. Here, we discuss current insights into the mechanism of NHEJ and the interplay between NHEJ and other pathways for repair of IR-induced DNA damage. PMID:24582502

  7. Homological equations for tensor fields and periodic averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avendaño Camacho, M.; Vorobiev, Y. M.

    2011-09-01

    Homological equations of tensor type associated to periodic flows on a manifold are studied. The Cushman intrinsic formula [4] is generalized to the case of multivector fields and differential forms. Some applications to normal forms and the averaging method for perturbed Hamiltonian systems on slow-fast phase spaces are given.

  8. On the Homology of Congruence Subgroups and K3(Z)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ronnie; Szczarba, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    Let Γ(n;p) be the congruence subgroup of SL(n;Z) of level p. We study the homology and cohomology of Γ(n;p) as modules over SL(n;Fp) and apply our results to obtain an upper bound for the order of K3(Z). PMID:16592224

  9. Multiresolution persistent homology for excessively large biomolecular datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Kelin; Zhao, Zhixiong; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-10-01

    Although persistent homology has emerged as a promising tool for the topological simplification of complex data, it is computationally intractable for large datasets. We introduce multiresolution persistent homology to handle excessively large datasets. We match the resolution with the scale of interest so as to represent large scale datasets with appropriate resolution. We utilize flexibility-rigidity index to access the topological connectivity of the data set and define a rigidity density for the filtration analysis. By appropriately tuning the resolution of the rigidity density, we are able to focus the topological lens on the scale of interest. The proposed multiresolution topological analysis is validated by a hexagonal fractal image which has three distinct scales. We further demonstrate the proposed method for extracting topological fingerprints from DNA molecules. In particular, the topological persistence of a virus capsid with 273 780 atoms is successfully analyzed which would otherwise be inaccessible to the normal point cloud method and unreliable by using coarse-grained multiscale persistent homology. The proposed method has also been successfully applied to the protein domain classification, which is the first time that persistent homology is used for practical protein domain analysis, to our knowledge. The proposed multiresolution topological method has potential applications in arbitrary data sets, such as social networks, biological networks, and graphs.

  10. Multiresolution persistent homology for excessively large biomolecular datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Kelin; Zhao, Zhixiong; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-10-07

    Although persistent homology has emerged as a promising tool for the topological simplification of complex data, it is computationally intractable for large datasets. We introduce multiresolution persistent homology to handle excessively large datasets. We match the resolution with the scale of interest so as to represent large scale datasets with appropriate resolution. We utilize flexibility-rigidity index to access the topological connectivity of the data set and define a rigidity density for the filtration analysis. By appropriately tuning the resolution of the rigidity density, we are able to focus the topological lens on the scale of interest. The proposed multiresolution topological analysis is validated by a hexagonal fractal image which has three distinct scales. We further demonstrate the proposed method for extracting topological fingerprints from DNA molecules. In particular, the topological persistence of a virus capsid with 273 780 atoms is successfully analyzed which would otherwise be inaccessible to the normal point cloud method and unreliable by using coarse-grained multiscale persistent homology. The proposed method has also been successfully applied to the protein domain classification, which is the first time that persistent homology is used for practical protein domain analysis, to our knowledge. The proposed multiresolution topological method has potential applications in arbitrary data sets, such as social networks, biological networks, and graphs.

  11. Separation of homologous BAC contigs in the tetraploid Upland cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Upland cotton has an allotetraploid genome. Separation of homologous BAC contigs to their sub-genomes and further to individual chromosomes is a great challenge for genome-wide integrated genetic and physical mapping. As a pilot experiment to test the feasibility of separating the contigs in sub-g...

  12. Homology and the optimization of DNA sequence data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, W.

    2001-01-01

    Three methods of nucleotide character analysis are discussed. Their implications for molecular sequence homology and phylogenetic analysis are compared. The criterion of inter-data set congruence, both character based and topological, are applied to two data sets to elucidate and potentially discriminate among these parsimony-based ideas. c2001 The Willi Hennig Society.

  13. Homology Groups of High-Resolution Temporal Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Félix; Vásquez Aguilar, Raciel; Carsteanu, Alin-Andrei

    2016-04-01

    This study applies topological data analysis, by generating homology groups to uncover patterns in the data of high-resolution temporal rainfall intensities from Iowa City (IIHR, U of Iowa). The state-space representation of the data is being investigated for an appropiate embedding dimension, in order to subsequently study topological properties of resulting manifold.

  14. Disruption of an ADE6 Homolog of Ustilago maydis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ustilago maydis secretes iron-binding compounds during times of iron depletion. A putative homolog of the Sacharromyces cereviseae ADE6 and Escherichia coli purL genes was identified near a multigenic complex, which contains two genes sid1 and sid2 involved in a siderophore biosynthetic pathway. The...

  15. Analysis of benzalkonium chloride and its homologs: HPLC versus HPCE.

    PubMed

    Prince, S J; McLaury, H J; Allen, L V; McLaury, P

    1999-05-01

    Benzalkonium chloride (BAK) is a mixture of alkylbenzyldimethylammonium chloride homologs with n-C,2H25, n-C,4H29, and n-C16H33 comprising a major portion of the alkyl groups present. An analytical method for BAK must differentiate and quantitate the homologs in the BAK mixture. Reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separates compounds based on their affinity for a nonpolar column, which is a direct correlation to the compounds' polarity. High performance capillary electrophoresis (HPCE), however, separates compounds in an electric field according to their charge and size. The BAK homologs are suitable for separation by either of these methods because their polarity and sizes differ significantly. The HPLC method employed a mobile phase of 60% acetonitrile and 40% 0.1 M sodium acetate buffer pH 5 pumped at 1.0 ml min(-1), a 4.6 x 250 mm cyano column with 5 microm packing, and UV detection at 254 nm. The HPCE method utilized a run buffer of 30% acetonitrile and 70% 0.05 M sodium phosphate pH 3.06, a 50 microm x 20 cm open silica capillary, 7.5 kV electric field and UV detection at 214 nm. Both HPLC and HPCE demonstrated good linearity in the range of 0.025 to 0.8 mg ml(-1) with r2 values of approximately 0.99. The HPLC method produced good separation of the homolog peaks with a total analysis time of 25 min. HPCE run time was less than 5 min and demonstrated good separation of the three homologs. The HPLC method, however, was superior to HPCE in the areas of sensitivity and precision. The HPLC has been extensively used in the routine quantitation and qualitation of benzalkonium chloride concentrations in various products; however, long analysis times make this method inefficient. The HPCE method produced comparable results to the HPLC method but with much shorter analysis times. An HPCE analysis method, as presented here, may prove to be a much more useful and efficient method for the analysis of benzalkonium chloride and its homologs. PMID

  16. Heterogeneous Preferential Solvation of Water and Trifluoroethanol in Homologous Lysozymes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cytoplasmic osmolytes can significantly alter the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of proteins relative to those under dilute solution conditions. Spectroscopic experiments of lysozymes in cosolvents indicate that such changes may arise from the heterogeneous, site-specific hydrophobic interactions between protein surface residues and individual solvent molecules. In pursuit of an accurate and predictive model for explaining biomolecular interactions, we study the averaged structural characteristics of mixed solvents with homologous lysozyme solutes using all-atom molecular dynamics. By observing the time-averaged densities of different aqueous solutions of trifluoroethanol, we deduce trends in the heterogeneous solvent interactions over each protein’s surface, and investigate how the homology of protein structure does not necessarily translate to similarities in solvent structure and composition—even when observing identical side chains. PMID:24823618

  17. [The problem of homologous blood in transfusiology and its solution].

    PubMed

    Sumbatov, L A; Iunovidova, L I

    1989-10-01

    In cardiosurgery conducted in this country and abroad the development of homologous blood syndrome was observed. Its frequency comprises up to 2.5%, according to the authors' data. It has been established that the syndrome is the result of isoimmunologic incompatibility by the antigenic systems of blood plasma allogeneic proteins. The authors have proposed the testing of blood compatibility by the agglutination methods according to the erythrocytic antigen systems with the use of the complement-fixation test according to the protein-plasma antigen systems, due to these tests the development of homologous blood syndrome has been completely eliminated from their practice. The development of massive blood transfusion syndrome described by some transfusiologists has been rejected by the authors, it is considered by them as manifestation of insufficient blood compatibility of the test animals as a result of a wrong method of their isoimmunologic selection using the only cross-testing. PMID:2515091

  18. Homology study of two polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthases from Pseudomonas aureofaciens.

    PubMed

    Umeda, F; Nishikawa, T; Miyasaka, H; Maeda, I; Kawase, M; Yagi, K

    2001-11-01

    Recently, we have cloned and analyzed two polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase genes (phaC1 and phaC2 in the pha cluster) from Pseudomonas aureofaciens. In this report, the deduced amino acid (AA) sequences of PHA synthase 1 and PHA synthase 2 from P. aureofaciens are compared with those from three other bacterial strains (Pseudomonas sp. 61-3, P. oleovorans and P. aeruginosa) containing the homologous pha cluster. The level of homology of either PHA synthase 1 or PHA synthase 2 was high with each enzyme from these three bacterial strains. Furthermore, multialignment of PHA synthase AA sequences implied that both enzymes of PHA synthase 1 and PHA synthase 2 were highly conserved in the four strains including P. aureofaciens. PMID:11916262

  19. Community-local homology of force chains in granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusti, Chad; Owens, Eli; Daniels, Karen; Bassett, Danielle

    2015-03-01

    The development of robust quantitative measurements of the structure of force chains in granular materials remains an open problem. Recent work of Bassett, et. al. applies community detection algorithms to extract subnetworks of strongly interacting particles, and then computes geometric measures of these networks to characterize local branching. Separately, Kramar, et. al. apply persistent homology to extract robust global signatures of chains in terms of their Betti numbers. Here, we investigate a hybrid of these two approaches, computing low-dimensional persistent homology of the clique complexes of communities in force-chain graphs. Such invariants measure the tendency of core chain sections to branch while remaining insensitive to the presence of tightly-packed collections of particles, thus making them natural candidates for both local and global stability analysis.

  20. Levels of homology and the problem of neocortex.

    PubMed

    Dugas-Ford, Jennifer; Ragsdale, Clifton W

    2015-07-01

    The neocortex is found only in mammals, and the fossil record is silent on how this soft tissue evolved. Understanding neocortex evolution thus devolves to a search for candidate homologous neocortex traits in the extant nonmammalian amniotes. The difficulty is that homology is based on similarity, and the six-layered neocortex structure could hardly be more dissimilar in appearance from the nuclear organization that is so conspicuous in the dorsal telencephalon of birds and other reptiles. Recent molecular data have, however, provided new support for one prominent hypothesis, based on neuronal circuits, that proposes the principal neocortical input and output cell types are a conserved feature of amniote dorsal telencephalon. Many puzzles remain, the greatest being understanding the selective pressures and molecular mechanisms that underlie such tremendous morphological variation in telencephalon structure. PMID:26154980

  1. Homology and isomorphism: Bourdieu in conversation with New Institutionalism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingyao

    2016-06-01

    Bourdieusian Field Theory (BFT) provided decisive inspiration for the early conceptual formulation of New Institutionalism (NI). This paper attempts to reinvigorate the stalled intellectual dialogue between NI and BFT by comparing NI's concept of isomorphism with BFT's notion of homology. I argue that Bourdieu's understanding of domination-oriented social action, transposable habitus, and a non-linear causality, embodied in his neglected concept of homology, provides an alternative theorization of field-level convergence to New Institutionalism's central idea of institutional isomorphism. To showcase how BFT can be useful for organizational research, I postulate a habitus-informed and field-conditioned theory of transference to enrich NI's spin-off thesis of 'diffusion'. I propose that while NI can benefit from BFT's potential of bringing social structure back into organizational research, BFT can enrich its social analysis by borrowing from NI's elaboration of the symbolic system of organizations. PMID:27218878

  2. Optimization criteria and biological process enrichment in homologous multiprotein modules.

    PubMed

    Hodgkinson, Luqman; Karp, Richard M

    2013-06-25

    Biological process enrichment is a widely used metric for evaluating the quality of multiprotein modules. In this study, we examine possible optimization criteria for detecting homologous multiprotein modules and quantify their effects on biological process enrichment. We find that modularity, linear density, and module size are the most important criteria considered, complementary to each other, and that graph theoretical attributes account for 36% of the variance in biological process enrichment. Variations in protein interaction similarity within module pairs have only minor effects on biological process enrichment. As random modules increase in size, both biological process enrichment and modularity tend to improve, although modularity does not show this upward trend in modules with size at most 50 proteins. To adjust for these trends, we recommend a size correction based on random sampling of modules when using biological process enrichment or other attributes to evaluate module boundaries. Characteristics of homologous multiprotein modules optimized for each of the optimization criteria are examined. PMID:23757502

  3. The Divergent Roles of STAYGREEN (SGR) Homologs in Chlorophyll Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Sakuraba, Yasuhito; Park, So-Yon; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2015-01-01

    Degradation of chlorophyll (Chl) by Chl catabolic enzymes (CCEs) causes the loss of green color that typically occurs during senescence of leaves. In addition to CCEs, STAYGREEN1 (SGR1) functions as a key regulator of Chl degradation. Although sgr1 mutants in many plant species exhibit a stay-green phenotype, the biochemical function of the SGR1 protein remains elusive. Many recent studies have examined the physiological and molecular roles of SGR1 and its homologs (SGR2 and SGR-LIKE) in Chl metabolism, finding that these proteins have different roles in different species. In this review, we summarize the recent studies on SGR and discuss the most likely functions of SGR homologs. PMID:25913011

  4. Homologous recombination maintenance of genome integrity during DNA damage tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Félix

    2014-01-01

    The DNA strand exchange protein Rad51 provides a safe mechanism for the repair of DNA breaks using the information of a homologous DNA template. Homologous recombination (HR) also plays a key role in the response to DNA damage that impairs the advance of the replication forks by providing mechanisms to circumvent the lesion and fill in the tracks of single-stranded DNA that are generated during the process of lesion bypass. These activities postpone repair of the blocking lesion to ensure that DNA replication is completed in a timely manner. Experimental evidence generated over the last few years indicates that HR participates in this DNA damage tolerance response together with additional error-free (template switch) and error-prone (translesion synthesis) mechanisms through intricate connections, which are presented here. The choice between repair and tolerance, and the mechanism of tolerance, is critical to avoid increased mutagenesis and/or genome rearrangements, which are both hallmarks of cancer. PMID:27308329

  5. Chemical shift guided homology modeling of larger proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yang; Bax, Ad

    2015-01-01

    We describe an alternate approach to protein structure determination that relies on experimental NMR chemical shifts, plus sparse NOEs if available. The newly introduced alignment method, POMONA, directly exploits the powerful bioinformatics algorithms previously developed for sequence-based homology modeling, but does not require significant sequence similarity. Protein templates, generated by POMONA, are subsequently used as input for chemical shift based Rosetta comparative modeling (CS-RosettaCM) to generate reliable full atom models. PMID:26053889

  6. Detection of homologous horizontal gene transfer in SNP data

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-07-23

    We study the detection of mutations, sequencing errors, and homologous horizontal gene transfers (HGT) in a set of closely related microbial genomes. We base the model on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP's) and break the genomes into blocks to handle the rearrangement problem. Then we apply a synamic programming algorithm to model whether changes within each block are likely a result of mutations, sequencing errors, or HGT.

  7. Oscillator strength trends in group IVb homologous ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    Shock tube data are used to examine the systematic f value behavior in prominent visible transition arrays (ns-np, np-(n+l)s, np-nd) for the homologous emitter sequence Si 11, Ge 11, Sn 11, and Pb 11. Regularities found for these data are compared with trends in lighter elements. Agreements and s disparities with theoretical and experimental oscillator strengths from the literature are noted.

  8. Assessment of sequence homology and cross-reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Aalberse, Rob C. . E-mail: r.aalberse@sanquin.nl

    2005-09-01

    Three aspects of allergenicity assessment and are discussed: IgE immunogenicity, IgE cross-reactivity and T cell cross-reactivity, all with emphasis on in-silico predictability: from amino acid sequence via 3D structure to allergenicity.(1)IgE immunogenicity depends to an overwhelming degree on factors other than the protein itself: the context and history of the protein by the time it reaches the immune system. Without specification of these two factors very few foreign proteins can be claimed to be absolutely non-allergenic. Any antigen may be allergenic, particularly if it avoids activation of TH2-suppressive mechanisms (CD8 cells, TH1 cells, other regulatory T cells and regulatory cytokines). (2)IgE cross-reactivity can be much more reliably assessed by a combination of in-silico homology searches and in vitro IgE antibody assays. The in-silico homology search is unlikely to miss potential cross-reactivity with sequenced allergens. So far, no biologically relevant cross-reactivity at the antibody level has been demonstrated between proteins without easily-demonstrable homology. (3)T cell cross-reactivity is much more difficult to predict compared to B cell cross-reactivity, and its effects are more diverse. Yet, pre-existing cross-reactive T cell activity is likely to influence the outcome not only of the immune response, but also of the effector phase of the allergic reaction.

  9. Distant homology recognition using structural classification of proteins.

    PubMed

    Murzin, A G; Bateman, A

    1997-01-01

    Protein structure prediction is arguably the biggest unsolved problem of structural biology. The notion of the number of naturally occurring different protein folds being limited allows partial solution of this problem by the use of fold recognition methods, which "thread" the sequence in question through a library of known protein folds. The fold recognition methods were thought to be superior to the distant homology recognition methods when there is no significant sequence similarity to known structures. We show here that the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database, organizing all known protein folds according their structural and evolutionary relationships, can be effectively used to enhance the sensitivity of the distant homology recognition methods to rival the "threading" methods. In the CASP2 experiment, our approach correctly assigned into existing SCOP superfamilies all of the six "fold recognition" targets we attempted. For each of the six targets, we correctly predicted the homologous protein with a very similar structure; often, it was the most similar structure. We correctly predicted local alignments of the sequence features that we found to be characteristic for the protein superfamily containing a given target. Our global alignments, extended manually from these local alignments, also appeared to be rather accurate. PMID:9485501

  10. TALEN-mediated homologous recombination in Daphnia magna

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Takashi; Kato, Yasuhiko; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) offer versatile tools to engineer endogenous genomic loci in various organisms. We established a homologous recombination (HR)-based knock-in using TALEN in the crustacean Daphnia magna, a model for ecological and toxicological genomics. We constructed TALENs and designed the 67 bp donor insert targeting a point deletion in the eyeless mutant that shows eye deformities. Co-injection of the TALEN mRNA with donor DNA into eggs led to the precise integration of the donor insert in the germ line, which recovered eye deformities in offspring. The frequency of HR events in the germ line was 2% by using both plasmid and single strand oligo DNA with 1.5 kb and 80 nt homology to the target. Deficiency of ligase 4 involved in non-homologous end joining repair did not increase the HR efficiency. Our data represent efficient HR-based knock-in by TALENs in D. magna, which is a promising tool to understand Daphnia gene functions. PMID:26674741

  11. Interchromosomal Homology Searches Drive Directional ALT Telomere Movement and Synapsis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Nam Woo; Dilley, Robert L.; Lampson, Michael A.; Greenberg, Roger A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Telomere length maintenance is a requisite feature of cellular immortalization and a hallmark of human cancer. While most human cancers express telomerase activity, approximately 10-15% employ a recombination-dependent telomere maintenance pathway known as Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT) that is characterized by multi-telomere clusters and associated promyelocytic leukemia protein bodies. Here, we show that a DNA double-strand break (DSB) response at ALT telomeres triggers long-range movement and clustering between chromosome termini, resulting in homology-directed telomere synthesis. Damaged telomeres initiate increased random surveillance of nuclear space before displaying rapid directional movement and association with recipient telomeres over micron-range distances. This phenomenon required Rad51 and the Hop2-Mnd1 heterodimer, which are essential for homologous chromosome synapsis during meiosis. These findings implicate a specialized homology searching mechanism in ALT dependent telomere maintenance and provide a molecular basis underlying the preference for recombination between non- sister telomeres during ALT. PMID:25259924

  12. Persistent Homology for The Quantitative Prediction of Fullerene Stability

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kelin; Feng, Xin; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo Wei

    2014-01-01

    Persistent homology is a relatively new tool often used for qualitative analysis of intrinsic topological features in images and data originated from scientific and engineering applications. In this paper, we report novel quantitative predictions of the energy and stability of fullerene molecules, the very first attempt in employing persistent homology in this context. The ground-state structures of a series of small fullerene molecules are first investigated with the standard Vietoris-Rips complex. We decipher all the barcodes, including both short-lived local bars and long-lived global bars arising from topological invariants, and associate them with fullerene structural details. By using accumulated bar lengths, we build quantitative models to correlate local and global Betti-2 bars respectively with the heat of formation and total curvature energies of fullerenes. It is found that the heat of formation energy is related to the local hexagonal cavities of small fullerenes, while the total curvature energies of fullerene isomers are associated with their sphericities, which are measured by the lengths of their long-lived Betti-2 bars. Excellent correlation coefficients (> 0.94) between persistent homology predictions and those of quantum or curvature analysis have been observed. A correlation matrix based filtration is introduced to further verify our findings. PMID:25523342

  13. Quantifying Homologous Replacement of Loci between Haloarchaeal Species

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David; Gogarten, J. Peter; Papke, R. Thane

    2012-01-01

    In vitro studies of the haloarchaeal genus Haloferax have demonstrated their ability to frequently exchange DNA between species, whereas rates of homologous recombination estimated from natural populations in the genus Halorubrum are high enough to maintain random association of alleles between five loci. To quantify the effects of gene transfer and recombination of commonly held (relaxed core) genes during the evolution of the class Halobacteria (haloarchaea), we reconstructed the history of 21 genomes representing all major groups. Using a novel algorithm and a concatenated ribosomal protein phylogeny as a reference, we created a directed horizontal genetic transfer (HGT) network of contemporary and ancestral genomes. Gene order analysis revealed that 90% of testable HGTs were by direct homologous replacement, rather than nonhomologous integration followed by a loss. Network analysis revealed an inverse log-linear relationship between HGT frequency and ribosomal protein evolutionary distance that is maintained across the deepest divergences in Halobacteria. We use this mathematical relationship to estimate the total transfers and amino acid substitutions delivered by HGTs in each genome, providing a measure of chimerism. For the relaxed core genes of each genome, we conservatively estimate that 11–20% of their evolution occurred in other haloarchaea. Our findings are unexpected, because the transfer and homologous recombination of relaxed core genes between members of the class Halobacteria disrupts the coevolution of genes; however, the generation of new combinations of divergent but functionally related genes may lead to adaptive phenotypes not available through cumulative mutations and recombination within a single population. PMID:23160063

  14. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer. PMID:26512702

  15. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer. PMID:26512702

  16. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Quasi-Homologous Solar Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pariat, E.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.

    2010-01-01

    Recent solar observations (e.g., obtained with Hinode and STEREO) have revealed that coronal jets are a more frequent phenomenon than previously believed. This higher frequency results, in part, from the fact that jets exhibit a homologous behavior: successive jets recur at the same location with similar morphological features. We present the results of three-dimensional (31)) numerical simulations of our model for coronal jets. This study demonstrates the ability of the model to generate recurrent 3D untwisting quasi-homologous jets when a stress is constantly applied at the photospheric boundary. The homology results from the property of the 3D null-point system to relax to a state topologically similar to its initial configuration. In addition, we find two distinct regimes of reconnection in the simulations: an impulsive 3D mode involving a helical rotating current sheet that generates the jet, and a quasi-steady mode that occurs in a 2D-like current sheet located along the fan between the sheared spines. We argue that these different regimes can explain the observed link between jets and plumes.

  17. THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF QUASI-HOMOLOGOUS SOLAR JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Pariat, E.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.

    2010-05-10

    Recent solar observations (e.g., obtained with Hinode and STEREO) have revealed that coronal jets are a more frequent phenomenon than previously believed. This higher frequency results, in part, from the fact that jets exhibit a homologous behavior: successive jets recur at the same location with similar morphological features. We present the results of three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations of our model for coronal jets. This study demonstrates the ability of the model to generate recurrent 3D untwisting quasi-homologous jets when a stress is constantly applied at the photospheric boundary. The homology results from the property of the 3D null-point system to relax to a state topologically similar to its initial configuration. In addition, we find two distinct regimes of reconnection in the simulations: an impulsive 3D mode involving a helical rotating current sheet that generates the jet and a quasi-steady mode that occurs in a 2D-like current sheet located along the fan between the sheared spines. We argue that these different regimes can explain the observed link between jets and plumes.

  18. MEDELLER: homology-based coordinate generation for membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kelm, Sebastian; Shi, Jiye; Deane, Charlotte M.

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Membrane proteins (MPs) are important drug targets but knowledge of their exact structure is limited to relatively few examples. Existing homology-based structure prediction methods are designed for globular, water-soluble proteins. However, we are now beginning to have enough MP structures to justify the development of a homology-based approach specifically for them. Results: We present a MP-specific homology-based coordinate generation method, MEDELLER, which is optimized to build highly reliable core models. The method outperforms the popular structure prediction programme Modeller on MPs. The comparison of the two methods was performed on 616 target–template pairs of MPs, which were classified into four test sets by their sequence identity. Across all targets, MEDELLER gave an average backbone root mean square deviation (RMSD) of 2.62 Å versus 3.16 Å for Modeller. On our ‘easy’ test set, MEDELLER achieves an average accuracy of 0.93 Å backbone RMSD versus 1.56 Å for Modeller. Availability and Implementation: http://medeller.info; Implemented in Python, Bash and Perl CGI for use on Linux systems; Supplementary data are available at http://www.stats.ox.ac.uk/proteins/resources. Contact: kelm@stats.ox.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:20926421

  19. A DNA-based method for detecting homologous blood doping.

    PubMed

    Manokhina, Irina; Rupert, James L

    2013-12-01

    Homologous (or allogeneic) blood doping, in which blood is transferred from a donor into a recipient athlete, is the easiest, cheapest, and fastest way to increase red cell mass (hematocrit) and therefore the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood. Although thought to have been rendered obsolete as a doping strategy by the increased use of rhEPO to increased hematocrits, there is evidence that athletes are still using this potentially dangerous method to improve endurance performance. Current testing for homologous blood doping is based on identification of mixed populations of red blood cells by flow cytometry. This paper proposes that homologous blood doping could also be tested for by high-resolution qPCR-based genotyping and demonstrates that assays could be developed that would detect second populations of cells even if the "donor" blood was depleted of 99% of the DNA-containing leukocytes. Issues of test specificity and sensitivity are discussed as well as some of the ethical considerations that would have to be addressed if athletes' genotypes were to be used by the anti-doping authorities to prevent, or detect, the use of prohibited ergogenic practices. PMID:23842898

  20. Identification of viruses and viroids by next-generation sequencing and homology-dependent and homology-independent algorithms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qingfa; Ding, Shou-Wei; Zhang, Yongjiang; Zhu, Shuifang

    2015-01-01

    A fast, accurate, and full indexing of viruses and viroids in a sample for the inspection and quarantine services and disease management is desirable but was unrealistic until recently. This article reviews the rapid and exciting recent progress in the use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies for the identification of viruses and viroids in plants. A total of four viroids/viroid-like RNAs and 49 new plant RNA and DNA viruses from 18 known or unassigned virus families have been identified from plants since 2009. A comparison of enrichment strategies reveals that full indexing of RNA and DNA viruses as well as viroids in a plant sample at single-nucleotide resolution is made possible by one NGS run of total small RNAs, followed by data mining with homology-dependent and homology-independent computational algorithms. Major challenges in the application of NGS technologies to pathogen discovery are discussed. PMID:26047558

  1. Identification of SHIP-1 and SHIP-2 homologs in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Src homology domain 2 (SH2) domain-containing inositol 5’-phosphatases (SHIP) proteins have diverse roles in signal transduction. SHIP-1 and SHIP-2 homologs were identified in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, based on sequence homology to murine and human SHIP sequences. Full-length cDNAs for ...

  2. The PIKE Homolog Centaurin gamma Regulates Developmental Timing in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Sendscheid, Oliver; Aberle, Hermann; Hoch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoinositide-3-kinase enhancer (PIKE) proteins encoded by the PIKE/CENTG1 gene are members of the gamma subgroup of the Centaurin superfamily of small GTPases. They are characterized by their chimeric protein domain architecture consisting of a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, a GTPase-activating (GAP) domain, Ankyrin repeats as well as an intrinsic GTPase domain. In mammals, three PIKE isoforms with variations in protein structure and subcellular localization are encoded by the PIKE locus. PIKE inactivation in mice results in a broad range of defects, including neuronal cell death during brain development and misregulation of mammary gland development. PIKE -/- mutant mice are smaller, contain less white adipose tissue, and show insulin resistance due to misregulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and insulin receptor/Akt signaling. here, we have studied the role of PIKE proteins in metabolic regulation in the fly. We show that the Drosophila PIKE homolog, ceng1A, encodes functional GTPases whose internal GAP domains catalyze their GTPase activity. To elucidate the biological function of ceng1A in flies, we introduced a deletion in the ceng1A gene by homologous recombination that removes all predicted functional PIKE domains. We found that homozygous ceng1A mutant animals survive to adulthood. In contrast to PIKE -/- mouse mutants, genetic ablation of Drosophila ceng1A does not result in growth defects or weight reduction. Although metabolic pathways such as insulin signaling, sensitivity towards starvation and mobilization of lipids under high fed conditions are not perturbed in ceng1A mutants, homozygous ceng1A mutants show a prolonged development in second instar larval stage, leading to a late onset of pupariation. In line with these results we found that expression of ecdysone inducible genes is reduced in ceng1A mutants. Together, we propose a novel role for Drosophila Ceng1A in regulating ecdysone signaling-dependent second to third instar

  3. An expert system for processing sequence homology data.

    PubMed

    Sonnhammer, E L; Durbin, R

    1994-01-01

    When confronted with the task of finding homology to large numbers of sequences, database searching tools such as Blast and Fasta generate prohibitively large amounts of information. An automatic way of making most of the decisions a trained sequence analyst would make was developed by means of a rule-based expert system combined with an algorithm to avoid non-informative biased residue composition matches. The results found relevant by the system are presented in a very concise and clear way, so that the homology can be assessed with minimum effort. The expert system, HSPcrunch, was implemented to process the output to the programs in the BLAST suite. HSPcrunch embodies rules on detecting distant similarities when pairs of weak matches are consistent with a larger gapped alignment, i.e. when Blast has broken a longer gapped alignment up into smaller ungapped ones. This way, more distant similarities can be detected with no or little side-effects of more spurious matches. The rules for how small the gaps must be to be considered significant have been derived empirically. Currently a set of rules are used that operate on two different scoring levels, one for very weak matches that have very small gaps and one for medium weak matches that have slightly larger gaps. This set of rules proved to be robust for most cases and gives high fidelity separation between real homologies and spurious matches. One of the most important rules for reducing the amount of output is to limit the number of overlapping matches to the same region of the query sequence.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7584413

  4. An expert system for processing sequence homology data

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnhammer, E.L.L.; Durbin, R.

    1994-12-31

    When confronted with the task of finding homology to large numbers of sequences, database searching tools such as Blast and Fasta generate prohibitively large amounts of information. An automatic way of making most of the decisions a trained sequence analyst would make was developed by means of a rule-based expert system combined with an algorithm to avoid non-informative biased residue composition matches. The results found relevant by the system are presented in a very concise and clear way, so that the homology can be assessed with minimum effort. The expert system, HSPcrunch, was implemented to process the output of the programs in the BLAST suite. HSPcrunch embodies rules on detecting distant similarities when pairs of weak matches are consistent with a larger gaped alignment, i.e. when Blast has broken a longer gaped alignment up into smaller ungaped ones. This way, more distant similarities can be detected with no or little side-effects of more spurious matches. The rules for how small the gaps must be to be considered significant have been derived empirically. Currently a set of rules are used that operate on two different scoring levels, one for very weak matches that have very small gaps and one for medium weak matches that have slightly larger gaps. This set of rules proved to be robust for most cases and gives high fidelity separation between real homologies and spurious matches, One of the most important rules for reducing the amount of output is to limit the number of overlapping matches to the same region of the query sequence. This way, a region with many high-scoring matches will not dominate the output and hide weaker but relevant matches to other regions. This is particularly valuable for multi-domain queries.

  5. Homologous Recombination Assay for Interstrand Cross-Link Repair

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Koji; Cavallo, Francesca; Brunet, Erika; Jasin, Maria

    2012-01-01

    DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) covalently link both strands of the DNA duplex, impeding cellular processes like DNA replication. Homologous recombination (HR) is considered to be a major pathway for the repair of ICLs in mammalian cells as mutants for HR components are highly sensitive to DNA-damaging agents that cause ICLs. This chapter describes GFP assays to measure HR following site-specific ICL formation with psoralen through DNA triplex technology. This approach can be used to determine the genetic requirements for ICL-induced HR in relation to those involved in HR repair of other DNA lesions such as double-strand breaks. PMID:21660700

  6. Parallel Computation of Persistent Homology using the Blowup Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Ryan; Morozov, Dmitriy

    2015-04-27

    We describe a parallel algorithm that computes persistent homology, an algebraic descriptor of a filtered topological space. Our algorithm is distinguished by operating on a spatial decomposition of the domain, as opposed to a decomposition with respect to the filtration. We rely on a classical construction, called the Mayer--Vietoris blowup complex, to glue global topological information about a space from its disjoint subsets. We introduce an efficient algorithm to perform this gluing operation, which may be of independent interest, and describe how to process the domain hierarchically. We report on a set of experiments that help assess the strengths and identify the limitations of our method.

  7. The colocalization transition of homologous chromosomes at meiosis.

    PubMed

    Nicodemi, Mario; Panning, Barbara; Prisco, Antonella

    2008-06-01

    Meiosis is the specialized cell division required in sexual reproduction. During its early stages, in the mother cell nucleus, homologous chromosomes recognize each other and colocalize in a crucial step that remains one of the most mysterious of meiosis. Starting from recent discoveries on the system molecular components and interactions, we discuss a statistical mechanics model of chromosome early pairing. Binding molecules mediate long-distance interaction of special DNA recognition sequences and, if their concentration exceeds a critical threshold, they induce a spontaneous colocalization transition of chromosomes, otherwise independently diffusing. PMID:18643306

  8. The colocalization transition of homologous chromosomes at meiosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicodemi, Mario; Panning, Barbara; Prisco, Antonella

    2008-06-01

    Meiosis is the specialized cell division required in sexual reproduction. During its early stages, in the mother cell nucleus, homologous chromosomes recognize each other and colocalize in a crucial step that remains one of the most mysterious of meiosis. Starting from recent discoveries on the system molecular components and interactions, we discuss a statistical mechanics model of chromosome early pairing. Binding molecules mediate long-distance interaction of special DNA recognition sequences and, if their concentration exceeds a critical threshold, they induce a spontaneous colocalization transition of chromosomes, otherwise independently diffusing.

  9. Structure of a 6-pyruvoyltetrahydropterin synthase homolog from Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Spoonamore, James E.; Roberts, Sue A.; Heroux, Annie; Bandarian, Vahe

    2008-01-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of the 6-pyruvoyltetrahydropterin synthase (PTPS) homolog from Streptomyces coelicolor, SCO 6650, was solved at 1.5 Å resolution. SCO 6650 forms a hexameric T-fold that closely resembles other PTPS proteins. The biological activity of SCO 6650 is unknown, but it lacks both a required active-site zinc metal ion and the essential catalytic triad and does not catalyze the PTPS reaction. However, SCO 6650 maintains active-site residues consistent with binding a pterin-like substrate. PMID:18931427

  10. Solution Structures of Two Homologous Venom Peptides from Sicarius dolichocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Loening, Nikolaus M.; Wilson, Zachary N.; Zobel-Thropp, Pamela A.; Binford, Greta J.

    2013-01-01

    We present solution-state NMR structures for two putative venom peptides from Sicarius dolichocephalus. These peptides were identified from cDNA libraries created from venom gland mRNA and then recombinantly expressed. They are the first structures from any species of Sicarius spiders, and the first peptide structures for any haplogyne spiders. These peptides are homologous to one another, and while they have at most only 20% sequence identity with known venom peptides their structures follow the inhibitor cystine knot motif that has been found in a broad range of venom peptides. PMID:23342149

  11. Homologous recombination deficiency: Exploiting the fundamental vulnerability of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A.; Ceccaldi, Raphael; Shapiro, Geoffrey I.; D’Andrea, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 50% of epithelial ovarian cancers (EOCs) exhibit defective DNA repair via homologous recombination (HR) due to genetic and epigenetic alterations of HR pathway genes. Defective HR is an important therapeutic target in EOC as exemplified by the efficacy of platinum analogues in this disease, as well as the advent of poly-ADP ribose polymerase inhibitors which exhibit synthetic lethality when applied to HR deficient cells. Here, we describe the genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of HR deficient EOCs, discuss current and emerging approaches for targeting these tumors, and present challenges associated with these approaches focusing on development and overcoming resistance. PMID:26463832

  12. Polyethylene glycol-based homologated ligands for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors☆

    PubMed Central

    Scates, Bradley A.; Lashbrook, Bethany L.; Chastain, Benjamin C.; Tominaga, Kaoru; Elliott, Brandon T.; Theising, Nicholas J.; Baker, Thomas A.; Fitch, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    A homologous series of polyethylene glycol (PEG) monomethyl ethers were conjugated with three ligand series for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Conjugates of acetylaminocholine, the cyclic analog 1-acetyl-4,4-dimethylpiperazinium, and pyridyl ether A-84543 were prepared. Each series was found to retain significant affinity at nicotinic receptors in rat cerebral cortex with tethers of up to six PEG units. Such compounds are hydrophilic ligands which may serve as models for fluorescent/affinity probes and multivalent ligands for nAChR. PMID:19006672

  13. Non-homologous end joining: advances and frontiers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai; Guo, Rong; Xu, Dongyi

    2016-07-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most serious form of DNA damage. In human cells, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is the major pathway for the repair of DSBs. Different types of DSBs result in different subsets of NHEJ repair strategies. These variations in NHEJ repair strategies depend on numerous elements, such as the flexible recruitment of NHEJ-related proteins, the complexity of the DSB ends, and the spatial- and temporal-ordered formation of the multi-protein complex. On the one hand, current studies of DNA DSBs repair focus on the repair pathway choices between homologous recombination and classic or alternative NHEJ. On the other hand, increasing researches have also deepened the significance and dug into the cross-links between the NHEJ pathway and the area of genome organization and aging. Although remarkable progress has been made in elucidating the underlying principles during the past decades, the detailed mechanism of action in response to different types of DSBs remains largely unknown and needs further evaluation in the future study. PMID:27217473

  14. Sequence homologies in the protamine gene family of rainbow trout.

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, J M; McKenzie, D; Zhao, H Z; States, J C; Dixon, G H

    1983-01-01

    We have sequenced five different rainbow trout protamine genes plus their flanking regions. The genes are not clustered and do not contain intervening sequences. There is an extremely high degree of sequence conservation in the coding and 3' untranslated regions of the gene. Downstream sequences exhibit little homology though conserved regions are found 250 base pairs 3' to the gene. There are four regions upstream of the gene that are highly conserved in the six clones, including the canonical Goldberg - Hogness box which is 45 base pairs 5' to the coding region. A second homologous region is found 90 bases upstream. Although in the same approximate location as the CAAT box found upstream of other genes, it does not contain the canonical CAAT sequence. Further upstream of the protamine genes at -115 there is an A-T rich sequence while a 25 base pair conserved sequence is located 150 bases upstream. In addition we report the presence of a potential Z-DNA region of predominantly A-C repeats approximately one kilobase downstream of one of the genes. Images PMID:6308564

  15. Glutamate Receptor Homologs in Plants: Functions and Evolutionary Origins

    PubMed Central

    Price, Michelle Beth; Jelesko, John; Okumoto, Sakiko

    2012-01-01

    The plant glutamate-like receptor homologs (GLRs) are homologs of mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) which were discovered more than 10 years ago, and are hypothesized to be potential amino acid sensors in plants. Although initial progress on this gene family has been hampered by gene redundancy and technical issues such as gene toxicity; genetic, pharmacological, and electrophysiological approaches are starting to uncover the functions of this protein family. In parallel, there has been tremendous progress in elucidating the structure of animal glutamate receptors (iGluRs), which in turn will help understanding of the molecular mechanisms of plant GLR functions. In this review, we will summarize recent progress on the plant GLRs. Emerging evidence implicates plant GLRs in various biological processes in and beyond N sensing, and implies that there is some overlap in the signaling mechanisms of amino acids between plants and animals. Phylogenetic analysis using iGluRs from metazoans, plants, and bacteria showed that the plant GLRs are no more closely related to metazoan iGluRs as they are to bacterial iGluRs, indicating the separation of plant, other eukaryotic, and bacterial GLRs might have happened as early on as the last universal common ancestor. Structural similarities and differences with animal iGluRs, and the implication thereof, are also discussed. PMID:23115559

  16. Persistent homology analysis of protein structure, flexibility and folding

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Proteins are the most important biomolecules for living organisms. The understanding of protein structure, function, dynamics and transport is one of most challenging tasks in biological science. In the present work, persistent homology is, for the first time, introduced for extracting molecular topological fingerprints (MTFs) based on the persistence of molecular topological invariants. MTFs are utilized for protein characterization, identification and classification. The method of slicing is proposed to track the geometric origin of protein topological invariants. Both all-atom and coarse-grained representations of MTFs are constructed. A new cutoff-like filtration is proposed to shed light on the optimal cutoff distance in elastic network models. Based on the correlation between protein compactness, rigidity and connectivity, we propose an accumulated bar length generated from persistent topological invariants for the quantitative modeling of protein flexibility. To this end, a correlation matrix based filtration is developed. This approach gives rise to an accurate prediction of the optimal characteristic distance used in protein B-factor analysis. Finally, MTFs are employed to characterize protein topological evolution during protein folding and quantitatively predict the protein folding stability. An excellent consistence between our persistent homology prediction and molecular dynamics simulation is found. This work reveals the topology-function relationship of proteins. PMID:24902720

  17. Persistent brain network homology from the perspective of dendrogram.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyekyoung; Kang, Hyejin; Chung, Moo K; Kim, Bung-Nyun; Lee, Dong Soo

    2012-12-01

    The brain network is usually constructed by estimating the connectivity matrix and thresholding it at an arbitrary level. The problem with this standard method is that we do not have any generally accepted criteria for determining a proper threshold. Thus, we propose a novel multiscale framework that models all brain networks generated over every possible threshold. Our approach is based on persistent homology and its various representations such as the Rips filtration, barcodes, and dendrograms. This new persistent homological framework enables us to quantify various persistent topological features at different scales in a coherent manner. The barcode is used to quantify and visualize the evolutionary changes of topological features such as the Betti numbers over different scales. By incorporating additional geometric information to the barcode, we obtain a single linkage dendrogram that shows the overall evolution of the network. The difference between the two networks is then measured by the Gromov-Hausdorff distance over the dendrograms. As an illustration, we modeled and differentiated the FDG-PET based functional brain networks of 24 attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder children, 26 autism spectrum disorder children, and 11 pediatric control subjects. PMID:23008247

  18. Homology of Melanoma-Inducing Loci in the Genus Xiphophorus

    PubMed Central

    Schartl, M.

    1990-01-01

    Several species of the genus Xiphophorus are polymorphic for specific pigment patterns. Some of these give rise to malignant melanoma following the appropriate crossings. For one of these pattern loci from the platyfish Xiphophorus maculatus the melanoma-inducing gene has been cloned and found to encode a novel receptor tyrosine kinase, designated Xmrk. Using molecular probes from this gene in Southern blot analyses on single fish DNA preparations from 600 specimens of different populations of various species of the genus Xiphophorus and their hybrids, either with or without melanoma-predisposing pattern, it was shown that all individuals contain the Xmrk gene as a proto-oncogene. It is located on the sex chromosome. All fish that carry a melanoma-predisposing locus which has been identified by Mendelian genetics contain an additional copy of Xmrk, closely linked to a specific melanophore pattern locus on the sex chromosome. The melanoma-inducing loci of the different species and populations are homologous. The additional copy of Xmrk obviously arose by a gene-duplication event, thereby acquiring the oncogenic potential. The homology of the melanoma-inducing loci points to a similar mechanism of tumor suppression in all feral fish populations of the different species of the genus Xiphophorus. PMID:1981761

  19. Tpr homologs in Treponema paraluiscuniculi Cuniculi A strain.

    PubMed

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Sun, Eileen S; Hevner, Karin; Molini, Barbara J; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Lukehart, Sheila A; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2004-11-01

    Treponema paraluiscuniculi, the etiologic agent of rabbit venereal syphilis, is morphologically indistinguishable from Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (T. pallidum), the human syphilis treponeme, and induces similar immune responses and histopathologic changes in the infected host. Because of their high degree of relatedness, comparative studies are likely to identify genetic determinants that contribute to pathogenesis or virulence in human syphilis. The tpr (Treponema pallidum repeat) genes are believed to code for potential virulence factors. In this study, we identified 10 tpr homologs in Treponema paraluiscuniculi Cuniculi A strain and determined their sequence architecture. Half of this group of paralogous genes were predicted to be nonfunctional due to the presence of frameshifts and premature stop codons. Furthermore, the immune response against the T. paraluiscuniculi Tpr homologs in long-term-infected rabbits was studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and lymphocyte proliferation assay, showing that TprK is the only target of the antibody and T-cell responses during experimental infection and emphasizing the importance of this putative virulence factor in venereal treponematosis. PMID:15501788

  20. MHD simulations of homologous and cannibalistic coronal mass ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yuhong; Chatterjee, Piyali

    2014-06-01

    We present magneto-hydrodynamic simulations of the development of a homologous sequence of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and demonstrate their so-called cannibalistic behavior. These CMEs originate from the repeated formations and partial eruptions of kink unstable flux ropes as a result of the continued emergence of a twisted flux rope across the lower boundary into a pre-existing coronal potential arcade field. The simulations show that a CME erupting into the open magnetic field created by a preceding CME has a higher speed, and therefore tends to be cannibalistic, catching up and merging with the preceding one into a single fast CME. All the CMEs attained speeds of about 1000 km/s as they exit the domain. The reformation of a twisted flux rope after each CME eruption during the sustained flux emergence can naturally explain the X-ray observations of repeated reformations of sigmoids and “sigmoid-under-cusp” configurations at a low-coronal source of homologous CMEs.

  1. Characterization of a canine homolog of hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Amit; Simmonds, Peter; Gerold, Gisa; Qaisar, Natasha; Jain, Komal; Henriquez, Jose A; Firth, Cadhla; Hirschberg, David L; Rice, Charles M; Shields, Shelly; Lipkin, W Ian

    2011-07-12

    An estimated 3% of the world's population is chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Although HCV was discovered more than 20 y ago, its origin remains obscure largely because no closely related animal virus homolog has been identified; furthermore, efforts to understand HCV pathogenesis have been hampered by the absence of animal models other than chimpanzees for human disease. Here we report the identification in domestic dogs of a nonprimate hepacivirus. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of the canine hepacivirus (CHV) confirmed it to be the most genetically similar animal virus homolog of HCV. Bayesian Markov chains Monte Carlo and associated time to most recent common ancestor analyses suggest a mean recent divergence time of CHV and HCV clades within the past 500-1,000 y, well after the domestication of canines. The discovery of CHV may provide new insights into the origin and evolution of HCV and a tractable model system with which to probe the pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of diseases caused by hepacivirus infection. PMID:21610165

  2. Insights into Hydrocarbon Formation by Nitrogenase Cofactor Homologs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi Chung; Hu, Yilin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The L-cluster is an all-iron homolog of nitrogenase cofactors. Driven by europium(II) diethylenetriaminepentaacetate [Eu(II)-DTPA], the isolated L-cluster is capable of ATP-independent reduction of CO and CN− to C1 to C4 and C1 to C6 hydrocarbons, respectively. Compared to its cofactor homologs, the L-cluster generates considerably more CH4 from the reduction of CO and CN−, which could be explained by the presence of a “free” Fe atom that is “unmasked” by homocitrate as an additional site for methanation. Moreover, the elevated CH4 formation is accompanied by a decrease in the amount of longer hydrocarbons and/or the lengths of the hydrocarbon products, illustrating a competition between CH4 formation/release and C−C coupling/chain extension. These observations suggest the possibility of designing simpler synthetic clusters for hydrocarbon formation while establishing the L-cluster as a platform for mechanistic investigations of CO and CN− reduction without complications originating from the heterometal and homocitrate components. PMID:25873377

  3. On discrete symmetries and torsion homology in F-theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayrhofer, Christoph; Palti, Eran; Till, Oskar; Weigand, Timo

    2015-06-01

    We study the relation between discrete gauge symmetries in F-theory compactifications and torsion homology on the associated Calabi-Yau manifold. Focusing on the simplest example of a symmetry, we show that there are two physically distinct ways that such a discrete gauge symmetry can arise. First, compactifications of M-Theory on Calabi-Yau threefolds which support a genus-one fibration with a bi-section are known to be dual to six-dimensional F-theory vacua with a gauge symmetry. We show that the resulting five-dimensional theories do not have a symmetry but that the latter emerges only in the F-theory decompactification limit. Accordingly the genus-one fibred Calabi-Yau manifolds do not exhibit torsion in homology. Associated to the bi-section fibration is a Jacobian fibration which does support a section. Compactifying on these related but distinct varieties does lead to a symmetry in five dimensions and, accordingly, we find explicitly an associated torsion cycle. We identify the expected particle and membrane system of the discrete symmetry in terms of wrapped M2 and M5 branes and present a field-theory description of the physics for both cases in terms of circle reductions of six-dimensional theories. Our results and methods generalise straightforwardly to larger discrete symmetries and to four-dimensional compactifications.

  4. Cockroach homologs of praying mantis peripheral auditory system components.

    PubMed

    Yager, David D

    2005-07-01

    This study identifies the cuticular metathoracic structures in earless cockroaches that are the homologs to the peripheral auditory components in their sister taxon, praying mantids, and defines the nature of the cuticular transition from earless to eared in the Dictyoptera. The single, midline ear of mantids comprises an auditory chamber with complex walls that contain the tympana and chordotonal transduction elements. The corresponding area in cockroaches, between the furcasternum and coxae, has many socketed hairs arranged in discrete fields and the Nerve 7 chordotonal organ, the homolog of the mantis tympanal organ. The Nerve 7 chordotonal organ attaches at the apex of the lateral ventropleurite (LVp), which has the same shape and general structure as an auditory chamber wall. High-speed video shows that when the coxa moves toward the midline, the LVp rotates medially to stimulate socketed hairs, and also moves like a triangular hinge giving the chordotonal organ maximal in-out stimulation. Formation of the mantis auditory chamber from the LVp and adjacent structures would involve only enlargement, a shift toward the midline, and a mild rotation. Almost all proprioceptive function would be lost, which may constitute the major cost of building and maintaining the mantis ear. Isolation from leg movement dictates the position of the mantis ear in the midline and the rigid frame, formed by the cuticular knobs, which protects the chordotonal organs. PMID:15887266

  5. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic RNA polymerases have homologous core subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Sweetser, D; Nonet, M; Young, R A

    1987-01-01

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerases are complex aggregates whose component subunits are functionally ill-defined. The gene that encodes the 140,000-dalton subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase II was isolated and studied in detail to obtain clues to the protein's function. This gene, RPB2, exists in a single copy in the haploid genome. Disruption of the gene is lethal to the yeast cell. RPB2 encodes a protein of 138,750 daltons, which contains sequences implicated in binding purine nucleotides and zinc ions and exhibits striking sequence homology with the beta subunit of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. These observations suggest that the yeast and the E. coli subunit have similar roles in RNA synthesis, as the beta subunit contains binding sites for nucleotide substrates and a portion of the catalytic site for RNA synthesis. The subunit homologies reported here, and those observed previously with the largest RNA polymerase subunit, indicate that components of the prokaryotic RNA polymerase "core" enzyme have counterparts in eukaryotic RNA polymerases. PMID:3547406

  6. Characterization of a canine homolog of hepatitis C virus

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Amit; Simmonds, Peter; Gerold, Gisa; Qaisar, Natasha; Jain, Komal; Henriquez, Jose A.; Firth, Cadhla; Hirschberg, David L.; Rice, Charles M.; Shields, Shelly; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2011-01-01

    An estimated 3% of the world's population is chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Although HCV was discovered more than 20 y ago, its origin remains obscure largely because no closely related animal virus homolog has been identified; furthermore, efforts to understand HCV pathogenesis have been hampered by the absence of animal models other than chimpanzees for human disease. Here we report the identification in domestic dogs of a nonprimate hepacivirus. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of the canine hepacivirus (CHV) confirmed it to be the most genetically similar animal virus homolog of HCV. Bayesian Markov chains Monte Carlo and associated time to most recent common ancestor analyses suggest a mean recent divergence time of CHV and HCV clades within the past 500–1,000 y, well after the domestication of canines. The discovery of CHV may provide new insights into the origin and evolution of HCV and a tractable model system with which to probe the pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of diseases caused by hepacivirus infection. PMID:21610165

  7. [Use of homologous erythrocyte concentrates. Analysis of economical factors].

    PubMed

    Janvier, G; Dugrais, G; Winnock, S; Vallet, A; Dardel, E; Mary, F; Erny, P; Vezon, G

    1991-01-01

    The factors involved in reducing consumption of bank packed red cells (PRC) were studied over three one year periods (1983, 1987 and 1989) in a Department of Vascular and General Surgery. The effects of autologous blood salvage (started in 1987), associated with the management of homologous blood by a branch of the blood bank inside the operating theater suite were assessed. In 1989, intentional normovolaemic haemodilution became virtually systematic, on top of the intraoperative blood salvage, for all patients due to undergo surgery with a risk of severe blood loss. The number of surgical procedures carried out during those three years did not vary. However, in the same time, the annual consumption of homologous PRC decreased by an overall 56% (36.7% between 1983 and 1987, and 29.8% between 1987 and 1989). This decrease was mostly due to a fall in prescription in the operating theaters, and not in the wards. In the same time, albumin consumption increased sixfold. Such transfusional policies can only be carried out if there is good cooperation between the blood bank and the prescribers of blood products. PMID:1928854

  8. Flexible mapping of homology onto structure with Homolmapper

    PubMed Central

    Rockwell, Nathan C; Lagarias, J Clark

    2007-01-01

    Background Over the past decade, a number of tools have emerged for the examination of homology relationships among protein sequences in a structural context. Most recent software implementations for such analysis are tied to specific molecular viewing programs, which can be problematic for collaborations involving multiple viewing environments. Incorporation into larger packages also adds complications for users interested in adding their own scoring schemes or in analyzing proteins incorporating unusual amino acid residues such as selenocysteine. Results We describe homolmapper, a command-line application for mapping information from a multiple protein sequence alignment onto a protein structure for analysis in the viewing software of the user's choice. Homolmapper is small (under 250 K for the application itself) and is written in Python to ensure portability. It is released for non-commercial use under a modified University of California BSD license. Homolmapper permits facile import of additional scoring schemes and can incorporate arbitrary additional amino acids to allow handling of residues such as selenocysteine or pyrrolysine. Homolmapper also provides tools for defining and analyzing subfamilies relative to a larger alignment, for mutual information analysis, and for rapidly visualizing the locations of mutations and multi-residue motifs. Conclusion Homolmapper is a useful tool for analysis of homology relationships among proteins in a structural context. There is also extensive, example-driven documentation available. More information about homolmapper is available at . PMID:17428344

  9. Multidrug resistance ABC transporter structure predictions by homology modeling approaches.

    PubMed

    Honorat, Mylène; Falson, Pierre; Terreux, Raphael; Di Pietro, Attilio; Dumontet, Charles; Payen, Léa

    2011-03-01

    Human multidrug resistance ABC transporters are ubiquitous membrane proteins responsible for the efflux of multiple, endogenous or exogenous, compounds out of the cells, and therefore they are involved in multi-drug resistance phenotype (MDR). They thus deeply impact the pharmacokinetic parameters and toxicity properties of drugs. A great pressure to develop inhibitors of these pumps is carried out, by either ligand-based drug design or (more ideally) structure-based drug design. In that goal, many biochemical studies have been carried out to characterize their transport functions, and many efforts have been spent to get high-resolution structures. Currently, beside the 3D-structures of bacterial ABC transporters Sav1866 and MsbA, only the mouse ABCB1 complete structure has been published at high-resolution, illustrating the tremendous difficulty in getting such information, taking into account that the human genome accounts for 48 ABC transporters encoding genes. Homology modeling is consequently a reasonable approach to overcome this obstacle. The present review describes, in the first part, the different approaches which have been published to set up human ABC pump 3D-homology models allowing the localization of binding sites for drug candidates, and the identification of critical residues therein. In a second part, the review proposes a more accurate strategy and practical keys to use such biological tools for initiating structure-based drug design. PMID:21470105

  10. CRISPR/Cas9 Genome Editing in Caenorhabditis elegans: Evaluation of Templates for Homology-Mediated Repair and Knock-Ins by Homology-Independent DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Katic, Iskra; Xu, Lan; Ciosk, Rafal

    2015-08-01

    Precise genome editing by the Cas9 nuclease depends on exogenously provided templates for homologous recombination. Here, we compare oligonucleotides with short homology and circular DNA molecules with extensive homology to genomic targets as templates for homology-based repair of CRISPR/Cas9 induced double-strand breaks. We find oligonucleotides to be templates of choice for introducing small sequence changes into the genome based on editing efficiency and ease of use. We show that polarity of oligonucleotide templates greatly affects repair efficiency: oligonucleotides in the sense orientation with respect to the target gene are better templates. In addition, combining a gene loss-of-function phenotype screen with detection of integrated fluorescent markers, we demonstrate that targeted knock-ins in Caenorhabditis elegans also can be achieved by homology-independent repair. PMID:26044730

  11. CRISPR/Cas9 Genome Editing in Caenorhabditis elegans: Evaluation of Templates for Homology-Mediated Repair and Knock-Ins by Homology-Independent DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Katic, Iskra; Xu, Lan; Ciosk, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    Precise genome editing by the Cas9 nuclease depends on exogenously provided templates for homologous recombination. Here, we compare oligonucleotides with short homology and circular DNA molecules with extensive homology to genomic targets as templates for homology-based repair of CRISPR/Cas9 induced double-strand breaks. We find oligonucleotides to be templates of choice for introducing small sequence changes into the genome based on editing efficiency and ease of use. We show that polarity of oligonucleotide templates greatly affects repair efficiency: oligonucleotides in the sense orientation with respect to the target gene are better templates. In addition, combining a gene loss-of-function phenotype screen with detection of integrated fluorescent markers, we demonstrate that targeted knock-ins in Caenorhabditis elegans also can be achieved by homology-independent repair. PMID:26044730

  12. A Case of Abnormal Lymphatic-Like Differentiation and Endothelial Progenitor Cell Activation in Neovascularization Associated with Hemi-Retinal Vein Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Loukovaara, Sirpa; Gucciardo, Erika; Repo, Pauliina; Lohi, Jouko; Salven, Petri; Lehti, Kaisa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pathological vascular differentiation in retinal vein occlusion (RVO)-related neovessel formation remains poorly characterized. The role of intraocular lymphatic-like differentiation or endothelial progenitor cell activity has not been studied in this disease. Methods Vitrectomy was performed in an eye with hemi-RVO; the neovessel membrane located at the optic nerve head was removed and subjected to immunohistochemistry. Characterization of the neovascular tissue was performed using hematoxylin and eosin, α-smooth muscle actin, and the pan-endothelial cell (EC) adhesion molecule CD31. The expression of lymphatic EC markers was studied by lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 (LYVE-1), podoplanin (PDPN), and prospero-related homeobox protein 1 (Prox-1). Potential vascular stem/progenitor cells were identified by active cellular proliferation (Ki67) and expression of the stem cell marker CD117. Results The specimen contained blood vessels lined by ECs and surrounded by pericytes. Immunoreactivity for LYVE-1 and Prox-1 was detected, with Prox-1 being more widely expressed in the active Ki67-positive lumen-lining cells. PDPN expression was instead found in the cells residing in the extravascular tissue. Expression of the stem cell markers CD117 and Ki67 suggested vascular endothelial progenitor cell activity. Conclusions Intraocular lymphatic-like differentiation coupled with progenitor cell activation may be involved in the pathology of neovessel formation in ischemia-induced human hemi-RVO. PMID:26327908

  13. Structures of Arg- and Gln-type bacterial cysteine dioxygenase homologs: Arg- and Gln-type Bacterial CDO Homologs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Driggers, Camden M.; Hartman, Steven J.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In some bacteria, cysteine is converted to cysteine sulfinic acid by cysteine dioxygenases (CDO) that are only ~15–30% identical in sequence to mammalian CDOs. Among bacterial proteins having this range of sequence similarity to mammalian CDO are some that conserve an active site Arg residue (“Arg-type” enzymes) and some having a Gln substituted for this Arg (“Gln-type” enzymes). Here, we describe a structure from each of these enzyme types by analyzing structures originally solved by structural genomics groups but not published: a Bacillus subtilis “Arg-type” enzyme that has cysteine dioxygenase activity (BsCDO), and a Ralstonia eutropha “Gln-type” CDO homolog ofmore » uncharacterized activity (ReCDOhom). The BsCDO active site is well conserved with mammalian CDO, and a cysteine complex captured in the active site confirms that the cysteine binding mode is also similar. The ReCDOhom structure reveals a new active site Arg residue that is hydrogen bonding to an iron-bound diatomic molecule we have interpreted as dioxygen. Notably, the Arg position is not compatible with the mode of Cys binding seen in both rat CDO and BsCDO. As sequence alignments show that this newly discovered active site Arg is well conserved among “Gln-type” CDO enzymes, we conclude that the “Gln-type” CDO homologs are not authentic CDOs but will have substrate specificity more similar to 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenases.« less

  14. Homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining repair pathways in bovine embryos with different developmental competence

    SciTech Connect

    Henrique Barreta, Marcos; Garziera Gasperin, Bernardo; Braga Rissi, Vitor; Cesaro, Matheus Pedrotti de; Ferreira, Rogerio; Oliveira, Joao Francisco de; Goncalves, Paulo Bayard Dias; Bordignon, Vilceu

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the expression of genes controlling homologous recombination (HR), and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) DNA-repair pathways in bovine embryos of different developmental potential. It also evaluated whether bovine embryos can respond to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced with ultraviolet irradiation by regulating expression of genes involved in HR and NHEJ repair pathways. Embryos with high, intermediate or low developmental competence were selected based on the cleavage time after in vitro insemination and were removed from in vitro culture before (36 h), during (72 h) and after (96 h) the expected period of embryonic genome activation. All studied genes were expressed before, during and after the genome activation period regardless the developmental competence of the embryos. Higher mRNA expression of 53BP1 and RAD52 was found before genome activation in embryos with low developmental competence. Expression of 53BP1, RAD51 and KU70 was downregulated at 72 h and upregulated at 168 h post-insemination in response to DSBs induced by ultraviolet irradiation. In conclusion, important genes controlling HR and NHEJ DNA-repair pathways are expressed in bovine embryos, however genes participating in these pathways are only regulated after the period of embryo genome activation in response to ultraviolet-induced DSBs.

  15. Structures of Arg- and Gln-type bacterial cysteine dioxygenase homologs: Arg- and Gln-type Bacterial CDO Homologs

    SciTech Connect

    Driggers, Camden M.; Hartman, Steven J.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In some bacteria, cysteine is converted to cysteine sulfinic acid by cysteine dioxygenases (CDO) that are only ~15–30% identical in sequence to mammalian CDOs. Among bacterial proteins having this range of sequence similarity to mammalian CDO are some that conserve an active site Arg residue (“Arg-type” enzymes) and some having a Gln substituted for this Arg (“Gln-type” enzymes). Here, we describe a structure from each of these enzyme types by analyzing structures originally solved by structural genomics groups but not published: a Bacillus subtilis “Arg-type” enzyme that has cysteine dioxygenase activity (BsCDO), and a Ralstonia eutropha “Gln-type” CDO homolog of uncharacterized activity (ReCDOhom). The BsCDO active site is well conserved with mammalian CDO, and a cysteine complex captured in the active site confirms that the cysteine binding mode is also similar. The ReCDOhom structure reveals a new active site Arg residue that is hydrogen bonding to an iron-bound diatomic molecule we have interpreted as dioxygen. Notably, the Arg position is not compatible with the mode of Cys binding seen in both rat CDO and BsCDO. As sequence alignments show that this newly discovered active site Arg is well conserved among “Gln-type” CDO enzymes, we conclude that the “Gln-type” CDO homologs are not authentic CDOs but will have substrate specificity more similar to 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenases.

  16. Sequence analysis and homology modeling of laccase from Pycnoporus cinnabarinus.

    PubMed

    Meshram, Rohan J; Gavhane, Aj; Gaikar, Rb; Bansode, Ts; Maskar, Au; Gupta, Ak; Sohni, Sk; Patidar, Ma; Pandey, Tr; Jangle, Sn

    2010-01-01

    Industrial effluents of textile, paper, and leather industries contain various toxic dyes as one of the waste material. It imparts major impact on human health as well as environment. The white rot fungus Pycnoporus cinnabarinus Laccase is generally used to degrade these toxic dyes. In order to decipher the mechanism of process by which Laccase degrade dyes, it is essential to know its 3D structure. Homology modeling was performed in presented work, by satisfying Spatial restrains using Modeller Program, which is considered as standard in this field, to generate 3D structure of Laccase in unison, SWISSMODEL web server was also utilized to generate and verify the alternative models. We observed that models created using Modeller stands better on structure evaluation tests. This study can further be used in molecular docking techniques, to understand the interaction of enzyme with its mediators like 2, 2-azinobis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) and Vanillin that are known to enhance the Laccase activity. PMID:21364777

  17. Cell-type homologies and the origins of the neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Dugas-Ford, Jennifer; Rowell, Joanna J.; Ragsdale, Clifton W.

    2012-01-01

    The six-layered neocortex is a uniquely mammalian structure with evolutionary origins that remain in dispute. One long-standing hypothesis, based on similarities in neuronal connectivity, proposes that homologs of the layer 4 input and layer 5 output neurons of neocortex are present in the avian forebrain, where they contribute to specific nuclei rather than to layers. We devised a molecular test of this hypothesis based on layer-specific gene expression that is shared across rodent and carnivore neocortex. Our findings establish that the layer 4 input and the layer 5 output cell types are conserved across the amniotes, but are organized into very different architectures, forming nuclei in birds, cortical areas in reptiles, and cortical layers in mammals. PMID:23027930

  18. Evolutionary progression at synaptic connections made by identified homologous neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, S R; Meinertzhagen, I A

    1986-01-01

    A comparative ultrastructural study of photoreceptor synapses formed upon homologous postsynaptic neurones in insects has been made by using serial-section electron microscopy in representative Diptera from a monophyletic series of 14 families. At all of the synaptic contacts there is a presynaptic dense bar, surmounted in phylogenetically more recent families by a presynaptic platform. Opposite the bar lies a pair of postsynaptic elements that invariably originate one each from two unique monopolar neurones L1 and L2. Both elements contain increasingly elaborate cisternae in more recent flies. Within the phylogenetic series, the postsynaptic ensemble itself changes from the original dyad to a tetradic configuration in more recent Muscomorpha by the addition of two new postsynaptic elements from an amacrine cell. This transition occurs once only in the series, which, gauged by the fossil record, covers divergences from the stem line extending back greater than 200 million years. Images PMID:3464012

  19. Crystal Structure of a Fructokinase Homolog from Halothermothrix orenii

    SciTech Connect

    Khiang, C.; Seetharaman, J; Kasprzak, J; Cherlyn, N; Patel, B; Love, C; Bujnicki, J; Sivaraman, J

    2010-01-01

    Fructokinase (FRK; EC 2.7.1.4) catalyzes the phosphorylation of D-fructose to D-fructose 6-phosphate (F6P). This irreversible and near rate-limiting step is a central and regulatory process in plants and bacteria, which channels fructose into a metabolically active state for glycolysis. Towards understanding the mechanism of FRK, here we report the crystal structure of a FRK homolog from a thermohalophilic bacterium Halothermothrix orenii (Hore{_}18220 in sequence databases). The structure of the Hore{_}18220 protein reveals a catalytic domain with a Rossmann-like fold and a b-sheet 'lid' for dimerization. Based on comparison of Hore{_}18220 to structures of related proteins, we propose its mechanism of action, in which the lid serves to regulate access to the substrate binding sites. Close relationship of Hore{_}18220 and plant FRK enzymes allows us to propose a model for the structure and function of FRKs.

  20. The Structure and Function of Bacterial Actin Homologs

    PubMed Central

    Shaevitz, Joshua W.; Gitai, Zemer

    2010-01-01

    During the past decade, the appreciation and understanding of how bacterial cells can be organized in both space and time have been revolutionized by the identification and characterization of multiple bacterial homologs of the eukaryotic actin cytoskeleton. Some of these bacterial actins, such as the plasmid-borne ParM protein, have highly specialized functions, whereas other bacterial actins, such as the chromosomally encoded MreB protein, have been implicated in a wide array of cellular activities. In this review we cover our current understanding of the structure, assembly, function, and regulation of bacterial actins. We focus on ParM as a well-understood reductionist model and on MreB as a central organizer of multiple aspects of bacterial cell biology. We also discuss the outstanding puzzles in the field and possible directions where this fast-developing area may progress in the future. PMID:20630996

  1. Optimised fine and coarse parallelism for sequence homology search.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiandong; Chaudhary, Vipin

    2006-01-01

    New biological experimental techniques are continuing to generate large amounts of data using DNA, RNA, human genome and protein sequences. The quantity and quality of data from these experiments makes analyses of their results very time-consuming, expensive and impractical. Searching on DNA and protein databases using sequence comparison algorithms has become one of the most powerful techniques to better understand the functionality of particular DNA, RNA, genome, or protein sequence. This paper presents a technique to effectively combine fine and coarse grain parallelism using general-purpose processors for sequence homology database searches. The results show that the classic Smith-Waterman sequence alignment algorithm achieves super linear performance with proper scheduling and multi-level parallel computing at no additional cost. PMID:18048183

  2. Homologies and homeotic transformation of the theropod 'semilunate' carpal.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xing; Han, Fenglu; Zhao, Qi

    2014-01-01

    The homology of the 'semilunate' carpal, an important structure linking non-avian and avian dinosaurs, has been controversial. Here we describe the morphology of some theropod wrists, demonstrating that the 'semilunate' carpal is not formed by the same carpal elements in all theropods possessing this feature and that the involvement of the lateralmost distal carpal in forming the 'semilunate' carpal of birds is an inheritance from their non-avian theropod ancestors. Optimization of relevant morphological features indicates that these features evolved in an incremental way and the 'semilunate' structure underwent a lateral shift in position during theropod evolution, possibly as a result of selection for foldable wings in birds and their close theropod relatives. We propose that homeotic transformation was involved in the evolution of the 'semilunate' carpal. In combination with developmental data on avian wing digits, this suggests that homeosis played a significant role in theropod hand evolution in general. PMID:25116378

  3. Trans-Homolog Interactions Facilitating Paramutation in Maize.

    PubMed

    Giacopelli, Brian John; Hollick, Jay Brian

    2015-08-01

    Paramutations represent locus-specific trans-homolog interactions affecting the heritable silencing properties of endogenous alleles. Although examples of paramutation are well studied in maize (Zea mays), the responsible mechanisms remain unclear. Genetic analyses indicate roles for plant-specific DNA-dependent RNA polymerases that generate small RNAs, and current working models hypothesize that these small RNAs direct heritable changes at sequences often acting as transcriptional enhancers. Several studies have defined specific sequences that mediate paramutation behaviors, and recent results identify a diversity of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase complexes operating in maize. Other reports ascribe broader roles for some of these complexes in normal genome function. This review highlights recent research to understand the molecular mechanisms of paramutation and examines evidence relevant to small RNA-based modes of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance. PMID:26149572

  4. Determination of complex magnetism in a homologous series of compounds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCallum, R. W.; Janssen, Y.; Lograsso, Ta.; Gschneidner, K. A., Jr.; Pecharsky, V. K.; Harmon, B. N.

    2006-03-01

    Pr(n+1)(n+2)Nin(n-1)+2Sin(n+1), where n = 2, 3, and 4, forms a homologous series of hexagonal compounds whose basic structural unit is a trigonal prism of Pr atoms with its axis parallel to the c-axis. Between 100 and 400 K, their dc susceptibility, χs measured with H||c and Hc on a single crystal follows a Curie-Weiss law. In all compounds, the component of M||c orders ferromagnetically with Tc increases with n. For Hc, a peak is observed in the low-field M vs T plots below Tc suggesting antiferromagnetic order. For Hc at 5 K, all three compounds exhibit a metamagnetic transition between 2 T and 3 T. Based on the systematics of the properties of the members of the series, a model for site specific interactions has been developed for comparison with first principles calculations.

  5. On the homology of the shoulder girdle in turtles.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Hiroshi; Sugahara, Fumiaki; Takechi, Masaki; Sato, Noboru; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2015-05-01

    The shoulder girdle in turtles is encapsulated in the shell and has a triradiate morphology. Due to its unique configuration among amniotes, many theories have been proposed about the skeletal identities of the projections for the past two centuries. Although the dorsal ramus represents the scapular blade, the ventral two rami remain uncertain. In particular, the ventrorostral process has been compared to a clavicle, an acromion, and a procoracoid based on its morphology, its connectivity to the rest of the skeleton and to muscles, as well as with its ossification center, cell lineage, and gene expression. In making these comparisons, the shoulder girdle skeleton of anurans has often been used as a reference. This review traces the history of the debate on the homology of the shoulder girdle in turtles. And based on the integrative aspects of developmental biology, comparative morphology, and paleontology, we suggest acromion and procoracoid identities for the two ventral processes. PMID:25052382

  6. Development and characterization of a homologous radioimmunoassay for equine prolactin

    SciTech Connect

    Roser, J.F.; Chang, Y.S.; Papkoff, H.; Li, C.H.

    1984-04-01

    A specific and sensitive homologous radioimmunoassay has been developed for equine prolactin, suitable for measuring prolactin concentrations in serum of horses. The sensitivity of the assay ranged from 0.4 to 0.6 ng/ml and the intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation averaged 6.9 and 15.4%, respectively, for five doses of hormone. Cross-reactivity with other mammalian and nonmammalian prolactins and growth hormones was less than 20 and 0.3%, respectively. Cross-reactivity with equine growth hormone was less than 0.07%. Equine serum and pituitary extracts showed parallel dilution-response curves with equine prolactin. The percentage recovery of exogenous equine prolactin in serum was 89%. Preliminary analysis of several physiological samples (stallions, pregnant, and nonpregnant mares) yielded values from 0.6 to 12.0 ng/ml.

  7. Topological Analysis of Rough Surfaces Using Persistent Homology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Ken

    2015-11-01

    This letter investigates rough surfaces using a topological method. The horizontal cross section of a rough surface consists of "islands", and we focus on the topological changes in the island shapes (generation and annihilation of islands and lakes) with changes in elevation. We apply persistent homology to track these topological changes. We numerically confirm that the life spans of the islands and lakes follow power-law distributions, whose scaling exponents vary according to the roughness of the surface. We also provide a theoretical explanation for the relation between these scaling exponents and the roughness exponent with a simple scaling argument. The proposed method successfully connects a topological property with the roughness of a surface.

  8. Homologous recombination is required for AAV-mediated gene targeting

    PubMed Central

    Vasileva, Ana; Linden, R. Michael; Jessberger, Rolf

    2006-01-01

    High frequencies of gene targeting can be achieved by infection of mammalian cells with recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors [D. W. Russell and R. K. Hirata (1998) Nature Genet., 18, 325–330; D. W. Russell and R. K. Hirata (2000) J. Virol., 74, 4612–4620; R. Hirata et al. (2002) Nat. Biotechnol., 20, 735–738], but the mechanism of targeting is unclear and random integration often occurs in parallel. We assessed the role of specific DNA repair and recombination pathways in rAAV gene targeting by measuring correction of a mutated enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene in cells where homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) had been suppressed by RNAi. EGFP-negative cells were transduced with rAAV vectors carrying a different inactivating deletion in the EGFP, and in parallel with rAAV vectors carrying red fluorescent protein (RFP). Expression of RFP accounted for viral transduction efficiency and long-term random integration. Approximately 0.02% of the infected GFP-negative cells were stably converted to GFP positive cells. Silencing of the essential NHEJ component DNA-PK had no significant effect on the frequency of targeting at any time point examined. Silencing of the SNF2/SWI2 family members RAD54L or RAD54B, which are important for HR, reduced the rate of stable rAAV gene targeting ∼5-fold. Further, partial silencing of the Rad51 paralogue XRCC3 completely abolished stable long-term EGFP expression. These results show that rAAV gene targeting requires the Rad51/Rad54 pathway of HR. PMID:16822856

  9. Perturbation analysis of a general polytropic homologously collapsing stellar core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi; Lou, Yu-Qing

    2009-12-01

    For dynamic background models of Goldreich & Weber and Lou & Cao, we examine three-dimensional perturbation properties of oscillations and instabilities in a general polytropic homologously collapsing stellar core of a relativistically hot medium with a polytropic index γ = 4/3. Perturbation behaviours, especially internal gravity g modes, depend on the variation of specific entropy in the collapsing core. Among possible perturbations, we identify acoustic p modes and surface f modes as well as internal gravity g+ and g- modes. As in stellar oscillations of a static star, we define g+ and g- modes by the sign of the Brunt-Väisälä buoyancy frequency squared for a collapsing stellar core. A new criterion for the onset of instabilities is established for a homologous stellar core collapse. We demonstrate that the global energy criterion of Chandrasekhar is insufficient to warrant the stability of general polytropic equilibria. We confirm the acoustic p-mode stability of Goldreich & Weber, even though their p-mode eigenvalues appear in systematic errors. Unstable modes include g- modes and sufficiently high-order g+ modes, corresponding to core instabilities. Such instabilities occur before the stellar core bounce, in contrast to instabilities in other models of supernova (SN) explosions. The breakdown of spherical symmetry happens earlier than expected in numerical simulations so far. The formation and motion of the central compact object are speculated to be much affected by such g-mode instabilities. By estimates of typical parameters, unstable low-order l = 1 g-modes may produce initial kicks of the central compact object. Other high-order and high-degree unstable g modes may shred the nascent neutron core into pieces without an eventual compact remnant (e.g. SN 1987A). Formation of binary pulsars and planets around neutron stars might originate from unstable l = 2 g-modes and high-order high-degree g modes, respectively.

  10. Is homologous recombination really an error-free process?

    PubMed Central

    Guirouilh-Barbat, Josée; Lambert, Sarah; Bertrand, Pascale; Lopez, Bernard S.

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is an evolutionarily conserved process that plays a pivotal role in the equilibrium between genetic stability and diversity. HR is commonly considered to be error-free, but several studies have shown that HR can be error-prone. Here, we discuss the actual accuracy of HR. First, we present the product of genetic exchanges (gene conversion, GC, and crossing over, CO) and the mechanisms of HR during double strand break repair and replication restart. We discuss the intrinsic capacities of HR to generate genome rearrangements by GC or CO, either during DSB repair or replication restart. During this process, abortive HR intermediates generate genetic instability and cell toxicity. In addition to genome rearrangements, HR also primes error-prone DNA synthesis and favors mutagenesis on single stranded DNA, a key DNA intermediate during the HR process. The fact that cells have developed several mechanisms protecting against HR excess emphasize its potential risks. Consistent with this duality, several pro-oncogenic situations have been consistently associated with either decreased or increased HR levels. Nevertheless, this versatility also has advantages that we outline here. We conclude that HR is a double-edged sword, which on one hand controls the equilibrium between genome stability and diversity but, on the other hand, can jeopardize the maintenance of genomic integrity. Therefore, whether non-homologous end joining (which, in contrast with HR, is not intrinsically mutagenic) or HR is the more mutagenic process is a question that should be re-evaluated. Both processes can be “Dr. Jekyll” in maintaining genome stability/variability and “Mr. Hyde” in jeopardizing genome integrity. PMID:24966870

  11. Inhibition of Homologous Recombination with Vorinostat Synergistically Enhances Ganciclovir Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ladd, Brendon; Ackroyd, Jeffrey J.; Hicks, J. Kevin; Canman, Christine E.; Flanagan, Sheryl A.; Shewach, Donna S.

    2014-01-01

    The nucleoside analog ganciclovir (GCV) elicits cytotoxicity in tumor cells via a novel mechanism in which drug incorporation into DNA produces minimal disruption of replication, but numerous DNA double strand breaks occur during the second S-phase after drug exposure. We propose that homologous recombination (HR), a major repair pathway for DNA double strand breaks, can prevent GCV-induced DNA damage, and that inhibition of HR will enhance cytotoxicity with GCV. Survival after GCV treatment in cells expressing a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase was strongly dependent on HR (>14-fold decrease in IC50 in HR-deficient vs. HR-proficient CHO cells). In a homologous recombination reporter assay, the histone deacetylase inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; vorinostat), decreased HR repair events up to 85%. SAHA plus GCV produced synergistic cytotoxicity in U251tk human glioblastoma cells. Elucidation of the synergistic mechanism demonstrated that SAHA produced a concentration-dependent decrease in the HR proteins Rad51 and CtIP. GCV alone produced numerous Rad51 foci, demonstrating activation of HR. However, the addition of SAHA blocked GCV-induced Rad51 foci formation completely and increased γH2AX, a marker of DNA double strand breaks. SAHA plus GCV also produced synergistic cytotoxicity in HR-proficient CHO cells, but the combination was antagonistic or additive in HR-deficient CHO cells. Collectively, these data demonstrate that HR promotes survival with GCV and compromise of HR by SAHA results in synergistic cytotoxicity, revealing a new mechanism for enhancing anticancer activity with GCV. PMID:24231389

  12. Homology of head sclerites in Burgess Shale euarthropods.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Hernández, Javier

    2015-06-15

    The Cambrian fossil record of euarthropods (extant arachnids, myriapods, crustaceans, hexapods) has played a major role in understanding the origins of these successful animals and indicates that early ancestors underwent an evolutionary transition from soft-bodied taxa (lobopodians) to more familiar sclerotized forms with jointed appendages [1-3]. Recent advances in paleoneurology and developmental biology show that this major transformation is reflected by substantial changes in the head region of early euarthropods, as informed by the segmental affinity of the cephalic appendages [1, 4-6]. However, data on the implications of this reorganization for non-appendicular exoskeletal structures are lacking, given the difficulty of inferring the precise segmental affinities of these features. Here, I report neurological remains associated with the stalked eyes and "anterior sclerite" in the (middle Cambrian) Burgess Shale euarthropods Helmetia expansa and Odaraia alata and provide evidence that these features are associated with nerve traces originating from the anterior brain region, the protocerebrum. The position of the protocerebral ganglia in exceptionally preserved Cambrian euarthropods indicates the homology of the anterior sclerite in extinct groups (e.g., fuxianhuiids, bivalved forms, artiopodans [7, 8]) and allows new comparisons with the dorsal cephalic plate of radiodontans, large nektonic predators whose anterior segmental organization bears fundamental similarities to that of Paleozoic lobopodians [1, 6, 9, 10]. These observations allow reconstruction of the segmental architecture of the head region in the earliest sclerotized euarthropods and demonstrate the deep homology between exoskeletal features in an evolutionary continuum of taxa with distinct types of body organization. PMID:25959966

  13. A rat homolog of the mouse deafness mutant jerker (je).

    PubMed

    Truett, G E; Walker, J A; Brock, J W

    1996-05-01

    An autosomal recessive deafness mutant was discovered in our colony of Zucker (ZUC) rats. These mutants behave like shaker-waltzer deafness mutants, and their inner ear pathology classifies them among neuroepithelial degeneration type of deafness mutants. To determine whether this rat deafness mutation (-) defines a unique locus or one that has been previously described, we mapped its chromosomal location. F2 progeny of (Pbrc:ZUC x BN/Crl) A/a B/b H/h +/- F1 rats were scored for coat color and behavioral phenotypes. Segregation analysis indicated that the deafness locus might be loosely linked with B on rat Chromosome (Chr) 5 (RNO5). Therefore, 40 -/- rats were scored for BN and ZUC alleles at four additional loci, D5Mit11, D5Mit13, Oprd1, and Gnb1, known to map to RNO5 or its homolog, mouse Chr 4 (MMU4). Linkage analysis established the gene order (cM distance) as D5Mit11-(19.3)-B-(17.9)-D5Mit13-(19. 2)-Oprd1-(21.5) - (1.2) Gnb1, placing the deafness locus on distal RNO5. The position of the deafness locus on RNO5 is similar to that ofjerker (je) on MMU4; the phenotypes and patterns of inheritance of the deafness mutation and je are also similar. It seems likely that the mutation affects the rat homolog of je. The rat deafness locus should, therefore, be named jerker and assigned the gene symbol Je. PMID:8661723

  14. DNA Damage, Homology-Directed Repair, and DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Angrisano, Tiziana; Morano, Annalisa; Lee, Bongyong; Pardo, Alba Di; Messina, Samantha; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Fusco, Alfredo; Santillo, Maria R; Muller, Mark T; Chiariotti, Lorenzo; Gottesman, Max E; Avvedimento, Enrico V

    2007-01-01

    To explore the link between DNA damage and gene silencing, we induced a DNA double-strand break in the genome of Hela or mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells using I-SceI restriction endonuclease. The I-SceI site lies within one copy of two inactivated tandem repeated green fluorescent protein (GFP) genes (DR-GFP). A total of 2%–4% of the cells generated a functional GFP by homology-directed repair (HR) and gene conversion. However, ~50% of these recombinants expressed GFP poorly. Silencing was rapid and associated with HR and DNA methylation of the recombinant gene, since it was prevented in Hela cells by 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. ES cells deficient in DNA methyl transferase 1 yielded as many recombinants as wild-type cells, but most of these recombinants expressed GFP robustly. Half of the HR DNA molecules were de novo methylated, principally downstream to the double-strand break, and half were undermethylated relative to the uncut DNA. Methylation of the repaired gene was independent of the methylation status of the converting template. The methylation pattern of recombinant molecules derived from pools of cells carrying DR-GFP at different loci, or from an individual clone carrying DR-GFP at a single locus, was comparable. ClustalW analysis of the sequenced GFP molecules in Hela and ES cells distinguished recombinant and nonrecombinant DNA solely on the basis of their methylation profile and indicated that HR superimposed novel methylation profiles on top of the old patterns. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and RNA analysis revealed that DNA methyl transferase 1 was bound specifically to HR GFP DNA and that methylation of the repaired segment contributed to the silencing of GFP expression. Taken together, our data support a mechanistic link between HR and DNA methylation and suggest that DNA methylation in eukaryotes marks homologous recombined segments. PMID:17616978

  15. Covalent structure of human haptoglobin: a serine protease homolog.

    PubMed Central

    Kurosky, A; Barnett, D R; Lee, T H; Touchstone, B; Hay, R E; Arnott, M S; Bowman, B H; Fitch, W M

    1980-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequences and the disulfide arrangements of the two chains of human haptoglobin 1-1 were established. The alpha 1 and beta chains of haptoglobin contain 83 and 245 residues, respectively. Comparison of the primary structure of haptoglobin with that of the chymotrypsinogen family of serine proteases revealed a significant degree of chemical similarity. The probability was less than 10(-5) that the chemical similarity of the beta chain of haptoglobin to the proteases was due to chance. The amino acid sequence of the beta chain of haptoglobin is 29--33% identical to bovine trypsin, bovine chymotrypsin, porcine elastase, human thrombin, or human plasmin. Comparison of haptoglobin alpha 1 chain to activation peptide regions of the zymogens revealed an identity of 25% to the fifth "kringle" region of the activation peptide of plasminogen. The probability was less than 0.014 that this similarity was due to chance. These results strongly indicate haptoglobin to be a homolog of the chymotrypsinogen family of serine proteases. Alignment of the beta-chain sequence of haptoglobin to the serine proteases is remarkably consistent except for an insertion of 16 residues in the region corresponding to the methionyl loop of the serine proteases. The active-site residues typical of the serine proteases, histidine-57 and serine-195, are replaced in haptoglobin by lysine and alanine, respectively; however, aspartic acid-102 and the trypsin specificity, residue, aspartic acid-189, do occur in haptoglobin. Haptoglobin and the serine proteases represent a striking example of homologous proteins with different biological functions. PMID:6997877

  16. Homology and Evolution of the Chaetae in Echiura (Annelida)

    PubMed Central

    Tilic, Ekin; Lehrke, Janina; Bartolomaeus, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Echiura is traditionally regarded as a small phylum of unsegmented spiralian worms. Molecular analyses, however, provide unquestionable evidence that Echiura are derived annelids that lost segmentation. Like annelids, echiurans possess chaetae, a single ventral pair in all species and one or two additional caudal hemi-circles of chaetae in two subgroups, but their evolutionary origin and affiliation to annelid chaetae are unresolved. Since annelids possess segmental pairs of dorsal (notopodial) and ventral (neuropodial) chaetae that are arranged in a row, the ventral chaetae in Echiura either represent a single or a paired neuropodial group of chaetae, while the caudal circle may represent fused rows of chaetae. In annelids, chaetogenesis is generally restricted to the ventral part of the notopodial chaetal sac and to the dorsal part of the neuropodial chaetal sac. We used the exact position of the chaetal formation site in the echiuran species, Thalassema thalassemum (Pallas, 1766) and Echiurus echiurus (Pallas, 1767), to test different hypotheses of the evolution of echiurid chaetae. As in annelids, a single chaetoblast is responsible for chaetogenesis in both species. Each chaeta of the ventral pair arises from its own chaetal sac and possesses a lateral formation site, evidencing that the pair of ventral chaetae in Echiura is homologous to a pair of neuropodia that fused on the ventral side, while the notopodia were reduced. Both caudal hemi-circles of chaetae in Echiurus echiurus are composed of several individual chaetal sacs, each with its own formative site. This finding argues against a homology of these hemi-circles of chaetae and annelids’ rows of chaetae and leads to the hypothesis that the caudal chaetal rings evolved once within the Echiura by multiplication of ventral chaetae. PMID:25734664

  17. Cubical homology and the Leech dimension of free partially commutative monoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khusainov, Akhmet A.

    2008-12-01

    The paper is devoted to problems arising when applying homological algebra to computer science. It is proved that the Leech dimension of a free partially commutative monoid is equal to the least upper bound of the cardinalities of finite subsets of pairwise commuting generators of the monoid. For an arbitrary free partially commutative monoid M(E,I) in which every subset of pairwise commuting generators is finite and for any contravariant natural system F on M(E,I) we construct a semicubical set T(E,I) with a homological system \\overline F on this set such that the Leech homology groups H_n(M(E,I),F) are isomorphic to the cubical homology groups H_n(T(E,I),\\overline F). Complexes of Abelian groups are also constructed enabling one to obtain (under additional finiteness conditions) algorithms for computing the Leech homology groups and homology groups with coefficients in right M(E,I)-modules. Bibliography: 16 titles.

  18. 25S ribosomal RNA homologies of basidiomycetous yeasts: taxonomic and phylogenetic implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baharaeen, S.; Vishniac, H. S.

    1984-01-01

    Genera, families, and possibly orders of basidiomycetous yeasts can be defined by 25S rRNA homology and correlated phenotypic characters. The teleomorphic genera Filobasidium, Leucosporidium, and Rhodosporidium have greater than 96 relative binding percent (rb%) intrageneric 25S rRNA homology and significant intergeneric separation from each other and from Filobasidiella. The anamorphic genus Cryptococcus can be defined by morphology (monopolar budding), colony color, and greater than 75 rb% intrageneric homology; Vanrija is heterogeneous. Agaricostilbum (Phragmobasidiomycetes, Auriculariales), Hansenula (Ascomycotera, Endomycota), Tremella (Phragmobasidiomycetes, Tremellales), and Ustilago (Ustomycota, Ustilaginales) appear equally unrelated to the Cryptococcus, Filobasidiella, and Rhodosporidium spp. used as probes. The Filobasidiaceae and Sporidiaceae, Filobasidiales and Sporidiales, form coherent homology groups which appear to have undergone convergent 25S rRNA evolution, since their relatedness is much greater than that indicated by 5S rRNA homology. Ribosomal RNA homologies do not appear to measure evolutionary distance.

  19. Possible quantum algorithm for the Lipshitz-Sarkar-Steenrod square for Khovanov homology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina, Juan

    2013-05-01

    Recently the celebrated Khovanov Homology was introduced as a target for Topological Quantum Computation given that the Khovanov Homology provides a generalization of the Jones polynomal and then it is possible to think about of a generalization of the Aharonov.-Jones-Landau algorithm. Recently, Lipshitz and Sarkar introduced a space-level refinement of Khovanov homology. which is called Khovanov Homotopy. This refinement induces a Steenrod square operation Sq2 on Khovanov homology which they describe explicitly and then some computations of Sq2 were presented. Particularly, examples of links with identical integral Khovanov homology but with distinct Khovanov homotopy types were showed. In the presente work we will introduce possible quantum algorithms for the Lipshitz- Sarkar-Steenrod square for Khovanov Homolog and their possible simulations using computer algebra.

  20. Effect of limited homology on gene conversion in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae plasmid recombination system

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, B.Y.; Dornfeld, K.J.; Fagrelius, T.J.; Livingston, D.M.

    1988-06-01

    Plasmids containing heteroallelic copies of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HIS3 gene undergo intramolecular gene conservation in mitotically dividing S. cerevisiae cels. The authors used this plasmid system to determine the minimum amount of homology required for gene conversion, to examine how conversion tract lengths are affected by limited homology, and to analyze the role of flanking DNA sequences on the pattern of exchange. Plasmids with homologous sequences greater than 2 kilobases have mitotic exchange rates as high as 2 x 10/sup -3/ event soper cell per generation. As the homology is reduced, the exchange rate decreases dramatically. A plasmid with 26 base pairs (bp) of homology undergones gene conversion at a rate of approximately 1 x 10/sup -10/ events per cell per generation. These studies have also shown that an 8-bp insertion mutation 13 bp from a border between homologous and nonhomologous sequences undergoes conversion, but that a similar 8-bp insertion 5 bp from a border does not. Examination of independent conversion events which occurred in plasmids with heteroallelic copies of the HIS3 gene shows that markers within 280 bp of a border between homologous and nonhomologous sequences undergo conversion less frequently than the same markers within a more extensive homologous sequence. Thus, proximity to a border between homologous and nonhomologous sequences shortens the conversion tract length.

  1. Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 Inhibition Attenuates Renal Fibrosis by Maintaining Smad7 and Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog Expression.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoxu; Zang, Xiujuan; Ponnusamy, Murugavel; Masucci, Monica V; Tolbert, Evelyn; Gong, Rujun; Zhao, Ting C; Liu, Na; Bayliss, George; Dworkin, Lance D; Zhuang, Shougang

    2016-07-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is a methyltransferase that induces histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) and functions as an oncogenic factor in many cancer types. However, the role of EZH2 in renal fibrogenesis remains unexplored. In this study, we found high expression of EZH2 and H3K27me3 in cultured renal fibroblasts and fibrotic kidneys from mice with unilateral ureteral obstruction and humans with CKD. Pharmacologic inhibition of EZH2 with 3-deazaneplanocin A (3-DZNeP) or GSK126 or siRNA-mediated silencing of EZH2 inhibited serum- and TGFβ1-induced activation of renal interstitial fibroblasts in vitro, and 3-DZNeP administration abrogated deposition of extracellular matrix proteins and expression of α-smooth muscle actin in the obstructed kidney. Injury to the kidney enhanced Smad7 degradation, Smad3 phosphorylation, and TGFβ receptor 1 expression, and 3-DZNeP administration prevented these effects. 3-DZNeP also suppressed phosphorylation of the renal EGF and PDGFβ receptors and downstream signaling molecules signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 after injury. Moreover, EZH2 inhibition increased the expression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), a protein previously associated with dephosphorylation of tyrosine kinase receptors in the injured kidney and serum-stimulated renal interstitial fibroblasts. Finally, blocking PTEN with SF1670 largely diminished the inhibitory effect of 3-DZNeP on renal myofibroblast activation. These results uncovered the important role of EZH2 in mediating the development of renal fibrosis by downregulating expression of Smad7 and PTEN, thus activating profibrotic signaling pathways. Targeted inhibition of EZH2, therefore, could be a novel therapy for treating CKD. PMID:26701983

  2. Involvement of Caveolin-1 in Repair of DNA Damage through Both Homologous Recombination and Non-Homologous End Joining

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hua; Yue, Jingyin; Pan, Zui; Wu, Hao; Cheng, Yan; Lu, Huimei; Ren, Xingcong; Yao, Ming; Shen, Zhiyuan; Yang, Jin-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Background Caveolin-1 (Cav-1), the major component of caveolae, is a 21–24 kDa integral membrane protein that interacts with a number of signaling molecules. By acting as a scaffolding protein, Cav-1 plays crucial roles in the regulation of various physiologic and patho-physiologic processes including oncogenic transformation and tumorigenesis, and tumor invasion and metastasis. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study we sought to explore the role of Cav-1 in response to DNA damage and the mechanism involved. We found that the level of Cav-1 was up-regulated rapidly in cells treated with ionizing radiation. The up-regulation of Cav-1 following DNA damage occurred only in cells expressing endogenous Cav-1, and was associated with the activation of DNA damage response pathways. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the expression of Cav-1 protected cells against DNA damage through modulating the activities of both the homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair systems, as evidenced by the inhibitory effects of the Cav-1-targeted siRNA on cell survival, HR frequency, phosphorylation of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), and nuclear translocation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) following DNA damage, and by the stimulatory effect of the forced expression of Cav-1 on NHEJ frequency. Conclusion/Significance Our results indicate that Cav-1 may play a critical role in sensing genotoxic stress and in orchestrating the response of cells to DNA damage through regulating the important molecules involved in maintaining genomic integrity. PMID:20700465

  3. Studies of Flerovium and Element 115 Homologs with Macrocyclic Extractants

    SciTech Connect

    Despotopulos, John D.

    2015-03-12

    Study of the chemistry of the heaviest elements, Z ≥ 104, poses a unique challenge due to their low production cross-sections and short half-lives. Chemistry also must be studied on the one-atom-at-a-time scale, requiring automated, fast, and very efficient chemical schemes. Recent studies of the chemical behavior of copernicium (Cn, element 112) and flerovium (Fl, element 114) together with the discovery of isotopes of these elements with half-lives suitable for chemical studies have spurred a renewed interest in the development of rapid systems designed to study the chemical properties of elements with Z ≥ 114. This dissertation explores both extraction chromatography and solvent extraction as methods for development of a rapid chemical separation scheme for the homologs of flerovium (Pb, Sn, Hg) and element 115 (Bi, Sb), with the goal of developing a chemical scheme that, in the future, can be applied to on-line chemistry of both Fl and element 115. Carrier-free radionuclides, used in these studies, of the homologs of Fl and element 115 were obtained by proton activation of high-purity metal foils at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS): natIn(p,n)113Sn, natSn(p,n)124Sb, and Au(p,n)197m,gHg. The carrier-free activity was separated from the foils by novel separation schemes based on ion exchange and extraction chromatography techniques. Carrier-free Pb and Bi isotopes were obtained from development of a novel generator based on cation exchange chromatography using the 232U parent to generate 212Pb and 212Bi. Macrocyclic extractants, specifically crown ethers and their derivatives, were chosen for these studies; crown ethers show high selectivity for metal ions. Finally. a potential chemical system for Fl was established based on the Eichrom Pb resin, and insight to an improved system based on thiacrown ethers is

  4. The LUX Score: A Metric for Lipidome Homology

    PubMed Central

    Marella, Chakravarthy; Torda, Andrew E.; Schwudke, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    A lipidome is the set of lipids in a given organism, cell or cell compartment and this set reflects the organism’s synthetic pathways and interactions with its environment. Recently, lipidomes of biological model organisms and cell lines were published and the number of functional studies of lipids is increasing. In this study we propose a homology metric that can quantify systematic differences in the composition of a lipidome. Algorithms were developed to 1. consistently convert lipids structure into SMILES, 2. determine structural similarity between molecular species and 3. describe a lipidome in a chemical space model. We tested lipid structure conversion and structure similarity metrics, in detail, using sets of isomeric ceramide molecules and chemically related phosphatidylinositols. Template-based SMILES showed the best properties for representing lipid-specific structural diversity. We also show that sequence analysis algorithms are best suited to calculate distances between such template-based SMILES and we adjudged the Levenshtein distance as best choice for quantifying structural changes. When all lipid molecules of the LIPIDMAPS structure database were mapped in chemical space, they automatically formed clusters corresponding to conventional chemical families. Accordingly, we mapped a pair of lipidomes into the same chemical space and determined the degree of overlap by calculating the Hausdorff distance. We named this metric the ‘Lipidome jUXtaposition (LUX) score’. First, we tested this approach for estimating the lipidome similarity on four yeast strains with known genetic alteration in fatty acid synthesis. We show that the LUX score reflects the genetic relationship and growth temperature better than conventional methods although the score is based solely on lipid structures. Next, we applied this metric to high-throughput data of larval tissue lipidomes of Drosophila. This showed that the LUX score is sufficient to cluster tissues and

  5. A model solar flares and their homologous behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Choe, G.S.; Cheng, C.Z.

    2000-01-27

    A model describing physical processes of solar flares and their homologous behavior is presented based on resistive MHD simulations of magnetic arcade evolution subject to continuous shear-increasing footpoint motions. It is proposed in the model that the individual flaring process encompasses magnetic reconnection of arcade field lines, generation of magnetic islands in the magnetic arcade, and coalescence of magnetic islands. When a magnetic arcade is sheared, a current sheet is formed and magnetic reconnection can take place to form a magnetic island. A continuing increase of magnetic shear can trigger a new reconnection process and create another island in the underlying arcade below the magnetic island. The newborn island rises faster than the preceding island and merges with it to form one island. Before merging with the upper island is completed, the newborn island exhibits two different phases of rising motion: the first phase with a slower rising speed and the second phase wit h a faster rising speed. This is consistent with the Yohkoh observation by Ohyama and Shibata (1998) of X-ray plasma ejecta motion. The first phase, in which reconnection of line-tied field in the underlying arcade is important, can be regarded to be related with the preflare phase. In the second phase, the island coalescence takes place, which creates an elongated current sheet below and enhances the reconnection rate of the line-tied arcade field. This phase is interpreted as the impulsive phase or the flash phase of flares. The obtained reconnection electric field is large enough to accelerate electrons to an energy level higher than 10 keV, which is necessary for observed X-ray emissions. After merging of the islands is completed, magnetic reconnection continues in the current sheet under the integrated island for rather a long period, which can be considered as the main phase of flares. The sequence of all these processes is repeated with some time interval while a shear

  6. Functional homologs of fungal metallothionein genes from Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, J; Goldsbrough, P B

    1994-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are cysteine-rich proteins required for heavy metal tolerance in animals and fungi. Two cDNAs encoding proteins with homology to animal and fungal MTs have been isolated from Arabidopsis. The genes represented by these cDNAs are referred to as MT1 and MT2. When expressed in an MT-deficient (cup1 delta) mutant of yeast, both MT1 and MT2 complemented the cup1 delta mutation, providing a high level of resistance to CuSO4 and moderate resistance to CdSO4. Although the MT-deficient yeast was not viable in the presence of either 300 microM CuSO4 or 5 microM CdSO4, cells expressing MT1 were able to grow in medium supplemented with 3 mM CuSO4 and 10 microM CdSO4, and those expressing MT2 grew in the presence of 3 mM CuSO4 and 100 microM CdSO4. In plants, MT1 mRNA was more abundant in roots and dark-grown seedlings than in leaves. In contrast, MT2 mRNA accumulated more in leaves than in either roots or darkgrown seedlings. MT2 mRNA was strongly induced in seedlings by CuSO4, but only slightly by CdSO4 or ZnSO4. However, MT1 mRNA was induced by CuSO4 in excised leaves that were submerged in medium. These results indicated that Arabidopsis MT genes are involved in copper tolerance. Plants also synthesized metal binding phytochelatins (poly[gamma-glutamylcysteine]glycine) when exposed to heavy metals. The results presented here argue against the hypothesis that phytochelatins are the sole molecules involved in heavy metal tolerance in plants. We conclude that Arabidopsis MT1 and MT2 are functional homologs of yeast MT. PMID:8061521

  7. Introduction to 'Homology and convergence in nervous system evolution'.

    PubMed

    Strausfeld, Nicholas J; Hirth, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The origin of brains and central nervous systems (CNSs) is thought to have occurred before the Palaeozoic era 540 Ma. Yet in the absence of tangible evidence, there has been continued debate whether today's brains and nervous systems derive from one ancestral origin or whether similarities among them are due to convergent evolution. With the advent of molecular developmental genetics and genomics, it has become clear that homology is a concept that applies not only to morphologies, but also to genes, developmental processes, as well as to behaviours. Comparative studies in phyla ranging from annelids and arthropods to mammals are providing evidence that corresponding developmental genetic mechanisms act not only in dorso-ventral and anterior-posterior axis specification but also in segmentation, neurogenesis, axogenesis and eye/photoreceptor cell formation that appear to be conserved throughout the animal kingdom. These data are supported by recent studies which identified Mid-Cambrian fossils with preserved soft body parts that present segmental arrangements in brains typical of modern arthropods, and similarly organized brain centres and circuits across phyla that may reflect genealogical correspondence and control similar behavioural manifestations. Moreover, congruence between genetic and geological fossil records support the notion that by the 'Cambrian explosion' arthropods and chordates shared similarities in brain and nervous system organization. However, these similarities are strikingly absent in several sister- and outgroups of arthropods and chordates which raises several questions, foremost among them: what kind of natural laws and mechanisms underlie the convergent evolution of such similarities? And, vice versa: what are the selection pressures and genetic mechanisms underlying the possible loss or reduction of brains and CNSs in multiple lineages during the course of evolution? These questions were addressed at a Royal Society meeting to discuss

  8. Characterization of chromosomal homologs of the plasmid-borne copper resistance operon of Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, C K; Cooksey, D A

    1993-01-01

    Copper-resistant and copper-sensitive strains of Pseudomonas syringae, as well as many other pseudomonads, contain chromosomal DNA homologous to the plasmid-borne copper resistance operon (copABCD). cop homologs were cloned from the chromosome of P. syringae pv. tomato PT12.2, which had an elevated level of resistance to copper compared with typical copper-sensitive strains of other P. syringae pathovars and showed an unusually high frequency of spontaneous mutation to high levels of copper resistance. Two chromosomal cop homolog regions were cloned. Homolog 1 hybridized with copA and copB, and homolog 2 hybridized with copA, copB, copC, and the copper-responsive regulatory genes copRS. Homolog 1 had no detectable function when transferred to a copper-sensitive strain of P. syringae. However, homolog 2 conferred the low level of copper resistance observed with PT12.2 and produced proteins related to CopA and CopC. In addition, homolog 2 conferred a high frequency of mutation to full copper resistance. In a spontaneously mutated derivative of the cloned homolog 2 (pCOPH2R) that conferred copper resistance, an increased level of CopA was observed. pCOPH2R also supported a higher level of transcriptional activity of the cop promoter that was fused to lacZ and provided in trans (pCOP38), suggesting that the spontaneous mutation was regulatory, probably involving the copRS homologs. Homolog 2 was similar but not identical to the plasmid-borne cop operon, and it did not complement site-specific mutations in cop genes. Images PMID:8331076

  9. Interaction of a mouse macrophage cell line with homologous erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Singer, J A; Walker, W S; Morrison, M

    1982-06-01

    The interaction of the IC-21 murine macrophage cell line and homologous red blood cells (RBC) was assessed in the absence of exogenous opsonins. These results were used to evaluate this system as a potential model for macrophage-mediated clearance of old or damaged RBC. The binding and ingestion of density-separated and unseparated RBC by IC-21 cells were quantitated in assays that involved both 51Cr-labeled RBC and direct microscopy. The number of unseparated RBC that bound to IC-21 macrophages depended on the number of RBC added. Macrophages phagocytized an appreciable proportion of RBC within 3 hours with the ratio of RBC:macrophage of 10, a point at which the RBC-binding was not rate limiting. The mouse RBC were separated into dense- and less-dense fractions which are presumably enriched for old and young cells, respectively. When these RBC fractions were incubated with the IC-21 macrophage, significantly more of these dense cells were phagocytized. These results show that IC-21 macrophage cell line is a useful model for defining the processes whereby aged or damaged RBC are recognized and removed from circulation by macrophages. PMID:7120230

  10. Databases of homologous gene families for comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    Penel, Simon; Arigon, Anne-Muriel; Dufayard, Jean-François; Sertier, Anne-Sophie; Daubin, Vincent; Duret, Laurent; Gouy, Manolo; Perrière, Guy

    2009-01-01

    Background Comparative genomics is a central step in many sequence analysis studies, from gene annotation and the identification of new functional regions in genomes, to the study of evolutionary processes at the molecular level (speciation, single gene or whole genome duplications, etc.) and phylogenetics. In that context, databases providing users high quality homologous families and sequence alignments as well as phylogenetic trees based on state of the art algorithms are becoming indispensable. Methods We developed an automated procedure allowing massive all-against-all similarity searches, gene clustering, multiple alignments computation, and phylogenetic trees construction and reconciliation. The application of this procedure to a very large set of sequences is possible through parallel computing on a large computer cluster. Results Three databases were developed using this procedure: HOVERGEN, HOGENOM and HOMOLENS. These databases share the same architecture but differ in their content. HOVERGEN contains sequences from vertebrates, HOGENOM is mainly devoted to completely sequenced microbial organisms, and HOMOLENS is devoted to metazoan genomes from Ensembl. Access to the databases is provided through Web query forms, a general retrieval system and a client-server graphical interface. The later can be used to perform tree-pattern based searches allowing, among other uses, to retrieve sets of orthologous genes. The three databases, as well as the software required to build and query them, can be used or downloaded from the PBIL (Pôle Bioinformatique Lyonnais) site at . PMID:19534752

  11. BRCA1-directed, enhanced and aberrant homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Dever, Seth M; White, E Railey; Hartman, Matthew CT

    2012-01-01

    Despite intense studies, questions still remain regarding the molecular mechanisms leading to the development of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. Research focused on elucidating the role of the breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) in the DNA damage response may be of the most critical importance to understanding these processes. The BRCA1 protein has an N-terminal RING domain possessing E3 ubiquitin-ligase activity and a C-terminal BRCT domain involved in binding specific phosphoproteins. These domains are involved directly or indirectly in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. As the two terminal domains of BRCA1 represent two separate entities, understanding how these domains communicate and are functionally altered in regards to DSB repair is critical for understanding the development of BRCA1-related breast and ovarian cancers and for developing novel therapeutics. Herein, we review recent findings of how altered functions of these domains might lead to cancer through a mechanism of increased aberrant homologous recombination and possible implications for the development of BRCA1 inhibitors. PMID:22306997

  12. Homology among tet determinants in conjugative elements of streptococci

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.D.; Hazum, S.; Guild, W.R.

    1981-10-01

    A mutation to tetracycline sensitivity in a resistant strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae was shown by several criteria to be due to a point mutation in the conjugative o(cat-tet) element found in the chromosomes of strains derived from BM6001, a clinical strain resistant to tetracycline and chloramphenicol. Strains carrying the mutation were transformed back to tetracycline resistance with the high efficiency of a point marker by donor deoxyribonucleic acids from its ancestral strain and from nine other clinical isolates of pneumococcus and by deoxyribonucleic acids from Group D Streptococcus faecalis and Group B Streptococcus agalactiae strains that also carry conjugative tet elements in their chromosomes. It was not transformed to resistance by tet plasmid deoxyribonucleic acids from either gram-negative or gram-positive species, except for one that carried transposon TN916, the conjugative tet element present in the chromosomes of some S. faecalis strains. The results showed that the tet determinants in conjugative elements of several streptococcal species share a high degree of deoxyribonucleic acid sequence homology and suggested that they differ from other tet genes.

  13. The Landscape of Realized Homologous Recombination in Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yahara, Koji; Didelot, Xavier; Jolley, Keith A.; Kobayashi, Ichizo; Maiden, Martin C.J.; Sheppard, Samuel K.; Falush, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Recombination enhances the adaptive potential of organisms by allowing genetic variants to be tested on multiple genomic backgrounds. Its distribution in the genome can provide insight into the evolutionary forces that underlie traits, such as the emergence of pathogenicity. Here, we examined landscapes of realized homologous recombination of 500 genomes from ten bacterial species and found all species have “hot” regions with elevated rates relative to the genome average. We examined the size, gene content, and chromosomal features associated with these regions and the correlations between closely related species. The recombination landscape is variable and evolves rapidly. For example in Salmonella, only short regions of around 1 kb in length are hot whereas in the closely related species Escherichia coli, some hot regions exceed 100 kb, spanning many genes. Only Streptococcus pyogenes shows evidence for the positive correlation between GC content and recombination that has been reported for several eukaryotes. Genes with function related to the cell surface/membrane are often found in recombination hot regions but E. coli is the only species where genes annotated as “virulence associated” are consistently hotter. There is also evidence that some genes with “housekeeping” functions tend to be overrepresented in cold regions. For example, ribosomal proteins showed low recombination in all of the species. Among specific genes, transferrin-binding proteins are recombination hot in all three of the species in which they were found, and are subject to interspecies recombination. PMID:26516092

  14. The Compound and Homologous Eruptions from the SAR 11429

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Suman Kumar; Zhang, Jie

    2016-05-01

    Super Active Regions (SARs) are ARs which shows extremely high rate of solar eruptions. NOAA AR 11429 was a SAR which produced 47 C-Class, 15 M-Class and 3 X-Class flares and 8 CMEs during its passage from the front disk of the Sun. This SAR had anti-Hale and delta-spot magnetic configuration and many sub-regions of magnetic flux emergence. With the aid of multi-wavelength observations of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and nonlinear force-free model for the magnetic field in the solar corona, we found the existence of many magnetic flux structures (flux bundles) in the corona of the AR. The energy released by these co-existing flux bundles within short time, resulted in compound erutpions from the AR on March 9 and 10, 2012. In the period of 38 hours, after the CME eruption on March 9, the continuous shearing and cancellation and new magnetic flux emergence resulted in another CME on March 10. Both of the events showed the compound nature and the similarity of the foot-points and EUV dimming made these eruptions homologous.

  15. V-antigen homologs in pathogenic gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Teiji; Katoh, Hideya; Yasumoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    Gram-negative bacteria cause many types of infections in animals from fish and shrimps to humans. Bacteria use Type III secretion systems (TTSSs) to translocate their toxins directly into eukaryotic cells. The V-antigen is a multifunctional protein required for the TTSS in Yersinia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. V-antigen vaccines and anti-V-antigen antisera confer protection against Yersinia or P. aeruginosa infections in animal models. The V-antigen forms a pentameric cap structure at the tip of the Type III secretory needle; this structure, which has evolved from the bacterial flagellar cap structure, is indispensable for toxin translocation. Various pathogenic gram-negative bacteria such as Photorhabdus luminescens, Vibrio spp., and Aeromonas spp. encode homologs of the V-antigen. Because the V-antigens of pathogenic gram-negative bacteria play a key role in toxin translocation, they are potential therapeutic targets for combatting bacterial virulence. In the USA and Europe, these vaccines and specific antibodies against V-antigens are in clinical trials investigating the treatment of Yersinia or P. aeruginosa infections. Pathogenic gram-negative bacteria are of great interest because of their ability to infect fish and shrimp farms, their potential for exploitation in biological terrorism attacks, and their ability to cause opportunistic infections in humans. Thus, elucidation of the roles of the V-antigen in the TTSS and mechanisms by which these functions can be blocked is critical to facilitating the development of improved anti-V-antigen strategies. PMID:24641673

  16. A Somatic Origin of Homologous Robertsonian Translocations and Isochromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, W. P.; Bernasconi, F.; Basaran, S.; Yüksel-Apak, M.; Neri, G.; Serville, F.; Balicek, P.; Haluza, R.; Farah, L. M. S.; Lüleci, G.; Schinzel, A. A.

    1994-01-01

    One t(14q14q), three t(15q15q), two t(21q21q), and two t(22q22q) nonmosaic, apparently balanced, de novo Robertsonian translocation cases were investigated with polymorphic markers to establish the origin of the translocated chromosomes. Four cases had results indicative of an isochromosome: one t(14q14q) case with mild mental retardation and maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) for chromosome 14, one t(15q15q) case with the Prader-Willi syndrome and UPD(15), a phenotypically normal carrier of t(22q22q) with maternal UPD(22), and a phenotypically normal t(21q21q) case of paternal UPD(21). All UPD cases showed complete homozygosity throughout the involved chromosome, which is supportive of a postmeiotic origin. In the remaining four cases, maternal and paternal inheritance of the involved chromosome was found, which unambiguously implies a somatic origin. One t(15q15q) female had a child with a ring chromosome 15, which was also of probable postmeiotic origin as recombination between grandparental haplotypes had occurred prior to ring formation. UPD might be expected to result from de novo Robertsonian translocations of meiotic origin; however, all de novo homologous translocation cases, so far reported, with UPD of chromosomes 14, 15, 21, or 22 have been isochromosomes. These data provide the first direct evidence that nonmosaic Robertsonian translocations, as well as isochromosomes, are commonly the result of a mitotic exchange. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:8304346

  17. A somatic origin of homologous Robertsonian translocations and isochromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, W.P.; Bernasconi, F.; Schinzel, A.A. ); Basaran, S.; Yueksel-Apak, M. ); Neri, G. ); Serville, F. ); Balicek, P.; Haluza, R. ); Farah, L.M.S. )

    1994-02-01

    One t(14q 14q), three t(15q 15q), two t(21q21q), and two t(22q22q) nonmosaic, apparently balanced, de novo Robertsonian translocation cases were investigated with polymorphic markers to establish the origin of the translocated chromosomes. Four cases had results indicative of an isochromosome: one t(14q14q) case with mild mental retardation and maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) for chromosome 14, one t(15q15q) case with the Prader-Willi syndrome and UPD(15), a phenotypically normal carrier of t(22q22q) with maternal UPD(22), and a phenotypically normal t(21q21q) case of paternal UPD(21). All UPD cases showed complete homozygosity throughout the involved chromosome, which is supportive of a postmeiotic origin. In the remaining four cases, maternal and paternal inheritance of the involved chromosome was found, which unambiguously implies a somatic origin. One t(15q15q) female had a child with a ring chromosome 15, which was also of probable postmeiotic origin as recombination between grandparental haplotypes had occurred prior to ring formation. UPD might be expected to result from de novo Robertsonian translocations of meiotic origin; however, all de novo homologous translocation cases, so far reported, with UPD of chromosomes 14, 15, 21, or 22 have been isochromosomes. These data provide the first direct evidence that nonmosaic Robertsonian translocations, as well as isochromosomes, are commonly the result of a mitotic exchange. 75 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  18. Homology and Convergence in Vertebrate and Invertebrate Nervous Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandeman, David

    Each year the meeting of the American Neuroscience Society attracts over 20,000 members, reflecting the explosion of interest in this field that has occurred over the past few decades. Researchers from many disciplines are focusing their skills on the investigation of every aspect of nervous systems, and neuroscience now encompasses the entire range of endeavour from the study of the single molecules that make up neural membranes to the non-invasive observation of neural function in animals behaving in their natural environments. Advances over the past three decades in our understanding of nervous systems are impressive and come from a multifaceted approach to the study of both vertebrate and invertebrate animals. An almost unexpected by-product of the parallel investigation of vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems that is explored in this article is the emergent view of an intricate web of evolutionary homology and convergence exhibited in the structure and function of the nervous systems of these two large, paraphyletic groups of animals.

  19. Homologous Recombination Is Necessary for Normal Lymphocyte Development▿

    PubMed Central

    Caddle, Lura B.; Hasham, Muneer G.; Schott, William H.; Shirley, Bobbi-Jo; Mills, Kevin D.

    2008-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies are rare but serious diseases with diverse genetic causes. Accumulating evidence suggests that defects in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair can underlie many of these syndromes. In this context, the nonhomologous end joining pathway of DSB repair is absolutely required for lymphoid development, but possible roles for the homologous recombination (HR) pathway have remained more controversial. While recent evidence suggests that HR may indeed be important to suppress lymphoid transformation, the specific relationship of HR to normal lymphocyte development remains unclear. We have investigated roles of the X-ray cross-complementing 2 (Xrcc2) HR gene in lymphocyte development. We show that HR is critical for normal B-cell development, with Xrcc2 nullizygosity leading to p53-dependent early S-phase arrest. In the absence of p53 (encoded by Trp53), Xrcc2-null B cells can fully develop but show high rates of chromosome and chromatid fragmentation. We present a molecular model wherein Xrcc2 is important to preserve or restore replication forks during rapid clonal expansion of developing lymphocytes. Our findings demonstrate a key role for HR in lymphoid development and suggest that Xrcc2 defects could underlie some human primary immunodeficiencies. PMID:18212067

  20. [Evaluation of an homologous bacterin against bovine leptospirosis].

    PubMed

    Vega, Laura Elena Orozco; Flores, Rafael López; Moles y Cervantes, Luis Pedro; Valiente, Jorge Quiroz

    2005-01-01

    48 adult bovine females dividided into 6 groups were used aimed at characterizing the immune response induced in breastfeeeding cows by an homologous bacterin formulated with different adjuvants. They were intramuscularly administered 2 milliliters of a bacterin formulated with Leptospira interrogans serovars uam, wolffi, hardjo, bratislava, grippotyphosa and panama added with different adjuvants, such as aluminum hydroxide, Freud's complete adjuvant, Freud's incomplete adjuvant, liposoluble vitamins, bacterin plus disparasitization with levamisol. The control group was administred only with bacterin. Immunization took place in 2 occasions at a time interval of 28 days. Blood samples were taken every 7 days during the first month after vaccination, and every 28 days for the next 8 months. All the sera were analyzed by the microscopic agglutination test. The results were transformed into Log10 and they were analyzed by NLIN and GLM of SAS. The period of greater response was estimated by the prediction model (Wood). The bacterin did not produce alteration either in the physiological constants, or in milk production. The serovars of Leptospira interrogans that induced higher titers were uam, hardjo and wolffi. The statistical difference between treatments and between serovars was determined. PMID:17966474

  1. Sequence analysis and homology modeling of peroxidase from Medicago sativa

    PubMed Central

    Hooda, Vinita; Gundala, Prasada babu; Chinthala, Paramageetham

    2012-01-01

    Plant peroxidases are one of the most extensively studied group of enzymes which find applications in the environment, health, pharmaceutical, chemical and biotechnological processes. Class III secretary peroxidase from alfalfa (Medicago sativa) has been characterized using bioinformatics approach Physiochemical properties and topology of alfalfa peroxidase were compared with that of soybean and horseradish peroxidase, two most popular commercially available peroxidase preparations. Lower value of instability index as predicted by ProtParam and presence of extra disulphide linkages as predicted by Cys_REC suggested alfalfa peroxidase to be more stable than either of the commercial preparations. Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA) with other functionally similar proteins revealed the presence of highly conserved catalytic residues. Three dimensional model of alfalfa peroxidase was constructed based on the crystal structure of soybean peroxidase (PDB Id: 1FHF A) by homology modelling approach. The model was checked for stereo chemical quality by PROCHECH, VERIFY 3D, WHAT IF, ERRAT, 3D MATCH AND ProSA servers. The best model was selected, energy minimized and used to analyze structure function relationship with substrate hydrogen peroxide by Autodock 4.0. The enzyme substrate complex was viewed with Swiss PDB viewer and one residue ASP43 was found to stabilize the interaction by hydrogen bonds. The results of the study may be a guiding point for further investigations on alfalfa peroxidase. PMID:23275690

  2. Characterization of a Canine Homolog of Human Aichivirus▿

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Amit; Simmonds, Peter; Dubovi, Edward J.; Qaisar, Natasha; Henriquez, Jose A.; Medina, Jan; Shields, Shelly; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2011-01-01

    Many of our fatal “civilization” infectious diseases have arisen from domesticated animals. Although picornaviruses infect most mammals, infection of a companion animal is not known. Here we describe the identification and genomic characterization of the first canine picornavirus. Canine kobuvirus (CKoV), identified in stool samples from dogs with diarrhea, has a genomic organization typical of a picornavirus and encodes a 2,469-amino-acid polyprotein flanked by 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions. Comparative phylogenetic analysis using various structural and nonstructural proteins of CKoV confirmed it as the animal virus homolog most closely related to human Aichivirus (AiV). Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis suggests a mean recent divergence time of CKoV and AiV within the past 20 to 50 years, well after the domestication of canines. The discovery of CKoV provides new insights into the origin and evolution of AiV and the species specificity and pathogenesis of kobuviruses. PMID:21880761

  3. Characterization of a canine homolog of human Aichivirus.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Amit; Simmonds, Peter; Dubovi, Edward J; Qaisar, Natasha; Henriquez, Jose A; Medina, Jan; Shields, Shelly; Lipkin, W Ian

    2011-11-01

    Many of our fatal "civilization" infectious diseases have arisen from domesticated animals. Although picornaviruses infect most mammals, infection of a companion animal is not known. Here we describe the identification and genomic characterization of the first canine picornavirus. Canine kobuvirus (CKoV), identified in stool samples from dogs with diarrhea, has a genomic organization typical of a picornavirus and encodes a 2,469-amino-acid polyprotein flanked by 5' and 3' untranslated regions. Comparative phylogenetic analysis using various structural and nonstructural proteins of CKoV confirmed it as the animal virus homolog most closely related to human Aichivirus (AiV). Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis suggests a mean recent divergence time of CKoV and AiV within the past 20 to 50 years, well after the domestication of canines. The discovery of CKoV provides new insights into the origin and evolution of AiV and the species specificity and pathogenesis of kobuviruses. PMID:21880761

  4. Why do Sequence Signatures Predict Enzyme Mechanism? Homology versus Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, Kirsten E.; De Ferrari, Luna; Mitchell, John B. O.

    2015-01-01

    First, we identify InterPro sequence signatures representing evolutionary relatedness and, second, signatures identifying specific chemical machinery. Thus, we predict the chemical mechanisms of enzyme-catalyzed reactions from catalytic and non-catalytic subsets of InterPro signatures. We first scanned our 249 sequences using InterProScan and then used the MACiE database to identify those amino acid residues that are important for catalysis. The sequences were mutated in silico to replace these catalytic residues with glycine and then again scanned using InterProScan. Those signature matches from the original scan that disappeared on mutation were called catalytic. Mechanism was predicted using all signatures, only the 78 “catalytic” signatures, or only the 519 “non-catalytic” signatures. The non-catalytic signatures gave indistinguishable results from those for the whole feature set, with precision of 0.991 and sensitivity of 0.970. The catalytic signatures alone gave less impressive predictivity, with precision and sensitivity of 0.791 and 0.735, respectively. These results show that our successful prediction of enzyme mechanism is mostly by homology rather than by identifying catalytic machinery. PMID:26740739

  5. Transcription-coupled homologous recombination after oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Wei, Leizhen; Levine, Arthur Samuel; Lan, Li

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative DNA damage induces genomic instability and may lead to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. As severe blockades to RNA polymerase II (RNA POLII) during transcription, oxidative DNA damage and the associated DNA strand breaks have a profoundly deleterious impact on cell survival. To protect the integrity of coding regions, high fidelity DNA repair at a transcriptionally active site in non-dividing somatic cells, (i.e., terminally differentiated and quiescent/G0 cells) is necessary to maintain the sequence integrity of transcribed regions. Recent studies indicate that an RNA-templated, transcription-associated recombination mechanism is important to protect coding regions from DNA damage-induced genomic instability. Here, we describe the discovery that G1/G0 cells exhibit Cockayne syndrome (CS) B (CSB)-dependent assembly of homologous recombination (HR) factors at double strand break (DSB) sites within actively transcribed regions. This discovery is a challenge to the current dogma that HR occurs only in S/G2 cells where undamaged sister chromatids are available as donor templates. PMID:27233112

  6. Pharmacokinetics of the dimethylheptyl homolog of cannabidiol in dogs.

    PubMed

    Samara, E; Bialer, M

    1988-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is one of the major nonpsychoactive cannabinoids produced by Cannabis sativa L. Recent studies have shown that a dimethylheptyl homolog (DMH) of CBD is more active as an anticonvulsant than is the naturally occurring CBD. In considering DMH as a potential antiepileptic agent, its pharmacokinetics was studied in dogs (N = 8) after both iv (20 mg) and oral (80 mg) administration. After iv administration, DMH was rapidly distributed. DMH has a mean terminal half-life of 2 hr, its plasma levels decline in a biphasic fashion, and its total body clearance is 8.3 liters/hr. This clearance value, after being normalized to blood clearance by the use of mathematical equations, was less than one half of the value of the hepatic blood flow and its extraction ratio (E) by the liver is 0.39, DMH was observed to have a mean volume of distribution of 10 liters (or 0.5 liters/kg). In four of the eight dogs studied, DMH could not be detected in the plasma after oral administration. In the other four, the oral bioavailability was 3, 21, 39, and 43%, respectively. After oral administration, DMH has a low and variable bioavailability, due to a liver first-pass effect and incomplete absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. In comparison with CBD, DMH has a shorter half-life and lower clearance and volume of distribution values, and its liver extraction ratio is about one half that of CBD. PMID:2907468

  7. Glutathione Binding to the Bcl-2 Homology-3 Domain Groove

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Angela K.; Loucks, F. Alexandra; Schroeder, Emily K.; Bouchard, Ron J.; Tyler, Kenneth L.; Linseman, Daniel A.

    2008-01-01

    Bcl-2 protects cells against mitochondrial oxidative stress and subsequent apoptosis. However, the mechanism underlying the antioxidant function of Bcl-2 is currently unknown. Recently, Bax and several Bcl-2 homology-3 domain (BH3)-only proteins (Bid, Puma, and Noxa) have been shown to induce a pro-oxidant state at mitochondria (1-4). Given the opposing effects of Bcl-2 and Bax/BH3-only proteins on the redox state of mitochondria, we hypothesized that the antioxidant function of Bcl-2 is antagonized by its interaction with the BH3 domains of pro-apoptotic family members. Here, we show that BH3 mimetics that bind to a hydrophobic surface (the BH3 groove) of Bcl-2 induce GSH-sensitive mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in cerebellar granule neurons. BH3 mimetics displace a discrete mitochondrial GSH pool in neurons and suppress GSH transport into isolated rat brain mitochondria. Moreover, BH3 mimetics and the BH3-only protein, Bim, inhibit a novel interaction between Bcl-2 and GSH in vitro. These results suggest that Bcl-2 regulates an essential pool of mitochondrial GSH and that this regulation may depend upon Bcl-2 directly interacting with GSH via the BH3 groove. We conclude that this novel GSH binding property of Bcl-2 likely plays a central role in its antioxidant function at mitochondria. PMID:17690097

  8. Differential Nanosecond Protein Dynamics in Homologous Calcium Sensors.

    PubMed

    Robin, Jörg; Brauer, Jens; Sulmann, Stefan; Marino, Valerio; Dell'Orco, Daniele; Lienau, Christoph; Koch, Karl-Wilhelm

    2015-10-16

    Shaping the temporal response of photoreceptors is facilitated by a well-balanced second messenger cascade, in which two neuronal Ca(2+)-sensor proteins operate in a sequential relay mechanism. Although they share structurally similar sensing units, they differentially activate the same target protein. Here, as a prototypical case in Ca(2+)-mediated signal processing, we investigate differential cellular responsiveness in protein conformational dynamics on a nanosecond time scale. For this, we have site-specifically labeled cysteine residues in guanylate cyclase-activating protein GCAP1 by the fluorescent dye Alexa647 and probed its local environment via time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence lifetime and rotational anisotropy measurements reveal a distinct structural movement of the polypeptide chain around position 106 upon release of Ca(2+). This is supported by analyzing the diffusional dye motion in a wobbling-in-a-cone model and by molecular dynamics simulations. We conclude that GCAP1 and its cellular cognate GCAP2 operate by distinctly different switching mechanisms despite their high structural homology. PMID:26204433

  9. Genome-wide Transcriptome Profiling of Homologous Recombination DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Guang; Lin, Curtis Chun-Jen; Mo, Wei; Dai, Hui; Park, Yun-Yong; Kim, Soo-Mi; Peng, Yang; Mo, Qianxing; Siwko, Stefan; Hu, Ruozhen; Lee, Ju-Seog; Hennessy, Bryan; Hanash, Samir; Mills, Gordon B.; Lin, Shiaw-Yih

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) repair deficiency predisposes to cancer development, but also sensitizes cancer cells to DNA-damage-inducing therapeutics. Here we identify an HR-defect (HRD) gene signature, which can be used to functionally assess HR repair status without interrogating individual genetic alterations in cells. By using this HRD gene signature as a functional network analysis tool, we discover that simultaneous loss of two major tumor suppressors BRCA1 and PTEN extensively rewire the HR repair-deficient phenotype, which is found in cells with defects in either BRCA1 or PTEN alone. Moreover, the HRD gene signature serves as an effective drug discovery platform to identify agents targeting HR repair as potential chemo/radio-sensitizers. More importantly, this HRD gene signature is able to predict clinical outcomes across multiple cancer lineages. Our findings, therefore, provide a molecular profile of HR repair to assess its status at a functional network level, which can provide both biological insights and have clinical implications in cancer. PMID:24553445

  10. Identification, localization, and sequencing of fetal bovine VASA homolog.

    PubMed

    Bartholomew, Rachel A; Parks, John E

    2007-10-01

    The vasa gene, first described in Drosophila, is purported to be important in germ cell development. Vasa is present across several invertebrate and vertebrate taxa, including frogs, fish, chickens, and humans. Vasa, a DEAD (asparagine-glutamine-alanine-asparagine) box protein shown to function as an RNA helicase in vitro, has not been investigated previously in fetal stage cattle. Total RNA was extracted from bovine fetal gonads obtained at 35-55 days, 55-80 days, and 80-120 days of gestation to amplify a 296 bp reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) product using primers for human vasa. The complete coding sequence of bovine vasa was cloned with 5' and 3' random amplification of cDNA ends polymerase chain reaction (RACE-PCR) and subsequently identified as bovine vasa homolog (BVH). Northern blot analysis revealed that among the tissues examined (gonad, liver, heart, brain, and femur), the vasa gene was expressed in the gonad. This localization, the conserved pattern of gene expression, and the gene sequence suggests that BVH plays a role in bovine germ cell development as proposed for other mammalian species. PMID:17150314

  11. Phylogenetic Analysis of the Formin Homology 2 DomainD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Higgs, Henry N.; Peterson, Kevin J.

    2005-01-01

    Formin proteins are key regulators of eukaryotic actin filament assembly and elongation, and many species possess multiple formin isoforms. A nomenclature system based on fundamental features would be desirable, to aid the rapid identification and characterization of novel formins. In this article, we attempt to systematize the formin family by performing phylogenetic analyses of the formin homology 2 (FH2) domain, an independently folding region common to all formins, which alone can influence actin dynamics. Through database searches, we identify 101 FH2 domains from 26 eukaryotic species, including 15 in mice. Sequence alignments reveal a highly conserved yeast-specific insert in the “knob loop” region of the FH2 domain, with unknown functional consequences. Phylogenetic analysis using minimum evolution (ME), maximum parsimony (MP), and maximum likelihood (ML) algorithms strongly supports the existence of seven metazoan groups. Yeast FH2 domains segregate from all other eukaryotes, including metazoans, other fungi, plants, and protists. Sequence comparisons of non-FH2 regions support relationships between three metazoan groups (Dia, DAAM, and FRL) and examine previously identified coiled-coil and Diaphanous auto-regulatory domain sequences. This analysis allows for a formin nomenclature system based on sequence relationships, as well as suggesting strategies for the determination of biochemical and cellular activities of these proteins. PMID:15509653

  12. Nonsense-mediated decay regulates key components of homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Janke, Ryan; Kong, Jeremy; Braberg, Hannes; Cantin, Greg; Yates, John R.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    Cells frequently experience DNA damage that requires repair by homologous recombination (HR). Proteins involved in HR are carefully coordinated to ensure proper and efficient repair without interfering with normal cellular processes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rad55 functions in the early steps of HR and is regulated in response to DNA damage through phosphorylation by the Mec1 and Rad53 kinases of the DNA damage response. To further identify regulatory processes that target HR, we performed a high-throughput genetic interaction screen with RAD55 phosphorylation site mutants. Genes involved in the mRNA quality control process, nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), were found to genetically interact with rad55 phospho-site mutants. Further characterization revealed that RAD55 transcript and protein levels are regulated by NMD. Regulation of HR by NMD extends to multiple targets beyond RAD55, including RAD51, RAD54 and RAD57. Finally, we demonstrate that loss of NMD results in an increase in recombination rates and resistance to the DNA damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate, suggesting this pathway negatively regulates HR under normal growth conditions. PMID:27001511

  13. DNA homologies of ribosomal RNA genes of Neurospora species

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, D.K.; Mimiko, R.; Dutta, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA genes (rDNAs) of Neurospora crassa contain DNA sequences which code for 17S, 5.8S, and 26S rRNAs, in addition to internal and external spacers. As has been reported for many eukaryotes, the DNA sequences which code for 17S, 5.8S, and 26S rRNAs in Neurospora species are probably conserved while the internal and external spacer regions are probably variable sequences. Extensive electron microscopic studies of 45S precursor rRNA of several cold and warm blooded animals confirm that spacer regions vary extensively from species to species. It was desirable to know whether such differences in rDNA sequences exist between Neurospora species. Any such difference should be detectable using standard procedures for DNA homology studies rDNA sequences were isolated from N. crassa mycelial cells using the procedure described previously. The purified rDNA was /sup 3/H-labeled (by nick translation) and reassociated with total DNA isolated from the heterothallic species N. crassa and from three homothalliospecies: N. dodgei, N. lineolata, and N. africana. In addition, /sup 32/P-labeled total DNA of N. crassa was reannealed with unlabeled bulk DNA from N. crassa, N. dodgei, and N. lineolata.

  14. Homologous sex chromosomes in three deeply divergent anuran species.

    PubMed

    Brelsford, Alan; Stöck, Matthias; Betto-Colliard, Caroline; Dubey, Sylvain; Dufresnes, Christophe; Jourdan-Pineau, Hélène; Rodrigues, Nicolas; Savary, Romain; Sermier, Roberto; Perrin, Nicolas

    2013-08-01

    Comparative genomic studies are revealing that, in sharp contrast with the strong stability found in birds and mammals, sex determination mechanisms are surprisingly labile in cold-blooded vertebrates, with frequent transitions between different pairs of sex chromosomes. It was recently suggested that, in context of this high turnover, some chromosome pairs might be more likely than others to be co-opted as sex chromosomes. Empirical support, however, is still very limited. Here we show that sex-linked markers from three highly divergent groups of anurans map to Xenopus tropicalis scaffold 1, a large part of which is homologous to the avian sex chromosome. Accordingly, the bird sex determination gene DMRT1, known to play a key role in sex differentiation across many animal lineages, is sex linked in all three groups. Our data provide strong support for the idea that some chromosome pairs are more likely than others to be co-opted as sex chromosomes because they harbor key genes from the sex determination pathway. PMID:23888863

  15. Gene assignment, expression, and homology of human tropomodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, L.A.; Fan, Y.S.; Lin, C.C.

    1996-05-15

    Tropomodulin is a newly characterized pointed end capping protein for actin filaments. It binds specifically to the N terminus of tropomyosin and blocks the elongation and depolymerization of tropomyosin-coated actin filaments. A 1.9-kb human tropomodulin cDNA clone was used to map its gene by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The tropomodulin gene was assigned to human chromosome 9q22.2-q22.3, a region that is also known to contain several other genes and disease loci and is proximal to the loci for gelsolin and {alpha}-fodrin. The gene for tropomodulin is expressed in major human tissues at different levels in the following order: heart and skeletal muscle much greater than that in placenta, liver, and kidney. Human tropomodulin and a 64-kDa autoantigen in Graves disease ({sub 1}D) are related: tropomodulin has 42 and 41% identity with the Graves protein in the N-terminal (69 residue) and C-terminal (194 residue) regions, respectively. The insertion of several homologous repeats in the midsection of the Graves protein, together with the extension of a proline-rich C terminus, accounts for the differences in length between the Graves protein (572 residues) and tropomodulin (359 residues). The significant sequence identity indicates that these two genes are evolved from a common ancestral gene. 22 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Attenuating homologous recombination stimulates an AID-induced antileukemic effect

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, Kristin R.; Hasham, Muneer G.; Donghia, Nina M.; Branca, Jane; Chavaree, Margaret; Chase, Betsy; Breggia, Anne; Hedlund, Jacquelyn; Emery, Ivette; Cavallo, Francesca; Jasin, Maria; Rüter, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is critical in normal B cells to initiate somatic hypermutation and immunoglobulin class switch recombination. Accumulating evidence suggests that AID is also prooncogenic, inducing cancer-promoting mutations or chromosome rearrangements. In this context, we find that AID is expressed in >40% of primary human chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cases, consistent with other reports. Using a combination of human B lymphoid leukemia cells and mouse models, we now show that AID expression can be harnessed for antileukemic effect, after inhibition of the RAD51 homologous recombination (HR) factor with 4,4′-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2-2′-disulfonic acid (DIDS). As a proof of principle, we show that DIDS treatment inhibits repair of AID-initiated DNA breaks, induces apoptosis, and promotes cytotoxicity preferentially in AID-expressing human CLL. This reveals a novel antineoplastic role of AID that can be triggered by inhibition of HR, suggesting a potential new paradigm to treat AID-expressing tumors. Given the growing list of tumor types with aberrant AID expression, this novel therapeutic approach has potential to impact a significant patient population. PMID:23589568

  17. Fertility after homologous prepubertal testis transplantation in the dog.

    PubMed

    Pullium, J K; Milner, R; Tuma, G A; Lin, P H

    2008-10-01

    Canine models of hereditary human diseases are widely used throughout the biomedical community, particularly when no suitable rodent model exists. In several models, the homozygote dogs die prior to puberty, or have substantially reduced fertility. Prepubertal transplantation of the testes was used to propagate the genotype of a mutant dog that would not otherwise have survived until puberty. The transplant recipient remained fertile 7 years postoperatively. To begin determining the factors necessary for successful function in testis transplants, prepubertal dogs that were dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) identical and disparate were examined for fertility and compared to the original transplant recipient as well as unoperated and sham-operated dogs. Immunosuppression was maintained with cyclosporine (CyA) and prednisone in the immediate postoperative period and CyA alone thereafter. The DLA-identical dogs demonstrated initial acceptance of the transplant, whereas one of two underwent chronic rejection. Both DLA-disparate dogs had subacute rejection prior to sexual maturity. These results demonstrate that homologous transplantation of prepubertal testes can be an effective method to preserve genotype in DLA-identical dogs. This model may also be useful for studying testis development and immunobiology. PMID:18929852

  18. Identification and primary immune characteristics of an amphioxus akirin homolog.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jie; Dong, Xuan; Kong, Yu; Zhang, Yan; Jing, Renwei; Feng, Lijun

    2013-08-01

    Akirin is a recently described nuclear protein that is thought to be required for the NF-κB signaling pathway in insects and vertebrates. Here, functional investigations of akirin are described in the basal chordate amphioxus Branchiostoma belcheri tsingtauense in an attempt to link this gene between insect and vertebrate lineages. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that amphioxus akirin represented a true ortholog of the two characterized vertebrate akirin paralogs. Amphioxus akirin, coding 219 amino acids with two nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences and one 14-3-3 binding motif, was widely expressed in various tissues and up-regulated in response to Escherichia coli (Gram-negative bacterium) and Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive bacterium) challenges. Furthermore, amphioxus akirin was strictly localized to the nucleus of HEK293T cells in a confocal analysis. Our work identified and characterized for the first time an amphioxus akirin homolog and will promote a better understanding of the evolution and transcriptional network of the akirin gene family. PMID:23732845

  19. Accelerated protein engineering for chemical biotechnology via homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Nordwald, Erik M; Garst, Andrew; Gill, Ryan T; Kaar, Joel L

    2013-12-01

    Protein engineering has traditionally relied on random mutagenesis strategies to generate diverse libraries, which require high-throughput screening or selection methods to identify rare variants. Alternatively, approaches to semi-rational library construction can be used to minimize the screening load and enhance the efficiency by which improved mutants may be identified. Such methods are typically limited to characterization of relatively few variants due to the difficulties in generating large rational libraries. New tools from synthetic biology, namely multiplexed DNA synthesis and homologous recombination, provide a promising avenue to rapidly construct large, rational libraries. These technologies also enable incorporation of synthetically encoded features that permit efficient characterization of the fitness of each mutant. Extension of these tools to protein library design could complement rational protein design cycles in an effort to more systematically search complex fitness landscapes. The highly parallelized nature with which such libraries can be generated also has the potential to expand directed protein evolution from single protein targets to protein networks whose concerted activities are required for the biological function of interest. PMID:23540421

  20. Nonsense-mediated decay regulates key components of homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Janke, Ryan; Kong, Jeremy; Braberg, Hannes; Cantin, Greg; Yates, John R; Krogan, Nevan J; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich

    2016-06-20

    Cells frequently experience DNA damage that requires repair by homologous recombination (HR). Proteins involved in HR are carefully coordinated to ensure proper and efficient repair without interfering with normal cellular processes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rad55 functions in the early steps of HR and is regulated in response to DNA damage through phosphorylation by the Mec1 and Rad53 kinases of the DNA damage response. To further identify regulatory processes that target HR, we performed a high-throughput genetic interaction screen with RAD55 phosphorylation site mutants. Genes involved in the mRNA quality control process, nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), were found to genetically interact with rad55 phospho-site mutants. Further characterization revealed that RAD55 transcript and protein levels are regulated by NMD. Regulation of HR by NMD extends to multiple targets beyond RAD55, including RAD51, RAD54 and RAD57 Finally, we demonstrate that loss of NMD results in an increase in recombination rates and resistance to the DNA damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate, suggesting this pathway negatively regulates HR under normal growth conditions. PMID:27001511

  1. ATR inhibition preferentially targets homologous recombination-deficient tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Krajewska, M; Fehrmann, R S N; Schoonen, P M; Labib, S; de Vries, E G E; Franke, L; van Vugt, M A T M

    2015-06-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is required for faithful repair of double-strand DNA breaks. Defects in HR repair cause severe genomic instability and challenge cellular viability. Paradoxically, various cancers are HR defective and have apparently acquired characteristics to survive genomic instability. We aimed to identify these characteristics to uncover therapeutic targets for HR-deficient cancers. Cytogenetic analysis of 1143 ovarian cancers showed that the degree of genomic instability was correlated to amplification of replication checkpoint genes ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related kinase (ATR) and CHEK1. To test whether genomic instability leads to increased reliance on replication checkpoint signaling, we inactivated Rad51 to model HR-related genomic instability. Rad51 inactivation caused defective HR repair and induced aberrant replication dynamics. Notably, inhibition of Rad51 led to increased ATR/checkpoint kinase-1 (Chk1)-mediated replication stress signaling. Importantly, inhibition of ATR or Chk1 preferentially killed HR-deficient cancer cells. Combined, our data show that defective HR caused by Rad51 inhibition results in differential sensitivity for ATR and Chk1 inhibitors, implicating replication checkpoint kinases as potential drug targets for HR-defective cancers. PMID:25174396

  2. [Evolutional principles of homology in regulatory genes of myogenesis].

    PubMed

    Ozerniuk, I D; Miuge, N S

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of early steps in muscular system development of invertebrates and vertebrates shows that early steps of myogenesis are regulated by genes-orthologs mainly belonging to two families, Pax and bHLH. In the majority of the following organisms, muscles formation (steps of determination and the earliest steps of myogenesis) is regulated by genes orthologs Pax3 which belong to the family Pax: nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans, Pristionchus pacificus), insects (Drosophila melanogaster), echinoderms (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus), sea squirts (Ciona intestinalis, Holocynthia roretzi), fishes (Danio rerio), amphibians (Xenopus laevis), birds, and mammals (mouse, rat). The nematode C. elegans is an exception since formation of its muscles in this period is regulated by homeobox gene Pal-1 belonging to the family Caudal. The sea squirt C. intestinalis is also an exception because the earliest steps of development involved in further muscle formation are accompanied by activation of the gene CiSna (snail) (gene family basic Zinc finger). The next steps of myogenesis in all analyzed species are regulated by genes orthologs belonging to the family of transcriptional factors bHLH. They along with genes Pax3 are characterized by a high extent of homology in all studied groups of animals. PMID:22988754

  3. Homologous PNA Hybridization to Noncanonical DNA G-Quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Kormuth, Karen A; Woolford, John L; Armitage, Bruce A

    2016-03-29

    Potential guanine (G) quadruplex-forming sequences (QFSs) found throughout the genomes and transcriptomes of organisms have emerged as biologically relevant structures. These G-quadruplexes represent novel opportunities for gene regulation at the DNA and RNA levels. Recently, the definition of functional QFSs has been expanding to include a variety of unconventional motifs, including relatively long loop sequences (i.e., >7 nucleotides) separating adjacent G-tracts. We have identified a QFS within the 25S rDNA gene from Saccharomyces cerevisae that features a long loop separating the two 3'-most G-tracts. An oligonucleotide based on this sequence, QFS3, folds into a stable G-quadruplex in vitro. We have studied the interaction between QFS3 and several loop mutants with a small, homologous (G-rich) peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomer that is designed to form a DNA/PNA heteroquadruplex. The PNA successfully invades the DNA quadruplex target to form a stable heteroquadruplex, but with surprisingly high PNA:DNA ratios based on surface plasmon resonance and mass spectrometric results. A model for high stoichiometry PNA-DNA heteroquadruplexes is proposed, and the implications for quadruplex targeting by G-rich PNA are discussed. PMID:26950608

  4. Microbial antigenic variation mediated by homologous DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Vink, Cornelis; Rudenko, Gloria; Seifert, H Steven

    2012-09-01

    Pathogenic microorganisms employ numerous molecular strategies in order to delay or circumvent recognition by the immune system of their host. One of the most widely used strategies of immune evasion is antigenic variation, in which immunogenic molecules expressed on the surface of a microorganism are continuously modified. As a consequence, the host is forced to constantly adapt its humoral immune response against this pathogen. An antigenic change thus provides the microorganism with an opportunity to persist and/or replicate within the host (population) for an extended period of time or to effectively infect a previously infected host. In most cases, antigenic variation is caused by genetic processes that lead to the modification of the amino acid sequence of a particular antigen or to alterations in the expression of biosynthesis genes that induce changes in the expression of a variant antigen. Here, we will review antigenic variation systems that rely on homologous DNA recombination and that are found in a wide range of cellular, human pathogens, including bacteria (such as Neisseria spp., Borrelia spp., Treponema pallidum, and Mycoplasma spp.), fungi (such as Pneumocystis carinii) and parasites (such as the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei). Specifically, the various DNA recombination-based antigenic variation systems will be discussed with a focus on the employed mechanisms of recombination, the DNA substrates, and the enzymatic machinery involved. PMID:22212019

  5. Shu1 Promotes Homolog Bias of Meiotic Recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Soogil; Kim, Keun Pil

    2013-01-01

    Homologous recombination occurs closely between homologous chromatids with highly ordered recombinosomes through RecA homologs and mediators. The present study demonstrates this relationship during the period of “partner choice” in yeast meiotic recombination. We have examined the formation of recombination intermediates in the absence or presence of Shu1, a member of the PCSS complex, which also includes Psy3, Csm2, and Shu2. DNA physical analysis indicates that Shu1 is essential for promoting the establishment of homolog bias during meiotic homologous recombination, and the partner choice is switched by Mek1 kinase activity. Furthermore, Shu1 promotes both crossover (CO) and non-crossover (NCO) pathways of meiotic recombination. The inactivation of Mek1 kinase allows for meiotic recombination to progress efficiently, but is lost in homolog bias where most double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired via stable intersister joint molecules. Moreover, the Srs2 helicase deletion cells in the budding yeast show slightly reduced COs and NCOs, and Shu1 promotes homolog bias independent of Srs2. Our findings reveal that Shu1 and Mek1 kinase activity have biochemically distinct roles in partner choice, which in turn enhances the understanding of the mechanism associated with the precondition for homolog bias. PMID:24213600

  6. Assembly and sorting of homologous BAC contigs in allotetraploid cotton genomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Upland cotton (G. hirsutum) is a diploidized allopolyploid species containing At and Dt sub-genomes that have partial homology. Assembly and sorting of homologous BAC contigs into their subgenomes and further to individual chromosomes are of both great interest and great challenge for genome-wide i...

  7. Resolving phylogenetic incongruence to articulate homology and phenotypic evolution: a case study from Nematoda.

    PubMed

    Ragsdale, Erik J; Baldwin, James G

    2010-05-01

    Modern morphology-based systematics, including questions of incongruence with molecular data, emphasizes analysis over similarity criteria to assess homology. Yet detailed examination of a few key characters, using new tools and processes such as computerized, three-dimensional ultrastructural reconstruction of cell complexes, can resolve apparent incongruence by re-examining primary homologies. In nematodes of Tylenchomorpha, a parasitic feeding phenotype is thus reconciled with immediate free-living outgroups. Closer inspection of morphology reveals phenotypes congruent with molecular-based phylogeny and points to a new locus of homology in mouthparts. In nematode models, the study of individually homologous cells reveals a conserved modality of evolution among dissimilar feeding apparati adapted to divergent lifestyles. Conservatism of cellular components, consistent with that of other body systems, allows meaningful comparative morphology in difficult groups of microscopic organisms. The advent of phylogenomics is synergistic with morphology in systematics, providing an honest test of homology in the evolution of phenotype. PMID:20106846

  8. A cohesin-based structural platform supporting homologous chromosome pairing in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Da-Qiao; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2016-08-01

    The pairing and recombination of homologous chromosomes during the meiotic prophase is necessary for the accurate segregation of chromosomes in meiosis. However, the mechanism by which homologous chromosomes achieve this pairing has remained an open question. Meiotic cohesins have been shown to affect chromatin compaction; however, the impact of meiotic cohesins on homologous pairing and the fine structures of cohesion-based chromatin remain to be determined. A recent report using live-cell imaging and super-resolution microscopy demonstrated that the lack of meiotic cohesins alters the chromosome axis structures and impairs the pairing of homologous chromosomes. These results suggest that meiotic cohesin-based chromosome axis structures are crucial for the pairing of homologous chromosomes. PMID:26856595

  9. A Pluralistic Account of Homology: Adapting the Models to the Data

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Leanne S.; Jachiet, Pierre-Alain; Hanage, William P.; Fitzpatrick, David A.; Lopez, Philippe; O’Connell, Mary J.; Pisani, Davide; Wilkinson, Mark; Bapteste, Eric; McInerney, James O.

    2014-01-01

    Defining homologous genes is important in many evolutionary studies but raises obvious issues. Some of these issues are conceptual and stem from our assumptions of how a gene evolves, others are practical, and depend on the algorithmic decisions implemented in existing software. Therefore, to make progress in the study of homology, both ontological and epistemological questions must be considered. In particular, defining homologous genes cannot be solely addressed under the classic assumptions of strong tree thinking, according to which genes evolve in a strictly tree-like fashion of vertical descent and divergence and the problems of homology detection are primarily methodological. Gene homology could also be considered under a different perspective where genes evolve as “public goods,” subjected to various introgressive processes. In this latter case, defining homologous genes becomes a matter of designing models suited to the actual complexity of the data and how such complexity arises, rather than trying to fit genetic data to some a priori tree-like evolutionary model, a practice that inevitably results in the loss of much information. Here we show how important aspects of the problems raised by homology detection methods can be overcome when even more fundamental roots of these problems are addressed by analyzing public goods thinking evolutionary processes through which genes have frequently originated. This kind of thinking acknowledges distinct types of homologs, characterized by distinct patterns, in phylogenetic and nonphylogenetic unrooted or multirooted networks. In addition, we define “family resemblances” to include genes that are related through intermediate relatives, thereby placing notions of homology in the broader context of evolutionary relationships. We conclude by presenting some payoffs of adopting such a pluralistic account of homology and family relationship, which expands the scope of evolutionary analyses beyond the traditional

  10. Asthma Increases Susceptibility to Heterologous but Not Homologous Secondary Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Yoichi; Roberts, Sean; Hurteau, Gregory J.; Sanfilippo, Alan M.; Racine, Rachael

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Asthma was the most common comorbidity observed among patients hospitalized with influenza A virus during the 2009 pandemic. However, little remains known about how the asthmatic phenotype influences protective immune responses against respiratory viral pathogens. Using the ovalbumin-induced allergic lung inflammation model, we found that asthmatic mice, unlike nonasthmatic mice, were highly susceptible to secondary heterologous virus challenge. While primary virus infection generated protective memory immune responses against homologous secondary virus challenge in both asthmatic and nonasthmatic mice, full protection against heterologous A/California/04/2009 (CA04) viral infection was observed only in nonasthmatic mice. Significant reductions in CA04-specific IgA, IgG, and IgM levels and in CA04-neutralizing activity of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was observed following secondary CA04 challenge of PR8-immunized asthmatic mice. Furthermore, transfer of immune BALF obtained from nonasthmatic, but not asthmatic, donors following secondary viral infection generated protection against CA04 in naive recipients. Nonspecific B-cell activation by CpG inoculation restored protection in PR8-immunized, CA04-challenged asthmatic mice. These results demonstrate a causal link between defective mucosal antibody responses and the heightened susceptibility of asthmatic mice to influenza infection and provide a mechanistic explanation for the observation that asthma was a major risk factor during the 2009 influenza pandemic. IMPORTANCE The prevalence of asthma worldwide is increasing each year. Unfortunately, there is no cure for asthma. Asthmatic individuals not only suffer from consistent wheezing and coughing but are also believed to be more prone to serious lung infections that result in bronchitis and pneumonia. However, little is known about the influence of asthma on host mucosal immunity. Here we show that antibody responses during secondary heterologous

  11. Mammalian X homolog acts as sex chromosome in lacertid lizards.

    PubMed

    Rovatsos, M; Vukić, J; Kratochvíl, L

    2016-07-01

    Among amniotes, squamate reptiles are especially variable in their mechanisms of sex determination; however, based largely on cytogenetic data, some lineages possess highly evolutionary stable sex chromosomes. The still very limited knowledge of the genetic content of squamate sex chromosomes precludes a reliable reconstruction of the evolutionary history of sex determination in this group and consequently in all amniotes. Female heterogamety with a degenerated W chromosome typifies the lizards of the family Lacertidae, the widely distributed Old World clade including several hundreds of species. From the liver transcriptome of the lacertid Takydromus sexlineatus female, we selected candidates for Z-specific genes as the loci lacking single-nucleotide polymorphisms. We validated the candidate genes through the comparison of the copy numbers in the female and male genomes of T. sexlineatus and another lacertid species, Lacerta agilis, by quantitative PCR that also proved to be a reliable technique for the molecular sexing of the studied species. We suggest that this novel approach is effective for the detection of Z-specific and X-specific genes in lineages with degenerated W, respectively Y chromosomes. The analyzed gene content of the Z chromosome revealed that lacertid sex chromosomes are not homologous with those of other reptiles including birds, but instead the genes have orthologs in the X-conserved region shared by viviparous mammals. It is possible that this part of the vertebrate genome was independently co-opted for the function of sex chromosomes in viviparous mammals and lacertids because of its content of genes involved in gonad differentiation. PMID:26980341

  12. Non-homologous end joining repair in Xenopus egg extract

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Songli; Peng, Aimin

    2016-01-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is a major DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair mechanism. We characterized here a series of plasmid-based DSB templates that were repaired in Xenopus egg extracts via the canonical, Ku-dependent NHEJ pathway. We showed that the template with compatible ends was efficiently repaired without end processing, in a manner that required the kinase activity of DNA-PKcs but not ATM. Moreover, non-compatible ends with blunt/3′-overhang, blunt/5′-overhang, and 3′-overhang/5′-overhang were predominantly repaired with fill-in and ligation without the removal of end nucleotides. In contrast, 3′-overhang/3′-overhang and 5′-overhang/5′-overhang templates were processed by resection of 3–5 bases and fill-in of 1–4 bases prior to end ligation. Therefore, the NHEJ machinery exhibited a strong preference for precise repair; the presence of neither non-compatible ends nor protruding single strand DNA sufficiently warranted the action of nucleases. ATM was required for the efficient repair of all non-compatible ends including those repaired without end processing by nucleases, suggesting its role beyond phosphorylation and regulation of Artemis. Finally, dephosphorylation of the 5′-overhang/3′-overhang template reduced the efficiency of DNA repair without increasing the risk of end resection, indicating that end protection via prompt end ligation is not the sole mechanism that suppresses the action of nucleases. PMID:27324260

  13. Ras Homolog Enriched in Brain (Rheb) Enhances Apoptotic Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Karassek, Sascha; Berghaus, Carsten; Schwarten, Melanie; Goemans, Christoph G.; Ohse, Nadine; Kock, Gerd; Jockers, Katharina; Neumann, Sebastian; Gottfried, Sebastian; Herrmann, Christian; Heumann, Rolf; Stoll, Raphael

    2010-01-01

    Rheb is a homolog of Ras GTPase that regulates cell growth, proliferation, and regeneration via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Because of the well established potential of activated Ras to promote survival, we sought to investigate the ability of Rheb signaling to phenocopy Ras. We found that overexpression of lipid-anchored Rheb enhanced the apoptotic effects induced by UV light, TNFα, or tunicamycin in an mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1)-dependent manner. Knocking down endogenous Rheb or applying rapamycin led to partial protection, identifying Rheb as a mediator of cell death. Ras and c-Raf kinase opposed the apoptotic effects induced by UV light or TNFα but did not prevent Rheb-mediated apoptosis. To gain structural insight into the signaling mechanisms, we determined the structure of Rheb-GDP by NMR. The complex adopts the typical canonical fold of RasGTPases and displays the characteristic GDP-dependent picosecond to nanosecond backbone dynamics of the switch I and switch II regions. NMR revealed Ras effector-like binding of activated Rheb to the c-Raf-Ras-binding domain (RBD), but the affinity was 1000-fold lower than the Ras/RBD interaction, suggesting a lack of functional interaction. shRNA-mediated knockdown of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK-1) strongly reduced UV or TNFα-induced apoptosis and suppressed enhancement by Rheb overexpression. In conclusion, Rheb-mTOR activation not only promotes normal cell growth but also enhances apoptosis in response to diverse toxic stimuli via an ASK-1-mediated mechanism. Pharmacological regulation of the Rheb/mTORC1 pathway using rapamycin should take the presence of cellular stress into consideration, as this may have clinical implications. PMID:20685651

  14. FAB overlapping: a strategy for sequencing homologous proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferranti, P.; Malorni, A.; Marino, G.; Pucci, P.; di Luccia, A.; Ferrara, L.

    1991-12-01

    Extensive similarity has been shown to exist between the primary structures of closely related proteins from different species, the only differences being restricted to a few amino acid variations. A new mass spectrometric procedure, which has been called FAB-overlapping, has been developed for sequencing highly homologous proteins based on the detection of these small differences as compared with a known protein used as a reference. Several complementary peptide maps are constructed using fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS) analysis of different proteolytic digests of the unknown protein and the mass values are related to those expected on the basis of the sequence of the reference protein. The mass signals exhibiting unusual mass values identify those regions where variations have taken place; fine location of the mutations can be obtained by coupling simple protein chemistry methodologies with FAB-MS. Using the FAB-overlapping procedure, it was possible to determine the sequence of [alpha]1, [alpha]3 and [beta] globins from water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis hemoglobins (phenotype AA). Two amino acid substitutions were detected in the buffalo [beta] chain (Lys16 --> His and Asn118 --> His) whereas the [alpha]1 chains were found the [alpha]1 and [alpha]3 chains were found to contain four amino acid replacements, three of which were identical (Glu23 --> Asp, Glu71 --> Gly, Phe117 --> Cys), and the insertion of an alanine residue in position 124. The only differences between [alpha]1 and [alpha]3 globins were identified in the C -terminal region; [alpha]1 contains a Phe residue at position 130 whereas [alpha]3 shows serine at position 132.

  15. Relative antidipsogenic potencies of six homologous natriuretic peptides in eels.

    PubMed

    Miyanishi, Hiroshi; Nobata, Shigenori; Takei, Yoshio

    2011-10-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) exhibits a potent antidipsogenic effect in seawater (SW) eels to limit excess Na(+) uptake, thereby effectively promoting SW adaptation. Recently, cardiac ANP, BNP and VNP and brain CNP1, 3 and 4, have been identified in eels. We examined the antidipsogenic effect of all homologous NPs using conscious, cannulated eels in both FW and SW together with parameters that affect drinking. A dose-response study (0.01-1 nmol/kg) in SW eels showed the relative potency of the antidipsogenic effect was in the order ANP ≥ VNP > BNP = CNP3 > CNP1 ≥ CNP4, while the order was ANP = VNP = BNP > CNP3 = CNP1 = CNP4 for the vasodepressor effect. The minimum effective dose of ANP for the antidipsogenic effect is much lower than that in mammals. ANP, BNP and VNP at 0.3 nmol/kg decreased drinking, plasma Na(+) concentration and aortic pressure and increased hematocrit in SW eels. The cardiac NPs induced similar changes in drinking, aortic pressure and hematocrit in FW eels, but aside from BNP no change in plasma Na(+) concentration. CNPs had no effect on drinking, plasma Na(+) concentration and hematocrit but induced mild hypotension in both FW and SW eels, except for CNP3 that inhibited drinking in SW eels. These results show that ANP, BNP and VNP are potent antidipsogenic hormones in eels in spite of other regulatory factors working to induce drinking, and that CNPs are without effects on drinking except for the ancestor of the cardiac NPs, CNP3. PMID:21967218

  16. Analogies and homologies in lipopolysaccharide and glycoprotein biosynthesis in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hug, Isabelle; Feldman, Mario F

    2011-02-01

    Bacteria generate and attach countless glycan structures to diverse macromolecules. Despite this diversity, the mechanisms of glycoconjugate biosynthesis are often surprisingly similar. The focus of this review is on the commonalities between lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and glycoprotein assembly pathways and their evolutionary relationship. Three steps that are essential for both pathways are completed by membrane proteins. These include the initiation of glycan assembly through the attachment of a first sugar residue onto the lipid carrier undecaprenyl pyrophosphate, the translocation across the plasma membrane and the final transfer onto proteins or lipid A-core. Two families of initiating enzymes have been described: the polyprenyl-P N-acetylhexosamine-1-P transferases and the polyprenyl-P hexosamine-1-P transferases, represented by Escherichia coli WecA and Salmonella enterica WbaP, respectively. Translocases are either Wzx-like flippases or adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporters (ABC transporters). The latter can consist either of two polypeptides, Wzt and Wzm, or of a single polypeptide homolog to the Campylobacter jejuni PglK. Finally, there are two families of conjugating enzymes, the N-oligosaccharyltransferases (N-OTase), best represented by C. jejuni PglB, and the O-OTases, including Neisseria meningitidis PglL and the O antigen ligases involved in LPS biosynthesis. With the exception of the N-OTases, probably restricted to glycoprotein synthesis, members of all these transmembrane protein families can be involved in the synthesis of both glycoproteins and LPS. Because many translocation and conjugation enzymes display relaxed substrate specificity, these bacterial enzymes could be exploited in engineered living bacteria for customized glycoconjugate production, generating potential vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:20871101

  17. Genetic Manipulation of Homologous Recombination In Vivo Attenuates Intestinal Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    McIlhatton, Michael A; Murnan, Kevin; Carson, Daniel; Boivin, Gregory P; Croce, Carlo M; Groden, Joanna

    2015-07-01

    Although disruption of DNA repair capacity is unquestionably associated with cancer susceptibility in humans and model organisms, it remains unclear if the inherent tumor phenotypes of DNA repair deficiency syndromes can be regulated by manipulating DNA repair pathways. Loss-of-function mutations in BLM, a member of the RecQ helicase family, cause Bloom's syndrome (BS), a rare, recessive genetic disorder that predisposes to many types of cancer. BLM functions in many aspects of DNA homeostasis, including the suppression of homologous recombination (HR) in somatic cells. We investigated whether BLM overexpression, in contrast with loss-of-function mutations, attenuated the intestinal tumor phenotypes of Apc(Min/+) and Apc(Min/+);Msh2(-/-) mice, animal models of familial adenomatous polyposis coli (FAP). We constructed a transgenic mouse line expressing human BLM (BLM-Tg) and crossed it onto both backgrounds. BLM-Tg decreased adenoma incidence in a dose-dependent manner in our Apc(Min/) (+) model of FAP, although levels of GIN were unaffected and concomitantly increased animal survival over 50%. It did not reduce intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc(Min/) (+);Msh2(-/-) mice. We used the pink-eyed unstable (p(un)) mouse model to demonstrate that increasing BLM dosage in vivo lowered endogenous levels of HR by 2-fold. Our data suggest that attenuation of the Min phenotype is achieved through a direct effect of BLM-Tg on the HR repair pathway. These findings demonstrate that HR can be manipulated in vivo to modulate tumor formation at the organismal level. Our data suggest that lowering HR frequencies may have positive therapeutic outcomes in the context of specific hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes, exemplified by FAP. PMID:25908507

  18. A role for homologous recombination proteins in cell cycle regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kostyrko, Kaja; Bosshard, Sandra; Urban, Zuzanna; Mermod, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells respond to DNA breaks, especially double-stranded breaks (DSBs), by activating the DNA damage response (DDR), which encompasses DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint signaling. The DNA damage signal is transmitted to the checkpoint machinery by a network of specialized DNA damage-recognizing and signal-transducing molecules. However, recent evidence suggests that DNA repair proteins themselves may also directly contribute to the checkpoint control. Here, we investigated the role of homologous recombination (HR) proteins in normal cell cycle regulation in the absence of exogenous DNA damage. For this purpose, we used Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells expressing the Fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicators (Fucci). Systematic siRNA-mediated knockdown of HR genes in these cells demonstrated that the lack of several of these factors alters cell cycle distribution, albeit differentially. The knock-down of MDC1, Rad51 and Brca1 caused the cells to arrest in the G2 phase, suggesting that they may be required for the G2/M transition. In contrast, inhibition of the other HR factors, including several Rad51 paralogs and Rad50, led to the arrest in the G1/G0 phase. Moreover, reduced expression of Rad51B, Rad51C, CtIP and Rad50 induced entry into a quiescent G0-like phase. In conclusion, the lack of many HR factors may lead to cell cycle checkpoint activation, even in the absence of exogenous DNA damage, indicating that these proteins may play an essential role both in DNA repair and checkpoint signaling. PMID:26125600

  19. Hepatic receptors for homologous growth hormone in the eel

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, T. )

    1991-03-01

    The specific binding of 125I-labeled eel growth hormone (eGH) to liver membranes of the eel was examined. The specific binding to the 10,000g pellet was greater than that to the 600g pellet. The specific binding was linear up to about 100 mg fresh tissue, and was saturable with increasing amounts of membrane. The specific binding was pH-, temperature-, and time-dependent, with the optimum pH at 7.4, and greater specific binding was obtained at 15 and 25 degrees than at 35 degrees. Scatchard analysis of liver binding gave an association constant of 1.1 x 10(9) M-1 and a capacity of 105 fmol/mg protein. The receptor preparation was highly specific for GHs. Natural and recombinant eel GHs as well as recombinant salmon GH competed equally with 125I-eGH for the receptor sites of the 10,000g liver membrane. Ovine GH was more potent in displacing the labeled eGH than the homologous eel hormone. Tilapia GH and ovine prolactin (PRL) were needed in greater amounts (40 times) than eGH to displace the labeled eGH. Salmon and tilapia PRLs were still less potent (500 times) than eGH. There was no displacement with eel PRL. No significant change in the specific binding was seen 1 week after hypophysectomy, whereas injection of eGH into the hypophysectomized eel caused a significant reduction after 24 hr. The binding to the membrane fractions from gills, kidney, muscle, intestine, and brain was low and exclusively nonspecific, indicating the presence of specific GH receptors predominantly in the liver.

  20. PREDICTING RNA STRUCTURE BY MULTIPLE TEMPLATE HOMOLOGY MODELING

    PubMed Central

    FLORES, SAMUEL C.; WAN, YAQI; RUSSELL, RICK; ALTMAN, RUSS B.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the importance of 3D structure to understand the myriad functions of RNAs in cells, most RNA molecules remain out of reach of crystallographic and NMR methods. However, certain structural information such as base pairing and some tertiary contacts can be determined readily for many RNAs by bioinformatics or relatively low cost experiments. Further, because RNA structure is highly modular, it is possible to deduce local 3D structure from the solved structures of evolutionarily related RNAs or even unrelated RNAs that share the same module. RNABuilder is a software package that generates model RNA structures by treating the kinematics and forces at separate, multiple levels of resolution. Kinematically, bonds in bases, certain stretches of residues, and some entire molecules are rigid while other bonds remain flexible. Forces act on the rigid bases and selected individual atoms. Here we use RNABuilder to predict the structure of the 200-nucleotide Azoarcus group I intron by homology modeling against fragments of the distantly-related Twort and Tetrahymena group I introns and by incorporating base pairing forces where necessary. In the absence of any information from the solved Azoarcus intron crystal structure, the model accurately depicts the global topology, secondary and tertiary connections, and gives an overall RMSD value of 4.6 Å relative to the crystal structure. The accuracy of the model is even higher in the intron core (RMSD = 3.5 Å), whereas deviations are modestly larger for peripheral regions that differ more substantially between the different introns. These results lay the groundwork for using this approach for larger and more diverse group I introns, as well for still larger RNAs and RNA-protein complexes such as group II introns and the ribosomal subunits. PMID:19908374

  1. Liver receptor homolog 1 influences blastocyst hatching in pigs

    PubMed Central

    GUO, Jing; ZHAO, Ming-Hui; LIANG, Shuang; CHOI, Jeong-Woo; KIM, Nam-Hyung; CUI, Xiang-Shun

    2016-01-01

    Liver receptor homolog 1 (Lrh1, also known as Nr5a2) belongs to the orphan nuclear receptor superfamily and has diverse functions in development, metabolism, and cell differentiation and death. Lrh1 regulates the expression of Oct4, which is a key factor of early embryonic differentiation. However, the role of Lrh1 in early development of mammalian embryo is unknown. In the present study, the localization, Lrh1 mRNA expression, and LRH1 protein levels in porcine early parthenotes were examined by immunofluorescence and real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. To determine the role of Lrh1 in porcine early embryo development, the parthenotes were treated with the specific LRH1 antagonist 505601. The immunofluorescence signal for LRH1 was only observed in the nucleus of blastocysts. The blastocyst developmental rate in the presence of 50 and 100 μM 505601 was significantly lower than that in the control group. The blastocyst hatching rate was also reduced in the presence of 50 and 100 μM 505601 than that under control conditions. The latter effect was possibly due to the decreased expression of hatching-related genes such as Fn1, Itgα5, and Cox2 upon the inhibition of Lrh1. Incubation with the LRH1 antagonist also increased the number of apoptotic cells among the blastocysts. Moreover, LRH1 inhibition enhanced the expression of the pro-apoptotic genes Bax and Casp3, and reduced the expression of the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl2. Lrh1 inhibition also led to significant decrease in the expression levels of Oct4 mRNA and octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4) protein in the blastocysts. In conclusion, Lrh1 affects blastocyst formation and hatching in porcine embryonic development through the regulation of OCT4 expression and cell apoptosis. PMID:26971889

  2. Studies of flerovium and element 115 homologs with macrocyclic extractants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despotopulos, John Dustin

    Study of the chemistry of the heaviest elements, Z ? 104, poses a unique challenge due to their low production cross-sections and short half-lives. Chemistry also must be studied on the one-atom-at-a-time scale, requiring automated, fast, and very efficient chemical schemes. Recent studies of the chemical behavior of copernicium (Cn, element 112) and flerovium (Fl, element 114) together with the discovery of isotopes of these elements with half-lives suitable for chemical studies have spurred a renewed interest in the development of rapid systems designed to study the chemical properties of elements with Z ≥ 114. This dissertation explores both extraction chromatography and solvent extraction as methods for development of a rapid chemical separation scheme for the homologs of flerovium (Pb, Sn, Hg) and element 115 (Bi, Sb), with the goal of developing a chemical scheme that, in the future, can be applied to on-line chemistry of both Fl and element 115. Macrocyclic extractants, specifically crown ethers and their derivatives, were chosen for these studies. Carrier-free radionuclides, used in these studies, of the homologs of Fl and element 115 were obtained by proton activation of high purity metal foils at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS): natIn(p,n)113Sn, natSn(p,n)124Sb, and Au(p,n)197m,gHg. The carrier-free activity was separated from the foils by novel separation schemes based on ion exchange and extraction chromatography techniques. Carrier-free Pb and Bi isotopes were obtained from development of a novel generator based on cation exchange chromatography using the 232U parent to generate 212Pb and 212Bi. Crown ethers show high selectivity for metal ions based on their size compared to the negatively charged cavity of the ether. Extraction by crown ethers occur based on electrostatic ion-dipole interactions between the negatively charged ring atoms (oxygen, sulfur, etc.) and the positively

  3. HorA web server to infer homology between proteins using sequence and structural similarity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bong-Hyun; Cheng, Hua; Grishin, Nick V

    2009-07-01

    The biological properties of proteins are often gleaned through comparative analysis of evolutionary relatives. Although protein structure similarity search methods detect more distant homologs than purely sequence-based methods, structural resemblance can result from either homology (common ancestry) or analogy (similarity without common ancestry). While many existing web servers detect structural neighbors, they do not explicitly address the question of homology versus analogy. Here, we present a web server named HorA (Homology or Analogy) that identifies likely homologs for a query protein structure. Unlike other servers, HorA combines sequence information from state-of-the-art profile methods with structure information from spatial similarity measures using an advanced computational technique. HorA aims to identify biologically meaningful connections rather than purely 3D-geometric similarities. The HorA method finds approximately 90% of remote homologs defined in the manually curated database SCOP. HorA will be especially useful for finding remote homologs that might be overlooked by other sequence or structural similarity search servers. The HorA server is available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/horaserver. PMID:19417074

  4. HorA web server to infer homology between proteins using sequence and structural similarity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bong-Hyun; Cheng, Hua; Grishin, Nick V.

    2009-01-01

    The biological properties of proteins are often gleaned through comparative analysis of evolutionary relatives. Although protein structure similarity search methods detect more distant homologs than purely sequence-based methods, structural resemblance can result from either homology (common ancestry) or analogy (similarity without common ancestry). While many existing web servers detect structural neighbors, they do not explicitly address the question of homology versus analogy. Here, we present a web server named HorA (Homology or Analogy) that identifies likely homologs for a query protein structure. Unlike other servers, HorA combines sequence information from state-of-the-art profile methods with structure information from spatial similarity measures using an advanced computational technique. HorA aims to identify biologically meaningful connections rather than purely 3D-geometric similarities. The HorA method finds ∼90% of remote homologs defined in the manually curated database SCOP. HorA will be especially useful for finding remote homologs that might be overlooked by other sequence or structural similarity search servers. The HorA server is available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/horaserver. PMID:19417074

  5. Retroviral vectors for homologous recombination provide efficient cloning and expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Eiji; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Horii, Masae; Hamana, Hiroshi; Nagai, Terumi; Muraguchi, Atsushi

    2014-02-14

    Homologous recombination technologies enable high-throughput cloning and the seamless insertion of any DNA fragment into expression vectors. Additionally, retroviral vectors offer a fast and efficient method for transducing and expressing genes in mammalian cells, including lymphocytes. However, homologous recombination cannot be used to insert DNA fragments into retroviral vectors; retroviral vectors contain two homologous regions, the 5'- and 3'-long terminal repeats, between which homologous recombination occurs preferentially. In this study, we have modified a retroviral vector to enable the cloning of DNA fragments through homologous recombination. To this end, we inserted a bacterial selection marker in a region adjacent to the gene insertion site. We used the modified retroviral vector and homologous recombination to clone T-cell receptors (TCRs) from single Epstein Barr virus-specific human T cells in a high-throughput and comprehensive manner and to efficiently evaluate their function by transducing the TCRs into a murine T-cell line through retroviral infection. In conclusion, the modified retroviral vectors, in combination with the homologous recombination method, are powerful tools for the high-throughput cloning of cDNAs and their efficient functional analysis. PMID:24462869

  6. Effects of homologous and heterologous antiserum on neutralizing-antibody response to rabies vaccine*

    PubMed Central

    Archer, B. G.; Dierks, R. E.

    1968-01-01

    Heterologous antirabies serum is commonly used in the treatment of persons exposed to rabies. However, the high incidence of serum sickness which accompanies its use has prompted work to develop a homologous human product. As human antirabies serum is expensive and difficult to obtain in large quantities, a series of experiments was done on guinea-pigs to test the effects of homologous and heterologous antirabies serum. Similar amounts of homologous and heterologous antisera administered to guinea-pigs produced similar circulating neutralization titres one day later. The homologous antibody titres, however, decreased more slowly than the heterologous antibody titres. When homologous antiserum was given, followed by duck-embryo rabies vaccine, an apparent response to the vaccine was suppressed or delayed longer than when heterologous antiserum and vaccine were administered. However, when homologous antiserum was given with suckling-mouse-brain vaccine, of a much higher potency, the response to vaccine was apparent in the presence of a passive titre of 1:120. If a similar relationship is seen in man with the use of a homologous antirabies product, it will be essential to use high potency vaccines or alter the established vaccination schedules in order to overcome the inherent interference problems. PMID:5303907

  7. Slow Replication Fork Velocity of Homologous Recombination-Defective Cells Results from Endogenous Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Therese; Ragu, Sandrine; Magdalou, Indiana; Machon, Christelle; Dardillac, Elodie; Técher, Hervé; Guitton, Jérôme; Debatisse, Michelle; Lopez, Bernard S

    2016-05-01

    Replications forks are routinely hindered by different endogenous stresses. Because homologous recombination plays a pivotal role in the reactivation of arrested replication forks, defects in homologous recombination reveal the initial endogenous stress(es). Homologous recombination-defective cells consistently exhibit a spontaneously reduced replication speed, leading to mitotic extra centrosomes. Here, we identify oxidative stress as a major endogenous source of replication speed deceleration in homologous recombination-defective cells. The treatment of homologous recombination-defective cells with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine or the maintenance of the cells at low O2 levels (3%) rescues both the replication fork speed, as monitored by single-molecule analysis (molecular combing), and the associated mitotic extra centrosome frequency. Reciprocally, the exposure of wild-type cells to H2O2 reduces the replication fork speed and generates mitotic extra centrosomes. Supplying deoxynucleotide precursors to H2O2-exposed cells rescued the replication speed. Remarkably, treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine strongly expanded the nucleotide pool, accounting for the replication speed rescue. Remarkably, homologous recombination-defective cells exhibit a high level of endogenous reactive oxygen species. Consistently, homologous recombination-defective cells accumulate spontaneous γH2AX or XRCC1 foci that are abolished by treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine or maintenance at 3% O2. Finally, oxidative stress stimulated homologous recombination, which is suppressed by supplying deoxynucleotide precursors. Therefore, the cellular redox status strongly impacts genome duplication and transmission. Oxidative stress should generate replication stress through different mechanisms, including DNA damage and nucleotide pool imbalance. These data highlight the intricacy of endogenous replication and oxidative stresses, which are both evoked during tumorigenesis and senescence initiation

  8. Slow Replication Fork Velocity of Homologous Recombination-Defective Cells Results from Endogenous Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Magdalou, Indiana; Machon, Christelle; Dardillac, Elodie; Técher, Hervé; Guitton, Jérôme; Debatisse, Michelle; Lopez, Bernard S.

    2016-01-01

    Replications forks are routinely hindered by different endogenous stresses. Because homologous recombination plays a pivotal role in the reactivation of arrested replication forks, defects in homologous recombination reveal the initial endogenous stress(es). Homologous recombination-defective cells consistently exhibit a spontaneously reduced replication speed, leading to mitotic extra centrosomes. Here, we identify oxidative stress as a major endogenous source of replication speed deceleration in homologous recombination-defective cells. The treatment of homologous recombination-defective cells with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine or the maintenance of the cells at low O2 levels (3%) rescues both the replication fork speed, as monitored by single-molecule analysis (molecular combing), and the associated mitotic extra centrosome frequency. Reciprocally, the exposure of wild-type cells to H2O2 reduces the replication fork speed and generates mitotic extra centrosomes. Supplying deoxynucleotide precursors to H2O2-exposed cells rescued the replication speed. Remarkably, treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine strongly expanded the nucleotide pool, accounting for the replication speed rescue. Remarkably, homologous recombination-defective cells exhibit a high level of endogenous reactive oxygen species. Consistently, homologous recombination-defective cells accumulate spontaneous γH2AX or XRCC1 foci that are abolished by treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine or maintenance at 3% O2. Finally, oxidative stress stimulated homologous recombination, which is suppressed by supplying deoxynucleotide precursors. Therefore, the cellular redox status strongly impacts genome duplication and transmission. Oxidative stress should generate replication stress through different mechanisms, including DNA damage and nucleotide pool imbalance. These data highlight the intricacy of endogenous replication and oxidative stresses, which are both evoked during tumorigenesis and senescence initiation

  9. Structural Analysis of Diheme Cytochrome c by Hydrogen–Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry and Homology Modeling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A lack of X-ray or nuclear magnetic resonance structures of proteins inhibits their further study and characterization, motivating the development of new ways of analyzing structural information without crystal structures. The combination of hydrogen–deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) data in conjunction with homology modeling can provide improved structure and mechanistic predictions. Here a unique diheme cytochrome c (DHCC) protein from Heliobacterium modesticaldum is studied with both HDX and homology modeling to bring some definition of the structure of the protein and its role. Specifically, HDX data were used to guide the homology modeling to yield a more functionally relevant structural model of DHCC. PMID:25138816

  10. Isolation and chromosomal mapping of a mouse homolog of the Batten disease gene CLN3

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.L.; Johnson, K.R.; Lerner, T.J. |

    1996-08-01

    We describe the isolation and chromosomal mapping of a mouse homology of the Batten disease gene, CLN3. Like its human counterpart, the mouse cDNA contains an open reading frame of 1314 bp encoding a predicted protein product of 438 amino acids. The mouse and human coding regions are 82 and 85% identical at the nucleic acid and amino acid levels, and respectively. The mouse gene maps to distal Chromosome 7, in a region containing genes whose homologs are on human chromosome 16p12, where CLN3 maps. Isolation of a mouse CLN3 homolog will facilitate the creation of a mouse model of Batten disease. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Rhomboid homologs in mycobacteria: insights from phylogeny and genomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    rhomboids. The Rv1337 (rhomboid protease 2) orthologs appear more stable and are conserved nearly in all mycobacteria, possibly alluding to their importance in mycobacteria. MAP2425c and MAP2426c provide the first evidence for a split homologous rhomboid, contrasting whole orthologs of genetically related species. Although valuable insights to the roles of rhomboids are provided, the data herein only lays a foundation for future investigations for the roles of rhomboids in mycobacteria. PMID:21029479

  12. Identification and transcriptional analysis of a Treponema pallidum operon encoding a putative ABC transport system, an iron-activated repressor protein homolog, and a glycolytic pathway enzyme homolog.

    PubMed

    Hardham, J M; Stamm, L V; Porcella, S F; Frye, J G; Barnes, N Y; Howell, J K; Mueller, S L; Radolf, J D; Weinstock, G M; Norris, S J

    1997-09-15

    We have characterized a 5.2-kilobase (kb) putative transport related operon (tro) locus of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (Nichols strain) (Tp) encoding six proteins: TroA, TroB, TroC, TroD, TroR and Phosphoglycerate mutase (Pgm). Four of these gene products (TroA-TroD) are homologous to members of the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) superfamily of bacterial transport proteins. TroA (previously identified as Tromp1) has significant sequence similarity to a family of Gram-negative periplasmic substrate-binding proteins and to a family of streptococcal proteins that may have dual roles as substrate binding proteins and adhesins. TroB is homologous to the ATP-binding protein component, whereas TroC and TroD are related to the hydrophobic membrane protein components of ABC transport systems. TroR is similar to Gram-positive iron-activated repressor proteins (DesR, DtxR, IdeR, and SirR). The last open reading frame (ORF) of the tro operon encodes a protein that is highly homologous to the glycolytic pathway enzyme, Pgm. Primer extension results demonstrated that the tro operon is transcribed from a sigma 70-type promoter element. Northern analysis and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reactions provided evidence for the presence of a primary 1-kb troA transcript and a secondary, less abundant, troA-pgm transcript. The tro operon is flanked by a Holliday structure DNA helicase homolog (upstream) and two ORFs representing a purine nucleoside phosphorylase homolog and tpp15, a previously characterized gene encoding a membrane lipoprotein (downstream). The presence of a complex operon containing a putative ABC transport system and a DtxR homolog indicates a possible linkage between transport and gene regulation in Tp. PMID:9332349

  13. Studies of flerovium and element 115 homologs with macrocyclic extractants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despotopulos, John Dustin

    Study of the chemistry of the heaviest elements, Z ? 104, poses a unique challenge due to their low production cross-sections and short half-lives. Chemistry also must be studied on the one-atom-at-a-time scale, requiring automated, fast, and very efficient chemical schemes. Recent studies of the chemical behavior of copernicium (Cn, element 112) and flerovium (Fl, element 114) together with the discovery of isotopes of these elements with half-lives suitable for chemical studies have spurred a renewed interest in the development of rapid systems designed to study the chemical properties of elements with Z ≥ 114. This dissertation explores both extraction chromatography and solvent extraction as methods for development of a rapid chemical separation scheme for the homologs of flerovium (Pb, Sn, Hg) and element 115 (Bi, Sb), with the goal of developing a chemical scheme that, in the future, can be applied to on-line chemistry of both Fl and element 115. Macrocyclic extractants, specifically crown ethers and their derivatives, were chosen for these studies. Carrier-free radionuclides, used in these studies, of the homologs of Fl and element 115 were obtained by proton activation of high purity metal foils at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS): natIn(p,n)113Sn, natSn(p,n)124Sb, and Au(p,n)197m,gHg. The carrier-free activity was separated from the foils by novel separation schemes based on ion exchange and extraction chromatography techniques. Carrier-free Pb and Bi isotopes were obtained from development of a novel generator based on cation exchange chromatography using the 232U parent to generate 212Pb and 212Bi. Crown ethers show high selectivity for metal ions based on their size compared to the negatively charged cavity of the ether. Extraction by crown ethers occur based on electrostatic ion-dipole interactions between the negatively charged ring atoms (oxygen, sulfur, etc.) and the positively

  14. DNA replication meets genetic exchange: Chromosomal damage and its repair by homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2001-01-01

    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Colloquium on the roles of homologous recombination in DNA replication are summarized. Current findings in experimental systems ranging from bacteriophages to mammalian cell lines substantiate the idea that homologous recombination is a system supporting DNA replication when either the template DNA is damaged or the replication machinery malfunctions. There are several lines of supporting evidence: (i) DNA replication aggravates preexisting DNA damage, which then blocks subsequent replication; (ii) replication forks abandoned by malfunctioning replisomes become prone to breakage; (iii) mutants with malfunctioning replisomes or with elevated levels of DNA damage depend on homologous recombination; and (iv) homologous recombination primes DNA replication in vivo and can restore replication fork structures in vitro. The mechanisms of recombinational repair in bacteriophage T4, Escherichia coli, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are compared. In vitro properties of the eukaryotic recombinases suggest a bigger role for single-strand annealing in the eukaryotic recombinational repair. PMID:11459990

  15. Using protein homology models for structure-based studies: approaches to model refinement.

    PubMed

    Kairys, V; Gilson, M K; Fernandes, Miguel Xavier

    2006-01-01

    Homology modeling is a computational methodology to assign a 3-D structure to a target protein when experimental data are not available. The methodology uses another protein with a known structure that shares some sequence identity with the target as a template. The crudest approach is to thread the target protein backbone atoms over the backbone atoms of the template protein, but necessary refinement methods are needed to produce realistic models. In this mini-review anchored within the scope of drug design, we show the validity of using homology models of proteins in the discovery of binders for potential therapeutic targets. We also report several different approaches to homology model refinement, going from very simple to the most elaborate. Results show that refinement approaches are system dependent and that more elaborate methodologies do not always correlate with better performances from built homology models. PMID:17160340

  16. Homology-directed Fanconi anemia pathway crosslink repair is dependent on DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Koji; Cavallo, Francesca; Perrouault, Loïc; Giovannangeli, Carine; Moynahan, Mary Ellen; Barchi, Marco; Brunet, Erika; Jasin, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Homologous recombination (also termed homology-directed repair, HDR) is a major pathway for the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) in mammalian cells. Cells from Fanconi anemia (FA) patients are characterized by extreme ICL sensitivity, but their reported defect in HDR is mild. Here, we examined ICL-induced HDR using a GFP reporter and observed a profound defect in ICL-induced HDR in FA cells, but only when the reporter could replicate. PMID:21423196

  17. Recovery of arrested replication forks by homologous recombination is error-prone.

    PubMed

    Iraqui, Ismail; Chekkal, Yasmina; Jmari, Nada; Pietrobon, Violena; Fréon, Karine; Costes, Audrey; Lambert, Sarah A E

    2012-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a universal mechanism that allows repair of DNA and provides support for DNA replication. Homologous recombination is therefore a major pathway that suppresses non-homology-mediated genome instability. Here, we report that recovery of impeded replication forks by homologous recombination is error-prone. Using a fork-arrest-based assay in fission yeast, we demonstrate that a single collapsed fork can cause mutations and large-scale genomic changes, including deletions and translocations. Fork-arrest-induced gross chromosomal rearrangements are mediated by inappropriate ectopic recombination events at the site of collapsed forks. Inverted repeats near the site of fork collapse stimulate large-scale genomic changes up to 1,500 times over spontaneous events. We also show that the high accuracy of DNA replication during S-phase is impaired by impediments to fork progression, since fork-arrest-induced mutation is due to erroneous DNA synthesis during recovery of replication forks. The mutations caused are small insertions/duplications between short tandem repeats (micro-homology) indicative of replication slippage. Our data establish that collapsed forks, but not stalled forks, recovered by homologous recombination are prone to replication slippage. The inaccuracy of DNA synthesis does not rely on PCNA ubiquitination or trans-lesion-synthesis DNA polymerases, and it is not counteracted by mismatch repair. We propose that deletions/insertions, mediated by micro-homology, leading to copy number variations during replication stress may arise by progression of error-prone replication forks restarted by homologous recombination. PMID:23093942

  18. Homology between the deoxyribonucleic acid of fertility factor P and Vibrio cholerae chromosomal deoxyribonucleic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Wohhieter, J A; Datta, A; Brenner, D J; Baron, L S

    1975-01-01

    The deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of the Vibrio cholerae fertility factor P was isolated by the dye-buoyant density method and hybridized to V. cholerae chromosomal DNA. The DNA of this fertility plasmid had between 35 to 40% homology with the V. cholerae chromosomal DNA. Little or no homology was detected between the P factor DNA and DNA of the Escherichia coli sex factor F. PMID:1092651

  19. Evidence of protein-free homology recognition in magnetic bead force–extension experiments

    PubMed Central

    (O’) Lee, D. J.; Danilowicz, C.; Rochester, C.; Prentiss, M.

    2016-01-01

    Earlier theoretical studies have proposed that the homology-dependent pairing of large tracts of dsDNA may be due to physical interactions between homologous regions. Such interactions could contribute to the sequence-dependent pairing of chromosome regions that may occur in the presence or the absence of double-strand breaks. Several experiments have indicated the recognition of homologous sequences in pure electrolytic solutions without proteins. Here, we report single-molecule force experiments with a designed 60 kb long dsDNA construct; one end attached to a solid surface and the other end to a magnetic bead. The 60 kb constructs contain two 10 kb long homologous tracts oriented head to head, so that their sequences match if the two tracts fold on each other. The distance between the bead and the surface is measured as a function of the force applied to the bead. At low forces, the construct molecules extend substantially less than normal, control dsDNA, indicating the existence of preferential interaction between the homologous regions. The force increase causes no abrupt but continuous unfolding of the paired homologous regions. Simple semi-phenomenological models of the unfolding mechanics are proposed, and their predictions are compared with the data. PMID:27493568

  20. Studying RNA Homology and Conservation with Infernal: From Single Sequences to RNA Families.

    PubMed

    Barquist, Lars; Burge, Sarah W; Gardner, Paul P

    2016-01-01

    Emerging high-throughput technologies have led to a deluge of putative non-coding RNA (ncRNA) sequences identified in a wide variety of organisms. Systematic characterization of these transcripts will be a tremendous challenge. Homology detection is critical to making maximal use of functional information gathered about ncRNAs: identifying homologous sequence allows us to transfer information gathered in one organism to another quickly and with a high degree of confidence. ncRNA presents a challenge for homology detection, as the primary sequence is often poorly conserved and de novo secondary structure prediction and search remain difficult. This unit introduces methods developed by the Rfam database for identifying "families" of homologous ncRNAs starting from single "seed" sequences, using manually curated sequence alignments to build powerful statistical models of sequence and structure conservation known as covariance models (CMs), implemented in the Infernal software package. We provide a step-by-step iterative protocol for identifying ncRNA homologs and then constructing an alignment and corresponding CM. We also work through an example for the bacterial small RNA MicA, discovering a previously unreported family of divergent MicA homologs in genus Xenorhabdus in the process. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27322404

  1. Possible universal quantum algorithms for generalized Khovanov homology and the Rasmussen's invariant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vélez, Mario; Ospina, Juan

    2012-06-01

    Possible quantum algorithms for generalized Khovanov homology and the Rasmussen's invariant are proposed. Such algorithms are resulting from adaptations of the recently proposed Kauffman's algorithm for the standard Khovanov homology. The method that was applied consists in to write the relevant quantum invariant as the trace of a certain unitary operator and then to compute the trace using the Hadamard test. We apply such method to the quantum computation of the Jones polynomial, HOMFLY polynomial, Chromatic polynomial, Tutte polynomial and Bollobàs- Riordan polynomial. These polynomials are quantum topological invariants for knots, links, graphs and ribbon graphs respectively. The Jones polynomial is categorified by the standard Khovanov homology and the others polynomials are categorified by generalized Khovanov homologies, such as the Khovanov-Rozansky homology and the graph homologies. The algorithm for the Rasmussen's invariant is obtained using the gauge theory; and the recently introduced program of homotopyfication is linked with the super-symmetric quantum mechanics. It is claimed that a new program of analytification could be development from the homotopyfication using the celebrated Atiyah-Singer theorem and its super-symmetric interpretations. It is hoped that the super-symmetric quantum mechanics provides the hardware for the implementation of the proposed quantum algorithms.

  2. Which way up? Recognition of homologous DNA segments in parallel and antiparallel alignments.

    PubMed

    O' Lee, Dominic J; Wynveen, Aaron; Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei A

    2015-01-28

    Homologous gene shuffling between DNA molecules promotes genetic diversity and is an important pathway for DNA repair. For this to occur, homologous genes need to find and recognize each other. However, despite its central role in homologous recombination, the mechanism of homology recognition has remained an unsolved puzzle of molecular biology. While specific proteins are known to play a role at later stages of recombination, an initial coarse grained recognition step has, however, been proposed. This relies on the sequence dependence of the DNA structural parameters, such as twist and rise, mediated by intermolecular interactions, in particular, electrostatic ones. In this proposed mechanism, sequences that have the same base pair text, or are homologous, have lower interaction energy than those sequences with uncorrelated base pair texts. The difference between the two energies is termed the "recognition energy." Here, we probe how the recognition energy changes when one DNA fragment slides past another, and consider, for the first time, homologous sequences in antiparallel alignment. This dependence on sliding is termed the "recognition well." We find there is a recognition well for anti-parallel, homologous DNA tracts, but only a very shallow one, so that their interaction will differ little from the interaction between two nonhomologous tracts. This fact may be utilized in single molecule experiments specially targeted to test the theory. As well as this, we test previous theoretical approximations in calculating the recognition well for parallel molecules against MC simulations and consider more rigorously the optimization of the orientations of the fragments about their long axes upon calculating these recognition energies. The more rigorous treatment affects the recognition energy a little, when the molecules are considered rigid. When torsional flexibility of the DNA molecules is introduced, we find excellent agreement between the analytical

  3. BRCA1 controls homologous recombination at Tus/Ter-stalled mammalian replication forks.

    PubMed

    Willis, Nicholas A; Chandramouly, Gurushankar; Huang, Bin; Kwok, Amy; Follonier, Cindy; Deng, Chuxia; Scully, Ralph

    2014-06-26

    Replication fork stalling can promote genomic instability, predisposing to cancer and other diseases. Stalled replication forks may be processed by sister chromatid recombination (SCR), generating error-free or error-prone homologous recombination (HR) outcomes. In mammalian cells, a long-standing hypothesis proposes that the major hereditary breast/ovarian cancer predisposition gene products, BRCA1 and BRCA2, control HR/SCR at stalled replication forks. Although BRCA1 and BRCA2 affect replication fork processing, direct evidence that BRCA gene products regulate homologous recombination at stalled chromosomal replication forks is lacking, due to a dearth of tools for studying this process. Here we report that the Escherichia coli Tus/Ter complex can be engineered to induce site-specific replication fork stalling and chromosomal HR/SCR in mouse cells. Tus/Ter-induced homologous recombination entails processing of bidirectionally arrested forks. We find that the Brca1 carboxy (C)-terminal tandem BRCT repeat and regions of Brca1 encoded by exon 11-two Brca1 elements implicated in tumour suppression-control Tus/Ter-induced homologous recombination. Inactivation of either Brca1 or Brca2 increases the absolute frequency of 'long-tract' gene conversions at Tus/Ter-stalled forks, an outcome not observed in response to a site-specific endonuclease-mediated chromosomal double-strand break. Therefore, homologous recombination at stalled forks is regulated differently from homologous recombination at double-strand breaks arising independently of a replication fork. We propose that aberrant long-tract homologous recombination at stalled replication forks contributes to genomic instability and breast/ovarian cancer predisposition in BRCA mutant cells. PMID:24776801

  4. Partial amino acid sequence of apolipoprotein(a) shows that it is homologous to plasminogen

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, D.L.; Fless, G.M.; Kohr, W.J.; McLean, J.W.; Xu, Q.T.; Miller, C.G.; Lawn, R.M.; Scanu, A.M.

    1987-05-01

    Apolipoprotein(a) (apo(a)) is a glycoprotein with M/sub r/ approx. 280,000 that is disulfide linked to apolipoprotein B in lipoprotein(a) particles. Elevated plasma levels of lipoprotein(a) are correlated with atherosclerosis. Partial amino acid sequence of apo(a) shows that it has striking homology to plasminogen. Plasminogen is a plasma serine protease zymogen that consists of five homologous and tandemly repeated domains called kringles and a trypsin-like protease domain. The amino-terminal sequence obtained for apo(a) is homologous to the beginning of kringle 4 but not the amino terminus of plasminogen. Apo(a) was subjected to limited proteolysis by trypsin or V8 protease, and fragments generated were isolated and sequenced. Sequences obtained from several of these fragments are highly (77-100%) homologous to plasminogen residues 391-421, which reside within kringle 4. Analysis of these internal apo(a) sequences revealed that apo(a) may contain at least two kringle 4-like domains. A sequence obtained from another tryptic fragment also shows homology to the end of kringle 4 and the beginning of kringle 5. Sequence data obtained from the two tryptic fragments shows homology with the protease domain of plasminogen. One of these sequences is homologous to the sequences surrounding the activation site of plasminogen. Plasminogen is activated by the cleavage of a specific arginine residue by urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator; however, the corresponding site in apo(a) is a serine that would not be cleaved by tissue plasminogen activator or urokinase. Using a plasmin-specific assay, no proteolytic activity could be demonstrated for lipoprotein(a) particles. These results suggest that apo(a) contains kringle-like domains and an inactive protease domain.

  5. Exploring representations of protein structure for automated remote homology detection and mapping of protein structure space

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to rapid sequencing of genomes, there are now millions of deposited protein sequences with no known function. Fast sequence-based comparisons allow detecting close homologs for a protein of interest to transfer functional information from the homologs to the given protein. Sequence-based comparison cannot detect remote homologs, in which evolution has adjusted the sequence while largely preserving structure. Structure-based comparisons can detect remote homologs but most methods for doing so are too expensive to apply at a large scale over structural databases of proteins. Recently, fragment-based structural representations have been proposed that allow fast detection of remote homologs with reasonable accuracy. These representations have also been used to obtain linearly-reducible maps of protein structure space. It has been shown, as additionally supported from analysis in this paper that such maps preserve functional co-localization of the protein structure space. Methods Inspired by a recent application of the Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) model for conducting structural comparisons of proteins, we propose higher-order LDA-obtained topic-based representations of protein structures to provide an alternative route for remote homology detection and organization of the protein structure space in few dimensions. Various techniques based on natural language processing are proposed and employed to aid the analysis of topics in the protein structure domain. Results We show that a topic-based representation is just as effective as a fragment-based one at automated detection of remote homologs and organization of protein structure space. We conduct a detailed analysis of the information content in the topic-based representation, showing that topics have semantic meaning. The fragment-based and topic-based representations are also shown to allow prediction of superfamily membership. Conclusions This work opens exciting venues in designing novel

  6. High frequency of phylogenetically diverse reductive dehalogenase-homologous genes in deep subseafloor sedimentary metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Mikihiko; Futagami, Taiki; Toyoda, Atsushi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Nishi, Shinro; Hori, Sayaka; Arai, Wataru; Tsubouchi, Taishi; Morono, Yuki; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Ito, Takehiko; Fujiyama, Asao; Inagaki, Fumio; Takami, Hideto

    2014-01-01

    Marine subsurface sediments on the Pacific margin harbor diverse microbial communities even at depths of several hundreds meters below the seafloor (mbsf) or more. Previous PCR-based molecular analysis showed the presence of diverse reductive dehalogenase gene (rdhA) homologs in marine subsurface sediment, suggesting that anaerobic respiration of organohalides is one of the possible energy-yielding pathways in the organic-rich sedimentary habitat. However, primer-independent molecular characterization of rdhA has remained to be demonstrated. Here, we studied the diversity and frequency of rdhA homologs by metagenomic analysis of five different depth horizons (0.8, 5.1, 18.6, 48.5, and 107.0 mbsf) at Site C9001 off the Shimokita Peninsula of Japan. From all metagenomic pools, remarkably diverse rdhA-homologous sequences, some of which are affiliated with novel clusters, were observed with high frequency. As a comparison, we also examined frequency of dissimilatory sulfite reductase genes (dsrAB), key functional genes for microbial sulfate reduction. The dsrAB were also widely observed in the metagenomic pools whereas the frequency of dsrAB genes was generally smaller than that of rdhA-homologous genes. The phylogenetic composition of rdhA-homologous genes was similar among the five depth horizons. Our metagenomic data revealed that subseafloor rdhA homologs are more diverse than previously identified from PCR-based molecular studies. Spatial distribution of similar rdhA homologs across wide depositional ages indicates that the heterotrophic metabolic processes mediated by the genes can be ecologically important, functioning in the organic-rich subseafloor sedimentary biosphere. PMID:24624126

  7. Which way up? Recognition of homologous DNA segments in parallel and antiparallel alignments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Lee, Dominic J.; Wynveen, Aaron; Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei A.

    2015-01-01

    Homologous gene shuffling between DNA molecules promotes genetic diversity and is an important pathway for DNA repair. For this to occur, homologous genes need to find and recognize each other. However, despite its central role in homologous recombination, the mechanism of homology recognition has remained an unsolved puzzle of molecular biology. While specific proteins are known to play a role at later stages of recombination, an initial coarse grained recognition step has, however, been proposed. This relies on the sequence dependence of the DNA structural parameters, such as twist and rise, mediated by intermolecular interactions, in particular, electrostatic ones. In this proposed mechanism, sequences that have the same base pair text, or are homologous, have lower interaction energy than those sequences with uncorrelated base pair texts. The difference between the two energies is termed the "recognition energy." Here, we probe how the recognition energy changes when one DNA fragment slides past another, and consider, for the first time, homologous sequences in antiparallel alignment. This dependence on sliding is termed the "recognition well." We find there is a recognition well for anti-parallel, homologous DNA tracts, but only a very shallow one, so that their interaction will differ little from the interaction between two nonhomologous tracts. This fact may be utilized in single molecule experiments specially targeted to test the theory. As well as this, we test previous theoretical approximations in calculating the recognition well for parallel molecules against MC simulations and consider more rigorously the optimization of the orientations of the fragments about their long axes upon calculating these recognition energies. The more rigorous treatment affects the recognition energy a little, when the molecules are considered rigid. When torsional flexibility of the DNA molecules is introduced, we find excellent agreement between the analytical

  8. RecA bundles mediate homology pairing between distant sisters during DNA break repair.

    PubMed

    Lesterlin, Christian; Ball, Graeme; Schermelleh, Lothar; Sherratt, David J

    2014-02-13

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination has evolved to maintain genetic integrity in all organisms. Although many reactions that occur during homologous recombination are known, it is unclear where, when and how they occur in cells. Here, by using conventional and super-resolution microscopy, we describe the progression of DSB repair in live Escherichia coli. Specifically, we investigate whether homologous recombination can occur efficiently between distant sister loci that have segregated to opposite halves of an E. coli cell. We show that a site-specific DSB in one sister can be repaired efficiently using distant sister homology. After RecBCD processing of the DSB, RecA is recruited to the cut locus, where it nucleates into a bundle that contains many more RecA molecules than can associate with the two single-stranded DNA regions that form at the DSB. Mature bundles extend along the long axis of the cell, in the space between the bulk nucleoid and the inner membrane. Bundle formation is followed by pairing, in which the two ends of the cut locus relocate at the periphery of the nucleoid and together move rapidly towards the homology of the uncut sister. After sister locus pairing, RecA bundles disassemble and proteins that act late in homologous recombination are recruited to give viable recombinants 1-2-generation-time equivalents after formation of the initial DSB. Mutated RecA proteins that do not form bundles are defective in sister pairing and in DSB-induced repair. This work reveals an unanticipated role of RecA bundles in channelling the movement of the DNA DSB ends, thereby facilitating the long-range homology search that occurs before the strand invasion and transfer reactions. PMID:24362571

  9. High frequency of phylogenetically diverse reductive dehalogenase-homologous genes in deep subseafloor sedimentary metagenomes.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Mikihiko; Futagami, Taiki; Toyoda, Atsushi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Nishi, Shinro; Hori, Sayaka; Arai, Wataru; Tsubouchi, Taishi; Morono, Yuki; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Ito, Takehiko; Fujiyama, Asao; Inagaki, Fumio; Takami, Hideto

    2014-01-01

    Marine subsurface sediments on the Pacific margin harbor diverse microbial communities even at depths of several hundreds meters below the seafloor (mbsf) or more. Previous PCR-based molecular analysis showed the presence of diverse reductive dehalogenase gene (rdhA) homologs in marine subsurface sediment, suggesting that anaerobic respiration of organohalides is one of the possible energy-yielding pathways in the organic-rich sedimentary habitat. However, primer-independent molecular characterization of rdhA has remained to be demonstrated. Here, we studied the diversity and frequency of rdhA homologs by metagenomic analysis of five different depth horizons (0.8, 5.1, 18.6, 48.5, and 107.0 mbsf) at Site C9001 off the Shimokita Peninsula of Japan. From all metagenomic pools, remarkably diverse rdhA-homologous sequences, some of which are affiliated with novel clusters, were observed with high frequency. As a comparison, we also examined frequency of dissimilatory sulfite reductase genes (dsrAB), key functional genes for microbial sulfate reduction. The dsrAB were also widely observed in the metagenomic pools whereas the frequency of dsrAB genes was generally smaller than that of rdhA-homologous genes. The phylogenetic composition of rdhA-homologous genes was similar among the five depth horizons. Our metagenomic data revealed that subseafloor rdhA homologs are more diverse than previously identified from PCR-based molecular studies. Spatial distribution of similar rdhA homologs across wide depositional ages indicates that the heterotrophic metabolic processes mediated by the genes can be ecologically important, functioning in the organic-rich subseafloor sedimentary biosphere. PMID:24624126

  10. RecA bundles mediate homology pairing between distant sisters during DNA break repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesterlin, Christian; Ball, Graeme; Schermelleh, Lothar; Sherratt, David J.

    2014-02-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination has evolved to maintain genetic integrity in all organisms. Although many reactions that occur during homologous recombination are known, it is unclear where, when and how they occur in cells. Here, by using conventional and super-resolution microscopy, we describe the progression of DSB repair in live Escherichia coli. Specifically, we investigate whether homologous recombination can occur efficiently between distant sister loci that have segregated to opposite halves of an E. coli cell. We show that a site-specific DSB in one sister can be repaired efficiently using distant sister homology. After RecBCD processing of the DSB, RecA is recruited to the cut locus, where it nucleates into a bundle that contains many more RecA molecules than can associate with the two single-stranded DNA regions that form at the DSB. Mature bundles extend along the long axis of the cell, in the space between the bulk nucleoid and the inner membrane. Bundle formation is followed by pairing, in which the two ends of the cut locus relocate at the periphery of the nucleoid and together move rapidly towards the homology of the uncut sister. After sister locus pairing, RecA bundles disassemble and proteins that act late in homologous recombination are recruited to give viable recombinants 1-2-generation-time equivalents after formation of the initial DSB. Mutated RecA proteins that do not form bundles are defective in sister pairing and in DSB-induced repair. This work reveals an unanticipated role of RecA bundles in channelling the movement of the DNA DSB ends, thereby facilitating the long-range homology search that occurs before the strand invasion and transfer reactions.

  11. Applying pattern recognition methods to analyze the molecular properties of a homologous series of nitrogen mustard agents.

    PubMed

    Bartzatt, Ronald; Donigan, Laura

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to analyze the pharmacological properties of a homologous series of nitrogen mustard (N-mustard) agents formed after inserting 1 to 9 methylene groups (-CH2-) between 2 -N(CH2CH2Cl)2 groups. These compounds were shown to have significant correlations and associations in their properties after analysis by pattern recognition methods including hierarchical classification, cluster analysis, nonmetric multi-dimensional scaling (MDS), detrended correspondence analysis, K-means cluster analysis, discriminant analysis, and self-organizing tree algorithm (SOTA) analysis. Detrended correspondence analysis showed a linear-like association of the 9 homologs, and hierarchical classification showed that each homolog had great similarity to at least one other member of the series-as did cluster analysis using paired-group distance measure. Nonmetric multi-dimensional scaling was able to discriminate homologs 2 and 3 (by number of methylene groups) from homologs 4, 5, and 6 as a group, and from homologs 7, 8, and 9 as a group. Discriminant analysis, K-means cluster analysis, and hierarchical classification distinguished the high molecular weight homologs from low molecular weight homologs. As the number of methylene groups increased the aqueous solubility decreased, dermal permeation coefficient increased, Log P increased, molar volume increased, parachor increased, and index of refraction decreased. Application of pattern recognition methods discerned useful interrelationships within the homologous series that will determine specific and beneficial clinical applications for each homolog and methods of administration. PMID:16796353

  12. The Evolutionary Fate of Alternatively Spliced Homologous Exons after Gene Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Abascal, Federico; Tress, Michael L.; Valencia, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing and gene duplication are the two main processes responsible for expanding protein functional diversity. Although gene duplication can generate new genes and alternative splicing can introduce variation through alternative gene products, the interplay between the two processes is complex and poorly understood. Here, we have carried out a study of the evolution of alternatively spliced exons after gene duplication to better understand the interaction between the two processes. We created a manually curated set of 97 human genes with mutually exclusively spliced homologous exons and analyzed the evolution of these exons across five distantly related vertebrates (lamprey, spotted gar, zebrafish, fugu, and coelacanth). Most of these exons had an ancient origin (more than 400 Ma). We found examples supporting two extreme evolutionary models for the behaviour of homologous axons after gene duplication. We observed 11 events in which gene duplication was accompanied by splice isoform separation, that is, each paralog specifically conserved just one distinct ancestral homologous exon. At other extreme, we identified genes in which the homologous exons were always conserved within paralogs, suggesting that the alternative splicing event cannot easily be separated from the function in these genes. That many homologous exons fall in between these two extremes highlights the diversity of biological systems and suggests that the subtle balance between alternative splicing and gene duplication is adjusted to the specific cellular context of each gene. PMID:25931610

  13. WAITING TIMES OF QUASI-HOMOLOGOUS CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS FROM SUPER ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yuming; Liu Lijuan; Shen Chenglong; Liu Rui; Ye Pinzhong; Wang, S.

    2013-02-01

    Why and how do some active regions (ARs) frequently produce coronal mass ejections (CMEs)? These are key questions for deepening our understanding of the mechanisms and processes of energy accumulation and sudden release in ARs and for improving our space weather prediction capability. Although some case studies have been performed, these questions are still far from fully answered. These issues are now being addressed statistically through an investigation of the waiting times of quasi-homologous CMEs from super ARs in solar cycle 23. It is found that the waiting times of quasi-homologous CMEs have a two-component distribution with a separation at about 18 hr. The first component is a Gaussian-like distribution with a peak at about 7 hr, which indicates a tight physical connection between these quasi-homologous CMEs. The likelihood of two or more occurrences of CMEs faster than 1200 km s{sup -1} from the same AR within 18 hr is about 20%. Furthermore, the correlation analysis among CME waiting times, CME speeds, and CME occurrence rates reveals that these quantities are independent of each other, suggesting that the perturbation by preceding CMEs rather than free energy input is the direct cause of quasi-homologous CMEs. The peak waiting time of 7 hr probably characterizes the timescale of the growth of the instabilities triggered by preceding CMEs. This study uncovers some clues from a statistical perspective for us to understand quasi-homologous CMEs as well as CME-rich ARs.

  14. DNA double-strand breaks alter the spatial arrangement of homologous loci in plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Takeshi; Katagiri, Yohei; Ando, Tadashi; Matsunaga, Sachihiro

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin dynamics and arrangement are involved in many biological processes in nuclei of eukaryotes including plants. Plants have to respond rapidly to various environmental stimuli to achieve growth and development because they cannot move. It is assumed that the alteration of chromatin dynamics and arrangement support the response to these stimuli; however, there is little information in plants. In this study, we investigated the chromatin dynamics and arrangement with DNA damage in Arabidopsis thaliana by live-cell imaging with the lacO/LacI-EGFP system and simulation analysis. It was revealed that homologous loci kept a constant distance in nuclei of A. thaliana roots in general growth. We also found that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induce the approach of the homologous loci with γ-irradiation. Furthermore, AtRAD54, which performs an important role in the homologous recombination repair pathway, was involved in the pairing of homologous loci with γ-irradiation. These results suggest that homologous loci approach each other to repair DSBs, and AtRAD54 mediates these phenomena. PMID:26046331

  15. Using homology relations within a database markedly boosts protein sequence similarity search.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jing; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Pei, Jimin; Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V

    2015-06-01

    Inference of homology from protein sequences provides an essential tool for analyzing protein structure, function, and evolution. Current sequence-based homology search methods are still unable to detect many similarities evident from protein spatial structures. In computer science a search engine can be improved by considering networks of known relationships within the search database. Here, we apply this idea to protein-sequence-based homology search and show that it dramatically enhances the search accuracy. Our new method, COMPADRE (COmparison of Multiple Protein sequence Alignments using Database RElationships) assesses the relationship between the query sequence and a hit in the database by considering the similarity between the query and hit's known homologs. This approach increases detection quality, boosting the precision rate from 18% to 83% at half-coverage of all database homologs. The increased precision rate allows detection of a large fraction of protein structural relationships, thus providing structure and function predictions for previously uncharacterized proteins. Our results suggest that this general approach is applicable to a wide variety of methods for detection of biological similarities. The web server is available at prodata.swmed.edu/compadre. PMID:26038555

  16. Using homology relations within a database markedly boosts protein sequence similarity search

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jing; Sadreyev, Ruslan I.; Pei, Jimin; Kinch, Lisa N.; Grishin, Nick V.

    2015-01-01

    Inference of homology from protein sequences provides an essential tool for analyzing protein structure, function, and evolution. Current sequence-based homology search methods are still unable to detect many similarities evident from protein spatial structures. In computer science a search engine can be improved by considering networks of known relationships within the search database. Here, we apply this idea to protein-sequence–based homology search and show that it dramatically enhances the search accuracy. Our new method, COMPADRE (COmparison of Multiple Protein sequence Alignments using Database RElationships) assesses the relationship between the query sequence and a hit in the database by considering the similarity between the query and hit’s known homologs. This approach increases detection quality, boosting the precision rate from 18% to 83% at half-coverage of all database homologs. The increased precision rate allows detection of a large fraction of protein structural relationships, thus providing structure and function predictions for previously uncharacterized proteins. Our results suggest that this general approach is applicable to a wide variety of methods for detection of biological similarities. The web server is available at prodata.swmed.edu/compadre. PMID:26038555

  17. Homologation and functionalization of carbon monoxide by a recyclable uranium complex

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Benedict M.; Stewart, John C.; Davis, Adrienne L.; McMaster, Jonathan; Lewis, William; Blake, Alexander J.; Liddle, Stephen T.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is in principle an excellent resource from which to produce industrial hydrocarbon feedstocks as alternatives to crude oil; however, CO has proven remarkably resistant to selective homologation, and the few complexes that can effect this transformation cannot be recycled because liberation of the homologated product destroys the complexes or they are substitutionally inert. Here, we show that under mild conditions a simple triamidoamine uranium(III) complex can reductively homologate CO and be recycled for reuse. Following treatment with organosilyl halides, bis(organosiloxy)acetylenes, which readily convert to furanones, are produced, and this was confirmed by the use of isotopically 13C-labeled CO. The precursor to the triamido uranium(III) complex is formed concomitantly. These findings establish that, under appropriate conditions, uranium(III) can mediate a complete synthetic cycle for the homologation of CO to higher derivatives. This work may prove useful in spurring wider efforts in CO homologation, and the simplicity of this system suggests that catalytic CO functionalization may soon be within reach. PMID:22652572

  18. Cloning of human papilloma virus genomic DNAs and analysis of homologous polynucleotide sequences.

    PubMed

    Heilman, C A; Law, M F; Israel, M A; Howley, P M

    1980-11-01

    The complete DNA genomes of four distinct human papilloma viruses (human papilloma virus subtype 1a [HPV-1a], HPV-1b, HPV-2a, and HPV-4) were molecularly cloned in Escherichia coli, using the certified plasmid vector pBR322. The restriction endonuclease patterns of the cloned HPV-1a and HPV-1b DNAs were similar to those already published for uncloned DNAs. Physical maps were constructed for HPV-2a DNA and HPV-4 DNA, since these viral DNAs had not been previously mapped. By using the cloned DNAs, the genomes of HPV-1a, HPV-2a, and HPV-4 were analyzed for nucleotide sequence homology. Under standard hybridization conditions (Tm = --28 degrees C), no homology was detectable among the genomes of these papilloma viruses, in agreement with previous reports. However, under less stringent conditions (i.e., Tm = --50 degrees C), stable DNA hybrids could be detected between these viral DNAs, indicating homologous segments in the genomes with approximately 30% base mismatch. By using specific DNA fragments immobilized on nitrocellulose filters, these regions of homology were mapped. Hybridization experiments between radiolabeled bovine papilloma virus type 1 (BPV-1) DNA and the unlabeled HPV-1a, HPV-2a, or HPV-4 DNA restriction fragments under low-stringency conditions indicated that the regions of homology among the HPV DNAs are also conserved in the BPV-1 genome with approximately the same degree of base mismatch. PMID:6253665

  19. Syntenic assignment of human chromosome 1 homologous loci in the bovine.

    PubMed

    Threadgill, D S; Threadgill, D W; Moll, Y D; Weiss, J A; Zhang, N; Davey, H W; Wildeman, A G; Womack, J E

    1994-08-01

    Three mouse chromosomes (MMU 1, 3, and 4) carry homologs of human chromosome 1 (HSA 1) genes. A similar situation is found in the bovine, where five bovine chromosomes (BTA 2, 3, 5, 16, and unassigned syntenic group U25) contain homologs of HSA 1 loci. To evaluate further the syntenic relationship of HSA 1 homologs in cattle, 10 loci have been physically mapped through segregation analysis in bovine-rodent hybrid somatic cells. These loci, chosen for their location on HSA 1, are antithrombin 3 (AT3), renin (REN), complement component receptor 2 (CR2), phosphofructokinase muscle type (PFKM), Gardner-Rasheed feline sarcoma viral (v-fgr) oncogene homolog (FGR), alpha fucosidase (FUCA1), G-protein beta 1 subunit (GNB1), alpha 1A amylase, (AMY1), the neuroblastoma RAS viral (v-ras) oncogene homolog (NRAS), and alpha skeletal actin (ACTA1). AT3, REN, CR2, and GNB1 mapped to BTA 16, PFKM to BTA 5, AMY1A and NRAS to BTA 3, FGR and FUCA1 to BTA 2, and ACTA1 to BTA 28. PMID:8001974

  20. Behavior of homologous chromosomes in early meiotic stages of human spermatocytes as revealed by FISH

    SciTech Connect

    Bar-Am, I.; Avivi, L.; Mukame, E.

    1994-09-01

    The process by which homologous chromosomes recognize each other at the beginning of meiosis, prior to synapsis, is poorly understood. To gain a better understanding as to when, where and how a given chromosome approaches its pairing partner, chromosome behavior at early stages of meiosis in human spermatocytes was studied. Using multi-color FISH with centromeric- and telomeric-specific probes, as well as with whole chromosome DNA libraries, it was clearly aligned. Rather, similarly to non-homologous chromosomes, they were well separated from each other. At the commencement of synapsis, during the process of homology search, homologues underwent a drastic conformational change, elongating into strands that approached each other by their telomeres. Just preceding the co-alignment of the homologous centromeres, telomeres changed their interphase random distribution and occupied a confined region of the nuclear periphery. Following synapsis, telomeres spread over the whole nuclear periphery. These dynamics in the telomeres distribution, which are unique to early stages of meiosis, are presumably related to the role that telomeres play in the process of homology search and the commencement of synapsis.

  1. An algorithm for automatically computing the horizontal shift between homologous contours from DTMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinoso, Juan Francisco

    The algorithm we present here is useful for measuring the planimetric discrepancy between two models which can be represented by contours. In cartography the paradigm of such models is represented by digital terrain models (DTMs). The measure we propose is based on an area enclosed between homologous contours (two level contours, each belonging to two different models). Our measure is similar to another used previously, although, in the previous studies, the area enclosed between homologous contours was computed manually or it was restricted to particular conditions. The innovation of our approach consists of the automation of the entire process and in the constraint elimination. The main problem to solve before computing the horizontal shift measure is how to determine the area enclosed between homologous contours. This is a problem because there is no bijective correspondence between homologous contours, and therefore the identification of the homologous contours is not a trivial task. Our approach overcomes this difficulty by closing following the limit of the DTM the open contours (the contours which cut the limit of the DTM) and classifying them by the external level. We achieve the automation assisted by the Boolean polygon operations, specifically using the symmetric difference operation. Our algorithm facilitates the computation of accuracy of a DTM by comparison with another and it is applicable in such fields as hydrology (precision estimation of the hydrological features), cartographic generalization, and civil engineering. Finally we use our measure for estimating the planimetric discrepancy between the same streams derived from different DEMs (different sources and precisions).

  2. Stratified fiber bundles, Quinn homology and brane stability of hyperbolic orbifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bytsenko, Andrey A.; Szabo, Richard J.; Tureanu, Anca

    2016-04-01

    We revisit the problem of stability of string vacua involving hyperbolic orbifolds using methods from homotopy theory and K-homology. We propose a definition of Type II string theory on such backgrounds that further carry stratified systems of fiber bundles, which generalize the more conventional orbifold and symmetric string backgrounds, together with a classification of wrapped branes by a suitable generalized homology theory. For spaces stratified fibered over hyperbolic orbifolds we use the algebraic K-theory of their fundamental groups and Quinn homology to derive criteria for brane stability in terms of an Atiyah-Hirzebruch type spectral sequence with its lift to K-homology. Stable D-branes in this setting carry stratified charges which induce new additive structures on the corresponding K-homology groups. We extend these considerations to backgrounds which support H-flux, where we use K-groups of twisted group algebras of the fundamental groups to analyze stability of locally symmetric spaces with K-amenable isometry groups, and derive stability conditions for branes wrapping the fibers of an Eilenberg-MacLane spectrum functor.

  3. A SRS2 homolog from Arabidopsis thaliana disrupts recombinogenic DNA intermediates and facilitates single strand annealing

    PubMed Central

    Blanck, Sandra; Kobbe, Daniela; Hartung, Frank; Fengler, Karin; Focke, Manfred; Puchta, Holger

    2009-01-01

    Genetic and biochemical analyses of SRS2 homologs in fungi indicate a function in the processing of homologous recombination (HR) intermediates. To date, no SRS2 homologs have been described and analyzed in higher eukaryotes. Here, we report the first biochemical characterization of an SRS2 homolog from a multicellular eukaryote, the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We studied the basic properties of AtSRS2 and were able to show that it is a functional 3′- to 5′-helicase. Furthermore, we characterized its biochemical function on recombinogenic intermediates and were able to show the unwinding of nicked Holliday junctions (HJs) and partial HJs (PX junctions). For the first time, we demonstrated strand annealing activity for an SRS2 homolog and characterized its strand pairing activity in detail. Our results indicate that AtSRS2 has properties that enable it to be involved in different steps during the processing of recombination intermediates. On the one hand, it could be involved in the unwinding of an elongating invading strand from a donor strand, while on the other hand, it could be involved in the annealing of the elongated strand at a later step. PMID:19767619

  4. Screening drug-like compounds by docking to homology models: a systematic study.

    PubMed

    Kairys, Visvaldas; Fernandes, Miguel X; Gilson, Michael K

    2006-01-01

    In the absence of an experimentally solved structure, a homology model of a protein target can be used instead for virtual screening of drug candidates by docking and scoring. This approach poses a number of questions regarding the choice of the template to use in constructing the model, the accuracy of the screening results, and the importance of allowing for protein flexibility. The present study addresses such questions with compound screening calculations for multiple homology models of five drug targets. A central result is that docking to homology models frequently yields enrichments of known ligands as good as that obtained by docking to a crystal structure of the actual target protein. Interestingly, however, standard measures of the similarity of the template used to build the homology model to the targeted protein show little correlation with the effectiveness of the screening calculations, and docking to the template itself often is as successful as docking to the corresponding homology model. Treating key side chains as mobile produces a modest improvement in the results. The reasons for these sometimes unexpected results, and their implications for future methodologic development, are discussed. PMID:16426071

  5. The evolutionary fate of alternatively spliced homologous exons after gene duplication.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Federico; Tress, Michael L; Valencia, Alfonso

    2015-06-01

    Alternative splicing and gene duplication are the two main processes responsible for expanding protein functional diversity. Although gene duplication can generate new genes and alternative splicing can introduce variation through alternative gene products, the interplay between the two processes is complex and poorly understood. Here, we have carried out a study of the evolution of alternatively spliced exons after gene duplication to better understand the interaction between the two processes. We created a manually curated set of 97 human genes with mutually exclusively spliced homologous exons and analyzed the evolution of these exons across five distantly related vertebrates (lamprey, spotted gar, zebrafish, fugu, and coelacanth). Most of these exons had an ancient origin (more than 400 Ma). We found examples supporting two extreme evolutionary models for the behaviour of homologous axons after gene duplication. We observed 11 events in which gene duplication was accompanied by splice isoform separation, that is, each paralog specifically conserved just one distinct ancestral homologous exon. At other extreme, we identified genes in which the homologous exons were always conserved within paralogs, suggesting that the alternative splicing event cannot easily be separated from the function in these genes. That many homologous exons fall in between these two extremes highlights the diversity of biological systems and suggests that the subtle balance between alternative splicing and gene duplication is adjusted to the specific cellular context of each gene. PMID:25931610

  6. Iterative homology checking and non-uniform stepping during RecA-mediated strand exchange.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Wei; Nong, Da-Guan; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Li, Wei; Yan, Yan; Xi, Xu-Guang; Xu, Chun-Hua; Li, Ming

    2016-09-23

    Recombinase-mediated homologous recombination (HR) in which strands are exchanged between two similar or identical DNA molecules is essential for maintaining genome fidelity and generating genetic diversity. It is believed that HR comprises two distinct stages: an initial alignment with stringent homology checking followed by stepwise heteroduplex expansion. If and how homology checking takes place during heteroduplex expansion, however, remains unknown. In addition, the number of base pairs (bp) involved in each step is still under debate. By using single-molecule approaches to catch transient intermediates in RecA-mediated HR with different degrees of homology, we show that (i) the expansion proceeds with step sizes of multiples of 3 bp, (ii) the step sizes follow wide distributions that are similar to that of initial alignment lengths, and (iii) each distribution can be divided into a short-scale and a long-scale part irrespective of the degree of homology. Our results suggest an iterative mechanism of strand exchange in which ssDNA-RecA filament interrogates double-stranded DNA using a short tract (6-15 bp) for quick checking and a long tract (>18 bp) for stringent sequence comparison. The present work provides novel insights into the physical and structural bases of DNA recombination. PMID:27543204

  7. Transcription patterns of genes encoding four metallothionein homologs in Daphnia pulex exposed to copper and cadmium are time- and homolog-dependent.

    PubMed

    Asselman, Jana; Shaw, Joseph R; Glaholt, Stephen P; Colbourne, John K; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2013-10-15

    Metallothioneins are proteins that play an essential role in metal homeostasis and detoxification in nearly all organisms studied to date. Yet discrepancies between outcomes of chronic and acute exposure experiments hamper the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of their isoforms following metal exposure. Here, we investigated transcriptional differences among four identified homologs (mt1-mt4) in Daphnia pulex exposed across time to copper and cadmium relative to a control. Transcriptional upregulation of mt1 and mt3 was detected on day four following exposure to cadmium, whereas that of mt2 and mt4 was detected on day two and day eight following exposure to copper. These results confirm temporal and metal-specific differences in the transcriptional induction of genes encoding metallothionein homologs upon metal exposure which should be considered in ecotoxicological monitoring programs of metal-contaminated water bodies. Indeed, the mRNA expression patterns observed here illustrate the complex regulatory system associated with metallothioneins, as these patterns are not only dependent on the metal, but also on exposure time and the homolog studied. Further phylogenetic analysis and analysis of regulatory elements in upstream promoter regions revealed a high degree of similarity between metallothionein genes of Daphnia pulex and Daphnia magna, a species belonging to the same genus. These findings, combined with a limited amount of available expression data for D. magna metallothionein genes, tentatively suggest a potential generalization of the metallothionein response system between these Daphnia species. PMID:24113165

  8. Comparative anatomy, evolution, and homologies of tetrapod hindlimb muscles, comparison with forelimb muscles, and deconstruction of the forelimb-hindlimb serial homology hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Diogo, Rui; Molnar, Julia

    2014-06-01

    For more than two centuries, the idea that the forelimb and hindlimb are serially homologous structures has been accepted without serious question. This study presents the first detailed analysis of the evolution and homologies of all hindlimb muscles in representatives of each major tetrapod group and proposes a unifying nomenclature for these muscles. These data are compared with information obtained previously about the forelimb muscles of tetrapods and the muscles of other gnathostomes in order to address one of the most central and enigmatic questions in evolutionary and comparative anatomy: why are the pelvic and pectoral appendages of gnathostomes generally so similar to each other? An integrative analysis of the new myological data, combined with a review of recent paleontological, developmental, and genetic works and of older studies, does not support serial homology between the structures of these appendages. For instance, many of the strikingly similar forelimb and hindlimb muscles found in each major extant tetrapod taxon were acquired at different geological times and/or have different embryonic origins. These similar muscles are not serial homologues, but the result of evolutionary parallelism/convergence due to a complex interplay of ontogenetic, functional, topological, and phylogenetic constraints/factors. PMID:24729440

  9. Missense mutations at homologous positions in the fourth and fifth laminin A G-like domains of eyes shut homolog cause autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Imran; Collin, Rob W.J.; Arimadyo, Kentar; Micheal, Shazia; Azam, Maleeha; Qureshi, Nadeem; Faradz, Sultana M.H.; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Qamar, Raheel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To describe two novel mutations in the eyes shut homolog (EYS) gene in two families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) from Pakistan and Indonesia. Methods Genome-wide linkage and homozygosity mapping were performed using single nucleotide polymorphism microarray analysis in affected members of the two arRP families. Sequence analysis was performed to identify genetic changes in protein coding exons of EYS. Results In the Indonesian and Pakistani families, homozygous regions encompassing the EYS gene at 6q12 were identified, with maximum LOD scores of 1.8 and 3.6, respectively. Novel missense variants in the EYS gene (p.D2767Y and p.D3028Y) were found in the Pakistani and Indonesian families, respectively, that co-segregate with the disease phenotype. Interestingly, the missense variants are located at the same homologous position within the fourth and fifth laminin A G-like domains of EYS. Conclusions To date, mostly protein-truncating mutations have been described in EYS, while only few patients have been described with pathogenic compound heterozygous missense mutations. The mutations p.D2767Y and p.D3028Y described in this study affect highly conserved residues at homologous positions in laminin A G-like domains and support the notion that missense mutations in EYS can cause arRP. PMID:21179430

  10. Transcription patterns of genes encoding four metallothionein homologs in Daphnia pulex exposed to copper and cadmium are time- and homolog- dependent

    PubMed Central

    Asselman, Jana; Shaw, Joseph R.; Glaholt, Stephen P.; Colbourne, John K.; De Schamphelaere, Karel AC.

    2013-01-01

    Metallothioneins are proteins that play an essential role in metal homeostasis and detoxification in nearly all organisms studied to date. Yet discrepancies between outcomes of chronic and acute exposure experiments hamper the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of their isoforms following metal exposure. Here, we investigated transcriptional differences among four identified homologs (mt1–mt4) in Daphnia pulex exposed across time to copper and cadmium relative to a control. Transcriptional upregulation of mt1 and mt3 was detected on day four following exposure to cadmium, whereas that of mt2 and mt4 was detected on day two and day eight following exposure to copper. These results confirm temporal and metal-specific differences in the transcriptional induction of genes encoding metallothionein homologs upon metal exposure which should be considered in ecotoxicological monitoring programs of metal-contaminated water bodies. Indeed, the mRNA expression patterns observed here illustrate the complex regulatory system associated with metallothioneins, as these patterns are not only dependent on the metal, but also on exposure time and the homolog studied. Further phylogenetic analysis and analysis of regulatory elements in upstream promoter regions revealed a high degree of similarity between metallothionein genes of Daphnia pulex and Daphnia magna, a species belonging to the same genus. These findings, combined with a limited amount of available expression data for D. magna metallothionein genes, tentatively suggest a potential generalization of the metallothionein response system between these Daphnia species. PMID:24113165

  11. Homolog detection using global sequence properties suggests an alternate view of structural encoding in protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    Scheraga, Harold A.; Rackovsky, S.

    2014-01-01

    We show that a Fourier-based sequence distance function is able to identify structural homologs of target sequences with high accuracy. It is shown that Fourier distances correlate very strongly with independently determined structural distances between molecules, a property of the method that is not attainable using conventional representations. It is further shown that the ability of the Fourier approach to identify protein folds is statistically far in excess of random expectation. It is then shown that, in actual searches for structural homologs of selected target sequences, the Fourier approach gives excellent results. On the basis of these results, we suggest that the global information detected by the Fourier representation is an essential feature of structure encoding in protein sequences and a key to structural homology detection. PMID:24706836

  12. Ku86 deficiency leads to reduced intrachromosomal homologous recombination in vivo in mice.

    PubMed

    Reliene, Ramune; Bishop, Alexander J R; Li, Gloria; Schiestl, Robert H

    2004-02-01

    Ku70 and Ku86 together with DNA-PKcs form the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) complex that is involved in DNA double-strand break repair by nonhomologous end joining. We investigated the effect of Ku86 mutation on intrachromosomal homologous recombination (HR) resulting in deletions in vivo in mice. We quantified such deletion events using a phenotypic pigmentation assay. Deletion of one copy of a 70 kb DNA duplication in the pink-eyed unstable (pun) allele results in reversion to the wildtype pink-eyed dilution (p) gene, allowing black pigment accumulation in cells of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We found that the frequency of homologous recombination was significantly reduced in Ku86 deficient mice. Furthermore, the proliferation of cells in which recombination events occurred was reduced and developmentally delayed in the Ku86 deficient mice. These data indicate a role for Ku86 directly or indirectly in homologous recombination in vivo. PMID:14706343

  13. Positive genetic selection for gene disruption in mammalian cells by homologous recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Sedivy, J M; Sharp, P A

    1989-01-01

    Efficient modification of genes in mammalian cells by homologous recombination has not been possible because of the high frequency of nonhomologous recombination. An efficient method for targeted gene disruption has been developed. Cells with substitution of exogenous sequences into a chromosomal locus were enriched, by a factor of 100, using a positive genetic selection that specifically selects for homologous recombination at the targeted site. The selection is based on the conditional expression of a dominant selectable marker by virtue of in-frame gene fusion with the target gene. The dominant selectable marker was derived by modification of the Escherichia coli neo gene so that it retains significant activity in mammalian cells after in-frame fusion with heterologous coding sequences. In the example presented here, homologous recombinants were efficiently recovered from a pool in which the targeted gene was disrupted in 1 per 10,000 cells incorporating exogenous DNA. Images PMID:2536156

  14. Engineering the Caenorhabditis elegans genome using Cas9-triggered homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Daniel J; Ward, Jordan D; Reiner, David J; Goldstein, Bob

    2013-10-01

    Study of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has provided important insights in a wide range of fields in biology. The ability to precisely modify genomes is critical to fully realize the utility of model organisms. Here we report a method to edit the C. elegans genome using the clustered, regularly interspersed, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease and homologous recombination. We demonstrate that Cas9 is able to induce DNA double-strand breaks with specificity for targeted sites and that these breaks can be repaired efficiently by homologous recombination. By supplying engineered homologous repair templates, we generated gfp knock-ins and targeted mutations. Together our results outline a flexible methodology to produce essentially any desired modification in the C. elegans genome quickly and at low cost. This technology is an important addition to the array of genetic techniques already available in this experimentally tractable model organism. PMID:23995389

  15. The C. elegans Crumbs family contains a CRB3 homolog and is not essential for viability.

    PubMed

    Waaijers, Selma; Ramalho, João Jacob; Koorman, Thijs; Kruse, Elisabeth; Boxem, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Crumbs proteins are important regulators of epithelial polarity. In C. elegans, no essential role for the two described Crumbs homologs has been uncovered. Here, we identify and characterize an additional Crumbs family member in C. elegans, which we termed CRB-3 based on its similarity in size and sequence to mammalian CRB3. We visualized CRB-3 subcellular localization by expressing a translational GFP fusion. CRB-3::GFP was expressed in several polarized tissues in the embryo and larval stages, and showed apical localization in the intestine and pharynx. To identify the function of the Crumbs family in C. elegans development, we generated a triple Crumbs deletion mutant by sequentially removing the entire coding sequence for each crumbs homolog using a CRISPR/Cas9-based approach. Remarkably, animals lacking all three Crumbs homologs are viable and show normal epithelial polarity. Thus, the three C. elegans Crumbs family members do not appear to play an essential role in epithelial polarity establishment. PMID:25661870

  16. Sequence homology between RNAs encoding rat alpha-fetoprotein and rat serum albumin.

    PubMed Central

    Jagodzinski, L L; Sargent, T D; Yang, M; Glackin, C; Bonner, J

    1981-01-01

    We have determined the sequences of the recombinant DNA inserts of three bacterial plasmid cDNA clones containing most of the rat alpha a-fetoprotein mRNA. The resultant nucleotide sequence of alpha-fetoprotein was exhaustively compared to the nucleotide sequence of the mRNA encoding rat serum albumin. These two mRNAs have extensive homology (50%) throughout and the same intron locations. The amino acid sequence of rat alpha-fetoprotein has been deduced from the nucleotide sequence, and its comparison to rat serum albumin's amino acid sequence reveals a 34% homology. The regularly spaced positions of the cysteines found in serum albumin are conserved in rat alpha-fetoprotein, indicating that these two proteins may have a similar secondary folding structure. These homologies indicate that alpha-fetoprotein and serum albumin were derived by duplication of a common ancestral gene and constitute a gene family. PMID:6167988

  17. Analysis of ultraviolet and X-ray observations of three homologous solar flares from SMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Chung-Chieh; Pallavicini, Roberto

    1987-01-01

    Three homologous flares observed in the UV lines of Fe XXI and O V and in X-rays from the SMM were studied. It was found that: (1) the homology of the flares was most noticeable in Fe XXI and soft X-ray emissions; (2) the three flares shared many of the same loop footprints which were located in O V bright kernals associated with hard X-ray bursts; and (3) in spite of the strong spatial homology, the temporal evolution in UV and X-ray emissions varied from flare to flare. A comparison between the UV observations and photospheric magnetograms revealed that the basic flare configuration was a complex loop system consisting of many loops or bundles of loops.

  18. orthoFind Facilitates the Discovery of Homologous and Orthologous Proteins.

    PubMed

    Mier, Pablo; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A; Pérez-Pulido, Antonio J

    2015-01-01

    Finding homologous and orthologous protein sequences is often the first step in evolutionary studies, annotation projects, and experiments of functional complementation. Despite all currently available computational tools, there is a requirement for easy-to-use tools that provide functional information. Here, a new web application called orthoFind is presented, which allows a quick search for homologous and orthologous proteins given one or more query sequences, allowing a recurrent and exhaustive search against reference proteomes, and being able to include user databases. It addresses the protein multidomain problem, searching for homologs with the same domain architecture, and gives a simple functional analysis of the results to help in the annotation process. orthoFind is easy to use and has been proven to provide accurate results with different datasets. Availability: http://www.bioinfocabd.upo.es/orthofind/. PMID:26624019

  19. Possible topological quantum computation via Khovanov homology: D-brane topological quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vélez, Mario; Ospina, Juan

    2009-05-01

    A model of a D-Brane Topological Quantum Computer (DBTQC) is presented and sustained. The model is based on four-dimensional TQFTs of the Donaldson-Witten and Seiber-Witten kinds. It is argued that the DBTQC is able to compute Khovanov homology for knots, links and graphs. The DBTQC physically incorporates the mathematical process of categorification according to which the invariant polynomials for knots, links and graphs such as Jones, HOMFLY, Tutte and Bollobás-Riordan polynomials can be computed as the Euler characteristics corresponding to special homology complexes associated with knots, links and graphs. The DBTQC is conjectured as a powerful universal quantum computer in the sense that the DBTQC computes Khovanov homology which is considered like powerful that the Jones polynomial.

  20. p53 modulates homologous recombination by transcriptional regulation of the RAD51 gene

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Lopez, Carmen; Lazaro-Trueba, Iciar; Kerr, Peter; Lord, Christopher J; Dexter, Tim; Iravani, Marjan; Ashworth, Alan; Silva, Augusto

    2006-01-01

    DNA repair by homologous recombination is involved in maintaining genome stability. Previous data report that wild-type p53 suppresses homologous recombination and physically interacts with Rad51. Here, we show the in vivo binding of wild-type p53 to a p53 response element in the promoter of Rad51 and the downregulation of Rad51 messenger RNA and protein by wild-type p53, favoured by DNA damage. Moreover, wild-type p53 inhibits Rad51 foci formation in response to double-strand breaks, whereas p53 contact mutant R280K fails to repress Rad51 mRNA and protein expression and Rad51 foci formation. We propose that transcriptional repression of Rad51 by p53 participates in regulating homologous recombination, and impaired Rad51 repression by p53 mutants may contribute to malignant transformation. PMID:16322760

  1. Partial resistance to homologous challenge infections of the digenean Echinostoma caproni in ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Antoli, C; Cortés, A; Martín-Grau, C; Fried, B; Esteban, J G; Toledo, R

    2016-07-01

    In the present paper, we analyse the effect of a primary infection of ICR mice with Echinostoma caproni (Trematoda: Echinostomatidae) on the generation of resistance against homologous challenge infections. In ICR mice, E. caproni induces chronic infections concomitantly with strong responses characterized by the development of T-helper 1 (Th1)-type local immune responses with elevated levels of local interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and inflammatory and antibody responses. Here, the effect of the response generated against a primary infection with E. caproni in the generation of resistance against subsequent homologous infections was analysed. For this purpose, ICR mice were challenged with metacercariae of E. caproni and the results obtained showed that primary infection induces partial resistance against subsequent homologous infections in ICR mice. This resistance was expressed as a reduced rate of infection, worm recovery and worm size, indicating that primary infection induces changes in the host, making a hostile environment for the development of the parasite. PMID:26202834

  2. Characterization of RAD51-Independent Break-Induced Replication That Acts Preferentially with Short Homologous Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Ira, Grzegorz; Haber, James E.

    2002-01-01

    Repair of double-strand breaks by gene conversions between homologous sequences located on different Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomes or plasmids requires RAD51. When repair occurs between inverted repeats of the same plasmid, both RAD51-dependent and RAD51-independent repairs are found. Completion of RAD51-independent plasmid repair events requires RAD52, RAD50, RAD59, TID1 (RDH54), and SRS2 and appears to involve break-induced replication coupled to single-strand annealing. Surprisingly, RAD51-independent recombination requires much less homology (30 bp) for strand invasion than does RAD51-dependent repair (approximately 100 bp); in fact, the presence of Rad51p impairs recombination with short homology. The differences between the RAD51- and RAD50/RAD59-dependent pathways account for the distinct ways that two different recombination processes maintain yeast telomeres in the absence of telomerase. PMID:12192038

  3. Oral Region Homologies in Paleozoic Crinoids and Other Plesiomorphic Pentaradial Echinoderms

    PubMed Central

    Kammer, Thomas W.; Sumrall, Colin D.; Zamora, Samuel; Ausich, William I.; Deline, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships between major groups of plesiomorphic pentaradial echinoderms, the Paleozoic crinoids, blastozoans, and edrioasteroids, are poorly understood because of a lack of widely recognized homologies. Here, we present newly recognized oral region homologies, based on the Universal Elemental Homology model for skeletal plates, in a wide range of fossil taxa. The oral region of echinoderms is mainly composed of the axial, or ambulacral, skeleton, which apparently evolved more slowly than the extraxial skeleton that forms the majority of the body. Recent phylogenetic hypotheses have focused on characters of the extraxial skeleton, which may have evolved too rapidly to preserve obvious homologies across all these groups. The axial skeleton conserved homologous suites of characters shared between various edrioasteroids and specific blastozoans, and between other blastozoans and crinoids. Although individual plates can be inferred as homologous, no directly overlapping suites of characters are shared between edrioasteroids and crinoids. Six different systems of mouth (peristome) plate organization (Peristomial Border Systems) are defined. These include four different systems based on the arrangement of the interradially-positioned oral plates and their peristomial cover plates, where PBS A1 occurs only in plesiomorphic edrioasteroids, PBS A2 occurs in plesiomorphic edrioasteroids and blastozoans, and PBS A3 and PBS A4 occur in blastozoans and crinoids. The other two systems have radially-positioned uniserial oral frame plates in construction of the mouth frame. PBS B1 has both orals and uniserial oral frame plates and occurs in edrioasterid and possibly edrioblastoid edrioasteroids, whereas PBS B2 has exclusively uniserial oral frame plates and is found in isorophid edrioasteroids and imbricate and gogiid blastozoans. These different types of mouth frame construction offer potential synapomorphies to aid in parsimony-based phylogenetics for

  4. Potential basis for regulation of the coordinately expressed fibrinogen genes: homology in the 5' flanking regions.

    PubMed Central

    Fowlkes, D M; Mullis, N T; Comeau, C M; Crabtree, G R

    1984-01-01

    The three chains of fibrinogen are encoded by three separate genes whose transcription is coordinately regulated. The breakdown of fibrinogen during the acute-phase reaction leads to a simultaneous increase in alpha-, beta-, and gamma-fibrinogen mRNA in the liver. In a search for the basis of this coordinate increase in transcription, we have determined the sequences of the regions surrounding the points of transcriptional initiation of the three rat fibrinogen genes, 1490 nucleotides upstream and 730 nucleotides downstream. Two unique regions of homology have been found. One region consists of 15 nucleotides that have a common 6-nucleotide core lying between -116 and -160; the other is approximately equal to 100 nucleotides long and is in the -165 to -472 region. In this region, the beta- and gamma-fibrinogen genes are approximately equal to 65% homologous. alpha-Fibrinogen has somewhat less homology with both beta- and gamma-fibrinogen. In addition, the beta-fibrinogen gene has 22 nucleotides at position -480 that are homologous to sequences that have been noted to occur in glucocorticosteroid-regulated genes in a similar position. We feel that these areas of conserved sequences play a role in the regulation of the transcription of fibrinogen. The fibrinogen chains are synthesized as precursor peptides, and the amino-terminal portion, the so-called signal peptide, is removed during the translocation of the peptide chain across the endoplasmic reticulum. We have determined those sequences that encode the signal peptides. Homology in the amino acid sequence between the rat and human signal peptides varies between 52% for alpha-fibrinogen and 66% for beta-fibrinogen. This homology implies that there has been strong selective pressure on this portion of these genes. PMID:6232608

  5. Non-homologous isofunctional enzymes: A systematic analysis of alternative solutions in enzyme evolution

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Evolutionarily unrelated proteins that catalyze the same biochemical reactions are often referred to as analogous - as opposed to homologous - enzymes. The existence of numerous alternative, non-homologous enzyme isoforms presents an interesting evolutionary problem; it also complicates genome-based reconstruction of the metabolic pathways in a variety of organisms. In 1998, a systematic search for analogous enzymes resulted in the identification of 105 Enzyme Commission (EC) numbers that included two or more proteins without detectable sequence similarity to each other, including 34 EC nodes where proteins were known (or predicted) to have distinct structural folds, indicating independent evolutionary origins. In the past 12 years, many putative non-homologous isofunctional enzymes were identified in newly sequenced genomes. In addition, efforts in structural genomics resulted in a vastly improved structural coverage of proteomes, providing for definitive assessment of (non)homologous relationships between proteins. Results We report the results of a comprehensive search for non-homologous isofunctional enzymes (NISE) that yielded 185 EC nodes with two or more experimentally characterized - or predicted - structurally unrelated proteins. Of these NISE sets, only 74 were from the original 1998 list. Structural assignments of the NISE show over-representation of proteins with the TIM barrel fold and the nucleotide-binding Rossmann fold. From the functional perspective, the set of NISE is enriched in hydrolases, particularly carbohydrate hydrolases, and in enzymes involved in defense against oxidative stress. Conclusions These results indicate that at least some of the non-homologous isofunctional enzymes were recruited relatively recently from enzyme families that are active against related substrates and are sufficiently flexible to accommodate changes in substrate specificity. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Andrei Osterman, Keith F. Tipton

  6. The homologous chromosome is an effective template for the repair of mitotic DNA double-strand breaks in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Yikang S; Golic, Kent G

    2003-01-01

    In recombinational DNA double-strand break repair a homologous template for gene conversion may be located at several different genomic positions: on the homologous chromosome in diploid organisms, on the sister chromatid after DNA replication, or at an ectopic position. The use of the homologous chromosome in mitotic gene conversion is thought to be limited in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian cells. In contrast, by studying the repair of double-strand breaks generated by the I-SceI rare-cutting endonuclease, we find that the homologous chromosome is frequently used in Drosophila melanogaster, which we suggest is attributable to somatic pairing of homologous chromosomes in mitotic cells of Drosophila. We also find that Drosophila mitotic cells of the germ line, like yeast, employ the homologous recombinational repair pathway more often than imperfect nonhomologous end joining. PMID:14704169

  7. On the influence of protein-DNA register during homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Greene, Eric C

    2016-01-17

    Homologous recombination enables the exchange of genetic information between related DNA molecules and is a driving force in evolution. Using single-molecule optical microscopy we have recently shown that members of the Rad51/RecA family of recombinases stabilize paired homologous strand of DNA in precise 3-nt increments. Here we discuss an interesting conceptual implication of these results, which is that the recombinases may actively sense and reorganize their alignment register relative to the bound DNA sequences to ensure optimal base triplet pairing interactions during the early stages of recombination. PMID:26652653

  8. A Betabaculovirus-Encoded gp64 Homolog Codes for a Functional Envelope Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ardisson-Araújo, Daniel M. P.; Melo, Fernando L.; Clem, Rollie J.; Wolff, José L. C.

    2015-01-01

    The GP64 envelope fusion protein is a hallmark of group I alphabaculoviruses. However, the Diatraea saccharalis granulovirus genome sequence revealed the first betabaculovirus species harboring a gp64 homolog (disa118). In this work, we have shown that this homolog encodes a functional envelope fusion protein and could enable the infection and fusogenic abilities of a gp64-null prototype baculovirus. Therefore, GP64 may complement or may be in the process of replacing F protein activity in this virus lineage. PMID:26537678

  9. A Betabaculovirus-Encoded gp64 Homolog Codes for a Functional Envelope Fusion Protein.

    PubMed

    Ardisson-Araújo, Daniel M P; Melo, Fernando L; Clem, Rollie J; Wolff, José L C; Ribeiro, Bergmann M

    2016-02-01

    The GP64 envelope fusion protein is a hallmark of group I alphabaculoviruses. However, the Diatraea saccharalis granulovirus genome sequence revealed the first betabaculovirus species harboring a gp64 homolog (disa118). In this work, we have shown that this homolog encodes a functional envelope fusion protein and could enable the infection and fusogenic abilities of a gp64-null prototype baculovirus. Therefore, GP64 may complement or may be in the process of replacing F protein activity in this virus lineage. PMID:26537678

  10. Homologous Recombination in E3 Genes of Human Adenovirus Species D

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurdeep; Robinson, Christopher M.; Dehghan, Shoaleh; Jones, Morris S.; Dyer, David W.; Seto, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Genes within the E3 transcription unit of human adenoviruses modulate host immune responses to infection. A comprehensive genomics and bioinformatics analysis of the E3 transcription unit for 38 viruses within human adenovirus species D (HAdV-D) revealed distinct and surprising patterns of homologous recombination. Homologous recombination was identified in open reading frames for E3 CR1α, CR1β, and CR1γ, similar to that previously observed with genes encoding the three major structural capsid proteins, the penton base, hexon, and fiber. PMID:24027303

  11. Facile Formation of β-Hydroxyboronate Esters by a Cu-Catalyzed Diboration/Matteson Homologation Sequence

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The copper-catalyzed diboration of aldehydes was used in conjunction with the Matteson homologation, providing the efficient synthesis of β-hydroxyboronate esters. The oxygen-bound boronate ester was found to play a key role in mediating the homologation reaction, which was compared to the α-hydroxyboronate ester (isolated hydrolysis product). The synthetic utility of the diboration/homologation sequence was demonstrated through the oxidation of one product to provide a 1,2-diol. PMID:25412356

  12. Two-Carbon Homologation of Ketones to 3-Methyl Unsaturated Aldehydes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The usual scheme of two-carbon homologation of ketones to 3-methyl unsaturated aldehydes by Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons condensations with phosphonate esters, such as triethyl-2-phosphonoacetate, involves three steps. The phosphonate condensation step results in extension of the carbon chain by two carb...

  13. Direct aldehyde homologation utilized to construct a conjugated-tetraene hydrocarbon insect pheromone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New phosphonate reagents were developed for the two-carbon homologation of aldehydes to methyl- or ethyl-branched unsaturated aldehydes and used in the practical synthesis of (2E,4E,6E,8E)-7-ethyl-3,5-dimethyl-2,4,6,8-undecatetraene (1), a pheromone of the beetle, Carpophilus lugubris. The phosphona...

  14. A Single-Strand Annealing Protein Clamps DNA to Detect and Secure Homology

    PubMed Central

    Ander, Marcel; Subramaniam, Sivaraman; Fahmy, Karim; Stewart, A. Francis; Schäffer, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Repair of DNA breaks by single-strand annealing (SSA) is a major mechanism for the maintenance of genomic integrity. SSA is promoted by proteins (single-strand-annealing proteins [SSAPs]), such as eukaryotic RAD52 and λ phage Redβ. These proteins use a short single-stranded region to find sequence identity and initiate homologous recombination. However, it is unclear how SSAPs detect homology and catalyze annealing. Using single-molecule experiments, we provide evidence that homology is recognized by Redβ monomers that weakly hold single DNA strands together. Once annealing begins, dimerization of Redβ clamps the double-stranded region and nucleates nucleoprotein filament growth. In this manner, DNA clamping ensures and secures a successful detection for DNA sequence homology. The clamp is characterized by a structural change of Redβ and a remarkable stability against force up to 200 pN. Our findings not only present a detailed explanation for SSAP action but also identify the DNA clamp as a very stable, noncovalent, DNA–protein interaction. PMID:26271032

  15. Homology Inference of Protein-Protein Interactions via Conserved Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Manoj; Thangudu, Ratna R.; Zhang, Dachuan; Bryant, Stephen H.; Madej, Thomas; Panchenko, Anna R.

    2012-01-01

    The coverage and reliability of protein-protein interactions determined by high-throughput experiments still needs to be improved, especially for higher organisms, therefore the question persists, how interactions can be verified and predicted by computational approaches using available data on protein structural complexes. Recently we developed an approach called IBIS (Inferred Biomolecular Interaction Server) to predict and annotate protein-protein binding sites and interaction partners, which is based on the assumption that the structural location and sequence patterns of protein-protein binding sites are conserved between close homologs. In this study first we confirmed high accuracy of our method and found that its accuracy depends critically on the usage of all available data on structures of homologous complexes, compared to the approaches where only a non-redundant set of complexes is employed. Second we showed that there exists a trade-off between specificity and sensitivity if we employ in the prediction only evolutionarily conserved binding site clusters or clusters supported by only one observation (singletons). Finally we addressed the question of identifying the biologically relevant interactions using the homology inference approach and demonstrated that a large majority of crystal packing interactions can be correctly identified and filtered by our algorithm. At the same time, about half of biological interfaces that are not present in the protein crystallographic asymmetric unit can be reconstructed by IBIS from homologous complexes without the prior knowledge of crystal parameters of the query protein. PMID:22303436

  16. New preparation of diethyl methylformylphosphonate dimethylhydrazone: A reagent for aldehyde homologation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The phosphonate reagent, diethyl methylformyl-2-phosphonate dimethylhydrazone contains a protected aldehyde group instead of the usual ester group. It can be used for the two-carbon homologation of aldehydes to a, ß-unsaturated aldehydes. The reagent can be prepared in good overall yield (82%) and...

  17. Short Convergent Synthesis of the Mycolactone Core Through Lithiation-Borylation Homologations.

    PubMed

    Brown, Christopher A; Aggarwal, Varinder K

    2015-09-28

    Using iterative lithiation-borylation homologations, the mycolactone toxin core has been synthesized in 13 steps and 17% overall yield. The rapid build-up of molecular complexity, high convergence and high stereoselectivity are noteworthy features of this synthesis. PMID:26332797

  18. Expression of TRPC homologs in endothelial cells and smooth muscle layers of human arteries.

    PubMed

    Yip, Ham; Chan, Wing-Yee; Leung, Pan-Cheung; Kwan, Hiu-Yee; Liu, Cuiling; Huang, Yu; Michel, Villaz; Yew, David Tai-Wai; Yao, Xiaoqiang

    2004-12-01

    TRPC channels are a group of Ca(2+)-permeable nonselective cation channels that mediate store-operated and/or agonist-stimulated Ca(2+) influx in a variety of cell types. In this study, we extensively examined the expression patterns of TRPC homologs in human vascular tissues. RT-PCR amplified cDNA fragments of TRPC1 (505 bp), TRPC3 (372 bp), TRPC4 (499 bp), TRPC5 (325 bp), TRPC6 (509 bp), and TRPC7 (187 bp) from RNA isolated from cultured human coronary artery endothelial cells. In situ hybridization yielded strong labeling of TRPC1,3-6 in the endothelial and smooth muscle cells of human coronary and cerebral arteries. TRPC7 labeling was exclusively found in endothelial cells but not in smooth muscle cells. Results from immunohistochemical staining were consistent with those from in situ hybridization. Similar expression patterns of TRPC homologs were also observed in arterioles and vaso vasora. In conclusion, our study indicates that TRPC homologs are widely expressed in human vessels of all calibers, including medium-sized coronary arteries and cerebral arteries, smaller-sized resistance arteries, and vaso vasora. These results suggest a ubiquitous role of TRPC homologs in regulating blood supply to different regions and in controlling arterial blood pressure. PMID:15538613

  19. Homology and repair of UV-irradiated plasmid DNA in Haemophilus influenzae

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrea-Juarez, E.; Setlow, J.K.

    1983-02-01

    UV-irradiated plasmid pNov1 containing a cloned fragment of chromosomal DNA could be repaired by excision, but plasmid p2265 without homology to the chromosome could not. Establishment of pNov1 was more UV resistant in Rec/sup -/ than in Rec/sup +/ cells. 19 references, 2 figures.

  20. Evolution and homologous recombination of the hemagglutinin-esterase gene sequences from porcine torovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the present study was to gain new insights into the evolution, homologous recombination and selection pressures imposed on the porcine torovirus (PToV), by examining changes in the hemagglutinin-esterase (HE) gene. The most recent common ancestor of PToV was estimated to have emerge...

  1. New Proposal of Setal Homology in Schizomida and Revision of Surazomus (Hubbardiidae) from Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The homology of three somatic systems in Schizomida is studied yielding the following results: (1) proposal of homology and chaetotaxy of abdominal setae in Surazomus; (2) revision of the cheliceral chaetotaxy in Schizomida, with suggestion of new homology scheme between Hubbardiidae and Protoschizomidae, description of a new group of setae in Hubbardiinae (G7), and division of setae group 5 in two subgroups, G5A and G5B; (3) proposal of segmental homology between trimerous and tetramerous female flagellum in Hubbardiinae with association of segment III of tri-segmented species to segments III + IV of tetra-segmented species. Considerations about the dorsal microsetae on the male flagellum are made. The genus Surazomus in Ecuador is revised. The sympatric species Surazomus palenque sp. nov. and S. kitu sp. nov. (Ecuador, Pichincha) are described and illustrated. The female of S. cuenca (Rowland and Reddell, 1979) is described, with two new distributional records for the species. Surazomus cumbalensis (Kraus, 1957) is recorded for the first time from Ecuador (Pichincha). PMID:26863017

  2. New Proposal of Setal Homology in Schizomida and Revision of Surazomus (Hubbardiidae) from Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Manzanilla, Osvaldo Villarreal; de Miranda, Gustavo Silva; Giupponi, Alessandro Ponce de Leão

    2016-01-01

    The homology of three somatic systems in Schizomida is studied yielding the following results: (1) proposal of homology and chaetotaxy of abdominal setae in Surazomus; (2) revision of the cheliceral chaetotaxy in Schizomida, with suggestion of new homology scheme between Hubbardiidae and Protoschizomidae, description of a new group of setae in Hubbardiinae (G7), and division of setae group 5 in two subgroups, G5A and G5B; (3) proposal of segmental homology between trimerous and tetramerous female flagellum in Hubbardiinae with association of segment III of tri-segmented species to segments III + IV of tetra-segmented species. Considerations about the dorsal microsetae on the male flagellum are made. The genus Surazomus in Ecuador is revised. The sympatric species Surazomus palenque sp. nov. and S. kitu sp. nov. (Ecuador, Pichincha) are described and illustrated. The female of S. cuenca (Rowland and Reddell, 1979) is described, with two new distributional records for the species. Surazomus cumbalensis (Kraus, 1957) is recorded for the first time from Ecuador (Pichincha). PMID:26863017

  3. Non-homologous DNA increases gene disruption efficiency by altering DNA repair outcomes.

    PubMed

    Richardson, C D; Ray, G J; Bray, N L; Corn, J E

    2016-01-01

    The Cas9 endonuclease can be targeted to genomic sequences by programming the sequence of an associated single guide RNA (sgRNA). For unknown reasons, the activity of these Cas9-sgRNA combinations varies widely at different genomic loci and in different cell types. Thus, disrupting genes in polyploid cell lines or when using poorly performing sgRNAs can require extensive downstream screening to identify homozygous clones. Here we find that non-homologous single-stranded DNA greatly stimulates Cas9-mediated gene disruption in the absence of homology-directed repair. This stimulation increases the frequency of clones with homozygous gene disruptions and rescues otherwise ineffective sgRNAs. The molecular outcome of enhanced gene disruption depends upon cellular context, stimulating deletion of genomic sequence or insertion of non-homologous DNA at the edited locus in a cell line specific manner. Non-homologous DNA appears to divert cells towards error-prone instead of error-free repair pathways, dramatically increasing the frequency of gene disruption. PMID:27530320

  4. Resistance of hypoxic cells to ionizing radiation is influenced by homologous recombination status

    SciTech Connect

    Sprong, Debbie; Janssen, Hilde L.; Vens, Conchita; Begg, Adrian C. . E-mail: a.begg@nki.nl

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the role of DNA repair in hypoxic radioresistance. Methods and Materials: Chinese hamster cell lines with mutations in homologous recombination (XRCC2, XRCC3, BRAC2, RAD51C) or nonhomologous end-joining (DNA-PKcs) genes were irradiated under normoxic (20% oxygen) and hypoxic (<0.1% oxygen) conditions, and the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) was calculated. In addition, Fanconi anemia fibroblasts (complementation groups C and G) were compared with fibroblasts from nonsyndrome patients. RAD51 foci were studied using immunofluorescence. Results: All hamster cell lines deficient in homologous recombination showed a decrease in OER (1.5-2.0 vs. 2.6-3.0 for wild-types). In contrast, the OER for the DNA-PKcs-deficient line was comparable to wild-type controls. The two Fanconi anemia cell strains also showed a significant reduction in OER. The OER for RAD51 foci formation at late times after irradiation was considerably lower than that for survival in wild-type cells. Conclusion: Homologous recombination plays an important role in determining hypoxic cell radiosensitivity. Lower OERs have also been reported in cells deficient in XPF and ERCC1, which, similar to homologous recombination genes, are known to play a role in cross-link repair. Because Fanconi anemia cells are also sensitive to cross-linking agents, this strengthens the notion that the capacity to repair cross-links determines hypoxic radiosensitivity.

  5. Irradiated homologous tarsal plate banking: a new alternative in eyelid reconstruction. Part II. Human data

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, D.R.; Tse, D.T.; Anderson, R.L.; Hansen, S.O. )

    1990-01-01

    Reconstruction of full thickness eyelid defects requires the correction of both posterior lamella (tarsus, conjunctiva) and anterior lamella (skin, muscle). Irradiated homologous tarsal plate provides a structured framework for the lid reconstruction, and is incorporated nicely into the normal lid anatomy.

  6. Sister cohesion and structural axis components mediate homolog bias of meiotic recombination

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Keun P.; Weiner, Beth M.; Zhang, Liangran; Jordan, Amy; Dekker, Job; Kleckner, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Meiotic recombination occurs between one chromatid of each maternal and paternal homolog (homolog bias) versus between sister chromatids (sister bias). Physical DNA analysis reveals that meiotic cohesin/axis component Rec8 promotes sister bias, likely via its cohesion activity. Two meiosis-specific axis components, Red1/Mek1kinase, counteract this effect. With this precondition satisfied, other molecules directly specify homolog bias per se. Rec8 also acts positively to maintain homolog bias during crossover recombination. These observations point to sequential release of double-strand break ends from association with their sister. Red1 and Rec8 are found to play distinct roles for sister cohesion, DSB formation and recombination progression kinetics. Also, the two components are enriched in spatially distinct domains of axial structure that develop prior to DSB formation. We propose that Red1 and Rec8 domains provide functionally complementary environments whereby inputs evolved from DSB repair and late-stage chromosome morphogenesis are integrated to give the complete meiotic chromosomal program. PMID:21145459

  7. The BARD1/HP1 interaction: Another clue to heterochromatin involvement in homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Takayo; Tsuruga, Tomoko; Kuroda, Takako; Takeuchi, Jun; Wu, Wenwen; Ohta, Tomohiko

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin compaction represents a barrier for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). However, heterochromatin components are also required for DSB repair by homologous recombination. The BARD1/HP1 interaction, required for the retention of BRCA1, CTIP, and RAD51 at DSB sites, may play a critical role in the crosstalk between chromatin compaction and DSB repair. PMID:27308582

  8. A fusicoccin binding protein belongs to the family of 14-3-3 brain protein homologs.

    PubMed Central

    Korthout, H A; de Boer, A H

    1994-01-01

    The fusicoccin binding protein (FCBP) is a highly conserved plasma membrane protein present in all higher plants tested thus far. It exhibits high- and low-affinity binding for the fungal toxin fusicoccin (FC). We purified the active FCBP from a fraction highly enriched in plasma membrane by selective precipitation and anion exchange chromatography. After SDS-PAGE, the two FCBP subunits of 30 and 31 kD were detected as major bands. Amino acid sequence analysis of the 31-kD polypeptide displayed a high degree of identity with so-called 14-3-3 proteins, a class of mammalian brain proteins initially described as regulators of neurotransmitter synthesis and protein kinase C inhibitors. Thereafter, we affinity purified the 30- and 31-kD FCBP subunits, using biotinylated FC in combination with a monomeric avidin column. Immunodecoration of these 30- and 31-kD FCBP subunits with polyclonal antibodies raised against a 14-3-3 homolog from yeast confirmed the identity of the FCBP as a 14-3-3 homolog. Similar to all 14-3-3 protein homologs, the FCBP seems to exist as a dimer in native form. Thus far, the FCBP is the only 14-3-3 homolog with a receptor-like function. The conserved structure of the 14-3-3 protein family is a further indication that the FCBP plays an important role in the physiology of higher plants. PMID:7827499

  9. Heterochromatin-Mediated Association of Achiasmate Homologs Declines With Age When Cohesion Is Compromised

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Vijayalakshmi V.; Bickel, Sharon E.

    2009-01-01

    Normally, meiotic crossovers in conjunction with sister-chromatid cohesion establish a physical connection between homologs that is required for their accurate segregation during the first meiotic division. However, in some organisms an alternative mechanism ensures the proper segregation of bivalents that fail to recombine. In Drosophila oocytes, accurate segregation of achiasmate homologs depends on pairing that is mediated by their centromere-proximal heterochromatin. Our previous work uncovered an unexpected link between sister-chromatid cohesion and the fidelity of achiasmate segregation when Drosophila oocytes are experimentally aged. Here we show that a weak mutation in the meiotic cohesion protein ORD coupled with a reduction in centromere-proximal heterochromatin causes achiasmate chromosomes to missegregate with increased frequency when oocytes undergo aging. If ORD activity is more severely disrupted, achiasmate chromosomes with the normal amount of pericentric heterochromatin exhibit increased nondisjunction when oocytes age. Significantly, even in the absence of aging, a weak ord allele reduces heterochromatin-mediated pairing of achiasmate chromosomes. Our data suggest that sister-chromatid cohesion proteins not only maintain the association of chiasmate homologs but also play a role in promoting the physical association of achiasmate homologs in Drosophila oocytes. In addition, our data support the model that deterioration of meiotic cohesion during the aging process compromises the segregation of achiasmate as well as chiasmate bivalents. PMID:19204374

  10. A Single-Strand Annealing Protein Clamps DNA to Detect and Secure Homology.

    PubMed

    Ander, Marcel; Subramaniam, Sivaraman; Fahmy, Karim; Stewart, A Francis; Schäffer, Erik

    2015-08-01

    Repair of DNA breaks by single-strand annealing (SSA) is a major mechanism for the maintenance of genomic integrity. SSA is promoted by proteins (single-strand-annealing proteins [SSAPs]), such as eukaryotic RAD52 and λ phage Redβ. These proteins use a short single-stranded region to find sequence identity and initiate homologous recombination. However, it is unclear how SSAPs detect homology and catalyze annealing. Using single-molecule experiments, we provide evidence that homology is recognized by Redβ monomers that weakly hold single DNA strands together. Once annealing begins, dimerization of Redβ clamps the double-stranded region and nucleates nucleoprotein filament growth. In this manner, DNA clamping ensures and secures a successful detection for DNA sequence homology. The clamp is characterized by a structural change of Redβ and a remarkable stability against force up to 200 pN. Our findings not only present a detailed explanation for SSAP action but also identify the DNA clamp as a very stable, noncovalent, DNA-protein interaction. PMID:26271032

  11. Non-homologous DNA increases gene disruption efficiency by altering DNA repair outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, C. D.; Ray, G. J.; Bray, N. L.; Corn, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    The Cas9 endonuclease can be targeted to genomic sequences by programming the sequence of an associated single guide RNA (sgRNA). For unknown reasons, the activity of these Cas9–sgRNA combinations varies widely at different genomic loci and in different cell types. Thus, disrupting genes in polyploid cell lines or when using poorly performing sgRNAs can require extensive downstream screening to identify homozygous clones. Here we find that non-homologous single-stranded DNA greatly stimulates Cas9-mediated gene disruption in the absence of homology-directed repair. This stimulation increases the frequency of clones with homozygous gene disruptions and rescues otherwise ineffective sgRNAs. The molecular outcome of enhanced gene disruption depends upon cellular context, stimulating deletion of genomic sequence or insertion of non-homologous DNA at the edited locus in a cell line specific manner. Non-homologous DNA appears to divert cells towards error-prone instead of error-free repair pathways, dramatically increasing the frequency of gene disruption. PMID:27530320

  12. Novel human and mouse homologs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerase eta.

    PubMed

    McDonald, J P; Rapić-Otrin, V; Epstein, J A; Broughton, B C; Wang, X; Lehmann, A R; Wolgemuth, D J; Woodgate, R

    1999-08-15

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD30 gene encodes a novel eukaryotic DNA polymerase, pol eta that is able to replicate across cis-syn cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers both accurately and efficiently. Very recently, a human homolog of RAD30 was identified, mutations in which result in the sunlight-sensitive, cancer-prone, Xeroderma pigmentosum variant group phenotype. We report here the cloning and localization of a second human homolog of RAD30. Interestingly, RAD30B is localized on chromosome 18q21.1 in a region that is often implicated in the etiology of many human cancers. The mouse homolog (Rad30b) is located on chromosome 18E2. The human RAD30B and mouse Rad30b mRNA transcripts, like many repair proteins, are highly expressed in the testis. In situ hybridization analysis indicates that expression of mouse Rad30b occurs predominantly in postmeiotic round spermatids. Database searches revealed genomic and EST sequences from other eukaryotes such as Aspergillus nidulans, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Brugia malayi, Caenorhabditis elegans, Trypanosoma cruzi, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Drosophila melanogaster that also encode putative homologs of RAD30, thereby suggesting that Rad30-dependent translesion DNA synthesis is conserved within the eukaryotic kingdom. PMID:10458907

  13. Mimicking the folding pathway to improve homology-free protein structure prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Karl; Debartolo, Joe; Colubri, Andres; Jha, Abhishek; Fitzgerald, James; Sosnick, Tobin

    2010-03-01

    Since demonstrating that a protein's sequence encodes its structure, the prediction of structure from sequence remains an outstanding problem that impacts numerous scientific disciplines including many genome projects. By iteratively fixing secondary structure assignments of residues during Monte Carlo simulations of folding, our coarse grained model without information concerning homology or explicit side chains outperforms current homology-based secondary structure prediction methods for many proteins. The computationally rapid algorithm using only single residue (phi, psi) dihedral angle moves also generates tertiary structures of comparable accuracy to existing all-atom methods for many small proteins, particularly ones with low homology. Hence, given appropriate search strategies and scoring functions, reduced representations can be used for accurately predicting secondary structure as well as providing three-dimensional structures, thereby increasing the size of proteins approachable by homology-free methods and the accuracy of template methods whose accuracy depends on the quality of the input secondary structure. Inclusion of information from evolutionarily related sequences enhances the statistics and the accuracy of the predictions.

  14. Vitamin E homologs and ¿-oryzanol levels in rice (Oryza sativa L.) during seed development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin E homologs (tocopherols and tocotrienols) and gamma-oryzanol have gained significant attention due to their proposed health benefits and ability to increase vegetable oil stability. Changes in the levels of these phytochemicals were examined during seed development. Rapid accumulation of toc...

  15. Protein remote homology detection based on auto-cross covariance transformation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuan; Zhao, Lijie; Dong, Qiwen

    2011-08-01

    Protein remote homology detection is a critical step toward annotating its structure and function. Supervised learning algorithms such as support vector machine are currently the most accurate methods. The position-specific score matrices (PSSMs) contain wealthy information about the evolutionary relationship of proteins. However, the PSSMs often have different lengths, which are difficult to be used by machine-learning methods. In this study, a simple, fast and powerful method is presented for protein remote homology detection, which combines support vector machine with auto-cross covariance transformation. The PSSMs are converted into a series of fixed-length vectors by auto-cross covariance transformation and these vectors are then input to a support vector machine classifier for remote homology detection. The sequence-order effects can be effectively captured by this scheme. Experiments are performed on well-established datasets, and the remote homology is simulated at the superfamily and the fold level, respectively. The results show that the proposed method, referred to as ACCRe, is comparable or even better than the state-of-the-art methods in terms of detection performance, and its time complexity is superior to those of other profile-based SVM methods. The auto-cross covariance transformation provides a novel way for the usage of evolutionary information, which can be widely used for protein-level studies. PMID:21664609

  16. Mechanism of homologous recombination from the RecA-ssDNA/dsDNA structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhucheng; Yang, Haijuan; Pavletich, Nikola P

    2008-07-08

    The RecA family of ATPases mediates homologous recombination, a reaction essential for maintaining genomic integrity and for generating genetic diversity. RecA, ATP and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) form a helical filament that binds to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), searches for homology, and then catalyses the exchange of the complementary strand, producing a new heteroduplex. Here we have solved the crystal structures of the Escherichia coli RecA-ssDNA and RecA-heteroduplex filaments. They show that ssDNA and ATP bind to RecA-RecA interfaces cooperatively, explaining the ATP dependency of DNA binding. The ATP {gamma}-phosphate is sensed across the RecA-RecA interface by two lysine residues that also stimulate ATP hydrolysis, providing a mechanism for DNA release. The DNA is underwound and stretched globally, but locally it adopts a B-DNA-like conformation that restricts the homology search to Watson-Crick-type base pairing. The complementary strand interacts primarily through base pairing, making heteroduplex formation strictly dependent on complementarity. The underwound, stretched filament conformation probably evolved to destabilize the donor duplex, freeing the complementary strand for homology sampling.

  17. Urban Planning and School Architecture: Homologies in Governing the Civic Body and the School Body.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennon, Lisa

    This paper is a preliminary examination of homologous shifts in U.S. discourses of school architecture and "planning" as they relate to curricular reforms and inventions of new pedagogical techniques. The strategy of discursive analysis uses Michel Foucault's conceptualization of "governmentality" to examine discourses on the design and building…

  18. pGraph: Efficient Parallel Construction of Large-Scale Protein Sequence Homology Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Changjun; Kalyanaraman, Anantharaman; Cannon, William R.

    2012-09-15

    Detecting sequence homology between protein sequences is a fundamental problem in computational molecular biology, with a pervasive application in nearly all analyses that aim to structurally and functionally characterize protein molecules. While detecting the homology between two protein sequences is relatively inexpensive, detecting pairwise homology for a large number of protein sequences can become computationally prohibitive for modern inputs, often requiring millions of CPU hours. Yet, there is currently no robust support to parallelize this kernel. In this paper, we identify the key characteristics that make this problemparticularly hard to parallelize, and then propose a new parallel algorithm that is suited for detecting homology on large data sets using distributed memory parallel computers. Our method, called pGraph, is a novel hybrid between the hierarchical multiple-master/worker model and producer-consumer model, and is designed to break the irregularities imposed by alignment computation and work generation. Experimental results show that pGraph achieves linear scaling on a 2,048 processor distributed memory cluster for a wide range of inputs ranging from as small as 20,000 sequences to 2,560,000 sequences. In addition to demonstrating strong scaling, we present an extensive report on the performance of the various system components and related parametric studies.

  19. Infinite-dimensional version of the Poincare-Hopf theorem and homological characteristics of functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Klimov, V S

    2001-02-28

    A version of the Poincare-Hopf theorem is established for multivalued vector fields on submanifolds of a reflexive space. The connection between the critical values and homological characteristics of the Lebesgue sets of Lipschitz functionals is studied. Applications to the theory of operator inclusions with parameters are indicated.

  20. A work stealing based approach for enabling scalable optimal sequence homology detection

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, Jeffrey A.; Kalyanaraman, Anantharaman; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Vishnu, Abhinav

    2015-05-01

    Sequence homology detection is central to a number of bioinformatics applications including genome sequencing and protein family characterization. Given millions of sequences, the goal is to identify all pairs of sequences that are highly similar (or “homologous”) on the basis of alignment criteria. While there are optimal alignment algorithms to compute pairwise homology, their deployment for large-scale is currently not feasible; instead, heuristic methods are used at the expense of quality. Here, we present the design and evaluation of a parallel implementation for conducting optimal homology detection on distributed memory supercomputers. Our approach uses a combination of techniques from asynchronous load balancing (viz. work stealing, dynamic task counters), data replication, and exact-matching filters to achieve homology detection at scale. Results for 2.56M sequences on up to 8K cores show parallel efficiencies of ~ 75-100%, a time-to-solution of 33s, and a rate of ~ 2.0M alignments per second.

  1. The art of destruction: revealing the proteolytic capacity of bacterial caspase homologs.

    PubMed

    Asplund-Samuelsson, Johannes

    2015-10-01

    Caspases are proteases that initiate and execute programmed cell death in animal tissues, thereby facilitating multicellular development and survival. While caspases are unique to metazoans and specifically cleave substrates at aspartic acid residues, homologs are found in protozoa, plants, algae, fungi, bacteria and archaea, and show specificity for basic residues. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, Klemenčič and colleagues present the first biochemical characterization of a bacterial caspase homolog, classified as an orthocaspase. By expressing the gene MaOC1 from the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 in Escherichia coli, the authors discovered specificity for substrates with arginine in the P1 position. The protein requires autocatalytic processing to become active and is dependent on an intact histidine-cysteine dyad. These results significantly extend our knowledge of the specificities of bacterial caspase homologs, which are known to be highly diverse in protein domain architectures and active site mutations. Although bacterial programmed cell death is one possible area of action, the function of most bacterial caspase homologs remains unexplored. Cyanobacteria represent the best studied group in terms of prokaryotic caspase-like proteins both genomically and experimentally, and thereby provide a suitable platform for further investigations into activation, regulation and physiological roles of orthocaspases. PMID:26123017

  2. Induction of Homologous Recombination Following in utero Exposure to DNA-Damaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Karia, Bijal; Martinez, Jo Ann; Bishop, Alexander J. R.

    2013-01-01

    Much of our understanding of homologous recombination, as well as the development of the working models for these processes, has been derived from extensive work in model organisms, such as yeast and fruit flies, and mammalian systems by studying the repair of induced double strand breaks or repair following exposure to genotoxic agents in vitro. We therefore set out to expand this in vitro work to ask whether DNA-damaging agents with varying modes of action could induce somatic change in an in vivo mouse model of homologous recombination. We exposed pregnant dams to DNA-damaging agents, conferring a variety of lesions at a specific time in embryo development. To monitor homologous recombination frequency, we used the well-established retinal pigment epithelium pink-eyed unstable assay. Homologous recombination resulting in the deletion of a duplicated 70 kb fragment in the coding region of the Oca2 gene renders this gene functional and can be visualized as a pigmented eyespot in the retinal pigment epithelium. We observed an increased frequency of pigmented eyespots in resultant litters following exposure to cisplatin, methyl methanesulfonate, ethyl methanesulfonate, 3-aminobenzamide, bleomycin, and etoposide with a contrasting decrease in the frequency of detectable reversion events following camptothecin and hydroxyurea exposure. The somatic genomic rearrangements that result from such a wide variety of differently acting damaging agents implies long-term potential effects from even short-term in utero exposures. PMID:24029142

  3. Isolation, expression and evolution of FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM homologs in Podostemaceae.

    PubMed

    Khanduri, Priyanka; Sharma, Roopam; Bhat, Vishnu; Tandon, Rajesh

    2016-03-01

    Podostemaceae is an interesting family of angiosperms with unusual development and morphology. Among these, double fertilization, a defining feature of angiosperms is invariably missing in the family. Consequently, embryo development in the seeds takes place without endosperm. In recent years, the role of polycomb genes has garnered much interest because of their crucial role in seed development. Some of these genes have been reported from many unrelated species, underlining their high conservation. Thus, it becomes exciting to know the role of these genes in podostemads, which are devoid of double fertilization and endosperm. Here, we report the isolation, characterization and expression patterns of homologs of Fertilization Independent Endosperm (FIE) in two species of Podostemaceae, Zeylanidium olivaceum and Polypleurum stylosum. FIE like homologs could be identified in Z. olivaceum (ZoFIE) and P. stylosum (PsFIE). The predicted amino acid sequence of FIE homologs showed similarity to other homologs, containing the conserved seven WD40 repeats. Expression studies revealed that ZoFIE and PsFIE transcripts were present in the vegetative tissue (thallus in Podostemaceae) and the seedlings, similar to the model plants. However, the ZoFIE and PsFIE expression disappeared in the flowering stages. This unique pattern of expression suggests that in the absence of double fertilization and endosperm the expression of FIS complex genes perhaps is obliterated in Podostemaceae. PMID:26649869

  4. Induction of homologous recombination following in utero exposure to DNA-damaging agents.

    PubMed

    Karia, Bijal; Martinez, Jo Ann; Bishop, Alexander J R

    2013-11-01

    Much of our understanding of homologous recombination, as well as the development of the working models for these processes, has been derived from extensive work in model organisms, such as yeast and fruit flies, and mammalian systems by studying the repair of induced double strand breaks or repair following exposure to genotoxic agents in vitro. We therefore set out to expand this in vitro work to ask whether DNA-damaging agents with varying modes of action could induce somatic change in an in vivo mouse model of homologous recombination. We exposed pregnant dams to DNA-damaging agents, conferring a variety of lesions at a specific time in embryo development. To monitor homologous recombination frequency, we used the well-established retinal pigment epithelium pink-eyed unstable assay. Homologous recombination resulting in the deletion of a duplicated 70 kb fragment in the coding region of the Oca2 gene renders this gene functional and can be visualized as a pigmented eyespot in the retinal pigment epithelium. We observed an increased frequency of pigmented eyespots in resultant litters following exposure to cisplatin, methyl methanesulfonate, ethyl methanesulfonate, 3-aminobenzamide, bleomycin, and etoposide with a contrasting decrease in the frequency of detectable reversion events following camptothecin and hydroxyurea exposure. The somatic genomic rearrangements that result from such a wide variety of differently acting damaging agents implies long-term potential effects from even short-term in utero exposures. PMID:24029142

  5. Comparative infectivity of homologous and heterologous nucleopolyhedroviruses against beet armyworm larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Homologous and heterologous nucleopolyhedroviruses (NPVs) were assayed to determine the most effective NPV against beet armyworm larvae, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)(SeMNPV). Included were three isolates from S. exigua, one isolate each from S. littoralis Boisduval, S. litura...

  6. Accumulation of RNA homologous to human papillomavirus type 16 open reading frames in genital precancers

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, C.P.; Nuovo, G.; Friedman, D.; Silverstein, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    The accumulation of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16)-specific RNAs in tissue sections from biopsies of patients with genital precancers was studied by in situ hybridization with single-stranded /sup 35/S-labeled RNA. These analyses revealed that the most abundant early-region RNAs were derived from the E4 and E5 open reading frames (ORFs). RNAs homologous to the E6/E7 ORFs were also detected, whereas RNAs homologous to the intervening E1 ORF were not. This suggest that the E4 and E5 mRNAs are derived by splicing to the upstream E6/E7 ORFs, consistent with studies of HPV-11 in condylomata. Abundant RNAs homologous to the 5' portion of L1 were also detected. These RNAs were localized to the apical strata of the epithelium. HPV-16 RNAs accumulated in discrete regions of these lesions, and when present were most abundant in the upper cell layers of the precancerous epithelium. RNAs homologous to early ORFs were also detected in some germinal cells within the basal layer of the epithelium.

  7. Dynamics of Homology Searching During Gene Conversion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Revealed by Donor Competition

    PubMed Central

    Coïc, Eric; Martin, Joshua; Ryu, Taehyun; Tay, Sue Yen; Kondev, Jané; Haber, James E.

    2011-01-01

    One of the least understood aspects of homologous recombination is the process by which the ends of a double-strand break (DSB) search the entire genome for homologous templates that can be used to repair the break. We took advantage of the natural competition between the alternative donors HML and HMR employed during HO endonuclease-induced switching of the budding yeast MAT locus. The strong mating-type-dependent bias in the choice of the donors is enforced by the recombination enhancer (RE), which lies 17 kb proximal to HML. We investigated factors that improve the use of the disfavored donor. We show that the normal heterochromatic state of the donors does not impair donor usage, as donor choice is not affected by removing this epigenetic silencing. In contrast, increasing the length of homology shared by the disfavored donor increases its use. This result shows that donor choice is not irrevocable and implies that there are several encounters between the DSB ends and even the favored donor before recombination is accomplished. The increase by adding more homology is not linear; these results can be explained by a thermodynamic model that determines the energy cost of using one donor over the other. An important inference from this analysis is that when HML is favored as the donor, RE causes a reduction in its effective genomic distance from MAT from 200 kb to ∼20 kb, which we hypothesize occurs after the DSB is created, by epigenetic chromatin modifications around MAT. PMID:21954161

  8. Homology and homoplasy of swimming behaviors and neural circuits in the Nudipleura (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia).

    PubMed

    Newcomb, James M; Sakurai, Akira; Lillvis, Joshua L; Gunaratne, Charuni A; Katz, Paul S

    2012-06-26

    How neural circuit evolution relates to behavioral evolution is not well understood. Here the relationship between neural circuits and behavior is explored with respect to the swimming behaviors of the Nudipleura (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Opithobranchia). Nudipleura is a diverse monophyletic clade of sea slugs among which only a small percentage of species can swim. Swimming falls into a limited number of categories, the most prevalent of which are rhythmic left-right body flexions (LR) and rhythmic dorsal-ventral body flexions (DV). The phylogenetic distribution of these behaviors suggests a high degree of homoplasy. The central pattern generator (CPG) underlying DV swimming has been well characterized in Tritonia diomedea and in Pleurobranchaea californica. The CPG for LR swimming has been elucidated in Melibe leonina and Dendronotus iris, which are more closely related. The CPGs for the categorically distinct DV and LR swimming behaviors consist of nonoverlapping sets of homologous identified neurons, whereas the categorically similar behaviors share some homologous identified neurons, although the exact composition of neurons and synapses in the neural circuits differ. The roles played by homologous identified neurons in categorically distinct behaviors differ. However, homologous identified neurons also play different roles even in the swim CPGs of the two LR swimming species. Individual neurons can be multifunctional within a species. Some of those functions are shared across species, whereas others are not. The pattern of use and reuse of homologous neurons in various forms of swimming and other behaviors further demonstrates that the composition of neural circuits influences the evolution of behaviors. PMID:22723353

  9. Homologs of vertebrate Opn3 potentially serve as a light sensor in nonphotoreceptive tissue.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Mitsumasa; Takada, Eiichiro; Nagata, Takashi; Tsukamoto, Hisao; Terakita, Akihisa

    2013-03-26

    Most opsins selectively bind 11-cis retinal as a chromophore to form a photosensitive pigment, which underlies various physiological functions, such as vision and circadian photoentrainment. Recently, opsin 3 (Opn3), originally called encephalopsin or panopsin, and its homologs were identified in various tissues including brain, eye, and liver in both vertebrates and invertebrates, including human. Because Opn3s are mainly expressed in tissues that are not considered to contain sufficient amounts of 11-cis retinal to form pigments, the photopigment formation ability of Opn3 has been of interest. Here, we report the successful expression of Opn3 homologs, pufferfish teleost multiple tissue opsin (PufTMT) and mosquito Opn3 (MosOpn3) and show that these proteins formed functional photopigments with 11-cis and 9-cis retinals. The PufTMT- and MosOpn3-based pigments have absorption maxima in the blue-to-green region and exhibit a bistable nature. These Opn3 homolog-based pigments activate Gi-type and Go-type G proteins light dependently, indicating that they potentially serve as light-sensitive Gi/Go-coupled receptors. We also demonstrated that mammalian cultured cells transfected with the MosOpn3 or PufTMT became light sensitive without the addition of 11-cis retinal and the photosensitivity retained after the continuous light exposure, showing a reusable pigment formation with retinal endogenously contained in culture medium. Interestingly, we found that the MosOpn3 also acts as a light sensor when constituted with 13-cis retinal, a ubiquitously present retinal isomer. Our findings suggest that homologs of vertebrate Opn3 might function as photoreceptors in various tissues; furthermore, these Opn3s, particularly the mosquito homolog, could provide a promising optogenetic tool for regulating cAMP-related G protein-coupled receptor signalings. PMID:23479626

  10. Characterization of homologous and heterologous adaptive immune responses in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Ivan; Gimeno, Mariona; Darwich, Laila; Navarro, Nuria; Kuzemtseva, Liudmila; López, Sergio; Galindo, Ivan; Segalés, Joaquim; Martín, Margarita; Pujols, Joan; Mateu, Enric

    2012-01-01

    The present study characterized the homologous and heterologous immune response in type-I porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection. Two experiments were conducted: in experiment 1, eight pigs were inoculated with PRRSV strain 3262 and 84 days post-inoculation (dpi) they were challenged with either strain 3262 or strain 3267 and followed for the next 14 days (98 dpi). In experiment 2, eight pigs were inoculated with strain 3267 and challenged at 84 dpi as above. Clinical course, viremia, humoral response (neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies, NA) and virus-specific IFN-γ responses (ELISPOT) were evaluated all throughout the study. Serum levels of IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and TGF-β were determined (ELISA) after the second challenge. In experiment 1 primo-inoculation with strain 3262 induced viremia of ≤ 28 days, low titres of homologous NA but strong IFN-γ responses. In contrast, strain 3267 induced longer viremias (up to 56 days), higher NA titres (≤ 6 log2) and lower IFN-γ responses. Inoculation with 3267 produced higher serum IL-8 levels. After the re-challenge at 84 dpi, pigs in experiment 1 developed mostly a one week viremia regardless of the strain used. In experiment 2, neither the homologous nor the heterologous challenge resulted in detectable viremia although PRRSV was present in tonsils of some animals. Homologous re-inoculation with 3267 produced elevated TGF-β levels in serum for 7-14 days but this did not occur with the heterologous re-inoculation. In conclusion, inoculation with different PRRSV strains result in different virological and immunological outcomes and in different degrees of homologous and heterologous protection. PMID:22515169

  11. Human DNA sequence homologous to the transforming gene (mos) of Moloney murine sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, R; Oskarsson, M; Vande Woude, G F

    1982-01-01

    We describe the molecular cloning of a 9-kilo-base-pair BamHI fragment from human placental DNA containing a sequence homologous to the transforming gene (v-mos) of Moloney murine sarcoma virus. The DNA sequence of the homologous region of human DNA (termed humos) was resolved and compared to that of the mouse cellular homolog of v-mos (termed mumos) [Van Beveren, C., van Straaten, F., Galleshaw, J.A. & Verma, I.M. (1981) Cell 27, 97-108]. The humos gene contained an open reading frame of 346 codons that was aligned with the equivalent mumos DNA sequence by the introduction of two gaps of 15 and 3 bases into the mumos DNA and a single gap of 9 bases into the humos DNA. The aligned coding sequences were 77% homologous and terminated at equivalent opal codons. The humos open reading frame initiated at an ATG found internally in the mumos coding sequence. The polypeptides predicted from the DNA sequence to be encoded by humos and mumos also were found to be extensively homologous, and 253 of 337 amino acids were shared between the two polypeptides. The first five NH2-terminal and last two COOH-terminal amino acids of the humos gene product were in common with those of mumos. In addition, near the middle of the polypeptide chains, four regions ranging from 19 to 26 consecutive amino acids were conserved. However, we have not been able to transform mouse cells with transfected humos DNA fragments or with hybrid DNA recombinants containing humos and retroviral long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences. Images PMID:6287464

  12. CjbHLH1 homologs regulate sanguinarine biosynthesis in Eschscholzia californica cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Motomura, Yukiya; Sato, Fumihiko

    2015-05-01

    Isoquinoline alkaloids (IQAs), terpenoid indole alkaloid and nicotine are some of the most studied alkaloids. Recently, several groups have reported that the biosynthesis of these alkaloids is regulated by basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors. Whereas the biosyntheses of nicotine and terpenoid indole alkaloid in Nicotiana plants and Catharanthus roseus are directly or indirectly regulated by Arabidopsis thaliana MYC2 homologs, a non-MYC2-type bHLH transcription factor, CjbHLH1, comprehensively regulates berberine biosynthesis in Coptis japonica. Interestingly, CjbHLH1 homologous genes were found in many IQA-producing plant species, which suggests that non-MYC2-type CjbHLH homologs are specifically associated with IQA biosynthesis. To test whether CjbHLH1 homologs are involved in the biosynthesis of IQA in a plant other than C. japonica, we isolated two genes homologous to CjbHLH1, i.e. EcbHLH1-1 and EcbHLH1-2, from Eschscholzia californica (California poppy). Stable transformants in which the expression levels of EcbHLH1 genes were constitutively suppressed by RNA interference (RNAi) showed a reduced expression of some IQA biosynthetic enzyme genes. A metabolite analysis confirmed that the suppression of EcbHLH1, particularly EcbHLH1-2, caused a decrease in sanguinarine accumulation in transgenic cultured cells. These results indicate that non-MYC2-type EcbHLH1s regulate IQA biosynthesis in California poppy like CjbHLH1 in C. japonica. PMID:25713177

  13. A family of cell-adhering peptides homologous to fibrinogen C-termini

    SciTech Connect

    Levy-Beladev, Liron; Levdansky, Lilia; Gaberman, Elena; Friedler, Assaf; Gorodetsky, Raphael

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Cell-adhesive sequences homologous to fibrinogen C-termini exist in other proteins. {yields} The extended homologous cell-adhesive C-termini peptides family is termed Haptides. {yields} In membrane-like environment random coiled Haptides adopt a helical conformation. {yields} Replacing positively charged residues with alanine reduces Haptides activity. -- Abstract: A family of cell-adhesive peptides homologous to sequences on different chains of fibrinogen was investigated. These homologous peptides, termed Haptides, include the peptides C{beta}, preC{gamma}, and C{alpha}E, corresponding to sequences on the C-termini of fibrinogen chains {beta}, {gamma}, and {alpha}E, respectively. Haptides do not affect cell survival and rate of proliferation of the normal cell types tested. The use of new sensitive assays of cell adhesion clearly demonstrated the ability of Haptides, bound to inert matrices, to mediate attachment of different matrix-dependent cell types including normal fibroblasts, endothelial, and smooth muscle cells. Here we present new active Haptides bearing homologous sequences derived from the C-termini of other proteins, such as angiopoietin 1 and 2, tenascins C and X, and microfibril-associated glycoprotein-4. The cell adhesion properties of all the Haptides were found to be associated mainly with their 11 N-terminal residues. Mutated preC{gamma} peptides revealed that positively charged residues account for their attachment effect. These results suggest a mechanism of direct electrostatic interaction of Haptides with the cell membrane. The extended Haptides family may be applied in modulating adhesion of cells to scaffolds for tissue regeneration and for enhancement of nanoparticulate transfection into cells.

  14. A mechanism for the suppression of homologous recombination in G1 cells.

    PubMed

    Orthwein, Alexandre; Noordermeer, Sylvie M; Wilson, Marcus D; Landry, Sébastien; Enchev, Radoslav I; Sherker, Alana; Munro, Meagan; Pinder, Jordan; Salsman, Jayme; Dellaire, Graham; Xia, Bing; Peter, Matthias; Durocher, Daniel

    2015-12-17

    DNA repair by homologous recombination is highly suppressed in G1 cells to ensure that mitotic recombination occurs solely between sister chromatids. Although many homologous recombination factors are cell-cycle regulated, the identity of the events that are both necessary and sufficient to suppress recombination in G1 cells is unknown. Here we report that the cell cycle controls the interaction of BRCA1 with PALB2-BRCA2 to constrain BRCA2 function to the S/G2 phases in human cells. We found that the BRCA1-interaction site on PALB2 is targeted by an E3 ubiquitin ligase composed of KEAP1, a PALB2-interacting protein, in complex with cullin-3 (CUL3)-RBX1 (ref. 6). PALB2 ubiquitylation suppresses its interaction with BRCA1 and is counteracted by the deubiquitylase USP11, which is itself under cell cycle control. Restoration of the BRCA1-PALB2 interaction combined with the activation of DNA-end resection is sufficient to induce homologous recombination in G1, as measured by RAD51 recruitment, unscheduled DNA synthesis and a CRISPR-Cas9-based gene-targeting assay. We conclude that the mechanism prohibiting homologous recombination in G1 minimally consists of the suppression of DNA-end resection coupled with a multi-step block of the recruitment of BRCA2 to DNA damage sites that involves the inhibition of BRCA1-PALB2-BRCA2 complex assembly. We speculate that the ability to induce homologous recombination in G1 cells with defined factors could spur the development of gene-targeting applications in non-dividing cells. PMID:26649820

  15. Sequence divergence and chromosomal rearrangements during the evolution of human pseudoautosomal genes and their mouse homologs

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, J.; Li, X.; Francke, U.

    1994-09-01

    The pseudoautosomal region (PAR) is an area of sequence identity between the X and Y chromosomes and is important for mediating X-Y pairing during male meiosis. Of the seven genes assigned to the human PAR, none of the mouse homologs have been isolated by a cross-hybridization strategy. Two of these homologs, Csfgmra and II3ra, have been isolated using a functional assay for the gene products. These genes are quite different in sequence from their human homologs, showing only 60-70% sequence similarity. The Csfgmra gene has been found to further differ from its human homolog in being isolated not on the sex chromosomes, but on a mouse autosome (chromosome 19). Using a mouse-hamster somatic cell hybrid mapping panel, we have mapped the II3ra gene to yet another mouse autosome, chromosome 14. Attempts to clone the mouse homolog of the ANT3 locus resulted in the isolation of two related genes, Ant1 and Ant2, but failed to yield the Ant3 gene. Southern blot analysis of the ANT/Ant genes showed the Ant1 and Ant2 sequences to be well-conserved among all of a dozen mammals tested. In contrast, the ANT3 gene only showed hybridization to non-rodent mammals, suggesting it is either greatly divergent or has been deleted in the rodent lineage. Similar experiments with other human pseudoautosomal probes likewise showed a lack of hybridization to rodent sequences. The results show a definite trend of extensive divergence of pseudoautosomal sequences in addition to chromosomal rearrangements involving X;autosome translocations and perhaps gene deletions. Such observations have interesting implications regarding the evolution of this important region of the sex chromosomes.

  16. Differential Expression of Ecdysone Receptor Leads to Variation in Phenotypic Plasticity across Serial Homologs

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xiaoling; Bear, Ashley; Liew, Seng Fatt; Bhardwaj, Shivam; Wasik, Bethany R.; Dinwiddie, April; Bastianelli, Carole; Cheong, Wei Fun; Wenk, Markus R.; Cao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Bodies are often made of repeated units, or serial homologs, that develop using the same core gene regulatory network. Local inputs and modifications to this network allow serial homologs to evolve different morphologies, but currently we do not understand which modifications allow these repeated traits to evolve different levels of phenotypic plasticity. Here we describe variation in phenotypic plasticity across serial homologous eyespots of the butterfly Bicyclus anynana, hypothesized to be under selection for similar or different functions in the wet and dry seasonal forms. Specifically, we document the presence of eyespot size and scale brightness plasticity in hindwing eyespots hypothesized to vary in function across seasons, and reduced size plasticity and absence of brightness plasticity in forewing eyespots hypothesized to have the same function across seasons. By exploring the molecular and physiological causes of this variation in plasticity across fore and hindwing serial homologs we discover that: 1) temperature experienced during the wandering stages of larval development alters titers of an ecdysteroid hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), in the hemolymph of wet and dry seasonal forms at that stage; 2) the 20E receptor (EcR) is differentially expressed in the forewing and hindwing eyespot centers of both seasonal forms during this critical developmental stage; and 3) manipulations of EcR signaling disproportionately affected hindwing eyespots relative to forewing eyespots. We propose that differential EcR expression across forewing and hindwing eyespots at a critical stage of development explains the variation in levels of phenotypic plasticity across these serial homologues. This finding provides a novel signaling pathway, 20E, and a novel molecular candidate, EcR, for the regulation of levels of phenotypic plasticity across body parts or serial homologs. PMID:26405828

  17. Alternatively Spliced Homologous Exons Have Ancient Origins and Are Highly Expressed at the Protein Level.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Federico; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Rodriguez-Rivas, Juan; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; del Pozo, Angela; Vázquez, Jesús; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L

    2015-06-01

    Alternative splicing of messenger RNA can generate a wide variety of mature RNA transcripts, and these transcripts may produce protein isoforms with diverse cellular functions. While there is much supporting evidence for the expression of alternative transcripts, the same is not true for the alternatively spliced protein products. Large-scale mass spectroscopy experiments have identified evidence of alternative splicing at the protein level, but with conflicting results. Here we carried out a rigorous analysis of the peptide evidence from eight large-scale proteomics experiments to assess the scale of alternative splicing that is detectable by high-resolution mass spectroscopy. We find fewer splice events than would be expected: we identified peptides for almost 64% of human protein coding genes, but detected just 282 splice events. This data suggests that most genes have a single dominant isoform at the protein level. Many of the alternative isoforms that we could identify were only subtly different from the main splice isoform. Very few of the splice events identified at the protein level disrupted functional domains, in stark contrast to the two thirds of splice events annotated in the human genome that would lead to the loss or damage of functional domains. The most striking result was that more than 20% of the splice isoforms we identified were generated by substituting one homologous exon for another. This is significantly more than would be expected from the frequency of these events in the genome. These homologous exon substitution events were remarkably conserved--all the homologous exons we identified evolved over 460 million years ago--and eight of the fourteen tissue-specific splice isoforms we identified were generated from homologous exons. The combination of proteomics evidence, ancient origin and tissue-specific splicing indicates that isoforms generated from homologous exons may have important cellular roles. PMID:26061177

  18. The apparatus composition and architecture of Cordylodus pander - Concepts of homology in primitive conodonts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, M.P.; Donoghue, P.C.J.; Repetski, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    A clear distinction may be drawn between the perpendicular architecture of the feeding apparatus of ozarkodinid, prioniodontid and prioniodinid conodonts, in which the P elements are situated at a high angle to the M and S elements, and the parallel architecture of panderodontid and other coniform apparatuses, where two suites of coniform elements lie parallel to each other and oppose across the midline. The quest for homologies between the two architectures has been fraught with difficulty, at least in part because of the paucity of natural assemblages of coniform taxa. A diagenetically fused apparatus of Cordylodns lindstroini elements is here described which is made up of one rounded and two compressed element morphotypes. One of the compressed elements is bowed and asymmetrical and the other is unbowed and more symmetrical. These compressed elements are considered to be homologous with those of panderodontid apparatuses and would have lain at the caudal end of the parallel arrays, with the more symmetrical morphotypes located rostrally to the asymmetrical ones. The bowed and unbowed compressed elements of Cordylodns thus correspond, respectively, to the pt and pf positions of panderodontid apparatuses. In addition, the presence of symmetry transition within the rounded elements of Cordylodns, but not the compressed morphotypes, enables correlation of these with the S and M element locations of ozarkodinid apparatuses. By extension, the compressed elements must be homologues of the P elements. Specifically, the asymmetrical pt morphotype is homologous with the P1 of ozarkodinids and the more symmetrical and rostral pf morphotype is homologous with the P2 position. However, because of uncertainties over the nature of topological transformation of the rostral element array (the "rounded" or "costate" suites), it is not possible to recognize specific homologies between these elements and the M and S elements of ozarkodinids. Morphologic differentiation of P from M

  19. Characterization of homologous and heterologous adaptive immune responses in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The present study characterized the homologous and heterologous immune response in type-I porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection. Two experiments were conducted: in experiment 1, eight pigs were inoculated with PRRSV strain 3262 and 84 days post-inoculation (dpi) they were challenged with either strain 3262 or strain 3267 and followed for the next 14 days (98 dpi). In experiment 2, eight pigs were inoculated with strain 3267 and challenged at 84 dpi as above. Clinical course, viremia, humoral response (neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies, NA) and virus-specific IFN-γ responses (ELISPOT) were evaluated all throughout the study. Serum levels of IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and TGF-β were determined (ELISA) after the second challenge. In experiment 1 primo-inoculation with strain 3262 induced viremia of ≤ 28 days, low titres of homologous NA but strong IFN-γ responses. In contrast, strain 3267 induced longer viremias (up to 56 days), higher NA titres (≤ 6 log2) and lower IFN-γ responses. Inoculation with 3267 produced higher serum IL-8 levels. After the re-challenge at 84 dpi, pigs in experiment 1 developed mostly a one week viremia regardless of the strain used. In experiment 2, neither the homologous nor the heterologous challenge resulted in detectable viremia although PRRSV was present in tonsils of some animals. Homologous re-inoculation with 3267 produced elevated TGF-β levels in serum for 7–14 days but this did not occur with the heterologous re-inoculation. In conclusion, inoculation with different PRRSV strains result in different virological and immunological outcomes and in different degrees of homologous and heterologous protection. PMID:22515169

  20. Identification of local conformational similarity in structurally variable regions of homologous proteins using protein blocks.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Garima; Mahajan, Swapnil; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; de Brevern, Alexandre G

    2011-01-01

    Structure comparison tools can be used to align related protein structures to identify structurally conserved and variable regions and to infer functional and evolutionary relationships. While the conserved regions often superimpose well, the variable regions appear non superimposable. Differences in homologous protein structures are thought to be due to evolutionary plasticity to accommodate diverged sequences during evolution. One of the kinds of differences between 3-D structures of homologous proteins is rigid body displacement. A glaring example is not well superimposed equivalent regions of homologous proteins corresponding to α-helical conformation with different spatial orientations. In a rigid body superimposition, these regions would appear variable although they may contain local similarity. Also, due to high spatial deviation in the variable region, one-to-one correspondence at the residue level cannot be determined accurately. Another kind of difference is conformational variability and the most common example is topologically equivalent loops of two homologues but with different conformations. In the current study, we present a refined view of the "structurally variable" regions which may contain local similarity obscured in global alignment of homologous protein structures. As structural alphabet is able to describe local structures of proteins precisely through Protein Blocks approach, conformational similarity has been identified in a substantial number of 'variable' regions in a large data set of protein structural alignments; optimal residue-residue equivalences could be achieved on the basis of Protein Blocks which led to improved local alignments. Also, through an example, we have demonstrated how the additional information on local backbone structures through protein blocks can aid in comparative modeling of a loop region. In addition, understanding on sequence-structure relationships can be enhanced through our approach. This has been

  1. Integrating Subcellular Location for Improving Machine Learning Models of Remote Homology Detection in Eukaryotic Organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Anuj R.; Oehmen, Chris S.; Harper, Jill K.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.

    2007-02-23

    Motivation: At the center of bioinformatics, genomics, and pro-teomics is the need for highly accurate genome annotations. Producing high-quality reliable annotations depends on identifying sequences which are related evolutionarily (homologs) on which to infer function. Homology detection is one of the oldest tasks in bioinformatics, however most approaches still fail when presented with sequences that have low residue similarity despite a distant evolutionary relationship (remote homology). Recently, discriminative approaches, such as support vector machines (SVMs) have demonstrated a vast improvement in sensitivity for remote homology detection. These methods however have only focused on one aspect of the sequence at a time, e.g., sequence similarity or motif based scores. However, supplementary information, such as the sub-cellular location of a protein within the cell would give further clues as to possible homologous pairs, additionally eliminating false relationships due to simple functional roles that cannot exist due to location. We have developed a method, SVM-SimLoc that integrates sub-cellular location with sequence similarity information into a pro-tein family classifier and compared it to one of the most accurate sequence based SVM approaches, SVM-Pairwise. Results: The SCOP 1.53 benchmark data set was utilized to assess the performance of SVM-SimLoc. As cellular location prediction is dependent upon the type of sequence, eukaryotic or prokaryotic, the analysis is restricted to the 2630 eukaryotic sequences in the benchmark dataset, evaluating a total of 27 protein families. We demonstrate that the integration of sequence similarity and sub-cellular location yields notably more accurate results than using sequence similarity independently at a significance level of 0.006.

  2. Alternatively Spliced Homologous Exons Have Ancient Origins and Are Highly Expressed at the Protein Level

    PubMed Central

    Abascal, Federico; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Rodriguez-Rivas, Juan; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; del Pozo, Angela; Vázquez, Jesús; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of messenger RNA can generate a wide variety of mature RNA transcripts, and these transcripts may produce protein isoforms with diverse cellular functions. While there is much supporting evidence for the expression of alternative transcripts, the same is not true for the alternatively spliced protein products. Large-scale mass spectroscopy experiments have identified evidence of alternative splicing at the protein level, but with conflicting results. Here we carried out a rigorous analysis of the peptide evidence from eight large-scale proteomics experiments to assess the scale of alternative splicing that is detectable by high-resolution mass spectroscopy. We find fewer splice events than would be expected: we identified peptides for almost 64% of human protein coding genes, but detected just 282 splice events. This data suggests that most genes have a single dominant isoform at the protein level. Many of the alternative isoforms that we could identify were only subtly different from the main splice isoform. Very few of the splice events identified at the protein level disrupted functional domains, in stark contrast to the two thirds of splice events annotated in the human genome that would lead to the loss or damage of functional domains. The most striking result was that more than 20% of the splice isoforms we identified were generated by substituting one homologous exon for another. This is significantly more than would be expected from the frequency of these events in the genome. These homologous exon substitution events were remarkably conserved—all the homologous exons we identified evolved over 460 million years ago—and eight of the fourteen tissue-specific splice isoforms we identified were generated from homologous exons. The combination of proteomics evidence, ancient origin and tissue-specific splicing indicates that isoforms generated from homologous exons may have important cellular roles. PMID:26061177

  3. Modeling Human Serum Albumin Tertiary Structure to Teach Upper-Division Chemistry Students Bioinformatics and Homology Modeling Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrovic, Dus?an; Zlatovic´, Mario

    2015-01-01

    A homology modeling laboratory experiment has been developed for an introductory molecular modeling course for upper-division undergraduate chemistry students. With this experiment, students gain practical experience in homology model preparation and assessment as well as in protein visualization using the educational version of PyMOL…

  4. Hypoxia and Extracellular Matrix Proteins Influence Angiogenesis and Lymphangiogenesis in Mouse Embryoid Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Foskett, Andrea M.; Ezekiel, Uthayashanker R.; Trzeciakowski, Jerome P.; Zawieja, David C.; Muthuchamy, Mariappan

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory mechanisms for angiogenesis are relatively well established compared to lymphangiogenesis. Few studies have shown that a combination of vascular endothelial growth factor VEGF-A/C with hypoxia or collagen matrix promotes lymphatic structures along with blood vessel development in mouse embryoid bodies (EB). In this study we tested the hypothesis that while hypoxia combined with prolonged VEGF-A/C treatment would induce early lymphangiogenesis in addition to angiogenesis in mouse EBs, under similar conditions specific extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins would promote lymphatic vessel-like structures over angiogenesis. EBs were subjected to four conditions and were maintained under normoxia and hypoxia (21% and 2.6% O2, respectively) with or without VEGF-A/C. Microarray analyses of normoxic and hypoxic EBs, and immunofluorescence data showed very low expression of early lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) markers, lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 (LYVE1), and prospero-related homeobox 1 (Prox1) at early time points. Double immunofluorescence using MECA-32 and Prox1/LYVE1 demonstrated that combined hypoxia and VEGF-A/C treatment promoted formation of blood vessel-like structures, whereas only Prox1+/LYVE1+ LECs were detected in EBs at E22.5. Furthermore, EBs were grown on laminin or collagen-I coated plates and were subjected to the four treatments as described above. Results revealed that LECs in EBs at E36.5 attached better to collagen-I, resulting in an organized network of lymphatic vessel-like structures as compared to EBs grown on laminin. However, blood vessel-like structures were less favored under these same conditions. Collectively, our data demonstrate that hypoxia combined with growth factors promotes angiogenesis, whereas combination of these conditions with specific ECM proteins favors lymphangiogenesis processes in mouse EBs. PMID:22194726

  5. A thermodynamic analysis of the mechanism of formation of homologs of the cucurbit[ n]uril family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakovets, V. V.

    2007-10-01

    A mechanism of the formation of cyclic cavitand CB[ n] macromolecules based on the aggregation in solution of monomeric hydrate derivatives of glycoluril and formaldehyde was suggested. A quasi-chemical description of the formation of macrorings led us to conclude that the formation of the population of a definite CB[ n] homolog was controlled by the solution composition. For this reason, homologs were formed in closed systems sequentially, first higher and then lower homologs, and the stable CB[6] macroring formed at the last stage of the process. Nucleation theory was used to describe the sequential formation of homolog solid phases. The use of open systems allows stationary conditions to be created for the formation of individual homologs by maintaining a constant solution composition.

  6. Either Non-Homologous Ends Joining or Homologous Recombination Is Required to Repair Double-Strand Breaks in the Genome of Macrophage-Internalized Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Klink, Magdalena; Brzezinska, Marta; Sulowska, Zofia; Dziadek, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is constantly exposed to a multitude of hostile conditions and is confronted by a variety of potentially DNA-damaging assaults in vivo, primarily from host-generated antimicrobial toxic radicals. Exposure to reactive nitrogen species and/or reactive oxygen species causes different types of DNA damage, including oxidation, depurination, methylation and deamination, that can result in single- or double-strand breaks (DSBs). These breaks affect the integrity of the whole genome and, when left unrepaired, can lead to cell death. Here, we investigated the role of the DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous ends joining (NHEJ), in the survival of Mtb inside macrophages. To this end, we constructed Mtb strains defective for HR (ΔrecA), NHEJ [Δ(ku,ligD)], or both DSB repair systems [Δ(ku,ligD,recA)]. Experiments using these strains revealed that either HR or NHEJ is sufficient for the survival and propagation of tubercle bacilli inside macrophages. Inhibition of nitric oxide or superoxide anion production with L-NIL or apocynin, respectively, enabled the Δ(ku,ligD,recA) mutant strain lacking both systems to survive intracellularly. Complementation of the Δ(ku,ligD,recA) mutant with an intact recA or ku-ligD rescued the ability of Mtb to propagate inside macrophages. PMID:24658131

  7. The MEKRE93 (Methoprene tolerant-Krüppel homolog 1-E93) pathway in the regulation of insect metamorphosis, and the homology of the pupal stage.

    PubMed

    Belles, Xavier; Santos, Carolina G

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies on transcription factor E93 revealed that it triggers adult morphogenesis in Blattella germanica, Tribolium castaneum and Drosophila melanogaster. Moreover, we show here that Krüppel homolog 1 (Kr-h1), a transducer of the antimetamorphic action of juvenile hormone (JH), represses E93 expression. Kr-h1 is upstream of E93, and upstream of Kr-h1 is Methoprene-tolerant (Met), the latter being the JH receptor in hemimetabolan and holometabolan species. As such, the Met - Kr-h1 - E93 pathway (hereinafter named "MEKRE93 pathway") appears to be central to the status quo action of JH, which switch adult morphogenesis off and on in species ranging from cockroaches to flies. The decrease in Kr-h1 mRNA and the rise of E93 expression that triggers adult morphogenesis occur at the beginning of the last instar nymph or in the prepupae of hemimetabolan and holometabolan species, respectively. This suggests that the hemimetabolan last nymph (considering the entire stage, from the apolysis to the last instar until the next apolysis that gives rise to the adult) is ontogenetically homologous to the holometabolan pupa (also considered between two apolyses, thus comprising the prepupal stage). PMID:25008785

  8. Mutation of the BRCA1 SQ-cluster results in aberrant mitosis, reduced homologous recombination, and a compensatory increase in non-homologous end joining.

    PubMed

    Beckta, Jason M; Dever, Seth M; Gnawali, Nisha; Khalil, Ashraf; Sule, Amrita; Golding, Sarah E; Rosenberg, Elizabeth; Narayanan, Aarthi; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Xu, Bo; Povirk, Lawrence F; Valerie, Kristoffer

    2015-09-29

    Mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility 1 (BRCA1) gene are catalysts for breast and ovarian cancers. Most mutations are associated with the BRCA1 N- and C-terminal domains linked to DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. However, little is known about the role of the intervening serine-glutamine (SQ) - cluster in the DNA damage response beyond its importance in regulating cell cycle checkpoints. We show that serine-to-alanine alterations at critical residues within the SQ-cluster known to be phosphorylated by ATM and ATR result in reduced homologous recombination repair (HRR) and aberrant mitosis. While a S1387A BRCA1 mutant - previously shown to abrogate S-phase arrest in response to radiation - resulted in only a modest decrease in HRR, S1387A together with an additional alteration, S1423A (BRCA12P), reduced HRR to vector control levels and similar to a quadruple mutant also including S1457A and S1524A (BRCA14P). These effects appeared to be independent of PALB2. Furthermore, we found that BRCA14P promoted a prolonged and struggling HRR late in the cell cycle and shifted DSB repair from HRR to non-homologous end joining which, in the face of irreparable chromosomal damage, resulted in mitotic catastrophe. Altogether, SQ-cluster phosphorylation is critical for allowing adequate time for completing normal HRR prior to mitosis and preventing cells from entering G1 prematurely resulting in gross chromosomal aberrations. PMID:26320175

  9. Study of Quasi-Homologous Coronal Mass Ejections from Super Active Regions in Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Wang, Y.; Shen, C.; Liu, R.; Ye, P.; Wang, S.

    2014-12-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections are most severe eruptive phenomenon in the solar atmosphere and are believed as the major energy source of the Near-Earth Space Environment. The study of CMEs is very important for the Space Weather forecast. The active regions , especially super-active regions, containing lots of magnetic free energy, are considered as the most important source regions of CMEs. Knowing why and how may some active regions (ARs) frequently produce CMEs is one of the key questions to deepen our understanding of the mechanisms and processes of energy accumulation and sudden release in ARs as well as improving our capability of space weather prediction. Based on above, we have done two parts of work: the first one is selecting all 37 SARs in the entire 23 solar cycle, using data provided by SOHO/LASCO C2|EIT|MDI, manually determining 285 CMEs produced by those SARs; second, we use the term 'quasi-homologous'to refer to successive CMEs originating from the same ARs within a short interval, analyze the rules of quasi-homologous CMEs' generation. Finally, we got two conclusions. 1. The waiting times of quasi-homologous CMEs have a two-component distribution with a separation at about 18 hours. The first component is a Gaussian-like distribution with a peak at about 7 hours, which indicates a tight physical connection between these quasi-homologous CMEs. The likelihood of occurrences of two or more CMEs faster than 1200 km /s from the same AR within 18 hours is about 20%. 2. The correlation analysis among CME waiting times, CME speeds and CME occurrence rates reveals that these quantities are independent to each other, suggesting that the perturbation by preceding CMEs rather than free energy input be the direct cause of quasi-homologous CMEs. The peak waiting time of 7 hours probably characterize the time scale of the growth of instabilities triggered by preceding CMEs. This study uncovers more clues from a statistical perspective for us to understand quasi-homologous

  10. Sequence analysis and characterization of a 40-kilodalton Borrelia hermsii glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase homolog.

    PubMed Central

    Shang, E S; Skare, J T; Erdjument-Bromage, H; Blanco, D R; Tempst, P; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1997-01-01

    We report the purification, molecular cloning, and characterization of a 40-kDa glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase homolog from Borrelia hermsii. The 40-kDa protein was solubilized from whole organisms with 0.1% Triton X-100, phase partitioned into the Triton X-114 detergent phase, and purified by fast-performance liquid chromatography (FPLC). The gene encoding the 40-kDa protein was cloned from a B. hermsii chromosomal DNA lambda EXlox expression library and identified by using affinity antibodies generated against the purified native protein. The deduced amino acid sequence included a 20-amino-acid signal peptide encoding a putative leader peptidase II cleavage site, indicating that the 40-kDa protein was a lipoprotein. Based on significant homology (31 to 52% identity) of the 40-kDa protein to glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterases of Escherichia coli (GlpQ), Bacillus subtilis (GlpQ), and Haemophilus influenzae (Hpd; protein D), we have designated this B. hermsii 40-kDa lipoprotein a glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase (Gpd) homolog, the first B. hermsii lipoprotein to have a putative functional assignment. A nonlipidated form of the Gpd homolog was overproduced as a fusion protein in E. coli BL21(DE3)(pLysE) and was used to immunize rabbits to generate specific antiserum. Immunoblot analysis with anti-Gpd serum recognized recombinant H. influenzae protein D, and conversely, antiserum to H. influenzae protein D recognized recombinant B. hermsii Gpd (rGpd), indicating antigenic conservation between these proteins. Antiserum to rGpd also identified native Gpd as a constituent of purified outer membrane vesicles prepared from B. hermsii. Screening of other pathogenic spirochetes with anti-rGpd serum revealed the presence of antigenically related proteins in Borrelia burgdorferi, Treponema pallidum, and Leptospira kirschneri. Further sequence analysis both upstream and downstream of the Gpd homolog showed additional homologs of glycerol metabolism

  11. Lymphatic endothelial differentiation in pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis cells.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jennifer M; Hyjek, Elizabeth; Husain, Aliya N; Shen, Le; Jones, Jennifer; Schuger, Lucia A

    2013-08-01

    Pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare, low-grade neoplasm affecting almost exclusively women of childbearing age. LAM belongs to the family of perivascular epithelioid cell tumors, characterized by spindle and epithelioid cells with smooth muscle and melanocytic differentiation. LAM cells infiltrate the lungs, producing multiple, bilateral lesions rich in lymphatic channels and forming cysts, leading to respiratory insufficiency. Here we used antibodies against four lymphatic endothelial markers-podoplanin (detected by D2-40), prospero homeobox 1 (PROX1), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 (VEGFR-3), and lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 (LYVE1)-to determine whether LAM cells show lymphatic differentiation. Twelve of 12 diagnostic biopsy specimens (early-stage LAM) and 19 of 19 explants (late-stage LAM) showed immunopositivity for D2-40 in most neoplastic cells. PROX1, VEGFR-3, and LYVE1 immunoreactivity varied from scarce in the early stage to abundant in the late stage. Lymphatic endothelial, smooth muscle, and melanocytic markers were partially co-localized. These findings indicate that lymphatic endothelial differentiation is a feature of LAM and provide evidence of a previously unidentified third lineage of differentiation in this neoplasm. This study has implications for the histological diagnosis of LAM, the origin of the neoplastic cells, and potential future treatment with drugs targeting lymphangiogenesis. PMID:23609227

  12. The use of novel lymphatic endothelial cell-specific immunohistochemical markers to differentiate cutaneous angiosarcomas in dogs.

    PubMed

    Halsey, C H C; Worley, D R; Curran, K; Charles, J B; Ehrhart, E J

    2016-09-01

    Lymphangiosarcomas are uncommon vascular neoplasms that arise from lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). They efface and replace normal subcutaneous tissue and are characterised by arborising, vascular channels lined by a single layer of pleomorphic endothelial cells and a paucity of erythrocytes. Lymphangiosarcomas are architecturally similar to hemangiosarcomas, a common malignancy of vascular origin arising from blood vascular endothelial cells. Common immunohistochemical markers for vascular endothelium, such as Factor VIII-related antigen (F8RA) and CD31, have traditionally been used to confirm the diagnosis of tumours of vascular origin. However, these markers fail to differentiate between lymphangiosarcoma and hemangiosarcoma, which often show overlapping morphologic features, disparate clinical behaviour and require different treatment modalities. Here we describe the use of two novel LEC-specific markers, lymphatic vessel endothelial receptor-1 (LYVE-1) and prospero-related homeobox gene-1 (PROX-1), to further differentiate between vascular tumours of lymphatic (lymphangiosarcoma) and blood (hemangiosarcoma) endothelial cell origin in the dog. PMID:24593773

  13. Accumulation of plastic strain in Zircaloy-4 at low homologous temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Tetsuya; Satoh, Yuhki; Abe, Hiroaki

    2015-10-01

    Time-dependent strain accumulation in Zircaloy-4 was evaluated at 294 K, i.e., homologous temperature (T/Tm, where Tm is the melting temperature) of 0.14, to ascertain the mechanical response in fuel cladding material, even at the time of storage. Although diffusion processes are suppressed, considerable strain accumulation was observed at less than 0.2% offset stress. Transmission electron microscopy and electron backscattered diffraction analyses were used to investigate the dominant microstructural mechanism. Results showed that the heterogeneous dislocation structure generated strain accumulation, where straightly aligned dislocation arrays on the prismatic plane move freely and few deformation twins were formed in the grain interior. Furthermore, few dislocation tangles were observed because the slip systems were limited to one. Therefore, Zircaloy-4 shows weak work-hardening at the low homologous temperature because of the fewer interactions among dislocations, leading to unexpected strain accumulation under constant load conditions.

  14. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a cloned DNA fragment from human cells reveals homology to retrotransposons.

    PubMed Central

    Flügel, R M; Maurer, B; Bannert, H; Rethwilm, A; Schnitzler, P; Darai, G

    1987-01-01

    During molecular cloning of proviral DNA of human spumaretrovirus, various recombinant clones were established and analyzed. Blot hybridization revealed that one of the recombinant plasmids had the characteristic features of a member of the long interspersed repetitive sequences family. The DNA element was analyzed by restriction mapping and nucleotide sequencing. It showed a high degree of amino acid sequence homology of 54.3% when compared with the 5'-terminal part of the pol gene product of the murine retrotransposon LIMd. The 3' region of the cloned DNA element encodes proteins with an even higher degree of homology of 67.4% in comparison to the corresponding parts of a member of the primate KpnI sequence family. Images PMID:3031462

  15. Complex in vivo Ligation Using Homologous Recombination and High-efficiency Plasmid Rescue from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Finnigan, Gregory C.; Thorner, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    The protocols presented here allow for the facile generation of a wide variety of complex multipart DNA constructs (tagged gene products, gene fusions, chimeric proteins, and other variants) using homologous recombination and in vivo ligation in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). This method is straightforward, efficient and cost-effective, and can be used both for vector creation and for subsequent one-step, high frequency integration into a chromosomal locus in yeast. The procedure utilizes PCR with extended oligonucleotide “tails” of homology between multiple fragments to allow for reassembly in yeast in a single transformation followed by a method for highly efficient plasmid extraction from yeast (for transformation into bacteria). The latter is an improvement on existing methods of yeast plasmid extraction, which, historically, has been a limiting step in recovery of desired constructs. We describe the utility and convenience of our techniques, and provide several examples. PMID:26523287

  16. The σ enigma: bacterial σ factors, archaeal TFB and eukaryotic TFIIB are homologs.

    PubMed

    Burton, Samuel P; Burton, Zachary F

    2014-01-01

    Structural comparisons of initiating RNA polymerase complexes and structure-based amino acid sequence alignments of general transcription initiation factors (eukaryotic TFIIB, archaeal TFB and bacterial σ factors) show that these proteins are homologs. TFIIB and TFB each have two-five-helix cyclin-like repeats (CLRs) that include a C-terminal helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif (CLR/HTH domains). Four homologous HTH motifs are present in bacterial σ factors that are relics of CLR/HTH domains. Sequence similarities clarify models for σ factor and TFB/TFIIB evolution and function and suggest models for promoter evolution. Commitment to alternate modes for transcription initiation appears to be a major driver of the divergence of bacteria and archaea. PMID:25483602

  17. Facilitation of Endosomal Recycling by an IRG Protein Homolog Maintains Apical Tubule Structure in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Grussendorf, Kelly A; Trezza, Christopher J; Salem, Alexander T; Al-Hashimi, Hikmat; Mattingly, Brendan C; Kampmeyer, Drew E; Khan, Liakot A; Hall, David H; Göbel, Verena; Ackley, Brian D; Buechner, Matthew

    2016-08-01

    Determination of luminal diameter is critical to the function of small single-celled tubes. A series of EXC proteins, including EXC-1, prevent swelling of the tubular excretory canals in Caenorhabditis elegans In this study, cloning of exc-1 reveals it to encode a homolog of mammalian IRG proteins, which play roles in immune response and autophagy and are associated with Crohn's disease. Mutants in exc-1 accumulate early endosomes, lack recycling endosomes, and exhibit abnormal apical cytoskeletal structure in regions of enlarged tubules. EXC-1 interacts genetically with two other EXC proteins that also affect endosomal trafficking. In yeast two-hybrid assays, wild-type and putative constitutively active EXC-1 binds to the LIM-domain protein EXC-9, whose homolog, cysteine-rich intestinal protein, is enriched in mammalian intestine. These results suggest a model for IRG function in forming and maintaining apical tubule structure via regulation of endosomal recycling. PMID:27334269

  18. Pleckstrin homology-like domain, family A, member 1 (PHLDA1) and cancer

    PubMed Central

    NAGAI, MARIA APARECIDA

    2016-01-01

    Pleckstrin homology-like domain, family A, member 1 (PHLDA1) encodes a member of an evolutionarily conserved pleckstrin homology-related domain protein family. It was first identified as a potential transcription factor required for Fas expression and activation-induced apoptosis in mouse T cell hybridomas. The exact molecular and biological functions of PHLDA1 remain to be elucidated. However, its expression is induced by a variety of external stimuli and there is evidence that it may function as a transcriptional activator that acts as a mediator of apoptosis, proliferation, differentiation and cell migration dependent on the cellular type and context. Recently, PHLDA1 has received attention due to its association with cancer. In the present review, the current knowledge of PHLDA1 protein structure, expression regulation and function is summarized. In addition, the current data in the literature is reviewed with regards to the role of PHLDA1 in cancer pathogenesis. PMID:26998263

  19. The σ enigma: Bacterial σ factors, archaeal TFB and eukaryotic TFIIB are homologs

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Samuel P; Burton, Zachary F

    2014-01-01

    Structural comparisons of initiating RNA polymerase complexes and structure-based amino acid sequence alignments of general transcription initiation factors (eukaryotic TFIIB, archaeal TFB and bacterial σ factors) show that these proteins are homologs. TFIIB and TFB each have two-five-helix cyclin-like repeats (CLRs) that include a C-terminal helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif (CLR/HTH domains). Four homologous HTH motifs are present in bacterial σ factors that are relics of CLR/HTH domains. Sequence similarities clarify models for σ factor and TFB/TFIIB evolution and function and suggest models for promoter evolution. Commitment to alternate modes for transcription initiation appears to be a major driver of the divergence of bacteria and archaea. PMID:25483602

  20. Evolution and functions of Oct4 homologs in non-mammalian vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Onichtchouk, Daria

    2016-06-01

    PouV class transcription factor Oct4/Pou5f1 is a central regulator of indefinite pluripotency in mammalian embryonic stem cells (ESCs) but also participates in cell lineage specification in mouse embryos and in differentiating cell cultures. The molecular basis for this versatility, which is shared between Oct4 and its non-mammalian homologs Pou5f1 and Pou5f3, is not yet completely understood. Here, I review the current understanding of the evolution of PouV class transcription factors and discuss equivalent and diverse roles of Oct4 homologs in pluripotency, differentiation, and cell behavior in different vertebrate embryos. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Oct Transcription Factor Family, edited by Dr. Dean Tantin. PMID:27058398

  1. Thermodynamic Properties of Selected Homologous Series of Ionic Liquids Calculated Using Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Červinka, Ctirad; Pádua, Agilio A H; Fulem, Michal

    2016-03-10

    This work presents a molecular dynamics simulation study concerning the thermodynamic data of ionic liquids (ILs) including phase change enthalpies, liquid phase densities, radial and spatial distribution functions, and diffusive properties. Three homologous series of ILs were selected for this study, namely, 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborates, hexafluorophosphates, and 1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethanesulfonates, so that properties of 36 ILs are calculated in total. The trends of calculated properties are compared to available experimental data and thoroughly discussed in context of the homologous series. The calculated trends of the vaporization enthalpies within the series are supported by analyzing the structural properties of the ILs. An excellent agreement of calculated structural properties (liquid phase density) with the experimental counterparts is reached. The calculated enthalpic properties are overestimated considerably; thus, further development of the force fields for ILs is required. PMID:26848831

  2. Partial amino acid sequence of human factor D:homology with serine proteases.

    PubMed Central

    Volanakis, J E; Bhown, A; Bennett, J C; Mole, J E

    1980-01-01

    Human factor D purified to homogeneity by a modified procedure was subjected to NH2-terminal amino acid sequence analysis by using a modified automated Beckman sequencer. We identified 48 of the first 57 NH2-terminal amino acids in a single sequencer run, using microgram quantities of factor D. The deduced amino acid sequence represents approximately 25% of the primary structure of factor D. This extended NH2-terminal amino acid sequence of factor D was compared to that of other trypsin-related serine proteases. By visual inspection, strong homologies (33--50% identity) were observed with all the serine proteases included in the comparison. Interestingly, factor D showed a higher degree of homology to serine proteases of pancreatic origin than to those of serum origin. Images PMID:6987665

  3. Fray, a Drosophila serine/threonine kinase homologous to mammalian PASK, is required for axonal ensheathment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiserson, W. M.; Harkins, E. W.; Keshishian, H.

    2000-01-01

    Fray is a serine/threonine kinase expressed by the peripheral glia of Drosophila, whose function is required for normal axonal ensheathment. Null fray mutants die early in larval development and have nerves with severe swelling and axonal defasciculation. The phenotype is associated with a failure of the ensheathing glia to correctly wrap peripheral axons. When the fray cDNA is expressed in the ensheathing glia of fray mutants, normal nerve morphology is restored. Fray belongs to a novel family of Ser/Thr kinases, the PF kinases, whose closest relatives are the PAK kinases. Rescue of the Drosophila mutant phenotype with PASK, the rat homolog of Fray, demonstrates a functional homology among these proteins and suggests that the Fray signaling pathway is widely conserved.

  4. A new model for 20-hydroxyecdysone and dibenzoylhydrazine binding: a homology modeling and docking approach.

    PubMed Central

    Wurtz, J. M.; Guillot, B.; Fagart, J.; Moras, D.; Tietjen, K.; Schindler, M.

    2000-01-01

    The ecdysone receptor (ECR), a nuclear transcription factor controlling insect development, is a novel target for insecticides such as dibenzoylhydrazines with low environmental and toxicological impacts. To understand the high selectivity of such synthetic molecules toward ECR, two homology models of the Chironomus tentans ECR ligand-binding domain (LDB) have been constructed by taking as templates the known LBD crystal structures of the retinoic acid and vitamin D receptors. Docking of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and dibenzoylhydrazines to the receptor suggests a novel superposition of the natural and synthetic molecules; the N-tert-butyl substituent of the dibenzoylhydrazines extends significantly beyond the 20E volume. Our ECR-LBD protein models rationalize how 20E and dibenzoylhydrazines interact with the ligand-binding pocket. The homology model complexes provide new insights that can be exploited in the rational design of new environmentally safe insecticides. PMID:10892801

  5. Homologous recombination-mediated gene targeting in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha L.

    PubMed Central

    Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Johzuka-Hisatomi, Yasuyo; Ishida, Sakiko; Iida, Shigeru; Kohchi, Takayuki

    2013-01-01

    The liverwort Marchantia polymorpha is an emerging model organism on account of its ideal characteristics for molecular genetics in addition to occupying a crucial position in the evolution of land plants. Here we describe a method for gene targeting by applying a positive/negative selection system for reduction of non-homologous random integration to an efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system using M. polymorpha sporelings. The targeting efficiency was evaluated by knocking out the NOP1 gene, which impaired air-chamber formation. Homologous recombination was observed in about 2% of the thalli that passed the positive/negative selection. With the advantage of utilizing the haploid gametophytic generation, this strategy should facilitate further molecular genetic analysis of M. polymorpha, in which many of the mechanisms found in land plants are conserved, yet in a less complex form. PMID:23524944

  6. Accumulation of plastic strain in Zircaloy-4 at low homologous temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Tetsuya; Satoh, Yuhki; Abe, Hiroaki

    2015-10-01

    Time-dependent strain accumulation in Zircaloy-4 was evaluated at 294 K, i.e., homologous temperature (T/Tm, where Tm is the melting temperature) of 0.14, to ascertain the mechanical response in fuel cladding material, even at the time of storage. Although diffusion processes are suppressed, considerable strain accumulation was observed at less than 0.2% offset stress. Transmission electron microscopy and electron backscattered diffraction analyses were used to investigate the dominant microstructural mechanism. Results showed that the heterogeneous dislocation structure generated strain accumulation, where straightly aligned dislocation arrays on the prismatic plane move freely and few deformation twins were formed in the grain interior. Furthermore, few dislocation tangles were observed because the slip systems were limited to one. Therefore, Zircaloy-4 shows weak work-hardening at the low homologous temperature because of the fewer interactions among dislocations, leading to unexpected strain accumulation under constant load conditions.

  7. High-efficiency homologous recombination in the oil-producing alga Nannochloropsis sp.

    PubMed

    Kilian, Oliver; Benemann, Christina S E; Niyogi, Krishna K; Vick, Bertrand

    2011-12-27

    Algae have reemerged as potential next-generation feedstocks for biofuels, but strain improvement and progress in algal biology research have been limited by the lack of advanced molecular tools for most eukaryotic microalgae. Here we describe the development of an efficient transformation method for Nannochloropsis sp., a fast-growing, unicellular alga capable of accumulating large amounts of oil. Moreover, we provide additional evidence that Nannochloropsis is haploid, and we demonstrate that insertion of transformation constructs into the nuclear genome can occur by high-efficiency homologous recombination. As examples, we generated knockouts of the genes encoding nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, resulting in strains that were unable to grow on nitrate and nitrate/nitrite, respectively. The application of homologous recombination in this industrially relevant alga has the potential to rapidly advance algal functional genomics and biotechnology. PMID:22123974

  8. SWIFT MODELLER v2.0: a platform-independent GUI for homology modeling.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Abhinav; Shankaracharya; Vidyarthi, Ambarish S

    2012-07-01

    SWIFT MODELLER v2.0 is a platform-independent Java-based graphical user interface to MODELLER. It provides an interactive homology modeling solution by automating the formatting, scripting, and data extraction processes, meaning that the user only needs to paste in the protein target sequence as input. SWIFT MODELLER v2.0 takes a step-by-step approach where the flow of the software screens depicts steps in the homology modeling protocol. Ramachandran plots and DOPE profile graphs are sketched and displayed for in-depth model analysis, along with an embedded Jmol viewer for 3D visualization of the constructed model. SWIFT MODELLER v2.0 is functional on all Linux-based and Microsoft Windows operating systems for which MODELLER has been developed. The software is available as freeware at http://www.bitmesra.ac.in/swift-modeller/swift.htm . PMID:22160795

  9. Tankyrases Promote Homologous Recombination and Check Point Activation in Response to DSBs.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Zita; Kalousi, Alkmini; Furst, Audrey; Koch, Marc; Fischer, Benoit; Soutoglou, Evi

    2016-02-01

    DNA lesions are sensed by a network of proteins that trigger the DNA damage response (DDR), a signaling cascade that acts to delay cell cycle progression and initiate DNA repair. The Mediator of DNA damage Checkpoint protein 1 (MDC1) is essential for spreading of the DDR signaling on chromatin surrounding Double Strand Breaks (DSBs) by acting as a scaffold for PI3K kinases and for ubiquitin ligases. MDC1 also plays a role both in Non-Homologous End Joining (NHEJ) and Homologous Recombination (HR) repair pathways. Here we identify two novel binding partners of MDC1, the poly (ADP-ribose) Polymerases (PARPs) TNKS1 and 2. We find that TNKSs are recruited to DNA lesions by MDC1 and regulate DNA end resection and BRCA1A complex stabilization at lesions leading to efficient DSB repair by HR and proper checkpoint activation. PMID:26845027

  10. The Phox homology (PX) domain, a new player in phosphoinositide signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Y; Seet, L F; Hanson, B; Hong, W

    2001-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are key regulators of diverse cellular processes. The pleckstrin homology (PH) domain mediates the action of PtdIns(3,4)P(2), PtdIns(4,5)P(2) and PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3), while the FYVE domain relays the pulse of PtdIns3P. The recent establishment that the Phox homology (PX) domain interacts with PtdIns3P and other phosphoinositides suggests another mechanism by which phosphoinositides can regulate/integrate multiple cellular events via a spectrum of PX domain-containing proteins. Together with the recent discovery that the epsin N-terminal homologue (ENTH) domain interacts with PtdIns(4,5)P(2), it is becoming clear that phosphoinositides regulate diverse cellular events through interactions with several distinct structural motifs present in many different proteins. PMID:11736640

  11. The role of AtMSH2 in homologous recombination in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Emmanuel, Eyal; Yehuda, Elizabeth; Melamed-Bessudo, Cathy; Avivi-Ragolsky, Naomi; Levy, Avraham A

    2006-01-01

    During homologous recombination (HR), a heteroduplex DNA is formed as a consequence of strand invasion. When the two homologous strands differ in sequence, a mismatch is generated. Earlier studies showed that mismatched heteroduplex often triggers abortion of recombination and that a pivotal component of this pathway is the mismatch repair Msh2 protein. In this study, we analysed the roles of AtMSH2 in suppression of recombination in Arabidopsis. We report that AtMSH2 has a broad range of anti-recombination effects: it suppresses recombination between divergent direct repeats in somatic cells or between homologues from different ecotypes during meiosis. This is the first example of a plant gene that affects HR as a function of sequence divergence and that has an anti-recombination meiotic effect. We discuss the implications of these results for plant improvement by gene transfer across species. PMID:16311517

  12. Using Membrane Computing for Obtaining Homology Groups of Binary 2D Digital Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christinal, Hepzibah A.; Díaz-Pernil, Daniel; Jurado, Pedro Real

    Membrane Computing is a new paradigm inspired from cellular communication. Until now, P systems have been used in research areas like modeling chemical process, several ecosystems, etc. In this paper, we apply P systems to Computational Topology within the context of the Digital Image. We work with a variant of P systems called tissue-like P systems to calculate in a general maximally parallel manner the homology groups of 2D images. In fact, homology computation for binary pixel-based 2D digital images can be reduced to connected component labeling of white and black regions. Finally, we use a software called Tissue Simulator to show with some examples how these systems work.

  13. Tankyrases Promote Homologous Recombination and Check Point Activation in Response to DSBs

    PubMed Central

    Furst, Audrey; Koch, Marc; Fischer, Benoit; Soutoglou, Evi

    2016-01-01

    DNA lesions are sensed by a network of proteins that trigger the DNA damage response (DDR), a signaling cascade that acts to delay cell cycle progression and initiate DNA repair. The Mediator of DNA damage Checkpoint protein 1 (MDC1) is essential for spreading of the DDR signaling on chromatin surrounding Double Strand Breaks (DSBs) by acting as a scaffold for PI3K kinases and for ubiquitin ligases. MDC1 also plays a role both in Non-Homologous End Joining (NHEJ) and Homologous Recombination (HR) repair pathways. Here we identify two novel binding partners of MDC1, the poly (ADP-ribose) Polymerases (PARPs) TNKS1 and 2. We find that TNKSs are recruited to DNA lesions by MDC1 and regulate DNA end resection and BRCA1A complex stabilization at lesions leading to efficient DSB repair by HR and proper checkpoint activation. PMID:26845027

  14. Accurate modification of a chromosomal plasmid by homologous recombination in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, K.Y.; Schwartz, F.; Maeda, N.; Smithies, O.; Kucherlapati, R.

    1987-10-01

    The authors have examined the consequences of modifying mammalian cellular DAN sequences by homologous recombination. A plasmid carrying a 248-base-pair deletion in the neomycin phosphotransferase (neo) gene was introduced into hamster and human cells. The integrated, defective neo gene was used as a target for modification by a second round of transfection with a plasmid carrying a different (283-base-pair) deletion in the neo gene. Recombinants resulting in an intact neo gene were selected by their G418 resistance phenotype. The best ratio of homologous to nonhomologous recombination events was about 1:80. Analysis of the functional neo genes in various independent cell lines establish that simple crossovers (single and double) generated the wild-type neo genes.

  15. High-efficiency homologous recombination in the oil-producing alga Nannochloropsis sp.

    PubMed Central

    Kilian, Oliver; Benemann, Christina S. E.; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Vick, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    Algae have reemerged as potential next-generation feedstocks for biofuels, but strain improvement and progress in algal biology research have been limited by the lack of advanced molecular tools for most eukaryotic microalgae. Here we describe the development of an efficient transformation method for Nannochloropsis sp., a fast-growing, unicellular alga capable of accumulating large amounts of oil. Moreover, we provide additional evidence that Nannochloropsis is haploid, and we demonstrate that insertion of transformation constructs into the nuclear genome can occur by high-efficiency homologous recombination. As examples, we generated knockouts of the genes encoding nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, resulting in strains that were unable to grow on nitrate and nitrate/nitrite, respectively. The application of homologous recombination in this industrially relevant alga has the potential to rapidly advance algal functional genomics and biotechnology. PMID:22123974

  16. Chromosome sites play dual roles to establish homologous synapsisduring meiosis in C. elegans

    SciTech Connect

    MacQueen, Amy J.; Phillips, Carolyn M.; Bhalla, Needhi; Weiser,Pinky; Villeneuve, Anne M.; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2005-06-05

    required for accurate segregation of homologous chromosomesduring meiosisin C. elegans. We find that these sites play two distinctroles that contribute to proper segregation. Chromosomes lacking PCsusually fail to synapse and also lack a synapsis-independentstabilization activity. The presence of a PC on justone copy of achromosome pair promotes synapsis but does not supportsynapsis-independent pairing stabilization, indicating that thesefunctions are separable. Once initiated, synapsis is highly processive,even between non homologous chromosomes of disparate lengths, elucidatinghow translocations suppress meiotic recombination in C. elegans. Thesefindings suggest a multistep pathway for chromosome synapsis in which PCsimpart selectivity and efficiency through a kinetic proofreadingmechanism. We speculate that concentration of these activities at oneregion per chromosome may have co-evolved with the loss of a pointcentromere to safeguard karyotype stability.

  17. Homology Model and Docking-Based Virtual Screening for Ligands of the σ1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This study presents for the first time the 3D model of the σ1 receptor protein as obtained from homology modeling techniques, shows the applicability of this structure to docking-based virtual screening, defines a computational strategy to optimize the results based on a combination of 3D pharmacophore-based docking and MM/PBSA free energy of binding scoring, and provides evidence that these in silico models and recipes are powerful tools on which virtual screening of new σ1 ligands can be based. In particular, the validation of the applicability of docking-based virtual screening to homology models is of utmost importance, since no crystal structure is available to date for the σ1 receptor, and this missing information still constitutes a major hurdle for a rational ligand design for this important protein target. PMID:24900272

  18. Donum Vitae on homologous interventions: is IVF-ET a less acceptable gift than "GIFT"?

    PubMed

    Carlson, J W

    1989-10-01

    Donum Vitae argues that, by failing to respect the connection between the conjugal act and procreation, in vitro fertilization-even in the homologous or "simple case", where both gametes come from a married couple and the resulting embryo is transferred to the wife-shows itself to be morally unacceptable. On the other hand, the document refers approvingly to other technological interventions which "facilitate" or "assist" the conjugal act in achieving its objective. Although none of the latter interventions are mentioned by name, the recently developed gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT) and certain associated techniques have found favor with many orthodox Roman Catholic thinkers, as well with some church authorities. The present article explores this situation in the Catholic moral tradition, and offers reasons for believing that, given relevantly similar conditions, if GIFT is morally acceptable so also is homologous IVF-ET. PMID:2607242

  19. Functional Characterization of KIN-32, the Caenorhabditis elegans Homolog of Focal Adhesion Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Cram, Erin J.; Fontanez, Kristina Marie; Schwarzbauer, Jean E.

    2014-01-01

    We have identified the single Caenorhabditis elegans focal adhesion kinase (FAK) homolog KIN-32, which has the signature FAK structure including an N-terminal Four.1-Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (FERM) domain followed by a tyrosine kinase domain and a C-terminal domain with weak homology to the focal adhesion targeting domain. The functional requirements for KIN-32 were examined using RNA interference depletion experiments and analysis of a deletion allele, kin-32(ok166), in which a large segment of the FERM domain is missing. Our results show that reduced levels of expression or absence of the FERM domain do not affect viability, fertility, or anatomy in C. elegans. Expression of an analogous FERM deletion in mouse FAK showed kinase activity in vitro and supported normal focal adhesion localization in cell culture. Thus, the FERM domain of KIN-32, and possibly KIN-32 activity in general, appears to be dispensable for normal C. elegans physiology. PMID:18297732

  20. Study of protein complexes via homology modeling, applied to cysteine proteases and their protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tastan Bishop, Ozlem; Kroon, Matthys

    2011-12-01

    This paper develops and evaluates large-scale calculation of 3D structures of protein complexes by homology modeling as a promising new approach for protein docking. The complexes investigated were papain-like cysteine proteases and their protein inhibitors, which play numerous roles in human and parasitic metabolisms. The structural modeling was performed in two parts. For the first part (evaluation set), nine crystal structure complexes were selected, 1325 homology models of known complexes were rebuilt by various templates including hybrids, allowing an analysis of the factors influencing the accuracy of the models. The important considerations for modeling the interface were protease coverage and inhibitor sequence identity. In the second part (study set), the findings of the evaluation set were used to select appropriate templates to model novel cysteine protease-inhibitor complexes from human and malaria parasites Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. The energy scores, considering the evaluation set, indicate that the models are of high accuracy. PMID:21365221

  1. Endogenous Hepatitis C Virus Homolog Fragments in European Rabbit and Hare Genomes Replicate in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Eliane; Marques, Sara; Osório, Hugo; Carvalheira, Júlio; Thompson, Gertrude

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses, non-retroviral RNA viruses and DNA viruses have been found in the mammalian genomes. The origin of Hepatitis C virus (HCV), the major cause of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma in humans, remains unclear since its discovery. Here we show that fragments homologous to HCV structural and non-structural (NS) proteins present in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and hare (Lepus europaeus) genomes replicate in bovine cell cultures. The HCV genomic homolog fragments were demonstrated by RT-PCR, PCR, mass spectrometry, and replication in bovine cell cultures by immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and immunogold electron microscopy (IEM) using specific MAbs for HCV NS3, NS4A, and NS5 proteins. These findings may lead to novel research approaches on the HCV origin, genesis, evolution and diversity. PMID:23185448

  2. Lithium Halomethylcarbenoids: Preparation and Use in the Homologation of Carbon Electrophiles.

    PubMed

    Pace, Vittorio; Holzer, Wolfgang; De Kimpe, Norbert

    2016-08-01

    α-Halomethyllithium carbenoids are useful homologating reagents which - reacting under proper reaction conditions as carbanions - enable the installation via nucleophilic addition of a reactive halomethyl fragment onto a preformed carbon-heteroatom bond. The pronounced thermolability represented - since seminal studies by Köbrich - the Achilles' heel of these reagents: the use of Barbier-type methodologies (i.e., the electrophile should be present in the reaction mixture prior to the formation of the carbenoid) was pivotal in order to suppress decomposition through α-elimination processes. Nowadays, the use of low temperatures (-78 °C) guarantees reliable procedures and, significantly, the employment of microreactor technologies allows external trapping to be performed even at higher temperatures as reported by Luisi. We will discuss the α-halomethyllithium-mediated homologations of a series of carbon electrophiles such as carbonyl compounds, imines, esters, Weinreb amides, and isocyanates. PMID:27381551

  3. NMR structure of a fungal virulence factor reveals structural homology with mammalian saposin B

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Moriah R.; DeKoster, Gregory T.; Cistola, David P.; Goldman, William E.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The fungal protein CBP (calcium binding protein) is a known virulence factor with an unknown virulence mechanism. The protein was identified based on its ability to bind calcium and its prevalence as Histoplasma capsulatum’s most abundant secreted protein. However, CBP has no sequence homology with other calcium binding proteins and contains no known calcium-binding motifs. Here, the NMR structure of CBP reveals a highly intertwined homodimer and represents the first atomic level NMR model of any fungal virulence factor. Each CBP monomer is comprised of four α-helices that adopt the saposin fold, characteristic of a protein family that binds to membranes and lipids. This structural homology suggests that CBP functions as a lipid-binding protein, potentially interacting with host glycolipids in the phagolysosome of host cells. PMID:19298372

  4. A protocol for construction of gene targeting vectors and generation of homologous recombinant ES cells

    PubMed Central

    Bouabe, Hicham; Okkenhaug, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Summary The completion of human and mouse genome sequencing has confronted us with huge amount of data sequences that certainly need decades and many generations of scientists to be reasonably interpreted and assigned to physiological functions, and subsequently fruitfully translated into medical application. A means to assess the function of genes provides gene targeting in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells that enables to introduce site-specific modifications in the mouse genome, and analyze their physiological consequences. Gene targeting enables almost any type of genetic modifications of interest, ranging from gene insertion (e.g. insertion of human-specific genes or reporter genes), gene disruption, point mutations, short and long range deletions, inversions. Site-specific modification into the genome of ES cells can be reached by homologous recombination using targeting vectors. Here, we describe a protocol to generate targeting constructs and homologous recombinant ES cells. PMID:23996269

  5. Photophysical behavior of a homologous series of amphiphilic hemicyanine dyes in thin AOT films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallos, L. K.; Stathatos, E.; Lianos, P.; Argyrakis, P.

    2002-01-01

    The photophysical behavior of a homologous series of amphiphilic hemicyanines, incorporated in thin films, made by dip-coating glass slides in bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate sodium salt (AOT) reverse micellar solutions, has been studied by absorption spectrophotometry and computer simulation techniques. At relatively high dye concentration, a narrow band in the absorption spectrum was observed, corresponding to aggregated species. Aggregates are of the H-type, displaying a hypsochromic shift in their absorption spectra, except for the shortest chain homolog. The growth of aggregates in films has been studied in relation with the [water]/[dye] and the [surfactant]/[dye] ratios. Simulation of the aggregate formation by extended dipole interaction in spherical reverse micelles and planar bilayer structures in combination with experimental data, revealed that the films are structured in microheterogeneous assemblies analogous to the reverse micelles found in the original solutions.

  6. Transformation-associated recombination between diverged and homologous DNA repeats is induced by strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Larionov, V.; Kouprina, N. |; Edlarov, M. |; Perkins, E.; Porter, G.; Resnick, M.A.

    1993-12-31

    Rearrangement and deletion within plasmid DNA is commonly observed during transformation. We have examined the mechanisms of transformation-associated recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a plasmid system which allowed the effects of physical state and/or extent of homology on recombination to be studied. The plasmid contains homologous or diverged (19%) DNA repeats separated by a genetically detectable color marker. Recombination during transformation for covalently closed circular plasmids was over 100-fold more frequent than during mitotic growth. The frequency of recombination is partly dependent on the method of transformation in that procedures involving lithium acetate or spheroplasting yield higher frequencies than electroporation. When present in the repeats, unique single-strand breaks that are ligatable, as well as double-strand breaks, lead to high levels of recombination between diverged and identical repeats. The transformation-associated recombination between repeat DNA`s is under the influence of the RADS2, RADI and the RNCI genes,

  7. CDK-mediated RNF4 phosphorylation regulates homologous recombination in S-phase

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Kuntian; Deng, Min; Li, Yunhui; Wu, Chenming; Xu, Ziwen; Yuan, Jian; Lou, Zhenkun

    2015-01-01

    There are the two major pathways responsible for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs): non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). NHEJ operates throughout the cell-cycle, while HR is primarily active in the S/G2 phases suggesting that there are cell cycle-specific mechanisms that regulate the balance between NHEJ and HR. Here we reported that CDK2 could phosphorylate RNF4 on T26 and T112 and enhance RNF4 E3 ligase activity, which is important for MDC1 degradation and proper HR repair during S phase. Mutation of the RNF4 phosphorylation sites results in MDC1 stabilization, which in turn compromised HR during S-phase. These results suggest that in addition to drive cell cycle progression, CDK also targets RNF4, which is involved in the regulatory network of DSBs repair. PMID:25948581

  8. CDK-mediated RNF4 phosphorylation regulates homologous recombination in S-phase.

    PubMed

    Luo, Kuntian; Deng, Min; Li, Yunhui; Wu, Chenming; Xu, Ziwen; Yuan, Jian; Lou, Zhenkun

    2015-06-23

    There are the two major pathways responsible for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs): non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). NHEJ operates throughout the cell-cycle, while HR is primarily active in the S/G2 phases suggesting that there are cell cycle-specific mechanisms that regulate the balance between NHEJ and HR. Here we reported that CDK2 could phosphorylate RNF4 on T26 and T112 and enhance RNF4 E3 ligase activity, which is important for MDC1 degradation and proper HR repair during S phase. Mutation of the RNF4 phosphorylation sites results in MDC1 stabilization, which in turn compromised HR during S-phase. These results suggest that in addition to drive cell cycle progression, CDK also targets RNF4, which is involved in the regulatory network of DSBs repair. PMID:25948581

  9. Srs2 and Mus81-Mms4 Prevent Accumulation of Toxic Inter-Homolog Recombination Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Keyamura, Kenji; Arai, Kota; Hishida, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Homologous recombination is an evolutionally conserved mechanism that promotes genome stability through the faithful repair of double-strand breaks and single-strand gaps in DNA, and the recovery of stalled or collapsed replication forks. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATP-dependent DNA helicase Srs2 (a member of the highly conserved UvrD family of helicases) has multiple roles in regulating homologous recombination. A mutation (srs2K41A) resulting in a helicase-dead mutant of Srs2 was found to be lethal in diploid, but not in haploid, cells. In diploid cells, Srs2K41A caused the accumulation of inter-homolog joint molecule intermediates, increased the levels of spontaneous Rad52 foci, and induced gross chromosomal rearrangements. Srs2K41A lethality and accumulation of joint molecules were suppressed by inactivating Rad51 or deleting the Rad51-interaction domain of Srs2, whereas phosphorylation and sumoylation of Srs2 and its interaction with sumoylated proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were not required for lethality. The structure-specific complex of crossover junction endonucleases Mus81 and Mms4 was also required for viability of diploid, but not haploid, SRS2 deletion mutants (srs2Δ), and diploid srs2Δ mus81Δ mutants accumulated joint molecule intermediates. Our data suggest that Srs2 and Mus81-Mms4 have critical roles in preventing the formation of (or in resolving) toxic inter-homolog joint molecules, which could otherwise interfere with chromosome segregation and lead to genetic instability. PMID:27390022

  10. Identification and Partial Characterization of Potential FtsL and FtsQ Homologs of Chlamydia

    PubMed Central

    Ouellette, Scot P.; Rueden, Kelsey J.; AbdelRahman, Yasser M.; Cox, John V.; Belland, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia is amongst the rare bacteria that lack the critical cell division protein FtsZ. By annotation, Chlamydia also lacks several other essential cell division proteins including the FtsLBQ complex that links the early (e.g., FtsZ) and late (e.g., FtsI/Pbp3) components of the division machinery. Here, we report chlamydial FtsL and FtsQ homologs. Ct271 aligned well with Escherichia coli FtsL and shared sequence homology with it, including a predicted leucine-zipper like motif. Based on in silico modeling, we show that Ct764 has structural homology to FtsQ in spite of little sequence similarity. Importantly, ct271/ftsL and ct764/ftsQ are present within all sequenced chlamydial genomes and are expressed during the replicative phase of the chlamydial developmental cycle, two key characteristics for a chlamydial cell division gene. GFP-Ct764 localized to the division septum of dividing transformed chlamydiae, and, importantly, over-expression inhibited chlamydial development. Using a bacterial two-hybrid approach, we show that Ct764 interacted with other components of the chlamydial division apparatus. However, Ct764 was not capable of complementing an E. coli FtsQ depletion strain in spite of its ability to interact with many of the same division proteins as E. coli FtsQ, suggesting that chlamydial FtsQ may function differently. We previously proposed that Chlamydia uses MreB and other rod-shape determining proteins as an alternative system for organizing the division site and its apparatus. Chlamydial FtsL and FtsQ homologs expand the number of identified chlamydial cell division proteins and suggest that Chlamydia has likely kept the late components of the division machinery while substituting the Mre system for the early components. PMID:26617598

  11. CASP2 knowledge-based approach to distant homology recognition and fold prediction in CASP4.

    PubMed

    Murzin, A G; Bateman, A

    2001-01-01

    In 1996, in CASP2, we presented a semimanual approach to the prediction of protein structure that was aimed at the recognition of probable distant homology, where it existed, between a given target protein and a protein of known structure (Murzin and Bateman, Proteins 1997; Suppl 1:105-112). Central to our method was the knowledge of all known structural and probable evolutionary relationships among proteins of known structure classified in the SCOP database (Murzin et al., J Mol Biol 1995;247:536-540). It was demonstrated that a knowledge-based approach could compete successfully with the best computational methods of the time in the correct recognition of the target protein fold. Four years later, in CASP4, we have applied essentially the same knowledge-based approach to distant homology recognition, concentrating our effort on the improvement of the completeness and alignment accuracy of our models. The manifold increase of available sequence and structure data was to our advantage, as well as was the experience and expertise obtained through the classification of these data. In particular, we were able to model most of our predictions from several distantly related structures rather than from a single parent structure, and we could use more superfamily characteristic features for the refinement of our alignments. Our predictions for each of the attempted distant homology recognition targets ranked among the few top predictions for each of these targets, with the predictions for the hypothetical protein HI0065 (T0104) and the C-terminal domain of the ABC transporter MalK (T0121C) being particularly successful. We also have attempted the prediction of protein folds of some of the targets tentatively assigned to new superfamilies. The average quality of our fold predictions was far less than the quality of our distant homology recognition models, but for the two targets, chorismate lyase (T0086) and Appr>p cyclic phosphodiesterase (T0094), our predictions achieved

  12. Recombination walking: Genetic selection of clones from pooled libraries of yeast artificial chromosomes by homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.M.; Savinelli, E.A.; Couture, S.M.; Hannigan, G.M.; Han, Z.; Selden, R.F.; Treco, D.A. )

    1993-09-01

    Recombination walking is based on the genetic selection of specific human clones from a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) library by homologous recombination. The desired clone is selected from a pooled (unorderd) YAC library, eliminating labor-intensive steps typically used in organizing and maintaining ordered YAC libraries. Recombination walking represents an efficient approach to library screening and is well suited for chromosome-walking approaches to the isolation of genes associated with common diseases. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. OsDMC1 Is Not Required for Homologous Pairing in Rice Meiosis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ding; Liu, Xiaofei; Du, Guijie; Shen, Yi; Li, Yafei; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic homologous recombination is pivotal to sexual reproduction. DMC1, a conserved recombinase, is involved in directing single-end invasion between interhomologs during meiotic recombination. In this study, we identified OsDMC1A and OsDMC1B, two closely related proteins in rice (Oryza sativa) with high sequence similarity to DMC1 proteins from other species. Analysis of Osdmc1a and Osdmc1b Tos17 insertion mutants indicated that these genes are functionally redundant. Immunolocalization analysis revealed OsDMC1 foci occurred at leptotene, which disappeared from late pachytene chromosomes in wild-type meiocytes. According to cytological analyses, homologous pairing is accomplished in the Osdmc1a Osdmc1b double mutant, but synapsis is seriously disrupted. The reduced number of bivalents and abnormal OsHEI10 foci in Osdmc1a Osdmc1b establishes an essential role for OsDMC1 in crossover formation. In the absence of OsDMC1, early recombination events probably occur normally, leading to normal localization of γH2AX, PAIR3, OsMRE11, OsCOM1, and OsRAD51C. Moreover, OsDMC1 was not detected in pairing-defective mutants, such as pair2, pair3, Oscom1, and Osrad51c, while it was loaded onto meiotic chromosomes in zep1, Osmer3, Oszip4, and Oshei10. Taken together, these results suggest that during meiosis, OsDMC1 is dispensable for homologous pairing in rice, which is quite different from the DMC1 homologs identified so far in other organisms. PMID:26960731

  14. Homology between O-linked GlcNAc transferases and proteins of the glycogen phosphorylase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Wrabl, J O; Grishin, N V

    2001-11-30

    The O-linked GlcNAc transferases (OGTs) are a recently characterized group of largely eukaryotic enzymes that add a single beta-N-acetylglucosamine moiety to specific serine or threonine hydroxyls. In humans, this process may be part of a sugar regulation mechanism or cellular signaling pathway that is involved in many important diseases, such as diabetes, cancer, and neurodegeneration. However, no structural information about the human OGT exists, except for the identification of tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) at the N terminus. The locations of substrate binding sites are unknown and the structural basis for this enzyme's function is not clear. Here, remote homology is reported between the OGTs and a large group of diverse sugar processing enzymes, including proteins with known structure such as glycogen phosphorylase, UDP-GlcNAc 2-epimerase, and the glycosyl transferase MurG. This relationship, in conjunction with amino acid similarity spanning the entire length of the sequence, implies that the fold of the human OGT consists of two Rossmann-like domains C-terminal to the TPR region. A conserved motif in the second Rossmann domain points to the UDP-GlcNAc donor binding site. This conclusion is supported by a combination of statistically significant PSI-BLAST hits, consensus secondary structure predictions, and a fold recognition hit to MurG. Additionally, iterative PSI-BLAST database searches reveal that proteins homologous to the OGTs form a large and diverse superfamily that is termed GPGTF (glycogen phosphorylase/glycosyl transferase). Up to one-third of the 51 functional families in the CAZY database, a glycosyl transferase classification scheme based on catalytic residue and sequence homology considerations, can be unified through this common predicted fold. GPGTF homologs constitute a substantial fraction of known proteins: 0.4% of all non-redundant sequences and about 1% of proteins in the Escherichia coli genome are found to belong to the GPGTF

  15. Mapping of barley homologs to genes that regulate low temperature tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Jeffrey S; Szucs, Péter; von Zitzewitz, Jarislav; Marquez-Cedillo, Luis; Filichkin, Tanya; Stockinger, Eric J; Thomashow, Michael F; Chen, Tony H H; Hayes, Patrick M

    2006-03-01

    We investigated the allelic nature and map locations of Hordeum vulgare (barley) homologs to three classes of Arabidopsis low temperature (LT) regulatory genes-CBFs, ICE1, and ZAT12-to determine if there were any candidates for winterhardiness-related quantitative trait loci (QTL). We phenotyped the Dicktoo x Morex (DxM) mapping population under controlled freezing conditions and in addition to the previously reported 5H-L Fr-H1 QTL, observed three additional LT tolerance QTLs on 1H-L, 4H-S, and 4H-L. We identified and assigned either linkage map or chromosome locations to 1 ICE1 homolog, 2 ZAT12 homologs, and 17 of 20 CBF homologs. Twelve of the CBF genes were located on 5H-L and the 11 with assigned linkage map positions formed 2 tandem clusters on 5H-L. A subset of these CBF genes was confirmed to be physically linked, validating the map position clustering. The tandem CBF clusters are not candidates for the DxM LT tolerance Fr-H1 QTL, as they are approximately 30 cM distal to the QTL peak. No LT tolerance QTL was detected in conjunction with the CBF gene clusters in Dicktoo x Morex. However, comparative mapping using common markers and BIN positions established the CBF clusters are coincident with reported Triticeae LT tolerance and COR gene accumulation QTLs and suggest one or more of the CBF genes may be candidates for Fr-H2 in some germplasm combinations. These results suggest members of the CBF gene family may function as components of winter-hardiness in the Triticeae and underscore both the importance of extending results from model systems to economically important crop species and in viewing QTL mapping results in the context of multiple germplasm combinations. PMID:16365758

  16. OsDMC1 Is Not Required for Homologous Pairing in Rice Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongjun; Hu, Qing; Tang, Ding; Liu, Xiaofei; Du, Guijie; Shen, Yi; Li, Yafei; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2016-05-01

    Meiotic homologous recombination is pivotal to sexual reproduction. DMC1, a conserved recombinase, is involved in directing single-end invasion between interhomologs during meiotic recombination. In this study, we identified OsDMC1A and OsDMC1B, two closely related proteins in rice (Oryza sativa) with high sequence similarity to DMC1 proteins from other species. Analysis of Osdmc1a and Osdmc1b Tos17 insertion mutants indicated that these genes are functionally redundant. Immunolocalization analysis revealed OsDMC1 foci occurred at leptotene, which disappeared from late pachytene chromosomes in wild-type meiocytes. According to cytological analyses, homologous pairing is accomplished in the Osdmc1a Osdmc1b double mutant, but synapsis is seriously disrupted. The reduced number of bivalents and abnormal OsHEI10 foci in Osdmc1a Osdmc1b establishes an essential role for OsDMC1 in crossover formation. In the absence of OsDMC1, early recombination events probably occur normally, leading to normal localization of γH2AX, PAIR3, OsMRE11, OsCOM1, and OsRAD51C. Moreover, OsDMC1 was not detected in pairing-defective mutants, such as pair2, pair3, Oscom1, and Osrad51c, while it was loaded onto meiotic chromosomes in zep1, Osmer3, Oszip4, and Oshei10 Taken together, these results suggest that during meiosis, OsDMC1 is dispensable for homologous pairing in rice, which is quite different from the DMC1 homologs identified so far in other organisms. PMID:26960731

  17. Anomalocaridid trunk limb homology revealed by a giant filter-feeder with paired flaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Roy, Peter; Daley, Allison C.; Briggs, Derek E. G.

    2015-06-01

    Exceptionally preserved fossils from the Palaeozoic era provide crucial insights into arthropod evolution, with recent discoveries bringing phylogeny and character homology into sharp focus. Integral to such studies are anomalocaridids, a clade of stem arthropods whose remarkable morphology illuminates early arthropod relationships and Cambrian ecology. Although recent work has focused on the anomalocaridid head, the nature of their trunk has been debated widely. Here we describe new anomalocaridid specimens from the Early Ordovician Fezouata Biota of Morocco, which not only show well-preserved head appendages providing key ecological data, but also elucidate the nature of anomalocaridid trunk flaps, resolving their homology with arthropod trunk limbs. The new material shows that each trunk segment bears a separate dorsal and ventral pair of flaps, with a series of setal blades attached at the base of the dorsal flaps. Comparisons with other stem lineage arthropods indicate that anomalocaridid ventral flaps are homologous with lobopodous walking limbs and the endopod of the euarthropod biramous limb, whereas the dorsal flaps and associated setal blades are homologous with the flaps of gilled lobopodians (for example, Kerygmachela kierkegaardi, Pambdelurion whittingtoni) and exites of the `Cambrian biramous limb'. This evidence shows that anomalocaridids represent a stage before the fusion of exite and endopod into the `Cambrian biramous limb', confirming their basal placement in the euarthropod stem, rather than in the arthropod crown or with cycloneuralian worms. Unlike other anomalocaridids, the Fezouata taxon combines head appendages convergently adapted for filter-feeding with an unprecedented body length exceeding 2 m, indicating a new direction in the feeding ecology of the clade. The evolution of giant filter-feeding anomalocaridids may reflect the establishment of highly developed planktic ecosystems during the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event.

  18. Anomalocaridid trunk limb homology revealed by a giant filter-feeder with paired flaps.

    PubMed

    Van Roy, Peter; Daley, Allison C; Briggs, Derek E G

    2015-06-01

    Exceptionally preserved fossils from the Palaeozoic era provide crucial insights into arthropod evolution, with recent discoveries bringing phylogeny and character homology into sharp focus. Integral to such studies are anomalocaridids, a clade of stem arthropods whose remarkable morphology illuminates early arthropod relationships and Cambrian ecology. Although recent work has focused on the anomalocaridid head, the nature of their trunk has been debated widely. Here we describe new anomalocaridid specimens from the Early Ordovician Fezouata Biota of Morocco, which not only show well-preserved head appendages providing key ecological data, but also elucidate the nature of anomalocaridid trunk flaps, resolving their homology with arthropod trunk limbs. The new material shows that each trunk segment bears a separate dorsal and ventral pair of flaps, with a series of setal blades attached at the base of the dorsal flaps. Comparisons with other stem lineage arthropods indicate that anomalocaridid ventral flaps are homologous with lobopodous walking limbs and the endopod of the euarthropod biramous limb, whereas the dorsal flaps and associated setal blades are homologous with the flaps of gilled lobopodians (for example, Kerygmachela kierkegaardi, Pambdelurion whittingtoni) and exites of the 'Cambrian biramous limb'. This evidence shows that anomalocaridids represent a stage before the fusion of exite and endopod into the 'Cambrian biramous limb', confirming their basal placement in the euarthropod stem, rather than in the arthropod crown or with cycloneuralian worms. Unlike other anomalocaridids, the Fezouata taxon combines head appendages convergently adapted for filter-feeding with an unprecedented body length exceeding 2 m, indicating a new direction in the feeding ecology of the clade. The evolution of giant filter-feeding anomalocaridids may reflect the establishment of highly developed planktic ecosystems during the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event

  19. Homologies in leaf form inferred from KNOXI gene expression during development.

    PubMed

    Bharathan, Geeta; Goliber, Thomas E; Moore, Christopher; Kessler, Sharon; Pham, Thinh; Sinha, Neelima R

    2002-06-01

    KNOTTEDI-like homeobox (KNOXI) genes regulate development of the leaf from the shoot apical meristem (SAM) and may regulate leaf form. We examined KNOXI expression in SAMs of various vascular plants and found that KNOXI expression correlated with complex leaf primordia. However, complex primordia may mature into simple leaves. Therefore, not all simple leaves develop similarly, and final leaf morphology may not be an adequate predictor of homology. PMID:12052958

  20. A Conserved Role for p48 Homologs in Protecting Dopaminergic Neurons from Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Bou Dib, Peter; Gnägi, Bettina; Daly, Fiona; Sabado, Virginie; Tas, Damla; Glauser, Dominique A.; Meister, Peter; Nagoshi, Emi

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder characterized by the progressive loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons. Both environmental and genetic factors are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of PD. Although several genes linked to rare familial PD have been identified, endogenous risk factors for sporadic PD, which account for the majority of PD cases, remain largely unknown. Genome-wide association studies have identified many single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with sporadic PD in neurodevelopmental genes including the transcription factor p48/ptf1a. Here we investigate whether p48 plays a role in the survival of DA neurons in Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that a Drosophila p48 homolog, 48-related-2 (Fer2), is expressed in and required for the development and survival of DA neurons in the protocerebral anterior medial (PAM) cluster. Loss of Fer2 expression in adulthood causes progressive PAM neuron degeneration in aging flies along with mitochondrial dysfunction and elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, leading to the progressive locomotor deficits. The oxidative stress challenge upregulates Fer2 expression and exacerbates the PAM neuron degeneration in Fer2 loss-of-function mutants. hlh-13, the worm homolog of p48, is also expressed in DA neurons. Unlike the fly counterpart, hlh-13 loss-of-function does not impair development or survival of DA neurons under normal growth conditions. Yet, similar to Fer2, hlh-13 expression is upregulated upon an acute oxidative challenge and is required for the survival of DA neurons under oxidative stress in adult worms. Taken together, our results indicate that p48 homologs share a role in protecting DA neurons from oxidative stress and degeneration, and suggest that loss-of-function of p48 homologs in flies and worms provides novel tools to study gene-environmental interactions affecting DA neuron survival. PMID:25340742

  1. A nuclear genetic lesion affecting Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial translation is complemented by a homologous Bacillus gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S I; Stange-Thomann, N; Martins, O; Hong, K W; Söll, D; Fox, T D

    1997-01-01

    A novel Bacillus gene was isolated and characterized. It encodes a homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pet112p, a protein that has no characterized relative and is dispensable for cell viability but required for mitochondrial translation. Expression of the Bacillus protein in yeast, modified to ensure mitochondrial targeting, partially complemented the phenotype of the pet112-1 mutation, demonstrating a high degree of evolutionary conservation for this as yet unidentified component of translation. PMID:9287027

  2. Function and Evolution of Two Forms of SecDF Homologs in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhan; Li, Yudong; Sun, Ning; Sun, Zhihao; Lv, Longxian; Wang, Yufeng; Shen, Libing; Li, Yong-Quan

    2014-01-01

    The general secretion (Sec) pathway plays a prominent role in bacterial protein export, and the accessory component SecDF has been shown to improve transportation efficiency. Inspection of Streptomyces coelicolor genome reveals the unexpected presence of two different forms of secDF homologous genes: one in fused form (secDF) and the other in separated form (secD and secF). However, the functional role of two SecDF homologs in S. coelicolor has not yet been determined. Transcriptional analysis of secDF homologs reveals that these genes are constitutively expressed. However, the transcript levels of secD and secF are much higher than that of secDF in S. coelicolor. Deletion of secDF or/and secD/secF in S. coelicolor did result in reduced secretion efficiency of Xylanase A and Amylase C, suggesting that they may have redundant functions for Sec-dependent translocation pathway. Moreover, our results also indicate that SecD/SecF plays a more prominent role than SecDF in protein translocation. Evolutionary analysis suggests that the fused and separated SecDF homologs in Streptomyces may have disparate evolutionary ancestries. SecD/SecF may be originated from vertical transmission of existing components from ancestor of Streptomyces species. However, SecDF may be derived from bacterial ancestors through horizontal gene transfer. Alternately, it is also plausible that SecDF may have arisen through additional gene duplication and fusion events. The acquisition of a second copy may confer a selective benefit to Streptomyces by enhancing protein transport capacity. Taken together, our results provide new insights into the potential biological function and evolutionary aspects of the prokaryotic SecDF complex. PMID:25140821

  3. Conservation of Histone Binding and Transcriptional Repressor Functions in a Schizosaccharomyces pombe Tup1p Homolog

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Yukio; Matsuo, Eri; Roth, Sharon Y.; Harashima, Satoshi

    1999-01-01

    The Ssn6p-Tup1p corepressor complex is important to the regulation of several diverse genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and serves as a model for corepressor functions. To investigate the evolutionary conservation of these functions, sequences homologous to the S. cerevisiae TUP1 gene were cloned from Kluyveromyces lactis (TUP1) and Schizosaccharomyces pombe (tup11+). Interestingly, while the K. lactis TUP1 gene complemented an S. cerevisiae tup1 null mutation, the S. pombe tup11+ gene did not, even when expressed under the control of the S. cerevisiae TUP1 promoter. However, an S. pombe Tup11p-LexA fusion protein repressed transcription of a corresponding reporter gene, indicating that this Tup1p homolog has intrinsic repressor activity. Moreover, a chimeric protein containing the amino-terminal Ssn6p-binding domain of S. cerevisiae Tup1p and 544 amino acids from the C-terminal region of S. pombe Tup11p complemented the S. cerevisiae tup1 mutation. The failure of native S. pombe Tup11p to complement loss of Tup1p functions in S. cerevisiae corresponds to an inability to bind to S. cerevisiae Ssn6p in vitro. Disruption of tup11+ in combination with a disruption of tup12+, another TUP1 homolog gene in S. pombe, causes a defect in glucose repression of fbp1+, suggesting that S. pombe Tup1p homologs function as repressors in S. pombe. Furthermore, Tup11p binds specifically to histones H3 and H4 in vitro, indicating that both the repression and histone binding functions of Tup1p-related proteins are conserved across species. PMID:10567571

  4. The Jaw Adductor Muscle Complex in Teleostean Fishes: Evolution, Homologies and Revised Nomenclature (Osteichthyes: Actinopterygii)

    PubMed Central

    Datovo, Aléssio; Vari, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    The infraclass Teleostei is a highly diversified group of bony fishes that encompasses 96% of all species of living fishes and almost half of extant vertebrates. Evolution of various morphological complexes in teleosts, particularly those involving soft anatomy, remains poorly understood. Notable among these problematic complexes is the adductor mandibulae, the muscle that provides the primary force for jaw adduction and mouth closure and whose architecture varies from a simple arrangement of two segments to an intricate complex of up to ten discrete subdivisions. The present study analyzed multiple morphological attributes of the adductor mandibulae in representatives of 53 of the 55 extant teleostean orders, as well as significant information from the literature in order to elucidate the homologies of the main subdivisions of this muscle. The traditional alphanumeric terminology applied to the four main divisions of the adductor mandibulae – A1, A2, A3, and Aω – patently fails to reflect homologous components of that muscle across the expanse of the Teleostei. Some features traditionally used as landmarks for identification of some divisions of the adductor mandibulae proved highly variable across the Teleostei; notably the insertion on the maxilla and the position of muscle components relative to the path of the ramus mandibularis trigeminus nerve. The evolutionary model of gain and loss of sections of the adductor mandibulae most commonly adopted under the alphanumeric system additionally proved ontogenetically incongruent and less parsimonious than a model of subdivision and coalescence of facial muscle sections. Results of the analysis demonstrate the impossibility of adapting the alphanumeric terminology so as to reflect homologous entities across the spectrum of teleosts. A new nomenclatural scheme is proposed in order to achieve congruence between homology and nomenclature of the adductor mandibulae components across the entire Teleostei. PMID

  5. The jaw adductor muscle complex in teleostean fishes: evolution, homologies and revised nomenclature (osteichthyes: actinopterygii).

    PubMed

    Datovo, Aléssio; Vari, Richard P

    2013-01-01

    The infraclass Teleostei is a highly diversified group of bony fishes that encompasses 96% of all species of living fishes and almost half of extant vertebrates. Evolution of various morphological complexes in teleosts, particularly those involving soft anatomy, remains poorly understood. Notable among these problematic complexes is the adductor mandibulae, the muscle that provides the primary force for jaw adduction and mouth closure and whose architecture varies from a simple arrangement of two segments to an intricate complex of up to ten discrete subdivisions. The present study analyzed multiple morphological attributes of the adductor mandibulae in representatives of 53 of the 55 extant teleostean orders, as well as significant information from the literature in order to elucidate the homologies of the main subdivisions of this muscle. The traditional alphanumeric terminology applied to the four main divisions of the adductor mandibulae - A1, A2, A3, and Aω - patently fails to reflect homologous components of that muscle across the expanse of the Teleostei. Some features traditionally used as landmarks for identification of some divisions of the adductor mandibulae proved highly variable across the Teleostei; notably the insertion on the maxilla and the position of muscle components relative to the path of the ramus mandibularis trigeminus nerve. The evolutionary model of gain and loss of sections of the adductor mandibulae most commonly adopted under the alphanumeric system additionally proved ontogenetically incongruent and less parsimonious than a model of subdivision and coalescence of facial muscle sections. Results of the analysis demonstrate the impossibility of adapting the alphanumeric terminology so as to reflect homologous entities across the spectrum of teleosts. A new nomenclatural scheme is proposed in order to achieve congruence between homology and nomenclature of the adductor mandibulae components across the entire Teleostei. PMID:23565279

  6. BAR expressolog identification: expression profile similarity ranking of homologous genes in plant species.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rohan V; Nahal, Hardeep K; Breit, Robert; Provart, Nicholas J

    2012-09-01

    Large numbers of sequences are now readily available for many plant species, allowing easy identification of homologous genes. However, orthologous gene identification across multiple species is made difficult by evolutionary events such as whole-genome or segmental duplications. Several developmental atlases of gene expression have been produced in the past couple of years, and it may be possible to use these transcript abundance data to refine ortholog predictions. In this study, clusters of homologous genes between seven plant species - Arabidopsis, soybean, Medicago truncatula, poplar, barley, maize and rice - were identified. Following this, a pipeline to rank homologs within gene clusters by both sequence and expression profile similarity was devised by determining equivalent tissues between species, with the best expression profile match being termed the 'expressolog'. Five electronic fluorescent pictograph (eFP) browsers were produced as part of this effort, to aid in visualization of gene expression data and to complement existing eFP browsers at the Bio-Array Resource (BAR). Within the eFP browser framework, these expression profile similarity rankings were incorporated into an Expressolog Tree Viewer to allow cross-species homolog browsing by both sequence and expression pattern similarity. Global analyses showed that orthologs with the highest sequence similarity do not necessarily exhibit the highest expression pattern similarity. Other orthologs may show different expression patterns, indicating that such genes may require re-annotation or more specific annotation. Ultimately, it is envisaged that this pipeline will aid in improvement of the functional annotation of genes and translational plant research. PMID:22607031

  7. Stable homotopy classification of A n 4 -polyhedra with 2- torsion free homology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, JianZhong; Zhu, ZhongJian

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study the stable homotopy types of $\\mathbf{F}^4_{n(2)}$-polyhedra, i.e., $(n-1)$-connected, at most $(n+4)$-dimensional polyhedra with 2-torsion free homologies. We are able to classify the indecomposable $\\mathbf{F}^4_{n(2)}$-polyhedra. The proof relies on the matrix problem technique which was developed in the classification of representaions of algebras and applied to homotopy theory by Baues and Drozd.

  8. Rearrangement of sapA homologs with conserved and variable regions in Campylobacter fetus.

    PubMed

    Tummuru, M K; Blaser, M J

    1993-08-01

    The Campylobacter fetus surface-layer (S-layer) proteins mediate both complement resistance and antigenic variation in mammalian hosts. Wild-type strain 23D possesses the sapA gene, which encodes a 97-kDa S-layer protein, and several sapA homologs are present in both wild-type and mutant strains. Here we report that a cloned silent gene (sapA1) in C. fetus can express a functional full-length S-layer protein in Escherichia coli. Analysis of sapA and sapA1 and partial analysis of sapA2 indicate that a block of approximately 600 bp beginning upstream and continuing into the open reading frames is completely conserved, and then the sequences diverge completely, but immediately downstream of each gene is another conserved 50-bp sequence. Conservation of sapA1 among strains, the presence of a putative Chi (RecBCD recognition) site upstream of sapA, sapA1, and sapA2, and the sequence identities of the sapA genes suggest a system for homologous recombination. Comparison of the wild-type strain (23D) with a phenotypic variant (23D-11) indicates that variation is associated with removal of the divergent region of sapA from the expression locus and exchange with a corresponding region from a sapA homolog. We propose that site-specific reciprocal recombination between sapA homologs leads to expression of divergent S-layer proteins as one of the mechanisms that C. fetus uses for antigenic variation. PMID:8346244

  9. The hyal and ventral branchial muscles in caecilian and salamander larvae: homologies and evolution.

    PubMed

    Kleinteich, Thomas; Haas, Alexander

    2011-05-01

    Amphibians (Lissamphibia) are characterized by a bi-phasic life-cycle that comprises an aquatic larval stage and metamorphosis to the adult. The ancestral aquatic feeding behavior of amphibian larvae is suction feeding. The negative pressure that is needed for ingestion of prey is created by depression of the hyobranchial apparatus as a result of hyobranchial muscle action. Understanding the homologies of hyobranchial muscles in amphibian larvae is a crucial step in understanding the evolution of this important character complex. However, the literature mostly focuses on the adult musculature and terms used for hyal and ventral branchial muscles in different amphibians often do not reflect homologies across lissamphibian orders. Here we describe the hyal and ventral branchial musculature in larvae of caecilians (Gymnophiona) and salamanders (Caudata), including juveniles of two permanently aquatic salamander species. Based on previous alternative terminology schemes, we propose a terminology for the hyal and ventral branchial muscles that reflects the homologies of muscles and that is suited for studies on hyobranchial muscle evolution in amphibians. We present a discussion of the hyal and ventral branchial muscles in larvae of the most recent common ancestor of amphibians (i.e. the ground plan of Lissamphibia). Based on our terminology, the hyal and ventral branchial musculature of caecilians and salamanders comprises the following muscles: m. depressor mandibulae, m. depressor mandibulae posterior, m. hyomandibularis, m. branchiohyoideus externus, m. interhyoideus, m. interhyoideus posterior, m. subarcualis rectus I, m. subarcualis obliquus II, m. subarcualis obliquus III, m. subarcualis rectus II-IV, and m. transversus ventralis IV. Except for the m. branchiohyoideus externus, all muscles considered herein can be assigned to the ground plan of the Lissamphibia with certainty. The m. branchiohyoideus externus is either apomorphic for the Batrachia (frogs

  10. Homology Modeling Procedures for Cytoskeletal Proteins of Tetrahymena and Other Ciliated Protists.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Giovanni J; Hufnagel, Linda A; King, Roberta S

    2016-01-01

    In recent years there has been an explosive increase in the number of annotated protein sequences available through genome sequencing, as well as an accumulation of published protein structural data based on crystallographic and NMR methods. When taken together with the development of computational methods for the prediction of protein structural and functional properties through homology modeling, an opportunity exists for prediction of properties of cytoskeletal proteins in a suitable model organism, such as Tetrahymena thermophila and its ciliated protist relatives. In particular, the recently sequenced genome of T. thermophila, long a model for cytoskeletal studies, provides a good starting point for undertaking such homology modeling studies. Homology modeling can produce functional predictions, for example regarding potential molecular interactions, that are of great interest to the drug industry and Tetrahymena is an attractive model system in which to follow up computational predictions with experimental analyses. We provide here procedures that can be followed to gain entry into this promising avenue of analysis. PMID:26498800

  11. Cellulose-inducible xylanase Xyl10A from Acremonium cellulolyticus: Purification, cloning and homologous expression.

    PubMed

    Kishishita, Seiichiro; Yoshimi, Miho; Fujii, Tatsuya; Taylor, Larry E; Decker, Stephen R; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2014-02-01

    Cellulose-inducible endo-β-1,4-xylanase (Xyl10A) from the mesophilic fungus Acremonium cellulolyticus was purified, characterized, and expressed by a homologous expression system. A. cellulolyticus CF-2612 produces a high level of xylanase upon induction by Solka-Floc cellulose. To identify this xylanase, the major fraction showing xylanase activity was purified from the CF-2612 culture supernatant, and its gene was identified from the genome sequence. Amino acid sequence homology of Xyl10A revealed that the purified xylanase, designated Xyl10A, exhibited significant homology to family 10 of the glycoside hydrolases (GH10), possessing a cellulose-binding module 1 in the C-terminal region. The xyl10A gene was cloned and expressed in A. cellulolyticus under the control of a glucoamylase promoter. Two recombinant Xyl10As (rXyl10A-I, 53kDa, and rXyl10A-II, 51kDa) were purified that have slightly different molecular weights based on SDS-PAGE. The rXyl10As had the same physicochemical and enzymatic properties as wtXyl10A: high thermostability (Tm 80.5°C), optimum pH 5.0 and specific activity 232-251U/mg for birchwood xylan. The molecular weights of N-deglycosylated rXyl10As were consistent with that of wild-type Xyl10A (wtXyl10A, 51kDa). PMID:24211645

  12. Role of RAD52 Epistasis Group Genes in Homologous Recombination and Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Symington, Lorraine S.

    2002-01-01

    The process of homologous recombination is a major DNA repair pathway that operates on DNA double-strand breaks, and possibly other kinds of DNA lesions, to promote error-free repair. Central to the process of homologous recombination are the RAD52 group genes (RAD50, RAD51, RAD52, RAD54, RDH54/TID1, RAD55, RAD57, RAD59, MRE11, and XRS2), most of which were identified by their requirement for the repair of ionizing-radiation-induced DNA damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Rad52 group proteins are highly conserved among eukaryotes, and Rad51, Mre11, and Rad50 are also conserved in prokaryotes and archaea. Recent studies showing defects in homologous recombination and double-strand break repair in several human cancer-prone syndromes have emphasized the importance of this repair pathway in maintaining genome integrity. Although sensitivity to ionizing radiation is a universal feature of rad52 group mutants, the mutants show considerable heterogeneity in different assays for recombinational repair of double-strand breaks and spontaneous mitotic recombination. Herein, I provide an overview of recent biochemical and structural analyses of the Rad52 group proteins and discuss how this information can be incorporated into genetic studies of recombination. PMID:12456786

  13. Cloning and characterization of two vertebrate homologs of the Drosophila eyes absent gene.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, J E; Bui, Q T; Steingrímsson, E; Nagle, D L; Fu, W; Genin, A; Spinner, N B; Copeland, N G; Jenkins, N A; Bucan, M; Bonini, N M

    1997-02-01

    The Drosophila eyes absent (eya) gene plays an essential role in the events that lead to proper development of the fly eye and embryo. Here we report the analysis of two human and two mouse homologs of the fly eya gene. Sequence comparison reveals a large domain of approximately 270 amino acids in the carboxyl terminus of the predicted mammalian proteins that shows 53% identity between the fly sequence and all of the vertebrate homologs. This Eya-homology domain is of novel sequence, with no previously identified motifs. RNA hybridization studies indicate that the mouse genes are expressed during embryogenesis and in select tissues of the adult. Both mouse Eya genes are expressed in the eye, suggesting that these genes may function in eye development in vertebrates as eya does in the fly. The mouse Eya2 gene maps to chromosome 2 in the region syntenic with human chromosome 20q13, and the mouse Eya2 gene maps to chromosome 4 in the region syntenic with human chromosome 1p36. Our findings support the notion that several families of genes (Pax-6/eyeless, Six-3/sine oculis, and Eya) play related and critical roles in the eye for both files and vertebrates. PMID:9049631

  14. Down-Regulation of Rad51 and Decreased Homologous Recombination in Hypoxic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bindra, Ranjit S.; Schaffer, Paul J.; Meng, Alice; Woo, Jennifer; Måseide, Kårstein; Roth, Matt E.; Lizardi, Paul; Hedley, David W.; Bristow, Robert G.; Glazer, Peter M.

    2004-01-01

    There is an emerging concept that acquired genetic instability in cancer cells can arise from the dysregulation of critical DNA repair pathways due to cell stresses such as inflammation and hypoxia. Here we report that hypoxia specifically down-regulates the expression of RAD51, a key mediator of homologous recombination in mammalian cells. Decreased levels of Rad51 were observed in multiple cancer cell types during hypoxic exposure and were not associated with the cell cycle profile or with expression of hypoxia-inducible factor. Analyses of RAD51 gene promoter activity, as well as mRNA and protein stability, indicate that the hypoxia-mediated regulation of this gene occurs via transcriptional repression. Decreased expression of Rad51 was also observed to persist in posthypoxic cells for as long as 48 h following reoxygenation. Correspondingly, we found reduced levels of homologous recombination in both hypoxic and posthypoxic cells, suggesting that the hypoxia-associated reduction in Rad51 expression has functional consequences for DNA repair. In addition, hypoxia-mediated down-regulation of Rad51 was confirmed in vivo via immunofluorescent image analysis of experimental tumors in mice. Based on these findings, we propose a novel mechanism of genetic instability in the tumor microenvironment mediated by hypoxia-induced suppression of the homologous recombination pathway in cancer cells. The aberrant regulation of Rad51 expression may also create heterogeneity in the DNA damage response among cells within tumors, with implications for the response to cancer therapies. PMID:15367671

  15. Detection of sequences homologous to human retroviral DNA in multiple sclerosis by gene amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, S.J.; Ehrlich, G.D.; Abbott, M.A.; Hurwitz, B.J.; Waldmann, T.A.; Poiesz, B.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Twenty-one patients with multiple sclerosis, chronic progressive type, were examined for DNA sequences homologous to a human retrovirus. Genomic DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells was analyzed for the presence of homologous sequences to the human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I (HTLV-I) long terminal repeat, 3{prime} gag, pol, and env domains by the enzymatic in vitro gene amplification technique, polymerase chain reaction. Positive identification of homologous pol sequences was made in the amplified DNA from six of these patients (29%). Three of these six patients (14%) also tested positive for the env region, but not for the other regions tested. In contrast, none of the samples from 35 normal individuals studied was positive when amplified and tested with the same primers and probes. Comparison of patterns obtained from controls and from patients with adult T-cell leukemia or tropical spastic paraparesis suggests that the DNA sequences identified are exogenous to the human genome and may correspond to a human retroviral species. The data support the detection of a human retroviral agent in some patients with multiple sclerosis.

  16. Different roles for homologous interneurons in species exhibiting similar rhythmic behaviors.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Akira; Newcomb, James M; Lillvis, Joshua L; Katz, Paul S

    2011-06-21

    It is often assumed that similar behaviors in related species are produced by similar neural mechanisms. To test this, we examined the neuronal basis of a simple swimming behavior in two nudibranchs (Mollusca, Opisthobranchia), Melibe leonina and Dendronotus iris. The side-to-side swimming movements of Dendronotus [1] strongly resemble those of Melibe [2, 3]. In Melibe, it was previously shown that the central pattern generator (CPG) for swimming is composed of two bilaterally symmetric pairs of identified interneurons, swim interneuron 1 (Si1) and swim interneuron 2 (Si2), which are electrically coupled ipsilaterally and mutually inhibit both contralateral counterparts [2, 4]. We identified homologs of Si1 and Si2 in Dendronotus. (Henceforth, homologous neurons in each species will be distinguished by the subscripts (Den) and (Mel).) We found that Si2(Den) and Si2(Mel) play similar roles in generating the swim motor pattern. However, unlike Si1(Mel), Si1(Den) was not part of the swim CPG, was not strongly coupled to the ipsilateral Si2(Den), and did not inhibit the contralateral neurons. Thus, species differences exist in the neuronal organization of the swim CPGs despite the similarity of the behaviors. Therefore, similarity in species-typical behavior is not necessarily predictive of common neural mechanisms, even for homologous neurons in closely related species. PMID:21620707

  17. Evidence for homologous peptidergic neurons in the buccal ganglia of diverse nudibranch mollusks.

    PubMed

    Watson, W H; Willows, A O

    1992-03-01

    The buccal ganglia of seven nudibranches (Aeolidia papillosa, Armina californica, Dirona albolineata, D. picta, Hermissenda crassicornis, Melibe leonina, and Tritonia diomedea) were examined to explore possible homologies between large cells that reacted with antibodies directed against small cardioactive peptide B (SCPB). The buccal ganglion of each species possessed a pair of large, dorsal-lateral, whitish neurons that contained an SCPB-like peptide. We refer to these neurons as the SLB (SCPB-immunoreactive Large Buccal) cells. In all species examined, the SLB cells project out the gastroesophageal nerves and appear to innervate the esophagus. In each species, an apparent rhythmic feeding motor program (FMP) was observed by intracellular recording from both SLB neurons and other neurons in isolated preparations of the buccal ganglia. SLB cells often fire at a high frequency, and usually burst in a specific phase relation to the FMP activity. Stimulation of SLB cells enhances expression of the feeding motor program, either by potentiating existing activity or eliciting the FMP in quiescent preparations. Finally, perfusion of isolated buccal ganglia with SCPB excites the SLB cells and activates FMPs. Thus, both the immunohistochemical and electrophysiological data suggest that the SLB cells within three suborders of the opisthobranchia (Dendronotacea, Arminacea, and Aeolidacea) are homologous. A comparison of our data with previously published studies indicates that SLB cell homologs may exist in other gastropods as well. PMID:1527526

  18. TaASY1 promotes homologous chromosome interactions and is affected by deletion of Ph1.

    PubMed

    Boden, Scott A; Langridge, Peter; Spangenberg, German; Able, Jason A

    2009-02-01

    During meiosis, chromosomes are sorted into homologous pairs as a preface to their intimate association via recombination and synapsis. However, little is known about the mechanism used to distinguish homologous chromosomes from other chromosomes present in the nucleus. Studies in wheat (Triticum aestivum) have shown that the Pairing homoeologous 1 (Ph1) locus is required to suppress interactions between genetically similar homoeologous chromosomes. Here we show that absence of Ph1 causes increased transcription of Asynapsis 1 (ASY1), a gene that encodes an axial-element-associated protein that is essential for synapsis and cross-over formation in Arabidopsis and rice. Localisation of ASY1 during meiosis is also affected by deletion of Ph1. In addition, transgenic wheat mutants with decreased activity of TaASY1 display reduced synapsis during prophase I and exhibit pairing between homoeologous chromosomes at metaphase I. These results suggest that ASY1 is required to promote interactions between homologous chromosomes in bread wheat, and that Ph1 has a gene regulatory role, which is consistent with its suggested genetic identity as a Cdk-like gene. Broader implications of this research suggest that we could use the Taasy1 mutants to assess their efficacy in alien chromatin introgression studies, as seen with the ph1b mutant. PMID:18826431

  19. Planarian PTEN homologs regulate stem cells and regeneration through TOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Oviedo, Néstor J; Pearson, Bret J; Levin, Michael; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    We have identified two genes, Smed-PTEN-1 and Smed-PTEN-2, capable of regulating stem cell function in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. Both genes encode proteins homologous to the mammalian tumor suppressor, phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN). Inactivation of Smed-PTEN-1 and -2 by RNA interference (RNAi) in planarians disrupts regeneration, and leads to abnormal outgrowths in both cut and uncut animals followed soon after by death (lysis). The resulting phenotype is characterized by hyperproliferation of neoblasts (planarian stem cells), tissue disorganization and a significant accumulation of postmitotic cells with impaired differentiation capacity. Further analyses revealed that rapamycin selectively prevented such accumulation without affecting the normal neoblast proliferation associated with physiological turnover and regeneration. In animals in which PTEN function is abrogated, we also detected a significant increase in the number of cells expressing the planarian Akt gene homolog (Smed-Akt). However, functional abrogation of Smed-Akt in Smed-PTEN RNAi-treated animals does not prevent cell overproliferation and lethality, indicating that functional abrogation of Smed-PTEN is sufficient to induce abnormal outgrowths. Altogether, our data reveal roles for PTEN in the regulation of planarian stem cells that are strikingly conserved to mammalian models. In addition, our results implicate this protein in the control of stem cell maintenance during the regeneration of complex structures in planarians. PMID:19048075

  20. Identification of a functional homolog of the yeast copper homeostasis gene ATX1 from Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Himelblau, E.; Amasino, R.M.; Mira, H.; Penarrubia, L.; Lin, S.J.; Culotta, V.C.

    1998-08-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a homolog of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) gene Anti-oxidant 1 (ATX1) has been identified from Arabidopsis. This gene, referred to as Copper CHaperone (CCH), encodes a protein that is 36% identical to the amino acid sequence of ATX1 and has a 48-amino acid extension at the C-terminal end, which is absent from ATX1 homologs identified in animals. ATX1-deficient yeast (atx1) displayed a loss of high-affinity iron uptake. Expression of CCH in the atx1 strain restored high-affinity iron uptake, demonstrating that CCH is a functional homolog of ATX1. When overexpressed in yeast lacking the superoxide dismutase gene SOD1, both ATX1 and CCH protected the cell from the reactive oxygen toxicity that results from superoxide dismutase deficiency. CCH was unable to rescue the sod1 phenotype in the absence of copper, indicating that CCH function is copper dependent. In Arabidopsis CCH mRNA is present in the root, leaf, and in fluorescence and is up-regulated 7-fold in leaves undergoing senescence. In plants treated with 800 nL/L ozone for 30 min, CCH mRNA levels increased by 30%. In excised leaves and whole plants treated with high levels of exogenous CuSO{sub 4}, CCH mRNA levels decreased, indicating that CCH is regulated differently than characterized metallothionein proteins in Arabidopsis.