Science.gov

Sample records for prostate cancer models

  1. Prostate Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing prostate cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  2. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Prostate Cancer What is Prostate Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... the Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) How Prostate Cancer Occurs Prostate cancer occurs when a tumor forms ...

  3. Prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000380.htm Prostate cancer To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Prostate cancer is cancer that starts in the prostate gland. ...

  4. Prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R., Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results.

  5. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... men younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  6. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  7. What is Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Key statistics for prostate cancer What is prostate cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... through the center of the prostate. Types of prostate cancer Almost all prostate cancers are adenocarcinomas . These cancers ...

  8. Prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Castillejos-Molina, Ricardo Alonso; Gabilondo-Navarro, Fernando Bernardo

    2016-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequent tumor found in men worldwide and in Mexico in particular. Age and family history are the main risk factors. The diagnosis is made by prostate biopsy in patients with abnormalities detected in their prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels or digital rectal exam (DRE). This article reviews screening and diagnostic methods as well as treatment options for patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. PMID:27557386

  9. Genetically engineered mouse models to study prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Brzezinska, Elspeth A; Nixon, Colin; Patel, Rachana; Leung, Hing Y

    2015-01-01

    Genetically engineered mouse models have become fundamental tools in the basic and translational research of prostate cancer. There is a plethora of models available to dissect the genetic alterations and aberrant signaling events associated with human prostate cancer and, furthermore, to investigate new and "personalized" therapies to treat the disease. In this chapter, we discuss some of the models recently and currently used to study prostate cancer in vivo, and some considerations when selecting an appropriate model to investigate particular aspects of the disease. We describe the methods required to isolate prostate tumors and conduct basic characterization of the tumor to determine tumor load and histopathology. We also discuss important aspects to be considered when processing samples for further analysis. PMID:25636465

  10. Model-based patterns in prostate cancer mortality worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Fontes, F; Severo, M; Castro, C; Lourenço, S; Gomes, S; Botelho, F; La Vecchia, C; Lunet, N

    2013-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer mortality has been decreasing in several high income countries and previous studies analysed the trends mostly according to geographical criteria. We aimed to identify patterns in the time trends of prostate cancer mortality across countries using a model-based approach. Methods: Model-based clustering was used to identify patterns of variation in prostate cancer mortality (1980–2010) across 37 European, five non-European high-income countries and four leading emerging economies. We characterised the patterns observed regarding the geographical distribution and gross national income of the countries, as well as the trends observed in mortality/incidence ratios. Results: We identified three clusters of countries with similar variation in prostate cancer mortality: pattern 1 (‘no mortality decline'), characterised by a continued increase throughout the whole period; patterns 2 (‘later mortality decline') and 3 (‘earlier mortality decline') depict mortality declines, starting in the late and early 1990s, respectively. These clusters are also homogeneous regarding the variation in the prostate cancer mortality/incidence ratios, while are heterogeneous with reference to the geographical region of the countries and distribution of the gross national income. Conclusion: We provide a general model for the description and interpretation of the trends in prostate cancer mortality worldwide, based on three main patterns. PMID:23660943

  11. Statistical volumetric model for characterization and visualization of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jianping; Srikanchana, Rujirutana; McClain, Maxine A.; Wang, Yue J.; Xuan, Jian Hua; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Freedman, Matthew T.; Mun, Seong K.

    2000-04-01

    To reveal the spatial pattern of localized prostate cancer distribution, a 3D statistical volumetric model, showing the probability map of prostate cancer distribution, together with the anatomical structure of the prostate, has been developed from 90 digitally-imaged surgical specimens. Through an enhanced virtual environment with various visualization modes, this master model permits for the first time an accurate characterization and understanding of prostate cancer distribution patterns. The construction of the statistical volumetric model is characterized by mapping all of the individual models onto a generic prostate site model, in which a self-organizing scheme is used to decompose a group of contours representing multifold tumors into localized tumor elements. Next crucial step of creating the master model is the development of an accurate multi- object and non-rigid registration/warping scheme incorporating various variations among these individual moles in true 3D. This is achieved with a multi-object based principle-axis alignment followed by an affine transform, and further fine-tuned by a thin-plate spline interpolation driven by the surface based deformable warping dynamics. Based on the accurately mapped tumor distribution, a standard finite normal mixture is used to model the cancer volumetric distribution statistics, whose parameters are estimated using both the K-means and expectation- maximization algorithms under the information theoretic criteria. Given the desired number of tissue samplings, the prostate needle biopsy site selection is optimized through a probabilistic self-organizing map thus achieving a maximum likelihood of cancer detection. We describe the details of our theory and methodology, and report our pilot results and evaluation of the effectiveness of the algorithm in characterizing prostate cancer distributions and optimizing needle biopsy techniques.

  12. Prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Attard, Gerhardt; Parker, Chris; Eeles, Ros A; Schröder, Fritz; Tomlins, Scott A; Tannock, Ian; Drake, Charles G; de Bono, Johann S

    2016-01-01

    Much progress has been made in research for prostate cancer in the past decade. There is now greater understanding for the genetic basis of familial prostate cancer with identification of rare but high-risk mutations (eg, BRCA2, HOXB13) and low-risk but common alleles (77 identified so far by genome-wide association studies) that could lead to targeted screening of patients at risk. This is especially important because screening for prostate cancer based on prostate-specific antigen remains controversial due to the high rate of overdiagnosis and unnecessary prostate biopsies, despite evidence that it reduces mortality. Classification of prostate cancer into distinct molecular subtypes, including mutually exclusive ETS-gene-fusion-positive and SPINK1-overexpressing, CHD1-loss cancers, could allow stratification of patients for different management strategies. Presently, men with localised disease can have very different prognoses and treatment options, ranging from observation alone through to radical surgery, with few good-quality randomised trials to inform on the best approach for an individual patient. The survival of patients with metastatic prostate cancer progressing on androgen-deprivation therapy (castration-resistant prostate cancer) has improved substantially. In addition to docetaxel, which has been used for more than a decade, in the past 4 years five new drugs have shown efficacy with improvements in overall survival leading to licensing for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Because of this rapid change in the therapeutic landscape, no robust data exist to inform on the selection of patients for a specific treatment for castration-resistant prostate cancer or the best sequence of administration. Moreover, the high cost of the newer drugs limits their widespread use in several countries. Data from continuing clinical and translational research are urgently needed to improve, and, crucially, to personalise management. PMID

  13. Optoacoustic imaging of an animal model of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Michelle P.; Arsenault, Michel; Riley, Chris; Kolios, Michael; Whelan, William M.

    2010-02-01

    Prostate cancer is currently the most common cancer among Canadian men. Due to an increase in public awareness and screening, prostate cancer is being detected at earlier stages and in much younger men. This is raising the need for better treatment monitoring approaches. Optoacoustic imaging is a new technique that involves exposing tissues to pulsed light and detecting the acoustic waves generated by the tissue. Optoacoustic images of a tumour bearing mouse and an agematched control were acquired for a 775 nm illumination using a reverse-mode imaging system. A murine model of prostate cancer, TRAMP (transgenetic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate), was investigated. The results show an increase in optoacoustic signal generated by the tumour compared to that generated by the surrounding tissues with a contrast ratio of 3.5. The dimensions of the tumour in the optoacoustic image agreed with the true tumour dimensions to within 0.5 mm. In this study we show that there are detectable changes in optoacoustic signal strength that arise from the presence of a tumour in the prostate, which demonstrates the potential of optoacoustic imaging for the monitoring of prostate cancer therapy.

  14. A partial differential equation model of metastasized prostatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Avner; Jain, Harsh Vardhan

    2013-06-01

    Biochemically failing metastatic prostate cancer is typically treated with androgen ablation. However, due to the emergence of castration-resistant cells that can survive in low androgen concentrations, such therapy eventually fails. Here, we develop a partial differential equation model of the growth and response to treatment of prostate cancer that has metastasized to the bone. Existence and uniqueness results are derived for the resulting free boundary problem. In particular, existence and uniqueness of solutions for all time are proven for the radially symmetric case. Finally, numerical simulations of a tumor growing in 2-dimensions with radial symmetry are carried in order to evaluate the therapeutic potential of different treatment strategies. These simulations are able to reproduce a variety of clinically observed responses to treatment, and suggest treatment strategies that may result in tumor remission, underscoring our model's potential to make a significant contribution in the field of prostate cancer therapeutics. PMID:23906138

  15. An RBF-PSO based approach for modeling prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perracchione, Emma; Stura, Ilaria

    2016-06-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men; it grows slowly and it could be diagnosed in an early stage by dosing the Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA). However, a relapse after the primary therapy could arise in 25 - 30% of cases and different growth characteristics of the new tumor are observed. In order to get a better understanding of the phenomenon, a two parameters growth model is considered. To estimate the parameters values identifying the disease risk level a novel approach, based on combining Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) with meshfree interpolation methods, is proposed.

  16. Primary versus castration-resistant prostate cancer: modeling through novel murine prostate cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Georges; Monzer, Alissar; Bahmad, Hisham; Chamaa, Farah; Hamdar, Layal; Mouhieddine, Tarek H; Shayya, Sami; Eid, Assaad; Kobeissy, Firas; Liu, Yen-Nien; Abou-Kheir, Wassim

    2016-05-17

    Cell lines representing the progression of prostate cancer (PC) from an androgen-dependent to an androgen-independent state are scarce. In this study, we used previously characterized prostate luminal epithelial cell line (Plum), under androgen influence, to establish cellular models of PC progression. Cells derived from orthotopic tumors have been isolated to develop an androgen-dependent (PLum-AD) versus an androgen-independent (PLum-AI) model. Upon immunofluorescent, qRT-PCR and Western blot analyses, PLum-AD cells mostly expressed prostate epithelial markers while PLum-AI cells expressed mesenchymal cell markers. Interestingly, both cell lines maintained a population of stem/progenitor cells. Furthermore, our data suggest that both cell lines are tumorigenic; PLum-AD resulted in an adenocarcinoma whereas PLum-AI resulted in a sarcomatoid carcinoma when transplanted subcutaneously in NOD-SCID mice. Finally, gene expression profiles showed enrichment in functions involved in cell migration, apoptosis, as well as neoplasm invasiveness and metastasis in PLum-AI cells. In conclusion, these data suggest that the newly isolated cell lines represent a new in vitro model of androgen-dependent and -independent PC. PMID:27036046

  17. Classification Models for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wichard, Joerg D.; Cammann, Henning; Stephan, Carsten; Tolxdorff, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the performance of different classification models and their ability to recognize prostate cancer in an early stage. We build ensembles of classification models in order to increase the classification performance. We measure the performance of our models in an extensive cross-validation procedure and compare different classification models. The datasets come from clinical examinations and some of the classification models are already in use to support the urologists in their clinical work. PMID:18464915

  18. Prostate cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - prostate cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on prostate cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/prostatecancer/index National Cancer Institute -- www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/ ...

  19. Modeling prostate cancer in mice: Something old, something new, something premalignant, something metastatic

    PubMed Central

    Irshad, Shazia; Abate-Shen, Cory

    2012-01-01

    More than 15 years ago the first generation of genetically-engineered mouse (GEM) models of prostate cancer was introduced. These transgenic models utilized prostate-specific promoters to express SV40 oncogenes specifically in prostate epithelium. Since the description of these initial models, there have been a plethora of GEM models of prostate cancer, representing various perturbations of oncogenes or tumor suppressors, either alone or in combination. This review describes these GEM models, focusing on their relevance for human prostate cancer and highlighting their strengths and limitations, as well as opportunities for the future. PMID:23114843

  20. Development of Interpretable Predictive Models for BPH and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo, Pablo; Vivo, Alicia; Tárraga, Pedro J; Rodríguez-Montes, JA

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Traditional methods for deciding whether to recommend a patient for a prostate biopsy are based on cut-off levels of stand-alone markers such as prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or any of its derivatives. However, in the last decade we have seen the increasing use of predictive models that combine, in a non-linear manner, several predictives that are better able to predict prostate cancer (PC), but these fail to help the clinician to distinguish between PC and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) patients. We construct two new models that are capable of predicting both PC and BPH. METHODS An observational study was performed on 150 patients with PSA ≥3 ng/mL and age >50 years. We built a decision tree and a logistic regression model, validated with the leave-one-out methodology, in order to predict PC or BPH, or reject both. RESULTS Statistical dependence with PC and BPH was found for prostate volume (P-value < 0.001), PSA (P-value < 0.001), international prostate symptom score (IPSS; P-value < 0.001), digital rectal examination (DRE; P-value < 0.001), age (P-value < 0.002), antecedents (P-value < 0.006), and meat consumption (P-value < 0.08). The two predictive models that were constructed selected a subset of these, namely, volume, PSA, DRE, and IPSS, obtaining an area under the ROC curve (AUC) between 72% and 80% for both PC and BPH prediction. CONCLUSION PSA and volume together help to build predictive models that accurately distinguish among PC, BPH, and patients without any of these pathologies. Our decision tree and logistic regression models outperform the AUC obtained in the compared studies. Using these models as decision support, the number of unnecessary biopsies might be significantly reduced. PMID:25780348

  1. Prostate Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... finasteride who did have prostate cancer had more aggressive tumors . The number of deaths from prostate cancer ... men that did not. The number of less aggressive prostate cancers was lower, but the number of ...

  2. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... for early screening. Photo: AP Photo/Danny Moloshok Prostate Cancer The prostate gland is a walnut-sized structure ...

  3. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... early screening. Photo: AP Photo/Danny Moloshok Prostate Cancer The prostate gland is a walnut-sized structure ...

  4. Localized Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a decision aid for men with clinically localized prostate cancer (available at http://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/prostate_da) ... A Decision Aid for Men With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Page 1 of 24 Introduction Men with clinically ...

  5. A Mathematical Model of Intermittent Androgen Suppression for Prostate Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ideta, Aiko Miyamura; Tanaka, Gouhei; Takeuchi, Takumi; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2008-12-01

    For several decades, androgen suppression has been the principal modality for treatment of advanced prostate cancer. Although the androgen deprivation is initially effective, most patients experience a relapse within several years due to the proliferation of so-called androgen-independent tumor cells. Bruchovsky et al. suggested in animal models that intermittent androgen suppression (IAS) can prolong the time to relapse when compared with continuous androgen suppression (CAS). Therefore, IAS has been expected to enhance clinical efficacy in conjunction with reduction in adverse effects and improvement in quality of life of patients during off-treatment periods. This paper presents a mathematical model that describes the growth of a prostate tumor under IAS therapy based on monitoring of the serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA). By treating the cancer tumor as a mixed assembly of androgen-dependent and androgen-independent cells, we investigate the difference between CAS and IAS with respect to factors affecting an androgen-independent relapse. Numerical and bifurcation analyses show how the tumor growth and the relapse time are influenced by the net growth rate of the androgen-independent cells, a protocol of the IAS therapy, and the mutation rate from androgen-dependent cells to androgen-independent ones.

  6. [Prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Morote, Joan; Maldonado, Xavier; Morales-Bárrera, Rafael

    2016-02-01

    The Vall d'Hebron multidisciplinary prostate cancer (PC) team reviews recent advances in the management of this neoplasm. Screening studies with long follow-up show a reduction in mortality, whereas active surveillance is emerging as a therapeutic approach of non-aggressive cancers. New markers increase the specificity of PSA and also allow targeting suspected aggressive cancers. Multiparametric magnetic resonance (mMRI) has emerged as the most effective method in the selection of patients for biopsy and also for local tumor staging. The paradigm of random prostatic biopsy is changing through the fusion techniques that allow guiding ultrasonography-driven biopsy of suspicious areas detected in mMRI. Radical prostatectomy (RP) and radiotherapy (RT) are curative treatments of localized PC and both have experienced significant technological improvements. RP is highly effective and the incorporation of robotic surgery is reducing morbidity. Modern RT allows the possibility of high tumor dose with minimal adjacent dose reducing its toxicity. Androgen deprivation therapy with LHRH analogues remains the treatment of choice for advanced PC, but should be limited to this indication. The loss of bone mass and adverse metabolic effects increases the frequency of fractures and cardiovascular morbimortality. After castration resistance in metastatic disease, new hormone-based drugs have demonstrated efficacy even after chemotherapy resistance. PMID:25727526

  7. Efficacy of targeted AKT inhibition in genetically engineered mouse models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    De Velasco, Marco A.; Kura, Yurie; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Nishio, Kazuto; Davies, Barry R.; Uemura, Hirotsugu

    2016-01-01

    The PI3K/AKT pathway is frequently altered in advanced human prostate cancer mainly through the loss of functional PTEN, and presents as potential target for personalized therapy. Our aim was to determine the therapeutic potential of the pan-AKT inhibitor, AZD5363, in PTEN-deficient prostate cancer. Here we used a genetically engineered mouse (GEM) model of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer to evaluate the in vivo pharmacodynamic and antitumor activity of AZD5363 in castration-naïve and castration-resistant prostate cancer. An additional GEM model, based on the concomitant inactivation of PTEN and Trp53 (P53), was established as an aggressive model of advanced prostate cancer and was used to further evaluate clinically relevant endpoints after treatment with AZD5363. In vivo pharmacodynamic studies demonstrated that AZD5363 effectively inhibited downstream targets of AKT. AZD5363 monotherapy significantly reduced growth of tumors in castration-naïve and castration-resistant models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer. More importantly, AZD5363 significantly delayed tumor growth and improved overall survival and progression-free survival in PTEN/P53 double knockout mice. Our findings demonstrate that AZD5363 is effective against GEM models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer and provide lines of evidence to support further investigation into the development of treatment strategies targeting AKT for the treatment of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer. PMID:26910118

  8. [Localized prostate cancer Focal Therapy: "A la carte" Model].

    PubMed

    Linares Espinós, E; Barret, E; Sivaraman, A; Pérez-Reggeti, J I; Sánchez-Salas, R; Rozet, F; Galiano, M; Cathelineau, X

    2016-07-01

    Focal therapy has settled as an alternative to radical treatment in selected cases of localized prostate cancer. The selection of patients who are candidates for focal therapy is based on imaging diagnosis relying on multiparametric MRI and image fusion techniques. Thanks to the oncological results and safety profiles of initial series, various energy sources have been developed over the last years. The availability of multiple types of energy sources for focal therapy, commits us to evaluate what type of energy would be the optimal depending on patient's profile and type of lesion. A unique energy for focal therapy would be ideal, but facing the research of the various types of energy we must identify which one is recommended for each lesion. With the experience of our center in different approaches of focal therapy we propose the "A LA CARTE" MODEL based on localization of the lesion. We present the criteria the "a la carte" model is based on, supported by the published evidence on the use of different ablative therapies for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Lesion localization, technical characteristics of each type of energy, patient's profile and secondary effects must be considered in every choice of focal therapy. PMID:27416638

  9. MR Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer with a Peptide Targeted Contrast Agent in a Mouse Orthotopic Prostate Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Mingqian; Burden-Gulley, Susan M.; Li, Wen; Wu, Xueming; Lindner, Daniel; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M.; Gulani, Vikas; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To study the effectiveness of a peptide targeted nanoglobular Gd-DOTA complexes for MR molecular imaging of prostate cancer in a mouse orthotopic PC-3 prostate cancer model. Methods A CLT1 (CGLIIQKNEC) peptide targeted generation 2 nanoglobular Gd-DOTA monoamide conjugate [CLT1-G2-(Gd-DOTA)] was used for imaging fibrin-fibronectin complexes in prostate tumor using a non-specific peptide KAREC modified conjugate, KAREC-G2-(Gd-DOTA) as a control. Cy5 conjugates of CLT1 and KAREC were synthesized for binding studies. Orthotopic PC-3 prostate tumors were established in the prostate of athymic male nude mice. MRI study was performed on a Bruker 7T animal scanner. Results CLT1 peptide showed specific binding in the prostate tumor with no binding in normal tissues. The control peptide had little binding in both normal and tumor tissues. CLT1-G2-(Gd-DOTA) resulted in stronger contrast enhancement in the tumor tissue than the KAREC-G2-(Gd-DOTA). CLT1-G2-(Gd-DOTA) generated approximately 100% increase in contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the tumor as compared to precontrast CNR at 1 minute post-injection, while the control agent KAREC-G2-(Gd-DOTA) only resulted in 8% CNR increase. Conclusion CLT1-G2-(Gd-DOTA) is a promising molecular MRI contrast agent for fibrin-fibronectin complexes in the tumor stroma. It has a potential for the diagnosis and assessing prognosis of malignant tumors with MRI. PMID:22139536

  10. MYC and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Cheryl M.; Bieberich, Charles J.; Dang, Chi V.; Nelson, William G.; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; De Marzo, Angelo M.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer, the majority of which is adenocarcinoma, is the most common epithelial cancer affecting a majority of elderly men in Western nations. Its manifestation, however, varies from clinically asymptomatic insidious neoplasms that progress slowly and do not threaten life to one that is highly aggressive with a propensity for metastatic spread and lethality if not treated in time. A number of somatic genetic and epigenetic alterations occur in prostate cancer cells. Some of these changes, such as loss of the tumor suppressors PTEN and p53, are linked to disease progression. Others, such as ETS gene fusions, appear to be linked more with early phases of the disease, such as invasion. Alterations in chromosome 8q24 in the region of MYC have also been linked to disease aggressiveness for many years. However, a number of recent studies in human tissues have indicated that MYC appears to be activated at the earliest phases of prostate cancer (e.g., in tumor-initiating cells) in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, a key precursor lesion to invasive prostatic adenocarcinoma. The initiation and early progression of prostate cancer can be recapitulated in genetically engineered mouse models, permitting a richer understanding of the cause and effects of loss of tumor suppressors and activation of MYC. The combination of studies using human tissues and mouse models paints an emerging molecular picture of prostate cancer development and early progression. This picture reveals that MYC contributes to disease initiation and progression by stimulating an embryonic stem cell–like signature characterized by an enrichment of genes involved in ribosome biogenesis and by repressing differentiation. These insights pave the way to potential novel therapeutic concepts based on MYC biology. PMID:21779461

  11. Prostate Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF Spotlight Prostate Cancer Foundation and Major League Baseball Step Up To The Plate To Raise Awareness ... Foundation News Prostate Cancer Foundation and Major League Baseball Step Up To The Plate To Raise Awareness ...

  12. Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat. There is no standard screening test for prostate cancer. Researchers are studying different tests to find those ... PSA level may be high if you have prostate cancer. It can also be high if you have ...

  13. Screening for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Screening for Prostate Cancer: A Guidance Statement From the Clinical Guidelines Committee ... Physicians The full report is titled “Screening for Prostate Cancer: A Guidance Statement From the Clinical Guidelines Committee ...

  14. Prostate cancer screenings

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000846.htm Prostate cancer screenings To use the sharing features on this ... present it is not clear if screening for prostate cancer is helpful for most men. For this reason, ...

  15. Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer Past ... Prostate Cancer" Articles Progress Against Prostate Cancer / Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer / Prostate ...

  16. Predictive computational modeling to define effective treatment strategies for bone metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Leah M.; Araujo, Arturo; Pow-Sang, Julio M.; Budzevich, Mikalai M.; Basanta, David; Lynch, Conor C.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to rapidly assess the efficacy of therapeutic strategies for incurable bone metastatic prostate cancer is an urgent need. Pre-clinical in vivo models are limited in their ability to define the temporal effects of therapies on simultaneous multicellular interactions in the cancer-bone microenvironment. Integrating biological and computational modeling approaches can overcome this limitation. Here, we generated a biologically driven discrete hybrid cellular automaton (HCA) model of bone metastatic prostate cancer to identify the optimal therapeutic window for putative targeted therapies. As proof of principle, we focused on TGFβ because of its known pleiotropic cellular effects. HCA simulations predict an optimal effect for TGFβ inhibition in a pre-metastatic setting with quantitative outputs indicating a significant impact on prostate cancer cell viability, osteoclast formation and osteoblast differentiation. In silico predictions were validated in vivo with models of bone metastatic prostate cancer (PAIII and C4-2B). Analysis of human bone metastatic prostate cancer specimens reveals heterogeneous cancer cell use of TGFβ. Patient specific information was seeded into the HCA model to predict the effect of TGFβ inhibitor treatment on disease evolution. Collectively, we demonstrate how an integrated computational/biological approach can rapidly optimize the efficacy of potential targeted therapies on bone metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:27411810

  17. Predictive computational modeling to define effective treatment strategies for bone metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Cook, Leah M; Araujo, Arturo; Pow-Sang, Julio M; Budzevich, Mikalai M; Basanta, David; Lynch, Conor C

    2016-01-01

    The ability to rapidly assess the efficacy of therapeutic strategies for incurable bone metastatic prostate cancer is an urgent need. Pre-clinical in vivo models are limited in their ability to define the temporal effects of therapies on simultaneous multicellular interactions in the cancer-bone microenvironment. Integrating biological and computational modeling approaches can overcome this limitation. Here, we generated a biologically driven discrete hybrid cellular automaton (HCA) model of bone metastatic prostate cancer to identify the optimal therapeutic window for putative targeted therapies. As proof of principle, we focused on TGFβ because of its known pleiotropic cellular effects. HCA simulations predict an optimal effect for TGFβ inhibition in a pre-metastatic setting with quantitative outputs indicating a significant impact on prostate cancer cell viability, osteoclast formation and osteoblast differentiation. In silico predictions were validated in vivo with models of bone metastatic prostate cancer (PAIII and C4-2B). Analysis of human bone metastatic prostate cancer specimens reveals heterogeneous cancer cell use of TGFβ. Patient specific information was seeded into the HCA model to predict the effect of TGFβ inhibitor treatment on disease evolution. Collectively, we demonstrate how an integrated computational/biological approach can rapidly optimize the efficacy of potential targeted therapies on bone metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:27411810

  18. Psychosocial stress and prostate cancer: a theoretical model.

    PubMed

    Ellison, G L; Coker, A L; Hebert, J R; Sanderson, S M; Royal, C D; Weinrich, S P

    2001-01-01

    African-American men are more likely to develop and die from prostate cancer than are European-American men; yet, factors responsible for the racial disparity in incidence and mortality have not been elucidated. Socioeconomic disadvantage is more prevalent among African-American than among European-American men. Socioeconomic disadvantage can lead to psychosocial stress and may be linked to negative lifestyle behaviors. Regardless of socioeconomic position, African-American men routinely experience racism-induced stress. We propose a theoretical framework for an association between psychosocial stress and prostate cancer. Within the context of history and culture, we further propose that psychosocial stress may partially explain the variable incidence of prostate cancer between these diverse groups. Psychosocial stress may negatively impact the immune system leaving the individual susceptible to malignancies. Behavioral responses to psychosocial stress are amenable to change. If psychosocial stress is found to negatively impact prostate cancer risk, interventions may be designed to modify reactions to environmental demands. PMID:11572415

  19. Prostate cancer as a model for tumour immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Charles G.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in basic immunology have led to an improved understanding of the interactions between the immune system and tumours, generating renewed interest in approaches that aim to treat cancer immunologically. As clinical and preclinical studies of tumour immunotherapy illustrate several immunological principles, a review of these data is broadly instructive and is particularly timely now that several agents are beginning to show evidence of efficacy. This is especially relevant in the case of prostate cancer, as recent approval of sipuleucel-T by the US Food and Drug Administration marks the first antigen-specific immunotherapy approved for cancer treatment. Although this Review focuses on immunotherapy for prostate cancer, the principles discussed are applicable to many tumour types, and the approaches discussed are highlighted in that context. PMID:20651745

  20. Cell Line Modeling to Study Biomarker Panel in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    NickKholgh, Bita; Fang, Xiaolan; Winters, Shira M.; Raina, Anvi; Pandya, Komal S.; Gyabaah, Kenneth; Fino, Nora; Balaji, K.C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND African–American men with prostate cancer (PCa) present with higher-grade and -stage tumors compared to Caucasians. While the disparity may result from multiple factors, a biological basis is often strongly suspected. Currently, few well-characterized experimental model systems are available to study the biological basis of racial disparity in PCa. We report a validated in vitro cell line model system that could be used for the purpose. METHODS We assembled a PCa cell line model that included currently available African–American PCa cell lines and LNCaP (androgen-dependent) and C4-2 (castration-resistant) Caucasian PCa cells. The utility of the cell lines in studying the biological basis of variance in a malignant phenotype was explored using a multiplex biomarker panel consisting of proteins that have been proven to play a role in the progression of PCa. The panel expression was evaluated by Western blot and RT-PCR in cell lines and validated in human PCa tissues by RT-PCR. As proof-of-principle to demonstrate the utility of our model in functional studies, we performed MTS viability assays and molecular studies. RESULTS The dysregulation of the multiplex biomarker panel in primary African–American cell line (E006AA) was similar to metastatic Caucasian cell lines, which would suggest that the cell line model could be used to study an inherent aggressive phenotype in African–American men with PCa. We had previously demonstrated that Protein kinase D1 (PKD1) is a novel kinase that is down regulated in advanced prostate cancer. We established the functional relevance by over expressing PKD1, which resulted in decreased proliferation and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) in PCa cells. Moreover, we established the feasibility of studying the expression of the multiplex biomarker panel in archived human PCa tissue from African–Americans and Caucasians as a prelude to future translational studies. CONCLUSION We have characterized a novel in

  1. Prediction of treatment efficacy for prostate cancer using a mathematical model

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Huiming; Zhao, Weiling; Tan, Hua; Ji, Zhiwei; Li, Jingsong; Li, King; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    Prostate immune system plays a critical role in the regulation of prostate cancer development regarding androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) and/or immunotherapy (vaccination). In this study, we developed a mathematical model to explore the interactions between prostate tumor and immune microenvironment. This model was used to predict treatment outcomes for prostate cancer with ADT, vaccination, Treg depletion and/or IL-2 neutralization. Animal data were used to guide construction, parameter selection, and validation of our model. Our analysis shows that Treg depletion and/or IL-2 neutralization can effectively improve the treatment efficacy of combined therapy with ADT and vaccination. Treg depletion has a higher synergetic effect than that from IL-2 neutralization. This study highlights a potential therapeutic strategy in effectively managing prostate tumor growth and provides a framework of systems biology approach in studying tumor-related immune mechanism and consequent selection of therapeutic regimens. PMID:26868634

  2. Cryotherapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cryotherapy uses very cold temperatures to freeze and kill prostate cancer cells. The goal of cryosurgery is ... Possible short-term side effects of cryotherapy for prostate ... of the penis or scrotum Problems controlling your bladder (more ...

  3. Screening for prostate cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weirich, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    Despite recent advances in both the survival and cure rates for many forms of cancer, unfortunately the same has not been true for prostate cancer. In fact, the age-adjusted death rate from prostate cancer has not significantly improved since 1949, and prostate cancer remains the most common cancer in American men, causing the second highest cancer mortality rate. Topics discussed include the following: serum testosterone levels; diagnosis; mortality statistics; prostate-sppecific antigen (PSA) tests; and the Occupational Medicine Services policy at LeRC.

  4. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000908.htm Hormone therapy for prostate cancer To use the sharing ... helps slow the growth of prostate cancer. Male Hormones and Prostate Cancer Androgens are male sex hormones. ...

  5. Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Preventing and treating prostate cancer spread to bones Vaccine treatment for prostate cancer Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) is ... less advanced prostate cancer. Possible side effects of vaccine treatment Side effects from the vaccine tend to ...

  6. Histotripsy Focal Ablation of Implanted Prostate Tumor in an ACE-1 Canine Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Schade, George R.; Keller, Jill; Ives, Kim; Cheng, Xu; Rosol, Thomas J.; Keller, Evan; Roberts, William W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Histotripsy is a nonthermal ablative focused ultrasound technology with possible future applications for prostate cancer focal therapy. We used the ACE-1 prostate tumor model and evaluated the feasibility of treating prostate tumors with histotripsy. Materials and Methods A total of 10 immunosuppressed (cyclosporine treated) canine subjects received transrectal ultrasound guided percutaneous intraprostatic injection of ACE-1 canine prostate cancer cells. Prostates were serially imaged with transrectal ultrasound to monitor tumor growth. Subjects were sham treated (3) or underwent transabdominal histotripsy of the prostate, which targeted implanted tumor and adjacent parenchyma using a 750 kHz piezoelectric ultrasound therapy transducer. Prostates were examined histologically to confirm tumor and the histotripsy treatment effect. Results ACE-1 tumors were visualized on transrectal ultrasound in all 10 subjects within 2 weeks of tumor injection. Lesions demonstrated growth in the prostatic capsule, glandular lobules, fibrous septa and periurethral stroma with significant desmoplastic reaction and areas of central necrosis on histology. Lymph node and/or pulmonary metastases developed in 4 subjects. Ultrasound tumor localization and initiation of cavitation during histotripsy therapy were feasible in all treated subjects. Histologically there was evidence of homogenization of tumor and prostatic parenchyma in all 4 acute subjects with necrosis and hemorrhage in the 3 chronic subjects. Conclusions This study shows the feasibility of histotripsy destruction of prostate tumors in a canine ACE-1 model. It suggests a potential role for histotripsy based focal therapy for prostate cancer. Further studies are needed to better characterize the effects of histotripsy on malignant tissues. PMID:22999534

  7. Prostate cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... effects of treatment The chance that treatment can cure your cancer or help you in other ways With stage ... III prostate cancer, the main goal is to cure the cancer by treating it and keeping it from coming ...

  8. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Androgen deprivation therapy; ADT; Androgen suppression therapy; Combined androgen blockade ... Androgens cause prostate cancer cells to grow. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer lowers the effect level of ...

  9. Prostate cancer screenings

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test is a blood test that checks the level of PSA in your blood. In some cases, a high level of PSA could mean you have prostate cancer. But other conditions can also cause a high level, such as infection in the prostate or ...

  10. Immunotherapy of prostate cancer in the Dunning rat model: use of cytokine gene modified tumor vaccines.

    PubMed

    Vieweg, J; Rosenthal, F M; Bannerji, R; Heston, W D; Fair, W R; Gansbacher, B; Gilboa, E

    1994-04-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the prostate is the most common cancer in men. The majority of cancers are discovered once they have already metastasized, and there is no effective therapy for prostatic cancer at this stage. The use of cytokine-secreting tumor cell preparations as therapeutic vaccines for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer was investigated in the Dunning rat R3327-MatLyLu prostatic tumor model. IL-2 secreting, irradiated, tumor cell preparations were capable of curing animals with s.c. established tumors, and induced immunological memory that protected animals from subsequent tumor challenge. Immunotherapy was less effective when tumors were induced orthotopically, but nevertheless led to improved outcome, significantly delaying, and occasionally preventing, recurrence of tumors after resection of the cancerous prostate. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor secreting tumor cell preparations were less effective, and interferon-gamma secreting cells had only a marginal effect. Induction of a potent immune response in tumor bearing animals against the nonimmunogenic MatLyLu tumor supports the view that active immunotherapy warrants further investigation as a potential therapeutic approach to prostate cancer. PMID:8137291

  11. Bifurcation analysis on a hybrid systems model of intermittent hormonal therapy for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Gouhei; Tsumoto, Kunichika; Tsuji, Shigeki; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2008-10-01

    Hybrid systems are widely used to model dynamical phenomena that are characterized by interplay between continuous dynamics and discrete events. An example of biomedical application is modeling of disease progression of prostate cancer under intermittent hormonal therapy, where continuous tumor dynamics is switched by interruption and reinstitution of medication. In the present paper, we study a hybrid systems model representing intermittent androgen suppression (IAS) therapy for advanced prostate cancer. Intermittent medication with switching between on-treatment and off-treatment periods is intended to possibly prevent a prostatic tumor from developing into a hormone-refractory state and is anticipated as a possible strategy for delaying or hopefully averting a cancer relapse which most patients undergo as a result of long-term hormonal suppression. Clinical efficacy of IAS therapy for prostate cancer is still under investigation but at least worth considering in terms of reduction of side effects and economic costs during off-treatment periods. In the model of IAS therapy, it depends on some clinically controllable parameters whether a relapse of prostate cancer occurs or not. Therefore, we examine nonlinear dynamics and bifurcation structure of the model by exploiting a numerical method to clarify bifurcation sets in the hybrid system. Our results suggest that adjustment of the normal androgen level in combination with appropriate medication scheduling could enhance the possibility of relapse prevention. Moreover, a two-dimensional piecewise-linear system reduced from the original model highlights the origin of nonlinear phenomena specific to the hybrid system.

  12. A New Murine Model of Osteoblastic/Osteolytic Lesions from Human Androgen-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Depalle, Baptiste; Serre, Claire Marie; Farlay, Delphine; Turtoi, Andrei; Bellahcene, Akeila; Follet, Hélène; Castronovo, Vincent; Clézardin, Philippe; Bonnelye, Edith

    2013-01-01

    Background Up to 80% of patients dying from prostate carcinoma have developed bone metastases that are incurable. Castration is commonly used to treat prostate cancer. Although the disease initially responds to androgen blockade strategies, it often becomes castration-resistant (CRPC for Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer). Most of the murine models of mixed lesions derived from prostate cancer cells are androgen sensitive. Thus, we established a new model of CRPC (androgen receptor (AR) negative) that causes mixed lesions in bone. Methods PC3 and its derived new cell clone PC3c cells were directly injected into the tibiae of SCID male mice. Tumor growth was analyzed by radiography and histology. Direct effects of conditioned medium of both cell lines were tested on osteoclasts, osteoblasts and osteocytes. Results We found that PC3c cells induced mixed lesions 10 weeks after intratibial injection. In vitro, PC3c conditioned medium was able to stimulate tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive osteoclasts. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) and endothelin-1 (ET1) were highly expressed by PC3c while dikkopf-1 (DKK1) expression was decreased. Finally, PC3c highly expressed bone associated markers osteopontin (OPN), Runx2, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and produced mineralized matrix in vitro in osteogenic conditions. Conclusions We have established a new CRPC cell line as a useful system for modeling human metastatic prostate cancer which presents the mixed phenotype of bone metastases that is commonly observed in prostate cancer patients with advanced disease. This model will help to understand androgen-independent mechanisms involved in the progression of prostate cancer in bone and provides a preclinical model for testing the effects of new treatments for bone metastases. PMID:24069383

  13. What Is Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... the more likely he is to develop the disease. Physician: Come on back, first room. Narrator: Most ... cancer. Prostate cancer is really a spectrum of diseases where on one end of the spectrum there ...

  14. Prostate cancer (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Treatment of prostate cancer varies depending on the stage of the cancer (i.e., spread) and may include surgical removal, radiation, chemotherapy, hormonal manipulation or a combination of these treatments.

  15. Prostate cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... test. A faster increase could show a more aggressive tumor. A prostate biopsy is done in your ... suggest the cancer is slow growing and not aggressive. Higher numbers indicate a faster growing cancer that ...

  16. Prostate cancer - treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... when cancer has spread to the bone. External beam radiation therapy uses high-powered x-rays pointed ... radiation therapy used to treat prostate cancer. Proton beams target the tumor precisely, so there is less ...

  17. Detecting Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... abnormal and raises the index of suspicion that cancer may be present. Narrator: While the use of ... examination does not mean that they have prostate cancer. It means that we're concerned about it ...

  18. Models for predicting objective function weights in prostate cancer IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Boutilier, Justin J. Lee, Taewoo; Craig, Tim; Sharpe, Michael B.; Chan, Timothy C. Y.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate the clinical applicability of advanced machine learning models that simultaneously predict multiple optimization objective function weights from patient geometry for intensity-modulated radiation therapy of prostate cancer. Methods: A previously developed inverse optimization method was applied retrospectively to determine optimal objective function weights for 315 treated patients. The authors used an overlap volume ratio (OV) of bladder and rectum for different PTV expansions and overlap volume histogram slopes (OVSR and OVSB for the rectum and bladder, respectively) as explanatory variables that quantify patient geometry. Using the optimal weights as ground truth, the authors trained and applied three prediction models: logistic regression (LR), multinomial logistic regression (MLR), and weighted K-nearest neighbor (KNN). The population average of the optimal objective function weights was also calculated. Results: The OV at 0.4 cm and OVSR at 0.1 cm features were found to be the most predictive of the weights. The authors observed comparable performance (i.e., no statistically significant difference) between LR, MLR, and KNN methodologies, with LR appearing to perform the best. All three machine learning models outperformed the population average by a statistically significant amount over a range of clinical metrics including bladder/rectum V53Gy, bladder/rectum V70Gy, and dose to the bladder, rectum, CTV, and PTV. When comparing the weights directly, the LR model predicted bladder and rectum weights that had, on average, a 73% and 74% relative improvement over the population average weights, respectively. The treatment plans resulting from the LR weights had, on average, a rectum V70Gy that was 35% closer to the clinical plan and a bladder V70Gy that was 29% closer, compared to the population average weights. Similar results were observed for all other clinical metrics. Conclusions: The authors demonstrated that the KNN and MLR

  19. Three-dimensional modeling of biopsy protocols for localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Loughlin, M; Carlbom, I; Busch, C; Douglas, T; Egevad, L; Frimmel, H; Norberg, M; Sesterhenn, I; Frogge, J M

    1998-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignant tumor in American men, yet only a small percentage of men will develop clinically significant disease. Needle core biopsies are used to confirm the presence of cancer prior to surgery. While needle core biopsies have shown some ability to predict tumor volume and grade in prostatectomy specimens, for the individual patient they are neither sensitive nor specific enough to guide therapy. In this paper, we describe a system for simulating needle biopsies on three-dimensional models of cancerous prostates reconstructed from serial sections. First we segment the serial sections, delineating tumors and landmarks. Next, we register the sections using a color-merging scheme, and reconstruct the three-dimensional model using modified-shape-based interpolation. The resulting volume can be rendered, and simulated needle core biopsies can be taken from the reconstructed model. We use our system to simulate two different biopsy protocols on a reconstructed prostate specimen. PMID:9740040

  20. Chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Vemana, Goutham; Hamilton, Robert J; Andriole, Gerald L; Freedland, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Large prospective randomized trials, such as the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT), Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events (REDUCE) trial, and Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT), have provided practitioners with considerable data regarding methods of treatment and prevention of prostate cancer. The best-studied medications for prevention are 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors. Their efficacy and side effects are well characterized. Other medications, dietary nutrients, and supplements have not been as well studied and generally do not demonstrate efficacy for disease prevention with an acceptable level of evidence. PMID:24188663

  1. Adoptive Transfer of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells and T Cells in a Prostate Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Libo; Xu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of immune cells for cancer, chronic infection, and autoimmunity is an emerging field that has shown promise in recent trials. The transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate (TRAMP) is a classical mouse model of prostate cancer (PCa) and TRAMP cell lines were derived from a TRAMP mouse tumor. TRAMP-C2 is tumorigenic when subcutaneously (s.c.) grafted into syngeneic C57BL/6 host mice (Foster et al., 1997). This protocol will describe the adoptive transfer of purified CD11b+Gr1+ double positive (DP) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and CD3+ T cells in the TRAMP-C2 prostate cancer mouse model in order to establish the intrinsic functionality of these immune cells and to determine their role in tumorigenesis in vivo (Yan et al., 2014).

  2. Novel expressed sequences identified in a model of androgen independent prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Quayle, Steven N; Hare, Heidi; Delaney, Allen D; Hirst, Martin; Hwang, Dorothy; Schein, Jacqueline E; Jones, Steven JM; Marra, Marco A; Sadar, Marianne D

    2007-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in American men, and few effective treatment options are available to patients who develop hormone-refractory prostate cancer. The molecular changes that occur to allow prostate cells to proliferate in the absence of androgens are not fully understood. Results Subtractive hybridization experiments performed with samples from an in vivo model of hormonal progression identified 25 expressed sequences representing novel human transcripts. Intriguingly, these 25 sequences have small open-reading frames and are not highly conserved through evolution, suggesting many of these novel expressed sequences may be derived from untranslated regions of novel transcripts or from non-coding transcripts. Examination of a large metalibrary of human Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE) tags demonstrated that only three of these novel sequences had been previously detected. RT-PCR experiments confirmed that the 6 sequences tested were expressed in specific human tissues, as well as in clinical samples of prostate cancer. Further RT-PCR experiments for five of these fragments indicated they originated from large untranslated regions of unannotated transcripts. Conclusion This study underlines the value of using complementary techniques in the annotation of the human genome. The tissue-specific expression of 4 of the 6 clones tested indicates the expression of these novel transcripts is tightly regulated, and future work will determine the possible role(s) these novel transcripts may play in the progression of prostate cancer. PMID:17257419

  3. A clinical data validated mathematical model of prostate cancer growth under intermittent androgen suppression therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portz, Travis; Kuang, Yang; Nagy, John D.

    2012-03-01

    Prostate cancer is commonly treated by a form of hormone therapy called androgen suppression. This form of treatment, while successful at reducing the cancer cell population, adversely affects quality of life and typically leads to a recurrence of the cancer in an androgen-independent form. Intermittent androgen suppression aims to alleviate some of these adverse affects by cycling the patient on and off treatment. Clinical studies have suggested that intermittent therapy is capable of maintaining androgen dependence over multiple treatment cycles while increasing quality of life during off-treatment periods. This paper presents a mathematical model of prostate cancer to study the dynamics of androgen suppression therapy and the production of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a clinical marker for prostate cancer. Preliminary models were based on the assumption of an androgen-independent (AI) cell population with constant net growth rate. These models gave poor accuracy when fitting clinical data during simulation. The final model presented hypothesizes an AI population with increased sensitivity to low levels of androgen. It also hypothesizes that PSA production is heavily dependent on androgen. The high level of accuracy in fitting clinical data with this model appears to confirm these hypotheses, which are also consistent with biological evidence.

  4. Modified Logistic Regression Models Using Gene Coexpression and Clinical Features to Predict Prostate Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongya; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Gorlov, Ivan P.; Zeng, Jia; Dai, Jianguo

    2013-01-01

    Predicting disease progression is one of the most challenging problems in prostate cancer research. Adding gene expression data to prediction models that are based on clinical features has been proposed to improve accuracy. In the current study, we applied a logistic regression (LR) model combining clinical features and gene co-expression data to improve the accuracy of the prediction of prostate cancer progression. The top-scoring pair (TSP) method was used to select genes for the model. The proposed models not only preserved the basic properties of the TSP algorithm but also incorporated the clinical features into the prognostic models. Based on the statistical inference with the iterative cross validation, we demonstrated that prediction LR models that included genes selected by the TSP method provided better predictions of prostate cancer progression than those using clinical variables only and/or those that included genes selected by the one-gene-at-a-time approach. Thus, we conclude that TSP selection is a useful tool for feature (and/or gene) selection to use in prognostic models and our model also provides an alternative for predicting prostate cancer progression. PMID:24367394

  5. Combined Treatment Effects of Radiation and Immunotherapy: Studies in an Autochthonous Prostate Cancer Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, Satoshi; Harris, Timothy J.; Tryggestad, Erik; Yoshimura, Kiyoshi; Zeng, Jing; Yen, Hung-Rong; Getnet, Derese; Grosso, Joseph F.; Bruno, Tullia C.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; and others

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To optimize the combination of ionizing radiation and cellular immunotherapy using a preclinical autochthonous model of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Transgenic mice expressing a model antigen under a prostate-specific promoter were treated using a platform that integrates cone-beam CT imaging with 3-dimensional conformal therapy. Using this technology we investigated the immunologic and therapeutic effects of combining ionizing radiation with granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor-secreting cellular immunotherapy for prostate cancer in mice bearing autochthonous prostate tumors. Results: The combination of ionizing radiation and immunotherapy resulted in a significant decrease in pathologic tumor grade and gross tumor bulk that was not evident with either single-modality therapy. Furthermore, combinatorial therapy resulted in improved overall survival in a preventive metastasis model and in the setting of established micrometastases. Mechanistically, combined therapy resulted in an increase of the ratio of effector-to-regulatory T cells for both CD4 and CD8 tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. Conclusions: Our preclinical model establishes a potential role for the use of combined radiation-immunotherapy in locally advanced prostate cancer, which warrants further exploration in a clinical setting.

  6. Cancer of the Prostate

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 180,890 % of All New Cancer Cases 10.7% Estimated Deaths in 2016 26,120 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 2,850,139 men living with prostate cancer ...

  7. Chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Andrew J; Abouassaly, Robert; Klein, Eric A

    2010-02-01

    Prostate cancer is an appropriate target for primary chemoprevention because of its ubiquity, disease-related mortality, treatment-related morbidity, and long latency period. The PCPT and REDUCE trials demonstrate that this cancer can be prevented by a relatively nontoxic oral pharmacologic agent (5alpha-reductase inhibitors). Evidence from the SELECT trial argues against the recommendation of the use of vitamins and micronutrients as chemoprevention of prostate cancer. Dietary modification may substantially alter a man's risk of prostate cancer, but the specific dietary manipulations that are necessary are poorly defined and these may need to be instituted in early adulthood to be successful. 5alpha-reductase inhibitors represent an effective primary prevention strategy, and these agents should be used more liberally for the prevention of prostate cancer, particularly in high-risk patients. PMID:20152515

  8. Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer Abiraterone Acetate Bicalutamide Cabazitaxel Casodex (Bicalutamide) Degarelix Docetaxel ...

  9. Human xenograft models as useful tools to assess the potential of novel therapeutics in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    van Weerden, W M; Bangma, C; de Wit, R

    2008-01-01

    With docetaxel as effective chemotherapy for hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC), the number of new treatment combinations for HRPC is expanding demanding a fast-track screening system. This review elaborates on the use of xenograft models to select the most promising combination therapies for entering into phase II clinical trials. PMID:19088719

  10. Screening for prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Cher, M L; Carroll, P R

    1995-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a serious health care problem in the United States. Whether or not to screen for it has become a timely issue. Although a large number of men have clinically important, asymptomatic, undetected prostate cancer, an even larger number have clinically unimportant cancer. To justify screening programs, not only must we avoid detecting biologically unimportant cancers, we must also detect and effectively treat that subset of tumors that, if undiagnosed, would progress, produce symptoms, and reduce life expectancy. Serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) assay, or its variations such as PSA density, PSA velocity, and age-specific reference ranges, and the digital rectal examination are the best tests for detecting clinically important, asymptomatic, curable tumors. Recent data suggest that using serum PSA levels does not result in an overdetection of unimportant tumors. Highly effective, curative treatment of localized prostate cancer is available. These factors promote optimism that screening for prostate cancer will ultimately prove beneficial. Nonetheless, men should be informed regarding the benefits and possible risks before being screened for prostate cancer. PMID:7536993

  11. Glipizide suppresses prostate cancer progression in the TRAMP model by inhibiting angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Cuiling; Bin Li; Yang, Yang; Yang, Yongxia; Li, Jialin; Zhou, Qin; Wen, Yinxin; Zeng, Cuiling; Zheng, Lingyun; Zhang, Qianqian; Li, Jiangchao; He, Xiaodong; Zhou, Jia; Shao, Chunkui; Wang, Lijing

    2016-01-01

    Drug repurposing of non-cancer drugs represents an attractive approach to develop new cancer therapy. Using the TRAMP transgenic mouse model, glipizide, a widely used drug for type 2 diabetes mellitus, has been identified to suppress prostate cancer (PC) growth and metastasis. Angiogenesis is intimately associated with various human cancer developments. Intriguingly, glipizide significantly reduces microvessel density in PC tumor tissues, while not inhibiting prostate cancer cell proliferation from the MTT assay and flow cytometry investigation. Moreover, glipizide inhibits the tubular structure formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells by regulating the HMGIY/Angiopoietin-1 signaling pathway. Taken together, these results demonstrate that glipizide has the potential to be repurposed as an effective therapeutic for the treatment of PC by targeting tumor-induced angiogenesis. PMID:27292155

  12. Glipizide suppresses prostate cancer progression in the TRAMP model by inhibiting angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Cuiling; Bin Li; Yang, Yang; Yang, Yongxia; Li, Jialin; Zhou, Qin; Wen, Yinxin; Zeng, Cuiling; Zheng, Lingyun; Zhang, Qianqian; Li, Jiangchao; He, Xiaodong; Zhou, Jia; Shao, Chunkui; Wang, Lijing

    2016-01-01

    Drug repurposing of non-cancer drugs represents an attractive approach to develop new cancer therapy. Using the TRAMP transgenic mouse model, glipizide, a widely used drug for type 2 diabetes mellitus, has been identified to suppress prostate cancer (PC) growth and metastasis. Angiogenesis is intimately associated with various human cancer developments. Intriguingly, glipizide significantly reduces microvessel density in PC tumor tissues, while not inhibiting prostate cancer cell proliferation from the MTT assay and flow cytometry investigation. Moreover, glipizide inhibits the tubular structure formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells by regulating the HMGIY/Angiopoietin-1 signaling pathway. Taken together, these results demonstrate that glipizide has the potential to be repurposed as an effective therapeutic for the treatment of PC by targeting tumor-induced angiogenesis. PMID:27292155

  13. Chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Rittmaster, Roger S

    2011-06-01

    Over the past two decades, many more men are diagnosed with prostate cancer then die of the disease. This increase in diagnosis has led to aggressive treatment of indolent disease in many individuals and has been the impetus for finding a means of reducing the risk of prostate cancer. In the past decade, there have been eight large trials of prostate cancer risk reduction using dietary supplements, 5α-reductase inhibitors, or anti-estrogens. The only two trials which have demonstrated efficacy are those involving 5α-reductase inhibitors: the PCPT (finasteride) and REDUCE (dutasteride). This review examines prostate cancer risk reduction, with emphasis on conclusions that can be drawn from these two landmark studies. PMID:21604953

  14. Direct intra-tumoral injection of zinc-acetate halts tumor growth in a xenograft model of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shah, Maulik R; Kriedt, Christopher L; Lents, Nathan H; Hoyer, Mary K; Jamaluddin, Nimah; Klein, Claudette; Baldassare, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Intracellular levels of zinc have shown a strong inverse correlation to growth and malignancy of prostate cancer. To date, studies of zinc supplementation in prostate cancer have been equivocal and have not accounted for bioavailability of zinc. Therefore, we hypothesized that direct intra-tumoral injection of zinc could impact prostate cancer growth. In this study, we evaluated the cytotoxic properties of the pH neutral salt zinc acetate on the prostate cancer cell lines PC3, DU145 and LNCaP. Zinc acetate killed prostate cancer cell lines in vitro, independent of androgen sensitivity, in a dose-dependent manner in a range between 200 and 600 microM. Cell death occurred rapidly with 50% cell death by six hours and maximal cell death by 18 hours. We next established a xenograft model of prostate cancer and tested an experimental treatment protocol of direct intra-tumoral injection of zinc acetate. We found that zinc treatments halted the growth of the prostate cancer tumors and substantially extended the survival of the animals, whilst causing no detectable cytoxicity to other tissues. Thus, our studies form a solid proof-of-concept that direct intra-tumoral injection of zinc acetate could be a safe and effective treatment strategy for prostate cancer. PMID:19534805

  15. Prediction of Pathological Stage in Patients with Prostate Cancer: A Neuro-Fuzzy Model

    PubMed Central

    Acampora, Giovanni; Brown, David; Rees, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    The prediction of cancer staging in prostate cancer is a process for estimating the likelihood that the cancer has spread before treatment is given to the patient. Although important for determining the most suitable treatment and optimal management strategy for patients, staging continues to present significant challenges to clinicians. Clinical test results such as the pre-treatment Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) level, the biopsy most common tumor pattern (Primary Gleason pattern) and the second most common tumor pattern (Secondary Gleason pattern) in tissue biopsies, and the clinical T stage can be used by clinicians to predict the pathological stage of cancer. However, not every patient will return abnormal results in all tests. This significantly influences the capacity to effectively predict the stage of prostate cancer. Herein we have developed a neuro-fuzzy computational intelligence model for classifying and predicting the likelihood of a patient having Organ-Confined Disease (OCD) or Extra-Prostatic Disease (ED) using a prostate cancer patient dataset obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network. The system input consisted of the following variables: Primary and Secondary Gleason biopsy patterns, PSA levels, age at diagnosis, and clinical T stage. The performance of the neuro-fuzzy system was compared to other computational intelligence based approaches, namely the Artificial Neural Network, Fuzzy C-Means, Support Vector Machine, the Naive Bayes classifiers, and also the AJCC pTNM Staging Nomogram which is commonly used by clinicians. A comparison of the optimal Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) points that were identified using these approaches, revealed that the neuro-fuzzy system, at its optimal point, returns the largest Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC), with a low number of false positives (FPR = 0.274, TPR = 0.789, AUC = 0.812). The proposed approach is also an improvement over the AJCC pTNM Staging Nomogram (FPR = 0.032, TPR

  16. Prediction of Pathological Stage in Patients with Prostate Cancer: A Neuro-Fuzzy Model.

    PubMed

    Cosma, Georgina; Acampora, Giovanni; Brown, David; Rees, Robert C; Khan, Masood; Pockley, A Graham

    2016-01-01

    The prediction of cancer staging in prostate cancer is a process for estimating the likelihood that the cancer has spread before treatment is given to the patient. Although important for determining the most suitable treatment and optimal management strategy for patients, staging continues to present significant challenges to clinicians. Clinical test results such as the pre-treatment Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) level, the biopsy most common tumor pattern (Primary Gleason pattern) and the second most common tumor pattern (Secondary Gleason pattern) in tissue biopsies, and the clinical T stage can be used by clinicians to predict the pathological stage of cancer. However, not every patient will return abnormal results in all tests. This significantly influences the capacity to effectively predict the stage of prostate cancer. Herein we have developed a neuro-fuzzy computational intelligence model for classifying and predicting the likelihood of a patient having Organ-Confined Disease (OCD) or Extra-Prostatic Disease (ED) using a prostate cancer patient dataset obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network. The system input consisted of the following variables: Primary and Secondary Gleason biopsy patterns, PSA levels, age at diagnosis, and clinical T stage. The performance of the neuro-fuzzy system was compared to other computational intelligence based approaches, namely the Artificial Neural Network, Fuzzy C-Means, Support Vector Machine, the Naive Bayes classifiers, and also the AJCC pTNM Staging Nomogram which is commonly used by clinicians. A comparison of the optimal Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) points that were identified using these approaches, revealed that the neuro-fuzzy system, at its optimal point, returns the largest Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC), with a low number of false positives (FPR = 0.274, TPR = 0.789, AUC = 0.812). The proposed approach is also an improvement over the AJCC pTNM Staging Nomogram (FPR = 0.032, TPR

  17. Generation of a syngeneic orthotopic transplant model of prostate cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Leigh; Lehet, Kristin; Ku, ShengYu; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Pili, Roberto

    2014-10-15

    Progression to metastatic disease is the primary cause of mortality in men with prostate cancer (PCa). Mouse models which progress with spontaneous metastasis are limited. Such models would allow for extensive studies of molecular mechanisms of metastasis, and more definite pre- clinical therapy trials. Orthotopic murine models have been described; however a limiting biology of these models is their lack of an intact immune system. Within, we describe the development of an androgen sensitive and castrate resistant tractable orthotopic murine syngeneic (immune competent) model of prostate cancer. Both models develop primary tumors which spontaneously progress to metastatic disease in lymph tissue. These models will allow for more complete mechanistic and therapeutic studies in a short time period. PMID:25485289

  18. Generation of a syngeneic orthotopic transplant model of prostate cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Leigh; Lehet, Kristin; Ku, ShengYu; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Pili, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Progression to metastatic disease is the primary cause of mortality in men with prostate cancer (PCa). Mouse models which progress with spontaneous metastasis are limited. Such models would allow for extensive studies of molecular mechanisms of metastasis, and more definite pre- clinical therapy trials. Orthotopic murine models have been described; however a limiting biology of these models is their lack of an intact immune system. Within, we describe the development of an androgen sensitive and castrate resistant tractable orthotopic murine syngeneic (immune competent) model of prostate cancer. Both models develop primary tumors which spontaneously progress to metastatic disease in lymph tissue. These models will allow for more complete mechanistic and therapeutic studies in a short time period. PMID:25485289

  19. Immunotherapy in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sobol, Ilya; Thompson, R H; Dong, Haidong; Krco, Christopher; Kwon, Eugene D

    2015-06-01

    Immunotherapy for the treatment of malignant neoplasms has made significant progress over the last 20 years. Multiple molecular targets and clinical agents have been developed recently, particularly in the field of metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Sipuleucel-T is currently the only FDA approved immunotherapy for prostate cancer. PSA-TRICOM (Prostvac) currently has a phase III randomized trial underway after a phase II trial showed an improvement in overall survival. Interestingly, both these agents showed improvement in overall survival with no measurable change in disease state, leading to significant controversy as the utility of these agents in prostate cancer. Ipilimumab revealed a benefit for a sub-cohort of men in a post-docetaxel group and is currently undergoing investigation in a pre-docetaxel group. There are a number of other targets such as PD-1 which have shown effectiveness in other neoplasms that will likely be investigated in the future for use in prostate cancer. PMID:25894495

  20. Understanding Prostate Cancer: Newly Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wellness PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Understanding Prostate Cancer Newly Diagnosed Newly Diagnosed Staging the Disease Issues ... you care about has recently been diagnosed with prostate cancer, this section will help guide you through the ...

  1. New Prostate Cancer Treatment Target

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have identified a potential alternative approach to blocking a key molecular driver of an advanced form of prostate cancer, called androgen-independent or castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  2. Optimizing heat shock protein expression induced by prostate cancer laser therapy through predictive computational models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rylander, Marissa N.; Feng, Yusheng; Zhang, Yongjie; Bass, Jon; Stafford, Roger J.; Hazle, John D.; Diller, Kenneth R.

    2006-07-01

    Thermal therapy efficacy can be diminished due to heat shock protein (HSP) induction in regions of a tumor where temperatures are insufficient to coagulate proteins. HSP expression enhances tumor cell viability and imparts resistance to chemotherapy and radiation treatments, which are generally employed in conjunction with hyperthermia. Therefore, an understanding of the thermally induced HSP expression within the targeted tumor must be incorporated into the treatment plan to optimize the thermal dose delivery and permit prediction of the overall tissue response. A treatment planning computational model capable of predicting the temperature, HSP27 and HSP70 expression, and damage fraction distributions associated with laser heating in healthy prostate tissue and tumors is presented. Measured thermally induced HSP27 and HSP70 expression kinetics and injury data for normal and cancerous prostate cells and prostate tumors are employed to create the first HSP expression predictive model and formulate an Arrhenius damage model. The correlation coefficients between measured and model predicted temperature, HSP27, and HSP70 were 0.98, 0.99, and 0.99, respectively, confirming the accuracy of the model. Utilization of the treatment planning model in the design of prostate cancer thermal therapies can enable optimization of the treatment outcome by controlling HSP expression and injury.

  3. Optoacoustic characterization of prostate cancer in an in vivo transgenic murine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Michelle P.; Riley, Christopher B.; Kolios, Michael C.; Whelan, William M.

    2014-05-01

    Optoacoustic (OA) imaging was employed to distinguish normal from neoplastic tissues in a transgenic murine model of prostate cancer. OA images of five tumor-bearing mice and five age-matched controls across a 14 mm×14 mm region of interest (ROI) on the lower abdomen were acquired using a reverse-mode OA imaging system (Seno Medical Instruments Inc., San Antonio, Texas). Neoplastic prostate tissue was identified based on the OA signal amplitude in combination with spectral analysis of the OA radio frequency (RF) data. Integration of the signal amplitude images was performed to construct two-dimensional images of the ROI. The prostate tumors generated higher amplitude signals than those of the surrounding tissues, with contrast ratios ranging from 31 to 36 dB. The RF spectrum analysis showed significant differences between the tumor and the control mice. The midband fit was higher by 5 dB (62%), the intercept higher by 4 dB (57%) and the spectral slope higher by 0.4 dB/MHz (50%) for neoplastic prostate tissue compared to normal tissues in the control mice. The results demonstrate that OA offers high contrast imaging of prostate cancer in vivo.

  4. Clinical Perspective of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Patil, Nilesh; Gaitonde, Krishnanath

    2016-06-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous cancer affecting men today. It largely affects men in the fifth and sixth decade of life. Screening for prostate cancer, though controversial, is still the only way to detect early prostate cancer. Multiple newer options such as blood tests and genetic markers are being used in the clinical domain today to improve cancer detection and avoid unnecessary biopsies. To date, biopsy of the prostate remains the only modality to stratify the grade of cancer. Significant improvements in the imaging technology have improved localizing and detecting the disease. Treatment of prostate cancer is stratified on the basis of the grade and volume of the disease. There are multiple treatment options involved in the management of prostate cancer. Treatment of localized prostate cancer still continues to have very high cure rates and long-term cancer-specific survival rates. PMID:27187167

  5. Prostate cancer detection from model-free T1-weighted time series and diffusion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, Nandinee F.; Kozlowski, Piotr; Jones, Edward C.; Chang, Silvia D.; Goldenberg, S. Larry; Moradi, Mehdi

    2015-03-01

    The combination of Dynamic Contrast Enhanced (DCE) images with diffusion MRI has shown great potential in prostate cancer detection. The parameterization of DCE images to generate cancer markers is traditionally performed based on pharmacokinetic modeling. However, pharmacokinetic models make simplistic assumptions about the tissue perfusion process, require the knowledge of contrast agent concentration in a major artery, and the modeling process is sensitive to noise and fitting instabilities. We address this issue by extracting features directly from the DCE T1-weighted time course without modeling. In this work, we employed a set of data-driven features generated by mapping the DCE T1 time course to its principal component space, along with diffusion MRI features to detect prostate cancer. The optimal set of DCE features is extracted with sparse regularized regression through a Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO) model. We show that when our proposed features are used within the multiparametric MRI protocol to replace the pharmacokinetic parameters, the area under ROC curve is 0.91 for peripheral zone classification and 0.87 for whole gland classification. We were able to correctly classify 32 out of 35 peripheral tumor areas identified in the data when the proposed features were used with support vector machine classification. The proposed feature set was used to generate cancer likelihood maps for the prostate gland.

  6. [Novel treatment for prostate cancer targeting prostaglandins].

    PubMed

    Terada, Naoki; Inoue, Takahiro; Kamba, Tomomi; Ogawa, Osamu

    2014-12-01

    PGE2 is highly expressed in the prostate, associating with prostate cancer progression. Targeting downstream signaling pathways of PGE2 may represent an attractive new strategy for the treatment of prostate cancer. We have established a novel prostate cancer xenograft model, KUCaP-2. The expression of EP4, one of PGE2 receptors, was significantly up-regulated during the development of castration resistance. A specific EP4 antagonist, ONO-AE3-208, decelerated castration-resistant growth of KUCaP-2 tumors in vivo. Moreover, ONO-AE3-208 could in vitro inhibit the cell invasion and in vivo suppress the bone metastasis of prostate cancer cells. These results indicated that EP4 is a novel target for the treatment of metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer. PMID:25518348

  7. Prostate Cancer Support Groups

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Suzanne; Garrett, Bernie; Bottorff, Joan L.; McKenzie, Michael; Han, Christina S.; Ogrodniczuk, John S.

    2015-01-01

    To understand prostate cancer (PCa) specialists’ views about prostate cancer support groups (PCSGs), a volunteer sample of Canada-based PCa specialists (n = 150), including urologists (n = 100), radiation oncologists (n = 40), and medical oncologists (n = 10) were surveyed. The 56-item questionnaire used in this study included six sets of attitudinal items to measure prostate cancer specialists’ beliefs about positive and negative influences of PCSGs, reasons for attending PCSGs, the attributes of effective PCSGs, and the value of face-to-face and web-based PCSGs. In addition, an open-ended question was included to invite additional input from participants. Results showed that PCSGs were positively valued, particularly for information sharing, education and psychosocial support. Inclusivity, privacy, and accessibility were identified as potential barriers, and recommendations were made for better marketing PCSGs to increase engagement. Findings suggest prostate cancer specialists highly valued the role and potential benefits of face-to-face PCSGs. Information provision and an educational role were perceived as key benefits. Some concerns were expressed about the ability of web-based PCSGs to effectively engage and educate men who experience prostate cancer. PMID:25061087

  8. Identification of genes regulating migration and invasion using a new model of metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding the complex, multistep process of metastasis remains a major challenge in cancer research. Metastasis models can reveal insights in tumor development and progression and provide tools to test new intervention strategies. Methods To develop a new cancer metastasis model, we used DU145 human prostate cancer cells and performed repeated rounds of orthotopic prostate injection and selection of subsequent lymph node metastases. Tumor growth, metastasis, cell migration and invasion were analyzed. Microarray analysis was used to identify cell migration- and cancer-related genes correlating with metastasis. Selected genes were silenced using siRNA, and their roles in cell migration and invasion were determined in transwell migration and Matrigel invasion assays. Results Our in vivo cycling strategy created cell lines with dramatically increased tumorigenesis and increased ability to colonize lymph nodes (DU145LN1-LN4). Prostate tumor xenografts displayed increased vascularization, enlarged podoplanin-positive lymphatic vessels and invasive margins. Microarray analysis revealed gene expression profiles that correlated with metastatic potential. Using gene network analysis we selected 3 significantly upregulated cell movement and cancer related genes for further analysis: EPCAM (epithelial cell adhesion molecule), ITGB4 (integrin β4) and PLAU (urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)). These genes all showed increased protein expression in the more metastatic DU145-LN4 cells compared to the parental DU145. SiRNA knockdown of EpCAM, integrin-β4 or uPA all significantly reduced cell migration in DU145-LN4 cells. In contrast, only uPA siRNA inhibited cell invasion into Matrigel. This role of uPA in cell invasion was confirmed using the uPA inhibitors, amiloride and UK122. Conclusions Our approach has identified genes required for the migration and invasion of metastatic tumor cells, and we propose that our new in vivo model system will be a powerful

  9. Radioimmunoscintigraphy of prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Babaian, R.J.; Lamki, L.M. )

    1989-10-01

    The development of hybridoma technology has increased research efforts and clinical applications in the area of radioimmunodetection. Despite the many investigative antibodies directed against prostatic tissue or prostate cancer cell lines, only two have been tested in clinical trials. A 111In-labeled antibody directed against prostate-specific antigen, the best available serum tumor marker for prostate cancer, has shown poor sensitivity in limited clinical radioimmunoimaging trials. Monoclonal antibodies against prostatic acid phosphatase have shown better imaging results, particularly at higher antibody doses (greater than or equal to 40 mg). The limitations of this antibody include the poor results in detecting soft tissue lesions, including the primary lesion; the development of human antimouse antibodies in 50% of the patients at doses greater than or equal to 40 mg; the expense of the antibody; and the fact that better results are currently attainable by other less expensive imaging modalities. If and when a more suitable antibody or fragment is developed, the prospect of improved staging and new treatments using immunologic conjugates carrying therapeutic agents may become realities. Until such time, prostatic cancer will be staged with other currently available imaging modalities and conventional therapies with their limitations will remain state of the art. 56 references.

  10. Development of New Treatments for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    DiPaola, R. S.; Abate-Shen, C.; Hait, W. N.

    2005-02-01

    The Dean and Betty Gallo Prostate Cancer Center (GPCC) was established with the goal of eradicating prostate cancer and improving the lives of men at risk for the disease through research, treatment, education and prevention. GPCC was founded in the memory of Dean Gallo, a beloved New Jersey Congressman who died tragically of prostate cancer diagnosed at an advanced stage. GPCC unites a team of outstanding researchers and clinicians who are committed to high-quality basic research, translation of innovative research to the clinic, exceptional patient care, and improving public education and awareness of prostate cancer. GPCC is a center of excellence of The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, which is the only NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center in the state. GPCC efforts are now integrated well as part of our Prostate Program at CINJ, in which Dr. Robert DiPaola and Dr. Cory Abate-Shen are co-leaders. The Prostate Program unites 19 investigators from 10 academic departments who have broad and complementary expertise in prostate cancer research. The overall goal and unifying theme is to elucidate basic mechanisms of prostate growth and oncogenesis, with the ultimate goal of promoting new and effective strategies for the eradication of prostate cancer. Members' wide range of research interests collectively optimize the chances of providing new insights into normal prostate biology and unraveling the molecular pathophysiology of prostate cancer. Cell culture and powerful animal models developed by program members recapitulate the various stages of prostate cancer progression, including prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, adenocarcinoma, androgen-independence, invasion and metastases. These models promise to further strengthen an already robust program of investigator-initiated therapeutic clinical trials, including studies adopted by national cooperative groups. Efforts to translate laboratory results into clinical studies of early detection and chemoprevention

  11. Chemotherapy in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, Michael

    2015-10-01

    For approximately a decade, chemotherapy has been shown to prolong life in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Since that time, however, only two agents have proven to prolong life (docetaxel and cabazitaxel). However, in the last year, the addition of chemotherapy to primary hormonal therapy became a standard of care for high-volume castration-sensitive metastatic disease. Here I will review current prostate cancer chemotherapies, mechanisms of resistance to those therapies, and ongoing clinical studies of chemotherapy combinations and novel chemotherapeutics. PMID:26216506

  12. Prostate Cancer: Take Time to Decide

    MedlinePlus

    ... printing [PDF-983KB] Cancer Home Prostate Cancer: Take Time to Decide Infographic Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Prostate Cancer: Take Time to Decide Most prostate cancers grow slowly, and ...

  13. A Tmprss2-CreERT2 Knock-In Mouse Model for Cancer Genetic Studies on Prostate and Colon

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Yu; Di, Wei; Moore, Amanda R.; Sher, Jessica J.; Guan, Youxin; Wang, Shangqian; Zhang, Zeda; Murphy, Devan A.; Sawyers, Charles L.; Chi, Ping; Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Fusion between TMPRSS2 and ERG, placing ERG under the control of the TMPRSS2 promoter, is the most frequent genetic alteration in prostate cancer, present in 40–50% of cases. The fusion event is an early, if not initiating, event in prostate cancer, implicating the TMPRSS2-positive prostate epithelial cell as the cancer cell of origin in fusion-positive prostate cancer. To introduce genetic alterations into Tmprss2-positive cells in mice in a temporal-specific manner, we generated a Tmprss2-CreERT2 knock-in mouse. We found robust tamoxifen-dependent Cre activation in the prostate luminal cells but not basal epithelial cells, as well as epithelial cells of the bladder and gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The knock-in allele on the Tmprss2 locus does not noticeably impact prostate, bladder, or gastrointestinal function. Deletion of Pten in Tmprss2-positive cells of adult mice generated neoplasia only in the prostate, while deletion of Apc in these cells generated neoplasia only in the GI tract. These results suggest that this new Tmprss2-CreERT2 mouse model will be a useful resource for genetic studies on prostate and colon. PMID:27536883

  14. A Tmprss2-CreERT2 Knock-In Mouse Model for Cancer Genetic Studies on Prostate and Colon.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dong; Zhan, Yu; Di, Wei; Moore, Amanda R; Sher, Jessica J; Guan, Youxin; Wang, Shangqian; Zhang, Zeda; Murphy, Devan A; Sawyers, Charles L; Chi, Ping; Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Fusion between TMPRSS2 and ERG, placing ERG under the control of the TMPRSS2 promoter, is the most frequent genetic alteration in prostate cancer, present in 40-50% of cases. The fusion event is an early, if not initiating, event in prostate cancer, implicating the TMPRSS2-positive prostate epithelial cell as the cancer cell of origin in fusion-positive prostate cancer. To introduce genetic alterations into Tmprss2-positive cells in mice in a temporal-specific manner, we generated a Tmprss2-CreERT2 knock-in mouse. We found robust tamoxifen-dependent Cre activation in the prostate luminal cells but not basal epithelial cells, as well as epithelial cells of the bladder and gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The knock-in allele on the Tmprss2 locus does not noticeably impact prostate, bladder, or gastrointestinal function. Deletion of Pten in Tmprss2-positive cells of adult mice generated neoplasia only in the prostate, while deletion of Apc in these cells generated neoplasia only in the GI tract. These results suggest that this new Tmprss2-CreERT2 mouse model will be a useful resource for genetic studies on prostate and colon. PMID:27536883

  15. Identification of Androgen Receptor Splice Variants in the Pten Deficient Murine Prostate Cancer Model.

    PubMed

    Liang, Mengmeng; Adisetiyo, Helty; Li, Xiuqing; Liu, Xiuqing; Liu, Ren; Gill, Parkash; Roy-Burman, Pradip; Jones, Jeremy O; Mulholland, David J

    2015-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) variants are associated with resistance to anti androgen therapy both in human prostate cancer cell lines and clinical samples. These observations support the hypothesis that AR isoform accumulation is a consequence of selective therapeutic pressure on the full length AR. The Pten deficient prostate cancer model proceeds with well-defined kinetics including progression to castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). While surgical castration and enzalutamide treatments yield an initial therapeutic response, Pten-/-epithelia continue to proliferate yielding locally invasive primary tumor pathology. That most epithelium remains AR positive, but ligand independent, suggests the presence of oncogenic AR variants. To address this hypothesis, we have used a panel of recently described Pten-/- tumor cell lines derived from both from hormone intact (E4, E8) and castrated Pten mutants (cE1, cE2) followed by RACE PCR to identify and characterize three novel truncated, amino terminus containing AR variants (mAR-Va, b, c). Variants appear not only conserved throughout progression but are correlated with nearly complete loss of full length AR (AR-FL) at castrate androgen levels. The overexpression of variants leads to enhanced transcriptional activity of AR while knock down studies show reduced transcriptional output. Collectively, the identification of truncated AR variants in the conditional PTEN deletion model supports a role for maintaining the CRPC phenotype and provides further therapeutic applications of this preclinical model. PMID:26196517

  16. Detection of Prostate Cancer: Quantitative Multiparametric MR Imaging Models Developed Using Registered Correlative Histopathology.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Gregory J; Kalavagunta, Chaitanya; Spilseth, Benjamin; Bolan, Patrick J; Li, Xiufeng; Hutter, Diane; Nam, Jung W; Johnson, Andrew D; Henriksen, Jonathan C; Moench, Laura; Konety, Badrinath; Warlick, Christopher A; Schmechel, Stephen C; Koopmeiners, Joseph S

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To develop multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging models to generate a quantitative, user-independent, voxel-wise composite biomarker score (CBS) for detection of prostate cancer by using coregistered correlative histopathologic results, and to compare performance of CBS-based detection with that of single quantitative MR imaging parameters. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. Patients with a diagnosis of prostate cancer underwent multiparametric MR imaging before surgery for treatment. All MR imaging voxels in the prostate were classified as cancer or noncancer on the basis of coregistered histopathologic data. Predictive models were developed by using more than one quantitative MR imaging parameter to generate CBS maps. Model development and evaluation of quantitative MR imaging parameters and CBS were performed separately for the peripheral zone and the whole gland. Model accuracy was evaluated by using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), and confidence intervals were calculated with the bootstrap procedure. The improvement in classification accuracy was evaluated by comparing the AUC for the multiparametric model and the single best-performing quantitative MR imaging parameter at the individual level and in aggregate. Results Quantitative T2, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), volume transfer constant (K(trans)), reflux rate constant (kep), and area under the gadolinium concentration curve at 90 seconds (AUGC90) were significantly different between cancer and noncancer voxels (P < .001), with ADC showing the best accuracy (peripheral zone AUC, 0.82; whole gland AUC, 0.74). Four-parameter models demonstrated the best performance in both the peripheral zone (AUC, 0.85; P = .010 vs ADC alone) and whole gland (AUC, 0.77; P = .043 vs ADC alone). Individual-level analysis showed statistically significant improvement in AUC in 82% (23 of 28) and 71% (24 of 34

  17. Simulated prostate biopsy: prostate cancer distribution and clinical correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, John J.; Zeng, Jianchao; Zhang, Wei; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Dean, Robert; Moul, Judd W.; Mun, Seong K.

    2000-04-01

    Our group has recently obtained data based upon whole- mounted step-sectioned radical prostatectomy specimens using a 3D computer assisted prostate biopsy simulator that suggests an increased detection rate is possible using laterally placed biopsies. A new 10-core biopsy pattern was demonstrated to be superior to the traditional sextant biopsy. This patter includes the traditional sextant biopsy cores and four laterally placed biopsies in the right and left apex and mid portion of the prostate gland. The objective of this study is to confirm the higher prostate cancer defection rate obtained using our simulated 10-core biopsy pattern in a small clinical trial. We retrospectively reviewed 35 consecutive patients with a pathologic diagnosis of prostate cancer biopsied by a single urologist using the 10-core prostate biopsy patterns were compared with respect to prostate cancer detection rate. Of the 35 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer, 54.3 percent were diagnosed when reviewing the sextant biopsy data only. Review of the 10-core pattern revealed that an additional 45.7 percent were diagnosed when reviewing the sextant biopsy data only. Review of the 10-core pattern revealed that an additional 45.7 percent of patients were diagnosed solely with the laterally placed biopsies. Our results suggest that biopsy protocols that use laterally placed biopsies based upon a five region anatomical model are superior to the routinely used sextant prostate biopsy pattern.

  18. Early Prostate Cancer: Hedonic Prices Model of Provider-Patient Interactions and Decisions

    SciTech Connect

    Jani, Ashesh B. Hellman, Samuel

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the relative influence of treatment features and treatment availabilities on final treatment decisions in early prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We describe and apply a model, based on hedonic prices, to understand provider-patient interactions in prostate cancer. This model included four treatments (observation, external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and prostatectomy) and five treatment features (one efficacy and four treatment complication features). We performed a literature search to estimate (1) the intersections of the 'bid' functions and 'offer' functions with the price function along different treatment feature axes, and (2) the treatments actually rendered in different patient subgroups based on age. We performed regressions to determine the relative weight of each feature in the overall interaction and the relative availability of each treatment modality to explain differences between observed vs. predicted use of different modalities in different patient subpopulations. Results: Treatment efficacy and potency preservation are the major factors influencing decisions for young patients, whereas preservation of urinary and rectal function is much more important for very elderly patients. Referral patterns seem to be responsible for most of the deviations of observed use of different treatments from those predicted by idealized provider-patient interactions. Specifically, prostatectomy is used far more commonly in young patients and radiotherapy and observation used far more commonly in elderly patients than predicted by a uniform referral pattern. Conclusions: The hedonic prices approach facilitated identifying the relative importance of treatment features and quantification of the impact of the prevailing referral pattern on prostate cancer treatment decisions.

  19. [Grading of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, G; Roth, W; Helpap, B

    2016-07-01

    The current grading of prostate cancer is based on the classification system of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) following a consensus conference in Chicago in 2014. The foundations are based on the frequently modified grading system of Gleason. This article presents a brief description of the development to the current ISUP grading system. PMID:27393141

  20. Prostate cancer markers: An update

    PubMed Central

    PENTYALA, SRINIVAS; WHYARD, TERRY; PENTYALA, SAHANA; MULLER, JOHN; PFAIL, JOHN; PARMAR, SUNJIT; HELGUERO, CARLOS G.; KHAN, SARDAR

    2016-01-01

    As the most common noncutaneous malignancy in American men, prostate cancer currently accounts for 29% of all diagnosed cancers, and ranks second as the cause of cancer fatality in American men. Prostatic cancer is rarely symptomatic early in its course and therefore disease presentation often implies local extension or even metastatic disease. Thus, it is extremely critical to detect and diagnose prostate cancer in its earliest stages, often prior to the presentation of symptoms. Three of the most common techniques used to detect prostate cancer are the digital rectal exam, the transrectal ultrasound, and the use of biomarkers. This review presents an update regarding the field of prostate cancer biomarkers and comments on future biomarkers. Although there is not a lack of research in the field of prostate cancer biomarkers, the discovery of a novel biomarker that may have the advantage of being more specific and effective warrants future scientific inquiry. PMID:26998261

  1. Vitamin E and Prostate Cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin E, its metabolites or its analogs, might help prevent prostate cancer initiation or progression. Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men in the United States, exceeded only by lung cancer. About 218,890 new cases of prost...

  2. Can Mathematical Models Predict the Outcomes of Prostate Cancer Patients Undergoing Intermittent Androgen Deprivation Therapy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, R. A.; Packer, A. M.; Kuang, Y.

    Androgen deprivation therapy is a common treatment for advanced or metastatic prostate cancer. Like the normal prostate, most tumors depend on androgens for proliferation and survival but often develop treatment resistance. Hormonal treatment causes many undesirable side effects which significantly decrease the quality of life for patients. Intermittently applying androgen deprivation in cycles reduces the total duration with these negative effects and may reduce selective pressure for resistance. We extend an existing model which used measurements of patient testosterone levels to accurately fit measured serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels. We test the model's predictive accuracy, using only a subset of the data to find parameter values. The results are compared with those of an existing piecewise linear model which does not use testosterone as an input. Since actual treatment protocol is to re-apply therapy when PSA levels recover beyond some threshold value, we develop a second method for predicting the PSA levels. Based on a small set of data from seven patients, our results showed that the piecewise linear model produced slightly more accurate results while the two predictive methods are comparable. This suggests that a simpler model may be more beneficial for a predictive use compared to a more biologically insightful model, although further research is needed in this field prior to implementing mathematical models as a predictive method in a clinical setting. Nevertheless, both models are an important step in this direction.

  3. Can Mathematical Models Predict the Outcomes of Prostate Cancer Patients Undergoing Intermittent Androgen Deprivation Therapy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, R. A.; Packer, A. M.; Kuang, Y.

    2014-04-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy is a common treatment for advanced or metastatic prostate cancer. Like the normal prostate, most tumors depend on androgens for proliferation and survival but often develop treatment resistance. Hormonal treatment causes many undesirable side effects which significantly decrease the quality of life for patients. Intermittently applying androgen deprivation in cycles reduces the total duration with these negative effects and may reduce selective pressure for resistance. We extend an existing model which used measurements of patient testosterone levels to accurately fit measured serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels. We test the model's predictive accuracy, using only a subset of the data to find parameter values. The results are compared with those of an existing piecewise linear model which does not use testosterone as an input. Since actual treatment protocol is to re-apply therapy when PSA levels recover beyond some threshold value, we develop a second method for predicting the PSA levels. Based on a small set of data from seven patients, our results showed that the piecewise linear model produced slightly more accurate results while the two predictive methods are comparable. This suggests that a simpler model may be more beneficial for a predictive use compared to a more biologically insightful model, although further research is needed in this field prior to implementing mathematical models as a predictive method in a clinical setting. Nevertheless, both models are an important step in this direction.

  4. Aminomethylphosphonic acid inhibits growth and metastasis of human prostate cancer in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Parajuli, Keshab Raj; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; You, Zongbing

    2016-03-01

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to determine if AMPA could inhibit growth and metastasis of prostate cancer in vivo. Human prostate cancer PC-3-LacZ-luciferase cells were implanted into the ventral lateral lobes of the prostate in 39 athymic Nu/Nu nude male mice. Seven days later, mice were randomized into the control group (n = 14, treated intraperitoneally with phosphate buffered saline), low dose group (n = 10, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 400 mg/kg body weight/day), and high dose group (n = 15, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 800 mg/kg body weight/day). Tumor growth and metastasis were examined every 4-7 days by bioluminescence imaging of live mice. We found that AMPA treatment significantly inhibited growth and metastasis of orthotopic xenograft prostate tumors and prolonged the survival time of the mice. AMPA treatment decreased expression of BIRC2 and activated caspase 3, leading to increased apoptosis in the prostate tumors. AMPA treatment decreased expression of cyclin D1. AMPA treatment also reduced angiogenesis in the prostate tumors. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AMPA can inhibit prostate cancer growth and metastasis, suggesting that AMPA may be developed into a therapeutic agent for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:26840261

  5. Aminomethylphosphonic acid inhibits growth and metastasis of human prostate cancer in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Parajuli, Keshab Raj; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; You, Zongbing

    2016-01-01

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to determine if AMPA could inhibit growth and metastasis of prostate cancer in vivo. Human prostate cancer PC-3-LacZ-luciferase cells were implanted into the ventral lateral lobes of the prostate in 39 athymic Nu/Nu nude male mice. Seven days later, mice were randomized into the control group (n = 14, treated intraperitoneally with phosphate buffered saline), low dose group (n = 10, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 400 mg/kg body weight/day), and high dose group (n = 15, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 800 mg/kg body weight/day). Tumor growth and metastasis were examined every 4-7 days by bioluminescence imaging of live mice. We found that AMPA treatment significantly inhibited growth and metastasis of orthotopic xenograft prostate tumors and prolonged the survival time of the mice. AMPA treatment decreased expression of BIRC2 and activated caspase 3, leading to increased apoptosis in the prostate tumors. AMPA treatment decreased expression of cyclin D1. AMPA treatment also reduced angiogenesis in the prostate tumors. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AMPA can inhibit prostate cancer growth and metastasis, suggesting that AMPA may be developed into a therapeutic agent for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:26840261

  6. What Tests Can Detect Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate cancer early detection What tests can detect prostate cancer early? The tests discussed below are used to ... also found in the blood. Most men without prostate cancer have PSA levels under 4 nanograms per milliliter ( ...

  7. Survival in prostate cancer prevention trial detailed

    Cancer.gov

    In the NCI-sponsored Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial, initial findings from a decade ago showed that the drug finasteride significantly reduced the risk of prostate cancer, but among those who did develop prostate cancer, paradoxically, the drug was asso

  8. Dietary soy and tea mitigate chronic inflammation and prostate cancer via NFκB pathway in the Noble rat model

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Anna; Bruno, Richard S.; Löhr, Christiane V.; Taylor, Alan W.; Dashwood, Rodrick H.; Bray, Tammy M.; Ho, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) have been implicated in prostate cancer development; thus, dietary factors that inhibit NFκB may serve as effective chemo-preventative agents. Prostate cancer risk is significantly lower in Asian countries compared to the US, which has prompted interest in the potential chemopreventative action of Asian dietary components such as soy and green tea. This study examined the effects of dietary soy and tea on NFκB activation and inflammation in vivo using a hormone-induced rat model for prostate cancer. Male Noble rats implanted with estradiol and testosterone were divided into 4 dietary groups: control, soy, tea, or soy+ tea. NFκB activation and inflammatory cytokines were measured post implantation. The combination of soy and tea suppressed NFκB p50 binding activity and protein levels via induction of IκBα. Soy and tea also decreased prostate inflammatory infiltration, increased Bax/BcL2 ratio, and decreased protein expression of TNFα, IL-6 and IL1-β compared to control. Soy and tea attenuated prostate malignancy by decreasing prostate hyperplasia. These effects were not apparent in groups treated with soy or tea alone. The ongoing in vivo studies thus far suggest that combination of foods, such as soy and tea, may inhibit hormone-induced pro-inflammatory NFκB signals that contribute to prostate cancer development. PMID:20801632

  9. Percentage of Positive Biopsy Cores: A Better Risk Stratification Model for Prostate Cancer?

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jiayi; Vicini, Frank A.; Williams, Scott G.; Ye Hong; McGrath, Samuel; Ghilezan, Mihai; Krauss, Daniel; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Kestin, Larry L.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To assess the prognostic value of the percentage of positive biopsy cores (PPC) and perineural invasion in predicting the clinical outcomes after radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer and to explore the possibilities to improve on existing risk-stratification models. Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2004, 1,056 patients with clinical Stage T1c-T3N0M0 prostate cancer, who had four or more biopsy cores sampled and complete biopsy core data available, were treated with external beam RT, with or without a high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost at William Beaumont Hospital. The median follow-up was 7.6 years. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was performed with PPC, Gleason score, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen, T stage, PNI, radiation dose, androgen deprivation, age, prostate-specific antigen frequency, and follow-up duration. A new risk stratification (PPC classification) was empirically devised to incorporate PPC and replace the T stage. Results: On multivariate Cox regression analysis, the PPC was an independent predictor of distant metastasis, cause-specific survival, and overall survival (all p < .05). A PPC >50% was associated with significantly greater distant metastasis (hazard ratio, 4.01; 95% confidence interval, 1.86-8.61), and its independent predictive value remained significant with or without androgen deprivation therapy (all p < .05). In contrast, PNI and T stage were only predictive for locoregional recurrence. Combining the PPC ({<=}50% vs. >50%) with National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk stratification demonstrated added prognostic value of distant metastasis for the intermediate-risk (hazard ratio, 5.44; 95% confidence interval, 1.78-16.6) and high-risk (hazard ratio, 4.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.70-11.3) groups, regardless of the use of androgen deprivation and high-dose RT (all p < .05). The proposed PPC classification appears to provide improved stratification of the clinical outcomes relative to the National

  10. In vivo MRI based prostate cancer localization with random forests and auto-context model.

    PubMed

    Qian, Chunjun; Wang, Li; Gao, Yaozong; Yousuf, Ambereen; Yang, Xiaoping; Oto, Aytekin; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-09-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the major causes of cancer death for men. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is being increasingly used as an important modality to localize prostate cancer. Therefore, localizing prostate cancer in MRI with automated detection methods has become an active area of research. Many methods have been proposed for this task. However, most of previous methods focused on identifying cancer only in the peripheral zone (PZ), or classifying suspicious cancer ROIs into benign tissue and cancer tissue. Few works have been done on developing a fully automatic method for cancer localization in the entire prostate region, including central gland (CG) and transition zone (TZ). In this paper, we propose a novel learning-based multi-source integration framework to directly localize prostate cancer regions from in vivo MRI. We employ random forests to effectively integrate features from multi-source images together for cancer localization. Here, multi-source images include initially the multi-parametric MRIs (i.e., T2, DWI, and dADC) and later also the iteratively-estimated and refined tissue probability map of prostate cancer. Experimental results on 26 real patient data show that our method can accurately localize cancerous sections. The higher section-based evaluation (SBE), combined with the ROC analysis result of individual patients, shows that the proposed method is promising for in vivo MRI based prostate cancer localization, which can be used for guiding prostate biopsy, targeting the tumor in focal therapy planning, triage and follow-up of patients with active surveillance, as well as the decision making in treatment selection. The common ROC analysis with the AUC value of 0.832 and also the ROI-based ROC analysis with the AUC value of 0.883 both illustrate the effectiveness of our proposed method. PMID:27048995

  11. Mineralized human primary osteoblast matrices as a model system to analyse interactions of prostate cancer cells with the bone microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Johannes C; Quent, Verena M C; Burke, Leslie J; Stansfield, Scott H; Clements, Judith A; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2010-11-01

    Prostate cancer metastasis is reliant on the reciprocal interactions between cancer cells and the bone niche/micro-environment. The production of suitable matrices to study metastasis, carcinogenesis and in particular prostate cancer/bone micro-environment interaction has been limited to specific protein matrices or matrix secreted by immortalised cell lines that may have undergone transformation processes altering signaling pathways and modifying gene or receptor expression. We hypothesize that matrices produced by primary human osteoblasts are a suitable means to develop an in vitro model system for bone metastasis research mimicking in vivo conditions. We have used a decellularized matrix secreted from primary human osteoblasts as a model for prostate cancer function in the bone micro-environment. We show that this collagen I rich matrix is of fibrillar appearance, highly mineralized, and contains proteins, such as osteocalcin, osteonectin and osteopontin, and growth factors characteristic of bone extracellular matrix (ECM). LNCaP and PC3 cells grown on this matrix, adhere strongly, proliferate, and express markers consistent with a loss of epithelial phenotype. Moreover, growth of these cells on the matrix is accompanied by the induction of genes associated with attachment, migration, increased invasive potential, Ca(2+) signaling and osteolysis. In summary, we show that growth of prostate cancer cells on matrices produced by primary human osteoblasts mimics key features of prostate cancer bone metastases and thus is a suitable model system to study the tumor/bone micro-environment interaction in this disease. PMID:20688384

  12. Prostate cancer is not breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Venniyoor, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    Cancers of the prostate and breast are hormone dependent cancers. There is a tendency to equate them and apply same algorithms for treatment. It is pointed out that metastatic prostate cancer with bone-only disease is a potentially fatal condition with a much poorer prognosis than metastatic breast cancer and needs a more aggressive approach. PMID:27051149

  13. Endocrine disruptors and prostate cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Gail S

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing evidence both from epidemiology studies and animal models that specific endocrine-disrupting compounds may influence the development or progression of prostate cancer. In large part, these effects appear to be linked to interference with estrogen signaling, either through interacting with ERs or by influencing steroid metabolism and altering estrogen levels within the body. In humans, epidemiologic evidence links specific pesticides, PCBs and inorganic arsenic exposures to elevated prostate cancer risk. Studies in animal models also show augmentation of prostate carcinogenesis with several other environmental estrogenic compounds including cadmium, UV filters and BPA. Importantly, there appears to be heightened sensitivity of the prostate to these endocrine disruptors during the critical developmental windows including in utero and neonatal time points as well as during puberty. Thus infants and children may be considered a highly susceptible population for ED exposures and increased risk of prostate cancers with aging. PMID:18524946

  14. Hepcidin regulation in prostate and its disruption in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tesfay, Lia; Clausen, Kathryn A.; Kim, Jin W.; Hegde, Poornima; Wang, Xiaohong; Miller, Lance D.; Deng, Zhiyong; Blanchette, Nicole; Arvedson, Tara; Miranti, Cindy K.; Babitt, Jodie L.; Lin, Herbert Y.; Peehl, Donna M.; Torti, Frank M.; Torti, Suzy V.

    2015-01-01

    Hepcidin is a circulating peptide hormone made by the liver that is a central regulator of systemic iron uptake and recycling. Here we report that prostate epithelial cells also synthesize hepcidin, and that synthesis and secretion of hepcidin are markedly increased in prostate cancer cells and tissue. Prostatic hepcidin functions as an autocrine hormone, decreasing cell surface ferroportin, an iron exporter, increasing intracellular iron retention, and promoting prostate cancer cell survival. Synthesis of hepcidin in prostate cancer is controlled by a unique intersection of pathways that involves BMP4/7, IL6, Wnt, and the dual BMP and Wnt antagonist, SOSTDC1. Epigenetic silencing of SOSTDC1 through methylation is increased in prostate cancer, and is associated with accelerated disease progression in prostate cancer patients. These results establish a new connection between iron metabolism and prostate cancer, and suggest that prostatic dysregulation of hepcidin contributes to prostate cancer growth and progression. PMID:25858146

  15. Biomarkers in Prostate Cancer Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Mukesh; Patel, Payal; Verma, Mudit

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the etiology of a disease such as prostate cancer may help in identifying populations at high risk, timely intervention of the disease, and proper treatment. Biomarkers, along with exposure history and clinical data, are useful tools to achieve these goals. Individual risk and population incidence of prostate cancer result from the intervention of genetic susceptibility and exposure. Biochemical, epigenetic, genetic, and imaging biomarkers are used to identify people at high risk for developing prostate cancer. In cancer epidemiology, epigenetic biomarkers offer advantages over other types of biomarkers because they are expressed against a person's genetic background and environmental exposure, and because abnormal events occur early in cancer development, which includes several epigenetic alterations in cancer cells. This article describes different biomarkers that have potential use in studying the epidemiology of prostate cancer. We also discuss the characteristics of an ideal biomarker for prostate cancer, and technologies utilized for biomarker assays. Among epigenetic biomarkers, most reports indicate GSTP1 hypermethylation as the diagnostic marker for prostate cancer; however, NKX2-5, CLSTN1, SPOCK2, SLC16A12, DPYS, and NSE1 also have been reported to be regulated by methylation mechanisms in prostate cancer. Current challenges in utilization of biomarkers in prostate cancer diagnosis and epidemiologic studies and potential solutions also are discussed. PMID:24213111

  16. Prostate Cancer MR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fütterer, Jurgen J.

    With a total of 192,280 new cases predicted for 2009, prostate cancer (PC) now accounts for 25% of all new male cancers diagnosed in the United States [1]. Furthermore, in their lifetime, one in six men will be clinically diagnosed with having PC, although many more men are found to have histological evidence of PC at autopsy [2,3,4]. Presently, approximately 1 in 10 men will die of PC [5,6]. The ever-aging population and wider spread use of the blood prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test [7,8], as well as the tendency to apply lower cut-off levels for this test [9], will further increase the diagnosis of this disease [10].

  17. [Screening for prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Koch, Klaus; Büchter, Roland; Lange, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Prostate cancer screening has been a controversial for decades. The recently published findings of large trials have further intensified the debate. The prospect of reducing mortality from prostate cancer is measured against the risk of over-diagnosing the disease. In individual cases, the trade-off between possible benefits and harms is possible to ascertain, so general recommendations in favor of or against PSA tests for individuals cannot be made. The majority of men, however, are not well-informed on the possible advantages and drawbacks of screening. This situation urgently needs to be corrected. The PSA test is promoted to healthy men, who need to be provided with especially detailed information. If not provided with clear and unbiased information on the risks associated with the test (above all over-diagnosis and over-treatment), these men cannot be considered to be fully informed. PMID:23535548

  18. Biomarkers for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, Eric

    2007-12-01

    Novel biomarkers for prostate cancer (PCa) are currently being assessed for utility in PCa diagnosis. This article aims to provide concise information on the current findings that impact prostate cancer research. Results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for single biomarkers, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assays for DNA/RNA markers will be reviewed in addition to high-throughput proteomic profiling of PCa specimens. The advantages/disadvantages of tissue, blood, urine or seminal plasma as sources for potential biomarkers are discussed emphasizing the consequences for PCa diagnosis. In summary, the majority of promising marker candidates available today needs further validation. Some of the identified markers have the potential to yield novel prognostic tools for PCa, provide novel insights into its pathophysiology, and contribute to the establishment of novel treatment strategies. PMID:17690889

  19. Cabazitaxel Plus Prednisone With Octreotide For Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC) Previously Treated With Docetaxel

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-21

    Diarrhea; Hormone-resistant Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  20. Biochip analysis of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Fan, M Q; Wang, P X; Feng, J Y; Xiao, Y; Huang, C B

    2014-01-01

    Microarray expression analysis was used to forecast the roles of differentially co-expressed genes (DCG) and DCG and links in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer. In addition, we demonstrate that the relationship between transcriptional factors (TFs) and their targets can be considered a key factor in determining the difference between primary and metastatic prostate cancer. Regulatory impact factors were adopted to calculate the impact of TF. We identified 5 TFs and 29 target genes important in the transition between normal prostate and primary prostate cancer and 2 TFs and 7 target genes important in the transition between primary and metastatic prostate cancer. These results suggest that it may be possible to predict the clinical behavior of prostate cancer based on gene expression analysis. PMID:24446298

  1. Statin Use in Prostate Cancer: An Update.

    PubMed

    Babcook, Melissa A; Joshi, Aditya; Montellano, Jeniece A; Shankar, Eswar; Gupta, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, known as statins, are commonly prescribed for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and cardiovascular disease. A systematic review was conducted using the keywords "statin and prostate cancer" within the title search engines including PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library for relevant research work published between 2004 and December 2015. Although still premature, accumulating clinical evidence suggests that statin use may be beneficial in the prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer. These human studies consist of meta-analyses of secondary endpoints obtained from randomized, controlled cardiovascular disease clinical trials of statins, patient database, observational studies, and a few, small case-control studies, directly addressing statin use on prostate cancer pathology and recurrence. This review summarizes and discusses the recent clinical literature on statins and prostate cancer with a recommendation to move forward with randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials, investigating the use of statins. Additional preclinical testing of statins on prostate cancer cell lines and in vivo models is needed to elucidate pathways and determine its efficacy for prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer, more specifically, the difference in the effectiveness of lipophilic versus hydrophilic statins in prostate cancer. PMID:27441003

  2. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R inhibits human prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis in mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Toneri, Makoto; Miwa, Shinji; Zhang, Yong; Hu, Cameron; Yano, Shuya; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Bouvet, Michael; Nakanishi, Hayao; Hoffman, Robert M.; Zhao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a frequent occurrence in prostate cancer patients and often is lethal. Zoledronic acid (ZOL) is often used for bone metastasis with limited efficacy. More effective models and treatment methods are required to improve the outcome of prostate cancer patients. In the present study, the effects of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R were analyzed in vitro and in vivo on prostate cancer cells and experimental bone metastasis. Both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of PC-3 cells expressing red fluorescent protien in vitro. To investigate the efficacy of S. typhimurium A1-R on prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis, we established models of both early and advanced stage bone metastasis. The mice were treated with ZOL, S. typhimurium A1-R, and combination therapy of both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R. ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of solitary bone metastases. S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly decreased bone metastasis and delayed the appearance of PC-3 bone metastases of multiple mouse models. Additionally, S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly improved the overall survival of the mice with multiple bone metastases. The results of the present study indicate that S. typhimurium A1-R is useful to prevent and inhibit prostate cancer bone metastasis and has potential for future clinical use in the adjuvant setting. PMID:26431498

  3. Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wibmer, Andreas G; Burger, Irene A; Sala, Evis; Hricak, Hedvig; Weber, Wolfgang A; Vargas, Hebert Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous malignancy among men in the Western world. The natural history and clinical course of prostate cancer are markedly diverse, ranging from small indolent intraprostatic lesions to highly aggressive disseminated disease. An understanding of this biologic heterogeneity is considered a necessary requisite in the quest for the adoption of precise and personalized management strategies. Molecular imaging offers the potential for noninvasive assessment of the biologic interactions underpinning prostate carcinogenesis. Currently, numerous molecular imaging probes are in clinical use or undergoing preclinical or clinical evaluation. These probes can be divided into those that image increased cell metabolism, those that target prostate cancer-specific membrane proteins and receptor molecules, and those that bind to the bone matrix adjacent to metastases to bone. The increased metabolism and vascular changes in prostate cancer cells can be evaluated with radiolabeled analogs of choline, acetate, glucose, amino acids, and nucleotides. The androgen receptor, prostate-specific membrane antigen, and gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (ie, bombesin) are overexpressed in prostate cancer and can be targeted by specific radiolabeled imaging probes. Because metastatic prostate cancer cells induce osteoblastic signaling pathways of adjacent bone tissue, bone-seeking radiotracers are sensitive tools for the detection of metastases to bone. Knowledge about the underlying biologic processes responsible for the phenotypes associated with the different stages of prostate cancer allows an appropriate choice of methods and helps avoid pitfalls. PMID:26587888

  4. Prostate Cancer and Sexual Function

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is now ranked fifth in incidence among cancers in Korean adult males. This is attributable to the more Westernized dietary style which increases the morbidity of prostate cancer and the development of cancer diagnostic technologies, such as prostate-specific antigen and advanced medical systems, increasing the rate of prostate cancer diagnosis. Prostate cancer effects include not only erectile dysfunction caused by the disease itself, but also by psychiatric disorders caused by prostate cancer or its treatments. Prostate cancer by itself reduces sexual desire and the frequency of sexual intercourse. Additionally, surgery or hormonal therapy to block testosterone further increases the frequency of erectile dysfunction. Erectile dysfunction following radical prostatectomy is primarily attributable to nerve injury caused by intraoperative nerve traction, thermal injury, ischemic injury, and local inflammatory reactions. Additionally, the absence of nocturnal penile tumescence causes persistent hypoxia of the corpus cavernosum, which, secondarily, causes anatomical and functional changes in the corpus cavernosum. Preservation of erectile function is one of the most significant issues for patients with local prostate cancer. Erectile dysfunction following radical prostatectomy is known to have various prognoses, depending on preservation of the neurovascular bundle, patient age, and preoperative erectile status. Intracavernosal injections, PDE5 inhibitors, and penile rehabilitation therapy using a vacuum constriction device after radical prostatectomy are known to improve the recovery of erectile function. Recently, testosterone replacement therapy has also drawn attention as a treatment method. PMID:23596596

  5. Epigenetic potential of resveratrol and analogs in preclinical models of prostate cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prostate cancer is affected by lifestyle, particularly diet. Dietary polyphenols such as resveratrol possess anticancer properties and, therefore, chemopreventive and therapeutic potentials. Resveratrol has pleiotropic effect exerting its biological activity through multiple pathways and targets ass...

  6. Effect of Small Molecules Modulating Androgen Receptor (SARMs) in Human Prostate Cancer Models

    PubMed Central

    Tesei, Anna; Leonetti, Carlo; Di Donato, Marzia; Gabucci, Elisa; Porru, Manuela; Varchi, Greta; Guerrini, Andrea; Amadori, Dino; Arienti, Chiara; Pignatta, Sara; Paganelli, Giulia; Caraglia, Michele; Castoria, Gabriella; Zoli, Wainer

    2013-01-01

    The management of hormone-refractory prostate cancer represents a major challenge in the therapy of this tumor, and identification of novel androgen receptor antagonists is needed to render treatment more effective. We analyzed the activity of two novel androgen receptor antagonists, (S)-11 and (R)-9, in in vitro and in vivo experimental models of hormone-sensitive or castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In vitro experiments were performed on LNCaP, LNCaP-AR, LNCaP-Rbic and VCaP human prostate cancer cells. Cytotoxic activity was assessed by SRB and BrdU uptake, AR transactivation by luciferase reporter assay and PSA levels by Real Time RT-PCR and ELISA assays. Cell cycle progression-related markers were evaluated by western blot. In vivo experiments were performed on SCID mice xenografted with cells with different sensitivity to hormonal treatment. In hormone-sensitive LNCaP and LNCaP-AR cells, the latter expressing high androgen receptor levels, (R)-9 and (S)-11 exhibited a higher cytotoxic effect compared to that of the reference compound ((R)-bicalutamide), also in the presence of the synthetic androgen R1881. Furthermore, the cytotoxic effect produced by (R)-9 was higher than that of (S)-11 in the two hormone-resistant LNCaP-AR and VCaP cells. A significant reduction in PSA levels was observed after exposure to both molecules. Moreover, (S)-11 and (R)-9 inhibited DNA synthesis by blocking the androgen-induced increase in cyclin D1 protein levels. In vivo studies on the toxicological profile of (R)-9 did not reveal the presence of adverse events. Furthermore, (R)-9 inhibited tumor growth in various in vivo models, especially LNCaP-Rbic xenografts, representative of recurrent disease. Our in vitro results highlight the antitumor activity of the two novel molecules (R)-9 and (S)-11, making them a potentially attractive option for the treatment of CRPC. PMID:23667504

  7. Exercise modulation of the host-tumor interaction in an orthotopic model of murine prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lee W; Antonelli, Jodi; Masko, Elizabeth M; Broadwater, Gloria; Lascola, Christopher D; Fels, Diane; Dewhirst, Mark W; Dyck, Jason R B; Nagendran, Jeevan; Flores, Catherine T; Betof, Allison S; Nelson, Erik R; Pollak, Michael; Dash, Rajesh C; Young, Martin E; Freedland, Stephen J

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of exercise on cancer progression, metastasis, and underlying mechanisms in an orthotopic model of murine prostate cancer. C57BL/6 male mice (6-8 wk of age) were orthotopically injected with transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate C-1 cells (5 × 10(5)) and randomly assigned to exercise (n = 28) or a non-intervention control (n = 31) groups. The exercise group was given voluntary access to a wheel 24 h/day for the duration of the study. Four mice per group were serially killed on days 14, 31, and 36; the remaining 38 mice (exercise, n = 18; control, n = 20) were killed on day 53. Before death, MRI was performed to assess tumor blood perfusion. Primary tumor growth rate was comparable between groups, but expression of prometastatic genes was significantly modulated in exercising animals with a shift toward reduced metastasis. Exercise was associated with increased activity of protein kinases within the MEK/MAPK and PI3K/mTOR signaling cascades with subsequent increased intratumoral protein levels of HIF-1α and VEGF. This was associated with improved tumor vascularization. Multiplex ELISAs revealed distinct reductions in plasma concentrations of several angiogenic cytokines in the exercise group, which was associated with increased expression of angiogenic and metabolic genes in the skeletal muscle. Exercise-induced stabilization of HIF-1α and subsequent upregulation of VEGF was associated with "productive" tumor vascularization with a shift toward suppressed metastasis in an orthotopic model of prostate cancer. PMID:22604887

  8. The Effect of Health Belief Model-Based Education on Knowledge and Prostate Cancer Screening Behaviors: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Zare, Maryam; Ghodsbin, Fariba; Jahanbin, Iran; Ariafar, Ali; Keshavarzi, Sareh; Izadi, Tayyebe

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer has been reported as the second leading cause of cancer death among men in 2013. Prevention and early detection of cancer are considered as critical factors in controlling the disease and increasing the survival of patients. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the effect of Health Belief Model (HBM)-based education on knowledge and prostate cancer screening behaviors in a randomized controlled trial. Methods: This study was a non-blinded randomized controlled trial. We enrolled 210 men aged 50-70. Balanced block randomization method was used to randomize the final participants who had inclusion criteria into intervention (n=93) and control (n=87) groups. The participants of the intervention group attended training workshops based on HBM. Data were collected using three questionnaires, i.e. demographic questionnaire, Prostate Cancer Screening-Health Belief Model Scale (PCS-HBMS), and the Knowledge about Prostate Cancer Screening questionnaire, all given before and immediately one month after the intervention. Results: The mean scores of the perceived susceptibility, severity, barriers and benefits increased significantly after the intervention (P>0.05) in the intervention group. In the control group, such a difference was reported only for perceived susceptibility (P>0.05). The rate of participation in prostate cancer screening in the intervention group increased from 7.5% to 24% and 43.3% one month and three months after the intervention, respectively. Conclusion: Our findings showed that the health education programs designed based on HBM could positively affect prostate cancer preventive behaviors of individuals by improving their knowledge level and leaving positive effects on perceived susceptibility and severity as well as considering the perceived barriers, benefits and health motivations. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2013090911691N3 PMID:26793731

  9. Statin Use in Prostate Cancer: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Babcook, Melissa A.; Joshi, Aditya; Montellano, Jeniece A.; Shankar, Eswar; Gupta, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, known as statins, are commonly prescribed for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and cardiovascular disease. A systematic review was conducted using the keywords “statin and prostate cancer” within the title search engines including PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library for relevant research work published between 2004 and December 2015. Although still premature, accumulating clinical evidence suggests that statin use may be beneficial in the prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer. These human studies consist of meta-analyses of secondary endpoints obtained from randomized, controlled cardiovascular disease clinical trials of statins, patient database, observational studies, and a few, small case–control studies, directly addressing statin use on prostate cancer pathology and recurrence. This review summarizes and discusses the recent clinical literature on statins and prostate cancer with a recommendation to move forward with randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials, investigating the use of statins. Additional preclinical testing of statins on prostate cancer cell lines and in vivo models is needed to elucidate pathways and determine its efficacy for prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer, more specifically, the difference in the effectiveness of lipophilic versus hydrophilic statins in prostate cancer. PMID:27441003

  10. HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER RISK FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any non-skin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating an...

  11. Androgen Control in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Pelekanou, Vasiliki; Castanas, Elias

    2016-10-01

    Research on prostate cancer has extensively advanced in the past decade, through an improved understanding for its genetic basis and risk-stratification. Molecular classification of prostate cancer into distinct subtypes and the recognition of new histologic entities promise the development of tailored-made management strategies of patients. Nowadays, various alternatives are available for clinical management of localized disease ranging from observation alone through radical prostatectomy. In patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer, the approval of new drugs for the management of metastatic disease has offered promising results improving the survival of these patients. In this context, androgen receptors (AR) remain at the epicenter of prostate cancer research holding a prominent role in the biology and therapeutic regimens of prostate cancer. As many of castration-resistant tumors retain hormone-responsiveness, AR is a clinical relevant, druggable target. However, AR paradoxically remains neglected as a prostate cancer biomarker. The great advancements in prostate cancer preclinical and clinical research, imply further improvement in clinical and translational data, for patient selection and treatment optimization. For a precision medicine-guided clinical management of prostate cancer, AR evaluation has to be implemented in companion and complementary diagnostics, as discussed here. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2224-2234, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27104784

  12. Factors associated with prostate cancer screening behavior among men over 50 in Fasa, Iran, based on the PRECEDE model

    PubMed Central

    Jeihooni, Ali Khani; Kashfi, Seyyed Mansour; kashfi, Seyyed hannan; Heydarabadi, Akbar Babaei; Imanzad, Masoumeh; Hafez, Asghar Ashrafi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer is one of the most common and lethal cancers in the world. The incidence of prostate cancer has been increasing in recent years. The purpose of this study was to investigate factors associated with prostate cancer screening behaviors among men over 50 in Fasa, Iran, based on the PRECEDE model. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 400 men over 50 were studied in Fasa, Iran. Data were collected via a questionnaire on demographic characteristics, such as age, number of children, occupation, education, marital status, smoking, and prostate cancer screening behaviors. Data were analyzed using SPSS software, version 16. Independent samples t-test and the Pearson Product Moment correlation coefficient were used for the statistical analyses. Results: Men in the study had little knowledge (34.11±8.22) and attitude (28.23±7.23) about prostate cancer and screening behavior. Their mean scores about prostate cancer, screening behavior, quality of life, and general health were moderate. The subjects had low self-efficacy and perceived social support. Their mean scores of enabling factors and screening behaviors were at a low level. Pearson correlation scores showed a significant correlation between cancer prostate screening behavior and demographic variables, such as age (p=0.04, r=0.136), occupation (p=0.01, r=0.121), educational level (p=0.02, r=0.211), and marital status of the subjects (p=0.01, r=0.112), but there were not significant correlations with the number of children (p=0.12, r=0.092) and smoking (p=0.09, r=0.002). The T-test results showed significant relationships between age, occupation, and education of the subjects, and the PRECEDE model structures were significant for predisposing factors, enabling factors, and reinforcing factors (p<0.05). Conclusion: The prostate cancer screening behaviors in men over 50 in Fasa, Iran, were at a low level. Due to predisposing factors, such as the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of

  13. New drugs in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sangjun; Choi, Se Young; You, Dalsan; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2016-06-01

    The standard primary treatment for advanced prostate cancer has been hormonal therapy since the 1940s. However, prostate cancer inevitably progresses to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) after a median duration of 18 months of androgen deprivation therapy. In patients with CRPC, docetaxel has been regarded as the standard treatment. However, survival advantages of docetaxel over other treatments are slim, and the need for new agents persists. In recent years, novel agents, including abiraterone, enzalutamide, cabazitaxel, radium-223, and sipuleucel-T, have been approved for the treatment of CRPC, and more such agents based on diverse mechanisms are under investigation or evaluation. In this article, the authors reviewed the current literature on recent advances in medical treatment of prostate cancer, especially CRPC. In addition, the authors elaborated on novel drugs for prostate cancer currently undergoing investigation and their mechanisms. PMID:27358841

  14. American Cancer Society Recommendations for Prostate Cancer Early Detection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Prostate Cancer » More Information » Prostate Cancer Early Detection » American ... Causes Cancer? Breast Cancer Colon/Rectum Cancer Lung Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Show All Cancer Types News ...

  15. Therapeutic efficacy and molecular mechanisms of snake (Walterinnesia aegyptia) venom-loaded silica nanoparticles in the treatment of breast cancer- and prostate cancer-bearing experimental mouse models.

    PubMed

    Badr, Gamal; Al-Sadoon, Mohamed K; Rabah, Danny M

    2013-12-01

    The treatment of drug-resistant cancer is a clinical challenge, and thus screening for novel anticancer drugs is critically important. We recently demonstrated a strong enhancement of the antitumor activity of snake (Walterinnesia aegyptia) venom (WEV) in vitro in breast carcinoma, prostate cancer, and multiple myeloma cell lines but not in normal cells when the venom was combined with silica nanoparticles (WEV+NP). In the present study, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of WEV+NP in breast cancer- and prostate cancer-bearing experimental mouse models. Xenograft breast and prostate tumor mice models were randomized into 4 groups for each cancer model (10 mice per group) and were treated with vehicle (control), NP, WEV, or WEV+NP daily for 28 days post tumor inoculation. The tumor volumes were monitored throughout the experiment. On Day 28 post tumor inoculation, breast and prostate tumor cells were collected and either directly cultured for flow cytometry analysis or lysed for Western blot and ELISA analysis. Treatment with WEV+NP or WEV alone significantly reduced both breast and prostate tumor volumes compared to treatment with NP or vehicle alone. Compared to treatment with WEV alone, treatment of breast and prostate cancer cells with WEV+NP induced marked elevations in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydroperoxides, and nitric oxide; robust reductions in the levels of the chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL12, CXCL13, and CXCL16 and decreased surface expression of their cognate chemokine receptors CXCR3, CXCR4, CXCR5, and CXCR6; and subsequent reductions in the chemokine-dependent migration of both breast and prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, we found that WEV+NP strongly inhibited insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1)- and epidermal growth factor (EGF)-mediated proliferation of breast and prostate cancer cells, respectively, and enhanced the induction of apoptosis by increasing the activity of caspase-3,-8, and -9 in both breast and

  16. The link between benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ørsted, David D; Bojesen, Stig E

    2013-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer are among the most common diseases of the prostate gland and represent significant burdens for patients and health-care systems in many countries. The two diseases share traits such as hormone-dependent growth and response to antiandrogen therapy. Furthermore, risk factors such as prostate inflammation and metabolic disruption have key roles in the development of both diseases. Despite these commonalities, BPH and prostate cancer exhibit important differences in terms of histology and localization. Although large-scale epidemiological studies have shown that men with BPH have an increased risk of prostate cancer and prostate-cancer-related mortality, it remains unclear whether this association reflects a causal link, shared risk factors or pathophysiological mechanisms, or detection bias upon statistical analysis. Establishing BPH as a causal factor for prostate cancer development could improve the accuracy of prognostication and expedite intervention, potentially reducing the number of men who die from prostate cancer. PMID:23165396

  17. Generation and Characterisation of a Canine EGFP-HMGA2 Prostate Cancer In Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    Willenbrock, Saskia; Wagner, Siegfried; Reimann-Berg, Nicola; Moulay, Mohammed; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Nolte, Ingo; Escobar, Hugo Murua

    2014-01-01

    The architectural transcription factor HMGA2 is abundantly expressed during embryonic development. In several malignant neoplasias including prostate cancer, high re-expression of HMGA2 is correlated with malignancy and poor prognosis. The let-7 miRNA family is described to regulate HMGA2 negatively. The balance of let-7 and HMGA2 is discussed to play a major role in tumour aetiology. To further analyse the role of HMGA2 in prostate cancer a stable and highly reproducible in vitro model system is precondition. Herein we established a canine CT1258-EGFP-HMGA2 prostate cancer cell line stably overexpressing HMGA2 linked to EGFP and in addition the reference cell line CT1258-EGFP expressing solely EGFP to exclude EGFP-induced effects. Both recombinant cell lines were characterised by fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. The proliferative effect of ectopically overexpressed HMGA2 was determined via BrdU assays. Comparative karyotyping of the derived and the initial CT1258 cell lines was performed to analyse chromosome consistency. The impact of the ectopic HMGA2 expression on its regulator let-7a was analysed by quantitative real-time PCR. Fluorescence microscopy and immunocytochemistry detected successful expression of the EGFP-HMGA2 fusion protein exclusively accumulating in the nucleus. Gene expression analyses confirmed HMGA2 overexpression in CT1258-EGFP-HMGA2 in comparison to CT1258-EGFP and native cells. Significantly higher let-7a expression levels were found in CT1258-EGFP-HMGA2 and CT1258-EGFP. The BrdU assays detected an increased proliferation of CT1258-HMGA2-EGFP cells compared to CT1258-EGFP and native CT1258. The cytogenetic analyses of CT1258-EGFP and CT1258-EGFP-HMGA2 resulted in a comparable hyperdiploid karyotype as described for native CT1258 cells. To further investigate the impact of recombinant overexpressed HMGA2 on CT1258 cells, other selected targets described to underlie HMGA2 regulation were screened in addition

  18. Integrated network model provides new insights into castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yanling; Gu, Yinmin; Wang, Huimin; Huang, Yuanjie; Zou, Yi Ming

    2015-01-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is the main challenge for prostate cancer treatment. Recent studies have indicated that extending the treatments to simultaneously targeting different pathways could provide better approaches. To better understand the regulatory functions of different pathways, a system-wide study of CRPC regulation is necessary. For this purpose, we constructed a comprehensive CRPC regulatory network by integrating multiple pathways such as the MEK/ERK and the PI3K/AKT pathways. We studied the feedback loops of this network and found that AKT was involved in all detected negative feedback loops. We translated the network into a predictive Boolean model and analyzed the stable states and the control effects of genes using novel methods. We found that the stable states naturally divide into two obvious groups characterizing PC3 and DU145 cells respectively. Stable state analysis further revealed that several critical genes, such as PTEN, AKT, RAF, and CDKN2A, had distinct expression behaviors in different clusters. Our model predicted the control effects of many genes. We used several public datasets as well as FHL2 overexpression to verify our finding. The results of this study can help in identifying potential therapeutic targets, especially simultaneous targets of multiple pathways, for CRPC. PMID:26603105

  19. Spatial extended hazard model with application to prostate cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Hanson, Timothy; Zhang, Jiajia

    2015-06-01

    This article develops a Bayesian semiparametric approach to the extended hazard model, with generalization to high-dimensional spatially grouped data. County-level spatial correlation is accommodated marginally through the normal transformation model of Li and Lin (2006, Journal of the American Statistical Association 101, 591-603), using a correlation structure implied by an intrinsic conditionally autoregressive prior. Efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms are developed, especially applicable to fitting very large, highly censored areal survival data sets. Per-variable tests for proportional hazards, accelerated failure time, and accelerated hazards are efficiently carried out with and without spatial correlation through Bayes factors. The resulting reduced, interpretable spatial models can fit significantly better than a standard additive Cox model with spatial frailties. PMID:25521422

  20. Combined AKT and MEK Pathway Blockade in Pre-Clinical Models of Enzalutamide-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Toren, Paul; Kim, Soojin; Johnson, Fraser; Zoubeidi, Amina

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent improvements in patient outcomes using newer androgen receptor (AR) pathway inhibitors, treatment resistance in castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) continues to remain a clinical problem. Co-targeting alternate resistance pathways are of significant interest to treat CRPC and delay the onset of resistance. Both the AKT and MEK signaling pathways become activated as prostate cancer develops resistance to AR-targeted therapies. This pre-clinical study explores co-targeting these pathways in AR-positive prostate cancer models. Using various in vitro models of prostate cancer disease states including androgen dependent (LNCaP), CRPC (V16D and 22RV1) and ENZ-resistant prostate cancer (MR49C and MR49F), we evaluate the relevance of targeting both AKT and MEK pathways. Our data reveal that AKT inhibition induces apoptosis and inhibits cell growth in PTEN null cell lines independently of their sensitivity to hormone therapy; however, AKT inhibition had no effect on the PTEN positive 22RV1 cell line. Interestingly, we found that MEK inhibition had greater effect on 22RV1 cells compared to LNCaP, V16D or ENZ-resistant cells MR49C and MR49F cells. In vitro, combination AKT and MEK blockade had evidence of synergy observed in some cell lines and assays, but this was not consistent across all results. In vivo, the combination of AKT and MEK inhibition resulted in more consistent tumor growth inhibition of MR49F xenografts and longer disease specific survival compared to AKT inhibitor monotherapy. As in our in vitro study, 22RV1 xenografts were more resistant to AKT inhibition while they were more sensitive to MEK inhibition. Our results suggest that targeting AKT and MEK in combination may be a valuable strategy in prostate cancer when both pathways are activated and further support the importance of characterizing the dominant oncogenic pathway in each patient’s tumor in order to select optimal therapy. PMID:27046225

  1. Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map.

    PubMed

    Datta, Dipamoy; Aftabuddin, Md; Gupta, Dinesh Kumar; Raha, Sanghamitra; Sen, Prosenjit

    2016-01-01

    Human prostate cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease that mainly affects elder male population of the western world with a high rate of mortality. Acquisitions of diverse sets of hallmark capabilities along with an aberrant functioning of androgen receptor signaling are the central driving forces behind prostatic tumorigenesis and its transition into metastatic castration resistant disease. These hallmark capabilities arise due to an intense orchestration of several crucial factors, including deregulation of vital cell physiological processes, inactivation of tumor suppressive activity and disruption of prostate gland specific cellular homeostasis. The molecular complexity and redundancy of oncoproteins signaling in prostate cancer demands for concurrent inhibition of multiple hallmark associated pathways. By an extensive manual curation of the published biomedical literature, we have developed Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map (HPCHM), an onco-functional atlas of human prostate cancer associated signaling and events. It explores molecular architecture of prostate cancer signaling at various levels, namely key protein components, molecular connectivity map, oncogenic signaling pathway map, pathway based functional connectivity map etc. Here, we briefly represent the systems level understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with prostate tumorigenesis by considering each and individual molecular and cell biological events of this disease process. PMID:27476486

  2. Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Dipamoy; Aftabuddin, Md.; Gupta, Dinesh Kumar; Raha, Sanghamitra; Sen, Prosenjit

    2016-01-01

    Human prostate cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease that mainly affects elder male population of the western world with a high rate of mortality. Acquisitions of diverse sets of hallmark capabilities along with an aberrant functioning of androgen receptor signaling are the central driving forces behind prostatic tumorigenesis and its transition into metastatic castration resistant disease. These hallmark capabilities arise due to an intense orchestration of several crucial factors, including deregulation of vital cell physiological processes, inactivation of tumor suppressive activity and disruption of prostate gland specific cellular homeostasis. The molecular complexity and redundancy of oncoproteins signaling in prostate cancer demands for concurrent inhibition of multiple hallmark associated pathways. By an extensive manual curation of the published biomedical literature, we have developed Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map (HPCHM), an onco-functional atlas of human prostate cancer associated signaling and events. It explores molecular architecture of prostate cancer signaling at various levels, namely key protein components, molecular connectivity map, oncogenic signaling pathway map, pathway based functional connectivity map etc. Here, we briefly represent the systems level understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with prostate tumorigenesis by considering each and individual molecular and cell biological events of this disease process. PMID:27476486

  3. Prostate Cancer for the Internist

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Shikha; Sarmad, Rehan; Arora, Sumant; Dasaraju, Radhikha; Sarmad, Komal

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, approximately 240,000 men are diagnosed annually with prostate cancer. Although effective treatment options are available for clinically localized cancer, the potential burdensome co-morbidities and attendant healthcare costs from over diagnosis and over treatment have escalated the discussion and controversy regarding appropriate screening, diagnosis, and optimal management of prostate cancer. Although the lifetime risk of developing prostate cancer is approximately 1 in 6 (~16%), the risk of dying from the disease is only ~2%. The discrepancy between the cancer incidence and lethality has led to widespread scrutiny of prostate cancer patient management, particularly for low-grade, low-stage (indolent) disease. The vast majority of men diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer are treated with interventional therapies despite studies demonstrating that even without treatment, prostate cancer-specific mortality is low. A MedLine/PubMed search was performed using PICO format (Patient, Intervention, Comparison and Outcome) identifying all relevant articles. No restrictions were used for publication dates. The terms “Prostate Cancer”, “Screening”, “Mortality”, “Morbidity” yielded 307 results. “Diagnosis”, “Prognosis” and “Survival” yielded 1504 results. Further filters were applied to narrow down the results using keywords “Prostate cancer screening guidelines 2014”, “Beyond PSA”, “NCCN Guidelines prostate”, “MRI guided Prostate biopsy” yielding 72, 274, 54 and 568 results respectively. Of these, approximately 137 articles were found relevant and were reviewed. References from the reviewed articles were included in the final article. PMID:26713287

  4. Cancer of the prostate.

    PubMed Central

    Dearnaley, D. P.

    1994-01-01

    Prostate cancer presents a growing health problem in Western societies as longevity increases. It is characteristically a disease of elderly men associated with the development of osteoblastic bone metastases and initial hormone responsiveness to androgen deprivation. Previously regarded as a Cinderella of cancers, there is currently more controversy concerning the detection and management of both localised and metastatic disease than for any other common malignancy. A balance needs to be drawn between the potential gains of more aggressive management and the disadvantages in terms of increased treatment side effects and cost, taking into account both the natural course of the disease and the life expectancy of patients. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 PMID:8142838

  5. Improving Clinical Risk Stratification at Diagnosis in Primary Prostate Cancer: A Prognostic Modelling Study

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Karen A.; Muir, Kenneth R.; Gavin, Anna

    2016-01-01

    . Using this approach, a new five-stratum risk stratification system was produced, and its prognostic power was compared against the current system, with PCSM as the outcome. The results were analysed using a Cox hazards model, the log-rank test, Kaplan-Meier curves, competing-risks regression, and concordance indices. In the training set, the new risk stratification system identified distinct subgroups with different risks of PCSM in pair-wise comparison (p < 0.0001). Specifically, the new classification identified a very low-risk group (Group 1), a subgroup of intermediate-risk cancers with a low PCSM risk (Group 2, hazard ratio [HR] 1.62 [95% CI 0.96–2.75]), and a subgroup of intermediate-risk cancers with an increased PCSM risk (Group 3, HR 3.35 [95% CI 2.04–5.49]) (p < 0.0001). High-risk cancers were also sub-classified by the new system into subgroups with lower and higher PCSM risk: Group 4 (HR 5.03 [95% CI 3.25–7.80]) and Group 5 (HR 17.28 [95% CI 11.2–26.67]) (p < 0.0001), respectively. These results were recapitulated in the testing set and remained robust after inclusion of competing risks. In comparison to the current risk stratification system, the new system demonstrated improved prognostic performance, with a concordance index of 0.75 (95% CI 0.72–0.77) versus 0.69 (95% CI 0.66–0.71) (p < 0.0001). In an external cohort, the new system achieved a concordance index of 0.79 (95% CI 0.75–0.84) for predicting PCSM versus 0.66 (95% CI 0.63–0.69) (p < 0.0001) for the current NICE risk stratification system. The main limitations of the study were that it was registry based and that follow-up was relatively short. Conclusions A novel and simple five-stratum risk stratification system outperforms the standard three-stratum risk stratification system in predicting the risk of PCSM at diagnosis in men with primary non-metastatic prostate cancer, even when accounting for competing risks. This model also allows delineation of new clinically relevant

  6. A survival model for fractionated radiotherapy with an application to prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaider, Marco; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Hanin, Leonid G.; Tsodikov, Alexander D.; Yakovlev, Andrei Y.; Leibel, Steven A.

    2001-10-01

    This paper explores the applicability of a mechanistic survival model, based on the distribution of clonogens surviving a course of fractionated radiation therapy, to clinical data on patients with prostate cancer. The study was carried out using data on 1100 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer who were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy. The patients were stratified by radiation dose (group 1: <67.5 Gy; group 2: 67.5-72.5 Gy; group 3: 72.5-77.5 Gy; group 4: 77.5-87.5 Gy) and prognosis category (favourable, intermediate and unfavourable as defined by pre-treatment PSA and Gleason score). A relapse was recorded when tumour recurrence was diagnosed or when three successive prostate specific antigen (PSA) elevations were observed from a post-treatment nadir PSA level. PSA relapse-free survival was used as the primary end point. The model, which is based on an iterated Yule process, is specified in terms of three parameters: the mean number of tumour clonogens that survive the treatment, the mean of the progression time of post-treatment tumour development and its standard deviation. The model parameters were estimated by the maximum likelihood method. The fact that the proposed model provides an excellent description both of the survivor function and of the hazard rate is prima facie evidence of the validity of the model because closeness of the two survivor functions (empirical and model-based) does not generally imply closeness of the corresponding hazard rates. The estimated cure probabilities for the favourable group are 0.80, 0.74 and 0.87 (for dose groups 1-3, respectively); for the intermediate group: 0.25, 0.51, 0.58 and 0.78 (for dose groups 1-4, respectively) and for the unfavourable group: 0.0, 0.27, 0.33 and 0.64 (for dose groups 1-4, respectively). The distribution of progression time to tumour relapse was found to be independent of prognosis group but dependent on dose. As the dose increases the mean progression

  7. SPARCL1 suppresses metastasis in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yuzhu; Qiu, Qingchao; Jiang, Ming; Jin, Renjie; Lehmann, Brian D; Strand, Douglas W; Jovanovic, Bojana; DeGraff, David J; Zheng, Yi; Yousif, Dina A; Case, Thomas C; Yi, Jia; Cates, Justin M; Virostko, John; He, Xiusheng; Jin, Xunbo; Hayward, Simon W; Matusik, Robert J; George, Alfred L; Yi, Yajun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Metastasis, the main cause of death from cancer, remains poorly understood at the molecular level. Experimental design Based on a pattern of reduced expression in human prostate cancer tissues and tumor cell lines, a candidate suppressor gene (SPARCL1) was identified. We used in vitro approaches to determine whether overexpression of SPARCL1 affects cell growth, migration, and invasiveness. We then employed xenograft mouse models to analyze the impact of SPARCL1 on prostate cancer cell growth and metastasis in vivo. Results SPARCL1 expression did not inhibit tumor cell proliferation in vitro. By contrast, SPARCL1 did suppress tumor cell migration and invasiveness in vitro and tumor metastatic growth in vivo, conferring improved survival in xenograft mouse models. Conclusions We present the first in vivo data suggesting that SPARCL1 suppresses metastasis of prostate cancer. PMID:23916135

  8. The essential role of methylthioadenosine phosphorylase in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Barbara A.; Karasik, Ellen; Gillard, Bryan; Morrison, Carl; Mohler, James; Phillips, James G.; Smiraglia, Dominic J.

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic epithelial cells secrete high levels of acetylated polyamines into the prostatic lumen. This distinctive characteristic places added strain on the connected pathways, which are forced to increase metabolite production to maintain pools. The methionine salvage pathway recycles the one-carbon unit lost to polyamine biosynthesis back to the methionine cycle, allowing for replenishment of SAM pools providing a mechanism to help mitigate metabolic stress associated with high flux through these pathways. The rate-limiting enzyme involved in this process is methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP), which, although commonly deleted in many cancers, is protected in prostate cancer. We report near universal retention of MTAP expression in a panel of human prostate cancer cell lines as well as patient samples. Upon metabolic perturbation, prostate cancer cell lines upregulate MTAP and this correlates with recovery of SAM levels. Furthermore, in a mouse model of prostate cancer we find that both normal prostate and diseased prostate maintain higher SAM levels than other tissues, even under increased metabolic stress. Finally, we show that knockdown of MTAP, both genetically and pharmacologically, blocks androgen sensitive prostate cancer growth in vivo. Our findings strongly suggest that the methionine salvage pathway is a major player in homeostatic regulation of metabolite pools in prostate cancer due to their high level of flux through the polyamine biosynthetic pathway. Therefore, this pathway, and specifically the MTAP enzyme, is an attractive therapeutic target for prostate cancer. PMID:26910893

  9. Contemporary Management of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cotter, Katherine; Konety, Badrinath; Ordonez, Maria A

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer represents a spectrum ranging from low-grade, localized tumors to devastating metastatic disease. We discuss the general options for treatment and recent developments in the field. PMID:26949522

  10. Contemporary Management of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, Katherine; Konety, Badrinath; Ordonez, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer represents a spectrum ranging from low-grade, localized tumors to devastating metastatic disease. We discuss the general options for treatment and recent developments in the field. PMID:26949522

  11. Hypoxia in the androgen-dependent Shionogi model for prostate cancer at three stages.

    PubMed

    Skov, Kirsten; Adomat, Hans; Bowden, Mary; Dragowska, Wieslawa; Gleave, Martin; Koch, Cameron J; Woo, Janet; Yapp, Donald T T

    2004-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate a possible relationship between androgen status and hypoxia in the Shionogi murine prostate tumor model, which is widely used to study the effects of androgen withdrawal on hormone resistance and radiation response. Binding of the nitroimidazole hypoxia marker EF5 was assessed using the Cy3-tagged monoclonal antibody ELK3-51. Three hours after injection of EF5 (30 mg/kg), tumors from the following three stages were excised: androgen-dependent, regressed tumors 7 days after castration, and androgen-independent. Half of each tumor was disaggregated for analysis by flow cytometry and the remainder was flash frozen. Statistically significant differences (P < 0.01) were found between androgen-dependent, regressed and androgen-dependent tumors: approximately 30, approximately 2 and approximately 50% hypoxic cells, respectively. Frozen sections from androgen-dependent tumors exhibited highly variable EF5 binding; regressed tumors showed very little or no binding; each section from androgen-dependent tumors showed high levels and uniformly distributed binding of EF5. There was no correlation between the degree of hypoxia and tumor weight (P > 0.1). The results from this preliminary study indicate that hypoxia may play an important role with respect to the timing of irradiation in prostate cancer treatments and possibly may be a useful prognostic tool. In addition, hypoxia may also be relevant to progression in this disease after androgen ablation. PMID:15624309

  12. Prevention and early detection of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Cuzick, Jack; Thorat, Mangesh A; Andriole, Gerald; Brawley, Otis W; Brown, Powel H; Culig, Zoran; Eeles, Rosalind A; Ford, Leslie G; Hamdy, Freddie C; Holmberg, Lars; Ilic, Dragan; Key, Timothy J; La Vecchia, Carlo; Lilja, Hans; Marberger, Michael; Meyskens, Frank L; Minasian, Lori M; Parker, Chris; Parnes, Howard L; Perner, Sven; Rittenhouse, Harry; Schalken, Jack; Schmid, Hans-Peter; Schmitz-Dräger, Bernd J; Schröder, Fritz H; Stenzl, Arnulf; Tombal, Bertrand; Wilt, Timothy J; Wolk, Alicja

    2014-10-01

    Prostate cancer is a common malignancy in men and the worldwide burden of this disease is rising. Lifestyle modifications such as smoking cessation, exercise, and weight control offer opportunities to reduce the risk of developing prostate cancer. Early detection of prostate cancer by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening is controversial, but changes in the PSA threshold, frequency of screening, and the use of other biomarkers have the potential to minimise the overdiagnosis associated with PSA screening. Several new biomarkers for individuals with raised PSA concentrations or those diagnosed with prostate cancer are likely to identify individuals who can be spared aggressive treatment. Several pharmacological agents such as 5α-reductase inhibitors and aspirin could prevent development of prostate cancer. In this Review, we discuss the present evidence and research questions regarding prevention, early detection of prostate cancer, and management of men either at high risk of prostate cancer or diagnosed with low-grade prostate cancer. PMID:25281467

  13. Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Josef J.; Schöder, Heiko; Larson, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Prostate cancer is a complex and biologically heterogeneous disease that is not adequately assessed with conventional imaging alone. Molecular imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) is poised to fill this unmet need through noninvasive probing of the multiple molecular and cellular processes that are active in prostate cancer patients. Recent findings Several PET tracers are active in early and late stage prostate cancer in humans. F18-FDG, C11/F18-choline and F18-sodium fluoride (NaF) have been studied most extensively. There is a growing body of literature supporting to the utility of choline in early stage prostate cancer. FDG and NaF are more valuable in advanced disease, especially for assessing bone metastases, the prevalent form of metastases in this patient population. F18-Fluoro-dihydrotestosterone is active in castrate disease and is emerging as a valuable pharmacodynamic marker in the development of novel AR-targeted therapies. Anti-PSMA PET tracers are in the early stages of clinical development. Summary Multiple PET tracers are currently available to aid in the detection and management of prostate cancer across the clinical spectrum of the disease. Prospective, rigorously controlled, clinical imaging trials are needed to establish the optimal role of PET in prostate cancer. PMID:22617062

  14. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia enhances radiation therapy: A study in mouse models of human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Attaluri, Anilchandra; Kandala, Sri Kamal; Wabler, Michele; Zhou, Haoming; Cornejo, Christine; Armour, Michael; Hedayati, Mohammad; Zhang, Yonggang; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Herman, Cila; Ivkov, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to characterise magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (mNPH) with radiation therapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods Human prostate cancer subcutaneous tumours, PC3 and LAPC-4, were grown in nude male mice. When tumours measured 150 mm3 magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONPs) were injected into tumours to a target dose of 5.5 mg Fe/cm3 tumour, and treated 24 h later by exposure to alternating magnetic field (AMF). Mice were randomly assigned to one of four cohorts to characterise (1) intratumour MIONP distribution, (2) effects of variable thermal dose mNPH (fixed AMF peak amplitude 24 kA/m at 160±5 kHz) with/without RT (5 Gy), (3) effects of RT (RT5: 5 Gy; RT8: 8 Gy), and (4) fixed thermal dose mNPH (43 °C for 20min) with/without RT (5 Gy). MIONP concentration and distribution were assessed following sacrifice and tissue harvest using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and Prussian blue staining, respectively. Tumour growth was monitored and compared among treated groups. Results LAPC-4 tumours retained higher MIONP concentration and more uniform distribution than did PC3 tumours. AMF power modulation provided similar thermal dose for mNPH and combination therapy groups (CEM43: LAPC-4: 33.6 ± 3.4 versus 25.9 ± 0.8, and PC3: 27.19 ± 0.7 versus 27.50 ± 0.6), thereby overcoming limitations of MIONP distribution and yielding statistically significant tumour growth delay. Conclusion PC3 and LAPC-4 tumours represent two biological models that demonstrate different patterns of nanoparticle retention and distribution, offering a model to make comparisons of these effects for mNPH. Modulating power for mNPH offers potential to overcome limitations of MIONP distribution to enhance mNPH. PMID:25811736

  15. Mathematical modeling of prostate cancer progression in response to androgen ablation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Harsh Vardhan; Clinton, Steven K.; Bhinder, Arvinder; Friedman, Avner

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer progression depends in part on the complex interactions between testosterone, its active metabolite DHT, and androgen receptors. In a metastatic setting, the first line of treatment is the elimination of testosterone. However, such interventions are not curative because cancer cells evolve via multiple mechanisms to a castrate-resistant state, allowing progression to a lethal outcome. It is hypothesized that administration of antiandrogen therapy in an intermittent, as opposed to continuous, manner may bestow improved disease control with fewer treatment-related toxicities. The present study develops a biochemically motivated mathematical model of antiandrogen therapy that can be tested prospectively as a predictive tool. The model includes “personalized” parameters, which address the heterogeneity in the predicted course of the disease under various androgen-deprivation schedules. Model simulations are able to capture a variety of clinically observed outcomes for “average” patient data under different intermittent schedules. The model predicts that in the absence of a competitive advantage of androgen-dependent cancer cells over castration-resistant cancer cells, intermittent scheduling can lead to more rapid treatment failure as compared to continuous treatment. However, increasing a competitive advantage for hormone-sensitive cells swings the balance in favor of intermittent scheduling, delaying the acquisition of genetic or epigenetic alterations empowering androgen resistance. Given the near universal prevalence of antiandrogen treatment failure in the absence of competing mortality, such modeling has the potential of developing into a useful tool for incorporation into clinical research trials and ultimately as a prognostic tool for individual patients. PMID:22106268

  16. Cryotherapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the needles to the prostate gland. Then, very cold gas passes through the needles, creating ice balls that destroy the prostate gland. Warm salt water will flow through the catheter to keep your urethra (the tube from the bladder to ...

  17. Lycopene: redress for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Pisipati, Sai Venkata Vedavyas; Pathapati, Harshavardhan; Bhukya, Ganesh; Nuthakki, Suresh; Chandu, Baburao; Nama, SreeKanth; Adeps, RajDev

    2012-03-01

    Lycopene, a carotenoid is what that gives red colour to some fruits like pomegranate, tomato, papaya etc... People with a sound diet of lycopene may have a less risk of cancers especially prostate cancer which is most impedent for the males of age 40-50 years. So, in countries of north America and Europe food contains much of the lycopene supplements. In accordance with the American journal of epidemiology 2002 studies implies that men with crushed serum lycopene levels are more divulged to prostate cancer and those with sound diet of lycopene have a less risk of prostate cancer. In a care study conveyed by The British journal of urology, men with prostate cancer are subjected to surgery and the tumour is detonated. Amongst the men half a set were supplemented with lycopene supplements and half were not. Those subjected with lycopene supplements have less bone pains and live longer than those not supplemented. This paints a picture about importance of lycopene in treatment of prostate cancer. This article evokes the importance of lycopene and its way of destroying the cancer. Lycopene reduces the risk of cancer by diverging its effect on the plasma Insulin like growth factor, on Connexins , and the most acceptable one, by quench of free radicals. PMID:24826034

  18. Lycopene: Redress for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pisipati, Sai Venkata Vedavyas; Pathapati, Harshavardhan; Bhukya, Ganesh; Nuthakki, Suresh; Chandu, Baburao; Nama, SreeKanth; Adeps, RajDev

    2012-01-01

    Lycopene, a carotenoid is what that gives red colour to some fruits like pomegranate, tomato, papaya etc... People with a sound diet of lycopene may have a less risk of cancers especially prostate cancer which is most impedent for the males of age 40-50 years. So, in countries of north America and Europe food contains much of the lycopene supplements. In accordance with the American journal of epidemiology 2002 studies implies that men with crushed serum lycopene levels are more divulged to prostate cancer and those with sound diet of lycopene have a less risk of prostate cancer. In a care study conveyed by The British journal of urology, men with prostate cancer are subjected to surgery and the tumour is detonated. Amongst the men half a set were supplemented with lycopene supplements and half were not. Those subjected with lycopene supplements have less bone pains and live longer than those not supplemented. This paints a picture about importance of lycopene in treatment of prostate cancer. This article evokes the importance of lycopene and its way of destroying the cancer. Lycopene reduces the risk of cancer by diverging its effect on the plasma Insulin like growth factor, on Connexins , and the most acceptable one, by quench of free radicals. PMID:24826034

  19. Resveratrol–zinc combination for prostate cancer management

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Chandra K; Pitschmann, Anna; Ahmad, Nihal

    2014-01-01

    Zinc, an essential trace element, plays a critical role in cell signaling, and defect(s) in zinc homeostasis may contribute to adverse physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer. Zinc is present in healthy prostate at a very high concentration, where it is required for important prostatic functions. However, zinc levels are significantly diminished in cancerous tissue, and intracellular zinc level is inversely correlated with prostate cancer progression. During neoplastic transformation, zinc-accumulating, citrate-producing normal prostate cells are metabolically transformed to citrate oxidizing cells that lose the ability to accumulate zinc. Interestingly, zinc has been shown to function as chemopreventive agent against prostate cancer, albeit at high doses, which may lead to many adverse effects. Therefore, novel means to enhance bioaccumulation of sufficient zinc in prostate cells via increasing zinc transport could be useful against prostate cancer. On the basis of available evidence, we present a possibility that the grape antioxidant resveratrol, when given with zinc, may lead to retuning the zinc homeostasis in prostate, thereby abolishing or reversing malignancy. If experimentally verified in in vivo model(s) of prostate cancer, such as transgenic mouse models, this may lead to novel means toward management of prostate cancer and other conditions with compromised zinc homeostasis. PMID:24866157

  20. Resveratrol-zinc combination for prostate cancer management.

    PubMed

    Singh, Chandra K; Pitschmann, Anna; Ahmad, Nihal

    2014-01-01

    Zinc, an essential trace element, plays a critical role in cell signaling, and defect(s) in zinc homeostasis may contribute to adverse physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer. Zinc is present in healthy prostate at a very high concentration, where it is required for important prostatic functions. However, zinc levels are significantly diminished in cancerous tissue, and intracellular zinc level is inversely correlated with prostate cancer progression. During neoplastic transformation, zinc-accumulating, citrate-producing normal prostate cells are metabolically transformed to citrate oxidizing cells that lose the ability to accumulate zinc. Interestingly, zinc has been shown to function as chemopreventive agent against prostate cancer, albeit at high doses, which may lead to many adverse effects. Therefore, novel means to enhance bioaccumulation of sufficient zinc in prostate cells via increasing zinc transport could be useful against prostate cancer. On the basis of available evidence, we present a possibility that the grape antioxidant resveratrol, when given with zinc, may lead to retuning the zinc homeostasis in prostate, thereby abolishing or reversing malignancy. If experimentally verified in in vivo model(s) of prostate cancer, such as transgenic mouse models, this may lead to novel means toward management of prostate cancer and other conditions with compromised zinc homeostasis. PMID:24866157

  1. Laser Illumination Modality of Photoacoustic Imaging Technique for Prostate Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Dong-qing; Peng, Yuan-yuan; Guo, Jian; Li, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) has recently emerged as a promising imaging technique for prostate cancer. But there was still a lot of challenge in the PAI for prostate cancer detection, such as laser illumination modality. Knowledge of absorbed light distribution in prostate tissue was essential since the distribution characteristic of absorbed light energy would influence the imaging depth and range of PAI. In order to make a comparison of different laser illumination modality of photoacoustic imaging technique for prostate cancer, optical model of human prostate was established and combined with Monte Carlo simulation method to calculate the light absorption distribution in the prostate tissue. Characteristic of light absorption distribution of transurethral and trans-rectal illumination case, and of tumor at different location was compared with each other.The relevant conclusions would be significant for optimizing the light illumination in a PAI system for prostate cancer detection.

  2. A TCP model for external beam treatment of intermediate-risk prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Sean; Putten, Wil van der

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Biological models offer the ability to predict clinical outcomes. The authors describe a model to predict the clinical response of intermediate-risk prostate cancer to external beam radiotherapy for a variety of fractionation regimes. Methods: A fully heterogeneous population averaged tumor control probability model was fit to clinical outcome data for hyper, standard, and hypofractionated treatments. The tumor control probability model was then employed to predict the clinical outcome of extreme hypofractionation regimes, as utilized in stereotactic body radiotherapy. Results: The tumor control probability model achieves an excellent level of fit, R{sup 2} value of 0.93 and a root mean squared error of 1.31%, to the clinical outcome data for hyper, standard, and hypofractionated treatments using realistic values for biological input parameters. Residuals Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 1.0% are produced by the tumor control probability model when compared to clinical outcome data for stereotactic body radiotherapy. Conclusions: The authors conclude that this tumor control probability model, used with the optimized radiosensitivity values obtained from the fit, is an appropriate mechanistic model for the analysis and evaluation of external beam RT plans with regard to tumor control for these clinical conditions.

  3. Lipid metabolism in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xinyu; Daniels, Garrett; Lee, Peng; Monaco, Marie E

    2014-01-01

    The malignant transformation of cells requires adaptations across multiple metabolic processes to satisfy the energy required for their increased rate of proliferation. Dysregulation of lipid metabolism has been a hallmark of the malignant phenotype; increased lipid accumulation secondary to changes in the levels of a variety of lipid metabolic enzymes has been documented in a variety of tumors, including prostate. Alterations in prostate lipid metabolism include upregulation of several lipogenic enzymes as well as of enzymes that function to oxidize fatty acids as an energy source. Cholesterol metabolism and phospholipid metabolism are also affected. With respect to lipogenesis, most studies have concentrated on increased expression and activity ofthe de novo fatty acid synthesis enzyme, fatty acid synthase (FASN), with suggestions that FASN might function as an oncogene. A central role for fatty acid oxidation in supplying energy to the prostate cancer cell is supported by the observation that the peroxisomal enzyme, α-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR), which facilitates the transformation of branched chain fatty acids to a form suitable for β-oxidation, is highly overexpressed in prostate cancer compared with normal prostate. Exploitation of the alterations in lipid metabolic pathways in prostate cancer could result in the development of new therapeutic modalities as well as provide candidates for new prognostic and predictive biomarkers. AMACR has already proven to be a valuable biomarker in distinguishing normal from malignant prostate tissue, and is used routinely in clinical practice. PMID:25374912

  4. Height and Prostate Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Zuccolo, Luisa; Harris, Ross; Gunnell, David; Oliver, Steven; Lane, Jane Athene; Davis, Michael; Donovan, Jenny; Neal, David; Hamdy, Freddie; Beynon, Rebecca; Savovic, Jelena; Martin, Richard Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background Height, a marker of childhood environmental exposures, is positively associated with prostate cancer risk, perhaps through the insulin-like growth factor system. We investigated the relationship of prostate cancer with height and its components (leg and trunk length) in a nested case-control study and with height in a dose-response meta-analysis. Methods We nested a case-control study within a population-based randomized controlled trial evaluating treatments for localized prostate cancer in British men ages 50 to 69 years, including 1,357 cases detected through prostate-specific antigen testing and 7,990 controls (matched on age, general practice, assessment date). Nine bibliographic databases were searched systematically for studies on the height-prostate cancer association that were pooled in a meta-analysis. Results Based on the nested case-control, the odds ratio (OR) of prostate-specific antigen-detected prostate cancer per 10 cm increase in height was 1.06 [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.97-1.16; ptrend = 0.2]. There was stronger evidence of an association of height with high-grade prostate cancer (OR: 1.23; 95% CI: 1.06-1.43), mainly due to the leg component, but not with low-grade disease (OR: 0.99; 95% CI: 0.90-1.10). In general, associations with leg or trunk length were similar. A meta-analysis of 58 studies found evidence that height is positively associated with prostate cancer (random-effects OR per 10 cm: 1.06; 95% CI: 1.03-1.09), with a stronger effect for prospective studies of more advanced/aggressive cancers (random-effects OR: 1.12; 95% CI: 1.05-1.19). Conclusion These data indicate a limited role for childhood environmental exposures—as indexed by adult height—on prostate cancer incidence, while suggesting a greater role for progression, through mechanisms requiring further investigation. PMID:18768501

  5. Parameter estimation and optimal scheduling algorithm for a mathematical model of intermittent androgen suppression therapy for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qian; Lu, Zhichang; Hirata, Yoshito; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2013-12-01

    We propose an algorithm based on cross-entropy to determine parameters of a piecewise linear model, which describes intermittent androgen suppression therapy for prostate cancer. By comparing with clinical data, the parameter estimation for the switched system shows good fitting accuracy and efficiency. We further optimize switching time points for the piecewise linear model to obtain a feasible therapeutic schedule. The simulation results of therapeutic effect are superior to those of previous strategy.

  6. African American Men and Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... have one of the highest incidences of prostate cancer in the world, and in this country the ... an epidemic. Winston Dyer: My introduction to prostate cancer started with the death of my 46-year- ...

  7. The therapeutic efficacy of I131-PSCA-mAb in orthotopic mouse models of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is upregulated in prostate cancer tissues. Here we aimed to study the therapeutic efficacy of a monoclonal antibody of PSCA-labeled I131 (I131-PSCA-mAb) in orthotopic mouse models of prostate cancer. Methods The proliferation, apoptosis and invasion abilities of PC-3 and LNCaP cells treated with I131-PSCA-mAb were measured by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay, flow cytometry and transwell culture, respectively. The human prostate cancer models were established by orthotopic implantation of PC-3 and LNCaP cells in nude mice. I131-PSCA-mAb distribution and tumor cell apoptosis in the tumor-bearing nude mice were measured. Results The inhibitory and apoptosis rates of PC-3 and LNCaP cells treated with I131-PSCA-mAb reached a maximum of 84%, 80% and 50%, 46%, respectively, which were obviously higher than in the cells treated with I131-IgG or PSCA-mAb. The invaded number of PC-3 and LNCaP cells treated with I131-PSCA-mAbe was significantly reduced (P < 0.01) compared with the control group. The ratios of I131-PSCA-mAb in tumor to intramuscular I131-PSCA-mAb (T/NT) in tumor-bearing nude mice were increased with time and reached the highest level after 8 h. T/NT stayed above 3.0 after 12 h, and the tumor could still be developed after 24 h. The number of apoptotic cells in tumor tissue of nude mice treated with I131-PSCA-mAb was larger than that in the control group. Conclusion I131-PSCA-mAb has the potential to become a new targeted therapy drug for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:24330823

  8. Vitamin D in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jungmi; Park, Sulgi; Zuniga, Baltazar; Bera, Alakesh; Song, Chung Seog; Chatterjee, Bandana

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) is a progressive, noncurable disease induced by androgen receptor (AR) upon its activation by tumor tissue androgen, which is generated from adrenal steroid dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) through intracrine androgen biosynthesis. Inhibition of mCRPC and early-stage, androgen-dependent prostate cancer by calcitriol, the bioactive vitamin D3 metabolite, is amply documented in cell culture and animal studies. However, clinical trials of calcitriol or synthetic analogs are inconclusive, although encouraging results have recently emerged from pilot studies showing efficacy of a safe-dose vitamin D3 supplementation in reducing tumor tissue inflammation and progression of low-grade prostate cancer. Vitamin D-mediated inhibition of normal and malignant prostate cells is caused by diverse mechanisms including G1/S cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, prodifferentiation gene expression changes, and suppressed angiogenesis and cell migration. Biological effects of vitamin D are mediated by altered expression of a gene network regulated by the vitamin D receptor (VDR), which is a multidomain, ligand-inducible transcription factor similar to AR and other nuclear receptors. AR-VDR cross talk modulates androgen metabolism in prostate cancer cells. Androgen inhibits vitamin D-mediated induction of CYP24A1, the calcitriol-degrading enzyme, while vitamin D promotes androgen inactivation by inducing phase I monooxygenases (e.g., CYP3A4) and phase II transferases (e.g., SULT2B1b, a DHEA-sulfotransferase). CYP3A4 and SULT2B1b levels are markedly reduced and CYP24A1 is overexpressed in advanced prostate cancer. In future trials, combining low-calcemic, potent next-generation calcitriol analogs with CYP24A1 inhibition or androgen supplementation, or cancer stem cell suppression by a phytonutrient such as sulfarophane, may prove fruitful in prostate cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:26827958

  9. Active surveillance for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Romero-Otero, Javier; García-Gómez, Borja; Duarte-Ojeda, José M; Rodríguez-Antolín, Alfredo; Vilaseca, Antoni; Carlsson, Sigrid V; Touijer, Karim A

    2016-03-01

    It is worth distinguishing between the two strategies of expectant management for prostate cancer. Watchful waiting entails administering non-curative androgen deprivation therapy to patients on development of symptomatic progression, whereas active surveillance entails delivering curative treatment on signs of disease progression. The objectives of the two management strategies and the patients enrolled in either are different: (i) to review the role of active surveillance as a management strategy for patients with low-risk prostate cancer; and (ii) review the benefits and pitfalls of active surveillance. We carried out a systematic review of active surveillance for prostate cancer in the literature using the National Center for Biotechnology Information's electronic database, PubMed. We carried out a search in English using the terms: active surveillance, prostate cancer, watchful waiting and conservative management. Selected studies were required to have a comprehensive description of the demographic and disease characteristics of the patients at the time of diagnosis, inclusion criteria for surveillance, and a protocol for the patients' follow up. Review articles were included, but not multiple papers from the same datasets. Active surveillance appears to reduce overtreatment in patients with low-risk prostate cancer without compromising cancer-specific survival at 10 years. Therefore, active surveillance is an option for select patients who want to avoid the side-effects inherent to the different types of immediate treatment. However, inclusion criteria for active surveillance and the most appropriate method of monitoring patients on active surveillance have not yet been standardized. PMID:26621054

  10. Prevention strategies for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Schmitz-Dräger, B J; Lümmen, G; Bismarck, E; Fischer, C

    2012-12-01

    Through the last decade consideration of the role of vitamins and minerals in primary prevention of genitourinary tumors has dramatically changed. Despite all efforts efficacy of a specific compound has not been proven, so far. In consequence, recommendations for a use of vitamins or other supplements with the intention of prostate cancer prevention should be avoided today. In contrast, there is some evidence that life style modification might be helpful: recent investigations suggest that smoking may be involved in prostate cancer carcinogenesis. In addition, there is evidence that moderate food consumption, reduction of dairy products and an Asian or Mediterranean diet might not only prevent prostate cancer but also harbors additional beneficial effects on general health. This move from single compounds to more complex diets can be considered as a change of paradigm in prostate cancer prevention and could be the starting point of future epidemiological research. Disappointing findings with regards to nutritional cancer prevention contrast with a solid evidence concerning the efficacy of chemoprevention using 5a-reductase inhibitors: Long-term use of Finasteride and Dutasteride significantly reduces prostate cancer detection. Further candidate drugs are under investigation. However, translation of these findings into urological practice remains a matter of controversial discussion. PMID:23288209

  11. Genomic approaches to outcome prediction in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Febbo, Phillip G

    2009-07-01

    Prostate cancer remains a common cause of cancer death in men. Applications of emerging genomic technologies to high-quality prostate cancer models and patient samples in multiple contexts have made significant contributions to our molecular understanding of the development and progression of prostate cancer. Genomic analysis of DNA, RNA, and protein alterations allows for the global assessment of this disease and provides the molecular framework to improve risk classification, outcome prediction, and development of targeted therapies. In this review, the author focused on highlighting recent work in genomics and its role in evaluating molecular modifiers of prostate cancer risk and behavior and the development of predictive models that anticipate the risk of developing prostate cancer, prostate cancer progression, and the response of prostate cancer to therapy. This framework has the exciting potential to be predictive and to provide personalized and individual treatment to the large number of men diagnosed with prostate cancer each year. Cancer 2009;115(13 suppl):3046-57. (c) 2009 American Cancer Society. PMID:19544546

  12. Shared gene expression alterations in prostate cancer and histologically benign prostate from patients with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kosari, Farhad; Cheville, John C; Ida, Cristiane M; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Leontovich, Alexey A; Sebo, Thomas J; Erdogan, Sibel; Rodriguez, Erika; Murphy, Stephen J; Vasmatzis, George

    2012-07-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) field effect alterations provide important clues regarding the initiation of these tumors and suggest targets for prevention or biomarkers for early detection. However, biomarkers of PCa field effects that have passed independent validation are lacking, largely because these alterations are subtle and difficult to distinguish from unrelated small changes in gene expression. We hypothesized that shared expression alterations in PCa and benign prostates containing PCa (BPCs) would have a higher potential for independent validation than alterations identified in BPCs alone. Expression analyses were performed on 37 PCas and 36 unmatched BPCs and were contrasted with 28 benign prostates (BPs) from patients free of PCa. Most of the protein-coding genes and nonexonic RNAs selected according to the hypothesis were validated by quantitative RT-PCR in an independent set of 51 BPCs and BPs. A statistical model based on two markers distinguished BPCs from BPs in the RT-PCR set and in an external microarray (area under the curve = 0.84 and 0.90, respectively). In addition, genes with predominant expression in stroma were identified by expression profiling of pure stroma and epithelial cells. Pathway analysis identified dysregulated platelet-derived growth factor receptor signaling in BPC stroma. These results validate our approach for finding PCa field effect alterations and demonstrate a PCa transcriptome fingerprint in nonneoplastic cells in prostates containing cancer. PMID:22640805

  13. Chronic Chlorpyrifos Exposure Does Not Promote Prostate Cancer in Prostate Specific PTEN Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Robert U.; Bannick, Nadine L.; Marin, Maximo J.; Robertson, Larry W.; Lynch, Charles F.; Henry, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental factors are likely to interact with genetic determinants to influence prostate cancer progression. The Agricultural Health Study has identified an association between exposure to organophosphorous pesticides including chlorpyrifos, and increased prostate cancer risk in pesticide applicators with a first-degree family history of this disease. Exploration of this potential gene-environment interaction would benefit from the development of a suitable animal model. Utilizing a previously described mouse model that is genetically predisposed to prostate cancer through a prostate-specific heterozygous PTEN deletion, termed C57/Luc/Ptenp+/−, we used bioluminescence imaging and histopathological analyses to test whether chronic exposure to chlorpyrifos in a grain-based diet for 32 weeks was able to promote prostate cancer development. Chronic exposure to chlorpyrifos in the diet did not promote prostate cancer development in C57/Luc/Ptenp+/− mice despite achieving sufficient levels to inhibit acetylcholinesterase activity in plasma. We found no significant differences in numbers of murine prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia lesions or disease progression in chlorpyrifos versus control treated animals up to 32 weeks. The mechanistic basis of pesticide-induced prostate cancer may be complex and may involve other genetic variants, multiple genes, or nongenetic factors that might alter prostate cancer risk during pesticide exposure in agricultural workers. PMID:23758150

  14. Prostate-specific antigen-negative prostate cancer recurrence?

    PubMed

    Froehner, Michael; Abolmaali, Nasreddin; Wirth, Manfred P

    2013-02-01

    We describe a patient with bone metastases occurring shortly after radical prostatectomy for organ-confined prostate cancer. The medical history and immunohistochemical findings suggested prostate cancer recurrence to the skeleton. Undetectable serum prostate-specific antigen levels, however, raised doubts about this diagnosis. A whole body (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan was obtained and revealed a right-sided breast cancer as the primary site of metastatic spread. PMID:23374851

  15. Longitudinal Analysis of a Model to Predict Quality of Life in Prostate Cancer Patients and their Spouses

    PubMed Central

    Kershaw, Trace S.; Mood, Darlene W.; Newth, Gail; Ronis, David L.; Sanda, Martin G.; Vaishampayan, Ulka; Northouse, Laurel L.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Purpose This study examined a stress-coping model to assess whether baseline antecedent variables predicted subsequent appraisal, and how that appraisal predicted coping and quality of life for prostate cancer patients and their spouses. Methods In a sample of 121 prostate cancer patient/spouse dyads, we assessed baseline antecedent variables (self-efficacy, current concerns, age, socioeconomic status, social support, communication, symptoms, phase of illness), 4-month follow-up appraisal (negative appraisal, hopelessness, uncertainty), and 8-month follow-up coping and mental and physical quality of life. Patients and spouses were assessed in a single integrated path model using structural equation modeling. Results The stress-coping model accounted for a significant amount of variance in mental and physical quality of life at 8 months for patients (40% and 34%, respectively) and spouses (43% and 24%, respectively). Appraisal mediated the effect of several antecedent variables on quality of life. In addition, several partner effects (e.g., spouse variables influencing patient outcomes) were found. Conclusions Prostate cancer patients need interventions that assist them to manage the effects of their disease. The stress-coping model suggests skills in several areas that could be improved. Programs need to include spouses because they also are negatively affected by the disease and can influence patient outcomes. PMID:18830672

  16. Coffee and tea consumption in relation to prostate cancer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Geybels, Milan S.; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Wright, Jonathan L.; Stott-Miller, Marni; Stanford, Janet L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Bioactive compounds found in coffee and tea may delay the progression of prostate cancer. Methods We investigated associations of pre-diagnostic coffee and tea consumption with risk of prostate cancer recurrence/progression. Study participants were men diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2002–2005 in King County, Washington, USA. We assessed the usual pattern of coffee and tea consumption two years before diagnosis date. Prostate cancer outcome events were identified using a detailed follow-up survey. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results The analysis of coffee intake in relation to prostate cancer recurrence/progression included 630 patients with a median follow-up of 6.4 years, during which 140 prostate cancer recurrence/progression events were recorded. Approximately 61% of patients consumed at least one cup of coffee per day. Coffee consumption was associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer recurrence/progression; the adjusted HR for ≥4 cups/day versus ≤1 cup/week was 0.41 (95% CI: 0.20, 0.81; P for trend = 0.01). Approximately 14% of patients consumed one or more cups of tea per day, and tea consumption was unrelated to prostate cancer recurrence/progression. Conclusion Results indicate that pre-diagnostic coffee consumption is associated with a lower risk of prostate cancer recurrence/progression. This finding will require replication in larger studies. PMID:23907772

  17. Counseling the Client with Prostate Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Russell C.; Juhnke, Gerald A.

    2003-01-01

    Prostate cancer is prevalent in the United States and has a far-reaching effect on men and their relationships. Being diagnosed with and treated for prostate cancer often causes men to experience side effects that induce physical, emotional, and social change. Counselors need to be aware of prostate cancer's impact on men and their families.…

  18. Dietary acrylamide and risk of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kathryn M; Giovannucci, Edward; Stampfer, Meir J; Mucci, Lorelei A

    2012-07-15

    Acrylamide has been designated by IARC as a "probable human carcinogen." High levels are formed during cooking of many commonly consumed foods including French fries, potato chips, breakfast cereal and coffee. Two prospective cohort studies and two case-control studies in Europe found no association between acrylamide intake and prostate cancer. We examined this association in a large prospective cohort of 47,896 US men in the Health Professionals' Follow-up Study, using updated dietary acrylamide intake from food frequency questionnaires in 1986, 1990, 1994, 1998 and 2002. From 1986 through 2006, we documented 5025 cases of prostate cancer, and 642 lethal cancers. We used Cox proportional hazards models to assess the association between acrylamide intake from diet and prostate cancer risk overall as well as risk of advanced or lethal cancer. Acrylamide intake ranged from a mean of 10.5 mcg/day in the lowest quintile to 40.1 mcg/day in the highest quintile; coffee and potato products were largest contributors to intake. The multivariate-adjusted relative risk of prostate cancer was 1.02 (95% confidence interval: 0.92-1.13) for the highest versus lowest quintile of acrylamide intake (p-value for trend = 0.90). Results were similar when restricted to never smokers and to men who had prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests. There was no significant association for dietary acrylamide and risk of lethal, advanced or high-grade disease, or for different latency periods ranging from 0-4 years to 12-16 years. We found no evidence that acrylamide intake, within the range of US diets, is associated with increased risk of prostate cancer. PMID:21866549

  19. Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ...

  20. Prostate cancer in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Konstantinos, Hatzimouratidis

    2005-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men. Despite earlier diagnosis due to prostate specific antigen (PSA) screening, it is still a disease of the elderly. Diagnosis is based on digital rectal examination (DRE) and PSA assessment. Refinements in PSA testing (age-specific reference ranges, free PSA, PSA density and velocity) increased specificity and limited unnecessary prostate biopsies. Diagnosis in earlier stages (T1 and T2) commonly leads to cure with current treatment modalities. These include radical prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Other treatment options under development include cryotherapy and high-intensity focused ultrasound. Metastatic prostate cancer is incurable and treatment is based on hormonal therapy. Cytotoxic chemotherapy has only limited role in hormone-independent prostate cancer. Radioisotopes and biphosphonates may alleviate bone pain and prevent osteoporosis and pathological fractures. Follow-up is based on PSA. Prognostic factors for recurrence include stage, Gleason score, pre- and posttreatment PSA. Quality of life issues play an important role in selecting treatment, especially in the elderly due to comorbidities that may negatively affect the overall quality of life. A holistic approach is recommended addressing all quality of life issues without focus only in cancer control. PMID:16362603

  1. Spheroid culture of LuCaP 136 patient-derived xenograft enables versatile preclinical models of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Valta, Maija P; Zhao, Hongjuan; Saar, Matthias; Tuomela, Johanna; Nolley, Rosalie; Linxweiler, Johannes; Sandholm, Jouko; Lehtimäki, Jaakko; Härkönen, Pirkko; Coleman, Ilsa; Nelson, Peter S; Corey, Eva; Peehl, Donna M

    2016-04-01

    LuCaP serially transplantable patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) are valuable preclinical models of locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer. Using spheroid culture methodology, we recently established cell lines from several LuCaP PDXs. Here, we characterized in depth the features of xenografts derived from LuCaP 136 spheroid cultures and found faithful retention of the phenotype of the original PDX. In vitro culture enabled luciferase transfection into LuCaP 136 spheroids, facilitating in vivo imaging. We showed that LuCaP 136 spheroids formed intratibial, orthotopic, and subcutaneous tumors when re-introduced into mice. Intratibial tumors responded to castration and were highly osteosclerotic. LuCaP 136 is a realistic in vitro-in vivo preclinical model of a subtype of bone metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:26873136

  2. [Prostate cancer and chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Gravis, Gwenaelle; Salem, Naji; Bladou, Franck; Viens, Patrice

    2007-07-01

    Androgen deprivation in patients with metastatic prostate cancer produces palliation of symptoms, PSA decrease and tumoral regression in most patients. After a brief period of disease regression lasting 18 to 24 months nearly all pts will progress to androgen independence disease (HRPC) with progressive clinical deterioration and ultimately death. Chemotherapy with mitoxantrone has been shown to palliate symptoms but did not extend survival. Two large randomized trials showed a survival benefit for pts with HRPC treated with docetaxel with a reduction risk of death by 21-24%, and significant improvement in palliation of symptoms and quality of life. New agents targeting angiogenesis, apoptosis, signal transduction pathway, used alone or in combination with docetaxel currently are under trial in an attempt to provide much needed improvements in outcome. Questions remains in suspend when and who need to be treated, earlier, in high risk as in adjuvant setting? Current data have demonstrated that neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy is relatively safe and feasible. Further investigation through prospective randomize trials is critical to define the precise role of this modality in high risk populations. PMID:17845990

  3. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia and the Risk of Prostate Cancer and Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiaoyu; Fang, Xiangming; Ma, Ying; Xianyu, Jianbo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has been suggested to be a risk factor for certain urologic cancers, but the current evidence is inconsistent. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between BPH and urologic cancers. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science were searched for potential eligible studies. We included case-control studies or cohort studies, which evaluated the association between BPH and urologic cancers (including prostate cancer, bladder cancer, kidney cancer, testicular cancer, or penile cancer). Overall effect estimates were calculated using the DerSimonian–Laird method for a random-effects model. Summary effect-size was calculated as risk ratio (RR), together with the 95% confidence interval (CI). This systematic review included 16 case-control studies and 10 cohort studies evaluating the association of BPH and prostate or bladder cancer; we did not identify any study about other urologic cancers. Meta-analyses demonstrated that BPH was associated with an increased incidence of prostate cancer (case-control study: RR = 3.93, 95% CI = 2.18–7.08; cohort-study: RR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.00–1.99) and bladder cancer (case-control study: RR = 2.50, 95% CI = 1.63–3.84; cohort-study: RR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.28–1.95). Subgroup analysis by ethnicity suggested that the association between BPH and prostate cancer was much stronger in Asians (RR = 6.09, 95% CI = 2.96–12.54) than in Caucasians (RR = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.19–2.01). Egger's tests indicated low risk of publication bias (prostate cancer: P = 0.11; bladder cancer: P = 0.95). BPH is associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer and bladder cancer. The risk of prostate cancer is particularly high in Asian BPH patients. Given the limitations of included studies, additional prospective studies with strict design are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:27149447

  4. Signaling lansdscape of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, X; Aslam, A; Attar, R; Yaylim, I; Qureshi, M Z; Hasnain, S; Qadir, M I; Farooqi, A A

    2016-01-01

    Research over the decades has gradually and sequentially shown that both intratumor heterogeneity and multifocality make prostate cancer difficult to target. Different challenges associated with generation of risk-stratification tools that correlate genomic landscape with clinical outcomes severely influence clinical efficacy of therapeutic strategies. Androgen receptor mediated signaling has gained great appreciation and rewiring of AR induced signaling cascade in absence of androgen, structural variants of AR have provided near complete resolution of genomic landscape and underlying mechanisms of prostate cancer. In this review we have attempted to provide an overview of most recent advancements in our knowledge related to different signaling cascades including TGF, SHH, Notch, JAK-STAT in prostate cancer progression and development. PMID:26828986

  5. Gene therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tangney, Mark; Ahmad, Sarfraz; Collins, Sara A; O'Sullivan, Gerald C

    2010-05-01

    Cancer remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Despite advances in understanding, detection, and treatment, it accounts for almost one-fourth of all deaths per year in Western countries. Prostate cancer is currently the most commonly diagnosed noncutaneous cancer in men in Europe and the United States, accounting for 15% of all cancers in men. As life expectancy of individuals increases, it is expected that there will also be an increase in the incidence and mortality of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer may be inoperable at initial presentation, unresponsive to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, or recur following appropriate treatment. At the time of presentation, patients may already have metastases in their tissues. Preventing tumor recurrence requires systemic therapy; however, current modalities are limited by toxicity or lack of efficacy. For patients with such metastatic cancers, the development of alternative therapies is essential. Gene therapy is a realistic prospect for the treatment of prostate and other cancers, and involves the delivery of genetic information to the patient to facilitate the production of therapeutic proteins. Therapeutics can act directly (eg, by inducing tumor cells to produce cytotoxic agents) or indirectly by upregulating the immune system to efficiently target tumor cells or by destroying the tumor's vasculature. However, technological difficulties must be addressed before an efficient and safe gene medicine is achieved (primarily by developing a means of delivering genes to the target cells or tissue safely and efficiently). A wealth of research has been carried out over the past 20 years, involving various strategies for the treatment of prostate cancer at preclinical and clinical trial levels. The therapeutic efficacy observed with many of these approaches in patients indicates that these treatment modalities will serve as an important component of urological malignancy treatment in the clinic, either in isolation or

  6. Histological changes caused by meclofenamic acid in androgen-independent prostate cancer tumors: evaluation in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Enciso, Iván; Soriano-Hernández, Alejandro D; Rodriguez-Hernandez, Alejandrina; Galvan-Salazar, Héctor R; Montes-Galindo, Daniel A; Martinez-Martinez, Rafael; Valdez-Velazquez, Laura L; Gonzalez-Alvarez, Rafael; Espinoza-Gómez, Francisco; Newton-Sanchez, Oscar A; Lara-Esqueda, Agustín; Guzman-Esquivel, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Meclofenamic acid is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that has shown therapeutic potential for different types of cancers, including androgen-independent prostate neoplasms. The antitumor effect of diverse nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been shown to be accompanied by histological and molecular changes that are responsible for this beneficial effect. The objective of the present work was to analyze the histological changes caused by meclofenamic acid in androgen-independent prostate cancer. Tumors were created in a nude mouse model using PC3 cancerous human cells. Meclofenamic acid (10 mg/kg/day; experimental group, n=5) or saline solution (control group, n=5) was administered intraperitoneally for twenty days. Histological analysis was then carried out on the tumors, describing changes in the cellular architecture, fibrosis, and quantification of cellular proliferation and tumor vasculature. Meclofenamic acid causes histological changes that indicate less tumor aggression (less hypercellularity, fewer atypical mitoses, and fewer nuclear polymorphisms), an increase in fibrosis, and reduced cellular proliferation and tumor vascularity. Further studies are needed to evaluate the molecular changes that cause the beneficial and therapeutic effects of meclofenamic acid in androgen-independent prostate cancer. PMID:26689527

  7. The Prostate Health Index Selectively Identifies Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, Stacy; Sanda, Martin G.; Broyles, Dennis L.; Shin, Sanghyuk S.; Bangma, Chris H.; Wei, John T.; Partin, Alan W.; Klee, George G.; Slawin, Kevin M.; Marks, Leonard S.; van Schaik, Ron H. N.; Chan, Daniel W.; Sokoll, Lori J.; Cruz, Amabelle B.; Mizrahi, Isaac A.; Catalona, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Prostate Health Index (phi) is a new test combining total, free and [-2]proPSA into a single score. It was recently approved by the FDA and is now commercially available in the U.S., Europe and Australia. We investigate whether phi improves specificity for detecting clinically significant prostate cancer and can help reduce prostate cancer over diagnosis. Materials and Methods From a multicenter prospective trial we identified 658 men age 50 years or older with prostate specific antigen 4 to 10 ng/ml and normal digital rectal examination who underwent prostate biopsy. In this population we compared the performance of prostate specific antigen, % free prostate specific antigen, [-2]proPSA and phi to predict biopsy results and, specifically, the presence of clinically significant prostate cancer using multiple criteria. Results The Prostate Health Index was significantly higher in men with Gleason 7 or greater and “Epstein significant” cancer. On receiver operating characteristic analysis phi had the highest AUC for overall cancer (AUCs phi 0.708, percent free prostate specific antigen 0.648, [-2]proPSA 0.550 and prostate specific antigen 0.516), Gleason 7 or greater (AUCs phi 0.707, percent free prostate specific antigen 0.661, [-2]proPSA 0.558, prostate specific antigen 0.551) and significant cancer (AUCs phi 0.698, percent free prostate specific antigen 0.654, [-2]proPSA 0.550, prostate specific antigen 0.549). At the 90% sensitivity cut point for phi (a score less than 28.6) 30.1% of patients could have been spared an unnecessary biopsy for benign disease or insignificant prostate cancer compared to 21.7% using percent free prostate specific antigen. Conclusions The new phi test outperforms its individual components of total, free and [-2]proPSA for the identification of clinically significant prostate cancer. Phi may be useful as part of a multivariable approach to reduce prostate biopsies and over diagnosis. PMID:25463993

  8. Cathepsin L inactivation leads to multimodal inhibition of prostate cancer cell dissemination in a preclinical bone metastasis model.

    PubMed

    Sudhan, Dhivya R; Pampo, Christine; Rice, Lori; Siemann, Dietmar W

    2016-06-01

    It is estimated that approximately 90% of patients with advanced prostate cancer develop bone metastases; an occurrence that results in a substantial reduction in the quality of life and a drastic worsening of prognosis. The development of novel therapeutic strategies that impair the metastatic process and associated skeletal adversities is therefore critical to improving prostate cancer patient survival. Recognition of the importance of Cathepsin L (CTSL) to metastatic dissemination of cancer cells has led to the development of several CTSL inhibition strategies. The present investigation employed intra-cardiac injection of human PC-3ML prostate cancer cells into nude mice to examine tumor cell dissemination in a preclinical bone metastasis model. CTSL knockdown confirmed the validity of targeting this protease and subsequent intervention studies with the small molecule CTSL inhibitor KGP94 resulted in a significant reduction in metastatic tumor burden in the bone and an improvement in overall survival. CTSL inhibition by KGP94 also led to a significant impairment of tumor initiated angiogenesis. Furthermore, KGP94 treatment decreased osteoclast formation and bone resorptive function, thus, perturbing the reciprocal interactions between tumor cells and osteoclasts within the bone microenvironment which typically result in bone loss and aggressive growth of metastases. These functional effects were accompanied by a significant downregulation of NFκB signaling activity and expression of osteoclastogenesis related NFκB target genes. Collectively, these data indicate that the CTSL inhibitor KGP94 has the potential to alleviate metastatic disease progression and associated skeletal morbidities and hence may have utility in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer patients. PMID:26757413

  9. Cathepsin L inactivation leads to multimodal inhibition of prostate cancer cell dissemination in a preclinical bone metastasis model

    PubMed Central

    Sudhan, Dhivya R.; Pampo, Christine; Rice, Lori; Siemann, Dietmar W.

    2016-01-01

    It is estimated that approximately 90% of patients with advanced prostate cancer develop bone metastases; an occurrence that results in a substantial reduction in the quality of life and a drastic worsening of prognosis. The development of novel therapeutic strategies that impair the metastatic process and associated skeletal adversities is therefore critical to improving prostate cancer patient survival. Recognition of the importance of Cathepsin L (CTSL) to metastatic dissemination of cancer cells has led to the development of several CTSL inhibition strategies. The present investigation employed intra-cardiac injection of human PC-3ML prostate cancer cells into nude mice to examine tumor cell dissemination in a preclinical bone metastasis model. CTSL knockdown confirmed the validity of targeting this protease and subsequent intervention studies with the small molecule CTSL inhibitor KGP94 resulted in a significant reduction in metastatic tumor burden in the bone and an improvement in overall survival. CTSL inhibition by KGP94 also led to a significant impairment of tumor initiated angiogenesis. Furthermore, KGP94 treatment decreased osteoclast formation and bone resorptive function, thus, perturbing the reciprocal interactions between tumor cells and osteoclasts within the bone microenvironment which typically result in bone loss and aggressive growth of metastases. These functional effects were accompanied by a significant downregulation of NFκB signaling activity and expression of osteoclastogenesis related NFκB target genes. Collectively, these data indicate that the CTSL inhibitor KGP94 has the potential to alleviate metastatic disease progression and associated skeletal morbidities and hence may have utility in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer patients. PMID:26757413

  10. SOX4 is essential for prostate tumorigenesis initiated by PTEN ablation | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Understanding remains incomplete of the mechanisms underlying initiation and progression of prostate cancer, the most commonly diagnosed cancer in American men. The transcription factor SOX4 is overexpressed in many human cancers, including prostate cancer, suggesting it may participate in prostate tumorigenesis. In this study, we investigated this possibility by genetically deleting Sox4 in a mouse model of prostate cancer initiated by loss of the tumor suppressor Pten.

  11. Prostate cancer immunotherapy: beyond immunity to curability.

    PubMed

    Simons, Jonathan W

    2014-11-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the United States. It is the first prevalent cancer in which overall survival in advanced disease is modestly, but objectively, improved with outpatient delivered dendritic cell-based immunotherapy. More prostate cancer patients have enrolled through Facebook and trusted-site Internet searches in clinical trials for prostate cancer vaccine-based immunotherapy than in immunotherapy trials for lung, breast, colon, pancreas, ovarian, and bladder cancer combined in the past 7 years. Exceptional responses to anti-CTLA-4 treatment have been documented in clinics, and prostate cancer neoantigen characterization and T-cell clonotyping are in their research ascendancy. The prostate is an accessory organ; it is not required for fertility, erectile function, or urinary continence. The true evolutionary advantage of having a prostate for male mammalian physiology is a topic of speculation in seminar rooms and on bar stools, but it remains unknown. Hundreds of prostate lineage-unique proteins (PLUP) exist among the >37,000 normal human prostate lineage-unique open reading frames that can be targeted for immunologic ablation of PLUP(+) prostate cancer cells by prostate-specific autoimmunity. This bioengineered graft-versus-prostate disease is a powerful strategy that can eliminate deaths from prostate cancer. Immunologic tolerance to prostate cancer can be overcome at every clinical stage of presentation. This Cancer Immunology at the Crossroads article aims to present advances in the past two decades of basic, translational, and clinical research in prostate cancer, including bioengineering B-cell and T-cell responses, and ongoing prostate cancer immunotherapy trials. PMID:25367978

  12. Chemosensitizing effects of sphingosine kinase-1 inhibition in prostate cancer cell and animal models.

    PubMed

    Pchejetski, Dimitri; Doumerc, Nicolas; Golzio, Muriel; Naymark, Maria; Teissié, Justin; Kohama, Takafumi; Waxman, Jonathan; Malavaud, Bernard; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2008-07-01

    We have previously reported that, in prostate cancer, inhibition of the oncogenic sphingosine kinase-1/sphingosine 1-phosphate (SphK1/S1P) pathway is a key element in chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. Here, we show that selective pharmacologic inhibition of SphK1 triggers apoptosis in LNCaP and PC-3 prostate cancer cells, an effect that is reversed by SphK1 enforced expression. More importantly, we show for the first time that the up-regulation of the SphK1/S1P pathway plays a crucial role in the resistance of prostate cancer cells to chemotherapy. Importantly, pharmacologic SphK1 inhibition with the B-5354c compound sensitizes LNCaP and PC-3 cells to docetaxel and camptothecin, respectively. In vivo, camptothecin and B-5354c alone display a limited effect on tumor growth in PC-3 cells, whereas in combination there is a synergy of effect on tumor size with a significant increase in the ceramide to S1P sphingolipid ratio. To conclude, our study highlights the notion that drugs specifically designed to inhibit SphK1 could provide a means of enhancing the effects of conventional treatment through the prosurvival antiapoptotic SphK1/S1P pathway. PMID:18644996

  13. Stromal androgen receptor roles in the development of normal prostate, benign prostate hyperplasia, and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wen, Simeng; Chang, Hong-Chiang; Tian, Jing; Shang, Zhiqun; Niu, Yuanjie; Chang, Chawnshang

    2015-02-01

    The prostate is an androgen-sensitive organ that needs proper androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signals for normal development. The progression of prostate diseases, including benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa), also needs proper androgen/AR signals. Tissue recombination studies report that stromal, but not epithelial, AR plays more critical roles via the mesenchymal-epithelial interactions to influence the early process of prostate development. However, in BPH and PCa, much more attention has been focused on epithelial AR roles. However, accumulating evidence indicates that stromal AR is also irreplaceable and plays critical roles in prostate disease progression. Herein, we summarize the roles of stromal AR in the development of normal prostate, BPH, and PCa, with evidence from the recent results of in vitro cell line studies, tissue recombination experiments, and AR knockout animal models. Current evidence suggests that stromal AR may play positive roles to promote BPH and PCa progression, and targeting stromal AR selectively with AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9, may allow development of better therapies with fewer adverse effects to battle BPH and PCa. PMID:25432062

  14. Stromal Androgen Receptor Roles in the Development of Normal Prostate, Benign Prostate Hyperplasia, and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Simeng; Chang, Hong-Chiang; Tian, Jing; Shang, Zhiqun; Niu, Yuanjie; Chang, Chawnshang

    2016-01-01

    The prostate is an androgen-sensitive organ that needs proper androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signals for normal development. The progression of prostate diseases, including benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa), also needs proper androgen/AR signals. Tissue recombination studies report that stromal, but not epithelial, AR plays more critical roles via the mesenchymal-epithelial interactions to influence the early process of prostate development. However, in BPH and PCa, much more attention has been focused on epithelial AR roles. However, accumulating evidence indicates that stromal AR is also irreplaceable and plays critical roles in prostate disease progression. Herein, we summarize the roles of stromal AR in the development of normal prostate, BPH, and PCa, with evidence from the recent results of in vitro cell line studies, tissue recombination experiments, and AR knockout animal models. Current evidence suggests that stromal AR may play positive roles to promote BPH and PCa progression, and targeting stromal AR selectively with AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9, may allow development of better therapies with fewer adverse effects to battle BPH and PCa. PMID:25432062

  15. Living with Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... pork, lamb, and processed meat (such as hot dogs, sausage, and bacon); and low in high-fat ... ACS Bookstore Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer ...

  16. Prevention strategies in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Trottier, Greg; Lawrentschuk, N.; Fleshner, N.E.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer (pca) prevention has been an exciting and controversial topic since the results of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (pcpt) were published. With the recently published results of the reduce (Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events) trial, interest in this topic is at a peak. Primary pca prevention will be unlikely to affect mortality significantly, but the reduction in overtreatment and the effect on quality of life from the avoidance of a cancer diagnosis are important factors to consider. This review provides a comparative update on the reduce and pcpt trials and some clinical recommendations. Other potential primary preventive strategies with statins, selective estrogen response modulators, and nutraceutical compounds—including current evidence for these agents and their roles in clinical practice—are discussed. Many substances that have been examined in the primary prevention of pca and for which clinical data are either negative or particularly weak are not covered. The future of pca prevention continues to expand, with several ongoing clinical trials and much interest in tertiary prostate cancer prevention. PMID:20882132

  17. Prevention strategies in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Trottier, Greg; Lawrentschuk, N; Fleshner, N E

    2010-09-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) prevention has been an exciting and controversial topic since the results of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT) were published. With the recently published results of the reduce (Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events) trial, interest in this topic is at a peak. Primary pca prevention will be unlikely to affect mortality significantly, but the reduction in overtreatment and the effect on quality of life from the avoidance of a cancer diagnosis are important factors to consider.This review provides a comparative update on the REDUCE and PCPT trials and some clinical recommendations. Other potential primary preventive strategies with statins, selective estrogen response modulators, and nutraceutical compounds-including current evidence for these agents and their roles in clinical practice-are discussed. Many substances that have been examined in the primary prevention of pca and for which clinical data are either negative or particularly weak are not covered.The future of PCa prevention continues to expand, with several ongoing clinical trials and much interest in tertiary prostate cancer prevention. PMID:20882132

  18. DNA microarrays in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ho, Shuk-Mei; Lau, Kin-Mang

    2002-02-01

    DNA microarray technology provides a means to examine large numbers of molecular changes related to a biological process in a high throughput manner. This review discusses plausible utilities of this technology in prostate cancer research, including definition of prostate cancer predisposition, global profiling of gene expression patterns associated with cancer initiation and progression, identification of new diagnostic and prognostic markers, and discovery of novel patient classification schemes. The technology, at present, has only been explored in a limited fashion in prostate cancer research. Some hurdles to be overcome are the high cost of the technology, insufficient sample size and repeated experiments, and the inadequate use of bioinformatics. With the completion of the Human Genome Project and the advance of several highly complementary technologies, such as laser capture microdissection, unbiased RNA amplification, customized functional arrays (eg, single-nucleotide polymorphism chips), and amenable bioinformatics software, this technology will become widely used by investigators in the field. The large amount of novel, unbiased hypotheses and insights generated by this technology is expected to have a significant impact on the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of prostate cancer. Finally, this review emphasizes existing, but currently underutilized, data-mining tools, such as multivariate statistical analyses, neural networking, and machine learning techniques, to stimulate wider usage. PMID:12084220

  19. Characterization of gradient echo signal decays in healthy and cancerous prostate at 3T improves with a Gaussian augmentation of the mono-exponential (GAME) model.

    PubMed

    Ciris, Pelin Aksit; Balasubramanian, Mukund; Seethamraju, Ravi T; Tokuda, Junichi; Scalera, Jonathan; Penzkofer, Tobias; Fennessy, Fiona M; Tempany-Afdhal, Clare M; Tuncali, Kemal; Mulkern, Robert V

    2016-07-01

    A biomarker of cancer aggressiveness, such as hypoxia, could substantially impact treatment decisions in the prostate, especially radiation therapy, by balancing treatment morbidity (urinary incontinence, erectile dysfunction, etc.) against mortality. R2 (*) mapping with Mono-Exponential (ME) decay modeling has shown potential for identifying areas of prostate cancer hypoxia at 1.5T. However, Gaussian deviations from ME decay have been observed in other tissues at 3T. The purpose of this study is to assess whether gradient-echo signal decays are better characterized by a standard ME decay model, or a Gaussian Augmentation of the Mono-Exponential (GAME) decay model, in the prostate at 3T. Multi-gradient-echo signals were acquired on 20 consecutive patients with a clinical suspicion of prostate cancer undergoing MR-guided prostate biopsies. Data were fitted with both ME and GAME models. The information contents of these models were compared using Akaike's information criterion (second order, AICC ), in skeletal muscle, the prostate central gland (CG), and peripheral zone (PZ) regions of interest (ROIs). The GAME model had higher information content in 30% of the prostate on average (across all patients and ROIs), covering up to 67% of cancerous PZ ROIs, and up to 100% of cancerous CG ROIs (in individual patients). The higher information content of GAME became more prominent in regions that would be assumed hypoxic using ME alone, reaching 50% of the PZ and 70% of the CG as ME R2 (*) approached 40 s(-1) . R2 (*) mapping may have important applications in MRI; however, information lost due to modeling could mask differences in parameters due to underlying tissue anatomy or physiology. The GAME model improves characterization of signal behavior in the prostate at 3T, and may increase the potential for determining correlates of fit parameters with biomarkers, for example of oxygenation status. PMID:27241215

  20. Selection and identification of ligand peptides targeting a model of castrate-resistant osteogenic prostate cancer and their receptors.

    PubMed

    Mandelin, Jami; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Driessen, Wouter H P; Mathew, Paul; Navone, Nora M; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Logothetis, Christopher J; Rietz, Anna Cecilia; Dobroff, Andrey S; Proneth, Bettina; Sidman, Richard L; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2015-03-24

    We performed combinatorial peptide library screening in vivo on a novel human prostate cancer xenograft that is androgen-independent and induces a robust osteoblastic reaction in bonelike matrix and soft tissue. We found two peptides, PKRGFQD and SNTRVAP, which were enriched in the tumors, targeted the cell surface of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells in vitro, and homed to androgen receptor-null prostate cancer in vivo. Purification of tumor homogenates by affinity chromatography on these peptides and subsequent mass spectrometry revealed a receptor for the peptide PKRGFQD, α-2-macroglobulin, and for SNTRVAP, 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78). These results indicate that GRP78 and α-2-macroglobulin are highly active in osteoblastic, androgen-independent prostate cancer in vivo. These previously unidentified ligand-receptor systems should be considered for targeted drug development against human metastatic androgen-independent prostate cancer. PMID:25762070

  1. Detection of prostate cancer on histopathology using color fractals and Probabilistic Pairwise Markov models.

    PubMed

    Yu, Elaine; Monaco, James P; Tomaszewski, John; Shih, Natalie; Feldman, Michael; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a system for detecting regions of carcinoma of the prostate (CaP) in H&E stained radical prostatectomy specimens using the color fractal dimension. Color textural information is known to be a valuable characteristic to distinguish CaP from benign tissue. In addition to color information, we know that cancer tends to form contiguous regions. Our system leverages the color staining information of histology as well as spatial dependencies. The color and textural information is first captured using color fractal dimension. To incorporate spatial dependencies, we combine the probability map constructed via color fractal dimension with a novel Markov prior called the Probabilistic Pairwise Markov Model (PPMM). To demonstrate the capability of this CaP detection system, we applied the algorithm to 27 radical prostatectomy specimens from 10 patients. A per pixel evaluation was conducted with ground truth provided by an expert pathologist using only the color fractal feature first, yielding an area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) curve of 0.790. In conjunction with a Markov prior, the resultant color fractal dimension + Markov random field (MRF) classifier yielded an AUC of 0.831. PMID:22255076

  2. Effects of sustained antiangiogenic therapy in multistage prostate cancer in TRAMP model.

    PubMed

    Isayeva, Tatyana; Chanda, Diptiman; Kallman, Lisa; Eltoum, Isam-Eldin A; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2007-06-15

    Antiangiogenic therapy is a promising alternative for prostate cancer growth and metastasis and holds great promise as an adjuvant therapy. The present study evaluated the potential of stable expression of angiostatin and endostatin before the onset of neoplasia and during the early and late stages of prostate cancer progression in transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice. Groups of 5-, 10-, and 18-week-old male TRAMP mice received recombinant adeno-associated virus-6 encoding mouse endostatin plus angiostatin (E+A) by i.m. injection. The effects of therapy were determined by sacrificing groups of treated mice at defined stages of tumor progression and following cohorts of similarly treated mice for long-term survival. Results indicated remarkable survival after recombinant adeno-associated virus-(E+A) therapy only when the treatment was given at an earlier time, before the onset of high-grade neoplasia, compared with treatment given for invasive cancer. Interestingly, early-stage antiangiogenic therapy arrested the progression of moderately differentiated carcinoma to poorly differentiated state and distant metastasis. Immunohistochemical analysis of the prostate from treated mice indicated significantly lower endothelial cell proliferation and increased tumor cell apoptosis. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2 expression was significantly down-regulated in tumor endothelium after treatment but not VEGFR-1. Analysis of the neuroendocrine marker synaptophysin expression indicated that antiangiogenic therapy given at an early-stage disease reduced neuroendocrine transition of the epithelial tumors. These studies indicate that stable endostatin and angiostatin gene therapy may be more effective for minimally invasive tumors rather than advanced-stage disease. PMID:17575146

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging for prostate cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Cuong V; Steenbergen, Peter; Ghobadi, Ghazaleh; Heijmink, Stijn W T J P; Pos, Floris J; Haustermans, Karin; van der Heide, Uulke A

    2016-03-01

    For radiotherapy of prostate cancer, MRI is used increasingly for delineation of the prostate gland. For focal treatment of low-risk prostate cancer or focal dose escalation for intermediate and high-risk cancer, delineation of the tumor is also required. While multi-parametric MRI is well established for detection of tumors and for staging of the disease, delineation of the tumor inside the prostate is not common practice. Guidelines, such as the PI-RADS classification, exist for tumor detection and staging, but no such guidelines are available for tumor delineation. Indeed, interobserver studies show substantial variation in tumor contours. Computer-aided tumor detection and delineation may help improve the robustness of the interpretation of multi-parametric MRI data. Comparing the performance of an earlier developed model for tumor segmentation with expert delineations, we found a significant correlation between tumor probability in a voxel and the number of experts identifying this voxel as tumor. This suggests that the model agrees with 'the wisdom of the crowd', and thus could serve as a reference for individual physicians in their decision making. With multi-parametric MRI it becomes feasible to revisit the GTV-CTV concept in radiotherapy of prostate cancer. While detection of index lesions is quite reliable, contouring variability and the low sensitivity to small lesions suggest that the remainder of the prostate should be treated as CTV. Clinical trials that investigate the options for dose differentiation, for example with dose escalation to the visible tumor or dose reduction to the CTV, are therefore warranted. PMID:26858164

  4. Screening spectroscopy of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolenko, S. B.; Voloshynskyy, D. I.; Fedoruk, O. S.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to establish objective parameters of the field of laser and incoherent radiation of different spectral ranges (UV, visible, IR) as a non-invasive optical method of interaction with different samples of biological tissues and fluids of patients to determine the state of prostate cancer and choosing the best personal treatment. The objects of study were selected venous blood plasma of patient with prostate cancer, histological sections of rat prostate gland in the postoperative period. As diagnostic methods have been used ultraviolet spectrometry samples of blood plasma in the liquid state, infrared spectroscopy middle range (2,5-25 microns) dry residue of plasma by spectral diagnostic technique of thin histological sections of biological tissues.

  5. Common Gene Rearrangements in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Mark A.; Maher, Christopher A.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common heterogeneous disease, and most patients diagnosed in the post prostate-specific antigen (PSA) era present with clinically localized disease, the majority of which do well regardless of treatment regimen undertaken. Overall, those with advanced prostate cancer at time of diagnosis do poorly after androgen withdrawal therapy. Understanding the biologic underpinning of prostate cancer is necessary to best determine the risk of disease progression and would be advantageous for the development of novel therapeutic approaches to impede or prevent disease. This review focuses on the recently identified common ETS and non-ETS gene rearrangements in prostate cancer. Although multiple molecular alterations have been detected in prostate cancer, a detailed understanding of gene fusion prostate cancer should help explain the clinical and biologic diversity, providing a rationale for a molecular subclassification of the disease. PMID:21859993

  6. The Anti-Proliferative Effect of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in a Prostate Cancer Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Yuki; Takai, Tomoaki; Ibuki, Naokazu; Hirano, Hajime; Nomi, Hayahito; Kawabata, Shinji; Kiyama, Satoshi; Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Minoru; Kirihata, Mitsunori; Azuma, Haruhito

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a selective radiation treatment for tumors that preferentially accumulate drugs carrying the stable boron isotope, 10B. BNCT has been evaluated clinically as an alternative to conventional radiation therapy for the treatment of brain tumors, and more recently, recurrent advanced head and neck cancer. Here we investigated the effect of BNCT on prostate cancer (PCa) using an in vivo mouse xenograft model that we have developed. Materials and Methods Mice bearing the xenotransplanted androgen-independent human PCa cell line, PC3, were divided into four groups: Group 1: untreated controls; Group 2: Boronophenylalanine (BPA); Group 3: neutron; Group 4: BPA-mediated BNCT. We compared xenograft growth among these groups, and the body weight and any motility disturbance were recorded. Immunohistochemical (IHC) studies of the proliferation marker, Ki-67, and TUNEL staining were performed 9 weeks after treatment. Results The in vivo studies demonstrated that BPA-mediated BNCT significantly delayed tumor growth in comparison with the other groups, without any severe adverse events. There was a significant difference in the rate of freedom from gait abnormalities between the BPA-mediated BNCT group and the other groups. The IHC studies revealed that BNCT treatment significantly reduced the number of Ki-67-positive cells in comparison with the controls (mean±SD 6.9±1.5 vs 12.7±4.0, p<0.05), while there was no difference in the number of apoptotic cells, suggesting that BPA-mediated BNCT reduced PCa progression without affecting apoptosis at 9 weeks post-treatment. Conclusions This study has provided the first preclinical proof-of-principle data to indicate that BPA-mediated BNCT reduces the in vivo growth of PCa. Although further studies will be necessary, BNCT might be a novel potential treatment for PCa. PMID:26325195

  7. Benzyl Isothiocyanate Inhibits Prostate Cancer Development in the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) Model, Which Is Associated with the Induction of Cell Cycle G1 Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Han Jin; Lim, Do Young; Kwon, Gyoo Taik; Kim, Ji Hee; Huang, Zunnan; Song, Hyerim; Oh, Yoon Sin; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Ki Won; Dong, Zigang; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) is a hydrolysis product of glucotropaeolin, a compound found in cruciferous vegetables, and has been shown to have anti-tumor properties. In the present study, we investigated whether BITC inhibits the development of prostate cancer in the transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice. Five-week old, male TRAMP mice and their nontransgenic littermates were gavage-fed with 0, 5, or 10 mg/kg of BITC every day for 19 weeks. The weight of the genitourinary tract increased markedly in TRAMP mice and this increase was suppressed significantly by BITC feeding. H and E staining of the dorsolateral lobes of the prostate demonstrated that well-differentiated carcinoma (WDC) was a predominant feature in the TRAMP mice. The number of lobes with WDC was reduced by BITC feeding while that of lobes with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia was increased. BITC feeding reduced the number of cells expressing Ki67 (a proliferation marker), cyclin A, cyclin D1, and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)2 in the prostatic tissue. In vitro cell culture results revealed that BITC decreased DNA synthesis, as well as CDK2 and CDK4 activity in TRAMP-C2 mouse prostate cancer cells. These results indicate that inhibition of cell cycle progression contributes to the inhibition of prostate cancer development in TRAMP mice treated with BITC. PMID:26907265

  8. Benzyl Isothiocyanate Inhibits Prostate Cancer Development in the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) Model, Which Is Associated with the Induction of Cell Cycle G1 Arrest.

    PubMed

    Cho, Han Jin; Lim, Do Young; Kwon, Gyoo Taik; Kim, Ji Hee; Huang, Zunnan; Song, Hyerim; Oh, Yoon Sin; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Ki Won; Dong, Zigang; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) is a hydrolysis product of glucotropaeolin, a compound found in cruciferous vegetables, and has been shown to have anti-tumor properties. In the present study, we investigated whether BITC inhibits the development of prostate cancer in the transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice. Five-week old, male TRAMP mice and their nontransgenic littermates were gavage-fed with 0, 5, or 10 mg/kg of BITC every day for 19 weeks. The weight of the genitourinary tract increased markedly in TRAMP mice and this increase was suppressed significantly by BITC feeding. H and E staining of the dorsolateral lobes of the prostate demonstrated that well-differentiated carcinoma (WDC) was a predominant feature in the TRAMP mice. The number of lobes with WDC was reduced by BITC feeding while that of lobes with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia was increased. BITC feeding reduced the number of cells expressing Ki67 (a proliferation marker), cyclin A, cyclin D1, and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)2 in the prostatic tissue. In vitro cell culture results revealed that BITC decreased DNA synthesis, as well as CDK2 and CDK4 activity in TRAMP-C2 mouse prostate cancer cells. These results indicate that inhibition of cell cycle progression contributes to the inhibition of prostate cancer development in TRAMP mice treated with BITC. PMID:26907265

  9. Immunotherapy for metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Charles G.

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy with docetaxel is the standard treatment for men with metastatic prostate cancer, and results in statistically significant improvements in survival, as well as in quality of life. However, the response rate to single-agent docetaxel is approximately 40% to 45%, emphasizing a need for alternative approaches. More significantly, with the onset of early, PSA-based detection of prostate cancer and closer follow-up, many men present with metastatic disease that remains asymptomatic. For such patients, the side effects of chemotherapy would compromise their current performance status and, thus, a nontoxic, early treatment option that could improve overall survival would be highly desirable. Immunotherapy represents one such approach; a number of clinical trials have suggested a survival benefit for immunotherapy in metastatic prostate cancer and confirmed that these agents are generally well-tolerated. As is the case for chemotherapy, it is doubtful that maximal survival benefit will be achieved with single-agent immunotherapy; experimental treatments in which mechanistically distinct immunotherapy approaches are combined, as well as approaches in which immunotherapy is combined with chemotherapy or hormonal therapy are currently under investigation. This review will discuss the mechanisms of action of several immunotherapy approaches for metastatic prostate cancer, focusing on active immunotherapy as opposed to administration of anti-tumor antibodies. The relative advantages and disadvantages of current approaches will be noted, and ongoing clinical trials will be highlighted. PMID:18593624

  10. Potent Anti-Proliferative, Pro-Apoptotic Activity of the Maytenus Royleanus Extract against Prostate Cancer Cells: Evidence in In-Vitro and In-Vivo Models

    PubMed Central

    Shabbir, Maria; Syed, Deeba N.; Lall, Rahul K.; Khan, Muhammad Rashid; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading of cause of cancer related death in men. Despite intensive investment in improving early diagnosis, it often escapes timely detection. Mortality remains high in advanced stage prostate cancer where palliative care remains the only option. Effective strategies are therefore needed to prevent the occurrence and progression of the disease. Plant-derived compounds have been an important source of several clinically useful anti-cancer agents and offer an attractive approach against prostate cancer. We previously showed that the methanol extract of Maytenus royleanus (MEM) leaves and its fractions possess significant antioxidant activity with therapeutic potential against free-radical associated damages. The present study evaluated the anti-proliferative activity of MEM in the prostate cancer model system. Analysis of MEM and its various fractions revealed the presence of triterpenoids, flavonoids and tannins, conjugated to one or more polar groups and carbohydrate moieties. Further studies against known standards established the existence of caffeic acid and quercetin 3-rhamnoside in varying concentration in different MEM fractions. Time course analysis of MEM treated prostate cancer cells indicated significant decrease in cell viability, assessed by MTT and clonogenic survival assays. This was accompanied by G2 phase arrest of cell cycle, downregulation of cyclin/cdk network and increase in cdk inhibitors. MEM treated cells exhibited cleavage of Caspase-3 and PARP, and modulation of apoptotic proteins, establishing apoptosis as the primary mechanism of cell death. Notably MEM suppressed AR/PSA signaling both in prostate cancer cell cultures and in the in vivo model. Intraperitoneal injection of MEM (1.25 and 2.5mg/ animal) to athymic nude mice implanted with androgen sensitive CWR22Rν1 cells showed significant inhibition in tumor growth and decreased serum PSA levels reciprocating in vitro findings. Taken together, our data suggest that

  11. The Feasibility of Assessing Branched-Chain Amino Acid Metabolism in Cellular Models of Prostate Cancer with Hyperpolarized [1-13C]-Ketoisocaproate

    PubMed Central

    Billingsley, Kelvin L.; Park, Jae Mo; Josan, Sonal; Hurd, Ralph; Mayer, Dirk; Spielman-Sun, Eleanor; Nishimura, Dwight G.; Brooks, James D.; Spielman, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Recent advancements in the field of hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) have yielded powerful techniques capable of real-time analysis of metabolic pathways. These non-invasive methods have increasingly shown application in impacting disease diagnosis and have further been employed in mechanistic studies of disease onset and progression. Our goals were to investigate branched-chain aminotransferase (BCAT) activity in prostate cancer with a novel molecular probe, hyperpolarized [1-13C]-2-ketoisocaproate ([1-13C]-KIC), and explore the potential of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism to serve as a biomarker. Using traditional spectrophotometric assays, BCAT enzymatic activities were determined in vitro for various sources of prostate cancer (human, transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mouse and human cell lines). These preliminary studies indicated that low levels of BCAT activity were present in all models of prostate cancer but enzymatic levels are altered significantly in prostate cancer relative to healthy tissue. The MR spectroscopic studies were conducted with two cellular models (PC-3 and DU-145) that exhibited levels of BCAA metabolism comparable to the human disease state. Hyperpolarized [1-13C]-KIC was administered to prostate cancer cell lines, and the conversion of [1-13C]-KIC to the metabolic product, [1-13C]-leucine ([1-13C]-Leu), could be monitored via hyperpolarized 13C MRS. PMID:24907854

  12. Prostate Cancer Chemoprevention Targeting Men with High-Grade Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia (HGPIN) and Atypical Small Acinar Proliferation (ASAP): Model for Trial Design and Outcome Measures

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nagi; Crocker, Theresa; Smith, Tiffany; Connors, Shahnjayla; Pow-Sang, Julio; Spiess, Philippe E.; Egan, Kathleen; Quinn, Gwen; Schell, Michael; Sebti, Said; Kazi, Aslam; Chuang, Tian; Salup, Raoul; Helal, Mohamed; Zagaja, Gregory; Trabulsi, Edouard; McLarty, Jerry; Fazili, Tajammul; Williams, Christopher R.; Schreiber, Fred; Anderson, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    In spite of the large number of nutrient-derived agents demonstrating promise as potential chemopreventive agents, most have failed to prove effectiveness in clinical trials. Critical requirements for moving nutrient-derived agents to recommendation for clinical use include adopting a systematic, molecular-mechanism based approach and utilizing the same ethical and rigorous methods such as are used to evaluate other pharmacological agents. Preliminary data on a mechanistic rationale for chemoprevention activity as observed from epidemiological, in vitro and preclinical studies, phase I data of safety in suitable cohorts, duration of intervention based on time to progression of preneoplastic disease to cancer and the use of a valid panel of biomarkers representing the hypothesized carcinogenesis pathway for measuring efficacy must inform the design of phase II clinical trials. The goal of this paper is to provide a model for evaluating a well characterized agent- Polyphenon E- in a phase II clinical trial of prostate cancer chemoprevention. PMID:24533253

  13. Prostate and Urologic Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of prostate and bladder cancer. | Conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of prostate, bladder, and skin cancers.

  14. Is There a Future for Chemoprevention of Prostate Cancer?

    PubMed

    Bosland, Maarten C

    2016-08-01

    The outcome of the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial, demonstrating harm and no preventive activity of selenomethionine and α-tocopherol for prostate cancer, and the lack of approval by the FDA for the use of 5α-reductase inhibitors to prevent prostate cancer have cast doubt about the future of chemoprevention of prostate cancer. This article attempts to critically assess whether the notion that chemoprevention of prostate cancer has no future is warranted. Risk of prostate cancer is modifiable and chemoprevention of prostate cancer, particularly fatal/lethal cancer, is both needed and possible. However, the approach to prostate cancer-chemopreventive agent development has not followed a rational and systematic process. To make progress, the following steps are necessary: (i) identification of intermediate biomarkers predictive of fatal/lethal disease; (ii) development of a rational approach to identification of candidate agents, including high-throughput screening and generation of information on mechanism and biology of candidate agents and potential molecular targets; and (iii) systematic evaluation of the predictive value of preclinical models, phase II trials, and intermediate biomarkers for the outcome of phase III trials. New phase III trials should be based on adequate preclinical and phase II studies. Cancer Prev Res; 9(8); 642-7. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27099271

  15. Copper signaling axis as a target for prostate cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Safi, Rachid; Nelson, Erik R; Chitneni, Satish K; Franz, Katherine J; George, Daniel J; Zalutsky, Michael R; McDonnell, Donald P

    2014-10-15

    Previously published reports indicate that serum copper levels are elevated in patients with prostate cancer and that increased copper uptake can be used as a means to image prostate tumors. It is unclear, however, to what extent copper is required for prostate cancer cell function as we observed only modest effects of chelation strategies on the growth of these cells in vitro. With the goal of exploiting prostate cancer cell proclivity for copper uptake, we developed a "conditional lethal" screen to identify compounds whose cytotoxic actions were manifested in a copper-dependent manner. Emerging from this screen was a series of dithiocarbamates, which, when complexed with copper, induced reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis of malignant, but not normal, prostate cells. One of the dithiocarbamates identified, disulfiram (DSF), is an FDA-approved drug that has previously yielded disappointing results in clinical trials in patients with recurrent prostate cancer. Similarly, in our studies, DSF alone had a minimal effect on the growth of prostate cancer tumors when propagated as xenografts. However, when DSF was coadministered with copper, a very dramatic inhibition of tumor growth in models of hormone-sensitive and of castrate-resistant disease was observed. Furthermore, we determined that prostate cancer cells express high levels of CTR1, the primary copper transporter, and additional chaperones that are required to maintain intracellular copper homeostasis. The expression levels of most of these proteins are increased further upon treatment of androgen receptor (AR)-positive prostate cancer cell lines with androgens. Not surprisingly, robust CTR1-dependent uptake of copper into prostate cancer cells was observed, an activity that was accentuated by activation of AR. Given these data linking AR to intracellular copper uptake, we believe that dithiocarbamate/copper complexes are likely to be effective for the treatment of patients with prostate cancer whose

  16. Models for studying benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Mahapokai, W; Van Sluijs, F J; Schalken, J A

    2000-07-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the most common diseases affecting aging man. Attempts have been made to clarify the etiology and pathogenesis and, to that end, experimental models have been developed. To date, in vitro and in vivo models have been used, depending on the concept of the study. Spontaneous animal models are limited to the chimpanzee and the dog. Ethical and financial factors restrict the applicability of these models. The hormonal-induced canine BPH model is a good alternative that closely resembles human BPH in many aspects. The experimental models currently used for studying BPH are reviewed. Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases (2000) 3, 28-33 PMID:12497158

  17. Inorganic Arsenic–Related Changes in the Stromal Tumor Microenvironment in a Prostate Cancer Cell–Conditioned Media Model

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Joseph J.; Wold, Eric A.; Umbaugh, Charles S.; Lichti, Cheryl F.; Nilsson, Carol L.; Figueiredo, Marxa L.

    2015-01-01

    , Figueiredo ML. 2016. Inorganic arsenic–related changes in the stromal tumor microenvironment in a prostate cancer cell–conditioned media model. Environ Health Perspect 124:1009–1015; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1510090 PMID:26588813

  18. What's New in Prostate Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Additional resources for prostate cancer What’s new in prostate cancer research? Research into the causes , ... in many medical centers throughout the world. Genetics New research on gene changes linked to prostate cancer ...

  19. Progress Against Prostate Cancer | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Prostate Cancer Progress Against Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Winter 2010 Table of Contents Click ... This can narrow the urethra, decreasing urine flow. Prostate cancer is made up of cells the body does ...

  20. Immunotherapy of prostate cancer in a murine model using a novel GnRH based vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Junco, Jesús A; Peschke, Peter; Zuna, Ivan; Ehemann, Volker; Fuentes, Franklin; Bover, Eddy; Pimentel, Eulogio; Basulto, Roberto; Reyes, Osvaldo; Calzada, Lesvia; Castro, María D; Arteaga, Niurka; López, Yovisleidis; Garay, Hilda; Hernández, Héctor; Bringas, Ricardo; Guillén, Gerardo E

    2007-12-01

    Previous studies with gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH/LHRH) vaccines have shown the usefulness of immunization against this hormone in prostate cancer. To this end, we have generated a completely synthetic peptide modified at position 6 and attached to the 830-844 tetanic toxoid (TT) helper T cell sequence. Through this work we have demonstrated that the GnRHm1-TT molecule was highly immunogenic when it is formulated as an oil-based emulsion adjuvated with Montanide ISA 51. That results correlated directly with testosterone reduction and tumor growth inhibition of the Dunning R3327-H androgen responsive prostate tumor model in rats. GnRHm1-TT, proved to be safe and useful for future clinical trials. PMID:18022737

  1. Androgen receptors in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Culig, Z; Klocker, H; Bartsch, G; Hobisch, A

    2002-09-01

    The androgen receptor (AR), a transcription factor that mediates the action of androgens in target tissues, is expressed in nearly all prostate cancers. Carcinoma of the prostate is the most frequently diagnosed neoplasm in men in industrialized countries. Palliative treatment for non-organ-confined prostate cancer aims to down-regulate the concentration of circulating androgen or to block the transcription activation function of the AR. AR function during endocrine therapy was studied in tumor cells LNCaP subjected to long-term steroid depletion; newly generated sublines could be stimulated by lower concentrations of androgen than parental cells and showed up-regulation of AR expression and activity as well as resistance to apoptosis. Androgenic hormones regulate the expression of key cell cycle regulators, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and 4, and that of the cell cycle inhibitor p27. Inhibition of AR expression could be achieved by potential chemopreventive agents flufenamic acid, resveratrol, quercetin, polyunsaturated fatty acids and interleukin-1beta, and by the application of AR antisense oligonucleotides. In the clinical situation, AR gene amplification and point mutations were reported in patients with metastatic disease. These mutations generate receptors which could be activated by other steroid hormones and non-steroidal antiandrogens. In the absence of androgen, the AR could be activated by various growth-promoting (growth factors, epidermal growth factor receptor-related oncogene HER-2/neu) and pleiotropic (protein kinase A activators, interleukin-6) compounds as well as by inducers of differentiation (phenylbutyrate). AR function is modulated by a number of coactivators and corepressors. The three coactivators, TIF-2, SRC-1 and RAC3, are up-regulated in relapsed prostate cancer. New experimental therapies for prostate cancer are aimed to down-regulate AR expression and to overcome difficulties which occur because of the acquisition of agonistic properties

  2. Effect of intermittent fasting on prostate cancer tumor growth in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J A; Antonelli, J A; Lloyd, J C; Masko, E M; Poulton, S H; Phillips, T E; Pollak, M; Freedland, S J

    2010-12-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to have anti-cancer properties. However, CR may be difficult to apply in humans secondary to compliance and potentially deleterious effects. An alternative is intermittent CR, or in the extreme case intermittent fasting (IF). In a previous small pilot study, we found 2 days per week of IF with ad libitum feeding on the other days resulted in trends toward prolonged survival of mice bearing prostate cancer xenografts. We sought to confirm these findings in a larger study. A total of 100 (7- to 8-week-old) male severe combined immunodeficiency mice were injected subcutaneously with 1 × 10(5) LAPC-4 prostate cancer cells. Mice were randomized to either ad libitum Western Diet (44% carbohydrates, 40% fat and 16% protein) or ad libitum Western Diet with twice-weekly 24 h fasts (IF). Tumor volumes and mouse bodyweights were measured twice weekly. Mice were killed when tumor volumes reached 1000 mm(3). Serum and tumor were collected for analysis of the insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) hormonal axis. Overall, there was no difference in mouse survival (P=0.37) or tumor volumes (P ≥ 0.10) between groups. Mouse body weights were similar between arms (P=0.84). IF mice had significantly higher serum IGF-1 levels and IGF-1/IGFBP-3 ratios at killing (P<0.001). However, no difference was observed in serum insulin, IGFBP-3 or tumor phospho-Akt levels (P ≥ 0.39). IF did not improve mouse survival nor did it delay prostate tumor growth. This may be secondary to metabolic adaptations to the 24 h fasting periods. Future studies are required to optimize CR for application in humans. PMID:20733612

  3. Prostate cancer cells home to bone using a novel in vivo model: modulation by the integrin antagonist GLPG0187.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Kimberley J; Hurrell, Jack E; Cecchini, Marco; van der Pluijm, Gabri; Down, Jenny M; Eaton, Colby L; Hamdy, Freddie; Clement-Lacroix, Philippe; Brown, Nicola J

    2015-04-01

    Micrometastasis is a barrier to the development of effective cancer therapies for prostate cancer metastasis to bone. The mechanisms remain incompletely characterised, primarily due to an inability to adequately monitor the initial metastatic events in vivo. This study aimed to establish a new model, allowing the tracking of prostate cancer cells homing to bone, and furthermore, to evaluate the response of this approach to therapeutic modulation, using the integrin antagonist GLPG0187. A single murine metatarsal was engrafted into a dorsal skinfold chamber implanted on a SCID mouse. Fluorescently-labeled human prostate (PC3-GFP) or oral (SCC4-GFP) cancer cells were administered via intracardiac (i.c) injection, with simultaneous daily GLPG0187 or vehicle-control treatment (i.p. 100 mg/kg/day) for the experimental duration. Metatarsal recordings were taken every 48 h for up to 4 weeks. Tissue was harvested and processed for microCT, multiphoton analysis, histology and immunohistochemistry. Cell viability, proliferation and migration in vitro were also quantified following treatment with GLPG0187. Metatarsals rapidly revascularised by inosculation with the host vasculature (day 5-7). PC3-GFP cells adhered to the microvascular endothelium and/or metatarsal matrix 3 days after administration, with adhesion maintained for the experimental duration. GLPG0187 treatment significantly (p < 0.05) reduced PC3 cell number within the metatarsal in vivo and reduced migration (p < 0.05) and proliferation (p < 0.05) but not cell viability in vitro. This new model allows evaluation of the early events of tumour-cell homing and localisation to the bone microenvironment, in addition to determining responses to therapeutic interventions. PMID:25156971

  4. Gene regulatory mechanisms underpinning prostate cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Whitington, Thomas; Gao, Ping; Song, Wei; Ross-Adams, Helen; Lamb, Alastair D; Yang, Yuehong; Svezia, Ilaria; Klevebring, Daniel; Mills, Ian G; Karlsson, Robert; Halim, Silvia; Dunning, Mark J; Egevad, Lars; Warren, Anne Y; Neal, David E; Grönberg, Henrik; Lindberg, Johan; Wei, Gong-Hong; Wiklund, Fredrik

    2016-04-01

    Molecular characterization of genome-wide association study (GWAS) loci can uncover key genes and biological mechanisms underpinning complex traits and diseases. Here we present deep, high-throughput characterization of gene regulatory mechanisms underlying prostate cancer risk loci. Our methodology integrates data from 295 prostate cancer chromatin immunoprecipitation and sequencing experiments with genotype and gene expression data from 602 prostate tumor samples. The analysis identifies new gene regulatory mechanisms affected by risk locus SNPs, including widespread disruption of ternary androgen receptor (AR)-FOXA1 and AR-HOXB13 complexes and competitive binding mechanisms. We identify 57 expression quantitative trait loci at 35 risk loci, which we validate through analysis of allele-specific expression. We further validate predicted regulatory SNPs and target genes in prostate cancer cell line models. Finally, our integrated analysis can be accessed through an interactive visualization tool. This analysis elucidates how genome sequence variation affects disease predisposition via gene regulatory mechanisms and identifies relevant genes for downstream biomarker and drug development. PMID:26950096

  5. Clinical validation of candidate genes associated with prostate cancer progression in the CWR22 model system using tissue microarrays.

    PubMed

    Mousses, Spyro; Bubendorf, Lukas; Wagner, Urs; Hostetter, Galen; Kononen, Juha; Cornelison, Robert; Goldberger, Natalie; Elkahloun, Abdel G; Willi, Niels; Koivisto, Pasi; Ferhle, William; Raffeld, Mark; Sauter, Guito; Kallioniemi, Olli-P

    2002-03-01

    To explore molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer progression, we applied tissue microarrays (TMAs) to analyze expression of candidate gene targets discovered by cDNA microarray analysis of the CWR22 xenograft model system. A TMA with 544 clinical specimens from different stages of disease progression was probed by mRNA in situ hybridization and protein immunohistochemistry. There was an excellent correlation (r = 0.96; n = 16) between the expression levels of the genes in the xenografts by cDNA microarray and mRNA in situ hybridization on a TMA. One of the most highly overexpressed genes in hormone-refractory CWR22R xenografts was the S100P gene. This gene, coding for a calcium signaling molecule implicated in the loss of senescence, was also significantly associated with progression in clinical tumors by TMA analysis (P < 0.001), suggesting dysregulation of this pathway in hormone-refractory and metastatic prostate cancers. Conversely, two genes that were down-regulated during tumor progression in the CWR22 model system were validated in vivo: crystallin mu (CRYM) and a LIM-domain protein LMO4 both showed significantly lower mRNA levels in hormone-refractory tumors as compared with primary tumors (P < 0.001). These results illustrate a strategy for rapid clinical validation at the mRNA and protein level of gene targets found to be differentially expressed in cDNA microarray experiments of model systems of cancer. PMID:11888886

  6. Loss of JUNB/AP-1 promotes invasive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, M K; Bakiri, L; Hasenfuss, S C; Wu, H; Morente, M; Wagner, E F

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a frequent cause of male death in the Western world. Relatively few genetic alterations have been identified, likely owing to disease heterogeneity. Here, we show that the transcription factor JUNB/AP-1 limits prostate cancer progression. JUNB expression is increased in low-grade prostate cancer compared with normal human prostate, but downregulated in high-grade samples and further decreased in all metastatic samples. To model the hypothesis that this downregulation is functionally significant, we genetically inactivated Junb in the prostate epithelium of mice. When combined with Pten (phosphatase and tensin homologue) loss, double-mutant mice were prone to invasive cancer development. Importantly, invasive tumours also developed when Junb and Pten were inactivated in a small cell population of the adult anterior prostate by topical Cre recombinase delivery. The resulting tumours displayed strong histological similarity with human prostate cancer. Loss of JunB expression led to increased proliferation and decreased senescence, likely owing to decreased p16Ink4a and p21CIP1 in epithelial cells. Furthermore, the tumour stroma was altered with increased osteopontin and S100 calcium-binding protein A8/9 expression, which correlated with poor prognoses in patients. These data demonstrate that JUNB/AP-1 cooperates with PTEN signalling as barriers to invasive prostate cancer, whose concomitant genetic or epigenetic suppression induce malignant progression. PMID:25526087

  7. Loss of JUNB/AP-1 promotes invasive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, M K; Bakiri, L; Hasenfuss, S C; Wu, H; Morente, M; Wagner, E F

    2015-04-01

    Prostate cancer is a frequent cause of male death in the Western world. Relatively few genetic alterations have been identified, likely owing to disease heterogeneity. Here, we show that the transcription factor JUNB/AP-1 limits prostate cancer progression. JUNB expression is increased in low-grade prostate cancer compared with normal human prostate, but downregulated in high-grade samples and further decreased in all metastatic samples. To model the hypothesis that this downregulation is functionally significant, we genetically inactivated Junb in the prostate epithelium of mice. When combined with Pten (phosphatase and tensin homologue) loss, double-mutant mice were prone to invasive cancer development. Importantly, invasive tumours also developed when Junb and Pten were inactivated in a small cell population of the adult anterior prostate by topical Cre recombinase delivery. The resulting tumours displayed strong histological similarity with human prostate cancer. Loss of JunB expression led to increased proliferation and decreased senescence, likely owing to decreased p16(Ink4a) and p21(CIP1) in epithelial cells. Furthermore, the tumour stroma was altered with increased osteopontin and S100 calcium-binding protein A8/9 expression, which correlated with poor prognoses in patients. These data demonstrate that JUNB/AP-1 cooperates with PTEN signalling as barriers to invasive prostate cancer, whose concomitant genetic or epigenetic suppression induce malignant progression. PMID:25526087

  8. Disease Progression/Clinical Outcome Model for Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer in Patients Treated With Eribulin

    PubMed Central

    van Hasselt, JGC; Gupta, A; Hussein, Z; Beijnen, JH; Schellens, JHM; Huitema, ADR

    2015-01-01

    Frameworks that associate cancer dynamic disease progression models with parametric survival models for clinical outcome have recently been proposed to support decision making in early clinical development. Here we developed such a disease progression clinical outcome model for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) using historical phase II data of the anticancer agent eribulin. Disease progression was captured using the dynamics of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). For clinical outcome, overall survival (OS) was used. The model for PSA dynamics comprised parameters for baseline PSA (23.2 ng/ml, relative standard error (RSE) 16.5%), growth rate (0.00879 day−1, RSE 12.6%), drug effect (0.241 µg·h·l−1 day−1, RSE 32.6%), and resistance development (0.0113 day−1, RSE 44.3%). OS was modeled according to a Weibull distribution. Predictors for survival included model-predicted PSA time to nadir (TTN), PSA growth rate, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score, and baseline PSA. The developed framework can be considered to support informative design and analysis of drugs developed for CRPC. PMID:26312162

  9. Decision making and prostate cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Knight, Sara J

    2014-05-01

    This article presents an overview of the challenges that men encounter in making decisions about prostate cancer screening, including complex affective and cognitive factors and controversies in the interpretation of the evidence on prostate cancer screening. Shared decision making involving patient decision aids are discussed as approaches that can be used to improve the quality of prostate cancer screening decisions, including a close alignment between a man's values, goals, and preferences and his choice about screening. PMID:24725488

  10. Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer: PET Radiotracers

    PubMed Central

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Recent advances in the fundamental understanding of the complex biology of prostate cancer have provided an increasing number of potential targets for imaging and treatment. The imaging evaluation of prostate cancer needs to be tailored to the various phases of this remarkably heterogeneous disease. CONCLUSION In this article, I review the current state of affairs on a range of PET radiotracers for potential use in the imaging evaluation of men with prostate cancer. PMID:22826388

  11. Testosterone Replacement Therapy and Prostate Cancer Incidence

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    While early studies demonstrated a positive association between testosterone and prostate cancer, evidence on the nature of the relationship has evolved with time and newer data. Studies examining links between baseline testosterone levels as well as testosterone therapy and incident prostate cancer, reveal a more complex relationship. Moreover, investigators have reported their initial experiences with supplementing testosterone in men with a history of both treated and untreated prostate cancer. PMID:26770932

  12. Differential expression and regulation of vitamin D hydroxylases and inflammatory genes in prostate stroma and epithelium by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in men with prostate cancer and an in vitro model

    PubMed Central

    Giangreco, Angeline A.; Dambal, Shweta; Wagner, Dennis; Van der Kwast, Theodorus; Vieth, Reinhold; Prins, Gail S.; Nonn, Larisa

    2014-01-01

    Previous work on vitamin D in the prostate has focused on the prostatic epithelium, from which prostate cancer arises. Prostatic epithelial cells are surrounded by stroma, which has well-established regulatory control over epithelial proliferation, differentiation, and the inflammatory response. Here we examined the regulation of vitamin D-related genes and inflammatory genes by 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D) in laser-capture microdissected prostate tissue from a vitamin D3 clinical trial and in an in vitro model that facilitates stromal–epithelial crosstalk. Analysis of the trial tissues showed that VDR was present in both cell types, whereas expression of the hydroxylases was the highest in the epithelium. Examination of gene expression by prostatic (1,25(OH)2D) concentrations showed that VDR was significantly lower in prostate tissues with the highest concentration of 1,25(OH)2D, and down-regulation of VDR by 1,25(OH) 2D was confirmed in the primary cell cultures. Analysis of inflammatory genes in the patient tissues revealed that IL-6 expression was the highest in the prostate stroma while PTGS2 (COX2) levels were lowest in the prostate cancer tissues from men in the highest tertile of prostatic 1,25(OH)2D. In vitro, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 were suppressed by 1,25 (OH)2D in the primary epithelial cells, whereas TNF-α and PTGS2 were suppressed by 1,25(OH) 2D in the stromal cells. Importantly, the ability of 1,25(OH)2D to alter pro-inflammatory-induced changes in epithelial cell growth were dependent on the presence of the stromal cells. In summary, whereas both stromal and epithelial cells of the prostate express VDR and can presumably respond to 1,25(OH)2D, which appears to be primarily produced by the prostatic epithelium. Further, while the prostate epithelium was more responsive to the anti-inflammatory activity of 1,25 (OH)2D than stromal cells, stroma–epithelial crosstalk enhanced the phenotypic effects of 1,25(OH)2D and the inflammatory

  13. Antisense approaches in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chi, Kim N; Gleave, Martin E

    2004-06-01

    Patients with hormone refractory prostate cancer have limited treatment options and new therapies are urgently needed. Advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms implicated in prostate cancer progression have identified many potential therapeutic gene targets that are involved in apoptosis, growth factors, cell signalling and the androgen receptor (AR). Antisense oligonucleotides are short sequences of synthetic modified DNA that are designed to be complimentary to a selected gene's mRNA and thereby specifically inhibit expression of that gene. The antisense approach continues to hold promise as a therapeutic modality to target genes involved in cancer progression, especially those in which the gene products are not amenable to small molecule inhibition or antibodies. The current status and future direction of a number of antisense oligonucleotides targeting several genes, including BCL-2, BCL-XL, clusterin, the inhibitors of apoptosis (IAP) family, MDM2, protein kinase C-alpha, c-raf, insulin-like growth factor binding proteins and the AR, that have potential clinical use in prostate cancer are reviewed. PMID:15174974

  14. Bone imaging in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Dotan, Zohar A

    2008-08-01

    Bone metastases of solid tumors are common, and about 80% of them occur in patients with breast, lung or prostate cancer. Bone metastases can be suspected clinically and by laboratory tests; however, a final diagnosis relies on radiographic evidence. Bone metastases of prostate cancer usually have osteoblastic characteristics, manifested by pathological bone resorption and formation. Conventional bone scans (e.g. with (99m)Tc-labeled methylene diphosphonate) are preferred to plain-film radiography for surveillance of the entire skeleton. Radiologic diagnosis of bone metastases, particularly in patients with low burden of disease, is difficult because noncancerous bone lesions that mimic cancer are common. Conventional bone scans are limited by their low sensitivity and high false-negative rate (up to 40%) compared with advanced bone-imaging modalities such as PET, PET-CT and MRI, which might assist or replace conventional scanning methods. The correct diagnosis of bone involvement in prostate cancer is crucial to assess the effects of therapy on the primary tumor, the patient's prognosis, and the efficacy of bone-specific treatments that can reduce future bone-associated morbidity. In addition, predictive tools such as nomograms enable the identification of patients at risk of bone involvement during the course of their disease. Such tools may limit treatment costs by avoidance of unnecessary tests and might reduce both short-term and long-term complication rates. PMID:18682719

  15. An informatics model for tissue banks – Lessons learned from the Cooperative Prostate Cancer Tissue Resource

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashokkumar A; Gilbertson, John R; Parwani, Anil V; Dhir, Rajiv; Datta, Milton W; Gupta, Rajnish; Berman, Jules J; Melamed, Jonathan; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Orenstein, Jan; Becich, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    Background Advances in molecular biology and growing requirements from biomarker validation studies have generated a need for tissue banks to provide quality-controlled tissue samples with standardized clinical annotation. The NCI Cooperative Prostate Cancer Tissue Resource (CPCTR) is a distributed tissue bank that comprises four academic centers and provides thousands of clinically annotated prostate cancer specimens to researchers. Here we describe the CPCTR information management system architecture, common data element (CDE) development, query interfaces, data curation, and quality control. Methods Data managers review the medical records to collect and continuously update information for the 145 clinical, pathological and inventorial CDEs that the Resource maintains for each case. An Access-based data entry tool provides de-identification and a standard communication mechanism between each group and a central CPCTR database. Standardized automated quality control audits have been implemented. Centrally, an Oracle database has web interfaces allowing multiple user-types, including the general public, to mine de-identified information from all of the sites with three levels of specificity and granularity as well as to request tissues through a formal letter of intent. Results Since July 2003, CPCTR has offered over 6,000 cases (38,000 blocks) of highly characterized prostate cancer biospecimens, including several tissue microarrays (TMA). The Resource developed a website with interfaces for the general public as well as researchers and internal members. These user groups have utilized the web-tools for public query of summary data on the cases that were available, to prepare requests, and to receive tissues. As of December 2005, the Resource received over 130 tissue requests, of which 45 have been reviewed, approved and filled. Additionally, the Resource implemented the TMA Data Exchange Specification in its TMA program and created a computer program for

  16. Internal Audit of a Comprehensive IMRT Program for Prostate Cancer: A Model for Centers in Developing Countries?

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, Wee Yao; Ren Wei; Mukherjee, Rahul K.; Chung, Hans T.

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: With improving regional prosperity, significant capital investments have been made to rapidly expand radiotherapy capacity across Southeast Asia. Yet little has been reported on the implementation of adequate quality assurance (QA) in patient management. The objective of this study is to perform an in-depth QA assessment of our definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) program for prostate cancer since its inception. Methods and Materials: The department's prostate IMRT program was modeled after that of University of California San Francisco. A departmental protocol consisting of radiotherapy volume/dose and hormone sequencing/duration and a set of 18 dose objectives to the target and critical organs were developed, and all plans were presented at the weekly departmental QA rounds. All patients treated with definitive IMRT for nonmetastatic prostate cancer were retrospectively reviewed. Protocol adherence, dosimetry data, toxicities, and outcomes were evaluated. Results: Since 2005, 76 patients received IMRT: 54 with whole-pelvis and 22 with prostate-only treatment. Of the 1,140 recorded dosimetric end points, 39 (3.3%) did not meet the protocol criteria. At QA rounds, no plans required a revision. Only one major protocol violation was observed. Two and two cases of Grade 3-4 acute and late toxicities, respectively, were observed. Five (8.8%) patients developed proctitis, but only one required argon laser therapy. Conclusions: Our comprehensive, practice-adapted QA measures appeared to ensure that we were able to consistently generate conforming IMRT plans with acceptable toxicities. These measures can be easily integrated into other clinics contemplating on developing such a program.

  17. Inhibition of bone loss with surface-modulated, drug-loaded nanoparticles in an intraosseous model of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Adjei, Isaac M; Sharma, Blanka; Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2016-06-28

    Advanced-stage prostate cancer usually metastasizes to bone and is untreatable due to poor biodistribution of intravenously administered anticancer drugs to bone. In this study, we modulated the surface charge/composition of biodegradable nanoparticles (NPs) to sustain their blood circulation time and made them small enough to extravasate through the openings of the bone's sinusoidal capillaries and thus localize into marrow. NPs with a neutral surface charge, achieved by modulating the NP surface-associated emulsifier composition, were more effective at localizing to bone marrow than NPs with a cationic or anionic surface charge. These small neutral NPs (~150nm vs. the more usual ~320nm) were also ~7-fold more effective in localizing in bone marrow than large NPs. We hypothesized that NPs that effectively localize to marrow could improve NP-mediated anticancer drug delivery to sites of bone metastasis, thereby inhibiting cancer progression and preventing bone loss. In a PC-3M-luc cell-induced osteolytic intraosseous model of prostate cancer, these small neutral NPs demonstrated greater accumulation in bone within metastatic sites than in normal contralateral bone as well as co-localization with the tumor mass in marrow. Significantly, a single-dose intravenous administration of these small neutral NPs loaded with paclitaxel (PTX-NPs), but not anionic PTX-NPs, slowed the progression of bone metastasis. In addition, neutral PTX-NPs prevented bone loss, whereas animals treated with the rapid-release drug formulation Cremophor EL (PTX-CrEL) or saline (control) showed >50% bone loss. Neutral PTX-NPs did not cause acute toxicity, whereas animals treated with PTX-CrEL experienced weight loss. These results indicate that NPs with appropriate physical and sustained drug-release characteristics could be explored to treat bone metastasis, a significant clinical issue in prostate and other cancers. PMID:27090164

  18. CD24 Is Not Required for Tumor Initiation and Growth in Murine Breast and Prostate Cancer Models

    PubMed Central

    Cremers, Natascha; Neeb, Antje; Uhle, Tanja; Dimmler, Arno; Rothley, Melanie; Allgayer, Heike; Fodde, Riccardo; Sleeman, Jonathan Paul; Thiele, Wilko

    2016-01-01

    CD24 is a small, heavily glycosylated, GPI-linked membrane protein, whose expression has been associated with the tumorigenesis and progression of several types of cancer. Here, we studied the expression of CD24 in tumors of MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572/T+ and TRAMP genetic mouse models that spontaneously develop mammary or prostate carcinoma, respectively. We found that CD24 is expressed during tumor development in all three models. In MMTV-PyMT and Apc1572T/+ breast tumors, CD24 was strongly but heterogeneously expressed during early tumorigenesis, but decreased in more advanced stages, and accordingly was increased in poorly differentiated lesions compared with well differentiated lesions. In prostate tumors developing in TRAMP mice, CD24 expression was strong within hyperplastic lesions in comparison with non-hyperplastic regions, and heterogeneous CD24 expression was maintained in advanced prostate carcinomas. To investigate whether CD24 plays a functional role in tumorigenesis in these models, we crossed CD24 deficient mice with MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572T/+ and TRAMP mice, and assessed the influence of CD24 deficiency on tumor onset and tumor burden. We found that mice negative or positive for CD24 did not significantly differ in terms of tumor initiation and burden in the genetic tumor models tested, with the exception of Apc1572T/+ mice, in which lack of CD24 reduced the mammary tumor burden slightly but significantly. Together, our data suggest that while CD24 is distinctively expressed during the early development of murine mammary and prostate tumors, it is not essential for the formation of tumors developing in MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572T/+ and TRAMP mice. PMID:26978528

  19. CD24 Is Not Required for Tumor Initiation and Growth in Murine Breast and Prostate Cancer Models.

    PubMed

    Cremers, Natascha; Neeb, Antje; Uhle, Tanja; Dimmler, Arno; Rothley, Melanie; Allgayer, Heike; Fodde, Riccardo; Sleeman, Jonathan Paul; Thiele, Wilko

    2016-01-01

    CD24 is a small, heavily glycosylated, GPI-linked membrane protein, whose expression has been associated with the tumorigenesis and progression of several types of cancer. Here, we studied the expression of CD24 in tumors of MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572/T+ and TRAMP genetic mouse models that spontaneously develop mammary or prostate carcinoma, respectively. We found that CD24 is expressed during tumor development in all three models. In MMTV-PyMT and Apc1572T/+ breast tumors, CD24 was strongly but heterogeneously expressed during early tumorigenesis, but decreased in more advanced stages, and accordingly was increased in poorly differentiated lesions compared with well differentiated lesions. In prostate tumors developing in TRAMP mice, CD24 expression was strong within hyperplastic lesions in comparison with non-hyperplastic regions, and heterogeneous CD24 expression was maintained in advanced prostate carcinomas. To investigate whether CD24 plays a functional role in tumorigenesis in these models, we crossed CD24 deficient mice with MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572T/+ and TRAMP mice, and assessed the influence of CD24 deficiency on tumor onset and tumor burden. We found that mice negative or positive for CD24 did not significantly differ in terms of tumor initiation and burden in the genetic tumor models tested, with the exception of Apc1572T/+ mice, in which lack of CD24 reduced the mammary tumor burden slightly but significantly. Together, our data suggest that while CD24 is distinctively expressed during the early development of murine mammary and prostate tumors, it is not essential for the formation of tumors developing in MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572T/+ and TRAMP mice. PMID:26978528

  20. Prostate Cancer, Version 1.2016.

    PubMed

    Mohler, James L; Armstrong, Andrew J; Bahnson, Robert R; D'Amico, Anthony Victor; Davis, Brian J; Eastham, James A; Enke, Charles A; Farrington, Thomas A; Higano, Celestia S; Horwitz, Eric M; Hurwitz, Michael; Kane, Christopher J; Kawachi, Mark H; Kuettel, Michael; Lee, Richard J; Meeks, Joshua J; Penson, David F; Plimack, Elizabeth R; Pow-Sang, Julio M; Raben, David; Richey, Sylvia; Roach, Mack; Rosenfeld, Stan; Schaeffer, Edward; Skolarus, Ted A; Small, Eric J; Sonpavde, Guru; Srinivas, Sandy; Strope, Seth A; Tward, Jonathan; Shead, Dorothy A; Freedman-Cass, Deborah A

    2016-01-01

    The NCCN Guidelines for Prostate Cancer address staging and risk assessment after an initial diagnosis of prostate cancer and management options for localized, regional, and metastatic disease. Recommendations for disease monitoring, treatment of recurrent disease, and systemic therapy for metastatic castration-recurrent prostate cancer also are included. This article summarizes the NCCN Prostate Cancer Panel's most significant discussions for the 2016 update of the guidelines, which include refinement of risk stratification methods and new options for the treatment of men with high-risk and very-high-risk disease and progressive castration-naïve disease. PMID:26733552

  1. Toll-Like Receptors and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shu; Zhang, Yifan; Zhang, Qingyuan; Wang, Fen; Zhang, Dekai

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men after lung cancer. Immune responses clearly play a critical role in the tumorigenesis and in the efficacy of radiation therapy and chemotherapy in prostate cancer; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a well-known family of pattern recognition receptors that play a key role in host immune system. Recent studies demonstrate that there are links between TLRs and cancer; however, the function and biological importance of TLRs in prostate cancer seems complex. To elucidate the role of TLRs and innate immunity in prostate cancer might provide us with a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of this disease. Moreover, utilizing the agonists or antagonists of TLRs might represent a promising new strategy against prostate cancer. In this review, we summarize recent advances on the studies of association between TLR signaling and prostate cancer, TLR polymorphisms and prostate cancer risk, and provide some insights about TLRs as potential targets for prostate cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25101092

  2. [Medical treatment of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Lobel, B; Cipolla, B; Labrador, J

    1994-03-01

    Hormone dependence of prostate cancer is well known. In 80% of cases with metastases, hormone suppression leads to the reduction of tumour volume and related disorders. However the treatment is generally palliative because malignant process recurs after about around 16 months. Mean survival is less than 3 years in these forms. Lack of response come always together with a poor prognosis, and there is 90% mortality at 2 years. Advanced prostatic cancer should not be treated with hormones if the patient has few symptoms and his quality of life is satisfactory. Symptomatic forms require hormone manipulation. Orchidectomy or LH-RH are recommended. Total androgen ablation (combined treatment) leads rapidly to more relief of symptoms, but its drawbacks and especially high cost indicate that its use should be weighed individually. Estramustine is not a first-lune treatment. Presently, there is no criteria to predict response to treatment. PMID:8066398

  3. Oxidative stress in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Khandrika, Lakshmipathi; Kumar, Binod; Koul, Sweaty; Maroni, Paul; Koul, Hari K

    2009-09-18

    As prostate cancer and aberrant changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) become more common with aging, ROS signaling may play an important role in the development and progression of this malignancy. Increased ROS, otherwise known as oxidative stress, is a result of either increased ROS generation or a loss of antioxidant defense mechanisms. Oxidative stress is associated with several pathological conditions including inflammation and infection. ROS are products of normal cellular metabolism and play vital roles in stimulation of signaling pathways in response to changing intra- and extracellular environmental conditions. Chronic increases in ROS over time are known to induce somatic mutations and neoplastic transformation. In this review we summarize the causes for increased ROS generation and its potential role in etiology and progression of prostate cancer. PMID:19185987

  4. Prostate cancer - treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood in the urine There are reports of secondary cancers arising from the radiation as well. Proton therapy ... Chemotherapy and immunotherapy (medicine that helps the body's immune system fight the cancer) may be used to ...

  5. High-throughput detection of prostate cancer in histological sections using probabilistic pairwise Markov models.

    PubMed

    Monaco, James P; Tomaszewski, John E; Feldman, Michael D; Hagemann, Ian; Moradi, Mehdi; Mousavi, Parvin; Boag, Alexander; Davidson, Chris; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Madabhushi, Anant

    2010-08-01

    In this paper we present a high-throughput system for detecting regions of carcinoma of the prostate (CaP) in HSs from radical prostatectomies (RPs) using probabilistic pairwise Markov models (PPMMs), a novel type of Markov random field (MRF). At diagnostic resolution a digitized HS can contain 80Kx70K pixels - far too many for current automated Gleason grading algorithms to process. However, grading can be separated into two distinct steps: (1) detecting cancerous regions and (2) then grading these regions. The detection step does not require diagnostic resolution and can be performed much more quickly. Thus, we introduce a CaP detection system capable of analyzing an entire digitized whole-mount HS (2x1.75cm(2)) in under three minutes (on a desktop computer) while achieving a CaP detection sensitivity and specificity of 0.87 and 0.90, respectively. We obtain this high-throughput by tailoring the system to analyze the HSs at low resolution (8microm per pixel). This motivates the following algorithm: (Step 1) glands are segmented, (Step 2) the segmented glands are classified as malignant or benign, and (Step 3) the malignant glands are consolidated into continuous regions. The classification of individual glands leverages two features: gland size and the tendency for proximate glands to share the same class. The latter feature describes a spatial dependency which we model using a Markov prior. Typically, Markov priors are expressed as the product of potential functions. Unfortunately, potential functions are mathematical abstractions, and constructing priors through their selection becomes an ad hoc procedure, resulting in simplistic models such as the Potts. Addressing this problem, we introduce PPMMs which formulate priors in terms of probability density functions, allowing the creation of more sophisticated models. To demonstrate the efficacy of our CaP detection system and assess the advantages of using a PPMM prior instead of the Potts, we alternately

  6. High-Throughput Detection of Prostate Cancer in Histological Sections Using Probabilistic Pairwise Markov Models

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, James P.; Tomaszewski, John E.; Feldman, Michael D.; Hagemann, Ian; Moradi, Mehdi; Mousavi, Parvin; Boag, Alexander; Davidson, Chris; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Madabhushi, Anant

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a high-throughput system for detecting regions of carcinoma of the prostate (CaP) in HSs from radical prostatectomies (RPs) using probabilistic pairwise Markov models (PPMMs), a novel type of Markov random field (MRF). At diagnostic resolution a digitized HS can contain 80K×70K pixels — far too many for current automated Gleason grading algorithms to process. However, grading can be separated into two distinct steps: 1) detecting cancerous regions and 2) then grading these regions. The detection step does not require diagnostic resolution and can be performed much more quickly. Thus, we introduce a CaP detection system capable of analyzing an entire digitized whole-mount HS (2×1.75 cm2) in under three minutes (on a desktop computer) while achieving a CaP detection sensitivity and specificity of 0.87 and 0.90, respectively. We obtain this high-throughput by tailoring the system to analyze the HSs at low resolution (8 µm per pixel). This motivates the following algorithm: Step 1) glands are segmented, Step 2) the segmented glands are classified as malignant or benign, and Step 3) the malignant glands are consolidated into continuous regions. The classification of individual glands leverages two features: gland size and the tendency for proximate glands to share the same class. The latter feature describes a spatial dependency which we model using a Markov prior. Typically, Markov priors are expressed as the product of potential functions. Unfortunately, potential functions are mathematical abstractions, and constructing priors through their selection becomes an ad hoc procedure, resulting in simplistic models such as the Potts. Addressing this problem, we introduce PPMMs which formulate priors in terms of probability density functions, allowing the creation of more sophisticated models. To demonstrate the efficacy of our CaP detection system and assess the advantages of using a PPMM prior instead of the Potts, we alternately incorporate

  7. Environmental exposures and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Jeffrey K; Loeb, Stacy

    2012-01-01

    Many malignancies have been linked to specific environmental exposures. Several environmental and occupational factors have been studied for an association to prostate cancer (CaP) risk. These include Agent Orange exposure, farming and pesticides, sunlight/ultraviolet radiation, as well as trace minerals used in tire and battery manufacturing. This manuscript reviews the literature on these environmental exposures and CaP. PMID:22385992

  8. Secondary Cancers After Radiation Therapy for Primary Prostate or Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yen-Chien; Hsieh, Chung-Cheng; Li, Chung-Yi; Chuang, Jen-Pin; Lee, Jenq-Chang

    2016-04-01

    Literature about the risk of secondary cancer after radiation therapy (RT) of prostate and rectal cancer reveals contradictory results. We conducted a meta-analysis to examine whether the RT induces secondary rectal or prostate cancer in patients, respectively, with prostate or rectal cancer. All studies published in Medline or Pubmed up to March 3, 2015, containing RT of primary rectal or prostate cancer, and providing risk estimates of secondary prostate or rectal cancer were considered as eligible. Relative risk (RR) and standardized incidence ratios (SIR) were calculated using the random-effects model. Twenty studies met the inclusion criteria. 12 of them were from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. For prostate cancer patients, pooled adjusted RRs or SIRs did not show an effect on the risk of secondary rectal cancer. However, notwithstanding the limitations of SEER-based studies, the subgroup of prostate cancer patients receiving external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) showed an increased risk of rectal cancer. For rectal cancer patients, pooled adjusted RR of prostate cancer was 1.12 (95 % CI, 0.44-2.8) and SIR was 0.40 (95 % CI, 0.29-0.55). All studies included in the SIR analysis of rectal cancer were derived from the SEER data source. Based on current evidence, RT for prostate cancer patients had no effect on rectal cancer incidence, except for patients who received EBRT therapy. However, compared with the general population, RT for rectal cancer is associated with a decreased prostate cancer risk as found in SEER-based studies. PMID:26711638

  9. Phosphodiesterase 4D Inhibitors Limit Prostate Cancer Growth Potential

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Ginny L.; Hammer, Kimberly D.P.; Domenech, Maribella; Frantskevich, Katsiaryna; Malinowski, Rita L.; Bushman, Wade; Beebe, David J.; Marker, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) has recently been implicated as a proliferation-promoting factor in prostate cancer and is over-expressed in human prostate carcinoma. However, the effects of PDE4D inhibition using pharmacological inhibitors have not been examined in prostate cancer. These studies examined the effects of selective PDE4D inhibitors, NVP-ABE171 and cilomilast, as anti-prostate cancer therapies in both in vitro and in vivo models. The effects of PDE4D inhibitors on pathways that are critical in prostate cancer and/or downstream of cyclic AMP (cAMP) were examined. Both NVP-ABE171 and cilomilast decreased cell growth. In vitro, PDE4D inhibitors lead to decreased signaling of the sonic hedgehog (SHH), Androgen Receptor (AR), and MAPK pathways, but growth inhibition was best correlated to the sonic hedgehog pathway. PDE4D inhibition also reduced proliferation of epithelial cells induced by paracrine signaling from co-cultured stromal cells that had activated hedgehog signaling. In addition, PDE4D inhibitors decreased the weight of the prostate in wild-type mice. Prostate cancer xenografts grown in nude mice that were treated with cilomilast or NVP-ABE171 had decreased wet weight and increased apoptosis compared to vehicle treated controls. These studies suggest the pharmacological inhibition of PDE4D using small molecule inhibitors is an effective option for prostate cancer therapy. Implications PDE4D inhibitors decrease the growth of prostate cancer cells in vivo and in vitro, and PDE4D inhibition has therapeutic potential in prostate cancer. PMID:25149359

  10. Interleukin-6: a multifunctional targetable cytokine in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Culig, Zoran; Puhr, Martin

    2012-09-01

    Several cytokines are involved in regulation of cellular events in prostate cancer. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) was frequently investigated in prostate cancer models because of its increased expression in cancer tissue at early stages of the disease. In patients with metastatic prostate cancer, it is well-known that IL-6 levels increase in serum. High levels of IL-6 were measured in the supernatants of cells which do not respond to androgenic stimulation. IL-6 expression in prostate cancer increases due to enhanced expression of transforming growth factor-beta, and members of the activating protein-1 complex, and loss of the retinoblastoma tumour suppressor. IL-6 activation of androgen receptor (AR) may contribute to progression of a subgroup of prostate cancers. Results obtained with two prostate cancer cell lines, LNCaP and MDA PCa 2b, indicate that IL-6 activation of AR may cause either stimulatory or inhibitory responses on proliferation. Interestingly, prolonged treatment with IL-6 led to establishment of an IL-6 autocrine loop, suppressed signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 activation, and increased mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation. In several cell lines IL-6 acts as a survival molecule through activation of the signalling pathway of phosphotidylinositol 3-kinase. Expression of suppressors of cytokine signalling (SOCS) has been studied in prostate cancer. SOCS-3 prevents phosphorylation of STAT3 and is an important anti-apoptotic factor in AR-negative prostate cancer cells. Experimental therapy against IL-6 in prostate cancer is based on the use of the monoclonal antibody siltuximab which may be used for personalised therapy coming in the future. PMID:21664423