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Sample records for prostate tumor-initiating cells

  1. The effects of telomerase inhibition on prostate tumor-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Marian, Calin O; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2010-07-15

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men, and patients with metastatic disease have poor outcome even with the most advanced therapeutic approaches. Most cancer therapies target the bulk tumor cells, but may leave intact a small population of tumor-initiating cells (TICs), which are believed to be responsible for the subsequent relapse and metastasis. Using specific surface markers (CD44, integrin alpha(2)beta(1) and CD133), Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion, and holoclone formation, we isolated TICs from a panel of prostate cancer cell lines (DU145, C4-2 and LNCaP). We have found that prostate TICs have significant telomerase activity which is inhibited by imetelstat sodium (GRN163L), a new telomerase antagonist that is currently in Phase I/II clinical trials for several hematological and solid tumor malignancies. Prostate TICs telomeres were of similar average length to the telomeres of the main population of cells and significant telomere shortening was detected in prostate TICs as a result of imetelstat treatment. These findings suggest that telomerase inhibition therapy may be able to efficiently target the prostate TICs in addition to the bulk tumor cells, providing new opportunities for combination therapies. PMID:19908230

  2. A Role for OCT4 in Tumor Initiation of Drug-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Linn, Douglas E.; Yang, Xi; Sun, Feng; Xie, Yingqiu; Chen, Hege; Jiang, Richeng; Chen, Hegang; Chumsri, Saranya; Burger, Angelika M.; Qiu, Yun

    2010-01-01

    Drug resistance remains a clinical challenge in cancer treatment due to poor understanding of underlying mechanisms. We have established several drug-resistant prostate cancer cell lines by long-term culture in medium containing chemotherapeutic drugs. These resistant lines displayed a significant increase in side population cells due to overexpression of drug efflux pumps including ABCG2/BCRP and MDR1/Pgp. To uncover potential mechanisms underlying drug resistance, we performed microarray analysis to identify differentially expressed genes in 2 drug-resistant lines. We observed that POU5F1/OCT4, a transcription factor key to regulating pluripotency in embryonic stem cells, was upregulated in drug-resistant lines and accompanied by transcriptional activation of a set of its known target genes. Upregulation of OCT4 in drug-resistant cells was validated by RT-PCR and sequencing of PCR products as well as confirmation by Western blot and specific shRNA knockdown. Analysis of the regulatory region of POU5F1/OCT4 revealed a reduction of methylation in drug-resistant cell lines. Furthermore, these drug-resistant cells exhibited a significant increase in tumorigenicity in vivo. Subcutaneous inoculation of as few as 10 drug-resistant cells could initiate tumor formation in SCID mice, whereas no detectable tumors were observed from the parental line under similar conditions, suggesting that these drug-resistant cells may be enriched for tumor-initiating cells. Knocking down OCT4 expression by specific shRNAs attenuated growth of drug-resistant cells. Our data suggest that OCT4 re-expression in cancer cells may play an important role in carcinogenesis and provide one possible mechanism by which cancer cells acquire/maintain a drug-resistant phenotype. PMID:21779471

  3. Effects of the sesquiterpene lactone parthenolide on prostate tumor-initiating cells: an integrated molecular profiling approach

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Brian T.; Hurt, Elaine M.; Kalathur, Madhuri; Duhagon, Maria Ana; Milner, John A.; Kim, Young S.; Farrar, William L.

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests tumor-initating cells (TICs), also called cancer stem cells, are responsible for tumor initiation and progression; therefore, they represent an important cell population for development of future anti-cancer therapies. In this study, we show that the sesquiterpene lactone parthenolide (PTL) is cytotoxic to prostate TICs isolated from prostate cancer cell lines: DU145, PC3, VCAP and LAPC4, as well as primary prostate TICs. Furthermore, PTL inhibited TIC-driven tumor formation in mouse xenografts. Using an integrated molecular profiling approach encompassing proteomics, profiles of activated transcription factors and genomics we ascertained the effects of PTL on prostate cancer cells. In addition to the previously described effects of PTL, we determined that the non-receptor tyrosine kinase src, and many src signaling components, including: Csk, FAK, β1-arrestin, FGFR2, PKC, MEK/MAPK, CaMK, ELK-1 and ELK-1-dependent genes are novel targets of PTL action. Furthermore, PTL altered the binding of transcription factors important in prostate cancer including: C/EBP-α, fos related antigen-1 (FRA-1), HOXA-4, c-MYB, SNAIL, SP1, serum response factor (SRF), STAT3, X-box binding protein-1 (XBP1) and p53. In summary, we show PTL is cytotoxic to prostate TICs and describe the molecular events of PTL-mediated cytotoxicity. Therefore, PTL represents a promising therapeutic for prostate cancer treatment. PMID:19204913

  4. Generation of prostate tumor-initiating cells is associated with elevation of reactive oxygen species and IL-6/STAT3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yi; Oyan, Anne Margrete; Liu, Runhui; Hua, Yaping; Zhang, Jigang; Hovland, Randi; Popa, Mihaela; Liu, Xiaojun; Brokstad, Karl A; Simon, Ronald; Molven, Anders; Lin, Biaoyang; Zhang, Wei-dong; McCormack, Emmet; Kalland, Karl-Henning; Ke, Xi-Song

    2013-12-01

    How prostate cancer is initiated remains a topic of debate. In an effort to establish a human model of prostate carcinogenesis, we adapted premalignant human prostate EPT2-D5 cells to protein-free medium to generate numerous tight prostate spheres (D5HS) in monolayer culture. In contrast to EPT2-D5 cells, the newly generated D5HS efficiently formed large subcutaneous tumors and subsequent metastases in vivo, showing the tumorigenicity of D5HS spheres. A striking production of interleukin (IL)-6 mRNA and protein was found in D5HS cells. The essential roles of IL-6 and the downstream STAT3 signaling in D5HS tumor sphere formation were confirmed by neutralizing antibody, chemical inhibitors, and fluorescent pathway reporter. In addition, elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced upon protein depletion was required for the activation of IL-6/STAT3 in D5HS. Importantly, a positive feedback loop was found between ROS and IL-6 during tumor sphere formation. The association of ROS/IL-6/STAT3 to the carcinogenesis of human prostate cells was further examined in xenograft tumors and verified by limiting dilution implantations. Collectively, we have for the first time established human prostate tumor-initiating cells based on physiologic adaption. The intrinsic association of ROS and IL-6/STAT3 signaling in human prostate carcinogenesis shed new light on this relationship and define therapeutic targets in this setting. PMID:24101153

  5. Tumor initiating cells in malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Hadjipanayis, Costas G.; Van Meir, Erwin G.

    2009-01-01

    A rare subpopulation of cells within malignant gliomas, which shares canonical properties with neural stem cells (NSCs), may be integral to glial tumor development and perpetuation. These cells, also known as tumor initiating cells (TICs), have the ability to self-renew, develop into any cell in the overall tumor population (multipotency), and proliferate. A defining property of TICs is their ability to initiate new tumors in immunocompromised mice with high efficiency. Mounting evidence suggests that TICs originate from the transformation of NSCs and their progenitors. New findings show that TICs may be more resistant to chemotherapy and radiation than the bulk of tumor cells, thereby permitting recurrent tumor formation and accounting for the failure of conventional therapies. The development of new therapeutic strategies selectively targeting TICs while sparing NSCs may provide for more effective treatment of malignant gliomas. PMID:19189072

  6. CDC20 maintains tumor initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qi; Wu, Qiulian; Mack, Stephen C.; Yang, Kailin; Kim, Leo; Hubert, Christopher G.; Flavahan, William A.; Chu, Chengwei; Bao, Shideng; Rich, Jeremy N.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most prevalent and lethal primary intrinsic brain tumor. Glioblastoma displays hierarchical arrangement with a population of self-renewing and tumorigenic glioma tumor initiating cells (TICs), or cancer stem cells. While non-neoplastic neural stem cells are generally quiescent, glioblastoma TICs are often proliferative with mitotic control offering a potential point of fragility. Here, we interrogate the role of cell-division cycle protein 20 (CDC20), an essential activator of anaphase-promoting complex (APC) E3 ubiquitination ligase, in the maintenance of TICs. By chromatin analysis and immunoblotting, CDC20 was preferentially expressed in TICs relative to matched non-TICs. Targeting CDC20 expression by RNA interference attenuated TIC proliferation, self-renewal and in vivo tumor growth. CDC20 disruption mediated its effects through induction of apoptosis and inhibition of cell cycle progression. CDC20 maintains TICs through degradation of p21CIP1/WAF1, a critical negative regulator of TICs. Inhibiting CDC20 stabilized p21CIP1/WAF1, resulting in repression of several genes critical to tumor growth and survival, including CDC25C, c-Myc and Survivin. Transcriptional control of CDC20 is mediated by FOXM1, a central transcription factor in TICs. These results suggest CDC20 is a critical regulator of TIC proliferation and survival, linking two key TIC nodes – FOXM1 and p21CIP1/WAF1 — elucidating a potential point for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25938542

  7. Tumor-Initiating Cells and Methods of Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlatky, Lynn (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Provided herein are an isolated or enriched population of tumor initiating cells derived from normal cells, cells susceptible to neoplasia, or neoplastic cells. Methods of use of the cells for screening for anti-hyperproliferative agents, and use of the cells for animal models of hyperproliferative disorders including metastatic cancer, diagnostic methods, and therapeutic methods are provided.

  8. Cryptotanshinone targets tumor-initiating cells through down-regulation of stemness genes expression

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YING; CABARCAS, STEPHANIE M.; ZHENG, JI; SUN, LEI; MATHEWS, LESLEY A.; ZHANG, XIAOHU; LIN, HONGSHENG; FARRAR, WILLIAM L.

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that tumor-initiating cells (TICs), also called cancer stem cells (CSCs), are responsible for tumor initiation and progression, therefore representing an important cell population that may be used as a target for the development of future anticancer therapies. In the present study, Cryptotanshinone (CT), a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, was demonstrated to regulate the behaviors of LNCaP prostate cells and prostate LNCaP TICs. The results demonstrate that treatment with CT alters cellular proliferation, cell cycle status, migration, viability, colony formation and notably, sphere formation and down-regulation of stemness genes (Nanog, OCT4, SOX2, β-catenin, CXCR4) in TICs. The present study demonstrates that CT targets the LNCaP CD44+CD24- population that is representative of prostate TICs and also affects total LNCaP cells as well via down-regulation of stemness genes. The strong effect with which CT has on prostate TICs suggests that CT may potentially function as a novel natural anticancer agent that specifically targets TICs. PMID:27313698

  9. Multiple Subsets of Brain Tumor Initiating Cells Coexist in Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Rennert, Robert C; Achrol, Achal S; Januszyk, Michael; Kahn, Suzana A; Liu, Tiffany T; Liu, Yi; Sahoo, Debashis; Rodrigues, Melanie; Maan, Zeshaan N; Wong, Victor W; Cheshier, Samuel H; Chang, Steven D; Steinberg, Gary K; Harsh, Griffith R; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2016-06-01

    Brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs) are self-renewing multipotent cells critical for tumor maintenance and growth. Using single-cell microfluidic profiling, we identified multiple subpopulations of BTICs coexisting in human glioblastoma, characterized by distinct surface marker expression and single-cell molecular profiles relating to divergent bulk tissue molecular subtypes. These data suggest BTIC subpopulation heterogeneity as an underlying source of intra-tumoral bulk tissue molecular heterogeneity, and will support future studies into BTIC subpopulation-specific therapies. Stem Cells 2016;34:1702-1707. PMID:26991945

  10. In vitro Enrichment of Ovarian Cancer Tumor-initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    House, Carrie D.; Hernandez, Lidia; Annunziata, Christina M.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that small subpopulations of tumor cells maintain a unique self-renewing and differentiation capacity and may be responsible for tumor initiation and/or relapse. Clarifying the mechanisms by which these tumor-initiating cells (TICs) support tumor formation and progression could lead to the development of clinically favorable therapies. Ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous and highly recurrent disease. Recent studies suggest TICs may play an important role in disease biology. We have identified culture conditions that enrich for TICs from ovarian cancer cell lines. Growing either adherent cells or non-adherent ‘floater’ cells in a low attachment plate with serum free media in the presence of growth factors supports the propagation of ovarian cancer TICs with stem cell markers (CD133 and ALDH activity) and increased tumorigenicity without the need to physically separate the TICs from other cell types within the culture. Although the presence of floater cells is not common for all cell lines, this population of cells with innate low adherence may have high tumorigenic potential.Compared to adherent cells grown in the presence of serum, TICs readily form spheres, are significantly more tumorigenic in mice, and express putative stem cell markers. The conditions are easy to establish in a timely manner and can be used to study signaling pathways important for maintaining stem characteristics, and to identify drugs or combinations of drugs targeting TICs. The culture conditions described herein are applicable for a variety of ovarian cancer cells of epithelial origin and will be critical in providing new information about the role of TICs in tumor initiation, progression, and relapse. PMID:25742116

  11. Culture and Isolation of Brain Tumor Initiating Cells.

    PubMed

    Vora, Parvez; Venugopal, Chitra; McFarlane, Nicole; Singh, Sheila K

    2015-01-01

    Brain tumors are typically composed of heterogeneous cells that exhibit distinct phenotypic characteristics and proliferative potentials. Only a relatively small fraction of cells in the tumor with stem cell properties, termed brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs), possess an ability to differentiate along multiple lineages, self-renew, and initiate tumors in vivo. This unit describes protocols for the culture and isolation BTICs. We applied culture conditions and assays originally used for normal neural stem cells (NSCs) in vitro to a variety of brain tumors. Using fluorescence-activated cell sorting for the neural precursor cell surface marker CD133/CD15, BTICs can be isolated and studied prospectively. Isolation of BTICs from GBM bulk tumor will enable examination of dissimilar morphologies, self-renewal capacities, tumorigenicity, and therapeutic sensitivities. As cancer is also considered a disease of unregulated self-renewal and differentiation, an understanding of BTICs is fundamental to understanding tumor growth. Ultimately, it will lead to novel drug discovery approaches that strategically target the functionally relevant BTIC population. PMID:26237571

  12. Ovarian tumor-initiating cells display a flexible metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Angela S.; Roberts, Paul C.; Frisard, Madlyn I.; Hulver, Matthew W.; Schmelz, Eva M.

    2014-10-15

    An altered metabolism during ovarian cancer progression allows for increased macromolecular synthesis and unrestrained growth. However, the metabolic phenotype of cancer stem or tumor-initiating cells, small tumor cell populations that are able to recapitulate the original tumor, has not been well characterized. In the present study, we compared the metabolic phenotype of the stem cell enriched cell variant, MOSE-L{sub FFLv} (TIC), derived from mouse ovarian surface epithelial (MOSE) cells, to their parental (MOSE-L) and benign precursor (MOSE-E) cells. TICs exhibit a decrease in glucose and fatty acid oxidation with a concomitant increase in lactate secretion. In contrast to MOSE-L cells, TICs can increase their rate of glycolysis to overcome the inhibition of ATP synthase by oligomycin and can increase their oxygen consumption rate to maintain proton motive force when uncoupled, similar to the benign MOSE-E cells. TICs have an increased survival rate under limiting conditions as well as an increased survival rate when treated with AICAR, but exhibit a higher sensitivity to metformin than MOSE-E and MOSE-L cells. Together, our data show that TICs have a distinct metabolic profile that may render them flexible to adapt to the specific conditions of their microenvironment. By better understanding their metabolic phenotype and external environmental conditions that support their survival, treatment interventions can be designed to extend current therapy regimens to eradicate TICs. - Highlights: • Ovarian cancer TICs exhibit a decreased glucose and fatty acid oxidation. • TICs are more glycolytic and have highly active mitochondria. • TICs are more resistant to AICAR but not metformin. • A flexible metabolism allows TICs to adapt to their microenvironment. • This flexibility requires development of specific drugs targeting TIC-specific changes to prevent recurrent TIC outgrowth.

  13. Cellular microenvironment modulates the galvanotaxis of brain tumor initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Ja; Hoffmann, Gwendolyn; Wheeler, Benjamin; Schiapparelli, Paula; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Searson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Galvanotaxis is a complex process that represents the collective outcome of various contributing mechanisms, including asymmetric ion influxes, preferential activation of voltage-gated channels, and electrophoretic redistribution of membrane components. While a large number of studies have focused on various up- and downstream signaling pathways, little is known about how the surrounding microenvironment may interact and contribute to the directional response. Using a customized galvanotaxis chip capable of carrying out experiments in both two- and three-dimensional microenvironments, we show that cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions modulate the galvanotaxis of brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs). Five different BTICs across three different glioblastoma subtypes were examined and shown to all migrate toward the anode in the presence of a direct-current electric field (dcEF) when cultured on a poly-L-ornithine/laminin coated surface, while the fetal-derived neural progenitor cells (fNPCs) migrated toward the cathode. Interestingly, when embedded in a 3D ECM composed of hyaluronic acid and collagen, BTICs exhibited opposite directional response and migrated toward the cathode. Pharmacological inhibition against a panel of key molecules involved in galvanotaxis further revealed the mechanistic differences between 2- and 3D galvanotaxis in BTICs. Both myosin II and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) were found to hold strikingly different roles in different microenvironments. PMID:26898606

  14. Mitochondrial Control by DRP1 in Brain Tumor Initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qi; Wu, Qiulian; Horbinski, Craig M.; Flavahan, William A.; Yang, Kailin; Zhou, Wenchao; Dombrowski, Stephen M.; Huang, Zhi; Fang, Xiaoguang; Shi, Yu; Ferguson, Ashley N.; Kashatus, David F.; Bao, Shideng; Rich, Jeremy N.

    2015-01-01

    Brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs) coopt the neuronal high affinity GLUT3 glucose transporter to withstand metabolic stress. Here, we investigated another mechanism critical to brain metabolism, mitochondrial morphology. BTICs displayed mitochondrial fragmentation relative to non-BTICs, suggesting that BTICs have increased mitochondrial fission. The essential mediator of mitochondrial fission, dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1), was activated in BTICs and inhibited in non-BTICs. Targeting DRP1 using RNA interference or pharmacologic inhibition induced BTIC apoptosis and inhibited tumor growth. Downstream, DRP1 activity regulated the essential metabolic stress sensor, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and AMPK targeting rescued the effects of DRP1 disruption. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) phosphorylated DRP1 to increase its activity in BTICs, whereas Ca2+–calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 2 (CAMK2) inhibited DRP1 in non-BTICs, suggesting tumor cell differentiation induces a regulatory switch in mitochondrial morphology. DRP1 activation correlates with poor prognosis in glioblastoma, suggesting mitochondrial dynamics may represent a therapeutic target for BTICs. PMID:25730670

  15. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition can suppress major attributes of human epithelial tumor-initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Celià-Terrassa, Toni; Meca-Cortés, Óscar; Mateo, Francesca; Martínez de Paz, Alexia; Rubio, Nuria; Arnal-Estapé, Anna; Ell, Brian J.; Bermudo, Raquel; Díaz, Alba; Guerra-Rebollo, Marta; Lozano, Juan José; Estarás, Conchi; Ulloa, Catalina; ρlvarez-Simón, Daniel; Milà, Jordi; Vilella, Ramón; Paciucci, Rosanna; Martínez-Balbás, Marian; García de Herreros, Antonio; Gomis, Roger R.; Kang, Yibin; Blanco, Jerónimo; Fernández, Pedro L.; Thomson, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    Malignant progression in cancer requires populations of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) endowed with unlimited self renewal, survival under stress, and establishment of distant metastases. Additionally, the acquisition of invasive properties driven by epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is critical for the evolution of neoplastic cells into fully metastatic populations. Here, we characterize 2 human cellular models derived from prostate and bladder cancer cell lines to better understand the relationship between TIC and EMT programs in local invasiveness and distant metastasis. The model tumor subpopulations that expressed a strong epithelial gene program were enriched in highly metastatic TICs, while a second subpopulation with stable mesenchymal traits was impoverished in TICs. Constitutive overexpression of the transcription factor Snai1 in the epithelial/TIC-enriched populations engaged a mesenchymal gene program and suppressed their self renewal and metastatic phenotypes. Conversely, knockdown of EMT factors in the mesenchymal-like prostate cancer cell subpopulation caused a gain in epithelial features and properties of TICs. Both tumor cell subpopulations cooperated so that the nonmetastatic mesenchymal-like prostate cancer subpopulation enhanced the in vitro invasiveness of the metastatic epithelial subpopulation and, in vivo, promoted the escape of the latter from primary implantation sites and accelerated their metastatic colonization. Our models provide new insights into how dynamic interactions among epithelial, self-renewal, and mesenchymal gene programs determine the plasticity of epithelial TICs. PMID:22505459

  16. Fibroblasts—a key host cell type in tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Strell, Carina; Rundqvist, Helene

    2012-01-01

    Tumor initiation, growth, invasion, and metastasis occur as a consequence of a complex interplay between the host environment and cancer cells. Fibroblasts are now recognized as a key host cell type involved in host–cancer signaling. This review discusses some recent studies that highlight the roles of fibroblasts in tumor initiation, early progression, invasion, and metastasis. Some clinical studies describing the prognostic significance of fibroblast-derived markers and signatures are also discussed. PMID:22509805

  17. Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase elevated in tumor-initiating cells is suppressed by mitocans.

    PubMed

    Stapelberg, Michael; Zobalova, Renata; Nguyen, Maria Nga; Walker, Tom; Stantic, Marina; Goodwin, Jacob; Pasdar, Elham Alizadeh; Thai, Thuan; Prokopova, Katerina; Yan, Bing; Hall, Susan; de Pennington, Nicholas; Thomas, Shane R; Grant, Gary; Stursa, Jan; Bajzikova, Martina; Meedeniya, Adrian C B; Truksa, Jaroslav; Ralph, Stephen J; Ansorge, Olaf; Dong, Lan-Feng; Neuzil, Jiri

    2014-02-01

    Tumor-initiating cells (TICs) often survive therapy and give rise to second-line tumors. We tested the plausibility of sphere cultures as models of TICs. Microarray data and microRNA data analysis confirmed the validity of spheres as models of TICs for breast and prostate cancer as well as mesothelioma cell lines. Microarray data analysis revealed the Trp pathway as the only pathway upregulated significantly in all types of studied TICs, with increased levels of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO1), the rate-limiting enzyme of Trp metabolism along the kynurenine pathway. All types of TICs also expressed higher levels of the Trp uptake system consisting of CD98 and LAT1 with functional consequences. IDO1 expression was regulated via both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms, depending on the cancer type. Serial transplantation of TICs in mice resulted in gradually increased IDO1. Mitocans, represented by α-tocopheryl succinate and mitochondrially targeted vitamin E succinate (MitoVES), suppressed IDO1 in TICs. MitoVES suppressed IDO1 in TICs with functional mitochondrial complex II, involving transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms. IDO1 increase and its suppression by VE analogues were replicated in TICs from primary human glioblastomas. Our work indicates that IDO1 is increased in TICs and that mitocans suppress the protein. PMID:24145120

  18. JNK Signaling in the Control of the Tumor-Initiating Capacity Associated with Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Atsushi; Okada, Masashi

    2013-01-01

    Deregulation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling occurs frequently in a variety of human cancers, yet the exact role(s) of JNK deregulation in cancer cell biology remains to be fully elucidated. Our recent demonstration that the activity of JNK is required not only for self-renewal of glioma stem cells but also for their tumor initiation has, however, identified a new role for JNK in the control of the stemness and tumor-initiating capacity of cancer cells. Significantly, transient JNK inhibition was sufficient to cause sustained loss of the tumor-initiating capacity of glioma stem cells, suggesting that the phenotype of “lost tumor-initiating capacity” may be as stable as the differentiated state and that the tumor-initiating capacity might therefore be under the control of JNK through an epigenetic mechanism that also governs stemness and differentiation. Here, in this article, we review the role and mechanism of JNK in the control of this “stemness-associated tumor-initiating capacity” (STATIC), a new hypothetical concept we introduce in this review article. Since the idea of STATIC is essentially applicable to both cancer types that do and do not follow the cancer stem cell hypothesis, we also give consideration to the possible involvement of JNK-mediated control of STATIC in a wide range of human cancers in which JNK is aberrantly activated. Theoretically, successful targeting of STATIC through JNK could contribute to long-term control of cancer. Issues to be considered before clinical application of therapies targeting this JNK-STATIC axis are also discussed. PMID:24349636

  19. CD24 Is Not Required for Tumor Initiation and Growth in Murine Breast and Prostate Cancer Models

    PubMed Central

    Cremers, Natascha; Neeb, Antje; Uhle, Tanja; Dimmler, Arno; Rothley, Melanie; Allgayer, Heike; Fodde, Riccardo; Sleeman, Jonathan Paul; Thiele, Wilko

    2016-01-01

    CD24 is a small, heavily glycosylated, GPI-linked membrane protein, whose expression has been associated with the tumorigenesis and progression of several types of cancer. Here, we studied the expression of CD24 in tumors of MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572/T+ and TRAMP genetic mouse models that spontaneously develop mammary or prostate carcinoma, respectively. We found that CD24 is expressed during tumor development in all three models. In MMTV-PyMT and Apc1572T/+ breast tumors, CD24 was strongly but heterogeneously expressed during early tumorigenesis, but decreased in more advanced stages, and accordingly was increased in poorly differentiated lesions compared with well differentiated lesions. In prostate tumors developing in TRAMP mice, CD24 expression was strong within hyperplastic lesions in comparison with non-hyperplastic regions, and heterogeneous CD24 expression was maintained in advanced prostate carcinomas. To investigate whether CD24 plays a functional role in tumorigenesis in these models, we crossed CD24 deficient mice with MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572T/+ and TRAMP mice, and assessed the influence of CD24 deficiency on tumor onset and tumor burden. We found that mice negative or positive for CD24 did not significantly differ in terms of tumor initiation and burden in the genetic tumor models tested, with the exception of Apc1572T/+ mice, in which lack of CD24 reduced the mammary tumor burden slightly but significantly. Together, our data suggest that while CD24 is distinctively expressed during the early development of murine mammary and prostate tumors, it is not essential for the formation of tumors developing in MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572T/+ and TRAMP mice. PMID:26978528

  20. CD24 Is Not Required for Tumor Initiation and Growth in Murine Breast and Prostate Cancer Models.

    PubMed

    Cremers, Natascha; Neeb, Antje; Uhle, Tanja; Dimmler, Arno; Rothley, Melanie; Allgayer, Heike; Fodde, Riccardo; Sleeman, Jonathan Paul; Thiele, Wilko

    2016-01-01

    CD24 is a small, heavily glycosylated, GPI-linked membrane protein, whose expression has been associated with the tumorigenesis and progression of several types of cancer. Here, we studied the expression of CD24 in tumors of MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572/T+ and TRAMP genetic mouse models that spontaneously develop mammary or prostate carcinoma, respectively. We found that CD24 is expressed during tumor development in all three models. In MMTV-PyMT and Apc1572T/+ breast tumors, CD24 was strongly but heterogeneously expressed during early tumorigenesis, but decreased in more advanced stages, and accordingly was increased in poorly differentiated lesions compared with well differentiated lesions. In prostate tumors developing in TRAMP mice, CD24 expression was strong within hyperplastic lesions in comparison with non-hyperplastic regions, and heterogeneous CD24 expression was maintained in advanced prostate carcinomas. To investigate whether CD24 plays a functional role in tumorigenesis in these models, we crossed CD24 deficient mice with MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572T/+ and TRAMP mice, and assessed the influence of CD24 deficiency on tumor onset and tumor burden. We found that mice negative or positive for CD24 did not significantly differ in terms of tumor initiation and burden in the genetic tumor models tested, with the exception of Apc1572T/+ mice, in which lack of CD24 reduced the mammary tumor burden slightly but significantly. Together, our data suggest that while CD24 is distinctively expressed during the early development of murine mammary and prostate tumors, it is not essential for the formation of tumors developing in MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572T/+ and TRAMP mice. PMID:26978528

  1. Non-lethal heat treatment of cells results in reduction of tumor initiation and metastatic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoo-Shin; Lee, Tae Hoon; O'Neill, Brian E.

    2015-08-14

    Non-lethal hyperthermia is used clinically as adjuvant treatment to radiation, with mixed results. Denaturation of protein during hyperthermia treatment is expected to synergize with radiation damage to cause cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Alternatively, hyperthermia is known to cause tissue level changes in blood flow, increasing the oxygenation and radiosensitivity of often hypoxic tumors. In this study, we elucidate a third possibility, that hyperthermia alters cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction, with particular impact on the cancer stem cell population. We demonstrate that cell heating results in a robust but temporary loss of cancer cell aggressiveness and metastatic potential in mouse models. In vitro, this heating results in a temporary loss in cell mobility, adhesion, and proliferation. Our hypothesis is that the loss of cellular adhesion results in suppression of cancer stem cells and loss of tumor virulence and metastatic potential. Our study suggests that the metastatic potential of cancer is particularly reduced by the effects of heat on cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction. If true, this could help explain both the successes and failures of clinical hyperthermia, and suggest ways to target treatments to those who would most benefit. - Highlights: • Non-lethal hyperthermia treatment of cancer cells is shown to cause a reduction in rates of tumor initiation and metastasis. • Dynamic imaging of cells during heat treatment shows temporary changes in cell shape, cell migration, and cell proliferation. • Loss of adhesion may lead to the observed effect, which may disproportionately impact the tumor initiating cell fraction. • Loss or suppression of the tumor initiating cell fraction results in the observed loss of metastatic potential in vivo. • This result may lead to new approaches to synergizing hyperthermia with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy.

  2. Tissue-Specific Stem Cells in the Myometrium and Tumor-Initiating Cells in Leiomyoma1

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Masanori; Bulun, Serdar E.; Maruyama, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tissue-specific (or somatic) stem cells constitute a subset of cells residing in normal adult tissues. By undergoing asymmetric division, they retain their ability to self-renew while producing daughter cells that go on to differentiate and play a role in tissue regeneration and repair. The human uterus consists primarily of endometrium and myometrium (the smooth muscle layer) that rapidly enlarges through its tremendous regenerative and remodeling capacity to accommodate the developing fetus. Such uterine enlargement and remodeling can take place repeatedly and cyclically over the course of a woman's reproductive life. These unique properties of the uterus suggest the existence of endometrial and myometrial stem cell systems. In addition, like somatic cells, tumor stem cells or tumor-initiating cells, a subset of cells within a tumor, retain the ability to reconstitute tumors. Uterine smooth muscle cells are thought to be the origin of leiomyomas that are the most common type of gynecologic tumor. Recent work has identified, isolated, and characterized putative stem/progenitor cells in the myometrium and in leiomyomas. Here, we review current studies of myometrial and leiomyoma stem/progenitor cells and provide a new paradigm for understanding myometrial physiology and pathology and how these cells might contribute to uterine remodeling during pregnancy and the formation of leiomyomas. The role of the WNT/CTNNB1 pathway in the pathogenesis of leiomyoma is also discussed. PMID:25376230

  3. Single Unpurified Breast Tumor-Initiating Cells from Multiple Mouse Models Efficiently Elicit Tumors in Immune-Competent Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Kurpios, Natasza A.; Girgis-Gabardo, Adele; Hallett, Robin M.; Rogers, Stephen; Gludish, David W.; Kockeritz, Lisa; Woodgett, James; Cardiff, Robert; Hassell, John A.

    2013-01-01

    The tumor-initiating cell (TIC) frequency of bulk tumor cell populations is one of the criteria used to distinguish malignancies that follow the cancer stem cell model from those that do not. However, tumor-initiating cell frequencies may be influenced by experimental conditions and the extent to which tumors have progressed, parameters that are not always addressed in studies of these cells. We employed limiting dilution cell transplantation of minimally manipulated tumor cells from mammary tumors of several transgenic mouse models to determine their tumor-initiating cell frequency. We determined whether the tumors that formed following tumor cell transplantation phenocopied the primary tumors from which they were isolated and whether they could be serially transplanted. Finally we investigated whether propagating primary tumor cells in different tissue culture conditions affected their resident tumor-initiating cell frequency. We found that tumor-initiating cells comprised between 15% and 50% of the bulk tumor cell population in multiple independent mammary tumors from three different transgenic mouse models of breast cancer. Culture of primary mammary tumor cells in chemically-defined, serum-free medium as non-adherent tumorspheres preserved TIC frequency to levels similar to that of the primary tumors from which they were established. By contrast, propagating the primary tumor cells in serum-containing medium as adherent populations resulted in a several thousand-fold reduction in their tumor-initiating cell fraction. Our findings suggest that experimental conditions, including the sensitivity of the transplantation assay, can dramatically affect estimates of tumor initiating cell frequency. Moreover, conditional on cell culture conditions, the tumor-initiating cell fraction of bulk mouse mammary tumor cell preparations can either be maintained at high or low frequency in vitro thus permitting comparative studies of tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cancer cells

  4. MIF Maintains the Tumorigenic Capacity of Brain Tumor-Initiating Cells by Directly Inhibiting p53.

    PubMed

    Fukaya, Raita; Ohta, Shigeki; Yaguchi, Tomonori; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Sugihara, Eiji; Okano, Hideyuki; Saya, Hideyuki; Kawakami, Yutaka; Kawase, Takeshi; Yoshida, Kazunari; Toda, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    Tumor-initiating cells thought to drive brain cancer are embedded in a complex heterogeneous histology. In this study, we isolated primary cells from 21 human brain tumor specimens to establish cell lines with high tumorigenic potential and to identify the molecules enabling this capability. The morphology, sphere-forming ability upon expansion, and differentiation potential of all cell lines were indistinguishable in vitro However, testing for tumorigenicity revealed two distinct cell types, brain tumor-initiating cells (BTIC) and non-BTIC. We found that macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was highly expressed in BTIC compared with non-BTIC. MIF bound directly to both wild-type and mutant p53 but regulated p53-dependent cell growth by different mechanisms, depending on glioma cell line and p53 status. MIF physically interacted with wild-type p53 in the nucleus and inhibited its transcription-dependent functions. In contrast, MIF bound to mutant p53 in the cytoplasm and abrogated transcription-independent induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, MIF knockdown inhibited BTIC-induced tumor formation in a mouse xenograft model, leading to increased overall survival. Collectively, our findings suggest that MIF regulates BTIC function through direct, intracellular inhibition of p53, shedding light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the tumorigenicity of certain malignant brain cells. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2813-23. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26980763

  5. Tumor-initiating label-retaining cancer cells in human gastrointestinal cancers undergo asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Hari, Danielle M; Mullinax, John E; Ambe, Chenwi M; Koizumi, Tomotake; Ray, Satyajit; Anderson, Andrew J; Wiegand, Gordon W; Garfield, Susan H; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Avital, Itzhak

    2012-04-01

    Label-retaining cells (LRCs) have been proposed to represent adult tissue stem cells. LRCs are hypothesized to result from either slow cycling or asymmetric cell division (ACD). However, the stem cell nature and whether LRC undergo ACD remain controversial. Here, we demonstrate label-retaining cancer cells (LRCCs) in several gastrointestinal (GI) cancers including fresh surgical specimens. Using a novel method for isolation of live LRCC, we demonstrate that a subpopulation of LRCC is actively dividing and exhibits stem cells and pluripotency gene expression profiles. Using real-time confocal microscopic cinematography, we show live LRCC undergoing asymmetric nonrandom chromosomal cosegregation LRC division. Importantly, LRCCs have greater tumor-initiating capacity than non-LRCCs. Based on our data and that cancers develop in tissues that harbor normal-LRC, we propose that LRCC might represent a novel population of GI stem-like cancer cells. LRCC may provide novel mechanistic insights into the biology of cancer and regenerative medicine and present novel targets for cancer treatment. PMID:22331764

  6. The emerging roles of Oct4 in tumor-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Jie; Herlyn, Meenhard

    2015-12-01

    Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4), a homeodomain transcription factor, is well established as a master factor controlling the self-renewal and pluripotency of pluripotent stem cells. Also, a large body of research has documented the detection of Oct4 in tumor cells and tissues and has indicated its enrichment in a subpopulation of undifferentiated tumor-initiating cells (TICs) that critically account for tumor initiation, metastasis, and resistance to anticancer therapies. There is circumstantial evidence for low-level expression of Oct4 in cancer cells and TICs, and the participation of Oct4 in various TIC functions such as its self-renewal and survival, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis, and drug resistance development is implicated from considerable Oct4 knockdown and overexpression-based studies. In a few studies, efforts have been made to identify Oct4 target genes in TICs of different sources. Based on such information, Oct4 in TICs appears to act via mechanisms quite distinct from those in pluripotent stem cells, and a main challenge for future studies is to unravel the molecular mechanisms of action of Oct4, particularly to address the question on how such low levels of Oct4 may exert its functions in TICs. Acquiring cells from their native microenvironment that are of high enough quantity and purity is the key to reliably analyze Oct4 functions and its target genes in TICs, and the information gained may greatly facilitate targeting and eradicating those cells. PMID:26447206

  7. MicroRNA-203 represses selection and expansion of oncogenic Hras transformed tumor initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Riemondy, Kent; Wang, Xiao-jing; Torchia, Enrique C; Roop, Dennis R; Yi, Rui

    2015-01-01

    In many mouse models of skin cancer, only a few tumors typically form even though many cells competent for tumorigenesis receive the same oncogenic stimuli. These observations suggest an active selection process for tumor-initiating cells. Here, we use quantitative mRNA- and miR-Seq to determine the impact of HrasG12V on the transcriptome of keratinocytes. We discover that microRNA-203 is downregulated by HrasG12V. Using a knockout mouse model, we demonstrate that loss of microRNA-203 promotes selection and expansion of tumor-initiating cells. Conversely, restoration of microRNA-203 using an inducible model potently inhibits proliferation of these cells. We comprehensively identify microRNA-203 targets required for Hras-initiated tumorigenesis. These targets include critical regulators of the Ras pathway and essential genes required for cell division. This study establishes a role for the loss of microRNA-203 in promoting selection and expansion of Hras mutated cells and identifies a mechanism through which microRNA-203 antagonizes Hras-mediated tumorigenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07004.001 PMID:26203562

  8. Regulation of Ovarian Cancer Stem Cells or Tumor-Initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Mi Jeong; Shin, Young Kee

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells or tumor-initiating cells (CSC/TICs), which can undergo self-renewal and differentiation, are thought to play critical roles in tumorigenesis, therapy resistance, tumor recurrence and metastasis. Tumor recurrence and chemoresistance are major causes of poor survival rates of ovarian cancer patients, which may be due in part to the existence of CSC/TICs. Therefore, elucidating the molecular mechanisms responsible for the ovarian CSC/TICs is required to develop a cure for this malignancy. Recent studies have indicated that the properties of CSC/TICs can be regulated by microRNAs, genes and signaling pathways which also function in normal stem cells. Moreover, emerging evidence suggests that the tumor microenvironments surrounding CSC/TICs are crucial for the maintenance of these cells. Similarly, efforts are now being made to unravel the mechanism involved in the regulation of ovarian CSC/TICs, although much work is still needed. This review considers recent advances in identifying the genes and pathways involved in the regulation of ovarian CSC/TICs. Furthermore, current approaches targeting ovarian CSC/TICs are described. Targeting both CSC/TICs and bulk tumor cells is suggested as a more effective approach to eliminating ovarian tumors. Better understanding of the regulation of ovarian CSC/TICs might facilitate the development of improved therapeutic strategies for recurrent ovarian cancer. PMID:23528891

  9. Thyroid tumor-initiating cells: Increasing evidence and opportunities for anticancer therapy (Review)

    PubMed Central

    GAO, YONG-JU; LI, BO; WU, XIN-YU; CUI, JING; HAN, JIAN-KUI

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the notion that thyroid cancer is initiated by tumor-initiating cells (TICs) (commonly known as cancer stem cells), which are thought to play a crucial role in malignant progression, therapeutic resistance and recurrence. Thyroid TICs have been isolated and identified using specific biomarkers (such as CD133), the side population, sphere formation and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity assays. Although their characteristics remain largely unknown, TICs provide an attractive cellular mechanism to explain therapeutic refractoriness. Efforts are currently being directed toward the identification of therapeutic strategies that could target these cells. The present review discusses the cellular origins of TICs and the main approaches used to isolate and identify thyroid TICs, with a focus on the remaining challenges and opportunities for anticancer therapy. PMID:24424445

  10. Scalable Production of Glioblastoma Tumor-initiating Cells in 3 Dimension Thermoreversible Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Lin, Haishuang; Wang, Ou; Qiu, Xuefeng; Kidambi, Srivatsan; Deleyrolle, Loic P.; Reynolds, Brent A.; Lei, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in developing drugs that specifically target glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Current cell culture methods, however, cannot cost-effectively produce the large numbers of glioblastoma TICs required for drug discovery and development. In this paper we report a new method that encapsulates patient-derived primary glioblastoma TICs and grows them in 3 dimension thermoreversible hydrogels. Our method allows long-term culture (~50 days, 10 passages tested, accumulative ~>1010-fold expansion) with both high growth rate (~20-fold expansion/7 days) and high volumetric yield (~2.0 × 107 cells/ml) without the loss of stemness. The scalable method can be used to produce sufficient, affordable glioblastoma TICs for drug discovery. PMID:27549983

  11. Scalable Production of Glioblastoma Tumor-initiating Cells in 3 Dimension Thermoreversible Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Lin, Haishuang; Wang, Ou; Qiu, Xuefeng; Kidambi, Srivatsan; Deleyrolle, Loic P; Reynolds, Brent A; Lei, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in developing drugs that specifically target glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Current cell culture methods, however, cannot cost-effectively produce the large numbers of glioblastoma TICs required for drug discovery and development. In this paper we report a new method that encapsulates patient-derived primary glioblastoma TICs and grows them in 3 dimension thermoreversible hydrogels. Our method allows long-term culture (~50 days, 10 passages tested, accumulative ~>10(10)-fold expansion) with both high growth rate (~20-fold expansion/7 days) and high volumetric yield (~2.0 × 10(7) cells/ml) without the loss of stemness. The scalable method can be used to produce sufficient, affordable glioblastoma TICs for drug discovery. PMID:27549983

  12. Targeting Tumor Initiating Cells through Inhibition of Cancer Testis Antigens and Notch Signaling: A Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Michela; Mirandola, Leonardo; Reidy, Adair; Suvorava, Natallia; Konala, Venu; Chiaramonte, Raffaella; Grizzi, Fabio; Rahman, Rakhshanda Layeequr; Jenkins, Marjorie R; Nugyen, Diane D; Dalhbeck, Scott; Cobos, Everardo; Figueroa, Jose A; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio

    2015-03-01

    Tumor initiating cells (TICs) differ from normal stem cells (SCs) in their ability to initiate tumorigenesis, invasive growth, metastasis and the acquisition of chemo and/or radio-resistance. Over the past years, several studies have indicated the potential role of the Notch system as a key regulator of cellular stemness and tumor development. Furthermore, the expression of cancer testis antigens (CTA) in TICs, and their role in SC differentiation and biology, has become an important area of investigation. Here, we propose a model in which CTA expression and Notch signaling interacts to maintain the sustainability of self-replicating tumor populations, ultimately leading to the development of metastasis, drug resistance and cancer progression. We hypothesize that Notch-CTA interactions in TICs offer a novel opportunity for meaningful therapeutic interventions in cancer. PMID:25901861

  13. Brain Tumor Initiating Cells Adapt to Restricted Nutrition through Preferential Glucose Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Flavahan, William A.; Wu, Qiulian; Hitomi, Masahiro; Rahim, Nasiha; Kim, Youngmi; Sloan, Andrew E.; Weil, Robert J.; Nakano, Ichiro; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Stringer, Brett W.; Day, Bryan W.; Li, Meizhang; Lathia, Justin D.; Rich, Jeremy N.; Hjelmeland, Anita B.

    2013-01-01

    Like all cancers, brain tumors require a continuous source of energy and molecular resources for new cell production. In normal brain, glucose is an essential neuronal fuel, but the blood-brain barrier limits its delivery. We now report that nutrient restriction contributes to tumor progression by enriching for brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs) due to preferential BTIC survival and adaptation of non-BTICs through acquisition of BTIC features. BTICs outcompete for glucose uptake by co-opting the high affinity neuronal glucose transporter, type 3 (Glut3, SLC2A3). BTICs preferentially express Glut3 and targeting Glut3 inhibits BTIC growth and tumorigenic potential. Glut3, but not Glut1, correlates with poor survival in brain tumors and other cancers; thus, TICs may extract nutrients with high affinity. As altered metabolism represents a cancer hallmark, metabolic reprogramming may instruct the tumor hierarchy and portend poor prognosis. PMID:23995067

  14. Inhibition of Mouse Breast Tumor-Initiating Cells by Calcitriol and Dietary Vitamin D.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Youngtae; Swami, Srilatha; Krishnan, Aruna V; Williams, Jasmaine D; Martin, Shanique; Horst, Ronald L; Albertelli, Megan A; Feldman, Brian J; Feldman, David; Diehn, Maximilian

    2015-08-01

    The anticancer actions of vitamin D and its hormonally active form, calcitriol, have been extensively documented in clinical and preclinical studies. However, the mechanisms underlying these actions have not been completely elucidated. Here, we examined the effect of dietary vitamin D and calcitriol on mouse breast tumor-initiating cells (TICs, also known as cancer stem cells). We focused on MMTV-Wnt1 mammary tumors, for which markers for isolating TICs have previously been validated. We confirmed that these tumors expressed functional vitamin D receptors and estrogen receptors (ER) and exhibited calcitriol-induced molecular responses including ER downregulation. Following orthotopic implantation of MMTV-Wnt1 mammary tumor cells into mice, calcitriol injections or a vitamin D-supplemented diet caused a striking delay in tumor appearance and growth, whereas a vitamin D-deficient diet accelerated tumor appearance and growth. Calcitriol inhibited TIC tumor spheroid formation in a dose-dependent manner in primary cultures and inhibited TIC self-renewal in secondary passages. A combination of calcitriol and ionizing radiation inhibited spheroid formation more than either treatment alone. Further, calcitriol significantly decreased TIC frequency as evaluated by in vivo limiting dilution analyses. Calcitriol inhibition of TIC spheroid formation could be overcome by the overexpression of β-catenin, suggesting that the inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin pathway is an important mechanism mediating the TIC inhibitory activity of calcitriol in this tumor model. Our findings indicate that vitamin D compounds target breast TICs reducing tumor-initiating activity. Our data also suggest that combining vitamin D compounds with standard therapies may enhance anticancer activity and improve therapeutic outcomes. PMID:25934710

  15. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus kills stem-like tumor-initiating colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Susanne G; Haddad, Dana; Au, Joyce; Carson, Joshua S; O’Leary, Michael P; Lewis, Christina; Monette, Sebastien; Fong, Yuman

    2016-01-01

    Stem-like tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are implicated in cancer progression and recurrence, and can be identified by sphere-formation and tumorigenicity assays. Oncolytic viruses infect, replicate in, and kill a variety of cancer cells. In this study, we seek proof of principle that TICs are susceptible to viral infection. HCT8 human colon cancer cells were subjected to serum-free culture to generate TIC tumorspheres. Parent cells and TICs were infected with HSV-1 subtype NV1066. Cytotoxicity, viral replication, and Akt1 expression were assessed. TIC tumorigenicity was confirmed and NV1066 efficacy was assessed in vivo. NV1066 infection was highly cytotoxic to both parent HCT8 cells and TICs. In both populations, cell-kill of >80% was achieved within 3 days of infection at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 1.0. However, the parent cells required 2-log greater viral replication to achieve the same cytotoxicity. TICs overexpressed Akt1 in vitro and formed flank tumors from as little as 100 cells, growing earlier, faster, larger, and with greater histologic atypia than tumors from parent cells. Treatment of TIC-induced tumors with NV1066 yielded tumor regression and slowed tumor growth. We conclude that colon TICs are selected for by serum-free culture, overexpress Akt1, and are susceptible to oncolytic viral infection. PMID:27347556

  16. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus kills stem-like tumor-initiating colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Warner, Susanne G; Haddad, Dana; Au, Joyce; Carson, Joshua S; O'Leary, Michael P; Lewis, Christina; Monette, Sebastien; Fong, Yuman

    2016-01-01

    Stem-like tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are implicated in cancer progression and recurrence, and can be identified by sphere-formation and tumorigenicity assays. Oncolytic viruses infect, replicate in, and kill a variety of cancer cells. In this study, we seek proof of principle that TICs are susceptible to viral infection. HCT8 human colon cancer cells were subjected to serum-free culture to generate TIC tumorspheres. Parent cells and TICs were infected with HSV-1 subtype NV1066. Cytotoxicity, viral replication, and Akt1 expression were assessed. TIC tumorigenicity was confirmed and NV1066 efficacy was assessed in vivo. NV1066 infection was highly cytotoxic to both parent HCT8 cells and TICs. In both populations, cell-kill of >80% was achieved within 3 days of infection at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 1.0. However, the parent cells required 2-log greater viral replication to achieve the same cytotoxicity. TICs overexpressed Akt1 in vitro and formed flank tumors from as little as 100 cells, growing earlier, faster, larger, and with greater histologic atypia than tumors from parent cells. Treatment of TIC-induced tumors with NV1066 yielded tumor regression and slowed tumor growth. We conclude that colon TICs are selected for by serum-free culture, overexpress Akt1, and are susceptible to oncolytic viral infection. PMID:27347556

  17. Rapid Reprogramming of Primary Human Astrocytes into Potent Tumor-Initiating Cells with Defined Genetic Factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Liu, Xinjian; Sampson, John H; Bigner, Darell D; Li, Chuan-Yuan

    2016-09-01

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSC) are thought to drive brain cancer, but their cellular and molecular origins remain uncertain. Here, we report the successful generation of induced CSC (iCSC) from primary human astrocytes through the expression of defined genetic factors. Combined transduction of four factors, Myc, Oct-4, p53DD, and Ras, induced efficient transformation of primary human astrocytes into malignant cells with powerful tumor-initiating capabilities. Notably, transplantation of 100 transduced cells into nude mice was sufficient for tumor formation. The cells showed unlimited self-renewal ability with robust telomerase activities. In addition, they expressed typical glioma stem-like cell markers, such as CD133, CD15, and CD90. Moreover, these cells could form spheres in culture and differentiate into neuron-like, astrocyte-like, and oligodendrocyte-like cells. Finally, they also displayed resistance to the widely used brain cancer drug temozolomide. These iCSCs could provide important tools for studies of glioma biology and therapeutics development. Cancer Res; 76(17); 5143-50. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27364552

  18. Erythropoietin promotes breast tumorigenesis through tumor-initiating cell self-renewal

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bing; Damrauer, Jeffrey S.; Bailey, Sean T.; Hadzic, Tanja; Jeong, Youngtae; Clark, Kelly; Fan, Cheng; Murphy, Laura; Lee, Cleo Y.; Troester, Melissa A.; Miller, C. Ryan; Jin, Jian; Darr, David; Perou, Charles M.; Levine, Ross L.; Diehn, Maximilian; Kim, William Y.

    2014-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a hormone that induces red blood cell production. In its recombinant form, EPO is the one of most prescribed drugs to treat anemia, including that arising in cancer patients. In randomized trials, EPO administration to cancer patients has been associated with decreased survival. Here, we investigated the impact of EPO modulation on tumorigenesis. Using genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer, we found that EPO promoted tumorigenesis by activating JAK/STAT signaling in breast tumor-initiating cells (TICs) and promoted TIC self renewal. We determined that EPO was induced by hypoxia in breast cancer cell lines, but not in human mammary epithelial cells. Additionally, we demonstrated that high levels of endogenous EPO gene expression correlated with shortened relapse-free survival and that pharmacologic JAK2 inhibition was synergistic with chemotherapy for tumor growth inhibition in vivo. These data define an active role for endogenous EPO in breast cancer progression and breast TIC self-renewal and reveal a potential application of EPO pathway inhibition in breast cancer therapy. PMID:24435044

  19. Erythropoietin promotes breast tumorigenesis through tumor-initiating cell self-renewal.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bing; Damrauer, Jeffrey S; Bailey, Sean T; Hadzic, Tanja; Jeong, Youngtae; Clark, Kelly; Fan, Cheng; Murphy, Laura; Lee, Cleo Y; Troester, Melissa A; Miller, C Ryan; Jin, Jian; Darr, David; Perou, Charles M; Levine, Ross L; Diehn, Maximilian; Kim, William Y

    2014-02-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a hormone that induces red blood cell production. In its recombinant form, EPO is the one of most prescribed drugs to treat anemia, including that arising in cancer patients. In randomized trials, EPO administration to cancer patients has been associated with decreased survival. Here, we investigated the impact of EPO modulation on tumorigenesis. Using genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer, we found that EPO promoted tumorigenesis by activating JAK/STAT signaling in breast tumor-initiating cells (TICs) and promoted TIC self renewal. We determined that EPO was induced by hypoxia in breast cancer cell lines, but not in human mammary epithelial cells. Additionally, we demonstrated that high levels of endogenous EPO gene expression correlated with shortened relapse-free survival and that pharmacologic JAK2 inhibition was synergistic with chemotherapy for tumor growth inhibition in vivo. These data define an active role for endogenous EPO in breast cancer progression and breast TIC self-renewal and reveal a potential application of EPO pathway inhibition in breast cancer therapy. PMID:24435044

  20. The Akt1/IL-6/STAT3 pathway regulates growth of lung tumor initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Malanga, Donatella; De Marco, Carmela; Guerriero, Ilaria; Colelli, Fabiana; Rinaldo, Nicola; Scrima, Marianna; Mirante, Teresa; De Vitis, Claudia; Zoppoli, Pietro; Ceccarelli, Michele; Riccardi, Miriam; Ravo, Maria; Weisz, Alessandro; Federico, Antonella; Franco, Renato; Rocco, Gaetano; Mancini, Rita; Rizzuto, Antonia; Gulletta, Elio; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Here we report that the PI3K/Akt1/IL-6/STAT3 signalling pathway regulates generation and stem cell-like properties of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) tumor initiating cells (TICs). Mutant Akt1, mutant PIK3CA or PTEN loss enhances formation of lung cancer spheroids (LCS), self-renewal, expression of stemness markers and tumorigenic potential of human immortalized bronchial cells (BEAS-2B) whereas Akt inhibition suppresses these activities in established (NCI-H460) and primary NSCLC cells. Matched microarray analysis of Akt1-interfered cells and LCSs identified IL-6 as a critical target of Akt signalling in NSCLC TICs. Accordingly, suppression of Akt in NSCLC cells decreases IL-6 levels, phosphorylation of IkK and IkB, NF-kB transcriptional activity, phosphorylation and transcriptional activity of STAT3 whereas active Akt1 up-regulates them. Exposure of LCSs isolated from NSCLC cells to blocking anti-IL-6 mAbs, shRNA to IL-6 receptor or to STAT3 markedly reduces the capability to generate LCSs, to self-renew and to form tumors, whereas administration of IL-6 to Akt-interfered cells restores the capability to generate LCSs. Finally, immunohistochemical studies in NSCLC patients demonstrated a positive correlative trend between activated Akt, IL-6 expression and STAT3 phosphorylation (n = 94; p < 0.05). In conclusion, our data indicate that aberrant Akt signalling contributes to maintaining stemness in lung cancer TICs through a NF-kB/IL-6/STAT3 pathway and provide novel potential therapeutic targets for eliminating these malignant cells in NSCLC. PMID:26486080

  1. The Akt1/IL-6/STAT3 pathway regulates growth of lung tumor initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Donatella; De Marco, Carmela; Guerriero, Ilaria; Colelli, Fabiana; Rinaldo, Nicola; Scrima, Marianna; Mirante, Teresa; De Vitis, Claudia; Zoppoli, Pietro; Ceccarelli, Michele; Riccardi, Miriam; Ravo, Maria; Weisz, Alessandro; Federico, Antonella; Franco, Renato; Rocco, Gaetano; Mancini, Rita; Rizzuto, Antonia; Gulletta, Elio; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    2015-12-15

    Here we report that the PI3K/Akt1/IL-6/STAT3 signalling pathway regulates generation and stem cell-like properties of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) tumor initiating cells (TICs). Mutant Akt1, mutant PIK3CA or PTEN loss enhances formation of lung cancer spheroids (LCS), self-renewal, expression of stemness markers and tumorigenic potential of human immortalized bronchial cells (BEAS-2B) whereas Akt inhibition suppresses these activities in established (NCI-H460) and primary NSCLC cells. Matched microarray analysis of Akt1-interfered cells and LCSs identified IL-6 as a critical target of Akt signalling in NSCLC TICs. Accordingly, suppression of Akt in NSCLC cells decreases IL-6 levels, phosphorylation of IkK and IkB, NF-kB transcriptional activity, phosphorylation and transcriptional activity of STAT3 whereas active Akt1 up-regulates them. Exposure of LCSs isolated from NSCLC cells to blocking anti-IL-6 mAbs, shRNA to IL-6 receptor or to STAT3 markedly reduces the capability to generate LCSs, to self-renew and to form tumors, whereas administration of IL-6 to Akt-interfered cells restores the capability to generate LCSs. Finally, immunohistochemical studies in NSCLC patients demonstrated a positive correlative trend between activated Akt, IL-6 expression and STAT3 phosphorylation (n = 94; p < 0.05). In conclusion, our data indicate that aberrant Akt signalling contributes to maintaining stemness in lung cancer TICs through a NF-kB/IL-6/STAT3 pathway and provide novel potential therapeutic targets for eliminating these malignant cells in NSCLC. PMID:26486080

  2. Lidamycin inhibits tumor initiating cells of hepatocellular carcinoma Huh7 through GSK3β/β-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Yu, Dongke; Zhang, Caixia; Shang, Boyang; He, Hongwei; Chen, Jinjing; Zhang, Hao; Zhao, Wuli; Wang, Zhen; Xu, Xiaoyu; Zhen, Yongsu; Shao, Rong-guang

    2015-01-01

    Recently, tumor initiating cells are considered as the central role of tumorigenicity in hepatocellular carcinoma. Enediyne anticancer antibiotic lidamycin with great potential antitumor activity is currently evaluated in Phase II clinical trials. In this study, we evaluated the effect of lidamycin on tumor initiating cells of hepatocellular carcinoma Huh7 and identified the potential mechanism. Flow cytometry analysis and sorting assay, surface marker assay, sphere formation assay, and aldefluor assay were used to evaluate the effect of lidamycin on Huh7 tumor initiating cells in vitro. To investigate the potential mechanism, the activity of GSK3β/β-catenin pathway was detected by Western blot and T cell factors transcriptional activity assay. Subcutaneous tumor model in nude mice was used to observe in vivo effect of lidamycin on Huh7 cells. Lidamycin decreased the proportion of EpCAM+ cells and the expression of EpCAM protein. Lidamycin inhibited sphere formation of sorted EpCAM+ cells in 7 d, and of parental cells in three serial passages. The population of aldehyde dehydrogenase-positive cells was reduced by lidamycin. In addition, lidamycin restrained tumor volume and incidence in vivo. Lidamycin activated GSK3β, and degraded the activity of β-catenin. Consequently, transcriptional activity of β-catenin/T cell factors was decreased. In brief, these results suggest that lidamycin suppressed Huh7 tumor initiating cells via GSK3β/β-catenin pathway. These findings reveal the potential mechanism of lidamycin on tumor initiating cells and the benefit for further clinical evaluation. PMID:23857500

  3. Targeting pancreatitis blocks tumor-initiating stem cells and pancreatic cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Altaf; Janakiram, Naveena B; Madka, Venkateshwar; Brewer, Misty; Ritchie, Rebekah L; Lightfoot, Stan; Kumar, Gaurav; Sadeghi, Michael; Patlolla, Jagan Mohan R; Yamada, Hiroshi Y; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; May, Randal; Houchen, Courtney W; Steele, Vernon E; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2015-06-20

    Recent development of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMs) for pancreatic cancer (PC) that recapitulates human disease progression has helped to identify new strategies to delay/inhibit PC development. We first found that expression of the pancreatic tumor-initiating/cancer stem cells (CSC) marker DclK1 occurs in early stage PC and in both early and late pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and that it increases as disease progresses in GEM and also in human PC. Genome-wide next generation sequencing of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) from GEM mice revealed significantly increased DclK1 along with inflammatory genes. Genetic ablation of cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) decreased DclK1 in GEM. Induction of inflammation/pancreatitis with cerulein in GEM mice increased DclK1, and the novel dual COX/5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) inhibitor licofelone reduced it. Dietary licofelone significantly inhibited the incidence of PDAC and carcinoma in situ with significant inhibition of pancreatic CSCs. Licofelone suppressed pancreatic tumor COX-2 and 5-LOX activities and modulated miRNAs characteristic of CSC and inflammation in correlation with PDAC inhibition. These results offer a preclinical proof of concept to target the inflammation initiation to inhibit cancer stem cells early for improving the treatment of pancreatic cancers, with immediate clinical implications for repositioning dual COX/5-LOX inhibitors in human trials for high risk patients. PMID:25906749

  4. IDENTIFYING AND TARGETING TUMOR-INITIATING CELLS IN THE TREATMENT OF BREAST CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Lewis, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women (exclusive of skin cancer), and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Although conventional and targeted therapies have improved survival rates, there are still considerable challenges in treating breast cancer, including treatment resistance, disease recurrence, and metastasis. Treatment resistance can be either de novo - due to traits that tumor cells possess prior to treatment, or acquired, - due to traits that tumor cells gain in response to treatment. A recently proposed mechanism of de novo resistance invokes existence of a specialized subset of cancer cells defined as tumor-initiating cells (TICs), or cancer stem cells (CSC). TICs have the capacity to self-renew and regenerate new tumors that consist of all clonally-derived cell types present in the parental tumor. There are data to suggest that TICs are resistant to many conventional cancer therapies, and survive treatment in spite of dramatic shrinkage of the tumor. Residual TICs can then eventually regrow resulting in disease relapse. It is also hypothesized that TIC may be responsible for metastatic disease. If these hypotheses are correct, targeting TICs may be imperative to achieve cure. In this review, we discuss evidence for breast TICs and their apparent resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, as well as to various targeted therapies. We also address the potential impact of breast TIC plasticity and metastatic potential on therapeutic strategies. Finally, we describe several genes and signaling pathways that appear important for TIC function that may represent promising therapeutic targets. PMID:25876646

  5. PKCδ maintains phenotypes of tumor initiating cells through cytokine-mediated autocrine loop with positive feedback.

    PubMed

    Kim, R-K; Suh, Y; Hwang, E; Yoo, K-C; Choi, K-S; An, S; Hwang, S-G; Kim, I-G; Kim, M-J; Lee, H-J; Lee, S-J

    2015-11-12

    The existence of tumor initiating cells (TICs) has been emerged as a good therapeutic target for treatment of glioblastoma that is the most aggressive brain tumor with poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the phenotypes of TICs still remain obscure. In this study, we found that PKCδ, among PKC isoforms, is preferentially activated in TICs and acts as a critical regulator for the maintenance of TICs in glioblastoma. By modulating the expression levels or activity of PKCδ, we demonstrated that PKCδ promotes self-renewal and tumorigenic potentials of TICs. Importantly, we found that the activation of PKCδ persists in TICs through an autocrine loop with positive feedback that was driven by PKCδ/STAT3/IL-23/JAK signaling axis. Moreover, for phenotypes of TICs, we showed that PKCδ activates AKT signaling component by phosphorylation specifically on Ser473. Taken together, we proposed that TICs regulate their own population in glioblastoma through an autocrine loop with positive feedback that is driven by PKCδ-dependent secretion of cytokines. PMID:25746003

  6. Telomerase inhibition abolishes the tumorigenicity of pediatric ependymoma tumor-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Barszczyk, Mark; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Castelo-Branco, Pedro; Mack, Stephen C; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Mangerel, Joshua; Agnihotri, Sameer; Remke, Marc; Golbourn, Brian; Pajovic, Sanja; Elizabeth, Cynthia; Yu, Man; Luu, Betty; Morrison, Andrew; Adamski, Jennifer; Nethery-Brokx, Kathleen; Li, Xiao-Nan; Van Meter, Timothy; Dirks, Peter B; Rutka, James T; Taylor, Michael D; Tabori, Uri; Hawkins, Cynthia

    2014-12-01

    Pediatric ependymomas are highly recurrent tumors resistant to conventional chemotherapy. Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein critical in permitting limitless replication, has been found to be critically important for the maintenance of tumor-initiating cells (TICs). These TICs are chemoresistant, repopulate the tumor from which they are identified, and are drivers of recurrence in numerous cancers. In this study, telomerase enzymatic activity was directly measured and inhibited to assess the therapeutic potential of targeting telomerase. Telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) (n = 36) and C-circle assay/telomere FISH/ATRX staining (n = 76) were performed on primary ependymomas to determine the prevalence and prognostic potential of telomerase activity or alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) as telomere maintenance mechanisms, respectively. Imetelstat, a phase 2 telomerase inhibitor, was used to elucidate the effect of telomerase inhibition on proliferation and tumorigenicity in established cell lines (BXD-1425EPN, R254), a primary TIC line (E520) and xenograft models of pediatric ependymoma. Over 60 % of pediatric ependymomas were found to rely on telomerase activity to maintain telomeres, while no ependymomas showed evidence of ALT. Children with telomerase-active tumors had reduced 5-year progression-free survival (29 ± 11 vs 64 ± 18 %; p = 0.03) and overall survival (58 ± 12 vs 83 ± 15 %; p = 0.05) rates compared to those with tumors lacking telomerase activity. Imetelstat inhibited proliferation and self-renewal by shortening telomeres and inducing senescence in vitro. In vivo, Imetelstat significantly reduced subcutaneous xenograft growth by 40 % (p = 0.03) and completely abolished the tumorigenicity of pediatric ependymoma TICs in an orthotopic xenograft model. Telomerase inhibition represents a promising therapeutic approach for telomerase-active pediatric ependymomas found to characterize high-risk ependymomas. PMID

  7. miR-17 inhibition enhances the formation of kidney cancer spheres with stem cell/tumor initiating cell properties

    PubMed Central

    Lichner, Zsuzsanna; Saleh, Carol; Subramaniam, Venkateswaran; Seivwright, Annetta; Prud'homme, Gerald Joseph; Yousef, George Makram

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is an aggressive disease, with 35% chance of metastasis. The ‘cancer stem cell’ hypothesis suggests that a subset of cancer cells possess stem cell properties and is crucial in tumor initiation, metastasis and treatment resistance. We isolated RCC spheres and showed that they exhibit cancer stem cell/tumor initiating cell-like properties including the formation of self-renewing spheres, high tumorigenicity and the ability to differentiate to cell types of the original tumor. Spheres showed increased expression of stem cell-related transcription factors and mesenchymal markers.  miRNAs were differentially expressed between RCC spheres and their parental cells. Inhibition of miR-17 accelerated the formation of RCC spheres which shared molecular characteristics with the spontaneous RCC spheres. Target prediction pointed out TGFβ pathway activation as a possible mechanism to drive RCC sphere formation. We demonstrate that miR-17 overexpression interferes with the TGFβ-EMT axis and hinders RCC sphere formation; and validated TGFBR2 as a direct and biologically relevant target during this process. Thus, a single miRNA may have an impact on the formation of highly tumorigenic cancer spheres of kidney cancer. PMID:25011053

  8. ABCG2 is a potential marker of tumor-initiating cells in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sicchieri, Renata Danielle; da Silveira, Willian Abraham; Mandarano, Larissa Raquel Mouro; de Oliveira, Tatiane Mendes Gonçalves; Carrara, Hélio Humberto Angotti; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; de Andrade, Jurandyr Moreira; Tiezzi, Daniel Guimarães

    2015-12-01

    The existence of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) within solid tumors has been hypothesized to explain tumor heterogeneity and resistance to cancer therapy. In breast cancer, the expression of CD44 and CD24 and the activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) can be used to selectively isolate a cell population enriched in TICs. However, the ideal marker to identify TICs has not been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of novel potential markers for TIC in breast carcinoma. We prospectively analyzed the expression of CD44, CD24, ABCG2, and CXCR4, and the activity of ALDH1 by using flow cytometry in 48 invasive ductal carcinomas from locally advanced and metastatic breast cancer patients who were administered primary chemotherapy. A mammosphere assay was employed in 30 samples. The relationship among flow cytometric analyses, ABCG2 gene expression, and clinical and pathological responses to therapy was analyzed. The GSE32646 database was analyzed in silico to identify genes associated with tumors with low and high ABCG2 expression. We observed that the presence of ABCG2(+) cells within the primary tumor was the only marker to predict the formation of mammospheres in vitro (R (2) = 0.15, p = 0.029). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) revealed a positive correlation between ABCG2 expression and the presence of ABCG2(+) cells within the primary tumor. The expression of ABCG2 was predictive of the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in our experiments and in the GSE32646 dataset (p = 0.04 and p = 0.002, respectively). The in silico analysis demonstrated that ABCG2(Up) breast cancer samples have a slower cell cycle and a higher expression of membrane proteins but a greater potential for chromosomal instability, metastasis, immune evasion, and resistance to hypoxia. Such genetic characteristics are compatible with highly aggressive and resistant tumors. Our results support the hypothesis that the presence of ABCG2

  9. SOX2 is a cancer-specific regulator of tumor initiating potential in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Siegle, Jasmin M.; Basin, Alice; Sastre-Perona, Ana; Yonekubo, Yoshiya; Brown, Jessie; Sennett, Rachel; Rendl, Michael; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Carucci, John A.; Schober, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Although the principles that balance stem cell self-renewal and differentiation in normal tissue homeostasis are beginning to emerge, it is still unclear whether cancer cells with tumor initiating potential are similarly governed, or whether they have acquired distinct mechanisms to sustain self-renewal and long-term tumor growth. Here we show that the transcription factor Sox2, which is not expressed in normal skin epithelium and is dispensable for epidermal homeostasis, marks tumor initiating cells (TICs) in cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). We demonstrate that Sox2 is required for SCC growth in mouse and human, where it enhances Nrp1/Vegf signaling to promote the expansion of TICs along the tumor-stroma interface. Our findings suggest that distinct transcriptional programs govern self-renewal and long-term growth of TICs and normal skin epithelial stem and progenitor cells. These programs present promising diagnostic markers and targets for cancer specific therapies. PMID:25077433

  10. Down-regulation of the Lamin A/C in neuroblastoma triggers the expansion of tumor initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Nardella, Marta; Guglielmi, Loredana; Musa, Carla; Iannetti, Ilaria; Maresca, Giovanna; Amendola, Donatella; Porru, Manuela; Carico, Elisabetta; Sessa, Giuseppe; Camerlingo, Rosalba; Dominici, Carlo; Megiorni, Francesca; Milan, Marika; Bearzi, Claudia; Rizzi, Roberto; Pirozzi, Giuseppe; Leonetti, Carlo; Bucci, Barbara; Mercanti, Delio; Felsani, Armando; D'Agnano, Igea

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-initiating cells constitute a population within a tumor mass that shares properties with normal stem cells and is considered responsible for therapy failure in many cancers. We have previously demonstrated that knockdown of the nuclear envelope component Lamin A/C in human neuroblastoma cells inhibits retinoic acid-mediated differentiation and results in a more aggressive phenotype. In addition, Lamin A/C is often lost in advanced tumors and changes in the nuclear envelope composition occur during tumor progression. Based on our previous data and considering that Lamin A/C is expressed in differentiated tissues, we hypothesize that the lack of Lamin A/C could predispose cells toward a stem-like phenotype, thus influencing the development of tumor-initiating cells in neuroblastoma. This paper demonstrates that knockdown of Lamin A/C triggers the development of a tumor-initiating cell population with self-renewing features in human neuroblastoma cells. We also demonstrates that the development of TICs is due to an increased expression of MYCN gene and that in neuroblastoma exists an inverse relationship between LMNA and MYCN expression. PMID:26439802

  11. Down-regulation of the Lamin A/C in neuroblastoma triggers the expansion of tumor initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Nardella, Marta; Guglielmi, Loredana; Musa, Carla; Iannetti, Ilaria; Maresca, Giovanna; Amendola, Donatella; Porru, Manuela; Carico, Elisabetta; Sessa, Giuseppe; Camerlingo, Rosalba; Dominici, Carlo; Megiorni, Francesca; Milan, Marika; Bearzi, Claudia; Rizzi, Roberto; Pirozzi, Giuseppe; Leonetti, Carlo; Bucci, Barbara; Mercanti, Delio; Felsani, Armando; D'Agnano, Igea

    2015-10-20

    Tumor-initiating cells constitute a population within a tumor mass that shares properties with normal stem cells and is considered responsible for therapy failure in many cancers. We have previously demonstrated that knockdown of the nuclear envelope component Lamin A/C in human neuroblastoma cells inhibits retinoic acid-mediated differentiation and results in a more aggressive phenotype. In addition, Lamin A/C is often lost in advanced tumors and changes in the nuclear envelope composition occur during tumor progression. Based on our previous data and considering that Lamin A/C is expressed in differentiated tissues, we hypothesize that the lack of Lamin A/C could predispose cells toward a stem-like phenotype, thus influencing the development of tumor-initiating cells in neuroblastoma. This paper demonstrates that knockdown of Lamin A/C triggers the development of a tumor-initiating cell population with self-renewing features in human neuroblastoma cells. We also demonstrates that the development of TICs is due to an increased expression of MYCN gene and that in neuroblastoma exists an inverse relationship between LMNA and MYCN expression. PMID:26439802

  12. EGCG inhibits the growth and tumorigenicity of nasopharyngeal tumor-initiating cells through attenuation of STAT3 activation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Hung; Chao, Li-Keng; Hung, Peir-Haur; Chen, Yann-Jang

    2014-01-01

    A subset of cancer cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor-initiating cells (TICs) could initiate tumors and are responsible for tumor recurrence and chemotherapeutic resistance. In this study, we enriched TICs in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) by the spheres formation and characterized the stem-like signatures such as self-renewal, proliferation, chemoresistance and tumorigenicity. By this method, we investigated that epigallocathechin gallate (EGCG), the major polyphenol in green tea could target TICs and potently inhibit sphere formation, eliminate the stem-like properties and enhance chemosensitivity in NPC through attenuation of STAT3 activation, which could be important in regulating the stemness expression in NPC. Our results demonstrated that STAT3 pathway plays an important role in mediating tumor-initiating capacities in NPC and suggest that inactivation of STAT3 with EGCG may represent a potential preventive and therapeutic approach for NPC. PMID:24966947

  13. MAPK13 is preferentially expressed in gynecological cancer stem cells and has a role in the tumor-initiation.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Kazuyo; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Kuroda, Takafumi; Takaya, Akari; Kubo, Terufumi; Kanaseki, Takayuki; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Noriyuki; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2016-04-15

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs)/cancer-initiating cells (CICs) are defined as small subpopulation of cancer cells that are endowed with higher tumor-initiating ability. CSCs/CICs are resistant to standard cancer therapies including chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and they are thus thought to be responsible for cancer recurrence and metastasis. Therefore, elucidation of molecular mechanisms of CSCs/CICs is essential to cure cancer. In this study, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of gynecological CSCs/CICs isolated as aldehyde dehydrogenase high (ALDH(high)) cells, and found that MAPK13, PTTG1IP, CAPN1 and UBQLN2 were preferentially expressed in CSCs/CICs. MAPK13 is expressed in uterine, ovary, stomach, colon, liver and kidney cancer tissues at higher levels compared with adjacent normal tissues. MAPK13 gene knockdown using siRNA reduced the ALDH(high) population and abrogated the tumor-initiating ability. These results indicate that MAPK13 is expressed in gynecological CSCs/CICs and has roles in the maintenance of CSCs/CICs and tumor-initiating ability, and MAPK13 might be a novel molecular target for treatment-resistant CSCs/CICs. PMID:26969274

  14. TLR4-dependent tumor-initiating stem cell-like cells (TICs) in alcohol-associated hepatocellular carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Machida, Keigo; Feldman, Douglas E; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse predisposes individuals to the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and synergistically heightens the HCC risk in patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The mechanisms of this synergism have been elusive until our recent demonstration of the obligatory role of ectopically expressed TLR4 in liver tumorigenesis in alcohol-fed HCV Ns5a or Core transgenic mice. CD133+/CD49f+ tumor-initiating stem cell-like cells (TICs) isolated from these models are tumorigenic in a manner dependent on TLR4 and NANOG. TICs' tumor-initiating activity and chemoresistance are causally associated with inhibition of TGF-β tumor suppressor pathway due to NANOG-mediated expression of IGF2BP3 and YAP1. TLR4/NANOG activation causes p53 degradation via phosphorylation of the protective protein NUMB and its dissociation from p53 by the oncoprotein TBC1D15. Nutrient deprivation reduces overexpressed TBC1D15 in TICs via autophagy-mediated degradation, suggesting a possible role of this oncoprotein in linking metabolic reprogramming and self-renewal. PMID:25427905

  15. Identification of a Novel Subpopulation of Tumor-Initiating Cells from Gemcitabine-Resistant Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Kazuya; Chiba, Sachie; Hori, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is highly resistant to systemic chemotherapy. Although there are many reports using pancreatic cancer cells derived from patients who did not receive chemotherapy, characteristics of pancreatic cancer cells from chemotherapy-resistant patients remain unclear. In this study, we set out to establish a cancer cell line in disseminated cancer cells derived from gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients. By use of in vitro co-culture system with stromal cells, we established a novel pancreatic tumor-initiating cell line. The cell line required its direct interaction with stromal cells for its in vitro clonogenic growth and passaging. Their direct interaction induced basal lamina-like extracellular matrix formation that maintained colony formation. The cell line expressed CD133 protein, which expression level changed autonomously and by culture conditions. These results demonstrated that there were novel pancreatic tumor-initiating cells that required direct interactions with stromal cells for their in vitro cultivation in gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. This cell line would help to develop novel therapies that enhance effects of gemcitabine or novel anti-cancer drugs. PMID:24278411

  16. The potential role of COX-2 in cancer stem cell-mediated canine mammary tumor initiation: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian; Zhang, Di; Xie, Fuqiang; Lin, Degui

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for tumor initiation and maintenance. Additionally, it is becoming apparent that cyclooxygenase (COX) signaling is associated with canine mammary tumor development. The goals of the present study were to investigate COX-2 expression patterns and their effect on CSC-mediated tumor initiation in primary canine mammary tissues and tumorsphere models using immunohistochemistry. Patterns of COX-2, CD44, octamer-binding transcription factor (Oct)-3/4, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression were examined in malignant mammary tumor (MMT) samples and analyzed in terms of clinicopathological characteristics. COX-2 and Oct-3/4 expression was higher in MMTs compared to other histological samples with heterogeneous patterns. In MMTs, COX-2 expression correlated with tumor malignancy features. Significant associations between COX-2, CD44, and EGFR were observed in low-differentiated MMTs. Comparative analysis showed that the levels of COX-2, CD44, and Oct-3/4 expression varied significantly among TSs of three histological grades. Enhanced COX-2 staining was consistently observed in TSs. Similar levels of staining intensity were found for CD44 and Oct-3/4, but EGFR expression was weak. Our findings indicate the potential role of COX-2 in CSC-mediated tumor initiation, and suggest that COX-2 inhibition may help treat canine mammary tumors by targeting CSCs. PMID:26124697

  17. Growth differentiating factor 15 enhances the tumor-initiating and self-renewal potential of multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Tanno, Toshihiko; Lim, Yiting; Wang, Qiuju; Chesi, Marta; Bergsagel, P. Leif; Matthews, Geoff; Johnstone, Ricky W.; Ghosh, Nilanjan; Borrello, Ivan; Huff, Carol Ann

    2014-01-01

    Disease relapse remains a major factor limiting the survival of cancer patients. In the plasma cell malignancy multiple myeloma (MM), nearly all patients ultimately succumb to disease relapse and progression despite new therapies that have improved remission rates. Tumor regrowth indicates that clonogenic growth potential is continually maintained, but the determinants of self-renewal in MM are not well understood. Normal stem cells are regulated by extrinsic niche factors, and the tumor microenvironment (TME) may similarly influence tumor cell clonogenic growth and self-renewal. Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) is aberrantly secreted by bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in MM. We found that GDF15 is produced by BMSCs after direct contact with plasma cells and enhances the tumor-initiating potential and self-renewal of MM cells in a protein kinase B- and SRY (sex-determining region Y)-box–dependent manner. Moreover, GDF15 induces the expansion of MM tumor-initiating cells (TICs), and changes in the serum levels of GDF15 were associated with changes in the frequency of clonogenic MM cells and the progression-free survival of MM patients. These findings demonstrate that GDF15 plays a critical role in mediating the interaction among mature tumor cells, the TME, and TICs, and strategies targeting GDF15 may affect long-term clinical outcomes in MM. PMID:24345755

  18. CD271 is a functional and targetable marker of tumor-initiating cells in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Murillo-Sauca, Oihana; Chung, Man Ki; Shin, June Ho; Karamboulas, Christina; Kwok, Shirley; Jung, Young Ho; Oakley, Richard; Tysome, James R.; Farnebo, Lovisa O.; Kaplan, Michael J.; Sirjani, Davud; Divi, Vasu; Holsinger, F. Christopher; Tomeh, Chafeek; Nichols, Anthony; Le, Quynh T.; Colevas, A. A. Dimitrios; Kong, Christina S.; Uppaluri, Ravindra; Lewis, James S.; Ailles, Laurie E.; Sunwoo, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-initiating cells (TICs) in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) are best characterized by their surface expression of CD44. Although there is great interest in identifying strategies to target this population, no marker of these cells has been found to be functionally active. Here, we examined the expression of the purported marker of normal human oral epithelial stem cells, CD271. We show that CD271 expression is restricted to a subset of the CD44+ cells. Using xenograft assays, we show that the CD44+CD271+ subpopulation contains the most tumorigenic cells. Loss of CD271 function results in a block in the G2-M phase of the cell cycle and a profound negative impact on the capacity of these cells to initiate tumor formation in vivo. Incubation with recombinant NGF results in enhanced phosphorylation of Erk, providing additional evidence that CD271 is functionally active. Finally, incubation of SCCHN cells with antibody to CD271 results in decreased Erk phosphorylation and decreased tumor formation in vivo. Thus, our data are the first to demonstrate that CD271 more specifically identifies the TIC subpopulation within the CD44+ compartment in SCCHN and that this receptor is a functionally active and targetable molecule. PMID:25149537

  19. Tumor-initiating and -propagating cells: cells that we would like to identify and control.

    PubMed

    Tysnes, Berit Bølge

    2010-07-01

    Identification of the cell types capable of initiating and sustaining growth of the neoplastic clone in vivo is a fundamental problem in cancer research. It is likely that tumor growth can be sustained both by rare cancer stem-like cells and selected aggressive clones and that the nature of the mutations, the cell of origin, and its environment will contribute to tumor propagation. Genomic instability, suggested as a driving force in tumorigenesis, may be induced by genetic and epigenetic changes. The feature of self-renewal in stem cells is shared with tumor cells, and deviant function of the stem cell regulatory networks may, in complex ways, contribute to malignant transformation and the establishment of a cancer stem cell-like phenotype. Understanding the nature of the more quiescent cancer stem-like cells and their niches has the potential to develop novel cancer therapeutic protocols including pharmacological targeting of self-renewal pathways. Drugs that target cancer-related inflammation may have the potential to reeducate a tumor-promoting microenvironment. Because most epigenetic modifications may be reversible, DNA methylation and histone deacetylase inhibitors can be used to induce reexpression of genes that have been silenced epigenetically. Design of therapies that eliminate cancer stem-like cells without eliminating normal stem cells will be important. Further insight into the mechanisms by which pluripotency transcription factors (e.g., OCT4, SOX2, and Nanog), polycomb repressive complexes and microRNA balance selfrenewal and differentiation will be essential for our understanding of both embryonic differentiation and human carcinogenesis and for the development of new treatment strategies. PMID:20651980

  20. Tumor-Initiating and -Propagating Cells: Cells That We Would Like to Identify and Control1

    PubMed Central

    Tysnes, Berit Bølge

    2010-01-01

    Identification of the cell types capable of initiating and sustaining growth of the neoplastic clone in vivo is a fundamental problem in cancer research. It is likely that tumor growth can be sustained both by rare cancer stem-like cells and selected aggressive clones and that the nature of the mutations, the cell of origin, and its environment will contribute to tumor propagation. Genomic instability, suggested as a driving force in tumorigenesis, may be induced by genetic and epigenetic changes. The feature of self-renewal in stem cells is shared with tumor cells, and deviant function of the stem cell regulatory networks may, in complex ways, contribute to malignant transformation and the establishment of a cancer stem cell-like phenotype. Understanding the nature of the more quiescent cancer stem-like cells and their niches has the potential to develop novel cancer therapeutic protocols including pharmacological targeting of self-renewal pathways. Drugs that target cancer-related inflammation may have the potential to reeducate a tumor-promoting microenvironment. Because most epigenetic modifications may be reversible, DNA methylation and histone deacetylase inhibitors can be used to induce reexpression of genes that have been silenced epigenetically. Design of therapies that eliminate cancer stem-like cells without eliminating normal stem cells will be important. Further insight into the mechanisms by which pluripotency transcription factors (e.g., OCT4, SOX2, and Nanog), polycomb repressive complexes and microRNA balance selfrenewal and differentiation will be essential for our understanding of both embryonic differentiation and human carcinogenesis and for the development of new treatment strategies. PMID:20651980

  1. Constitutive activation of myosin-dependent contractility sensitizes glioma tumor-initiating cells to mechanical inputs and reduces tissue invasion

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Sophie Y.; Ulrich, Theresa A.; Deleyrolle, Loic P.; MacKay, Joanna L.; Lin, Jung-Ming G.; Martuscello, Regina T.; Jundi, Musa A.; Reynolds, Brent A.; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-initiating cells (TICs) perpetuate tumor growth, enable therapeutic resistance, and drive initiation of successive tumors. Virtually nothing is known about the role of mechanotransductive signaling in controlling TIC tumorigenesis, despite the recognized importance of altered mechanics in tissue dysplasia and the common observation that extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness strongly regulates cell behavior. To address this open question, we cultured primary human glioblastoma (GBM) TICs on laminin-functionalized ECMs spanning a range of stiffnesses. Surprisingly, we found that these cells were largely insensitive to ECM stiffness cues, evading the inhibition of spreading, migration, and proliferation typically imposed by compliant ECMs. We hypothesize that this insensitivity may result from insufficient generation of myosin-dependent contractile force. Indeed, we found that both pharmacologic and genetic activation of cell contractility through RhoA GTPase, Rho-associated kinase (ROCK), or myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) restored stiffness-dependent spreading and motility, with TICs adopting the expected rounded and non-motile phenotype on soft ECMs. Moreover, constitutive activation of RhoA restricted three-dimensional invasion in both spheroid implantation and transwell paradigms. Orthotopic xenotransplantation studies revealed that control TICs formed tumors with classical GBM histopathology including diffuse infiltration and secondary foci, whereas TICs expressing a constitutively active mutant of RhoA produced circumscribed masses and yielded a 30% enhancement in mean survival time. This is the first direct evidence that manipulation of mechanotransductive signaling can alter the tumor-initiating capacity of GBM TICs, supporting further exploration of these signals as potential therapeutic targets and predictors of tumor initiating capacity within heterogeneous tumor cell populations. PMID:25634210

  2. IMP1 promotes tumor growth, dissemination and a tumor-initiating cell phenotype in colorectal cancer cell xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Kathryn E.; Noubissi, Felicite K.; Rustgi, Anil K.

    2013-01-01

    Igf2 mRNA binding protein 1 (IMP1, CRD-BP, ZBP-1) is a messenger RNA binding protein that we have shown previously to regulate colorectal cancer (CRC) cell growth in vitro. Furthermore, increased IMP1 expression correlates with enhanced metastasis and poor prognosis in CRC patients. In the current study, we sought to elucidate IMP1-mediated functions in CRC pathogenesis in vivo. Using CRC cell xenografts, we demonstrate that IMP1 overexpression promotes xenograft tumor growth and dissemination into the blood. Furthermore, intestine-specific knockdown of Imp1 dramatically reduces tumor number in the Apc Min/+ mouse model of intestinal tumorigenesis. In addition, IMP1 knockdown xenografts exhibit a reduced number of tumor cells entering the circulation, suggesting that IMP1 may directly modulate this early metastatic event. We further demonstrate that IMP1 overexpression decreases E-cadherin expression, promotes survival of single tumor cell-derived colonospheres and promotes enrichment and maintenance of a population of CD24+CD44+ cells, signifying that IMP1 overexpressing cells display evidence of loss of epithelial identity and enhancement of a tumor-initiating cell phenotype. Taken together, these findings implicate IMP1 as a modulator of tumor growth and provide evidence for a novel role of IMP1 in early events in CRC metastasis. PMID:23764754

  3. Treatment of agarose–agarose RENCA macrobeads with docetaxel selects for OCT4+ cells with tumor-initiating capability

    PubMed Central

    Gazda, Lawrence S; Martis, Prithy C; Laramore, Melissa A; Bautista, Melissa A; Dudley, Atira; Vinerean, Horatiu V; Smith, Barry H

    2013-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) theory depicts such cells as having the capacity to produce both identical CSCs (symmetrical division) and tumor-amplifying daughter cells (asymmetric division). CSCs are thought to reside in niches similar to those of normal stem cells as described for neural, intestinal, and epidermal tissue, are resistant to chemotherapy, and are responsible for tumor recurrence. We recently described the niche-like nature of mouse renal adenocarcinoma (RENCA) cells following encapsulation in agarose macrobeads. In this paper we tested the hypothesis that encapsulated RENCA colonies function as an in vitro model of a CSC niche and that the majority of cells would undergo chemotherapy-induced death, followed by tumor recurrence. After exposure to docetaxel (5 µg/ml), 50% of cells were lost one week post-treatment while only one or two cells remained in each colony by 6 weeks. Surviving cells expressed OCT4 and reformed tumors at 16 weeks post-treatment. Docetaxel-resistant cells also grew as monolayers in cell culture (16–17 weeks post-exposure) or as primary tumors following transplantation to Balb/c mice (6 of 10 mice) or NOD.CB17-Prkdcscid/J mice (9 of 9 mice; 10 weeks post-transplantation or 28 weeks post-exposure). These data support the hypothesis that a rare subpopulation of OCT4+ cells are resistant to docetaxel and these cells are sufficient for tumor recurrence. The reported methodology can be used to obtain purified populations of tumor-initiating cells, to screen for anti-tumor-initiating cell agents, and to investigate the in vitro correlate of a CSC niche, especially as it relates to chemo-resistance and tumor recurrence. PMID:24025409

  4. Tumor Initiating Cells and Chemoresistance: Which Is the Best Strategy to Target Colon Cancer Stem Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Paldino, Emanuela; Tesori, Valentina; Casalbore, Patrizia; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    There is an emerging body of evidence that chemoresistance and minimal residual disease result from selective resistance of a cell subpopulation from the original tumor that is molecularly and phenotypically distinct. These cells are called “cancer stem cells” (CSCs). In this review, we analyze the potential targeting strategies for eradicating CSCs specifically in order to develop more effective therapeutic strategies for metastatic colon cancer. These include induction of terminal epithelial differentiation of CSCs or targeting some genes expressed only in CSCs and involved in self-renewal and chemoresistance. Ideal targets could be cell regulators that simultaneously control the stemness and the resistance of CSCs. Another important aspect of cancer biology, which can also be harnessed to create novel broad-spectrum anticancer agents, is the Warburg effect, also known as aerobic glycolysis. Actually, little is yet known with regard to the metabolism of CSCs population, leaving an exciting unstudied avenue in the dawn of the emerging field of metabolomics. PMID:24527460

  5. EZH2 promotes expansion of breast tumor initiating cells through activation of RAF1-β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Ju; Yang, Jer-Yen; Xia, Weiya; Chen, Chun-Te; Xie, Xiaoming; Chao, Chi-Hong; Woodward, Wendy A; Hsu, Jung-Mao; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2011-01-18

    It has been proposed that an aggressive secondary cancer stem cell population arises from a primary cancer stem cell population through acquisition of additional genetic mutations and drives cancer progression. Overexpression of Polycomb protein EZH2, essential in stem cell self-renewal, has been linked to breast cancer progression. However, critical mechanism linking increased EZH2 expression to BTIC (breast tumor initiating cell) regulation and cancer progression remains unclear. Here, we identify a mechanism in which EZH2 expression-mediated downregulation of DNA damage repair leads to accumulation of recurrent RAF1 gene amplification in BTICs, which activates p-ERK-β-catenin signaling to promote BTIC expansion. We further reveal that AZD6244, a clinical trial drug that inhibits RAF1-ERK signaling, could prevent breast cancer progression by eliminating BTICs. PMID:21215703

  6. Delineation of a cellular hierarchy in lung cancer reveals an oncofetal antigen expressed on tumor-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Damelin, Marc; Geles, Kenneth G; Follettie, Maximillian T; Yuan, Ping; Baxter, Michelle; Golas, Jonathon; DiJoseph, John F; Karnoub, Maha; Huang, Shuguang; Diesl, Veronica; Behrens, Carmen; Choe, Sung E; Rios, Carol; Gruzas, Janet; Sridharan, Latha; Dougher, Maureen; Kunz, Arthur; Hamann, Philip R; Evans, Deborah; Armellino, Douglas; Khandke, Kiran; Marquette, Kimberly; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila; Boghaert, Erwin R; Abraham, Robert T; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Zhou, Bin-Bing S

    2011-06-15

    Poorly differentiated tumors in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been associated with shorter patient survival and shorter time to recurrence following treatment. Here, we integrate multiple experimental models with clinicopathologic analysis of patient tumors to delineate a cellular hierarchy in NSCLC. We show that the oncofetal protein 5T4 is expressed on tumor-initiating cells and associated with worse clinical outcome in NSCLC. Coexpression of 5T4 and factors involved in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition were observed in undifferentiated but not in differentiated tumor cells. Despite heterogeneous expression of 5T4 in NSCLC patient-derived xenografts, treatment with an anti-5T4 antibody-drug conjugate resulted in complete and sustained tumor regression. Thus, the aggressive growth of heterogeneous solid tumors can be blocked by therapeutic agents that target a subpopulation of cells near the top of the cellular hierarchy. PMID:21540235

  7. CD133+ tumor initiating cells (TIC) in a syngenic murine model of pancreatic cancer respond to Minnelide

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sulagna; Nomura, Alice; Sangwan, Veena; Chugh, Rohit; Dudeja, Vikas; Vickers, Selwyn M; Saluja, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the fourth leading cause for cancer-related mortality with a survival rate of less than 5%. Late diagnosis and lack of effective chemotherapeutic regimen contribute to these grim survival statistics. Relapse of any tumor is largely attributed to the presence of tumor-initiating cells (TIC) or cancer stem cells (CSC). These cells are considered as hurdles to cancer therapy as no known chemotherapeutic compound is reported to target them. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop a TIC-targeted therapy for pancreatic cancer. Experimental design We isolated CD133+ cells from a spontaneous PDAC mouse model and studied both surface expression, molecular markers of pancreatic TICs. We also studied tumor initiation properties by implanting low numbers of CD133+ cells in immune competent mice. Effect of Minnelide, a drug currently under Phase I clinical trial, was studied on the tumors derived from the CD133+ cells. Results Our study showed for the first time that CD133+ population demonstrated all the molecular markers for pancreatic TIC. These cells initiated tumors in immunocompetent mouse models and showed increased expression of pro-survival and pro-invasive proteins compared to the CD133− non-TIC population. Our study further showed that Minnelide, was very efficient in downregulating both CD133− and CD133+ population in the tumors, resulting in a 60% decrease in tumor volume compared to the untreated ones. Conclusion As Minnelide is currently under Phase I clinical trial, its evaluation in reducing tumor burden by decreasing TIC as well as non-TIC population suggests its potential as an effective therapy. PMID:24634377

  8. Inhibition of Phosphatidylcholine-Specific Phospholipase C Interferes with Proliferation and Survival of Tumor Initiating Cells in Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Renata; Mercurio, Laura; Canevari, Silvana; Podo, Franca; Miotti, Silvia; Iorio, Egidio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The role of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC), the enzyme involved in cell differentiation and proliferation, has not yet been explored in tumor initiating cells (TICs). We investigated PC-PLC expression and effects of PC-PLC inhibition in two adherent (AD) squamous carcinoma cell lines (A431 and CaSki), with different proliferative and stemness potential, and in TIC-enriched floating spheres (SPH) originated from them. Results Compared with immortalized non-tumoral keratinocytes (HaCaT) A431-AD cells showed 2.5-fold higher PC-PLC activity, nuclear localization of a 66-kDa PC-PLC isoform, but a similar distribution of the enzyme on plasma membrane and in cytoplasmic compartments. Compared with A431-AD, A431-SPH cells showed about 2.8-fold lower PC-PLC protein and activity levels, but similar nuclear content. Exposure of adherent cells to the PC-PLC inhibitor D609 (48h) induced a 50% reduction of cell proliferation at doses comprised between 33 and 50 μg/ml, without inducing any relevant cytotoxic effect (cell viability 95±5%). In A431-SPH and CaSki-SPH D609 induced both cytostatic and cytotoxic effects at about 20 to 30-fold lower doses (IC50 ranging between 1.2 and 1.6 μg/ml). Furthermore, D609 treatment of A431-AD and CaSki-AD cells affected the sphere-forming efficiency, which dropped in both cells, and induced down-modulation of stem-related markers mRNA levels (Oct4, Nestin, Nanog and ALDH1 in A431; Nestin and ALDH1 in CaSki cells). Conclusions These data suggest that the inhibition of PC-PLC activity may represent a new therapeutic approach to selectively target the most aggressive and tumor promoting sub-population of floating spheres originated from squamous cancer cells possessing different proliferative and stemness potential. PMID:26402860

  9. STAT3 signaling is activated preferentially in tumor-initiating cells in claudin-low models of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Tweardy, David J; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Landua, John; Petrovic, Ivana; Bu, Wen; Roarty, Kevin; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Rosen, Jeffrey M; Lewis, Michael T

    2014-10-01

    In breast cancer, a subset of tumor-initiating cells (TIC) or "cancer stem cells" are thought to be responsible for tumor maintenance, treatment resistance, and disease recurrence. While current breast cancer stem cell markers (e.g., CD44(high) /CD24(low/neg) , ALDH positive) have allowed enrichment for such cells, they are not universally expressed and may actually identify distinct TIC subpopulations in the same tumor. Thus, additional markers of functional stem cells are needed. The STAT3 pathway is a critical regulator of the function of normal stem cells, and evidence is accumulating for its important role in breast cancer stem cells. However, due to the lack of a method for separating live cells based on their level of STAT3 activity, it remains unknown whether STAT3 functions in the cancer stem cells themselves, or in surrounding niche cells, or in both. To approach this question, we constructed a series of lentiviral fluorescent (enhanced green fluorescent protein, EGFP) reporters that enabled flow cytometric enrichment of cells differing in STAT3-mediated transcriptional activity, as well as in vivo/in situ localization of STAT3 responsive cells. Using in vivo claudin-low cell line xenograft models of human breast cancer, we found that STAT3 signaling reporter activity (EGFP(+) ) is associated with a subpopulation of cancer cells enriched for mammosphere-forming efficiency, as well as TIC function in limiting dilution transplantation assays compared to negative or unsorted populations. Our results support STAT3 signaling activity as another functional marker for human breast cancer stem cells thus making it an attractive therapeutic target for stem-cell-directed therapy in some breast cancer subtypes. PMID:24891218

  10. Endosialin-expressing bone sarcoma stem-like cells are highly tumor-initiating and invasive

    PubMed Central

    SUN, DONG-XIU; LIAO, GUANG-JUN; LIU, KE-GUI; JIAN, HAN

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that the presence of a small group of cancer stem-like 'side population (SP)' cells is responsible for therapy failure and tumor recurrence. The present study demonstrated that primary human osteosarcoma samples contained a SP of about 3.9% which overexpressed ABC transporters, including ABCA1, ABCB1, ABCB2 and ABCG2, which are associated with drug resistance and may have contributed to multidrug resistance of SP cells. Furthermore, these SP cells displayed increased expression of endosialin (CD248) and other stem cell surface proteins, including CD133, octamer-binding transcription factor 3/4A, Nanog and Nestin, which are ultimately responsible for high self-renewal and deregulated cell proliferation. In addition, it was shown that endosialin-overexpressing SP cells were able to regenerate the tumor population and had a high invasive potential. Therefore, the present study suggested that osteosarcoma SP cells were cancer stem cells, as they displayed stem-like properties; furthermore, endosialin may be a potential target to prevent osteosarcoma recurrence following chemotherapy. PMID:26300407

  11. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α promotes primary tumor growth and tumor-initiating cell activity in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Overexpression of the oxygen-responsive transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) correlates with poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. The mouse mammary tumor virus polyoma virus middle T (MMTV-PyMT) mouse is a widely utilized preclinical mouse model that resembles human luminal breast cancer and is highly metastatic. Prior studies in which the PyMT model was used demonstrated that HIF-1α is essential to promoting carcinoma onset and lung metastasis, although no differences in primary tumor end point size were observed. Using a refined model system, we investigated whether HIF-1α is directly implicated in the regulation of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) in breast cancer. Methods Mammary tumor epithelial cells were created from MMTV-PyMT mice harboring conditional alleles of Hif1a, followed by transduction ex vivo with either adenovirus β-galactosidase or adenovirus Cre to generate wild-type (WT) and HIF-1α-null (KO) cells, respectively. The impact of HIF-1α deletion on tumor-initiating potential was investigated using tumorsphere assays, limiting dilution transplantation and gene expression analysis. Results Efficient deletion of HIF-1α reduced primary tumor growth and suppressed lung metastases, prolonging survival. Loss of HIF-1α led to reduced expression of markers of the basal lineage (K5/K14) in cells and tumors and of multiple genes involved in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. HIF-1α also enhanced tumorsphere formation at normoxia and hypoxia. Decreased expression of several genes in the Notch pathway as well as Vegf and Prominin-1 (CD133)was observed in response to Hif1a deletion. Immunohistochemistry confirmed that CD133 expression was reduced in KO cells and in tumorspheres. Tumorsphere formation was enhanced in CD133hi versus CD133neg cells sorted from PyMT tumors. Limiting dilution transplantation of WT and KO tumor cells into immunocompetent recipients revealed > 30-fold enrichment of TICs in WT cells

  12. The impact of age on oncogenic potential: tumor-initiating cells and the brain microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Elizabeth A; Horner, Philip J; Rostomily, Robert C

    2013-10-01

    Paradoxically, aging leads to both decreased regenerative capacity in the brain and an increased risk of tumorigenesis, particularly the most common adult-onset brain tumor, glioma. A shared factor contributing to both phenomena is thought to be age-related alterations in neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which function normally to produce new neurons and glia, but are also considered likely cells of origin for malignant glioma. Upon oncogenic transformation, cells acquire characteristics known as the hallmarks of cancer, including unlimited replication, altered responses to growth and anti-growth factors, increased capacity for angiogenesis, potential for invasion, genetic instability, apoptotic evasion, escape from immune surveillance, and an adaptive metabolic phenotype. The precise molecular pathogenesis and temporal acquisition of these malignant characteristics is largely a mystery. Recent studies characterizing NPCs during normal aging, however, have begun to elucidate mechanisms underlying the age-associated increase in their malignant potential. Aging cells are dependent upon multiple compensatory pathways to maintain cell cycle control, normal niche interactions, genetic stability, programmed cell death, and oxidative metabolism. A few multi-functional proteins act as 'critical nodes' in the coordination of these various cellular activities, although both intracellular signaling and elements within the brain environment are critical to maintaining a balance between senescence and tumorigenesis. Here, we provide an overview of recent progress in our understanding of how mechanisms underlying cellular aging inform on glioma pathogenesis and malignancy. PMID:23711239

  13. Genomic profiling of tumor initiating prostatospheres

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis proposes that a population of tumor cells bearing stem cell properties is responsible for the origin and maintenance of tumors. Normal and cancer stem cells possess the ability to grow in vitro as self-renewing spheres, but the molecular basis of this phenotype remains largely unknown. We intended to establish a comprehensive culture system to grow prostatospheres (PSs) from both cancer cell lines and patient tumors. We then used gene expression microarrays to gain insight on the molecular pathways that sustain the PS tumor initiating cell (TIC) phenotype. Results Traditional stem cell medium (SCM) supplemented with Knockout™SR (KO) allows the propagation of monoclonal PSs from cell lines and primary cells. PSs display gene expression and tumorigenicity hallmarks of TICs. Gene expression analysis defined a gene signature composed of 66 genes that characterize LNCaP and patient PSs. This set includes novel prostate TIC growth factors (NRP1, GDF1, JAG1), proteins implicated in cell adhesion and cytoskeletal maintenance, transcriptional regulators (MYCBP, MYBL1, ID1, ID3, FOS, ELF3, ELF4, KLF2, KLF5) and factors involved in protein biosynthesis and metabolism. Meta-analysis in Oncomine reveals that some of these genes correlate with prostate cancer status and/or progression. Reporter genes and inhibitors indicate that the Notch pathway contributes to prostatosphere growth. Conclusions We have developed a model for the culture of PSs, and provide a genomic profile that support CSCs identity. This signature identifies novel markers and pathways that are predicted to correlate with prostate cancer evolution. PMID:20500816

  14. Na+/K+-ATPase β2-subunit (AMOG) expression abrogates invasion of glioblastoma-derived brain tumor-initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Matthew Z.; Kim, Joseph M.; Oh, Michael C.; Safaee, Michael; Kaur, Gurvinder; Clark, Aaron J.; Bloch, Orin; Ivan, Michael E.; Kaur, Rajwant; Oh, Taemin; Fouse, Shaun D.; Phillips, Joanna J.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Parsa, Andrew T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Mechanisms of glioma invasion remain to be fully elucidated. Glioma cells within glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) range from well-differentiated tumor cells to less-differentiated brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs). The β2-subunit of Na+/K+-ATPase, called the adhesion molecule on glia (AMOG), is highly expressed in normal glia but is thought to be universally downregulated in GBM. To test our hypothesis that expression of AMOG is heterogeneous in GBM and confers a less invasive phenotype, we compared it between BTICs and differentiated cells from patient-matched GBM and then tested GBM invasion in vitro after AMOG overexpression. Methods Immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting, and real-time PCR were used to characterize AMOG protein and mRNA expression in tumor samples, BTICs, and differentiated cells. Matrigel invasion assay, scratch assay, and direct cell counting were used for testing in vitro invasion, migration, and proliferation, respectively. Results While AMOG expression is heterogeneous in astrocytomas of grades II–IV, it is lost in most GBM. BTICs express higher levels of AMOG mRNA and protein compared with patient-matched differentiated tumor cells. Overexpression of AMOG decreased GBM cell and BTIC invasion without affecting migration or proliferation. Knockdown of AMOG expression in normal human astrocytes increased invasion. Conclusions AMOG expression inhibits GBM invasion. Its downregulation increases invasion in glial cells and may also represent an important step in BTIC differentiation. These data provide compelling evidence implicating the role of AMOG in glioma invasion and provide impetus for further investigation. PMID:23887941

  15. A Case of Malignant Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Initially Misdiagnosed as Malignant B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Byoung Jo

    2016-01-01

    Errors that occur in anatomic pathology influence the treatment strategy of patients with malignancy. There are four general types of error with three subtypes in the category of defective interpretation. The first subtype is a false-negative diagnosis or undercall of the extent or severity of the lesion, the second is a false-positive diagnosis, and the third is misclassification. We herein report a 65-year-old female patient with malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor that was diagnosed after reevaluation of the lesion at our hospital – and treated with proximal gastrectomy – after initial diagnosis as malignant B-cell lymphoma on esophagogastroduodenoscopy biopsy of a small gastric fundic mass and subsequent treatment with six cycles of CHOP chemotherapy with aggravation of the mass at another hospital. PMID:27462236

  16. Design and in vitro evaluation of layer by layer siRNA nanovectors targeting breast tumor initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Jaganathan, Hamsa; Mitra, Sucharita; Srinivasan, Srimeenakshi; Dave, Bhuvanesh; Godin, Biana

    2014-01-01

    Efficient therapeutics and early detection has helped to increase breast cancer survival rates over the years. However, the recurrence of breast cancer remains to be a problem and this may be due to the presence of a small population of cells, called tumor initiating cells (TICs). Breast TICs are resistant to drugs, difficult to detect, and exhibit high self-renewal capabilities. In this study, layer by layer (LBL) small interfering RNA (siRNA) nanovectors (SNVs) were designed to target breast TICs. SNVs were fabricated using alternating layers of poly-L-lysine and siRNA molecules on gold (Au) nanoparticle (NP) surfaces. The stability, cell uptake, and release profile for SNVs were examined. In addition, SNVs reduced TIC-related STAT3 expression levels, CD44+/CD24-/EpCAM+ surface marker levels and the number of mammospheres formed compared to the standard transfection agent. The data from this study show, for the first time, that SNVs in LBL assembly effectively delivers STAT3 siRNA and inhibit the growth of breast TICs in vitro. PMID:24694753

  17. New ex-ovo colorectal-cancer models from different SdFFF-sorted tumor-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Mélin, Carole; Perraud, Aurélie; Christou, Niki; Bibes, Romain; Cardot, Philippe; Jauberteau, Marie-Odile; Battu, Serge; Mathonnet, Muriel

    2015-11-01

    Despite effective treatments, relapse of colorectal cancer (CRC) is frequent, in part caused by the existence of tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Different subtypes of TICs, quiescent and activated, coexist in tumors, defining the tumor aggressiveness and therapeutic response. These subtypes have been sorted by hyperlayer sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF) from WiDr and HCT116 cell lines. On the basis of a new strategy, including TIC SdFFF sorting, 3D Matrigel amplification, and grafting of corresponding TIC colonies on the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), specific tumor matrices could be obtained. If tumors had similar architectural structure with vascularization by the host system, they had different proliferative indices in agreement with their initial quiescent or activated state. Protein analysis also revealed that tumors obtained from a population enriched for "activated" TICs lost "stemness" properties and became invasive. In contrast, tumors obtained from a population enriched for "quiescent" TICs kept their stemness properties and seemed to be less proliferative and invasive. Then, it was possible to produce different kinds of tumor which could be used as selective supports to study carcinogenesis and therapy sensitivity. PMID:26427501

  18. NANOG Metabolically Reprograms Tumor-Initiating Stem-like Cells through Tumorigenic Changes in Oxidative Phosphorylation and Fatty Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Lin; Uthaya Kumar, Dinesh Babu; Punj, Vasu; Xu, Jun; Sher, Linda; Tahara, Stanley M; Hess, Sonja; Machida, Keigo

    2016-01-12

    Stem cell markers, including NANOG, have been implicated in various cancers; however, the functional contribution of NANOG to cancer pathogenesis has remained unclear. Here, we show that NANOG is induced by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling via phosphorylation of E2F1 and that downregulation of Nanog slows down hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progression induced by alcohol western diet and hepatitis C virus protein in mice. NANOG ChIP-seq analyses reveal that NANOG regulates the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial metabolic pathways required to maintain tumor-initiating stem-like cells (TICs). NANOG represses mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) genes, as well as ROS generation, and activates fatty acid oxidation (FAO) to support TIC self-renewal and drug resistance. Restoration of OXPHOS activity and inhibition of FAO renders TICs susceptible to a standard care chemotherapy drug for HCC, sorafenib. This study provides insights into the mechanisms of NANOG-mediated generation of TICs, tumorigenesis, and chemoresistance through reprogramming of mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:26724859

  19. ZFHX4 interacts with the NuRD core member CHD4 and regulates the glioblastoma tumor initiating cell state

    PubMed Central

    Chudnovsky, Yakov; Kim, Dohoon; Zheng, Siyuan; Whyte, Warren A.; Bansal, Mukesh; Bray, Mark-Anthony; Gopal, Shuba; Theisen, Matthew A.; Bilodeau, Steve; Thiru, Prathapan; Muffat, Julien; Yilmaz, Omer H.; Mitalipova, Maya; Woolard, Kevin; Lee, Jeongwu; Nishimura, Riko; Sakata, Nobuo; Fine, Howard A.; Carpenter, Anne E.; Silver, Serena J.; Verhaak, Roel G. W.; Califano, Andrea; Young, Richard A.; Ligon, Keith L.; Mellinghoff, Ingo K.; Root, David E.; Sabatini, David M.; Hahn, William C.; Chheda, Milan G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Glioblastomas (GBM) harbor subpopulations of therapy-resistant tumor initiating cells (TICs) that are self-renewing and multipotent. To understand the regulation of the TIC state, we performed an image-based screen for genes regulating GBM TIC maintenance and identified ZFHX4, a 397-kDa transcription factor. ZFHX4 is required to maintain TIC-associated and normal human neural precursor cell phenotypes in vitro, suggesting that ZFHX4 regulates differentiation, and its suppression increases glioma-free survival in intracranial xenografts. ZFHX4 interacts with CHD4, a core member of the NuRD (nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase) complex. ZFHX4 and CHD4 bind to overlapping sets of genomic loci and control similar gene expression programs. Using expression data derived from GBM patients, we found that ZFHX4 significantly affects CHD4-mediated gene expression perturbations, which defines ZFHX4 as a master regulator of CHD4. These observations define ZFHX4 as a regulatory factor that links the chromatin remodeling NuRD complex and the GBM TIC state. PMID:24440720

  20. The many ways to make a luminal cell and a prostate cancer cell

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Douglas W; Goldstein, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    Research in the area of stem/progenitor cells has led to the identification of multiple stem-like cell populations implicated in prostate homeostasis and cancer initiation. Given that there are multiple cells that can regenerate prostatic tissue and give rise to prostate cancer, our focus should shift to defining the signaling mechanisms that drive differentiation and progenitor self-renewal. In this article, we will review the literature, present the evidence and raise important unanswered questions that will help guide the field forward in dissecting critical mechanisms regulating stem-cell differentiation and tumor initiation. PMID:26307022

  1. A DLL3-targeted antibody-drug conjugate eradicates high-grade pulmonary neuroendocrine tumor-initiating cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Laura R.; Bankovich, Alexander J.; Anderson, Wade C.; Aujay, Monette A.; Bheddah, Sheila; Black, KristenAnn; Desai, Radhika; Escarpe, Paul A.; Hampl, Johannes; Laysang, Amy; Liu, David; Lopez-Molina, Javier; Milton, Milly; Park, Albert; Pysz, Marybeth A.; Shao, Hui; Slingerland, Brian; Torgov, Michael; Williams, Samuel A.; Foord, Orit; Howard, Philip; Jassem, Jacek; Badzio, Andrzej; Czapiewski, Piotr; Harpole, David H.; Dowlati, Afshin; Massion, Pierre P.; Travis, William D.; Pietanza, M. Catherine; Poirier, J. T.; Rudin, Charles M.; Stull, Robert A.; Dylla, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    The high-grade pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors, small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC), remain among the most deadly malignancies. Therapies that effectively target and kill tumor-initiating cells (TICs) in these cancers should translate to improved patient survival. Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumors serve as excellent models to study tumor biology and characterize TICs. Increased expression of delta-like 3 (DLL3) was discovered in SCLC and LCNEC PDX tumors and confirmed in primary SCLC and LCNEC tumors. DLL3 protein is expressed on the surface of tumor cells but not in normal adult tissues. A DLL3-targeted antibody-drug conjugate (ADC), SC16LD6.5, comprised of a humanized anti-DLL3 monoclonal antibody conjugated to a DNA-damaging pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD) dimer toxin, induced durable tumor regression in vivo across multiple PDX models. Serial transplantation experiments executed with limiting dilutions of cells provided functional evidence confirming that the lack of tumor recurrence after SC16LD6.5 exposure resulted from effective targeting of DLL3-expressing TICs. In vivo efficacy correlated with DLL3 expression, and responses were observed in PDX models initiated from patients with both limited and extensive-stage disease and were independent of their sensitivity to standard-of-care chemotherapy regimens. SC16LD6.5 effectively targets and eradicates DLL3-expressing TICs in SCLC and LCNEC PDX tumors and is a promising first-in-class ADC for the treatment of high-grade pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:26311731

  2. Presence of a putative tumor-initiating progenitor cell population predicts poor prognosis in smokers with non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Aik T.; Mah, Vei; Nickerson, Derek W.; Gilbert, Jennifer L.; Ha, Vi Luan; Hegab, Ahmed E.; Horvath, Steve; Alavi, Mohammad; Maresh, Erin L.; Chia, David; Gower, Adam C.; Lenburg, Marc E.; Spira, Avrum; Solis, Luisa M.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Walser, Tonya C.; Wallace, William D.; Dubinett, Steven M.; Goodglick, Lee; Gomperts, Brigitte N.

    2010-01-01

    Smoking is the most important known risk factor for the development of lung cancer. Tobacco exposure results in chronic inflammation, tissue injury and repair. A recent hypothesis argues for a stem/progenitor cell involved in airway epithelial repair that may be a tumor-initiating cell in lung cancer, and which may be associated with recurrence and metastasis. We used immunostaining, quantitative real-time PCR, Western blots and lung cancer tissue microarrays to identify subpopulations of airway epithelial stem/progenitor cells under steady state conditions, normal repair, aberrant repair with premalignant lesions and lung cancer and their correlation with injury and prognosis. We identified a population of keratin 14 (K14)-expressing progenitor epithelial cells that was involved in repair after injury. Dysregulated repair resulted in persistence of K14+ cells in the airway epithelium in premalignant lesions. The presence of K14+ cells in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) samples predicted poorer outcomes. This was especially true in smokers where the presence of K14+ cells in NSCLC was predictive of metastasis. The presence of K14+ progenitor airway epithelial cells in NSCLC predicted a poor prognosis and this predictive value was strongest in smokers, where it also correlated with metastasis. This suggests that reparative K14+ progenitor cells may be tumor-initiating cells in this subgroup of smokers with NSCLC. PMID:20710044

  3. Yap1 promotes the survival and self-renewal of breast tumor initiating cells via inhibiting Smad3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian-Guo; Chen, Xie-Wan; Zhang, Lu-Ping; Wang, Jiang; Diehn, Max

    2016-03-01

    Tumor initiating cells (TICs) serve as the root of tumor growth. After identifying TICs in spontaneous breast tumors of the MMTV-Wnt1 mouse model, we confirmed the specific expression and activation of Yes-associated protein 1 (Yap1) within TICs. To investigate the role of Yap1 in the self-renewal of breast TICs and the underlying mechanism, we sorted CD49fhighEpCAMlow cells as breast TICs. Active Yap1 with ectopic expression in breast TICs promoted their colony formation in vitro (p< 0.01) and self-renewal in vivo (p< 0.01), and led to a 4-fold increase in TIC frequency (p< 0.05).A conditional knock-out mouse was reconstructed to generate Yap1 knock-out breast tumors. The loss of Yap1 led to a dramatic growth disadvantage of breast TICs in vitro (p< 0.01) and in vivo (p< 0.01), and it also led to an over 200-fold decrease in TIC frequency (p< 0.01). The expression of active Yap1 was negatively correlated with that of phosphorylated Smad3 (p-Smad3).Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) served as a strong enhancer of Smad3 and an inhibitor of clonogenesis of TICs. The presence of SIS3, a specific inhibitor of Smad3, could rescue the TGF-β -induced growth inhibition and reverse the Smad3 inhibition by Yap1. Analysis of a database containing 2,072 human breast cancer samples showed that higher expressions of Yap1 correlated with a poorer outcome of a 15-year survival rate and median overall survival (mOS)in patients, especially in those with basal breast tumors without estrogen receptor 1 (ER) expression. The findings indicate that active Yap1 promotes the self-renewal of breast TICs by inhibiting Smad3 signaling. PMID:26695440

  4. Yap1 promotes the survival and self-renewal of breast tumor initiating cells via inhibiting Smad3 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian-Guo; Chen, Xie-Wan; Zhang, Lu-Ping; Wang, Jiang; Diehn, Max

    2016-01-01

    Tumor initiating cells (TICs) serve as the root of tumor growth. After identifying TICs in spontaneous breast tumors of the MMTV-Wnt1 mouse model, we confirmed the specific expression and activation of Yes-associated protein 1 (Yap1) within TICs. To investigate the role of Yap1 in the self-renewal of breast TICs and the underlying mechanism, we sorted CD49fhighEpCAMlow cells as breast TICs. Active Yap1 with ectopic expression in breast TICs promoted their colony formation in vitro (p< 0.01) and self-renewal in vivo (p< 0.01), and led to a 4-fold increase in TIC frequency (p< 0.05). A conditional knock-out mouse was reconstructed to generate Yap1 knock-out breast tumors. The loss of Yap1 led to a dramatic growth disadvantage of breast TICs in vitro (p< 0.01) and in vivo (p< 0.01), and it also led to an over 200-fold decrease in TIC frequency (p< 0.01). The expression of active Yap1 was negatively correlated with that of phosphorylated Smad3 (p-Smad3). Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) served as a strong enhancer of Smad3 and an inhibitor of clonogenesis of TICs. The presence of SIS3, a specific inhibitor of Smad3, could rescue the TGF-β -induced growth inhibition and reverse the Smad3 inhibition by Yap1. Analysis of a database containing 2,072 human breast cancer samples showed that higher expressions of Yap1 correlated with a poorer outcome of a 15-year survival rate and median overall survival (mOS)in patients, especially in those with basal breast tumors without estrogen receptor 1 (ER) expression. The findings indicate that active Yap1 promotes the self-renewal of breast TICs by inhibiting Smad3 signaling. PMID:26695440

  5. EpCAM-positive hepatocellular carcinoma cells are tumor initiating cells with stem/progenitor cell features

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Taro; Ji, Junfang; Budhu, Anuradha; Forgues, Marshonna; Yang, Wen; Wang, Hong-Yang; Jia, Huliang; Ye, Qinghai; Qin, Lun-Xiu; Wauthier, Elaine; Reid, Lola M.; Minato, Hiroshi; Honda, Masao; Kaneko, Shuichi; Tang, Zhao-You; Wei Wang, Xin

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims Cancer progression/metastases and embryonic development share many properties including cellular plasticity, dynamic cell motility, and integral interaction with the microenvironment. We hypothesized that the heterogeneous nature of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) may be, in part, due to the presence of hepatic cancer cells with stem/progenitor features. Methods Gene expression profiling and immunohistochemistry analyses were used to analyze 235 tumor specimens derived from two recently identified HCC subtypes (EpCAM+ AFP+ HCC and EpCAM− AFP− HCC). These subtypes differed in their expression of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), a molecule produced in the developing embryo, and EpCAM, a cell surface hepatic stem cell marker. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) was used to isolate EpCAM+ HCC cells, which were tested for hepatic stem/progenitor cell properties. Results Gene expression and pathway analyses revealed that the EpCAM+ AFP+ HCC subtype had features of hepatic stem/progenitor cells. Indeed, the FACS-isolated EpCAM+ HCC cells displayed hepatic cancer stem cell-like traits including the abilities to self-renew and differentiate. Moreover, these cells were capable of initiating highly invasive HCC in NOD/SCID mice. Activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling enriched the EpCAM+ cell population, while RNA interference-based blockage of EpCAM, a Wnt/β-catenin signaling target, attenuated the activities of these cells. Conclusions Taken together, our results suggest that HCC growth and invasiveness is dictated by a subset of EpCAM+ cells, opening a new avenue for HCC cancer cell eradication by targeting Wnt/β-catenin signaling components such as EpCAM. PMID:19150350

  6. Activated and expanded natural killer cells target osteosarcoma tumor initiating cells in an NKG2D-NKG2DL dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Fernández, L; Valentín, J; Zalacain, M; Leung, W; Patiño-García, A; Pérez-Martínez, A

    2015-11-01

    Current therapies fail to cure most metastatic or recurrent bone cancer. We explored the efficacy and the pathways involved in natural killer (NK) cells' elimination of osteosarcoma (OS) cells, including tumor initiating cells (TICs), which are responsible for chemotherapy resistance, recurrence, and metastasis. The expression of ligands for NK cell receptors was studied in primary OS cell lines by flow cytometry. In vitro cytotoxicity of activated and expanded NK (NKAE) cells against OS was tested, and the pathways involved explored by using specific antibody blockade. NKAE cells' ability to target OS TICs was analyzed by flow cytometry and sphere formation assays. Spironolactone (SPIR) was tested for its ability to increase OS cells' susceptibility to NK cell lysis in vitro and in vivo. We found OS cells were susceptible to NKAE cells' lysis both in vivo and in vitro, and this cytolytic activity relied on interaction between NKG2D receptor and NKG2D ligands (NKG2DL). SPIR increased OS cells' susceptibility to lysis by NKAE cells, and could shrink the OS TICs. Our results show NKAE cells target OS cells including the TICs compartment, supporting the use of NK-cell based immunotherapies for OS. PMID:26276724

  7. Deletion of Ptp4a3 reduces clonogenicity and tumor-initiation ability of colitis-associated cancer cells in mice

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Tim; Homanics, Gregg E.; Lazo, John S.; Lagasse, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The PTP4A3 gene is highly expressed in human colon cancer and often associates with enhanced metastatic potential. Genetic disruption of the mouse Ptp4a3 gene reduces the frequency of colon tumor formation in mice treated in a colitis-associated cancer model. In the current study, we have examined the role of Ptp4a3 in the tumor-initiating cell population of mouse colon tumors using an in vitro culture system. Tumors generated in vivo following AOM/DSS treatment were isolated, dissociated, and expanded on a feeder layer resulting in a CD133+ cell population, which expressed high levels of Ptp4a3. Tumor cells deficient for Ptp4a3 exhibited reduced clonogenicity and growth potential relative to WT cells as determined by limiting dilution analysis. Importantly, expanded tumor cells from WT mice readily formed secondary tumors when transplanted into nude mice, while tumor cells without Ptp4a3 expression failed to form secondary tumors and thus were not tumorigenic. These results demonstrate that Ptp4a3 contributes to the malignant phenotype of tumor-initiating cells and supports its role as a potential therapeutic target to inhibit tumor self-renewal and metastasis. PMID:24950307

  8. Gene Knockdown by EpCAM Aptamer-siRNA Chimeras Suppresses Epithelial Breast Cancers and Their Tumor-Initiating Cells.

    PubMed

    Gilboa-Geffen, Adi; Hamar, Peter; Le, Minh T N; Wheeler, Lee Adam; Trifonova, Radiana; Petrocca, Fabio; Wittrup, Anders; Lieberman, Judy

    2015-10-01

    Effective therapeutic strategies for in vivo siRNA delivery to knockdown genes in cells outside the liver are needed to harness RNA interference for treating cancer. EpCAM is a tumor-associated antigen highly expressed on common epithelial cancers and their tumor-initiating cells (TIC, also known as cancer stem cells). Here, we show that aptamer-siRNA chimeras (AsiC, an EpCAM aptamer linked to an siRNA sense strand and annealed to the siRNA antisense strand) are selectively taken up and knock down gene expression in EpCAM(+) cancer cells in vitro and in human cancer biopsy tissues. PLK1 EpCAM-AsiCs inhibit colony and mammosphere formation (in vitro TIC assays) and tumor initiation by EpCAM(+) luminal and basal-A triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines, but not EpCAM(-) mesenchymal basal-B TNBCs, in nude mice. Subcutaneously administered EpCAM-AsiCs concentrate in EpCAM(+) Her2(+) and TNBC tumors and suppress their growth. Thus, EpCAM-AsiCs provide an attractive approach for treating epithelial cancer. PMID:26264278

  9. Fractionation of a tumor-initiating UV dose introduces DNA damage-retaining cells in hairless mouse skin and renders subsequent TPA-promoted tumors non-regressing

    PubMed Central

    van de Glind, Gerline; Rebel, Heggert; van Kempen, Marika; Tensen, Kees; de Gruijl, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Sunburns and especially sub-sunburn chronic UV exposure are associated with increased risk of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Here we focus on a possible difference in tumor initiation from a single severe-sunburn dose (on day 1, 21 hairless mice) and from an equal dose fractionated into very low sub-sunburn doses not causing any (growth-promoting) epidermal hyperplasia (40 days daily exposure, n=20). From day 47 all mice received 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) applications (2x/wk) for 20 weeks to promote tumor development within the lifetime of the animals. After the sub-sunburn regimen sparse DNA damage-retaining basal cells (quiescent stem cells, QSCs) remained in the non-hyperplastic epidermis. These cells were forced to divide by TPA. After discontinuation of TPA tumors regressed and disappeared in the ‘sunburn group’ but persisted and grew in the ‘sub-sunburn group’ (0.06 vs 2.50 SCCs and precursors ≥4mm/mouse after 280 days, p=0.03). As the tumors carried no mutations in p53, H/K/N-Ras and Notch1/2, these ‘usual suspects' were not involved in the UV-driven tumor initiation. Although we could not selectively eliminate QSCs (unknown phenotype) to establish causality, our data suggest that forcing specifically DNA damage-retaining QSCs to divide – with high mutagenic risk - gives rise to persisting (mainly ‘in situ’) skin carcinomas. PMID:26797757

  10. Fractionation of a tumor-initiating UV dose introduces DNA damage-retaining cells in hairless mouse skin and renders subsequent TPA-promoted tumors non-regressing.

    PubMed

    van de Glind, Gerline; Rebel, Heggert; van Kempen, Marika; Tensen, Kees; de Gruijl, Frank

    2016-02-16

    Sunburns and especially sub-sunburn chronic UV exposure are associated with increased risk of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Here we focus on a possible difference in tumor initiation from a single severe-sunburn dose (on day 1, 21 hairless mice) and from an equal dose fractionated into very low sub-sunburn doses not causing any (growth-promoting) epidermal hyperplasia (40 days daily exposure, n=20). From day 47 all mice received 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) applications (2x/wk) for 20 weeks to promote tumor development within the lifetime of the animals. After the sub-sunburn regimen sparse DNA damage-retaining basal cells (quiescent stem cells, QSCs) remained in the non-hyperplastic epidermis. These cells were forced to divide by TPA. After discontinuation of TPA tumors regressed and disappeared in the 'sunburn group' but persisted and grew in the 'sub-sunburn group' (0.06 vs 2.50 SCCs and precursors ≥4 mm/mouse after 280 days, p=0.03). As the tumors carried no mutations in p53, H/K/N-Ras and Notch1/2, these 'usual suspects' were not involved in the UV-driven tumor initiation. Although we could not selectively eliminate QSCs (unknown phenotype) to establish causality, our data suggest that forcing specifically DNA damage-retaining QSCs to divide--with high mutagenic risk--gives rise to persisting (mainly 'in situ') skin carcinomas. PMID:26797757

  11. Neural Cell Adhesion Protein CNTN1 Promotes the Metastatic Progression of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Judy; Ojo, Diane; Kapoor, Anil; Lin, Xiaozeng; Pinthus, Jehonathan H; Aziz, Tariq; Bismar, Tarek A; Wei, Fengxiang; Wong, Nicholas; De Melo, Jason; Cutz, Jean-Claude; Major, Pierre; Wood, Geoffrey; Peng, Hao; Tang, Damu

    2016-03-15

    Prostate cancer metastasis is the main cause of disease-related mortality. Elucidating the mechanisms underlying prostate cancer metastasis is critical for effective therapeutic intervention. In this study, we performed gene-expression profiling of prostate cancer stem-like cells (PCSC) derived from DU145 human prostate cancer cells to identify factors involved in metastatic progression. Our studies revealed contactin 1 (CNTN1), a neural cell adhesion protein, to be a prostate cancer-promoting factor. CNTN1 knockdown reduced PCSC-mediated tumor initiation, whereas CNTN1 overexpression enhanced prostate cancer cell invasion in vitro and promoted xenograft tumor formation and lung metastasis in vivo. In addition, CNTN1 overexpression in DU145 cells and corresponding xenograft tumors resulted in elevated AKT activation and reduced E-cadherin (CDH1) expression. CNTN1 expression was not readily detected in normal prostate glands, but was clearly evident on prostate cancer cells in primary tumors and lymph node and bone metastases. Tumors from 637 patients expressing CNTN1 were associated with prostate cancer progression and worse biochemical recurrence-free survival following radical prostatectomy (P < 0.05). Collectively, our findings demonstrate that CNTN1 promotes prostate cancer progression and metastasis, prompting further investigation into the mechanisms that enable neural proteins to become aberrantly expressed in non-neural malignancies. PMID:26795349

  12. CD44 variant 9 is a potential biomarker of tumor initiating cells predicting survival outcome in hepatitis C virus-positive patients with resected hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kakehashi, Anna; Ishii, Naomi; Sugihara, Eiji; Gi, Min; Saya, Hideyuki; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated whether the expression of CD44 variant 9 (CD44v9) might be a functional marker of tumor-initiating stem-like cells in primary hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) of hepatitis C virus (HCV)(+) patients and provide an indicator of patient survival, as well as associated mechanisms. A total of 90 HCV(+) HCC patients who underwent surgery from 2006 to 2011 were enrolled and monitored for 2-8 years. Expression of CD44v9 was validated immunohistochemically in all HCCs, followed by comparative proteome, survival, and clinicopathological analyses. CD44 variant 8--10 was further evaluated in diethylnitrosamine-induced HCCs of C57Bl/6J mice. Focally localized CD44v(+) cells with a membranous staining pattern were detected in human HCV(+) and mouse HCCs. CD44v9(+) cells of HCCs were predominantly negative for Ki67 and P-p38, indicating decrease of cell proliferation in the CD44v9(+) tumor cell population, likely to be related to suppression of intracellular oxidative stress due to activation of Nrf2-mediated signaling, DNA repair, and inhibition of xenobiotic metabolism. CD44v9 IHC evaluation in 90 HCV(+) HCC cases revealed that positive expression was significantly associated with poor overall and recurrence-free survival, a younger age, poor histological differentiation of HCCs, and high alkaline phosphatase levels compared with patients with negative expression. CD44v9 is concluded to be a potential biomarker of tumor-initiating stem-like cells and a prognostic marker in HCV(+) HCC patients associated with Nrf2-mediated resistance to oxidative stress. PMID:26882440

  13. Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts Regulate Tumor-Initiating Cell Plasticity in Hepatocellular Carcinoma through c-Met/FRA1/HEY1 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Lau, Eunice Yuen Ting; Lo, Jessica; Cheng, Bowie Yik Ling; Ma, Mark Kin Fai; Lee, Joyce Man Fong; Ng, Johnson Kai Yu; Chai, Stella; Lin, Chi Ho; Tsang, Suk Ying; Ma, Stephanie; Ng, Irene Oi Lin; Lee, Terence Kin Wah

    2016-05-10

    Like normal stem cells, tumor-initiating cells (T-ICs) are regulated extrinsically within the tumor microenvironment. Because HCC develops primarily in the context of cirrhosis, in which there is an enrichment of activated fibroblasts, we hypothesized that cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) would regulate liver T-ICs. We found that the presence of α-SMA(+) CAFs correlates with poor clinical outcome. CAF-derived HGF regulates liver T-ICs via activation of FRA1 in an Erk1,2-dependent manner. Further functional analysis identifies HEY1 as a direct downstream effector of FRA1. Using the STAM NASH-HCC mouse model, we find that HGF-induced FRA1 activation is associated with the fibrosis-dependent development of HCC. Thus, targeting the CAF-derived, HGF-mediated c-Met/FRA1/HEY1 cascade may be a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of HCC. PMID:27134167

  14. MTDH-SND1 Interaction is Essential for the Expansion and Activity of Tumor-Initiating Cells in Diverse Oncogene- and Carcinogen-Induced Mammary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Liling; Lu, Xin; Yuan, Salina; Wei, Yong; Guo, Feng; Shen, Minhong; Yuan, Min; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Hua, Yuling; Smith, Heath A.; Blanco, Mario Andres; Chekmareva, Marina; Wu, Hao; Bronson, Roderick T.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Xing, Yongna; Kang, Yibin

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The Metadherin gene (MTDH) is prevalently amplified in breast cancer and associated with poor prognosis but its functional contribution to tumorigenesis is poorly understood. Using mouse models representing different subtypes of breast cancer, we demonstrated that MTDH plays a critical role in mammary tumorigenesis by regulating oncogene-induced expansion and activities of tumor-initiating cells (TICs), whereas it is largely dispensable for normal development. Mechanistically, MTDH supports the survival of mammary epithelial cells (MECs) under oncogenic/stress conditions by interacting with and stabilizing Staphylococcal nuclease domain-containing 1 (SND1). Silencing MTDH or SND1 individually or disrupting their interaction compromises tumorigenenic potential of TICs in vivo. Finally, this functional significance of MTDH-SND1 interaction is supported by clinical analysis of human breast cancer samples. PMID:24981741

  15. The critical roles of tumor-initiating cells and the lymph node stromal microenvironment in human colorectal cancer extranodal metastasis using a unique humanized orthotopic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Margolin, David A; Myers, Tamara; Zhang, Xin; Bertoni, Danielle M; Reuter, Brian A; Obokhare, Izi; Borgovan, Theodor; Grimes, Chelsea; Green, Heather; Driscoll, Tiffany; Lee, Chung-Gi; Davis, Nancy K; Li, Li

    2015-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second-most common cause of cancer-related mortality. The most important prognostic factors are lymph node (LN) involvement and extranodal metastasis. Our objective is to investigate the interactions between CD133(+)CXCR4(+) (CXC receptor 4) colorectal cancer tumor-initiating cells (Co-TICs) and the LN stromal microenvironment in human CRC extranodal metastasis. We established a unique humanized orthotopic xenograft model. Luciferase-tagged CRC cell lines and human cancer cells were injected intrarectally into nonobese diabetic/SCID mice. Mesenteric LN stromal cells, stromal cell line HK, or CXCL12 knockdown HK (HK-KD-A3) cells were coinoculated with CRC cells. Tumor growth and metastasis were monitored by bioluminescent imaging and immunohistochemistry. We found that this model mimics the human CRC metastatic pattern with CRC cell lines or patient specimens. Adding LN stromal cells promotes CRC tumor growth and extranodal metastasis (P < 0.001). Knocking down CXCL12 impaired HK cell support of CRC tumor formation and extranodal metastasis. When HK cells were added, sorted CD133(+)CXCR4(+) Co-TICs showed increased tumor formation and extranodal metastasis capacities compared to unseparated and non-Co-TIC populations. In conclusion, both Co-TIC and LN stromal factors play crucial roles in CRC metastasis through the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis. Blocking Co-TIC/LN-stromal interactions may lead to effective therapy to prevent extranodal metastasis. PMID:25962655

  16. Label-retaining assay enriches tumor-initiating cells in glioblastoma spheres cultivated in serum-free medium

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lingcheng; Zhao, Yiqing; Ouyang, Taohui; Zhao, Tianyuan; Zhang, Suojun; Chen, Jian; Yu, Jiasheng; Lei, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Label-retaining cells, which are characterized by dormancy or slow cycling, may be identified in a number of human normal and cancer tissues, and these cells demonstrate stem cell potential. In glioblastoma, label-retaining assays to enrich glioma stem cells remain to be fully investigated. In the present study, glioblastoma sphere cells cultured in serum-free medium were initially stained with the cell membrane fluorescent marker DiI. The fluorescence intensity during cell proliferation and sphere reformation was observed. At 2 weeks, the DiI-retaining cells were screened by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and compared phenotypically with the DiI-negative cells in terms of in vitro proliferation, clonogenicity and multipotency and for in vivo tumorigenicity, as well as sensitivity to irradiation and temozolomide treatment. It was observed that DiI-retaining cells accounted for a small proportion, <10%, within the glioblastoma spheres and that DiI-retaining cells proliferated significantly more slowly compared with DiI-negative cells (P=0.011, P=0.035 and P=0.023 in the of NCH421k, NCH441 and NCH644 glioblastoma sphere cell lines). Significantly increased clonogenicity (P=0.002, P=0.034 and P=0.016 in the NCH441, NCH644 and NCH421k glioblastoma sphere cell lines) and three-lineage multipotency were observed in DiI-retaining cells in vitro compared with DiI-negative cells. As few as 100 DiI-retaining cells were able to effectively generate tumors in the immunocompromised mouse brain, whereas the same number of DiI-negative cells possessed no such ability, indicating the increased tumorigenicity of DiI-retaining cells compared with DiI-negative cells. Furthermore, DiI-retaining cells demonstrated significant resistance following irradiation (P=0.012, P=0.024 and P=0.036) and temozolomide (P=0.003, P=0.005 and P=0.029) compared with DiI-negative cells in the NCH421k, NCH441 and NCH644 glioblastoma sphere cell lines, respectively. It was concluded that label

  17. Aspirin blocks growth of breast tumor cells and tumor-initiating cells and induces reprogramming factors of mesenchymal to epithelial transition.

    PubMed

    Maity, Gargi; De, Archana; Das, Amlan; Banerjee, Snigdha; Sarkar, Sandipto; Banerjee, Sushanta K

    2015-07-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), also known as aspirin, a classic, nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), is widely used to relieve minor aches and pains and to reduce fever. Epidemiological studies and other experimental studies suggest that ASA use reduces the risk of different cancers including breast cancer (BC) and may be used as a chemopreventive agent against BC and other cancers. These studies have raised the tempting possibility that ASA could serve as a preventive medicine for BC. However, lack of in-depth knowledge of the mechanism of action of ASA reshapes the debate of risk and benefit of using ASA in prevention of BC. Our studies, using in vitro and in vivo tumor xenograft models, show a strong beneficial effect of ASA in the prevention of breast carcinogenesis. We find that ASA not only prevents breast tumor cell growth in vitro and tumor growth in nude mice xenograft model through the induction of apoptosis, but also significantly reduces the self-renewal capacity and growth of breast tumor-initiating cells (BTICs)/breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) and delays the formation of a palpable tumor. Moreover, ASA regulates other pathophysiological events in breast carcinogenesis, such as reprogramming the mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET) and delaying in vitro migration in BC cells. The tumor growth-inhibitory and reprogramming roles of ASA could be mediated through inhibition of TGF-β/SMAD4 signaling pathway that is associated with growth, motility, invasion, and metastasis in advanced BCs. Collectively, ASA has a therapeutic or preventive potential by attacking possible target such as TGF-β in breast carcinogenesis. PMID:25867761

  18. Acetate Supplementation Induces Growth Arrest of NG2/PDGFRα-Positive Oligodendroglioma-Derived Tumor-Initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Long, Patrick M.; Tighe, Scott W.; Driscoll, Heather E.; Moffett, John R.; Namboodiri, Aryan M. A.; Viapiano, Mariano S.; Lawler, Sean E.; Jaworski, Diane M.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is associated with globally hypoacetylated chromatin and considerable attention has recently been focused on epigenetic therapies. N-acetyl-L-aspartate (NAA), the primary storage form of acetate in the brain, and aspartoacylase (ASPA), the enzyme responsible for NAA catalysis to generate acetate and ultimately acetyl-Coenzyme A for histone acetylation, are reduced in oligodendroglioma. The short chain triglyceride glyceryl triacetate (GTA), which increases histone acetylation and inhibits histone deacetylase expression, has been safely used for acetate supplementation in Canavan disease, a leukodystrophy due to ASPA mutation. We demonstrate that GTA induces cytostatic G0 growth arrest of oligodendroglioma-derived cells in vitro, without affecting normal cells. Sodium acetate, at doses comparable to that generated by complete GTA catalysis, but not glycerol also promoted growth arrest, whereas long chain triglycerides promoted cell growth. To begin to elucidate its mechanism of action, the effects of GTA on ASPA and acetyl-CoA synthetase protein levels and differentiation of established human oligodendroglioma cells (HOG and Hs683) and primary tumor-derived oligodendroglioma cells that exhibit some features of cancer stem cells (grade II OG33 and grade III OG35) relative to an oligodendrocyte progenitor line (Oli-Neu) were examined. The nuclear localization of ASPA and acetyl-CoA synthetase-1 in untreated cells was regulated during the cell cycle. GTA-mediated growth arrest was not associated with apoptosis or differentiation, but increased expression of acetylated proteins. Thus, GTA-mediated acetate supplementation may provide a safe, novel epigenetic therapy to reduce the growth of oligodendroglioma cells without affecting normal neural stem or oligodendrocyte progenitor cell proliferation or differentiation. PMID:24278309

  19. GALNT1-Mediated Glycosylation and Activation of Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Maintains the Self-Renewal and Tumor-Initiating Capacity of Bladder Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Chong; Du, Ying; Yang, Zhao; He, Luyun; Wang, Yanying; Hao, Lu; Ding, Mingxia; Yan, Ruping; Wang, Jiansong; Fan, Zusen

    2016-03-01

    The existence of bladder cancer stem cells (BCSC) has been suggested to underlie bladder tumor initiation and recurrence. Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) signaling has been implicated in promoting cancer stem cell (CSC) self-renewal and is activated in bladder cancer, but its impact on BCSC maintenance is unclear. In this study, we generated a mAb (BCMab1) against CD44(+) human bladder cancer cells that recognizes aberrantly glycosylated integrin α3β1. The combination of BCMab1 with an anti-CD44 antibody identified a BCMab1(+)CD44(+) cell subpopulation as BCSCs with stem cell-like properties. Gene expression analysis revealed that the hedgehog pathway was activated in the BCMab1(+)CD44(+) subpopulation and was required for BCSC self-renewal. Furthermore, the glycotransferase GALNT1 was highly expressed in BCMab1(+)CD44(+) cells and correlated with clinicopathologic features of bladder cancers. Mechanistically, GALNT1 mediated O-linked glycosylation of SHH to promote its activation, which was essential for the self-renewal maintenance of BCSCs and bladder tumorigenesis. Finally, intravesical instillation of GALNT1 siRNA and the SHH inhibitor cyclopamine exerted potent antitumor activity against bladder tumor growth. Taken together, our findings identify a BCSC subpopulation in human bladder tumors that appears to be responsive to the inhibition of GALNT1 and SHH signaling, and thus highlight a potential strategy for preventing the rapid recurrence typical in patients with bladder cancer. PMID:26676748

  20. Oct4 Mediates Tumor Initiating Properties in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas through the Regulation of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Lo-Lin; Hu, Fang-Wei; Lee, Shiuan-Shinn; Yu, Chuan-Hang; Yu, Cheng-Chia; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2014-01-01

    Background Overexpression of Oct4, an important transcription factor of embryonic stem cells (ESC), has been reported in several cancers. The aim of this study was to determine the emerging role of Oct4 in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) both in vitro and in vivo. Methodology/Principal Finding Tumourigenic activity and molecular mechanisms of Oct4 overexpression or knockdown by lentiviral infection in OSCC was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Initially, we demonstrated that Oct4 expression was increased in OSCC cell lines as compared to a normal oral epithelial cell line SG. Overexpression of Oct4 was demonstrated to enhance cell proliferation, invasiveness, anchorage-independent growth and xenotransplantation tumourigenicity. These findings were coupled with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) transformation in OSCCs. In contrast, the silence of Oct4 significantly blocked the xenograft tumorigenesis of OSCC-derived cancer stem cells (OSCC-CSCs) and significantly improved the recipient survival. Clinically, the level of Oct4 expression was higher in recurrent and metastatic OSCC specimens but lower in primary OSCC specimens. Conclusion/Significance Our results suggest that Oct4-mediated tumorigenecity is associated with the regulation of EMT. Oct4 might be a therapeutic target for OSCC. PMID:24475251

  1. Tetrandrine, a Compound Common in Chinese Traditional Medicine, Preferentially Kills Breast Cancer Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Debeb, Bisrat G.; Lacerda, Lara; Li, Jessica; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2011-01-01

    Tetrandrine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid found in Stephania tetrandra, a Chinese medicine commonly used as an anti-inflammatory. It has extensive pharmacological activity, including positive ion channel blockade and inhibition of multiple drug resistance proteins. These activities are very similar to that of salinomycin, a known drug targeting breast cancer initiation cells (TICs). Herein, we tested tetrandrine targeting of breast cancer TICs. SUM-149, an inflammatory breast cancer cell line and SUM-159, a non-inflammatory metaplastic breast cancer cell line were used in these studies. In proliferation assays using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS), we found that the IC50 for inhibition of proliferation is 15.3 ± 4.1 μM for SUM-149 and 24.3 ± 2.1 μM for SUM-159 cells. Tetrandrine also inhibited mammosphere formation, a surrogate for breast cancer TICs growth in vitro with IC50 around 1 μM for SUM-149 and around 2 μM for SUM-159 cells. Tetrandrine has similar effects on the mammosphere formation from cells isolated from fresh patient sample. Moreover, tetrandrine decreases the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) positive population in SUM-159 by 45% ± 5.45% P = 0.005. In summary, tetrandrine demonstrates significant efficacy against in vitro surrogates for inflammatory and aggressive breast cancer TICs. PMID:24212809

  2. Investigating potential exogenous tumor initiating and promoting factors for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphomas (CTCL), a rare skin malignancy.

    PubMed

    Litvinov, Ivan V; Shtreis, Anna; Kobayashi, Kenneth; Glassman, Steven; Tsang, Matthew; Woetmann, Anders; Sasseville, Denis; Ødum, Niels; Duvic, Madeleine

    2016-07-01

    Most skin malignancies are caused by external and often preventable environmental agents. Multiple reports demonstrated that cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) can occur in married couples and cluster in families. Furthermore, recent studies document geographic clustering of this malignancy in Texas as well as in other areas of the United States. Multiple infectious, occupational, and medication causes have been proposed as triggers or promoters of this malignancy including hydrochlorothiazide diuretics, Staphylococcus aureus, dermatophytes, Mycobacterium leprae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, human T-Cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV1), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and herpes simplex virus (HSV). In this report, we review recent evidence evaluating the involvement of these agents in cancer initiation/progression. Most importantly, recent molecular experimental evidence documented for the first time that S. aureus can activate oncogenic STAT3 signaling in malignant T cells. Specifically, S. aureus Enterotoxin type A (SEA) was recently shown to trigger non-malignant infiltrating T cells to release IL-2 and other cytokines. These signals upon binging to their cognate receptors on malignant T cells are then able to activate STAT3 and STAT5 oncogenic signaling and promote cancer progression and IL-17 secretion. In light of these findings, it might be important for patients with exacerbation of their CTCL symptoms to maintain high index of suspicion and treat these individuals for S. aureus colonization and/or sepsis with topical and systemic antibiotics. PMID:27622024

  3. Selective expression of constitutively active pro-apoptotic protein BikDD gene in primary mammary tumors inhibits tumor growth and reduces tumor initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Rahal, Omar M; Nie, Lei; Chan, Li-Chuan; Li, Chia-Wei; Hsu, Yi-Hsin; Hsu, Jennifer; Yu, Dihua; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study showed that specifically delivering BikDD, a constitutive active mutant of pro-apoptotic protein Bik, to breast cancer cell xenografts in immunocompromised mice has a potent activity against tumor initiating cells (TICs), and that the combination between tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) and BikDD gene therapy yielded synergistic effect on EGFR and HER2 positive breast cancer cells in immunodeficient nude mice. Those encouraging results have allowed us to propose a clinical trial using the liposome-complexing plasmid DNA expressing BikDD gene which has been approved by the NIH RAC Advisory committee. However, it is imperative to test whether systemic delivery of BikDD-expressing plasmid DNAs with liposomes into immunocompetent mice has therapeutic efficacy and tolerable side effects as what we observed in the nude mice model. In this study, we investigated the effects of BikDD gene-therapy on the primary mammary tumors, especially on tumor initiating cells (TICs), of a genetically engineered immunocompetent mouse harboring normal microenvironment and immune response. The effects on TIC population in tumors were determined by FACS analysis with different sets of murine specific TIC markers, CD49fhighCD61high and CD24+Jagged1-. First we showed in vitro that ectopic expression of BikDD in murine N202 cells derived from MMTV-HER2/Neu transgenic mouse tumors induced apoptosis and decreased the number of TICs. Consistently, systemic delivery of VISA-Claudin4-BikDD by liposome complexes significantly inhibited mammary tumor growth and slowed down residual tumor growth post cessation of therapy in MMTV-HER2/Neu transgenic mice compared to the controls. In addition, the anti-tumor effects of BikDD in vivo were consistent with decreased TIC population assessed by FACS analysis and in vitro tumorsphere formation assay of freshly isolated tumor cells. Importantly, systemic administration of BikDD did not cause significant cytotoxic response in standard

  4. Selective expression of constitutively active pro-apoptotic protein BikDD gene in primary mammary tumors inhibits tumor growth and reduces tumor initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Rahal, Omar M; Nie, Lei; Chan, Li-Chuan; Li, Chia-Wei; Hsu, Yi-Hsin; Hsu, Jennifer; Yu, Dihua; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study showed that specifically delivering BikDD, a constitutive active mutant of pro-apoptotic protein Bik, to breast cancer cell xenografts in immunocompromised mice has a potent activity against tumor initiating cells (TICs), and that the combination between tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) and BikDD gene therapy yielded synergistic effect on EGFR and HER2 positive breast cancer cells in immunodeficient nude mice. Those encouraging results have allowed us to propose a clinical trial using the liposome-complexing plasmid DNA expressing BikDD gene which has been approved by the NIH RAC Advisory committee. However, it is imperative to test whether systemic delivery of BikDD-expressing plasmid DNAs with liposomes into immunocompetent mice has therapeutic efficacy and tolerable side effects as what we observed in the nude mice model. In this study, we investigated the effects of BikDD gene-therapy on the primary mammary tumors, especially on tumor initiating cells (TICs), of a genetically engineered immunocompetent mouse harboring normal microenvironment and immune response. The effects on TIC population in tumors were determined by FACS analysis with different sets of murine specific TIC markers, CD49f(high)CD61(high) and CD24(+)Jagged1(-). First we showed in vitro that ectopic expression of BikDD in murine N202 cells derived from MMTV-HER2/Neu transgenic mouse tumors induced apoptosis and decreased the number of TICs. Consistently, systemic delivery of VISA-Claudin4-BikDD by liposome complexes significantly inhibited mammary tumor growth and slowed down residual tumor growth post cessation of therapy in MMTV-HER2/Neu transgenic mice compared to the controls. In addition, the anti-tumor effects of BikDD in vivo were consistent with decreased TIC population assessed by FACS analysis and in vitro tumorsphere formation assay of freshly isolated tumor cells. Importantly, systemic administration of BikDD did not cause significant cytotoxic response in

  5. Elimination of ALDH+ breast tumor initiating cells by docosahexanoic acid and/or gamma tocotrienol through SHP-1 inhibition of Stat3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ailian; Yu, Weiping; Liu, Yaobin; Sanders, Bob G; Kline, Kimberly

    2016-05-01

    Study investigated the ability of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) alone and in combination with gamma-tocotrienol (γT3) to eliminate aldehyde dehydrogenase positive (ALDH+) cells and to inhibit mammosphere formation, biomarker and functional assay for tumor initiating cells (TICs), respectively, in human triple negative breast cancer cells (TNBCs), and investigated possible mechanisms of action. DHA upregulated Src homology region 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) protein levels and suppressed levels of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (pStat3) and its downstream mediators c-Myc, and cyclin D1. siRNA to SHP-1 enhanced the percentage of ALDH+ cells and Stat-3 signaling, as well as inhibited, in part, the ability of DHA to reduce the percentage of ALDH+ cells and Stat-3 signaling. γT3 alone and in combination with DHA reduced ALDH+ TNBCs, up-regulated SHP-1 protein levels, and suppressed Stat-3 signaling. Taken together, data demonstrate the anti-TIC potential of achievable concentrations of DHA alone as well as in combination with γT3. PMID:25648304

  6. pRb Inactivation in Mammary Cells Reveals Common Mechanisms for Tumor Initiation and Progression in Divergent Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Retinoblastoma 1 (pRb) and the related pocket proteins, retinoblastoma-like 1 (p107) and retinoblastoma-like 2 (p130) (pRbf, collectively), play a pivotal role in regulating eukaryotic cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and terminal differentiation. While aberrations in the pRb-signaling pathway are common in human cancers, the consequence of pRbf loss in the mammary gland has not been directly assayed in vivo. We reported previously that inactivating these critical cell cycle regulators in divergent cell types, either brain epithelium or astrocytes, abrogates the cell cycle restriction point, leading to increased cell proliferation and apoptosis, and predisposing to cancer. Here we report that mouse mammary epithelium is similar in its requirements for pRbf function; Rbf inactivation by T121, a fragment of SV40 T antigen that binds to and inactivates pRbf proteins, increases proliferation and apoptosis. Mammary adenocarcinomas form within 16 mo. Most apoptosis is regulated by p53, which has no impact on proliferation, and heterozygosity for a p53 null allele significantly shortens tumor latency. Most tumors in p53 heterozygous mice undergo loss of the wild-type p53 allele. We show that the mechanism of p53 loss of heterozygosity is not simply the consequence of Chromosome 11 aneuploidy and further that chromosomal instability subsequent to p53 loss is minimal. The mechanisms for pRb and p53 tumor suppression in the epithelia of two distinct tissues, mammary gland and brain, are indistinguishable. Further, this study has produced a highly penetrant breast cancer model based on aberrations commonly observed in the human disease. PMID:14966529

  7. NRF2 Intensifies Host Defense Systems to Prevent Lung Carcinogenesis, but After Tumor Initiation Accelerates Malignant Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Hironori; Moriguchi, Takashi; Saigusa, Daisuke; Baird, Liam; Yu, Lei; Rokutan, Hirofumi; Igarashi, Keiko; Ebina, Masahito; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2016-05-15

    Nrf2 activation promotes resistance to chemical carcinogenesis in animal models, but activating mutations in Nrf2 also confer malignant characters to human cells by activating antioxidative/detoxifying enzymes and metabolic reprogramming. In this study, we examined how these contradictory activities of Nrf2, cancer chemoprevention and cancer cell growth enhancement, can be reconciled in an established mouse model of urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis. Using Keap1-knockdown (kd) mice, which express high levels of Nrf2, we found that urethane was rapidly excreted into the urine, consistent with an upregulation in the expression of urethane detoxification genes. Consequently, urethane-induced tumors were significantly smaller and less frequent in Keap1-kd mice than in wild-type mice. In contrast, tumor cells derived from Keap1-kd mice and transplanted into nude mice exhibited higher tumorigenicity compared with cells derived from wild-type mice. To identify the factors contributing to the tumor growth phenotype in the transplantation model, we performed a microarray analysis and found that many antioxidative stress genes were upregulated in the Keap1-kd-derived tumors. Therefore, we suggest that Nrf2 activation in cancer cells enhances their tumorigenicity, but global Nrf2 activation, as in Keap1-kd mice, simultaneously enhances anticancer immunity, thereby suppressing the growth potential of Keap1-kd tumors. Our findings provide relevant insight into the dual role of Nrf2 in cancer and warrant further studies of Nrf2 function during different stages of carcinogenesis. Cancer Res; 76(10); 3088-96. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27020858

  8. Doxycycline down-regulates DNA-PK and radiosensitizes tumor initiating cells: Implications for more effective radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Rebecca; Fiorillo, Marco; Chadwick, Amy; Ozsvari, Bela; Reeves, Kimberly J.; Smith, Duncan L.; Clarke, Robert B.; Howell, Sacha J.; Cappello, Anna Rita; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Peiris-Pagès, Maria; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-PK is an enzyme that is required for proper DNA-repair and is thought to confer radio-resistance in cancer cells. As a consequence, it is a high-profile validated target for new pharmaceutical development. However, no FDA-approved DNA-PK inhibitors have emerged, despite many years of drug discovery and lead optimization. This is largely because existing DNA-PK inhibitors suffer from poor pharmacokinetics. They are not well absorbed and/or are unstable, with a short plasma half-life. Here, we identified the first FDA-approved DNA-PK inhibitor by “chemical proteomics”. In an effort to understand how doxycycline targets cancer stem-like cells (CSCs), we serendipitously discovered that doxycycline reduces DNA-PK protein expression by nearly 15-fold (> 90%). In accordance with these observations, we show that doxycycline functionally radio-sensitizes breast CSCs, by up to 4.5-fold. Moreover, we demonstrate that DNA-PK is highly over-expressed in both MCF7- and T47D-derived mammospheres. Interestingly, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of DNA-PK in MCF7 cells is sufficient to functionally block mammosphere formation. Thus, it appears that active DNA-repair is required for the clonal expansion of CSCs. Mechanistically, doxycycline treatment dramatically reduced the oxidative mitochondrial capacity and the glycolytic activity of cancer cells, consistent with previous studies linking DNA-PK expression to the proper maintenance of mitochondrial DNA integrity and copy number. Using a luciferase-based assay, we observed that doxycycline treatment quantitatively reduces the anti-oxidant response (NRF1/2) and effectively blocks signaling along multiple independent pathways normally associated with stem cells, including STAT1/3, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), Notch, WNT and TGF-beta signaling. In conclusion, we propose that the efficacy of doxycycline as a DNA-PK inhibitor should be tested in Phase-II clinical trials, in combination with radio-therapy. Doxycycline has

  9. KIAA1114, a full-length protein encoded by the trophinin gene, is a novel surface marker for isolating tumor-initiating cells of multiple hepatocellular carcinoma subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sae Won; Yang, Hyun Gul; Kang, Moon Cheol; Lee, Seungwon; Namkoong, Hong; Lee, Seung-Woo; Sung, Young Chul

    2014-01-01

    Identification of novel biomarkers for tumor-initiating cells (TICs) is of critical importance for developing diagnostic and therapeutic strategies against cancers. Here we identified the role of KIAA1114, a full-length translational product of the trophinin gene, as a distinctive marker for TICs in human liver cancer by developing a DNA vaccine-induced monoclonal antibody targeting the putative extracellular domain of KIAA1114. Compared with other established markers of liver TICs, KIAA1114 was unique in that its expression was detected in both alpha fetoprotein (AFP)-positive and AFP-negative hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines with the expression levels of KIAA1114 being positively correlated to their tumorigenic potentials. Notably, KIAA1114 expression was strongly detected in primary hepatic tumor, but neither in the adjacent non-tumorous tissue from the same patient nor normal liver tissue. KIAA1114high cells isolated from HCC cell lines displayed TIC-like features with superior functional and phenotypic traits compared to their KIAA1114low counterparts, including tumorigenic abilities in xenotransplantation model, in vitro colony- and spheroid-forming capabilities, expression of stemness-associated genes, and migratory capacity. Our findings not only address the value of a novel antigen, KIAA1114, as a potential diagnostic factor of human liver cancer, but also as an independent biomarker for identifying TIC populations that could be broadly applied to the heterogeneous HCC subtypes. PMID:24713374

  10. Prostate cancer stem cells: the role of androgen and estrogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Di Zazzo, Erika; Galasso, Giovanni; Giovannelli, Pia; Di Donato, Marzia; Di Santi, Annalisa; Cernera, Gustavo; Rossi, Valentina; Abbondanza, Ciro; Moncharmont, Bruno; Sinisi, Antonio Agostino; Castoria, Gabriella; Migliaccio, Antimo

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in men, and androgen deprivation therapy still represents the primary treatment for prostate cancer patients. This approach, however, frequently fails and patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer, which is almost untreatable.Cancer cells are characterized by a hierarchical organization, and stem/progenitor cells are endowed with tumor-initiating activity. Accumulating evidence indicates that prostate cancer stem cells lack the androgen receptor and are, indeed, resistant to androgen deprivation therapy. In contrast, these cells express classical (α and/or β) and novel (GPR30) estrogen receptors, which may represent new putative targets in prostate cancer treatment.In the present review, we discuss the still-debated mechanisms, both genomic and non-genomic, by which androgen and estradiol receptors (classical and novel) mediate the hormonal control of prostate cell stemness, transformation, and the continued growth of prostate cancer. Recent preclinical and clinical findings obtained using new androgen receptor antagonists, anti-estrogens, or compounds such as enhancers of androgen receptor degradation and peptides inhibiting non-genomic androgen functions are also presented. These new drugs will likely lead to significant advances in prostate cancer therapy. PMID:26506594

  11. Prostate cancer stem cells: the role of androgen and estrogen receptors

    PubMed Central

    Di Zazzo, Erika; Galasso, Giovanni; Giovannelli, Pia; Di Donato, Marzia; Di Santi, Annalisa; Cernera, Gustavo; Rossi, Valentina; Abbondanza, Ciro; Moncharmont, Bruno; Sinisi, Antonio Agostino; Castoria, Gabriella; Migliaccio, Antimo

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in men, and androgen deprivation therapy still represents the primary treatment for prostate cancer patients. This approach, however, frequently fails and patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer, which is almost untreatable. Cancer cells are characterized by a hierarchical organization, and stem/progenitor cells are endowed with tumor-initiating activity. Accumulating evidence indicates that prostate cancer stem cells lack the androgen receptor and are, indeed, resistant to androgen deprivation therapy. In contrast, these cells express classical (α and/or β) and novel (GPR30) estrogen receptors, which may represent new putative targets in prostate cancer treatment. In the present review, we discuss the still-debated mechanisms, both genomic and non-genomic, by which androgen and estradiol receptors (classical and novel) mediate the hormonal control of prostate cell stemness, transformation, and the continued growth of prostate cancer. Recent preclinical and clinical findings obtained using new androgen receptor antagonists, anti-estrogens, or compounds such as enhancers of androgen receptor degradation and peptides inhibiting non-genomic androgen functions are also presented. These new drugs will likely lead to significant advances in prostate cancer therapy. PMID:26506594

  12. Prostate Stem Cells and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Pharmacological approaches are available to medically-managed patients with symptomatic BPH before surgical intervention is required. These include daily treatment with alpha-blockers and 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors alone or in combination. These medical approaches have two major problems. First, treatments are chronic and must be taken daily. Second, there are significant financial costs and quality of life issues for such chronic treatments. Is it possible to develop effective acute therapy for symptomatic BPH without the long-term androgen deprivation-induced side effects? Two seminal but rarely cited studies of Walsh [Peters, Walsh: N Engl J Med 317:599–604, 1987] and Coffey et al. [Sufrin et al.: Invest Urol 13:418–423, 1976], combined with the growing understanding of the stem cell organization of the prostate stromal (S) and epithelial (E) compartments and their reciprocal paracrine and autocrine interactions provides the rationale for an acute approach. The Walsh study documents that: (1) androgen deprivation disrupts the reciprocal interaction between the prostate S and E thereby decreasing the weight of both compartments and (2) once BPH develops, androgen deprivation does not decrease the number of stem cell units in either the S or E compartments since subsequent androgen restoration fully restores the enlarged gland. The Coffey study documents that acute androgen deprivation sensitizes S–E interactions to radiation induced disruptions so that following radiation, androgen restoration does not induce full gland regrowth. Therefore, effective therapy for symptomatic BPH should be achievable by acute treatment with reversible androgen deprivation for a limited period followed by a single dose of conformal external beam radiation before allowing the man to recovery his normal serum testosterone. PMID:18386293

  13. Long-term tumor regression induced by an antibody-drug conjugate that targets 5T4, an oncofetal antigen expressed on tumor-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Sapra, Puja; Damelin, Marc; Dijoseph, John; Marquette, Kimberly; Geles, Kenneth G; Golas, Jonathon; Dougher, Maureen; Narayanan, Bitha; Giannakou, Andreas; Khandke, Kiran; Dushin, Russell; Ernstoff, Elana; Lucas, Judy; Leal, Mauricio; Hu, George; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila; Abraham, Robert T; Gerber, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) represent a promising therapeutic modality for the clinical management of cancer. We sought to develop a novel ADC that targets 5T4, an oncofetal antigen expressed on tumor-initiating cells (TIC), which comprise the most aggressive cell population in the tumor. We optimized an anti-5T4 ADC (A1mcMMAF) by sulfydryl-based conjugation of the humanized A1 antibody to the tubulin inhibitor monomethylauristatin F (MMAF) via a maleimidocaproyl linker. A1mcMMAF exhibited potent in vivo antitumor activity in a variety of tumor models and induced long-term regressions for up to 100 days after the last dose. Strikingly, animals showed pathologic complete response in each model with doses as low as 3 mg antibody/kg dosed every 4 days. In a non-small cell lung cancer patient-derived xenograft model, in which 5T4 is preferentially expressed on the less differentiated tumor cells, A1mcMMAF treatment resulted in sustained tumor regressions and reduced TIC frequency. These results highlight the potential of ADCs that target the most aggressive cell populations within tumors, such as TICs. In exploratory safety studies, A1mcMMAF exhibited no overt toxicities when administered to cynomolgus monkeys at doses up to 10 mg antibody/kg/cycle × 2 and displayed a half-life of 5 days. The preclinical efficacy and safety data established a promising therapeutic index that supports clinical testing of A1mcMMAF. PMID:23223830

  14. Radio-photothermal therapy mediated by a single compartment nanoplatform depletes tumor initiating cells and reduces lung metastasis in the orthotopic 4T1 breast tumor model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Min; Zhao, Jun; Tian, Mei; Song, Shaoli; Zhang, Rui; Gupta, Sanjay; Tan, Dongfeng; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, Chun

    2015-12-14

    Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and are believed to be responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Combination therapies can overcome the limitation of conventional cancer treatments, and have demonstrated promising application in the clinic. Here, we show that dual modality radiotherapy (RT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) mediated by a single compartment nanosystem copper-64-labeled copper sulfide nanoparticles ([(64)Cu]CuS NPs) could suppress breast tumor metastasis through eradication of TICs. Positron electron tomography (PET) imaging and biodistribution studies showed that more than 90% of [(64)Cu]CuS NPs was retained in subcutaneously grown BT474 breast tumor 24 h after intratumoral (i.t.) injection, indicating the NPs are suitable for the combination therapy. Combined RT/PTT therapy resulted in significant tumor growth delay in the subcutaneous BT474 breast cancer model. Moreover, RT/PTT treatment significantly prolonged the survival of mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast tumors compared to no treatment, RT alone, or PTT alone. The RT/PTT combination therapy significantly reduced the number of tumor nodules in the lung and the formation of tumor mammospheres from treated 4T1 tumors. No obvious side effects of the CuS NPs were noted in the treated mice in a pilot toxicity study. Taken together, our data support the feasibility of a therapeutic approach for the suppression of tumor metastasis through localized RT/PTT therapy. PMID:26376843

  15. Radio-photothermal therapy mediated by a single compartment nanoplatform depletes tumor initiating cells and reduces lung metastasis in the orthotopic 4T1 breast tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Min; Zhao, Jun; Tian, Mei; Song, Shaoli; Zhang, Rui; Gupta, Sanjay; Tan, Dongfeng; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, Chun

    2015-11-01

    Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and are believed to be responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Combination therapies can overcome the limitation of conventional cancer treatments, and have demonstrated promising application in the clinic. Here, we show that dual modality radiotherapy (RT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) mediated by a single compartment nanosystem copper-64-labeled copper sulfide nanoparticles ([64Cu]CuS NPs) could suppress breast tumor metastasis through eradication of TICs. Positron electron tomography (PET) imaging and biodistribution studies showed that more than 90% of [64Cu]CuS NPs was retained in subcutaneously grown BT474 breast tumor 24 h after intratumoral (i.t.) injection, indicating the NPs are suitable for the combination therapy. Combined RT/PTT therapy resulted in significant tumor growth delay in the subcutaneous BT474 breast cancer model. Moreover, RT/PTT treatment significantly prolonged the survival of mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast tumors compared to no treatment, RT alone, or PTT alone. The RT/PTT combination therapy significantly reduced the number of tumor nodules in the lung and the formation of tumor mammospheres from treated 4T1 tumors. No obvious side effects of the CuS NPs were noted in the treated mice in a pilot toxicity study. Taken together, our data support the feasibility of a therapeutic approach for the suppression of tumor metastasis through localized RT/PTT therapy.Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and are believed to be responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Combination therapies can overcome the limitation of conventional cancer treatments, and have demonstrated promising application in the clinic. Here, we show that dual modality radiotherapy (RT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) mediated by a single compartment nanosystem copper-64-labeled copper sulfide nanoparticles ([64Cu]CuS NPs) could suppress

  16. Prostate cancer stem cells: do they have a basal or luminal phenotype?

    PubMed

    Maitland, Norman J; Frame, Fiona M; Polson, Euan S; Lewis, John L; Collins, Anne T

    2011-02-01

    The prostate is a luminal secretory tissue whose function is regulated by male sex hormones. Castration produces involution of the prostate to a reversible basal state, and as the majority of prostate cancers also have a luminal phenotype, drug-induced castration is a front line therapy. It has therefore been assumed that the tumor arises from transformation of a luminal progenitor cell. Here, we demonstrate that a minority basal "cancer stem cell" (CSC) population persists in primary human prostate cancers, as in normal prostate, serving as a reservoir for tumor recurrence after castration therapy. While the CSCs exhibit a degree of phenotypic fluidity from different patients, the tumor-initiating cells in immunocompromised mice express basal markers (such as p63), but do not express androgen receptor (AR) or markers of luminal differentiation (PSA, PAP) when freshly fractionated from human tissues or following culture in vitro. Estrogen receptors α and β and AR are transcriptionally active in the transit amplifying (TA) cell (the progeny of SC). However, AR protein is consistently undetectable in TA cells. The prostate-specific TMPRSS2 gene, while upregulated by AR activity in luminal cells, is also transcribed in basal populations, confirming that AR acts as an expression modulator. Selected cells with basal phenotypes are tumor initiating, but the resultant tumors are phenotypically intermediate, with focal expression of AR, AMACR, and p63. In vitro differentiation experiments, employing lentivirally transduced SCs with a luminal (PSA-probasin) promoter regulating a fluorescent indicator gene, confirm that the basal SCs are the source of luminal progeny. PMID:21761340

  17. Cobblestone-Area Forming Cells Derived from Patients with Mantle Cell Lymphoma Are Enriched for CD133+ Tumor-Initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Daniel J.; Abass-Shereef, Jeneba; Walton, Kelly; Goodell, Lauri; Aviv, Hana; Strair, Roger K.; Budak-Alpdogan, Tulin

    2014-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is associated with a significant risk of therapeutic failure and disease relapse, but the biological origin of relapse is poorly understood. Here, we prospectively identify subpopulations of primary MCL cells with different biologic and immunophenotypic features. Using a simple culture system, we demonstrate that a subset of primary MCL cells co-cultured with either primary human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC) or murine MS-5 cells form in cobblestone-areas consisting of cells with a primitive immunophenotype (CD19−CD133+) containing the chromosomal translocation t (11;14)(q13;q32) characteristic of MCL. Limiting dilution serial transplantation experiments utilizing immunodeficient mice revealed that primary MCL engraftment was only observed when either unsorted or CD19−CD133+ cells were utilized. No engraftment was seen using the CD19+CD133− subpopulation. Our results establish that primary CD19−CD133+ MCL cells are a functionally distinct subpopulation of primary MCL cells enriched for MCL-initiating activity in immunodeficient mice. This rare subpopulation of MCL-initiating cells may play an important role in the pathogenesis of MCL. PMID:24722054

  18. Traceable clonal culture and chemodrug assay of heterogeneous prostate carcinoma PC3 cells in microfluidic single cell array chips

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jaehoon; Ingram, Patrick N.; Bersano-Begey, Tom; Yoon, Euisik

    2014-01-01

    Cancer heterogeneity has received considerable attention for its role in tumor initiation and progression, and its implication for diagnostics and therapeutics in the clinic. To facilitate a cellular heterogeneity study in a low cost and highly efficient manner, we present a microfluidic platform that allows traceable clonal culture and characterization. The platform captures single cells into a microwell array and cultures them for clonal expansion, subsequently allowing on-chip characterization of clonal phenotype and response against drug treatments. Using a heterogeneous prostate cancer model, the PC3 cell line, we verified our prototype, identifying three different sub-phenotypes and correlating their clonal drug responsiveness to cell phenotype. PMID:25553180

  19. 1B50-1, a mAb raised against recurrent tumor cells, targets liver tumor-initiating cells by binding to the calcium channel α2δ1 subunit.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Wang, Limin; Han, Haibo; Jin, Kemin; Lin, Na; Guo, Ting; Chen, Yangde; Cheng, Heping; Lu, Fengmin; Fang, Weigang; Wang, Yu; Xing, Baocai; Zhang, Zhiqian

    2013-04-15

    The identification and targeted therapy of cells involved in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence remain challenging. Here, we generated a monoclonal antibody against recurrent HCC, 1B50-1, that bound the isoform 5 of the α2δ1 subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels and identified a subset of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) with stem cell-like properties. A surgical margin with cells detected by 1B50-1 predicted rapid recurrence. Furthermore, 1B50-1 had a therapeutic effect on HCC engraftments by eliminating TICs. Finally, α2δ1 knockdown reduced self-renewal and tumor formation capacities and induced apoptosis of TICs, whereas its overexpression led to enhanced sphere formation, which is regulated by calcium influx. Thus, α2δ1 is a functional liver TIC marker, and its inhibitors may serve as potential anti-HCC drugs. PMID:23597567

  20. Notch-1 signaling promotes the cyclinD1-dependent generation of mammary tumor-initiating cells which can revert to bi-potential progenitors from which they arise

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Hua; Jolicoeur, Paul

    2016-01-01

    In a previous work, we reported that young transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the intracellular domain of Notch1 (N1IC) showed expansion of lin− CD24+ CD29high mammary cells enriched for stem cells and later developed mammary tumors. Mammary tumor formation was abolished or greatly reduced in cyclin D1−/− or cyclin D1+/− N1IC Tg mice, respectively. Here, we studied the epithelial cell subsets present in N1IC-induced tumors. CD24− CD29int and CD24+ CD29high cells were found to be present at low numbers in tumors. The latter had the same properties as those expanded in young Tg females, and neither cell population showed tumor-initiating potential, nor were they required for maintenance of tumors after transplantation. CD24int CD29int cells were identified as tumor-initiating and mammosphere-forming cells and represent a large percentage tumor cells in this model. Their number was significantly lower in tumors from cyclin D1+/− N1IC Tg mice. Using cyclin D1 shRNA knockdown, we also show that N1IC-induced tumor cells remain addicted to cyclin D1 for growth and survival. Interestingly, at lower levels of cyclin D1 or after transplantion in the presence of normal mammary cells, these N1IC-expressing tumor cells reverted to a state of low malignancy and differentiate into duct-like structures. They seem to adopt the fate of bi-potential stem/progenitor cells similar to that of the expanded CD24+ CD29high stem/progenitor cells from which they are likely to be derived. Our data indicate that decreasing cyclin D1 levels would be an efficient treatment for tumors induced by N1 signaling. PMID:22907433

  1. Induced pluripotency of human prostatic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongjuan; Sun, Ning; Young, Sarah R; Nolley, Rosalie; Santos, Jennifer; Wu, Joseph C; Peehl, Donna M

    2013-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are a valuable resource for discovery of epigenetic changes critical to cell type-specific differentiation. Although iPS cells have been generated from other terminally differentiated cells, the reprogramming of normal adult human basal prostatic epithelial (E-PZ) cells to a pluripotent state has not been reported. Here, we attempted to reprogram E-PZ cells by forced expression of Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc, and Klf4 using lentiviral vectors and obtained embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like colonies at a frequency of 0.01%. These E-PZ-iPS-like cells with normal karyotype gained expression of pluripotent genes typical of iPS cells (Tra-1-81, SSEA-3, Nanog, Sox2, and Oct4) and lost gene expression characteristic of basal prostatic epithelial cells (CK5, CK14, and p63). E-PZ-iPS-like cells demonstrated pluripotency by differentiating into ectodermal, mesodermal, and endodermal cells in vitro, although lack of teratoma formation in vivo and incomplete demethylation of pluripotency genes suggested only partial reprogramming. Importantly, E-PZ-iPS-like cells re-expressed basal epithelial cell markers (CD44, p63, MAO-A) in response to prostate-specific medium in spheroid culture. Androgen induced expression of androgen receptor (AR), and co-culture with rat urogenital sinus further induced expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a hallmark of secretory cells, suggesting that E-PZ-iPS-like cells have the capacity to differentiate into prostatic basal and secretory epithelial cells. Finally, when injected into mice, E-PZ-iPS-like cells expressed basal epithelial cell markers including CD44 and p63. When co-injected with rat urogenital mesenchyme, E-PZ-iPS-like cells expressed AR and expression of p63 and CD44 was repressed. DNA methylation profiling identified epigenetic changes in key pathways and genes involved in prostatic differentiation as E-PZ-iPS-like cells converted to differentiated AR- and PSA-expressing cells. Our results suggest that

  2. Proteomic analysis of cancer stem cells in human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun-Kyung; Cho, Hyungdon; Kim, Chan-Wha

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} DU145 prostate cancer cell line was isolated into CD44+ or CD44- cells. {yields} We confirmed CD44+ DU145 cells are more proliferative and tumorigenic than CD44- DU145 cells. {yields} We analyzed and identified proteins that were differentially expressed between CD44+ and CD44- DU145 cells. {yields} Cofilin and Annexin A5 associated with cancer were found to be positively correlated with CD44 expression. -- Abstract: Results from recent studies support the hypothesis that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for tumor initiation and formation. Here, we applied a proteome profiling approach to investigate the mechanisms of CSCs and to identify potential biomarkers in the prostate cancer cell line DU145. Using MACS, the DU145 prostate cancer cell line was isolated into CD44+ or CD44- cells. In sphere culture, CD44+ cells possessed stem cell characteristics and highly expressed genes known to be important in stem cell maintenance. In addition, they showed strong tumorigenic potential in the clonogenic assay and soft agar colony formation assay. We then analyzed and identified proteins that were differentially expressed between CD44+ and CD44- using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS. Cofilin and Annexin A5, which are associated with proliferation or metastasis in cancer, were found to be positively correlated with CD44 expression. These results provide information that will be important to the development of new cancer diagnostic tools and understanding the mechanisms of CSCs although a more detailed study is necessary to investigate the roles of Cofilin and Annexin A5 in CSCs.

  3. Stem-like tumor initiating cells isolated from IL13Rα2-expressing gliomas are targeted and killed by IL13-zetakine redirected T cells

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Christine E.; Starr, Renate; Aguilar, Brenda; Shami, Andrew F.; Martinez, Catalina; D’Apuzzo, Massimo; Barish, Michael E.; Forman, Stephen J.; Jensen, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate IL13Rα2 as an immunotherapeutic target for eliminating glioma stem-like initiating cells (GSC) of high-grade gliomas, with particular focus on the potential of genetically engineered IL13Rα2-specific primary human CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (IL13-zetakine+ CTL) to target this therapeutically resistant glioma subpopulation. Experimental Design A panel of low-passage GSC tumor sphere and serum-differentiated glioma lines were expanded from patient glioblastoma specimens. These glioblastoma lines were evaluated for expression of IL13Rα2 and for susceptibility to IL13-zetakine+ CTL-mediated killing in vitro and in vivo. Results We observed that while glioma IL13Rα2 expression varies between patients, for IL13Rα2pos cases this antigen was detected on both GSCs and more differentiated tumor cell populations. IL13-zetakine+ CTL were capable of efficient recognition and killing of both IL13Rα2pos GSC and IL13Rα2pos differentiated cells in vitro, as well as eliminating glioma initiating activity in an orthotopic mouse tumor model. Furthermore, intracranial administration of IL13-zetakine+ CTL displayed robust anti-tumor activity against established IL13Rα2pos GSC tumor sphere-initiated orthotopic tumors in mice. Conclusions Within IL13Rα2-expressing high-grade gliomas, this receptor is expressed by GSCs and differentiated tumor populations, rendering both targetable by IL13-zetakine+ CTLs. Thus, our results support the potential utility of IL13Rα2-directed immunotherapeutic approaches for eradicating therapeutically resistant GSC populations. PMID:22407828

  4. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Tang, Dean G.

    2016-01-01

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features. PMID:26924072

  5. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Dagmara; Król, Wojciech; Szliszka, Ewelina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease. PMID:26593898

  6. Secretome from senescent melanoma engages the STAT3 pathway to favor reprogramming of naive melanoma towards a tumor-initiating cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Bonet, Caroline; Bonazzi, Vanessa F; Allegra, Marylin; Giuliano, Sandy; Bille, Karine; Bahadoran, Philippe; Giacchero, Damien; Lacour, Jean Philippe; Boyle, Glen M; Hayward, Nicholas F

    2013-01-01

    Here, we showed that the secretome of senescent melanoma cells drives basal melanoma cells towards a mesenchymal phenotype, with characteristic of stems illustrated by increased level of the prototype genes FN1, SNAIL, OCT4 and NANOG. This molecular reprogramming leads to an increase in the low-MITF and slow-growing cell population endowed with melanoma-initiating cell features. The secretome of senescent melanoma cells induces a panel of 52 genes, involved in cell movement and cell/cell interaction, among which AXL and ALDH1A3 have been implicated in melanoma development. We found that the secretome of senescent melanoma cells activates the STAT3 pathway and STAT3 inhibition prevents secretome effects, including the acquisition of tumorigenic properties. Collectively, the findings provide insights into how the secretome of melanoma cells entering senescence upon chemotherapy treatments increases the tumorigenicity of naïve melanoma cells by inducing, through STAT3 activation, a melanoma-initiating cell phenotype that could favor chemotherapy resistance and relapse. PMID:24344100

  7. Prostate-Specific Natural Health Products (Dietary Supplements) Radiosensitize Normal Prostate Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Yasmin; Schoenherr, Diane; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific health products (dietary supplements) are taken by cancer patients to alleviate the symptoms linked with poor prostate health. However, the effect of these agents on evidence-based radiotherapy practice is poorly understood. The present study aimed to determine whether dietary supplements radiosensitized normal prostate or prostate cancer cell lines. Methods and Materials: Three well-known prostate-specific dietary supplements were purchased from commercial sources available to patients (Trinovin, Provelex, and Prostate Rx). The cells used in the study included normal prostate lines (RWPE-1 and PWR-1E), prostate tumor lines (PC3, DU145, and LNCaP), and a normal nonprostate line (HaCaT). Supplement toxicity was assessed using cell proliferation assays [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] and cellular radiosensitivity using conventional clonogenic assays (0.5-4Gy). Cell cycle kinetics were assessed using the bromodeoxyuridine/propidium iodide pulse-labeling technique, apoptosis by scoring caspase-3 activation, and DNA repair by assessing gammaH2AX. Results: The cell growth and radiosensitivity of the malignant PC3, DU145, and LNcaP cells were not affected by any of the dietary prostate supplements (Provelex [2mug/mL], Trinovin [10mug/mL], and Prostate Rx [50 mug/mL]). However, both Trinovin (10mug/mL) and Prostate Rx (6mug/mL) inhibited the growth rate of the normal prostate cell lines. Prostate Rx increased cellular radiosensitivity of RWPE-1 cells through the inhibition of DNA repair. Conclusion: The use of prostate-specific dietary supplements should be discouraged during radiotherapy owing to the preferential radiosensitization of normal prostate cells.

  8. High-Density and Very-Low-Density Lipoprotein Have Opposing Roles in Regulating Tumor-Initiating Cells and Sensitivity to Radiation in Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, Adam R.; Atkinson, Rachel L.; Reddy, Jay P.; Debeb, Bisrat G.; Larson, Richard; Li, Li; Masuda, Hiroko; Brewer, Takae; Atkinson, Bradley J.; Brewster, Abeena; Ueno, Naoto T.; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: We previously demonstrated that cholesterol-lowering agents regulate radiation sensitivity of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) cell lines in vitro and are associated with less radiation resistance among IBC patients who undergo postmastectomy radiation. We hypothesized that decreasing IBC cellular cholesterol induced by treatment with lipoproteins would increase radiation sensitivity. Here, we examined the impact of specific transporters of cholesterol (ie lipoproteins) on the responses of IBC cells to self-renewal and to radiation in vitro and on clinical outcomes in IBC patients. Methods and Materials: Two patient-derived IBC cell lines, SUM 149 and KPL4, were incubated with low-density lipoproteins (LDL), very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), or high-density lipoproteins (HDL) for 24 hours prior to irradiation (0-6 Gy) and mammosphere formation assay. Cholesterol panels were examined in a cohort of patients with primary IBC diagnosed between 1995 and 2011 at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Lipoprotein levels were then correlated to patient outcome, using the log rank statistical model, and examined in multivariate analysis using Cox regression. Results: VLDL increased and HDL decreased mammosphere formation compared to untreated SUM 149 and KPL4 cells. Survival curves showed enhancement of survival in both of the IBC cell lines when pretreated with VLDL and, conversely, radiation sensitization in all cell lines when pretreated with HDL. In IBC patients, higher VLDL values (>30 mg/dL) predicted a lower 5-year overall survival rate than normal values (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.9 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-3.45], P=.035). Lower-than-normal patient HDL values (<60 mg/dL) predicted a lower 5-year overall survival rate than values higher than 60 mg/dL (HR = 3.21 [95% CI: 1.25-8.27], P=.015). Conclusions: This study discovered a relationship among the plasma levels of lipoproteins, overall patient response, and radiation resistance in IBC patients

  9. Targeting lactate dehydrogenase-A inhibits tumorigenesis and tumor progression in mouse models of lung cancer and impacts tumor initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Han; Hanai, Jun-ichi; Ren, Jian-Guo; Kats, Lev; Burgess, Kerri; Bhargava, Parul; Signoretti, Sabina; Billiard, Julia; Duffy, Kevin J.; Grant, Aaron; Wang, Xiaoen; Lorkiewicz, Pawel K.; Schatzman, Sabrina; Bousamra, Michael; Lane, Andrew N.; Higashi, Richard M.; Fan, Teresa W.M.; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Sukhatme, Vikas P.; Seth, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    Summary The lactate dehydrogenase-A (LDH-A) enzyme catalyzes the inter-conversion of pyruvate and lactate, is upregulated in human cancers and is associated with aggressive tumor outcomes. Here we use a novel inducible murine model and demonstrate that inactivation of LDH-A in mouse models of NSCLC driven by oncogenic K-RAS or EGFR leads to decreased tumorigenesis and disease regression in established tumors. We also show that abrogation of LDH-A results in reprogramming of pyruvate metabolism, with decreased lactic fermentation in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo. This was accompanied by re-activation of mitochondrial function in vitro but not in vivo or ex vivo. Finally, using a specific small molecule LDH-A inhibitor, we demonstrated that LDH-A is essential for cancer initiating cell survival and proliferation. Thus, LDH-A can be a viable therapeutic target for NSCLC including cancer stem cell-dependent drug resistant tumors. PMID:24726384

  10. Uric acid: a modulator of prostate cells and activin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Sangkop, Febbie; Singh, Geeta; Rodrigues, Ely; Gold, Elspeth; Bahn, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Elevated serum uric acid (SUA) or urate is associated with inflammation and gout. Recent evidence has linked urate to cancers, but little is known about urate effects in prostate cancer. Activins are inflammatory cytokines and negative growth regulators in the prostate. A hallmark of prostate cancer progression is activin insensitivity; however, mechanisms underlying this are unclear. We propose that elevated SUA is associated with prostate cancer counteracting the growth inhibitory effects of activins. The expression of activins A and B, urate transporter GLUT9 and tissue urate levels were examined in human prostate disease. Intracellular and secreted urate and GLUT9 expression were assessed in human prostate cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the effects of urate and probenecid, a known urate transport inhibitor, were determined in combination with activin A. Activin A expression was increased in low-grade prostate cancer, whereas activin B expression was reduced in high-grade prostate cancer. Intracellular urate levels decreased in all prostate pathologies, while GLUT9 expression decreased in benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostatitis and high-grade prostate cancer. Activin responsive LNCaP cells had higher intracellular and lower secreted urate levels than activin-insensitive PC3 cells. GLUT9 expression in prostate cancer cells was progressively lower than in prostate epithelial cells. Elevated extracellular urate was growth promoting in vitro, which was abolished by the gout medication probenecid, and it antagonized the growth inhibitory effects of activins. This study shows for the first time that a change in plasma or intracellular urate levels, possibly involving GLUT9 and a urate efflux transporter, has an impact on prostate cancer cell growth, and that lowering SUA levels in prostate cancer is likely to be therapeutically beneficial. PMID:26910779

  11. The role of Cajal cells in chronic prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Haki Yuksel, Ozgur; Urkmez, Ahmet; Verit, Ayhan

    2016-01-01

    Types of prostatitis can be defined as groups of syndromes in adult men associated with infectious and noninfectious causes characterized frequently by lower abdominal and perineal signs and diverse clinical symptoms and complications. Etiopathogenesis of chronic prostatitis is not well defined. Moreover, its treatment outcomes are not satisfactory. Presence of c-kit positive interstitial cells in human prostate is already known. It has been demonstrated that these cells can be pacemaker cells which trigger spontaneous slow-wave electrical activity in the prostate and can be responsible for the transport of glandular secretion from acinar cells into major and minor prostatic ducts and finally into urethra. In the light of all these data, when presence of a possible inflammatory pathology is thought to involve prostate that secretes and has a reservoir which drains its secretion (for prostate, prostatic urethra), two points are worth mentioning. Impairment of secretion mechanism and collection of secretion within the organ with reflux of the microbial material from its reservoir back into prostate gland. Both of these potential conditions can be explained by ductal neuromuscular mechanism, which induces secretion. We think that in this neuromuscular mechanism interstitial Cajal cells have an important role in chronic prostatitis. Our hypothesis is that curability of prostatitis is correlated with the number of Cajal cells not subjected to apoptosis. PMID:27377090

  12. EXAFS studies of prostate cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapla, J.; Kwiatek, W. M.; Lekki, J.; Kisiel, A.; Steininger, R.; Goettlicher, J.

    2013-04-01

    Sulphur plays a vital role in every human organism. It is known, that sulphur-bearing compounds, such as for example cysteine and glutathione, play critical roles in development and progression of many diseases. Any alteration in sulphur's biochemistry could become a precursor of serious pathological conditions. One of such condition is prostate cancer, the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in the western world and the second leading cause of cancer related death in men. The purpose of presented studies was to examine what changes occur in the nearest chemical environment of sulphur in prostate cancer cell lines in comparison to healthy cells. The Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was used, followed by theoretical calculations. The results of preliminary analysis is presented.

  13. Comparative uptake of polyamines by prostate and non-prostate cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Srinath, P; McQuarrie, S A; Suresh, M R

    2002-05-01

    The Km and Vmax of [14C]-radiolabeled polyamines were determined for PC-3 and AT3B-1 cell lines. With PC-3 Km values are in the following order: ornithine> spermidine> spermine> putrescine, while with AT3B-1 it was spermidine> ornithine> spermine> putrescine. To determine which of these polyamines exhibit higher accumulation, the relative uptake of all the four amines was studied with prostate (PC-3, AT3B-1, LNCaP) and non-prostate (MCF-7, KLN-205, OVCAR) cell lines at 10 and 20 microM after 1 hour. Spermine and spermidine accumulated at higher levels in prostate (AT3B-1 and LNCaP) over non-prostate cell lines (p < 0.01). Putrescine accumulated more in PC-3 and LNCaP than the non-prostate cancer cells. PMID:12031886

  14. Normal peripheral prostate stromal cells stimulate prostate cancer development: roles of c-kit signal

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jian-Hua; Zhou, Juan; Zhao, Yang; Liu, Peng-Yue; Yao, Hai-Jun; Da, Jun; Zhang, Ming; Zhou, Zhe; Chen, Qi; Peng, Yu-Bing; Wang, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Background: To investigated the peripheral stromal cell conditioned medium (CM) -stimulated c-kit-JAK2-STAT1 pathway in prostate cancer. Methods: CM harvested from normal prostate peripheral stromal cells was added to DU145 cells. DU145 cell viability and migration were measured by cell counting kit-8 reagent and Transwell analysis respectively. Colony and sphere formation efficiencies of DU145 cells co-cultured with CM from human prostate stromal cells were also measured. DU145cells were stably transfected with lentivirus-mediated shRNA for c-kit silencing. Results: C-kit expression in prostate cancer was found to be significantly higher than in benign prostatic hyperplasia and positively associated with Gleason scores. The growth, migration and capacity of clonogenic property of DU145 cells significantly increased upon exposure to peripheral stromal CM and then were inhibited after silencing the expression of c-kit. The levels of c-kit, pJAK2 and pSTAT1 were significantly induced by peripheral zone stromal CM compared with controls in serum free medium and the levels of pJAK2 and pSTAT1 decreased after c-kit silencing. Conclusions: C-kit hyper-expression promotes the development of prostate cancer. The peripheral stromal cell CM stimulated c-kit-JAK2-STAT1 pathway in prostate cancer cell viability, migration, and capacity of clonogenic property. This may lead to a greater understanding of the role of c-kit in prostate cancer and provide a potential therapeutic target for prostate cancer. PMID:26045890

  15. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Warrick, Joshua I; Owens, Scott R; Tomlins, Scott A

    2014-10-01

    In this article, we review prostatic lymphomas and discuss the differential diagnosis of high-grade malignant neoplasms of the prostate. We illustrate this with a case of a 46-year-old man seen with lower urinary tract obstruction who had diffuse involvement by a high-grade malignancy on prostate biopsy. Morphologic evaluation and immunohistochemistry were consistent with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the prostate. Workup with positron emission tomography-computed tomography demonstrated intensely hypermetabolic lymph nodes in the mediastinum, as well as widespread osseous involvement and involvement of the pancreatic tail, prostate, and urinary bladder, suggesting secondary prostatic involvement by a nodal lymphoma. Lymphomas of the prostate are uncommon in surgical pathology practice and usually represent secondary involvement from leukemia/lymphoma at a more typical site. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma is the most common subtype. PMID:25268190

  16. Identification of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in the reactive stroma of a prostate cancer xenograft by side population analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Santamaria-Martinez, Albert; Barquinero, Jordi; Barbosa-Desongles, Anna; Hurtado, Antoni; Pinos, Tomas; Seoane, Joan; Poupon, Marie-France; Morote, Joan; Reventos, Jaume; Munell, Francina

    2009-10-15

    Cancer stem cells are a distinct cellular population that is believed to be responsible for tumor initiation and maintenance. Recent data suggest that solid tumors also contain another type of stem cells, the mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), which contribute to the formation of tumor-associated stroma. The Hoechst 33342 efflux assay has proved useful to identify a rare cellular fraction, named Side Population (SP), enriched in cells with stem-like properties. Using this assay, we identified SP cells in a prostate cancer xenograft containing human prostate cancer cells and mouse stromal cells. The SP isolation, subculture and sequential sorting allowed the generation of single-cell-derived clones of murine origin that were recognized as MSC by their morphology, plastic adherence, proliferative potential, adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation ability and immunophenotype (CD45{sup -}, CD81{sup +} and Sca-1{sup +}). We also demonstrated that SP clonal cells secrete transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) and that their inhibition reduces proliferation and accelerates differentiation. These results reveal the existence of SP cells in the stroma of a cancer xenograft, and provide evidence supporting their MSC nature and the role of TGF-{beta}1 in maintaining their proliferation and undifferentiated status. Our data also reveal the usefulness of the SP assay to identify and isolate MSC cells from carcinomas.

  17. (-)-Gossypol reduces invasiveness in metastatic prostate cancer cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acquisition of metastatic ability by prostatic cancer cells is the most lethal aspect of prostatic cancer progression. (-)-Gossypol, a polyphenolic compound present in cottonseeds, possesses anti-proliferation and pro-apoptotic effects in various cancer cells. In this study, the differences betwee...

  18. N-Myc Drives Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer Initiated from Human Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, John K; Phillips, John W; Smith, Bryan A; Park, Jung Wook; Stoyanova, Tanya; McCaffrey, Erin F; Baertsch, Robert; Sokolov, Artem; Meyerowitz, Justin G; Mathis, Colleen; Cheng, Donghui; Stuart, Joshua M; Shokat, Kevan M; Gustafson, W Clay; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2016-04-11

    MYCN amplification and overexpression are common in neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC). However, the impact of aberrant N-Myc expression in prostate tumorigenesis and the cellular origin of NEPC have not been established. We define N-Myc and activated AKT1 as oncogenic components sufficient to transform human prostate epithelial cells to prostate adenocarcinoma and NEPC with phenotypic and molecular features of aggressive, late-stage human disease. We directly show that prostate adenocarcinoma and NEPC can arise from a common epithelial clone. Further, N-Myc is required for tumor maintenance, and destabilization of N-Myc through Aurora A kinase inhibition reduces tumor burden. Our findings establish N-Myc as a driver of NEPC and a target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27050099

  19. LHRH-Conjugated Lytic Peptides Directly Target Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Clayton; Sharp, Starlette; Jones, Jacqueline; Topps, Daphne; Coleman, Mathew; Aneja, Ritu; Jaynes, Jesse; Turner, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men. For patients with hormone-refractory disease, few treatments are available once the tumor has metastasized beyond the prostate. In the present study, two conjugated lytic peptide sequences (named JCHLHRH and JC21LHRH) were designed to target luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone receptors (LHRH-R). Our results indicate that human prostate cancer cell lines were sensitive to both LHRH-conjugated and non-conjugated lytic peptides, with IC50 concentrations for LNCaP cells, 4.4 and 9.1 µM; for DU-145 cells, 4.8 and 5.7 µM; and for PC-3 cells, 4.4 and 8.2 µM, respectively. JCHLHRH and JC21LHRH were nontoxic to normal primary human prostate epithelial cells or to bone marrow stromal cells in co-culture. There were morphological changes in PC-3 cells after 3 hr of exposure to either peptide; after 6 hr, there were significant reductions in cell numbers. Exposure of PC-3 cells for 24 hr to either JCHLHRH or JC21LHRH blocked their growth over 3 days. Since JCHLHRH and JC21LHRH have specificity for and anti-proliferative activity against tumor cells, and low toxicity for normal prostate cells, these peptides could serve as a new type of therapy for prostate cancer. PMID:20869347

  20. Obesity promotes aerobic glycolysis in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cavazos, David A; deGraffenried, Matthew J; Apte, Shruti A; Bowers, Laura W; Whelan, Kaitlin A; deGraffenried, Linda A

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is the leading preventable comorbidity associated with increased prostate cancer-related recurrence and mortality. Epidemiological and clinical studies indicate that a body mass index >30 is associated with increased oxidative DNA damage within the prostate gland and increased prostate cancer-related mortality. Here we provide evidence that obesity promotes worse clinical outcome through induction of metabolic abnormalities known to promote genotoxic stress. We have previously reported that blood serum derived from obese mice may enhance the proliferative and invasive potential of human prostate cancer cell lines ex vivo. Here we show that a 1-h exposure of LNCaP or PacMetUT1 prostate cancer cell lines and nonmalignant RWPE-1 prostate epithelial cells to 2% serum from obese mice induces markers of aerobic glycolysis relative to those exposed to serum from nonobese mice. This metabolic change was correlated with accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increased frequency of DNA double-strand breaks. Interestingly, N-tert-Butylhydroxylamine, an antioxidant, significantly suppressed markers of aerobic glycolysis in the cells exposed to the blood serum of obese mice, suggesting that ROS contributes to a metabolic shift toward aerobic glycolysis. Here we describe obesity-induced changes in key metabolic markers that impact prostate cancer cell progression and explore the role of antioxidants in ameliorating these effects. PMID:25264717

  1. Hyaluronan in aged collagen matrix increases prostate epithelial cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Damodarasamy, Mamatha; Vernon, Robert B.; Chan, Christina K.; Plymate, Stephen R.; Wight, Thomas N.

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of the prostate, which is comprised primarily of collagen, becomes increasingly disorganized with age, a property that may influence the development of hyperplasia and cancer. Collageous ECM extracted from the tails of aged mice exhibits many characteristics of collagen in aged tissues, including the prostate. When polymerized into a 3-dimensional (3D) gel, these collagen extracts can serve as models for the study of specific cell-ECM interactions. In the present study, we examined the behaviors of human prostatic epithelial cell lines representing normal prostate epithelial cells (PEC), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH-1), and adenocarcinoma (LNCaP) cultured in contact with 3D gels made from collagen extracts of young and aged mice. We found that proliferation of PEC, BPH-1, and LNCaP cells were all increased by culture on aged collagen gels relative to young collagen gels. In examining age-associated differences in the composition of the collagen extracts, we found that aged and young collagen had a similar amount of several collagen-associated ECM components, but aged collagen had a much greater content of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA) than young collagen. The addition of HA (of similar size and concentration to that found in aged collagen extracts) to cells placed in young collagen elicited significantly increased proliferation in BPH-1 cells, but not in PEC or LNCaP cells, relative to controls not exposed to HA. Of note, histochemical analyses of human prostatic tissues showed significantly higher expression of HA in BPH and prostate cancer stroma relative to stroma of normal prostate. Collectively, these results suggest that changes in ECM involving increased levels of HA contribute to the growth of prostatic epithelium with aging. PMID:25124870

  2. Nonylphenol effects on human prostate non tumorigenic cells.

    PubMed

    Forte, Maurizio; Di Lorenzo, Mariana; Carrizzo, Albino; Valiante, Salvatore; Vecchione, Carmine; Laforgia, Vincenza; De Falco, Maria

    2016-05-16

    Nonylphenol (NP) is an industrial chemical with estrogenic activity both in vivo and in vitro; estrogens play a critical role in the development of prostate and may be the cause of some pathological states, including cancer. In this study we examined the effects of NP on human prostate non tumorigenic epithelial cells (PNT1A) investigating on cell proliferation, interaction with estrogen receptors (ERs) and gene expression of genes involved in prostate diseases. We found that NP affects cell proliferation at 10(-6)M, promoting a cytoplasm-nucleus translocation of ERα and not ERβ, like the natural estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2). Moreover, we showed that NP enhances gene expression of key regulators of cell cycle. Estrogen selective antagonist ICI182780 in part reverted the observed effects of NP. These results confirm the estrogenic activity of NP and suggest that other transduction pathways may be involved in NP action on prostate. PMID:27260121

  3. Cathepsin L inactivation leads to multimodal inhibition of prostate cancer cell dissemination in a preclinical bone metastasis model.

    PubMed

    Sudhan, Dhivya R; Pampo, Christine; Rice, Lori; Siemann, Dietmar W

    2016-06-01

    It is estimated that approximately 90% of patients with advanced prostate cancer develop bone metastases; an occurrence that results in a substantial reduction in the quality of life and a drastic worsening of prognosis. The development of novel therapeutic strategies that impair the metastatic process and associated skeletal adversities is therefore critical to improving prostate cancer patient survival. Recognition of the importance of Cathepsin L (CTSL) to metastatic dissemination of cancer cells has led to the development of several CTSL inhibition strategies. The present investigation employed intra-cardiac injection of human PC-3ML prostate cancer cells into nude mice to examine tumor cell dissemination in a preclinical bone metastasis model. CTSL knockdown confirmed the validity of targeting this protease and subsequent intervention studies with the small molecule CTSL inhibitor KGP94 resulted in a significant reduction in metastatic tumor burden in the bone and an improvement in overall survival. CTSL inhibition by KGP94 also led to a significant impairment of tumor initiated angiogenesis. Furthermore, KGP94 treatment decreased osteoclast formation and bone resorptive function, thus, perturbing the reciprocal interactions between tumor cells and osteoclasts within the bone microenvironment which typically result in bone loss and aggressive growth of metastases. These functional effects were accompanied by a significant downregulation of NFκB signaling activity and expression of osteoclastogenesis related NFκB target genes. Collectively, these data indicate that the CTSL inhibitor KGP94 has the potential to alleviate metastatic disease progression and associated skeletal morbidities and hence may have utility in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer patients. PMID:26757413

  4. Cathepsin L inactivation leads to multimodal inhibition of prostate cancer cell dissemination in a preclinical bone metastasis model

    PubMed Central

    Sudhan, Dhivya R.; Pampo, Christine; Rice, Lori; Siemann, Dietmar W.

    2016-01-01

    It is estimated that approximately 90% of patients with advanced prostate cancer develop bone metastases; an occurrence that results in a substantial reduction in the quality of life and a drastic worsening of prognosis. The development of novel therapeutic strategies that impair the metastatic process and associated skeletal adversities is therefore critical to improving prostate cancer patient survival. Recognition of the importance of Cathepsin L (CTSL) to metastatic dissemination of cancer cells has led to the development of several CTSL inhibition strategies. The present investigation employed intra-cardiac injection of human PC-3ML prostate cancer cells into nude mice to examine tumor cell dissemination in a preclinical bone metastasis model. CTSL knockdown confirmed the validity of targeting this protease and subsequent intervention studies with the small molecule CTSL inhibitor KGP94 resulted in a significant reduction in metastatic tumor burden in the bone and an improvement in overall survival. CTSL inhibition by KGP94 also led to a significant impairment of tumor initiated angiogenesis. Furthermore, KGP94 treatment decreased osteoclast formation and bone resorptive function, thus, perturbing the reciprocal interactions between tumor cells and osteoclasts within the bone microenvironment which typically result in bone loss and aggressive growth of metastases. These functional effects were accompanied by a significant downregulation of NFκB signaling activity and expression of osteoclastogenesis related NFκB target genes. Collectively, these data indicate that the CTSL inhibitor KGP94 has the potential to alleviate metastatic disease progression and associated skeletal morbidities and hence may have utility in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer patients. PMID:26757413

  5. Effect of anthralin on cell viability in human prostate adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Raevskaya, A A; Gorbunova, S L; Savvateeva, M V; Severin, S E; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2012-07-01

    The study revealed the key role of serine protease hepsin activity in transition of in situ prostate adenocarcinoma into the metastasizing form. Inhibition of hepsin activity suppresses the invasive growth of the tumor. Hepsin is an convenient target for pharmacological agents, so the study of its inhibitory mechanisms is a promising avenue in drug development. Assay of proteolytic activity in various tumor cell lines in vitro showed that this activity in prostate adenocarcinoma cells significantly surpasses proteolytic activity in other examined tumor cell lines. Selective cytotoxic action of anthralin, an inhibitor of hepsin activity, on human adenocarcinoma cells was demonstrated in comparison with other tumor cell lines. PMID:22866312

  6. Milk stimulates growth of prostate cancer cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Tate, Patricia L; Bibb, Robert; Larcom, Lyndon L

    2011-11-01

    Concern has been expressed about the fact that cows' milk contains estrogens and could stimulate the growth of hormone-sensitive tumors. In this study, organic cows' milk and two commercial substitutes were digested in vitro and tested for their effects on the growth of cultures of prostate and breast cancer cells. Cows' milk stimulated the growth of LNCaP prostate cancer cells in each of 14 separate experiments, producing an average increase in growth rate of over 30%. In contrast, almond milk suppressed the growth of these cells by over 30%. Neither cows' milk nor almond milk affected the growth of MCF-7 breast cancer cells or AsPC-1 pancreatic cancer cells significantly. Soy milk increased the growth rate of the breast cancer cells. These data indicate that prostate and breast cancer patients should be cautioned about the possible promotional effects of commercial dairy products and their substitutes. PMID:22043817

  7. Primary versus castration-resistant prostate cancer: modeling through novel murine prostate cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Georges; Monzer, Alissar; Bahmad, Hisham; Chamaa, Farah; Hamdar, Layal; Mouhieddine, Tarek H; Shayya, Sami; Eid, Assaad; Kobeissy, Firas; Liu, Yen-Nien; Abou-Kheir, Wassim

    2016-05-17

    Cell lines representing the progression of prostate cancer (PC) from an androgen-dependent to an androgen-independent state are scarce. In this study, we used previously characterized prostate luminal epithelial cell line (Plum), under androgen influence, to establish cellular models of PC progression. Cells derived from orthotopic tumors have been isolated to develop an androgen-dependent (PLum-AD) versus an androgen-independent (PLum-AI) model. Upon immunofluorescent, qRT-PCR and Western blot analyses, PLum-AD cells mostly expressed prostate epithelial markers while PLum-AI cells expressed mesenchymal cell markers. Interestingly, both cell lines maintained a population of stem/progenitor cells. Furthermore, our data suggest that both cell lines are tumorigenic; PLum-AD resulted in an adenocarcinoma whereas PLum-AI resulted in a sarcomatoid carcinoma when transplanted subcutaneously in NOD-SCID mice. Finally, gene expression profiles showed enrichment in functions involved in cell migration, apoptosis, as well as neoplasm invasiveness and metastasis in PLum-AI cells. In conclusion, these data suggest that the newly isolated cell lines represent a new in vitro model of androgen-dependent and -independent PC. PMID:27036046

  8. Solitary Spinal Epidural Metastasis from Prostatic Small Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Maeng, Young Hee

    2016-01-01

    Solitary, spinal epidural metastasis (SEM) that is not related to vertebral metastasis is very rare. And solitary SEM from prostatic cancer is rarely found in previously published reports. However, it is clinically significant due to the possibility of neurologic dysfunction, and it can be assessed by MRI. In this report, we show a case of solitary SEM arising from prostatic small cell carcinoma detected by MRI. PMID:27413569

  9. Comparative Metabolomic and Lipidomic Analysis of Phenotype Stratified Prostate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Booher, Christiana L.; Rhim, Johng S.; Rainville, Paul; Langridge, James; Baker, Andrew; Nyalwidhe, Julius O.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most prevalent cancer amongst men and the second most common cause of cancer related-deaths in the USA. Prostate cancer is a heterogeneous disease ranging from indolent asymptomatic cases to very aggressive life threatening forms. The goal of this study was to identify differentially expressed metabolites and lipids in prostate cells with different tumorigenic phenotypes. We have used mass spectrometry metabolomic profiling, lipidomic profiling, bioinformatic and statistical methods to identify, quantify and characterize differentially regulated molecules in five prostate derived cell lines. We have identified potentially interesting species of different lipid subclasses including phosphatidylcholines (PCs), phosphatidylethanolamines (PEs), glycerophosphoinositols (PIs) and other metabolites that are significantly upregulated in prostate cancer cells derived from distant metastatic sites. Transcriptomic and biochemical analysis of key enzymes that are involved in lipid metabolism demonstrate the significant upregulation of choline kinase alpha in the metastatic cells compared to the non-malignant and non-metastatic cells. This suggests that different de novo lipogenesis and other specific signal transduction pathways are activated in aggressive metastatic cells as compared to normal and non-metastatic cells. PMID:26244785

  10. Nuclear Kaiso Indicates Aggressive Prostate Cancers and Promotes Migration and Invasiveness of Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jacqueline; Wang, Honghe; Zhou, Jianjun; Hardy, Shana; Turner, Timothy; Austin, David; He, Qinghua; Wells, Alan; Grizzle, William E.; Yates, Clayton

    2013-01-01

    Kaiso, a p120 catenin-binding protein, is expressed in the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments of cells; however, the biological consequences and clinical implications of a shift between these compartments have yet to be established. Herein, we report an enrichment of nuclear Kaiso expression in cells of primary and metastatic prostate tumors relative to the normal prostate epithelium. Nuclear expression of Kaiso correlates with Gleason score (P < 0.001) and tumor grade (P < 0.001). There is higher nuclear expression of Kaiso in primary tumor/normal matched samples and in primary tumors from African American men (P < 0.0001). We further found that epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor up-regulates Kaiso at the RNA and protein levels in prostate cancer cell lines, but more interestingly causes a shift of cytoplasmic Kaiso to the nucleus that is reversed by the EGF receptor–specific kinase inhibitor, PD153035. In both DU-145 and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines, Kaiso inhibition (short hairpin RNA-Kaiso) decreased cell migration and invasion even in the presence of EGF. Further, Kaiso directly binds to the E-cadherin promoter, and inhibition of Kaiso in PC-3 cells results in increased E-cadherin expression, as well as re-establishment of cell–cell contacts. In addition, Kaiso-depleted cells show more epithelial morphology and a reversal of the mesenchymal markers N-cadherin and fibronectin. Our findings establish a defined oncogenic role of Kaiso in promoting the progression of prostate cancer. PMID:22974583

  11. Metformin and prostate cancer stem cells: a novel therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Mayer, M J; Klotz, L H; Venkateswaran, V

    2015-12-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in the world. Localized disease can be effectively treated with radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy. However, advanced prostate cancer is more difficult to treat and if metastatic, is incurable. There is a need for more effective therapy for advanced prostate cancer. One potential target is the cancer stem cell (CSC). CSCs have been described in several solid tumors, including prostate cancer, and contribute to therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence. Metformin, a common oral biguanide used to treat type 2 diabetes, has been demonstrated to have anti-neoplastic effects. Specifically, metformin targets CSCs in breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, glioblastoma and colon cancer. Metformin acts directly on the mitochondria to inhibit oxidative phosphorylation and reduce mitochondrial ATP production. This forces tumor cells to compensate by increasing the rate of glycolysis. CSCs rely heavily on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation for energy production. The glycolytic switch results in an energy crisis in these cells. Metformin could be used to exploit this metabolic weakness in CSCs. This would increase CSC sensitivity to conventional cancer therapies, circumventing treatment resistance and enhancing treatment efficacy. This review will explore the characteristics of prostate CSCs, their role in tumor propagation and therapeutic resistance and the role of metformin as a potential prostate CSC sensitizer to current anticancer therapies. PMID:26215782

  12. What is Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Key statistics for prostate cancer What is prostate cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... through the center of the prostate. Types of prostate cancer Almost all prostate cancers are adenocarcinomas . These cancers ...

  13. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Male Breast Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  14. KAT8 Regulates Androgen Signaling in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Young; Yu, Jindan; Abdulkadir, Sarki A; Chakravarti, Debabrata

    2016-08-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays pivotal roles in prostate cancer. Upon androgen stimulation, AR recruits the Protein kinase N1 (PKN1), which phosphorylates histone H3 at threonine 11, with subsequent recruitment of tryptophan, aspartic acid (WD) repeat-containing protein 5 (WDR5) and the su(var)3-9, enhancer of zeste, trithorax/mixed-lineage leukemia (SET1/MLL) histone methyltransferase complex to promote AR target gene activation and prostate cancer cell growth. However, the underlying mechanisms of target gene activation and cell growth subsequent to WDR5 recruitment are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate an epigenetic cross talk between histone modifications and AR target gene regulation. We discovered that K(lysine) acetyltransferase 8 (KAT8), a member of the MOZ, YBF2/SAS2, and TIP 60 protein 1 (MYST) family of histone acetyltransferases that catalyzes histone H4 lysine 16 acetylation, colocalized with WDR5 at AR target genes, resulting in hormone-dependent gene activation in prostate cancer cells. PKN1 or WDR5 knockdown severely inhibited KAT8 association with AR target genes and histone H4 lysine 16 acetylation upon androgen treatment. Knockdown of KAT8 significantly decreased AR target gene expression and prostate cancer cell proliferation. Collectively, these data describe a trans-histone modification pathway involving PKN1/histone H3 threonine 11 phosphorylation followed by WDR5/MLL histone methyltransferase and KAT8/histone acetyltransferase recruitment to effect androgen-dependent gene activation and prostate cancer cell proliferation. PMID:27268279

  15. MYC and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Cheryl M.; Bieberich, Charles J.; Dang, Chi V.; Nelson, William G.; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; De Marzo, Angelo M.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer, the majority of which is adenocarcinoma, is the most common epithelial cancer affecting a majority of elderly men in Western nations. Its manifestation, however, varies from clinically asymptomatic insidious neoplasms that progress slowly and do not threaten life to one that is highly aggressive with a propensity for metastatic spread and lethality if not treated in time. A number of somatic genetic and epigenetic alterations occur in prostate cancer cells. Some of these changes, such as loss of the tumor suppressors PTEN and p53, are linked to disease progression. Others, such as ETS gene fusions, appear to be linked more with early phases of the disease, such as invasion. Alterations in chromosome 8q24 in the region of MYC have also been linked to disease aggressiveness for many years. However, a number of recent studies in human tissues have indicated that MYC appears to be activated at the earliest phases of prostate cancer (e.g., in tumor-initiating cells) in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, a key precursor lesion to invasive prostatic adenocarcinoma. The initiation and early progression of prostate cancer can be recapitulated in genetically engineered mouse models, permitting a richer understanding of the cause and effects of loss of tumor suppressors and activation of MYC. The combination of studies using human tissues and mouse models paints an emerging molecular picture of prostate cancer development and early progression. This picture reveals that MYC contributes to disease initiation and progression by stimulating an embryonic stem cell–like signature characterized by an enrichment of genes involved in ribosome biogenesis and by repressing differentiation. These insights pave the way to potential novel therapeutic concepts based on MYC biology. PMID:21779461

  16. Elp3 drives Wnt-dependent tumor initiation and regeneration in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Ladang, Aurélie; Rapino, Francesca; Heukamp, Lukas C; Tharun, Lars; Shostak, Kateryna; Hermand, Damien; Delaunay, Sylvain; Klevernic, Iva; Jiang, Zheshen; Jacques, Nicolas; Jamart, Diane; Migeot, Valérie; Florin, Alexandra; Göktuna, Serkan; Malgrange, Brigitte; Sansom, Owen J; Nguyen, Laurent; Büttner, Reinhard; Close, Pierre; Chariot, Alain

    2015-11-16

    Tumor initiation in the intestine can rapidly occur from Lgr5(+) crypt columnar stem cells. Dclk1 is a marker of differentiated Tuft cells and, when coexpressed with Lgr5, also marks intestinal cancer stem cells. Here, we show that Elp3, the catalytic subunit of the Elongator complex, is required for Wnt-driven intestinal tumor initiation and radiation-induced regeneration by maintaining a subpool of Lgr5(+)/Dclk1(+)/Sox9(+) cells. Elp3 deficiency dramatically delayed tumor appearance in Apc-mutated intestinal epithelia and greatly prolonged mice survival without affecting the normal epithelium. Specific ablation of Elp3 in Lgr5(+) cells resulted in marked reduction of polyp formation upon Apc inactivation, in part due to a decreased number of Lgr5(+)/Dclk1(+)/Sox9(+) cells. Mechanistically, Elp3 is induced by Wnt signaling and promotes Sox9 translation, which is needed to maintain the subpool of Lgr5(+)/Dclk1(+) cancer stem cells. Consequently, Elp3 or Sox9 depletion led to similar defects in Dclk1(+) cancer stem cells in ex vivo organoids. Finally, Elp3 deficiency strongly impaired radiation-induced intestinal regeneration, in part because of decreased Sox9 protein levels. Together, our data demonstrate the crucial role of Elp3 in maintaining a subpopulation of Lgr5-derived and Sox9-expressing cells needed to trigger Wnt-driven tumor initiation in the intestine. PMID:26527802

  17. Prostatic inflammation enhances basal-to-luminal differentiation and accelerates initiation of prostate cancer with a basal cell origin

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh-Joon; Zhang, Li; Ittmann, Michael M.; Xin, Li

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been shown to promote the initiation and progression of diverse malignancies by inducing genetic and epigenetic alterations. In this study, we investigate an alternative mechanism through which inflammation promotes the initiation of prostate cancer. Adult murine prostate epithelia are composed predominantly of basal and luminal cells. Previous studies revealed that the two lineages are largely self-sustained when residing in their native microenvironment. To interrogate whether tissue inflammation alters the differentiation program of basal cells, we conducted lineage tracing of basal cells using a K14-CreER;mTmG model in concert with a murine model of prostatitis induced by infection from the uropathogenic bacteria CP9. We show that acute prostatitis causes tissue damage and creates a tissue microenvironment that induces the differentiation of basal cells into luminal cells, an alteration that rarely occurs under normal physiological conditions. Previously we showed that a mouse model with prostate basal cell-specific deletion of Phosphatase and tensin homolog (K14-CreER;Ptenfl/fl) develops prostate cancer with a long latency, because disease initiation in this model requires and is limited by the differentiation of transformation-resistant basal cells into transformation-competent luminal cells. Here, we show that CP9-induced prostatitis significantly accelerates the initiation of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in this model. Our results demonstrate that inflammation results in a tissue microenvironment that alters the normal prostate epithelial cell differentiation program and that through this cellular process inflammation accelerates the initiation of prostate cancer with a basal cell origin. PMID:24367088

  18. Paneth cell-like change in benign prostate can account for P504S (AMACR) reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Iczkowski, Kenneth A

    2014-01-01

    Paneth cell-like neuroendocrine metaplasia of benign and cancerous prostate was described in 1992. Here, we note that P504S (AMACR), the cytoplasmic marker for prostate cancer used alone or in concert with basal cell markers, can be strongly reactive in benign prostatic acini with Paneth cell-like change. PMID:25031776

  19. The Prostate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ... Publications Reports What You Need To Know About™ Prostate Cancer This booklet is about prostate cancer. Learning about ...

  20. Enlarged prostate

    MedlinePlus

    BPH; Benign prostatic hyperplasia (hypertrophy); Prostate - enlarged ... The actual cause of prostate enlargement is unknown. Factors linked to aging and changes in the cells of the testicles may have a role in the growth ...

  1. [Basal cell carcinoma of prostate: a report of three cases].

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Ma, L L; Zhang, S D; Lu, M; Tian, Y; He, Q; Jin, J

    2016-02-18

    To explore the clinical pathological characteristics and improve the recognition in the diagnosis and treatment of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of prostate. Three cases of BCC of prostate were reported and the relevant literature was reviewed to investigate the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. We analyzed three cases of prostatic BCC. Their ages were within a range of 57 to 83 years. One of them complained of hematuria and two complained of dysuria. All of them presented with prostatic hyperplasia. Two of them presented with high prostate specific antigen (PSA) and one with normal PSA. Case 1 had prostate cancer invasion of bladder, rectal fascia, with lymph node metastasis, bone metastasis and lung metastases. The patient received bladder resection+bilateral ureteral cutaneous ureterostomy+lymph node dissection on November 2, 2014 . Postoperative pathological diagnosis showed BCC. Reexamination of pelvic enhanced MRI in January 8, 2015 suggested pelvic recurrence. Abdominal enhanced CT showed multiple liver metastases and pancreatic metastasis on July 11, 2015. Prostate cancer specific death occurred in October 2015. Case 2 was diagnosed as BCC in prostate biopsy on March 27, 2015. Positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) showed pulmonary metastasis and bone metastasis. Then the patient received chemotherapy, endocrine therapy and local radiation therapy. Reexamination of PET-CT on January 11, 2016 showed that the lung metastase tumors and bone metastase tumors were larger than before. Up to January 10, 2016, the patient was still alive. Postoperative pathological changes of transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) in case 3 showed BCC might be considered. The PET-CT suggested residual prostate cancer, which might be associated with bilateral pelvic lymph node metastasis. In April 20, 2016, the review of PET-CT showed pelvic huge irregular hybrid density shadow, about 14.5 cm×10.0 cm×12.9 cm in size, and tumor recurrence was

  2. FOXP3-microRNA-146-NF-κB axis and therapy for precancerous lesions in prostate

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Runhua; Yi, Bin; Wei, Shi; Yang, Wei-Hsiung; Hart, Karen M.; Chauhan, Priyanka; Zhang, Wei; Mao, Xicheng; Liu, Xiuping; Liu, Chang-Gong; Wang, Lizhong

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressive activity of FOXP3 has been observed in tumor initiation, but the underlying mechanism still remains largely unknown. Here, we identified a FOXP3-microRNA-146 (miR-146)-NF-κB axis in vitro and in vivo in prostate cancer cells. We observed that FOXP3 dramatically induced the expression of miR-146a/b, which contributed to transcriptional inhibition of IRAK1 and TRAF6, in prostate cancer cell lines. Tissue-specific deletion of Foxp3 in mouse prostate caused a significant reduction of miR-146a and upregulation of NF-κB activation. In addition, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia lesions were observed in miR-146a mutant mice as well as in Foxp3 mutant mice. Notably, the NF-κB inhibitor bortezomib inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in prostate epithelial cells, attenuating prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia formation in Foxp3 mutant mice. Our data suggest that the FOXP3-miR-146-NF-κB axis has a functional role during tumor initiation in prostate cancer. Targeting the miR-146-NF-κB axis may provide a new therapeutic approach for prostate cancers with FOXP3 defects. PMID:25712341

  3. Adipocyte Secreted Factors Enhance Aggressiveness of Prostate Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Ângela; Pereira, Sofia S.; Costa, Madalena; Morais, Tiago; Pinto, Ana; Fernandes, Rúben; Monteiro, Mariana P.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with increased incidence and risk of mortality of prostate cancer. One of the proposed mechanisms underlying this risk association is the change in adipokines expression that could promote the development and progression of the prostate tumor cells. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of preadipocyte and adipocyte secretome in the proliferation, migration and invasion of androgen independent prostate carcinoma cells (RM1) and to assess cell proliferation in the presence of the adiposity signals leptin and insulin. RM1 cells were co-cultured in with preadipocytes, adipocytes or cultured in their respective conditioned medium. Cell proliferation was assessed by flow cytometry and XTT viability test. Cell migration was evaluated using a wound healing injury assay of RM1 cells cultured with conditioned media. Cellular invasion of RM1 cells co-cultured with adipocytes and preadipocytes was assessed using matrigel membranes. Preadipocyte conditioned medium was associated with a small increase in RM1 proliferation, while adipocytes conditioned media significantly increased RM1 cell proliferation (p<0.01). Adipocytes also significantly increased the RM1 cells proliferation in co-culture (p <0.01). Cell migration was higher in RM1 cells cultured with preadipocyte and adipocyte conditioned medium. RM1 cell invasion was significantly increased after co-culture with preadipocytes and adipocytes (p <0.05). Insulin also increased significantly the cell proliferation in contrast to leptin, which showed no effect. In conclusion, prostate carcinoma cells seem to be influenced by factors secreted by adipocytes that are able to increase their ability to proliferate, migrate and invade. PMID:25928422

  4. Human Prostate Side Population Cells Demonstrate Stem Cell Properties in Recombination with Urogenital Sinus Mesenchyme

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Barbara A.; Gangavarapu, Kalyan J.; Mathew, Grinu; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Morrison, Carl D.; Miller, Austin; Huss, Wendy J.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell enrichment provides a tool to examine prostate stem cells obtained from benign and malignant tissue. Functional assays can enrich stem cells based on common stem cell phenotypes, such as high ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter mediated efflux of Hoechst substrates (side population assay). This functional assay is based upon mechanisms that protect cells from environmental insult thus contributing to the survival and protection of the stem cell population. We have isolated and analyzed cells digested from twelve clinical prostate specimens based on the side population assay. Prostate stem cell properties of the isolated cells were tested by serial recombination with rat urogenital mesenchyme. Recombinants with side population cells demonstrate an increase in the frequency of human ductal growth and the number of glands per recombinant when compared to recombinants with non-side population cells. Isolated cells were capable of prostatic growth for up to three generations in the recombination assay with as little as 125 sorted prostate cells. The ability to reproducibly use cells isolated by fluorescence activated cell sorting from human prostate tissue is an essential step to a better understanding of human prostate stem cell biology. ABC transporter G2 (ABCG2) was expressed in recombinants from side population cells indicating the side population cells have self-renewal properties. Epithelial cell differentiation of recombinants was determined by immunohistochemical analysis for expression of the basal, luminal, and neuroendocrine markers, p63, androgen receptor, prostate specific antigen, and chromogranin A, respectively. Thus, the ABCG2 expressing side population demonstrates multipotency and self-renewal properties indicating stem cells are within this population. PMID:23383057

  5. Human prostate side population cells demonstrate stem cell properties in recombination with urogenital sinus mesenchyme.

    PubMed

    Foster, Barbara A; Gangavarapu, Kalyan J; Mathew, Grinu; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Morrison, Carl D; Miller, Austin; Huss, Wendy J

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell enrichment provides a tool to examine prostate stem cells obtained from benign and malignant tissue. Functional assays can enrich stem cells based on common stem cell phenotypes, such as high ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter mediated efflux of Hoechst substrates (side population assay). This functional assay is based upon mechanisms that protect cells from environmental insult thus contributing to the survival and protection of the stem cell population. We have isolated and analyzed cells digested from twelve clinical prostate specimens based on the side population assay. Prostate stem cell properties of the isolated cells were tested by serial recombination with rat urogenital mesenchyme. Recombinants with side population cells demonstrate an increase in the frequency of human ductal growth and the number of glands per recombinant when compared to recombinants with non-side population cells. Isolated cells were capable of prostatic growth for up to three generations in the recombination assay with as little as 125 sorted prostate cells. The ability to reproducibly use cells isolated by fluorescence activated cell sorting from human prostate tissue is an essential step to a better understanding of human prostate stem cell biology. ABC transporter G2 (ABCG2) was expressed in recombinants from side population cells indicating the side population cells have self-renewal properties. Epithelial cell differentiation of recombinants was determined by immunohistochemical analysis for expression of the basal, luminal, and neuroendocrine markers, p63, androgen receptor, prostate specific antigen, and chromogranin A, respectively. Thus, the ABCG2 expressing side population demonstrates multipotency and self-renewal properties indicating stem cells are within this population. PMID:23383057

  6. Lymphatic endothelial cells actively regulate prostate cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Shah, Tariq; Wildes, Flonne; Kakkad, Samata; Artemov, Dmitri; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2016-07-01

    Lymphatic vessels serve as the primary route for metastatic spread to lymph nodes. However, it is not clear how interactions between cancer cells and lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), especially within hypoxic microenvironments, affect the invasion of cancer cells. Here, using an MR compatible cell perfusion assay, we investigated the role of LEC-prostate cancer (PCa) cell interaction in the invasion and degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) by two human PCa cell lines, PC-3 and DU-145, under normoxia and hypoxia, and determined the metabolic changes that occurred under these conditions. We observed a significant increase in the invasion of ECM by invasive PC-3 cells, but not poorly invasive DU-145 cells when human dermal lymphatic microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-dlys) were present. Enhanced degradation of ECM by PC-3 cells in the presence of HMVEC-dlys identified interactions between HMVEC-dlys and PCa cells influencing cancer cell invasion. The enhanced ECM degradation was partly attributed to increased MMP-9 enzymatic activity in PC-3 cells when HMVEC-dlys were in close proximity. Significantly higher uPAR and MMP-9 expression levels observed in PC-3 cells compared to DU-145 cells may be one mechanism for increased invasion and degradation of matrigel by these cells irrespective of the presence of HMVEC-dlys. Hypoxia significantly decreased invasion by PC-3 cells, but this decrease was significantly attenuated when HMVEC-dlys were present. Significantly higher phosphocholine was observed in invasive PC-3 cells, while higher glycerophosphocholine was observed in DU-145 cells. These metabolites were not altered in the presence of HMVEC-dlys. Significantly increased lipid levels and lipid droplets were observed in PC-3 and DU-145 cells under hypoxia reflecting an adaptive survival response to oxidative stress. These results suggest that in vivo, invasive cells in or near lymphatic endothelial cells are likely to be more invasive and degrade the ECM

  7. fucosyltransferase1 and H-type complex carbohydrates modulate epithelial cell proliferation during prostatic branching morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Marker, P C; Stephan, J P; Lee, J; Bald, L; Mather, J P; Cunha, G R

    2001-05-01

    The prostate undergoes branching morphogenesis dependent on paracrine interactions between the prostatic epithelium and the urogenital mesenchyme. To identify cell-surface molecules that function in this process, monoclonal antibodies raised against epithelial cell-surface antigens were screened for antigen expression in the developing prostate and for their ability to alter development of prostates grown in serum-free organ culture. One antibody defined a unique expression pattern in the developing prostate and inhibited growth and ductal branching of cultured prostates by inhibiting epithelial cell proliferation. Expression cloning showed that this antibody binds fucosyltransferase1, an alpha-(1,2)-fucosyltransferase that synthesizes H-type structures on the complex carbohydrate modifications of some proteins and lipids. The lectin UEA I that binds H-type 2 carbohydrates also inhibited development of cultured prostates. These data demonstrate a previously unrecognized role for fucosyltransferase1 and H-type carbohydrates in controlling the spatial distribution of epithelial cell proliferation during prostatic branching morphogenesis. We also show that fucosyltransferase1 is expressed by epithelial cells derived from benign prostatic hyperplasia or prostate cancer; thus, fucosyltransferase1 may also contribute to pathological prostatic growth. These data further suggest that rare individuals who lack fucosyltransferase1 (Bombay phenotype) should be investigated for altered reproductive function and/or altered susceptibility to benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer. PMID:11319860

  8. Targeting Btk/Etk of prostate cancer cells by a novel dual inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Guo, W; Liu, R; Bhardwaj, G; Yang, J C; Changou, C; Ma, A-H; Mazloom, A; Chintapalli, S; Xiao, K; Xiao, W; Kumaresan, P; Sanchez, E; Yeh, C-T; Evans, C P; Patterson, R; Lam, K S; Kung, H-J

    2014-01-01

    Btk and Etk/BMX are Tec-family non-receptor tyrosine kinases. Btk has previously been reported to be expressed primarily in B cells and has an important role in immune responses and B-cell malignancies. Etk has been shown previously to provide a strong survival and metastasis signal in human prostate cancer cells, and to confer androgen independence and drug resistance. While the role of Etk in prostate carcinogenesis is well established, the functions of Btk in prostate cancer have never been investigated, likely due to the perception that Btk is a hematopoietic, but not epithelial, kinase. Herein, we found that Btk is overexpressed in prostate cancer tissues and prostate cancer cells. The level of Btk in prostate cancer tissues correlates with cancer grades. Knockdown of Btk expression selectively inhibits the growth of prostate cancer cells, but not that of the normal prostate epithelial cells, which express very little Btk. Dual inhibition of Btk and Etk has an additive inhibitory effect on prostate cancer cell growth. To explore Btk and Etk as targets for prostate cancer, we developed a small molecule dual inhibitor of Btk and Etk, CTN06. Treatment of PC3 and other prostate cancer cells, but not immortalized prostate epithelial cells with CTN06 resulted in effective cell killing, accompanied by the attenuation of Btk/Etk signals. The killing effect of CTN06 is more potent than that of commonly used inhibitors against Src, Raf/VEGFR and EGFR. CTN06 induces apoptosis as well as autophagy in human prostate cancer cells, and is a chemo-sensitizer for docetaxel (DTX), a standard of care for metastatic prostate cancer patients. CTN06 also impeded the migration of human prostate cancer cells based on a 'wound healing' assay. The anti-cancer effect of CTN06 was further validated in vivo in a PC3 xenograft mouse model. PMID:25188519

  9. SREBP-2 promotes stem cell-like properties and metastasis by transcriptional activation of c-Myc in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangyan; Wu, Jason Boyang; Li, Qinlong; Shigemura, Katsumi; Chung, Leland W.K.; Huang, Wen-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 (SREBP-2) transcription factor mainly controls cholesterol biosynthesis and homeostasis in normal cells. The role of SREBP-2 in lethal prostate cancer (PCa) progression remains to be elucidated. Here, we showed that expression of SREBP-2 was elevated in advanced pathologic grade and metastatic PCa and significantly associated with poor clinical outcomes. Biofunctional analyses demonstrated that SREBP-2 induced PCa cell proliferation, invasion and migration. Furthermore, overexpression of SREBP-2 increased the PCa stem cell population, prostasphere-forming ability and tumor-initiating capability, whereas genetic silencing of SREBP-2 inhibited PCa cell growth, stemness, and xenograft tumor growth and metastasis. Clinical and mechanistic data showed that SREBP-2 was positively correlated with c-Myc and induced c-Myc activation by directly interacting with an SREBP-2-binding element in the 5′-flanking c-Myc promoter region to drive stemness and metastasis. Collectively, these clinical and experimental results reveal a novel role of SREBP-2 in the induction of a stem cell-like phenotype and PCa metastasis, which sheds light on translational potential by targeting SREBP-2 as a promising therapeutic approach in PCa. PMID:26883200

  10. Stem Cell Based Gene Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong Jun; Song, Yun Seob

    2014-01-01

    Current prostate cancer treatment, especially hormone refractory cancer, may create profound iatrogenic outcomes because of the adverse effects of cytotoxic agents. Suicide gene therapy has been investigated for the substitute modality for current chemotherapy because it enables the treatment targeting the cancer cells. However the classic suicide gene therapy has several profound side effects, including immune-compromised due to viral vector. Recently, stem cells have been regarded as a new upgraded cellular vehicle or vector because of its homing effects. Suicide gene therapy using genetically engineered mesenchymal stem cells or neural stem cells has the advantage of being safe, because prodrug administration not only eliminates tumor cells but consequently kills the more resistant therapeutic stem cells as well. The attractiveness of prodrug cancer gene therapy by stem cells targeted to tumors lies in activating the prodrug directly within the tumor mass, thus avoiding systemic toxicity. Therapeutic achievements using stem cells in prostate cancer include the cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine prodrug system, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir, carboxyl esterase/CPT11, and interferon-beta. The aim of this study is to review the stem cell therapy in prostate cancer including its proven mechanisms and also limitations. PMID:25121103

  11. Proapoptotic effect of endocannabinoids in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Orellana-Serradell, O; Poblete, C E; Sanchez, C; Castellón, E A; Gallegos, I; Huidobro, C; Llanos, M N; Contreras, H R

    2015-04-01

    In the early stages, prostate cancer is androgen‑ dependent; therefore, medical castration has shown significant results during the initial stages of this pathology. Despite this early effect, advanced prostate cancer is resilient to such treatment. Recent evidence shows that derivatives of Cannabis sativa and its analogs may exert a protective effect against different types of oncologic pathologies. The purpose of the present study was to detect the presence of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2) on cancer cells with a prostatic origin and to evaluate the effect of the in vitro use of synthetic analogs. In order to do this, we used a commercial cell line and primary cultures derived from prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. The presence of the CB1 and CB2 receptors was determined by immunohistochemistry where we showed a higher expression of these receptors in later stages of the disease (samples with a high Gleason score). Later, treatments were conducted using anandamide, 2-arachidonoyl glycerol and a synthetic analog of anandamide, methanandamide. Using the MTT assay, we proved that the treatments produced a cell growth inhibitory effect on all the different prostate cancer cultures. This effect was demonstrated to be dose-dependent. The use of a specific CB1 receptor blocker (SR141716) confirmed that this effect was produced primarily from the activation of the CB1 receptor. In order to understand the MTT assay results, we determined cell cycle distribution by flow cytometry, which showed no variation at the different cell cycle stages in all the cultures after treatment. Treatment with endocannabinoids resulted in an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells as determined by Annexin V assays and caused an increase in the levels of activated caspase-3 and a reduction in the levels of Bcl-2 confirming that the reduction in cell viability noted in the MTT assay was caused by the activation of the apoptotic pathway. Finally, we observed

  12. Androgen receptors expressed by prostatic stromal cells obtained from younger versus older males exhibit opposite roles in prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Lu, You-Yi; Jiang, Bo; Zhao, Fu-Jun; Cui, Di; Jiang, Qi; Yu, Jun-Jie; Li, En-Hui; Wang, Xiao-Hai; Han, Bang-Min; Xia, Shu-Jie

    2013-01-01

    Aging is a major risk factor for prostate cancer (PCa), and prostatic stromal cells may also promote PCa progression. Accordingly, stromal cells do not equally promote PCa in older males and younger males. Therefore, it is also possible that the expression of androgen receptors (ARs) by prostatic stromal cells in older versus younger males plays different roles in PCa progression. Using a gene knockdown technique and coculture system, we found that the knockdown of the AR in prostatic stromal cells obtained from younger males could promote the invasiveness and metastasis of cocultured PC3/LNCaP cells in vitro. By contrast, the invasiveness and metastasis of LNCaP cells was inhibited when cocultured with prostatic stromal cells from older males that when AR expression was knocked down. Moreover, after targeting AR expression with small hairpin RNA (shRNA), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression in stromal cells was observed to increase in the younger group, but decreased or remained unchanged in the older group. One exception, however, was observed with MMP9. In vivo, after knocking down AR expression in prostatic stromal cells, the incidence of metastatic lymph nodes was observed to increase in the younger age group, but decreased in the older age group. Together, these data suggest that the AR in prostatic stromal cells played opposite roles in PCa metastasis for older versus younger males. Therefore, collectively, the function of the AR in prostatic stromal cells appears to change with age, and this may account for the increased incidence of PCa in older males. PMID:23792338

  13. ELEVATED EXPRESSION OF CANCER-ASSOCIATED PROLIFERATING CELL NUCLEAR ANTIGEN IN HIGH-GRADE PROSTATIC INTRAEPITHELIAL NEOPLASIA AND PROSTATE CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Hickey, Robert J.; Malkas, Linda H.; Koch, Michael O.; Li, Lang; Zhang, Shaobo; Sandusky, George E.; Grignon, David J; Eble, John N.; Cheng, Liang

    2011-01-01

    Background Proliferating-cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) plays an important role in DNA replication and repair. The expression and potential utility of this marker in prostatic neoplasia is uncertain. With the development of this new caPCNA selective antibody, we explored the potential utility of this marker in prostate cancer. Methods Using a traditional primary Fab2′ rabbit anti-caPCNA antibody-HRP conjugated secondary anti-Fab2′ antibody format, the expression of the caPCNA was analyzed in prostate tissue from 89 radical prostatectomy specimens. The caPCNA expression was correlated with clinicopathologic characteristics. Results The fraction of cells staining positively with caPCNA antibody in prostatic adenocarcinoma (mean, 23%) was significantly higher than that in benign prostatic epithelium (mean, 2%; p < 0.001) or high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) (mean, 6%; p < 0.05). Moreover, the intensity of caPCNA expression in prostatic adenocarcinoma (mean, 2.9) was significantly higher than that in benign prostatic tissue (mean, 0.7; p < 0.001) or high-grade PIN (mean, 2.0; p < 0.001). Benign prostatic epithelium showed only minimal or negative reactivity. There was significant correlation between the percentage of caPCNA expression and primary Gleason grade (p = 0.01), and with Gleason score (p = 0.02). Adenocarcinomas with positive vascular invasion had a significantly higher percentage of cells staining with caPCNA antibody (p < 0.0001) and a higher intensity of caPCNA expression (p = 0.04). Conclusions Our data indicate that increased expression of the cancer-associated isoform of PCNA is common in prostatic adenocarcinoma and its precursor and may be a useful biomarker. PMID:21031434

  14. Outcome of radical prostatectomy in primary circulating prostate cell negative prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Nigel P; Aedo, Sócrates; Reyes, Eduardo; Fuentealba, Cynthia; Jacob, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Around 90% of prostate cancers detected using the serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) as a screening test are considered to be localised. However, 20–30% of men treated by radical prostatectomy experience biochemical failure within two years of treatment. The presence of primary circulating prostate cells (CPCs) in the blood of these men implies a dissemination of the tumour and could indicate a greater risk of treatment failure. Objective To evaluate the use of the number of primary CPCs detected before surgery in the prediction of biochemical failure at ten years. Hypothesis The dissemination of cancer cells to distant sites will determine the patient’s prognosis. The absence of primary CPCs in men undergoing radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer may imply a less aggressive disease and therefore could be utilised as a prognostic factor to predict biochemical failure after surgery. Methods and patients A single-centre observational study of a cohort of 285 men who underwent radical prostatectomy as monotherapy for prostate cancer, in whom the number of CPCs prior to treatment was determined, and who were followed up for ten years to determine biochemical failure. A Cox proportional risks with polynomial fractions analysis was used to predict biochemical failure based on the number of primary CPCs detected. A decision curve analysis was performed for the model obtained. Results Kaplan–Meier curves for biochemical free survival at ten years was 47.34% (95% CI 38.71–55.48%). It is important to note that in CPC negative men, the ten years Kaplan–Meier biochemical-free survival was 90.35% (95% CI 75.0–96.27) whereas in men who were primary CPC positive, the biochemical free survival rate was 30.00% (95% CI 20.34–40.60%). The Coxs´model to predict biochemical failure using transformed data with a power of minus one for the number of primary CPCs detected, showed a Harrell´s C concordance index of 0.74 and a decision analysis curve

  15. Cytometric comparisons between circulating tumor cells from prostate cancer patients and the prostate tumor derived LNCaP cell line

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Daniel C.; Cho, Edward H.; Luttgen, Madelyn S.; Metzner, Thomas J.; Uson, Maria Loressa; Torrey, Melissa; Gross, Mitchell E.; Kuhn, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Many important experiments in cancer research are initiated with cell line data analysis due to the ease of accessibility and utilization. Recently, the ability to capture and characterize circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has become more prevalent in the research setting. This ability to detect, isolate, and analyze CTCs allows us to directly compare specific protein expression levels found in patient CTCs to cell lines. In this study, we use immunocytochemistry to compare the protein expression levels of total cytokeratin (CK) and androgen receptor (AR) in CTCs and cell lines from patients with prostate cancer to determine what translational insights might be gained through the use of cell line data. A non-enrichment CTC detection assay enables us to compare cytometric features and relative expression levels of CK and AR by indirect immunofluorescence from prostate cancer patients against the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. We measured physical characteristics of these two groups and observed significant differences in cell size, fluorescence intensity, and nuclear to cytoplasmic (N/C) ratio. We hope that these experiments will initiate a foundation to allow cell line data to be compared against characteristics of primary cells from patients. PMID:22306736

  16. Regulation of Prostate Development and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia by Autocrine Cholinergic Signaling via Maintaining the Epithelial Progenitor Cells in Proliferating Status.

    PubMed

    Wang, Naitao; Dong, Bai-Jun; Quan, Yizhou; Chen, Qianqian; Chu, Mingliang; Xu, Jin; Xue, Wei; Huang, Yi-Ran; Yang, Ru; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2016-05-10

    Regulation of prostate epithelial progenitor cells is important in prostate development and prostate diseases. Our previous study demonstrated a function of autocrine cholinergic signaling (ACS) in promoting prostate cancer growth and castration resistance. However, whether or not such ACS also plays a role in prostate development is unknown. Here, we report that ACS promoted the proliferation and inhibited the differentiation of prostate epithelial progenitor cells in organotypic cultures. These results were confirmed by ex vivo lineage tracing assays and in vivo renal capsule recombination assays. Moreover, we found that M3 cholinergic receptor (CHRM3) was upregulated in a large subset of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) tissues compared with normal tissues. Activation of CHRM3 also promoted the proliferation of BPH cells. Together, our findings identify a role of ACS in maintaining prostate epithelial progenitor cells in the proliferating state, and blockade of ACS may have clinical implications for the management of BPH. PMID:27167157

  17. SU-E-J-95: Predicting Treatment Outcomes for Prostate Cancer: Irradiation Responses of Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Most prostate cancers are slow-growing diseases but normally require much higher doses (80Gy) with conventional fractionation radiotherapy, comparing to other more aggressive cancers. This study is to disclose the radiobiological basis of this discrepancy by proposing the concept of prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs) and examining their specific irradiation responses. Methods: There are overwhelming evidences that CSC may keep their stemness, e.g. the competency of cell differentiation, in hypoxic microenvironments and hence become radiation resistive, though the probability is tiny for aggressiveness cancers. Tumor hypoxia used to be considered as an independent reason for poor treatment outcomes, and recent evidences showed that even prostate cancers were also hypoxic though they are very slow-growing. In addition, to achieve comparable outcomes to other much more aggressive cancers, much higher doses (rather than lower doses) are always needed for prostate cancers, regardless of its non-aggressiveness. All these abnormal facts can only be possibly interpreted by the irradiation responses characteristics of prostate CSCs. Results: Both normal cancer cells (NCCs) and CSCs exiting in tumors, in which NCCs are mainly for symptoms whereas killing all CSCs achieves disease-free. Since prostate cancers are slow-growing, the hypoxia in prostate cancers cannot possibly from NCCs, thus it is caused by hypoxic CSCs. However, single hypoxic cell cannot be imaged due to limitation of imaging techniques, unless a large group of hypoxic cells exist together, thus most of CSCs in prostate cancers are virtually hypoxic, i.e. not in working mode because CSCs in proliferating mode have to be normoxic, and this explains why prostate cancers are unaggressive. Conclusion: The fractional dose in conventional radiotherapy (∼2Gy) could only kill NCCs and CSCs in proliferating modes, whereas most CSCs survived fractional treatments since they were hypoxic, thus to eliminate all

  18. Growth factors mediated cell signalling in prostate cancer progression: Implications in discovery of anti-prostate cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Gaurav; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Negi, Arvind; Rana, Anil; Singh, Sandeep; Kumar, Raj

    2015-10-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality amongst world's population, in which prostate cancer is one of the most encountered malignancies among men. Globally, it is the sixth leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Prostate cancer is more prevalent in the developed world and is increasing at alarming rates in the developing countries. Prostate cancer is mostly a very sluggish progressing disease, caused by the overproduction of steroidal hormones like dihydrotestosterone or due to over-expression of enzymes such as 5-α-reductase. Various studies have revealed that growth factors play a crucial role in the progression of prostate cancer as they act either by directly elevating the level of steroidal hormones or upregulating enzyme efficacy by the active feedback mechanism. Presently, treatment options for prostate cancer include radiotherapy, surgery and chemotherapy. If treatment is done with prevailing traditional chemotherapy; it leads to resistance and development of androgen-independent prostate cancer that further complicates the situation with no cure option left. The current review article is an attempt to cover and establish an understanding of some major signalling pathways intervened through survival factors (IGF-1R), growth factors (TGF-α, EGF), Wnt, Hedgehog, interleukin, cytokinins and death factor receptor which are frequently dysregulated in prostate cancer. This will enable the researchers to design and develop better therapeutic strategies targeting growth factors and their cross talks mediated prostate cancer cell signalling. PMID:26297992

  19. ICRAC controls the rapid androgen response in human primary prostate epithelial cells and is altered in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Holzmann, Christian; Kilch, Tatiana; Kappel, Sven; Armbrüster, Andrea; Jung, Volker; Stöckle, Michael; Bogeski, Ivan; Schwarz, Eva C.; Peinelt, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Labelled 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) binding experiments have shown that expression levels of (yet unidentified) membrane androgen receptors (mAR) are elevated in prostate cancer and correlate with a negative prognosis. However, activation of these receptors which mediate a rapid androgen response can counteract several cancer hallmark functions such as unlimited proliferation, enhanced migration, adhesion and invasion and the inability to induce apoptosis. Here, we investigate the downstream signaling pathways of mAR and identify rapid DHT induced activation of store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) in primary cultures of human prostate epithelial cells (hPEC) from non-tumorous tissue. Consequently, down-regulation of Orai1, the main molecular component of Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels results in an almost complete loss of DHT induced SOCE. We demonstrate that this DHT induced Ca2+ influx via Orai1 is important for rapid androgen triggered prostate specific antigen (PSA) release. We furthermore identified alterations of the molecular components of CRAC channels in prostate cancer. Three lines of evidence indicate that prostate cancer cells down-regulate expression of the Orai1 homolog Orai3: First, Orai3 mRNA expression levels are significantly reduced in tumorous tissue when compared to non-tumorous tissue from prostate cancer patients. Second, mRNA expression levels of Orai3 are decreased in prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and DU145 when compared to hPEC from healthy tissue. Third, the pharmacological profile of CRAC channels in prostate cancer cell lines and hPEC differ and siRNA based knock-down experiments indicate changed Orai3 levels are underlying the altered pharmacological profile. The cancer-specific composition and pharmacology of CRAC channels identifies CRAC channels as putative targets in prostate cancer therapy. PMID:24240085

  20. ERBB2 increases metastatic potentials specifically in androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tome-Garcia, Jessica; Li, Dan; Ghazaryan, Seda; Shu, Limin; Wu, Lizhao

    2014-01-01

    Despite all the blood-based biomarkers used to monitor prostate cancer patients, prostate cancer remains as the second common cause of cancer mortality in men in the United States. This is largely due to a lack of understanding of the molecular pathways that are responsible for the aggressive forms of prostate cancers, the castrate-resistant prostate cancer and the metastatic prostate cancer. Cell signaling pathways activated by the ERBB2 oncogene or the RAS oncogene are frequently found to be altered in metastatic prostate cancers. To evaluate and define the role of the ERBB2/RAS pathway in prostate cancer metastasis, we have evaluated the impact of ERBB2- or RAS-overexpression on the metastatic potentials for four prostate cancer cell lines derived from tumors with different androgen sensitivities. To do so, we transfected the human DU145, LnCaP, and PC3 prostate cancer cells and the murine Myc-CaP prostate cancer cells with the activated form of ERBB2 or H-RAS and assessed their metastatic potentials by three complementary assays, a wound healing assay, a transwell motility assay, and a transwell invasion assay. We showed that while overexpression of ERBB2 increased the metastatic potential of the androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells (i.e. PC3 and DU145), it did not affect metastatic potentials of the androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells (i.e. LnCaP and Myc-CaP). In contrast, overexpression of H-RAS only increased the cell motility of Myc-CaP cells, which overexpress the human c-MYC oncogene. Our data suggest that ERBB2 collaborates with androgen signaling to promote prostate cancer metastasis, and that although RAS is one of the critical downstream effectors of ERBB2, it does not phenocopy ERBB2 for its impact on the metastatic potentials of prostate cancer cell lines. PMID:24937171

  1. Influence of lycopene on cell viability, cell cycle, and apoptosis of human prostate cancer and benign hyperplastic cells.

    PubMed

    Soares, Nathalia da Costa Pereira; Teodoro, Anderson Junger; Oliveira, Felipe Leite; Santos, Carlos Antonio do Nascimento; Takiya, Christina Maeda; Junior, Oswaldo Saback; Bianco, Mario; Junior, Antonio Palumbo; Nasciutti, Luiz Eurico; Ferreira, Luciana Bueno; Gimba, Etel Rodrigues Pereira; Borojevic, Radovan

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men and the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality in men of the Western world. Lycopene has received attention because of its expcted potential to prevent cancer. In the present study, we evaluated the influence of lycopene on cell viability, cell cycle, and apoptosis of human prostate cancer cells and benign prostate hyperplastic cells. Using MTT assay, we observed a decrease of cell viability in all cancer cell lines after treatment with lycopene, which decreased the percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase and increased in S and G2/M phases after 96 h of treatment in metastatic prostate cancer cell lineages. Flow citometry analysis of cell cycle revealed lycopene promoted cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase after 48 and 96 h of treatment in a primary cancer cell line. Using real time PCR assay, lycopene also induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells with altered gene expression of Bax and Bcl-2. No effect was observed in benign prostate hyperplasia cells. These results suggest an effect of lycopene on activity of human prostate cancer cells. PMID:24053141

  2. Gold nanocages for imaging and therapy of prostate cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, Laura; Avvakumova, Svetlana; Galbiati, Elisabetta; Locarno, Silvia A.; Macchi, Chiara; D'Alfonso, Laura; Ruscica, Massimiliano; Magni, Paolo; Collini, Maddalena; Romeo, Sergio; Chirico, Giuseppe; Prosperi, Davide

    2016-04-01

    Gold nanocages (AuNCs) have been shown to be a useful tool both for imaging and hyperthermia therapy of cancer, thanks to their outstanding optical properties, low toxicity and facile functionalization with targeting molecules, including peptides and antibodies. In particular, hyperthermia is a minimally invasive therapy which takes advantage of the peculiar properties of gold nanoparticles to efficiently convert the absorbed light into heat. Here, we use AuNCs for the selective targeting and imaging of prostate cancer cells. Moreover, we report the hyperthermic effect characterization of the AuNCs both in solution and internalized in cells. Prostate cancer cells were irradiated at different exposure times, with a pulsed near infrared laser, and the cellular viability was evaluated by confocal microscopy.

  3. Isolation and characterization of circulating tumor cells in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Elan; Lee, Guang Yu; Akhtar, Naveed H.; Kirby, Brian J.; Giannakakou, Paraskevi; Tagawa, Scott T.; Nanus, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells found in the peripheral blood that putatively originate from established sites of malignancy and likely have metastatic potential. Analysis of CTCs has demonstrated promise as a prognostic marker as well as a source of identifying potential targets for novel therapeutics. Isolation and characterization of these cells for study, however, remain challenging owing to their rarity in comparison with other cellular components of the peripheral blood. Several techniques that exploit the unique biochemical properties of CTCs have been developed to facilitate their isolation. Positive selection of CTCs has been achieved using microfluidic surfaces coated with antibodies against epithelial cell markers or tumor-specific antigens such as EpCAM or prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA). Following isolation, characterization of CTCs may help guide clinical decision making. For instance, molecular and genetic characterization may shed light on the development of chemotherapy resistance and mechanisms of metastasis without the need for a tissue biopsy. This paper will review novel isolation techniques to capture CTCs from patients with advanced prostate cancer, as well as efforts to characterize the CTCs. We will also review how these analyzes can assist in clinical decision making. Conclusion: The study of CTCs provides insight into the molecular biology of tumors of prostate origin that will eventually guide the development of tailored therapeutics. These advances are predicated on high yield and accurate isolation techniques that exploit the unique biochemical features of these cells. PMID:23087897

  4. Prostate Cancer Stem-like Cells Contribute to the Development of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Diane; Lin, Xiaozeng; Wong, Nicholas; Gu, Yan; Tang, Damu

    2015-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been the standard care for patients with advanced prostate cancer (PC) since the 1940s. Although ADT shows clear benefits for many patients, castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) inevitably occurs. In fact, with the two recent FDA-approved second-generation anti-androgens abiraterone and enzalutamide, resistance develops rapidly in patients with CRPC, despite their initial effectiveness. The lack of effective therapeutic solutions towards CRPC largely reflects our limited understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for CRPC development. While persistent androgen receptor (AR) signaling under castration levels of serum testosterone (<50 ng/mL) contributes to resistance to ADT, it is also clear that CRPC evolves via complex mechanisms. Nevertheless, the physiological impact of individual mechanisms and whether these mechanisms function in a cohesive manner in promoting CRPC are elusive. In spite of these uncertainties, emerging evidence supports a critical role of prostate cancer stem-like cells (PCSLCs) in stimulating CRPC evolution and resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide. In this review, we will discuss the recent evidence supporting the involvement of PCSLC in CRPC acquisition as well as the pathways and factors contributing to PCSLC expansion in response to ADT. PMID:26593949

  5. Detection of micrometastatic prostate cancer cells in the bone marrow of patients with prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Deguchi, T.; Yang, M.; Ehara, H.; Ito, S.; Nishino, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Ito, Y.; Shimokawa, K.; Tanaka, T.; Imaeda, T.; Doi, T.; Kawada, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Thirty-five patients with prostate cancer were examined for micrometastases to the bone marrow using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with primers specific for the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) gene. Of nine patients with bone metastases detectable by bone scan imaging, five patients had PSA mRNA expression in the bone marrow detectable by RT-PCR. Of 26 patients with negative bone scan findings, seven patients had PSA mRNA expression detectable in the bone marrow. RT-PCR could detect micrometastatic prostate cancer cells in the bone marrow that were not detectable by bone scan imaging. Of 16 patients with a serum PSA concentration of 25 ng ml(-1) or greater, only nine (56.3%) had bone metastases detected by bone scans. Of the remaining seven patients, five had micrometastases to the bone marrow detected by RT-PCR. Overall, 14 of 16 patients (87.5%) with a serum PSA concentration of 25 ng ml(-1) or greater had metastatic bone diseases including bone marrow micrometastases. Of 19 patients with a serum PSA concentration of less than 25 ng ml(-1), two (10.5%) had only micrometastatic disease detected by RT-PCR. A significant correlation was observed between the incidence of bone involvement and the serum PSA concentration. This study suggests that RT-PCR will potentially develop into a relevant tool to assess bone involvement including bone marrow micrometastases and establish a precise correlation between serum PSA concentration and metastatic bone disease in patients with prostate cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:9043017

  6. Prostate-specific expression of Bax delivered by an adenoviral vector induces apoptosis in LNCaP prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lowe, S L; Rubinchik, S; Honda, T; McDonnell, T J; Dong, J Y; Norris, J S

    2001-09-01

    In prostate carcinoma, overexpression of the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-2 has been found to be associated with resistance to therapies including radiation and androgen ablation. Restoring the balance of Bcl-2 family members may result in the induction of apoptosis in prostate cancer cells previously resistant to treatment. To accomplish this, a strategy involving overexpression of the pro-apoptotic gene Bax was executed. The use of cytotoxic genes such as Bax require selective expression of the gene. In this study, we examined the ability of selective expression of Bax protein directed by a prostate-specific promoter to induce apoptosis in human prostate carcinoma. A second-generation adenoviral vector was constructed with the modified prostate-specific probasin promoter, ARR2PB, directing expression of an HA-tagged Bax gene and a green fluorescent protein reporter translated from an internal ribosome entry site (ARR2PB.Bax.GFP). ARR2PB promoter activity is tightly regulated and highly prostate specific and is responsive to androgens and glucocorticoids. The prostate-specific promoter-Bax-GFP transgene cassette was inserted into a cloning site near the right inverted terminal repeat of the adenoviral vector to retain specificity of the promoter. LNCaP cells infected with Ad/ARR(2)PB.Bax.GFP showed high levels of Bax expression 48 h after infection resulting in an 85% reduction in cell viability. Importantly, LNCaP cells stably transfected to overexpress Bcl-2 showed similar patterns of cell death when infected with Ad/ARR(2)PB.Bax.GFP, an 82% reduction in cell viability seen 48 h after infection. Apoptosis was confirmed by measuring caspase activation and using the TUNEL assay. Tissue specificity was evaluated using A549 cells (lung adenocarcinoma), SK-Hep-1 (liver cancer) cells, and Hela (cervical cancer) cells which did not show detectable expression of virally delivered Bax protein or any increase in cell death. Systemic administration of Ad/ARR2PB. Bax.GFP in nude

  7. Natural compound Alternol induces oxidative stress-dependent apoptotic cell death preferentially in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yuzhe; Chen, Ruibao; Huang, Yan; Li, Guodong; Huang, Yiling; Chen, Jiepeng; Duan, Lili; Zhu, Bao-Ting; Thrasher, J Brantley; Zhang, Xu; Li, Benyi

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancers at the late stage of castration resistance are not responding well to most of current therapies available in clinic, reflecting a desperate need of novel treatment for this life-threatening disease. In this study, we evaluated the anti-cancer effect of a recently isolated natural compound Alternol in multiple prostate cancer cell lines with the properties of advanced prostate cancers in comparison to prostate-derived non-malignant cells. As assessed by trypan blue exclusion assay, a significant cell death was observed in all prostate cancer cell lines except DU145 but not in non-malignant (RWPE-1and BPH1) cells. Further analyses revealed that Alternol-induced cell death was an apoptotic response in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as evidenced by the appearance of apoptosis hallmarks such as Caspase-3 processing and PARP cleavage. Interestingly, Alternol-induced cell death was completely abolished by reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers, N-acetylcysteine (N-Ac) and dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA). We also demonstrated that the pro-apoptotic Bax protein was activated after Alternol treatment and was critical for Alternol-induced apoptosis. Animal xenograft experiments in nude mice showed that Alternol treatment largely suppressed tumor growth of PC-3 xenografts but not Bax-null DU-145 xenografts in vivo. These data suggest that Alternol might serve as a novel anticancer agent for late stage prostate cancer patient. PMID:24688053

  8. Adipocytes promote prostate cancer stem cell self-renewal through amplification of the cholecystokinin autocrine loop

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Kai-Dun; Liu, Ji; Jovanovic, Lidija; An, Jiyuan; Hill, Michelle M.; Vela, Ian; Lee, Terence Kin-Wah; Ma, Stephanie; Nelson, Colleen; Russell, Pamela J.; Clements, Judith A.; Ling, Ming-Tat

    2016-01-01

    Obesity has long been linked with prostate cancer progression, although the underlying mechanism is still largely unknown. Here, we report that adipocytes promote the enrichment of prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs) through a vicious cycle of autocrine amplification. In the presence of adipocytes, prostate cancer cells actively secrete the peptide hormone cholecystokinin (CCK), which not only stimulates prostate CSC self-renewal, but also induces cathepsin B (CTSB) production of the adipocytes. In return, CTSB facilitates further CCK secretion by the cancer cells. More importantly, inactivation of CCK receptor not only suppresses CTSB secretion by the adipocytes, but also synergizes the inhibitory effect of CTSB inhibitor on adipocyte-promoted prostate CSC self-renewal. In summary, we have uncovered a novel mechanism underlying the mutual interplay between adipocytes and prostate CSCs, which may help explaining the role of adipocytes in prostate cancer progression and provide opportunities for effective intervention. PMID:26700819

  9. Cell mates: paracrine and stromal targets for prostate cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Sluka, Pavel; Davis, Ian D

    2013-08-01

    After many years of limited treatment options for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), multiple systemic therapies are now available, providing patients with significant improvements in survival, symptom control and bone health. Most of the recent advances in this area have been based on better understanding of mCRPC biology, particularly with respect to the key role of androgen receptor signalling. However, most therapies are targeted towards the malignant epithelial cell component of the cancer and it should not be forgotten that cancer cells exist in close and symbiotic relationships with other components of the tumour. Paracrine and stromal signals are often critical to the growth of the cancer and represent new potential therapeutic targets that are separate from the malignant epithelial cells. The stroma produces numerous growth factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor family members, platelet-derived growth factors and fibroblast growth factors, which are all critical for tumour growth. Targeting prostate-cancer-associated fibroblasts in order to destroy the physical and functional scaffold of a cancer is also a logical approach. The interaction between prostate cancer and the immune system remains an active topic of basic and clinical research, with cytokines, chemokines and growth factors being potential targets for therapy. The biology of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and of circulating tumour cells might also provide insight into new therapeutic targets. PMID:23857181

  10. Sphingosine enhances apoptosis of radiation-resistant prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nava, V E; Cuvillier, O; Edsall, L C; Kimura, K; Milstien, S; Gelmann, E P; Spiegel, S

    2000-08-15

    Ceramide has been implicated as an important component of radiation-induced apoptosis of human prostate cancer cells. We examined the role of the sphingolipid metabolites--ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine-1-phosphate--in susceptibility to radiation-induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cell lines with different sensitivities to gamma-irradiation. Exposure of radiation-sensitive TSU-Pr1 cells to 8-Gy irradiation led to a sustained increase in ceramide, beginning after 12 h of treatment and increasing to 2.5- to 3-fold within 48 h. Moreover, irradiation of TSU-Pr1 cells also produced a marked and rapid 50% decrease in the activity of sphingosine kinase, the enzyme that phosphorylates sphingosine to form sphingosine-1-phosphate. In contrast, the radiation-insensitive cell line, LNCaP, had sustained sphingosine kinase activity and did not produce elevated ceramide levels on 8-Gy irradiation. Although LNCaP cells are highly resistant to gamma-irradiation-induced apoptosis, they are sensitive to the death-inducing effects of tumor necrosis factor alpha, which also increases ceramide levels in these cells (K. Kimura et al., Cancer Res., 59: 1606-1614, 1999). Moreover, we found that although irradiation alone did not increase sphingosine levels in LNCaP cells, tumor necrosis factor alpha plus irradiation induced significantly higher sphingosine levels and markedly reduced intracellular levels of sphingosine-1-phosphate. The elevation of sphingosine levels either by exogenous sphingosine or by treatment with the sphingosine kinase inhibitor N,N-dimethylsphingosine induced apoptosis and also sensitized LNCaP cells to gamma-irradiation-induced apoptosis. Our data suggest that the relative levels of sphingolipid metabolites may play a role in determining the radiosensitivity of prostate cancer cells, and that the enhancement of ceramide and sphingosine generation could be of therapeutic value. PMID:10969794

  11. Early Human Prostate Adenocarcinomas Harbor Androgen-Independent Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fiñones, Rita R.; Yeargin, Jo; Lee, Melissa; Kaur, Aman Preet; Cheng, Clari; Sun, Paulina; Wu, Christopher; Nguyen, Catherine; Wang-Rodriguez, Jessica; Meyer, April N.; Baird, Stephen M.; Donoghue, Daniel J.; Haas, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Although blockade of androgen receptor (AR) signaling represents the main treatment for advanced prostate cancer (PrCa), many patients progress to a lethal phenotype of “Castration-Resistant” prostate cancer (CR-PrCa). With the hypothesis that early PrCa may harbor a population of androgen-unresponsive cancer cells as precursors to CR-recurrent disease, we undertook the propagation of androgen-independent cells from PrCa-prostatectomy samples of early, localized (Stage-I) cases. A collection of 120 surgical specimens from prostatectomy cases was established, among which 54 were adenocarcinomas. Hormone-free cell culture conditions were developed allowing routine propagation of cells expressing prostate basal cell markers and stem/progenitor cell markers, and which proliferated as spheres/spheroids in suspension cultures. Colonies of androgen-independent epithelial cells grew out from 30/43 (70%) of the adenocarcinoma cases studied in detail. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry showed that CR-PrCa cells were positive for CD44, CD133, CK5/14, c-kit, integrin α2β1, SSEA4, E-Cadherin and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ALDH). All 30 CR-PrCa cell cultures were also TERT-positive, but negative for TMPRSS2-ERG. Additionally, a subset of 22 of these CR-PrCa cell cultures was examined by orthotopic xenografting in intact and castrated SCID mice, generating histologically typical locally-invasive human PrCa or undifferentiated cancers, respectively, in 6–8 weeks. Cultured PrCa cells and orthotopically-induced in vivo cancers lacked PSA expression. We report here the propagation of Cancer Initiating Cells (CIC) directly from Stage I human PrCa tissue without selection or genetic manipulation. The propagation of stem/progenitor-like CR-PrCa cells derived from early human prostate carcinomas suggests the existence of a subpopulation of cells resistant to androgen-deprivation therapy and which may drive the subsequent emergence of disseminated CR-PrCa. PMID:24086346

  12. Phase transitions in tumor growth: II prostate cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanos-Pérez, J. A.; Betancourt-Mar, A.; De Miguel, M. P.; Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Royuela-García, M.; Tejera, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a mechanism for prostate cancer cell lines growth, LNCaP and PC3 based on a Gompertz dynamics. This growth exhibits a multifractal behavior and a "second order" phase transition. Finally, it was found that the cellular line PC3 exhibits a higher value of entropy production rate compared to LNCaP, which is indicative of the robustness of PC3, over to LNCaP and may be a quantitative index of metastatic potential tumors.

  13. Presence of calcitonin-like immunoreactivity (iCT) in human prostate gland: evidence for iCT secretion by cultured prostate cells.

    PubMed

    Shah, G V; Noble, M J; Austenfeld, M; Weigel, J; Deftos, L J; Mebust, W K

    1992-01-01

    Immunoreactive calcitonin (iCT) has been detected in human prostate tissue extracts as well as seminal plasma. The present studies were undertaken to examine whether iSCT (immunoreactive salmon CT-like human peptide) co-exists with iHCT (thyroid CT-like substance) in human prostate tissue extracts, and whether these substances are secreted by primary prostate cells in culture. Since the local secretion of these substances seems to increase in some neoplasms, a second objective of the study was to examine whether basal secretion of iCTs from primary prostate cells is increased in carcinoma. The present results have shown that both iHCT and iSCT were present in prostate tissue extracts. The mean iHCT levels in extracts of benign hyperplastic prostates (BPH) were 0.59 ng/g prostate, and these were significantly lower than iHCT concentrations in prostatic carcinoma (PC) (2.53 ng/g). No significant differences in their iSCT contents were observed. However, the results from culture of over 90 individual prostate tissue specimens from BPH or PC indicate that primary prostate cells secreted detectable quantities of iSCT and the basal release of this material from PC prostate cultures was almost four-fold higher than that from BPH prostate cultures. These results suggest that a CT-like immunoreactive material is secreted by primary prostate cells in culture, and the basal secretion of this material is significantly higher in PC cells as compared to BPH cells. Endogenous secretion of prostatic CT, and the elevation of its expression in PC suggest that it may serve as a regulatory factor in the pathophysiology of the prostate gland. PMID:1409122

  14. Current Stem Cell Biomarkers and Their Functional Mechanisms in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kaile; Zhou, Shukui; Wang, Leilei; Wang, Jianlong; Zou, Qingsong; Zhao, Weixin; Fu, Qiang; Fang, Xiaolan

    2016-01-01

    Currently there is little effective treatment available for castration resistant prostate cancer, which is responsible for the majority of prostate cancer related deaths. Emerging evidence suggested that cancer stem cells might play an important role in resistance to traditional cancer therapies, and the studies of cancer stem cells (including specific isolation and targeting on those cells) might benefit the discovery of novel treatment of prostate cancer, especially castration resistant disease. In this review, we summarized major biomarkers for prostate cancer stem cells, as well as their functional mechanisms and potential application in clinical diagnosis and treatment of patients. PMID:27447616

  15. Transcription Factor HBP1 Enhances Radiosensitivity by Inducing Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yicheng; Wang, Yueping; Yu, Yanlan; Xu, Liwei; Zhang, Youyun; Yu, Shicheng; Li, Gonghui; Zhang, Zhigeng

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy for prostate cancer has been gradually carried out in recent years; however, acquired radioresistance often occurred in some patients after radiotherapy. HBP1 (HMG-box transcription factor 1) is a transcriptional inhibitor which could inhibit the expression of dozens of oncogenes. In our previous study, we showed that the expression level of HBP1 was closely related to prostate cancer metastasis and prognosis, but the relationship between HBP1 and radioresistance for prostate cancer is largely unknown. In this study, the clinical data of patients with prostate cancer was compared, and the positive correlation was revealed between prostate cancer brachytherapy efficacy and the expression level of HBP1 gene. Through research on prostate cancer cells in vitro, we found that HBP1 expression levels were negatively correlated with oncogene expression levels. Furthermore, HBP1 overexpression could sensitize prostate cancer cells to radiation and increase apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. In addition, animal model was employed to analyze the relationship between HBP1 gene and prostate cancer radiosensitivity in vivo; the result showed that knockdown of HBP1 gene could decrease the sensitivity to radiation of xenograft. These studies identified a specific molecular mechanism underlying prostate cancer radiosensitivity, which suggested HBP1 as a novel target in prostate cancer radiotherapy. PMID:26942107

  16. Triterpene saponosides from Lysimachia ciliata differentially attenuate invasive potential of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Koczurkiewicz, Paulina; Podolak, Irma; Skrzeczyńska-Moncznik, Joanna; Sarna, Michał; Wójcik, Katarzyna Anna; Ryszawy, Damian; Galanty, Agnieszka; Lasota, Sławomir; Madeja, Zbigniew; Czyż, Jarosław; Michalik, Marta

    2013-10-25

    Neither androgen ablation nor chemotherapeutic agents are effective in reducing the risk of prostate cancer progression. On the other hand, multifaceted effects of phytochemicals, such as triterpene saponins, on cancer cells have been suggested. A promising safety and tolerability profile indicate their possible application in the treatment of advanced prostate cancers. We analyzed the specificity, selectivity and versatility of desglucoanagalloside B effects on human prostate cancer cells derived from prostate cancer metastases to brain (DU-145 cells) and bone (PC-3 cells). Prominent growth arrest and apoptotic response of both cell types was observed in the presence of sub-micromolar desglucoanagalloside B concentrations. This was accompanied by cytochrome c release and caspase 3/7 activation. A relatively low cytostatic and pro-apoptotic response of cancer cells to a desglucoanagalloside B analog, anagallosaponin IV, illustrated the specificity of the effects of desglucoanagalloside B, whereas the low sensitivity of normal prostate PNT2 cells to desglucoanagalloside B showed the selectivity of its action. Inhibition of cancer cell motility was observed in the presence of both saponins, however only desglucoanagalloside B attenuated cancer cell invasive potential, predominantly through an effect on cell elastic properties. These data demonstrate the versatility of its effects on prostate cancer cells. In contrast to PNT2 cells, cancer cells tested in this study were relatively resistant to mitoxantrone. The multifaceted action of desglucoanagalloside B on basic cellular traits, crucial for prostate cancer progression, opens perspectives for elaboration of combined palliative therapies and new prostate cancer prophylaxis regimens. PMID:23954719

  17. Engineering chemically modified viruses for prostate cancer cell recognition.

    PubMed

    Mohan, K; Weiss, G A

    2015-12-01

    Specific detection of circulating tumor cells and characterization of their aggressiveness could improve cancer diagnostics and treatment. Metastasis results from such tumor cells, and causes the majority of cancer deaths. Chemically modified viruses could provide an inexpensive and efficient approach to detect tumor cells and quantitate their cell surface biomarkers. However, non-specific adhesion between the cell surface receptors and the virus surface presents a challenge. This report describes wrapping the virus surface with different PEG architectures, including as fusions to oligolysine, linkers, spacers and scaffolded ligands. The reported PEG wrappers can reduce by >75% the non-specific adhesion of phage to cell surfaces. Dynamic light scattering verified the non-covalent attachment by the reported wrappers as increased sizes of the virus particles. Further modifications resulted in specific detection of prostate cancer cells expressing PSMA, a key prostate cancer biomarker. The approach allowed quantification of PSMA levels on the cell surface, and could distinguish more aggressive forms of the disease. PMID:26463253

  18. Individual Rac GTPases Mediate Aspects of Prostate Cancer Cell and Bone Marrow Endothelial Cell Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Moumita; Sequeira, Linda; Jenkins-Kabaila, Mashariki; Dubyk, Cara W.; Pathak, Surabhi; van Golen, Kenneth L.

    2011-01-01

    The Rho GTPases organize the actin cytoskeleton and are involved in cancer metastasis. Previously, we demonstrated that RhoC GTPase was required for PC-3 prostate cancer cell invasion. Targeted down-regulation of RhoC led to sustained activation of Rac1 GTPase and morphological, molecular and phenotypic changes reminiscent of epithelial to mesenchymal transition. We also reported that Rac1 is required for PC-3 cell diapedesis across a bone marrow endothelial cell layer. In the current study, we queried whether Rac3 and RhoG GTPases also have a role in prostate tumor cell diapedesis. Using specific siRNAs we demonstrate roles for each protein in PC-3 and C4-2 cell adhesion and diapedesis. We have shown that the chemokine CCL2 induces tumor cell diapedesis via Rac1 activation. Here we find that RhoG partially contributes to CCL2-induced tumor cell diapedesis. We also find that Rac1 GTPase mediates tight binding of prostate cancer cells to bone marrow endothelial cells and promotes retraction of endothelial cells required for tumor cell diapedesis. Finally, Rac1 leads to β1 integrin activation, suggesting a mechanism that Rac1 can mediate tight binding with endothelial cells. Together, our data suggest that Rac1 GTPase is key mediator of prostate cancer cell-bone marrow endothelial cell interactions. PMID:21776386

  19. Adult murine prostate basal and luminal cells are self-sustained lineages that can both serve as targets for prostate cancer initiation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Nahyun; Zhang, Boyu; Zhang, Li; Ittmann, Michael; Xin, Li

    2012-01-01

    Summary The prostate epithelial lineage hierarchy and the cellular origin for prostate cancer remain inadequately defined. Using a lineage tracing approach, we show that adult rodent prostate basal and luminal cells are independently self-sustained in vivo. Disrupting the tumor suppressor Pten in either lineage led to prostate cancer initiation. However, the cellular composition and onset dynamics of the resulting tumors are distinctive. Prostate luminal cells are more responsive to Pten null-induced mitogenic signaling. In contrast, basal cells are resistant to direct transformation. Instead, loss of Pten activity induces the capability of basal cells to differentiate into transformation-competent luminal cells. Our study suggests that deregulation of epithelial differentiation is a critical step for the initiation of prostate cancers of basal cell origin. PMID:22340597

  20. Honokiol Inhibits Androgen Receptor Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hahm, Eun-Ryeong; Karlsson, A. Isabella; Bonner, Michael Y.; Arbiser, Jack L.; Singh, Shivendra V.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND We have shown previously that honokiol (HNK), a bioactive component of the medicinal plant Magnolia officinalis, inhibits growth of human prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. However, the effect of HNK on androgen receptor (AR) signaling is not known. METHODS LNCaP, C4-2, and TRAMP-C1 cells were used for various assays. Trypan blue dye exclusion assay or clonogenic assay was performed for determination of cell viability. The effects of HNK and/or its analogs on protein levels of AR and its target gene product prostate specific antigen (PSA) were determined by western blotting. RNA interference of p53 was achieved by transient transfection. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed for mRNA expression of AR. Nuclear translocation of AR was visualized by microscopy. Apoptosis was quantified by DNA fragmentation assay or flow cytometry after Annexin V-propidium iodide staining. RESULTS HNK and its dichloroacetate analog (HDCA) were relatively more effective in suppressing cell viability and AR protein level than honokiol epoxide or biseugenol. Nuclear translocation of AR stimulated by a synthetic androgen (R1881) was markedly suppressed in the presence of HNK. Downregulation of AR protein resulting from HNK exposure was attributable to transcriptional repression as well as proteasomal degradation. HNK-mediated suppression of AR protein was maintained in LNCaP cells after knockdown of p53 protein. HNK-induced apoptosis was not affected by R1881 treatment. CONCLUSIONS The present study demonstrates, for the first time, that HNK inhibits activity of AR in prostate cancer cells regardless of the p53 status. PMID:24338950

  1. Clonotypic Diversification of Intratumoral T Cells Following Sipuleucel-T Treatment in Prostate Cancer Subjects.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Nadeem; Cham, Jason; Zhang, Li; DeVries, Todd; Letarte, Simon; Pufnock, Jeff; Hamm, David; Trager, James; Fong, Lawrence

    2016-07-01

    Sipuleucel-T is an autologous cellular therapy for asymptomatic, or minimally symptomatic, metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer, designed to stimulate an immune response against prostate cancer. In a recent clinical trial (NCT00715104), we found that neoadjuvant sipuleucel-T increased the number of activated T cells within the tumor microenvironment. The current analysis examined whether sipuleucel-T altered adaptive T-cell responses by expanding pre-existing T cells or by recruiting new T cells to prostate tissue. Next-generation sequencing of the T-cell receptor (TCR) genes from blood or prostate tissue was used to quantitate and track T-cell clonotypes in these treated subjects with prostate cancer. At baseline, there was a significantly greater diversity of circulating TCR sequences in subjects with prostate cancer compared with healthy donors. Among healthy donors, circulating TCR sequence diversity remained unchanged over the same time interval. In contrast, sipuleucel-T treatment reduced circulating TCR sequence diversity versus baseline as measured by the Shannon index. Interestingly, sipuleucel-T treatment resulted in greater TCR sequence diversity in resected prostate tissue in sipuleucel-T-treated subjects versus tissue of nonsipuleucel-T-treated subjects with prostate cancer. Furthermore, sipuleucel-T increased TCR sequence commonality between blood and resected prostate tissue in treated versus untreated subjects with prostate cancer. The broadening of the TCR repertoire within the prostate tissue supports the hypothesis that sipuleucel-T treatment facilitates the recruitment of T cells into the prostate. Our results highlight the importance of assessing T-cell response to immunotherapy both in the periphery and in tumor tissue. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3711-8. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27216195

  2. Recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells into prostate tumours promotes metastasis.

    PubMed

    Jung, Younghun; Kim, Jin Koo; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Wang, Jingcheng; Mishra, Anjali; Joseph, Jeena; Berry, Janice E; McGee, Samantha; Lee, Eunsohl; Sun, Hongli; Wang, Jianhua; Jin, Taocong; Zhang, Honglai; Dai, Jinlu; Krebsbach, Paul H; Keller, Evan T; Pienta, Kenneth J; Taichman, Russell S

    2013-01-01

    Tumours recruit mesenchymal stem cells to facilitate healing, which induces their conversion into cancer-associated fibroblasts that facilitate metastasis. However, this process is poorly understood on the molecular level. Here we show that CXCL16, a ligand for CXCR6, facilitates mesenchymal stem cell or very small embryonic-like cells recruitment into prostate tumours. CXCR6 signalling stimulates the conversion of mesenchymal stem cells into cancer-associated fibroblasts, which secrete stromal-derived factor-1, also known as CXCL12. CXCL12 expressed by cancer-associated fibroblasts then binds to CXCR4 on tumour cells and induces an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, which ultimately promotes metastasis to secondary tumour sites. Our results provide the molecular basis for mesenchymal stem cell recruitment into tumours and how this process leads to tumour metastasis. PMID:23653207

  3. FTY720 (fingolimod) sensitizes prostate cancer cells to radiotherapy by inhibition of sphingosine kinase-1.

    PubMed

    Pchejetski, Dmitri; Bohler, Torsten; Brizuela, Leyre; Sauer, Lysann; Doumerc, Nicolas; Golzio, Muriel; Salunkhe, Vishal; Teissié, Justin; Malavaud, Bernard; Waxman, Jonathan; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2010-11-01

    Radiotherapy is widely used as a radical treatment for prostate cancer, but curative treatments are elusive for poorly differentiated tumors where survival is just 15% at 15 years. Dose escalation improves local response rates but is limited by tolerance in normal tissues. A sphingosine analogue, FTY720 (fingolimod), a drug currently in phase III studies for treatment of multiple sclerosis, has been found to be a potent apoptosis inducer in prostate cancer cells. Using in vitro and in vivo approaches, we analyzed the impact of FTY720 on sphingolipid metabolism in hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer cells and evaluated its potential as a radiosensitizer on cell lines and prostate tumor xenografts. In prostate cancer cell lines, FTY720 acted as a sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) inhibitor that induced prostate cancer cell apoptosis in a manner independent of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors. In contrast, γ irradiation did not affect SphK1 activity in prostate cancer cells yet synergized with FTY720 to inhibit SphK1. In mice bearing orthotopic or s.c. prostate cancer tumors, we show that FTY720 dramatically increased radiotherapeutic sensitivity, reducing tumor growth and metastasis without toxic side effects. Our findings suggest that low, well-tolerated doses of FTY720 could offer significant improvement to the clinical treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:20959468

  4. Perturbation of NK cell peripheral homeostasis accelerates prostate carcinoma metastasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Lu, Shengjun; Wang, Xuanjun; Page, Stephanie T; Higano, Celestia S; Plymate, Stephen R; Greenberg, Norman M; Sun, Shaoli; Li, Zihai; Wu, Jennifer D

    2013-10-01

    The activating receptor NK cell group 2 member D (NKG2D) mediates antitumor immunity in experimental animal models. However, whether NKG2D ligands contribute to tumor suppression or progression clinically remains controversial. Here, we have described 2 novel lines of "humanized" bi-transgenic (bi-Tg) mice in which native human NKG2D ligand MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence B (MICB) or the engineered membrane-restricted MICB (MICB.A2) was expressed in the prostate of the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model of spontaneous carcinogenesis. Bi-Tg TRAMP/MICB mice exhibited a markedly increased incidence of progressed carcinomas and metastasis, whereas TRAMP/MICB.A2 mice enjoyed long-term tumor-free survival conferred by sustained NKG2D-mediated antitumor immunity. Mechanistically, we found that cancer progression in TRAMP/MICB mice was associated with loss of the peripheral NK cell pool owing to high serum levels of tumor-derived soluble MICB (sMICB). Prostate cancer patients also displayed reduction of peripheral NK cells and high sMIC levels. Our study has not only provided direct evidence in "humanized" mouse models that soluble and membrane-restricted NKG2D ligands pose opposite impacts on cancer progression, but also uncovered a mechanism of sMIC-induced impairment of NK cell antitumor immunity. Our findings suggest that the impact of soluble NKG2D ligands should be considered in NK cell-based cancer immunotherapy and that our unique mouse models should be valuable for therapy optimization. PMID:24018560

  5. Adoptive Transfer of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells and T Cells in a Prostate Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Libo; Xu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of immune cells for cancer, chronic infection, and autoimmunity is an emerging field that has shown promise in recent trials. The transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate (TRAMP) is a classical mouse model of prostate cancer (PCa) and TRAMP cell lines were derived from a TRAMP mouse tumor. TRAMP-C2 is tumorigenic when subcutaneously (s.c.) grafted into syngeneic C57BL/6 host mice (Foster et al., 1997). This protocol will describe the adoptive transfer of purified CD11b+Gr1+ double positive (DP) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and CD3+ T cells in the TRAMP-C2 prostate cancer mouse model in order to establish the intrinsic functionality of these immune cells and to determine their role in tumorigenesis in vivo (Yan et al., 2014).

  6. Renal-type clear cell carcinoma of the prostate: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Patne, Shashikant C U; Johri, Nidhi; Katiyar, Richa; Trivedi, Sameer; Dwivedi, Uday Shankar

    2015-01-01

    A 72-year-old male presented with urinary symptoms. His serum prostate specific antigen level was 65.2 ng/ml. His radical prostatectomy specimen showed clear cell lesion reminiscent of the clear cell renal cell carcinoma along with acinar type of prostatic adenocarcinoma, Gleason score 4 + 4. The lesional clear cells were positive for pancytokeratin, epithelial membrane antigen, CD10, vimentin, and AMACR while negative for 34βE12, CK7, prostate specific antigen, and PAX8. The final diagnosis was renal-type clear cell carcinoma of the prostate. A follow-up of 20 months did not show metastasis. We herein report fifth case of renal-type clear cell carcinoma of the prostate. PMID:26498435

  7. Influence of zinc deficiency on AKT-MDM2-P53 signaling axes in normal and malignant human prostate cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With prostate being the highest zinc-accumulating tissue before the onset of cancer, the effects of physiologic levels of zinc on Akt-Mdm2-p53 and Akt-p21 signaling axes in human normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) and malignant prostate LNCaP cells were examined. Cells were cultured for 6 d in...

  8. Targeting prostate cancer based on signal transduction and cell cycle pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, John T.; Lehmann, Brian D.; Terrian, David M.; Chappell, William H.; Stivala, Franca; Libra, Massimo; Martelli, Alberto M.; Steelman, Linda S.

    2008-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains a leading cause of death in men despite increased capacity to diagnose at earlier stages. After prostate cancer has become hormone independent, which often occurs after hormonal ablation therapies, it is difficult to effectively treat. Prostate cancer may arise from mutations and dysregulation of various genes involved in regulation signal transduction (e.g., PTEN, Akt, etc.,) and the cell cycle (e.g., p53, p21Cip1, p27Kip1, Rb, etc.,). This review focuses on the aberrant interactions of signal transduction and cell cycle genes products and how they can contribute to prostate cancer and alter therapeutic effectiveness. PMID:18594202

  9. Expression and functional study of estrogen receptor-related receptors in human prostatic cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Cheung, C P; Yu, Shan; Wong, K B; Chan, L W; Lai, Fernand M M; Wang, Xianghong; Suetsugi, Masatomo; Chen, Shiuan; Chan, Franky L

    2005-03-01

    Estrogen receptor-related receptors (ERRs; alpha, beta, gamma) are orphan nuclear receptors and constitutively active without binding to estrogen. Like estrogen receptors (ERs), ERRs bind to estrogen receptor elements and estrogen receptor element-related repeats. Growing evidence suggests that ERRs can cross-talk with ERs in different cell types via competition for DNA sites and coactivators. We hypothesize that ERRs might play regulatory roles in normal and neoplastic prostatic cells by sharing similar ER-mediated pathways or acting independently. In this study, we investigated mRNA and protein expression patterns of three ERR members in normal human prostate epithelial cells, established cell lines, cancer xenografts, and prostatic tissues. Additionally, effects of transient transfection of ERRs on prostatic cell proliferation and ER expression were also examined. RT-PCR showed that ERRalpha and ERRgamma transcripts were detected in most cell lines and xenografts, whereas ERRbeta was detected in normal epithelial cells and few immortalized cell lines but not in most cancer lines. Similar results were demonstrated in clinical prostatic specimens. Western blottings and immunohistochemistry confirmed similar expression patterns that ERR proteins were detected as nuclear proteins in epithelial cells, whereas their expressions became reduced or undetected in neoplastic prostatic cells. Transient transfection confirmed that ERRs were expressed in prostatic cells as nuclear proteins and transcriptionally active in the absence of estradiol. Transfection results showed that overexpression of ERRs inhibited cell proliferation and repressed ERalpha transcription in PC-3 cells. Our study shows that ERRs, which are coexpressed with ERs in prostatic cells, could regulate cell growth and modulate ER-mediated pathways via interference on ERalpha transcription in prostatic cells. PMID:15598686

  10. The impact of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control after permanent interstitial brachytherapy for early stage prostate cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    (Jay Chen, Zhe; Roberts, Kenneth; Decker, Roy; Pathare, Pradip; Rockwell, Sara; Nath, Ravinder

    2011-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that procedure-induced prostate edema during permanent interstitial brachytherapy (PIB) can cause significant variations in the dose delivered to the prostate gland. Because the clinical impact of edema-induced dose variations strongly depends on the magnitude of the edema, the temporal pattern of its resolution and its interplay with the decay of radioactivity and the underlying biological processes of tumor cells (such as tumor potential doubling time), we investigated the impact of edema-induced dose variations on the tumor cell survival and tumor control probability after PIB with the 131Cs, 125I and 103Pd sources used in current clinical practice. The exponential edema resolution model reported by Waterman et al (1998 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 41 1069-77) was used to characterize the edema evolutions previously observed during clinical PIB for prostate cancer. The concept of biologically effective dose, taking into account tumor cell proliferation and sublethal damage repair during dose delivery, was used to characterize the effects of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control probability. Our calculation indicated that prostate edema, if not appropriately taken into account, can increase the cell survival and decrease the probability of local control of PIB. The magnitude of an edema-induced increase in cell survival increased with increasing edema severity, decreasing half-life of radioactive decay and decreasing photon energy emitted by the source. At the doses currently prescribed for PIB and for prostate cancer cells characterized by nominal radiobiology parameters recommended by AAPM TG-137, PIB using 125I sources was less affected by edema than PIB using 131Cs or 103Pd sources due to the long radioactive decay half-life of 125I. The effect of edema on PIB using 131Cs or 103Pd was similar. The effect of edema on 103Pd PIB was slightly greater, even though the decay half-life of 103Pd (17 days) is longer than

  11. Impact of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control after permanent interstitial brachytherapy for early stage prostate cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhe (Jay); Roberts, Kenneth; Decker, Roy; Pathare, Pradip; Rockwell, Sara; Nath, Ravinder

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the procedure-induced prostate edema during permanent interstitial brachytherapy (PIB) can cause significant variations in the dose delivered to the prostate gland. Because the clinical impact of edema-induced dose variations depends strongly on the magnitude of the edema, the temporal pattern of its resolution and its interplay with the decay of radioactivity and the underlying biological processes of tumor cells (such as tumor potential doubling time), we investigated the impact of edema-induced dose variations on the tumor cell survival and tumor control probability after PIB with the 131Cs, 125I and 103Pd sources used in current clinical practice. The exponential edema resolution model reported by Waterman et al. (Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 41, 1069–1077–1998) was used to characterize the edema evolutions observed previously during clinical PIB for prostate cancer. The concept of biologically effective dose (BED), taking into account tumor cell proliferation and sublethal damage repair during dose delivery, was used to characterize the effects of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control probability. Our calculation indicated that prostate edema, if not taken into account appropriately, can increase the cell survival and decrease the probability of local control of PIB. The edema-induced increase in cell survival increased with increasing edema severity, decreasing half-life for radioactive decay and decreasing energy of the photons energy emitted by the source. At the doses currently prescribed for PIB and for prostate cancer cells characterized by nominal radiobiology parameters recommended by AAPM TG-137, PIB using 125I sources was less affected by edema than PIB using 131Cs or 103Pd sources due to the long radioactive decay half-life of 125I. The effect of edema on PIB using 131Cs or 103Pd was similar. The effect of edema on 103Pd PIB was slightly greater, even though the decay half-life of 103Pd (17 days

  12. Studying circulating prostate cancer cells by in-vivo flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jin; Gu, Zhengqin; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2011-11-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in American men and the second leading cause of deaths from cancer, after lung cancer. The tumor usually grows slowly and remains confined to the gland for many years. As the cancer advances, however, it can metastasize throughout other areas of the body, such as the bones, lungs, and liver. Surgical resection, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current prostate cancer therapies. Treatments for prostate cause both short- and long-term side effects that may be difficult to accept. Molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed to selectively target to unique characteristics of cancer cell growth and metastasis. We have developed the "in vivo microscopy" to study the mechanisms that govern prostate cancer cell spread through the microenvironment in vivo in real-time confocal near-infrared fluorescence imaging. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" and optical imaging are used to assess prostate cancer cell spreading and the circulation kinetics of prostate cancer cells. We have measured the depletion kinetics of cancer cells with different metastatic potential. Interestingly, more invasive PC-3 prostate cancer cells are depleted faster from the circulation than LNCaP cells.

  13. Studying circulating prostate cancer cells by in-vivo flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jin; Gu, Zhengqin; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2012-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in American men and the second leading cause of deaths from cancer, after lung cancer. The tumor usually grows slowly and remains confined to the gland for many years. As the cancer advances, however, it can metastasize throughout other areas of the body, such as the bones, lungs, and liver. Surgical resection, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current prostate cancer therapies. Treatments for prostate cause both short- and long-term side effects that may be difficult to accept. Molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed to selectively target to unique characteristics of cancer cell growth and metastasis. We have developed the "in vivo microscopy" to study the mechanisms that govern prostate cancer cell spread through the microenvironment in vivo in real-time confocal near-infrared fluorescence imaging. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" and optical imaging are used to assess prostate cancer cell spreading and the circulation kinetics of prostate cancer cells. We have measured the depletion kinetics of cancer cells with different metastatic potential. Interestingly, more invasive PC-3 prostate cancer cells are depleted faster from the circulation than LNCaP cells.

  14. TWIST1-induced microRNA-424 reversibly drives mesenchymal programming while inhibiting tumor initiation

    PubMed Central

    Drasin, David J.; Guarnieri, Anna L.; Neelakantan, Deepika; Kim, Jihye; Cabrera, Joshua H.; Wang, Chu-An; Zaberezhnyy, Vadym; Gasparini, Pierluigi; Cascione, Luciano; Huebner, Kay; Tan, Aik-Choon; Ford, Heide L.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a dynamic process that relies on cellular plasticity. Recently, the process of an oncogenic EMT, followed by a reverse mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET), has been implicated as critical in the metastatic colonization of carcinomas. Unlike governance of epithelial programming, regulation of mesenchymal programming is not well understood in EMT. Here, we describe and characterize the first microRNA that enhances exclusively mesenchymal programming. We demonstrate that microRNA-424 is upregulated early during a TWIST1 or SNAI1-induced EMT, and that it causes cells to express mesenchymal genes without affecting epithelial genes, resulting in a mixed/intermediate EMT. Furthermore, microRNA-424 increases motility, decreases adhesion and induces a growth arrest, changes associated with a complete EMT, that can be reversed when microRNA-424 expression is lowered, concomitant with an MET-like process. Breast cancer patient microRNA-424 levels positively associate with TWIST1/2 and EMT-like gene signatures, and miR-424 is increased in primary tumors versus matched normal breast. However, microRNA-424 is downregulated in patient metastases versus matched primary tumors. Correspondingly, microRNA-424 decreases tumor initiation and is post-transcriptionally downregulated in macrometastases in mice, suggesting the need for biphasic expression of miR-424 to transit the EMT-MET axis. Next-generation RNA sequencing revealed microRNA-424 regulates numerous EMT and cancer stemness-associated genes, including TGFBR3, whose downregulation promotes mesenchymal phenotypes, but not tumor-initiating phenotypes. Instead, we demonstrate that increased MAPK/ERK signaling is critical for miR-424-mediated decreases in tumor-initiating phenotypes. These findings suggest microRNA-424 plays distinct roles in tumor progression, potentially facilitating earlier, but repressing later, stages of metastasis by regulating an EMT-MET axis. PMID

  15. Overexpression of FGF9 in prostate epithelial cells augments reactive stroma formation and promotes prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanqing; Jin, Chengliu; Hamana, Tomoaki; Liu, Junchen; Wang, Cong; An, Lei; McKeehan, Wallace L; Wang, Fen

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastasis is the major cause of morbidity and mortality of prostate cancer (PCa). Fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9) has been reported to promote PCa bone metastasis. However, the mechanism by which overexpression of FGF9 promotes PCa progression and metastasis is still unknown. Herein, we report that transgenic mice forced to express FGF9 in prostate epithelial cells (F9TG) developed high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) in an expression level- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, FGF9/TRAMP bigenic mice (F9TRAMP) grew advanced PCa earlier and had higher frequencies of metastasis than TRAMP littermates. We observed tumor microenvironmental changes including hypercellularity and hyperproliferation in the stromal compartment of F9TG and F9TRAMP mice. Expression of TGFβ1, a key signaling molecule overexpressed in reactive stroma, was increased in F9TG and F9TRAMP prostates. Both in vivo and in vitro data indicated that FGF9 promoted TGFβ1 expression via increasing cJun-mediated signaling. Moreover, in silico analyses showed that the expression level of FGF9 was positively associated with expression of TGFβ1 and its downstream signaling molecules in human prostate cancers. Collectively, our data demonstrated that overexpressing FGF9 in PCa cells augmented the formation of reactive stroma and promoted PCa initiation and progression. PMID:26157349

  16. Effect of AQP9 Expression in Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Cell PC3

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiwei; Zhu, Liang; Zheng, Bo; Wang, Jinliang; Song, Xishuang; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Lina; Yang, Deyong; Wang, Jianbo

    2016-01-01

    It is known that aquaporin 9 (AQP9) in the prostate was strictly upregulated by androgen and may represent a novel therapeutic target for several cancers, but whether AQP9 plays a role in the regulation of androgen-independent prostate cancer still remains unclear. In the present study, AQP9 was determined in prostate cancer and adjacent cancer tissues; AQP9-siRNA was applied to silencing AQP9 in androgen-independent prostate cancer cell PC3 cell line. Western blot and flow cytometry analysis were employed to detect changes in related-function of control and AQP9-siRNA groups. The results showed that AQP9 is significantly induced in cancer tissues than that in adjacent cancer tissues. Moreover, knockdown of AQP9 in PC3 androgen-independent prostate cancer cell prostate cancer cells increased inhibition rates of proliferation. In addition, knockdown of AQP9 resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of the Bcl-2 and with a notable increase in the expression of Bax and cleaved caspase 3, indicated that AQP9 knockdown promoted apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. From wound healing assay and matrigel invasion, we suggested that AQP9 expression affects the motility and invasiveness of prostate cancer cells. Moreover, In order to explore the pathway may be involved in AQP9-mediated motility and invasion of prostate cancer cells, the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was significant suppressed in AQP9 siRNA-transfected cells compared with that in control cells, suggesting that AQP9 is involved in the activation of the ERK pathway in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells. PMID:27187384

  17. SLUG promotes prostate cancer cell migration and invasion via CXCR4/CXCL12 axis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background SLUG is a zinc-finger transcription factor of the Snail/Slug zinc-finger family that plays a role in migration and invasion of tumor cells. Mechanisms by which SLUG promotes migration and invasion in prostate cancers remain elusive. Methods Expression level of CXCR4 and CXCL12 was examined by Western blot, RT-PCR, and qPCR analyses. Forced expression of SLUG was mediated by retroviruses, and SLUG and CXCL12 was downregulated by shRNAs-expressing lentiviruses. Migration and invasion of prostate cancer were measured by scratch-wound assay and invasion assay, respectively. Research We demonstrated that forced expression of SLUG elevated CXCR4 and CXCL12 expression in human prostate cancer cell lines PC3, DU145, 22RV1, and LNCaP; conversely, reduced expression of SLUG by shRNA downregulated CXCR4 and CXCL12 expression at RNA and protein levels in prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, ectopic expression of SLUG increased MMP9 expression and activity in PC3, 22RV1, and DU-145 cells, and SLUG knockdown by shRNA downregulated MMP9 expression. We showed that CXCL12 is required for SLUG-mediated MMP9 expression in prostate cancer cells. Moreover, we found that migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells was increased by ectopic expression of SLUG and decreased by SLUG knockdown. Notably, knockdown of CXCL12 by shRNA impaired SLUG-mediated migration and invasion in prostate cancer cells. Lastly, our data suggest that CXCL12 and SLUG regulate migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells independent of cell growth. Conclusion We provide the first compelling evidence that upregulation of autocrine CXCL12 is a major mechanism underlying SLUG-mediated migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells. Our findings suggest that CXCL12 is a therapeutic target for prostate cancer metastasis. PMID:22074556

  18. Genistein cooperates with the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat to induce cell death in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Among American men, prostate cancer is the most common, non-cutaneous malignancy that accounted for an estimated 241,000 new cases and 34,000 deaths in 2011. Previous studies have suggested that Wnt pathway inhibitory genes are silenced by CpG hypermethylation, and other studies have suggested that genistein can demethylate hypermethylated DNA. Genistein is a soy isoflavone with diverse effects on cellular proliferation, survival, and gene expression that suggest it could be a potential therapeutic agent for prostate cancer. We undertook the present study to investigate the effects of genistein on the epigenome of prostate cancer cells and to discover novel combination approaches of other compounds with genistein that might be of translational utility. Here, we have investigated the effects of genistein on several prostate cancer cell lines, including the ARCaP-E/ARCaP-M model of the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), to analyze effects on their epigenetic state. In addition, we investigated the effects of combined treatment of genistein with the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat on survival in prostate cancer cells. Methods Using whole genome expression profiling and whole genome methylation profiling, we have determined the genome-wide differences in genetic and epigenetic responses to genistein in prostate cancer cells before and after undergoing the EMT. Also, cells were treated with genistein, vorinostat, and combination treatment, where cell death and cell proliferation was determined. Results Contrary to earlier reports, genistein did not have an effect on CpG methylation at 20 μM, but it did affect histone H3K9 acetylation and induced increased expression of histone acetyltransferase 1 (HAT1). In addition, genistein also had differential effects on survival and cooperated with the histone deacteylase inhibitor vorinostat to induce cell death and inhibit proliferation. Conclusion Our results suggest that there are a number of

  19. Inhibition of Granzyme B by PI-9 protects prostate cancer cells from apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Manisha; Hostetter, Daniel R.; Loeb, Carly RK; Simko, Jeffry; Craik, Charles S.

    2012-01-01

    Background In order for tumors to grow and proliferate, they must avoid recognition by immune cells and subsequent death by apoptosis. Granzyme B, a protease located in natural killer cells, initiates apoptosis in target cells. Inhibition of Granzyme B by PI-9, its natural inhibitor, can prevent apoptosis. Here we investigate whether PI-9 protects prostate cancer cells from apoptosis. Methods The expression of PI-9 was quantified by qPCR in several prostate cancer cell lines, and Granzyme B activity was tested in each cell line. PI-9 was overexpressed in LNCaP cells, which lack endogenous PI-9. Apoptosis was induced by natural killer cells in LNCaP cells that either contained or lacked PI-9, and the percent cell death in was quantified. Lastly, PI-9 levels were examined by qPCR and immunohistochemistry in prostate tumor tissue. Results Prostate cancer cell lines that expressed PI-9 could inhibit Granzyme B. Overexpression of PI-9 protected LNCaP cells from natural killer cell-mediated apoptosis. Examination of the levels of PI-9 in tissue from prostate tumors showed that PI-9 could be upregulated in low grade tumors and stochastically dysregulated in high grade tumors. Additionally, PI-9 is found consistently in high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and atrophic lesions. Conclusions These results indicate that overexpression of PI-9 can protect prostate cancer cells from apoptosis, and this effect may occur in human prostate tumors. These findings imply that early prostatic inflammation may trigger this increase in PI-9. This suggests that PI-9 upregulation is needed early in tumor progression, before additional protective mechanisms are in place. PMID:21919028

  20. Transient receptor potential melastatin 4 channel contributes to migration of androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kilch, Tatiana; Jochum, Marcus Martin; Urban, Sabine Katharina; Jung, Volker; Stöckle, Michael; Rother, Karen; Greiner, Markus; Peinelt, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Impaired Ca2+ signaling in prostate cancer contributes to several cancer hallmarks, such as enhanced proliferation and migration and a decreased ability to induce apoptosis. Na+ influx via transient receptor potential melastatin 4 channel (TRPM4) can reduce store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) by decreasing the driving force for Ca2+. In patients with prostate cancer, gene expression of TRPM4 is elevated. Recently, TRPM4 was identified as a cancer driver gene in androgen-insensitive prostate cancer. We investigated TRPM4 protein expression in cancer tissue samples from 20 patients with prostate cancer. We found elevated TRPM4 protein levels in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and prostate cancer tissue compared to healthy tissue. In primary human prostate epithelial cells (hPEC) from healthy tissue and in the androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and PC3, TRPM4 mediated large Na+ currents. We demonstrated significantly increased SOCE after siRNA targeting of TRPM4 in hPEC and DU145 cells. In addition, knockdown of TRPM4 reduced migration but not proliferation of DU145 and PC3 cells. Taken together, our data identify TRPM4 as a regulator of SOCE in hPEC and DU145 cells, demonstrate a role for TRPM4 in cancer cell migration and suggest that TRPM4 is a promising potential therapeutic target. PMID:26496025

  1. Specific detection of prostate cancer cells in urine by multiplex immunofluorescence cytology.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kazutoshi; Pavlovich, Christian P; Netto, George J; Konishi, Yuko; Isaacs, William B; Ali, Syed; De Marzo, Angelo; Meeker, Alan K

    2009-07-01

    Prostate cancer biomarkers are enriched in urine after prostatic manipulation, suggesting that whole cells might also be detectable for diagnosis. We tested multiplex staining of urinary sediments as a minimally invasive method to detect prostate cancer. Urine samples were collected from 35 men who had prostatic massage (attentive digital rectal examination) in a urology clinic and from 15 control men without urologic disease and without massage, for a total of 50 specimens (27 cancer-positive cases and 23 cancer-negative cases). LNCaP prostate cancer cells spiked into urine were used for initial marker optimization. Urine sediments were cytospun onto glass slides and stained. Multiplex urine cytology was compared with conventional urine cytology for cancer detection; anti-alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase antibody was used as a marker of prostate cancer cells, anti-Nkx3.1 as a marker of prostate epithelial cells, anti-nucleolin as a marker of nucleoli, and 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole to highlight nuclei. Prostate cancer cells were successfully visualized by combined staining for alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase, Nkx3.1, and nucleolin. Of the 25 informative cases with biopsy-proven prostate cancer, 9 were diagnosed as suspicious or positive by multiplex immunofluorescence urine cytology, but only 4 were similarly judged by conventional cytology. All cases without cancer were read as negative by both methods. The multiplex cytology sensitivity for cancer detection in informative cases was 36% (9/25), and specificity was 100% (8/8). In conclusion, we have successfully achieved multiple staining for alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase, Nkx3.1, nucleolin, and 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole to detect prostate cancer cells in urine. Further refinements in marker selection and technique may increase sensitivity and applicability for prostate cancer diagnosis. PMID:19368959

  2. Recruitment of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Into Prostate Tumors Promotes Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Younghun; Kim, Jin Koo; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Wang, Jingcheng; Mishra, Anjali; Joseph, Jeena; Berry, Janice E.; McGee, Samantha; Lee, Eunsohl; Sun, Hongli; Wang, Jianhua; Jin, Taocong; Zhang, Honglai; Dai, Jinlu; Krebsbach, Paul H.; Keller, Evan T.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Taichman, Russell S.

    2013-01-01

    Tumors recruit mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to facilitate healing, which induces their conversion into cancer-associated fibroblasts that facilitate metastasis. However, this process is poorly understood on the molecular level. Here we show that the CXCR6 ligand CXCL16 facilitates MSC or Very Small Embryonic-Like (VSEL) cells recruitment into prostate tumors. CXCR6 signaling stimulates the conversion of MSCs into cancer-associated fibroblasts, which secrete stromal-derived factor-1, also known as CXCL12. CXCL12 expressed by cancer-associated fibroblasts then binds to CXCR4 on tumor cells and induces an epithelial to mesenchymal transition, which ultimately promotes metastasis to secondary tumor sites. Our results provide the molecular basis for MSC recruitment into tumors and how this process leads to tumor metastasis. PMID:23653207

  3. A prostate-specific antigen-dependent fusion polypeptide inhibits growth of prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang; Ma, Yueyun; Wei, Hua; Li, Bin; Xiao, Fengjing; Yang, Jing; Yue, Qiaohong; Yang, Angang; Hao, Xiaoke

    2016-01-01

    Polypeptide APP8 is a prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-activated prodrug that was designed to synergize the effects of the Bcl-2 homology domain 3 (BH3) peptide, K237 and the DG2 peptide. The aim of this study is to evaluate its biodistribution and anticancer effect in vitro and in vivo. In this study, APP8 and each component peptide were synthesized. The biodistribution was identified using con-focal microscopyin both PSA+ cell line and PSA- cell line in vitro. Then cell cycle, MTT and in-cell western blot were accessed to analyze the effect mechanisms. Finally, xenografts were used to confirm the anticancer effect in vivo. Here, it was shown that APP8 was hydrolyzed and BH3 was released into the nucleus, while K237 and DG2 were located predominantly in the cytoplasm, only in LNCaP cells (PSA+), but not PC3 cells (PSA-). K237 and DG2 could induce cell apoptosis through decreasing the phosphorylation of ERK-2 and Flk-1. APP8 also caused the death of LNCaP cells, and was predominantly dependent on BH3 in vitro. In addition, It was noted that as the tumor grew in vivo, APP8 could inhibit the tumor volume to 77.3%, mainly depending on K237 and DG2 via inhibition of the growth of vascular endothelial cells. Our results suggested that APP8 could promote prostate cancer cell death and stop prostate cancer growth via synergizing apoptosis induction of tumor cell and inhibition of the growth of vascular endothelial cells. It provides a novel candidate prodrug for specific therapy of prostate cancer. PMID:27293998

  4. Studying depletion kinetics of circulating prostate cancer cells by in vivo flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guangda; Gu, Zhengqin; Guo, Jin; Li, Yan; Chen, Yun; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2011-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in American men and the second leading cause of deaths from cancer, after lung cancer. The tumor usually grows slowly and remains confined to the gland for many years. During this time, the tumor produces little or no symptoms or outward signs. As the cancer advances, however, it can metastasize throughout other areas of the body, such as the bones, lungs, and liver. Surgical resection, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current prostate cancer therapies. Treatments for prostate cause both short- and long-term side effects that may be difficult to accept. Molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed to selectively target to unique characteristics of cancer cell growth and metastasis. We have developed the "in vivo microscopy" to study the mechanisms that govern prostate cancer cell spread through the microenvironment in vivo in real-time confocal near-infrared fluorescence imaging. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" and optical imaging are used to assess prostate cancer cell spreading and the circulation kinetics of prostate cancer cells. A real- time quantitative monitoring of circulating prostate cancer cells by the in vivo flow cytometer will be useful to assess the effectiveness of the potential therapeutic interventions.

  5. Depletion kinetics of circulating prostate cancer cells studied by in vivo flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guangda; Guo, Jin; Li, Yan; Chen, Yun; Gu, Zhengqin; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2010-11-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in American men and the second leading cause of deaths from cancer, after lung cancer. The tumor usually grows slowly and remains confined to the gland for many years. During this time, the tumor produces little or no symptoms or outward signs. As the cancer advances, however, it can metastasize throughout other areas of the body, such as the bones, lungs, and liver. Surgical resection, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current prostate cancer therapies. Treatments for prostate cause both short- and long-term side effects that may be difficult to accept. Molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed to selectively target to unique characteristics of cancer cell growth and metastasis. We have developed the "in vivo microscopy" to study the mechanisms that govern prostate cancer cell spread through the microenvironment in vivo in real-time confocal nearinfrared fluorescence imaging. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" and optical imaging are used to assess prostate cancer cell spreading and the circulation kinetics of prostate cancer cells. A real- time quantitative monitoring of circulating prostate cancer cells by the in vivo flow cytometer will be useful to assess the effectiveness of the potential therapeutic interventions.

  6. Effects of cisplatin on the LSD1-mediated invasion and metastasis of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Yuan; Chen, Hui; Qiu, Tao; Weng, Xiao-Dong; Guo, Jia; Wang, Lei; Liu, Xiu-Heng

    2016-09-01

    Prostate cancer poses a major public health problem in men. Metastatic prostate cancer is incurable, and ultimately threatens the life of patients. Lysine‑specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) is an androgen receptor‑interacting protein that exerts a key role in regulating gene expression and is involved in numerous biological processes associated with prostate cancer. Cisplatin, also known as cis‑diamminedichloroplatinum or DDP, is a standard chemotherapeutic agent used to treat prostate cancer; however, it has the disadvantage of various serious side effects. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of LSD1 knockdown, and the interplay between LSD1 and DDP, on prostate cancer cell proliferation, apoptosis and invasion, and, therefore, the potential of LSD1 as a target for prostate cancer therapy. Flow cytometric analysis, Cell Counting kit 8 assay, Transwell assay and western blotting results revealed that LSD1 knockdown, in combination with DDP treatment, exerted antiproliferative, proapoptotic and anti‑invasive effects on PC3 prostate cancer cells. In addition, knockdown of LSD1 acted synergistically with DDP, thereby enhancing the induction of apoptosis, and the inhibition of proliferation and invasion in prostate cancer cells. These results indicated that LSD1 may serve as a potential therapeutic target, and may enhance the sensitivity of PC3 cells to DDP. PMID:27484796

  7. Effects of cisplatin on the LSD1-mediated invasion and metastasis of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-Yuan; Chen, Hui; Qiu, Tao; Weng, Xiao-Dong; Guo, Jia; Wang, Lei; Liu, Xiu-Heng

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer poses a major public health problem in men. Metastatic prostate cancer is incurable, and ultimately threatens the life of patients. Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) is an androgen receptor-interacting protein that exerts a key role in regulating gene expression and is involved in numerous biological processes associated with prostate cancer. Cisplatin, also known as cis-diamminedichloroplatinum or DDP, is a standard chemotherapeutic agent used to treat prostate cancer; however, it has the disadvantage of various serious side effects. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of LSD1 knockdown, and the interplay between LSD1 and DDP, on prostate cancer cell proliferation, apoptosis and invasion, and, therefore, the potential of LSD1 as a target for prostate cancer therapy. Flow cytometric analysis, Cell Counting kit 8 assay, Transwell assay and western blotting results revealed that LSD1 knockdown, in combination with DDP treatment, exerted antiproliferative, proapoptotic and anti–invasive effects on PC3 prostate cancer cells. In addition, knockdown of LSD1 acted synergistically with DDP, thereby enhancing the induction of apoptosis, and the inhibition of proliferation and invasion in prostate cancer cells. These results indicated that LSD1 may serve as a potential therapeutic target, and may enhance the sensitivity of PC3 cells to DDP. PMID:27484796

  8. Potential clinical relevance of Eph receptors and ephrin ligands expressed in prostate carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Fox, Brian P; Tabone, Christopher J; Kandpal, Raj P

    2006-04-21

    The family of Eph and ephrin receptors is involved in a variety of functions in normal cells, and the alterations in their expression profiles have been observed in several cancers. We have compared the transcripts for Eph receptors and ephrin ligands in cell lines established from normal prostate epithelium and several carcinoma cell lines isolated from prostate tumors of varying degree of metastasis. These cell lines included NPTX, CTPX, LNCaP, DU145, PC-3, and PC-3ML. The cell lines displayed characteristic pattern of expression for specific Eph receptors and ephrin ligands, thus allowing identification of Eph receptor signatures for a particular cell line. The sensitivity of these transcripts to genome methylation is also investigated by treating the cells with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. The comparison of expression profiles revealed that normal prostate and primary prostate tumor cell lines differ in the expression of EphA3, EphB3, and ephrin A3 that are over-expressed in normal prostate. Furthermore, the transcript levels for EphA1 decrease progressively from normal prostate to primary prostate tumor cell line and metastatic tumor cells. A converse relationship was observed for ephrin B2. The treatment of cells with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine revealed the sensitivity of EphA3, EphA10, EphB3, and EphB6 to methylation status of genomic DNA. The utility of methylation specific PCR to identify prostate tumor cells and the importance of specific Eph receptors and ephrin ligands in initiation and progression of prostate tumor are discussed. PMID:16516143

  9. Human periprostatic white adipose tissue is rich in stromal progenitor cells and a potential source of prostate tumor stroma.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ricardo; Monteiro, Cátia; Silvestre, Ricardo; Castela, Angela; Coutinho, Helena; Fraga, Avelino; Príncipe, Paulo; Lobato, Carlos; Costa, Carla; Cordeiro-da-Silva, Anabela; Lopes, José Manuel; Lopes, Carlos; Medeiros, Rui

    2012-10-01

    A body of growing evidence now implicates white adipose tissue as a relevant source of stromal progenitor cells recruited to the tumor microenvironment to form supportive tumor stroma. While the role of periprostatic (PP) adipose tissue in prostate cancer progression has been barely appreciated, we sought to determine the progenitor cell population in PP adipose tissue and the association with prostate cancer. We isolated and characterized CD31(-)CD34(+)CD45(-)CD146(-) progenitor cells (adipose-derived stem cells [ASC]) in paired samples of PP and preperitoneal visceral adipose tissue from prostate tissue and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of prostate cancer and nodular prostatic hyperplasia patients. ASC were quantified by flow cytometry and confirmed through target gene expression. Here we show a significantly higher amount of ASC in PP than in visceral adipose tissue, independent of body mass index and prostatic disease. In the prostate, ASC are increased in cancer compared with prostatic nodular hyperplasia patients. Concordantly, adipsin gene (CFD) expression, which is known to be up-regulated in adipose stem cells, was overexpressed in PP adipose tissue, in the prostate of cancer patients and in prostate CD31(-)CD34(+)CD45(-)CD146(-) sorted cells. ASC were found at higher levels in the blood of prostate cancer patients simultaneously overweight/obese. Present findings indicate that PP adipose tissue is a reservoir of progenitor cells with the potential to migrate towards prostate tumors, although its clinical significance merits further evaluation. PMID:23038706

  10. Expression of melanocortin receptors in human prostate cancer cell lines: MC2R activation by ACTH increases prostate cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Hafiz, Saly; Dennis, John C; Schwartz, Dean; Judd, Robert; Tao, Ya-Xiong; Khazal, Kamel; Akingbemi, Benson; Mo, Xiu-Lei; Abdel-Mageed, Asim B; Morrison, Edward; Mansour, Mahmoud

    2012-10-01

    The melanocortin receptors (MCRs 1-5) are G protein coupled-receptors (GPCRs) that regulate food intake, inflammation, skin pigmentation, sexual function and steroidogenesis. Their peptide ligands, the melanocortins, are α-, β- and γ-melanocyte-stimulating hormone and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) all of which are secreted from the anterior pituitary gland under hypothalamic control. MC2R binds ACTH but has no affinity for the other melanocortins and is, thereby, pharmacologically different from MCRs that bind those ligands. Evidence suggests that elevated GPCRs transactivate the androgen receptor (AR), the critical mediator of prostate cell growth, and consequently promote prostate cancer cell proliferation. It may be that reduced central melanocortin signaling is coincidental with reversal of prostate cancer cachexia, but no data are available on the expression of, or the role for, MCRs in prostate cancer. Here, we show that MCR (1-5) mRNAs are expressed in androgen-dependent LNCaP and androgen-independent PC3 and DU-145 human prostate cancer cell lines. Further, MC2R, the specific target of ACTH, is expressed in LNCaP, PC3 and DU-145 cells. Among the several synthetic MCR peptide ligands that we used, only ACTH promoted concentration-dependent cell proliferation in the three cell lines as shown by MTT cell proliferation assay. In LNCaP cells, the effect was additive with testosterone stimulation and was partially blunted with SHU9119, a non-selective MCR antagonist. In the same cells, ACTH induced cAMP production and increased AR nuclear labeling in immunocytochemical assays. Our observations suggest that MC2R is involved in prostate carcinogenesis and that targeting MC2R signaling may provide a novel avenue in prostate carcinoma treatment. PMID:22842514

  11. Inhibition of O-GlcNAc transferase activity reprograms prostate cancer cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Itkonen, Harri M; Gorad, Saurabh S; Duveau, Damien Y; Martin, Sara E S; Barkovskaya, Anna; Bathen, Tone F; Moestue, Siver A; Mills, Ian G

    2016-03-15

    Metabolic networks are highly connected and complex, but a single enzyme, O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) can sense the availability of metabolites and also modify target proteins. We show that inhibition of OGT activity inhibits the proliferation of prostate cancer cells, leads to sustained loss of c-MYC and suppresses the expression of CDK1, elevated expression of which predicts prostate cancer recurrence (p=0.00179). Metabolic profiling revealed decreased glucose consumption and lactate production after OGT inhibition. This decreased glycolytic activity specifically sensitized prostate cancer cells, but not cells representing normal prostate epithelium, to inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation (rotenone and metformin). Intra-cellular alanine was depleted upon OGT inhibitor treatment. OGT inhibitor increased the expression and activity of alanine aminotransferase (GPT2), an enzyme that can be targeted with a clinically approved drug, cycloserine. Simultaneous inhibition of OGT and GPT2 inhibited cell viability and growth rate, and additionally activated a cell death response. These combinatorial effects were predominantly seen in prostate cancer cells, but not in a cell-line derived from normal prostate epithelium. Combinatorial treatments were confirmed with two inhibitors against both OGT and GPT2. Taken together, here we report the reprogramming of energy metabolism upon inhibition of OGT activity, and identify synergistically lethal combinations that are prostate cancer cell specific. PMID:26824323

  12. Inhibition of O-GlcNAc transferase activity reprograms prostate cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Itkonen, Harri M.; Gorad, Saurabh S.; Duveau, Damien Y.; Martin, Sara E.S.; Barkovskaya, Anna; Bathen, Tone F.; Moestue, Siver A.; Mills, Ian G.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic networks are highly connected and complex, but a single enzyme, O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) can sense the availability of metabolites and also modify target proteins. We show that inhibition of OGT activity inhibits the proliferation of prostate cancer cells, leads to sustained loss of c-MYC and suppresses the expression of CDK1, elevated expression of which predicts prostate cancer recurrence (p=0.00179). Metabolic profiling revealed decreased glucose consumption and lactate production after OGT inhibition. This decreased glycolytic activity specifically sensitized prostate cancer cells, but not cells representing normal prostate epithelium, to inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation (rotenone and metformin). Intra-cellular alanine was depleted upon OGT inhibitor treatment. OGT inhibitor increased the expression and activity of alanine aminotransferase (GPT2), an enzyme that can be targeted with a clinically approved drug, cycloserine. Simultaneous inhibition of OGT and GPT2 inhibited cell viability and growth rate, and additionally activated a cell death response. These combinatorial effects were predominantly seen in prostate cancer cells, but not in a cell-line derived from normal prostate epithelium. Combinatorial treatments were confirmed with two inhibitors against both OGT and GPT2. Taken together, here we report the reprogramming of energy metabolism upon inhibition of OGT activity, and identify synergistically lethal combinations that are prostate cancer cell specific. PMID:26824323

  13. Topoisomerase inhibitors modulate gene expression of B-cell translocation gene 2 and prostate specific antigen in prostate carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Kun-Chun; Tsui, Ke-Hung; Chung, Li-Chuan; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Chang, Phei-Lang; Chen, Wen-Tsung; Juang, Horng-Heng

    2014-01-01

    Camptothecin (CPT) and doxorubicin (DOX) have been demonstrated to have potent anti-tumor activity. The B-cell translocation gene 2 (BTG2) is involved in the regulation of cell cycle progression. We evaluated the molecular mechanisms of CPT and DOX on cell proliferation and the expressions of BTG2 and prostate specific antigen (PSA) in prostate carcinoma cells. Our results indicated that CPT or DOX treatments induced Go/G1 cell cycle arrest in LNCaP cells and apoptosis at higher dosage. Immunoblot and transient gene expression assay indicated that CPT or DOX treatments induced p53 and BTG2 gene expression, with the later effect dependent on the p53 response element within BTG2 promoter area since mutation of the p53 response element from GGGAAAGTCC to GGAGTCC or from GGCAGAGCCC to GGCACC by site-directed mutagenesis abolished the stimulation of CPT or DOX on the BTG2 promoter activity, which is also supported by our results that cotreatments of pifithrin-α, an inhibitor of p53 dependent transcriptional activation, blocked the induction of CPT or DOX on BTG2 gene expression. CPT or DOX also downregulated the protein expressions of androgen receptor (AR) and PSA. Transient gene expression assays suggested that CPT or DOX's attenuation of PSA promoter activity is dependent on both the androgen and p53 response elements within of the PSA promoter. Our results indicated that CPT and DOX attenuate cell proliferation via upregulation of BTG2 gene expression through the p53-dependent pathway. The CPT and DOX block the PSA gene expression by upregulation of p53 activity and downregulation of androgen receptor activity. PMID:24586533

  14. Topoisomerase Inhibitors Modulate Gene Expression of B-Cell Translocation Gene 2 and Prostate Specific Antigen in Prostate Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Li-Chuan; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Chang, Phei-Lang; Chen, Wen-Tsung; Juang, Horng-Heng

    2014-01-01

    Camptothecin (CPT) and doxorubicin (DOX) have been demonstrated to have potent anti-tumor activity. The B-cell translocation gene 2 (BTG2) is involved in the regulation of cell cycle progression. We evaluated the molecular mechanisms of CPT and DOX on cell proliferation and the expressions of BTG2 and prostate specific antigen (PSA) in prostate carcinoma cells. Our results indicated that CPT or DOX treatments induced Go/G1 cell cycle arrest in LNCaP cells and apoptosis at higher dosage. Immunoblot and transient gene expression assay indicated that CPT or DOX treatments induced p53 and BTG2 gene expression, with the later effect dependent on the p53 response element within BTG2 promoter area since mutation of the p53 response element from GGGAAAGTCC to GGAGTCC or from GGCAGAGCCC to GGCACC by site-directed mutagenesis abolished the stimulation of CPT or DOX on the BTG2 promoter activity, which is also supported by our results that cotreatments of pifithrin-α, an inhibitor of p53 dependent transcriptional activation, blocked the induction of CPT or DOX on BTG2 gene expression. CPT or DOX also downregulated the protein expressions of androgen receptor (AR) and PSA. Transient gene expression assays suggested that CPT or DOX’s attenuation of PSA promoter activity is dependent on both the androgen and p53 response elements within of the PSA promoter. Our results indicated that CPT and DOX attenuate cell proliferation via upregulation of BTG2 gene expression through the p53-dependent pathway. The CPT and DOX block the PSA gene expression by upregulation of p53 activity and downregulation of androgen receptor activity. PMID:24586533

  15. Distinct function of estrogen receptor α in smooth muscle and fibroblast cells in prostate development.

    PubMed

    Vitkus, Spencer; Yeh, Chiuan-Ren; Lin, Hsiu-Hsia; Hsu, Iawen; Yu, Jiangzhou; Chen, Ming; Yeh, Shuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen signaling, through estrogen receptor (ER)α, has been shown to cause hypertrophy in the prostate. Our recent report has shown that epithelial ERα knockout (KO) will not affect the normal prostate development or homeostasis. However, it remains unclear whether ERα in different types of stromal cells has distinct roles in prostate development. This study proposed to elucidate how KO of ERα in the stromal smooth muscle or fibroblast cells may interrupt cross talk between prostate stromal and epithelial cells. Smooth muscle ERαKO (smERαKO) mice showed decreased glandular infolding with the proximal area exhibiting a significant decrease. Fibroblast ERαKO mouse prostates did not exhibit this phenotype but showed a decrease in the number of ductal tips. Additionally, the amount of collagen observed in the basement membrane was reduced in smERαKO prostates. Interestingly, these phenotypes were found to be mutually exclusive among smERαKO or fibroblast ERαKO mice. Compound KO of ERα in both fibroblast and smooth muscle showed combined phenotypes from each of the single KO. Further mechanistic studies showed that IGF-I and epidermal growth factor were down-regulated in prostate smooth muscle PS-1 cells lacking ERα. Together, our results indicate the distinct functions of fibroblast vs. smERα in prostate development. PMID:23204329

  16. Molecular effects of soy phytoalexin glyceollins in human prostate cancer cells LNCaP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glyceollins are soy–derived phytoalexins that have been proposed to be candidate cancer preventive compounds. The effect of the glyceollins on prostate cancer is unknown. The present study examined the molecular effects of soy phytoalexins, glyceollins, on the human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP t...

  17. Doxazosin treatment alters stromal cell behavior and increases elastic system fibers deposition in rat prostate.

    PubMed

    Delella, Flávia Karina; Felisbino, Sérgio Luis

    2010-10-01

    Doxazosin (DOX), an α-adrenoceptor antagonist, induces the relaxation of smooth muscle cell tonus and reduces the clinical symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). However, the effects of DOX in the prostate stromal microenvironment are not fully known. In a previous study, we showed that DOX treatment for 30 days increased deposition of collagen fibers in the three rat prostatic lobes. Herein, we investigated the effects of DOX on stromal cell ultrastructure and elastic fiber deposition. Adult Wistar rats were treated with DOX (25 mg/kg/day); and the ventral, dorsal, and anterior prostates were excised at 30 days of treatment. The prostatic lobes were submitted to histochemical and stereological-morphometric analyze and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Histochemical staining plus stereological analysis of the elastic fiber system showed that DOX-treated prostatic lobes presented more elaunin and elastic fibers than controls, mainly in the ventral lobe. Ultrastructural analysis showed that fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells from DOX-treated prostates presented active synthetic phenotypes, evidenced by enlarged rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus cisterns, and confirmed the observation of thickened elaunin fibers. Our findings suggest that, under α-adrenergic blockade by DOX, the fibroblasts become more active and smooth muscle cells shift from a predominantly contractile to a more synthetic phenotype. The deposition of collagen and elastic system fibers in the prostatic stroma may counterbalance the absence of smooth muscle tone during α-blockers treatment. PMID:20155861

  18. Renal-type clear cell carcinoma of the prostate: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, QIULAN; XUE, YONGJIE

    2015-01-01

    Renal-type clear cell carcinoma of the prostate is a rare and novel tumor that has only been identified in recent years. The present study describes a lesion in the prostate of a 64-year-old male with a two-year history of urinary frequency, urgency and difficulty, who was admitted to the San Ai Tang Hospital for benign prostatic hyperplasia, and subsequently underwent transurethral resection of the prostate. In total, 12 g of tissue was resected, which demonstrated morphological and immunohistochemical similarities to clear cell carcinoma of the kidney. Ultrasound inspection and computed tomography revealed prostate enlargement. Although no renal-enclosed mass was identified, metastatic lesions were revealed in the lungs, sternum and clavicles. In addition, right pleural thickening and a small amount of effusion in the pleural cavity were detected. Clear cell carcinoma was identified throughout the prostate, with surrounding regions of ordinary-type prostatic adenocarcinoma (Gleason score, 4+4). The urinary bladder exhibited no dysplasia or neoplasia. It was therefore concluded that the tumor represented a primary renal-type clear cell carcinoma that had arisen in the prostate. To the best of our knowledge, this type of extra-renal tumor has only been reported in three other previous studies. PMID:26137029

  19. Loss of estrogen receptor beta expression in malignant human prostate cells in primary cultures and in prostate cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, D; Rossi, V; Esposito, D; Abbondanza, C; Puca, G A; Bellastella, A; Sinisi, A A

    2001-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of estrogen receptor (ER) beta and alpha genes in normal (N) and malignant (C) primary cultures of human prostate epithelial cells (PEC) and fibroblasts (PFC) and in the prostate tissue donors. Both ERbeta and ERalpha messenger ribonucleic acids were found by RT-PCR analysis in six NPECs and normal prostate tissues and in only one of six CPECs and in the respective cancer tissue donor. The other five CPECs and related cancer tissue donors and all normal and cancer PFCs expressed ERalpha messenger ribonucleic acid alone. Immunoblot analysis, using a polyclonal anti-ERbeta (C-terminal) antibody, demonstrated ERbeta protein in all NPEC lysates and in one of the six CPECS: ERalpha protein was expressed in both NPECs and CPECs when a polyclonal antibody directed against the ERalpha N-terminal domain was used. In contrast, ERalpha protein was not detected in two of the six CPEC lysates when ERalpha C-terminal monoclonal antibodies were used. Using a set of primers designed to amplify the region from exons 6-8, RT-PCR analysis demonstrated the absence of the expected transcript in these cells. The present study shows that the ERbeta gene is expressed together with ERalpha in normal prostates and NPECs, whereas it is barely detectable in prostate cancer and CPECS: Moreover, in some CPECs, the ERalpha gene may be transcribed in a changed protein, resulting from the expression of a deletion variant. Together, these data suggest that prostate malignancy is associated with a potential disorder of ER-mediated pathways. PMID:11344205

  20. Matrix-Dependent Regulation of AKT in Hepsin-Overexpressing PC3 Prostate Cancer Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Wittig-Blaich, Stephanie M; Kacprzyk, Lukasz A; Eismann, Thorsten; Bewerunge-Hudler, Melanie; Kruse, Petra; Winkler, Eva; Strauss, Wolfgang S L; Hibst, Raimund; Steiner, Rudolf; Schrader, Mark; Mertens, Daniel; Sültmann, Holger; Wittig, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    The serine-protease hepsin is one of the most prominently overexpressed genes in human prostate carcinoma. Forced expression of the enzyme in mice prostates is associated with matrix degradation, invasive growth, and prostate cancer progression. Conversely, hepsin overexpression in metastatic prostate cancer cell lines was reported to induce cell cycle arrest and reduction of invasive growth in vitro. We used a system for doxycycline (dox)-inducible target gene expression in metastasis-derived PC3 cells to analyze the effects of hepsin in a quantitative manner. Loss of viability and adhesion correlated with hepsin expression levels during anchorage-dependent but not anchorage-independent growth. Full expression of hepsin led to cell death and detachment and was specifically associated with reduced phosphorylation of AKT at Ser473, which was restored by growth on matrix derived from RWPE1 normal prostatic epithelial cells. In the chorioallantoic membrane xenograft model, hepsin overexpression in PC3 cells reduced the viability of tumors but did not suppress invasive growth. The data presented here provide evidence that elevated levels of hepsin interfere with cell adhesion and viability in the background of prostate cancer as well as other tissue types, the details of which depend on the microenvironment provided. Our findings suggest that overexpression of the enzyme in prostate carcinogenesis must be spatially and temporally restricted for the efficient development of tumors and metastases. PMID:21750652

  1. Suppression of human prostate cancer cell growth by alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists doxazosin and terazosin via induction of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kyprianou, N; Benning, C M

    2000-08-15

    Recent evidence from our laboratory has demonstrated that alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists doxazosin and terazosin induced apoptosis in prostate epithelial and smooth muscle cells in patients with benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH; J. Urol., 159: 1810-1815, 1998; J. Urol., 161: 2002-2007, 1999). In this study, we investigated the biological action of three alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists, doxazosin, terazosin, and tamsulosin, against prostate cancer cell growth. The antigrowth effect of the three alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists was examined in two human prostate cancer cell lines, PC-3 and DU-145, and a prostate smooth muscle cell primary culture, SMC-1, on the basis of: (a) cell viability assay; (b) rate of DNA synthesis; and (c) induction of apoptosis. Our results indicate that treatment of prostate cancer cells with doxazosin or terazosin results in a significant loss of cell viability, via induction of apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, whereas tamsulosin had no effect on prostate cell growth. Neither doxazosin nor terazosin exerted a significant effect on the rate of cell proliferation in prostate cancer cells. Exposure to phenoxybenzamine, an irreversible inhibitor of alpha1-adrenoceptors, does not abrogate the apoptotic effect of doxazosin or terazosin against human prostate cancer or smooth muscle cells. This suggests that the apoptotic activity of doxazosin and terazosin against prostate cells is independent of their capacity to antagonize alpha1-adrenoceptors. Furthermore, an in vivo efficacy trial demonstrated that doxazosin administration (at tolerated pharmacologically relevant doses) in SCID mice bearing PC-3 prostate cancer xenografts resulted in a significant inhibition of tumor growth. These findings demonstrate the ability of doxazosin and terazosin (but not tamsulosin) to suppress prostate cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo by inducing apoptosis without affecting cell proliferation. This evidence provides the rationale for targeting both

  2. ASC-J9(®), and not Casodex or Enzalutamide, suppresses prostate cancer stem/progenitor cell invasion via altering the EZH2-STAT3 signals.

    PubMed

    Wen, Simeng; Tian, Jing; Niu, Yuanjie; Li, Lei; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2016-07-01

    Early studies suggested that prostate cancer (PCa) stem/progenitor (S/P) cells might play key roles to promote the tumor initiation and metastasis. Yet their linkage to the failure of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), however, remains unclear. Here we demonstrated that the ADT with anti-androgens Casodex (also known as Bicalutamide) and Enzalutamide (also known as MDV3100), but not the newly identified AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9(®), increased PCa S/P population, which might then lead to enhance the PCa cell invasion. Targeting AR with ASC-J9(®), and not targeting androgens with Casodex or Enzalutamide, led to suppress PCa S/P cell invasion. Mechanism dissection revealed ASC-J9(®) could suppress S/P cell invasion via altering the EZH2/STAT3 and/or AKT/EZH2/STAT3 signals. Together, these results suggest that targeting PCa S/P cells with ASC-J9(®) or inhibitors to interrupt the EZH2/STAT3 and/or Akt/EZH2/STAT3 signals may become a new therapy to overcome the unwanted side effects of Casodex or Enzalutamide to further suppress the PCa metastasis. PMID:27045473

  3. Cell Line Modeling to Study Biomarker Panel in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    NickKholgh, Bita; Fang, Xiaolan; Winters, Shira M.; Raina, Anvi; Pandya, Komal S.; Gyabaah, Kenneth; Fino, Nora; Balaji, K.C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND African–American men with prostate cancer (PCa) present with higher-grade and -stage tumors compared to Caucasians. While the disparity may result from multiple factors, a biological basis is often strongly suspected. Currently, few well-characterized experimental model systems are available to study the biological basis of racial disparity in PCa. We report a validated in vitro cell line model system that could be used for the purpose. METHODS We assembled a PCa cell line model that included currently available African–American PCa cell lines and LNCaP (androgen-dependent) and C4-2 (castration-resistant) Caucasian PCa cells. The utility of the cell lines in studying the biological basis of variance in a malignant phenotype was explored using a multiplex biomarker panel consisting of proteins that have been proven to play a role in the progression of PCa. The panel expression was evaluated by Western blot and RT-PCR in cell lines and validated in human PCa tissues by RT-PCR. As proof-of-principle to demonstrate the utility of our model in functional studies, we performed MTS viability assays and molecular studies. RESULTS The dysregulation of the multiplex biomarker panel in primary African–American cell line (E006AA) was similar to metastatic Caucasian cell lines, which would suggest that the cell line model could be used to study an inherent aggressive phenotype in African–American men with PCa. We had previously demonstrated that Protein kinase D1 (PKD1) is a novel kinase that is down regulated in advanced prostate cancer. We established the functional relevance by over expressing PKD1, which resulted in decreased proliferation and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) in PCa cells. Moreover, we established the feasibility of studying the expression of the multiplex biomarker panel in archived human PCa tissue from African–Americans and Caucasians as a prelude to future translational studies. CONCLUSION We have characterized a novel in

  4. Epidermal growth factor increases LRF/Pokemon expression in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Himanshu; Aggarwal, Anshu; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2011-10-01

    Leukemia/lymphoma related factor/POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor (LRF/Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of proteins that promotes oncogenesis in several forms of cancer. Recently, we found higher LRF expression in human breast and prostate carcinomas compared to the corresponding normal tissues. The aim of this study was to examine the regulation of LRF expression in human prostate cells. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptors mediate several tumorigenic cascades that regulate cell differentiation, proliferation, migration and survival of prostate cancer cells. There was significantly higher level of LRF expression in the nucleus of LNCaP and PC-3 cells than RWPE-1 cells. A significant increase in LRF expression was observed with increasing doses of EGF in more aggressive and androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells suggesting that EGF signaling pathway is critical in upregulating the expression of LRF/Pokemon to promote oncogenesis. PMID:21640721

  5. Tumor initiators and promoters in the induction of Epstein—Barr virus

    PubMed Central

    Hausen, Harald zur; Bornkamm, Georg W.; Schmidt, Rainer; Hecker, Erich

    1979-01-01

    The effect of various tumor initiators and promoters on induction of persisting Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in different lines of lymphoblastoid cells was analyzed. Neither five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, amongst them potent tumor initiators (e.g., 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene), nor the potent (ultimate) liver carcinogen N-acetoxy-N-2-acetylamino-fluorene induced EBV. A series of compounds, representing three classes of tumor-promoting diterpene esters (e.g., 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate), efficiently induced EBV in persistently infected cells. The concentration required for maximal induction ranged between 0.5 and 100 nM. Some nonpromoting diterpenes (phorbol, 4α-phorbol-12,13-didecanoate, and ingenol) did not induce EBV. However, the nonpromoters, resiniferatoxin and 12-deoxyphorbol-13-decatrienoate, were effective, whereas anthralin, a tumor promoter, did not induce EBV. In three lines of EBV genome-carrying cells (Raji, NC-37, and RPMI 64-10) only abortive induction was noted, leading exclusively to synthesis of early antigen. In cells of lines with low spontaneous virus release (P3HR-1, B95-8, and QIMR-Wil), upon treatment with tetradecanoylphorbol acetate, approximately 20-40 times more viral DNA was recovered as compared to untreated controls. Viral DNA from tetradeca-noylphorbol acetate-induced cultures revealed the same restriction endonuclease cleavage pattern as viral DNA obtained from noninduced cells. Within 10 days after induction, release of infectious virus increased approximately by one order of magnitude. Prostaglandins, reported to be released after treatment with tumor promoters, were ineffective in virus induction under the conditions tested. Images PMID:218219

  6. Prothrombotic effects of prostasomes isolated from prostatic cancer cell lines and seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Babiker, Adil A; Ekdahl, Kristina Nilsson; Nilsson, Bo; Ronquist, Gunnar

    2007-02-01

    Thromboembolism is well recognized as a major complication of cancer. Many tumor cells overexpress tissue factor (TF), which activates blood coagulation in cancer patients. Inflammatory cells expressing TF are also contributors to this activation. In prostate cancer, we believe that prostasomes may also be involved in the initiation of blood coagulation. Prostasomes are submicron secretory granules derived from the prostate gland. They are surrounded by membrane and their extracellular appearance and membrane architecture are complex. Seminal prostasomes are believed to be necessary for successful fertilization and act as protectors of the spermatozoa in the lower and upper female genital tract. Cells from prostate cancer and its metastases are able to produce and export prostasomes to the extracellular environment. These prostasomes may differ quantitatively rather than qualitatively from their normal counterparts with regard to protein composition and function. A majority of human prostate cancers have been found to overexpress TF, and we have demonstrated by various methods that prostasomes derived from prostate cancer cells express considerably higher levels of TF compared with prostasomes of nonmalignant cell origin. The mechanism related to thromboembolic disease generated by prostasomes in prostatic cancer patients may be the early release of prostasomes from prostate cancer cells into the blood circulation, where they will evoke their blood-clotting effects. PMID:17253194

  7. Role of androgen and vitamin D receptors in endothelial cells from benign and malignant human prostate

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ivy; Montecinos, Viviana P.; Buttyan, Ralph; Johnson, Candace S.; Smith, Gary J.

    2013-01-01

    Forty years ago, Judah Folkman (Folkman. N Engl J Med 285: 1182–1186, 1971) proposed that tumor growth might be controlled by limiting formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) needed to supply a growing tumor with oxygen and nutrients. To this end, numerous “antiangiogenic” agents have been developed and tested for therapeutic efficacy in cancer patients, including prostate cancer (CaP) patients, with limited success. Despite the lack of clinical efficacy of lead anti-angiogenic therapeutics in CaP patients, recent published evidence continues to support the idea that prostate tumor vasculature provides a reasonable target for development of new therapeutics. Particularly relevant to antiangiogenic therapies targeted to the prostate is the observation that specific hormones can affect the survival and vascular function of prostate endothelial cells within normal and malignant prostate tissues. Here, we review the evidence demonstrating that both androgen(s) and vitamin D significantly impact the growth and survival of endothelial cells residing within prostate cancer and that systemic changes in circulating androgen or vitamin D drastically affect blood flow and vascularity of prostate tissue. Furthermore, recent evidence will be discussed about the expression of the receptors for both androgen and vitamin D in prostate endothelial cells that argues for direct effects of these hormone-activated receptors on the biology of endothelial cells. Based on this literature, we propose that prostate tumor vasculature represents an unexplored target for modulation of tumor growth. A better understanding of androgen and vitamin D effects on prostate endothelial cells will support development of more effective angiogenesis-targeting therapeutics for CaP patients. PMID:23548616

  8. Increase in prostate stem cell antigen expression in prostatic hyperplasia induced by testosterone and 17β-estradiol in C57BL mice.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Nariaki; Kanno, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Estradiol (E2) is known to act synergistically with testosterone (T) for the development of prostatic hyperplasia in rats and dogs, but murine prostate is less responsive to hormonal stimulation. However, a recent study revealed that the combined administration of E2 and T induced prostatic hyperplasia with bladder outlet obstruction in C57BL mice. To understand the mechanisms underlying the hormonal induction of prostatic hyperplasia, the expression of growth factors and their receptors, androgen receptor, estrogen receptor (ER), and prostatic secretory proteins was investigated. Ten-week-old male C57BL mice were treated with T (30mg) or T+E2 (0.5mg) for 10 weeks, and prostatic lobes were dissected and subjected to quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting analysis. T administration appeared to induce glandular prostatic growth, while with T+E2 administration this growth was greater and accompanied by extreme bladder enlargement. The expression of prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) mRNA and protein was increased in prostate tissue in the T group. The combined administration of E2 with T prominently enhanced PSCA expression, along with increased insulin growth factor 1 mRNA levels and decreased estrogen receptor β mRNA expression. The synergistic effect of E2 on the expression of PSCA suggests that this protein may play an important role in the hormone-induced development of prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:26815912

  9. NPM1 Silencing Reduces Tumour Growth and MAPK Signalling in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Loubeau, Gaëlle; Boudra, Rafik; Maquaire, Sabrina; Lours-Calet, Corinne; Beaudoin, Claude; Verrelle, Pierre; Morel, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The chaperone nucleophosmin (NPM1) is over-expressed in the epithelial compartment of prostate tumours compared to adjacent healthy epithelium and may represent one of the key actors that support the neoplastic phenotype of prostate adenocarcinoma cells. Yet, the mechanisms that underlie NPM1 mediated phenotype remain elusive in the prostate. To better understand NPM1 functions in prostate cancer cells, we sought to characterize its impact on prostate cancer cells behaviour and decipher the mechanisms by which it may act. Here we show that NPM1 favors prostate tumour cell migration, invasion and colony forming. Furthermore, knockdown of NPM1 leads to a decrease in the growth of LNCaP-derived tumours grafted in Nude mice in vivo. Such oncogenic-like properties are found in conjunction with a positive regulation of NPM1 on the ERK1/2 (Extracellular signal-Regulated Kinases 1/2) kinase phosphorylation in response to EGF (Epidermal Growth Factor) stimulus, which is critical for prostate cancer progression following the setting of an autonomous production of the growth factor. NPM1 could then be a target to switch off specifically ERK1/2 pathway activation in order to decrease or inhibit cancer cell growth and migration. PMID:24796332

  10. Exogenous fatty acid binding protein 4 promotes human prostate cancer cell progression.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Hisanori; Takahashi, Tetsuyuki; Oha, Mina; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Izumi, Keisuke

    2014-12-01

    Epidemiologic studies have found that obesity is associated with malignant grade and mortality in prostate cancer. Several adipokines have been implicated as putative mediating factors between obesity and prostate cancer. Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), a member of the cytoplasmic fatty acid binding protein multigene family, was recently identified as a novel adipokine. Although FABP4 is released from adipocytes and mean circulating concentrations of FABP4 are linked with obesity, effects of exogenous FABP4 on prostate cancer progression are unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of exogenous FABP4 on human prostate cancer cell progression. FABP4 treatment promoted serum-induced prostate cancer cell invasion in vitro. Furthermore, oleic acid promoted prostate cancer cell invasion only if FABP4 was present in the medium. These promoting effects were reduced by FABP4 inhibitor, which inhibits FABP4 binding to fatty acids. Immunostaining for FABP4 showed that exogenous FABP4 was taken up into DU145 cells in three-dimensional culture. In mice, treatment with FABP4 inhibitor reduced the subcutaneous growth and lung metastasis of prostate cancer cells. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the number of apoptotic cells, positive for cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP, was increased in subcutaneous tumors of FABP4 inhibitor-treated mice, as compared with control mice. These results suggest that exogenous FABP4 might promote human prostate cancer cell progression by binding with fatty acids. Additionally, exogenous FABP4 activated the PI3K/Akt pathway, independently of binding to fatty acids. Thus, FABP4 might be a key molecule to understand the mechanisms underlying the obesity-prostate cancer progression link. PMID:24740818