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Sample records for protect cellular dna

  1. Protective Effect of Carvacrol on Oxidative Stress and Cellular DNA Damage Induced by UVB Irradiation in Human Peripheral Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Aristatile, Balakrishnan; Al-Numair, Khalid S; Al-Assaf, Abdullah H; Veeramani, Chinnadurai; Pugalendi, Kodukkur Viswanathan

    2015-11-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet B (UVB; 280-320 nm) radiation induces the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the biological system. In this study, we examined the protective effect of carvacrol on UVB-induced lipid peroxidation and oxidative DNA damage with reference to alterations in cellular an-tioxidant status in human lymphocytes. A series of in vitro assays (hydroxyl radical, superoxide, nitric oxide, DPPH (2,2-Diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl), and ABTS (2,2-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical scavenging assays) demonstrate antioxidant property of carvacrol in our study. UVB exposure significantly increased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), lipid hydroperoxides (LHPs), % tail DNA and tail moment; decreased % cell viability and antioxidant status in UVB-irradiated lymphocytes. Treatment with carvacrol 30 min prior to UVB-exposure resulted in a significant decline of TBARS, LHP, % tail DNA, and tail moment and increased % cell viability as carvacrol concentration increased. UVB irradiated lymphocytes with carvacrol alone (at 10 μg/mL) gave no significant change in cell viability, TBARS, LHP, % tail DNA, and tail moment when compared with normal lymphocytes. On the basis of our results, we conclude that carvacrol, a dietary antioxidant, mediates its protective effect through modulation of UVB-induced ROS. PMID:26768646

  2. Reciprocal Paracrine Interactions Between Normal Human Epithelial and Mesenchymal Cells Protect Cellular DNA from Radiation-Induced Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Nakazawa, Yuka; Saenko, Vladimir Rogounovitch, Tatiana; Suzuki, Keiji; Mitsutake, Norisato; Matsuse, Michiko; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To explore whether interactions between normal epithelial and mesenchymal cells can modulate the extent of radiation-induced DNA damage in one or both types of cells. Methods and Materials: Human primary thyrocytes (PT), diploid fibroblasts BJ, MRC-5, and WI-38, normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), and endothelial human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells (HUV-EC-C), cultured either individually or in co-cultures or after conditioned medium transfer, were irradiated with 0.25 to 5 Gy of {gamma}-rays and assayed for the extent of DNA damage. Results: The number of {gamma}-H2AX foci in co-cultures of PT and BJ fibroblasts was approximately 25% lower than in individual cultures at 1 Gy in both types of cells. Reciprocal conditioned medium transfer to individual cultures before irradiation resulted in approximately a 35% reduction of the number {gamma}-H2AX foci at 1 Gy in both types of cells, demonstrating the role of paracrine soluble factors. The DNA-protected state of cells was achieved within 15 min after conditioned medium transfer; it was reproducible and reciprocal in several lines of epithelial cells and fibroblasts, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells but not in epithelial and endothelial cells. Unlike normal cells, human epithelial cancer cells failed to establish DNA-protected states in fibroblasts and vice versa. Conclusions: The results imply the existence of a network of reciprocal interactions between normal epithelial and some types of mesenchymal cells mediated by soluble factors that act in a paracrine manner to protect DNA from genotoxic stress.

  3. Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

  4. [Pulse-modulated Electromagnetic Radiation of Extremely High Frequencies Protects Cellular DNA against Damaging Effect of Physico-Chemical Factors in vitro].

    PubMed

    Gapeyev, A B; Lukyanova, N A

    2015-01-01

    Using a comet assay technique, we investigated protective effects of. extremely high frequency electromagnetic radiation in combination with the damaging effect of X-ray irradiation, the effect of damaging agents hydrogen peroxide and methyl methanesulfonate on DNA in mouse whole blood leukocytes. It was shown that the preliminary exposure of the cells to low intensity pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation (42.2 GHz, 0.1 mW/cm2, 20-min exposure, modulation frequencies of 1 and 16 Hz) caused protective effects decreasing the DNA damage by 20-45%. The efficacy of pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation depended on the type of genotoxic agent and increased in a row methyl methanesulfonate--X-rays--hydrogen peroxide. Continuous electromagnetic radiation was ineffective. The mechanisms of protective effects may be connected with an induction of the adaptive response by nanomolar concentrations of reactive oxygen species formed by pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation. PMID:26591599

  5. Ellagic acid, a natural polyphenol protects rat peripheral blood lymphocytes against nicotine-induced cellular and DNA damage in vitro: with the comparison of N-acetylcysteine.

    PubMed

    Sudheer, Adluri Ram; Muthukumaran, Shanmugavelu; Devipriya, Nagarajan; Menon, Venugopal Padmanabhan

    2007-01-25

    The present work is aimed at evaluating the protective effect of ellagic acid (EA), a natural polyphenolic compound that is widely distributed in fruits and nuts against nicotine-induced toxicity in rat peripheral blood lymphocytes. The effect of EA against nicotine toxicity was compared with N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a well-known antioxidant. Lymphocytes were exposed to nicotine at the doses of 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 4 mM for 1h in culture media. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), a lipid peroxidative marker and reduced glutathione (GSH), as indicative of endogenous antioxidant status were analyzed to fix the optimum dose. The lowest concentration eliciting significant damage was 1 mM nicotine and maximum damage was observed with 3 mM concentration, as evidenced by increased levels of TBARS and decreased levels of GSH. Hence, the test concentration was fixed at 3 mM nicotine. To establish most effective protective support we used five different concentrations of EA (10, 50, 100, 150 and 300 microM) against 3 mM nicotine. A dose-dependent inhibitory effect was observed with all doses of EA. Maximum protection was observed at the dose of 100 microM EA. So, 100 microM dose was used for further studies. We have tested five different concentrations of NAC-0.25, 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 mM to elucidate the optimum protective dose against nicotine toxicity. One millimolar NAC showed a significant protection against nicotine toxicity. Protective effect of EA against nicotine toxicity was elucidated by analyzing the lipid peroxidative index, viz., TBARS, hydroperoxides (HP) and endogenous antioxidant status, viz., superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), reduced glutathione (GSH), Vitamins A, E and C. DNA damage and repair were assessed by using alkaline single-cell microgel electrophoresis (Comet assay) and micronucleus assay. There was a significant increase in the levels of lipid peroxidative index, severity in DNA damage and

  6. AP39, a novel mitochondria-targeted hydrogen sulfide donor, stimulates cellular bioenergetics, exerts cytoprotective effects and protects against the loss of mitochondrial DNA integrity in oxidatively stressed endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Szczesny, Bartosz; Módis, Katalin; Yanagi, Kazunori; Coletta, Ciro; Le Trionnaire, Sophie; Perry, Alexis; Wood, Mark E; Whiteman, Matthew; Szabo, Csaba

    2014-09-15

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of the recently synthesized mitochondrially-targeted H2S donor, AP39 [(10-oxo-10-(4-(3-thioxo-3H-1,2-dithiol-5yl)phenoxy)decyl) triphenylphosphonium bromide], on bioenergetics, viability, and mitochondrial DNA integrity in bEnd.3 murine microvascular endothelial cells in vitro, under normal conditions, and during oxidative stress. Intracellular H2S was assessed by the fluorescent dye 7-azido-4-methylcoumarin. For the measurement of bioenergetic function, the XF24 Extracellular Flux Analyzer was used. Cell viability was estimated by the combination of the MTT and LDH methods. Oxidative protein modifications were measured by the Oxyblot method. Reactive oxygen species production was monitored by the MitoSOX method. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA integrity were assayed by the Long Amplicon PCR method. Oxidative stress was induced by addition of glucose oxidase. Addition of AP39 (30-300 nM) to bEnd.3 cells increased intracellular H2S levels, with a preferential response in the mitochondrial regions. AP39 exerted a concentration-dependent effect on mitochondrial activity, which consisted of a stimulation of mitochondrial electron transport and cellular bioenergetic function at lower concentrations (30-100 nM) and an inhibitory effect at the higher concentration of 300 nM. Under oxidative stress conditions induced by glucose oxidase, an increase in oxidative protein modification and an enhancement in MitoSOX oxidation was noted, coupled with an inhibition of cellular bioenergetic function and a reduction in cell viability. AP39 pretreatment attenuated these responses. Glucose oxidase induced a preferential damage to the mitochondrial DNA; AP39 (100 nM) pretreatment protected against it. In conclusion, the current paper documents antioxidant and cytoprotective effects of AP39 under oxidative stress conditions, including a protection against oxidative mitochondrial DNA damage. PMID:24755204

  7. p53-Mediated Cellular Response to DNA Damage in Cells with Replicative Hepatitis B Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puisieux, Alain; Ji, Jingwei; Guillot, Celine; Legros, Yann; Soussi, Thierry; Isselbacher, Kurt; Ozturk, Mehmet

    1995-02-01

    Wild-type p53 acts as a tumor suppressor gene by protecting cells from deleterious effects of genotoxic agents through the induction of a G_1/S arrest or apoptosis as a response to DNA damage. Transforming proteins of several oncogenic DNA viruses inactivate tumor suppressor activity of p53 by blocking this cellular response. To test whether hepatitis B virus displays a similar effect, we studied the p53-mediated cellular response to DNA damage in 2215 hepatoma cells with replicative hepatitis B virus. We demonstrate that hepatitis B virus replication does not interfere with known cellular functions of p53 protein.

  8. REC-2006-A Fractionated Extract of Podophyllum hexandrum Protects Cellular DNA from Radiation-Induced Damage by Reducing the Initial Damage and Enhancing Its Repair In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Pankaj; Shukla, Sandeep Kumar; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Podophyllum hexandrum, a perennial herb commonly known as the Himalayan May Apple, is well known in Indian and Chinese traditional systems of medicine. P. hexandrum has been widely used for the treatment of venereal warts, skin infections, bacterial and viral infections, and different cancers of the brain, lung and bladder. This study aimed at elucidating the effect of REC-2006, a bioactive fractionated extract from the rhizome of P. hexandrum, on the kinetics of induction and repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in murine thymocytes in vivo. We evaluated its effect on non-specific radiation-induced DNA damage by the alkaline halo assay in terms of relative nuclear spreading factor (RNSF) and gene-specific radiation-induced DNA damage via semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Whole body exposure of animals with gamma rays (10 Gy) caused a significant amount of DNA damage in thymocytes (RNSF values 17.7 ± 0.47, 12.96 ± 1.64 and 3.3 ± 0.014) and a reduction in the amplification of β-globin gene to 0, 28 and 43% at 0, 15 and 60 min, respectively. Administrating REC-2006 at a radioprotective concentration (15 mg kg(-1) body weight) 1 h before irradiation resulted in time-dependent reduction of DNA damage evident as a decrease in RNSF values 6.156 ± 0.576, 1.647 ± 0.534 and 0.496 ± 0.012, and an increase in β-globin gene amplification 36, 95 and 99%, at 0, 15 and 60 min, respectively. REC-2006 scavenged radiation-induced hydroxyl radicals in a dose-dependent manner stabilized DPPH free radicals and also inhibited superoxide anions. Various polyphenols and flavonoides present in REC-2006 might contribute to scavenging of radiation-induced free radicals, thereby preventing DNA damage and stimulating its repair. PMID:20008078

  9. Ejecting Phage DNA against Cellular Turgor Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Sanjin; Šiber, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    We examine in vivo ejection of noncondensed DNA from tailed bacteriophages into bacteria. The ejection is dominantly governed by the physical conditions in the bacteria. The confinement of the DNA in the virus capsid only slightly helps the ejection, becoming completely irrelevant during its last stages. A simple calculation based on the premise of condensed DNA in the cell enables us to estimate the maximal bacterial turgor pressure against which the ejection can still be fully realized. The calculated pressure (∼5 atm) shows that the ejection of DNA into Gram-negative bacteria could proceed spontaneously, i.e., without the need to invoke active mechanisms. PMID:25418173

  10. Anthocyanidins modulate the activity of human DNA topoisomerases I and II and affect cellular DNA integrity.

    PubMed

    Habermeyer, Michael; Fritz, Jessica; Barthelmes, Hans U; Christensen, Morten O; Larsen, Morten K; Boege, Fritz; Marko, Doris

    2005-09-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of anthocyanidins on human topoisomerases I and II and its relevance for DNA integrity within human cells. Anthocyanidins bearing vicinal hydroxy groups at the B-ring (delphinidin, DEL; cyanidin, CY) were found to potently inhibit the catalytic activity of human topoisomerases I and II, without discriminating between the IIalpha and the IIbeta isoforms. However, in contrast to topoisomerase poisons, DEL and CY did not stabilize the covalent DNA-topoisomerase intermediates (cleavable complex) of topoisomerase I or II. Using recombinant topoisomerase I, the presence of CY or DEL (> or = 1 microM) effectively prohibited the stabilization of the cleavable complex by the topoisomerase I poison camptothecin. We furthermore investigated whether the potential protective effect vs topoisomerase I poisons is reflected also on the cellular level, affecting the DNA damaging properties of camptothecin. Indeed, in HT29 cells, low micromolar concentrations of DEL (1-10 microM) significantly diminished the DNA strand breaking effect of camptothecin (100 microM). However, at concentrations > or = 50 microM, all anthocyanidins tested (delphinidin, cyanidin, malvidin, pelargonidin, and paeonidin), including those not interfering with topoisomerases, were found to induce DNA strand breaks in the comet assay. All of these analogues were able to compete with ethidium bromide for the intercalation into calf thymus DNA and to replace the minor groove binder Hoechst 33258. These data indicate substantial affinity to double-stranded DNA, which might contribute at least to the DNA strand breaking effect of anthocyanidins at higher concentrations (> or = 50 microM). PMID:16167831

  11. DNA vaccines targeting heavy chain C-terminal fragments of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A, B, and E induce potent humoral and cellular immunity and provide protection from lethal toxin challenge

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Veronica L; Villarreal, Daniel O; Hutnick, Natalie A; Walters, Jewell N; Ragwan, Edwin; Bdeir, Khalil; Yan, Jian; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Finnefrock, Adam C; Casimiro, Danilo R; Weiner, David B

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are deadly, toxic proteins produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum that can cause significant diseases in humans. The use of the toxic substances as potential bioweapons has raised concerns by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the United States Military. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine to prevent botulinum intoxication. Here we present an immunogenicity study to evaluate the efficacy of novel monovalent vaccines and a trivalent cocktail DNA vaccine targeting the heavy chain C-terminal fragments of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A, B, and E. These synthetic DNA vaccines induced robust humoral and polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses which fully protected animals against lethal challenge after just 2 immunizations. In addition, naïve animals administered immunized sera mixed with the lethal neurotoxin were 100% protected against intoxication. The data demonstrate the protective efficacy induced by a combinative synthetic DNA vaccine approach. This study has importance for the development of vaccines that provide protective immunity against C. botulinum neurotoxins and other toxins. PMID:26158319

  12. Borrowing nuclear DNA helicases to protect mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lin; Liu, Yilun

    2015-01-01

    In normal cells, mitochondria are the primary organelles that generate energy, which is critical for cellular metabolism. Mitochondrial dysfunction, caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations or an abnormal mtDNA copy number, is linked to a range of human diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, premature aging‎ and cancer. mtDNA resides in the mitochondrial lumen, and its duplication requires the mtDNA replicative helicase, Twinkle. In addition to Twinkle, many DNA helicases, which are encoded by the nuclear genome and are crucial for nuclear genome integrity, are transported into the mitochondrion to also function in mtDNA replication and repair. To date, these helicases include RecQ-like helicase 4 (RECQ4), petite integration frequency 1 (PIF1), DNA replication helicase/nuclease 2 (DNA2) and suppressor of var1 3-like protein 1 (SUV3). Although the nuclear functions of some of these DNA helicases have been extensively studied, the regulation of their mitochondrial transport and the mechanisms by which they contribute to mtDNA synthesis and maintenance remain largely unknown. In this review, we attempt to summarize recent research progress on the role of mammalian DNA helicases in mitochondrial genome maintenance and the effects on mitochondria-associated diseases. PMID:25984607

  13. Multiple cellular mechanisms prevent chromosomal rearrangements involving repetitive DNA

    PubMed Central

    George, Carolyn M.; Alani, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive DNA is present in the eukaryotic genome in the form of segmental duplications, tandem and interspersed repeats, and satellites. Repetitive sequences can be beneficial by serving specific cellular functions (e.g. centromeric and telomeric DNA) and by providing a rapid means for adaptive evolution. However, such elements are also substrates for deleterious chromosomal rearrangements that affect fitness and promote human disease. Recent studies analyzing the role of nuclear organization in DNA repair and factors that suppress non-allelic homologous recombination have provided insights into how genome stability is maintained in eukaryotes. In this review we outline the types of repetitive sequences seen in eukaryotic genomes and how recombination mechanisms are regulated at the DNA sequence, cell organization, chromatin structure, and cell cycle control levels to prevent chromosomal rearrangements involving these sequences. PMID:22494239

  14. Quality control mechanisms in cellular and systemic DNA damage responses

    PubMed Central

    Ermolaeva, Maria A.; Dakhovnik, Alexander; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of the genome is of pivotal importance for the functional integrity of cells and tissues. The gradual accumulation of DNA damage is thought to contribute to the functional decline of tissues and organs with ageing. Defects in multiple genome maintenance systems cause human disorders characterized by cancer susceptibility, developmental failure, and premature ageing. The complex pathological consequences of genome instability are insufficiently explained by cell-autonomous DNA damage responses (DDR) alone. Quality control pathways play an important role in DNA repair and cellular DDR pathways. Recent years have revealed non-cell autonomous effects of DNA damage that impact the physiological adaptations during ageing. We will discuss the role of quality assurance pathways in cell-autonomous and systemic responses to genome instability. PMID:25560147

  15. Cellular processing and destinies of artificial DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Di Sheng; Qian, Hang; Tay, Chor Yong; Leong, David Tai

    2016-08-01

    Since many bionanotechnologies are targeted at cells, understanding how and where their interactions occur and the subsequent results of these interactions is important. Changing the intrinsic properties of DNA nanostructures and linking them with interactions presents a holistic and powerful strategy for understanding dual nanostructure-biological systems. With the recent advances in DNA nanotechnology, DNA nanostructures present a great opportunity to understand the often convoluted mass of information pertaining to nanoparticle-biological interactions due to the more precise control over their chemistry, sizes, and shapes. Coupling just some of these designs with an understanding of biological processes is both a challenge and a source of opportunities. Despite continuous advances in the field of DNA nanotechnology, the intracellular fate of DNA nanostructures has remained unclear and controversial. Because understanding its cellular processing and destiny is a necessary prelude to any rational design of exciting and innovative bionanotechnology, in this review, we will discuss and provide a comprehensive picture relevant to the intracellular processing and the fate of various DNA nanostructures which have been remained elusive for some time. We will also link the unique capabilities of DNA to some novel ideas for developing next-generation bionanotechnologies. PMID:27119124

  16. Cellular integrity is required for inhibition of initiation of cellular DNA synthesis by reovirus type 3.

    PubMed Central

    Roner, M R; Cox, D C

    1985-01-01

    Synchronized HeLa cells, primed for entry into the synthesis phase by amethopterin, were prevented from initiating DNA synthesis 9 h after infection with reovirus type 3. However, nuclei isolated from synchronized cells infected with reovirus for 9 or 16 h demonstrated a restored ability to synthesize DNA. The addition of enucleated cytoplasmic extracts from infected or uninfected cells did not affect this restored capacity for synthesis. The addition of ribonucleotide triphosphates to nuclei isolated from infected cells stimulated additional DNA synthesis, suggesting that these nuclei were competent to initiate new rounds of DNA replication. Permeabilization of infected cells did not restore the ability of these cells to synthesize DNA. Nucleoids isolated from intact or permeabilized cells, infected for 9 or 16 h displayed an increased rate of sedimentation when compared with nucleoids isolated from uninfected cells. Nucleoids isolated from the nuclei of infected cells demonstrated a rate of sedimentation similar to that of nucleoids isolated from the nuclei of uninfected cells. The inhibition of initiation of cellular DNA synthesis by reovirus type 3 appears not to have been due to a permanent alteration of the replication complex, but this inhibition could be reversed by the removal of that complex from factors unique to the structural or metabolic integrity of the infected cell. Images PMID:3968718

  17. Cellular immune response in the presence of protective antibody levels correlates with protection against 1918 influenza in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Pillet, Stéphane; Kobasa, Darwyn; Meunier, Isabelle; Gray, Michael; Laddy, Dominick; Weiner, David B; von Messling, Veronika; Kobinger, Gary P

    2011-09-01

    The identification of immune correlates of protection against highly pathogenic human-adapted influenza is instrumental in the development of the next generation of vaccines. Towards this, ferrets received either one dose of a conventionally produced vaccine, two inoculations of a hemagglutinin (HA)-expressing DNA vaccine, or a prime-boost regimen of the DNA vaccine followed by injection of a HA-expressing adenoviral vector. In addition to the antibody response, ferret-specific interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) ELISpot and flow cytometry assays were developed to follow the cellular immune response. Animals that received the conventional vaccine mounted a humoral response, while the DNA vaccinated groups also developed IFN-γ producing T cells. Upon challenge with the matched highly pathogenic A/South Carolina/1/18 H1N1 influenza A virus, the conventionally vaccinated group developed moderate to severe signs of disease, whereas the DNA vaccinated animals experienced mild disease. In the presence of an antibody response within the protective range, the extent of the T cell response correlated more accurately with reduced morbidity in vaccinated ferrets. PMID:21211587

  18. Cellular Response to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damage in Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Outside the protection of the geomagnetic field, astronauts and other living organisms are constantly exposed to space radiation that consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles. Whether spaceflight factors, microgravity in particular, have effects on cellular responses to DNA damage induced by exposure to radiation or cytotoxic chemicals is still unknown, as is their impact on the radiation risks for astronauts and on the mutation rate in microorganisms. Although possible synergistic effects of space radiation and other spaceflight factors have been investigated since the early days of the human space program, the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate effects of spaceflight on cellular responses to DNA damages, human fibroblast cells flown to the International Space Station (ISS) were treated with bleomycin for three hours in the true microgravity environment, which induced DNA damages including double-strand breaks (DSB) similar to the ionizing radiation. Damages in the DNA were measured by the phosphorylation of a histone protein H2AX (g-H2AX), which showed slightly more foci in the cells on ISS than in the ground control. The expression of genes involved in DNA damage response was also analyzed using the PCR array. Although a number of the genes, including CDKN1A and PCNA, were significantly altered in the cells after bleomycin treatment, no significant difference in the expression profile of DNA damage response genes was found between the flight and ground samples. At the time of the bleomycin treatment, the cells on the ISS were found to be proliferating faster than the ground control as measured by the percentage of cells containing positive Ki-67 signals. Our results suggested that the difference in g-H2AX focus counts between flight and ground was due to the faster growth rate of the cells in space, but spaceflight did not affect initial transcriptional responses of the DNA damage response genes to

  19. Rearrangement of a common cellular DNA domain on chromosome 4 in human primary liver tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquinelli, C.; Garreau, F.; Bougueleret, L.; Cariani, E.; Thiers, V.; Croissant, O.; Hadchouel, M.; Tiollais, P.; Brechot, C. ); Grzeschik, K.H. )

    1988-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA integration has been shown to occur frequently in human hepatocellular carcinomas. The authors have investigated whether common cellular DNA domains might be rearranged, possibly by HBV integration, in human primary liver tumors. Unique cellular DNA sequences adjacent to an HBV integration site were isolated from a patient with hepatitis B surface antigen-positive hepatocellular carcinoma. These probes detected rearrangement of this cellular region of chromosomal DNA in 3 of 50 additional primary liver tumors studied. Of these three tumor samples, two contained HBV DNA, without an apparent link between the viral DNA and the rearranged allele; HBV DNA sequences were not detected in the third tumor sample. By use of a panel of somatic cell hybrids, these unique cellular DNA sequences were shown to be located on chromosome 4. Therefore, this region of chromosomal DNA might be implicated in the formation of different tumors at one step of liver cell transformation, possible related to HBV integration.

  20. Salt shield: intracellular salts provide cellular protection against ionizing radiation in the halophilic archaeon, Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1.

    PubMed

    Kish, A; Kirkali, G; Robinson, C; Rosenblatt, R; Jaruga, P; Dizdaroglu, M; DiRuggiero, J

    2009-05-01

    The halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 was used as a model system to investigate cellular damage induced by exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation (IR). Oxidative damages are the main lesions from IR and result from free radicals production via radiolysis of water. This is the first study to quantify DNA base modification in a prokaryote, revealing a direct relationship between yield of DNA lesions and IR dose. Most importantly, our data demonstrate the significance of DNA radiation damage other than strand breaks on cell survival. We also report the first in vivo evidence of reactive oxygen species scavenging by intracellular halides in H. salinarum NRC-1, resulting in increased protection against nucleotide modification and carbonylation of protein residues. Bromide ions, which are highly reactive with hydroxyl radicals, provided the greatest protection to cellular macromolecules. Modified DNA bases were repaired in 2 h post irradiation, indicating effective DNA repair systems. In addition, measurements of H. salinarum NRC-1 cell interior revealed a high Mn/Fe ratio similar to that of Deinococcus radiodurans and other radiation-resistant microorganisms, which has been shown to provide a measure of protection for proteins against oxidative damage. The work presented here supports previous studies showing that radiation resistance is the product of mechanisms for cellular protection and detoxification, as well as for the repair of oxidative damage to cellular macromolecules. The finding that not only Mn/Fe but also the presence of halides can decrease the oxidative damage to DNA and proteins emphasizes the significance of the intracellular milieu in determining microbial radiation resistance. PMID:19452594

  1. Cellular transcription factors enhance herpes simplex virus type 1 oriS-dependent DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Huynh, A T; Schaffer, P A

    1998-05-01

    replication had no detectable effect on either basal or induced levels of transcription from the ICP4 and ICP22/47 promoters, as determined by RNase protection assays. The Oscar elements thus appear to provide binding sites for cellular proteins that facilitate oriS-dependent DNA replication but have no effect on transcription of oriS-flanking genes. PMID:9557644

  2. A Germline Polymorphism of DNA Polymerase Beta Induces Genomic Instability and Cellular Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Keh, Agnes; Sweasy, Joann B.

    2012-01-01

    Several germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified in the POLB gene, but little is known about their cellular and biochemical impact. DNA Polymerase β (Pol β), encoded by the POLB gene, is the main gap-filling polymerase involved in base excision repair (BER), a pathway that protects the genome from the consequences of oxidative DNA damage. In this study we tested the hypothesis that expression of the POLB germline coding SNP (rs3136797) in mammalian cells could induce a cancerous phenotype. Expression of this SNP in both human and mouse cells induced double-strand breaks, chromosomal aberrations, and cellular transformation. Following treatment with an alkylating agent, cells expressing this coding SNP accumulated BER intermediate substrates, including single-strand and double-strand breaks. The rs3136797 SNP encodes the P242R variant Pol β protein and biochemical analysis showed that P242R protein had a slower catalytic rate than WT, although P242R binds DNA similarly to WT. Our results suggest that people who carry the rs3136797 germline SNP may be at an increased risk for cancer susceptibility. PMID:23144635

  3. Protection of DNA From Ionizing Radiation-Induced Lesions by Asiaticoside.

    PubMed

    Joy, Jisha; Alarifi, Saud; Alsuhaibani, Entissar; Nair, Cherupally K Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate whether asiaticoside, a triterpene glycoside, can afford protection to DNA from alterations induced by gamma radiation under in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo conditions. In vitro studies were done on plasmid pBR322 DNA, ex vivo studies were done on cellular DNA of human peripheral blood leukocytes, and in vivo investigations were conducted on cellular DNA of spleen and bone marrow cells of mice exposed to whole-body gamma radiation. The supercoiled form of the plasmid pBR322 DNA upon exposure to the radiation was converted into relaxed open circular form due to induction of strand breaks. Presence of asiaticoside along with the DNA during irradiation prevented the relaxation of the supercoiled form to the open circular form. When human peripheral blood leukocytes were exposed to gamma radiation, the cellular DNA suffered strand breaks as evidenced by the increased comet parameters in an alkaline comet assay. Asiaticoside, when present along with blood during irradiation ex vivo, prevented the strand breaks and the comet parameters were closer to that of the controls. Whole-body exposure of mice to gamma radiation resulted in a significant increase in comet parameters of DNA of bone marrow and spleen cells of mice as a result of radiation-induced strand breaks in DNA. Administration of asiaticoside prior to whole-body radiation exposure of the mice prevented this increase in radiation-induced increase in comet parameters, which could be the result of protection to DNA under in vivo conditions of radiation exposure. Thus, it can be concluded from the results that asiaticoside can offer protection to DNA from radiation-induced alterations under in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo conditions. PMID:26756427

  4. Mushroom-derived preparations in the prevention of H2O2-induced oxidative damage to cellular DNA.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yu-ling; James, Anthony E; Benzie, Iris F F; Buswell, John A

    2002-01-01

    Aqueous extracts of the sporophores of eight mushroom species were assessed for their ability to prevent H2O2-induced oxidative damage to cellular DNA using the single-cell gel electrophoresis ("Comet") assay. The highest genoprotective effects were obtained with cold (20 degrees C) and hot (100 degrees C) water extracts of Agaricus bisporus and Ganoderma lucidum fruit bodies, respectively. No protective effects were observed with Mushroom Derived Preparations (MDPs) from Flammulina velutipes, Auricularia auricula, Hypsizygus marmoreus, Lentinula edodes, Pleurotus sajor-caju, and Volvariella volvacea. These findings indicate that some edible mushrooms represent a valuable source of biologically active compounds with potential for protecting cellular DNA from oxidative damage. PMID:11835288

  5. DNA prime-protein boost vaccination enhances protective immunity against infectious bursal disease virus in chickens.

    PubMed

    Gao, Honglei; Li, Kai; Gao, Li; Qi, Xiaole; Gao, Yulong; Qin, Liting; Wang, Yongqiang; Wang, Xiaomei

    2013-05-31

    Infectious bursal disease virus causes an acute contagious immunosuppressive disease in chickens. Using VP2 protein from IBDV (Gx strain) as the immunogen, the goal of the current study was to evaluate the immune responses and protective efficacy elicited by different prime-boost vaccination regimens (DNA only, protein only, and DNA plus protein) in chickens. The results indicated that both pCAGoptiVP2 plasmid and rVP2 protein induced humoral and cellular immune responses. Chickens in the DNA prime-protein boost group developed significantly higher levels of ELISA and neutralizing antibodies to IBDV compared with those immunized with either the DNA vaccine or the protein vaccine alone (P<0.05). Furthermore, the highest levels of lymphocyte proliferation response, IL-4 and IFN-γ production were induced following priming with the DNA vaccine and boosting with the rVP2 protein. Additionally, chickens inoculated with the DNA prime-protein boost vaccine had 100% protection against challenge with vvIBDV, as evidenced by the absence of clinical signs, mortality, and bursal atrophy. In contrast, chickens receiving the DNA vaccine and the rVP2 protein vaccine had 67% and 80% protection, respectively. These findings demonstrated that the DNA prime-protein boost immunization strategy was effective in eliciting both humoral and cellular immune responses in chickens, highlighting the potential value of such an approach in the prevention of vvIBDV infection. PMID:23419823

  6. Crosstalk between cellular compartments protects against proteotoxicity and extends lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Perić, Matea; Dib, Peter Bou; Dennerlein, Sven; Musa, Marina; Rudan, Marina; Lovrić, Anita; Nikolić, Andrea; Šarić, Ana; Sobočanec, Sandra; Mačak, Željka; Raimundo, Nuno; Kriško, Anita

    2016-01-01

    In cells living under optimal conditions, protein folding defects are usually prevented by the action of chaperones. Here, we investigate the cell-wide consequences of loss of chaperone function in cytosol, mitochondria or the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in budding yeast. We find that the decline in chaperone activity in each compartment results in loss of respiration, demonstrating the dependence of mitochondrial activity on cell-wide proteostasis. Furthermore, each chaperone deficiency triggers a response, presumably via the communication among the folding environments of distinct cellular compartments, termed here the cross-organelle stress response (CORE). The proposed CORE pathway encompasses activation of protein conformational maintenance machineries, antioxidant enzymes, and metabolic changes simultaneously in the cytosol, mitochondria, and the ER. CORE induction extends replicative and chronological lifespan in budding yeast, highlighting its protective role against moderate proteotoxicity and its consequences such as the decline in respiration. Our findings accentuate that organelles do not function in isolation, but are integrated in a functional crosstalk, while also highlighting the importance of organelle communication in aging and age-related diseases. PMID:27346163

  7. Crosstalk between cellular compartments protects against proteotoxicity and extends lifespan.

    PubMed

    Perić, Matea; Dib, Peter Bou; Dennerlein, Sven; Musa, Marina; Rudan, Marina; Lovrić, Anita; Nikolić, Andrea; Šarić, Ana; Sobočanec, Sandra; Mačak, Željka; Raimundo, Nuno; Kriško, Anita

    2016-01-01

    In cells living under optimal conditions, protein folding defects are usually prevented by the action of chaperones. Here, we investigate the cell-wide consequences of loss of chaperone function in cytosol, mitochondria or the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in budding yeast. We find that the decline in chaperone activity in each compartment results in loss of respiration, demonstrating the dependence of mitochondrial activity on cell-wide proteostasis. Furthermore, each chaperone deficiency triggers a response, presumably via the communication among the folding environments of distinct cellular compartments, termed here the cross-organelle stress response (CORE). The proposed CORE pathway encompasses activation of protein conformational maintenance machineries, antioxidant enzymes, and metabolic changes simultaneously in the cytosol, mitochondria, and the ER. CORE induction extends replicative and chronological lifespan in budding yeast, highlighting its protective role against moderate proteotoxicity and its consequences such as the decline in respiration. Our findings accentuate that organelles do not function in isolation, but are integrated in a functional crosstalk, while also highlighting the importance of organelle communication in aging and age-related diseases. PMID:27346163

  8. Mechanistic Modelling of DNA Repair and Cellular Survival Following Radiation-Induced DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Stephen J; Schuemann, Jan; Paganetti, Harald; Prise, Kevin M

    2016-01-01

    Characterising and predicting the effects of ionising radiation on cells remains challenging, with the lack of robust models of the underlying mechanism of radiation responses providing a significant limitation to the development of personalised radiotherapy. In this paper we present a mechanistic model of cellular response to radiation that incorporates the kinetics of different DNA repair processes, the spatial distribution of double strand breaks and the resulting probability and severity of misrepair. This model enables predictions to be made of a range of key biological endpoints (DNA repair kinetics, chromosome aberration and mutation formation, survival) across a range of cell types based on a set of 11 mechanistic fitting parameters that are common across all cells. Applying this model to cellular survival showed its capacity to stratify the radiosensitivity of cells based on aspects of their phenotype and experimental conditions such as cell cycle phase and plating delay (correlation between modelled and observed Mean Inactivation Doses R(2) > 0.9). By explicitly incorporating underlying mechanistic factors, this model can integrate knowledge from a wide range of biological studies to provide robust predictions and may act as a foundation for future calculations of individualised radiosensitivity. PMID:27624453

  9. Protection after stroke: cellular effectors of neurovascular unit integrity

    PubMed Central

    Posada-Duque, Rafael Andres; Barreto, George E.; Cardona-Gomez, Gloria Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Neurological disorders are prevalent worldwide. Cerebrovascular diseases (CVDs), which account for 55% of all neurological diseases, are the leading cause of permanent disability, cognitive and motor disorders and dementia. Stroke affects the function and structure of blood-brain barrier, the loss of cerebral blood flow regulation, oxidative stress, inflammation and the loss of neural connections. Currently, no gold standard treatments are available outside the acute therapeutic window to improve outcome in stroke patients. Some promising candidate targets have been identified for the improvement of long-term recovery after stroke, such as Rho GTPases, cell adhesion proteins, kinases, and phosphatases. Previous studies by our lab indicated that Rho GTPases (Rac and RhoA) are involved in both tissue damage and survival, as these proteins are essential for the morphology and movement of neurons, astrocytes and endothelial cells, thus playing a critical role in the balance between cell survival and death. Treatment with a pharmacological inhibitor of RhoA/ROCK blocks the activation of the neurodegeneration cascade. In addition, Rac and synaptic adhesion proteins (p120 catenin and N-catenin) play critical roles in protection against cerebral infarction and in recovery by supporting the neurovascular unit and cytoskeletal remodeling activity to maintain the integrity of the brain parenchyma. Interestingly, neuroprotective agents, such as atorvastatin, and CDK5 silencing after cerebral ischemia and in a glutamate-induced excitotoxicity model may act on the same cellular effectors to recover neurovascular unit integrity. Therefore, future efforts must focus on individually targeting the structural and functional roles of each effector of neurovascular unit and the interactions in neural and non-neural cells in the post-ischemic brain and address how to promote the recovery or prevent the loss of homeostasis in the short, medium and long term. PMID:25177270

  10. Enhancement of mucosal and cellular immune response in mice by vaccination with respiratory syncytial virus DNA encapsulated with transfersome.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Ding, Yunzhen; Yang, Yi

    2008-12-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the principal causes of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in young children, and currently there is no safe and effective vaccine. DNA vaccines encoding RSV surface glycoproteins are one option being examined. We evaluated the topical delivery of transfersome encapsulated DNA vaccine for its ability to confer protection against RSV challenge in mice and to determine whether such delivery could induce strong and specific immunity against RSV. After topical vaccination with a transfersome encapsulated RSV-F DNA, both RSV-specific mucosal antibody response and IFN-gamma-producing cells were detected. Intramuscular vaccination of naked RSV-F DNA only induced a significant anti-RSV IgG antibody response but no remarkable sIgA antibody and virus-specific cellular activity. Lungs from mice receiving topical vaccination had fewer histopathologic anomalies after RSV challenge than did mice receiving intramuscular vaccination or controls. Immunization with transfersome encapsulated F gene encoding DNA induces mucosal and cellular immune responses in mice that appear to produce protective immunity against respiratory syncytial virus. PMID:19115938

  11. DNA damage induction and/or repair as mammalian cell biomarker for the prediction of cellular radiation response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumstark-Khan, C.

    DNA damage and its repair processes are key factors in cancer induction and also in the treatment of malignancies. Cancer prevention during extended space missions becomes a topic of great importance for space radiobiology. The knowledge of individual responsiveness would allow the protection strategy to be tailored optimally in each case. Radiobiological analysis of cultured cells derived from tissue explants from individuals has shown that measurement of the surviving fraction after 2 Gy (SF2) may be used to predict the individual responsiveness. However, clonogenic assays are timeconsuming, thus alternative assays for the determination of radiore-sponse are being sought. For that reason CHO cell strains having different repair capacities were used for examining whether DNA strand break repair is a suitable experimental design to allow predictive statements. Cellular survival (CFA assay) and DNA strand breaks (total DNA strand breaks: FADU technique; DSBs: non-denaturing elution) were determined in parallel immediately after irradiation as well as after a 24 hour recovery period according to dose. There were no correlations between the dose-response curves of the initial level of DNA strand breaks and parameters that describe clonogenic survival curves (SF2). A good correlation exists between intrinsic cellular radioresistance and the extent of residual DNA strand breaks.

  12. AMPKα1 deficiency promotes cellular proliferation and DNA damage via p21 reduction in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hairong; Zhou, Yanhong; Coughlan, Kathleen A.; Ding, Ye; Wang, Shaobin; Wu, Yue; Song, Ping; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an energy gauge and redox sensor, controls the cell cycle and protects against DNA damage. However, the molecular mechanisms by which AMPKα isoform regulates DNA damage remain largely unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if AMPKα deletion contributes to cellular hyperproliferation by reducing p21WAF1/Cip1 (p21) expression thereby leading to accumulated DNA damage. The markers for DNA damage, cell cycle proteins, and apoptosis were monitored in cultured mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) isolated from wild type (WT, C57BL/6J), AMPKα1, or AMPKα2 homozygous deficient (AMPKα1−/−, AMPKα2−/−) mice by Western blot, flow cytometry, and cellular immunofluorescence staining. Deletion of AMPKα1, the predominant AMPKα isoform, but not AMPKα2 in immortalized MEFs led to spontaneous DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) which corresponded to repair protein p53-binding protein1 (53BP1) foci formation and subsequent apoptosis. Furthermore, AMPKα1 localizes to chromatin and AMPKα1 deletion down-regulates cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21, an important protein that plays a role in decreasing the incidence of spontaneous DSB via inhibition of cell proliferation. In addition, AMPKα1 null cells exhibited enhanced cell proliferation. Finally, p21 overexpression partially blocked the cellular hyperproliferation of AMPKα1-deleted MEFs via the inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2). Taken together, our results suggest that AMPKα1 plays a fundamental role in controlling the cell cycle thereby affecting DNA damage and cellular apoptosis. PMID:25307521

  13. Global DNA hypomethylation coupled to cellular transformation and metastatic ability.

    PubMed

    Funaki, Soichiro; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Nakatani, Tsunetoshi; Umehara, Hiroki; Nakashima, Hiroyuki; Okumura, Meinoshin; Oboki, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Kenji; Saito, Hirohisa; Nakano, Toru

    2015-12-21

    Global DNA hypomethylation and DNA hypermethylation of promoter regions are frequently detected in human cancers. Although many studies have suggested a contribution to carcinogenesis, it is still unclear whether the aberrant DNA hypomethylation observed in tumors is a consequence or a cause of cancer. Here, we show that the enforced expression of Stella (also known as PGC7 and Dppa3) induced not only global DNA demethylation but also transformation of NIH3T3 cells. Furthermore, overexpression of Stella enhanced the metastatic ability of B16 melanoma cells, presumably through the induction of metastasis-related genes. These results provide new insights into the function of global DNA hypomethylation in carcinogenesis. PMID:26608031

  14. Both Complexity and Location of DNA Damage Contribute to Cellular Senescence Induced by Ionizing Radiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xurui; Ye, Caiyong; Sun, Fang; Wei, Wenjun; Hu, Burong; Wang, Jufang

    2016-01-01

    Persistent DNA damage is considered as a main cause of cellular senescence induced by ionizing radiation. However, the molecular bases of the DNA damage and their contribution to cellular senescence are not completely clear. In this study, we found that both heavy ions and X-rays induced senescence in human uveal melanoma 92-1 cells. By measuring senescence associated-β-galactosidase and cell proliferation, we identified that heavy ions were more effective at inducing senescence than X-rays. We observed less efficient repair when DNA damage was induced by heavy ions compared with X-rays and most of the irreparable damage was complex of single strand breaks and double strand breaks, while DNA damage induced by X-rays was mostly repaired in 24 hours and the remained damage was preferentially associated with telomeric DNA. Our results suggest that DNA damage induced by heavy ion is often complex and difficult to repair, thus presents as persistent DNA damage and pushes the cell into senescence. In contrast, persistent DNA damage induced by X-rays is preferentially associated with telomeric DNA and the telomere-favored persistent DNA damage contributes to X-rays induced cellular senescence. These findings provide new insight into the understanding of high relative biological effectiveness of heavy ions relevant to cancer therapy and space radiation research. PMID:27187621

  15. Both Complexity and Location of DNA Damage Contribute to Cellular Senescence Induced by Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xurui; Ye, Caiyong; Sun, Fang; Wei, Wenjun; Hu, Burong; Wang, Jufang

    2016-01-01

    Persistent DNA damage is considered as a main cause of cellular senescence induced by ionizing radiation. However, the molecular bases of the DNA damage and their contribution to cellular senescence are not completely clear. In this study, we found that both heavy ions and X-rays induced senescence in human uveal melanoma 92–1 cells. By measuring senescence associated-β-galactosidase and cell proliferation, we identified that heavy ions were more effective at inducing senescence than X-rays. We observed less efficient repair when DNA damage was induced by heavy ions compared with X-rays and most of the irreparable damage was complex of single strand breaks and double strand breaks, while DNA damage induced by X-rays was mostly repaired in 24 hours and the remained damage was preferentially associated with telomeric DNA. Our results suggest that DNA damage induced by heavy ion is often complex and difficult to repair, thus presents as persistent DNA damage and pushes the cell into senescence. In contrast, persistent DNA damage induced by X-rays is preferentially associated with telomeric DNA and the telomere-favored persistent DNA damage contributes to X-rays induced cellular senescence. These findings provide new insight into the understanding of high relative biological effectiveness of heavy ions relevant to cancer therapy and space radiation research. PMID:27187621

  16. DNA-PKcs-Dependent Modulation of Cellular Radiosensitivity by a Selective Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Kodym, Elisabeth; Kodym, Reinhard; Chen, Benjamin P.; Chen, David J.; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Choy, Hak; Saha, Debabrata

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 has been shown to increase radiosensitivity. Recently, the suppression of radiation-induced DNA-dependant protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity by the selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib was reported. Given the importance of DNA-PK for repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks by nonhomologous end-joining and the clinical use of the substance, we investigated the relevance of the DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) for the modulation of cellular radiosensitivity by celecoxib. Methods and Materials: We used a syngeneic model of Chinese hamster ovarian cell lines: AA8, possessing a wild-type DNK-PKcs; V3, lacking a functional DNA-PKcs; and V3/WT11, V3 stably transfected with the DNA-PKcs. The cells were treated with celecoxib (50 {mu}M) for 24 h before irradiation. The modulation of radiosensitivity was determined using the colony formation assay. Results: Treatment with celecoxib increased the cellular radiosensitivity in the DNA-PKcs-deficient cell line V3 with a dose-enhancement ratio of 1.3 for a surviving fraction of 0.5. In contrast, clonogenic survival was increased in DNA-PKcs wild-type-expressing AA8 cells and in V3 cells transfected with DNA-PKcs (V3/WT11). The decrease in radiosensitivity was comparable to the radiosensitization in V3 cells, with a dose-enhancement ratio of 0.76 (AA8) and 0.80 (V3/WT11) for a survival of 0.5. Conclusions: We have demonstrated a DNA-PKcs-dependent differential modulation of cellular radiosensitivity by celecoxib. These effects might be attributed to alterations in signaling cascades downstream of DNA-PK toward cell survival. These findings offer an explanation for the poor outcomes in some recently published clinical trials.

  17. Dynamic cellular uptake of mixed-monolayer protected nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Carney, Randy P; Carney, Tamara M; Mueller, Marie; Stellacci, Francesco

    2012-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are gaining increasing attention for potential application in medicine; consequently, studying their interaction with cells is of central importance. We found that both ligand arrangement and composition on gold nanoparticles play a crucial role in their cellular internalization. In our previous investigation, we showed that 66-34OT nanoparticles coated with stripe-like domains of hydrophobic (octanethiol, OT, 34%) and hydrophilic (11-mercaptoundecane sulfonate, MUS, 66%) ligands permeated through the cellular lipid bilayer via passive diffusion, in addition to endo-/pino-cytosis. Here, we show an analysis of NP internalization by DC2.4, 3T3, and HeLa cells at two temperatures and multiple time points. We study four NPs that differ in their surface structures and ligand compositions and report on their cellular internalization by intracellular fluorescence quantification. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy we have found that all three cell types internalize the 66-34OT NPs more than particles coated only with MUS, or particles coated with a very similar coating but lacking any detectable ligand shell structure, or 'striped' particles but with a different composition (34-66OT) at multiple data points. PMID:22589060

  18. Probabilistically determining the cellular source of DNA derived from differential extractions in sexual assault scenarios.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Duncan

    2016-09-01

    Sexual assault cases are the type of case that often produces questions about the cellular source of DNA. In these cases multiple findings of microscopy, DNA profiling and presumptive testing need to be considered when addressing source level propositions. In this work, I consider a line of questioning that has been raised a number of times in the recent past, where in court it was disputed that low levels of sperm seen on a microscope slide were the cellular source of the male DNA profile component generated from the sperm fraction of a differential DNA extraction. I demonstrate how the cell scoring results and DNA profiling results can be considered together, in helping address this source level question through the use of Bayesian Networks. PMID:27388428

  19. Inhibition of Cellular DNA Synthesis in Cells Infected with Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lothrop, David; Nicholson, Bruce L.

    1974-01-01

    In asynchronous RTG-2 cell cultures infected with infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN) virus, inhibition of cellular DNA synthesis, but not protein synthesis, was detected 5 to 6 h postinfection and was 80 to 90% complete by 7 to 8 h. Inhibition of DNA synthesis was largely abolished by UV irradiation of the virus. Sedimentation analyses of phenol-extracted DNA indicated that native cellular DNA was not degraded during infection. Sedimentation on alkaline sucrose gradients of DNA from cells pulsed with radioactive thymidine for varying periods indicated that elongation of nascent DNA chains proceeded normally in infected cells. These and previous results suggest that IPN virus infection results in a reduction of the number of chromosomal sites active in DNA synthesis but does not affect the rate of polymerization at active sites. Cells synchronized with excess thymidine and hydroxyurea and infected with virus at the time of release from the block demonstrated an inhibition of DNA synthesis 3 h postinfection. Cells infected 4 h prior to release continued to synthesize normal amounts of DNA for 1 to 2 h after release. These results indicated that DNA synthesis in early synthetic phase is relatively insensitive to inhibition by IPN virus. PMID:4852469

  20. In vivo generation of DNA sequence diversity for cellular barcoding

    PubMed Central

    Peikon, Ian D.; Gizatullina, Diana I.; Zador, Anthony M.

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneity is a ubiquitous feature of biological systems. A complete understanding of such systems requires a method for uniquely identifying and tracking individual components and their interactions with each other. We have developed a novel method of uniquely tagging individual cells in vivo with a genetic ‘barcode’ that can be recovered by DNA sequencing. Our method is a two-component system comprised of a genetic barcode cassette whose fragments are shuffled by Rci, a site-specific DNA invertase. The system is highly scalable, with the potential to generate theoretical diversities in the billions. We demonstrate the feasibility of this technique in Escherichia coli. Currently, this method could be employed to track the dynamics of populations of microbes through various bottlenecks. Advances of this method should prove useful in tracking interactions of cells within a network, and/or heterogeneity within complex biological samples. PMID:25013177

  1. Cellular strategies for regulating DNA supercoiling: A single-molecule perspective

    PubMed Central

    Koster, Daniel A.; Crut, Aurélien; Shuman, Stewart; Bjornsti, Mary-Ann; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Excess entangling and twisting of cellular DNA (i.e., DNA supercoiling) are problems inherent to the helical structure of double-stranded DNA. Supercoiling affects transcription, DNA replication, and chromosomal segregation. Consequently the cell must fine-tune supercoiling to optimize these key processes. Here, we summarize how supercoiling is generated and review experimental and theoretical insights into supercoil relaxation. We distinguish between the passive dissipation of supercoils by diffusion and the active removal of supercoils by topoisomerase enzymes. We also review single-molecule studies that elucidate the timescales and mechanisms of supercoil removal. PMID:20723754

  2. Homozygous mutation of MTPAP causes cellular radiosensitivity and persistent DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Martin, N T; Nakamura, K; Paila, U; Woo, J; Brown, C; Wright, J A; Teraoka, S N; Haghayegh, S; McCurdy, D; Schneider, M; Hu, H; Quinlan, A R; Gatti, R A; Concannon, P

    2014-01-01

    The study of rare human syndromes characterized by radiosensitivity has been instrumental in identifying novel proteins and pathways involved in DNA damage responses to ionizing radiation. In the present study, a mutation in mitochondrial poly-A-polymerase (MTPAP), not previously recognized for its role in the DNA damage response, was identified by exome sequencing and subsequently associated with cellular radiosensitivity. Cell lines derived from two patients with the homozygous MTPAP missense mutation were radiosensitive, and this radiosensitivity could be abrogated by transfection of wild-type mtPAP cDNA into mtPAP-deficient cell lines. Further analysis of the cellular phenotype revealed delayed DNA repair, increased levels of DNA double-strand breaks, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), and increased cell death after irradiation (IR). Pre-IR treatment of cells with the potent anti-oxidants, α-lipoic acid and n-acetylcysteine, was sufficient to abrogate the DNA repair and clonogenic survival defects. Our results firmly establish that mutation of the MTPAP gene results in a cellular phenotype of increased DNA damage, reduced repair kinetics, increased cell death by apoptosis, and reduced clonogenic survival after exposure to ionizing radiation, suggesting a pathogenesis that involves the disruption of ROS homeostasis. PMID:24651433

  3. Amphiphilic Block Copolymers Enhance Cellular Uptake and Nuclear Entry of Polyplex-Delivered DNA

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhihui; Sahay, Gaurav; Sriadibhatla, Srikanth; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2008-01-01

    This work for the first time demonstrates that synthetic polymers enhance uptake and nuclear import of plasmid DNA (pDNA) through the activation of cellular trafficking machinery. Nonionic block copolymers of poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(propylene oxide), Pluronics, are widely used as excipients in pharmaceutics. We previously demonstrated that Pluronics increase the phosphorylation of IκB and subsequent NFκB nuclear localization as well as upregulate numerous NFκB-related genes. In this study, we show that Pluronics enhance gene transfer by pDNA/polycation complexes (“polyplexes”) in a promoter-dependent fashion. Addition of Pluronic P123 or P85 to polyethyleneimine-based polyplexes had little effect on polyplex particle size but significantly enhanced pDNA cellular uptake, nuclear translocation and gene expression in several cell lines. When added to polyplex-transfected cells after transfection, Pluronics enhanced nuclear import of pDNA containing NFκB–binding sites, but have no effect on import of pDNA without these sites. All together, our studies suggest that Pluronics rapidly activate NFκB, which binds cytosolic pDNA that possesses promoters containing NFκB binding sites and consequently increases nuclear import of pDNA through NFκB nuclear translocation. PMID:18729495

  4. DNA Mismatch Repair System: Repercussions in Cellular Homeostasis and Relationship with Aging

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Pérezprina, Juan Cristóbal; León-Galván, Miguel Ángel; Konigsberg, Mina

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms that concern DNA repair have been studied in the last years due to their consequences in cellular homeostasis. The diverse and damaging stimuli that affect DNA integrity, such as changes in the genetic sequence and modifications in gene expression, can disrupt the steady state of the cell and have serious repercussions to pathways that regulate apoptosis, senescence, and cancer. These altered pathways not only modify cellular and organism longevity, but quality of life (“health-span”). The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) is highly conserved between species; its role is paramount in the preservation of DNA integrity, placing it as a necessary focal point in the study of pathways that prolong lifespan, aging, and disease. Here, we review different insights concerning the malfunction or absence of the DNA-MMR and its impact on cellular homeostasis. In particular, we will focus on DNA-MMR mechanisms regulated by known repair proteins MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, and MHL1, among others. PMID:23213348

  5. Inducing Humoral and Cellular Responses to Multiple Sporozoite and Liver-Stage Malaria Antigens Using Exogenous Plasmid DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, B.; Talbott, K. T.; Balakrishnan, A.; Cisper, N.; Morrow, M. P.; Hutnick, N. A.; Myles, D. J.; Shedlock, D. J.; Obeng-Adjei, N.; Yan, J.; Kayatani, A. K. K.; Richie, N.; Cabrera, W.; Shiver, R.; Khan, A. S.; Brown, A. S.; Yang, M.; Wille-Reece, U.; Birkett, A. J.; Sardesai, N. Y.

    2013-01-01

    A vaccine candidate that elicits humoral and cellular responses to multiple sporozoite and liver-stage antigens may be able to confer protection against Plasmodium falciparum malaria; however, a technology for formulating and delivering such a vaccine has remained elusive. Here, we report the preclinical assessment of an optimized DNA vaccine approach that targets four P. falciparum antigens: circumsporozoite protein (CSP), liver stage antigen 1 (LSA1), thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (TRAP), and cell-traversal protein for ookinetes and sporozoites (CelTOS). Synthetic DNA sequences were designed for each antigen with modifications to improve expression and were delivered using in vivo electroporation (EP). Immunogenicity was evaluated in mice and nonhuman primates (NHPs) and assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), gamma interferon (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISpot) assay, and flow cytometry. In mice, DNA with EP delivery induced antigen-specific IFN-γ production, as measured by ELISpot assay and IgG seroconversion against all antigens. Sustained production of IFN-γ, interleukin-2, and tumor necrosis factor alpha was elicited in both the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell compartments. Furthermore, hepatic CD8+ lymphocytes produced LSA1-specific IFN-γ. The immune responses conferred to mice by this approach translated to the NHP model, which showed cellular responses by ELISpot assay and intracellular cytokine staining. Notably, antigen-specific CD8+ granzyme B+ T cells were observed in NHPs. Collectively, the data demonstrate that delivery of gene sequences by DNA/EP encoding malaria parasite antigens is immunogenic in animal models and can harness both the humoral and cellular arms of the immune system. PMID:23897618

  6. A threshold of endogenous stress is required to engage cellular response to protect against mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Saintigny, Yannick; Chevalier, François; Bravard, Anne; Dardillac, Elodie; Laurent, David; Hem, Sonia; Dépagne, Jordane; Radicella, J. Pablo; Lopez, Bernard S.

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous stress represents a major source of genome instability, but is in essence difficult to apprehend. Incorporation of labeled radionuclides into DNA constitutes a tractable model to analyze cellular responses to endogenous attacks. Here we show that incorporation of [3H]thymidine into CHO cells generates oxidative-induced mutagenesis, but, with a peak at low doses. Proteomic analysis showed that the cellular response differs between low and high levels of endogenous stress. In particular, these results confirmed the involvement of proteins implicated in redox homeostasis and DNA damage signaling pathways. Induced-mutagenesis was abolished by the anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine and plateaued, at high doses, upon exposure to L-buthionine sulfoximine, which represses cellular detoxification. The [3H]thymidine-induced mutation spectrum revealed mostly base substitutions, exhibiting a signature specific for low doses (GC > CG and AT > CG). Consistently, the enzymatic activity of the base excision repair protein APE-1 is induced at only medium or high doses. Collectively, the data reveal that a threshold of endogenous stress must be reached to trigger cellular detoxification and DNA repair programs; below this threshold, the consequences of endogenous stress escape cellular surveillance, leading to high levels of mutagenesis. Therefore, low doses of endogenous local stress can jeopardize genome integrity more efficiently than higher doses. PMID:27406380

  7. A threshold of endogenous stress is required to engage cellular response to protect against mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Saintigny, Yannick; Chevalier, François; Bravard, Anne; Dardillac, Elodie; Laurent, David; Hem, Sonia; Dépagne, Jordane; Radicella, J Pablo; Lopez, Bernard S

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous stress represents a major source of genome instability, but is in essence difficult to apprehend. Incorporation of labeled radionuclides into DNA constitutes a tractable model to analyze cellular responses to endogenous attacks. Here we show that incorporation of [(3)H]thymidine into CHO cells generates oxidative-induced mutagenesis, but, with a peak at low doses. Proteomic analysis showed that the cellular response differs between low and high levels of endogenous stress. In particular, these results confirmed the involvement of proteins implicated in redox homeostasis and DNA damage signaling pathways. Induced-mutagenesis was abolished by the anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine and plateaued, at high doses, upon exposure to L-buthionine sulfoximine, which represses cellular detoxification. The [(3)H]thymidine-induced mutation spectrum revealed mostly base substitutions, exhibiting a signature specific for low doses (GC > CG and AT > CG). Consistently, the enzymatic activity of the base excision repair protein APE-1 is induced at only medium or high doses. Collectively, the data reveal that a threshold of endogenous stress must be reached to trigger cellular detoxification and DNA repair programs; below this threshold, the consequences of endogenous stress escape cellular surveillance, leading to high levels of mutagenesis. Therefore, low doses of endogenous local stress can jeopardize genome integrity more efficiently than higher doses. PMID:27406380

  8. Protective Effects of Extracts from Fructus rhodomyrti against Oxidative DNA Damage In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Yuebin; Xu, Xinyun; Wu, Shuang; Huang, Juan; Misra, Hara; Li, Yunbo

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the potential protective effects of extracts from Fructus rhodomyrti (FR) against oxidative DNA damage using a cellular system and the antioxidant ability on potassium bromate- (KBrO3-) mediated oxidative stress in rats. Methods. The effects of FR on DNA damage induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were evaluated by comet assay in primary spleen lymphocytes cultures. The effects of FR on the activities of SOD, CAT, and GPx and the levels of GSH, hydroperoxides, and 8-OHdG were determined in the plasma and tissues of rats treated with KBrO3. Results. FR was shown to effectively protect against DNA damage induced by H2O2  in vitro, and the maximum protective effect was observed when FR was diluted 20 times. Endogenous antioxidant status, namely, the activities of SOD, CAT, and GPx and the levels of GSH were significantly decreased in the plasma, the liver, and the kidney of the KBrO3-treated rats, while the pretreatment of FR prevented the decreases of these parameters. In addition, the pretreatment of FR was also able to prevent KBrO3-induced increases in the levels of hydroperoxides and 8-OHdG in the plasma, the liver, and the kidney in rats. Conclusions. Our findings suggested that FR might act as a chemopreventive agent with antioxidant properties offering effective protection against oxidative DNA damage in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24089629

  9. GRA7 provides protective immunity in cocktail DNA vaccines against Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Jongert, E; de Craeye, S; Dewit, J; Huygen, K

    2007-09-01

    In a previous study, single-gene vaccination with GRA1, GRA7 or ROP2 was shown to elicit partial protection against Toxoplasma gondii. In this study, the contribution of each antigen in the evoked humoral and cellular immune responses was evaluated after vaccination with plasmid mixtures containing GRA1, GRA7 and ROP2. Cocktail DNA vaccinated mice developed high antibody titers against the antigens from two-gene DNA vaccine cocktails, but lower titres when immunized with the three-gene cocktail. High numbers of IFN-gamma secreting splenocytes were generated predominantly against GRA7. Brain cyst burden was reduced by 81% in mice vaccinated with the three-gene mixture and they were completely protected against acute toxoplasmosis. Similar high levels of brain cyst reductions were obtained after vaccination with cocktails composed of GRA1 and GRA7 (89% reduction), or GRA7 and ROP2 (79% reduction), but not with the cocktail composed of GRA1 and ROP2. In low dose single-gene vaccinations, IFN-gamma and strong protection could only be elicited by GRA7. Hence, the presence of GRA7 in the DNA vaccine formulation was important for optimal protection and this was correlated with GRA7-specific IFN-gamma production. We propose GRA7 as a main component in cocktail DNA vaccines for vaccination against T. gondii. PMID:17727568

  10. Detection of uracil within DNA using a sensitive labeling method for in vitro and cellular applications

    PubMed Central

    Róna, Gergely; Scheer, Ildikó; Nagy, Kinga; Pálinkás, Hajnalka L.; Tihanyi, Gergely; Borsos, Máté; Békési, Angéla; Vértessy, Beáta G.

    2016-01-01

    The role of uracil in genomic DNA has been recently re-evaluated. It is now widely accepted to be a physiologically important DNA element in diverse systems from specific phages to antibody maturation and Drosophila development. Further relevant investigations would largely benefit from a novel reliable and fast method to gain quantitative and qualitative information on uracil levels in DNA both in vitro and in situ, especially since current techniques does not allow in situ cellular detection. Here, starting from a catalytically inactive uracil-DNA glycosylase protein, we have designed several uracil sensor fusion proteins. The designed constructs can be applied as molecular recognition tools that can be detected with conventional antibodies in dot-blot applications and may also serve as in situ uracil-DNA sensors in cellular techniques. Our method is verified on numerous prokaryotic and eukaryotic cellular systems. The method is easy to use and can be applied in a high-throughput manner. It does not require expensive equipment or complex know-how, facilitating its easy implementation in any basic molecular biology laboratory. Elevated genomic uracil levels from cells of diverse genetic backgrounds and/or treated with different drugs can be demonstrated also in situ, within the cell. PMID:26429970

  11. Detection of uracil within DNA using a sensitive labeling method for in vitro and cellular applications.

    PubMed

    Róna, Gergely; Scheer, Ildikó; Nagy, Kinga; Pálinkás, Hajnalka L; Tihanyi, Gergely; Borsos, Máté; Békési, Angéla; Vértessy, Beáta G

    2016-02-18

    The role of uracil in genomic DNA has been recently re-evaluated. It is now widely accepted to be a physiologically important DNA element in diverse systems from specific phages to antibody maturation and Drosophila development. Further relevant investigations would largely benefit from a novel reliable and fast method to gain quantitative and qualitative information on uracil levels in DNA both in vitro and in situ, especially since current techniques does not allow in situ cellular detection. Here, starting from a catalytically inactive uracil-DNA glycosylase protein, we have designed several uracil sensor fusion proteins. The designed constructs can be applied as molecular recognition tools that can be detected with conventional antibodies in dot-blot applications and may also serve as in situ uracil-DNA sensors in cellular techniques. Our method is verified on numerous prokaryotic and eukaryotic cellular systems. The method is easy to use and can be applied in a high-throughput manner. It does not require expensive equipment or complex know-how, facilitating its easy implementation in any basic molecular biology laboratory. Elevated genomic uracil levels from cells of diverse genetic backgrounds and/or treated with different drugs can be demonstrated also in situ, within the cell. PMID:26429970

  12. Chromatin Compaction Protects Genomic DNA from Radiation Damage

    PubMed Central

    Takata, Hideaki; Hanafusa, Tomo; Mori, Toshiaki; Shimura, Mari; Iida, Yutaka; Ishikawa, Kenichi; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Genomic DNA is organized three-dimensionally in the nucleus, and is thought to form compact chromatin domains. Although chromatin compaction is known to be essential for mitosis, whether it confers other advantages, particularly in interphase cells, remains unknown. Here, we report that chromatin compaction protects genomic DNA from radiation damage. Using a newly developed solid-phase system, we found that the frequency of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in compact chromatin after ionizing irradiation was 5–50-fold lower than in decondensed chromatin. Since radical scavengers inhibited DSB induction in decondensed chromatin, condensed chromatin had a lower level of reactive radical generation after ionizing irradiation. We also found that chromatin compaction protects DNA from attack by chemical agents. Our findings suggest that genomic DNA compaction plays an important role in maintaining genomic integrity. PMID:24130727

  13. Protection from immunodeficiency virus challenges in rhesus macaques by multicomponent DNA immunization.

    PubMed

    Kim, J J; Yang, J S; Nottingham, L K; Lee, D J; Lee, M; Manson, K H; Wyand, M S; Boyer, J D; Ugen, K E; Weiner, D B

    2001-07-01

    Multicomponent DNA vaccines were used to elicit immune responses, which can impact viral challenge in three separate rhesus macaque models. Eight rhesus macaques were immunized with DNA vaccines for HIV env/rev and SIV gag/pol and were challenged intravenously with 10 animal infective doses (AID(50)) of cell-free SHIV IIIB. Three of eight immunized rhesus macaques were protected, exhibiting no detectable virus. Animals protected from nonpathogenic SHIVIIIB challenge were rested for extended periods of time and were rechallenged first with pathogenic SIV(mac239) and subsequently with pathogenic SHIV89.6P viruses. Following the pathogenic challenges, all three vaccinated animals were negative for viral coculture and antigenemia and were negative by PCR. In contrast, the control animals exhibited antigenemia by 2 weeks postchallenge and exhibited greater than 10 logs of virus/10(6) cells in limiting dilution coculture. The control animals exhibited CD4 cell loss and developed SIV-related wasting with high viral burden and subsequently failed to thrive. Vaccinated animals remained virus-negative and were protected from the viral load, CD4 loss, disease, and death. We observed strong Th1-type cellular immune responses in the protected macaques throughout the study, suggesting their important roles in protection. These studies support the finding that multicomponent DNA vaccines can directly impact viral replication and disease in a highly pathogenic challenge system, thus potentially broadening our strategies against HIV. PMID:11437655

  14. p19(Arf) is required for the cellular response to chronic DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bieging-Rolett, K T; Johnson, T M; Brady, C A; Beaudry, V G; Pathak, N; Han, S; Attardi, L D

    2016-08-18

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a stress sensor, driving cell cycle arrest or apoptosis in response to DNA damage or oncogenic signals. p53 activation by oncogenic signals relies on the p19(Arf) tumor suppressor, while p53 activation downstream of acute DNA damage is reported to be p19(Arf)-independent. Accordingly, p19(Arf)-deficient mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) arrest in response to acute DNA damage. However, p19(Arf) is required for replicative senescence, a condition associated with an activated DNA damage response, as p19(Arf)-/- MEFs do not senesce after serial passage. A possible explanation for these seemingly disparate roles for p19(Arf) is that acute and chronic DNA damage responses are mechanistically distinct. Replicative senescence may result from chronic, low-dose DNA damage responses in which p19(Arf) has a specific role. We therefore examined the role of p19(Arf) in cellular responses to chronic, low-dose DNA-damaging agent treatment by maintaining MEFs in low oxygen and administering 0.5 G y γ-irradiation daily or 150 μM hydroxyurea, a replication stress inducer. In contrast to their response to acute DNA damage, p19(Arf)-/- MEFs exposed to chronic DNA damage do not senesce, revealing a selective role for p19(Arf) in senescence upon low-level, chronic DNA damage. We show further that p53 pathway activation in p19(Arf)-/- MEFs exposed to chronic DNA damage is attenuated relative to wild-type MEFs, suggesting a role for p19(Arf) in fine-tuning p53 activity. However, combined Nutlin3a and chronic DNA-damaging agent treatment is insufficient to promote senescence in p19(Arf)-/- MEFs, suggesting that the role of p19(Arf) in the chronic DNA damage response may be partially p53-independent. These data suggest the importance of p19(Arf) for the cellular response to the low-level DNA damage incurred in culture or upon oncogene expression, providing new insight into how p19(Arf) serves as a tumor suppressor. Moreover, our study helps reconcile reports

  15. p19Arf is required for the cellular response to chronic DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Bieging-Rolett, Kathryn T.; Johnson, Thomas M.; Brady, Colleen A.; Beaudry, Veronica G.; Pathak, Navneeta; Han, Shuo; Attardi, Laura D.

    2015-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a stress sensor, driving cell-cycle arrest or apoptosis in response to DNA damage or oncogenic signals. p53 activation by oncogenic signals relies on the p19Arf tumor suppressor, while p53 activation downstream of acute DNA damage is reported to be p19Arf-independent. Accordingly, p19Arf-deficient mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) arrest in response to acute DNA damage. However, p19Arf is required for replicative senescence, a condition associated with an activated DNA damage response, as p19Arf−/− MEFs do not senesce after serial passage. A possible explanation for these seemingly disparate roles for p19Arf is that acute and chronic DNA damage responses are mechanistically distinct. Replicative senescence may result from chronic, low-dose DNA damage responses in which p19Arf has a specific role. We therefore examined the role of p19Arf in cellular responses to chronic, low-dose DNA damaging agent treatment by maintaining MEFs in low oxygen and administering 0.5 Gy γ-irradiation daily or 150μM hydroxyurea, a replication stress-inducer. In contrast to their response to acute DNA damage, p19Arf−/− MEFs exposed to chronic DNA damage do not senesce, revealing a selective role for p19Arf in senescence upon low-level, chronic DNA damage. We show further that p53 pathway activation in p19Arf−/− MEFs exposed to chronic DNA damage is attenuated relative to wild-type MEFs, suggesting a role for p19Arf in fine-tuning p53 activity. However, combined Nutlin3a and chronic DNA damaging agent treatment is insufficient to promote senescence in p19Arf−/− MEFs, suggesting that the role of p19Arf in the chronic DNA damage response may be partially p53-independent. These data suggest the importance of p19Arf for the cellular response to the low-level DNA damage incurred in culture or upon oncogene expression, providing new insight into how p19Arf serves as a tumor suppressor. Moreover, our study helps reconcile reports suggesting crucial

  16. Temporal order of evolution of DNA replication systems inferred by comparison of cellular and viral DNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Koonin, Eugene V

    2006-01-01

    Background The core enzymes of the DNA replication systems show striking diversity among cellular life forms and more so among viruses. In particular, and counter-intuitively, given the central role of DNA in all cells and the mechanistic uniformity of replication, the core enzymes of the replication systems of bacteria and archaea (as well as eukaryotes) are unrelated or extremely distantly related. Viruses and plasmids, in addition, possess at least two unique DNA replication systems, namely, the protein-primed and rolling circle modalities of replication. This unexpected diversity makes the origin and evolution of DNA replication systems a particularly challenging and intriguing problem in evolutionary biology. Results I propose a specific succession for the emergence of different DNA replication systems, drawing argument from the differences in their representation among viruses and other selfish replicating elements. In a striking pattern, the DNA replication systems of viruses infecting bacteria and eukaryotes are dominated by the archaeal-type B-family DNA polymerase (PolB) whereas the bacterial replicative DNA polymerase (PolC) is present only in a handful of bacteriophage genomes. There is no apparent mechanistic impediment to the involvement of the bacterial-type replication machinery in viral DNA replication. Therefore, I hypothesize that the observed, markedly unequal distribution of the replicative DNA polymerases among the known cellular and viral replication systems has a historical explanation. I propose that, among the two types of DNA replication machineries that are found in extant life forms, the archaeal-type, PolB-based system evolved first and had already given rise to a variety of diverse viruses and other selfish elements before the advent of the bacterial, PolC-based machinery. Conceivably, at that stage of evolution, the niches for DNA-viral reproduction have been already filled with viruses replicating with the help of the archaeal

  17. Single mammalian cells compensate for differences in cellular volume and DNA copy number through independent global transcriptional mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Padovan-Merhar, Olivia; Nair, Gautham P.; Biaesch, Andrew; Mayer, Andreas; Scarfone, Steven; Foley, Shawn W.; Wu, Angela R.; Churchman, L. Stirling; Singh, Abhyudai; Raj, Arjun

    2015-01-01

    Summary Individual mammalian cells exhibit large variability in cellular volume even with the same absolute DNA content and so must compensate for differences in DNA concentration in order to maintain constant concentration of gene expression products. Using single molecule counting and computational image analysis, we show that transcript abundance correlates with cellular volume at the single cell level due to increased global transcription in larger cells. Cell fusion experiments establish that increased cellular content itself can directly increase transcription. Quantitative analysis shows that this mechanism measures the ratio of cellular volume to DNA content, mostly likely through sequestration of a transcriptional factor to DNA. Analysis of transcriptional bursts reveals a separate mechanism for gene dosage compensation after DNA replication that enables proper transcriptional output during early and late S-phase. Our results provide a framework for quantitatively understanding the relationships between DNA content, cell size and gene expression variability in single cells. PMID:25866248

  18. Protective immune responses to biolistic DNA vaccination of Brugia malayi abundant larval transcript-2.

    PubMed

    Joseph, S K; Sambanthamoorthy, S; Dakshinamoorthy, G; Munirathinam, G; Ramaswamy, K

    2012-10-01

    Biolistic vaccination using gene gun is developed as a safer tool for delivery of DNA vaccines, a technique that combines high vaccine efficiency with lower antigen dosage and lower cost per vaccine dose. In this study, we compared the protective responses in mice after delivering the Brugia malayi abundant larval transcript-2 (BmALT-2) DNA vaccine using the conventional intradermal approach or with the needleless gene gun delivery approach. BmALT-2 is a leading vaccine candidate against B. malayi, a lymphatic filarial parasite of human. After optimizing the DNA dose and gene gun parameters for delivery into mouse skin, groups of mice were biolistically vaccinated with 5 μg of BmALT-2pVAX. Groups of mice vaccinated intradermally with 5 μg or 100 μg of BmALT-2pVAX was used for comparison of vaccine efficacy. Results demonstrated that gene gun vaccination with 5 μg of BmALT-2pVAX conferred significant protection against challenge infection that was comparable to the degree of protection conferred by intradermal vaccination with 100 μg of BmALT-2pVAX. This observation was further supported by an in vitro antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay. Analysis of the immune response showed that the gene gun vaccination predominantly induced an IgG1 antibody response and significantly high Th2 cytokine response (IL-4) from spleen cells compared to intradermal BmALT-2 DNA delivery that induced predominantly an IgG2a and Th1 cytokine response (IFN-γ, IL-12 and TNF-α). These findings show that host protective responses could be achieved with 20 fold decrease in DNA dose using a gene gun and could prove to be an efficient delivery method in BmALT-2 DNA vaccination against lymphatic filariasis. PMID:22885273

  19. The cellular response to DNA damage: A focus on MDC1 and its interacting proteins

    PubMed Central

    Coster, Gideon

    2010-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is comprised of a network of proteins that respond to DNA damage. Mediator of DNA Damage Checkpoint 1 (MDC1) plays an early and important role in the DDR. Recent data show that MDC1 binds multiple proteins that participate in various aspects of the DDR, positioning it at the core of the DDR. Furthermore, interactions with non-DDR proteins were also revealed, suggesting novel roles for MDC1. In this review we provide a comprehensive overview of all known MDC1-binding proteins and discuss their role. We present these binding partners according to their function, thereby providing the reader with a detailed and updated overview of the cellular response to DNA damage. We discuss more recent findings in detail and conclude by presenting the challenges the field faces in the future. PMID:21326949

  20. Hyperphosphorylation results in tau dysfunction in DNA folding and protection.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; He, Hai-Jin; Zhou, Jun; Miao, Jun-Ye; Lu, Jing; He, Ying-Ge; Pan, Rong; Wei, Yan; Liu, Ying; He, Rong-Qiao

    2013-01-01

    Hyperphosphorylation of tau occurs in preclinical and clinical stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and hyperphosphorylated tau is the main constituent of the paired helical filaments in the brains of mild cognitive impairment and AD patients. While most of the work described so far focused on the relationship between hyperphosphorylation of tau and microtubule disassembly as well as axonal transport impairments, both phenomena ultimately leading to cell death, little work has been done to study the correlation between tau hyperphosphorylation and DNA damage. As we showed in this study, tau hyperphosphorylation and DNA damage co-occurred under formaldehyde treatment in N2a cells, indicating that phosphorylated tau (p-Tau) induced by formaldehyde may be involved in DNA impairment. After phosphorylation, the effect of tau in preventing DNA from thermal denaturation was diminished, its ability to accelerate DNA renaturation was lost, and its function in protecting DNA from reactive oxygen species (ROS) attack was impaired. Thus, p-Tau is not only associated with the disassembly of the microtubule system, but also plays a crucial role in DNA impairment. Hyperphosphorylation-mediated dysfunction of tau protein in prevention of DNA structure from damage under the attack of ROS may provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying tauopathies. PMID:24064506

  1. Role of Humoral versus Cellular Responses Induced by a Protective Dengue Vaccine Candidate

    PubMed Central

    Zellweger, Raphaël M.; Miller, Robyn; Eddy, William E.; White, Laura J.; Johnston, Robert E.; Shresta, Sujan

    2013-01-01

    With 2.5 billion people at risk, dengue is a major emerging disease threat and an escalating public health problem worldwide. Dengue virus causes disease ranging from a self-limiting febrile illness (dengue fever) to the potentially fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome. Severe dengue disease is associated with sub-protective levels of antibody, which exacerbate disease upon re-infection. A dengue vaccine should generate protective immunity without increasing severity of disease. To date, the determinants of vaccine-mediated protection against dengue remain unclear, and additional correlates of protection are urgently needed. Here, mice were immunized with viral replicon particles expressing the dengue envelope protein ectodomain to assess the relative contribution of humoral versus cellular immunity to protection. Vaccination with viral replicon particles provided robust protection against dengue challenge. Vaccine-induced humoral responses had the potential to either protect from or exacerbate dengue disease upon challenge, whereas cellular immune responses were beneficial. This study explores the immunological basis of protection induced by a dengue vaccine and suggests that a safe and efficient vaccine against dengue should trigger both arms of the immune system. PMID:24204271

  2. Cellular protection during oxidative stress: a potential role for D-ribose and antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Addis, Paul; Shecterle, Linda M; St Cyr, John A

    2012-09-01

    A healthy cellular system involves the maintenance of an intracellular metabolic balance. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are constantly produced as a normal product of cellular metabolism; however, during situations of cellular stress, these levels can increase dramatically with the potential to cause deleterious cellular structural and/or functional consequences. There is a significant elevation in these ROS following stressful situations, such as ischemia, hypoxia, high-intensity exercise, and in many diseases. To combat these ROS, neutralizing endogenous enzymes, as well as exogenous antioxidants, can aid in minimizing their potential untoward cellular effects. Exogenous reducing antioxidant agents, such as vitamin C and/or E, play a role in addressing these formed species; however, recent research has suggested that fruit seed extracts may provide additional cellular benefits beyond their antioxidant features. Furthermore, supplemental D-ribose enhances the recovery of high-energy phosphates following stress and appears to potentially offer additional benefits by reducing radical formation. Specifically, during periods of hypoxia/ischemia, supplemental D-ribose may play an inhibitory role in the breakdown of adenine nucleotides, influencing the subsequent formation of xanthine and uric acid compounds; and thereby affecting the release of superoxide anion radicals. The combination of D-ribose with reducing antioxidants may provide a more optimal state of cellular protection during and following times of oxidative stress. PMID:22891990

  3. Protection of CpG islands from DNA methylation is DNA-encoded and evolutionarily conserved.

    PubMed

    Long, Hannah K; King, Hamish W; Patient, Roger K; Odom, Duncan T; Klose, Robert J

    2016-08-19

    DNA methylation is a repressive epigenetic modification that covers vertebrate genomes. Regions known as CpG islands (CGIs), which are refractory to DNA methylation, are often associated with gene promoters and play central roles in gene regulation. Yet how CGIs in their normal genomic context evade the DNA methylation machinery and whether these mechanisms are evolutionarily conserved remains enigmatic. To address these fundamental questions we exploited a transchromosomic animal model and genomic approaches to understand how the hypomethylated state is formed in vivo and to discover whether mechanisms governing CGI formation are evolutionarily conserved. Strikingly, insertion of a human chromosome into mouse revealed that promoter-associated CGIs are refractory to DNA methylation regardless of host species, demonstrating that DNA sequence plays a central role in specifying the hypomethylated state through evolutionarily conserved mechanisms. In contrast, elements distal to gene promoters exhibited more variable methylation between host species, uncovering a widespread dependence on nucleotide frequency and occupancy of DNA-binding transcription factors in shaping the DNA methylation landscape away from gene promoters. This was exemplified by young CpG rich lineage-restricted repeat sequences that evaded DNA methylation in the absence of co-evolved mechanisms targeting methylation to these sequences, and species specific DNA binding events that protected against DNA methylation in CpG poor regions. Finally, transplantation of mouse chromosomal fragments into the evolutionarily distant zebrafish uncovered the existence of a mechanistically conserved and DNA-encoded logic which shapes CGI formation across vertebrate species. PMID:27084945

  4. Transforming growth factor-beta1 mediates cellular response to DNA damage in situ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewan, Kenneth B.; Henshall-Powell, Rhonda L.; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Pajares, Maria Jose; Arteaga, Carlos; Warters, Ray; Akhurst, Rosemary J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2002-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 is rapidly activated after ionizing radiation, but its specific role in cellular responses to DNA damage is not known. Here we use Tgfbeta1 knockout mice to show that radiation-induced apoptotic response is TGF-beta1 dependent in the mammary epithelium, and that both apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation in response to DNA damage decrease as a function of TGF-beta1 gene dose in embryonic epithelial tissues. Because apoptosis in these tissues has been shown previously to be p53 dependent, we then examined p53 protein activation. TGF-beta1 depletion, by either gene knockout or by using TGF-beta neutralizing antibodies, resulted in decreased p53 Ser-18 phosphorylation in irradiated mammary gland. These data indicate that TGF-beta1 is essential for rapid p53-mediated cellular responses that mediate cell fate decisions in situ.

  5. EBNA-LP Associates with Cellular Proteins Including DNA-PK and HA95

    PubMed Central

    Han, Innoc; Harada, Shizuko; Weaver, David; Xue, Yong; Lane, William; Orstavik, Sigurd; Skalhegg, Bjorn; Kieff, Elliott

    2001-01-01

    EBNA-LP-associated proteins were identified by sequencing proteins that immunoprecipitated with Flag epitope-tagged EBNA-LP (FLP) from lymphoblasts in which FLP was stably expressed. The association of EBNA-LP with Hsp70 (72/73) was confirmed, and sequences of DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), HA95, Hsp27, prolyl 4-hydroxylase α-1 subunit, α-tubulin, and β-tubulin were identified. The fraction of total cellular HA95 that associated with FLP was very high, while progressively lower fractions of the total DNA-PKcs, Hsp70, Hsp 27, α-tubulin, and β-tubulin specifically associated with EBNA-LP as determined by immunoblotting with antibodies to these proteins. EBNA-LP bound to two domains in the DNA-PKcs C terminus and DNA-PKcs associated with the EBNA-LP repeat domain. DNA-PKcs that was bound to EBNA-LP phosphorylated p53 or EBNA-LP in vitro, and the phosphorylation of EBNA-LP was inhibited by Wortmannin, a specific in vitro inhibitor of DNA-PKcs. PMID:11160753

  6. DNA Damage and Its Cellular Response in Mother and Fetus Exposed to Hyperglycemic Environment

    PubMed Central

    Moreli, Jusciele Brogin; Santos, Janine Hertzog; Rocha, Clarissa Ribeiro; Rudge, Marilza Vieira; Bevilacqua, Estela; Calderon, Iracema Mattos Paranhos

    2014-01-01

    The increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a key role in pathogenesis of diabetic complications. ROS are generated by exogenous and endogenous factors such as during hyperglycemia. When ROS production exceeds the detoxification and scavenging capacity of the cell, oxidative stress ensues. Oxidative stress induces DNA damage and when DNA damage exceeds the cellular capacity to repair it, the accumulation of errors can overwhelm the cell resulting in cell death or fixation of genome mutations that can be transmitted to future cell generations. These mutations can lead to and/or play a role in cancer development. This review aims at (i) understanding the types and consequences of DNA damage during hyperglycemic pregnancy; (ii) identifying the biological role of DNA repair during pregnancy, and (iii) proposing clinical interventions to maintain genome integrity. While hyperglycemia can damage the maternal genetic material, the impact of hyperglycemia on fetal cells is still unclear. DNA repair mechanisms may be important to prevent the deleterious effects of hyperglycemia both in mother and in fetus DNA and, as such, prevent the development of diseases in adulthood. Hence, in clinical practice, maternal glycemic control may represent an important point of intervention to prevent the deleterious effects of maternal hyperglycemia to DNA. PMID:25197655

  7. The adenovirus E1A protein overrides the requirement for cellular ras in initiating DNA synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, D W; Dobrowolski, S F; Piotrkowski, A; Harter, M L

    1994-01-01

    The adenovirus E1A protein can induce cellular DNA synthesis in growth-arrested cells by interacting with the cellular protein p300 or pRb. In addition, serum- and growth factor-dependent cells require ras activity to initiate DNA synthesis and recently we have shown that Balb/c 3T3 cells can be blocked in either early or late G1 following microinjection of an anti-ras antibody. In this study, the E1A 243 amino acid protein is shown through microinjection not only to shorten the G0 to S phase interval but, what is more important, to override the inhibitory effects exerted by the anti-ras antibody in either early or late G1. Specifically, whether E1A is co-injected with anti-ras into quiescent cells or injected 18 h following a separate injection of anti-ras after serum stimulation, it efficiently induces cellular DNA synthesis in cells that would otherwise be blocked in G0/G1. Moreover, injection of a mutant form of E1A that can no longer associate with p300 is just as efficient as wild-type E1A in stimulating DNA synthesis in cells whose ras activity has been neutralized by anti-ras. The results presented here show that E1A is capable of overriding the requirement of cellular ras activity in promoting the entry of cells into S phase. Moreover, the results suggest the possibility that pRb and/or pRb-related proteins may function in a ras-dependent pathway that enables E1A to achieve this activity. Images PMID:7813447

  8. VEZF1 Elements Mediate Protection from DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Strogantsev, Ruslan; Gaszner, Miklos; Hair, Alan; Felsenfeld, Gary; West, Adam G.

    2010-01-01

    There is growing consensus that genome organization and long-range gene regulation involves partitioning of the genome into domains of distinct epigenetic chromatin states. Chromatin insulator or barrier elements are key components of these processes as they can establish boundaries between chromatin states. The ability of elements such as the paradigm β-globin HS4 insulator to block the range of enhancers or the spread of repressive histone modifications is well established. Here we have addressed the hypothesis that a barrier element in vertebrates should be capable of defending a gene from silencing by DNA methylation. Using an established stable reporter gene system, we find that HS4 acts specifically to protect a gene promoter from de novo DNA methylation. Notably, protection from methylation can occur in the absence of histone acetylation or transcription. There is a division of labor at HS4; the sequences that mediate protection from methylation are separable from those that mediate CTCF-dependent enhancer blocking and USF-dependent histone modification recruitment. The zinc finger protein VEZF1 was purified as the factor that specifically interacts with the methylation protection elements. VEZF1 is a candidate CpG island protection factor as the G-rich sequences bound by VEZF1 are frequently found at CpG island promoters. Indeed, we show that VEZF1 elements are sufficient to mediate demethylation and protection of the APRT CpG island promoter from DNA methylation. We propose that many barrier elements in vertebrates will prevent DNA methylation in addition to blocking the propagation of repressive histone modifications, as either process is sufficient to direct the establishment of an epigenetically stable silent chromatin state. PMID:20062523

  9. Sub-cellular temporal and spatial distribution of electrotransferred LNA/DNA oligomer.

    PubMed

    Orio, Julie; Bellard, Elisabeth; Baaziz, Houda; Pichon, Chantal; Mouritzen, Peter; Rols, Marie-Pierre; Teissié, Justin; Golzio, Muriel; Chabot, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Low biological activity and inefficient targeted delivery in vivo have hindered RNA interference (RNAi)-based therapy from realising its full clinical potential. To overcome these hurdles, progresses have been made to develop new technologies optimizing oligonucleotides chemistry on one hand and achieving its effective delivery on the other hand. In this report, we achieved, by using the electropulsation technique (EP), efficient cellular delivery of chemically-modified oligonucleotide: The locked nucleic acid (LNA)/DNA oligomer. We used single cell level confocal fluorescence microscopy to follow the spatial and temporal distribution of electrotransferred cyanine 5 (Cy5)-labeled LNA/DNA oligomer. We observed that EP allowed LNA/DNA oligomer cellular uptake providing the oligomer a rapid access to the cytoplasm of HeLa cells. Within a few minutes after electrotransfer, Cy5-LNA/DNA oligomers shuttle from cytoplasm to nucleus whereas in absence of pulses application, Cy5-LNA/DNA oligomers were not detected. We then observed a redistribution of the Cy5 fluorescence that accumulated over time into cytoplasmic organelles. To go further and to identify these compartments, we used the HeLa GFP-Rab7 cell line to visualise late endosomes, and lysosomal or mitochondrial specific markers. Our results showed that the EP technique allowed direct entry into the cytoplasm of the Cy5-LNA/DNA oligomer bypassing the endocytosic pathway. However, in absence of pulses application, Cy5-LNA/DNA oligomer were able to enter cells through the endocytosic pathway. We demonstrated that EP is an efficient technique for LNA-based oligonucleotides delivery offering strong advantages by avoiding the endolysosomal compartmentalization, giving a rapid and free access to the cytoplasm and the nucleus where they can find their targets. PMID:23946765

  10. Cellular Response to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damage in Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Living organisms are constantly exposed to space radiation that consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles. Whether spaceflight factors, microgravity in particular, affects on the cellular response to DNA damage induced by exposures to radiation or other toxic chemicals will have an impact on the radiation risks for the astronauts, as well as on the mutation rate in microorganisms, is still an open question. Although the possible synergistic effects of space radiation and other spaceflight factors have been investigated since the early days of the human space program, the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate the effects of spaceflight on the cellular response to DNA damages, human fibroblast cells flown to the International Space Station (ISS) were treated with bleomycin for three hours in the true microgravity environment, which induces DNA damages including the double strand breaks (DSB) similar to the ionizing radiation. Damage in the DNA was measured by the phosphorylation of a histone protein H2AX (-H2AX), which showed slightly more foci in the cells on ISS than in the ground control. The expression of genes involved in the DNA damage response was also analyzed using the PCR array. Although a number of the genes, including CDKN1A and PCNA, were significantly altered in the cells after bleomycin treatment, no significant difference in the expression profile of DNA damage response genes was found between the flight and ground samples. At the time of the bleomycin treatment, the cells on the ISS were found to be proliferating faster than the ground control as measured by the percentage of cells containing positive Ti-67 signals. Our results suggested that the difference in -H2AX between flight and ground was due to the faster growth rate of the cells in space, but spaceflight did not affect the response of the DNA damage response genes to bleomycin treatment.

  11. Autophagy confers DNA damage repair pathways to protect the hematopoietic system from nuclear radiation injury

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Weiwei; Yuan, Na; Wang, Zhen; Cao, Yan; Fang, Yixuan; Li, Xin; Xu, Fei; Song, Lin; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Han; Yan, Lili; Xu, Li; Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Suping; Wang, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is essentially a metabolic process, but its in vivo role in nuclear radioprotection remains unexplored. We observed that ex vivo autophagy activation reversed the proliferation inhibition, apoptosis, and DNA damage in irradiated hematopoietic cells. In vivo autophagy activation improved bone marrow cellularity following nuclear radiation exposure. In contrast, defective autophagy in the hematopoietic conditional mouse model worsened the hematopoietic injury, reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and DNA damage caused by nuclear radiation exposure. Strikingly, in vivo defective autophagy caused an absence or reduction in regulatory proteins critical to both homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA damage repair pathways, as well as a failure to induce these proteins in response to nuclear radiation. In contrast, in vivo autophagy activation increased most of these proteins in hematopoietic cells. DNA damage assays confirmed the role of in vivo autophagy in the resolution of double-stranded DNA breaks in total bone marrow cells as well as bone marrow stem and progenitor cells upon whole body irradiation. Hence, autophagy protects the hematopoietic system against nuclear radiation injury by conferring and intensifying the HR and NHEJ DNA damage repair pathways and by removing ROS and inhibiting apoptosis. PMID:26197097

  12. Induction of DNA double-strand breaks and cellular senescence by human respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Isidoro; García-Carpizo, Verónica; Guijarro, Trinidad; García-Gomez, Ana; Navarro, Diego; Aranda, Ana; Zambrano, Alberto

    2016-05-18

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) accounts for the majority of lower respiratory tract infections during infancy and childhood and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. HRSV provokes a proliferation arrest and characteristic syncytia in cellular systems such as immortalized epithelial cells. We show here that HRSV induces the expression of DNA damage markers and proliferation arrest such as P-TP53, P-ATM, CDKN1A and γH2AFX in cultured cells secondary to the production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). The DNA damage foci contained γH2AFX and TP53BP1, indicative of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and could be reversed by antioxidant treatments such as N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) or reduced glutathione ethyl ester (GSHee). The damage observed is associated with the accumulation of senescent cells, displaying a canonical senescent phenotype in both mononuclear cells and syncytia. In addition, we show signs of DNA damage and aging such as γH2AFX and CDKN2A expression in the respiratory epithelia of infected mice long after viral clearance. Altogether, these results show that HRSV triggers a DNA damage-mediated cellular senescence program probably mediated by oxidative stress. The results also suggest that this program might contribute to the physiopathology of the infection, tissue remodeling and aging, and might be associated to long-term consequences of HRSV infections. PMID:26809688

  13. Mitochondrial DNA Replication Defects Disturb Cellular dNTP Pools and Remodel One-Carbon Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nikkanen, Joni; Forsström, Saara; Euro, Liliya; Paetau, Ilse; Kohnz, Rebecca A; Wang, Liya; Chilov, Dmitri; Viinamäki, Jenni; Roivainen, Anne; Marjamäki, Päivi; Liljenbäck, Heidi; Ahola, Sofia; Buzkova, Jana; Terzioglu, Mügen; Khan, Nahid A; Pirnes-Karhu, Sini; Paetau, Anders; Lönnqvist, Tuula; Sajantila, Antti; Isohanni, Pirjo; Tyynismaa, Henna; Nomura, Daniel K; Battersby, Brendan J; Velagapudi, Vidya; Carroll, Christopher J; Suomalainen, Anu

    2016-04-12

    Mitochondrial dysfunction affects cellular energy metabolism, but less is known about the consequences for cytoplasmic biosynthetic reactions. We report that mtDNA replication disorders caused by TWINKLE mutations-mitochondrial myopathy (MM) and infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia (IOSCA)-remodel cellular dNTP pools in mice. MM muscle shows tissue-specific induction of the mitochondrial folate cycle, purine metabolism, and imbalanced and increased dNTP pools, consistent with progressive mtDNA mutagenesis. IOSCA-TWINKLE is predicted to hydrolyze dNTPs, consistent with low dNTP pools and mtDNA depletion in the disease. MM muscle also modifies the cytoplasmic one-carbon cycle, transsulfuration, and methylation, as well as increases glucose uptake and its utilization for de novo serine and glutathione biosynthesis. Our evidence indicates that the mitochondrial replication machinery communicates with cytoplasmic dNTP pools and that upregulation of glutathione synthesis through glucose-driven de novo serine biosynthesis contributes to the metabolic stress response. These results are important for disorders with primary or secondary mtDNA instability and offer targets for metabolic therapy. PMID:26924217

  14. Antioxidant and DNA damage protection potentials of selected phenolic acids.

    PubMed

    Sevgi, Kemal; Tepe, Bektas; Sarikurkcu, Cengiz

    2015-03-01

    In this study, ten different phenolic acids (caffeic, chlorogenic, cinnamic, ferulic, gallic, p-hydroxybenzoic, protocatechuic, rosmarinic, syringic, and vanillic acids) were evaluated for their antioxidant and DNA damage protection potentials. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by using four different test systems named as β-carotene bleaching, DPPH free radical scavenging, reducing power and chelating effect. In all test systems, rosmarinic acid showed the maximum activity potential, while protocatechuic acid was determined as the weakest antioxidant in β-carotene bleaching, DPPH free radical scavenging, and chelating effect assays. Phenolic acids were also screened for their protective effects on pBR322 plasmid DNA against the mutagenic and toxic effects of UV and H2O2. Ferulic acid was found as the most active phytochemical among the others. Even at the lowest concentration value (0.002 mg/ml), ferulic acid protected all of the bands in the presence of H2O2 and UV. It is followed by caffeic, rosmarinic, and vanillic acids. On the other hand, cinnamic acid (at 0.002 mg/ml), gallic acid (at 0.002 mg/ml), p-hydroxybenzoic acid (at 0.002 and 0.004 mg/ml), and protocatechuic acid (at 0.002 and 0.004 mg/ml) could not protect plasmid DNA. PMID:25542528

  15. R152C DNA Pol β mutation impairs base excision repair and induces cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Sun, Hongfang; Zhou, Xiaolong; Wu, Xuping; He, Lingfeng; Hu, Zhigang; Chen, Haoyan; Shen, Binghui; Guo, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerase β (Pol β) is a key enzyme in DNA base excision repair (BER), a pathway that maintains genome integrity and stability. Pol β mutations have been detected in various types of cancers, suggesting a possible linkage between Pol β mutations and cancer. However, it is not clear whether and how Pol β mutations cause cancer onset and progression. In the current work, we show that a substitution mutation, R152C, impairs Pol β polymerase activity and BER efficiency. Cells harboring Pol β R152C are sensitive to the DNA damaging agents methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and H2O2. Moreover, the mutant cells display a high frequency of chromatid breakages and aneuploidy and also form foci. Taken together, our data indicate that Pol β R152C can drive cellular transformation. PMID:26760506

  16. Protection against respiratory syncytial virus infection by DNA immunization.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Sambhara, S; Li, C X; Ewasyshyn, M; Parrington, M; Caterini, J; James, O; Cates, G; Du, R P; Klein, M

    1998-08-17

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in infants and the elderly and is a continuing challenge for vaccine development. A murine T helper cell (Th) type 2 response associates with enhanced lung pathology, which has been observed in past infant trials using formalin-inactivated RSV vaccine. In this study, we have engineered an optimized plasmid DNA vector expressing the RSV fusion (F) protein (DNA-F). DNA-F was as effective as live RSV in mice at inducing neutralizing antibody and cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses, protection against infection, and high mRNA expression of lung interferon gamma after viral challenge. Furthermore, a DNA-F boost could switch a preestablished anti-RSV Th2 response towards a Th1 response. Critical elements for the optimization of the plasmid constructs included expression of a secretory form of the F protein and the presence of the rabbit beta-globin intron II sequence upstream of the F-encoding sequence. In addition, anti-F systemic immune response profile could be modulated by the route of DNA-F delivery: intramuscular immunization resulted in balanced responses, whereas intradermal immunization resulted in a Th2 type of response. Thus, DNA-F immunization may provide a novel and promising RSV vaccination strategy. PMID:9705950

  17. Rabies DNA vaccines for protection and therapeutic treatment.

    PubMed

    Lodmell, D L

    1999-02-01

    Rabies is a successful zoonotic disease that has persisted over time, achieving worldwide distribution in a variety of species. Annually, in developing countries with limited access to high-quality antirabies biologics, approximately 50,000 individuals and millions of animals die of rabies. Many of these countries continue to use vaccines produced in sheep, goat or suckling mouse brain, with ultraviolet light or phenol inactivation of the virus. Although there are several efficacious rabies vaccines derived from cultured cells, such as the human diploid cell vaccine, they are costly to produce and prohibitively expensive for developing countries. DNA vaccines offer a new and powerful approach for the generation of needed vaccines. They are stable, inexpensive to produce, easy to construct and induce a full spectrum of long-lasting humoral and cellular immune responses. This review concerns the present state of rabies DNA vaccines, and addresses the technology that may enhance their therapeutic efficacy. PMID:15992067

  18. The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase is required for cellular resistance to oxidative stress independent of DNA double strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengxia; Lin, Yu-Fen; Palchik, Guillermo; Matsunaga, Shinji; Wang, Dong; Chen, Benjamin P.C.

    2014-01-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) are the two major kinases involved in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, and are required for cellular resistance to ionizing radiation. While ATM is the key upstream kinase for DSB signaling, DNA-PKcs is primarily involved in DSB repair through the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) mechanism. In addition to DSB repair, ATM has been shown to be involved in oxidative stress response and could be activated directly in vitro upon hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment. However, the role of DNA-PKcs in cellular response to oxidative stress is not clear. We hypothesize that DNA-PKcs may participate in the regulation of ATM activation in response to oxidative stress, and that this regulatory role is independent of its role in DNA double strand break repair. Our findings reveal that H2O2 induces hyperactivation of ATM signaling in DNA-PKcs deficient, but not Ligase 4 deficient cells, suggesting an NHEJ-independent role for DNA-PKcs. Furthermore, DNA-PKcs deficiency leads to the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and to a decrease in cellular survival against H2O2. For the first time, our results reveal that DNA-PKcs plays a non-canonical role in the cellular response to oxidative stress, which is independent from its role in NHEJ. In addition, DNA-PKcs is a critical regulator of the oxidative stress response and contributes to the maintenance of redox homeostasis. Our findings reveal that DNA-PKcs is required for cellular resistance to oxidative stress and suppression of ROS build-up independently to its function in DSB repair. PMID:25224041

  19. The catalytic A1 domains of cholera toxin and heat-labile enterotoxin are potent DNA adjuvants that evoke mixed Th1/Th17 cellular immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Bagley, Kenneth; Xu, Rong; Ota-Setlik, Ayuko; Egan, Michael; Schwartz, Jennifer; Fouts, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    DNA encoded adjuvants are well known for increasing the magnitude of cellular and/or humoral immune responses directed against vaccine antigens. DNA adjuvants can also tune immune responses directed against vaccine antigens to better protect against infection of the target organism. Two potent DNA adjuvants that have unique abilities to tune immune responses are the catalytic A1 domains of Cholera Toxin (CTA1) and Heat-Labile Enterotoxin (LTA1). Here, we have characterized the adjuvant activities of CTA1 and LTA1 using HIV and SIV genes as model antigens. Both of these adjuvants enhanced the magnitude of antigen-specific cellular immune responses on par with those induced by the well-characterized cytokine adjuvants IL-12 and GM-CSF. CTA1 and LTA1 preferentially enhanced cellular responses to the intracellular antigen SIVmac239-gag over those for the secreted HIVBaL-gp120 antigen. IL-12, GM-CSF and electroporation did the opposite suggesting differences in the mechanisms of actions of these diverse adjuvants. Combinations of CTA1 or LTA1 with IL-12 or GM-CSF generated additive and better balanced cellular responses to both of these antigens. Consistent with observations made with the holotoxin and the CTA1-DD adjuvant, CTA1 and LTA1 evoked mixed Th1/Th17 cellular immune responses. Together, these results show that CTA1 and LTA1 are potent DNA vaccine adjuvants that favor the intracellular antigen gag over the secreted antigen gp120 and evoke mixed Th1/Th17 responses against both of these antigens. The results also indicate that achieving a balanced immune response to multiple intracellular and extracellular antigens delivered via DNA vaccination may require combining adjuvants that have different and complementary mechanisms of action. PMID:26042527

  20. The catalytic A1 domains of cholera toxin and heat-labile enterotoxin are potent DNA adjuvants that evoke mixed Th1/Th17 cellular immune responses.

    PubMed

    Bagley, Kenneth; Xu, Rong; Ota-Setlik, Ayuko; Egan, Michael; Schwartz, Jennifer; Fouts, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    DNA encoded adjuvants are well known for increasing the magnitude of cellular and/or humoral immune responses directed against vaccine antigens. DNA adjuvants can also tune immune responses directed against vaccine antigens to better protect against infection of the target organism. Two potent DNA adjuvants that have unique abilities to tune immune responses are the catalytic A1 domains of Cholera Toxin (CTA1) and Heat-Labile Enterotoxin (LTA1). Here, we have characterized the adjuvant activities of CTA1 and LTA1 using HIV and SIV genes as model antigens. Both of these adjuvants enhanced the magnitude of antigen-specific cellular immune responses on par with those induced by the well-characterized cytokine adjuvants IL-12 and GM-CSF. CTA1 and LTA1 preferentially enhanced cellular responses to the intracellular antigen SIVmac239-gag over those for the secreted HIVBaL-gp120 antigen. IL-12, GM-CSF and electroporation did the opposite suggesting differences in the mechanisms of actions of these diverse adjuvants. Combinations of CTA1 or LTA1 with IL-12 or GM-CSF generated additive and better balanced cellular responses to both of these antigens. Consistent with observations made with the holotoxin and the CTA1-DD adjuvant, CTA1 and LTA1 evoked mixed Th1/Th17 cellular immune responses. Together, these results show that CTA1 and LTA1 are potent DNA vaccine adjuvants that favor the intracellular antigen gag over the secreted antigen gp120 and evoke mixed Th1/Th17 responses against both of these antigens. The results also indicate that achieving a balanced immune response to multiple intracellular and extracellular antigens delivered via DNA vaccination may require combining adjuvants that have different and complementary mechanisms of action. PMID:26042527

  1. Aqueous extract of Crataegus azarolus protects against DNA damage in human lymphoblast Cell K562 and enhances antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Mustapha, Nadia; Bouhlel, Inès; Chaabane, Fadwa; Bzéouich, Imèn Mokdad; Ghedira, Kamel; Hennebelle, Thierry; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2014-02-01

    The present study was carried out to characterize the cellular antioxidant effect of the aqueous extract of Crataegus azarolus and its antigenotoxic potential using human myelogenous cells, K562. The antioxidant capacity of this extract was evaluated by determining its cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) in K562 cells. Also, preceding antigenotoxicity assessment, its eventual genotoxicity property was investigated by evaluating its capacity to induce the DNA degradation of treated cell nuclei. As no genotoxicity was detected at different exposure times, its ability to protect cell DNA against H2O2 oxidative effect was investigated, using the "comet assay." It appears that 800 μg/mL of extract inhibited the genotoxicity induced by H2O2 with a rate of 41.30 %, after 4 h of incubation. In addition, this extract revealed a significant cellular antioxidant capacity against the reactive oxygen species in K562 cells. PMID:24347159

  2. Antioxidative Activity of Platinum Nanocolloid and Its Protective Effect Against Chemical-Induced Hepatic Cellular Damage.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mi-Ran; Do, Le Thanh; Chung, Yong-Hoon; Yoo, Hoon; Yu, Rina

    2015-08-01

    Oxidative stress, a major cause of cellular injuries, is closely associated with a variety of chronic diseases such as cancer, liver diseases, degenerative brain disease and aging. In this study, we investigated antioxidant properties of platinum nanocolloid (PNC) against various oxidative stress conditions in vitro/in vivo by treating PNC on liver cell or tissue. Antioxidant activities of the PNC were determined by measuring quenching capacity on reactive oxygen species and its protective action against hydrogen peroxide or CCl4-induced oxidative cellular damage in HepG2 cell or liver tissue of mice. In vitro study, PNC markedly suppressed the production H2O2, ·OH, α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl radical and nitric oxide in a dose-dependent manner. PNC also inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative cellular damage in HepG2 hepatocytes. In vivo study with mice, PNC reduced hepatic lipid peroxidation and CCl4 induced toxicity. Our results support that platinum nanocolloid has antioxidant activities and protects hepatic cellular oxidative damage. Thus platinum nanocolloid may have a potential to be used as an antioxidant supplement. PMID:26369119

  3. Cyanine fluorophores for cellular protection against ROS in stimulated macrophages and two-photon ROS detection.

    PubMed

    Chan, M S; Xu, D; Guo, L; Tam, D Y; Liu, L S; Chen, Y; Wong, M S; Lo, P K

    2015-07-14

    We report the first example of a novel two-photon active, biocompatible, and macrophage cell-membrane permeable carbazole-based cyanine fluorophore for the detection of three biologically important ROS, namely, ˙OH, O2(-) and OCl(-) in solution. This versatile probe shows cellular protection not only in stimulated macrophages from phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced morphological changes but also lipopolysaccharide-induced cytotoxicity by quenching with the O2(-) and OCl(-) production, respectively. Such protection could be visualized by a distinct change in the fluorescence intensity of the probe. PMID:26059852

  4. p53-dependent SIRT6 expression protects Aβ42-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Eun Sun; Choi, Hyunjung; Song, Hyundong; Hwang, Yu Jin; Kim, Ahbin; Ryu, Hoon; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia and age-related neurodegenerative disease. Elucidating the cellular changes that occur during ageing is an important step towards understanding the pathogenesis and progression of neurodegenerative disorders. SIRT6 is a member of the mammalian sirtuin family of anti-aging genes. However, the relationship between SIRT6 and AD has not yet been elucidated. Here, we report that SIRT6 protein expression levels are reduced in the brains of both the 5XFAD AD mouse model and AD patients. Aβ42, a major component of senile plaques, decreases SIRT6 expression, and Aβ42-induced DNA damage is prevented by the overexpression of SIRT6 in HT22 mouse hippocampal neurons. Also, there is a strong negative correlation between Aβ42-induced DNA damage and p53 levels, a protein involved in DNA repair and apoptosis. In addition, upregulation of p53 protein by Nutlin-3 prevents SIRT6 reduction and DNA damage induced by Aβ42. Taken together, this study reveals that p53-dependent SIRT6 expression protects cells from Aβ42-induced DNA damage, making SIRT6 a promising new therapeutic target for the treatment of AD. PMID:27156849

  5. Controlled DNA condensation and targeted cellular imaging by ligand exchange in a polysaccharide-quantum dot conjugate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Hui; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Yang, Yang; Chen, Li-Xia; Liu, Yu

    2016-05-01

    A multicomponent supramolecular nanoparticle composed of a polysaccharide-quantum dot conjugate was successfully constructed using a ligand-exchange method, which possessed low cellular cytotoxicity and showed controlled DNA condensation and targeted cellular imaging abilities toward cancer cells. PMID:27064053

  6. Protection of cisplatin-induced spermatotoxicity, DNA damage and chromatin abnormality by selenium nano-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Rezvanfar, Mohammad Amin; Rezvanfar, Mohammad Ali; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza; Ahmadi, Abbas; Baeeri, Maryam; Mohammadirad, Azadeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-02-01

    Cisplatin (CIS), an anticancer alkylating agent, induces DNA adducts and effectively cross links the DNA strands and so affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. The present study investigated the cellular/biochemical mechanisms underlying possible protective effect of selenium nano-particles (Nano-Se) as an established strong antioxidant with more bioavailability and less toxicity, on reproductive toxicity of CIS by assessment of sperm characteristics, sperm DNA integrity, chromatin quality and spermatogenic disorders. To determine the role of oxidative stress (OS) in the pathogenesis of CIS gonadotoxicity, the level of lipid peroxidation (LPO), antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and peroxynitrite (ONOO) as a marker of nitrosative stress (NS) and testosterone (T) concentration as a biomarker of testicular function were measured in the blood and testes. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were equally divided into four groups. A single IP dose of CIS (7 mg/kg) and protective dose of Nano-Se (2 mg/kg/day) were administered alone or in combination. The CIS-exposed rats showed a significant increase in testicular and serum LPO and ONOO level, along with a significant decrease in enzymatic antioxidants levels, diminished serum T concentration and abnormal histologic findings with impaired sperm quality associated with increased DNA damage and decreased chromatin quality. Coadministration of Nano-Se significantly improved the serum T, sperm quality, and spermatogenesis and reduced CIS-induced free radical toxic stress and spermatic DNA damage. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that Nano-Se may be useful to prevent CIS-induced gonadotoxicity through its antioxidant potential. Highlights: ► Cisplatin (CIS) affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. ► Effect of Nano-Se on CIS-induced spermatotoxicity was investigated. ► CIS-exposure induces oxidative sperm DNA damage

  7. Dandelion Extracts Protect Human Skin Fibroblasts from UVB Damage and Cellular Senescence.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yafan; Li, Shuangshuang

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation causes damage in skin by generating excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), leading to skin photoageing. Dandelion extracts have long been used for traditional Chinese medicine and native American medicine to treat cancers, hepatitis, and digestive diseases; however, less is known on the effects of dandelion extracts in skin photoageing. Here we found that dandelion leaf and flower extracts significantly protect UVB irradiation-inhibited cell viability when added before UVB irradiation or promptly after irradiation. Dandelion leaf and flower extracts inhibited UVB irradiation-stimulated MMP activity and ROS generation. Dandelion root extracts showed less action on protecting HDFs from UVB irradiation-induced MMP activity, ROS generation, and cell death. Furthermore, dandelion leaf and flower but not root extracts stimulated glutathione generation and glutathione reductase mRNA expression in the presence or absence of UVB irradiation. We also found that dandelion leaf and flower extracts help absorb UVB irradiation. In addition, dandelion extracts significantly protected HDFs from H2O2-induced cellular senescence. In conclusion, dandelion extracts especially leaf and flower extracts are potent protective agents against UVB damage and H2O2-induced cellular senescence in HDFs by suppressing ROS generation and MMP activities and helping UVB absorption. PMID:26576225

  8. Dandelion Extracts Protect Human Skin Fibroblasts from UVB Damage and Cellular Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yafan; Li, Shuangshuang

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation causes damage in skin by generating excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), leading to skin photoageing. Dandelion extracts have long been used for traditional Chinese medicine and native American medicine to treat cancers, hepatitis, and digestive diseases; however, less is known on the effects of dandelion extracts in skin photoageing. Here we found that dandelion leaf and flower extracts significantly protect UVB irradiation-inhibited cell viability when added before UVB irradiation or promptly after irradiation. Dandelion leaf and flower extracts inhibited UVB irradiation-stimulated MMP activity and ROS generation. Dandelion root extracts showed less action on protecting HDFs from UVB irradiation-induced MMP activity, ROS generation, and cell death. Furthermore, dandelion leaf and flower but not root extracts stimulated glutathione generation and glutathione reductase mRNA expression in the presence or absence of UVB irradiation. We also found that dandelion leaf and flower extracts help absorb UVB irradiation. In addition, dandelion extracts significantly protected HDFs from H2O2-induced cellular senescence. In conclusion, dandelion extracts especially leaf and flower extracts are potent protective agents against UVB damage and H2O2-induced cellular senescence in HDFs by suppressing ROS generation and MMP activities and helping UVB absorption. PMID:26576225

  9. DNA-controlled dynamic colloidal nanoparticle systems for mediating cellular interaction.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Seiichi; Glancy, Dylan; Chan, Warren C W

    2016-02-19

    Precise control of biosystems requires development of materials that can dynamically change physicochemical properties. Inspired by the ability of proteins to alter their conformation to mediate function, we explored the use of DNA as molecular keys to assemble and transform colloidal nanoparticle systems. The systems consist of a core nanoparticle surrounded by small satellites, the conformation of which can be transformed in response to DNA via a toe-hold displacement mechanism. The conformational changes can alter the optical properties and biological interactions of the assembled nanosystem. Photoluminescent signal is altered by changes in fluorophore-modified particle distance, whereas cellular targeting efficiency is increased 2.5 times by changing the surface display of targeting ligands. These concepts provide strategies for engineering dynamic nanotechnology systems for navigating complex biological environments. PMID:26912892

  10. DNA-controlled dynamic colloidal nanoparticle systems for mediating cellular interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Seiichi; Glancy, Dylan; Chan, Warren C. W.

    2016-02-01

    Precise control of biosystems requires development of materials that can dynamically change physicochemical properties. Inspired by the ability of proteins to alter their conformation to mediate function, we explored the use of DNA as molecular keys to assemble and transform colloidal nanoparticle systems. The systems consist of a core nanoparticle surrounded by small satellites, the conformation of which can be transformed in response to DNA via a toe-hold displacement mechanism. The conformational changes can alter the optical properties and biological interactions of the assembled nanosystem. Photoluminescent signal is altered by changes in fluorophore-modified particle distance, whereas cellular targeting efficiency is increased 2.5 times by changing the surface display of targeting ligands. These concepts provide strategies for engineering dynamic nanotechnology systems for navigating complex biological environments.

  11. Fisetin Protects DNA Against Oxidative Damage and Its Possible Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tingting; Lin, Huajuan; Tu, Qian; Liu, Jingjing; Li, Xican

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The paper tries to assess the protective effect of fisetin against •OH-induced DNA damage, then to investigate the possible mechanism. Methods: The protective effect was evaluated based on the content of malondialdehyde (MDA). The possible mechanism was analyzed using various antioxidant methods in vitro, including •OH scavenging (deoxyribose degradation), •O2- scavenging (pyrogallol autoxidation), DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•+ scavenging, and Cu2+-reducing power assays. Results: Fisetin increased dose-dependently its protective percentages against •OH-induced DNA damage (IC50 value =1535.00±29.60 µM). It also increased its radical-scavenging percentages in a dose-dependent manner in various antioxidants assays. Its IC50 values in •OH scavenging, •O2- scavenging, DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•+ scavenging, and Cu2+-reducing power assays, were 47.41±4.50 µM, 34.05±0.87 µM, 9.69±0.53 µM, 2.43±0.14 µM, and 1.49±0.16 µM, respectively. Conclusion: Fisetin can effectively protect DNA against •OH-induced oxidative damage possibly via reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging approach, which is assumed to be hydrogen atom (H•) and/or single electron (e) donation (HAT/SET) pathways. In the HAT pathway, the 3’,4’-dihydroxyl moiety in B ring of fisetin is thought to play an important role, because it can be ultimately oxidized to a stable ortho-benzoquinone form. PMID:27478791

  12. Oxidative DNA damage and cellular sensitivity to oxidative stress in human autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, S; Harris, G; Denman, M A; Blake, D R; Winyard, P G

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To estimate the extent of genomic DNA damage and killing of lymphocytes by reactive oxygen intermediates in autoimmune diseases. METHODS--8-Oxo-7-hydrodeoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), a promutagenic DNA lesion induced by reactive oxygen intermediates, was measured by high performance liquid chromatography, coupled with electrochemical detection, in hydrolysates of DNA which had been extracted from lymphocyte and polymorphonuclear leucocyte fractions of human blood. In addition, human primary blood lymphocytes stimulated by concanavalin A were assayed for cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide on day 0, by assessing cell proliferation during seven days of culture. RESULTS--Constitutive 8-oxodG was detectable (mean (2 SEM) moles 8-oxodG/10(6) moles deoxyguanosine) in DNA isolated from normal human blood lymphocytes (68 (8), n = 26) and polymorphonuclear leucocytes (118 (24), n = 24). Lymphocyte DNA from donors with the following inflammatory autoimmune diseases contained significantly higher levels of 8-oxodG than that from healthy donors: rheumatoid arthritis (98 (16)), systemic lupus erythematosus (137 (28)), vasculitis (100 (32)), and Behçet's disease (92 (19)). Lymphocyte 8-oxodG levels in non-autoimmune controls and patients with scleroderma were not significantly different from those of healthy controls. The levels of 8-oxodG were significantly higher in the DNA from normal polymorphonuclear leucocytes than in paired DNA samples from normal lymphocytes, but there were no differences between levels of 8-oxodG in polymorphonuclear leucocytes from normal subjects and the patients studied. Levels of 8-oxodG did not correlate with disease duration, disease severity, or age. Lymphocytes from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis, but not those with scleroderma, also showed cellular hypersensitivity to the toxic effects of hydrogen peroxide. CONCLUSION--There was increased genomic DNA damage, and increased susceptibility to

  13. A DNA-dependent stress response involving DNA-PK occurs in hypoxic cells and contributes to cellular adaptation to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Bouquet, Fanny; Ousset, Marielle; Biard, Denis; Fallone, Frédérique; Dauvillier, Stéphanie; Frit, Philippe; Salles, Bernard; Muller, Catherine

    2011-06-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is involved in DNA double-strand break (DSB) signalling and repair. We report that DNA-PK is activated by mild hypoxia conditions (0.1-1% O₂) as shown by (1) its autophosphorylation on Ser2056, and (2) its mobilisation from a soluble nucleoplasmic compartment to a less extractable nuclear fraction. The recruitment of DNA-PK was not followed by activation and recruitment of the XRCC4-DNA-ligase-IV complex, suggesting that DSBs are not responsible for activation of DNA-PK. To unravel the mechanism of DNA-PK activation, we show that exposure of cells to trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, leads to DNA-PK autophosphorylation and relocalisation to DNA. Histone acetylation (mainly H3K14) is increased in hypoxic cells and treatment with anacardic acid, an inhibitor of histone acetyl transferase, prevented both histone modifications and DNA-PK activation in hypoxic conditions. Importantly, in using either silenced DNA-PK cells or cells exposed to a specific DNA-PK inhibitor (NU7026), we demonstrated that hypoxic DNA-PK activation positively regulates the key transcription factor HIF-1 and one subsequent target gene, GLUT1. Our results show that hypoxia initiates chromatin modification and consequently DNA-PK activation, which positively regulate cellular oxygen-sensing and oxygen-signalling pathways. PMID:21576354

  14. Protection of cisplatin-induced spermatotoxicity, DNA damage and chromatin abnormality by selenium nano-particles.

    PubMed

    Rezvanfar, Mohammad Amin; Rezvanfar, Mohammad Ali; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza; Ahmadi, Abbas; Baeeri, Maryam; Mohammadirad, Azadeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-02-01

    Cisplatin (CIS), an anticancer alkylating agent, induces DNA adducts and effectively cross links the DNA strands and so affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. The present study investigated the cellular/biochemical mechanisms underlying possible protective effect of selenium nano-particles (Nano-Se) as an established strong antioxidant with more bioavailability and less toxicity, on reproductive toxicity of CIS by assessment of sperm characteristics, sperm DNA integrity, chromatin quality and spermatogenic disorders. To determine the role of oxidative stress (OS) in the pathogenesis of CIS gonadotoxicity, the level of lipid peroxidation (LPO), antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and peroxynitrite (ONOO) as a marker of nitrosative stress (NS) and testosterone (T) concentration as a biomarker of testicular function were measured in the blood and testes. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were equally divided into four groups. A single IP dose of CIS (7 mg/kg) and protective dose of Nano-Se (2 mg/kg/day) were administered alone or in combination. The CIS-exposed rats showed a significant increase in testicular and serum LPO and ONOO level, along with a significant decrease in enzymatic antioxidants levels, diminished serum T concentration and abnormal histologic findings with impaired sperm quality associated with increased DNA damage and decreased chromatin quality. Coadministration of Nano-Se significantly improved the serum T, sperm quality, and spermatogenesis and reduced CIS-induced free radical toxic stress and spermatic DNA damage. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that Nano-Se may be useful to prevent CIS-induced gonadotoxicity through its antioxidant potential. PMID:23260366

  15. Preserved DNA Damage Checkpoint Pathway Protects against Complications in Long-Standing Type 1 Diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, Shweta; Gupta, Manoj; Khamaisi, Mogher; Martinez, Rachael; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Wagner, Bridget; Guye, Patrick; Busskamp, Volker; Shirakawa, Jun; Wu, Gongxiong; Liew, Chong Wee; Clauss, Therese RW; Valdez, Ivan; EL Ouaaman, Abdelfattah; Dirice, Ercument; Takatani, Tomozumi; Keenan, Hillary; Smith, Richard D.; Church, George; Weiss, Ron; Wagers, Amy J.; Qian, Weijun; King, George L.; Kulkami, Rohit N.

    2015-08-04

    Themechanisms underlying the development of complications in type 1 diabetes (T1D) are poorly understood. Disease modeling of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients with longstanding T1D(disease durationR50 years) with severe (Medalist +C) or absent to mild complications (Medalist *C) revealed impaired growth, reprogramming, and differentiation in Medalist +C. Genomics and proteomics analyses suggested differential regulation of DNA damage checkpoint proteins favoring protection from cellular apoptosis in Medalist *C. In silico analyses showed altered expression patterns of DNA damage checkpoint factors among the Medalist groups to be targets of miR200, whose expression was significantly elevated in Medalist +C serum. Notably, neurons differentiated from Medalist +C iPSCs exhibited enhanced susceptibility to genotoxic stress that worsened upon miR200 overexpression. Furthermore, knockdown of miR200 in Medalist +C fibroblasts and iPSCs rescued checkpoint protein expression and reduced DNA damage.WeproposemiR200-regulated DNA damage checkpoint pathway as a potential therapeutic target for treating complications of diabetes.

  16. Combined metformin and resveratrol confers protection against UVC-induced DNA damage in A549 lung cancer cells via modulation of cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Syu; Doonan, Barbara B; Wu, Joseph M; Hsieh, Tze-Chen

    2016-06-01

    Aging in humans is a multi-factorial cellular process that is associated with an increase in the risk of numerous diseases including diabetes, coronary heart disease and cancer. Aging is linked to DNA damage, and a persistent source of DNA damage is exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. As such, identifying agents that confer protection against DNA damage is an approach that could reduce the public health burden of age-related disorders. Metformin and resveratrol have both shown effectiveness in preventing several age-related diseases; using human A549 cells, we investigated whether metformin or resveratrol, alone or combined, prevent UVC-induced DNA damage. We found that metformin inhibited UVC-induced upregulation of p53, as well as downregulated the expression of two DNA damage markers: γH2AX and p-chk2. Metformin also upregulated DNA repair as evidenced by the increase in expression of p53R2. Treatment with metformin also induced cell cycle arrest in UVC-induced cells, in correlation with a reduction in the levels of cyclin E/cdk2/Rb and cyclin B1/cdk1. Compared to metformin, resveratrol as a single agent showed less effectiveness in counteracting UVC-elicited cellular responses. However, resveratrol displayed synergism when combined with metformin as shown by the downregulation of p53/γH2AX/p-chk2. In conclusion, the results of the present study validate the effectiveness of metformin, alone or with the addition of resveratrol, in reducing the risk of aging by conferring protection against UV-induced DNA damage. PMID:27109601

  17. The role of the DNA damage response in zebrafish and cellular models of Diamond Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Danilova, Nadia; Bibikova, Elena; Covey, Todd M; Nathanson, David; Dimitrova, Elizabeth; Konto, Yoan; Lindgren, Anne; Glader, Bertil; Radu, Caius G; Sakamoto, Kathleen M; Lin, Shuo

    2014-07-01

    Ribosomal biogenesis involves the processing of pre-ribosomal RNA. A deficiency of some ribosomal proteins (RPs) impairs processing and causes Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA), which is associated with anemia, congenital malformations and cancer. p53 mediates many features of DBA, but the mechanism of p53 activation remains unclear. Another hallmark of DBA is the upregulation of adenosine deaminase (ADA), indicating changes in nucleotide metabolism. In RP-deficient zebrafish, we found activation of both nucleotide catabolism and biosynthesis, which is consistent with the need to break and replace the faulty ribosomal RNA. We also found upregulation of deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP) synthesis - a typical response to replication stress and DNA damage. Both RP-deficient zebrafish and human hematopoietic cells showed activation of the ATR/ATM-CHK1/CHK2/p53 pathway. Other features of RP deficiency included an imbalanced dNTP pool, ATP depletion and AMPK activation. Replication stress and DNA damage in cultured cells in non-DBA models can be decreased by exogenous nucleosides. Therefore, we treated RP-deficient zebrafish embryos with exogenous nucleosides and observed decreased activation of p53 and AMPK, reduced apoptosis, and rescue of hematopoiesis. Our data suggest that the DNA damage response contributes to p53 activation in cellular and zebrafish models of DBA. Furthermore, the rescue of RP-deficient zebrafish with exogenous nucleosides suggests that nucleoside supplements could be beneficial in the treatment of DBA. PMID:24812435

  18. A Germline Polymorphism of Thymine DNA Glycosylase Induces Genomic Instability and Cellular Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Sjolund, Ashley; Nemec, Antonia A.; Paquet, Nicolas; Prakash, Aishwarya; Sung, Patrick; Doublié, Sylvie; Sweasy, Joann B.

    2014-01-01

    Thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) functions in base excision repair, a DNA repair pathway that acts in a lesion-specific manner to correct individual damaged or altered bases. TDG preferentially catalyzes the removal of thymine and uracil paired with guanine, and is also active on 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) paired with adenine or guanine. The rs4135113 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of TDG is found in 10% of the global population. This coding SNP results in the alteration of Gly199 to Ser. Gly199 is part of a loop responsible for stabilizing the flipped abasic nucleotide in the active site pocket. Biochemical analyses indicate that G199S exhibits tighter binding to both its substrate and abasic product. The persistent accumulation of abasic sites in cells expressing G199S leads to the induction of double-strand breaks (DSBs). Cells expressing the G199S variant also activate a DNA damage response. When expressed in cells, G199S induces genomic instability and cellular transformation. Together, these results suggest that individuals harboring the G199S variant may have increased risk for developing cancer. PMID:25375110

  19. Derinat Protects Skin against Ultraviolet-B (UVB)-Induced Cellular Damage.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wen-Li; Lu, Jian-He; Noda, Mami; Wu, Ching-Ying; Liu, Jia-Dai; Sakakibara, Manabu; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Yu, Hsin-Su; Lin, Ming-Wei; Huang, Yaw-Bin; Yan, Shian-Jang; Yoshioka, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UVB) is one of the most cytotoxic and mutagenic stresses that contribute to skin damage and aging through increasing intracellular Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Derinat (sodium deoxyribonucleate) has been utilized as an immunomodulator for the treatment of ROS-associated diseases in clinics. However, the molecular mechanism by which Derinat protects skin cells from UVB-induced damage is poorly understood. Here, we show that Derinat significantly attenuated UVB-induced intracellular ROS production and decreased DNA damage in primary skin cells. Furthermore, Derinat reduced intracellular ROS, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and DNA damage in the skin of the BALB/c-nu mice exposed to UVB for seven days in vivo. Importantly, Derinat blocked the transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels (TRPCs), as demonstrated by calcium imaging. Together, our results indicate that Derinat acts as a TRPCs blocker to reduce intracellular ROS production and DNA damage upon UVB irradiation. This mechanism provides a potential new application of Derinat for the protection against UVB-induced skin damage and aging. PMID:26569211

  20. Reconstitution of the cellular response to DNA damage in vitro using damage-activated extracts from mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, Katherine; Coverley, Dawn

    2012-03-10

    In proliferating mammalian cells, DNA damage is detected by sensors that elicit a cellular response which arrests the cell cycle and repairs the damage. As part of the DNA damage response, DNA replication is inhibited and, within seconds, histone H2AX is phosphorylated. Here we describe a cell-free system that reconstitutes the cellular response to DNA double strand breaks using damage-activated cell extracts and naieve nuclei. Using this system the effect of damage signalling on nuclei that do not contain DNA lesions can be studied, thereby uncoupling signalling and repair. Soluble extracts from G1/S phase cells that were treated with etoposide before isolation, or pre-incubated with nuclei from etoposide-treated cells during an in vitro activation reaction, restrain both initiation and elongation of DNA replication in naieve nuclei. At the same time, H2AX is phosphorylated in naieve nuclei in a manner that is dependent upon the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like protein kinases. Notably, phosphorylated H2AX is not focal in naieve nuclei, but is evident throughout the nucleus suggesting that in the absence of DNA lesions the signal is not amplified such that discrete foci can be detected. This system offers a novel screening approach for inhibitors of DNA damage response kinases, which we demonstrate using the inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A cell free system that reconstitutes the response to DNA damage in the absence of DNA lesions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Damage-activated extracts impose the cellular response to DNA damage on naieve nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PIKK-dependent response impacts positively and negatively on two separate fluorescent outputs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Can be used to screen for inhibitors that impact on the response to damage but not on DNA repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LY294002 and wortmannin demonstrate the system's potential as a pathway focused screening

  1. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 tax attenuates the ATM-mediated cellular DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Chandhasin, Chandtip; Ducu, Razvan I; Berkovich, Elijahu; Kastan, Michael B; Marriott, Susan J

    2008-07-01

    Genomic instability, a hallmark of leukemic cells, is associated with malfunctioning cellular responses to DNA damage caused by defective cell cycle checkpoints and/or DNA repair. Adult T-cell leukemia, which can result from infection with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), is associated with extensive genomic instability that has been attributed to the viral oncoprotein Tax. How Tax influences cellular responses to DNA damage to mediate genomic instability, however, remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the effect of Tax on cellular pathways involved in recognition and repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Premature attenuation of ATM kinase activity and reduced association of MDC1 with repair foci were observed in Tax-expressing cells. Following ionizing radiation-induced S-phase checkpoint activation, Tax-expressing cells progressed more rapidly than non-Tax-expressing cells toward DNA replication. These results demonstrate that Tax expression may allow premature DNA replication in the presence of genomic lesions. Attempts to replicate in the presence of these lesions would result in gradual accumulation of mutations, leading to genome instability and cellular transformation. PMID:18434398

  2. Coupled actin-lamin biopolymer networks and protecting DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Rocklin, D. Zeb; Mao, Xiaoming; Schwarz, J. M.

    The mechanical properties of cells are largely determined by networks of semiflexible biopolymers forming the cytoskeleton. Similarly, the mechanical properties of cell nuclei are also largely determined by networks of semiflexible biopolymers forming the nuclear cytoskeleton. In particular, a network of filamentous lamin sits just inside the inner nuclear membrane to presumably protect the heart of the cell nucleus--the DNA. It has been demonstrated over the past decade that the actin cytoskeletal biopolymer network and the lamin biopolymer network are coupled via a sequence of proteins bridging the outer and inner nuclear membranes, known as the LINC complex. We, therefore, probe the consequences of such a coupling in a model biopolymer network system via numerical simulations to understand the resulting deformations in the lamin network in response to perturbations in the actin cytoskeletal network. We find, for example, that the force transmission across the coupled system can depend sensitively on the concentration of LINC complexes. Such study could have implications for mechanical mechanisms of the regulation of transcription since DNA couples to lamin via lamin-binding domains so that deformations in the lamin network may result in deformations in the DNA.

  3. Dinuclear Ruthenium(II) Complexes as Two-Photon, Time-Resolved Emission Microscopy Probes for Cellular DNA**

    PubMed Central

    Baggaley, Elizabeth; Gill, Martin R; Green, Nicola H; Turton, David; Sazanovich, Igor V; Botchway, Stanley W; Smythe, Carl; Haycock, John W; Weinstein, Julia A; Thomas, Jim A

    2014-01-01

    The first transition-metal complex-based two-photon absorbing luminescence lifetime probes for cellular DNA are presented. This allows cell imaging of DNA free from endogenous fluorophores and potentially facilitates deep tissue imaging. In this initial study, ruthenium(II) luminophores are used as phosphorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (PLIM) probes for nuclear DNA in both live and fixed cells. The DNA-bound probes display characteristic emission lifetimes of more than 160 ns, while shorter-lived cytoplasmic emission is also observed. These timescales are orders of magnitude longer than conventional FLIM, leading to previously unattainable levels of sensitivity, and autofluorescence-free imaging. PMID:24458590

  4. Improvement of Cellular Uptake and Transfection Ability of pDNA Using α-Cyclodextrin-Polyamidoamine Conjugates as Gene Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Qin, Linghao; Cao, Duanwen; Huang, Huan; Ji, Gangjian; Feng, Min; Chen, Jianhai; Pan, Shirong

    2016-02-01

    Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers are a class of unique nanomaterials which attracted attention because of their extraordinary properties, such as highly branched structure and types of terminal primary groups. In addition, development in PAMAM chemical modification has broadened its biological application especially for drug and gene delivery. In this study, PAMAMs are covalently conjugated onto α-Cyclodextrin (α-CD) via amide bonds obtaining the starburst cationic polymers (CD-PG2). The chemical structure and composition of CD-PG2 was characterized by IH NMR. Physicochemical and biological properties of CD-PG2/pDNA polyplex were evaluated by agarose gel retardation, stability test against DNasecñ, MTT assay, DLS measurement, CLSM observation, LDH leakage test, cellular uptake route analysis and in-vitro cell transfection. Results showed that CD-PG2 can efficiently condense pDNA into nanoscale particles with a narrow size distribution, and protect pDNA form DNase I degradation. Compared with free PEI-25K and commercial product Lipofectamine2000, CD-PG2 shows excellent gene transfection efficiency without serum interference as well as relatively low cytotoxicity. Cellular uptake of CD-PG2/pDNA polyplex is mainly through CME and CvME route and further investigations demonstrate that α-CD can regulate CvME pathway to improve polyplex transfection behavior. In conclusion, CD-PG2 can be considered as a versatile tool for gene delivery, especially for gene transfer in-vivo. PMID:27305760

  5. Evaluation of protective efficacy and immune mechanisms of using a non-structural protein NS1 in DNA vaccine against dengue 2 virus in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu-Fen; Liao, Ching-Len; Lin, Yi-Ling; Yeh, Chia-Tsui; Chen, Li-Kuang; Huang, Yung-Feng; Chou, Hsin-Ying; Huang, Jau-Ling; Shaio, Men-Fang; Sytwu, Huey-Kang

    2003-09-01

    To evaluate the potential of DNA vaccine against dengue (DEN) infection, we characterize the protective efficacy and immune responses of mice intramuscularly injected with plasmid encoding DEN-2 non-structural protein 1 (NS1). Intravenously challenged by lethal DEN-2, mice vaccinated with NS1-DNA exhibited a delay onset of paralysis, a marked decrease of morbidity, and a significant enhancement of survival. In addition to a moderate increase of NS1-specific antibody titer from immunized mice measured by ELISA, a strong priming effect on anti-NS1 response was also noticed in plasmid NS1-vaccinated mice by radioimmunoprecipitation (RIP) or immunoblot analysis. Interestingly, newborn mice from NS1-DNA-immunized dam showed stronger resistance to viral challenge, as compared to those from vector DNA or PBS-immunized dams, indicating the protective role of NS1-specific antibody. In contrast to humoral immune response, DNA immunization can elicit strong cellular immune responses, including NS1-specific T cell proliferation and cytolytic activity. The NS1-DNA-induced protection can be further augmented by co-injection of plasmid encoding interleukin 12 (IL-12), suggesting an effector role of Th1 immunity against DEN infection. In summary, our results suggest the potential of NS1-DNA vaccine against DEN infection, and indicate both NS1-specific humoral and cellular immune responses contribute to the protection. PMID:12922127

  6. Dimer monomer transition and dimer re-formation play important role for ATM cellular function during DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Fengxia; Zhang, Minjie; Li, Xiaohua; Yang, Caiyun; Meng, Hao; Wang, Dong; Chang, Shuang; Xu, Ye; Price, Brendan; Sun, Yingli

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • ATM phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. • The PETPVFRLT box of ATM plays a key role in its dimer dissociation in DNA repair. • The dephosphorylation of ATM is critical for dimer re-formation after DNA repair. - Abstract: The ATM protein kinase, is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is recruited and activated by DNA double-strand breaks, mediates responses to ionizing radiation in mammalian cells. Here we show that ATM is held inactive in unirradiated cells as a dimer and phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. Cellular irradiation induces rapid intermolecular autophosphorylation of serine 1981 that causes dimer dissociation and initiates cellular ATM kinase activity. ATM cannot phosphorylate the substrates when it could not undergo dimer monomer transition. After DNA repair, the active monomer will undergo dephosphorylation to form dimer again and dephosphorylation is critical for dimer re-formation. Our work reveals novel function of ATM dimer monomer transition and explains why ATM dimer monomer transition plays such important role for ATM cellular activity during DNA repair.

  7. Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of the US Department of Energy conducts a broad multidisciplinary research program which includes basic biophysics, biophysical chemistry, molecular and cellular biology as well as experimental animal studies and opportunistic human studies. This research is directed at understanding how low levels of radiation of various qualities produce the spectrum of biological effects that are seen for such exposures. This workshop was entitled ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection.'' It ws jointly sponsored by the Department of Energy and the Commission of European Communities. The aim of the workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection. The overview of research provided by this multidisciplinary group will be helpful to the Office in program planning. This report includes a summary of the presentations, extended abstracts, the meeting agenda, research recommendations, and a list of participants. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base.

  8. Downregulation of Cellular Protective Factors of Rumen Epithelium in Goats Fed High Energy Diet

    PubMed Central

    Hollmann, Manfred; Miller, Ingrid; Hummel, Karin; Sabitzer, Sonja; Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U.; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2013-01-01

    Energy-rich diets can challenge metabolic and protective functions of the rumen epithelial cells, but the underlying factors are unclear. This study sought to evaluate proteomic changes of the rumen epithelium in goats fed a low, medium, or high energy diet. Expression of protein changes were compared by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis followed by protein identification with matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Of about 2,000 spots commonly detected in all gels, 64 spots were significantly regulated, which were traced back to 24 unique proteins. Interestingly, the expression profiles of several chaperone proteins with important cellular protective functions such as heat shock cognate 71 kDa protein, peroxiredoxin-6, serpin H1, protein disulfide-isomerase, and selenium-binding protein were collectively downregulated in response to high dietary energy supply. Similar regulation patterns were obtained for some other proteins involved in transport or metabolic functions. In contrast, metabolic enzymes like retinal dehydrogenase 1 and ATP synthase subunit beta, mitochondrial precursor were upregulated in response to high energy diet. Lower expressions of chaperone proteins in the rumen epithelial cells in response to high energy supply may suggest that these cells were less protected against the potentially harmful rumen toxic compounds, which might have consequences for rumen and systemic health. Our findings also suggest that energy-rich diets and the resulting acidotic insult may render rumen epithelial cells more vulnerable to cellular damage by attenuating their cell defense system, hence facilitating the impairment of rumen barrier function, typically observed in energy-rich fed ruminants. PMID:24349094

  9. Plasmid DNA Vaccine Co-Immunisation Modulates Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses Induced by Intranasal Inoculation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    King, Deborah F. L.; McKay, Paul F.; Mann, Jamie F. S.; Jones, C. Bryn; Shattock, Robin J.

    2015-01-01

    Background An effective HIV vaccine will likely require induction of both mucosal and systemic cellular and humoral immune responses. We investigated whether intramuscular (IM) delivery of electroporated plasmid DNA vaccine and simultaneous protein vaccinations by intranasal (IN) and IM routes could be combined to induce mucosal and systemic cellular and humoral immune responses to a model HIV-1 CN54 gp140 antigen in mice. Results Co-immunisation of DNA with intranasal protein successfully elicited both serum and vaginal IgG and IgA responses, whereas DNA and IM protein co-delivery did not induce systemic or mucosal IgA responses. Cellular IFNγ responses were preserved in co-immunisation protocols compared to protein-only vaccination groups. The addition of DNA to IN protein vaccination reduced the strong Th2 bias observed with IN protein vaccination alone. Luminex analysis also revealed that co-immunisation with DNA and IN protein induced expression of cytokines that promote B-cell function, generation of TFH cells and CCR5 ligands that can reduce HIV infectivity. Significance These data suggest that while IN inoculation alone elicits both cellular and humoral responses, co-administration with homologous DNA vaccination can tailor these towards a more balanced Th1/Th2 phenotype modulating the cellular cytokine profile while eliciting high-levels of antigen-specific antibody. This work provides insights on how to generate differential immune responses within the same vaccination visit, and supports co-immunisation with DNA and protein by a mucosal route as a potential delivery strategy for HIV vaccines. PMID:26544970

  10. Sublingual Immunization of Trivalent Human Papillomavirus DNA Vaccine in Baculovirus Nanovector for Protection against Vaginal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee-Jung; Cho, Hansam; Kim, Mi-Gyeong; Heo, Yoon-Ki; Cho, Yeondong; Gwon, Yong-Dae; Park, Ki Hoon; Jin, Hyerim; Kim, Jinyoung; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Young Bong

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the immunogenicity of a sublingually delivered, trivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA vaccine encapsidated in a human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) envelope-coated, nonreplicable, baculovirus nanovector. The HERV envelope-coated, nonreplicable, baculovirus-based DNA vaccine, encoding HPV16L1, -18L1 and -58L1 (AcHERV-triHPV), was constructed and sublingually administered to mice without adjuvant. Following sublingual (SL) administration, AcHERV-triHPV was absorbed and distributed throughout the body. At 15 minutes and 1 day post-dose, the distribution of AcHERV-triHPV to the lung was higher than that to other tissues. At 30 days post-dose, the levels of AcHERV-triHPV had diminished throughout the body. Six weeks after the first of three doses, 1×108 copies of SL AcHERV-triHPV induced HPV type-specific serum IgG and neutralizing antibodies to a degree comparable to that of IM immunization with 1×109 copies. AcHERV-triHPV induced HPV type-specific vaginal IgA titers in a dose-dependent manner. SL immunization with 1×1010 copies of AcHERV-triHPV induced Th1 and Th2 cellular responses comparable to IM immunization with 1×109 copies. Molecular imaging revealed that SL AcHERV-triHPV in mice provided complete protection against vaginal challenge with HPV16, HPV18, and HPV58 pseudoviruses. These results support the potential of SL immunization using multivalent DNA vaccine in baculovirus nanovector for induction of mucosal, systemic, and cellular immune responses. PMID:25789464

  11. Evidence for direct cellular protective effect of PL-10 substances (synthesized parts of body protection compound, BPC) and their specificity to gastric mucosal cells.

    PubMed

    Bódis, B; Karádi, O; Németh, P; Dohoczky, C; Kolega, M; Mózsik, G

    1997-01-01

    The direct gastric mucosal cellular effect of four PL-10 substances (a synthesized part of human body protection compound, BPC containing 14 or 15 amino acids) was studied on freshly isolated rat gastric mucosal cells and on a mouse myeloma cell line (Sp2/0-Ag14) in an ethanol-induced cell injury model. The examined substances were not toxic for the cells. Two of them proved to be significantly protective against the direct cellular damaging effect of ethanol (PL 10.1.15AK-3 in 5 microg/ml dose and PL 10.1.AK14-2 dose-dependently, ED50=50 ng/ml) on gastric mucosal cells. This cytoprotective effect was failured on mouse myeloma cells. Based on these results a part of the in vivo protection induced by BPC seems to be a direct cellular protective effect to gastric mucosal cells. PMID:9353174

  12. Origin of giant viruses from smaller DNA viruses not from a fourth domain of cellular life

    PubMed Central

    Yutin, Natalya; Wolf, Yuri I.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2015-01-01

    The numerous and diverse eukaryotic viruses with large double-stranded DNA genomes that at least partially reproduce in the cytoplasm of infected cells apparently evolved from a single virus ancestor. This major group of viruses is known as Nucleocytoplasmic Large DNA Viruses (NCLDV) or the proposed order Megavirales. Among the “Megavirales”, there are three groups of giant viruses with genomes exceeding 500 kb, namely Mimiviruses, Pithoviruses, and Pandoraviruses that hold the current record of viral genome size, about 2.5 Mb. Phylogenetic analysis of conserved, ancestral NLCDV genes clearly shows that these three groups of giant viruses have three distinct origins within the “Megavirales”. The Mimiviruses constitute a distinct family that is distantly related to Phycodnaviridae, Pandoraviruses originate from a common ancestor with Coccolithoviruses within the Phycodnaviridae family, and Pithoviruses are related to Iridoviridae and Marseilleviridae. Maximum likelihood reconstruction of gene gain and loss events during the evolution of the “Megavirales” indicates that each group of giant viruses evolved from viruses with substantially smaller and simpler gene repertoires. Initial phylogenetic analysis of universal genes, such as translation system components, encoded by some giant viruses, in particular Mimiviruses, has led to the hypothesis that giant viruses descend from a fourth, probably extinct domain of cellular life. The results of our comprehensive phylogenomic analysis of giant viruses refute the fourth domain hypothesis and instead indicate that the universal genes have been independently acquired by different giant viruses from their eukaryotic hosts. PMID:25042053

  13. Colon Cancer-associated DNA Polymerase β Variant Induces Genomic Instability and Cellular Transformation*

    PubMed Central

    Nemec, Antonia A.; Donigan, Katherine A.; Murphy, Drew L.; Jaeger, Joachim; Sweasy, Joann B.

    2012-01-01

    Rapidly advancing technology has resulted in the generation of the genomic sequences of several human tumors. We have identified several mutations of the DNA polymerase β (pol β) gene in human colorectal cancer. We have demonstrated that the expression of the pol β G231D variant increased chromosomal aberrations and induced cellular transformation. The transformed phenotype persisted in the cells even once the expression of G231D was extinguished, suggesting that it resulted as a consequence of genomic instability. Biochemical analysis revealed that its catalytic rate was 140-fold slower than WT pol β, and this was a result of the decreased binding affinity of nucleotides by G231D. Residue 231 of pol β lies in close proximity to the template strand of the DNA. Molecular modeling demonstrated that the change from a small and nonpolar glycine to a negatively charged aspartate resulted in a repulsion between the template and residue 231 leading to the distortion of the dNTP binding pocket. In addition, expression of G231D was insufficient to rescue pol β-deficient cells treated with chemotherapeutic agents suggesting that these agents may be effectively used to treat tumors harboring this mutation. More importantly, this suggests that the G231D variant has impaired base excision repair. Together, these data indicate that the G231D variant plays a role in driving cancer. PMID:22573322

  14. Tuning the cellular uptake properties of luminescent heterobimetallic iridium(III)-ruthenium(II) DNA imaging probes.

    PubMed

    Wragg, Ashley; Gill, Martin R; Turton, David; Adams, Harry; Roseveare, Thomas M; Smythe, Carl; Su, Xiaodi; Thomas, Jim A

    2014-10-20

    The synthesis of two new luminescent dinuclear Ir(III)-Ru(II) complexes containing tetrapyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c:3'',2''-h:2''',3'''-j]phenazine (tpphz) as the bridging ligand is reported. Unlike many other complexes incorporating cyclometalated Ir(III) moieties, these complexes display good water solubility, allowing the first cell-based study on Ir(III)-Ru(II) bioprobes to be carried out. Photophysical studies indicate that emission from each complex is from a Ru(II) excited state and both complexes display significant in vitro DNA-binding affinities. Cellular studies show that each complex is rapidly internalised by HeLa cells, in which they function as luminescent nuclear DNA-imaging agents for confocal microscopy. Furthermore, the uptake and nuclear targeting properties of the complex incorporating cyclometalating 2-(4-fluorophenyl)pyridine ligands around its Ir(III) centre is enhanced in comparison to the non-fluorinated analogue, indicating that fluorination may provide a route to promote cell uptake of transition-metal bioprobes. PMID:25208528

  15. Development of Cross-Protective Influenza A Vaccines Based on Cellular Responses

    PubMed Central

    Soema, Peter Christiaan; van Riet, Elly; Kersten, Gideon; Amorij, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal influenza vaccines provide protection against matching influenza A virus (IAV) strains mainly through the induction of neutralizing serum IgG antibodies. However, these antibodies fail to confer a protective effect against mismatched IAV. This lack of efficacy against heterologous influenza strains has spurred the vaccine development community to look for other influenza vaccine concepts, which have the ability to elicit cross-protective immune responses. One of the concepts that is currently been worked on is that of influenza vaccines inducing influenza-specific T cell responses. T cells are able to lyse infected host cells, thereby clearing the virus. More interestingly, these T cells can recognize highly conserved epitopes of internal influenza proteins, making cellular responses less vulnerable to antigenic variability. T cells are therefore cross-reactive against many influenza strains, and thus are a promising concept for future influenza vaccines. Despite their potential, there are currently no T cell-based IAV vaccines on the market. Selection of the proper antigen, appropriate vaccine formulation and evaluation of the efficacy of T cell vaccines remains challenging, both in preclinical and clinical settings. In this review, we will discuss the current developments in influenza T cell vaccines, focusing on existing protein-based and novel peptide-based vaccine formulations. Furthermore, we will discuss the feasibility of influenza T cell vaccines and their possible use in the future. PMID:26029218

  16. DNA damage by smoke: Protection by turmeric and other inhibitors of ROS

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivas, L.; Shalini, V.K. )

    1991-01-01

    Twigs-dry leaves smoke condensate (TDS), as a source of clastogenic ROS and carcinogenic PAH, was investigated for its in vitro DNA-damaging effect in calf thymus DNA and human peripheral lymphocytes. An aqueous turmeric component--Aq.T--with an established antioxidant activity, was tested as a DNA protectant. TDS induced 13-fold damage to calf thymus DNA as judged by the emergence of a DNA damage specific, fluorescent product (em: 405 nm). Aq.T at 800 ng/microL extended 69% protection to calf thymus DNA and was comparable to the other protectants such as curcumin, BHA, vitamin E, SOD, and CAT. In human peripheral lymphocytes, TDS induced extensive DNA damage in comparison with the tumor promoter TPA, as judged by FADU. Aq.T at 300 ng/microL extended 90% protection to human lymphocyte DNA against TDS-induced damage, and was more effective than the other protectants--DABCO, D-mannitol, sodium benzoate, vitamin E (ROS quenchers), SOD, CAT (antioxidant enzymes), tannic acid, flufenamic acid, BHA, BHT, n-PG, curcumin and quercetin (antioxidants). Aq.T offered 65% protection to human lymphocyte DNA against TPA-induced damage and was comparable to SOD. The above results indicate that TDS induces substantial DNA damage in calf thymus DNA and human lymphocytes and Aq.T is an efficient protectant.

  17. Efficient Cellular Entry of (r-x-r)-Type Carbamate-Plasmid DNA Complexes and Its Implication for Noninvasive Topical DNA Delivery to Skin.

    PubMed

    Vij, Manika; Natarajan, Poornemaa; Yadav, Amit K; Patil, Kiran M; Pandey, Tanuja; Gupta, Nidhi; Santhiya, Deenan; Kumar, Vaijayanti A; Fernandes, Moneesha; Ganguli, Munia

    2016-06-01

    Arginine-rich cell penetrating peptides are powerful tools for in vitro as well as in vivo delivery of a wide plethora of biomolecules. However, presence of consecutive arginine residues leads to enhanced amenability for proteolytic degradation as well as steric hindrances for membrane interactions which compromise its bioavailability. In order to overcome these limitations we previously reported a safe and stable octaarginine based oligomer, i.e., (r-x-r)4-carbamate, where the backbone amide linkages were replaced by carbamate linkages and 6-aminohexanoic acid based spacer moieties were incorporated for better flexibility, hydrophobicity, optimal spacing of guanidinium groups, and protection against proteolytic cleavage; resulting in improved transfection efficiency over its amide counterpart. In the present work we have investigated the mechanism behind this enhanced transfection efficiency and, based on our observations, demonstrate how the synergistic effect of rationalized oligomer designing, complex characteristics, and cell type contributes to overall effective intracellular delivery. Our results indicate that the (r-x-r)4-carbamate-plasmid DNA complexes primarily utilize lipid raft dependent pathway of cellular entry more than other pathways, and this possibly facilitates their increased entry in the lipid raft rich milieu of skin cells. We also emphasize the utility of oligomer (r-x-r)4-carbamate as an efficient carrier for topical delivery of nucleic acids in skin tissue. This carrier can be utilized for safe, efficient, and noninvasive delivery of therapeutically relevant macromolecular hydrophilic cargo like nucleic acids to skin. PMID:27175623

  18. IFI16, an amplifier of DNA-damage response: Role in cellular senescence and aging-associated inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Choubey, Divaker; Panchanathan, Ravichandran

    2016-07-01

    DNA-damage induces a DNA-damage response (DDR) in mammalian cells. The response, depending upon the cell-type and the extent of DNA-damage, ultimately results in cell death or cellular senescence. DDR-induced signaling in cells activates the ATM-p53 and ATM-IKKα/β-interferon (IFN)-β signaling pathways, thus leading to an induction of the p53 and IFN-inducible IFI16 gene. Further, upon DNA-damage, DNA accumulates in the cytoplasm, thereby inducing the IFI16 protein and STING-dependent IFN-β production and activation of the IFI16 inflammasome, resulting in the production of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-1β and IL-18). Increased expression of IFI16 protein in a variety of cell-types promotes cellular senescence. However, reduced expression of IFI16 in cells promotes cell proliferation. Because expression of the IFI16 gene is induced by activation of DNA-damage response in cells and increased levels of IFI16 protein in cells potentiate the p53-mediated transcriptional activation of genes and p53 and pRb-mediated cell cycle arrest, we discuss how an improved understanding of the role of IFI16 protein in cellular senescence and associated inflammatory secretory phenotype is likely to identify the molecular mechanisms that contribute to the development of aging-associated human inflammatory diseases and a failure to cancer therapy. PMID:27063514

  19. A cellular system that degrades misfolded proteins and protects against neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lili; Giasson, Benoit I; Glavis-Bloom, Alex; Brewer, Michael D; Shorter, James; Gitler, Aaron D; Yang, Xiaolu

    2014-07-01

    Misfolded proteins compromise cellular function and cause disease. How these proteins are detected and degraded is not well understood. Here we show that PML/TRIM19 and the SUMO-dependent ubiquitin ligase RNF4 act together to promote the degradation of misfolded proteins in the mammalian cell nucleus. PML selectively interacts with misfolded proteins through distinct substrate recognition sites and conjugates these proteins with the small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) through its SUMO ligase activity. SUMOylated misfolded proteins are then recognized and ubiquitinated by RNF4 and are subsequently targeted for proteasomal degradation. We further show that PML deficiency exacerbates polyglutamine (polyQ) disease in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia 1 (SCA1). These findings reveal a mammalian system that removes misfolded proteins through sequential SUMOylation and ubiquitination and define its role in protection against protein-misfolding diseases. PMID:24882209

  20. Mitochondrial DNA depletion and thymidine phosphate pool dynamics in a cellular model of mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Pontarin, Giovanna; Ferraro, Paola; Valentino, Maria L; Hirano, Michio; Reichard, Peter; Bianchi, Vera

    2006-08-11

    Mitochondrial (mt) neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is an autosomal recessive disease associated with depletion, deletions, and point mutations of mtDNA. Patients lack a functional thymidine phosphorylase and their plasma contains high concentrations of thymidine and deoxyuridine; elevation of the corresponding triphosphates probably impairs normal mtDNA replication and repair. To study metabolic events leading to MNGIE we used as model systems skin and lung fibroblasts cultured in the presence of thymidine and/or deoxyuridine at concentrations close to those in the plasma of the patients, a more than 100-fold excess relative to controls. The two deoxynucleosides increased the mt and cytosolic dTTP pools of skin fibroblasts almost 2-fold in cycling cells and 8-fold in quiescent cells. During up to a two-month incubation of quiescent fibroblasts with thymidine (but not with deoxyuridine), mtDNA decreased to approximately 50% without showing deletions or point mutations. When we removed thymidine, but maintained the quiescent state, mtDNA recovered rapidly. With thymidine in the medium, the dTTP pool of quiescent cells turned over rapidly at a rate depending on the concentration of thymidine, due to increased degradation and resynthesis of dTMP in a substrate (=futile) cycle between thymidine kinase and 5'-deoxyribonucleotidase. The cycle limited the expansion of the dTTP pool at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. We propose that the substrate cycle represents a regulatory mechanism to protect cells from harmful increases of dTTP. Thus MNGIE patients may increase their consumption of ATP to counteract an unlimited expansion of the dTTP pool caused by circulating thymidine. PMID:16774911

  1. 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural: assessment of mutagenicity, DNA-damaging potential and reactivity towards cellular glutathione.

    PubMed

    Janzowski, C; Glaab, V; Samimi, E; Schlatter, J; Eisenbrand, G

    2000-09-01

    5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furfural (HMF), a common product of the Maillard reaction, occurs in many foods in high concentrations, sometimes exceeding 1 g/kg (in certain dried fruits and caramel products). The toxicological relevance of this exposure has not yet been clarified. Induction of aberrant colonic crypt foci had been reported for HMF, in vitro studies on genotoxicity/mutagenicity have given controversial results. To elucidate the toxic potential of HMF, cytotoxicity (trypan blue exclusion), growth inhibition (SRB assay), mutagenicity (HPRT assay), DNA damage (single-cell gel electrophoresis) and depletion of cellular glutathione were investigated in mammalian cells. Genotoxicity (SOS repair) was monitored in Salmonella typhimurium (umu assay). HMF induced moderate cytotoxicity in V79 cells (LC(50): 115 mM, 1 hr incubation) and in Caco-2 cells (LC(50): 118 mM, 1 hr incubation). Growth inhibition was monitored following 24 hr of incubation (V79, IC(50): 6.4 mM). DNA damage was detectable neither in these cell lines nor in primary rat hepatocytes up to the cytotoxic threshold concentration (75% absolute viability). Likewise, in primary human colon cells, obtained from biopsy material, DNA damage was not measurable. At 120 mM, already exhibiting some reduction in cell viability, HMF was weakly mutagenic at the hprt-locus in V79 cells (mutants/10(6) cells: HMF 120 mM: 16 vs control: 3). Intracelluar glutathione was depleted by HMF (>/=50 mM) in V79 cells, in the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line Caco-2 and in primary rat hepatocytes down to approximately 30% of control (120 mM). Genotoxicity was observed with HMF in the umu assay without external activation (16 mM: 185 rel. umu units, %, P<0.001). The genotoxic potential was not altered by addition of rat liver microsomes. By comparison, the natural flavour constituent (E)-2-hexenal (HEX) was already cytotoxic, mutagenic and depleted glutathione at about 1000-fold lower concentrations. It induced DNA damage in

  2. Liposome-based HCV vaccine enhances protective cellular immunity and IFN-gamma secretion in mice.

    PubMed

    Abo-Elnazar, S; Moaaz, M; El-Sayed, A; Shalaby, Th; SirEl-Khatim, S

    2013-01-01

    HCV is a worldwide health problem and with the lack of effective treatment, vaccination becomes an urgent task, especially in developing countries. The effective vaccine should elicit long-lasting antibodies but most importantly induce a vigorous, multi-specific cellular immune response that includes both helper and cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Advances in liposome technology account for much of the progress in vaccine delivery systems. Therefore, this study aimed at investigating the potential immunogenicity of HCV core antigen, and assessing the influence of the novel antigen carried on liposomes on T cell proliferation and IFN-gamma production as potent markers of cellular immune response. Several formulations for immunization were prepared, including liposomal encapsulation of the Ag. The study was conducted on a total of 95 female inbred (C57B1/6J) mice divided into five groups including a control group. Spleen lymphocytes were evaluated for cellular proliferation using 3-(4, 5-Dimethylthiazol-2-YI)-2, 5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide (MTT) assay and for secretion of IFN-gamma by ELISA. Mice injected with liposomes carrying HCV core Ag (group 1) showed a highly significant increase in splenocytes proliferation (spontaneously and after stimulation with the Ag) compared to all other groups, with a stimulation index (S.I) of 1.47 (P < 0.001). The second highest cellular proliferation was noticed in mice injected with core Ag and CFA (group 2) (S.I = 1.29) with a significant difference from group I (P = 0.001). Mice injected with core Ag alone showed a non-significant difference from the control group (P = 0.126). IFN-gamma level was the highest in liposomal Ag group with a highly significant difference; both spontaneously (56.3 pg/L) and with stimulation (68.32) (P < 0.001) followed by mice injected with core Ag with CFA. In conclusion, Liposomal formulation of HCV peptide vaccine is effective as direct in vivo antigen loading and activation of T cells leading to

  3. Carvacrol and rosemary essential oil manifest cytotoxic, DNA-protective and pro-apoptotic effect having no effect on DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Melusova, M; Slamenova, D; Kozics, K; Jantova, S; Horvathova, E

    2014-01-01

    For several thousand years natural products were successfully used to treat a variety of diseases and to maintain health in humans, but until now it is not fully known what causes these medicinal effects. In our study we assessed the cytotoxic, DNA-protective and pro-apoptotic effect of two frequently occurring natural compounds, carvacrol and rosemary essential oil, on human hepatoma HepG2 cells. In addition we examined the in vitro incision repair activity of liver cell extracts prepared from hepatocytes isolated from Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats fed with water containing carvacrol or rosemary oil. Using conventional and modified single cell gel electrophoresis we proved that incubation of HepG2 cells with selected concentrations of carvacrol and rosemary oil significantly protected cellular DNA against two dangerous oxidative agents, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (DMNQ). It is interesting that despite this DNA protection, the addition of both volatiles to the drinking water of SD rats had no effect on incision repair capacity of hepatocyte extracts. In this paper we also showed that carvacrol and rosemary oil can trigger apoptotic cell death pathways in HepG2 cells, which is probably connected with their cytotoxicity. PMID:25341996

  4. Low concentrations of isothiocyanates protect mesenchymal stem cells from oxidative injuries, while high concentrations exacerbate DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Zanichelli, Fulvia; Capasso, Stefania; Di Bernardo, Giovanni; Cipollaro, Marilena; Pagnotta, Eleonora; Cartenì, Maria; Casale, Fiorina; Iori, Renato; Giordano, Antonio; Galderisi, Umberto

    2012-09-01

    Isothiocyanates (ITCs) are molecules naturally present in many cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, black radish, daikon radish, and cauliflowers). Several studies suggest that cruciferous vegetable consumption may reduce cancer risk and slow the aging process. To investigate the effect of ITCs on cellular DNA damage, we evaluated the effects of two different ITCs [sulforaphane (SFN) and raphasatin (RPS)] on the biology of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which, in addition to their ability to differentiate into mesenchymal tissues, contribute to the homeostatic maintenance of many organs. The choice of SFN and RPS relies on two considerations: they are among the most popular cruciferous vegetables in the diet of western and eastern countries, respectively, and their bioactive properties may differ since they possess specific molecular moiety. Our investigation evidenced that MSCs incubated with low doses of SFN and RPS show reduced in vitro oxidative stress. Moreover, these cells are protected from oxidative damages induced by hydrogen peroxide, while no protection was evident following treatment with the UV ray of a double strand DNA damaging drug, such as doxorubicin. High concentrations of both ITCs induced cytotoxic effects in MSC cultures and further increased DNA damage induced by peroxides. In summary, our study suggests that ITCs, at low doses, may contribute to slowing the aging process related to oxidative DNA damage. Moreover, in cancer treatment, low doses of ITCs may be used as an adjuvant to reduce chemotherapy-induced oxidative stress, while high doses may synergize with anticancer drugs to promote cell DNA damage. PMID:22684843

  5. Comparative proteomics analysis of global cellular stress responses to hydroxyurea-induced DNA damage in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    You, Chao; Yang, Yanhua; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Huiqing; Chen, Yan; Chen, Keping; Zhou, Yajing

    2016-08-01

    Both environmental agents and spontaneous cellular events cause serious DNA damage, threatening the integrity of the genome. In response to replication stress or genotoxic agents triggered DNA damage, degradation of p12 subunit of DNA polymerase delta (Pol δ) results in an inter-conversion between heterotetramer (Pol δ4) and heterotrimer (Pol δ3) forms and plays a significant role in DNA damage response in eukaryotic cells. In this work, we used mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach to identify those cellular stress response protein changes corresponding to the degradation of p12 in DNA-damaged HeLa cells by the treatment with hydroxyurea (HU). A total of 736 ± 13 proteins in non-treated control group and 741 ± 19 protein spots in HU-treated cells were detected, of which 34 proteins (17 up-regulated and 17 down-regulated) exhibited significantly altered protein expression levels. Their physiological roles are mainly associated with cellular components, molecular functions, and biological processes by gene ontology analysis, among which 21 proteins were mapped to KEGG pathways. They are involved in 5 primary pathways with the subsets involving 16 secondary pathways by further KEGG analysis. More interestingly, the up-regulation of translationally controlled tumor protein was further identified to be associated with p12 degradation by Western blot analysis. Our works may enlarge and broaden our view for deeply understanding how global cellular stress responds to DNA damage, which could contribute to the etiology of human cancer or other diseases that can result from loss of genomic stability. PMID:25519465

  6. Glucocorticoids Protect Against the Delayed Behavioral and Cellular Effects of Acute Stress on the Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Rajnish P.; Anilkumar, Shobha; McEwen, Bruce; Chattarji, Sumantra

    2013-01-01

    Background A single episode of acute immobilization stress has previously been shown to trigger a delayed onset of anxiety-like behavior and spinogenesis in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) of rats. Spurred on by a seemingly paradoxical observation in which even a modest increase in corticosterone (CORT), caused by a single vehicle injection before stress, could dampen the delayed effects of stress, we hypothesized a protective role for glucocorticoids against stress. Methods We tested this hypothesis by analyzing how manipulations in CORT levels modulate delayed increase in anxiety-like behavior of rats on the elevated plus-maze 10 days after acute stress. We also investigated the cellular correlates of different levels of anxiety under different CORT conditions by quantifying spine density on Golgi-stained BLA principal neurons. Results CORT in drinking water for 12 hours preceding acute stress prevented delayed increase in anxiety rather than exacerbating it. Conversely, vehicle injection failed to prevent the anxiogenic effect of stress in bilaterally adrenalectomized rats. However, when CORT was restored in adrenalectomized rats by injection, the delayed anxiogenic effect of stress was once again blocked. Finally, high and low anxiety states were accompanied by high and low levels of BLA spine density. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the presence of elevated levels of CORT at the time of acute stress confers protection against the delayed enhancing effect of stress on BLA synaptic connectivity and anxiety-like behavior. These observations are consistent with clinical reports on the protective effects of glucocorticoids against the development of posttraumatic symptoms triggered by traumatic stress. PMID:22572034

  7. Protective Effect of Folic Acid on Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaojuan; Cui, Huan; Zhang, Haiyang; Guan, Xiaoju; Zhang, Zheng; Jia, Chaonan; Wu, Jia; Yang, Hui; Qiu, Wenting; Zhang, Chuanwu; Yang, Zuopeng; Chen, Zhu; Mao, Guangyun

    2015-01-01

    < 0.001). Test of interaction between hypercholesterolemia and FA supplementation on urinary 8-OHdG reduction was significant (P = 0.001). The present study demonstrates that FA fortification is independently linked to the reduction of urinary 8-OHdG/Cr in a dose-related pattern, which suggests that FA is beneficial to protect against oxidative damage to DNA. This effect is apparently stronger in those with hypercholesterolemia. The authors provide a new insight into the prevention and reversal of oxidative DNA damage. PMID:26559255

  8. Inhibition of Influenza Virus Replication by DNA Aptamers Targeting a Cellular Component of Translation Initiation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Paloma; Pérez-Morgado, M Isabel; Gonzalez, Víctor M; Martín, M Elena; Nieto, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    The genetic diversity of the influenza virus hinders the use of broad spectrum antiviral drugs and favors the appearance of resistant strains. Single-stranded DNA aptamers represent an innovative approach with potential application as antiviral compounds. The mRNAs of influenza virus possess a 5'cap structure and a 3'poly(A) tail that makes them structurally indistinguishable from cellular mRNAs. However, selective translation of viral mRNAs occurs in infected cells through a discriminatory mechanism, whereby viral polymerase and NS1 interact with components of the translation initiation complex, such as the eIF4GI and PABP1 proteins. We have studied the potential of two specific aptamers that recognize PABP1 (ApPABP7 and ApPABP11) to act as anti-influenza drugs. Both aptamers reduce viral genome expression and the production of infective influenza virus particles. The interaction of viral polymerase with the eIF4GI translation initiation factor is hindered by transfection of infected cells with both PABP1 aptamers, and ApPABP11 also inhibits the association of NS1 with PABP1 and eIF4GI. These results indicate that aptamers targeting the host factors that interact with viral proteins may potentially have a broad therapeutic spectrum, reducing the appearance of escape mutants and resistant subtypes. PMID:27070300

  9. Punicalagin exerts protective effect against high glucose-induced cellular stress and neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jianxiang; Reece, E Albert; Yang, Peixin

    2015-11-13

    Maternal diabetes-induced birth defects remain a significant health problem. Studying the effect of natural compounds with antioxidant properties and minimal toxicities on diabetic embryopathy may lead to the development of new and safe dietary supplements. Punicalagin is a primary polyphenol found in pomegranate juice, which possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumorigenic properties, suggesting a protective effect of punicalagin on diabetic embryopathy. Here, we examined whether punicalagin could reduce high glucose-induced neural tube defects (NTDs), and if this rescue occurs through blockage of cellular stress and caspase activation. Embryonic day 8.5 (E8.5) mouse embryos were cultured for 24 or 36 h with normal (5 mM) glucose or high glucose (16.7 mM), in presence or absence of 10 or 20 μM punicalagin. 10 μM punicalagin slightly reduced NTD formation under high glucose conditions; however, 20 μM punicalagin significantly inhibited high glucose-induced NTD formation. Punicalagin suppressed high glucose-induced lipid peroxidation marker 4-hydroxynonenal, nitrotyrosine-modified proteins, and lipid peroxides. Moreover, punicalagin abrogated endoplasmic reticulum stress by inhibiting phosphorylated protein kinase ribonucleic acid (RNA)-like ER kinase (p-PERK), phosphorylated inositol-requiring protein-1α (p-IRE1α), phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (p-eIF2α), C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP), binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and x-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA splicing. Additionally, punicalagin suppressed high glucose-induced caspase 3 and caspase 8 cleavage. Punicalagin reduces high glucose-induced NTD formation by blocking cellular stress and caspase activation. These observations suggest punicalagin supplements could mitigate the teratogenic effects of hyperglycemia in the developing embryo, and possibly prevent diabetes-induced NTDs. PMID:26453010

  10. Protection of low density lipoprotein oxidation at chemical and cellular level by the antioxidant drug dipyridamole.

    PubMed Central

    Iuliano, L.; Colavita, A. R.; Camastra, C.; Bello, V.; Quintarelli, C.; Alessandroni, M.; Piovella, F.; Violi, F.

    1996-01-01

    1. The oxidative modification of low density lipoprotein (LDL) is thought to be an important factor in the initiation and development of atherosclerosis. Natural and synthetic antioxidants have been shown to protect LDL from oxidation and to inhibit atherosclerosis development in animals. Synthetic antioxidants are currently being tested, by they are not necessarily safe for human use. 2. We have previously reported that dipyridamole, currently used in clinical practice, is a potent scavenger of free radicals. Thus, we tested whether dipyridamole could affect LDL oxidation at chemical and cellular level. 3. Chemically induced LDL oxidation was made by Cu(II), Cu(II) plus hydrogen peroxide or peroxyl radicals generated by thermolysis of 2,2'-azo-bis(2-amidino propane). Dipyridamole, (1-10 microM), inhibited LDL oxidation as monitored by diene formation, evolution of hydroperoxides and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, apoprotein modification and by the fluorescence of cis-parinaric acid. 4. The physiological relevance of the antioxidant activity was validated by experiments at the cellular level where dipyridamole inhibited endothelial cell-mediated LDL oxidation, their degradation by monocytes, and cytotoxicity. 5. In comparison with ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol and probucol, dipyridamole was the more efficient antioxidant with the following order of activity: dipyridamole > probucol > ascorbic acid > alpha-tocopherol. The present study shows that dipyridamole inhibits oxidation of LDL at pharmacologically relevant concentrations. The inhibition of LDL oxidation is unequivocally confirmed by use of three different methods of chemical oxidation, by several methods of oxidation monitoring, and the pharmacological relevance is demonstrated by the superiority of dipyridamole over the naturally occurring antioxidants, ascorbic acid and alpha-tocopherol and the synthetic antioxidant probucol. Images Figure 6 PMID:8968553

  11. Potential Mechanisms for Cancer Resistance in Elephants and Comparative Cellular Response to DNA Damage in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Abegglen, Lisa M.; Caulin, Aleah F.; Chan, Ashley; Lee, Kristy; Robinson, Rosann; Campbell, Michael S.; Kiso, Wendy K.; Schmitt, Dennis L.; Waddell, Peter J; Bhaskara, Srividya; Jensen, Shane T.; Maley, Carlo C.; Schiffman, Joshua D.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Evolutionary medicine may provide insights into human physiology and pathophysiology, including tumor biology. OBJECTIVE To identify mechanisms for cancer resistance in elephants and compare cellular response to DNA damage among elephants, healthy human controls, and cancer-prone patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A comprehensive survey of necropsy data was performed across 36 mammalian species to validate cancer resistance in large and long-lived organisms, including elephants (n = 644). The African and Asian elephant genomes were analyzed for potential mechanisms of cancer resistance. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from elephants, healthy human controls, and patients with LFS were tested in vitro in the laboratory for DNA damage response. The study included African and Asian elephants (n = 8), patients with LFS (n = 10), and age-matched human controls (n = 11). Human samples were collected at the University of Utah between June 2014 and July 2015. EXPOSURES Ionizing radiation and doxorubicin. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Cancer mortality across species was calculated and compared by body size and life span. The elephant genome was investigated for alterations in cancer-related genes. DNA repair and apoptosis were compared in elephant vs human peripheral blood lymphocytes. RESULTS Across mammals, cancer mortality did not increase with body size and/or maximum life span (eg, for rock hyrax, 1% [95%CI, 0%–5%]; African wild dog, 8%[95%CI, 0%–16%]; lion, 2%[95%CI, 0% –7%]). Despite their large body size and long life span, elephants remain cancer resistant, with an estimated cancer mortality of 4.81% (95%CI, 3.14%–6.49%), compared with humans, who have 11% to 25%cancer mortality. While humans have 1 copy (2 alleles) of TP53, African elephants have at least 20 copies (40 alleles), including 19 retrogenes (38 alleles) with evidence of transcriptional activity measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain

  12. Effects of Spaceflight on Molecular and Cellular Responses to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damages in Confluent Human Fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    Spaceflights expose human beings to various risk factors. Among them are microgravity related physiological stresses in immune, cytoskeletal, and cardiovascular systems, and space radiation related elevation of cancer risk. Cosmic radiation consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles that induce DNA damages. Effective DNA damage response and repair mechanism is important to maintain genomic integrity and reduce cancer risk. There were studies on effects of spaceflight and microgravity on DNA damage response in cell and animal models, but the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate effects of spaceflight on molecular and cellular responses to DNA damages, bleomycin, an anti-cancer drug and radiomimetic reagent, was used to induce DNA damages in confluent human fibroblasts flown to the International Space Station (ISS) and on ground. After exposure to 1.0 µg/ml bleomycin for 3 hours, cells were fixed for immunofluorescence assays and for RNA preparation. Extents of DNA damages were quantified by foci and pattern counting of phosphorylated histone protein H2AX (?-H2AX). The cells on the ISS showed modestly increased average foci counts per nucleus while the distribution of patterns was similar to that on the ground. PCR array analysis showed that expressions of several genes, including CDKN1A and PCNA, were significantly changed in response to DNA damages induced by bleomycin in both flight and ground control cells. However, there were no significant differences in the overall expression profile of DNA damage response genes between the flight and ground samples. Analysis of cellular proliferation status with Ki-67 staining showed a slightly higher proliferating population in cells on the ISS than those on ground. Our results suggested that the difference in ?-H2AX focus counts between flight and ground was due to the higher percentage of proliferating cells in space, but spaceflight did not significantly affect

  13. Catalytic and non-catalytic roles of DNA polymerase κ in the protection of human cells against genotoxic stresses.

    PubMed

    Kanemaru, Yuki; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Niimi, Naoko; Grúz, Petr; Matsumoto, Kyomu; Adachi, Noritaka; Honma, Masamitsu; Nohmi, Takehiko

    2015-10-01

    DNA polymerase κ (Pol κ) is a specialized DNA polymerase involved in translesion DNA synthesis. Although its bypass activities across lesions are well characterized in biochemistry, its cellular protective roles against genotoxic insults are still elusive. To better understand the in vivo protective roles, we have established a human cell line deficient in the expression of Pol κ (KO) and another expressing catalytically dead Pol κ (CD), to examine the cytotoxic sensitivity to 11 genotoxins including ultraviolet C light (UV). These cell lines were established in a genetic background of Nalm-6-MSH+, a human lymphoblastic cell line that has high efficiency for gene targeting, and functional p53 and mismatch repair activities. We classified the genotoxins into four groups. Group 1 includes benzo[a]pyrene diolepoxide, mitomycin C, and bleomycin, where the sensitivity was equally higher in KO and CD than in the cell line expressing wild-type Pol κ (WT). Group 2 includes hydrogen peroxide and menadione, where hypersensitivity was observed only in KO. Group 3 includes methyl methanesulfonate and ethyl methanesulfonate, where hypersensitivity was observed only in CD. Group 4 includes UV and three chemicals, where the chemicals exhibited similar cytotoxicity to all three cell lines. The results suggest that Pol κ not only protects cells from genotoxic DNA lesions via DNA polymerase activities, but also contributes to genome integrity by acting as a non-catalytic protein against oxidative damage caused by hydrogen peroxide and menadione. The non-catalytic roles of Pol κ in protection against oxidative damage by hydrogen peroxide are discussed. PMID:26031400

  14. Dose-dependent inhibition of Gag cellular immunity by Env in SIV/HIV DNA vaccinated macaques

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Antonio; Li, Jinyao; Rosati, Margherita; Kulkarni, Viraj; Patel, Vainav; Jalah, Rashmi; Alicea, Candido; Reed, Steven; Sardesai, Niranjan; Berkower, Ira; Pavlakis, George N; Felber, Barbara K

    2015-01-01

    The induction of a balanced immune response targeting the major structural proteins, Gag and Env of HIV, is important for the development of an efficacious vaccine. The use of DNA plasmids expressing different antigens offers the opportunity to test in a controlled manner the influence of different vaccine components on the magnitude and distribution of the vaccine-induced cellular and humoral immune responses. Here, we show that increasing amounts of env DNA results in greatly enhanced Env antibody titers without significantly affecting the levels of anti-Env cellular immune responses. Co-immunization with Env protein further increased antibody levels, indicating that vaccination with DNA only is not sufficient for eliciting maximal humoral responses against Env. In contrast, under high env:gag DNA plasmid ratio, the development of Gag cellular responses was significantly reduced by either SIV or HIV Env, whereas Gag humoral responses were not affected. Our data indicate that a balanced ratio of the 2 key HIV/SIV vaccine components, Gag and Env, is important to avoid immunological interference and to achieve both maximal humoral responses against Env to prevent virus acquisition and maximal cytotoxic T cell responses against Gag to prevent virus spread. PMID:26125521

  15. Protective Immunity Elicited by a Divalent DNA Vaccine Encoding Both the L7/L12 and Omp16 Genes of Brucella abortus in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Deyan; Ni, Bing; Li, Peng; Shi, Wei; Zhang, Songle; Han, Yue; Mao, Liwei; He, Yangdong; Wu, Yuzhang; Wang, Xiliang

    2006-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the immunogenicity and the protective efficacy of a divalent fusion DNA vaccine encoding both the Brucella abortus L7/L12 protein (ribosomal protein) and Omp16 protein (outer membrane lipoprotein), designated pcDNA3.1-L7/L12-Omp16. Intramuscular injection of this divalent DNA vaccine into BALB/c mice elicited markedly both humoral and cellular immune responses. The specific antibodies exhibited a dominance of immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) over IgG1. In addition, the dual-gene DNA vaccine elicited a strong T-cell proliferative response and induced a large amount of gamma interferon-producing T cells upon restimulation in vitro with recombinant fusion protein L7/L12-Omp16, suggesting the induction of a typical T-helper-1-dominated immune response in vivo. This divalent DNA vaccine could also induce a significant level of protection against challenge with the virulent strain B. abortus 544 in BALB/c mice. Furthermore, the protection level induced by the divalent DNA vaccine was significantly higher than that induced by the univalent DNA vaccines pcDNA3.1-L7/L12 or pcDNA3.1-Omp16. Taken together, the results of this study verify for the first time that the Omp16 gene can be a candidate target for a DNA vaccine against brucellosis. Additionally, a divalent genetic vaccine based on the L7/L12 and Omp16 genes can elicit a stronger cellular immune response and better immunoprotection than the relevant univalent vaccines can. PMID:16622210

  16. Sirtuin 7 promotes cellular survival following genomic stress by attenuation of DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran, Shashi; Oddi, Vineesha; Ramakrishna, Gayatri

    2015-02-01

    Maintaining the genomic integrity is a constant challenge in proliferating cells. Amongst various proteins involved in this process, Sirtuins play a key role in DNA damage repair mechanisms in yeast as well as mammals. In the present work we report the role of one of the least explored Sirtuin viz., SIRT7, under conditions of genomic stress when treated with doxorubicin. Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized osteosarcoma (U2OS) cells to DNA damage induced cell death by doxorubicin. SIRT7 overexpression in NIH3T3 delayed cell cycle progression by causing delay in G1 to S transition. SIRT7 overexpressing cells when treated with low dose of doxorubicin (0.25 µM) showed delayed onset of senescence, lesser accumulation of DNA damage marker γH2AX and lowered levels of growth arrest markers viz., p53 and p21 when compared to doxorubicin treated control GFP expressing cells. Resistance to DNA damage following SIRT7 overexpression was also evident by EdU incorporation studies where cellular growth arrest was significantly delayed. When treated with higher dose of doxorubicin (>1 µM), SIRT7 conferred resistance to apoptosis by attenuating stress activated kinases (SAPK viz., p38 and JNK) and p53 response thereby shifting the cellular fate towards senescence. Interestingly, relocalization of SIRT7 from nucleolus to nucleoplasm together with its co-localization with SAPK was an important feature associated with DNA damage. SIRT7 mediated resistance to doxorubicin induced apoptosis and senescence was lost when p53 level was restored by nutlin treatment. Overall, we propose SIRT7 attenuates DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response thereby promoting cellular survival under conditions of genomic stress. - Highlights: • Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized cells to DNA damage induced apoptosis. • SIRT7 delayed onset of premature senescence by attenuating DNA damage response. • Overexpression of SIRT7 delayed cell cycle progression by delaying G1/S transition. • Upon DNA damage SIRT

  17. More than 10% of yeast genes are related to genome stability and influence cellular senescence via rDNA maintenance.

    PubMed

    Saka, Kimiko; Takahashi, Akihiro; Sasaki, Mariko; Kobayashi, Takehiko

    2016-05-19

    Genome instability triggers cellular senescence and is a common cause of cancer. The ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA), due to their repetitive structure, form a fragile site with frequent rearrangements. To identify eukaryotic factors that connect reduced genome stability to senescence we screened 4,876 strains of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion library for aberrant rDNA and found 708 genes that contribute to its upkeep. 28 mutants caused abnormalities in non-rDNA chromosomes and among them 12 mutants have abnormalities both in rDNA and in non-rDNA chromosomes. Many mutated genes have not previously been implicated with genome maintenance nor their homologues with tumorigenesis in mammals. The link between rDNA state and senescence was broken after deletion of factors related with DNA polymerase ϵ. These mutations also suppressed the short lifespan phenotype of a sir2 mutant, suggesting a model in which molecular events at the heart of the replication fork induce abnormal rDNA recombination and are responsible for the emergence of an aging signal. PMID:26912831

  18. Induction of a Protective Response in Mice by the Dengue Virus NS3 Protein Using DNA Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Simone M.; Yorio, Anna Paula; Gonçalves, Antônio J. S.; Vidale, Mariana M.; Costa, Emmerson C. B.; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo; Motta, Marcia A.; Freire, Marcos S.; Alves, Ada M. B.

    2011-01-01

    The dengue non-structural 3 (NS3) is a multifunctional protein, containing a serino-protease domain, located at the N-terminal portion, and helicase, NTPase and RTPase domains present in the C-terminal region. This protein is considered the main target for CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses during dengue infection, which may be involved in protection. However, few studies have been undertaken evaluating the use of this protein as a protective antigen against dengue, as well as other flavivirus. In the present work, we investigate the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines based on the NS3 protein from DENV2. Different recombinant plasmids were constructed, encoding either the full-length NS3 protein or only its functional domains (protease and helicase), fused or not to a signal peptide (t-PA). The recombinant proteins were successfully expressed in transfected BHK-21 cells, and only plasmids encoding the t-PA signal sequence mediated protein secretion. Balb/c mice were immunized with the different DNA vaccines and challenged with a lethal dose of DENV2. Most animals immunized with plasmids encoding the full-length NS3 or the helicase domain survived challenge, regardless of the presence of the t-PA. However, some mice presented clinical signs of infection with high morbidity (hind leg paralysis and hunched posture), mainly in animal groups immunized with the DNA vaccines based on the helicase domain. On the other hand, inoculation with plasmids encoding the protease domain did not induce any protection, since mortality and morbidity rates in these mouse groups were similar to those detected in the control animals. The cellular immune response was analyzed by ELISPOT with a specific-CD8+ T cell NS3 peptide. Results revealed that the DNA vaccines based on the full-length protein induced the production of INF-γ, thus suggesting the involvement of this branch of the immune system in the protection. PMID:22031819

  19. Vaccines displaying mycobacterial proteins on biopolyester beads stimulate cellular immunity and induce protection against tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Parlane, Natalie A; Grage, Katrin; Mifune, Jun; Basaraba, Randall J; Wedlock, D Neil; Rehm, Bernd H A; Buddle, Bryce M

    2012-01-01

    New improved vaccines are needed for control of both bovine and human tuberculosis. Tuberculosis protein vaccines have advantages with regard to safety and ease of manufacture, but efficacy against tuberculosis has been difficult to achieve. Protective cellular immune responses can be preferentially induced when antigens are displayed on small particles. In this study, Escherichia coli and Lactococcus lactis were engineered to produce spherical polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) inclusions which displayed a fusion protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, antigen 85A (Ag85A)-early secreted antigenic target 6-kDa protein (ESAT-6). L. lactis was chosen as a possible production host due its extensive use in the food industry and reduced risk of lipopolysaccharide contamination. Mice were vaccinated with PHB bead vaccines with or without displaying Ag85A-ESAT-6, recombinant Ag85A-ESAT-6, or M. bovis BCG. Separate groups of mice were used to measure immune responses and assess protection against an aerosol M. bovis challenge. Increased amounts of antigen-specific gamma interferon, interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha were produced from splenocytes postvaccination, but no or minimal IL-4, IL-5, or IL-10 was produced, indicating Th1- and Th17-biased T cell responses. Decreased lung bacterial counts and less extensive foci of inflammation were observed in lungs of mice receiving BCG or PHB bead vaccines displaying Ag85A-ESAT-6 produced in either E. coli or L. lactis compared to those observed in the lungs of phosphate-buffered saline-treated control mice. No differences between those receiving wild-type PHB beads and those receiving recombinant Ag85A-ESAT-6 were observed. This versatile particulate vaccine delivery system incorporates a relatively simple production process using safe bacteria, and the results show that it is an effective delivery system for a tuberculosis protein vaccine. PMID:22072720

  20. The bright side of plasmonic gold nanoparticles; activation of Nrf2, the cellular protective pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Alona; Soroka, Yoram; Frušić-Zlotkin, Marina; Lewis, Aaron; Kohen, Ron

    2016-06-01

    Plasmonic gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are widely investigated for cancer therapy, due to their ability to strongly absorb light and convert it to heat and thus selectively destroy tumor cells. In this study we shed light on a new aspect of AuNPs and their plasmonic excitation, wherein they can provide anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory protection by stimulating the cellular protective Nrf2 pathway. Our study was carried out on cells of the immune system, macrophages, and on skin cells, keratinocytes. A different response to AuNPs was noted in the two types of cells, explained by their distinct uptake profiles. In keratinocytes, the exposure to AuNPs, even at low concentrations, was sufficient to activate the Nrf2 pathway, without any irradiation, due to the presence of free AuNPs inside the cytosol. In contrast, in macrophages, the plasmonic excitation of the AuNPs by a low, non-lethal irradiation dose was required for their release from the constraining vesicles. The mechanism by which AuNPs activate the Nrf2 pathway was studied. Direct and indirect activation were suggested, based on the inherent ability of the AuNPs to react with thiol groups and to generate reactive oxygen species, in particular, under plasmonic excitation. The ability of AuNPs to directly activate the Nrf2 pathway renders them good candidates for treatment of disorders in which the up-regulation of Nrf2 is beneficial, specifically for topical treatment of inflammatory skin diseases.

  1. The bright side of plasmonic gold nanoparticles; activation of Nrf2, the cellular protective pathway.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Alona; Soroka, Yoram; Frušić-Zlotkin, Marina; Lewis, Aaron; Kohen, Ron

    2016-06-01

    Plasmonic gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are widely investigated for cancer therapy, due to their ability to strongly absorb light and convert it to heat and thus selectively destroy tumor cells. In this study we shed light on a new aspect of AuNPs and their plasmonic excitation, wherein they can provide anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory protection by stimulating the cellular protective Nrf2 pathway. Our study was carried out on cells of the immune system, macrophages, and on skin cells, keratinocytes. A different response to AuNPs was noted in the two types of cells, explained by their distinct uptake profiles. In keratinocytes, the exposure to AuNPs, even at low concentrations, was sufficient to activate the Nrf2 pathway, without any irradiation, due to the presence of free AuNPs inside the cytosol. In contrast, in macrophages, the plasmonic excitation of the AuNPs by a low, non-lethal irradiation dose was required for their release from the constraining vesicles. The mechanism by which AuNPs activate the Nrf2 pathway was studied. Direct and indirect activation were suggested, based on the inherent ability of the AuNPs to react with thiol groups and to generate reactive oxygen species, in particular, under plasmonic excitation. The ability of AuNPs to directly activate the Nrf2 pathway renders them good candidates for treatment of disorders in which the up-regulation of Nrf2 is beneficial, specifically for topical treatment of inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:27224746

  2. DC targeting DNA vaccines induce protective and therapeutic antitumor immunity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qun; Cao, Wei; Yang, Zhi-Gang; Zhao, Guang-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anti-CD11c antibodies target to the CD11c receptor that mediates antigen presentation to T cells by dendritic cells (DCs). To exploit these properties for immunization purposes, we obtained DC-targeting DNA vaccines by fusing tumor-associated antigen HER2/neu ectodomain to single chain antibody fragment (scFv) from N418 (scFvN418), a monoclonal antibody binding the mouse DC-restricted surface molecule CD11c, and explored its antitumoral efficacy and underlying mechanisms in mouse breast cancer models. Methods: Induction of humoral and cellular immune responses and antitumoral activity of the DNA vaccines were tested in transplantable HER2/neu-expressing murine tumor models and in transgenic BALB-neuT mice developing spontaneous Neu-driven mammary carcinomas. Results: Upon injection of the breast tumor cell line D2F2/E2 (stably expressing human wild-type HER2), scFvN418-HER2 immunized mice were protected against tumor growth. Even more important for clinical applications, we were able to substantially slow the growth of implanted D2F2/E2 cells by injection of scFvN418-HER2 conjugates into tumor bearing hosts. The existing tumors were eradicated by treatment with scFvN418-HER2 combined with low-dose cyclophosphamide (CTX), which can make a temporary regulatory T cells (Treg) depletion. What’s more, in combination with the low-dose CTX, vaccination with scFvN418-neu significantly retarded the development of spontaneous mammary carcinomas in transgenic BALB-neuT mice. Conclusion: Our results show that DNA vaccine which targeting of dendritic cells in situ by the means of antibody-antigen conjugates may be a novel way to induce long-lasting antitumor immunity. PMID:26770347

  3. Modulation of cellular immune response against hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 3 by cationic liposome encapsulated DNA immunization.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xuanmao; Wang, Richard Y-H; Feng, Zhiming; Alter, Harvey J; Shih, James Wai-Kuo

    2003-02-01

    A vaccine strategy directed to increase Th1 cellular immune responses, particularly to hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 3 (NS3), has considerable potential to overcome the infection with HCV. DNA vaccination can induce both humoral and cellular immune responses, but it became apparent that the cellular uptake of naked DNA injected into muscle was not very efficient, as much of the DNA is degraded by interstitial nucleases before it reaches the nucleus for transcription. In this paper, cationic liposomes composed of different cationic lipids, such as dimethyl-dioctadecylammonium bromide (DDAB), 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP), or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycerol-3-ethylphosphocholine (DOEPC), were used to improve DNA immunization in mice, and their efficiencies were compared. It was found that cationic liposome-mediated DNA immunization induced stronger HCV NS3-specific immune responses than immunization with naked DNA alone. Cationic liposomes composed of DDAB and equimolar of a neutral lipid, egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EPC), induced the strongest antigen-specific Th1 type immune responses among the cationic liposome investigated, whereas the liposomes composed of 2 cationic lipids, DDAB and DOEPC, induced an antigen-specific Th2 type immune response. All cationic liposomes used in this study triggered high-level, nonspecific IL-12 production in mice, a feature important for the development of maximum Th1 immune responses. In conclusion, the cationic liposome-mediated gene delivery is a viable HCV vaccine strategy that should be further tested in the chimpanzee model. PMID:12540796

  4. Protective activity of C-geranylflavonoid analogs from Paulownia tomentosa against DNA damage in 137Cs irradiated AHH-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyung-In; Jeong, Min Ho; Jo, Wol Soon

    2014-09-01

    Radiotherapy is an important form of treatment for a wide range of cancers, but it can damage DNA and cause adverse effects. We investigated if the diplacone analogs of P. tomentosa were radio-protective in a human lymphoblastoid cell line (AHH-1). Four geranylated flavonoids, diplacone, 3'-O-methyl-5'-hydroxydiplacone, 3'-O-methyl-5'-O-methyldiplacone and 3'-O-methyldiplacol, were tested for their antioxidant and radio-protective effects. Diplacone analogs effectively scavenged free radicals and inhibited radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in vitro. They significantly decreased levels of reactive oxygen species and cellular DNA damage in 2 Gy-irradiated AHH-1 cells. Glutathione levels and superoxide dismutase activity in irradiated AHH-1 cells increased significantly after treatment with these analogs. The enhanced biological anti-oxidant activity and radioprotective activity of diplacone analogs maintained the survival of irradiated AHH-1 cells in a clonogenic assay. These data suggest that diplacone analogs may protect healthy tissue surrounding tumor cells during radiotherapy to ensure better control of radiotherapy and allow higher doses of radiotherapy to be employed. PMID:25918796

  5. Partial Protection of PC12 Cells from Cellular Stress by Low-Dose Sodium Nitroprusside Pre-treatment.

    PubMed

    Varga, Judit; Bátor, Judit; Nádasdi, Gergő; Árvai, Zita; Schipp, Renáta; Szeberényi, József

    2016-10-01

    The PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cell line is an in vitro model system widely used for the investigation of intracellular signaling events contributing to neuronal differentiation and cell death. We found earlier that the nitric oxide donor compound sodium nitroprusside (SNP) induced apoptosis of PC12 cells if it was applied in high concentration (400 µM). Yoshioka et al. (J Pharmacol Sci 101:126-134, 2006) reported that cell death evoked by cytotoxic concentrations of SNP could be prevented by a 100 µM SNP pre-treatment in a murine macrophage cell line. The apoptosis caused by toxic-dose SNP treatment (400 µM) could be partially overcome in PC12 cells as well by the low-dose SNP pre-treatment. The partial inhibition of apoptosis was accompanied by reduced phosphorylation of certain proteins (such as stress-activated protein kinases, the p53, and the eIF2α proteins), decreased caspase activation, and less intense internucleosomal DNA fragmentation. The 100 µM SNP pre-treatment reduced the pro-apoptotic potential of certain other stress stimuli (serum withdrawal, cisplatin and tunicamycin treatments) as well, although the underlying biochemical changes were not entirely uniform. On the contrary, the 100 µM SNP pre-treatment was unable to prevent cell death caused by the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin. Further clarification of the above-mentioned processes may be important in understanding the mechanisms by which mild nitrosative stress protects cells against certain forms of cellular stress conditions. PMID:26626595

  6. Fluorescent cDNA microarray hybridization reveals complexity and heterogeneity of cellular genotoxic stress responses.

    PubMed

    Amundson, S A; Bittner, M; Chen, Y; Trent, J; Meltzer, P; Fornace, A J

    1999-06-17

    The fate of cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR) may depend greatly on changes in gene expression, so that an improved view of gene induction profiles is important for understanding mechanisms of checkpoint control, repair and cell death following such exposures. We have used a quantitative fluorescent cDNA microarray hybridization approach to identify genes regulated in response to 7-irradiation in the p53 wild-type ML-1 human myeloid cell line. Hybridization of the array to fluorescently-labeled RNA from treated and untreated cells was followed by computer analysis to derive relative changes in expression levels of the genes present in the array, which agreed well with actual quantitative changes in expression. Forty-eight sequences, 30 not previously identified as IR-responsive, were significantly regulated by IR. Induction by IR and other stresses of a subset of these genes, including the previously characterized CIP1/ WAF1, MDM2 and BAX genes, as well as nine genes not previously reported to be IR-responsive, was examined in a panel of 12 human cell lines. Responses varied widely in cell lines with different tissues of origin and different genetic backgrounds, highlighting the importance of cellular context to genotoxic stress responses. Two of the newly identified IR-responsive genes, FRA-1 and ATF3, showed a p53-associated component to their IR-induction, and this was confirmed both in isogenic human cell lines and in mouse thymus. The majority of the IR-responsive genes, however, showed no indication of p53-dependent regulation, representing a potentially important class of stress-responsive genes in leukemic cells. PMID:10380890

  7. Normal Cellular Prion Protein Protects against Manganese-induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptotic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Christopher J.; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Saetveit, Nathan J.; Houk, Robert. S.; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2012-01-01

    The normal prion protein is abundantly expressed in the CNS, but its biological function remains unclear. The prion protein has octapeptide repeat regions that bind to several divalent metals, suggesting that the prion proteins may alter the toxic effect of environmental neurotoxic metals. In the present study, we systematically examined whether prion protein modifies the neurotoxicity of manganese (Mn) by comparing the effect of Mn on mouse neural cells expressing prion protein (PrPC -cells) and prion-knockout (PrPKO -cells). Exposure to Mn (10 μM-1 mM) for 24 hr produced a dose-dependent cytotoxic response in both PrPC -cells and PrPKO -cells. Interestingly, PrPC -cells (EC50 117.6μM) were more resistant to Mn-induced cytotoxicity, as compared to PrPKO -cells (EC50 59.9μM), suggesting a protective role for PrPC against Mn neurotoxicity. Analysis of intracellular Mn levels showed less Mn accumulation in PrPC -cells as compared to PrPKO -cells. Furthermore, Mn-induced mitochondrial depolarization and ROS generation were significantly attenuated in PrPC -cells as compared to PrPKO -cells. Measurement of antioxidant status revealed similar basal levels of glutathione (GSH) in PrPC -cells and PrPKO -cells; however, Mn treatment caused greater depletion of GSH in PrPKO -cells. Mn-induced mitochondrial depolarization and ROS production were followed by time- and dose-dependent activation of the apoptotic cell death cascade involving caspase-9 and -3. Notably, DNA fragmentation induced by both Mn treatment and oxidative stress-inducer hydrogen peroxide (100μM) was significantly suppressed in PrPC -cells as compared to PrPKO -cells. Together, these results demonstrate that prion protein interferes with divalent metal Mn uptake and protects against Mn-induced oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death. PMID:17483122

  8. Specific humoral and cellular immunity induced by Trypanosoma cruzi DNA immunization in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Arce-Fonseca, Minerva; Ballinas-Verdugo, Martha A; Zenteno, Emma R Abreu; Suárez-Flores, Davinia; Carrillo-Sánchez, Silvia C; Alejandre-Aguilar, Ricardo; Rosales-Encina, José Luis; Reyes, Pedro A; Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease has a high incidence in Mexico and other Latin American countries. Because one of the most important known methods of prevention is vector control, which has been effective only in certain areas of South America, the development of a vaccine to protect people at risk has been proposed. In this study, we assessed the cellular and humoral immune response generated following immunization with pBCSP and pBCSSP4 plasmids containing the genes encoding a trans-sialidase protein (present in all three forms of T. cruzi) and an amastigote specific glycoprotein, respectively, in a canine model. Thirty-five beagle dogs were divided randomly into 5 groups (n=7) and were immunized twice intramuscularly with 500 μg of pBCSSP4, pBCSP, pBk-CMV (empty plasmid) or saline solution. Fifteen days after the last immunization the 4 groups were infected intraperitoneally with 500,000 metacyclic trypomastigotes. The fifth group was unimmunized/infected. The parasitaemia in the immunized/infected dogs was for a shorter period (14 vs. 29 days) and the parasite load was lower. The concentration of IgG1 (0.612±0.019 O.D.) and IgG2 (1.167±0.097 O.D.) subclasses was measured (absorbance) 15 days after the last immunization with both recombinant plasmids, the majority of which were IgG2. The treatment of parasites using the serum from dogs immunized with pBCSP and pBCSSP4 plasmids produced 54% (±11.8) and 68% (±21.4) complement-mediated lysis, respectively. At 12 h post immunization, an increase in cytokines was not observed; however, vaccination with pBCSSP4 significantly increased the levels of IFN-γ and IL-10 at 9 months post-infection. The recombinant plasmid immunization stimulated the spleen cell proliferation showing a positive stimulatory index above 2.0. In conclusion, immunization using both genes effectively induces a humoral and cellular immune response. PMID:23497041

  9. Specific humoral and cellular immunity induced by Trypanosoma cruzi DNA immunization in a canine model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease has a high incidence in Mexico and other Latin American countries. Because one of the most important known methods of prevention is vector control, which has been effective only in certain areas of South America, the development of a vaccine to protect people at risk has been proposed. In this study, we assessed the cellular and humoral immune response generated following immunization with pBCSP and pBCSSP4 plasmids containing the genes encoding a trans-sialidase protein (present in all three forms of T. cruzi) and an amastigote specific glycoprotein, respectively, in a canine model. Thirty-five beagle dogs were divided randomly into 5 groups (n = 7) and were immunized twice intramuscularly with 500 μg of pBCSSP4, pBCSP, pBk-CMV (empty plasmid) or saline solution. Fifteen days after the last immunization the 4 groups were infected intraperitoneally with 500 000 metacyclic trypomastigotes. The fifth group was unimmunized/infected. The parasitaemia in the immunized/infected dogs was for a shorter period (14 vs. 29 days) and the parasite load was lower. The concentration of IgG1 (0.612 ± 0.019 O.D.) and IgG2 (1.167 ± 0.097 O.D.) subclasses was measured (absorbance) 15 days after the last immunization with both recombinant plasmids, the majority of which were IgG2. The treatment of parasites using the serum from dogs immunized with pBCSP and pBCSSP4 plasmids produced 54% (± 11.8) and 68% (± 21.4) complement-mediated lysis, respectively. At 12 h post immunization, an increase in cytokines was not observed; however, vaccination with pBCSSP4 significantly increased the levels of IFN-γ and IL-10 at 9 months post-infection. The recombinant plasmid immunization stimulated the spleen cell proliferation showing a positive stimulatory index above 2.0. In conclusion, immunization using both genes effectively induces a humoral and cellular immune response. PMID:23497041

  10. Ternary complex consisting of DNA, polycation, and a natural polysaccharide of schizophyllan to induce cellular uptake by antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yoichi; Shimada, Naohiko; Kaneko, Kenji; Shinkai, Seiji; Sakurai, Kazuo

    2007-04-01

    A natural polysaccharide called schizophyllan (SPG) can form a complex with polynucleotides, and the complex has been shown to deliver biofunctional short DNAs such as antisense DNAs and CpG-DNAs. Although it is a novel and efficient method, there is a drawback: attachment of homo-polynucleotide tails [for example, poly(dA) or poly(C)] to the end of DNA is necessary to stabilize the complex, because DNA heterosequences cannot bind to SPG. The aim of this paper is to present an alternative method in which SPG/DNA complexes can be made without using the tails. The basic strategy is as follows: since SPG can form hydrophobic domains in aqueous solutions, hydrophobic objects should be encapsulated by this domain. DNA alone is highly hydrophilic; however, once DNA/polycation complexes are made, they should be included by the SPG hydrophobic domain. The aim of this paper is to prove the formation of the polycation/DNA/SPG ternary complex. Gel electrophoresis showed that presence of SPG influenced the migration pattern of polycation+DNA mixtures. With increasing the SPG ratio, the zeta potential (zeta) of the polycation+DNA+SPG mixture decreased drastically to reach almost zeta = 0 and the particle size distributions were altered due to the ternary complex formation. Confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that the polycation/DNA/SPG ternary complexes showed high uptake efficiency when the complexes were exposed to macrophage-like cells (J774.A1). IL-12 secretion was enhanced when CpG-DNA was added as the ternary complex. These features can be ascribed to the fact that J774.A1 has a SPG recognition site called Dectin-1 on the cellular surface and the ternary complex can be ingested by this pathway. PMID:17328571

  11. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of Semliki forest virus replicon-based DNA vaccines encoding goatpox virus structural proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Min; Jin Ningyi; Liu Qi; Huo Xiaowei; Li Yang; Hu Bo; Ma Haili; Zhu Zhanbo; Cong Yanzhao; Li Xiao; Jin Minglan; Zhu Guangze

    2009-08-15

    Goatpox, caused by goatpox virus (GTPV), is an acute feverish and contagious disease in goats often associated with high morbidity and high mortality. To resolve potential safety risks and vaccination side effects of existing live attenuated goatpox vaccine (AV41), two Semliki forest virus (SFV) replicon-based bicistronic expression DNA vaccines (pCSm-AAL and pCSm-BAA) which encode GTPV structural proteins corresponding to the Vaccinia virus proteins A27, L1, A33, and B5, respectively, were constructed. Then, theirs ability to induce humoral and cellular response in mice and goats, and protect goats against virulent virus challenge were evaluated. The results showed that, vaccination with pCSm-AAL and pCSm-BAA in combination could elicit strong humoral and cellular responses in mice and goats, provide partial protection against viral challenge in goats, and reduce disease symptoms. Additionally, priming vaccination with the above-mentioned DNA vaccines could significantly reduce the goats' side reactions from boosting vaccinations with current live vaccine (AV41), which include skin lesions at the inoculation site and fevers. Data obtained in this study could not only facilitate improvement of the current goatpox vaccination strategy, but also provide valuable guidance to suitable candidates for evaluation and development of orthopoxvirus vaccines.

  12. DNA vaccination with a gene encoding Toxoplasma gondii Rhoptry Protein 17 induces partial protective immunity against lethal challenge in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-Long; Wang, Yu-Jing; Pei, Yan-Jiang; Bai, Ji-Zhong; Yin, Li-Tian; Guo, Rui; Yin, Guo-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular apicomplexan parasite that affects humans and various vertebrate livestock and causes serious economic losses. To develop an effective vaccine against T. gondii infection, we constructed a DNA vaccine encoding the T. gondii rhoptry protein 17 (TgROP17) and evaluated its immune protective efficacy against acute T. gondii infection in mice. The DNA vaccine (p3×Flag-CMV-14-ROP17) was intramuscularly injected to BALB/c mice and the immune responses of the vaccinated mice were determined. Compared to control mice treated with empty vector or PBS, mice immunized with the ROP17 vaccine showed a relatively high level of specific anti-T. gondii antibodies, and a mixed IgG1/IgG2a response with predominance of IgG2a production. The immunized mice also displayed a specific lymphocyte proliferative response, a Th1-type cellular immune response with production of IFN-γ and interleukin-2, and increased number of CD8+ T cells. Immunization with the ROP17 DNA significantly prolonged the survival time (15.6 ± 5.4 days, P < 0.05) of mice after challenge infection with the virulent T. gondii RH strain (Type I), compared with the control groups which died within 8 days. Therefore, our data suggest that DNA vaccination with TgROP17 triggers significant humoral and cellular responses and induces effective protection in mice against acute T. gondii infection, indicating that TgROP17 is a promising vaccine candidate against acute toxoplasmosis. PMID:26842927

  13. The cellular Mre11 protein interferes with adenovirus E4 mutant DNA replication

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Shomita S.; Bridge, Eileen

    2007-09-01

    Adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) relocalizes and degrades the host DNA repair protein Mre11, and efficiently initiates viral DNA replication. Mre11 associates with Ad E4 mutant DNA replication centers and is important for concatenating viral genomes. We have investigated the role of Mre11 in the E4 mutant DNA replication defect. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Mre11 dramatically rescues E4 mutant DNA replication in cells that do or do not concatenate viral genomes, suggesting that Mre11 inhibits DNA replication independent of genome concatenation. The mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (Mdc1) protein is involved in recruiting and sustaining Mre11 at sites of DNA damage following ionizing radiation. We observe foci formation by Mdc1 in response to viral infection, indicating that this damage response protein is activated. However, knockdown of Mdc1 does not prevent Mre11 from localizing at viral DNA replication foci or rescue E4 mutant DNA replication. Our results are consistent with a model in which Mre11 interferes with DNA replication when it is localized at viral DNA replication foci.

  14. Extracellular reduction of uranium via Geobacter conductive pili as a protective cellular mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Cologgi, Dena L.; Lampa-Pastirk, Sanela; Speers, Allison M.; Kelly, Shelly D.; Reguera, Gemma

    2011-01-01

    The in situ stimulation of Fe(III) oxide reduction by Geobacter bacteria leads to the concomitant precipitation of hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater. Despite its promise for the bioremediation of uranium contaminants, the biological mechanism behind this reaction remains elusive. Because Fe(III) oxide reduction requires the expression of Geobacter's conductive pili, we evaluated their contribution to uranium reduction in Geobacter sulfurreducens grown under pili-inducing or noninducing conditions. A pilin-deficient mutant and a genetically complemented strain with reduced outer membrane c-cytochrome content were used as controls. Pili expression significantly enhanced the rate and extent of uranium immobilization per cell and prevented periplasmic mineralization. As a result, pili expression also preserved the vital respiratory activities of the cell envelope and the cell's viability. Uranium preferentially precipitated along the pili and, to a lesser extent, on outer membrane redox-active foci. In contrast, the pilus-defective strains had different degrees of periplasmic mineralization matching well with their outer membrane c-cytochrome content. X-ray absorption spectroscopy analyses demonstrated the extracellular reduction of U(VI) by the pili to mononuclear tetravalent uranium U(IV) complexed by carbon-containing ligands, consistent with a biological reduction. In contrast, the U(IV) in the pilin-deficient mutant cells also required an additional phosphorous ligand, in agreement with the predominantly periplasmic mineralization of uranium observed in this strain. These findings demonstrate a previously unrecognized role for Geobacter conductive pili in the extracellular reduction of uranium, and highlight its essential function as a catalytic and protective cellular mechanism that is of interest for the bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater. PMID:21896750

  15. Rabies DNA vaccines for protection and therapeutic treatment.

    PubMed

    Ertl, Hildegund C J

    2003-07-01

    DNA vaccines have shown efficacy in preclinical animal models in preventing or even treating a variety of diseases caused by infectious agents, malignancies or immunological disorders. One of the main perceived advantages of DNA vaccines for use in less developed countries is their low cost. Nevertheless, in general, immune responses elicited by DNA vaccines are less potent than those induced by traditional vaccines or second generation viral recombinant vaccines, and their efficacy in human Phase I trials has been disappointing. DNA vaccines have shown good efficacy in preventing rabies in some experimental animal models; their performance in postexposure treatment has been less impressive. Considering that rabies is nearly always fatal, efficacious vaccines are available and treatment in most cases is initiated after exposure, the development of current DNA vaccines to rabies for use in humans is, at the current time, not appropriate. PMID:12831368

  16. Label-free and real-time imaging of dehydration-induced DNA conformational changes in cellular nucleus using second harmonic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Shuangmu; Ni, Ming

    2014-12-01

    Dehydration-induced DNA conformational changes have been probed for the first time with the use of second harmonic microscopy. Unlike conventional approaches, second harmonic microscopy provides a label-free and real-time approach to detect DNA conformational changes. Upon dehydration, cellular DNA undergoes a transition from B- to A-form, whereas cellular nuclei change from invisible to visible under second harmonic microscopy. These results showed that DNA is a second order nonlinear optical material. We further confirmed this by characterizing the nonlinear optical properties of extracted DNA from human cells. Our findings open a new path for SHG imaging. DNA can change its conformations under many circumstances. For example: normal cells turning into cancerous cells and drug molecules binding with DNA. Therefore, the detection of DNA conformational changes with second harmonic microscopy will be a useful tool in cancer therapy and new drug discovery.

  17. A prime-boost immunization with Tc52 N-terminal domain DNA and the recombinant protein expressed in Pichia pastoris protects against Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Matos, Marina N; Sánchez Alberti, Andrés; Morales, Celina; Cazorla, Silvia I; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2016-06-14

    We have previously reported that the N-terminal domain of the antigen Tc52 (NTc52) is the section of the protein that confers the strongest protection against Trypanosoma cruzi infection. To improve vaccine efficacy, we conducted here a prime-boost strategy (NTc52PB) by inoculating two doses of pcDNA3.1 encoding the NTc52 DNA carried by attenuated Salmonella (SNTc52), followed by two doses of recombinant NTc52 expressed in Picchia pastoris plus ODN-CpG as adjuvant. This strategy was comparatively analyzed with the following protocols: (1) two doses of NTc52+ODN-CpG by intranasal route followed by two doses of NTc52+ODN-CpG by intradermal route (NTc52CpG); (2) four doses of SNTc52; and (3) a control group with four doses of Salmonella carrying the empty plasmid. All immunized groups developed a predominant Th1 cellular immune response but with important differences in antibody development and protection against infection. Thus, immunization with just SNTc52 induces a strong specific cellular response, a specific systemic antibody response that is weak yet functional (considering lysis of trypomastigotes and inhibition of cell invasion), and IgA mucosal immunity, protecting in both the acute and chronic stages of infection. The group that received only recombinant protein (NTc52CpG) developed a strong antibody immune response but weaker cellular immunity than the other groups, and the protection against infection was clear in the acute phase of infection but not in chronicity. The prime-boost strategy, which combines DNA and protein vaccine and both mucosal and systemic immunizations routes, was the best assayed protocol, inducing strong cellular and humoral responses as well as specific mucosal IgA, thus conferring better protection in the acute and chronic stages of infection. PMID:27177947

  18. Evaluation of Biological and Physical Protection against Nuclease Degradation of Clay-Bound Plasmid DNA

    PubMed Central

    Demanèche, Sandrine; Jocteur-Monrozier, Lucile; Quiquampoix, Hervé; Simonet, Pascal

    2001-01-01

    In order to determine the mechanisms involved in the persistence of extracellular DNA in soils and to monitor whether bacterial transformation could occur in such an environment, we developed artificial models composed of plasmid DNA adsorbed on clay particles. We determined that clay-bound DNA submitted to an increasing range of nuclease concentrations was physically protected. The protection mechanism was mainly related to the adsorption of the nuclease on the clay mineral. The biological potential of the resulting DNA was monitored by transforming the naturally competent proteobacterium Acinetobacter sp. strain BD413, allowing us to demonstrate that adsorbed DNA was only partially available for transformation. This part of the clay-bound DNA which was available for bacteria, was also accessible to nucleases, while the remaining fraction escaped both transformation and degradation. Finally, transformation efficiency was related to the perpetuation mechanism, with homologous recombination being less sensitive to nucleases than autonomous replication, which requires intact molecules. PMID:11133458

  19. Damage to cellular DNA from particulate radiations, the efficacy of its processing and the radiosensitivity of mammalian cells. Emphasis on DNA double strand breaks and chromatin breaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lett, J. T.

    1992-01-01

    For several years, it has been evident that cellular radiation biology is in a necessary period of consolidation and transition (Lett 1987, 1990; Lett et al. 1986, 1987). Both changes are moving apace, and have been stimulated by studies with heavy charged particles. From the standpoint of radiation chemistry, there is now a consensus of opinion that the DNA hydration shell must be distinguished from bulk water in the cell nucleus and treated as an integral part of DNA (chromatin) (Lett 1987). Concomitantly, sentiment is strengthening for the abandonment of the classical notions of "direct" and "indirect" action (Fielden and O'Neill 1991; O'Neill 1991; O'Neill et al. 1991; Schulte-Frohlinde and Bothe 1991 and references therein). A layer of water molecules outside, or in the outer edge of, the DNA (chromatin) hydration shell influences cellular radiosensitivity in ways not fully understood. Charge and energy transfer processes facilitated by, or involving, DNA hydration must be considered in rigorous theories of radiation action on cells. The induction and processing of double stand breaks (DSBs) in DNA (chromatin) seem to be the predominant determinants of the radiotoxicity of normally radioresistant mammalian cells, the survival curves of which reflect the patterns of damage induced and the damage present after processing ceases, and can be modelled in formal terms by the use of reaction (enzyme) kinetics. Incongruities such as sublethal damage are neither scientifically sound nor relevant to cellular radiation biology (Calkins 1991; Lett 1990; Lett et al. 1987a). Increases in linear energy transfer (LET infinity) up to 100-200 keV micron-1 cause increases in the extents of neighboring chemical and physical damage in DNA denoted by the general term DSB. Those changes are accompanied by decreasing abilities of cells normally radioresistant to sparsely ionizing radiations to process DSBs in DNA and chromatin and to recover from radiation exposure, so they make

  20. Epitope analysis and protection by a ROP19 DNA vaccine against Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jian; Wang, Lin; Lu, Gang; Zhou, Aihua; Zhu, Meiyan; Li, Qihang; Wang, Zhilin; Arken, Miradel; Wang, Ao; He, Shenyi

    2016-01-01

    We used bioinformatics approaches to identify B-cell and T-cell epitopes on the ROP19 protein of Toxoplasma gondii. Then, we constructed plasmids with ROP19 (pEGFP-C1-ROP19) and injected them into BALB/c mice to test the immunoprotection induced by this vaccine candidate. The results showed that immunization with pEGFP-C1-ROP19 induced effective cellular and humoral immune responses in mice; specifically, high serum levels of T. gondii-specific IgG and increased interferon-gamma production by splenocytes. Furthermore, the mice vaccinated with pROP19 had significantly fewer brain cysts (583 ± 160) than the mice injected with phosphate-buffered saline (1350 ± 243) or with the control plasmid, pEGFP-C1 (1300 ± 167). Compared with PBS-treated mice, those immunized with pROP19 had only 43% of the number of brain cysts. These results suggest that the DNA vaccine encoding ROP19 induced a significant immune response and provided protection against a challenge with T. gondii strain PRU cysts. PMID:27055564

  1. Synergistic and additive effects of cimetidine and levamisole on cellular immune responses to hepatitis B virus DNA vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Niu, X; Yang, Y; Wang, J

    2013-02-01

    We and others have previously shown that both cimetidine (CIM) and levamisole (LMS) enhance humoral and cellular responses to DNA vaccines via different mechanisms. In this study, we investigated the synergistic and additive effects of CIM and LMS on the potency of antigen-specific immunities generated by a DNA vaccine encoding the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg, pVax-S2). Compared with CIM or LMS alone, the combination of CIM and LMS elicited a robust HBsAg-specific cellular response that was characterized by higher IgG2a, but did not further increase HBsAg-specific antibody IgG and IgG1 production. Consistent with these results, the combination of CIM and LMS produced the highest level of IL-2 and IFN-γ in antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells, whereas the combination of CIM and LMS did not further increase IL-4 production. Significantly, a robust HBsAg-specific cytotoxic response was also observed in the animals immunized with pVax-S2 in the presence of the combination of CIM and LMS. Further mechanistic studies demonstrated that the combination of CIM and LMS promoted dendritic cell (DC) activation and blocked anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and TGF-β production in CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells. These findings suggest that CIM and LMS have the synergistic and additive ability to enhance cellular response to hepatitis B virus DNA vaccine, which may be mediated by DC activation and inhibition of anti-inflammatory cytokine expression. Thus, the combination of cimetidine and levamisole may be useful as an effective adjuvant in DNA vaccinations for chronic hepatitis B virus infection. PMID:23298196

  2. Novel synthetic plasmid and Doggybone™ DNA vaccines induce neutralizing antibodies and provide protection from lethal influenza challenge in mice

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Veronica L; Patel, Ami; Villarreal, Daniel O; Hensley, Scott E; Ragwan, Edwin; Yan, Jian; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Rothwell, Paul J; Extance, Jonathan P; Caproni, Lisa J; Weiner, David B

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based vaccines (NAVs) are a promising alternative to conventional influenza vaccines with the potential to increase influenza vaccine availability due to their simplicity in design and rapid speed of production. NAVs can also target multiple influenza antigens and control flu variants. Traditionally NAVs have been DNA plasmids however, we are continuing to explore new methods that may enhance vaccine efficacy. Recently new focus has been on RNA cassettes as NAVs. RNA vaccines combine conceptual advantages in that they focus on delivery of only the coding cassette. However, RNA vaccines have a short half-life and cause interferon-induced fevers. Here we describe a new NAV approach where we study delivery of a linear DNA cassette [Doggybone™ linear closed DNA [(dbDNA™)] produced by an enzymatic process that yields an antigen expression cassette comprising a promoter, DNA antigen, poly A tail, and telomeric ends. This focused approach has many of the advantages of plasmid DNA as well as a minimal cassette size similar to RNA strategies. For this study, we characterized the specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses and determined the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers induced by dbDNA™ and compared the responses with those of an optimized plasmid DNA (pDNA) vaccine encoding the same H1N1 influenza A/PR/8/34 HA gene. Immunizations with the constructs resulted in similar humoral and cellular immune responses. Both constructs induced high-titer HI antibodies and fully protected animals from lethal viral challenge. The data obtained from this study provides important validation for further development of novel vector approaches. PMID:26091432

  3. Gene Expression Profile Changes and Cellular Responses to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damage in Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Kidane, Yared; Feiveson, Alan; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms are constantly exposed to space radiation that consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles. In addition, DNA in space can be damaged by toxic chemicals or reactive oxygen species generated due to increased levels of environmental and psychological stresses. Understanding the impact of spaceflight factors, microgravity in particular, on cellular responses to DNA damage affects the accuracy of the radiation risk assessment for astronauts and the mutation rate in microorganisms. Although possible synergistic effects of space radiation and microgravity have been investigated since the early days of the human space program, the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate the effects of spaceflight on cellular responses to DNA damage, confluent human fibroblast cells (AG1522) flown on the International Space Station (ISS) were treated with bleomycin for three hours in the true microgravity environment, which induced DNA damages including double-strand breaks (DSB). Damages in the DNA were quantified by immunofluorescence staining for ?-H2AX, which showed similar percentages of different types of stained cells between flight and ground. However, there was a slight shift in the distribution of the ?-H2AX foci number in the flown cells with countable foci. Comparison of the cells in confluent and in exponential growth conditions indicated that the proliferation rate between flight and the ground may be responsible for such a shift. A microarray analysis of gene expressions in response to bleomycin treatment was also performed. Comparison of the responsive pathways between the flown and ground cells showed similar responses with the p53 network being the top upstream regulator. Similar responses at the RNA level between different gravity conditions were also observed with a PCR array analysis containing a set of genes involved in DNA damage signaling; with BBC3, CDKN1A, PCNA and PPM1D being significantly

  4. Effects of Spaceflight on Molecular and Cellular Responses to Bleomycin-induced DNA Damages in Confluent Human Fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao; Wu, Honglu; Karouia, Fathi; Stodieck, Louis; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Spaceflights expose human beings to various risk factors. Among them are microgravity related physiological stresses in immune, cytoskeletal, and cardiovascular systems, and space radiation related elevation of cancer risk. Cosmic radiation consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles that induce DNA damages. Effective DNA damage response and repair mechanism is important to maintain genomic integrity and reduce cancer risk. There were studies on effects of spaceflight and microgravity on DNA damage response in cell and animal models, but the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate effects of spaceflight on molecular and cellular responses to DNA damages, bleomycin, an anti-cancer drug and radiomimetic reagent, was used to induce DNA damages in confluent human fibroblasts flown to the International Space Station (ISS) and on ground. After exposure to 1.0 mg/ml bleomycin for 3 hours, cells were fixed for immunofluorescence assays and for RNA preparation. Extents of DNA damages were quantified by focus pattern and focus number counting of phosphorylated histone protein H2AX (γg-H2AX). The cells on the ISS showed modestly increased average focus counts per nucleus while the distribution of patterns was similar to that on the ground. PCR array analysis showed that expressions of several genes, including CDKN1A and PCNA, were significantly changed in response to DNA damages induced by bleomycin in both flight and ground control cells. However, there were no significant differences in the overall expression profiles of DNA damage response genes between the flight and ground samples. Analysis of cellular proliferation status with Ki-67 staining showed a slightly higher proliferating population in cells on the ISS than those on ground. Our results suggested that the difference in γg-H2AX focus counts between flight and ground was due to the higher percentage of proliferating cells in space, but spaceflight did not

  5. Deoxyribonucleoprotein structure and radiation injury: cellular radiosensitivity is determined by LET infinity -dependent DNA damage in hydrated deoxyribonucleoproteins and the extent of its repair.

    PubMed

    Lett, J T; Peters, E L

    1992-01-01

    For decades, theories of cellular radiosensitivity relied upon the initial patterns of energy deposition to explain radiation lethality. Such theories are unsound: cellular (DNA) repair also underlies cellular radiosensitivity. For the charged particles encountered in deep space, both the types of DNA damage caused in cellular deoxyribonucleoproteins and the efficacies of their repair are dependent on linear energy transfer (LET infinity), and repair efficiency is also influenced by cell and tissue type, i.e., the actual recovery processes involved. Therefore, quality factors derived from radiation quality alone are inadequate parameters for assessing the radiation risks of space flight. Until recently, OH radicals formed in bulk nuclear water were believed to be the major causes of DNA damage that results in cell death, especially for sparsely ionizing radiations. That hypothesis has now been challenged, if not refuted. Lethal genomic DNA damage is determined mainly by energy deposition in deoxyribonucleoproteins, and their hydration shells, and charge (energy) transfer processes within those structures. PMID:11537046

  6. Functional cellular analyses reveal energy metabolism defect and mitochondrial DNA depletion in a case of mitochondrial aconitase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sadat, Roa; Barca, Emanuele; Masand, Ruchi; Donti, Taraka R; Naini, Ali; De Vivo, Darryl C; DiMauro, Salvatore; Hanchard, Neil A; Graham, Brett H

    2016-05-01

    Defects in the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) are associated with a spectrum of neurological phenotypes that are often difficult to diagnose and manage. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) led to a rapid expansion of diagnostic capabilities in such disorders and facilitated a better understanding of disease pathogenesis, although functional characterization remains a bottleneck to the interpretation of potential pathological variants. We report a 2-year-old boy of Afro-Caribbean ancestry, who presented with neuromuscular symptoms without significant abnormalities on routine diagnostic evaluation. WES revealed compound heterozygous missense variants of uncertain significance in mitochondrial aconitase (ACO2), which encodes the TCA enzyme ACO2. Pathogenic variants in ACO2 have been described in a handful of families as the cause of infantile cerebellar-retinal degeneration syndrome. Using biochemical and cellular assays in patient fibroblasts, we found that ACO2 expression was quantitatively normal, but ACO2 enzyme activity was <20% of that observed in control cells. We also observed a deficiency in cellular respiration and, for the first time, demonstrate evidence of mitochondrial DNA depletion and altered expression of some TCA components and electron transport chain subunits. The observed cellular defects were completely restored with ACO2 gene rescue. Our findings demonstrate the pathogenicity of two VUS in ACO2, provide novel mechanistic insights to TCA disturbances in ACO2 deficiency, and implicate mitochondrial DNA depletion in the pathogenesis of this recently described disorder. PMID:26992325

  7. A Combination DNA and Attenuated Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccine Strategy Provides Enhanced Protection from Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Induced Disease†

    PubMed Central

    Amara, Rama Rao; Patel, Kalpana; Niedziela, Genevieve; Nigam, Pragati; Sharma, Sunita; Staprans, Silvija I.; Montefiori, David C.; Chenareddi, Lakshmi; Herndon, James G.; Robinson, Harriet L.; McClure, Harold M.; Novembre, Francis J.

    2005-01-01

    Among the most effective vaccine candidates tested in the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/macaque system, live attenuated viruses have been shown to provide the best protection from challenge. To investigate if preimmunization would increase the level of protection afforded by live attenuated SIVmac239Δnef (Δnef), macaques were given two priming immunizations of DNA encoding SIV Gag and Pol proteins, with control macaques receiving vector DNA immunizations. In macaques receiving the SIV DNA inoculation, SIV-specific cellular but not humoral responses were readily detectable 2 weeks after the second DNA inoculation. Following boosting with live attenuated virus, control of Δnef replication was superior in SIV-DNA-primed macaques versus vector-DNA-primed macaques and was correlated with higher levels of CD8+/gamma-interferon-positive and/or interleukin-2-positive cells. Challenge with an intravenous inoculation of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) strain SHIV89.6p resulted in infection of all animals. However, macaques receiving SIV DNA as the priming immunizations had statistically lower viral loads than control animals and did not develop signs of disease, whereas three of seven macaques receiving vector DNA showed severe CD4+ T-cell decline, with development of AIDS in one of these animals. No correlation of immune responses to protection from disease could be derived from our analyses. These results demonstrate that addition of a DNA prime to a live attenuated virus provided better protection from disease following challenge than live attenuated virus alone. PMID:16306607

  8. Sequence-specific interactions between a cellular DNA-binding protein and the simian virus 40 origin of DNA replication

    SciTech Connect

    Traut, W.; Fanning, E.

    1988-02-01

    The core origin of simian virus 40 (SV40) DNA replication is composed of a 64-base-pair sequence encompassing T-antigen-binding site II and adjacent sequences on either side. A 7-base-pair sequence to the early side of T-antigen-binding site II which is conserved among the papovavirus genomes SV40, BK, JC and SA12 was recently shown to be part of a 10-base-pair sequence required for origin activity, but its functional role was not defined. In the present report, the authors used gel retention assays to identify a monkey cell factor that interacts specifically with double-stranded DNA carrying this sequence and also binds to single-stranded DNA. DNA-protein complexes formed with extracts from primate cells are more abundant and display electrophoretic mobilities distinct from those formed with rodent cell extracts. The binding activity of the factor on mutant templates is correlate with the replication activity of the origin. The results suggest that the monkey cell factor may be involved in SV40 DNA replication.

  9. Enhanced Immune Response to DNA Vaccine Encoding Bacillus anthracis PA-D4 Protects Mice against Anthrax Spore Challenge.

    PubMed

    Kim, Na Young; Chang, Dong Suk; Kim, Yeonsu; Kim, Chang Hwan; Hur, Gyeung Haeng; Yang, Jai Myung; Shin, Sungho

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax has long been considered the most probable bioweapon-induced disease. The protective antigen (PA) of Bacillus anthracis plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of anthrax. In the current study, we evaluated the efficiency of a genetic vaccination with the fourth domain (D4) of PA, which is responsible for initial binding of the anthrax toxin to the cellular receptor. The eukaryotic expression vector was designed with the immunoglobulin M (IgM) signal sequence encoding for PA-D4, which contains codon-optimized genes. The expression and secretion of recombinant protein was confirmed in vitro in 293T cells transfected with plasmid and detected by western blotting, confocal microscopy, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results revealed that PA-D4 protein can be efficiently expressed and secreted at high levels into the culture medium. When plasmid DNA was given intramuscularly to mice, a significant PA-D4-specific antibody response was induced. Importantly, high titers of antibodies were maintained for nearly 1 year. Furthermore, incorporation of the SV40 enhancer in the plasmid DNA resulted in approximately a 15-fold increase in serum antibody levels in comparison with the plasmid without enhancer. The antibodies produced were predominantly the immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) type, indicating the predominance of the Th1 response. In addition, splenocytes collected from immunized mice produced PA-D4-specific interferon gamma (IFN-γ). The biodistribution study showed that plasmid DNA was detected in most organs and it rapidly cleared from the injection site. Finally, DNA vaccination with electroporation induced a significant increase in immunogenicity and successfully protected the mice against anthrax spore challenge. Our approach to enhancing the immune response contributes to the development of DNA vaccines against anthrax and other biothreats. PMID:26430894

  10. Enhanced Immune Response to DNA Vaccine Encoding Bacillus anthracis PA-D4 Protects Mice against Anthrax Spore Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Na Young; Chang, Dong Suk; Kim, Yeonsu; Kim, Chang Hwan; Hur, Gyeung Haeng; Yang, Jai Myung; Shin, Sungho

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax has long been considered the most probable bioweapon-induced disease. The protective antigen (PA) of Bacillus anthracis plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of anthrax. In the current study, we evaluated the efficiency of a genetic vaccination with the fourth domain (D4) of PA, which is responsible for initial binding of the anthrax toxin to the cellular receptor. The eukaryotic expression vector was designed with the immunoglobulin M (IgM) signal sequence encoding for PA-D4, which contains codon-optimized genes. The expression and secretion of recombinant protein was confirmed in vitro in 293T cells transfected with plasmid and detected by western blotting, confocal microscopy, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results revealed that PA-D4 protein can be efficiently expressed and secreted at high levels into the culture medium. When plasmid DNA was given intramuscularly to mice, a significant PA-D4-specific antibody response was induced. Importantly, high titers of antibodies were maintained for nearly 1 year. Furthermore, incorporation of the SV40 enhancer in the plasmid DNA resulted in approximately a 15-fold increase in serum antibody levels in comparison with the plasmid without enhancer. The antibodies produced were predominantly the immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) type, indicating the predominance of the Th1 response. In addition, splenocytes collected from immunized mice produced PA-D4-specific interferon gamma (IFN-γ). The biodistribution study showed that plasmid DNA was detected in most organs and it rapidly cleared from the injection site. Finally, DNA vaccination with electroporation induced a significant increase in immunogenicity and successfully protected the mice against anthrax spore challenge. Our approach to enhancing the immune response contributes to the development of DNA vaccines against anthrax and other biothreats. PMID:26430894

  11. Rat cellular retinol-binding protein: cDNA sequence and rapid retinol-dependent accumulation of mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, D R; Lloyd, R S; Chytil, F

    1987-01-01

    Cellular retinol-binding protein (CRBP) may be an important mediator of vitamin A action. We report here the identification of a cDNA clone corresponding to the rat CRBP gene. The cDNA is 695 nucleotides long, with an open reading frame corresponding to a protein of 134 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence is identical with that of rat CRBP. The nucleotide sequence shows 90.5% similarity with the human CRBP cDNA sequence. Genomic DNA analysis indicates that CRBP is present in one, or at most two, copies within the rat genome. Analysis of mRNA reveals a single species in every tissue tested and suggests that the isolated cDNA is full-length. Finally, when retinol-deficient rats are fed retinyl acetate for 4 hr, about 4-fold accumulation of CRBP-specific mRNA is observed in the lungs. This rapid effect suggests that the micronutrient retinol may directly influence the expression of its specific intracellular binding protein. Images PMID:3472205

  12. Intradermal Gene Immunization: The Possible Role of DNA Uptake in the Induction of Cellular Immunity to Viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raz, Eyal; Carson, Dennis A.; Parker, Suezanne E.; Parr, Tyler B.; Abai, Anna M.; Aichinger, Gerald; Gromkowski, Stanislaw H.; Singh, Malini; Lew, Denise; Yankauckas, Michelle A.; Baird, Stephen M.; Rhodes, Gary H.

    1994-09-01

    The skin and mucous membranes are the anatomical sites where most viruses are first encountered by the immune system. Previous experiments have suggested that striated muscle cells are unique among mammalian cell types in their capacity to take up and express free DNA in the absence of a viral vector or physical carrier. However, we have found that mice injected into the superficial skin with free (naked) plasmid DNA encoding the influenza nucleoprotein gene had discrete foci of epidermal and dermal cells, including cells with dendritic morphology, that contained immunoreactive nucleoprotein antigen. A single intradermal administration of 0.3-15 μ g of free plasmid DNA induced anti-nucleoprotein-specific antibody and cytotoxic T lymphocytes that persisted for at least 68-70 weeks after vaccination. Intradermal gene administration induced higher antibody titers than did direct gene injection into skeletal muscle and did not cause local inflammation or necrosis. Compared with control animals, the gene-injected mice were resistant to challenge with a heterologous strain of influenza virus. These results indicate that the cells of the skin can take up and express free foreign DNA and induce cellular and humoral immune responses against the encoded protein. We suggest that DNA uptake by the skin-associated lymphoid tissues may play a role in the induction of cytotoxic T cells against viruses and other intracellular pathogens.

  13. Methods to assess the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of the HPV E1 helicase and its effects on cellular proliferation and induction of a DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Lehoux, Michaël; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Archambault, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Replication of the human papillomavirus (HPV) double-stranded DNA genome in the nucleus of infected cells relies on the viral proteins E1 and E2 in conjunction with the host DNA replication machinery. This process is tightly linked to the replication of cellular DNA, in part through the cyclin-dependent phosphorylation of E1, which inhibits its export out of the nucleus to promote its accumulation in this compartment during S-phase. It has been recently shown that accumulation of E1 in the nucleus, while a prerequisite for viral DNA replication, leads to the inhibition of cellular proliferation and the activation of a DNA damage response (DDR). Here we describe methods to monitor the subcellular localization of E1 and to assess the deleterious effects of its nuclear accumulation on cellular proliferation, cell cycle progression and the induction of a DDR, using a combination of colony formation assays, immunofluorescence microcopy, and flow cytometry approaches. PMID:25348298

  14. Possible prebiotic significance of polyamines in the condensation, protection, encapsulation, and biological properties of DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baeza, I.; Ibanez, M.; Wong, C.; Chavez, P.; Gariglio, P.; Oro, J.

    1991-01-01

    Some properties of DNA condensed with spermidine have been compared with the properties of DNA condensed with Co3+(NH3)6 to determine whether condensation of DNA with these trivalent cations protects DNA against the action of DNase I and increases transcription and encapsulation of DNA into liposomes. It was shown that DNA condensed with Co3+(NH3)6 was resistant to the action of the endonuclease DNase I such as DNA condensed with spermidine was. However, DNA condensed with Co3+(NH3)6 was significantly less active in transcription with the E. coli RNA polymerase than DNA-spermidine condensed forms. In addition, it was demonstrated that both compacted forms of DNA were more efficiently encapsulated into neutral liposomes; however, negatively, charged liposomes were scarcely formed in the presence of DNA condensed with Co3+(NH3)6. These experiments and the well documented properties of polyamines increasing the resistance to radiations and hydrolysis of nucleic acids, as well as their biological activities, such as replication, transcription, and translation, together with the low concentration of Co3+ in the environment, lead us to propose spermidine as a plausible prebiotic DNA condensing agent rather than Co3+ and the basic proteins proposed by other authors. Then, we consider the possible role and relevance of the polyamine-nucleic acids complexes in the evolution of life.

  15. Immunization with non-replicating E. coli minicells delivering both protein antigen and DNA protects mice from lethal challenge with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus

    PubMed Central

    Giacalone, Matthew J.; Zapata, Juan C.; Berkley, Neil L.; Sabbadini, Roger A.; Chu, Yen-Lin; Salvato, Maria S.; McGuire, Kathleen L.

    2008-01-01

    In the midst of new investigations into the mechanisms of both delivery and protection of new vaccines and vaccine carriers, it has become clear that immunization with delivery mechanisms that do not involve living, replicating organisms are vastly preferred. In this report, non-replicating bacterial minicells simultaneously co-delivering the nucleoprotein (NP) of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and the corresponding DNA vaccine were tested for the ability to generate protective cellular immune responses in mice. It was found that good protection (89%) was achieved after intramuscular administration, moderate protection (31%) was achieved after intranasal administration, and less protection (7%) was achieved following gastric immunization. These results provide a solid foundation on which to pursue the use of bacterial minicells as a non-replicating vaccine delivery platform. PMID:17258845

  16. DNA Vaccines: Protective Immunizations by Parenteral, Mucosal, and Gene-Gun Inoculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fynan, Ellen F.; Webster, Robert G.; Fuller, Deborah H.; Haynes, Joel R.; Santoro, Joseph C.; Robinson, Harriet L.

    1993-12-01

    Plasmid DNAs expressing influenza virus hemagglutinin glycoproteins have been tested for their ability to raise protective immunity against lethal influenza challenges of the same subtype. In trials using two inoculations of from 50 to 300 μg of purified DNA in saline, 67-95% of test mice and 25-63% of test chickens have been protected against a lethal influenza challenge. Parenteral routes of inoculation that achieved good protection included intramuscular and intravenous injections. Successful mucosal routes of vaccination included DNA drops administered to the nares or trachea. By far the most efficient DNA immunizations were achieved by using a gene gun to deliver DNA-coated gold beads to the epidermis. In mice, 95% protection was achieved by two immunizations with beads loaded with as little as 0.4 μg of DNA. The breadth of routes supporting successful DNA immunizations, coupled with the very small amounts of DNA required for gene-gun immunizations, highlight the potential of this remarkably simple technique for the development of subunit vaccines.

  17. Evaluation of cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking as determining factors of gene expression for amino acid-substituted gemini surfactant-based DNA nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene transfer using non-viral vectors offers a non-immunogenic and safe method of gene delivery. Cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking of the nanoparticles can impact on the transfection efficiency of these vectors. Therefore, understanding the physicochemical properties that may influence the cellular uptake and the intracellular trafficking can aid the design of more efficient non-viral gene delivery systems. Recently, we developed novel amino acid-substituted gemini surfactants that showed higher transfection efficiency than their parent compound. In this study, we evaluated the mechanism of cellular uptake of the plasmid/gemini surfactant/helper lipid nanoparticles and their effect on the transfection efficiency. Results Nanoparticles were incubated with Sf 1 Ep cells in the presence of different endocytic inhibitors and gene expression (interferon-γ) was measured using ELISA. Clathrin-mediated and caveolae-mediated uptake were found to be equally contributing to cellular internalization of both P/12-7NH-12/L (parent gemini surfactant) and P/12-7NGK-12/L (amino acid-substituted gemini surfactant) nanoparticles. The plasmid and the helper lipid were fluorescently tagged to track the nanoparticles inside the cells, using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Transmission electron microscopy images showed that the P/12-7NGK-12/L particles were cylindrical while the P/12-7NH-12/L particles were spherical which may influence the cellular uptake behaviour of these particles. Dye exclusion assay and pH-titration of the nanoparticles suggested that high buffering capacity, pH-dependent increase in particle size and balanced DNA binding properties may be contributing to a more efficient endosomal escape of P/12-7NGK-12/L compared to the P/12-7NH-12/L nanoparticles, leading to higher gene expression. Conclusion Amino-acid substitution in the spacer of gemini surfactant did not alter the cellular uptake pathway, showing similar pattern to the

  18. Chiral Ruthenium(II) Polypyridyl Complexes: Stabilization of G-Quadruplex DNA, Inhibition of Telomerase Activity and Cellular Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qianqian; Liu, Yanan; Wang, Chuan; Sun, Dongdong; Yang, Xingcheng; Liu, Yanyu; Liu, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Two ruthenium(II) complexes, Λ-[Ru(phen)2(p-HPIP)]2+ and Δ-[Ru(phen)2(p-HPIP)]2+, were synthesized and characterized via proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, and circular dichroism spectroscopy. This study aims to clarify the anticancer effect of metal complexes as novel and potent telomerase inhibitors and cellular nucleus target drug. First, the chiral selectivity of the compounds and their ability to stabilize quadruplex DNA were studied via absorption and emission analyses, circular dichroism spectroscopy, fluorescence-resonance energy transfer melting assay, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and polymerase chain reaction stop assay. The two chiral compounds selectively induced and stabilized the G-quadruplex of telomeric DNA with or without metal cations. These results provide new insights into the development of chiral anticancer agents for G-quadruplex DNA targeting. Telomerase repeat amplification protocol reveals the higher inhibitory activity of Λ-[Ru(phen)2(p-HPIP)]2+ against telomerase, suggesting that Λ-[Ru(phen)2(p-HPIP)]2+ may be a potential telomerase inhibitor for cancer chemotherapy. MTT assay results show that these chiral complexes have significant antitumor activities in HepG2 cells. More interestingly, cellular uptake and laser-scanning confocal microscopic studies reveal the efficient uptake of Λ-[Ru(phen)2(p-HPIP)]2+ by HepG2 cells. This complex then enters the cytoplasm and tends to accumulate in the nucleus. This nuclear penetration of the ruthenium complexes and their subsequent accumulation are associated with the chirality of the isomers as well as with the subtle environment of the ruthenium complexes. Therefore, the nucleus can be the cellular target of chiral ruthenium complexes for anticancer therapy. PMID:23236402

  19. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of Brugia malayi Heavy Chain Myosin as Homologous DNA, Protein and Heterologous DNA/Protein Prime Boost Vaccine in Rodent Model.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Jyoti; Pathak, Manisha; Misra, Sweta; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2015-01-01

    We earlier demonstrated the immunoprophylactic efficacy of recombinant heavy chain myosin (Bm-Myo) of Brugia malayi (B. malayi) in rodent models. In the current study, further attempts have been made to improve this efficacy by employing alternate approaches such as homologous DNA (pcD-Myo) and heterologous DNA/protein prime boost (pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo) in BALB/c mouse model. The gene bm-myo was cloned in a mammalian expression vector pcDNA 3.1(+) and protein expression was confirmed in mammalian Vero cell line. A significant degree of protection (79.2%±2.32) against L3 challenge in pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunized group was observed which was much higher than that exerted by Bm-Myo (66.6%±2.23) and pcD-Myo (41.6%±2.45). In the heterologous immunized group, the percentage of peritoneal leukocytes such as macrophages, neutrophils, B cells and T cells marginally increased and their population augmented further significantly following L3 challenge. pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunization elicited robust cellular and humoral immune responses as compared to pcD-Myo and Bm-Myo groups as evidenced by an increased accumulation of CD4+, CD8+ T cells and CD19+ B cells in the mouse spleen and activation of peritoneal macrophages. Though immunized animals produced antigen-specific IgG antibodies and isotypes, sera of mice receiving pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo or Bm-Myo developed much higher antibody levels than other groups and there was profound antibody-dependent cellular adhesion and cytotoxicity (ADCC) to B. malayi infective larvae (L3). pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo as well as Bm-Myo mice generated a mixed T helper cell phenotype as evidenced by the production of both pro-inflammatory (IL-2, IFN-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10) cytokines. Mice receiving pcD-Myo on contrary displayed a polarized pro-inflammatory immune response. The findings suggest that the priming of animals with DNA followed by protein booster generates heightened and mixed pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses that are capable of providing

  20. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of Brugia malayi Heavy Chain Myosin as Homologous DNA, Protein and Heterologous DNA/Protein Prime Boost Vaccine in Rodent Model

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Jyoti; Pathak, Manisha; Misra, Sweta; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2015-01-01

    We earlier demonstrated the immunoprophylactic efficacy of recombinant heavy chain myosin (Bm-Myo) of Brugia malayi (B. malayi) in rodent models. In the current study, further attempts have been made to improve this efficacy by employing alternate approaches such as homologous DNA (pcD-Myo) and heterologous DNA/protein prime boost (pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo) in BALB/c mouse model. The gene bm-myo was cloned in a mammalian expression vector pcDNA 3.1(+) and protein expression was confirmed in mammalian Vero cell line. A significant degree of protection (79.2%±2.32) against L3 challenge in pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunized group was observed which was much higher than that exerted by Bm-Myo (66.6%±2.23) and pcD-Myo (41.6%±2.45). In the heterologous immunized group, the percentage of peritoneal leukocytes such as macrophages, neutrophils, B cells and T cells marginally increased and their population augmented further significantly following L3 challenge. pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunization elicited robust cellular and humoral immune responses as compared to pcD-Myo and Bm-Myo groups as evidenced by an increased accumulation of CD4+, CD8+ T cells and CD19+ B cells in the mouse spleen and activation of peritoneal macrophages. Though immunized animals produced antigen-specific IgG antibodies and isotypes, sera of mice receiving pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo or Bm-Myo developed much higher antibody levels than other groups and there was profound antibody-dependent cellular adhesion and cytotoxicity (ADCC) to B. malayi infective larvae (L3). pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo as well as Bm-Myo mice generated a mixed T helper cell phenotype as evidenced by the production of both pro-inflammatory (IL-2, IFN-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10) cytokines. Mice receiving pcD-Myo on contrary displayed a polarized pro-inflammatory immune response. The findings suggest that the priming of animals with DNA followed by protein booster generates heightened and mixed pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses that are capable of providing

  1. Functions that protect Escherichia coli from DNA-protein crosslinks.

    PubMed

    Krasich, Rachel; Wu, Sunny Yang; Kuo, H Kenny; Kreuzer, Kenneth N

    2015-04-01

    Pathways for tolerating and repairing DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs) are poorly defined. We used transposon mutagenesis and candidate gene approaches to identify DPC-hypersensitive Escherichia coli mutants. DPCs were induced by azacytidine (aza-C) treatment in cells overexpressing cytosine methyltransferase; hypersensitivity was verified to depend on methyltransferase expression. We isolated hypersensitive mutants that were uncovered in previous studies (recA, recBC, recG, and uvrD), hypersensitive mutants that apparently activate phage Mu Gam expression, and novel hypersensitive mutants in genes involved in DNA metabolism, cell division, and tRNA modification (dinG, ftsK, xerD, dnaJ, hflC, miaA, mnmE, mnmG, and ssrA). Inactivation of SbcCD, which can cleave DNA at protein-DNA complexes, did not cause hypersensitivity. We previously showed that tmRNA pathway defects cause aza-C hypersensitivity, implying that DPCs block coupled transcription/translation complexes. Here, we show that mutants in tRNA modification functions miaA, mnmE and mnmG cause defects in aza-C-induced tmRNA tagging, explaining their hypersensitivity. In order for tmRNA to access a stalled ribosome, the mRNA must be cleaved or released from RNA polymerase. Mutational inactivation of functions involved in mRNA processing and RNA polymerase elongation/release (RNase II, RNaseD, RNase PH, RNase LS, Rep, HepA, GreA, GreB) did not cause aza-C hypersensitivity; the mechanism of tmRNA access remains unclear. PMID:25731940

  2. Functions that protect Escherichia coli from DNA-protein crosslinks

    PubMed Central

    Krasich, Rachel; Wu, Sunny Yang; Kuo, H. Kenny; Kreuzer, Kenneth N

    2015-01-01

    Pathways for tolerating and repairing DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs) are poorly defined. We used transposon mutagenesis and candidate gene approaches to identify DPC-hypersensitive Escherichia coli mutants. DPCs were induced by azacytidine (aza-C) treatment in cells overexpressing cytosine methyltransferase; hypersensitivity was verified to depend on methyltransferase expression. We isolated hypersensitive mutants that were uncovered in previous studies (recA, recBC, recG, and uvrD), hypersensitive mutants that apparently activate phage Mu Gam expression, and novel hypersensitive mutants in genes involved in DNA metabolism, cell division, and tRNA modification (dinG, ftsK, xerD, dnaJ, hflC, miaA, mnmE, mnmG, and ssrA). Inactivation of SbcCD, which can cleave DNA at protein-DNA complexes, did not cause hypersensitivity. We previously showed that tmRNA pathway defects cause aza-C hypersensitivity, implying that DPCs block coupled transcription/translation complexes. Here, we show that mutants in tRNA modification functions miaA, mnmE and mnmG cause defects in aza-C-induced tmRNA tagging, explaining their hypersensitivity. In order for tmRNA to access a stalled ribosome, the mRNA must be cleaved or released from RNA polymerase. Mutational inactivation of functions involved in mRNA processing and RNA polymerase elongation/release (RNase II, RNaseD, RNase PH, RNase LS, Rep, HepA, GreA, GreB) did not cause aza-C hypersensitivity; the mechanism of tmRNA access remains unclear. PMID:25731940

  3. Lamin A/C-dependent interaction with 53BP1 promotes cellular responses to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs-Seymour, Ian; Markiewicz, Ewa; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels; Hutchison, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Lamins A/C have been implicated in DNA damage response pathways. We show that the DNA repair protein 53BP1 is a lamin A/C binding protein. In undamaged human dermal fibroblasts (HDF), 53BP1 is a nucleoskeleton protein. 53BP1 binds to lamins A/C via its Tudor domain, and this is abrogated by DNA damage. Lamins A/C regulate 53BP1 levels and consequently lamin A/C-null HDF display a 53BP1 null-like phenotype. Our data favour a model in which lamins A/C maintain a nucleoplasmic pool of 53BP1 in order to facilitate its rapid recruitment to sites of DNA damage and could explain why an absence of lamin A/C accelerates aging. PMID:25645366

  4. Correlated analysis of cellular DNA, membrane antigens and light scatter of human lymphoid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Braylan, R.C.; Benson, N.A.; Nourse, V.; Kruth, H.S.

    1982-03-01

    Flow cytometric correlated analysis of membrane antigens, DNA, and light scatter was performed on human lymphoid cells using fluorescein (FITC)-conjugated antibodies to label B- and T-cell antigens and propidium iodide (PI) to stain DNA after ethanol fixation and RNase treatment. A FACS II flow cytometer was modified to obtain digitized measurements of two color fluorescence and light scatter emissions, simultaneously. Software was written to allow single parameter analysis or correlated analysis of any two of the three parameters acquired. Ethanol fixation preserved FITC surface labeling for at least 15 weeks, but produced marked changes in light scatter. No changes in FITC distributions were observed after RNase treatment and PI staining, and the presence of FITC labeling did not affect DNA distributions. Within heterogeneous cell populations, the DNA distribution of cell subpopulations identified by a membrane antigen was clearly demonstrated.

  5. Base excision repair enzymes protect abasic sites in duplex DNA from interstrand cross-links.

    PubMed

    Admiraal, Suzanne J; O'Brien, Patrick J

    2015-03-10

    Hydrolysis of the N-glycosyl bond between a nucleobase and deoxyribose leaves an abasic site within duplex DNA. The abasic site can react with exocyclic amines of nucleobases on the complementary strand to form interstrand DNA-DNA cross-links (ICLs). We find that several enzymes from the base excision repair (BER) pathway protect an abasic site on one strand of a DNA duplex from cross-linking with an amine on the opposing strand. Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) and Escherichia coli 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase II (AlkA) accomplish this by binding tightly to the abasic site and sequestering it. AAG protects an abasic site opposite T, the product of its canonical glycosylase reaction, by a factor of ∼10-fold, as estimated from its inhibition of the reaction of an exogenous amine with the damaged DNA. Human apurinic/apyrimidinic site endonuclease 1 and E. coli endonuclease III both decrease the amount of ICL at equilibrium by generating a single-strand DNA nick at the abasic position as it is liberated from the cross-link. The reversibility of the reaction between amines and abasic sites allows BER enzymes to counter the potentially disruptive effects of this type of cross-link on DNA transactions. PMID:25679877

  6. Transcriptomal profiling of the cellular response to DNA damage mediated by Slug (Snai2)

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Caro, M; Bermejo-Rodríguez, C; González-Herrero, I; Sánchez-Beato, M; Piris, M A; Sánchez-García, I

    2008-01-01

    Snai2-deficient cells are radiosensitive to DNA damage. The function of Snai2 in response to DNA damage seems to be critical for its function in normal development and cancer. Here, we applied a functional genomics approach that combined gene-expression profiling and computational molecular network analysis to obtain global dissection of the Snai2-dependent transcriptional response to DNA damage in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), which undergo p53-dependent growth arrest in response to DNA damage. Although examination of the response showed that overall expression of p53 target gene expression patterns was similarly altered in both control and Snai2-deficient cells, we have identified and validated candidate Snai2 target genes linked to Snai2 gene function in response to DNA damage. This work defines for the first time the effect of Snai2 on p53 target genes in cells undergoing growth arrest, elucidates the Snai2-dependent molecular network induced by DNA damage, points to novel putative Snai2 targets, and suggest a mechanistic model, which has implications for cancer management. PMID:18182996

  7. Neocarzinostatin as a probe for DNA protection activity--molecular interaction with caffeine.

    PubMed

    Chin, Der-Hang; Li, Huang-Hsien; Kuo, Hsiu-Maan; Chao, Pei-Dawn Lee; Liu, Chia-Wen

    2012-04-01

    Neocarzinostatin (NCS), a potent mutagen and carcinogen, consists of an enediyne prodrug and a protein carrier. It has a unique double role in that it intercalates into DNA and imposes radical-mediated damage after thiol activation. Here we employed NCS as a probe to examine the DNA-protection capability of caffeine, one of common dietary phytochemicals with potential cancer-chemopreventive activity. NCS at the nanomolar concentration range could induce significant single- and double-strand lesions in DNA, but up to 75 ± 5% of such lesions were found to be efficiently inhibited by caffeine. The percentage of inhibition was caffeine-concentration dependent, but was not sensitive to the DNA-lesion types. The well-characterized activation reactions of NCS allowed us to explore the effect of caffeine on the enediyne-generated radicals. Postactivation analyses by chromatographic and mass spectroscopic methods identified a caffeine-quenched enediyne-radical adduct, but the yield was too small to fully account for the large inhibition effect on DNA lesions. The affinity between NCS chromophore and DNA was characterized by a fluorescence-based kinetic method. The drug-DNA intercalation was hampered by caffeine, and the caffeine-induced increases in DNA-drug dissociation constant was caffeine-concentration dependent, suggesting importance of binding affinity in the protection mechanism. Caffeine has been shown to be both an effective free radical scavenger and an intercalation inhibitor. Our results demonstrated that caffeine ingeniously protected DNA against the enediyne-induced damages mainly by inhibiting DNA intercalation beforehand. The direct scavenging of the DNA-bound NCS free radicals by caffeine played only a minor role. PMID:21538576

  8. RPA and Rad51 constitute a cell intrinsic mechanism to protect the cytosol from self DNA.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Christine; Rapp, Alexander; Berndt, Nicole; Staroske, Wolfgang; Schuster, Max; Dobrick-Mattheuer, Manuela; Kretschmer, Stefanie; König, Nadja; Kurth, Thomas; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Kast, Karin; Cardoso, M Cristina; Günther, Claudia; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae

    2016-01-01

    Immune recognition of cytosolic DNA represents a central antiviral defence mechanism. Within the host, short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) continuously arises during the repair of DNA damage induced by endogenous and environmental genotoxic stress. Here we show that short ssDNA traverses the nuclear membrane, but is drawn into the nucleus by binding to the DNA replication and repair factors RPA and Rad51. Knockdown of RPA and Rad51 enhances cytosolic leakage of ssDNA resulting in cGAS-dependent type I IFN activation. Mutations in the exonuclease TREX1 cause type I IFN-dependent autoinflammation and autoimmunity. We demonstrate that TREX1 is anchored within the outer nuclear membrane to ensure immediate degradation of ssDNA leaking into the cytosol. In TREX1-deficient fibroblasts, accumulating ssDNA causes exhaustion of RPA and Rad51 resulting in replication stress and activation of p53 and type I IFN. Thus, the ssDNA-binding capacity of RPA and Rad51 constitutes a cell intrinsic mechanism to protect the cytosol from self DNA. PMID:27230542

  9. RPA and Rad51 constitute a cell intrinsic mechanism to protect the cytosol from self DNA

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Christine; Rapp, Alexander; Berndt, Nicole; Staroske, Wolfgang; Schuster, Max; Dobrick-Mattheuer, Manuela; Kretschmer, Stefanie; König, Nadja; Kurth, Thomas; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Kast, Karin; Cardoso, M. Cristina; Günther, Claudia; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae

    2016-01-01

    Immune recognition of cytosolic DNA represents a central antiviral defence mechanism. Within the host, short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) continuously arises during the repair of DNA damage induced by endogenous and environmental genotoxic stress. Here we show that short ssDNA traverses the nuclear membrane, but is drawn into the nucleus by binding to the DNA replication and repair factors RPA and Rad51. Knockdown of RPA and Rad51 enhances cytosolic leakage of ssDNA resulting in cGAS-dependent type I IFN activation. Mutations in the exonuclease TREX1 cause type I IFN-dependent autoinflammation and autoimmunity. We demonstrate that TREX1 is anchored within the outer nuclear membrane to ensure immediate degradation of ssDNA leaking into the cytosol. In TREX1-deficient fibroblasts, accumulating ssDNA causes exhaustion of RPA and Rad51 resulting in replication stress and activation of p53 and type I IFN. Thus, the ssDNA-binding capacity of RPA and Rad51 constitutes a cell intrinsic mechanism to protect the cytosol from self DNA. PMID:27230542

  10. Expression of plasmid DNA in the salivary gland epithelium: novel approaches to study dynamic cellular processes in live animals

    PubMed Central

    Sramkova, Monika; Masedunskas, Andrius; Parente, Laura; Molinolo, Alfredo

    2009-01-01

    The ability to dynamically image cellular and subcellular structures in a live animal and to target genes to a specific cell population in a living tissue provides a unique tool to address many biological questions in the proper physiological context. Here, we describe a powerful approach that is based on the use of rat submandibular salivary glands, which offer the possibility to easily perform intravital imaging and deliver molecules from the oral cavity, and plasmid DNA, which offers the advantage of rapid manipulations. We show that, under different experimental conditions, a reporter molecule can be rapidly expressed in specific compartments of the glands: 1) in the intercalated ducts, when plasmid DNA is administered alone, and 2) in granular ducts, striated ducts, and, to a lesser extent, acini, when plasmid DNA is mixed with replication-deficient adenovirus subtype 5 particles. Remarkably, we also found that gene expression can be directed to acinar cells when plasmid DNA is administered during isoproterenol-stimulated exocytosis, suggesting a novel mechanism of plasmid internalization regulated by compensatory endocytosis. Finally, as a practical application of these strategies, we show how the expression of fluorescently tagged molecules enables the study of the dynamics of various organelles in live animals at a resolution comparable to that achieved in cell cultures. PMID:19794147

  11. Vitamin E protection against chemical-induced cell injury. I. Maintenance of cellular protein thiols as a cytoprotective mechanism.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, G A; Olafsdottir, K; Reed, D J

    1987-07-01

    Vitamin E protection against chemical-induced toxicity to isolated hepatocytes was examined during an imbalance in the thiol redox system. Intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH) was depleted by two chemicals of distinct mechanisms of action: adriamycin, a cancer chemotherapeutic agent that undergoes redox cycling, producing reactive oxygen species that consume GSH, and ethacrynic acid, a direct depleter of GSH. The experimental system used both nonstressed vitamin E-adequate isolated rat hepatocytes and compromised hepatocytes subjected to physiologically induced stress, generated by incubation in calcium-free medium. At doses whereby intracellular GSH was near total depletion, cell injury induced by either chemical was found to follow the depletion of cellular alpha-tocopherol, regardless of the status of the GSH redox system. Changes in protein thiol contents of the cells closely paralleled the changes in alpha-tocopherol contents throughout the incubation period. Supplementation of the calcium-depleted hepatocytes with alpha-tocopheryl succinate (25 microM) markedly elevated their alpha-tocopherol content and prevented the toxicities of both drugs. The prevention of cell injury and the elevation in alpha-tocopherol contents were both associated with a prevention of the loss in cellular protein thiols in the near total absence of intracellular GSH. The mechanism of protection by vitamin E against chemical-induced toxicity to hepatocytes may therefore be an alpha-tocopherol-dependent maintenance of cellular protein thiols. PMID:3606119

  12. Calcitriol-copper interaction leads to non enzymatic, reactive oxygen species mediated DNA breakage and modulation of cellular redox scavengers in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Asim; Farhan, Mohd; Naseem, Imrana; Hadi, S M

    2016-09-01

    Calcitriol is the metabolically active form of Vitamin D and is known to kill cancer cells. Using the rat model of DEN induced hepatocellular carcinoma we show that there is a marked increase in cellular levels of copper in hepatocellular carcinoma and that calcitriol-copper interaction leads to reactive oxygen species mediated DNA breakage selectively in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. In vivo studies show that calcitriol selectively induces severe fluctuations in cellular enzymatic and non enzymatic scavengers of reactive oxygen species in the malignant tissue. Lipid peroxidation, a well established marker of oxidative stress, was found to increase, and substantial cellular DNA breakage was observed. We propose that calcitriol is a proxidant in the cellular milieu of hepatocellular carcinoma cells, and this copper mediated prooxidant action of calcitriol causes selective DNA breakage in malignant cells, while sparing normal (non malignant) cells. PMID:27343126

  13. Protective Effect of Thymoquinone against Cyclophosphamide-Induced Hemorrhagic Cystitis through Inhibiting DNA Damage and Upregulation of Nrf2 Expression.

    PubMed

    Gore, Prashant R; Prajapati, Chaitali P; Mahajan, Umesh B; Goyal, Sameer N; Belemkar, Sateesh; Ojha, Shreesh; Patil, Chandragouda R

    2016-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CYP) induced hemorrhagic cystitis is a dose-limiting side effect involving increased oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokines and suppressed activity of nuclear factor related erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2). Thymoquinone (TQ), an active constituent of Nigella sativa seeds, is reported to increase the expression of Nrf2, exert antioxidant action, and anti-inflammatory effects in the experimental animals. The present study was designed to explore the effects of TQ on CYP-induced hemorrhagic cystitis in Balb/c mice. Cystitis was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of CYP (200 mg/kg). TQ was administered intraperitoneally at 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg doses twice a day, for three days before and three days after the CYP administration. The efficacy of TQ was determined in terms of the protection against the CYP-induced histological perturbations in the bladder tissue, reduction in the oxidative stress, and inhibition of the DNA fragmentation. Immunohistochemistry was performed to examine the expression of Nrf2. TQ protected against CYP-induced oxidative stress was evident from significant reduction in the lipid peroxidation, restoration of the levels of reduced glutathione, catalase and superoxide dismutase activities. TQ treatment significantly reduced the DNA damage evident as reduced DNA fragmentation. A significant decrease in the cellular infiltration, edema, epithelial denudation and hemorrhage were observed in the histological observations. There was restoration and rise in the Nrf2 expression in the bladder tissues of mice treated with TQ. These results confirm that, TQ ameliorates the CYP-induced hemorrhagic cystitis in mice through reduction in the oxidative stress, inhibition of the DNA damage and through increased expression of Nrf2 in the bladder tissues. PMID:27489498

  14. Protective Effect of Thymoquinone against Cyclophosphamide-Induced Hemorrhagic Cystitis through Inhibiting DNA Damage and Upregulation of Nrf2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Prashant R.; Prajapati, Chaitali P.; Mahajan, Umesh B.; Goyal, Sameer N.; Belemkar, Sateesh; Ojha, Shreesh; Patil, Chandragouda R.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CYP) induced hemorrhagic cystitis is a dose-limiting side effect involving increased oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokines and suppressed activity of nuclear factor related erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2). Thymoquinone (TQ), an active constituent of Nigella sativa seeds, is reported to increase the expression of Nrf2, exert antioxidant action, and anti-inflammatory effects in the experimental animals. The present study was designed to explore the effects of TQ on CYP-induced hemorrhagic cystitis in Balb/c mice. Cystitis was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of CYP (200 mg/kg). TQ was administered intraperitoneally at 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg doses twice a day, for three days before and three days after the CYP administration. The efficacy of TQ was determined in terms of the protection against the CYP-induced histological perturbations in the bladder tissue, reduction in the oxidative stress, and inhibition of the DNA fragmentation. Immunohistochemistry was performed to examine the expression of Nrf2. TQ protected against CYP-induced oxidative stress was evident from significant reduction in the lipid peroxidation, restoration of the levels of reduced glutathione, catalase and superoxide dismutase activities. TQ treatment significantly reduced the DNA damage evident as reduced DNA fragmentation. A significant decrease in the cellular infiltration, edema, epithelial denudation and hemorrhage were observed in the histological observations. There was restoration and rise in the Nrf2 expression in the bladder tissues of mice treated with TQ. These results confirm that, TQ ameliorates the CYP-induced hemorrhagic cystitis in mice through reduction in the oxidative stress, inhibition of the DNA damage and through increased expression of Nrf2 in the bladder tissues. PMID:27489498

  15. Anti-oxidative cellular protection effect of fasting-induced autophagy as a mechanism for hormesis.

    PubMed

    Moore, Michael N; Shaw, Jennifer P; Ferrar Adams, Dawn R; Viarengo, Aldo

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that fasting-induced augmented lysosomal autophagic turnover of cellular proteins and organelles will reduce potentially harmful lipofuscin (age-pigment) formation in cells by more effectively removing oxidatively damaged proteins. An animal model (marine snail--common periwinkle, Littorina littorea) was used to experimentally test this hypothesis. Snails were deprived of algal food for 7 days to induce an augmented autophagic response in their hepatopancreatic digestive cells (hepatocyte analogues). This treatment resulted in a 25% reduction in the cellular content of lipofuscin in the digestive cells of the fasting animals in comparison with snails fed ad libitum on green alga (Ulva lactuca). Similar findings have previously been observed in the digestive cells of marine mussels subjected to copper-induced oxidative stress. Additional measurements showed that fasting significantly increased cellular health based on lysosomal membrane stability, and reduced lipid peroxidation and lysosomal/cellular triglyceride. These findings support the hypothesis that fasting-induced augmented autophagic turnover of cellular proteins has an anti-oxidative cytoprotective effect by more effectively removing damaged proteins, resulting in a reduction in the formation of potentially harmful proteinaceous aggregates such as lipofuscin. The inference from this study is that autophagy is important in mediating hormesis. An increase was demonstrated in physiological complexity with fasting, using graph theory in a directed cell physiology network (digraph) model to integrate the various biomarkers. This was commensurate with increased health status, and supportive of the hormesis hypothesis. The potential role of enhanced autophagic lysosomal removal of damaged proteins in the evolutionary acquisition of stress tolerance in intertidal molluscs is discussed and parallels are drawn with the growing evidence for the involvement of

  16. Protection of guinea pigs against Leptospira interrogans serovar Lai by LipL21 DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    He, Han Jiang; Wang, Wen Yu; Wu, Zhong Dao; Lv, Zhi Yue; Li, Jun; Tan, Li Zhi

    2008-10-01

    In this study, the full lipL21 gene fragment encoding outer membrane protein LipL21 was cloned from L. interrogans serovar Lai and inserted into eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(+). The guinea pigs were immunized with pcDNA3.1(+)-lipL21, pcDNA3.1(+) or PBS. Six weeks after the second immunization, the splenocytes were isolated to detect their proliferative ability by lymphocyte transformation experiments. In addition, microscopic agglutination test was used for quantitative detection of specific antibodies. The rest guinea pigs were challenged intraperitoneally with L. interogans sorevar Lai. Then, protective effect was evaluated on the basis of survival and histopathological lesions in the kidneys, lungs, and liver. The lipL21 gene was successfully expressed in COS-7 cells through recombinant pcDNA3.1(+)-lipL21. The titer of specific antibodies substantially increased, and the stimulation index of splenocytes increased significantly. Hence, the pcDNA3.1(+)-lipL21 could protect the immunized guinea pigs from homotypic Leptospira infection. Furthermore, no obvious pathologic changes were observed in the pcDNA3.1(+)-lipL21 immunized guinea pigs. The results showed that the protective effect with pathogenic strains of Leptospira was shared by LipL21 mediated through a plasmid vector. Consequently, these results indicated that the lipL21 DNA vaccine was a promising candidate for the prevention of leptospirosis. PMID:18954563

  17. Mitochondrial Targeted Endonuclease III DNA Repair Enzyme Protects against Ventilator Induced Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Masahiro; Mouner, Marc; Chouteau, Joshua M; Gorodnya, Olena M; Ruchko, Mykhaylo V; Wilson, Glenn L; Gillespie, Mark N; Parker, James C

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial targeted DNA repair enzyme, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1, was previously reported to protect against mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and ventilator induced lung injury (VILI). In the present study we determined whether mitochondrial targeted endonuclease III (EndoIII) which cleaves oxidized pyrimidines rather than purines from damaged DNA would also protect the lung. Minimal injury from 1 h ventilation at 40 cmH2O peak inflation pressure (PIP) was reversed by EndoIII pretreatment. Moderate lung injury due to ventilation for 2 h at 40 cmH2O PIP produced a 25-fold increase in total extravascular albumin space, a 60% increase in W/D weight ratio, and marked increases in MIP-2 and IL-6. Oxidative mtDNA damage and decreases in the total tissue glutathione (GSH) and the GSH/GSSH ratio also occurred. All of these indices of injury were attenuated by mitochondrial targeted EndoIII. Massive lung injury caused by 2 h ventilation at 50 cmH2O PIP was not attenuated by EndoIII pretreatment, but all untreated mice died prior to completing the two hour ventilation protocol, whereas all EndoIII-treated mice lived for the duration of ventilation. Thus, mitochondrial targeted DNA repair enzymes were protective against mild and moderate lung damage and they enhanced survival in the most severely injured group. PMID:25153040

  18. A combined DNA vaccine provides protective immunity against Mycobacterium bovis and Brucella abortus in cattle.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xi-Dan; Yu, Da-Hai; Chen, Su-Ting; Li, Shu-Xia; Cai, Hong

    2009-04-01

    We evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a combined DNA vaccine containing six genes encoding immunodominant antigens from Mycobacterium bovis and Brucella abortus. The number of lymph node and spleen cultures positive for M. bovis and B. abortus from calves immunized with the combined DNA vaccine was significantly reduced (p < 0.01) compared with unvaccinated calves after challenge with virulent M. bovis and B. abortus 544. The combined DNA vaccine group displayed stronger antigen-specific interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) responses and antigen-specific IFN-gamma ELISPOT activities 2 months after final immunization and after challenge. Antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses in the combined DNA vaccine group were higher than either the Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)-positive or S19-positive control group. Likewise, more calves in the DNA vaccine group exhibited antigen-specific IgG titers and had higher IgG titers than those in the BCG- or S19-immunized groups 2 months after the final immunization. Moreover, two antigens in the combined DNA vaccine induced significant antigen-specific IFN-gamma responses 6 months after challenge (p < 0.05). Bacterial counts and pathological analyses of the challenged animals indicated that the combined DNA vaccine provided significantly better protection than the BCG vaccine against M. bovis, and the protection level induced by the combined DNA vaccine was comparable to S19 against B. abortus. This is the first report to demonstrate that a single combined DNA vaccine protects cattle against two infectious diseases. PMID:19364278

  19. Layered double hydroxide nanoparticles as cellular delivery vectors of supercoiled plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi Ping; Walker, Tara L; Liu, Kerh-lin; Cooper, Helen M; Lu, G Q Max; Bartlett, Perry F

    2007-01-01

    We prepared stable homogeneous suspensions with layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoparticles for in vitro gene delivery tests. The viability of HEK 293T cells in the presence of LDH nanoparticles at different concentrations was investigated. This revealed 50% cell viability at 500 microg/mL of LDH nanoparticles that is much higher than 50-100 microg/mL used for the delivery tests. The supercoiled pEF-eGFP plasmid (ca. 6100 base pairs) was mixed with LDH nanoparticle suspensions for anion exchange at a weight ratio of DNA/LDH between 1:25 and 1:100. In vitro experiments show that GFP expression in HEK 293T cells starts in the first day, reaches the maximum levels by the second day and continues in the third day. The GFP expression generally increases with the increase in DNA loading in DNA-LDH nanohybrids. However, the delivery efficiency with LDH nanoparticles as the agent is low. For example, the relative efficiency is 7%-15% of that of the commercial agent FuGENE 6. Three to 6% of total cells expressed GFP in an amount detectable by the FACS cytometry 2 days after transfection at 1 microg/mL of plasmid DNA with 25 microg/mL of LDH nanomaterial. The lower delivery efficiency could be attributed to the aggregation of LDH nanoparticles caused by the long-chain plasmid DNA. PMID:17722544

  20. DNA-binding, cytotoxicity, cellular uptake, apoptosis and photocleavage studies of Ru(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    N Deepika; C Shobha Devi; Y Praveen Kumar; K Laxma Reddy; P Venkat Reddy; D Anil Kumar; Surya S Singh; S Satyanarayana

    2016-07-01

    Two Ru(II) complexes [Ru(phen)2bppp](ClO4)2 (1) and [Ru(phen)27-Br-dppz](ClO4)2 (2) [phen=1,10 phenanthroline, 7-Br-dppz=7-fluorodipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine, bppp=11-bromo-pyrido[2',3':5,6]pyrazino[2,3-f] [1,10]phenanthroline] have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, ES-MS, (1)H-NMR, (13)C-NMR and IR. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the complexes examined against a panel of cancer cell lines (HeLa, Du145 and A549) by MTT method, both complexes show prominent anticancer activity against various cancer cells. Live cell imaging study and flow cytometric analysis demonstrate that both the complexes 1 and 2 could cross the cell membrane accumulating in the nucleus. Further, flow cytometry experiments showed that the cytotoxic Ru(II) complexes 1 and 2 induced apoptosis of HeLa tumor cell lines. Photo induced DNA cleavage studies have been performed and results indicate that both the complexes efficiently photo cleave pBR322 DNA. The binding properties of two complexes toward CT-DNA were investigated by various optical methods and viscosity measurements. The experimental results suggested that both Ru(II) complexes can intercalate into DNA base pairs. The complexes were docked into DNA-base pairs using the GOLD docking program. PMID:27107334

  1. Conophylline Protects Cells in Cellular Models of Neurodegenerative Diseases by Inducing Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR)-independent Autophagy*

    PubMed Central

    Sasazawa, Yukiko; Sato, Natsumi; Umezawa, Kazuo; Simizu, Siro

    2015-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a cellular response that leads to the bulk, nonspecific degradation of cytosolic components, including organelles. In recent years, it has been recognized that autophagy is essential for prevention of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson disease (PD) and Huntington disease (HD). Here, we show that conophylline (CNP), a vinca alkaloid, induces autophagy in an mammalian target of rapamycin-independent manner. Using a cellular model of PD, CNP suppressed protein aggregation and protected cells from cell death caused by treatment with 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, a neurotoxin, by inducing autophagy. Moreover, in the HD model, CNP also eliminated mutant huntingtin aggregates. Our findings demonstrate the possible use of CNP as a therapeutic drug for neurodegenerative disorders, including PD and HD. PMID:25596530

  2. Conophylline protects cells in cellular models of neurodegenerative diseases by inducing mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-independent autophagy.

    PubMed

    Sasazawa, Yukiko; Sato, Natsumi; Umezawa, Kazuo; Simizu, Siro

    2015-03-01

    Macroautophagy is a cellular response that leads to the bulk, nonspecific degradation of cytosolic components, including organelles. In recent years, it has been recognized that autophagy is essential for prevention of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson disease (PD) and Huntington disease (HD). Here, we show that conophylline (CNP), a vinca alkaloid, induces autophagy in an mammalian target of rapamycin-independent manner. Using a cellular model of PD, CNP suppressed protein aggregation and protected cells from cell death caused by treatment with 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, a neurotoxin, by inducing autophagy. Moreover, in the HD model, CNP also eliminated mutant huntingtin aggregates. Our findings demonstrate the possible use of CNP as a therapeutic drug for neurodegenerative disorders, including PD and HD. PMID:25596530

  3. Investigations of DNA damage induction and repair resulting from cellular exposure to high dose-rate pulsed proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renis, M.; Borghesi, M.; Favetta, M.; Malfa, G.; Manti, L.; Romano, F.; Schettino, G.; Tomasello, B.; Cirrone, G. A. P.

    2013-07-01

    Studies regarding the radiobiological effects of low dose radiation, microbeam irradiation services have been developed in the world and today laser acceleration of protons and heavy ions may be used in radiation therapy. The application of different facilities is essential for studying bystander effects and relating signalling phenomena in different cells or tissues. In particular the use of ion beams results advantageous in cancer radiotherapy compared to more commonly used X-rays, since the ability of ions in delivering lethal amount of doses into the target tumour avoiding or limiting damage to the contiguous healthy tissues. At the INFN-LNS in Catania, a multidisciplinary radiobiology group is strategically structured aimed to develop radiobiological research, finalised to therapeutic applications, compatible with the use of high dose laser-driven ion beams. The characteristic non-continuous dose rates with several orders of magnitude of laser-driven ion beams makes this facility very interesting in the cellular systems' response to ultra-high dose rates with non-conventional pulse time intervals cellular studies. Our group have projected to examine the effect of high dose laser-driven ion beams on two cellular types: foetal fibroblasts (normal control cells) and DU145 (prostate cancer cells), studying the modulation of some different bio-molecular parameters, in particular cell proliferation and viability, DNA damage, redox cellular status, morphological alterations of both the cytoskeleton components and some cell organelles and the possible presence of apoptotic or necrotic cell death. Our group performed preliminary experiments with high energy (60 MeV), dose rate of 10 Gy/min, doses of 1, 2, 3 Gy and LET 1 keV/μm on human foetal fibroblasts (control cells). We observed that cell viability was not influenced by the characteristics of the beam, the irradiation conditions or the analysis time. Conversely, DNA damage was present at time 0, immediately

  4. Investigations of DNA damage induction and repair resulting from cellular exposure to high dose-rate pulsed proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Renis, M.; Malfa, G.; Tomasello, B.; Borghesi, M.; Schettino, G.; Favetta, M.; Romano, F.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Manti, L.

    2013-07-26

    Studies regarding the radiobiological effects of low dose radiation, microbeam irradiation services have been developed in the world and today laser acceleration of protons and heavy ions may be used in radiation therapy. The application of different facilities is essential for studying bystander effects and relating signalling phenomena in different cells or tissues. In particular the use of ion beams results advantageous in cancer radiotherapy compared to more commonly used X-rays, since the ability of ions in delivering lethal amount of doses into the target tumour avoiding or limiting damage to the contiguous healthy tissues. At the INFN-LNS in Catania, a multidisciplinary radiobiology group is strategically structured aimed to develop radiobiological research, finalised to therapeutic applications, compatible with the use of high dose laser-driven ion beams. The characteristic non-continuous dose rates with several orders of magnitude of laser-driven ion beams makes this facility very interesting in the cellular systems' response to ultra-high dose rates with non-conventional pulse time intervals cellular studies. Our group have projected to examine the effect of high dose laser-driven ion beams on two cellular types: foetal fibroblasts (normal control cells) and DU145 (prostate cancer cells), studying the modulation of some different bio-molecular parameters, in particular cell proliferation and viability, DNA damage, redox cellular status, morphological alterations of both the cytoskeleton components and some cell organelles and the possible presence of apoptotic or necrotic cell death. Our group performed preliminary experiments with high energy (60 MeV), dose rate of 10 Gy/min, doses of 1, 2, 3 Gy and LET 1 keV/μm on human foetal fibroblasts (control cells). We observed that cell viability was not influenced by the characteristics of the beam, the irradiation conditions or the analysis time. Conversely, DNA damage was present at time 0, immediately

  5. Cellular HIV-1 DNA quantitation in patients during simplification therapy with protease inhibitor-sparing regimens.

    PubMed

    Sarmati, Loredana; Parisi, Saverio Giuseppe; Nicastri, Emanuele; d'Ettorre, Gabriella; Andreoni, Carolina; Dori, Luca; Gatti, Francesca; Montano, Marco; Buonomini, Anna Rita; Boldrin, Caterina; Palù, Giorgio; Vullo, Vincenzo; Andreoni, Massimo

    2007-07-01

    Simplified regimens containing protease-inhibitors (PI)-sparing combinations were used in patients with virological suppression after prolonged highly active antiretroviral therapy. This study evaluated the total HIV-1 DNA quantitation as a predictor of long-term success for PI-sparing simplified therapy. Sixty-two patients were enrolled in a prospective non-randomized cohort. All patients have been receiving a triple-therapy regimen, two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) plus one PI, for at least 9 months and were characterized by undetectable plasma HIV-1 RNA levels (<50 cp/ml) for at least 6 months. Patients were changed to a simplified PI-sparing regimen to overcome PI-associated adverse effects. HIV-DNA levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were evaluated at baseline and at the end of follow-up. Patients with proviral DNA levels below the median value (226 copies/10(6) PBMCs) had a significant higher CD4 cell count at nadir (P = 0.003) and at enrolment (P = 0.001) with respect to patients with HIV-DNA levels above the median value. At month 18, 53 out of 62 (85%) patients on simplified regimen showed virological success, 4 (6.4%) patients experienced virological failure and 5 (8%) patients showed viral blip. At logistic regression analysis, HIV-DNA levels below 226 copies/10(6) PBMCs at baseline were associated independently to a reduced risk of virological failure or viral blip during simplified therapy (OR 0.002, 95% CI 0.001-0.46, P = 0.025). The substitution of PI with NRTI or non-NRTIs may represent an effective treatment option. Indeed, treatment failure or viral blip were experienced by 6% and 8% of the patients on simplified therapy, respectively. In addition, sustained suppression of the plasma viral load was significantly correlated with low levels of proviral DNA before treatment simplification. PMID:17516532

  6. Intranasal DNA Vaccine for Protection against Respiratory Infectious Diseases: The Delivery Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yingying; Yuen, Pak-Wai; Lam, Jenny Ka-Wing

    2014-01-01

    Intranasal delivery of DNA vaccines has become a popular research area recently. It offers some distinguished advantages over parenteral and other routes of vaccine administration. Nasal mucosa as site of vaccine administration can stimulate respiratory mucosal immunity by interacting with the nasopharyngeal-associated lymphoid tissues (NALT). Different kinds of DNA vaccines are investigated to provide protection against respiratory infectious diseases including tuberculosis, coronavirus, influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) etc. DNA vaccines have several attractive development potential, such as producing cross-protection towards different virus subtypes, enabling the possibility of mass manufacture in a relatively short time and a better safety profile. The biggest obstacle to DNA vaccines is low immunogenicity. One of the approaches to enhance the efficacy of DNA vaccine is to improve DNA delivery efficiency. This review provides insight on the development of intranasal DNA vaccine for respiratory infections, with special attention paid to the strategies to improve the delivery of DNA vaccines using non-viral delivery agents. PMID:25014738

  7. Infectious bursal disease DNA vaccination conferring protection by delayed appearance and rapid clearance of invading viruses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Yi; Hsieh, Ming Kun; Tung, Chun-Yu; Wu, Ching Ching; Lin, Tsang Long

    2011-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the kinetics of viral load and immune response in protection against infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) by DNA vaccination. Chickens were DNA-vaccinated and challenged with IBDV one week after the third vaccination. Tissues were collected at 12 hours postinfection (HPI), 1 day postinfection (DPI), 3, 5, 7 and 10 DPI. The vaccinated chickens had less viral RNA, with delayed appearance and shorter duration in the bursa of Fabricius, spleen, and cecal tonsil than the challenged control chickens. Their ELISA and neutralizing antibody titers were decreased at 12 HPI and significantly lower (P < 0.05) than those in the challenged control chickens at later time points. Their spleen IFNγ expression was up-regulated compared to that in the DNA-vaccinated chickens without IBDV challenge. These results indicate that DNA vaccination confers protection against IBDV challenge by delayed appearance and rapid clearance of the invading viruses. PMID:21984266

  8. Protective efficacy of a Toxoplasma gondii rhoptry protein 13 plasmid DNA vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Yuan; Yuan, Zi-Guo; Petersen, Eskild; Li, Jie; Zhang, Xiu-Xiang; Li, Xiu-Zhen; Li, Hao-Xin; Lv, Zhi-Cheng; Cheng, Tian; Ren, Di; Yang, Gui-Lian; Lin, Rui-Qing; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2012-12-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite infecting humans and other warm-blooded animals, resulting in serious public health problems and economic losses worldwide. Rhoptries are involved in T. gondii invasion and host cell interaction and have been implicated as important virulence factors. In the present study, a DNA vaccine expressing rhoptry protein 13 (ROP13) of T. gondii inserted into eukaryotic expression vector pVAX I was constructed, and the immune protection it induced in Kunming mice was evaluated. Kunming mice were immunized intramuscularly with pVAX-ROP13 and/or with interleukin-18 (IL-18). Then, we evaluated the immune response using a lymphoproliferative assay, cytokine and antibody measurements, and the survival times of mice challenged with the virulent T. gondii RH strain (type I) and the cyst-forming PRU strain (type II). The results showed that pVAX-ROP13 alone or with pVAX/IL-18 induced a high level of specific anti-T. gondii antibodies and specific lymphocyte proliferative responses. Coinjection of pVAX/IL-18 significantly increased the production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), IL-2, IL-4, and IL-10. Further, challenge experiments showed that coimmunization of pVAX-ROP13 with pVAX/IL-18 significantly (P < 0.05) increased survival time (32.3 ± 2.7 days) compared with pVAX-ROP13 alone (24.9 ± 2.3 days). Immunized mice challenged with T. gondii cysts (strain PRU) had a significant reduction in the number of brain cysts, suggesting that ROP13 could trigger a strong humoral and cellular response against T. gondii cyst infection and that it is a potential vaccine candidate against toxoplasmosis, which provided the foundation for further development of effective vaccines against T. gondii. PMID:23015648

  9. A Review on Hemeoxygenase-2: Focus on Cellular Protection and Oxygen Response

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Sánchez, Jorge; Chánez-Cárdenas, María Elena

    2014-01-01

    Hemeoxygenase (HO) system is responsible for cellular heme degradation to biliverdin, iron, and carbon monoxide. Two isoforms have been reported to date. Homologous HO-1 and HO-2 are microsomal proteins with more than 45% residue identity, share a similar fold and catalyze the same reaction. However, important differences between isoforms also exist. HO-1 isoform has been extensively studied mainly by its ability to respond to cellular stresses such as hemin, nitric oxide donors, oxidative damage, hypoxia, hyperthermia, and heavy metals, between others. On the contrary, due to its apparently constitutive nature, HO-2 has been less studied. Nevertheless, its abundance in tissues such as testis, endothelial cells, and particularly in brain, has pointed the relevance of HO-2 function. HO-2 presents particular characteristics that made it a unique protein in the HO system. Since attractive results on HO-2 have been arisen in later years, we focused this review in the second isoform. We summarize information on gene description, protein structure, and catalytic activity of HO-2 and particular facts such as its cellular impact and activity regulation. Finally, we call attention on the role of HO-2 in oxygen sensing, discussing proposed hypothesis on heme binding motifs and redox/thiol switches that participate in oxygen sensing as well as evidences of HO-2 response to hypoxia. PMID:25136403

  10. Cellular proteins specifically bind single- and double-stranded DNA and RNA from the initiation site of a transcript that crosses the origin of DNA replication of herpes simplex virus 1.

    PubMed Central

    Roller, R J; McCormick, A L; Roizman, B

    1989-01-01

    The small-component origins of herpes simplex virus 1 DNA synthesis are transcribed late in infection by an RNA with heterogeneous initiation sites approximately 290-360 base pairs from the origins. We report that cellular proteins react with a labeled RNA probe representing the 5' terminus of a subset of this RNA but not with the complementary strand of this RNA. The proteins form two complexes. Complex 2 was formed by all nuclear extracts tested, whereas complex 1 was invariably formed by proteins present only in nuclear extracts of mock-infected cells. Complex 1 protects a contiguous stretch of 40 nucleotides of the labeled RNA probe from nuclease degradation. Formation of complex 1 was competitively inhibited in a sequence-specific fashion by single-stranded RNA and DNA and by double-stranded RNA and DNA. The protein(s) forming complex 1 is, thus, quite distinct from known nucleic acid-binding proteins in that they recognize a specific nucleotide sequence, irrespective of the nature (single- and double-stranded RNA and DNA) of the nucleic acid. We conclude the following: (i) the proteins forming complex 1 and 2 are probably different, (ii) complex 1 is neither required throughout infection for viral replication nor able to hinder viral replication in cells in culture, and (iii) cells susceptible to infection encode one or more proteins that recognize specific sequences in single-stranded nucleic acids; either these proteins impart a compatible conformation on single-stranded nucleic acids with the conformation of the same strand in the double-stranded nucleic acid, or these proteins confer a specific, distinct conformation to both single-stranded and double-stranded nucleic acids. Images PMID:2549540

  11. A novel role of the tumor suppressor GNMT in cellular defense against DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Wei-Li; Lin, Yan-Jun; Tang, Feng-Yao; Chen, Yi-Ming; Chiang, En-Pei Isabel

    2014-02-15

    Glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) is a folate binding protein commonly diminished in human hepatoma yet its role in tumor development remains to be established. GNMT binds to methylfolate but is also inhibited by it; how such interactions affect human carcinogenesis is unclear. We postulated that GNMT plays a role in folate-dependent methyl group homeostasis and helps maintain genome integrity by promoting nucleotide biosynthesis and DNA repair. To test the hypothesis, GNMT was over-expressed in GNMT-null cell lines cultured in conditions of folate abundance or restriction. The partitioning of folate dependent 1-carbon groups was investigated using stable isotopic tracers and GC/MS. DNA damage was assessed as uracil content in cell models, as well as in Gnmt wildtype (Gnmt(+/+)), heterozygote (Gnmt(+/-)) and knockout (Gnmt(-/-)) mice under folate deplete, replete, or supplementation conditions. Our study demonstrated that GMMT 1) supports methylene-folate dependent pyrimidine synthesis; 2) supports formylfolate dependent purine syntheses; 3) minimizes uracil incorporation into DNA when cells and animals were exposed to folate depletion; 4) translocates into nuclei during prolonged folate depletion. In conclusion, loss of GNMT impairs nucleotide biosynthesis. Over-expression of GNMT enhances nucleotide biosynthesis and improves DNA integrity by reducing uracil misincorporation in DNA both in vitro and in vivo. To our best knowledge, the role of GNMT in folate dependent 1-carbon transfer in nucleotide biosynthesis has never been investigated. The present study gives new insights into the underlying mechanism by which GNMT can participate in tumor prevention/suppression in humans. PMID:23922098

  12. Protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine construct encoding the VP2 gene of infectious bursal disease and a truncated HSP70 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Maity, Hemanta Kumar; Dey, Sohini; Mohan, C Madhan; Khulape, Sagar A; Pathak, Dinesh C; Vakharia, Vikram N

    2015-02-18

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is an acute, infectious, immunosuppressive disease affecting young chicken worldwide. The etiological agent IBD virus (IBDV) is a double stranded RNA virus with outer capsid protein VP2 of IBDV is the major antigenic determinant capable of inducing neutralizing antibody. DNA vaccines encoding VP2 has been extensively studied achieving only partial protection. However, the efficacy of DNA vaccines against IBDV can be augmented by choosing a potential molecular adjuvant. The goal of the present study is to evaluate the immune response and protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine encoding the C-terminal domain of the heat shock protein 70 (cHSP70) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis gene genetically fused with the full length VP2 gene of IBDV (pCIVP2-cHSP70) in comparison to a 'DNA prime-protein boost' approach and a DNA vaccine encoding the VP2 gene (pCIVP2) alone. The results indicate that both pCIVP2-cHSP70 and 'DNA prime-protein boost' elicited humoral as well as cellular immune responses. Chickens in the pCIVP2-cHSP70 and 'DNA prime-protein boost' groups developed significantly higher levels of ELISA titer to IBDV antigen compared to the group immunized with pCIVP2 alone (p<0.01). However, significantly higher levels of lymphocyte proliferative response, IL-12 and IFN-γ production were found in the pCIVP2-cHSP70 group compared to 'DNA prime-protein boost' group. Additionally, chickens immunized with pCIVP2-cHSP70 and 'DNA prime-protein boost' vaccines were completely protected against the vvIBDV whereas pCIVP2 DNA vaccine alone was able to protect only 70%. These findings suggest that the truncated C-terminal HSP70 mediated DNA vaccine genetically fused with the VP2 gene construct stimulated both humoral and cell mediated immune responses and conferred complete protection against IBDV. This novel strategy is perhaps a seminal concept in utilizing HSP70 as an adjuvant molecule to elicit an immune response against IBD affecting chickens. PMID

  13. Increased origin activity in transformed versus normal cells: identification of novel protein players involved in DNA replication and cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Di Paola, Domenic; Rampakakis, Emmanouil; Chan, Man Kid; Arvanitis, Dina N.; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Using libraries of replication origins generated previously, we identified three clones that supported the autonomous replication of their respective plasmids in transformed, but not in normal cells. Assessment of their in vivo replication activity by in situ chromosomal DNA replication assays revealed that the chromosomal loci corresponding to these clones coincided with chromosomal replication origins in all cell lines, which were more active by 2–3-fold in the transformed by comparison to the normal cells. Evaluation of pre-replication complex (pre-RC) protein abundance at these origins in transformed and normal cells by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, using anti-ORC2, -cdc6 and -cdt1 antibodies, showed that they were bound by these pre-RC proteins in all cell lines, but a 2–3-fold higher abundance was observed in the transformed by comparison to the normal cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) performed on the most efficiently replicating clone, using nuclear extracts from the transformed and normal cells, revealed the presence of a DNA replication complex in transformed cells, which was barely detectable in normal cells. Subsequent supershift EMSAs suggested the presence of transformation-specific complexes. Mass spectrometric analysis of these complexes revealed potential new protein players involved in DNA replication that appear to correlate with cellular transformation. PMID:20064876

  14. A fusion DNA vaccine that targets antigen-presenting cells increases protection from viral challenge

    PubMed Central

    Deliyannis, Georgia; Boyle, Jefferey S.; Brady, Jamie L.; Brown, Lorena E.; Lew, Andrew M.

    2000-01-01

    Improving the immunological potency, particularly the Ab response, is a serious hurdle for the protective efficacy and hence broad application of DNA vaccines. We examined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a hemagglutinin-based influenza DNA vaccine that was targeted to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) by fusion to CTLA4. The targeted vaccine was shown to induce an accelerated and increased Ab response (as compared with those receiving the nontargeted control) that was predominated by IgG1 and recognized conformationally dependent viral epitopes. Moreover, mice receiving the APC-targeted DNA vaccine had significantly reduced viral titers (100-fold) after a nonlethal virus challenge. The increased protective efficacy was most likely because of increased Ab responses, as cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses were not enhanced. Targeting was demonstrated by direct binding studies of CTLA4 fusion proteins to the cognate ligand (B7; expressed on APCs in vivo). In addition, a targeted protein was detected at 4-fold higher levels in draining lymph nodes within 2–24 h of administration. Therefore, this study demonstrates that targeting DNA-encoded antigen to APCs results in enhanced immunity and strongly suggests that this approach may be useful in improving the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines. PMID:10823919

  15. Smallpox DNA vaccine delivered by novel skin electroporation device protects mice against intranasal poxvirus challenge.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Jay W; Golden, Joseph W; Ferro, Anthony M; King, Alan D

    2007-02-26

    Previously, we demonstrated that an experimental smallpox DNA vaccine comprised of four vaccinia virus genes (4pox) administered by gene gun elicited protective immunity in mice challenged with vaccinia virus, and in nonhuman primates challenged with monkeypox virus (Hooper JW, et al. Smallpox DNA vaccine protects nonhuman primates against lethal monkeypox. J Virol 2004;78:4433-43). Here, we report that this 4pox DNA vaccine can be efficiently delivered by a novel method involving skin electroporation using plasmid DNA-coated microneedle arrays. Mice vaccinated with the 4pox DNA vaccine mounted robust antibody responses against the four immunogens-of-interest, including neutralizing antibody titers that were greater than those elicited by the traditional live virus vaccine administered by scarification. Moreover, vaccinated mice were completely protected against a lethal (>10LD(50)) intranasal challenge with vaccinia virus strain IHD-J. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a protective immune response being elicited by microneedle-mediated skin electroporation. PMID:17240007

  16. TRF2-Mediated Control of Telomere DNA Topology as a Mechanism for Chromosome-End Protection.

    PubMed

    Benarroch-Popivker, Delphine; Pisano, Sabrina; Mendez-Bermudez, Aaron; Lototska, Liudmyla; Kaur, Parminder; Bauwens, Serge; Djerbi, Nadir; Latrick, Chrysa M; Fraisier, Vincent; Pei, Bei; Gay, Alexandre; Jaune, Emilie; Foucher, Kevin; Cherfils-Vicini, Julien; Aeby, Eric; Miron, Simona; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo; Ye, Jing; Le Du, Marie-Hélène; Wang, Hong; Gilson, Eric; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe

    2016-01-21

    The shelterin proteins protect telomeres against activation of the DNA damage checkpoints and recombinational repair. We show here that a dimer of the shelterin subunit TRF2 wraps ∼ 90 bp of DNA through several lysine and arginine residues localized around its homodimerization domain. The expression of a wrapping-deficient TRF2 mutant, named Top-less, alters telomeric DNA topology, decreases the number of terminal loops (t-loops), and triggers the ATM checkpoint, while still protecting telomeres against non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). In Top-less cells, the protection against NHEJ is alleviated if the expression of the TRF2-interacting protein RAP1 is reduced. We conclude that a distinctive topological state of telomeric DNA, controlled by the TRF2-dependent DNA wrapping and linked to t-loop formation, inhibits both ATM activation and NHEJ. The presence of RAP1 at telomeres appears as a backup mechanism to prevent NHEJ when topology-mediated telomere protection is impaired. PMID:26774283

  17. A fusion DNA vaccine that targets antigen-presenting cells increases protection from viral challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deliyannis, Georgia; Boyle, Jefferey S.; Brady, Jamie L.; Brown, Lorena E.; Lew, Andrew M.

    2000-06-01

    Improving the immunological potency, particularly the Ab response, is a serious hurdle for the protective efficacy and hence broad application of DNA vaccines. We examined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a hemagglutinin-based influenza DNA vaccine that was targeted to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) by fusion to CTLA4. The targeted vaccine was shown to induce an accelerated and increased Ab response (as compared with those receiving the nontargeted control) that was predominated by IgG1 and recognized conformationally dependent viral epitopes. Moreover, mice receiving the APC-targeted DNA vaccine had significantly reduced viral titers (100-fold) after a nonlethal virus challenge. The increased protective efficacy was most likely because of increased Ab responses, as cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses were not enhanced. Targeting was demonstrated by direct binding studies of CTLA4 fusion proteins to the cognate ligand (B7; expressed on APCs in vivo). In addition, a targeted protein was detected at 4-fold higher levels in draining lymph nodes within 2-24 h of administration. Therefore, this study demonstrates that targeting DNA-encoded antigen to APCs results in enhanced immunity and strongly suggests that this approach may be useful in improving the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines.

  18. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of endothelial ischemia/reperfusion injury: perspectives and implications for postischemic myocardial protection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; He, Guo-Wei; Underwood, Malcolm John; Yu, Cheuk-Man

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is a major cause of myocardial damage. Despite continuous efforts, minimizing I/R injury still represents a great challenge in standard medical treatments of ischemic heart disease, i.e., thrombolytic therapy, primary percutaneous coronary intervention, and coronary arterial bypass grafting. Development of effective interventions and strategies to prevent or reduce myocardial I/R injury is therefore of great clinical significance. Endothelial dysfunction plays a significant role in myocardial I/R injury, which renders endothelial cells an attractive target for postischemic myocardial protection. The rapidly evolving knowledge of the mechanisms of endothelial I/R injury helps broaden perspective for future development of novel strategies targeting endothelium for alleviating myocardial I/R damage. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of endothelial I/R injury. Current perspectives and future directions for developing endothelium targeting therapeutics for postischemic myocardial protection are further discussed. PMID:27158368

  19. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of endothelial ischemia/reperfusion injury: perspectives and implications for postischemic myocardial protection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qin; He, Guo-Wei; Underwood, Malcolm John; Yu, Cheuk-Man

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is a major cause of myocardial damage. Despite continuous efforts, minimizing I/R injury still represents a great challenge in standard medical treatments of ischemic heart disease, i.e., thrombolytic therapy, primary percutaneous coronary intervention, and coronary arterial bypass grafting. Development of effective interventions and strategies to prevent or reduce myocardial I/R injury is therefore of great clinical significance. Endothelial dysfunction plays a significant role in myocardial I/R injury, which renders endothelial cells an attractive target for postischemic myocardial protection. The rapidly evolving knowledge of the mechanisms of endothelial I/R injury helps broaden perspective for future development of novel strategies targeting endothelium for alleviating myocardial I/R damage. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of endothelial I/R injury. Current perspectives and future directions for developing endothelium targeting therapeutics for postischemic myocardial protection are further discussed. PMID:27158368

  20. Protection of DNA during oxidative stress and cytotoxic potential of Artemisia absinthium.

    PubMed

    Ali, Abid; Rahman, Khalilur; Jahan, Nazish; Jamil, Amer; Rashid, Abid; Shah, Syed Muhammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal plants are rich in secondary metabolites (alkoloids, glycosides, coumarins, flavonides, steroids, etc.) and considered to be more effective and a safer alternative source to manage a variety of diseases related to liver, heart and kidney disordered. This study determines in vitro antioxidant and in vivo toxicological profile including hemolytic, brine shrimp lethality and mutagenicity of aerial parts of Artemisia absinthium. DNA protection assay was performed on pUC19 plasmid vector using H(2)O(2) as oxidative agent. Total phenolic and flavonoid content were determined using colorimetric methods. Toxicity of the plant was evaluated by brine shrimp lethality, hemolytic and mutagenic activity. DNA protection assay of the plant showed concentration dependent protective effect and at concentration 10μL/mL revealed complete protective effect against H(2)O(2) induced DNA damage. Highest phenolic and flavonoid content was found to be 167.3 (mg GAE 100g DW(-1)) and 14 (mg CE 100g DW(-1)) respectively. Results showed that A. absinthium is potent against standard toxicological procedures, that indicates the presence of bioactive components in the plant and possess antioxidant activity that protects DNA against H(2)O(2) induced oxidative damage. Thus the results showed/support that A. absinthium provides significant health benefits. PMID:27005506

  1. DNA Demethylation Upregulated Nrf2 Expression in Alzheimer’s Disease Cellular Model

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Huimin; Wang, Li; Chen, Beibei; Zheng, Peng; He, Yi; Ding, Yubin; Deng, Yushuang; Lu, Xi; Guo, Xiuming; Zhang, Yuping; Li, Yu; Yu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is an important transcription factor in the defense against oxidative stress. Cumulative evidence has shown that oxidative stress plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Previous animal and clinical studies had observed decreased expression of Nrf2 in AD. However, the underlying regulation mechanisms of Nrf2 in AD remain unclear. Here, we used the DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts) inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-Aza) to test whether Nrf2 expression was regulated by methylation in N2a cells characterizing by expressing human Swedish mutant amyloid precursor protein (N2a/APPswe). We found 5-Aza treatment increased Nrf2 at both messenger RNA and protein levels via downregulating the expression of Dnmts and DNA demethylation. In addition, 5-Aza-mediated upregulation of Nrf2 expression was concomitant with increased nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and higher expression of Nrf2 downstream target gene NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductas (NQO1). Our study showed that DNA demethylation promoted the Nrf2 cell signaling pathway, which may enhance the antioxidant system against AD development. PMID:26779013

  2. A sindbis virus replicon-based DNA vaccine encoding the rabies virus glycoprotein elicits immune responses and complete protection in mice from lethal challenge.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Sonal; Dahiya, Shyam S; Sonwane, Arvind A; Patel, Chhabi Lal; Saini, Mohini; Rai, A; Gupta, Praveen K

    2008-12-01

    A sindbis virus replicon-based DNA vaccine encoding rabies virus glycoprotein (G) was developed by subcloning rabies G gene into a sindbis virus replicon-based vaccine vector (pAlpha). The self-amplification of RNA transcripts and translation efficiency of rabies G was analyzed in pAlpha-Rab-G-transfected mammalian cells using RT-PCR, SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. The transfected cells also showed induction of apoptosis which is an important event in the enhancement of immune responses. Further, immune responses induced with replicon-based rabies DNA vaccine (pAlpha-Rab-G) was compared with conventional rabies DNA vaccine and commercial cell culture vaccine (Rabipur) in intramuscularly injected mice. The mice immunized with replicon-based rabies DNA vaccine induced humoral and cell mediated immune responses better than conventional rabies DNA vaccine however, comparable to Rabipur vaccine. On challenge with rabies virus CVS strain, replicon-based rabies DNA vaccine conferred complete protection similar to Rabipur. These results demonstrate that replicon-based rabies DNA vaccine is effective in inducing both humoral and cellular immune responses and can be considered as effective vaccine against rabies. PMID:18848857

  3. Protective Effect of Garlic on Cellular Senescence in UVB-Exposed HaCaT Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cells, which induces the cellular senescence and photoaging. The present study investigated the protective effects of garlic on photo-damage and cellular senescence in UVB-exposed human keratinocytes, HaCaT cells. An in vitro cell free system was used to examine the scavenging activity of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radicals and nitric oxide (NO). The effect of garlic extract on ROS formation, MMP-1 protein and mRNA expressions, cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, senescence associated-β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity, and silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1) activity were determined in UVB-irradiated HaCaT cells. Garlic exhibited strong DPPH radical and NO scavenging activity in cell free system exhibiting IC50 values of 2.50 mg/mL and 4.38 mg/mL, respectively. Garlic pretreatment attenuated the production of UVB-induced intracellular ROS. MMP-1 level, which has been known to be induced by ROS, was dramatically elevated by UVB irradiation, and UVB-induced MMP-1 mRNA and protein expressions were significantly reduced by garlic treatment (50 µg/mL) comparable to those of UV-unexposed control cells. UV-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine productions (IL-6 and IL-1β) were significantly inhibited by pretreatment with garlic in a dose-dependent manner. SA-β-gal activity, a classical biomarker of cellular senescence, and SIRT1 activity, which has attracted attention as an anti-aging factor in recent years, were ameliorated by garlic treatment in UV-irradiated HaCaT cells. The present study provides the first evidence of garlic inhibiting UVB-induced photoaging as a result of augmentation of cellular senescence in HaCaT human keratinocytes. PMID:27483310

  4. Protective Effect of Garlic on Cellular Senescence in UVB-Exposed HaCaT Human Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cells, which induces the cellular senescence and photoaging. The present study investigated the protective effects of garlic on photo-damage and cellular senescence in UVB-exposed human keratinocytes, HaCaT cells. An in vitro cell free system was used to examine the scavenging activity of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radicals and nitric oxide (NO). The effect of garlic extract on ROS formation, MMP-1 protein and mRNA expressions, cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, senescence associated-β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity, and silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1) activity were determined in UVB-irradiated HaCaT cells. Garlic exhibited strong DPPH radical and NO scavenging activity in cell free system exhibiting IC50 values of 2.50 mg/mL and 4.38 mg/mL, respectively. Garlic pretreatment attenuated the production of UVB-induced intracellular ROS. MMP-1 level, which has been known to be induced by ROS, was dramatically elevated by UVB irradiation, and UVB-induced MMP-1 mRNA and protein expressions were significantly reduced by garlic treatment (50 µg/mL) comparable to those of UV-unexposed control cells. UV-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine productions (IL-6 and IL-1β) were significantly inhibited by pretreatment with garlic in a dose-dependent manner. SA-β-gal activity, a classical biomarker of cellular senescence, and SIRT1 activity, which has attracted attention as an anti-aging factor in recent years, were ameliorated by garlic treatment in UV-irradiated HaCaT cells. The present study provides the first evidence of garlic inhibiting UVB-induced photoaging as a result of augmentation of cellular senescence in HaCaT human keratinocytes. PMID:27483310

  5. Effective humoral and cellular immunoprotective responses in Li ESAp-MDP vaccinated protected dogs.

    PubMed

    Bourdoiseau, G; Hugnet, C; Gonçalves, R Bras; Vézilier, F; Petit-Didier, E; Papierok, G; Lemesre, J L

    2009-03-15

    Cell-mediated and humoral immunity were explored in LiESAp-MDP vaccinated protected dogs versus susceptible placebo dogs 2 months and 8 months post-vaccination. As previously described, a strong and long-lasting cell-mediated immunity, critical for protection against Leishmania infantum was exclusively revealed in vaccinated dogs as confirmed by a positive response to the intradermal inoculation of leishmanin and by a significant higher anti-leishmanial activity of canine monocytes-derived macrophages. Moreover, our results support the view that cooperation of humoral antibody with cell-mediated immunity might be important in developing protective immunity in LiESAp-MDP vaccinated dogs. Anti-LiESAp serum samples were found functionally active in vitro, promoting (i) early killing of pretreated promastigotes and amastigotes, (ii) strong inhibitory effect on the in vitro growth of both parasitic developmental stages of L. infantum and (iii) most importantly, a significant inhibition of pretreated promastigotes in vitro infectivity in canine macrophages. However, anti-LiESAp antibody response was not implicated in the promastigotes-amastigotes differentiation process. In these experiments, we have added additional support to the concept that antibodies to Leishmania may be important in developing protective immunity. PMID:19046774

  6. Protection against Streptococcus pneumoniae lung infection after nasopharyngeal colonization requires both humoral and cellular immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, R; Cohen, J M; Jose, R J; de Vogel, C; Baxendale, H; Brown, J S

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of pneumonia and infective exacerbations of chronic lung disease, yet there are few data on how adaptive immunity can specifically prevent S. pneumoniae lung infection. We have used a murine model of nasopharyngeal colonization by the serotype 19F S. pneumoniae strain EF3030 followed by lung infection to investigate whether colonization protects against subsequent lung infection and the mechanisms involved. EF3030 colonization induced systemic and local immunoglobulin G against a limited number of S. pneumoniae protein antigens rather than capsular polysaccharide. During lung infection, previously colonized mice had increased early cytokine responses and neutrophil recruitment and reduced bacterial colony-forming units in the lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid compared with control mice. Colonization-induced protection was lost when experiments were repeated in B-cell- or neutrophil-deficient mice. Furthermore, the improved interleukin (IL)-17 response to infection in previously colonized mice was abolished by depletion of CD4+ cells, and prior colonization did not protect against lung infection in mice depleted of CD4+ cells or IL17. Together these data show that naturally acquired protective immunity to S. pneumoniae lung infection requires both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, providing a template for the design of improved vaccines that can specifically prevent pneumonia or acute bronchitis. PMID:25354319

  7. Rabies DNA vaccine encoding lysosome-targeted glycoprotein supplemented with Emulsigen-D confers complete protection in preexposure and postexposure studies in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manpreet; Saxena, Ankur; Rai, Anant; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2010-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of rabies and the inability of currently used vaccination strategies to provide highly potent and cost-effective therapy indicate the need for an improved rabies vaccine. Thus, DNA vaccine based on lysosome-targeted glycoprotein of the rabies virus was evaluated in BALB/c mice. It imparted partial protection (60%) against challenge with 20 LD(50) of the challenge virus standard (CVS) strain of rabies virus. To improve the outcome of vaccination, to ultimately enhance the immune response, we investigated different routes for DNA vaccine delivery, varied doses of DNA, and the influence of adjuvant supplementation. The highest immune response pertaining to IgG antibody titer, with a predominantly IgG1/IgG2a subclass distribution, effective cellular immunity, and a high level of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (RVNAs) was attained by the optimized DNA vaccine formulation comprising intramuscular administration of 100 microg of DNA vaccine supplemented with Emulsigen-D. In preexposure prophylaxis, a 3-dose regimen of this formulation generated a high RVNA titer (32 IU/ml) and conferred complete protection against challenge with 20 LD(50) of CVS. For postexposure efficacy analysis, rabies was experimentally induced with 50 LD(50) of CVS. Subsequent therapy with 5 doses of the formulation completely prevented rabies in BALB/c mice, which maintained protective RVNA titers of 4 IU/ml. The World Health Organization recommended rabies protective titer threshold is 0.5 IU/ml. Thus, this optimized DNA vaccine formulation provides an avenue for preventing and controlling rabies. PMID:19741168

  8. Factors influencing the transfection efficiency and cellular uptake mechanisms of Pluronic P123-modified polypropyleneimine/pDNA polyplexes in multidrug resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jijin; Hao, Junguo; Fang, Xiaoling; Sha, Xianyi

    2016-04-01

    Generally, the major obstacles for efficient gene delivery are cellular internalization and endosomal escape of nucleic acid such as plasmid DNA (pDNA) or small interfering RNA (siRNA). We previously developed Pluronic P123 modified polypropyleneimine (PPI)/pDNA (P123-PPI/pDNA) polyplexes as a gene delivery system. The results showed that P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes revealed higher transfection efficiency than PPI/pDNA polyplexes in multidrug resistant breast cancer cells. As a continued effort, the present investigation on the factors influencing the transfection efficiency, cellular uptake mechanisms, and intracellular fate of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes is reported. The presence of P123 was the main factor influencing the transfection efficiency of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes in MCF-7/ADR cells, but other parameters, such as N/P ratio, FBS concentration, incubation time and temperature were important as well. The endocytic inhibitors against clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), caveolae-mediated endocytosis (CvME), and macropinocytosis were involved in the internalization to investigate their effects on the cellular uptake and transfection efficiency of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes in vitro. The data showed that the internalization of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes was obtained from both CME and CvME. Colocalization experiments with TRITC-transferrin (CME indicator), Alexa Fluor 555-CTB (CvME indicator), monoclonal anti-α-tubulin (microtubule indicator), and LysoTracker Green (Endosome/lysosome indicator) were carried out to confirm the internalization routes. The results showed that both CME and CvME played vital roles in the effective transfection of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes. Endosome/lysosome system and skeleton, including actin filament and microtubule, were necessary for the transportation after internalization. PMID:26741268

  9. Ru(ii)-polypyridyl surface functionalised gold nanoparticles as DNA targeting supramolecular structures and luminescent cellular imaging agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Calvo, Miguel; Orange, Kim N.; Elmes, Robert B. P.; La Cour Poulsen, Bjørn; Williams, D. Clive; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur

    2015-12-01

    The development of Ru(ii) functionalized gold nanoparticles 1-3.AuNP is described. These systems were found to be mono-disperse with a hydrodynamic radius of ca. 15 nm in water but gave rise to the formation of higher order structures in buffered solution. The interaction of 1-3.AuNP with DNA was also studied by spectroscopic and microscopic methods and suggested the formation of large self-assembly structures in solution. The uptake of 1-3.AuNP by cancer cells was studied using both confocal fluorescence as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), with the aim of investigating their potential as tools for cellular biology. These systems displaying a non-toxic profile with favourable photophysical properties may have application across various biological fields including diagnostics and therapeutics.The development of Ru(ii) functionalized gold nanoparticles 1-3.AuNP is described. These systems were found to be mono-disperse with a hydrodynamic radius of ca. 15 nm in water but gave rise to the formation of higher order structures in buffered solution. The interaction of 1-3.AuNP with DNA was also studied by spectroscopic and microscopic methods and suggested the formation of large self-assembly structures in solution. The uptake of 1-3.AuNP by cancer cells was studied using both confocal fluorescence as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), with the aim of investigating their potential as tools for cellular biology. These systems displaying a non-toxic profile with favourable photophysical properties may have application across various biological fields including diagnostics and therapeutics. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05598a

  10. Protective effects of black tea extract against oxidative DNA damage in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ježovičová, Miriam; Koňariková, Katarína; Ďuračková, Zdeňka; Keresteš, Ján; Králik, Gabriel; Žitňanová, Ingrid

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the genoprotective and radioprotective effects of black tea extract (BTE) against the induction of single strand DNA breaks in human lymphocytes subjected to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or gamma-rays (2 Gy dose). Lymphocytes were incubated with or without different concentrations of BTE (0.005-500 µg/ml) for 30 min, followed by treatment with or without H2O2 (0.088 µmol/l) for 5 min. To examine the radioprotective effect of BTE, the lymphocytes were incubated with or without BTE for 30 and 60 min prior to and following in vitro irradiation. Oxidative damage to DNA was monitored using a comet assay. BTE at lower concentrations prevented H2O2-induced DNA damage. An increase in BTE concentrations resulted in increased formation of single strand DNA breaks. BTE also exerted significant protective effects against gamma radiation-induced total DNA damage in healthy lymphocytes during their 30 or 60 min incubation with BTE prior to or following irradiation. Therefore, the protective effect of BTE against irradiation was time-dependent. The results contribute to the research on potential beneficial effects of natural compounds, such as BTE, in cancer and its protective effects of normal tissue during radiation therapy. PMID:26718244

  11. Actin and DNA Protect Histones from Degradation by Bacterial Proteases but Inhibit Their Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sol, Asaf; Skvirsky, Yaniv; Blotnick, Edna; Bachrach, Gilad; Muhlrad, Andras

    2016-01-01

    Histones are small polycationic proteins located in the cell nucleus. Together, DNA and histones are integral constituents of the nucleosomes. Upon apoptosis, necrosis, and infection – induced cell death, histones are released from the cell. The extracellular histones have strong antimicrobial activity but are also cytotoxic and thought as mediators of cell death in sepsis. The antimicrobial activity of the cationic extracellular histones is inhibited by the polyanionic DNA and F-actin, which also become extracellular upon cell death. DNA and F-actin protect histones from degradation by the proteases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Porphyromonas gingivalis. However, though the integrity of the histones is protected, the activity of histones as antibacterial agents is lost. The inhibition of the histone’s antibacterial activity and their protection from proteolysis by DNA and F-actin indicate a tight electrostatic interaction between the positively charged histones and negatively charged DNA and F-actin, which may have physiological significance in maintaining the equilibrium between the beneficial antimicrobial activity of extracellular histones and their cytotoxic effects. PMID:27555840

  12. DNA vaccine protects ornamental koi (Cyprinus carpio koi) against North American spring viremia of carp virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmenegger, E.J.; Kurath, G.

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV) in the United States constitutes a potentially serious alien pathogen threat to susceptible fish stocks in North America. A DNA vaccine with an SVCV glycoprotein (G) gene from a North American isolate was constructed. In order to test the vaccine a challenge model utilizing a specific pathogen-free domestic koi stock and a cold water stress treatment was also developed. We have conducted four trial studies demonstrating that the pSGnc DNA vaccine provided protection in vaccinated fish against challenge at low, moderate, and high virus doses of the homologous virus. The protection was significant (p < 0.05) as compared to fish receiving a mock vaccine construct containing a luciferase reporter gene and to non-vaccinated controls in fish ranging in age from 3 to 14 months. In all trials, the SVCV-G DNA immunized fish were challenged 28-days post-vaccination (546 degree-days) and experienced low mortalities varying from 10 to 50% with relative percent survivals ranging from 50 to 88%. The non-vaccinated controls and mock construct vaccinated fish encountered high cumulative percent mortalities ranging from 70 to 100%. This is the first report of a SVCV DNA vaccine being tested successfully in koi. These experiments prove that the SVCV DNA (pSGnc) vaccine can elicit specific reproducible protection and validates its potential use as a prophylactic vaccine in koi and other vulnerable North American fish stocks.

  13. Oxidative stress diverts tRNA synthetase to nucleus for protection against DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Wei, Na; Shi, Yi; Truong, Lan N; Fisch, Kathleen M; Xu, Tao; Gardiner, Elisabeth; Fu, Guangsen; Hsu, Yun-Shiuan Olivia; Kishi, Shuji; Su, Andrew I; Wu, Xiaohua; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2014-10-23

    Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS) is known for its essential aminoacylation function in protein synthesis. Here we report a function for TyrRS in DNA damage protection. We found that oxidative stress, which often downregulates protein synthesis, induces TyrRS to rapidly translocate from the cytosol to the nucleus. We also found that angiogenin mediates or potentiates this stress-induced translocalization. The nuclear-localized TyrRS activates transcription factor E2F1 to upregulate the expression of DNA damage repair genes such as BRCA1 and RAD51. The activation is achieved through direct interaction of TyrRS with TRIM28 to sequester this vertebrate-specific epigenetic repressor and its associated HDAC1 from deacetylating and suppressing E2F1. Remarkably, overexpression of TyrRS strongly protects against UV-induced DNA double-strand breaks in zebrafish, whereas restricting TyrRS nuclear entry completely abolishes the protection. Therefore, oxidative stress triggers an essential cytoplasmic enzyme used for protein synthesis to translocate to the nucleus to protect against DNA damage. PMID:25284223

  14. Manipulation of cellular DNA damage repair machinery facilitates propagation of human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Nicholas A; Galloway, Denise A

    2014-06-01

    In general, the interplay among viruses and DNA damage repair (DDR) pathways can be divided based on whether the interaction promotes or inhibits the viral lifecycle. The propagation of human papillomaviruses is both promoted and inhibited by DDR proteins. As a result, HPV proteins both activate repair pathways, such as the ATM and ATR pathways, and inhibit other pathways, most notably the p53 signaling pathway. Indeed, the role of HPV proteins, with regard to the DDR pathways, can be divided into two broad categories. The first set of viral proteins, HPV E1 and E2 activate a DNA damage response and recruit repair proteins to viral replication centers, where these proteins are likely usurped to replicate the viral genome. Because the activation of the DDR response typically elicits a cell cycle arrest that would impeded the viral lifecycle, the second set of HPV proteins, HPV E6 and E7, prevents the DDR response from pausing cell cycle progression or inducing apoptosis. This review provides a detailed account of the interactions among HPV proteins and DDR proteins that facilitate HPV propagation. PMID:24412279

  15. Mutations affecting sensitivity of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum to DNA-damaging agents.

    PubMed

    Bronner, C E; Welker, D L; Deering, R A

    1992-09-01

    We describe 22 new mutants of D. discoideum that are sensitive to DNA damage. These mutants were isolated on the basis of sensitivity to either temperature, gamma-rays, or 4-nitroquinolone-1-oxide (4NQO). The doses of gamma-rays, ultraviolet light (UV), and 4NQO required to reduce the survival of colony-forming ability of these mutants to 10% (D10) range from 2% to 100% of the D10s for the nonmutant, parent strains. For most of the mutants, those which are very sensitive to one agent are very sensitive to all agents tested and those which are moderately sensitive to one agent, are moderately sensitive to all agents tested. One mutant is sensitive only to 4NQO. Linkage relationships have been examined for 13 of these mutants. This linkage information was used to design complementation tests to determine allelism with previously characterized complementation groups affecting sensitivity to radiation. 4 of the new mutants fall within previously identified complementation groups and 3 new complementation groups have been identified (radJ, radK and radL). Other new loci probably also exist among these new mutants. This brings the number of characterized mutants of D. discoideum which are sensitive to DNA-damaging agents to 33 and the number of assigned complementation groups to 11. PMID:1380652

  16. A novel liquid multi-phytonutrient supplement demonstrates DNA-protective effects.

    PubMed

    Baechler, Benjamin J; Nita, Florina; Jones, Lon; Frestedt, Joy L

    2009-06-01

    This study explored the DNA protective (anti-mutagenic) effects of an oral, liquid, multi-phytonutrient dietary supplement containing a proprietary blend of fruits, vegetables and aloe vera concentrated components in addition to a proprietary catechin complex from green tea (VIBE Cardiac & Life, Eniva Nutraceuticals, Anoka, MN; herein described as "VIBE"). This study tested the hypothesis that VIBE would reduce DNA damage in skin cells exposed to UVR. Human epidermal cells, from the cell line A431NS, were treated with 0% (control), 0.125%, 0.5%, 1% and 2% VIBE, and then exposed to 240 J/m(2) UVR. The amount of DNA damage was assessed using the COMET assay. At each concentration tested, a significantly smaller amount of DNA damage was measured by the COMET assay for the VIBE treated cells compared to the control cells exposed to UVR without VIBE. The dose response curves showed a maximal response at 0.5% VIBE with a threefold reduction in COMET tail density compared to the control samples without VIBE (p < 0.001). Additional research is warranted in human clinical trials to further explore the results of this study which demonstrated the DNA protective and anti-mutagenic effects of VIBE for human skin cells exposed to UVR-induced DNA damage. PMID:19255855

  17. Mcl-1 protects prostate cancer cells from cell death mediated by chemotherapy-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Teresita; de Las Pozas, Alicia; Parrondo, Ricardo; Palenzuela, Deanna; Cayuso, William; Rai, Priyamvada; Perez-Stable, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 is highly expressed in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), resulting in resistance to apoptosis and association with poor prognosis. Although predominantly localized in the cytoplasm, there is evidence that Mcl-1 exhibits nuclear localization where it is thought to protect against DNA damage-induced cell death. The role of Mcl-1 in mediating resistance to chemotherapy-induced DNA damage in prostate cancer (PCa) is not known. We show in human PCa cell lines and in TRAMP, a transgenic mouse model of PCa, that the combination of the antimitotic agent ENMD-1198 (analog of 2-methoxyestradiol) with betulinic acid (BA, increases proteotoxic stress) targets Mcl-1 by increasing its proteasomal degradation, resulting in increased γH2AX (DNA damage) and apoptotic/necrotic cell death. Knockdown of Mcl-1 in CRPC cells leads to elevated γH2AX, DNA strand breaks, and cell death after treatment with 1198 + BA- or doxorubicin. Additional knockdowns in PC3 cells suggests that cytoplasmic Mcl-1 protects against DNA damage by blocking the mitochondrial release of apoptosis-inducing factor and thereby preventing its nuclear translocation and subsequent interaction with the cyclophilin A endonuclease. Overall, our results suggest that chemotherapeutic agents that target Mcl-1 will promote cell death in response to DNA damage, particularly in CRPC. PMID:26425662

  18. Mitochondrial Telomerase Protects Cancer Cells from Nuclear DNA Damage and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Singhapol, Chatchawan; Pal, Deepali; Czapiewski, Rafal; Porika, Mahendar; Nelson, Glyn; Saretzki, Gabriele C.

    2013-01-01

    Most cancer cells express high levels of telomerase and proliferate indefinitely. In addition to its telomere maintenance function, telomerase also has a pro-survival function resulting in an increased resistance against DNA damage and decreased apoptosis induction. However, the molecular mechanisms for this protective function remain elusive and it is unclear whether it is connected to telomere maintenance or is rather a non-telomeric function of the telomerase protein, TERT. It was shown recently that the protein subunit of telomerase can shuttle from the nucleus to the mitochondria upon oxidative stress where it protects mitochondrial function and decreases intracellular oxidative stress. Here we show that endogenous telomerase (TERT protein) shuttles from the nucleus into mitochondria upon oxidative stress in cancer cells and analyzed the nuclear exclusion patterns of endogenous telomerase after treatment with hydrogen peroxide in different cell lines. Cell populations excluded TERT from the nucleus upon oxidative stress in a heterogeneous fashion. We found a significant correlation between nuclear localization of telomerase and high DNA damage, while cells which excluded telomerase from the nucleus displayed no or very low DNA damage. We modeled nuclear and mitochondrial telomerase using organelle specific localization vectors and confirmed that mitochondrial localization of telomerase protects the nucleus from inflicted DNA damage and apoptosis while, in contrast, nuclear localization of telomerase correlated with higher amounts of DNA damage and apoptosis. It is known that nuclear DNA damage can be caused by mitochondrially generated reactive oxygen species (ROS). We demonstrate here that mitochondrial localization of telomerase specifically prevents nuclear DNA damage by decreasing levels of mitochondrial ROS. We suggest that this decrease of oxidative stress might be a possible cause for high stress resistance of cancer cells and could be especially

  19. Solid-phase synthesis, thermal denaturation studies, nuclease resistance, and cellular uptake of (oligodeoxyribonucleoside)methylborane phosphine-DNA chimeras.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Heera; Caruthers, Marvin H

    2011-06-29

    The major hurdle associated with utilizing oligodeoxyribonucleotides for therapeutic purposes is their poor delivery into cells coupled with high nuclease susceptibility. In an attempt to combine the nonionic nature and high nuclease stability of the P-C bond of methylphosphonates with the high membrane permeability, low toxicity, and improved gene silencing ability of borane phosphonates, we have focused our research on the relatively unexplored methylborane phosphine (Me-P-BH(3)) modification. This Article describes the automated solid-phase synthesis of mixed-backbone oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) consisting of methylborane phosphine and phosphate or thiophosphate linkages (16-mers). Nuclease stability assays show that methylborane phosphine ODNs are highly resistant to 5' and 3' exonucleases. When hybridized to a complementary strand, the ODN:RNA duplex was more stable than its corresponding ODN:DNA duplex. The binding affinity of ODN:RNA duplex increased at lower salt concentration and approached that of a native DNA:RNA duplex under conditions close to physiological saline, indicating that the Me-P-BH(3) linkage is positively charged. Cellular uptake measurements indicate that these ODNs are efficiently taken up by cells even when the strand is 13% modified. Treatment of HeLa cells and WM-239A cells with fluorescently labeled ODNs shows significant cytoplasmic fluorescence when viewed under a microscope. Our results suggest that methylborane phosphine ODNs may prove very valuable as potential candidates in antisense research and RNAi. PMID:21585202

  20. Human DNA Helicase B (HDHB) Binds to Replication Protein A and Facilitates Cellular Recovery from Replication Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Guler, Gulfem Dilek; Liu, Hanjian; Vaithiyalingam, Sivaraja; Arnett, Diana R.; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Chazin, Walter J.; Fanning, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Maintenance of genomic stability in proliferating cells depends on a network of proteins that coordinate chromosomal replication with DNA damage responses. Human DNA helicase B (HELB or HDHB) has been implicated in chromosomal replication, but its role in this coordinated network remains undefined. Here we report that cellular exposure to UV irradiation, camptothecin, or hydroxyurea induces accumulation of HDHB on chromatin in a dose- and time-dependent manner, preferentially in S phase cells. Replication stress-induced recruitment of HDHB to chromatin is independent of checkpoint signaling but correlates with the level of replication protein A (RPA) recruited to chromatin. We show using purified proteins that HDHB physically interacts with the N-terminal domain of the RPA 70-kDa subunit (RPA70N). NMR spectroscopy and site-directed mutagenesis reveal that HDHB docks on the same RPA70N surface that recruits S phase checkpoint signaling proteins to chromatin. Consistent with this pattern of recruitment, cells depleted of HDHB display reduced recovery from replication stress. PMID:22194613

  1. Detection of cellular DNA adducts in human fibroblasts treated with A-ring saturated and A-NCR-DMBA

    SciTech Connect

    Kumari, H.L.; Abood, N.; Goswami, S.P.; Bhat, H.B.; Milo, G.E.; Vitiak, D.T.

    1986-05-01

    Previous reports from these laboratories revealed that 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (TH-DMBA) and 6,11-dimethylcyclopentano(a)anthracene (CP-DMA) transform human fibroblasts to an abnormal phenotype. The parent PAH 7,12-DMBA does not transform these cells. Since 7,12-DMBA but not TH-DMBA or CP-DMA is anticipated to form active bay region diol epoxides, they investigated whether the A-ring analogues form adducts with cellular DNA, when the cells are treated in S phase of the cell cycle. Treatment for 10 hr was carried out when the cells exhibited S phase entry i.e. 10 hr after Gl release from a nutritionally deficient block. Adducts were isolated using a modification of the /sup 32/P-post-labeling technique. Preliminary results indicate that TH-DMBA formed two different nucleotide adducts where as there were three different adducts identified with CP-DMA. These results suggest the level of modification to be circa 1-2 adducts/10/sup 7/ total nucleotides for TH-DMBA and 2-4 adducts/10/sup 7/ total nucleotides for CP-DMA. The present evidence accumulated to date strongly suggests that alternate mechanisms exist to oxygenate the FAH to reactive intermediates that subsequently form specific DNA adducts.

  2. The p53 network: Cellular and systemic DNA damage responses in aging and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reinhardt, H. Christian; Schumacher, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Genome instability contributes to cancer development and accelerates age-related pathologies as evidenced by a variety of congenital cancer susceptibility and progeroid syndromes that are caused by defects in genome maintenance mechanisms. DNA damage response pathways that are mediated through the tumor suppressor p53 play an important role in the cell intrinsic responses to genome instability, including a transient cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis. Both senescence and apoptosis are powerful tumor suppressive pathways preventing the uncontrolled proliferation of transformed cells. However, both pathways can potentially deplete stem and progenitor cell pools, thus promoting tissue degeneration and organ failure, which are both hallmarks of aging. p53 signaling is also involved in mediating non-cell autonomous interactions with the innate immune system and in the systemic adjustments during the aging process. The network of p53 target genes thus functions as an important regulator of cancer prevention and the physiology of aging. PMID:22265392

  3. Transcriptional activation and repression by cellular DNA-binding protein C/EBP.

    PubMed Central

    Pei, D Q; Shih, C H

    1990-01-01

    A putative transcription factor, C/EBP, isolated from rat liver nuclei, has been shown to bind to at least two different sequence motifs: the CCAAT promoter domain and a core sequence [GTGG(T/A)(T/A)(T/A)G] common to many viral enhancers, including simian virus 40 and human hepatitis B virus. It has been proposed that C/EBP might function as a positive transcription factor by facilitating the communication between promoter and enhancer elements through its dual binding activities to DNA. Surprisingly, results from three different approaches suggest that C/EBP functions as a transcriptional repressor to hepatitis B virus and simian virus 40. Further investigation indicated that C/EBP can function as both a transcriptional activator and a repressor, depending on the reporter gene system. Images PMID:2157040

  4. Cellular Tug-of-War: Forces at Work and DNA Stretching in Mitosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Brian; Kilfoil, Maria L.

    2013-03-01

    In the microscopic world of the cell dominated by thermal noise, a cell must be able to successfully segregate its DNA with high fidelity in order to pass its genetic information on to its progeny. In this process of mitosis in eukaryotes, driving forces act on the cytoskeleton-based architecture called the mitotic spindle to promote this division. Our preliminary data demonstrates that the dynamics of this process in yeast cells is universal. Moreover, the dynamics suggest an increasing load as the chromosomes are pulled apart. To investigate this, we use three-dimensional imaging to track the dynamics of the poles of this architecture and the points of attachment to chromosomes simultaneously and with high spatial resolution. We analyze the relative motions of chromosomes as they are organized before segregation and as they are pulled apart, using this data to investigate the force-response behavior of this cytoskeleton-chromosome polymer system.

  5. Acute dosing and p53-deficiency promote cellular sensitivity to DNA methylating agents.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Katherine E; Doak, Shareen H; Jenkins, Gareth J S

    2015-04-01

    Risk assessment of human exposure to chemicals is crucial for understanding whether such agents can cause cancer. The current emphasis on avoidance of animal testing has placed greater importance on in vitro tests for the identification of genotoxicants. Selection of an appropriate in vitro dosing regime is imperative in determining the genotoxic effects of test chemicals. Here, the issue of dosing approaches was addressed by comparing acute and chronic dosing, uniquely using low-dose experiments. Acute 24 h exposures were compared with equivalent dosing every 24 h over 5-day, fractionated treatment periods. The in vitro micronucleus assay was used to measure clastogenicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) in human lymphoblastoid cell line, TK6. Quantitative real-time (qRT) PCR was used to measure mRNA level induction of DNA repair enzymes. Lowest observed genotoxic effect levels (LOGELs) for MMS were obtained at 0.7 µg/ml for the acute study and 1.0 µg/ml for the chronic study. For acute MNU dosing, a LOGEL was observed at 0.46 µg/ml, yet genotoxicity was completely removed following the chronic study. Interestingly, acute MNU dosing demonstrated a statistically significant decrease at 0.009 µg/ml. Levels of selected DNA repair enzymes did not change significantly following doses tested. However, p53 deficiency (using the TK6-isogenic cell line, NH32) increased sensitivity to MMS during chronic dosing, causing this LOGEL to equate to the acute treatment LOGEL. In the context of the present data for 2 alkylating agents, chronic dosing could be a valuable in vitro supplement to acute dosing and could contribute to reduction of unnecessary in vivo follow-up tests. PMID:25595616

  6. Anthracyclines Induce DNA Damage Response-Mediated Protection against Severe Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Nuno; Chora, Angelo; Raquel, Helena; Pejanovic, Nadja; Pereira, Pedro; Hartleben, Björn; Neves-Costa, Ana; Moita, Catarina; Pedroso, Dora; Pinto, Andreia; Marques, Sofia; Faridi, Hafeez; Costa, Paulo; Gozzelino, Raffaella; Zhao, Jimmy L.; Soares, Miguel P.; Gama-Carvalho, Margarida; Martinez, Jennifer; Zhang, Qingshuo; Döring, Gerd; Grompe, Markus; Simas, J. Pedro; Huber, Tobias B.; Baltimore, David; Gupta, Vineet; Green, Douglas R.; Ferreira, João A.; Moita, Luis F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Severe sepsis remains a poorly understood systemic inflammatory condition with high mortality rates and limited therapeutic options in addition to organ support measures. Here we show that the clinically approved group of anthracyclines acts therapeutically at a low dose regimen to confer robust protection against severe sepsis in mice. This salutary effect is strictly dependent on the activation of DNA damage response and autophagy pathways in the lung, as demonstrated by deletion of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (Atm) or the autophagy-related protein 7 (Atg7) specifically in this organ. The protective effect of anthracyclines occurs irrespectively of pathogen burden, conferring disease tolerance to severe sepsis. These findings demonstrate that DNA damage responses, including the ATM and Fancony Anemia pathways, are important modulators of immune responses and might be exploited to confer protection to inflammation-driven conditions, including severe sepsis. PMID:24184056

  7. Anthracyclines induce DNA damage response-mediated protection against severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Nuno; Chora, Angelo; Raquel, Helena; Pejanovic, Nadja; Pereira, Pedro; Hartleben, Björn; Neves-Costa, Ana; Moita, Catarina; Pedroso, Dora; Pinto, Andreia; Marques, Sofia; Faridi, Hafeez; Costa, Paulo; Gozzelino, Raffaella; Zhao, Jimmy L; Soares, Miguel P; Gama-Carvalho, Margarida; Martinez, Jennifer; Zhang, Qingshuo; Döring, Gerd; Grompe, Markus; Simas, J Pedro; Huber, Tobias B; Baltimore, David; Gupta, Vineet; Green, Douglas R; Ferreira, João A; Moita, Luis F

    2013-11-14

    Severe sepsis remains a poorly understood systemic inflammatory condition with high mortality rates and limited therapeutic options in addition to organ support measures. Here we show that the clinically approved group of anthracyclines acts therapeutically at a low dose regimen to confer robust protection against severe sepsis in mice. This salutary effect is strictly dependent on the activation of DNA damage response and autophagy pathways in the lung, as demonstrated by deletion of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (Atm) or the autophagy-related protein 7 (Atg7) specifically in this organ. The protective effect of anthracyclines occurs irrespectively of pathogen burden, conferring disease tolerance to severe sepsis. These findings demonstrate that DNA damage responses, including the ATM and Fanconi Anemia pathways, are important modulators of immune responses and might be exploited to confer protection to inflammation-driven conditions, including severe sepsis. PMID:24184056

  8. GM-CSF and IL-2 induce specific cellular immunity and provide protection against Epstein-Barr virus lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Baiocchi, R A; Ward, J S; Carrodeguas, L; Eisenbeis, C F; Peng, R; Roychowdhury, S; Vourganti, S; Sekula, T; O'Brien, M; Moeschberger, M; Caligiuri, M A

    2001-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD) is a potentially life-threatening complication in immune-deficient patients. We have used the severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mouse engrafted with human leukocytes (hu-PBL-SCID) to evaluate the use of human cytokines in the prevention of EBV-LPD in vivo. Daily low-dose IL-2 therapy can prevent EBV-LPD in the hu-PBL-SCID mouse, but protection is lost if murine natural killer (NK) cells are depleted. Here we demonstrate that combined therapy with human GM-CSF and low-dose IL-2 is capable of preventing EBV-LPD in the hu-PBL-SCID mouse in the absence of murine NK cells. Lymphocyte depletion experiments showed that human NK cells, CD8(+) T cells, and monocytes were each required for the protective effects of GM-CSF and IL-2 combination therapy. This treatment resulted in a marked expansion of human CD3(+)CD8(+) lymphocytes in vivo. Using HLA tetramers complexed with EBV immunodominant peptides, a subset of these lymphocytes was found to be EBV-specific. These data establish that combined GM-CSF and low-dose IL-2 therapy can prevent the immune deficiencies that lead to fatal EBV-LPD in the hu-PBL-SCID mouse depleted of murine NK cells, and they point to a critical role for several human cellular subsets in mediating this protective effect. PMID:11560958

  9. GM-CSF and IL-2 induce specific cellular immunity and provide protection against Epstein-Barr virus lymphoproliferative disorder

    PubMed Central

    Baiocchi, Robert A.; Ward, Jacqueline S.; Carrodeguas, Lester; Eisenbeis, Charles F.; Peng, Ruoqi; Roychowdhury, Sameek; Vourganti, Srinivas; Sekula, Taryn; O’Brien, Maggie; Moeschberger, Melvin; Caligiuri, Michael A.

    2001-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus–associated lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD) is a potentially life-threatening complication in immune-deficient patients. We have used the severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mouse engrafted with human leukocytes (hu-PBL-SCID) to evaluate the use of human cytokines in the prevention of EBV-LPD in vivo. Daily low-dose IL-2 therapy can prevent EBV-LPD in the hu-PBL-SCID mouse, but protection is lost if murine natural killer (NK) cells are depleted. Here we demonstrate that combined therapy with human GM-CSF and low-dose IL-2 is capable of preventing EBV-LPD in the hu-PBL-SCID mouse in the absence of murine NK cells. Lymphocyte depletion experiments showed that human NK cells, CD8+ T cells, and monocytes were each required for the protective effects of GM-CSF and IL-2 combination therapy. This treatment resulted in a marked expansion of human CD3+CD8+ lymphocytes in vivo. Using HLA tetramers complexed with EBV immunodominant peptides, a subset of these lymphocytes was found to be EBV-specific. These data establish that combined GM-CSF and low-dose IL-2 therapy can prevent the immune deficiencies that lead to fatal EBV-LPD in the hu-PBL-SCID mouse depleted of murine NK cells, and they point to a critical role for several human cellular subsets in mediating this protective effect. PMID:11560958

  10. Moderate ethanol ingestion and cardiovascular protection: from epidemiologic associations to cellular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Krenz, Maike; Korthuis, Ronald J

    2012-01-01

    While ethanol intake at high levels (3-4 or more drinks), either in acute (occasional binge drinking) or chronic (daily) settings, increases the risk for myocardial infarction and stroke, an inverse relationship between regular consumption of alcoholic beverages at light to moderate levels (1-2 drinks per day) and cardiovascular risk has been consistently noted in a large number of epidemiologic studies. Although initially attributed to polyphenolic antioxidants in red wine, subsequent work has established that the ethanol component contributes to the beneficial effects associated with moderate intake of alcoholic beverages regardless of type (red versus white wine, beer, spirits). Concerns have been raised with regard to interpretation of epidemiologic evidence for this association including heterogeneity of the reference groups examined in many studies, different lifestyles of moderate drinkers versus abstainers, and favorable risk profiles in moderate drinkers. However, better controlled epidemiologic studies and especially work conducted in animal models and cell culture systems have substantiated this association and clearly established a cause and effect relationship between alcohol consumption and reductions in tissue injury induced by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), respectively. The aims of this review are to summarize the epidemiologic evidence supporting the effectiveness of ethanol ingestion in reducing the likelihood of adverse cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke, even in patients with co-existing risk factors, to discuss the ideal quantities, drinking patterns, and types of alcoholic beverages that confer protective effects in the cardiovascular system, and to review the findings of recent experimental studies directed at uncovering the mechanisms that underlie the cardiovascular protective effects of antecedent ethanol ingestion. Mechanistic interrogation of the signaling pathways invoked by antecedent ethanol