Sample records for protection programs radon

  1. STATUS OF EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) RADON MITIGATION DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the portion of EPA's radon reduction technology development/demonstration program dealing with the study of reduction methods for existing and new construction houses. The EPA program has as its objective the development and demonstration of cost-effective rad...

  2. Environmental Protection Agency: Radon (Rn)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Indoor Air Quality division of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) presents this Web page dedicated to information about radon, the colorless and odorless radioactive known to cause lung cancer. In addition to general resources on radon (including a guide to reducing radon levels in the home), visitors will find information on how to obtain a free educational video (Breathing Easy: What Home Buyers and Sellers Should Know About Radon) recently released by the EPA. Geared primarily toward homebuyers and sellers (as well as real estate professionals), this video thoroughly reviews radon science, lung cancer risk, home inspection, how to build a new home radon-resistant, and more.

  3. EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) PROGRAM TO DEMONSTRATE MITIGATION MEASURES FOR INDOOR RADON: INITIAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives initial results of an EPA program to demonstrate mitigation measures for indoor radon. EPA has installed radon mitigation techniques in 18 concrete block basement homes in the Reading Prong area of eastern Pennsylvania, all designed to demonstrate techniques which...

  4. Radon Research Program, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The United States Department of Energy, Office of Health and Environmental Research (DOE/OHER) is the principal federal agency conducting basic research related to indoor radon. The scientific information being sought in this program encompasses research designed to determine radon availability and transport outdoors, modeling transport into and within buildings, physics and chemistry of radon and radon progeny, dose response relationships, lung cancer risk, and mechanisms of radon carcinogenesis. There still remains a significant number of uncertainties in the currently available knowledge that is used to estimate lung cancer risk from exposure to environmental levels of radon and its progeny. The main goal of the DOE/OHER Radon Research Program is to develop information to reduce these uncertainties and thereby provide an improved health risk estimate of exposure to radon and its progeny and to identify and understand biological mechanisms of lung cancer development and required copollutants at low levels of exposure. Information useful in radon control strategies is also provided by the basic science undertaken in this program.

  5. SITE-SPECIFIC MEASUREMENTS OF RESIDENTIAL RADON PROTECTION CATEGORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a series of benchmark measurements of soil radon potential at seven Florida sites and compares the measurements with regional estimates of radon potential from the Florida radon protection map. The measurements and map were developed under the Florida Radon R...

  6. 30 CFR 57.5046 - Protection against radon gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Protection against radon gas. 57.5046 Section 57.5046 Mineral Resources...Radiation-Underground Only § 57.5046 Protection against radon gas. Where radon daughter concentrations exceed 10 WL, respirator...

  7. 30 CFR 57.5046 - Protection against radon gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Protection against radon gas. 57.5046 Section 57.5046 Mineral Resources...Radiation-Underground Only § 57.5046 Protection against radon gas. Where radon daughter concentrations exceed 10 WL, respirator...

  8. 30 CFR 57.5046 - Protection against radon gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Protection against radon gas. 57.5046 Section 57.5046 Mineral Resources...Radiation-Underground Only § 57.5046 Protection against radon gas. Where radon daughter concentrations exceed 10 WL, respirator...

  9. 30 CFR 57.5046 - Protection against radon gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Protection against radon gas. 57.5046 Section 57.5046 Mineral Resources...Radiation-Underground Only § 57.5046 Protection against radon gas. Where radon daughter concentrations exceed 10 WL, respirator...

  10. 30 CFR 57.5046 - Protection against radon gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protection against radon gas. 57.5046 Section 57.5046 Mineral Resources...Radiation-Underground Only § 57.5046 Protection against radon gas. Where radon daughter concentrations exceed 10 WL, respirator...

  11. STANDARD MEASUREMENT PROTOCOLS - FLORIDA RADON RESEARCH PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual, in support of the Florida Radon Research Program, contains standard protocols for key measurements where data quality is vital to the program. t contains two sections. he first section, soil measurements, contains field sampling protocols for soil gas permeability and...

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A RADON PROTECTION MAP FOR LARGE BUILDINGS IN FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the development of a radon protection map to show from soil and geological features the areas of Florida that require different levels of Radon protection for large building construction. The map was proposed as a basis for implementing radon-protective const...

  13. FLORIDA RADON RESEARCH PROGRAM: TECHNICAL SUPPORT FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF RADON RESISTANT CONSTRUCTION STANDARDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes the technical direction of the Florida Radon Research Program (FRRP), its current objectives, and accomplishments to date. he 1988 Florida Legislature mandated the development of standards for the construction of radon resistant buildings. In support of this d...

  14. Radon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Howard Frumkin; Jonathan M. Samet

    1949-01-01

    BACKGROUND Radon-222 is a colorless, odorless, radioactive gas that forms from the decay of naturally occurring uranium-238. Since U-238 occurs in soil and rock throughout the world, radon exposure is universal; radon is present not only indoors but outdoors. Radon exposure in homes is largely a result of radon-contaminated gas rising from the soil. This makes it an unusual indoor

  15. Radon

    MedlinePLUS

    ... been raised about the radon released indoors from granite countertops or tiles. However, these sources are rarely ... 2014). [ 2] "What about Radon and Radioactivity in Granite Countertops?" Find Answers (page 1 of 16). http:// ...

  16. Citizen's Guide to Radon: The Guide to Protecting Yourself and Your Family from Radon

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cases may be reduced. Radon is estimated to cause thousands of lung cancer deaths in the U.S. each year. * Radon is ... has warned that radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States today. Only smoking causes ...

  17. Radon Health Risks

    MedlinePLUS

    ... resources at www.epa.gov/radon/pubs A Citizen's Guide To Radon: The Guide to Protecting Yourself ... page Radon Risk If You Smoke from " A Citizen's Guide to Radon : The Guide to Protecting Yourself ...

  18. Radon

    Cancer.gov

    Radon is a radioactive gas that is released from the normal decay of the elements uranium, thorium, and radium in rocks and soil. The invisible, odorless gas seeps up through the ground and diffuses into the air. In a few areas, depending on local geology, radon dissolves into ground water and can be released into the air when the water is used.

  19. Fire Protection Program Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Sharry, J A

    2012-05-18

    This manual documents the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Fire Protection Program. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 420.1B, Facility Safety, requires LLNL to have a comprehensive and effective fire protection program that protects LLNL personnel and property, the public and the environment. The manual provides LLNL and its facilities with general information and guidance for meeting DOE 420.1B requirements. The recommended readers for this manual are: fire protection officers, fire protection engineers, fire fighters, facility managers, directorage assurance managers, facility coordinators, and ES and H team members.

  20. Food Protection Management Program

    E-print Network

    Food Protection Management Program http://foodsafety.tamu.edu Relevance The Centers for Disease illnesses are attributed to improper handling of food prepared away from home. Because almost half of our food dollars is spent on food prepared outside the home, food safety is a top concern among consumers

  1. Where Can Radon Be Found? Radoncomesfromthenaturalradioactivedecayofradium

    E-print Network

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Where Can Radon Be Found? · RadoncomesfromthenaturalradioactivedecayofradiumProtectionAgencywebsite:www.epa. gov/radon/states/virginia.html.Themountainand Piedmontregionsof Effects of Radon? Radonisthesecondleadingcauseoflungcancer

  2. RECOMMENDED FOUNDATION FILL MATERIALS CONSTRUCTION STANDARD OF THE FLORIDA RADON RESEARCH PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the technical basis for a recommended foundation fill materials standard for new construction houses in Florida. he radon-control construction standard was developed by the Florida Radon Research Program (FRRP). ill material standards are formulated for: (1)...

  3. The Department of Energy`s radon testing program

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, H.L. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Dudney, C.S.; Wilson, D.L.; Gammage, R.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-07-01

    The US Department of Energy recently completed an initial survey of indoor radon in its buildings in response to Public Law 100--551, the Indoor Radon Abatement Act of 1988. Other federal agencies have also conducted radon surveys. This paper presents an overview of the results from radon testing of several thousand buildings ranging from 100 m{sup 2} to over 10,000 M{sup 2} in size. In addition, we have examined results from groups of buildings, classified according to ventilation and usage characteristics. So far, there is no apparent difference among building classes. The paper also discusses our proposal for phased radon surveys. We suggest that first-phase results can be used to identify facilities with radon problems. In the second phase, we suggest measurements be made at a much higher sampling density at facilities with radon problems. The results of the second phase are expected to identify all buildings in need of mitigation.

  4. SOIL RADON POTENTIAL MAPPLING OF TWELVE COUNTIES IN NORTH-CENTRAL FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the approach, methods, and detailed data used to prepare soil radon potential maps of 12 counties in North-Central Florida. he maps were developed under the Florida Radon Research Program to provide a scientific basis for implementing radon-protective buildin...

  5. SOIL RADON POTENTIAL MAPPING OF TWELVE COUNTIES IN NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the approach, methods, and detailed data used to prepare soil radon potential maps of 12 counties in North-Central Florida. he maps were developed under the Florida Radon Research Program to provide a scientific basis for implementing radon-protective buildin...

  6. IAEA\\/EPA international climatic test program for integrating radon detectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. D. Hopper; F. Steinhaeusler; M. Ronca-Battista

    1999-01-01

    As an element of the joint IAEA-EPA International Radon Metrology Evaluation Program, a climatic test of long-term integrating radon detectors was conducted at the US EPA Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory. The objective of this study was to test the performance of commonly used commercially available long-term ²²²Rn detector systems under extreme climatological conditions using filtered polycarbonate CR-39 plastic

  7. CEBAF - environmental protection program plan

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    An important objective in the successful operation of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) is to ensure protection of the public and the environment. To meet this objective, the Southeastern Universities Research Association, Inc., (SURA) is committed to working with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop, implement, and manage a sound and workable environmental protection program at CEBAF. This environmental protection plan includes information on environmental monitoring, long-range monitoring, groundwater protection, waste minimization, and pollution prevention awareness program plan.

  8. Protection in programming languages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James H. Morris Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Linguistic mechanisms which can be used to protect one subprogram from another's malfunctioning are described. Function-producing functions and various type-tagging schemes are considered. An attempt is made to distinguish between access limitation and authentication.

  9. Develop a Wellhead Protection Program

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this activity, students will develop a wellhead protection program for a hypothetical community. Students assume various roles in the community such as gas station owner, photo lab owner or employee, beauty salon owner, restaurant owner, resident, or environmentalist so that each student can bring the perspective of his or her role to the discussion. Students will discover that the relationships between businesses, environmentalists, and community leaders can be, but need not be, adversarial. As they progress through this activity students learn about the tools communities may use to develop a wellhead protection program. They will also recognize that developing a community wellhead protection program is not easy and that, while it is important to protect drinking water supplies, it can be very difficult to develop a program that will gain support from the overall community.

  10. Measurement of radon and radon daughters in air: Recommendations of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-15

    All of the radon isotopes are noble gases and are inert with no large sinks in the environment. Radon is relatively soluble in water and, for this reason, water transport has been a significant mechanism for bringing radon into some underground mines and into some homes where ground water (well water) is used instead of surface water. Radon does not readily form chemical compounds. However, several compounds have been produced and used for experimental purposes. The short-lived daughter products of radon, /sup 218/Po, /sup 214/Pb, /sup 214/Bi, and /sup 214/Po, are of most significance for human exposure since it is these products which are inhaled and deliver the bronchial radiation dose that is implicated in bronchogenic carcinoma. The two polonium isotopes, /sup 218/Po and /sup 214/Po, are the alpha emitters, and these are the daughters of dosimetric interest. The overall effective half-life for the sequence of the four daughters is about 30 minutes. The majority of /sup 218/Po is formed as positively charged ions which rapidly change charge and size. The diffusion coefficient of the daughter is of fundamental importance since it controls the movement of the species in the environment. The measurements of radon and thoron in air are separated into three categories, instantaneous, continuous or time-averaged methods. Ionization chambers and scintillation cells are utilized primarily for instantaneous or grab samples, but may be modified to accommodate continuous measurements. Passive methods to detect radon are popular since large-scale environmental surveys require that a detector be located in a suitable location for extended periods of time in order to assess annual exposure.

  11. U.S. EPA'S INDOOR AIR QUALITY IMPLEMENTATION PLAN. APPENDIX C. EPA RADON PROGRAM. APPENDIX D. INDOOR AIR RESOURCE HISTORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 'EPA Radon Program' briefly describes the goals, strategy and implementation plan adopted by the Agency for dealing specifically with radon as an indoor air pollutant. This discussion is excerpted from a more comprehensive report, 'EPA Interim Report to Congress on Indoor Air...

  12. GUIDANCE FOR RESEARCH HOUSE STUDIES OF THE FLORIDA RADON RESEARCH PROGRAM, VOLUME 1: RESEARCH PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report provides guidance and a readily available reference to groups involved with the Florida Radon Research Program's (FRRP's) research house studies. t includes: 1): Lists of Parameters for continuous and periodic high and low resolution measurements; (2) Protocols for cha...

  13. GUIDANCE FOR RESEARCH HOUSE STUDIES OF THE FLORIDA RADON RESEARCH PROGRAM, VOLUME 2: MODEL-BACKED EXPERIMENTAL PROTOCOL FOR DETERMINING RADON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report provides guidance and a readily available reference to groups involved with the Florida Radon Research Program's (FRRP's) research house studies. It includes: 1): Lists of Parameters for continuous and periodic high and low resolution measurements; (2) Protocols for c...

  14. GUIDANCE FOR RESEARCH HOUSE STUDIES OF THE FLORIDA RADON RESEARCH PROGRAM, VOLUME 2: MODEL-BACKED EXPERIMENTAL PROTOCOL FOR DETERMINING RADON RESISTANCE OF BUILDINGS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report provides guidance and a readily available reference to groups involved with the Florida Radon Research Program's (FRRP's) research house studies. t includes: 1): Lists of Parameters for continuous and periodic high and low resolution measurements; (2) Protocols for cha...

  15. Radon Risks in the Tahoe Region Happy Hour with Jeff Miner (Radon at Tahoe) and

    E-print Network

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    Radon Risks in the Tahoe Region Happy Hour with Jeff Miner (Radon at Tahoe) and George Faggella (California DHS Radon Program) Date: Thursday, January 18, 2007 Time: 5:30 ­ 7:00 p.m. Cost: $5 donation: Radon Risks in the Tahoe Region Radon is a cancer-causing, radioactive gas. You can't see radon. And you

  16. Pinellas Plant groundwater protection management program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-10-01

    The Groundwater Protection Management Program (GPMP) Plan outlines the program in place at the Pinellas Plant to detect and monitor contaminated groundwater, which may have become contaminated by materials and waste.

  17. Human Subjects Protection Program Improvements Spring 2011

    E-print Network

    Biederman, Irving

    Human Subjects Protection Program Improvements Spring 2011 www.usc.edu/oprs/policies/cqi April 20 monitoring user feedback/requests in order to improve the USC Human Subjects Protection Program (HSPP.edu/oprs/private/docs/oprs/ChildElder_Abuse_FAQ_2.15.pdf 3. Witnesses to Informed Consent: The USC informed consent template unnecessarily required

  18. Mars Technology Program: Planetary Protection Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ying

    2006-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development of Planetary Protection Technology in the Mars Technology Program. The goal of the program is to develop technologies that will enable NASA to build, launch, and operate a mission that has subsystems with different Planetary Protection (PP) classifications, specifically for operating a Category IVb-equivalent subsystem from a Category IVa platform. The IVa category of planetary protection requires bioburden reduction (i.e., no sterilization is required) The IVb category in addition to IVa requirements: (i.e., terminal sterilization of spacecraft is required). The differences between the categories are further reviewed.

  19. Radon: A health problem and a communication problem

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.H. [Key Technology, Inc., Jonestown, PA (United States)

    1992-12-31

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is making great efforts to alert the American public to the potential health risks of radon in homes. The news media have widely publicized radon as a problem; state and local governments are responding to public alarms; and hundreds of radon {open_quotes}experts{close_quotes} are now offering radon detection and mitigation services. Apparently, USEPA`s communication program is working, and the public is becoming increasingly concerned with radon. But are they concerned with radon as a {open_quotes}health{close_quotes} problem in the way USEPA intended? The answer is yes, partly. More and more, however, the concerns are about home resale values. Many homebuyers are now deciding whether to buy on the basis of a single radon screening measurement, comparing it with USEPA`s action guide of 4 pCi L{sup {minus}1}. They often conclude that 3.9 is OK, but 4.1 is not. Here is where the communication problems begin. The public largely misunderstands the significance of USEPA`s guidelines and the meaning of screening measurements. Seldom does anyone inquire about the quality of the measurements, or the results of USEPA performance testing? Who asks about the uncertainty of lifetime exposure assessments based on a 1-hour, 1-day, 3-day, or even 30-day measurement? Who asks about the uncertainty of USEPA`s risk estimates? Fortunately, an increasing number of radiation protection professions are asking such questions. They find that USEPA`s risk projections are based on many assumptions which warrant further evaluation, particularly with regard to the combined risks of radon and cigarette-smoking. This is the next communication problem. What are these radiation professions doing to understand the bases for radon health-risk projections? Who is willing to communicate a balanced perspective to the public? Who is willing to communicate the uncertainty and conservatism in radon measurements and risk estimates?

  20. Respiratory Protection Program Environmental Health & Safety

    E-print Network

    Responsibilities 3 3.1 Environmental Health and Safety 3 3.2 Department Management 3 3.3 Respirator Users 3 4Respiratory Protection Program Environmental Health & Safety August 2012 #12;Georgia Institute Respirators Can Be Used 4 5.4 Exposed Population 4 6 Objective 4 7 Program elements 4 7.1 Air Monitoring 4 7

  1. Radon (Rn)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... health hazard with a simple solution. Read " A Citizen's Guide to Radon ". Need a radon test kit? | ... Media Campaigns More Radon Information On... Health Effects/Science Builders/Remodelers Partners/Stakeholders Acerca del Radón Media ...

  2. Radon: Counseling patients about risk

    SciTech Connect

    Birrer, R.B. (Catholic Medical Center of Brooklyn and Queens, Jamaica, NY (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Exposure to radon and its decay products has increased as the United States has changed from an outdoor society to a largely indoor society. Radon, which is found primarily in the soil, enters houses and buildings through cracks, holes and pipes in foundation walls and floors. Although radon is suspected of being a significant cause of lung cancer, comparisons with other risk factors cannot yet be made. Radon levels in the home can be measured with commercially available kits. Guidelines for reducing the amount of radon in a home are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.18 references.

  3. US Environmental Protection Agency: National Estuary Program

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Established in 1987 by amendments to the Clean Water Act and administered by the Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds (OWOW), the National Estuary Program (NEP) identifies, restores and protects estuaries along the coasts of the United States. Unlike the traditional regulatory approaches to environmental protection, the NEP targets a wide range of issues and engages local communities in the process. At the site users can find descriptions of the NEP, specific NEP projects, estuaries involved in the NEP (including location, size, presence of threatened and endangered species, major habitat types, etc.), a current awareness section, links to related sites, and the full text of NEP's newsletter, Coastlines.

  4. Predictors of Home Radon Testing and Implications for Testing Promotion Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandman, Peter M.; Weinstein, Neil D.

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of 4 New Jersey studies of 3,329 homeowners found that (1) thinking about radon testing is predicted by general radon knowledge; (2) decision to test is related to perceived likelihood of risk; and (3) actual testing is influenced by situational factors such as locating and choosing test kits. (SK)

  5. Pinellas Plant groundwater protection management program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1996-10-01

    The objectives of the Groundwater Protection Management Program (GPMP) are to establish that current operations and transition of the facility are not affecting groundwater in a way that creates unacceptable risks to human health and safety, or to the environment, and that the plant is working to address any such risks previously identified.

  6. Modeled atmospheric radon concentrations from uranium mines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Droppo

    1985-01-01

    Uranium mining and milling operations result in the release of radon from numerous sources of various types and strengths. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the Clean Air Act, is assessing the health impact of air emissions of radon from underground uranium mines. In this case, the radon emissions may impact workers and residents in the mine vicinity. To

  7. Mineral dusts and radon in uranium mines

    SciTech Connect

    Abelson, P.H.

    1991-11-08

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) continues to assert that radon is a major cause of lung cancer in this country. EPA is fostering a radon program that could entail huge financial and emotional costs while yielding negligible benefits to public health. Justification for the program was the occurrence of lung cancer in men exposed to huge amounts of radon, mineral dusts, and other lung irritants in uranium mines on the Colorado Plateau. Lung cancer has been reported in about 356 cigarette smokers and in about 25 nonsmokers. During the era of high radon levels, monitoring was sporadic. Conditions in only a small fraction of the mines were measured, and that on a few separate occasions. Later, cumulative exposure to radon was calculated on the basis of measurements involving only a tiny fraction of the miners. Some were exposed to more than 15,000 pCi/liter of radon and its products. The level in the average home is about 1.5 pCi/liter. In making extrapolations from mine to home, the assumption is made that residents are in their dwellings most of the time and that miners spend only 170 hours a month in the mine. Two major questionable assumptions are involved in extrapolations from high doses of radon in the mines to low doses in homes. One is that no threshold is involved; that is, that humans have no remediation mechanism for {alpha} particle damages. There is evidence to the contrary. The most unrealistic assumption is that heavy exposure to silica has no effect on inducing lung cancer. Many studies have shown that silica dust causes lung cancer in animals. Exposure of human culture cells to silica has resulted in formation of neoplastic tissue. EPA has no solid evidence that exposures to 4 pCi/liter of radon causes lung cancer in either smokers or nonsmokers. Indeed, there is abundant evidence to the contrary in the fact that in states with high levels of radon, inhabitants have less lung cancer than those in states with low levels.

  8. Radon evasion rates in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans as determined during the Geosecs program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T.-H. Peng; W. S. Broecker; G. G. Mathieu; Y.-H. Li; A. E. Bainbridge

    1979-01-01

    During the Geosecs expedition in the Atlantic and the Pacific oceans, more than 100 stations were occupied for the measurement of surface radon profiles. The radon deficiency in these profiles gives estimates of the gas transfer rate across the sea-air interface. The global mean transfer rate is estimated to be 2.9 m\\/d (at 20° C) which is corresponding to a

  9. Accreditation of ionizing radiation protection programs

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.C.; Swinth, K.L.; Selby, J.M.

    1991-10-01

    There are over one million workers in the United States who have the potential to be exposed to ionizing radiation. Therefore, it is necessary to determine accurately the quantity of radiation to which they may have been exposed. This quantity if measured by personnel dosimeters that are carried by individuals requiring radiation monitoring. Accreditation of the organizations which evaluate this quantity provides official recognition of the competence of these organizations. Accreditation programs in the field of ionizing radiation protection have been in operation for a number of years, and their experience has demonstrated that such programs can help to improve performance.

  10. Nevada National Security Site Radiation Protection Program

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-04-30

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, “Occupational Radiation Protection,” establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), related (on-site or off-site) U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) operations, and environmental restoration off-site projects. This RPP section consists of general statements that are applicable to the NNSS as a whole. The RPP also includes a series of appendices which provide supporting detail for the associated NNSS Tennant Organizations (TOs). Appendix H, “Compliance Demonstration Table,” contains a cross-walk for the implementation of 10 CFR 835 requirements. This RPP does not contain any exemptions from the established 10 CFR 835 requirements. The RSPC and TOs are fully compliant with 10 CFR 835 and no additional funding is required in order to meet RPP commitments. No new programs or activities are needed to meet 10 CFR 835 requirements and there are no anticipated impacts to programs or activities that are not included in the RPP. There are no known constraints to implementing the RPP. No guides or technical standards are adopted in this RPP as a means to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 835.

  11. Quality assurance program for LR 115 based radon concentration measurements in a case-control study: description and results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Bochicchio; F. Forastiere; S. Farchi; D. Marocco; M. Quarto; F. Sera

    2003-01-01

    A case-control study on lung cancer and radon exposure in dwellings has been carried out in Lazio, a high indoor radon region of Central Italy. A total of about 400 cases and 400 controls were recruited and radon concentration was measured in a total of about 1850 dwellings. In each dwelling, radon concentration measurement devices were placed in both the

  12. [Radon risk and prevention].

    PubMed

    Caciari, T; Tomei, F; Fiaschetti, M; Giubilati, R; Ponticiello, B G; De Sio, S; Naro, F; Tomei, G; Sancini, A

    2010-01-01

    The chemical element Radon is the strongest source of natural ionizing radiations for men and it is responsible of some patologies, such as lungs cancer. The concentration of this gas in houses is in Italy on average 70-75 Bq/m3. Apart from a regulative first step, represented by the 2002 Radon National Plan, at the moment there are no specified rules regarding the risks of exposition to radon in general population. On the contrary, safeguarding workers exposed to natural sources of radiation, working places are regulated by legislative decrees. In order to carry out corrective actions in case of high rates, it is necessary to correctly measure the expositional levels both with active and passive instruments. The topical knowledge about radon and its effects urge us to take preventive and reductive measures, protecting the well-being if population. PMID:21438271

  13. Computer program for the sensitivity calculation of a CR-39 detector in a diffusion chamber for radon measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Nikezic, D., E-mail: nikezic@kg.ac.rs; Stajic, J. M. [Faculty of Science, University of Kragujevac, R. Domanovica 12, Kragujevac 34000 (Serbia)] [Faculty of Science, University of Kragujevac, R. Domanovica 12, Kragujevac 34000 (Serbia); Yu, K. N. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue (Hong Kong)] [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue (Hong Kong)

    2014-02-15

    Computer software for calculation of the sensitivity of a CR-39 detector closed in a diffusion chamber to radon is described in this work. The software consists of two programs, both written in the standard Fortran 90 programming language. The physical background and a numerical example are given. Presented software is intended for numerous researches in radon measurement community. Previously published computer programs TRACK-TEST.F90 and TRACK-VISION.F90 [D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 174, 160 (2006); D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 178, 591 (2008)] are used here as subroutines to calculate the track parameters and to determine whether the track is visible or not, based on the incident angle, impact energy, etching conditions, gray level, and visibility criterion. The results obtained by the software, using five different V functions, were compared with the experimental data found in the literature. Application of two functions in this software reproduced experimental data very well, while other three gave lower sensitivity than experiment.

  14. Computer program for the sensitivity calculation of a CR-39 detector in a diffusion chamber for radon measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikezic, D.; Yu, K. N.; Stajic, J. M.

    2014-02-01

    Computer software for calculation of the sensitivity of a CR-39 detector closed in a diffusion chamber to radon is described in this work. The software consists of two programs, both written in the standard Fortran 90 programming language. The physical background and a numerical example are given. Presented software is intended for numerous researches in radon measurement community. Previously published computer programs TRACK_TEST.F90 and TRACK_VISION.F90 [D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 174, 160 (2006); D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 178, 591 (2008)] are used here as subroutines to calculate the track parameters and to determine whether the track is visible or not, based on the incident angle, impact energy, etching conditions, gray level, and visibility criterion. The results obtained by the software, using five different V functions, were compared with the experimental data found in the literature. Application of two functions in this software reproduced experimental data very well, while other three gave lower sensitivity than experiment.

  15. The health risk of radon

    SciTech Connect

    Conrath, S.M.; Kolb, L. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Radiation and Indoor Air

    1995-10-01

    Although radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States, second only to cigarette smoking, many members of the public are not aware that radon is one of the most serious environmental cancer risks in the US. Based on extensive data from epidemiological studies of underground miners, radon has been classified as a known human carcinogen. In contrast to most pollutants, the assessment of human risk from radon is based on human occupational exposure data rather than animal data. That radon causes lung cancer has been well established by the scientific community. More is known about radon than most other cancer causing environmental carcinogens. While there are some uncertainties involved when estimating radon risk to the public, it is important to recognize that the risk information is based on human data and that the uncertainties have been addressed in the risk assessment. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that the number of annual US lung cancer deaths due to residential radon exposures is approximately 14,000 with an uncertainty range of 7,000 to 30,000. The abundant information on radon health risks that supports EPA`s risk assessment indicates that recommendations for public action by the federal government and other public health organizations constitute prudent public policy.

  16. Radon Quest

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this module, students pretend to be an environmental consulting firm that has been hired by the County to investigate two cases involving radon exposure. They will prepare a report addressing: the probable causes of the elevated radon values; the extent of the potential problem; the possible routes and effects of human exposure to radon, and ways to educate the public; and strategies for clean up and reduction of exposure to radon in the area. Students will form field, laboratory, risk and impact investigative teams in order to complete their reports.

  17. Combination of geological data and radon survey results for radon mapping.

    PubMed

    Zhukovsky, Michael; Yarmoshenko, Ilia; Kiselev, Sergey

    2012-10-01

    The typical method of radon mapping usually used in most countries is the presenting of average radon concentrations in dwellings for districts or regions. Sometimes the maps of radon concentrations in the soil or maps of percentage above the reference level also demonstrated. Such approach not always can be used for identification of the regions with high probability of radon exposure above the reference levels where the population density is low. The combination of archive geological data and the results of representative radon survey allow estimating the typical parameters of radon concentration distribution for selected categories of buildings (multi-storey or rural type houses) situated in geological zones with the different radon potential. In this case it is possible to give grounds for the necessary level of radon protection measures in the new buildings constructed in this region. The use of such approach in Ural region of Russia is demonstrated. PMID:22466302

  18. Researching Radon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucidi, Louis; Mecca, Peter M.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a project in which students examined the physics, chemistry, and geology of radon and used available technology to measure radon concentrations in their homes. Uses the inquiry process, analytical skills, communication skills, content knowledge, and production of authentic products for student assessment. (YDS)

  19. Protection system representation in the electromagnetic transients program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. K. S. Chaudhary; Kwa-Sur Tam; A. G. Phadke

    1994-01-01

    This paper concerns the addition of the few critical elements of a protection system to the Electromagnetic Transients Program (EMTP), which is one of the most widely used programs for the simulation of transients in power systems. It contains models for almost every major power system component. A protection system consists of instrument transformers, relays, and circuit breakers. Models for

  20. EPRI guide to managing nuclear utility protective clothing programs

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.J. (Right Angle Industries, Melbourne, FL (USA))

    1991-05-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) commissioned a radioactive waste related project (RP2414-34) during the last quarter of 1989 to produce a guide for developing and managing nuclear protective clothing programs. Every nuclear facility must coordinate some type of protective clothing program for its radiation workers to insure proper and safe protection for the wearer and to maintain control over the spread of contamination. Yet, every nuclear facility has developed its own unique program for managing such clothing. Accordingly, a need existed for a reference guide to assist with the standardization of protective clothing programs and to assist in controlling the potentially runaway economics of such programs. This document is the first known effort to formalize the planning and economic factors surrounding a nuclear utility protective clothing program. It is intended to be informative by addressing the various pieces of information necessary to establish and maintain an effective, professionally managed protective clothing program. It also attempts to provide guidance toward tailoring the information and providing examples within the report to fit each utility's specific needs. This report is further intended to address new issues and trends occurring throughout the nuclear industry in late 1989 which can have either a significant positive or negative impact on the operations or economics of nuclear protective clothing programs. 1 ref., 11 tabs.

  1. 40 CFR 29.3 - What programs and activities of the Environmental Protection Agency are subject to these...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...programs and activities of the Environmental Protection Agency are subject to...Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY PROGRAMS AND...

  2. The Environmental Protection Agency: Legislation, Programs and Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Library Systems Branch.

    This document is designed to introduce the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and its programs. It is organized into four categories which discuss the legislation authorizing EPA activities, the history and present organization, the pollution control programs operated by the Agency, and budgetary appropriations. Specific program…

  3. Space shuttle program: Lightning protection criteria document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The lightning environment for space shuttle design is defined and requirements that the design must satisfy to insure protection of the vehicle system from direct and indirect effects of lightning are imposed. Specifications, criteria, and guidelines included provide a practical and logical approach to protection problems.

  4. Hanford Site Groundwater Protection Management Program: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1993-11-01

    Groundwater protection is a national priority that is promulgated in a variety of environmental regulations at local, state, and federal levels. To effectively coordinate and ensure compliance with applicable regulations, the US Department of Energy has issued DOE Order 5400.1 (now under revision) that requires all US Department of Energy facilities to prepare separate groundwater protection program descriptions and plans. This document describes the Groundwater Protection Management Program for the Hanford Site located in the state of Washington. DOE Order 5400.1 specifies that the Groundwater Protection Management Program cover the following general topical areas: (1) documentation of the groundwater regime, (2) design and implementation of a groundwater monitoring program to support resource management and comply with applicable laws and regulations, (3) a management program for groundwater protection and remediation, (4) a summary and identification of areas that may be contaminated with hazardous waste, (5) strategies for controlling these sources, (6) a remedial action program, and (7) decontamination and decommissioning and related remedial action requirements. Many of the above elements are covered by existing programs at the Hanford Site; thus, one of the primary purposes of this document is to provide a framework for coordination of existing groundwater protection activities. Additionally, it describes how information needs are identified and can be incorporated into existing or proposed new programs. The Groundwater Protection Management Program provides the general scope, philosophy, and strategies for groundwater protection/management at the Hanford Site. Subtier documents provide the detailed plans for implementing groundwater-related activities and programs. Related schedule and budget information are provided in the 5-year plan for environmental restoration and waste management at the Hanford Site.

  5. 78 FR 49524 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Personal Protective Technology Program and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ...Health Personal Protective Technology Program and National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory Conformity...NIOSH Personal Protective Technology (PPT) Conformity Assessment...targeting General Industry, Healthcare, Public Safety,...

  6. Chapter 30 Fall Protection Program 4/16/2010 30.1 Policy .................................................................................................................................................. 2

    E-print Network

    Knowles, David William

    Chapter 30 Fall Protection Program 4/16/2010 Contents 30.1 Policy Protection Plan ............................................................................... Work Process B. Fall Protection Work Control Requirements

  7. Radon Measurement in Schools. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other major national and international scientific organizations have concluded that radon is a human carcinogen and a serious environmental health problem. The EPA has conducted extensive research on the presence and measurement of radon in schools. This report provides school administrators and…

  8. Radon Measurements in Schools: An Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Radiation Programs.

    Radon-222 is a colorless, odorless, tasteless, radioactive gas that occurs naturally in soil, rocks, underground water, and air. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other scientific organizations have identified an increased risk of lung cancer associated with exposure to elevated levels of radon in homes. Schools in many…

  9. 77 FR 35700 - Protected Critical Infrastructure Information (PCII) Program Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-14

    ...Office of Infrastructure Protection (IP), Infrastructure Information Collection...Request should be forwarded to DHS/NPPD/IP/IICD, 245 Murray Lane, SW., Mailstop...internal PCII Program, IICD, and NPPD/IP use only.OMB is particularly...

  10. Extended area protection system (EAPS) program overview

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. J. Smith; R. W. Nourse; J. L. Baumann; G. Sanders

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Army's Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) are undertaking an advanced technology objective (ATO) to provide active protection to U.S. forces against attack by rockets, artillery, and mortars (RAM). Engaging and destroying RAM will reduce U.S. causalities, provide all freedom of movement, protect non-combatants, and safeguard military\\/civilian installations. Novel solutions are required to counter RAM

  11. Optimal Resource Allocation for Network Protection: A Geometric Programming Approach

    E-print Network

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    1 Optimal Resource Allocation for Network Protection: A Geometric Programming Approach Victor M the problem of containing spreading processes in arbitrary directed networks by distributing pro- tection resources throughout the nodes of the network. We consider two types of protection resources are available

  12. Y-12 Site environmental protection program implementation plan (EPPIP)

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The Y-12 Plant Environmental Protection Program is conducted to: (1) protect public health and the environment from chemical and radiological releases occurring from current plant operations and past waste management and operational practices; (2) ensure compliance with federal, state, and local environmental regulations and DOE directives; (3) identify potential environmental problems; (4) evaluate existing environmental contamination and determine the need for remedial actions and mitigative measures; (5) monitor the progress of ongoing remedial actions and cleanup measures; and (6) inform the public of environmental issues relating to DOE operations. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, defines the general requirements for environmental protection programs at DOE facilities. This Environmental Protection Program Implementation Plan (EPPIP) defines the methods by which the Y-12 Plant staff will comply with the order by: (1) referencing environmental protection goals and objectives and identifying strategies and timetables for attaining them; (2) providing the overall framework for the design and implementation of the Y-12 Environmental Protection Program; and (3) assigning responsibilities for complying with the requirements of the order. The EPPIP is revised and updated annually.

  13. Operating instructions for LBL radon measurement facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersoll, J.G.

    1980-06-01

    This manual is intended for users of the radon-measuring facilities of the Radon Project of the Building Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality Program at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The manual comprises three parts. Part 1 sets out the steps involved in collecting, transferring, and counting radon. Part 2 describes the calibration of the transfer system and of the Lucas cells in the counting system. Part 3 outlines the maintenance procedures for the facility.

  14. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Pesticide Programs

    MedlinePLUS

    Pesticides Recent Additions | Contact Us Search: All EPA You are here: EPA Home Pesticides Highlights 6/24: EPA’s Risk Management Approach to ... EPA’s Proposal to Protect Bees from Acutely Toxic Pesticides – Public Webinar and Comment Period Extension 6/5: ...

  15. SECTION 11-PERSONAL PROTECTION PROGRAM INTRODUCTION

    E-print Network

    Selmic, Sandra

    , chemical hazards, radiological hazards, biological hazards, or mechanical irritants encountered in a manner of their exposure to hazards in the working, teaching, or research environment. The use of Personal Protective in sanitary and reliable conditions whenever is necessary by reason of hazards of process, environment

  16. SECTION 11-PERSONAL PROTECTION PROGRAM INTRODUCTION

    E-print Network

    Selmic, Sandra

    is necessary by reason of hazards of process, environment, chemical hazards, radiological hazards, biological of their exposure to hazards in the working, teaching, or research environment. The use of Personal Protective hazards, or mechanical irritants encountered in a manner capable of causing injury or impairment

  17. EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) RESEARCH PROGRAM GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Annual extramural research program guide for the Office of Research and Development. This report provides information on work being done in each part of ORD, research which EPA is planning for FY 1984, and how much the authors intend to spend on each program area. Some of the are...

  18. Radon detection

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

    1994-01-25

    A detector for atmospheric radon using a long range alpha detector as its sensing element is described. An electrostatic filter removes ions from ambient air, while allowing radon atoms to pass into a decay cavity. Here, radon atoms are allowed to decay, creating air ions. These air ions are drawn by a fan through a second electrostatic filter which can be activated or deactivated, and into the long range alpha detector. With the second electrostatic filter activated, no air ions are allowed to pass, and the signal output from the long range alpha detector consists of only the electronic background. With the second electrostatic filter deactivated, air ions and cosmic rays will be detected. The cosmic ray contribution can be minimized by shielding. 3 figures.

  19. Radon detection

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W. (Los Alamos, NM); Allander, Krag S. (Ojo Caliente, NM); Bounds, John A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01

    A detector for atmospheric radon using a long range alpha detector as its sensing element. An electrostatic filter removes ions from ambient air, while allowing radon atoms to pass into a decay cavity. Here, radon atoms are allowed to decay, creating air ions. These air ions are drawn by a fan through a second electrostatic filter which can be activated or deactivated, and into the long range alpha detector. With the second electrostatic filter activated, no air ions are allowed to pass, and the signal output from the long range alpha detector consists of only the electronic background. With the second electrostatic filter deactivated, air ions and cosmic rays will be detected. The cosmic ray contribution can be minimized by shielding.

  20. Radon Training for Professionals

    E-print Network

    Netoff, Theoden

    Radon Training for Professionals 2008-2009 www.cce.umn.edu/radon Regional Radon Training Center of Continuing Education, Kansas State University #12;WHAT IS THE MIDWEST UNIVERSITIES RADON CONSORTIUM (MURC)? MURC is a University-based world leader in radon training for professionals with a focus on North

  1. U. S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program: An ecological status and trends program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. F. Paul; A. F. Holland; S. C. Schimmel; J. K. Summers; K. J. Scott

    1990-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is initiating an Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) to monitor the status and trends of the Nation's near-coastal waters, forests, freshwater wetlands, surface waters, agroecosystems, deserts, and rangelands. The program is also intended to evaluate the effectiveness of EPA policies in protecting the ecological resources of these systems. The monitoring data collected for

  2. 34 CFR 381.1 - What is the Protection and Advocacy of Individual Rights program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY OF INDIVIDUAL RIGHTS General § 381.1 What is the Protection and Advocacy of Individual Rights program? This program is designed...each State to protect the legal and human rights of eligible individuals with...

  3. 34 CFR 381.1 - What is the Protection and Advocacy of Individual Rights program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY OF INDIVIDUAL RIGHTS General § 381.1 What is the Protection and Advocacy of Individual Rights program? This program is designed...each State to protect the legal and human rights of eligible individuals with...

  4. 34 CFR 381.1 - What is the Protection and Advocacy of Individual Rights program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY OF INDIVIDUAL RIGHTS General § 381.1 What is the Protection and Advocacy of Individual Rights program? This program is designed...each State to protect the legal and human rights of eligible individuals with...

  5. 48 CFR 3.908 - Pilot program for enhancement of contractor employee whistleblower protections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pilot program for enhancement of contractor employee whistleblower protections. 3...Protections for Contractor Employees 3.908 Pilot program for enhancement of contractor employee whistleblower protections....

  6. 48 CFR 3.908 - Pilot program for enhancement of contractor employee whistleblower protections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pilot program for enhancement of contractor employee whistleblower protections. 3...Protections for Contractor Employees 3.908 Pilot program for enhancement of contractor employee whistleblower protections....

  7. 78 FR 54069 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Program Integrity: Exchange, SHOP, and Eligibility...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ...al. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Program Integrity: Exchange, SHOP...0938-AR82 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Program Integrity: Exchange, SHOP...of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education...

  8. 78 FR 37031 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Program Integrity: Exchange, SHOP, Premium...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ...al. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Program Integrity: Exchange, SHOP...0938-AR82 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Program Integrity: Exchange, SHOP...of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act as amended by the Health Care and...

  9. 78 FR 65045 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Program Integrity: Exchange, Premium Stabilization...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-30

    ...al. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Program Integrity: Exchange, Premium...0938-AR74 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Program Integrity: Exchange, Premium...of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education...

  10. 34 CFR 381.1 - What is the Protection and Advocacy of Individual Rights program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY OF INDIVIDUAL RIGHTS General § 381.1 What is the Protection and Advocacy of Individual Rights program? This program is designed...each State to protect the legal and human rights of eligible individuals with...

  11. 34 CFR 381.1 - What is the Protection and Advocacy of Individual Rights program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY OF INDIVIDUAL RIGHTS General § 381.1 What is the Protection and Advocacy of Individual Rights program? This program is designed...each State to protect the legal and human rights of eligible individuals with...

  12. Indoor radon measurements and methodologies in Latin American countries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A Canoba; F. O López; M. I Arnaud; A. A Oliveira; R. S Neman; J. C Hadler; P. J Iunes; S. R Paulo; A. M Osorio; R Aparecido; C Rodr??guez; V Moreno; R Vasquez; G Espinosa; J. I Golzarri; T Mart??nez; M Navarrete; I Cabrera; N Segovia; P Peña; E Taméz; P Pereyra; M. E López-Herrera; L Sajo-Bohus

    2001-01-01

    According to the current international guidelines concerning environmental problems, it is necessary to evaluate and to know the indoor radon levels, specially since most of the natural radiation dose to man comes from radon gas and its progeny. Several countries have established National Institutions and National Programs for the study of radon and its connection with lung cancer risk and

  13. 40 CFR 700.41 - Radon user fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Radon user fees. 700.41 Section 700.41 ...SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT GENERAL Fees § 700.41 Radon user fees. User fees relating to radon proficiency programs authorized under the...

  14. 40 CFR 700.41 - Radon user fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Radon user fees. 700.41 Section 700.41 ...SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT GENERAL Fees § 700.41 Radon user fees. User fees relating to radon proficiency programs authorized under the...

  15. 40 CFR 700.41 - Radon user fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Radon user fees. 700.41 Section 700.41 ...SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT GENERAL Fees § 700.41 Radon user fees. User fees relating to radon proficiency programs authorized under the...

  16. 40 CFR 700.41 - Radon user fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Radon user fees. 700.41 Section 700.41 ...SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT GENERAL Fees § 700.41 Radon user fees. User fees relating to radon proficiency programs authorized under the...

  17. 40 CFR 700.41 - Radon user fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Radon user fees. 700.41 Section 700.41 ...SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT GENERAL Fees § 700.41 Radon user fees. User fees relating to radon proficiency programs authorized under the...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 45 - Environmental Protection Agency Training Programs

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Environmental Protection Agency Training Programs...Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER...Appendix A to Part 45—Environmental Protection Agency Training...

  19. Skin Protection for (SPF) Kids Program.

    PubMed

    Walker, Deborah K

    2012-06-01

    Skin cancer is increasing faster than any other cancer in the United States. Individuals who have had excessive sun exposure during childhood and adolescence set the stage for the development of skin cancers later in life. In 2009, there were more than 1 million newly diagnosed cases of skin cancer in the United States. This primary prevention program combined the guidelines in the literature resulting in a unique evidence-based program for teachers and informational guidelines for parents. These guidelines were used in classrooms and at home, supporting intervention among school-age children, specifically those in kindergarten through fifth grade. PMID:22525811

  20. Radon: The Invisible Invader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Leader, 1987

    1987-01-01

    A brief background on indoor radon and the health risks associated with radon exposure, with special emphasis on nonresidential buildings. One school district's experience in radon testing and monitoring is included. (MLF)

  1. Radon Testing in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Schools may be a significant source of radon exposure for children and staff. Describes radon detection kits and technologies, when to use them, and what action to take given the results of a radon test. (MLF)

  2. SITE-SPECIFIC PROTOCOL FOR MEASURING SOIL RADON POTENTIALS FOR FLORIDA HOUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a protocol for site-specific measurement of radon potentials for Florida houses that is consistent with existing residential radon protection maps. The protocol gives further guidance on the possible need for radon-protective house construction features. In a...

  3. Measurements of indoor radon concentrations and assessment of radiation exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medici, F.; Rybach, L.

    1994-02-01

    In the past decade many international studies have established that the radioactive gas radon is responsible to a large extent for the radiation dose absorbed by the population. Consequently the Swiss Federal Health Office started and sponsored a research program called RAPROS (Radon Programm Schweiz, 1987-1991) to assess the relevant aspects of radon exposure in Switzerland. The average indoor radon concentration in Swiss living rooms is about 60-70 Bq m -3, this corresponds to an annual dose of about 2.2 mSv, but values largely exceeding 1000 Bq m -3 were also found. Often very strong temporal fluctuations of indoor radon concentrations were measured. The ground directly underneath buildings is the main radon source of indoor radon. The material properties that influence the radon production and transport in soils are: radium content, emanating coefficient and soil gas permeability; among them only the last one can vary over many orders of magnitude. The permeability is consequently the decisive factor that enables radon transport in the subsurface. To characterize the radon potential of soils a radon availability index ( RAV) was introduced. Our investigations have also shown that in karst systems the radon concentration in the air is often increased to 10-100 times higher than in buildings. This radon-charged air is able to travel over considerable distances through faults and cavities in the underground and reach living rooms built over karstified areas.

  4. Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program - Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Radiological Control Managers' Council

    2008-06-01

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection,' establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (on-site or off-site) U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration off-site projects. This NTS RPP promulgates the radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation resulting from NNSA/NSO activities at the NTS and other operational areas as stated in 10 CFR 835.1(a). NNSA/NSO activities (including design, construction, operation, and decommissioning) within the scope of this RPP may result in occupational exposures to radiation or radioactive material. Therefore, a system of control is implemented through specific references to the site-specific NV/YMP RCM. This system of control is intended to ensure that the following criteria are met: (1) occupational exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), (2) DOE's limiting values are not exceeded, (3) employees are aware of and are prepared to cope with emergency conditions, and (4) employees are not inadvertently exposed to radiation or radioactive material.

  5. FY-2007 PNNL Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Program Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Patrick A.; Fisher, Julie A.; Goheen, Steven C.; Isern, Nancy G.; Madson, Vernon J.; Meicenheimer, Russell L.; Pugh, Ray; Schneirla, Keri A.; Shockey, Loretta L.; Tinker, Mike R.

    2008-08-15

    This document reports the results of the FY-2007 PNNL VPP Program Evaluation, which is a self-assessment of the operational and programmatic performance of the Laboratory related to worker safety and health. The report was compiled by a team of worker representatives and safety professionals who evaluated the Laboratory's worker safety and health programs on the basis of DOE-VPP criteria. The principle elements of DOE's VPP program are: Management Leadership, Employee Involvement, Worksite Analysis, Hazard Prevention and Control, and Safety and Health Training.

  6. PNNL FY2005 DOE Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Program Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Patrick A.; Madson, Vernon J.; Isern, Nancy G.; Haney, Janice M.; Fisher, Julie A.; Goheen, Steven C.; Gulley, Susan E.; Reck, John J.; Collins, Drue A.; Tinker, Mike R.; Walker, Landon A.; Wynn, Clifford L.

    2005-01-31

    This document reports the results of the FY 2005 PNNL VPP Program Evaluation, which is a self-assessment of the operational and programmatic performance of the Laboratory related to worker safety and health. The report was compiled by a team of worker representatives and safety professionals who evaluated the Laboratory's worker safety and health programs on the basis of DOE-VPP criteria. The principle elements of DOE's VPP program are: Management Leadership, Employee Involvement, Worksite Analysis, Hazard Prevention and Control, and Safety and Health Training.

  7. NASA's planetary protection program as an astrobiology teaching module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Vera M.

    2005-09-01

    We are currently developing a teaching module on the NASA's Planetary Protection Program for UW-Parkside SENCER courses. SENCER stands for Science Education for New Civic Engagements and Responsibility. It is a national initiative of the National Science Foundation (NSF), now in its fifth year, to improve science education by teaching basic sciences through the complex public issues of the 21st century. The Planetary Protection Program is one such complex public issue. Teaching astrobiology and the NASA's goals via the Planetary Protection module within the SENCER courses seems to be a good formula to reach large number of students in an interesting and innovative way. We shall describe the module that we are developing. It will be launched on our web site titled "Astrobiology at Parkside" (http://oldweb.uwp.edu/academic/chemistry/kolb/organic_chemistry/, or go to Google and then to Vera Kolb Home Page), and thus will be available for teaching to all interested parties.

  8. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions

    2002-09-24

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to prepare a Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan. This document fulfills the requirement for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This document was prepared by the Hydrology Section of the Westinghouse TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) Environmental Compliance Department, and it is the responsibility of this group to review the plan annually and update it every three years. This document is not, nor is it intended to be, an implementing document that sets forth specific details on carrying out field projects or operational policy. Rather, it is intended to give the reader insight to the groundwater protection philosophy at WIPP.

  9. The IHS diagnostic X-ray equipment radiation protection program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Knapp; G. Byrns; O. Suleiman

    1994-01-01

    The Indian Health Service (IHS) operates or contracts with Tribal groups to operate 50 hospitals and approximately 165 primary ambulatory care centers. These facilities contain approximately 275 medical and 800 dental diagnostic x-ray machines. IHS environmental health personnel in collaboration with the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) developed a diagnostic x-ray protection program

  10. QUALITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION: THE EPA QA PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Formalized quality assurance (QA) program requirements for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have been established for more than ten years. uring this period, the environmental issues and concerns addressed by the EPA have changed. any issues, such as ozone depletion...

  11. Evaluation of Food Protection and Defense Outreach Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shutske, John M.; Pierquet, Jennifer; Michel, Laura; Rasmussen, Ruth; Olson, Debra

    2008-01-01

    This analysis documents the outcomes and impacts from a series of food protection and defense educational programs conducted over a 3-y period for private and public sector food system professionals. Several measures were used to determine the professions of participants; their improvements in skills and abilities that resulted from workshops; the…

  12. Environmental Protection Agency's hazardous waste research and development program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. Skinner; N. J. Bassin

    1988-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency conducts research, development, and demonstrations supporting statutory missions to clean up and regulate solid and hazardous wastes. EPA's research, development, and demonstration program concentrates on predicting the transport and transformation of hazardous chemicals in soil, water, ground water, and the biosphere; improving environmental detection and monitoring methods, determining the effects of hazardous wastes on human health;

  13. DUKE UNIVERSITY HEALTH SYSTEM Human Research Protection Program

    E-print Network

    involving a drug, device or biologic, and all research involving data that will be submitted to or held1 DUKE UNIVERSITY HEALTH SYSTEM Human Research Protection Program QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ACTIVITIES product in the course of medical practice. FDA research provisions will not be considered further here

  14. Geochemistry of atmospheric radon and radon products

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. K. Turekian; Y. Nozaki; L. K. Benninger

    1977-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: measurement of the radon-222 flux to the atmosphere; measurement of the lead-210 atmospheric flux; and the mean residence time of aerosols. A total global model is proposed for radon-222 and its daughters.

  15. The IHS diagnostic X-ray equipment radiation protection program

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, A.; Byrns, G.; Suleiman, O.

    1994-05-01

    The Indian Health Service (IHS) operates or contracts with Tribal groups to operate 50 hospitals and approximately 165 primary ambulatory care centers. These facilities contain approximately 275 medical and 800 dental diagnostic x-ray machines. IHS environmental health personnel in collaboration with the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) developed a diagnostic x-ray protection program including standard survey procedures and menu-driven calculations software. Important features of the program include the evaluation of equipment performance collection of average patient entrance skin exposure (ESE) measurements for selected procedures, and quality assurance. The ESE data, collected using the National Evaluation of X-ray Trends (NEXT) protocol, will be presented. The IHS Diagnostic X-ray Radiation Protection Program is dynamic and is adapting to changes in technology and workload.

  16. Exposure to atmospheric radon.

    PubMed Central

    Steck, D J; Field, R W; Lynch, C F

    1999-01-01

    We measured radon (222Rn) concentrations in Iowa and Minnesota and found that unusually high annual average radon concentrations occur outdoors in portions of central North America. In some areas, outdoor concentrations exceed the national average indoor radon concentration. The general spatial patterns of outdoor radon and indoor radon are similar to the spatial distribution of radon progeny in the soil. Outdoor radon exposure in this region can be a substantial fraction of an individual's total radon exposure and is highly variable across the population. Estimated lifetime effective dose equivalents for the women participants in a radon-related lung cancer study varied by a factor of two at the median dose, 8 mSv, and ranged up to 60 mSv (6 rem). Failure to include these doses can reduce the statistical power of epidemiologic studies that examine the lung cancer risk associated with residential radon exposure. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9924007

  17. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Multimedia Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ambutas, K. [Environmental Protection Agency, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The Native American multimedia program was developed to facilitate the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) partnership with tribes in the delivery of environmental programs on reservation lands and to enhance the EPA`s ability to carry out its trust responsibility to the tribes. By providing the means for each tribe to employ its own environmental specialist, the multimedia program helps provide the foundation necessary to build environmental infrastructure for the protection of Native American lands and people and for the development of more rigorous medium-specific programs. The multimedia program began in 1991 with two pilot projects on the Bad River Chippewa Reservation, Wisconsin, and the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming. Expanded in 1992, Region 5 awarded ten multimedia cooperative agreements. At the time, Region 5 made the commitment to fund all reservations within the region, and by end of fiscal year 1993, 24 agreements brought the program to all 29 tribes. This has been a monumental effort, possible only by coupling fiscal year 1993`s funding from the Office of Federal Activities ($599050) with the region`s own reprogramming efforts ($510000).

  18. 76 FR 27603 - Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program: Civil Rights Protections for SNAP Households

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ...Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program: Civil Rights Protections for SNAP Households...Program (SNAP) regulations that secure civil rights protections for SNAP households...reviewed under Executive Order 12988, Civil Justice Reform. This rule is...

  19. 75 FR 21011 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; Statewide Communication Interoperability Plan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ...Security, National Protection and Programs Directorate/Cybersecurity and Communications/Office of Emergency Communications...DHS), National Protection and Programs Directorate/Cybersecurity and Communications/Office of Emergency...

  20. Dental-service Dental Radiation Safety and Protection: Program guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-27

    The primary purpose of the program guide for Dental Radiation Safety and Protection is to assist VA dental personnel in developing radiologic procedures that ensure maximum safety for their patients and themselves. In order to do this, the authors have included a summary of the biological hazards associated with exposure to x-radiation, provided information on patient exposure levels associated with dental X-ray units, and explained the methods for reducing patient and staff exposure to X-rays.

  1. Constructing vulnerabilty and protective measures indices for the enhanced critical infrastructure protection program.

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R. E.; Buehring, W. A.; Whitfield, R. G.; Bassett, G. W.; Dickinson, D. C.; Haffenden, R. A.; Klett, M. S.; Lawlor, M. A.; Decision and Information Sciences; LANL

    2009-10-14

    The US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has directed its Protective Security Advisors (PSAs) to form partnerships with the owners and operators of assets most essential to the Nation's well being - a subclass of critical infrastructure and key resources (CIKR) - and to conduct site visits for these and other high-risk assets as part of the Enhanced Critical Infrastructure Protection (ECIP) Program. During each such visit, the PSA documents information about the facility's current CIKR protection posture and overall security awareness. The primary goals for ECIP site visits (DHS 2009) are to: (1) inform facility owners and operators of the importance of their facilities as an identified high-priority CIKR and the need to be vigilant in light of the ever-present threat of terrorism; (2) identify protective measures currently in place at these facilities, provide comparisons of CIKR protection postures across like assets, and track the implementation of new protective measures; and (3) enhance existing relationships among facility owners and operators; DHS; and various Federal, State, local tribal, and territorial partners. PSAs conduct ECIP visits to assess overall site security; educate facility owners and operators about security; help owners and operators identify gaps and potential improvements; and promote communication and information sharing among facility owners and operators, DHS, State governments, and other security partners. Information collected during ECIP visits is used to develop metrics; conduct sector-by-sector and cross-sector vulnerability comparisons; identify security gaps and trends across CIKR sectors and subsectors; establish sector baseline security survey results; and track progress toward improving CIKR security through activities, programs, outreach, and training (Snyder 2009). The data being collected are used in a framework consistent with the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) risk criteria (DHS 2009). The NIPP framework incorporates consequence, threat, and vulnerability components and addresses all hazards. The analysis of the vulnerability data needs to be reproducible, support risk analysis, and go beyond protection. It also needs to address important security/vulnerability topics, such as physical security, cyber security, systems analysis, and dependencies and interdependencies. This report provides an overview of the approach being developed to estimate vulnerability and provide vulnerability comparisons for sectors and subsectors. the information will be used to assist DHS in analyzing existing protective measures and vulnerability at facilities, to identify potential ways to reduce vulnerabilities, and to assist in preparing sector risk estimates. The owner/operator receives an analysis of the data collected for a specific asset, showing a comparison between the facility's protection posture/vulnerability index and those of DHS sector/subsector sites visited. This comparison gives the owner/operator an indication of the asset's security strengths and weaknesses that may be contributing factors to its vulnerability and protection posture. The information provided to the owner/operator shows how the asset compares to other similar assets within the asset's sector or subsector. A 'dashboard' display is used to illustrate the results in a convenient format. The dashboard allows the owner/operator to analyze the implementation of additional protective measures and to illustrate how such actions would impact the asset's Protective Measures Index (PMI) or Vulnerability Index (VI).

  2. Controlling the Radon Threat Needn't Be Another Costly Nightmare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freije, Matthew R.

    1989-01-01

    After a study of 3,000 classrooms in 130 schools in 16 states, the Environmental Protection Agency urged all schools to conduct tests for radon. Explains a 6-step screening test, methods of reducing radon concentrations, and how the risk from radon exposure compares with other risks. (MLF)

  3. RADON MITIGATION IN CRAWL SPACE HOUSES IN NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Approximately 15 percent of existing U.S. houses are built over dirt crawl spaces, and little or no data exist relative to radon mitigation techniques for this style of house construction. The paper discusses and Environmental Protection Agency radon mitigation demonstration. A v...

  4. FEASIBILITY AND APPROACH FOR MAPPING RADON POTENTIALS IN FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an analysis of the feasibility and approach for developing statewide maps of radon potentials in Florida. he maps would provide a geographic basis for implementing new radon-protective building construction standards to reduce public health risks from ...

  5. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2005-07-01

    The DOE established the Groundwater Monitoring Program (GMP) (WP 02-1) to monitor groundwater resources at WIPP. In the past, the GMP was conducted to establish background data of existing conditions of groundwater quality and quantity in the WIPP vicinity, and to develop and maintain a water quality database as required by regulation. Today the GMP is conducted consistent with 204.1.500 NMAC (New MexicoAdministrative Code), "Adoption of 40 CFR [Code of Federal Regulations] Part 264,"specifically 40 CFR §264.90 through §264.101. These sections of 20.4.1 NMAC provide guidance for detection monitoring of groundwater that is, or could be, affected by waste management activities at WIPP. Detection monitoring at WIPP is designed to detect contaminants in the groundwater long before the general population is exposed. Early detection will allow cleanup efforts to be accomplished before any exposure to the general population can occur. Title 40 CFR Part 264, Subpart F, stipulates minimum requirements of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] §6901 et seq.) (RCRA) groundwater monitoring programs including the number and location of monitoring wells; sampling and reporting schedules; analytical methods and accuracy requirements; monitoring parameters; and statistical treatment of monitoring data. This document outlines how WIPP intends to protect and preserve groundwater within the WIPP Land Withdrawal Area (WLWA). Groundwater protection is just one aspect of the WIPP environmental protection effort. An overview of the entire environmental protection effort can be found in DOE/WIPP 99-2194, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan. The WIPP GMP is designed to statistically determine if any changes are occurring in groundwater characteristics within and surrounding the WIPP facility. If a change is noted, the cause will then be determined and the appropriate corrective action(s) initiated.

  6. What Is Radon?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... materials may contribute significantly to radon exposure. Some granite countertops may expose people to different levels of ... experts agree that while a small portion of granite countertops may give off increased levels of radon, ...

  7. Ambient Radon-222 Monitoring in Amargosa Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    L.H. Karr; J.J. Tappen; D. Shafer; K.J. Gray

    2008-06-05

    As part of a program to characterize and baseline selected environmental parameters in the region around the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, ambient radon-222 monitoring was conducted in the rural community of Amargosa Valley, the community closest to the proposed repository site. Passive integrating radon monitors and a continuous radon monitoring instrument were deployed adjacent to the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) (http://www.cemp.dri.edu/index.html) station located in the Amargosa Valley Community Center near the library. The CEMP station provided real-time ambient gamma exposure and meteorological data used to correct the integrated radon measurements as well as verify meteorological data collected by the continuous radon monitoring instrument. Additionally, different types of environmental enclosures that housed the monitors and instrument were used to determine if particular designs influenced the ambient radon measurements.

  8. 75 FR 34017 - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Notice 25 for Significant New Alternatives Policy Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ...Stratospheric Ozone: Notice 25 for Significant New Alternatives Policy Program AGENCY: Environmental...Environmental Protection Agency's Significant New Alternatives Policy program. The substitutes...process for administering the Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program...

  9. Radon and lung cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jm Samet

    1989-01-01

    Radon, an inert gas released during the decay of uranium-238, is ubiquitous in indoor and outdoor air and contaminates many underground mines. Extensive epidemiologic evidence from studies of underground miners and complementary animal data have documented that radon causes lung cancer in smokers and nonsmokers. Radon must also be considered a potentially important cause of lung cancer for the general

  10. On the road to the OSHA voluntary protection program.

    PubMed

    Adamus, Mary Sgarlata

    2004-01-01

    In 1998, representatives from the Employee Health Services, Safety and Security, Physical Therapy, Human Resources, and Legal Affairs Departments and the Risk Management Program at Robert Packer Hospital (RPH) in Sayre, PA began a project to create a "culture of safety." The journey would ultimately lead to application to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration Voluntary Protection Program (OSHA VPP). Four years later, because of the dedication and collaboration of many individuals, RPH received notification that its application for OSHA VPP participation was approved by the Assistant Secretary of Labor. This article describes that journey and provides other healthcare organizations with the information needed to begin their own journey to successful project implementation. PMID:15060956

  11. United States Office of EPA-520/1-88-020 Environmental Protection Radiation Program September 1988

    E-print Network

    United States Office of EPA-520/1-88-020 Environmental Protection Radiation Program September 1988. This report was prepared by the OFFICE OF RADIATION PROGRAMS U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Washington and Exposure-to-Dose Conversion Factors for General Application, Based on the 1987 Federal Radiation Protection

  12. Environmental Compliance and Protection Program Description Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2009-02-26

    The objective of the Environmental Compliance and Protection (EC and P) Program Description (PD) is to establish minimum environmental compliance requirements and natural resources protection goals for the Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) Oak Ridge Environmental Management Cleanup Contract (EMCC) Contract Number DE-AC05-98OR22700-M198. This PD establishes the work practices necessary to ensure protection of the environment during the performance of EMCC work activities on the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, by BJC employees and subcontractor personnel. Both BJC and subcontractor personnel are required to implement this PD. A majority of the decontamination and demolition (D and D) activities and media (e.g., soil and groundwater) remediation response actions at DOE sites on the ORR are conducted under the authority of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). CERCLA activities are governed by individual CERCLA decision documents (e.g., Record of Decision [ROD] or Action Memorandum) and according to requirements stated in the Federal Facility Agreement for the Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE 1992). Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) for the selected remedy are the requirements for environmental remediation responses (e.g., removal actions and remedial actions) conducted under CERCLA.

  13. Home Safety: Radon Gas 

    E-print Network

    Shaw, Bryan W.; Denny, Monica L.

    1999-11-12

    Every home should be tested for radon, an invisible, odorless, radioactive gas that occurs naturally. Radon is estimated to be the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. However, with proper equipment, radon is easy to detect.... These particles collect on dust in the air. After you inhale radon, the dust and smoke particles become deeply lodged or trapped in your lungs, where they penetrate the cells of the mucous membranes and other tissues. Lung cancer from inhaling radon decay products...

  14. 25 CFR 63.35 - How may Indian child protection and family violence prevention program funds be used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...How may Indian child protection and family violence prevention program funds be used? 63...GOVERNMENT INDIAN CHILD PROTECTION AND FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Program § 63.35...

  15. 25 CFR 63.33 - What must an application for Indian child protection and family violence prevention program funds...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...for Indian child protection and family violence prevention program funds include? 63...GOVERNMENT INDIAN CHILD PROTECTION AND FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Program § 63.33...

  16. 25 CFR 63.30 - What is the purpose of the Indian child protection and family violence prevention program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...the Indian child protection and family violence prevention program? 63.30 Section...GOVERNMENT INDIAN CHILD PROTECTION AND FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Program § 63.30...

  17. 25 CFR 63.35 - How may Indian child protection and family violence prevention program funds be used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...How may Indian child protection and family violence prevention program funds be used? 63...GOVERNMENT INDIAN CHILD PROTECTION AND FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Program § 63.35...

  18. 25 CFR 63.33 - What must an application for Indian child protection and family violence prevention program funds...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...for Indian child protection and family violence prevention program funds include? 63...GOVERNMENT INDIAN CHILD PROTECTION AND FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Program § 63.33...

  19. 25 CFR 63.30 - What is the purpose of the Indian child protection and family violence prevention program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...the Indian child protection and family violence prevention program? 63.30 Section...GOVERNMENT INDIAN CHILD PROTECTION AND FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Program § 63.30...

  20. 25 CFR 63.32 - Under what authority are Indian child protection and family violence prevention program funds...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...are Indian child protection and family violence prevention program funds awarded? 63...GOVERNMENT INDIAN CHILD PROTECTION AND FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Program § 63.32...

  1. 25 CFR 63.32 - Under what authority are Indian child protection and family violence prevention program funds...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...are Indian child protection and family violence prevention program funds awarded? 63...GOVERNMENT INDIAN CHILD PROTECTION AND FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Program § 63.32...

  2. 77 FR 32397 - Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance Traumatic Injury Protection Program-Genitourinary Losses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ...RIN 2900-AO20 Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance Traumatic Injury Protection Program...regulations governing the Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance Traumatic Injury Protection...that expanded the Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance Traumatic Injury...

  3. Interlaboratory comparisons for passive radon measuring devices at BfS.

    PubMed

    Beck, T R; Buchröder, H; Foerster, E; Schmidt, V

    2007-01-01

    Since 2003, the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) has conducted annual interlaboratory comparisons for passive radon measuring devices in order to ensure the quality of these measurements. Passive radon devices which use solid state nuclear track detectors, electrets or activated charcoal can be tested. The exposures of radon devices are carried out in the radon calibration laboratory at BfS. Radon activity concentrations are traced back to the national standard, being established at the National Institute of Physics and Metrology (PTB). According to the national guideline, radon services which offer radon monitoring at workplaces have to participate in the intercomparisons and prove the suitability of their radon devices for the measurements. PMID:17562644

  4. Protection in good and bad times ? the Turkish green card health program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Meltem A. Aran; Jesko S. Hentschel

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates the equity and financial protection implications of the expansion of the Green Card (Yesil Kart) non-contributory health insurance program in Turkey during the growth years from 2003 to 2008. It also considers the program's protective impact during the economic crisis in 2009. The authors find that the rapid expansion of the program between 2003 and 2008 was

  5. Human Lung Cancer Risks from Radon – Part III - Evidence of Influence of Combined Bystander and Adaptive Response Effects on Radon Case-Control Studies - A Microdose Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Bobby E.; Thompson, Richard E.; Beecher, Georgia C.

    2012-01-01

    Since the publication of the BEIR VI (1999) report on health risks from radon, a significant amount of new data has been published showing various mechanisms that may affect the ultimate assessment of radon as a carcinogen, in particular the potentially deleterious Bystander Effect (BE) and the potentially beneficial Adaptive Response radio-protection (AR). The case-control radon lung cancer risk data of the pooled 13 European countries radon study (Darby et al 2005, 2006) and the 8 North American pooled study (Krewski et al 2005, 2006) have been evaluated. The large variation in the odds ratios of lung cancer from radon risk is reconciled, based on the large variation in geological and ecological conditions and variation in the degree of adaptive response radio-protection against the bystander effect induced lung damage. The analysis clearly shows Bystander Effect radon lung cancer induction and Adaptive Response reduction in lung cancer in some geographical regions. It is estimated that for radon levels up to about 400 Bq m?3 there is about a 30% probability that no human lung cancer risk from radon will be experienced and a 20% probability that the risk is below the zero-radon, endogenic spontaneous or perhaps even genetically inheritable lung cancer risk rate. The BEIR VI (1999) and EPA (2003) estimates of human lung cancer deaths from radon are most likely significantly excessive. The assumption of linearity of risk, by the Linear No-Threshold Model, with increasing radon exposure is invalid. PMID:22942874

  6. EVALUATION OF WATERBORNE RADON IMPACT ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ASSESSMENT OF CONTROL OPTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research program was conducted with two objectives: (1) evaluation of waterborne radon impacts on indoor air quality, and (2) assessment of available control technologies to limit indoor exposures to radon and its decay products. This report contains a review of radon's phys...

  7. Geometric programming prediction of design trends for OMV protective structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mog, R. A.; Horn, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    The global optimization trends of protective honeycomb structural designs for spacecraft subject to hypervelocity meteroid and space debris are presented. This nonlinear problem is first formulated for weight minimization of the orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV) using a generic monomial predictor. Five problem formulations are considered, each dependent on the selection of independent design variables. Each case is optimized by considering the dual geometric programming problem. The dual variables are solved for in terms of the generic estimated exponents of the monomial predictor. The primal variables are then solved for by conversion. Finally, parametric design trends are developed for ranges of the estimated regression parameters. Results specify nonmonotonic relationships for the optimal first and second sheet mass per unit areas in terms of the estimated exponents.

  8. Hanford Protective Barriers Program water-erosion studies, FY 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, K.A.; Cadwell, L.L.; Walters, W.H.

    1990-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is conducting the water-erosion control task of the Hanford Protective Barriers Program to assess barrier stability against soil erosion and slumping. The purpose of the barriers is to protect shallow-burial waste sites at the Hanford Site from water infiltration, biointrusion, and surficial erosion for up to 10,000 years. These aboveground, mounded structures will consist of layered, fine-grained sediment and rock designed to direct surface- and ground-water pathways away from the buried waste. The fine-grained sediment for the barrier will be obtained from the McGee Ranch on the Hanford Site. The purpose of the FY 1989 field work was to test two hypotheses concerning the behavior of McGee Ranch soil: runoff may occur on very dry, fine-grained sediment prior to complete saturation and rainsplash is an important erosional process for this type of sediment. This report describes plot construction, sediment sampling, and calibration testing of the rainfall simulator. Baseline stratigraphic and sedimentologic data include bulk density and textural properties of sediment in the test plots. Baseline precipitation data consist of predetermined raindrop sizes, rainfall intensities, plot coverage, and operational data for the simulator. 10 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. 75 FR 417 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; Statewide Communication Interoperability Plan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ...SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security, National Protection and Programs Directorate/Cybersecurity and Communications/Office of Emergency Communications, has submitted the following Information Collection Request...

  10. 75 FR 9608 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; Technical Assistance Request and Evaluation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-03

    ...SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security, National Protection and Programs Directorate/Cybersecurity and Communications/Office of Emergency Communications, has submitted the following Information Collection Request...

  11. Consumer's Guide to Radon Reduction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to locate a qualified radon professional. EPA's A Citizen's Guide to Radon and the Home Buyer's and ... is not for sale; refer to EPA's " A Citizen's Guide to Radon " for testing guidance. The second ...

  12. Indoor Radon: The Deadliest Pollutant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the origin, occurrence, and effects of radon gas. Cites studies which attribute 5,000 to 20,000 deaths per year to radon exposure and the synergistic effect between radon and smoking. Explains ways to reduce risks. (RT)

  13. Steady-state response of a charcoal bed to radon in flowing air with water vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, T.E.; Jarzemba, M.S.; Fentiman, A.W. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Previously we have developed a mathematical model of radon adsorption in active air with water vapor on small U.S. Environmental Protection Agency charcoal canisters that are used for environmental measurements of radon. The purpose of this paper is to extend this mathematical model to describe the adsorption of radon by large charcoal beds with radon-laden air flowing through them. The resulting model equations are solved analytically to predict the steady-state adsorption of radon by such beds. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Radon assay and purification techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Simgen, Hardy [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-08-08

    Radon is a source of background in many astroparticle physics experiments searching for rare low energy events. In this paper an overview about radon in the field is given including radon detection techniques, radon sources and material screening with respect to radon emanation. Finally, also the problem of long-lived radioactive {sup 222}Rn-daughters and the question of gas purification from radon is addressed.

  15. CONSERVATION AND NATURAL RESOURCES Water Resources: Enact Flint River Drought Protection Act; Create Drought Protection Program; Require the Board of Natural Resources To Establish a Drought Protection Program; Require Cooperation with the Georgia Environmental Facilities Authority

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura Windsor

    2000-01-01

    The Act, known as the Flint River Drought Protection Act, adds several sections to the Code to identify the importance of Georgia's water resources, define certain terms, and authorize the Board of Natural Resources and the Director of the Environmental Protection Division (EPD) of the Department of Natural Resources to create and enforce a drought protection program and administer funds.

  16. Determination of radon flux rates in a uranium mine, Cluff Lake, Saskatchewan. Report No. INFO-0347

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    In 1986, the Atomic Energy Control Board completed a project in which a computer model (VENTRAD) was developed to model underground mine ventilation systems. The accuracy of the radon/radon daughter concentration predictions by the computer model depend on the input parameters describing the radon source term. At present, there is a lack of reliable data on radon sources in general and in uranium mines in particular. This study determined the flux of radon emitted per unit surface area in selected locations of Amok Ltd.'s underground Cluff Lake uranium mine; measured parameters that can have an influence on radon flux; tested the VENTRAD computer program using the input parameters measured in the mine; and determined the total flux of radon per unit surface area from the total amount of radon exhausted from the mine and the total surface area of the mine openings.

  17. Radon reduction and radon monitoring in the NEMO experiment

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Radon reduction and radon monitoring in the NEMO experiment A. NACHAB a and NEMO collaboration) Abstract: The first data of the NEMO 3 neutrinoless double beta decay experiment have shown that the radon can be a non negligible component of the background. In order to reduce the radon level in the gas

  18. Hanford Site Protective Barrier Development Program: Fiscal year 1990 highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwell, L.L. (ed.)

    1991-09-01

    The Hanford Site Protective Barrier Development Program was jointly developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to design and test an earthen cover system(s) that can be used to inhibit water infiltration; plant, animal, and human intrusion; and wind and water erosion. The joint PNL/WHC program was initiated in FY 1986. To date, research findings support the initial concepts of barrier designs for the Hanford Site. A fine-soil surface is planned to partition surface water into runoff and temporary storage. Transpiration by vegetation that grows in the fine-soil layer will return stored water to the atmosphere as will surface evaporation. A capillary break created by the interface of the fine-soil layer and coarser textured materials below will further limit the downward migration of surface water, making it available over a longer period of time for cycling to the atmosphere. Should water pass the interface, it will drain laterally through a coarse textured sand/gravel layer. Tested barrier designs appear to work adequately to prevent drainage under current and postulated wetter-climate (added precipitation) conditions. Wind and water erosion tasks are developing data to predict the extent of erosion on barrier surfaces. Data collected during the last year confirm the effectiveness of small burrowing animals in removing surface water. Water infiltrating through burrows of larger mammals was subsequently lost by natural processes. Natural analog and climate change studies are under way to provide credibility for modeling the performance of barrier designs over a long period of time and under shifts in climate. 10 refs., 30 figs.

  19. Public response to radon information: A case study of Bonneville Power Administration's indoor air quality information program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. C. Baechler; J. E. Englin

    1989-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration was among the first federal agencies to recognize that the quality of indoor air may affect people's health and habits. With this recognition has come several research projects, environmental assessments, and program features geared toward understanding and mitigating any potential effects that may result from the agencies energy conservation programs. Program features include minimum requirements for

  20. Radon: The Silent Danger.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoffel, Jennifer

    1989-01-01

    This article discusses the public health dangers associated with radon exposure in homes and schools. In addition, testing and corrective efforts by federal and state agencies are discussed. A map indicating areas in the U.S. with potentially high radon levels is included. (IAH)

  1. Radon permeability and radon exhalation of building materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G Keller; B Hoffmann; T Feigenspan

    2001-01-01

    High radon concentrations indoors usually depend on the possibilities of radon penetration from the surrounding soil into the buildings. Radon concentrations in dwellings up to 100 kBq\\/m3 were found in some special regions (i.e. Schneeberg\\/Saxony, Umhausen\\/Tyrol), where the soil shows a high uranium content and additionally, a fast radon transport in the soil is possible. To reduce the radon exposure

  2. Awareness and perceptions of the risks of exposure to indoor radon: a population-based approach to evaluate a radon awareness and testing campaign in England and Wales.

    PubMed

    Poortinga, Wouter; Bronstering, Karin; Lannon, Simon

    2011-11-01

    The current study aimed to evaluate the locally directed radon roll-out program that was conducted between 2001 and 2005 in England and Wales to increase radon awareness and testing rates. A representative sample of 1,578 residents aged 16 and older were interviewed who lived in radon-affected areas of 15 local authorities in England and Wales that were eligible for participation in the program. The study systematically sampled across participating and nonparticipating local authorities, "actionable" and "nonactionable" radon-affected areas, and geographic regions with different campaign histories (Wales, Southwest England, and the rest of England). As a multistage sampling strategy was used, the data were analyzed from a multilevel perspective. This study found that participants living in participating local authorities had higher levels of awareness and were more likely to have tested their home for radon than participants living in nonparticipating local authorities. Similar results were found for participants living in "actionable" areas as compared to those living in "nonactionable" radon-affected areas. The study further found that radon awareness and testing rates were the highest in Southwest England and the lowest in Wales. This study suggests that the radon roll-out program has been effective in raising awareness and testing rates, and that ongoing domestic radon campaigns in Southwest England may have raised radon awareness and testing in these areas, showing important reinforcement effects of multiple risk communication campaigns. PMID:21477087

  3. 40 CFR 29.3 - What programs and activities of the Environmental Protection Agency are subject to these...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01...programs and activities of the Environmental Protection Agency are subject to these regulations? 29.3 Section 29.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  4. 40 CFR 29.3 - What programs and activities of the Environmental Protection Agency are subject to these...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01...programs and activities of the Environmental Protection Agency are subject to these regulations? 29.3 Section 29.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  5. 40 CFR 29.3 - What programs and activities of the Environmental Protection Agency are subject to these...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01...programs and activities of the Environmental Protection Agency are subject to these regulations? 29.3 Section 29.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  6. 40 CFR 29.3 - What programs and activities of the Environmental Protection Agency are subject to these...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01...programs and activities of the Environmental Protection Agency are subject to these regulations? 29.3 Section 29.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  7. Protecting You/Protecting Me: Evaluation of a Student-Led Alcohol Prevention and Traffic Safety Program for Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Mary Lou; Baker, Tara Kelley; Falb, Timothy; Roberts-Gray, Cindy

    2005-01-01

    Pre- and post-surveys of self-protective knowledge and skills in third, fourth, and fifth grade classrooms (n = 24) randomly assigned to a model program for alcohol prevention and traffic safety or to comparison group (n = 24 classrooms) were analyzed to evaluate replicability of immediate positive effects of first-year exposure and to test…

  8. CRC handbook of management of radiation protection programs

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.L.; Weidner, A.

    1986-01-01

    This guidebook organizes the profusion of rules and regulations surrounding radiation protection into a single-volume reference. Employee and public protection, accident prevention, and emergency preparedness are included in this comprehensive coverage. Whenever possible, information is presented in convenient checklists, tables, or outlines that enable you to locate information quickly.

  9. THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S WATERSHED MANAGEMENT RESEARCH PROGRAM: AN OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has directed much attention to watersheds and water quality during its tenure as the United States Federal Agency charged with protection of human health and the environment. Watershed research as a vehicle to understand the interaction ...

  10. The Environmental protection agency industrial technology transfer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suter, K. H.

    1974-01-01

    Today TAC consists of a full service information center and five programs, which are: (1) our industrial program; (2) the energy information center; (3) the business and industry extension program; (4) the remote sensing program; and (5) the center for environmental research and development.

  11. Radon calibration chamber assembly, detector accuracy, and pertinent operational findings.

    PubMed

    Distenfeld, C H

    2007-08-01

    Reliable radon laboratory operations motivated the construction of three radon gas calibration chambers. One chamber is used for background calibrations while the other two cover a radon gas concentration range of 110 to >5,550 Bq m(-3) (3-150 pCi L(-1)). The chambers entered commercial service, for tertiary radon calibration chambers, after review and listing by the National Radon Safety Board. The chambers were used since 2003 to calibrate over 500 activated charcoal (AC) detectors, half open face, and the remainder a diffusion barrier type, and >150 continuous radon (CR) monitors. Nearly all the CR devices were Sun Nuclear model 1027. Analysis of the calibration results show the overall AC measurement uncertainties, expressed as standard deviations of the relative percent differences, R%D, were <10% and were about the same as the Sun Nuclear CR devices. The diffusion barrier AC detectors displayed a smaller uncertainty than the CR monitor group. All but one CR monitor satisfied the U.S. EPA Radon Proficiency Program requirement of +/-25%. In view of the similar R%D between CR and AC detectors, good agreement was found for all simultaneous field radon measurements with CR and single AC devices. The U.S. EPA appears to have adopted a position that CR devices are superior to AC detectors. Neither the present results nor U.S. EPA's published detector uncertainties support this presumed position. PMID:17630640

  12. Radon concentrations in different types of dwellings in Israel.

    PubMed

    Epstein, L; Koch, J; Riemer, T; Orion, I; Haquin, G

    2014-12-01

    The average radon concentration in Israeli dwellings was assessed by combining the results of a 2006 radon survey in single-family houses with the results of a 2011 radon survey in apartments of multistorey buildings. Both surveys were based on long-term measurements using CR-39 detectors. The survey in multistorey buildings was intended to assess the influence of recent practices in the local building industry on the radon concentrations. These practices include the use of building materials with higher concentrations of the natural radionuclides in the last 20 y than before, as well as the improvement in sealing techniques over that period. Another practice in place since the early 1990 s is the building of a shielded area in every apartment that is known as an RSS (residential secure space). The RSS is a room built from massive concrete walls, floor and ceiling that can be hermetically sealed and is intended to protect its residents from a missile attack. The influence of the above-mentioned features on radon concentrations was estimated by dividing the participating apartments into two groups: apartments in buildings >20 y, built using building materials with low concentrations of the natural radionuclides, regular sealing and without an RSS and apartments in buildings newer than 10 y, built using building materials with higher concentrations of the natural radionuclides, improved sealing and including an RSS. It was found that the average radon concentration in apartments in new buildings was significantly higher than in old buildings and the average radon concentration in single-family houses was significantly higher than in apartments in multistorey buildings. Doses due to indoor radon were estimated on the basis of the updated information included in the 2009 International Commission on Radiological Protection statement on radon. PMID:24381204

  13. Distribution of indoor radon concentrations in Pennsylvania, 1990-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gross, Eliza L.

    2013-01-01

    Results from 548,507 indoor radon tests from a database compiled by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Radiation Protection, Radon Division, are evaluated in this report in an effort to determine areas where concentrations of radon are highest. Indoor radon concentrations were aggregated according to geologic unit and hydrogeologic setting for spatial analysis. Indoor radon concentrations greater than or equal to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) action level of 4 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) were observed for 39 percent of the test results; the highest concentration was 1,866.4 pCi/L. When analyzed according to Pennsylvania’s geologic units, 93 of the 188 (49.5 percent) geologic units with indoor radon concentrations had median concentrations greater than the USEPA action level of 4 pCi/L; most of these geologic units are located in the eastern part of the State and include metamorphic rocks, limestones, sandstones, shales, and glacial deposits. When analyzed according to Pennsylvania’s hydrogeologic settings, 5 of the 20 (25 percent) settings had median indoor radon concentrations greater than the USEPA action level of 4 pCi/L; these settings are located mostly in the south-central part of the State. Median indoor radon concentrations aggregated according to geologic units and hydrogeologic settings are useful for drawing general conclusions about the occurrence of indoor radon in specific geologic units and hydrogeologic settings, but the associated data and maps have limitations. The aggregated indoor radon data have testing and spatial accuracy limitations due to lack of available information regarding testing conditions and the imprecision of geocoded test locations. In addition, the associated data describing geologic units and hydrogeologic settings have spatial and interpretation accuracy limitations, which are a result of using statewide data to define conditions at test locations and geologic data that represent a broad interpretation of geologic units across the State. As a result, indoor air radon concentration distributions are not proposed for use in predicting individual concentrations at specific sites nor for use as a decision-making tool for property owners to decide whether to test for indoor radon concentrations at specific property locations.

  14. Radon reduction and radon monitoring in the NEMO experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Nachab, A. [Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, BP 120, Le Haut Vigneau, 33175 Gradignan Cedex (France)

    2007-03-28

    The first data of the NEMO 3 neutrinoless double beta decay experiment have shown that the radon can be a non negligible component of the background. In order to reduce the radon level in the gas mixture, it has been necessary first to cover the NEMO 3 detector with an airtight tent and then to install a radon-free air factory. With the use of sensitive radon detectors, the level of radon at the exit of the factory and inside the tent is continuously controlled. These radon levels are discussed within the NEMO 3 context.

  15. Secure face biometric verification in the randomized Radon space

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohammad A. Dabbah; Satnam Singh Dlay; Wai Lok Woo

    2008-01-01

    Biometrics has become a strong candidate to replace traditional authentication systems however biometric data in itself is vulnerable and requires protection. This paper presents a new method to protect face biometric data using one-way transformation in which original face images cannot be retrieved. The secure and reissueable templates are generated by utilizing the Radon transformed signatures of the face biometric

  16. Search for radon sources in buildings — kindergartens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Vaupoti?

    2002-01-01

    In ten high radon level kindergartens, radon sources were sought by applying a combination of several radon measuring techniques: etched track detectors to obtain average indoor air radon concentration, continuous devices to record radon concentration and see its diurnal variation, and alpha scintillation cells to determine radon concentration in the air entering a room from cracks, holes and sinks in

  17. Dare County Beaches, Shore Protection Project Physical Monitoring Program

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    .7...... 8 Figure 6. Example Profile Stack Plots ..................................... 10 Figure 7. Kitty Protection Project includes the towns of Kitty Hawk, Kill Devil Hills, and Nags Head along the Outer Banks

  18. THE US ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A scientifically rigorous determination of the condition of an aquatic resource is fundamental to all subsequent research, modeling, protection, and restoration issues. Environmental risk characterization is predicated on knowledge of condition and the rate at which that conditio...

  19. STATUS OF THE U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S ENCODRINE DISRUPTOR SCREENING PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Status of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program. Susan Laws. Endocrinology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, ORD, U.S. EPA, RTP, NC. In response to emergi...

  20. 75 FR 23783 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; Sector-Specific Agency Executive Management Office...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ...Office of Infrastructure Protection (IP), Sector-Specific Agency Executive Management...Collection Request should be forwarded to NPPD/IP/SSA EMO, Attn.: Esther Langer, Esther...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On behalf of DHS, IP manages the Department's program to...

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) PROGRAM: WET-WEATHER FLOW/SOURCE WATER PROTECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents an overview of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program which was established to overcome the numerous impediments to commercialization experienced by developers of innovative environmental technologies. ...

  2. 76 FR 16000 - Voluntary Protection Programs Information; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ...and Health Administration [Docket No. OSHA-2011-0056] Voluntary Protection Programs...Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Request for public...SUMMARY: OSHA solicits public comments concerning...

  3. THERMAL PROCESSES FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE: THE EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) RESEARCH PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been conducting an extensive research program to study the practice of destroying hazardous waste in high temperature industrial processes. These studies have encompassed processes such as hazardous waste incineration, and processes c...

  4. ENCOURAGING CLEAN TECHNOLOGIES: THE UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY POLLUTION PREVENTION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since 1988, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), has supported a research program to encourage the development, demonstration, and evaluation of production techniques and processes that lead to reduced waste generation. his clean technologies research progra...

  5. 76 FR 2700 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; National Emergency Communications Plan (NECP) Goal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ...SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security (DHS)/National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD)/Office of Cybersecurity and Communications (CS&C)/Office of Emergency Communications (OEC) will submit the following Information...

  6. ETV Program Report: Coatings for Wastewater Collection Systems - Protective Liner Systems, Inc., Epoxy Mastic, PLS-614

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Protective Liner Systems International, Inc. Epoxy Mastic PLS-614 coating used for wastewater collection system rehabilitation was evaluated by EPA?s Environmental Technology Verification Program under laboratory conditions at the Center for Innovative Grouting Material and T...

  7. NON-COMPLIANCE WITH THE REQUIREMENTS OF THE HUMAN RESEARCH PROTECTION PROGRAM

    E-print Network

    1 NON-COMPLIANCE WITH THE REQUIREMENTS OF THE HUMAN RESEARCH PROTECTION PROGRAM 4/22/2011 In order of Human Research Protection (OHRP) and US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) the necessary information serious or continuing non- compliance with federal policy or determinations made by the IRB. Definitions

  8. Evaluation of a Stress Management Program in a Child Protection Agency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahill, Janet; Feldman, Lenard H.

    High stress levels experienced by child protection workers have been well documented. This study examined the effectiveness of a stress management program in a child protection agency. Subjects were case workers, immediate supervisors, and clerical staff; 320 subjects participated in pretesting and 279 subjects participated in posttesting.…

  9. 75 FR 41213 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; Infrastructure Protection Data Call Survey; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ...Office of Infrastructure Protection (IP), Infrastructure Information Collection...an information collection entitled, ``IP Data Call.'' This is a correction notice...published 60-day notice to read, ``IP Data Call Survey.'' There are no...

  10. Home Safety: Radon Gas

    E-print Network

    Shaw, Bryan W.; Denny, Monica L.

    1999-11-12

    leading cause of lung cancer in the United States, according to American Lung Association estimates. L-5337 11-99 Radon Gas Bryan W. Shaw and Monica L. Denny* TEXAS Home Safety *Assistant Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineering Specialist...

  11. Indoor Radon Measurement in Van

    SciTech Connect

    Kam, E.; Osmanlioglu, A. E.; Celebi, N. [TAEK, Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center, Istanbul (Turkey); Dogan, I. [Yuzuncu Yil University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Biochemistry Department, Van (Turkey)

    2007-04-23

    In this study, indoor radon concentrations obtained from the radon surveys conducted in the Van. Radon monitoring was performed by applying a passive, time-integrating measuring technique. For this purpose, CR-39 nuclear track detectors were installed in dwellings for 2 months. After the monitoring period, detectors were collected. In order to make the alpha tracks visible, chemical etching was applied to the exposed detectors. Nuclear track numbers and the corresponding indoor radon concentrations were determined. Annual effective dose equivalents and the risk probabilities caused by indoor radon inhalation were calculated, and the found results compared with the indoor radon concentrations' data measured in different provinces of Turkey.

  12. Residents in a high radon potential geographic area: Their risk perception and attitude toward testing and mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Ferng, S.F. [Indiana State Univ., Terre Haute, IN (United States). Dept. of Health and Safety; Lawson, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    Boone County, Indiana was identified by the EPA as one of the high radon potential geographic areas. Health education campaigns are needed to prevent resident`s unnecessary radon exposure. In order to design suitable programs, a questionnaire mail survey was conducted to measure socio-demographic characteristics of County resident`s knowledge about radon, attitude toward radon testing and mitigation, support of education campaigns, and the best media to deliver radon education campaigns. A stratified random sampling method was applied for a total of 400 samples. The number of samples from each township/city was a proportion of their taxable parcels. The survey return rate was 39.8%. The data were analyzed by Epi Info and SPSS. The statistical significant level was set at {alpha} = 0.05. The results showed that resident`s knowledge about radon was at a relatively superficial level. There was no association identified between the knowledge of radon and gender, age, family income, or education, except that females more frequently believed in false effects caused by radon. A significant correlation between radon knowledge and home radon tests was observed. Also found in this study was that respondents with better knowledge about diseases caused by radon had more confidence in radon mitigation actions. Newspaper was chosen by respondents as the most favorite media to deliver radon health education campaigns. Health education campaigns for the residents of Boone County might be conducted by local governments and/or other organizations.

  13. DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF INDOOR RADON REDUCTION MEASURES FOR 10 HOMES IN CLINTON, NEW JERSEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the development and demonstration of indoor radon reduction methods for 10 houses in Clinton, New Jersey, where (in the spring of 1986) the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) located a cluster of houses with extremely high radon levels. T...

  14. A Citizen's Guide to Radon. What It Is and What To Do about It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) are concerned about the increased risk of developing lung cancer faced by persons exposed to above-average levels of radon in their homes. The purpose of this pamphlet is to help readers to understand the radon problem and decide if they need to take…

  15. Summary of fire protection programs of the United States Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This edition of the Annual Summary of DOE Fire Protection Programs continues the series started in 1972. Since May 1950, an annual report has been required from each field organization. The content has varied through the years and most of the accident data reporting requirements have been superseded by the Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System administered by EG G, Idaho. However, this report is the sole source of information relating to fire protection programs, and to the actions of the field offices and to headquarters that are of general fire protection interest.

  16. Laser protective eyewear program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Winburn, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    The proliferation of lasers at Los Alamos focused considerable attention on providing adequate eye protection for experimenters involved in the use of a wide variety of nonionizing radiation. Experiments with fast-pulsed lasers (Nd:YAG, HF, and CO/sub 2/) were performed to gain biological threshold data on ocular damage. In parallel, eye protection devices were evaluated, which resulted in the development of lightweight, comfortable spectacles of colored glass filters that can be ground to prescription specifications. Goggle styles are employed in specific applications.

  17. Air radon concentration decrease in a waste water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Juste, B; Ortiz, J; Verdú, G; Martorell, S

    2015-06-01

    (222)Rn is a naturally occurring gas created from the decay of (226)Ra. The long-term health risk of breathing radon is lung cancer. One particular place where indoor radon concentrations can exceed national guidelines is in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) where treatment processes may contribute to ambient airborne concentrations. The aim of this paper was to study the radon concentration decrease after the application of corrective measures in a Spanish WWTP. According to first measures, air radon concentration exceeded International Commission Radiologica1 Protection (ICRP) normative (recommends intervention between 400 and 1000 Bq m(-3)). Therefore, the WWTP improved mechanical forced ventilation to lower occupational exposure. This measure allowed to increase the administrative controls, since the limitation of workers access to the plant changed from 2 h d(-1) (considering a maximum permissible dose of 20 mSv y(-1) averaged over 5 y) to 7 h d(-1). PMID:25971342

  18. Radon and Radon Progeny in the Carlsbad Caverns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yung-Sung Cheng; Tou-Rong Chen; Piotr T. Wasiolek; Amelia Van Engen

    1997-01-01

    Measurements were made in July 1994 to determine air exchange rate, aerosol characteristics, radon concentrations, and radon progeny activity size distributions in the Carlsbad Caverns. The measured radon concentrations were stable at a level of 1821 ± 55 Bq m (mean ±SD). Using a SF6 trace gas method, it was determined that stagnant air in the Caverns was exchanged once

  19. Workshop on dosimetry for radon and radon daughters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. E. Turner; C. F. Holoway; A. S. Loebl

    1978-01-01

    Emphasis is placed on the dosimetry for radon and daughters, rather than on monitoring and instrumentation. The objectives of the meeting were to exchange scientific information, to identify problem areas in radon-daughter dosimetry, and to make any observations or recommendations by the participants through issuance of this report. The discussion topics included the history of dosimetry for radon and daughters,

  20. Space radiation protection: Human support thrust exploration technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, Edmund J.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on space radiation protection are presented. For crew and practical missions, exploration requires effective, low-mass shielding and accurate estimates of space radiation exposure for lunar and Mars habitat shielding, manned space transfer vehicle, and strategies for minimizing exposure during extravehicular activity (EVA) and rover operations.

  1. Protective barrier program: Test plan for plant community dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sackschewsky, M.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Chatters, J.C.; Link, S.O.; Brandt, C.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are jointly developing protective barriers for the long term isolation of low-level radioactive defense waste for the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the Arid Sites. Protective barriers have been identified as an integral part of the overall final disposal strategy for low-level defense waste at the Arid Sites (DOE 1987). At present, the conceptual design of the Arid Site protective barrier is a multilayer structure that will minimize waster infiltration into and through the underlying waste, and will prevent intrusion into the waste by plant roots, animals, and humans. This multilayer system consists of a fine soil layer overlying a coarse sand and/or gravel geo-filter overlying a layer of large cobbles or basalt riprap. Plants contribute several crucial functions to the overall performance of the protective barrier.Through transpiration, plants are capable of removing considerably more moisture from a given volume of soil than the physical process of evaporation alone. This becomes especially important after periods of excessive precipitation when the possibility of saturation of the textural break and leeching to the buried waste is increased. Plants also function in significantly reducing the amount of wind and water erosion that would be expected to occur on the barrier surface. In addition to these physical functions, plants also influence other biotic effects on barrier performance.

  2. The NERC program for the electricity sector critical infrastructure protection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Leffler

    2001-01-01

    NERC has been called on and has served on a number of occasions in the past decade as the electric power industry's primary point of contact, communication, and coordination on a broad range of issues relating to national electric security, interconnected electric system vulnerability, and critical infrastructure protection. Dating back to the early 1980s, NERC has been involved with electromagnetic

  3. Procedure No 400.10 Subject: Fire Protection Impairment Program

    E-print Network

    Karsai, Istvan

    extinguishing systems, fire service control valves, fire alarms systems, and emergency lights. Firewatch or to the fire alarm annunciator/control panel for fire alarm systems. Contractors, Outside Workers, Outside: To establish procedures to be followed when a fire protection system is taken out of service due

  4. Indoor radon measurements in the uranium regions of Poli and Lolodorf, Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Saïdou; Abdourahimi; Tchuente Siaka, Y F; Bouba, O

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this work is to carry out indoor radon measurements in the uranium regions of Poli and Lolodorf in which lie the uranium deposits of Kitongo and Lolodorf, prior to their impending exploitation. The indoor radon concentration was measured in 103 and 50 dwellings located respectively in Poli and Lolodorf using E-PERM electret chamber detectors. Indoor radon distributions in Poli and Lolodorf follow the lognormal law. Radon concentrations range respectively in Poli and Lolodorf between 29 and 2240 Bq m(-3) and 24-4390 Bq m(-3) with corresponding median values of 165 Bq m(-3) and 331 Bq m(-3). Corresponding arithmetic and geometric means are respectively 294 Bq m(-3) and 200 Bq m(-3) for the uranium region of Poli, 687 Bq m(-3) and 318 Bq m(-3) for the uranium region of Lolodorf. For the uranium region of Poli, 80% of dwellings have radon concentration above the reference level of 100 Bq m(-3) and 20% of dwellings show a radon concentration above 300 Bq m(-3). For the uranium region of Lolodorf, 80% of dwellings have radon concentration above 100 Bq m(-3) and 50% of dwellings show a radon concentration above 300 Bq m(-3). Thus radon monitoring and mitigation plan are required to better protect people against harmful effects of radon. PMID:24878718

  5. Time-dependent response of a charcoal bed to radon and water vapor in flowing air

    SciTech Connect

    Henkel, J.A.; Fentiman, A.W.; Blue, T.E. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Extremely high airborne concentrations of radon gas may be encountered during the remediation of uranium mill tailings storage facilities. Radon is also a constituent of the off-gas of mill-tailing vitrification. An effective way to remove radon from either gas is to pass the gas through a packed bed containing activated charcoal. Measurements of radon concentrations in the environment using charcoal canisters were first described by George. Canisters similar to those used by George in his first experiments have become the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) standard for measuring environmental radon and were described in the EPA protocol for environmental radon measurement. The dynamic behavior of EPA charcoal canisters has been previously described with a mathematical model for the kinetics of radon gas adsorption in air in the presence of water vapor. This model for charcoal canisters has been extended to large charcoal beds with flowing air containing radon and water vapor. The mathematical model for large charcoal beds can be used to evaluate proposed bed designs or to model existing beds. Parameters that affect the radon distribution within a charcoal bed that can be studied using the mathematical model include carrier gas relative humidity and flow velocity, and input radon concentration. In addition, the relative performances of several different charcoals can be studied, provided sufficient information about their adsorption, desorption, and diffusion constants is known.

  6. OVERVIEW OF EPA'S (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S) LIMB TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives an overview of EPA's Limestone Injection with Multistage Burners (LIMB) program, a program for research, development, and demonstration of cost-effective emissions control technology for coal-fired boilers that can reduce both sulfur oxides (SOx) and nitrogen oxid...

  7. Three Mile Island, Unit 2, radiation protection program: report of the special panel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. B. Meinhold; T. D. Murphy; D. R. Neely; R. L. Kathren; B. L. Rich; G. F. Stone; W. R. Casey

    1979-01-01

    A special panel was appointed by the Director of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, NRC, to review the radiation protection program at Three Mile Island Unit 2. The Panel confirmed several management and technical deficiencies in the program. Recent major GPU\\/Met Ed commitments and actions demonstrated a major change in management attitude. The Panel concluded that exposures to personnel can be maintained

  8. Abatement and Pollution Control Training and Educational Programs Presented by the United States Environmental Protection Agency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This catalog is a compilation of training course and educational program descriptions in abatement and pollution control scheduled by the Environmental Protection Agency. Descriptions of programs include prerequisites, class size, and length of time with the content goals. Also given is general information concerning tuition fees, waiver requests,…

  9. Nuclear Technology Series. Radiation Protection Technician. A Suggested Program Planning Guide. Revised June 80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This program planning guide for a two-year postsecondary radiation protection technician program is designed for use with courses 17-22 of thirty-five included in the Nuclear Technology Series. The purpose of the guide is to describe the nuclear power field and its job categories for specialists, technicians, and operators; and to assist planners,…

  10. Optimal Resource Allocation for Network Protection: A Geometric Programming Approach

    E-print Network

    Preciado, Victor M; Enyioha, Chinwendu; Jadbabaie, Ali; Pappas, George

    2013-01-01

    We study the problem of containing spreading processes in arbitrary directed networks by distributing protection resources throughout the nodes of the network. We consider two types of protection resources are available: (i) Preventive resources able to defend nodes against the spreading (such as vaccines in a viral infection process), and (ii) corrective resources able to neutralize the spreading after it has reached a node (such as antidotes). We assume that both preventive and corrective resources have an associated cost and study the problem of finding the cost-optimal distribution of resources throughout the nodes of the network. We analyze these questions in the context of viral spreading processes in directed networks. We study the following two problems: (i) Given a fixed budget, find the optimal allocation of preventive and corrective resources in the network to achieve the highest level of containment, and (ii) when a budget is not specified, find the minimum budget required to control the spreading...

  11. EPA'S (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S) INTEGRATED AIR CANCER PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Integrated Air Cancer Project (IACP) is an interdisciplinary research program designed to develop the scientific methods and data sets needed to identify the major carcinogenic chemicals in the atmosphere; to characterize the emission sources and chemical precursors which giv...

  12. Planetary protection program for Mars 94/96 mission.

    PubMed

    Rogovski, G; Bogomolov, V; Ivanov, M; Runavot, J; Debus, A; Victorov, A; Darbord, J C

    1996-01-01

    Mars surface in-situ exploration started in 1975 with the American VIKING mission. Two probes landed on the northern hemisphere and provided, for the first time, detailed information on the martian terrain, atmosphere and meteorology. The current goal is to undertake larger surface investigations and many projects are being planned by the major Space Agencies with this objective. Among these projects, the Mars 94/96 mission will make a major contributor toward generating significant information about the martian surface on a large scale. Since the beginning of the Solar System exploration, planets where life could exist have been subject to planetary protection requirements. Those requirements accord with the COSPAR Policy and have two main goals: the protection of the planetary environment from influence or contamination by terrestrial microorganisms, the protection of life science, and particularly of life detection experiments searching extra-terrestrial life, and not life carried by probes and spacecrafts. As the conditions for life and survival for terrestrial microorganisms in the Mars environment became known, COSPAR recommendations were updated. This paper will describe the decontamination requirements which will be applied for the MARS 94/96 mission, the techniques and the procedures which are and will be used to realize and control the decontamination of probes and spacecrafts. PMID:11538980

  13. Development of cataract and corneal opacity in mice due to radon exposure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. A. Abdelkawi; M. Abo-Elmagd; H. A. Soliman

    2008-01-01

    This work investigates the radiation damage on the eye of albino mice exposed to effective radon doses ranging from 20.92 to 83.68 mSv. These doses were taken over 2-8 weeks using a radon chamber constructed by the National Institute for Standard (Egypt). The guidance on the quality assurance program for radon measurements was followed. Therefore, the estimated doses received by

  14. Development of cataract and corneal opacity in mice due to radon exposure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. A. Abdelkawi; M. Abo-Elmagd; H. A. Soliman

    2008-01-01

    This work investigates the radiation damage on the eye of albino mice exposed to effective radon doses ranging from 20.92 to 83.68 mSv. These doses were taken over 2–8 weeks using a radon chamber constructed by the National Institute for Standard (Egypt). The guidance on the quality assurance program for radon measurements was followed. Therefore, the estimated doses received by the

  15. Review and assessment of global and domestic ultraviolet light protection programs.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Laura; Malerich, Sarah; Moon, Summer; Spencer, James

    2014-09-01

    Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States. A number of UV protection programs have been developed and initiated both globally and domestically, and this article will review and assess the effectiveness of each of these programs. The programs reviewed in this article target grade school aged children, as this is a time when adult health behaviors are being formed. Among these programs, multiunit programs were more effective at changing behavior as they were given over a longer period of time with more frequent interventions and included various learning techniques. PMID:25226011

  16. The Therapeutic use of Radon: A Biomedical Treatment in Europe; An “Alternative” Remedy in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Barbra E.

    2007-01-01

    There is a growing recognition in the United States and Europe that health care is driven to a significant extent by an emphasis on consumer choice and demand. As consumers, people regularly choose their own solutions for health promotion and maintenance, solutions which may or may not be sanctioned by mainstream medicine. Radioactive radon therapy exemplifies a non-sanctioned treatment eagerly sought by certain patients, but scorned or dismissed by many physicians. This is certainly the case in the United States, where well-publicized Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) warnings portray radon as a potential carcinogen. Between 1997 and 2001, I worked with a population of arthritis sufferers who expose themselves to radon gas in Montana radon health mines in order to alleviate their symptoms. In this paper I discuss the decision-making process involved in using radon, and compare the Montana radon health mine facilities with selected radon mines and spas in Europe. PMID:18648554

  17. The Pilot Program for Enhancement of Employee Whistleblower Protection (41 U.S.C. 4712)(the "Program") is effective until January 1, 2017. The purpose of the Program is to provide protections for

    E-print Network

    Sharp, Kim

    The Pilot Program for Enhancement of Employee Whistleblower Protection (41 U.S.C. 4712)(the for employees against reprisal for certain whistleblowing activities in relation to federal grants and contracts

  18. 78 FR 75581 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment of the Multi-State Plan Program for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-12

    ...MANAGEMENT Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment of the Multi-State Plan Program for the Affordable Insurance Exchanges; Announcement...entitled ``Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment of the...

  19. 78 FR 25591 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment of the Multi-State Plan Program for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ...3206-AM47 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment of the Multi-State Plan Program for the Affordable Insurance Exchanges; Correction...entitled ``Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment of the...

  20. LLNL Fire Protection Engineering Standard 5.8 Facility Survey Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sharry, J A

    2012-01-04

    This standard describes the LLNL Fire Protection Facility Survey Program. The purpose of this standard is to describe the type of facility surveys required to fulfill the requirements of DOE Order 420.1B, Facility Safety. Nothing in this standard is intended to prevent the development of a FHA using alternative approaches. Alternate approaches, including formatting, will be by exception only, and approved by the Fire Marshal/Fire Protection Engineering Subject Matter Expert in advance of their use.

  1. Protecting Our Own. Community Child Passenger Safety Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This manual provides information on implementing a local child passenger safety program. It covers understanding the problems and solutions; deciding what can be done; planning and carrying out a project; providing adequate, accurate, and current technical information; and reaching additional sources of information. Chapter 1 provides community…

  2. DUKE UNIVERSITY HEALTH SYSTEM Human Research Protection Program

    E-print Network

    OR PUBLIC HEALTH SURVEILLANCE VERSUS RESEARCH 06/01/07 As defined in 45 CFR 46.102(d) and 45 CFR 164 for inspection by the FDA (21 CFR 56.102(c)). Quality improvement has been described as follows by the National Involving Human Participants" (page 37): "These activities, generally referred to as program evaluation

  3. Radon monitoring and early low background counting at the Sanford Underground Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K.J.; Mei, D.M.; Heise, J.; Durben, D.; Salve, R.

    2010-09-01

    Radon detectors have been deployed underground at the Sanford Underground Laboratory at the site of the former Homestake Mine in Lead, SD. Currently, no radon mitigation measures are in place in the underground environment, and the continuing evolution of the facility ventilation systems has led to significant variations in early airborne radon concentrations. The average radon concentration measured near the primary ventilation intake for the 4850-ft level (Yates shaft) is 391 Bq/m{sup 3}, based on approximately 146 days of data. The corresponding average radon concentration near the other main ventilation intake for the 4850-ft level (Ross shaft) is 440 Bq/m{sup 3} based on approximately 350 days of data. Measurements have also been collected near the 1250-ft level Ross shaft, with average radon concentrations at 180 Bq/m{sup 3}. Secondary factors that may increase the baseline radon level underground include the presence of iron oxide and moisture, which are known to enhance radon emanation. The results of the current radon monitoring program will be used for the planning of future measurements and any potential optimization of ventilation parameters for the reduction of radon in relevant areas underground.

  4. Radon programmes and health marketing.

    PubMed

    Fojtikova, Ivana; Rovenska, Katerina

    2011-05-01

    Being aware of negative health effects of radon exposure, many countries aim for the reduction of the radon exposure of their population. The Czech radon programme was commenced >20 y ago. Since then experts have gathered a lot of knowledge, necessary legislation has been enacted, tens of thousands of inhabitants have been offered free measurement and subsidy for the mitigation. Despite the effort, the effectiveness of the radon programme seems to be poor. Newly built houses still exhibit elevated radon concentrations and the number of houses mitigated is very low. Is it possible to enhance the effectivity of radon programme while keeping it on a voluntary basis? One possible way is to employ health marketing that draws together traditional marketing theories and science-based strategies to prevention. The potential of using marketing principles in communication and delivery of radon information will be discussed. PMID:21498864

  5. What Teachers Should Know about Radon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bettis, Clifford; Throckmorton, Carl

    1991-01-01

    Attempts to clear up misunderstandings about radon and outlines information teachers can convey to their students. Includes a brief history of radon, health threats posed by radon, methods to measure radon quantities, homeowner risks and preventative actions, and a glossary of radon terms. (MDH)

  6. Preliminary integrated indoor radon measurements in Transylvania (Romania).

    PubMed

    Cosma, Constantin; Szacsvai, Kinga; Dinu, Alexandra; Ciorba, Daniela; Dicu, Tiberius; Suciu, Liviu

    2009-09-01

    Measurements of indoor radon concentrations were performed in 406 residential houses in five counties (Cluj, Bihor, Alba, Bistrita, and Sibiu) using Makrofol and CR-39 alpha-track detectors. From our measurements, an average indoor radon concentration of 82.5 Bq m(-3) for the Transylvanian population was calculated, i.e. an annual effective dose of 2.4 mSv for the whole body. The calculated dose is 62% higher than that previously reported but yet below the recommended action level of ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection). A log-normal distribution of the radon concentration was obtained for the studied counties, excluding some higher values from the Stei region--a radon-prone area in Transylvania. For the Stei region, the data show a dual log-normal distribution of the radon concentration with the second maximum being related to the houses built using uranium waste as a construction material. Assuming a cancer risk coefficient of 10(-4)/100 Bq m(-3) year(-1), one can estimate that about 600 lung cancer per year, for about 7,000,000 inhabitants of the Transylvania region, are due to radon inhalation. PMID:19507082

  7. Indications of repair of radon-induced chromosome damage in human lymphocytes: An adaptive response induced by low doses of X-rays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Wolff; V. Afzal; R. F. Jostes

    1993-01-01

    Naturally occurring radon is a relatively ubiquitous environmental carcinogen to which large numbers of people can be exposed over their lifetimes. The accumulation of radon in homes, therefore, has led to a large program to determine the effects of the densely ionizing a particles that are produced when radon decays. In human lymphocytes, low doses of X-rays can decrease the

  8. Risks from Radon: Reconciling Miner and Residential Epidemiology

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, Douglas B. [SENES Consultants Limited, 121 Granton Drive, Unit 12 Richmond Hill, Ontario, L4B 3N4 (Canada); Harley, Naomi H. [New York University School of Medicine, 550 First Avenue, New York, NY (United States)

    2008-08-07

    Everyone is exposed to radon, an inert radioactive gas that occurs naturally and is present everywhere in the atmosphere. The annual dose from radon and its (short-lived) decay products is typically about one-half of the dose received by members of the public from all natural sources of ionizing radiation. Data on exposures and consequent effects have recently been reviewed by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). Studies of underground miners provides a well-established basis for estimating risks from occupational exposures to radon and for studying factors that may affect the dose response relationship such as the reduction of risk (coefficients) with increasing time since exposure. Miners' studies previously formed the basis for estimating risks to people exposed to radon at home, with downward extrapolation from exposures in mines to residential levels of radon. Presently, the risk estimates from residential studies are adequate to estimate radon risks in homes. Although there are major uncertainties in extrapolating the risks of exposure to radon from the miner studies to assessing risks in the home, there is remarkably good agreement between the average of risk factors derived from miner studies and those from pooled residential case-control studies. There are now over 20 analytical studies of residential radon and lung cancer. These studies typically assess the relative risk from exposure to radon based on estimates of residential exposure over a period of 25 to 30 years prior to diagnosis of lung cancer. Recent pooled analyses of residential case-control studies support a small but detectable lung cancer risk from residential exposure, and this risk increases with increasing concentrations. The excess relative risk of lung cancer from long-term residential exposure is about the same for both smokers and non-smokers; however, because the baseline lung cancer rate for smokers is much higher than for non or never smokers, smokers account for nearly 90% of the population risk from residential exposure to radon. As described in the paper, an excess relative risk (ERR) of 0.12(95% CI: 0.08-0.2)per 100 Bq m{sup -3} (radon gas) can be estimated from combined miner studies. This compares well with the ERR from pooled residential case-control studies (for restricted analysis) for Europe of 0.16(95% CI: 0.05-0.31) and for North America of 0.11(95% CI: 0.0-0.28)

  9. RADON / MOISTURE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Limited field study in three basement houses in Mechanicsburg, Pa. Each house will have a radon mitigation installed and be monitored over the course of a year for moisture entry and control. Followed by a more extensive statistical analysis of the data....

  10. Indoor air radon.

    PubMed

    Cothern, C R

    1990-01-01

    This review concerns primarily the health effects that result from indoor air exposure to radon gas and its progeny. Radon enters homes mainly from the soil through cracks in the foundation and other holes to the geologic deposits beneath these structures. Once inside the home the gas decays (half-life 3.8 d) and the ionized atoms adsorb to dust particles and are inhaled. These particles lodge in the lung and can cause lung cancer. The introduction to this review gives some background properties of radon and its progeny that are important to understanding this public health problem as well as a discussion of the units used to describe its concentrations. The data describing the health effects of inhaled radon and its progeny come both from epidemiological and animal studies. The estimates of risk from these two data bases are consistent within a factor of two. The epidemiological studies are primarily for hard rock miners, although some data exist for environmental exposures. The most complete studies are those of the US, Canadian, and Czechoslovakian uranium miners. Although all studies have some deficiencies, those of major importance include uranium miners in Saskatchewan, Canada, Swedish iron miners, and Newfoundland fluorspar miners. These six studies provide varying degrees of detail in the form of dose-response curves. Other epidemiological studies that do not provide quantitative dose-response information, but are useful in describing the health effects, include coal, iron ore and tin miners in the UK, iron ore miners in the Grangesburg and Kiruna, Sweden, metal miners in the US, Navajo uranium miners in the US, Norwegian niobian and magnitite miners, South African gold and uranium miners, French uranium miners, zinc-lead miners in Sweden and a variety of small studies of environmental exposure. An analysis of the epidemiological studies reveals a variety of interpretation problem areas. The major and almost universal problem is in estimating exposure levels. In many cases there were no direct measurements of radon or radon progeny and the exposure levels are estimates based on irregular measurements and known levels in nearby mines. Perhaps the most important variable or complicating factor in the determination of the risk due to radon exposure is the confounding factor of exposure to cigarette smoke. The general scientific concensus is that, although the interaction could be somewhere between linear and supramultiplicative, it is likely a combination, and closer to multiplicative. A number of other complexities contribute to the uncertainty in the risk estimates, likely to a lesser degree than those of exposure measurements and cigarette smoke confounding.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2403687

  11. OSU is dedicated to encouraging conservation and protecting the environment for future generations. With OSU's Energy Conservation Program, we have made great strides in protecting

    E-print Network

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    . With OSU's Energy Conservation Program, we have made great strides in protecting our natural resources help make OSU's efforts successful. Use these simple energy conservation strategies in the officeOSU is dedicated to encouraging conservation and protecting the environment for future generations

  12. OVERVIEW OF THE EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) PARTICULATE TECHNOLOGY R AND D PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives an overview of a number of key projects in the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) particulate research and development program having applicability to industry. For electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), it gives results of work on large-diameter discharge ele...

  13. THE U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S SITE EMERGING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the SITE Emerging Technology Program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is seeking to foster the further development of technol- ogies that have been successfully tested at bench-scale and are now ready for pilot-scale testing, prior to field- or full-scale demonstra...

  14. THE U.S. ENVIORNMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S SITE EMERGING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the SITE Emerging Technology Program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is seeking to foster the further development of technologies that have been successfully tested at bench-scale and are now ready for pilot scale testing, prior to field or full scale demons...

  15. 1990 UPDATE OF THE U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S SITE EMERGING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) is seeking to foster the further development of technologies that have been successfully tested at bench-scale and are now ready for pilot-scale testing, prior...

  16. Indoor Air Quality Program California State University, Fullerton has adopted a policy to protect employees and

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Indoor Air Quality Program I. Policy California State University, Fullerton has adopted a policy to protect employees and the public from unsafe indoor air quality (IAQ). The overall safety of faculty, Physical Plant, and Design and Construction. However, it is the responsibility of all employees to report

  17. Descriptions of new varieties recently distributed from the Citrus Clonal Protection Program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Citrus Clonal Protection Program (CCPP) is operated through the Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology at University of California (UC) Riverside and is funded in large part by The California Citrus Research Board (CRB). The CCPP processes citrus propagative material in two phases. First...

  18. Activity-Based Cost Management Part II: Applied to a Respiratory Protection Program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael T. Brandt; Steven P. Levine; Dean G. Smith; Harry J. Ettinger; Bradford F. Gallimore

    1998-01-01

    To demonstrate the relevance of activity-based cost management (ABCM) for the occupational and environmental health community, the investigators used data generated by an ABCM model of a respiratory protection program (RPP) to develop options for solving a business problem. The RPP manager in this hypothetical but realistic business scenario is faced with a 25% budget cut and a 10% increase

  19. Northwest Power and Conservation Council Protected Areas Designations, Fish and Wildlife Program

    E-print Network

    identified for the Pacific Northwest Region (Region 17) from the 2014 US Department of Energy Study (E-1 fromPage | 1 Northwest Power and Conservation Council Protected Areas Designations, Fish and Wildlife Program There are hydropower projects identified in the studies that can be developed at existing

  20. Land Rehabilitation programs1 teach individuals how to monitor, protect, and restore disturbed landscapes to natural

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Land Rehabilitation programs1 teach individuals how to monitor, protect, and restore disturbed knowledge of land rehabilitation processes, are able to critically analyze and solve problems, and can work in teams to develop and implement effective land management strategies. Studies in Land Rehabilitation

  1. Map showing radon potential of rocks and soils in Montgomery County, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gundersen, L.C.; Reimer, G.M.; Wiggs, C.R.; Rice, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes the radon potential of Montgomery County in the context of its geology. Radon is a naturally occurring gas produced by the radioactive decay of uranium. Radon produced by uraniferous rocks and soils may enter a house through porous building materials and through openings in walls and floors. Radon gases has a tendency to move from the higher pressure commonly existing in the soil to the lower pressure commonly existing in the house. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA, 1986a) estimates that elevated levels of indoor radon may be associated with 5,000 to 20,000 of the 130,000 lung cancer deaths per year. They also estimate that 8 to 12 percent of the homes in the United States will have annual average indoor radon levels exceeding 4 picoCuries per liter of air (pCi/L). Above this level, the U.S. EPA recommends homeowners take remedial action. May factors control the amount of radon which may enter a home from the geologic environment. Soil drainage, permeability, and moisture content effect the amount of radon that can be released from rocks and soils (known as the emmanation) and may limit or increase how far it can migrate. Well drained, highly permeable soils facilitate the movement of radon. Soils with water content in the 8 to 15 percent range enhance the emmanation of radon (Lindmark, 1985). Daily and seasonal variations in soil and indoor radon can be caused by meteorologic factors such as barometric pressure, temperature, and wind (Clements and Wilkening, 1974; Schery and other, 1984). Construction practices also inhibit or promote entry of radon into the home (U.S. EPA, 1986b). In general, however, geology controls the source and distribution of radon (Akerblom and Wilson, 1982; Gundersen and others, 1987, 1988; Sextro and others, 1987; U.S. EPA, 1983; Peake, 1988; Peake and Hess, 1988). The following sections describe: 1) the methods used to measure radon and equivalent uranium (eU) in soil; 2) the radon potential ratings that were developed for this study; and 3) the characteristics of the rocks and soils in Montgomery County that give them their radon potential.

  2. Radon in Irish Show Caves - Personal Monitoring Data From 2001-2006

    SciTech Connect

    Currivan, L.; Murray, M.; O'Colmain, M.; Pollard, D. [Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland, 3 Clonskeagh Square, Clonskeagh, Dublin 14 (Ireland)

    2008-08-07

    The European Directive 96/29/EURATOM and its transposition into national legislation demands the application of radiation protection measures if the presence of radon and radon decay products leads to significant increase in exposures of workers. Irish legislation further demands that laboratories carrying out radon measurements operate a high level quality assurance programme. As a result of a reconnaissance survey regular measurements of show cave guides have been made in order to assess exposure to radon in such workplaces and to ascertain that the limits set for radon are not exceeded. In 2000, an action level of 400 Bqm{sup -3}, was established. Doses in the range 0.3-12.0 mSv have been estimated for workers for the period 2001-2006.

  3. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory search and property protection programs -- March 22, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Leary, D.A.

    1984-03-22

    On November 30, 1983, the LLNL Directorate met to discuss Laboratory policy regarding searches. An advance package (dated November 16, 1983) discussing background issues and DOE`s property protection and safeguards concerns was distributed to the Director and Associate Directors. A number of Associate Directors expressed concern about the nature of the theft problem at the Laboratory. There was also discussion about many employees` perception that Laboratory Management (including the Security Department) really did not care. The Director endorsed the need to establish searches in the SNM areas. The property protection type of searches were perceived as being very sensitive from a labor relations perspective. Nevertheless, the Directorate was sufficiently concerned about the safeguards and property protection issues to request the Security Department to develop a search plan for their review. A draft Search Program was prepared by the Security Department and reviewed individually with the Directorate for their comments. On March 19, 1984, the Directorate met collectively to consider a summary of these individual comments and to finalize a Search Program. Decisions made during that meeting have been incorporated into this document. This plan describes the search procedures that will be implemented at SNM areas and a two point program concerning property protection. Procedures are also set forth that will allow for expanded searches during periods of heightened security concern.

  4. Integrated Worker Health Protection and Promotion Programs: Overview and Perspectives on Health and Economic Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Pronk, Nicolaas P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe integrated worker health protection and promotion (IWHPP) program characteristics, to discuss the rationale for integration of OSH and WHP programs, and to summarize what is known about the impact of these programs on health and economic outcomes. Methods A descriptive assessment of the current state of the IWHPP field and a review of studies on the effectiveness of IWHPP programs on health and economic outcomes. Results Sufficient evidence of effectiveness was found for IWHPP programs when health outcomes are considered. Impact on productivity-related outcomes is considered promising, but inconclusive, whereas insufficient evidence was found for health care expenditures. Conclusions Existing evidence supports an integrated approach in terms of health outcomes but will benefit significantly from research designed to support the business case for employers of various company sizes and industry types. PMID:24284747

  5. Moisture content and unsaturated conditions in UMTRA project radon barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    A typical Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal facility consists of uranium tailings and other contaminated materials covered by a three to six foot thick radon barrier and six inches of filter sand, overlain by one foot of erosion-protection riprap. To comply with the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency groundwater protection standards applicable to the UMTRA Project, groundwater concentration limits of hazardous constitutents cannot be exceeded at the point of compliance, which is the downgradient limit of the waste management area. The typical radon barrier has a saturated hydraulic conductivity of approximately 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} centimeters per second (cm/s). Long-term seepage rates from a disposal facility with an unsaturated radon barrier may permit the concentration limits to be met at the point of compliance. Field studies were undertaken to measure the percent saturation and the relation of percent saturation to soil tension, and to predict the hydraulic conductivity as a function of percent saturation in radon barriers at three UMTRA Project disposal facilities that have been completed for up to two years. Presently typical covers have been completed at the Shiprock, Clive, and Burrell sites, and they are planned or under construction at the Ambrosia Lake, Green River, Lakeview, Mexican Hat, Slick Rock, and Tuba City sites. 2 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  6. [Radon and internal contamination].

    PubMed

    Stanga, A; Trenta, F

    2008-01-01

    Because of hits everywhere presence in air and in water needful mediums for life, radon is a omnipresent risk for every person. Therefore, in relation to those vital functions, lungs and gastro-enteric tract represent the principal target organs of this noble radioactive gas (and mainly of hits radioactive daughters). International organisms evaluated the effective dose coefficients for both target organs, so it is possible e quantitative assessment of the exposure risk related to this noble gas. PMID:19288807

  7. Discrete radon transform

    Microsoft Academic Search

    GREGORY BEYLKIN

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the discrete Radon transform (DRT) and the exact inversion algorithm for it. Similar to the discrete Fourier transform (DFT), the DRT is defined for periodic vector-sequences and studied as a transform in its own right. Casting the forward transform as a matrix-vector multiplication, the key observation is that the matrix-although very large-has a block-circulant structure. This observation

  8. Radon Treatment Controversy

    PubMed Central

    Zdrojewicz, Zygmunt; Strzelczyk, Jadwiga (Jodi)

    2006-01-01

    In spite of long traditions, treatments utilizing radon-rich air or water have not been unequivocally embraced by modern medicine. The objective of this work is to examine factors that contribute to this continuing controversy. While the exact mechanism of radon's effect on human body is not completely understood, recent advances in radiobiology offer new insights into biochemical processes occurring at low-level exposures to ionizing radiation. Medical evidence and patients' testimonials regarding effectiveness of radon spa treatments of various ailments, most notably rheumatoid arthritis are accumulating worldwide. They challenge the premise of the Linear-No-Threshold (LNT) theory that the dose-effect response is the same per unit dose regardless of the total dose. Historically, such inference overshadowed scientific inquiries into the low-dose region and lead to a popular belief that no amount of radiation can be good. Fortunately, the LNT theory, which lacks any scientific basis, did not remain unchallenged. As the reviewed literature suggests, a paradigm shift, reflected in the consideration of hormetic effects at low-doses, is gaining momentum in the scientific community worldwide. The impetus comes from significant evidence of adaptive and stimulatory effects of low-levels of radiation on human immune system. PMID:18648641

  9. The Dual Horospherical Radon Transform as a Limit of Spherical Radon Transforms

    E-print Network

    Pasquale, Angela

    The Dual Horospherical Radon Transform as a Limit of Spherical Radon Transforms J. Hilgert, A of G. The horospherical Radon transform maps functions on X to functions on HorX by integrating over the dual horospherical Radon transform as a limit of dual spherical Radon transforms. 1. Introduction

  10. Measurements of indoor radon concentrations in Chaiya and Tha Chana districts, Surat Thani province, Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titipornpun, K.; Titipornpun, A.; Sola, P.; Bhongsuwan, T.

    2015-05-01

    Chaiya and Tha Chana districts of Surat Thani province are located in the areas with high levels of equivalent uranium at the ground surface, which have been identified as sources of radon. A survey measurement of indoor radon concentrations was carried out in 248 houses, using CR-39 detectors in closed cups. The geometric mean of indoor radon concentrations in Chaiya and Tha Chana districts were 26 ± 2 Bq·m-3 and 30 ± 2 Bq·m-3, respectively. Although the minimum radon concentration was 4 Bq·m-3 in both locations, the maximum radon concentration was found to be 159 Bq·m-3 in Tha Chana district, while it was 88 Bq·m-3 in Chaiya district. The level of radon concentrations above the action level (148 Bq·m-3) recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency was only found in two houses, which accounted for 1% of the total buildings surveyed in this present study. The majority of houses, which accounted for 94% of the total buildings surveyed, showed the radon concentration below the action level. As these houses had access to air flow during the daytime through open doors and windows, it is likely that such ventilation was sufficient to keep radon at a low concentration.

  11. Radon permeability and radon exhalation of building materials.

    PubMed

    Keller, G; Hoffmann, B; Feigenspan, T

    2001-05-14

    High radon concentrations indoors usually depend on the possibilities of radon penetration from the surrounding soil into the buildings. Radon concentrations in dwellings up to 100 kBq/m3 were found in some special regions (i.e. Schneeberg/Saxony, Umhausen/Tyrol), where the soil shows a high uranium content and additionally, a fast radon transport in the soil is possible. To reduce the radon exposure of the inhabitants in these 'radon prone areas' it is necessary to look for building and insulating materials with low radon permeability. We examined several building materials, like cements, concretes and bricks of different constitutions for their diffusion coefficients and their exhalation rates. The insulating materials, like foils and bitumen were tested also on their radon tightness. The measurements were performed with an online radon measuring device, using electrostatic deposition of 218Po ions onto a surface barrier detector and subsequent alpha spectroscopy. The mean diffusion lengths for the investigated building materials range from lower than 0.7 mm (i.e. for plastic foil), up to 1.1 m for gypsum. The diffusion length R was calculated from the diffusion coefficient D with R = square root(D/lambda). If the thickness of the material is more than 3 times the diffusion length, then it is called radon-tight. The mean 222Rn exhalation rates for the building materials varied between 0.05 and 0.4 mBq/m2s. The samples were investigated as stones, plates, blocks, foils, coatings, powders etc., no statement can be made about working at the construction site of a building. Also the fabrication and processing of the materials has to be considered, because the material characteristics may have changed. PMID:11379942

  12. APPLICATION OF RADON REDUCTION METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document is intended to aid homeowners and contractors in diagnosing and solving indoor radon problems. It will also be useful to State and Federal regulatory officials and many other persons who provide advice on the selection, design and operation of radon reduction methods...

  13. Radon as an earthquake precursor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Planinic; V. Radoli?; B. Vukovic

    2004-01-01

    Radon concentrations in soil gas were continuously measured by the LR-115 nuclear track detectors during a four-year period. Seismic activities, as well as barometric pressure, rainfall and air temperature were also observed. The influence of meteorological parameters on temporal radon variations was investigated, and a respective equation of the multiple regression was derived. The earthquakes with magnitude ?3 at epicentral

  14. Radon i danske boliger Kortlgning af lands-,

    E-print Network

    Radon i danske boliger Kortlægning af lands-, amts- og kommuneværdier #12;Radon i danske boliger en kortlægning af radonforholdene i danske boliger. Kon- centrationen af radon-222 er m°alt i 3019 mod radon. For landet som helhed har 4.6 % af enfamiliehusene værdier over 200 Bq/m3. Det svarer til

  15. Geohydrological control on radon availability in groundwater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yogesh Prasad; Ganesh Prasad; V. M. Choubey; R. C. Ramola

    2009-01-01

    The radon content in groundwater sources depends on the radium concentration in the rock of the aquifer. Radon was measured in water in many parts of the world, mostly for the risk assessment due to consumption of drinking water. The exposure to radon through drinking water is largely by inhalation and ingestion. Airborne radon can be released during normal household

  16. Spatial and temporal indoor radon variations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. J. Steck

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines the ability of standard radon measurement protocols to predict long-term radon concentrations in houses located in the upper Midwest. It was observed that: (1) significant radon variations can occur on a spatial scale as small as a single floor; (2) radon measurements that integrate for periods less than 3 mo are reliable only to within a factor

  17. Fourth conference on radiation protection and dosimetry: Proceedings, program, and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Casson, W.H.; Thein, C.M.; Bogard, J.S. [eds.] [eds.

    1994-10-01

    This Conference is the fourth in a series of conferences organized by staff members of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in an effort to improve communication in the field of radiation protection and dosimetry. Scientists, regulators, managers, professionals, technologists, and vendors from the United States and countries around the world have taken advantage of this opportunity to meet with their contemporaries and peers in order to exchange information and ideas. The program includes over 100 papers in 9 sessions, plus an additional session for works in progress. Papers are presented in external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, radiation protection programs and assessments, developments in instrumentation and materials, environmental and medical applications, and on topics related to standards, accreditation, and calibration. Individual papers are indexed separately on EDB.

  18. Deep in the Forests: Program works to protect water quality through forestry practices 

    E-print Network

    Wythe, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    , wetlands, coastal waters, and underground water. BMPs o#15;er site-speci#28;c practices to control potential nonpoint source pollution. As part of the program, the TFS and Texas Forestry Association jointly published a #23;#25;#16;-page guidebook...20 tx H2O Winter 2011 Story by Kathy Wythe The Texas Forest Service works with forestry professionals to implement best management practices to help protect water quality, which is critical for people and wildlife to survive. Photo courtesy...

  19. Deep in the forests: Program works to protect water quality through forestry practices 

    E-print Network

    Wythe, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    , wetlands, coastal waters, and underground water. BMPs o#15;er site-speci#28;c practices to control potential nonpoint source pollution. As part of the program, the TFS and Texas Forestry Association jointly published a #23;#25;#16;-page guidebook...20 tx H2O Winter 2011 Story by Kathy Wythe The Texas Forest Service works with forestry professionals to implement best management practices to help protect water quality, which is critical for people and wildlife to survive. Photo courtesy...

  20. PROTECTING CHILDREN FROM ENVIRONMENTAL THREATS - A CONTINUING EDUCATION PROGRAM FOR NURSES OF THE AMERICAN NURSES FOUNDATION/ASSOCIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The American Nurses Association/Foundation will develop online, in print and pre conference continuing education (CE) children's environmental health protection programs to meet the objective of the program. The first CE program is on school environments, the second on home and ...

  1. EERF (Eastern Environmental Radiation Facility) standard operating procedures for radon-222 measurement using charcoal canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, D.J.; Windham, S.T.

    1987-06-01

    The passive nature of activated charcoal allows both adsorption and desorption, and, in addition, the adsorbed radon undergoes radioactive decay during the exposure period. Therefore, the canister cannot uniformly integrate over the entire exposure period. However, the canisters can be calibrated to yield precise results for radon concentrations in structures during the deployment period of 48 hours used by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

  2. Monitoring of Radon in Tourist Part of Skocjan Caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debevec Gerjevic, Vanja; Jovanovic, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Due to their exceptional significance for cultural and natural heritage, the Škocjan Caves were entered on UNESCO's list of natural and cultural world heritage sites in 1986. Park Škocjan Caves is located in South Eastern part of Slovenia. It was established with aim of conserving and protecting exceptional geomorphological, geological and hydrological outstanding features, rare and endangered plant and animal species, paleontological and archaeological sites, ethnological and architectural characteristics and cultural landscape and for the purpose of ensuring opportunities for suitable development, by the National Assembly of the Republic of Slovenia in 1996. Park Škocjan Caves established monitoring that includes caves microclimate parameters: humidity, CO2, wind flow and radon concentration and daughter products. The approach in managing the working place with natural background radiation is complex. Monitoring of Radon has been functioning for more than ten years now. Presentation will show the yearly dynamic observed in the different parts of the caves, related to radon daughter products and other microclimatic data, beside the most convenient measuring technique. Implementing the Slovene legislation in the field of radiation protection, we are obligated to perform special measurements in the caves and also having our guides and workers in the caves regularly examined according to established procedure. The medical exams are performed at Institution of Occupational Safety, Ljubljana in order to monitor the influence of Radon to the workers in the cave. The equivalent dose for each employed person is also established on regular basis and it is part of medical survey of workers in the caves. The survey will be described along with education of the staff working in the caves in the field of radiation protection. An overview of Slovene legislation with practical example on implementation will be demonstrated in the case of Škocjan Caves where the managing authority considers the monitoring of Radon as one of the tools for adaptive management.

  3. Small Sample Radon Testing of Homes in East Texas 

    E-print Network

    Crawford, J. G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper covers the results of small sample radon testing of homes in East Texas. The program was voluntary and participation was offered to a group of technical personnel involved in thc HVAC industry. Response was smaller than expected. The only...

  4. Collective dose as a performance measure for occupational radiation protection programs: Issues and recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, D.J.; Harty, R.; Hickey, E.E.; Martin, J.B.; Peffers, M.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Kathren, R.L. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Collective dose is one of the performance measures used at many US Department of Energy (DOE) contractor facilities to quantitatively assess the objectives of the radiation protection program. It can also be used as a management tool to improve the program for keeping worker doses as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Collective dose is used here to mean the sum of all total effective dose equivalent values for all workers in a specified group over a specified time. It is often used as a surrogate estimate of radiological risk. In principle, improvements in radiation protection programs and procedures will result in reduction of collective dose, all other things being equal. Within the DOE, most frequently, a single collective dose number, which may or may not be adjusted for workload and other factors, is used as a performance measure for a contractor. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the use of collective dose as a performance measure for ALARA programs at DOE sites.

  5. 2014 ICHLNRRA intercomparison of radon/thoron gas and radon short-lived decay products measuring instruments in the NRPI Prague.

    PubMed

    Jílek, K; Timková, J

    2015-06-01

    During the Eighth International Conference on High Levels of Natural Radiation and Radon Areas held in autumn 2014 at Prague, the third intercomparison of radon/thoron gas and radon short-lived decay products measurement instruments was organised by and held at the Natural Radiation Division of the National Radiation Protection Institute (NRPI; SÚRO v.v.i.) in Prague. The intercomparison was newly focussed also on continuous monitors with active sampling adapters capable to distinguish radon/thoron gas in their mix field.The results of radon gas measurements carried out in the big NRPI radon chamber indicated very well an average deviation of up to 5 % from the reference NRPI value for 80 % of all the exposed instruments. The results of equilibrium equivalent concentration continuous monitors indicated an average deviation of up to 5 % from the reference NRPI value for 40 % of all the exposed instruments and their ?8-10 % shift compared with the NRPI. The results of investigated ambient conditions upon response of exposed continuous monitors indicated influence of aerosol changes upon response of radon monitors with an active air sampling adapters through the filter, only. The exposures of both radon/thoron gas discriminative continuous monitors and passive detectors have been indicated inconsistent results: on one hand, their excellent agreement up to several per cent for both the gases, and on the other hand, systematic unsatisfactory differences up to 40 %. Additional radon/thoron exercises are recommended to improve both the instruments themselves and quality of their operators. PMID:25990114

  6. Map showing radon potential of rocks and soils in Fairfax County, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Otton, James K.; Schumann, R. Randall; Owen, Douglass E.; Thurman, Nelson; Duval, Joseph S.

    1988-01-01

    Since 1984, indoor radon has gained national attention as a significant health hazard in the United States. Radon is a colorless, odorless, radioactive gas derived from uranium by radioactive decay. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) now projects that 5,000 to 20,000 lung-cancer deaths per year may be attributed to the long-term exposure to indoor radon and its radioactive decay products. Indoor radon has been previously recognized as a health hazard associated with uranium-bearing mill tailings or building materials, but it was not until December 1984 that some natural soils and rocks were found to be sources of indoor radon at levels comparable to those in uranium mines. It is now suspected that elevated indoor radon levels are far more widespread than initially though. The EPA considers 4 picoCuries of radon per liter of air (pCi/L) as the level (in a year-round measurement) at which actions ought to be taken to lower the concentration of indoor radon. All soils and rocks contain measurable amounts of uranium, which generate measurable amounts of radon. Certain soils and rocks, however, have a greater potential to cause indoor radon problems than others because (1) they have a higher uranium content and thus can generate higher levels of radon in soil gas (gas that occupies the pores of the soil), and (2) the permeability of the sol or rack is sufficiently high that radon-bearing soil gas can flow freely and move indoors through the foundation of the structure. This study was designed to demonstrate the correlation between the geologic environment and indoor radon levels and to demonstrate a method of assessment that could be used by other informed workers in areas of their interest. A parallel study by Gundersen and others (1988) of the radon potential of rocks and soils in Montgomery County, Md., used somewhat different methods of assessment because the data available for and assessment of Montgomery County differed.

  7. Computer program for nonlinear static stress analysis of shuttle thermal protection system: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, G. L.; Wallas, M.

    1981-01-01

    User documentation is presented for a computer program which considers the nonlinear properties of the strain isolator pad (SIP) in the static stress analysis of the shuttle thermal protection system. This program is generalized to handle an arbitrary SIP footprint including cutouts for instrumentation and filler bar. Multiple SIP surfaces are defined to model tiles in unique locations such as leading edges, intersections, and penetrations. The nonlinearity of the SIP is characterized by experimental stress displacement data for both normal and shear behavior. Stresses in the SIP are calculated using a Newton iteration procedure to determine the six rigid body displacements of the tile which develop reaction forces in the SIP to equilibrate the externally applied loads. This user documentation gives an overview of the analysis capabilities, a detailed description of required input data and an example to illustrate use of the program.

  8. The Ural Electrochemical Integrated Plant Sustainability Program of Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting System Upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Vakhonin, Alexander; Yuldashev, Rashid; Dabbs, Richard D.; Carroll, Michael F.; Garrett, Albert G.; Patrick, Scott W.; Ku, Eshter M.

    2009-09-30

    UEIP has been working on a comprehensive sustainability program that includes establishing a site sustainability working group, information gathering, planning, organizing, developing schedule and estimated costs, trhough joint UEIP-US DOE/NNSA National Laboratory sustainability contracts. Considerable efforts have been necessary in the sustainability planning, monitoring, and control of the scope of work using tools such as Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Project and SAP R/3. While information interchanges within the sustainability program provides adequate US assurances that US funds are well spent through its quarterly reporting methodology, proper information security and protection measures are taken throughout the process. Decommissioning of outdated equipment has also become part of determining sustainability requirements and processes. The site’s sustainability program has facilitated the development of a transition plan toward eventual full Russian funding of sustaining nuclear security upgrades.

  9. Building the basis for a comprehensive radiation protection program for a multi-program laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Copenhaver, E.D.

    1987-01-01

    An explicit, workplace-specific training has been developed, implemented, and documented for all radiation workers. In addition to the radiation worker personnel located at reactors, accelerators, radiochemical laboratories, and waste treatment areas, we have trained other personnel who work in areas where a lesser potential for radiological/chemical exposure exists. These workforces include construction crews, site restoration crews, contracted special services such as scoping and site characterization teams, and short-term visitors. We are developing a comprehensive, integrated approach to radiation protection training suited for a multi-purpose research laboratory. 9 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  10. National Renewable Energy Laboratory program on lightning risk and wind turbine generator protection

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); McNiff, B. [McNiff Light Industry, Blue Hill, ME (United States)

    1997-12-31

    In the early development of wind turbine generators (WTG) in the United States, wind farms were primarily located in California where lightning activity is the lowest in the United States. As such, lightning protection for wind turbines was not considered to be a major issue for designers or wind farm operators. However, wind turbine installations are expanding into the Midwest, Southwest and other regions of the United States where lightning activity is significantly more intense and lightning damage to wind turbines is more common. There is a growing need, therefore, to better understand lightning activity on wind farms and to improve wind turbine lightning protection systems. In support of the U.S. Department of Energy/Electric Power Research Institute (DOE/EPRI) Utility Wind Turbine Verification Program (TVP), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has recently begun to take steps to determine the extent of damage due to lightning and the effectiveness of various lightning protection techniques for wind power plants. Working through the TVP program, NREL will also perform outreach and education to (1) help manufacturers to provide equipment that is adequately designed to survive lightning, (2) make sure that operators are aware of effective safety procedures, and (3) help site designers and wind farm developers take the risk of lightning into account as effectively as possible.

  11. Radon in earthquake prediction research.

    PubMed

    Friedmann, H

    2012-04-01

    The observation of anomalies in the radon concentration in soil gas and ground water before earthquakes initiated systematic investigations on earthquake precursor phenomena. The question what is needed for a meaningful earthquake prediction as well as what types of precursory effects can be expected is shortly discussed. The basic ideas of the dilatancy theory are presented which in principle can explain the occurrence of earthquake forerunners. The reasons for radon anomalies in soil gas and in ground water are clarified and a possible classification of radon anomalies is given. PMID:21669940

  12. Intercomparison of retrospective radon detectors.

    PubMed Central

    Field, R W; Steck, D J; Parkhurst, M A; Mahaffey, J A; Alavanja, M C

    1999-01-01

    We performed both a laboratory and a field intercomparison of two novel glass-based retrospective radon detectors previously used in major radon case-control studies performed in Missouri and Iowa. The new detectors estimate retrospective residential radon exposure from the accumulation of a long-lived radon decay product, (210)Pb, in glass. The detectors use track registration material in direct contact with glass surfaces to measure the alpha-emission of a (210)Pb-decay product, (210)Po. The detector's track density generation rate (tracks per square centimeter per hour) is proportional to the surface alpha-activity. In the absence of other strong sources of alpha-emission in the glass, the implanted surface alpha-activity should be proportional to the accumulated (210)Po, and hence to the cumulative radon gas exposure. The goals of the intercomparison were to a) perform collocated measurements using two different glass-based retrospective radon detectors in a controlled laboratory environment to compare their relative response to implanted polonium in the absence of environmental variation, b) perform collocated measurements using two different retrospective radon progeny detectors in a variety of residential settings to compare their detection of glass-implanted polonium activities, and c) examine the correlation between track density rates and contemporary radon gas concentrations. The laboratory results suggested that the materials and methods used by the studies produced similar track densities in detectors exposed to the same implanted (210)Po activity. The field phase of the intercomparison found excellent agreement between the track density rates for the two types of retrospective detectors. The correlation between the track density rates and direct contemporary radon concentration measurements was relatively high, considering that no adjustments were performed to account for either the residential depositional environment or glass surface type. Preliminary comparisons of the models used to translate track rate densities to average long-term radon concentrations differ between the two studies. Further calibration of the retrospective detectors' models for interpretation of track rate density may allow the pooling of studies that use glass-based retrospective radon detectors to determine historic residential radon exposures. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:10545336

  13. Fire Protection Program fiscal year 1996, site support program plan Hanford Fire Department. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Good, D.E.

    1995-09-01

    The mission of the Hanford Fire Department (HFD) is to support the safe and timely cleanup of the Hanford site by providing fire suppression, fire prevention, emergency rescue, emergency medical service, and hazardous materials response; and to be capable of dealing with and terminating emergency situations which could threaten the operations, employees, or interest of the US Department of Energy operated Hanford Site. This includes response to surrounding fire departments/districts under a mutual aid agreement and contractual fire fighting, hazardous materials, and ambulance support to Washington Public Power Supply System (Supply System). The fire department also provides site fire marshal overview authority, fire system testing and maintenance, self-contained breathing apparatus maintenance, building tours and inspections, ignitable and reactive waste site inspections, prefire planning, and employee fire prevention education. This report gives a program overview, technical program baselines, and cost and schedule baseline.

  14. A generic biokinetic model for noble gases with application to radon

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Marsh, James [Health Protection Agency of Great Britain; Gregoratto, Demetrio [Health Protection Agency of Great Britain; Blanchardon, Eric [IRSN

    2013-01-01

    The International Commission for Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently uses a dose conversion coefficient to calculate effective dose per unit exposure to radon and its progeny. The coefficient is derived by dividing the detriment associated with unit exposure to radon, as estimated from epidemiological studies, by the detriment per unit effective dose, as estimated mainly from atomic bomb survivor data and animal studies. In a recent statement the ICRP indicated that future guidance on exposure to radon and its progeny will be developed in the same way as guidance for any other radionuclide. That is, intake of radon and progeny will be limited on the basis of effective dose coefficients derived from biokinetic and dosimetric models. This paper proposes a biokinetic model for systemic (absorbed) radon for use in the calculation of dose coefficients for inhaled or ingested radon. The model is based largely on physical laws governing transfer of a non-reactive and soluble gas between materials. Model predictions are shown to be consistent with results of controlled studies of the fate of internally deposited radon in human subjects.

  15. A study of Monitoring and Mapping for Radon-Concentration Distribution in Gyeongju - 12201

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Chan Hee; Lee, Jung Min; Jang, So Young; Kim, Shin Jae; Moon, Joo Hyun [Dongguk University, 707, Seokjang-Dong, Gyeongju, Gyeongbuk 780-714 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    Radon is one of the most important contributors to the radiation exposure in humans. This study measured the indoor radon concentrations at the 17 elementary school auditoriums that were sampled from those in the city of Gyeongju, Korea. The reason that an elementary school was selected as a measurement object is that many students and teachers stay for a long time in a day and it's easy to identify the characteristics of the auditorium building such as the essential building. The measurement shows that most of the indoor radon concentrations at the 17 elementary school auditoriums did not exceed 148 Bq/m{sup 3} that is the action level recommended by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This study measured the indoor radon concentrations at the elementary school auditoriums in Gyeongju. The measurements were analyzed according to the bedrock type and the time intervals per day. In this study, it was found that the indoor radon concentrations over off-duty hours were generally higher that those over on-duty hours, and the indoor radon concentration in the area whose bedrock is volcanic rock was higher than those in the area of the other types of bedrock. As mentioned above, attention has to be paid to an elementary school since many young students and teachers stay for more 6 hours a day at it. Hence, it is necessary to continuously monitor and properly manage the indoor radon concentrations in the elementary schools. (authors)

  16. Radon Policy in Finland, Achievements and Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Arvela, Hannu; Maekelaeinen, Ilona; Reisbacka, Heikki [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority-STUK PO Box 14, 00881 Helsinki (Finland)

    2008-08-07

    Finland is a country of high indoor radon concentrations. Since 1980 the authority regulations, guidance, radon mapping and research work supporting decision making have been developed continuously. Clear regulations directed to citizens and authorities form the basis for radon policy. Active mapping work and measurement ordered by private home owners has resulted in 100.000 houses measured. National indoor radon data base forms a good basis for decision making, communication and research. The number of new houses provided with radon preventive constructions has increased remarkably. New radon campaigns has increased measurement and mitigation activity. Furher increasing of public awareness is the key challenge.

  17. Reducing the risks from radon indoors: an IAEA perspective.

    PubMed

    Boal, T; Colgan, P A

    2014-07-01

    The IAEA has a mandate to develop, in collaboration with other relevant international organisations, 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimisation of danger to life and property', and to provide for the application of these standards. The most recent edition of the International Basic Safety Standards includes, for the first time, requirements to protect the public from exposure due to radon indoors. As a result, the IAEA has already developed guidance material in line with accepted best international practice and an international programme to assist its Member States in identifying and addressing high radon concentrations in buildings is being prepared. This paper overviews the current situation around the world and summarises the management approach advocated by the IAEA. A number of important scientific and policy issues are identified and discussed from the point-of-view of how they may impact on national action plans and strategies. Finally, the assistance and support available through the Agency is described. PMID:24743761

  18. The Russian Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting Program: Analysis and prospect

    SciTech Connect

    Kempf, C.R.

    1998-11-01

    This paper summarizes an analysis of the US-Russian Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC and A) Program, developed on the basis of extensive discussions with US laboratory participants as well as personal experience. Results of the discussions have been organized into three main areas: Technical/MPC and A Progress; Programmatic and Administrative Issues; and Professional Aspects. Implications for MPC and A effectiveness, for MPC and A sustainability, and for future relations and collaboration are derived. Suggested next steps are given.

  19. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; program integrity: Exchange, SHOP, and eligibility appeals. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2013-08-30

    This final rule implements provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively referred to as the Affordable Care Act). Specifically, this final rule outlines Exchange standards with respect to eligibility appeals, agents and brokers, privacy and security, issuer direct enrollment, and the handling of consumer cases. It also sets forth standards with respect to a State's operation of the Exchange and Small Business Health Options Program (SHOP). It generally is finalizing previously proposed policies without change. PMID:23991479

  20. Radiation Protection Considerations at USACE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.H. [CHP, SHB INC., Centennial, Colorado (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was initially authorized by Congress in 1974. FUSRAP was enacted to address residual radioactive contamination associated with numerous sites across the U.S. at which radioactive material (primarily Uranium ores and related milling products) had been processed in support of the nation's nuclear weapons program dating back to the Manhattan Project and the period immediately following World War II. In October 1997, Congress transferred the management of this program from the Department of Energy to the United States Corp of Engineers. Through this program, the Corps addresses the environmental remediation of certain sites once used by DOE's predecessor agencies, the Manhattan Engineer District and the Atomic Energy Commission. The waste at FUSRAP sites consists mainly of low levels of uranium, thorium and radium, along with some mixed wastes. Upon completion of remedial activities, these sites are transferred to DOE for long-term stewardship activities. This paper presents and contrasts the radiological conditions and recent monitoring results associated with five large ongoing FUSRAP projects including Maywood, N.J.; the Linde site near Buffalo, N.Y.; Colonie in Albany N.Y. and the St Louis, Mo. airport and downtown sites. The radiological characteristics of soil and debris at each site and respective regulatory clean up criteria is presented and contrasted. Some differences are discussed in the radiological characteristics of material at some sites that result in variations in radiation protection monitoring programs. Additionally, summary data for typical personnel radiation exposure monitoring results are presented. In summary: 1. The FUSRAP projects for which data and observations are reported in this paper are considered typical of the radiological nature of FUSRAP sites in general. 2. These sites are characterized by naturally occurring uranium and thorium series radionuclides in soil and debris, at concentrations typically < E4 pCi/ gram total activity. 3. Although external exposure rates are generally low resulting in few exposures above background, occasional 'hot spots' are observed in the 1- 10 mR / hr range or higher. However personnel and general area external exposure monitoring programs consistently demonstrate very low potential for external exposure at theses sites. 4. Potential for airborne exposure is controlled by wetting and misting techniques during excavation and movement of materials. Air sampling and bioassay programs confirm low potential for airborne exposure of workers at these sites. 5. Radiation protection and health physics monitoring programs as implemented at these sites ensure that exposures to personal are maintained ALARA. (authors)

  1. Radon testing behavior in a sample of individuals with high home radon screening measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R.W.; Kross, B.C.; Vust, L.J. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States))

    1993-08-01

    Although radon exposure has been identified as the second leading cause of lung cancer, fewer than 6% of US homeowners test their homes for radon. This report examines participants' follow-up radon testing behavior subsequent to receiving an initial screening radon level greater than 20 pCi/L. Sixty-two participants in the Iowa State-Wide Rural Radon Screening Survey who had radon screening measurements over 20 pCi/L were questioned by phone survey 3 months after receipt of their radon screening result to assess: whether participants were aware of radon's health risk; if participants recalled the radon screening results; how participants perceived the relative health risk of radon and whether participants planned follow-up radon testing. Only 19% of the respondents specifically identified lung cancer as the possible adverse health outcome of high radon exposure, and the majority of participants underestimated the health risks high radon levels pose when compared to cigarettes and x-rays. In addition, less than one third (29%) of the participants actually remembered their radon screening level within 10 pCi/L 3 months after receiving their screening results. Only 53% of the individuals correctly interpreted their screening radon level as being in the high range, and only 39% of the participants planned follow-up radon measurements. Receipt of radon screening test results indicating high radon levels was not an adequate motivational factor in itself to stimulate further radon assessment or mitigation. The findings suggest that free radon screening will not result in a dramatic increase in subsequent homeowner initiated remediation or further recommended radon testing. 13 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  2. EFFECT OF NATURAL VENTILATION ON RADON AND RADON PROGENY LEVELS IN HOUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the effect of natural ventilation on radon and radon progeny levels in houses. ontradicting the widely held assumption that ventilation is ineffective in reducing indoor radon concentrations, experiments in a research house have shown that the basement radon l...

  3. RADON REDUCTION AND RADON-RESISTANT CONSTRUCTION DEMONSTRATIONS IN NEW YORK - VOLUME 1: TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of radon reduction and radon-resistant construction demonstrations in New York. The existing house evaluation demonstrated radon mitigation techniques where indoor radon concentrations exceeded 4 pCi/L. Results demonstrated that sealing all accessible fou...

  4. Regional and local variation of indoor radon and radon source potentials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. J. Steck; S. A. Baynes; A. P. Noack

    1996-01-01

    The upper midwest has been identified as an area with high potential for elevated indoor radon. In Minnesota (MN), substantial spatial variations have been observed in radon and radon sources on both regional and local scales. Different methods for identifying ‘hot spots’ were investigated. Maps generated from existing indoor radon screening measurements averaged over a small area (postal zip code

  5. Calculation of impulse current distributions and magnetic fields in lightning protection structures-a computer program and its laboratory validation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Cortina; A. Porrino

    1992-01-01

    A circuit model and an ad hoc computer program were set up to evaluate electromagnetic interference in the vicinity of protective structures struck by lightning. This program permits the evaluation of the impulsive magnetic fields by calculating the impulse current distribution in different parts of such structures. It also allows the evaluation of the electromagnetic interference induced on susceptible victim

  6. Exposure to indoor radon and natural gamma radiation in some workplaces at Algiers, Algeria.

    PubMed

    Aït Ziane, M; Lounis-Mokrani, Z; Allab, M

    2014-07-01

    Radon activity concentrations have been measured in 34 workplaces throughout Algiers nuclear research centre, in Algeria, during some periods between March 2007 and June 2013 using Electret ion chambers, nuclear tracks detectors and an AlphaGuard system. The indoor radon levels range from 2 to 628 Bq m(-3) with an average indoor concentration equals to 92 Bq m(-3), whereas the estimated outdoor radon concentrations range from 2 to 14 Bq m(-3) with an average value of 6 Bq m(-3). This study also focused on parameters affecting radon concentration levels such as ?oor number, ventilation and atmospheric parameters. Furthermore, the mean gamma rates have been measured in the different investigated locations and have been found to be varying between 33 and 3300 nSv h(-1). The annual effective dose for workers calculated using the appropriate equilibrium and occupancy factors is lower than the value recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection in its Publication 103. PMID:24711531

  7. Radon removal from flowing air by a water scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, T.E.; Jarzemba, M.S.; Fentiman, A.W.; Denison, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    As part of a process that is being developed to vitrify tailings from Belgian Congo ore that is stored in large silos at a former U.S. Department of Energy uranium-processing facility in southwestern Ohio, process off-gas is produced that contains large concentrations of radon gas (on the order of hundreds of thousands of picocuries per litre). To meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency restrictions, the process off-gas must be stripped of its radon content before it is vented to the atmosphere. It is appropriate to consider a charcoal bed as part of an off-gas treatment system for the removal of radon at the vitrification facility. However, a difficulty arises in incorporating a charcoal bed into an off-gas treatment system at a vitrification facility. That difficulty is that the capability of the charcoal bed to capture and retain radon gas decreases with increasing bed temperature. Thus, it may be necessary to include a water scrubber in the off-gas treatment system to cool the process off-gas before it is passed through the charcoal bed.

  8. Investigating Indoor Radon Levels and Influencing Factors in Primary Schools of Zulfi City, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ghamdi, S. S.; Al-Garawi, M. S.; Al-Mosa, Tahani M.; Baig, M. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Science, King Saud University, P. O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-10-27

    Measurement of indoor Concentrations were performed in Zulfi city of Saudi Arabia, using CR-39 track etch detectors. This investigation focused on the influence of different parameters, namely different locations, school categories, school building types, and room type as well as on the existence of differences in radon concentration at floor levels. We divided the Zulfi city into five regions, keeping in mind their geographical locations between Tuwaiq Mountains and Al-Thuwayrat sands. The measured average radon concentrations for regions 1-5 respectively are: 87.0{+-}14.2 Bq/m{sup 3}, 83.4{+-}6.0 Bq/m{sup 3}, 61.6{+-}6.4 Bq/m{sup 3}, 63.7{+-}5.4 Bq/m{sup 3} and 87.5{+-}6.Bq/m{sup 3} and the minimum concentrations are 28.0 Bq/m{sup 3}, 5.5 Bq/m{sup 3}, 1.1 Bq/m{sup 3}, 1.0 Bq/m{sup 3} and 24 Bq/m{sup 3} respectively. These results are still within normal limits and below the action level of 148 Bqm{sup -3} set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). A test of significance using Minitab program was applied to investigate if radon levels in regions are significantly different from each other. We tried all combinations, and found the following results. The ''within regions''(different location) test yielded, region 2 is not significant versus region ''1''(p = 0.783) and versus region ''5''(P = 0.646), whereas it is significant versus region ''3''(P = 0.0160) and also versus region ''4''(p = 0.018). We investigated government and rented school's building also and none was found significantly different (p = 0.052). Floors of the same building were tested in order to examine the radon concentration as a function of storey level. No significant difference was observed at floor levels (p = 0.009). When girl's schools versus Boys and kindergartens schools were tested they were found significantly different. It is believed that this significant difference is due to geographical nature of the area, since most of the girl's schools were selected from regions 2 and 3, these regions are relatively close to the Tuwaiq mountains whereas other regions are near to the Al-Thuwayrat sands.

  9. Radon adsorption on an aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schopfer, Carl J.

    Radon is an important radioactive gas, responsible for environmental exposures and subsequent impact on human health. It is a Noble gas and under most circumstances is not chemically reactive. Its physical properties and resultant behavior, however, may not be simple in all cases, especially where barriers to free diffusion are present, or when encountering materials with special properties. The importance of radon comes from its radioactivity, by imparting energy in material after decay, with resulting damage to living tissue. Transport in the environment is controlled by its physical properties, since it is chemically inert. Aerogels made of silica glass are a relatively new material with the unique property of having a very large surface area, on the order of hundreds of m2 per gram, compared to the exterior surface of the bulk volume of typical solid materials. Insight may be gained into the behavior of both radon and unique materials by observing how radon interacts with such materials. Silica aerogel monoliths with bulk densities of approximately 0.25 g cm-3 were manufactured and exposed to radon gas diffusing freely into the gel using a closed chamber. Measurements were taken while allowing the gas to diffuse out of the gel. Radon is found to diffuse out of the sample chamber at about the same rate when a gel material is present as from an empty chamber. Long-term measurements show radioactivity (from progeny) remains present leading to the conclusion that, the radon may have penetrated some distance into the gel. This leaves open the possibility of applying aerogels as a radon detector. The aerogel manufactured in this study did not preferentially absorb radon. Some evidence suggests that radon may have penetrated the surface however, based on increased long-term radioactivity. Doping the gel with cerium salts, known to cause glass produced by melting processes to scintillate when exposed to ionizing radiation did not produce observable light signal distinguishable from Cerenkov radiation, thereby excluding the hypothesis that the cerium will scintillate in the current arrangement.

  10. The indoor radon problem: Studies in the Albuquerque, New Mexico area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookins, Douglas G.

    1988-12-01

    Radon buildup in homes is now recognized throughout the world as a potentially major health hazard. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimate 8,000 30,000 fatalities per year in the United States due to indoor radon. The Albuquerque, New Mexico area was chosen for study because it is representative of metropolitan areas in the southwestern United States where slightly uraniferous source rocks (Sandia granite) have provided the very immature soil for much of the area. The granite contains 4.7 ppm U, and limestone capping the granite 5.7 ppm U. Soils in the area average 4.24 ppm U, and Th/U ratios average 3.2. These data suggest some removal of U from the source rocks, but fixation of the U in the soils (that is, as opposed to widespread removal of the U by solution), thus providing a ready source for soil radon. A pilot study of soil radon in the area in winter of 1983 1984 shows high values, 180 pCi/l, relative to the U.S. average (about 100 pCi/l). In the winter of 1986 1987, 180 dwellings were surveyed for their indoor radon levels, including 20 that had been surveyed in summer of 1986. Twenty-eight percent of those in the winter study yielded indoor radon above the EPA suggested maximum permissible level of 4 pCi/l air, well above the EPA estimate of 10 15 dwellings for the U.S. The indoor radon levels show positive correlation with closeness to the Sandia Mountains, to soil radon, to excess insulation, to homes with solar capacities, and other factors. Building materials may provide a very minor source of some indoor radon. Summer readings are lower than winter readings except when the houses possess refrigerated air conditioning.

  11. Effects of Program Exposure and Engagement with Tailored Prevention Communication on Sun Protection by Young Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Kim D.; Buller, David B.; Yaroch, Amy L.; Maloy, Julie; Geno, Cristy R.; Cutter, Gary R.

    2013-01-01

    Few family-based interventions to increase sun safe behavior among adolescents have been evaluated. The present study tested an intervention that included tailored and nontailored print communications delivered by mail to adolescents (age 11 to 15) and their parents who were also participating in an evaluation of an in-school intervention. The use of sunscreen, protective clothing, and avoidance of the sun were promoted, and family communication and environmental change strategies were fostered. Adolescents and their parents were pretested in May of 2002 and posttested from August to October. Adolescents (N=599) were stratified on experimental condition in the in-school study (in-school intervention vs control) and randomly were assigned from within strata to receive (N=288) or not receive (N=311) the summer intervention materials. No statistically significant effects were found for adolescents between the randomized experimental conditions. Parents’ had increased knowledge (F = 5.52, p <. 05) and propensity to have their child wear sunglasses (F = 4.07, p <. 05). Greater program exposure/engagement led to enhanced sun protection behavior (e.g., fewer sunburns) and psychosocial factors among adolescents and parents. Greater exposure/engagement led to improvements in family interaction and home environment (e.g., shade audit completed). Future research is needed on exposure/engagement with family-based health messaging and on family-based sun safety programs for adolescents. PMID:18958776

  12. 1994 Annual wildlife survey report. Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-04-24

    This report summarizes the results of wildlife surveys and other wildlife monitoring performed from January through December 1994. These surveys are part of a long-term ecological monitoring program conducted under the Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program (NRPCP). This program is essential in identifying and quantifying fluctuations of wildlife populations, wildlife habitat use, and changes in the species using the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) as year-round or seasonal habitat. Wildlife population densities vary constantly due to natural pressures, and only well-integrated, long-term monitoring can identify which factors influencing wildlife populations are a consequence of natural causes, and which are due to human activities. An integrated monitoring program that gathers data on ecologically interactive species is essential in evaluating population fluctuations. Such data can be an invaluable tool in predicting and avoiding impacts on the ecology of an area due to projected human activities. With 167 species of birds, three big game species, nine species of carnivores, nine species of mid-sized mammals, and 15 small mammal species, the Site provides habitat to a surprising variety of wildlife. Many of these species are sensitive species or indicator organisms that by their presence or, more significantly, by their absence can indicate the ecological health of an area. Their presence at the Site indicates a very healthy ecosystem.

  13. The Material Protection, Control and Accounting Sustainability Program Implementation at the Electrochemical Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Sirotenko, Vladimir; Antonov, Eduard; Sirotenko, Alexei; Kukartsev, Alexander; Krivenko, Vladimir; Dabbs, Richard D.; Carroll, Michael F.; Garrett, Albert G.; Patrick, Scott W.; Ku, Esther M.

    2008-06-10

    Joint efforts by the Electrochemical Plant (ECP) in Zelenogorsk, Russia, and the United States Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (US DOE/NNSA) Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Program to upgrade ECP security systems began in 1996. The commissioning of major MPC&A systems at ECP occurred in December 2004. Since that time, the US Project Team (USPT) and ECP personnel have focused jointly on the development and implementation of an enterprise-wide MPC&A Sustainability Program (SP) that address the seven essential MPC&A Program sustainability elements. This paper describes current operational experience at the ECP with the full implementation of the site SP utilizing an earned-value methodology. In support of this site program, ECP has established a Document Control Program (DCP) for sustainability-related documents; developed a robust master Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) that outlines all ECP MPC&A sustainability activities; and chartered an Enterprise-Wide Sustainability Working Group (ESWG) The earned value methodology uses ECP-completed (and USPT-verified) analyses to assess project performance on a quarterly basis. The MPC&A SP, presently operational through a contract between ECP and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), incorporates the seven essential MPC&A Program sustainability elements and governs all sustainability activities associated with MPC&A systems at ECP. The site SP is designed to ensure over the near term the upgraded MPC&A systems continuous operation at ECP as funding transitions from US-assisted to fully Russian supported and sustained.

  14. A study of a radon gas scrubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoyi; Guiseppe, Vincente E.; Mei, Dongming

    2012-03-01

    Radon gas and its progeny are critical sources of background for low background experimental devices. The required reduction of radon levels in the air of the experimental area can typically be achieved with a radon scrubbing system. For testing purposes, a single column system has been built at USD to study the radon-adsorption properties of activated charcoal under different conditions. In this paper, we will demonstrate the working principle and test results.

  15. Radon concentrations in a spa in Serbia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Manic; S. Petrovic; Manic Vesna; Dragana Popovic; Dragana Todorovic

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents the results of indoor radon concentration survey in 201 homes and offices in Niska Banja (the Spa of Nis), a well-known health resort and a spa in the South-East of Serbia. Radon indoor concentrations were determined by active charcoal method, according to standard EPA procedure. The indoor radon concentrations were in the range of up to 200

  16. Constructing a Radon Scrubber for Air

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew Schmitz; Xiaoyi Yang; Dongming Mei; Vincente Guiseppe; Chao Zhang; Yongchen Sun; Jason Spaans

    2010-01-01

    A recurring problem in low background physics is the presence of the decay products of 222Rn (radon). The particularly treacherous aspect of radon is its gaseous nature and the long half-life of its daughters. Many industrial devices for air radon removal are sold on the market, but none achieve the removal factor required by our experiments in DUSEL. Therefore, we

  17. RADON TRANSFORMINVERSIONVIA WIENER FILTERINGOVER THE EUCLIDEAN MOTIONGROUP

    E-print Network

    Yazici, Birsen

    RADON TRANSFORMINVERSIONVIA WIENER FILTERINGOVER THE EUCLIDEAN MOTIONGROUP Can Evren Yarman Drexel formulatethe Radon transform asa wn- volution integral over the Euclidean motion group (SE(2)) and provideaminimummeansquare error(MMSE) stochas- tic deconvolution method for the Radon transform inver- sion. Proposed

  18. Multilinear generalized Radon transforms and point configurations

    E-print Network

    Grafakos, Loukas

    Multilinear generalized Radon transforms and point configurations Loukas Grafakos, Allan Greenleaf, Alex Iosevich and Eyvindur Palsson Abstract. We study multilinear generalized Radon transforms using for the results in [7]. 1. Introduction Linear generalized Radon transforms are operators of the form (1.1) Rf

  19. 4, 15191548, 2007 Radon in lakes

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    HESSD 4, 1519­1548, 2007 Radon in lakes T. Kluge et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction into lakes using radon-222 T. Kluge, J. Ilmberger, C. von Rohden, and W. Aeschbach-Hertig Institute.kluge@iup.uni-heidelberg.de) 1519 #12;HESSD 4, 1519­1548, 2007 Radon in lakes T. Kluge et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction

  20. Large families of mutually singular Radon measures

    E-print Network

    Plebanek, Grzegorz

    Large families of mutually singular Radon measures David H. Fremlin & Grzegorz Plebanek \\Lambda mutually singular Radon probability measures. 1. Introduction. We present here a partial answer with a family (¯ s ) s2S of mu­ tually singular Radon measures on X such that #(S) ? #(X)? In section 2 we

  1. Radon Risk Perception and Testing: Sociodemographic Correlates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Michael T.; Warner, Kenneth E.

    1994-01-01

    Using information from the 1990 National Health Interview Survey, examined beliefs regarding radon and radon-testing activities among different sociodemographic groups. Results suggest relatively superficial knowledge regarding radon, and little testing, within the survey population. Significantly less knowledge was observed among female and…

  2. Radon Transform Inversion using the Shearlet Representation

    E-print Network

    Labate, Demetrio

    Radon Transform Inversion using the Shearlet Representation Flavia Colonna Department The inversion of the Radon transform is a classical ill-posed inverse problem where some method-optimal rate of convergence in estimating a large class of images from noisy Radon data. This is achieved

  3. Sampling the 2-D Radon transform

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Rattey; A. Lindgren

    1981-01-01

    The Radon transform of a bivariate function, which has application in tomographic imaging, has traditionally been viewed as a parametrized univariate function. In this paper, the Radon transform is instead viewed as a bivariate function and two-dimensional sampling theory is used to address sampling and information content issues. It is Shown that the band region of the Radon transform of

  4. 8, 20852127, 2008 Evaluation of radon

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 8, 2085­2127, 2008 Evaluation of radon transport in a GCM K. Zhang et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Evaluation of the atmospheric transport in a GCM using radon measurements: sensitivity to cumulus.zhang@zmaw.de) 2085 #12;ACPD 8, 2085­2127, 2008 Evaluation of radon transport in a GCM K. Zhang et al. Title Page

  5. Retrospective determination of radon in houses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christer Samuelsson

    1988-01-01

    In the 1970s it was statistically proved that exposure to radon daughter products caused lung cancer in miners1. High concentrations of radon daughters have since been found in houses. Any epidemiological radon study begun today is hampered because relevant exposure data are difficult to obtain owing to the long latency period between exposure and tumour manifestation. Here I present a

  6. Is Your School Safe from Radon?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Radon is a natural, chemically inert, radioactive gas that can seep to the surface from underground rocks. As many as 20,000 lung cancer deaths in the U.S. each year may be radon-caused. Screening a school for radon is not difficult and may be done on weekends. It's safer for students and staff to test and be sure. (MLH)

  7. Indoor radon and lung cancer in China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. J. Blot; Z.-Y. Xu; J. D. Jr. Boice; D.-Z. Zhao; B. J. Stone; J. Sun; L.-B. Jing; J. F. Jr. Fraumeni

    1990-01-01

    Radon has long been known to contribute to risk of lung cancer, especially in undergound miners who are exposed to large amounts of the carcinogen. Recently, however, lower amounts of radon present in living areas have been suggested as an important cause of lung cancer. In an effort to clarify the relationship of low amounts of radon with lung cancer

  8. Dosimetric Challenges for Residential Radon Epidemiology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel J. Steck; R. William Field

    2006-01-01

    Radon concentration alone may not be an adequate surrogate to measure for lung cancer risk in all residential radon epidemiologic lung cancer studies. The dose delivered to the lungs per unit radon exposure can vary significantly with exposure conditions. These dose-effectiveness variations can be comparable to spatial and temporal factor variations in many situations. New technologies that use surface-deposited and

  9. A survey of the 16 Canadian child and youth protection programs: A threadbare patchwork quilt

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Susan; Plint, Amy C; MacKay, Morag

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND Child abuse and neglect (CAN) represents an international public health and societal problem, the extent and nature of which are inadequately understood. Child and youth protection programs (CYPPs), based in 16 Canadian paediatric academic health science centres, identify, manage, treat and prevent cases of CAN. OBJECTIVES To ascertain the structure, resources and functioning of Canadian CYPPs. METHODS Telephone interviews were conducted with the directors of the 16 CYPPs. RESULTS Full-time equivalent staffing ranged from 0.25 to 18.7 people. All programs were staffed with physicians. The majority of programs had social workers (14 of 16) and administrative staff (12 of 16), while fewer programs had a dedicated nurse (nine of 16) or psychologists (six of 16). All CYPPs provided medical examinations and psychosocial assessments, consultation and coordination of CAN cases within the hospital and with community professionals, expert medico-legal opinions and representation in court, and hospital in-service and community outreach education and advocacy. Nine centres participated in regular multi-agency reviews of cases. Fourteen centres had specialized teams for acute sexual assault. Academic activities include lectures to medical students (16 of 16), undergraduate clinical electives (11 of 16), mandatory clinical rotations for paediatric residents (10 of 16) and/or electives (15 of 16), a fellowship (one of 16) and research on CAN-related issues (11 of 16). CAN documentation was inconsistent and limited, underestimating the number of cases assessed within the CYPPs. CONCLUSION CYPPs appear to need further resources to care for maltreated children and their families. A national, standardized database to document CAN cases would aid in the allocation of resources to help develop policies and programs that effectively address the needs of CAN victims and their families, and to prevent CAN. PMID:19030360

  10. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project: Report from the DOE voluntary protection program onsite review, November 17--21, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-01-28

    This report summarizes the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) Review Team`s findings from the five-day onsite evaluation of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP), conducted November 17--21, 1997. The site was evaluated against the program requirements contained in ``US Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program, Part 1: Program Elements`` to determine its success in implementing the five tenets of DOE-VPP. DOE-VPP consists of three programs, with names and functions similar to those in OSHA`s VPP. These programs are STAR, MERIT, and DEMONSTRATION. The STAR program is the core of DOE-VPP. The program is aimed at truly outstanding protectors of employee safety and health. The MERIT program is a steppingstone for contractors and subcontractors that have good safety and health programs but need time and DOE guidance to achieve STAR status. The DEMONSTRATION program is rarely used; it allows DOE to recognize achievements in unusual situations about which DOE needs to learn more before determining approval requirements for the STAR status.

  11. A Radon Progeny Deposition Model

    SciTech Connect

    Guiseppe, V. E. [University of South Dakota, Vermillion, South Dakota 57069 (United States); Elliott, S. R.; Hime, A.; Rielage, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Westerdale, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2011-04-27

    The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly {sup 222}Rn) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of {sup 210}Pb on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to deposit radon progeny on various surfaces under a controlled environment in order to develop a deposition model. Results from this test stand and the resulting deposition model are presented.

  12. A Radon Progeny Deposition Model

    E-print Network

    V. E. Guiseppe; S. R. Elliott; A. Hime; K. Rielage; S. Westerdale

    2010-12-30

    The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly Rn-222) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of Pb-210 on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to deposit radon progeny on various surfaces under a controlled environment in order to develop a deposition model. Results from this test stand and the resulting deposition model are presented.

  13. A radon progeny deposition model

    SciTech Connect

    Rielage, Keith [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elliott, Steven R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hime, Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Guiseppe, Vincente E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Westerdale, S. [MIT

    2010-12-01

    The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly {sup 222}Rn) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of {sup 210}Pb on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to deposit radon progeny on various surfaces under a controlled environment in order to develop a deposition model. Results from this test stand and the resulting deposition model are presented.

  14. Can an hour or two of sun protection education keep the sunburn away? Evaluation of the Environmental Protection Agency's Sunwise School Program

    PubMed Central

    Geller, Alan C; Rutsch, Linda; Kenausis, Kristin; Selzer, Paula; Zhang, Zi

    2003-01-01

    Background Melanoma incidence is rising at a rate faster than any other preventable cancer in the United States. Childhood exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light increases risk for skin cancer as an adult, thus starting positive sun protection habits early may be key to reducing the incidence of this disease. Methods The Environmental Protection Agency's SunWise School Program, a national environmental and health education program for sun safety of children in primary and secondary schools (grades K-8), was evaluated with surveys administered to participating students and faculty. Results Pretests (n = 5,625) and posttests (n = 5,028) were completed by students in 102 schools in 42 states. Significant improvement was noted for the three knowledge variables. Intentions to play in the shade increased from 68% to 75%(p < 0.001) with more modest changes in intentions to use sunscreen. Attitudes regarding healthiness of a tan also decreased significantly. Conclusions Brief, standardized sun protection education can be efficiently interwoven into existing school curricula, and result in improvements in knowledge and positive intentions for sun protection. PMID:14613488

  15. [Protect employability: effects of prevention programs offered by the german pension scheme].

    PubMed

    Kittel, J; Fröhlich, S M; Heilmeyer, P; Olbrich, D; Karoff, M; Greitemann, B

    2014-08-01

    A pilot study was carried out in 4 medical rehabilitation centers to examine the practicability and effectiveness of preventive life-style interventions for employees with risk factors. The programs were developed in cooperation with the German pension scheme and employers. Selection criteria were risk factors as lack of physical activity, overweight, dorsal pain or job strain. The results demonstrate that preventive programs, which are conducted in addition to the normal working hours on the job, can be implemented successfully in rehabilitation units. The participation in the multimodal prevention program goes along with a stable reduction of risky health behavior: increased physical activity, stress coping, dietary change und weight reduction. The healthier life-style is reflected in an enhanced state of health and has also positive impact on the occupational field scale: The percentage of employees who believed to be able to work until their old-age pension, could be increased significantly (p<0.001) from 47% to 74%. Work-related risk behaviors like excessive demands on oneself were reduced and protective strategies were -developed. PMID:24399282

  16. 1995 Annual wildlife survey report. Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-04-25

    This report summarizes the results of wildlife surveys performed at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) from January through December of 1995 as compared with results from previous years. These surveys were performed as part of a long-term ecological monitoring program conducted under the Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program (NRPCP). This program is essential in identifying and describing fluctuations of wildlife populations, wildlife habitat use, and changes in species using RFETS. The NRPCP provides support to the Department of Energy (DOE) in its role as Natural Resource Trustee, and provides data essential to accomplishing the goal of preserving the unique ecological values of RFETS in keeping with the Rocky Flats Vision presented in the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement Public Comment Draft. Wildlife population densities vary due to natural pressures and human influences, and only long-term monitoring can verify which factors influencing wildlife populations are the consequence of natural fluctuations, and which are due to human influences. The wildlife monitoring described in this report provides qualitative data that give an indication of the ecological health of RFETS. Monitoring numbers, habitat affinities, and apparent health of the wildlife populations makes it possible to evaluate the overall ecological health of the site. Monitoring and surveys such as those carried out by the NRPCP can indicate trends of this sort, and act as an {open_quotes}early warning system{close_quotes} for impending ecological problems.

  17. Potential lung cancer risk from indoor radon exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, N.H.; Harley, J.H. (New York Univ. Medical Center, NY (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The contribution of radon daughter exposure to excess lung cancer in underground miners is universally accepted. These miners received exposures from tens to thousands of WLM in a relatively few years. Although the miners were also exposed to other noxious agents in mines, the appearance of the excess lung cancer mortality in several types of mines and the increase with increasing exposure provide convincing evidence of the role of radon as the carcinogen. It is conceivable that exposures to radon at an average concentration of one to two pCi/liter, the levels for a majority of homes, might not produce excess lung cancers. This would require that a lifetime exposure at low concentrations produce a different response from that of a few years at higher levels for the miners. This is unlikely but not impossible. The current environmental epidemiology is of varying quality. The better studies may give some answers in a few years. These studies are more likely to establish an upper limit of risk than to provide an exposure-response model. Present risk estimates cannot be used accurately in estimating the overall lung cancer risk to the US population, since there are no good data on average exposure and exposure distribution. For example, the number of homes above the EPA guideline of four pCi/liter may range from two million to 10 million. An estimate of the actual radon exposure in the US may be forthcoming from a planned EPA survey, but these data will not be available for a few years. In the conservative tradition of radiation protection, indoor radon exposures in homes are estimated to produce a number of excess lung cancers in the population.22 references.

  18. A Study of a Radon Gas Scrubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoyi; Schmitz, Andrew; Guiseppe, Vincente; Mei, Dongming

    2011-04-01

    Radon gas and its progeny are critical source of background for low background experimental devices. The required reduction of radon levels in air of the experimental area can typically be achieved with a radon scrubbing system. Various designs and techniques are commonly adopted in building a radon scrubber. For testing purpose, a single column system has been built at USD to study the radon-adsorption properties of activated charcoal. In this paper, we will demonstrate the working principle and test results. This work is supported by the NSF Grant PHY-0758120.

  19. Simulation of Radon Transport in Geothermal Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Semprini, Lewis; Kruger, Paul

    1983-12-15

    Numerical simulation of radon transport is a useful adjunct in the study of radon as an in situ tracer of hydrodynamic and thermodynamic numerical model has been developed to assist in the interpretation of field experiments. The model simulates transient response of radon concentration in wellhead geofluid as a function of prevailing reservoir conditions. The radon simulation model has been used to simulate radon concentration response during production drawdown and two flowrate transient tests in vapor-dominated systems. Comparison of model simulation with experimental data from field tests provides insight in the analysis of reservoir phenomena such as propagation of boiling fronts, and estimates of reservoir properties of porosity and permeability thickness.

  20. EERF (Eastern Environmental Radiation Facility) standard operating procedures for radon-222 measurement using charcoal canisters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, D.J.; Windham, S.T.

    1987-06-01

    This report describes in detail EPA's office of Radiation Programs Eastern Environmental Radiation Facility's standard operating procedures for radon-222 measurement using charcoal canisters. It lists the materials and equipment that are used and explains their laboratory and survey methods.

  1. The use of track registration detectors to reconstruct contemporary and historical airborne radon ( 222RN) and radon progeny concentrations for radon-lung cancer epidemiologic study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. J. Steck; R. W. Field

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies that investigate the relationship between radon and lung cancer require accurate estimates for the long-term average concentrations of radon progeny in dwellings. Year-to-year and home-to-home variations of radon in domestic environments pose serious difficulties for reconstructing an individual's long-term radon-related exposure. The use of contemporary radon gas concentrations as a surrogate for radon-related dose introduces additional uncertainty in

  2. Validation of NASA Thermal Ice Protection Computer Codes. Part 1; Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Dean; Bond, Thomas; Sheldon, David; Wright, William; Langhals, Tammy; Al-Khalil, Kamel; Broughton, Howard

    1996-01-01

    The Icing Technology Branch at NASA Lewis has been involved in an effort to validate two thermal ice protection codes developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center. LEWICE/Thermal (electrothermal deicing & anti-icing), and ANTICE (hot-gas & electrothermal anti-icing). The Thermal Code Validation effort was designated as a priority during a 1994 'peer review' of the NASA Lewis Icing program, and was implemented as a cooperative effort with industry. During April 1996, the first of a series of experimental validation tests was conducted in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel(IRT). The purpose of the April 96 test was to validate the electrothermal predictive capabilities of both LEWICE/Thermal, and ANTICE. A heavily instrumented test article was designed and fabricated for this test, with the capability of simulating electrothermal de-icing and anti-icing modes of operation. Thermal measurements were then obtained over a range of test conditions, for comparison with analytical predictions. This paper will present an overview of the test, including a detailed description of: (1) the validation process; (2) test article design; (3) test matrix development; and (4) test procedures. Selected experimental results will be presented for de-icing and anti-icing modes of operation. Finally, the status of the validation effort at this point will be summarized. Detailed comparisons between analytical predictions and experimental results are contained in the following two papers: 'Validation of NASA Thermal Ice Protection Computer Codes: Part 2- The Validation of LEWICE/Thermal' and 'Validation of NASA Thermal Ice Protection Computer Codes: Part 3-The Validation of ANTICE'

  3. Reassessment of the NRC`s program for protecting allegers against retaliation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    On July 6, 1993, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) Executive Director for Operations established a review team to reassess the NRC`s program for protecting allegers against retaliation. The team evaluated the current system, and solicited comments from various NRC offices, other Federal agencies, licensees, former allegers, and the public. This report is subject to agency review. The report summarizes current processes and gives an overview of current problems. It discusses: (1) ways in which licensees can promote a quality-conscious work environment, in which all employees feel free to raise concerns without fear of retaliation; (2) ways to improve the NRC`s overall handling of allegations; (3) the NRC`s involvement in the Department of Labor process; (4) related NRC enforcement practices; and (5) methods other than investigation and enforcement that may be useful in treating allegations of potential or actual discrimination. Recommendations are given in each area.

  4. Assessing the quality of VA Human Research Protection Programs: VA vs. affiliated University Institutional Review Board.

    PubMed

    Tsan, Min-Fu; Nguyen, Yen; Brooks, Robert

    2013-04-01

    We compared the Human Research Protection Program (HRPP) quality indicator data of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities using their own VA institutional review boards (IRBs) with those using affiliated university IRBs. From a total of 25 performance metrics, 13 did not demonstrate statistically significant differences, while 12 reached statistically significance differences. Among the 12 with statistically significant differences, facilities using their own VA IRBs performed better on four of the metrics, while facilities using affiliate IRBs performed better on eight. However, the absolute difference was small (0.2-2.7%) in all instances, suggesting that they were of no practical significance. We conclude that it is acceptable for facilities to use their own VA IRBs or affiliated university IRBs as their IRBs of record. PMID:23651939

  5. Blinded Anonymization: a method for evaluating cancer prevention programs under restrictive data protection regulations.

    PubMed

    Bartholomäus, Sebastian; Hense, Hans Werner; Heidinger, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating cancer prevention programs requires collecting and linking data on a case specific level from multiple sources of the healthcare system. Therefore, one has to comply with data protection regulations which are restrictive in Germany and will likely become stricter in Europe in general. To facilitate the mortality evaluation of the German mammography screening program, with more than 10 Million eligible women, we developed a method that does not require written individual consent and is compliant to existing privacy regulations. Our setup is composed of different data owners, a data collection center (DCC) and an evaluation center (EC). Each data owner uses a dedicated software that preprocesses plain-text personal identifiers (IDAT) and plaintext evaluation data (EDAT) in such a way that only irreversibly encrypted record assignment numbers (RAN) and pre-aggregated, reversibly encrypted EDAT are transmitted to the DCC. The DCC uses the RANs to perform a probabilistic record linkage which is based on an established and evaluated algorithm. For potentially identifying attributes within the EDAT ('quasi-identifiers'), we developed a novel process, named 'blinded anonymization'. It allows selecting a specific generalization from the pre-processed and encrypted attribute aggregations, to create a new data set with assured k-anonymity, without using any plain-text information. The anonymized data is transferred to the EC where the EDAT is decrypted and used for evaluation. Our concept was approved by German data protection authorities. We implemented a prototype and tested it with more than 1.5 Million simulated records, containing realistically distributed IDAT. The core processes worked well with regard to performance parameters. We created different generalizations and calculated the respective suppression rates. We discuss modalities, implications and limitations for large data sets in the cancer registry domain, as well as approaches for further improvements like l-diversity and automatic computation of 'optimal' generalizations. PMID:25991179

  6. Automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor

    DOEpatents

    Langner, G.H. Jr.

    1993-01-12

    An automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor is provided which includes a housing having an aperture allowing radon entry, and a filter that excludes the entry of radon daughters into the housing. A flexible track registration material is located within the housing that records alpha-particle emissions from the decay of radon and radon daughters inside the housing. The flexible track registration material is capable of being spliced such that the registration material from a plurality of monitors can be spliced into a single strip to facilitate automatic processing of the registration material from the plurality of monitors. A process for the automatic counting of radon registered by a radon monitor is also provided.

  7. New Methods of Energy Efficient Radon Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, W.J.; Prill, R.J.; Wooley, J.; Bonnefous, Y.C.; Gadgil, A.J.; Riley, W.J.

    1994-05-01

    Two new radon mitigation techniques are introduced and their evaluation in a field study complemented by numerical model predictions is described. Based on numerical predictions, installation of a sub gravel membrane at the study site resulted in a factor of two reduction in indoor radon concentrations. Experimental data indicated that installation of 'short-circuit' pipes extending between the subslab gravel and outdoors, caused an additional factor of two decrease in the radon concentration. Consequently, the combination of these two passive radon mitigation features, called the membrane and short-circuit (MASC) technique, was associated with a factor of four reduction in indoor radon concentration. The energy-efficient active radon mitigation method, called efficient active subslab pressurization (EASP), required only 20% of the fan energy of conventional active subslab depressurization and reduced the indoor radon concentration by approximately a factor of 15, including the numerically-predicted impact of the sub-gravel membrane.

  8. Radon and remedial action in Spokane River Valley residences: an interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Turk, B.H.; Prill, R.J.; Fisk, W.J.; Grimsrud, D.T.; Moed, B.A.; Sextro, R.G.

    1986-03-01

    Fifty-six percent of 46 residences monitored in the Spokane River Valley in eastern Washington/northern Idaho have indoor radon concentrations above the National Council for Radiation Protection (NCRP) guidelines of 8 pCi/1. Indoor levels were over 20 pCi/1 in eight homes, and ranged up to 132 pCi/1 in one house. Radon concentrations declined by factors of 4 to 38 during summer months. Measurements of soil emanation rates, domestic water supply concentrations, and building material flux rates indicate that diffusion of radon does not significantly contribute to the high concentrations observed. Rather, radon entry is dominated by pressure-driven bulk soil gas transport, aggravated by the local subsurface soil composition and structure. A variety of radon control strategies are being evaluated in 14 of these homes. Sub-surface ventilation by depressurization and overpressurization, basement overpressurization, and crawlspace ventilation are capable of successfully reducing radon levels below 5 pCi/1 in these homes. House ventilation is appropriate in buildings with low-moderate concentrations, while sealing of cracks has been relatively ineffective.

  9. 'Radon Concentration Survey in Inner Rooms from Deputy Chamber and National Congress-Brasilia/DF'

    SciTech Connect

    Nicoli, Ieda Gomes [Escritorio de Brasilia-CNEN Quadra 4 Bl. B Sala 1002 A Setor Comercial Norte CEP 70714-900 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Cardozo, Katia Maria [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear-CNEN Rua Helio de Almeida, 75--Cidade Universitaria-Ilha do Fundao CEP 21941-906-Caixa Postal 68550 Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil); Azevedo Gouvea, Vandir de [Divisao de Materias Primas e Minerais-DIMAP-CNEN Rua General Severiano, 90-Botafogo CEP 22290-901 Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil)

    2008-08-07

    Radon gas has been monitored in many environments such as rural and urban houses, high natural radioactivity areas and underground mining regions. Nevertheless few data are reported in literature about studies in state buildings. So we get in touch with these buildings managers, where work the Deputy Chamber and the National Congress in Brasilia--DF, in order to obtain radon data in these state buildings, so representative for brazilian people. In order to make a preliminary scanning of radon concentration in these buildings, it was put in selected points, radon nuclear track passive detectors type SSNTD, specifically polycarbonate Lexan, which were exposed for periods from two to five months. Afterwards they were sent to Nuclear Engineering Institute in Rio de Janeiro for analysis of {sup 222}Rn contents. Derived values, whose average value was about 73 Bq/m{sup 3}, were all under maximum permissible limits for radon 200 Bq/m{sup 3}, established by International Comission on Radiological Protection--ICRP 65, for inner environments of houses and state buildings. This work has been coordinated by CNEN Office in Braselia with effective participation of Nuclear Engineering Institute from CNEN--RJ, that has worked since beginning of april 2004, supplying and analysing radon detectors.

  10. Ecological impact in ditch mesocosms of simulated spray drift from a crop protection program for potatoes.

    PubMed

    Arts, Gertie H P; Buijse-Bogdan, Laura L; Belgers, J Dick M; van Rhenen-Kersten, Caroline H; van Wijngaarden, Rene P A; Roessink, Ivo; Maund, Steve J; van den Brink, Paul J; Brockt, Theo C M

    2006-04-01

    Outdoor aquatic ditch mesocosms were treated with a range of pesticides to simulate various spray drift rates resulting from a typical crop protection program used in the cultivation of potatoes in The Netherlands. The main experimental aims of the present study were to provide information on the fate and ecological effects of drift of the pesticides into surface water and to evaluate the effectiveness of drift-reduction measures in mitigating risks. The pesticides selected and the dosage, frequency, and timing of application were based on normal agricultural practices in the potato crop. Applications of prosulfocarb, metribuzin (both herbicides), lambda-cyhalothrin (insecticide), chlorothalonil, and fluazinam (both fungicides) were made in the sequence typical of the spray calendar for potatoes. A total of 15 treatments with the various compounds were made by spray application to the water surface at 0.2%, 1%, and 5% of the recommended label rates. Chemical fate and effects on ecosystem function and structure (phytoplankton, zooplankton, chlorophyll-a, macroinvertebrates, macrophytes, breakdown of plant litter) were investigated. To interpret the observed effects, treatment concentrations were also expressed in toxic units (TU), which describe the relative toxicity of the compounds with standard toxicity test organisms (Daphnia and algae). After treatment, each compound disappeared from the water phase within 2 d, with the exception of prosulfocarb, for which 50% dissipation time (DT50) values ranged between 6 and 7 d. At the 5% treatment level, an exposure peak of 0.9 TUalgae was observed, which resulted in short-term responses of pH, oxygen, and phytoplankton. At the 5% treatment level, exposure concentrations also exceeded 0.1 TUDaphnia, and this resulted in long-term effects on zooplankton and macroinvertebrates, some of which did not fully recover by the end of the present study. At the 1% treatment level, only slight transient effects were observed on a limited number of zooplankton and macro-invertebrate species and on pH. At the 0.2% level, no consistent treatment-related effects were observed. Most of the observed effects were consistent with the results from higher-tier and mesocosm studies with the individual compounds. Multi and repeated stress played a small role within the applied pesticide package, because of rapid dissipation of most substances and the absence of many simultaneous applications. This suggests that risk assessments based on the individual compounds would in this case have been sufficiently protective for their uses in a crop protection program. PMID:16646380

  11. The Infrastructure Necessary to Support a Sustainable Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Program in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Bachner, Katherine M.; Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2011-07-20

    The NNSA Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC&A) program has been engaged for fifteen years in upgrading the security of nuclear materials in Russia. Part of the effort has been to establish the conditions necessary to ensure the long-term sustainability of nuclear security. A sustainable program of nuclear security requires the creation of an indigenous infrastructure, starting with sustained high level government commitment. This includes organizational development, training, maintenance, regulations, inspections, and a strong nuclear security culture. The provision of modern physical protection, control, and accounting equipment to the Russian Federation alone is not sufficient. Comprehensive infrastructure projects support the Russian Federation's ability to maintain the risk reduction achieved through upgrades to the equipment. To illustrate the contributions to security, and challenges of implementation, this paper discusses the history and next steps for an indigenous Tamper Indication Device (TID) program, and a Radiation Portal Monitoring (RPM) program.

  12. Indoor radon concentration data: Its geographic and geologic distribution, an example from the Capital District, NY

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.J. [Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY (United States); Overeynder, H.M. [C.E.S., Gabon (Central African Republic); Thomas, B.R. [CMT Independent Laboratories, Clifton Park, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Most studies of the geographic distribution of indoor radon levels are plotted by county or ZIP code. This method is used for the radon potential maps produced by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH). The basis for the mapping is the mean or median indoor radon count for all the data provided by NYSDOH within each geographic area. While testing the indoor radon analyses provided to the authors by CMT Independent Laboratories, we discovered data that deviated markedly from the EPA and NYSDOH means for the Capital District of New York (Albany and surrounding counties). Their screening indoor radon average concentrations in pCi/L, indicate low potential for Schenectady (3.0), Saratoga (3.2), and Albany (3.7) counties; and moderate potential for Rensselaer (6.4) and Columbia (7.0) counties. Our database of over 3,000 analyses contains over 800 records of indoor radon counts above 4 pCi/L (14-47% of each county`s analyses), many high enough to be rated as a serious health hazard. In order to obtain greater precision of information, the authors plotted their indoor radon data by street address using MapInfo, a geographic Information System (GIS), and StreetInfo, MapInfo`s TIGER address database. We compared the geographic distribution of our data to both the Bedrock Geology and Surficial Geology Maps of New York State. The results show a striking relationship of radon concentrations to bedrock, faults and permeability of surficial material. Data being compiled and mapped by street address by the NYSDOH in Erie County in western New York, confirm our results.

  13. Radon mitigation survey among New York State residents living in high radon homes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Ju, C.; Stark, A.D.; Teresi, N.

    1999-10-01

    In order to evaluate the effectiveness of New York State Department of Health's efforts to increase public awareness about radon risk and to promote radon testing and mitigation in compliance with EPA's guideline, a statewide radon mitigation survey was conducted between September 1995 and January 1996 among New York State residents whose homes had radon levels equal to or greater than 148 Bq m{sup {minus}3} on the first floor (or above) living areas. The survey found that about 60% of 1,113 participants had taken actions for radon mitigation. The percentage of respondents who took actions to reduce radon levels in their homes increased with increasing education level as well as household income level. The method of installing a powered system to provide more ventilation was a more effective mitigation method than opening windows/doors or sealing cracks/openings in the basement. Mitigation performed by contractors was more effective in reducing radon levels than mitigation performed by residents. The reasons for performing radon mitigation given by the majority of respondents were those strongly related to radon health risk. High home radon level was an important motivational factor to stimulate radon mitigation. On the other hand, the cost of radon mitigation was a major barrier in decision making for performing radon mitigation and for selecting mitigation measures.

  14. 40 CFR 195.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS RADON PROFICIENCY PROGRAMS General Provisions...for each location from which it provides radon measurement services. After the application...component, or system designed to measure radon gas or radon decay products. EPA...

  15. 40 CFR 195.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS RADON PROFICIENCY PROGRAMS General Provisions...for each location from which it provides radon measurement services. After the application...component, or system designed to measure radon gas or radon decay products. EPA...

  16. 40 CFR 195.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS RADON PROFICIENCY PROGRAMS General Provisions...for each location from which it provides radon measurement services. After the application...component, or system designed to measure radon gas or radon decay products. EPA...

  17. 40 CFR 195.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS RADON PROFICIENCY PROGRAMS General Provisions...for each location from which it provides radon measurement services. After the application...component, or system designed to measure radon gas or radon decay products. EPA...

  18. A developmental package of interactive software for illustrating power-system protection principles in educational and industry training program

    SciTech Connect

    Smolleck, H.A.; Chen, H.; Badruzzaman, S. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering] [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Bravo, R.; Pardave, D. [Los Angeles Dept. of Water and Power, CA (United States)] [Los Angeles Dept. of Water and Power, CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    This paper describes the philosophy, development and use of a series of microcomputer-based software packages which assist in the analysis and demonstration of some fundamental concepts associated with power system protection and related areas. These easily-used, interactive programs employ extended screen color graphics capabilities to demonstrate fundamentals of steady-state synchronous-machine behavior, instrument transformers, time-overcurrent relay operation, directional relaying, percentage differential protection of a generator, and distance relaying. They include the display of instructions and tutorials, parameter values and numerical results, phasor diagrams, one-line diagrams, circuit diagrams, and device animation as appropriate. The software described here is representative of what the authors envision to ultimately form a very comprehensive but expandable set of training modules for the power-system protection area. The modules are applicable to both academic power programs and industry training efforts.

  19. Data and Metadata Reporting Standards for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's PM Supersites Research Program1

    E-print Network

    existing data standards and practices. Overall, the standards are getting good acceptance fromData and Metadata Reporting Standards for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's PM Supersites Program needs consistency of metadata and data structures to facilitate information sharing among

  20. WHAT IS IT? Title IX protects people from sex discrimination in educational programs and activities at institutions that receive federal

    E-print Network

    Meyers, Steven D.

    TITLE IX WHAT IS IT? Title IX protects people from sex discrimination in educational programs to providing an environment free from sex discrimination, including sexual harassment and sexual battery. (See USF System Policy 0-004 Sexual Misconduct/Sex Harassment) WHO ARE USF'S TITLE IX COORDINATORS? Interim

  1. WHAT IS IT? Title IX protects people from sex discrimination in educational programs and activities at institutions that receive federal

    E-print Network

    Meyers, Steven D.

    TITLE IX WHAT IS IT? Title IX protects people from sex discrimination in educational programs to providing an environment free from sex discrimination, including sexual harassment and sexual battery. (See USF System Policy 0-004 Sexual Misconduct/Sex Harassment) WHO ARE USF'S TITLE IX COORDINATORS? Title

  2. Experimental evaluation of EMTP-based current transformer models for protective relay transient study. [Electro Magnetic Transient Program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Kezunovic; Lj. Kojovic; A. Abur; C. W. Fromen; D. R. Sevcik; F. Phillips

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes an EPRI study of Current Transformer (CT) digital models intended for protective relay transient performance analysis. Experimental evaluation of CT models implemented using Electro Magnetic Transient Program (EMTP) was carried out. Two relaying CTs with 600\\/5 and 2000\\/5 ratios were used in the study. Experiments in a high power laboratory were performed to obtain transient responses. Simulation

  3. CDC's National Asthma Control Program CDC 24/7: Saving Lives. Protecting People from Health Threats. Saving Money Through Prevention.

    E-print Network

    CS229334-V CDC's National Asthma Control Program CDC 24/7: Saving Lives. Protecting People from. · Nearly 26 million people have asthma. · Asthma is linked to 3,388 deaths a year. · Asthma is the 3rd asthma than any other racial or ethnic group. · Asthma costs the United States an estimated $56 billion

  4. 40 CFR 61.203 - Radon monitoring and compliance procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Radon monitoring and compliance procedures. ...POLLUTANTS National Emission Standards for Radon Emissions From Phosphogypsum Stacks § 61.203 Radon monitoring and compliance...

  5. 40 CFR 61.203 - Radon monitoring and compliance procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Radon monitoring and compliance procedures. ...POLLUTANTS National Emission Standards for Radon Emissions From Phosphogypsum Stacks § 61.203 Radon monitoring and compliance...

  6. 40 CFR 61.203 - Radon monitoring and compliance procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Radon monitoring and compliance procedures. ...POLLUTANTS National Emission Standards for Radon Emissions From Phosphogypsum Stacks § 61.203 Radon monitoring and compliance...

  7. 40 CFR 61.203 - Radon monitoring and compliance procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Radon monitoring and compliance procedures. ...POLLUTANTS National Emission Standards for Radon Emissions From Phosphogypsum Stacks § 61.203 Radon monitoring and compliance...

  8. 40 CFR 61.203 - Radon monitoring and compliance procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Radon monitoring and compliance procedures. ...POLLUTANTS National Emission Standards for Radon Emissions From Phosphogypsum Stacks § 61.203 Radon monitoring and compliance...

  9. Radium and radon tracers in aquatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, S. B.

    2012-10-01

    Fourth International Ra-Rn Workshop;Narragansett, Rhode Island, 3-8 June 2012 Radium (Ra) and radon (Rn) are widely recognized as important geochemical tracers in the estimation of dispersion in aquatic environments, submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) to the coastal ocean, water mass residence times, and air-sea and water- sediment exchange. More than 50 scientists, including graduate students and early- career scientists from 10 countries, recently participated in a workshop on Ra and Rn in Narragansett, R. I. The workshop was hosted by the University of Rhode Island and sponsored by the U.S. National Science Foundation Chemical Oceanography Program, ORTEC, Eichrom, and Durridge Company. The workshop provided a forum for presentations and open discussions regarding the latest developments and new directions in the application and measurement of isotopes 223Ra, 224Ra, 226Ra, 228Ra, and 222Rn, as well as models used in the application of these tracers to a range of environmental problems.

  10. Radon/radon daughter environmental chamber located in the northwest end of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Radon/radon daughter environmental chamber located in the northwest end of building. VIEW LOOKING WEST - Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office, Building No. 32, 2597 B3/4 Road, Grand Junction, Mesa County, CO

  11. Spatial variation of residential radon concentrations: The Iowa radon lung cancer study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eileen L. Fisher; R. William Field; Brian J. Smith; Charles F. Lynch; Daniel J. Steck; John S. Neuberger

    1998-01-01

    Homeowners and researchers frequently estimate the radon concentrations in various areas of the home from a single radon measurement often performed in the home`s basement. This study describes the spatial variation of radon concentrations both between floors and between rooms on the same floor. The geometric mean basement and first floor radon concentrations for one-story homes were 13.8% and 9.0%

  12. RESIDENTIAL RADON RISK ASSESSMENT: HOW WELL IS IT WORKING IN A HIGH RADON REGION?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel J. Steck

    Three surveys of long-term indoor radon concentrations in Minnesota living spaces show that the state has many homes with elevated radon. A large random sample of Minnesota homes had a geometric mean of 3.5 pCi\\/L. Forty two percent had radon concentrations above 4pCi\\/L. A comparative study of short term and long term radon measurements in a subsample of these homes

  13. Establishing a lightning protection evaluation program for distribution and subtransmission lines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. W. Marshall; B. P. Angeli

    1996-01-01

    The level of lightning protection on transmission, subtransmission, and distribution lines can be effectively evaluated with the use of historical outage information, lightning ground flash density data, information obtained on field inspections, and EPRI's Lightning Protection Design Workstation. Comparisons can be made between various methods of lightning protection for a given line to obtain the most beneficial and cost effective

  14. Establishing a lightning protection evaluation program for distribution and subtransmission lines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. W. Marshall; B. P. Angeli

    1998-01-01

    Union Electric (UE) began a project in December 1994 to evaluate the performance of existing types of lightning protection, identify deficiencies, and recommend changes that will result in improved performance. UE employs two basic types of lightning protection-static wire and arresters. The authors discuss ground impedance, the National Lightning Detection Network, and the Lightning Protection Design Workstation (LPDW). The LPDW

  15. Supplemental Assessment of the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Using Monitoring and Remediation Optimization System Software

    SciTech Connect

    Elvado Environmental LLC; GSI Environmental LLC

    2009-01-01

    A supplemental quantitative assessment of the Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, TN was performed using the Monitoring and Remediation Optimization System (MAROS) software. This application was previously used as part of a similar quantitative assessment of the GWPP completed in December 2005, hereafter referenced as the 'baseline' MAROS assessment (BWXT Y-12 L.L.C. [BWXT] 2005). The MAROS software contains modules that apply statistical analysis techniques to an existing GWPP analytical database in conjunction with hydrogeologic factors, regulatory framework, and the location of potential receptors, to recommend an improved groundwater monitoring network and optimum sampling frequency for individual monitoring locations. The goal of this supplemental MAROS assessment of the Y-12 GWPP is to review and update monitoring network optimization recommendations resulting from the 2005 baseline report using data collected through December 2007. The supplemental MAROS assessment is based on the findings of the baseline MAROS assessment and includes only the groundwater sampling locations (wells and natural springs) currently granted 'Active' status in accordance with the Y-12 GWPP Monitoring Optimization Plan (MOP). The results of the baseline MAROS assessment provided technical rationale regarding the 'Active' status designations defined in the MOP (BWXT 2006). One objective of the current report is to provide a quantitative review of data collected from Active but infrequently sampled wells to confirm concentrations at these locations. This supplemental MAROS assessment does not include the extensive qualitative evaluations similar to those presented in the baseline report.

  16. The Japanese Radon and Thoron Reference Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Tokonami, Shinji; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Miyahara, Nobuyuki [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2008-08-07

    Passive detectors used for large-scale and long-term surveys are generally calibrated in a well-controlled environment such as a radon chamber. It has been also pointed out that some of them are sensitive to thoron. Thus it is necessary to check the thoron contribution to the detector response with the proposed or similar test before practical use. The NIRS accommodates radon/aerosol and thoron chambers for quality assurance and quality control of radon measurements. Thus both chambers work so well that they can supply us with the calibration technique and consequently, a good level of knowledge of the radon and thoron issue.

  17. Modeling of radon transport in unsaturated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuan; Thomas, Donald M.; Green, Richard E.

    1995-08-01

    This study applies a recently developed model, LEACHV, to simulate transport of radon through unsaturated soil and compares calculated soil radon activities against field-measured values. For volatile and gas phase transport, LEACHV is modified from LEACHP, a pesticide version of LEACHM, a well-documented one-dimensional model for water and chemical movement through unsaturated soil. LEACHV adds consideration of air temperature changes and air flow driven by barometric pressure change to the other soil variables currently used in LEACHP. It applies diurnal barometric pressure and air temperature changes to reflect more accurately the typical field conditions. Sensitivity analysis and simulated results have clearly demonstrated the relative importance of barometric pressure change, rainfall events, changes in water content, gas advection, and radon source term in radon transport process. Comparisons among simulated results illustrated that the importance of barometric pressure change and its pumping phenomenon produces both fluctuation in soil gas radon activities and an elevation of the long-term average radon activity in the shallow soil. Barometric pressure pumping was found to produce an effect on radon activity in shallow soils of an equal magnitude to the distributed source parameter. Comparison between measured and simulated soil radon activities showed that LEACHV can provide realistic estimates of radon activity concentration in the soil profile.

  18. 40 CFR 195.1 - Purpose and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS RADON PROFICIENCY PROGRAMS General Provisions...operating the following programs: The National Radon Measurement Proficiency (RMP) Program...component of the RMP Program, and the National Radon Contractor Proficiency (RCP)...

  19. 40 CFR 195.1 - Purpose and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS RADON PROFICIENCY PROGRAMS General Provisions...operating the following programs: The National Radon Measurement Proficiency (RMP) Program...component of the RMP Program, and the National Radon Contractor Proficiency (RCP)...

  20. 40 CFR 195.30 - Failure to remit fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS RADON PROFICIENCY PROGRAMS Fees § 195.30...participant's listing in the National Radon Measurement Proficiency program, individual...component of the RMP program, or the National Radon Contractor Proficiency program until...

  1. 40 CFR 195.20 - Fee payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS RADON PROFICIENCY PROGRAMS Fees § 195.20...is not a listed participant in EPA's radon proficiency programs on the effective...and the RCP Program shall be sent to: Radon Proficiency Programs User Fees,...

  2. 40 CFR 195.1 - Purpose and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS RADON PROFICIENCY PROGRAMS General Provisions...operating the following programs: The National Radon Measurement Proficiency (RMP) Program...component of the RMP Program, and the National Radon Contractor Proficiency (RCP)...

  3. 40 CFR 195.20 - Fee payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS RADON PROFICIENCY PROGRAMS Fees § 195.20...is not a listed participant in EPA's radon proficiency programs on the effective...and the RCP Program shall be sent to: Radon Proficiency Programs User Fees,...

  4. 40 CFR 195.30 - Failure to remit fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS RADON PROFICIENCY PROGRAMS Fees § 195.30...participant's listing in the National Radon Measurement Proficiency program, individual...component of the RMP program, or the National Radon Contractor Proficiency program until...

  5. 40 CFR 195.20 - Fee payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS RADON PROFICIENCY PROGRAMS Fees § 195.20...is not a listed participant in EPA's radon proficiency programs on the effective...and the RCP Program shall be sent to: Radon Proficiency Programs User Fees,...

  6. 40 CFR 195.30 - Failure to remit fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS RADON PROFICIENCY PROGRAMS Fees § 195.30...participant's listing in the National Radon Measurement Proficiency program, individual...component of the RMP program, or the National Radon Contractor Proficiency program until...

  7. 40 CFR 195.1 - Purpose and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS RADON PROFICIENCY PROGRAMS General Provisions...operating the following programs: The National Radon Measurement Proficiency (RMP) Program...component of the RMP Program, and the National Radon Contractor Proficiency (RCP)...

  8. 40 CFR 195.1 - Purpose and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS RADON PROFICIENCY PROGRAMS General Provisions...operating the following programs: The National Radon Measurement Proficiency (RMP) Program...component of the RMP Program, and the National Radon Contractor Proficiency (RCP)...

  9. 40 CFR 195.30 - Failure to remit fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS RADON PROFICIENCY PROGRAMS Fees § 195.30...participant's listing in the National Radon Measurement Proficiency program, individual...component of the RMP program, or the National Radon Contractor Proficiency program until...

  10. 40 CFR 195.20 - Fee payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS RADON PROFICIENCY PROGRAMS Fees § 195.20...is not a listed participant in EPA's radon proficiency programs on the effective...and the RCP Program shall be sent to: Radon Proficiency Programs User Fees,...

  11. 40 CFR 195.30 - Failure to remit fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS RADON PROFICIENCY PROGRAMS Fees § 195.30...participant's listing in the National Radon Measurement Proficiency program, individual...component of the RMP program, or the National Radon Contractor Proficiency program until...

  12. Identification of high radon areas with passive methods and geological assessments in some Italian regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossetti, Marta; Bartolomei, Paolo; Esposito, Massimo; Marrocchino, Elena; Vaccaro, Carmela

    2010-05-01

    Internationally the indoor radon exposition as health hazard is widely recognized; so in many countries specific laws and regulations and so-called radon - risk maps have been introduced. Few Italian Regions have started surveys for the identification of 'radon prone areas', with independent standards and protocols and this involves a bigger uncertainty on the definition of a national risk map failing guidelines. In the present work a standardized methodology for indoor radon measurements has been set up by U-Series Srl (Bologna), with attention to the development of a passive measurement technique (solid state nuclear track detectors) on large scale. The developed technique has been validated through an inter-laboratory comparison conducted by the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) in 2008 and repeated in 2009. An indoor radon monitoring survey has been conducted in all Italian Regions with the developed methodology and 5425 measurements have been elaborated to obtain the annual average radon concentration in regional scale and the relapse of seasonal fluctuations on radon concentrations were verified. For the survey, the detectors were installed in underground rooms in workplaces and the measurements were performed over one solar year. As a consequence of our developed methodology (measurements only in underground rooms), indoor radon concentrations resulted generally higher than the concentrations obtained in the National Survey; we estimated an annual mean radon concentration of 110 Bqm3 compared to 70 Bq/m3 obtained by the National Survey. Only for the Italian Regions with the largest number of sampling (Lombardia, with the case studies of Milano Province and Milano city, Emilia Romagna, Toscana, Puglia) the data obtained were georeferentiated and we elaborated these data using geostatistical technique in order to produce distribution maps of the annual average indoor radon concentration. We have integrated the elaborated maps with the geological knowledge of the high concentration macro-areas identified in this work in order to better determine them. This study has allowed to point out not negligible radon concentrations also in traditionally no-risk zone; moreover the application of the developed methodology will be useful to give advices in order to fill Italian legislation gaps or to draft urban development plans. In particular, the correlation between radon concentrations and some geological features has been proved in Lombardia and some hypothesis have been formulated to understand the geological origin of the radon source. The high radon concentrations in the North of the Region are related to the high uranium content in different rock types distributed in these areas. For the flat area in correspondence of the Milan Province and the city of Milan, traditionally considered a no-risk zone, we have done some hypothesis of correlation between radon and the geochemical processes occurred in this area and soil permeability and fracturation by means of the existing geological sections. The application of the developed methodology will be useful to give advices to fill legislation gaps or to draft urban development plans.

  13. Measurement of Indoor Radon-222 and Radon-220 Concentrations in Central Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Mitsuaki; Shimo, Michikuni [Graduate School of Health Science, Fujita Health University 1-98, Dengakugakubo, Kutsukake, Tyoake, Aichi, 470-1192 (Japan); Tokonami, Shinji; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Takahashi, Hiromichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2008-08-07

    A passive-type radon/thoron detector was used for measuring indoor radon and thoron concentrations at 90 dwellings in Aichi and Gifu prefectures in central Japan during 90 days from December, 2006 to March, 2007. The radon and thoron concentrations were 21.1 Bq/m3 and 25.1 Bq/m3, respectively. The dose due to radon and thoron in dwellings was roughly evaluated as 0.7 mSv/y and 2.4 mSv/y, respectively. The examination of the geological factor and house condition having an effect on indoor radon concentration was performed.

  14. ARE RADON GAS MEASUREMENTS ADEQUATE FOR EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES AND CASE CONTROL

    E-print Network

    Yu, K.N.

    ARE RADON GAS MEASUREMENTS ADEQUATE FOR EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES AND CASE CONTROL STUDIES OF RADON 2004 The lung dose derived from radon is not attributed to the radon gas itself, but instead to its of the radon risk, the excess number of cancers are related to the radon gas exposure, and not to the radon

  15. Radon in homes of the Portland, Oregon Area: Radon data from local radon testing companies collected by CRM (Continuous Radon Measurement) machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, H.; Lindsey, K.; Linde, T.; Burns, S. F.

    2013-12-01

    Students from the Department of Geology at Portland State University paired up with the Oregon Health Authority to better understand radon gas values in homes of the Portland metropolitan area. This study focuses on radon values collected by continuous radon measurement (CRM) machines, taken by local radon testing companies. The local companies participating in this study include Alpha Environmental Services, Inc., Cascade Radon, Environmental Works, The House Detectives, LLC, and Soil Solutions Environmental Services, Inc. In total, 2491 radon readings spanning across 77 zip codes were collected from local companies in the Portland metropolitan area. The maximum value, average value, percentage of homes greater than 4 pCi/L and total rank sum was calculated and used to determine the overall radon potential for each zip code (Burns et al., 1998). A list and four maps were produced showing the results from each category. Out of the total records, 24 zip codes resulted in high radon potential and the average reading for the entire Portland Metropolitan area was 3.7 pCi/L. High potential zip codes are thought to be a result of sand and gravel (Missoula Flood deposits) and faults present in the subsurface. The CRM data was compared with both long-term and short-term data provided by the Oregon Health Authority to validate radon potentials in each zip code. If a home is located in a zip code with high or moderate radon potential across two types of data sets, it is recommended that those homes be tested for radon gas.

  16. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program CY 2009 Triennial Report Of The Monitoring Well Inspection And Maintenance Program, Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-06-01

    This document is the triennial report for the Well Inspection and Maintenance Program of the Y- 12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). This report formally documents well inspection events conducted on active and inactive wells at Y-12 during calendar years (CY) 2007 through 2009; it documents well maintenance and plugging and abandonment activities completed since the last triennial inspection event (CY 2006); and provides summary tables of well inspection events, well maintenance events, and well plugging and abandonment events during the reference time period.

  17. Rotor burst protection program: Statistics on aircraft gas turbine engine failures that occurred in commercial aviation during 1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delucia, R. A.; Mangano, G. J.

    1973-01-01

    A program to develop criteria for the design of devices that will be used on aircraft to protect passengers and the aircraft structure from the lethal and devastating fragments generated by the disintegration of a gas turbine engine rotor is discussed. Statistics on gas rotor turbine failures that have occurred in commercial aviation in 1971 are presented. It is shown that 124 rotor failures occurred and 35 of these were uncontained. This figure is considered significantly high to justify continuation of the development program.

  18. Determination of radon concentration in water using RAD7 with RAD H2O accessories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, M. F. I.; Rabaiee, N. A.; Jaafar, M. S.

    2015-04-01

    In the last decade, the radon issue has become one of the major problems of radiation protection. Radon exposure occurs when using water for showering, washing dishes, cooking and drinking water. RAD7 and Rad H20 accessories were used in order to measure radon concentration in water sample. In this study, four types of water were concerns which are reverse osmosis (drinking water), mineral water, tap water and well water. Reverse osmosis (drinking water) and mineral water were bought from the nearest supermarket while tap water and well water were taken from selected areas of Pulau Pinang and Kedah. Total 20 samples were taken with 5 samples for each type of water. The measured radon concentration ranged from 2.9±2.9 to 79.5±17 pCi/L, 2.9±2.9 to 67.8±16 pCi/L, 15.97±7 to 144.25±24 pCi/L and 374.89±37 to 6409.03±130 pCi/L in reverse osmosis (drinking water), mineral water, tap water and well water. Well water has the highest radon compared to others. It was due to their geological element such as granite. Results for all types of water are presented and compared with maximum contamination limit (MCL) recommended by United State Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) which is 300pCi/L. Reverse osmosis water, mineral water and tap water were fall below MCL. However, well water was exceeded maximum level that was recommended. Thus, these findings were suggested that an action should be taken to reduce radon concentration level in well water as well as reduce a health risk towards the public.

  19. RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION CODE IMPACTS ON RADON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses residential construction code impacts on radon. It references existing residential construction codes that pertain to the elements of construction that impact either the ability to seal radon out of houses or the ability to achieve good soil ventilation for ra...

  20. Measurements of radon around closed uranium mines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sadaaki Furuta; Kimio Ito; Yuu Ishimori

    2002-01-01

    There are several waste rock yards at closed uranium mines around Ningyo-toge, in the Western Honshu Island of Japan, and measurements of radon were carried out by both the passive method and the sampling method around these yards. As comparatively high radon concentrations were observed in two districts through routine measurements, more detailed measurements were made by the passive method

  1. Latest views of the sparse Radon transform

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Trad; Tadeusz Ulrych; Mauricio Sacchi

    2003-01-01

    The Radon transform (RT) suffers from the typical problems of loss of resolution and aliasing that arise as a consequence of incomplete information, including limited aperture and discretization. Sparseness in the Radon domain is a valid and useful criterion for sup- plying this missing information, equivalent somehow to assuming smooth amplitude variation in the transition between known and unknown (missing)

  2. Image Representation Via a Finite Radon Transform

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frantisek Matús; Jan Flusser

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a model of finite Radon transforms composed of Radonprojections. The model generalizes to finite groups projections in the classical Radontransform theory. The Radon projector averages a function on a group over cosets ofa subgroup. Reconstruction formulae formally similar to the convolved backprojectionones are derived and an iterative reconstruction technique is found to converge after finitenumber of steps.

  3. Hough Transform from the Radon Transform

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stanley R. Deans

    1981-01-01

    An appropriate special case of a transform developed by J. Radon in 1917 is shown to have the major properties of the Hough transform which is useful for finding line segments in digital pictures. Such an observation may be useful in further efforts to generalize the Hough transform. Techniques for applying the Radon transform to lines and pixels are developed

  4. Radon earthquake precursor: A short review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woith, H.

    2015-05-01

    More than 100 publications reporting radon anomalies to precede earthquakes were evaluated. A clear apparent negative correlation between the number of reported anomalies and the published length of the timeseries is evident. 19% of all timeseries are longer than 5 years, characterized by a precursor rate of less than one precursor per year, the extreme case being 1 anomaly in 18 years of monitoring. Contrary, precursor rates between 1 and more than 10 precursors per year stem from published timeseries shorter than 3 years. Nearly 50% of the timeseries contain exactly one radon anomaly, independent of the length of the observation interval. Generally, the number of anomalies is about 5 times higher at sites where radon is measured in soil air as compared to radon in groundwater. In conclusion: (i) significant radon anomalies exist, and (ii) seismo-tectonically induced radon anomalies probably exist. But, radon anomalies of non-tectonic origin also exist and may look strikingly similar to tectonic ones. Thus, presumably only a fraction of all reported radon precursors are real in the sense that they are physically related to the preparation process of an impending earthquake.

  5. Injectivity of Rotation Invariant Windowed Radon Transforms

    E-print Network

    Biermé, Hermine

    , with a lot of applications in medicine, optics, physics and other areas. It is well known that one can by the injectivity of the windowed Radon transform for spectral densities, which satisfy adapted integrability condi (for instance in the case of attenuated Radon Transforms in the so-called Emission Tomography [2

  6. A FAST AND ACCURATE MULTILEVEL INVERSION OF THE RADON TRANSFORM

    E-print Network

    A FAST AND ACCURATE MULTILEVEL INVERSION OF THE RADON TRANSFORM ACHI BRANDT, JORDAN MANN, MATVEI its Radon pro- jection using the convolution backprojection method. The convolution is an O(N2 log N of the classical backprojection technique. Key words. Radon transform, inversion of the Radon transform, computed

  7. Hidden Hazards of Radon: Scanning the Country for Problem Locations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gundersen, Linda C. S.

    1992-01-01

    Describes the geology of the radon problem in the United States and suggests how homeowners can cope with the radio active gas. Vignettes illustrate how and where radon is produced beneath the earth's surface, testing sites and procedures for radon in houses, and locations for potential radon problems across the United States. (MCO)

  8. When tensor products of AC charges and Radon

    E-print Network

    Buczolich, Zoltán

    When tensor products of AC #3; charges and Radon measures are AC #3; charges Zolt#19;an Buczolich and Radon measures. We show that if F is a charge in R m which is AC#3; in a locally BV set E and #22; is an absolutely continuous Radon measure on R n with locally bounded Radon-Nikodym derivative then the charge F

  9. RADON TRANSFORM ON THE TORUS AHMED ABOUELAZ AND FRANOIS ROUVIRE

    E-print Network

    Rouvière, François

    RADON TRANSFORM ON THE TORUS AHMED ABOUELAZ AND FRANÇOIS ROUVIÈRE Abstract. We consider the Radon-Ricci spaces etc. We consider here the n-dimensional (at) torus Tn = Rn=Zn and the Radon transform de will thus enter the picture, as in the case of Radon transforms on Zn already studied by the ...rst author

  10. POST-MITIGATION RADON CONCENTRATIONS IN MINNESOTA HOMES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel J. Steck

    Real radon risk reduction requires that mitigation systems maintain low radon concentrations for years. In most states, the actual radon reductions are not known since systematic or representative sampling of post mitigation radon is not routinely done or archived. Uncertainty about the accuracy of post-mitigation screening tests, aging effects on system performance and follow-up testing maintenance plague calculations of the

  11. Indoor radon e xposure uncertainties caused by temporal variation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. J. Steck; J. A. Capistrant; J. P. Dumm; E. S. Patton

    Radon is the primary source of radiat ion exposure for most people in the United States . Although radon concentrations are known to vary temporally, radon exposure estimates are often based on measurement periods as short as two days. We studied the temporal radon variation in 80 central North American homes for periods ranging from two days to one year.

  12. Small ion concentration in houses with enhanced radon concentration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Graeffe; J. Keskinen; M. Lehtimaeki

    1989-01-01

    The concentration of radon, small air ions, and aerosol particles were measured continuously in 16 Finnish dwellings. As expected, radon was found to be the major source for small ion generation in indoor air. A simple model for the relationship between ion concentration and radon concentration is tested. The parameters of the model are the ion production rate from radon

  13. U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S COMPUTATIONAL TOXCIOLOGY PROGRAM - METABOLISM AND METABONOMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mission of the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is to safeguard public health and the environment from adverse effects that may be caused by exposure to pollutants in the air, water, soil and food. Protecting human health and the environment carries with it the ch...

  14. MASTER HOME ENVIRONMENTALIST PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Master Home Environmentalist (MHE) program is an innovative approach to address issues of indoor pollution, such as molds and biological contaminants that cause allergies and asthma, dust, indoor air pollution (including asbestos, formaldehyde, radon, combustion sources, tob...

  15. Fast Approximate Matching of Programs for Protecting Libre\\/Open Source Software by Using Spatial Indexes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arnoldo José Müller Molina; Takeshi Shinohara

    2007-01-01

    To encourage open source\\/libre software development, it is desirable to have tools that can help to identify open source license violations. This paper describes the imple- mentation of a tool that matches open source programs embedded inside pirate programs. The problem of binary program matching can be approximated by analyzing the similarity of program fragments generated from low-level instructions. These

  16. Indoor radon risk potential of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimer, G.M.; Szarzi, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive evaluation of radon risk potential in the State of Hawaii indicates that the potential for Hawaii is low. Using a combination of factors including geology, soils, source-rock type, soil-gas radon concentrations, and indoor measurements throughout the state, a general model was developed that permits prediction for various regions in Hawaii. For the nearly 3,100 counties in the coterminous U.S., National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) aerorad data was the primary input factor. However, NURE aerorad data was not collected in Hawaii, therefore, this study used geology and soil type as the primary and secondary components of potential prediction. Although the radon potential of some Hawaiian soils suggests moderate risk, most houses are built above ground level and the radon soil potential is effectively decoupled from the house. Only underground facilities or those with closed or recirculating ventilation systems might have elevated radon potential. ?? 2005 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  17. Radon risk perception and testing: Sociodemographic correlates

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, M.T.; Warner, K.E. (Battelle Memorial Inst., Washington, DC (United States). Technology Assessment and Policy Research Center)

    1994-03-01

    While numerous health education campaigns have been carried out to alert the public to radon's potential dangers and to encourage testing and mitigation, there has been little follow-up to determine which segments of the public are now most aware of the possible hazards of radon. Using information from the 1990 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), the authors have examined beliefs regarding radon and radon-testing activities among different sociodemographic groups. They used logistic regression to determine the relationship between these beliefs and actions and age, gender, education, income, minority status, and smoking status. The results suggest relatively superficial knowledge regarding radon, and very little testing, within the survey population. In particular, significantly less knowledge was observed among female and minority respondents, while less testing behavior was seen among older respondents. Lower educational levels and lower family income were associated with both decreased knowledge and testing. Recommendations for future education campaigns are discussed.

  18. Indoor radon and lung cancer in China

    SciTech Connect

    Blot, W.J.; Xu, Z.Y.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Zhao, D.Z.; Stone, B.J.; Sun, J.; Jing, L.B.; Fraumeni, J.F. Jr. (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-06-20

    Radon has long been known to contribute to risk of lung cancer, especially in undergound miners who are exposed to large amounts of the carcinogen. Recently, however, lower amounts of radon present in living areas have been suggested as an important cause of lung cancer. In an effort to clarify the relationship of low amounts of radon with lung cancer risk, we placed alpha-track radon detectors in the homes of 308 women with newly diagnosed lung cancer and 356 randomly selected female control subjects of similar age. Measurements were taken after 1 year. All study participants were part of the general population of Shenyang, People's Republic of China, an industrial city in the northeast part of the country that has one of the world's highest rates of lung cancer in women. The median time of residence in the homes was 24 years. The median household radon level was 2.3 pCi/L of air; 20% of the levels were greater than 4 pCi/L. Radon levels tended to be higher in single-story houses or on the first floor of multiple-story dwellings, and they were also higher in houses with increased levels of indoor air pollution from coal-burning stoves. However, the levels were not higher in homes of women who developed lung cancer than in homes of controls, nor did lung cancer risk increase with increasing radon level. No association between radon and lung cancer was observed regardless of cigarette-smoking status, except for a nonsignificant trend among heavy smokers. No positive associations of lung cancer cell type with radon were observed, except for a nonsignificant excess risk of small cell cancers among the more heavily exposed residents. Our data suggest that projections from surveys of miners exposed to high radon levels may have overestimated the overall risks of lung cancer associated with levels typically seen in homes in this Chinese city.

  19. Effect of natural ventilation on radon and radon progeny levels in houses. Rept. for Apr 90Sep 91

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Cavallo; K. Gadsby; T. A. Reddy; R. Socolow

    1991-01-01

    The paper discusses the effect of natural ventilation on radon and radon progeny levels in houses. Contradicting the widely held assumption that ventilation is ineffective in reducing indoor radon concentrations, experiments in a research house have shown that the basement radon level can be reduced by a factor of 5 to 10 using only natural ventilation. Measurement of the outdoor-basement

  20. [Dynamics of radon decay product activity in saliva following therapeutic radon exposure].

    PubMed

    Falkenbach, A; Just, G; Kleinschmidt, J

    2000-08-01

    Radon decay product activity was measured in saliva of 10 male patients 20-30 min after a 1-hour radon exposure in the gallery of the Gasteiner Heilstollen (radon activity 36.2 kBq/m(3), radon progeny activity 20.3 kBq/m(3)). In 1 patient showing relatively high activity (75th percentile) measurements were continued until 65 min after exposure. Patients were asked to collect about 2 ml of saliva in the mouth and produce it on a filter. After drying the filter at 300 degrees C, radon progeny activity was measured. Activity (median) at 20-30 min after leaving the treatment area was 4.5 Bq (25th percentile 1 Bq; 75th percentile 21 Bq). In the patient who underwent additional measurements the activity showed a further increase up to 29 Bq (35 min after radon exposure) before it continuously decreased to a very low activity (1-3 Bq) at 65 min after exposure. The results show that a significantly increased radon decay product activity is found in saliva after speleotherapeutic radon exposure. Maximum values were observed 35 min after radon exposure. Radon decay product activity almost disappeared after about 1 h. PMID:11025392

  1. Indoor Radon Gas Management For Multi-Site Companies: How To Screen For Potentially High-Risk Sites By Studying The Local Geology

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggeri, Rudi; Gigliuto, Andrea; Minnei, Tiziana; Savini, Raffaella [ENSR Italia S.r.l., Via Francesco Ferrucci 17/A, 20145 Milano (Italy)

    2008-08-07

    In this article, ENSR presents an evaluation tool for Radon gas monitoring programs that companies with large portfolios of properties will find useful in reducing their efforts and expenditures. The World Health Organization (WHO) considers Radon gas the second cause of lung cancer and the first source of natural radiations affecting the human population. In Italy, Legal Decree No. 230 (0/17/95) is the laws that regulate gas Radon concentrations in work places. Hereunder we present the ENSR approach to executing preliminary geologic studies aimed at planning an instrumental monitoring program for companies.

  2. Radon release and dispersion from an open pit uranium mine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kisieleski

    1980-01-01

    Radon-222 flux from representative sections of the United Nuclear St. Anthony open-pit mine complex was measured. The collected radon was adsorbed on activated charcoal and the radon activity was measured by gamma spectroscopy. System design, calibration, and the procedure to determine radon flux density (pCi\\/m².s) are described. A continuous series of radon flux densities were measured over a 5-month period

  3. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program CY2012 Triennial Report Of The Monitoring Well Inspection And Maintenance Program Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This document is the triennial report for the Well Inspection and Maintenance Program of the Y- 12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). This report formally documents well inspections completed by the GWPP on active and inactive wells at Y-12 during calendar years (CY) 2010 through 2012. In addition, this report also documents well inspections performed under the Y-12 Water Resources Restoration Program, which is administered by URS|CH2M Oak Ridge (UCOR). This report documents well maintenance activities completed since the last triennial inspection event (CY 2009); and provides summary tables of well inspections and well maintenance activities during the reference time period.

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory Facilities, Security and Safeguards Division, Safeguards and Security Program Office, Protective Force Oversight Program

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-11-30

    The purpose of this document is to identify and describe the duties and responsibilities of Facility Security and Safeguards (FSS) Safeguards and Security (SS) organizations (groups/offices) with oversight functions over the Protection Force (PF) subcontractor. Responsible organizations will continue their present PF oversight functions under the Cost Plus Award Fee (CPAF) assessment, but now will be required to also coordinate, integrate, and interface with other FSS S and S organizations and with the PF subcontractor to measure performance, assess Department of Energy (DOE) compliance, reduce costs, and minimize duplication of effort. The role of the PF subcontractor is to provide the Laboratory with effective and efficient protective force services. PF services include providing protection for the special nuclear material, government property and classified or sensitive information developed and/or consigned to the Laboratory, as well as protection for personnel who work or participate in laboratory activities. FSS S and S oversight of both performance and compliance standards/metrics is essential for these PF objectives to be met.

  5. 76 FR 5186 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; Agency Information Collection Activities; Office of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ...Office of Infrastructure Protection (IP), will submit the following information...104-13, 44 U.S.C. Chapter 35). IP is soliciting comments concerning this New...information is required, contact DHS/NPPD/IP, Michael Beland, (703)...

  6. 77 FR 37060 - Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources (CIKR) Asset Protection Technical Assistance Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-20

    ...Office of Infrastructure Protection (IP), Infrastructure Information Collection...Request should be forwarded to DHS/NPPD/IP/IICD, 245 Murray Lane SW., Mailstop...CAPTAP) is offered jointly by the NPPD/IP and the Federal Emergency Management...

  7. Continuous hourly radon gradient observations at Cabauw, the Netherlands - a review of main features of the 2007-2009 dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahorowski, Wlodek; Vermeulen, Alex; Williams, Alastair; Chambers, Scott; Verheggen, Bart

    2010-05-01

    We report on results of the first three years of radon time series and radon gradient observations at the Cabauw site in the Netherlands (51.971oN, 4.927oE). Two 1500 L dual flow loop, two filter radon detectors with a sensitivity better than 40 mBq m-3 are installed at the site, ensuring that gradients can be defined to the required precision every hour. The inlets are mounted on the main meteorological tower at 20 m and 200 m above ground level. The Cabauw site, located 50 km inland on a polder in an agricultural region, has a simple orography with surface elevations changing by a few metres at most within a 20 km radius. The radon gradient observations are part of our larger program to characterise turbulent mixing processes throughout the lower atmosphere. The two other related measurement projects are the continuous hourly measurements of radon gradients in the surface layer on a 50 m tower at Lucas Heights, Australia (34.053°S, 150.981°E; see Chambers et al, this conference), and campaign-style measurements of radon profiles up to altitudes of 4000 m above ground level using light aircraft (see Williams et al., this conference). We observe well pronounced absolute radon and radon gradient signals at Cabauw, influenced by atmospheric processes occurring on seasonal, synoptic, and diurnal time scales. Seasonal variability. The lowest radon concentrations were observed in winter and summer, when the dominant air mass fetch was the Atlantic Ocean. In spring and autumn, concentrations were generally high, as the air mass fetch was primarily over western and/or central Europe. Even when the fetch was oceanic during the latter seasons, it was often over the North Sea where radon concentrations are perturbed by land emissions. In autumn, radon concentrations from the mainland European fetch were more than three times larger than the corresponding concentration from the Atlantic/North Sea regions. Synoptic variability. The radon signal is typically a combination of local and remote influences. Synoptic and diurnal components can be separated by comparing the radon signal at 20 m and 200 m, and by using wind speed as a selecting condition. For most of the data, the diurnal signal is strongly pronounced in the 20 m data, especially when wind speeds are lower than 3 ms-1. In low wind conditions, local influences dominate and the radon signal is predominantly a combination of local source variations and diurnal changes in the local mixing depth. On the other hand, under high wind conditions (> 7 ms-1) the remote signal dominates at both levels, reflecting variations in the radon source function over a wider fetch area, the geographic extent of which is defined by the radon half-life and prevailing wind conditions. The separation of these two signals provides an opportunity to compare subsets of radon time series and gradient observations with a column or regional model and thus evaluate mixing and transport schemes characteristic for the site and the region. Diurnal variability. Diurnal composite plots show that the 20 m signal is characterized by an early morning maximum and early afternoon minimum, predominantly reflecting changes in the boundary layer mixing depth on this time scale. The amplitude of this cycle ranged from 450 mBq m-3 in winter to 1460 mBq m-3 in spring. The 200 m Cabauw data exhibited a modest mid-morning maximum, consistent with upward mixing of radon from the surface as the nocturnal inversion breaks down.

  8. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: FIELD ANALYTICAL SCREENING PROGRAM: PCP METHOD - U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program evaluates new technologies to assess their effectiveness. This bulletin summarizes results from the 1993 SITE demonstration of the Field Analytical Screening Program (FASP) Pentachlorophenol (PCP) Method to determine P...

  9. IDENTIFYING HIGH RISK AREAS IN NEW YORK STATE: MAPPING INDOOR RADON DATA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles Kunz; Charles Schwenker; John Green; Michael Kitto; Charles Laymon

    A project is underway to map die indoor radon potential for New York State at the township level. Through a detector distribution program the New York State Department of Health has a database of over 36,000 basement screening measurements. The address field for the indoor measurement data is being linked to latitude and longitude coordinates using data files containing coordinate

  10. Aerosol microphysics of indoor radon. Final report, [March 1, 1987--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Marlow, W.H.

    1991-12-31

    To determine the potential impact of airborne radioactivity on human health, understanding is required of where in the aerosol size spectrum the radioactive daughter atoms of radon become located. Objective of this program is to contribute to the ability to account for airborne radioactivity associated with indoor aerosols via quantitative descriptions of the rates of interaction and growth for aerosol particles. Progress is reported in the following areas: aerosol electrical charging and radon daughter deposition, effects of SO{sub 2} on {sup 218}Po ion mobility spectrum, and aerosol and cluster coagulation.

  11. Exploratory study of the radiation-protection training programs in nuclear power plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1982-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine current radiation training programs at a sample of utilities operating nuclear reactors and to evaluate employee information on radiation health. The study addressed three elements: (1) employee perceptions and understanding of ionizing radiation; (2) utility trainers-their background, training, and problems; (3) the content, materials, and conduct of training programs; (4) program uniformity

  12. 42 CFR 457.810 - Premium assistance programs: Required protections against substitution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...children under premium assistance programs must not be greater than the...children under premium assistance programs to the cost of other CHIP...premium assisted coverage in the aggregate. (d) State evaluation...result of premium assistance programs and the effect of those...

  13. Health Effects of High Radon Environments in Central Europe: Another Test for the LNT Hypothesis?

    PubMed

    Becker, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    Among the various "natural laboratories" of high natural or technical enhanced natural radiation environments in the world such as Kerala (India), Brazil, Ramsar (Iran), etc., the areas in and around the Central European Ore Mountains (Erzgebirge) in the southern parts of former East Germany, but also including parts of Thuringia, northern Bohemia (now Czech Republic), and northeastern Bavaria, are still relatively little known internationally.Although this area played a central role in the history of radioactivity and radiation effects on humans over centuries, most of the valuable earlier results have not been published in English or quotable according to the current rules in the scientific literature and therefore are not generally known internationally. During the years 1945 to 1989, this area was one of the world's most important uranium mining areas, providing the former Soviet Union with 300,000 tons of uranium for its military programs. Most data related to health effects of radon and other carcinogenic agents on miners and residents became available only during the years after German reunification. Many of the studies are still unpublished, or more or less internal reports.By now, substantial studies have been performed on the previously unavailable data about the miners and the population, providing valuable insights that are, to a large degree, in disagreement with the opinion of various international bodies assuming an increase of lung cancer risk in the order of 10% for each 100 Bq/m(3) (or doubling for 1000 Bq/m(3)), even for small residential radon concentrations. At the same time, other studies focusing on never-smokers show little or no effects of residential radon exposures. Experiments in medical clinics using radon on a large scale as a therapeutic against various rheumatic and arthritic disease demonstrated in randomized double-blind studies the effectiveness of such treatments.The main purpose of this review is to critically examine, including some historical references, recent results primarily in three areas, namely the possible effects of the inhalation of very high radon concentrations on miners; the effect of increased residential radon concentrations on the population; and the therapeutic use of radon. With many of the results still evolving and/or under intense discussion among the experts, more evidence is emerging that radon, which has been inhaled at extremely high concentrations in the multimillion Bq/m(3) range by many of older miners (however, with substantial confounders, and large uncertainties in retrospective dosimetry), was perhaps an important but not the dominating factor for an increase in lung cancer rates. Other factors such as smoking, inhalation of quartz and mineral dust, arsenic, nitrous gases, etc. are likely to be more serious contributors to increased miner lung cancer rates. An extrapolation of miner data to indoor radon situations is not feasible.Concerning indoor radon studies, the by far dominating effect of smoking on the lung cancer incidence makes the results of some studies, apparently showing a positive dose-response relationship, questionable. According to recent studies in several countries, there are no, or beneficial, residential radon effects below about 600 to 1000 Bq/m(3) (the extensive studies in the U.S., in particular by B. Cohen, and the discussions about these data, will not be part of this review, because they have already been discussed in detail in the U.S. literature). As a cause of lung cancer, radon seems to rank - behind active and passive smoking, and probably also air pollution in densely populated and/or industrial areas (diesel exhaust soot, etc.) - as a minor contributor in cases of extremely high residential radon levels, combined with heavy smoking of the residents.As demonstrated in an increasing number of randomized double-blind clinical studies for various painful inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatism, arthritic problems, and Morbus Bechterew, radon treatments are beneficial, with the positive effect lasting until

  14. 40 CFR 197.38 - Are the Individual Protection and Ground Water Protection Standards Severable?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Section 197.38 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS PUBLIC HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION PROTECTION STANDARDS FOR YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Public Health and...

  15. The Iowa radon lung cancer study — phase I: residential radon gas exposure and lung cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. William Field; Daniel J Steck; Brian J Smith; Christine P Brus; Eileen L Fisher; John S Neuberger; Charles F Lynch

    2001-01-01

    Exposure to high concentrations of radon (222Rn) progeny produces lung cancer in both underground miners and experimentally-exposed laboratory animals. The goal of the study was to determine whether or not residential radon exposure exhibits a statistically significant association with lung cancer in a state with high residential radon concentrations. A population-based, case-control epidemiologic study was conducted examining the relationship between

  16. Worker participation in an integrated health promotion/health protection program: results from the WellWorks project.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, G; Stoddard, A; Ockene, J K; Hunt, M K; Youngstrom, R

    1996-05-01

    According to prior reports, blue-collar workers are less likely to participate in worksite health promotion programs than are white-collar workers. This study examined worker participation in the WellWorks worksite cancer prevention intervention, which integrated health promotion and health protection. Analyses were conducted to assess relationships among participation in health promotion and health protection programs, and workers' perceptions of management changes to reduce potential occupational exposures. Results indicate that blue-collar workers were less likely to report participating in health promotion activities than white-collar workers. A significant association was observed between participation in nutrition- and exposure-related activities, suggesting that participation in programs to reduce exposures to occupational hazards might contribute to blue-collar workers' participation in health promotion activities. Furthermore, when workers were aware of changes their employer had made to reduce exposures to occupational hazards, they were more likely to participate in both smoking control and nutrition activities, even when controlling for job category. These findings have clear implications for future worksite cancer prevention efforts. PMID:8744872

  17. Normal and seasonally amplified indoor radon levels

    SciTech Connect

    Gammage, R.B.; Dudney, C.S.; Wilson, D.L.; King, D.

    1995-01-01

    Winter and summer indoor radon measurements are reported for 121 houses in Freehold, New Jersey. When presented as winter:summer ratios of indoor radon, the data closely approximate a lognormal distribution. The geometric mean is 1.49. Freehold is located on the fairly flat coastal plain. The winter:summer ratios are believed to represent the norm for regions of the U.S. with cold winters and hot summers. The Freehold data set can be compared to corresponding data sets from other locations to suggest seasonal perturbations of indoor radon arising from unusual causes.

  18. Radon in workplaces: first results of an extensive survey and comparison with radon in homes.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Silvia; Pratesi, Gabriele; Viti, Maria Letizia; Pantani, Marta; Bochicchio, Francesco; Venoso, Gennaro

    2011-05-01

    Extensive radon surveys have been carried out in many countries only in dwellings, whereas surveys in workplaces are rather sparse and generally restricted to specific workplaces/activities, e.g. schools, spas and caves. Moreover, radon-prone areas are generally defined on the basis of radon surveys in dwellings, while radon regulations use this concept to introduce specific requirements in workplaces in such areas. This approach does not take into account that work activities and workplace characteristics can significantly affect radon concentration. Therefore, an extensive survey on radon in different workplaces have been carried out in a large region of Italy (Tuscany), in order to evaluate radon distribution in workplaces over the whole territory and to identify activities and workplace characteristics affecting radon concentration. The results of this extensive survey are compared with the results of the survey carried out in dwellings in the same period. The workplaces monitored were randomly selected among the main work activities in the region, including both public and industrial buildings. The survey monitored over 3500 rooms in more than 1200 buildings for two consecutive periods of ?6 months. Radon concentration was measured by means of passive nuclear track detectors. PMID:21586542

  19. Soil gas radon assessment and development of a radon risk map in Bolsena, Central Italy.

    PubMed

    Cinelli, G; Tositti, L; Capaccioni, B; Brattich, E; Mostacci, D

    2015-04-01

    Vulsini Volcanic district in Northern Latium (Central Italy) is characterized by high natural radiation background resulting from the high concentrations of uranium, thorium and potassium in the volcanic products. In order to estimate the radon radiation risk, a series of soil gas radon measurements were carried out in Bolsena, the principal urban settlement in this area NE of Rome. Soil gas radon concentration ranges between 7 and 176 kBq/m(3) indicating a large degree of variability in the NORM content and behavior of the parent soil material related in particular to the occurrence of two different lithologies. Soil gas radon mapping confirmed the existence of two different areas: one along the shoreline of the Bolsena lake, characterized by low soil radon level, due to a prevailing alluvial lithology; another close to the Bolsena village with high soil radon level due to the presence of the high radioactive volcanic rocks of the Vulsini volcanic district. Radon risk assessment, based on soil gas radon and permeability data, results in a map where the alluvial area is characterized by a probability to be an area with high Radon Index lower than 20 %, while probabilities higher than 30 % and also above 50 % are found close to the Bolsena village. PMID:25239677

  20. Variation of radon sources and indoor radon along the southwestern edge of the Canadian shield

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D STECK

    1989-01-01

    Radon source and indoor radon concentrations were measured in 240 homes. Waterborne radon concentrations ranged from 0.4 to 360 kBq\\/m³, with a geometric mean value of 8.6 kBq\\/m³ (230 pCi\\/L). Dry soil samples showed an average radon emanation of 16 Bq\\/kg (0.43 pCi\\/g) and an average radium content of 26 Bq\\/kg (0.7 pCi\\/g). In situ, surface soilborne ²¹⁴Bi concentrations ranged

  1. Small Sample Radon Testing of Homes in East Texas

    E-print Network

    Crawford, J. G.

    1990-01-01

    measurements and charcoal canislers is 120 to 168 hours. The shorter period could bc used for the instrument so thal it could be moved to a new site once per week with time for set up, stabilization, eC. Additional Research An instrumenled lest program...,~~~~l~, the alpha value of 0.05 looks this value, we- The results of thc additional work would give a better understanding of the would want IO wait about 125-150 hours arkr the sm of (he lest before we dynamics of radon concentration in a home and how...

  2. Radiological risk assessment of environmental radon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid, Norafatin; Majid, Amran Ab; Yahaya, Redzuwan; Yasir, Muhammad Samudi

    2013-11-01

    Measurements of radon gas (222Rn) in the environmental are important to assess indoor air quality and to study the potential risk to human health. Generally known that exposure to radon is considered the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. The environmental radon concentration depends on the 226Ra concentration, indoor atmosphere, cracking on rocks and building materials. This study was carried out to determine the indoor radon concentration from selected samples of tin tailings (amang) and building materials in an airtight sealed homemade radon chamber. The radiological risk assessment for radon gas was also calculated based on the annual exposure dose, effective dose equivalent, radon exhalation rates and fatal cancer risk. The continuous radon monitor Sun Nuclear model 1029 was used to measure the radon concentration emanates from selected samples for 96 hours. Five types of tin tailings collected from Kampar, Perak and four samples of building materials commonly used in Malaysia dwellings or building constructions were analysed for radon concentration. The indoor radon concentration determined in ilmenite, monazite, struverite, xenotime and zircon samples varies from 219.6 ± 76.8 Bq m-3 to 571.1 ± 251.4 Bq m-3, 101.0 ± 41.0 Bq m-3 to 245.3 ± 100.2 Bq m-3, 53.1 ± 7.5 Bq m-3 to 181.8 ± 9.7 Bq m-3, 256.1 ± 59.3 Bq m-3 to 652.2 ± 222.2 Bq m-3 and 164.5 ± 75.9 Bq m-3 to 653.3 ± 240.0 Bq m-3, respectively. Whereas, in the building materials, the radon concentration from cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and cement showed 396.3 ± 194.3 Bq m-3, 192.1 ± 75.4 Bq m-3, 176.1 ± 85.9 Bq m-3 and 28.4 ± 5.7 Bq m-3, respectively. The radon concentration in tin tailings and building materials were found to be much higher in xenotime and cement brick samples than others. All samples in tin tailings were exceeded the action level for radon gas of 148 Bq m-3 proposed by EPA except monazite 0.15 kg, struverite 0.15 kg and 0.25 kg. Whereas, all building material samples have exceeded the radon concentration in concrete and building materials of 3 to 7 Bq m-3 estimated by ICRP. The annual effective dose, effective dose equivalent, and radon exhalation rates in tin tailings were calculated to be in the range of 2.47 to 11.46 mSv, 5.94 to 1090.56 mSv y-1, and 0.23 to 1.18 mBq kg-1 h-1. For building materials, the calculated risk assessment of the annual effective dose, effective dose equivalent, radon exhalation rates and fatal cancer risk were 0.72 to 10.00 mSv, 1.73 to 24.00 mSv y-1, 0.010 to 0.06 mBq kg-1 h-1 and 40 to 550 chances of persons will suffer the cancer per million (1 × 106), respectively.

  3. Radiological risk assessment of environmental radon

    SciTech Connect

    Khalid, Norafatin; Majid, Amran Ab; Yahaya, Redzuwan; Yasir, Muhammad Samudi [Nuclear Science Programme, School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    Measurements of radon gas ({sup 222}Rn) in the environmental are important to assess indoor air quality and to study the potential risk to human health. Generally known that exposure to radon is considered the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. The environmental radon concentration depends on the {sup 226}Ra concentration, indoor atmosphere, cracking on rocks and building materials. This study was carried out to determine the indoor radon concentration from selected samples of tin tailings (amang) and building materials in an airtight sealed homemade radon chamber. The radiological risk assessment for radon gas was also calculated based on the annual exposure dose, effective dose equivalent, radon exhalation rates and fatal cancer risk. The continuous radon monitor Sun Nuclear model 1029 was used to measure the radon concentration emanates from selected samples for 96 hours. Five types of tin tailings collected from Kampar, Perak and four samples of building materials commonly used in Malaysia dwellings or building constructions were analysed for radon concentration. The indoor radon concentration determined in ilmenite, monazite, struverite, xenotime and zircon samples varies from 219.6 ± 76.8 Bq m{sup ?3} to 571.1 ± 251.4 Bq m{sup ?3}, 101.0 ± 41.0 Bq m{sup ?3} to 245.3 ± 100.2 Bq m{sup ?3}, 53.1 ± 7.5 Bq m{sup ?3} to 181.8 ± 9.7 Bq m{sup ?3}, 256.1 ± 59.3 Bq m{sup ?3} to 652.2 ± 222.2 Bq m{sup ?3} and 164.5 ± 75.9 Bq m{sup ?3} to 653.3 ± 240.0 Bq m{sup ?3}, respectively. Whereas, in the building materials, the radon concentration from cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and cement showed 396.3 ± 194.3 Bq m{sup ?3}, 192.1 ± 75.4 Bq m{sup ?3}, 176.1 ± 85.9 Bq m{sup ?3} and 28.4 ± 5.7 Bq m{sup ?3}, respectively. The radon concentration in tin tailings and building materials were found to be much higher in xenotime and cement brick samples than others. All samples in tin tailings were exceeded the action level for radon gas of 148 Bq m{sup ?3} proposed by EPA except monazite 0.15 kg, struverite 0.15 kg and 0.25 kg. Whereas, all building material samples have exceeded the radon concentration in concrete and building materials of 3 to 7 Bq m{sup ?3} estimated by ICRP. The annual effective dose, effective dose equivalent, and radon exhalation rates in tin tailings were calculated to be in the range of 2.47 to 11.46 mSv, 5.94 to 1090.56 mSv y{sup ?1}, and 0.23 to 1.18 mBq kg{sup ?1} h{sup ?1}. For building materials, the calculated risk assessment of the annual effective dose, effective dose equivalent, radon exhalation rates and fatal cancer risk were 0.72 to 10.00 mSv, 1.73 to 24.00 mSv y{sup ?1}, 0.010 to 0.06 mBq kg{sup ?1} h{sup ?1} and 40 to 550 chances of persons will suffer the cancer per million (1 × 10{sup 6}), respectively.

  4. Analysis of radon in shallow-well water: a case study at Phichit subdistrict in Songkhla province, Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charoensri, A.; Siriboonprapob, S.; Sastri, N.

    2015-05-01

    Radon levels were measured in shallow-well water samples collected from Phichit subdistrict in Songkhla province, Thailand. A total of 35 water samples from shallow-wells were collected and measured for the radon concentration. The measurements were performed using a RAD7 portable radon detector. The radon concentrations varied from 0.18 ± 0.07 to 98.1 ± 5.92 Bq/L with a mean value of 16.76 ± 2.33 Bq/L. These recorded values were compared with the safe limit values recommended for drinking water by various health and environmental protection agencies. Thirty-four percent of the recorded values were within the safe limit of 11 Bq/L recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency. The annual effective dose from ingestion and inhalation of radon was also evaluated. The estimated total effective dose varied from 0.48 to 262.91 ?Sv/year. The total effective dose in most of the samples (?90%) in this study was within the safe limit (0.1 mSv/year) recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the European Council.

  5. Methodology developed to make the Quebec indoor radon potential map.

    PubMed

    Drolet, Jean-Philippe; Martel, Richard; Poulin, Patrick; Dessau, Jean-Claude

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a relevant approach to predict the indoor radon potential based on the combination of the radiogeochemical data and the indoor radon measurements in the Quebec province territory (Canada). The Quebec ministry of health asked for such a map to identify the radon-prone areas to manage the risk for the population related to indoor radon exposure. Three radiogeochemical criteria including (1) equivalent uranium (eU) concentration from airborne surface gamma-ray surveys, (2) uranium concentration measurements in sediments, (3) bedrock and surficial geology were combined with 3082 basement radon concentration measurements to identify the radon-prone areas. It was shown that it is possible to determine thresholds for the three criteria that implied statistically significant different levels of radon potential using Kruskal-Wallis one way analyses of variance by ranks. The three discretized radiogeochemical datasets were combined into a total predicted radon potential that sampled 98% of the studied area. The combination process was also based on Kruskal-Wallis one way ANOVA. Four statistically significant different predicted radon potential levels were created: low, medium, high and very high. Respectively 10 and 13% of the dwellings exceed the Canadian radon guideline of 200 Bq/m(3) in low and medium predicted radon potentials. These proportions rise up to 22 and 45% respectively for high and very high predicted radon potentials. This predictive map of indoor radon potential based on the radiogeochemical data was validated using a map of confirmed radon exposure in homes based on the basement radon measurements. It was shown that the map of predicted radon potential based on the radiogeochemical data was reliable to identify radon-prone areas even in zones where no indoor radon measurement exists. PMID:24378928

  6. HAZARDOUS WASTE LANDFILL RESEARCH, USEPA (UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Land Pollution Control Division (LPCD), Hazardous Waste Engineering Research Lab. (HWERL), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, in Cincinnati, Ohio, has responsibility for research in solid and hazardous waste management with respect to land disposal of wastes. To fulfill th...

  7. G-CSF drives a posttraumatic immune program that protects the host from infection.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Jason C; Noel, John G; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos M; Karns, Rebekah; Aronow, Bruce J; Ogle, Cora K; McCormack, Francis X

    2014-03-01

    Traumatic injury is generally considered to have a suppressive effect on the immune system, resulting in increased susceptibility to infection. Paradoxically, we found that thermal injury to the skin induced a robust time-dependent protection of mice from a lethal Klebsiella pneumoniae pulmonary challenge. The protective response was neutrophil dependent and temporally associated with a systemic increase in neutrophils resulting from a reprioritization of hematopoiesis toward myeloid lineages. A prominent and specific activation of STAT3 in the bone marrow preceded the myeloid shift in that compartment, in association with durable increases in STAT3 activating serum cytokines G-CSF and IL-6. Neutralization of the postburn increase in serum G-CSF largely blocked STAT3 activation in marrow cells, reversing the hematopoietic changes and systemic neutrophilia. Daily administration of rG-CSF was sufficient to recapitulate the changes induced by injury including hematopoietic reprioritization and protection from pulmonary challenge with K. pneumoniae. Analysis of posttraumatic gene expression patterns in humans reveals that they are also consistent with a role for G-CSF as a switch that activates innate immune responses and suppresses adaptive immune responses. Our findings suggest that the G-CSF STAT3 axis constitutes a key protective mechanism induced by injury to reduce the risk for posttraumatic infection. PMID:24470495

  8. G-CSF Drives a Post Traumatic Immune Program that Protects the Host from Infection1

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Jason C.; Noel, John G.; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos M.; Karns, Rebekah; Aronow, Bruce J.; Ogle, Cora K.; McCormack, Francis X.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic injury is generally considered to have a suppressive effect on the immune system, resulting in increased susceptibility to infection. Paradoxically, we found that thermal injury to the skin induced a robust time-dependent protection of mice from a lethal Klebsiella pneumoniae pulmonary challenge. The protective response was neutrophil dependent and temporally associated with a systemic increase in neutrophils resulting from a reprioritization of hematopoiesis toward myeloid lineages. A prominent and specific activation of STAT3 in the bone marrow preceded the myeloid shift in that compartment, in association with durable increases in STAT3 activating serum cytokines G-CSF and IL-6. Neutralization of the post burn rise in serum G-CSF largely blocked STAT3 activation in marrow cells, reversing the hematopoietic changes and systemic neutrophilia. Daily administration of recombinant G-CSF was sufficient to recapitulate the changes induced by injury including hematopoietic reprioritization and protection from pulmonary challenge with K. pneumoniae. Analysis of posttraumatic gene expression patterns in humans reveals that they are also consistent with a role for G-CSF as a switch that activates innate immune responses and suppresses adaptive immune responses. Our findings suggest that the G-CSF STAT3 axis constitutes a key protective mechanism induced by injury to reduce the risk of post-traumatic infection. PMID:24470495

  9. UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTION RESIDUE SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION EVALUATION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vendors of solidification/stabilization (S/S) and other technologies are cooperating with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA's) Office of Research and Development (ORD), Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory to demonstrate and evaluate the performance of the tec...

  10. THE US EPA'S DERMAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH PROGRAM IN SUPPORT OF THE FOOD QUALITY PROTECTION ACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Food Quality Protection Act of 1996 (FQPA) requires that children's risks to pesticide exposures be considered during the tolerance-setting process. FQPA requires exposure assessments to be conducted for all pesticides sources, not just food sources. It also requires tha...

  11. Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals Research Program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: Summary of a Peer-Review Report

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Anna K.; Daston, George P.; Boyd, Glen R.; Lucier, George W.; Safe, Stephen H.; Stewart, Juarine; Tillitt, Donald E.; Van Der Kraak, Glen

    2006-01-01

    At the request of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Research and Development, a subcommittee of the Board of Scientific Counselors Executive Committee conducted an independent and open peer review of the Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals Research Program (EDC Research Program) of the U.S. EPA. The subcommittee was charged with reviewing the design, relevance, progress, scientific leadership, and resources of the program. The subcommittee found that the long-term goals and science questions in the EDC Program are appropriate and represent an understandable and solid framework for setting research priorities, representing a combination of problem-driven and core research. Long-term goal (LTG) 1, dealing with the underlying science surrounding endocrine disruptors, provides a solid scientific foundation for conducting risk assessments and making risk management decisions. LTG 2, dealing with defining the extent of the impact of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), has shown greater progress on ecologic effects of EDCs compared with that on human health effects. LTG 3, which involves support of the Endocrine Disruptor Screening and Testing Program of the U.S. EPA, has two mammalian tests already through a validation program and soon available for use. Despite good progress, we recommend that the U.S. EPA a) strengthen their expertise in wildlife toxicology, b) expedite validation of the Endocrine Disruptors Screening and Testing Advisory Committee tests, c) continue dependable funding for the EDC Research Program, d) take a leadership role in the application of “omics” technologies to address many of the science questions critical for evaluating environmental and human health effects of EDCs, and e) continue to sponsor multidisciplinary intramural research and interagency collaborations. PMID:16882539

  12. Radon transport: laboratory and model study.

    PubMed

    Catalano, R; Immé, G; Mangano, G; Morelli, D; Aranzulla, M

    2015-06-01

    In order to exploit radon profiles for geophysical purposes and also to estimate its entry indoors, it is necessary to study its transport through porous soils. The great number of involved parameters and processes affecting the emanation of radon from the soil grains and its transport in the source medium has led to many theoretical and/or laboratory studies. The authors report the first results of a laboratory study carried out at the Radioactivity Laboratory of the Department of Physics and Astronomy (University of Catania) by means of a facility for measuring radon concentrations in the sample pores at various depths under well-defined and controlled conditions of physical parameters. In particular, radon concentration vertical profiles extracted in low-moisture samples for different advective fluxes and temperatures were compared with expected concentrations, according to a three-phase transport model developed by Andersen (Risø National Laboratory, Denmark), showing, in general, a good agreement between measurements and model calculations. PMID:25977352

  13. Radon emanation on San Andreas Fault

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chi-Yu King

    1978-01-01

    Subsurface radon emanation monitored in shallow dry holes along an active segment of the San Andreas fault in central California shows spatially coherent large temporal variations that seem to be correlated with local seismicity.

  14. Radon in earth-sheltered structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landa, E.R.

    1984-01-01

    Radon concentration in the indoor air of six residential and three non-residential earth-sheltered buildings in eastern Colorado was monitored quarterly over a nine-month period using passive, integrating detectors. Average radon concentrations during the three-month sampling periods ranged from about 1 to 9 pCi/L, although one building, a poorly ventilated storage bunker, had concentrations as high as 39 pCi/L. These radon concentrations are somewhat greater than those typically reported for conventional buildings (around 1 pCi/L); but they are of the same order of magnitude as radon concentrations reported for energy-efficient buildings which are not earth-sheltered. ?? 1984.

  15. Radon emanation on San Andreas Fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, C.-Y.

    1978-01-01

    Subsurface radon emanation monitored in shallow dry holes along an active segment of the San Andreas fault in central California shows spatially coherent large temporal variations that seem to be correlated with local seismicity. ??1978 Nature Publishing Group.

  16. Long term performance of radon mitigation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Prill, R.; Fisk, W.J.

    2002-03-01

    Researchers installed radon mitigation systems in 12 houses in Spokane, Washington and Coeur d'Alene, Idaho during the heating season 1985--1986 and continued to monitor indoor radon quarterly and annually for ten years. The mitigation systems included active sub-slab ventilation, basement over-pressurization, and crawlspace isolation and ventilation. The occupants reported various operational problems with these early mitigation systems. The long-term radon measurements were essential to track the effectiveness of the mitigation systems over time. All 12 homes were visited during the second year of the study, while a second set 5 homes was visited during the fifth year to determine the cause(s) of increased radon in the homes. During these visits, the mitigation systems were inspected and measurements of system performance were made. Maintenance and modifications were performed to improve system performance in these homes.

  17. Geophysical methods in radon risk studies.

    PubMed

    Wysocka, Malgorzata; Kotyrba, Andrzej; Chalupnik, Stanislaw; Skowronek, Jan

    2005-01-01

    The results of the studies presented in the paper have shown that in the Upper Silesian Region in Poland, radon indoor concentration levels depend first of all on the geological structure of the subsurface layers. The essential factors influencing radon migration ability are the mining-induced transformations of a rock mass. In some cases, significant variations of radon potential have been found at sites featuring similar geological structures and experiencing comparable mining effects. To find out the causes of these variations, studies involving geophysical methods such as electrical resistivity profiling (PE) and electrical resisitivity sounding (VES) were used. These studies have shown that the measurements made using the electrical resistivity method can be helpful in evaluating radon potential of both the tectonically disturbed areas and the mining-transformed ones. PMID:15885380

  18. Measurement of Radon in Indoor Air.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downey, Daniel M.; Simolunas, Glenn

    1988-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment to teach the principles of air sampling, gamma ray spectroscopy, nuclear decay, and radioactive equilibrium. Analyzes radon by carbon adsorption and gamma ray counting. Provides methodology and rate of decay equations. (MVL)

  19. Protection, Electric and Instrumentation System Standards and the International Atomic Energy Agency Nuclear Safety Standards Program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward C. Wenzinger

    1979-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Nuclear Safety Standards Program is described. The program consists of codes of practice, describing safety objectives and broad requirements and safety guides describing means of implementing requirements of the codes. Procedures for developing codes and guides are described. Some of the technical points covered by three of the guides are covered. These guides address

  20. Radiation Protection Considerations at USACE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Projects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2008-01-01

    The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was initially authorized by Congress in 1974. FUSRAP was enacted to address residual radioactive contamination associated with numerous sites across the U.S. at which radioactive material (primarily Uranium ores and related milling products) had been processed in support of the nation's nuclear weapons program dating back to the Manhattan Project and the

  1. Distributed Departments: A New Approach to Protecting the Vitality of Small Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suson, Daniel J.; Cox, Paul H.; Hewett, Lionel D.; Leckenby, Henry J.; Espinosa, James; Fisher, Paul; Craig, David; Marble, Daniel K.; Balasubramanya, M. K.; Gonzalez, O.; Ni, Q.; Willson, V. L.

    2008-01-01

    The Texas Electronic Coalition for Physics was established in 2000 as a means of demonstrating that by linking together, small programs can maintain their vitality in higher education. Using Interactive Television, the Internet, telephones, faxes, and other electronic media, five physics programs scattered across the state of Texas formed a…

  2. U.S. EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) WASTE MINIMIZATION RESEARCH PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A program to encourage the development and adoption of new production and recycling technologies that result in the production of less hazardous waste was initiated by the U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development in 1987. The program includes a broad spectrum of demonstratio...

  3. River Protection Project waste feed delivery program technical performance measurement assessment plan

    SciTech Connect

    O'TOOLE, S.M.

    1999-09-30

    This plan establishes a formal technical performance-monitoring program. Technical performance is assessed by establishing requirements based performance goals at the beginning of a program and routinely evaluating progress in meeting these goals at predetermined milestones throughout the project life cycle.

  4. U.S. EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) WASTEWATER DISINFECTION RESEARCH PROGRAM EVOLUTION TO A DESIGN MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents the history of the EPA wastewater disinfection research program from the early 1970's until it culminated with the publication of the Process Design Manual in September 1986. The program was elevated to the highest Agency research priority in 1976 with the infu...

  5. Promoting Responsible Fatherhood Programming: Factors Affecting Low-Income Fathers' Involvement in Child Protection Services and Court-Restricted Access to Their Children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Derrick M. Gordon; Derek Iwamoto; Natasha D. Watkins; Trace Kershaw; Diana Mason; Anthony Judkins

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates how unemployment, traumatic sexual experiences, substance use, intimate partner violence, and parental involvement collectively contribute to involvement with child protective system (CPS) and court-restricted access to children among low-income, ethnically diverse fathers. Participants were 164 fathers involved in a statewide fatherhood program. The majority of the fathers in the program were unemployed (76%) and ethnic minorities (66%).

  6. Proposed natural gas protection program for Naval Oil Shale Reserves Nos. 1 and 3, Garfield County, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    As a result of US Department of Energy (DOE) monitoring activities, it was determined in 1983 that the potential existed for natural gas resources underlying the Naval Oil Shales Reserves Nos. 1 and 3 (NOSrs-1 3) to be drained by privately-owned gas wells that were being drilled along the Reserves borders. In 1985, DOE initiated a limited number of projects to protect the Government's interest in the gas resources by drilling its own offset production'' wells just inside the boundaries, and by formally sharing in the production, revenues and costs of private wells that are drilled near the boundaries ( communitize'' the privately-drilled wells). The scope of these protection efforts must be expanded. DOE is therefore proposing a Natural Gas Protection Program for NOSRs-1 3 which would be implemented over a five-year period that would encompass a total of 200 wells (including the wells drilled and/or communitized since 1985). Of these, 111 would be offset wells drilled by DOE on Government land inside the NOSRs' boundaries and would be owned either entirely by the Government or communitized with adjacent private land owners or lessees. The remainder would be wells drilled by private operators in an area one half-mile wide extending around the NOSRs boundaries and communitized with the Government. 23 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2014

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2014 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring is performed by the GWPP during CY 2014 to achieve the following goals: 􀁸 to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; 􀁸 to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; 􀁸 to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; 􀁸 to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and 􀁸 to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12.

  8. Dosimetry of inhaled radon and thoron progeny

    SciTech Connect

    James, A.C.

    1994-06-01

    This chapter reviews recent developments in modeling doses received by lung tissues, with particular emphasis on application of ICRP`s new dosimetric model of the respiratory tract for extrapolating to other environments the established risks from exposure to radon progeny in underground mines. Factors discussed include: (1) the influence of physical characteristics of radon progeny aerosols on dose per unit exposure, e.g., the unattached fraction, and the activity-size distributions of clustered and attached progeny; (2) the dependence of dose on breathing rate, and on the exposed subject (man, woman or child); (3) the variability of dose per unit exposure in a home when exposure is expressed in terms of potential {alpha} energy or radon gas concentration; (4) the comparative dosimetry of thoron progeny; and (5) the effects of air-cleaning on lung dose. Also discussed is the apparent discrepancy between lung cancer risk estimates derived purely from dosimetry and the lung cancer incidence observed in the epidemiological studies of radon-exposed underground miners. Application of ICRP`s recommended risk factors appears to overestimate radon lung-cancer risk for miners by a factor of three. ``Normalization`` of the calculated effective dose is therefore needed, at least for {alpha} dose from radon and thoron progeny, in order to obtain a realistic estimate of lung cancer risk.

  9. Savings estimates for the United States Environmental Protection Agency?s ENERGY STAR voluntary product labeling program

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Marla Christine; Sanchez, Marla Christine; Brown, Richard; Homan, Gregory; Webber, Carrie

    2008-06-03

    ENERGY STAR is a voluntary energy efficiency-labeling program operated jointly by the United States Department of Energy and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). Since the program inception in 1992, ENERGY STAR has become a leading international brand for energy efficient products. ENERGY STAR's central role in the development of regional, national, and international energy programs necessitates an open process whereby its program achievements to date as well as projected future savings are shared with committed stakeholders. Through 2006, US EPA?S ENERGY STAR labeled products saved 4.8 EJ of primary energy and avoided 82 Tg C equivalent. We project that US EPA?S ENERGY STAR labeled products will save 12.8 EJ and avoid 203 Tg C equivalent over the period 2007-2015. A sensitivity analysis examining two key inputs (carbon factor and ENERGY STAR unit sales) bounds the best estimate of carbon avoided between 54 Tg C and 107 Tg C (1993 to 2006) and between 132 Tg C and 278 Tg C (2007 to 2015).

  10. Radon progeny activity in sweat following radon exposure in a warm and humid environment.

    PubMed

    Falkenbach, A; Just, G; Soto, J

    2000-06-01

    The objective was to evaluate whether activity of radon progenies can be detected in sweat following speleotherapeutic radon exposure (40 kBq/m3) in a warm (38 degrees C) and humid (relative humidity > 70%) environment. A group of 11 male patients with spondyloarthropathy (n = 6) or non-inflammatory rheumatic diseases (n = 5) underwent a 1-h treatment in the gallery of the Gasteiner Heilstollen, and 20 min after leaving the treatment area radon progeny activity was measured in sweat by utilizing a special filter set. The results suggest that radon is discharged with sweat, causing a significant activity of radon and radon progenies on the skin. This finding may be important from a clinical point of view, since specialists experienced in radon therapy have repeatedly emphasized the importance of the degree of radioactivity on the skin for the effectiveness of treatment. It has even been claimed that the skin is the major target for radon therapy, possibly because of the influence on Langerhans' cell function. PMID:10929383

  11. 75 FR 28034 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; Agency Information Collection Activities: United...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ...United States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology (US-VISIT) Biometric Data...United States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology Program (US- VISIT...and assumptions used; 3. Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the...

  12. ENDOCRINE DISRUPTER SCREENING PROGRAMS TO PROTECT WILDLIFE: ONLY AS STRONG AS THE WEAKEST LINK

    EPA Science Inventory

    As global efforts move towards the establishment of screening programs for endocrine disrupters (EDs) in wildlife, a number of unresolved questions demand attention if such efforts are to strengthen the......

  13. 78 FR 31955 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security National Protection and Programs Directorate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-28

    ...Technology (US-VISIT) program's biometric identity management functions to the Office of Biometric Identity Management (OBIM), a newly created...Directorate (NPPD) Office of Biometric Identity Management (OBIM) proposes to...

  14. 47 CFR 76.101 - Cable syndicated program exclusivity: extent of protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Network Non-duplication...rights to which are held by a commercial television station licensed by the Commission...that program as broadcast by any other television signal, except as otherwise...

  15. 47 CFR 76.101 - Cable syndicated program exclusivity: extent of protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Network Non-duplication...rights to which are held by a commercial television station licensed by the Commission...that program as broadcast by any other television signal, except as otherwise...

  16. 75 FR 52768 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; Agency Information Collection Activities: Office of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ...training program to improve security in the chemical industry sector. Information is automatically collected...The training is designed for the general chemical facility employee. U.S. chemical industry direct employment is about...

  17. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: FIELD ANALYTICAL SCREENING PROGRAM: PCB METHOD - U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The field analytical screening program (FASP) polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) method uses a temperature-programmable gas chromatograph (GC) equipped with an electron capture detector (ECD) to identify and quantify PCBs. Gas chromatography is an EPA-approved method for determi...

  18. Acting Globally While Thinking Locally: Is the Global Environment Protected by Transport Emission Control Programs?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gunnar S. Eskeland; Jian Xie

    1998-01-01

    September 1998Locally motivated air quality programs have only minor collateral benefits for the global climate. If agencies with global and local agendas did business together, then individuals and firms-and even cities-would act globally when thinking locally, and one would see greater synergy.Eskeland and Xie find that locally motivated air quality programs for urban transport have limited collateral benefits in terms

  19. Human lung cancer risks from radon - part I - influence from bystander effects - a microdose analysis.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Bobby E; Thompson, Richard E; Beecher, Georgia C

    2011-01-01

    Since the publication of the BEIR VI report in 1999 on health risks from radon, a significant amount of new data has been published showing various mechanisms that may affect the ultimate assessment of radon as a carcinogen, at low domestic and workplace radon levels, in particular the Bystander Effect (BE) and the Adaptive Response radio-protection (AR). We analyzed the microbeam and broadbeam alpha particle data of Miller et al. (1995, 1999), Zhou et al. (2001, 2003, 2004), Nagasawa and Little (1999, 2002), Hei et al. (1999), Sawant et al. (2001a) and found that the shape of the cellular response to alphas is relatively independent of cell species and LET of the alphas. The same alpha particle traversal dose response behavior should be true for human lung tissue exposure to radon progeny alpha particles. In the Bystander Damage Region of the alpha particle response, there is a variation of RBE from about 10 to 35. There is a transition region between the Bystander Damage Region and Direct Damage Region of between one and two microdose alpha particle traversals indicating that perhaps two alpha particle "hits" are necessary to produce the direct damage. Extrapolation of underground miners lung cancer risks to human risks at domestic and workplace levels may not be valid. PMID:21731539

  20. Radon contamination problems in North Dakota. Hearing before the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, One Hundredth Congress, First Session, August 20, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    From tests of 200 homes in North Dakota in over 25 cities and towns, the Department of Health estimates that as many as 50% of all homes in the state may have radon levels above the EPA-recommended safety level, at this hearing in Fargo, ten witnesses included university professors, state and local health authorities, and the North Dakota Association of Realtors. US Sen. Quentin N. Burdick of North Dakota, who chaired the hearing, pointed out that the recently passed Radon Program Development Act (1) provide seed money to help states get radon programs up and running; (2) requires EPA to conduct surveys in Federal buildings; and (3) requires EPA to determine the extent of radon contamination in the Nation's schools. He recommends that North Dakota take advantage of this Federal assistance.

  1. Health risks due to radon in drinking water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hopke, P.K.; Borak, T.B.; Doull, J.; Cleaver, J.E.; Eckerman, K.F.; Gundersen, L.C.S.; Harley, N.H.; Hess, C.T.; Kinner, N.E.; Kopecky, K.J.; Mckone, T.E.; Sextro, R.G.; Simon, S.L.

    2000-01-01

    Following more than a decade of scientific debate about the setting of a standard for 222Rn in drinking water, Congress established a timetable for the promulgation of a standard in the 1996 Amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act. As a result of those Amendments, the EPA contracted with the National Academy of Sciences to undertake a risk assessment for exposure to radon in drinking water. In addition, the resulting committee was asked to address several other scientific issues including the national average ambient 222Rn concentration and the increment of 222Rn to the indoor- air concentration arising from the use of drinking water in a home. A new dosimetric analysis of the cancer risk to the stomach from ingestion was performed. The recently reported risk estimates developed by the BEIR VI Committee for inhalation of radon decay products were adopted. Because the 1996 Amendments permit states to develop programs in which mitigation of air- producing health-risk reductions equivalent to that which would be achieved by treating the drinking water, the scientific issues involved in such 'multimedia mitigation programs' were explored.

  2. Radon exposures in a Jerusalem public school.

    PubMed Central

    Richter, E D; Neeman, E; Fischer, I; Berdugo, M; Westin, J B; Kleinstern, J; Margaliot, M

    1997-01-01

    In December 1995, ambient radon levels exceeding 10,000 Bq/m3 were measured in a basement shelter workroom of a multilevel East Talpiot, Jerusalem, public elementary school (six grades, 600 students). The measurements were taken after cancers (breast and multiple myeloma) were diagnosed in two workers who spent their workdays in basement rooms. The school was located on a hill that geologic maps show to be rich in phosphate deposits, which are a recognized source for radon gas and its daughter products. Levels exceeding 1000,000 Bq/m3 were measured at the mouth of a pipe in the basement shelter workroom, the major point of radon entry. The school was closed and charcoal and electret ion chamber detectors were used to carry out repeated 5-day measurements in all rooms in the multilevel building over a period of several months. Radon concentrations were generally higher in rooms in the four levels of the building that were below ground level. There were some ground-level rooms in the building in which levels reached up to 1300 Bq/m3. In rooms above ground level, however, peak levels did not exceed 300 Bq/m3. Exposure control based on sealing and positive pressure ventilation was inadequate. These findings suggested that radon diffused from highly contaminated basement and ground-floor rooms to other areas of the building and that sealing off the source may have led to reaccumulation of radon beneath the building. Later, subslab venting of below-ground radon pockets to the outside air was followed by more sustained reductions in indoor radon levels to levels below 75 Bq/m3. Even so, radon accumulated in certain rooms when the building was closed. This sentinel episode called attention to the need for a national radon policy requiring threshold exposure levels for response and control. A uniform nationwide standard for school buildings below 75 Bq/m3 level was suggested after considering prudent avoidance, the controversies over risk assessment of prolonged low-level exposures in children, and the fact that exposures in most locations in the Talpiot school could be reduced below this level. Proposal of this stringent standard stimulated the search for a strategy of risk control and management based on control at the source. This strategy was more effective and probably more cost effective than one based on suppression of exposure based on sealing and ventilation. Because many Israeli areas and much of the West Bank area of the Palestinian National Authority sit on the same phosphate deposits, regional joint projects for surveillance and control may be indicated. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:9467053

  3. Radon removal from gaseous xenon with activated charcoal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Hieda, K.; Hiraide, K.; Hirano, S.; Kishimoto, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Koshio, Y.; Liu, J.; Martens, K.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nishiie, H.; Ogawa, H.; Sekiya, H.; Shinozaki, A.; Suzuki, Y.; Takachio, O.; Takeda, A.; Ueshima, K.; Umemoto, D.; Yamashita, M.; Hosokawa, K.; Murata, A.; Otsuka, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Kusaba, F.; Motoki, D.; Nishijima, K.; Tasaka, S.; Fujii, K.; Murayama, I.; Nakamura, S.; Fukuda, Y.; Itow, Y.; Masuda, K.; Nishitani, Y.; Takiya, H.; Uchida, H.; Kim, Y. D.; Kim, Y. H.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, J. S.; Xmass Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Many low background experiments using xenon need to remove radioactive radon to improve their sensitivities. However, no method of continually removing radon from xenon has been described in the literature. We studied a method to remove radon from xenon gas through an activated charcoal trap. From our measurements we infer a linear relationship between the mean propagation velocity vRn of radon and vXe of xenon in the trap with vRn/vXe=(0.96±0.10)×10-3 at -85 °C. As the mechanism for radon removal in this charcoal trap is its decay, knowledge of this parameter allows us to design an efficient radon removal system for the XMASS experiment. The verification of this system found that it reduces radon by a factor of 0.07, which is in line with its expected average retention time of 14.8 days for radon.

  4. A fast butterfly algorithm for generalized Radon transforms

    E-print Network

    Hu, Jingwei

    Generalized Radon transforms, such as the hyperbolic Radon transform, cannot be implemented as efficiently in the frequency domain as convolutions, thus limiting their use in seismic data processing. We have devised a fast ...

  5. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling and Analysis Plan for Calendar Year 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Elvado Environmental LLC for the Environmental Compliance Department ES& H Division, Y-12 National Security Complex Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    2003-09-30

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2004 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2004 will be in accordance with the following requirements of DOE Order 5400.1: (1) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (2) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (3) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (4) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2004 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge, along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation (Figure A.1). Modifications to the CY 2004 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells, or wells could be added or removed from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan.

  6. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling and Analysis Plan for Calendar Year 2005

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2004-09-30

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2005 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2005 will be in accordance with DOE Order 540.1 requirements and the following goals: (1) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (2) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (3) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (4) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2005 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge, along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation (Figure A.1). Modifications to the CY 2005 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan.

  7. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling and Analysis Plan for Calendar Year 2003

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2002-09-01

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2003 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2003 will be in accordance with the following requirements of DOE Order 5400.1: (1) to evaluate and maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (2) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (3) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (4) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2003 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge, along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation (Figure A.1). Modifications to the CY 2003 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells, or wells could be added or removed from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan.

  8. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling and Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2001-09-01

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2002 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2002 will be in accordance with the following requirements of DOE Order 5400.1: to evaluate and maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2002 will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge, along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation (Figure A.1). Modifications to the CY 2002 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells, or wells could be added or removed from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan.

  9. Using radon as environmental tracer for the assessment of subsurface Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (NAPL) contamination - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, M.

    2015-05-01

    The radioactive noble gas radon has an ambivalent nature: on the one hand is it of main concern with regard to radiation protection, on the other hand can it be applied as powerful tracer tool in various fields of applied geosciences. Due to its omnipresence in nature, its chemical and physical properties, and its uncomplicated detectability radon fulfils all requirements for being used as environmental tracer. This application is discussed in the paper with focus on the use of radon as tracer for subsurface contamination with Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids (NAPL). After a short introduction in the ambivalence and ubiquitous presence of radon in nature, the theoretical background of its suitability as NAPL tracer is summarized. Finally three potential applications are discussed. Background information and practical examples are given for (i) the investigation of residual NAPL contamination in soils, (ii) the investigation of residual NAPL contamination in aquifers and (iii) the monitoring of the remediation of dissolved NAPL contamination in groundwater. The presented information reveals that radon is an ideal tracer for the assessment of a wide range of subsurface NAPL contamination. Still, its application is not without restrictions. Problems may occur due to mineralogical heterogeneity of the soil or aquifer matrix. Furthermore, local changes in the permeability of the subsurface may be associated with preferential groundwater or soil gas flow paths bypassing isolated sub-domains of an investigated NAPL source zone. Moreover, NAPL aging may result in alterations in the composition of a complex NAPL mixture thus giving rise to significant changes of the radon partition coefficient between NAPL and water or soil gas. However, since radon shows a strong affinity to NAPLs in general, semi-quantitative results will always be possible.

  10. Inversion of the two dimensional Radon transformation by diagonalisation

    E-print Network

    Knill, Oliver

    diagonalisation of Abel's integral operator, we give an inversion of the plane Radon transformation R(f)(p, ) = {x the spectrum and the kernel of ~R. Keywords Computerized Tomography, Abel and Radon transformation, InverseInversion of the two dimensional Radon transformation by diagonalisation Oliver Knill Department

  11. Attachment of radon progeny to cigarette-smoke aerosols

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. H. Biermann; S. R. Sawyer

    1995-01-01

    The daughter products of radon gas are now recognized as a significant contributor to radiation exposure to the general public. It is also suspected that a synergistic effect exists with the combination cigarette smoking and radon exposure. We have conducted an experimental investigation to determine the physical nature of radon progeny interactions with cigarette smoke aerosols. The size distributions of

  12. Radiation doses to cardiovascular system due to absorbed radon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jing Chen; Richard B. Richardson

    2005-01-01

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas. When it is inhaled, a significant proportion of the radon and its progeny deposited in the lung are absorbed into the blood. The absorbed radon delivers radiation doses to all tissues or organs. The thin inner layer of the coronary arteries is probably the primary target tissue of radiation-induced atherosclerosis. A Monte Carlo

  13. Radon gas — where from and what to do?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G Jönsson

    1995-01-01

    Radon is sort of an outsider in nature because it is the only element that is a gas in a long chain of radioactive decays.For an individual person, exposed to radon gas for a long time, there is an increase in the risk for growth of a lung cancer. Radon may also be a causative factor for other kinds of

  14. INVARIANT RADON MEASURES FOR HOROCYCLE FLOWS ON ABELIAN COVERS

    E-print Network

    INVARIANT RADON MEASURES FOR HOROCYCLE FLOWS ON ABELIAN COVERS OMRI SARIG Dedicated to the memory of M. Babillot Abstract. We classify the ergodic invariant Radon measures for horocycle flows on Zd those supported on periodic orbits. There are however invariant Radon measures. Burger [Bu] classified

  15. Outdoor Radon--Sources, Monitoring and Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Bulko, M.; Holy, K.; Mullerova, M.; Simon, J. [Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, Bratislava Mlynska dolina F1, 84248 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2007-11-26

    Various sources of atmospheric radon, as well as the results of radon monitoring at the Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics (FMFI CU) campus are discussed. The evaluation of the risk caused by radon and its decay products in the Bratislava atmosphere is given.

  16. Fast Curve Estimation Using PreConditioned Generalized Radon Transform

    E-print Network

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    Fast Curve Estimation Using Pre­Conditioned Generalized Radon Transform Kim V. Hansen Oticon on the generalized Radon transform is proposed. The algorithm works on binary images, obtained, e.g., by edge map to reduce the computational cost of the generalized Radon transform. The pre­condition map

  17. Curvelets and Reconstruction of Images from Noisy Radon Data

    E-print Network

    Candes, Emmanuel J.

    Curvelets and Reconstruction of Images from Noisy Radon Data Emmanuel J. Cand`es and David L of scientific investigation; e.g., noisy Radon inversion (tomography) is a problem of special interest-based biorthogonal decomposition of the Radon operator and build a reconstruction based on the shrinkage (or

  18. Radon Transform and Cavalieri Condition: a Cohomological Approach

    E-print Network

    D'Agnolo, Andrea

    Radon Transform and Cavalieri Condition: a Cohomological Approach Andrea D'Agnolo Abstract We apply the theory of integral transforms for sheaves and D-modules to the study of the real Radon transform. J. 93 (1998), no. 3, 597­632. #12;Radon Transform and Cavalieri Condition: a Cohomological Approach

  19. Letter to the Editor Rutherford, the Curies, and Radon

    E-print Network

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    Letter to the Editor Rutherford, the Curies, and Radon Received 3 January 2000; accepted,2 it is interesting to note that the Curies were also responsible for the discovery of radon-222, the naturally oc of about one minute.''6 In modern terminology, Rutherford and Owens had discovered radon in the form

  20. Curvelets and Reconstruction of Images from Noisy Radon Data

    E-print Network

    Candes, Emmanuel J.

    Curvelets and Reconstruction of Images from Noisy Radon Data Emmanuel J. Cand#18;es and David L#12;c investigation; e.g., noisy Radon inversion (tomography) is a problem of special interest-based biorthogonal decomposition of the Radon operator and build a reconstruction based on the shrinkage (or

  1. Radon space and Adaboost for Pose Estimation Patrick Etyngier1

    E-print Network

    Paragios, Nikos

    Radon space and Adaboost for Pose Estimation Patrick Etyngier1 Nikos Paragios2 Renaud Keriven1 in the radon space consist of our feature space. Such features are associ- ated with [AdaBoost] learners spaces and methods exist for fast line extraction and manipulation (Hough[5, 10], Radon [10]). Our method

  2. THE LAGRANGIAN RADON TRANSFORM AND THE WEIL REPRESENTATION

    E-print Network

    Michor, Peter W.

    THE LAGRANGIAN RADON TRANSFORM AND THE WEIL REPRESENTATION GIUSEPPE MARMO, PETER W. MICHOR, YURY A consider the space of lines in the X-rays Radon transform as the space of Lagrangian subspaces when figure out from here that a possible connection between the standard Radon transform and the formulation

  3. On Radon's theorem and representations of separoids Ricardo Strausz

    E-print Network

    Strausz, Ricardo

    On Radon's theorem and representations of separoids Ricardo Strausz Instituto de Matem´aticas, U is a Radon partition, denoted as AB, iff their convex hulls intersect; otherwise, we say will construct a family of convex sets whose separation structure (whose Radon partitions) are exactly those

  4. The Generalised Radon Transform: Sampling and Memory Considerations

    E-print Network

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    The Generalised Radon Transform: Sampling and Memory Considerations C.L. Luengo Hendriks, M. van. The generalised Radon transform is a well-known tool for detecting parameterised shapes in an image. Applying the Radon trans- form to an image results in a parameter response function (PRF). Curves in the image become

  5. GEODESIC RADON TRANSFORMS ON SYMMETRIC SPACES FRANOIS ROUVIRE

    E-print Network

    Rouvière, François

    GEODESIC RADON TRANSFORMS ON SYMMETRIC SPACES FRANÇOIS ROUVIÈRE à la mémoire d'André Cerezo of the non-compact type, by means of shifted dual Radon transforms. One of these formulas is extended to a large class of totally geodesic Radon transforms on these spaces. 1. Introduction 1.1. Inverting the X

  6. Approximating Radon measures on first--countable compact spaces

    E-print Network

    Plebanek, Grzegorz

    Approximating Radon measures on first--countable compact spaces Grzegorz Plebanek (Wroc/law) Abstract The assertion every Radon measure defined on a first--countable compact space is uniformly regular under CH. In this note we consider some properties of finite Radon measures defined on compact spaces

  7. A Radon-Nikodym derivative for almost subadditive set functions

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    EA 4272 A Radon-Nikodym derivative for almost subadditive set functions Yann REBILLE (*) 2009,version1-17Dec2009 #12;A Radon-Nikodym derivative for almost subadditive set functions Yann R Nantes Cedex 3, France. Abstract In classical measure theory, the Radon-Nikodym theorem states

  8. Representation of Radon Shape Diffusions via Hyperspherical Brownian Motion

    E-print Network

    Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    Representation of Radon Shape Diffusions via Hyperspherical Brownian Motion Victor M. Panaretos A framework is introduced for the study of general Radon shape dif- fusions. This is done via a convenient representation of unoriented Radon shape diffusions in (unoriented) D.G. Kendall shape space k n through

  9. INVERTING RADON TRANSFORMS : THE GROUP-THEORETIC Franois Rouvire

    E-print Network

    Rouvière, François

    INVERTING RADON TRANSFORMS : THE GROUP-THEORETIC APPROACH François Rouvière Abstract of various inversion formulas from the literature on Radon transforms, obtained by group-theoretic tools such as invariant di¤erential operators and harmonic analysis. We introduce a general concept of shifted Radon

  10. RADON-NIKODYM THEOREMS D. CANDELORO and A. VOLCIC

    E-print Network

    Candeloro, Domenico

    RADON-NIKOD´YM THEOREMS D. CANDELORO and A. VOLCIC 1 Introduction Suppose is the Lebesgue measure and , that is the integral measure of some function f L1 (µ) : such function is called Radon- Nikod´ym derivative a Radon-Nikod´ym derivative d dµ , i.e. a µ- integrable function f such that (E) = E f dµ holds, for any

  11. Spatial Implementation for Erasure Coding by Finite Radon Transform

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Spatial Implementation for Erasure Coding by Finite Radon Transform Dimitri Pertin, Giulio D data. In this paper we propose a new approach using the Finite Radon Transform (FRT). The FRT with discrete projection angles. In this paper, we propose to use the Finite Radon Transform (FRT) for erasure

  12. Radon Q & A. What You Need to Know.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayham, Chris

    1994-01-01

    Because radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in this country, the article presents a question and answer sheet on where radon comes from, which buildings are most likely to have radon, how to tell whether there is a problem, and expenses involved in testing and fixing problems. (SM)

  13. A discrete approach to monogenic analysis through Radon transform

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A discrete approach to monogenic analysis through Radon transform Rapha¨el Soulard and Philippe address this issue by proposing an innovative scheme that uses a discrete Radon transform based on discrete geometry. Radon domain signal processing and monogenic analysis is studied and performance

  14. Ris-R-1201(EN) Radon Transport Modelling

    E-print Network

    Risø-R-1201(EN) Radon Transport Modelling: User's Guide to RnMod3d Claus E. Andersen Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark August 2000 #12;Risø-R-1201(EN) Radon Transport Modelling: User's Guide to Rn. Moisture is included in the model, and partitioning of radon between air, water and soil grains (adsorption

  15. Residential Radon Exposure and Lung Cancer Among Nonsmoking Women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael C. R. Alavanja; Ross C. Brownson; Jay H. Lubin; Eric Berger; Jian Chang; John D. Boice

    1994-01-01

    Background: Radon at sufficiently high concentrations is known to cause lung cancer among underground miners and in experimental laboratory animals. Purpose: Our aim was to determine whether indoor levels of radon are associated with a detectable increase in lung cancer. Nonsmoking women were selected because they offer the best opportunity to detect radon-related risk while minimizing the potentially confounding influences

  16. Design of a Continuous Digital-Output Environmental Radon Monitor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    McDonald E. Wrenn; Henry Spitz; Norman Cohen; M. Eisenbud

    1975-01-01

    A new field instrument for the continuous measurement of radon concentrations has been developed to investigate the magnitude and variability of environmental levels of 222Rn. Passive diffusion of radon, but not its daughters, occurs through an open pore polyurethane foam into a sensitive volume where a static electric field directs the positively ionized radon daughter products to a central collecting

  17. Radon Dosimetry in Typical Indian Dwellings Using Plastic Track Detectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Kant; Suraj B. Upadhyay; G. S. Sharma; S. K. Chakarvarti

    2006-01-01

    Measurements of the effective dose through inhalation from radon and its progeny are important for human health since they contribute more than 50% of the total radiation dose from natural sources.In consequence of this radon has been identified as second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. In the present study radon monitoring has been carried out in some typical

  18. Structural and functional effects of conventional and low pesticide input crop-protection programs on benthic macroinvertebrate communities in outdoor pond mesocosms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arnaud Auber; Marc Roucaute; Anne Togola; Thierry Caquet

    The impacts of current and alternative wheat crop protection programs were compared in outdoor pond mesocosms in a 10-month\\u000a long study. Realistic exposure scenarios were built based upon the results of modelling of drift, drainage and runoff of pesticides\\u000a successively applied under two environmental situations characteristics of drained soils of northern France. Each situation\\u000a was associated to two crop protection

  19. CONTRIBUTIONS OF THE FLUID MODELING FACILITY TO EPA'S (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S) COMPLEX TERRAIN MODEL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The contributions of the EPA Fluid Modeling Facility (FMF) to the Complex Terrain Model Development Program (CTMDP) are described. These contributions included a wide range of laboratory studies and a limited amount of numerical modeling of flow and diffusion in neutral and stabl...

  20. Randomized Trial Testing a Worksite Sun Protection Program in an Outdoor Recreation Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buller, David B.; Andersen, Peter A.; Walkosz, Barbara J.; Scott, Michael D.; Cutter, Gary R.; Dignan, Mark B.; Zarlengo, Elizabeth M.; Voeks, Jenifer H.; Giese, Aimee J.

    2005-01-01

    Health communication campaigns intended to reduce chronic and severe exposure to ultraviolet radiation in sunlight and prevent skin cancer are a national priority. Outdoor workers represent an unaddressed, high-risk population. Go Sun Smart (GSS), a worksite sun safety program largely based on the diffusion-of-innovations theory, was evaluated in…