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Sample records for protects human retinal

  1. Constitutive Overexpression of Human Erythropoietin Protects the Mouse Retina against Induced But Not Inherited Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Christian; Wenzel, Andreas; Stanescu, Dinu; Samardzija, Marijana; Hotop, Svenja; Groszer, Mathias; Naash, Muna; Gassmann, Max; Remé, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Elevation of erythropoietin (Epo) concentrations by hypoxic preconditioning or application of recombinant human Epo (huEpo) protects the mouse retina against light-induced degeneration by inhibiting photoreceptor cell apoptosis. Because photoreceptor apoptosis is also the common path to cell loss in retinal dystrophies such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP), we tested whether high levels of huEpo would reduce apoptotic cell death in two mouse models of human RP. We combined the two respective mutant mouse lines with a transgenic line (tg6) that constitutively overexpresses huEpo mainly in neural tissues. Transgenic expression of huEpo caused constitutively high levels of Epo in the retina and protected photoreceptors against light-induced degeneration; however, the presence of high levels of huEpo did not affect the course or the extent of retinal degeneration in a light-independent (rd1) and a light-accelerated (VPP) mouse model of RP. Similarly, repetitive intraperitoneal injections of recombinant huEpo did not protect the retina in the rd1 and the VPP mouse. Lack of neuroprotection by Epo in the two models of inherited retinal degeneration was not caused by adaptational downregulation of Epo receptor. Our results suggest that apoptotic mechanisms during acute, light-induced photoreceptor cell death differ from those in genetically based retinal degeneration. Therapeutic intervention with cell death in inherited retinal degeneration may therefore require different drugs and treatments. PMID:15215287

  2. Protection of Visual Functions by Human Neural Progenitors in a Rat Model of Retinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gamm, David M.; Wang, Shaomei; Lu, Bin; Girman, Sergei; Holmes, Toby; Bischoff, Nicholas; Shearer, Rebecca L.; Sauvé, Yves; Capowski, Elizabeth; Svendsen, Clive N.; Lund, Raymond D.

    2007-01-01

    Background A promising clinical application for stem and progenitor cell transplantation is in rescue therapy for degenerative diseases. This strategy seeks to preserve rather than restore host tissue function by taking advantage of unique properties often displayed by these versatile cells. In studies using different neurodegenerative disease models, transplanted human neural progenitor cells (hNPC) protected dying host neurons within both the brain and spinal cord. Based on these reports, we explored the potential of hNPC transplantation to rescue visual function in an animal model of retinal degeneration, the Royal College of Surgeons rat. Methodology/Principal Findings Animals received unilateral subretinal injections of hNPC or medium alone at an age preceding major photoreceptor loss. Principal outcomes were quantified using electroretinography, visual acuity measurements and luminance threshold recordings from the superior colliculus. At 90–100 days postnatal, a time point when untreated rats exhibit little or no retinal or visual function, hNPC-treated eyes retained substantial retinal electrical activity and visual field with near-normal visual acuity. Functional efficacy was further enhanced when hNPC were genetically engineered to secrete glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. Histological examination at 150 days postnatal showed hNPC had formed a nearly continuous pigmented layer between the neural retina and retinal pigment epithelium, as well as distributed within the inner retina. A concomitant preservation of host cone photoreceptors was also observed. Conclusions/Significance Wild type and genetically modified human neural progenitor cells survive for prolonged periods, migrate extensively, secrete growth factors and rescue visual functions following subretinal transplantation in the Royal College of Surgeons rat. These results underscore the potential therapeutic utility of hNPC in the treatment of retinal degenerative diseases and suggest

  3. Melissa Officinalis L. Extracts Protect Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells against Oxidative Stress-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Jeung, In Cheul; Jee, Donghyun; Rho, Chang-Rae; Kang, Seungbum

    2016-01-01

    Background: We evaluated the protective effect of ALS-L1023, an extract of Melissa officinalis L. (Labiatae; lemon balm) against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19 cells). Methods: ARPE-19 cells were incubated with ALS-L1023 for 24 h and then treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assessed by flow cytometry. Caspase-3/7 activation and cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) were measured to investigate the protective role of ALS-L1023 against apoptosis. The protective effect of ALS-L1023 against oxidative stress through activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) was evaluated by Western blot analysis. Results: ALS-L1023 clearly reduced H2O2-induced cell apoptosis and intracellular production of ROS. H2O2-induced oxidative stress increased caspase-3/7 activity and apoptotic PARP cleavage, which were significantly inhibited by ALS-L1023. Activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway was associated with the protective effect of ALS-L1023 on ARPE-19 cells. Conclusions: ALS-L1023 protected human RPE cells against oxidative damage. This suggests that ALS-L1023 has therapeutic potential for the prevention of dry age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26941573

  4. Fisetin and luteolin protect human retinal pigment epithelial cells from oxidative stress-induced cell death and regulate inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hytti, Maria; Piippo, Niina; Korhonen, Eveliina; Honkakoski, Paavo; Kaarniranta, Kai; Kauppinen, Anu

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is a clinical hallmark of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness among aged people in the Western world. Both inflammation and oxidative stress are known to play vital roles in the development of this disease. Here, we assess the ability of fisetin and luteolin, to protect ARPE-19 cells from oxidative stress-induced cell death and to decrease intracellular inflammation. We also compare the growth and reactivity of human ARPE-19 cells in serum-free and serum-containing conditions. The absence of serum in the culture medium did not prevent ARPE-19 cells from reaching full confluency but caused an increased sensitivity to oxidative stress-induced cell death. Both fisetin and luteolin protected ARPE-19 cells from oxidative stress-induced cell death. They also significantly decreased the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines into the culture medium. The decrease in inflammation was associated with reduced activation of MAPKs and CREB, but was not linked to NF- κB or SIRT1. The ability of fisetin and luteolin to protect and repair stressed RPE cells even after the oxidative insult make them attractive in the search for treatments for AMD. PMID:26619957

  5. Pinosylvin-mediated protection against oxidative stress in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Koskela, Ali; Reinisalo, Mika; Hyttinen, Juha M. T.; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In this work, we investigated the ability of pinosylvin (PS), 3,5-dihydroxy-trans-stilbene, to modulate oxidative stress in human RPE cells. PS, a stilbenoid polyphenol, occurs in high concentrations in bark byproducts and therefore represents an attractive bioactive compound for health-promoting applications. Methods First, we evaluated the toxicity range of PS by exposing ARPE-19 cells to 0.1–200 µM concentrations of PS for 24 h followed by the cell viability test. In the next stage, the ARPE-19 cells were preincubated in PS for 24 h followed by hydroquinone (HQ) exposure without PS for another 24 h. The cell viability test was conducted after HQ exposure. To elucidate the potential mechanisms behind PS-mediated protection against oxidative stress, the ARPE-19 cells were treated with 5 µM PS for 6 h, and mRNA was extracted at four time points (2 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h) to determine changes in the expression of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2), sequestosome 1 (p62/SQSTM1), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and glutathione S-transferase pi 1 (GSTP1) genes. To clarify the molecular mechanism behind PS-mediated protection further, the ARPE-19 cells were transfected with p62 and Nrf2 siRNAs for 24 h, and the roles of p62, Nrf2, and its target gene HO-1 in conferring protection against oxidative stress were studied with quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and the cell viability test. Results PS treatment at concentrations of 5 and 10 µM significantly enhanced cell survival from oxidative stress. The expression levels of an enzyme with antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory properties, HO-1, were increased by PS treatment and correlated strongly with cell survival. PS treatment did not elevate the expression levels of Nrf2 or its target genes, p62 or GSTP1, even though it had a clear effect on the expression of HO-1, another gene controlled by Nrf2. RNA interference analysis further confirmed the important role of Nrf2 and HO-1 in PS

  6. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-10-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy.

  7. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans.

    PubMed

    Werkmeister, René M; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A; Leitgeb, Rainer A; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26503332

  8. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    PubMed Central

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26503332

  9. Neuroglobin Protection in Retinal Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Anita S.Y.; Saraswathy, Sindhu; Rehak, Matus; Ueki, Mari

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a vertebrate globin that is predominantly expressed in the retina and brain. To explore the role of Ngb in retinal neuroprotection during ischemia reperfusion (IR), the authors examined the effect of Ngb overexpression in the retina in vivo by using Ngb-transgenic (Ngb-Tg) mice. Methods. Retinal IR was induced in Ngb overexpressing Ngb-Tg mice and wild type (WT) mice by cannulating the anterior chamber and transiently elevating the IOP for 60 minutes. After Day 7 of reperfusion, the authors evaluated Ngb mRNA and protein expression in nonischemic control as well as ischemic mice and its effect on retinal histology, mitochondrial oxidative stress, and apoptosis, using morphometry and immunohistochemistry, quantitative PCR analysis and Western blot techniques. Results. Ngb-Tg mice without ischemia overexpress Ngb mRNA 11.3-fold (SE ± 0.457, P < 0.05) higher than WT control mice, and this overexpression of Ngb protein was localized to the mitochondria of the ganglion cells, outer and inner plexiform layers, and photoreceptor inner segments. This overexpression of Ngb is associated with decreased mitochondrial DNA damage in Ngb-Tg mice with IR in comparison with WT. Ngb-Tg mice with IR also revealed significant preservation of retinal thickness, significantly less activated caspase 3 protein expression, and apoptosis in comparison with WT mice. Conclusions. Neuroglobin overexpression plays a neuroprotective role against retinal ischemia reperfusion injury due to decreasing of mitochondrial oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis. PMID:22167093

  10. Protective Effects of Human iPS-Derived Retinal Pigmented Epithelial Cells in Comparison with Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Human Neural Stem Cells on the Degenerating Retina in rd1 mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianan; Mandai, Michiko; Kamao, Hiroyuki; Hashiguchi, Tomoyo; Shikamura, Masayuki; Kawamata, Shin; Sugita, Sunao; Takahashi, Masayo

    2015-05-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of visual impairments characterized by progressive rod photoreceptor cell loss due to a genetic background. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) predominantly secreted by the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) has been reported to protect photoreceptors in retinal degeneration models, including rd1. In addition, clinical trials are currently underway outside Japan using human mesenchymal stromal cells and human neural stem cells to protect photoreceptors in RP and dry age-related macular degeneration, respectively. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the rescue effects of induced pluripotent stem (iPS)-RPE cells in comparison with those types of cells used in clinical trials on photoreceptor degeneration in rd1 mice. Cells were injected into the subretinal space of immune-suppressed 2-week-old rd1 mice. The results demonstrated that human iPS-RPE cells significantly attenuated photoreceptor degeneration on postoperative days (PODs) 14 and 21 and survived longer up to at least 12 weeks after operation than the other two types of graft cells with less immune responses and apoptosis. The mean PEDF concentration in the intraocular fluid in RPE-transplanted eyes was more than 1 µg/ml at PODs 14 and 21, and this may have contributed to the protective effect of RPE transplantation. Our findings suggest that iPS-RPE cells serve as a competent source to delay photoreceptor degeneration through stable survival in degenerating ocular environment and by releasing neuroprotective factors such as PEDF. PMID:25728228

  11. Retinal Light Damage: Mechanisms and Protection

    PubMed Central

    Organisciak, Daniel T.; Vaughan, Dana K.

    2009-01-01

    By its action on rhodopsin, light triggers the well-known visual transduction cascade, but can also induce cell damage and death through phototoxic mechanisms -- a comprehensive understanding of which is still elusive despite more than 40 years of research. Herein, we integrate recent experimental findings to address several hypotheses of retinal light damage, premised in part on the close anatomical and metabolic relationships between the photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium. We begin by reviewing the salient features of light damage, recently joined by evidence for retinal remodeling which has implications for the prognosis of recovery of function in retinal degenerations. We then consider select factors that influence the progression of the damage process and the extent of visual cell loss. Traditional, genetically-modified, and emerging animal models are discussed, with particular emphasis on cone visual cells. Exogenous and endogenous retinal protective factors are explored, with implications for light damage mechanisms and some suggested avenues for future research. Synergies are known to exist between our long term light environment and photoreceptor cell death in retinal disease. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of light damage in a variety of animal models can provide valuable insights into the effects of light in clinical disorders and may form the basis of future therapies to prevent or delay visual cell loss. PMID:19951742

  12. N-Acetylcysteine Amide Protects Against Oxidative Stress–Induced Microparticle Release From Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Carver, Kyle A.; Yang, Dongli

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Oxidative stress is a major factor involved in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) apoptosis that underlies AMD. Drusen, extracellular lipid- and protein-containing deposits, are strongly associated with the development of AMD. Cell-derived microparticles (MPs) are small membrane-bound vesicles shed from cells. The purpose of this study was to determine if oxidative stress drives MP release from RPE cells, to assess whether these MPs carry membrane complement regulatory proteins (mCRPs: CD46, CD55, and CD59), and to evaluate the effects of a thiol antioxidant on oxidative stress–induced MP release. Methods Retinal pigment epithelium cells isolated from human donor eyes were cultured and treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to induce oxidative stress. Isolated MPs were fixed for transmission electron microscopy or processed for component analysis by flow cytometry, Western blot analysis, and confocal microscopy. Results Transmission electron microscopy showed that MPs ranged in diameter from 100 to 1000 nm. H2O2 treatment led to time- and dose-dependent elevations in MPs with externalized phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine, known markers of MPs. These increases were strongly correlated to RPE apoptosis. Oxidative stress significantly increased the release of mCRP-positive MPs, which were prevented by a thiol antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA). Conclusions This is the first evidence that oxidative stress induces cultured human RPE cells to release MPs that carry mCRPs on their surface. The levels of released MPs are strongly correlated with RPE apoptosis. N-acetylcysteine amide prevents oxidative stress–induced effects. Our findings indicate that oxidative stress reduces mCRPs on the RPE surface through releasing MPs. PMID:26842754

  13. Autocrine protective mechanisms of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve crush.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shun-Ping; Fang, Kan-Tang; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Huang, Tzu-Lun; Wen, Yao-Tseng; Tsai, Rong-Kung

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the role of autocrine mechanisms in the anti-apoptotic effects of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) after optic nerve (ON) crush. We observed that both G-CSF and G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) are expressed in normal rat retina. Further dual immunofluorescence staining showed G-CSFR immunoreactive cells were colocalized with RGCs, Müller cells, horizontal and amacrine cells. These results confirm that G-CSF is an endogenous ligand in the retina. The semi-quantitative RT-PCR finding demonstrated the transcription levels of G-CSF and G-CSFR were up-regulated after ON crush injury. G-CSF treatment further increased and prolonged the expression level of G-CSFR in the retina. G-CSF has been shown to enhance transdifferentiation of the mobilized hematopoietic stem cells into tissue to repair central nervous system injury. We test the hypothesis that the hematopoietic stem cells recruited by G-CSF treatment can transdifferentiate into RGCs after ON crush by performing sublethal irradiation of the rats 5 days before ON crush. The flow cytometric analysis showed the number of CD34 positive cells in the peripheral blood is significantly lower in the irradiated, crushed and G-CSF-treated group than the sham control group or crush and G-CSF treated group. Nevertheless, the G-CSF treatment enhances the RGC survival after sublethal irradiation and ON crush injury. These data indicate that G-CSF seems unlikely to induce hematopoietic stem cell transdifferentiation into RGCs after ON crush injury. In conclusion, G-CSF may serve an endogenous protective signaling in the retina through direct activation of intrinsic G-CSF receptors and downstream signaling pathways to rescue RGCs after ON crush injury, exogenous G-CSF administration can enhance the anti-apoptotic effects on RGCs. PMID:26518178

  14. Molecular pharmacodynamics of emixustat in protection against retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianye; Kiser, Philip D; Badiee, Mohsen; Palczewska, Grazyna; Dong, Zhiqian; Golczak, Marcin; Tochtrop, Gregory P; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-07-01

    Emixustat is a visual cycle modulator that has entered clinical trials as a treatment for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This molecule has been proposed to inhibit the visual cycle isomerase RPE65, thereby slowing regeneration of 11-cis-retinal and reducing production of retinaldehyde condensation byproducts that may be involved in AMD pathology. Previously, we reported that all-trans-retinal (atRAL) is directly cytotoxic and that certain primary amine compounds that transiently sequester atRAL via Schiff base formation ameliorate retinal degeneration. Here, we have shown that emixustat stereoselectively inhibits RPE65 by direct active site binding. However, we detected the presence of emixustat-atRAL Schiff base conjugates, indicating that emixustat also acts as a retinal scavenger, which may contribute to its therapeutic effects. Using agents that lack either RPE65 inhibitory activity or the capacity to sequester atRAL, we assessed the relative importance of these 2 modes of action in protection against retinal phototoxicity in mice. The atRAL sequestrant QEA-B-001-NH2 conferred protection against phototoxicity without inhibiting RPE65, whereas an emixustat derivative incapable of atRAL sequestration was minimally protective, despite direct inhibition of RPE65. These data indicate that atRAL sequestration is an essential mechanism underlying the protective effects of emixustat and related compounds against retinal phototoxicity. Moreover, atRAL sequestration should be considered in the design of next-generation visual cycle modulators. PMID:26075817

  15. Molecular pharmacodynamics of emixustat in protection against retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianye; Kiser, Philip D.; Badiee, Mohsen; Palczewska, Grazyna; Dong, Zhiqian; Golczak, Marcin; Tochtrop, Gregory P.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Emixustat is a visual cycle modulator that has entered clinical trials as a treatment for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This molecule has been proposed to inhibit the visual cycle isomerase RPE65, thereby slowing regeneration of 11-cis-retinal and reducing production of retinaldehyde condensation byproducts that may be involved in AMD pathology. Previously, we reported that all-trans-retinal (atRAL) is directly cytotoxic and that certain primary amine compounds that transiently sequester atRAL via Schiff base formation ameliorate retinal degeneration. Here, we have shown that emixustat stereoselectively inhibits RPE65 by direct active site binding. However, we detected the presence of emixustat-atRAL Schiff base conjugates, indicating that emixustat also acts as a retinal scavenger, which may contribute to its therapeutic effects. Using agents that lack either RPE65 inhibitory activity or the capacity to sequester atRAL, we assessed the relative importance of these 2 modes of action in protection against retinal phototoxicity in mice. The atRAL sequestrant QEA-B-001-NH2 conferred protection against phototoxicity without inhibiting RPE65, whereas an emixustat derivative incapable of atRAL sequestration was minimally protective, despite direct inhibition of RPE65. These data indicate that atRAL sequestration is an essential mechanism underlying the protective effects of emixustat and related compounds against retinal phototoxicity. Moreover, atRAL sequestration should be considered in the design of next-generation visual cycle modulators. PMID:26075817

  16. Human retinal gene therapy for Leber congenital amaurosis shows advancing retinal degeneration despite enduring visual improvement.

    PubMed

    Cideciyan, Artur V; Jacobson, Samuel G; Beltran, William A; Sumaroka, Alexander; Swider, Malgorzata; Iwabe, Simone; Roman, Alejandro J; Olivares, Melani B; Schwartz, Sharon B; Komáromy, András M; Hauswirth, William W; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2013-02-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) associated with retinal pigment epithelium-specific protein 65 kDa (RPE65) mutations is a severe hereditary blindness resulting from both dysfunction and degeneration of photoreceptors. Clinical trials with gene augmentation therapy have shown partial reversal of the dysfunction, but the effects on the degeneration are not known. We evaluated the consequences of gene therapy on retinal degeneration in patients with RPE65-LCA and its canine model. In untreated RPE65-LCA patients, there was dysfunction and degeneration of photoreceptors, even at the earliest ages. Examined serially over years, the outer photoreceptor nuclear layer showed progressive thinning. Treated RPE65-LCA showed substantial visual improvement in the short term and no detectable decline from this new level over the long term. However, retinal degeneration continued to progress unabated. In RPE65-mutant dogs, the first one-quarter of their lifespan showed only dysfunction, and there was normal outer photoreceptor nuclear layer thickness retina-wide. Dogs treated during the earlier dysfunction-only stage showed improved visual function and dramatic protection of treated photoreceptors from degeneration when measured 5-11 y later. Dogs treated later during the combined dysfunction and degeneration stage also showed visual function improvement, but photoreceptor loss continued unabated, the same as in human RPE65-LCA. The results suggest that, in RPE65 disease treatment, protection from visual function deterioration cannot be assumed to imply protection from degeneration. The effects of gene augmentation therapy are complex and suggest a need for a combinatorial strategy in RPE65-LCA to not only improve function in the short term but also slow retinal degeneration in the long term. PMID:23341635

  17. Aerobic exercise protects retinal function and structure from light-induced retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Eric C; Han, Moon K; Sellers, Jana T; Chrenek, Micah A; Hanif, Adam; Gogniat, Marissa A; Boatright, Jeffrey H; Pardue, Machelle T

    2014-02-12

    Aerobic exercise is a common intervention for rehabilitation of motor, and more recently, cognitive function (Intlekofer and Cotman, 2013; Wood et al., 2012). While the underlying mechanisms are complex, BDNF may mediate much of the beneficial effects of exercise to these neurons (Ploughman et al., 2007; Griffin et al., 2011; Real et al., 2013). We studied the effects of aerobic exercise on retinal neurons undergoing degeneration. We exercised wild-type BALB/c mice on a treadmill (10 m/min for 1 h) for 5 d/week or placed control mice on static treadmills. After 2 weeks of exercise, mice were exposed to either toxic bright light (10,000 lux) for 4 h to induce photoreceptor degeneration or maintenance dim light (25 lux). Bright light caused 75% loss of both retinal function and photoreceptor numbers. However, exercised mice exposed to bright light had 2 times greater retinal function and photoreceptor nuclei than inactive mice exposed to bright light. In addition, exercise increased retinal BDNF protein levels by 20% compared with inactive mice. Systemic injections of a BDNF tropomyosin-receptor-kinase (TrkB) receptor antagonist reduced retinal function and photoreceptor nuclei counts in exercised mice to inactive levels, effectively blocking the protective effects seen with aerobic exercise. The data suggest that aerobic exercise is neuroprotective for retinal degeneration and that this effect is mediated by BDNF signaling. PMID:24523530

  18. Transplantation of human retinal pigment epithelial cells in the nucleus accumbens of cocaine self-administering rats provides protection from seeking.

    PubMed

    Venkiteswaran, Kala; Alexander, Danielle N; Puhl, Matthew D; Rao, Anand; Piquet, Amanda L; Nyland, Jennifer E; Subramanian, Megha P; Iyer, Puja; Boisvert, Matthew M; Handly, Erin; Subramanian, Thyagarajan; Grigson, Patricia Sue

    2016-05-01

    Chronic exposure to drugs and alcohol leads to damage to dopaminergic neurons and their projections in the 'reward pathway' that originate in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and terminate in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). This damage is thought to contribute to the signature symptom of addiction: chronic relapse. In this study we show that bilateral transplants of human retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPECs), a cell mediated dopaminergic and trophic neuromodulator, into the medial shell of the NAc, rescue rats with a history of high rates of cocaine self-administration from drug-seeking when returned, after 2 weeks of abstinence, to the drug-associated chamber under extinction conditions (i.e., with no drug available). Excellent survival was noted for the transplant of RPECs in the shell and/or the core of the NAc bilaterally in all rats that showed behavioral recovery from cocaine seeking. Design based unbiased stereology of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive cell bodies in the VTA showed better preservation (p<0.035) in transplanted animals compared to control animals. This experiment shows that the RPEC graft provides beneficial effects to prevent drug seeking in drug addiction via its effects directly on the NAc and its neural network with the VTA. PMID:26562520

  19. SiC protective coating for photovoltaic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xin; Kane, Sheryl; Cogan, Stuart; Lorach, Henri; Galambos, Ludwig; Huie, Philip; Mathieson, Keith; Kamins, Theodore; Harris, James; Palanker, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Objective. To evaluate plasma-enhanced, chemically vapor deposited (PECVD) amorphous silicon carbide (α-SiC:H) as a protective coating for retinal prostheses and other implantable devices, and to study their failure mechanisms in vivo. Approach. Retinal prostheses were implanted in rats sub-retinally for up to 1 year. Degradation of implants was characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Dissolution rates of SiC, SiN x and thermal SiO2 were measured in accelerated soaking tests in saline at 87 °C. Defects in SiC films were revealed and analyzed by selectively removing the materials underneath those defects. Main results. At 87 °C SiN x dissolved at 18.3 ± 0.3 nm d‑1, while SiO2 grown at high temperature (1000 °C) dissolved at 0.104 ± 0.008 nm d‑1. SiC films demonstrated the best stability, with no quantifiable change after 112 d. Defects in thin SiC films appeared primarily over complicated topography and rough surfaces. Significance. SiC coatings demonstrating no erosion in accelerated aging test for 112 d at 87 °C, equivalent to about 10 years in vivo, can offer effective protection of the implants. Photovoltaic retinal prostheses with PECVD SiC coatings exhibited effective protection from erosion during the 4 month follow-up in vivo. The optimal thickness of SiC layers is about 560 nm, as defined by anti-reflective properties and by sufficient coverage to eliminate defects.

  20. Protective effect of autophagy on human retinal pigment epithelial cells against lipofuscin fluorophore A2E: implications for age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J; Bai, Y; Huang, L; Qi, Y; Zhang, Q; Li, S; Wu, Y; Li, X

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of central vision loss in the elderly. Degeneration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is a crucial causative factor responsible for the onset and progression of AMD. A2E, a major component of toxic lipofuscin implicated in AMD, is deposited in RPE cells with age. However, the mechanism whereby A2E may contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD remains unclear. We demonstrated that A2E was a danger signal of RPE cells, which induced autophagy and decreased cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Within 15 min after the treatment of RPE with 25 μM A2E, the induction of autophagosome was detected by transmission electron microscopy. After continuous incubating RPE cells with A2E, intense punctate staining of LC3 and increased expression of LC3-II and Beclin-1 were identified. Meanwhile, the levels of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM), interleukin (IL)1β, IL2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-22, macrophage cationic peptide (MCP)-1, stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1, and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) were elevated. The autophagic inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and activator rapamycin were also used to verify the effect of autophagy on RPE cells against A2E. Our results revealed that 3-MA decreased the autophagosomes and LC3 puncta induced by A2E, increased inflammation-associated protein expression including ICAM, IL1β, IL2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-22, and SDF-1, and upregulated VEGFA expression. Whereas rapamycin augmented the A2E-mediated autophagy, attenuated protein expression of inflammation-associated and angiogenic factors, and blocked the Akt/mTOR pathway. Taken together, A2E induces autophagy in RPE cells at the early stage of incubation, and this autophagic response can be inhibited by 3-MA or augmented by rapamycin via the mTOR pathway. The enhancement of autophagy has a protective role in RPE cells against the adverse effects of A2E by reducing the

  1. Protective effect of autophagy on human retinal pigment epithelial cells against lipofuscin fluorophore A2E: implications for age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Bai, Y; Huang, L; Qi, Y; Zhang, Q; Li, S; Wu, Y; Li, X

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of central vision loss in the elderly. Degeneration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is a crucial causative factor responsible for the onset and progression of AMD. A2E, a major component of toxic lipofuscin implicated in AMD, is deposited in RPE cells with age. However, the mechanism whereby A2E may contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD remains unclear. We demonstrated that A2E was a danger signal of RPE cells, which induced autophagy and decreased cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Within 15 min after the treatment of RPE with 25 μM A2E, the induction of autophagosome was detected by transmission electron microscopy. After continuous incubating RPE cells with A2E, intense punctate staining of LC3 and increased expression of LC3-II and Beclin-1 were identified. Meanwhile, the levels of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM), interleukin (IL)1β, IL2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-22, macrophage cationic peptide (MCP)-1, stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1, and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) were elevated. The autophagic inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and activator rapamycin were also used to verify the effect of autophagy on RPE cells against A2E. Our results revealed that 3-MA decreased the autophagosomes and LC3 puncta induced by A2E, increased inflammation-associated protein expression including ICAM, IL1β, IL2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-22, and SDF-1, and upregulated VEGFA expression. Whereas rapamycin augmented the A2E-mediated autophagy, attenuated protein expression of inflammation-associated and angiogenic factors, and blocked the Akt/mTOR pathway. Taken together, A2E induces autophagy in RPE cells at the early stage of incubation, and this autophagic response can be inhibited by 3-MA or augmented by rapamycin via the mTOR pathway. The enhancement of autophagy has a protective role in RPE cells against the adverse effects of A2E by reducing the

  2. Inferior retinal light exposure is more effective than superior retinal exposure in suppressing melatonin in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glickman, Gena; Hanifin, John P.; Rollag, Mark D.; Wang, Jenny; Cooper, Howard; Brainard, George C.

    2003-01-01

    Illumination of different areas of the human retina elicits differences in acute light-induced suppression of melatonin. The aim of this study was to compare changes in plasma melatonin levels when light exposures of equal illuminance and equal photon dose were administered to superior, inferior, and full retinal fields. Nine healthy subjects participated in the study. Plexiglass eye shields were modified to permit selective exposure of the superior and inferior halves of the retinas of each subject. The Humphrey Visual Field Analyzer was used both to confirm intact full visual fields and to quantify exposure of upper and lower visual fields. On study nights, eyes were dilated, and subjects were exposed to patternless white light for 90 min between 0200 and 0330 under five conditions: (1) full retinal exposure at 200 lux, (2) full retinal exposure at 100 lux, (3) inferior retinal exposure at 200 lux, (4) superior retinal exposure at 200 lux, and (5) a dark-exposed control. Plasma melatonin levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. ANOVA demonstrated a significant effect of exposure condition (F = 5.91, p < 0.005). Post hoc Fisher PLSD tests showed significant (p < 0.05) melatonin suppression of both full retinal exposures as well as the inferior retinal exposure; however, superior retinal exposure was significantly less effective in suppressing melatonin. Furthermore, suppression with superior retinal exposure was not significantly different from that of the dark control condition. The results indicate that the inferior retina contributes more to the light-induced suppression of melatonin than the superior retina at the photon dosages tested in this study. Findings suggest a greater sensitivity or denser distribution of photoreceptors in the inferior retina are involved in light detection for the retinohypothalamic tract of humans.

  3. Tetrandrine protects mouse retinal ganglion cells from ischemic injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weiyi; Yang, Chen; Lu, Jing; Huang, Ping; Barnstable, Colin J; Zhang, Chun; Zhang, Samuel S

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the protective effects of tetrandrine (Tet) on murine ischemia-injured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). For this, we used serum deprivation cell model, glutamate and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced RGC-5 cell death models, and staurosporine-differentiated neuron-like RGC-5 in vitro. We also investigated cell survival of purified primary-cultured RGCs treated with Tet. An in vivo retinal ischemia/reperfusion model was used to examine RGC survival after Tet administration 1 day before ischemia. We found that Tet affected RGC-5 survival in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Compared to dimethyl sulfoxide treatment, Tet increased the numbers of RGC-5 cells by 30% at 72 hours. After 48 hours, Tet protected staurosporine-induced RGC-5 cells from serum deprivation-induced cell death and significantly increased the relative number of cells cultured with 1 mM H2O2 (P<0.01). Several concentrations of Tet significantly prevented 25-mM-glutamate-induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Tet also increased primary RGC survival after 72 and 96 hours. Tet administration (10 μM, 2 μL) 1 day before retinal ischemia showed RGC layer loss (greater survival), which was less than those in groups with phosphate-buffered saline intravitreal injection plus ischemia in the central (P=0.005, n=6), middle (P=0.018, n=6), and peripheral (P=0.017, n=6) parts of the retina. Thus, Tet conferred protective effects on serum deprivation models of staurosporine-differentiated neuron-like RGC-5 cells and primary cultured murine RGCs. Furthermore, Tet showed greater in vivo protective effects on RGCs 1 day after ischemia. Tet and ciliary neurotrophic factor maintained the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) of primary cultured RGCs and inhibited the expression of activated caspase-3 and bcl-2 in ischemia/reperfusion-insult retinas. PMID:24711693

  4. The novel triterpenoid RTA 408 protects human retinal pigment epithelial cells against H2O2-induced cell injury via NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaobin; Ward, Keith; Xavier, Christy; Jann, Jamieson; Clark, Abbot F; Pang, Iok-Hou; Wu, Hongli

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative stress-induced retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell damage is an important factor in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Previous studies have shown that RTA 408, a synthetic triterpenoid compound, potently activates Nrf2. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of RTA 408 in cultured RPE cells during oxidative stress and to determine the effects of RTA 408 on Nrf2 and its downstream target genes. Primary human RPE cells were pretreated with RTA 408 and then incubated in 200μM H2O2 for 6h. Cell viability was measured with the WST-8 assay. Apoptosis was quantitatively measured by annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining and Hoechst 33342 fluorescent staining. Reduced (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) were measured using colorimetric assays. Nrf2 activation and its downstream effects on phase II enzymes were examined by Western blot. Treatment of RPE cells with nanomolar ranges (10 and 100nM) of RTA 408 markedly attenuated H2O2-induced viability loss and apoptosis. RTA 408 pretreatment significantly protected cells from oxidative stress-induced GSH loss, GSSG formation and decreased ROS production. RTA 408 activated Nrf2 and increased the expression of its downstream genes, such as HO-1, NQO1, SOD2, catalase, Grx1, and Trx1. Consequently, the enzyme activities of NQO1, Grx1, and Trx1 were fully protected by RTA 408 pretreatment under oxidative stress. Moreover, knockdown of Nrf2 by siRNA significantly reduced the cytoprotective effects of RTA 408. In conclusion, our data suggest that RTA 408 protect primary human RPE cells from oxidative stress-induced damage by activating Nrf2 and its downstream genes. PMID:26773873

  5. The novel triterpenoid RTA 408 protects human retinal pigment epithelial cells against H2O2-induced cell injury via NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaobin; Ward, Keith; Xavier, Christy; Jann, Jamieson; Clark, Abbot F.; Pang, Iok-Hou; Wu, Hongli

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress-induced retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell damage is an important factor in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Previous studies have shown that RTA 408, a synthetic triterpenoid compound, potently activates Nrf2. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of RTA 408 in cultured RPE cells during oxidative stress and to determine the effects of RTA 408 on Nrf2 and its downstream target genes. Primary human RPE cells were pretreated with RTA 408 and then incubated in 200 μM H2O2 for 6 h. Cell viability was measured with the WST-8 assay. Apoptosis was quantitatively measured by annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining and Hoechst 33342 fluorescent staining. Reduced (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) were measured using colorimetric assays. Nrf2 activation and its downstream effects on phase II enzymes were examined by Western blot. Treatment of RPE cells with nanomolar ranges (10 and 100 nM) of RTA 408 markedly attenuated H2O2-induced viability loss and apoptosis. RTA 408 pretreatment significantly protected cells from oxidative stress-induced GSH loss, GSSG formation and decreased ROS production. RTA 408 activated Nrf2 and increased the expression of its downstream genes, such as HO-1, NQO1, SOD2, catalase, Grx1, and Trx1. Consequently, the enzyme activities of NQO1, Grx1, and Trx1 were fully protected by RTA 408 pretreatment under oxidative stress. Moreover, knockdown of Nrf2 by siRNA significantly reduced the cytoprotective effects of RTA 408. In conclusion, our data suggest that RTA 408 protect primary human RPE cells from oxidative stress-induced damage by activating Nrf2 and its downstream genes. PMID:26773873

  6. Using human induced pluripotent stem cells to treat retinal disease☆

    PubMed Central

    Borooah, S.; Phillips, M.J.; Bilican, B.; Wright, A.F.; Wilmut, I.; Chandran, S.; Gamm, D.; Dhillon, B.

    2013-01-01

    The eye is an ideal target for exploiting the potential of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) technology in order to understand disease pathways and explore novel therapeutic strategies for inherited retinal disease. The aim of this article is to map the pathway from state-of-the art laboratory-based discoveries to realising the translational potential of this emerging technique. We describe the relevance and routes to establishing hiPSCs in selected models of human retinal disease. Additionally, we define pathways for applying hiPSC technology in treating currently incurable, progressive and blinding retinal disease. PMID:24104210

  7. Protective Effect of Proanthocyanidins from Sea Buckthorn (Hippophae Rhamnoides L.) Seed against Visible Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Zhao, Liang; Huo, Yazhen; Zhou, Feng; Wu, Wei; Lu, Feng; Yang, Xue; Guo, Xiaoxuan; Chen, Peng; Deng, Qianchun; Ji, Baoping

    2016-01-01

    Dietary proanthocyanidins (PACs) as health-protective agents have become an important area of human nutrition research because of their potent bioactivities. We investigated the retinoprotective effects of PACs from sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) seed against visible light-induced retinal degeneration in vivo. Pigmented rabbits were orally administered sea buckthorn seed PACs (50 and 100 mg/kg/day) for 14 consecutive days of pre-illumination and seven consecutive days of post-illumination. Retinal function was quantified via electroretinography 7 days after light exposure. Retinal damage was evaluated by measuring the thickness of the full-thickness retina and outer nuclear layer 7 days after light exposure. Sea buckthorn seed PACs significantly attenuated the destruction of electroretinograms and maintained the retinal structure. Increased retinal photooxidative damage was expressed by the depletion of glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities, the decrease of total antioxidant capacity level and the increase of malondialdehyde level. Light exposure induced a significant increase of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6) and angiogenesis (VEGF) levels in retina. Light exposure upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and caspase-3 and downregulated the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. However, sea buckthorn seed PACs ameliorated these changes induced by light exposure. Sea buckthorn seed PACs mediated the protective effect against light-induced retinal degeneration via antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic mechanisms. PMID:27144578

  8. Protective Effect of Proanthocyanidins from Sea Buckthorn (Hippophae Rhamnoides L.) Seed against Visible Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Zhao, Liang; Huo, Yazhen; Zhou, Feng; Wu, Wei; Lu, Feng; Yang, Xue; Guo, Xiaoxuan; Chen, Peng; Deng, Qianchun; Ji, Baoping

    2016-01-01

    Dietary proanthocyanidins (PACs) as health-protective agents have become an important area of human nutrition research because of their potent bioactivities. We investigated the retinoprotective effects of PACs from sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) seed against visible light-induced retinal degeneration in vivo. Pigmented rabbits were orally administered sea buckthorn seed PACs (50 and 100 mg/kg/day) for 14 consecutive days of pre-illumination and seven consecutive days of post-illumination. Retinal function was quantified via electroretinography 7 days after light exposure. Retinal damage was evaluated by measuring the thickness of the full-thickness retina and outer nuclear layer 7 days after light exposure. Sea buckthorn seed PACs significantly attenuated the destruction of electroretinograms and maintained the retinal structure. Increased retinal photooxidative damage was expressed by the depletion of glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities, the decrease of total antioxidant capacity level and the increase of malondialdehyde level. Light exposure induced a significant increase of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6) and angiogenesis (VEGF) levels in retina. Light exposure upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and caspase-3 and downregulated the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. However, sea buckthorn seed PACs ameliorated these changes induced by light exposure. Sea buckthorn seed PACs mediated the protective effect against light-induced retinal degeneration via antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic mechanisms. PMID:27144578

  9. Efficacy and Safety of Human Retinal Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Semo, Ma'ayan; Haamedi, Nasrin; Stevanato, Lara; Carter, David; Brooke, Gary; Young, Michael; Coffey, Peter; Sinden, John; Patel, Sara; Vugler, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We assessed the long-term efficacy and safety of human retinal progenitor cells (hRPC) using established rodent models. Methods Efficacy of hRPC was tested initially in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) dystrophic rats immunosuppressed with cyclosporine/dexamethasone. Due to adverse effects of dexamethasone, this drug was omitted from a subsequent dose-ranging study, where different hRPC doses were tested for their ability to preserve visual function (measured by optokinetic head tracking) and retinal structure in RCS rats at 3 to 6 months after grafting. Safety of hRPC was assessed by subretinal transplantation into wild type (WT) rats and NIH-III nude mice, with analysis at 3 to 6 and 9 months after grafting, respectively. Results The optimal dose of hRPC for preserving visual function/retinal structure in dystrophic rats was 50,000 to 100,000 cells. Human retinal progenitor cells integrated/survived in dystrophic and WT rat retina up to 6 months after grafting and expressed nestin, vimentin, GFAP, and βIII tubulin. Vision and retinal structure remained normal in WT rats injected with hRPC and there was no evidence of tumors. A comparison between dexamethasone-treated and untreated dystrophic rats at 3 months after grafting revealed an unexpected reduction in the baseline visual acuity of dexamethasone-treated animals. Conclusions Human retinal progenitor cells appear safe and efficacious in the preclinical models used here. Translational Relevance Human retinal progenitor cells could be deployed during early stages of retinal degeneration or in regions of intact retina, without adverse effects on visual function. The ability of dexamethasone to reduce baseline visual acuity in RCS dystrophic rats has important implications for the interpretation of preclinical and clinical cell transplant studies. PMID:27486556

  10. Pericytes Derived from Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Protect against Retinal Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mendel, Thomas A.; Clabough, Erin B. D.; Kao, David S.; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.; Durham, Jennifer T.; Zotter, Brendan C.; Seaman, Scott A.; Cronk, Stephen M.; Rakoczy, Elizabeth P.; Katz, Adam J.; Herman, Ira M.; Peirce, Shayn M.; Yates, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Retinal vasculopathies, including diabetic retinopathy (DR), threaten the vision of over 100 million people. Retinal pericytes are critical for microvascular control, supporting retinal endothelial cells via direct contact and paracrine mechanisms. With pericyte death or loss, endothelial dysfunction ensues, resulting in hypoxic insult, pathologic angiogenesis, and ultimately blindness. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) differentiate into pericytes, suggesting they may be useful as a protective and regenerative cellular therapy for retinal vascular disease. In this study, we examine the ability of ASCs to differentiate into pericytes that can stabilize retinal vessels in multiple pre-clinical models of retinal vasculopathy. Methodology/Principal Findings We found that ASCs express pericyte-specific markers in vitro. When injected intravitreally into the murine eye subjected to oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR), ASCs were capable of migrating to and integrating with the retinal vasculature. Integrated ASCs maintained marker expression and pericyte-like morphology in vivo for at least 2 months. ASCs injected after OIR vessel destabilization and ablation enhanced vessel regrowth (16% reduction in avascular area). ASCs injected intravitreally before OIR vessel destabilization prevented retinal capillary dropout (53% reduction). Treatment of ASCs with transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1) enhanced hASC pericyte function, in a manner similar to native retinal pericytes, with increased marker expression of smooth muscle actin, cellular contractility, endothelial stabilization, and microvascular protection in OIR. Finally, injected ASCs prevented capillary loss in the diabetic retinopathic Akimba mouse (79% reduction 2 months after injection). Conclusions/Significance ASC-derived pericytes can integrate with retinal vasculature, adopting both pericyte morphology and marker expression, and provide functional vascular protection in multiple murine models of

  11. Beneficial protective effect of pramipexole on light-induced retinal damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Shibagaki, Keiichi; Okamoto, Kazuyoshi; Katsuta, Osamu; Nakamura, Masatsugu

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the effects of pramipexole, a potent dopamine receptor D2/D3 agonist, on light-induced retinal damage in mice, H2O2-induced retinal pigment epithelium ARPE-19 cell injury in humans, and hydroxyl radical scavenging activity in a cell-free system. Pramipexole (0.1 and 1 mg/kg body weight) was orally administered to mice 1 h before light exposure (5000 lux, 2 h). Electrophysiological and morphologic studies were performed to evaluate the effects of the pramipexole on light-induced retinal damage in mice. Pramipexole significantly prevented the reduction of the a- and b-wave electroretinogram (ERG) amplitudes caused by light exposure in a dose-dependent manner. In parallel, damage to the inner and outer segments (IS/OS) of the photoreceptors, loss of photoreceptor nuclei, and the number of Tdt-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) caused by light exposure were notably ameliorated by pramipexole. Additionally, pramipexole suppressed H2O2-induced ARPE-19 cell death in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. The effect of pramipexole was significant at concentrations of 10(-6) M or higher. Pramipexole also significantly prevented H2O2-induced activation of caspases-3/7 and the intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a concentration-dependent manner ranging from 10(-5) to 10(-3) M. Furthermore, pramipexole increased the scavenging activity toward a hydroxyl radical generated from H2O2 in a Fenton reaction. Our results suggest that pramipexole protects against light-induced retinal damage as an antioxidant and that it may be a novel and effective therapy for retinal degenerative disorders, such as dry age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26213307

  12. Erythropoietin administration protects retinal neurons from acute ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Junk, Anna K.; Mammis, Antonios; Savitz, Sean I.; Singh, Manjeet; Roth, Steven; Malhotra, Samit; Rosenbaum, Pearl S.; Cerami, Anthony; Brines, Michael; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.

    2002-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) plays an important role in the brain's response to neuronal injury. Systemic administration of recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) protects neurons from injury after middle cerebral artery occlusion, traumatic brain injury, neuroinflammation, and excitotoxicity. Protection is in part mediated by antiapoptotic mechanisms. We conducted parallel studies of rhEPO in a model of transient global retinal ischemia induced by raising intraocular pressure, which is a clinically relevant model for retinal diseases. We observed abundant expression of EPO receptor (EPO-R) throughout the ischemic retina. Neutralization of endogenous EPO with soluble EPO-R exacerbated ischemic injury, which supports a crucial role for an endogenous EPO/EPO-R system in the survival and recovery of neurons after an ischemic insult. Systemic administration of rhEPO before or immediately after retinal ischemia not only reduced histopathological damage but also promoted functional recovery as assessed by electroretinography. Exogenous EPO also significantly diminished terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP end labeling labeling of neurons in the ischemic retina, implying an antiapoptotic mechanism of action. These results further establish EPO as a neuroprotective agent in acute neuronal ischemic injury. PMID:12130665

  13. Protection against methanol-induced retinal toxicity by LED photostimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelan, Harry T.; Wong-Riley, Margaret T. T.; Eells, Janis T.

    2002-06-01

    We have initiated experiments designed to test the hypothesis that 670-nm Light-Emitting Diode (LED) exposure will attenuate formate-induced retinal dysfunction in a rodent model of methanol toxicity. Methanol intoxication produces toxic injury to the retina. The toxic metabolite formed in methanol intoxication is formic acid, a mitochondrial toxin known to inhibit cytochrome oxidase activity. 670-nm LED light has been hypothesized to act by stimulating cytochrome oxidase activity. To test this hypothesis, one group of animals was intoxicated with methanol, a second group was intoxicated with methanol and LED-treated and a third group was untreated. LED treatment (670 nm for 1 min 45 seconds equals 50 mW/cm2, 4 joules/cm2) was administered at 5, 25, and 50 hours after the initial dose of methanol. At 72 hours of methanol intoxication, retinal function was assessed by measurement of ERG responses and retinas were prepared for histologic analysis. ERG responses recorded in methanol-intoxicated animals revealed profound attenuation of both rod-dominated and UV-cone mediated responses. In contrast, methanol- intoxicated animals exposed to LED treatment exhibited a nearly complete recovery of rod-dominated ERG responses and a slight improvement of UV-cone mediated ERG responses. LED treatment also protected the retina against the histopathologic changes produced by formate in methanol intoxication. These data provide evidence that LED phototherapy protects the retina against the cytotoxic actions of formate and are consistent with the hypothesis that LED photostimulation improves mitochondrial respiratory chain function.

  14. Office for Human Research Protections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Office for Human Research Protections The Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) provides leadership in the protection of the rights, welfare, and wellbeing of human subjects involved in ...

  15. Automated spectroscopic imaging of oxygen saturation in human retinal vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, D.; Sueda, S.; Matsuoka, N.; Yoshinaga, Y.; Enaida, H.; Okada, T.; Ishibashi, T.

    2009-02-01

    A new automatic visualization procedure for the oxygen saturation imaging from multi-spectral imaging of human retinal vessels has been proposed. Two-wavelength retinal fundus images at 545 and 560 nm, which were oxygen insensitive and oxygen sensitive, respectively, were captured by CCD cameras simultaneously through a beam splitter and interference filters. We applied a morphological processing technique to presume a distribution of incident light including the vessel parts and an optical density (OD) image of each wavelength image. And the OD ratio (OD560/OD545) image was calculated as a relative indicator of oxygen saturation. Furthermore, processing of line convergence index filter was adopted to identify the retinal vessels. Clear difference between retinal arteries and veins was observed in the automated imaging method. In addition, the decrease of oxygen saturation in the retinal artery without breathing could be monitored by the ODR. This method is possible to be applied to real-time monitoring for oxygen saturation of retinal vessels.

  16. Primary amines protect against retinal degeneration in mouse models of retinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Akiko; Golczak, Marcin; Chen, Yu; Okano, Kiichiro; Kohno, Hideo; Shiose, Satomi; Ishikawa, Kaede; Harte, William; Palczewska, Grazyna; Maeda, Tadao; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Vertebrate vision is initiated by photoisomerization of the visual pigment chromophore, 11-cis-retinal, and is maintained by continuous regeneration of this retinoid through a series of reactions termed the retinoid cycle. However, toxic side reaction products, especially those involving reactive aldehyde groups of the photoisomered product, all-trans-retinal, can cause severe retinal pathology. Here we lowered peak concentrations of free all-trans-retinal with primary amine-containing FDA-approved drugs that did not inhibit chromophore regeneration in mouse models of retinal degeneration. Schiff base adducts between all-trans-retinal and these amines were identified by mass spectrometry. Adducts were observed in mouse eyes only when an experimental drug protected the retina from degeneration in both short-term and long-term treatment experiments. This study demonstrates a molecular basis of all-trans-retinal-induced retinal pathology and identifies an assemblage of FDA-approved compounds with protective effects against this pathology in a mouse model that displays features of Stargardt’s and age-related retinal degeneration. PMID:22198730

  17. Phloroglucinol protects retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptor against all-trans-retinal-induced toxicity and inhibits A2E formation.

    PubMed

    Cia, David; Cubizolle, Aurélie; Crauste, Céline; Jacquemot, Nathalie; Guillou, Laurent; Vigor, Claire; Angebault, Claire; Hamel, Christian P; Vercauteren, Joseph; Brabet, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    Among retinal macular diseases, the juvenile recessive Stargardt disease and the age-related degenerative disease arise from carbonyl and oxidative stresses (COS). Both stresses originate from an accumulation of all-trans-retinal (atRAL) and are involved in bisretinoid formation by condensation of atRAL with phosphatidylethanolamine (carbonyl stress) in the photoreceptor and its transformation into lipofuscin bisretinoids (oxidative stress) in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). As atRAL and bisretinoid accumulation contribute to RPE and photoreceptor cell death, our goal is to select powerful chemical inhibitors of COS. Here, we describe that phloroglucinol, a natural phenolic compound having anti-COS properties, protects both rat RPE and mouse photoreceptor primary cultures from atRAL-induced cell death and reduces hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 )-induced damage in RPE in a dose-dependent manner. Mechanistic analyses demonstrate that the protective effect encompasses decrease in atRAL-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species and free atRAL levels. Moreover, we show that phloroglucinol reacts with atRAL to form a chromene adduct which prevents bisretinoid A2E synthesis in vitro. Taken together, these data show that the protective effect of phloroglucinol correlates with its ability to trap atRAL and to prevent its further transformation into deleterious bisretinoids. Phloroglucinol might be a good basis to develop efficient therapeutic derivatives in the treatment of retinal macular diseases. PMID:27072643

  18. Regulation of retinal oxygen metabolism in humans during graded hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Palkovits, Stefan; Told, Reinhard; Schmidl, Doreen; Boltz, Agnes; Napora, Katarzyna J; Lasta, Michael; Kaya, Semira; Werkmeister, René M; Popa-Cherecheanu, Alina; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-11-15

    Animal experiments indicate that the inner retina keeps its oxygen extraction constant despite systemic hypoxia. For the human retina no such data exist. In the present study we hypothesized that systemic hypoxia does not alter inner retinal oxygen extraction. To test this hypothesis we included 30 healthy male and female subjects aged between 18 and 35 years. All subjects were studied at baseline and during breathing 12% O₂ in 88% N₂ as well as breathing 15% O₂ in 85% N₂. Oxygen saturation in a retinal artery (SO₂art) and an adjacent retinal vein (SO₂vein) were measured using spectroscopic fundus reflectometry. Measurements of retinal venous blood velocity using bidirectional laser Doppler velocimetry and retinal venous diameters using a Retinal Vessel Analyzer (RVA) were combined to calculate retinal blood flow. Oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressure were measured from earlobe arterialized capillary blood. Retinal blood flow was increased by 43.0 ± 23.2% (P < 0.001) and 30.0 ± 20.9% (P < 0.001) during 12% and 15% O₂ breathing, respectively. SO₂art as well as SO₂vein decreased during both 12% O₂ breathing (SO₂art: -11.2 ± 4.3%, P < 0.001; SO₂vein: -3.9 ± 8.5%, P = 0.012) and 15% O₂ breathing (SO₂art: -7.9 ± 3.6%, P < 0.001; SO₂vein: -4.0 ± 7.0%, P = 0.010). The arteriovenous oxygen difference decreased during both breathing periods (12% O2: -28.9 ± 18.7%; 15% O₂: -19.1 ± 16.7%, P < 0.001 each). Calculated oxygen extraction did, however, not change during our experiments (12% O₂: -2.8 ± 18.9%, P = 0.65; 15% O₂: 2.4 ± 15.8%, P = 0.26). Our results indicate that in healthy humans, oxygen extraction of the inner retina remains constant during systemic hypoxia. PMID:25217648

  19. Structure and Conformation of the Carotenoids in Human Retinal Macular Pigment.

    PubMed

    Arteni, Ana-Andreea; Fradot, Mathias; Galzerano, Denise; Mendes-Pinto, Maria M; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge; Robert, Bruno; Pascal, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    Human retinal macular pigment (MP) is formed by the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin (including the isomer meso-zeaxanthin). MP has several functions in improving visual performance and protecting against the damaging effects of light, and MP levels are used as a proxy for macular health-specifically, to predict the likelihood of developing age-related macular degeneration. While the roles of these carotenoids in retinal health have been the object of intense study in recent years, precise mechanistic details of their protective action remain elusive. We have measured the Raman signals originating from MP carotenoids in ex vivo human retinal tissue, in order to assess their structure and conformation. We show that it is possible to distinguish between lutein and zeaxanthin, by their excitation profile (related to their absorption spectra) and the position of their ν1 Raman mode. In addition, analysis of the ν4 Raman band indicates that these carotenoids are present in a specific, constrained conformation in situ, consistent with their binding to specific proteins as postulated in the literature. We discuss how these conclusions relate to the function of these pigments in macular protection. We also address the possibilities for a more accurate, consistent measurement of MP levels by Raman spectroscopy. PMID:26313550

  20. Structure and Conformation of the Carotenoids in Human Retinal Macular Pigment

    PubMed Central

    Arteni, Ana-Andreea; Fradot, Mathias; Galzerano, Denise; Mendes-Pinto, Maria M.; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge; Robert, Bruno; Pascal, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    Human retinal macular pigment (MP) is formed by the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin (including the isomer meso-zeaxanthin). MP has several functions in improving visual performance and protecting against the damaging effects of light, and MP levels are used as a proxy for macular health–specifically, to predict the likelihood of developing age-related macular degeneration. While the roles of these carotenoids in retinal health have been the object of intense study in recent years, precise mechanistic details of their protective action remain elusive. We have measured the Raman signals originating from MP carotenoids in ex vivo human retinal tissue, in order to assess their structure and conformation. We show that it is possible to distinguish between lutein and zeaxanthin, by their excitation profile (related to their absorption spectra) and the position of their ν1 Raman mode. In addition, analysis of the ν4 Raman band indicates that these carotenoids are present in a specific, constrained conformation in situ, consistent with their binding to specific proteins as postulated in the literature. We discuss how these conclusions relate to the function of these pigments in macular protection. We also address the possibilities for a more accurate, consistent measurement of MP levels by Raman spectroscopy. PMID:26313550

  1. Protective responses to sublytic complement in the retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li Xuan; Toops, Kimberly A; Lakkaraju, Aparna

    2016-08-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a key site of injury in inherited and age-related macular degenerations. Abnormal activation of the complement system is a feature of these blinding diseases, yet how the RPE combats complement attack is poorly understood. The complement cascade terminates in the cell-surface assembly of membrane attack complexes (MACs), which promote inflammation by causing aberrant signal transduction. Here, we investigated mechanisms crucial for limiting MAC assembly and preserving cellular integrity in the RPE and asked how these are compromised in models of macular degeneration. Using polarized primary RPE and the pigmented Abca4(-/-) Stargardt disease mouse model, we provide evidence for two protective responses occurring within minutes of complement attack, which are essential for maintaining mitochondrial health in the RPE. First, accelerated recycling of the membrane-bound complement regulator CD59 to the RPE cell surface inhibits MAC formation. Second, fusion of lysosomes with the RPE plasma membrane immediately after complement attack limits sustained elevations in intracellular calcium and prevents mitochondrial injury. Cholesterol accumulation in the RPE, induced by vitamin A dimers or oxidized LDL, inhibits these defense mechanisms by activating acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase), which increases tubulin acetylation and derails organelle traffic. Defective CD59 recycling and lysosome exocytosis after complement attack lead to mitochondrial fragmentation and oxidative stress in the RPE. Drugs that stimulate cholesterol efflux or inhibit ASMase restore both these critical safeguards in the RPE and avert complement-induced mitochondrial injury in vitro and in Abca4(-/-) mice, indicating that they could be effective therapeutic approaches for macular degenerations. PMID:27432952

  2. Retinal Remodeling and Metabolic Alterations in Human AMD

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Bryan W.; Pfeiffer, Rebecca L.; Ferrell, William D.; Watt, Carl B.; Tucker, James; Marc, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive retinal degeneration resulting in central visual field loss, ultimately causing debilitating blindness. AMD affects 18% of Americans from 65 to 74, 30% older than 74 years of age and is the leading cause of severe vision loss and blindness in Western populations. While many genetic and environmental risk factors are known for AMD, we currently know less about the mechanisms mediating disease progression. The pathways and mechanisms through which genetic and non-genetic risk factors modulate development of AMD pathogenesis remain largely unexplored. Moreover, current treatment for AMD is palliative and limited to wet/exudative forms. Retina is a complex, heterocellular tissue and most retinal cell classes are impacted or altered in AMD. Defining disease and stage-specific cytoarchitectural and metabolic responses in AMD is critical for highlighting targets for intervention. The goal of this article is to illustrate cell types impacted in AMD and demonstrate the implications of those changes, likely beginning in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), for remodeling of the the neural retina. Tracking heterocellular responses in disease progression is best achieved with computational molecular phenotyping (CMP), a tool that enables acquisition of a small molecule fingerprint for every cell in the retina. CMP uncovered critical cellular and molecular pathologies (remodeling and reprogramming) in progressive retinal degenerations such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We now applied these approaches to normal human and AMD tissues mapping progression of cellular and molecular changes in AMD retinas, including late-stage forms of the disease. PMID:27199657

  3. Zinc uptake in vitro by human retinal pigment epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Newsome, D.A.; Rothman, R.J.

    1987-11-01

    Zinc, an essential trace element, is present in unusually high concentrations in the chorioretinal complex relative to most other tissues. Because little has been known about the interactions between the retinal pigment epithelium and free or protein-associated zinc, we studied /sup 65/Zn uptake by human retinal pigment epithelium in vitro. When monolayers were exposed to differing concentrations from 0 to 30 microM /sup 65/Zn in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium with 5.4 gm/l glucose at 37 degrees C and 4 degrees C, we observed a temperature-dependent saturable accumulation of the radiolabel. With 15 microM /sup 65/Zn, we saw a biphasic pattern of uptake with a rapid first phase and a slower second phase over 120 min. Uptake of /sup 65/Zn was inhibited by iodacetate and cold, and reduced approximately 50% by the addition of 2% albumin to the labelling medium. Neither ouabain nor 2-deoxyglucose inhibited uptake. Cells previously exposed to /sup 65/Zn retained approximately 70% of accumulated /sup 65/Zn 60 min after being changed to radiolabel-free medium. Following removal of cells from the extracellular matrix adherent to the dish bottom, a variable amount of nonspecific binding of /sup 65/Zn to the residual matrix was demonstrated. These observations are consistent with a facilitated type of transport and demonstrate the ability of human retinal pigment epithelium in vitro to accumulate and retain zinc.

  4. miR-146a Attenuates Inflammatory Pathways Mediated by TLR4/NF-κB and TNFα to Protect Primary Human Retinal Microvascular Endothelial Cells Grown in High Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Eun-Ah; Steinle, Jena J.

    2016-01-01

    Pathological mechanisms underlying diabetic retinopathy are still not completely understood. Increased understanding of potential cellular pathways responsive to hyperglycemia is essential to develop novel therapeutic strategies for diabetic retinopathy. A growing body of evidence shows that microRNA (miRNA) play important roles in pathological mechanisms involved in diabetic retinopathy, as well as possessing potential as novel therapeutic targets. The hypothesis of this study was that miR-146a plays a key role in attenuating hyperglycemia-induced inflammatory pathways through reduced TLR4/NF-κB and TNFα signaling in primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (REC). We cultured human REC in normal (5 mM) glucose or transferred to high glucose medium (25 mM) for 3 days. Transfection was performed on REC with miRNA mimic (hsa-miR-146a-5p). Our results demonstrate that miR-146a expression was decreased in human REC cultured in high glucose. Overexpression of miR-146a using mimics reduced the levels of TLR4/NF-κB and TNFα in REC cultured in high glucose. Both MyD88-dependent and -independent signaling were decreased by miR-146a overexpression in REC in high glucose conditions. The results suggest that miR-146a is a potential therapeutic target for reducing inflammation in REC through inhibition of TLR4/NF-κB and TNFα. Our study will contribute to understanding of diabetic retinal pathology, as well as providing important clues to develop therapeutics for clinical applications. PMID:26997759

  5. miR-146a Attenuates Inflammatory Pathways Mediated by TLR4/NF-κB and TNFα to Protect Primary Human Retinal Microvascular Endothelial Cells Grown in High Glucose.

    PubMed

    Ye, Eun-Ah; Steinle, Jena J

    2016-01-01

    Pathological mechanisms underlying diabetic retinopathy are still not completely understood. Increased understanding of potential cellular pathways responsive to hyperglycemia is essential to develop novel therapeutic strategies for diabetic retinopathy. A growing body of evidence shows that microRNA (miRNA) play important roles in pathological mechanisms involved in diabetic retinopathy, as well as possessing potential as novel therapeutic targets. The hypothesis of this study was that miR-146a plays a key role in attenuating hyperglycemia-induced inflammatory pathways through reduced TLR4/NF-κB and TNFα signaling in primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (REC). We cultured human REC in normal (5 mM) glucose or transferred to high glucose medium (25 mM) for 3 days. Transfection was performed on REC with miRNA mimic (hsa-miR-146a-5p). Our results demonstrate that miR-146a expression was decreased in human REC cultured in high glucose. Overexpression of miR-146a using mimics reduced the levels of TLR4/NF-κB and TNFα in REC cultured in high glucose. Both MyD88-dependent and -independent signaling were decreased by miR-146a overexpression in REC in high glucose conditions. The results suggest that miR-146a is a potential therapeutic target for reducing inflammation in REC through inhibition of TLR4/NF-κB and TNFα. Our study will contribute to understanding of diabetic retinal pathology, as well as providing important clues to develop therapeutics for clinical applications. PMID:26997759

  6. Protective effects of total flavonoids from Flos Puerariae on retinal neuronal damage in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dai; Yang, Fang; Cheng, Hongke; Liu, Chao; Sun, Ming; Wu, Kaili

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the potential protective effects of total flavonoids from Flos Puerariae (TFF) on retinal neural cells in diabetic mice. Methods C57BL/6J mice were intraperitoneally injected with streptozotocin to generate type I diabetes in a murine model, as indicated by blood glucose levels ≥11.1 mmol/l. TFF was administered intragastrically at a dose of 50, 100, or 200 mg/kg/day. After 10 weeks of administration, the mice were euthanized, and the eyes were dissected. Retinal histology was examined, and the thickness of the retina was measured. Ultrastructural changes in the retinal ganglion cells and capillary basement membrane were observed with electron microscopy. Apoptosis of retinal neural cells was determined with the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling assay. Bax and Bcl-2 expression in the retinal tissues was determined with immunohistochemical staining and western blotting. Results Compared with the diabetic mice, the blood glucose level decreased (p<0.01) and the bodyweight increased (p<0.05) in the 100 and 200 mg/kg TFF-treated groups. The thickness of the retina significantly increased (p<0.01), and the retinal capillary basement membrane (BM) thickness was reduced in the 100 and 200 mg/kg TFF-treated diabetic mice (DM). The 100 and 200 mg/kg TFF treatments also attenuated the diabetes-induced apoptosis of retinal neural cells. Consistent with these effects, TFF treatment decreased the Bax expression level and, concurrently, increased the ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax. Conclusions TFF attenuated diabetes-induced apoptosis in retinal neurons by inhibiting Bax expression and increasing the ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax, which suggests that TFF might prevent retinal neuronal damage in diabetes mellitus. PMID:24146535

  7. Protective effect of magnesium acetyltaurate against endothelin-induced retinal and optic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Arfuzir, N N N; Lambuk, L; Jafri, A J A; Agarwal, R; Iezhitsa, I; Sidek, S; Agarwal, P; Bakar, N S; Kutty, M K; Yusof, A P Md; Krasilnikova, A; Spasov, A; Ozerov, A; Mohd Ismail, N

    2016-06-14

    Vascular dysregulation has long been recognized as an important pathophysiological factor underlying the development of glaucomatous neuropathy. Endothelin-1 (ET1) has been shown to be a key player due to its potent vasoconstrictive properties that result in retinal ischemia and oxidative stress leading to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) apoptosis and optic nerve (ON) damage. In this study we investigated the protective effects of magnesium acetyltaurate (MgAT) against retinal cell apoptosis and ON damage. MgAT was administered intravitreally prior to, along with or after administration of ET1. Seven days post-injection, animals were euthanized and retinae were subjected to morphometric analysis, TUNEL and caspase-3 staining. ON sections were stained with toluidine blue and were graded for neurodegenerative effects. Oxidative stress was also estimated in isolated retinae. Pre-treatment with MgAT significantly lowered ET1-induced retinal cell apoptosis as measured by retinal morphometry and TUNEL staining. This group of animals also showed significantly lesser caspase-3 activation and significantly reduced retinal oxidative stress compared to the animals that received intravitreal injection of only ET1. Additionally, the axonal degeneration in ON was markedly reduced in MgAT pretreated animals. The animals that received MgAT co- or post-treatment with ET1 also showed improvement in all parameters; however, the effects were not as significant as observed in MgAT pretreated animals. The current study showed that the intravitreal pre-treatment with MgAT reduces caspase-3 activation and prevents retinal cell apoptosis and axon loss in ON induced by ET1. This protective effect of ET1 was associated with reduced retinal oxidative stress. PMID:27012609

  8. Protection of Retinal Ganglion Cells and Retinal Vasculature by Lycium Barbarum Polysaccharides in a Mouse Model of Acute Ocular Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Xue-Song; Feng, Qian; Lo, Amy Cheuk Yin; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung; Lin, Bin; Chung, Sookja Kim; So, Kwok-Fai

    2012-01-01

    Acute ocular hypertension (AOH) is a condition found in acute glaucoma. The purpose of this study is to investigate the protective effect of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP) and its protective mechanisms in the AOH insult. LBP has been shown to exhibit neuroprotective effect in the chronic ocular hypertension (COH) experiments. AOH mouse model was induced in unilateral eye for one hour by introducing 90 mmHg ocular pressure. The animal was fed with LBP solution (1 mg/kg) or vehicle daily from 7 days before the AOH insult till sacrifice at either day 4 or day 7 post insult. The neuroprotective effects of LBP on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and blood-retinal-barrier (BRB) were evaluated. In control AOH retina, loss of RGCs, thinning of IRL thickness, increased IgG leakage, broken tight junctions, and decreased density of retinal blood vessels were observed. However, in LBP-treated AOH retina, there was less loss of RGCs with thinning of IRL thickness, IgG leakage, more continued structure of tight junctions associated with higher level of occludin protein and the recovery of the blood vessel density when compared with vehicle-treated AOH retina. Moreover, we found that LBP provides neuroprotection by down-regulating RAGE, ET-1, Aβ and AGE in the retina, as well as their related signaling pathways, which was related to inhibiting vascular damages and the neuronal degeneration in AOH insults. The present study suggests that LBP could prevent damage to RGCs from AOH-induced ischemic injury; furthermore, through its effects on blood vessel protection, LBP would also be a potential treatment for vascular-related retinopathy. PMID:23094016

  9. Calcium buffer proteins are specific markers of human retinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kántor, Orsolya; Mezey, Szilvia; Adeghate, Jennifer; Naumann, Angela; Nitschke, Roland; Énzsöly, Anna; Szabó, Arnold; Lukáts, Ákos; Németh, János; Somogyvári, Zoltán; Völgyi, Béla

    2016-07-01

    Ca(2+)-buffer proteins (CaBPs) modulate the temporal and spatial characteristics of transient intracellular Ca(2+)-concentration changes in neurons in order to fine-tune the strength and duration of the output signal. CaBPs have been used as neurochemical markers to identify and trace neurons of several brain loci including the mammalian retina. The CaBP content of retinal neurons, however, varies between species and, thus, the results inferred from animal models cannot be utilised directly by clinical ophthalmologists. Moreover, the shortage of well-preserved human samples greatly impedes human retina studies at the cellular and network level. Our purpose has therefore been to examine the distribution of major CaBPs, including calretinin, calbindin-D28, parvalbumin and the recently discovered secretagogin in exceptionally well-preserved human retinal samples. Based on a combination of immunohistochemistry, Neurolucida tracing and Lucifer yellow injections, we have established a database in which the CaBP marker composition can be defined for morphologically identified cell types of the human retina. Hence, we describe the full CaBP make-up for a number of human retinal neurons, including HII horizontal cells, AII amacrine cells, type-1 tyrosine-hydroxylase-expressing amacrine cells and other lesser known neurons. We have also found a number of unidentified cells whose morphology remains to be characterised. We present several examples of the colocalisation of two or three CaBPs with slightly different subcellular distributions in the same cell strongly suggesting a compartment-specific division of labour of Ca(2+)-buffering by CaBPs. Our work thus provides a neurochemical framework for future ophthalmological studies and renders new information concerning the cellular and subcellular distribution of CaBPs for experimental neuroscience. PMID:26899253

  10. Transcriptome analysis and molecular signature of human retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Strunnikova, N.V.; Maminishkis, A.; Barb, J.J.; Wang, F.; Zhi, C.; Sergeev, Y.; Chen, W.; Edwards, A.O.; Stambolian, D.; Abecasis, G.; Swaroop, A.; Munson, P.J.; Miller, S.S.

    2010-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a polarized cell layer critical for photoreceptor function and survival. The unique physiology and relationship to the photoreceptors make the RPE a critical determinant of human vision. Therefore, we performed a global expression profiling of native and cultured human fetal and adult RPE and determined a set of highly expressed ‘signature’ genes by comparing the observed RPE gene profiles to the Novartis expression database (SymAtlas: http://wombat.gnf.org/index.html) of 78 tissues. Using stringent selection criteria of at least 10-fold higher expression in three distinct preparations, we identified 154 RPE signature genes, which were validated by qRT-PCR analysis in RPE and in an independent set of 11 tissues. Several of the highly expressed signature genes encode proteins involved in visual cycle, melanogenesis and cell adhesion and Gene ontology analysis enabled the assignment of RPE signature genes to epithelial channels and transporters (ClCN4, BEST1, SLCA20) or matrix remodeling (TIMP3, COL8A2). Fifteen RPE signature genes were associated with known ophthalmic diseases, and 25 others were mapped to regions of disease loci. An evaluation of the RPE signature genes in a recently completed AMD genomewide association (GWA) data set revealed that TIMP3, GRAMD3, PITPNA and CHRNA3 signature genes may have potential roles in AMD pathogenesis and deserve further examination. We propose that RPE signature genes are excellent candidates for retinal diseases and for physiological investigations (e.g. dopachrome tautomerase in melanogenesis). The RPE signature gene set should allow the validation of RPE-like cells derived from human embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells for cell-based therapies of degenerative retinal diseases. PMID:20360305

  11. Naturally occurring rhodopsin mutation in the dog causes retinal dysfunction and degeneration mimicking human dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Kijas, James W.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Aleman, Tomas S.; Pianta, Michael J.; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E.; Miller, Brian J.; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.; Acland, Gregory M.

    2002-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by light and initiates the transduction cascade leading to night (rod) vision. Naturally occurring pathogenic rhodopsin (RHO) mutations have been previously identified only in humans and are a common cause of dominantly inherited blindness from retinal degeneration. We identified English Mastiff dogs with a naturally occurring dominant retinal degeneration and determined the cause to be a point mutation in the RHO gene (Thr4Arg). Dogs with this mutant allele manifest a retinal phenotype that closely mimics that in humans with RHO mutations. The phenotypic features shared by dog and man include a dramatically slowed time course of recovery of rod photoreceptor function after light exposure and a distinctive topographic pattern to the retinal degeneration. The canine disease offers opportunities to explore the basis of prolonged photoreceptor recovery after light in RHO mutations and determine whether there are links between the dysfunction and apoptotic retinal cell death. The RHO mutant dog also becomes the large animal needed for preclinical trials of therapies for a major subset of human retinopathies. PMID:11972042

  12. Mapping the human blood-retinal barrier function.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Rui; Dias, Jorge; Cunha-Vaz, José

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the work herein presented is to map blood-retinal barrier function by measuring retinal fluorescein leakage from the blood stream into the human vitreous using a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (CSLO). Existing methods for the assessment of fluorescein leakage into the human vitreous are based on the qualitative evaluation of fluorescein angiographies (FA) and on volume measurements, as performed by the Fluorotron Master. A new procedure is presented capable of measuring fluorescein leakage into the vitreous while simultaneously imaging the retina. The present methodology computes the fluorescein leakage in a fully automated way, based on the three-dimensional fluorescence distribution in the human eye by using a single data acquisition. The processing includes signal filtering, volume alignment and profile deconvolution. The deconvolved profile obeys the established physical model. Representative cases shown are: a healthy eye; an eye with drusen from a nondiabetic person; a photocoagulated eye; and an eye with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy. The results are in agreement with previous findings and go a step further by making possible its daily usage in a clinical setup based on currently available instrumentation. PMID:15651569

  13. Enriched retinal ganglion cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Katherine P.; Hung, Sandy S. C.; Sharov, Alexei; Lo, Camden Y.; Needham, Karina; Lidgerwood, Grace E.; Jackson, Stacey; Crombie, Duncan E.; Nayagam, Bryony A.; Cook, Anthony L.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C. B.

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuropathies are characterised by a loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that lead to vision impairment. Development of cell therapy requires a better understanding of the signals that direct stem cells into RGCs. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an unlimited cellular source for generation of human RGCs in vitro. In this study, we present a 45-day protocol that utilises magnetic activated cell sorting to generate enriched population of RGCs via stepwise retinal differentiation using hESCs. We performed an extensive characterization of these stem cell-derived RGCs by examining the gene and protein expressions of a panel of neural/RGC markers. Furthermore, whole transcriptome analysis demonstrated similarity of the hESC-derived RGCs to human adult RGCs. The enriched hESC-RGCs possess long axons, functional electrophysiological profiles and axonal transport of mitochondria, suggestive of maturity. In summary, this RGC differentiation protocol can generate an enriched population of functional RGCs from hESCs, allowing future studies on disease modeling of optic neuropathies and development of cell therapies. PMID:27506453

  14. Enriched retinal ganglion cells derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gill, Katherine P; Hung, Sandy S C; Sharov, Alexei; Lo, Camden Y; Needham, Karina; Lidgerwood, Grace E; Jackson, Stacey; Crombie, Duncan E; Nayagam, Bryony A; Cook, Anthony L; Hewitt, Alex W; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C B

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuropathies are characterised by a loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that lead to vision impairment. Development of cell therapy requires a better understanding of the signals that direct stem cells into RGCs. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an unlimited cellular source for generation of human RGCs in vitro. In this study, we present a 45-day protocol that utilises magnetic activated cell sorting to generate enriched population of RGCs via stepwise retinal differentiation using hESCs. We performed an extensive characterization of these stem cell-derived RGCs by examining the gene and protein expressions of a panel of neural/RGC markers. Furthermore, whole transcriptome analysis demonstrated similarity of the hESC-derived RGCs to human adult RGCs. The enriched hESC-RGCs possess long axons, functional electrophysiological profiles and axonal transport of mitochondria, suggestive of maturity. In summary, this RGC differentiation protocol can generate an enriched population of functional RGCs from hESCs, allowing future studies on disease modeling of optic neuropathies and development of cell therapies. PMID:27506453

  15. Altered aldose reductase gene regulation in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, D N; Del Monte, M; Greene, D A; Killen, P D

    1993-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR2), a putative "hypertonicity stress protein" whose gene is induced by hyperosmolarity, protects renal medullary cells against the interstitial hyperosmolarity of antidiuresis by catalyzing the synthesis of millimolar concentrations of intracellular sorbitol from glucose. Although AR2 gene induction has been noted in a variety of renal and nonrenal cells subjected to hypertonic stress in vitro, the functional significance of AR2 gene expression in cells not normally exposed to a hyperosmolar milieu is not fully understood. The physiological impact of basal AR2 expression in such cells may be limited to hyperglycemic states in which AR2 promotes pathological polyol accumulation, a mechanism invoked in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Since AR2 overexpression in the retinal pigment epithelium has been associated with diabetic retinopathy, the regulation of AR2 gene expression and associated changes in sorbitol and myo-inositol were studied in human retinal pigment epithelial cells in culture. The relative abundance of aldehyde reductase (AR1) and AR2 mRNA was quantitated by filter hybridization of RNA from several human retinal pigment epithelial cell lines exposed to hyperglycemic and hyperosmolar conditions in vitro. AR2 but not AR1 mRNA was significantly increased some 11- to 18-fold by hyperosmolarity in several retinal pigment epithelial cell lines. A single cell line with a 15-fold higher basal level of AR2 mRNA than other cell lines tested demonstrated no significant increase in AR2 mRNA in response to hypertonic stress. This cell line demonstrated accelerated and exaggerated production of sorbitol and depletion of myo-inositol upon exposure to 20 mM glucose. Therefore, abnormal AR2 expression may enhance the sensitivity of cells to the biochemical consequences of hyperglycemia potentiating the development of diabetic complications. Images PMID:8349800

  16. Mimicking Retinal Development and Disease With Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Divya; Phillips, Jenny; Joseph Phillips, M; Gamm, David M

    2016-04-01

    As applications of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) continue to be refined and pursued, it is important to keep in mind that the strengths and weaknesses of this technology lie with its developmental origins. The remarkable capacity of differentiating hPSCs to recapitulate cell and tissue genesis has provided a model system to study stages of human development that were not previously amenable to investigation and experimentation. Furthermore, demonstration of developmentally appropriate, stepwise differentiation of hPSCs to specific cell types offers support for their authenticity and their suitability for use in disease modeling and cell replacement therapies. However, limitations to farming cells and tissues in an artificial culture environment, as well as the length of time required for most cells to mature, are some of the many issues to consider before using hPSCs to study or treat a particular disease. Given the overarching need to understand and modulate the dynamics of lineage-specific differentiation in stem cell cultures, this review will first examine the capacity of hPSCs to serve as models of retinal development. Thereafter, we will discuss efforts to model retinal disorders with hPSCs and present challenges that face investigators who aspire to use such systems to study disease pathophysiology and/or screen for therapeutics. We also refer readers to recent publications that provide additional insight and details on these rapidly evolving topics. PMID:27116663

  17. Transplantation of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal tissue in two primate models of retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, Hiroshi; Mandai, Michiko; Matsushita, Keizo; Kuwahara, Atsushi; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Nakano, Tokushige; Assawachananont, Juthaporn; Kimura, Toru; Saito, Koichi; Terasaki, Hiroko; Eiraku, Mototsugu; Sasai, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Masayo

    2016-01-01

    Retinal transplantation therapy for retinitis pigmentosa is increasingly of interest due to accumulating evidence of transplantation efficacy from animal studies and development of techniques for the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells into retinal tissues or cells. In this study, we aimed to assess the potential clinical utility of hESC-derived retinal tissues (hESC-retina) using newly developed primate models of retinal degeneration to obtain preparatory information regarding the potential clinical utility of these hESC-retinas in transplantation therapy. hESC-retinas were first transplanted subretinally into nude rats with or without retinal degeneration to confirm their competency as a graft to mature to form highly specified outer segment structure and to integrate after transplantation. Two focal selective photoreceptor degeneration models were then developed in monkeys by subretinal injection of cobalt chloride or 577-nm optically pumped semiconductor laser photocoagulation. The utility of the developed models and a practicality of visual acuity test developed for monkeys were evaluated. Finally, feasibility of hESC-retina transplantation was assessed in the developed monkey models under practical surgical procedure and postoperational examinations. Grafted hESC-retina was observed differentiating into a range of retinal cell types, including rod and cone photoreceptors that developed structured outer nuclear layers after transplantation. Further, immunohistochemical analyses suggested the formation of host–graft synaptic connections. The findings of this study demonstrate the clinical feasibility of hESC-retina transplantation and provide the practical tools for the optimization of transplantation strategies for future clinical applications. PMID:26699487

  18. Selenium Protects Retinal Cells from Cisplatin-Induced Alterations in Carbohydrate Residues

    PubMed Central

    Akşit, Dilek; Yazıcı, Alper; Akşit, Hasan; Sarı, Esin S.; Yay, Arzu; Yıldız, Onur; Kılıç, Adil; Ermiş, Sıtkı S.; Seyrek, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    Background: Investigate alterations in the expression and localization of carbohydrate units in rat retinal cells exposed to cisplatin toxicity. Aims: The aim of the study was to evaluate putative protective effects of selenium on retinal cells subjected to cisplatin. Study Design: Animal experiment. Methods: Eighteen healthy Wistar rats were divided into three equal groups: 1. Control, 2. Cisplatin and 3. Cisplatin+selenium groups. After anesthesia, the right eye of each rat was enucleated. Results: Histochemically, retinal cells of control groups reacted with α-2,3-bound sialic acid-specific Maackia amurensis lectin (MAA) strongly, while cisplatin reduced the staining intensity for MAA. However, selenium administration alleviated the reducing effect of cisplatin on the binding sites for MAA in retinal cells. The staining intensity for N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc residues) specific Griffonia simplicifolia-1 (GSL–1) was relatively slight in control animals and cisplatin reduced this slight staining for GSL-1 further. Selenium administration mitigated the reducing effect of cisplatin on the binding sites for GSL-1. A diffuse staining for N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) specific wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) was observed throughout the retina of the control animals. In particular, cells localized in the inner plexiform and photoreceptor layers are reacted strongly with WGA. Compared to the control animals, binding sites for WGA in the retina of rats given cisplatin were remarkably decreased. However, the retinal cells of rats given selenium reacted strongly with WGA. Conclusion: Cisplatin reduces α-2,3-bound sialic acid, GlcNAc and GalNAc residues in certain retinal cells. However, selenium alleviates the reducing effect of cisplatin on carbohydrate residues in retinal cells. PMID:27606141

  19. Consumption of Polyphenol-Rich Zingiber Zerumbet Rhizome Extracts Protects against the Breakdown of the Blood-Retinal Barrier and Retinal Inflammation Induced by Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Thing-Fong; Hong, Tang-Yao; Tzeng, Yu-Cheng; Liou, Shorong-Shii; Liu, I-Min

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigates the amelioration of diabetic retinopathy (DR) by Zingiber zerumbet rhizome ethanol extracts (ZZRext) in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ-diabetic rats). ZZRext contains high phenolic and flavonoid contents. STZ-diabetic rats were treated orally with ZZRext (200, 300 mg/kg per day) for three months. Blood-retinal barrier (BRB) breakdown and increased vascular permeability were found in diabetic rats, with downregulation of occludin, and claudin-5. ZZRext treatment effectively preserved the expression of occludin, and claudin-5, leading to less BRB breakdown and less vascular permeability. Retinal histopathological observation showed that the disarrangement and reduction in thickness of retinal layers were reversed in ZZRext-treated diabetic rats. Retinal gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, vascular endothelial growth factor, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 were all decreased in ZZRext-treated diabetic rats. Moreover, ZZRext treatment not only inhibited the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation, but also downregulated the protein expression of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in diabetic retina. In conclusion, the results suggest that the retinal protective effects of ZZRext occur through improved retinal structural change and inhibiting retinal inflammation. The antiretinopathy property of ZZRext might be related to the downregulation of p38 MAPK and NF-κB signal transduction induced by diabetes. PMID:26389948

  20. Consumption of Polyphenol-Rich Zingiber Zerumbet Rhizome Extracts Protects against the Breakdown of the Blood-Retinal Barrier and Retinal Inflammation Induced by Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Thing-Fong; Hong, Tang-Yao; Tzeng, Yu-Cheng; Liou, Shorong-Shii; Liu, I-Min

    2015-09-01

    The present study investigates the amelioration of diabetic retinopathy (DR) by Zingiber zerumbet rhizome ethanol extracts (ZZRext) in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ-diabetic rats). ZZRext contains high phenolic and flavonoid contents. STZ-diabetic rats were treated orally with ZZRext (200, 300 mg/kg per day) for three months. Blood-retinal barrier (BRB) breakdown and increased vascular permeability were found in diabetic rats, with downregulation of occludin, and claudin-5. ZZRext treatment effectively preserved the expression of occludin, and claudin-5, leading to less BRB breakdown and less vascular permeability. Retinal histopathological observation showed that the disarrangement and reduction in thickness of retinal layers were reversed in ZZRext-treated diabetic rats. Retinal gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, vascular endothelial growth factor, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 were all decreased in ZZRext-treated diabetic rats. Moreover, ZZRext treatment not only inhibited the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation, but also downregulated the protein expression of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in diabetic retina. In conclusion, the results suggest that the retinal protective effects of ZZRext occur through improved retinal structural change and inhibiting retinal inflammation. The antiretinopathy property of ZZRext might be related to the downregulation of p38 MAPK and NF-κB signal transduction induced by diabetes. PMID:26389948

  1. Protective effect of basic fibroblast growth factor on retinal injury induced by argon laser photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.; Zhang, C. P.; San, Q.; Wang, C. Z.; Yang, Z. F.; Kang, H. X.; Qian, H. W.

    2010-12-01

    Laser photocoagulation treatment is often complicated by a side effect of visual impairment, which is caused by the unavoidable laser-induced retinal destruction. At present no specific is found to cure this retinopathy. The aim of this study was to observe the neuroprotective effect of bFGF on laser-induced retinal injury. Chinchilla rabbits were divided into three groups and argon laser lesions were created in the retinas. Then bFGF or dexamethasone, a widely used ophthalmic preparation, or saline was given severally by retrobulbar injection. The retinal lesions were evaluated histologically and morphometrically, and visual function was examined by ERG. The results showed that bFGF administration better preserved morphology of retinal photoreceptors and significantly diminished the area of the lesions. Furthermore, bFGF promoted the restoration of the ERG b-wave amplitude. In rabbits treated with dexamethasone, however, the lesions showed almost no ameliorative changes. This is the first study to investigate the potential role of bFGF as a remedial agent in laser photocoagulation treatment. These findings suggest that bFGF has significant neuroprotective properties in the retina and this type of neuroprotection may be of clinical significance in reducing iatrogenic laser-induced retinal injuries in humans.

  2. Rod photoreceptors protect from cone degeneration-induced retinal remodeling and restore visual responses in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Saade, Carole J.; Alvarez-Delfin, Karen; Fadool, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Humans are largely dependent upon cone-mediated vision. However, death or dysfunction of rods, the predominant photoreceptor subtype, results in secondary loss of cones, remodeling of retinal circuitry and blindness. The changes in circuitry may contribute to the vision deficit and undermine attempts at restoring sight. We exploit zebrafish larvae as a genetic model to specifically characterize changes associated with photoreceptor degenerations in a cone-dominated retina. Photoreceptors form synapses with two types of second order neurons, bipolar cells and horizontal cells. Using cell-specific reporter gene expression and immunolabeling for postsynaptic glutamate receptors, significant remodeling is observed following cone degeneration in the pde6cw59 larval retina but not rod degeneration in the Xops:mCFPq13 line. In adults, rods and cones are present in approximately equal numbers, and in pde6cw59 mutants glutamate receptor expression and synaptic structures in the outer plexiform layer are preserved, and visual responses are gained in these once-blind fish. We propose that the abundance of rods in the adult protects the retina from cone degeneration-induced remodeling. We test this hypothesis by genetically manipulating the number of rods in larvae. We show that an increased number and uniform distribution of rods in lor/tbx2bp22bbtl or six7 morpholino-injected larvae protect from pde6cw59-induced secondary changes. The observations that remodeling is a common consequence of photoreceptor death across species, and that in zebrafish a small number of surviving photoreceptors afford protection from degeneration-induced changes provides a model for systematic analysis of factors that slow or even prevent the secondary deteriorations associated with neural degenerative disease. PMID:23365220

  3. Predicting the Incidence of Human Cataract through Retinal Imaging Technology

    PubMed Central

    Horng, Chi-Ting; Sun, Han-Ying; Liu, Hsiang-Jui; Lue, Jiann-Hwa; Yeh, Shang-Min

    2015-01-01

    With the progress of science, technology and medicine, the proportion of elderly people in society has gradually increased over the years. Thus, the medical care and health issues of this population have drawn increasing attention. In particular, among the common medical problems of the elderly, the occurrence of cataracts has been widely observed. In this study, we developed retinal imaging technology by establishing a human eye module with ray tracing. Periodic hole arrays with different degrees were constructed on the anterior surface of the lens to emulate the eyesight decline caused by cataracts. Then, we successfully predicted the incidence of cataracts among people with myopia ranging from −3.0 D to −9.0 D. Results show that periodic hole arrays cause severe eyesight decline when they are centralized in the visual center. However, the wide distribution of these arrays on the anterior surface of the lens would not significantly affect one’s eyesight. PMID:26610533

  4. Predicting the Incidence of Human Cataract through Retinal Imaging Technology.

    PubMed

    Horng, Chi-Ting; Sun, Han-Ying; Liu, Hsiang-Jui; Lue, Jiann-Hwa; Yeh, Shang-Min

    2015-11-01

    With the progress of science, technology and medicine, the proportion of elderly people in society has gradually increased over the years. Thus, the medical care and health issues of this population have drawn increasing attention. In particular, among the common medical problems of the elderly, the occurrence of cataracts has been widely observed. In this study, we developed retinal imaging technology by establishing a human eye module with ray tracing. Periodic hole arrays with different degrees were constructed on the anterior surface of the lens to emulate the eyesight decline caused by cataracts. Then, we successfully predicted the incidence of cataracts among people with myopia ranging from -3.0 D to -9.0 D. Results show that periodic hole arrays cause severe eyesight decline when they are centralized in the visual center. However, the wide distribution of these arrays on the anterior surface of the lens would not significantly affect one's eyesight. PMID:26610533

  5. Hsp90 inhibition protects against inherited retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Aguilà, Mònica; Bevilacqua, Dalila; McCulley, Caroline; Schwarz, Nele; Athanasiou, Dimitra; Kanuga, Naheed; Novoselov, Sergey S.; Lange, Clemens A.K.; Ali, Robin R.; Bainbridge, James W.; Gias, Carlos; Coffey, Peter J.; Garriga, Pere; Cheetham, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular chaperone Hsp90 is important for the functional maturation of many client proteins, and inhibitors are in clinical trials for multiple indications in cancer. Hsp90 inhibition activates the heat shock response and can improve viability in a cell model of the P23H misfolding mutation in rhodopsin that causes autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). Here, we show that a single low dose of the Hsp90 inhibitor HSP990 enhanced visual function and delayed photoreceptor degeneration in a P23H transgenic rat model. This was associated with the induction of heat shock protein expression and reduced rhodopsin aggregation. We then investigated the effect of Hsp90 inhibition on a different type of rod opsin mutant, R135L, which is hyperphosphorylated, binds arrestin and disrupts vesicular traffic. Hsp90 inhibition with 17-AAG reduced the intracellular accumulation of R135L and abolished arrestin binding in cells. Hsf-1−/− cells revealed that the effect of 17-AAG on P23H aggregation was dependent on HSF-1, whereas the effect on R135L was HSF-1 independent. Instead, the effect on R135L was mediated by a requirement of Hsp90 for rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) maturation and function. Importantly, Hsp90 inhibition restored R135L rod opsin localization to wild-type (WT) phenotype in vivo in rat retina. Prolonged Hsp90 inhibition with HSP990 in vivo led to a posttranslational reduction in GRK1 and phosphodiesterase (PDE6) protein levels, identifying them as Hsp90 clients. These data suggest that Hsp90 represents a potential therapeutic target for different types of rhodopsin adRP through distinct mechanisms, but also indicate that sustained Hsp90 inhibition might adversely affect visual function. PMID:24301679

  6. Efficient generation of retinal progenitor cells from human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lamba, Deepak A.; Karl, Mike O.; Ware, Carol B.; Reh, Thomas A.

    2006-01-01

    The retina is subject to degenerative conditions, leading to blindness. Although retinal regeneration is robust in lower vertebrates, regeneration does not occur in the adult mammalian retina. Thus, we have developed efficient methods for deriving retinal neurons from human embryonic stem (hES) cells. Under appropriate culture conditions, up to 80% of the H1 line can be directed to the retinal progenitor fate, and express a gene expression profile similar to progenitors derived from human fetal retina. The hES cell-derived progenitors differentiate primarily into inner retinal neurons (ganglion and amacrine cells), with functional glutamate receptors. Upon coculture with retinas derived from a mouse model of retinal degeneration, the hES cell derived retinal progenitors integrate with the degenerated mouse retina and increase in their expression of photoreceptor-specific markers. These results demonstrate that human ES cells can be selectively directed to a neural retinal cell fate and thus may be useful in the treatment of retinal degenerations. PMID:16908856

  7. Subretinal transplantation of putative retinal pigment epithelial cells derived from human embryonic stem cells in rat retinal degeneration model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Un Chul; Cho, Myung Soo; Park, Jung Hyun; Kim, Sang Jin; Ku, Seung-Yup; Choi, Young Min; Moon, Shin Yong

    2011-01-01

    Objective To differentiate the human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in the defined culture condition and determine its therapeutic potential for the treatment of retinal degenerative diseases. Methods The embryoid bodies were formed from hESCs and attached on the matrigel coated culture dishes. The neural structures consisting neural precursors were selected and expanded to form rosette structures. The mechanically isolated neural rosettes were differentiated into pigmented cells in the media comprised of N2 and B27. Expression profiles of markers related to RPE development were analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining. Dissociated putative RPE cells (105 cells/5 µL) were transplanted into the subretinal space of rat retinal degeneration model induced by intravenous sodium iodate injection. Animals were sacrificed at 1, 2, and 4 weeks after transplantation, and immnohistochemistry study was performed to verify the survival of the transplanted cells. Results The putative RPE cells derived from hESC showed characteristics of the human RPE cells morphologically and expressed molecular markers and associated with RPE fate. Grafted RPE cells were found to survive in the subretinal space up to 4 weeks after transplantation, and the expression of RPE markers was confirmed with immunohistochemistry. Conclusion Transplanted RPE cells derived from hESC in the defined culture condition successfully survived and migrated within subretinal space of rat retinal degeneration model. These results support the feasibility of the hESC derived RPE cells for cell-based therapies for retinal degenerative disease. PMID:22384445

  8. Application of clotrimazole via a novel controlled release device provides potent retinal protection.

    PubMed

    Nezhad, Zhaleh Kashkouli; Nagai, Nobuhiro; Yamamoto, Kotaro; Kaji, Hirokazu; Nishizawa, Matsuhiko; Saya, Hideyuki; Nakazawa, Toru; Abe, Toshiaki

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of legal blindness among older individuals. Therefore, the development of new therapeutic agents and optimum drug delivery systems for its treatment are crucial. In this study, we investigate whether clotrimazole (CLT) is capable of protecting retinal cells against oxidative-induced injury and the possible inhibitory effect of a sustained CLT-release device against light-induced retinal damage in rats. In vitro results indicated pretreatment of immortalized retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE-J cells) with 10-50 µM CLT before exposure to oxygen/glucose deprivation conditions for 48 h decreased the extent of cell death, attenuated the percentage of reactive oxygen species-positive cells, and decreased the levels of cleaved caspase-3. The device consists of a separately fabricated reservoir, a CLT formulation, and a controlled release cover, which are made of poly(ethyleneglycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDM) and tri(ethyleneglycol) dimethacrylate (TEGDM). The release rate of CLT was successfully tuned by changing the ratio of PEGDM/TEGDM in the cover. In vivo results showed that use of a CLT-loaded device lessened the reduction of electroretinographic amplitudes after light exposure. These findings indicate that the application of a polymeric CLT-loaded device may be a promising method for the treatment of some retinal disorders. PMID:26335210

  9. Phototoxicity and cytotoxicity of fullerol in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wielgus, Albert R.; Zhao, Baozhong; Chignell, Colin F.; Hu, Dan-Ning; Roberts, Joan E.

    2010-01-01

    The water-soluble nanoparticle hydroxylated fullerene [fullerol, nano-C{sub 60}(OH){sub 22-26}] has several clinical applications including use as a drug carrier to bypass the blood ocular barriers. We have previously found that fullerol is both cytotoxic and phototoxic to human lens epithelial cells (HLE B-3) and that the endogenous antioxidant lutein blocked some of this phototoxicity. In the present study we have found that fullerol induces cytotoxic and phototoxic damage to human retinal pigment epithelial cells. Accumulation of nano-C{sub 60}(OH){sub 22-26} in the cells was confirmed spectrophotometrically at 405 nm, and cell viability, cell metabolism and membrane permeability were estimated using trypan blue, MTS and LDH assays, respectively. Fullerol was cytotoxic toward hRPE cells maintained in the dark at concentrations higher than 10 muM. Exposure to an 8.5 J.cm{sup -2} dose of visible light in the presence of > 5 muM fullerol induced TBARS formation and early apoptosis, indicating phototoxic damage in the form of lipid peroxidation. Pretreatment with 10 and 20 muM lutein offered some protection against fullerol photodamage. Using time resolved photophysical techniques, we have now confirmed that fullerol produces singlet oxygen with a quantum yield of PHI = 0.05 in D{sub 2}O and with a range of 0.002-0.139 in various solvents. As our previous studies have shown that fullerol also produces superoxide in the presence of light, retinal phototoxic damage may occur through both type I (free radical) and type II (singlet oxygen) mechanisms. In conclusion, ocular exposure to fullerol, particularly in the presence of sunlight, may lead to retinal damage.

  10. Investigation of SLA4A3 as a candidate gene for human retinal disease.

    PubMed

    Downs, Louise M; Webster, Andrew R; Moore, Anthony T; Michaelides, Michel; Ali, Robin R; Hardcastle, Alison J; Mellersh, Cathryn S

    2016-01-01

    SLC4A3 has been shown to cause retinal degeneration in a genetically engineered knockout mouse, and in a naturally occurring form of canine progressive retinal atrophy considered to be the equivalent of retinitis pigmentosa in humans (RP). This study was undertaken to investigate if SLC4A3 coding variants were implicated in human retinal degeneration. SLC4A3 exons were amplified and sequenced in 200 patients with autosomal recessive retinal degeneration who had no known molecular diagnosis for their condition, which included 197 unrelated individuals with suspected RP and three individuals with other forms of retinal disease. Three rare variants were identified that were predicted to be potentially pathogenic, however each variant was heterozygous in a single patient and therefore not considered disease-causing in isolation. Of these three variants, SNP-3 was the rarest, with an allele frequency of 7.06 x 10(-5) (>46,000 exomes from the ExAC database). In conclusion, no compound heterozygous or homozygous potentially pathogenic variants were identified that would account for recessive RP or retinal degeneration in this cohort, however the possibility remains that the rare variants identified could be acting with as yet undiscovered mutations in introns or regulatory regions. SLC4A3 remains an excellent candidate gene for human retinal degeneration, and with the advent of whole exome and whole genome sequencing of cohorts of molecularly unsolved patients with syndromic and non-syndromic forms of retinal degeneration, SLC4A3 may yet be implicated in human disease. PMID:27211793

  11. Suppression of microglial activation is neuroprotective in a mouse model of human retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Xiao, Jia; Wang, Ke; So, Kwok-Fai; Tipoe, George L; Lin, Bin

    2014-06-11

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a photoreceptor-degenerative disease caused by various mutations and is characterized by death of rod photoreceptor cell followed by gradual death of cone photoreceptors. The molecular mechanisms that lead to rod and cone death are not yet fully understood. Neuroinflammation contributes to the progression of many chronic neurodegenerative disorders. However, it remains to be determined how microglia contribute to photoreceptor disruption in RP. In this study, we explored the role of microglia as a contributor to photoreceptor degeneration in the rd10 mouse model of RP. First, we demonstrated that microglia activation was an early alteration in RP retinas. Inhibition of microglia activation by minocycline reduced photoreceptor apoptosis and significantly improved retinal structure and function and visual behavior in rd10 mice. Second, we identified that minocycline exerted its neuroprotective effects through both anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic mechanisms. Third, we found that Cx3cr1 deficiency dysregulated microglia activation and subsequently resulted in increased photoreceptor vulnerability in rd10 mice, suggesting that the Cx3cl1/Cx3cr1 signaling pathway might protect against microglia neurotoxicity. We concluded that suppression of neuroinflammatory responses could be a potential treatment strategy aimed at improving photoreceptor survival in human RP. PMID:24920619

  12. Retinal and post-retinal contributions to the quantum efficiency of the human eye revealed by electrical neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Manasseh, Gibran; de Balthasar, Chloe; Sanguinetti, Bruno; Pomarico, Enrico; Gisin, Nicolas; de Peralta, Rolando Grave; Andino, Sara L. Gonzalez

    2013-01-01

    The retina is one of the best known quantum detectors with rods able to reliably respond to single photons. However, estimates on the number of photons eliciting conscious perception, based on signal detection theory, are systematically above these values after discounting by retinal losses. One possibility is that there is a trade-off between the limited motor resources available to living systems and the excellent reliability of the visual photoreceptors. On this view, the limits to sensory thresholds are not set by the individual reliability of the receptors within each sensory modality (as often assumed) but rather by the limited central processing and motor resources available to process the constant inflow of sensory information. To investigate this issue, we reproduced the classical experiment from Hetch aimed to determine the sensory threshold in human vision. We combined a careful physical control of the stimulus parameters with high temporal/spatial resolution recordings of EEG signals and behavioral variables over a relatively large sample of subjects (12). Contrarily to the idea that the limits to visual sensitivity are fully set by the statistical fluctuations in photon absorption on retinal photoreceptors we observed that the state of ongoing neural oscillations before any photon impinges the retina helps to determine if the responses of photoreceptors have access to central conscious processing. Our results suggest that motivational and attentional off-retinal mechanisms play a major role in reducing the QE efficiency of the human visual system when compared to the efficiency of isolated retinal photoreceptors. Yet, this mechanism might subserve adaptive behavior by enhancing the overall multisensory efficiency of the whole system composed by diverse reliable sensory modalities. PMID:24302913

  13. Retinal and post-retinal contributions to the quantum efficiency of the human eye revealed by electrical neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Manasseh, Gibran; de Balthasar, Chloe; Sanguinetti, Bruno; Pomarico, Enrico; Gisin, Nicolas; de Peralta, Rolando Grave; Andino, Sara L Gonzalez

    2013-01-01

    The retina is one of the best known quantum detectors with rods able to reliably respond to single photons. However, estimates on the number of photons eliciting conscious perception, based on signal detection theory, are systematically above these values after discounting by retinal losses. One possibility is that there is a trade-off between the limited motor resources available to living systems and the excellent reliability of the visual photoreceptors. On this view, the limits to sensory thresholds are not set by the individual reliability of the receptors within each sensory modality (as often assumed) but rather by the limited central processing and motor resources available to process the constant inflow of sensory information. To investigate this issue, we reproduced the classical experiment from Hetch aimed to determine the sensory threshold in human vision. We combined a careful physical control of the stimulus parameters with high temporal/spatial resolution recordings of EEG signals and behavioral variables over a relatively large sample of subjects (12). Contrarily to the idea that the limits to visual sensitivity are fully set by the statistical fluctuations in photon absorption on retinal photoreceptors we observed that the state of ongoing neural oscillations before any photon impinges the retina helps to determine if the responses of photoreceptors have access to central conscious processing. Our results suggest that motivational and attentional off-retinal mechanisms play a major role in reducing the QE efficiency of the human visual system when compared to the efficiency of isolated retinal photoreceptors. Yet, this mechanism might subserve adaptive behavior by enhancing the overall multisensory efficiency of the whole system composed by diverse reliable sensory modalities. PMID:24302913

  14. Human organotypic retinal cultures (HORCs) as a chronic experimental model for investigation of retinal ganglion cell degeneration.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Andrew; Hopes, Marina; Wright, Phillip; Broadway, David C; Sanderson, Julie

    2016-02-01

    There is a growing need for models of human diseases that utilise native, donated human tissue in order to model disease processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies. In this paper we assessed the suitability of adult human retinal explants as a potential model of chronic retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration. Our results confirmed that RGC markers commonly used in rodent studies (NeuN, βIII Tubulin and Thy-1) were appropriate for labelling human RGCs and followed the expected differential expression patterns across, as well as throughout, the macular and para-macular regions of the retina. Furthermore, we showed that neither donor age nor post-mortem time (within 24 h) significantly affected the initial expression levels of RGC markers. In addition, the feasibility of using human post mortem donor tissue as a long-term model of RGC degeneration was determined with RGC protein being detectable up to 4 weeks in culture with an associated decline in RGC mRNA and significant, progressive, apoptotic labelling of NeuN(+) cells. Differences in RGC apoptosis might have been influenced by medium compositions indicating that media constituents could play a role in supporting axotomised RGCs. We propose that using ex vivo human explants may prove to be a useful model for testing the effectiveness of neuroprotective strategies. PMID:26432917

  15. Iron prochelator BSIH protects retinal pigment epithelial cells against cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Charkoudian, Louise K; Dentchev, Tzvete; Lukinova, Nina; Wolkow, Natalie; Dunaief, Joshua L; Franz, Katherine J

    2008-12-01

    Dysregulation of localized iron homeostasis is implicated in several degenerative diseases, including Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and age-related macular degeneration, wherein iron-mediated oxidative stress is hypothesized to contribute to cell death. Inhibiting toxic iron without altering normal metal-dependent processes presents significant challenges for standard small molecule chelating agents. We previously introduced BSIH (isonicotinic acid [2-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-[1,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yl)-benzylidene]-hydrazide) prochelators that are converted by hydrogen peroxide into SIH (salicylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone) chelating agents that inhibit iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical generation. Here, we show that BSIH protects a cultured cell model for retinal pigment epithelium against cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide. BSIH is more stable than SIH in cell culture medium and is more protective during long-term experiments. Repetitive exposure of cells to BSIH is nontoxic, whereas SIH and desferrioxamine induce cell death after repeated exposure. Combined, our results indicate that cell protection by BSIH involves iron sequestration that occurs only when the cells are stressed by hydrogen peroxide. These findings suggest that prochelators discriminate toxic iron from healthy iron and are promising candidates for neuro- and retinal protection. PMID:18835041

  16. A method and technical equipment for an acute human trial to evaluate retinal implant technology.

    PubMed

    Hornig, Ralf; Laube, Thomas; Walter, Peter; Velikay-Parel, Michaela; Bornfeld, Norbert; Feucht, Matthias; Akguel, Harun; Rössler, Gernot; Alteheld, Nils; Lütke Notarp, Dietmar; Wyatt, John; Richard, Gisbert

    2005-03-01

    This paper reports on methods and technical equipment to investigate the epiretinal stimulation of the retina in blind human subjects in acute trials. Current is applied to the retina through a thin, flexible microcontact film (microelectrode array) with electrode diameters ranging from 50 to 360 microm. The film is mounted in a custom-designed surgical tool that is hand-held by the surgeon during stimulation. The eventual goal of the work is the development of a chronically implantable retinal prosthesis to restore a useful level of vision to patients who are blind with outer retinal degenerations, specifically retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration. PMID:15876648

  17. A method and technical equipment for an acute human trial to evaluate retinal implant technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornig, Ralf; Laube, Thomas; Walter, Peter; Velikay-Parel, Michaela; Bornfeld, Norbert; Feucht, Matthias; Akguel, Harun; Rössler, Gernot; Alteheld, Nils; Lütke Notarp, Dietmar; Wyatt, John; Richard, Gisbert

    2005-03-01

    This paper reports on methods and technical equipment to investigate the epiretinal stimulation of the retina in blind human subjects in acute trials. Current is applied to the retina through a thin, flexible microcontact film (microelectrode array) with electrode diameters ranging from 50 to 360 µm. The film is mounted in a custom-designed surgical tool that is hand-held by the surgeon during stimulation. The eventual goal of the work is the development of a chronically implantable retinal prosthesis to restore a useful level of vision to patients who are blind with outer retinal degenerations, specifically retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration.

  18. Dietary Supplement Enriched in Antioxidants and Omega-3 Protects from Progressive Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ramchani-Ben Othman, Khaoula; Cercy, Christine; Amri, Mohamed; Doly, Michel; Ranchon-Cole, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we have evaluated one of the dietary supplements enriched with antioxidants and fish oil used in clinical care for patient with age-related macular degeneration. Rats were orally fed by a gastric canula daily with 0.2 ml of water or dietary supplement until they were sacrificed. After one week of treatment, animals were either sacrificed for lipid analysis in plasma and retina, or used for evaluation of rod-response recovery by electroretinography (ERG) followed by their sacrifice to measure rhodopsin content, or used for progressive light-induced retinal degeneration (PLIRD). For PLIRD, animals were transferred to bright cyclic light for one week. Retinal damage was quantified by ERG, histology and detection of apoptotic nuclei. Animals kept in dim-cyclic-light were processed in parallel. PLIRD induced a thinning of the outer nuclear layer and a reduction of the b-wave amplitude of the ERG in the water group. Retinal structure and function were preserved in supplemented animals. Supplement induced a significant increase in omega-3 fatty acids in plasma by 168% for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), 142% for docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and 19% for docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and a decrease in the omega-6 fatty acids, DPA by 28%. In the retina, supplement induced significant reduction of linolenic acid by 67% and an increase in EPA and DPA by 80% and 72%, respectively, associated with significant decrease in omega-6 DPA by 42%. Supplement did not affect rhodopsin content or rod-response recovery. The present data indicate that supplement rapidly modified the fatty acid content and induced an accumulation of EPA in the retina without affecting rhodopsin content or recovery. In addition, it protected the retina from oxidative stress induced by light. Therefore, this supplement might be beneficial to slow down progression of certain retinal degeneration. PMID:26042773

  19. Effects of PACAP on intracellular signaling pathways in human retinal pigment epithelial cells exposed to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Fabian, E; Reglodi, D; Mester, L; Szabo, A; Szabadfi, K; Tamas, A; Toth, G; Kovacs, K

    2012-11-01

    The integrity of retinal pigment epithelial cells is critical for photoreceptor survival and vision. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) exerts retinoprotective effects against several types of injuries in vivo, including optic nerve transection, retinal ischemia, excitotoxic injuries, UVA-induced lesion, and diabetic retinopathy. In a recent study, we have proven that PACAP is also protective in oxidative stress-induced injury in human pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19 cells). The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible mechanisms of this protection. ARPE cells were exposed to a 24-h hydrogen peroxide treatment. Expressions of kinases and apoptotic markers were studied by complex array kits and Western blot. Oxidative stress induced the activation of several apoptotic markers, including Bad, Bax, HIF-1α, several heat shock proteins, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, and Fas-associated protein with death domain, while PACAP treatment decreased them. The changes in the expression of MAP kinases showed that PACAP activated the protective ERK1/2 and downstream CREB, and decreased the activation of the pro-apoptotic p38MAPK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, an effect opposite to that observed with only oxidative stress. Furthermore, PACAP increased the activation of the protective Akt pathway. In addition, the effects of oxidative stress on several other signaling molecules were counteracted by PACAP treatment (Chk2, Yes, Lyn, paxillin, p53, PLC, STAT4, RSK). These play a role in cell death, cell cycle, inflammation, adhesion, differentiation and proliferation. In summary, PACAP, acting at several levels, influences the balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic factors in favor of anti-apoptosis, thereby providing protection in oxidative stress-induced injury of human retinal pigment epithelial cells. PMID:22644900

  20. Protective Effect of Total Flavones from Hippophae rhamnoides L. against Visible Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration in Pigmented Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Huang, Fenghong; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Di; Wang, Ou; Guo, Xiaoxuan; Lu, Feng; Yang, Xue; Ji, Baoping; Deng, Qianchun

    2016-01-13

    Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) flavones have been used as candidate functional food ingredients because of their bioactivities, such as treating cardiovascular disorders, lowering plasma cholesterol level, and regulating immune function. However, the protective effects of sea buckthorn flavones against retinal degeneration remain unclear to date. This study investigated the protective effects of total flavones from H. rhamnoides (TFH) against visible light-induced retinal damage and explored the related mechanisms in pigmented rabbits. Rabbits were treated with TFH (250 and 500 mg/kg) for 2 weeks pre-illumination and 1 week post-illumination until sacrifice. Retinal function was quantified by performing electroretinography 1 day before and 1, 3, and 7 days after light exposure (18000 lx for 2 h). Retinal degeneration was evaluated by measuring the thickness of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) and performing the TUNEL assay 7 days after light exposure. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry were used to explore the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic mechanisms of TFH during visible light-induced retinal degeneration. Light exposure produced a degenerative effect primarily on the ONL, inner nuclear layer (INL), and ganglion cell layer (GCL). TFH significantly attenuated the destruction of electroretinograms caused by light damage, maintained ONL thickness, and decreased the number of TUNEL-positive cells in the INL and GCL. TFH ameliorated the retinal oxidative stress (GSH-Px, CAT, T-AOC, and MDA), inflammation (IL-1β and IL-6), angiogenesis (VEGF), and apoptosis (Bax, Bcl2, and caspase-3) induced by light exposure. Therefore, TFH exhibited protective effects against light-induced retinal degeneration by increasing the antioxidant defense mechanisms, suppressing pro-inflammatory and angiogenic cytokines, and inhibiting retinal cell apoptosis. PMID:26653970

  1. Progressive outer retinal necrosis: manifestation of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lo, Phey Feng; Lim, Rongxuan; Antonakis, Serafeim N; Almeida, Goncalo C

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 54-year-old man who developed progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) as an initial manifestation of HIV infection without any significant risk factors for infection with HIV. PORN is usually found as a manifestation of known AIDS late in the disease. Our patient presented with transient visual loss followed by decrease in visual acuity and facial rash. Subsequent investigation revealed anterior chamber tap positive for varicella zoster virus (VZV), as well as HIV positivity, with an initial CD4 count of 48 cells/µL. Systemic and intravitreal antivirals against VZV, and highly active antiretroviral therapy against HIV were started, which halted further progression of retinal necrosis. This case highlights the importance of suspecting PORN where there is a rapidly progressive retinitis, and also testing the patient for HIV, so appropriate treatment can be started. PMID:25948844

  2. Lithium chloride protects retinal neurocytes from nutrient deprivation by promoting DNA non-homologous end-joining

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang Jing; Li Fan; Liu Xuan; Liu Zhiping; Lin Jianxian; Ge Yihong; Kaminski, Joseph M.; Summers, James Bradley; Wang Zhichong; Ge Jian Yu Keming

    2009-03-13

    Lithium chloride is a therapeutic agent for treatment of bipolar affective disorders. Increasing numbers of studies have indicated that lithium has neuroprotective effects. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the actions of lithium have not been fully elucidated. This study aimed to investigate whether lithium chloride produces neuroprotective function by improving DNA repair pathway in retinal neurocyte. In vitro, the primary cultured retinal neurocytes (85.7% are MAP-2 positive cells) were treated with lithium chloride, then cultured with serum-free media to simulate the nutrient deprived state resulting from ischemic insult. The neurite outgrowth of the cultured cells increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner when exposed to different levels of lithium chloride. Genomic DNA electrophoresis demonstrated greater DNA integrity of retinal neurocytes when treated with lithium chloride as compared to the control. Moreover, mRNA and protein levels of Ligase IV (involved in DNA non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway) in retinal neurocytes increased with lithium chloride. The end joining activity assay was performed to determine the role of lithium on NHEJ in the presence of extract from retinal neurocytes. The rejoining levels in retinal neurocytes treated with lithium were significantly increased as compared to the control. Furthermore, XRCC4, the Ligase IV partner, and the transcriptional factor, CREB and CTCF, were up-regulated in retinal cells after treating with 1.0 mM lithium chloride. Therefore, our data suggest that lithium chloride protects the retinal neural cells from nutrient deprivation in vitro, which may be similar to the mechanism of cell death in glaucoma. The improvement in DNA repair pathway involving in Ligase IV might have an important role in lithium neuroprotection. This study provides new insights into the neural protective mechanisms of lithium chloride.

  3. Small Molecules that Protect Mitochondrial Function from Metabolic Stress Decelerate Loss of Photoreceptor Cells in Murine Retinal Degeneration Models.

    PubMed

    Beeson, Craig; Lindsey, Chris; Nasarre, Cecile; Bandyopadhyay, Mausumi; Perron, Nathan; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2016-01-01

    One feature common to many of the pathways implicated in retinal degeneration is increased metabolic stress leading to impaired mitochondrial function. We found that exposure of cells to calcium ionophores or oxidants as metabolic stressors diminish maximal mitochondrial capacity. A library of 50,000 structurally diverse "drug-like" molecules was screened for protection against loss of calcium-induced loss of mitochondrial capacity in 661W rod-derived cells and C6 glioblastomas. Initial protective hits were then tested for protection against IBMX-induced loss of mitochondrial capacity as measured via respirometry. Molecules that protected mitochondria were then evaluated for protection of rod photoreceptor cells in retinal explants from rd1 mice. Two of the molecules attenuated loss of photoreceptor cells in the rd1 model. In the 661W cells, exposure to calcium ionophore or tert-butylhydroperoxide caused mitochondrial fragmentation that was blocked with the both compounds. Our studies have identified molecules that protect mitochondria and attenuate loss of photoreceptors in models of retinal degeneration suggesting that they could be good leads for development of therapeutic drugs for treatment of a wide variety of retinal dystrophies. PMID:26427445

  4. Politics and Human Welfare: Retinitis Pigmentosa Patients in South Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKendrick, B. W.; Leketi, M.

    1990-01-01

    The study found that apartheid impacted the sociopsychological and physical circumstances of 12 African and 11 White people with retinitis pigmentosa in South Africa. Findings are discussed in terms of onset of condition, effects on subjects' lives, knowledge of social services, and needs unmet by existing services. (JDD)

  5. Protection of photoreceptor cells from phototoxicity by transplanted retinal pigment epithelial cells expressing different neurotrophic factors.

    PubMed

    Abe, Toshiaki; Saigo, Yoko; Hojo, Masayoshi; Kano, Tetsuya; Wakusawa, Ryosuke; Tokita, Yumi; Tamai, Makoto

    2005-01-01

    Transplantation of cells or tissues and the intravitreal injection of neurotrophic factors are two methods that have been used to treat retinal diseases. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of combining both methods: the transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells expressing different neurotrophic factors. The neutrophic factors were Axokine, brain derived-neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). The enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP) gene was used as a reporter gene. These genes were transduced into RPE cells by lipofection, selected by antibiotics, and transplanted into the subretinal space of 108 rats. The rats were examined at 1 week and 3 months after the transplantation to determine whether the transduced cells were present, were expressing the protein, and were able to protect photoreceptors against phototoxicity. The survival of the transplanted cells was monitored by the presence of eGFP. The degree of protection was determined by the thickness of the outer nuclear layer. Our results showed that the degree of photoreceptor protection was different for the different types of neurotrophic factors at 1 week. After 3 months, the number of surviving transplanted cell was markedly reduced, and protection was observed only with the BDNF-transduced RPE cells. A significant degree of rescue was also observed by BDNF-transduced RPE cells in the nontransplanted area of the retina at both the early and late times. Lymphocytic infiltration was not detected in the vitreous, retina, and choroid at any time. We conclude that the transplantation of BDNF-transduced RPE cells can reduce the photoreceptor damage induced by phototoxicity in the transplanted area and weakly in the nontransplanted area. PMID:16454354

  6. Association of reduced Connexin 43 expression with retinal vascular lesions in human diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Tien, Thomas; Muto, Tetsuya; Zhang, Joyce; Sohn, Elliott H; Mullins, Robert F; Roy, Sayon

    2016-05-01

    Connexin 43 (Cx43) downregulation promotes apoptosis in retinal vascular cells of diabetic animal models; however, its relevance to human diabetic retinopathy has not been established. In this study, we investigated whether diabetes alters Cx43 expression and promotes retinal vascular lesions in human retinas. Diabetic human eyes (aged 64-94 years) and non-diabetic human eyes (aged 61-90 years) were analyzed in this study. Retinal protein samples and retinal capillary networks were assessed for Cx43 level by Western blot (WB) analysis and immunostaining. In parallel, retinal capillary networks were stained with hematoxylin and periodic acid Schiff to determine the extent of pericyte loss (PL) and acellular capillaries (AC) in these retinas. Cx43 protein expression was significantly reduced in the diabetic retinas compared to non-diabetic retinas as indicated by WB analysis (81 ± 11% of control). Additionally, a significant decrease in the number of Cx43 plaques per unit length of vessel was observed in the diabetic retinas compared to those of non-diabetic retinas (62 ± 10% of control; p < 0.005). Importantly, a strong inverse relationship was noted between Cx43 expression and the relative number of AC (r = -0.89; p < 0.0005), and between Cx43 expression and number of pericyte loss (r = -0.88; p < 0.0005). Overall, these results show that Cx43 expression is reduced in the human diabetic retinas and Cx43 reduction is associated with increased vascular cell death. These findings suggest that diabetes decreases retinal Cx43 expression and that the development of PL and AC is associated with reduced Cx43 expression in human diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26738943

  7. Apelin Protects Primary Rat Retinal Pericytes from Chemical Hypoxia-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Tao, Yong; Feng, Jing; Jiang, Yan Rong

    2015-01-01

    Pericytes are a population of cells that participate in normal vessel architecture and regulate permeability. Apelin, as the endogenous ligand of G protein-coupled receptor APJ, participates in a number of physiological and pathological processes. To date, the effect of apelin on pericyte is not clear. Our study aimed to investigate the potential protection mechanisms of apelin, with regard to primary rat retinal pericytes under hypoxia. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that pericytes colocalized with APJ in the fibrovascular membranes dissected from proliferative diabetic retinopathy patients. In the in vitro studies, we first demonstrated that the expression of apelin/APJ was upregulated in pericytes under hypoxia, and apelin increased pericytes proliferation and migration. Moreover, knockdown of apelin in pericyte was achieved via lentivirus-mediated RNA interference. After the inhibition of apelin, pericytes proliferation was inhibited significantly in hypoxia culture condition. Furthermore, exogenous recombinant apelin effectively prevented hypoxia-induced apoptosis through downregulating active-caspase 3 expression and increasing the ratio of B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2)/Bcl-2 associated X protein (Bax) in pericytes. These results suggest that apelin suppressed hypoxia-induced pericytes injury, which indicated that apelin could be a potential therapeutic target for retinal angiogenic diseases. PMID:26491547

  8. Protective Effects of Melatonin on Retinal Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Experimental Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tingting; Cai, Jiyang; Fan, Jiawen; Zhang, Xiaozhe

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation are important pathogenic factors contributing to the etiology of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Melatonin is an endogenous hormone that exhibits a variety of biological effects including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory functions. The goals of this study were to determine whether melatonin could ameliorate retinal injury and to explore the potential mechanisms. Diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of STZ (60 mg/kg) in Sprague-Dawley rats. Melatonin (10 mg kg−1 daily, i.p.) was administered from the induction of diabetes and continued for up to 12 weeks, after which the animals were sacrificed and retinal samples were collected. The retina of diabetic rats showed depletion of glutathione and downregulation of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL). Melatonin significantly upregulated GCL by retaining Nrf2 in the nucleus and stimulating Akt phosphorylation. The production of proinflammatory cytokines and proteins, including interleukin 1β, TNF-α, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), was inhibited by melatonin through the NF-κB pathway. At 12 weeks, melatonin prevented the significant decrease in the ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes under the diabetic condition. Our results suggest potent protective functions of melatonin in diabetic retinopathy. In addition to being a direct antioxidant, melatonin can exert receptor-mediated signaling effects to attenuate inflammation and oxidative stress of the retina. PMID:27143993

  9. Autophagy and mitochondrial alterations in human retinal pigment epithelial cells induced by ethanol: implications of 4-hydroxy-nonenal

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Bellver, M; Bonet-Ponce, L; Barcia, J M; Garcia-Verdugo, J M; Martinez-Gil, N; Saez-Atienzar, S; Sancho-Pelluz, J; Jordan, J; Galindo, M F; Romero, F J

    2014-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium has a crucial role in the physiology and pathophysiology of the retina due to its location and metabolism. Oxidative damage has been demonstrated as a pathogenic mechanism in several retinal diseases, and reactive oxygen species are certainly important by-products of ethanol (EtOH) metabolism. Autophagy has been shown to exert a protective effect in different cellular and animal models. Thus, in our model, EtOH treatment increases autophagy flux, in a concentration-dependent manner. Mitochondrial morphology seems to be clearly altered under EtOH exposure, leading to an apparent increase in mitochondrial fission. An increase in 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence and accumulation of lipid peroxidation products, such as 4-hydroxy-nonenal (4-HNE), among others were confirmed. The characterization of these structures confirmed their nature as aggresomes. Hence, autophagy seems to have a cytoprotective role in ARPE-19 cells under EtOH damage, by degrading fragmented mitochondria and 4-HNE aggresomes. Herein, we describe the central implication of autophagy in human retinal pigment epithelial cells upon oxidative stress induced by EtOH, with possible implications for other conditions and diseases. PMID:25032851

  10. Expression and regulation of enzymes in the ceramide metabolic pathway in human retinal pigment epithelial cells and their relevance to retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, DanHong; Sreekumar, Parameswaran G.; Hinton, David R.; Kannan, Ram

    2009-01-01

    Ceramide and its metabolic derivatives are important modulators of cellular apoptosis and proliferation. Dysregulation or imbalance of their metabolic pathways may promote the development of retinal degeneration. The aim of this study was to identify the expression and regulation of key enzymes of the ceramide pathway in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. RT-PCR was used to screen the enzymes involved in ceramide metabolism that are expressed in RPE. Over-expression of neutral sphingomyelinase-2 (SMPD3) or sphingosine kinase 1 (Sphk1) in ARPE-19 cells was achieved by transient transfection of SMPD3 or Sphk1 cDNA subcloned into an expression vector. The number of apoptotic or proliferating cells was determined using TUNEL and BrdU assays respectively. Neutral sphingomyelinase-1, neutral sphingomyelinase-2, acidic ceramidase, ceramide kinase, SphK1 and Sphk2 were expressed in both ARPE-19 and early passage human fetal RPE (fRPE) cells, while alkaline ceramidase 2 was only expressed in fRPE cells. Over-expression of SMPD3 decreased RPE cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis. The percentage of apoptotic cells increased proportionally with the amount of transfected SMPD3 DNA. Over-expression of SphK1 promoted cell proliferation and protected ARPE-19 cells from ceramide-induced apoptosis. The effect of C2 ceramide on induction of apoptosis was evaluated in polarized vs. non-polarized RPE cultures; polarization of RPE was associated with much reduced apoptosis in response to ceramide. In conclusion, RPE cells possess the synthetic machinery for the production of ceramide, sphingosine, ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P), and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). Overexpression of SMPD3 may increase cellular ceramide levels, leading to enhanced cell death and arrested cell proliferation. The selective induction of apoptosis in non-polarized RPE cultures by C2 ceramide suggests that increased ceramide levels will preferentially affect non-polarized RPE, as are found in late

  11. First-in-Human Trial of a Novel Suprachoroidal Retinal Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ayton, Lauren N.; Blamey, Peter J.; Guymer, Robyn H.; Luu, Chi D.; Nayagam, David A. X.; Sinclair, Nicholas C.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Yeoh, Jonathan; McCombe, Mark F.; Briggs, Robert J.; Opie, Nicholas L.; Villalobos, Joel; Dimitrov, Peter N.; Varsamidis, Mary; Petoe, Matthew A.; McCarthy, Chris D.; Walker, Janine G.; Barnes, Nick; Burkitt, Anthony N.; Williams, Chris E.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Allen, Penelope J.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal visual prostheses (“bionic eyes”) have the potential to restore vision to blind or profoundly vision-impaired patients. The medical bionic technology used to design, manufacture and implant such prostheses is still in its relative infancy, with various technologies and surgical approaches being evaluated. We hypothesised that a suprachoroidal implant location (between the sclera and choroid of the eye) would provide significant surgical and safety benefits for patients, allowing them to maintain preoperative residual vision as well as gaining prosthetic vision input from the device. This report details the first-in-human Phase 1 trial to investigate the use of retinal implants in the suprachoroidal space in three human subjects with end-stage retinitis pigmentosa. The success of the suprachoroidal surgical approach and its associated safety benefits, coupled with twelve-month post-operative efficacy data, holds promise for the field of vision restoration. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01603576 PMID:25521292

  12. CNTF Gene Therapy Confers Lifelong Neuroprotection in a Mouse Model of Human Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Lipinski, Daniel M; Barnard, Alun R; Singh, Mandeep S; Martin, Chris; Lee, Edward J; Davies, Wayne I L; MacLaren, Robert E

    2015-08-01

    The long-term outcome of neuroprotection as a therapeutic strategy for preventing cell death in neurodegenerative disorders remains unknown, primarily due to slow disease progression and the inherent difficulty of assessing neuronal survival in vivo. Employing a murine model of retinal disease, we demonstrate that ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) confers life-long protection against photoreceptor degeneration. Repetitive retinal imaging allowed the survival of intrinsically fluorescent cone photoreceptors to be quantified in vivo. Imaging of the visual cortex and assessment of visually-evoked behavioral responses demonstrated that surviving cones retain function and signal correctly to the brain. The mechanisms underlying CNTF-mediated neuroprotection were explored through transcriptome analysis, revealing widespread upregulation of proteolysis inhibitors, which may prevent cellular/extracellular matrix degradation and complement activation in neurodegenerative diseases. These findings provide insights into potential novel therapeutic avenues for diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, for which CNTF has been evaluated unsuccessfully in clinical trials. PMID:25896245

  13. Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase B2 is Highly Expressed in the Retina and Protects Retinal Pigmented Epithelium Cells from Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Iranzu; Larrayoz, Ignacio M.; Campos, Maria M.; Rodriguez, Ignacio R.

    2010-01-01

    Methionine sulfoxide reductase B2 (MSRB2) is a mitochondrial enzyme that converts methionine sulfoxide (R) enantiomer back to methionine. This enzyme is suspected of functioning to protect mitochondrial proteins from oxidative damage. In this study we report that the retina is one of the human tissues with highest levels of MSRB2 mRNA expression. Other tissues with high expression were heart, kidney and skeletal muscle. Over-expression of a MSRB2-GFP fusion protein increased the MSR enzymatic activity three-fold in stably transfected cultured RPE cells. This overexpression augmented the resistance of these cells to the toxicity induced by 7-ketocholesterol, tert-butyl hydroperoxide and all-trans retinoic acid. By contrast, knockdown of MSRB2 by a miRNA in stably transfected cells did not convey increased sensitivity to the oxidative stress. In the monkey retina MSRB2 localized to the ganglion cell layer (GLC), the outer plexiform layer (OPL) and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). MSRB2 expression is most pronounced in the OPL of the macula and foveal regions suggesting an association with the cone synaptic mitochondria. Our data suggests that MSRB2 plays an important function in protecting cones from multiple type of oxidative stress and may be critical in preserving central vision. PMID:20026324

  14. The relation between resolution measurements and numbers of retinal ganglion cells in the same human subjects.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Zoran; Sjöstrand, Johan

    2005-08-01

    Limiting factors of resolution have previously only been investigated by using resolution data and retinal ganglion cell spacing data from different individuals. We report on our unique opportunity to study the intra-individual relationship in three human subjects between retinal ganglion cell separations and resolution thresholds, measured with high-pass resolution perimetry. Our data show that resolution is directly proportional to half the midget population, in accordance with the hypothesis that a dichotomous midget ON/OFF population mediates resolution. PMID:15924946

  15. Characterization of Three-Dimensional Retinal Tissue Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells in Adherent Monolayer Cultures.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ratnesh K; Mallela, Ramya K; Cornuet, Pamela K; Reifler, Aaron N; Chervenak, Andrew P; West, Michael D; Wong, Kwoon Y; Nasonkin, Igor O

    2015-12-01

    Stem cell-based therapy of retinal degenerative conditions is a promising modality to treat blindness, but requires new strategies to improve the number of functionally integrating cells. Grafting semidifferentiated retinal tissue rather than progenitors allows preservation of tissue structure and connectivity in retinal grafts, mandatory for vision restoration. Using human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), we derived retinal tissue growing in adherent conditions consisting of conjoined neural retina and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and evaluated cell fate determination and maturation in this tissue. We found that deriving such tissue in adherent conditions robustly induces all eye field genes (RX, PAX6, LHX2, SIX3, SIX6) and produces four layers of pure populations of retinal cells: RPE (expressing NHERF1, EZRIN, RPE65, DCT, TYR, TYRP, MITF, PMEL), early photoreceptors (PRs) (coexpressing CRX and RCVRN), inner nuclear layer neurons (expressing CALB2), and retinal ganglion cells [RGCs, expressing BRN3B and Neurofilament (NF) 200]. Furthermore, we found that retinal progenitors divide at the apical side of the hESC-derived retinal tissue (next to the RPE layer) and then migrate toward the basal side, similar to that found during embryonic retinogenesis. We detected synaptogenesis in hESC-derived retinal tissue, and found neurons containing many synaptophysin-positive boutons within the RGC and PR layers. We also observed long NF200-positive axons projected by RGCs toward the apical side. Whole-cell recordings demonstrated that putative amacrine and/or ganglion cells exhibited electrophysiological responses reminiscent of those in normal retinal neurons. These responses included voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) currents, depolarization-induced spiking, and responses to neurotransmitter receptor agonists. Differentiation in adherent conditions allows generation of long and flexible pieces of 3D retinal tissue suitable for isolating transplantable slices of tissue

  16. Imipramine protects retinal ganglion cells from oxidative stress through the tyrosine kinase receptor B signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ming-lei; Liu, Guo-hua; Guo, Jin; Yu, Shu-juan; Huang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration is irreversible in glaucoma and tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB)-associated signaling pathways have been implicated in the process. In this study, we attempted to examine whether imipramine, a tricyclic antidepressant, may protect hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced RGC degeneration through the activation of the TrkB pathway in RGC-5 cell lines. RGC-5 cell lines were pre-treated with imipramine 30 minutes before exposure to H2O2. Western blot assay showed that in H2O2 -damaged RGC-5 cells, imipramine activated TrkB pathways through extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase/TrkB phosphorylation. TUNEL staining assay also demonstrated that imipramine ameliorated H2O2 -induced apoptosis in RGC-5 cells. Finally, TrkB-IgG intervention was able to reverse the protective effect of imipramine on H2O2 -induced RGC-5 apoptosis. Imipramine therefore protects RGCs from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through the TrkB signaling pathway. PMID:27127489

  17. Synergistic protective effects of escin and low‑dose glucocorticoids against vascular endothelial growth factor‑induced blood‑retinal barrier breakdown in retinal pigment epithelial and umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fenglan; Man, Xuejing; Yu, Huajun; Liu, Limei; Li, Yuanbin

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that escin possesses glucocorticoid (GC)‑like anti‑edematous and anti‑inflammatory effects. The present study was designed to investigate whether escin exhibits synergistic protective effects against blood‑retinal barrier (BRB) breakdown when combined with GC in an in vitro monolayer BRB model, based on retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The results showed that low concentrations of escin and triamcinolone acetonide (TA) administered separately did not affect BRB trans‑endothelial (epithelium) resistance (TEER). However, when administered together, escin and TA significantly inhibited reduced BRB TEER following treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Furthermore, low‑concentrations of escin and TA administered together significantly increased the expression levels of occludin and ZO‑1. This demonstrates that escin and GC have synergistic protective effects against BRB breakdown, and the molecular mechanisms may be related to the upregulation of occludin and ZO‑1 expression. The combination of escin with GC indicates a potential beneficial strategy for the treatment of breakdown of the BRB. PMID:25370688

  18. Detection of Anatomic Structures in Human Retinal Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin Jr, Kenneth William; Chaum, Edward; Muthusamy Govindasamy, Vijaya Priya; Karnowski, Thomas Paul

    2007-01-01

    The widespread availability of electronic imaging devices throughout the medical community is leading to a growing body of research on image processing and analysis to diagnose retinal disease such as diabetic retinopathy (DR). Productive computer-based screening of large, at-risk populations at low cost requires robust, automated image analysis. In this paper we present results for the automatic detection of the optic nerve and localization of the macula using digital red-free fundus photography. Our method relies on the accurate segmentation of the vasculature of the retina followed by the determination of spatial features describing the density,average thickness, and average orientation of the vasculature in relation to the position of the optic nerve. Localization of the macula follows using knowledge of the optic nerve location to detect the horizontal raphe of the retina using a geometric model of the vasculature. We report 90.4% detection performance for the optic nerve and 92.5% localization performance for the macula for red-free fundus images representing a population of 345 images corresponding to 269 patients with 18 different pathologies associated with DR and other common retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration.

  19. Novel mutations in PDE6B causing human retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lu-Lu; Han, Ru-Yi; Yang, Fa-Yu; Yu, Xin-Ping; Xu, Jin-Ling; Min, Qing-Jie; Tian, Jie; Ge, Xiang-Lian; Zheng, Si-Si; Lin, Ye-Wen; Zheng, Yi-Han; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    AIM To identify the genetic defects of a Chinese patient with sporadic retinitis pigmentosa (RP). METHODS Ophthalmologic examinations were performed on the sporadic RP patient, 144 genes associated with retinal diseases were scanned with capture next generation sequencing (CNGS) approach. Two heterozygous mutations in PDE6B were confirmed in the pedigree by Sanger sequencing subsequently. The carrier frequency of PDE6B mutations of reported PDE6B mutations based on the available two public exome databases (1000 Genomes Project and ESP6500 Genomes Project) and one in-house exome database was investigated. RESULTS We identified compound heterozygosity of two novel nonsense mutations c.1133G>A (p.W378X) and c.2395C>T (p.R799X) in PDE6B, one reported causative gene for RP. Neither of the two mutations in our study was presented in three exome databases. Two mutations (p.R74C and p.T604I) in PDE6B have relatively high frequencies in the ESP6500 and in-house databases, respectively, while no common dominant mutation in each of the database or across all databases. CONCLUSION We demonstrates that compound heterozygosity of two novel nonsense mutations in PDE6B could lead to RP. These results collectively point to enormous potential of next-generation sequencing in determining the genetic etiology of RP and how various mutations in PDE6B contribute to the genetic heterogeneity of RP. PMID:27588261

  20. Inner Retinal Oxygen Extraction Fraction in Response to Light Flicker Stimulation in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Felder, Anthony E.; Wanek, Justin; Blair, Norman P.; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Light flicker has been shown to stimulate retinal neural activity, increase blood flow, and alter inner retinal oxygen metabolism (MO2) and delivery (DO2). The purpose of the study was to determine the change in MO2 relative to DO2 due to light flicker stimulation in humans, as assessed by the inner retinal oxygen extraction fraction (OEF). Methods An optical imaging system, based on a modified slit lamp biomicroscope, was developed for simultaneous measurements of retinal vascular diameter (D) and oxygen saturation (SO2). Retinal images were acquired in 20 healthy subjects before and during light flicker stimulation. Arterial and venous D (DA and DV) and SO2 (SO2A and SO2V) were quantified within a circumpapillary region. Oxygen extraction fraction was defined as the ratio of MO2 to DO2 and was calculated as (SO2A − SO2V)/SO2A. Reproducibility of measurements was assessed. Results Coefficients of variation and intraclass correlation coefficients of repeated measurements were <5% and ≥0.83, respectively. During light flicker stimulation, DA, DV , and SO2V significantly increased (P ≤ 0.004). Oxygen extraction fraction was 0.37 ± 0.08 before light flicker and significantly decreased to 0.31 ± 0.07 during light flicker (P = 0.001). Conclusions Oxygen extraction fraction before and during light flicker stimulation is reported in human subjects for the first time. Oxygen extraction fraction decreased during light flicker stimulation, indicating the change in DO2 exceeded that of MO2. This technology is potentially useful for the detection of changes in OEF response to light flicker in physiological and pathological retinal conditions. PMID:26469748

  1. Losartan Treatment Protects Retinal Ganglion Cells and Alters Scleral Remodeling in Experimental Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Pitha, Ian F.; Nguyen, Cathy; Steinhart, Matthew R.; Nguyen, Thao D.; Pease, Mary Ellen; Oglesby, Ericka N.; Berlinicke, Cynthia A.; Mitchell, Katherine L.; Kim, Jessica; Jefferys, Joan J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine if oral losartan treatment decreases the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death caused by experimental intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation in mice. Methods We produced IOP increase in CD1 mice and performed unilateral optic nerve crush. Mice received oral losartan, spironolactone, enalapril, or no drug to test effects of inhibiting angiotensin receptors. IOP was monitored by Tonolab, and blood pressure was monitored by tail cuff device. RGC loss was measured in masked axon counts and RGC bodies by β-tubulin labeling. Scleral changes that could modulate RGC injury were measured including axial length, scleral thickness, and retinal layer thicknesses, pressure-strain behavior in inflation testing, and study of angiotensin receptors and pathways by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Results Losartan treatment prevented significant RGC loss (median loss = 2.5%, p = 0.13), while median loss with water, spironolactone, and enalapril treatments were 26%, 28% and 43%; p < 0.0001). The lower RGC loss with losartan was significantly less than the loss with spironolactone or enalapril (regression model p = 0.001; drug treatment group term p = 0.01). Both losartan and enalapril significantly lowered blood pressure (p< 0.001), but losartan was protective, while enalapril led to worse than water-treated RGC loss. RGC loss after crush injury was unaffected by losartan treatment (difference from control p = 0.9). Survival of RGC in cell culture was not prolonged by sartan treatment. Axonal transport blockade after 3 day IOP elevations was less in losartan-treated than in control glaucoma eyes (p = 0.007). Losartan inhibited effects of glaucoma, including reduction in extracellular signal-related kinase activity and modification of glaucoma-related changes in scleral thickness and creep under controlled IOP. Conclusions The neuroprotective effect of losartan in mouse glaucoma is associated with adaptive changes

  2. Research on the liquid crystal adaptive optics system for human retinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Tong, Shoufeng; Song, Yansong; Zhao, Xin

    2013-12-01

    The blood vessels only in Human eye retinal can be observed directly. Many diseases that are not obvious in their early symptom can be diagnosed through observing the changes of distal micro blood vessel. In order to obtain the high resolution human retinal images,an adaptive optical system for correcting the aberration of the human eye was designed by using the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and the Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulator(LCLSM) .For a subject eye with 8m-1 (8D)myopia, the wavefront error is reduced to 0.084 λ PV and 0.12 λRMS after adaptive optics(AO) correction ,which has reached diffraction limit.The results show that the LCLSM based AO system has the ability of correcting the aberration of the human eye efficiently,and making the blurred photoreceptor cell to clearly image on a CCD camera.

  3. Synergistic protective effects of escin and low‑dose glucocorticoids on blood‑retinal barrier breakdown in a rat model of retinal ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fenglan; Li, Yuanbin; Zhang, Leiming; Mu, Guoying

    2013-05-01

    Escin, a natural mixture of triterpenoid saponins isolated from the seed of the horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum), has been demonstrated to possess glucocorticoid (GC)‑like anti‑edematous and anti‑inflammatory effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether escin exhibits synergistic protective effects on blood‑retinal barrier (BRB) breakdown when combined with GCs in a rat model of retinal ischemia. Low concentrations of escin and triamcinolone acetonide (TA) alone did not affect BRB permeability. However, when administered together, low‑dose escin and TA significantly reduced BRB permeability following ischemia. Furthermore, low‑dose escin and TA alone did not affect the expression of occludin in the ischemic retina; however, when administered together, they significantly increased occludin expression in the ganglion cell layer of the ischemic retina. This indicates that escin and GCs have synergistic protective effects on BRB breakdown and the molecular mechanisms may be correlated with the upregulation of occludin. Therefore, the administration of escin may allow a reduction in the dose of GCs for the treatment of macular edema. The combination of escin with GCs is potentially a beneficial treatment method for BRB breakdown and warrants further investigation. PMID:23525122

  4. Protective effect of alpha-mangostin against oxidative stress induced-retinal cell death.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Su, Tu; Qiu, Xiaorong; Mao, Pingan; Xu, Yidan; Hu, Zizhong; Zhang, Yi; Zheng, Xinhua; Xie, Ping; Liu, Qinghuai

    2016-01-01

    It is known that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) pathogenesis. Alpha-mangostin is the main xanthone purified from mangosteen known as anti-oxidative properties. The aim of the study was to test the protective effect of alpha-mangostin against oxidative stress both in retina of light-damaged mice model and in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-stressed RPE cells. We observed that alpha-mangostin significantly inhibited light-induced degeneration of photoreceptors and 200 μM H2O2-induced apoptosis of RPE cells. 200 μM H2O2-induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and light-induced generation of malondialdehyde (MDA) were suppressed by alpha-mangostin. Alpha-mangostin stimulation resulted in an increase of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity and glutathione (GSH) content both in vivo and vitro. Furthermore, the mechanism of retinal protection against oxidative stress by alpha-mangostin involves accumulation and the nuclear translocation of the NF-E2-related factor (Nrf2) along with up-regulation the expression of heme oxygenas-1 (HO-1). Meanwhile, alpha-mangostin can activate the expression of PKC-δ and down-regulate the expression of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), including ERK1/2, JNK, P38. The results suggest that alpha-mangostin could be a new approach to suspend the onset and development of AMD. PMID:26888416

  5. Protective effect of alpha-mangostin against oxidative stress induced-retinal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yuan; Su, Tu; Qiu, Xiaorong; Mao, Pingan; Xu, Yidan; Hu, Zizhong; Zhang, Yi; Zheng, Xinhua; Xie, Ping; Liu, Qinghuai

    2016-01-01

    It is known that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) pathogenesis. Alpha-mangostin is the main xanthone purified from mangosteen known as anti-oxidative properties. The aim of the study was to test the protective effect of alpha-mangostin against oxidative stress both in retina of light-damaged mice model and in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-stressed RPE cells. We observed that alpha-mangostin significantly inhibited light-induced degeneration of photoreceptors and 200 μM H2O2-induced apoptosis of RPE cells. 200 μM H2O2-induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and light-induced generation of malondialdehyde (MDA) were suppressed by alpha-mangostin. Alpha-mangostin stimulation resulted in an increase of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity and glutathione (GSH) content both in vivo and vitro. Furthermore, the mechanism of retinal protection against oxidative stress by alpha-mangostin involves accumulation and the nuclear translocation of the NF-E2-related factor (Nrf2) along with up-regulation the expression of heme oxygenas-1 (HO-1). Meanwhile, alpha-mangostin can activate the expression of PKC-δ and down-regulate the expression of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), including ERK1/2, JNK, P38. The results suggest that alpha-mangostin could be a new approach to suspend the onset and development of AMD. PMID:26888416

  6. Protective effects of the compounds isolated from the seed of Psoralea corylifolia on oxidative stress-induced retinal damage

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyung-A; Shim, Sang Hee; Ahn, Hong Ryul; Jung, Sang Hoon

    2013-06-01

    The mechanism underlying glaucoma remains controversial, but apoptosis caused by increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is thought to play a role in its pathogenesis. We investigated the effects of compounds isolated from Psoralea corylifolia on oxidative stress-induced cell death in vitro and in vivo. Transformed retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5) were treated with L-buthione-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) and glutamate in the presence or with pre-treatment with compound 6, bakuchiol isolated from P. corylifolia. We observed reduced cell death in cells pre-treated with bakuchiol. Moreover, bakuchiol inhibited the oxidative stress-induced decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, ΔΨm). Furthermore, while intracellular Ca{sup 2+} was high in RGC-5 cells after exposure to oxidative stress, bakuchiol reduced these levels. In an in vivo study, in which rat retinal damage was induced by intravitreal injection of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), bakuchiol markedly reduced translocation of AIF and release of cytochrome c, and inhibited up-regulation of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9, and cleaved PARP. The survival rate of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) 7 days after optic nerve crush (ONC) in mice was significantly decreased; however, bakuchiol attenuated the loss of RGCs. Moreover, bakuchiol attenuated ONC-induced up-regulation of apoptotic proteins, including cleaved PARP, cleaved caspase-3, and cleaved caspase-9. Bakuchiol also significantly inhibited translocation of mitochondrial AIF into the nuclear fraction and release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into the cytosol. These results demonstrate that bakuchiol isolated from P. corylifolia has protective effects against oxidative stress-induced retinal damage, and may be considered as an agent for treating or preventing retinal degeneration. - Highlights: • Psoralea corylifolia have neuroprotective effects in vitro and in vivo. • Bakuchiol attenuated the increase of apoptotic proteins induced by oxidative

  7. In vitro ultraviolet–induced damage in human corneal, lens, and retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Hyun-Yi; Sivak, Jacob G.; Jones, Lyndon W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to develop suitable in vitro methods to detect ocular epithelial cell damage when exposed to UV radiation, in an effort to evaluate UV-absorbing ophthalmic biomaterials. Methods Human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC), lens epithelial cells (HLEC), and retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19) were cultured and Ultraviolet A/Ultraviolet B (UVA/UVB) blocking filters and UVB-only blocking filters were placed between the cells and a UV light source. Cells were irradiated with UV radiations at various energy levels with and without filter protections. Cell viability after exposure was determined using the metabolic dye alamarBlue and by evaluating for changes in the nuclei, mitochondria, membrane permeability, and cell membranes of the cells using the fluorescent dyes Hoechst 33342, rhodamine 123, calcein AM, ethidium homodimer-1, and annexin V. High-resolution images of the cells were taken with a Zeiss 510 confocal laser scanning microscope. Results The alamarBlue assay results of UV-exposed cells without filters showed energy level-dependent decreases in cellular viability. However, UV treated cells with 400 nm LP filter protection showed the equivalent viability to untreated control cells at all energy levels. Also, UV irradiated cells with 320 nm LP filter showed lower cell viability than the unexposed control cells, yet higher viability than UV-exposed cells without filters in an energy level-dependent manner. The confocal microscopy results also showed that UV radiation can cause significant dose-dependent degradations of nuclei and mitochondria in ocular cells. The annexin V staining also showed an increased number of apoptotic cells after UV irradiation. Conclusions The findings suggest that UV-induced HCEC, HLEC, and ARPE-19 cell damage can be evaluated by bioassays that measure changes in the cell nuclei, mitochondria, cell membranes, and cell metabolism, and these assay methods provide a valuable in vitro model for evaluating the

  8. Adaptive optics OCT using 1060nm swept source and dual deformable lenses for human retinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Yifan; Lee, Sujin; Cua, Michelle; Miao, Dongkai; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-03-01

    Adaptive optics concepts have been applied to the advancement of biological imaging and microscopy. In particular, AO has also been very successfully applied to cellular resolution imaging of the retina, enabling visualization of the characteristic mosaic patterns of the outer retinal layers using flood illumination fundus photography, Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy (SLO), and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Despite the high quality of the in vivo images, there has been a limited uptake of AO imaging into the clinical environment. The high resolution afforded by AO comes at the price of limited field of view and specialized equipment. The implementation of a typical adaptive optics imaging system results in a relatively large and complex optical setup. The wavefront measurement is commonly performed using a Hartmann-Shack Wavefront Sensor (HS-WFS) placed at an image plane that is optically conjugated to the eye's pupil. The deformable mirror is also placed at a conjugate plane, relaying the wavefront corrections to the pupil. Due to the sensitivity of the HS-WFS to back-reflections, the imaging system is commonly constructed from spherical mirrors. In this project, we present a novel adaptive optics OCT retinal imaging system with significant potential to overcome many of the barriers to integration with a clinical environment. We describe in detail the implementation of a compact lens based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WSAO) 1060nm swept source OCT human retinal imaging system with dual deformable lenses, and present retinal images acquired in vivo from research volunteers.

  9. VSX2 and ASCL1 Are Indicators of Neurogenic Competence in Human Retinal Progenitor Cultures.

    PubMed

    Wright, Lynda S; Pinilla, Isabel; Saha, Jishnu; Clermont, Joshua M; Lien, Jessica S; Borys, Katarzyna D; Capowski, Elizabeth E; Phillips, M Joseph; Gamm, David M

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) culture techniques are frequently used for CNS tissue modeling and organoid production, including generation of retina-like tissues. A proposed advantage of these 3D systems is their potential to more closely approximate in vivo cellular microenvironments, which could translate into improved manufacture and/or maintenance of neuronal populations. Visual System Homeobox 2 (VSX2) labels all multipotent retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) and is known to play important roles in retinal development. In contrast, the proneural transcription factor Acheate scute-like 1 (ASCL1) is expressed transiently in a subset of RPCs, but is required for the production of most retinal neurons. Therefore, we asked whether the presence of VSX2 and ASCL1 could gauge neurogenic potential in 3D retinal cultures derived from human prenatal tissue or ES cells (hESCs). Short term prenatal 3D retinal cultures displayed multiple characteristics of human RPCs (hRPCs) found in situ, including robust expression of VSX2. Upon initiation of hRPC differentiation, there was a small increase in co-labeling of VSX2+ cells with ASCL1, along with a modest increase in the number of PKCα+ neurons. However, 3D prenatal retinal cultures lost expression of VSX2 and ASCL1 over time while concurrently becoming refractory to neuronal differentiation. Conversely, 3D optic vesicles derived from hESCs (hESC-OVs) maintained a robust VSX2+ hRPC population that could spontaneously co-express ASCL1 and generate photoreceptors and other retinal neurons for an extended period of time. These results show that VSX2 and ASCL1 can serve as markers for neurogenic potential in cultured hRPCs. Furthermore, unlike hESC-OVs, maintenance of 3D structure does not independently convey an advantage in the culture of prenatal hRPCs, further illustrating differences in the survival and differentiation requirements of hRPCs extracted from native tissue vs. those generated entirely in vitro. PMID:26292211

  10. Characterization of human retinal vessel arborisation in normal and amblyopic eyes using multifractal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tălu, Stefan; Vlăduţiu, Cristina; Lupaşcu, Carmen A.

    2015-01-01

    AIM To characterize the human retinal vessel arborisation in normal and amblyopic eyes using multifractal geometry and lacunarity parameters. METHODS Multifractal analysis using a box counting algorithm was carried out for a set of 12 segmented and skeletonized human retinal images, corresponding to both normal (6 images) and amblyopia states of the retina (6 images). RESULTS It was found that the microvascular geometry of the human retina network represents geometrical multifractals, characterized through subsets of regions having different scaling properties that are not evident in the fractal analysis. Multifractal analysis of the amblyopia images (segmented and skeletonized versions) show a higher average of the generalized dimensions (Dq) for q=0, 1, 2 indicating a higher degree of the tree-dimensional complexity associated with the human retinal microvasculature network whereas images of healthy subjects show a lower value of generalized dimensions indicating normal complexity of biostructure. On the other hand, the lacunarity analysis of the amblyopia images (segmented and skeletonized versions) show a lower average of the lacunarity parameter Λ than the corresponding values for normal images (segmented and skeletonized versions). CONCLUSION The multifractal and lacunarity analysis may be used as a non-invasive predictive complementary tool to distinguish amblyopic subjects from healthy subjects and hence this technique could be used for an early diagnosis of patients with amblyopia. PMID:26558216

  11. Escin activates AKT-Nrf2 signaling to protect retinal pigment epithelium cells from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kaijun; Jiang, Yiqian; Wang, Wei; Ma, Jian; Chen, Min

    2015-12-25

    Here we explored the anti-oxidative and cytoprotective potentials of escin, a natural triterpene-saponin, against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. We showed that escin remarkably attenuated H2O2-induced death and apoptosis of established (ARPE-19) and primary murine RPE cells. Meanwhile, ROS production and lipid peroxidation by H2O2 were remarkably inhibited by escin. Escin treatment in RPE cells resulted in NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling activation, evidenced by transcription of anti-oxidant-responsive element (ARE)-regulated genes, including HO-1, NQO-1 and SRXN-1. Knockdown of Nrf2 through targeted shRNAs/siRNAs alleviated escin-mediated ARE gene transcription, and almost abolished escin-mediated anti-oxidant activity and RPE cytoprotection against H2O2. Reversely, escin was more potent against H2O2 damages in Nrf2-over-expressed ARPE-19 cells. Further studies showed that escin-induced Nrf2 activation in RPE cells required AKT signaling. AKT inhibitors (LY294002 and perifosine) blocked escin-induced AKT activation, and dramatically inhibited Nrf2 phosphorylation, its cytosol accumulation and nuclear translocation in RPE cells. Escin-induced RPE cytoprotection against H2O2 was also alleviated by the AKT inhibitors. Together, these results demonstrate that escin protects RPE cells from oxidative stress possibly through activating AKT-Nrf2 signaling. PMID:26505797

  12. Serum Response Factor Protects Retinal Ganglion Cells Against High-Glucose Damage.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yan; Wang, Liang; Zhao, Junhong; Zhang, Hongbing; Tian, Ying; Liang, Houcheng; Ma, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Serum response factor (SRF), which encodes the MADS-box family of related proteins, is a common transcription factor related to the expression of genes associated with cell survival. However, SRF's role in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) after high-glucose injury remains unclear. In this study, we investigate the protective role of SRF after high-glucose injury and its underlying mechanism. The in vitro RGC model subjected to high glucose was established by employing a 50 mmol/L glucose culture environment. As detected by real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot, SRF was significantly upregulated in RGCs treated with high glucose. Overexpression of SRF significantly promoted survival among RGCs exposed to high glucose and inhibited RGC apoptosis. Knockdown of SRF exerted an inverse effect. Moreover, SRF upregulation enhanced expression of an antioxidant protein, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2), via control of the Fos-related antigen 1 (Fra-1). SRF upregulation also affected RGC survival after high-glucose treatment. Our findings showed that overexpression of SRF promoted survival of RGCs after high-glucose injury by regulating Fra-1 and Nrf2. PMID:26803311

  13. Degradation in the degree of polarization in human retinal nerve fiber layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Biwei; Wang, Bingqing; Rylander, Henry G.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Using a fiber-based swept-source (SS) polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) system, we investigate the degree of polarization (DOP) of light backscattered from the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in normal human subjects. Algorithms for processing data were developed to analyze the deviation in phase retardation and intensity of backscattered light in directions parallel and perpendicular to the nerve fiber axis (fast and slow axes of RNFL). Considering superior, inferior, and nasal quadrants, we observe the strongest degradation in the DOP with increasing RNFL depth in the temporal quadrant. Retinal ganglion cell axons in normal human subjects are known to have the smallest diameter in the temporal quadrant, and the greater degradation observed in the DOP suggests that higher polarimetric noise may be associated with neural structure in the temporal RNFL. The association between depth degradation in the DOP and RNFL structural properties may broaden the utility of PS-OCT as a functional imaging technique.

  14. A new approach to optic disc detection in human retinal images using the firefly algorithm.

    PubMed

    Rahebi, Javad; Hardalaç, Fırat

    2016-03-01

    There are various methods and algorithms to detect the optic discs in retinal images. In recent years, much attention has been given to the utilization of the intelligent algorithms. In this paper, we present a new automated method of optic disc detection in human retinal images using the firefly algorithm. The firefly intelligent algorithm is an emerging intelligent algorithm that was inspired by the social behavior of fireflies. The population in this algorithm includes the fireflies, each of which has a specific rate of lighting or fitness. In this method, the insects are compared two by two, and the less attractive insects can be observed to move toward the more attractive insects. Finally, one of the insects is selected as the most attractive, and this insect presents the optimum response to the problem in question. Here, we used the light intensity of the pixels of the retinal image pixels instead of firefly lightings. The movement of these insects due to local fluctuations produces different light intensity values in the images. Because the optic disc is the brightest area in the retinal images, all of the insects move toward brightest area and thus specify the location of the optic disc in the image. The results of implementation show that proposed algorithm could acquire an accuracy rate of 100 % in DRIVE dataset, 95 % in STARE dataset, and 94.38 % in DiaRetDB1 dataset. The results of implementation reveal high capability and accuracy of proposed algorithm in the detection of the optic disc from retinal images. Also, recorded required time for the detection of the optic disc in these images is 2.13 s for DRIVE dataset, 2.81 s for STARE dataset, and 3.52 s for DiaRetDB1 dataset accordingly. These time values are average value. PMID:26093773

  15. Safety and Efficacy of Human Wharton's Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Therapy for Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Leow, S. N.; Luu, Chi D.; Hairul Nizam, M. H.; Mok, P. L.; Ruhaslizan, R.; Wong, H. S.; Wan Abdul Halim, Wan Haslina; Ng, M. H.; Ruszymah, B. H. I.; Chowdhury, S. R.; Bastion, M. L. C.; Then, K. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the safety and efficacy of subretinal injection of human Wharton’s Jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hWJ-MSCs) on retinal structure and function in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats. Methods RCS rats were divided into 2 groups: hWJ-MSCs treated group (n = 8) and placebo control group (n = 8). In the treatment group, hWJ-MSCs from healthy donors were injected into the subretinal space in one eye of each rat at day 21. Control group received saline injection of the same volume. Additional 3 animals were injected with nanogold-labelled stem cells for in vivo tracking of cells localisation using a micro-computed tomography (microCT). Retinal function was assessed by electroretinography (ERG) 3 days before the injection and repeated at days 15, 30 and 70 after the injection. Eyes were collected at day 70 for histology, cellular and molecular studies. Results No retinal tumor formation was detected by histology during the study period. MicroCT scans showed that hWJ-MSCs stayed localised in the eye with no systemic migration. Transmission electron microscopy showed that nanogold-labelled cells were located within the subretinal space. Histology showed preservation of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) in the treated group but not in the control group. However, there were no significant differences in the ERG responses between the groups. Confocal microscopy showed evidence of hWJ-MSCs expressing markers for photoreceptor, Müller cells and bipolar cells. Conclusions Subretinal injection of hWJ-MSCs delay the loss of the ONL in RCS rats. hWJ-MSCs appears to be safe and has potential to differentiate into retinal-like cells. The potential of this cell-based therapy for the treatment of retinal dystrophies warrants further studies. PMID:26107378

  16. Activation of glucocorticoid receptors in Müller glia is protective to retinal neurons and suppresses microglial reactivity.

    PubMed

    Gallina, Donika; Zelinka, Christopher Paul; Cebulla, Colleen M; Fischer, Andy J

    2015-11-01

    Reactive microglia and macrophages are prevalent in damaged retinas. Glucocorticoid signaling is known to suppress inflammation and the reactivity of microglia and macrophages. In the vertebrate retina, the glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) is known to be activated and localized to the nuclei of Müller glia (Gallina et al., 2014). Accordingly, we investigated how signaling through GCR influences the survival of neurons using the chick retina in vivo as a model system. We applied intraocular injections of GCR agonist or antagonist, assessed microglial reactivity, and the survival of retinal neurons following different damage paradigms. Microglial reactivity was increased in retinas from eyes that were injected with vehicle, and this reactivity was decreased by GCR-agonist dexamethasone (Dex) and increased by GCR-antagonist RU486. We found that activation of GCR suppresses the reactivity of microglia and inhibited the loss of retinal neurons resulting from excitotoxicity. We provide evidence that the protection-promoting effects of Dex were maintained when the microglia were selectively ablated. Similarly, intraocular injections of Dex protected ganglion cells from colchicine-treatment and protected photoreceptors from damage caused by retinal detachment. We conclude that activation of GCR promotes the survival of ganglion cells in colchicine-damaged retinas, promotes the survival of amacrine and bipolar cells in excitotoxin-damaged retinas, and promotes the survival of photoreceptors in detached retinas. We propose that suppression of microglial reactivity is secondary to activation of GCR in Müller glia, and this mode of signaling is an effective means to lessen the damage and vision loss resulting from different types of retinal damage. PMID:26272753

  17. Human iPSC derived disease model of MERTK-associated retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Lukovic, Dunja; Artero Castro, Ana; Delgado, Ana Belen Garcia; Bernal, María de los Angeles Martín; Luna Pelaez, Noelia; Díez Lloret, Andrea; Perez Espejo, Rocío; Kamenarova, Kunka; Fernández Sánchez, Laura; Cuenca, Nicolás; Cortón, Marta; Avila Fernandez, Almudena; Sorkio, Anni; Skottman, Heli; Ayuso, Carmen; Erceg, Slaven; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) represents a genetically heterogeneous group of retinal dystrophies affecting mainly the rod photoreceptors and in some instances also the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells of the retina. Clinical symptoms and disease progression leading to moderate to severe loss of vision are well established and despite significant progress in the identification of causative genes, the disease pathology remains unclear. Lack of this understanding has so far hindered development of effective therapies. Here we report successful generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) from skin fibroblasts of a patient harboring a novel Ser331Cysfs*5 mutation in the MERTK gene. The patient was diagnosed with an early onset and severe form of autosomal recessive RP (arRP). Upon differentiation of these iPSC towards RPE, patient-specific RPE cells exhibited defective phagocytosis, a characteristic phenotype of MERTK deficiency observed in human patients and animal models. Thus we have created a faithful cellular model of arRP incorporating the human genetic background which will allow us to investigate in detail the disease mechanism, explore screening of a variety of therapeutic compounds/reagents and design either combined cell and gene- based therapies or independent approaches. PMID:26263531

  18. Comparative study of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) as a treatment for retinal dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Riera, Marina; Fontrodona, Laura; Albert, Silvia; Ramirez, Diana Mora; Seriola, Anna; Salas, Anna; Muñoz, Yolanda; Ramos, David; Villegas-Perez, Maria Paz; Zapata, Miguel Angel; Raya, Angel; Ruberte, Jesus; Veiga, Anna; Garcia-Arumi, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Retinal dystrophies (RD) are major causes of familial blindness and are characterized by progressive dysfunction of photoreceptor and/or retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. In this study, we aimed to evaluate and compare the therapeutic effects of two pluripotent stem cell (PSC)-based therapies. We differentiated RPE from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and transplanted them into the subretinal space of the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat. Once differentiated, cells from either source of PSC resembled mature RPE in their morphology and gene expression profile. Following transplantation, both hESC- and hiPSC-derived cells maintained the expression of specific RPE markers, lost their proliferative capacity, established tight junctions, and were able to perform phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segments. Remarkably, grafted areas showed increased numbers of photoreceptor nuclei and outer segment disk membranes. Regardless of the cell source, human transplants protected retina from cell apoptosis, glial stress and accumulation of autofluorescence, and responded better to light stimuli. Altogether, our results show that hESC- and hiPSC-derived cells survived, migrated, integrated, and functioned as RPE in the RCS rat retina, providing preclinical evidence that either PSC source could be of potential benefit for treating RD. PMID:27006969

  19. Comparative study of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) as a treatment for retinal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Riera, Marina; Fontrodona, Laura; Albert, Silvia; Ramirez, Diana Mora; Seriola, Anna; Salas, Anna; Muñoz, Yolanda; Ramos, David; Villegas-Perez, Maria Paz; Zapata, Miguel Angel; Raya, Angel; Ruberte, Jesus; Veiga, Anna; Garcia-Arumi, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Retinal dystrophies (RD) are major causes of familial blindness and are characterized by progressive dysfunction of photoreceptor and/or retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. In this study, we aimed to evaluate and compare the therapeutic effects of two pluripotent stem cell (PSC)-based therapies. We differentiated RPE from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and transplanted them into the subretinal space of the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat. Once differentiated, cells from either source of PSC resembled mature RPE in their morphology and gene expression profile. Following transplantation, both hESC- and hiPSC-derived cells maintained the expression of specific RPE markers, lost their proliferative capacity, established tight junctions, and were able to perform phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segments. Remarkably, grafted areas showed increased numbers of photoreceptor nuclei and outer segment disk membranes. Regardless of the cell source, human transplants protected retina from cell apoptosis, glial stress and accumulation of autofluorescence, and responded better to light stimuli. Altogether, our results show that hESC- and hiPSC-derived cells survived, migrated, integrated, and functioned as RPE in the RCS rat retina, providing preclinical evidence that either PSC source could be of potential benefit for treating RD. PMID:27006969

  20. Generation of Highly Enriched Populations of Optic Vesicle-Like Retinal Cells from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohlemacher, Sarah K.; Iglesias, Clara L.; Sridhar, Akshayalakshmi; Gamm, David M.; Meyer, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    The procedure to efficiently and reproducibly differentiate retinal cells from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) is described below. Cells are taken through a stepwise protocol to direct them toward a neural fate by treatment with neural induction medium (NIM), then to a retinal fate by exposure to retinal differentiation medium (RDM). Undifferentiated hPSCs are enzymatically lifted from matrigel-coated plates and exposed to NIM in suspension. Differentiation in suspension allows the cells to form 3 dimensional aggregates. At 7 days of differentiation, aggregates are plated and attach to 6 well plates, where a neuroepithelial fate begins to be established. Upon 16 days of differentiation, neurospheres are lifted and maintained in RDM to create a three-dimensional optic vesicle-like structure. This procedure allows for the efficient and timely generation of a variety of retinal cell types, including ganglion cells, retinal pigment epithelium, as well as cone and rod photoreceptors. The use of this protocol to generate a myriad of retinal cell types facilitates in vitro studies of human retinogenesis, and will enable retinal dysfunction to be more easily studied in vitro, as well as providing a large population of cells with which to aid in drug development and patient specific therapies. PMID:25640818

  1. Retinitis Pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Action You are here Home › Retinal Diseases Listen Retinitis Pigmentosa What is retinitis pigmentosa? What are the symptoms? ... available? Are there any related diseases? What is retinitis pigmentosa? Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) refers to a group of ...

  2. Generation of retinal pigment epithelial cells from human embryonic stem cell-derived spherical neural masses.

    PubMed

    Cho, Myung Soo; Kim, Sang Jin; Ku, Seung-Yup; Park, Jung Hyun; Lee, Haksup; Yoo, Dae Hoon; Park, Un Chul; Song, Seul Ae; Choi, Young Min; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2012-09-01

    Dysfunction and loss of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are major pathologic changes observed in various retinal degenerative diseases such as aged-related macular degeneration. RPE generated from human pluripotent stem cells can be a good candidate for RPE replacement therapy. Here, we show the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) toward RPE with the generation of spherical neural masses (SNMs), which are pure masses of hESCs-derived neural precursors. During the early passaging of SNMs, cystic structures arising from opened neural tube-like structures showed pigmented epithelial morphology. These pigmented cells were differentiated into functional RPE by neuroectodermal induction and mechanical purification. Most of the differentiated cells showed typical RPE morphologies, such as a polygonal-shaped epithelial monolayer, and transmission electron microscopy revealed apical microvilli, pigment granules, and tight junctions. These cells also expressed molecular markers of RPE, including Mitf, ZO-1, RPE65, CRALBP, and bestrophin. The generated RPE also showed phagocytosis of isolated bovine photoreceptor outer segment and secreting pigment epithelium-derived factor and vascular endothelial growth factor. Functional RPE could be generated from SNM in our method. Because SNMs have several advantages, including the capability of expansion for long periods without loss of differentiation capability, easy storage and thawing, and no need for feeder cells, our method for RPE differentiation may be used as an efficient strategy for generating functional RPE cells for retinal regeneration therapy. PMID:22683799

  3. Retinal blood flow indices in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Yung, C W; Harris, A; Massicotte, S; Chioran, G; Krombach, G; Danis, R; Wolf, S

    1996-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND: Abnormal blood flow dynamics are believed to contribute to the development of retinal microvascular disease in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In this study, the scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) was used, combined with fluorescein angiography, to measure retinal blood flow indices in HIV seropositive patients. METHODS: Arteriovenous passage time (AVP) and perifoveal capillary blood flow velocity (CFV) were measured in 23 HIV infected patients and 23 control subjects with SLO fluorescein angiography. RESULTS: No significant difference in AVP was found between the two groups. However, CFV was significantly reduced in HIV infected patients (p = 0.013). CONCLUSION: Patients infected with HIV show abnormal haemodynamics at the level of the perifoveal capillaries. PMID:8949717

  4. CNTF gene therapy confers lifelong neuroprotection in a mouse model of human retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Lipinski, Daniel M.; Barnard, Alun R.; Singh, Mandeep S.; Martin, Chris; Lee, Edward; Davies, Wayne I.L.; MacLaren, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    The long-term outcome of neuroprotection as a therapeutic strategy for preventing cell death in neurodegenerative disorders remains unknown, primarily due to slow disease progression and the inherent difficulty of assessing neuronal survival in vivo. Employing a murine model of retinal disease, we demonstrate that ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) confers life-long protection against photoreceptor degeneration. Repetitive retinal imaging allowed the survival of intrinsically fluorescent cone photoreceptors to be quantified in vivo. Imaging of the visual cortex and assessment of visually-evoked behavioural responses demonstrated that surviving cones retain function and signal correctly to the brain. The mechanisms underlying CNTF-mediated neuroprotection were explored through transcriptome analysis, revealing widespread up-regulation of proteolysis inhibitors, which may prevent cellular/extracellular matrix degradation and complement activation in neurodegenerative diseases. These findings provide insights into potential novel therapeutic avenues for diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, for which CNTF has been evaluated unsuccessfully in clinical trials. PMID:25896245

  5. A frameshift mutation in golden retriever dogs with progressive retinal atrophy endorses SLC4A3 as a candidate gene for human retinal degenerations.

    PubMed

    Downs, Louise M; Wallin-Håkansson, Berit; Boursnell, Mike; Marklund, Stefan; Hedhammar, Åke; Truvé, Katarina; Hübinette, Louise; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Bergström, Tomas; Mellersh, Cathryn S

    2011-01-01

    Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) in dogs, the canine equivalent of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in humans, is characterised by vision loss due to degeneration of the photoreceptor cells in the retina, eventually leading to complete blindness. It affects more than 100 dog breeds, and is caused by numerous mutations. RP affects 1 in 4000 people in the Western world and 70% of causal mutations remain unknown. Canine diseases are natural models for the study of human diseases and are becoming increasingly useful for the development of therapies in humans. One variant, prcd-PRA, only accounts for a small proportion of PRA cases in the Golden Retriever (GR) breed. Using genome-wide association with 27 cases and 19 controls we identified a novel PRA locus on CFA37 (p(raw) = 1.94×10(-10), p(genome) = 1.0×10(-5)), where a 644 kb region was homozygous within cases. A frameshift mutation was identified in a solute carrier anion exchanger gene (SLC4A3) located within this region. This variant was present in 56% of PRA cases and 87% of obligate carriers, and displayed a recessive mode of inheritance with full penetrance within those lineages in which it segregated. Allele frequencies are approximately 4% in the UK, 6% in Sweden and 2% in France, but the variant has not been found in GRs from the US. A large proportion of cases (approximately 44%) remain unexplained, indicating that PRA in this breed is genetically heterogeneous and caused by at least three mutations. SLC4A3 is important for retinal function and has not previously been associated with spontaneously occurring retinal degenerations in any other species, including humans. PMID:21738669

  6. Retinal image quality in the human eye as a function of the accommodation.

    PubMed

    López-Gil, N; Iglesias, I; Artal, P

    1998-10-01

    The changes in the retinal image quality with accommodation in the human eye were studied by using a near-infrared double-pass apparatus. A slightly better modulation transfer function (MTF) in the unaccommodated eye with respect to the accommodated eye was found when using an artificial pupil with a fixed diameter. The technique allows the estimation of the MTF of the accommodated eye discounting the effect of the accommodative defocus error. Most of the reduction found in the MTF with accommodation could be explained in terms of the accommodative defocusing error. However, the shape of the retinal images clearly changes with accommodation, indicating that other aberrations are also altered with accommodation. In general, the double-pass image for the accommodated eye tends to be more symmetric than that of the unaccommodated eye. This is probably due to either a decrease in the amount of coma-like aberrations with accommodation or to an increase of other symmetric aberrations, such as defocus or spherical aberration, that hide the asymmetries present in the retinal image of the unaccommodated eye. PMID:9797986

  7. Human retinal imaging using visible-light optical coherence tomography guided by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ji; Chen, Siyu; Shu, Xiao; Fawzi, Amani A; Zhang, Hao F

    2015-10-01

    We achieved human retinal imaging using visible-light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT) guided by an integrated scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO). We adapted a spectral domain OCT configuration and used a supercontinuum laser as the illumating source. The center wavelength was 564 nm and the bandwidth was 115 nm, which provided a 0.97 µm axial resolution measured in air. We characterized the sensitivity to be 86 dB with 226 µW incidence power on the pupil. We also integrated an SLO that shared the same optical path of the vis-OCT sample arm for alignment purposes. We demonstrated the retinal imaging from both systems centered at the fovea and optic nerve head with 20° × 20° and 10° × 10° field of view. We observed similar anatomical structures in vis-OCT and NIR-OCT. The contrast appeared different from vis-OCT to NIR-OCT, including slightly weaker signal from intra-retinal layers, and increased visibility and contrast of anatomical layers in the outer retina. PMID:26504622

  8. Human retinal imaging using visible-light optical coherence tomography guided by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ji; Chen, Siyu; Shu, Xiao; Fawzi, Amani A.; Zhang, Hao F.

    2015-01-01

    We achieved human retinal imaging using visible-light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT) guided by an integrated scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO). We adapted a spectral domain OCT configuration and used a supercontinuum laser as the illumating source. The center wavelength was 564 nm and the bandwidth was 115 nm, which provided a 0.97 µm axial resolution measured in air. We characterized the sensitivity to be 86 dB with 226 µW incidence power on the pupil. We also integrated an SLO that shared the same optical path of the vis-OCT sample arm for alignment purposes. We demonstrated the retinal imaging from both systems centered at the fovea and optic nerve head with 20° × 20° and 10° × 10° field of view. We observed similar anatomical structures in vis-OCT and NIR-OCT. The contrast appeared different from vis-OCT to NIR-OCT, including slightly weaker signal from intra-retinal layers, and increased visibility and contrast of anatomical layers in the outer retina. PMID:26504622

  9. Regulation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated transcription in human retinal pigmented epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hong Lan; Jeong, Kwang Won

    2016-04-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor with pleiotropic effects in normal physiology or vascular development, xenobiotic metabolism, and cancer. A previous study has reported that BRG1, a component of the SWI/SNF complex, is a coactivator for AHR and is recruited to the promoter region of the CYP1A1 gene in mouse hepatocytes. Recent data suggest that AHR is also expressed in human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19), which play a crucial role in retinal physiology and the visual cycle. Multiple studies have shown that the AHR plays an important role in the pathogenesis of retinal diseases including age-related macular degeneration. However, the mechanism of AHR transcriptional activation in retinal pigment cells has not been reported. Here, we demonstrate that the AHR signaling pathway is active in ARPE-19 cells, as in hepatocytes, but with different target gene specificity. We also found that chromatin remodeling by the BRG1-containing SWI/SNF complex is required for the AHR-mediated expression of target genes in ARPE-19 cells. We identified a novel enhancer region (-12 kb) of the CYP1A1 gene in ARPE-19 cells, to which both AHR and BRG1 are recruited in a ligand-dependent manner. BRG1 is associated with the AHR in ARPE-19 cells, and the C-terminal activation domain of the AHR directly interacts with BRG1. Furthermore, depletion of BRG1 caused a reduction in chromatin accessibility at the CYP1A1 enhancer. These results suggest that ARPE-19 cells possess an AHR-mediated transcription pathway with different target gene specificity, and that BRG1 is required for AHR-mediated transcription in ARPE-19 cells. PMID:26966070

  10. The effect of retinal image error update rate on human vestibulo-ocular reflex gain adaptation.

    PubMed

    Fadaee, Shannon B; Migliaccio, Americo A

    2016-04-01

    The primary function of the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is to stabilise images on the retina during head movements. Retinal image movement is the likely feedback signal that drives VOR modification/adaptation for different viewing contexts. However, it is not clear whether a retinal image position or velocity error is used primarily as the feedback signal. Recent studies examining this signal are limited because they used near viewing to modify the VOR. However, it is not known whether near viewing drives VOR adaptation or is a pre-programmed contextual cue that modifies the VOR. Our study is based on analysis of the VOR evoked by horizontal head impulses during an established adaptation task. Fourteen human subjects underwent incremental unilateral VOR adaptation training and were tested using the scleral search coil technique over three separate sessions. The update rate of the laser target position (source of the retinal image error signal) used to drive VOR adaptation was different for each session [50 (once every 20 ms), 20 and 15/35 Hz]. Our results show unilateral VOR adaptation occurred at 50 and 20 Hz for both the active (23.0 ± 9.6 and 11.9 ± 9.1% increase on adapting side, respectively) and passive VOR (13.5 ± 14.9, 10.4 ± 12.2%). At 15 Hz, unilateral adaptation no longer occurred in the subject group for both the active and passive VOR, whereas individually, 4/9 subjects tested at 15 Hz had significant adaptation. Our findings suggest that 1-2 retinal image position error signals every 100 ms (i.e. target position update rate 15-20 Hz) are sufficient to drive VOR adaptation. PMID:26715411

  11. Different ranking of avian colors predicted by modeling of retinal function in humans and birds.

    PubMed

    Håstad, Olle; Odeen, Anders

    2008-06-01

    Abstract: Only during the past decade have vision-system-neutral methods become common practice in studies of animal color signals. Consequently, much of the current knowledge on sexual selection is based directly or indirectly on human vision, which may or may not emphasize spectral information in a signal differently from the intended receiver. In an attempt to quantify this discrepancy, we used retinal models to test whether human and bird vision rank plumage colors similarly. Of 67 species, human and bird models disagreed in 26 as to which pair of patches in the plumage provides the strongest color contrast or which male in a random pair is the more colorful. These results were only partly attributable to human UV blindness. Despite confirming a strong correlation between avian and human color discrimination, we conclude that a significant proportion of the information in avian visual signals may be lost in translation. PMID:18429674

  12. Knockout of insulin and IGF-1 receptors on vascular endothelial cells protects against retinal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Tatsuya; Vicent, David; Suzuma, Kiyoshi; Yanagisawa, Masashi; King, George L.; Holzenberger, Martin; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2003-01-01

    Both insulin and IGF-1 have been implicated in control of retinal endothelial cell growth, neovascularization, and diabetic retinopathy. To precisely define the role of insulin and IGF-1 signaling in endothelium in these processes, we have used the oxygen-induced retinopathy model to study mice with a vascular endothelial cell–specific knockout of the insulin receptor (VENIRKO) or IGF-1 receptor (VENIFARKO). Following relative hypoxia, VENIRKO mice show a 57% decrease in retinal neovascularization as compared with controls. This is associated with a blunted rise in VEGF, eNOS, and endothelin-1. By contrast, VENIFARKO mice show only a 34% reduction in neovascularization and a very modest reduction in mediator generation. These data indicate that both insulin and IGF-1 signaling in endothelium play a role in retinal neovascularization through the expression of vascular mediators, with the effect of insulin being most important in this process. PMID:12813019

  13. Treatment Paradigms for Retinal and Macular Diseases Using 3-D Retina Cultures Derived From Human Reporter Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Kaewkhaw, Rossukon; Swaroop, Manju; Homma, Kohei; Nakamura, Jutaro; Brooks, Matthew; Kaya, Koray Dogan; Chaitankar, Vijender; Michael, Sam; Tawa, Gregory; Zou, Jizhong; Rao, Mahendra; Zheng, Wei; Cogliati, Tiziana; Swaroop, Anand

    2016-04-01

    We discuss the use of pluripotent stem cell lines carrying fluorescent reporters driven by retinal promoters to derive three-dimensional (3-D) retina in culture and how this system can be exploited for elucidating human retinal biology, creating disease models in a dish, and designing targeted drug screens for retinal and macular degeneration. Furthermore, we realize that stem cell investigations are labor-intensive and require extensive resources. To expedite scientific discovery by sharing of resources and to avoid duplication of efforts, we propose the formation of a Retinal Stem Cell Consortium. In the field of vision, such collaborative approaches have been enormously successful in elucidating genetic susceptibility associated with age-related macular degeneration. PMID:27116668

  14. A2E and lipofuscin distributions in macaque retinal pigment epithelium are similar to human.

    PubMed

    Pallitto, Patrick; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Jones, E Ellen; Drake, Richard R; Koutalos, Yiannis; Crouch, Rosalie K; Donello, John; Herrmann, Julia

    2015-10-01

    The accumulation of lipofuscin, an autofluorescent aging marker, in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) has been implicated in the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Lipofuscin contains several visual cycle byproducts, most notably the bisretinoid N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine (A2E). Previous studies with human donor eyes have shown a significant mismatch between lipofuscin autofluorescence (AF) and A2E distributions. The goal of the current project was to examine this relationship in a primate model with a retinal anatomy similar to that of humans. Ophthalmologically naive young (<10 years., N = 3) and old (>10 years., N = 4) Macaca fascicularis (macaque) eyes, were enucleated, dissected to yield RPE/choroid tissue, and flat-mounted on indium-tin-oxide-coated conductive slides. To compare the spatial distributions of lipofuscin and A2E, fluorescence and mass spectrometric imaging were carried out sequentially on the same samples. The distribution of lipofuscin fluorescence in the primate RPE reflected previously obtained human results, having the highest intensities in a perifoveal ring. Contrarily, A2E levels were consistently highest in the periphery, confirming a lack of correlation between the distributions of lipofuscin and A2E previously described in human donor eyes. We conclude that the mismatch between lipofuscin AF and A2E distributions is related to anatomical features specific to primates, such as the macula, and that this primate model has the potential to fill an important gap in current AMD research. PMID:26223373

  15. Panuveitis With Exudative Retinal Detachments After Vaccination Against Human Papilloma Virus.

    PubMed

    Dansingani, Kunal K; Suzuki, Mihoko; Naysan, Jonathan; Samson, C Michael; Spaide, Richard F; Fisher, Yale L

    2015-10-01

    A 20-year-old white woman presented with bilateral acute visual loss (visual acuity: 20/60), panuveitis, and exudative retinal detachments 3 weeks after a second dose of quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV4) vaccine. She was treated with oral prednisolone for 6 weeks and responded rapidly. By week 4, vision had normalized and clinical signs resolved. Uveitis after HPV4 vaccination has been reported in two cases. Although the differential diagnosis includes Harada disease, temporal correlation with HPV4 and definitive response to a short course of treatment implicate the vaccine in this case. Vaccine-induced uveitis is rare and difficult to distinguish from coincidental autoimmune disease. PMID:26469238

  16. Hydroxyl PAMAM dendrimer-based gene vectors for transgene delivery to human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Kambhampati, Siva P.; Mishra, Manoj K.; Wu, Tony; Song, Eric; Hanes, Justin; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M.

    2015-02-01

    Ocular gene therapy holds promise for the treatment of numerous blinding disorders. Despite the significant progress in the field of viral and non-viral gene delivery to the eye, significant obstacles remain in the way of achieving high-level transgene expression without adverse effects. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is involved in the pathogenesis of retinal diseases and is a key target for a number of gene-based therapeutics. In this study, we addressed the inherent drawbacks of non-viral gene vectors and combined different approaches to design an efficient and safe dendrimer-based gene-delivery platform for delivery to human RPE cells. We used hydroxyl-terminated polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers functionalized with various amounts of amine groups to achieve effective plasmid compaction. We further used triamcinolone acetonide (TA) as a nuclear localization enhancer for the dendrimer-gene complex and achieved significant improvement in cell uptake and transfection of hard-to-transfect human RPE cells. To improve colloidal stability, we further shielded the gene vector surface through incorporation of PEGylated dendrimer along with dendrimer-TA for DNA complexation. The resultant complexes showed improved stability while minimally affecting transgene delivery, thus improving the translational relevance of this platform.Ocular gene therapy holds promise for the treatment of numerous blinding disorders. Despite the significant progress in the field of viral and non-viral gene delivery to the eye, significant obstacles remain in the way of achieving high-level transgene expression without adverse effects. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is involved in the pathogenesis of retinal diseases and is a key target for a number of gene-based therapeutics. In this study, we addressed the inherent drawbacks of non-viral gene vectors and combined different approaches to design an efficient and safe dendrimer-based gene-delivery platform for delivery to human RPE

  17. ON and OFF channels in human retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takao; Katai, Satoshi; Saito, Yasunori; Kobayashi, Fumitoshi; Goto, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    The ON and OFF channels are basic functional elements in parallel processing in the visual system in vertebrates including primates. We analysed the responses of the optic tract fibre activity in response to switching a flashlight on or off in 25 awake patients with Parkinson's disease who underwent stereotactic surgery targeting the internal globus pallidus. The responses were evoked in a darkened room by a light with a luminance of approximately 4 × 10(4) cd m(-2) at the eye and a wide-spectrum wavelength. Most of the responses at the light on event were excitatory (38 out of 41 sites, 93%). Thirty-five sites with increase in activity at the light on event showed reciprocal responses or no responses to light off, and these sites were classified as containing ON fibres. In single-fibre analysis, all of 14 ON fibres were recorded at the sites of multi-fibre excitatory responses. Six sites showed multi-fibre excitatory responses at the light off event; three sites showed sustained reduction in activity at the light on event, and these three sites were classified as containing OFF fibres. In single-fibre analysis, two OFF fibres were recorded at the sites of multi-fibre suppressive responses at the light on event, and the other two OFF fibres were recorded at the sites of multi-fibre excitatory responses at the light on event. We found that all excitatory responses to light on were transient, while all but one excitatory responses to light off were sustained. Reduction in activity tended to be smaller than increase in activity at the light on event. These results demonstrate that the ON and OFF channels, and their transient and sustained features function in visual processing in humans. PMID:23070704

  18. [Animal models of human retinal and optic nerve diseases analysed using electroretinography].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Mineo

    2010-03-01

    Investigations of animal models with diseases found in humans are important to the understanding of their pathophysiology and for developing new treatments. Both naturally occurring and genetically-manipulated animal models of human retinal and optic nerve diseases have been studied in this manner. Electroretinography (ERG) is valuable for the evaluation of the visual function of animal models, because a layer-by-layer assessment of the retina can be done objectively. We used ERGs to analyze the visual functions of animal models of human retinal and and optic nerve diseases. To investigate the contribution of the cone ON- and OFF-pathways to the mouse photopic ERGs, we studied the properties of the photopic ERGs of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 6-deficient mice. The results of the ERG and the effect of an intravitreous injection of cis-2,3 piperidine dicarboxylic acid (PDA) in these mice suggest that the contribution of the post-synaptic ON-pathway to the photopic ERG of mice is larger than that of the OFF-pathway. The ERGs of pikachurin-deficient mice had normal a-waves with severely delayed b-waves, indicating that the signal transmission from the photoreceptors to the bipolar cells was impaired in these mutant mice. We also generated a rabbit model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), the rhodopsin P347L transgenic (Tg) rabbit, by using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenesis. These rabbits showed a rod-dominant, progressive retinal degeneration with marked regional variations in the loss of photoreceptors. All ERG components of the Tg rabbits decreased progressively with the a-waves more affected than the b-waves, and with the oscillatory potentials (OPs) the best preserved. Interestingly, the OP amplitudes of young Tg rabbits were significantly larger than those of wild-type rabbits. Pharmacological experiments showed that the significantly larger OPs in young Tg rabbits resulted from secondary alterations in the inner retinal function. This type

  19. Zerumbone, a Phytochemical of Subtropical Ginger, Protects against Hyperglycemia-Induced Retinal Damage in Experimental Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Thing-Fong; Liou, Shorong-Shii; Tzeng, Yu-Cheng; Liu, I-Min

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR), the most ordinary and specific microvascular complication of diabetes, is a disease of the retina. Zerumbone (ZER) is a monocyclic sesquiterpene compound, and based on reports, it is the predominant bioactive compound from the rhizomes of Zingiber zerumbet. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the protective effect of zerumbone against DR in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. STZ-diabetic rats were treated with ZER (40 mg/kg) once a day orally for 8 weeks. ZER administration significantly (p < 0.05) lowered the levels of plasma glucose (32.5% ± 5.7% lower) and glycosylated hemoglobin (29.2% ± 3.4% lower) in STZ-diabetic rats. Retinal histopathological observations indicated that disarrangement and reduction in thickness of retinal layers were reversed in ZER-treated diabetic rats. ZER downregulated both the elevated levels of advanced glycosylated end products (AGEs) and the higher levels of the receptors for AGEs (RAGE) in retinas of diabetic rats. What’s more, ZER significantly (p < 0.05) ameliorated diabetes-induced upregulation of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6. ZER also attenuated overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor and intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and suppressed activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and apoptosis in the retinas of STZ-diabetic rats. Our results suggest ZER possesses retinal protective effects, which might be associated with the blockade of the AGEs/RAGE/NF-κB pathway and its anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:27463726

  20. Zerumbone, a Phytochemical of Subtropical Ginger, Protects against Hyperglycemia-Induced Retinal Damage in Experimental Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Thing-Fong; Liou, Shorong-Shii; Tzeng, Yu-Cheng; Liu, I-Min

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR), the most ordinary and specific microvascular complication of diabetes, is a disease of the retina. Zerumbone (ZER) is a monocyclic sesquiterpene compound, and based on reports, it is the predominant bioactive compound from the rhizomes of Zingiber zerumbet. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the protective effect of zerumbone against DR in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. STZ-diabetic rats were treated with ZER (40 mg/kg) once a day orally for 8 weeks. ZER administration significantly (p < 0.05) lowered the levels of plasma glucose (32.5% ± 5.7% lower) and glycosylated hemoglobin (29.2% ± 3.4% lower) in STZ-diabetic rats. Retinal histopathological observations indicated that disarrangement and reduction in thickness of retinal layers were reversed in ZER-treated diabetic rats. ZER downregulated both the elevated levels of advanced glycosylated end products (AGEs) and the higher levels of the receptors for AGEs (RAGE) in retinas of diabetic rats. What's more, ZER significantly (p < 0.05) ameliorated diabetes-induced upregulation of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6. ZER also attenuated overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor and intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and suppressed activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and apoptosis in the retinas of STZ-diabetic rats. Our results suggest ZER possesses retinal protective effects, which might be associated with the blockade of the AGEs/RAGE/NF-κB pathway and its anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:27463726

  1. The effect of hyperglycaemia on permeability and the expression of junctional complex molecules in human retinal and choroidal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Saker, S; Stewart, E A; Browning, A C; Allen, C L; Amoaku, W M

    2014-04-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of preventable blindness in the working population and its prevalence continues to increase as the worldwide prevalence of diabetes grows. Diabetic choroidopathy is less well studied and occurs in the late stages of diabetic eye disease. The main cause of visual loss in diabetic eye disease is diabetic macular oedema caused by an increase in microvascular endothelial permeability. Endothelial cell permeability is influenced by multiple factors which have not been fully elucidated, particularly in human models. In addition, the gene and protein expression between retinal and choroidal endothelial cells, even in humans, has been shown to be heterogeneous. The aim of this project was to determine, in vitro, the effect of high glucose (25 mM) on human paracellular permeability in retinal and choroidal endothelial cells. The expression of selected tight junction molecules (Occludin, Claudin-5, JAM-A and JAM-C) and adheren junction (VE-Cadherin) molecules was also compared between retinal and choroidal endothelial cells and with high glucose. High glucose conditions significantly increased the permeability in both retinal and choroidal endothelial cells monolayers although the increase was higher in retinal endothelial cells. Under normal glucose culture conditions microarray analysis determined that occludin and claudin-5 gene expression was higher in retinal endothelial cells than choroidal endothelial cells, and western blotting indicated that claudin-5 protein expression was also higher in retinal endothelial cells whilst JAM-A, and C and VE-Cadherin levels were similar. In retinal endothelial cells exposed to high glucose claudin-5, occludin and JAM-A was found to be reduced, whereas the expression of VE-Cadherin and JAM-C was unchanged when evaluated with western blotting, immunofluorescence and qPCR. None of the proteins were significantly decreased by high glucose in choroidal endothelial cells. The increase in retinal

  2. Type VII Collagen Expression in the Human Vitreoretinal Interface, Corpora Amylacea and Inner Retinal Layers

    PubMed Central

    Wullink, Bart; Pas, Hendri H.; Van der Worp, Roelofje J.; Kuijer, Roel; Los, Leonoor I.

    2015-01-01

    Type VII collagen, as a major component of anchoring fibrils found at basement membrane zones, is crucial in anchoring epithelial tissue layers to their underlying stroma. Recently, type VII collagen was discovered in the inner human retina by means of immunohistochemistry, while proteomic investigations demonstrated type VII collagen at the vitreoretinal interface of chicken. Because of its potential anchoring function at the vitreoretinal interface, we further assessed the presence of type VII collagen at this site. We evaluated the vitreoretinal interface of human donor eyes by means of immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, immunoelectron microscopy, and Western blotting. Firstly, type VII collagen was detected alongside vitreous fibers6 at the vitreoretinal interface. Because of its known anchoring function, it is likely that type VII collagen is involved in vitreoretinal attachment. Secondly, type VII collagen was found within cytoplasmic vesicles of inner retinal cells. These cells resided most frequently in the ganglion cell layer and inner plexiform layer. Thirdly, type VII collagen was found in astrocytic cytoplasmic inclusions, known as corpora amylacea. The intraretinal presence of type VII collagen was confirmed by Western blotting of homogenized retinal preparations. These data add to the understanding of vitreoretinal attachment, which is important for a better comprehension of common vitreoretinal attachment pathologies. PMID:26709927

  3. Intermittent high oxygen influences the formation of neural retinal tissue from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lixiong; Chen, Xi; Zeng, Yuxiao; Li, Qiyou; Zou, Ting; Chen, Siyu; Wu, Qian; Fu, Caiyun; Xu, Haiwei; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate retina is a highly multilayered nervous tissue with a large diversity of cellular components. With the development of stem cell technologies, human retinas can be generated in three-dimensional (3-D) culture in vitro. However, understanding the factors modulating key productive processes and the way that they influence development are far from clear. Oxygen, as the most essential element participating in metabolism, is a critical factor regulating organic development. In this study, using 3-D culture of human stem cells, we examined the effect of intermittent high oxygen treatment (40% O2) on the formation and cellular behavior of neural retinas (NR) in the embryonic body (EB). The volume of EB and number of proliferating cells increased significantly under 40% O2 on day 38, 50, and 62. Additionally, the ratio of PAX6+ cells within NR was significantly increased. The neural rosettes could only develop with correct apical-basal polarity under 40% O2. In addition, the generation, migration and maturation of retinal ganglion cells were enhanced under 40% O2. All of these results illustrated that 40% O2 strengthened the formation of NR in EB with characteristics similar to the in vivo state, suggesting that the hyperoxic state facilitated the retinal development in vitro. PMID:27435522

  4. Bestrophin 1 is indispensable for volume regulation in human retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Milenkovic, Andrea; Brandl, Caroline; Milenkovic, Vladimir M; Jendryke, Thomas; Sirianant, Lalida; Wanitchakool, Potchanart; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Reiff, Charlotte M; Horling, Franziska; Schrewe, Heinrich; Schreiber, Rainer; Kunzelmann, Karl; Wetzel, Christian H; Weber, Bernhard H F

    2015-05-19

    In response to cell swelling, volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs) participate in a process known as regulatory volume decrease (RVD). Only recently, first insight into the molecular identity of mammalian VRACs was obtained by the discovery of the leucine-rich repeats containing 8A (LRRC8A) gene. Here, we show that bestrophin 1 (BEST1) but not LRRC8A is crucial for volume regulation in human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in RPE derived from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) exhibit an outwardly rectifying chloride current with characteristic functional properties of VRACs. This current is severely reduced in hiPSC-RPE cells derived from macular dystrophy patients with pathologic BEST1 mutations. Disruption of the orthologous mouse gene (Best1(-/-)) does not result in obvious retinal pathology but leads to a severe subfertility phenotype in agreement with minor endogenous expression of Best1 in murine RPE but highly abundant expression in mouse testis. Sperm from Best1(-/-) mice showed reduced motility and abnormal sperm morphology, indicating an inability in RVD. Together, our data suggest that the molecular identity of VRACs is more complex--that is, instead of a single ubiquitous channel, VRACs could be formed by cell type- or tissue-specific subunit composition. Our findings provide the basis to further examine VRAC diversity in normal and diseased cell physiology, which is key to exploring novel therapeutic approaches in VRAC-associated pathologies. PMID:25941382

  5. In vivo imaging of human retinal microvasculature using adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope fluorescein angiography

    PubMed Central

    Pinhas, Alexander; Dubow, Michael; Shah, Nishit; Chui, Toco Y.; Scoles, Drew; Sulai, Yusufu N.; Weitz, Rishard; Walsh, Joseph B.; Carroll, Joseph; Dubra, Alfredo; Rosen, Richard B.

    2013-01-01

    The adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) allows visualization of microscopic structures of the human retina in vivo. In this work, we demonstrate its application in combination with oral and intravenous (IV) fluorescein angiography (FA) to the in vivo visualization of the human retinal microvasculature. Ten healthy subjects ages 20 to 38 years were imaged using oral (7 and/or 20 mg/kg) and/or IV (500 mg) fluorescein. In agreement with current literature, there were no adverse effects among the patients receiving oral fluorescein while one patient receiving IV fluorescein experienced some nausea and heaving. We determined that all retinal capillary beds can be imaged using clinically accepted fluorescein dosages and safe light levels according to the ANSI Z136.1-2000 maximum permissible exposure. As expected, the 20 mg/kg oral dose showed higher image intensity for a longer period of time than did the 7 mg/kg oral and the 500 mg IV doses. The increased resolution of AOSLO FA, compared to conventional FA, offers great opportunity for studying physiological and pathological vascular processes. PMID:24009994

  6. Direct visualization and characterization of erythrocyte flow in human retinal capillaries

    PubMed Central

    Bedggood, Phillip; Metha, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Imaging the retinal vasculature offers a surrogate view of systemic vascular health, allowing noninvasive and longitudinal assessment of vascular pathology. The earliest anomalies in vascular disease arise in the microvasculature, however current imaging methods lack the spatiotemporal resolution to track blood flow at the capillary level. We report here on novel imaging technology that allows direct, noninvasive optical imaging of erythrocyte flow in human retinal capillaries. This was made possible using adaptive optics for high spatial resolution (1.5 μm), sCMOS camera technology for high temporal resolution (460 fps), and tunable wavebands from a broadband laser for maximal erythrocyte contrast. Particle image velocimetry on our data sequences was used to quantify flow. We observed marked spatiotemporal variability in velocity, which ranged from 0.3 to 3.3 mm/s, and changed by up to a factor of 4 in a given capillary during the 130 ms imaging period. Both mean and standard deviation across the imaged capillary network varied markedly with time, yet their ratio remained a relatively constant parameter (0.50 ± 0.056). Our observations concur with previous work using less direct methods, validating this as an investigative tool for the study of microvascular disease in humans. PMID:23243576

  7. Intermittent high oxygen influences the formation of neural retinal tissue from human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lixiong; Chen, Xi; Zeng, Yuxiao; Li, Qiyou; Zou, Ting; Chen, Siyu; Wu, Qian; Fu, Caiyun; Xu, Haiwei; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate retina is a highly multilayered nervous tissue with a large diversity of cellular components. With the development of stem cell technologies, human retinas can be generated in three-dimensional (3-D) culture in vitro. However, understanding the factors modulating key productive processes and the way that they influence development are far from clear. Oxygen, as the most essential element participating in metabolism, is a critical factor regulating organic development. In this study, using 3-D culture of human stem cells, we examined the effect of intermittent high oxygen treatment (40% O2) on the formation and cellular behavior of neural retinas (NR) in the embryonic body (EB). The volume of EB and number of proliferating cells increased significantly under 40% O2 on day 38, 50, and 62. Additionally, the ratio of PAX6+ cells within NR was significantly increased. The neural rosettes could only develop with correct apical-basal polarity under 40% O2. In addition, the generation, migration and maturation of retinal ganglion cells were enhanced under 40% O2. All of these results illustrated that 40% O2 strengthened the formation of NR in EB with characteristics similar to the in vivo state, suggesting that the hyperoxic state facilitated the retinal development in vitro. PMID:27435522

  8. Hydroxyl PAMAM dendrimer-based gene vectors for transgene delivery to human retinal pigment epithelial cells†

    PubMed Central

    Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Kambhampati, Siva P.; Mishra, Manoj K.; Wu, Tony; Song, Eric; Hanes, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Ocular gene therapy holds promise for the treatment of numerous blinding disorders. Despite the significant progress in the field of viral and non-viral gene delivery to the eye, significant obstacles remain in the way of achieving high-level transgene expression without adverse effects. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is involved in the pathogenesis of retinal diseases and is a key target for a number of gene-based therapeutics. In this study, we addressed the inherent drawbacks of non-viral gene vectors and combined different approaches to design an efficient and safe dendrimer-based gene-delivery platform for delivery to human RPE cells. We used hydroxyl-terminated polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers functionalized with various amounts of amine groups to achieve effective plasmid compaction. We further used triamcinolone acetonide (TA) as a nuclear localization enhancer for the dendrimer-gene complex and achieved significant improvement in cell uptake and transfection of hard-to-transfect human RPE cells. To improve colloidal stability, we further shielded the gene vector surface through incorporation of PEGylated dendrimer along with dendrimer-TA for DNA complexation. The resultant complexes showed improved stability while minimally affecting transgene delivery, thus improving the translational relevance of this platform. PMID:25213606

  9. Complement system in pathogenesis of AMD: dual player in degeneration and protection of retinal tissue.

    PubMed

    Kawa, Milosz P; Machalinska, Anna; Roginska, Dorota; Machalinski, Boguslaw

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of blindness among the elderly, especially in Western countries. Although the prevalence, risk factors, and clinical course of the disease are well described, its pathogenesis is not entirely elucidated. AMD is associated with a variety of biochemical abnormalities, including complement components deposition in the retinal pigment epithelium-Bruch's membrane-choriocapillaris complex. Although the complement system (CS) is increasingly recognized as mediating important roles in retinal biology, its particular role in AMD pathogenesis has not been precisely defined. Unrestricted activation of the CS following injury may directly damage retinal tissue and recruit immune cells to the vicinity of active complement cascades, therefore detrimentally causing bystander damage to surrounding cells and tissues. On the other hand, recent evidence supports the notion that an active complement pathway is a necessity for the normal maintenance of the neurosensory retina. In this scenario, complement activation appears to have beneficial effect as it promotes cell survival and tissue remodeling by facilitating the rapid removal of dying cells and resulting cellular debris, thus demonstrating anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activities. In this review, we discuss both the beneficial and detrimental roles of CS in degenerative retina, focusing on the diverse aspects of CS functions that may promote or inhibit macular disease. PMID:25276841

  10. Stepwise Differentiation of Retinal Ganglion Cells from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Enables Analysis of Glaucomatous Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Ohlemacher, Sarah K; Sridhar, Akshayalakshmi; Xiao, Yucheng; Hochstetler, Alexandra E; Sarfarazi, Mansoor; Cummins, Theodore R; Meyer, Jason S

    2016-06-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including both embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, possess the unique ability to readily differentiate into any cell type of the body, including cells of the retina. Although previous studies have demonstrated the ability to differentiate hPSCs to a retinal lineage, the ability to derive retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) from hPSCs has been complicated by the lack of specific markers with which to identify these cells from a pluripotent source. In the current study, the definitive identification of hPSC-derived RGCs was accomplished by their directed, stepwise differentiation through an enriched retinal progenitor intermediary, with resultant RGCs expressing a full complement of associated features and proper functional characteristics. These results served as the basis for the establishment of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a patient with a genetically inherited form of glaucoma, which results in damage and loss of RGCs. Patient-derived RGCs specifically exhibited a dramatic increase in apoptosis, similar to the targeted loss of RGCs in glaucoma, which was significantly rescued by the addition of candidate neuroprotective factors. Thus, the current study serves to establish a method by which to definitively acquire and identify RGCs from hPSCs and demonstrates the ability of hPSCs to serve as an effective in vitro model of disease progression. Moreover, iPSC-derived RGCs can be utilized for future drug screening approaches to identify targets for the treatment of glaucoma and other optic neuropathies. Stem Cells 2016;34:1553-1562. PMID:26996528

  11. Quantitative Autofluorescence and Cell Density Maps of the Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Ach, Thomas; Huisingh, Carrie; McGwin, Gerald; Messinger, Jeffrey D.; Zhang, Tianjiao; Bentley, Mark J.; Gutierrez, Danielle B.; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Smith, R. Theodore; Sloan, Kenneth R.; Curcio, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Lipofuscin (LF) accumulation within RPE cells is considered pathogenic in AMD. To test whether LF contributes to RPE cell loss in aging and to provide a cellular basis for fundus autofluorescence (AF) we created maps of human RPE cell number and histologic AF. Methods. Retinal pigment epithelium–Bruch's membrane flat mounts were prepared from 20 donor eyes (10 ≤ 51 and 10 > 80 years; postmortem: ≤4.2 hours; no retinal pathologies), preserving foveal position. Phalloidin-binding RPE cytoskeleton and LF-AF (488-nm excitation) were imaged at up to 90 predefined positions. Maps were assembled from 83,330 cells in 1470 locations. From Voronoi regions representing each cell, the number of neighbors, cell area, and total AF intensity normalized to an AF standard was determined. Results. Highly variable between individuals, RPE-AF increases significantly with age. A perifoveal ring of high AF mirrors rod photoreceptor topography and fundus-AF. Retinal pigment epithelium cell density peaks at the fovea, independent of age, yet no net RPE cell loss is detectable. The RPE monolayer undergoes considerable lifelong re-modeling. The relationship of cell size and AF, a surrogate for LF concentration, is orderly and linear in both groups. Autofluorescence topography differs distinctly from the topography of age-related rod loss. Conclusions. Digital maps of quantitative AF, cell density, and packing geometry provide metrics for cellular-resolution clinical imaging and model systems. The uncoupling of RPE LF content, cell number, and photoreceptor topography in aging challenges LF's role in AMD. PMID:25034602

  12. Minimization of Retinal Slip Cannot Explain Human Smooth-Pursuit Eye Movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Leland S.; Beutter, Brent R.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Existing models assume that pursuit attempts a direct minimization of retinal image motion or "slip" (e.g. Robinson et al., 1986; Krauzlis & Weisberger, 1989). Using occluded line-figure stimuli, we have previously shown that humans can accurately pursue stimuli for which perfect tracking does not zero retinal slip (Neurologic ARCO). These findings are inconsistent with the standard control strategy of matching eye motion to a target-motion signal reconstructed by adding retinal slip and eye motion, but consistent with a visual front-end which estimates target motion via a global spatio-temporal integration for pursuit and perception. Another possible explanation is that pursuit simply attempts to minimize slip perpendicular to the segments (and neglects parallel "sliding" motion). To resolve this, 4 observers (3 naive) were asked to pursue the center of 2 types of stimuli with identical velocity-space descriptions and matched motion energy. The line-figure "diamond" stimulus was viewed through 2 invisible 3 deg-wide vertical apertures (38 cd/m2 equal to background) such that only the sinusoidal motion of 4 oblique line segments (44 cd/m2 was visible. The "cross" was identical except that the segments exchanged positions. Two trajectories (8's and infinity's) with 4 possible initial directions were randomly interleaved (1.25 cycles, 2.5s period, Ax = Ay = 1.4 deg). In 91% of trials, the diamond appeared rigid. Correspondingly, pursuit was vigorous (mean Again: 0.74) with a V/H aspect ratio approx. 1 (mean: 0.9). Despite a valid rigid solution, the cross however appeared rigid in 8% of trials. Correspondingly, pursuit was weaker (mean Hgain: 0.38) with an incorrect aspect ratio (mean: 1.5). If pursuit were just minimizing perpendicular slip, performance would be the same in both conditions.

  13. Observation of Human Retinal Remodeling in Octogenarians with a Resveratrol Based Nutritional Supplement

    PubMed Central

    Richer, Stuart; Stiles, William; Ulanski, Lawrence; Carroll, Donn; Podella, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Rare spontaneous remissions from age-related macular degeneration (AMD) suggest the human retina has large regenerative capacity, even in advanced age. We present examples of robust improvement of retinal structure and function using an OTC oral resveratrol (RV) based nutritional supplement called Longevinex® or L/RV (circa 2004, Resveratrol Partners, LLC, Las Vegas, NV, USA). RV, a polyphenolic phytoalexin caloric-restriction mimic, induces hormesis at low doses with widespread beneficial effects on systemic health. RV alone inhibits neovascularization in the murine retina. Thus far, published evidence includes L/RV mitigation of experimentally induced murine cardiovascular reperfusion injury, amelioration of human atherosclerosis serum biomarkers in a human Japanese randomized placebo controlled trial, modulation of micro RNA 20b and 539 that control hypoxia-inducing-factor (HIF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) genes in the murine heart (RV inhibited micro RNA20b 189-fold, L/RV 1366-fold). Little is known about the effects of L/RV on human ocular pathology. Methods: Absent FDA IRB approval, but with permission from our Chief of Staff and medical center IRB, L/RV is reserved for AMD patients, on a case-by-case compassionate care basis. Patients include those who progress on AREDS II type supplements, refuse intra-vitreal anti-VEGF injections or fail to respond to Lucentis®, Avastin® or Eylea®. Patients are clinically followed traditionally as well as with multi-spectral retinal imaging, visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, cone glare recovery and macular visual fields. Three cases are presented. Results: Observed dramatic short-term anti-VEGF type effect including anatomic restoration of retinal structure with a suggestion of improvement in choroidal blood flow by near IR multispectral imaging. The visual function improvement mirrors the effect seen anatomically. The effect is bilateral with the added benefit of better RPE function

  14. KLF4 Promotes Angiogenesis by Activating VEGF Signaling in Human Retinal Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinan; Yang, Chuanhe; Gu, Qingqing; Sims, Michelle; Gu, Weiwang; Pfeffer, Lawrence M.; Yue, Junming

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) has been implicated in regulating cell proliferation, migration and differentiation in a variety of human cells and is one of four factors required for the induction of pluripotent stem cell reprogramming. However, its role has not been addressed in ocular neovascular diseases. This study investigated the role of KLF4 in angiogenesis and underlying molecular mechanisms in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRMECs). The functional role of KLF4 in HRMECs was determined following lentiviral vector mediated inducible expression and shRNA knockdown of KLF4. Inducible expression of KLF4 promotes cell proliferation, migration and tube formation. In contrast, silencing KLF4 inhibits cell proliferation, migration, tube formation and induces apoptosis in HRMECs. KLF4 promotes angiogenesis by transcriptionally activating VEGF expression, thus activating the VEGF signaling pathway in HRMECs. PMID:26075898

  15. Photochemistry and photocytotoxicity of alkaloids from Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) 3: effect on human lens and retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chignell, Colin F; Sik, Robert H; Watson, Mary A; Wielgus, Albert R

    2007-01-01

    The dried root or rhizome of Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) contains several alkaloids including berberine, hydrastine, palmatine and lesser amounts of canadine and hydrastinine. Preparations derived from Goldenseal have been used to treat skin and eye ailments. Berberine, the major alkaloid in Goldenseal root powder, has been used in eye drops to treat trachoma, a disease characterized by keratoconjunctivitis. Berberine and palmatine are also present in extracts from Berberis amurensis Ruprecht (Berberidaceae) which are used to treat ocular disorders. We have previously shown that Goldenseal alkaloids are phototoxic to keratinocytes (Chem Res Toxicol. 14, 1529, 2001; ibid 19, 739, 2006) and now report their effect on human lens and retinal pigment epithelial cells. Human lens epithelial cells (HLE-B3) were severely damaged when incubated with berberine (25 microM) and exposed to UVA (5 J cm(-2)). Under the same conditions, palmatine was less phototoxic and hydrastine, canadine and hydrastinine were inactive. Moderate protection against berberine phototoxicity was afforded by the antioxidants ascorbate (2 mM) and N-acetylcysteine (5 mM). When exposed to UVA (5 J cm(-2)) both berberine (10 microM) and palmatine (10 microM) caused mild DNA damage as determined by the alkaline comet assay which measures single strand breaks. Berberine and palmatine are the only Goldenseal alkaloids with appreciable absorption above 400 nm. Because light at wavelengths below 400 nm is cut off by the anterior portion of the adult human eye only berberine and palmatine were tested for phototoxicity to human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells. Although berberine did damage hRPE cells when irradiated with visible light (lambda > 400 nm) approximately 10 times higher concentrations were required to produce the same amount of damage as seen in lens cells. Palmatine was not phototoxic to hRPE cells. Neither berberine nor palmatine photodamaged DNA in hRPE. Infusions of Goldenseal

  16. Intracellular delivery of dendrimer triamcinolone acetonide conjugates into microglial and human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kambhampati, Siva P; Mishra, Manoj K; Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Oh, Yumin; Lutty, Gerard A; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M

    2015-09-01

    Triamcinolone acetonide (TA) is a potent, intermediate-acting, steroid that has anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic activity. Intravitreal administration of TA has been used for diabetic macular edema, proliferative diabetic retinopathy and exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the hydrophobicity, lack of solubility, and the side effects limit its effectiveness in the treatment of retinal diseases. In this study, we explore a PAMAM dendrimer-TA conjugate (D-TA) as a potential strategy to improve intracellular delivery and efficacy of TA to target cells. The conjugates were prepared with a high drug payload (∼ 21%) and were readily soluble in saline. Compared to free TA, D-TA demonstrated a significantly improved toxicity profile in two important target [microglial and human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)] cells. The D-TA was ∼ 100-fold more effective than free TA in its anti-inflammatory activity (measured in microglia), and in suppressing VEGF production (in hypoxic RPE cells). Dendrimer-based delivery may improve the efficacy of TA towards both its key targets of inflammation and VEGF production, with significant clinical implications. PMID:25701805

  17. Intracellular delivery of dendrimer triamcinolone acetonide conjugates into microglial and human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kambhampati, Siva P.; Mishra, Manoj K.; Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Oh, Yumin; Lutty, Gerard A.; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M.

    2016-01-01

    Triamcinolone acetonide (TA) is a potent, intermediate-acting, steroid that has anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic activity. Intravitreal administration of TA has been used for diabetic macular edema, proliferative diabetic retinopathy and exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the hydrophobicity, lack of solubility, and the side effects limit its effectiveness in the treatment of retinal diseases. In this study, we explore a PAMAM dendrimer-TA conjugate (D-TA) as a potential strategy to improve intracellular delivery and efficacy of TA to target cells. The conjugates were prepared with a high drug payload (~21%) and were readily soluble in saline. Compared to free TA, D-TA demonstrated a significantly improved toxicity profile in two important target [microglial and human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)] cells. The D-TA was ~100-fold more effective than free TA in its anti-inflammatory activity (measured in microglia), and in suppressing VEGF production (in hypoxic RPE cells). Dendrimer-based delivery may improve the efficacy of TA towards both its key targets of inflammation and VEGF production, with significant clinical implications. PMID:25701805

  18. Vaccination for protection of retinal ganglion cells against death from glutamate cytotoxicity and ocular hypertension: Implications for glaucoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schori, Hadas; Kipnis, Jonathan; Yoles, Eti; Woldemussie, Elizabeth; Ruiz, Guadalupe; Wheeler, Larry A.; Schwartz, Michal

    2001-03-01

    Our group recently demonstrated that autoimmune T cells directed against central nervous system-associated myelin antigens protect neurons from secondary degeneration. We further showed that the synthetic peptide copolymer 1 (Cop-1), known to suppress experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, can be safely substituted for the natural myelin antigen in both passive and active immunization for neuroprotection of the injured optic nerve. Here we attempted to determine whether similar immunizations are protective from retinal ganglion cell loss resulting from a direct biochemical insult caused, for example, by glutamate (a major mediator of degeneration in acute and chronic optic nerve insults) and in a rat model of ocular hypertension. Passive immunization with T cells reactive to myelin basic protein or active immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-derived peptide, although neuroprotective after optic nerve injury, was ineffective against glutamate toxicity in mice and rats. In contrast, the number of surviving retinal ganglion cells per square millimeter in glutamate-injected retinas was significantly larger in mice immunized 10 days previously with Cop-1 emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant than in mice injected with PBS in the same adjuvant (2,133 ± 270 and 1,329 ± 121, respectively, mean ± SEM; P < 0.02). A similar pattern was observed when mice were immunized on the day of glutamate injection (1,777 ± 101 compared with 1,414 ± 36; P <0.05), but not when they were immunized 48h later. These findings suggest that protection from glutamate toxicity requires reinforcement of the immune system by antigens that are different from those associated with myelin. The use of Cop-1 apparently circumvents this antigen specificity barrier. In the rat ocular hypertension model, which simulates glaucoma, immunization with Cop-1 significantly reduced the retinal ganglion cell loss from 27.8%±6.8% to 4.3%±1.6%, without affecting the intraocular pressure

  19. Protective effects of triptolide on retinal ganglion cells in a rat model of chronic glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Dongmei; Wu, Lingling; Li, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To study the effects of triptolide, a Chinese herb extract, on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in a rat model of chronic glaucoma. Methods Eighty Wistar rats were randomly divided into triptolide group (n=40) and normal saline (NS) group (n=40). Angle photocoagulation was used to establish the model of glaucoma, with right eye as laser treated eye and left eye as control eye. Triptolide group received triptolide intraperitoneally daily, while NS group received NS. Intraocular pressure (IOP), anti-CD11b immunofluorescent stain in retina and optic nerve, RGCs count with Nissel stain and microglia count with anti-CD11b immunofluorescence stain in retina flat mounts, retinal tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α mRNA detection by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, and double immunofluorescent labeling with anti-TNF-α and anti-CD11b in retinal frozen section were performed. Results Mean IOP of the laser treated eyes significantly increased 3 weeks after photocoagulation (P<0.05), with no statistical difference between the two groups (P>0.05). RGCs survival in the laser treated eyes was significantly improved in the triptolide group than the NS group (P<0.05). Microglia count in superficial retina of the laser treated eyes was significantly less in the triptolide group (30.40±4.90) than the NS group (35.06±7.59) (P<0.05). TNF-α mRNA expression in the retina of the laser treated eyes in the triptolide group decreased by 60% compared with that in the NS group (P<0.01). The double immunofluorescent labeling showed that TNF-α was mainly distributed around the microglia. Conclusion Triptolide improved RGCs survival in this rat model of chronic glaucoma, which did not depend on IOP decrease but might be exerted by inhibiting microglia activities and reducing TNF-α secretion. PMID:26604697

  20. MicroRNA Expression Profiles of Human iPS Cells, Retinal Pigment Epithelium Derived From iPS, and Fetal Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Whitney A.; Muñiz, Alberto.; Plamper, Mark L.; Kaini, Ramesh R.; Wang, Heuy-Ching

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this report is to describe the protocols for comparing the microRNA (miRNA) profiles of human induced-pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) derived from human iPS cells (iPS-RPE), and fetal RPE. The protocols include collection of RNA for analysis by microarray, and the analysis of microarray data to identify miRNAs that are differentially expressed among three cell types. The methods for culture of iPS cells and fetal RPE are explained. The protocol used for differentiation of RPE from human iPS is also described. The RNA extraction technique we describe was selected to allow maximal recovery of very small RNA for use in a miRNA microarray. Finally, cellular pathway and network analysis of microarray data is explained. These techniques will facilitate the comparison of the miRNA profiles of three different cell types. PMID:24999033

  1. Three-dimensional pointwise comparison of human retinal optical property at 845 and 1060 nm using optical frequency domain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yueli; Burnes, Daina L.; de Bruin, Martijn; Mujat, Mircea; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2009-03-01

    To compare the optical properties of the human retina, 3-D volumetric images of the same eye are acquired with two nearly identical optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems at center wavelengths of 845 and 1060 nm using optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI). To characterize the contrast of individual tissue layers in the retina at these two wavelengths, the 3-D volumetric data sets are carefully spatially matched. The relative scattering intensities from different layers such as the nerve fiber, photoreceptor, pigment epithelium, and choroid are measured and a quantitative comparison is presented. OCT retinal imaging at 1060 nm is found to have a significantly better depth penetration but a reduced contrast between the retinal nerve fiber, the ganglion cell, and the inner plexiform layers compared to the OCT retinal imaging at 845 nm.

  2. In-vivo imaging of blood flow in human retinal vessels using color Doppler optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdanfar, Siavash; Rollins, Andrew M.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    1999-04-01

    Quantification of retinal blood flow may lead to a better understanding of the progression and treatment of several ocular disorders, including diabetic retinopathy, age- related macular degeneration, and glaucoma. Current techniques, such as fluorescein angiography and laser Doppler velocimetry are limited, failing to provide sufficient information to the clinician. Color Doppler optical coherence tomography (CDOCT) is a novel technique using coherent heterodyne detection for simultaneous cross- sectional imaging of tissue microstructure and blood flow. This technique is capable of high spatial and velocity resolution imaging in highly scattering media. We implemented CDOCT for retinal blood flow mapping in human subjects. No dilation of the pupil was necessary. CDOCT is demonstrated for determining bidirectional flow in sub- 100micrometers diameter vessels in the retina. Additionally, we calculated Doppler broadening using the variance of depth- resolved spectra to identify regions with large velocity gradients within the Xenopus heart. This technique may be useful in quantifying local tissue perfusion in highly vascular retinal tissue.

  3. Genetic Ablation of Pannexin1 Protects Retinal Neurons from Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dvoriantchikova, Galina; Ivanov, Dmitry; Barakat, David; Grinberg, Alexander; Wen, Rong; Slepak, Vladlen Z.; Shestopalov, Valery I.

    2012-01-01

    Pannexin1 (Panx1) forms large nonselective membrane channel that is implicated in paracrine and inflammatory signaling. In vitro experiments suggested that Panx1 could play a key role in ischemic death of hippocampal neurons. Since retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) express high levels of Panx1 and are susceptible to ischemic induced injury, we hypothesized that Panx1 contributes to rapid and selective loss of these neurons in ischemia. To test this hypothesis, we induced experimental retinal ischemia followed by reperfusion in live animals with the Panx1 channel genetically ablated either in the entire mouse (Panx1 KO), or only in neurons using the conditional knockout (Panx1 CKO) technology. Here we report that two distinct neurotoxic processes are induced in RGCs by ischemia in the wild type mice but are inactivated in Panx1KO and Panx1 CKO animals. First, the post-ischemic permeation of RGC plasma membranes is suppressed, as assessed by dye transfer and calcium imaging assays ex vivo and in vitro. Second, the inflammasome-mediated activation of caspase-1 and the production of interleukin-1β in the Panx1 KO retinas are inhibited. Our findings indicate that post-ischemic neurotoxicity in the retina is mediated by previously uncharacterized pathways, which involve neuronal Panx1 and are intrinsic to RGCs. Thus, our work presents the in vivo evidence for neurotoxicity elicited by neuronal Panx1, and identifies this channel as a new therapeutic target in ischemic pathologies. PMID:22384122

  4. Spatial and Spectral Characterization of Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Fluorophore Families by Ex Vivo Hyperspectral Autofluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ben Ami, Tal; Tong, Yuehong; Bhuiyan, Alauddin; Huisingh, Carrie; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Ach, Thomas; Curcio, Christine A.; Smith, R. Theodore

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Discovery of candidate spectra for abundant fluorophore families in human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) by ex vivo hyperspectral imaging. Methods Hyperspectral autofluorescence emission images were captured between 420 and 720 nm (10-nm intervals), at two excitation bands (436–460, 480–510 nm), from three locations (fovea, perifovea, near-periphery) in 20 normal RPE/Bruch's membrane (BrM) flatmounts. Mathematical factorization extracted a BrM spectrum (S0) and abundant lipofuscin/melanolipofuscin (LF/ML) spectra of RPE origin (S1, S2, S3) from each tissue. Results Smooth spectra S1 to S3, with perinuclear localization consistent with LF/ML at all three retinal locations and both excitations in 14 eyes (84 datasets), were included in the analysis. The mean peak emissions of S0, S1, and S2 at λex 436 nm were, respectively, 495 ± 14, 535 ± 17, and 576 ± 20 nm. S3 was generally trimodal, with peaks at either 580, 620, or 650 nm (peak mode, 650 nm). At λex 480 nm, S0, S1, and S2 were red-shifted to 526 ± 9, 553 ± 10, and 588 ± 23 nm, and S3 was again trimodal (peak mode, 620 nm). S1 often split into two spectra, S1A and S1B. S3 strongly colocalized with melanin. There were no significant differences across age, sex, or retinal location. Conclusions There appear to be at least three families of abundant RPE fluorophores that are ubiquitous across age, retinal location, and sex in this sample of healthy eyes. Further molecular characterization by imaging mass spectrometry and localization via super-resolution microscopy should elucidate normal and abnormal RPE physiology involving fluorophores. Translational Relevance Our results help establish hyperspectral autofluorescence imaging of the human retinal pigment epithelium as a useful tool for investigating retinal health and disease. PMID:27226929

  5. Two-photon excited autofluorescence imaging of human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Meng; Bindewald-Wittich, Almut; Holz, Frank G; Giese, Guenter; Niemz, Markolf H; Snyder, Sarah; Sun, Hui; Yu, Jiayi; Agopov, Michael; La Schiazza, Olivier; Bille, Josef F

    2006-01-01

    Degeneration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells severely impairs the visual function of retina photoreceptors. However, little is known about the events that trigger the death of RPE cells at the subcellular level. Two-photon excited autofluorescence (TPEF) imaging of RPE cells proves to be well suited to investigate both the morphological and the spectral characteristics of the human RPE cells. The dominant fluorophores of autofluorescence derive from lipofuscin (LF) granules that accumulate in the cytoplasm of the RPE cells with increasing age. Spectral TPEF imaging reveals the existence of abnormal LF granules with blue shifted autofluorescence in RPE cells of aging patients and brings new insights into the complicated composition of the LF granules. Based on a proposed two-photon laser scanning ophthalmoscope, TPEF imaging of the living retina may be valuable for diagnostic and pathological studies of age related eye diseases. PMID:16526877

  6. MicroRNA-29 regulates high-glucose-induced apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells through PTEN.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaohui; Zhou, Xiyuan; Liu, Danning; Yun, Lixia; Zhang, Lina; Chen, Xiaohai; Chai, Qinghe; Li, Langen

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia or high-glucose (HG)-induced apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is a characteristic process in diabetic retinopathy. In our study, we examined whether microRNA-29 (miR-29) may regulate HG-induced RPE cell apoptosis. Human RPE cell line, ARPE-19 cells, was treated with various high concentration of glucose in vitro. HG-induced RPE cell apoptosis was examined by terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and miR-29 gene expression by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). miR-29 was then downregulated in RPE cells, and its effect on HG-induced apoptosis was examined by TUNEL assay and western blot assay on caspase-7 protein. Association of miR-29 on its downstream target, PTEN, in HG-induced RPE cell apoptosis was evaluated by dual-luciferase assay and qRT-PCR. PTEN was silenced in RPE cells. The effects of PTEN downregulation on miR-29-mediated HG-induced RPE cell apoptosis were also examined by TUNEL and western blot assays. HG induced significant apoptosis in RPE cells in a dose-dependent manner. miR-29 was upregulated by HG in RPE cells. miR-29 downregulation protected HG-induced apoptosis and reduced the production of caspase-7 protein in RPE cells. PTEN was shown to be directly downregulated by HG and then upregulated by miR-29 downregulation in RPE cells. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated PTEN downregulation reversed the protective effect of miR-29 downregulation on HG-induced RPE cell apoptosis. This study demonstrates that miR-29, through inverse association of PTEN, plays an important role in the process of HG-induced apoptosis in RPE cells. PMID:26822433

  7. Bestrophin 1 is indispensable for volume regulation in human retinal pigment epithelium cells

    PubMed Central

    Milenkovic, Andrea; Brandl, Caroline; Milenkovic, Vladimir M.; Jendryke, Thomas; Sirianant, Lalida; Wanitchakool, Potchanart; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Reiff, Charlotte M.; Horling, Franziska; Schrewe, Heinrich; Schreiber, Rainer; Kunzelmann, Karl; Wetzel, Christian H.; Weber, Bernhard H. F.

    2015-01-01

    In response to cell swelling, volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs) participate in a process known as regulatory volume decrease (RVD). Only recently, first insight into the molecular identity of mammalian VRACs was obtained by the discovery of the leucine-rich repeats containing 8A (LRRC8A) gene. Here, we show that bestrophin 1 (BEST1) but not LRRC8A is crucial for volume regulation in human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in RPE derived from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) exhibit an outwardly rectifying chloride current with characteristic functional properties of VRACs. This current is severely reduced in hiPSC-RPE cells derived from macular dystrophy patients with pathologic BEST1 mutations. Disruption of the orthologous mouse gene (Best1−/−) does not result in obvious retinal pathology but leads to a severe subfertility phenotype in agreement with minor endogenous expression of Best1 in murine RPE but highly abundant expression in mouse testis. Sperm from Best1−/− mice showed reduced motility and abnormal sperm morphology, indicating an inability in RVD. Together, our data suggest that the molecular identity of VRACs is more complex—that is, instead of a single ubiquitous channel, VRACs could be formed by cell type- or tissue-specific subunit composition. Our findings provide the basis to further examine VRAC diversity in normal and diseased cell physiology, which is key to exploring novel therapeutic approaches in VRAC-associated pathologies. PMID:25941382

  8. Cytomegalovirus retinitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to prevent its return. Alternative Names Cytomegalovirus retinitis Images Eye CMV retinitis CMV (cytomegalovirus) References Crumpacker CS. ... 5. Read More Antibody HIV/AIDS Immune response Retinal detachment Systemic WBC count Update Date 12/10/ ...

  9. Imaging human retinal pigment epithelium cells using adaptive optics optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhuolin; Kocaoglu, Omer P.; Turner, Timothy L.; Miller, Donald T.

    2016-03-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells are vital to health of the outer retina, but are often compromised in ageing and major ocular diseases that lead to blindness. Early manifestation of RPE disruption occurs at the cellular level, and while biomarkers at this scale hold considerable promise, RPE cells have proven extremely challenging to image in the living human eye. We present a novel method based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) equipped with adaptive optics (AO) that overcomes the associated technical obstacles. The method takes advantage of the 3D resolution of AO-OCT, but more critically sub-cellular segmentation and registration that permit organelle motility to be used as a novel contrast mechanism. With this method, we successfully visualized RPE cells and characterized their 3D reflectance profile in every subject and retinal location (3° and 7° temporal to the fovea) imaged to date. We have quantified RPE packing geometry in terms of cell density, cone-to-RPE ratio, and number of nearest neighbors using Voronoi and power spectra analyses. RPE cell density (cells/mm2) showed no significant difference between 3° (4,892+/-691) and 7° (4,780+/-354). In contrast, cone-to- RPE ratio was significantly higher at 3° (3.88+/-0.52:1) than 7° (2.31+/- 0.23:1). Voronoi analysis also showed most RPE cells have six nearest neighbors, which was significantly larger than the next two most prevalent associations: five and seven. Averaged across the five subjects, prevalence of cells with six neighbors was 51.4+/-3.58% at 3°, and 54.58+/-3.01% at 7°. These results are consistent with histology and in vivo studies using other imaging modalities.

  10. Pro-inflammatory cytokines downregulate Hsp27 and cause apoptosis of human retinal capillary endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Nahomi, Rooban B.; Palmer, Allison; Roth, Katelyn E.; Fort, Patrice E.; Nagaraj, Ram H.

    2013-01-01

    The formation of acellular capillaries in the retina, a hallmark feature of diabetic retinopathy, is caused by apoptosis of endothelial cells and pericytes. The biochemical mechanism of such apoptosis remains unclear. Small heat shock proteins play an important role in the regulation of apoptosis. In the diabetic retina, pro-inflammatory cytokines are upregulated. In this study, we investigated the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines on small heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) in human retinal endothelial cells (HREC). In HREC cultured in the presence of cytokine mixtures (CM), a significant downregulation of Hsp27 at the protein and mRNA level occurred, with no effect on HSF-1, the transcription factor for Hsp27. The presence of high glucose (25 mM) amplified the effects of cytokines on Hsp27. CM activated indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and enhanced the production of kynurenine and ROS. An inhibitor of IDO, 1-methyl tryptophan (MT), inhibited the effects of CM on Hsp27. CM also upregulated NOS2 and, consequently, nitric oxide (NO). A NOS inhibitor, L-NAME, and a ROS scavenger blocked the CM-mediated Hsp27 downregulation. While a NO donor in the culture medium did not decrease the Hsp27 content, a peroxynitrite donor and exogenous peroxynitrite did. The cytokines and high glucose-induced apoptosis of HREC were inhibited by MT and L-NAME. Downregulation of Hsp27 by a siRNA treatment promoted apoptosis in HREC. Together, these data suggest that pro-inflammatory cytokines induce the formation of ROS and NO, which, through the formation of peroxynitrite, reduce the Hsp27 content and bring about apoptosis of retinal capillary endothelial cells. PMID:24252613

  11. Effects of light-emitting diode radiations on human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Eva; Bonnin-Arias, Cristina; Pérez-Carrasco, María Jesús; Muñoz de Luna, Javier; Vázquez, Daniel; Sánchez-Ramos, Celia

    2013-01-01

    Human visual system is exposed to high levels of natural and artificial lights of different spectra and intensities along lifetime. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are the basic lighting components in screens of PCs, phones and TV sets; hence it is so important to know the implications of LED radiations on the human visual system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of LEDs radiations on human retinal pigment epithelial cells (HRPEpiC). They were exposed to three light-darkness (12 h/12 h) cycles, using blue-468 nm, green-525 nm, red-616 nm and white light. Cellular viability of HRPEpiC was evaluated by labeling all nuclei with DAPI; Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined by H2DCFDA staining; mitochondrial membrane potential was quantified by TMRM staining; DNA damage was determined by H2AX histone activation, and apoptosis was evaluated by caspases-3,-7 activation. It is shown that LED radiations decrease 75-99% cellular viability, and increase 66-89% cellular apoptosis. They also increase ROS production and DNA damage. Fluorescence intensity of apoptosis was 3.7% in nonirradiated cells and 88.8%, 86.1%, 83.9% and 65.5% in cells exposed to white, blue, green or red light, respectively. This study indicates three light-darkness (12 h/12 h) cycles of exposure to LED lighting affect in vitro HRPEpiC. PMID:22989198

  12. Course for undergraduate students: analysis of the retinal image quality of a human eye model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Mar Pérez, Maria; Yebra, Ana; Fernández-Oliveras, Alicia; Ghinea, Razvan; Ionescu, Ana M.; Cardona, Juan C.

    2014-07-01

    In teaching of Vision Physics or Physiological Optics, the knowledge and analysis of the aberration that the human eye presents are of great interest, since this information allows a proper evaluation of the quality of the retinal image. The objective of the present work is that the students acquire the required competencies which will allow them to evaluate the optical quality of the human visual system for emmetropic and ammetropic eye, both with and without the optical compensation. For this purpose, an optical system corresponding to the Navarro-Escudero eye model, which allows calculating and evaluating the aberration of this eye model in different ammetropic conditions, was developed employing the OSLO LT software. The optical quality of the visual system will be assessed through determinations of the third and fifth order aberration coefficients, the impact diagram, wavefront analysis, calculation of the Point Spread Function and the Modulation Transfer Function for ammetropic individuals, with myopia or hyperopia, both with or without the optical compensation. This course is expected to be of great interest for student of Optics and Optometry Sciences, last courses of Physics or medical sciences related with human vision.

  13. Dissociation of retinal and headcentric disparity signals in dorsal human cortex

    PubMed Central

    Arnoldussen, David M.; Goossens, Jeroen; van Den Berg, Albert V.

    2015-01-01

    Recent fMRI studies have shown fusion of visual motion and disparity signals for shape perception (Ban et al., 2012), and unmasking camouflaged surfaces (Rokers et al., 2009), but no such interaction is known for typical dorsal motion pathway tasks, like grasping and navigation. Here, we investigate human speed perception of forward motion and its representation in the human motion network. We observe strong interaction in medial (V3ab, V6) and lateral motion areas (MT+), which differ significantly. Whereas the retinal disparity dominates the binocular contribution to the BOLD activity in the anterior part of area MT+, headcentric disparity modulation of the BOLD response dominates in area V3ab and V6. This suggests that medial motion areas not only represent rotational speed of the head (Arnoldussen et al., 2011), but also translational speed of the head relative to the scene. Interestingly, a strong response to vergence eye movements was found in area V1, which showed a dependency on visual direction, just like vertical-size disparity. This is the first report of a vertical-size disparity correlate in human striate cortex. PMID:25759642

  14. Conditioned Medium from Early-Outgrowth Bone Marrow Cells Is Retinal Protective in Experimental Model of Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Diego A; Papadimitriou, Alexandros; Gilbert, Richard E; Thai, Kerri; Zhang, Yanling; Rosales, Mariana A B; Lopes de Faria, José B; Lopes de Faria, Jacqueline M

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells were demonstrated to improve organ function, but the lack of cell retention within injured organs suggests that the protective effects are due to factors released by the cells. Herein, we tested cell therapy using early outgrowth cells (EOCs) or their conditioned media (CM) to protect the retina of diabetic animal models (type 1 and type 2) and assessed the mechanisms by in vitro study. Control and diabetic (db/db) mice (8 weeks of age) were randomized to receive a unique intravenous injection of 5×105EOCs or 0.25 ml thrice weekly tail-vein injections of 10x concentrated CM and Wystar Kyoto rats rendered diabetic were randomized to receive 0.50 ml thrice weekly tail-vein injections of 10x concentrated CM. Four weeks later, the animals were euthanized and the eyes were enucleated. Rat retinal Müller cells (rMCs) were exposed for 24 h to high glucose (HG), combined or not with EOC-conditioned medium (EOC-CM) from db/m EOC cultures. Diabetic animals showed increase in diabetic retinopathy (DR) and oxidative damage markers; the treatment with EOCs or CM infusions significantly reduced this damage and re-established the retinal function. In rMCs exposed to diabetic milieu conditions (HG), the presence of EOC-CM reduced reactive oxygen species production by modulating the NADPH-oxidase 4 system, thus upregulating SIRT1 activity and deacetylating Lys-310-p65-NFκB, decreasing GFAP and VEGF expressions. The antioxidant capacity of EOC-CM led to the prevention of carbonylation and nitrosylation posttranslational modifications on the SIRT1 molecule, preserving its activity. The pivotal role of SIRT1 on the mode of action of EOCs or their CM was also demonstrated on diabetic retina. These findings suggest that EOCs are effective as a form of systemic delivery for preventing the early molecular markers of DR and its conditioned medium is equally protective revealing a novel possibility for cell-free therapy for the treatment of DR. PMID:26836609

  15. Conditioned Medium from Early-Outgrowth Bone Marrow Cells Is Retinal Protective in Experimental Model of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Diego A.; Papadimitriou, Alexandros; Gilbert, Richard E.; Thai, Kerri; Zhang, Yanling; Rosales, Mariana A. B.; Lopes de Faria, José B.; Lopes de Faria, Jacqueline M.

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells were demonstrated to improve organ function, but the lack of cell retention within injured organs suggests that the protective effects are due to factors released by the cells. Herein, we tested cell therapy using early outgrowth cells (EOCs) or their conditioned media (CM) to protect the retina of diabetic animal models (type 1 and type 2) and assessed the mechanisms by in vitro study. Control and diabetic (db/db) mice (8 weeks of age) were randomized to receive a unique intravenous injection of 5×105EOCs or 0.25 ml thrice weekly tail-vein injections of 10x concentrated CM and Wystar Kyoto rats rendered diabetic were randomized to receive 0.50 ml thrice weekly tail-vein injections of 10x concentrated CM. Four weeks later, the animals were euthanized and the eyes were enucleated. Rat retinal Müller cells (rMCs) were exposed for 24 h to high glucose (HG), combined or not with EOC-conditioned medium (EOC-CM) from db/m EOC cultures. Diabetic animals showed increase in diabetic retinopathy (DR) and oxidative damage markers; the treatment with EOCs or CM infusions significantly reduced this damage and re-established the retinal function. In rMCs exposed to diabetic milieu conditions (HG), the presence of EOC-CM reduced reactive oxygen species production by modulating the NADPH-oxidase 4 system, thus upregulating SIRT1 activity and deacetylating Lys-310-p65-NFκB, decreasing GFAP and VEGF expressions. The antioxidant capacity of EOC-CM led to the prevention of carbonylation and nitrosylation posttranslational modifications on the SIRT1 molecule, preserving its activity. The pivotal role of SIRT1 on the mode of action of EOCs or their CM was also demonstrated on diabetic retina. These findings suggest that EOCs are effective as a form of systemic delivery for preventing the early molecular markers of DR and its conditioned medium is equally protective revealing a novel possibility for cell-free therapy for the treatment of DR. PMID:26836609

  16. Modeling human retinal development with patient-specific iPS cells reveals multiple roles for VSX2

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, M. Joseph; Perez, Enio T.; Martin, Jessica M.; Reshel, Samantha T.; Wallace, Kyle A.; Capowski, Elizabeth E.; Singh, Ruchira; Wright, Lynda S.; Clark, Eric M.; Barney, Patrick M.; Stewart, Ron; Dickerson, Sarah J.; Miller, Michael J.; Percin, E. Ferda; Thomson, James A.; Gamm, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have been shown to differentiate along the retinal lineage in a manner that mimics normal mammalian development. Under certain culture conditions hiPSCs form optic vesicle-like structures (OVs), which contain proliferating progenitors capable of yielding all neural retina (NR) cell types over time. Such observations imply conserved roles for regulators of retinogenesis in hiPSC-derived cultures and the developing embryo. However, whether and to what extent this assumption holds true has remained largely uninvestigated. We examined the role of a key NR transcription factor, Visual System Homeobox 2 (VSX2), using hiPSCs derived from a patient with microphthalmia caused by an R200Q mutation in the VSX2 homeodomain region. No differences were noted between (R200Q)VSX2 and sibling control hiPSCs prior to OV generation. Thereafter, (R200Q)VSX2 hiPSC-OVs displayed a significant growth deficit compared to control hiPSC-OVs, as well as increased production of retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) at the expense of NR cell derivatives. Furthermore, (R200Q)VSX2 hiPSC-OVs failed to produce bipolar cells, a distinctive feature previously observed in Vsx2 mutant mice. (R200Q)VSX2 hiPSC-OVs also demonstrated delayed photoreceptor maturation, which could be overcome via exogenous expression of wildtype VSX2 at early stages of retinal differentiation. Finally, RNAseq analysis on isolated hiPSC-OVs implicated key transcription factors and extracellular signaling pathways as potential downstream effectors of VSX2-mediated gene regulation. Our results establish hiPSC-OVs as versatile model systems to study retinal development at stages not previously accessible in humans, and support the bona fide nature of hiPSC-OV-derived retinal progeny. PMID:24532057

  17. Bestrophin-1 influences transepithelial electrical properties and Ca2+ signaling in human retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Kinnick, Tyson R.; Stanton, J. Brett; Johnson, Adiv A.; Lynch, Ronald M.; Marmorstein, Lihua Y.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Mutations in BEST1, encoding Bestrophin-1 (Best1), cause Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD) and other inherited retinal degenerative diseases. Best1 is an integral membrane protein localized to the basolateral plasma membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Data from numerous in vitro and in vivo models have demonstrated that Best1 regulates intracellular Ca2+ levels. Although it is known from in vitro and crystal structure data that Best1 is also a calcium-activated anion channel, evidence for Best1 functioning as a channel in human RPE is lacking. To assess Best1-associated channel activity in the RPE, we examined the transepithelial electrical properties of fetal human RPE (fhRPE) cells, which express endogenous Best1. Methods Using adenovirus-mediated gene transfer, we overexpressed Best1 and the BVMD mutant Best1W93C in fhRPE cells and assessed resting transepithelial potential (TEP), transepithelial resistance, short circuit current (Isc), and intracellular Ca2+ levels. Cl- currents were directly measured in transfected HEK293 cells using whole-cell patch clamp. Results Best1W93C showed ablated Cl- currents and, when co-expressed, suppressed the channel activity of Best1 in HEK293 cells. In fhRPE, overexpression of Best1 increased TEP and Isc, while Best1W93C diminished TEP and Isc. Substitution of Cl- in the bath media resulted in a significant reduction of Isc in monolayers overexpressing Best1, but no significant Isc change in monolayers expressing Best1W93C. We removed Ca2+ as a limit on transepithelial electrical properties by treating cells with ionomycin, and found that changes in Isc and TEP for monolayers expressing Best1 were absent in monolayers expressing Best1W93C. Similarly, inhibition of calcium-activated anion channels with niflumic acid reduced both Isc and TEP of control and Best1 monolayers, but did not notably affect Best1W93C monolayers. Stimulation with extracellular ATP induced an increase in TEP in control

  18. Hydrostatic Pressure Does Not Cause Detectable Changes in Survival of Human Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Andrew; Aldarwesh, Amal; Rhodes, Jeremy D.; Broadway, David C.; Everitt, Claire; Sanderson, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is a major risk factor for glaucoma. One consequence of raised IOP is that ocular tissues are subjected to increased hydrostatic pressure (HP). The effect of raised HP on stress pathway signaling and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival in the human retina was investigated. Methods A chamber was designed to expose cells to increased HP (constant and fluctuating). Accurate pressure control (10-100mmHg) was achieved using mass flow controllers. Human organotypic retinal cultures (HORCs) from donor eyes (<24h post mortem) were cultured in serum-free DMEM/HamF12. Increased HP was compared to simulated ischemia (oxygen glucose deprivation, OGD). Cell death and apoptosis were measured by LDH and TUNEL assays, RGC marker expression by qRT-PCR (THY-1) and RGC number by immunohistochemistry (NeuN). Activated p38 and JNK were detected by Western blot. Results Exposure of HORCs to constant (60mmHg) or fluctuating (10-100mmHg; 1 cycle/min) pressure for 24 or 48h caused no loss of structural integrity, LDH release, decrease in RGC marker expression (THY-1) or loss of RGCs compared with controls. In addition, there was no increase in TUNEL-positive NeuN-labelled cells at either time-point indicating no increase in apoptosis of RGCs. OGD increased apoptosis, reduced RGC marker expression and RGC number and caused elevated LDH release at 24h. p38 and JNK phosphorylation remained unchanged in HORCs exposed to fluctuating pressure (10-100mmHg; 1 cycle/min) for 15, 30, 60 and 90min durations, whereas OGD (3h) increased activation of p38 and JNK, remaining elevated for 90min post-OGD. Conclusions Directly applied HP had no detectable impact on RGC survival and stress-signalling in HORCs. Simulated ischemia, however, activated stress pathways and caused RGC death. These results show that direct HP does not cause degeneration of RGCs in the ex vivo human retina. PMID:25635827

  19. Protective Effects of Panax notoginseng Saponins against High Glucose-Induced Oxidative Injury in Rat Retinal Capillary Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yue; Qiao, Yuan; Huang, Jianmei; Tang, Minke

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, a leading cause of visual loss and blindness, is characterized by microvascular dysfunction. Hyperglycemia is considered the major pathogenic factor for diabetic retinopathy and is associated with increased oxidative stress in the retina. In this study, we investigated the potential protective effects of Panax notoginseng Saponins (PNS) in retinal capillary endothelial cells (RCECs) exposed to high glucose conditions. We found a pronounced increase in cell viability in rat RCECs incubated with both PNS and high glucose (30 mM) for 48 h or 72 h. The increased viability was accompanied by reduced intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O2 (-)), decreased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), and lowered malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. PNS also increased the activities of total superoxide dismutase (SOD), MnSOD, catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX). The glutathione (GSH) content also increased after PNS treatment. Furthermore, PNS reduced NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) expression. These results indicate that PNS exerts a protective effect against high glucose-induced injury in RCECs, which may be partially attributed to its antioxidative function. PMID:27019662

  20. Increased production of omega-3 fatty acids protects retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shanshan; Shi, Zhe; Su, Huanxing; So, Kwok-Fai; Cui, Qi

    2016-07-01

    Injury to the central nervous system causes progressive degeneration of injured axons, leading to loss of the neuronal bodies. Neuronal survival after injury is a prerequisite for successful regeneration of injured axons. In this study, we investigated the effects of increased production of omega-3 fatty acids and elevation of cAMP on retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival and axonal regeneration after optic nerve (ON) crush injury in adult mice. We found that increased production of omega-3 fatty acids in mice enhanced RGC survival, but not axonal regeneration, over a period of 3 weeks after ON injury. cAMP elevation promoted RGC survival in wild type mice, but no significant difference in cell survival was seen in mice over-producing omega-3 fatty acids and receiving intravitreal injections of CPT-cAMP, suggesting that cAMP elevation protects RGCs after injury but does not potentiate the actions of the omega-3 fatty acids. The observed omega-3 fatty acid-mediated neuroprotection is likely achieved partially through ERK1/2 signaling as inhibition of this pathway by PD98059 hindered, but did not completely block, RGC protection. Our study thus enhances our current understanding of neural repair after CNS injury, including the visual system. PMID:27264241

  1. Protective Effects of Panax notoginseng Saponins against High Glucose-Induced Oxidative Injury in Rat Retinal Capillary Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yue; Qiao, Yuan; Huang, Jianmei

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, a leading cause of visual loss and blindness, is characterized by microvascular dysfunction. Hyperglycemia is considered the major pathogenic factor for diabetic retinopathy and is associated with increased oxidative stress in the retina. In this study, we investigated the potential protective effects of Panax notoginseng Saponins (PNS) in retinal capillary endothelial cells (RCECs) exposed to high glucose conditions. We found a pronounced increase in cell viability in rat RCECs incubated with both PNS and high glucose (30 mM) for 48 h or 72 h. The increased viability was accompanied by reduced intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O2−), decreased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), and lowered malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. PNS also increased the activities of total superoxide dismutase (SOD), MnSOD, catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX). The glutathione (GSH) content also increased after PNS treatment. Furthermore, PNS reduced NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) expression. These results indicate that PNS exerts a protective effect against high glucose-induced injury in RCECs, which may be partially attributed to its antioxidative function. PMID:27019662

  2. Cytokine regulation of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) production by human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Crane, I J; Kuppner, M C; Mckillop-Smith, S; Wallace, C A; Forrester, J V

    1999-01-01

    GM-CSF is an important regulator of macrophage, granulocyte and dendritic cell behaviour and function. These cell types have been implicated in the retinal damage characteristic of endogenous posterior uveitis. Dendritic cells in the choroid have access to retinal antigens processed by the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells of the blood–retinal barrier and are thought to be candidates for the presentation of antigen in uveoretinitis. We therefore investigated the production of GM-CSF and its regulation in human RPE cells. IL-1β, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) all stimulated GM-CSF production by RPE cells and a combination of these cytokines increased GM-CSF production over five-fold compared with that with the individual cytokines alone. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) rapidly down-regulated these responses. IFN-γ did not appear to be acting directly on IL-1β or via the synthesis of another protein. GM-CSF mRNA expression showed the same pattern of response to these cytokines, indicating transcriptional or pre-transcriptional regulation, and there was no evidence that IFN-γ was acting by destabilizing GM-CSF mRNA. These results are generally important in understanding the ways in which cytokine regulation differs between different cell types and also more specifically for determining ways in which a cytokine with a significant role in the development of autoimmune uveoretinitis may be manipulated. PMID:9933455

  3. Differential expression of TYRP1 in adult human retinal pigment epithelium and uveal melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    QIU, CHUN; LI, PENG; BI, JIANJUN; WU, QING; LU, LINNA; QIAN, GUANXIANG; JIA, RENBING; JIA, RONG

    2016-01-01

    Uveal melanoma (UM) is the most frequently occurring primary intraocular malignancy in adults. Tyrosinase (TYR) is a copper-containing enzyme and a type I membrane protein that is involved in the generation of melanin, the main pigment in vertebrates. TYR-related protein 1 (TYRP1) is regarded to have a crucial role in the immunotherapy of melanoma. As biomarkers, the TYR-related proteins, TYRP1 and TYRP2, exhibit specific expression in melanocytes, while also contributing to melanin synthesis within melanosomes. In the present study, the differential expression of TYRP1 was investigated at the mRNA, protein and morphological levels in four human UM cell lines (SP6.5, OM431, OCM1 and OCM290) and the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell line, using polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence staining. It was found that SP6.5 cells expressed the highest level of TYRP1, in comparison to SP6.5 OCM1 and OM431 cells, which produced less TYRP1, and OCM290 cells, which produced almost no TYRP1. No TYRP1 protein expression was identified in the RPE cell line. These findings indicate the potential use of TYRP1 in the development of therapy for UM. PMID:27073483

  4. Adaptive Optics-Assisted Identification of Preferential Erythrocyte Aggregate Pathways in the Human Retinal Microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    Arichika, Shigeta; Uji, Akihito; Ooto, Sotaro; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To characterize human parafoveal blood flow using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO). Methods In 5 normal subjects, erythrocyte aggregate distributions were analyzed on 3 different days. Erythrocyte aggregates were described as a “dark tail” in AO-SLO. The characteristics of the pathways with dark tail flow in the parafovea were measured. Additionally, the tendency for dark tail flow before and after bifurcations was analyzed to study the blood flow in detail. Results Average velocity in parent vessels with dark tail flow was 1.30±0.27 mm/s. Average velocity in daughter vessels with dark tail flow was 1.12±0.25 mm/s, and the average velocity of plasma gaps in daughter vessels without dark tail flow was 0.64±0.11 mm/s. Downstream from the bifurcations, the velocity in vessels with dark tail flow was higher than that in those without it (p<0.001), and the branching angles of vessels with dark tail flow were smaller than those of vessels without it (p<0.001). Conclusions Images from the AO-SLO noninvasively revealed pathways with and without dark tail flow in the human parafovea. Pathways with dark tail flow in the daughter vessels generally had faster flow and smaller bifurcation angles than daughter vessels without dark tail flow. Thus, AO-SLO is an instructive tool for analyzing retinal microcirculatory hemodynamics. PMID:24586959

  5. A novel Bruch's membrane-mimetic electrospun substrate scaffold for human retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Ping; Wu, Kun-Chao; Zhu, Ying; Xiang, Lue; Li, Chong; Chen, Deng-Long; Chen, Feng; Xu, Guotong; Wang, Aijun; Li, Min; Jin, Zi-Bing

    2014-12-01

    Various artificial membranes have been used as scaffolds for retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE) for monolayer reconstruction, however, long-term cell viability and functionality are still largely unknown. This study aimed to construct an ultrathin porous nanofibrous film to mimic Bruch's membrane, and in particular to investigate human RPE cell responses to the resultant substrates. An ultrathin porous nanofibrous membrane was fabricated by using regenerated wild Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin (RWSF), polycaprolactone (PCL) and gelatin (Gt) and displayed a thickness of 3-5 μm, with a high porosity and an average fiber diameter of 166 ± 85 nm. Human RPE cells seeded on the RWSF/PCL/Gt membranes showed a higher cell growth rate (p < 0.05), and a typical expression pattern of RPE signature genes, with reduced expression of inflammatory mediators. With long-term cultivation on the substrates, RPE cells exhibited characteristic polygonal morphology and development of apical microvilli. Immunocytochemisty demonstrated RPE-specific expression profiles in cells after 12-weeks of co-culture on RWSF/PCL/Gt membranes. Interestingly, the cells on the RWSF/PCL/Gt membranes functionally secreted polarized PEDF and phagocytosed labeled porcine POS. Furthermore, RWSF/PCL/Gt membranes transplanted subsclerally exhibited excellent biocompatibility without any evidence of inflammation or rejection. In conclusion, we established a novel RWSF-based substrate for growth of RPE cells with excellent cytocompatibility in vitro and biocompatibility in vivo for potential use as a prosthetic Bruch's membrane for RPE transplantation. PMID:25220295

  6. Differentiation of human ESCs to retinal ganglion cells using a CRISPR engineered reporter cell line

    PubMed Central

    Sluch, Valentin M.; Davis, Chung-ha O.; Ranganathan, Vinod; Kerr, Justin M.; Krick, Kellin; Martin, Russ; Berlinicke, Cynthia A.; Marsh-Armstrong, Nicholas; Diamond, Jeffrey S.; Mao, Hai-Quan; Zack, Donald J.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) injury and cell death from glaucoma and other forms of optic nerve disease is a major cause of irreversible vision loss and blindness. Human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived RGCs could provide a source of cells for the development of novel therapeutic molecules as well as for potential cell-based therapies. In addition, such cells could provide insights into human RGC development, gene regulation, and neuronal biology. Here, we report a simple, adherent cell culture protocol for differentiation of hPSCs to RGCs using a CRISPR-engineered RGC fluorescent reporter stem cell line. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting of the differentiated cultures yields a highly purified population of cells that express a range of RGC-enriched markers and exhibit morphological and physiological properties typical of RGCs. Additionally, we demonstrate that aligned nanofiber matrices can be used to guide the axonal outgrowth of hPSC-derived RGCs for in vitro optic nerve-like modeling. Lastly, using this protocol we identified forskolin as a potent promoter of RGC differentiation. PMID:26563826

  7. Small-molecule-directed, efficient generation of retinal pigment epithelium from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Maruotti, Julien; Sripathi, Srinivas R; Bharti, Kapil; Fuller, John; Wahlin, Karl J; Ranganathan, Vinod; Sluch, Valentin M; Berlinicke, Cynthia A; Davis, Janine; Kim, Catherine; Zhao, Lijun; Wan, Jun; Qian, Jiang; Corneo, Barbara; Temple, Sally; Dubey, Ramin; Olenyuk, Bogdan Z; Bhutto, Imran; Lutty, Gerard A; Zack, Donald J

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with dysfunction and death of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Cell-based approaches using RPE-like cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are being developed for AMD treatment. However, most efficient RPE differentiation protocols rely on complex, stepwise treatments and addition of growth factors, whereas small-molecule-only approaches developed to date display reduced yields. To identify new compounds that promote RPE differentiation, we developed and performed a high-throughput quantitative PCR screen complemented by a novel orthogonal human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-based RPE reporter assay. Chetomin, an inhibitor of hypoxia-inducible factors, was found to strongly increase RPE differentiation; combination with nicotinamide resulted in conversion of over one-half of the differentiating cells into RPE. Single passage of the whole culture yielded a highly pure hPSC-RPE cell population that displayed many of the morphological, molecular, and functional characteristics of native RPE. PMID:26269569

  8. Photobiomodulation with 670 nm light increased phagocytosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Fuma, Shinichiro; Murase, Hiromi; Kuse, Yoshiki; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Photobiomodulation is the treatment with light in the far-red to near-infrared region of the spectrum and has been reported to have beneficial effects in various animal models of disease, including an age-related macular degeneration (AMD) mouse model. Previous reports have suggested that phagocytosis is reduced by age-related increased oxidative stress in AMD. Therefore, we investigated whether photobiomodulation improves phagocytosis caused by oxidative stress in the human retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cell line. Methods ARPE-19 cells and human primary retinal pigment epithelium (hRPE) cells were incubated and irradiated with near-infrared light (670 nm LED light, 2,500 lx, twice a day, 250 s/per time) for 4 d. Next, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and photoreceptor outer segments (POS) labeled using a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye were added to the cell culture, and phagocytosis was evaluated by measuring the fluorescence intensity. Furthermore, cell death was observed by double staining with Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide after photobiomodulation. CM-H2DCFDA, JC-1 dye, and CCK-8 were added to the cell culture to investigate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell viability, respectively. We also investigated the expression of phagocytosis-related proteins, such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Mer tyrosine kinase (MerTK). Results Oxidative stress inhibited phagocytosis, and photobiomodulation increased the oxidative stress-induced hypoactivity of phagocytosis in ARPE-19 cells and hRPE cells. Furthermore, H2O2 and photobiomodulation did not affect cell death in this experimental condition. Photobiomodulation reduced ROS production but did not affect cell viability or mitochondrial membrane potential. The expression of phosphorylated MerTK increased, but phosphorylated FAK was not affected by photobiomodulation. Conclusions These findings indicate that near-infrared light photobiomodulation (670 nm) may

  9. Human Milk Glycoproteins Protect Infants Against Human Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Breastfeeding protects the neonate against pathogen infection. Major mechanisms of protection include human milk glycoconjugates functioning as soluble receptor mimetics that inhibit pathogen binding to the mucosal cell surface, prebiotic stimulation of gut colonization by favorable microbiota, immunomodulation, and as a substrate for bacterial fermentation products in the gut. Human milk proteins are predominantly glycosylated, and some biological functions of these human milk glycoproteins (HMGPs) have been reported. HMGPs range in size from 14 kDa to 2,000 kDa and include mucins, secretory immunoglobulin A, bile salt-stimulated lipase, lactoferrin, butyrophilin, lactadherin, leptin, and adiponectin. This review summarizes known biological roles of HMGPs that may contribute to the ability of human milk to protect neonates from disease. PMID:23697737

  10. Protection of Human Subjects: Proposed Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Register, 1974

    1974-01-01

    In the Federal Register of May 30, 1974, regulations were published as Part 46 of Title 45 of the Code of Federal Regulations providing generally for the protection of human subjects involved in research, development, or related activities supported by Department of Health, Education, and Welfare grants or contracts. This notice of proposed…

  11. Human cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein has secondary thermal 9-cis-retinal isomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Bolze, Christin S; Helbling, Rachel E; Owen, Robin L; Pearson, Arwen R; Pompidor, Guillaume; Dworkowski, Florian; Fuchs, Martin R; Furrer, Julien; Golczak, Marcin; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Cascella, Michele; Stocker, Achim

    2014-01-01

    Cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein (CRALBP) chaperones 11-cis-retinal to convert opsin receptor molecules into photosensitive retinoid pigments of the eye. We report a thermal secondary isomerase activity of CRALBP when bound to 9-cis-retinal. UV/vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopy were used to characterize the product as 9,13-dicis-retinal. The X-ray structure of the CRALBP mutant R234W:9-cis-retinal complex at 1.9 Å resolution revealed a niche in the binding pocket for 9-cis-aldehyde different from that reported for 11-cis-retinal. Combined computational, kinetic, and structural data lead us to propose an isomerization mechanism catalyzed by a network of buried waters. Our findings highlight a specific role of water molecules in both CRALBP-assisted specificity toward 9-cis-retinal and its thermal isomerase activity yielding 9,13-dicis-retinal. Kinetic data from two point mutants of CRALBP support an essential role of Glu202 as the initial proton donor in this isomerization reaction. PMID:24328211

  12. Human subjects research handbook: Protecting human research subjects. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-30

    This handbook serves as a guide to understanding and implementing the Federal regulations and US DOE Orders established to protect human research subjects. Material in this handbook is directed towards new and continuing institutional review board (IRB) members, researchers, institutional administrators, DOE officials, and others who may be involved or interested in human subjects research. It offers comprehensive overview of the various requirements, procedures, and issues relating to human subject research today.

  13. Development of Lead Hammerhead Ribozyme Candidates against Human Rod Opsin mRNA for Retinal Degeneration Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Abdelmaksoud, Heba E.; Yau, Edwin H.; Zuker, Michael; Sullivan, Jack M.

    2011-01-01

    To identify lead candidate allele-independent hammerhead ribozymes (hhRz) for the treatment of autosomal dominant mutations in the human rod opsin (RHO) gene, we tested a series of hhRzs for potential to significantly knockdown human RHO gene expression in a human cell expression system. Multiple computational criteria were used to select target mRNA regions likely to be single stranded and accessible to hhRz annealing and cleavage. Target regions are tested for accessibility in a human cell culture expression system where the hhRz RNA and target mRNA and protein are coexpressed. The hhRz RNA is embedded in an adenoviral VAI RNA chimeric RNA of established structure and properties which are critical to the experimental paradigm. The chimeric hhRz-VAI RNA is abundantly transcribed so that the hhRzs are expected to be in great excess over substrate mRNA. HhRz-VAI traffics predominantly to the cytoplasm to colocalize with the RHO mRNA target. Colocalization is essential for second-order annealing reactions. The VAI chimera protects the hhRz RNA from degradation and provides for a long half life. With cell lines chosen for high transfection efficiency and a molar excess of hhRz plasmid over target plasmid, the conditions of this experimental paradigm are specifically designed to evaluate for regions of accessibility of the target mRNA in cellulo. Western analysis was used to measure the impact of hhRz expression on RHO protein expression. Three lead candidate hhRz designs were identified that significantly knockdown target protein expression relative to control (p < 0.05). Successful lead candidates (hhRz CUC↓ 266, hhRz CUC↓ 1411, hhRz AUA↓ 1414) targeted regions of human RHO mRNA that were predicted to be accessible by a bioinformatics approach, whereas regions predicted to be inaccessible supported no knockdown. The maximum opsin protein level knockdown is approximately 30% over a 48 hr paradigm of testing. These results validate a rigorous computational

  14. Are pharmaceutical patents protected by human rights?

    PubMed

    Millum, J

    2008-11-01

    The International Bill of Rights enshrines a right to health, which includes a right to access essential medicines. This right frequently appears to conflict with the intellectual property regime that governs pharmaceutical patents. However, there is also a human right that protects creative works, including scientific productions. Does this right support intellectual property protections, even when they may negatively affect health? This article examines the recent attempt by the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights to resolve this issue and argues that it fails. This is problematic because it means defenders of the present patent regime can continue using human rights documents to support their position. I offer a new framework for resolving the problem by examining the values that underlie human rights. PMID:18974405

  15. Are Pharmaceutical Patents Protected By Human Rights?

    PubMed Central

    Millum, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The International Bill of Rights enshrines a right to health, which includes a right to access essential medicines. This right frequently appears to conflict with the intellectual property regime that governs pharmaceutical patents. However, there is also a human right that protects creative works, including scientific productions. Does this right support intellectual property protections, even when they may negatively affect health? This article examines the recent attempt by the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights to resolve this issue and argues that it fails. This is problematic because it means defenders of the present patent regime can continue using human rights documents to support their position. I offer a new framework for resolving the problem by examining the values that underlie human rights. PMID:18974405

  16. Baicalein Protects Against Retinal Ischemia by Antioxidation, Antiapoptosis, Downregulation of HIF-1α, VEGF, and MMP-9 and Upregulation of HO-1

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Min-Jay; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Ho, Li-Kang; Pan, Wynn H.T.; Zhang, Xiu-Mei; Liu, Chi-Ming; Tsai, Shen-Kou; Kong, Chi-Woon; Lee, Shou-Dong; Chen, Mi-Mi; Chao, Fang-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Purpose Retinal ischemia-associated ocular disorders are vision threatening. This study examined whether the flavonoid baicalein is able to protect against retinal ischemia/reperfusion. Methods Using rats, the intraocular pressure was raised to 120 mmHg for 60 min to induce retinal ischemia. In vitro, an ischemic-like insult, namely oxidative stress, was established by incubating dissociated retinal cells with 100 μM ascorbate and 5 μM FeSO4 (iron) for 1 h. The rats or the dissociated cells had been pretreated with baicalein (in vivo: 0.05 or 0.5 nmol; in vitro: 100 μM), vehicle (1% ethanol), or trolox (in vivo: 5 nmol; in vitro: 100 μM or 1 mM). The effects of these treatments on the retina or the retinal cells were evaluated by electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) staining, Western blotting, or in vitro dichlorofluorescein assay. In addition, real-time-polymerase chain reaction was used to assess the retinal expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), vascular endothelium growth factor (VEGF), and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Results The retinal changes after ischemia included a decrease in the electroretinogram b-wave amplitude, a loss of choline acetyltransferase immunolabeling amacrine cell bodies/neuronal processes, an increase in vimentin immunoreactivity, which is a marker for Müller cells, an increase in apoptotic cells in the retinal ganglion cell layer linked to a decrease in the Bcl-2 protein, and changes in the mRNA levels of HIF-1α, VEGF, MMP-9, and HO-1. Of clinical importance, the ischemic detrimental effects were concentration dependently and/or significantly (0.05 nmol and/or 0.5 nmol) altered when baicalein was applied 15 min before retinal ischemia. Most of all, 0.5 nmol baicalein significantly reduced the upregulation of MMP-9; in contrast, 5 nmol trolox only had a weak

  17. Cell-Deposited Matrix Improves Retinal Pigment Epithelium Survival on Aged Submacular Human Bruch's Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Sugino, Ilene K.; Gullapalli, Vamsi K.; Sun, Qian; Wang, Jianqiu; Nunes, Celia F.; Cheewatrakoolpong, Noounanong; Johnson, Adam C.; Degner, Benjamin C.; Hua, Jianyuan; Liu, Tong; Chen, Wei; Li, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To determine whether resurfacing submacular human Bruch's membrane with a cell-deposited extracellular matrix (ECM) improves retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) survival. Methods. Bovine corneal endothelial (BCE) cells were seeded onto the inner collagenous layer of submacular Bruch's membrane explants of human donor eyes to allow ECM deposition. Control explants from fellow eyes were cultured in medium only. The deposited ECM was exposed by removing BCE. Fetal RPE cells were then cultured on these explants for 1, 14, or 21 days. The explants were analyzed quantitatively by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Surviving RPE cells from explants cultured for 21 days were harvested to compare bestrophin and RPE65 mRNA expression. Mass spectroscopy was performed on BCE-ECM to examine the protein composition. Results. The BCE-treated explants showed significantly higher RPE nuclear density than did the control explants at all time points. RPE expressed more differentiated features on BCE-treated explants than on untreated explants, but expressed very little mRNA for bestrophin or RPE65. The untreated young (<50 years) and African American submacular Bruch's membrane explants supported significantly higher RPE nuclear densities (NDs) than did the Caucasian explants. These differences were reduced or nonexistent in the BCE-ECM-treated explants. Proteins identified in the BCE-ECM included ECM proteins, ECM-associated proteins, cell membrane proteins, and intracellular proteins. Conclusions. Increased RPE survival can be achieved on aged submacular human Bruch's membrane by resurfacing the latter with a cell-deposited ECM. Caucasian eyes seem to benefit the most, as cell survival is the worst on submacular Bruch's membrane in these eyes. PMID:21398292

  18. Changes in spectral properties and composition of lipofuscin fluorophores from human-retinal-pigment epithelium with age and pathology.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Tatiana B; Yakovleva, Marina A; Arbukhanova, Patimat M; Borzenok, Sergey A; Kononikhin, Alexey S; Popov, Igor A; Nikolaev, Evgeny N; Ostrovsky, Mikhail A

    2015-02-01

    Fundus autofluorescence mostly originates from bisretinoid fluorophores in lipofuscin granules, which accumulate in retinal-pigment-epithelium cells with age. The dynamics of accumulation, photo-oxidation, and photodegradation of bisretinoids during aging or in the presence of pathology have been insufficiently investigated. Changes in spectral properties and composition of human lipofuscin-granule fluorophores with age and pathology have now been investigated by a high-performance liquid chromatography method using spectrophotometric and fluorescent detectors connected in series. It was found that: (i) N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine (A2E) fluorescence intensity is not predominant in the chloroform extract of human-cadaver-eye retinal pigment epithelium studied; bisretinoid photo-oxidation and photodegradation products have much higher fluorescent properties; (ii) the relative emission maximum in the fluorescence spectrum of suspended retinal-pigment-epithelium cells obtained from an individual human-cadaver eye without pathology is irrespective of donor age and falls within the range 575 ± 15 nm; in two cadaver eyes with signs of age-related macular degeneration, emission maxima were shifted by 23-36 nm towards the shortwave region; and (iii) the ratio of bisretinoid photo-oxidation and photodegradation products to unoxidized bisretinoids in the chloroform extract of cadaver-eye retinal pigment epithelium increases with donor age, from 0.69 ± 0.03 to 1.32 ± 0.04. The differences in fluorescence properties between chloroform extracts obtained from cadaver eyes with and without signs of age-related macular degeneration could be used to increase the potential of fundus autofluorescence imaging as a noninvasive diagnostic method. PMID:25471291

  19. Human cadaver retina model for retinal heating during corneal surgery with a femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Fan, Zhongwei; Yun, Jin; Zhao, Tianzhuo; Yan, Ying; Kurtz, Ron M.; Juhasz, Tibor

    2014-02-01

    Femtosecond lasers are widely used in everyday clinical procedures to perform minimally invasive corneal refractive surgery. The intralase femtosecond laser (AMO Corp. Santa Ana, CA) is a common example of such a laser. In the present study a numerical simulation was developed to quantify the temperature rise in the retina during femtosecond intracorneal surgery. Also, ex-vivo retinal heating due to laser irradiation was measured with an infrared thermal camera (Fluke Corp. Everett, WA) as a validation of the simulation. A computer simulation was developed using Comsol Multiphysics to calculate the temperature rise in the cadaver retina during femtosecond laser corneal surgery. The simulation showed a temperature rise of less than 0.3 degrees for realistic pulse energies for the various repetition rates. Human cadaver retinas were irradiated with a 150 kHz Intralase femtosecond laser and the temperature rise was measured withan infrared thermal camera. Thermal camera measurements are in agreement with the simulation. During routine femtosecond laser corneal surgery with normal clinical parameters, the temperature rise is well beneath the threshold for retina damage. The simulation predictions are in agreement with thermal measurements providing a level of experimental validation.

  20. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of bacterial magnetosomes against human retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lei; Lv, Xiujuan; Zhang, Tongwei; Jia, Peina; Yan, Ruiying; Li, Shuli; Zou, Ruitao; Xue, Yuhua; Dai, Liming

    2016-01-01

    A variety of nanomaterials have been developed for ocular diseases. The ability of these nanomaterials to pass through the blood-ocular barrier and their biocompatibility are essential characteristics that must be considered. Bacterial magnetosomes (BMs) are a type of biogenic magnetic nanomaterials synthesized by magnetotactic bacteria. Due to their unique biomolecular membrane shell and narrow size distribution of approximately 30 nm, BMs can pass through the blood-brain barrier. The similarity of the blood-ocular barrier to the blood-brain barrier suggests that BMs have great potential as treatments for ocular diseases. In this work, BMs were isolated from magnetotactic bacteria and evaluated in various cytotoxicity and genotoxicity studies in human retinal pigment epithelium (ARPE-19) cells. The BMs entered ARPE-19 cells by endocytosis after a 6-h incubation and displayed much lower cytotoxicity than chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). MNPs exhibited significantly higher genotoxicity than BMs and promoted the expression of Bax (the programmed cell death acceleration protein) and the induction of greater cell necrosis. In BM-treated cells, apoptosis tended to be suppressed via increased expression of the Bcl-2 protein. In conclusion, BMs display excellent biocompatibility and potential for use in the treatment of ocular diseases. PMID:27246808

  1. Defining the proteome of human iris, ciliary body, retinal pigment epithelium, and choroid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pingbo; Kirby, David; Dufresne, Craig; Chen, Yan; Turner, Randi; Ferri, Sara; Edward, Deepak P; Van Eyk, Jennifer E; Semba, Richard D

    2016-04-01

    The iris is a fine structure that controls the amount of light that enters the eye. The ciliary body controls the shape of the lens and produces aqueous humor. The retinal pigment epithelium and choroid (RPE/choroid) are essential in supporting the retina and absorbing light energy that enters the eye. Proteins were extracted from iris, ciliary body, and RPE/choroid tissues of eyes from five individuals and fractionated using SDS-PAGE. After in-gel digestion, peptides were analyzed using LC-MS/MS on an Orbitrap Elite mass spectrometer. In iris, ciliary body, and RPE/choroid, we identified 2959, 2867, and 2755 nonredundant proteins with peptide and protein false-positive rates of <0.1% and <1%, respectively. Forty-three unambiguous protein isoforms were identified in iris, ciliary body, and RPE/choroid. Four "missing proteins" were identified in ciliary body based on ≥2 proteotypic peptides. The mass spectrometric proteome database of the human iris, ciliary body, and RPE/choroid may serve as a valuable resource for future investigations of the eye in health and disease. The MS proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifiers PXD001424 and PXD002194. PMID:26834087

  2. Optical coherence tomography noise modeling and fundamental bounds on human retinal layer segmentation accuracy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DuBose, Theodore B.; Milanfar, Peyman; Izatt, Joseph A.; Farsiu, Sina

    2016-03-01

    The human retina is composed of several layers, visible by in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. To enhance diagnostics of retinal diseases, several algorithms have been developed to automatically segment one or more of the boundaries of these layers. OCT images are corrupted by noise, which is frequently the result of the detector noise and speckle, a type of coherent noise resulting from the presence of several scatterers in each voxel. However, it is unknown what the empirical distribution of noise in each layer of the retina is, and how the magnitude and distribution of the noise affects the lower bounds of segmentation accuracy. Five healthy volunteers were imaged using a spectral domain OCT probe from Bioptigen, Inc, centered at 850nm with 4.6µm full width at half maximum axial resolution. Each volume was segmented by expert manual graders into nine layers. The histograms of intensities in each layer were then fit to seven possible noise distributions from the literature on speckle and image processing. Using these empirical noise distributions and empirical estimates of the intensity of each layer, the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB), a measure of the variance of an estimator, was calculated for each boundary layer. Additionally, the optimum bias of a segmentation algorithm was calculated, and a corresponding biased CRLB was calculated, which represents the improved performance an algorithm can achieve by using prior knowledge, such as the smoothness and continuity of layer boundaries. Our general mathematical model can be easily adapted for virtually any OCT modality.

  3. Low Power Laser Irradiation Stimulates the Proliferation of Adult Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qing; Uygun, Basak; Banerjee, Ipsita; Nahmias, Yaakov; Zhang, Quan; Berthiaume, François; Latina, Mark; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of low power laser irradiation on the proliferation of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Adult human RPE cells were artificially pigmented by preincubation with sepia melanin, and exposed to a single sublethal laser pulse (590 nm, 1 µs, <200 mJ/cm2). DNA synthesis, cell number, and growth factor activity in irradiated RPE cells were subsequently monitored. The effect of sublethal laser irradiation on the “wound” healing response of an RPE monolayer in an in vitro scratch assay was also investigated. Single pulsed laser irradiation increased DNA synthesis in pigmented RPE cells measured 6 h post-treatment. In the scratch assay, laser irradiation increased the rates of cell proliferation and wound closure. Conditioned medium, collected 48 h following laser treatment, increased cell proliferation of unirradiated cells. Irradiation increased RPE cell secretion of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-B chain, and increased mRNA levels of several growth factors and their receptors, including PDGF, transforming growth factor-β1, basic fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, insulin-like growth factor, as well as heat shock proteins. This demonstrates, for the first time, that low power single pulsed laser irradiation stimulates the proliferation of RPE cells, and upregulates growth factors that are mitogenic for RPE cells. PMID:26740823

  4. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of bacterial magnetosomes against human retinal pigment epithelium cells

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Lei; Lv, Xiujuan; Zhang, Tongwei; Jia, Peina; Yan, Ruiying; Li, Shuli; Zou, Ruitao; Xue, Yuhua; Dai, Liming

    2016-01-01

    A variety of nanomaterials have been developed for ocular diseases. The ability of these nanomaterials to pass through the blood-ocular barrier and their biocompatibility are essential characteristics that must be considered. Bacterial magnetosomes (BMs) are a type of biogenic magnetic nanomaterials synthesized by magnetotactic bacteria. Due to their unique biomolecular membrane shell and narrow size distribution of approximately 30 nm, BMs can pass through the blood-brain barrier. The similarity of the blood-ocular barrier to the blood-brain barrier suggests that BMs have great potential as treatments for ocular diseases. In this work, BMs were isolated from magnetotactic bacteria and evaluated in various cytotoxicity and genotoxicity studies in human retinal pigment epithelium (ARPE-19) cells. The BMs entered ARPE-19 cells by endocytosis after a 6-h incubation and displayed much lower cytotoxicity than chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). MNPs exhibited significantly higher genotoxicity than BMs and promoted the expression of Bax (the programmed cell death acceleration protein) and the induction of greater cell necrosis. In BM-treated cells, apoptosis tended to be suppressed via increased expression of the Bcl-2 protein. In conclusion, BMs display excellent biocompatibility and potential for use in the treatment of ocular diseases. PMID:27246808

  5. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of bacterial magnetosomes against human retinal pigment epithelium cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Lei; Lv, Xiujuan; Zhang, Tongwei; Jia, Peina; Yan, Ruiying; Li, Shuli; Zou, Ruitao; Xue, Yuhua; Dai, Liming

    2016-06-01

    A variety of nanomaterials have been developed for ocular diseases. The ability of these nanomaterials to pass through the blood-ocular barrier and their biocompatibility are essential characteristics that must be considered. Bacterial magnetosomes (BMs) are a type of biogenic magnetic nanomaterials synthesized by magnetotactic bacteria. Due to their unique biomolecular membrane shell and narrow size distribution of approximately 30 nm, BMs can pass through the blood-brain barrier. The similarity of the blood-ocular barrier to the blood-brain barrier suggests that BMs have great potential as treatments for ocular diseases. In this work, BMs were isolated from magnetotactic bacteria and evaluated in various cytotoxicity and genotoxicity studies in human retinal pigment epithelium (ARPE-19) cells. The BMs entered ARPE-19 cells by endocytosis after a 6-h incubation and displayed much lower cytotoxicity than chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). MNPs exhibited significantly higher genotoxicity than BMs and promoted the expression of Bax (the programmed cell death acceleration protein) and the induction of greater cell necrosis. In BM-treated cells, apoptosis tended to be suppressed via increased expression of the Bcl-2 protein. In conclusion, BMs display excellent biocompatibility and potential for use in the treatment of ocular diseases.

  6. Pirfenidone inhibits migration, differentiation, and proliferation of human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Yang, Yangfan; Xu, Jiangang; Lin, Xianchai; Wu, Kaili

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of pirfenidone (PFD) on the migration, differentiation, and proliferation of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and demonstrate whether the drug induces cytotoxicity. Methods Human RPE cells (line D407) were treated with various concentrations of PFD. Cell migration was measured with scratch assay. The protein levels of fibronectin (FN), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), transforming growth factor beta (TGFβS), and Smads were assessed with western blot analyses. Levels of mRNA of TGFβS, FN, and Snail1 were analyzed using reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. Cell apoptosis was detected with flow cytometry using the Annexin V/PI apoptosis kit, and the percentages of cells labeled in different apoptotic stage were compared. A Trypan Blue assay was used to assess cell viability. Results PFD inhibited RPE cell migration. Western blot analyses showed that PFD inhibited the expression of FN, α-SMA, CTGF, TGFβ1, TGFβ2, Smad2/3, and Smad4. Similarly, PFD also downregulated mRNA levels of Snail1, FN, TGFβ1, and TGFβ2. No significant differences in cell apoptosis or viability were observed between the control and PFD-treated groups. Conclusions PFD inhibited RPE cell migration, differentiation, and proliferation in vitro and caused no significant cytotoxicity. PMID:24415895

  7. Concurrent expression of heme oxygenase-1 and p53 in human retinal pigment epithelial cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Yull; Jo, Hong Jae; Kim, Kang Mi; Song, Ju Dong; Chung, Hun Taeg; Park, Young Chul

    2008-01-25

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress-responsive protein that is known to regulate cellular functions such as cell proliferation, inflammation, and apoptosis. Here, we investigated the effects of HO activity on the expression of p53 in the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell line ARPE-19. Cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) induced the expression of both HO-1 and p53 without significant toxicity to the cells. In addition, the blockage of HO activity with the iron chelator DFO or with HO-1 siRNA inhibited the CoPP-induced expression of p53. Similarly, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), an inhibitor of HO, suppressed p53 expression in ARPE-19 cells, although ZnPP increased the level of HO-1 protein while inhibiting HO activity. Also, CoPP-induced p53 expression was not affected by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Based on these results, we conclude that HO activity is involved in the regulation of p53 expression in a ROS-independent mechanism, and also suggest that the expression of p53 in ARPE-19 cells is associated with heme metabolites such as biliverdin/bilirubin, carbon monoxide, and iron produced by the activity of HO.

  8. Osmotic Induction of Angiogenic Growth Factor Expression in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reichenbach, Andreas; Wiedemann, Peter; Kohen, Leon; Bringmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Although systemic hypertension is a risk factor of age-related macular degeneration, antihypertensive medications do not affect the risk of the disease. One condition that induces hypertension is high intake of dietary salt resulting in increased blood osmolarity. In order to prove the assumption that, in addition to hypertension, high osmolarity may aggravate neovascular retinal diseases, we determined the effect of extracellular hyperosmolarity on the expression of angiogenic cytokines in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Hyperosmolarity was induced by the addition of 100 mM NaCl or sucrose to the culture medium. Hypoxia and oxidative stress were induced by the addition of the hypoxia mimetic CoCl2 and H2O2, respectively. Alterations in gene expression were determined with real-time RT-PCR. Secretion of bFGF was evaluated by ELISA. Cell viability was determined by trypan blue exclusion. Nuclear factor of activated T cell 5 (NFAT5) expression was knocked down with siRNA. Hyperosmolarity induced transcriptional activation of bFGF, HB-EGF, and VEGF genes, while the expression of other cytokines such as EGF, PDGF-A, TGF-β1, HGF, and PEDF was not or moderately altered. Hypoxia induced increased expression of the HB-EGF, EGF, PDGF-A, TGF-β1, and VEGF genes, but not of the bFGF gene. Oxidative stress induced gene expression of HB-EGF, but not of bFGF. The hyperosmotic expression of the bFGF gene was dependent on the activation of p38α/β MAPK, JNK, PI3K, and the transcriptional activity of NFAT5. The hyperosmotic expression of the HB-EGF gene was dependent on the activation of p38α/β MAPK, ERK1/2, and JNK. The hyperosmotic expression of bFGF, HB-EGF, and VEGF genes was reduced by inhibitors of TGF-β1 superfamily activin receptor-like kinase receptors and the FGF receptor kinase, respectively. Hyperosmolarity induced secretion of bFGF that was reduced by inhibition of autocrine/paracrine TGF-β1

  9. Role of the Retinal Vascular Endothelial Cell in Ocular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Arpita S.; Appukuttan, Binoy; Wilmarth, Phillip A.; Pan, Yuzhen; Stempel, Andrew J.; Chipps, Timothy J.; Benedetti, Eric E.; Zamora, David O.; Choi, Dongseok; David, Larry L.; Smith, Justine R.

    2012-01-01

    Retinal endothelial cells line the arborizing microvasculature that supplies and drains the neural retina. The anatomical and physiological characteristics of these endothelial cells are consistent with nutritional requirements and protection of a tissue critical to vision. On the one hand, the endothelium must ensure the supply of oxygen and other nutrients to the metabolically active retina, and allow access to circulating cells that maintain the vasculature or survey the retina for the presence of potential pathogens. On the other hand, the endothelium contributes to the blood-retinal barrier that protects the retina by excluding circulating molecular toxins, microorganisms, and pro-inflammatory leukocytes. Features required to fulfill these functions may also predispose to disease processes, such as retinal vascular leakage and neovascularization, and trafficking of microbes and inflammatory cells. Thus, the retinal endothelial cell is a key participant in retinal ischemic vasculopathies that include diabetic retinopathy and retinopathy of prematurity, and retinal inflammation or infection, as occurs in posterior uveitis. Using gene expression and proteomic profiling, it has been possible to explore the molecular phenotype of the human retinal endothelial cell and contribute to understanding of the pathogenesis of these diseases. In addition to providing support for the involvement of well-characterized endothelial molecules, profiling has the power to identify new players in retinal pathologies. Findings may have implications for the design of new biological therapies. Additional progress in this field is anticipated as other technologies, including epigenetic profiling methods, whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing, and metabolomics, are used to study the human retinal endothelial cell. PMID:22982179

  10. Regulation of tyrosinase expression and activity in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Abul-Hassan, K; Walmsley, R; Tombran-Tink, J; Boulton, M

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the regulation of tyrosinase gene expression and activity in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. The tyrosinase promoter (Ty.prom) region (400 bp) was PCR amplified and cloned into a modified mammalian expression vector (pcDNA3.1) upstream of a firefly luciferase (Luc) cDNA and was designated 'pcDNA3.1-Ty.prom.Luc'. The plasmid was co-transfected into RPE cells with a second mammalian expression plasmid (pRL-TK) containing a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter region upstream of Renilla Luc in a protocol designated the 'dual luciferase assay' (DLA). After co-transfection, cells were treated with a range of potential melanogenic agents; basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), methyl methane sulphonate, alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone, verapamil, phorbol myristate acetate, cholera toxin (CT), pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF), and L-tyrosine. The expression of tyrosinase promoter and enzymatic activities were determined 48 hr post-transfection using the DLA and DOPA oxidase assays, respectively. Tyrosinase activity could not be detected in RPE cells with any of the treatments. Tyrosinase promoter activity was significantly up-regulated in RPE cells treated with bFGF, PEDF, verapamil, CT and tyrosine compared with control cells. In conclusion, the tyrosinase gene is not only expressed but can be regulated in response to different chemicals in cultured human RPE cells. However, it appears that RPE cells in culture lack a post-transcriptional and/or translational modification point(s), which are necessary for tyrosinase enzymic activity. PMID:11153695

  11. The small tellurium-based compound SAS suppresses inflammation in human retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Livnat, Tami; Halpert, Gilad; Jawad, Shayma; Nisgav, Yael; Azar-Avivi, Shirley; Liu, Baoying; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Weinberger, Dov; Sredni, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pathological angiogenesis and chronic inflammation greatly contribute to the development of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in chorioretinal diseases involving abnormal contact between retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) and endothelial cells (ECs), associated with Bruch’s membrane rupture. We explored the ability of the small organotellurium compound octa-O-bis-(R,R)-tartarate ditellurane (SAS) to mitigate inflammatory processes in human RPE cells. Methods Cell adhesion assays and analyses of gene and protein expression were used to examine the effect of SAS on ARPE-19 cells or primary human RPE cells that were grown alone or in an RPE-EC co-culture. Results Adhesion assays showed that SAS inhibited αv integrins expressed on RPE cells. Co-cultures of RPE cells with ECs significantly reduced the gene expression of PEDF, as compared to RPE cells cultured alone. Both SAS and the anti-αvβ3 antibody LM609 significantly enhanced the production of PEDF at both mRNA and protein levels in RPE cells. RPE cells co-cultured with EC exhibited increased gene expression of CXCL5, COX1, MMP2, IGF1, and IL8, all of which are involved in both angiogenesis and inflammation. The enhanced expression of these genes was greatly suppressed by SAS, but interestingly, remained unaffected by LM609. Zymography assay showed that SAS reduced the level of MMP-2 activity in RPE cells. We also found that SAS significantly suppressed IL-1β-induced IL-6 expression and secretion from RPE cells by reducing the protein levels of phospho-IkappaBalpha (pIκBα). Conclusions Our results suggest that SAS is a promising anti-inflammatory agent in RPE cells, and may be an effective therapeutic approach for controlling chorioretinal diseases. PMID:27293373

  12. Protective effects of NSP-116, a novel imidazolyl aniline derivative, against light-induced retinal damage in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Hiroshi; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Inoue, Yuki; Uchida, Seiichi; Moroe, Hiroko; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Hara, Hideaki

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the protective effects of NSP-116 [4-(4-acetylpiperazin-1-yl)-2-(1H-imidazol-1-yl) aniline], a novel imidazolyl aniline derivative, against light-induced photoreceptor cell damage. In an in vitro experiment, murine photoreceptor (661W) cells were damaged by exposure to light for 24h. Viability of 661W cells after light exposure was assessed by Hoechst 33342/Propidium iodide nuclear staining and a tetrazolium salt (WST-8) assay. Intracellular radical production in 661W cells was evaluated using the reactive oxygen species (ROS) sensitive probe 5-(and 6)-chloromethyl-2, 7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate acetyl ester (CM-H2DCFDA). NSP-116 significantly suppressed light-induced cell death and ROS production in 661W cells. In an in vivo mouse experiment, retinal damage was induced by exposure to white light at 8000lx for 3h after dark adaptation. Retinal damage was evaluated by recording the electroretinogram and measuring the outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness at 5 days after light exposure. Single oral administration of NSP-116 before light exposure protected retinal function and ONL thinning after light exposure. Furthermore, the effect of NSP-116 on lipid peroxidation was evaluated using thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) assay in porcine retina, and was found to decrease the production of TBARS. Electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements showed that NSP-116 exhibited radical scavenging activities against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, superoxide anion radical (∙O2(-)), and hydroxyl radical (∙OH). These findings suggest that NSP-116 has protective effects against light-induced photoreceptor degeneration in vitro and in vivo as a free radical scavenger, and it may be a novel therapeutic agent for retinal degenerative disorders, such as dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD). PMID:27151507

  13. 75 FR 37813 - Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections AGENCY: Department of Health... hereby given that the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections (SACHRP) will hold its..., Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP), or Julia Gorey, J.D., Executive Director, SACHRP;...

  14. 48 CFR 1552.223-70 - Protection of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Protection of human... 1552.223-70 Protection of human subjects. As prescribed in 1523.303-70, insert the following contract clause when the contract involves human test subjects. Protection of Human Subjects (APR 1984) (a)...

  15. 48 CFR 1552.223-70 - Protection of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Protection of human... 1552.223-70 Protection of human subjects. As prescribed in 1523.303-70, insert the following contract clause when the contract involves human test subjects. Protection of Human Subjects (APR 1984) (a)...

  16. 48 CFR 1552.223-70 - Protection of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Protection of human... 1552.223-70 Protection of human subjects. As prescribed in 1523.303-70, insert the following contract clause when the contract involves human test subjects. Protection of Human Subjects (APR 1984) (a)...

  17. 48 CFR 1552.223-70 - Protection of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Protection of human... 1552.223-70 Protection of human subjects. As prescribed in 1523.303-70, insert the following contract clause when the contract involves human test subjects. Protection of Human Subjects (APR 1984) (a)...

  18. 48 CFR 352.270-4 - Protection of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... following provision: Notice to Offerors of Requirements of 45 CFR Part 46, Protection of Human Subjects... protection of human subjects, 45 CFR Part 46, are available from the Office for Human Research Protections... directly regulated by 45 CFR Part 46. (c) Activities in which the only involvement of human subjects...

  19. 48 CFR 352.270-4 - Protection of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... following provision: Notice to Offerors of Requirements of 45 CFR Part 46, Protection of Human Subjects... protection of human subjects, 45 CFR Part 46, are available from the Office for Human Research Protections... directly regulated by 45 CFR Part 46. (c) Activities in which the only involvement of human subjects...

  20. Human retinal development in an in situ whole eye culture system.

    PubMed

    Engelsberg, Karl; Ghosh, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    Phenotypic characterization of human retinogenesis may be facilitated by use of the tissue culture system paradigm. Traditionally, most culture protocols involve isolation of retinal tissue and/or cells, imposing various degrees of trauma, which in many cases leads to abnormal development. In this paper, we present a novel culture technique using whole embryonic eyes to investigate whether the retina in situ can develop normally in vitro. All procedures were carried out in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki. Human embryos were obtained from elective abortions with the informed consent of the women seeking abortion. A total of 19 eyes were enucleated. The ages of the embryonic retinas were 6-7.5 weeks. Eyecups from 2 eyes were fixed immediately, to be used as controls. The remaining 17 eyes were placed on culture plates and divided into 3 groups kept for 7 (n = 4), 14 (n = 7) and 28 (n = 6) days in vitro (DIV). After fixation, the specimens were processed for hematoxylin and eosin staining, immunohistochemistry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). Antibodies against recoverin (rods and cones), protein kinase C (PKC; rod bipolar cells) and vimentin (Müller cells) were used. TUNEL was used to detect apoptotic cells. In hematoxylin- and eosin-stained sections, the control retinas displayed a neuroblast cell layer (NBL) and an inner marginal zone. Specimens kept 7-14 DIV had a similar appearance, while 28-day specimens consisted of an NBL with almost no marginal zone. Thirteen of the 17 cultured retinas displayed completely normal lamination without rosettes or double folds. Pyknotic cells were found at the inner margin of the retinas, and the proportion of these cells increased with time in vitro. TUNEL staining revealed a few scattered cells in 7-DIV specimens, and the amount of stained cells in the inner part of the retinas progressively increased in 14- and 28-DIV specimens. Vimentin labeling showed cells

  1. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate protects retinal vascular endothelial cells from high glucose stress in vitro via the MAPK/ERK-VEGF pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Zhang, Z K; Liang, S

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a frequent microvascular complication of diabetes, and one of the most common causes of legal blindness in the world. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) produces an anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effect against various human diseases. In this study, we determined the effect of EGCG on a human retinal endothelial cell (HREC) line. The cell viability was determined by a standard MTT assay, while the cell cycle and apoptosis rate were analyzed by flow cytometry. Inflammatory marker expression was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Treatment of HRECs with EGCG (20 and 40 mM) led to a significant decrease in the apoptosis rate (2.35 ± 0.56 and 1.24 ± 0.32%). The culture supernatant of cells treated with high glucose concentrations showed significantly higher levels of TNF-α (598.7 ± 89.7 vs 193.2 ± 38.5 pg/mL; P < 0.001), IL-6 (6.16 ± 0.51 vs 1.61 ± 0.21 ng/mL; P < 0.001), and ICAM-1 (31.6 ± 4.4 vs 14.8 ± 2.9 ng/mL; P < 0.001) compared to the cells in the control group. EGCG decreased the expression level of phosphorylated p38-mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)1/2. Moreover, EGCG was shown to significantly inhibit the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Therefore, EGCG treatment ameliorated the negative effect of high glucose concentrations on the cell viability and apoptotic rate. The protective effects of EGCG under high glucose conditions may be attributed to the regulation of inflammatory cytokines and inhibition of the MAPK/ERK-VEGF pathway. PMID:27323164

  2. Protective Effect of Fucoxanthin Isolated from Laminaria japonica against Visible Light-Induced Retinal Damage Both in Vitro and in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yixiang; Liu, Meng; Zhang, Xichun; Chen, Qingchou; Chen, Haixiu; Sun, Lechang; Liu, Guangming

    2016-01-20

    With increasingly serious eye exposure to light stresses, such as light-emitting diodes, computers, and widescreen mobile phones, efficient natural compounds for preventing visible light-induced retinal damages are becoming compelling needs in the modern society. Fucoxanthin, as the main light absorption system in marine algae, may possess an outstanding bioactivity in vision protection because of its filtration of blue light and excellent antioxidative activity. In this work, both in vitro and in vivo simulated visible light-induced retinal damage models were employed. The in vitro results revealed that fucoxanthin exhibited better bioactivities than lutein, zeaxanthin, and blueberry anthocyanins in inhibiting overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor, resisting senescence, improving phagocytic function, and clearing intracellular reactive oxygen species in retinal pigment epithelium cells. The in vivo experiment also confirmed the superiority of fucoxanthin than lutein in protecting retina against photoinduced damage. This excellent bioactivity may be attributed to its unique structural features, including allenic, epoxide, and acetyl groups. Fucoxanthin is expected to be an important ocular nutrient in the future. PMID:26708928

  3. Mutations in human IFT140 cause non-syndromic retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingchu; Yang, Lizhu; Wang, Feng; Li, Huajin; Wang, Xia; Wang, Weichen; Ge, Zhongqi; Wang, Keqing; Zhao, Li; Li, Hui; Li, Yumei; Sui, Ruifang; Chen, Rui

    2015-10-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are two genetically heterogeneous retinal degenerative disorders. Despite the identification of a number of genes involved in LCA and RP, the genetic etiology remains unknown in many patients. In this study, we aimed to identify novel disease-causing genes of LCA and RP. Retinal capture sequencing was initially performed to screen mutations in known disease-causing genes in different cohorts of LCA and RP patients. For patients with negative results, we performed whole exome sequencing and applied a series of variant filtering strategies. Sanger sequencing was done to validate candidate causative IFT140 variants. Exome sequencing data analysis led to the identification of IFT140 variants in multiple unrelated non-syndromic LCA and RP cases. All the variants are extremely rare and predicted to be damaging. All the variants passed Sanger validation and segregation tests provided that the family members' DNA was available. The results expand the phenotype spectrum of IFT140 mutations to non-syndromic retinal degeneration, thus extending our understanding of intraflagellar transport and primary cilia biology in the retina. This work also improves the molecular diagnosis of retinal degenerative disease. PMID:26216056

  4. Three-dimensional model of angiogenesis: coculture of human retinal cells with bovine aortic endothelial cells in the NASA bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Dutt, Kamla; Sanford, Gary; Harris-Hooker, Sandra; Brako, Lawrence; Kumar, Ravindra; Sroufe, Angela; Melhado, Caroline

    2003-10-01

    Ocular angiogenesis is the leading cause of blindness and is associated with diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. We describe, in this report, our preliminary studies using a horizontally rotating bioreactor (HRB), developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), to explore growth and differentiation-associated events in the early phase of ocular angiogenesis. Human retinal (HRet) cells and bovine endothelial cells (ECs) were cocultured on laminin-coated Cytodex-3 microcarrier beads in an HRB for 1-36 days. Endothelial cells grown alone in the HRB remained cuboidal and were well differentiated. However, when HRet cells were cocultured with ECs, cordlike structures formed as early as 18-36 h and were positive for von Willebrand factor. In addition to the formation of cords and capillary-like structures, ECs showed the beginning of sprouts. The HRB seems not only to promote accelerated capillary formation, but also to enhance differentiation of retinal precursor cells. This leads to the formation of rosette-like structures (which may be aggregates of photoreceptors that were positive for rhodopsin). Upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor was seen in retinal cells grown in the HRB as compared with monolayers and could be one of the factors responsible for accelerated capillary formation. Hence, the HRB promotes three-dimensional assembly and differentiation, possibly through promoting cell-to-cell interaction and/or secretion of growth and differentiation factors. PMID:14633374

  5. Three-Dimensional Neuroepithelial Culture from Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Its Use for Quantitative Conversion to Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yu; Carido, Madalena; Meinhardt, Andrea; Kurth, Thomas; Karl, Mike O.; Ader, Marius; Tanaka, Elly M.

    2013-01-01

    A goal in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research is the faithful differentiation to given cell types such as neural lineages. During embryonic development, a basement membrane surrounds the neural plate that forms a tight, apico-basolaterally polarized epithelium before closing to form a neural tube with a single lumen. Here we show that the three-dimensional epithelial cyst culture of hESCs in Matrigel combined with neural induction results in a quantitative conversion into neuroepithelial cysts containing a single lumen. Cells attain a defined neuroepithelial identity by 5 days. The neuroepithelial cysts naturally generate retinal epithelium, in part due to IGF-1/insulin signaling. We demonstrate the utility of this epithelial culture approach by achieving a quantitative production of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from hESCs within 30 days. Direct transplantation of this RPE into a rat model of retinal degeneration without any selection or expansion of the cells results in the formation of a donor-derived RPE monolayer that rescues photoreceptor cells. The cyst method for neuroepithelial differentiation of pluripotent stem cells is not only of importance for RPE generation but will also be relevant to the production of other neuronal cell types and for reconstituting complex patterning events from three-dimensional neuroepithelia. PMID:23358448

  6. Inhibition of miR-134 Protects Against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis in Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yi; Yu, Yao; Zhou, Qiong; Li, Cheng; Yang, Lu; Pei, Chong-Gang

    2015-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been suggested to play an important role in neurological diseases. Particularly, miR-134 is reportedly involved in regulating neuron survival. However, the association between miR-134 and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival under adverse stimulus has not been extensively investigated. In this study, we aimed to explore the role and underlying mechanism of miR-134 in regulating RGC apoptosis in response to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment. Results showed that the expression of miR-134 dose- and time-dependently increased in RGC after H2O2 treatment. H2O2-induced RGC apoptosis was significantly attenuated by the inhibition of miR-134 expression by antagomiR-134 and was enhanced by miR-134 overexpression. Luciferase reporter assay revealed a direct interaction between miR-134 and the 3'-untranslated region of cyclic AMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), a critical transcription factor for neuronal protection. In H2O2-treated RGCs, the inhibition of miR-134 significantly elevated the expression of CREB and its downstream genes, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Bcl-2. Furthermore, the inhibition of miR-134 also increased the expression of miR-132, a rapid response gene downstream of CREB. In addition, the target gene of miR-132, acetylcholinesterase was expectedly decreased by miR-134 inhibition. However, the overexpression of miR-134 exerted an opposite effect. The knockdown of CREB apparently abolished the protective effect of miR-134 inhibition against H2O2-induced RGC apoptosis. The increased expression of BDNF and Bcl-2 induced by miR-134 inhibition was also abrogated by CREB knockdown. Overall, our results suggested that the downregulation of miR-134 can effectively protect against H2O2-induced RGC apoptosis by negatively modulating CREB expression. PMID:25744098

  7. Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    The author describes the etiology of retinitis pigmentosa, a visual dysfunction which results from progressive loss of the retinal photoreceptors. Sections address signs and symptoms, ancillary findings, heredity, clinical diagnosis, therapy, and research. (SBH)

  8. A five-primary photostimulator suitable for studying intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cell functions in humans.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dingcai; Nicandro, Nathaniel; Barrionuevo, Pablo A

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) can respond to light directly through self-contained photopigment, melanopsin. IpRGCs also receive synaptic inputs from rods and cones. Thus, studying ipRGC functions requires a novel photostimulating method that can account for all of the photoreceptor inputs. Here, we introduced an inexpensive LED-based five-primary photostimulator that can control the excitations of rods, S-, M-, L-cones, and melanopsin-containing ipRGCs in humans at constant background photoreceptor excitation levels, a critical requirement for studying the adaptation behavior of ipRGCs with rod, cone, or melanopsin input. We described the theory and technical aspects (including optics, electronics, software, and calibration) of the five-primary photostimulator. Then we presented two preliminary studies using the photostimulator we have implemented to measure melanopsin-mediated pupil responses and temporal contrast sensitivity function (TCSF). The results showed that the S-cone input to pupil responses was antagonistic to the L-, M- or melanopsin inputs, consistent with an S-OFF and (L + M)-ON response property of primate ipRGCs (Dacey et al., 2005). In addition, the melanopsin-mediated TCSF had a distinctive pattern compared with L + M or S-cone mediated TCSF. Other than controlling individual photoreceptor excitation independently, the five-primary photostimulator has the flexibility in presenting stimuli modulating any combination of photoreceptor excitations, which allows researchers to study the mechanisms by which ipRGCs combine various photoreceptor inputs. PMID:25624466

  9. Expression and Functional Roles of Caspase-5 in Inflammatory Responses of Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Zong-Mei; Elner, Susan G.; Khanna, Hemant; Murga-Zamalloa, Carlos A.; Patil, Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the expression, activation, and functional involvement of caspase-5 in human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells. Methods. Expression and activation of caspase-5 in primary cultured hRPE cells, telomerase-immortalized hTERT-RPE1 cells (hTERT-RPE1), or both, were measured after stimulation with proinflammatory agents IL-1β, TNF-α, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interferon-γ, monocyte coculture, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), or endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducers. Immunomodulating agents dexamethasone (Dex), IL-10, and triamcinolone acetonide (TA) were used to antagonize proinflammatory stimulation. Cell death ELISA and TUNEL staining assays were used to assess apoptosis. Results. Caspase-5 mRNA expression and protein activation were induced by LPS and monocyte-hRPE coculture. Caspase-5 activation appeared as early as 2 hours after challenge by LPS and consistently increased to 24 hours. Meanwhile, caspase-1 expression and protein activation were induced by LPS. Activation of caspase-5 was blocked or reduced by Dex, IL-10, and TA. Activation of caspase-5 and -1 was also enhanced by ATP and ER stress inducers. Expression and activation of caspase-5 were inhibited by a caspase-1–specific inhibitor. Caspase-5 knockdown reduced caspase-1 protein expression and activation and inhibited TNF-α–induced IL-8 and MCP-1. In contrast to caspase-4, the contribution of caspase-5 to stress-induced apoptosis was moderate. Conclusions. Caspase-5 mRNA synthesis, protein expression, and catalytic activation were highly regulated in response to various proinflammatory stimuli, ATP, and ER stress inducers. Mutual activation between caspase-5 and -1 suggests caspase-5 may work predominantly in concert with caspase-1 in modulating hRPE inflammatory responses. PMID:21969293

  10. A five-primary photostimulator suitable for studying intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cell functions in humans

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dingcai; Nicandro, Nathaniel; Barrionuevo, Pablo A.

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) can respond to light directly through self-contained photopigment, melanopsin. IpRGCs also receive synaptic inputs from rods and cones. Thus, studying ipRGC functions requires a novel photostimulating method that can account for all of the photoreceptor inputs. Here, we introduced an inexpensive LED-based five-primary photostimulator that can control the excitations of rods, S-, M-, L-cones, and melanopsin-containing ipRGCs in humans at constant background photoreceptor excitation levels, a critical requirement for studying the adaptation behavior of ipRGCs with rod, cone, or melanopsin input. We described the theory and technical aspects (including optics, electronics, software, and calibration) of the five-primary photostimulator. Then we presented two preliminary studies using the photostimulator we have implemented to measure melanopsin-mediated pupil responses and temporal contrast sensitivity function (TCSF). The results showed that the S-cone input to pupil responses was antagonistic to the L-, M- or melanopsin inputs, consistent with an S-OFF and (L + M)-ON response property of primate ipRGCs (Dacey et al., 2005). In addition, the melanopsin-mediated TCSF had a distinctive pattern compared with L + M or S-cone mediated TCSF. Other than controlling individual photoreceptor excitation independently, the five-primary photostimulator has the flexibility in presenting stimuli modulating any combination of photoreceptor excitations, which allows researchers to study the mechanisms by which ipRGCs combine various photoreceptor inputs. PMID:25624466

  11. Immunization with Pneumolysin Protects Against Both Retinal and Global Damage Caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae Endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Melissa E.; Norcross, Erin W.; Moore, Quincy C.; Fratkin, Jonathan; Thompson, Hilary

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Purpose To determine whether immunization with pneumolysin (PLY) protects against pneumococcal endophthalmitis. Methods New Zealand white rabbits were immunized with a mutant form of PLY that retains only 1% of its cytolytic activity until serum IgG titers were ≥51,200. For a negative control, rabbits were immunized with phosphate-buffered saline (mock). Each vitreous was injected with 102 colony-forming units of a clinical endophthalmitis isolate of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Severity of endophthalmitis was graded by slit lamp examination at 24 and 48 h postinfection (PI). Serial dilutions of vitreous were plated for bacterial colony-forming units quantitation, eyes were extracted for histology, and a whole blood survival assay was performed. Results Immunized rabbits had a significantly lower mean slit lamp examination score at 24 and 48 h PI when compared to mock immunized rabbits (P ≤ 0.002). There was not a significant difference in bacterial load in the vitreous at 24 or 48 h PI. Histological sections showed that retinas of mock immunized rabbits appeared to be destroyed, whereas those of PLY immunized rabbits remained largely intact. Damage spread to the aqueous humor, stroma, and conjunctiva of mock immunized rabbits by 48 h PI. Minimal damage was observed in the vitreous of PLY immunized rabbits and did not spread to other parts of the eye. Whole blood from immunized rabbits inhibited the growth of bacteria better than whole blood from mock immunized rabbits. Conclusion Immunization with PLY helps protect the eye from damage caused by pneumococcal endophthalmitis. PMID:21034245

  12. Surface Modified Biodegradable Electrospun Membranes as a Carrier for Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sorkio, Anni; Porter, Patrick J; Juuti-Uusitalo, Kati; Meenan, Brian J; Skottman, Heli; Burke, George A

    2015-09-01

    Human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial (hESC-RPE) cells are currently undergoing clinical trials to treat retinal degenerative diseases. Transplantation of hESC-RPE cells in conjuction with a supportive biomaterial carrier holds great potential as a future treatment for retinal degeneration. However, there has been no such biodegradable material that could support the growth and maturation of hESC-RPE cells so far. The primary aim of this work was to create a thin porous poly (L-lactide-co-caprolactone) (PLCL) membrane that could promote attachment, proliferation, and maturation of the hESC-RPE cells in serum-free culture conditions. The PLCL membranes were modified by atmospheric pressure plasma processing and coated with collagen IV to enhance cell growth and maturation. Permeability of the membranes was analyzed with an Ussing chamber system. Analysis with scanning electron microscopy, contact angle measurement, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated that plasma surface treatment augments the surface properties of the membrane, which enhances the binding and conformation of the protein. Cell proliferation assays, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, indirect immunofluoresence staining, trans-epithelial electrical resistance measurements, and in vitro phagocytosis assay clearly demonstrated that the plasma treated PLCL membranes supported the adherence, proliferation, maturation and functionality of hESC-RPE cells in serum-free culture conditions. Here, we report for the first time, how PLCL membranes can be modified with atmospheric pressure plasma processing to enable the formation of a functional hESC-RPE monolayer on a porous biodegradable substrate, which have a potential as a tissue-engineered construct for regenerative retinal repair applications. PMID:25946229

  13. Viral-mediated RdCVF and RdCVFL expression protects cone and rod photoreceptors in retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Leah C.; Dalkara, Deniz; Luna, Gabriel; Fisher, Steven K.; Clérin, Emmanuelle; Sahel, Jose-Alain; Léveillard, Thierry; Flannery, John G.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing of nucleoredoxin-like 1 (Nxnl1) results in 2 isoforms of the rod-derived cone viability factor. The truncated form (RdCVF) is a thioredoxin-like protein secreted by rods that promotes cone survival, while the full-length isoform (RdCVFL), which contains a thioredoxin fold, is involved in oxidative signaling and protection against hyperoxia. Here, we evaluated the effects of these different isoforms in 2 murine models of rod-cone dystrophy. We used adeno-associated virus (AAV) to express these isoforms in mice and found that both systemic and intravitreal injection of engineered AAV vectors resulted in RdCVF and RdCVFL expression in the eye. Systemic delivery of AAV92YF vectors in neonates resulted in earlier onset of RdCVF and RdCVFL expression compared with that observed with intraocular injection using the same vectors at P14. We also evaluated the efficacy of intravitreal injection using a recently developed photoreceptor-transducing AAV variant (7m8) at P14. Systemic administration of AAV92YF-RdCVF improved cone function and delayed cone loss, while AAV92YF-RdCVFL increased rhodopsin mRNA and reduced oxidative stress by-products. Intravitreal 7m8-RdCVF slowed the rate of cone cell death and increased the amplitude of the photopic electroretinogram. Together, these results indicate different functions for Nxnl1 isoforms in the retina and suggest that RdCVF gene therapy has potential for treating retinal degenerative disease. PMID:25415434

  14. αvβ5 Integrin/FAK/PGC-1α Pathway Confers Protective Effects on Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Roggia, Murilo F.; Ueta, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate the mechanism of the induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) by photoreceptor outer segments (POS) and its effects on retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Methods PGC-1α upregulation by POS was confirmed in ARPE-19 cells and in RPE ex vivo. To elucidate the mechanism, siRNAs against β5 integrin, CD36, Mer tyrosine kinase (MerTK), and Atg5, blocking antibodies against CD36 and MerTK, and a specific inhibitor for focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were used. We examined the effect of POS-induced PGC-1α upregulation on the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial biogenesis, senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) after H2O2 treatment, and lysosomal activity. Lysosomal activity was evaluated through transcriptional factor EB and its target genes, and the activity of cathepsin D. Lipid metabolism after POS treatment was assessed using Oil Red O and BODIPY C11. RPE phenotypes of PGC-1α-deficient mice were examined. Results POS-induced PGC-1α upregulation was suppressed by siRNA against β5 integrin and a FAK inhibitor. siRNAs and blocking antibodies against CD36 and MerTK enhanced the effect of POS on PGC-1α. The upregulation of PGC-1α increased the levels of mRNA for antioxidant enzymes and stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis, decreased ROS levels, and reduced SA-β-gal staining in H2O2-treated ARPE-19 cells. PGC-1α was critical for lysosomal activity and lipid metabolism after POS treatment. PGC-1α-deficient mice demonstrated an accumulation of type 2 lysosomes in RPE, thickening of Bruch’s membrane, and poor choriocapillaris vasculature. Conclusions The binding, but not the internalization of POS confers protective effects on RPE cells through the αvβ5 integrin/FAK/PGC-1α pathway. PMID:26244551

  15. Features specific to retinal pigment epithelium cells derived from three-dimensional human embryonic stem cell cultures — a new donor for cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhengya; Li, Qiyou; Xu, Haiwei; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2016-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) transplantation is a particularly promising treatment of retinal degenerative diseases affecting RPE-photoreceptor complex. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) provide an abundant donor source for RPE transplantation. Herein, we studied the time-course characteristics of RPE cells derived from three-dimensional human ESCs cultures (3D-RPE). We showed that 3D-RPE cells possessed morphology, ultrastructure, gene expression profile, and functions of authentic RPE. As differentiation proceeded, 3D-RPE cells could mature gradually with decreasing proliferation but increasing functions. Besides, 3D-RPE cells could form polarized monolayer with functional tight junction and gap junction. When grafted into the subretinal space of Royal College of Surgeons rats, 3D-RPE cells were safe and efficient to rescue retinal degeneration. This study showed that 3D-RPE cells were a new donor for cell therapy of retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:27009841

  16. In Vivo Imaging of the Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Mosaic Using Adaptive Optics Enhanced Indocyanine Green Ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Johnny; Liu, Jianfei; Dubra, Alfredo; Fariss, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to establish that retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells take up indocyanine green (ICG) dye following systemic injection and that adaptive optics enhanced indocyanine green ophthalmoscopy (AO-ICG) enables direct visualization of the RPE mosaic in the living human eye. Methods A customized adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) was used to acquire high-resolution retinal fluorescence images of residual ICG dye in human subjects after intravenous injection at the standard clinical dose. Simultaneously, multimodal AOSLO images were also acquired, which included confocal reflectance, nonconfocal split detection, and darkfield. Imaging was performed in 6 eyes of three healthy subjects with no history of ocular or systemic diseases. In addition, histologic studies in mice were carried out. Results The AO-ICG channel successfully resolved individual RPE cells in human subjects at various time points, including 20 minutes and 2 hours after dye administration. Adaptive optics-ICG images of RPE revealed detail which could be correlated with AO dark-field images of the same cells. Interestingly, there was a marked heterogeneity in the fluorescence of individual RPE cells. Confirmatory histologic studies in mice corroborated the specific uptake of ICG by the RPE layer at a late time point after systemic ICG injection. Conclusions Adaptive optics-enhanced imaging of ICG dye provides a novel way to visualize and assess the RPE mosaic in the living human eye alongside images of the overlying photoreceptors and other cells. PMID:27564519

  17. Humans do not have direct access to retinal flow during walking

    PubMed Central

    Souman, Jan L.; Freeman, Tom C.A.; Eikmeier, Verena; Ernst, Marc O.

    2013-01-01

    Perceived visual speed has been reported to be reduced during walking. This reduction has been attributed to a partial subtraction of walking speed from visual speed (Durgin & Gigone, 2007; Durgin, Gigone, & Scott, 2005). We tested whether observers still have access to the retinal flow before subtraction takes place. Observers performed a 2IFC visual speed discrimination task while walking on a treadmill. In one condition, walking speed was identical in the two intervals, while in a second condition walking speed differed between intervals. If observers have access to the retinal flow before subtraction, any changes in walking speed across intervals should not affect their ability to discriminate retinal flow speed. Contrary to this “direct-access hypothesis”, we found that observers were worse at discrimination when walking speed differed between intervals. The results therefore suggest that observers do not have access to retinal flow before subtraction. We also found that the amount of subtraction depended on the visual speed presented, suggesting that the interaction between the processing of visual input and of self-motion is more complex than previously proposed. PMID:20884509

  18. CERKL Knockdown Causes Retinal Degeneration in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Riera, Marina; Burguera, Demian; Garcia-Fernàndez, Jordi; Gonzàlez-Duarte, Roser

    2013-01-01

    The human CERKL gene is responsible for common and severe forms of retinal dystrophies. Despite intense in vitro studies at the molecular and cellular level and in vivo analyses of the retina of murine knockout models, CERKL function remains unknown. In this study, we aimed to approach the developmental and functional features of cerkl in Danio rerio within an Evo-Devo framework. We show that gene expression increases from early developmental stages until the formation of the retina in the optic cup. Unlike the high mRNA-CERKL isoform multiplicity shown in mammals, the moderate transcriptional complexity in fish facilitates phenotypic studies derived from gene silencing. Moreover, of relevance to pathogenicity, teleost CERKL shares the two main human protein isoforms. Morpholino injection has been used to generate a cerkl knockdown zebrafish model. The morphant phenotype results in abnormal eye development with lamination defects, failure to develop photoreceptor outer segments, increased apoptosis of retinal cells and small eyes. Our data support that zebrafish Cerkl does not interfere with proliferation and neural differentiation during early developmental stages but is relevant for survival and protection of the retinal tissue. Overall, we propose that this zebrafish model is a powerful tool to unveil CERKL contribution to human retinal degeneration. PMID:23671706

  19. Defined Medium Conditions for the Induction and Expansion of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Lidgerwood, Grace E; Lim, Shiang Y; Crombie, Duncan E; Ali, Ray; Gill, Katherine P; Hernández, Damián; Kie, Josh; Conquest, Alison; Waugh, Hayley S; Wong, Raymond C B; Liang, Helena H; Hewitt, Alex W; Davidson, Kathryn C; Pébay, Alice

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate that a combination of Noggin, Dickkopf-1, Insulin Growth Factor 1 and basic Fibroblast Growth Factor, promotes the differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. We describe an efficient one-step approach that allows the generation of RPE cells from both human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells within 40-60 days without the need for manual excision, floating aggregates or imbedded cysts. Compared to methods that rely on spontaneous differentiation, our protocol results in faster differentiation into RPE cells. This pro-retinal culture medium promotes the growth of functional RPE cells that exhibit key characteristics of the RPE including pigmentation, polygonal morphology, expression of mature RPE markers, electrophysiological membrane potential and the ability to phagocytose photoreceptor outer segments. This protocol can be adapted for feeder, feeder-free and serum-free conditions. This method thereby provides a rapid and simplified production of RPE cells for downstream applications such as disease modelling and drug screening. PMID:26589197

  20. A simplified technique for in situ excision of cornea and evisceration of retinal tissue from human ocular globe.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Mohit; Ferrari, Stefano; Di Iorio, Enzo; Barbaro, Vanessa; Camposampiero, Davide; Karali, Marianthi; Ponzin, Diego; Salvalaio, Gianni

    2012-01-01

    Enucleation is the process of retrieving the ocular globe from a cadaveric donor leaving the rest of the globe undisturbed. Excision refers to the retrieval of ocular tissues, especially cornea, by cutting it separate from the ocular globe. Evisceration is the process of removing the internal organs referred here as retina. The ocular globe consists of the cornea, the sclera, the vitreous body, the lens, the iris, the retina, the choroid, muscles etc (Suppl. Figure 1). When a patient is suffering from corneal damage, the cornea needs to be removed and a healthy one must be transplanted by keratoplastic surgeries. Genetic disorders or defects in retinal function can compromise vision. Human ocular globes can be used for various surgical procedures such as eye banking, transplantation of human cornea or sclera and research on ocular tissues. However, there is little information available on human corneal and retinal excision, probably due to the limited accessibility to human tissues. Most of the studies describing similar procedures are performed on animal models. Research scientists rely on the availability of properly dissected and well-conserved ocular tissues in order to extend the knowledge on human eye development, homeostasis and function. As we receive high amount of ocular globes out of which approximately 40% (Table 1) of them are used for research purposes, we are able to perform huge amount of experiments on these tissues, defining techniques to excise and preserve them regularly. The cornea is an avascular tissue which enables the transmission of light onto the retina and for this purpose should always maintain a good degree of transparency. Within the cornea, the limbus region, which is a reservoir of the stem cells, helps the reconstruction of epithelial cells and restricts the overgrowth of the conjunctiva maintaining corneal transparency and clarity. The size and thickness of the cornea are critical for clear vision, as changes in either of them

  1. Intravitreal injection of erythropoietin protects against retinal vascular regression at the early stage of diabetic retinopathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Junko; Morikawa, Shunichi; Shimizu, Kazuhiko; Ezaki, Taichi; Yasuda, Yoshiko; Hori, Sadao

    2013-01-01

    A single intravitreal injection of erythropoietin (EPO) (50 ng/eye) or phosphate-buffered saline was administered to 5-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats at the onset of diabetes mellitus (DM) to determine and evaluate the protective effect of EPO on retinal microvessels. DM was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ; 60 mg/kg body weight). Morphological changes in microvessels in flat retinal preparations were evaluated during the subsequent 4 weeks by three-dimensional imaging of all blood vessels stained with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated tomato lectin, following immunofluorescence techniques. No marked differences were observed in the shape or density of retinal vessels and the number of retinal capillary branches of the four groups [control, EPO, DM, and DM/EPO] up to 4 weeks after STZ administration. We also observed unique type IV collagen-positive filamentous structures that lacked both cellular elements and blood circulation (lectin-/type IV+ acellular strands), suggesting regressed vessel remnants. The lectin-/type IV+ acellular strands were detected soon after the onset of DM in the diabetic rats, and the number of these structures increased in the DM group (P < 0.01). A single intravitreal injection of EPO caused a significant reduction in the number of lectin-/type IV+ acellular strands to levels observed in the control group. However, the lectin-/type IV+ acellular strands were observed in the central area of the retina near the optic disc in all four groups. Intravitreal injection of EPO resulted in downregulation of the EPO receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and VEGF receptor at 4 weeks. We conclude that EPO may play a primary role against the progression of diabetic retinopathy by reducing blood vessel degeneration at a very early disease stage. PMID:23178551

  2. Correlation between the radial peripapillary capillaries and the retinal nerve fibre layer in the normal human retina.

    PubMed

    Yu, Paula K; Cringle, Stephen J; Yu, Dao-Yi

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to provide evidence of the importance of radial peripapillary capillaries (RPCs) by quantitative study of the relationship between the RPCs and retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) in normal human donor eyes. The retinal microvasculature in eleven normal human donor eyes was perfused, fixed and labelled after cannulation of the central retinal artery. The retinas were dissected and whole-mounted for confocal microscopy. Six study regions were taken radially from the edge of the optic disc. RPCs from the optic disc edge to a radial distance up to 2.5 mm were imaged and their diameters, inter-capillary distance and volume occupation measured. These were correlated with the study region as well as thickness of the RNFL. It was found that the pooled average diameter of the RPCs in the first 2.5 mm from the optic disk was 8.9 μm. Significant differences in capillary diameter were present in the six regions, with larger diameter RPCs in the superior, inferior and nasal regions, and significantly smaller diameter in the temporal region. RPCs in the arcuate fibre regions extend the furthest from the optic disc, maintained a close inter-capillary distance for a longer distance than other regions, and have the highest RPCs volume occupancy. The RPCs volume was generally correlated with RNFL thickness. In conclusion, a close correlation between RNFL and RPCs presence has been demonstrated which is supportive of their functional reliance/co-dependence. The significantly smaller temporal RPCs may be a result of the greater presence of RPCs in the two bordering arcuate fibre regions and therefore a richer availability of nutrients diffusing from these two regions. PMID:25447563

  3. Ultrathin Polyimide Membrane as Cell Carrier for Subretinal Transplantation of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Ilmarinen, Tanja; Hiidenmaa, Hanna; Kööbi, Peeter; Nymark, Soile; Sorkio, Anni; Wang, Jing-Huan; Stanzel, Boris V.; Thieltges, Fabian; Alajuuma, Päivi; Oksala, Olli; Kataja, Marko; Uusitalo, Hannu; Skottman, Heli

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the suitability of ultrathin and porous polyimide (PI) membrane as a carrier for subretinal transplantation of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) -derived retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in rabbits. The in vivo effects of hESC-RPE cells were analyzed by subretinal suspension injection into Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats. Rat eyes were analyzed with electroretinography (ERG) and histology. After analyzing the surface and permeability properties of PI, subretinal PI membrane transplantations with and without hESC-RPE were performed in rabbits. The rabbits were followed for three months and eyes analyzed with fundus photography, ERG, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and histology. Animals were immunosuppressed with cyclosporine the entire follow-up time. In dystrophic RCS rats, ERG and outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness showed some rescue after hESC-RPE injection. Cells positive for human antigen were found in clusters under the retina 41 days post-injection but not anymore after 105 days. In rabbits, OCT showed good placement of the PI. However, there was loss of pigmentation on the hESC-RPE-PI over time. In the eyes with PI alone, no obvious signs of inflammation or retinal atrophy were observed. In the presence of hESC-RPE, mononuclear cell infiltration and retinal atrophy were observed around the membranes. The porous ultrathin PI membrane was well-tolerated in the subretinal space and is a promising scaffold for RPE transplantation. However, the rejection of the transplanted cells seems to be a major problem and the given immunosuppression was insufficient for reduction of xenograft induced inflammation. PMID:26606532

  4. Lipid Composition of the Human Eye: Are Red Blood Cells a Good Mirror of Retinal and Optic Nerve Fatty Acids?

    PubMed Central

    Acar, Niyazi; Berdeaux, Olivier; Grégoire, Stéphane; Cabaret, Stéphanie; Martine, Lucy; Gain, Philippe; Thuret, Gilles; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine P.; Bron, Alain M.; Bretillon, Lionel

    2012-01-01

    Background The assessment of blood lipids is very frequent in clinical research as it is assumed to reflect the lipid composition of peripheral tissues. Even well accepted such relationships have never been clearly established. This is particularly true in ophthalmology where the use of blood lipids has become very common following recent data linking lipid intake to ocular health and disease. In the present study, we wanted to determine in humans whether a lipidomic approach based on red blood cells could reveal associations between circulating and tissue lipid profiles. To check if the analytical sensitivity may be of importance in such analyses, we have used a double approach for lipidomics. Methodology and Principal Findings Red blood cells, retinas and optic nerves were collected from 9 human donors. The lipidomic analyses on tissues consisted in gas chromatography and liquid chromatography coupled to an electrospray ionization source-mass spectrometer (LC-ESI-MS). Gas chromatography did not reveal any relevant association between circulating and ocular fatty acids except for arachidonic acid whose circulating amounts were positively associated with its levels in the retina and in the optic nerve. In contrast, several significant associations emerged from LC-ESI-MS analyses. Particularly, lipid entities in red blood cells were positively or negatively associated with representative pools of retinal docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), retinal very-long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (VLC-PUFA) or optic nerve plasmalogens. Conclusions and Significance LC-ESI-MS is more appropriate than gas chromatography for lipidomics on red blood cells, and further extrapolation to ocular lipids. The several individual lipid species we have identified are good candidates to represent circulating biomarkers of ocular lipids. However, further investigation is needed before considering them as indexes of disease risk and before using them in clinical studies on optic nerve

  5. 77 FR 37408 - Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, Office of the Secretary, Department of Health and Human Services. ACTION..., notice is hereby given that the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections...

  6. 75 FR 59264 - Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections AGENCY: Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Secretary, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health. ACTION..., notice is hereby given that the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections...

  7. 77 FR 58383 - Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, Office of the Secretary, Department of Health and Human Services. ACTION..., notice is hereby given that the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections...

  8. Tetramethylpyrazine Protects Retinal Capillary Endothelial Cells (TR-iBRB2) against IL-1β-Induced Nitrative/Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xue; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Kai; Tan, Xuhua; Wu, Zhifeng; Sun, Song; Zhou, Fanfan; Zhu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Blood-retinal barrier (BRB) breakdown is one of the primary causes of diabetic retinopathy (DR). The pro-inflammatory factor interleukin-1β (IL-1β) was reported to be involved in the induction of BRB breakdown during the pathogenesis of DR. In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), a major active component of the traditional herb Ligusticum chuanxiong, on IL-1β-induced cell death of the rat retinal capillary endothelial TR-iBRB2 cells. Our results showed that IL-1β-induced cell dysfunction in TR-iBRB2 cells via inducing nitrative/oxidative stress; however, such effect was attenuated with the pre-treatment of TMP. The cellular protective effect of TMP was likely to be mediated through the inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and leukostasis as well as suppression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, mitochondrial dysfunction and MAPKs activation. These findings significantly contribute to a better understanding of the protective effect of TMP in DR and form the basis of the therapeutic development of TMP in treating such disease in the future. PMID:26370989

  9. Gene delivery and expression in human retinal pigment epithelial cells: effects of synthetic carriers, serum, extracellular matrix and viral promoters.

    PubMed

    Urtti, A; Polansky, J; Lui, G M; Szoka, F C

    2000-01-01

    Non-viral gene therapy is a potential treatment to many incurable retinal diseases. To fulfill this promise, plasmid DNA must be delivered to the retinal target cells. We evaluated the efficacy of synthetic DNA complexing compounds in transfecting primary human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in vitro. Fetal human RPE cells were cultured with or without extracellular matrix (ECM), produced using calf corneal endothelial cells. Plasmids encoding nuclear localizing beta galactosidase or luciferase (pRSVLuc, pCLuc4, pSV2Luc) were complexed in water at various +/- charge ratios using cationic lipids (Lipofectin, DOTAP, DOGS), polyethylene imines (25 and 750 kDa), and with degraded 6th generation starburst polyamidoamine dendrimers. Luciferase was quantified using a luminometric assay and beta galactosidase with X-gal staining. Toxicities of transfections were evaluated with the MTT-assay. Using beta galactosidase as the reporter gene naked DNA did not transfect RPE cells at measurable levels whereas 1-5% of the cells expressed histochemically detectable amounts of the gene after transfection with cationic lipid DNA complexes. In RPE cells, Rous sarcoma virus and cytomegalovirus (CMV) were more efficient promoters than SV40 in driving luciferase expression, and CMV was chosen for further experiments. At optimal complex charge ratios, expression levels of luciferase were > 10(9) light units/mg protein after transfection using dendrimers and PEI25, while transfection mediated with the other carriers resulted in luciferase expression levels of 10(7)-10(9) light units/mg protein or less. In general, dendrimers and large molecular weight PEI were less toxic than cationic lipids or PEI25 to RPE cells. Serum and ECM decreased gene expression to the RPE cells with all carriers. Despite low percentage of transfected cells the transgene expression per RPE cell is high, important feature in the retinal tissue with small dimensions, in particular in the case of secreted gene

  10. 34 CFR 75.681 - Protection of human research subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... 1221e-3 and 3474) Cross reference: See 34 CFR part 97—Protection of Human Subjects. ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protection of human research subjects. 75.681 Section... Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Other Requirements for Certain Projects § 75.681 Protection of...