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Sample records for protects retina ganglion

  1. Topography of ganglion cell production in the cat's retina

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, C.; Polley, E.H.

    1985-03-01

    The ganglion cells of the cat's retina form several classes distinguishable in terms of soma size, axon diameter, dendritic morphology, physiological properties, and central connections. Labeling with (/sup 3/H)thymidine shows that the ganglion cells which survive in the adult are produced as several temporally shifted, overlapping waves: medium-sized cells are produced before large cells, whereas the smallest ganglion cells are produced throughout the period of ganglion cell generation. Large cells and medium-sized cells show the same distinctive pattern of production, forming rough spirals around the area centralis. The oldest cells tend to lie superior and nasal to the area centralis, whereas cells in the inferior nasal retina and inferior temporal retina are, in general, progressively younger. Within each retinal quadrant, cells nearer the area centralis tend to be older than cells in the periphery, but there is substantial overlap. The retinal raphe divides the superior temporal quadrant into two zones with different patterns of cell addition. Superior temporal retina near the vertical meridian adds cells only slightly later than superior nasal retina, whereas superior temporal retina near the horizontal meridian adds cells very late, contemporaneously with inferior temporal retina. The broader wave of production of smaller ganglion cells seems to follow this same spiral pattern at its beginning and end. The presence of the area centralis as a nodal point about which ganglion cell production in the retinal quadrants pivots suggests that the area centralis is already an important retinal landmark even at the earliest stages of retinal development.

  2. Ganglion Cell Regeneration Following Whole-Retina Destruction in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Sherpa, Tshering; Fimbel, Shane M.; Mallory, Dianne E.; Maaswinkel, Hans; Spritzer, Scott D.; Sand, Jordan A.; Li, L.; Hyde, David R.; Stenkamp, Deborah L.

    2008-01-01

    The retinas of adult teleost fish can regenerate neurons following injury. The current study provides the first documentation of functional whole retina regeneration in the zebrafish, Danio rerio, following intraocular injection of the cytotoxin, ouabain. Loss and replacement of laminated retinal tissue was monitored by analysis of cell death and cell proliferation, and by analysis of retina-specific gene expression patterns. The spatiotemporal process of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) regeneration was followed through the use of selective markers, and was found to largely recapitulate the spatiotemporal process of embryonic ganglion cell neurogenesis, over a more protracted time frame. However, the re-expression of some ganglion cell markers was not observed. The growth and pathfinding of ganglion cell axons was evaluated by measurement of the optic nerve head (ONH), and the restoration of normal ONH size was found to correspond to the time of recovery of two visually-mediated behaviors. However, some abnormalities were noted, including overproduction of RGCs, and progressive and excessive growth of the ONH at longer recovery times. This model system for whole-retina regeneration has provided an informative view of the regenerative process. PMID:18000816

  3. Evaluation of the percentage of ganglion cells in the ganglion cell layer of the rodent retina

    PubMed Central

    Schlamp, Cassandra L.; Montgomery, Angela D.; Mac Nair, Caitlin E.; Schuart, Claudia; Willmer, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Retinal ganglion cells comprise a percentage of the neurons actually residing in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) of the rodent retina. This estimate is useful to extrapolate ganglion cell loss in models of optic nerve disease, but the values reported in the literature are highly variable depending on the methods used to obtain them. Methods We tested three retrograde labeling methods and two immunostaining methods to calculate ganglion cell number in the mouse retina (C57BL/6). Additionally, a double-stain retrograde staining method was used to label rats (Long-Evans). The number of total neurons was estimated using a nuclear stain and selecting for nuclei that met specific criteria. Cholinergic amacrine cells were identified using transgenic mice expressing Tomato fluorescent protein. Total neurons and total ganglion cell numbers were measured in microscopic fields of 104 µm2 to determine the percentage of neurons comprising ganglion cells in each field. Results Historical estimates of the percentage of ganglion cells in the mouse GCL range from 36.1% to 67.5% depending on the method used. Experimentally, retrograde labeling methods yielded a combined estimate of 50.3% in mice. A retrograde method also yielded a value of 50.21% for rat retinas. Immunolabeling estimates were higher at 64.8%. Immunolabeling may introduce overestimates, however, with non-specific labeling effects, or ectopic expression of antigens in neurons other than ganglion cells. Conclusions Since immunolabeling methods may overestimate ganglion cell numbers, we conclude that 50%, which is consistently derived from retrograde labeling methods, is a reliable estimate of the ganglion cells in the neuronal population of the GCL. PMID:23825918

  4. A Novel Type of Complex Ganglion Cell in Rabbit Retina

    PubMed Central

    Sivyer, Benjamin; Venkataramani, Sowmya; Taylor, W. Rowland; Vaney, David I.

    2012-01-01

    The 15–20 physiological types of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) can be grouped according to whether they fire to increased illumination in the receptive-field center (ON cells), decreased illumination (OFF cells), or both (ON-OFF cells). The diversity of RGCs has been best described in the rabbit retina, which has three types of ON-OFF RGCs with complex receptive-field properties: the ON-OFF direction-selective ganglion cells (DSGCs), the local edge detectors, and the uniformity detectors. Here we describe a novel type of bistratified ON-OFF RGC that has not been described in either physiological or morphological studies of rabbit RGCs. These cells stratify in the ON and OFF sublaminae of the inner plexiform layer, branching at about 30% and 60% depth, between the ON and OFF arbors of the bistratified DSGCs. Similar to the ON-OFF DSGCs, these cells respond with transient firing to both bright and dark spots flashed in the receptive field but, unlike the DSGCs, they show no directional preference for moving stimuli. We have termed these cells “transient ON-OFF” RGCs. Area-response measurements show that both the ON and the OFF spike responses have an antagonistic receptive-field organization, but with different spatial extents. Voltage-clamp recordings reveal transient excitatory inputs at light ON and light OFF; this excitation is strongly suppressed by surround stimulation, which also elicits direct inhibitory inputs to the cells at light ON and light OFF. Thus the receptive-field organization is mediated both within the presynaptic circuitry and by direct feed-forward inhibition. PMID:21800303

  5. Ganglion cell topography of the retina in the bottlenosed dolphin, Tursiops truncatus.

    PubMed

    Mass, A M; Supin AYa

    1995-01-01

    The distribution and size of ganglion cells in the retina of the bottlenosed dolphin are described. Ganglion cells concentrate at two spots of the highest density in the nasal and temporal quadrants, 15 to 16 mm (50 to 55 degrees) from the optic disk. The mean peak cell density in both spots is about 670 cells/mm2. With a posterior nodal distance of 14.5 mm (under water), this corresponds to 43 cells/deg2, which provides a retinal resolution of about 9' in water and 12' in air. Mean cell size was from 26 to 31 microns in various parts of the retina. PMID:7620874

  6. Cell type-specific bipolar cell input to ganglion cells in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Neumann, S; Hüser, L; Ondreka, K; Auler, N; Haverkamp, S

    2016-03-01

    Many distinct ganglion cell types, which are the output elements of the retina, were found to encode for specific features of a visual scene such as contrast, color information or movement. The detailed composition of retinal circuits leading to this tuning of retinal ganglion cells, however, is apart from some prominent examples, largely unknown. Here we aimed to investigate if ganglion cell types in the mouse retina receive selective input from specific bipolar cell types or if they sample their synaptic input non-selectively from all bipolar cell types stratifying within their dendritic tree. To address this question we took an anatomical approach and immunolabeled retinae of two transgenic mouse lines (GFP-O and JAM-B) with markers for ribbon synapses and type 2 bipolar cells. We morphologically identified all green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing ganglion cell types, which co-stratified with type 2 bipolar cells and assessed the total number of bipolar input synapses and the proportion of synapses deriving from type 2 bipolar cells. Only JAM-B ganglion cells received synaptic input preferentially from bipolar cell types other than type 2 bipolar cells whereas the other analyzed ganglion cell types sampled their bipolar input most likely from all bipolar cell terminals within their dendritic arbor. PMID:26751712

  7. Rhythmic Ganglion Cell Activity in Bleached and Blind Adult Mouse Retinas

    PubMed Central

    Menzler, Jacob; Channappa, Lakshmi; Zeck, Guenther

    2014-01-01

    In retinitis pigmentosa – a degenerative disease which often leads to incurable blindness- the loss of photoreceptors deprives the retina from a continuous excitatory input, the so-called dark current. In rodent models of this disease this deprivation leads to oscillatory electrical activity in the remaining circuitry, which is reflected in the rhythmic spiking of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). It remained unclear, however, if the rhythmic RGC activity is attributed to circuit alterations occurring during photoreceptor degeneration or if rhythmic activity is an intrinsic property of healthy retinal circuitry which is masked by the photoreceptor’s dark current. Here we tested these hypotheses by inducing and analysing oscillatory activity in adult healthy (C57/Bl6) and blind mouse retinas (rd10 and rd1). Rhythmic RGC activity in healthy retinas was detected upon partial photoreceptor bleaching using an extracellular high-density multi-transistor-array. The mean fundamental spiking frequency in bleached retinas was 4.3 Hz; close to the RGC rhythm detected in blind rd10 mouse retinas (6.5 Hz). Crosscorrelation analysis of neighbouring wild-type and rd10 RGCs (separation distance <200 µm) reveals synchrony among homologous RGC types and a constant phase shift (∼70 msec) among heterologous cell types (ON versus OFF). The rhythmic RGC spiking in these retinas is driven by a network of presynaptic neurons. The inhibition of glutamatergic ganglion cell input or the inhibition of gap junctional coupling abolished the rhythmic pattern. In rd10 and rd1 retinas the presynaptic network leads to local field potentials, whereas in bleached retinas additional pharmacological disinhibition is required to achieve detectable field potentials. Our results demonstrate that photoreceptor bleaching unmasks oscillatory activity in healthy retinas which shares many features with the functional phenotype detected in rd10 retinas. The quantitative physiological differences advance the

  8. Expression of hermes gene is restricted to the ganglion cells in the retina.

    PubMed

    Piri, Natik; Kwong, Jacky M K; Song, Min; Caprioli, Joseph

    2006-09-11

    The RNA binding protein with multiple splicing 2, or hermes, is a member of the RRM (RNA recognition motif) family of RNA-binding proteins. In this study, we show that the hermes gene is expressed in the rat retina, and its expression is restricted to the ganglion cell layer. Double in situ hybridization with riboprobes corresponding to the hermes gene and Thy-1, the RGC marker in the retina, showed that the majority of the Thy-1 positive cells in the ganglion cell layer were also hermes positive. This was also shown by co-localization of the hermes in situ hybridization signals with the retrogradely labeled RGCs. Our observations suggest that hermes is expressed in the majority, if not all, of RGCs and is not restricted to only certain RGC types. Hermes in situ hybridization signals were not detected in the retinal sections of optic nerve transected animals, which are characterized by rapid and specific RGC degeneration. The dramatic reduction of the hermes mRNA level in axotomized retinas was also observed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The specific expression of hermes in retinal ganglion cells qualifies this gene as a potential RGC marker in the retina. Outside the retina, hermes is expressed in the heart, liver, and kidney, and to a lesser degree in the cerebellum, cortex, lung, and small intestine. PMID:16870336

  9. Neuroprotection by α2-Adrenergic Receptor Stimulation after Excitotoxic Retinal Injury: A Study of the Total Population of Retinal Ganglion Cells and Their Distribution in the Chicken Retina.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Romero, Caridad; Harun-Or-Rashid, Mohammad; Jiménez-López, Manuel; Vidal-Sanz, Manuel; Agudo-Barriuso, Marta; Hallböök, Finn

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the effect of α2-adrenergic receptor stimulation on the total excitotoxically injured chicken retinal ganglion cell population. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) was intraocularly injected at embryonic day 18 and Brn3a positive retinal ganglion cells (Brn3a+ RGCs) were counted in flat-mounted retinas using automated routines. The number and distribution of the Brn3a+ RGCs were analyzed in series of normal retinas from embryonic day 8 to post-hatch day 11 retinas and in retinas 7 or 14 days post NMDA lesion. The total number of Brn3a+ RGCs in the post-hatch retina was approximately 1.9x106 with a density of approximately 9.2x103 cells/mm2. The isodensity maps of normal retina showed that the density decreased with age as the retinal size increased. In contrast to previous studies, we did not find any specific region with increased RGC density, rather the Brn3a+ RGCs were homogeneously distributed over the central retina with decreasing density in the periphery and in the region of the pecten oculli. Injection of 5-10 μg NMDA caused 30-50% loss of Brn3a+ cells and the loss was more severe in the dorsal than in the ventral retina. Pretreatment with brimonidine reduced the loss of Brn3a+ cells both 7 and 14 days post lesion and the protective effect was higher in the dorsal than in the ventral retina. We conclude that α2-adrenergic receptor stimulation reduced the impact of the excitotoxic injury in chicken similarly to what has been shown in mammals. Furthermore, the data show that the RGCs are evenly distributed over in the retina, which challenges previous results that indicate the presence of specific high RGC-density regions of the chicken retina. PMID:27611432

  10. Neuroprotective Effect of Lutein on NMDA-Induced Retinal Ganglion Cell Injury in Rat Retina.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chanjuan; Wang, Zhen; Zhao, Jiayi; Li, Qin; Huang, Cuiqin; Zhu, Lihong; Lu, Daxiang

    2016-05-01

    Lutein injection is a possible therapeutic approach for retinal diseases, but the molecular mechanism of its neuroprotective effect remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate its protective effects in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) against N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced retinal damage in vivo. Retinal damage was induced by intravitreal NMDA injection in rats. Each animal was given five daily intraperitoneal injections of Lutein or vehicle along with intravitreal NMDA injections. Electroretinograms were recorded. The number of viable RGCs was quantified using the retinal whole-mount method by immunofluorescence. Proteins were measured by Western blot assays. Lutein reduced the retinal damage and improved the response to light, as shown by an animal behavior assay (the black-and-white box method) in rats. Furthermore, Lutein treatment prevented the NMDA-induced reduction in phNR wave amplitude. Lutein increased RGC number after NMDA-induced retina damage. Most importantly, Bax, cytochrome c, p-p38 MAPK, and p-c-Jun were all upregulated in rats injected with NMDA, but these expression patterns were reversed by continuous Lutein uptake. Bcl-2, p-GSK-3β, and p-Akt in the Lutein-treated eyes were increased compared with the NMDA group. Lutein has neuroprotective effects against retinal damage, its protective effects may be partly mediated by its anti-excitability neurotoxicity, through MAPKs and PI3K/Akt signaling, suggesting a potential approach for suppressing retinal neural damage. PMID:26119305

  11. Diosmin Protects Rat Retina from Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Nianting; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Gong, Yuanyuan; Yin, Lili

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective Diosmin, a natural flavone glycoside, possesses antioxidant activity and has been used to alleviate ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. The aim of this study was to clarify whether the administration of diosmin has a protective effect against I/R injury induced using the high intraocular pressure (IOP) model in rat retina, and to determine the possible antioxidant mechanisms involved. Methods Retinal I/R injury was induced in the rats by elevating the IOP to 110 mmHg for 60 min. Diosmin (100 mg/kg) or vehicle solution was administered intragastrically 30 min before the onset of ischemia and then daily after I/R injury until the animals were sacrificed. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activities of total-superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase (CAT) in the retinal tissues were determined 24 h after I/R injury. At 7 days post-I/R injury, electroretinograms (ERGs) were recorded, and the density of surviving retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) was estimated by counting retrograde tracer-labeled cells in whole-mounted retinas. Retinal histological changes were also examined and quantified using light microscopy. Results Diosmin significantly decreased the MDA levels and increased the activities of T-SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT in the retina of rats compared with the ischemia group (P<0.05), and suppressed the I/R-induced reduction in the a- and b-wave amplitudes of the ERG (P<0.05). The thickness of the entire retina, inner nuclear layer, inner plexiform layer, and outer retinal layer and the number of cells in the ganglion cell layer were significantly less after I/R injury (P<0.05), and diosmin remarkably ameliorated these changes on retinal morphology. Diosmin also attenuated the I/R-induced loss of RGCs of the rat retina (P<0.05). Conclusion Diosmin protected the retina from I/R injury, possibly via a mechanism involving the regulation of oxidative parameters. PMID:22509733

  12. Diversity of Retinal Ganglion Cells Identified by Transient GFP Transfection in Organotypic Tissue Culture of Adult Marmoset Monkey Retina

    PubMed Central

    Moritoh, Satoru; Komatsu, Yusuke; Yamamori, Tetsuo; Koizumi, Amane

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian retina has more diversity of neurons than scientists had once believed in order to establish complicated vision processing. In the monkey retina, morphological diversity of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) besides dominant midget and parasol cells has been suggested. However, characteristic subtypes of RGCs in other species such as bistratified direction-selective ganglion cells (DSGC) have not yet been identified. Increasing interest has been shown in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) monkey as a “super-model” of neuroscientific research. Here, we established organotypic tissue culture of the adult marmoset monkey retina with particle-mediated gene transfer of GFP to survey the morphological diversity of RGCs. We successfully incubated adult marmoset monkey retinas for 2 to 4 days ex vivo for transient expression of GFP. We morphologically examined 121 RGCs out of more than 3240 GFP-transfected cells in 5 retinas. Among them, we identified monostratified or broadly stratified ganglion cells (midget, parasol, sparse, recursive, thorny, and broad thorny ganglion cells), and bistratified ganglion cells (recursive, large, and small bistratified ganglion cells [blue-ON/yellow-OFF-like]). By this survey, we also found a candidate for bistratified DSGC whose dendrites were well cofasciculated with ChAT-positive starburst dendrites, costratified with ON and OFF ChAT bands, and had honeycomb-shaped dendritic arbors morphologically similar to those in rabbits. Our genetic engineering method provides a new approach to future investigation for morphological and functional diversity of RGCs in the monkey retina. PMID:23336011

  13. Broad Thorny Ganglion Cells: A Candidate for Visual Pursuit Error Signaling in the Primate Retina

    PubMed Central

    Manookin, Michael B.; Neitz, Jay; Rieke, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Functional analyses exist only for a few of the morphologically described primate ganglion cell types, and their correlates in other mammalian species remain elusive. Here, we recorded light responses of broad thorny cells in the whole-mounted macaque retina. They showed ON-OFF-center light responses that were strongly suppressed by stimulation of the receptive field surround. Spike responses were delayed compared with parasol ganglion cells and other ON-OFF cells, including recursive bistratified ganglion cells and A1 amacrine cells. The receptive field structure was shaped by direct excitatory synaptic input and strong presynaptic and postsynaptic inhibition in both ON and OFF pathways. The cells responded strongly to dark or bright stimuli moving either in or out of the receptive field, independent of the direction of motion. However, they did not show a maintained spike response either to a uniform background or to a drifting plaid pattern. These properties could be ideally suited for guiding movements involved in visual pursuit. The functional characteristics reported here permit the first direct cross-species comparison of putative homologous ganglion cell types. Based on morphological similarities, broad thorny ganglion cells have been proposed to be homologs of rabbit local edge detector ganglion cells, but we now show that the two cells have quite distinct physiological properties. Thus, our data argue against broad thorny cells as the homologs of local edge detector cells. PMID:25834063

  14. Inhibition of HDAC2 Protects the Retina From Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jie; Alsarraf, Oday; Dahrouj, Mohammad; Platt, Kenneth A.; Chou, C. James; Rice, Dennis S.; Crosson, Craig E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Protein acetylation is an essential mechanism in regulating transcriptional and inflammatory events. Studies have shown that nonselective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors can protect the retina from ischemic injury in rats. However, the role of specific HDAC isoforms in retinal degenerative processes remains obscure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of HDAC2 isoform in a mouse model of ischemic retinal injury. Methods. Localization of HDAC2 in mice retinas was evaluated by immunohistochemical analyses. To investigate whether selective reduction in HDAC2 activity can protect the retina from ischemic injury, Hdac2+/− mice were utilized. Electroretinographic (ERG) and morphometric analyses were used to assess retinal function and morphology. Results. Our results demonstrated that HDAC2 is primarily localized in nuclei in inner nuclear and retinal ganglion cell layers, and HDAC2 activity accounted for approximately 35% of the total activities of HDAC1, 2, 3, and 6 in the retina. In wild-type mice, ERG a- and b-waves from ischemic eyes were significantly reduced when compared to pre-ischemia baseline values. Morphometric examination of these eyes revealed significant degeneration of inner retinal layers. In Hdac2+/− mice, ERG a- and b-waves from ischemic eyes were significantly greater than those measured in ischemic eyes from wild-type mice. Morphologic measurements demonstrated that Hdac2+/− mice exhibit significantly less retinal degeneration than wild-type mice. Conclusions. This study demonstrated that suppressing HDAC2 expression can effectively reduce ischemic retinal injury. Our results support the idea that the development of selective HDAC2 inhibitors may provide an efficacious treatment for ischemic retinal injury. PMID:23696608

  15. Identification of AⅡ amacrine, displaced amacrine, and bistratified ganglion cell types in human retina with antibodies against calretinin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sammy C S; Weltzien, Felix; Madigan, Michele C; Martin, Paul R; Grünert, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies against calretinin are markers for one type of rod pathway interneuron (AⅡ amacrine cell) in the retina of some but not all mammalian species. The AⅡ cells play a crucial role in night-time (scotopic) vision and have been proposed as a target for optogenetic restoration of vision in retinal disease. In the present study we aimed to characterize the AⅡ cells in human retina. Postmortem human donor eyes were obtained with ethical approval and processed for calretinin immunofluorescence. Calretinin-positive somas in the inner nuclear and the ganglion cell layer were filled with the lipophilic dye DiI. The large majority (over 80%) of calretinin-immunoreactive cells is located in the inner nuclear layer, is immunopositive for glycine transporter 1, and shows the typical morphology of AⅡ amacrine cells. In addition, a small proportion of calretinin-positive cells in the inner nuclear layer and in the ganglion cell layer is glutamic acid decarboxylase-positive and shows the morphology of widefield amacrine cells (stellate, semilunar, and thorny amacrine cells). About half of the calretinin cells in the ganglion cell layer are bistratified ganglion cells resembling the small bistratified (presumed blue-ON/yellow-OFF) and the G17 ganglion cell previously described in primates. We conclude that in human retina, antibodies against calretinin can be used to identify AⅡ amacrine cells in the inner nuclear layer as well as widefield amacrine and small bistratified ganglion cells in the ganglion cell layer. PMID:26053777

  16. Gibbs distribution analysis of temporal correlations structure in retina ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, J. C.; Marre, O.; Palacios, A.G.; Berry, M.J.; Cessac, B.

    2012-01-01

    We present a method to estimate Gibbs distributions with spatio-temporal constraints on spike trains statistics. We apply this method to spike trains recorded from ganglion cells of the salamander retina, in response to natural movies. Our analysis, restricted to a few neurons, performs more accurately than pairwise synchronization models (Ising) or the 1-time step Markov models (Marre et al. (2009)) to describe the statistics of spatio-temporal spike patterns and emphasizes the role of higher order spatio-temporal interactions. PMID:22115900

  17. The RNA binding protein RBPMS is a selective marker of ganglion cells in the mammalian retina

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Allen R.; de Sevilla Müller, Luis Pérez; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2014-01-01

    There are few neurochemical markers that reliably identify retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), which are a heterogeneous population of cells that integrate and transmit the visual signal from the retina to the central visual nuclei. We have developed and characterized a new set of affinity purified guinea pig and rabbit antibodies against RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (RBPMS). On Western blots these antibodies recognize a single band at ~24 kDa, corresponding to RBPMS, and they strongly label RGC and displaced RGC (dRGC) somata in mouse, rat, guinea pig, rabbit and monkey retina. RBPMS immunoreactive cells and RGCs identified by other techniques have a similar range of somal diameters and areas. The density of RBPMS cells in mouse and rat retina is comparable to earlier semi-quantitative estimates of RGCs. RBPMS is mainly expressed in medium and large DAPI-, DRAQ5-, NeuroTrace- and NeuN-stained cells in the ganglion cell layer (GCL), and RBPMS is not expressed in syntaxin (HPC-1) immunoreactive cells in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and GCL, consistent with their identity as RGCs, and not displaced amacrine cells. In mouse and rat retina, most RBPMS cells are lost following optic nerve crush or transection at three weeks, and all Brn3a, SMI-32 and melanopsin immunoreactive RGCs also express RBPMS immunoreactivity. RBPMS immunoreactivity is localized to CFP-fluorescent RGCs in the B6.Cg-Tg(Thy1-CFP)23Jrs/J mouse line. These findings show that antibodies against RBPMS are robust reagents that exclusively identify RGCs and dRGCs in multiple mammalian species, and they will be especially useful for quantification of RGCs. PMID:24318667

  18. Tetrandrine protects mouse retinal ganglion cells from ischemic injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weiyi; Yang, Chen; Lu, Jing; Huang, Ping; Barnstable, Colin J; Zhang, Chun; Zhang, Samuel S

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the protective effects of tetrandrine (Tet) on murine ischemia-injured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). For this, we used serum deprivation cell model, glutamate and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced RGC-5 cell death models, and staurosporine-differentiated neuron-like RGC-5 in vitro. We also investigated cell survival of purified primary-cultured RGCs treated with Tet. An in vivo retinal ischemia/reperfusion model was used to examine RGC survival after Tet administration 1 day before ischemia. We found that Tet affected RGC-5 survival in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Compared to dimethyl sulfoxide treatment, Tet increased the numbers of RGC-5 cells by 30% at 72 hours. After 48 hours, Tet protected staurosporine-induced RGC-5 cells from serum deprivation-induced cell death and significantly increased the relative number of cells cultured with 1 mM H2O2 (P<0.01). Several concentrations of Tet significantly prevented 25-mM-glutamate-induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Tet also increased primary RGC survival after 72 and 96 hours. Tet administration (10 μM, 2 μL) 1 day before retinal ischemia showed RGC layer loss (greater survival), which was less than those in groups with phosphate-buffered saline intravitreal injection plus ischemia in the central (P=0.005, n=6), middle (P=0.018, n=6), and peripheral (P=0.017, n=6) parts of the retina. Thus, Tet conferred protective effects on serum deprivation models of staurosporine-differentiated neuron-like RGC-5 cells and primary cultured murine RGCs. Furthermore, Tet showed greater in vivo protective effects on RGCs 1 day after ischemia. Tet and ciliary neurotrophic factor maintained the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) of primary cultured RGCs and inhibited the expression of activated caspase-3 and bcl-2 in ischemia/reperfusion-insult retinas. PMID:24711693

  19. Ganglion Cell and Displaced Amacrine Cell Density Distribution in the Retina of the Howler Monkey (Alouatta caraya)

    PubMed Central

    Muniz, José Augusto Pereira Carneiro; de Athaide, Luana Modesto; Gomes, Bruno Duarte; Finlay, Barbara L.; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima

    2014-01-01

    Unlike all other New World (platyrrine) monkeys, both male and female howler monkeys (Alouatta sp.) are obligatory trichromats. In all other platyrrines, only females can be trichromats, while males are always dichromats, as determined by multiple behavioral, electrophysiological, and genetic studies. In addition to obligatory trichromacy, Alouatta has an unusual fovea, with substantially higher peak cone density in the foveal pit than every other diurnal anthropoid monkey (both platyrrhines and catarrhines) and great ape yet examined, including humans. In addition to documenting the general organization of the retinal ganglion cell layer in Alouatta, the distribution of cones is compared to retinal ganglion cells, to explore possible relationships between their atypical trichromacy and foveal specialization. The number and distribution of retinal ganglion cells and displaced amacrine cells were determined in six flat-mounted retinas from five Alouatta caraya. Ganglion cell density peaked at 0.5 mm between the fovea and optic nerve head, reaching 40,700–45,200 cells/mm2. Displaced amacrine cell density distribution peaked between 0.5–1.75 mm from the fovea, reaching mean values between 2,050–3,100 cells/mm2. The mean number of ganglion cells was 1,133,000±79,000 cells and the mean number of displaced amacrine cells was 537,000±61,800 cells, in retinas of mean area 641±62 mm2. Ganglion cell and displaced amacrine cell density distribution in the Alouatta retina was consistent with that observed among several species of diurnal Anthropoidea, both platyrrhines and catarrhines. The principal alteration in the Alouatta retina appears not to be in the number of any retinal cell class, but rather a marked gradient in cone density within the fovea, which could potentially support high chromatic acuity in a restricted central region. PMID:25546077

  20. Axonal Transmission in the Retina Introduces a Small Dispersion of Relative Timing in the Ganglion Cell Population Response

    PubMed Central

    Zeck, Günther; Lambacher, Armin; Fromherz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background Visual stimuli elicit action potentials in tens of different retinal ganglion cells. Each ganglion cell type responds with a different latency to a given stimulus, thus transforming the high-dimensional input into a temporal neural code. The timing of the first spikes between different retinal projection neurons cells may further change along axonal transmission. The purpose of this study is to investigate if intraretinal conduction velocity leads to a synchronization or dispersion of the population signal leaving the eye. Methodology/Principal Findings We ‘imaged’ the initiation and transmission of light-evoked action potentials along individual axons in the rabbit retina at micron-scale resolution using a high-density multi-transistor array. We measured unimodal conduction velocity distributions (1.3±0.3 m/sec, mean ± SD) for axonal populations at all retinal eccentricities with the exception of the central part that contains myelinated axons. The velocity variance within each piece of retina is caused by ganglion cell types that show narrower and slightly different average velocity tuning. Ganglion cells of the same type respond with similar latency to spatially homogenous stimuli and conduct with similar velocity. For ganglion cells of different type intraretinal conduction velocity and response latency to flashed stimuli are negatively correlated, indicating that differences in first spike timing increase (up to 10 msec). Similarly, the analysis of pair-wise correlated activity in response to white-noise stimuli reveals that conduction velocity and response latency are negatively correlated. Conclusion/Significance Intraretinal conduction does not change the relative spike timing between ganglion cells of the same type but increases spike timing differences among ganglion cells of different type. The fastest retinal ganglion cells therefore act as indicators of new stimuli for postsynaptic neurons. The intraretinal dispersion of the population

  1. Connectivity between the OFF bipolar type DB3a and six types of ganglion cell in the marmoset retina.

    PubMed

    Masri, Rania A; Percival, Kumiko A; Koizumi, Amane; Martin, Paul R; Grünert, Ulrike

    2016-06-15

    Parallel visual pathways originate at the first synapse in the retina, where cones make connections with cone bipolar cells that in turn contact ganglion cells. There are more ganglion cell types than bipolar types, suggesting that there must be divergence from bipolar to ganglion cells. Here we analyze the contacts between an OFF bipolar type (DB3a) and six ganglion cell types in the retina of the marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus). Ganglion cells were transfected via particle-mediated gene transfer of an expression plasmid for the postsynaptic density 95-green fluorescent protein (PSD95-GFP), and DB3a cells were labeled via immunohistochemistry. Ganglion cell types that fully or partially costratified with DB3a cells included OFF parasol, OFF midget, broad thorny, recursive bistratified, small bistratified, and large bistratified cells. On average, the number of DB3a contacts to parasol cells (18 contacts per axon terminal) is higher than that to other ganglion cell types (between four and seven contacts). We estimate that the DB3a output to OFF parasol cells accounts for at least 30% of the total DB3a output. Furthermore, we found that OFF parasol cells receive approximately 20% of their total bipolar input from DB3a cells, suggesting that other diffuse bipolar types also provide input to OFF parasol cells. We conclude that DB3a cells preferentially contact OFF parasol cells but also provide input to other ganglion cell types. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1839-1858, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26559914

  2. An excitatory amacrine cell detects object motion and provides feature-selective input to ganglion cells in the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tahnbee; Soto, Florentina; Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Retinal circuits detect salient features of the visual world and report them to the brain through spike trains of retinal ganglion cells. The most abundant ganglion cell type in mice, the so-called W3 ganglion cell, selectively responds to movements of small objects. Where and how object motion sensitivity arises in the retina is incompletely understood. In this study, we use 2-photon-guided patch-clamp recordings to characterize responses of vesicular glutamate transporter 3 (VGluT3)-expressing amacrine cells (ACs) to a broad set of visual stimuli. We find that these ACs are object motion sensitive and analyze the synaptic mechanisms underlying this computation. Anatomical circuit reconstructions suggest that VGluT3-expressing ACs form glutamatergic synapses with W3 ganglion cells, and targeted recordings show that the tuning of W3 ganglion cells' excitatory input matches that of VGluT3-expressing ACs' responses. Synaptic excitation of W3 ganglion cells is diminished, and responses to object motion are suppressed in mice lacking VGluT3. Object motion, thus, is first detected by VGluT3-expressing ACs, which provide feature-selective excitatory input to W3 ganglion cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08025.001 PMID:25988808

  3. Physiological and morphological characterization of ganglion cells in the salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Jacoby, Roy; Wu, Samuel M

    2016-02-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) integrate visual information from the retina and transmit collective signals to the brain. A systematic investigation of functional and morphological characteristics of various types of RGCs is important to comprehensively understand how the visual system encodes and transmits information via various RGC pathways. This study evaluated both physiological and morphological properties of 67 RGCs in dark-adapted flat-mounted salamander retina by examining light-evoked cation and chloride current responses via voltage-clamp recordings and visualizing morphology by Lucifer yellow fluorescence with a confocal microscope. Six groups of RGCs were described: asymmetrical ON-OFF RGCs, symmetrical ON RGCs, OFF RGCs, and narrow-, medium- and wide-field ON-OFF RGCs. Dendritic field diameters of RGCs ranged 102-490 μm: narrow field (<200 μm, 31% of RGCs), medium field (200-300 μm, 45%) and wide field (>300 μm, 24%). Dendritic ramification patterns of RGCs agree with the sublamina A/B rule. 34% of RGCs were monostratified, 24% bistratified and 42% diffusely stratified. 70% of ON RGCs and OFF RGCs were monostratified. Wide-field RGCs were diffusely stratified. 82% of RGCs generated light-evoked ON-OFF responses, while 11% generated ON responses and 7% OFF responses. Response sensitivity analysis suggested that some RGCs obtained separated rod/cone bipolar cell inputs whereas others obtained mixed bipolar cell inputs. 25% of neurons in the RGC layer were displaced amacrine cells. Although more types may be defined by more refined classification criteria, this report is to incorporate more physiological properties into RGC classification. PMID:26731645

  4. Spatial properties and functional organization of small bistratified ganglion cells in primate retina.

    PubMed

    Field, Greg D; Sher, Alexander; Gauthier, Jeffrey L; Greschner, Martin; Shlens, Jonathon; Litke, Alan M; Chichilnisky, E J

    2007-11-28

    The primate visual system consists of parallel pathways initiated by distinct cell types in the retina that encode different features of the visual scene. Small bistratified cells (SBCs), which form a major projection to the thalamus, exhibit blue-ON/yellow-OFF [S-ON/(L+M)-OFF] light responses thought to be important for high-acuity color vision. However, the spatial processing properties of individual SBCs and their spatial arrangement across the visual field are poorly understood. The present study of peripheral primate retina reveals that contrary to previous suggestions, SBCs exhibit center-surround spatial structure, with the (L+M)-OFF component of the receptive field approximately 50% larger in diameter than the S-ON component. Analysis of response kinetics shows that the (L+M)-OFF response in SBCs is slower than the S-ON response and significantly less transient than that of simultaneously recorded OFF-parasol cells. The (L+M)-OFF response in SBCs was eliminated by bath application of the metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist L-APB. These observations indicate that the (L+M)-OFF response of SBCs is not formed by OFF-bipolar cell input as has been suspected and suggest that it arises from horizontal cell feedback. Finally, the receptive fields of SBCs form orderly mosaics, with overlap and regularity similar to those of ON-parasol cells. Thus, despite their distinctive morphology and chromatic properties, SBCs exhibit two features of other retinal ganglion cell types: center-surround antagonism and regular mosaic sampling of visual space. PMID:18045920

  5. Cyan fluorescent protein expression in ganglion and amacrine cells in a thy1-CFP transgenic mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Alejandro; Huynh, Uyen-Chi N.; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To characterize cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) expression in the retina of the thy1-CFP (B6.Cg-Tg(Thy1-CFP)23Jrs/J) transgenic mouse line. Methods CFP expression was characterized using morphometric methods and immunohistochemistry with antibodies to neurofilament light (NF-L), neuronal nuclei (NeuN), POU-domain protein (Brn3a) and calretinin, which immunolabel ganglion cells, and syntaxin 1 (HPC-1), glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD67), GABA plasma membrane transporter-1 (GAT-1), and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), which immunolabel amacrine cells. Results CFP was extensively expressed in the inner retina, primarily in the inner plexiform layer (IPL), ganglion cell layer (GCL), nerve fiber layer, and optic nerve. CFP fluorescent cell bodies were in all retinal regions and their processes ramified in all laminae of the IPL. Some small, weakly CFP fluorescent somata were in the inner nuclear layer (INL). CFP-containing somata in the GCL ranged from 6 to 20 μm in diameter, and they had a density of 2636±347 cells/mm2 at 1.5 mm from the optic nerve head. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated colocalization of CFP with the ganglion cell markers NF-L, NeuN, Brn3a, and calretinin. Immunohistochemistry with antibodies to HPC-1, GAD67, GAT-1, and ChAT indicated that the small, weakly fluorescent CFP cells in the INL and GCL were cholinergic amacrine cells. Conclusions The total number and density of CFP-fluorescent cells in the GCL were within the range of previous estimates of the total number of ganglion cells in the C57BL/6J line. Together these findings suggest that most ganglion cells in the thy1-CFP mouse line 23 express CFP. In conclusion, the thy1-CFP mouse line is highly useful for studies requiring the identification of ganglion cells. PMID:18728756

  6. Activation of ganglion cells in wild-type and rd1 mouse retinas with monophasic and biphasic current pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Ralph J.; Rizzo, Joseph F. III

    2009-06-01

    We and other research groups are designing an electronic retinal prosthesis to provide vision for patients who are blind due to photoreceptor degeneration. In this study, we examined the effect of stimulus waveform on the amount of current needed to activate retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) when the retinal neural network is stimulated. Isolated retinas of wild-type and rd1 mice were stimulated with cathodal and anodal monophasic current pulses of 1 ms duration and symmetric biphasic current pulses (1 ms per phase) delivered through an electrode that was located subretinally. For both wild-type and rd1 mouse retinas, cathodal current pulses were least effective in activating most RGCs. The median threshold current for a cathodal current pulse was 2.0-4.4 fold higher than the median threshold current for either an anodal or a biphasic current pulse. In wild-type mouse retinas, the median threshold current for activating RGCs with anodal current pulses was 23% lower than that with biphasic current pulses. In rd1 mouse retinas, the median threshold currents for anodal and biphasic current pulses were about the same. However, the variance in thresholds of rd1 RGCs for biphasic pulse stimulation was much smaller than for anodal pulse stimulation. Thus, a symmetric biphasic current pulse may be the best stimulus for activating the greatest number of RGCs in retinas devoid of photoreceptors.

  7. Melanopsin-expressing ganglion cells on macaque and human retinas form two morphologically distinct populations.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hsi-Wen; Ren, Xiaozhi; Peterson, Beth B; Marshak, David W; Yau, King-Wai; Gamlin, Paul D; Dacey, Dennis M

    2016-10-01

    The long-term goal of this research is to understand how retinal ganglion cells that express the photopigment melanopsin, also known as OPN4, contribute to vision in humans and other primates. Here we report the results of anatomical studies using our polyclonal antibody specifically against human melanopsin that confirm and extend previous descriptions of melanopsin cells in primates. In macaque and human retina, two distinct populations of melanopsin cells were identified based on dendritic stratification in either the inner or the outer portion of the inner plexiform layer (IPL). Variation in dendritic field size and cell density with eccentricity was confirmed, and dendritic spines, a new feature of melanopsin cells, were described. The spines were the sites of input from DB6 diffuse bipolar cell axon terminals to the inner stratifying type of melanopsin cells. The outer stratifying melanopsin type received inputs from DB6 bipolar cells via a sparse outer axonal arbor. Outer stratifying melanopsin cells also received inputs from axon terminals of dopaminergic amacrine cells. On the outer stratifying melanopsin cells, ribbon synapses from bipolar cells and conventional synapses from amacrine cells were identified in electron microscopic immunolabeling experiments. Both inner and outer stratifying melanopsin cell types were retrogradely labeled following tracer injection in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN). In addition, a method for targeting melanopsin cells for intracellular injection using their intrinsic fluorescence was developed. This technique was used to demonstrate that melanopsin cells were tracer coupled to amacrine cells and would be applicable to electrophysiological experiments in the future. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2845-2872, 2016. © 2016 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26972791

  8. Voltage-dependent conductances of solitary ganglion cells dissociated from the rat retina.

    PubMed Central

    Lipton, S A; Tauck, D L

    1987-01-01

    1. Ganglion cells were dissociated from the enzyme-treated rat retina, identified with specific fluorescent labels, and maintained in vitro. Electrophysiological properties of solitary retinal ganglion cells were investigated with both conventional intracellular and patch-clamp recordings. Although comparable results were obtained for most measurements some important differences were noted. 2. The input resistance of solitary retinal ganglion cells was considerably higher when measured with 'giga-seal' suction pipettes than with conventional intracellular electrodes. Under current-clamp conditions with both intracellular and patch pipettes, these central mammalian neurones maintained resting potentials of about -60 mV and displayed action potentials followed by an after-hyperpolarization in response to small depolarizations. The membrane currents during this activity, analysed under voltage clamp with patch pipettes, consisted of five components: Na+ current (INa), Ca2+ current (ICa), and currents with properties similar to the delayed outward, the transient (A-type), and the Ca2+-activated K+ currents (IK, IA and IK(Ca), respectively). 3. Ionic substitution, pharmacological agents, and voltage-clamp experiments revealed that the regenerative currents were carried by both Na+ and Ca2+. 100 nM-1 microM-tetradotoxin (TTX) reversibly blocked the fast spikes carried by the presumptive INa, which under voltage-clamp analysis had classical Hodgkin-Huxley-type activation and inactivation. 4. Single-channel recordings of the Na+ current (iNa) permitted comparison of these 'microscopic' events with the 'macroscopic' whole-cell current (INa). The inactivation time constant (tau h) fitted to the averaged single-channel recordings of iNa in outside-out patches was slower than the tau h obtained during whole-cell recordings of INa. 5. In the presence of 1-40 microM-TTX and 20 mM-TEA, slow action potentials appeared in intracellular recordings and were probably mediated by Ca2

  9. Relative contribution of rod and cone inputs to bipolar cells and ganglion cells in the tiger salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Hensley, S H; Yang, X L; Wu, S M

    1993-06-01

    1. The relative contribution of rod and cone inputs to bipolar and ganglion cells were studied by comparing the response-irradiance relations, spectral sensitivities, and response waveforms of these neurons recorded from the isolated, flat-mounted tiger salamander retina under dark-adapted conditions. 2. Bipolar cells could be differentiated both on the basis of the polarity of the light response and on their relative rod/cone input. Thus some depolarizing bipolar cells appeared more strongly influenced by rod input (DBCR), whereas others were more influenced by cone input (DBCC). Similarly, hyperpolarizing bipolar cells could be divided into those that received rod-dominant input (HBCR) or cone-dominant input (HBCC). 3. The light onset response of sustained-ON ganglion cells reflected both rod-dominant input from DBCRs and cone-dominant input from DBCCs. 4. OFF ganglion cells displayed both a rod-dominant sustained light offset response and a cone-dominant transient light offset response, suggesting input from both HBCRs and HBCCs. 5. In ON-OFF ganglion cells, the light onset response was strongly rod dominated and was presumably mediated by DBCRs, whereas the light offset response displayed both rod and cone influence, suggesting input from HBCRs and HBCCs. The contribution of cones to the light onset response of ON-OFF ganglion cells was only observed in the presence of a rod-adapting background light. 6. A suppression of the light offset responses of OFF and ON-OFF ganglion cells was observed, which was dependent both on the wavelength and irradiance of the light stimulus. 7. These results indicate that the photoreceptor inputs to bipolar cells in the tiger salamander retina are segregated such that they form separate rod-dominant and cone-dominant pathways. Thus the response properties of the different types of ganglion cells are influenced not only by the excitatory and inhibitory inputs they receive from the bipolar and amacrine cells but also whether these

  10. Inner plexiform layer of jack mackerel retina: participation of amacrine and ganglion cells in its spatial organization.

    PubMed

    Podugolnikova, T A

    1985-01-01

    In the jack mackerel retina (Trachurus mediterraneus ponticus) the inner plexiform layer demonstrates a very high degree of differentiation and contains not less than 25 sublayers. Investigation with Golgi method revealed many varieties of neurons, which are responsible for the structural organization of the inner plexiform layer. There are 8 types of bipolar cells, 24 types of amacrine cells and 7 types of ganglion cells with layered processes. The branching levels of the processes of these neurons were determined. Several varieties of neurons are described for the first time. PMID:3832609

  11. Light-evoked synaptic activity of retinal ganglion and amacrine cells is regulated in developing mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    He, Quanhua; Wang, Ping; Tian, Ning

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have shown a continued maturation of visual responsiveness and synaptic activity of retina after eye opening, including the size of receptive fields of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), light-evoked synaptic output of RGCs, bipolar cell spontaneous synaptic inputs to RGCs, and the synaptic connections between RGCs and ON and OFF bipolar cells. Light deprivation retarded some of these age-dependent changes. However, many other functional and morphological features of RGCs are not sensitive to visual experience. To determine whether light-evoked synaptic responses of RGCs undergo developmental change, we directly examined the light-evoked synaptic inputs from ON and OFF synaptic pathways to RGCs in developing retinas and found that both light-evoked excitatory and inhibitory synaptic currents decreased, but not increased, with age. We also examined the light-evoked synaptic inputs from ON and OFF synaptic pathways to amacrine cells in developing retinas and found that the light-evoked synaptic input of amacrine cells is also down-regulated in developing mouse retina. Different from the developmental changes of RGC spontaneous synaptic activity, dark rearing has little effect on the developmental changes of light-evoked synaptic activity of both RGCs and amacrine cells. Therefore, we concluded that the synaptic mechanisms mediating spontaneous and light-evoked synaptic activity of RGCs and amacrine cells are likely to be different. PMID:21091802

  12. Retinal Cell Responses to Elevated Intraocular Pressure: A Gene Array Comparison between the Whole Retina and Retinal Ganglion Cell Layer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ying; Cepurna, William O.; Dyck, Jennifer A.; Doser, Tom A.; Johnson, Elaine C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To determine and compare gene expression patterns in the whole retina and retinal ganglion cell layer (RGCL) in a rodent glaucoma model. Methods. IOP was unilaterally elevated in Brown Norway rats (N = 26) by injection of hypertonic saline and monitored for 5 weeks. A cDNA microarray was used on whole retinas from one group of eyes with extensive optic nerve injury and on RGCL isolated by laser capture microdissection (LCM) from another group with comparable injury, to determine the significantly up- or downregulated genes and gene categories in both groups. Expression changes of selected genes were examined by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qPCR) to verify microarray results. Results. Microarray analysis of the whole retina identified 632 genes with significantly changed expression (335 up, 297 down), associated with 9 upregulated and 3 downregulated biological processes. In contrast, the RGCL microarray yielded 3726 genes with significantly changed expression (2003 up, 1723 down), including 60% of those found in whole retina. Thirteen distinct upregulated biological processes were identified in the RGCL, dominated by protein synthesis. Among 11 downregulated processes, axon extension and dendrite morphogenesis and generation of precursor metabolism and energy were uniquely identified in the RGCL. qPCR confirmed significant changes in 6 selected messages in whole retina and 11 in RGCL. Increased Atf3, the most upregulated gene in the RGCL, was confirmed by immunohistochemistry of RGCs. Conclusions. Isolation of RGCL by LCM allows a more refined detection of gene response to elevated pressure and improves the potential of determining cellular mechanisms in RGCs and their supporting cells that could be targets for enhancing RGC survival. PMID:20071680

  13. Spatially restricted electrical activation of retinal ganglion cells in the rabbit retina by hexapolar electrode return configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Amgad G.; Cameron, Morven A.; Suaning, Gregg J.; Lovell, Nigel H.; Morley, John W.

    2013-06-01

    Objective. Visual prostheses currently in development aim to restore some form of vision to patients suffering from diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Most rely on electrically stimulating inner retinal cells via electrodes implanted on or near the retina, resulting in percepts of light termed ‘phosphenes’. Activation of spatially distinct populations of cells in the retina is key for pattern vision to be produced. To achieve this, the electrical stimulation must be localized, activating cells only in the direct vicinity of the stimulating electrode(s). With this goal in mind, a hexagonal return (hexapolar) configuration has been proposed as an alternative to the traditional monopolar or bipolar return configurations for electrically stimulating the retina. This study investigated the efficacy of the hexapolar configuration in localizing the activation of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), compared to a monopolar configuration. Approach. Patch-clamp electrophysiology was used to measure the activation thresholds of RGCs in whole-mount rabbit retina to monopolar and hexapolar electrical stimulation, applied subretinally. Main results. Hexapolar activation thresholds for RGCs located outside the hex guard were found to be significantly (>2 fold) higher than those located inside the area of tissue bounded by the hex guard. The hexapolar configuration localized the activation of RGCs more effectively than its monopolar counterpart. Furthermore, no difference in hexapolar thresholds or localization was observed when using cathodic-first versus anodic-first stimulation. Significance. The hexapolar configuration may provide an improved method for electrically stimulating spatially distinct populations of cells in retinal tissue.

  14. Diffuse Bipolar Cells Provide Input to OFF Parasol Ganglion Cells in the Macaque Retina

    PubMed Central

    JACOBY, ROY A.; WIECHMANN, ALLAN F.; AMARA, SUSAN G.; LEIGHTON, BARBARA H.; MARSHAK, DAVID W.

    2012-01-01

    Parasol retinal ganglion cells are more sensitive to luminance contrast and respond more transiently at all levels of adaptation than midget ganglion cells. This may be due, in part, to differences between bipolar cells that provide their input, and the goal of these experiments was to study these differences. Midget bipolar cells are known to be presynaptic to midget ganglion cells. To identify the bipolar cells presynaptic to parasol cells, these ganglion cells were intracellularly injected with Neurobiotin, cone bipolar cells were immunolabeled, and the double-labeled material was analyzed. In the electron microscope, we found that DB3 diffuse bipolar cells labeled by using antiserum to calbindin D-28k were presynaptic to OFF parasol cells. In the confocal microscope, DB3 bipolars costratified with OFF parasol cell dendrites and made significantly more appositions with them than expected due to chance. Flat midget bipolar cells were labeled with antiserum to recoverin. Although they made a few appositions with parasol cells, the number was no greater than would be expected when two sets of processes have overlapping distributions in the inner plexiform layer. DB2 diffuse bipolar cells were labeled with antibodies to excitatory amino acid transporter 2, and they also made appositions with OFF parasol cells. These results suggest that DB2 bipolar cells are also presynaptic to OFF parasol ganglion cells, but midget bipolar cells are not. We estimate that midperipheral OFF parasol cells receive ≈500 synapses from 50 DB3 bipolar cells that, in turn, receive input from 250 cones. PMID:10578099

  15. Retinal ganglion cell responses to voltage and current stimulation in wild-type and rd1 mouse retinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goo, Yong Sook; Ye, Jang Hee; Lee, Seokyoung; Nam, Yoonkey; Ryu, Sang Baek; Kim, Kyung Hwan

    2011-06-01

    Retinal prostheses are being developed to restore vision for those with retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa or age-related macular degeneration. Since neural prostheses depend upon electrical stimulation to control neural activity, optimal stimulation parameters for successful encoding of visual information are one of the most important requirements to enable visual perception. In this paper, we focused on retinal ganglion cell (RGC) responses to different stimulation parameters and compared threshold charge densities in wild-type and rd1 mice. For this purpose, we used in vitro retinal preparations of wild-type and rd1 mice. When the neural network was stimulated with voltage- and current-controlled pulses, RGCs from both wild-type and rd1 mice responded; however the temporal pattern of RGC response is very different. In wild-type RGCs, a single peak within 100 ms appears, while multiple peaks (approximately four peaks) with ~10 Hz rhythm within 400 ms appear in RGCs in the degenerated retina of rd1 mice. We find that an anodic phase-first biphasic voltage-controlled pulse is more efficient for stimulation than a biphasic current-controlled pulse based on lower threshold charge density. The threshold charge densities for activation of RGCs both with voltage- and current-controlled pulses are overall more elevated for the rd1 mouse than the wild-type mouse. Here, we propose the stimulus range for wild-type and rd1 retinas when the optimal modulation of a RGC response is possible.

  16. Shh/Boc Signaling Is Required for Sustained Generation of Ipsilateral Projecting Ganglion Cells in the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Camacho, Cristina; Carreres, M. Isabel; Herrera, Eloisa; Okada, Ami; Bovolenta, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling is an important determinant of vertebrate retinal ganglion cell (RGC) development. In mice, there are two major RGC populations: (1) the Islet2-expressing contralateral projecting (c)RGCs, which both produce and respond to Shh; and (2) the Zic2-expressing ipsilateral projecting RGCs (iRGCs), which lack Shh expression. In contrast to cRGCs, iRGCs, which are generated in the ventrotemporal crescent (VTC) of the retina, specifically express Boc, a cell adhesion molecule that acts as a high-affinity receptor for Shh. In Boc−/− mutant mice, the ipsilateral projection is significantly decreased. Here, we demonstrate that this phenotype results, at least in part, from the misspecification of a proportion of iRGCs. In Boc−/− VTC, the number of Zic2-positive RGCs is reduced, whereas more Islet2/Shh-positive RGCs are observed, a phenotype also detected in Zic2 and Foxd1 null embryos. Consistent with this observation, organization of retinal projections at the dorsallateral geniculate nucleus is altered in Boc−/− mice. Analyses of the molecular and cellular consequences of introducing Shh into the developing VTC and Zic2 and Boc into the central retina indicate that Boc expression alone is in sufficient to fully activate the ipsilateral program and that Zic2 regulates Shh expression. Taking these data together, we propose that expression of Boc in cells from the VTC is required to sustain Zic2 expression, likely by regulating the levels of Shh signaling from the nearby cRGCs. Zic2, in turn, directly or indirectly, counteracts Shh and Islet2 expression in the VTC and activates the ipsilateral program. PMID:23678105

  17. Activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 Antioxidant Pathway Contributes to the Protective Effects of Lycium Barbarum Polysaccharides in the Rodent Retina after Ischemia-Reperfusion-Induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung; So, Kwok-Fai; Brecha, Nicholas C.; Pu, Mingliang

    2014-01-01

    Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP), extracts from the wolfberries, are protective to retina after ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). The antioxidant response element (ARE)–mediated antioxidant pathway plays an important role in maintaining the redox status of the retina. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), combined with potent AREs in its promoter, is a highly effective therapeutic target for the protection against neurodegenerative diseases, including I/R-induced retinal damage. The aim of our present study was to investigate whether the protective effect of LBP after I/R damage was mediated via activation of the Nrf2/HO-1-antioxidant pathway in the retina. Retinal I/R was induced by an increase in intraocular pressure to 130 mm Hg for 60 minutes. Prior to the induction of ischemia, rats were orally treated with either vehicle (PBS) or LBP (1 mg/kg) once a day for 1 week. For specific experiments, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP, 20 mg/kg), an HO-1 inhibitor, was intraperitoneally administered at 24 h prior to ischemia. The protective effects of LBP were evaluated by quantifying ganglion cell and amacrine cell survival, and by measuring cell apoptosis in the retinal layers. In addition, HO-1 expression was examined using Western blotting and immunofluorescence analyses. Cytosolic and nuclear Nrf2 was measured using immunofluorescent staining. LBP treatment significantly increased Nrf2 nuclear accumulation and HO-1 expression in the retina after I/R injury. Increased apoptosis and a decrease in the number of viable cells were observed in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) and inner nuclear layer (INL) in the I/R retina, which were reversed by LBP treatment. The HO-1 inhibitor, ZnPP, diminished the LBP treatment-induced protective effects in the retina after I/R. Taken together, these results suggested that LBP partially exerted its beneficial neuroprotective effects via the activation of Nrf2 and an increase in HO-1 protein expression. PMID:24400114

  18. Protective and Antioxidant Effects of PPARα in the Ischemic Retina

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Elizabeth; Ding, Lexi; Wang, Zhongxiao; Cheng, Rui; Chen, Qian; Moore, Robert; Takahashi, Yusuke; Ma, Jian-xing

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Previous studies have demonstrated that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARα) agonists have therapeutic effects in diabetic retinopathy, although the mechanism of action remains incompletely understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate PPARα's protective effects in the ischemic retina, and to delineate its molecular mechanism of action. Methods. For the oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model, wild-type (WT), and PPARα knockout (PPARα−/−) mice were exposed to 75% O2 from postnatal day 7 (P7) to P12 and treated with the PPARα agonist fenofibric acid (Feno-FA) from P12 to P16. At P17, the effects of Feno-FA on retinal glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression, apoptotic DNA cleavage, and TUNEL labeling were analyzed. Cultured retinal cells were exposed to CoCl2 to induce hypoxia, and TUNEL staining and 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein dye were used to measure apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Western blotting was used to measure GFAP levels and cell signaling. Results. Feno-FA decreased retinal apoptosis and oxidative stress in WT but not PPARα−/− OIR mice. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha knockout OIR mice showed increased retinal cell death and glial activation in comparison to WT OIR mice. Feno-FA treatment and PPARα overexpression protected cultured retinal cells from hypoxic cell death and decreased ROS levels. Nuclear hypoxia-inducible factor-α (HIF-1α) and nicotine adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase-4 (Nox 4) were increased in OIR retinas and downregulated by Feno-FA in WT but not in PPARα−/− mice. Conclusions. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha has a potent antiapoptotic effect in the ischemic retina. This protective effect may be mediated in part through downregulation of HIF-1α/Nox 4 and consequently alleviation of oxidative stress. PMID:24825105

  19. Neural architecture of the "transient" ON directionally selective (class IIb1) ganglion cells in rabbit retina, partly co-stratified with starburst amacrine cells.

    PubMed

    Famiglietti, Edward V

    2016-01-01

    Recent physiological studies coupled with intracellular staining have subdivided ON directionally selective (DS) ganglion cells of rabbit retina into two types. One exhibits more "transient" and more "brisk" responses (ON DS-t), and the other has more "sustained' and more "sluggish" responses (ON DS-s), although both represent the same three preferred directions and show preference for low stimulus velocity, as reported in previous studies of ON DS ganglion cells in rabbit retina. ON DS-s cells have the morphology of ganglion cells previously shown to project to the medial terminal nucleus (MTN) of the accessory optic system, and the MTN-projecting, class IVus1 cells have been well-characterized previously in terms of their dendritic morphology, branching pattern, and stratification. ON DS-t ganglion cells have a distinctly different morphology and exhibit heterotypic coupling to amacrine cells, including axon-bearing amacrine cells, with accompanying synchronous firing, while ON DS-s cells are not coupled. The present study shows that ON DS-t cells are morphologically identical to the previously well-characterized, "orphan" class IIb1 ganglion cell, previously regarded as a member of the "brisk-concentric" category of ganglion cells. Its branching pattern, quantitatively analyzed, is similar to that of the morphological counterparts of X and Y cells, and very different from that of the ON DS-s ganglion cell. Close analysis of the dendritic stratification of class IIb1 ganglion cells together with fiducial cells indicates that they differ from that of the ON DS-s cells. In agreement with one of the three previous studies, class IIb1/ON DS-t cells, unlike class IVus1/ON DS-s ganglion cells, in the main do not co-stratify with starburst amacrine cells. As the present study shows, however, portions of their dendrites do deviate from the main substratum, coming within range of starburst boutons. Parsimony favors DS input from starburst amacrine cells both to ON DS

  20. The physiological basis of heterochromatic flicker photometry demonstrated in the ganglion cells of the macaque retina.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, B B; Martin, P R; Valberg, A

    1988-01-01

    1. Heterochromatic flicker photometry is a way of measuring the spectral sensitivity of the human eye. Two lights of different colour are sinusoidally alternated at, typically, 10-20 Hz, and their relative intensities adjusted by the observer until the sensation of flicker is minimized. This technique has been used to define the human photopic luminosity, or V lambda, function on which photometry is based. 2. We have studied the responses of macaque retinal ganglion cells using this stimulus paradigm. The responses of the phasic ganglion cells go through a minimum at relative radiances very similar to that predicted from the V lambda function. At this point, defined as equal luminance, an abrupt change in response phase was observed. A small residual response at twice the flicker frequency was apparent under some conditions. 3. The spectral sensitivity of parafoveal phasic cells measured in this way corresponded very closely to that of human observers minimizing flicker on the same apparatus. 4. Minima in phasic cell activity were independent of flicker frequency, as is the case in the psychophysical task. 5. The response minima of phasic cells obey the laws of additivity and transitivity which are important characteristics of heterochromatic flicker photometry. 6. As the relative intensities of the lights were altered responses of tonic, spectrally opponent cells usually underwent a gradual phase change with vigorous responses at equal luminance. The responses of tonic cells treated individually or as a population could not be related to the V lambda function in any meaningful way. 7. We conclude that the phasic, magnocellular cell system of the primate visual pathway underlies performance in the psychophysical task of heterochromatic flicker photometry. It is likely that other tasks in which spectral sensitivity conforms to the V lambda function also rely on this cell system. PMID:3253435

  1. Multiplied functions unify shapes of ganglion-cell receptive fields in retina of turtle.

    PubMed

    Dearworth, James R; Granda, A M

    2002-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells in the turtle were extracellularly recorded to define the shapes of their receptive fields by small moving light spots. To better define the geometries, spectral-light adaptations and vitreal injections of 2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (APB) were used to disrupt balances in field organization along dimensions of wavelength, ON and OFF responses, and center/surround areas. Three-dimensional data plots were fit by Gaussian, Gabor, and cardioid functions to show that the shapes of receptive fields are predicted by combinations of these multiplied functions. Results indicate that Gaussian functions describe simple symmetrical receptive fields that are center-only; Gabor functions describe center/surround color-opponent receptive fields that have a ring of spike activity in the periphery; and directionally selective receptive fields, in contrast, which are asymmetrical, are described by cardioid functions adjoined to Gaussian or Gabor functions. The advantage of linking multiplied functions is that receptive fields are unified by a model that predicts progressively more complex field geometries derived from particular stimulating conditions. PMID:12678583

  2. Protan-like spectral sensitivity of foveal Y ganglion cells of the retina of macaque monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    de Monasterio, F M; Schein, S J

    1980-01-01

    1. The spectral sensitivity of two varieties of macaque Y ganglion cells with a centre-surround organization, type III (non-colour opponent) and type IV (broad-band colour opponent), was examined with test stimuli of different size, shape and wave-length. 2. The spectral sensitivity of type III cells to large stimuli decreased at the long wave-lengths with decreasing retinal eccentricity; this change was due to a lower sensitivity of green-sensitive than of red-sensitive cone input to the surround of foveal cells, which resulted in stronger surround antagonism at the long than at the short wave-lengths leading to a rudimentary form of colour opponency. 3. The spectral properties of foveal type III cells were intermediate between those of perifoveal type III cells, whose surrounds receive a rather similar input from both cone types, and of the predominantly foveal type IV cells, whose surrounds appeared to lack input from green-sensitive cones. 4. The results indicate that both cell types represent varieties within a continuum of a single macaque Y-cell system which has a reduced long-wave-length sensitivity in the foveal region. The fact that a similar reduction of long-wave-length sensitivity can be observed in (foveal) macaque photopic luminosity functions measured with different techniques by different authors suggest that both types of Y cell have an important role in the processing of luminance information. PMID:6770078

  3. The rat retina has five types of ganglion-cell photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Reifler, Aaron N; Chervenak, Andrew P; Dolikian, Michael E; Benenati, Brian A; Meyers, Benjamin S; Demertzis, Zachary D; Lynch, Andrew M; Li, Benjamin Y; Wachter, Rebecca D; Abufarha, Fady S; Dulka, Eden A; Pack, Weston; Zhao, Xiwu; Wong, Kwoon Y

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) are inner retinal photoreceptors that mediate non-image-forming visual functions, e.g. pupillary constriction, regulation of pineal melatonin release, and circadian photoentrainment. Five types of ipRGCs were recently discovered in mouse, but whether they exist in other mammals remained unknown. We report that the rat also has five types of ipRGCs, whose morphologies match those of mouse ipRGCs; this is the first demonstration of all five cell types in a non-mouse species. Through immunostaining and λmax measurements, we showed that melanopsin is likely the photopigment of all rat ipRGCs. The various cell types exhibited diverse spontaneous spike rates, with the M1 type spiking the least and M4 spiking the most, just like we had observed for their mouse counterparts. Also similar to mouse, all ipRGCs in rat generated not only sluggish intrinsic photoresponses but also fast, synaptically driven ones. However, we noticed two significant differences between these species. First, whereas we learned previously that all mouse ipRGCs had equally sustained synaptic light responses, rat M1 cells' synaptic photoresponses were far more transient than those of M2-M5. Since M1 cells provide all input to the circadian clock, this rat-versus-mouse discrepancy could explain the difference in photoentrainment threshold between mouse and other species. Second, rat ipRGCs' melanopsin-based spiking photoresponses could be classified into three varieties, but only two were discerned for mouse ipRGCs. This correlation of spiking photoresponses with cell types will help researchers classify ipRGCs in multielectrode-array (MEA) spike recordings. PMID:25450063

  4. Protection of Retinal Ganglion Cells and Retinal Vasculature by Lycium Barbarum Polysaccharides in a Mouse Model of Acute Ocular Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Xue-Song; Feng, Qian; Lo, Amy Cheuk Yin; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung; Lin, Bin; Chung, Sookja Kim; So, Kwok-Fai

    2012-01-01

    Acute ocular hypertension (AOH) is a condition found in acute glaucoma. The purpose of this study is to investigate the protective effect of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP) and its protective mechanisms in the AOH insult. LBP has been shown to exhibit neuroprotective effect in the chronic ocular hypertension (COH) experiments. AOH mouse model was induced in unilateral eye for one hour by introducing 90 mmHg ocular pressure. The animal was fed with LBP solution (1 mg/kg) or vehicle daily from 7 days before the AOH insult till sacrifice at either day 4 or day 7 post insult. The neuroprotective effects of LBP on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and blood-retinal-barrier (BRB) were evaluated. In control AOH retina, loss of RGCs, thinning of IRL thickness, increased IgG leakage, broken tight junctions, and decreased density of retinal blood vessels were observed. However, in LBP-treated AOH retina, there was less loss of RGCs with thinning of IRL thickness, IgG leakage, more continued structure of tight junctions associated with higher level of occludin protein and the recovery of the blood vessel density when compared with vehicle-treated AOH retina. Moreover, we found that LBP provides neuroprotection by down-regulating RAGE, ET-1, Aβ and AGE in the retina, as well as their related signaling pathways, which was related to inhibiting vascular damages and the neuronal degeneration in AOH insults. The present study suggests that LBP could prevent damage to RGCs from AOH-induced ischemic injury; furthermore, through its effects on blood vessel protection, LBP would also be a potential treatment for vascular-related retinopathy. PMID:23094016

  5. Suppression of Acid Sphingomyelinase Protects the Retina from Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jie; Wu, Bill X.; Crosson, Craig E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to ceramide and mediates multiple responses involved in inflammatory and apoptotic signaling. However, the role ASMase plays in ischemic retinal injury has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to investigate how reduced ASMase expression impacts retinal ischemic injury. Methods Changes in ceramide levels and ASMase activity were determined by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis and ASMase activity. Retinal function and morphology were assessed by electroretinography (ERG) and morphometric analyses. Levels of TNF-α were determined by ELISA. Activation of p38 MAP kinase was assessed by Western blot analysis. Results In wild-type mice, ischemia produced a significant increase in retinal ASMase activity and ceramide levels. These increases were associated with functional deficits as measured by ERG analysis and significant structural degeneration in most retinal layers. In ASMase+/− mice, retinal ischemia did not significantly alter ASMase activity, and the rise in ceramide levels were significantly reduced compared to levels in retinas from wild-type mice. In ASMase+/− mice, functional and morphometric analyses of ischemic eyes revealed significantly less retinal degeneration than in injured retinas from wild-type mice. The ischemia-induced increase in retinal TNF-α levels was suppressed by the administration of the ASMase inhibitor desipramine, or by reducing ASMase expression. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that reducing ASMase expression provides partial protection from ischemic injury. Hence, the production of ceramide and subsequent mediators plays a role in the development of ischemic retinal injury. Modulating ASMase may present new opportunities for adjunctive therapies when treating retinal ischemic disorders. PMID:27571014

  6. Heat shock proteins in the retina: Focus on HSP70 and alpha crystallins in ganglion cell survival.

    PubMed

    Piri, Natik; Kwong, Jacky M K; Gu, Lei; Caprioli, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) belong to a superfamily of stress proteins that are critical constituents of a complex defense mechanism that enhances cell survival under adverse environmental conditions. Cell protective roles of HSPs are related to their chaperone functions, antiapoptotic and antinecrotic effects. HSPs' anti-apoptotic and cytoprotective characteristics, their ability to protect cells from a variety of stressful stimuli, and the possibility of their pharmacological induction in cells under pathological stress make these proteins an attractive therapeutic target for various neurodegenerative diseases; these include Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, prion disease, and others. This review discusses the possible roles of HSPs, particularly HSP70 and small HSPs (alpha A and alpha B crystallins) in enhancing the survival of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in optic neuropathies such as glaucoma, which is characterized by progressive loss of vision caused by degeneration of RGCs and their axons in the optic nerve. Studies in animal models of RGC degeneration induced by ocular hypertension, optic nerve crush and axotomy show that upregulation of HSP70 expression by hyperthermia, zinc, geranyl-geranyl acetone, 17-AAG (a HSP90 inhibitor), or through transfection of retinal cells with AAV2-HSP70 effectively supports the survival of injured RGCs. RGCs survival was also stimulated by overexpression of alpha A and alpha B crystallins. These findings provide support for translating the HSP70- and alpha crystallin-based cell survival strategy into therapy to protect and rescue injured RGCs from degeneration associated with glaucomatous and other optic neuropathies. PMID:27017896

  7. Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase B2 is Highly Expressed in the Retina and Protects Retinal Pigmented Epithelium Cells from Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Iranzu; Larrayoz, Ignacio M.; Campos, Maria M.; Rodriguez, Ignacio R.

    2010-01-01

    Methionine sulfoxide reductase B2 (MSRB2) is a mitochondrial enzyme that converts methionine sulfoxide (R) enantiomer back to methionine. This enzyme is suspected of functioning to protect mitochondrial proteins from oxidative damage. In this study we report that the retina is one of the human tissues with highest levels of MSRB2 mRNA expression. Other tissues with high expression were heart, kidney and skeletal muscle. Over-expression of a MSRB2-GFP fusion protein increased the MSR enzymatic activity three-fold in stably transfected cultured RPE cells. This overexpression augmented the resistance of these cells to the toxicity induced by 7-ketocholesterol, tert-butyl hydroperoxide and all-trans retinoic acid. By contrast, knockdown of MSRB2 by a miRNA in stably transfected cells did not convey increased sensitivity to the oxidative stress. In the monkey retina MSRB2 localized to the ganglion cell layer (GLC), the outer plexiform layer (OPL) and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). MSRB2 expression is most pronounced in the OPL of the macula and foveal regions suggesting an association with the cone synaptic mitochondria. Our data suggests that MSRB2 plays an important function in protecting cones from multiple type of oxidative stress and may be critical in preserving central vision. PMID:20026324

  8. Parallel ON and OFF cone bipolar inputs establish spatially-coextensive receptive field structure of blue-yellow ganglion cells in primate retina

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Joanna D.; Davenport, Christopher M.; Peterson, Beth B.; Packer, Orin S.; Detwiler, Peter B.; Dacey, Dennis M.

    2009-01-01

    In the primate retina the small bistratified, ‘blue-yellow’ color-opponent ganglion cell receives parallel ON-depolarizing and OFF-hyperpolarizing inputs from short (S) wavelength sensitive and combined long (L) and middle (M) wavelength sensitive cone photoreceptors respectively. However the synaptic pathways that create S vs LM cone-opponent receptive field structure remain controversial. Here we show in the macaque monkey retina in vitro that at photopic light levels, when an identified rod input is excluded, the small bistratified cell displays a spatially coextensive receptive field in which the S-ON-input is in spatial, temporal and chromatic balance with the LM-OFF-input. ON pathway block with L-AP-4, the mGluR6 receptor agonist, abolished the SON response but spared the LM-OFF response. The isolated LM component showed a center-surround receptive field structure consistent with an input from OFF-center, ON-surround ‘diffuse’ cone bipolar cells. Increasing retinal buffering capacity with HEPES attenuated the LM-ON surround component, consistent with a non-GABAergic outer retina feedback mechanism for the bipolar surround. The GABAa/c receptor antagonist picrotoxin and the glycine receptor antagonist strychnine did not affect chromatic balance or the basic coextensive receptive field structure suggesting that the LM-OFF field is not generated by an inner retinal inhibitory pathway. We conclude that the opponent S-ON and LM-OFF responses originate from the excitatory receptive field centers of S-ON and LM-OFF cone bipolar cells and that the LM-OFF- and ON-surrounds of these parallel bipolar inputs largely cancel, explaining the small, spatially coextensive but spectrally antagonistic receptive field structure of the blue-ON ganglion cell. PMID:19571128

  9. Three Forms of Spatial Temporal Feedforward Inhibition Are Common to Different Ganglion Cell Types in Rabbit Retina

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Hsueh, Hain-Ann; Greenberg, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    There exist more than 30 different morphological amacrine cell types, but there may be fewer physiological types. Here we studied the amacrine cell outputs by measuring the temporal and spatial properties of feedforward inhibition to four different types of ganglion cells. These ganglion cells, each with concentric receptive field organization, appear to receive a different relative contribution of the same three forms of feed-forward inhibition, namely: local glycinergic, local sustained GABAergic, and broad transient GABAergic inhibition. Two of these inhibitory components, local glycinergic inhibition and local sustained GABAergic inhibition were localized to narrow regions confined to the dendritic fields of the ganglion cells. The third, a broad transient GABAergic inhibition, was driven from regions peripheral to the dendritic area. Each inhibitory component is also correlated with characteristic kinetics expressed in all ganglion cells: broad transient GABAergic inhibition had the shortest latency, local glycinergic inhibition had an intermediate latency, and local sustained GABAergic inhibition had the longest latency. We suggest each of these three inhibitory components represents the output from a distinct class of amacrine cell, mediates a specific visual function, and each forms a basic functional component for the four ganglion cell types. Similar subunits likely exist in the circuits of other ganglion cell types as well. PMID:20220071

  10. Effects of Dopamine D2-Like Receptor Antagonists on Light Responses of Ganglion Cells in Wild-Type and P23H Rat Retinas

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    In animal models of retinitis pigmentosa the dopaminergic system in the retina appears to be dysfunctional, which may contribute to the debilitated sight experienced by retinitis pigmentosa patients. Since dopamine D2-like receptors are known to modulate the activity of dopaminergic neurons, I examined the effects of dopamine D2-like receptor antagonists on the light responses of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the P23H rat model of retinitis pigmentosa. Extracellular electrical recordings were made from RGCs in isolated transgenic P23H rat retinas and wild-type Sprague-Dawley rat retinas. Intensity-response curves to flashes of light were evaluated prior to and during bath application of a dopamine D2-like receptor antagonist. The dopamine D2/D3 receptor antagonists sulpiride and eticlopride and the D4 receptor antagonist L-745,870 increased light sensitivity of P23H rat RGCs but decreased light sensitivity in Sprague-Dawley rat RGCs. In addition, L-745,870, but not sulpiride or eticlopride, reduced the maximum peak responses of Sprague-Dawley rat RGCs. I describe for the first time ON-center RGCs in P23H rats that exhibit an abnormally long-latency (>200 ms) response to the onset of a small spot of light. Both sulpiride and eticlopride, but not L-745,870, reduced this ON response and brought out a short-latency OFF response, suggesting that these cells are in actuality OFF-center cells. Overall, the results show that the altered dopaminergic system in degenerate retinas contributes to the deteriorated light responses of RGCs. PMID:26717015

  11. Effects of Dopamine D2-Like Receptor Antagonists on Light Responses of Ganglion Cells in Wild-Type and P23H Rat Retinas.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    In animal models of retinitis pigmentosa the dopaminergic system in the retina appears to be dysfunctional, which may contribute to the debilitated sight experienced by retinitis pigmentosa patients. Since dopamine D2-like receptors are known to modulate the activity of dopaminergic neurons, I examined the effects of dopamine D2-like receptor antagonists on the light responses of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the P23H rat model of retinitis pigmentosa. Extracellular electrical recordings were made from RGCs in isolated transgenic P23H rat retinas and wild-type Sprague-Dawley rat retinas. Intensity-response curves to flashes of light were evaluated prior to and during bath application of a dopamine D2-like receptor antagonist. The dopamine D2/D3 receptor antagonists sulpiride and eticlopride and the D4 receptor antagonist L-745,870 increased light sensitivity of P23H rat RGCs but decreased light sensitivity in Sprague-Dawley rat RGCs. In addition, L-745,870, but not sulpiride or eticlopride, reduced the maximum peak responses of Sprague-Dawley rat RGCs. I describe for the first time ON-center RGCs in P23H rats that exhibit an abnormally long-latency (>200 ms) response to the onset of a small spot of light. Both sulpiride and eticlopride, but not L-745,870, reduced this ON response and brought out a short-latency OFF response, suggesting that these cells are in actuality OFF-center cells. Overall, the results show that the altered dopaminergic system in degenerate retinas contributes to the deteriorated light responses of RGCs. PMID:26717015

  12. The distribution of the preferred directions of the ON–OFF direction selective ganglion cells in the rabbit retina requires refinement after eye opening

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ya-Chien; Chiao, Chuan-Chin

    2013-01-01

    The ON–OFF direction selective ganglion cells (DSGCs) in the mammalian retina respond differentially for an object moving in different directions. DSGCs can be further segregated into four functional subtypes, namely those responsible for the detection of motion in the superior, inferior, anterior, and posterior directions of the visual field. Although it has been known that the basic neural circuit of direction selectivity is established at around the time of eye opening, it is less known if the four DSGC subtypes can be unambiguously distinguished at this time and whether their preferred directions are aligned with four canonical axes at this developmental stage. By examining the preferred directions of DSGCs in P10-12 rabbit retinas and characterizing their distribution pattern, we have shown that the preferred directions of DSGCs at around the time of eye opening are not distinctly segregated but rather are diffusely distributed along the four canonical axes. Similar results were found in the mouse retina by reanalyzing previously published data. Furthermore, taking into account the fact that the direction tuning strength of DSGCs at P10-12 is weaker than that in adults, this was found not to be correlated with their preferred directions, which suggests that the maturations of direction selectivity and preferred direction are independent processes. In addition, we also found that the subtypes of DSGCs, which do not display tracer coupling pattern in the adult, show extensive coupling at P10-12. Taken together, the present study supports that the significant refinement after eye opening is required for the development of the four functional DSGC subtypes in the rabbit retina. PMID:24303104

  13. Sulforaphane Protects Rodent Retinas against Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury through the Activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 Antioxidant Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruixing; Brecha, Nicholas C.; Yu, Albert Cheung Hoi; Pu, Mingliang

    2014-01-01

    Retinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury induces oxidative stress, leukocyte infiltration, and neuronal cell death. Sulforaphane (SF), which can be obtained in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, exerts protective effects in response to oxidative stress in various tissues. These effects can be initiated through nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). This investigation was designed to elucidate the neural protective mechanisms of SF in the retinal I/R rat model. Animals were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with SF (12.5 mg/kg) or vehicle (corn oil) once a day for 7 consecutive days. Then, retinal I/R was made by elevating the intraocular pressure (IOP) to 130 mmHg for 1 h. To determine if HO-1 was involved in the Nrf2 antioxidant pathway, rats were subjected to protoporphyrin IX zinc (II) (ZnPP, 30 mg/kg, i.p.) treatments at 24 h before retinal ischemia. The neuroprotective effects of SF were assessed by determining the morphology of the retina, counting the infiltrating inflammatory cells and the surviving retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and amacrine cells, and measuring apoptosis in the retinal layers. The expression of Nrf2 and HO-1 was studied by immunofluorescence analysis and western blotting. I/R induced a marked increase of ROS generation, caused pronounced inflammation, increased the apoptosis of RGCs and amacrine cells and caused the thinning of the inner retinal layer (IRL), and these effects were diminished or abolished by SF pretreatment. Meanwhile, SF pretreatment significantly elevated the nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 and the level of HO-1 expression in the I/R retinas; however, ZnPP reversed the protective effects of SF on I/R retinas. Together, we offer direct evidence that SF had protective effects on I/R retinas, which could be attributed, at least in part, to the activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 antioxidant pathway. PMID:25470382

  14. Staurosporine induces ganglion cell differentiation in part by stimulating urokinase-type plasminogen activator expression and activation in the developing chick retina

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yeoun-Hee; Chang, Yongmin; Jung, Jae-Chang

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Staurosporine mediates stimulation of RGC differentiation in vitro cultured retinal neuroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Staurosporine mediates uPA activation during RGC differentiation in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of uPA blocks the staurosporine mediated RGC differentiation both in vitro and in ovo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thus, uPA may play a role in the staurosporine-mediated stimulation of RGC differentiation. -- Abstract: Here, we investigated whether staurosporine-mediated urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activation is involved in retinal ganglion cell (RGC) differentiation. Retinal cells were isolated from developing chick retinas at embryonic day 6 (E6). Relatively few control cells grown in serum-free medium started to form processes by 12 h. In contrast, staurosporine-treated cells had processes within 3 h, and processes were evident at 8 h. Immunofluorescence staining showed that Tuj-1-positive cells with shorter neurites could be detected in control cultures at 18 h, whereas numerous Tuj-1 positive ganglion cells with longer neuritic extensions were seen in staurosporine-treated cultures. BrdU-positive proliferating cells were more numerous in control cultures than in staurosporine-treated cultures, and the BrdU staining was not detected in post-mitotic Tuj-1 positive ganglion cells. Western blotting of cell lysates showed that staurosporine induced high levels of the active form of uPA. The staurosporine-induced uPA signal was localized predominantly in the soma, neurites and axons of Tuj-1-positive ganglion cells. Amiloride, an inhibitor of uPA, markedly reduced staurosporine-induced Tuj-1 staining, neurite length, neurite number, and uPA staining versus controls. In developing retinas in ovo, amiloride administration remarkably reduced the staurosporine-induced uPA staining and RGC differentiation. Taken together, our in vitro and in vivo data collectively indicate that

  15. Peak density, size and regional distribution of ganglion cells in the retina of the fur seal Callorhinus ursinus.

    PubMed

    Mass, A M; Supin, A Y

    1992-01-01

    The total number, size, topographic distribution and peak density of ganglion cells were studied in retinal wholemounts of the fur seal, Callorhinus ursinus. The cell distribution showed a distinct zone of high ganglion cell density. It was located in the temporal retinal quadrant, near the horizontal meridian, 10-12 mm (25-31 degrees) from the optic disk. The peak cell density in this zone was 812-1332 cells/mm2 (mean 1053 cells/mm2), i.e. 125-205 cells/deg2 (mean 162 cells/deg2). These data predict a retinal resolution of 5.6-7.1 cycle/deg. The ganglion cell soma size ranged from 10 to 50 microns. Cell size histograms were bimodal in shape with modes below and above 30 microns. PMID:1555111

  16. Effects of GABA receptor antagonists on thresholds of P23H rat retinal ganglion cells to electrical stimulation of the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Ralph J.; Rizzo, Joseph F., III

    2011-06-01

    An electronic retinal prosthesis may provide useful vision for patients suffering from retinitis pigmentosa (RP). In animal models of RP, the amount of current needed to activate retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is higher than in normal, healthy retinas. In this study, we sought to reduce the stimulation thresholds of RGCs in a degenerate rat model (P23H-line 1) by blocking GABA receptor mediated inhibition in the retina. We examined the effects of TPMPA, a GABAC receptor antagonist, and SR95531, a GABAA receptor antagonist, on the electrically evoked responses of RGCs to biphasic current pulses delivered to the subretinal surface through a 400 µm diameter electrode. Both TPMPA and SR95531 reduced the stimulation thresholds of ON-center RGCs on average by 15% and 20% respectively. Co-application of the two GABA receptor antagonists had the greatest effect, on average reducing stimulation thresholds by 32%. In addition, co-application of the two GABA receptor antagonists increased the magnitude of the electrically evoked responses on average three-fold. Neither TPMPA nor SR95531, applied alone or in combination, had consistent effects on the stimulation thresholds of OFF-center RGCs. We suggest that the effects of the GABA receptor antagonists on ON-center RGCs may be attributable to blockage of GABA receptors on the axon terminals of ON bipolar cells.

  17. Vaccination for protection of retinal ganglion cells against death from glutamate cytotoxicity and ocular hypertension: Implications for glaucoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schori, Hadas; Kipnis, Jonathan; Yoles, Eti; Woldemussie, Elizabeth; Ruiz, Guadalupe; Wheeler, Larry A.; Schwartz, Michal

    2001-03-01

    Our group recently demonstrated that autoimmune T cells directed against central nervous system-associated myelin antigens protect neurons from secondary degeneration. We further showed that the synthetic peptide copolymer 1 (Cop-1), known to suppress experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, can be safely substituted for the natural myelin antigen in both passive and active immunization for neuroprotection of the injured optic nerve. Here we attempted to determine whether similar immunizations are protective from retinal ganglion cell loss resulting from a direct biochemical insult caused, for example, by glutamate (a major mediator of degeneration in acute and chronic optic nerve insults) and in a rat model of ocular hypertension. Passive immunization with T cells reactive to myelin basic protein or active immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-derived peptide, although neuroprotective after optic nerve injury, was ineffective against glutamate toxicity in mice and rats. In contrast, the number of surviving retinal ganglion cells per square millimeter in glutamate-injected retinas was significantly larger in mice immunized 10 days previously with Cop-1 emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant than in mice injected with PBS in the same adjuvant (2,133 ± 270 and 1,329 ± 121, respectively, mean ± SEM; P < 0.02). A similar pattern was observed when mice were immunized on the day of glutamate injection (1,777 ± 101 compared with 1,414 ± 36; P <0.05), but not when they were immunized 48h later. These findings suggest that protection from glutamate toxicity requires reinforcement of the immune system by antigens that are different from those associated with myelin. The use of Cop-1 apparently circumvents this antigen specificity barrier. In the rat ocular hypertension model, which simulates glaucoma, immunization with Cop-1 significantly reduced the retinal ganglion cell loss from 27.8%±6.8% to 4.3%±1.6%, without affecting the intraocular pressure

  18. The physiological basis of the minimally distinct border demonstrated in the ganglion cells of the macaque retina.

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, P K; Lee, B B; Martin, P R; Valberg, A

    1990-01-01

    1. The minimally distinct border method involves setting the relative radiances of two adjacent, differently coloured fields until the border between them is minimally distinct. At these radiance settings, the two fields are found to be of equal luminance. The task shares with flicker photometry all the requirements of a photometric method. 2. We have recorded responses of macaque ganglion cells to such borders moved back and forth across the receptive field; the size of the luminance step across the border was systematically varied. 3. Phasic ganglion cells gave transient responses to such borders, consisting of an increase or decrease in firing rate depending on direction of luminance contrast and cell type (on- or off-centre). Tonic ganglion cells gave sustained responses dependent on chromatic contrast across the border. 4. An analysis of phasic cell responses showed a minimum near equal luminance, suggesting their signal could readily support the minimally distinct border task. We could not devise a scheme whereby tonic cells could support the task. 5. Spectral sensitivity of phasic cells, determined from their minima, closely resembled the 10 deg luminous efficiency function, as required of a mechanism underlying the psychophysical performance. 6. For phasic cells, the minimum was independent of movement speed, and hence of eye movement velocity under natural viewing conditions. 7. Proportionality, additivity and transitivity are found psychophysically with the minimally distinct border method. All these properties were also exhibited by phasic cell responses. 8. Residual responses were present in individual phasic cells to equal-luminance borders, probably due to a non-linearity of M- and L-cone summation. The amplitude of residual response depended on the wavelengths on either side of the border, and was zero for pairs of lights lying along a tritanopic confusion line. These residual responses could be correlated with residual border distinctness at equal

  19. Protective effects of triptolide on retinal ganglion cells in a rat model of chronic glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Dongmei; Wu, Lingling; Li, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To study the effects of triptolide, a Chinese herb extract, on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in a rat model of chronic glaucoma. Methods Eighty Wistar rats were randomly divided into triptolide group (n=40) and normal saline (NS) group (n=40). Angle photocoagulation was used to establish the model of glaucoma, with right eye as laser treated eye and left eye as control eye. Triptolide group received triptolide intraperitoneally daily, while NS group received NS. Intraocular pressure (IOP), anti-CD11b immunofluorescent stain in retina and optic nerve, RGCs count with Nissel stain and microglia count with anti-CD11b immunofluorescence stain in retina flat mounts, retinal tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α mRNA detection by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, and double immunofluorescent labeling with anti-TNF-α and anti-CD11b in retinal frozen section were performed. Results Mean IOP of the laser treated eyes significantly increased 3 weeks after photocoagulation (P<0.05), with no statistical difference between the two groups (P>0.05). RGCs survival in the laser treated eyes was significantly improved in the triptolide group than the NS group (P<0.05). Microglia count in superficial retina of the laser treated eyes was significantly less in the triptolide group (30.40±4.90) than the NS group (35.06±7.59) (P<0.05). TNF-α mRNA expression in the retina of the laser treated eyes in the triptolide group decreased by 60% compared with that in the NS group (P<0.01). The double immunofluorescent labeling showed that TNF-α was mainly distributed around the microglia. Conclusion Triptolide improved RGCs survival in this rat model of chronic glaucoma, which did not depend on IOP decrease but might be exerted by inhibiting microglia activities and reducing TNF-α secretion. PMID:26604697

  20. Synthesis of docosahexaenoic acid from eicosapentaenoic acid in retina neurons protects photoreceptors from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Simón, María Victoria; Agnolazza, Daniela L; German, Olga Lorena; Garelli, Andrés; Politi, Luis E; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Anderson, Robert E; Rotstein, Nora P

    2016-03-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in activating photoreceptor death in several retinal degenerations. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the major polyunsaturated fatty acid in the retina, protects cultured retina photoreceptors from apoptosis induced by oxidative stress and promotes photoreceptor differentiation. Here, we investigated whether eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a metabolic precursor to DHA, had similar effects and whether retinal neurons could metabolize EPA to DHA. Adding EPA to rat retina neuronal cultures increased opsin expression and protected photoreceptors from apoptosis induced by the oxidants paraquat and hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ). Palmitic, oleic, and arachidonic acids had no protective effect, showing the specificity for DHA. We found that EPA supplementation significantly increased DHA percentage in retinal neurons, but not EPA percentage. Photoreceptors and glial cells expressed Δ6 desaturase (FADS2), which introduces the last double bond in DHA biosynthetic pathway. Pre-treatment of neuronal cultures with CP-24879 hydrochloride, a Δ5/Δ6 desaturase inhibitor, prevented EPA-induced increase in DHA percentage and completely blocked EPA protection and its effect on photoreceptor differentiation. These results suggest that EPA promoted photoreceptor differentiation and rescued photoreceptors from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through its elongation and desaturation to DHA. Our data show, for the first time, that isolated retinal neurons can synthesize DHA in culture. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the major polyunsaturated fatty acid in retina photoreceptors, and its precursor, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) have multiple beneficial effects. Here, we show that retina neurons in vitro express the desaturase FADS2 and can synthesize DHA from EPA. Moreover, addition of EPA to these cultures protects photoreceptors from oxidative stress and promotes their differentiation through its metabolization to DHA. PMID:26662863

  1. Neurodegenerative Diseases of the Retina and Potential for Protection and Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, K.-G; Bergert, H; Funk, R.H.W

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms in the cascade of events resulting in retinal cell death in ocular pathologies like glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration led to the common descriptive term of neurodegenerative diseases of the retina. The final common pathophysiologic pathway of these diseases includes a particular form of metabolic stress, resulting in an insufficient supply of nutrients to the respective target structures (optic nerve head, retina). During metabolic stress, glutamate is released initiating the death of neurones containing ionotropic glutamate (N-methyl-D-aspartat, NMDA) receptors present on ganglion cells and a specific type of amacrine cells. Experimental studies demonstrate that several drugs reduce or prevent the death of retinal neurones deficient of nutrients. These agents generally block NMDA receptors to prevent the action of glutamate or halt the subsequent pathophysiologic cycle resulting in cell death. The major causes for cell death following activation of NMDA receptors are the influx of calcium and sodium into cells, the generation of free radicals linked to the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and/or advanced lipoxidation endproducts (ALEs) as well as defects in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Substances preventing these cytotoxic events are considered to be potentially neuroprotective. PMID:19305795

  2. Isolation and Molecular Profiling of Primary Mouse Retinal Ganglion Cells: Comparison of Phenotypes from Healthy and Glaucomatous Retinas

    PubMed Central

    Chintalapudi, Sumana R.; Djenderedjian, Levon; Stiemke, Andrew B.; Steinle, Jena J.; Jablonski, Monica M.; Morales-Tirado, Vanessa M.

    2016-01-01

    Loss of functional retinal ganglion cells (RGC) is an element of retinal degeneration that is poorly understood. This is in part due to the lack of a reliable and validated protocol for the isolation of primary RGCs. Here we optimize a feasible, reproducible, standardized flow cytometry-based protocol for the isolation and enrichment of homogeneous RGC with the Thy1.2hiCD48negCD15negCD57neg surface phenotype. A three-step validation process was performed by: (1) genomic profiling of 25-genes associated with retinal cells; (2) intracellular labeling of homogeneous sorted cells for the intracellular RGC-markers SNCG, brain-specific homeobox/POU domain protein 3A (BRN3A), TUJ1, and RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (RBPMS); and (3) by applying the methodology on RGC from a mouse model with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) and optic nerve damage. Use of primary RGC cultures will allow for future careful assessment of important cell specific pathways in RGC to provide mechanistic insights into the declining of visual acuity in aged populations and those suffering from retinal neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27242509

  3. Autocrine protective mechanisms of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve crush.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shun-Ping; Fang, Kan-Tang; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Huang, Tzu-Lun; Wen, Yao-Tseng; Tsai, Rong-Kung

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the role of autocrine mechanisms in the anti-apoptotic effects of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) after optic nerve (ON) crush. We observed that both G-CSF and G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) are expressed in normal rat retina. Further dual immunofluorescence staining showed G-CSFR immunoreactive cells were colocalized with RGCs, Müller cells, horizontal and amacrine cells. These results confirm that G-CSF is an endogenous ligand in the retina. The semi-quantitative RT-PCR finding demonstrated the transcription levels of G-CSF and G-CSFR were up-regulated after ON crush injury. G-CSF treatment further increased and prolonged the expression level of G-CSFR in the retina. G-CSF has been shown to enhance transdifferentiation of the mobilized hematopoietic stem cells into tissue to repair central nervous system injury. We test the hypothesis that the hematopoietic stem cells recruited by G-CSF treatment can transdifferentiate into RGCs after ON crush by performing sublethal irradiation of the rats 5 days before ON crush. The flow cytometric analysis showed the number of CD34 positive cells in the peripheral blood is significantly lower in the irradiated, crushed and G-CSF-treated group than the sham control group or crush and G-CSF treated group. Nevertheless, the G-CSF treatment enhances the RGC survival after sublethal irradiation and ON crush injury. These data indicate that G-CSF seems unlikely to induce hematopoietic stem cell transdifferentiation into RGCs after ON crush injury. In conclusion, G-CSF may serve an endogenous protective signaling in the retina through direct activation of intrinsic G-CSF receptors and downstream signaling pathways to rescue RGCs after ON crush injury, exogenous G-CSF administration can enhance the anti-apoptotic effects on RGCs. PMID:26518178

  4. Constitutive Overexpression of Human Erythropoietin Protects the Mouse Retina against Induced But Not Inherited Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Christian; Wenzel, Andreas; Stanescu, Dinu; Samardzija, Marijana; Hotop, Svenja; Groszer, Mathias; Naash, Muna; Gassmann, Max; Remé, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Elevation of erythropoietin (Epo) concentrations by hypoxic preconditioning or application of recombinant human Epo (huEpo) protects the mouse retina against light-induced degeneration by inhibiting photoreceptor cell apoptosis. Because photoreceptor apoptosis is also the common path to cell loss in retinal dystrophies such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP), we tested whether high levels of huEpo would reduce apoptotic cell death in two mouse models of human RP. We combined the two respective mutant mouse lines with a transgenic line (tg6) that constitutively overexpresses huEpo mainly in neural tissues. Transgenic expression of huEpo caused constitutively high levels of Epo in the retina and protected photoreceptors against light-induced degeneration; however, the presence of high levels of huEpo did not affect the course or the extent of retinal degeneration in a light-independent (rd1) and a light-accelerated (VPP) mouse model of RP. Similarly, repetitive intraperitoneal injections of recombinant huEpo did not protect the retina in the rd1 and the VPP mouse. Lack of neuroprotection by Epo in the two models of inherited retinal degeneration was not caused by adaptational downregulation of Epo receptor. Our results suggest that apoptotic mechanisms during acute, light-induced photoreceptor cell death differ from those in genetically based retinal degeneration. Therapeutic intervention with cell death in inherited retinal degeneration may therefore require different drugs and treatments. PMID:15215287

  5. Parallel Inhibition of Dopamine Amacrine Cells and Intrinsically Photosensitive Retinal Ganglion Cells in a Non-Image-Forming Visual Circuit of the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Helen E.; Hardi, Claudia N.; Barnes, Steven

    2015-01-01

    STATEMENT Amacrine cells form multiple microcircuits in the inner retina to mediate visual processing, although their organization and function remain incompletely understood. The somatostatin [somatotropin release inhibiting factor (SRIF)]- and dopamine (DA)-releasing amacrine cells act globally, and, in this study, they are shown to interact and modulate the light response of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs). SRIF amacrine cells target both DA amacrine cells and M1 ipRGCs for inhibition. The parallel actions of SRIF may serve to compensate for the loss of DA-mediated inhibition of M1 ipRGCs. This inhibitory tuning is of particular importance because the DA system mediates a broad range of light adaptational actions in the retina and M1 ipRGCs project to brain areas that influence sleep, mood, cognition, circadian entrainment, and pupillary reflexes. PMID:26631476

  6. Evaluation of the Structure–Function Relationship in Glaucoma Using a Novel Method for Estimating the Number of Retinal Ganglion Cells in the Human Retina

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Ali S.; Hood, Donald C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We developed a simple method for estimating the number of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the human retina using optical coherence tomography (OCT), compared it to a previous approach, and demonstrated its potential for furthering our understanding of the structure–function relationship in glaucoma. Methods Swept-source (ss) OCT data and 10-2 visual fields (VFs) were obtained from 43 eyes of 36 healthy controls, and 50 eyes of 50 glaucoma patients and suspects. Using estimates of RGC density from the literature and relatively few assumptions, estimates of the number of RGCs in the macula were obtained based on ssOCT-derived RGC layer thickness measurements. Results The RGC estimates were in general agreement with previously published values derived from histology, whereas a prior method based on VF sensitivity did not agree as well with histological data and had significantly higher (P = 0.001) and more variable (P < 0.001) RGC estimates than the new method based on ssOCT. However, the RGC estimates of the new approach were not zero for extreme VF losses, suggesting that a residual, non-RGC contribution needs to be added. Finally, the new ssOCT-derived RGC estimates were significantly (P < 0.001 to P = 0.018) related to VF sensitivity (Spearman's ρ = 0.26–0.47), and, in contrast to claims made in prior studies, statistically significant RGC loss did not occur more often than statistically significant visual loss. Conclusions The novel method for estimating RGCs yields values that are closer to histological estimates than prior methods, while relying on considerably fewer assumptions. Although the value added for clinical applications is yet to be determined, this approach is useful for assessing the structure–function relationship in glaucoma. PMID:26305526

  7. The protective role of tacrine and donepezil in the retina of acetylcholinesterase knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Yun-Min; Cai, Li; Shao, Yi; Xu, Man; Yi, Jing-Lin

    2015-01-01

    AIM To determine the effect of different concentrations of the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors tacrine and donepezil on retinal protection in AChE+/− mice (AChE knockout mice) of various ages. METHODS Cultured ARPE-19 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) at concentrations of 0, 250, 500, 1000 and 2000 µmol/L and protein levels were measured using Western blot. Intraperitoneal injections of tacrine and donepezil (0.1 mg/mL, 0.2 mg/mL and 0.4 mg/mL) were respectively given to AChE+/− mice aged 2mo and 4mo and wild-type S129 mice for 7d; phosphate buffered saline (PBS) was administered to the control group. The mice were sacrificed after 30d by in vitro cardiac perfusion and retinal samples were taken. AChE-deficient mice were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis using specific genotyping protocols obtained from the Jackson Laboratory website. H&E staining, immunofluorescence and Western blot were performed to observe AChE protein expression changes in the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell layer. RESULTS Different concentrations of H2O2 induced AChE expression during RPE cell apoptosis. AChE+/− mice retina were thinner than those in wild-type mice (P<0.05); the retinal structure was still intact at 2mo but became thinner with increasing age (P<0.05); furthermore, AChE+/− mice developed more slowly than wild-type mice (P<0.05). Increased concentrations of tacrine and donepezil did not significantly improve the protection of the retina function and morphology (P>0.05). CONCLUSION In vivo, tacrine and donepezil can inhibit the expression of AChE; the decrease of AChE expression in the retina is beneficial for the development of the retina. PMID:26558196

  8. Protective Effect of ALA in Crushed Optic Nerve Cat Retinal Ganglion Cells Using a New Marker RBPMS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanling; Wang, Wenyao; Liu, Jessica; Huang, Xin; Liu, Ruixing; Xia, Huika; Brecha, Nicholas C.; Pu, Mingliang; Gao, Jie

    2016-01-01

    In this study we first sought to determine whether RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (RBPMS) can serve as a specific marker for cat retina ganglion cells (RGCs) using retrograde labeling and immunohistochemistry staining. RBPM was then used as an RGC marker to study RGC survival after optic nerve crush (ONC) and alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) treatment in cats. ALA treatment yielded a peak density of RBPMS-alpha cells within the peak isodensity zone (>60/mm2) which did not differ from ONC retinas. The area within the zone was significantly enlarged (control: 2.3%, ONC: 0.06%, ONC+ALA: 0.1%). As for the 10-21/mm2 zone, ALA treatment resulted in a significant increase in area (control: 34.5%, ONC: 12.1%, ONC+ALA: 35.9%). ALA can alleviate crush-induced RGC injury. PMID:27504635

  9. Time-dependent retinal ganglion cell loss, microglial activation and blood-retina-barrier tightness in an acute model of ocular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Trost, A; Motloch, K; Bruckner, D; Schroedl, F; Bogner, B; Kaser-Eichberger, A; Runge, C; Strohmaier, C; Klein, B; Aigner, L; Reitsamer, H A

    2015-07-01

    Glaucoma is a group of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons, and is the second leading cause of blindness worldwide. Elevated intraocular pressure is a well known risk factor for the development of glaucomatous optic neuropathy and pharmacological or surgical lowering of intraocular pressure represents a standard procedure in glaucoma treatment. However, the treatment options are limited and although lowering of intraocular pressure impedes disease progression, glaucoma cannot be cured by the currently available therapy concepts. In an acute short-term ocular hypertension model in rat, we characterize RGC loss, but also microglial cell activation and vascular alterations of the retina at certain time points. The combination of these three parameters might facilitate a better evaluation of the disease progression, and could further serve as a new model to test novel treatment strategies at certain time points. Acute ocular hypertension (OHT) was induced by the injection of magnetic microbeads into the rat anterior chamber angle (n = 22) with magnetic position control, leading to constant elevation of IOP. At certain time points post injection (4d, 7d, 10d, 14d and 21d), RGC loss, microglial activation, and microvascular pericyte (PC) coverage was analyzed using immunohistochemistry with corresponding specific markers (Brn3a, Iba1, NG2). Additionally, the tightness of the retinal vasculature was determined via injections of Texas Red labeled dextran (10 kDa) and subsequently analyzed for vascular leakage. For documentation, confocal laser-scanning microscopy was used, followed by cell counts, capillary length measurements and morphological and statistical analysis. The injection of magnetic microbeads led to a progressive loss of RGCs at the five time points investigated (20.07%, 29.52%, 41.80%, 61.40% and 76.57%). Microglial cells increased in number and displayed an activated morphology

  10. Protective effects of retinoid x receptors on retina pigment epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Peña, Victoria Belén; Pilotti, Fiorella; Volonté, Yanel; Rotstein, Nora P; Politi, Luis E; German, Olga Lorena

    2016-06-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is among the main pathologies leading to blindness in adults and has currently no cure or effective treatment. Selective apoptosis of retina pigment epithelial (RPE) cells results in the progressive loss of photoreceptor neurons, with the consequent gradual vision loss. Oxidative stress plays an important role in this process. We have previously determined that activation of RXRs protects rat photoreceptor neurons from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. In this study we investigated whether RXR ligands prevented apoptosis in an RPE cell line, D407 cells, exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). H2O2 induced apoptosis of D407 cells, promoting p65NFκB nuclear translocation, increasing Bax mRNA expression, activating caspase-3 and altering cell morphology. We show, for the first time, that HX630, a RXR pan-agonist, protected D407 cells from H2O2-induced apoptosis, preventing p65NFκB nuclear translocation, increasing Bclxl and PPARγ mRNA levels and simultaneously decreasing Bax mRNA levels and caspase-3 activation. Pretreatment with a RXR antagonist blocked HX630 protection. LG100754, which binds RXRs but only activates heterodimers and is an antagonist of RXR homodimers, also had a protective effect. In addition, only agonists known to bind to RXR/PPARγ were protective. As a whole, our results suggest that RXR activation protects RPE cells from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and this protection might involve signaling through a heterodimeric receptor, such as RXR/PPARγ. These data also imply that RXR agonists might provide potential pharmacological tools for treating retina degenerative diseases. PMID:26883505

  11. A novel AhR ligand, 2AI, protects the retina from environmental stress

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Mark A.; Davis, Sonnet S.; Rosko, Andrew; Nguyen, Steven M.; Mitchell, Kylie P.; Mateen, Samiha; Neves, Joana; Garcia, Thelma Y.; Mooney, Shaun; Perdew, Gary H.; Hubbard, Troy D.; Lamba, Deepak A.; Ramanathan, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Various retinal degenerative diseases including dry and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, and diabetic retinopathy are associated with the degeneration of the retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) layer of the retina. This consequently results in the death of rod and cone photoreceptors that they support, structurally and functionally leading to legal or complete blindness. Therefore, developing therapeutic strategies to preserve cellular homeostasis in the RPE would be a favorable asset in the clinic. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a conserved, environmental ligand-dependent, per ARNT-sim (PAS) domain containing bHLH transcription factor that mediates adaptive response to stress via its downstream transcriptional targets. Using in silico, in vitro and in vivo assays, we identified 2,2′-aminophenyl indole (2AI) as a potent synthetic ligand of AhR that protects RPE cells in vitro from lipid peroxidation cytotoxicity mediated by 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE) as well as the retina in vivo from light-damage. Additionally, metabolic characterization of this molecule by LC-MS suggests that 2AI alters the lipid metabolism of RPE cells, enhancing the intracellular levels of palmitoleic acid. Finally, we show that, as a downstream effector of 2AI-mediated AhR activation, palmitoleic acid protects RPE cells from 4HNE-mediated stress, and light mediated retinal degeneration in mice. PMID:27364765

  12. A novel AhR ligand, 2AI, protects the retina from environmental stress.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Mark A; Davis, Sonnet S; Rosko, Andrew; Nguyen, Steven M; Mitchell, Kylie P; Mateen, Samiha; Neves, Joana; Garcia, Thelma Y; Mooney, Shaun; Perdew, Gary H; Hubbard, Troy D; Lamba, Deepak A; Ramanathan, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Various retinal degenerative diseases including dry and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, and diabetic retinopathy are associated with the degeneration of the retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) layer of the retina. This consequently results in the death of rod and cone photoreceptors that they support, structurally and functionally leading to legal or complete blindness. Therefore, developing therapeutic strategies to preserve cellular homeostasis in the RPE would be a favorable asset in the clinic. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a conserved, environmental ligand-dependent, per ARNT-sim (PAS) domain containing bHLH transcription factor that mediates adaptive response to stress via its downstream transcriptional targets. Using in silico, in vitro and in vivo assays, we identified 2,2'-aminophenyl indole (2AI) as a potent synthetic ligand of AhR that protects RPE cells in vitro from lipid peroxidation cytotoxicity mediated by 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE) as well as the retina in vivo from light-damage. Additionally, metabolic characterization of this molecule by LC-MS suggests that 2AI alters the lipid metabolism of RPE cells, enhancing the intracellular levels of palmitoleic acid. Finally, we show that, as a downstream effector of 2AI-mediated AhR activation, palmitoleic acid protects RPE cells from 4HNE-mediated stress, and light mediated retinal degeneration in mice. PMID:27364765

  13. Connexin30.2: In Vitro Interaction with Connexin36 in HeLa Cells and Expression in AII Amacrine Cells and Intrinsically Photosensitive Ganglion Cells in the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Arndt; Tetenborg, Stephan; Greb, Helena; Segelken, Jasmin; Dorgau, Birthe; Weiler, Reto; Hormuzdi, Sheriar G.; Janssen-Bienhold, Ulrike; Dedek, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Electrical coupling via gap junctions is an abundant phenomenon in the mammalian retina and occurs in all major cell types. Gap junction channels are assembled from different connexin subunits, and the connexin composition of the channel confers specific properties to the electrical synapse. In the mouse retina, gap junctions were demonstrated between intrinsically photosensitive ganglion cells and displaced amacrine cells but the underlying connexin remained undetermined. In the primary rod pathway, gap junctions play a crucial role, coupling AII amacrine cells among each other and to ON cone bipolar cells. Although it has long been known that connexin36 and connexin45 are necessary for the proper functioning of this most sensitive rod pathway, differences between homocellular AII/AII gap junctions and AII/ON bipolar cell gap junctions suggested the presence of an additional connexin in AII amacrine cells. Here, we used a connexin30.2-lacZ mouse line to study the expression of connexin30.2 in the retina. We show that connexin30.2 is expressed in intrinsically photosensitive ganglion cells and AII amacrine cells. Moreover, we tested whether connexin30.2 and connexin36—both expressed in AII amacrine cells—are able to interact with each other and are deposited in the same gap junctional plaques. Using newly generated anti-connexin30.2 antibodies, we show in HeLa cells that both connexins are indeed able to interact and may form heteromeric channels: both connexins were co-immunoprecipitated from transiently transfected HeLa cells and connexin30.2 gap junction plaques became significantly larger when co-expressed with connexin36. These data suggest that connexin36 is able to form heteromeric gap junctions with another connexin. We hypothesize that co-expression of connexin30.2 and connexin36 may endow AII amacrine cells with the means to differentially regulate its electrical coupling to different synaptic partners. PMID:27303262

  14. Glia-Neuron Interactions in the Retina Can Be Studied in Cocultures of Müller Cells and Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Skytt, D. M.; Toft-Kehler, A. K.; Brændstrup, C. T.; Cejvanovic, S.; Gurubaran, I. S.; Bergersen, L. H.; Kolko, M.

    2016-01-01

    Glia-neuron partnership is important for inner retinal homeostasis and any disturbances may result in retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death. Müller cells support RGCs with essential functions such as removing excess glutamate and providing energy sources. The aim was to explore the impact of Müller cells on RGC survival. To investigate the Müller cell/RGC interactions we developed a coculture model, in which primary Müller cells were grown in inserts on top of pure primary RGC cultures. The impact of starvation and mitochondrial inhibition on the Müller cell ability to protect RGCs was studied. Moreover, the ability of Müller cells to remove glutamate from the extracellular space was investigated. RGC survival was evaluated by cell viability assays and glutamate uptake was assessed by kinetic uptake assays. We demonstrated a significantly increased RGC survival in presence of untreated and prestarved Müller cells. Additionally, prestarved Müller cells significantly increased RGC survival after mitochondrial inhibition. Finally, we revealed a significantly increased ability to take up glutamate in starved Müller cells. Overall, our study confirms essential roles of Müller cells in RGC survival. We suggest that targeting Müller cell function could have potential for future treatment strategies to prevent blinding neurodegenerative retinal diseases. PMID:27429974

  15. CNTF AND RETINA

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Rong; Tao, Weng; Li, Yiwen; Sieving, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is one of the most studied neurotrophic factors for neuroprotection of the retina. A large body of evidence demonstrates that CNTF promotes rod photoreceptor survival in almost all animal models. Recent studies indicate that CNTF also promotes cone photoreceptor survival and cone outer segment regeneration in the degenerating retina and improves cone function in dogs with congenital achromotopsia. In addition, CNTF is a neuroprotective factor and an axogenesis factor for retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). This review focuses on the effects of exogenous CNTF on photoreceptors and RGCs in the mammalian retina and the potential clinical application of CNTF for retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:22182585

  16. Imipramine protects retinal ganglion cells from oxidative stress through the tyrosine kinase receptor B signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ming-lei; Liu, Guo-hua; Guo, Jin; Yu, Shu-juan; Huang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration is irreversible in glaucoma and tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB)-associated signaling pathways have been implicated in the process. In this study, we attempted to examine whether imipramine, a tricyclic antidepressant, may protect hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced RGC degeneration through the activation of the TrkB pathway in RGC-5 cell lines. RGC-5 cell lines were pre-treated with imipramine 30 minutes before exposure to H2O2. Western blot assay showed that in H2O2 -damaged RGC-5 cells, imipramine activated TrkB pathways through extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase/TrkB phosphorylation. TUNEL staining assay also demonstrated that imipramine ameliorated H2O2 -induced apoptosis in RGC-5 cells. Finally, TrkB-IgG intervention was able to reverse the protective effect of imipramine on H2O2 -induced RGC-5 apoptosis. Imipramine therefore protects RGCs from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through the TrkB signaling pathway. PMID:27127489

  17. Peroxisome Proliferator–Activated Receptor α Protects Capillary Pericytes in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lexi; Cheng, Rui; Hu, Yang; Takahashi, Yusuke; Jenkins, Alicia J.; Keech, Anthony C.; Humphries, Kenneth M.; Gu, Xiaowu; Elliott, Michael H.; Xia, Xiaobo; Ma, Jian-xing

    2015-01-01

    Pericyte degeneration is an early event in diabetic retinopathy and plays an important role in progression of diabetic retinopathy. Clinical studies have shown that fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist, has robust therapeutic effects on diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetic patients. We evaluated the protective effect of PPARα against pericyte loss in diabetic retinopathy. In streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, fenofibrate treatment significantly ameliorated retinal acellular capillary formation and pericyte loss. In contrast, PPARα−/− mice with diabetes developed more severe retinal acellular capillary formation and pericyte dropout, compared with diabetic wild-type mice. Furthermore, PPARα knockout abolished the protective effect of fenofibrate against diabetes-induced retinal pericyte loss. In cultured primary human retinal capillary pericytes, activation and expression of PPARα both significantly reduced oxidative stress–induced apoptosis, decreased reactive oxygen species production, and down-regulated NAD(P)H oxidase 4 expression through blockade of NF-κB activation. Furthermore, activation and expression of PPARα both attenuated the oxidant-induced suppression of mitochondrial O2 consumption in human retinal capillary pericytes. Primary retinal pericytes from PPARα−/− mice displayed more apoptosis, compared with those from wild-type mice under the same oxidative stress. These findings identified a protective effect of PPARα on retinal pericytes, a novel function of endogenous PPARα in the retina. PMID:25108226

  18. Protective effects of bestatin in the retina of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Ahamed; Heron, David; Davenport, Ian; Huckaba, Thomas; Graves, Richard; Mandal, Tarun; Muniruzzaman, Syed; Wang, Shusheng; Bhattacharjee, Partha S

    2016-08-01

    CD13/APN (aminopeptidase N) was first identified as a selective angiogenic marker expressed in tumor vasculature and is considered a target for anti-cancer therapy. CD13 was also reported to express in non-diabetic, hypoxia-induced retinal neovascularization. Whether diabetes induces upregulation of CD13 expression in the retina is unknown. We hypothesize that at an early stage of non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) characterized by disruption of blood-retinal barrier (BRB) permeability is related to upregulated expression of CD13 because of its known role in extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the role of CD13/APN and the therapeutic efficacy of a CD13/APN inhibitor in a mouse model of streptozotocin-induced NPDR. Hyperglycemic C57Bl/6 mice 26 weeks after streptozotocin (STZ) injection were intravitreally injected with a sustained release formulation of CD13/APN inhibitor bestatin. At 15th day of post-bestatin treatment, mouse retinas were evaluated for vascular permeability by Evans blue dye extravasation assay, fluorescent angiography of retinal vascular permeability and leukostasis. Retinal protein extracts were analyzed by Western blot to determine the effects of bestatin treatment on the expression of CD13/APN related inflammatory mediators of ECM degradation and angiogenesis. Intravitreal bestatin treatment significantly inhibited retinal vascular permeability and leukostasis. This treatment also significantly inhibited retinal expression of CD13, ECM degrading proteases (heparanase and MMP9 and angiogenic molecules (HIF-1α and VEGF). Intravitreal CD13 inhibition may relate to furthering our knowledge on the protective effect of bestatin against diabetic retinal vasculature abnormalities through inhibition of retinal permeability, leukostasis, inflammatory molecules of ECM degradation and angiogenesis. PMID:27344955

  19. Paradoxical Role of BDNF: BDNF+/− Retinas Are Protected against Light Damage–Mediated Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, R. Brooks; Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Photoreceptors can be prevented from undergoing apoptosis in response to constant light by the application of exogenous neuroprotective agents, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF, however, cannot exert its effect directly on photoreceptors because they do not express receptors for BDNF. It has been proposed that BDNF released from Müller cells provides a feed-forward loop, increasing ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) production in Müller cells, which may enhance photoreceptor survival. The authors hypothesized that retinas with reduced BDNF levels in which the BDNF-mediated release of neuroprotective signals is dampened are more susceptible to light-induced photoreceptor degeneration. Methods Young adult BDNF+/+ and BDNF+/− littermates (B6.129-BDNFtm1-LT) were analyzed. Retinal neurotrophin and growth factor mRNA levels were determined by quantitative RT-PCR, photoreceptor function was assessed through electroretinography, and survival was documented in morphologic sections and in TUNEL assays. Oxidative stress was assayed by measuring glutathione peroxidase activity. Results baseline, BDNF+/− animals had significantly increased levels of glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) mRNA compared with their wild-type littermates. After light damage GDNF, CNTF, and BDNF mRNA levels dropped 14- to 16-fold in the BDNF+/+ mice but remained almost unchanged compared with baseline levels in the BDNF+/− mice. Preservation of neurotrophin levels in BDNF+/− mice correlated with photoreceptor cell survival, preservation of function, and reduced oxidative stress. Conclusions Contrary to the hypothesis, reducing BDNF levels resulted in photoreceptor protection against light damage. Survival was paralleled by a reduction in oxidative stress and the preservation of neurotrophin levels, suggesting that chronic reduction of BDNF in the retina provides a level of preconditioning against stress. PMID

  20. Protective effects of flunarizine on ischemic injury in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Lam, T T; Edward, D P; Buchi, E R; Tso, M O

    1992-06-01

    Intracellular calcium overload has been implicated to be a major factor in triggering cell death after ischemic neuronal injury. We investigated the effects of flunarizine hydrochloride, a calcium-overload blocker, on pressure-induced retinal ischemia in a rat model. Retinal ischemia was induced in intraocular pressure to 110 mm Hg for 45 minutes. Two regimens of treatment with flunarizine were examined: (1) prophylactic treatment, in which flunarizine was administered before ischemia and in the early phase of reperfusion; and (2) postischemic treatment, in which flunarizine was administered only in the early phase of reperfusion. Injury was evaluated morphologically and morphometrically by measuring the thickness of the inner retinal layers on plastic-embedded retinal sections and by counting the retinal ganglion cells on retinal flat preparations. By morphologic and morphometric criteria, a significant but partial protection of the inner retinal layers was noted in the groups given either regimen. This protective effect of flunarizine suggests that elevated intracellular calcium concentration may play an important role in ischemic retinal injury. PMID:1596236

  1. The Retina of Ansorge's Cusimanse (Crossarchus ansorgei): Number, Topography and Convergence of Photoreceptors and Ganglion Cells in Relation to Ecology and Behavior.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, João Paulo; Kaswera-Kyamakya, Consolate; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Manger, Paul R; Collin, Shaun P

    2015-01-01

    The family Herpestidae (cusimanses and mongooses) is a monophyletic radiation of carnivores with remarkable variation in microhabitat occupation and diel activity, but virtually nothing is known about how they use vision in the context of their behavioral ecology. In this paper, we measured the number and topographic distribution of neurons (rods, cones and retinal ganglion cells) and estimated the spatial resolving power of the eye of the diurnal, forest-dwelling Ansorge's cusimanse (Crossarchus ansorgei). Using retinal wholemounts and stereology, we found that rods are more numerous (42,500,000; 92%) than cones (3,900,000; 8%). Rod densities form a concentric and dorsotemporally asymmetric plateau that matches the location and shape of a bright yellow tapetum lucidum located within the dorsal aspect of the eye. Maximum rod density (340,300 cells/mm(2)) occurs within an elongated plateau below the optic disc that corresponds to a transitional region between the tapetum lucidum and the pigmented choroid. Cone densities form a temporal area with a peak density of 44,500 cells/mm(2) embedded in a weak horizontal streak that matches the topographic distribution of retinal ganglion cells. Convergence ratios of cones to retinal ganglion cells vary from 50:1 in the far periphery to 3:1 in the temporal area. With a ganglion cell peak density of 13,400 cells/mm(2) and an eye size of 11 mm in axial length, we estimated upper limits of spatial resolution of 7.5-8 cycles/degree, which is comparable to other carnivores such as hyenas. In conclusion, we suggest that the topographic retinal traits described for Ansorge's cusimanse conform to a presumed carnivore retinal blueprint but also show variations that reflect its specific ecological needs. PMID:26288092

  2. Sarpogrelate, a 5-HT2A Receptor Antagonist, Protects the Retina From Light-Induced Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tullis, Brandon E.; Ryals, Renee C.; Coyner, Aaron S.; Gale, Michael J.; Nicholson, Alex,; Ku, Cristy,; Regis, Dain,; Sinha, Wrik,; Datta, Shreya,; Wen, Yuquan,; Yang, Paul,; Pennesi, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine if sarpogrelate, a selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, is protective against light-induced retinopathy in BALB/c mice. Methods BALB/c mice were dosed intraperitoneally with 5, 15, 30, 40, or 50 mg/kg sarpogrelate 48, 24, and 0 hours prior to bright light exposure (10,000 lux) as well as 24 and 48 hours after exposure. Additionally, a single injection regimen was evaluated by injecting mice with 50 mg/kg sarpogrelate once immediately prior to light exposure. To investigate the potential for additive effects of serotonin receptor agents, a combination therapy consisting of sarpogrelate (15 mg/kg) and 8-OH-DPAT (1 mg/kg) was evaluated with the 5-day treatment regimen. Neuroprotection was characterized by the preservation of retinal thickness and function, measured by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and electroretinography (ERG), respectively. Results Mice that were light damaged and injected with saline had significantly reduced outer retinal thickness, total retinal thickness, and ERG amplitudes compared with naïve mice. A 5-day administration of 15, 30, or 40 mg/kg of sarpogrelate was able to partially protect retinal morphology and full protection of retinal morphology was achieved with a 50 mg/kg dose. Both 15 and 30 mg/kg doses of sarpogrelate partially preserved retinal function measured by ERG, whereas 40 and 50 mg/kg doses fully preserved retinal function. Additionally, a single administration of 50 mg/kg sarpogrelate was able to fully preserve both retinal morphology and function. Administration of 15 mg/kg of sarpogrelate and 1 mg/kg of 8-OH-DPAT together demonstrated an additive effect and fully preserved retinal morphology. Conclusions A 5- or 1-day treatment with 50 mg/kg sarpogrelate can completely protect the retina of BALB/c mice from light-induced retinopathy. Partial protection can be achieved with lower doses starting at 15 mg/kg and protection increases in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with low

  3. Serum Response Factor Protects Retinal Ganglion Cells Against High-Glucose Damage.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yan; Wang, Liang; Zhao, Junhong; Zhang, Hongbing; Tian, Ying; Liang, Houcheng; Ma, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Serum response factor (SRF), which encodes the MADS-box family of related proteins, is a common transcription factor related to the expression of genes associated with cell survival. However, SRF's role in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) after high-glucose injury remains unclear. In this study, we investigate the protective role of SRF after high-glucose injury and its underlying mechanism. The in vitro RGC model subjected to high glucose was established by employing a 50 mmol/L glucose culture environment. As detected by real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot, SRF was significantly upregulated in RGCs treated with high glucose. Overexpression of SRF significantly promoted survival among RGCs exposed to high glucose and inhibited RGC apoptosis. Knockdown of SRF exerted an inverse effect. Moreover, SRF upregulation enhanced expression of an antioxidant protein, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2), via control of the Fos-related antigen 1 (Fra-1). SRF upregulation also affected RGC survival after high-glucose treatment. Our findings showed that overexpression of SRF promoted survival of RGCs after high-glucose injury by regulating Fra-1 and Nrf2. PMID:26803311

  4. Grape seed proanthocyanidin extract protects the retina against early diabetic injury by activating the Nrf2 pathway

    PubMed Central

    SUN, YAN; XIU, CAIMEI; LIU, WEI; TAO, YUAN; WANG, JIANRONG; QU, YI

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether grape seed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE) has a protective effect on diabetic retinal function. A total of 30 Wistar rats were randomly divided into three equal groups, including the control, diabetic and GSPE-treated diabetic groups. Retinal tissue was harvested and subsequently stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) levels were evaluated using respective assay kits; whereas nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression levels were assessed by immunohistochemical and western blot analysis. Cell apoptosis in the retina was determined using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling method. The results showed that the structure of the retina was damaged in diabetic rats, as compared with the control rats. Notably, the structure of the retina improved in the GSPE-treated diabetic group, as compared with the diabetic group. SOD and GSH-Px activities were significantly increased in the retina of rats in the GSPE-treated diabetic group, as compared with the diabetic group (P=0.011 and P=0.001, respectively). Furthermore, a significant reduction in MDA was detected (P=0.013) and the expression levels of Nrf2 and HO-1 in the bladders of rats in the GSPE-treated diabetic group were significantly increased, as compared with the diabetic group (P=0.038 and P=0.043, respectively). Apoptosis of retinal cells was significantly increased in the diabetic group, as compared with the control group (P<0.001); a significant reduction was also detected in the GSPE-treated diabetic group, as compared with the diabetic group (P=0.014). These results demonstrate that GSPE administration may protect the retina against hyperglycemic damage, possibly by ameliorating oxidative stress-mediated injury via the activation of the Nrf2 pathway. PMID:27073432

  5. Why has Nature Chosen Lutein and Zeaxanthin to Protect the Retina?

    PubMed Central

    Widomska, Justyna; Subczynski, Witold K

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with a low level of macular carotenoids in the eye retina. Only two carotenoids, namely lutein and zeaxanthin are selectively accumulated in the human eye retina from blood plasma where more than twenty other carotenoids are available. The third carotenoid which is found in the human retina, meso-zeaxanthin is formed directly in the retina from lutein. All these carotenoids, named also macular xanthophylls, play key roles in eye health and retinal disease. Macular xanthophylls are thought to combat light-induced damage mediated by reactive oxygen species by absorbing the most damaging incoming wavelength of light prior to the formation of reactive oxygen species (a function expected of carotenoids in nerve fibers) and by chemically and physically quenching reactive oxygen species once they are formed (a function expected of carotenoids in photoreceptor outer segments). There are two major hypotheses about the precise location of macular xanthophylls in the nerve fiber layer of photoreceptor axons and in photoreceptor outer segments. According to the first, macular xanthophylls transversely incorporate in the lipid-bilayer portion of membranes of the human retina. According to the second, macular xanthophylls are protein-bound by membrane-associated, xanthophyll-binding proteins. In this review we indicate specific properties of macular xanthophylls that could help explain their selective accumulation in the primate retina with special attention paid to xanthophyll-membrane interactions. PMID:24883226

  6. Losartan Treatment Protects Retinal Ganglion Cells and Alters Scleral Remodeling in Experimental Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Pitha, Ian F.; Nguyen, Cathy; Steinhart, Matthew R.; Nguyen, Thao D.; Pease, Mary Ellen; Oglesby, Ericka N.; Berlinicke, Cynthia A.; Mitchell, Katherine L.; Kim, Jessica; Jefferys, Joan J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine if oral losartan treatment decreases the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death caused by experimental intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation in mice. Methods We produced IOP increase in CD1 mice and performed unilateral optic nerve crush. Mice received oral losartan, spironolactone, enalapril, or no drug to test effects of inhibiting angiotensin receptors. IOP was monitored by Tonolab, and blood pressure was monitored by tail cuff device. RGC loss was measured in masked axon counts and RGC bodies by β-tubulin labeling. Scleral changes that could modulate RGC injury were measured including axial length, scleral thickness, and retinal layer thicknesses, pressure-strain behavior in inflation testing, and study of angiotensin receptors and pathways by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Results Losartan treatment prevented significant RGC loss (median loss = 2.5%, p = 0.13), while median loss with water, spironolactone, and enalapril treatments were 26%, 28% and 43%; p < 0.0001). The lower RGC loss with losartan was significantly less than the loss with spironolactone or enalapril (regression model p = 0.001; drug treatment group term p = 0.01). Both losartan and enalapril significantly lowered blood pressure (p< 0.001), but losartan was protective, while enalapril led to worse than water-treated RGC loss. RGC loss after crush injury was unaffected by losartan treatment (difference from control p = 0.9). Survival of RGC in cell culture was not prolonged by sartan treatment. Axonal transport blockade after 3 day IOP elevations was less in losartan-treated than in control glaucoma eyes (p = 0.007). Losartan inhibited effects of glaucoma, including reduction in extracellular signal-related kinase activity and modification of glaucoma-related changes in scleral thickness and creep under controlled IOP. Conclusions The neuroprotective effect of losartan in mouse glaucoma is associated with adaptive changes

  7. The Functional Architecture of the Retina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masland, Richard H.

    1986-01-01

    Examines research related to the retina's coding of visual input with emphasis on the organization of two kinds of ganglion cell receptive fields. Reviews current techniques for examining the shapes and arrangement in the retina of entire populations of nerve cells. (ML)

  8. The Potential Use of PGC-1α and PGC-1β to Protect the Retina by Stimulating Mitochondrial Repair.

    PubMed

    Abrahan, Carolina; Ash, John D

    2016-01-01

    Damage to mitochondria is a common mechanism of cell death in inherited neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, mitochondrial protection and mitochondrial repair are promising strategies to induce retinal neuroprotection. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-α (PGC-1α) and β (PGC-1β) are transcriptional coactivators that are the main regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis. We propose that PGC-1α and PGC-1β could play a role in regulating retina cell survival, and may be important therapeutic targets to prevent retinal degeneration. PMID:26427438

  9. Atorvastatin-mediated protection of the retina in a model of diabetes with hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Rosa; Bento, Carla F; Matafome, Paulo; Sena, Cristina M; Seiça, Raquel M; Pereira, Paulo

    2014-12-01

    Insulin resistance, a key feature of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), results in a variety of metabolic and vascular abnormalities. Metabolic disturbances associated with diabetes could contribute to disrupting the structural and (or) functional integrity of the retina. The effects of atorvastatin on retinal cells in hyperlipidemic T2DM rats have not yet been investigated. We used Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats fed with an atherogenic diet (AD) for 4 months to investigate whether atorvastatin (administered for 1 month) would slow-down or reverse the progression of lesions in the diabetic retina. Fluorogenic substrates were used to measure the proteasome activities in retinal cells. The production of reactive oxygen species was determined by immunofluorescence in frozen retina sections, using dihydroethydium. Nitrotyrosine levels were assessed using immunohistochemistry. Protein levels of ubiquitin conjugates, free ubiquitin, and ubiquitin activating enzyme E1 were determined with Western blotting. Atorvastatin significantly reduced the levels of oxidative stress that were induced by the AD and restored the proteasome activities in the diabetic GK rats. Atorvastatin therapy significantly improved local oxidative stress levels in GK rats fed with AD. Atorvastatin can, at least in part, restore the ubiquitin proteasome system, and may represent a pharmacological approach to prevent some of the complications associated with diabetic retinopathy. PMID:25404034

  10. Mechanical Stress and Antioxidant Protection in the Retina of Hindlimb Suspended Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Aziza; Theriot, Corey A.; Alway, Stephen E.; Zanello, Susana B.

    2012-01-01

    It has been postulated that hindlimb suspension (HS) causes a cephalad fluid shift in quadrupeds similar to that occurring to humans in microgravity. Therefore, HS may provide a suitable animal model in which to recapitulate the ocular changes observed in the human Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. This work reports preliminary results from a tissue sharing project using 34 week-old Brown Norway rats. Two different experiments compared normal posture controls and HS rats for 2 weeks and rats exposed to HS for 2 weeks but allowed to recover in normal posture for 2 additional weeks. The effects of two nutritional countermeasures, green tea extract (GT) and plant polyphenol resveratrol (Rv), were also evaluated. Green tea contains the antioxidant epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). qPCR gene expression analysis of selected targets was performed on RNA from isolated retinas, and histologic analysis was done on one fixed eye per rat. The transcription factor early growth response protein 1 (Egr1) was upregulated almost 2-fold in HS retinas relative to controls (P = 0.059), and its expression returned to control levels after 2 weeks of recovery in normal posture (P = 0.023). HS-induced upregulation of Egr1 was attenuated (but not significantly) in retinas from rats fed an antioxidant rich (GT extract) diet. In rats fed the GT-enriched diet, antioxidant enzymes were induced, evidenced by the upregulation of the gene heme oxygenase 1 (Hmox1) (P = 0.042) and the gene superoxide dismutase 2 (Sod2) (P = 0.0001). Egr1 is a stretch-activated transcription factor, and the Egr1 mechanosensitive response to HS may have been caused by a change in the translaminal pressure and/or mechanical deformation of the eye globe. The observed histologic measurements of the various retinal layers in the HS rats were lower in value than those of the control animal (n = 1), however insufficient data were available for statistical analysis. Aquaporin 4, a water

  11. Parallel Inhibition of Dopamine Amacrine Cells and Intrinsically Photosensitive Retinal Ganglion Cells in a Non-Image-Forming Visual Circuit of the Mouse Retina.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Helen E; Hardi, Claudia N; Barnes, Steven; Brecha, Nicholas C

    2015-12-01

    An inner retinal microcircuit composed of dopamine (DA)-containing amacrine cells and melanopsin-containing, intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (M1 ipRGCs) process information about the duration and intensity of light exposures, mediating light adaptation, circadian entrainment, pupillary reflexes, and other aspects of non-image-forming vision. The neural interaction is reciprocal: M1 ipRGCs excite DA amacrine cells, and these, in turn, feed inhibition back onto M1 ipRGCs. We found that the neuropeptide somatostatin [somatotropin release inhibiting factor (SRIF)] also inhibits the intrinsic light response of M1 ipRGCs and postulated that, to tune the bidirectional interaction of M1 ipRGCs and DA amacrine cells, SRIF amacrine cells would provide inhibitory modulation to both cell types. SRIF amacrine cells, DA amacrine cells, and M1 ipRGCs form numerous contacts. DA amacrine cells and M1 ipRGCs express the SRIF receptor subtypes sst(2A) and sst4 respectively. SRIF modulation of the microcircuit was investigated with targeted patch-clamp recordings of DA amacrine cells in TH-RFP mice and M1 ipRGCs in OPN4-EGFP mice. SRIF increases K(+) currents, decreases Ca(2+) currents, and inhibits spike activity in both cell types, actions reproduced by the selective sst(2A) agonist L-054,264 (N-[(1R)-2-[[[(1S*,3R*)-3-(aminomethyl)cyclohexyl]methyl]amino]-1-(1H-indol-3-ylmethyl)-2-oxoethyl]spiro[1H-indene-1,4'-piperidine]-1'-carboxamide) in DA amacrine cells and the selective sst4 agonist L-803,087 (N(2)-[4-(5,7-difluoro-2-phenyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-1-oxobutyl]-L-arginine methyl ester trifluoroacetate) in M1 ipRGCs. These parallel actions of SRIF may serve to counteract the disinhibition of M1 ipRGCs caused by SRIF inhibition of DA amacrine cells. This allows the actions of SRIF on DA amacrine cells to proceed with adjusting retinal DA levels without destabilizing light responses by M1 ipRGCs, which project to non-image-forming targets in the brain. PMID:26631476

  12. Decreased glutathione transferase levels in rd1/rd1 mouse retina: replenishment protects photoreceptors in retinal explants.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, P; Caffé, A R; Ahuja, S; Ekström, P; van Veen, T

    2005-01-01

    Currently much attention is focused on glutathione S transferase (GST)-induced suppression of apoptosis. The objective of our studies was therefore to see if GST isoenzymes rescue photoreceptors in retinal explants from rd1/rd1 mice, in which photoreceptors degenerate rapidly. Eyes from C3H rd1/rd1 and +/+ mice were collected at various time points between postnatal day (PN) 2 and PN28. Localization and content of alpha-GST and mu-GST was investigated by immunofluorescence and semi-quantitative Western blot analysis, respectively. In addition, PN2 and PN7 retinal explants were cultured till PN28, during which they were treated with 10 ng/ml alpha-GST or mu-GST. The spatiotemporal expression of both GST isoforms was closely similar: early presence in ganglion cell layer after which staining became restricted to Muller cells (particularly in the endfeet) and horizontal cell fibers in both rd1/rd1 and +/+. Doublets of alpha-GST and mu-GST were detected by Western blot analysis. Densitometry of these bands indicated steady reduction of alpha-GST content in rd1/rd1 retina starting from the second postnatal week. When alpha-GST and mu-GST were added exogenously to rd1/rd1 explants, photoreceptor rescue was produced that was more prominent in PN2 than in PN7 explants and more effective by alpha-GST than mu-GST. We propose that alpha-GST neuroprotection is mediated by reduction of tissue oxidative stress. PMID:15749346

  13. PhTx3-4, a Spider Toxin Calcium Channel Blocker, Reduces NMDA-Induced Injury of the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Binda, Nancy Scardua; Porto Petruceli Carayon, Charles; Agostini, Rafael Mourão; do Nascimento Pinheiro, Ana Cristina; Nascimento Cordeiro, Marta; Romano Silva, Marco Aurélio; Figueira Silva, Juliana; Rita Pereira, Elizete Maria; da Silva Junior, Claudio Antonio; de Castro Junior, Célio José; Sena Guimarães, Andre Luiz; Gomez, Marcus Vinicius

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo neuroprotective effect of PhTx3-4, a spider toxin N-P/Q calcium channel blocker, was studied in a rat model of NMDA-induced injury of the retina. NMDA (N-Methyl-d-Aspartate)-induced retinal injury in rats reduced the b-wave amplitude by 62% ± 3.6%, indicating the severity of the insult. PhTx3-4 treatment increased the amplitude of the b-wave, which was almost equivalent to the control retinas that were not submitted to injury. The PhTx3-4 functional protection of the retinas recorded on the ERG also was observed in the neuroprotection of retinal cells. NMDA-induced injury reduced live cells in the retina layers and the highest reduction, 84%, was in the ganglion cell layer. Notably, PhTx3-4 treatment caused a remarkable reduction of dead cells in the retina layers, and the highest neuroprotective effect was in the ganglion cells layer. NMDA-induced cytotoxicity of the retina increased the release of glutamate, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and oxidative stress. PhTx3-4 treatment reduced glutamate release, ROS production and oxidative stress measured by malondialdehyde. Thus, we presented for the first time evidence of in vivo neuroprotection from NMDA-induced retinal injury by PhTx3-4 (-ctenitoxin-Pn3a), a spider toxin that blocks N-P/Q calcium channels. PMID:26978403

  14. PhTx3-4, a Spider Toxin Calcium Channel Blocker, Reduces NMDA-Induced Injury of the Retina.

    PubMed

    Binda, Nancy Scardua; Porto Petruceli Carayon, Charles; Agostini, Rafael Mourão; do Nascimento Pinheiro, Ana Cristina; Nascimento Cordeiro, Marta; Romano Silva, Marco Aurélio; Figueira Silva, Juliana; Rita Pereira, Elizete Maria; da Silva Junior, Claudio Antonio; de Castro Junior, Célio José; Sena Guimarães, Andre Luiz; Gomez, Marcus Vinicius

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo neuroprotective effect of PhTx3-4, a spider toxin N-P/Q calcium channel blocker, was studied in a rat model of NMDA-induced injury of the retina. NMDA (N-Methyl-d-Aspartate)-induced retinal injury in rats reduced the b-wave amplitude by 62% ± 3.6%, indicating the severity of the insult. PhTx3-4 treatment increased the amplitude of the b-wave, which was almost equivalent to the control retinas that were not submitted to injury. The PhTx3-4 functional protection of the retinas recorded on the ERG also was observed in the neuroprotection of retinal cells. NMDA-induced injury reduced live cells in the retina layers and the highest reduction, 84%, was in the ganglion cell layer. Notably, PhTx3-4 treatment caused a remarkable reduction of dead cells in the retina layers, and the highest neuroprotective effect was in the ganglion cells layer. NMDA-induced cytotoxicity of the retina increased the release of glutamate, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and oxidative stress. PhTx3-4 treatment reduced glutamate release, ROS production and oxidative stress measured by malondialdehyde. Thus, we presented for the first time evidence of in vivo neuroprotection from NMDA-induced retinal injury by PhTx3-4 (-ctenitoxin-Pn3a), a spider toxin that blocks N-P/Q calcium channels. PMID:26978403

  15. Mitochondrial Uncoupling Protein 2 (UCP2) Regulates Retinal Ganglion Cell Number and Survival.

    PubMed

    Barnstable, Colin J; Reddy, Rajini; Li, Hong; Horvath, Tamas L

    2016-04-01

    In the brain, mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) has emerged as a stress signal associated with neuronal survival. In the retina, UCP2 is expressed primarily by retinal ganglion cells. Here, we investigated the functional relevance of UCP2 in the mouse retina. Increased expression of UCP2 significantly reduced apoptosis during the critical developmental period resulting in elevated numbers of retinal ganglion cells in the adult. Elevated UCP2 levels also protected against excitotoxic cell death induced by intraocular injection of either NMDA or kainic acid. In monolayer cultures of retinal cells, elevated UCP2 levels increased cell survival and rendered the cells independent of the survival-promoting effects of the neurotrophic factors BDNF and CNTF. Taken together, these data implicate UCP2 as an important regulator of retinal neuron survival both during development and in adult animals. PMID:26846222

  16. Environmental Enrichment Protects the Retina from Early Diabetic Damage in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dorfman, Damián; Aranda, Marcos L.; González Fleitas, María Florencia; Chianelli, Mónica S.; Fernandez, Diego C.; Sande, Pablo H.; Rosenstein, Ruth E.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of reduced visual acuity and acquired blindness. Available treatments are not completely effective. We analyzed the effect of environmental enrichment on retinal damage induced by experimental diabetes in adult Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Three days after vehicle or streptozotocin injection, animals were housed in enriched environment or remained in a standard environment. Retinal function (electroretinogram, and oscillatory potentials), retinal morphology, blood-retinal barrier integrity, synaptophysin, astrocyte and Müller cell glial fibrillary acidic protein, vascular endothelial growth factor, tumor necrosis factor-α, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels, as well as lipid peroxidation were assessed in retina from diabetic animals housed in standard or enriched environment. Environmental enrichment preserved scotopic electroretinogram a-wave, b-wave and oscillatory potential amplitude, avoided albumin-Evan's blue leakage, prevented the decrease in retinal synaptophysin and astrocyte glial fibrillary acidic protein levels, the increase in Müller cell glial fibrillary acidic protein, vascular endothelial growth factor and tumor necrosis factor-α levels, as well as oxidative stress induced by diabetes. In addition, enriched environment prevented the decrease in retinal brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels induced by experimental diabetes. When environmental enrichment started 7 weeks after diabetes onset, retinal function was significantly preserved. These results indicate that enriched environment could attenuate the early diabetic damage in the retina from adult rats. PMID:25004165

  17. Zinc might protect oxidative changes in the retina and pancreas at the early stage of diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Moustafa, Sohair A. . E-mail: Sohabdulla@hotmail.com

    2004-12-01

    It is well documented that oxidative stress is a basic mechanism behind the development of diabetic retinopathy (DR). The current study was undertaken to elucidate the possible role of zinc as an antioxidant and a biological membrane stabilizer in the protection against (DR). Male Wistar rats weighing 250 {+-} 50 g were made diabetic by injection with a single ip dose of alloxan (100 mg/kg). Another group of rats was simultaneously treated with alloxan (100 mg/kg) and a single ip dose of zinc chloride (ZnCl{sub 2}) (5 mg/kg). Blood and tissue samples were collected at 24, 48, and 72 h post-treatment in both groups. Diabetic state was confirmed by the determination of plasma glucose levels (significantly elevated at any time of the experiment when compared with controls receiving vehicle). Plasma insulin was significantly increased 24 h after treatment in both alloxan and alloxan plus ZnCl{sub 2}-treated groups, and then decreased markedly 48 and 72 h post treatment in both groups. Alloxan treatment depleted both retinal and liver glutathione contents. The decrease in retinal and liver GSH in alloxan-treated rats was accompanied with a sustained increase in their thiobarbituric acid (TBA) content. Simultaneous treatment of rats with alloxan and ZnCl{sub 2} blunted the sustained increment in plasma glucose induced by alloxan. The combined administration of alloxan and zinc reversed the depleting effect on retinal and hepatic GSH in alloxan-treated rats and reduced the elevations in TBA content of both retinas and livers. At variance with many other antioxidants the current results clearly indicate the beneficial effects of Zn in both controlling hyperglycemia and the protection of the retina against oxidative stress in diabetes which may help set a new direction toward the development of effective treatments of DR.

  18. Increased production of omega-3 fatty acids protects retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shanshan; Shi, Zhe; Su, Huanxing; So, Kwok-Fai; Cui, Qi

    2016-07-01

    Injury to the central nervous system causes progressive degeneration of injured axons, leading to loss of the neuronal bodies. Neuronal survival after injury is a prerequisite for successful regeneration of injured axons. In this study, we investigated the effects of increased production of omega-3 fatty acids and elevation of cAMP on retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival and axonal regeneration after optic nerve (ON) crush injury in adult mice. We found that increased production of omega-3 fatty acids in mice enhanced RGC survival, but not axonal regeneration, over a period of 3 weeks after ON injury. cAMP elevation promoted RGC survival in wild type mice, but no significant difference in cell survival was seen in mice over-producing omega-3 fatty acids and receiving intravitreal injections of CPT-cAMP, suggesting that cAMP elevation protects RGCs after injury but does not potentiate the actions of the omega-3 fatty acids. The observed omega-3 fatty acid-mediated neuroprotection is likely achieved partially through ERK1/2 signaling as inhibition of this pathway by PD98059 hindered, but did not completely block, RGC protection. Our study thus enhances our current understanding of neural repair after CNS injury, including the visual system. PMID:27264241

  19. 17β-Estradiol eye drops protect the retinal ganglion cell layer and preserve visual function in an in vivo model of glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Tatrai, Katalin Prokai; Xin, Hua; Nguyen, Vien; Szarka, Szabolcs; Blazics, Balazs; Prokai, Laszlo; Koulen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Neuroprotection in glaucoma as a curative strategy complementary to current therapies to lower intraocular pressure (IOP) is highly desirable. This study was designed to investigate neuroprotection by 17β-estradiol (E2) to prevent retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death in a glaucoma model of surgically elevated IOP in rats. We found that daily treatment with E2 containing eye drops resulted in significant E2 concentration in the retina with concomitant profound neuroprotective therapeutic benefits, even in the presence of continually elevated IOP. The number of apoptotic cells in the RGC layer was significantly decreased in the E2-treated group, when compared to the vehicle-treated controls. Deterioration in visual acuity in these animals was also markedly prevented. Using mass spectrometry-based proteomics, beneficial changes in the expression of several proteins implicated in the maintenance of retinal health were also found in the retina of E2-treated animals. On the other hand, systemic side-effects could not be avoided with the eye drops, as confirmed by the measured high circulating estrogen levels and through the assessment of the uterus representing a typical hormone-sensitive peripheral organ. Collectively, the demonstrated significant neuroprotective effect of topical E2 in the selected animal model of glaucoma provides a clear rationale for further studies aiming at targeting E2 into the eye while avoiding systemic E2 exposure to diminish undesirable off target side-effects. PMID:23841874

  20. Using the Electroretinogram to Assess Function in the Rodent Retina and the Protective Effects of Remote Limb Ischemic Preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Brandli, Alice; Stone, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The ERG is the sum of all retinal activity. The ERG is usually recorded from the cornea, which acts as an antenna that collects and sums signals from the retina. The ERG is a sensitive measure of changes in retinal function that are pan-retinal, but is less effective for detecting damage confined to a small area of retina. In the present work we describe how to record the 'flash' ERG, which is the potential generated when the retina is exposed to a brief light flash. We describe methods of anaesthesia, mydriasis and corneal management during recording; how to keep the retina dark adapted; electrode materials and placement; the range and calibration of stimulus energy; recording parameters and the extraction of data. We also describe a method of inducing ischemia in one limb, and how to use the ERG to assess the effects of this remote-from-the-retina ischemia on retinal function after light damage. A two-flash protocol is described which allows isolation of the cone-driven component of the dark-adapted ERG, and thereby the separation of the rod and cone components. Because it can be recorded with techniques that are minimally invasive, the ERG has been widely used in studies of the physiology, pharmacology and toxicology of the retina. We describe one example of this usefulness, in which the ERG is used to assess the function of the light-damaged retina, with and without a neuroprotective intervention; preconditioning by remote ischemia. PMID:26131649

  1. A Computational Framework for Realistic Retina Modeling.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cañada, Pablo; Morillas, Christian; Pino, Begoña; Ros, Eduardo; Pelayo, Francisco

    2016-11-01

    Computational simulations of the retina have led to valuable insights about the biophysics of its neuronal activity and processing principles. A great number of retina models have been proposed to reproduce the behavioral diversity of the different visual processing pathways. While many of these models share common computational stages, previous efforts have been more focused on fitting specific retina functions rather than generalizing them beyond a particular model. Here, we define a set of computational retinal microcircuits that can be used as basic building blocks for the modeling of different retina mechanisms. To validate the hypothesis that similar processing structures may be repeatedly found in different retina functions, we implemented a series of retina models simply by combining these computational retinal microcircuits. Accuracy of the retina models for capturing neural behavior was assessed by fitting published electrophysiological recordings that characterize some of the best-known phenomena observed in the retina: adaptation to the mean light intensity and temporal contrast, and differential motion sensitivity. The retinal microcircuits are part of a new software platform for efficient computational retina modeling from single-cell to large-scale levels. It includes an interface with spiking neural networks that allows simulation of the spiking response of ganglion cells and integration with models of higher visual areas. PMID:27354192

  2. Changes in ganglion cells during retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Saha, Susmita; Greferath, Ursula; Vessey, Kirstan A; Grayden, David B; Burkitt, Anthony N; Fletcher, Erica L

    2016-08-01

    Inherited retinal degeneration such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is associated with photoreceptor loss and concomitant morphological and functional changes in the inner retina. It is not known whether these changes are associated with changes in the density and distribution of synaptic inputs to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). We quantified changes in ganglion cell density in rd1 and age-matched C57BL/6J-(wildtype, WT) mice using the immunocytochemical marker, RBPMS. Our data revealed that following complete loss of photoreceptors, (∼3months of age), there was a reduction in ganglion cell density in the peripheral retina. We next examined changes in synaptic inputs to A type ganglion cells by performing double labeling experiments in mice with the ganglion cell reporter lines, rd1-Thy1 and age-matched wildtype-Thy1. Ribbon synapses were identified by co-labelling with CtBP2 (RIBEYE) and conventional synapses with the clustering molecule, gephyrin. ON RGCs showed a significant reduction in RIBEYE-immunoreactive synapse density while OFF RGCs showed a significant reduction in the gephyrin-immmunoreactive synapse density. Distribution patterns of both synaptic markers across the dendritic trees of RGCs were unchanged. The change in synaptic inputs to RGCs was associated with a reduction in the number of immunolabeled rod bipolar and ON cone bipolar cells. These results suggest that functional changes reported in ganglion cells during retinal degeneration could be attributed to loss of synaptic inputs. PMID:27132232

  3. Inhibition of miR-134 Protects Against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis in Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yi; Yu, Yao; Zhou, Qiong; Li, Cheng; Yang, Lu; Pei, Chong-Gang

    2015-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been suggested to play an important role in neurological diseases. Particularly, miR-134 is reportedly involved in regulating neuron survival. However, the association between miR-134 and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival under adverse stimulus has not been extensively investigated. In this study, we aimed to explore the role and underlying mechanism of miR-134 in regulating RGC apoptosis in response to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment. Results showed that the expression of miR-134 dose- and time-dependently increased in RGC after H2O2 treatment. H2O2-induced RGC apoptosis was significantly attenuated by the inhibition of miR-134 expression by antagomiR-134 and was enhanced by miR-134 overexpression. Luciferase reporter assay revealed a direct interaction between miR-134 and the 3'-untranslated region of cyclic AMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), a critical transcription factor for neuronal protection. In H2O2-treated RGCs, the inhibition of miR-134 significantly elevated the expression of CREB and its downstream genes, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Bcl-2. Furthermore, the inhibition of miR-134 also increased the expression of miR-132, a rapid response gene downstream of CREB. In addition, the target gene of miR-132, acetylcholinesterase was expectedly decreased by miR-134 inhibition. However, the overexpression of miR-134 exerted an opposite effect. The knockdown of CREB apparently abolished the protective effect of miR-134 inhibition against H2O2-induced RGC apoptosis. The increased expression of BDNF and Bcl-2 induced by miR-134 inhibition was also abrogated by CREB knockdown. Overall, our results suggested that the downregulation of miR-134 can effectively protect against H2O2-induced RGC apoptosis by negatively modulating CREB expression. PMID:25744098

  4. Lactate Transport and Receptor Actions in Retina: Potential Roles in Retinal Function and Disease.

    PubMed

    Kolko, Miriam; Vosborg, Fia; Henriksen, Ulrik L; Hasan-Olive, Md Mahdi; Diget, Elisabeth Holm; Vohra, Rupali; Gurubaran, Iswariya Raja Sridevi; Gjedde, Albert; Mariga, Shelton Tendai; Skytt, Dorte M; Utheim, Tor Paaske; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Bergersen, Linda H

    2016-06-01

    In retina, like in brain, lactate equilibrates across cell membranes via monocarboxylate transporters and in the extracellular space by diffusion, forming a basis for the action of lactate as a transmitter of metabolic signals. In the present paper, we argue that the lactate receptor GPR81, also known as HCAR1, may contribute importantly to the control of retinal cell functions in health and disease. GPR81, a G-protein coupled receptor, is known to downregulate cAMP both in adipose and nervous tissue. The receptor also acts through other down-stream mechanisms to control functions, such as excitability, metabolism and inflammation. Recent publications predict effects of the lactate receptor on neurodegeneration. Neurodegenerative diseases in retina, where the retinal ganglion cells die, notably glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, may be linked to disturbed lactate homeostasis. Pilot studies reveal high GPR81 mRNA in retina and indicate GPR81 localization in Müller cells and retinal ganglion cells. Moreover, monocarboxylate transporters are expressed in retinal cells. We envision that lactate receptors and transporters could be useful future targets of novel therapeutic strategies to protect neurons and prevent or counteract glaucoma as well as other retinal diseases. PMID:26677077

  5. TRPM3 Expression in Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Brown, R. Lane; Xiong, Wei-Hong; Peters, James H.; Tekmen-Clark, Merve; Strycharska-Orczyk, Iwona; Reed, Brian T.; Morgans, Catherine W.; Duvoisin, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels constitute a large family of cation permeable ion channels that serve crucial functions in sensory systems by transducing environmental changes into cellular voltage and calcium signals. Within the retina, two closely related members of the melastatin TRP family, TRPM1 and TRPM3, are highly expressed. TRPM1 has been shown to be required for the depolarizing response to light of ON-bipolar cells, but the role of TRPM3 in the retina is unknown. Immunohistochemical staining of mouse retina with an antibody directed against the C-terminus of TRPM3 labeled the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and a subset of cells in the ganglion cell layer. Within the IPL, TRPM3 immunofluorescence was markedly stronger in the OFF sublamina than in the ON sublamina. Electroretinogram recordings showed that the scotopic and photopic a- and b-waves of TRPM3-/- mice are normal indicating that TRPM3 does not play a major role in visual processing in the outer retina. TRPM3 activity was measured by calcium imaging and patch-clamp recording of immunopurified retinal ganglion cells. Application of the TRPM3 agonist, pregnenolone sulfate (PS), stimulated increases in intracellular calcium in ~40% of cells from wild type and TRPM1‑/‑ mice, and the PS-stimulated increases in calcium were blocked by co-application of mefenamic acid, a TRPM3 antagonist. No PS-stimulated changes in fluorescence were observed in ganglion cells from TRPM3-/- mice. Similarly, PS-stimulated currents that could be blocked by mefenamic acid were recorded from wild type retinal ganglion cells but were absent in ganglion cells from TRPM3-/- mice. PMID:25679224

  6. Systemic treatment with a 5HT1a agonist induces anti-oxidant protection and preserves the retina from mitochondrial oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Manas R; Ahmed, Chulbul M; Ildefonso, Cristhian J; Han, Pingyang; Li, Hong; Jivanji, Hiral; Mao, Haoyu; Lewin, Alfred S

    2015-11-01

    Chronic oxidative stress contributes to age related diseases including age related macular degeneration (AMD). Earlier work showed that the 5-hydroxy-tryptamine 1a (5HT1a) receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) protects retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells from hydrogen peroxide treatment and mouse retinas from oxidative insults including light injury. In our current experiments, RPE derived cells subjected to mitochondrial oxidative stress were protected from cell death by the up-regulation of anti-oxidant enzymes and of the metal ion chaperone metallothionein. Differentiated RPE cells were resistant to oxidative stress, and the expression of genes for protective proteins was highly increased by oxidative stress plus drug treatment. In mice treated with 8-OH-DPAT, the same genes (MT1, HO1, NqO1, Cat, Sod1) were induced in the neural retina, but the drug did not affect the expression of Sod2, the gene for manganese superoxide dismutase. We used a mouse strain deleted for Sod2 in the RPE to accelerate age-related oxidative stress in the retina and to test the impact of 8-OH-DPAT on the photoreceptor and RPE degeneration developed in these mice. Treatment of mice with daily injections of the drug led to increased electroretinogram (ERG) amplitudes in dark-adapted mice and to a slight improvement in visual acuity. Most strikingly, in mice treated with a high dose of the drug (5 mg/kg) the structure of the RPE and Bruch's membrane and the normal architecture of photoreceptor outer segments were preserved. These results suggest that systemic treatment with this class of drugs may be useful in preventing geographic atrophy, the advanced form of dry AMD, which is characterized by RPE degeneration. PMID:26315784

  7. MEMS technologies for epiretinal stimulation of the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokwa, W.

    2004-09-01

    It has been shown that electrical stimulation of retinal ganglion cells yields visual sensations. Therefore, a retina implant for blind humans suffering from retinitis pigmentosa based on this concept seems to be feasible. In Germany, there are two projects funded by the government working on different approaches namely the subretinal and the epiretinal approaches. This paper describes the epiretinal approach for such a system. The extraocular part of this system records visual images. The images are transformed by a neural net into corresponding signals for stimulation of the retinal ganglion cells. These signals are transmitted to a receiver unit of an intraocular implant, the retina stimulator. Integrated circuitry of this unit decodes the signals and transfers the data to a stimulation circuitry that selects stimulation electrodes placed onto the retina and generates current pulses to the electrodes. By this, action potentials in retinal ganglion cells are evoked, causing a visual sensation. This paper concentrates on the MEMS part of this implant.

  8. Retina and Omega-3

    PubMed Central

    Querques, Giuseppe; Forte, Raimondo; Souied, Eric H.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, several epidemiological studies based on food frequency questionnaires suggest that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids could have a protective role in reducing the onset and progression of retinal diseases. The retina has a high concentration of omega-3, particularly DHA, which optimizes fluidity of photoreceptor membranes, retinal integrity, and visual function. Furthermore, many studies demonstrated that DHA has a protective, for example antiapoptotic, role in the retina. From a nutritional point of view, it is known that western populations, particularly aged individuals, have a higher than optimal omega-6/omega-3 ratio and should enrich their diet with more fish consumption or have DHA supplementation. This paper underscores the potential beneficial effect of omega-3 fatty acids on retinal diseases. PMID:22175009

  9. Immunohistochemical and Calcium Imaging Methods in Wholemount Rat Retina

    PubMed Central

    Sargoy, Allison; Barnes, Steven; Brecha, Nicholas C.; De Sevilla Müller, Luis Pérez

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe the tools, reagents, and the practical steps that are needed for: 1) successful preparation of wholemount retinas for immunohistochemistry and, 2) calcium imaging for the study of voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC) mediated calcium signaling in retinal ganglion cells. The calcium imaging method we describe circumvents issues concerning non-specific loading of displaced amacrine cells in the ganglion cell layer. PMID:25349920

  10. Early functional neural networks in the developing retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, R. O. L.; Chernjavsky, A.; Smith, S. J.; Shatz, C. J.

    1995-04-01

    IN the adult mammalian retina, the principal direction of information flow is along a vertical pathway from photoreceptors to retinal interneurons to ganglion cells, the output neurons of the retina. We report here, however, that initially in development, at a time when the photoreceptors are not yet even present, there are already functionally defined networks within the retina. These networks are spontaneously active rather than visually driven, and they involve horizontal rather than vertical pathways. By means of optical recording using the calcium-sensitive dye Fura-2, we have found that sets of retinal ganglion cells and amacrine cells, a type of retinal interneuron, undergo synchronized oscillations in intracellular calcium concentration. These oscillations are highly correlated among subgroups of neighbouring cells, and spread in a wave-like fashion tangentially across the retina. Thus, in development of retinal circuitry, the initial patterning of neuronal function occurs in the horizontal domain before the adult pattern of vertical information transfer emerges.

  11. Infrared retina

    DOEpatents

    Krishna, Sanjay; Hayat, Majeed M.; Tyo, J. Scott; Jang, Woo-Yong

    2011-12-06

    Exemplary embodiments provide an infrared (IR) retinal system and method for making and using the IR retinal system. The IR retinal system can include adaptive sensor elements, whose properties including, e.g., spectral response, signal-to-noise ratio, polarization, or amplitude can be tailored at pixel level by changing the applied bias voltage across the detector. "Color" imagery can be obtained from the IR retinal system by using a single focal plane array. The IR sensor elements can be spectrally, spatially and temporally adaptive using quantum-confined transitions in nanoscale quantum dots. The IR sensor elements can be used as building blocks of an infrared retina, similar to cones of human retina, and can be designed to work in the long-wave infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum ranging from about 8 .mu.m to about 12 .mu.m as well as the mid-wave portion ranging from about 3 .mu.m to about 5 .mu.m.

  12. Directional summation in non-direction selective retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Syed Y; Hamade, Khaldoun C; Yang, Ellen J; Nawy, Scott; Smith, Robert G; Pettit, Diana L

    2013-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells receive inputs from multiple bipolar cells which must be integrated before a decision to fire is made. Theoretical studies have provided clues about how this integration is accomplished but have not directly determined the rules regulating summation of closely timed inputs along single or multiple dendrites. Here we have examined dendritic summation of multiple inputs along On ganglion cell dendrites in whole mount rat retina. We activated inputs at targeted locations by uncaging glutamate sequentially to generate apparent motion along On ganglion cell dendrites in whole mount retina. Summation was directional and dependent13 on input sequence. Input moving away from the soma (centrifugal) resulted in supralinear summation, while activation sequences moving toward the soma (centripetal) were linear. Enhanced summation for centrifugal activation was robust as it was also observed in cultured retinal ganglion cells. This directional summation was dependent on hyperpolarization activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels as blockade with ZD7288 eliminated directionality. A computational model confirms that activation of HCN channels can override a preference for centripetal summation expected from cell anatomy. This type of direction selectivity could play a role in coding movement similar to the axial selectivity seen in locust ganglion cells which detect looming stimuli. More generally, these results suggest that non-directional retinal ganglion cells can discriminate between input sequences independent of the retina network. PMID:23516351

  13. Directional Summation in Non-direction Selective Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Syed Y.; Hamade, Khaldoun C.; Yang, Ellen J.; Nawy, Scott; Smith, Robert G.; Pettit, Diana L.

    2013-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells receive inputs from multiple bipolar cells which must be integrated before a decision to fire is made. Theoretical studies have provided clues about how this integration is accomplished but have not directly determined the rules regulating summation of closely timed inputs along single or multiple dendrites. Here we have examined dendritic summation of multiple inputs along On ganglion cell dendrites in whole mount rat retina. We activated inputs at targeted locations by uncaging glutamate sequentially to generate apparent motion along On ganglion cell dendrites in whole mount retina. Summation was directional and dependent13 on input sequence. Input moving away from the soma (centrifugal) resulted in supralinear summation, while activation sequences moving toward the soma (centripetal) were linear. Enhanced summation for centrifugal activation was robust as it was also observed in cultured retinal ganglion cells. This directional summation was dependent on hyperpolarization activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels as blockade with ZD7288 eliminated directionality. A computational model confirms that activation of HCN channels can override a preference for centripetal summation expected from cell anatomy. This type of direction selectivity could play a role in coding movement similar to the axial selectivity seen in locust ganglion cells which detect looming stimuli. More generally, these results suggest that non-directional retinal ganglion cells can discriminate between input sequences independent of the retina network. PMID:23516351

  14. 7, 8, 3′-Trihydroxyflavone Promotes Neurite Outgrowth and Protects Against Bupivacaine-Induced Neurotoxicity in Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Haohong; Luo, Xingjing

    2016-01-01

    Background 7, 8, 3′-trihydroxyflavone (THF) is a novel pro-neuronal small molecule that acts as a TrkB agonist. In this study, we examined the effect of THF on promoting neuronal growth and protecting anesthetics-induced neurotoxicity in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in vitro. Material/Methods Neonatal mouse DRG neurons were cultured in vitro and treated with various concentrations of THF. The effect of THF on neuronal growth was investigated by neurite outgrowth assay and Western blot. In addition, the protective effects of THF on bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity were investigated by apoptosis TUNEL assay, neurite outgrowth assay, and Western blot, respectively. Results THF promoted neurite outgrowth of DRG neurons in dose-dependent manner, with an EC50 concentration of 67.4 nM. Western blot analysis showed THF activated TrkB signaling pathway by inducing TrkB phosphorylation. THF also rescued bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity by reducing apoptosis and protecting neurite retraction in DRG neurons. Furthermore, the protection of THF in bupivacaine-injured neurotoxicity was directly associated with TrkB phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent manner in DRG neurons. Conclusions THF has pro-neuronal effect on DRG neurons by promoting neurite growth and protecting against bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity, likely through TrkB activation. PMID:27371503

  15. PBN (Phenyl-N-Tert-Butylnitrone)-Derivatives Are Effective in Slowing the Visual Cycle and Rhodopsin Regeneration and in Protecting the Retina from Light-Induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, Megan; Moiseyev, Gennadiy P.; Budda, Madeline L.; Linens, Annette; Brush, Richard S.; Qi, Hui; White, Gary L.; Wolf, Roman F.; Ma, Jian-xing; Floyd, Robert; Anderson, Robert E.; Mandal, Nawajes A.

    2015-01-01

    A2E and related toxic molecules are part of lipofuscin found in the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in eyes affected by Stargardt’s disease, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and other retinal degenerations. A novel therapeutic approach for treating such degenerations involves slowing down the visual cycle, which could reduce the amount of A2E in the RPE. This can be accomplished by inhibiting RPE65, which produces 11-cis-retinol from all-trans-retinyl esters. We recently showed that phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN) inhibits RPE65 enzyme activity in RPE cells. In this study we show that like PBN, certain PBN-derivatives (PBNDs) such as 4-F-PBN, 4-CF3-PBN, 3,4-di-F-PBN, and 4-CH3-PBN can inhibit RPE65 and synthesis of 11-cis-retinol in in vitro assays using bovine RPE microsomes. We further demonstrate that systemic (intraperitoneal, IP) administration of these PBNDs protect the rat retina from light damage. Electroretinography (ERG) and histological analysis showed that rats treated with PBNDs retained ~90% of their photoreceptor cells compared to a complete loss of function and 90% loss of photoreceptors in the central retina in rats treated with vehicle/control injections. Topically applied PBN and PBNDs also significantly slowed the rate of the visual cycle in mouse and baboon eyes. One hour dark adaptation resulted in 75–80% recovery of bleachable rhodopsin in control/vehicle treated mice. Eye drops of 5% 4-CH3-PBN were most effective, inhibiting the regeneration of bleachable rhodopsin significantly (60% compared to vehicle control). In addition, a 10% concentration of PBN and 5% concentration of 4-CH3-PBN in baboon eyes inhibited the visual cycle by 60% and by 30%, respectively. We have identified a group of PBN related nitrones that can reach the target tissue (RPE) by systemic and topical application and slow the rate of rhodopsin regeneration and therefore the visual cycle in mouse and baboon eyes. PBNDs can also protect the rat retina

  16. The retinal ganglion cell classes of New World primates.

    PubMed

    Yamada, E S; Silveira, L C; Gomes, F L; Lee, B B

    1996-12-01

    In the primate retina there are distinct ganglion cell classes, exhibiting particular morphologies and central projections, each responsible for conveying particular types of visual information to the brain. The chief retinal inputs to the cortex arise from specific ganglion cell classes, M-ganglion cells, responsible for carrying the luminance signal, and P-ganglion cells, that convey the red-green color opponent signal, as well as high contrast luminance signal. There are other ganglion cell classes, such as small-field bistratified cells, exhibiting dendrites that stratify at two different levels in the inner plexiform layer, which convey the blue-yellow color opponent signal. Most published data concerning primate retinal ganglion cell anatomy and physiology have been obtained from Old World species. Studies on New World monkeys have recently become of interest since they differ from the Old World monkeys with respect to the color vision inheritance pattern. On reviewing retinal ganglion cell layer organization in New World monkeys, it seems that there are more similarities than differences in relation to the Old World monkeys. Diurnal genera of New World monkeys exhibit a well-developed fovea centralis and ganglion cell density peak, as well as peripheral density values which are in the range reported for Old World monkeys and human. Moreover, all the major ganglion cell classes identified in Old World monkeys are also present in New World primates. Up to now, no obvious anatomical differences between dichromats and trichromats have been reported. The only genus that is significantly different from the others is the Aotus. It exhibits lower ganglion cell density in the central retina, and apparently lacks the small-field bistratified cells. PMID:9394516

  17. Transformation of stimulus correlations by the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, Jason; Simmons, Kristina; Tkacik, Gasper; Homann, Jan; Yee, Heather; Palmer, Stephanie; Nelson, Phillip; Balasubramanian, Vijay

    2014-03-01

    Correlations in the responses of sensory neurons seem to waste neural resources, but can carry cues about structured stimuli and help the brain correct for response errors. To assess how the retina negotiates this tradeoff, we measured simultaneous responses from many retinal ganglion cells presented with natural and artificial stimuli that varied in correlation structure. Responding to spatio-temporally structured stimuli such as natural movies, pairs of ganglion cells were more correlated than in response to white noise checkerboards, but were much less correlated than predicted by a non-adapting functional model of retinal response. Meanwhile, responding to stimuli with purely spatial correlations, pairs of ganglion cells showed increased correlations consistent with a static, non-adapting receptive field and nonlinearity. We found that in response to spatio- temporally correlated stimuli, ganglion cells had faster temporal kernels and tended to have stronger surrounds. These properties of individual cells, along with gain changes that opposed changes in effective contrast at the ganglion cell input, largely explained the pattern of correlations across stimuli.

  18. An efficient method that reveals both the dendrites and the soma mosaics of retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Zhan, X J; Troy, J B

    1997-03-01

    A method of using neurobiotin to stain both the dendrites and the soma mosaics of retinal ganglion cells in fresh retinae is described. This method is simple to use and efficient in revealing morphological details for a large number of retinal ganglion cells. It has five advantages over currently available staining methods. (1) It stains all ganglion cells in the whole retina or in a selected retinal area, permitting ganglion cell distributions across the retina to be obtained. (2) It reveals cell dendrites in great detail, especially in regions outside the area centralis. The dendritic field mosaics and, therefore the dendritic field coverage factors, of different ganglion cell types across the whole retina can be obtained easily. (3) It works reliably, efficiently, and does not require the expensive set-up or the pains-taking work needed when staining cells through intracellular injection. (4) It works under both in vivo and in vitro settings, permitting the use of retinae from animals sacrificed for other purposes and the use of postmortem human retinae. (5) The end product of the visualization process is optically dark and electron dense, permitting specimens to be examined under both light and electron microscopes. PMID:9128174

  19. E2F1-CDK1 pathway activation in kanamycin-induced spiral ganglion cell apoptosis and the protective effect of CR8.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-ying; Wang, Guo-peng; Peng, Zhe; Guo, Jing-ying; Wu, Qian; Xie, Jing; Gong, Shu-sheng

    2016-03-23

    Cochlear hair cell loss results in the secondary loss of spiral ganglion cells (SGCs). The death of these SGCs is due to apoptosis. The E2F1-cyclin dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) pathway is believed to represent an important mechanism of neuronal cell death. However, the role of this pathway in spiral ganglion neuronal apoptosis has not yet been reported. In this study, we deafened guinea pigs with a subcutaneous injection of kanamycin followed by an intravenous infusion of furosemide and then assayed the expression levels of cleaved caspase-3, E2F1, CDK1 and cleaved caspase-9 during the induced SGC apoptosis. Our results revealed that co-administration of kanamycin and furosemide rapidly induced hair cell loss in the guinea pigs and then resulted in a progressive loss of SGCs. Expression levels of E2F1 and CDK1 were obviously up-regulated at 1 and 3 days after deafening. Cleaved caspase-9 also increased robustly 1 or 2 weeks after the deafening procedure. The up-regulation of E2F1, CDK1 and cleaved caspase-9 was significantly attenuated by the systemic injection of CR8 (1mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally) starting at 5min after deafening. These findings indicate that the activation of the E2F1-CDK1 pathway and cell cycle re-entry contributes to the apoptosis of SGCs and that the selective inhibition of this signaling cascade may represent an attractive therapeutic strategy. CR8 has the potential to protect SGCs from apoptosis. PMID:26905670

  20. Cancers Affecting the Retina

    MedlinePlus

    ... or ARMD) Epiretinal Membrane Detachment of the Retina Retinitis Pigmentosa Blockage of Central Retinal Veins and Branch Retinal ... or ARMD) Epiretinal Membrane Detachment of the Retina Retinitis Pigmentosa Blockage of Central Retinal Veins and Branch Retinal ...

  1. Intravitreal Injection of AAV2 Transduces Macaque Inner Retina

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Lu; Greenberg, Kenneth; Hunter, Jennifer J.; Dalkara, Deniz; Kolstad, Kathleen D.; Masella, Benjamin D.; Wolfe, Robert; Visel, Meike; Stone, Daniel; Libby, Richard T.; DiLoreto, David; Schaffer, David; Flannery, John; Williams, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) has been shown to be effective in transducing inner retinal neurons after intravitreal injection in several species. However, results in nonprimates may not be predictive of transduction in the human inner retina, because of differences in eye size and the specialized morphology of the high-acuity human fovea. This was a study of inner retina transduction in the macaque, a primate with ocular characteristics most similar to that of humans. Methods. In vivo imaging and histology were used to examine GFP expression in the macaque inner retina after intravitreal injection of AAV vectors containing five distinct promoters. Results. AAV2 produced pronounced GFP expression in inner retinal cells of the fovea, no expression in the central retina beyond the fovea, and variable expression in the peripheral retina. AAV2 vector incorporating the neuronal promoter human connexin 36 (hCx36) transduced ganglion cells within a dense annulus around the fovea center, whereas AAV2 containing the ubiquitous promoter hybrid cytomegalovirus (CMV) enhancer/chicken-β-actin (CBA) transduced both Müller and ganglion cells in a dense circular disc centered on the fovea. With three shorter promoters—human synapsin (hSYN) and the shortened CBA and hCx36 promoters (smCBA and hCx36sh)—AAV2 produced visible transduction, as seen in fundus images, only when the retina was altered by ganglion cell loss or enzymatic vitreolysis. Conclusions. The results in the macaque suggest that intravitreal injection of AAV2 would produce high levels of gene expression at the human fovea, important in retinal gene therapy, but not in the central retina beyond the fovea. PMID:21310920

  2. Enkephalin in the goldfish retina

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Y.Y.; Fry, K.R.; Lam, D.M.; Watt, C.B.

    1986-12-01

    Enkephalin-like immunoreactive amacrine cells were visualized using the highly sensitive avidin-biotin method. The somas of these cells were situated in the inner nuclear and ganglion cell layers. Enkephalin-stained processes were observed in layers 1, 3, and 5 of the inner plexiform layer. The biosynthesis of sulfur-containing compounds in the goldfish retina was studied by means of a pulse-chase incubation with /sup 35/S-methionine. A /sup 35/S-labeled compound, which comigrated with authentic Met5-enkephalin on high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), was synthesized and was bound competitively by antibodies to enkephalin and by opiate receptors. This compound was tentatively identified as Met5-enkephalin. The newly synthesized /sup 35/S-Met5-enkephalin was released upon depolarization of the retina with a high K+ concentration. This K+-stimulated release was greatly suppressed by 5 mM Co/sup 2 +/, suggesting that the release was Ca/sup 2 +/ dependent. Using a double-label technique, enkephalin immunoreactivity and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) uptake were colocalized to some amacrine cells, whereas others labeled only for enkephalin or GABA. The possible significance of enkephalin-GABA interactions is also discussed.

  3. A test of metabolically efficient coding in the retina.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Vijay; Berry, Michael J

    2002-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that aspects of the neural code of retinal ganglion cells are optimized to transmit visual information at minimal metabolic cost. Under a broad ensemble of light patterns, ganglion cell spike trains consisted of sparse, precise bursts of spikes. These bursts were viewed as independent neural symbols. The noise in each burst was measured via repeated presentation of the visual stimulus, and the energy cost was estimated from the total charge flow during ganglion cell spiking. Given these costs and noise, the theory of efficient codes predicts an optimal distribution of symbol usage. Symbols that are either noisy or costly occur less frequently in this optimal code. We found good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the measured distribution of burst sizes for ganglion cells in the tiger salamander retina. PMID:12463343

  4. Caspase-2 Is Upregulated after Sciatic Nerve Transection and Its Inhibition Protects Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons from Apoptosis after Serum Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Vigneswara, Vasanthy; Berry, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Sciatic nerve (SN) transection-induced apoptosis of dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGN) is one factor determining the efficacy of peripheral axonal regeneration and the return of sensation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that caspase-2 (CASP2) orchestrates apoptosis of axotomised DRGN both in vivo and in vitro by disrupting the local neurotrophic supply to DRGN. We observed significantly elevated levels of cleaved CASP2 (C-CASP2), compared to cleaved caspase-3 (C-CASP3), within TUNEL+DRGN and DRG glia (satellite and Schwann cells) after SN transection. A serum withdrawal cell culture model, which induced 40% apoptotic death in DRGN and 60% in glia, was used to model DRGN loss after neurotrophic factor withdrawal. Elevated C-CASP2 and TUNEL were observed in both DRGN and DRG glia, with C-CASP2 localisation shifting from the cytosol to the nucleus, a required step for induction of direct CASP2-mediated apoptosis. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated downregulation of CASP2 protected 50% of DRGN from apoptosis after serum withdrawal, while downregulation of CASP3 had no effect on DRGN or DRG glia survival. We conclude that CASP2 orchestrates the death of SN-axotomised DRGN directly and also indirectly through loss of DRG glia and their local neurotrophic factor support. Accordingly, inhibiting CASP2 expression is a potential therapy for improving both the SN regeneration response and peripheral sensory recovery. PMID:23451279

  5. Changes in morphology of retinal ganglion cells with eccentricity in retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E E; Greferath, U; Fletcher, E L

    2016-05-01

    Ganglion cells are the output neurons of the retina and are known to remodel during the subtle plasticity changes that occur following the death of photoreceptors in inherited retinal degeneration. We examine the influence of retinal eccentricity on anatomical remodelling and ganglion cell morphology well after photoreceptor loss. Rd1 mice that have a mutation in the β subunit of phosphodiesterase 6 were used as a model of retinal degeneration and gross remodelling events were examined by processing serial sections for immunocytochemistry. Retinal wholemounts from rd1-Thy1 and control Thy1 mice that contained a fluorescent protein labelling a subset of ganglion cells were processed for immunohistochemistry at 11 months of age. Ganglion cells were classified based on their soma size, dendritic field size and dendritic branching pattern and their dendritic fields were analysed for their length, area and quantity of branching points. Overall, more remodelling was found in the central compared with the peripheral retina. In addition, the size and complexity of A2, B1, C1 and D type ganglion cells located in the central region of the retina decreased. We propose that the changes in ganglion cell morphology are correlated with remodelling events in these regions and impact the function of retinal circuitry in the degenerated retina. PMID:26670589

  6. Transplanted neurons integrate into adult retinas and respond to light.

    PubMed

    Venugopalan, Praseeda; Wang, Yan; Nguyen, Tu; Huang, Abigail; Muller, Kenneth J; Goldberg, Jeffrey L

    2016-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) degenerate in diseases like glaucoma and are not replaced in adult mammals. Here we investigate whether transplanted RGCs can integrate into the mature retina. We have transplanted GFP-labelled RGCs into uninjured rat retinas in vivo by intravitreal injection. Transplanted RGCs acquire the general morphology of endogenous RGCs, with axons orienting towards the optic nerve head of the host retina and dendrites growing into the inner plexiform layer. Preliminary data show in some cases GFP(+) axons extending within the host optic nerves and optic tract, reaching usual synaptic targets in the brain, including the lateral geniculate nucleus and superior colliculus. Electrophysiological recordings from transplanted RGCs demonstrate the cells' electrical excitability and light responses similar to host ON, ON-OFF and OFF RGCs, although less rapid and with greater adaptation. These data present a promising approach to develop cell replacement strategies in diseased retinas with degenerating RGCs. PMID:26843334

  7. Transplanted neurons integrate into adult retinas and respond to light

    PubMed Central

    Venugopalan, Praseeda; Wang, Yan; Nguyen, Tu; Huang, Abigail; Muller, Kenneth J.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) degenerate in diseases like glaucoma and are not replaced in adult mammals. Here we investigate whether transplanted RGCs can integrate into the mature retina. We have transplanted GFP-labelled RGCs into uninjured rat retinas in vivo by intravitreal injection. Transplanted RGCs acquire the general morphology of endogenous RGCs, with axons orienting towards the optic nerve head of the host retina and dendrites growing into the inner plexiform layer. Preliminary data show in some cases GFP+ axons extending within the host optic nerves and optic tract, reaching usual synaptic targets in the brain, including the lateral geniculate nucleus and superior colliculus. Electrophysiological recordings from transplanted RGCs demonstrate the cells' electrical excitability and light responses similar to host ON, ON–OFF and OFF RGCs, although less rapid and with greater adaptation. These data present a promising approach to develop cell replacement strategies in diseased retinas with degenerating RGCs. PMID:26843334

  8. Inhibition of cyclophilin D by cyclosporin A promotes retinal ganglion cell survival by preventing mitochondrial alteration in ischemic injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S Y; Shim, M S; Kim, K-Y; Weinreb, R N; Wheeler, L A; Ju, W-K

    2014-01-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) inhibits the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) by interacting with cyclophilin D (CypD) and ameliorates neuronal cell death in the central nervous system against ischemic injury. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying CypD/MPTP opening-mediated cell death in ischemic retinal injury induced by acute intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation remain unknown. We observed the first direct evidence that acute IOP elevation significantly upregulated CypD protein expression in ischemic retina at 12 h. However, CsA prevented the upregulation of CypD protein expression and promoted retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival against ischemic injury. Moreover, CsA blocked apoptotic cell death by decreasing cleaved caspase-3 protein expression in ischemic retina. Of interest, although the expression level of Bcl-xL protein did not show a significant change in ischemic retina treated with vehicle or CsA at 12 h, ischemic damage induced the reduction of Bcl-xL immunoreactivity in RGCs. More importantly, CsA preserved Bcl-xL immunoreactivity in RGCs of ischemic retina. In parallel, acute IOP elevation significantly increased phosphorylated Bad (pBad) at Ser112 protein expression in ischemic retina at 12 h. However, CsA significantly preserved pBad protein expression in ischemic retina. Finally, acute IOP elevation significantly increased mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) protein expression in ischemic retina at 12 h. However, CsA significantly preserved Tfam protein expression in ischemic retina. Studies on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content in ischemic retina showed that there were no statistically significant differences in mtDNA content among control and ischemic groups treated with vehicle or CsA. Therefore, these results provide evidence that the activation of CypD-mediated MPTP opening is associated with the apoptotic pathway and the mitochondrial alteration in RGC death of ischemic retinal injury. On the basis

  9. Argon mediates protection by interleukin-8 suppression via a TLR2/TLR4/STAT3/NF-κB pathway in a model of apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells in vitro and following ischemia-reperfusion injury in rat retina in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ulbrich, Felix; Lerach, Teresa; Biermann, Julia; Kaufmann, Kai B; Lagreze, Wolf A; Buerkle, Hartmut; Loop, Torsten; Goebel, Ulrich

    2016-09-01

    Argon has recently come into scientific focus as a neuroprotective agent. The underlying neuroprotective mechanism remains unknown although toll-like receptors were recently suggested to play an important role. We hypothesized that TLR-associated downstream transcription factors are responsible for argon's effects, leading to anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory properties. Apoptosis was induced in human neuroblastoma cells. Immediately afterwards, argon treatment (75 Vol% for 2 h) was initiated. Cells were analyzed, measuring mitochondrial membrane potential, reactive-oxygen-species, annexin-V/propidium iodide staining, transcription factor phosphorylation and binding activity as well as protein and mRNA expression of interleukins. Argon's in vivo effects were analyzed by quantification of retinal ganglion cell density, mRNA expression, serum cytokine analysis and immunohistochemistry after retinal ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) in rats. Argon diminished rotenone-induced kappa-light-chain-enhancer' of activated B-cells (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) but not STAT5 or cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and DNA-binding activity. Argon treatment attenuated apoptosis by preservation of mitochondrial membrane potential and decline in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. NF-κB and STAT3 inhibition, as well as TLR2 and TLR4 inhibition reversed argon's effects on IL-8 mRNA expression. Argon attenuated rotenone-induced IL-8 protein and mRNA expression in vitro. Inhibition of TLR2 and 4 attenuated argon's protective effect in vivo reducing IRI driven retinal IL-8 expression. IL-8 expression was found in the retina in co-localization with Müller cells and retinal ganglion cells. Argon mediates its neuroprotective effects by TLR-mediated regulation of transcription factors NF-κB and STAT3, thus decreasing interleukin-8 expression in vitro and in vivo. These findings may open up new

  10. Selectivity for multiple stimulus features in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Fairhall, Adrienne L; Burlingame, C Andrew; Narasimhan, Ramesh; Harris, Robert A; Puchalla, Jason L; Berry, Michael J

    2006-11-01

    Under normal viewing conditions, retinal ganglion cells transmit to the brain an encoded version of the visual world. The retina parcels the visual scene into an array of spatiotemporal features, and each ganglion cell conveys information about a small set of these features. We study the temporal features represented by salamander retinal ganglion cells by stimulating with dynamic spatially uniform flicker and recording responses using a multi-electrode array. While standard reverse correlation methods determine a single stimulus feature--the spike-triggered average--multiple features can be relevant to spike generation. We apply covariance analysis to determine the set of features to which each ganglion cell is sensitive. Using this approach, we found that salamander ganglion cells represent a rich vocabulary of different features of a temporally modulated visual stimulus. Individual ganglion cells were sensitive to at least two and sometimes as many as six features in the stimulus. While a fraction of the cells can be described by a filter-and-fire cascade model, many cells have feature selectivity that has not previously been reported. These reverse models were able to account for 80-100% of the information encoded by ganglion cells. PMID:16914609

  11. Concerted Signaling by Retinal Ganglion Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Markus; Lagnado, Leon; Baylor, Denis A.

    1995-11-01

    To analyze the rules that govern communication between eye and brain, visual responses were recorded from an intact salamander retina. Parallel observation of many retinal ganglion cells with a microelectrode array showed that nearby neurons often fired synchronously, with spike delays of less than 10 milliseconds. The frequency of such synchronous spikes exceeded the correlation expected from a shared visual stimulus up to 20-fold. Synchronous firing persisted under a variety of visual stimuli and accounted for the majority of action potentials recorded. Analysis of receptive fields showed that concerted spikes encoded information not carried by individual cells; they may represent symbols in a multineuronal code for vision.

  12. Gene and noncoding RNA regulation underlying photoreceptor protection: microarray study of dietary antioxidant saffron and photobiomodulation in rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuan; Valter, Krisztina; Bisti, Silvia; Eells, Janis; Stone, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To identify the genes and noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) involved in the neuroprotective actions of a dietary antioxidant (saffron) and of photobiomodulation (PBM). Methods We used a previously published assay of photoreceptor damage, in which albino Sprague Dawley rats raised in dim cyclic illumination (12 h 5 lux, 12 h darkness) were challenged by 24 h exposure to bright (1,000 lux) light. Experimental groups were protected against light damage by pretreatment with dietary saffron (1 mg/kg/day for 21 days) or PBM (9 J/cm2 at the eye, daily for 5 days). RNA from one eye of four animals in each of the six experimental groups (control, light damage [LD], saffron, PBM, saffronLD, and PBMLD) was hybridized to Affymetrix rat genome ST arrays. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of 14 selected genes was used to validate the microarray results. Results LD caused the regulation of 175 entities (genes and ncRNAs) beyond criterion levels (p<0.05 in comparison with controls, fold-change >2). PBM pretreatment reduced the expression of 126 of these 175 LD-regulated entities below criterion; saffron pretreatment reduced the expression of 53 entities (50 in common with PBM). In addition, PBM pretreatment regulated the expression of 67 entities not regulated by LD, while saffron pretreatment regulated 122 entities not regulated by LD (48 in common with PBM). PBM and saffron, given without LD, regulated genes and ncRNAs beyond criterion levels, but in lesser numbers than during their protective action. A high proportion of the entities regulated by LD (>90%) were known genes. By contrast, ncRNAs were prominent among the entities regulated by PBM and saffron in their neuroprotective roles (73% and 62%, respectively). Conclusions Given alone, saffron and (more prominently) PBM both regulated significant numbers of genes and ncRNAs. Given before retinal exposure to damaging light, thus while exerting their neuroprotective action, they regulated much larger numbers of entities

  13. Aberrant Activity in Degenerated Retinas Revealed by Electrical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zeck, Günther

    2016-01-01

    In this review, I present and discuss the current understanding of aberrant electrical activity found in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) of rod-degenerated (rd) mouse retinas. The reported electrophysiological properties revealed by electrical imaging using high-density microelectrode arrays can be subdivided between spiking activity originating from retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and local field potentials (LFPs) reflecting strong trans-membrane currents within the GCL. RGCs in rd retinas show increased and rhythmic spiking compared to age-matched wild-type retinas. Fundamental spiking frequencies range from 5 to 15 Hz in various mouse models. The rhythmic RGC spiking is driven by a presynaptic network comprising AII amacrine and bipolar cells. In the healthy retina this rhythm-generating circuit is inhibited by photoreceptor input. A unique physiological feature of rd retinas is rhythmic LFP manifested as spatially-restricted low-frequency (5–15 Hz) voltage changes. Their spatiotemporal characterization revealed propagation and correlation with RGC spiking. LFPs rely on gap-junctional coupling and are shaped by glycinergic and by GABAergic transmission. The aberrant RGC spiking and LFPs provide a simple readout of the functionality of the remaining retinal circuitry which can be used in the development of improved vision restoration strategies. PMID:26903810

  14. Crocin protects retinal ganglion cells against H2O2-induced damage through the mitochondrial pathway and activation of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Lv, Bochang; Chen, Tao; Xu, Zhiguo; Huo, Fuquan; Wei, Yanyan; Yang, Xinguang

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is a degenerative nerve disorder that results in irreversible blindness. It has been reported that the apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is a hallmark of glaucoma. Oxidative stress is one of the major factors that cause apoptosis of RGCs. Crocin has many beneficial effects, including antioxidant and anti-apoptotic actions. However, the mechanism by which crocin protects against oxidative stress‑induced damage to RGCs remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanism by which crocin protects RGC-5 cells against H2O2-induced damage. H2O2 was used to establish a model of oxidative stress injury in RGC-5 cells to mimic the development of glaucoma in vitro. Different concentrations (0.1 and 1 µM) of crocin were added to test whether crocin was capable of protecting RGCs from H2O2-induced damage. WST-1, lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) release and Annexin V/FITC assays were then performed. Levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected using a ROS assay kit, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) was analyzed by JC-1 staining, caspase-3 activity was examined using a Caspase-3 assay kit, and the protein levels of Bax, Bcl-1 and cytochrome c were measured using western blot analysis. In addition, the protein level of phosphorylated nuclear factor-κB (p-NF-κB) p65 was also evaluated using western blot analysis. The results showed that crocin protected RGC-5 cells from apoptosis, decreased LDH release and enhanced cell viability. Additional experiments demonstrated that crocin decreased ROS levels, increased ΔΨm, downregulated the protein expression of Bax and cytochrome c, promoted Bcl-2 protein expression and activated NF-κB. Taken together, the findings of this study indicate that crocin prevented H2O2‑induced damage to RGCs through the mitochondrial pathway and activation of NF-κB. PMID:26718031

  15. Hydrogen-Rich Saline Promotes Survival of Retinal Ganglion Cells in a Rat Model of Optic Nerve Crush

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Qiao; Wang, Ruo-bing; Qi, Ai-qing; Cao, Wen-luo; Sun, Ai-jun; Sun, Xue-jun; Xu, Jiajun

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of molecular hydrogen (H2) in a rat model subjected to optic nerve crush (ONC). Methods We tested the hypothesis that after optic nerve crush (ONC), retinal ganglion cell (RGC) could be protected by H2. Rats in different groups received saline or hydrogen-rich saline every day for 14 days after ONC. Retinas from animals in each group underwent measurements of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, cholera toxin beta (CTB) tracing, gamma synuclein staining, and terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining 2 weeks post operation. Flash visual evoked potentials (FVEP) and pupillary light reflex (PLR) were then tested to evaluate the function of optic nerve. The malondialdehyde (MDA) level in retina was evaluated. Results H&E, gamma synuclein staining and CTB tracing showed that the survival rate of RGCs in hydrogen saline-treated group was significantly higher than that in saline-treated group. Apoptosis of RGCs assessed by TUNEL staining were less observed in hydrogen saline-treated group. The MDA level in retina of H2 group was much lower than that in placebo group. Furthermore, animals treated with hydrogen saline showed better function of optic nerve in assessments of FVEP and PLR. Conclusion These results demonstrated that H2 protects RGCs and helps preserve the visual function after ONC and had a neuroprotective effect in a rat model subjected to ONC. PMID:24915536

  16. Sigma-1 receptor stimulation protects retinal ganglion cells from ischemia-like insult through the activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1/2.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Brett H; Park, Yong; Ma, Hai-Ying; Dibas, Adnan; Ellis, Dorette Z; Clark, Abbot F; Yorio, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (σ-1) activation and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have been shown to protect retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) from cell death. The purpose of this study was to determine if σ-1 receptor stimulation with pentazocine could promote neuroprotection under conditions of an ischemia-like insult (oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD)) through the phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (pERK)1/2. Primary RGCs were isolated from P3-P7 Sprague-Dawley rats and purified by sequential immunopanning using Thy1.1 antibodies. RGCs were cultured for 7 days before subjecting the cells to an OGD insult (0.5% oxygen in glucose-free medium) for 6 h. During the OGD, RGCs were treated with pentazocine (σ-1 receptor agonist) with or without BD 1047 (σ-1 receptor antagonist). In other experiments, primary RGCs were treated with pentazocine in the presence or absence of an MEK1/2 inhibitor, PD098059. Cell survival/death was assessed by staining with the calcein-AM/ethidium homodimer reagent. Levels of pERK1/2, total ERK1/2, and beta tubulin expression were determined by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence staining. RGCs subjected to OGD for 6 h induced 50% cell death in primary RGCs (p < 0.001) and inhibited pERK1/2 expression by 65% (p < 0.001). Cell death was attenuated when RGCs were treated with pentazocine under OGD (p < 0.001) and pERK1/2 expression was increased by 1.6 fold (p < 0.05) compared to OGD treated RGCs without pentazocine treatment. The co-treatment of PD098059 (MEK1/2 inhibitor) with pentazocine significantly abolished the protective effects of pentazocine on the RGCs during this OGD insult. Activation of the σ-1 receptor is a neuroprotective target that can protect RGCs from an ischemia-like insult. These results also established a direct relationship between σ-1 receptor stimulation and the neuroprotective effects of the ERK1/2 pathway in purified RGCs subjected to OGD. These findings suggest that activation of

  17. Lipoprotein(A) with An Intact Lysine Binding Site Protects the Retina From an Age-Related Macular Degeneration Phenotype in Mice (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Handa, James T.; Tagami, Mizuki; Ebrahimi, Katayoon; Leibundgut, Gregor; Janiak, Anna; Witztum, Joseph L.; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the accumulation of oxidized phospholipids (OxPL) in the macula is toxic to the retina unless neutralized by a variety of mechanisms, including binding by lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], which is composed of apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] and apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB). Methods: Human maculas and eyes from two Lp(a) transgenic murine models were subjected to morphologic, ultrastructural, and immunohistochemical analysis. “Wild-type Lp(a)” mice, which express human apoB-100 and apo(a) that contains oxidized phospholipid, and “mutant LBS− Lp(a)” mice with a defective apo(a) lysine binding site (LBS) for oxidized phospholipid binding, were fed a chow or high-fat diet for 2 to 12 months. Oxidized phospholipid–containing lipoproteins were detected by immunoreactivity to E06, a murine monoclonal antibody binding to the phosphocholine headgroup of oxidized, but not native, phospholipids. Results: Oxidized phospholipids, apo(a), and apoB accumulate in maculas, including drusen, of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) samples and age-matched controls. Lp(a) mice fed a high-fat diet developed age-related changes. However, mutant LBS− Lp(a) mice fed a high-fat diet developed retinal pigment epithelial cell degeneration and drusen. These changes were associated with increased OxPL, decreased antioxidant defenses, increased complement, and decreased complement regulators. Conclusions: Human maculas accumulate Lp(a) and OxPL. Mutant LBS− Lp(a) mice, lacking the ability to bind E06-detectable oxidized phospholipid, develop AMD-like changes. The ability of Lp(a) to bind E06-detectable OxPL may play a protective role in AMD. PMID:26538774

  18. Glycogen metabolism in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Coffe, Víctor; Carbajal, Raymundo C; Salceda, Rocío

    2004-02-01

    It has been reported that glycogen levels in retina vary with retinal vascularization. However, the electrical activity of isolated retina depends on glucose supply, suggesting that it does not contain energetic reserves. We determined glycogen levels and pyruvate and lactate production under various conditions in isolated retina. Ex vivo retinas from light- and dark-adapted rats showed values of 44 +/- 0.3 and 19.5 +/- 0.4 nmol glucosyl residues/mg protein, respectively. The glycogen content of retinas from light-adapted animals was reduced by 50% when they were transferred to darkness. Glycogen levels were low in retinas incubated in glucose-free media and increased in the presence of glucose. The highest glycogen values were found in media containing 20 mm of glucose. A rapid increase in lactate production was observed in the presence of glucose. Surprisingly, glycogen levels were the lowest and lactate production was also very low in the presence of 30 mm glucose. Our results suggest that glycogen can be used as an immediate accessible energy reserve in retina. We speculate on the possibility that gluconeogenesis may play a protective role by removal of lactic acid. PMID:14756809

  19. CRYSTALLINS IN RETINAL GANGLION CELL SURVIVAL AND REGENERATION

    PubMed Central

    Piri, Natik; Kwong, Jacky MK; Caprioli, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Crystallins are heterogeneous proteins classified into alpha, beta, and gamma families. Although crystallins were first identified as the major structural components of the ocular lens with a principal function to maintain lens transparency, further studies have demonstrated the expression of these proteins in a wide variety of tissues and cell types. Alpha crystallins (alpha A and alpha B) share significant homology with small heat shock proteins and have chaperone-like properties, including the ability to bind and prevent the precipitation of denatured proteins and to increase cellular resistance to stress-induced apoptosis. Stress-induced upregulation of crystallin expression is a commonly observed phenomenon and viewed as a cellular response mechanism against environmental and metabolic insults. However, several studies reported downregulation of crystallin gene expression in various models of glaucomatous nerodegeneration suggesting that that the decreased levels of crystallins may affect the survival properties of retinal ganglion cells and thus, be associated with their degeneration. This hypothesis was corroborated by increased survival of axotomized retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in retinas overexpressing alpha A or alpha B crystallins. In addition to RGC protective functions of alpha crystallins, beta or gamma crystallins were implicated in RGC axonal regeneration. These findings demonstrate the importance of crystallin genes in RGC survival and regeneration and further in-depth studies are necessary to better understand the mechanisms underlying the functions of these proteins in healthy RGCs as well as during glaucomatous neurodegeneration, which in turn could help in designing new therapeutic strategies to preserve or regenerate these cells. PMID:23709342

  20. Complex computation in the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Nikhil Rajiv

    Elucidating the general principles of computation in neural circuits is a difficult problem requiring both a tractable model circuit as well as sophisticated measurement tools. This thesis advances our understanding of complex computation in the salamander retina and its underlying circuitry and furthers the development of advanced tools to enable detailed study of neural circuits. The retina provides an ideal model system for neural circuits in general because it is capable of producing complex representations of the visual scene, and both its inputs and outputs are accessible to the experimenter. Chapter 2 describes the biophysical mechanisms that give rise to the omitted stimulus response in retinal ganglion cells described in Schwartz et al., (2007) and Schwartz and Berry, (2008). The extra response to omitted flashes is generated at the input to bipolar cells, and is separable from the characteristic latency shift of the OSR apparent in ganglion cells, which must occur downstream in the circuit. Chapter 3 characterizes the nonlinearities at the first synapse of the ON pathway in response to high contrast flashes and develops a phenomenological model that captures the effect of synaptic activation and intracellular signaling dynamics on flash responses. This work is the first attempt to model the dynamics of the poorly characterized mGluR6 transduction cascade unique to ON bipolar cells, and explains the second lobe of the biphasic flash response. Complementary to the study of neural circuits, recent advances in wafer-scale photolithography have made possible new devices to measure the electrical and mechanical properties of neurons. Chapter 4 reports a novel piezoelectric sensor that facilitates the simultaneous measurement of electrical and mechanical signals in neural tissue. This technology could reveal the relationship between the electrical activity of neurons and their local mechanical environment, which is critical to the study of mechanoreceptors

  1. Cytogenesis in the monkey retina

    SciTech Connect

    La Vail, M.M.; Rapaport, D.H.; Rakic, P. )

    1991-07-01

    Time of cell origin in the retina of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) was studied by plotting the number of heavily radiolabeled nuclei in autoradiograms prepared from 2- to 6-month-old animals, each of which was exposed to a pulse of 3H-thymidine (3H-TdR) on a single embryonic (E) or postnatal (P) day. Cell birth in the monkey retina begins just after E27, and approximately 96% of cells are generated by E120. The remaining cells are produced during the last (approximately 45) prenatal days and into the first several weeks after birth. Cell genesis begins near the fovea, and proceeds towards the periphery. Cell division largely ceases in the foveal and perifoveal regions by E56. Despite extensive overlap, a class-specific sequence of cell birth was observed. Ganglion and horizontal cells, which are born first, have largely congruent periods of cell genesis with the peak between E38 and E43, and termination around E70. The first labeled cones were apparent by E33, and their highest density was achieved between E43 and E56, tapering to low values at E70, although some cones are generated in the far periphery as late as E110. Amacrine cells are next in the cell birth sequence and begin genesis at E43, reach a peak production between E56 and E85, and cease by E110. Bipolar cell birth begins at the same time as amacrines, but appears to be separate from them temporally since their production reaches a peak between E56 and E102, and persists beyond the day of birth. Mueller cells and rod photoreceptors, which begin to be generated at E45, achieve a peak, and decrease in density at the same time as bipolar cells, but continue genesis at low density on the day of birth. Thus, bipolar, Mueller, and rod cells have a similar time of origin.

  2. Ganglion cell distribution and retinal resolution in the Florida manatee, Trichechus manatus latirostris.

    PubMed

    Mass, Alla M; Ketten, Darlene R; Odell, Daniel K; Supin, Alexander Ya

    2012-01-01

    The topographic organization of retinal ganglion cells was examined in the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) to assess ganglion cell size and distribution and to estimate retinal resolution. The ganglion cell layer of the manatee's retina was comprised primarily of large neurons with broad intercellular spaces. Cell sizes varied from 10 to 60 μm in diameter (mean 24.3 μm). The retinal wholemounts from adult animals measured 446-501 mm(2) in area with total ganglion cell counts of 62,000-81,800 (mean 70,200). The cell density changed across the retina, with the maximum in the area below the optic disc and decreasing toward the retinal edges and in the immediate vicinity of the optic disc. The maximum cell density ranged from 235 to 337 cells per millimeter square in the adult retinae. Two wholemounts obtained from juvenile animals were 271 and 282 mm(2) in area with total cell numbers of 70,900 and 68,700, respectively (mean 69,800), that is, nearly equivalent to those of adults, but juvenile retinae consequently had maximum cell densities that were higher than those of adults: 478 and 491 cells per millimeter square. Calculations indicate a retinal resolution of ∼19' (1.6 cycles per degree) in both adult and juvenile retinae. PMID:21964938

  3. The functional diversity of retinal ganglion cells in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Baden, Tom; Berens, Philipp; Franke, Katrin; Román Rosón, Miroslav; Bethge, Matthias; Euler, Thomas

    2016-01-21

    In the vertebrate visual system, all output of the retina is carried by retinal ganglion cells. Each type encodes distinct visual features in parallel for transmission to the brain. How many such 'output channels' exist and what each encodes are areas of intense debate. In the mouse, anatomical estimates range from 15 to 20 channels, and only a handful are functionally understood. By combining two-photon calcium imaging to obtain dense retinal recordings and unsupervised clustering of the resulting sample of more than 11,000 cells, here we show that the mouse retina harbours substantially more than 30 functional output channels. These include all known and several new ganglion cell types, as verified by genetic and anatomical criteria. Therefore, information channels from the mouse eye to the mouse brain are considerably more diverse than shown thus far by anatomical studies, suggesting an encoding strategy resembling that used in state-of-the-art artificial vision systems. PMID:26735013

  4. Decorrelation and efficient coding by retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Pitkow, Xaq; Meister, Markus

    2013-01-01

    An influential theory of visual processing asserts that retinal center-surround receptive fields remove spatial correlations in the visual world, producing ganglion cell spike trains that are less redundant than the corresponding image pixels. For bright, high-contrast images, this decorrelation would enhance coding efficiency in optic nerve fibers of limited capacity. Here we test the central prediction of the theory and demonstrate that the spike trains of retinal ganglion cells are indeed decorrelated compared to the visual input. However, most of the decorrelation is accomplished not by the receptive fields, but by nonlinear processing in the retina. We show that a steep response threshold enhances efficient coding by noisy spike trains, and the effect of this nonlinearity is near optimal in both salamander and macaque retina. These results offer an explanation for the sparseness of retinal spike trains, and highlight the importance of treating the full nonlinear character of neural codes. PMID:22406548

  5. Activation of glucocorticoid receptors in Müller glia is protective to retinal neurons and suppresses microglial reactivity.

    PubMed

    Gallina, Donika; Zelinka, Christopher Paul; Cebulla, Colleen M; Fischer, Andy J

    2015-11-01

    Reactive microglia and macrophages are prevalent in damaged retinas. Glucocorticoid signaling is known to suppress inflammation and the reactivity of microglia and macrophages. In the vertebrate retina, the glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) is known to be activated and localized to the nuclei of Müller glia (Gallina et al., 2014). Accordingly, we investigated how signaling through GCR influences the survival of neurons using the chick retina in vivo as a model system. We applied intraocular injections of GCR agonist or antagonist, assessed microglial reactivity, and the survival of retinal neurons following different damage paradigms. Microglial reactivity was increased in retinas from eyes that were injected with vehicle, and this reactivity was decreased by GCR-agonist dexamethasone (Dex) and increased by GCR-antagonist RU486. We found that activation of GCR suppresses the reactivity of microglia and inhibited the loss of retinal neurons resulting from excitotoxicity. We provide evidence that the protection-promoting effects of Dex were maintained when the microglia were selectively ablated. Similarly, intraocular injections of Dex protected ganglion cells from colchicine-treatment and protected photoreceptors from damage caused by retinal detachment. We conclude that activation of GCR promotes the survival of ganglion cells in colchicine-damaged retinas, promotes the survival of amacrine and bipolar cells in excitotoxin-damaged retinas, and promotes the survival of photoreceptors in detached retinas. We propose that suppression of microglial reactivity is secondary to activation of GCR in Müller glia, and this mode of signaling is an effective means to lessen the damage and vision loss resulting from different types of retinal damage. PMID:26272753

  6. Connecting the Retina to the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Eloisa

    2014-01-01

    The visual system is beautifully crafted to transmit information of the external world to visual processing and cognitive centers in the brain. For visual information to be relayed to the brain, a series of axon pathfinding events must take place to ensure that the axons of retinal ganglion cells, the only neuronal cell type in the retina that sends axons out of the retina, find their way out of the eye to connect with targets in the brain. In the past few decades, the power of molecular and genetic tools, including the generation of genetically manipulated mouse lines, have multiplied our knowledge about the molecular mechanisms involved in the sculpting of the visual system. Here, we review major advances in our understanding of the mechanisms controlling the differentiation of RGCs, guidance of their axons from the retina to the primary visual centers, and the refinement processes essential for the establishment of topographic maps and eye-specific axon segregation. Human disorders, such as albinism and achiasmia, that impair RGC axon growth and guidance and, thus, the establishment of a fully functioning visual system will also be discussed. PMID:25504540

  7. Three-dimensional printing of the retina

    PubMed Central

    Lorber, Barbara; Hsiao, Wen-Kai; Martin, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Biological three-dimensional printing has received a lot of media attention over recent years with advances made in printing cellular structures, including skin and heart tissue for transplantation. Although limitations exist in creating functioning organs with this method, the hope has been raised that creating a functional retina to cure blindness is within reach. The present review provides an update on the advances made toward this goal. Recent findings It has recently been shown that two types of retinal cells, retinal ganglion cells and glial cells, can be successfully printed using a piezoelectric inkjet printer. Importantly, the cells remained viable and did not change certain phenotypic features as a result of the printing process. In addition, recent advances in the creation of complex and viable three-dimensional cellular structures have been made. Summary Some first promising steps toward the creation of a functional retina have been taken. It now needs to be investigated whether recent findings can be extended to other cells of the retina, including those derived from human tissue, and if a complex and viable retinal structure can be created through three-dimensional printing. PMID:27045545

  8. Connecting the retina to the brain.

    PubMed

    Erskine, Lynda; Herrera, Eloisa

    2014-01-01

    The visual system is beautifully crafted to transmit information of the external world to visual processing and cognitive centers in the brain. For visual information to be relayed to the brain, a series of axon pathfinding events must take place to ensure that the axons of retinal ganglion cells, the only neuronal cell type in the retina that sends axons out of the retina, find their way out of the eye to connect with targets in the brain. In the past few decades, the power of molecular and genetic tools, including the generation of genetically manipulated mouse lines, have multiplied our knowledge about the molecular mechanisms involved in the sculpting of the visual system. Here, we review major advances in our understanding of the mechanisms controlling the differentiation of RGCs, guidance of their axons from the retina to the primary visual centers, and the refinement processes essential for the establishment of topographic maps and eye-specific axon segregation. Human disorders, such as albinism and achiasmia, that impair RGC axon growth and guidance and, thus, the establishment of a fully functioning visual system will also be discussed. PMID:25504540

  9. Expression of Aquaporin-6 in Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sun Young; Lee, Eung Suk; Ohn, Young-Hoon; Park, Tae Kwann

    2016-08-01

    Several aquaporins (AQPs) have been identified to be present in the eyes, and it has been suggested that they are involved in the movement of water and small solutes. AQP6, which has low water permeability and transports mainly anions, was recently discovered in the eyes. In the present study, we investigate the localization of AQP6 in the rat retina and show that AQP6 is selectively localized to the ganglion cell layer and the outer plexiform layer. Along with the gradual decrease in retinal ganglion cells after a crushing injury of optic nerve, immunofluorescence signals of AQP6 gradually decreased. Confocal microscope images confirmed AQP6 expression in retinal ganglion cells and Müller cells in vitro. Therefore, AQP6 might participate in water and anion transport in these cells. PMID:26526333

  10. GABAergic and glycinergic pathways to goldfish retinal ganglion cells: an ultrastructural double label study

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    An ultrastructural double label has been employed to compare GABAergic and glycinergic systems in the inner plexiform layer (IPL) of the goldfish retina. Electron microscope autoradiography of /sup 3/H-GABA and /sup 3/H-glycine uptake was combined with retrograde HRP-labeling of ganglion cells. When surveyed for distribution, GABAergic and glycinergic synapses were found onto labeled ganglion cells throughout the IPL. This reinforces previous physiological work that described GABAergic and glycinergic influences on a variety of ganglion cells in goldfish and carp; These physiological effects often reflect direct inputs.

  11. Expression of myelin genes in the developing chick retina.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Hitosh; Ueda, Takayuki; Uno, Aoi; Ohuchi, Hideyo; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro; Ono, Katsuhiko

    2011-12-01

    In submammalian animals including chicks, the retina contains oligodendrocytes (OLs), and axons in the optic fiber layer are wrapped with compact myelin within the retina; however, the expression of myelin genes in the chick retina has not been demonstrated yet. In the present study, we examined the expression of three myelin genes (proteolipid protein, PLP; myelin basic protein, MBP; cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, CNP) and PLP in the developing chick retina, in comparison to the localization of Mueller cells. In situ hybridization demonstrated that all three myelin genes began to be expressed at E14 in the chick embryo retina. They are mostly restricted to the ganglion cell layer and the optic fiber layer, with a few exceptions in the inner nuclear layer where Mueller cells reside; however, PLP mRNA+ cells do not express glutamine synthetase, or vice versa. The present results elucidate that myelin genes are expressed only by OLs that are mostly localized in the innermost layer of the developing chick retina. PMID:21872683

  12. Synaptic mechanisms of adaptation and sensitization in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaev, Anton; Leung, Kin-Mei; Odermatt, Benjamin; Lagnado, Leon

    2014-01-01

    Sensory systems continually adjust the way stimuli are processed. What are the circuit mechanisms underlying this plasticity? We investigated how synapses in the retina of zebrafish adjust to changes in the temporal contrast of a visual stimulus by imaging activity in vivo. Following an increase in contrast, bipolar cell synapses with strong initial responses depressed, whereas synapses with weak initial responses facilitated. Depression and facilitation predominated in different strata of the inner retina, where bipolar cell output was anticorrelated with the activity of amacrine cell synapses providing inhibitory feedback. Pharmacological block of GABAergic feedback converted facilitating bipolar cell synapses into depressing ones. These results indicate that depression intrinsic to bipolar cell synapses causes adaptation of the ganglion cell response to contrast, whereas depression in amacrine cell synapses causes sensitization. Distinct microcircuits segregating to different layers of the retina can cause simultaneous increases or decreases in the gain of neural responses. PMID:23685718

  13. Semimembranosus ganglion cyst

    PubMed Central

    Kannadath, Bijun Sai; Soundamourthy, Sandosh; Subramanian, Aruna; Sinhasan, Sankappa P.; Bhat, Ramachandra V.

    2014-01-01

    Ganglion cysts are tumor-like lesions in the soft tissues, generated by mucoid degeneration of the joint capsule, tendon or tendon sheaths on the dorsum of hand, wrist and foot. However, an intratendinous origin for a ganglion cyst is extremely rare. During dissection of the popliteal fossa, a cyst of 2.5 cm×2 cm×0.5 cm was observed in the tendon of right semimembranosus, 3.5 cm above the insertion of the muscle. Contrast X-ray revealed the cyst as not communicating with the knee joint or any adjacent bursae. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of ganglion cyst. PMID:25276481

  14. Hyperactivity of ON-type retinal ganglion cells in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun; Wang, Lu; Weng, Shi-Jun; Yang, Xiong-Li; Zhang, Dao-Qi; Zhong, Yong-Mei

    2013-01-01

    Impairment of visual function has been detected in the early stage of diabetes but the underlying neural mechanisms involved are largely unknown. Morphological and functional alterations of retinal ganglion cells, the final output neurons of the vertebrate retina, are thought to be the major cause of visual defects in diabetes but direct evidence to support this notion is limited. In this study we investigated functional changes of retinal ganglion cells in a type 1-like diabetic mouse model. Our results demonstrated that the spontaneous spiking activity of ON-type retinal ganglion cells was increased in streptozotocin-diabetic mice after 3 to 4 months of diabetes. At this stage of diabetes, no apoptotic signals or cell loss were detected in the ganglion cell layer of the retina, suggesting that the functional alterations in ganglion cells occur prior to massive ganglion cell apoptosis. Furthermore, we found that the increased activity of ON-type ganglion cells was mainly a result of reduced inhibitory signaling to the cells in diabetes. This novel mechanism provides insight into how visual function is impaired in diabetic retinopathy. PMID:24069457

  15. Hyperactivity of ON-Type Retinal Ganglion Cells in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jun; Wang, Lu; Weng, Shi-Jun; Yang, Xiong-Li; Zhang, Dao-Qi; Zhong, Yong-Mei

    2013-01-01

    Impairment of visual function has been detected in the early stage of diabetes but the underlying neural mechanisms involved are largely unknown. Morphological and functional alterations of retinal ganglion cells, the final output neurons of the vertebrate retina, are thought to be the major cause of visual defects in diabetes but direct evidence to support this notion is limited. In this study we investigated functional changes of retinal ganglion cells in a type 1-like diabetic mouse model. Our results demonstrated that the spontaneous spiking activity of ON-type retinal ganglion cells was increased in streptozotocin-diabetic mice after 3 to 4 months of diabetes. At this stage of diabetes, no apoptotic signals or cell loss were detected in the ganglion cell layer of the retina, suggesting that the functional alterations in ganglion cells occur prior to massive ganglion cell apoptosis. Furthermore, we found that the increased activity of ON-type ganglion cells was mainly a result of reduced inhibitory signaling to the cells in diabetes. This novel mechanism provides insight into how visual function is impaired in diabetic retinopathy. PMID:24069457

  16. Intracerebroventricular gene therapy that delays neurological disease progression is associated with selective preservation of retinal ganglion cells in a canine model of CLN2 disease.

    PubMed

    Whiting, Rebecca E H; Jensen, Cheryl A; Pearce, Jacqueline W; Gillespie, Lauren E; Bristow, Daniel E; Katz, Martin L

    2016-05-01

    CLN2 disease is one of a group of lysosomal storage disorders called the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs). The disease results from mutations in the TPP1 gene that cause an insufficiency or complete lack of the soluble lysosomal enzyme tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1). TPP1 is involved in lysosomal protein degradation, and lack of this enzyme results in the accumulation of protein-rich autofluorescent lysosomal storage bodies in numerous cell types including neurons throughout the central nervous system and the retina. CLN2 disease is characterized primarily by progressive loss of neurological functions and vision as well as generalized neurodegeneration and retinal degeneration. In children the progressive loss of neurological functions typically results in death by the early teenage years. A Dachshund model of CLN2 disease with a null mutation in TPP1 closely recapitulates the human disorder with a progression from disease onset at approximately 4 months of age to end-stage at 10-11 months. Delivery of functional TPP1 to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), either by periodic infusion of the recombinant protein or by a single administration of a TPP1 gene therapy vector to the CSF, significantly delays the onset and progression of neurological signs and prolongs life span but does not prevent the loss of vision or modest retinal degeneration that occurs by 11 months of age. In this study we found that in dogs that received the CSF gene therapy treatment, the degeneration of the retina and loss of retinal function continued to progress during the prolonged life spans of the treated dogs. Eventually the normal cell layers of the retina almost completely disappeared. An exception was the ganglion cell layer. In affected dogs that received TPP1 gene therapy to the CSF and survived an average of 80 weeks, ganglion cell axons were present in numbers comparable to those of normal Dachshunds of similar age. The selective preservation of the retinal ganglion cells suggests

  17. Intracerebroventricular gene therapy that delays neurological disease progression is associated with selective preservation of retinal ganglion cells in a canine model of CLN2 disease

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, Rebecca E.H.; Jensen, Cheryl A.; Pearce, Jacqueline W.; Gillespie, Lauren E.; Bristow, Daniel E.; Katz, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    CLN2 disease is one of a group of lysosomal storage disorders called the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs). The disease results from mutations in the TPP1 gene that cause an insufficiency or complete lack of the soluble lysosomal enzyme tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1). TPP1 is involved in lysosomal protein degradation, and lack of this enzyme results in the accumulation of protein-rich autofluorescent lysosomal storage bodies in numerous cell types including neurons throughout the central nervous system and the retina. CLN2 disease is characterized primarily by progressive loss of neurological functions and vision as well as generalized neurodegeneration and retinal degeneration. In children the progressive loss of neurological functions typically results in death by the early teenage years. A Dachshund model of CLN2 disease with a null mutation in TPP1 closely recapitulates the human disorder with a progression from disease onset at approximately 4 months of age to end-stage at 10–11 months. Delivery of functional TPP1 to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), either by periodic infusion of the recombinant protein or by a single administration of a TPP1 gene therapy vector to the CSF, significantly delays the onset and progression of neurological signs and prolongs life span but does not prevent the loss of vision or modest retinal degeneration that occurs by 11 months of age. In this study we found that in dogs that received the CSF gene therapy treatment, the degeneration of the retina and loss of retinal function continued to progress during the prolonged life spans of the treated dogs. Eventually the normal cell layers of the retina almost completely disappeared. An exception was the ganglion cell layer. In affected dogs that received TPP1 gene therapy to the CSF and survived an average of 80 weeks, ganglion cell axons were present in numbers comparable to those of normal Dachshunds of similar age. The selective preservation of the retinal ganglion cells suggests

  18. Celastrol supports survival of retinal ganglion cells injured by optic nerve crush.

    PubMed

    Kyung, Haksu; Kwong, Jacky M K; Bekerman, Vlad; Gu, Lei; Yadegari, Daniel; Caprioli, Joseph; Piri, Natik

    2015-06-01

    The present study evaluates the effect of celastrol on the survival of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) injured by optic nerve crush (ONC). Celastrol, a quinine methide triterpene extracted from the perennial vine Tripterygium wilfordii (Celastraceae), has been identified as a potential neuroprotective candidate in a comprehensive drug screen against various neurodegenerative diseases. Two weeks after ONC, the average density of remaining RGCs in retinas of animals treated with daily intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of celastrol (1mg/kg) was approximately 1332 cells/mm(2), or 40.8% of the Celastrol/Control group. In retinas of the Vehicle/ONC group about 381 RGCs/mm(2) were counted, which is 9.6% of the total number of RGCs in the DMSO/Control group. This corresponds to approximately a 250% increase in RGC survival mediated by celastrol treatment compared to Vehicle/ONC group. Furthermore, the average RGC number in retinas of ONC animals treated with a single intravitreal injection of 1mg/kg or 5mg/kg of celastrol was increased by approximately 80% (760 RGCs/mm(2)) and 78% (753 RGCs/mm(2)), respectively, compared to Vehicle/ONC controls (422 cells/mm(2)). Injection of 0.2mg/kg of celastrol had no significant effect on cell survival, with the average number of RGCs being 514 cells/mm(2) in celastrol-treated animals versus 422 cells/mm(2) in controls. The expression levels of Hsp70, Hsf1, Hsf2, HO-1 and TNF-alpha in the retina were analyzed to evaluate the roles of these proteins in the celastrol-mediated protection of injured RGCs. No statistically significant change in HO-1, Hsf1 and Hsp70 levels was seen in animals with ONC. An approximately 2 fold increase in Hsf2 level was observed in celastrol-treated animals with or without injury. Hsf2 level was also increased 1.8 fold in DMSO-treated animals with ONC injury compared to DMSO-treated animals with no injury suggesting that Hsf2 induction has an injury-induced component. Expression of TNF-alpha in retinas of

  19. CELASTROL SUPPORTS SURVIVAL OF RETINAL GANGLION CELLS INJURED BY OPTIC NERVE CRUSH

    PubMed Central

    Kyung, Haksu; Kwong, Jacky M. K.; Bekerman, Vlad; Gu, Lei; Yadegari, Daniel; Caprioli, Joseph; Piri, Natik

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluates the effect of celastrol on the survival of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) injured by optic nerve crush (ONC). Celastrol, a quinine methide triterpene extracted from the perennial vine Tripterygium wilfordii (Celastraceae), has been identified as a potential neuroprotective candidate in a comprehensive drug screen against various neurodegenerative diseases. Two weeks after ONC, the average density of remaining RGCs in retinas of animals treated with daily intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of celastrol (1 mg/kg) was approximately 1332 cells/mm2, or 40.8% of that of the Celastrol/Control group. In retinas of the Vehicle/ONC group about 381 RGCs/mm2 were counted, which is 9.6% of the total number of RGCs in the DMSO/Control group. This corresponds to approximately a 250% increase in RGC survival mediated by celastrol treatment compared to control. Furthermore, the average RGC number in retinas of ONC animals treated with a single intravitreal injection of 1 mg/kg or 5 mg/kg of celastrol was increased by approximately 80% (760 RGCs/ mm2) and 78% (753 RGCs/mm2), respectively, compared to controls (422 cells/mm2). Injection of 0.2 mg/kg of celastrol had no significant effect on cell survival compared to DMSO-injected controls, with the average number of RGCs being 514 cells/mm2 in celastrol-treated animals versus 422 cells/mm2 in controls. The expression levels of Hsp70, Hsf1, Hsf2, HO-1 and TNF-alpha in the retina were analyzed to evaluate the roles of these proteins in the celastrol-mediated protection of injured RGCs. No statistically significant change in HO-1, Hsf1 and Hsp70 levels was seen in animals with ONC. An approximately 2 fold increase in Hsf2 level was observed in celastrol-treated animals with or without injury. Hsf2 level was also increased 1.8 fold in DMSO-treated animals with ONC injury compared to DMSO-treated animals with no injury suggesting that Hsf2 induction has an injury-induced component. Expression of TNF-alpha in

  20. In vivo volumetric imaging of chicken retina with ultrahigh-resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Moayed, Alireza Akhlagh; Hariri, Sepideh; Song, Eun Sun; Choh, Vivian; Bizheva, Kostadinka

    2011-01-01

    The chicken retina is an established animal model for myopia and light-associated growth studies. It has a unique morphology: it is afoveate and avascular; oxygen and nutrition to the inner retina is delivered by a vascular tissue (pecten) that protrudes into the vitreous. Here we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first in vivo, volumetric high-resolution images of the chicken retina. Images were acquired with an ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography (UHROCT) system with 3.5 µm axial resolution in the retina, at the rate of 47,000 A-scans/s. Spatial variations in the thickness of the nerve fiber and ganglion cell layers were mapped by segmenting and measuring the layer thickness with a semi-automatic segmentation algorithm. Volumetric visualization of the morphology and morphometric analysis of the chicken retina could aid significantly studies with chicken retinal models of ophthalmic diseases. PMID:21559138

  1. Distribution of Cones in Human and Monkey Retina: Individual Variability and Radial Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curcio, Christine A.; Sloan, Kenneth R.; Packer, Orin; Hendrickson, Anita E.; Kalina, Robert E.

    1987-05-01

    The distribution of photoreceptors is known for only one complete human retina and for the cardinal meridians only in the macaque monkey retina. Cones can be mapped in computer-reconstructed whole mounts of human and monkey retina. A 2.9-fold range in maximum cone density in the foveas of young adult human eyes may contribute to individual differences in acuity. Cone distribution is radially asymmetrical about the fovea in both species, as previously described for the distribution of retinal ganglion cells and for lines of visual isosensitivity. Cone density was greater in the nasal than in the temporal peripheral retina, and this nasotemporal asymmetry was more pronounced in monkey than in human retina.

  2. JNK Inhibition Reduced Retinal Ganglion Cell Death after Ischemia/Reperfusion In Vivo and after Hypoxia In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Produit-Zengaffinen, Nathalie; Favez, Tatiana; Pournaras, Constantin J; Schorderet, Daniel F

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are key regulators that have been linked to cell survival and death. Among the main classes of MAPKs, c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) has been shown to mediate cell stress responses associated with apoptosis. In Vitro, hypoxia induced a significant increase in 661W cell death that paralleled increased activity of JNK and c-jun. 661W cells cultured in presence of the inhibitor of JNK (D-JNKi) were less sensitive to hypoxia-induced cell death. In vivo, elevation in intraocular pressure (IOP) in the rat promoted cell death that correlated with modulation of JNK activation. In vivo inhibition of JNK activation with D-JNKi resulted in a significant and sustained decrease in apoptosis in the ganglion cell layer, the inner nuclear layer and the photoreceptor layer. These results highlight the protective effect of D-JNKi in ischemia/reperfusion induced cell death of the retina. PMID:26427475

  3. The intricacies of neurotrophic factor therapy for retinal ganglion cell rescue in glaucoma: a case for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Foldvari, Marianna; Chen, Ding Wen

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration of damaged retinal ganglion cells (RGC) and their axons is an important aspect of reversing vision loss in glaucoma patients. While current therapies can effectively lower intraocular pressure, they do not provide extrinsic support to RGCs to actively aid in their protection and regeneration. The unmet need could be addressed by neurotrophic factor gene therapy, where plasmid DNA, encoding neurotrophic factors, is delivered to retinal cells to maintain sufficient levels of neurotrophins in the retina. In this review, we aim to describe the intricacies in the design of the therapy including: the choice of neurotrophic factor, the site and route of administration and target cell populations for gene delivery. Furthermore, we also discuss the challenges currently being faced in RGC-related therapy development with special considerations to the existence of multiple RGC subtypes and the lack of efficient and representative in vitro models for rapid and reliable screening in the drug development process. PMID:27482199

  4. Litsea japonica extract inhibits neuronal apoptosis and the accumulation of advanced glycation end products in the diabetic mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    KIM, JUNGHYUN; KIM, CHAN-SIK; LEE, YUN MI; SOHN, EUNJIN; JO, KYUHYUNG; KIM, JIN SOOK

    2015-01-01

    The retinal accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is a condition, which is found in diabetic retinopathy. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of Litsea japonica extract (LJE) and to elucidate its underlying protective mechanism in model diabetic db/db mice. Male, 7 -week-old db/db mice were treated with LJE (100 or 250 mg/kg body weight) once a day orally for 12 weeks. The expression levels of AGEs and their receptor (RAGE) were subsequently assessed by immunohistochemistry. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay and southwestern histochemistry were used to detect activated nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). The immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that LJE significantly reduced the expression levels of the AGEs and RAGE in the neural retinas of the db/db mice. LJE markedly inhibited the apop-tosis of retinal ganglion cells. In addition, LJE suppressed the activation of NF-κB. These results suggested that LJE may be beneficial for the treatment of diabetes-induced retinal neurodegeneration, and the ability of LJE to attenuate retinal ganglion cell loss may be mediated by inhibition of the accumulation of AGEs. PMID:25815519

  5. A method for selective intracellular labeling of immunostained neurons in turtle retina.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, E; Kolb, H

    1993-04-01

    We describe a method for direct intracellular staining under visual control of immunolabeled neurons in the turtle retina. Substance P was the antiserum used. It labels two different sizes of ganglion cells in turtle retina. Intracellular labeling under visual control was achieved by iontophoresis of Lucifer yellow or Neurobiotin. The best immunolabeling of substance P-immunoreactive (SP-IR) ganglion cells occurred after either Triton X-100 or freeze-thaw techniques to get good penetration of the antisera. However, this inevitably resulted in leaky cells and inadequate morphology of the ganglion cells subsequently stained by Lucifer yellow and Neurobiotin. Most successful immunocytochemical labeling followed by intracellular labeling was achieved with light fixation (15 min in 4% paraformaldehyde) and long incubation time in the primary antiserum (4 days). Before intracellular labeling, dendritic tree shape, dendritic field size, and stratification of SP-IR ganglion cells were not sufficiently revealed for correct classification of these cells. After the selective intracellular staining described here, we were able to identify and characterize one of the populations of substance P-IR ganglion cells types as large-field, monostratified G20 ganglion cells. PMID:7680680

  6. Radioadaptive Cytoprotective Pathways in the Mouse Retina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanello, Susana B.; Wotring, V.; Theriot, C.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to cosmic radiation implies a risk of tissue degeneration. Radiation retinopathy is a complication of radiotherapy and exhibits common features with other retinopathies and neuropathies. Exposure to a low radiation dose elicits protective cellular events (radioadaptive response), reducing the stress of a subsequent higher dose. To assess the risk of radiation-induced retinal changes and the extent to which a small priming dose reduces this risk, we used a mouse model exposed to a source of Cs-137-gamma radiation. Gene expression profiling of retinas from non-irradiated control C57BL/6J mice (C) were compared to retinas from mice treated with a low 50 mGy dose (LD), a high 6 Gy dose (HD), and a combined treatment of 50 mGy (priming) and 6 Gy (challenge) doses (LHD). Whole retina RNA was isolated and expression analysis for selected genes performed by RTqPCR. Relevant target genes associated with cell death/survival, oxidative stress, cellular stress response and inflammation pathways, were analyzed. Cellular stress response genes were upregulated at 4 hr after the challenge dose in LHD retinas (Sirt1: 1.5 fold, Hsf1: 1.7 fold, Hspa1a: 2.5 fold; Hif1a: 1.8 fold, Bag1: 1.7). A similar trend was observed in LD animals. Most antioxidant enzymes (Hmox1, Sod2, Prdx1, Cygb, Cat1) and inflammatory mediators (NF B, Ptgs2 and Tgfb1) were upregulated in LHD and LD retinas. Expression of the pro-survival gene Bcl2 was upregulated in LD (6-fold) and LHD (4-fold) retinas. In conclusion, cytoprotective gene networks activation in the retina suggests a radioadaptive response to a priming irradiation dose, with mitigation of the deleterious effects of a subsequent high dose exposure. The enhancement of these cytoprotective mechanisms has potential value as a countermeasure to ocular alterations caused by radiation alone or in combination with other factors in spaceflight environments.

  7. A Dopamine- and Protein Kinase A-Dependent Mechanism for Network Adaptation in Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vaquero, C. F.; Pignatelli, A.; Partida, G. J.; Ishida, A. T.

    2011-01-01

    Vertebrates can detect light intensity changes in vastly different photic environments, in part, because post-receptoral neurons undergo “network adaptation”. Previous data implicated dopaminergic, cAMP-dependent inhibition of retinal ganglion cells in this process, yet left unclear how this occurs, and whether this occurs in darkness versus light. To test for light- and dopamine-dependent changes in ganglion cell cAMP levels in situ, we immunostained dark- and light-adapted retinas with anti-cAMP antisera, in the presence and absence of various dopamine receptor ligands. To test for direct effects of dopamine receptor ligands and membrane-permeable protein kinase ligands on ganglion cell excitability, we recorded spikes from isolated ganglion cells in perforated-patch whole-cell mode, before and during application of these agents by microperfusion. Our immunostainings show that light, endogenous dopamine, and exogenous dopamine elevate ganglion cell cAMP levels in situ by activating D1-type dopamine receptors. Our spike recordings show that D1-type agonists and 8-bromo cAMP reduce spike frequency and curtail sustained spike firing, and that these effects entail protein kinase A activation. These effects resemble those of background light on ganglion cell responses to light flashes. Network adaptation could thus be produced, to some extent, by dopaminergic modulation of ganglion cell spike generation, a mechanism distinct from modulation of transmitter release onto ganglion cells or of transmitter-gated currents in ganglion cells. Combining these observations, with results obtained in studies of photoreceptor, bipolar, and horizontal cells, indicates that all three layers of neurons in the retina are equipped with mechanisms for adaptation to ambient light. PMID:11606650

  8. Adeno-associated virus mediated SOD gene therapy protects the retinal ganglion cells from chronic intraocular pressure elevation induced injury via attenuating oxidative stress and improving mitochondrial dysfunction in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wenmin; Tang, Luosheng; Zeng, Jun; Chen, Baihua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to determine whether chronic intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation induces retinal oxidative stress and alters mitochondrial morphology and function of retinal ganglion cells (RGC) and to explore the effects of AAV-SOD2 gene therapy on the RGC survival and mitochondrial dysfunction. Methods: Chronic experimental glaucoma was induced unilaterally in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats by laser burns at trabecular meshwork and episcleral veins 2 times with an interval of one week. One eye of each rat was intravitreally pretreated with recombinant adeno-associated virus expressing SOD2 (AAV-SOD2) or recombinant AAV expressing GFP (AAV-GFP) 21 days before glaucoma induction. RGCs counting, morphometric analysis of retina and optic nerve, and detection of activities of retinal SOD2 and catalase, MDA, mitochondrial morphology, mitochondrial dynamin protein OPA1 and DRP-1 expressions were conducted at 4, 8, 12 and 24 weeks. Results: Severe RGC loss, degeneration of optic nerve, reduced thickness of RGC layer and nerve fiber layer, significant decrease in total SOD and catalase activities, mitochondrial dysfunction and increased MDA were observed at 4, 8, 12 and 24 weeks after glaucoma. Pretreatment with AAV-SOD2 significantly reduced MDA and attenuated the damage to RGCs through a mitochondria-related pathway. Conclusion: AAV mediated pre-treatment with SOD2 is able to attenuate oxidative stress and improve mitochondrial dysfunction of RGC and optic nerve secondary to glaucoma. Thus, SOD2 may be used to prevent the retinal RGCs from glaucoma, which provides a promising strategy for glaucoma therapy. PMID:27158370

  9. Vibratome Sectioning Mouse Retina to Prepare Photoreceptor Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Clérin, Emmanuelle; Yang, Ying; Forster, Valérie; Fontaine, Valérie; Sahel, José-Alain; Léveillard, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    The retina is a part of the central nervous system that has organized architecture, with neurons in layers from the photoreceptors, both rods and cones in contact with the retinal pigmented epithelium in the most distant part on the retina considering the direction of light, and the ganglion cells in the most proximal distance. This architecture allows the isolation of the photoreceptor layer by vibratome sectioning. The dissected neural retina of a mouse aged 8 days is flat-embedded in 4% gelatin on top of a slice of 20% gelatin photoreceptor layer facing down. Using a vibratome and a double edged razor blade, the 100 µm thick inner retina is sectioned. This section contains the ganglion cells and the inner layer with notably the bipolar cells. An intermediary section of 15 µm is discarded before 200 µm of the outer retina containing the photoreceptors is recovered. The gelatin is removed by heating at 37 °C. Pieces of outer layer are incubated in 500 µl of Ringer's solution with 2 units of activated papain for 20 min at 37 °C. The reaction is stopped by adding 500 µl 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM), then 25 units of DNAse I is added before centrifugation at RT, washed several times to remove serum and the cells are resuspended in 500 µl of DMEM and seeded at 1 x 105 cells/cm2. The cells are grown to 5 days in vitro and their viability scored using live/dead assay. The purity of the culture is first determined by microscopic observation during the experiment. The purity is then validated by seeding and fixing cells on a histological slide and analyzing using a rabbit polyclonal anti-SAG, a photoreceptor marker and mouse monoclonal anti-RHO, a rod photoreceptor specific marker. Alternatively, the photoreceptor layer (97% rods) can be used for gene or protein expression analysis and for transplantation. PMID:25548881

  10. A Possible Role of Neuroglobin in the Retina After Optic Nerve Injury: A Comparative Study of Zebrafish and Mouse Retina.

    PubMed

    Sugitani, Kayo; Koriyama, Yoshiki; Ogai, Kazuhiro; Wakasugi, Keisuke; Kato, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a new member of the family of heme proteins and is specifically expressed in neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems in all vertebrates. In particular, the retina has a 100-fold higher concentration of Ngb than do other nervous tissues. The role of Ngb in the retina is yet to be clarified. Therefore, to understand the functional role of Ngb in the retina after optic nerve injury (ONI), we used two types of retina, from zebrafish and mice, which have permissible and non-permissible capacity for nerve regeneration after ONI, respectively. After ONI, the Ngb protein in zebrafish was upregulated in the amacrine cells within 3 days, whereas in the mouse retina, Ngb was downregulated in the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) within 3 days. Zebrafish Ngb (z-Ngb) significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth in retinal explant culture. According to these results, we designed an overexpression experiment with the mouse Ngb (m-Ngb) gene in RGC-5 cells (retinal precursor cells). The excess of m-Ngb actually rescued RGC-5 cells under hypoxic conditions and significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth in cell culture. These data suggest that mammalian Ngb has positive neuroprotective and neuritogenic effects that induce nerve regeneration after ONI. PMID:26427474

  11. The major cell populations of the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Jeon, C J; Strettoi, E; Masland, R H

    1998-11-01

    We report a quantitative analysis of the major populations of cells present in the retina of the C57 mouse. Rod and cone photoreceptors were counted using differential interference contrast microscopy in retinal whole mounts. Horizontal, bipolar, amacrine, and Müller cells were identified in serial section electron micrographs assembled into serial montages. Ganglion cells and displaced amacrine cells were counted by subtracting the number of axons in the optic nerve, learned from electron microscopy, from the total neurons of the ganglion cell layer. The results provide a base of reference for future work on genetically altered animals and put into perspective certain recent studies. Comparable data are now available for the retinas of the rabbit and the monkey. With the exception of the monkey fovea, the inner nuclear layers of the three species contain populations of cells that are, overall, quite similar. This contradicts the previous belief that the retinas of lower mammals are "amacrine-dominated", and therefore more complex, than those of higher mammals. PMID:9786999

  12. Adaptation of the Central Retina for High Acuity Vision: Cones, the Fovea and the Avascular Zone

    PubMed Central

    Provis, Jan M; Dubis, Adam M; Maddess, Ted; Carroll, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Presence of a fovea centralis is directly linked to molecular specification of an avascular area in central retina, before the fovea (or `pit') begins to form. Modeling suggests that mechanical forces, generated within the eye, initiate formation of a pit within the avascular area, and its later remodeling in the postnatal period. Within the avascular area the retina is dominated by `midget' circuitry, in which signals are transferred from a single cone to a single bipolar cell, then a single ganglion cell. Thus in inner, central retina there are relatively few lateral connections between neurons. This renders the region adaptable to tangential forces, that translocate of ganglion cells laterally / centrifugally, to form the fovea. Optical coherence tomography enables live imaging of the retina, and shows that there is greater variation in the morphology of foveae in humans than previously thought. This variation is associated with differences in size of the avascular area and appears to be genetically based, but can be modified by environmental factors, including prematurity. Even when the fovea is absent (foveal hypoplasia), cones in central retina adopt an elongated and narrow morphology, enabling them to pack more densely to increase the sampling rate, and to act as more effective waveguides. Given these findings, what then is the adaptive advantage of a fovea? We suggest that the advantages of having a pit in central retina are relatively few, and minor, but together work to enhance acuity. PMID:23500068

  13. Spatiotemporal features of early neuronogenesis differ in wild-type and albino mouse retina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rachel, Rivka A.; Dolen, Gul; Hayes, Nancy L.; Lu, Alice; Erskine, Lynda; Nowakowski, Richard S.; Mason, Carol A.

    2002-01-01

    In albino mammals, lack of pigment in the retinal pigment epithelium is associated with retinal defects, including poor visual acuity from a photoreceptor deficit in the central retina and poor depth perception from a decrease in ipsilaterally projecting retinal fibers. Possible contributors to these abnormalities are reported delays in neuronogenesis (Ilia and Jeffery, 1996) and retinal maturation (Webster and Rowe, 1991). To further determine possible perturbations in neuronogenesis and/or differentiation, we used cell-specific markers and refined birth dating methods to examine these events during retinal ganglion cell (RGC) genesis in albino and pigmented mice from embryonic day 11 (E11) to E18. Our data indicate that relative to pigmented mice, more ganglion cells are born in the early stages of neuronogenesis in the albino retina, although the initiation of RGC genesis in the albino is unchanged. The cellular organization of the albino retina is perturbed as early as E12. In addition, cell cycle kinetics and output along the nasotemporal axis differ in retinas of albino and pigmented mice, both absolutely, with the temporal aspect of the retina expanded in albino, and relative to the position of the optic nerve head. Finally, blocking melanin synthesis in pigmented eyecups in culture leads to an increase in RGC differentiation, consistent with a role for melanin formation in regulating RGC neuronogenesis. These results point to spatiotemporal defects in neuronal production in the albino retina, which could perturb expression of genes that specify cell fate, number, and/or projection phenotype.

  14. [Phototransduction mediated by melanopsin in intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Solís, Carlos Augusto; Pérez-León, Jorge Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Melanopsin is the most recent photopigment described. As all the other opsins, it attaches in the retina as chromophore. Its amino acid sequence resembles more invertebrate opsins than those of vertebrates. The signal transduction pathway of opsins in vertebrates is based on the coupling to the G protein transducin, triggering a signaling cascade that results in the hyperpolarization of the plasma membrane. On the contrary, the photoreceptors of invertebrates activate the Gq protein pathway, which leads to depolarizing responses. Phototransduction mediated by melanopsin leads to the depolarization of those cells where it is expressed, the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells; the cellular messengers and the ion channel type(s) responsible for the cells´ response is still unclear. Studies to elucidate the signaling cascade of melanopsin in heterologous expression systems, in retina and isolated/cultured intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells, have provided evidence for the involvement of protein Gq and phospholipase C together with the likely participation of an ion channel member of the transient receptor potential-canonical family, a transduction pathway similar to invertebrate photopigments, particularly Drosophila melanogaster. The intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells are the sole source of retinal inferences to the suprachiasmatic nucleus; thus, clarifying completely the melanopsin signaling pathway will impact the chronobiology field, including the clinical aspects. PMID:26581535

  15. Gain-of-function nature of Cav1.4 L-type calcium channels alters firing properties of mouse retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Knoflach, Dagmar; Schicker, Klaus; Glösmann, Martin; Koschak, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Proper function of Cav1.4 L-type calcium channels is crucial for neurotransmitter release in the retina. Our understanding about how different levels of Cav1.4 channel activity affect retinal function is still limited. In the gain-of-function mouse model Cav1.4-IT we expected a reduction in the photoreceptor dynamic range but still transmission toward retinal ganglion cells. A fraction of Cav1.4-IT ganglion cells responded to light stimulation in multielectrode array recordings from whole-mounted retinas, but showed a significantly delayed response onset. Another significant number of cells showed higher activity in darkness. In addition to structural remodeling observed at the first retinal synapse of Cav1.4-IT mice the functional data suggested a loss of contrast enhancement, a fundamental feature of our visual system. In fact, Cav1.4-IT mouse retinas showed a decline in spatial response and changes in their contrast sensitivity profile. Photoreceptor degeneration was obvious from the nodular structure of cone axons and enlarged pedicles which partly moved toward the outer nuclear layer. Loss of photoreceptors was also expressed as reduced expression of proteins involved in chemical and electrical transmission, as such metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR6 and the gap junction protein Connexin 36. Such gross changes in retinal structure and function could also explain the diminished visual performance of CSNB2 patients. The expression pattern of the plasma-membrane calcium ATPase 1 which participates in the maintenance of the intracellular calcium homeostasis in photoreceptors was changed in Cav1.4-IT mice. This might be part of a protection mechanism against increased calcium influx, as this is suggested for Cav1.4-IT channels. PMID:26274509

  16. Gain-of-function nature of Cav1.4 L-type calcium channels alters firing properties of mouse retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Knoflach, Dagmar; Schicker, Klaus; Glösmann, Martin; Koschak, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Proper function of Cav1.4 L-type calcium channels is crucial for neurotransmitter release in the retina. Our understanding about how different levels of Cav1.4 channel activity affect retinal function is still limited. In the gain-of-function mouse model Cav1.4-IT we expected a reduction in the photoreceptor dynamic range but still transmission toward retinal ganglion cells. A fraction of Cav1.4-IT ganglion cells responded to light stimulation in multielectrode array recordings from whole-mounted retinas, but showed a significantly delayed response onset. Another significant number of cells showed higher activity in darkness. In addition to structural remodeling observed at the first retinal synapse of Cav1.4-IT mice the functional data suggested a loss of contrast enhancement, a fundamental feature of our visual system. In fact, Cav1.4-IT mouse retinas showed a decline in spatial response and changes in their contrast sensitivity profile. Photoreceptor degeneration was obvious from the nodular structure of cone axons and enlarged pedicles which partly moved toward the outer nuclear layer. Loss of photoreceptors was also expressed as reduced expression of proteins involved in chemical and electrical transmission, as such metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR6 and the gap junction protein Connexin 36. Such gross changes in retinal structure and function could also explain the diminished visual performance of CSNB2 patients. The expression pattern of the plasma-membrane calcium ATPase 1 which participates in the maintenance of the intracellular calcium homeostasis in photoreceptors was changed in Cav1.4-IT mice. This might be part of a protection mechanism against increased calcium influx, as this is suggested for Cav1.4-IT channels. PMID:26274509

  17. Nicotinic Antagonists Enhance Process Outgrowth by Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells in Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipton, Stuart A.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Phillips, Micheal D.; Tauck, David L.; Aizenman, Elias

    1988-03-01

    Functional nicotinic cholinergic receptors are found on mammalian retinal ganglion cell neurons in culture. The neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) can be detected in the medium of many of these retinal cultures, after release presumably from the choline acetyltransferase-positive amacrine cells. The postsynaptic effect of endogenous or applied ACh on the ganglion cells can be blocked with specific nicotinic antagonists. Here it is shown that within 24 hours of producing such a pharmacologic blockade, the retinal ganglion cells begin to sprout or regenerate neuronal processes. Thus, the growth-enhancing effect of nicotinic antagonists may be due to the removal of inhibition to growth by tonic levels of ACh present in the culture medium. Since there is a spontaneous leak of ACh in the intact retina, the effects of nicotinic cholinergic drugs on process outgrowth in culture may reflect a normal control mechanism for growth or regeneration of retinal ganglion cell processes that is exerted by ACh in vivo.

  18. Polymodal Sensory Integration in Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    PubMed

    Križaj, David

    2016-01-01

    An animal's ability to perceive the external world is conditioned by its capacity to extract and encode specific features of the visual image. The output of the vertebrate retina is not a simple representation of the 2D visual map generated by photon absorptions in the photoreceptor layer. Rather, spatial, temporal, direction selectivity and color "dimensions" of the original image are distributed in the form of parallel output channels mediated by distinct retinal ganglion cell (RGC) populations. We propose that visual information transmitted to the brain includes additional, light-independent, inputs that reflect the functional states of the retina, anterior eye and the body. These may include the local ion microenvironment, glial metabolism and systemic parameters such as intraocular pressure, temperature and immune activation which act on ion channels that are intrinsic to RGCs. We particularly focus on light-independent mechanical inputs that are associated with physical impact, cell swelling and intraocular pressure as excessive mechanical stimuli lead to the counterintuitive experience of "pressure phosphenes" and/or debilitating blinding disease such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. We point at recently discovered retinal mechanosensitive ion channels as examples through which molecular physiology brings together Greek phenomenology, modern neuroscience and medicine. Thus, RGC output represents a unified picture of the embodied context within which vision takes place. PMID:26427477

  19. Compound 49b Restores Retinal Thickness and Reduces Degenerate Capillaries in the Rat Retina following Ischemia/Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Jiang, Youde

    2016-01-01

    We have recently reported that Compound 49b, a novel β-adrenergic receptor agonist, can significantly reduce VEGF levels in retinal endothelial cells (REC) grown in diabetic-like conditions. In this study, we investigated whether Compound 49b could protect the retina under hypoxic conditions using the ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)-induced model in rats, as well REC cultured in hypoxic conditions. Some rats received 1mM topical Compound 49b for the 2 (5 rats each group) or 10 (4 rats in each group) days post-I/R. Analyses for retinal thickness and cell loss in the ganglion cell layer was done at 2 days post-I/R, while numbers of degenerate capillaries and pericyte ghosts were measured at 10 days post-I/R. Additionally, REC were cultured in normal oxygen or hypoxia (5% O2) only or treated with 50 nM Compound 49b for 12 hours. Twelve hours after Compound 49b exposure, cells were collected and analyzed for protein levels of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor (KDR), angiopoietin 1 and its receptor Tie2 for Western blotting. Data indicate that exposure to I/R significantly decreased retinal thickness, with increasing numbers of degenerate capillaries and pericyte ghosts. Compound 49b treatment inhibited these retinal changes. In REC cultured in hypoxia, levels of IGFBP-3 were reduced, which were significantly increased by Compound 49b. Hypoxia significantly increased protein levels of VEGF, KDR, Angiopoiein 1, and Tie2, which were reduced following Compound 49b treatment. These data strongly suggested that Compound 49b protected the retina against I/R-induced injury. This provides additional support for a role of β-adrenergic receptor actions in the retina. PMID:27439004

  20. Label-free nonlinear optical imaging of mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    He, Sicong; Ye, Cong; Sun, Qiqi; Leung, Christopher K.S.; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2015-01-01

    A nonlinear optical (NLO) microscopy system integrating stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) was developed to image fresh mouse retinas. The morphological and functional details of various retinal layers were revealed by the endogenous NLO signals. Particularly, high resolution label-free imaging of retinal neurons and nerve fibers in the ganglion cell and nerve fiber layers was achieved by capturing endogenous SRS and TPEF signals. In addition, the spectral and temporal analysis of TPEF images allowed visualization of different fluorescent components in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Fluorophores with short TPEF lifetime, such as A2E, can be differentiated from other long-lifetime components in the RPE. The NLO imaging method would provide important information for investigation of retinal ganglion cell degeneration and holds the potential to study the biochemical processes of visual cycle in the RPE. PMID:25798325

  1. Neuroprotective Effect of Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid on N-Methyl-D-Aspartate-Induced Retinal Ganglion Cell Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Rondón, Netxibeth; Esquiva, Gema; Germain, Francisco; de la Villa, Pedro; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell degeneration underlies the pathophysiology of diseases affecting the retina and optic nerve. Several studies have previously evidenced the anti-apoptotic properties of the bile constituent, tauroursodeoxycholic acid, in diverse models of photoreceptor degeneration. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced damage in the rat retina using a functional and morphological approach. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid was administered intraperitoneally before and after intravitreal injection of NMDA. Three days after insult, full-field electroretinograms showed reductions in the amplitudes of the positive and negative-scotopic threshold responses, scotopic a- and b-waves and oscillatory potentials. Quantitative morphological evaluation of whole-mount retinas demonstrated a reduction in the density of retinal ganglion cells. Systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid attenuated the functional impairment induced by NMDA, which correlated with a higher retinal ganglion cell density. Our findings sustain the efficacy of tauroursodeoxycholic acid administration in vivo, suggesting it would be a good candidate for the pharmacological treatment of degenerative diseases coursing with retinal ganglion cell loss. PMID:26379056

  2. [CHARACTERISTICS OF THE RETINA IN CHRONIC STRESS IN LABORATORY RATS OF DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS].

    PubMed

    Nesterova, A A; Yermilov, V V; Tiurenkov, I N; Smirnov, A V; Grigoriyeva, N V; Zagrebin, V L; Rogova, L N; Antoshkin, O N; Dovgalyov, A O

    2016-01-01

    The retina was studied in albino laboratory male rats of two age groups (12 and 24 months), 10 animals in each subjected to chronic combined stress. The stress was caused in animals by simultaneous exposure to pulsed light, loud sound, swinging and restriction of mobility for 7 days, 30 mm daily. The retina of intact rats of the corresponding age groups (n = 20) served as control. Enucleated eyes of stressed and control animals were processed with standard histological technique and stained with Nissl's method and hematoxylin-eosin. The retina of the stressed animals of both age groups showed the decrease in the number of cells and the disarrangement of its layers, most pronounced in the layers of photoreceptor neurons and ganglion cells. The comparative morphometric analysis demonstrated a reduction of the layer thickness and cell numerical density in the retina of stressed animals, both young (12 months) and old (24 months), as compared to that of control animals. PMID:27487662

  3. A polyaxonal amacrine cell population in the primate retina.

    PubMed

    Greschner, Martin; Field, Greg D; Li, Peter H; Schiff, Max L; Gauthier, Jeffrey L; Ahn, Daniel; Sher, Alexander; Litke, Alan M; Chichilnisky, E J

    2014-03-01

    Amacrine cells are the most diverse and least understood cell class in the retina. Polyaxonal amacrine cells (PACs) are a unique subset identified by multiple long axonal processes. To explore their functional properties, populations of PACs were identified by their distinctive radially propagating spikes in large-scale high-density multielectrode recordings of isolated macaque retina. One group of PACs exhibited stereotyped functional properties and receptive field mosaic organization similar to that of parasol ganglion cells. These PACs had receptive fields coincident with their dendritic fields, but much larger axonal fields, and slow radial spike propagation. They also exhibited ON-OFF light responses, transient response kinetics, sparse and coordinated firing during image transitions, receptive fields with antagonistic surrounds and fine spatial structure, nonlinear spatial summation, and strong homotypic neighbor electrical coupling. These findings reveal the functional organization and collective visual signaling by a distinctive, high-density amacrine cell population. PMID:24599459

  4. Dorsal raphe nucleus projecting retinal ganglion cells: Why Y cells?

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, Gary E.; So, Kwok-Fai; Pu, Mingliang

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ganglion Y (alpha) cells are found in retinas ranging from frogs to mice to primates. The highly conserved nature of the large, fast conducting retinal Y cell is a testament to its fundamental task, although precisely what this task is remained ill-defined. The recent discovery that Y-alpha retinal ganglion cells send axon collaterals to the serotonergic dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) in addition to the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), medial interlaminar nucleus (MIN), pretectum and the superior colliculus (SC) has offered new insights into the important survival tasks performed by these cells with highly branched axons. We propose that in addition to its role in visual perception, the Y-alpha retinal ganglion cell provides concurrent signals via axon collaterals to the DRN, the major source of serotonergic afferents to the forebrain, to dramatically inhibit 5-HT activity during orientation or alerting/escape responses, which dis-facilitates ongoing tonic motor activity while dis-inhibiting sensory information processing throughout the visual system. The new data provide a fresh view of these evolutionarily old retinal ganglion cells. PMID:26363667

  5. Dorsal raphe nucleus projecting retinal ganglion cells: Why Y cells?

    PubMed

    Pickard, Gary E; So, Kwok-Fai; Pu, Mingliang

    2015-10-01

    Retinal ganglion Y (alpha) cells are found in retinas ranging from frogs to mice to primates. The highly conserved nature of the large, fast conducting retinal Y cell is a testament to its fundamental task, although precisely what this task is remained ill-defined. The recent discovery that Y-alpha retinal ganglion cells send axon collaterals to the serotonergic dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) in addition to the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), medial interlaminar nucleus (MIN), pretectum and the superior colliculus (SC) has offered new insights into the important survival tasks performed by these cells with highly branched axons. We propose that in addition to its role in visual perception, the Y-alpha retinal ganglion cell provides concurrent signals via axon collaterals to the DRN, the major source of serotonergic afferents to the forebrain, to dramatically inhibit 5-HT activity during orientation or alerting/escape responses, which dis-facilitates ongoing tonic motor activity while dis-inhibiting sensory information processing throughout the visual system. The new data provide a fresh view of these evolutionarily old retinal ganglion cells. PMID:26363667

  6. Retinal ganglion cell projections to the hamster suprachiasmatic nucleus, intergeniculate leaflet, and visual midbrain: bifurcation and melanopsin immunoreactivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, Lawrence P.; Blanchard, Jane H.; Provencio, Ignacio

    2003-01-01

    The circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) receives direct retinal input via the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT), and the retinal ganglion cells contributing to this projection may be specialized with respect to direct regulation of the circadian clock. However, some ganglion cells forming the RHT bifurcate, sending axon collaterals to the intergeniculate leaflet (IGL) through which light has secondary access to the circadian clock. The present studies provide a more extensive examination of ganglion cell bifurcation and evaluate whether ganglion cells projecting to several subcortical visual nuclei contain melanopsin, a putative ganglion cell photopigment. The results showed that retinal ganglion cells projecting to the SCN send collaterals to the IGL, olivary pretectal nucleus, and superior colliculus, among other places. Melanopsin-immunoreactive (IR) ganglion cells are present in the hamster retina, and some of these cells project to the SCN, IGL, olivary pretectal nucleus, or superior colliculus. Triple-label analysis showed that melanopsin-IR cells bifurcate and project bilaterally to each SCN, but not to the other visual nuclei evaluated. The melanopsin-IR cells have photoreceptive characteristics optimal for circadian rhythm regulation. However, the presence of moderately widespread bifurcation among ganglion cells projecting to the SCN, and projection by melanopsin-IR cells to locations distinct from the SCN and without known rhythm function, suggest that this ganglion cell type is generalized, rather than specialized, with respect to the conveyance of photic information to the brain. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Calcium preconditioning triggers neuroprotection in retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Sean K.; Weatherly, Monique E.; Ware, Lillian; Linn, David M.; Linn, Cindy L.

    2010-01-01

    In the mammalian retina, excitotoxicity has been shown to be involved in apoptotic retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death and is associated with certain retinal disease states including glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and retinal ischemia. Previous studies from this lab (Wehrwein et al., 2004) have demonstrated that acetylcholine (ACh) and nicotine protects against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in isolated adult pig RGCs through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Activation of nAChRs in these RGCs triggers cell survival signaling pathways and inhibits apoptotic enzymes (Asomugha et al., 2010). However, the link between binding of nAChRs and activation of neuroprotective pathways is unknown. In this study, we examine the hypothesis that calcium permeation through nAChR channels is required for ACh-induced neuroprotection against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in isolated pig RGCs. RGCs were isolated from other retinal tissue using a two step panning technique and cultured for 3 days under different conditions. In some studies, calcium imaging experiments were performed using the fluorescent calcium indicator, fluo-4, and demonstrated that calcium permeates the nAChR channels located on pig RGCs. In other studies, the extracellular calcium concentration was altered to determine the effect on nicotine-induced neuroprotection. Results support the hypothesis that calcium is required for nicotine-induced neuroprotection in isolated pig RGCs. Lastly, studies were performed to analyze the effects of preconditioning on glutamate-induced excitotoxicity and neuroprotection. In these studies, a preconditioning dose of calcium was introduced to cells using a variety of mechanisms before a large glutamate insult was applied to cells. Results from these studies support the hypothesis that preconditioning cells with a relatively low level of calcium before an excitotoxic insult leads to neuroprotection. In the future, these results could provide important information

  8. Glaucoma related Proteomic Alterations in Human Retina Samples

    PubMed Central

    Funke, Sebastian; Perumal, Natarajan; Beck, Sabine; Gabel-Scheurich, Silke; Schmelter, Carsten; Teister, Julia; Gerbig, Claudia; Gramlich, Oliver W.; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Grus, Franz H.

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma related proteomic changes have been documented in cell and animal models. However, proteomic studies investigating on human retina samples are still rare. In the present work, retina samples of glaucoma and non-glaucoma control donors have been examined by a state-of-the-art mass spectrometry (MS) workflow to uncover glaucoma related proteomic changes. More than 600 proteins could be identified with high confidence (FDR < 1%) in human retina samples. Distinct proteomic changes have been observed in 10% of proteins encircling mitochondrial and nucleus species. Numerous proteins showed a significant glaucoma related level change (p < 0.05) or distinct tendency of alteration (p < 0.1). Candidates were documented to be involved in cellular development, stress and cell death. Increase of stress related proteins and decrease of new glaucoma related candidates, ADP/ATP translocase 3 (ANT3), PC4 and SRFS1-interacting protein 1 (DFS70) and methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCp2) could be documented by MS. Moreover, candidates could be validated by Accurate Inclusion Mass Screening (AIMS) and immunostaining and supported for the retinal ganglion cell layer (GCL) by laser capture microdissection (LCM) in porcine and human eye cryosections. The workflow allowed a detailed view into the human retina proteome highlighting new molecular players ANT3, DFS70 and MeCp2 associated to glaucoma. PMID:27425789

  9. Colocalization of HCN Channel Subunits in Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stradleigh, Tyler W.; Ogata, Genki; Partida, Gloria J.; Oi, Hanako; Greenberg, Kenneth P.; Krempely, Kalen S.; Ishida, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    The current-passing pore of mammalian hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated ("HCN") channels is formed by subunit isoforms denoted HCN1-4. In various brain areas, antibodies directed against multiple isoforms bind to single neurons and the current ("Ih") passed during hyperpolarizations differs from that of heterologously expressed homomeric channels. By contrast, retinal rod, cone, and bipolar cells appear to use homomeric HCN channels. Here, we assess the generality of this pattern by examining HCN1 and HCN4 immunoreactivity in rat retinal ganglion cells, measuring Ih in dissociated cells, and testing whether HCN1 and HCN4 protein coimmunoprecipitate. Nearly half of the ganglion cells in whole-mounted retinae bound antibodies against both isoforms. Consistent with colocalization and physical association, 8-bromo-cAMP shifted the voltage-sensitivity of Ih less than that of HCN4 channels and more than that of HCN1 channels, and HCN1 coimmunoprecipitated with HCN4 from membrane fraction proteins. Lastly, the immunopositive somata ranged in diameter from the smallest to the largest in rat retina, the dendrites of immunopositive cells arborized at various levels of the inner plexiform layer and over fields of different diameters, and Ih activated with similar kinetics and proportions of fast and slow components in small, medium, and large somata. These results show that different HCN subunits colocalize in single retinal ganglion cells, identify a subunit that can reconcile native Ih properties with the previously reported presence of HCN4 in these cells, and indicate that Ih is biophysically similar in morphologically diverse retinal ganglion cells and differs from Ih in rods, cones, and bipolar cells. PMID:21456027

  10. Treatment of Ganglion Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Fung, B.; Lung, C. P.

    2013-01-01

    Ganglion cysts are soft tissue swellings occurring most commonly in the hand or wrist. Apart from swelling, most cysts are asymptomatic. Other symptoms include pain, weakness, or paraesthesia. The two main concerns patients have are the cosmetic appearance of the cysts and the fear of future malignant growth. It has been shown that 58% of cysts will resolve spontaneously over time. Treatment can be either conservative or through surgical excision. This review concluded that nonsurgical treatment is largely ineffective in treating ganglion cysts. However, it advised to patients who do not surgical treatment but would like symptomatic relief. Compared to surgery, which has a lower recurrence rate but have a higher complication rate with longer recovery period. It has been shown that surgical interventions do not provide better symptomatic relief compared to conservative treatment. If symptomatic relief is the patient's primary concern, a conservative approach is preferred, whilst surgical intervention will decrease the likelihood of recurrence. PMID:24967120

  11. Neuroprotection of a Novel Cyclopeptide C*HSDGIC* from the Cyclization of PACAP (1–5) in Cellular and Rodent Models of Retinal Ganglion Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Huanhuan; Ding, Yong; Yu, Rongjie; Chen, Jiansu; Wu, Chunyun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the protective effects of a novel cyclopeptide C*HSDGIC* (CHC) from the cyclization of Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) (1–5) in cellular and rodent models of retinal ganglion cell apoptosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Double-labeling immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of Thy-1 and PACAP receptor type 1 in a retinal ganglion cell line RGC-5. The apoptosis of RGC-5 cells was induced by 0.02 J/cm2 Ultraviolet B irradiation. MTT assay, flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy were used to investigate the viability, the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis of RGC-5 cells respectively. CHC attenuated apoptotic cell death induced by Ultraviolet B irradiation and inhibited the excessive generation of ROS. Moreover, CHC treatment resulted in decreased expression of Bax and concomitant increase of Bcl-2, as was revealed by western-blot analysis. The in vivo apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells was induced by injecting 50 mM N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) (100 nmol in a 2 µL saline solution) intravitreally, and different dosages of CHC were administered. At day 7, rats in CHC+ NMDA-treated groups showed obvious aversion to light when compared to NMDA rats. Electroretinogram recordings revealed a marked decrease in the amplitudes of a-wave, b-wave, and photopic negative response due to NMDA damage. In retina receiving intravitreal NMDA and CHC co-treatment, these values were significantly increased. CHC treatment also resulted in less NMDA-induced cell loss and a decrease in the proportion of dUTP end-labeling-positive cells in ganglion cell line. Conclusions C*HSDGIC*, a novel cyclopeptide from PACAP (1–5) attenuates apoptosis in RGC-5 cells and inhibits NMDA-induced retinal neuronal death. The beneficial effects may occur via the mitochondria pathway. PACAP derivatives like CHC may serve as a promising candidate for neuroprotection in glaucoma. PMID:25286089

  12. Molecular Characterization of Notch1 Positive Progenitor Cells in the Developing Retina

    PubMed Central

    Dvoriantchikova, Galina; Perea-Martinez, Isabel; Pappas, Steve; Barry, Ariel Faye; Danek, Dagmara; Dvoriantchikova, Xenia; Pelaez, Daniel; Ivanov, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    The oscillatory expression of Notch signaling in neural progenitors suggests that both repressors and activators of neural fate specification are expressed in the same progenitors. Since Notch1 regulates photoreceptor differentiation and contributes (together with Notch3) to ganglion cell fate specification, we hypothesized that genes encoding photoreceptor and ganglion cell fate activators would be highly expressed in Notch1 receptor-bearing (Notch1+) progenitors, directing these cells to differentiate into photoreceptors or into ganglion cells when Notch1 activity is diminished. To identify these genes, we used microarray analysis to study expression profiles of whole retinas and isolated from them Notch1+ cells at embryonic day 14 (E14) and postnatal day 0 (P0). To isolate Notch1+ cells, we utilized immunomagnetic cell separation. We also used Notch3 knockout (Notch3KO) animals to evaluate the contribution of Notch3 signaling in ganglion cell differentiation. Hierarchical clustering of 6,301 differentially expressed genes showed that Notch1+ cells grouped near the same developmental stage retina cluster. At E14, we found higher expression of repressors (Notch1, Hes5) and activators (Dll3, Atoh7, Otx2) of neuronal differentiation in Notch1+ cells compared to whole retinal cell populations. At P0, Notch1, Hes5, and Dll1 expression was significantly higher in Notch1+ cells than in whole retinas. Otx2 expression was more than thirty times higher than Atoh7 expression in Notch1+ cells at P0. We also observed that retinas of wild type animals had only 14% (P < 0.05) more ganglion cells compared to Notch3KO mice. Since this number is relatively small and Notch1 has been shown to contribute to ganglion cell fate specification, we suggested that Notch1 signaling may play a more significant role in RGC development than the Notch3 signaling cascade. Finally, our findings suggest that Notch1+ progenitors—since they heavily express both pro-ganglion cell (Atoh7) and pro

  13. The elevation of intraocular pressure is associated with apoptosis and increased immunoreactivity for nitric oxide synthase in rat retina whereas the effectiveness of retina derived relaxing factor is unaffected.

    PubMed

    Takır, Selçuk; Gürel-Gürevin, Ebru; Toprak, Ayça; Demirci-Tansel, Cihan; Uydeş-Doğan, B Sönmez

    2016-04-01

    Glaucoma is a progressive ocular disease that stands in the upper rank for the cause of blindness in worldwide. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the possible disturbances occurred in the layers of retina due to an increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) and to verify the effectiveness of retina derived relaxing factor, i.e., RRF in this pathologic condition. The increase in IOP was induced by cauterization of the three of episcleral veins simultaneously in rats. After 8 weeks period, the retinas excised from the vein cauterized eyes were evaluated for the possible histopathological and ultrastructural alterations as well as for the relaxing effects on isolated bovine retinal and rat mesenteric arteries, in comparison with the retinas obtained from contralateral sham-operated eyes. In the retinas of IOP-elevated eyes, profound morphological deteriorations were determined in the ganglion and outer nuclear cell layers which were associated with an increased number of TUNEL positive cells in the ganglion and inner nuclear cell layers. Increased immunohistochemical stainings for three isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) were defined in almost all layers of the retinas of IOP-elevated eyes, in which eNOS was abundant particularly in the inner plexiform and ganglion cell layers. An irregular basal folding of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and an increased inter lamellar space of photoreceptor cell layer furtherly characterized the prominent degeneration of those layers in the retinas of IOP-elevated eyes. On the other hand, the relaxing effects of the retina obtained from IOP-elevated eyes were determined to be unchanged on the retinal and mesenteric arteries precontracted either with prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α, 30 μM) or potassium chloride (K(+), 100 mM), when compared with the relaxations of control retina obtained from contralateral sham-operated eyes. Overall, these findings suggested that the elevation of IOP induces prominent structural changes in

  14. Correlation in the Discharges of Neighboring Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells During Prenatal Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffei, Lamberto; Galli-Resta, Lucia

    1990-04-01

    The spontaneous discharges of neighboring retinal ganglion cells were recorded simultaneously in anesthetized prenatal rats between embryonic days 18 and 21. We report here that in the majority of cases the firings of neighboring retinal ganglion cells are strongly correlated during prenatal life. Correlation in the discharges of neighboring cells during development has long been suggested as a way to consolidate synaptic connections with a target cell onto which they converge, a model first proposed by Hebb. Correlation in the activities of neighboring neurons in the retina could be the basis of developmental processes such as refinement of retinotopic maps in the brain and segregation of the inputs from the two eyes.

  15. Spectral and temporal sensitivity of cone-mediated responses in mouse retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanbin V.; Weick, Michael; Demb, Jonathan B.

    2011-01-01

    The retina uses two photoreceptor types to encode the wide range of light intensities in the natural environment. Rods mediate vision in dim light, whereas cones mediate vision in bright light. Mouse photoreceptors include only 3% cones, and the majority of these co-express two opsins (S, M), with peak sensitivity to either ultraviolet (360 nm) or green light (508 nm). The M:S opsin ratio varies across the retina but has not been characterized functionally, preventing quantitative study of cone-mediated vision. Furthermore, physiological and behavioral measurements suggested that mouse retina supports relatively slow temporal processing (peak sensitivity, ~2–5 Hz), compared to primates; however, past studies used visible wavelengths that are inefficient at stimulating mouse S opsin. Here, we measured the M:S opsin expression ratio across the mouse retina, as reflected by ganglion cell responses, in vitro, and probed cone-mediated ganglion cell temporal properties using ultraviolet light stimulation and linear systems analysis. From recordings in mice lacking rod function (Gnat1−/−, Rho−/−), we estimate ~70% M-opsin expression in far dorsal retina, dropping to <5% M-opsin expression throughout ventral retina. In mice lacking cone function (Gnat2cpfl3), light-adapted rod-mediated responses peaked at ~5–7 Hz. In wild-type mice, cone-mediated responses peaked at ~10 Hz, with substantial responsiveness up to ~30 Hz. Therefore, despite the small percentage of cones, cone-mediated responses in mouse ganglion cells are fast and robust, similar to those in primates. These measurements enable quantitative analysis of cone-mediated responses at all levels of the visual system. PMID:21613480

  16. Microarray-based gene expression profiles in rabbit retina due to negative pressure suction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H X; Niu, C M; Guan, W Y

    2012-01-01

    We investigated a possible molecular pathogenesis involving retinal ganglion cell apoptosis following transient high intraocular pressure. Changes in the gene expression profiles of the retina were detected via gene chip methodology. Twelve New Zealand white rabbits were randomly assigned to control and 3-min negative pressure suction groups. The control group was treated only with a laser, and the experimental group was also treated with suction for 3 min, using a negative pressure generator. Total RNA was then extracted from the retinal tissue at different recovery stages to analyze gene expression profiles using the Agilent rabbit one-way gene chip. The groups were then compared. Immediately after negative pressure suction induction, 704 genes were differentially expressed. Among these, 485 genes were upregulated, and 219 were downregulated. Expression of the genes encoding CRYAA, CRYAB, and TLR3 genes, which are involved in apoptosis, was elevated. The KRT18 gene, which is involved in apoptosis, had reduced expression. Seven days after negative pressure suction, 482 genes were differentially expressed. Among these, 178 genes were upregulated, and 304 were downregulated. Expression of the genes encoding CRYAB, IL1-BETA and IL1R1, which are involved in apoptosis, was upregulated. Ten days after negative pressure suction, 402 genes were differentially expressed. Of these, 213 genes were upregulated, and 189 were downregulated. Apoptosis genes CRYAB, CRYBA3, CRYBB2, IL1- BETA, and IL1R1 showed higher expression levels. We concluded that negative pressure suction for long periods of time (for example, 3 min) results in changes in gene expression. Genes with higher fold changes help protect retinal ganglion cells from apoptosis. We suggest that promoting the expression of these genes should be considered as a new means for treating ischemic-hypoxic retinopathy. PMID:22653643

  17. Crizotinib-Induced Abnormal Signal Processing in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Toshiyuki; Iwasawa, Shunichiro; Kurimoto, Ryota; Maeda, Akemi; Takiguchi, Yuichi; Kaneda, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Molecular target therapy for cancer is characterized by unique adverse effects that are not usually observed with cytotoxic chemotherapy. For example, the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor crizotinib causes characteristic visual disturbances, whereas such effects are rare when another ALK-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, alectinib, is used. To elucidate the mechanism responsible for these visual disturbances, the responses to light exhibited by retinal ganglion cells treated with these agents were evaluated using a C57BL6 mouse ex vivo model. Both crizotinib and alectinib changed the firing rate of ON and OFF type retinal ganglion cells. However, the ratio of alectinib-affected cells (15.7%) was significantly lower than that of crizotinib-affected cells (38.6%). Furthermore, these drugs changed the response properties to light stimuli of retinal ganglion cells in some of the affected cells, i.e., OFF cells responded to both ON and OFF stimuli, etc. Finally, the expressions of ALK (a target receptor of both crizotinib and alectinib) and of MET and ROS1 (additional target receptors of crizotinib) were observed at the mRNA level in the retina. Our findings suggest that these drugs might target retinal ganglion cells and that the potency of the drug actions on the light responses of retinal ganglion cells might be responsible for the difference in the frequencies of visual disturbances observed between patients treated with crizotinib and those treated with alectinib. The present experimental system might be useful for screening new molecular target agents prior to their use in clinical trials. PMID:26271036

  18. Localization of the high-resolution area in the ganglion cell layer of the Baikal seal Pusa sibirica Gm.1788.

    PubMed

    Mass, A M

    2016-03-01

    The morphological and functional density of the retinal ganglion cells of the Baikal Lake endemic seal Pusa sibirica was studied using cresyl-violet-stained whole-mounts. An area of the highest concentration of ganglion cells has been identified by drawing up a density map. This was an ellipsoid spot in the upper temporal part of the retina 6-7 mm from the visual nerve output. The maximum cell density in this area was 3800 cells/mm(2). The retinal resolution estimated from the maximum density of ganglion cells and the posterior nodal distance (24 mm) was 2.4' in the water and 3' in the air, and this can be used as an estimation of the retina resolving power. PMID:27193874

  19. Neuroprotective effect of memantine on the retinal ganglion cells of APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice and its immunomodulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lixiong; Chen, Xi; Tang, Yongping; Zhao, Jinghui; Li, Qiyou; Fan, Xiaotang; Xu, Haiwei; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2015-06-01

    Besides the cognitive impairment and degeneration in the brain, vision dysfunction and retina damage are always prevalent in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The uncompetitive antagonist of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor, memantine (MEM), has been proven to improve the cognition of patients with AD. However, limited information exists regarding the mechanism of neurodegeneration and the possible neuroprotective mechanisms of MEM on the retinas of patients with AD. In the present study, by using APPswe/PS1ΔE9 double transgenic (dtg) mice, we found that MEM rescued the loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), as well as improved visual impairments, including improving the P50 component in pattern electroretinograms and the latency delay of the P2 component in flash visual evoked potentials of APPswe/PS1ΔE9 dtg mice. The activated microglia in the retinas of APPswe/PS1ΔE9 dtg mice were also inhibited by MEM. Additionally, the level of glutamine synthetase expressed by Müller cells within the RGC layer was upregulated in APPswe/PS1ΔE9 dtg mice, which was inhibited by MEM. Simultaneously, MEM also reduced the apoptosis of choline acetyl transferase-immunoreactive cholinergic amacrine cells within the RGC layer of AD mice. Moreover, the phosphorylation level of extracellular regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 was increased in APPswe/PS1ΔE9 dtg mice, which was blocked by MEM treatment. These findings suggest that MEM protects RGCs in the retinas of APPswe/PS1ΔE9 dtg mice by modulating the immune response of microglia and the adapted response of Müller cells, making MEM a potential ophthalmic treatment alternative in patients with AD. PMID:25912193

  20. A method for electrophysiological characterization of hamster retinal ganglion cells using a high-density CMOS microelectrode array

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ian L.; Russell, Thomas L.; Farrow, Karl; Fiscella, Michele; Franke, Felix; Müller, Jan; Jäckel, David; Hierlemann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of neuronal cell types in the mammalian retina is important for the understanding of human retinal disease and the advancement of sight-restoring technology, such as retinal prosthetic devices. A somewhat less utilized animal model for retinal research is the hamster, which has a visual system that is characterized by an area centralis and a wide visual field with a broad binocular component. The hamster retina is optimally suited for recording on the microelectrode array (MEA), because it intrinsically lies flat on the MEA surface and yields robust, large-amplitude signals. However, information in the literature about hamster retinal ganglion cell functional types is scarce. The goal of our work is to develop a method featuring a high-density (HD) complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) MEA technology along with a sequence of standardized visual stimuli in order to categorize ganglion cells in isolated Syrian Hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) retina. Since the HD-MEA is capable of recording at a higher spatial resolution than most MEA systems (17.5 μm electrode pitch), we were able to record from a large proportion of RGCs within a selected region. Secondly, we chose our stimuli so that they could be run during the experiment without intervention or computation steps. The visual stimulus set was designed to activate the receptive fields of most ganglion cells in parallel and to incorporate various visual features to which different cell types respond uniquely. Based on the ganglion cell responses, basic cell properties were determined: direction selectivity, speed tuning, width tuning, transience, and latency. These properties were clustered to identify ganglion cell types in the hamster retina. Ultimately, we recorded up to a cell density of 2780 cells/mm2 at 2 mm (42°) from the optic nerve head. Using five parameters extracted from the responses to visual stimuli, we obtained seven ganglion cell types. PMID:26528115

  1. Retinal Ganglion Cell Adaptation to Small Luminance Fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Daniel K.; Graña, Gilberto

    2010-01-01

    To accommodate the wide input range over which the visual system operates within the narrow output range of spiking neurons, the retina adjusts its sensitivity to the mean light level so that retinal ganglion cells can faithfully signal contrast, or relative deviations from the mean luminance. Given the large operating range of the visual system, the majority of work on luminance adaptation has involved logarithmic changes in light level. We report that luminance gain controls are recruited for remarkably small fluctuations in luminance as well. Using spike recordings from the rat optic tract, we show that ganglion cell responses to a brief flash of light are modulated in amplitude by local background fluctuations as little as 15% contrast. The time scale of the gain control is rapid (<125 ms), at least for on cells. The retinal locus of adaptation precedes the ganglion cell spike generator because response gain changes of on cells were uncorrelated with firing rate. The mechanism seems to reside within the inner retinal network and not in the photoreceptors, because the adaptation profiles of on and off cells differed markedly. The response gain changes follow Weber's law, suggesting that network mechanisms of luminance adaptation described in previous work modulates retinal ganglion cell sensitivity, not just when we move between different lighting environments, but also as our eyes scan a visual scene. Finally, we show that response amplitude is uniformly reduced for flashes on a modulated background that has spatial contrast, indicating that another gain control that integrates luminance signals nonlinearly over space operates within the receptive field center of rat ganglion cells. PMID:20538771

  2. Retinal ganglion cell layer of the Caspian seal Pusa caspica: topography and localization of the high-resolution area.

    PubMed

    Mass, Alla M; Supin, A Y

    2010-01-01

    Retinal topography, cell density and sizes of ganglion cells in the Caspian seal (Pusa caspica) were analyzed in retinal whole mounts stained with cresyl-violet. The topographic distribution of ganglion cells displayed an area of high cell density located in the temporal quadrant of the retina and was similar to the area centralis of terrestrial carnivores. It extended nasally, above the optic disk, as a streak of increased cell density. In different whole mounts, the peak cell density in the high-density area ranged from 1,684 to 1,844 cells/mm² (mean 1,773 cells/mm²). The cell density data predict a retinal resolution of around 8.5 cycles/degree in water. A distinctive feature of the Caspian seal's retina is the large size of ganglion cells and the low cell density compared to terrestrial mammals. The ganglion cell diameter ranged from 10 to 58 μm. Cell size histograms featured bimodal patterns with groups of small and large ganglion cells. The large cells appeared similar to α-cells of terrestrial mammals and constituted 7% of the total ganglion cell population. PMID:21079394

  3. Ionotropic purinergic receptors P2X in frog and turtle retina: glial and neuronal localization.

    PubMed

    Vitanova, Lily Alexandrova; Kupenova, Petia Nikolova

    2014-06-01

    Purinergic signaling is represented in both the peripheral and central nervous system (CNS), and in particular in the retina, which may be regarded as a part of the CNS. While purigenic signaling is relatively well studied in mammalian retinas, little is known about it in retinas of lower vertebrates. The aim of present study was to investigate, using immunocytochemistry, the distribution of purinoreceptors P2X in retinas of frog and turtle, which are appropriate models of the brain neuron-to-glia interactions. The results showed widespread expression of all seven ionotropic purinoreceptors (P2X1-P2X7) in both frog and turtle retinas. They were predominantly expressed in Müller cells, the principal glial cells in the retina. All structures typical of Müller cells: the outer and the inner limiting membranes, the cells bodies in the inner nuclear layer, the radial processes in the inner plexiform layer (IPL), and the so called endfeet (frog) or the orthogonal arrays of particles (turtle) in the ganglion cells layer were immunostained. Colocalizations between P2X1-P2X7 and the glial cell marker Vimentin proved that the immunostaining was in the Müller cells. In addition to the glial staining, neuronal staining was also seen as fine puncta in the inner plexiform layer and by small dots and patches in the outer plexiform layer. Some cell bodies of horizontal, amacrine and ganglion cells were also stained. The results obtained imply that the purinergic P2X receptors may significantly contribute to the neuron-to-glia signaling in retinas of the lower vertebrates. PMID:24461518

  4. Cortical basal ganglionic degeneration.

    PubMed

    Scarmeas, N; Chin, S S; Marder, K

    2001-10-01

    In this case study, we describe the symptoms, neuropsychological testing, and brain pathology of a retired mason's assistant with cortical basal ganglionic degeneration (CBGD). CBGD is an extremely rare neurodegenerative disease that is categorized under both Parkinsonian syndromes and frontal lobe dementias. It affects men and women nearly equally, and the age of onset is usually in the sixth decade of life. CBGD is characterized by Parkinson's-like motor symptoms and by deficits of movement and cognition, indicating focal brain pathology. Neuronal cell loss is ultimately responsible for the neurological symptoms. PMID:14602941

  5. α-Lipoic Acid Antioxidant Treatment Limits Glaucoma-Related Retinal Ganglion Cell Death and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Calkins, David J.; Horner, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, including glaucoma. However, due to the lack of clinically relevant models and expense of long-term testing, few studies have modeled antioxidant therapy for prevention of neurodegeneration. We investigated the contribution of oxidative stress to the pathogenesis of glaucoma in the DBA/2J mouse model of glaucoma. Similar to other neurodegenerative diseases, we observed lipid peroxidation and upregulation of oxidative stress-related mRNA and protein in DBA/2J retina. To test the role of oxidative stress in disease progression, we chose to deliver the naturally occurring, antioxidant α-lipoic acid (ALA) to DBA/2J mice in their diet. We used two paradigms for ALA delivery: an intervention paradigm in which DBA/2J mice at 6 months of age received ALA in order to intervene in glaucoma development, and a prevention paradigm in which DBA/2J mice were raised on a diet supplemented with ALA, with the goal of preventing glaucoma development. At 10 and 12 months of age (after 4 and 11 months of dietary ALA respectively), we measured changes in genes and proteins related to oxidative stress, retinal ganglion cell (RGC) number, axon transport, and axon number and integrity. Both ALA treatment paradigms showed increased antioxidant gene and protein expression, increased protection of RGCs and improved retrograde transport compared to control. Measures of lipid peroxidation, protein nitrosylation, and DNA oxidation in retina verified decreased oxidative stress in the prevention and intervention paradigms. These data demonstrate the utility of dietary therapy for reducing oxidative stress and improving RGC survival in glaucoma. PMID:23755225

  6. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Detached or Torn Retina Sections Retinal Detachment: What Is a Torn ... Retina Treatment Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Diagnosis Written by: Kierstan Boyd ...

  7. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Detached or Torn Retina Sections Retinal Detachment: What Is a Torn ... Retina Treatment Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Symptoms Written by: Kierstan Boyd ...

  8. The functional diversity of retinal ganglion cells in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Baden, Tom; Berens, Philipp; Franke, Katrin; Rosón, Miroslav Román; Bethge, Matthias; Euler, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In the vertebrate visual system, all output of the retina is carried by retinal ganglion cells. Each type encodes distinct visual features in parallel for transmission to the brain. How many such “output channels” exist and what each encodes is an area of intense debate. In mouse, anatomical estimates range between 15–20 channels, and only a handful are functionally understood. Combining two-photon calcium imaging to obtain dense retinal recordings and unsupervised clustering of the resulting sample of >11,000 cells, we here show that the mouse retina harbours substantially more than 30 functional output channels. These include all known and several new ganglion cell types, as verified by genetic and anatomical criteria. Therefore, information channels from the mouse’s eye to the mouse’s brain are considerably more diverse than shown thus far by anatomical studies, suggesting an encoding strategy resembling that used in state-of-the-art artificial vision systems. PMID:26735013

  9. Spatiotemporal Pattern of Doublecortin Expression in the Retina of the Sea Lamprey

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-López, Blanca; Romaus-Sanjurjo, Daniel; Senra-Martínez, Pablo; Anadón, Ramón; Barreiro-Iglesias, Antón; Rodicio, María Celina

    2016-01-01

    Despite the importance of doublecortin (DCX) for the development of the nervous system, its expression in the retina of most vertebrates is still unknown. The key phylogenetic position of lampreys, together with their complex life cycle, with a long blind larval stage and an active predator adult stage, makes them an interesting model to study retinal development. Here, we studied the spatiotemporal pattern of expression of DCX in the retina of the sea lamprey. In order to characterize the DCX expressing structures, the expression of acetylated α-tubulin (a neuronal marker) and cytokeratins (glial marker) was also analyzed. Tract-tracing methods were used to label ganglion cells. DCX immunoreactivity appeared initially in photoreceptors, ganglion cells and in fibers of the prolarval retina. In larvae smaller than 100 mm, DCX expression was observed in photoreceptors, in cells located in the inner nuclear and inner plexiform layers (IPLs) and in fibers coursing in the nuclear and IPLs, and in the optic nerve (ON). In retinas of premetamorphic and metamorphic larvae, DCX immunoreactivity was also observed in radially oriented cells and fibers and in a layer of cells located in the outer part of the inner neuroblastic layer (INbL) of the lateral retina. Photoreceptors and fibers ending in the outer limitans membrane (OLM) showed DCX expression in adults. Some retinal pigment epithelium cells were also DCX immunoreactive. Immunofluorescence for α-tubulin in premetamorphic larvae showed coexpression in most of the DCX immunoreactive structures. No cells/fibers were found showing DCX and cytokeratins colocalization. The perikaryon of mature ganglion cells is DCX negative. The expression of DCX in sea lamprey retinas suggests that it could play roles in the migration of cells that differentiate in the metamorphosis, in the establishment of connections of ganglion cells and in the development of photoreceptors. Our results also suggest that the radial glia and retinal

  10. Spatiotemporal Pattern of Doublecortin Expression in the Retina of the Sea Lamprey.

    PubMed

    Fernández-López, Blanca; Romaus-Sanjurjo, Daniel; Senra-Martínez, Pablo; Anadón, Ramón; Barreiro-Iglesias, Antón; Rodicio, María Celina

    2016-01-01

    Despite the importance of doublecortin (DCX) for the development of the nervous system, its expression in the retina of most vertebrates is still unknown. The key phylogenetic position of lampreys, together with their complex life cycle, with a long blind larval stage and an active predator adult stage, makes them an interesting model to study retinal development. Here, we studied the spatiotemporal pattern of expression of DCX in the retina of the sea lamprey. In order to characterize the DCX expressing structures, the expression of acetylated α-tubulin (a neuronal marker) and cytokeratins (glial marker) was also analyzed. Tract-tracing methods were used to label ganglion cells. DCX immunoreactivity appeared initially in photoreceptors, ganglion cells and in fibers of the prolarval retina. In larvae smaller than 100 mm, DCX expression was observed in photoreceptors, in cells located in the inner nuclear and inner plexiform layers (IPLs) and in fibers coursing in the nuclear and IPLs, and in the optic nerve (ON). In retinas of premetamorphic and metamorphic larvae, DCX immunoreactivity was also observed in radially oriented cells and fibers and in a layer of cells located in the outer part of the inner neuroblastic layer (INbL) of the lateral retina. Photoreceptors and fibers ending in the outer limitans membrane (OLM) showed DCX expression in adults. Some retinal pigment epithelium cells were also DCX immunoreactive. Immunofluorescence for α-tubulin in premetamorphic larvae showed coexpression in most of the DCX immunoreactive structures. No cells/fibers were found showing DCX and cytokeratins colocalization. The perikaryon of mature ganglion cells is DCX negative. The expression of DCX in sea lamprey retinas suggests that it could play roles in the migration of cells that differentiate in the metamorphosis, in the establishment of connections of ganglion cells and in the development of photoreceptors. Our results also suggest that the radial glia and retinal

  11. Retinal ganglion cell density of the black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis): calculating visual resolution.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, John D; Manger, Paul R

    2008-01-01

    A single right retina from a black rhinoceros was whole mounted, stained and analyzed to determine the visual resolution of the rhinoceros, an animal with reputedly poor eyesight. A range of small (15-microm diameter) to large (100-microm diameter) ganglion cell types was seen across the retina. We observed two regions of high density of retinal ganglion cells at either end of a long, but thin, horizontal streak. The temporal specialization, which receives light from the anterior visual field, exhibited a ganglion cell density of approximately 2000/mm2, while the nasal specialization exhibited a density of approximately 1500/mm2. The retina exhibited a ganglion cell density bias toward the upper half, especially so, the upper temporal quadrant, indicating that the rhinoceros would be processing visual information from the visual field below the anterior horizon for the most part. Our calculations indicate that the rhinoceros has a visual resolution of 6 cycles/degree. While this resolution is one-tenth that of humans (60 cycles/deg) and less than that of the domestic cat (9 cycles/deg), it is comparable to that of the rabbit (6 cycles/deg), and exceeds that seen in a variety of other mammals including seals, dolphins, microbats, and rats. Thus, the reputation of the rhinoceros as a myopic, weakly visual animal is not supported by our observations of the retina. We calculate that the black rhinoceros could readily distinguish a 30 cm wide human at a distance of around 200 m given the appropriate visual background. PMID:18442443

  12. Artificial retina: the multichannel processing of the mammalian retina achieved with a neuromorphic asynchronous light acquisition device.

    PubMed

    Lorach, Henri; Benosman, Ryad; Marre, Olivier; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Sahel, José A; Picaud, Serge

    2012-12-01

    Objective. Accurate modeling of retinal information processing remains a major challenge in retinal physiology with applications in visual rehabilitation and prosthetics. Most of the current artificial retinas are fed with static frame-based information, losing thereby the fundamental asynchronous features of biological vision. The objective of this work is to reproduce the spatial and temporal properties of the majority of ganglion cell (GC) types in the mammalian retina. Approach. Here, we combined an asynchronous event-based light sensor with a model pulling nonlinear subunits to reproduce the parallel filtering and temporal coding occurring in the retina. We fitted our model to physiological data and were able to reconstruct the spatio-temporal responses of the majority of GC types previously described in the mammalian retina (Roska et al 2006 J. Neurophysiol. 95 3810-22). Main results. Fitting of the temporal and spatial components of the response was achieved with high coefficients of determination (median R(2) = 0.972 and R(2) = 0.903, respectively). Our model provides an accurate temporal precision with a reliability of only few milliseconds-peak of the distribution at 5 ms-similar to biological retinas (Berry et al 1997 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 94 5411-16; Gollisch and Meister 2008 Science 319 1108-11). The spiking statistics of the model also followed physiological measurements (Fano factor: 0.331). Significance. This new asynchronous retinal model therefore opens new perspectives in the development of artificial visual systems and visual prosthetic devices. PMID:23075696

  13. Phenotypic and functional characterization of Bst+/− mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Riazifar, Hamidreza; Sun, Guoli; Wang, Xinjian; Rupp, Alan; Vemaraju, Shruti; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N.; Lang, Richard A.; Sadun, Alfredo A.; Hattar, Samer; Guan, Min-Xin; Huang, Taosheng

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The belly spot and tail (Bst+/−) mouse phenotype is caused by mutations of the ribosomal protein L24 (Rpl24). Among various phenotypes in Bst+/− mice, the most interesting are its retinal abnormalities, consisting of delayed closure of choroid fissures, decreased ganglion cells and subretinal vascularization. We further characterized the Bst+/− mouse and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms to assess the feasibility of using this strain as a model for stem cell therapy of retinal degenerative diseases due to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss. We found that, although RGCs are significantly reduced in retinal ganglion cell layer in Bst+/− mouse, melanopsin+ RGCs, also called ipRGCs, appear to be unchanged. Pupillary light reflex was completely absent in Bst+/− mice but they had a normal circadian rhythm. In order to examine the pathological abnormalities in Bst+/− mice, we performed electron microscopy in RGC and found that mitochondria morphology was deformed, having irregular borders and lacking cristae. The complex activities of the mitochondrial electron transport chain were significantly decreased. Finally, for subretinal vascularization, we also found that angiogenesis is delayed in Bst+/− associated with delayed hyaloid regression. Characterization of Bst+/− retina suggests that the Bst+/− mouse strain could be a useful murine model. It might be used to explore further the pathogenesis and strategy of treatment of retinal degenerative diseases by employing stem cell technology. PMID:26035379

  14. Inner retinal inhibition shapes the receptive field of retinal ganglion cells in primate

    PubMed Central

    Protti, D A; Di Marco, S; Huang, J Y; Vonhoff, C R; Nguyen, V; Solomon, S G

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The centre–surround organisation of receptive fields is a feature of most retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and is critical for spatial discrimination and contrast detection. Although lateral inhibitory processes are known to be important in generating the receptive field surround, the contribution of each of the two synaptic layers in the primate retina remains unclear. Here we studied the spatial organisation of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs onto ON and OFF ganglion cells in the primate retina. All RGCs showed an increase in excitation in response to stimulus of preferred polarity. Inhibition onto RGCs comprised two types of responses to preferred polarity: some RGCs showed an increase in inhibition whilst others showed removal of tonic inhibition. Excitatory inputs were strongly spatially tuned but inhibitory inputs showed more variable organisation: in some neurons they were as strongly tuned as excitation, and in others inhibitory inputs showed no spatial tuning. We targeted one source of inner retinal inhibition by functionally ablating spiking amacrine cells with bath application of tetrodotoxin (TTX). TTX significantly reduced the spatial tuning of excitatory inputs. In addition, TTX reduced inhibition onto those RGCs where a stimulus of preferred polarity increased inhibition. Reconstruction of the spatial tuning properties by somatic injection of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic conductances verified that TTX-mediated inhibition onto bipolar cells increases the strength of the surround in RGC spiking output. These results indicate that in the primate retina inhibitory mechanisms in the inner plexiform layer sharpen the spatial tuning of ganglion cells. PMID:24042496

  15. Monte Carlo methods for localization of cones given multielectrode retinal ganglion cell recordings.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, K; Gauthier, J L; Field, G D; Greschner, M; Agne, M; Chichilnisky, E J; Paninski, L

    2013-01-01

    It has recently become possible to identify cone photoreceptors in primate retina from multi-electrode recordings of ganglion cell spiking driven by visual stimuli of sufficiently high spatial resolution. In this paper we present a statistical approach to the problem of identifying the number, locations, and color types of the cones observed in this type of experiment. We develop an adaptive Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method that explores the space of cone configurations, using a Linear-Nonlinear-Poisson (LNP) encoding model of ganglion cell spiking output, while analytically integrating out the functional weights between cones and ganglion cells. This method provides information about our posterior certainty about the inferred cone properties, and additionally leads to improvements in both the speed and quality of the inferred cone maps, compared to earlier "greedy" computational approaches. PMID:23194406

  16. Parallel information processing channels created in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    In the retina, several parallel channels originate that extract different attributes from the visual scene. This review describes how these channels arise and what their functions are. Following the introduction four sections deal with these channels. The first discusses the “ON” and “OFF” channels that have arisen for the purpose of rapidly processing images in the visual scene that become visible by virtue of either light increment or light decrement; the ON channel processes images that become visible by virtue of light increment and the OFF channel processes images that become visible by virtue of light decrement. The second section examines the midget and parasol channels. The midget channel processes fine detail, wavelength information, and stereoscopic depth cues; the parasol channel plays a central role in processing motion and flicker as well as motion parallax cues for depth perception. Both these channels have ON and OFF subdivisions. The third section describes the accessory optic system that receives input from the retinal ganglion cells of Dogiel; these cells play a central role, in concert with the vestibular system, in stabilizing images on the retina to prevent the blurring of images that would otherwise occur when an organism is in motion. The last section provides a brief overview of several additional channels that originate in the retina. PMID:20876118

  17. A minute fraction of Syrian golden hamster retinal ganglion cells project bilaterally.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, K; Sachs, G M; Schneider, G E

    1984-02-01

    Bilaterally projecting retinal ganglion cells (BPRGCs) in the adult Syrian golden hamster were identified through the use of two retrogradely transported neuronal labels, horseradish peroxidase and Nuclear Yellow, placed separately in each optic tract. The distribution and size of doubly labeled retinal ganglion cells were characterized and their numbers were determined. Strict criteria were used to exclude artifactual doubly labeled cells. This work revealed that: (a) BPRGCs comprise less than 0.01% of the entire retinal ganglion cell population, averaging 7.4 (SD = 3) cells per retina; (b) BPRGCs are found primarily in the upper, peripheral retina and not along the vertical meridian or in the temporal crescent; and (c) BPRGCs correspond in size to ordinary retinal ganglion cells in their immediate vicinity, thus providing no evidence that they comprise a separate population of cells. Electrophysiological collision experiments were also performed, with stimulating electrodes in the two brachia of the superior colliculi and a recording electrode in one optic nerve. A collision effect was not detected, thus supporting the anatomical findings of rare bilateral branching of optic nerve axons. The occurrence of BPRGCs may reflect occasional ambiguities in the cues that guide axons through the chiasm. PMID:6199482

  18. Ocular anatomy, ganglion cell distribution and retinal resolution of a killer whale (Orcinus orca).

    PubMed

    Mass, Alla M; Supin, Alexander Y; Abramov, Andrey V; Mukhametov, Lev M; Rozanova, Elena I

    2013-01-01

    Retinal topography, cell density and sizes of ganglion cells in the killer whale (Orcinus orca) were analyzed in retinal whole mounts stained with cresyl violet. A distinctive feature of the killer whale's retina is the large size of ganglion cells and low cell density compared to terrestrial mammals. The ganglion cell diameter ranged from 8 to 100 µm, with the majority of cells within a range of 20-40 µm. The topographic distribution of ganglion cells displayed two spots of high cell density located in the temporal and nasal quadrants, 20 mm from the optic disk. The high-density areas were connected by a horizontal belt-like area passing below the optic disk of the retina. Peak cell densities in these areas were evaluated. Mean peak cell densities were 334 and 288 cells/mm(2) in the temporal and nasal high-density areas, respectively. With a posterior nodal distance of 19.5 mm, these high-density data predict a retinal resolution of 9.6' (3.1 cycles/deg.) and 12.6' (2.4 cycles/deg.) in the temporal and nasal areas, respectively, in water. PMID:23018493

  19. Retinal ganglion cell topography in juvenile Pacific bluefin tuna Thunnus orientalis (Temminck and Schlegel).

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Taeko

    2014-02-01

    The retinal ganglion cell distribution, which is known to reflect fish feeding behavior, was investigated in juvenile Pacific bluefin tuna Thunnus orientalis. During the course of examination, regularly arrayed cells with a distinctive larger soma, which may be regarded as motion-sensitive cells, were found. The topographical distribution of ordinary-sized ganglion cells, which is usually utilized to estimate fish visual axis and/or visual field characteristics, showed that the highest-density area, termed the area centralis, was localized in the ventral-temporal retina. The retinal topography of ordinary-sized ganglion cells seems to reflect the bluefin tuna's foraging behavior; while cruising, cells in the area centralis may signal potential prey, such as small schooling pelagic fishes or squids, that are present in the upward-forward direction. Judging from morphological characteristics, the large ganglion cells localized in the small temporal retinal area seem to be equivalent to physiologically categorized off-center Y-cells of cat, which are stimulated by a transient dark spot in a bright visual field. It was inferred that presumed large off-center cells in the temporal retina detect movements of agile prey animals escaping from bluefin tuna as a silhouette against environmental light. PMID:23775518

  20. Optical Recording of Retinal and Visual Cortical Responses Evoked by Electrical Stimulation on the Retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osanai, Makoto; Sakaehara, Haruko; Sawai, Hajime; Song, Wen-Jie; Yagi, Tetsuya

    To develop a retinal prosthesis for blind patients using an implanted multielectrode array, it is important to study the response properties of retinal ganglion cells and of the visual cortex to localized retinal electrical stimulation. Optical imaging can reveal the spatio-temporal properties of neuronal activity. Therefore, we conducted a calcium imaging study to investigate response properties to local current stimulation in frog retinas, and a membrane potential imaging study to explore the visual cortical responses to retinal stimulation in guinea pigs. In the retina, local current stimuli evoked transient responses in the ganglion cells located near the stimulus electrode. The spatial pattern of the responding area was altered by changing the location of the stimulation. Local electrical stimulation to the retina also caused transient responses in the visual cortex. The responding cortical areas in the primary visual cortex were localized. A spatially different cortical response was observed to stimulation of a different position on the retina. These results suggest that the imaging study has great potential in revealing the spatio-temporal properties of the neuronal response for the retinal prosthesis.

  1. Adaptive Colour Contrast Coding in the Salamander Retina Efficiently Matches Natural Scene Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Vasserman, Genadiy; Schneidman, Elad; Segev, Ronen

    2013-01-01

    The visual system continually adjusts its sensitivity to the statistical properties of the environment through an adaptation process that starts in the retina. Colour perception and processing is commonly thought to occur mainly in high visual areas, and indeed most evidence for chromatic colour contrast adaptation comes from cortical studies. We show that colour contrast adaptation starts in the retina where ganglion cells adjust their responses to the spectral properties of the environment. We demonstrate that the ganglion cells match their responses to red-blue stimulus combinations according to the relative contrast of each of the input channels by rotating their functional response properties in colour space. Using measurements of the chromatic statistics of natural environments, we show that the retina balances inputs from the two (red and blue) stimulated colour channels, as would be expected from theoretical optimal behaviour. Our results suggest that colour is encoded in the retina based on the efficient processing of spectral information that matches spectral combinations in natural scenes on the colour processing level. PMID:24205373

  2. Microglia response in retina and optic nerve in chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Horstmann, Lioba; Kuehn, Sandra; Pedreiturria, Xiomara; Haak, Kathrin; Pfarrer, Christiane; Dick, H Burkhard; Kleiter, Ingo; Joachim, Stephanie C

    2016-09-15

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a common rodent model for multiple sclerosis (MS). Yet, the long-term consequences for retina and optic nerve (ON) are unknown. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with an encephalitogenic peptide (MOG35-55) and the controls received the carriers or PBS. Clinical symptoms started at day 8, peaked at day 14, and were prevalent until day 60. They correlated with infiltration and demyelination of the ON. In MOG-immunized animals more microglia cells in the ONs and retinas were detected at day 60. Additionally, retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss was combined with an increased macroglia response. At this late stage, an increased number of microglia was associated with axonal damage in the ON and in the retina with RGC loss. Whether glial activation contributes to repair mechanisms or adversely affects the number of RGCs is currently unclear. PMID:27609273

  3. The sarcoglycan-sarcospan complex localization in mouse retina is independent from dystrophins

    PubMed Central

    Fort, Patrice; Estrada, Francisco-Javier; Bordais, Agnès; Mornet, Dominique; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge; Vargas, Haydeé Rosas; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón M.; Rendon, Alvaro

    2005-01-01

    The sarcoglycan–sarcospan (SG–SSPN) complex is part of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex that has been extensively characterized in muscle. To establish the framework for functional studies of sarcoglycans in retina here, we quantified sarcoglycans mRNA levels with real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and performed immunohistochemistry to determine their cellular and subcellular distribution. We showed that the β-, δ-, γ-, ε-sarcoglycans and sarcospan are expressed in mouse retina. They are localized predominantly in the outer and the inner limiting membranes, probably in the Müller cells and also in the ganglion cells axons where the expression of dystrophins have never been reported. We also investigated the status of the sarcoglycans in the retina of mdx3cv mutant mice for all Duchene Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) gene products. The absence of dystrophin did not produce any change in the sarcoglycan–sarcospan components expression and distribution. PMID:15993965

  4. Symptomatic Elbow Ganglion Causing Pronator Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rockwell, W. Bradford

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Descriptions of ganglion cysts date back to 400 BC. Ganglions causing peripheral nerve compression have been described most notably at the wrist. Ganglion compression of the median nerve at the elbow is rare. We report a case of a palmar elbow ganglion causing median nerve compression and the clinical presentation of pronator syndrome. After removal of the ganglion and median nerve decompression, the patient’s symptoms fully resolved. PMID:25289303

  5. Quantitative analysis of the retinal ganglion cell layer and optic nerve of the barn owl Tyto alba.

    PubMed

    Wathey, J C; Pettigrew, J D

    1989-01-01

    The visual capacity of the common barn owl (Tyto alba) was studied by quantitative analysis of the retina and optic nerve. Cell counts in the ganglion cell layer of the whole-mounted retina revealed a temporal area centralis with peak cell density of 12,500 cells/mm2 and a horizontal streak of high cell density extending from the area centralis into the nasal retina. Integration of the ganglion cell density map gave an estimated total of 1.4 million cells for the ganglion cell layer. Electron microscopy of a single, complete section of the optic nerve revealed a bimodal fiber diameter spectrum (modes at 0.3 and 0.9 microns; bin width = 0.2 microns), with diameters ranging from 0.15 microns (unmyelinated) to 6.05 microns (myelinated, sheath included). The total axon count for the optic nerve was estimated from sample counts to be about 680,000 axons (25% unmyelinated). Therefore, roughly half of the cells in the retinal ganglion cell layer do not send axons into the optic nerve. With certain assumptions, the data predict a visual spatial acuity for barn owls on the order of 8 cycles/degree, a value similar to the known behaviorally measured acuities of masked owls (10 cycles/degree) and domestic cats (6 cycles/degree). PMID:2758316

  6. Differential modulation of retinal ganglion cell light responses by orthosteric and allosteric metabotropic glutamate receptor 8 compounds

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Brian T.; Morgans, Catherine W.; Duvoisin, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the role of mGluR8 in modulating the synaptic responses of retinal ganglion cells, we used a recently identified positive allosteric modulator of mGluR8, AZ12216052 (AZ) and the mGluR8-specific orthosteric agonist (S)-3,4-dicarboxyphenylglycine (DCPG). These agents were applied to whole-cell voltage-clamped ganglion cells from an isolated, superfused mouse retina preparation. DCPG reduced OFF-ganglion cell excitatory currents, whereas AZ enhanced the peak excitatory currents in ON-, OFF-, and ON-OFF-ganglion cells. The effects on ganglion cell inhibitory currents were more varied. The effects of the allosteric modulator were stronger for bright stimuli than for dim stimuli, consistent with receptor stimulation by endogenous glutamate being stronger during bright light stimulation and with mGluR8 receptors mainly being localized away from glutamate release sites, immuno-labeled with VGLUT1. The differential sensitivity of ganglion cell light responses to DCPG and AZ supports multiple sites where mGluR8 modulates the light responses of ganglion cells. PMID:23164615

  7. Retina vascular network recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tascini, Guido; Passerini, Giorgio; Puliti, Paolo; Zingaretti, Primo

    1993-09-01

    The analysis of morphological and structural modifications of the retina vascular network is an interesting investigation method in the study of diabetes and hypertension. Normally this analysis is carried out by qualitative evaluations, according to standardized criteria, though medical research attaches great importance to quantitative analysis of vessel color, shape and dimensions. The paper describes a system which automatically segments and recognizes the ocular fundus circulation and micro circulation network, and extracts a set of features related to morphometric aspects of vessels. For this class of images the classical segmentation methods seem weak. We propose a computer vision system in which segmentation and recognition phases are strictly connected. The system is hierarchically organized in four modules. Firstly the Image Enhancement Module (IEM) operates a set of custom image enhancements to remove blur and to prepare data for subsequent segmentation and recognition processes. Secondly the Papilla Border Analysis Module (PBAM) automatically recognizes number, position and local diameter of blood vessels departing from optical papilla. Then the Vessel Tracking Module (VTM) analyses vessels comparing the results of body and edge tracking and detects branches and crossings. Finally the Feature Extraction Module evaluates PBAM and VTM output data and extracts some numerical indexes. Used algorithms appear to be robust and have been successfully tested on various ocular fundus images.

  8. Expression of neurotransmitters and neurotrophins in neurogenic inflammation of the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Bronzetti, Elena; Artico, M; Kovacs, I; Felici, L M; Magliulo, G; Vignone, D; D'Ambrosio, A; Forte, F; Di Liddo, R; Feher, J

    2007-01-01

    Antidromic stimulation of the rat trigeminal ganglion triggers the release of substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from sensory nerve terminals of the capsaicin sensitive C-fibers. These pro-inflammatory neuropeptides produce a marked hyperemia in the anterior segment of the eye, accompanied by increased intraocular pressure, breakdown of the blood-aqueous barrier and myosis. To assess the effects of neurogenic inflammation on the retina, specifically on the immunostaining of neurotransmitters and neurotrophins, as well as on the expression of neurotrophin receptors in the retina. RT-PCR was also accomplished in control and stimulated animals to confirm the immunohistochemical results. In the electrically stimulated eyes, immunostaining for SP, CGRP, VIP and nNOS demonstrated a marked increase in the RPE/POS (Retinal Pigment Epithelium/Photoreceptor Outer Segments), in the inner and outer granular layers and in the ganglion cells in comparison to the control eyes. CGRP and SP were found increased in stimulated animals and this result has been confirmed by RT- PCR. Changes in neurotrophin immunostaining and in receptor expression were also observed after electric stimulation of trigeminal ganglia. Decrease of BDNF and NT4 in the outer and inner layers and in ganglion cells was particularly marked. In stimulated rat retinas immunostaining and RT-PCR showed a NGF expression increase. Neurotrophin receptors remained substantially unchanged. These studies demonstrated, for the first time, that antidromic stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion and subsequent neurogenic inflammation affect immunostaining of retinal cell neurotransmitter/neuropeptides and neurotrophins as well as the expression of neurotrophin receptors. PMID:18162454

  9. Correlation of spatial intensity distribution of light reaching the retina and restoration of vision by optogenetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivalingaiah, Shivaranjani; Gu, Ling; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2011-03-01

    Stimulation of retinal neuronal cells using optogenetics via use of chanelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) and blue light has opened up a new direction for restoration of vision with respect to treatment of Retinitis pigmentosa (RP). In addition to delivery of ChR2 to specific retinal layer using genetic engineering, threshold level of blue light needs to be delivered onto the retina for generating action potential and successful behavioral outcome. We report measurement of intensity distribution of light reaching the retina of Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) mouse models and compared those results with theoretical simulations of light propagation in eye. The parameters for the stimulating source positioning in front of eye was determined for optimal light delivery to the retina. In contrast to earlier viral method based delivery of ChR2 onto retinal ganglion cells, in-vivo electroporation method was employed for retina-transfection of RP mice. The behavioral improvement in mice with Thy1-ChR2-YFP transfected retina, expressing ChR2 in retinal ganglion cells, was found to correlate with stimulation intensity.

  10. Retroviral misexpression of cVax disturbs retinal ganglion cell axon fasciculation and intraretinal pathfinding in vivo and guidance of nasal ganglion cell axons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mühleisen, Thomas W; Agoston, Zsuzsa; Schulte, Dorothea

    2006-09-01

    The transcription factor cVax (Vax2) is expressed in the ventral neural retina and restricted expression is a prerequisite for at least three prominent aspects of retinal dorsal-ventral patterning: polarized expression of EphB/B-ephrin molecules, the retinotectal projection and the distribution of rod photoreceptors across the retina. In the chick retina, the fasciculation pattern of ganglion cell axons also differs between the dorsal and ventral eye. To investigate the molecular mechanisms involved, the nerve fiber layer was analyzed after retroviral misexpression of several factors known to regulate the positional specification of retinal ganglion cells. Forced cVax expression ventralized the fasciculation pattern and caused axon pathfinding errors near the optic disc. Ectopic expression of different ephrin molecules indicated that axon fasciculation is, at least in part, mediated by the EphB system. Finally, we report that retroviral misexpression of cVax increased the pool of EphA4 receptors phosphorylated on tyrosine residues and altered the guidance preference of nasal axons in vitro. These results identify novel functions for cVax in intraretinal axon fasciculation and pathfinding as well as suggest a mechanism to explain how restricted cVax expression may influence map formation along the dorso-ventral and antero-posterior axes of the optic tectum. PMID:16769047

  11. Expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors, AMPA, kainite and NMDA, in the pigeon retina.

    PubMed

    Atoji, Yasuro

    2015-07-01

    Glutamate is an excitatory neurotransmitter in the vertebrate retina. A previous study found vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGluT2) mRNA in the pigeon retina, suggesting that bipolar and ganglion cells are glutamatergic. The present study examined the localization of ionotropic glutamate receptors to identify receptor cells in the pigeon retina using in situ hybridization histochemistry. Nine subunits of AMPA receptor (GluA1, GluA2, GluA3, and GluA4), kainate receptor (GluK1, GluK2, and GluK4), and NMDA receptor (GluN1 and GluN2A) were found to be expressed in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and ganglion cell layers. GluA1, GluA2, GluA3, and GluA4 were primarily expressed in the inner half of INL, and the signal intensity was strong for GluA2, GluA3, and GluA4. GluK1 was intensely expressed in the outer half of INL, whereas GluK2 and GluK4 were mainly localized in the inner half of INL. GluN1 and GluN2A were moderately expressed in the inner half of INL. Horizontal cells expressed GluA3 and GluA4, and ganglion cells expressed all subunits examined. These results suggest that the glutamatergic neurotransmission in the pigeon retina is similar to that in mammals. PMID:25983186

  12. Calcium preconditioning triggers neuroprotection in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Brandt, S K; Weatherly, M E; Ware, L; Linn, D M; Linn, C L

    2011-01-13

    In the mammalian retina, excitotoxicity has been shown to be involved in apoptotic retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death and is associated with certain retinal disease states including glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and retinal ischemia. Previous studies from this lab [Wehrwein E, Thompson SA, Coulibaly SF, Linn DM, Linn CL (2004) Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 45:1531-1543] have demonstrated that acetylcholine (ACh) and nicotine protects against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in isolated adult pig RGCs through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Activation of nAChRs in these RGCs triggers cell survival signaling pathways and inhibits apoptotic enzymes [Asomugha CO, Linn DM, Linn CL (2010) J Neurochem 112:214-226]. However, the link between binding of nAChRs and activation of neuroprotective pathways is unknown. In this study, we examine the hypothesis that calcium permeation through nAChR channels is required for ACh-induced neuroprotection against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in isolated pig RGCs. RGCs were isolated from other retinal tissue using a two step panning technique and cultured for 3 days under different conditions. In some studies, calcium imaging experiments were performed using the fluorescent calcium indicator, fluo-4, and demonstrated that calcium permeates the nAChR channels located on pig RGCs. In other studies, the extracellular calcium concentration was altered to determine the effect on nicotine-induced neuroprotection. Results support the hypothesis that calcium is required for nicotine-induced neuroprotection in isolated pig RGCs. Lastly, studies were performed to analyze the effects of preconditioning on glutamate-induced excitotoxicity and neuroprotection. In these studies, a preconditioning dose of calcium was introduced to cells using a variety of mechanisms before a large glutamate insult was applied to cells. Results from these studies support the hypothesis that preconditioning cells with a relatively low level of calcium before

  13. Ganglion Cyst of the Wrist and Hand

    MedlinePlus

    ... frequently fails to eliminate the ganglion because the “root” or connection to the joint or tendon sheath ... a weed which will grow back if the root is not removed. In many cases, the ganglion ...

  14. Step-by-step instructions for retina recordings with perforated multi electrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Katja; Tikidji-Hamburyan, Alexandra; Seitter, Hartwig; Idrees, Saad; Mutter, Marion; Benkner, Boris; Münch, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    Multi-electrode arrays are a state-of-the-art tool in electrophysiology, also in retina research. The output cells of the retina, the retinal ganglion cells, form a monolayer in many species and are well accessible due to their proximity to the inner retinal surface. This structure has allowed the use of multi-electrode arrays for high-throughput, parallel recordings of retinal responses to presented visual stimuli, and has led to significant new insights into retinal organization and function. However, using conventional arrays where electrodes are embedded into a glass or ceramic plate can be associated with three main problems: (1) low signal-to-noise ratio due to poor contact between electrodes and tissue, especially in the case of strongly curved retinas from small animals, e.g. rodents; (2) insufficient oxygen and nutrient supply to cells located on the bottom of the recording chamber; and (3) displacement of the tissue during recordings. Perforated multi-electrode arrays (pMEAs) have been found to alleviate all three issues in brain slice recordings. Over the last years, we have been using such perforated arrays to study light evoked activity in the retinas of various species including mouse, pig, and human. In this article, we provide detailed step-by-step instructions for the use of perforated MEAs to record visual responses from the retina, including spike recordings from retinal ganglion cells and in vitro electroretinograms (ERG). In addition, we provide in-depth technical and methodological troubleshooting information, and show example recordings of good quality as well as examples for the various problems which might be encountered. While our description is based on the specific equipment we use in our own lab, it may also prove useful when establishing retinal MEA recordings with other equipment. PMID:25165854

  15. DRP1 inhibition rescues retinal ganglion cells and their axons by preserving mitochondrial integrity in a mouse model of glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, K-Y; Perkins, G A; Shim, M S; Bushong, E; Alcasid, N; Ju, S; Ellisman, M H; Weinreb, R N; Ju, W-K

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness and is characterized by slow and progressive degeneration of the optic nerve head axons and retinal ganglion cell (RGC), leading to loss of visual function. Although oxidative stress and/or alteration of mitochondrial (mt) dynamics induced by elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) are associated with this neurodegenerative disease, the mechanisms that regulate mt dysfunction-mediated glaucomatous neurodegeneration are poorly understood. Using a mouse model of glaucoma, DBA/2J (D2), which spontaneously develops elevated IOP, as well as an in vitro RGC culture system, we show here that oxidative stress, as evidenced by increasing superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and mt transcription factor A (Tfam) protein expression, triggers mt fission and loss by increasing dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) in the retina of glaucomatous D2 mice as well as in cultured RGCs exposed to elevated hydrostatic pressure in vitro. DRP1 inhibition by overexpressing DRP1 K38A mutant blocks mt fission and triggers a subsequent reduction of oxidative stress, as evidenced by decreasing SOD2 and Tfam protein expression. DRP1 inhibition promotes RGC survival by increasing phosphorylation of Bad at serine 112 in the retina and preserves RGC axons by maintaining mt integrity in the glial lamina of glaucomatous D2 mice. These findings demonstrate an important vicious cycle involved in glaucomatous neurodegeneration that starts with elevated IOP producing oxidative stress; the oxidative stress then leads to mt fission and a specific form of mt dysfunction that generates further oxidative stress, thus perpetuating the cycle. Our findings suggest that DRP1 is a potential therapeutic target for ameliorating oxidative stress-mediated mt fission and dysfunction in RGC and its axons during glaucomatous neurodegeneration. Thus, DRP1 inhibition may provide a new therapeutic strategy for protecting both RGCs and their axons in glaucoma and other optic

  16. Intrinsic bursting of AII amacrine cells underlies oscillations in the rd1 mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hannah; Zhang, Lei; Cembrowski, Mark S; Sabottke, Carl F; Markowitz, Alexander L; Butts, Daniel A; Kath, William L; Singer, Joshua H; Riecke, Hermann

    2014-09-15

    In many forms of retinal degeneration, photoreceptors die but inner retinal circuits remain intact. In the rd1 mouse, an established model for blinding retinal diseases, spontaneous activity in the coupled network of AII amacrine and ON cone bipolar cells leads to rhythmic bursting of ganglion cells. Since such activity could impair retinal and/or cortical responses to restored photoreceptor function, understanding its nature is important for developing treatments of retinal pathologies. Here we analyzed a compartmental model of the wild-type mouse AII amacrine cell to predict that the cell's intrinsic membrane properties, specifically, interacting fast Na and slow, M-type K conductances, would allow its membrane potential to oscillate when light-evoked excitatory synaptic inputs were withdrawn following photoreceptor degeneration. We tested and confirmed this hypothesis experimentally by recording from AIIs in a slice preparation of rd1 retina. Additionally, recordings from ganglion cells in a whole mount preparation of rd1 retina demonstrated that activity in AIIs was propagated unchanged to elicit bursts of action potentials in ganglion cells. We conclude that oscillations are not an emergent property of a degenerated retinal network. Rather, they arise largely from the intrinsic properties of a single retinal interneuron, the AII amacrine cell. PMID:25008417

  17. Intrinsic bursting of AII amacrine cells underlies oscillations in the rd1 mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hannah; Zhang, Lei; Cembrowski, Mark S.; Sabottke, Carl F.; Markowitz, Alexander L.; Butts, Daniel A.; Kath, William L.; Singer, Joshua H.

    2014-01-01

    In many forms of retinal degeneration, photoreceptors die but inner retinal circuits remain intact. In the rd1 mouse, an established model for blinding retinal diseases, spontaneous activity in the coupled network of AII amacrine and ON cone bipolar cells leads to rhythmic bursting of ganglion cells. Since such activity could impair retinal and/or cortical responses to restored photoreceptor function, understanding its nature is important for developing treatments of retinal pathologies. Here we analyzed a compartmental model of the wild-type mouse AII amacrine cell to predict that the cell's intrinsic membrane properties, specifically, interacting fast Na and slow, M-type K conductances, would allow its membrane potential to oscillate when light-evoked excitatory synaptic inputs were withdrawn following photoreceptor degeneration. We tested and confirmed this hypothesis experimentally by recording from AIIs in a slice preparation of rd1 retina. Additionally, recordings from ganglion cells in a whole mount preparation of rd1 retina demonstrated that activity in AIIs was propagated unchanged to elicit bursts of action potentials in ganglion cells. We conclude that oscillations are not an emergent property of a degenerated retinal network. Rather, they arise largely from the intrinsic properties of a single retinal interneuron, the AII amacrine cell. PMID:25008417

  18. Allogeneic Transplantation of Müller-Derived Retinal Ganglion Cells Improves Retinal Function in a Feline Model of Ganglion Cell Depletion.

    PubMed

    Becker, Silke; Eastlake, Karen; Jayaram, Hari; Jones, Megan F; Brown, Robert A; McLellan, Gillian J; Charteris, David G; Khaw, Peng T; Limb, G Astrid

    2016-02-01

    Human Müller glia with stem cell characteristics (hMGSCs) have been shown to improve retinal function upon transplantation into rat models of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) depletion. However, their translational potential may depend upon successful engraftment and improvement of retinal function in experimental models with anatomical and functional features resembling those of the human eye. We investigated the effect of allogeneic transplantation of feline Müller glia with the ability to differentiate into cells expressing RGC markers, following ablation of RGCs by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA). Unlike previous observations in the rat, transplantation of hMGSC-derived RGCs into the feline vitreous formed aggregates and elicited a severe inflammatory response without improving visual function. In contrast, allogeneic transplantation of feline MGSC (fMGSC)-derived RGCs into the vitrectomized eye improved the scotopic threshold response (STR) of the electroretinogram (ERG). Despite causing functional improvement, the cells did not attach onto the retina and formed aggregates on peripheral vitreous remnants, suggesting that vitreous may constitute a barrier for cell attachment onto the retina. This was confirmed by observations that cellular scaffolds of compressed collagen and enriched preparations of fMGSC-derived RGCs facilitated cell attachment. Although cells did not migrate into the RGC layer or the optic nerve, they significantly improved the STR and the photopic negative response of the ERG, indicative of increased RGC function. These results suggest that MGSCs have a neuroprotective ability that promotes partial recovery of impaired RGC function and indicate that cell attachment onto the retina may be necessary for transplanted cells to confer neuroprotection to the retina. Significance: Müller glia with stem cell characteristics are present in the adult human retina, but they do not have regenerative ability. These cells, however, have potential for

  19. Allogeneic Transplantation of Müller-Derived Retinal Ganglion Cells Improves Retinal Function in a Feline Model of Ganglion Cell Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Silke; Eastlake, Karen; Jayaram, Hari; Jones, Megan F.; Brown, Robert A.; McLellan, Gillian J.; Charteris, David G.; Khaw, Peng T.

    2016-01-01

    Human Müller glia with stem cell characteristics (hMGSCs) have been shown to improve retinal function upon transplantation into rat models of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) depletion. However, their translational potential may depend upon successful engraftment and improvement of retinal function in experimental models with anatomical and functional features resembling those of the human eye. We investigated the effect of allogeneic transplantation of feline Müller glia with the ability to differentiate into cells expressing RGC markers, following ablation of RGCs by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA). Unlike previous observations in the rat, transplantation of hMGSC-derived RGCs into the feline vitreous formed aggregates and elicited a severe inflammatory response without improving visual function. In contrast, allogeneic transplantation of feline MGSC (fMGSC)-derived RGCs into the vitrectomized eye improved the scotopic threshold response (STR) of the electroretinogram (ERG). Despite causing functional improvement, the cells did not attach onto the retina and formed aggregates on peripheral vitreous remnants, suggesting that vitreous may constitute a barrier for cell attachment onto the retina. This was confirmed by observations that cellular scaffolds of compressed collagen and enriched preparations of fMGSC-derived RGCs facilitated cell attachment. Although cells did not migrate into the RGC layer or the optic nerve, they significantly improved the STR and the photopic negative response of the ERG, indicative of increased RGC function. These results suggest that MGSCs have a neuroprotective ability that promotes partial recovery of impaired RGC function and indicate that cell attachment onto the retina may be necessary for transplanted cells to confer neuroprotection to the retina. Significance Müller glia with stem cell characteristics are present in the adult human retina, but they do not have regenerative ability. These cells, however, have potential for

  20. Cold Shock Proteins Are Expressed in the Retina Following Exposure to Low Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Contartese, Daniela S.; Rolón, Federico; Sarotto, Anibal; Dorfman, Veronica B.; Loidl, Cesar F.; Martínez, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia has been proposed as a therapeutic intervention for some retinal conditions, including ischemic insults. Cold exposure elevates expression of cold-shock proteins (CSP), including RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) and cold inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP), but their presence in mammalian retina is so far unknown. Here we show the effects of hypothermia on the expression of these CSPs in retina-derived cell lines and in the retina of newborn and adult rats. Two cell lines of retinal origin, R28 and mRPE, were exposed to 32°C for different time periods and CSP expression was measured by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. Neonatal and adult Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a cold environment (8°C) and expression of CSPs in their retinas was studied by Western blotting, multiple inmunofluorescence, and confocal microscopy. RBM3 expression was upregulated by cold in both R28 and mRPE cells in a time-dependent fashion. On the other hand, CIRP was upregulated in R28 cells but not in mRPE. In vivo, expression of CSPs was negligible in the retina of newborn and adult rats kept at room temperature (24°C). Exposure to a cold environment elicited a strong expression of both proteins, especially in retinal pigment epithelium cells, photoreceptors, bipolar, amacrine and horizontal cells, Müller cells, and ganglion cells. In conclusion, CSP expression rapidly rises in the mammalian retina following exposure to hypothermia in a cell type-specific pattern. This observation may be at the basis of the molecular mechanism by which hypothermia exerts its therapeutic effects in the retina. PMID:27556928

  1. Optical imaging of the retina in response to the electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikado, Takashi; Okawa, Yoshitaka; Miyoshi, Tomomitsu; Hirohara, Yoko; Mihashi, Toshifumi; Tano, Yasuo

    2008-02-01

    Purposes: To determine if reflectance changes of the retina can be detected following electrical stimulation to the retina using a newly developed optical-imaging fundus camera. Methods: Eyes of cats were examined after pupil dilation. Retina was stimulated either focally by a ball-type electrode (BE) placed on the fenestrated sclera or diffusely using a ring-type electrode (RE) placed on the corneoscleral limbus. Electrical stimulation by biphasic pulse trains was applied for 4 seconds. Fundus images with near-infrared (800-880 nm) light were obtained between 2 seconds before and 20 seconds after the electrical stimulation (ES). A two-dimensional map of the reflectance changes (RCs) was constructed. The effect of Tetrodotoxin (TTX) was also investigated on RCs by ES using RE. Results: RCs were observed around the retinal locus where the stimulating electrodes were positioned (BE) or in the retina of the posterior pole (RE), in which the latency was about 0.5 to 1.0 sec and the peak time about 2 to 5 sec after the onset of ES. The intensity of the RCs increased with the increase of the stimulus current in both cases. RCs were completely suppressed after the injection of TTX. Conclusions: The functional changes of the retina either by focal or diffuse electrical stimulation were successfully detected by optical imaging of the retina. The contribution of retinal ganglion cells on RCs by ES was confirmed by TTX experiment. This method may be applied to the objective evaluation of the artificial retina.

  2. Cold Shock Proteins Are Expressed in the Retina Following Exposure to Low Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Larrayoz, Ignacio M; Rey-Funes, Manuel; Contartese, Daniela S; Rolón, Federico; Sarotto, Anibal; Dorfman, Veronica B; Loidl, Cesar F; Martínez, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia has been proposed as a therapeutic intervention for some retinal conditions, including ischemic insults. Cold exposure elevates expression of cold-shock proteins (CSP), including RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) and cold inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP), but their presence in mammalian retina is so far unknown. Here we show the effects of hypothermia on the expression of these CSPs in retina-derived cell lines and in the retina of newborn and adult rats. Two cell lines of retinal origin, R28 and mRPE, were exposed to 32°C for different time periods and CSP expression was measured by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. Neonatal and adult Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a cold environment (8°C) and expression of CSPs in their retinas was studied by Western blotting, multiple inmunofluorescence, and confocal microscopy. RBM3 expression was upregulated by cold in both R28 and mRPE cells in a time-dependent fashion. On the other hand, CIRP was upregulated in R28 cells but not in mRPE. In vivo, expression of CSPs was negligible in the retina of newborn and adult rats kept at room temperature (24°C). Exposure to a cold environment elicited a strong expression of both proteins, especially in retinal pigment epithelium cells, photoreceptors, bipolar, amacrine and horizontal cells, Müller cells, and ganglion cells. In conclusion, CSP expression rapidly rises in the mammalian retina following exposure to hypothermia in a cell type-specific pattern. This observation may be at the basis of the molecular mechanism by which hypothermia exerts its therapeutic effects in the retina. PMID:27556928

  3. Spatiotemporal aspects of pulsed electrical stimuli on the responses of rabbit retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Ralph J; Ziv, Ofer R; Rizzo, Joseph F; Scribner, Dean; Johnson, Lee

    2009-12-01

    Implanted intraocular microelectrode arrays are being used to provide sight to individuals who are blind due to photoreceptor degeneration. It is envisioned that this retinal prosthesis will create the illusion of motion by stimulating focal areas of the retina in a sequential fashion through neighboring electrodes, much like the rapid succession of still images in movies and computer animation gives rise to apparent motion. Using a high-density microelectrode array, we examined the extracellularly recorded responses of rabbit retinal ganglion cells to a bar-shaped electrode array that was stepped at 50 microm increments at different rates across the retina and compared these responses to the responses generated to a similarly shaped light stimulus that was stepped across the retina. When the retina was stimulated at 1 step/s, retinal ganglion cells gave robust bursts of action potentials to both the electrode array and the light stimulus. The responses to the 'moving' electrode array decreased progressively with increasing stepping frequency. At 16 steps/s (highest frequency tested), the number of spikes per sweep and the number of bursts per sweep were reduced 75% and 67% respectively. In contrast, when the retina was stimulated at 16 steps/s with the 'moving' light stimulus, the number of spikes per sweep and the number of bursts per sweep were reduced only 43% and 25% respectively. These findings suggest that simple translation of object motion to sequential stimulation through neighboring electrodes may not be the best way to convey the perception of object motion in a patient with a retinal prosthesis. PMID:19766116

  4. Benzodiazepine binding to bovine retina.

    PubMed

    Osborne, N N

    1980-02-01

    [3H]Diazepam binds to membrane preparations of the retina, suggesting that benzodiazepine receptors exist in this tissue. The binding characteristics are similar to those known to occur in the brain, with affinity constants in the same range. Unlike the finding in the brain, [3H]diazepam binding in the retina is not stimulated by GABA and other GABA agonists. These findings indicate that benzodiazepine receptors may have a more general function and not only be associated with anxiety or emotional behaviour. PMID:6302572

  5. Changes in ganglion cell physiology during retinal degeneration influence excitability by prosthetic electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Alice; Ratliff, Charles; Sampath, Alapakkam; Weiland, James

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Here we investigate ganglion cell physiology in healthy and degenerating retina to test its influence on threshold to electrical stimulation. Approach. Age-related Macular Degeneration and Retinitis Pigmentosa cause blindness via outer retinal degeneration. Inner retinal pathways that transmit visual information to the central brain remain intact, so direct electrical stimulation from prosthetic devices offers the possibility for visual restoration. Since inner retinal physiology changes during degeneration, we characterize physiological properties and responses to electrical stimulation in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) of both wild type mice and the rd10 mouse model of retinal degeneration. Main results. Our aggregate results support previous observations that elevated thresholds characterize diseased retinas. However, a physiology-driven classification scheme reveals distinct sub-populations of ganglion cells with thresholds either normal or strongly elevated compared to wild-type. When these populations are combined, only a weakly elevated threshold with large variance is observed. The cells with normal threshold are more depolarized at rest and exhibit periodic oscillations. Significance. During degeneration, physiological changes in RGCs affect the threshold stimulation currents required to evoke action potentials.

  6. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... of these procedures create a scar that helps seal the retina to the back of the eye. ... around the retinal tear. The scarring that results seals the retina to the underlying tissue, helping to ...

  7. Frequency Responses of Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cloherty, Shaun L.; Hung, Yu-Shan; Kameneva, Tatiana; Ibbotson, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    There are 15–20 different types of retinal ganglion cells (RGC) in the mammalian retina, each encoding different aspects of the visual scene. The mechanism by which post-synaptic signals from the retinal network generate spikes is determined by each cell’s intrinsic electrical properties. Here we investigate the frequency responses of morphologically identified rat RGCs using intracellular injection of sinusoidal current waveforms, to assess their intrinsic capabilities with minimal contributions from the retinal network. Recorded cells were classified according to their morphological characteristics (A, B, C or D-type) and their stratification (inner (i), outer (o) or bistratified) in the inner plexiform layer (IPL). Most cell types had low- or band-pass frequency responses. A2, C1 and C4o cells were band-pass with peaks of 15–30 Hz and low-pass cutoffs above 56 Hz (A2 cells) and ~42 Hz (C1 and C4o cells). A1 and C2i/o cells were low-pass with peaks of 10–15 Hz (cutoffs 19–25 Hz). Bistratified D1 and D2 cells were also low-pass with peaks of 5–10 Hz (cutoffs ~16 Hz). The least responsive cells were the B2 and C3 types (peaks: 2–5 Hz, cutoffs: 8–11 Hz). We found no difference between cells stratifying in the inner and outer IPL (i.e., ON and OFF cells) or between cells with large and small somas or dendritic fields. Intrinsic physiological properties (input resistance, spike width and sag) had little impact on frequency response at low frequencies, but account for 30–40% of response variability at frequencies >30 Hz. PMID:27341669

  8. A Retina Inspired Model for Enhancing Visibility of Hazy Images

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xian-Shi; Gao, Shao-Bing; Li, Chao-Yi; Li, Yong-Jie

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian retina seems far smarter than scientists have believed so far. Inspired by the visual processing mechanisms in the retina, from the layer of photoreceptors to the layer of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), we propose a computational model for haze removal from a single input image, which is an important issue in the field of image enhancement. In particular, the bipolar cells serve to roughly remove the low-frequency of haze, and the amacrine cells modulate the output of cone bipolar cells to compensate the loss of details by increasing the image contrast. Then the RGCs with disinhibitory receptive field surround refine the local haze removal as well as the image detail enhancement. Results on a variety of real-world and synthetic hazy images show that the proposed model yields results comparative to or even better than the state-of-the-art methods, having the advantage of simultaneous dehazing and enhancing of single hazy image with simple and straightforward implementation. PMID:26733857

  9. Histotypic differentiation of neonatal mouse retina in organ culture.

    PubMed

    Caffé, A R; Visser, H; Jansen, H G; Sanyal, S

    1989-10-01

    Retinae from neonatal mice were explanted in toto, with or without the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and adjoining mesenchymal cells, and maintained in organ culture for up to 3 weeks. The explants remained flat, rosette formation was minimal and histogenetic changes followed in the normal sequence. After 11, 14 and 21 days in vitro the three cellular layers--the outer nuclear layer including well differentiated rod and cone perikarya, the inner nuclear layer and the ganglion cell layer--with the intervening plexiform layers were comparable to those of the in vivo eyes. Electron microscopic analysis revealed that in the explants without RPE the nuclear layers developed as in vivo, but receptor outer segments (ROS) were not formed. When the RPE was present, receptor inner segments appeared normal and ROS including profuse disc structures were developed. Presence of synaptic elements was also recognized. Mesenchymal cells, when present differentiated into choroidal and scleral tissues and appeared to play a supportive role for the RPE cells. The system is described in detail and its suitability for the analysis of various cellular and metabolic factors in the development of the retina is discussed. PMID:2612197

  10. A Crystallin Gene Network in the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Justin P.; Wang, XiangDi; Freeman, Natalie E.; Ma, Zhiwei; Lu, Anna; Hejtmancik, Fielding; Geisert, Eldon E.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the regulation of crystallin genes and protein in the mouse retina using the BXD recombinant inbred (RI) strains. Illumina Sentrix BeadChip Arrays (MouseWG-6v2) were used to analyze mRNA levels in 75 BXD RI strains along with the parental strains (C57Bl/6J and DBA/2J), and the reciprocal crosses in the Hamilton Eye Institute (HEI) Retina Dataset (www.genenetwork.org). Protein levels were investigated using immunoblots to quantify levels of proteins and indirect immunohistochemistry to define the distribution of protein. Algorithms in the Genomatix program were used to identify transcription factor binding sites common to the regulatory sequences in the 5′ regions of co-regulated set of crystallin and other genes as compared to a set of control genes. As subset of genes, including many encoding lens crystallins is part of a tightly co-regulated network that is active in the retina. Expression of this crystallin network appears to be binary in nature, being expressed either at relatively low levels or being highly upregulated. Relative to a control set of genes, the 5′ regulatory sequences of the crystallin network genes show an increased frequency of a set of common transcription factor-binding sites, the most common being those of the Maf family. Chromatin immunoprecipitation of human lens epithelial cells (HLEC) and rat retinal ganglion cells (RGC) confirmed the functionality of these sites, showing that MafA binds the predicted sites of CRYGA and CRYGD in HLE and CRYAB, CRYGA, CRYBA1, and CRYBB3 in RGC cells. In the retina there is a highly correlated group of genes containing many members of the α- β- and γ-crystallin families. These genes can be dramatically upregulated in the retina. One transcription factor that appears to be involved in this coordinated expression is the MAF family transcription of factors associated with both lens and extralenticular expression of crystallin genes. PMID:23978599

  11. Tissue engineering the retinal ganglion cell nerve fiber layer.

    PubMed

    Kador, Karl E; Montero, Ramon B; Venugopalan, Praseeda; Hertz, Jonathan; Zindell, Allison N; Valenzuela, Daniel A; Uddin, Mohammed S; Lavik, Erin B; Muller, Kenneth J; Andreopoulos, Fotios M; Goldberg, Jeffrey L

    2013-06-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases, such as glaucoma and macular degeneration, affect millions of people worldwide and ultimately lead to retinal cell death and blindness. Cell transplantation therapies for photoreceptors demonstrate integration and restoration of function, but transplantation into the ganglion cell layer is more complex, requiring guidance of axons from transplanted cells to the optic nerve head in order to reach targets in the brain. Here we create a biodegradable electrospun (ES) scaffold designed to direct the growth of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons radially, mimicking axon orientation in the retina. Using this scaffold we observed an increase in RGC survival and no significant change in their electrophysiological properties. When analyzed for alignment, 81% of RGCs were observed to project axons radially along the scaffold fibers, with no difference in alignment compared to the nerve fiber layer of retinal explants. When transplanted onto retinal explants, RGCs on ES scaffolds followed the radial pattern of the host retinal nerve fibers, whereas RGCs transplanted directly grew axons in a random pattern. Thus, the use of this scaffold as a cell delivery device represents a significant step towards the use of cell transplant therapies for the treatment of glaucoma and other retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:23489919

  12. Tissue Engineering the Retinal Ganglion Cell Nerve Fiber Layer

    PubMed Central

    Kador, Karl E.; Montero, Ramon B.; Venugopalan, Praseeda; Hertz, Jonathan; Zindell, Allison N.; Valenzuela, Daniel A.; Uddin, Mohammed S.; Lavik, Erin B.; Muller, Kenneth J.; Andreopoulos, Fotios M.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases, such as glaucoma and macular degeneration, affect millions of people worldwide and ultimately lead to retinal cell death and blindness. Cell transplantation therapies for photoreceptors demonstrate integration and restoration of function, but transplantation into the ganglion cell layer is more complex, requiring guidance of axons from transplanted cells to the optic nerve head in order to reach targets in the brain. Here we create a biodegradable electrospun (ES) scaffold designed to direct the growth of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons radially, mimicking axon orientation in the retina. Using this scaffold we observed an increase in RGC survival and no significant change in their electrophysiological properties. When analyzed for alignment, 81% of RGCs were observed to project axons radially along the scaffold fibers, with no difference in alignment compared to the nerve fiber layer of retinal explants. When transplanted onto retinal explants, RGCs on ES scaffolds followed the radial pattern of the host retinal nerve fibers, whereas RGCs transplanted directly grew axons in a random pattern. Thus, the use of this scaffold as a cell delivery device represents a significant step towards the use of cell transplant therapies for the treatment of glaucoma and other retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:23489919

  13. Types of Parvalbumin-Containing Retinotectal Ganglion Cells in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chae-Woo; Yu, Song-Hee; Lee, Eun-Shil; Lee, Jee-Geon; Jeon, Chang-Jin

    2012-01-01

    The calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PV) occurs in the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) of various vertebrate species. In the present study, we aimed to identify the types of PV-containing RGCs that project to the superior colliculus (SC) in the mouse. We injected retrograde tracer dextran into the mouse SC to label RGCs. PV-containing RGCs were first identified by immunocytochemistry and then neurons double-labeled with dextran and PV were iontophoretically injected with a lipophilic dye, DiI. Subsequently, confocal microscopy was used to characterize the morphologic classification of the PV-immunoreactive (IR) retinotectal ganglion cells on the basis of dendritic field size, branching pattern, and stratification within the inner plexiform layer. Among the 8 different types of PV-containing RGCs in the mouse retina, we found all 8 types of RGCs projecting to the SC. The RGCs were heterogeneous in morphology. The combined approach of using tracer injection and a single cell injection after immunocytochemistry on a particular protein will provide valuable data to further understand the functional features of the RGCs which constitute the retinotectal pathway. PMID:22829714

  14. Spike-Triggered Covariance Analysis Reveals Phenomenological Diversity of Contrast Adaptation in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian K.; Gollisch, Tim

    2015-01-01

    When visual contrast changes, retinal ganglion cells adapt by adjusting their sensitivity as well as their temporal filtering characteristics. The latter has classically been described by contrast-induced gain changes that depend on temporal frequency. Here, we explored a new perspective on contrast-induced changes in temporal filtering by using spike-triggered covariance analysis to extract multiple parallel temporal filters for individual ganglion cells. Based on multielectrode-array recordings from ganglion cells in the isolated salamander retina, we found that contrast adaptation of temporal filtering can largely be captured by contrast-invariant sets of filters with contrast-dependent weights. Moreover, differences among the ganglion cells in the filter sets and their contrast-dependent contributions allowed us to phenomenologically distinguish three types of filter changes. The first type is characterized by newly emerging features at higher contrast, which can be reproduced by computational models that contain response-triggered gain-control mechanisms. The second type follows from stronger adaptation in the Off pathway as compared to the On pathway in On-Off-type ganglion cells. Finally, we found that, in a subset of neurons, contrast-induced filter changes are governed by particularly strong spike-timing dynamics, in particular by pronounced stimulus-dependent latency shifts that can be observed in these cells. Together, our results show that the contrast dependence of temporal filtering in retinal ganglion cells has a multifaceted phenomenology and that a multi-filter analysis can provide a useful basis for capturing the underlying signal-processing dynamics. PMID:26230927

  15. Spike-Triggered Covariance Analysis Reveals Phenomenological Diversity of Contrast Adaptation in the Retina.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian K; Gollisch, Tim

    2015-07-01

    When visual contrast changes, retinal ganglion cells adapt by adjusting their sensitivity as well as their temporal filtering characteristics. The latter has classically been described by contrast-induced gain changes that depend on temporal frequency. Here, we explored a new perspective on contrast-induced changes in temporal filtering by using spike-triggered covariance analysis to extract multiple parallel temporal filters for individual ganglion cells. Based on multielectrode-array recordings from ganglion cells in the isolated salamander retina, we found that contrast adaptation of temporal filtering can largely be captured by contrast-invariant sets of filters with contrast-dependent weights. Moreover, differences among the ganglion cells in the filter sets and their contrast-dependent contributions allowed us to phenomenologically distinguish three types of filter changes. The first type is characterized by newly emerging features at higher contrast, which can be reproduced by computational models that contain response-triggered gain-control mechanisms. The second type follows from stronger adaptation in the Off pathway as compared to the On pathway in On-Off-type ganglion cells. Finally, we found that, in a subset of neurons, contrast-induced filter changes are governed by particularly strong spike-timing dynamics, in particular by pronounced stimulus-dependent latency shifts that can be observed in these cells. Together, our results show that the contrast dependence of temporal filtering in retinal ganglion cells has a multifaceted phenomenology and that a multi-filter analysis can provide a useful basis for capturing the underlying signal-processing dynamics. PMID:26230927

  16. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) 2 and 4.2 are expressed in the retina of the adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Viña, E; Parisi, V; Sánchez-Ramos, C; Cabo, R; Guerrera, M C; Quirós, L M; Germanà, A; Vega, J A; García-Suárez, O

    2015-05-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are H(+)-gated, voltage-insensitive cation channels involved in synaptic transmission, mechanosensation and nociception. Different ASICs have been detected in the retina of mammals but it is not known whether they are expressed in adult zebrafish, a commonly used animal model to study the retina in both normal and pathological conditions. We study the expression and distribution of ASIC2 and ASIC4 in the retina of adult zebrafish and its regulation by light using PCR, in situ hybridization, western blot and immunohistochemistry. We detected mRNA encoding zASIC2 and zASIC4.2 but not zASIC4.1. ASIC2, at the mRNA or protein level, was detected in the outer nuclear layer, the outer plexiform layer, the inner plexiform layer, the retinal ganglion cell layer and the optic nerve. ASIC4 was expressed in the photoreceptors layer and to a lesser extent in the retinal ganglion cell layer. Furthermore, the expression of both ASIC2 and ASIC4.2 was down-regulated by light and darkness. These results are the first demonstration that ASIC2 and ASIC4 are expressed in the adult zebrafish retina and suggest that zebrafish could be used as a model organism for studying retinal pathologies involving ASICs. PMID:25585988

  17. An amacrine cell circuit for signaling steady illumination in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, Jason; Zhu, Yongling; DeVries, Steven H.; Schwartz, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Summary Decades of research have focused on the circuit connectivity between retinal neurons, yet only a handful of amacrine cells have been described functionally and placed in the context of a specific retinal circuit. Here we identify a circuit where inhibition from a specific amacrine cell plays a vital role in shaping the feature selectivity of a postsynaptic ganglion cell. We record from transgenically labeled CRH-1 amacrine cells and identify a postsynaptic target for CRH-1 amacrine cell inhibition in an atypical retinal ganglion cell (RGC) in mouse retina, the Suppressed-by-Contrast (SbC) RGC. Unlike other RGC types, SbC RGCs spike tonically in steady illumination and are suppressed by both increases and decreases in illumination. Inhibition from GABAergic CRH-1 amacrine cells shapes this unique contrast response profile to positive contrast. We show the existence and impact of this circuit with both paired recordings and cell-type specific ablation. PMID:26711334

  18. Mapping nonlinear receptive field structure in primate retina at single cone resolution.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Jeremy; Field, Greg D; Li, Peter H; Greschner, Martin; Gunning, Deborah E; Mathieson, Keith; Sher, Alexander; Litke, Alan M; Paninski, Liam; Simoncelli, Eero P; Chichilnisky, E J

    2015-01-01

    The function of a neural circuit is shaped by the computations performed by its interneurons, which in many cases are not easily accessible to experimental investigation. Here, we elucidate the transformation of visual signals flowing from the input to the output of the primate retina, using a combination of large-scale multi-electrode recordings from an identified ganglion cell type, visual stimulation targeted at individual cone photoreceptors, and a hierarchical computational model. The results reveal nonlinear subunits in the circuity of OFF midget ganglion cells, which subserve high-resolution vision. The model explains light responses to a variety of stimuli more accurately than a linear model, including stimuli targeted to cones within and across subunits. The recovered model components are consistent with known anatomical organization of midget bipolar interneurons. These results reveal the spatial structure of linear and nonlinear encoding, at the resolution of single cells and at the scale of complete circuits. PMID:26517879

  19. Improved spike sorting for multi-electrode array data from mammalian retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, Jason; Homann, Jan; Simmons, Kristy; Tkacik, Gasper; Balasubramanian, Vijay; Nelson, Philip

    2010-03-01

    Multi-electrode array technology provides an efficient means of simultaneously recording from many neurons. However, as arrays become larger, a greater computational burden falls on the spike-sorting algorithm. We have developed a new method for sorting multi-electrode signals and applied it to retinal ganglion cells. Our method is explicitly designed to scale well with increasing array size. It can dissect temporally overlapping spikes and accommodate the amplitude variation seen in spike bursts. The broad outline of our method is to (1) identify spikes in the raw data, cluster a subset, generate template waveforms, then (2) fit the templates to all the data using an iterative Bayesian algorithm. Each of these two steps makes use of the 2D spatial arrangement of the ganglion cells and electrodes, and the locality of signals from each individual cell. We demonstrate the method on data recorded from guinea pig retina on a 30-electrode array.

  20. Distribution of Mammalian-Like Melanopsin in Cyclostome Retinas Exhibiting a Different Extent of Visual Functions

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lanfang; Kawano-Yamashita, Emi; Nagata, Takashi; Tsukamoto, Hisao; Furutani, Yuji; Koyanagi, Mitsumasa; Terakita, Akihisa

    2014-01-01

    Mammals contain 1 melanopsin (Opn4) gene that is expressed in a subset of retinal ganglion cells to serve as a photopigment involved in non-image-forming vision such as photoentrainment of circadian rhythms. In contrast, most nonmammalian vertebrates possess multiple melanopsins that are distributed in various types of retinal cells; however, their functions remain unclear. We previously found that the lamprey has only 1 type of mammalian-like melanopsin gene, which is similar to that observed in mammals. Here we investigated the molecular properties and localization of melanopsin in the lamprey and other cyclostome hagfish retinas, which contribute to visual functions including image-forming vision and mainly to non-image-forming vision, respectively. We isolated 1 type of mammalian-like melanopsin cDNA from the eyes of each species. We showed that the recombinant lamprey melanopsin was a blue light-sensitive pigment and that both the lamprey and hagfish melanopsins caused light-dependent increases in calcium ion concentration in cultured cells in a manner that was similar to that observed for mammalian melanopsins. We observed that melanopsin was distributed in several types of retinal cells, including horizontal cells and ganglion cells, in the lamprey retina, despite the existence of only 1 melanopsin gene in the lamprey. In contrast, melanopsin was almost specifically distributed to retinal ganglion cells in the hagfish retina. Furthermore, we found that the melanopsin-expressing horizontal cells connected to the rhodopsin-containing short photoreceptor cells in the lamprey. Taken together, our findings suggest that in cyclostomes, the global distribution of melanopsin in retinal cells might not be related to the melanopsin gene number but to the extent of retinal contribution to visual function. PMID:25251771

  1. Destructive Changes in the Neuronal Structure of the FVB/N Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jinnan; Nan, ChangLong; Ripps, Harris; Shen, Wen

    2015-01-01

    We applied a series of selective antibodies for labeling the various cell types in the mammalian retina. These were used to identify the progressive loss of neurons in the FVB/N mouse, a model of early onset retinal degeneration produced by a mutation in the pde6b gene. The immunocytochemical studies, together with electroretinogram (ERG) recordings, enabled us to examine the time course of the degenerative changes that extended from the photoreceptors to the ganglion cells at the proximal end of the retina. Our study indicates that photoreceptors in FVB/N undergo a rapid degeneration within three postnatal weeks, and that there is a concomitant loss of retinal neurons in the inner nuclear layer. Although the loss of rods was detected at an earlier age during which time M- and S-opsin molecules were translocated to the cone nuclei; by 6 months all cones had also degenerated. Neuronal remodeling was also seen in the second-order neurons with horizontal cells sprouting processes proximally and dendritic retraction in rod-driven bipolar cells. Interestingly, the morphology of cone-driven bipolar cells were affected less by the disease process. The cellular structure of inner retinal neurons, i.e., ChAT amacrine cells, ganglion cells, and melanopsin-positive ganglion cells did not exhibit any gross changes of cell densities and appeared to be relatively unaffected by the massive photoreceptor degeneration in the distal retina. However, Muller cell processes began to express GFAP at their endfeet at p14, and it climbed progressively to the cell’s distal ends by 6 months. Our study indicates that FVB/N mouse provides a useful model with which to assess possible intervention strategies to arrest photoreceptor death in related diseases. PMID:26091175

  2. Destructive Changes in the Neuronal Structure of the FVB/N Mouse Retina.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinnan; Nan, ChangLong; Ripps, Harris; Shen, Wen

    2015-01-01

    We applied a series of selective antibodies for labeling the various cell types in the mammalian retina. These were used to identify the progressive loss of neurons in the FVB/N mouse, a model of early onset retinal degeneration produced by a mutation in the pde6b gene. The immunocytochemical studies, together with electroretinogram (ERG) recordings, enabled us to examine the time course of the degenerative changes that extended from the photoreceptors to the ganglion cells at the proximal end of the retina. Our study indicates that photoreceptors in FVB/N undergo a rapid degeneration within three postnatal weeks, and that there is a concomitant loss of retinal neurons in the inner nuclear layer. Although the loss of rods was detected at an earlier age during which time M- and S-opsin molecules were translocated to the cone nuclei; by 6 months all cones had also degenerated. Neuronal remodeling was also seen in the second-order neurons with horizontal cells sprouting processes proximally and dendritic retraction in rod-driven bipolar cells. Interestingly, the morphology of cone-driven bipolar cells were affected less by the disease process. The cellular structure of inner retinal neurons, i.e., ChAT amacrine cells, ganglion cells, and melanopsin-positive ganglion cells did not exhibit any gross changes of cell densities and appeared to be relatively unaffected by the massive photoreceptor degeneration in the distal retina. However, Muller cell processes began to express GFAP at their endfeet at p14, and it climbed progressively to the cell's distal ends by 6 months. Our study indicates that FVB/N mouse provides a useful model with which to assess possible intervention strategies to arrest photoreceptor death in related diseases. PMID:26091175

  3. Restoring visual function to blind mice with a photoswitch that exploits electrophysiological remodeling of retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Tochitsky, Ivan; Polosukhina, Aleksandra; Degtyar, Vadim E.; Gallerani, Nicholas; Smith, Caleb M.; Friedman, Aaron; Van Gelder, Russell N.; Trauner, Dirk; Kaufer, Daniela; Kramer, Richard H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are blinding diseases caused by the degeneration of rods and cones, leaving the remainder of the visual system unable to respond to light. Here we report a chemical photoswitch named DENAQ that restores retinal responses to white light of intensity similar to ordinary daylight. A single intraocular injection of DENAQ photosensitizes the blind retina for days, restoring electrophysiological and behavioral responses with no toxicity. Experiments on mouse strains with functional, non-functional, or degenerated rods and cones show that DENAQ is effective only in retinas with degenerated photoreceptors. DENAQ confers light sensitivity on a hyperpolarization-activated inward current that is enhanced in degenerated retina, enabling optical control of retinal ganglion cell firing The acceptable light sensitivity, favorable spectral sensitivity, and selective targeting to diseased tissue make DENAQ a prime drug candidate for vision restoration in patients with end-stage RP and AMD. PMID:24559673

  4. Restoring visual function to blind mice with a photoswitch that exploits electrophysiological remodeling of retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Tochitsky, Ivan; Polosukhina, Aleksandra; Degtyar, Vadim E; Gallerani, Nicholas; Smith, Caleb M; Friedman, Aaron; Van Gelder, Russell N; Trauner, Dirk; Kaufer, Daniela; Kramer, Richard H

    2014-02-19

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are blinding diseases caused by the degeneration of rods and cones, leaving the remainder of the visual system unable to respond to light. Here, we report a chemical photoswitch named DENAQ that restores retinal responses to white light of intensity similar to ordinary daylight. A single intraocular injection of DENAQ photosensitizes the blind retina for days, restoring electrophysiological and behavioral responses with no toxicity. Experiments on mouse strains with functional, nonfunctional, or degenerated rods and cones show that DENAQ is effective only in retinas with degenerated photoreceptors. DENAQ confers light sensitivity on a hyperpolarization-activated inward current that is enhanced in degenerated retina, enabling optical control of retinal ganglion cell firing. The acceptable light sensitivity, favorable spectral sensitivity, and selective targeting to diseased tissue make DENAQ a prime drug candidate for vision restoration in patients with end-stage RP and AMD. PMID:24559673

  5. Uniformity detector retinal ganglion cells fire complex spikes and receive only light-evoked inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Sivyer, Benjamin; Taylor, W. Rowland; Vaney, David I.

    2010-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells convey information by increasing their firing in response to an optimal visual stimulus or “trigger feature.” However, one class of ganglion cell responds to changes in the visual scene by decreasing its firing. These cells, termed uniformity detectors in the rabbit retina, are encountered only rarely and the synaptic mechanisms underlying their unusual responses have not been investigated. In this study, patch-clamp recordings of uniformity detectors show that the action potentials underlying the maintained firing arise within “complex spikes.” Both ON and OFF visual stimuli elicit only inhibitory synaptic input, the immediate effect of which is to suppress the maintained firing. However, this inhibition also alters the properties of the “renascent” spiking by increasing the amplitude of the spikes within each burst, suggesting that the effect may increase the efficacy of spike propagation and transmission. PMID:20212117

  6. Delayed rectifier K channels contribute to contrast adaptation in mammalian retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Weick, Michael; Demb, Jonathan B.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Retinal ganglion cells adapt by reducing their sensitivity during periods of high contrast. Contrast adaptation in the firing response depends on both presynaptic and intrinsic mechanisms. Here, we investigated intrinsic mechanisms for contrast adaptation in OFF Alpha ganglion cells in the in vitro guinea pig retina. Using either visual stimulation or current injection, we show that brief depolarization evoked spiking and suppressed firing during subsequent depolarization. The suppression could be explained by Na channel inactivation, as shown in salamander cells. However, brief hyperpolarization in the physiological range (5–10 mV) also suppressed firing during subsequent depolarization. This suppression was sensitive selectively to blockers of delayed-rectifier K channels (KDR). Somatic membrane patches showed TEA-sensitive KDR currents with activation near −25 mV and removal of inactivation at voltages negative to Vrest. Brief periods of hyperpolarization apparently remove KDR inactivation and thereby increase the channel pool available to suppress excitability during subsequent depolarization. PMID:21745646

  7. Contribution of the GABAergic pathway(s) to the correlated activities of chicken retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xue; Zhou, Yi; Gong, Hai-Qing; Liang, Pei-Ji

    2007-10-26

    In the present study, the spatiotemporal pattern of chicken retinal ganglion cells' firing activity in response to full-field white light stimulation was investigated. Cross-correlation analysis showed that ganglion cells of sustained subtype fired in precise synchrony with their adjacent neurons of the same subtype (delay lag within 2 ms, narrow correlation). On the other hand, the activities of neighboring ganglion cells of transient subtype were correlated with distributed time lags (10-30 ms, medium correlation). Pharmacological studies demonstrated that the intensity of the medium correlations could be strengthened when exogenous GABA was applied and attenuated when GABA receptors were blocked by picrotoxin. Meanwhile, the GABAergic modulation on the narrow correlations was not consistent. These results suggest that, in the chicken retina, GABAergic pathway(s) are likely involved in the formation of medium correlations between ganglion cells. Neurons might fire at a lower rate but with higher level of synchronization to improve the efficiency of information transmission, with the mechanism involving the GABAergic inhibitory input. PMID:17919471

  8. Activity of retinal ganglion cells following intense, nanosecond laser flashes. Final report, 1983-1986

    SciTech Connect

    Glickman, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of intense, but nonlesion-producing, laser exposures of 20-ns duration were determined on the light responses and spontaneous activity of retinal ganglion cells recorded in situ from the rhesus monkey. (Following a single, 20-ns exposure centered on its receptive field, a ganglion cell produced an 'afterdischarge' of maintained action potentials). The duration of the afterdischarge depended on the diameter of the laser beam on the retina and on the beam's intensity. Laser exposures subtending 0.5 to 2.0 deg, and delivering 45 to 60% of the maximum permissible exposure, elicited afterdischarges that lasted up to 80 s. When the beam diameter was decreased to 0.25 deg, the afterdischarge was reduced to 30 s, and to less than 5 s with the 0.12-deg beam. Light sensitivity after the laser exposure recovered rapidly during the first 10 s and then more slowly, but exponentially, until it reached the preflash level. Color-opponent ganglion cells exhibited a phenomenon called 'response-reversal' after the laser exposure, presumably due to selective adaptation of a mid-wavelength cone-input. Because a 20-ns exposure, regardless of intensity, is likely to photoregenerate more than half of the available visual pigment, the effects of ganglion cell response described here are not likely to be due solely to pigment bleaching.

  9. Neuropsin (OPN5)-mediated photoentrainment of local circadian oscillators in mammalian retina and cornea

    PubMed Central

    Buhr, Ethan D.; Yue, Wendy W. S.; Ren, Xiaozhi; Jiang, Zheng; Liao, Hsi-Wen Rock; Mei, Xue; Vemaraju, Shruti; Nguyen, Minh-Thanh; Reed, Randall R.; Lang, Richard A.; Yau, King-Wai; Van Gelder, Russell N.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular circadian clocks in the mammalian retina are locally synchronized by environmental light cycles independent of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) in the brain. Unexpectedly, this entrainment does not require rods, cones, or melanopsin (OPN4), possibly suggesting the involvement of another retinal photopigment. Here, we show that the ex vivo mouse retinal rhythm is most sensitive to short-wavelength light but that this photoentrainment requires neither the short-wavelength–sensitive cone pigment [S-pigment or cone opsin (OPN1SW)] nor encephalopsin (OPN3). However, retinas lacking neuropsin (OPN5) fail to photoentrain, even though other visual functions appear largely normal. Initial evidence suggests that OPN5 is expressed in select retinal ganglion cells. Remarkably, the mouse corneal circadian rhythm is also photoentrainable ex vivo, and this photoentrainment likewise requires OPN5. Our findings reveal a light-sensing function for mammalian OPN5, until now an orphan opsin. PMID:26392540

  10. Comparative study of photoreceptor and retinal ganglion cell topography and spatial resolving power in Dipsadidae snakes.

    PubMed

    Hauzman, Einat; Bonci, Daniela M O; Grotzner, Sonia R; Mela, Maritana; Liber, André M P; Martins, Sonia L; Ventura, Dora F

    2014-01-01

    The diurnal Dipsadidae snakes Philodryas olfersii and P. patagoniensis are closely related in their phylogeny but inhabit different ecological niches. P. olfersii is arboreal, whereas P. patagoniensis is preferentially terrestrial. The goal of the present study was to compare the density and topography of neurons, photoreceptors, and cells in the ganglion cell layer in the retinas of these two species using immunohistochemistry and Nissl staining procedures and estimate the spatial resolving power of their eyes based on the ganglion cell peak density. Four morphologically distinct types of cones were observed by scanning electron microscopy, 3 of which were labeled with anti-opsin antibodies: large single cones and double cones labeled by the antibody JH492 and small single cones labeled by the antibody JH455. The average densities of photoreceptors and neurons in the ganglion cell layer were similar in both species (∼10,000 and 7,000 cells·mm(-2), respectively). The estimated spatial resolving power was also similar, ranging from 2.4 to 2.7 cycles·degree(-1). However, the distribution of neurons had different specializations. In the arboreal P. olfersii, the isodensity maps had a horizontal visual streak, with a peak density in the central region and a lower density in the dorsal retina. This organization might be relevant for locomotion and hunting behavior in the arboreal layer. In the terrestrial P. patagoniensis, a concentric pattern of decreasing cell density emanated from an area centralis located in the naso-ventral retina. Lower densities were observed in the dorsal region. The ventrally high density improves the resolution in the superior visual field and may be an important adaptation for terrestrial snakes to perceive the approach of predators from above. PMID:25342570

  11. Modeling laser damage to the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Clifton D.

    significantly for wavelengths in the near infrared due to an increase in the absorption coefficient for these long wavelengths. This means that less energy actually reaches the retina, but it also means that more energy is absorbed by the vitreous which can lead to significant temperature rises. The refractive index of water is known to depend on temperature, and the vitreous has very similar optical properties to water, so temperature gradients in the vitreous lead to refractive index gradients that act as a lens. Since the refractive index of water decreases with an increase in temperature, the overall effect is to establish a negative lens that defocuses a beam inside the eye during a laser exposure. This effect is a potential protection mechanism for the retina, as it would limit the time for which a laser can be sharply focused on the retina. Our model agrees well with thermal lensing measurements that have been conducted in water and we have used it to predict the retinal damage threshold as a function of exposure duration for 1318 nm exposures at various beam diameters. The model predicts that the damage threshold remains constant after some exposure time, which depends on the beam diameter. This is due mainly to the fact the retinal temperature rise is limited by the thermal lens and reaches a peak value in a relatively short time (on the order of 10 ms), which limits the amount of time that a laser exposure can cause damage. Finally, in Chapter 6 we describe the first steps we have taken in building a comprehensive short pulse retina damage model. Currently, no model capable of predicting retinal damage outcome based on the exposure parameters at the cornea exists. Models of possible damage mechanisms do exist (the damage mechanism for pulses less than about 1 mus are non-thermal), but these models assume that the exposure parameters are known at the absorption site (the retina). We have constructed a configurable, linear short pulse propagation model, that is capable

  12. Hazardous effects of fried potato chips on the development of retina in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayyad, Hassan I; Sakr, Saber A; Badawy, Gamal M; Afify, Hanaa S

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the hazardous effects of fried potato chips upon the retina of two developmental stages of the albino rats aged 7 and 14 days from parturition. Methods Pregnant rats were arranged into two groups: control pregnant rats and consequently their delivered newborns until reaching 7 and 14 days old from parturition and fried potato chips group in which pregnant rats at the 6th day of gestation maintained on diet formed of fried potato chips supplied from the market mixed with standard diet at a concentration of 50% per each till 7 and 14 post-partum. Three fold integrated approaches were adopted, namely, histological, ultrastructural and proteomic analysis. Results Histological examination of the retina of the experimental offsprings revealed many histopathological changes, including massive degeneration, vacuolization and cell loss in the ganglion cell layer, as well as general reduction in retinal size. At the ultrastructural level, the retina of experimental offsprings exhibited number of deformities, including ill differentiated and degenerated nuclear layer, malformed and vacuolated pigment epithelium with vesiculated and fragmented rough endoplasmic reticulum, degenerated outer segment of photoreceptors, as well as swollen choriocapillaris and loss of neuronal cells. Proteomic analysis of retina of the two experimental developmental stages showed variations in the expressed proteins as a result of intoxication which illustrated the adverse toxic effects of fried potato chips upon the retina. Conclusions It can be concluded that the effect of fried potato chips on the development of retina in rats may be due to the presence of acrylamide or its metabolite. PMID:23569770

  13. Rod Photoreceptors Express GPR55 in the Adult Vervet Monkey Retina

    PubMed Central

    Bouskila, Joseph; Javadi, Pasha; Casanova, Christian; Ptito, Maurice; Bouchard, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoids exert their actions mainly through two receptors, the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) and cannabinoid CB2 receptor (CB2R). In recent years, the G-protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) was suggested as a cannabinoid receptor based on its activation by anandamide and tetrahydrocannabinol. Yet, its formal classification is still a matter of debate. CB1R and CB2R expression patterns are well described for rodent and monkey retinas. In the monkey retina, CB1R has been localized in its neural (cone photoreceptor, horizontal, bipolar, amacrine and ganglion cells) and CB2R in glial components (Müller cells). The aim of this study was to determine the expression pattern of GPR55 in the monkey retina by using confocal microscopy. Our results show that GPR55 is strictly localized in the photoreceptor layer of the extrafoveal portion of the retina. Co-immunolabeling of GPR55 with rhodopsin, the photosensitive pigment in rods, revealed a clear overlap of expression throughout the rod structure with most prominent staining in the inner segments. Additionally, double-label of GPR55 with calbindin, a specific marker for cone photoreceptors in the primate retina, allowed us to exclude expression of GPR55 in cones. The labeling of GPR55 in rods was further assessed with a 3D visualization in the XZ and YZ planes thus confirming its exclusive expression in rods. These results provide data on the distribution of GPR55 in the monkey retina, different than CB1R and CB2R. The presence of GPR55 in rods suggests a function of this receptor in scotopic vision that needs to be demonstrated. PMID:24244730

  14. Expression and Distribution Pattern of Aquaporin 4, 5 and 11 in Retinas of 15 Different Species.

    PubMed

    Amann, Barbara; Kleinwort, Kristina J H; Hirmer, Sieglinde; Sekundo, Walter; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Hauck, Stefanie M; Deeg, Cornelia A

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are small integral membrane proteins with 13 members in mammals and are essential for water transport across membranes. They are found in many different tissues and cells. Currently, there are conflicting results regarding retinal aquaporin expression and subcellular localization between genome and protein analyses and among various species. AQP4, 7, 9 and 11 were described in the retina of men; whereas AQP6, 8 and 10 were earlier identified in rat retinas and AQP4, 5 and 11 in horses. Since there is a lack of knowledge regarding AQP expression on protein level in retinas of different animal models, we decided to analyze retinal cellular expression of AQP4, 5 and 11 in situ with immunohistochemistry. AQP4 was detected in all 15 explored species, AQP5 and AQP11 in 14 out of 15. Interestingly, AQP4 was unambiguously expressed in Muller glial cells, whereas AQP5 was differentially allocated among the species analyzed. AQP11 expression was Muller glial cell-specific in 50% of the animals, whereas in the others, AQP11 was detected in ganglion cell layer and at photoreceptor outer segments. Our data indicate a disparity in aquaporin distribution in retinas of various animals, especially for AQP5 and 11. PMID:27438827

  15. Glutamatergic Monopolar Interneurons Provide a Novel Pathway of Excitation in the Mouse Retina.

    PubMed

    Della Santina, Luca; Kuo, Sidney P; Yoshimatsu, Takeshi; Okawa, Haruhisa; Suzuki, Sachihiro C; Hoon, Mrinalini; Tsuboyama, Kotaro; Rieke, Fred; Wong, Rachel O L

    2016-08-01

    Excitatory and inhibitory neurons in the CNS are distinguished by several features, including morphology, transmitter content, and synapse architecture [1]. Such distinctions are exemplified in the vertebrate retina. Retinal bipolar cells are polarized glutamatergic neurons receiving direct photoreceptor input, whereas amacrine cells are usually monopolar inhibitory interneurons with synapses almost exclusively in the inner retina [2]. Bipolar but not amacrine cell synapses have presynaptic ribbon-like structures at their transmitter release sites. We identified a monopolar interneuron in the mouse retina that resembles amacrine cells morphologically but is glutamatergic and, unexpectedly, makes ribbon synapses. These glutamatergic monopolar interneurons (GluMIs) do not receive direct photoreceptor input, and their light responses are strongly shaped by both ON and OFF pathway-derived inhibitory input. GluMIs contact and make almost as many synapses as type 2 OFF bipolar cells onto OFF-sustained A-type (AOFF-S) retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). However, GluMIs and type 2 OFF bipolar cells possess functionally distinct light-driven responses and may therefore mediate separate components of the excitatory synaptic input to AOFF-S RGCs. The identification of GluMIs thus unveils a novel cellular component of excitatory circuits in the vertebrate retina, underscoring the complexity in defining cell types even in this well-characterized region of the CNS. PMID:27426514

  16. Mapping the Time Line of Development in Each Layer of Human Foetal Retina

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Kanchan; Sahni, Daisy; Singh, Balbir

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is need to elucidate the histological developmental stages of various layers of retina, to understand the process better and provide clinically significant insights. Aim To study the details and chronology of in utero development of different layers of retina. Materials and Methods To study time of appearance, differentiation and organization of all layers of central retina in different gestational age groups. Retina was studied histologically in 27 foetuses from18th to 34th weeks of gestation. Results We found the period of mid gestation (19th -21st week of gestation) to be the defining time for retinal layers: The bruch’s membrane was fully formed at 20th week of gestation; the photoreceptor layer became well defined at 21st week of gestation; both the nuclear layers and both the plexiform layers and the ganglion cell layer became distinct at 19th week of gestation. Before the 19th week, outer and inner neuroblastic zones separated by the neuropil were seen. Well defined nerve fibre layer and inner limiting membrane was present at 18th week. The outer limiting membrane was first appreciated at 32nd week of gestation. Foetal retinal pigment epithelium was cuboidal and filled with melanin granules while no trace of lipofuscin pigment was found under fluorescent microscope. Conclusion Detailed data on retinal histogenesis and its timeline might aid in directed differentiation of retinal cell types from stem cells for therapeutic purposes. PMID:27134848

  17. A preparation for studying electrical stimulation of the retina in vivo in rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baig-Silva, M. S.; Hathcock, C. D.; Hetling, J. R.

    2005-03-01

    A remaining challenge to the development of electronic prostheses for vision is improving the effectiveness of retinal stimulation. Electrode design and stimulus parameters need to be optimized such that the neural output from the retina conveys information to the mind's eye that aids the patient in interpreting his or her environment. This optimization will require a detailed understanding of the response of the retina to electrical stimulation. The identity and response characteristics of the cellular targets of stimulation need to be defined and evaluated. Described here is an in vivo preparation for studying electrical stimulation of the retina in rat at the cellular level. The use of rat makes available a number of well-described models of retinal disease that motivate prosthesis development. Artificial stimulation can be investigated by adapting techniques traditionally employed to study the response of the retina to photic stimuli, such as recording at the cornea, single-cell recording, and pharmacological dissection of the response. Pilot studies include amplitude-intensity response data for subretinal and transretinal stimulation paradigms recorded in wild-type rats and a transgenic rat model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. The ability to record single-unit ganglion cell activity in vivo is also demonstrated.

  18. Expression and Distribution Pattern of Aquaporin 4, 5 and 11 in Retinas of 15 Different Species

    PubMed Central

    Amann, Barbara; Kleinwort, Kristina J. H.; Hirmer, Sieglinde; Sekundo, Walter; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Hauck, Stefanie M.; Deeg, Cornelia A.

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are small integral membrane proteins with 13 members in mammals and are essential for water transport across membranes. They are found in many different tissues and cells. Currently, there are conflicting results regarding retinal aquaporin expression and subcellular localization between genome and protein analyses and among various species. AQP4, 7, 9 and 11 were described in the retina of men; whereas AQP6, 8 and 10 were earlier identified in rat retinas and AQP4, 5 and 11 in horses. Since there is a lack of knowledge regarding AQP expression on protein level in retinas of different animal models, we decided to analyze retinal cellular expression of AQP4, 5 and 11 in situ with immunohistochemistry. AQP4 was detected in all 15 explored species, AQP5 and AQP11 in 14 out of 15. Interestingly, AQP4 was unambiguously expressed in Muller glial cells, whereas AQP5 was differentially allocated among the species analyzed. AQP11 expression was Muller glial cell-specific in 50% of the animals, whereas in the others, AQP11 was detected in ganglion cell layer and at photoreceptor outer segments. Our data indicate a disparity in aquaporin distribution in retinas of various animals, especially for AQP5 and 11. PMID:27438827

  19. Celsr3 is required for normal development of GABA circuits in the inner retina.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Alaron; Wilson, Neil; Stearns, George; Johnson, Nicolas; Nelson, Ralph; Brockerhoff, Susan E

    2011-08-01

    The identity of the specific molecules required for the process of retinal circuitry formation is largely unknown. Here we report a newly identified zebrafish mutant in which the absence of the atypical cadherin, Celsr3, leads to a specific defect in the development of GABAergic signaling in the inner retina. This mutant lacks an optokinetic response (OKR), the ability to visually track rotating illuminated stripes, and develops a super-normal b-wave in the electroretinogram (ERG). We find that celsr3 mRNA is abundant in the amacrine and ganglion cells of the retina, however its loss does not affect synaptic lamination within the inner plexiform layer (IPL) or amacrine cell number. We localize the ERG defect pharmacologically to a late-stage disruption in GABAergic modulation of ON-bipolar cell pathway and find that the DNQX-sensitive fast b1 component of the ERG is specifically affected in this mutant. Consistently, we find an increase in GABA receptors on mutant ON-bipolar terminals, providing a direct link between the observed physiological changes and alterations in GABA signaling components. Finally, using blastula transplantation, we show that the lack of an OKR is due, at least partially, to Celsr3-mediated defects within the brain. These findings support the previously postulated inner retina origin for the b1 component and reveal a new role for Celsr3 in the normal development of ON visual pathway circuitry in the inner retina. PMID:21852962

  20. Experimental and theoretical investigations concerning a frequency filter behavior of the human retina regarding electric pulse currents. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier-Koll, A.

    1979-01-01

    Investigation involving patients with injuries in the visual nervous system are discussed. This led to the identification of the epithelial ganglion of the retina as a frequency filter. Threshold curves of the injured visual organs were compared with threshold curves obtained with a control group as a basis for identification. A model which considers the epithelial ganglion as a homogeneous cell layer in which adjacent neurons interact is discussed. It is shown the behavior of the cells against alternating exciting currents can be explained.

  1. Cobalamin C Deficiency Shows a Rapidly Progressing Maculopathy With Severe Photoreceptor and Ganglion Cell Loss

    PubMed Central

    Bonafede, Lucas; Ficicioglu, Can H.; Serrano, Leona; Han, Grace; Morgan, Jessica I. W.; Mills, Monte D.; Forbes, Brian J.; Davidson, Stefanie L.; Binenbaum, Gil; Kaplan, Paige B.; Nichols, Charles W.; Verloo, Patrick; Leroy, Bart P.; Maguire, Albert M.; Aleman, Tomas S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe in detail the retinal structure and function of a group of patients with cobalamin C (cblC) disease. Methods Patients (n = 11, age 4 months to 15 years) with cblC disease (9/11, early onset) diagnosed by newborn screening underwent complete ophthalmic examinations, fundus photography, near-infrared reflectance imaging, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Electroretinograms (ERGs) were performed in a subset of patients. Results Patients carried homozygous or compound heterozygote mutations in the methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type C (MMACHC) gene. Late-onset patients had a normal exam. All early-onset patients showed a maculopathy; older subjects had a retina-wide degeneration (n = 4; >7 years of age). In general, retinal changes were first observed before 1 year of age and progressed within months to a well-established maculopathy. Pseudocolobomas were documented in three patients. Measurable visual acuities ranged from 20/200 to 20/540. Nystagmus was present in 8/11 patients; 5/6 patients had normal ERGs; 1/6 had reduced rod-mediated responses. Spectral-domain OCT showed macular thinning, with severe ganglion cell layer (GCL) and outer nuclear layer (ONL) loss. Inner retinal thickening was observed in areas of total GCL/ONL loss. A normal lamination pattern in the peripapillary nasal retina was often seen despite severe central and/or retina-wide disease. Conclusions Patients with early-onset cblC and MMACHC mutations showed an early-onset, unusually fast-progressing maculopathy with severe central ONL and GCL loss. An abnormally thickened inner retina supports a remodeling response to both photoreceptor and ganglion cell degeneration and/or an interference with normal development in early-onset cblC. PMID:26658511

  2. Tissue-specific neuro-glia interactions determine neurite differentiation in ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, K; Bauch, H; Stier, H; Schlosshauer, B

    2001-03-01

    Guided formation and extension of axons versus dendrites is considered crucial for structuring the nervous system. In the chick visual system, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) extend their axons into the tectum opticum, but not into glial somata containing retina layers. We addressed the question whether the different glia of retina and tectum opticum differentially affect axon growth. Glial cells were purified from retina and tectum opticum by complement-mediated cytolysis of non-glial cells. RGCs were purified by enzymatic delayering from flat mounted retina. RGCs were seeded onto retinal versus tectal glia monolayers. Subsequent neuritic differentiation was analysed by immunofluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation revealed that retinal glia somata inhibited axons. Time-lapse video recording indicated that axonal inhibition was based on the collapse of lamellipodia- and filopodia-rich growth cones of axons. In contrast to retinal glia, tectal glia supported axonal extension. Notably, retinal glia were not inhibitory for neurons in general, because in control experiments axon extension of dorsal root ganglia was not hampered. Therefore, the axon inhibition by retinal glia was neuron type-specific. In summary, the data demonstrate that homotopic (retinal) glia somata inhibit axonal outgrowth of RGCs, whereas heterotopic (tectal) glia of the synaptic target area support RGC axon extension. The data underscore the pivotal role of glia in structuring the developing nervous system. PMID:11322389

  3. Sectorial loss of retinal ganglion cells in inherited photoreceptor degeneration is due to RGC death

    PubMed Central

    García-Ayuso, Diego; Salinas-Navarro, Manuel; Nadal-Nicolás, Francisco Manuel; Ortín-Martínez, Arturo; Agudo-Barriuso, Marta; Vidal-Sanz, Manuel; Villegas-Pérez, María P

    2014-01-01

    Aims To investigate the cause of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss in dystrophic aged Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats. Methods RCS-p+ (dystrophic) female rats of postnatal times (P365, P450 and P540) and age-matched RCS-p1 rdy+ (non-dystrophic) rats were used. In whole-mounted retinas, RGCs were doubly labelled with Fluorogold (FG) retrogradely transported from the superior colliculi and Brn3a immunohistochemistry. RGC axons were labelled with anti-neurofilament antibodies. Automatic image analysis techniques allowed quantification of the total population of RGCs per retina and construction of isodensity maps to investigate RGC topology. Results Dystrophic retinas showed at all times studied wedge-shaped sectors devoid of FG+ and Brn3a+ RGCs. These sectors were also devoid of neurofilament-labelled axons. The total number of FG+RGC and Brn3a+RGC per retina was significantly smaller in dystrophic rats at P540, revealing RGC death at this age. The total number of FG+RGCs was smaller than those of Brn3a+RGCs at P540, indicating a disturbance of the retrograde axonal transport at this age. Conclusions RGC double labelling documents that sectorial RGC loss in aged dystrophic RCS rats is mainly due to RGC death, although a deficit of the retrograde axonal transport exists also at the more advanced ages. PMID:24326325

  4. Müller glia cell reprogramming and retina regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Müller glia are the major glial component of the retina. They are one of the last retinal cell types to be born during development and they function to maintain retinal homeostasis and integrity. In mammals, Müller glia respond to retinal injury in a variety of ways that can be either protective or detrimental to retinal function. Although under special circumstances these cells can be coaxed to proliferate and generate neurons, these responses are meager and insufficient for repairing a damaged retina. By contrast, in teleost fish (such as zebrafish) the response of Müller glia to retinal injury involves a reprogramming event that imparts retinal stem cell characteristics and allows them to produce a proliferating population of progenitors that can regenerate all major retinal cell types and restore vision. Recent studies have revealed a number of important mechanisms underlying Müller glia reprogramming and retina regeneration in fish that may lead to new strategies for stimulating retina regeneration in mammals. PMID:24894585

  5. Proximal Sciatic Nerve Intraneural Ganglion Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Karin R.; Wilson, Dianne; Boland, Michael; Fee, Dominic B.

    2009-01-01

    Intraneural ganglion cysts are nonneoplastic, mucinous cysts within the epineurium of peripheral nerves which usually involve the peroneal nerve at the knee. A 37-year-old female presented with progressive left buttock and posterior thigh pain. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a sciatic nerve mass at the sacral notch which was subsequently revealed to be an intraneural ganglion cyst. An intraneural ganglion cyst confined to the proximal sciatic nerve has only been reported once prior to 2009. PMID:20069041

  6. Ligamentous Hyperlaxity and Dorsal Wrist Ganglions

    PubMed Central

    McKeon, Kathleen E.; London, Daniel A.; Osei, Daniel A.; Gelberman, Richard H.; Goldfarb, Charles A.; Boyer, Martin I.; Calfee, Ryan P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine if symptomatic dorsal wrist ganglions are associated with generalized ligamentous hyperlaxity. Methods Ninety-six patients (61 females) presenting to hand surgeons for a symptomatic dorsal wrist ganglions were prospectively enrolled in this case-control investigation. Beighton scores were calculated to quantify generalized ligamentous laxity in each patient, and a scaphoid shift test (scapholunate capsuloligamentous laxity evaluation) was performed. A positive scaphoid shift test was defined by both pain and a palpable clunk. Ninety-six individuals without ganglions were then enrolled to form an age and sex frequency-matched control cohort. The control group was similarly assessed for Beighton score and scaphoid shift test. Binary logistic regression was performed to assess the association of ganglions with generalized ligamentous hyperlaxity (Beighton score ≥4) while accounting for effects of age and sex. Results Patients with symptomatic dorsal wrist ganglions demonstrated significantly increased rates of generalized ligamentous hyperlaxity. Among those with ganglions, 27 of 96 (28%) patients exhibited generalized ligamentous hyperlaxity, compared to 12 of the 96 (13%) age and sex-matched individuals in the control group. Patients with symptomatic dorsal wrist ganglions were also significantly more likely to demonstrate localized scapholunate hyperlaxity with a positive scaphoid shift test (25% positive scaphoid shift test with ganglions vs 1% in controls). In logistic modeling, patients with dorsal wrist ganglions had 2.9 (95% CI 1.3-6.2) times greater odds of generalized ligamentous hyperlaxity compared to patients without a dorsal wrist ganglion after accounting for patient age and sex. Discussion Symptomatic dorsal wrist ganglions were associated with both generalized ligamentous hyperlaxity and a positive scaphoid shift test. Although an association between wrist ganglions and ligamentous hyperlaxity does not prove causation, the

  7. Ganglions of the proximal interphalangeal joint.

    PubMed

    Cheng, C A; Rockwell, W B

    1999-08-01

    Ganglion cysts-the most common hand tumors-usually affect women in their twenties and thirties. The cause of these cysts is unknown, although trauma has been postulated as an inciting factor. Ganglions occur most commonly at the dorsal and palmar wrist. However, ganglions of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint are rare. Four patients with PIP joint ganglions were recently treated at our institution. Three received aspiration and one received operative therapy, all with good results. All four patients were older than 65 years. PMID:10470671

  8. Differential Calcium Signaling Mediated by Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells and Their Unmyelinated Axons

    PubMed Central

    Sargoy, Allison; Sun, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant calcium regulation has been implicated as a causative factor in the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in numerous injury models of optic neuropathy. Since calcium has dual roles in maintaining homeostasis and triggering apoptotic pathways in healthy and injured cells, respectively, investigation of voltage-gated Ca channel (VGCC) regulation as a potential strategy to reduce the loss of RGCs is warranted. The accessibility and structure of the retina provide advantages for the investigation of the mechanisms of calcium signalling in both the somata of ganglion cells as well as their unmyelinated axons. The goal of the present study was to determine the distribution of VGCC subtypes in the cell bodies and axons of ganglion cells in the normal retina and to define their contribution to calcium signals in these cellular compartments. We report L-type Ca channel α1C and α1D subunit immunoreactivity in rat RGC somata and axons. The N-type Ca channel α1B subunit was in RGC somata and axons, while the P/Q-type Ca channel α1A subunit was only in the RGC somata. We patch clamped isolated ganglion cells and biophysically identified T-type Ca channels. Calcium imaging studies of RGCs in wholemounted retinas showed that selective Ca channel antagonists reduced depolarization-evoked calcium signals mediated by L-, N-, P/Q- and T-type Ca channels in the cell bodies but only by L-type Ca channels in the axons. This differential contribution of VGCC subtypes to calcium signals in RGC somata and their axons may provide insight into the development of target-specific strategies to spare the loss of RGCs and their axons following injury. PMID:24416240

  9. Glaucoma-inducing Procedure in an In Vivo Rat Model and Whole-mount Retina Preparation.

    PubMed

    Gossman, Cynthia A; Linn, David M; Linn, Cindy

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is a disease of the central nervous system affecting retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). RGC axons making up the optic nerve carry visual input to the brain for visual perception. Damage to RGCs and their axons leads to vision loss and/or blindness. Although the specific cause of glaucoma is unknown, the primary risk factor for the disease is an elevated intraocular pressure. Glaucoma-inducing procedures in animal models are a valuable tool to researchers studying the mechanism of RGC death. Such information can lead to the development of effective neuroprotective treatments that could aid in the prevention of vision loss. The protocol in this paper describes a method of inducing glaucoma - like conditions in an in vivo rat model where 50 µl of 2 M hypertonic saline is injected into the episcleral venous plexus. Blanching of the vessels indicates successful injection. This procedure causes loss of RGCs to simulate glaucoma. One month following injection, animals are sacrificed and eyes are removed. Next, the cornea, lens, and vitreous are removed to make an eyecup. The retina is then peeled from the back of the eye and pinned onto sylgard dishes using cactus needles. At this point, neurons in the retina can be stained for analysis. Results from this lab show that approximately 25% of RGCs are lost within one month of the procedure when compared to internal controls. This procedure allows for quantitative analysis of retinal ganglion cell death in an in vivo rat glaucoma model. PMID:27023167

  10. Three Distinct Blue-Green Color Pathways in a Mammalian Retina

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lian-Ming; Hoshi, Hideo; Whitaker, Christopher M.; Massey, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    In mammalian retinae, the first steps in the process of discrimination of color are mediated by color-opponent neurons that respond with opposite polarity to signals from short (S, blue) and longer wavelength (M, green or L, red) cones. Primates also contain a second system that is different from M and L cones. Although pathways responding to the onset of S-cone stimulation (S-ON) are well known, the existence of bipolar cells and retinal ganglion cells that respond to the offset of S-cone stimulation (S-OFF) has been controversial. We have recorded from and stained three different types of S/M color-opponent ganglion cells in the rabbit retina that are distinguished by the polarity of their responses to S-cone stimulation, the stratification pattern of their dendrites, and the distinct mechanisms underlying their color-opponent responses. We describe an S-ON and an S-OFF pathway formed by amacrine cells inverting the S-ON signal. Most importantly, we also provide both anatomical and physiological evidence for a direct S-OFF pathway dependent on an S-OFF cone bipolar cell. The results indicate a greater diversity of pathways for processing of signals from S-cones than previously suspected. PMID:24478358

  11. Localisation of the Putative Magnetoreceptive Protein Cryptochrome 1b in the Retinae of Migratory Birds and Homing Pigeons

    PubMed Central

    Bolte, Petra; Bleibaum, Florian; Einwich, Angelika; Günther, Anja; Liedvogel, Miriam; Heyers, Dominik; Depping, Anne; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Rabus, Ralf; Janssen‐Bienhold, Ulrike; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochromes are ubiquitously expressed in various animal tissues including the retina. Some cryptochromes are involved in regulating circadian activity. Cryptochrome proteins have also been suggested to mediate the primary mechanism in light-dependent magnetic compass orientation in birds. Cryptochrome 1b (Cry1b) exhibits a unique carboxy terminus exclusively found in birds so far, which might be indicative for a specialised function. Cryptochrome 1a (Cry1a) is so far the only cryptochrome protein that has been localised to specific cell types within the retina of migratory birds. Here we show that Cry1b, an alternative splice variant of Cry1a, is also expressed in the retina of migratory birds, but it is primarily located in other cell types than Cry1a. This could suggest different functions for the two splice products. Using diagnostic bird-specific antibodies (that allow for a precise discrimination between both proteins), we show that Cry1b protein is found in the retinae of migratory European robins (Erithacus rubecula), migratory Northern Wheatears (Oenanthe oenanthe) and pigeons (Columba livia). In all three species, retinal Cry1b is localised in cell types which have been discussed as potentially well suited locations for magnetoreception: Cry1b is observed in the cytosol of ganglion cells, displaced ganglion cells, and in photoreceptor inner segments. The cytosolic rather than nucleic location of Cry1b in the retina reported here speaks against a circadian clock regulatory function of Cry1b and it allows for the possible involvement of Cry1b in a radical-pair-based magnetoreception mechanism. PMID:26953791

  12. Localisation of the Putative Magnetoreceptive Protein Cryptochrome 1b in the Retinae of Migratory Birds and Homing Pigeons.

    PubMed

    Bolte, Petra; Bleibaum, Florian; Einwich, Angelika; Günther, Anja; Liedvogel, Miriam; Heyers, Dominik; Depping, Anne; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Rabus, Ralf; Janssen-Bienhold, Ulrike; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochromes are ubiquitously expressed in various animal tissues including the retina. Some cryptochromes are involved in regulating circadian activity. Cryptochrome proteins have also been suggested to mediate the primary mechanism in light-dependent magnetic compass orientation in birds. Cryptochrome 1b (Cry1b) exhibits a unique carboxy terminus exclusively found in birds so far, which might be indicative for a specialised function. Cryptochrome 1a (Cry1a) is so far the only cryptochrome protein that has been localised to specific cell types within the retina of migratory birds. Here we show that Cry1b, an alternative splice variant of Cry1a, is also expressed in the retina of migratory birds, but it is primarily located in other cell types than Cry1a. This could suggest different functions for the two splice products. Using diagnostic bird-specific antibodies (that allow for a precise discrimination between both proteins), we show that Cry1b protein is found in the retinae of migratory European robins (Erithacus rubecula), migratory Northern Wheatears (Oenanthe oenanthe) and pigeons (Columba livia). In all three species, retinal Cry1b is localised in cell types which have been discussed as potentially well suited locations for magnetoreception: Cry1b is observed in the cytosol of ganglion cells, displaced ganglion cells, and in photoreceptor inner segments. The cytosolic rather than nucleic location of Cry1b in the retina reported here speaks against a circadian clock regulatory function of Cry1b and it allows for the possible involvement of Cry1b in a radical-pair-based magnetoreception mechanism. PMID:26953791

  13. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha mediates activation of NF-κB and JNK signaling cascades in retinal ganglion cells and astrocytes in opposite ways

    PubMed Central

    Dvoriantchikova, Galina; Ivanov, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) is an important mediator of the innate immune response in the retina. TNF can activate various signaling cascades, including NF-κB, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathways. The harmful role of these pathways, as well as of TNF, has previously been shown in several retinal neurodegenerative conditions including glaucoma and retinal ischemia. However, TNF and TNF-regulated signaling cascades are capable not only of mediating neurotoxicity, but of being protective. We performed this study to delineate the beneficial and detrimental effects of TNF signaling in the retina. To this end, we used TNF-treated primary retinal ganglion cell (RGC) and astrocyte cultures. Levels of expression of NF-κB subunits in RGCs and astrocytes were evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blot (WB) analysis. NF-κB and JNK activity in TNF-treated cells was determined in a time-dependent manner using ELISA and WB. Gene expression in TNF-treated astrocytes was measured by qRT-PCR. We found that NF-κB family members were present in RGCs and astrocytes at the mRNA and protein levels. RGCs failed to activate NF-κB in the presence of TNF, a phenomenon that was associated with sustained JNK activation and RGC death. However, TNF initiated the activation of NF-κB and mediated transient JNK activation in astrocytes. These events were associated with glial survival and increased expression of neurotoxic pro-inflammatory factors. Our findings suggest that, in the presence of TNF, NF-κB and JNK signaling cascades are activated in opposite ways in RGCs and astrocytes. These events can directly and indirectly facilitate RGC death. PMID:25160799

  14. Visual responses of ganglion cells of a New-World primate, the capuchin monkey, Cebus apella

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Barry B; Silveira, Luiz Carlos L; Yamada, Elizabeth S; Hunt, David M; Kremers, Jan; Martin, Paul R; Troy, John B; da Silva-Filho, Manoel

    2000-01-01

    The genetic basis of colour vision in New-World primates differs from that in humans and other Old-World primates. Most New-World primate species show a polymorphism; all males are dichromats and most females trichromats. In the retina of Old-World primates such as the macaque, the physiological correlates of trichromacy are well established. Comparison of the retinae in New- and Old-World species may help constrain hypotheses as to the evolution of colour vision and the pathways associated with it. Ganglion cell behaviour was recorded from trichromatic and dichromatic members of a New-World species (the capuchin monkey, Cebus apella) and compared with macaque data. Despite some differences in quantitative detail (such as a temporal response extended to higher frequencies), results from trichromatic animals strongly resembled those from the macaque. In particular, cells of the parvocellular (PC) pathway showed characteristic frequency-dependent changes in responsivity to luminance and chromatic modulation, cells of the magnocellular (MC) pathway showed frequency-doubled responses to chromatic modulation, and the surround of MC cells received a chromatic input revealed on changing the phase of heterochromatically modulated lights. Ganglion cells of dichromats were colour-blind versions of those of trichromats. This strong physiological homology is consistent with a common origin of trichromacy in New- and Old-World monkeys; in the New-World primate the presence of two pigments in the middle-to-long wavelength range permits full expression of the retinal mechanisms of trichromatic vision. PMID:11432364

  15. Temporal distribution of the ganglion cell volleys in the normal rat optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Galambos, Robert; Szabó-Salfay, Orsolya; Barabás, Péter; Pálhalmi, János; Szilágyi, Nóra; Juhász, Gábor

    2000-01-01

    We describe experiments on behaving rats with electrodes implanted on the cornea, in the optic chiasm, and on the visual cortex; in addition, two red light-emitting diodes (LED) are permanently attached to the skull over the left eye. Recordings timelocked to the LED flashes reveal both the local events at each electrode site and the orderly transfer of visual information from retina to cortex. The major finding is that every stimulus, regardless of its luminance, duration, or the state of retinal light adaptation, elicits an optic nerve volley with a latency of about 10 ms and a duration of about 300 ms. This phenomenon has not been reported previously, so far as we are aware. We conclude that the retina, which originates from the forebrain of the developing embryo, behaves like a typical brain structure: it translates, within a few hundred milliseconds, the chemical information in each pattern of bleached photoreceptors into a corresponding pattern of ganglion cell neuronal information that leaves via the optic nerve. The attributes of each rat ganglion cell appear to include whether the retinal neuropile calls on it to leave after a stimulus and, if so when, within a 300-ms poststimulus epoch. The resulting retinal analysis of the scene, on arrival at the cortical level, is presumed to participate importantly in the creation of visual perceptual experiences. PMID:11078526

  16. Somatic tetraploidy in specific chick retinal ganglion cells induced by nerve growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Morillo, Sandra M.; Escoll, Pedro; de la Hera, Antonio; Frade, José M.

    2009-01-01

    A subset of neurons in the normal vertebrate nervous system contains double the normal amount of DNA in their nuclei. These neurons are all thought to derive from aberrant mitoses in neuronal precursor cells. Here we show that endogenous NGF induces DNA replication in a subpopulation of differentiating chick retinal ganglion cells that express both the neurotrophin receptor p75 and the E2F1 transcription factor, but that lack the retinoblastoma protein. Many of these neurons avoid G2/M transition and remain alive in the retina as tetraploid cells with large cell somas and extensive dendritic trees, and most of them express β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits, a specific marker of retinal ganglion cells innervating lamina F in the stratum-griseum-et-fibrosum-superficiale of the tectal cortex. Tetraploid neurons were also observed in the adult mouse retina. Thus, a developmental program leading to somatic tetraploidy in specific retinal neurons exists in vertebrates. This program might occur in other vertebrate neurons during normal or pathological situations. PMID:20018664

  17. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated stimulation of retinal ganglion cell photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Puneet; Hartwick, Andrew T E

    2016-09-01

    Melanopsin-dependent phototransduction in intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) involves a Gq-coupled phospholipase C (PLC) signaling cascade. Acetylcholine, released in the mammalian retina by starburst amacrine cells, can also activate Gq-PLC pathways through certain muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). Using multielectrode array recordings of rat retinas, we demonstrate that robust spiking responses can be evoked in neonatal and adult ipRGCs after bath application of the muscarinic agonist carbachol. The stimulatory action of carbachol on ipRGCs was a direct effect, as confirmed through calcium imaging experiments on isolated ipRGCs in purified cultures. Using flickering (6 Hz) yellow light stimuli at irradiances below the threshold for melanopsin activation, spiking responses could be elicited in ipRGCs that were suppressed by mAChR antagonism. Therefore, this work identified a novel melanopsin-independent pathway for stimulating sustained spiking in ganglion cell photoreceptors. This mAChR-mediated pathway could enhance ipRGC spiking responses in conditions known to evoke retinal acetylcholine release, such as those involving flickering or moving visual stimuli. Furthermore, this work identifies a pharmacological approach for light-independent ipRGC stimulation that could be targeted by mAChR agonists. PMID:27055770

  18. DERF: distinctive efficient robust features from the biological modeling of the P ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Weng, Dawei; Wang, Yunhong; Gong, Mingming; Tao, Dacheng; Wei, Hui; Huang, Di

    2015-08-01

    Studies in neuroscience and biological vision have shown that the human retina has strong computational power, and its information representation supports vision tasks on both ventral and dorsal pathways. In this paper, a new local image descriptor, termed distinctive efficient robust features (DERF), is derived by modeling the response and distribution properties of the parvocellular-projecting ganglion cells in the primate retina. DERF features exponential scale distribution, exponential grid structure, and circularly symmetric function difference of Gaussian (DoG) used as a convolution kernel, all of which are consistent with the characteristics of the ganglion cell array found in neurophysiology, anatomy, and biophysics. In addition, a new explanation for local descriptor design is presented from the perspective of wavelet tight frames. DoG is naturally a wavelet, and the structure of the grid points array in our descriptor is closely related to the spatial sampling of wavelets. The DoG wavelet itself forms a frame, and when we modulate the parameters of our descriptor to make the frame tighter, the performance of the DERF descriptor improves accordingly. This is verified by designing a tight frame DoG, which leads to much better performance. Extensive experiments conducted in the image matching task on the multiview stereo correspondence data set demonstrate that DERF outperforms state of the art methods for both hand-crafted and learned descriptors, while remaining robust and being much faster to compute. PMID:25769164

  19. Plasmalemmal and Vesicular γ-Aminobutyric Acid Transporter Expression in the Developing Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    GUO, CHENYING; STELLA, SALVATORE L.; HIRANO, ARLENE A.; BRECHA, NICHOLAS C.

    2009-01-01

    Plasmalemmal and vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters influence neurotransmission by regulating high-affinity GABA uptake and GABA release into the synaptic cleft and extracellular space. Postnatal expression of the plasmalemmal GABA transporter-1 (GAT-1), GAT-3, and the vesicular GABA/glycine transporter (VGAT) were evaluated in the developing mouse retina by using immunohistochemistry with affinity-purified antibodies. Weak transporter immunoreactivity was observed in the inner retina at postnatal day 0 (P0). GAT-1 immunostaining at P0 and at older ages was in amacrine and displaced amacrine cells in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and ganglion cell layer (GCL), respectively, and in their processes in the inner plexiform layer (IPL). At P10, weak GAT-1 immunostaining was in Müller cell processes. GAT-3 immunostaining at P0 and older ages was in amacrine cells and their processes, as well as in Müller cells and their processes that extended radially across the retina. At P10, Müller cell somata were observed in the middle of the INL. VGAT immunostaining was present at P0 and older ages in amacrine cells in the INL as well as processes in the IPL. At P5, weak VGAT immunostaining was also observed in horizontal cell somata and processes. By P15, the GAT and VGAT immunostaining patterns appear similar to the adult immunostaining patterns; they reached adult levels by about P20. These findings demonstrate that GABA uptake and release are initially established in the inner retina during the first postnatal week and that these systems subsequently mature in the outer retina during the second postnatal week. PMID:18975268

  20. Alzheimer’s Disease-Related Protein Expression in the Retina of Octodon degus

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lucia Y.; Chang, Lily Y-L.; Ardiles, Alvaro O.; Tapia-Rojas, Cheril; Araya, Joaquin; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2015-01-01

    New studies show that the retina also undergoes pathological changes during the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). While transgenic mouse models used in these previous studies have offered insight into this phenomenon, they do not model human sporadic AD, which is the most common form. Recently, the Octodon degus has been established as a sporadic model of AD. Degus display age-related cognitive impairment associated with Aβ aggregates and phosphorylated tau in the brain. Our aim for this study was to examine the expression of AD-related proteins in young, adult and old degus retina using enzyme-linked or fluorescence immunohistochemistry and to quantify the expression using slot blot and western blot assays. Aβ4G8 and Aβ6E10 detected Aβ peptides in some of the young animals but the expression was higher in the adults. Aβ peptides were observed in the inner and outer segment of the photoreceptors, the nerve fiber layer (NFL) and ganglion cell layer (GCL). Expression was higher in the central retinal region than in the retinal periphery. Using an anti-oligomer antibody we detected Aβ oligomer expression in the young, adult and old retina. Immunohistochemical labeling showed small discrete labeling of oligomers in the GCL that did not resemble plaques. Congo red staining did not result in green birefringence in any of the animals analyzed except for one old (84 months) animal. We also investigated expression of tau and phosphorylated tau. Expression was seen at all ages studied and in adults it was more consistently observed in the NFL-GCL. Hyperphosphorylated tau detected with AT8 antibody was significantly higher in the adult retina and it was localized to the GCL. We confirm for the first time that Aβ peptides and phosphorylated tau are expressed in the retina of degus. This is consistent with the proposal that AD biomarkers are present in the eye. PMID:26267479

  1. Two-Photon Autofluorescence Imaging Reveals Cellular Structures Throughout the Retina of the Living Primate Eye

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Robin; Williams, David R.; Palczewska, Grazyna; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Hunter, Jennifer J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although extrinsic fluorophores can be introduced to label specific cell types in the retina, endogenous fluorophores, such as NAD(P)H, FAD, collagen, and others, are present in all retinal layers. These molecules are a potential source of optical contrast and can enable noninvasive visualization of all cellular layers. We used a two-photon fluorescence adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (TPF-AOSLO) to explore the native autofluorescence of various cell classes spanning several layers in the unlabeled retina of a living primate eye. Methods Three macaques were imaged on separate occasions using a custom TPF-AOSLO. Two-photon fluorescence was evoked by pulsed light at 730 and 920 nm excitation wavelengths, while fluorescence emission was collected in the visible range from several retinal layers and different locations. Backscattered light was recorded simultaneously in confocal modality and images were postprocessed to remove eye motion. Results All retinal layers yielded two-photon signals and the heterogeneous distribution of fluorophores provided optical contrast. Several structural features were observed, such as autofluorescence from vessel walls, Müller cell processes in the nerve fibers, mosaics of cells in the ganglion cell and other nuclear layers of the inner retina, as well as photoreceptor and RPE layers in the outer retina. Conclusions This in vivo survey of two-photon autofluorescence throughout the primate retina demonstrates a wider variety of structural detail in the living eye than is available through conventional imaging methods, and broadens the use of two-photon imaging of normal and diseased eyes. PMID:26903224

  2. Automatic Counting of Microglial Cells in Healthy and Glaucomatous Mouse Retinas

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Blanca; Ramírez, Ana I.; de Hoz, Rosa; Salazar, Juan J.; Triviño, Alberto; Ramírez, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Proliferation of microglial cells has been considered a sign of glial activation and a hallmark of ongoing neurodegenerative diseases. Microglia activation is analyzed in animal models of different eye diseases. Numerous retinal samples are required for each of these studies to obtain relevant data of statistical significance. Because manual quantification of microglial cells is time consuming, the aim of this study was develop an algorithm for automatic identification of retinal microglia. Two groups of adult male Swiss mice were used: age-matched controls (naïve, n = 6) and mice subjected to unilateral laser-induced ocular hypertension (lasered; n = 9). In the latter group, both hypertensive eyes and contralateral untreated retinas were analyzed. Retinal whole mounts were immunostained with anti Iba-1 for detecting microglial cell populations. A new algorithm was developed in MATLAB for microglial quantification; it enabled the quantification of microglial cells in the inner and outer plexiform layers and evaluates the area of the retina occupied by Iba-1+ microglia in the nerve fiber-ganglion cell layer. The automatic method was applied to a set of 6,000 images. To validate the algorithm, mouse retinas were evaluated both manually and computationally; the program correctly assessed the number of cells (Pearson correlation R = 0.94 and R = 0.98 for the inner and outer plexiform layers respectively). Statistically significant differences in glial cell number were found between naïve, lasered eyes and contralateral eyes (P<0.05, naïve versus contralateral eyes; P<0.001, naïve versus lasered eyes and contralateral versus lasered eyes). The algorithm developed is a reliable and fast tool that can evaluate the number of microglial cells in naïve mouse retinas and in retinas exhibiting proliferation. The implementation of this new automatic method can enable faster quantification of microglial cells in retinal pathologies. PMID:26580208

  3. BACE1 in the retina: a sensitive biomarker for monitoring early pathological changes in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lan; Luo, Jia; Chen, Dan; Tong, Jian-bin; Zeng, Le-ping; Cao, Yan-qun; Xiang, Jian; Luo, Xue-gang; Shi, Jing-ming; Wang, Hui; Huang, Ju-fang

    2016-01-01

    Because of a lack of sensitive biomarkers, the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) cannot be made prior to symptom manifestation. Therefore, it is crucial to identify novel biomarkers for the presymptomatic diagnosis of AD. While brain lesions are a major feature of AD, retinal pathological changes also occur in patients. In this study, we investigated the temporal changes in β-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) expression in the retina and brain to determine whether it could serve as a suitable biomarker for early monitoring of AD. APP/PS-1 transgenic mice, 3, 6 and 8 months of age, were used as an experimental group, and age-matched C57/BL6 wild-type mice served as the control group. In the Morris water maze test, there were no significant differences in escape latency or in the number of crossings in the target area among mice of different ages. Compared with wild-type mice, no changes in learning or memory abilities were detected in transgenic mice at 3 months of age. However, compared with wild-type mice, the escape latency was significantly increased in transgenic mice at 6 months, starting on day 3, and at 8 months, starting on day 2, during Morris water maze training. In addition, the number of crossings of the target area was significantly decreased in transgenic mice. The learning and memory abilities of transgenic mice were further worsened at 8 months of age. Immunohistochemical staining revealed no BACE1 plaques in wild-type mice at 3, 6 or 8 months or in transgenic mice at 3 months, but they were clearly found in the entorhinal cortex, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of transgenic mice at 6 and 8 months. BACE1 expression was not detected in the retina of wild-type mice at 3 months, but weak BACE1 expression was detected in the ganglion cell layer, inner plexiform layer and outer plexiform layer at 6 and 8 months. In transgenic mice, BACE1 expression in the ganglion cell layer was increased at 3 months, and BACE1 expression in the ganglion cell

  4. Anti-excitotoxic activity of trimetazidine in the retina.

    PubMed

    Payet, Olivier; D'Aldin, Christine; Maurin, Laurence; Bonne, Claude; Muller, Agnès

    2004-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of the neuroprotective activity of trimetazidine in animal retina stressed by ischemia or kainate. Flash electroretinograms were recorded in guinea pigs after ischemia, induced by an acute increase in the intraocular pressure (IOP), or after an intravitreal injection of kainate. Treatment with trimetazidine per os afforded a significant protection of the electroretinogram against the ischemic as well as the excitotoxic insult as an antioxidant (dimethylthiourea) and a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (nitroarginine) did. The effect of the drug on the extracellular accumulation of glutamate induced by chemical ischemia was studied by incubating rat retina in vitro. Trimetazidine was able to inhibit the extracellular glutamate accumulation, which represents the first step of the excitotoxic phenomenon. Then the compound activity on the glial uptake of glutamate was studied in a rat Müller cell line (rMC-1) in culture. Chemical ischemia inhibited the active 3H-glutamate transport, an effect that was reversed by trimetazidine, at micromolar concentrations. These results demonstrate that trimetazidine which is recognized as an efficient drug against ischemic injuries, is also capable of protecting the retina against excitotoxicity by reducing ischemia-induced accumulation of glutamate due in particular to glial transporter inhibition. PMID:15006162

  5. Melanopsin, Photosensitive Ganglion Cells, and Seasonal Affective Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Roecklein, Kathryn A.; Wong, Patricia M.; Miller, Megan A.; Donofry, Shannon D.; Kamarck, Marissa L.; Brainard, George C.

    2013-01-01

    ROECKLEIN, K.A., WONG, P.M., MILLER, M.A., DONOFRY, S.D., KAMARCK, M.L., BRAINARD, G.C. Melanopsin, Photosensitive Ganglion Cells, and Seasonal Affective Disorder…NEUROSCI BIOBEHAV REV x(x) XXX-XXX, 2012. In two recent reports, melanopsin gene variations were associated with seasonal affective disorder (SAD), and in changes in the timing of sleep and activity in healthy individuals. New studies have deepened our understanding of the retinohypothalamic tract, which translates environmental light received by the retina into neural signals sent to a set of nonvisual nuclei in the brain that are responsible for functions other than sight including circadian, neuroendocrine and neurobehavioral regulation. Because this pathway mediates seasonal changes in physiology, behavior, and mood, individual variations in the pathway may explain why approximately 1–2% of the North American population develops mood disorders with a seasonal pattern (i.e., Major Depressive and Bipolar Disorders with a seasonal pattern, also known as seasonal affective disorder/SAD). Components of depression including mood changes, sleep patterns, appetite, and cognitive performance can be affected by the biological and behavioral responses to light. Specifically, variations in the gene sequence for the retinal photopigment, melanopsin, may be responsible for significant increased risk for mood disorders with a seasonal pattern, and may do so by leading to changes in activity and sleep timing in winter. The retinal sensitivity of SAD is hypothesized to be decreased compared to controls, and that further decrements in winter light levels may combine to trigger depression in winter. Here we outline steps for new research to address the possible role of melanopsin in seasonal affective disorder including chromatic pupillometry designed to measure the sensitivity of melanopsin containing retinal ganglion cells. PMID:23286902

  6. Ubiquitous presence of gluconeogenic regulatory enzyme, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, within layers of rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Mamczur, Piotr; Mazurek, Jakub

    2010-01-01

    To shed some light on gluconeogenesis in mammalian retina, we have focused on fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), a regulatory enzyme of the process. The abundance of the enzyme within the layers of the rat retina suggests that, in mammals in contrast to amphibia, gluconeogenesis is not restricted to one specific cell of the retina. We propose that FBPase, in addition to its gluconeogenic role, participates in the protection of the retina against reactive oxygen species. Additionally, the nuclear localization of FBPase and of its binding partner, aldolase, in the retinal cells expressing the proliferation marker Ki-67 indicates that these two gluconeogenic enzymes are involved in non-enzymatic nuclear processes. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00441-010-1008-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20614135

  7. Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Do, Michael Tri Hoang; Yau, King-Wai

    2010-10-01

    Life on earth is subject to alternating cycles of day and night imposed by the rotation of the earth. Consequently, living things have evolved photodetective systems to synchronize their physiology and behavior with the external light-dark cycle. This form of photodetection is unlike the familiar "image vision," in that the basic information is light or darkness over time, independent of spatial patterns. "Nonimage" vision is probably far more ancient than image vision and is widespread in living species. For mammals, it has long been assumed that the photoreceptors for nonimage vision are also the textbook rods and cones. However, recent years have witnessed the discovery of a small population of retinal ganglion cells in the mammalian eye that express a unique visual pigment called melanopsin. These ganglion cells are intrinsically photosensitive and drive a variety of nonimage visual functions. In addition to being photoreceptors themselves, they also constitute the major conduit for rod and cone signals to the brain for nonimage visual functions such as circadian photoentrainment and the pupillary light reflex. Here we review what is known about these novel mammalian photoreceptors. PMID:20959623

  8. Transport-mediated release of endogenous glutamate in the vertebrate retina.

    PubMed

    Maguire, G; Simko, H; Weinreb, R N; Ayoub, G

    1998-08-01

    In the present study we measured calcium-dependent, vesicular glutamate release, and calcium-independent, transport-mediated glutamate release patterns in the vertebrate retina to better understand the sources of elevated glutamate in neural tissue under ischemic conditions. A potassium concentration of 40 mM, which mimics the extracellular potassium concentration in the central nervous system during ischemia, was applied to the bathing medium of a retinal slice prepared from zebrafish. High external potassium evoked release of endogenous glutamate that was measured using a glutamate-specific fluorometric assay applied to the bath. The slice was visualized under 668 nm light using Normarski optics and fluorescent images were captured using a cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Following the elevation of external potassium to 40 mM several bands of glutamate fluorescence, reflecting the spatial distribution of glutamate release, were observed. A calcium-dependent cloud of glutamate was observed in the inner plexiform layer, that was antagonized by bath-applied nifedipine. A relatively dense glutamate cloud (1-10 microM) was observed over the ganglion cell layer, which was blocked by dihydrokainate, a glutamate transport antagonist. In contrast, nifedipine, an inhibitor of calcium-dependent neurotransmitter release in the retina, failed to block the cloud of released glutamate in the ganglion cell layer. These data suggest that under pathological conditions in the eye where glutamate levels are elevated surrounding retinal ganglion cells, such as observed in some forms of glaucoma, a possible source of the elevated glutamate is through a glutamate transporter operating in a reversed direction. A likely candidate for mediating this reversed transport of glutamate is the retinal Muller cell. PMID:9644233

  9. Melanopsin retinal ganglion cell loss in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Ross‐Cisneros, Fred N.; Koronyo, Yosef; Hannibal, Jens; Gallassi, Roberto; Cantalupo, Gaetano; Sambati, Luisa; Pan, Billy X.; Tozer, Kevin R.; Barboni, Piero; Provini, Federica; Avanzini, Pietro; Carbonelli, Michele; Pelosi, Annalisa; Chui, Helena; Liguori, Rocco; Baruzzi, Agostino; Koronyo‐Hamaoui, Maya; Sadun, Alfredo A.; Carelli, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    Objective Melanopsin retinal ganglion cells (mRGCs) are photoreceptors driving circadian photoentrainment, and circadian dysfunction characterizes Alzheimer disease (AD). We investigated mRGCs in AD, hypothesizing that they contribute to circadian dysfunction. Methods We assessed retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness by optical coherence tomography (OCT) in 21 mild‐moderate AD patients, and in a subgroup of 16 we evaluated rest–activity circadian rhythm by actigraphy. We studied postmortem mRGCs by immunohistochemistry in retinas, and axons in optic nerve cross‐sections of 14 neuropathologically confirmed AD patients. We coimmunostained for retinal amyloid β (Aβ) deposition and melanopsin to locate mRGCs. All AD cohorts were compared with age‐matched controls. Results We demonstrated an age‐related optic neuropathy in AD by OCT, with a significant reduction of RNFL thickness (p = 0.038), more evident in the superior quadrant (p = 0.006). Axonal loss was confirmed in postmortem AD optic nerves. Abnormal circadian function characterized only a subgroup of AD patients. Sleep efficiency was significantly reduced in AD patients (p = 0.001). We also found a significant loss of mRGCs in postmortem AD retinal specimens (p = 0.003) across all ages and abnormal mRGC dendritic morphology and size (p = 0.003). In flat‐mounted AD retinas, Aβ accumulation was remarkably evident inside and around mRGCs. Interpretation We show variable degrees of rest–activity circadian dysfunction in AD patients. We also demonstrate age‐related loss of optic nerve axons and specifically mRGC loss and pathology in postmortem AD retinal specimens, associated with Aβ deposition. These results all support the concept that mRGC degeneration is a contributor to circadian rhythm dysfunction in AD. ANN NEUROL 2016;79:90–109 PMID:26505992

  10. Localization of melanopsin-immunoreactive cells in the Mongolian gerbil retina.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Mi-Jin; Jeon, Chang-Jin

    2015-11-01

    Melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) are involved in circadian rhythm and pupil responses. The purpose of this study was to reveal the organization of melanopsin-immunoreactive (IR) neurons in the Mongolian gerbil retina using immunocytochemistry. Melanopsin-IR cells were primarily located in the ganglion cell layer (GCL; M1c; 75.15%). Many melanopsin-IR cells were also observed in the inner nuclear layer (INL; M1d; 22.28%). The M1c and M1d cell types extended their dendritic processes into the OFF sublayer of the inner plexiform layer (IPL). We rarely observed bistratified cells (M3; 2.56%) with dendrites in both the ON and OFF sublayers of the IPL. Surprisingly, we did not observe M2 cells which are well observed in other rodents. Melanopsin-IR cell somas were small to medium in size and had large dendritic fields. They had 2-5 primary dendrites that branched sparingly and had varicosities. Melanopsin-IR cell density was very low: they comprised 0.50% of the total ganglion cell population. Moreover, none of the melanopsin-IR cells expressed calbindin-D28K, calretinin, or parvalbumin. These results suggest that in the Mongolian gerbil, melanopsin-IR cells are expressed in a very small RGC subpopulation, and are independent of calcium-binding proteins-containing RGCs. PMID:26083722

  11. Sonic Hedgehog Has a Dual Effect on the Growth of Retinal Ganglion Axons Depending on Its Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Kolpak, Adrianne; Zhang, Jinhua; Bao, Zheng-Zheng

    2006-01-01

    The stereotypical projection of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons to the optic disc has served as a good model system for studying axon guidance. By both in vitro and in vivo experiments, we show that a secreted molecule, Sonic hedgehog (Shh), may play a critical role in the process. It is expressed in a dynamic pattern in the ganglion cell layer with a relatively higher expression in the center of the retina. Through gel culture and stripe assays, we show that Shh has a dual effect on RGC axonal growth, acting as a positive factor at low concentrations and a negative factor at high concentrations. Results from time-lapse video microscopic and stripe assay experiments further suggest that the effects of Shh on axons are not likely attributable to indirect transcriptional regulation by Shh. Overexpression of Shh protein or inhibition of Shh function inside the retina resulted in a complete loss of centrally directed projection of RGC axons, suggesting that precise regulation of Shh level inside the retina is critical for the projection of RGC axons to the optic disc. PMID:15800198

  12. An Isolated Retinal Preparation to Record Light Response from Genetically Labeled Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Tiffany M; Kofuji, Paulo

    2011-01-01

    The first steps in vertebrate vision take place when light stimulates the rod and cone photoreceptors of the retina 1. This information is then segregated into what are known as the ON and OFF pathways. The photoreceptors signal light information to the bipolar cells (BCs), which depolarize in response to increases (On BCs) or decreases (Off BCs) in light intensity. This segregation of light information is maintained at the level of the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), which have dendrites stratifying in either the Off sublamina of the inner plexiform layer (IPL), where they receive direct excitatory input from Off BCs, or stratifying in the On sublamina of the IPL, where they receive direct excitatory input from On BCs. This segregation of information regarding increases or decreases in illumination (the On and Off pathways) is conserved and signaled to the brain in parallel. The RGCs are the output cells of the retina, and are thus an important cell to study in order to understand how light information is signaled to visual nuclei in the brain. Advances in mouse genetics over recent decades have resulted in a variety of fluorescent reporter mouse lines where specific RGC populations are labeled with a fluorescent protein to allow for identification of RGC subtypes 2 3 4 and specific targeting for electrophysiological recording. Here, we present a method for recording light responses from fluorescently labeled ganglion cells in an intact, isolated retinal preparation. This isolated retinal preparation allows for recordings from RGCs where the dendritic arbor is intact and the inputs across the entire RGC dendritic arbor are preserved. This method is applicable across a variety of ganglion cell subtypes and is amenable to a wide variety of single-cell physiological techniques. PMID:21307827

  13. Internalization and synaptogenic effect of GH in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs).

    PubMed

    Fleming, Thomas; Martínez-Moreno, Carlos G; Mora, Janeth; Aizouki, Miray; Luna, Maricela; Arámburo, Carlos; Harvey, Steve

    2016-08-01

    In the chicken embryo, GH gene expression occurs in the neural retina and retinal GH promotes cell survival and induces axonal growth of retinal ganglion cells. Neuroretinal GH is therefore of functional importance before the appearance of somatotrophs and the onset of pituitary GH secretion to the peripheral plasma (at ED15-17). Endocrine actions of pituitary GH in the development and function of the chicken embryo eye are, however, unknown. This possibility has therefore been investigated in ED15 embryos and using the quail neuroretinal derived cell line (QNR/D). During this research, we studied for the first time, the coexistence of exogenous (endocrine) and local GH (autocrine/paracrine) in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). In ovo systemic injections of Cy3-labeled GH demonstrated that GH in the embryo bloodstream was translocated into the neural retina and internalized into RGC's. Pituitary GH may therefore be functionally involved in retinal development during late embryogenesis. Cy3-labelled GH was similarly internalized into QNR/D cells after its addition into incubation media. The uptake of exogenous GH was by a receptor-mediated mechanism and maximal after 30-60min. The exogenous (endocrine) GH induced STAT5 phosphorylation and increased growth associated protein 43 (GAP43) and SNAP-25 immunoreactivity. Ex ovo intravitreal injections of Cy3-GH in ED12 embryos resulted in GH internalization and STAT5 activation. Interestingly, the CY3-labeled GH accumulated in perinuclear regions of the QNR/D cells, but was not found in the cytoplasm of neurite outgrowths, in which endogenous retinal GH is located. This suggests that exogenous (endocrine) and local (autocrine/paracrine) GH are both involved in retinal function in late embryogenesis but they co-exist in separate intracellular compartments within retinal ganglion cells. PMID:27036926

  14. Retinal Ganglion Cell Damage in an Experimental Rodent Model of Blast-Mediated Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Kabhilan; Kecova, Helga; Hernandez-Merino, Elena; Kardon, Randy H.; Harper, Matthew M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate retina and optic nerve damage following experimental blast injury. Methods. Healthy adult mice were exposed to an overpressure blast wave using a custom-built blast chamber. The effects of blast exposure on retina and optic nerve function and structure were evaluated using the pattern electroretinogram (pERG), spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT), and the chromatic pupil light reflex. Results. Assessment of the pupil response to light demonstrated decreased maximum pupil constriction diameter in blast-injured mice using red light or blue light stimuli 24 hours after injury compared with baseline in the eye exposed to direct blast injury. A decrease in the pupil light reflex was not observed chronically following blast exposure. We observed a biphasic pERG decrease with the acute injury recovering by 24 hours postblast and the chronic injury appearing at 4 months postblast injury. Furthermore, at 3 months following injury, a significant decrease in the retinal nerve fiber layer was observed using OCT compared with controls. Histologic analysis of the retina and optic nerve revealed punctate regions of reduced cellularity in the ganglion cell layer and damage to optic nerves. Additionally, a significant upregulation of proteins associated with oxidative stress was observed acutely following blast exposure compared with control mice. Conclusions. Our study demonstrates that decrements in retinal ganglion cell responses can be detected after blast injury using noninvasive functional and structural tests. These objective responses may serve as surrogate tests for higher CNS functions following traumatic brain injury that are difficult to quantify. PMID:23620426

  15. Melanopsin and the Non-visual Photochemistry in the Inner Retina of Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Nicolás M; Morera, Luis P; Guido, Mario E

    2016-01-01

    Melanopsin (Opn4), a member of the G-protein-coupled receptor family, is a vitamin A-based opsin in the vertebrate retina that has been shown to be involved in the synchronization of circadian rhythms, pupillary light reflexes, melatonin suppression and other light-regulated tasks. In nonmammalian vertebrates there are two Opn4 genes, Opn4m and Opn4x, the mammalian and Xenopus orthologs respectively. Opn4x is only expressed in nonmammalian vertebrates including reptiles, fish and birds, while Opn4m is found in a subset of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), the intrinsically photosensitive (ip) RGCs of the inner retina of both mammals and nonmammalian vertebrates. All opsins described utilize retinaldehyde as chromophore, photoisomerized from 11-cis- to all-trans-retinal upon light exposure. Visual retinal photoreceptor cones and rods, responsible for day and night vision respectively, recycle retinoids through a process called the visual cycle that involves the retinal pigment epithelium or glial Müller cells. Although Opn4 has been characterized as a bistable photopigment, little is known about the mechanism/s involved in its chromophore regeneration. In this review, we will attempt to shed light on the visual cycle taking place in the inner retina and discuss the state of the art in the nonvisual photochemistry of vertebrates. PMID:26500165

  16. Tickling the retina: integration of subthreshold electrical pulses can activate retinal neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhar, S.; Jalligampala, A.; Zrenner, E.; Rathbun, D. L.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. The field of retinal prosthetics has made major progress over the last decade, restoring visual percepts to people suffering from retinitis pigmentosa. The stimulation pulses used by present implants are suprathreshold, meaning individual pulses are designed to activate the retina. In this paper we explore subthreshold pulse sequences as an alternate stimulation paradigm. Subthreshold pulses have the potential to address important open problems such as fading of visual percepts when patients are stimulated at moderate pulse repetition rates and the difficulty in preferentially stimulating different retinal pathways. Approach. As a first step in addressing these issues we used Gaussian white noise electrical stimulation combined with spike-triggered averaging to interrogate whether a subthreshold sequence of pulses can be used to activate the mouse retina. Main results. We demonstrate that the retinal network can integrate multiple subthreshold electrical stimuli under an experimental paradigm immediately relevant to retinal prostheses. Furthermore, these characteristic stimulus sequences varied in their shape and integration window length across the population of retinal ganglion cells. Significance. Because the subthreshold sequences activate the retina at stimulation rates that would typically induce strong fading (25 Hz), such retinal ‘tickling’ has the potential to minimize the fading problem. Furthermore, the diversity found across the cell population in characteristic pulse sequences suggests that these sequences could be used to selectively address the different retinal pathways (e.g. ON versus OFF). Both of these outcomes may significantly improve visual perception in retinal implant patients.

  17. Vision Drives Correlated Activity without Patterned Spontaneous Activity in Developing Xenopus Retina

    PubMed Central

    Demas, James A.; Payne, Hannah; Cline, Hollis T.

    2011-01-01

    Developing amphibians need vision to avoid predators and locate food before visual system circuits fully mature. Xenopus tadpoles can respond to visual stimuli as soon as retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) innervate the brain, however, in mammals, chicks and turtles, RGCs reach their central targets many days, or even weeks, before their retinas are capable of vision. In the absence of vision, activity-dependent refinement in these amniote species is mediated by waves of spontaneous activity that periodically spread across the retina, correlating the firing of action potentials in neighboring RGCs. Theory suggests that retinorecipient neurons in the brain use patterned RGC activity to sharpen the retinotopy first established by genetic cues. We find that in both wild type and albino Xenopus tadpoles, RGCs are spontaneously active at all stages of tadpole development studied, but their population activity never coalesces into waves. Even at the earliest stages recorded, visual stimulation dominates over spontaneous activity and can generate patterns of RGC activity similar to the locally correlated spontaneous activity observed in amniotes. In addition, we show that blocking AMPA and NMDA type glutamate receptors significantly decreases spontaneous activity in young Xenopus retina, but that blocking GABAA receptor blockers does not. Our findings indicate that vision drives correlated activity required for topographic map formation. They further suggest that developing retinal circuits in the two major subdivisions of tetrapods, amphibians and amniotes, evolved different strategies to supply appropriately patterned RGC activity to drive visual circuit refinement. PMID:21312343

  18. Olfactory stimulation selectively modulates the OFF pathway in the retina of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Esposti, Federico; Johnston, Jamie; Rosa, Juliana M; Leung, Kin-Mei; Lagnado, Leon

    2013-07-10

    Cross-modal regulation of visual performance by olfactory stimuli begins in the retina, where dopaminergic interneurons receive projections from the olfactory bulb. However, we do not understand how olfactory stimuli alter the processing of visual signals within the retina. We investigated this question by in vivo imaging activity in transgenic zebrafish expressing SyGCaMP2 in bipolar cell terminals and GCaMP3.5 in ganglion cells. The food-related amino acid methionine reduced the gain and increased sensitivity of responses to luminance and contrast transmitted through OFF bipolar cells but not ON. The effects of olfactory stimulus were blocked by inhibiting dopamine uptake and release. Activation of dopamine receptors increased the gain of synaptic transmission in vivo and potentiated synaptic calcium currents in isolated bipolar cells. These results indicate that olfactory stimuli alter the sensitivity of the retina through the dopaminergic regulation of presynaptic calcium channels that control the gain of synaptic transmission through OFF bipolar cells. PMID:23849198

  19. Melanopsin-mediated post-illumination pupil response in the peripheral retina.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Daniel S; Feigl, Beatrix; Zele, Andrew J

    2016-06-01

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) regulate pupil size by integrating extrinsic rod and cone signals with intrinsic melanopsin-mediated phototransduction. Light adapted pupil diameter is determined by the corneal flux density (CFD), and for central visual field stimulation the melanopsin-mediated post-illumination pupil response (PIPR) follows this same CFD relationship. Rods, cones, and ipRGCs vary in size, density, and distribution across the retina, but how these differences affect the amplitude and timing of the extrinsic and intrinsic pupil light reflex in the central and peripheral retina is unknown. We determined the relationship between stimulus area and photon flux with stimuli constant for CFD, irradiance, or area at central (0°) and peripheral (20°) eccentricities with high and low melanopsin excitation. We show that the pupil constriction amplitude was similar at both eccentricities and the time to minimum diameter increased as melanopsin excitation increased. In contrast, the peripheral PIPR follows a CFD relationship but with lower amplitude compared with that at the fovea. This indicates differences in the spatial and temporal characteristics of extrinsic and intrinsic ipRGC inputs to the pupil control pathway for the central and peripheral retina. The eccentricity-dependent change in PIPR amplitude may be analogous to the hill of vision observed in visual perimetry; such knowledge is an important precursor to the development of pupil perimetry paradigms to measure the PIPR in select regions of the visual field. PMID:27271992

  20. Development of asymmetric inhibition underlying direction selectivity in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Hamby, Aaron M.; Zhou, Kaili; Feller, Marla B.

    2014-01-01

    Establishing precise synaptic connections is crucial to the development of functional neural circuits. The direction-selective circuit in the retina relies upon highly selective wiring of inhibitory inputs from starburst amacrine cells1 (SACs) onto four subtypes of on–off direction-selective ganglion cell (DSGC), each preferring motion in one of four cardinal directions2. It has been reported in rabbit that the SACs on the ‘null’ sides of DSGCs form functional GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid)-mediated synapses, whereas those on the preferred sides do not3. However, it is not known how the asymmetric wiring between SACs and DSGCs is established during development. Here we report that in transgenic mice with cell-type-specific labelling, the synaptic connections from SACs to DSGCs were of equal strength during the first postnatal week, regardless of whether the SAC was located on the preferred or null side of the DSGC. However, by the end of the second postnatal week, the strength of the synapses made from SACs on the null side of a DSGC significantly increased whereas those made from SACs located on the preferred side remained constant. Blocking retinal activity by intraocular injections of muscimol or gabazine during this period did not alter the development of direction selectivity. Hence, the asymmetric inhibition between the SACs and DSGCs is achieved by a developmental program that specifically strengthens the GABA-mediated inputs from SACs located on the null side, in a manner not dependent on neural activity. PMID:21131947

  1. Network Analysis and Visualization of Mouse Retina Connectivity Data

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The largest available cellular level connectivity map, of a 0.1 mm sample of the mouse retina Inner Plexiform Layer, was analysed using network models and visualized using spectral graph layouts and observed cell coordinates. This allows key nodes in the network to be identified with retinal neurons. Their strongest synaptic links can trace pathways in the network, elucidating possible circuits. Modular decomposition of the network, by sampling signal flows over nodes and links using the InfoMap method, shows discrete modules of cone bipolar cells that form a tiled mosaic in the retinal plane. The highest flow nodes, calculated by InfoMap, proved to be the most useful landmarks for elucidating possible circuits. Their dominant links to high flow amacrine cells reveal possible circuits linking bipolar through to ganglion cells and show an Off-On discrimination between the Left-Right sections of the sample. Circuits suggested by this analysis confirm known roles for some cells and point to roles for others. PMID:27414405

  2. Transcriptome profiling of the rat retina after optic nerve transection

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Masayuki; Tanaka, Yuji; Omodaka, Kazuko; Nishiguchi, Koji M.; Nakamura, Orie; Tsuda, Satoru; Nakazawa, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases characterized by alterations in the contour of the optic nerve head (ONH), with corresponding visual field defects and progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). This progressive RGC death is considered to originate in axonal injury caused by compression of the axon bundles in the ONH. However, the molecular pathomechanisms of axonal injury-induced RGC death are not yet well understood. Here, we used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to examine transcriptome changes in rat retinas 2 days after optic nerve transection (ONT), and then used computational techniques to predict the resulting alterations in the transcriptional regulatory network. RNA-seq revealed 267 differentially expressed genes after ONT, 218 of which were annotated and 49 unannotated. We also identified differentially expressed transcripts, including potentially novel isoforms. An in silico pathway analysis predicted that CREB1 was the most significant upstream regulator. Thus, this study identified genes and pathways that may be involved in the pathomechanisms of axonal injury. We believe that our data should serve as a valuable resource to understand the molecular processes that define axonal injury-driven RGC death and to discover novel therapeutic targets for glaucoma. PMID:27353354

  3. Short- and long-wavelength-sensitive opsins are involved in photoreception both in the retina and throughout the central nervous system of crayfish.

    PubMed

    Kingston, Alexandra C N; Cronin, Thomas W

    2015-12-01

    Crayfish have two classes of photoreceptors in the retinas of their reflecting superposition eyes. Long-wavelength-sensitive photoreceptors, comprised of microvilli from R1-7 cells, make up the main rhabdoms. Eighth retinular cells, located distal to the main rhabdoms, house short-wavelength-sensitive photoreceptors. While the opsin involved in long-wavelength sensitivity has long been known, we present the first description of the short-wavelength-sensitive opsin in the retina of the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii. The expression patterns of these SWS and LWS opsin proteins in the retina are consistent with the previously described locations of SWS and LWS receptors. Crayfish also have a well-characterized extraocular photoreceptor, called the caudal photoreceptor, located in the sixth abdominal ganglion. To search for retinal opsins in the caudal photoreceptor (and elsewhere in the CNS), we used RT-PCR and immunohistochemical labeling. We found both SWS and LWS opsin transcripts not only in the sixth abdominal ganglion, but also in all ganglia of the nerve cord. Immunolabeling shows that both opsins are expressed in nerve fibers that extend from the brain through the entire length of the CNS. Thus, the same two photopigments are used both for vision in the retina and for extraocular functions throughout the CNS of crayfish. PMID:26445969

  4. Dorsal wrist ganglion: Current review of literature.

    PubMed

    Meena, Sanjay; Gupta, Ajay

    2014-06-01

    Ganglion cyst is the most common soft tissue tumour of hand. Sixty to seventy percent of ganglion cysts are found in the dorsal aspect of the wrist. They may affect any age group; however they are more common in the twenties to forties. Its origin and pathogenesis remains enigmatic. Non-surgical treatment is unreliable with a high recurrence rates. Open surgical excision leads to unsightly scar and poor outcome. Arthroscopy excision has shown very promising result with very low recurrence rate. We reviewed the current literature available on dorsal wrist ganglion. PMID:25983472

  5. Intramuscular Ganglion of the Quadriceps Femoris

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeung Jin; Chae, Soo Uk; Kim, Jong Yun; Jo, Hyang Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Ganglion cysts are common lesions that are most often found around the joints of the hands and feet. Ganglia around the distal femur usually occur within the synovial membrane or tendon sheath, but rarely within muscles. Several cases of intramuscular ganglions in the hand and wrist have been reported, but a ganglion cyst in the quadriceps muscle has rarely been addressed in studies. In this report, we present a 17-year-old patient with a painful movable mass in the intramuscular area of the quadriceps femoris that was diagnosed by ultrasound and treated by excision and biopsy. PMID:23508475

  6. Dorsal wrist ganglion: Current review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Sanjay; Gupta, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Ganglion cyst is the most common soft tissue tumour of hand. Sixty to seventy percent of ganglion cysts are found in the dorsal aspect of the wrist. They may affect any age group; however they are more common in the twenties to forties. Its origin and pathogenesis remains enigmatic. Non-surgical treatment is unreliable with a high recurrence rates. Open surgical excision leads to unsightly scar and poor outcome. Arthroscopy excision has shown very promising result with very low recurrence rate. We reviewed the current literature available on dorsal wrist ganglion. PMID:25983472

  7. [Intrinsically Photosensitive Retinal Ganglion Cells].

    PubMed

    Skorkovská, K; Skorkovská, Š

    2015-06-01

    Recently discovered intrinsically photosensitive melanopsin-containing retinal ganglion cells contribute to circadian photoentrainment and pupillary constriction; recent works have also brought new evidence for their accessory role in the visual system in humans. Pupil light reaction driven by individual photoreceptors can be isolated by means of the so called chromatic pupillography. The use of chromatic stimuli to elicit different pupillary responses may become an objective clinical pupil test in the detection of retinal diseases and in assessing new therapeutic approaches particularly in hereditary retinal degenerations like retinitis pigmentosa. In advanced stages of disease, the pupil light reaction is even more sensitive than standard electroretinography for detecting residual levels of photoreceptor activity. This review summarizes current knowledge on intrinsically photosensitive retinal cells and highlights its possible implications for clinical practice. PMID:26201360

  8. Expression and modulation of connexin 30.2, a novel gap junction protein in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Müller, Luis Pérez de Sevilla; Dedek, Karin; Janssen-Bienhold, Ulrike; Meyer, Arndt; Kreuzberg, Maria M; Lorenz, Susanne; Willecke, Klaus; Weiler, Reto

    2010-07-01

    Mammalian retinae express multiple connexins that mediate the metabolic and electrical coupling of various cell types. In retinal neurons, only connexin 36, connexin 45, connexin 50, and connexin 57 have been described so far. Here, we present an analysis of a novel retinal connexin, connexin 30.2 (Cx30.2), and its regulation in the mouse retina. To analyze the expression of Cx30.2, we used a transgenic mouse line in which the coding region of Cx30.2 was replaced by lacZ reporter DNA. We detected the lacZ signal in the nuclei of neurons located in the inner nuclear layer and the ganglion cell layer (GCL). In this study, we focused on the GCL and characterized the morphology of the Cx30.2-expressing cells. Using immunocytochemistry and intracellular dye injections, we found six different types of Cx30.2-expressing ganglion cells: one type of ON-OFF, three types of OFF, and two types of ON ganglion cells; among the latter was the RG A1 type. We show that RG A1 cells were heterologously coupled to numerous displaced amacrine cells. Our results suggest that these gap junction channels may be heterotypic, involving Cx30.2 and a connexin yet unidentified in the mouse retina. Gap junction coupling can be modulated by protein kinases, a process that plays a major role in retinal adaptation. Therefore, we studied the protein kinase-induced modulation of coupling between RG A1 and displaced amacrine cells. Our data provide evidence that coupling of RG A1 cells to displaced amacrine cells is mediated by Cx30.2 and that the extent of this coupling is modulated by protein kinase C. PMID:20537217

  9. Intraretinal projection of retinal ganglion cell axons as a model system for studying axon navigation

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Zheng-Zheng

    2008-01-01

    The initial step of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axon pathfinding involves directed growth of RGC axons toward the center of the retina, the optic disc, a process termed “intraretinal guidance”. Due to the accessibility of the system, and with various embryological, molecular, and genetic approaches, significant progress has been made in recent years toward understanding the mechanisms involved in the precise guidance of the RGC axons. As axons are extending from RGCs located throughout the retina, a multitude of factors expressed along with the differentiation wave are important for the guidance of the RGC axons. To ensure that the RGC axons are oriented correctly, restricted to the optic fiber layer (OFL) of the retina, and exit the eye properly, different sets of positive and negative factors cooperate in the process. Fasciculation mediated by a number of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) and modulation of axonal response to guidance factors provide additional mechanisms to ensure proper guidance of the RGC axons. The intraretinal axon guidance thus serves as an excellent model system for studying how different signals are regulated, modulated and integrated for guiding a large number of axons in three-dimensional space. PMID:17320832

  10. Exogenous glycosaminoglycans induce complete inversion of retinal ganglion cell bodies and their axons within the retinal neuroepithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Brittis, P A; Silver, J

    1994-01-01

    Prior to forming an axon, retinal ganglion cells retain a primitive radial configuration while maintaining ventricular and vitreal endfeet attachments. During their subsequent differentiation, ganglion cells polarize their cell body and axon only along the vitreal surface. When the ventricular surfaces of intact retinas in organ culture were exposed to free chondroitin sulfate (CS) in solution, both the cell body and nerve fiber layers were repolarized to the opposite side of the neuroepithelium. However, the basal lamina remained in its usual position. Thus, the ability to initiate an axon is not restricted to the vitreal endfoot region of differentiating neurons, and in addition, the radial position at which the axon emerges can be mediated by the location and concentration of the extracellular CS milieu. Images PMID:8052616

  11. A high frequency resonance in the responses of retinal ganglion cells to rapidly modulated stimuli: a computer model.

    PubMed

    Miller, J A; Denning, K S; George, J S; Marshak, D W; Kenyon, G T

    2006-01-01

    Brisk Y-type ganglion cells in the cat retina exhibit a high frequency resonance (HFR) in their responses to large, rapidly modulated stimuli. We used a computer model to test whether negative feedback mediated by axon-bearing amacrine cells onto ganglion cells could account for the experimentally observed properties of HFRs. Temporal modulation transfer functions (tMTFs) recorded from model ganglion cells exhibited HFR peaks whose amplitude, width, and locations were qualitatively consistent with experimental data. Moreover, the wide spatial distribution of axon-mediated feedback accounted for the observed increase in HFR amplitude with stimulus size. Model phase plots were qualitatively similar to those recorded from Y ganglion cells, including an anomalous phase advance that in our model coincided with the amplification of low-order harmonics that overlapped the HFR peak. When axon-mediated feedback in the model was directed primarily to bipolar cells, whose synaptic output was graded, or else when the model was replaced with a simple cascade of linear filters, it was possible to produce large HFR peaks but the region of anomalous phase advance was always eliminated, suggesting the critical involvement of strongly non-linear feedback loops. To investigate whether HFRs might contribute to visual processing, we simulated high frequency ocular tremor by rapidly modulating a naturalistic image. Visual signals riding on top of the imposed jitter conveyed an enhanced representation of large objects. We conclude that by amplifying responses to ocular tremor, HFRs may selectively enhance the processing of large image features. PMID:17020633

  12. Molecular biology of retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, M; Zhou, H; Nathans, J

    1996-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells are the output neurons that encode and transmit information from the eye to the brain. Their diverse physiologic and anatomic properties have been intensively studied and appear to account well for a number of psychophysical phenomena such as lateral inhibition and chromatic opponency. In this paper, we summarize our current view of retinal ganglion cell properties and pose a number of questions regarding underlying molecular mechanisms. As an example of one approach to understanding molecular mechanisms, we describe recent work on several POU domain transcription factors that are expressed in subsets of retinal ganglion cells and that appear to be involved in ganglion cell development. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8570601

  13. Infraspinatus paralysis due to spinoglenoid notch ganglion.

    PubMed

    Skirving, A P; Kozak, T K; Davis, S J

    1994-07-01

    We describe five patients, seen since 1984, with posterior shoulder pain and isolated wasting and weakness of the infraspinatus. In four of these a ganglion in the spinoglenoid notch was demonstrated by MRI and in one recent case ultrasound scans were positive. Three patients have been treated by operation, but there was recurrence in one after five years. In each confirmed case, the ganglion straddled the base of the spine of the scapula, extending into both supraspinatus and infraspinatus fossae. The nerve was either compressed against the spine or stretched over the posterior aspect of the ganglion. Adequate surgical exposure is essential to preserve the nerve to the infraspinatus and to allow complete removal of the ganglion. This is difficult because of the location and thin-walled nature of the cysts. PMID:8027146

  14. Ganglions of the hand and wrist.

    PubMed

    Young, L; Bartell, T; Logan, S E

    1988-06-01

    The ganglion is the most common soft tissue tumor of the hand and wrist, originating from the joint capsule or tendon sheath. Accurate diagnosis and proper treatment of these entities require a thorough knowledge of the anatomy of the wrist and hand as well as of the ganglion itself. Definitive therapy is based on total surgical removal of the cyst and its connections to the joint or tendon sheath. PMID:3287641

  15. Distribution of Purkinje cell-specific Zebrin-II/aldolase C immunoreactivity in the mouse, rat, rabbit, and human retina.

    PubMed

    Caffé, A R; Von Schantz, M; Szél, A; Voogd, J; Van Veen, T

    1994-10-01

    The developmental, genetic, and biochemical similarities that have been observed between the cerebellum and retina form the basis for ongoing investigations into retinal expression of cerebellar-specific proteins. We have examined the mouse, rat, rabbit, and human retina for expression of a protein that is present in parasagittal Purkinje cell strips and that is recognized by the antibody Zebrin-II. This protein has recently been identified as a member of the aldolase C isoenzymes. Western blotting and immunocytochemistry have been used. The monoclonal antibody Zebrin-II recognized a prominent 36 kDa protein band on immunoblots of both the cerebellum and the retina of the examined species. Immunocytochemistry showed that, in the three nonhuman species, cells were stained in the ganglion cell layer (GCL). In addition, in the mouse and rabbit, cells in the inner nuclear layer (INL) were also labeled. Except for the visual streak, there were more immunopositive cells in the rabbit GCL and INL than in corresponding areas of the mouse retina. In the human, in contrast to the other species, the photoreceptor cell layer was strongly aldolase C immunoreactive. In all species except for the rat, the photoreceptor inner segments also displayed a weak labeling. The results show that this aldolase C isoenzyme is another protein that is selectively expressed by the cerebellum and retina. Furthermore, the retinal expression is species specific, and this pattern seems to show a good correlation with the oxygenation level of the individual compartments. The indication that this aldolase C isoenzyme has specific developmental functions in the retina provides additional clues for our understanding of cerebellar organization. PMID:7814693

  16. Scene from above: retinal ganglion cell topography and spatial resolving power in the giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis).

    PubMed

    Coimbra, João Paulo; Hart, Nathan S; Collin, Shaun P; Manger, Paul R

    2013-06-15

    The giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) is a browser that uses its extensible tongue to selectively collect leaves during foraging. As the tallest extant terrestrial mammal, its elevated head height provides panoramic surveillance of the environment. These aspects of the giraffe's ecology and phenotype suggest that vision is of prime importance. Using Nissl-stained retinal wholemounts and stereological methods, we quantitatively assessed the retinal specializations in the ganglion cell layer of the giraffe. The mean total number of retinal ganglion cells was 1,393,779 and their topographic distribution revealed the presence of a horizontal visual streak and a temporal area. With a mean peak of 14,271 cells/mm(2), upper limits of spatial resolving power in the temporal area ranged from 25 to 27 cycles/degree. We also observed a dorsotemporal extension (anakatabatic area) that tapers toward the nasal retina giving rise to a complete dorsal arch. Using neurofilament-200 immunohistochemistry, we also detected a dorsal arch formed by alpha ganglion cells with density peaks in the temporal (14-15 cells/mm(2)) and dorsonasal (10 cells/mm(2)) regions. As with other artiodactyls, the giraffe shares the presence of a horizontal streak and a temporal area which, respectively, improve resolution along the horizon and in the frontal visual field. The dorsal arch is related to the giraffe's head height and affords enhanced resolution in the inferior visual field. The alpha ganglion cell distribution pattern is unique to the giraffe and enhances acquisition of motion information for the control of tongue movement during foraging and the detection of predators. PMID:23595815

  17. Seasonally Changing Cryptochrome 1b Expression in the Retinal Ganglion Cells of a Migrating Passerine Bird.

    PubMed

    Nießner, Christine; Gross, Julia Christina; Denzau, Susanne; Peichl, Leo; Fleissner, Gerta; Wiltschko, Wolfgang; Wiltschko, Roswitha

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochromes, blue-light absorbing proteins involved in the circadian clock, have been proposed to be the receptor molecules of the avian magnetic compass. In birds, several cryptochromes occur: Cryptochrome 2, Cryptochrome 4 and two splice products of Cryptochrome 1, Cry1a and Cry1b. With an antibody not distinguishing between the two splice products, Cryptochrome 1 had been detected in the retinal ganglion cells of garden warblers during migration. A recent study located Cry1a in the outer segments of UV/V-cones in the retina of domestic chickens and European robins, another migratory species. Here we report the presence of cryptochrome 1b (eCry1b) in retinal ganglion cells and displaced ganglion cells of European Robins, Erithacus rubecula. Immuno-histochemistry at the light microscopic and electron microscopic level showed eCry1b in the cell plasma, free in the cytosol as well as bound to membranes. This is supported by immuno-blotting. However, this applies only to robins in the migratory state. After the end of the migratory phase, the amount of eCry1b was markedly reduced and hardly detectable. In robins, the amount of eCry1b in the retinal ganglion cells varies with season: it appears to be strongly expressed only during the migratory period when the birds show nocturnal migratory restlessness. Since the avian magnetic compass does not seem to be restricted to the migratory phase, this seasonal variation makes a role of eCry1b in magnetoreception rather unlikely. Rather, it could be involved in physiological processes controlling migratory restlessness and thus enabling birds to perform their nocturnal flights. PMID:26953690

  18. Seasonally Changing Cryptochrome 1b Expression in the Retinal Ganglion Cells of a Migrating Passerine Bird

    PubMed Central

    Nießner, Christine; Gross, Julia Christina; Denzau, Susanne; Peichl, Leo; Fleissner, Gerta; Wiltschko, Wolfgang; Wiltschko, Roswitha

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochromes, blue-light absorbing proteins involved in the circadian clock, have been proposed to be the receptor molecules of the avian magnetic compass. In birds, several cryptochromes occur: Cryptochrome 2, Cryptochrome 4 and two splice products of Cryptochrome 1, Cry1a and Cry1b. With an antibody not distinguishing between the two splice products, Cryptochrome 1 had been detected in the retinal ganglion cells of garden warblers during migration. A recent study located Cry1a in the outer segments of UV/V-cones in the retina of domestic chickens and European robins, another migratory species. Here we report the presence of cryptochrome 1b (eCry1b) in retinal ganglion cells and displaced ganglion cells of European Robins, Erithacus rubecula. Immuno-histochemistry at the light microscopic and electron microscopic level showed eCry1b in the cell plasma, free in the cytosol as well as bound to membranes. This is supported by immuno-blotting. However, this applies only to robins in the migratory state. After the end of the migratory phase, the amount of eCry1b was markedly reduced and hardly detectable. In robins, the amount of eCry1b in the retinal ganglion cells varies with season: it appears to be strongly expressed only during the migratory period when the birds show nocturnal migratory restlessness. Since the avian magnetic compass does not seem to be restricted to the migratory phase, this seasonal variation makes a role of eCry1b in magnetoreception rather unlikely. Rather, it could be involved in physiological processes controlling migratory restlessness and thus enabling birds to perform their nocturnal flights. PMID:26953690

  19. Anterior Displacement of the Geniculate Ganglion.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Tomoyasu; Orita, Yorihisa; Nishizaki, Kazunori

    2016-04-01

    We present the case of a 34-year-old Japanese woman with cholesteatoma of the middle ear. During the operation, this patient showed an unusual position of the geniculate ganglion. We reviewed the computed tomography (CT) images targeting the ear of the present case after the operation. We found that the shortest ranges from the ampullated end of the superior semicircular canal to the geniculate ganglion fossa were 5.1 mm on both sides. We did not find any cases with obvious dislocation of the geniculate ganglion among the 67 cases for which we had performed tympanoplasty. Displacement of the geniculate ganglion is either extremely rare or typically unnoticed because this abnormality is asymptomatic. We speculated that the unusual position of the geniculate ganglion was due to an incomplete development of the tympanic tegmen. When surgical treatment such as decompression of the facial nerve or tympanoplasty is performed, close attention should always be paid to the anatomy of the facial nerve from the labyrinthine segment to the geniculate ganglion. In the present case, although connective tissues existed around the anterior epitympanic recess, we left this lesion to avoid iatrogenic facial palsy. PMID:27340996

  20. Characterisation of light responses in the retina of mice lacking principle components of rod, cone and melanopsin phototransduction signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Steven; Rodgers, Jessica; Hickey, Doron; Foster, Russell G; Peirson, Stuart N; Hankins, Mark W

    2016-01-01

    Gnat(-/-), Cnga3(-/-), Opn4(-/-) triple knockout (TKO) mice lack essential components of phototransduction signalling pathways present in rods, cones and photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (pRGCs), and are therefore expected to lack all sensitivity to light. However, a number of studies have shown that light responses persist in these mice. In this study we use multielectrode array (MEA) recordings and light-induced c-fos expression to further characterise the light responses of the TKO retina. Small, but robust electroretinogram type responses are routinely detected during MEA recordings, with properties consistent with rod driven responses. Furthermore, a distinctive pattern of light-induced c-fos expression is evident in the TKO retina, with c-fos expression largely restricted to a small subset of amacrine cells that express disabled-1 (Dab1) but lack expression of glycine transporter-1 (GlyT-1). Collectively these data are consistent with the persistence of a novel light sensing pathway in the TKO retina that originates in rod photoreceptors, potentially a rare subset of rods with distinct functional properties, and which is propagated to an atypical subtype of AII amacrine cells. Furthermore, the minimal responses observed following UV light stimulation suggest only a limited role for the non-visual opsin OPN5 in driving excitatory light responses within the mouse retina. PMID:27301998

  1. Characterisation of light responses in the retina of mice lacking principle components of rod, cone and melanopsin phototransduction signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Steven; Rodgers, Jessica; Hickey, Doron; Foster, Russell G.; Peirson, Stuart N.; Hankins, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Gnat−/−, Cnga3−/−, Opn4−/− triple knockout (TKO) mice lack essential components of phototransduction signalling pathways present in rods, cones and photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (pRGCs), and are therefore expected to lack all sensitivity to light. However, a number of studies have shown that light responses persist in these mice. In this study we use multielectrode array (MEA) recordings and light-induced c-fos expression to further characterise the light responses of the TKO retina. Small, but robust electroretinogram type responses are routinely detected during MEA recordings, with properties consistent with rod driven responses. Furthermore, a distinctive pattern of light-induced c-fos expression is evident in the TKO retina, with c-fos expression largely restricted to a small subset of amacrine cells that express disabled-1 (Dab1) but lack expression of glycine transporter-1 (GlyT-1). Collectively these data are consistent with the persistence of a novel light sensing pathway in the TKO retina that originates in rod photoreceptors, potentially a rare subset of rods with distinct functional properties, and which is propagated to an atypical subtype of AII amacrine cells. Furthermore, the minimal responses observed following UV light stimulation suggest only a limited role for the non-visual opsin OPN5 in driving excitatory light responses within the mouse retina. PMID:27301998

  2. Cholesterol oxidation in the retina: implications of 7KCh formation in chronic inflammation and age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Ignacio R.; Larrayoz, Ignacio M.

    2010-01-01

    This review will discuss the formation and potential implications of 7-ketocholesterol (7KCh) in the retina. 7KCh is a proinflammatory oxysterol known to be present in high amounts in oxidized LDL deposits associated with atheromatous plaques. 7KCh is generated in situ in these lipoprotein deposits where it can accumulate and reach very high concentrations. In normal primate retina, 7KCh has been found associated with lipoprotein deposits in the choriocapillaris, Bruch's membrane, and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). In photodamaged rats, 7KCh has been found in the neural retina in areas of high mitochondrial content, ganglion cells, photoreceptor inner segments and synapses, and the RPE. Intermediates found by LCMS indicate 7KCh is formed via a free radical-mediated mechanism catalyzed by iron. 7KCh seems to activate several kinase signaling pathways that work via nuclear factor κB and cause the induction of vascular endothelial growth factor, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-8. There seems to be little evidence of 7KCh metabolism in the retina, although some form of efflux mechanism may be active. The chronic mode of formation and the potent inflammatory properties of 7KCh indicate it may be an “age-related” risk factor in aging diseases such as atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's, and age-related macular degeneration. PMID:20567027

  3. Morphology and function of three VIP-expressing amacrine cell types in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Akrouh, Alejandro; Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Amacrine cells (ACs) are the most diverse class of neurons in the retina. The variety of signals provided by ACs allows the retina to encode a wide range of visual features. Of the 30-50 AC types in mammalian species, few have been studied in detail. Here, we combine genetic and viral strategies to identify and to characterize morphologically three vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-expressing GABAergic AC types (VIP1-, VIP2-, and VIP3-ACs) in mice. Somata of VIP1- and VIP2-ACs reside in the inner nuclear layer and somata of VIP3-ACs in the ganglion cell layer, and they show asymmetric distributions along the dorsoventral axis of the retina. Neurite arbors of VIP-ACs differ in size (VIP1-ACs ≈ VIP3-ACs > VIP2-ACs) and stratify in distinct sublaminae of the inner plexiform layer. To analyze light responses and underlying synaptic inputs, we target VIP-ACs under 2-photon guidance for patch-clamp recordings. VIP1-ACs depolarize strongly to light increments (ON) over a wide range of stimulus sizes but show size-selective responses to light decrements (OFF), depolarizing to small and hyperpolarizing to large stimuli. The switch in polarity of OFF responses is caused by pre- and postsynaptic surround inhibition. VIP2- and VIP3-ACs both show small depolarizations to ON stimuli and large hyperpolarizations to OFF stimuli but differ in their spatial response profiles. Depolarizations are caused by ON excitation outweighing ON inhibition, whereas hyperpolarizations result from pre- and postsynaptic OFF-ON crossover inhibition. VIP1-, VIP2-, and VIP3-ACs thus differ in response polarity and spatial tuning and contribute to the diversity of inhibitory and neuromodulatory signals in the retina. PMID:26311183

  4. Distinct nuclear localization patterns of DNA methyltransferases in developing and mature mammalian retina.

    PubMed

    Nasonkin, Igor O; Lazo, Kevin; Hambright, Dustin; Brooks, Matthew; Fariss, Robert; Swaroop, Anand

    2011-07-01

    DNA methyltransferases--DNMT1, DNMT3a, and DNMT3b--produce methylation patterns that dynamically regulate chromatin remodeling and gene expression. The vertebrate retina provides an ideal model to elucidate molecular control of neurogenesis as all neuronal cell types and Müller glia are generated in a conserved order from common pools of progenitor cells. As a prelude to exploring epigenetic regulation of mammalian retinal development, we investigated the expression of Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, and Dnmt3b in the mouse retina from embryonic day (E) 10.5 to 10 months of age. High levels of transcripts for all three Dnmt genes were observed in early stages of retinal differentiation, with significantly reduced expression after birth. Although DNMT1 protein is abundant in retinal progenitors at E10.5, it becomes restricted to postmitotic cells by E15.5. Most cells in the postnatal retina show nuclear immunostaining of DNMT1; however, the photoreceptors exhibit distinctive patterns. In rods, weak expression of DNMT1 is detected in perinuclear region and in the nucleus, whereas a strong nuclear labeling is evident in cones. DNMT3a and DNMT3b show a discrete pattern in developing retina with high expression at E11.5, little or no immunostaining by E15.5, and then postnatal expression overlapping with DNMT1 in early born neurons (ganglion, amacrine and horizontal cells, and cones). Robust nuclear localization of DNMTs in cones compared to rods suggests a potential role of DNA methylation in differential remodeling of chromatin in these two specialized neurons. Our studies indicate that DNA methyltransferases contribute to the establishment and maturation of cell fates during retinal development. PMID:21452232

  5. Imaging Single Cells in the Living Retina

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David R.

    2011-01-01

    A quarter century ago, we were limited to a macroscopic view of the retina inside the living eye. Since then, new imaging technologies, including confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, optical coherence tomography, and adaptive optics fundus imaging, transformed the eye into a microscope in which individual cells can now be resolved noninvasively. These technologies have enabled a wide range of studies of the retina that were previously impossible. PMID:21596053

  6. Flipping coins in the fly retina.

    PubMed

    Mikeladze-Dvali, Tamara; Desplan, Claude; Pistillo, Daniela

    2005-01-01

    Color vision in Drosophila melanogaster relies on the presence of two different subtypes of ommatidia: the "green" and "blue." These two classes are distributed randomly throughout the retina. The decision of a given ommatidium to take on the "green" or "blue" fate seems to be based on a stochastic mechanism. Here we compare the stochastic choice of photoreceptors in the fly retina with other known examples of random choices in both sensory and other systems. PMID:16243594

  7. Spectral imaging of the retina

    PubMed Central

    Mordant, D J; Al-Abboud, I; Muyo, G; Gorman, A; Sallam, A; Ritchie, P; Harvey, A R; McNaught, A I

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The work described here involved the use of a modified fundus camera to obtain sequential hyperspectral images of the retina in 14 normal volunteers and in 1 illustrative patient with a retinal vascular occlusion. Methods The paper describes analysis techniques, which allow oximetry within retinal vessels; these results are presented as retinal oximetry maps. Results Using spectral images, with wavelengths between 556 and 650 nm, the mean oxygen saturation (OS) value in temporal retinal arterioles in normal volunteers was 104.3 (±16.7), and in normal temporal retinal venules was 34.8 (±17.8). These values are comparable to those quoted in the literature, although, the venular saturations are slightly lower than those values found by other authors; explanations are offered for these differences. Discussion The described imaging and analysis techniques produce a clinically useful map of retinal oximetric values. The results from normal volunteers and from one illustrative patient are presented. Further developments, including the recent development of a ‘snapshot' spectral camera, promises enhanced non-invasive retinal vessel oximetry mapping. PMID:21390065

  8. Relationship between dorsal ganglion cysts of the wrist and intraosseous ganglion cysts of the carpal bones.

    PubMed

    Van den Dungen, Sophie; Marchesi, Simona; Ezzedine, Rabih; Bindou, David; Lorea, Patrick

    2005-10-01

    Soft tissue ganglion cysts are the most common benign tumours of the wrist; their pathogenesis remains controversial. We prospectively screened the radiographic appearance of the wrists of 51 patients presenting to a single surgeon with dorsal wrist ganglions during a one-year period. Postero-anterior and lateral radiographs were systematically performed looking for possible associated intraosseous ganglion cysts. There were 51 dorsal soft tissue ganglion cysts in 51 patients. We detected 29 associated intraosseous ganglia in 24 patients (47%): 16 ganglia in the lunate bone (55%), 5 in the capitate bone, 7 in the scaphoid and 1 in the trapezoid. Mean size of the intraosseous ganglia was 3 mm (range, 2 to 5 mm). This high prevalence of intraosseous ganglia in association with soft tissue ganglia has to our knowledge never been reported previously. A common aetiology for these two types of ganglion cysts may explain this high association rate. PMID:16305077

  9. Highly Efficient Delivery of Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors to the Primate Retina.

    PubMed

    Boye, Shannon E; Alexander, John J; Witherspoon, C Douglas; Boye, Sanford L; Peterson, James J; Clark, Mark E; Sandefer, Kristen J; Girkin, Chris A; Hauswirth, William W; Gamlin, Paul D

    2016-08-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has emerged as the preferred vector for targeting gene expression to the retina. Subretinally injected AAV can efficiently transduce retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptors in primate retina. Inner and middle primate retina can be transduced by intravitreally delivered AAV, but with low efficiency. This is due to dilution of vector, potential neutralization of capsid because it is not confined to the immune-privileged retinal compartment, and the presence of the inner limiting membrane (ILM), a barrier separating the vitreous from the neural retina. We here describe a novel "subILM" injection method that addresses all three issues. Specifically, vector is placed in a surgically induced, hydrodissected space between the ILM and neural retina. In an initial experiment, we injected viscoelastic (Healon(®)), a substance we confirmed was biocompatible with AAV, to create a subILM bleb and subsequently injected AAV2-GFP into the bleb after irrigation with basic salt solution. For later experiments, we used a Healon-AAV mixture to place single, subILM injections. In all cases, subILM delivery of AAV was well tolerated-no inflammation or gross structural changes were observed by ophthalmological examination or optical coherence tomography. In-life fluorescence imaging revealed profound transgene expression within the area of the subILM injection bleb that persisted for the study duration. Uniform and extensive transduction of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) was achieved in the areas beneath the subILM bleb. Transduction of Müller glia, ON bipolar cells, and photoreceptors was also observed. Robust central labeling from green fluorescent protein-expressing RGCs confirmed their continued survival, and was observed in the lateral geniculate nucleus, the superior colliculus, and the pretectum. Our results confirm that the ILM is a major barrier to transduction by AAV in primate retina and that, when it is circumvented, the efficiency and

  10. Doublecortin is widely expressed in the developing and adult retina of sharks.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Farías, Nuria; Candal, Eva

    2015-05-01

    Doublecortin (DCX) is a microtubule-associated protein that has been considered a marker for neuronal precursors and young migrating neurons during the development of the central nervous system and in adult neurogenic niches. The retina of fishes represents an accessible, continuously growing and highly structured (layered) part of the central nervous system and, therefore, offers an exceptional model to extend our knowledge on the possible role of DCX in promoting neurogenesis and migration to appropriate layers. We have analyzed the distribution of DCX in the embryonic and postembryonic retina of a small shark, the lesser spotted dogfish Scyliorhinus canicula, by means of immunohistochemistry. We investigated the relationship between DCX expression and the neurogenic state of DCX-labeled cells by exploring its co-localization with the proliferation marker PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) and the marker of neuronal differentiation HuC/D. Since radially migrating neurons use radial glial fibers as substrate, we explored the possible correlation between DCX expression and cell migration along radial glia by comparing its expression with that of the glial marker GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein). Additionally, we characterized DCX-expressing cells by double immunocytochemistry using antibodies against Calbindin (a marker for mature bipolar and horizontal cells in this species) and Pax6, which has been proposed as a regulator of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and neuron diversification in the neural retina of sharks. Strong DCX immunoreactivity was observed in immature cells and cell processes, at a time when retinal cells were not yet organized into different laminae. DCX was also found in subsets of mature ganglion, amacrine, bipolar and horizontal cells long after they had exited the cell cycle, a pattern that was maintained in juveniles and adults. Our results on DCX expression in the retina are compatible with a role for DCX in cell

  11. Developmental Changes in NMDA Receptor Subunit Composition at ON and OFF Bipolar Cell Synapses onto Direction-Selective Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, Benjamin K.; Park, Silvia J. H.; Wong, Kwoon Y.

    2014-01-01

    In the developing mouse retina, spontaneous and light-driven activity shapes bipolar→ganglion cell glutamatergic synapse formation, beginning around the time of eye-opening (P12–P14) and extending through the first postnatal month. During this time, glutamate release can spill outside the synaptic cleft and possibly stimulate extrasynaptic NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) on ganglion cells. Furthermore, the role of NMDARs during development may differ between ON and OFF bipolar synapses as in mature retina, where ON synapses reportedly include extrasynaptic NMDARs with GluN2B subunits. To better understand the function of glutamatergic synapses during development, we made whole-cell recordings of NMDAR-mediated responses, in vitro, from two types of genetically identified direction-selective ganglion cells (dsGCs): TRHR (thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor) and Drd4 (dopamine receptor 4). Both dsGC types responded to puffed NMDA between P7 and P28; and both types exhibited robust light-evoked NMDAR-mediated responses at P14 and P28 that were quantified by conductance analysis during nicotinic and GABAA receptor blockade. For a given cell type and at a given age, ON and OFF bipolar cell inputs evoked similar NMDAR-mediated responses, suggesting that ON-versus-OFF differences in mature retina do not apply to the cell types or ages studied here. At P14, puff- and light-evoked NMDAR-mediated responses in both dsGCs were partially blocked by the GluN2B antagonist ifenprodil, whereas at P28 only TRHR cells remained ifenprodil-sensitive. NMDARs contribute at both ON and OFF bipolar cell synapses during a period of robust activity-dependent synaptic development, with declining GluN2B involvement over time in specific ganglion cell types. PMID:24478373

  12. Effects of Dietary Iron and Gamma Radiation on the Rat Retina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Jennifer; Marshall, Grace; Theriot, Corey A.; Chacon, Natalia; Zwart, Sara; Zanello, Susana B.

    2012-01-01

    A health risk of concern for NASA relates to radiation exposure and its synergistic effects with other space environmental factors, includi ng nutritional status of the crew. Astronauts consume almost three times the recommended daily allowance of iron due to the use of fortifie d foods aboard the International Space Station, with iron intake occa sionally exceeding six times the recommended values. Recently, NASA has become concerned with visual changes associated with spaceflight, a nd research is being conducted to elucidate the etiology of eye structure alterations in the spaceflight environment. Terrestrially, iron o verload is also associated with certain optic neuropathies. In additi on, due to its role in Fenton reactions, iron can potentiate oxidative stress, which is a recognized cause of cataract formation. As part o f a study investigating the combined effects of radiation exposure an d iron overload on multiple physiological systems, we focused on defining the effects of both treatments on eye biology. In this study, 12- week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of four experimental groups: normal iron/no radiation (Control/Sham), high iron/no radiat ion (Fe/Sham), normal iron/gamma radiation (3 Gy cumulative dose, fra ctionated at 0.375 Gy/d every other day for 16 d) (Control/Rad), and high iron/gamma radiation (Fe/Rad). Oxidative stress-induced DNA damag e, measured as concentration of the marker 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG) in eye retinal tissue by enzyme-immunoanalysis did not show significant changes among treatments. However, there was an overall i ncrease in 8OHdG immunostaining density in retina sections due to radiation exposure (P = 0.05). Increased dietary iron and radiation expos ure had an interactive effect (P = 0.02) on 8OHdG immunostaining of t he retinal ganglion cell layer with iron diet increasing the signal in the group not exposed to radiation (P = 0.05). qPCR gene expression profiling of relevant target genes

  13. The Topographic Organization of Retinal Ganglion Cell Density and Spatial Resolving Power in an Unusual Arboreal and Slow-Moving Strepsirhine Primate, the Potto (Perodicticus potto).

    PubMed

    Coimbra, João Paulo; Kaswera-Kyamakya, Consolate; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Manger, Paul R; Collin, Shaun P

    2016-01-01

    The potto (Perodicticus potto) is an arboreal strepsirhine found in the rainforests of central Africa. In contrast to most primates, the potto shows slow-moving locomotion over the upper surface of branches, where it forages for exudates and crawling invertebrates with its head held very close to the substrate. Here, we asked whether the retina of the potto displays topographic specializations in neuronal density that correlate with its unusual lifestyle. Using stereology and retinal wholemounts, we measured the total number and topographic distribution of retinal ganglion cells (total and presumed parasol), as well as estimating the upper limits of the spatial resolution of the potto eye. We estimated ∼210,000 retinal ganglion cells, of which ∼7% (∼14,000) comprise presumed parasol ganglion cells. The topographic distribution of both total and parasol ganglion cells reveals a concentric centroperipheral organization with a nasoventral asymmetry. Combined with the upwardly shifted orbits of the potto, this nasoventral increase in parasol ganglion cell density enhances contrast sensitivity and motion detection skywards, which potentially assists with the detection of predators in the high canopy. The central area of the potto occurs ∼2.5 mm temporal to the optic disc and contains a maximum ganglion cell density of ∼4,300 cells/mm2. We found no anatomical evidence of a fovea within this region. Using maximum ganglion cell density and eye size (∼14 mm), we estimated upper limits of spatial resolving power between 4.1 and 4.4 cycles/degree. Despite their reported reliance on olfaction to detect exudates, this level of spatial resolution potentially assists pottos with foraging for small invertebrates and in the detection of predators. PMID:26820506

  14. Characterization of the retina in the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Marci L.

    Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) are involved in visual processing and are expressed by inner retinal neurons in all species studied to date (Keyser et al., 2000; Dmitrieva et al., 2007; Liu et al., 2009), but their distribution in the mouse retina remains unknown. Reductions in alpha7 nicotinic AChRs (nAChRs) are thought to contribute to memory and visual deficits observed in Alzheimer's and schizophrenia (Coyle et al., 1983; Nordberg et al., 1999; Leonard et al., 2006). However, the alpha7 nAChR knockout (KO) mouse has a mild phenotype (Paylor et al., 1998; Fernandes et al., 2006; Young et al., 2007; Origlia et al., 2012). The purpose of this study was to determine the expression of AChRs in wildtype (WT) mouse retina and to assess whether up-regulation of other AChRs in the alpha7 nAChR KO retina may explain the minimal deficits described in the KO mouse. Reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) showed that mRNA transcripts for alpha2-7, alpha 9, alpha10, beta2-4 nAChR subunits and m1-m5 muscarinic AChR (mAChR) subtypes were present in WT murine retina. Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of alpha3-5, alpha9, and m1-m5 AChR proteins and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated nAChR and mAChR proteins expressed by subsets of bipolar, amacrine and ganglion cells. This is the first reported expression of alpha9 and alpha10 nAChR transcripts and alpha9 nAChR proteins in the retina of any species. Quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR) showed changes in AChR transcript expression in the alpha7 nAChR KO mouse retina relative to WT. Within whole retina alpha2, alpha9, alpha10, beta4, m1 and m4 AChR transcripts were up-regulated, while alpha5 nAChR transcripts were down-regulated. However, cell populations showed subtle differences; m4 mAChR transcripts were up-regulated in the ganglion cell layer and outer portion of the inner nuclear layer (oINL),while beta4 nAChR transcript up-regulation was limited to the oINL. Surprisingly, alpha2, alpha9, beta4, m2 and m4 transcripts were

  15. Ectopic ganglion in cauda equina: case report.

    PubMed

    Conner, Andrew K; Fung, Kar-Ming; Peterson, Jo Elle G; Glenn, Chad A; Martin, Michael D

    2016-06-01

    Macroscopic ectopic or heterotopic ganglionic tissue within the cauda equina is a very rare pathological finding and is usually associated with spinal dysraphism. However, it may mimic genuine neoplasms of the cauda equina. The authors describe a 29-year-old woman with a history of back pain, right leg pain, and urinary incontinence in whom imaging demonstrated an enhancing mass located in the cauda equina at the L1-2 interspace. The patient subsequently underwent biopsy and was found to have a focus of ectopic ganglionic tissue that was 1.3 cm in greatest dimension. To the authors' knowledge, ectopic or heterotopic ganglionic tissue within the cauda equina in a patient without evidence of spinal dysraphism has never been reported. This patient presented with imaging and clinical findings suggestive of a neoplasm, and an open biopsy proved the lesion to be ectopic ganglionic tissue. The authors suggest that ectopic ganglionic tissue be added to the list of differential diagnoses of a space-occupying lesion arising from the cauda equina. PMID:26871650

  16. Effects of Histamine on Light Responses of Amacrine Cells in Tiger Salamander Retina

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yongchun; Satoh, Hiromasa; Vila, Alejandro; Wu, Samuel M.; Marshak, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Using immunofluorescence, we showed that histamine receptor 1 is expressed by horizontal cell axons and a subset of amacrine cells in the tiger salamander retina. The effects of histamine on light responses of amacrine cells were studied in slice preparations. Histamine modulated the light responses of many salamander amacrine cells, depending upon the morphological type. The most pronounced effects of histamine were decreases in the light responses of broadly stratified amacrine cells, particularly those having medium-sized dendritic field diameters. To determine whether the effects of histamine were direct, Co++ was substituted for Ca++ in the extracellular medium to block synaptic transmission. Histamine still affected broadly stratified amacrine cells, but not narrowly stratified amacrine cells under these conditions. Taken together, these findings suggest that inhibitory interactions between strata of the IPL and within the classical receptive fields of the ganglion cells would be particularly sensitive to histamine released from retinopetal axons. PMID:20878231

  17. Radiation therapy in and about the retina, optic nerve, and anterior visual pathway. Psychophysical assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, C.R.; Enoch, J.M.; Temme, L.A.

    1981-04-01

    Visual changes may develop in patients receiving radiation therapy for malignant neoplasms in and about the optic nerve and anterior visual pathway. Cases have been studied using a series of psychophysical tests, including kinetic perimetry, increment threshold determinations, Flashing Repeat Static Test, and sustained- and transient-like functions. A characteristic time-dependent reduction in sensitivity has been identified in these patients. This finding, in addition to the presence of nerve fiber bundle defects, appears to place the pathologic changes in the axon of the ganglion cell posterior to the lamina cribrosa. Any change in the sustained- and transient-like functions, the organization of which appears to be in the neural retina, was seen only if a concomitant radiation retinopathy was identified.

  18. Radiation therapy in and about the retina, optic nerve, and anterior visual pathway: psychophysical assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, C.R.; Enoch, J.M.; Temme, L.A.

    1981-04-01

    Visual changes may develop in patients receiving radiation therapy for malignant neoplasms in and about the optic nerve and anterior visual pathway. Cases have been studied using a series of psychophysical tests, including kinetic perimetry, increment threshold determinations, Flashing Repeat Static Test, and sustained- and transient-like functions. A characteristic time-dependent reduction in sensitivity has been identified in these patients. This finding, in addition to the presence of nerve fiber bundle defects, appears to place the pathologic changes in the axon of the ganglion cell posterior to the lamina cribrosa. Any change in the sustained- and transient-like functions, the organization of which appears to be in the neural retina, was seen only if a concomitant radiation retinopathy was identified.

  19. Simultaneous in vivo imaging of melanin and lipofuscin in the retina with multimodal photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangyang; Zhang, Hao F.; Zhou, Lixiang; Jiao, Shuliang

    2012-02-01

    We combined photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM) with autofluorescence imaging for simultaneous in vivo imaging of dual molecular contrasts in the retina using a single light source. The dual molecular contrasts come from melanin and lipofuscin in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Melanin and lipofuscin are two types of pigments and are believed to play opposite roles (protective vs. exacerbate) in the RPE in the aging process. We successfully imaged the retina of pigmented and albino rats at different ages. The experimental results showed that multimodal PAOM system can be a potentially powerful tool in the study of age-related degenerative retinal diseases.

  20. Compression Neuropathy of the Radial Nerve Due to Ganglion Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Lifchez, Scott D.; Dzwierzynski, William W.

    2008-01-01

    Ganglions of the upper extremity are common. Radial nerve dysfunction, particularly radial sensory dysfunction, is a rare finding in association with a ganglion. We present our experience with two such ganglia and a review of the literature. PMID:18780092

  1. Immunocytochemical and biochemical evidence for aromatase in neurons of the retina, optic tectum and retinotectal pathways in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Gelinas, D; Callard, G V

    1993-12-01

    Using an animal model in which neural aromatase is apparently overexpressed (the goldfish, Carassius auratus) and an anti-human placental antibody which specifically crossreacts with goldfish brain aromatase, aromatase-immunoreactive neuronal cell bodies and fibers have been localized within the retina. These include a subset of horizontal cells, bipolar cells, and amacrine cells of the inner nuclear layer, some fibers of the outer and inner synaptic layers and certain cells of the ganglion cell layer; photoreceptors were never labeled. Some ganglion cell projections to the brain via the optic nerve and optic tract were aromatase-positive, as were small neurons of the stratum periventriculare (SPV) and fibers of two other strata of the optic tectum. Aromatase activity, as measured by [3H]androgen by tissue homogenates and cell cultures, confirmed the presence of aromatase in retina and in brain regions containing the optic tectum. This localization of the rate-limiting enzyme in estrogen biosynthesis suggests that neuroestrogen derived from circulating androgen m ay modulate transmission and integration of visual information important for reproduction in this species. PMID:8680435

  2. Unique Regulation of the Melatonin Synthetic Pathway in the Retina of Diurnal Female Arvicanthis ansorgei (Rodentia).

    PubMed

    Gianesini, Coralie; Clesse, Daniel; Tosini, Gianluca; Hicks, David; Laurent, Virginie

    2015-09-01

    Knowledge about melatonin synthesis and its potential roles within the retina remains fragmented, especially in mammals where studies have focused on the penultimate enzyme of melatonin synthesis arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT), whereas the final enzyme necessary for melatonin production is hydroxyindole-O-methytransferase (HIOMT). We explored multiple parameters of the melatonin synthetic pathway in the cone-rich retina of a diurnal rodent, Arvicanthis ansorgei, cones being previously implicated as probable reservoirs of melatonin production. We analyzed the temporal and spatial expression of Aa-nat mRNA and AA-NAT protein and enzymatic activity of AA-NAT, HIOMT, as well as the melatonin receptor type 1 and melatonin itself. We report that Aa-nat mRNA was localized principally to cones and ganglion cells (retinal ganglion cell [RGC]) with opposing cyclic expression, being maximal in cones during the night, and maximal in RGC in the daytime. AA-NAT protein was also immunolocalized to these same populations, and was present and active throughout the 24-hour period. HIOMT immunolocalization mirrored that of AA-NAT, but expression levels and activity were extremely low and remained uniform throughout the 24-hour period. MT1 showed a complementary expression pattern to the synthetic enzymes, present in rod photoreceptors, some inner retinal neurons and RGC. Surprisingly, melatonin levels were consistently low throughout the day/night cycle, in accordance with the low activity levels of HIOMT. These data demonstrate that the melatonin synthetic pathway in a diurnal rodent differs from that described for other tissues and species (nocturnal and diurnal), the contrasting phase expression in photoreceptors and RGC, suggesting distinct roles in these populations. PMID:26153723

  3. Light responses and morphology of bNOS-immunoreactive neurons in the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Ji-Jie; Gao, Fan; Wu, Samuel M.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), produced by NO synthase (NOS), modulates the function of all retinal neurons and ocular blood vessels and participates in the pathogenesis of ocular diseases. To further understand the regulation of ocular NO release, we systematically studied the morphology, topography and light responses of NOS-containing amacrine cells (NOACs) in dark-adapted mouse retina. Immunohistological staining for neuronal NOS (bNOS), combined with retrograde labeling of ganglion cells (GCs) with Neurobiotin (NB, a gap junction permeable dye) and Lucifer yellow (LY, a less permeable dye), was used to identify NOACs. The light responses of ACs were recorded under whole-cell voltage clamp conditions and cell morphology was examined with a confocal microscope. We found that in dark-adapted conditions bNOS-immunoreactivity (IR) was present primarily in the inner nuclear layer and the ganglion cell layer. bNOS-IR somas were negative for LY, thus they were identified as ACs; nearly 6 % of the cells were labeled by NB but not by LY, indicating that they were dye-coupled with GCs. Three morphological subtypes of NOACs (NI, NII and displaced) were identified. The cell density, inter-cellular distance and the distribution of NOACs were studied in whole retinas. Light evoked depolarizing highly sensitive ON-OFF responses in NI cells and less sensitive OFF responses in NII cells. Frequent (1 to 2 Hz) or abrupt change of light-intensity evoked larger peak responses. The possibility for light to modify NO release from NOACs is discussed. PMID:20503422

  4. Hyperoxia depletes (6R)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin levels in the neonatal retina: implications for nitric oxide synthase function in retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Edgar, Kevin S; Matesanz, Nuria; Gardiner, Tom A; Katusic, Zvonimir S; McDonald, Denise M

    2015-06-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity is a sight-threatening complication of premature birth caused by nitro-oxidative insult to the developing retinal vasculature during therapeutic hyperoxia exposure and later ischemia-induced neovascularization on supplemental oxygen withdrawal. In the vasodegenerative phase, during hyperoxia, defective endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) produces reactive oxygen and nitrogen free radicals rather than vasoprotective nitric oxide for unclear reasons. Crucially, normal NOS function depends on availability of the cofactor (6R)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). Because BH4 synthesis is controlled enzymatically by GTP cyclohydrolase (GTPCH), we used GTPCH-depleted mice [hyperphenylalaninemia strain (hph1)] to investigate the impact of hyperoxia on BH4 bioavailability and retinal vascular pathology in the neonate. Hyperoxia decreased BH4 in retinas, lungs, and aortas in all experimental groups, resulting in a dose-dependent decrease in NOS activity and, in the wild-type group, elevated NOS-derived superoxide. Retinal dopamine levels were similarly diminished, consistent with the dependence of tyrosine hydroxylase on BH4. Despite greater depletion of BH4, the hph(+/-) and hph1(-/-) groups did not show exacerbated hyperoxia-induced vessel closure, but exhibited greater vascular protection and reduced progression to neovascular disease. This vasoprotective effect was independent of enhanced circulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which was reduced by hyperoxia, but to local retinal ganglion cell layer-derived VEGF. In conclusion, a constitutively higher level of VEGF expression associated with retinal development protects GTPCH-deficient neonates from oxygen-induced vascular damage. PMID:25913075

  5. Intraneural ganglion cyst of the tibial nerve.

    PubMed

    Adn, M; Hamlat, A; Morandi, X; Guegan, Y

    2006-08-01

    Intraneural ganglion cyst of the tibial nerve is very rare. To date, only 5 cases of this entity in the popliteal fossa have been reported. We report a new case and review the previously reported cases. A 40-year-old man experienced a mild vague pain in the medial half of his right foot for 3 years. Magnetic resonance imaging scan demonstrated a soft-tissue mass along the right tibial nerve. At surgery, an intraneural ganglion cyst was evacuated. After 12 months, the patient was pain-free with no signs of recurrence. Trauma might be a contributing factor to the development of intraneural ganglion cysts. Application of microsurgical techniques is encouraged. PMID:16775659

  6. COMPARISON OF THE ONTOGENY OF THE VESICULAR GLUTAMATE TRANSPORTER 3 (VGLUT3) WITH VGLUT1 AND VGLUT2 IN THE RAT RETINA

    PubMed Central

    Stella, Salvatore L.; Li, Stefanie; Sabatini, Andrea; Vila, Alejandro; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the retina, and most glutamatergic neurons express one of the three known vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1, 2, or 3). However, the expression profiles of these transporters vary greatly in the retina. VGLUT1 is expressed by photoreceptor and bipolar cell terminals, and VGLUT2 appears to be predominately expressed by ganglion cells, and perhaps Müller cells, cone photoreceptor terminals, and horizontal cells in some species. The discovery of a third vesicular glutamate transporter, VGLUT3, has brought about speculation concerning its role and function based on its expression in amacrine cells. To address this we studied the postnatal development of VGLUT3 from day 0 through adult in the rat retina, and compared this with the expression patterns of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2. VGLUT3 expression was restricted to a population of amacrine cells. Expression of VGLUT3 was first observed at postnatal day 10 (P10) in the soma and some processes, which extensively arborized in both the ON and OFF sublamina of the IPL by P15. In contrast, VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 expression appeared earlier than VGLUT3; with VGLUT1 initially detected at P5 in photoreceptor terminals and P6 in bipolar terminals, and VGLUT2 immunoreactivity initially detected at P0 in ganglion cell bodies, and remained prominent throughout all stages of development. Interestingly, VGLUT3 has extensive somatic expression throughout development, which could be involved in non-synaptic modulation by glutamate in developing retina, and could influence trophic and extra-synaptic neuronal signaling by glutamate in the inner retina. PMID:18482716

  7. A Self-Assembling Injectable Biomimetic Microenvironment Encourages Retinal Ganglion Cell Axon Extension in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Laughter, Melissa R; Ammar, David A; Bardill, James R; Pena, Brisa; Kahook, Malik Y; Lee, David J; Park, Daewon

    2016-08-17

    Sensory-somatic nervous system neurons, such as retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), are typically thought to be incapable of regenerating. However, it is now known that these cells may be stimulated to regenerate by providing them with a growth permissive environment. We have engineered an injectable microenvironment designed to provide growth-stimulating cues for RGC culture. Upon gelation, this injectable material not only self-assembles into laminar sheets, similar to retinal organization, but also possesses a storage modulus comparable to that of retinal tissue. Primary rat RGCs were grown, stained, and imaged in this three-dimensional scaffold. We were able to show that RGCs grown in this retina-like structure exhibited characteristic long, prominent axons. In addition, RGCs showed a consistent increase in average axon length and neurite-bearing ratio over the 7 day culture period, indicating this scaffold is capable of supporting substantial RGC axon extension. PMID:27434231

  8. NMDA Receptors Multiplicatively Scale Visual Signals and Enhance Directional Motion Discrimination in Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    PubMed

    Poleg-Polsky, Alon; Diamond, Jeffrey S

    2016-03-16

    Postsynaptic responses in many CNS neurons are typically small and variable, often making it difficult to distinguish physiologically relevant signals from background noise. To extract salient information, neurons are thought to integrate multiple synaptic inputs and/or selectively amplify specific synaptic activation patterns. Here, we present evidence for a third strategy: directionally selective ganglion cells (DSGCs) in the mouse retina multiplicatively scale visual signals via a mechanism that requires both nonlinear NMDA receptor (NMDAR) conductances in DSGC dendrites and directionally tuned inhibition provided by the upstream retinal circuitry. Postsynaptic multiplication enables DSGCs to discriminate visual motion more accurately in noisy visual conditions without compromising directional tuning. These findings demonstrate a novel role for NMDARs in synaptic processing and provide new insights into how synaptic and network features interact to accomplish physiologically relevant neural computations. PMID:26948896

  9. Imaging Light Responses of Foveal Ganglion Cells in the Living Macaque Eye

    PubMed Central

    Masella, Benjamin; Dalkara, Deniz; Zhang, Jie; Flannery, John. G.; Schaffer, David V.; Williams, David R.

    2014-01-01

    The fovea dominates primate vision, and its anatomy and perceptual abilities are well studied, but its physiology has been little explored because of limitations of current physiological methods. In this study, we adapted a novel in vivo imaging method, originally developed in mouse retina, to explore foveal physiology in the macaque, which permits the repeated imaging of the functional response of many retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) simultaneously. A genetically encoded calcium indicator, G-CaMP5, was inserted into foveal RGCs, followed by calcium imaging of the displacement of foveal RGCs from their receptive fields, and their intensity-response functions. The spatial offset of foveal RGCs from their cone inputs makes this method especially appropriate for fovea by permitting imaging of RGC responses without excessive light adaptation of cones. This new method will permit the tracking of visual development, progression of retinal disease, or therapeutic interventions, such as insertion of visual prostheses. PMID:24806684

  10. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor prevents dendritic retraction of adult mouse retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Binley, Kate E; Ng, Wai S; Barde, Yves-Alain; Song, Bing; Morgan, James E

    2016-08-01

    We used cultured adult mouse retinae as a model system to follow and quantify the retraction of dendrites using diolistic labelling of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) following explantation. Cell death was monitored in parallel by nuclear staining as 'labelling' with RGC and apoptotic markers was inconsistent and exceedingly difficult to quantify reliably. Nuclear staining allowed us to delineate a lengthy time window during which dendrite retraction can be monitored in the absence of RGC death. The addition of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) produced a marked reduction in dendritic degeneration, even when application was delayed for 3 days after retinal explantation. These results suggest that the delayed addition of trophic factors may be functionally beneficial before the loss of cell bodies in the course of conditions such as glaucoma. PMID:27285957

  11. Imaging light responses of foveal ganglion cells in the living macaque eye.

    PubMed

    Yin, Lu; Masella, Benjamin; Dalkara, Deniz; Zhang, Jie; Flannery, John G; Schaffer, David V; Williams, David R; Merigan, William H

    2014-05-01

    The fovea dominates primate vision, and its anatomy and perceptual abilities are well studied, but its physiology has been little explored because of limitations of current physiological methods. In this study, we adapted a novel in vivo imaging method, originally developed in mouse retina, to explore foveal physiology in the macaque, which permits the repeated imaging of the functional response of many retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) simultaneously. A genetically encoded calcium indicator, G-CaMP5, was inserted into foveal RGCs, followed by calcium imaging of the displacement of foveal RGCs from their receptive fields, and their intensity-response functions. The spatial offset of foveal RGCs from their cone inputs makes this method especially appropriate for fovea by permitting imaging of RGC responses without excessive light adaptation of cones. This new method will permit the tracking of visual development, progression of retinal disease, or therapeutic interventions, such as insertion of visual prostheses. PMID:24806684

  12. Synaptic connections of amacrine cells containing vesicular glutamate transporter 3 in baboon retinas

    PubMed Central

    MARSHAK, DAVID W.; CHUANG, ALICE Z.; DOLINO, DREW M.; JACOBY, ROY A.; LIU, WEILEY S.; LONG, YE; SHERMAN, MICHAEL B.; SUH, JAE M.; VILA, ALEJANDRO; MILLS, STEPHEN L.

    2016-01-01

    The goals of these experiments were to describe the morphology and synaptic connections of amacrine cells in the baboon retina that contain immunoreactive vesicular glutamate transporter 3 (vGluT3). These amacrine cells had the morphology characteristic of knotty bistratified type 1 cells, and their dendrites formed two plexuses on either side of the center of the inner plexiform layer. The primary dendrites received large synapses from amacrine cells, and the higher-order dendrites were both pre- and postsynaptic to other amacrine cells. Based on light microscopic immunolabeling results, these include AII cells and starburst cells, but not the polyaxonal amacrine cells tracer-coupled to ON parasol ganglion cells. The vGluT3 cells received input from ON bipolar cells at ribbon synapses and made synapses onto OFF bipolar cells, including the diffuse DB3a type. Many synapses from vGluT3 cells onto retinal ganglion cells were observed in both plexuses. At synapses where vGluT3 cells were presynaptic, two types of postsynaptic densities were observed; there were relatively thin ones characteristic of inhibitory synapses and relatively thick ones characteristic of excitatory synapses. In the light microscopic experiments with Neurobiotin-injected ganglion cells, vGluT3 cells made contacts with midget and parasol ganglion cells, including both ON and OFF types. Puncta containing immunoreactive gephyrin, an inhibitory synapse marker, were found at appositions between vGluT3 cells and each of the four types of labeled ganglion cells. The vGluT3 cells did not have detectable levels of immunoreactive γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) or immunoreactive glycine transporter 1. Thus, the vGluT3 cells would be expected to have ON responses to light and make synapses onto neurons in both the ON and the OFF pathways. Taken with previous results, these findings suggest that vGluT3 cells release glycine at some of their output synapses and glutamate at others. PMID:26241195

  13. Endocannabinoids in the Retina: From Marijuana to Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Yazulla, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    The active component of the marijuana plant Cannabis sativa, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), produces numerous beneficial effects, including analgesia, appetite stimulation and nausea reduction, in addition to its psychotropic effects. THC mimics the action of endogenous fatty acid derivatives, referred to as endocannabinoids. The effects of THC and the endocannabinoids are mediated largely by metabotropic receptors that are distributed throughout the nervous and peripheral organ systems. There is great interest in endocannabinoids for their role in neuroplasticity as well as for therapeutic use in numerous conditions, including pain, stroke, cancer, obesity, osteoporosis, fertility, neurodegenerative diseases, multiple sclerosis, glaucoma and inflammatory diseases, among others. However, there has been relatively far less research on this topic in the eye and retina compared with the brain and other organ systems. The purpose of this review is to introduce the “cannabinergic” field to the retinal community. All of the fundamental work on cannabinoids has been performed in non-retinal preparations, necessitating extensive dependence on this literature for background. Happily, the retinal cannabinoid system has much in common with other regions of the central nervous system. For example, there is general agreement that cannabinoids suppress dopamine release and presynaptically reduce transmitter release from cones and bipolar cells. How these effects relate to light and dark adaptation, receptive field formation, temporal properties of ganglion cells or visual perception are unknown. The presence of multiple endocannabinoids, degradative enzymes with their bioactive metabolites, and receptors provides a broad spectrum of opportunities for basic research and to identify targets for therapeutic application to retinal diseases. PMID:18725316

  14. Effects of low level laser treatment on the survival of axotomized retinal ganglion cells in adult Hamsters.

    PubMed

    So, Kwok-Fai; Leung, Mason Chin Pang; Cui, Qi

    2014-11-01

    Injury to axons close to the neuronal bodies in the mammalian central nervous system causes a large proportion of parenting neurons to degenerate. It is known that optic nerve transection close to the eye in rodents leads to a loss of about half of retinal ganglion cells in 1 week and about 90% in 2 weeks. Using low level laser treatment in the present study, we demonstrated that treatment with helium-neon (660 nm) laser with 15 mW power could delay retinal ganglion cell death after optic nerve axotomy in adult hamsters. The effect was most apparent in the first week with a short period of treatment time (5 minutes) in which 65-66% of retinal ganglion cells survived the optic nerve axotomy whereas 45-47% of retinal ganglion cells did so in optic nerve axotomy controls. We also found that single dose and early commencement of laser irradiation were important in protecting retinal ganglion cells following optic nerve axotomy. These findings thus convincingly show that appropriate laser treatment may be neuroprotective to retinal ganglion cells. PMID:25558230

  15. Effects of low level laser treatment on the survival of axotomized retinal ganglion cells in adult Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    So, Kwok-Fai; Leung, Mason Chin Pang; Cui, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Injury to axons close to the neuronal bodies in the mammalian central nervous system causes a large proportion of parenting neurons to degenerate. It is known that optic nerve transection close to the eye in rodents leads to a loss of about half of retinal ganglion cells in 1 week and about 90% in 2 weeks. Using low level laser treatment in the present study, we demonstrated that treatment with helium-neon (660 nm) laser with 15 mW power could delay retinal ganglion cell death after optic nerve axotomy in adult hamsters. The effect was most apparent in the first week with a short period of treatment time (5 minutes) in which 65–66% of retinal ganglion cells survived the optic nerve axotomy whereas 45–47% of retinal ganglion cells did so in optic nerve axotomy controls. We also found that single dose and early commencement of laser irradiation were important in protecting retinal ganglion cells following optic nerve axotomy. These findings thus convincingly show that appropriate laser treatment may be neuroprotective to retinal ganglion cells. PMID:25558230

  16. [Ganglion cysts of the hand and wrist].

    PubMed

    Sarig, Oren; Hass, Avraham; Oron, Amir

    2013-10-01

    Ganglion cysts are considered the most common tumor of the wrist and hand. They are most common between the second and fourth decades of life. The most common anatomical location is the dorsal wrist. This article includes a general review of these cysts including symptoms, pathology and methods of diagnosis, as well as a review of these cysts in specific anatomic locations. The article also includes an updated review of the literature comparing open surgery vs. arthroscopic treatment. The authors believe that arthroscopic surgery of ganglion cysts will gain an important role in the treatment of these cysts. PMID:24450035

  17. Current treatment of ganglion of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Ho, P C; Griffiths, J; Lo, W N; Yen, C H; Hung, L K

    2001-07-01

    Ganglion of the wrist is one of the the most common lesions of the hand. The cause of pain in an occult dorsal wrist ganglion has been linked to compression of the posterior interosseous nerve at the wrist. A case is presented in this paper and the pathoanatomy discussed. Ultrasound-guided aspiration after hyaluronidase instillation provided a useful alternative to surgery with a high success rate. Arthroscopic decompression for dorsal and palmar wrist ganglia offered the patient the benefit of smaller surgical scars and a high success rate. A description of the surgical techniques, pathoanatomy, and early results of the authors and a review of the literature is presented. PMID:11677666

  18. Stressor-dependent Alterations in Glycoprotein 130: Implications for Glial Cell Reactivity, Cytokine Signaling and Ganglion Cell Health in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Echevarria, FD; Walker, CC; Abella, SK; Won, M; Sappington, RM

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The interleukin-6 (IL-6) family of cytokines is associated with retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival and glial reactivity in glaucoma. The purpose of this study was to evaluate glaucoma-related changes in glycoprotein-130 (gp130), the common signal transducer of the IL-6 family of cytokines, as they relate to RGC health, glial reactivity and expression of IL-6 cytokine family members. Methods: For all experiments, we examined healthy retina (young C57), aged retina (aged C57), retina predisposed to glaucoma (young DBA/2) and retina with IOP-induced glaucoma (aged DBA/2). We determined retinal gene expression of gp130 and IL-6 family members, using quantitative PCR, and protein expression of gp130, using multiplex ELISA. For protein localization and cell-specific expression, we performed co-immunolabeling for gp130 and cell type-specific markers. We used quantitative microscopy to measure layer-specific expression of gp130 and its relationships to astrocyte and Müller glia reactivity and RGC axonal transport, as determined by uptake and transport of cholera toxin β-subunit (CTB). Results: Gene expression of gp130 was elevated with all glaucoma-related stressors, but only normal aging increased protein levels. In healthy retina, gp130 localized primarily to the inner retina, where it was expressed by astrocytes, Müller cells and RGCs. Layer-specific analysis of gp130 expression revealed increased expression in aging retina and decreased expression in glaucomatous retina that was eccentricity-dependent. These glaucoma-related changes in gp130 expression correlated with the level of GFAP and glutamine synthetase expression, as well as axonal transport in RGCs. The relationships between gp130, glial reactivity and RGC health could impact signaling by many IL-6 family cytokines, which exhibited overall increased expression in a stressor-dependent manner. Conclusions: Glaucoma-related stressors, including normal aging, glaucoma predisposition and IOP

  19. Neurotransmitter properties of the newborn human retina

    SciTech Connect

    Hollyfield, J.G.; Frederick, J.M.; Rayborn, M.E.

    1983-07-01

    Human retinal tissue from a newborn was examined autoradiographically for the presence of high-affinity uptake and localization of the following putative neurotransmitters: dopamine, glycine, GABA, aspartate, and glutamate. In addition, the dopamine content of this newborn retina was measured by high pressure liquid chromatography. Our study reveals that specific uptake mechanisms for /sup 3/H-glycine, /sup 3/H-dopamine, and /sup 3/H-GABA are present at birth. However, the number and distribution of cells labeled with each of these /sup 3/H-transmitters are not identical to those observed in adult human retinas. Furthermore, the amount of endogenous dopamine in the newborn retina is approximately 1/20 the adult level. Photoreceptor-specific uptake of /sup 3/H-glutamate and /sup 3/H-aspartate are not observed. These findings indicate that, while some neurotransmitter-specific properties are present at birth, significant maturation of neurotransmitter systems occurs postnatally.

  20. Expression of the γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Plasma Membrane Transporter-1 in Monkey and Human Retina

    PubMed Central

    Casini, Giovanni; Rickman, Dennis W.; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine the expression pattern of the predominant γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) plasma membrane transporter GAT-1 in Old World monkey (Macaca mulatta) and human retina. Methods GAT-1 was localized in retinal sections by using immunohistochemical techniques with fluorescence and confocal microscopy. Double-labeling studies were performed with the GAT-1 antibody using antibodies to GABA, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and the bipolar cell marker Mab115A10. Results The pattern of GAT-1 immunostaining was similar in human and monkey retinas. Numerous small immunoreactive somata were in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and were present rarely in the inner plexiform layer (IPL) of all retinal regions. Medium GAT-1 somata were in the ganglion cell layer in the parafoveal and peripheral retinal regions. GAT-1 fibers were densely distributed throughout the IPL. Varicose processes, originating from both the IPL and somata in the INL, arborized in the outer plexiform layer (OPL), forming a sparse network in all retinal regions, except the fovea. Sparsely occurring GAT-1 processes were in the nerve fiber layer in parafoveal regions and near the optic nerve head but not in the optic nerve. In the INL, 99% of the GAT-1 somata contained GABA, and 66% of the GABA immunoreactive somata expressed GAT-1. GAT-1 immunoreactivity was in all VIP-containing cells, but it was absent in TH-immunoreactive amacrine cells and in Mab115A10 immunoreactive bipolar cells. Conclusions GAT-1 in primate retinas is expressed by amacrine and displaced amacrine cells. The predominant expression of GAT-1 in the inner retina is consistent with the idea that GABA transporters influence neurotransmission and thus participate in visual information processing in the retina. PMID:16565409

  1. Retinal ganglion cell neuroprotection induced by activation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Mata, David; Linn, David M; Linn, Cindy L

    2015-12-01

    The α7nAChR agonist, PNU-282987, has previously been shown to have a neuroprotective effect against loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in an in vivo glaucoma model when the agent was injected into the vitreous chamber of adult Long Evans rat eyes. Here, we characterized the neuroprotective effect of PNU-282987 at the nerve fiber and retinal ganglion cell layer, determined that neuroprotection occurred when the agonist was applied as eye drops and verified detection of the agonist in the retina, using LC/MS/MS. To induce glaucoma-like conditions in adult Long Evans rats, hypertonic saline was injected into the episcleral veins to induce scar tissue and increase intraocular pressure. Within one month, this procedure produced significant loss of RGCs compared to untreated conditions. RGCs were quantified after immunostaining with an antibody against Thy 1.1 and imaged using a confocal microscope. In dose-response studies, concentrations of PNU-282987 were applied to the animal's right eye two times each day, while the left eye acted as an internal control. Eye drops of PNU-282987 resulted in neuroprotection against RGC loss in a dose-dependent manner using concentrations between 100 μM and 2 mM PNU-282987. LC/MS/MS results demonstrated that PNU-282987 was detected in the retina when applied as eye drops, relatively small amounts of PNU-282987 were measured in blood plasma and no PNU-282987 was detected in cardiac tissue. These results support the hypothesis that eye drop application of PNU-282987 can prevent loss of RGCs associated with glaucoma, which can lead to neuroprotective treatments for diseases that involve α7nAChRs. PMID:26239818

  2. Eye Histology and Ganglion Cell Topography of Northern Elephant Seals (Mirounga angustirostris).

    PubMed

    Smodlaka, Hrvoje; Khamas, Wael A; Palmer, Lauren; Lui, Bryan; Borovac, Josip A; Cohn, Brian A; Schmitz, Lars

    2016-06-01

    Northern elephant seals are one of the deepest diving marine mammals. As northern elephant seals often reach the bathypelagic zone, it is usually assumed that their eyes possess evolutionary adaptations that provide better ability to see in dim or scotopic environments. The purpose of this study was to carefully describe anatomical and histological traits of the eye that may improve light sensitivity. Northern elephant seals have large, somewhat elliptical eyes, with equatorial and anteroposterior diameters of 5.03 and 4.4 cm, respectively. The cornea is large in diameter and the lens is completely spherical. The iris has pronounced constrictor and dilator muscles, whereas the ciliary muscle is notably less developed. The tapetum lucidum is more prominent than in other pinnipeds, making up about 63% of retinal thickness in the posterior aspect of the globe. Within the retina, the pigmented epithelium lacks pigment except for the region close to the ora serrata. Parts of the photoreceptor and outer nuclear layers are folded. Although the photoreceptor layer is composed predominantly of rods, cone photoreceptors were also observed. Cells within the retinal ganglion cell layer are arranged in a single level. Ganglion cells reach their maximum density (∼1,300 cells per mm(2) ) dorsal to the optic disc, whereas the periphery of the retina is sparsely populated (<100 cells per mm(2) ). All above mentioned features are consistent with the predicted evolutionary adaptations to the photic environment of the bathypelagic zone. Anat Rec, 299:798-805, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26950409

  3. Proteomics Analysis of Molecular Risk Factors in the Ocular Hypertensive Human Retina

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiangjun; Hondur, Gözde; Li, Ming; Cai, Jian; Klein, Jon B.; Kuehn, Markus H.; Tezel, Gülgün

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To better understand ocular hypertension–induced early molecular alterations that may determine the initiation of neurodegeneration in human glaucoma, this study analyzed retinal proteomic alterations in the ocular hypertensive human retina. Methods Retina samples were obtained from six human donors with ocular hypertension (without glaucomatous injury) and six age- and sex-matched normotensive controls. Retinal proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional LC-MS/MS (liquid chromatography and linear ion trap mass spectrometry) using oxygen isotope labeling for relative quantification of protein expression. Proteomics data were validated by Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses of selected proteins. Results Out of over 2000 retinal proteins quantified, hundreds exhibited over 2-fold increased or decreased expression in ocular hypertensive samples relative to normotensive controls. Bioinformatics linked the proteomics datasets to various pathways important for maintenance of cellular homeostasis in the ocular hypertensive retina. Upregulated proteins included various heat shock proteins, ubiquitin proteasome pathway components, antioxidants, and DNA repair enzymes, while many proteins involved in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation exhibited downregulation in the ocular hypertensive retina. Despite the altered protein expression reflecting intrinsic adaptive/protective responses against mitochondrial energy failure, oxidative stress, and unfolded proteins, no alterations suggestive of an ongoing cell death process or neuroinflammation were detectable. Conclusions This study provides information about ocular hypertension–related molecular risk factors for glaucoma development. Molecular alterations detected in the ocular hypertensive human retina as opposed to previously detected alterations in human donor retinas with clinically manifest glaucoma suggest that proteome alterations determine the individual threshold to tolerate the ocular

  4. Partial regeneration and long-term survival of rat retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve crush is accompanied by altered expression, phosphorylation and distribution of cytoskeletal proteins.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Daniela C; Trivedi, Niraj; Engelmann, Ralf; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Gordon-Weeks, Phillip R; Kreutz, Michael R

    2002-05-01

    In a screen to identify genes that are expressed differentially in the retina after partial optic nerve crush, we identified MAP1B as an up-regulated transcript. Western blot analysis of inner retina protein preparations confirmed changes in the protein composition of the microtubule-associated cytoskeleton of crushed vs. uncrushed nerve. MAP1B immunoreactivity and transcript levels were elevated for two weeks after crush. Immunostaining and Western blots with monoclonal antibodies directed against developmentally regulated phosphorylation sites on MAP1B revealed a gradient of MAP1B phosphorylation from the proximal optic nerve stump to the soma of retinal ganglion cells. Most interestingly, using antibodies directed against developmentally regulated phosphorylation sites on MAP1B, we observed that a significant number of crushed optic nerve axons develop MAP1B-immunopositive growth cones, which cross the crush site and migrate along the distal nerve fragment. In parallel, an abnormal distribution of highly phosphorylated neurofilament protein (pNF-H) in the cell soma and dendrites of presumably axotomized retinal ganglion cells was observed following partial nerve crush. This redistribution is present for the period between day 7 and 28 postcrush and is not seen in cells that stay connected to the superior colliculus. Axotomized ganglion cells, which contain pNF-H in soma and dendrites appear to have been disconnected from the colliculus at an early stage but survive axonal trauma for long periods. PMID:12028353

  5. Mapping nonlinear receptive field structure in primate retina at single cone resolution

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peter H; Greschner, Martin; Gunning, Deborah E; Mathieson, Keith; Sher, Alexander; Litke, Alan M; Paninski, Liam

    2015-01-01

    The function of a neural circuit is shaped by the computations performed by its interneurons, which in many cases are not easily accessible to experimental investigation. Here, we elucidate the transformation of visual signals flowing from the input to the output of the primate retina, using a combination of large-scale multi-electrode recordings from an identified ganglion cell type, visual stimulation targeted at individual cone photoreceptors, and a hierarchical computational model. The results reveal nonlinear subunits in the circuity of OFF midget ganglion cells, which subserve high-resolution vision. The model explains light responses to a variety of stimuli more accurately than a linear model, including stimuli targeted to cones within and across subunits. The recovered model components are consistent with known anatomical organization of midget bipolar interneurons. These results reveal the spatial structure of linear and nonlinear encoding, at the resolution of single cells and at the scale of complete circuits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05241.001 PMID:26517879

  6. Parallel processing in the mammalian retina.

    PubMed

    Wässle, Heinz

    2004-10-01

    Our eyes send different 'images' of the outside world to the brain - an image of contours (line drawing), a colour image (watercolour painting) or an image of moving objects (movie). This is commonly referred to as parallel processing, and starts as early as the first synapse of the retina, the cone pedicle. Here, the molecular composition of the transmitter receptors of the postsynaptic neurons defines which images are transferred to the inner retina. Within the second synaptic layer - the inner plexiform layer - circuits that involve complex inhibitory and excitatory interactions represent filters that select 'what the eye tells the brain'. PMID:15378035

  7. Protective Effects of Human iPS-Derived Retinal Pigmented Epithelial Cells in Comparison with Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Human Neural Stem Cells on the Degenerating Retina in rd1 mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianan; Mandai, Michiko; Kamao, Hiroyuki; Hashiguchi, Tomoyo; Shikamura, Masayuki; Kawamata, Shin; Sugita, Sunao; Takahashi, Masayo

    2015-05-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of visual impairments characterized by progressive rod photoreceptor cell loss due to a genetic background. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) predominantly secreted by the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) has been reported to protect photoreceptors in retinal degeneration models, including rd1. In addition, clinical trials are currently underway outside Japan using human mesenchymal stromal cells and human neural stem cells to protect photoreceptors in RP and dry age-related macular degeneration, respectively. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the rescue effects of induced pluripotent stem (iPS)-RPE cells in comparison with those types of cells used in clinical trials on photoreceptor degeneration in rd1 mice. Cells were injected into the subretinal space of immune-suppressed 2-week-old rd1 mice. The results demonstrated that human iPS-RPE cells significantly attenuated photoreceptor degeneration on postoperative days (PODs) 14 and 21 and survived longer up to at least 12 weeks after operation than the other two types of graft cells with less immune responses and apoptosis. The mean PEDF concentration in the intraocular fluid in RPE-transplanted eyes was more than 1 µg/ml at PODs 14 and 21, and this may have contributed to the protective effect of RPE transplantation. Our findings suggest that iPS-RPE cells serve as a competent source to delay photoreceptor degeneration through stable survival in degenerating ocular environment and by releasing neuroprotective factors such as PEDF. PMID:25728228

  8. Substituting mouse transcription factor Pou4f2 with a sea urchin orthologue restores retinal ganglion cell development

    PubMed Central

    Mocko-Strand, Julie A.; Wang, Jing; Ullrich-Lüter, Esther; Pan, Ping; Wang, Steven W.; Arnone, Maria Ina; Frishman, Laura J.; Klein, William H.

    2016-01-01

    Pou domain transcription factor Pou4f2 is essential for the development of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the vertebrate retina. A distant orthologue of Pou4f2 exists in the genome of the sea urchin (class Echinoidea) Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (SpPou4f1/2), yet the photosensory structure of sea urchins is strikingly different from that of the mammalian retina. Sea urchins have no obvious eyes, but have photoreceptors clustered around their tube feet disc. The mechanisms that are associated with the development and function of photoreception in sea urchins are largely unexplored. As an initial approach to better understand the sea urchin photosensory structure and relate it to the mammalian retina, we asked whether SpPou4f1/2 could support RGC development in the absence of Pou4f2. To answer this question, we replaced genomic Pou4f2 with an SpPou4f1/2 cDNA. In Pou4f2-null mice, retinas expressing SpPou4f1/2 were outwardly identical to those of wild-type mice. SpPou4f1/2 retinas exhibited dark-adapted electroretinogram scotopic threshold responses, indicating functionally active RGCs. During retinal development, SpPou4f1/2 activated RGC-specific genes and in S. purpuratus, SpPou4f2 was expressed in photoreceptor cells of tube feet in a pattern distinct from Opsin4 and Pax6. Our results suggest that SpPou4f1/2 and Pou4f2 share conserved components of a gene network for photosensory development and they maintain their conserved intrinsic functions despite vast morphological differences in mouse and sea urchin photosensory structures. PMID:26962139

  9. Mutant WDR36 directly affects axon growth of retinal ganglion cells leading to progressive retinal degeneration in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Zai-Long; Yasumoto, Fumie; Sergeev, Yuri; Minami, Masayoshi; Obazawa, Minoru; Kimura, Itaru; Takada, Yuichiro; Iwata, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is one of the three principal subtypes of glaucoma and among the leading cause of blindness worldwide. POAG is defined by cell death of the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and surrounding neuronal cells at higher or normal intraocular pressure (IOP). Coded by one of the three genes responsible for POAG, WD repeat-containing protein 36 (WDR36) has two domains with a similar folding. To address whether WDR36 is functionally important in the retina, we developed four transgenic mice strains overexpressing a wild-type (Wt) and three mutant variants of D606G, deletion of amino acids at positions 605–607 (Del605–607) and at 601–640 (Del601–640) equivalent to the location of the D658G mutation observed in POAG patients. A triple amino acid deletion of mouse Wdr36 at positions 605–607 corresponding to the deletion at positions 657–659 in humans developed progressive retinal degeneration at the peripheral retina with normal IOP. RGCs and connecting amacrine cell synapses were affected at the peripheral retina. Axon outgrowth rate of cultured RGC directly isolated from transgenic animal was significantly reduced by the Wdr36 mutation compared with Wt. Molecular modeling of wild and mutant mouse Wdr36 revealed that deletion at positions 605–607 removed three residues and a hydrogen bond, required to stabilize anti-parallel β-sheet of the 6th β-propeller in the second domain. We concluded that WDR36 plays an important functional role in the retina homeostasis and mutation to this gene can cause devastating retinal damage. These data will improve understanding of the functional property of WDR36 in the retina and provide a new animal model for glaucoma therapeutics. PMID:20631153

  10. Substituting mouse transcription factor Pou4f2 with a sea urchin orthologue restores retinal ganglion cell development.

    PubMed

    Mao, Chai-An; Agca, Cavit; Mocko-Strand, Julie A; Wang, Jing; Ullrich-Lüter, Esther; Pan, Ping; Wang, Steven W; Arnone, Maria Ina; Frishman, Laura J; Klein, William H

    2016-03-16

    Pou domain transcription factor Pou4f2 is essential for the development of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the vertebrate retina. A distant orthologue of Pou4f2 exists in the genome of the sea urchin (class Echinoidea) Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (SpPou4f1/2), yet the photosensory structure of sea urchins is strikingly different from that of the mammalian retina. Sea urchins have no obvious eyes, but have photoreceptors clustered around their tube feet disc. The mechanisms that are associated with the development and function of photoreception in sea urchins are largely unexplored. As an initial approach to better understand the sea urchin photosensory structure and relate it to the mammalian retina, we asked whether SpPou4f1/2 could support RGC development in the absence of Pou4f2. To answer this question, we replaced genomic Pou4f2 with an SpPou4f1/2 cDNA. In Pou4f2-null mice, retinas expressing SpPou4f1/2 were outwardly identical to those of wild-type mice. SpPou4f1/2 retinas exhibited dark-adapted electroretinogram scotopic threshold responses, indicating functionally active RGCs. During retinal development, SpPou4f1/2 activated RGC-specific genes and in S. purpuratus, SpPou4f2 was expressed in photoreceptor cells of tube feet in a pattern distinct from Opsin4 and Pax6. Our results suggest that SpPou4f1/2 and Pou4f2 share conserved components of a gene network for photosensory development and they maintain their conserved intrinsic functions despite vast morphological differences in mouse and sea urchin photosensory structures. PMID:26962139

  11. Functional role of efferents to the avian retina. II. Effects of reversible cooling of the isthmo-optic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Pearlman, A L; Hughes, C P

    1976-03-01

    Efferents to the retina in the bird arise in the isthmo-optic nucleus of the caudal midbrain, and terminate on amacrine cells in the retina. The functional role of these efferents was studied by determining the receptive field properties of 107 optic tract fibers in the lightly anesthetized adult pigeon, and quantitating their responses to specific moving stimuli. While the recording from these fibers continued, the isthmo-optic nucleus was cooled by a thermoelectric cooling probe, and the response properties of the cells redetermined. Recording was maintained in half of the units long enough to observe recovery from cooling, and in several units the entire procedure was repeated. In 77 of the 107 units, responsiveness to all stimuli was decreased by removing efferent influences, whereas specific receptive field properties such as motion sensitivity or directionaltiy were not altered. All of the major receptive field types were affected in a similar fashion, irrespective of their position in the visual field. Responses to stimuli that did not involve the antagonistic surround were similarly affected by removal of the efferents, as were units were both weak and strong antagonistic surrounds. Efferents exert their influence on retinal ganglion cells by way of the amacrine cells on which they terminate. Data available on amacrines in Necturus indicates that they are inhibitory to ganglion cells. If amacrines have a similar role in the pigeon, then it may be stated that decreased activity in the centrifugal fibers leads to enhanced inhibition throughout the receptive fields of ganglion cells, and increased activity in the efferents produces disinhibition. PMID:1262546

  12. Melatonin modulates M4-type ganglion-cell photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Pack, W; Hill, D D; Wong, K Y

    2015-09-10

    In the retina, melatonin is secreted at night by rod/cone photoreceptors and serves as a dark-adaptive signal. Melatonin receptors have been found in many retinal neurons including melanopsin-containing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), suggesting it could modulate the physiology of these inner retinal photoreceptors. Here, we investigated whether melatonin modulates the alpha-like M4-type ipRGCs, which are believed to mediate image-forming vision as well as non-image-forming photoresponses. Applying melatonin during daytime (when endogenous melatonin secretion is low) caused whole-cell-recorded M4 cells' rod/cone-driven depolarizing photoresponses to become broader and larger, whereas the associated elevation in spike rate was reduced. Melanopsin-based light responses were not affected significantly. Nighttime application of the melatonin receptor antagonist luzindole also altered M4 cells' rod/cone-driven light responses but in the opposite ways: the duration and amplitude of the graded depolarization were reduced, whereas the accompanying spiking increase was enhanced. These luzindole-induced changes confirmed that M4 cells are modulated by endogenous melatonin. Melatonin could induce the above effects by acting directly on M4 cells because immunohistochemistry detected MT1 receptors in these cells, although it could also act presynaptically. Interestingly, the daytime and nighttime recordings showed significant differences in resting membrane potential, spontaneous spike rate and rod/cone-driven light responses, suggesting that M4 cells are under circadian control. This is the first report of a circadian variation in ipRGCs' resting properties and synaptic input, and of melatoninergic modulation of ipRGCs. PMID:26141846

  13. Can Xanthophyll-Membrane Interactions Explain Their Selective Presence in the Retina and Brain?

    PubMed Central

    Widomska, Justyna; Zareba, Mariusz; Subczynski, Witold Karol

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate that a high dietary intake of carotenoids may offer protection against age-related macular degeneration, cancer and cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Humans cannot synthesize carotenoids and depend on their dietary intake. Major carotenoids that have been found in human plasma can be divided into two groups, carotenes (nonpolar molecules, such as β-carotene, α-carotene or lycopene) and xanthophylls (polar carotenoids that include an oxygen atom in their structure, such as lutein, zeaxanthin and β-cryptoxanthin). Only two dietary carotenoids, namely lutein and zeaxanthin (macular xanthophylls), are selectively accumulated in the human retina. A third carotenoid, meso-zeaxanthin, is formed directly in the human retina from lutein. Additionally, xanthophylls account for about 70% of total carotenoids in all brain regions. Some specific properties of these polar carotenoids must explain why they, among other available carotenoids, were selected during evolution to protect the retina and brain. It is also likely that the selective uptake and deposition of macular xanthophylls in the retina and brain are enhanced by specific xanthophyll-binding proteins. We hypothesize that the high membrane solubility and preferential transmembrane orientation of macular xanthophylls distinguish them from other dietary carotenoids, enhance their chemical and physical stability in retina and brain membranes and maximize their protective action in these organs. Most importantly, xanthophylls are selectively concentrated in the most vulnerable regions of lipid bilayer membranes enriched in polyunsaturated lipids. This localization is ideal if macular xanthophylls are to act as lipid-soluble antioxidants, which is the most accepted mechanism through which lutein and zeaxanthin protect neural tissue against degenerative diseases. PMID:27030822

  14. Ethambutol induces impaired autophagic flux and apoptosis in the rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shun-Ping; Chien, Jia-Ying; Tsai, Rong-Kung

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ethambutol (EMB), an effective first-line antituberculosis agent, can cause serious visual impairment or irreversible vision loss in a significant number of patients. However, the mechanism underlying this ocular cytotoxicity remains to be elucidated. In this study, we found that there were statistically significant dose- and time-dependent increases in the number of cytoplasmic vacuoles and the level of cell death in EMB-treated RGC-5 cells (retinal ganglion cells). The protein kinase C (PKC)δ inhibitor rottlerin markedly reduced the EMB-induced activation of caspase-3 and the subsequent apoptosis of RGC-5 cells. Western blot analysis revealed that the expression levels of class III PI3K, Beclin-1, p62 and LC3-II were upregulated, and LC3 immunostaining results showed activation of the early phase and inhibition of the late stage of autophagy in retinas of the EMB-intraperitoneal (IP)-injected rat model. We further demonstrated that exposure to EMB induces autophagosome accumulation, which results from the impaired autophagic flux that is mediated by a PKCδ-dependent pathway, inhibits the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway and leads to apoptotic death in retina neuronal cells. These results indicate that autophagy dysregulation in retinal neuronal cells might play a substantial role in EMB-induced optic neuroretinopathy. PMID:26092127

  15. Ethambutol induces impaired autophagic flux and apoptosis in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shun-Ping; Chien, Jia-Ying; Tsai, Rong-Kung

    2015-08-01

    Ethambutol (EMB), an effective first-line antituberculosis agent, can cause serious visual impairment or irreversible vision loss in a significant number of patients. However, the mechanism underlying this ocular cytotoxicity remains to be elucidated. In this study, we found that there were statistically significant dose- and time-dependent increases in the number of cytoplasmic vacuoles and the level of cell death in EMB-treated RGC-5 cells (retinal ganglion cells). The protein kinase C (PKC)δ inhibitor rottlerin markedly reduced the EMB-induced activation of caspase-3 and the subsequent apoptosis of RGC-5 cells. Western blot analysis revealed that the expression levels of class III PI3K, Beclin-1, p62 and LC3-II were upregulated, and LC3 immunostaining results showed activation of the early phase and inhibition of the late stage of autophagy in retinas of the EMB-intraperitoneal (IP)-injected rat model. We further demonstrated that exposure to EMB induces autophagosome accumulation, which results from the impaired autophagic flux that is mediated by a PKCδ-dependent pathway, inhibits the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway and leads to apoptotic death in retina neuronal cells. These results indicate that autophagy dysregulation in retinal neuronal cells might play a substantial role in EMB-induced optic neuroretinopathy. PMID:26092127

  16. Glial cell regulation of neuronal activity and blood flow in the retina by release of gliotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes in the brain release transmitters that actively modulate neuronal excitability and synaptic efficacy. Astrocytes also release vasoactive agents that contribute to neurovascular coupling. As reviewed in this article, Müller cells, the principal retinal glial cells, modulate neuronal activity and blood flow in the retina. Stimulated Müller cells release ATP which, following its conversion to adenosine by ectoenzymes, hyperpolarizes retinal ganglion cells by activation of A1 adenosine receptors. This results in the opening of G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels and small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels. Tonic release of ATP also contributes to the generation of tone in the retinal vasculature by activation of P2X receptors on vascular smooth muscle cells. Vascular tone is lost when glial cells are poisoned with the gliotoxin fluorocitrate. The glial release of vasoactive metabolites of arachidonic acid, including prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), contributes to neurovascular coupling in the retina. Neurovascular coupling is reduced when neuronal stimulation of glial cells is interrupted and when the synthesis of arachidonic acid metabolites is blocked. Neurovascular coupling is compromised in diabetic retinopathy owing to the loss of glial-mediated vasodilation. This loss can be reversed by inhibiting inducible nitric oxide synthase. It is likely that future research will reveal additional important functions of the release of transmitters from glial cells. PMID:26009774

  17. The architecture of the avian retina following exposure to chronic 2 G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlando, R. G.; Negulesco, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Rhode Island Red female chicks at 2 weeks posthatch were subjected, for 7 d, to either earth gravity of 1 G or a 2-G hypergravity environment by chronic whole-body centrifugation. Animals were sacrificed at 3 weeks posthatch and the eyes were enucleated, fixed in 10% BNF, doubly embedded, sectioned at 7-8 microns and routinely processed with H & E for histological examination. Compared to normogravity controls, animal exposure for 1 week to the chronic effects of 2-G resulted in a significantly decreased mean width of the photoreceptor, inner nuclear, and inner plexiform retinal layers. The outer nuclear, outer plexiform, and ganglion cell layers of the retina appeared minimally affected by the hypergravity state since the mean width of these layers showed no noticeable differences from earth gravity control animals. The present anatomic findings suggest a reduction in the detection of motion or rapid changes in illumination by the avian retina when the animal is exposed at a 2-G environment.

  18. Visual pattern discrimination by population retinal ganglion cells' activities during natural movie stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying-Ying; Wang, Ru-Bin; Pan, Xiao-Chuan; Gong, Hai-Qing; Liang, Pei-Ji

    2014-02-01

    In the visual system, neurons often fire in synchrony, and it is believed that synchronous activities of group neurons are more efficient than single cell response in transmitting neural signals to down-stream neurons. However, whether dynamic natural stimuli are encoded by dynamic spatiotemporal firing patterns of synchronous group neurons still needs to be investigated. In this paper we recorded the activities of population ganglion cells in bullfrog retina in response to time-varying natural images (natural scene movie) using multi-electrode arrays. In response to some different brief section pairs of the movie, synchronous groups of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) fired with similar but different spike events. We attempted to discriminate the movie sections based on temporal firing patterns of single cells and spatiotemporal firing patterns of the synchronous groups of RGCs characterized by a measurement of subsequence distribution discrepancy. The discrimination performance was assessed by a classification method based on Support Vector Machines. Our results show that different movie sections of the natural movie elicited reliable dynamic spatiotemporal activity patterns of the synchronous RGCs, which are more efficient in discriminating different movie sections than the temporal patterns of the single cells' spike events. These results suggest that, during natural vision, the down-stream neurons may decode the visual information from the dynamic spatiotemporal patterns of the synchronous group of RGCs' activities. PMID:24465283

  19. Functional diversity of melanopsins and their global expression in the teleost retina.

    PubMed

    Davies, Wayne I L; Zheng, Lei; Hughes, Steven; Tamai, T Katherine; Turton, Michael; Halford, Stephanie; Foster, Russell G; Whitmore, David; Hankins, Mark W

    2011-12-01

    Melanopsin (OPN4) is an opsin photopigment that, in mammals, confers photosensitivity to retinal ganglion cells and regulates circadian entrainment and pupil constriction. In non-mammalian species, two forms of opn4 exist, and are classified into mammalian-like (m) and non-mammalian-like (x) clades. However, far less is understood of the function of this photopigment family. Here we identify in zebrafish five melanopsins (opn4m-1, opn4m-2, opn4m-3, opn4x-1 and opn4x-2), each encoding a full-length opsin G protein. All five genes are expressed in the adult retina in a largely non-overlapping pattern, as revealed by RNA in situ hybridisation and immunocytochemistry, with at least one melanopsin form present in all neuronal cell types, including cone photoreceptors. This raises the possibility that the teleost retina is globally light sensitive. Electrophysiological and spectrophotometric studies demonstrate that all five zebrafish melanopsins encode a functional photopigment with peak spectral sensitivities that range from 470 to 484 nm, with opn4m-1 and opn4m-3 displaying invertebrate-like bistability, where the retinal chromophore interchanges between cis- and trans-isomers in a light-dependent manner and remains within the opsin binding pocket. In contrast, opn4m-2, opn4x-1 and opn4x-2 are monostable and function more like classical vertebrate-like photopigments, where the chromophore is converted from 11-cis to all-trans retinal upon absorption of a photon, hydrolysed and exits from the binding pocket of the opsin. It is thought that all melanopsins exhibit an invertebrate-like bistability biochemistry. Our novel findings, however, reveal the presence of both invertebrate-like and vertebrate-like forms of melanopsin in the teleost retina, and indicate that photopigment bistability is not a universal property of the melanopsin family. The functional diversity of these teleost melanopsins, together with their widespread expression pattern within the retina

  20. Ganglions of the hand and wrist.

    PubMed

    Thornburg, L E

    1999-01-01

    Ganglions of the hand and wrist are common benign lesions. They most frequently arise adjacent to joints and tendons, but may also be intratendinous or intraosseous. Treatment options include observation, aspiration, and surgical excision. Observation is acceptable in most instances. Indications for more aggressive treatment include pain, interference with activity, nerve compression, and imminent ulceration (in the case of some mucous cysts). The recurrence rate after puncture and aspiration is greater than 50% for cysts in most locations, but is less than 30% for cysts in the flexor tendon sheath. Surgical excision is effective, with a recurrence rate of only 5% if care is taken to completely excise the stalk of the cyst along with a small portion of joint capsule. Surgical treatment of occult ganglions is successful with accurate assessment of the source of the pain. Arthroscopic treatment of dorsal wrist ganglions is still experimental, but early results are encouraging. Ganglion surgery requires a formal operative environment and careful technique in order to minimize injury to adjacent structures and minimize the likelihood of recurrence. PMID:10434077

  1. Separability of stimulus parameter encoding by on-off directionally selective rabbit retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Przemyslaw; Dobbins, Allan C.; Gawne, Timothy J.; Grzywacz, Norberto M.

    2011-01-01

    The ganglion cell output of the retina constitutes a bottleneck in sensory processing in that ganglion cells must encode multiple stimulus parameters in their responses. Here we investigate encoding strategies of On-Off directionally selective retinal ganglion cells (On-Off DS RGCs) in rabbits, a class of cells dedicated to representing motion. The exquisite axial discrimination of these cells to preferred vs. null direction motion is well documented: it is invariant with respect to speed, contrast, spatial configuration, spatial frequency, and motion extent. However, these cells have broad direction tuning curves and their responses also vary as a function of other parameters such as speed and contrast. In this study, we examined whether the variation in responses across multiple stimulus parameters is systematic, that is the same for all cells, and separable, such that the response to a stimulus is a product of the effects of each stimulus parameter alone. We extracellularly recorded single On-Off DS RGCs in a superfused eyecup preparation while stimulating them with moving bars. We found that spike count responses of these cells scaled as independent functions of direction, speed, and luminance. Moreover, the speed and luminance functions were common across the whole sample of cells. Based on these findings, we developed a model that accurately predicted responses of On-Off DS RGCs as products of separable functions of direction, speed, and luminance (r = 0.98; P < 0.0001). Such a multiplicatively separable encoding strategy may simplify the decoding of these cells' outputs by the higher visual centers. PMID:21325684

  2. NMDA and AMPA receptors contribute similarly to temporal processing in mammalian retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, Benjamin K; Manookin, Michael B; Singer, Joshua H; Demb, Jonathan B

    2014-01-01

    Postsynaptic AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs, NMDARs) are commonly expressed at the same synapses. AMPARs are thought to mediate the majority of fast excitatory neurotransmission whereas NMDARs, with their relatively slower kinetics and higher Ca2+ permeability, are thought to mediate synaptic plasticity, especially in neural circuits devoted to learning and memory. In sensory neurons, however, the roles of AMPARs and NMDARs are less well understood. Here, we tested in the in vitro guinea pig retina whether AMPARs and NMDARs differentially support temporal contrast encoding by two ganglion cell types. In both OFF Alpha and Delta ganglion cells, contrast stimulation evoked an NMDAR-mediated response with a characteristic J-shaped I–V relationship. In OFF Delta cells, AMPAR- and NMDAR-mediated responses could be modulated at low frequencies but were suppressed during 10 Hz stimulation, when responses were instead shaped by synaptic inhibition. With inhibition blocked, both AMPAR- and NMDAR-mediated responses could be modulated at 10 Hz, indicating that NMDAR kinetics do not limit temporal encoding. In OFF Alpha cells, NMDAR-mediated responses followed stimuli at frequencies up to ∼18 Hz. In both cell types, NMDAR-mediated responses to contrast modulation at 9–18 Hz showed delays of <10 ms relative to AMPAR-mediated responses. Thus, NMDARs combine with AMPARs to encode rapidly modulated glutamate release, and NMDAR kinetics do not limit temporal coding by OFF Alpha and Delta ganglion cells substantially. Furthermore, glutamatergic transmission is differentially regulated across bipolar cell pathways: in some, release is suppressed at high temporal frequencies by presynaptic inhibition. PMID:25217374

  3. Time-Lapse Retinal Ganglion Cell Dendritic Field Degeneration Imaged in Organotypic Retinal Explant Culture

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Thomas V.; Oglesby, Ericka N.; Steinhart, Matthew R.; Cone-Kimball, Elizabeth; Jefferys, Joan; Quigley, Harry A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop an ex vivo organotypic retinal explant culture system suitable for multiple time-point imaging of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) dendritic arbors over a period of 1 week, and capable of detecting dendrite neuroprotection conferred by experimental treatments. Methods Thy1-YFP mouse retinas were explanted and maintained in organotypic culture. Retinal ganglion cell dendritic arbors were imaged repeatedly using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Maximal projection z-stacks were traced by two masked investigators and dendritic fields were analyzed for characteristics including branch number, size, and complexity. One group of explants was treated with brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) added to the culture media. Changes in individual dendritic fields over time were detected using pair-wise comparison testing. Results Retinal ganglion cells in mouse retinal explant culture began to degenerate after 3 days with 52.4% surviving at 7 days. Dendritic field parameters showed minimal change over 8 hours in culture. Intra- and interobserver measurements of dendrite characteristics were strongly correlated (Spearman rank correlations consistently > 0.80). Statistically significant (P < 0.001) dendritic tree degeneration was detected following 7 days in culture including: 40% to 50% decreases in number of branch segments, number of junctions, number of terminal branches, and total branch length. Scholl analyses similarly demonstrated a significant decrease in dendritic field complexity. Treatment of explants with BDNF+CNTF significantly attenuated dendritic field degeneration. Conclusions Retinal explant culture of Thy1-YFP tissue provides a useful model for time-lapse imaging of RGC dendritic field degeneration over a course of several days, and is capable of detecting neuroprotective amelioration of dendritic pruning within individual RGCs. PMID:26811145

  4. Transdifferentiation of periodontal ligament-derived stem cells into retinal ganglion-like cells and its microRNA signature

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Tsz Kin; Yung, Jasmine S. Y.; Choy, Kwong Wai; Cao, Di; Leung, Christopher K. S.; Cheung, Herman S.; Pang, Chi Pui

    2015-01-01

    Retinal diseases are the leading causes of irreversible visual impairment and blindness in the developed countries. Human retina has limited regenerative power to replace cell loss. Stem cell replacement therapy has been proposed as a viable option. Previously, we have induced human adult periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) to the retinal lineage. In this study, we modified our induction protocol to direct human adult PDLSCs into retinal ganglion-like cells and determined the microRNA (miRNA) signature of this transdifferentiation process. The differentiated PDLSCs demonstrated the characteristics of functional neurons as they expressed neuronal and retinal ganglion cell markers (ATOH7, POU4F2, β-III tubulin, MAP2, TAU, NEUROD1 and SIX3), formed synapses and showed glutamate-induced calcium responses as well as spontaneous electrical activities. The global miRNA expression profiling identified 44 upregulated and 27 downregulated human miRNAs after retinal induction. Gene ontology analysis of the predicted miRNA target genes confirmed the transdifferentiation is closely related to neuronal differentiation processes. Furthermore, the expressions of 2 miRNA-targeted candidates, VEGF and PTEN, were significantly upregulated during the induction process. This study identified the transdifferentiation process of human adult stem cells into retinal ganglion-like cells and revealed the involvement of both genetic and miRNA regulatory mechanisms. PMID:26549845

  5. Effects of IP3R2 Receptor Deletion in the Ischemic Mouse Retina.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Lysann; Pannicke, Thomas; Frommherz, Ina; Sauer, Katja; Chen, Ju; Grosche, Antje

    2016-04-01

    Glial cells in the diseased nervous system undergo a process known as reactive gliosis. Gliosis of retinal Müller glial cells is characterized by an upregulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein and frequently by a reduction of inward K(+) current amplitudes. Purinergic signaling is assumed to be involved in gliotic processes. As previously shown, lack of the nucleotide receptor P2Y1 leads to an altered regulation of K(+) currents in Müller cells of the ischemic retina. Here, we asked first whether this effect is mediated by the IP3 receptor subtype 2 (IP3R2) known as the major downstream signaling target of P2Y1 in Müller cells. The second question was whether lack of IP3R2 affects neuronal survival in the control and ischemic retina. Ischemia was induced in wild type and IP3R2-deficient (IP 3 R2 (-/-)) mice by transient elevation of the intraocular pressure. Immunostaining and TUNEL labelling were used to quantify neuronal cell loss. The downregulation of inward K(+) currents in Müller cells from ischemic IP 3 R2 (-/-) retinae was less strong than in wild type animals. The reduction of the number of cells in the ganglion cell layer and of calretinin- and calbindin-positive cells 7 days after ischemia was similar in wild type and IP 3 R2 (-/-) mice. However, IP3R2 deficiency led to an increased number of TUNEL-positive cells in the outer nuclear layer at 1 day and to an enhanced postischemic loss of photoreceptors 7 days after ischemia. This implies that IP3R2 is involved in some but not all aspects of signaling in Müller cells after an ischemic insult. PMID:26446037

  6. Effect of long-term weightlessness on retina and optic nerve in tail-suspension rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hong-Wei; Zhao, Jun; Hu, Lian-Na; Liang, Jing-Nan; Shi, Yuan-Yuan; Nie, Chuang; Qiu, Chang-Yu; Nan, Xin-Shuai; Li, Yu-Xin; Gao, Fu-Lin; Liu, Yi; Dong, Yu; Luo, Ling

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effect of long-term weightlessness on retina and optic nerve in tail-suspension (TS) rats. METHODS A stimulated weightlessness model was established by suspending rats' tail. After 12wk, the ultrastructure and the number of optic nerve axons were observed by transmission electron microscope. The number of survival retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) was calculated by fluorescent gold retrograde labeling. Retina cells apoptosis was detected by TUNEL staining. The function of optic nerve and retina was evaluated by the visual evoked potential (VEP) and oscillatory potentials (Ops). RESULTS The optic nerve axons were swollen and sparsely aligned, and the lamellar separation and myelin disintegration occurred after 12wk in TS rats. The density of optic nerve axons was 32.23±3.92 (vs 37.43±4.13, P=0.0145), the RGCs density was 1645±46 cells/mm2 (vs 1867±54 cells/mm2 P=0.0000), the incidence rate of retinal cells apoptosis was 5.38%±0.53% (vs 4.75%±0.54%, P=0.0238), the amplitude of VEP-P100 was 15.43±2.14 µV (vs 17.67±2.17 µV, P=0.0424), the latency of VEP-P100 was 69.05±5.34ms (vs 62.43±4.87ms P=0.0143) and the sum amplitude of Ops was 81.05±8.34 µV (vs 91.67±10.21 µV, P=0.0280) in TS group and the control group, respectively. CONCLUSION Long-term weightlessness can induce the ultrastructural changes and functional depress of the optic nerve, as well as retinal cell damages in TS rats. PMID:27366682

  7. Localization of diacylglycerol lipase alpha and monoacylglycerol lipase during postnatal development of the rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Cécyre, Bruno; Monette, Marjorie; Beudjekian, Liza; Casanova, Christian; Bouchard, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, there has been increased interest in the physiological roles of the endocannabinoid (eCB) system and its receptors, the cannabinoid receptor types 1 (CB1R) and 2 (CB2R). Exposure to cannabinoids during development results in neurofunctional alterations, which implies that the eCB system is involved in the developmental processes of the brain. Because of their lipophilic nature, eCBs are synthesized on demand and are not stored in vesicles. Consequently, the enzymes responsible for their synthesis and degradation are key regulators of their physiological actions. Therefore, knowing the localization of these enzymes during development is crucial for a better understanding of the role played by eCBs during the formation of the central nervous system. In this study, we investigated the developmental protein localization of the synthesizing and catabolic enzymes of the principal eCB, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in the retinas of young and adult rats. The distribution of the enzymes responsible for the synthesis (DAGLα) and the degradation (MAGL) of 2-AG was determined for every retinal cell type from birth to adulthood. Our results indicate that DAGLα is present early in postnatal development. It is highly expressed in photoreceptor, horizontal, amacrine, and ganglion cells. MAGL appears later during the development of the retina and its presence is limited to amacrine and Müller cells. Overall, these results suggest that 2-AG is strongly present in early retinal development and might be involved in the regulation of the structural and functional maturation of the retina. PMID:25565975

  8. Heterogeneous Expression of the Core Circadian Clock Proteins among Neuronal Cell Types in Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Zhijing; Ribelayga, Christophe P.

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in metabolism, physiology, and behavior originate from cell-autonomous circadian clocks located in many organs and structures throughout the body and that share a common molecular mechanism based on the clock genes and their protein products. In the mammalian neural retina, despite evidence supporting the presence of several circadian clocks regulating many facets of retinal physiology and function, the exact cellular location and genetic signature of the retinal clock cells remain largely unknown. Here we examined the expression of the core circadian clock proteins CLOCK, BMAL1, NPAS2, PERIOD 1(PER1), PERIOD 2 (PER2), and CRYPTOCHROME2 (CRY2) in identified neurons of the mouse retina during daily and circadian cycles. We found concurrent clock protein expression in most retinal neurons, including cone photoreceptors, dopaminergic amacrine cells, and melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive ganglion cells. Remarkably, diurnal and circadian rhythms of expression of all clock proteins were observed in the cones whereas only CRY2 expression was found to be rhythmic in the dopaminergic amacrine cells. Only a low level of expression of the clock proteins was detected in the rods at any time of the daily or circadian cycle. Our observations provide evidence that cones and not rods are cell-autonomous circadian clocks and reveal an important disparity in the expression of the core clock components among neuronal cell types. We propose that the overall temporal architecture of the mammalian retina does not result from the synchronous activity of pervasive identical clocks but rather reflects the cellular and regional heterogeneity in clock function within retinal tissue. PMID:23189207

  9. Relationship of ocular pigmentation to the boundaries of dorsal and ventral retina in a nonmammalian vertebrate.

    PubMed

    Springer, A D; Mednick, A S

    1986-03-01

    The goldfish eye and retina are partitioned traditionally into dorsal and ventral sectors by a horizontal meridian that passes through the optic disc and is perpendicular to a vertical meridian that extends from the remnant of the choroid fissure through the optic disc. Axons of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) situated above the horizontal meridian are thought to reach the optic tectum via the ventrolateral optic tract and axons of RGCs situated below the horizontal meridian are thought to reach the optic tectum via the dorsomedial optic tract. When cobaltous-lysine was applied to small temporal retinal slits that were centered on the traditional horizontal meridian, filled fibers were found in the dorsomedial, but not in the ventrolateral, optic tract (Springer and Mednick, '83). Since cobalt-filled axons should have been found in both optic tracts, the traditional horizontal meridian does not indicate the actual boundary between dorsal and ventral retina. We report here that the goldfish iris contains nasal and temporal pigmentation lines (darts) that are each located approximately 21 degrees above the traditional horizontal retinal meridian. Cobalt applied to retinal slits located just above the darts filled RGC axons in the ventrolateral optic tract and cobalt applied to retinal slits just below the darts filled RGC axons in the dorsomedial optic tract. Converging evidence for the reliability of the darts as indicators of the boundary between dorsal and ventral retina was obtained by applying cobalt to severed RGC axons along the dorsomedial edge of the tectum. Cobalt-filled RGCs were found below the nasal dart.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2420839

  10. Nitric oxide production and the expression of two nitric oxide synthases in the avian retina.

    PubMed

    Tekmen-Clark, Merve; Gleason, Evanna

    2013-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is known to exert multiple effects on the function of many retinal neurons and their synapses. Therefore, it is equally important to understand the potential sources of NO within the retina. To explore this, we employ a combination of 4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF-FM) based NO detection and immunohistochemistry for the NO synthetic enzymes, neuronal and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (nNOS and eNOS). We find DAF signals in photoreceptors, horizontal cells, amacrine cells, efferent synapses, Müller cells, and cells in the ganglion cell layer (GCL). nNOS immunoreactivity was consistent with the DAF signal with the exception that horizontal cells and Müller cells were not clearly labeled. eNOS-like immunoreactivity (eNOS-LI) was more widespread with photoreceptors, horizontal cells, occasional bipolar cells, amacrine cells, Müller cells, and cells in the GCL all showing labeling. Double labeling with antibodies raised against calretinin, syntaxin, and glutamine synthetase confirmed that horizontal cells, amacrine cells, and Müller cells (respectively) were expressing eNOS-LI. Although little or no nNOS labeling is observed in horizontal cells or Müller cells, the expression of eNOS-LI is consistent with the ability of these cells to produce NO. Together these results suggest that the capability to produce NO is widespread in the chicken retina. We propose that multiple forms of regulation for nNOS and eNOS play a role in the patterning of NO production in the chicken retina. PMID:23721886

  11. The types of retinal ganglion cells: current status and implications for neuronal classification.

    PubMed

    Sanes, Joshua R; Masland, Richard H

    2015-07-01

    In the retina, photoreceptors pass visual information to interneurons, which process it and pass it to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Axons of RGCs then travel through the optic nerve, telling the rest of the brain all it will ever know about the visual world. Research over the past several decades has made clear that most RGCs are not merely light detectors, but rather feature detectors, which send a diverse set of parallel, highly processed images of the world on to higher centers. Here, we review progress in classification of RGCs by physiological, morphological, and molecular criteria, making a particular effort to distinguish those cell types that are definitive from those for which information is partial. We focus on the mouse, in which molecular and genetic methods are most advanced. We argue that there are around 30 RGC types and that we can now account for well over half of all RGCs. We also use RGCs to examine the general problem of neuronal classification, arguing that insights and methods from the retina can guide the classification enterprise in other brain regions. PMID:25897874

  12. Math5 is required for retinal ganglion cell and optic nerve formation

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Nadean L.; Patel, Sima; Brzezinski, Joseph; Glaser, Tom

    2006-01-01

    SUMMARY The vertebrate retina contains seven major neuronal and glial cell types in an interconnected network that collects, processes and sends visual signals through the optic nerve to the brain. Retinal neuron differentiation is thought to require both intrinsic and extrinsic factors, yet few intrinsic gene products have been identified that direct this process. Math5 (Atoh7) encodes a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor that is specifically expressed by mouse retinal progenitors. Math5 is highly homologous to atonal, which is critically required for R8 neuron formation during Drosophila eye development. Like R8 cells in the fly eye, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are the first neurons in the vertebrate eye. Here we show that Math5 mutant mice are fully viable, yet lack RGCs and optic nerves. Thus, two evolutionarily diverse eye types require atonal gene family function for the earliest stages of retinal neuron formation. At the same time, the abundance of cone photoreceptors is significantly increased in Math5−/− retinae, suggesting a binary change in cell fate from RGCs to cones. A small number of nascent RGCs are detected during embryogenesis, but these fail to develop further, suggesting that committed RGCs may also require Math5 function. PMID:11493566

  13. Simultaneous recording of mouse retinal ganglion cells during epiretinal or subretinal stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Sim, S.L.; Szalewski, R.J.; Johnson, L.J.; Akah, L.E.; Shoemaker, L.E.; Thoreson, W.B.; Margalit, E.

    2015-01-01

    We compared response patterns and electrical receptive fields (ERF) of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) during epiretinal and subretinal electrical stimulation of isolated mouse retina. Retinas were stimulated with an array of 3200 independently controllable electrodes. Four response patterns were observed: a burst of activity immediately after stimulation (Type I cells, Vision Research (2008), 48, 1562–1568), delayed bursts beginning >25 ms after stimulation (Type II), a combination of both (Type III), and inhibition of ongoing spike activity. Type I responses were produced more often by epiretinal than subretinal stimulation whereas delayed and inhibitory responses were evoked more frequently by subretinal stimulation. Response latencies were significantly shorter with epiretinal than subretinal stimulation. These data suggest that subretinal stimulation is more effective at activating intraretinal circuits than epiretinal stimulation. There was no significant difference in charge threshold between subretinal and epiretinal configurations. ERFs were defined by the stimulating array surface area that successfully stimulated spikes in an RGC. ERFs were complex in shape, similar to receptive fields mapped with light. ERF areas were significantly smaller with subretinal than epiretinal stimulation. This may reflect the greater distance between stimulating electrodes and RGCs in the subretinal configuration. ERFs for immediate and delayed responses mapped within the same Type III cells differed in shape and size, consistent with different sites and mechanisms for generating these two response types. PMID:24863584

  14. Eye formation in the absence of retina

    PubMed Central

    Swindell, Eric C.; Liu, Chaomei; Shah, Rina; Smith, April N.; Lang, Richard A.; Jamrich, Milan

    2008-01-01

    Eye development is a complex process that involves the formation of the retina and the lens, collectively called the eyeball, as well as the formation of auxiliary eye structures such as the eyelid, lacrimal gland, cornea and conjunctiva. The developmental requirements for the formation of each individual structure are only partially understood. We have shown previously that the homeobox-containing gene Rx is a key component in eye formation, as retinal structures do not develop and retina-specific gene expression is not observed in Rx-deficient mice. In addition, Rx−/− embryos do not develop any lens structure, despite the fact that Rx is not expressed in the lens. This demonstrates that during normal mammalian development, retina-specific gene expression is necessary for lens formation. In this paper we show that lens formation can be restored in Rx-deficient embryos experimentally, by the elimination of β-catenin expression in the head surface ectoderm. This suggests that β-catenin is involved in lens specification either through Wnt signaling or through its function in cell adhesion. In contrast to lens formation, we demonstrate that the development of auxiliary eye structures does not depend on retina-specific gene expression or retinal morphogenesis. These results point to the existence of two separate developmental processes involved in the formation of the eye and its associated structures. One involved in the formation of the eyeball and the second involved in the formation of the auxiliary eye structures. PMID:18675797

  15. Vascular tumors of the choroid and retina

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, P Mahesh; Ramanjulu, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Vascular tumors of the retina and choroid can be seen occasionally. In the following article, the key clinical and diagnostic features of the major retinal and choroidal vascular tumors, their systemic associations, and the literature pertaining to the most currently available treatment strategies are reviewed. PMID:25827544

  16. The Neurovascular Retina in Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Anne B.; Hansen, Ronald M.; Moskowitz, Anne; Akula, James D.

    2009-01-01

    The continuing worldwide epidemic of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), a leading cause of childhood visual impairment, strongly motivates further research into mechanisms of the disease. Although the hallmark of ROP is abnormal retinal vasculature, a growing body of evidence supports a critical role for the neural retina in the ROP disease process. The age of onset of ROP coincides with the rapid developmental increase in rod photoreceptor outer segment length and rhodopsin content of the retina with escalation of energy demands. Using a combination of non-invasive electroretinographic (ERG), psychophysical, and image analysis procedures, the neural retina and its vasculature have been studied in prematurely born human subjects, both with and without ROP, and in rats that model the key vascular and neural parameters found in human ROP subjects. These data are compared to comprehensive numeric summaries of the neural and vascular features in normally developing human and rat retina. In rats, biochemical, anatomical, and molecular biological investigations are paired with the non-invasive assessments. ROP, even if mild, primarily and persistently alters the structure and function of photoreceptors. Post-receptor neurons and retinal vasculature, which are intimately related, are also affected by ROP; conspicuous neurovascular abnormalities disappear, but subtle structural anomalies and functional deficits may persist years after clinical ROP resolves. The data from human subjects and rat models identify photoreceptor and post-receptor targets for interventions that promise improved outcomes for children at risk for ROP. PMID:19563909

  17. Quantitative measurement of retinal ganglion cell populations via histology-based random forest classification.

    PubMed

    Hedberg-Buenz, Adam; Christopher, Mark A; Lewis, Carly J; Fernandes, Kimberly A; Dutca, Laura M; Wang, Kai; Scheetz, Todd E; Abràmoff, Michael D; Libby, Richard T; Garvin, Mona K; Anderson, Michael G

    2016-05-01

    The inner surface of the retina contains a complex mixture of neurons, glia, and vasculature, including retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), the final output neurons of the retina and primary neurons that are damaged in several blinding diseases. The goal of the current work was two-fold: to assess the feasibility of using computer-assisted detection of nuclei and random forest classification to automate the quantification of RGCs in hematoxylin/eosin (H&E)-stained retinal whole-mounts; and if possible, to use the approach to examine how nuclear size influences disease susceptibility among RGC populations. To achieve this, data from RetFM-J, a semi-automated ImageJ-based module that detects, counts, and collects quantitative data on nuclei of H&E-stained whole-mounted retinas, were used in conjunction with a manually curated set of images to train a random forest classifier. To test performance, computer-derived outputs were compared to previously published features of several well-characterized mouse models of ophthalmic disease and their controls: normal C57BL/6J mice; Jun-sufficient and Jun-deficient mice subjected to controlled optic nerve crush (CONC); and DBA/2J mice with naturally occurring glaucoma. The result of these efforts was development of RetFM-Class, a command-line-based tool that uses data output from RetFM-J to perform random forest classification of cell type. Comparative testing revealed that manual and automated classifications by RetFM-Class correlated well, with 83.2% classification accuracy for RGCs. Automated characterization of C57BL/6J retinas predicted 54,642 RGCs per normal retina, and identified a 48.3% Jun-dependent loss of cells at 35 days post CONC and a 71.2% loss of RGCs among 16-month-old DBA/2J mice with glaucoma. Output from automated analyses was used to compare nuclear area among large numbers of RGCs from DBA/2J mice (n = 127,361). In aged DBA/2J mice with glaucoma, RetFM-Class detected a decrease in median and mean nucleus size

  18. Canine Retina Has a Primate Fovea-Like Bouquet of Cone Photoreceptors Which Is Affected by Inherited Macular Degenerations

    PubMed Central

    Guziewicz, Karina E.; Iwabe, Simone; Swider, Malgorzata; Scott, Erin M.; Savina, Svetlana V.; Ruthel, Gordon; Stefano, Frank; Zhang, Lingli; Zorger, Richard; Sumaroka, Alexander; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal areas of specialization confer vertebrates with the ability to scrutinize corresponding regions of their visual field with greater resolution. A highly specialized area found in haplorhine primates (including humans) is the fovea centralis which is defined by a high density of cone photoreceptors connected individually to interneurons, and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that are offset to form a pit lacking retinal capillaries and inner retinal neurons at its center. In dogs, a local increase in RGC density is found in a topographically comparable retinal area defined as the area centralis. While the canine retina is devoid of a foveal pit, no detailed examination of the photoreceptors within the area centralis has been reported. Using both in vivo and ex vivo imaging, we identified a retinal region with a primate fovea-like cone photoreceptor density but without the excavation of the inner retina. Similar anatomical structure observed in rare human subjects has been named fovea-plana. In addition, dogs with mutations in two different genes, that cause macular degeneration in humans, developed earliest disease at the newly-identified canine fovea-like area. Our results challenge the dogma that within the phylogenetic tree of mammals, haplorhine primates with a fovea are the sole lineage in which the retina has a central bouquet of cones. Furthermore, a predilection for naturally-occurring retinal degenerations to alter this cone-enriched area fills the void for a clinically-relevant animal model of human macular degenerations. PMID:24599007

  19. Cell-Specific Promoters Enable Lipid-Based Nanoparticles to Deliver Genes to Specific Cells of the Retina In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhong; Rajala, Ammaji; Cao, Binrui; Ranjo-Bishop, Michelle; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Mao, Chuanbin; Rajala, Raju V.S.

    2016-01-01

    Non-viral vectors, such as lipid-based nanoparticles (liposome-protamine-DNA complex [LPD]), could be used to deliver a functional gene to the retina to correct visual function and treat blindness. However, one of the limitations of LPD is the lack of cell specificity, as the retina is composed of seven types of cells. If the same gene is expressed in multiple cell types or is absent from one desired cell type, LPD-mediated gene delivery to every cell may have off-target effects. To circumvent this problem, we have tested LPD-mediated gene delivery using various generalized, modified, and retinal cell-specific promoters. We achieved retinal pigment epithelium cell specificity with vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2), rod cell specificity with mouse rhodopsin, cone cell specificity with red/green opsin, and ganglion cell specificity with thymocyte antigen promoters. Here we show for the first time that cell-specific promoters enable lipid-based nanoparticles to deliver genes to specific cells of the retina in vivo. This work will inspire investigators in the field of lipid nanotechnology to couple cell-specific promoters to drive expression in a cell- and tissue-specific manner. PMID:27446487

  20. X-ray microprobe analysis of the retina and RPE in sheep with ovine ceroid-lipofuscinosis

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelson, D.A.; Armstrong, D.; Jolly, R. )

    1990-11-01

    Ovine ceroid-lipofuscinosis (OCL) is one animal model for the human condition, and because autofluorescent lipopigments are prominent in the brain and eye, it may also prove useful as a model for aging. For example, a progressive decline in electrical recording from brain and retina are observed in both aging and OCL. Samples of retinal and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) tissues were obtained from a young control. 2 animals with OCL and a normal aged sheep. Specimens were cryo-fractured and examined by scanning electron microscopy/x-ray microanalysis. Measurements made of 6 individual cells in the ganglion layer of OCL specimens, the remainder of the retina, and RPE showed age-related changes in zinc, iron, and copper which were associated with lipopigment accumulation in the RPE. There was marked decrease in phosphate, sulfur, and manganese levels, as photoreceptor cells and their outer segments are lost in the disease process. This is the first report of metal analysis in the retina and RPE in a disease entity, and as a function of normal aging.

  1. Characterization of an N-system amino acid transporter expressed in retina and its involvement in glutamine transport.

    PubMed

    Gu, S; Roderick, H L; Camacho, P; Jiang, J X

    2001-06-29

    We report here on the characterization of a mouse N-system amino acid transporter protein, which is involved in the transport of glutamine. This protein of 485 amino acids shares 52% sequence homology with an N-system amino acid transporter, mouse N-system amino acid transporter (mNAT) and its orthologs. Because this protein shares a high degree of sequence homology and functional similarity to mNAT, we named it mNAT2. mNAT2 is predominately expressed in the retina and to a slightly lesser extent in the brain. In the retina, it is located in the axons of ganglion cells in the nerve fiber layer and in the bundles of the optic nerve. Functional analysis of mNAT2 expressed in Xenopus oocytes revealed that the strongest transport activities were specific for l-glutamine. In addition, mNAT2 is a Na(+)- and pH-dependent, high affinity transporter and partially tolerates substitution of Na(+) by Li(+). Additionally, mNAT2 functions as a carrier-mediated transporter that facilitates efflux. The unique expression pattern and selective glutamine transport properties of mNAT2 suggest that it plays a specific role in the uptake of glutamine involved in the generation of the neurotransmitter glutamate in retina. PMID:11325958

  2. PAX6 MiniPromoters drive restricted expression from rAAV in the adult mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Hickmott, Jack W; Chen, Chih-Yu; Arenillas, David J; Korecki, Andrea J; Lam, Siu Ling; Molday, Laurie L; Bonaguro, Russell J; Zhou, Michelle; Chou, Alice Y; Mathelier, Anthony; Boye, Sanford L; Hauswirth, William W; Molday, Robert S; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Simpson, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Current gene therapies predominantly use small, strong, and readily available ubiquitous promoters. However, as the field matures, the availability of small, cell-specific promoters would be greatly beneficial. Here we design seven small promoters from the human paired box 6 (PAX6) gene and test them in the adult mouse retina using recombinant adeno-associated virus. We chose the retina due to previous successes in gene therapy for blindness, and the PAX6 gene since it is: well studied; known to be driven by discrete regulatory regions; expressed in therapeutically interesting retinal cell types; and mutated in the vision-loss disorder aniridia, which is in need of improved therapy. At the PAX6 locus, 31 regulatory regions were bioinformatically predicted, and nine regulatory regions were constructed into seven MiniPromoters. Driving Emerald GFP, these MiniPromoters were packaged into recombinant adeno-associated virus, and injected intravitreally into postnatal day 14 mice. Four MiniPromoters drove consistent retinal expression in the adult mouse, driving expression in combinations of cell-types that endogenously express Pax6: ganglion, amacrine, horizontal, and Müller glia. Two PAX6-MiniPromoters drive expression in three of the four cell types that express PAX6 in the adult mouse retina. Combined, they capture all four cell types, making them potential tools for research, and PAX6-gene therapy for aniridia. PMID:27556059

  3. Restricted expression of Neuroglobin in the mouse retina and co-localization with Melanopsin and Tyrosine Hydroxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Hundahl, C.A.; Fahrenkrug, J.; Luuk, H.; Hay-Schmidt, A.; Hannibal, J.

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Restricted Neuroglobin expression in the mouse retina. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antibody validation using Neuroglobin-null mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-expression of Neuroglobin with Melanopsin and tyrosine hydroxylase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No effect of Neuroglobin deficiency on neuronal survival. -- Abstract: Neuroglobin (Ngb), a neuronal specific oxygen binding heme-globin, reported to be expressed at high levels in most layers of the murine retina. Ngb's function is presently unknown, but based on its high expression level and oxygen binding capabilities Ngb was proposed to function as an oxygen reservoir facilitating oxygen metabolism in highly active neurons or to function as a neuroprotectant. In the present study, we re-examined the expression pattern of Ngb in the retina using a highly validated antibody. Furthermore, intactness of retino-hypothalamic projections and the retinal expression level of Melanopsin and Tyrosine Hydroxylase were investigated in Ngb-null mice. Ngb-immunoreactivity was found in a few neurons of the ganglion cell and inner nuclear layers co-expressing Melanopsin and Tyrosine Hydroxylase, respectively. Ngb deficiency neither affected the level of Melanopsin and Tyrosine Hydroxylase proteins nor the intactness of PACAP-positive retinohypothalamic projections in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Based on the present results, it seems unlikely that Ngb could have a major role in retinal oxygen homeostasis and neuronal survival under normal conditions. The present study suggests that a number of previously published reports have relied on antibodies with dubious specificity.

  4. PAX6 MiniPromoters drive restricted expression from rAAV in the adult mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Hickmott, Jack W; Chen, Chih-yu; Arenillas, David J; Korecki, Andrea J; Lam, Siu Ling; Molday, Laurie L; Bonaguro, Russell J; Zhou, Michelle; Chou, Alice Y; Mathelier, Anthony; Boye, Sanford L; Hauswirth, William W; Molday, Robert S; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Simpson, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Current gene therapies predominantly use small, strong, and readily available ubiquitous promoters. However, as the field matures, the availability of small, cell-specific promoters would be greatly beneficial. Here we design seven small promoters from the human paired box 6 (PAX6) gene and test them in the adult mouse retina using recombinant adeno-associated virus. We chose the retina due to previous successes in gene therapy for blindness, and the PAX6 gene since it is: well studied; known to be driven by discrete regulatory regions; expressed in therapeutically interesting retinal cell types; and mutated in the vision-loss disorder aniridia, which is in need of improved therapy. At the PAX6 locus, 31 regulatory regions were bioinformatically predicted, and nine regulatory regions were constructed into seven MiniPromoters. Driving Emerald GFP, these MiniPromoters were packaged into recombinant adeno-associated virus, and injected intravitreally into postnatal day 14 mice. Four MiniPromoters drove consistent retinal expression in the adult mouse, driving expression in combinations of cell-types that endogenously express Pax6: ganglion, amacrine, horizontal, and Müller glia. Two PAX6-MiniPromoters drive expression in three of the four cell types that express PAX6 in the adult mouse retina. Combined, they capture all four cell types, making them potential tools for research, and PAX6-gene therapy for aniridia. PMID:27556059

  5. Vascular Precursors in Developing Human Retina

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Takuya; McLeod, D. Scott; Prow, Tarl; Merges, Carol; Grebe, Rhonda; Lutty, Gerard A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Prior investigation has demonstrated that angioblasts are present in the inner retinas of human embryos and fetuses and that they differentiate and organize to form the primordial retinal vasculature. The purpose of this study was to characterize these angioblasts further and examine ligands that might control their migration and differentiation. Methods Immunohistochemistry was used to localize stroma-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), its receptor CXCR4, stem cell factor (SCF), and its receptor c-Kit on sections obtained from human eyes at from 6 to 23 weeks’ gestation (WG). Coexpression of CD39 (marker for retinal angioblasts and endothelial cells) and CXCR4 or c-Kit was investigated by confocal microscopy. Results SDF-1 was prominent in inner retina with the greatest reaction product near the internal limiting membrane (ILM). SCF immunoreactivity was also confined to the inner retina and increased significantly between 7 and 12 WG. The level of both ligands declined by 22 WG. A layer of CXCR4+ and c-Kit+ precursors, some of which coexpressed CD39, existed in the inner retina from 7 to 12 WG. With migration, c-Kit was downregulated, whereas CD39+ cells continued to express CXCR4 as they formed cords. With canalization, CXCR4 expression was downregulated. Conclusions Embryonic human retina has a pool of precursors (CXCR4+ and c-Kit+) that enlarged centrifugally during fetal development. From this pool emerges angioblasts, which migrate anteriorly into the nerve fiber layer where SDF-1 and SCF levels are highest. c-Kit expression declines with apparent migration, and CXCR4 expression declines with canalization of new vessels. Both SCF and SDF-1 are associated with the differentiation of retinal precursors into angioblasts and their migration to sites of vessel assembly. PMID:18436851

  6. Histone deacetylase inhibitors sodium butyrate and valproic acid delay spontaneous cell death in purified rat retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Jennifer; Pielen, Amelie; Lagrèze, Wolf Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have neuroprotective effects under various neurodegenerative conditions, e.g., after optic nerve crush (ONC). HDACi-mediated protection of central neurons by increased histone acetylation has not previously been demonstrated in rat retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), although epigenetic changes were shown to be associated with cell death after ONC. We investigated whether HDACi can delay spontaneous cell death in purified rat RGCs and analyzed concomitant histone acetylation levels. Methods RGCs were purified from newborn (postnatal day [P] 0–P2) rat retinas by immunopanning with antibodies against Thy-1.1 and culturing in serum-free medium for 2 days. RGCs were treated with HDACi, each at several different concentrations: 0.1–10 mM sodium butyrate (SB), 0.1–2 mM valproic acid (VPA), or 0.5–10 nM trichostatin A (TSA). Negative controls were incubated in media alone, while positive controls were incubated in 0.05–0.4 IU/µl erythropoietin. Survival was quantified by counting viable cells using phase-contrast microscopy. The expression of acetylated histone proteins (AcH) 3 and 4 was analyzed in RGCs by immunohistochemistry. Results SB and VPA enhanced RGC survival in culture, with both showing a maximum effect at 0.1 mM (increase in survival to 188% and 163%, respectively). Their neuroprotective effect was comparable to that of erythropoietin at 0.05 IU/µl. TSA 0.5–1.0 nM showed no effect on RGC survival, and concentrations ≥5 nM increased RGC death. AcH3 and AcH4 levels were only significantly increased in RGCs treated with 0.1 mM SB. VPA 0.1 mM produced only a slight effect on histone acetylation. Conclusions Millimolar concentrations of SB and VPA delayed spontaneous cell death in purified RGCs; however, significantly increased histone acetylation levels were only detectable in RGCs after SB treatment. As the potent HDACi TSA was not neuroprotective, mechanisms other than histone acetylation may be the

  7. Transient ipsilateral retinal ganglion cell projections to the brain: Extent, targeting and disappearance

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Célia A.; Mason, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    During development of the mammalian eye, the first retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that extend to the brain are located in the dorsocentral retina. These RGCs extend to either ipsilateral or contralateral targets, but the ipsilateral projections do not survive into postnatal periods. The function and means of disappearance of the transient ipsilateral projection are not known. We have followed the course of this transient early ipsilateral cohort of RGCs, paying attention to how far they extend, whether they enter targets and if so, which ones, and the time course of their disappearance. The dorsocentral ipsilateral RGC axons were traced using DiI labeling at E13.5 and 15.5 to compare the proportion of ipsi-versus contralateral projections during the first period of growth. In utero electroporation of E12.5 retina with GFP constructs was used to label axons that could be visualized at succeeding time points into postnatal ages. Our results show that the earliest ipsilateral axons grow along the cellular border of the brain, and are segregated from the laterally-postioned contralateral axons from the same retinal origin. In agreement with previous reports, although many early RGCs extend ipsilaterally, after E16 their number rapidly declines. Nonetheless, some ipsilateral axons from the dorsocentral retina enter the superior colliculus (SC) and arborize minimally, but very few enter the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) and those that do extend only short branches. While the mechanism of selective axonal disappearance remains elusive, these data give further insight into establishment of the visual pathways. PMID:25788284

  8. Ganglion cell complex thickness in nonexudative age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yenice, E; Şengün, A; Soyugelen Demirok, G; Turaçlı, E

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate ganglion cell complex (GCC) thickness with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in eyes with nonexudative age-related macular degeneration (NEAMD). Methods Forty-seven eyes of 28 patients with nonexudative age-related macular degeneration (NEAMD) and 54 eyes of 28 age-matched healthy subjects were enrolled. Each subject underwent a complete ophthalmic examination before SD-OCT were obtained. Macular scans were taken with software version 6.0 of the ganglion cell analysis (GCA) algorithm. GCC thickness was evaluated automatically as the average, minimum, temporal superior, superior, nasal superior, nasal inferior, inferior, and temporal-inferior segments by SD-OCT and parameters were compared between groups. Results The mean age was 68.7±8.73 years in patient group, and 61.51±5.66 years in control group. There were no significant differences in mean age, gender distribution, intraocular pressure, and sferic equivalent at imaging between the groups (P>0.05). The mean (±SD) GCC thicknesses were as follows; average 71.53±16.53 μm, minumum 62.36±21.51 μm, temporal superior 72.23±14.60 μm, superior 72.76±20.40 μm, nasal superior 72.31±20.13 μm, nasal inferior 69.74±20.51 μm, inferior 69.38±19.03 μm, and temporal-inferior 73.12±15.44 μm in patient group. Corresponding values in control group were 81.46±4.90 μm, 78.66±6.00 μm, 81.51±4.66 μm, 82.94±5.14 μm, 81.79±5.86 μm, 80.94±6.18 μm, 80.14±6.30 μm, and 81.75±5.26 μm, respectively. There were significant differences between two groups in each segments (Mann–Whitney U-test, P<0.05). Conclusion The average GCC thickness values (in all segments) of NEAMD patients were lower than control group. NEAMD, which is considered as a disease of outer layers of retina, may be accompanied with a decrease of ganglion cell thickness, so inner layers of retina may be affected. PMID:26021868

  9. Down-regulation of semaphorin 3F in rat retinal ganglion cells in response to optic nerve crush.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ji-Ae; Minamoto, Akira; Sugimoto, Yosuke; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki

    2016-07-01

    Glaucoma is characterized by degeneration of optic nerve axons and death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Nerve crush and axotomy of the optic nerve are studied as models of RGC death in glaucoma and of axon regeneration. The mechanisms underlying the response of RGCs to axonal injury remain unclear, however. We have now examined the effects of optic nerve crush on the expression of members of the semaphorin family of neuronal guidance proteins in the rat retina. The expression of semaphorin 3F (Sema3F) in the retina was down-regulated at both the mRNA and protein levels at 7 days after optic nerve injury, whereas that of Sema3A, Sema3B or Sema3C remained unaffected. Immunohistofluorescence analysis and laser capture microdissection followed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that this loss of Sema3F expression occurred in the RGC layer of the retina. Furthermore, antibody-mediated neutralization of secreted Sema3F in retinal organ culture resulted in down-regulation of neuron-specific βIII-tubulin (Tuj-1 antigen), a marker of RGCs. Our results suggest that Sema3F may contribute to the regulation of RGC function or survival and therefore warrants further investigation as a potential mediator of neuroprotection. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27309587

  10. Transducin Duplicates in the Zebrafish Retina and Pineal Complex: Differential Specialisation after the Teleost Tetraploidisation

    PubMed Central

    Lagman, David; Callado-Pérez, Amalia; Franzén, Ilkin E.

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplications provide raw materials that can be selected for functional adaptations by evolutionary mechanisms. We describe here the results of 350 million years of evolution of three functionally related gene families: the alpha, beta and gamma subunits of transducins, the G protein involved in vision. Early vertebrate tetraploidisations resulted in separate transducin heterotrimers: gnat1/gnb1/gngt1 for rods, and gnat2/gnb3/gngt2 for cones. The teleost-specific tetraploidisation generated additional duplicates for gnb1, gnb3 and gngt2. We report here that the duplicates have undergone several types of subfunctionalisation or neofunctionalisation in the zebrafish. We have found that gnb1a and gnb1b are co-expressed at different levels in rods; gnb3a and gnb3b have undergone compartmentalisation restricting gnb3b to the dorsal and medial retina, however, gnb3a expression was detected only at very low levels in both larvae and adult retina; gngt2b expression is restricted to the dorsal and medial retina, whereas gngt2a is expressed ventrally. This dorsoventral distinction could be an adaptation to protect the lower part of the retina from intense light damage. The ontogenetic analysis shows earlier onset of expression in the pineal complex than in the retina, in accordance with its earlier maturation. Additionally, gnb1a but not gnb1b is expressed in the pineal complex, and gnb3b and gngt2b are transiently expressed in the pineal during ontogeny, thus showing partial temporal subfunctionalisation. These retina-pineal distinctions presumably reflect their distinct functional roles in vision and circadian rhythmicity. In summary, this study describes several functional differences between transducin gene duplicates resulting from the teleost-specific tetraploidisation. PMID:25806532

  11. Transducin duplicates in the zebrafish retina and pineal complex: differential specialisation after the teleost tetraploidisation.

    PubMed

    Lagman, David; Callado-Pérez, Amalia; Franzén, Ilkin E; Larhammar, Dan; Abalo, Xesús M

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplications provide raw materials that can be selected for functional adaptations by evolutionary mechanisms. We describe here the results of 350 million years of evolution of three functionally related gene families: the alpha, beta and gamma subunits of transducins, the G protein involved in vision. Early vertebrate tetraploidisations resulted in separate transducin heterotrimers: gnat1/gnb1/gngt1 for rods, and gnat2/gnb3/gngt2 for cones. The teleost-specific tetraploidisation generated additional duplicates for gnb1, gnb3 and gngt2. We report here that the duplicates have undergone several types of subfunctionalisation or neofunctionalisation in the zebrafish. We have found that gnb1a and gnb1b are co-expressed at different levels in rods; gnb3a and gnb3b have undergone compartmentalisation restricting gnb3b to the dorsal and medial retina, however, gnb3a expression was detected only at very low levels in both larvae and adult retina; gngt2b expression is restricted to the dorsal and medial retina, whereas gngt2a is expressed ventrally. This dorsoventral distinction could be an adaptation to protect the lower part of the retina from intense light damage. The ontogenetic analysis shows earlier onset of expression in the pineal complex than in the retina, in accordance with its earlier maturation. Additionally, gnb1a but not gnb1b is expressed in the pineal complex, and gnb3b and gngt2b are transiently expressed in the pineal during ontogeny, thus showing partial temporal subfunctionalisation. These retina-pineal distinctions presumably reflect their distinct functional roles in vision and circadian rhythmicity. In summary, this study describes several functional differences between transducin gene duplicates resulting from the teleost-specific tetraploidisation. PMID:25806532

  12. The retina as an early biomarker of neurodegeneration in a rotenone-induced model of Parkinson's disease: evidence for a neuroprotective effect of rosiglitazone in the eye and brain.

    PubMed

    Normando, Eduardo Maria; Davis, Benjamin Michael; De Groef, Lies; Nizari, Shereen; Turner, Lisa A; Ravindran, Nivedita; Pahlitzsch, Milena; Brenton, Jonathan; Malaguarnera, Giulia; Guo, Li; Somavarapu, Satyanarayana; Cordeiro, Maria Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's Disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease worldwide, affecting 1 % of the population over 65 years of age. Dopaminergic cell death in the substantia nigra and accumulation of Lewy bodies are the defining neuropathological hallmarks of the disease. Neuronal death and dysfunction have been reported in other central nervous system regions, including the retina. Symptoms of PD typically manifest only when more than 70 % of dopaminergic cells are lost, and the definitive diagnosis of PD can only be made histologically at post-mortem, with few biomarkers available.In this study, a rotenone-induced rodent model of PD was employed to investigate retinal manifestations in PD and their usefulness in assessing the efficacy of a novel therapeutic intervention with a liposomal formulation of the PPAR-γ (Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma) agonist rosiglitazone.Retinal assessment was performed using longitudinal in vivo imaging with DARC (detection of apoptosing retinal cells) and OCT (optical coherence tomography) technologies and revealed increased RGCs (Retinal Ganglion Cells) apoptosis and a transient swelling of the retinal layers at day 20 of the rotenone insult. Follow-up of this model demonstrated characteristic histological neurodegenerative changes in the substantia nigra and striatum by day 60, suggesting that retinal changes precede the "traditional" pathological manifestations of PD. The therapeutic effect of systemic administration of different formulations of rosiglitazone was then evaluated, both in the retina and the brain. Of all treatment regimen tested, sustained release administration of liposome-encapsulated rosiglitazone proved to be the most potent therapeutic strategy, as evidenced by its significant neuroprotective effect on retinal neurons at day 20, and on nigrostriatal neurons at day 60, provided convincing evidence for its potential as a treatment for PD.Our results demonstrate significant retinal

  13. In Vitro Functional Assessment of Adult Spiral Ganglion Neurons (SGNs).

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Han; Sihn, Choongryoul; Wang, Wanging; Flores, Cristina Maria Perez; Yamoah, Ebenezer N

    2016-01-01

    Spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) faithfully encode acoustic waves from hair cells to the cochlear nucleus (CN) using voltage-dependent ion channels. A sizable portion of our knowledge on SGN functions have been derived from pre-hearing neurons. In post-hearing SGNs, the mechanisms of how they encode the massive sound information without delay and precisely are largely unknown. Mature SGNs are housed in the central bony labyrinth of the cochlea, protected by a well-insulated myelin sheath, making it a technical feat to isolate viable neurons for rigorous functional electrophysiology. Recently, we have overcome the previous intractable hindrance in SGN functional analyses. We provide a step-by-step user-friendly protocol with practical applications, including patch-clamp recordings and imaging by using cultured SGNs. PMID:27259946

  14. Synergistic protective effects of escin and low‑dose glucocorticoids on blood‑retinal barrier breakdown in a rat model of retinal ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fenglan; Li, Yuanbin; Zhang, Leiming; Mu, Guoying

    2013-05-01

    Escin, a natural mixture of triterpenoid saponins isolated from the seed of the horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum), has been demonstrated to possess glucocorticoid (GC)‑like anti‑edematous and anti‑inflammatory effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether escin exhibits synergistic protective effects on blood‑retinal barrier (BRB) breakdown when combined with GCs in a rat model of retinal ischemia. Low concentrations of escin and triamcinolone acetonide (TA) alone did not affect BRB permeability. However, when administered together, low‑dose escin and TA significantly reduced BRB permeability following ischemia. Furthermore, low‑dose escin and TA alone did not affect the expression of occludin in the ischemic retina; however, when administered together, they significantly increased occludin expression in the ganglion cell layer of the ischemic retina. This indicates that escin and GCs have synergistic protective effects on BRB breakdown and the molecular mechanisms may be correlated with the upregulation of occludin. Therefore, the administration of escin may allow a reduction in the dose of GCs for the treatment of macular edema. The combination of escin with GCs is potentially a beneficial treatment method for BRB breakdown and warrants further investigation. PMID:23525122

  15. Dual Function of the IRF8 Transcription Factor in Autoimmune Uveitis: Loss of IRF8 in T Cells Exacerbates Uveitis, Whereas Irf8 Deletion in the Retina Confers Protection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hye; Burton, Jenna; Yu, Cheng-Rong; Sun, Lin; He, Chang; Wang, Hongsheng; Morse, Herbert C; Egwuagu, Charles E

    2015-08-15

    IFN regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) is constitutively expressed in monocytes and B cells and plays a critical role in the functional maturation of microglia cells. It is induced in T cells following Ag stimulation, but its functions are less well understood. However, recent studies in mice with T cell-specific Irf8 disruption under direction of the Lck promoter (LCK-IRF8KO) suggest that IRF8 directs a silencing program for Th17 differentiation, and IL-17 production is markedly increased in IRF8-deficient T cells. Paradoxically, loss of IRF8 in T cells has no effect on the development or severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), although exacerbating colitis in a mouse colitis model. In contrast, mice with a macrophage/microglia-specific Irf8 disruption are resistant to EAE, further confounding our understanding of the roles of IRF8 in host immunity and autoimmunity. To clarify the role of IRF8 in autoimmune diseases, we have generated two mouse strains with targeted deletion of Irf8 in retinal cells, including microglial cells and a third mouse strain with targeted Irf8 deletion in T cells under direction of the nonpromiscuous, CD4 promoter (CD4-IRF8KO). In contrast to the report that IRF8 deletion in T cells has no effect on EAE, experimental autoimmune uveitis is exacerbated in CD4-IRF8KO mice and disease enhancement correlates with significant expansion of Th17 cells and a reduction in T regulatory cells. In contrast to CD4-IRF8KO mice, Irf8 deletion in retinal cells confers protection from uveitis, underscoring divergent and tissue-specific roles of IRF8 in host immunity. These results raise a cautionary note in the context of therapeutic targeting of IRF8. PMID:26163590

  16. From connected pathway flow to ganglion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rücker, M.; Berg, S.; Armstrong, R. T.; Georgiadis, A.; Ott, H.; Schwing, A.; Neiteler, R.; Brussee, N.; Makurat, A.; Leu, L.; Wolf, M.; Khan, F.; Enzmann, F.; Kersten, M.

    2015-05-01

    During imbibition, initially connected oil is displaced until it is trapped as immobile clusters. While initial and final states have been well described before, here we image the dynamic transient process in a sandstone rock using fast synchrotron-based X-ray computed microtomography. Wetting film swelling and subsequent snap off, at unusually high saturation, decreases nonwetting phase connectivity, which leads to nonwetting phase fragmentation into mobile ganglia, i.e., ganglion dynamics regime. We find that in addition to pressure-driven connected pathway flow, mass transfer in the oil phase also occurs by a sequence of correlated breakup and coalescence processes. For example, meniscus oscillations caused by snap-off events trigger coalescence of adjacent clusters. The ganglion dynamics occurs at the length scale of oil clusters and thus represents an intermediate flow regime between pore and Darcy scale that is so far dismissed in most upscaling attempts.

  17. Telocytes of the human adult trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Mugurel Constantin; Cretoiu, Dragos; Vrapciu, Alexandra Diana; Hostiuc, Sorin; Dermengiu, Dan; Manoiu, Vasile Sorin; Cretoiu, Sanda Maria; Mirancea, Nicolae

    2016-06-01

    Telocytes (TCs) are typically defined as cells with telopodes by their ultrastructural features. Their presence was reported in various organs, however little is known about their presence in human trigeminal ganglion. To address this issue, samples of trigeminal ganglia were tested by immunocytochemistry for CD34 and examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We found that TCs are CD34 positive and form networks within the ganglion in close vicinity to microvessels and nerve fibers around the neuronal-glial units (NGUs). TEM examination confirmed the existence of spindle-shaped and bipolar TCs with one or two telopodes measuring between 15 to 53 μm. We propose that TCs are cells with stemness capacity which might contribute in regeneration and repair processes by: modulation of the stem cell activity or by acting as progenitors of other cells present in the normal tissue. In addition, further studies are needed to establish if they might influence the neuronal circuits. PMID:27147447

  18. Ganglion cysts in a juvenile dog.

    PubMed

    Cho, K O; Park, N Y; Kang, M I; Umemura, K; Itakura, C

    2000-07-01

    Ganglion cysts were diagnosed in a 4-month-old male Afghan Hound. Grossly, the subcutaneous ovoid cysts around the caudal right elbow joint and left ischiatic tuberosity had abundant mucinous fluid and internal folding. The lesions recurred twice around the elbow joint after surgical removal. Neither cyst communicated with the joint cavity. Histologically, the cyst wall consisted of inner myxomatous and outer immature connective tissue. Some parts of the cyst wall had various stages of myxoid metaplasia of collagen tissue leading to new cyst formation. Ultrastructural study revealed that cells in the myxoid metaplastic lesion had well-developed cytoplasmic secretory elements, including abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and many smooth-walled vesicles. These ganglion cysts apparently resulted from the metaplasia of fibroblasts to secreting cells. PMID:10896396

  19. Ganglion cysts and carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kerrigan, J J; Bertoni, J M; Jaeger, S H

    1988-09-01

    We review 12 cases of ganglion cyst with carpal tunnel syndrome in 11 patients seen at the Hand Rehabilitation Center. Mean age was 42 years (range, 28 to 60 years). One half of the cysts were associated with direct trauma, usually with wrist hyperextension. Symptoms usually developed after the appearance or sudden growth of the cyst. Motor conduction or distal sensory latency was abnormal in seven of eight studied cases. Tinel's sign on tapping the cyst may be pathognomonic for this syndrome. Cyst removal and incision of the flexor retinaculum relieved the symptoms in 11 cases. The other case had total resolution after spontaneous cyst rupture. This syndrome is successfully treated with cyst decompression with release of the carpal canal and has an excellent prognosis. To our knowledge this represents the largest operative series of carpal tunnel syndrome and ganglion cyst. PMID:3241055

  20. Learning LM Specificity for Ganglion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Unsupervised learning models have been proposed based on experience (Ahumada and Mulligan, 1990;Wachtler, Doi, Lee and Sejnowski, 2007) that allow the cortex to develop units with LM specific color opponent receptive fields like the blob cells reported by Hubel and Wiesel on the basis of visual experience. These models used ganglion cells with LM indiscriminate wiring as inputs to the learning mechanism, which was presumed to occur at the cortical level.

  1. Effects of ascorbic acid on UV light-mediated photoreceptor damage in isolated rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Kazuhiro; Zorumski, Charles F.; Izumi, Yukitoshi

    2007-01-01

    Concerns have been raised about whether operating microscopes and endoillumination used during ophthalmic surgeries contribute to retinal damage. Despite the recognition that ascorbic acid (vitamin C) helps to protect the eye from light and the abundance of vitamin C in the retina, artificial aqueous humors used during surgery only contain the antioxidant glutathione. To test whether inclusion of antioxidants other than glutathione in surgical solutions might help to preserve retinal integrity, we studied the effects of vitamin C on acute toxicity in isolated rat retinas. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (PND 30 ± 2) were sacrificed for retinal isolation. In the presence or absence of vitamin C (1 or 3 mM), retinas were exposed to 302 nm ultraviolet B (UVB) light for 1 hour and were incubated for a total of 5 hours at 30°C. Retinal damage was assessed by morphological examination and biochemical assay measuring the amount of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) released from injured cells. In control retinas, LDH release was significantly increased after UVB exposure. The presence of 1 mM vitamin C in the incubation media significantly reduced LDH release during the post-incubation period following UV exposure. No difference was found between 1 mM and 3 mM vitamin C. Microscopic examination revealed that disorganization in the outer nuclear layer after UVB exposure was markedly attenuated by administration of 1 mM vitamin C. One mM vitamin C, a concentration found in the anterior chamber in humans, but not glutathione, prevented phototoxic injury following UV exposure. Although vitamin C itself cannot be used in intraocular irrigating solutions because of adverse interactions with iron released during bleeding, inclusion of antioxidants equivalent to vitamin C should be considered to help protect the retina from intraoperative light toxicity. PMID:17222826

  2. Computational adaptive optics of the human retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    South, Fredrick A.; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-03-01

    It is well known that patient-specific ocular aberrations limit imaging resolution in the human retina. Previously, hardware adaptive optics (HAO) has been employed to measure and correct these aberrations to acquire high-resolution images of various retinal structures. While the resulting aberration-corrected images are of great clinical importance, clinical use of HAO has not been widespread due to the cost and complexity of these systems. We present a technique termed computational adaptive optics (CAO) for aberration correction in the living human retina without the use of hardware adaptive optics components. In CAO, complex interferometric data acquired using optical coherence tomography (OCT) is manipulated in post-processing to adjust the phase of the optical wavefront. In this way, the aberrated wavefront can be corrected. We summarize recent results in this technology for retinal imaging, including aberration-corrected imaging in multiple retinal layers and practical considerations such as phase stability and image optimization.

  3. The Dept. of Energy Artificial Retina project

    SciTech Connect

    2009-08-10

    LLNL has assisted in the development of the first long-term retinal prosthesis - called an artificial retina - that can function for years inside the harsh biological environment of the eye. This work has been done in collaboration with four national laboratories (Argonne, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge and Sandia), four universities (the California Institute of Technology, the Doheny Eye Institute at USC, North Carolina State University and the University of California, Santa Cruz), an industrial partner (Second Sight® Medical Products Inc. of Sylmar, Calif.) and the U.S. Department of Energy. With this device, application-specific integrated circuits transform digital images from a camera into electric signals in the eye that the brain uses to create a visual image. In clinical trials, patients with vision loss were able to successfully identify objects, increase mobility and detect movement using the artificial retina.

  4. The Dept. of Energy Artificial Retina project

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2010-09-01

    LLNL has assisted in the development of the first long-term retinal prosthesis - called an artificial retina - that can function for years inside the harsh biological environment of the eye. This work has been done in collaboration with four national laboratories (Argonne, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge and Sandia), four universities (the California Institute of Technology, the Doheny Eye Institute at USC, North Carolina State University and the University of California, Santa Cruz), an industrial partner (Second Sight® Medical Products Inc. of Sylmar, Calif.) and the U.S. Department of Energy. With this device, application-specific integrated circuits transform digital images from a camera into electric signals in the eye that the brain uses to create a visual image. In clinical trials, patients with vision loss were able to successfully identify objects, increase mobility and detect movement using the artificial retina.

  5. Localization of Neuropeptide Y1 Receptor Immunoreactivity in the Rat Retina and the Synaptic Connectivity of Y1 Immunoreactive Cells

    PubMed Central

    D'Angelo, Iona; Oh, Su-Ja; Chun, Myung-Hoon; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2010-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY), an inhibitory neuropeptide expressed by a moderately dense population of wide-field amacrine cells in the rat retina, acts through multiple (Y1–y6) G-protein–coupled receptors. This study determined the cellular localization of Y1 receptors and the synaptic connectivity of Y1 processes in the inner plexiform layer (IPL) of the rat retina. Specific Y1 immunoreactivity was localized to horizontal cell bodies in the distal inner nuclear layer and their processes in the outer plexiform layer. Immunoreactivity was also prominent in cell processes located in strata 2 and 4, and puncta in strata 4 and 5 of the IPL. Double-label immunohistochemical experiments with calbindin, a horizontal cell marker, confirmed Y1 immunostaining in all horizontal cells. Double-label immunohistochemical experiments, using antibodies to choline acetyltransferase and vesicular acetylcholine transporter to label cholinergic amacrine cell processes, demonstrated that Y1 immunoreactivity in strata 2 and 4 of the IPL was localized to cholinergic amacrine cell processes. Electron microscopic studies of the inner retina showed that Y1-immunostained amacrine cell processes and puncta received synaptic inputs from unlabeled amacrine cell processes (65.2%) and bipolar cell axon terminals (34.8%). Y1-immunoreactive amacrine cell processes most frequently formed synaptic outputs onto unlabeled amacrine cell processes (34.0%) and ganglion cell dendrites (54.1%). NPY immunoreactivity in the rat retina is distributed primarily to strata 1 and 5 of the IPL, and the present findings, thus, suggest that NPY acts in a paracrine manner on Y1 receptors to influence both horizontal and amacrine cells. PMID:12455004

  6. Differential alterations in the expression of neurotransmitter receptors in inner retina following loss of photoreceptors in rd1 mouse.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Prerna; Sinha-Mahapatra, Sumit K; Ghosh, Abhinaba; Srivastava, Ipsit; Dhingra, Narender K

    2015-01-01

    Loss of photoreceptors leads to significant remodeling in inner retina of rd1 mouse, a widely used model of retinal degeneration. Several morphological and physiological alterations occur in the second- and third-order retinal neurons. Synaptic activity in the excitatory bipolar cells and the predominantly inhibitory amacrine cells is enhanced. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) exhibit hyperactivity and aberrant spiking pattern, which adversely affects the quality of signals they can carry to the brain. To further understand the pathophysiology of retinal degeneration, and how it may lead to aberrant spiking in RGCs, we asked how loss of photoreceptors affects some of the neurotransmitter receptors in rd1 mouse. Using Western blotting, we measured the levels of several neurotransmitter receptors in adult rd1 mouse retina. We found significantly higher levels of AMPA, glycine and GABAa receptors, but lower levels of GABAc receptors in rd1 mouse than in wild-type. Since GABAa receptor is expressed in several retinal layers, we employed quantitative immunohistochemistry to measure GABAa receptor levels in specific retinal layers. We found that the levels of GABAa receptors in inner plexiform layer of wild-type and rd1 mice were similar, whereas those in outer plexiform layer and inner nuclear layer combined were higher in rd1 mouse. Specifically, we found that the number of GABAa-immunoreactive somas in the inner nuclear layer of rd1 mouse retina was significantly higher than in wild-type. These findings provide further insights into neurochemical remodeling in the inner retina of rd1 mouse, and how it might lead to oscillatory activity in RGCs. PMID:25835503

  7. Distribution of melanopsin positive neurons in pigmented and albino mice: evidence for melanopsin interneurons in the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Valiente-Soriano, Francisco J.; García-Ayuso, Diego; Ortín-Martínez, Arturo; Jiménez-López, Manuel; Galindo-Romero, Caridad; Villegas-Pérez, Maria Paz; Agudo-Barriuso, Marta; Vugler, Anthony A.; Vidal-Sanz, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Here we have studied the population of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) in adult pigmented and albino mice. Our data show that although pigmented (C57Bl/6) and albino (Swiss) mice have a similar total number of ipRGCs, their distribution is slightly different: while in pigmented mice ipRGCs are more abundant in the temporal retina, in albinos the ipRGCs are more abundant in superior retina. In both strains, ipRGCs are located in the retinal periphery, in the areas of lower Brn3a+RGC density. Both strains also contain displaced ipRGCs (d-ipRGCs) in the inner nuclear layer (INL) that account for 14% of total ipRGCs in pigmented mice and 5% in albinos. Tracing from both superior colliculli shows that 98% (pigmented) and 97% (albino) of the total ipRGCs, become retrogradely labeled, while double immunodetection of melanopsin and Brn3a confirms that few ipRGCs express this transcription factor in mice. Rather surprisingly, application of a retrograde tracer to the optic nerve (ON) labels all ipRGCs, except for a sub-population of the d-ipRGCs (14% in pigmented and 28% in albino, respectively) and melanopsin positive cells residing in the ciliary marginal zone (CMZ) of the retina. In the CMZ, between 20% (pigmented) and 24% (albino) of the melanopsin positive cells are unlabeled by the tracer and we suggest that this may be because they fail to send an axon into the ON. As such, this study provides the first evidence for a population of melanopsin interneurons in the mammalian retina. PMID:25477787

  8. The avian egg and the retina

    PubMed Central

    MALCOLM, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    A mathematical model for study of blood flow has been derived from the avian egg, utilizing the theories of crystallography and photosynthesis. The model is employed to explain the form of the eye and the function of the cells of the human retina, with special reference to colour vision and the pathology of migraine. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11 PMID:4736600

  9. Silicon retina for optical tracking systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohbehn, K.; Jenkins, R. E.; Sun, X.; Andreou, A. G.

    1993-01-01

    There are a host of position sensors, such as quadcells and CCD's, which are candidates for detecting optical position errors and providing error signals for a mirror positioning loop. We are developing a novel, very high bandwidth, biologically inspired position sensor for optical position tracking systems. We present recent test results and design issues for the use of biologically inspired silicon retinas for spaceborne optical position tracking systems.

  10. Simultaneous bilateral ganglion cysts of the anterior cruciate ligaments

    PubMed Central

    Demircay, Emre; Ofluoglu, Demet; Ozel, Omer; Oztop, Pinar

    2015-01-01

    Intra-articular ganglion cysts of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are rare, and bilateral ganglion cysts are even rarer. These cysts may cause intermittent or chronic nonspecific knee discomfort. Although three cases of bilateral ganglion cysts have been reported in the literature, the knees were not simultaneously affected in those cases. Herein, we report the case of a 56-year-old woman who presented with simultaneous bilateral ganglion cysts of the ACL that were symptomatic. She was successfully treated with arthroscopic resection and debridement. We also present a brief review of the literature, highlighting the aetiology, diagnosis and management of ganglion cysts of the ACL. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of simultaneous bilateral intra-articular ganglion cysts of the ACL. PMID:25917477

  11. Simultaneous bilateral ganglion cysts of the anterior cruciate ligaments.

    PubMed

    Demircay, Emre; Ofluoglu, Demet; Ozel, Omer; Oztop, Pinar

    2015-04-01

    Intra-articular ganglion cysts of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are rare, and bilateral ganglion cysts are even rarer. These cysts may cause intermittent or chronic nonspecific knee discomfort. Although three cases of bilateral ganglion cysts have been reported in the literature, the knees were not simultaneously affected in those cases. Herein, we report the case of a 56-year-old woman who presented with simultaneous bilateral ganglion cysts of the ACL that were symptomatic. She was successfully treated with arthroscopic resection and debridement. We also present a brief review of the literature, highlighting the aetiology, diagnosis and management of ganglion cysts of the ACL. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of simultaneous bilateral intra-articular ganglion cysts of the ACL. PMID:25917477

  12. The mammalian retina as a clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tosini, Gianluca; Fukuhara, Chiaki

    2002-01-01

    Many physiological, cellular, and biochemical parameters in the retina of vertebrates show daily rhythms that, in many cases, also persist under constant conditions. This demonstrates that they are driven by a circadian pacemaker. The presence of an autonomous circadian clock in the retina of vertebrates was first demonstrated in Xenopus laevis and then, several years later, in mammals. In X. laevis and in chicken, the retinal circadian pacemaker has been localized in the photoreceptor layer, whereas in mammals, such information is not yet available. Recent advances in molecular techniques have led to the identification of a group of genes that are believed to constitute the molecular core of the circadian clock. These genes are expressed in the retina, although with a slightly different 24-h profile from that observed in the central circadian pacemaker. This result suggests that some difference (at the molecular level) may exist between the retinal clock and the clock located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of hypothalamus. The present review will focus on the current knowledge of the retinal rhythmicity and the mechanisms responsible for its control.

  13. Reactive gliosis in the adult zebrafish retina.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jennifer L; Ranski, Alexandra H; Morgan, Gregory W; Thummel, Ryan

    2016-02-01

    In contrast to mammals, zebrafish posses the remarkable ability to regenerate retinal neurons. Damage to the zebrafish retina induces Müller glia to act as stem cells, generating retinal progenitors for regeneration. In contrast, injury in the mammalian retina results in Müller glial reactive gliosis, a characteristic gliotic response that is normally detrimental to vision. Understanding the signaling pathways that determine how Müller glia respond to injury is a critical step toward promoting regeneration in the mammalian retina. Here we report that zebrafish Müller glia exhibit signs of reactive gliosis even under normal regenerative conditions and that cell cycle inhibition increases this response. Persistently reactive Müller glia increase their neuroprotective functions, temporarily saving photoreceptors from a cytotoxic light lesion. However, the absence of a sustained proliferation response results in a significant inhibition of retinal regeneration. Interestingly, when cell cycle inhibition is released, a partial recovery of regeneration is observed. Together, these data demonstrate that zebrafish Müller glia possess both gliotic and regenerative potential. PMID:26492821

  14. Effect of diabetes on glycogen metabolism in rat retina.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Chávez, Gustavo; Hernández-Berrones, Jethro; Luna-Ulloa, Luis Bernardo; Coffe, Víctor; Salceda, Rocío

    2008-07-01

    Glucose is the main fuel for energy metabolism in retina. The regulatory mechanisms that maintain glucose homeostasis in retina could include hormonal action. Retinopathy is one of the chemical manifestations of long-standing diabetes mellitus. In order to better understand the effect of hyperglycemia in retina, we studied glycogen content as well as glycogen synthase and phosphorylase activities in both normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat retina and compared them with other tissues. Glycogen levels in normal rat retina are low (46 +/- 4.0 nmol glucosyl residues/mg protein). However, high specific activity of glycogen synthase was found in retina, indicating a substantial capacity for glycogen synthesis. In diabetic rats, glycogen synthase activity increased between 50% and 100% in retina, brain cortex and liver of diabetic rats, but only retina exhibited an increase in glycogen content. Although, total and phosphorylated glycogen synthase levels were similar in normal and diabetic retina, activation of glycogen synthase by glucose-6-P was remarkable increased. Glycogen phosphorylase activity decreased 50% in the liver of diabetic animals; it was not modified in the other tissues examined. We conclude that the increase in glycogen levels in diabetic retina was due to alterations in glycogen synthase regulation. PMID:18274898

  15. IL-33 amplifies an innate immune response in the degenerating retina

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Hongkang; Katschke, Kenneth J.; Li, Yun; Truong, Tom; Lee, Wyne P.; Diehl, Lauri; Rangell, Linda; Tao, Jianhua; Arceo, Rommel; Eastham-Anderson, Jeffrey; Hackney, Jason A.; Iglesias, Antonio; Cote-Sierra, Javier; Elstrott, Justin; Weimer, Robby M.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of vision impairment in the ageing population, is characterized by irreversible loss of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and photoreceptors and can be associated with choroidal neovascularization. Mononuclear phagocytes are often present in AMD lesions, but the processes that direct myeloid cell recruitment remain unclear. Here, we identify IL-33 as a key regulator of inflammation and photoreceptor degeneration after retina stress or injury. IL-33+ Müller cells were more abundant and IL-33 cytokine was elevated in advanced AMD cases compared with age-matched controls with no AMD. In rodents, retina stress resulted in release of bioactive IL-33 that in turn increased inflammatory chemokine and cytokine expression in activated Müller cells. Deletion of ST2, the IL-33 receptor α chain, or treatment with a soluble IL-33 decoy receptor significantly reduced release of inflammatory mediators from Müller cells, inhibited accumulation of mononuclear phagocytes in the outer retina, and protected photoreceptor rods and cones after a retina insult. This study demonstrates a central role for IL-33 in regulating mononuclear phagocyte recruitment to the photoreceptor layer and positions IL-33 signaling as a potential therapeutic target in macular degenerative diseases. PMID:26755704

  16. IL-33 amplifies an innate immune response in the degenerating retina.

    PubMed

    Xi, Hongkang; Katschke, Kenneth J; Li, Yun; Truong, Tom; Lee, Wyne P; Diehl, Lauri; Rangell, Linda; Tao, Jianhua; Arceo, Rommel; Eastham-Anderson, Jeffrey; Hackney, Jason A; Iglesias, Antonio; Cote-Sierra, Javier; Elstrott, Justin; Weimer, Robby M; van Lookeren Campagne, Menno

    2016-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of vision impairment in the ageing population, is characterized by irreversible loss of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and photoreceptors and can be associated with choroidal neovascularization. Mononuclear phagocytes are often present in AMD lesions, but the processes that direct myeloid cell recruitment remain unclear. Here, we identify IL-33 as a key regulator of inflammation and photoreceptor degeneration after retina stress or injury. IL-33(+) Müller cells were more abundant and IL-33 cytokine was elevated in advanced AMD cases compared with age-matched controls with no AMD. In rodents, retina stress resulted in release of bioactive IL-33 that in turn increased inflammatory chemokine and cytokine expression in activated Müller cells. Deletion of ST2, the IL-33 receptor α chain, or treatment with a soluble IL-33 decoy receptor significantly reduced release of inflammatory mediators from Müller cells, inhibited accumulation of mononuclear phagocytes in the outer retina, and protected photoreceptor rods and cones after a retina insult. This study demonstrates a central role for IL-33 in regulating mononuclear phagocyte recruitment to the photoreceptor layer and positions IL-33 signaling as a potential therapeutic target in macular degenerative diseases. PMID:26755704

  17. Age-Dependent Changes of Monocarboxylate Transporter 8 Availability in the Postnatal Murine Retina.

    PubMed

    Henning, Yoshiyuki; Szafranski, Karol

    2016-01-01

    The thyroid hormones (TH) triiodothyronine (T3) and its prohormone thyroxine (T4) are crucial for retinal development and function, and increasing evidence points at TH dysregulation as a cause for retinal degenerative diseases. Thus, precise regulation of retinal TH supply is required for proper retinal function, but knowledge on these mechanisms is still fragmentary. Several transmembrane transporters have been described as key regulators of TH availability in target tissues of which the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), a high affinity transporter for T4 and T3, plays an essential role in the central nervous system. Moreover, in the embryonic chicken retina, MCT8 is highly expressed, but the postnatal availability of MCT8 in the mammalian retina was not reported to date. In the present study, spatiotemporal retinal MCT8 availability was examined in mice of different age. For this purpose, we quantified expression levels of Mct8 via Real-Time Reverse-Transcriptase PCR in mouse eyecups (C57BL/6) of juvenile and adult age groups. Additionally, age-dependent MCT8 protein levels were quantified via Western blotting and localized via immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. While no difference in Mct8 expression levels could be detected between age groups, MCT8 protein levels in juvenile animals were about two times higher than in adult animals based on Western blot analyses. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that MCT8 immunoreactivity in the eyecup was restricted to the retina and the retinal pigment epithelium. In juvenile mice, MCT8 was broadly observed along the apical membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium, tightly surrounding photoreceptor outer segments. Distinct immunopositive staining was also detected in the inner nuclear layer and the ganglion cell layer. However, in adult specimens, immunoreactivity visibly declined in all layers, which was in line with Western blot analyses. Since MCT8 was abundantly present in juvenile and about twofold lower in

  18. Age-Dependent Changes of Monocarboxylate Transporter 8 Availability in the Postnatal Murine Retina

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Yoshiyuki; Szafranski, Karol

    2016-01-01

    The thyroid hormones (TH) triiodothyronine (T3) and its prohormone thyroxine (T4) are crucial for retinal development and function, and increasing evidence points at TH dysregulation as a cause for retinal degenerative diseases. Thus, precise regulation of retinal TH supply is required for proper retinal function, but knowledge on these mechanisms is still fragmentary. Several transmembrane transporters have been described as key regulators of TH availability in target tissues of which the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), a high affinity transporter for T4 and T3, plays an essential role in the central nervous system. Moreover, in the embryonic chicken retina, MCT8 is highly expressed, but the postnatal availability of MCT8 in the mammalian retina was not reported to date. In the present study, spatiotemporal retinal MCT8 availability was examined in mice of different age. For this purpose, we quantified expression levels of Mct8 via Real-Time Reverse-Transcriptase PCR in mouse eyecups (C57BL/6) of juvenile and adult age groups. Additionally, age-dependent MCT8 protein levels were quantified via Western blotting and localized via immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. While no difference in Mct8 expression levels could be detected between age groups, MCT8 protein levels in juvenile animals were about two times higher than in adult animals based on Western blot analyses. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that MCT8 immunoreactivity in the eyecup was restricted to the retina and the retinal pigment epithelium. In juvenile mice, MCT8 was broadly observed along the apical membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium, tightly surrounding photoreceptor outer segments. Distinct immunopositive staining was also detected in the inner nuclear layer and the ganglion cell layer. However, in adult specimens, immunoreactivity visibly declined in all layers, which was in line with Western blot analyses. Since MCT8 was abundantly present in juvenile and about twofold lower in

  19. Programmed cell death-1 is expressed in large retinal ganglion cells and is upregulated after optic nerve crush.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Chan, Ann; Qin, Yu; Kwong, Jacky M K; Caprioli, Joseph; Levinson, Ralph; Chen, Ling; Gordon, Lynn K

    2015-11-01

    Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) is a key negative receptor inducibly expressed on T cells, B cells and dendritic cells. I