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Sample records for protein backbone transitions

  1. Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Protein Backbone Transitions in Aqueous Solution: combined QM and MM Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jun; Abramavicius, Darius; Bulheller, Benjamin M.; Hirst, Jonathan D.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2010-01-01

    A generalized approach combining Quantum Mechanics (QM) and Molecular Mechanics (MM) calculations is developed to simulate the n → π* and π → π* backbone transitions of proteins in aqueous solution. These transitions, which occur in the ultraviolet (UV) at 180–220 nm, provide a sensitive probe for secondary structures. The excitation Hamiltonian is constructed using high level electronic structure calculations of N-methylacetamide (NMA). Its electrostatic fluctuations are modeled using a new algorithm, EHEF, which combines a molecular dynamics (MD) trajectory obtained with a molecular mechanics forcefield, and electronic structures of sampled MD snapshots calculated by QM. The lineshapes and excitation split-tings induced by the electrostatic environment in the experimental UV linear absorption (LA) and circular dichroism (CD) spectra of several proteins in aqueous solution are reproduced by our calculations. The distinct CD features of α-helix and β-sheet protein structures are observed in the simulations and can be assigned to different backbone geometries. The fine structure of the UV spectra is accurately characterized and enables us to identify signatures of secondary structures. PMID:20503991

  2. Vanishing amplitude of backbone dynamics causes a true protein dynamical transition: H2 NMR studies on perdeuterated C-phycocyanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kämpf, Kerstin; Kremmling, Beke; Vogel, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Using a combination of H2 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, we study internal rotational dynamics of the perdeuterated protein C-phycocyanin (CPC) in dry and hydrated states over broad temperature and dynamic ranges with high angular resolution. Separating H2 NMR signals from methyl deuterons, we show that basically all backbone deuterons exhibit highly restricted motion occurring on time scales faster than microseconds. The amplitude of this motion increases when a hydration shell exists, while it decreases upon cooling and vanishes near 175 K. We conclude that the vanishing of the highly restricted motion marks a dynamical transition, which is independent of the time window and of a fundamental importance. This conclusion is supported by results from experimental and computational studies of the proteins myoglobin and elastin. In particular, we argue based on findings in molecular dynamics simulations that the behavior of the highly restricted motion of proteins at the dynamical transition resembles that of a characteristic secondary relaxation of liquids at the glass transition, namely the nearly constant loss. Furthermore, H2 NMR studies on perdeuterated CPC reveal that, in addition to highly restricted motion, small fractions of backbone segments exhibit weakly restricted dynamics when temperature and hydration are sufficiently high.

  3. Vanishing amplitude of backbone dynamics causes a true protein dynamical transition: 2H NMR studies on perdeuterated C-phycocyanin.

    PubMed

    Kämpf, Kerstin; Kremmling, Beke; Vogel, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Using a combination of H2 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, we study internal rotational dynamics of the perdeuterated protein C-phycocyanin (CPC) in dry and hydrated states over broad temperature and dynamic ranges with high angular resolution. Separating H2 NMR signals from methyl deuterons, we show that basically all backbone deuterons exhibit highly restricted motion occurring on time scales faster than microseconds. The amplitude of this motion increases when a hydration shell exists, while it decreases upon cooling and vanishes near 175 K. We conclude that the vanishing of the highly restricted motion marks a dynamical transition, which is independent of the time window and of a fundamental importance. This conclusion is supported by results from experimental and computational studies of the proteins myoglobin and elastin. In particular, we argue based on findings in molecular dynamics simulations that the behavior of the highly restricted motion of proteins at the dynamical transition resembles that of a characteristic secondary relaxation of liquids at the glass transition, namely the nearly constant loss. Furthermore, H2 NMR studies on perdeuterated CPC reveal that, in addition to highly restricted motion, small fractions of backbone segments exhibit weakly restricted dynamics when temperature and hydration are sufficiently high. PMID:24730877

  4. Protein-protein docking with backbone flexibility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chu; Bradley, Philip; Baker, David

    2007-10-19

    Computational protein-protein docking methods currently can create models with atomic accuracy for protein complexes provided that the conformational changes upon association are restricted to the side chains. However, it remains very challenging to account for backbone conformational changes during docking, and most current methods inherently keep monomer backbones rigid for algorithmic simplicity and computational efficiency. Here we present a reformulation of the Rosetta docking method that incorporates explicit backbone flexibility in protein-protein docking. The new method is based on a "fold-tree" representation of the molecular system, which seamlessly integrates internal torsional degrees of freedom and rigid-body degrees of freedom. Problems with internal flexible regions ranging from one or more loops or hinge regions to all of one or both partners can be readily treated using appropriately constructed fold trees. The explicit treatment of backbone flexibility improves both sampling in the vicinity of the native docked conformation and the energetic discrimination between near-native and incorrect models. PMID:17825317

  5. Conformation Dependence of Backbone Geometry in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Berkholz, Donald S.; Shapovalov, Maxim V.; Dunbrack, Roland L.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Summary Protein structure determination and predictive modeling have long been guided by the paradigm that the peptide backbone has a single, context-independent ideal geometry. Both quantum-mechanics calculations and empirical analyses have shown this is an incorrect simplification in that backbone covalent geometry actually varies systematically as a function of the Φ and Ψ backbone dihedral angles. Here, we use a nonredundant set of ultrahigh-resolution protein structures to define these conformation-dependent variations. The trends have a rational, structural basis that can be explained by avoidance of atomic clashes or optimization of favorable electrostatic interactions. To facilitate adoption of this new paradigm, we have created a conformation-dependent library of covalent bond lengths and bond angles and shown that it has improved accuracy over existing methods without any additional variables to optimize. Protein structures derived both from crystallographic refinement and predictive modeling both stand to benefit from incorporation of the new paradigm. PMID:19836332

  6. Backbone Dynamics Of Intracellular Lipid Binding Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-González, Luis H.

    2005-04-01

    The family of intracellular lipid binding proteins (iLBPs) comprises a group of homologous 14-15 kDa proteins that specifically bind and facilitate the transport of fatty acids, bile acids, retinoids or eicosanoids. Members of this family include several types of fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs), ileal lipid binding protein, cellular retinoic acid binding proteins and cellular retinoid binding proteins. As a contribution to understanding the structure-function relationship in this protein family, the solution structure and backbone dynamics of human epidermal-type FABP (E-FABP) determined by NMR spectroscopy are reported. Moreover, hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments indicated a direct correlation between the stability of the hydrogen-bonding network in the β-sheet structure and the conformational exchange in the millisecond-to-microsecond time range. The features of E-FABP backbone dynamics discussed in the present study are compared with those obtained for other phylogenetically related proteins. A strong interdependence with the overall protein stability and possibly also with the ligand-binding affinity for members of the lipid-binding protein family is shown.

  7. TMAO influence on the backbone of proteins: an oligoglycine model

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Char Y.; Lynch, Gillian C.; Kokubo, Hironori; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2009-01-01

    The study of organic osmolytes has been pivotal in demonstrating the role of solvent effects on the protein backbone in the folding process. Whereas a thermodynamic description of the interactions between the protein backbone and osmolyte has been well defined, the structural analysis of the effect of osmolyte on the protein backbone has been incomplete. Therefore, we have carried out simulations of a peptide backbone model, glycine15 in protecting osmolyte TMAO solution in order to determine the effect of the solution structure on the conformation of the peptide backbone. We demonstrate that the models chosen show that the ensemble of backbone structures shifts towards a more collapsed state in TMAO solution as compared to pure water solution. The collapse is consistent with preferential exclusion of the osmolyte caused by unfavorable interactions between osmolyte and peptide backbone. The exclusion is due to strong triplet correlations of osmolyte, water, and peptide backbone. This provides a clear mechanism demonstrating that even a modest concentration of TMAO forces the protein backbone to adopt a more collapsed structure in the absence of sidechain effects. PMID:19790265

  8. A sampling approach for protein backbone fragment conformations.

    PubMed

    Yu, J Y; Zhang, W

    2013-01-01

    In protein structure prediction, backbone fragment bias information can narrow down the conformational space of the whole polypeptide chain significantly. Unlike existing methods that use fragments as building blocks, the paper presents a probabilistic sampling approach for protein backbone torsion angles by modelling angular correlation of (phi, psi) with a directional statistics distribution. Given a protein sequence and secondary structure information, this method samples backbone fragments conformations by using a backtrack sampling algorithm for the hidden Markov model with multiple inputs and a single output. The proposed approach is applied to a fragment library, and some well-known structural motifs are sampled very well on the optimal path. Computational results show that the method can help to obtain native-like backbone fragments conformations. PMID:23777175

  9. Local backbone structure prediction of proteins.

    PubMed

    de Brevern, Alexandre G; Benros, Cristina; Gautier, Romain; Valadié, Héléne; Hazout, Serge; Etchebest, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    A statistical analysis of the PDB structures has led us to define a new set of small 3D structural prototypes called Protein Blocks (PBs). This structural alphabet includes 16 PBs, each one is defined by the (phi, psi) dihedral angles of 5 consecutive residues. The amino acid distributions observed in sequence windows encompassing these PBs are used to predict by a Bayesian approach the local 3D structure of proteins from the sole knowledge of their sequences. LocPred is a software which allows the users to submit a protein sequence and performs a prediction in terms of PBs. The prediction results are given both textually and graphically. PMID:15724288

  10. Increasing protein production by directed vector backbone evolution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant protein production in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms was a key enabling technology for the rapid development of industrial and molecular biotechnology. However, despite all progress the improvement of protein production is an ongoing challenge and of high importance for cost-effective enzyme production. With the epMEGAWHOP mutagenesis protocol for vector backbone optimization we report a novel directed evolution based approach to increase protein production levels by randomly introducing mutations in the vector backbone. In the current study we validate the epMEGAWHOP mutagenesis protocol for three different expression systems. The latter demonstrated the general applicability of the epMEGAWHOP method. Cellulase and lipase production was doubled in one round of directed evolution by random mutagenesis of pET28a(+) and pET22b(+) vector backbones. Protease production using the vector pHY300PLK was increased ~4-times with an average of ~1.25 mutations per kb vector backbone. The epMEGAWHOP does not require any rational understanding of the expression machinery and can generally be applied to enzymes, expression vectors and related hosts. epMEGAWHOP is therefore from our point of view a robust, rapid and straight forward alternative for increasing protein production in general and for biotechnological applications. PMID:23890095

  11. Protein-Backbone Thermodynamics across the Membrane Interface.

    PubMed

    Bereau, Tristan; Kremer, Kurt

    2016-07-01

    The thermodynamics of insertion of a protein in a membrane depends on the fine interplay between backbone and side-chain contributions interacting with the lipid environment. Using computer simulations, we probe how different descriptions of the backbone glycyl unit affect the thermodynamics of insertion of individual residues, dipeptides, and entire transmembrane helices. Due to the lack of reference data, we first introduce an efficient methodology to estimate atomistic potential of mean force (PMF) curves from a series of representative and uncorrelated coarse-grained (CG) snapshots. We find strong discrepancies between two CG models, Martini and PLUM, against reference atomistic PMFs and experiments. Atomistic simulations suggest a weak free energy of insertion between water and a POPC membrane for the glycyl unit, in overall agreement with experimental results despite severe assumptions in our calculations. We show that refining the backbone contribution in PLUM significantly improves the PMF of insertion of the WALP16 transmembrane peptide. An improper balance between the glycyl backbone and the attached side chain will lead to energetic artifacts, rationalizing Martini's overstabilization of WALP's adsorbed interfacial state. It illustrates difficulties associated with free-energy-based parametrizations of single-residue models, as the relevant free energy of partitioning used for force-field parametrization does not arise from the entire residue but rather the solvent-accessible chemical groups. PMID:27138459

  12. Determination of backbone nitrogen-nitrogen J correlations in proteins.

    PubMed

    Theis, K; Dingley, A J; Hoffmann, A; Omichinski, J G; Grzesiek, S

    1997-12-01

    Recently, a quantitative J correlation technique has been presented which makes use of homonuclear Hartmann-Hahn cross-polarization (TOCSY) to measure (3)J(C)'(C)' in proteins isotopically enriched with (13)C [Grzesiek, S. and Bax, A. (1997) J. Biomol. NMR, 9, 207-211]. Since homonuclear Hartmann-Hahn is twice as fast as conventional COSY transfer, this method is much less sensitive to transverse relaxation, which is the principal limiting factor in achieving long-range J-coupling correlations in macromolecules. Here we describe a similar experiment which is used to measure(3) J(NN) coupling constants between sequential amide(15) N nuclei in the backbone of ubiquitin. As expected from the low magnetic moment of (15)N, the (3)J(NN) coupling constants are exceedingly small, with values between 0.14 and 0.36 Hz for residues in β-conformations and values below 0.15 Hz for residues in α-conformations. In contrast to what is expected from a Karplus-type dependence on the backbone angle ψ, large differences in the values of(3) J(NN) are observed for a number of residues with very similar backbone ψ angles. A quantitative description of statistical and systematic errors, in particular of relaxation effects during the TOCSY transfer, shows that these differences are highly significant. PMID:20859784

  13. Increasing Sequence Diversity with Flexible Backbone Protein Design: The Complete Redesign of a Protein Hydrophobic Core

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Grant S.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Miley, Michael J.; Machius, Mischa; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian

    2015-10-15

    Protein design tests our understanding of protein stability and structure. Successful design methods should allow the exploration of sequence space not found in nature. However, when redesigning naturally occurring protein structures, most fixed backbone design algorithms return amino acid sequences that share strong sequence identity with wild-type sequences, especially in the protein core. This behavior places a restriction on functional space that can be explored and is not consistent with observations from nature, where sequences of low identity have similar structures. Here, we allow backbone flexibility during design to mutate every position in the core (38 residues) of a four-helix bundle protein. Only small perturbations to the backbone, 12 {angstrom}, were needed to entirely mutate the core. The redesigned protein, DRNN, is exceptionally stable (melting point >140C). An NMR and X-ray crystal structure show that the side chains and backbone were accurately modeled (all-atom RMSD = 1.3 {angstrom}).

  14. Statistical mechanics of protein allostery: Roles of backbone and side-chain structural fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Kazuhito; Sasai, Masaki

    2011-03-01

    A statistical mechanical model of allosteric transition of proteins is developed by extending the structure-based model of protein folding to cases that a protein has two different native conformations. Partition function is calculated exactly within the model and free-energy surfaces associated with allostery are derived. In this paper, the model of allosteric transition proposed in a previous paper [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A 134, 7775 (2010)] is reformulated to describe both fluctuation in side-chain configurations and that in backbone structures in a balanced way. The model is applied to example proteins, Ras, calmodulin, and CheY: Ras undergoes the allosteric transition between guanosine diphosphate (GDP)-bound and guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-bound forms, and the model results show that the GDP-bound form is stabilized enough to prevent unnecessary signal transmission, but the conformation in the GTP-bound state bears large fluctuation in side-chain configurations, which may help to bind multiple target proteins for multiple pathways of signaling. The calculated results of calmodulin show the scenario of sequential ordering in Ca2 + binding and the associated allosteric conformational change, which are realized though the sequential appearing of pre-existing structural fluctuations, i.e., fluctuations to show structures suitable to bind Ca2 + before its binding. Here, the pre-existing fluctuations to accept the second and third Ca2 + ions are dominated by the side-chain fluctuation. In CheY, the calculated side-chain fluctuation of Tyr106 is coordinated with the backbone structural change in the β4-α4 loop, which explains the pre-existing Y-T coupling process in this protein. Ability of the model to explain allosteric transitions of example proteins supports the view that the large entropic effects lower the free-energy barrier of allosteric transition.

  15. Monitoring Backbone Hydrogen-Bond Formation in β-Barrel Membrane Protein Folding.

    PubMed

    Raschle, Thomas; Rios Flores, Perla; Opitz, Christian; Müller, Daniel J; Hiller, Sebastian

    2016-05-10

    β-barrel membrane proteins are key components of the outer membrane of bacteria, mitochondria and chloroplasts. Their three-dimensional structure is defined by a network of backbone hydrogen bonds between adjacent β-strands. Here, we employ hydrogen-deuterium (H/D) exchange in combination with NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry to monitor backbone hydrogen bond formation during folding of the outer membrane protein X (OmpX) from E. coli in detergent micelles. Residue-specific kinetics of interstrand hydrogen-bond formation were found to be uniform in the entire β-barrel and synchronized to formation of the tertiary structure. OmpX folding thus propagates via a long-lived conformational ensemble state in which all backbone amide protons exchange with the solvent and engage in hydrogen bonds only transiently. Stable formation of the entire OmpX hydrogen bond network occurs downhill of the rate-limiting transition state and thus appears cooperative on the overall folding time scale. PMID:27062600

  16. A Native to Amyloidogenic Transition Regulated by a Backbone Trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Eakin,C.; Berman, A.; Miranker, A.

    2006-01-01

    Many polypeptides can self-associate into linear, aggregated assemblies termed amyloid fibers. High-resolution structural insights into the mechanism of fibrillogenesis are elusive owing to the transient and mixed oligomeric nature of assembly intermediates. Here, we report the conformational changes that initiate fiber formation by beta-2-microglobulin (beta2m) in dialysis-related amyloidosis. Access of beta2m to amyloidogenic conformations is catalyzed by selective binding of divalent cations. The chemical basis of this process was determined to be backbone isomerization of a conserved proline. On the basis of this finding, we designed a beta2m variant that closely adopts this intermediate state. The variant has kinetic, thermodynamic and catalytic properties consistent with its being a fibrillogenic intermediate of wild-type beta2m. Furthermore, it is stable and folded, enabling us to unambiguously determine the initiating conformational changes for amyloid assembly at atomic resolution.

  17. Trimethylamine Ν-oxide Influence on the Backbone of Proteins: An Oligoglycine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Char Y.; Lynch, Gillian C.; Kokubo, Hironori; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2010-02-15

    The study of organic osmolytes has been pivotal in demonstrating the role of solvent effects on the protein backbone in the folding process. Although a thermodynamic description of the interactions between the protein backbone and osmolyte has been well defined, the structural analysis of the effect of osmolyte on the protein backbone has been incomplete. Therefore, we have performed simulations of a peptide backbone model, glycine₁₅, in protecting osmolyte trimethylamine Ν-oxide (TMAO) solution, in order to determine the effect of the solution structure on the conformation of the peptide backbone. We show that the models chosen show that the ensemble of backbone structures shifts toward a more collapsed state in TMAO solution as compared with pure water solution. The collapse is consistent with preferential exclusion of the osmolyte caused by unfavorable interactions between osmolyte and peptide backbone. The exclusion is caused by strong triplet correlations of osmolyte, water, and peptide backbone. This provides a clear mechanism showing that even a modest concentration of TMAO forces the protein backbone to adopt a more collapsed structure in the absence of side chain effects.

  18. Computation-Guided Backbone Grafting of a Discontinuous Motif onto a Protein Scaffold

    SciTech Connect

    Azoitei, Mihai L.; Correia, Bruno E.; Ban, Yih-En Andrew; Carrico, Chris; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Chen, Lei; Schroeter, Alexandria; Huang, Po-Ssu; McLellan, Jason S.; Kwong, Peter D.; Baker, David; Strong, Roland K.; Schief, William R.

    2012-02-07

    The manipulation of protein backbone structure to control interaction and function is a challenge for protein engineering. We integrated computational design with experimental selection for grafting the backbone and side chains of a two-segment HIV gp120 epitope, targeted by the cross-neutralizing antibody b12, onto an unrelated scaffold protein. The final scaffolds bound b12 with high specificity and with affinity similar to that of gp120, and crystallographic analysis of a scaffold bound to b12 revealed high structural mimicry of the gp120-b12 complex structure. The method can be generalized to design other functional proteins through backbone grafting.

  19. Backbone Additivity in the Transfer Model of Protein Solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Char Y.; Kokubo, Hironori; Lynch, Gillian C.; Bolen, D Wayne; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2010-05-01

    The transfer model implying additivity of the peptide backbone free energy of transfer is computationally tested. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to determine the extent of change in transfer free energy (ΔGtr) with increase in chain length of oligoglycine with capped end groups. Solvation free energies of oligoglycine models of varying lengths in pure water and in the osmolyte solutions, 2M urea and 2M trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), were calculated from simulations of all atom models, and ΔGtr values for peptide backbone transfer from water to the osmolyte solutions were determined. The results show that the transfer free energies change linearly with increasing chain length, demonstrating the principle of additivity, and provide values in reasonable agreement with experiment. The peptide backbone transfer free energy contributions arise from van der Waals interactions in the case of transfer to urea, but from electrostatics on transfer to TMAO solution. The simulations used here allow for the calculation of the solvation and transfer free energy of longer oligoglycine models to be evaluated than is currently possible through experiment. The peptide backbone unit computed transfer free energy of –54 cal/mol/Mcompares quite favorably with –43 cal/mol/M determined experimentally.

  20. Backbone additivity in the transfer model of protein solvation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Char Y; Kokubo, Hironori; Lynch, Gillian C; Bolen, D Wayne; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2010-01-01

    The transfer model implying additivity of the peptide backbone free energy of transfer is computationally tested. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to determine the extent of change in transfer free energy (ΔGtr) with increase in chain length of oligoglycine with capped end groups. Solvation free energies of oligoglycine models of varying lengths in pure water and in the osmolyte solutions, 2M urea and 2M trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), were calculated from simulations of all atom models, and ΔGtr values for peptide backbone transfer from water to the osmolyte solutions were determined. The results show that the transfer free energies change linearly with increasing chain length, demonstrating the principle of additivity, and provide values in reasonable agreement with experiment. The peptide backbone transfer free energy contributions arise from van der Waals interactions in the case of transfer to urea, but from electrostatics on transfer to TMAO solution. The simulations used here allow for the calculation of the solvation and transfer free energy of longer oligoglycine models to be evaluated than is currently possible through experiment. The peptide backbone unit computed transfer free energy of −54 cal/mol/M compares quite favorably with −43 cal/mol/M determined experimentally. PMID:20306490

  1. A new default restraint library for the protein backbone in Phenix: a conformation-dependent geometry goes mainstream

    PubMed Central

    Moriarty, Nigel W.; Tronrud, Dale E.; Adams, Paul D.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Chemical restraints are a fundamental part of crystallographic protein structure refinement. In response to mounting evidence that conventional restraints have shortcomings, it has previously been documented that using backbone restraints that depend on the protein backbone conformation helps to address these shortcomings and improves the performance of refinements [Moriarty et al. (2014 ▸), FEBS J. 281, 4061–4071]. It is important that these improvements be made available to all in the protein crystallography community. Toward this end, a change in the default geometry library used by Phenix is described here. Tests are presented showing that this change will not generate increased numbers of outliers during validation, or deposition in the Protein Data Bank, during the transition period in which some validation tools still use the conventional restraint libraries. PMID:26894545

  2. Modeling (15)N NMR chemical shift changes in protein backbone with pressure.

    PubMed

    La Penna, Giovanni; Mori, Yoshiharu; Kitahara, Ryo; Akasaka, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yuko

    2016-08-28

    Nitrogen chemical shift is a useful parameter for determining the backbone three-dimensional structure of proteins. Empirical models for fast calculation of N chemical shift are improving their reliability, but there are subtle effects that cannot be easily interpreted. Among these, the effects of slight changes in hydrogen bonds, both intramolecular and with water molecules in the solvent, are particularly difficult to predict. On the other hand, these hydrogen bonds are sensitive to changes in protein environment. In this work, the change of N chemical shift with pressure for backbone segments in the protein ubiquitin is correlated with the change in the population of hydrogen bonds involving the backbone amide group. The different extent of interaction of protein backbone with the water molecules in the solvent is put in evidence. PMID:27586953

  3. Reconstruction of protein backbones from the BriX collection of canonical protein fragments.

    PubMed

    Baeten, Lies; Reumers, Joke; Tur, Vicente; Stricher, François; Lenaerts, Tom; Serrano, Luis; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost

    2008-05-01

    As modeling of changes in backbone conformation still lacks a computationally efficient solution, we developed a discretisation of the conformational states accessible to the protein backbone similar to the successful rotamer approach in side chains. The BriX fragment database, consisting of fragments from 4 to 14 residues long, was realized through identification of recurrent backbone fragments from a non-redundant set of high-resolution protein structures. BriX contains an alphabet of more than 1,000 frequently observed conformations per peptide length for 6 different variation levels. Analysis of the performance of BriX revealed an average structural coverage of protein structures of more than 99% within a root mean square distance (RMSD) of 1 Angstrom. Globally, we are able to reconstruct protein structures with an average accuracy of 0.48 Angstrom RMSD. As expected, regular structures are well covered, but, interestingly, many loop regions that appear irregular at first glance are also found to form a recurrent structural motif, albeit with lower frequency of occurrence than regular secondary structures. Larger loop regions could be completely reconstructed from smaller recurrent elements, between 4 and 8 residues long. Finally, we observed that a significant amount of short sequences tend to display strong structural ambiguity between alpha helix and extended conformations. When the sequence length increases, this so-called sequence plasticity is no longer observed, illustrating the context dependency of polypeptide structures. PMID:18483555

  4. Changing the topology of protein backbone: the effect of backbone cyclization on the structure and dynamics of a SH3 domain

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Frank H.; Varadan, Ranjani; Tayakuniyil, Praveen P.; Grossman, Jennifer H.; Camarero, Julio A.; Fushman, David

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of the effects of the backbone cyclization on the structure and dynamics of a protein is essential for using protein topology engineering to alter protein stability and function. Here we have determined, for the first time, the structure and dynamics of the linear and various circular constructs of the N-SH3 domain from protein c-Crk. These constructs differ in the length and amino acid composition of the cyclization region. The backbone cyclization was carried out using intein-mediated intramolecular chemical ligation between the juxtaposed N- and the C-termini. The structure and backbone dynamics studies were performed using solution NMR. Our data suggest that the backbone cyclization has little effect on the overall three-dimensional structure of the SH3 domain: besides the termini, only minor structural changes were found in the proximity of the cyclization region. In contrast to the structure, backbone dynamics are significantly affected by the cyclization. On the subnanosecond time scale, the backbone of all circular constructs on average appears more rigid than that of the linear SH3 domain; this effect is observed over the entire backbone and is not limited to the cyclization site. The backbone mobility of the circular constructs becomes less restricted with increasing length of the circularization loop. In addition, significant conformational exchange motions (on the sub-millisecond time scale) were found in the N-Src loop and in the adjacent β-strands in all circular constructs studied in this work. These effects of backbone cyclization on protein dynamics have potential implications for the stability of the protein fold and for ligand binding. PMID:25905098

  5. Folding a protein by discretizing its backbone torsional dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Ariel

    1999-05-01

    The aim of this work is to provide a coarse codification of local conformational constraints associated with each folding motif of a peptide chain in order to obtain a rough solution to the protein folding problem. This is accomplished by implementing a discretized version of the soft-mode dynamics on a personal computer (PC). Our algorithm mimics a parallel process as it evaluates concurrent folding possibilities by pattern recognition. It may be implemented in a PC as a sequence of perturbation-translation-renormalization (p-t-r) cycles performed on a matrix of local topological constraints (LTM). This requires suitable representational tools and a periodic quenching of the dynamics required for renormalization. We introduce a description of the peptide chain based on a local discrete variable the values of which label the basins of attraction of the Ramachandran map for each residue. Thus, the local variable indicates the basin in which the torsional coordinates of each residue lie at a given time. In addition, a coding of local topological constraints associated with each secondary and tertiary structural motif is introduced. Our treatment enables us to adopt a computation time step of 81 ps, a value far larger than hydrodynamic drag time scales. Folding pathways are resolved as transitions between patterns of locally encoded structural signals that change within the 10 μs-100 ms time scale range. These coarse folding pathways are generated by the periodic search for structural patterns in the time-evolving LTM. Each pattern is recorded as a contact matrix, an operation subject to a renormalization feedback loop. The validity of our approach is tested vis-a-vis experimentally-probed folding pathways eventually generating tertiary interactions in proteins which recover their active structure under in vitro renaturation conditions. As an illustration, we focus on determining significant folding intermediates and late kinetic bottlenecks that occur within the

  6. Using Excel To Study The Relation Between Protein Dihedral Angle Omega And Backbone Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shew, Christopher; Evans, Samari; Tao, Xiuping

    How to involve the uninitiated undergraduate students in computational biophysics research? We made use of Microsoft Excel to carry out calculations of bond lengths, bond angles and dihedral angles of proteins. Specifically, we studied protein backbone dihedral angle omega by examining how its distribution varies with the length of the backbone length. It turns out Excel is a respectable tool for this task. An ordinary current-day desktop or laptop can handle the calculations for midsized proteins in just seconds. Care has to be taken to enter the formulas for the spreadsheet column after column to minimize the computing load. Supported in part by NSF Grant #1238795.

  7. Nano-Scale Alignment of Proteins on a Flexible DNA Backbone

    PubMed Central

    Nojima, Tatsuya; Konno, Hiroki; Kodera, Noriyuki; Seio, Kohji; Taguchi, Hideki; Yoshida, Masasuke

    2012-01-01

    Nano-scale alignment of several proteins with freedom of motion is equivalent to an enormous increase in effective local concentration of proteins and will enable otherwise impossible weak and/or cooperative associations between them or with their ligands. For this purpose, a DNA backbone made of six oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) chains is designed in which five double-stranded segments are connected by four single-stranded flexible linkers. A desired protein with an introduced cysteine is connected covalently to the 5′-end of azido-ODN by catalyst-free click chemistry. Then, six protein-ODN conjugates are assembled with their complementary nucleotide sequences into a single multi-protein-DNA complex, and six proteins are aligned along the DNA backbone. Flexible alignment of proteins is directly observed by high-speed AFM imaging, and association of proteins with weak interaction is demonstrated by fluorescence resonance energy transfer between aligned proteins. PMID:23300700

  8. A Novel Method for Sampling Alpha-Helical Protein Backbones

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Fain, Boris; Levitt, Michael

    2001-01-01

    We present a novel technique of sampling the configurations of helical proteins. Assuming knowledge of native secondary structure, we employ assembly rules gathered from a database of existing structures to enumerate the geometrically possible 3-D arrangements of the constituent helices. We produce a library of possible folds for 25 helical protein cores. In each case the method finds significant numbers of conformations close to the native structure. In addition we assign coordinates to all atoms for 4 of the 25 proteins. In the context of database driven exhaustive enumeration our method performs extremely well, yielding significant percentages of structures (0.02%--82%) within 6A of the native structure. The method's speed and efficiency make it a valuable contribution towards the goal of predicting protein structure.

  9. Automated Real-Space Refinement of Protein Structures Using a Realistic Backbone Move Set

    PubMed Central

    Haddadian, Esmael J.; Gong, Haipeng; Jha, Abhishek K.; Yang, Xiaojing; DeBartolo, Joe; Hinshaw, James R.; Rice, Phoebe A.; Sosnick, Tobin R.; Freed, Karl F.

    2011-01-01

    Crystals of many important biological macromolecules diffract to limited resolution, rendering accurate model building and refinement difficult and time-consuming. We present a torsional optimization protocol that is applicable to many such situations and combines Protein Data Bank-based torsional optimization with real-space refinement against the electron density derived from crystallography or cryo-electron microscopy. Our method converts moderate- to low-resolution structures at initial (e.g., backbone trace only) or late stages of refinement to structures with increased numbers of hydrogen bonds, improved crystallographic R-factors, and superior backbone geometry. This automated method is applicable to DNA-binding and membrane proteins of any size and will aid studies of structural biology by improving model quality and saving considerable effort. The method can be extended to improve NMR and other structures. Our backbone score and its sequence profile provide an additional standard tool for evaluating structural quality. PMID:21843481

  10. Backbone Solution Structures of Proteins Using Residual Dipolar Couplings: Application to a Novel Structural Genomics Target

    PubMed Central

    Valafar, H.; Mayer, K. L.; Bougault, C. M.; LeBlond, P. D.; Jenney, F. E.; Brereton, P. S.; Adams, M.W.W.; Prestegard, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    Structural genomics (or proteomics) activities are critically dependent on the availability of high-throughput structure determination methodology. Development of such methodology has been a particular challenge for NMR based structure determination because of the demands for isotopic labeling of proteins and the requirements for very long data acquisition times. We present here a methodology that gains efficiency from a focus on determination of backbone structures of proteins as opposed to full structures with all side chains in place. This focus is appropriate given the presumption that many protein structures in the future will be built using computational methods that start from representative fold family structures and replace as many as 70% of the side chains in the course of structure determination. The methodology we present is based primarily on residual dipolar couplings (RDCs), readily accessible NMR observables that constrain the orientation of backbone fragments irrespective of separation in space. A new software tool is described for the assembly of backbone fragments under RDC constraints and an application to a structural genomics target is presented. The target is an 8.7 kDa protein from Pyrococcus furiosus, PF1061, that was previously not well annotated, and had a nearest structurally characterized neighbor with only 33% sequence identity. The structure produced shows structural similarity to this sequence homologue, but also shows similarity to other proteins that suggests a functional role in sulfur transfer. Given the backbone structure and a possible functional link this should be an ideal target for development of modeling methods. PMID:15704012

  11. Mapping membrane protein backbone dynamics: a comparison of site-directed spin labeling with NMR 15N-relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ryan H; Kroncke, Brett M; Solomon, Tsega L; Columbus, Linda

    2014-10-01

    The ability to detect nanosecond backbone dynamics with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in soluble proteins has been well established. However, for membrane proteins, the nitroxide appears to have more interactions with the protein surface, potentially hindering the sensitivity to backbone motions. To determine whether membrane protein backbone dynamics could be mapped with SDSL, a nitroxide was introduced at 55 independent sites in a model polytopic membrane protein, TM0026. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectral parameters were compared with NMR (15)N-relaxation data. Sequential scans revealed backbone dynamics with the same trends observed for the R1 relaxation rate, suggesting that nitroxide dynamics remain coupled to the backbone on membrane proteins. PMID:25296323

  12. On the relationship between NMR-derived amide order parameters and protein backbone entropy changes

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Kim A.; O’Brien, Evan; Kasinath, Vignesh; Wand, A. Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to analyze the relationship between NMR-derived squared generalized order parameters of amide NH groups and backbone entropy. Amide order parameters (O2NH) are largely determined by the secondary structure and average values appear unrelated to the overall flexibility of the protein. However, analysis of the more flexible subset (O2NH < 0.8) shows that these report both on the local flexibility of the protein and on a different component of the conformational entropy than that reported by the side chain methyl axis order parameters, O2axis. A calibration curve for backbone entropy vs. O2NH is developed which accounts for both correlations between amide group motions of different residues, and correlations between backbone and side chain motions. This calibration curve can be used with experimental values of O2NH changes obtained by NMR relaxation measurements to extract backbone entropy changes, e.g. upon ligand binding. In conjunction with our previous calibration for side chain entropy derived from measured O2axis values this provides a prescription for determination of the total protein conformational entropy changes from NMR relaxation measurements. PMID:25739366

  13. A structural role for arginine in proteins: multiple hydrogen bonds to backbone carbonyl oxygens.

    PubMed

    Borders, C L; Broadwater, J A; Bekeny, P A; Salmon, J E; Lee, A S; Eldridge, A M; Pett, V B

    1994-04-01

    We propose that arginine side chains often play a previously unappreciated general structural role in the maintenance of tertiary structure in proteins, wherein the positively charged guanidinium group forms multiple hydrogen bonds to backbone carbonyl oxygens. Using as a criterion for a "structural" arginine one that forms 4 or more hydrogen bonds to 3 or more backbone carbonyl oxygens, we have used molecular graphics to locate arginines of interest in 4 proteins: Arg 180 in Thermus thermophilus manganese superoxide dismutase, Arg 254 in human carbonic anhydrase II, Arg 31 in Streptomyces rubiginosus xylose isomerase, and Arg 313 in Rhodospirillum rubrum ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. Arg 180 helps to mold the active site channel of superoxide dismutase, whereas in each of the other enzymes the structural arginine is buried in the "mantle" (i.e., inside, but near the surface) of the protein interior well removed from the active site, where it makes 5 hydrogen bonds to 4 backbone carbonyl oxygens. Using a more relaxed criterion of 3 or more hydrogen bonds to 2 or more backbone carbonyl oxygens, arginines that play a potentially important structural role were found in yeast enolase, Bacillus stearothermophilus glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, bacteriophage T4 and human lysozymes, Enteromorpha prolifera plastocyanin, HIV-1 protease, Trypanosoma brucei brucei and yeast triosephosphate isomerases, and Escherichia coli trp aporepressor (but not trp repressor or the trp repressor/operator complex).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8003972

  14. On the satisfaction of backbone-carbonyl lone pairs of electrons in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Gail J; Woolfson, Derek N

    2016-04-01

    Protein structures are stabilized by a variety of noncovalent interactions (NCIs), including the hydrophobic effect, hydrogen bonds, electrostatic forces and van der Waals' interactions. Our knowledge of the contributions of NCIs, and the interplay between them remains incomplete. This has implications for computational modeling of NCIs, and our ability to understand and predict protein structure, stability, and function. One consideration is the satisfaction of the full potential for NCIs made by backbone atoms. Most commonly, backbone-carbonyl oxygen atoms located within α-helices and β-sheets are depicted as making a single hydrogen bond. However, there are two lone pairs of electrons to be satisfied for each of these atoms. To explore this, we used operational geometric definitions to generate an inventory of NCIs for backbone-carbonyl oxygen atoms from a set of high-resolution protein structures and associated molecular-dynamics simulations in water. We included more-recently appreciated, but weaker NCIs in our analysis, such as n→π* interactions, Cα-H bonds and methyl-H bonds. The data demonstrate balanced, dynamic systems for all proteins, with most backbone-carbonyl oxygen atoms being satisfied by two NCIs most of the time. Combinations of NCIs made may correlate with secondary structure type, though in subtly different ways from traditional models of α- and β-structure. In addition, we find examples of under- and over-satisfied carbonyl-oxygen atoms, and we identify both sequence-dependent and sequence-independent secondary-structural motifs in which these reside. Our analysis provides a more-detailed understanding of these contributors to protein structure and stability, which will be of use in protein modeling, engineering and design. PMID:26833776

  15. Backrub-like backbone simulation recapitulates natural protein conformational variability and improves mutant side-chain prediction

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Colin A.; Kortemme, Tanja

    2008-01-01

    Summary Incorporation of effective backbone sampling into protein simulation and design is an important step in increasing the accuracy of computational protein modeling. Recent analysis of high-resolution crystal structures has suggested a new model, termed backrub, to describe localized, hinge-like alternative backbone and side chain conformations observed in the crystal lattice. The model involves internal backbone rotations about axes between Cα atoms. Based on this observation, we have implemented a backrub-inspired sampling method in the Rosetta structure prediction and design program. We evaluate this model of backbone flexibility using three different tests. First, we show that Rosetta backrub simulations recapitulate the correlation between backbone and side-chain conformations in the high-resolution crystal structures upon which the model was based. As a second test of backrub sampling, we show that backbone flexibility improves the accuracy of predicting point-mutant side chain conformations over fixed backbone rotameric sampling alone. Finally, we show that backrub sampling of triosephosphate isomerase loop 6 can capture the ms/µs oscillation between the open and closed states observed in solution. Our results suggest that backrub sampling captures a sizable fraction of localized conformational changes that occur in natural proteins. Application of this simple model of backbone motions may significantly improve both protein design and atomistic simulations of localized protein flexibility. PMID:18547585

  16. ff14SB: Improving the Accuracy of Protein Side Chain and Backbone Parameters from ff99SB.

    PubMed

    Maier, James A; Martinez, Carmenza; Kasavajhala, Koushik; Wickstrom, Lauren; Hauser, Kevin E; Simmerling, Carlos

    2015-08-11

    Molecular mechanics is powerful for its speed in atomistic simulations, but an accurate force field is required. The Amber ff99SB force field improved protein secondary structure balance and dynamics from earlier force fields like ff99, but weaknesses in side chain rotamer and backbone secondary structure preferences have been identified. Here, we performed a complete refit of all amino acid side chain dihedral parameters, which had been carried over from ff94. The training set of conformations included multidimensional dihedral scans designed to improve transferability of the parameters. Improvement in all amino acids was obtained as compared to ff99SB. Parameters were also generated for alternate protonation states of ionizable side chains. Average errors in relative energies of pairs of conformations were under 1.0 kcal/mol as compared to QM, reduced 35% from ff99SB. We also took the opportunity to make empirical adjustments to the protein backbone dihedral parameters as compared to ff99SB. Multiple small adjustments of φ and ψ parameters were tested against NMR scalar coupling data and secondary structure content for short peptides. The best results were obtained from a physically motivated adjustment to the φ rotational profile that compensates for lack of ff99SB QM training data in the β-ppII transition region. Together, these backbone and side chain modifications (hereafter called ff14SB) not only better reproduced their benchmarks, but also improved secondary structure content in small peptides and reproduction of NMR χ1 scalar coupling measurements for proteins in solution. We also discuss the Amber ff12SB parameter set, a preliminary version of ff14SB that includes most of its improvements. PMID:26574453

  17. Membrane Curvature Sensing by Amphipathic Helices Is Modulated by the Surrounding Protein Backbone

    PubMed Central

    Doucet, Christine M.; Esmery, Nina; de Saint-Jean, Maud; Antonny, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Membrane curvature is involved in numerous biological pathways like vesicle trafficking, endocytosis or nuclear pore complex assembly. In addition to its topological role, membrane curvature is sensed by specific proteins, enabling the coordination of biological processes in space and time. Amongst membrane curvature sensors are the ALPS (Amphipathic Lipid Packing Sensors). ALPS motifs are short peptides with peculiar amphipathic properties. They are found in proteins targeted to distinct curved membranes, mostly in the early secretory pathway. For instance, the ALPS motif of the golgin GMAP210 binds trafficking vesicles, while the ALPS motif of Nup133 targets nuclear pores. It is not clear if, besides curvature sensitivity, ALPS motifs also provide target specificity, or if other domains in the surrounding protein backbone are involved. To elucidate this aspect, we studied the subcellular localization of ALPS motifs outside their natural protein context. The ALPS motifs of GMAP210 or Nup133 were grafted on artificial fluorescent probes. Importantly, ALPS motifs are held in different positions and these contrasting architectures were mimicked by the fluorescent probes. The resulting chimeras recapitulated the original proteins localization, indicating that ALPS motifs are sufficient to specifically localize proteins. Modulating the electrostatic or hydrophobic content of Nup133 ALPS motif modified its avidity for cellular membranes but did not change its organelle targeting properties. In contrast, the structure of the backbone surrounding the helix strongly influenced targeting. In particular, introducing an artificial coiled-coil between ALPS and the fluorescent protein increased membrane curvature sensitivity. This coiled-coil domain also provided membrane curvature sensitivity to the amphipathic helix of Sar1. The degree of curvature sensitivity within the coiled-coil context remains correlated to the natural curvature sensitivity of the helices. This suggests

  18. The magnitude of the backbone conformational entropy change in protein folding.

    PubMed

    D'Aquino, J A; Gómez, J; Hilser, V J; Lee, K H; Amzel, L M; Freire, E

    1996-06-01

    The magnitude of the conformational entropy change experienced by the peptide backbone upon protein folding was investigated experimentally and by computational analysis. Experimentally, two different pairs of mutants of a 33 amino acid peptide corresponding to the leucine zipper region of GCN4 were used for high-sensitivity microcalorimetric analysis. Each pair of mutants differed only by having alanine or glycine at a specific solvent-exposed position under conditions in which the differences in stability could be attributed to differences in the conformational entropy of the unfolded state. The mutants studied were characterized by different stabilities but had identical heat capacity changes of unfolding (delta Cp), identical solvent-related entropies of unfolding (delta Ssolv), and identical enthalpies of unfolding (delta H) at equivalent temperatures. Accordingly, the differences in stability between the different mutants could be attributed to differences in conformational entropy. The computational studies were aimed at generating the energy profile of backbone conformations as a function of the main chain dihedral angles phi and phi. The energy profiles permit a direct calculation of the probability distribution of different conformers and therefore of the conformational entropy of the backbone. The experimental results presented in this paper indicate that the presence of the methyl group in alanine reduces the conformational entropy of the peptide backbone by 2.46 +/- 0.2 cal/K. mol with respect to that of glycine, consistent with a 3.4-fold reduction in the number of allowed conformations in the alanine-containing peptides. Similar results were obtained from the energy profiles. The computational analysis also indicates that the addition of further carbon atoms to the side chain had only a small effect as long as the side chains were unbranched at position beta. A further reduction with respect to Ala of only 0.61 and 0.81 cal/K. mol in the backbone

  19. Predicting Disease-Related Proteins Based on Clique Backbone in Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lei; Zhao, Xudong; Tang, Xianglong

    2014-01-01

    Network biology integrates different kinds of data, including physical or functional networks and disease gene sets, to interpret human disease. A clique (maximal complete subgraph) in a protein-protein interaction network is a topological module and possesses inherently biological significance. A disease-related clique possibly associates with complex diseases. Fully identifying disease components in a clique is conductive to uncovering disease mechanisms. This paper proposes an approach of predicting disease proteins based on cliques in a protein-protein interaction network. To tolerate false positive and negative interactions in protein networks, extending cliques and scoring predicted disease proteins with gene ontology terms are introduced to the clique-based method. Precisions of predicted disease proteins are verified by disease phenotypes and steadily keep to more than 95%. The predicted disease proteins associated with cliques can partly complement mapping between genotype and phenotype, and provide clues for understanding the pathogenesis of serious diseases. PMID:25013377

  20. NMR Backbone Assignment of Large Proteins by Using (13) Cα -Only Triple-Resonance Experiments.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qingtao; Chen, Jiajing; Mi, Juan; Zhang, Jiahai; Ruan, Ke; Wu, Jihui

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool to interrogate protein structure and dynamics residue by residue. However, the prerequisite chemical-shift assignment remains a bottleneck for large proteins due to the fast relaxation and the frequency degeneracy of the (13) Cα nuclei. Herein, we present a covariance NMR strategy to assign the backbone chemical shifts by using only HN(CO)CA and HNCA spectra that has a high sensitivity even for large proteins. By using the peak linear correlation coefficient (LCC), which is a sensitive probe even for tiny chemical-shift displacements, we correctly identify the fidelity of approximately 92 % cross-peaks in the covariance spectrum, which is thus a significant improvement on the approach developed by Snyder and Brüschweiler (66 %) and the use of spectral derivatives (50 %). Thus, we calculate the 4D covariance spectrum from HN(CO)CA and HNCA experiments, in which cross-peaks with LCCs above a universal threshold are considered as true correlations. This 4D covariance spectrum enables the sequential assignment of a 42 kDa maltose binding protein (MBP), in which about 95 % residues are successfully assigned with a high accuracy of 98 %. Our LCC approach, therefore, paves the way for a residue-by-residue study of the backbone structure and dynamics of large proteins. PMID:27276173

  1. NMR Structure Determination for Larger Proteins Using Backbone-Only Data

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Srivatsan; Lange, Oliver F.; Rossi, Paolo; Tyka, Michael; Wang, Xu; Aramini, James; Liu, Gaohua; Ramelot, Theresa; Eletsky, Alexander; Szyperski, Thomas; Kennedy, Michael; Prestegard, James; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Baker, David

    2010-01-01

    Conventional protein structure determination from nuclear magnetic resonance data relies heavily on side-chain proton-proton distances. The necessary side-chain resonance assignment, however, is labor intensive and prone to error. Here we show that structures can be accurately determined without NMR information on the sidechains for proteins up to 25 kDa by incorporating backbone chemical shifts, residual dipolar couplings, and amide proton distances into the Rosetta protein structure modelling methodology. These data, which are too sparse for conventional methods, serve only to guide conformational search towards the lowest energy conformations in the folding landscape; the details of the computed models are determined by the physical chemistry implicit in the Rosetta all atom energy function. The new method is not hindered by the deuteration required to suppress nuclear relaxation processes for proteins greater than 15 kDa, and should enable routine NMR structure determination for larger proteins. PMID:20133520

  2. Robust Chemical Synthesis of Membrane Proteins through a General Method of Removable Backbone Modification.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ji-Shen; He, Yao; Zuo, Chao; Cai, Xiao-Ying; Tang, Shan; Wang, Zhipeng A; Zhang, Long-Hua; Tian, Chang-Lin; Liu, Lei

    2016-03-16

    Chemical protein synthesis can provide access to proteins with post-translational modifications or site-specific labelings. Although this technology is finding increasing applications in the studies of water-soluble globular proteins, chemical synthesis of membrane proteins remains elusive. In this report, a general and robust removable backbone modification (RBM) method is developed for the chemical synthesis of membrane proteins. This method uses an activated O-to-N acyl transfer auxiliary to install in the Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis process a RBM group with switchable reactivity toward trifluoroacetic acid. The method can be applied to versatile membrane proteins because the RBM group can be placed at any primary amino acid. With RBM, the membrane proteins and their segments behave almost as if they were water-soluble peptides and can be easily handled in the process of ligation, purification, and mass characterizations. After the full-length protein is assembled, the RBM group can be readily removed by trifluoroacetic acid. The efficiency and usefulness of the new method has been demonstrated by the successful synthesis of a two-transmembrane-domain protein (HCV p7 ion channel) with site-specific isotopic labeling and a four-transmembrane-domain protein (multidrug resistance transporter EmrE). This method enables practical synthesis of small- to medium-sized membrane proteins or membrane protein domains for biochemical and biophysical studies. PMID:26943264

  3. Direct Observation of the Intrinsic Backbone Torsional Mobility of Disordered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Jain, Neha; Narang, Dominic; Bhasne, Karishma; Dalal, Vijit; Arya, Shruti; Bhattacharya, Mily; Mukhopadhyay, Samrat

    2016-08-23

    The fundamental backbone dynamics of unfolded proteins arising due to intrinsic ϕ-ψ dihedral angle fluctuations dictate the course of protein folding, binding, assembly, and function. These internal fluctuations are also critical for protein misfolding associated with a range of human diseases. However, direct observation and unambiguous assignment of this inherent dynamics in chemically denatured proteins is extremely challenging due to various experimental limitations. To directly map the backbone torsional mobility in the ϕ-ψ dihedral angle space, we used a model intrinsically disordered protein, namely, α-synuclein, that adopts an expanded state under native conditions. We took advantage of nonoccurrence of tryptophan in α-synuclein and created a number of single-tryptophan variants encompassing the entire polypeptide chain. We then utilized highly sensitive picosecond time-resolved fluorescence depolarization measurements that allowed us to discern the site-specific torsional relaxation at a low protein concentration under physiological conditions. For all the locations, the depolarization kinetics exhibited two well-separated rotational-correlation-time components. The shorter, subnanosecond component arises due to the local mobility of the indole side chain, whereas the longer rotational-correlation-time component (1.37 ± 0.15 ns), independent of global tumbling, represents a characteristic timescale for short-range conformational exchange in the ϕ-ψ dihedral space. This correlation time represents an intrinsic timescale for torsional relaxation and is independent of position, which is expected for an extended polypeptide chain having little or no propensity to form persistent structures. We were also able to capture this intrinsic timescale at the N-terminal unstructured domain of the prion protein. Our estimated timescale of the segmental mobility is similar to that of unfolded proteins studied by nuclear magnetic resonance in conjunction with

  4. Structure and Assembly of Group B Streptococcus Pilus 2b Backbone Protein

    PubMed Central

    Cozzi, Roberta; Malito, Enrico; Lazzarin, Maddalena; Nuccitelli, Annalisa; Castagnetti, Andrea; Bottomley, Matthew J.; Margarit, Immaculada; Maione, Domenico; Rinaudo, C. Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a major cause of invasive disease in infants. Like other Gram-positive bacteria, GBS uses a sortase C-catalyzed transpeptidation mechanism to generate cell surface pili from backbone and ancillary pilin precursor substrates. The three pilus types identified in GBS contain structural subunits that are highly immunogenic and are promising candidates for the development of a broadly-protective vaccine. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of the backbone protein of pilus 2b (BP-2b) at 1.06Å resolution. The structure reveals a classical IgG-like fold typical of the pilin subunits of other Gram-positive bacteria. The crystallized portion of the protein (residues 185-468) encompasses domains D2 and D3 that together confer high stability to the protein due to the presence of an internal isopeptide bond within each domain. The D2+D3 region, lacking the N-terminal D1 domain, was as potent as the entire protein in conferring protection against GBS challenge in a well-established mouse model. By site-directed mutagenesis and complementation studies in GBS knock-out strains we identified the residues and motives essential for assembly of the BP-2b monomers into high-molecular weight complexes, thus providing new insights into pilus 2b polymerization. PMID:25942637

  5. Conformation-dependent backbone geometry restraints set a new standard for protein crystallographic refinement

    PubMed Central

    Moriarty, Nigel W.; Tronrud, Dale E.; Adams, Paul D.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Ideal values of bond angles and lengths used as external restraints are crucial for the successful refinement of protein crystal structures at all but the highest of resolutions. The restraints in common usage today have been designed based on the assumption that each type of bond or angle has a single ideal value independent of context. However, recent work has shown that the ideal values are, in fact, sensitive to local conformation, and as a first step toward using such information to build more accurate models, ultra-high resolution protein crystal structures have been used to derive a conformation-dependent library (CDL) of restraints for the protein backbone (Berkholz et al. 2009. Structure. 17, 1316). Here, we report the introduction of this CDL into the Phenix package and the results of test refinements of thousands of structures across a wide range of resolutions. These tests show that use of the conformation dependent library yields models that have substantially better agreement with ideal main-chain bond angles and lengths and, on average, a slightly enhanced fit to the X-ray data. No disadvantages of using the backbone CDL are apparent. In Phenix usage of the CDL can be selected by simply specifying the cdl=True option. This successful implementation paves the way for further aspects of the context-dependence of ideal geometry to be characterized and applied to improve experimental and predictive modelling accuracy. PMID:24890778

  6. Conformation-dependent backbone geometry restraints set a new standard for protein crystallographic refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, Nigel W.; Tronrud, Dale E.; Adams, Paul D.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2014-06-17

    Ideal values of bond angles and lengths used as external restraints are crucial for the successful refinement of protein crystal structures at all but the highest of resolutions. The restraints in common usage today have been designed based on the assumption that each type of bond or angle has a single ideal value independent of context. However, recent work has shown that the ideal values are, in fact, sensitive to local conformation, and as a first step toward using such information to build more accurate models, ultra-high resolution protein crystal structures have been used to derive a conformation-dependent library (CDL) of restraints for the protein backbone (Berkholz et al. 2009. Structure. 17, 1316). Here, we report the introduction of this CDL into the Phenix package and the results of test refinements of thousands of structures across a wide range of resolutions. These tests show that use of the conformation dependent library yields models that have substantially better agreement with ideal main-chain bond angles and lengths and, on average, a slightly enhanced fit to the X-ray data. No disadvantages of using the backbone CDL are apparent. In Phenix usage of the CDL can be selected by simply specifying the cdl=True option. This successful implementation paves the way for further aspects of the context-dependence of ideal geometry to be characterized and applied to improve experimental and predictive modelling accuracy.

  7. Conformation-dependent backbone geometry restraints set a new standard for protein crystallographic refinement

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Moriarty, Nigel W.; Tronrud, Dale E.; Adams, Paul D.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2014-06-17

    Ideal values of bond angles and lengths used as external restraints are crucial for the successful refinement of protein crystal structures at all but the highest of resolutions. The restraints in common usage today have been designed based on the assumption that each type of bond or angle has a single ideal value independent of context. However, recent work has shown that the ideal values are, in fact, sensitive to local conformation, and as a first step toward using such information to build more accurate models, ultra-high resolution protein crystal structures have been used to derive a conformation-dependent library (CDL)more » of restraints for the protein backbone (Berkholz et al. 2009. Structure. 17, 1316). Here, we report the introduction of this CDL into the Phenix package and the results of test refinements of thousands of structures across a wide range of resolutions. These tests show that use of the conformation dependent library yields models that have substantially better agreement with ideal main-chain bond angles and lengths and, on average, a slightly enhanced fit to the X-ray data. No disadvantages of using the backbone CDL are apparent. In Phenix usage of the CDL can be selected by simply specifying the cdl=True option. This successful implementation paves the way for further aspects of the context-dependence of ideal geometry to be characterized and applied to improve experimental and predictive modelling accuracy.« less

  8. The effect of chirality and steric hindrance on intrinsic backbone conformational propensities: tools for protein design.

    PubMed

    Childers, Matthew Carter; Towse, Clare-Louise; Daggett, Valerie

    2016-07-01

    The conformational propensities of amino acids are an amalgamation of sequence effects, environmental effects and underlying intrinsic behavior. Many have attempted to investigate neighboring residue effects to aid in our understanding of protein folding and improve structure prediction efforts, especially with respect to difficult to characterize states, such as disordered or unfolded states. Host-guest peptide series are a useful tool in examining the propensities of the amino acids free from the surrounding protein structure. Here, we compare the distributions of the backbone dihedral angles (φ/ψ) of the 20 proteogenic amino acids in two different sequence contexts using the AAXAA and GGXGG host-guest pentapeptide series. We further examine their intrinsic behaviors across three environmental contexts: water at 298 K, water at 498 K, and 8 M urea at 298 K. The GGXGG systems provide the intrinsic amino acid propensities devoid of any conformational context. The alanine residues in the AAXAA series enforce backbone chirality, thereby providing a model of the intrinsic behavior of amino acids in a protein chain. Our results show modest differences in φ/ψ distributions due to the steric constraints of the Ala side chains, the magnitudes of which are dependent on the denaturing conditions. One of the strongest factors modulating φ/ψ distributions was the protonation of titratable side chains, and the largest differences observed were in the amino acid propensities for the rarely sampled αL region. PMID:27284086

  9. Correlation between protein secondary structure, backbone bond angles, and side-chain orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, Martin; Niemi, Antti J.

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the fine structure of the sp3 hybridized covalent bond geometry that governs the tetrahedral architecture around the central Cα carbon of a protein backbone, and for this we develop new visualization techniques to analyze high-resolution x-ray structures in the Protein Data Bank. We observe that there is a correlation between the deformations of the ideal tetrahedral symmetry and the local secondary structure of the protein. We propose a universal coarse-grained energy function to describe the ensuing side-chain geometry in terms of the Cβ carbon orientations. The energy function can model the side-chain geometry with a subatomic precision. As an example we construct the Cα-Cβ structure of HP35 chicken villin headpiece. We obtain a configuration that deviates less than 0.4 Å in root-mean-square distance from the experimental x-ray structure.

  10. Assignment of protein backbone resonances using connectivity, torsion angles and 13Calpha chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Morris, Laura C; Valafar, Homayoun; Prestegard, James H

    2004-05-01

    A program is presented which will return the most probable sequence location for a short connected set of residues in a protein given just (13)C(alpha) chemical shifts (delta((13)C(alpha))) and data restricting the phi and psi backbone angles. Data taken from both the BioMagResBank and the Protein Data Bank were used to create a probability density function (PDF) using a multivariate normal distribution in delta((13)C(alpha)), phi, and psi space for each amino acid residue. Extracting and combining probabilities for particular amino acid residues in a short proposed sequence yields a score indicative of the correctness of the proposed assignment. The program is illustrated using several proteins for which structure and (13)C(alpha) chemical shift data are available. PMID:15017135

  11. Collapse transition in proteins.

    PubMed

    Ziv, Guy; Thirumalai, D; Haran, Gilad

    2009-01-01

    The coil-globule transition, a tenet of the physics of polymers, has been identified in recent years as an important unresolved aspect of the initial stages of the folding of proteins. We describe the basics of the collapse transition, starting with homopolymers and continuing with proteins. Studies of denatured-state collapse under equilibrium are then presented. An emphasis is placed on single-molecule fluorescence experiments, which are particularly useful for measuring properties of the denatured state even under conditions of coexistence with the folded state. Attempts to understand the dynamics of collapse, both theoretically and experimentally, are then described. Only an upper limit for the rate of collapse has been obtained so far. Improvements in experimental and theoretical methodology are likely to continue to push our understanding of the importance of the denatured-state thermodynamics and dynamics for protein folding in the coming years. PMID:19081910

  12. Slow dynamics of a protein backbone in molecular dynamics simulation revealed by time-structure based independent component analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Naritomi, Yusuke; Fuchigami, Sotaro

    2013-12-07

    We recently proposed the method of time-structure based independent component analysis (tICA) to examine the slow dynamics involved in conformational fluctuations of a protein as estimated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation [Y. Naritomi and S. Fuchigami, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 065101 (2011)]. Our previous study focused on domain motions of the protein and examined its dynamics by using rigid-body domain analysis and tICA. However, the protein changes its conformation not only through domain motions but also by various types of motions involving its backbone and side chains. Some of these motions might occur on a slow time scale: we hypothesize that if so, we could effectively detect and characterize them using tICA. In the present study, we investigated slow dynamics of the protein backbone using MD simulation and tICA. The selected target protein was lysine-, arginine-, ornithine-binding protein (LAO), which comprises two domains and undergoes large domain motions. MD simulation of LAO in explicit water was performed for 1 μs, and the obtained trajectory of C{sub α} atoms in the backbone was analyzed by tICA. This analysis successfully provided us with slow modes for LAO that represented either domain motions or local movements of the backbone. Further analysis elucidated the atomic details of the suggested local motions and confirmed that these motions truly occurred on the expected slow time scale.

  13. Slow dynamics of a protein backbone in molecular dynamics simulation revealed by time-structure based independent component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naritomi, Yusuke; Fuchigami, Sotaro

    2013-12-01

    We recently proposed the method of time-structure based independent component analysis (tICA) to examine the slow dynamics involved in conformational fluctuations of a protein as estimated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation [Y. Naritomi and S. Fuchigami, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 065101 (2011)]. Our previous study focused on domain motions of the protein and examined its dynamics by using rigid-body domain analysis and tICA. However, the protein changes its conformation not only through domain motions but also by various types of motions involving its backbone and side chains. Some of these motions might occur on a slow time scale: we hypothesize that if so, we could effectively detect and characterize them using tICA. In the present study, we investigated slow dynamics of the protein backbone using MD simulation and tICA. The selected target protein was lysine-, arginine-, ornithine-binding protein (LAO), which comprises two domains and undergoes large domain motions. MD simulation of LAO in explicit water was performed for 1 μs, and the obtained trajectory of Cα atoms in the backbone was analyzed by tICA. This analysis successfully provided us with slow modes for LAO that represented either domain motions or local movements of the backbone. Further analysis elucidated the atomic details of the suggested local motions and confirmed that these motions truly occurred on the expected slow time scale.

  14. Water proton spin saturation affects measured protein backbone 15 N spin relaxation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kang; Tjandra, Nico

    2011-12-01

    Protein backbone 15N NMR spin relaxation rates are useful in characterizing the protein dynamics and structures. To observe the protein nuclear-spin resonances a pulse sequence has to include a water suppression scheme. There are two commonly employed methods, saturating or dephasing the water spins with pulse field gradients and keeping them unperturbed with flip-back pulses. Here different water suppression methods were incorporated into pulse sequences to measure 15N longitudinal T1 and transversal rotating-frame T1ρ spin relaxation. Unexpectedly the 15N T1 relaxation time constants varied significantly with the choice of water suppression method. For a 25-kDa Escherichiacoli. glutamine binding protein (GlnBP) the T1 values acquired with the pulse sequence containing a water dephasing gradient are on average 20% longer than the ones obtained using a pulse sequence containing the water flip-back pulse. In contrast the two T1ρ data sets are correlated without an apparent offset. The average T1 difference was reduced to 12% when the experimental recycle delay was doubled, while the average T1 values from the flip-back measurements were nearly unchanged. Analysis of spectral signal to noise ratios ( s/ n) showed the apparent slower 15N relaxation obtained with the water dephasing experiment originated from the differences in 1H N recovery for each relaxation time point. This in turn offset signal reduction from 15N relaxation decay. The artifact becomes noticeable when the measured 15N relaxation time constant is comparable to recycle delay, e.g., the 15N T1 of medium to large proteins. The 15N relaxation rates measured with either water suppression schemes yield reasonable fits to the structure. However, data from the saturated scheme results in significantly lower Model-Free order parameters (< S2> = 0.81) than the non-saturated ones (< S2> = 0.88), indicating such order parameters may be previously underestimated.

  15. Solution structure and backbone dynamics of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV) nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Y.; Kaluarachchi, K.; Giedroc, D. P.

    1998-01-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid proteins (NCPs) are CCHC-type zinc finger proteins that mediate virion RNA binding activities associated with retrovirus assembly and genomic RNA encapsidation. Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV), a type D retrovirus, encodes a 96-amino acid nucleocapsid protein, which contains two Cys-X2-Cys-X4-His-X4-Cys (CCHC) zinc fingers connected by an unusually long 15-amino acid linker. Homonuclear, two-dimensional sensitivity-enhanced 15N-1H, three-dimensional 15N-1H, and triple resonance NMR spectroscopy have been used to determine the solution structure and residue-specific backbone dynamics of the structured core domain of MPMV NCP containing residues 21-80. Structure calculations and spectral density mapping of N-H bond vector mobility reveal that MPMV NCP 21-80 is best described as two independently folded, rotationally uncorrelated globular domains connected by a seven-residue flexible linker consisting of residues 42-48. The N-terminal CCHC zinc finger domain (residues 24-37) appears to adopt a fold like that described previously for HIV-1 NCP; however, residues within this domain and the immediately adjacent linker region (residues 38-41) are characterized by extensive conformational averaging on the micros-ms time scale at 25 degrees C. In contrast to other NCPs, residues 49-77, which includes the C-terminal CCHC zinc-finger (residues 53-66), comprise a well-folded globular domain with the Val49-Pro-Gly-Leu52 sequence and C-terminal tail residues 67-77 characterized by amide proton exchange properties and 15N R1, R2, and (1H-15N) NOE values indistinguishable to residues in the core C-terminal finger. Twelve refined structural models of MPMV NCP residues 49-80 (pairwise backbone RMSD of 0.77 A) reveal that the side chains of the conserved Pro50 and Trp62 are in van der Waals contact with one another. Residues 70-73 in the C-terminal tail adopt a reverse turn-like structure. Ile77 is involved in extensive van der Waals contact with the core

  16. A Multi-Objective Approach for Protein Structure Prediction Based on an Energy Model and Backbone Angle Preferences

    PubMed Central

    Tsay, Jyh-Jong; Su, Shih-Chieh; Yu, Chin-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Protein structure prediction (PSP) is concerned with the prediction of protein tertiary structure from primary structure and is a challenging calculation problem. After decades of research effort, numerous solutions have been proposed for optimisation methods based on energy models. However, further investigation and improvement is still needed to increase the accuracy and similarity of structures. This study presents a novel backbone angle preference factor, which is one of the factors inducing protein folding. The proposed multiobjective optimisation approach simultaneously considers energy models and backbone angle preferences to solve the ab initio PSP. To prove the effectiveness of the multiobjective optimisation approach based on the energy models and backbone angle preferences, 75 amino acid sequences with lengths ranging from 22 to 88 amino acids were selected from the CB513 data set to be the benchmarks. The data sets were highly dissimilar, therefore indicating that they are meaningful. The experimental results showed that the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) of the multiobjective optimization approach based on energy model and backbone angle preferences was superior to those of typical energy models, indicating that the proposed approach can facilitate the ab initio PSP. PMID:26151847

  17. Unconventional N-H…N Hydrogen Bonds Involving Proline Backbone Nitrogen in Protein Structures.

    PubMed

    Deepak, R N V Krishna; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2016-05-10

    Contrary to DNA double-helical structures, hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) involving nitrogen as the acceptor are not common in protein structures. We systematically searched N-H…N H-bonds in two different sets of protein structures. Data set I consists of neutron diffraction and ultrahigh-resolution x-ray structures (0.9 Å resolution or better) and the hydrogen atom positions in these structures were determined experimentally. Data set II contains structures determined using x-ray diffraction (resolution ≤ 1.8 Å) and the positions of hydrogen atoms were generated using a computational method. We identified 114 and 14,347 potential N-H…N H-bonds from these two data sets, respectively, and 56-66% of these were of the Ni+1-Hi+1…Ni type, with Ni being the proline backbone nitrogen. To further understand the nature of such unusual contacts, we performed quantum chemical calculations on the model compound N-acetyl-L-proline-N-methylamide (Ace-Pro-NMe) with coordinates taken from the experimentally determined structures. A potential energy profile generated by varying the ψ dihedral angle in Ace-Pro-NMe indicates that the conformation with the N-H…N H-bond is the most stable. An analysis of H-bond-forming proline residues reveals that more than 30% of the proline carbonyl groups are also involved in n → π(∗) interactions with the carbonyl carbon of the preceding residue. Natural bond orbital analyses demonstrate that the strength of N-H…N H-bonds is less than half of that observed for a conventional H-bond. This study clearly establishes the H-bonding capability of proline nitrogen and its prevalence in protein structures. We found many proteins with multiple instances of H-bond-forming prolines. With more than 15% of all proline residues participating in N-H…N H-bonds, we suggest a new, to our knowledge, structural role for proline in providing stability to loops and capping regions of secondary structures in proteins. PMID:27166805

  18. Protein inhibitors of serine proteinases: role of backbone structure and dynamics in controlling the hydrolysis constant.

    PubMed

    Song, Jikui; Markley, John L

    2003-05-13

    Standard mechanism protein inhibitors of serine proteinases bind as substrates and are cleaved by cognate proteinases at their reactive sites. The hydrolysis constant for this cleavage reaction at the P(1)-P(1)' peptide bond (K(hyd)) is determined by the relative concentrations at equilibrium of the "intact" (uncleaved, I) and "modified" (reactive site cleaved, I*) forms of the inhibitor. The pH dependence of K(hyd) can be explained in terms of a pH-independent term, K(hyd) degrees, plus the proton dissociation constants of the newly formed amino and carboxylate groups at the cleavage site. Two protein inhibitors that differ from one another by a single residue substitution have been found to have K(hyd) degrees values that differ by a factor of 5 [Ardelt, W., and Laskowski, M., Jr. (1991) J. Mol. Biol. 220, 1041-1052]: turkey ovomucoid third domain (OMTKY3) has K(hyd) degrees = 1.0, and Indian peafowl ovomucoid third domain (OMIPF3), which differs from OMTKY3 by the substitution P(2)'-Tyr(20)His, has K(hyd) degrees = 5.15. What mechanism is responsible for this small difference? Is it structural (enthalpic) or dynamic (entropic)? Does the mutation affect the free energy of the I state, the I* state, or both? We have addressed these questions through NMR investigations of the I and I forms of OMTKY3 and OMIPF3. Information about structure was derived from measurements of NMR chemical shift changes and trans-hydrogen-bond J-couplings; information about dynamics was obtained through measurements of (15)N relaxation rates and (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear NOEs with model-free analysis of the results. Although the I forms of each variant are more dynamic than the corresponding I forms, the study revealed no appreciable difference in the backbone dynamics of either intact inhibitor (OMIPF3 vs OMTKY3) or modified inhibitor (OMIPF3* vs OMTKY3*). Instead, changes in chemical shifts and trans-hydrogen-bond J-couplings suggested that the K(hyd) degrees difference arises from

  19. Comparison of Backbone Modification in Protein β-Sheets by α→γ Residue Replacement and α-Residue Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Lengyel, George A.; Reinert, Zachary E.; Griffith, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    The mimicry of protein tertiary structure by oligomers with unnatural backbones is a significant contemporary research challenge. Among common elements of secondary structure found in natural proteins, sheets have proven the most difficult to address. Here, we report the systematic comparison of different strategies for peptide backbone modification in β-sheets with the goal of identifying the best method for replacing a multi-stranded sheet in a protein tertiary fold. The most effective sheet modifications examined lead to native-like tertiary folding behavior with thermodynamic fold stability comparable to the prototype protein on which the modified backbones are based. PMID:24909436

  20. Reduced dimensionality (4,3)D-hnCOCANH experiment: an efficient backbone assignment tool for NMR studies of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-09-01

    Sequence specific resonance assignment of proteins forms the basis for variety of structural and functional proteomics studies by NMR. In this context, an efficient standalone method for rapid assignment of backbone ((1)H, (15)N, (13)C(α) and (13)C') resonances of proteins has been presented here. Compared to currently available strategies used for the purpose, the method employs only a single reduced dimensionality experiment--(4,3)D-hnCOCANH and exploits the linear combinations of backbone ((13)C(α) and (13)C') chemical shifts to achieve a dispersion relatively better compared to those of individual chemical shifts (see the text). The resulted increased dispersion of peaks--which is different in sum (CA + CO) and difference (CA - CO) frequency regions--greatly facilitates the analysis of the spectrum by resolving the problems (associated with routine assignment strategies) arising because of degenerate amide (15)N and backbone (13)C chemical shifts. Further, the spectrum provides direct distinction between intra- and inter-residue correlations because of their opposite peak signs. The other beneficial feature of the spectrum is that it provides: (a) multiple unidirectional sequential (i→i + 1) (15)N and (13)C correlations and (b) facile identification of certain specific triplet sequences which serve as check points for mapping the stretches of sequentially connected HSQC cross peaks on to the primary sequence for assigning the resonances sequence specifically. On top of all this, the F₂-F₃ planes of the spectrum corresponding to sum (CA + CO) and difference (CA - CO) chemical shifts enable rapid and unambiguous identification of sequential HSQC peaks through matching their coordinates in these two planes (see the text). Overall, the experiment presented here will serve as an important backbone assignment tool for variety of structural and functional proteomics and drug discovery research programs by NMR involving well behaved small folded proteins (MW

  1. Improving prediction of secondary structure, local backbone angles, and solvent accessible surface area of proteins by iterative deep learning

    PubMed Central

    Heffernan, Rhys; Paliwal, Kuldip; Lyons, James; Dehzangi, Abdollah; Sharma, Alok; Wang, Jihua; Sattar, Abdul; Yang, Yuedong; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2015-01-01

    Direct prediction of protein structure from sequence is a challenging problem. An effective approach is to break it up into independent sub-problems. These sub-problems such as prediction of protein secondary structure can then be solved independently. In a previous study, we found that an iterative use of predicted secondary structure and backbone torsion angles can further improve secondary structure and torsion angle prediction. In this study, we expand the iterative features to include solvent accessible surface area and backbone angles and dihedrals based on Cα atoms. By using a deep learning neural network in three iterations, we achieved 82% accuracy for secondary structure prediction, 0.76 for the correlation coefficient between predicted and actual solvent accessible surface area, 19° and 30° for mean absolute errors of backbone φ and ψ angles, respectively, and 8° and 32° for mean absolute errors of Cα-based θ and τ angles, respectively, for an independent test dataset of 1199 proteins. The accuracy of the method is slightly lower for 72 CASP 11 targets but much higher than those of model structures from current state-of-the-art techniques. This suggests the potentially beneficial use of these predicted properties for model assessment and ranking. PMID:26098304

  2. DNA Backbone BI/BII Distribution and Dynamics in E2 Protein-Bound Environment Determined by Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Robertson, James C; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2015-11-01

    BI and BII conformational substates in the DNA backbone typify canonical B-form DNA. The BI and BII substates are important for structural variation of DNA and have been implicated in protein-nucleic acid recognition mechanisms. Recent refinements have been made to nucleic acid force fields employed in molecular dynamics simulations that demonstrate a better ability to model the BI and BII states, leading to overall improved modeling of DNA structure and dynamics. These force field improvements have yet to be significantly demonstrated in the context of a protein-DNA system extended to long time scales. Our plan was to run molecular dynamics simulations of a well-studied protein-DNA system (E2-DNA) into the microsecond time scale and determine the ability of the force field to populate BII states in the DNA backbone consistent with dinucleotide steps crystallized in the BII conformation. The results showed that the dinucleotide steps in the E2-DNA complex with the highest BII populations from simulation trajectories corresponded to the dinucleotide steps crystallized in the BII state and that decoy BI and BII states converge to the same results within approximately one microsecond. PMID:26482568

  3. General order parameter based correlation analysis of protein backbone motions between experimental NMR relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qing; Shi, Chaowei; Yu, Lu; Zhang, Longhua; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Changlin

    2015-02-13

    Internal backbone dynamic motions are essential for different protein functions and occur on a wide range of time scales, from femtoseconds to seconds. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation measurements are valuable tools to gain access to fast (nanosecond) internal motions. However, there exist few reports on correlation analysis between MD and NMR relaxation data. Here, backbone relaxation measurements of {sup 15}N-labeled SH3 (Src homology 3) domain proteins in aqueous buffer were used to generate general order parameters (S{sup 2}) using a model-free approach. Simultaneously, 80 ns MD simulations of SH3 domain proteins in a defined hydrated box at neutral pH were conducted and the general order parameters (S{sup 2}) were derived from the MD trajectory. Correlation analysis using the Gromos force field indicated that S{sup 2} values from NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations were significantly different. MD simulations were performed on models with different charge states for three histidine residues, and with different water models, which were SPC (simple point charge) water model and SPC/E (extended simple point charge) water model. S{sup 2} parameters from MD simulations with charges for all three histidines and with the SPC/E water model correlated well with S{sup 2} calculated from the experimental NMR relaxation measurements, in a site-specific manner. - Highlights: • Correlation analysis between NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations. • General order parameter (S{sup 2}) as common reference between the two methods. • Different protein dynamics with different Histidine charge states in neutral pH. • Different protein dynamics with different water models.

  4. The backbone structure of the thermophilic Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis ribose binding protein is essentially identical to its mesophilic E. coli homolog

    PubMed Central

    Cuneo, Matthew J; Tian, Yaji; Allert, Malin; Hellinga, Homme W

    2008-01-01

    Background Comparison of experimentally determined mesophilic and thermophilic homologous protein structures is an important tool for understanding the mechanisms that contribute to thermal stability. Of particular interest are pairs of homologous structures that are structurally very similar, but differ significantly in thermal stability. Results We report the X-ray crystal structure of a Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis ribose binding protein (tteRBP) determined to 1.9 Å resolution. We find that tteRBP is significantly more stable (appTm value ~102°C) than the mesophilic Escherichia coli ribose binding protein (ecRBP) (appTm value ~56°C). The tteRBP has essentially the identical backbone conformation (0.41 Å RMSD of 235/271 Cα positions and 0.65 Å RMSD of 270/271 Cα positions) as ecRBP. Classification of the amino acid substitutions as a function of structure therefore allows the identification of amino acids which potentially contribute to the observed thermal stability of tteRBP in the absence of large structural heterogeneities. Conclusion The near identity of backbone structures of this pair of proteins entails that the significant differences in their thermal stabilities are encoded exclusively by the identity of the amino acid side-chains. Furthermore, the degree of sequence divergence is strongly correlated with structure; with a high degree of conservation in the core progressing to increased diversity in the boundary and surface regions. Different factors that may possibly contribute to thermal stability appear to be differentially encoded in each of these regions of the protein. The tteRBP/ecRBP pair therefore offers an opportunity to dissect contributions to thermal stability by side-chains alone in the absence of large structural differences. PMID:18373848

  5. General trends of dihedral conformational transitions in a globular protein.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yinglong; Baudry, Jerome; Smith, Jeremy C; McCammon, J Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Dihedral conformational transitions are analyzed systematically in a model globular protein, cytochrome P450cam, to examine their structural and chemical dependences through combined conventional molecular dynamics (cMD), accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) and adaptive biasing force (ABF) simulations. The aMD simulations are performed at two acceleration levels, using dihedral and dual boost, respectively. In comparison with cMD, aMD samples protein dihedral transitions approximately two times faster on average using dihedral boost, and ∼ 3.5 times faster using dual boost. In the protein backbone, significantly higher dihedral transition rates are observed in the bend, coil, and turn flexible regions, followed by the β bridge and β sheet, and then the helices. Moreover, protein side chains of greater length exhibit higher transition rates on average in the aMD-enhanced sampling. Side chains of the same length (particularly Nχ = 2) exhibit decreasing transition rates with residues when going from hydrophobic to polar, then charged and aromatic chemical types. The reduction of dihedral transition rates is found to be correlated with increasing energy barriers as identified through ABF free energy calculations. These general trends of dihedral conformational transitions provide important insights into the hierarchical dynamics and complex free energy landscapes of functional proteins. PMID:26799251

  6. The backbone structure of the thermophilic Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis ribose binding protein is essentially identical to its mesophilic E. coli homolog

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Matthew J.; Tian, Yaji; Allert, Malin; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2008-10-27

    We report the X-ray crystal structure of a Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis ribose binding protein (tteRBP) determined to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. We find that tteRBP is significantly more stable ({sup app}T{sub m} value {approx} 102 C) than the mesophilic Escherichia coli ribose binding protein (ecRBP) ({sup app}T{sub m} value {approx} 56 C). The tteRBP has essentially the identical backbone conformation (0.41 {angstrom} RMSD of 235/271 C{sub {alpha}} positions and 0.65 {angstrom} RMSD of 270/271 C{sub {alpha}} positions) as ecRBP. Classification of the amino acid substitutions as a function of structure therefore allows the identification of amino acids which potentially contribute to the observed thermal stability of tteRBP in the absence of large structural heterogeneities.

  7. A HAUSDORFF-BASED NOE ASSIGNMENT ALGORITHM USING PROTEIN BACKBONE DETERMINED FROM RESIDUAL DIPOLAR COUPLINGS AND ROTAMER PATTERNS

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jianyang (Michael); Tripathy, Chittaranjan; Zhou, Pei; Donald, Bruce R.

    2008-01-01

    High-throughput structure determination based on solution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy plays an important role in structural genomics. One of the main bottlenecks in NMR structure determination is the interpretation of NMR data to obtain a sufficient number of accurate distance restraints by assigning nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) spectral peaks to pairs of protons. The difficulty in automated NOE assignment mainly lies in the ambiguities arising both from the resonance degeneracy of chemical shifts and from the uncertainty due to experimental errors in NOE peak positions. In this paper we present a novel NOE assignment algorithm, called HAusdorff-based NOE Assignment (HANA), that starts with a high-resolution protein backbone computed using only two residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) per residue37, 39, employs a Hausdorff-based pattern matching technique to deduce similarity between experimental and back-computed NOE spectra for each rotamer from a statistically diverse library, and drives the selection of optimal position-specific rotamers for filtering ambiguous NOE assignments. Our algorithm runs in time O(tn3 +tn log t), where t is the maximum number of rotamers per residue and n is the size of the protein. Application of our algorithm on biological NMR data for three proteins, namely, human ubiquitin, the zinc finger domain of the human DNA Y-polymerase Eta (pol η) and the human Set2-Rpb1 interacting domain (hSRI) demonstrates that our algorithm overcomes spectral noise to achieve more than 90% assignment accuracy. Additionally, the final structures calculated using our automated NOE assignments have backbone RMSD < 1.7 Å and all-heavy-atom RMSD < 2.5 Å from reference structures that were determined either by X-ray crystallography or traditional NMR approaches. These results show that our NOE assignment algorithm can be successfully applied to protein NMR spectra to obtain high-quality structures. PMID:19122773

  8. Backbone upgrades and DEC equipment replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vancamp, Warren

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Science Internet (NSI) dual protocol backbone is outlined. It includes DECnet link upgrades to match TCP/IP link performance. It also includes the integration of backbone resources and central management. The phase 1 transition process is outlined.

  9. Insight into a molecular interaction force supporting peptide backbones and its implication to protein loops and folding.

    PubMed

    Du, Qi-Shi; Chen, Dong; Xie, Neng-Zhong; Huang, Ri-Bo; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2015-09-01

    Although not being classified as the most fundamental protein structural elements like α-helices and β-strands, the loop segment may play considerable roles for protein stability, flexibility, and dynamic activity. Meanwhile, the protein loop is also quite elusive; i.e. its interactions with the other parts of protein as well as its own shape-maintaining forces have still remained as a puzzle or at least not quite clear yet. Here, we report a molecular force, the so-called polar hydrogen-π interaction (Hp-π), which may play an important role in supporting the backbones of protein loops. By conducting the potential energy surface scanning calculations on the quasi π-plane of peptide bond unit, we have observed the following intriguing phenomena: (1) when the polar hydrogen atom of a peptide unit is perpendicularly pointing to the π-plane of other peptide bond units, a remarkable Hp-π interaction occurs; (2) the interaction is distance and orientation dependent, acting in a broad space, and belonging to the 'point-to-plane' one. The molecular force reported here may provide useful interaction concepts and insights into better understanding the loop's unique stability and flexibility feature, as well as the driving force of the protein global folding. PMID:25375237

  10. Insight into a molecular interaction force supporting peptide backbones and its implication to protein loops and folding

    PubMed Central

    Du, Qi-Shi; Chen, Dong; Xie, Neng-Zhong; Huang, Ri-Bo; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Although not being classified as the most fundamental protein structural elements like α-helices and β-strands, the loop segment may play considerable roles for protein stability, flexibility, and dynamic activity. Meanwhile, the protein loop is also quite elusive; i.e. its interactions with the other parts of protein as well as its own shape-maintaining forces have still remained as a puzzle or at least not quite clear yet. Here, we report a molecular force, the so-called polar hydrogen–π interaction (Hp–π), which may play an important role in supporting the backbones of protein loops. By conducting the potential energy surface scanning calculations on the quasi π-plane of peptide bond unit, we have observed the following intriguing phenomena: (1) when the polar hydrogen atom of a peptide unit is perpendicularly pointing to the π-plane of other peptide bond units, a remarkable Hp–π interaction occurs; (2) the interaction is distance and orientation dependent, acting in a broad space, and belonging to the ‘point-to-plane’ one. The molecular force reported here may provide useful interaction concepts and insights into better understanding the loop’s unique stability and flexibility feature, as well as the driving force of the protein global folding. PMID:25375237

  11. Toward quantification of protein backbone–backbone hydrogen bonding energies: An energetic analysis of an amide-to-ester mutation in an α-helix within a protein

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jianmin; Kelly, Jeffery W.

    2008-01-01

    Amide-to-ester backbone mutagenesis enables a specific backbone–backbone hydrogen bond (H-bond) in a protein to be eliminated in order to quantify its energetic contribution to protein folding. To extract a H-bonding free energy from an amide-to-ester perturbation free energy (ΔG folding,wt − ΔG folding,mut), it is necessary to correct for the putative introduction of a lone pair–lone pair electrostatic repulsion, as well as for the transfer free energy differences that may arise between the all amide sequence and the predominantly amide sequence harboring an ester bond. Mutation of the 9–10 amide bond within the V9F variant of the predominantly helical villin headpiece subdomain (HP35) to an ester or an E-olefin backbone bond results in a less stable but defined wild-type fold, an attribute required for this study. Comparing the folding free energies of the ester and E-olefin mutants, with correction for the desolvation free energy differences (ester and E-olefin) and the loss of an n-to-π* interaction (E-olefin), yields an experimentally based estimate of +0.4 kcal/mol for the O–O repulsion energy in an α-helical context, analogous to our previous experimentally based estimate of the O–O repulsion free energy in the context of a β-sheet. The small O–O repulsion energy indicates that amide-to-ester perturbation free energies can largely be attributed to the deletion of the backbone H-bonds after correction for desolvation differences. Quantitative evaluation of H-bonding in an α-helix should now be possible, an important step toward deciphering the balance of forces that enable spontaneous protein folding. PMID:18434500

  12. A Network Flow Approach to Predict Protein Targets and Flavonoid Backbones to Treat Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Poloni, Joice de Faria; Saraiva Macedo Timmers, Luis Fernando; Bonatto, Diego; Condessa Pitrez, Paulo Márcio; Tetelbom Stein, Renato

    2015-01-01

    Background. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is the major cause of respiratory disease in lower respiratory tract in infants and young children. Attempts to develop effective vaccines or pharmacological treatments to inhibit RSV infection without undesired effects on human health have been unsuccessful. However, RSV infection has been reported to be affected by flavonoids. The mechanisms underlying viral inhibition induced by these compounds are largely unknown, making the development of new drugs difficult. Methods. To understand the mechanisms induced by flavonoids to inhibit RSV infection, a systems pharmacology-based study was performed using microarray data from primary culture of human bronchial cells infected by RSV, together with compound-proteomic interaction data available for Homo sapiens. Results. After an initial evaluation of 26 flavonoids, 5 compounds (resveratrol, quercetin, myricetin, apigenin, and tricetin) were identified through topological analysis of a major chemical-protein (CP) and protein-protein interacting (PPI) network. In a nonclustered form, these flavonoids regulate directly the activity of two protein bottlenecks involved in inflammation and apoptosis. Conclusions. Our findings may potentially help uncovering mechanisms of action of early RSV infection and provide chemical backbones and their protein targets in the difficult quest to develop new effective drugs. PMID:25879022

  13. Isolation of the protein backbone of an arabinogalactan-protein from the styles of Nicotiana alata and characterization of a corresponding cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Du, H; Simpson, R J; Moritz, R L; Clarke, A E; Bacic, A

    1994-01-01

    Arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs) from the styles of Nicotiana alata were isolated by ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. After deglycosylation by anhydrous hydrogen fluoride, the protein backbones were fractionated by reversed-phase HPLC. One of the protein backbones, containing mainly hydroxyproline, alanine, and serine residues (53% of total residues), was digested with proteases, and the peptides were isolated and sequenced. This sequence information allowed the cloning of a 712-bp cDNA, AGPNa1. AGPNa1 encodes a 132-amino acid protein with three domains: an N-terminal secretion signal sequence, which is cleaved from the mature protein; a central sequence, which contains most of the hydroxyproline/proline residues; and a C-terminal hydrophobic region. AGPNa1 is expressed in many tissues of N. alata and related species. The arrangement of domains and amino acid composition of the AGP encoded by AGPNa1 are similar to that of an AGP from pear cell suspension culture filtrate, although the only sequence identity is at the N termini of the mature proteins. PMID:7827496

  14. Bayesian probabilistic approach for predicting backbone structures in terms of protein blocks.

    PubMed

    de Brevern, A G; Etchebest, C; Hazout, S

    2000-11-15

    By using an unsupervised cluster analyzer, we have identified a local structural alphabet composed of 16 folding patterns of five consecutive C(alpha) ("protein blocks"). The dependence that exists between successive blocks is explicitly taken into account. A Bayesian approach based on the relation protein block-amino acid propensity is used for prediction and leads to a success rate close to 35%. Sharing sequence windows associated with certain blocks into "sequence families" improves the prediction accuracy by 6%. This prediction accuracy exceeds 75% when keeping the first four predicted protein blocks at each site of the protein. In addition, two different strategies are proposed: the first one defines the number of protein blocks in each site needed for respecting a user-fixed prediction accuracy, and alternatively, the second one defines the different protein sites to be predicted with a user-fixed number of blocks and a chosen accuracy. This last strategy applied to the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme (alpha/beta protein) shows that 91% of the sites may be predicted with a prediction accuracy larger than 77% considering only three blocks per site. The prediction strategies proposed improve our knowledge about sequence-structure dependence and should be very useful in ab initio protein modelling. PMID:11025540

  15. Genetically encoded multispectral labeling of proteins with polyfluorophores on a DNA backbone.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay; Wang, Shenliang; Kool, Eric T

    2013-04-24

    Genetically encoded methods for protein conjugation are of high importance as biological tools. Here we describe the development of a new class of dyes for genetically encoded tagging that add new capabilities for protein reporting and detection via HaloTag methodology. Oligodeoxyfluorosides (ODFs) are short DNA-like oligomers in which the natural nucleic acid bases are replaced by interacting fluorescent chromophores, yielding a broad range of emission colors using a single excitation wavelength. We describe the development of an alkyl halide dehalogenase-compatible chloroalkane linker phosphoramidite derivative that enables the rapid automated synthesis of many possible dyes for protein conjugation. Experiments to test the enzymatic self-conjugation of nine different DNA-like dyes to proteins with HaloTag domains in vitro were performed, and the data confirmed the rapid and efficient covalent labeling of the proteins. Notably, a number of the ODF dyes were found to increase in brightness or change color upon protein conjugation. Tests in mammalian cellular settings revealed that the dyes are functional in multiple cellular contexts, both on the cell surface and within the cytoplasm, allowing protein localization to be imaged in live cells by epifluorescence and laser confocal microscopy. PMID:23590213

  16. Prediction of Mutational Tolerance in HIV-1 Protease and Reverse Transcriptase Using Flexible Backbone Protein Design

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Rocco; Ó Conchúir, Shane; Kortemme, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Predicting which mutations proteins tolerate while maintaining their structure and function has important applications for modeling fundamental properties of proteins and their evolution; it also drives progress in protein design. Here we develop a computational model to predict the tolerated sequence space of HIV-1 protease reachable by single mutations. We assess the model by comparison to the observed variability in more than 50,000 HIV-1 protease sequences, one of the most comprehensive datasets on tolerated sequence space. We then extend the model to a second protein, reverse transcriptase. The model integrates multiple structural and functional constraints acting on a protein and uses ensembles of protein conformations. We find the model correctly captures a considerable fraction of protease and reverse-transcriptase mutational tolerance and shows comparable accuracy using either experimentally determined or computationally generated structural ensembles. Predictions of tolerated sequence space afforded by the model provide insights into stability-function tradeoffs in the emergence of resistance mutations and into strengths and limitations of the computational model. PMID:22927804

  17. High Accuracy of Karplus Equations for Relating Three-Bond J Couplings to Protein Backbone Torsion Angles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fang; Lee, Jung Ho; Grishaev, Alexander; Ying, Jinfa; Bax, Ad

    2015-01-01

    3JC′C′ and 3JHNHα couplings are related to the intervening backbone torsion angle ϕ by standard Karplus equations. Although these couplings are known to be affected by parameters other than ϕ, including H-bonding, valence angles and residue type, experimental results and quantum calculations indicate that the impact of these latter parameters is typically very small. The solution NMR structure of protein GB3, newly refined by using extensive sets of residual dipolar couplings (RDCs), yields 50–60% better Karplus equation agreement between ϕ angles and experimental 3JC′C′ and 3JHNHα values than does the high resolution X-ray structure. In intrinsically disordered proteins, 3JC′C′ and 3JHNHα couplings can be measured at even higher accuracy, and the impact of factors other than the intervening torsion angle on 3J will be smaller than in folded proteins, making these couplings exceptionally valuable reporters on the ensemble of ϕ angles sampled by each residue. PMID:25511552

  18. Independent Metrics for Protein Backbone and Side-Chain Flexibility: Time Scales and Effects of Ligand Binding.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Julian E; Waldner, Birgit J; Huber, Roland G; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Kramer, Christian; Liedl, Klaus R

    2015-03-10

    Conformational dynamics are central for understanding biomolecular structure and function, since biological macromolecules are inherently flexible at room temperature and in solution. Computational methods are nowadays capable of providing valuable information on the conformational ensembles of biomolecules. However, analysis tools and intuitive metrics that capture dynamic information from in silico generated structural ensembles are limited. In standard work-flows, flexibility in a conformational ensemble is represented through residue-wise root-mean-square fluctuations or B-factors following a global alignment. Consequently, these approaches relying on global alignments discard valuable information on local dynamics. Results inherently depend on global flexibility, residue size, and connectivity. In this study we present a novel approach for capturing positional fluctuations based on multiple local alignments instead of one single global alignment. The method captures local dynamics within a structural ensemble independent of residue type by splitting individual local and global degrees of freedom of protein backbone and side-chains. Dependence on residue type and size in the side-chains is removed via normalization with the B-factors of the isolated residue. As a test case, we demonstrate its application to a molecular dynamics simulation of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) on the millisecond time scale. This allows for illustrating different time scales of backbone and side-chain flexibility. Additionally, we demonstrate the effects of ligand binding on side-chain flexibility of three serine proteases. We expect our new methodology for quantifying local flexibility to be helpful in unraveling local changes in biomolecular dynamics. PMID:26579739

  19. HMM-based prediction for protein structural motifs' two local properties: solvent accessibility and backbone torsion angles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jianyong; Xiang, Leijun; Hong, Jiang; Zhang, Weidong

    2013-02-01

    Protein structure prediction is often assisted by predicting one-dimensional structural properties including relative solvent accessibility (RSA) surface and backbone torsion angles (BTA) of residues, and these two properties are continuously varying variables because proteins can move freely in a three-dimensional space. Instead of subdividing them into a few arbitrarily defined states that many popular approaches used, this paper proposes an integrated system for realvalue prediction of protein structural motifs' two local properties, based on the modified Hidden Markov Model that we previously presented. The model was used to capture the relevance of RSA and the dependency of BTA between adjacent residues along the local protein chain in motifs with definite probabilities. These two properties were predicted according to their own probability distribution. The method was applied to a protein fragment library. For nine different classes of motifs, real values of RSA were predicted with mean absolute error (MAE) of 0.122-0.175 and Pearson's correlation coefficient (PCC) of 0.623-0.714 between predicted and actual RSA. Meanwhile, real values of BTA were obtained with MAE of 8.5⁰-29.4⁰ for Φ angles, 11.2⁰-38.5⁰ for ψ angles and PCC of 0.601-0.716 for Φ, 0.597-0.713 for ψ. The results were compared with well-known Real-SPINE Server, and indicate the proposed method may at least serve as the foundation to obtain better local properties from structural motifs for protein structure prediction. PMID:22894152

  20. (4,2)D Projection--reconstruction experiments for protein backbone assignment: application to human carbonic anhydrase II and calbindin D(28K).

    PubMed

    Venters, Ronald A; Coggins, Brian E; Kojetin, Doug; Cavanagh, John; Zhou, Pei

    2005-06-22

    Projection-reconstruction NMR experiments have been shown to significantly reduce the acquisition time required to obtain protein backbone assignment data. To date, this concept has only been applied to smaller (15)N/(13)C-labeled proteins. Here, we show that projection-reconstruction NMR techniques can be extended to larger protonated and perdeuterated proteins. We present a suite of (4,2)D triple-resonance experiments for protein backbone assignment and a Hybrid Backprojection/Lower-Value algorithm for reconstructing data with relatively weak signal-to-noise ratios. In addition, we propose a sampling theorem and discuss its implication on the choice of projection angles. We demonstrate the efficacy of this approach using the 29 kDa protein, human carbonic anhydrase II and the 30 kDa protein, calbindin D(28K). PMID:15954785

  1. Assessing protein conformational sampling methods based on bivariate lag-distributions of backbone angles

    PubMed Central

    Maadooliat, Mehdi; Huang, Jianhua Z.

    2013-01-01

    Despite considerable progress in the past decades, protein structure prediction remains one of the major unsolved problems in computational biology. Angular-sampling-based methods have been extensively studied recently due to their ability to capture the continuous conformational space of protein structures. The literature has focused on using a variety of parametric models of the sequential dependencies between angle pairs along the protein chains. In this article, we present a thorough review of angular-sampling-based methods by assessing three main questions: What is the best distribution type to model the protein angles? What is a reasonable number of components in a mixture model that should be considered to accurately parameterize the joint distribution of the angles? and What is the order of the local sequence–structure dependency that should be considered by a prediction method? We assess the model fits for different methods using bivariate lag-distributions of the dihedral/planar angles. Moreover, the main information across the lags can be extracted using a technique called Lag singular value decomposition (LagSVD), which considers the joint distribution of the dihedral/planar angles over different lags using a nonparametric approach and monitors the behavior of the lag-distribution of the angles using singular value decomposition. As a result, we developed graphical tools and numerical measurements to compare and evaluate the performance of different model fits. Furthermore, we developed a web-tool (http://www.stat.tamu.edu/∼madoliat/LagSVD) that can be used to produce informative animations. PMID:22926831

  2. Synthesis and in vitro antioxidant functions of protein hydrolysate from backbones of Rastrelliger kanagurta by proteolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sheriff, Sheik Abdulazeez; Sundaram, Balasubramanian; Ramamoorthy, Baranitharan; Ponnusamy, Ponmurugan

    2014-01-01

    Every year, a huge quantity of fishery wastes and by-products are generated by fish processing industries. These wastes are either underutilized to produce low market value products or dumped leading to environmental issues. Complete utilization of fishery wastes for recovering value added products would be beneficial to the society and individual. The fish protein hydrolysates and derived peptides of fishery resources are widely used as nutritional supplements, functional ingredients, and flavor enhancers in food, beverage and pharmaceutical industries. Antioxidants from fishery resources have attracted the attention of researchers as they are cheaper in cost, easy to derive, and do not have side effects. Thus the present investigation was designed to produce protein hydrolysate by pepsin and papain digestion from the backbones of Rastrelliger kanagurta (Indian mackerel) and evaluate its antioxidant properties through various in vitro assays. The results reveal that both hydrolysates are potent antioxidants, capable of scavenging 46% and 36% of DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2 picrylhydrazyl) and 58.5% and 37.54% of superoxide radicals respectively. The hydrolysates exhibit significant (p < 0.05) reducing power and lipid peroxidation inhibition. Among the two hydrolysates produced, pepsin derived fraction is superior than papain derived fraction in terms of yield, DH (Degree of hydrolysis), and antioxidant activity. PMID:24596496

  3. Synthesis and in vitro antioxidant functions of protein hydrolysate from backbones of Rastrelliger kanagurta by proteolytic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Sheriff, Sheik Abdulazeez; Sundaram, Balasubramanian; Ramamoorthy, Baranitharan; Ponnusamy, Ponmurugan

    2013-01-01

    Every year, a huge quantity of fishery wastes and by-products are generated by fish processing industries. These wastes are either underutilized to produce low market value products or dumped leading to environmental issues. Complete utilization of fishery wastes for recovering value added products would be beneficial to the society and individual. The fish protein hydrolysates and derived peptides of fishery resources are widely used as nutritional supplements, functional ingredients, and flavor enhancers in food, beverage and pharmaceutical industries. Antioxidants from fishery resources have attracted the attention of researchers as they are cheaper in cost, easy to derive, and do not have side effects. Thus the present investigation was designed to produce protein hydrolysate by pepsin and papain digestion from the backbones of Rastrelliger kanagurta (Indian mackerel) and evaluate its antioxidant properties through various in vitro assays. The results reveal that both hydrolysates are potent antioxidants, capable of scavenging 46% and 36% of DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2 picrylhydrazyl) and 58.5% and 37.54% of superoxide radicals respectively. The hydrolysates exhibit significant (p < 0.05) reducing power and lipid peroxidation inhibition. Among the two hydrolysates produced, pepsin derived fraction is superior than papain derived fraction in terms of yield, DH (Degree of hydrolysis), and antioxidant activity. PMID:24596496

  4. Role of enzyme-peptide substrate backbone hydrogen bonding in determining protein kinase substrate specificities.

    PubMed

    Thomas, N E; Bramson, H N; Miller, W T; Kaiser, E T

    1987-07-14

    As part of a search for peptides that have specificity for selected protein kinases, the possibility that adenosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate dependent protein kinase (A-kinase) recognizes the hydrogen-bonding potential of its peptide substrates was investigated. A-Kinase catalyzes the phosphorylation of five N alpha-methylated and four depsipeptide derivatives of Leu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Ser-Leu-Gly (peptide 1) at rates that differ by at least 7 orders of magnitude. These peptide 1 analogues each lack the ability to donate a hydrogen bond at selected positions in the peptide chain. If a particular amide hydrogen of a peptide amide is involved in hydrogen bonding, which is important for enzyme recognition, the prediction is that peptides which contain an ester or a N-methylated bond at that position in peptide 1 will be comparatively poor substrates. In contrast, if a depsipeptide has a reactivity comparable to that of peptide 1 but the analogous N-methylated peptide has a poor reactivity with A-kinase, the result might indicate that the N-methyl group causes unfavorable steric effects. The depsipeptide that lacks a Leu6 amide proton is a good substrate for A-kinase, but the corresponding N-methylated peptide is phosphorylated far less efficiently. This result and others presented in this paper suggest that although enzyme-substrate hydrogen bonding may play some role in A-kinase catalysis of phosphoryl group transfer, other explanations are necessary to account for the relative reactivities of N alpha-methylated and depsi-containing peptide 1 analogues.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3663600

  5. Amplitudes of protein backbone dynamics and correlated motions in a small alpha/beta protein: correspondence of dipolar coupling and heteronuclear relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Clore, G Marius; Schwieters, Charles D

    2004-08-24

    Backbone residual dipolar coupling (N-H, Calpha-Halpha, N-C', and Calpha-C') data collected in five different media on the B3 IgG binding domain of streptococcal protein G (GB3) have been analyzed by simultaneous refinement of the coordinates and optimization of the magnitudes and orientations of the alignment tensors using single and multiple structure representations. We show, using appropriate error analysis, that agreement between observed and calculated dipolar couplings at the level of experimental uncertainty is obtained with a two-structure (N(e) = 2) ensemble representation which represents the simplest equilibrium description of anisotropic motions. The data permit one to determine the magnitude of the anisotropic motions along the four different backbone bond vectors in terms of order parameters. The order parameters, , for the N-H bond vectors are in qualitative agreement with the generalized order parameters, S(2)NH(relaxation), derived from (15)N relaxation measurements, with a correlation coefficient of 0.84. S(2)NH(relaxation) can be regarded as the product of an anisotropic order parameter, corresponding to derived from the residual dipolar couplings, and an axially symmetric order parameter, S(2)NH(axial), corresponding to bond librations which are expected to be essentially uniform along the polypeptide chain. The current data indicate that the average value of S(2)NH(axial) is approximately 0.9. The close correspondence of and S(2)NH(relaxation) indicates that any large-scale displacements from the mean coordinate positions on time scales longer than the rotational correlation time are rare and hence do not perturb the observed dipolar couplings. Analysis of a set of 100 N(e) = 2 ensembles reveals the presence of some long-range correlated motions of N-H and Calpha-Halpha vectors involving residues far apart in the sequence but close together in space. In addition, direct evidence is

  6. Drug screening strategy for human membrane proteins: from NMR protein backbone structure to in silica- and NMR-screened hits.

    PubMed

    Lindert, Steffen; Maslennikov, Innokentiy; Chiu, Ellis J C; Pierce, Levi C; McCammon, J Andrew; Choe, Senyon

    2014-03-21

    About 8000 genes encode membrane proteins in the human genome. The information about their druggability will be very useful to facilitate drug discovery and development. The main problem, however, consists of limited structural and functional information about these proteins because they are difficult to produce biochemically and to study. In this paper we describe the strategy that combines Cell-free protein expression, NMR spectroscopy, and molecular DYnamics simulation (CNDY) techniques. Results of a pilot CNDY experiment provide us with a guiding light towards expedited identification of the hit compounds against a new uncharacterized membrane protein as a potentially druggable target. These hits can then be further characterized and optimized to develop the initial lead compound quicker. We illustrate such "omics" approach for drug discovery with the CNDY strategy applied to two example proteins: hypoxia-induced genes HIGD1A and HIGD1B. PMID:24525125

  7. Graft copolymer composed of cationic backbone and bottle brush-like side chains as a physically adsorbed coating for protein separation by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dan; Xiang, Lina; Zeng, Rongju; Cao, Fuhu; Zhu, Xiaoxi; Wang, Yanmei

    2011-12-01

    To stabilize electroosmotic flow (EOF) and suppress protein adsorption onto the silica capillary inner wall, a cationic hydroxyethylcellulose-graft-poly (poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (cat-HEC-g-PPEGMA) graft copolymer composed of cationic backbone and bottle brush-like side chains was synthesized for the first time and used as a novel physically adsorbed coating for protein separation by capillary electrophoresis. Reversed (anodal) and very stable EOF was obtained in cat-HEC-g-PPEGMA-coated capillary at pH 2.2-7.8. The effects of degree of cationization, PEGMA grafting ratio, PEGMA molecular mass, and buffer pH on the separation of basic proteins were investigated. A systematic comparative study of protein separation in bare and HEC-coated capillaries and in cat-HEC-g-PPEGMA-coated capillary was also performed. The basic proteins can be well separated in cat-HEC-g-PPEGMA-coated capillary over the pH range of 2.8-6.8 with good repeatability and high separation efficiency, because the coating combines good protein-resistant property of bottle brush-like PPEGMA side chains with excellent coating ability of cat-HEC backbone. Besides its success in separation of basic proteins, the cat-HEC-g-PPEGMA coating was also superior in the fast separation of other protein samples, such as protein mixture, egg white, and saliva, which indicates that it is a promising coating for further proteomics analysis. PMID:22038787

  8. Improving the prediction accuracy of residue solvent accessibility and real-value backbone torsion angles of proteins by guided-learning through a two-layer neural network

    PubMed Central

    Faraggi, Eshel; Xue, Bin; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2008-01-01

    This paper attempts to increase the prediction accuracy of residue solvent accessibility and real-value backbone torsion angles of proteins through improved learning. Most methods developed for improving the backpropagation algorithm of artificial neural networks are limited to small neural networks. Here, we introduce a guided-learning method suitable for networks of any size. The method employs a part of the weights for guiding and the other part for training and optimization. We demonstrate this technique by predicting residue solvent accessibility and real-value backbone torsion angles of proteins. In this application, the guiding factor is designed to satisfy the intuitive condition that for most residues, the contribution of a residue to the structural properties of another residue is smaller for greater separation in the protein-sequence distance between the two residues. We show that the guided-learning method makes a 2-4% reduction in ten-fold cross-validated mean absolute errors (MAE) for predicting residue solvent accessibility and backbone torsion angles, regardless of the size of database, the number of hidden layers and the size of input windows. This together with introduction of two-layer neural network with a bipolar activation function leads to a new method that has a MAE of 0.11 for residue solvent accessibility, 36° for ψ, and 22° for ϕ. The method is available as a Real-SPINE 3.0 server in http://sparks.informatics.iupui.edu. PMID:18704931

  9. A maximum entropy approach to the study of residue-specific backbone angle distributions in α-synuclein, an intrinsically disordered protein

    PubMed Central

    Mantsyzov, Alexey B; Maltsev, Alexander S; Ying, Jinfa; Shen, Yang; Hummer, Gerhard; Bax, Ad

    2014-01-01

    α-Synuclein is an intrinsically disordered protein of 140 residues that switches to an α-helical conformation upon binding phospholipid membranes. We characterize its residue-specific backbone structure in free solution with a novel maximum entropy procedure that integrates an extensive set of NMR data. These data include intraresidue and sequential HN–Hα and HN–HN NOEs, values for 3JHNHα, 1JHαCα, 2JCαN, and 1JCαN, as well as chemical shifts of 15N, 13Cα, and 13C′ nuclei, which are sensitive to backbone torsion angles. Distributions of these torsion angles were identified that yield best agreement to the experimental data, while using an entropy term to minimize the deviation from statistical distributions seen in a large protein coil library. Results indicate that although at the individual residue level considerable deviations from the coil library distribution are seen, on average the fitted distributions agree fairly well with this library, yielding a moderate population (20–30%) of the PPII region and a somewhat higher population of the potentially aggregation-prone β region (20–40%) than seen in the database. A generally lower population of the αR region (10–20%) is found. Analysis of 1H–1H NOE data required consideration of the considerable backbone diffusion anisotropy of a disordered protein. PMID:24976112

  10. "Pinning strategy": a novel approach for predicting the backbone structure in terms of protein blocks from sequence.

    PubMed

    De Brevern, A G; Etchebest, C; Benros, C; Hazout, S

    2007-01-01

    The description of protein 3D structures can be performed through a library of 3D fragments, named a structural alphabet. Our structural alphabet is composed of 16 small protein fragments of 5 C alpha in length, called protein blocks (PBs). It allows an efficient approximation of the 3D protein structures and a correct prediction of the local structure. The 72 most frequent series of 5 consecutive PBs, called structural words (SWs)are able to cover more than 90% of the 3D structures. PBs are highly conditioned by the presence of a limited number of transitions between them. In this study, we propose a new method called "pinning strategy" that used this specific feature to predict long protein fragments. Its goal is to define highly probable successions of PBs. It starts from the most probable SW and is then extended with overlapping SWs. Starting from an initial prediction rate of 34.4%, the use of the SWs instead of the PBs allows a gain of 4.5%. The pinning strategy simply applied to the SWs increases the prediction accuracy to 39.9%. In a second step, the sequence-structure relationship is optimized, the prediction accuracy reaches 43.6%. PMID:17426380

  11. On the source of entropic elastomeric force in polypeptides and proteins: Backbone configurational vs. side-chain solvational entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, Chihao; Jaggard, J.; Harris, R.D.; Urry, D.W. )

    1989-01-01

    At physiological temperature in water, the relaxed state of the protein, elastin, and model elastomeric sequential polypeptides derived from this biological elastomer is the result of an inverse temperature transition. At lower temperatures, say at 20{degree}C, the hydrophobic side chains of the elastomers are hydrated with a low-entropy net of water. Following Flory and colleagues, thermoelasticity studies suggests that these polypeptide elastomers are dominantly entropic elastomers above the temperature of the inverse temperature transition. A central question becomes the source of the entropic elastomeric force. On stretching, hydrophobic side chains become exposed to water, resulting in an exothermic reaction of hydrophobic hydration. The issue addressed by the present report is whether this decrease in solvent entropy on stretching might make a major contribution to the entropic elastomeric restoring force. It has previously been argued that the free energy of solvation can be made very small by a 30% ethylene glycol (EG):70% water solvent mixture. This is demonstrated here using the repeating pentapeptide sequence of elastin (Val{sup 1}-Pro{sup 2}-Gly{sup 3} -Val{sup 4}-Gly{sup 5}){sub n} or poly(VPGVG) and its {gamma}-irradiation cross-linked elastomeric matrix. Differential scanning calorimetry of the inverse temperature transition of poly(VPGVG) shows the endothermic heat of the transition to become very small in EG/H{sub 2}O when compared with H{sub 2}O alone, which also indicates a very small entropy change for the transition on exposure of the hydrophobic side chains to the EG/H{sub 2}O solvent mixture. A similar result is found for the crosslinked elastomeric matrix. Significantly, however, in spite of the lower heats for hydrophobic solvation, the elastic modulus and the entropic elastomeric forces generated are greater in EG/H{sub 2}O.

  12. Grid-based backbone correction to the ff12SB protein force field for implicit-solvent simulations.

    PubMed

    Perez, Alberto; MacCallum, Justin L; Brini, Emiliano; Simmerling, Carlos; Dill, Ken A

    2015-10-13

    Force fields, such as Amber's ff12SB, can be fairly accurate models of the physical forces in proteins and other biomolecules. When coupled with accurate solvation models, force fields are able to bring insight into the conformational preferences, transitions, pathways, and free energies for these biomolecules. When computational speed/cost matters, implicit solvent is often used but at the cost of accuracy. We present an empirical grid-like correction term, in the spirit of cMAPs, to the combination of the ff12SB protein force field and the GBneck2 implicit-solvent model. Ff12SB-cMAP is parametrized on experimental helicity data. We provide validation on a set of peptides and proteins. Ff12SB-cMAP successfully improves the secondary structure biases observed in ff12SB + Gbneck2. Ff12SB-cMAP can be downloaded ( https://github.com/laufercenter/Amap.git ) and used within the Amber package. It can improve the agreement of force fields + implicit solvent with experiments. PMID:26574266

  13. A new approach to measuring protein backbone protection with high spatial resolution using H/D exchange and electron capture dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Abzalimov, Rinat R.; Bobst, Cedric E.; Kaltashov, Igor A.

    2013-01-01

    Inadequate spatial resolution remains one of the most serious limitations of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS), especially when applied to larger proteins (over 30 kDa). Supplementing proteolytic fragmentation of the protein in solution with ion dissociation in the gas phase has been used successfully by several groups to obtain near-residue level resolution. However, the restrictions imposed by the LC/MS/MS mode of operation on the data acquisition time frame makes it difficult in many cases to obtain signal-to-noise ratio adequate for reliable assignment of the backbone amide protection levels at individual residues. This restriction is lifted in the present work by eliminating the LC separation step from the workflow and taking advantage of the high resolving power and dynamic range of a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT ICR MS). A residue-level resolution is demonstrated for a peptic fragment of a 37 kDa recombinant protein (N-lobe of human serum transferrin) using electron-capture dissociation as an ion fragmentation tool. The absence of hydrogen scrambling in the gas phase prior to ion dissociation is verified using redundant HDX MS data generated by FT ICR MS. The backbone protection pattern generated by direct HDX MS/MS is in excellent agreement with the known crystal structure of the protein, but also provides information on conformational dynamics, which is not available from the static X-ray structure. PMID:23978257

  14. Backbone conformational flexibility of the lipid modified membrane anchor of the human N-Ras protein investigated by solid-state NMR and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Alexander; Reuther, Guido; Roark, Matthew B; Tan, Kui-Thong; Waldmann, Herbert; Feller, Scott E; Huster, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    The lipid modified human N-Ras protein, implicated in human cancer development, is of particular interest due to its membrane anchor that determines the activity and subcellular location of the protein. Previous solid-state NMR investigations indicated that this membrane anchor is highly dynamic, which may be indicative of backbone conformational flexibility. This article aims to address if a dynamic exchange between three structural models exist that had been determined previously. We applied a combination of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods and replica exchange molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using a Ras peptide that represents the terminal seven amino acids of the human N-Ras protein. Analysis of correlations between the conformations of individual amino acids revealed that Cys 181 and Met 182 undergo collective conformational exchange. Two major structures constituting about 60% of all conformations could be identified. The two conformations found in the simulation are in rapid exchange, which gives rise to low backbone order parameters and nuclear spin relaxation as measured by experimental NMR methods. These parameters were also determined from two 300 ns conventional MD simulations, providing very good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:19819220

  15. Reduced dimensionality tailored HN(C)N experiments for facile backbone resonance assignment of proteins through unambiguous identification of sequential HSQC peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-12-01

    Two novel reduced dimensionality (RD) tailored HN(C)N [S.C. Panchal, N.S. Bhavesh, R.V. Hosur, Improved 3D triple resonance experiments, HNN and HN(C)N, for HN and 15N sequential correlations in (13C, 15N) labeled proteins: application to unfolded proteins, J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147] experiments are proposed to facilitate the backbone resonance assignment of proteins both in terms of its accuracy and speed. These experiments - referred here as (4,3)D-hNCOcaNH and (4,3)D-hNcoCANH - exploit the linear combination of backbone 15N and 13C‧/13Cα chemical shifts simultaneously to achieve higher peak dispersion and randomness along their respective F1 dimensions. Simply, this has been achieved by modulating the backbone 15N(i) chemical shifts with that of 13C‧ (i - 1)/13Cα (i - 1) spins following the established reduced dimensionality NMR approach [T. Szyperski, D.C. Yeh, D.K. Sukumaran, H.N. Moseley, G.T. Montelione, Reduced-dimensionality NMR spectroscopy for high-throughput protein resonance assignment, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99 (2002) 8009-8014]. Though the modification is simple it has resulted an ingenious improvement of HN(C)N both in terms of peak dispersion and easiness of establishing the sequential connectivities. The increased dispersion along F1 dimension solves two purposes here: (i) resolves the ambiguities arising because of degenerate 15N chemical shifts and (ii) reduces the signal overlap in F2(15N)-F3(1H) planes (an important requisite in HN(C)N based assignment protocol for facile and unambiguous identification of sequentially connected HSQC peaks). The performance of both these experiments and the assignment protocol has been demonstrated using bovine apo Calbindin-d9k (75 aa) and urea denatured UNC60B (a 152 amino acid ADF/cofilin family protein of Caenorhabditis elegans), as representatives of folded and unfolded protein systems, respectively.

  16. Reduced dimensionality tailored HN(C)N experiments for facile backbone resonance assignment of proteins through unambiguous identification of sequential HSQC peaks.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-12-01

    Two novel reduced dimensionality (RD) tailored HN(C)N [S.C. Panchal, N.S. Bhavesh, R.V. Hosur, Improved 3D triple resonance experiments, HNN and HN(C)N, for HN and 15N sequential correlations in (13C, 15N) labeled proteins: application to unfolded proteins, J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147] experiments are proposed to facilitate the backbone resonance assignment of proteins both in terms of its accuracy and speed. These experiments - referred here as (4,3)D-hNCOcaNH and (4,3)D-hNcoCANH - exploit the linear combination of backbone (15)N and (13)C'/(13)C(α) chemical shifts simultaneously to achieve higher peak dispersion and randomness along their respective F1 dimensions. Simply, this has been achieved by modulating the backbone (15)N(i) chemical shifts with that of (13)C' (i-1)/(13)C(α) (i-1) spins following the established reduced dimensionality NMR approach [T. Szyperski, D.C. Yeh, D.K. Sukumaran, H.N. Moseley, G.T. Montelione, Reduced-dimensionality NMR spectroscopy for high-throughput protein resonance assignment, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99 (2002) 8009-8014]. Though the modification is simple it has resulted an ingenious improvement of HN(C)N both in terms of peak dispersion and easiness of establishing the sequential connectivities. The increased dispersion along F1 dimension solves two purposes here: (i) resolves the ambiguities arising because of degenerate (15)N chemical shifts and (ii) reduces the signal overlap in F2((15)N)-F3((1)H) planes (an important requisite in HN(C)N based assignment protocol for facile and unambiguous identification of sequentially connected HSQC peaks). The performance of both these experiments and the assignment protocol has been demonstrated using bovine apo Calbindin-d9k (75 aa) and urea denatured UNC60B (a 152 amino acid ADF/cofilin family protein of Caenorhabditis elegans), as representatives of folded and unfolded protein systems, respectively. PMID:24161682

  17. Proton-detected MAS NMR experiments based on dipolar transfers for backbone assignment of highly deuterated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2014-05-01

    Proton-detected solid-state NMR was applied to a highly deuterated insoluble, non-crystalline biological assembly, the Salmonella typhimurium type iii secretion system (T3SS) needle. Spectra of very high resolution and sensitivity were obtained at a low protonation level of 10-20% at exchangeable amide positions. We developed efficient experimental protocols for resonance assignment tailored for this system and the employed experimental conditions. Using exclusively dipolar-based interspin magnetization transfers, we recorded two sets of 3D spectra allowing for an almost complete backbone resonance assignment of the needle subunit PrgI. The additional information provided by the well-resolved proton dimension revealed the presence of two sets of resonances in the N-terminal helix of PrgI, while in previous studies employing 13C detection only a single set of resonances was observed.

  18. Backbone and Ile-δ1, Leu, Val Methyl 1H, 13C and 15N NMR chemical shift assignments for human interferon-stimulated gene 15 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Cuifeng; Aramini, James M.; Ma, LiChung; Cort, John R.; Swapna, G.V.T.; Krug, R. M.; Montelione, Gaetano

    2011-10-01

    Human interferon-stimulated gene 15 protein (ISG15), also called ubiquitin cross-reactive protein (UCRP), is the first identified ubiquitin-like protein containing two ubiquitin-like domains fused in tandem. The active form of ISG15 is conjugated to target proteins via the C-terminal glycine residue through an isopeptide bond in a manner similar to ubiquitin. The biological role of ISG15 is strongly associated with the modulation of cell immune function, and there is mounting evidence suggesting that many viral pathogens evade the host innate immune response by interfering with ISG15 conjugation to both host and viral proteins in a variety of ways. Here we report nearly complete backbone 1HN, 15N, 13CO, and 13Ca, as well as side chain 13Cb, methyl (Ile-d1, Leu, Val), amide (Asn, Gln), and indole NH (Trp) NMR resonance assignments for the 157-residue human ISG15 protein. These resonance assignments provide the basis for future structural and functional solution NMR studies of the biologically important human ISG15 protein.

  19. Insight into the factors influencing the backbone dynamics of three homologous proteins, dendrotoxins I and K, and BPTI: FTIR and time-resolved fluorescence investigations.

    PubMed

    Hollecker, Michelle; Vincent, Michel; Gallay, Jacques; Ruysschaert, Jean-Marie; Goormaghtigh, Erik

    2002-12-24

    Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, combined with hydrogen/deuterium exchange technique and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, has been used to investigate the changes in structure and dynamics that underlie the thermodynamic stability differences observed for three closely homologous proteins: dendrotoxins I and K, and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI). The experiments were performed on proteins under their native state and a modified form, obtained by selective reduction of a disulfide bond at the surface of the molecule, increasing slightly the backbone flexibility without changing the average structure. The data confirmed the high local as well as global rigidity of BPTI. In protein K, the exchange process was slow during the first 2 h of exchange, presumably reflecting a compact three-dimensional conformation, and then increased rapidly, the internal amide protons of the beta-strands exchanging 10-fold faster than in BPTI or protein I. The most probable destabilizing element was identified as Pro32, in the core of the beta-sheet. Protein I was found to present a 10% more expanded volume than protein K or BPTI, and there is a possible correlation between the resulting increased flexibility of the molecule and the lower thermodynamic stability observed for this protein. Interestingly, the interior amide protons of the beta-sheet structure were found to be as protected against exchange in protein I as in BPTI, suggesting that, although globally more flexible than that of Toxin K or BPTI, the structure of Toxin I could be locally quite rigid. The structural factors suspected to be responsible for the differences in internal flexibility of the two toxins could play a significant role in determining their functional properties. PMID:12484765

  20. RrgB321, a Fusion Protein of the Three Variants of the Pneumococcal Pilus Backbone RrgB, Is Protective In Vivo and Elicits Opsonic Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Harfouche, Carole; Filippini, Sara; Gianfaldoni, Claudia; Ruggiero, Paolo; Moschioni, Monica; Maccari, Silvia; Pancotto, Laura; Arcidiacono, Letizia; Galletti, Bruno; Censini, Stefano; Mori, Elena; Giuliani, Marzia; Facciotti, Claudia; Cartocci, Elena; Savino, Silvana; Doro, Francesco; Pallaoro, Michele; Nocadello, Salvatore; Mancuso, Giuseppe; Haston, Mitch; Goldblatt, David; Barocchi, Michèle A.; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae pilus 1 is present in 30 to 50% of invasive disease-causing strains and is composed of three subunits: the adhesin RrgA, the major backbone subunit RrgB, and the minor ancillary protein RrgC. RrgB exists in three distinct genetic variants and, when used to immunize mice, induces an immune response specific for each variant. To generate an antigen able to protect against the infection caused by all pilus-positive S. pneumoniae strains, we engineered a fusion protein containing the three RrgB variants (RrgB321). RrgB321 elicited antibodies against proteins from organisms in the three clades and protected mice against challenge with piliated pneumococcal strains. RrgB321 antisera mediated complement-dependent opsonophagocytosis of piliated strains at levels comparable to those achieved with the PCV7 glycoconjugate vaccine. These results suggest that a vaccine composed of RrgB321 has the potential to cover 30% or more of all pneumococcal strains and support the inclusion of this fusion protein in a multicomponent vaccine against S. pneumoniae. PMID:22083702

  1. Structural insights into the evolution of a sexy protein: novel topology and restricted backbone flexibility in a hypervariable pheromone from the red-legged salamander, Plethodon shermani.

    PubMed

    Wilburn, Damien B; Bowen, Kathleen E; Doty, Kari A; Arumugam, Sengodagounder; Lane, Andrew N; Feldhoff, Pamela W; Feldhoff, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    In response to pervasive sexual selection, protein sex pheromones often display rapid mutation and accelerated evolution of corresponding gene sequences. For proteins, the general dogma is that structure is maintained even as sequence or function may rapidly change. This phenomenon is well exemplified by the three-finger protein (TFP) superfamily: a diverse class of vertebrate proteins co-opted for many biological functions - such as components of snake venoms, regulators of the complement system, and coordinators of amphibian limb regeneration. All of the >200 structurally characterized TFPs adopt the namesake "three-finger" topology. In male red-legged salamanders, the TFP pheromone Plethodontid Modulating Factor (PMF) is a hypervariable protein such that, through extensive gene duplication and pervasive sexual selection, individual male salamanders express more than 30 unique isoforms. However, it remained unclear how this accelerated evolution affected the protein structure of PMF. Using LC/MS-MS and multidimensional NMR, we report the 3D structure of the most abundant PMF isoform, PMF-G. The high resolution structural ensemble revealed a highly modified TFP structure, including a unique disulfide bonding pattern and loss of secondary structure, that define a novel protein topology with greater backbone flexibility in the third peptide finger. Sequence comparison, models of molecular evolution, and homology modeling together support that this flexible third finger is the most rapidly evolving segment of PMF. Combined with PMF sequence hypervariability, this structural flexibility may enhance the plasticity of PMF as a chemical signal by permitting potentially thousands of structural conformers. We propose that the flexible third finger plays a critical role in PMF:receptor interactions. As female receptors co-evolve, this flexibility may allow PMF to still bind its receptor(s) without the immediate need for complementary mutations. Consequently, this unique

  2. Protein-Transition Metal Ion Networks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins obtained from agricultural sources were blended with divalent metal ions. Feather keratin, egg albumin, and wheat gluten showed increases of 2-3 times in modulus with addition of divalent transition metal ions Cu2+ and Zn2+. Increasing concentrations of ions resulted in increased stiffnes...

  3. Context and Force Field Dependence of the Loss of Protein Backbone Entropy upon Folding Using Realistic Denatured and Native State Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Baxa, Michael C.; Haddadian, Esmael J.; Jha, Abhishek K.; Freed, Karl F.; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2012-01-01

    The loss of conformational entropy is the largest unfavorable quantity affecting a protein’s stability. We calculate the reduction in the number of backbone conformations upon folding using the distribution of backbone dihedral angles (φ,ψ) obtained from an experimentally validated denatured state model, along with all-atom simulations for both the denatured and native states. The average loss of entropy per residue is TΔSBBU-N = 0.7, 0.9, or 1.1 kcal·mol−1 at T = 298 K, depending on the force field used, with a 0.6 kcal·mol−1 dispersion across the sequence. The average equates to a decrease of a factor of 3–7 in the number of conformations available per residue (f = ΩDenatured/ΩNative) or to a total of ftot=3n–7n for an n residue protein. Our value is smaller than most previous estimates where f = 7–20, i.e., our computed TΔSBBU-N is smaller by 10–100 kcal mol−1 for n=100. The differences emerge from our use of realistic native and denatured state ensembles as well as from the inclusion of accurate local sequence preferences, neighbor effects, and correlated motions (vibrations), in contrast to some previous studies that invoke gross assumptions about the entropy in either or both states. We find that the loss of entropy primarily depends on the local environment and less on properties of the native state, with the exception of α-helical residues in some force fields. PMID:22928488

  4. Backbone Relaxation Coupled to the Ionization of Internal Groups in Proteins: A Self-Guided Langevin Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Damjanović, Ana; Wu, Xiongwu; García-Moreno E., Bertrand; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2008-01-01

    Pathways of structural relaxation triggered by ionization of internal groups in staphylococcal nuclease (SNase) were studied through multiple self-guided Langevin dynamics (SGLD) simulations. Circular dichroism, steady-state Trp fluorescence, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy have shown previously that variants of SNase with internal Glu, Asp, and Lys at positions 66 or 92, and Arg at position 66, exhibit local reorganization or global unfolding when the internal ionizable group is charged. Except for Arg-66, these internal ionizable groups have unusual pKa values and are neutral at physiological pH. The structural trends observed in the simulations are in general agreement with experimental observations. The I92D variant, which unfolds globally upon ionization of Asp-92, in simulations often exhibits extensive hydration of the protein core, and sometimes also significant perturbations of the β-barrel. In the crystal structure of the V66R variant, the β1 strand from the β-barrel is domain-swapped; in the simulations, the β1 strand is sometimes partially released. The V66K variant, which in solutions shows reorganization of six residues at the C-terminus of helix α1 and perturbations in the β-barrel structure, exhibits fraying of three residues of helix α1 in one simulation, and perturbations and partial unfolding of three β-strands in a few other simulations. In sharp contrast, very small structural changes were observed in simulations of the wild-type protein. The simulations indicate that charging of internal groups frequently triggers penetration of water into the protein interior. The pKa values of Asp-92 and Arg-66 calculated with continuum methods on SGLD-relaxed structures reached the normal values in most simulations. Detailed analysis of accuracy and performance of SGLD demonstrates that SGLD outperforms LD in sampling of alternative protein conformations without loss of the accuracy and level of detail characteristic of regular LD. PMID

  5. Restraints on backbone conformations in solid state NMR studies of uniformly labeled proteins from quantitative amide 15N–15N and carbonyl 13C–13C dipolar recoupling data

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kan-Nian; Qiang, Wei; Bermejo, Guillermo A.; Schwieters, Charles D.; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Recent structural studies of uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled proteins by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) rely principally on two sources of structural restraints: (i) restraints on backbone conformation from isotropic 15N and 13C chemical shifts, based on empirical correlations between chemical shifts and backbone torsion angles; (ii) restraints on inter-residue proximities from qualitative measurements of internuclear dipole–dipole couplings, detected as the presence or absence of inter-residue crosspeaks in multidimensional spectra. We show that site-specific dipole–dipole couplings among 15N-labeled backbone amide sites and among 13C-labeled backbone carbonyl sites can be measured quantitatively in uniformly-labeled proteins, using dipolar recoupling techniques that we call 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE (BAckbone REcoupling), and that the resulting data represent a new source of restraints on backbone conformation. 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE data can be incorporated into structural modeling calculations as potential energy surfaces, which are derived from comparisons between experimental 15N and 13C signal decay curves, extracted from crosspeak intensities in series of two-dimensional spectra, with numerical simulations of the 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE measurements. We demonstrate this approach through experiments on microcrystalline, uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled protein GB1. Results for GB1 show that 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE restraints are complementary to restraints from chemical shifts and inter-residue crosspeaks, improving both the precision and the accuracy of calculated structures. PMID:22449573

  6. Strike a Balance: Optimization of Backbone Torsion Parameters of AMBER Polarizable Force Field for Simulations of Proteins and Peptides

    PubMed Central

    WANG, ZHI-XIANG; ZHANG, WEI; WU, CHUN; LEI, HONGXING; CIEPLAK, PIOTR; DUAN, YONG

    2014-01-01

    Based on the AMBER polarizable model (ff02), we have reoptimized the parameters related to the main-chain (Φ, Ψ) torsion angles by fitting to the Boltzmann-weighted average quantum mechanical (QM) energies of the important regions (i.e., β, PII, αR, and αL regions). Following the naming convention of the AMBER force field series, this release will be called ff02pol.rl The force field has been assessed both by energetic comparison against the QM data and by the replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations of short alanine peptides in water. For Ace-Ala-Nme, the simulated populations in the β, PII and αR regions were approximately 30, 43, and 26%, respectively. For Ace-(Ala)7-Nme, the populations in these three regions were approximately 24, 49, and 26%. Both were in qualitative agreement with the NMR and CD experimental conclusions. In comparison with the previous force field, ff02pol.rl demonstrated good balance among these three important regions. The optimized torsion parameters, together with those in ff02, allow us to carry out simulations on proteins and peptides with the consideration of polarization. PMID:16526038

  7. (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of the LAM-RRM1 N-terminal module of La protein from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Chasapis, Christos T; Argyriou, Aikaterini I; Apostolidi, Maria; Konstantinidou, Parthena; Bentrop, Detlef; Stathopoulos, Constantinos; Spyroulias, Georgios A

    2015-10-01

    The N-terminal half of La protein consists of two concatenated motifs: La motif (LAM) and the N-terminal RNA recognition motif (RRM1) both of which are responsible for poly(U) RNA binding. Here, we present the backbone and side-chain assignments of the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonances of the 191-residue LAM-RRM1 region of the La protein from the lower eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum and its secondary structure prediction. PMID:25687647

  8. The Na+-phosphate cotransport system (NaPi-II) with a cleaved protein backbone: implications on function and membrane insertion

    PubMed Central

    Kohl, Beate; Wagner, Carsten A; Huelseweh, Birgit; Busch, Andreas E; Werner, Andreas

    1998-01-01

    Renal handling of inorganic phosphate (Pi) involves a Na+-Pi cotransport system which is well conserved between vertebrates. The members of this protein family, denoted NaPi-II, share a topology with, it is thought, eight transmembrane domains. The transporter is proposed to be proteolytically cleaved within a large hydrophilic loop in vivo. The consequences of an interrupted backbone were tested by constructing cDNA clones encoding different N- (1-3 and 1-5) and C-terminal (4-8 and 6-8) complementary fragments of NaPi-II from winter flounder. When the cognate fragments were used in combination (1-3 plus 4-8; 1-5 plus 6-8) they comprised the full complement of the putative transporter domains. None of the four individual fragments or the 1-5 plus 6-8 combination when expressed in Xenopus oocytes increased Pi flux. Coexpression of fragments 1-3 plus 4-8 stimulated transport activity identical to that for expressed wild-type NaPi-II with regard to pH dependency and Km for Na+ and Pi binding; however, the maximal transport rate (vmax) was lower. Immunohistochemistry on cryosections confined the functionally active 1-3 plus 4-8 combination to the oocyte membrane. This was not the case for the 1-5 plus 6-8 combination or any of the individual fragments, all of which failed to induce fluorescence. A second immunohistochemical approach using intact oocytes allowed determination of the extracellular regions of the protein. Epitopes within the loop between transmembrane domains 3 and 4 enhanced fluorescence. Neither N- nor C-terminal tags induced fluorescence. PMID:9508800

  9. Database algorithm for generating protein backbone and side-chain co-ordinates from a C alpha trace application to model building and detection of co-ordinate errors.

    PubMed

    Holm, L; Sander, C

    1991-03-01

    The problem of constructing all-atom model co-ordinates of a protein from an outline of the polypeptide chain is encountered in protein structure determination by crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, in model building by homology and in protein design. Here, we present an automatic procedure for generating full protein co-ordinates (backbone and, optionally, side-chains) given the C alpha trace and amino acid sequence. To construct backbones, a protein structure database is first scanned for fragments that locally fit the chain trace according to distance criteria. A best path algorithm then sifts through these segments and selects an optimal path with minimal mismatch at fragment joints. In blind tests, using fully known protein structures, backbones (C alpha, C, N, O) can be reconstructed with a reliability of 0.4 to 0.6 A root-mean-square position deviation and not more than 0 to 5% peptide flips. This accuracy is sufficient to identify possible errors in protein co-ordinate sets. To construct full co-ordinates, side-chains are added from a library of frequently occurring rotamers using a simple and fast Monte Carlo procedure with simulated annealing. In tests on X-ray structures determined at better than 2.5 A resolution, the positions of side-chain atoms in the protein core (less than 20% relative accessibility) have an accuracy of 1.6 A (r.m.s. deviation) and 70% of chi 1 angles are within 30 degrees of the X-ray structure. The computer program MaxSprout is available on request. PMID:2002501

  10. Motif-directed flexible backbone design of functional interactions

    PubMed Central

    Havranek, James J; Baker, David

    2009-01-01

    Computational protein design relies on a number of approximations to efficiently search the huge sequence space available to proteins. The fixed backbone and rotamer approximations in particular are important for formulating protein design as a discrete combinatorial optimization problem. However, the resulting coarse-grained sampling of possible side-chain terminal positions is problematic for the design of protein function, which depends on precise positioning of side-chain atoms. Although backbone flexibility can greatly increase the conformation freedom of side-chain functional groups, it is not obvious which backbone movements will generate the critical constellation of atoms responsible for protein function. Here, we report an automated method for identifying protein backbone movements that can give rise to any specified set of desired side-chain atomic placements and interactions, using protein–DNA interfaces as a model system. We use a library of previously observed protein–DNA interactions (motifs) and a rotamer-based description of side-chain conformation freedom to identify placements for the protein backbone that can give rise to a favorable side-chain interaction with DNA. We describe a tree-search algorithm for identifying those combinations of interactions from the library that can be realized with minimal perturbation of the protein backbone. We compare the efficiency of this method with the alternative approach of building and screening alternate backbone conformations. PMID:19472357

  11. Backbone 1H, 15N, and 13C resonance assignments and secondary structure of a novel protein OGL-20P(T)-358 from hyperthermophile Thermococcus thioreducens sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Randall; Hughes, Ronny; Curto, Ernest; Ng, Joseph; Twigg, Pamela

    2007-12-31

    OGL-20P(T)-358 is a novel 66 amino acid residue protein from the hyperthermophile Thermococcus thioreducens sp. nov., strain OGL-20PT, which was collected from the wall of the hydrothermal black smoker in the Rainbow Vent along the mid-Atlantic ridge. This protein, which has no detectable sequence homology with proteins or domains of known function, has a calculated pI of 4.76 and a molecular mass of 8.2 kDa. We report here the backbone 1H, 15N, and 13C resonance assignments of OGL-20PT-358. Assignments are 97.5% (316/324) complete. Chemical shift index was used to determine the secondary structure of the protein, which appears to consist of primarily alpha-helical regions. This work is the foundation for future studies to determine the three-dimensional solution structure of the protein. PMID:18182861

  12. Effect of the chirality of the glycerol backbone on the bilayer and nonbilayer phase transitions in the diastereomers of di-dodecyl-beta-D-glucopyranosyl glycerol.

    PubMed Central

    Mannock, D A; Lewis, R N; McElhaney, R N; Akiyama, M; Yamada, H; Turner, D C; Gruner, S M

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the physical properties of aqueous dispersions of 1,2-sn- and 2,3-sn-didodecyl-beta-D-glucopyranosyl glycerols, as well as their diastereomeric mixture, using differential scanning calorimetry and low angle x-ray diffraction. Upon heating, both the chiral lipids and the diastereomeric mixture exhibit characteristically energetic L beta/L alpha phase transitions at 31.7-32.8 degrees C and two or three weakly energetic thermal events between 49 degrees C and 89 degrees C. In the diastereomeric mixture and the 1,2-sn glycerol derivative, these higher temperature endotherms correspond to the formation of, and interconversions between, several nonlamellar structures and have been assigned to L alpha/QIIa, QIIa/QIIb, and QIIb/HII phase transitions, respectively. The cubic phases QIIa and QIIb, whose cell lattice parameters are strongly temperature dependent, can be identified as belonging to space groups Ia3d and Pn3m/Pn3, respectively. In the equivalent 2,3-sn glucolipid, the QIIa phase is not observed and only two transitions are seen at 49 degrees C and 77 degrees C, which are identified as L alpha/QIIb and QIIb/HII phase transitions, respectively. These phase transitions temperatures are some 10 degrees C lower than those of the corresponding phase transitions observed in the diastereomeric mixture and the 1,2-sn glycerol derivative. On cooling, all three lipids exhibit a minor higher temperature exothermic event, which can be assigned to a HII/QIIb phase transition. An exothermic L alpha/L beta phase transition is observed at 30-31 degrees C. A shoulder is sometimes discernible on the high temperature side of the L alpha/L beta event, which may originate from a QIIb/L alpha phase transition prior to the freezing of the hydrocarbon chains. None of the lipids show evidence of a QIIa phase on cooling. No additional exothermic transitions are observed on further cooling to -3 degrees C. However, after nucleation at 0 degrees C followed by a short period

  13. Binding of transition metals to S100 proteins.

    PubMed

    Gilston, Benjamin A; Skaar, Eric P; Chazin, Walter J

    2016-08-01

    The S100 proteins are a unique class of EF-hand Ca(2+) binding proteins distributed in a cell-specific, tissue-specific, and cell cycle-specific manner in humans and other vertebrates. These proteins are distinguished by their distinctive homodimeric structure, both intracellular and extracellular functions, and the ability to bind transition metals at the dimer interface. Here we summarize current knowledge of S100 protein binding of Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and Mn(2+) ions, focusing on binding affinities, conformational changes that arise from metal binding, and the roles of transition metal binding in S100 protein function. PMID:27430886

  14. Optimization of amino acid type-specific 13C and 15N labeling for the backbone assignment of membrane proteins by solution- and solid-state NMR with the UPLABEL algorithm.

    PubMed

    Hefke, Frederik; Bagaria, Anurag; Reckel, Sina; Ullrich, Sandra Johanna; Dötsch, Volker; Glaubitz, Clemens; Güntert, Peter

    2011-02-01

    We present a computational method for finding optimal labeling patterns for the backbone assignment of membrane proteins and other large proteins that cannot be assigned by conventional strategies. Following the approach of Kainosho and Tsuji (Biochemistry 21:6273-6279 (1982)), types of amino acids are labeled with (13)C or/and (15)N such that cross peaks between (13)CO(i - 1) and (15)NH(i) result only for pairs of sequentially adjacent amino acids of which the first is labeled with (13)C and the second with (15)N. In this way, unambiguous sequence-specific assignments can be obtained for unique pairs of amino acids that occur exactly once in the sequence of the protein. To be practical, it is crucial to limit the number of differently labeled protein samples that have to be prepared while obtaining an optimal extent of labeled unique amino acid pairs. Our computer algorithm UPLABEL for optimal unique pair labeling, implemented in the program CYANA and in a standalone program, and also available through a web portal, uses combinatorial optimization to find for a given amino acid sequence labeling patterns that maximize the number of unique pair assignments with a minimal number of differently labeled protein samples. Various auxiliary conditions, including labeled amino acid availability and price, previously known partial assignments, and sequence regions of particular interest can be taken into account when determining optimal amino acid type-specific labeling patterns. The method is illustrated for the assignment of the human G-protein coupled receptor bradykinin B2 (B(2)R) and applied as a starting point for the backbone assignment of the membrane protein proteorhodopsin. PMID:21170670

  15. Single molecule fluorescence experiments determine protein folding transition path times

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hoi Sung; McHale, Kevin; Louis, John M.; Eaton, William A.

    2013-01-01

    The transition path is the tiny fraction of an equilibrium molecular trajectory when a transition occurs by crossing the free-energy barrier between two states. It is a single-molecule property that contains all the mechanistic information on how a process occurs. As a step toward observing transition paths in protein folding we determined the average transition-path time for a fast- and a slow-folding protein from a photon-by-photon analysis of fluorescence trajectories in single-molecule Förster-resonance-energy-transfer experiments. While the folding rate coefficients differ by a factor of 10,000, the transition-path times differ by less than a factor of 5, showing that a fast-and a slow-folding protein take almost the same time to fold when folding actually happens. A very simple model based on energy landscape theory can explain this result. PMID:22363011

  16. Characterizing Aciniform Silk Repetitive Domain Backbone Dynamics and Hydrodynamic Modularity.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Marie-Laurence; Xu, Lingling; Sarker, Muzaddid; Liu, Xiang-Qin; Rainey, Jan K

    2016-01-01

    Spider aciniform (wrapping) silk is a remarkable fibrillar biomaterial with outstanding mechanical properties. It is a modular protein consisting, in Argiope trifasciata, of a core repetitive domain of 200 amino acid units (W units). In solution, the W units comprise a globular folded core, with five α-helices, and disordered tails that are linked to form a ~63-residue intrinsically disordered linker in concatemers. Herein, we present nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy-based (15)N spin relaxation analysis, allowing characterization of backbone dynamics as a function of residue on the ps-ns timescale in the context of the single W unit (W₁) and the two unit concatemer (W₂). Unambiguous mapping of backbone dynamics throughout W₂ was made possible by segmental NMR active isotope-enrichment through split intein-mediated trans-splicing. Spectral density mapping for W₁ and W₂ reveals a striking disparity in dynamics between the folded core and the disordered linker and tail regions. These data are also consistent with rotational diffusion behaviour where each globular domain tumbles almost independently of its neighbour. At a localized level, helix 5 exhibits elevated high frequency dynamics relative to the proximal helix 4, supporting a model of fibrillogenesis where this helix unfolds as part of the transition to a mixed α-helix/β-sheet fibre. PMID:27517921

  17. Characterizing Aciniform Silk Repetitive Domain Backbone Dynamics and Hydrodynamic Modularity

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Marie-Laurence; Xu, Lingling; Sarker, Muzaddid; Liu, Xiang-Qin; Rainey, Jan K.

    2016-01-01

    Spider aciniform (wrapping) silk is a remarkable fibrillar biomaterial with outstanding mechanical properties. It is a modular protein consisting, in Argiope trifasciata, of a core repetitive domain of 200 amino acid units (W units). In solution, the W units comprise a globular folded core, with five α-helices, and disordered tails that are linked to form a ~63-residue intrinsically disordered linker in concatemers. Herein, we present nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy-based 15N spin relaxation analysis, allowing characterization of backbone dynamics as a function of residue on the ps–ns timescale in the context of the single W unit (W1) and the two unit concatemer (W2). Unambiguous mapping of backbone dynamics throughout W2 was made possible by segmental NMR active isotope-enrichment through split intein-mediated trans-splicing. Spectral density mapping for W1 and W2 reveals a striking disparity in dynamics between the folded core and the disordered linker and tail regions. These data are also consistent with rotational diffusion behaviour where each globular domain tumbles almost independently of its neighbour. At a localized level, helix 5 exhibits elevated high frequency dynamics relative to the proximal helix 4, supporting a model of fibrillogenesis where this helix unfolds as part of the transition to a mixed α-helix/β-sheet fibre. PMID:27517921

  18. Instantaneous normal modes and the protein glass transition.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Roland; Krishnan, Marimuthu; Daidone, Isabella; Smith, Jeremy C

    2009-01-01

    In the instantaneous normal mode method, normal mode analysis is performed at instantaneous configurations of a condensed-phase system, leading to modes with negative eigenvalues. These negative modes provide a means of characterizing local anharmonicities of the potential energy surface. Here, we apply instantaneous normal mode to analyze temperature-dependent diffusive dynamics in molecular dynamics simulations of a small protein (a scorpion toxin). Those characteristics of the negative modes are determined that correlate with the dynamical (or glass) transition behavior of the protein, as manifested as an increase in the gradient with T of the average atomic mean-square displacement at approximately 220 K. The number of negative eigenvalues shows no transition with temperature. Further, although filtering the negative modes to retain only those with eigenvectors corresponding to double-well potentials does reveal a transition in the hydration water, again, no transition in the protein is seen. However, additional filtering of the protein double-well modes, so as to retain only those that, on energy minimization, escape to different regions of configurational space, finally leads to clear protein dynamical transition behavior. Partial minimization of instantaneous configurations is also found to remove nondiffusive imaginary modes. In summary, examination of the form of negative instantaneous normal modes is shown to furnish a physical picture of local diffusive dynamics accompanying the protein glass transition. PMID:19167298

  19. Instantaneous Normal Modes and the Protein Glass Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Roland; Krishnan, Marimuthu; Daidone, Isabella; Smith, Jeremy C

    2009-01-01

    In the instantaneous normal mode method, normal mode analysis is performed at instantaneous configurations of a condensed-phase system, leading to modes with negative eigenvalues. These negative modes provide a means of characterizing local anharmonicities of the potential energy surface. Here, we apply instantaneous normal mode to analyze temperature-dependent diffusive dynamics in molecular dynamics simulations of a small protein (a scorpion toxin). Those characteristics of the negative modes are determined that correlate with the dynamical (or glass) transition behavior of the protein, as manifested as an increase in the gradient with T of the average atomic mean-square displacement at 220 K. The number of negative eigenvalues shows no transition with temperature. Further, although filtering the negative modes to retain only those with eigenvectors corresponding to double-well potentials does reveal a transition in the hydration water, again, no transition in the protein is seen. However, additional filtering of the protein double-well modes, so as to retain only those that, on energy minimization, escape to different regions of configurational space, finally leads to clear protein dynamical transition behavior. Partial minimization of instantaneous configurations is also found to remove nondiffusive imaginary modes. In summary, examination of the form of negative instantaneous normal modes is shown to furnish a physical picture of local diffusive dynamics accompanying the protein glass transition.

  20. Parameterization of backbone flexibility in a coarse-grained force field for proteins (COFFDROP) derived from all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations of all possible two-residue peptides

    PubMed Central

    Frembgen-Kesner, Tamara; Andrews, Casey T.; Li, Shuxiang; Ngo, Nguyet Anh; Shubert, Scott A.; Jain, Aakash; Olayiwola, Oluwatoni; Weishaar, Mitch R.; Elcock, Adrian H.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we reported the parameterization of a set of coarse-grained (CG) nonbonded potential functions, derived from all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of amino acid pairs, and designed for use in (implicit-solvent) Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations of proteins; this force field was named COFFDROP (COarse-grained Force Field for Dynamic Representations Of Proteins). Here, we describe the extension of COFFDROP to include bonded backbone terms derived from fitting to results of explicit-solvent MD simulations of all possible two-residue peptides containing the 20 standard amino acids, with histidine modeled in both its protonated and neutral forms. The iterative Boltzmann inversion (IBI) method was used to optimize new CG potential functions for backbone-related terms by attempting to reproduce angle, dihedral and distance probability distributions generated by the MD simulations. In a simple test of the transferability of the extended force field, the angle, dihedral and distance probability distributions obtained from BD simulations of 56 three-residue peptides were compared to results from corresponding explicit-solvent MD simulations. In a more challenging test of the COFFDROP force field, it was used to simulate eight intrinsically disordered proteins and was shown to quite accurately reproduce the experimental hydrodynamic radii (Rhydro), provided that the favorable nonbonded interactions of the force field were uniformly scaled downwards in magnitude. Overall, the results indicate that the COFFDROP force field is likely to find use in modeling the conformational behavior of intrinsically disordered proteins and multi-domain proteins connected by flexible linkers. PMID:26574429

  1. Atomistic simulations of the MS2 coat protein conformational transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkett, Matthew; Pontiggia, Francesco; Hagan, Michael

    2012-02-01

    During the replication of many viruses, hundreds to thousands of proteins self-assemble to form a protective protein coat, called a capsid, around the viral nucleic acid. Often these proteins have identical amino acid sequences with slightly different, or quasi-equivalent, conformations, which join in precise spatial arrangements. Although the structure of completed capsids is known to atomic resolution, little is known about the assembly intermediates and how protein conformations are selected during assembly. In this talk, we will use all-atom simulations to investigate how protein-RNA interactions guide conformational transitions of capsid proteins from the single-stranded RNA bacteriophage MS2. Since conformational changes occur on timescales which are not accessible to all-atom simulations, we use enhanced sampling methods to sample probable transition pathways and corresponding free energy profiles. Specifically, we will present free energy profiles associated with the MS2 capsid protein conformation in the presence and absence of RNA.

  2. Spectral and Hydration Dependence of Protein Dynamical Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipps, Ferdinand; Knab, J. R.; Chen, Jing Yin; He, Yunfen; Markelz, A. G.

    2008-03-01

    The protein dynamical transition, a rapid increase in flexibility at ˜ 200K, is hydration dependent suggesting that the transition may in fact be due to a transition in the surrounding water. Previously we have shown that the terahertz dielectric response is sensitive to the dynamical transition using terahertz time domain spectroscopy [1]. The broadband technique allows the determination of what motions are affected by the transition, that is whether long time scale motions such as side chain rotations, or faster vibrational motions. Here we examine both the frequency and hydration dependence of the protein dynamical transition for hydrated myoglobin powder for the 0.2 -- 2.0 THz and 80-295 K ranges. The transition is observed in both the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric response. Our earlier measurements of solutions did not show a transition in the real part of the permittivity, likely due to bulk solvent dominating the index. There is a strong frequency dependence with hydration. While a slight transition is observed at frequencies higher than 1 THz which is nearly hydration independent, for frequencies below 1 THz the strength of the transition rapidly increases with hydration. [1] A. G. Markelz, J. R. Knab, Jing Yin Chen, Yunfen He, Chem. Phys. Lett. 442, 413 (2007).

  3. Native proteins trap high-energy transit conformations

    PubMed Central

    Brereton, Andrew E.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    During protein folding and as part of some conformational changes that regulate protein function, the polypeptide chain must traverse high-energy barriers that separate the commonly adopted low-energy conformations. How distortions in peptide geometry allow these barrier-crossing transitions is a fundamental open question. One such important transition involves the movement of a non-glycine residue between the left side of the Ramachandran plot (that is, ϕ < 0°) and the right side (that is, ϕ > 0°). We report that high-energy conformations with ϕ ~ 0°, normally expected to occur only as fleeting transition states, are stably trapped in certain highly resolved native protein structures and that an analysis of these residues provides a detailed, experimentally derived map of the bond angle distortions taking place along the transition path. This unanticipated information lays to rest any uncertainty about whether such transitions are possible and how they occur, and in doing so lays a firm foundation for theoretical studies to better understand the transitions between basins that have been little studied but are integrally involved in protein folding and function. Also, the context of one such residue shows that even a designed highly stable protein can harbor substantial unfavorable interactions. PMID:26601321

  4. Protein Dynamical Transition: Role of Methyl Dynamics and Local Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, M.; Schulz, R.; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2009-03-01

    The temperature-dependent protein dynamical transition is investigated using the Instanteous Normal mode analysis (INM) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of crystalline myoglobin and Toxin II. The onset of anharmonic dynamics in myoglobin is observed at 150 K, far below the much-studied solvent-activated dynamical transition at 220 K. A significant fraction of methyl groups exhibit nanosecond anharmonic rotational jump diffusion at 150 K indicating the essential role of methyl dynamics in the low-temperature onset of anharmonic protein dynamics. The methyl groups that exhibit many rotational excitations are located near xenon cavities, suggesting that cavities in proteins act as activation centers of anharmonic dynamics. INM analysis of Toxin II indicates the presence of non-zero barrier-crossing, diffusive degrees of freedom accessible to the protein below the dynamical transition. The number of these diffusive degrees of freedom increases abruptly at the dynamical transition. In summary, the present investigation suggests that local diffusive processes (for example, methyl dynamics) are activated at low temperatures (much below 220 K) leading to global diffusive protein dynamics (this involves excitation of many protein atoms) at the dynamical transition.

  5. Dynamical Transition of Protein-Hydration Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doster, W.; Busch, S.; Gaspar, A. M.; Appavou, M.-S.; Wuttke, J.; Scheer, H.

    2010-03-01

    Thin layers of water on biomolecular and other nanostructured surfaces can be supercooled to temperatures not accessible with bulk water. Chen et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 9012 (2006)]PNASA60027-842410.1073/pnas.0602474103 suggested that anomalies near 220 K observed by quasielastic neutron scattering can be explained by a hidden critical point of bulk water. Based on more sensitive measurements of water on perdeuterated phycocyanin, using the new neutron backscattering spectrometer SPHERES, and an improved data analysis, we present results that show no sign of such a fragile-to-strong transition. The inflection of the elastic intensity at 220 K has a dynamic origin that is compatible with a calorimetric glass transition at 170 K. The temperature dependence of the relaxation times is highly sensitive to data evaluation; it can be brought into perfect agreement with the results of other techniques, without any anomaly.

  6. Design of HIV-1 protease inhibitors with pyrrolidinones and oxazolidinones as novel P1'-ligands to enhance backbone-binding interactions with protease: synthesis, biological evaluation, and protein-ligand X-ray studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Leshchenko-Yashchuk, Sofiya; Anderson, David D.; Baldridge, Abigail; Noetzel, Marcus; Miller, Heather B.; Tie, Yunfeng; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Koh, Yasuhiro; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2009-09-02

    Structure-based design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a series of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors are described. In an effort to enhance interactions with protease backbone atoms, we have incorporated stereochemically defined methyl-2-pyrrolidinone and methyl oxazolidinone as the P1{prime}-ligands. These ligands are designed to interact with Gly-27{prime} carbonyl and Arg-8 side chain in the S1{prime}-subsite of the HIV protease. We have investigated the potential of these ligands in combination with our previously developed bis-tetrahydrofuran (bis-THF) and cyclopentanyltetrahydrofuran (Cp-THF) as the P2-ligands. Inhibitor 19b with a (R)-aminomethyl-2-pyrrolidinone and a Cp-THF was shown to be the most potent compound. This inhibitor maintained near full potency against multi-PI-resistant clinical HIV-1 variants. A high resolution protein-ligand X-ray crystal structure of 19b-bound HIV-1 protease revealed that the P1{prime}-pyrrolidinone heterocycle and the P2-Cp-ligand are involved in several critical interactions with the backbone atoms in the S1{prime} and S2 subsites of HIV-1 protease.

  7. Phase transitions in the assembly of multivalent signalling proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Pilong; Banjade, Sudeep; Cheng, Hui-Chun; Kim, Soyeon; Chen, Baoyu; Guo, Liang; Llaguno, Marc; Hollingsworth, Javoris V; King, David S; Banani, Salman F; Russo, Paul S; Jiang, Qiu-Xing; Nixon, B Tracy; Rosen, Michael K

    2012-03-15

    Cells are organized on length scales ranging from ångström to micrometres. However, the mechanisms by which ångström-scale molecular properties are translated to micrometre-scale macroscopic properties are not well understood. Here we show that interactions between diverse synthetic, multivalent macromolecules (including multi-domain proteins and RNA) produce sharp liquid-liquid-demixing phase separations, generating micrometre-sized liquid droplets in aqueous solution. This macroscopic transition corresponds to a molecular transition between small complexes and large, dynamic supramolecular polymers. The concentrations needed for phase transition are directly related to the valency of the interacting species. In the case of the actin-regulatory protein called neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) interacting with its established biological partners NCK and phosphorylated nephrin, the phase transition corresponds to a sharp increase in activity towards an actin nucleation factor, the Arp2/3 complex. The transition is governed by the degree of phosphorylation of nephrin, explaining how this property of the system can be controlled to regulatory effect by kinases. The widespread occurrence of multivalent systems suggests that phase transitions may be used to spatially organize and biochemically regulate information throughout biology. PMID:22398450

  8. Phase transitions in the assembly of multivalent signalling proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Pilong; Banjade, Sudeep; Cheng, Hui-Chun; Kim, Soyeon; Chen, Baoyu; Guo, Liang; Llaguno, Marc; Hollingsworth, Javoris V.; King, David S.; Banani, Salman F.; Russo, Paul S.; Jiang, Qiu-Xing; Nixon, B. Tracy; Rosen, Michael K.

    2013-04-08

    Cells are organized on length scales ranging from angstrom to micrometers. However, the mechanisms by which angstrom-scale molecular properties are translated to micrometer-scale macroscopic properties are not well understood. Here we show that interactions between diverse synthetic, multivalent macromolecules (including multi-domain proteins and RNA) produce sharp liquid-liquid-demixing phase separations, generating micrometer-sized liquid droplets in aqueous solution. This macroscopic transition corresponds to a molecular transition between small complexes and large, dynamic supramolecular polymers. The concentrations needed for phase transition are directly related to the valency of the interacting species. In the case of the actin-regulatory protein called neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) interacting with its established biological partners NCK and phosphorylated nephrin1, the phase transition corresponds to a sharp increase in activity towards an actin nucleation factor, the Arp2/3 complex. The transition is governed by the degree of phosphorylation of nephrin, explaining how this property of the system can be controlled to regulatory effect by kinases. The widespread occurrence of multivalent systems suggests that phase transitions may be used to spatially organize and biochemically regulate information throughout biology.

  9. Transition Metal-Free Tryptophan-Selective Bioconjugation of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Seki, Yohei; Ishiyama, Takashi; Sasaki, Daisuke; Abe, Junpei; Sohma, Youhei; Oisaki, Kounosuke; Kanai, Motomu

    2016-08-31

    Chemical modifications of native proteins can facilitate production of supernatural protein functions that are not easily accessible by complementary methods relying on genetic manipulations. However, accomplishing precise control over selectivity while maintaining structural integrity and homogeneity still represents a formidable challenge. Herein, we report a transition metal-free method for tryptophan-selective bioconjugation of proteins that is based on an organoradical and operates under ambient conditions. This method exhibits low levels of cross-reactivity and leaves higher-order structures of the protein and various functional groups therein unaffected. The strategy to target less abundant amino acids contributes to the formation of structurally homogeneous conjugates, which may even be suitable for protein crystallography. The absence of toxic metals and biochemically incompatible conditions allows a rapid functional modulation of native proteins such as antibodies and pathogenic aggregative proteins, and this method may thus easily find therapeutic applications. PMID:27534812

  10. Fluctuation Flooding Method (FFM) for accelerating conformational transitions of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Ryuhei; Takano, Yu; Shigeta, Yasuteru

    2014-03-01

    A powerful conformational sampling method for accelerating structural transitions of proteins, "Fluctuation Flooding Method (FFM)," is proposed. In FFM, cycles of the following steps enhance the transitions: (i) extractions of largely fluctuating snapshots along anisotropic modes obtained from trajectories of multiple independent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and (ii) conformational re-sampling of the snapshots via re-generations of initial velocities when re-starting MD simulations. In an application to bacteriophage T4 lysozyme, FFM successfully accelerated the open-closed transition with the 6 ns simulation starting solely from the open state, although the 1-μs canonical MD simulation failed to sample such a rare event.

  11. NPHP4 controls ciliary trafficking of membrane proteins and large soluble proteins at the transition zone

    PubMed Central

    Awata, Junya; Takada, Saeko; Standley, Clive; Lechtreck, Karl F.; Bellvé, Karl D.; Pazour, Gregory J.; Fogarty, Kevin E.; Witman, George B.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The protein nephrocystin-4 (NPHP4) is widespread in ciliated organisms, and defects in NPHP4 cause nephronophthisis and blindness in humans. To learn more about the function of NPHP4, we have studied it in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. NPHP4 is stably incorporated into the distal part of the flagellar transition zone, close to the membrane and distal to CEP290, another transition zone protein. Therefore, these two proteins, which are incorporated into the transition zone independently of each other, define different domains of the transition zone. An nphp4-null mutant forms flagella with nearly normal length, ultrastructure and intraflagellar transport. When fractions from isolated wild-type and nphp4 flagella were compared, few differences were observed between the axonemes, but the amounts of certain membrane proteins were greatly reduced in the mutant flagella, and cellular housekeeping proteins >50 kDa were no longer excluded from mutant flagella. Therefore, NPHP4 functions at the transition zone as an essential part of a barrier that regulates both membrane and soluble protein composition of flagella. The phenotypic consequences of NPHP4 mutations in humans likely follow from protein mislocalization due to defects in the transition zone barrier. PMID:25150219

  12. Simulation of Ames Backbone Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahnasser, Hamid

    1998-01-01

    The networking demands of Ames Research Center are dramatically increasing. More and more workstations are requested to run video and audio applications on the network. These applications require a much greater bandwidth than data applications. The existing ARCLAN 2000 network bandwidth is insufficient, due to the use of FDDI as its backbone, for accommodating video applications. Operating at a maximum of 100 Mbps, FDDI can handle only a few workstations running multimedia applications. The ideal solution is to replace the current ARCLAN 2000 FDDI backbone with an ATM backbone. ATM has the capability to handle the increasing traffic loads on the ARCLAN 2000 that results from these new applications. As it can be seen from Figure 1, ARCLAN 2000 have a total of 32 routers (5 being core routers) each connected to the FDDI backbone via a 100 Mbps link. This network serves 34 different locations by using 34 hubs that are connected to secondary routers. End users are connected to the secondary routers with 10 Mbps links.

  13. Structure-Based Prediction of Protein-Folding Transition Paths.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, William M; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2016-09-01

    We propose a general theory to describe the distribution of protein-folding transition paths. We show that transition paths follow a predictable sequence of high-free-energy transient states that are separated by free-energy barriers. Each transient state corresponds to the assembly of one or more discrete, cooperative units, which are determined directly from the native structure. We show that the transition state on a folding pathway is reached when a small number of critical contacts are formed between a specific set of substructures, after which folding proceeds downhill in free energy. This approach suggests a natural resolution for distinguishing parallel folding pathways and provides a simple means to predict the rate-limiting step in a folding reaction. Our theory identifies a common folding mechanism for proteins with diverse native structures and establishes general principles for the self-assembly of polymers with specific interactions. PMID:27602721

  14. Evaluation of Newcastle disease virus chimeras expressing the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein of velogenic strains in the context of a mesogenic recombinant virus backbone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major factor in the pathogenicity of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is the amino acid sequence of the fusion protein cleavage site, but the role of other viral genes that contribute to virulence and different clinical forms of the disease remain undefined. To assess the role of other NDV genes in ...

  15. Accurate Determination of Conformational Transitions in Oligomeric Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Hernández, Máximo; Vostrikov, Vitaly V.; Veglia, Gianluigi; De Simone, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    The structural dynamics governing collective motions in oligomeric membrane proteins play key roles in vital biomolecular processes at cellular membranes. In this study, we present a structural refinement approach that combines solid-state NMR experiments and molecular simulations to accurately describe concerted conformational transitions identifying the overall structural, dynamical, and topological states of oligomeric membrane proteins. The accuracy of the structural ensembles generated with this method is shown to reach the statistical error limit, and is further demonstrated by correctly reproducing orthogonal NMR data. We demonstrate the accuracy of this approach by characterising the pentameric state of phospholamban, a key player in the regulation of calcium uptake in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and by probing its dynamical activation upon phosphorylation. Our results underline the importance of using an ensemble approach to characterise the conformational transitions that are often responsible for the biological function of oligomeric membrane protein states. PMID:26975211

  16. Adding Diverse Noncanonical Backbones to Rosetta: Enabling Peptidomimetic Design

    PubMed Central

    Craven, Timothy W.; Butterfoss, Glenn L.; Chou, Fang-Chieh; Lyskov, Sergey; Bullock, Brooke N.; Watkins, Andrew; Labonte, Jason W.; Pacella, Michael; Kilambi, Krishna Praneeth; Leaver-Fay, Andrew; Kuhlman, Brian; Gray, Jeffrey J.; Bradley, Philip; Kirshenbaum, Kent; Arora, Paramjit S.; Das, Rhiju; Bonneau, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Peptidomimetics are classes of molecules that mimic structural and functional attributes of polypeptides. Peptidomimetic oligomers can frequently be synthesized using efficient solid phase synthesis procedures similar to peptide synthesis. Conformationally ordered peptidomimetic oligomers are finding broad applications for molecular recognition and for inhibiting protein-protein interactions. One critical limitation is the limited set of design tools for identifying oligomer sequences that can adopt desired conformations. Here, we present expansions to the ROSETTA platform that enable structure prediction and design of five non-peptidic oligomer scaffolds (noncanonical backbones), oligooxopiperazines, oligo-peptoids, -peptides, hydrogen bond surrogate helices and oligosaccharides. This work is complementary to prior additions to model noncanonical protein side chains in ROSETTA. The main purpose of our manuscript is to give a detailed description to current and future developers of how each of these noncanonical backbones was implemented. Furthermore, we provide a general outline for implementation of new backbone types not discussed here. To illustrate the utility of this approach, we describe the first tests of the ROSETTA molecular mechanics energy function in the context of oligooxopiperazines, using quantum mechanical calculations as comparison points, scanning through backbone and side chain torsion angles for a model peptidomimetic. Finally, as an example of a novel design application, we describe the automated design of an oligooxopiperazine that inhibits the p53-MDM2 protein-protein interaction. For the general biological and bioengineering community, several noncanonical backbones have been incorporated into web applications that allow users to freely and rapidly test the presented protocols (http://rosie.rosettacommons.org). This work helps address the peptidomimetic community's need for an automated and expandable modeling tool for noncanonical

  17. ANSS Backbone Station Quality Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeds, A.; McNamara, D.; Benz, H.; Gee, L.

    2006-12-01

    In this study we assess the ambient noise levels of the broadband seismic stations within the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) backbone network. The backbone consists of stations operated by the USGS as well as several regional network stations operated by universities. We also assess the improved detection capability of the network due to the installation of 13 additional backbone stations and the upgrade of 26 existing stations funded by the Earthscope initiative. This assessment makes use of probability density functions (PDF) of power spectral densities (PSD) (after McNamara and Buland, 2004) computed by a continuous noise monitoring system developed by the USGS- ANSS and the Incorporated Research Institutions in Seismology (IRIS) Data Management Center (DMC). We compute the median and mode of the PDF distribution and rank the stations relative to the Peterson Low noise model (LNM) (Peterson, 1993) for 11 different period bands. The power of the method lies in the fact that there is no need to screen the data for system transients, earthquakes or general data artifacts since they map into a background probability level. Previous studies have shown that most regional stations, instrumented with short period or extended short period instruments, have a higher noise level in all period bands while stations in the US network have lower noise levels at short periods (0.0625-8.0 seconds), high frequencies (8.0- 0.125Hz). The overall network is evaluated with respect to accomplishing the design goals set for the USArray/ANSS backbone project which were intended to increase broadband performance for the national monitoring network.

  18. 1H, 13C, 15N backbone and side chain NMR resonance assignments for the N-terminal RNA recognition motif of the HvGR-RBP1 protein involved in the regulation of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) senescence

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Katelyn E.; Tripet, Brian P.; Parrott, David; Fischer, Andreas M.; Copié, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    Leaf senescence is an important process in the developmental life of all plant species. Senescence efficiency influences important agricultural traits such as grain protein content and plant growth, which are often limited by nitrogen use. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating this highly orchestrated process. To enhance our understanding of leaf senescence and its regulation, we have undertaken the structural and functional characterization of previously unknown proteins that are involved in the control of senescence in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Previous microarray analysis highlighted several barley genes whose transcripts are differentially expressed during senescence, including a specific gene which is greater than 40 fold up-regulated in the flag leaves of early- as compared to late-senescing near-isogenic barley lines at 14 and 21 days past flowering (anthesis). From inspection of its amino acid sequence, this gene is predicted to encode a glycine-rich RNA-binding protein herein referred to as HvGR-RBP1. HvGR-RBP1 has been expressed as a recombinant protein in E. coli, and preliminary NMR data analysis has revealed that its glycine-rich C-terminal region [residues: 93–162] is structurally disordered whereas its N-terminal region [residues: 1–92] forms a well-folded domain. Herein, we report the complete 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments of backbone and sidechain atoms, and the secondary structural topology of the N-terminal RNA Recognition Motif (RRM) domain of HvGR-RBP1, as a first step to unraveling its structural and functional role in the regulation of barley leaf senescence. PMID:23417794

  19. Physics-based potentials for the coupling between backbone- and side-chain-local conformational states in the united residue (UNRES) force field for protein simulations

    PubMed Central

    Sieradzan, Adam K.; Krupa, Paweł; Scheraga, Harold A.; Liwo, Adam; Czaplewski, Cezary

    2015-01-01

    The UNited RESidue (UNRES) model of polypeptide chains is a coarse-grained model in which each amino-acid residue is reduced to two interaction sites, namely a united peptide group (p) located halfway between the two neighboring α-carbon atoms (Cαs), which serve only as geometrical points, and a united side chain (SC) attached to the respective Cα. Owing to this simplification, millisecond Molecular Dynamics simulations of large systems can be performed. While UNRES predicts overall folds well, it reproduces the details of local chain conformation with lower accuracy. Recently, we implemented new knowledge-based torsional potentials (Krupa et. al. J. Chem. Theory Comput., 2013, 9, 4620–4632) that depend on the virtual-bond dihedral angles involving side chains: Cα ⋯ Cα ⋯ Cα ⋯ SC (τ(1)), SC ⋯ Cα ⋯ Cα ⋯ Cα (τ(2)), and SC ⋯ Cα ⋯ Cα ⋯ SC (τ(3)) in the UNRES force field. These potentials resulted in significant improvement of the simulated structures, especially in the loop regions. In this work, we introduce the physics-based counterparts of these potentials, which we derived from the all-atom energy surfaces of terminally-blocked amino-acid residues by Boltzmann integration over the angles λ(1) and λ(2) for rotation about the Cα ⋯ Cα virtual-bond angles and over the side-chain angles χ. The energy surfaces were, in turn, calculated by using the semiempirical AM1 method of molecular quantum mechanics. Entropy contribution was evaluated with use of the harmonic approximation from Hessian matrices. One-dimensional Fourier series in the respective virtual-bond-dihedral angles were fitted to the calculated potentials, and these expressions have been implemented in the UNRES force field. Basic calibration of the UNRES force field with the new potentials was carried out with eight training proteins, by selecting the optimal weight of the new energy terms and reducing the weight of the regular torsional terms. The force field was

  20. Conformation transition kinetics of Bombyx mori silk protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Shao, Zhengzhong; Knight, David P; Vollrath, Fritz

    2007-07-01

    Time-resolved FTIR analysis was used to monitor the conformation transition induced by treating regenerated Bombyx mori silk fibroin films and solutions with different concentrations of ethanol. The resulting curves showing the kinetics of the transition for both films and fibroin solutions were influenced by the ethanol concentration. In addition, for silk fibroin solutions the protein concentration also had an effect on the kinetics. At low ethanol concentrations (for example, less than 40% v/v in the case of film), films and fibroin solutions showed a phase in which beta-sheets slowly formed at a rate dependent on the ethanol concentration. Reducing the concentration of the fibroin in solutions also slowed the formation of beta-sheets. These observations suggest that this phase represents a nucleation step. Such a nucleation phase was not seen in the conformation transition at ethanol concentrations > 40% in films or > 50% in silk fibroin solutions. Our results indicate that the ethanol-induced conformation transition of silk fibroin in films and solutions is a three-phase process. The first phase is the initiation of beta-sheet structure (nucleation), the second is a fast phase of beta-sheet growth while the third phase represents a slow perfection of previously formed beta-sheet structure. The nucleation step can be very fast or relatively slow, depending on factors that influence protein chain mobility and intermolecular hydrogen bond formation. The findings give support to the previous evidence that natural silk spinning in silkworms is nucleation-dependent, and that silkworms (like spiders) use concentrated silk protein solutions, and careful control of the pH value and metallic ion content of the processing environment to speed up the nucleation step to produce a rapid conformation transition to convert the water soluble spinning dope to a tough solid silk fiber. PMID:17436322

  1. Cross-Correlated Relaxation of Dipolar Coupling and Chemical-Shift Anisotropy in Magic-Angle Spinning R1ρ NMR Measurements: Application to Protein Backbone Dynamics Measurements.

    PubMed

    Kurauskas, Vilius; Weber, Emmanuelle; Hessel, Audrey; Ayala, Isabel; Marion, Dominique; Schanda, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Transverse relaxation rate measurements in magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance provide information about molecular motions occurring on nanosecond-to-millisecond (ns-ms) time scales. The measurement of heteronuclear ((13)C, (15)N) relaxation rate constants in the presence of a spin-lock radiofrequency field (R1ρ relaxation) provides access to such motions, and an increasing number of studies involving R1ρ relaxation in proteins have been reported. However, two factors that influence the observed relaxation rate constants have so far been neglected, namely, (1) the role of CSA/dipolar cross-correlated relaxation (CCR) and (2) the impact of fast proton spin flips (i.e., proton spin diffusion and relaxation). We show that CSA/D CCR in R1ρ experiments is measurable and that the CCR rate constant depends on ns-ms motions; it can thus provide insight into dynamics. We find that proton spin diffusion attenuates this CCR due to its decoupling effect on the doublet components. For measurements of dynamics, the use of R1ρ rate constants has practical advantages over the use of CCR rates, and this article reveals factors that have so far been disregarded and which are important for accurate measurements and interpretation. PMID:27500976

  2. Cross-linking proteins with bimetallic tetracarboxylate compounds of transition metals

    DOEpatents

    Kostic, N.M.; Chen, J.

    1991-03-05

    Stable cross-linked complexes of transition-metal tetracarboxylates and proteins are formed. The preferred transition-metal is rhodium. The protein may be collagen or an enzyme such as a proteolytic enzyme. No Drawings

  3. Cross-linking proteins with bimetallic tetracarboxylate compounds of transition metals

    DOEpatents

    Kostic, Nenad M.; Chen, Jian

    1991-03-05

    Stable cross-linked complexes of transition-metal tetracarboxylates and proteins are formed. The preferred transition-metal is rhodium. The protein may be collagen or an enzyme such as a proteolytic enzyme.

  4. Periodicity, planarity, and pixel (3P): a program using the intrinsic residual dipolar coupling periodicity-to-peptide plane correlation and phi/psi angles to derive protein backbone structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinbu; Walsh, Joseph D; Kuszewski, John; Wang, Yun-Xing

    2007-11-01

    We present a detailed description of a theory and a program called 3P. "3P" stands for periodicity, planarity, and pixel. The 3P program is based on the intrinsic periodic correlations between residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) and in-plane internuclear vectors, and between RDCs and the orientation of peptide planes relative to an alignment tensor. The program extracts accurate rhombic, axial components of the alignment tensor without explicit coordinates, and discrete peptide plane orientations, which are utilized in combination with readily available phi/psi angles to determine the three-dimensional backbone structures of proteins. The 3P program uses one alignment tensor. We demonstrate the utility and robustness of the program, using both experimental and synthetic data sets, which were added with different levels of noise or were incomplete. The program is interfaced to Xplor-NIH via a "3P" module and is available to the public. The limitations and differences between our program and existing methods are also discussed. PMID:17892961

  5. The backbone of a city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scellato, S.; Cardillo, A.; Latora, V.; Porta, S.

    2006-03-01

    Recent studies have revealed the importance of centrality measures to analyze various spatial factors affecting human life in cities. Here we show how it is possible to extract the backbone of a city by deriving spanning trees based on edge betweenness and edge information. By using as sample cases the cities of Bologna and San Francisco, we show how the obtained trees are radically different from those based on edge lengths, and allow an extended comprehension of the “skeleton” of most important routes that so much affects pedestrian/vehicular flows, retail commerce vitality, land-use separation, urban crime and collective dynamical behaviours.

  6. Effects of phosphorylation on the intrinsic propensity of backbone conformations of serine/threonine.

    PubMed

    He, Erbin; Yan, Guanghui; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Jun; Li, Wenfei

    2016-03-01

    Each amino acid has its intrinsic propensity for certain local backbone conformations, which can be further modulated by the physicochemical environment and post-translational modifications. In this work, we study the effects of phosphorylation on the intrinsic propensity for different local backbone conformations of serine/threonine by molecular dynamics simulations. We showed that phosphorylation has very different effects on the intrinsic propensity for certain local backbone conformations for the serine and threonine. The phosphorylation of serine increases the propensity of forming polyproline II, whereas that of threonine has the opposite effect. Detailed analysis showed that such different responses to phosphorylation mainly arise from their different perturbations to the backbone hydration and the geometrical constraints by forming side-chain-backbone hydrogen bonds due to phosphorylation. Such an effect of phosphorylation on backbone conformations can be crucial for understanding the molecular mechanism of phosphorylation-regulated protein structures/dynamics and functions. PMID:26759163

  7. Transition-metal prion protein attachment: Competition with copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Bernholc, Jerry

    2012-02-01

    Prion protein, PrP, is a protein capable of binding copper ions in multiple modes depending on their concentration. Misfolded PrP is implicated in a group of neurodegenerative diseases, which include ``mad cow disease'' and its human form, variant Creutzfeld-Jacob disease. An increasing amount of evidence suggests that attachment of non-copper metal ions to PrP triggers transformations to abnormal forms similar to those observed in prion diseases. In this work, we use hybrid Kohn-Sham/orbital-free density functional theory simulations to investigate copper replacement by other transition metals that bind to PrP, including zinc, iron and manganese. We consider all known copper binding modes in the N-terminal domain of PrP. Our calculations identify modes most susceptible to copper replacement and reveal metals that can successfully compete with copper for attachment to PrP.

  8. Multistability and dynamic transitions of intracellular Min protein patterns.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fabai; Halatek, Jacob; Reiter, Matthias; Kingma, Enzo; Frey, Erwin; Dekker, Cees

    2016-01-01

    Cells owe their internal organization to self-organized protein patterns, which originate and adapt to growth and external stimuli via a process that is as complex as it is little understood. Here, we study the emergence, stability, and state transitions of multistable Min protein oscillation patterns in live Escherichia coli bacteria during growth up to defined large dimensions. De novo formation of patterns from homogenous starting conditions is observed and studied both experimentally and in simulations. A new theoretical approach is developed for probing pattern stability under perturbations. Quantitative experiments and simulations show that, once established, Min oscillations tolerate a large degree of intracellular heterogeneity, allowing distinctly different patterns to persist in different cells with the same geometry. Min patterns maintain their axes for hours in experiments, despite imperfections, expansion, and changes in cell shape during continuous cell growth. Transitions between multistable Min patterns are found to be rare events induced by strong intracellular perturbations. The instances of multistability studied here are the combined outcome of boundary growth and strongly nonlinear kinetics, which are characteristic of the reaction-diffusion patterns that pervade biology at many scales. PMID:27279643

  9. From Helix–Coil Transitions to Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Scheraga, Harold A.

    2009-01-01

    An evolution of procedures to simulate protein structure and folding pathways is described. From an initial focus on the helix–coil transition and on hydrogen-bonding and hydrophobic interactions, our original attempts to determine protein structure and folding pathways were based on an experimental approach. Experiments on the oxidative folding of reduced bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A) led to a mechanism by which the molecule folded to the native structure by a minimum of four different pathways. The experiments with RNase A were followed by development of a molecular mechanics approach, first, making use of global optimization procedures and then with molecular dynamics (MD), evolving from an all-atom to a united-residue model. This hierarchical MD approach facilitated probing of the folding trajectory to longer time scales than with all-atom MD, and hence led to the determination of complete folding trajectories, thus far for a protein containing as many as 75 amino acid residues. With increasing refinement of the computational procedures, the computed results are coming closer to experimental observations, providing an understanding as to how physics directs the folding process. PMID:18008324

  10. The "universal polymer backbone" concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollino, Joel Matthew

    This thesis begins with a brief analysis of the synthetic methodologies utilized in polymer science. A conclusion is drawn inferring that upper limits in molecular design are inevitable, arising as a direct consequence of the predominance of covalent strategies in the field. To address these concerns, the 'universal polymer backbone' (UPB) concept has been hypothesized. A UPB has been defined as any copolymer, side-chain functionalized with multiple recognition elements that are individually capable of forming strong, directional, and reversible non-covalent bonds. Non-covalent functionalization of these scaffolds can lead to the formation of a multitude of new polymer structures, each stemming from a single parent or 'universal polymer backbone'. To prepare such a UPB, isomerically pure exo-norbornene esters containing either a PdII SCS pincer complex or a diaminopyridine residue were synthesized, polymerized, and copolymerized via ROMP. All polymerizations were living under mild reaction conditions. Kinetic studies showed that the kp values are highly dependent upon the isomeric purity but completely independent of the terminal recognition units. Non-covalent functionalization of these copolymers was accomplished via (1) directed self-assembly, (2) multi-step self-assembly , and (3) one-step orthogonal self-assembly. This system shows complete specificity of each recognition motif for its complementary unit with no observable changes in the association constant upon functionalization. To explore potential applications of this UPB concept, random terpolymers possessing high concentrations of pendant alkyl chains and small amounts of recognition units were synthesized. Non-covalent crosslinking using a directed functionalization strategy resulted in dramatic increases in solution viscosities for metal crosslinked polymers with only minor changes in viscosity for hydrogen bonding motifs. The crosslinked materials were further functionalized via self-assembly by

  11. Flexible backbone aromatic polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St.clair, Terry L.

    1988-01-01

    Continuing research at Langley Research Center on the synthesis and development of new inexpensive flexible aromatic polyimides as adhesives has resulted in a material identified as LARC-F-SO2 with similarities to polyimidesulfone, PISO2, and other flexible backbone polyimides recently reported by Progar and St. Clair. Also prepared and evaluated was an endcapped version of PISO2. These two polymers were compared with LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI, polyimides research in our laboratory and reported in the literature. The adhesive evaluation, primarily based on lap shear strength (LSS) tests at RT, 177 C and 204 C, involved preparing adhesive tapes, conducting bonding studies and exposing lap shear specimens to 204 C air for up to 1000 hrs and to a 72-hour water boil. The type of adhesive failure as well as the Tg was determined for the fractured specimens. The results indicate that LARC-TPI provides the highest LSSs. LARC-F-SO2, LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI all retain their strengths after thermal exposure for 1000 hrs and PISO2 retains greater than 80 percent of its control strengths. After a 72-hr water boil exposure, most of the four adhesive systems showed reduced strengths for all test temperatures although still retaining a high percentage of their original strength (greater than 60 percent) except for one case. The predominant failure type was cohesive with no significant change in the Tgs.

  12. Flexible backbone aromatic polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St. Clair, Terry L.

    1989-01-01

    Continuing research at Langley Research Center on the synthesis and development of new inexpensive flexible aromatic polyimides as adhesives has resulted in a material identified as LARC-F-SO2 with similarities to polyimidesulfone, PISO2, and other flexible backbone polyimides recently reported by Progar and St. Clair. Also prepared and evaluated was an endcapped version of PISO2. These two polymers were compared with LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI, polyimides research in our laboratory and reported in the literature. The adhesive evaluation, primarily based on lap shear strength (LSS) tests at RT, 177 C and 204 C, involved preparing adhesive tapes, conducting bonding studies and exposing lap shear specimens to 204 C air for up to 1000 hrs and to a 72-hour water boil. The type of adhesive failure as well as the Tg was determined for the fractured specimens. The results indicate that LARC-TPI provides the highest LSSs. LARC-F-SO2, LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI all retain their strengths after thermal exposure for 1000 hrs and PISO2 retains greater than 80 percent of its control strengths. After a 72-hr water boil exposure, most of the four adhesive systems showed reduced strengths for all test temperatures although still retaining a high percentage of their original strength (greater than 60 percent) except for one case. The predominant failure type was cohesive with no significant change in the Tgs.

  13. Free backbone carbonyls mediate rhodopsin activation.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Naoki; Pope, Andreyah; Sanchez-Reyes, Omar B; Eilers, Markus; Opefi, Chikwado A; Ziliox, Martine; Reeves, Philip J; Smith, Steven O

    2016-08-01

    Conserved prolines in the transmembrane helices of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are often considered to function as hinges that divide the helix into two segments capable of independent motion. Depending on their potential to hydrogen-bond, the free C=O groups associated with these prolines can facilitate conformational flexibility, conformational switching or stabilization of the receptor structure. To address the role of conserved prolines in family A GPCRs through solid-state NMR spectroscopy, we focus on bovine rhodopsin, a GPCR in the visual receptor subfamily. The free backbone C=O groups on helices H5 and H7 stabilize the inactive rhodopsin structure through hydrogen-bonds to residues on adjacent helices. In response to light-induced isomerization of the retinal chromophore, hydrogen-bonding interactions involving these C=O groups are released, thus facilitating repacking of H5 and H7 onto the transmembrane core of the receptor. These results provide insights into the multiple structural and functional roles of prolines in membrane proteins. PMID:27376589

  14. Glass transitions in aqueous solutions of protein (bovine serum albumin).

    PubMed

    Shinyashiki, Naoki; Yamamoto, Wataru; Yokoyama, Ayame; Yoshinari, Takeo; Yagihara, Shin; Kita, Rio; Ngai, K L; Capaccioli, Simone

    2009-10-29

    Measurements by adiabatic calorimetry of heat capacities and enthalpy relaxation rates of a 20% (w/w) aqueous solution of bovine serum albumin (BSA) by Kawai, Suzuki, and Oguni [Biophys. J. 2006, 90, 3732] have found several enthalpy relaxations at long times indicating different processes undergoing glass transitions. In a quenched sample, one enthalpy relaxation at around 110 K and another over a wide temperature range (120-190 K) were observed. In a sample annealed at 200-240 K after quenching, three separated enthalpy relaxations at 110, 135, and above 180 K were observed. Dynamics of processes probed by adiabatic calorimetric data are limited to long times on the order of 10(3) s. A fuller understanding of the processes can be gained by probing the dynamics over a wider time/frequency range. Toward this goal, we performed broadband dielectric measurements of BSA-water mixtures at various BSA concentrations over a wide frequency range of thirteen decades from 2 mHz to 1.8 GHz at temperatures from 80 to 270 K. Three relevant relaxation processes were detected. For relaxation times equal to 100 s, the three processes are centered approximately at 110, 135, and 200 K, in good agreement with those observed by adiabatic calorimetry. We have made the following interpretation of the molecular origins of the three processes. The fastest relaxation process having relaxation time of 100 or 1000 s at ca. 110 K is due to the secondary relaxation of uncrystallized water (UCW) in the hydration shell. The intermediate relaxation process with 100 s relaxation time at ca. 135 K is due to ice. The slowest relaxation process having relaxation time of 100 s at ca. 200 K is interpreted to originate from local chain conformation fluctuations of protein slaved by water. Experimental evidence supporting these interpretations include the change of temperature dependence of the relaxation time of the UCW at approximately T(gBSA) approximately = 200 K, the glass transition temperature of

  15. Transitive closure and metric inequality of weighted graphs:detecting protein interaction modules using cliques

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Chris; He, Xiaofeng; Xiong, Hui; Peng, Hanchuan; Holbrook,Stephen R.

    2006-06-02

    We study transitivity properties of edge weights in complex networks. We show that enforcing transitivity leads to a transitivity inequality which is equivalent to ultra-metric inequality. This can be used to define transitive closure on weighted undirected graphs, which can be computed using a modified Floyd-Warshall algorithm. We outline several applications and present results of detecting protein functional modules in a protein interaction network.

  16. Pendant Dynamics of Ethylene-Oxide Containing Polymers with Diverse Backbones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Joshua; Wang, Jing-Han Helen; Chen, Quan; Runt, James; Colby, Ralph

    In the last twenty years, a wide variety of ion conducting polymers have used ether oxygens to facilitate ion conduction, and it is therefore important to understand the dynamics of ether oxygens (EOs) when attached to different polymer backbones. Four different EO-containing polymer architectures are studied by dielectric spectroscopy to understand the backbone effect on the EO dipoles. Polysiloxanes, polyphosphazenes, polymethylmethacrylates, and a polyester ether are compared, with different EO pendant lengths for the siloxane and methylmethacrylate backbones. The flexible polysiloxanes and polyphosphazene backbones impart superior segmental mobility with a glass transition temperature 15 K lower than that of the organic backbone polymers. Short EO pendants are found to impart a lower static dielectric constant at comparable EO content as compared to longer EO pendants of either inorganic or organic backbones. The long-pendant polymethylmethacrylate polymers show two relaxations corresponding to fast EOs near the pendant tail end and slow EOs close to the slower backbone, whereas the long-pendant polysiloxane shows a single relaxation due to the siloxane backbone relaxing faster than the EO pendant. Supported by the NSF Division of Materials Research Polymers Program through Grants DMR-1404586 (RHC) and DMR-1505953 (JR).

  17. Statistical Mechanical Theory of Protein Conformation and Its Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yukio; Wako, Hiroshi; Saitô, Nobuhiko

    2007-07-01

    The statistical mechanical theory of the structural transitions of proteins is developed in accordance with the island model by considering the hydrophobic interactions and the entropy factors while connecting the two hydrophobic residues. The proteins treated here are apo-α-lactalbumin (1B9O), lysozyme (1LZ1), ferrocytochrome c (1CYC), cytochrome c (isozyme 1) (1YCC), chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 (2CI2), and ubiquitin (1UBQ). Among them, according to the experiments, 2CI2 and 1UBQ do not exhibit intermediate structures (two-state model), but others do exhibit intermediate structures that are sometimes termed molten globules (three-state model). The theory related to these facts is given in terms of the island model, specifically 1B9O and 1LZ1. The stability or instability of the intermediate structures is explained by the effects of entropy during folding and the amino acid sequence. The intermediate structure is composed of several stable islands, which become unstable during unfolding.

  18. Parathyroid Hormone–Related Protein Promotes Epithelial–Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Ardura, Juan Antonio; Rayego-Mateos, Sandra; Rámila, David; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important process that contributes to renal fibrogenesis. TGF-β1 and EGF stimulate EMT. Recent studies suggested that parathyroid hormone–related protein (PTHrP) promotes fibrogenesis in the damaged kidney, apparently dependent on its interaction with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), but whether it also interacts with TGF-β and EGF to modulate EMT is unknown. Here, PTHrP(1-36) increased TGF-β1 in cultured tubuloepithelial cells and TGF-β blockade inhibited PTHrP-induced EMT-related changes, including upregulation of α-smooth muscle actin and integrin-linked kinase, nuclear translocation of Snail, and downregulation of E-cadherin and zonula occludens-1. PTHrP(1-36) also induced EGF receptor (EGFR) activation; inhibition of protein kinase C and metalloproteases abrogated this activation. Inhibition of EGFR activation abolished these EMT-related changes, the activation of ERK1/2, and upregulation of TGF-β1 and VEGF by PTHrP(1-36). Moreover, inhibition of ERK1/2 blocked EMT induced by either PTHrP(1-36), TGF-β1, EGF, or VEGF. In vivo, obstruction of mouse kidneys led to changes consistent with EMT and upregulation of TGF-β1 mRNA, p-EGFR protein, and PTHrP. Taken together, these data suggest that PTHrP, TGF-β, EGF, and VEGF might cooperate through activation of ERK1/2 to induce EMT in renal tubuloepithelial cells. PMID:19959711

  19. External Tank - The Structure Backbone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welzyn, Kenneth; Pilet, Jeffrey C.; Diecidue-Conners, Dawn; Worden, Michelle; Guillot, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    The External Tank forms the structural backbone of the Space Shuttle in the launch configuration. Because the tank flies to orbital velocity with the Space Shuttle Orbiter, minimization of weight is mandatory, to maximize payload performance. Choice of lightweight materials both for structure and thermal conditioning was necessary. The tank is large, and unique manufacturing facilities, tooling, handling, and transportation operations were required. Weld processes and tooling evolved with the design as it matured through several block changes, to reduce weight. Non Destructive Evaluation methods were used to assure integrity of welds and thermal protection system materials. The aluminum-lithium alloy was used near the end of the program and weld processes and weld repair techniques had to be refined. Development and implementation of friction stir welding was a substantial technology development incorporated during the Program. Automated thermal protection system application processes were developed for the majority of the tank surface. Material obsolescence was an issue throughout the 40 year program. The final configuration and tank weight enabled international space station assembly in a high inclination orbit allowing international cooperation with the Russian Federal Space Agency. Numerous process controls were implemented to assure product quality, and innovative proof testing was accomplished prior to delivery. Process controls were implemented to assure cleanliness in the production environment, to control contaminants, and to preclude corrosion. Each tank was accepted via rigorous inspections, including non-destructive evaluation techniques, proof testing, and all systems testing. In the post STS-107 era, the project focused on ascent debris risk reduction. This was accomplished via stringent process controls, post flight assessment using substantially improved imagery, and selective redesigns. These efforts were supported with a number of test programs to

  20. NET amyloidogenic backbone in human activated neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Pulze, L; Bassani, B; Gini, E; D'Antona, P; Grimaldi, A; Luini, A; Marino, F; Noonan, D M; Tettamanti, G; Valvassori, R; de Eguileor, M

    2016-03-01

    Activated human neutrophils produce a fibrillar DNA network [neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs)] for entrapping and killing bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses. Our results suggest that the neutrophil extracellular traps show a resistant amyloidogenic backbone utilized for addressing reputed proteins and DNA against the non-self. The formation of amyloid fibrils in neutrophils is regulated by the imbalance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cytoplasm. The intensity and source of the ROS signal is determinant for promoting stress-associated responses such as amyloidogenesis and closely related events: autophagy, exosome release, activation of the adrenocorticotrophin hormone/α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (ACTH/α-MSH) loop and synthesis of specific cytokines. These interconnected responses in human activated neutrophils, that have been evaluated from a morphofunctional and quantitative viewpoint, represent primitive, but potent, innate defence mechanisms. In invertebrates, circulating phagocytic immune cells, when activated, show responses similar to those described previously for activated human neutrophils. Invertebrate cells within endoplasmic reticulum cisternae produce a fibrillar material which is then assembled into an amyloidogenic scaffold utilized to convey melanin close to the invader. These findings, in consideration to the critical role played by NET in the development of several pathologies, could explain the structural resistance of these scaffolds and could provide the basis for developing new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in immunomediated diseases in which the innate branch of the immune system has a pivotal role. PMID:26462606

  1. Design of HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors with Amino-bis-tetrahydrofuran Derivatives as P2-Ligands to Enhance Backbone-Binding Interactions. Synthesis, Biological Evaluation, and Protein-Ligand X-ray Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Martyr, Cuthbert D.; Osswald, Heather L.; Sheri, Venkat Reddy; Kassekert, Luke A.; Chen, Shujing; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Hayashi, Hironori; Aoki, Manabu; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2015-10-30

    Structure-based design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a series of very potent HIV-1 protease inhibitors are described. In an effort to improve backbone ligand–binding site interactions, we have incorporated basic-amines at the C4 position of the bis-tetrahydrofuran (bis-THF) ring. We speculated that these substituents would make hydrogen bonding interactions in the flap region of HIV-1 protease. Synthesis of these inhibitors was performed diastereoselectively. A number of inhibitors displayed very potent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity. Inhibitors 25f, 25i, and 25j were evaluated against a number of highly-PI-resistant HIV-1 strains, and they exhibited improved antiviral activity over darunavir. Two high resolution X-ray structures of 25f- and 25g-bound HIV-1 protease revealed unique hydrogen bonding interactions with the backbone carbonyl group of Gly48 as well as with the backbone NH of Gly48 in the flap region of the enzyme active site. These ligand–binding site interactions are possibly responsible for their potent activity.

  2. Simple Model Study of Phase Transition Properties of Isolated and Aggregated Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yong-Yun; Yi, Wei-Qi; Zhang, Lin-Xi

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the phase transition properties of isolated and aggregated protein by exhaustive numerical study in the confined conformation space with maximally compact lattice model. The study within the confined conformation space shows some general folding properties. Various sequences show different folding properties: two-state folding, three-state folding and prion-like folding behavior. We find that the aggregated protein holds a more evident transition than isolated one and the transition temperature is generally lower than that in isolated case.

  3. Solution Structure and Backbone Dynamics of Streptopain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chih-Chieh; Houng, Hsiang-Chee; Chen, Chun-Liang; Wang, Pei-Ju; Kuo, Chih-Feng; Lin, Yee-Shin; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lin, Ming T.; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Huang, Wenya; Chuang, Woei-Jer

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SPE B) is a cysteine protease expressed by Streptococcus pyogenes. The D9N, G163S, G163S/A172S, and G239D mutant proteins were expressed to study the effect of the allelic variants on their protease activity. In contrast to other mutants, the G239D mutant was ∼12-fold less active. The Gly-239 residue is located within the C-terminal S230-G239 region, which cannot be observed in the x-ray structure. The three-dimensional structure and backbone dynamics of the 28-kDa mature SPE B (mSPE B) were determined. Unlike the x-ray structure of the 40-kDa zymogen SPE B (proSPE B), we observed the interactions between the C-terminal loop and the active site residues in mSPE B. The structural differences between mSPE B and proSPE B were the conformation of the C-terminal loop and the orientation of the catalytic His-195 residue, suggesting that activation and inactivation of SPE B is involved in the His-195 side-chain rotation. Dynamics analysis of mSPE B and the mSPE B/inhibitor complexes showed that the catalytic and C-terminal loops were the most flexible regions with low order parameter values of 0.5 to 0.8 and exhibited the motion on the ps/ns timescale. These findings suggest that the flexible C-terminal loop of SPE B may play an important role in controlling the substrate binding, resulting in its broad substrate specificity. PMID:19237546

  4. Transitive closure and metric inequality of weighted graphs: detecting protein interaction modules using cliques.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chris; He, Xiaofeng; Xiong, Hui; Peng, Hanchuan; Holbrook, Stephen R

    2006-01-01

    We study transitivity properties of edge weights in complex networks. We show that enforcing transitivity leads to a transitivity inequality which is equivalent to ultra-metric inequality. This can be used to define transitive closure on weighted undirected graphs, which can be computed using a modified Floyd-Warshall algorithm. These new concepts are extended to dissimilarity graphs and triangle inequalities. From this, we extend the clique concept from unweighted graph to weighted graph. We outline several applications and present results of detecting protein functional modules in a protein interaction network. PMID:18399069

  5. Identification of key residues for protein conformational transition using elastic network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ji Guo; Jin Xu, Xian; Hua Li, Chun; Chen, Wei Zu; Wang, Cun Xin

    2011-11-01

    Proteins usually undergo conformational transitions between structurally disparate states to fulfill their functions. The large-scale allosteric conformational transitions are believed to involve some key residues that mediate the conformational movements between different regions of the protein. In the present work, a thermodynamic method based on the elastic network model is proposed to predict the key residues involved in protein conformational transitions. In our method, the key functional sites are identified as the residues whose perturbations largely influence the free energy difference between the protein states before and after transition. Two proteins, nucleotide binding domain of the heat shock protein 70 and human/rat DNA polymerase β, are used as case studies to identify the critical residues responsible for their open-closed conformational transitions. The results show that the functionally important residues mainly locate at the following regions for these two proteins: (1) the bridging point at the interface between the subdomains that control the opening and closure of the binding cleft; (2) the hinge region between different subdomains, which mediates the cooperative motions between the corresponding subdomains; and (3) the substrate binding sites. The similarity in the positions of the key residues for these two proteins may indicate a common mechanism in their conformational transitions.

  6. Statistical Analysis of RNA Backbone

    PubMed Central

    Hershkovitz, Eli; Sapiro, Guillermo; Tannenbaum, Allen; Williams, Loren Dean

    2009-01-01

    Local conformation is an important determinant of RNA catalysis and binding. The analysis of RNA conformation is particularly difficult due to the large number of degrees of freedom (torsion angles) per residue. Proteins, by comparison, have many fewer degrees of freedom per residue. In this work, we use and extend classical tools from statistics and signal processing to search for clusters in RNA conformational space. Results are reported both for scalar analysis, where each torsion angle is separately studied, and for vectorial analysis, where several angles are simultaneously clustered. Adapting techniques from vector quantization and clustering to the RNA structure, we find torsion angle clusters and RNA conformational motifs. We validate the technique using well-known conformational motifs, showing that the simultaneous study of the total torsion angle space leads to results consistent with known motifs reported in the literature and also to the finding of new ones. PMID:17048391

  7. Sequence-specific transitions of the torsion angle gamma change the polar-hydrophobic profile of the DNA grooves: implication for indirect protein-DNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Zhitnikova, Mariia Yu; Boryskina, Olena P; Shestopalova, Anna V

    2014-01-01

    Variations of the shape and polarity of the DNA grooves caused by changes of the DNA conformation play an important role in the DNA readout. Despite the fact that non-canonical trans and gauche- conformations of the DNA backbone angle γ (O5'-C5'-C4'-C3') are frequently found in the DNA crystal structures, their possible role in the DNA recognition has not been studied systematically. In order to fill in this gap, we analyze the available high-resolution crystal structures of the naked and complexed DNA. The analysis shows that the non-canonical γ angle conformations are present both in the naked and bound DNA, more often in the bound vs. naked DNA, and in the nucleotides with the A-like vs. the B-like sugar pucker. The alternative angle γ torsions are more frequently observed in the purines with the A-like sugar pucker and in the pyrimidines with the B-like sugar conformation. The minor groove of the nucleotides with non-canonical γ angle conformation is more polar, while the major groove is more hydrophobic than in the nucleotides with the classical γ torsions due to variations in exposure of the polar and hydrophobic groups of the DNA backbone. The propensity of the nucleotides with different γ angle conformations to participate in the protein-nucleic acid contacts in the minor and major grooves is connected with their sugar pucker and sequence-specific. Our findings imply that the angle γ transitions contribute to the process of the protein-DNA recognition due to modification of the polar/hydrophobic profile of the DNA grooves. PMID:23998351

  8. AbDesign: an algorithm for combinatorial backbone design guided by natural conformations and sequences

    PubMed Central

    Lapidoth, Gideon D.; Baran, Dror; Pszolla, Gabriele M.; Norn, Christoffer; Alon, Assaf; Tyka, Michael D.; Fleishman, Sarel J.

    2016-01-01

    Computational design of protein function has made substantial progress, generating new enzymes, binders, inhibitors, and nanomaterials not previously seen in nature. However, the ability to design new protein backbones for function – essential to exert control over all polypeptide degrees of freedom – remains a critical challenge. Most previous attempts to design new backbones computed the mainchain from scratch. Here, instead, we describe a combinatorial backbone and sequence optimization algorithm called AbDesign, which leverages the large number of sequences and experimentally determined molecular structures of antibodies to construct new antibody models, dock them against target surfaces and optimize their sequence and backbone conformation for high stability and binding affinity. We used the algorithm to produce antibody designs that target the same molecular surfaces as nine natural, high-affinity antibodies; in six the backbone conformation at the core of the antibody binding surface is similar to the natural antibody targets, and in several cases sequence and sidechain conformations recapitulate those seen in the natural antibodies. In the case of an anti-lysozyme antibody, designed antibody CDRs at the periphery of the interface, such as L1 and H2, show a greater backbone conformation diversity than the CDRs at the core of the interface, and increase the binding surface area compared to the natural antibody, which could enhance affinity and specificity. PMID:25670500

  9. CEP290 tethers flagellar transition zone microtubules to the membrane and regulates flagellar protein content

    PubMed Central

    Craige, Branch; Tsao, Che-Chia; Diener, Dennis R.; Hou, Yuqing; Lechtreck, Karl-Ferdinand; Rosenbaum, Joel L.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in human CEP290 cause cilia-related disorders that range in severity from isolated blindness to perinatal lethality. Here, we describe a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant in which most of the CEP290 gene is deleted. Immunoelectron microscopy indicated that CEP290 is located in the flagellar transition zone in close association with the prominent microtubule–membrane links there. Ultrastructural analysis revealed defects in these microtubule–membrane connectors, resulting in loss of attachment of the flagellar membrane to the transition zone microtubules. Biochemical analysis of isolated flagella revealed that the mutant flagella have abnormal protein content, including abnormal levels of intraflagellar transport proteins and proteins associated with ciliopathies. Experiments with dikaryons showed that CEP290 at the transition zone is dynamic and undergoes rapid turnover. The results indicate that CEP290 is required to form microtubule–membrane linkers that tether the flagellar membrane to the transition zone microtubules, and is essential for controlling flagellar protein composition. PMID:20819941

  10. WDM backbone network with guaranteed performance planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Peng; Sheng, Wang; Zhong, Xusi; Li, Lemin

    2005-11-01

    Wavelength-Division multiplexing (WDM), which allows a single fibre to carry multiple signals simultaneously, has been widely used to increase link capacity and is a promising technology in backbone transport network. But designing such WDM backbone network is hard for two reasons, one is the uncertainty of future traffic demand, the other is difficulty of planning of the backup resource for failure conditions. As a result, enormous amount of link capacity for the network has to be provided for the network. Recently, a new approach called Valiant Load-Balanced Scheme (VLBS) has been proposed to design the WDM backbone network. The network planned by Valiant Load-Balanced Scheme is insensitive to the traffic and continues to guarantee performance under a user defined number of link or node failures. In this paper, the Valiant Load-Balanced Scheme (VLBS) for backbone network planning has been studied and a new Valiant Load-Balanced Scheme has been proposed. Compared with the early work, the new Valiant Load-Balanced Scheme is much more general and can be used for the computation of the link capacity of both homogeneous and heterogeneous networks. The abbreviation for the general Valiant Load-Balanced Scheme is GVLBS. After a brief description of the VLBS, we will give the detail derivation of the GVLBS. The central concept of the derivation of GVLBS is transforming the heterogeneous network into a homogeneous network, and taking advantage of VLBS to get GVLBS. Such transformation process is described and the derivation and analysis of GVLBS for link capacity under normal and failure conditions is also given. The numerical results show that GVLBS can compute the minimum link capacity required for the heterogeneous backbone network under different conditions (normal or failure).

  11. Conformational transition in signal transduction: metastable states and transition pathways in the activation of a signaling protein.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Rahul; Yan, Honggao; Cukier, Robert I

    2015-06-01

    Signal transduction is of vital importance to the growth and adaptation of living organisms. The key to understand mechanisms of biological signal transduction is elucidation of the conformational dynamics of its signaling proteins, as the activation of a signaling protein is fundamentally a process of conformational transition from an inactive to an active state. A predominant form of signal transduction for bacterial sensing of environmental changes in the wild or inside their hosts is a variety of two-component systems, in which the conformational transition of a response regulator (RR) from an inactive to an active state initiates responses to the environmental changes. Here, RR activation has been investigated using RR468 as a model system by extensive unbiased all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit solvent, starting from snapshots along a targeted MD trajectory that covers the conformational transition. Markov state modeling, transition path theory, and geometric analyses of the wealth of the MD data have provided a comprehensive description of the RR activation. It involves a network of metastable states, with one metastable state essentially the same as the inactive state and another very similar to the active state that are connected via a small set of intermediates. Five major pathways account for >75% of the fluxes of the conformational transition from the inactive to the active-like state. The thermodynamic stability of the states and the activation barriers between states are found, to identify rate-limiting steps. The conformal transition is initiated predominantly by movements of the β3α3 loop, followed by movements of the β4α4-loop and neighboring α4 helix region, and capped by additional movements of the β3α3 loop. A number of transient hydrophobic and hydrogen bond interactions are revealed, and they may be important for the conformational transition. PMID:25945797

  12. Topological Transitions in Mitochondrial Membranes controlled by Apoptotic Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwee Lai, Ghee; Sanders, Lori K.; Mishra, Abhijit; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Ivashyna, Olena; Schlesinger, Paul H.

    2010-03-01

    The Bcl-2 family comprises pro-apoptotic proteins, capable of permeabilizing the mitochondrial membrane, and anti-apoptotic members interacting in an antagonistic fashion to regulate programmed cell death (apoptosis). They offer potential therapeutic targets to re-engage cellular suicide in tumor cells but the extensive network of implicated protein-protein interactions has impeded full understanding of the decision pathway. We show, using synchrotron x-ray diffraction, that pro-apoptotic proteins interact with mitochondrial-like model membranes to generate saddle-splay (negative Gaussian) curvature topologically required for pore formation, while anti-apoptotic proteins can deactivate curvature generation by molecules drastically different from Bcl-2 family members and offer evidence for membrane-curvature mediated interactions general enough to affect very disparate systems.

  13. Unraveling protein stabilization mechanisms: vitrification and water replacement in a glass transition temperature controlled system.

    PubMed

    Grasmeijer, N; Stankovic, M; de Waard, H; Frijlink, H W; Hinrichs, W L J

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of the two main mechanisms used to explain the stabilization of proteins by sugar glasses during drying and subsequent storage: the vitrification and the water replacement theory. Although in literature protein stability is often attributed to either vitrification or water replacement, both mechanisms could play a role and they should be considered simultaneously. A model protein, alkaline phosphatase, was incorporated in either inulin or trehalose by spray drying. To study the storage stability at different glass transition temperatures, a buffer which acts as a plasticizer, ammediol, was incorporated in the sugar glasses. At low glass transition temperatures (<50°C), the enzymatic activity of the protein strongly decreased during storage at 60°C. Protein stability increased when the glass transition temperature was raised considerably above the storage temperature. This increased stability could be attributed to vitrification. A further increase of the glass transition temperature did not further improve stability. In conclusion, vitrification plays a dominant role in stabilization at glass transition temperatures up to 10 to 20°C above storage temperature, depending on whether trehalose or inulin is used. On the other hand, the water replacement mechanism predominantly determines stability at higher glass transition temperatures. PMID:23360765

  14. Interplay among side chain sequence, backbone composition, and residue rigidification in polypeptide folding and assembly

    PubMed Central

    Horne, W. Seth; Price, Joshua L.; Gellman, Samuel H.

    2008-01-01

    The extent to which polypeptide conformation depends on side-chain composition and sequence has been widely studied, but less is known about the importance of maintaining an α-amino acid backbone. Here, we examine a series of peptides with backbones that feature different repeating patterns of α- and β-amino acid residues but an invariant side-chain sequence. In the pure α-backbone, this sequence corresponds to the previously studied peptide GCN4-pLI, which forms a very stable four-helix bundle quaternary structure. Physical characterization in solution and crystallographic structure determination show that a variety of α/β-peptide backbones can adopt sequence-encoded quaternary structures similar to that of the α prototype. There is a loss in helix bundle stability upon β-residue incorporation; however, stability of the quaternary structure is not a simple function of β-residue content. We find that cyclically constrained β-amino acid residues can stabilize the folds of α/β-peptide GCN4-pLI analogues and restore quaternary structure formation to backbones that are predominantly unfolded in the absence of cyclic residues. Our results show a surprising degree of plasticity in terms of the backbone compositions that can manifest the structural information encoded in a sequence of amino acid side chains. These findings offer a framework for the design of nonnatural oligomers that mimic the structural and functional properties of proteins. PMID:18587049

  15. Protein palmitoylation activate zygotic gene expression during the maternal-to-zygotic transition.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhaoxia; Chen, Xueran; Li, Xian; He, Kun; Ji, Shufang; Shi, Wei; Hao, Aijun

    2016-06-24

    Upon fertilization, maternal factors direct development and trigger zygotic genome activation at the maternal-to-zygotic transition (MZT). However, the factors that activate the zygotic program in vertebrates are not well defined. Here, we found that protein palmitoylation played an important role in acquiring transcriptional competency and orchestrating the clearance of the maternal program in zebrafish. After inhibition of protein palmitoylation, zebrafish embryos developed normally before the Mid-Blastula Transition (MBT); however, they did not initiate epiboly. Moreover, our results showed that protein palmitoylation is required to initiate the zygotic developmental program and induce clearance of the maternal program by activating miR-430 expression. PMID:27235108

  16. Conformational Transitions in Protein-Protein Association: Binding of Fasciculin-2 to Acetylcholinesterase

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Jennifer M.; Radic, Zoran; Taylor, Palmer; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2006-01-01

    The neurotoxin fasciculin-2 (FAS2) is a picomolar inhibitor of synaptic acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The dynamics of binding between FAS2 and AChE is influenced by conformational fluctuations both before and after protein encounter. Submicrosecond molecular dynamics trajectories of apo forms of fasciculin, corresponding to different conformational substates, are reported here with reference to the conformational changes of loop I of this three-fingered toxin. This highly flexible loop exhibits an ensemble of conformations within each substate corresponding to its functions. The high energy barrier found between the two major substates leads to transitions that are slow on the timescale of the diffusional encounter of noninteracting FAS2 and AChE. The more stable of the two apo substates may not be the one observed in the complex with AChE. It seems likely that the more stable apo form binds rapidly to AChE and conformational readjustments then occur in the resulting encounter complex. PMID:16473897

  17. Membrane tension and peripheral protein density mediate membrane shape transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zheng; Baumgart, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis is a ubiquitous eukaryotic membrane budding, vesiculation and internalization process fulfilling numerous roles including compensation of membrane area increase after bursts of exocytosis. The mechanism of the coupling between these two processes to enable homeostasis is not well understood. Recently, an ultrafast endocytosis (UFE) pathway was revealed with a speed significantly exceeding classical clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). Membrane tension reduction is a potential mechanism by which endocytosis can be rapidly activated at remote sites. Here, we provide experimental evidence for a mechanism whereby membrane tension reduction initiates membrane budding and tubulation mediated by endocytic proteins, such as endophilin A1. We find that shape instabilities occur at well-defined membrane tensions and surface densities of endophilin. From our data, we obtain a membrane shape stability diagram that shows remarkable consistency with a quantitative model. This model applies to all laterally diffusive curvature-coupling proteins and therefore a wide range of endocytic proteins.

  18. Membrane tension and peripheral protein density mediate membrane shape transitions

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zheng; Baumgart, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis is a ubiquitous eukaryotic membrane budding, vesiculation, and internalization process fulfilling numerous roles including compensation of membrane area increase after bursts of exocytosis. The mechanism of the coupling between these two processes to enable homeostasis is not well understood. Recently, an ultrafast endocytosis (UFE) pathway was revealed with a speed significantly exceeding classical clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). Membrane tension reduction is a potential mechanism by which endocytosis can be rapidly activated at remote sites. Here we provide experimental evidence for a mechanism whereby membrane tension reduction initiates membrane budding and tubulation mediated by endocytic proteins such as endophilin A1. We find that shape instabilities occur at well-defined membrane tensions and surface densities of endophilin. From our data, we obtain a membrane shape stability diagram that shows remarkable consistency with a quantitative model. This model applies to all laterally diffusive curvature coupling proteins and therefore a wide range of endocytic proteins. PMID:25569184

  19. Membrane tension and peripheral protein density mediate membrane shape transitions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zheng; Baumgart, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis is a ubiquitous eukaryotic membrane budding, vesiculation and internalization process fulfilling numerous roles including compensation of membrane area increase after bursts of exocytosis. The mechanism of the coupling between these two processes to enable homeostasis is not well understood. Recently, an ultrafast endocytosis (UFE) pathway was revealed with a speed significantly exceeding classical clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). Membrane tension reduction is a potential mechanism by which endocytosis can be rapidly activated at remote sites. Here, we provide experimental evidence for a mechanism whereby membrane tension reduction initiates membrane budding and tubulation mediated by endocytic proteins, such as endophilin A1. We find that shape instabilities occur at well-defined membrane tensions and surface densities of endophilin. From our data, we obtain a membrane shape stability diagram that shows remarkable consistency with a quantitative model. This model applies to all laterally diffusive curvature-coupling proteins and therefore a wide range of endocytic proteins. PMID:25569184

  20. ANSS Backbone Station Installation and Site Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meremonte, M.; Leeds, A.; Overturf, D.; McMillian, J.; Allen, J.; McNamara, D.

    2004-12-01

    During 2004 several new broadband seismic stations have been deployed as a part of the USGS's Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) backbone and regional networks. New stations include: ERPA, MNTX, OGLA, AMTX, NATX, KCCO, BMO, MARC, TZTN, LAO, DGMT, REDW, KSU1, MOOW, TPAW, LOHW, RAMW. Permanent station locations were chosen to minimize the local noise conditions by recording continuous data and using a quantitative analysis of the statistical distribution of noise power estimates. For each one-hour segment of continuous data, a power spectral density (PSD) is estimated and smoothed in full octave averages at 1/8 octave intervals. Powers for each 1/8 period interval were then accumulated in one dB power bins. A statistical analysis of power bins yields probability density functions (PDFs) as a function of noise power for each of the octave bands at each station and component. Examination of earthquake signal, artifacts related to station operation and episodic cultural noise in the PDFs allow us to estimate both the overall station quality and the level of earth noise at each potential backbone site. The main function of a seismic network, such as the ANSS, is to provide high quality data for earthquake monitoring, source studies, and Earth structure research. The utility of seismic data is greatly increased when noise levels are reduced. A good quantification and understanding of seismic noise is a first step at reducing noise levels in seismic data and improving overall data quality from the ANSS backbone network.

  1. Max Delbruck Prize in Biological Physics Lecture: Single-molecule protein folding and transition paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, William

    2012-02-01

    The transition path is the tiny fraction of an equilibrium molecular trajectory when a transition occurs by crossing the free energy barrier between two states. It is a uniquely single-molecule property, and has not yet been observed experimentally for any system in the condensed phase. The importance of the transition path in protein folding is that it contains all of the mechanistic information on how a protein folds. As a major step toward observing transition paths, we have determined the average transition-path time for a fast and a slow-folding protein from a photon-by-photon analysis of fluorescence trajectories in single-molecule FRET experiments. While the folding rate coefficients differ by 10,000-fold, surprisingly, the transition-path times differ by less than 5-fold, showing that a successful barrier crossing event takes almost the same time for a fast- and a slow-folding protein, i.e. almost the same time to fold when it actually happens.

  2. Ratcheted molecular-dynamics simulations identify efficiently the transition state of protein folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiana, Guido; Camilloni, Carlo

    2012-12-01

    The atomistic characterization of the transition state (TS) is a fundamental step to improve the understanding of the folding mechanism and the function of proteins. From a computational point of view, the identification of the conformations that build out the transition state is particularly cumbersome, mainly because of the large computational cost of generating a statistically sound set of folding trajectories. Here we show that a biasing algorithm, based on the physics of the ratchet-and-pawl, can be used to approximate efficiently the transition state. The basic idea is that the algorithmic ratchet exerts a force on the protein when it is climbing the free-energy barrier, while it is inactive when it is descending. The transition state can be identified as the point of the trajectory where the ratchet changes regime. Besides discussing this strategy in general terms, we test it within a protein model whose transition state can be studied independently by plain molecular dynamics simulations. Finally, we show its power in explicit-solvent simulations, obtaining and characterizing a set of transition-state conformations for Acyl-Coenzyme A-Binding Protein (ACBP) and Chymotrypsin Inhibitor 2 (CI2).

  3. Phase Transitions in the Assembly of Multi-Valent Signaling Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pilong; Banjade, Sudeep; Cheng, Hui-Chun; Kim, Soyeon; Chen, Baoyu; Guo, Liang; Llaguno, Marc; Hollingsworth, Javoris V.; King, David S.; Banani, Salman F.; Russo, Paul S.; Jiang, Qiu-Xing; Nixon, B. Tracy; Rosen, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    Cells are organized on length scales ranging from Angstroms to microns. However, the mechanisms by which Angstrom-scale molecular properties are translated to micron-scale macroscopic properties are not well understood. Here we show that interactions between diverse, synthetic multivalent macromolecules (including multi-domain proteins and RNA) produce sharp, liquid-liquid demixing phase separations, generating micron-sized liquid droplets in aqueous solution. This macroscopic transition corresponds to a molecular transition between small complexes and large, dynamic supramolecular polymers. The concentrations needed for phase transition are directly related to valency of the interacting species. In the case of the actin regulatory protein, neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein (N-WASP) interacting with its established biological partners Nck and phosphorylated nephrin1, the phase transition corresponds to a sharp increase in activity toward the actin nucleation factor, Arp2/3 complex. The transition is governed by the degree of phosphorylation of nephrin, explaining how this property of the system can be controlled to regulatory effect by kinases. The widespread occurrence of multivalent systems suggests that phase transitions are likely used to spatially organize and biochemically regulate information throughout biology. PMID:22398450

  4. Characterization of the Golgi Complex Cleared of Proteins in Transit and Examination of Calcium Uptake Activities

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Randall S.; Jones, Steven M.; Dahl, Rolf H.; Nordeen, Mark H.; Howell, Kathryn E.

    1997-01-01

    To characterize endogenous molecules and activities of the Golgi complex, proteins in transit were >99% cleared from rat hepatocytes by using cycloheximide (CHX) treatment. The loss of proteins in transit resulted in condensation of the Golgi cisternae and stacks. Isolation of a stacked Golgi fraction is equally efficient with or without proteins in transit [control (CTL SGF1) and cycloheximide (CHX SGF1)]. Electron microscopy and morphometric analysis showed that >90% of the elements could be positively identified as Golgi stacks or cisternae. Biochemical analysis showed that the cis-, medial-, trans-, and TGN Golgi markers were enriched over the postnuclear supernatant 200- to 400-fold with and 400- to 700-fold without proteins in transit. To provide information on a mechanism for import of calcium required at the later stages of the secretory pathway, calcium uptake into CTL SGF1 and CHX SGF1 was examined. All calcium uptake into CTL SGF1 was dependent on a thapsigargin-resistant pump not resident to the Golgi complex and a thapsigargin-sensitive pump resident to the Golgi. Experiments using CHX SGF1 showed that the thapsigargin-resistant activity was a plasma membrane calcium ATPase isoform in transit to the plasma membrane and the thapsigargin-sensitive pump was a sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase isoform. In vivo both of these calcium ATPases function to maintain millimolar levels of calcium within the Golgi lumen. PMID:9348533

  5. Direct observation of transition paths during the folding of proteins and nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Krishna; Foster, Daniel A N; Dee, Derek R; Yu, Hao; Wang, Feng; Woodside, Michael T

    2016-04-01

    Transition paths, the fleeting trajectories through the transition states that dominate the dynamics of biomolecular folding reactions, encapsulate the critical information about how structure forms. Owing to their brief duration, however, they have not previously been observed directly. We measured transition paths for both nucleic acid and protein folding, using optical tweezers to observe the microscopic diffusive motion of single molecules traversing energy barriers. The average transit times and the shapes of the transit-time distributions agreed well with theoretical expectations for motion over the one-dimensional energy landscapes reconstructed for the same molecules, validating the physical theory of folding reactions. These measurements provide a first look at the critical microscopic events that occur during folding, opening exciting new avenues for investigating folding phenomena. PMID:27124461

  6. Analysis of Euglena gracilis Plastid-Targeted Proteins Reveals Different Classes of Transit Sequences▿

    PubMed Central

    Durnford, Dion G.; Gray, Michael W.

    2006-01-01

    The plastid of Euglena gracilis was acquired secondarily through an endosymbiotic event with a eukaryotic green alga, and as a result, it is surrounded by a third membrane. This membrane complexity raises the question of how the plastid proteins are targeted to and imported into the organelle. To further explore plastid protein targeting in Euglena, we screened a total of 9,461 expressed sequence tag (EST) clusters (derived from 19,013 individual ESTs) for full-length proteins that are plastid localized to characterize their targeting sequences and to infer potential modes of translocation. Of the 117 proteins identified as being potentially plastid localized whose N-terminal targeting sequences could be inferred, 83 were unique and could be classified into two major groups. Class I proteins have tripartite targeting sequences, comprising (in order) an N-terminal signal sequence, a plastid transit peptide domain, and a predicted stop-transfer sequence. Within this class of proteins are the lumen-targeted proteins (class IB), which have an additional hydrophobic domain similar to a signal sequence and required for further targeting across the thylakoid membrane. Class II proteins lack the putative stop-transfer sequence and possess only a signal sequence at the N terminus, followed by what, in amino acid composition, resembles a plastid transit peptide. Unexpectedly, a few unrelated plastid-targeted proteins exhibit highly similar transit sequences, implying either a recent swapping of these domains or a conserved function. This work represents the most comprehensive description to date of transit peptides in Euglena and hints at the complex routes of plastid targeting that must exist in this organism. PMID:16998072

  7. High throughput methods for analyzing transition metals in proteins on a microgram scale.

    PubMed

    Atanassova, Anelia; Högbom, Martin; Zamble, Deborah B

    2008-01-01

    Transition metals are among the most common ligands that contribute to the biochemical and physiological properties of proteins. In the course of structural proteomic projects, the detection of transition metal cofactors prior to the determination of a high-resolution structure is extremely beneficial. This information can be used to select tractable targets from the proteomic pipeline because the presence of a metal often improves protein stability and can be used to help solve the phasing problem in x-ray crystallography. Recombinant proteins are often purified with substoichiometric amounts of metal loaded, so additional metal may be needed to obtain the homogeneous protein solution crucial for structural analysis. Furthermore, identifying a metal cofactor provides a clue about the nature of the biological role of an unclassified protein and can be applied with structural data in the assignation of a putative function. Many of the existing methods for transition metal analysis of purified proteins have limitations, which include a requirement for a large quantity of protein or a reliance on equipment with a prohibitive cost.The authors have developed two simple high throughput methods for identifying metalloproteins on a microgram scale. Each of the techniques has distinct advantages and can be applied to address divergent experimental goals. The first method, based on simple luminescence and colorimetric reactions, is fast, cheap, and semiquantitative. The second method, which employs HPLC separation, is accurate and affords unambiguous metal identification. PMID:18542873

  8. Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This theme issue on transitions for individuals with disabilities contains nine papers discussing transition programs and issues. "Transition Issues for the 1990s," by Michael J. Ward and William D. Halloran, discusses self-determination, school responsibility for transition, continued educational engagement of at-risk students, and service…

  9. Conservation of Transit Peptide-Independent Protein Import into the Mitochondrial and Hydrogenosomal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Sriram; Stölting, Jan; Zimorski, Verena; Rada, Petr; Tachezy, Jan; Martin, William F.; Gould, Sven B.

    2015-01-01

    The origin of protein import was a key step in the endosymbiotic acquisition of mitochondria. Though the main translocon of the mitochondrial outer membrane, TOM40, is ubiquitous among organelles of mitochondrial ancestry, the transit peptides, or N-terminal targeting sequences (NTSs), recognised by the TOM complex, are not. To better understand the nature of evolutionary conservation in mitochondrial protein import, we investigated the targeting behavior of Trichomonas vaginalis hydrogenosomal proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and vice versa. Hydrogenosomes import yeast mitochondrial proteins even in the absence of their native NTSs, but do not import yeast cytosolic proteins. Conversely, yeast mitochondria import hydrogenosomal proteins with and without their short NTSs. Conservation of an NTS-independent mitochondrial import route from excavates to opisthokonts indicates its presence in the eukaryote common ancestor. Mitochondrial protein import is known to entail electrophoresis of positively charged NTSs across the electrochemical gradient of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Our present findings indicate that mitochondrial transit peptides, which readily arise from random sequences, were initially selected as a signal for charge-dependent protein targeting specifically to the mitochondrial matrix. Evolutionary loss of the electron transport chain in hydrogenosomes and mitosomes lifted the selective constraints that maintain positive charge in NTSs, allowing first the NTS charge, and subsequently the NTS itself, to be lost. This resulted in NTS-independent matrix targeting, which is conserved across the evolutionary divide separating trichomonads and yeast, and which we propose is the ancestral state of mitochondrial protein import. PMID:26338186

  10. Base-pairing potential identified by in vitro selection predicts the kinked RNA backbone observed in the crystal structure of the alfalfa mosaic virus RNA-coat protein complex.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Michael; Scott, Felicia; Guogas, Laura M; Gehrke, Lee

    2006-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the 3' terminus of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA in complex with an amino-terminal coat protein peptide revealed an unusual RNA fold with inter-AUGC basepairing stabilized by key arginine residues (Guogas, et al., 2004). To probe viral RNA interactions with the full-length coat protein, we have used in vitro genetic selection to characterize potential folding patterns among RNAs isolated from a complex randomized pool. Nitrocellulose filter retention, electrophoretic mobility bandshift analysis, and hydroxyl radical footprinting techniques were used to define binding affinities and to localize the potential RNA-protein interaction sites. Minimized binding sites were identified that included both the randomized domain and a portion of the constant regions of the selected RNAs. The selected RNAs, identified by their ability to bind full-length coat protein, have the potential to form the same unusual inter-AUGC Watson-Crick base pairs observed in the crystal structure, although the primary sequences diverge from the wild-type RNA. A constant feature of both the wild-type RNA and the selected RNAs is a G ribonucleotide in the third position of an AUGC-like repeat. Competitive binding assays showed that substituting adenosine for the constant guanosine in either the wild-type or selected RNAs impaired coat protein binding. These data suggest that the interactions observed in the RNA-peptide structure are likely recapitulated when the full-length protein binds. Further, the results underscore the power of in vitro genetic selection for probing RNA-protein structure and function. PMID:16312015

  11. Kinetic Definition of Protein Folding Transition State Ensembles and Reaction Coordinates

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Christopher D.; Rhee, Young Min; Pande, Vijay S.

    2006-01-01

    Using distributed molecular dynamics simulations we located four distinct folding transitions for a 39-residue ββαβ protein fold. To characterize the nature of each room temperature transition, we calculated the probability of transmission for 500 points along each free energy barrier. We introduced a method for determining transition states by employing the transmission probability, Ptrans, and determined which conformations were transition state ensemble members (Ptrans ≈ 0.5). The transmission probability may be used to characterize the barrier in several ways. For example, we ran simulations at 82°C, determined the change in Ptrans with temperature for all 2,000 conformations, and quantified Hammond behavior directly using Ptrans correlation. Additionally, we propose that diffusion along Ptrans may provide the configurational diffusion rate at the top of the barrier. Specifically, given a transition state conformation x0 with estimated Ptrans = 0.5, we selected a large set of subsequent conformations from independent trajectories, each exactly a small time δt after x0 (250 ps). Calculating Ptrans for the new trial conformations, we generated the P(Ptrans|δt = 250 ps) distribution that reflected diffusion. This approach provides a novel perspective on the diffusive nature of a protein folding transition and provides a framework for a quantitative study of activated relaxation kinetics. PMID:16617068

  12. Local conformational fluctuations can modulate the coupling between proton binding and global structural transitions in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Whitten, Steven T.; García-Moreno E., Bertrand; Hilser, Vincent J.

    2005-01-01

    Local conformational fluctuations in proteins can affect the coupling between ligand binding and global structural transitions. This finding was established by monitoring quantitatively how the population distribution in the ensemble of microstates of staphylococcal nuclease was affected by proton binding. Analysis of acid unfolding and proton-binding data with an ensemble-based model suggests that local fluctuations: (i) can be effective modulators of ligand-binding affinities, (ii) are important determinants of the cooperativity of ligand-driven global structural transitions, and (iii) are well represented thermodynamically as local unfolding processes. These studies illustrate how an ensemble-based description of proteins can be used to describe quantitatively the interdependence of local conformational fluctuations, ligand-binding processes, and global structural transitions. This level of understanding of the relationship between conformation, energy, and dynamics is required for a detailed mechanistic understanding of allostery, cooperativity, and other complex functional and regulatory properties of macromolecules. PMID:15767576

  13. Coarse-Grained Simulations of Heme Proteins: Validation and Study of Large Conformational Transitions.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Claudia L; Petruk, Ariel; Bringas, Mauro; Estrin, Dario A; Roitberg, Adrian E; Marti, Marcelo A; Capece, Luciana

    2016-07-12

    Heme proteins are ubiquitous in nature and perform many diverse functions in all kingdoms of life. Many of these functions are related to large-scale conformational transitions and allosteric processes. Sampling of these large conformational changes is computationally very challenging. In this context, coarse-grain simulations emerge as an efficient approach to explore the conformational landscape. In this work, we present a coarse-grained model of the heme group and thoroughly validate this model in different benchmark examples, which include the monomeric heme proteins myoglobin and neuroglobin and the tetrameric human hemoglobin where we evaluated the method's ability to explore conformational changes (as the formation of hexacoordinated species) and allosteric transitions (as the well-known R → T transition). The obtained results are compared with atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Overall, the results indicate that this approach conserves the essential dynamical information on different allosteric processes. PMID:27267322

  14. Lactate dehydrogenase X, malate dehydrogenase and total protein in rat spermatozoa during epididymal transit.

    PubMed

    Vermouth, N T; Carriazo, C S; Ponce, R H; Blanco, A

    1986-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase isozyme X (LDH X), malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and total soluble protein have been determined in lysates of spermatozoa isolated from caput, corpus and cauda of rat epididymis. Transit of spermatozoa through epididymis is accompanied by a reduction of LDH X, MDH and total protein per cell in sexually rested animals. The profiles of reduction along epididymal segments are different for the three variables studied. Mating with receptive females during the 5 days prior to determinations increases significantly the levels of MDH in spermatozoa from all sections of epididymis and produces increase of total soluble protein in the cells contained in cauda. PMID:3956158

  15. Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, David; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Includes four articles: "Career Aspirations" (Field); "Making the Transition to a New Curriculum" (Baker, Householder); "How about a 'Work to School' Transition?" (Glasberg); and "Technological Improvisation: Bringing CNC to Woodworking" (Charles, McDuffie). (SK)

  16. Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Sandy, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This "feature issue" focuses on transition from school to adult life for persons with disabilities. Included are "success stories," brief program descriptions, and a list of resources. Individual articles include the following titles and authors: "Transition: An Energizing Concept" (Paul Bates); "Transition Issues for the 1990s" (William Halloran…

  17. Core-Shell Model of Folding-Unfolding Transitions (UFT) in Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aroutiounian, Svetlana

    2008-03-01

    There are ˜10^N conformations for a protein of length N to sort out randomly in search of lowest free energy state. Can protein folding be simple and fast? Core-shell model introduces principles, proposes mechanisms and scores residues of fast, reversible UFT in protein. According to it, during UFT the realm of intra-residual interactions leads the residue motion. The scaffold of hydrophilic residues forms external shell of unstructured, tube-like protein in unfolded state, just as the hydrophobic residues form internal scaffold -- core, of the protein in folded state. As UFT proceeds, residue slides into lowest-score position permitted by its structure. Model accounts for experimentally observed features of UFT. It is based on three principles: 1) During UFT protein is virtual - its features or structure are inferred only statistically and with limited precision; 2) Mechanism of UFT memory is not longitudinal, but transverse; 3) Native design overrides specific features of residues - the alphabet of amino acids assumes an intrinsic score-function. Per-residue mechanism of UFT is proposed and score-function is described. Difference graphs of transitional score-function and average genome-wide abundance index show that our score-function is the order parameter of UFT in protein and by virtue of being it, reveals transitional key residues. It echoes the multiple-tier and funnel concepts of FEL perspective. Monte Carlo simulations of UFT in myoglobin illustrate the idea.

  18. A high-performance liquid chromatography method for determining transition metal content in proteins.

    PubMed

    Atanassova, Anelia; Lam, Robert; Zamble, Deborah B

    2004-12-01

    Transition metals are common components of cellular proteins and the detailed study of metalloproteins necessitates the identification and quantification of bound metal ions. Screening for metals is also an informative step in the initial characterization of the numerous unknown and unclassified proteins now coming through the proteomic pipeline. We have developed a high-performance liquid chromatography method for the quantitative determination of the most prevalent biological transition metals: manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, and zinc. The method is accurate and simple and can be adapted for automated high-throughput studies. The metal analysis involves acid hydrolysis to release the metal ions into solution, followed by ion separation on a mixed-bead ion-exchange column and absorbance detection after postcolumn derivatization with the metallochromic indicator 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol. The potential interferences by common components of protein solutions were investigated. The metal content of a variety of metalloproteins was analyzed and the data were compared to data obtained from inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. The sensitivity of the assay allows for the detection of 0.1-0.8 nmol, depending on the metal. The amount of protein required is governed by the size of the protein and the fraction of protein with metal bound. For routine analysis 50 microg was used but for many proteins 10 microg would be sufficient. The advantages, disadvantages, and possible applications of this method are discussed. PMID:15519577

  19. Differential Scanning Fluorimetry provides high throughput data on silk protein transitions.

    PubMed Central

    Vollrath, Fritz; Hawkins, Nick; Porter, David; Holland, Chris; Boulet-Audet, Maxime

    2014-01-01

    Here we present a set of measurements using Differential Scanning Fluorimetry (DSF) as an inexpensive, high throughput screening method to investigate the folding of silk protein molecules as they abandon their first native melt conformation, dehydrate and denature into their final solid filament conformation. Our first data and analyses comparing silks from spiders, mulberry and wild silkworms as well as reconstituted ‘silk' fibroin show that DSF can provide valuable insights into details of silk denaturation processes that might be active during spinning. We conclude that this technique and technology offers a powerful and novel tool to analyse silk protein transitions in detail by allowing many changes to the silk solutions to be tested rapidly with microliter scale sample sizes. Such transition mechanisms will lead to important generic insights into the folding patterns not only of silks but also of other fibrous protein (bio)polymers. PMID:25004800

  20. Differential Scanning Fluorimetry provides high throughput data on silk protein transitions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollrath, Fritz; Hawkins, Nick; Porter, David; Holland, Chris; Boulet-Audet, Maxime

    2014-07-01

    Here we present a set of measurements using Differential Scanning Fluorimetry (DSF) as an inexpensive, high throughput screening method to investigate the folding of silk protein molecules as they abandon their first native melt conformation, dehydrate and denature into their final solid filament conformation. Our first data and analyses comparing silks from spiders, mulberry and wild silkworms as well as reconstituted `silk' fibroin show that DSF can provide valuable insights into details of silk denaturation processes that might be active during spinning. We conclude that this technique and technology offers a powerful and novel tool to analyse silk protein transitions in detail by allowing many changes to the silk solutions to be tested rapidly with microliter scale sample sizes. Such transition mechanisms will lead to important generic insights into the folding patterns not only of silks but also of other fibrous protein (bio)polymers.

  1. Protein accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum as a non-equilibrium phase transition.

    PubMed

    Budrikis, Zoe; Costantini, Giulio; La Porta, Caterina A M; Zapperi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Several neurological disorders are associated with the aggregation of aberrant proteins, often localized in intracellular organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum. Here we study protein aggregation kinetics by mean-field reactions and three dimensional Monte carlo simulations of diffusion-limited aggregation of linear polymers in a confined space, representing the endoplasmic reticulum. By tuning the rates of protein production and degradation, we show that the system undergoes a non-equilibrium phase transition from a physiological phase with little or no polymer accumulation to a pathological phase characterized by persistent polymerization. A combination of external factors accumulating during the lifetime of a patient can thus slightly modify the phase transition control parameters, tipping the balance from a long symptomless lag phase to an accelerated pathological development. The model can be successfully used to interpret experimental data on amyloid-β clearance from the central nervous system. PMID:24722051

  2. Protein accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum as a non-equilibrium phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Budrikis, Zoe; Costantini, Giulio; La Porta, Caterina A. M.; Zapperi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Several neurological disorders are associated with the aggregation of aberrant proteins, often localized in intracellular organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum. Here we study protein aggregation kinetics by mean-field reactions and three dimensional Monte carlo simulations of diffusion-limited aggregation of linear polymers in a confined space, representing the endoplasmic reticulum. By tuning the rates of protein production and degradation, we show that the system undergoes a non-equilibrium phase transition from a physiological phase with little or no polymer accumulation to a pathological phase characterized by persistent polymerization. A combination of external factors accumulating during the lifetime of a patient can thus slightly modify the phase transition control parameters, tipping the balance from a long symptomless lag phase to an accelerated pathological development. The model can be successfully used to interpret experimental data on amyloid-β clearance from the central nervous system. PMID:24722051

  3. Thermogelling Biodegradable Polymers with Hydrophilic Backbones: PEG-g-PLGA

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Byeongmoon; Kibbey, Merinda R.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Won, You-Yeong; Gutowska, Anna

    2000-10-31

    The aqueous solutions of poly(ethylene glycol)grafted with poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) flow freely at room temperature but form gels at higher temperature. The existence of micelles in water at low polymer concentration was confirmed by Cro-transmission electron microscopy and dye solubilization studies. The micellar diameter and critical micelle concentration are about 9 nm and 0.47 wt.% respectively. The critical gel concentration, above which a gel phase appears was 16 wt.% and sol-to-gel transition temperature was slightly affected by the concentration in the range of 16 {approx} 25 wt.%. At sol-to-gel transition, viscosity increased abruptly and C-NMR showed molecular motion of hydrophilic poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) side-chains increased. The hydrogel of PEG-g-PLGA with hydrophilic backbones was transparent during degradation and remained a gel for one week, suggesting a promising material for short-term drug delivery.

  4. Identification of Arabidopsis SUMO-interacting proteins that regulate chromatin activity and developmental transitions

    PubMed Central

    Elrouby, Nabil; Bonequi, Mitzi Villajuana; Porri, Aimone; Coupland, George

    2013-01-01

    Posttranslational modification of proteins by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) plays essential roles in eukaryotic growth and development. Many covalently modified SUMO targets have been identified; however, the extent and significance of noncovalent interactions of SUMO with cellular proteins is poorly understood. Here, large-scale yeast two-hybrid screens repeatedly identified a surprisingly small number of proteins that interacted with three Arabidopsis SUMO isoforms. These SUMO-interacting proteins are nuclear and fall into two main categories: six histone or DNA methyltransferses or demethylases and six proteins that we show to be the evolutionary and functional homologs of SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs). The selectivity of the screen for several methylases and demethylases suggests that SUMO interaction with these proteins has a significant impact on chromatin methylation. Furthermore, the Arabidopsis STUbLs (AT-STUbLs) complemented to varying degrees the growth defects of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe STUbL mutant rfp1/rfp2, and three of them also complemented the genome integrity defects of this mutant, demonstrating that these proteins show STUbL activity. We show that one of the AT-STUbLs least related to the S. pombe protein, AT-STUbL4, has acquired a plant-specific function in the floral transition. It reduces protein levels of CYCLING DOF FACTOR 2, hence increasing transcript levels of CONSTANS and promoting flowering through the photoperiodic pathway. PMID:24255109

  5. Probing the Folding-Unfolding Transition of a Thermophilic Protein, MTH1880

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Youngjin; Han, Jeongmin; Yun, Ji-Hye; Chang, Iksoo; Lee, Weontae

    2016-01-01

    The folding mechanism of typical proteins has been studied widely, while our understanding of the origin of the high stability of thermophilic proteins is still elusive. Of particular interest is how an atypical thermophilic protein with a novel fold maintains its structure and stability under extreme conditions. Folding-unfolding transitions of MTH1880, a thermophilic protein from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, induced by heat, urea, and GdnHCl, were investigated using spectroscopic techniques including circular dichorism, fluorescence, NMR combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our results suggest that MTH1880 undergoes a two-state N to D transition and it is extremely stable against temperature and denaturants. The reversibility of refolding was confirmed by spectroscopic methods and size exclusion chromatography. We found that the hyper-stability of the thermophilic MTH1880 protein originates from an extensive network of both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions coordinated by the central β-sheet. Spectroscopic measurements, in combination with computational simulations, have helped to clarify the thermodynamic and structural basis for hyper-stability of the novel thermophilic protein MTH1880. PMID:26766214

  6. Myelin Membrane Assembly Is Driven by a Phase Transition of Myelin Basic Proteins Into a Cohesive Protein Meshwork

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Shweta; Snaidero, Nicolas; Pähler, Gesa; Frey, Steffen; Sánchez, Paula; Zweckstetter, Markus; Janshoff, Andreas; Schneider, Anja; Weil, Marie-Theres; Schaap, Iwan A. T.; Görlich, Dirk; Simons, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Rapid conduction of nerve impulses requires coating of axons by myelin. To function as an electrical insulator, myelin is generated as a tightly packed, lipid-rich multilayered membrane sheath. Knowledge about the mechanisms that govern myelin membrane biogenesis is required to understand myelin disassembly as it occurs in diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Here, we show that myelin basic protein drives myelin biogenesis using weak forces arising from its inherent capacity to phase separate. The association of myelin basic protein molecules to the inner leaflet of the membrane bilayer induces a phase transition into a cohesive mesh-like protein network. The formation of this protein network shares features with amyloid fibril formation. The process is driven by phenylalanine-mediated hydrophobic and amyloid-like interactions that provide the molecular basis for protein extrusion and myelin membrane zippering. These findings uncover a physicochemical mechanism of how a cytosolic protein regulates the morphology of a complex membrane architecture. These results provide a key mechanism in myelin membrane biogenesis with implications for disabling demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system. PMID:23762018

  7. Myelin membrane assembly is driven by a phase transition of myelin basic proteins into a cohesive protein meshwork.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Shweta; Snaidero, Nicolas; Pähler, Gesa; Frey, Steffen; Sánchez, Paula; Zweckstetter, Markus; Janshoff, Andreas; Schneider, Anja; Weil, Marie-Theres; Schaap, Iwan A T; Görlich, Dirk; Simons, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Rapid conduction of nerve impulses requires coating of axons by myelin. To function as an electrical insulator, myelin is generated as a tightly packed, lipid-rich multilayered membrane sheath. Knowledge about the mechanisms that govern myelin membrane biogenesis is required to understand myelin disassembly as it occurs in diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Here, we show that myelin basic protein drives myelin biogenesis using weak forces arising from its inherent capacity to phase separate. The association of myelin basic protein molecules to the inner leaflet of the membrane bilayer induces a phase transition into a cohesive mesh-like protein network. The formation of this protein network shares features with amyloid fibril formation. The process is driven by phenylalanine-mediated hydrophobic and amyloid-like interactions that provide the molecular basis for protein extrusion and myelin membrane zippering. These findings uncover a physicochemical mechanism of how a cytosolic protein regulates the morphology of a complex membrane architecture. These results provide a key mechanism in myelin membrane biogenesis with implications for disabling demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system. PMID:23762018

  8. Responsive Gel-Gel Phase Transitions in Artificially Engineered Protein Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, B. D.

    2012-02-01

    Artificially engineered protein hydrogels provide an attractive platform for biomedical materials due to their similarity to components of the native extracellular matrix. Engineering responsive transitions between shear-thinning and tough gel phases in these materials could potentially enable gels that are both shear-thinning and tough to be produced as novel injectable biomaterials. To engineer a gel with such transitions, a triblock copolymer with thermoresponsive polymer endblocks and an artificially engineered protein gel midblock is designed. Temperature is used to trigger a transition from a single network protein hydrogel phase to a double network phase with both protein and block copolymer networks present at different length scales. The thermodynamics of network formation and resulting structural changes are established using small-angle scattering, birefringence, and dynamic scanning calorimetry. The formation of the second network is shown to produce a large, nonlinear increase in the elastic modulus as well as enhancements in creep compliance and toughness. Although the gels show yielding behavior in both the single and double network regimes, a qualitative change in the deformation mechanism is observed due to the structural changes.

  9. Pre-transition effects mediate forces of assembly between transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Katira, Shachi; Mandadapu, Kranthi K; Vaikuntanathan, Suriyanarayanan; Smit, Berend; Chandler, David

    2016-01-01

    We present a mechanism for a generic, powerful force of assembly and mobility for transmembrane proteins in lipid bilayers. This force is a pre-transition (or pre-melting) effect for the first-order transition between ordered and disordered phases in the membrane. Using large-scale molecular simulation, we show that a protein with hydrophobic thickness equal to that of the disordered phase embedded in an ordered bilayer stabilizes a microscopic order-disorder interface. The stiffness of that interface is finite. When two such proteins approach each other, they assemble because assembly reduces the net interfacial energy. Analogous to the hydrophobic effect, we refer to this phenomenon as the 'orderphobic effect'. The effect is mediated by proximity to the order-disorder phase transition and the size and hydrophobic mismatch of the protein. The strength and range of forces arising from this effect are significantly larger than those that could arise from membrane elasticity for the membranes considered. PMID:26910009

  10. Pre-transition effects mediate forces of assembly between transmembrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Katira, Shachi; Mandadapu, Kranthi K; Vaikuntanathan, Suriyanarayanan; Smit, Berend; Chandler, David

    2016-01-01

    We present a mechanism for a generic, powerful force of assembly and mobility for transmembrane proteins in lipid bilayers. This force is a pre-transition (or pre-melting) effect for the first-order transition between ordered and disordered phases in the membrane. Using large-scale molecular simulation, we show that a protein with hydrophobic thickness equal to that of the disordered phase embedded in an ordered bilayer stabilizes a microscopic order–disorder interface. The stiffness of that interface is finite. When two such proteins approach each other, they assemble because assembly reduces the net interfacial energy. Analogous to the hydrophobic effect, we refer to this phenomenon as the 'orderphobic effect'. The effect is mediated by proximity to the order–disorder phase transition and the size and hydrophobic mismatch of the protein. The strength and range of forces arising from this effect are significantly larger than those that could arise from membrane elasticity for the membranes considered. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13150.001 PMID:26910009

  11. Pre-transition effects mediate forces of assembly between transmembrane proteins

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Katira, Shachi; Mandadapu, Kranthi K.; Vaikuntanathan, Suriyanarayanan; Smit, Berend; Chandler, David

    2016-02-24

    We present a mechanism for a generic, powerful force of assembly and mobility for transmembrane proteins in lipid bilayers. This force is a pre-transition (or pre-melting) effect for the first-order transition between ordered and disordered phases in the membrane. Using large-scale molecular simulation, we show that a protein with hydrophobic thickness equal to that of the disordered phase embedded in an ordered bilayer stabilizes a microscopic order–disorder interface. The stiffness of that interface is finite. When two such proteins approach each other, they assemble because assembly reduces the net interfacial energy. Analogous to the hydrophobic effect, we refer to thismore » phenomenon as the 'orderphobic effect'. The effect is mediated by proximity to the order–disorder phase transition and the size and hydrophobic mismatch of the protein. The strength and range of forces arising from this effect are significantly larger than those that could arise from membrane elasticity for the membranes considered.« less

  12. Backbone Assignment of the MALT1 Paracaspase by Solution NMR

    PubMed Central

    Unnerståle, Sofia; Nowakowski, Michal; Baraznenok, Vera; Stenberg, Gun; Lindberg, Jimmy; Mayzel, Maxim; Orekhov, Vladislav; Agback, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1) is a unique paracaspase protein whose protease activity mediates oncogenic NF-κB signalling in activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphomas (ABC-DLBCLs). ABC-DLBCLs are aggressive lymphomas with high resistance to current chemotherapies. Low survival rate among patients emphasizes the urgent need for alternative treatment options. The characterization of the MALT1 will be an essential tool for developing new target-directed drugs against MALT1 dependent disorders. As the first step in the atomic-level NMR studies of the system, here we report, the 15N/13C/1H backbone assignment of the apo form of the MALT1 paracaspase region together with the third immunoglobulin-like (Ig3) domain, 44 kDa, by high resolution NMR. In addition, the non-uniform sampling (NUS) based targeted acquisition procedure is evaluated as a mean of decreasing acquisition and analysis time for larger proteins. PMID:26788853

  13. Backbone dependency further improves side chain prediction efficiency in the Energy-based Conformer Library (bEBL).

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Sabareesh; Senes, Alessandro

    2014-11-01

    Side chain optimization is an integral component of many protein modeling applications. In these applications, the conformational freedom of the side chains is often explored using libraries of discrete, frequently occurring conformations. Because side chain optimization can pose a computationally intensive combinatorial problem, the nature of these conformer libraries is important for ensuring efficiency and accuracy in side chain prediction. We have previously developed an innovative method to create a conformer library with enhanced performance. The Energy-based Library (EBL) was obtained by analyzing the energetic interactions between conformers and a large number of natural protein environments from crystal structures. This process guided the selection of conformers with the highest propensity to fit into spaces that should accommodate a side chain. Because the method requires a large crystallographic data-set, the EBL was created in a backbone-independent fashion. However, it is well established that side chain conformation is strongly dependent on the local backbone geometry, and that backbone-dependent libraries are more efficient in side chain optimization. Here we present the backbone-dependent EBL (bEBL), whose conformers are independently sorted for each populated region of Ramachandran space. The resulting library closely mirrors the local backbone-dependent distribution of side chain conformation. Compared to the EBL, we demonstrate that the bEBL uses fewer conformers to produce similar side chain prediction outcomes, thus further improving performance with respect to the already efficient backbone-independent version of the library. PMID:25212195

  14. Global Transcriptional Regulation of Backbone Genes in Broad-Host-Range Plasmid RA3 from the IncU Group Involves Segregation Protein KorB (ParB Family).

    PubMed

    Kulinska, Anna; Godziszewska, Jolanta; Wojciechowska, Anna; Ludwiczak, Marta; Jagura-Burdzy, Grazyna

    2016-04-01

    The KorB protein of the broad-host-range conjugative plasmid RA3 from the IncU group belongs to the ParB family of plasmid and chromosomal segregation proteins. As a partitioning DNA-binding factor, KorB specifically recognizes a 16-bp palindrome which is an essential motif in the centromere-like sequence parSRA3, forms a segrosome, and together with its partner IncC (ParA family) participates in active DNA segregation ensuring stable plasmid maintenance. Here we show that by binding to this palindromic sequence, KorB also acts as a repressor for the adjacent mobC promoter driving expression of the mobC-nicoperon, which is involved in DNA processing during conjugation. Three other promoters, one buried in the conjugative transfer module and two divergent promoters located at the border between the replication and stability regions, are regulated by KorB binding to additional KorB operators (OBs). KorB acts as a repressor at a distance, binding to OBs separated from their cognate promoters by between 46 and 1,317 nucleotides. This repressor activity is facilitated by KorB spreading along DNA, since a polymerization-deficient KorB variant with its dimerization and DNA-binding abilities intact is inactive in transcriptional repression. KorB may act as a global regulator of RA3 plasmid functions in Escherichia coli, since its overexpression in transnegatively interferes with mini-RA3 replication and stable maintenance of RA3. PMID:26850301

  15. Use of glass transitions in carbohydrate excipient design for lyophilized protein formulations.

    PubMed

    Roughton, Brock C; Topp, E M; Camarda, Kyle V

    2012-01-10

    This work describes an effort to apply methods from process systems engineering to a pharmaceutical product design problem, with a novel application of statistical approaches to comparing solutions. A computational molecular design framework was employed to design carbohydrate molecules with high glass transition temperatures and low water content in the maximally freeze-concentrated matrix, with the objective of stabilizing lyophilized protein formulations. Quantitative structure-property relationships were developed for glass transition temperature of the anhydrous solute, glass transition temperature of the maximally concentrated solute, melting point of ice and Gordon-Taylor constant for carbohydrates. An optimization problem was formulated to design an excipient with optimal property values. Use of a stochastic optimization algorithm, Tabu search, provided several carbohydrate excipient candidates with statistically similar property values, as indicated by prediction intervals calculated for each property. PMID:24385675

  16. Desmoplastic melanoma: expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Maria Concepción; Requena, Luis; Kutzner, Heinz; Ortiz, Pablo; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Rodriguez-Peralto, José-Luis

    2014-03-01

    Desmoplastic melanoma (DM) is a rare variant of melanoma. Most frequently, it seems as clinically ambiguous and histologically characterized by a poorly demarcated neoplasm composed of a proliferation of spindle melanocytes dispersed in a prominent collagenous stroma. It often represents a diagnostic challenge, delaying its detection. We analyzed the expression profile of 29 (28 "pure" and 1 "combined") DM. These data were compared with a series of 62 primary vertical growth phase nondesmoplastic melanomas (NDMs) using a set of proteins including melanocytic markers (S-100 protein and melan-A) and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related proteins (E-cadherin, N-cadherin, SPARC, WT1, and PKCα). The S-100 protein confirmed the melanocytic origin of the DM (positive in 96%). The significant positive expression of N-cadherin, SPARC, and WT1 in DM (61%, 82%, and 71%) compared with NDM (28%, 43%, and 47%; P < 0.05) and a lower expression of E-cadherin in DM (14%) compared with NDM (61%) support specific adhesive and migratory properties of DM tumor cells. The study was carried out with tissue microarrays that partly limited the study of the tumor sections. This study demonstrates, for the first time, a prominent expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related proteins in DMs and tries to be one more step in refining its knowledge and leading to a better understanding of its biological and clinical behaviors. PMID:23974224

  17. Hydration of the folding transition-state ensemble of a protein

    PubMed Central

    Brun, Ludovic; Isom, Daniel G.; Velu, Priya; García-Moreno, Bertrand

    2008-01-01

    A complete description of the mechanisms of protein folding requires knowledge of the structural and physical character of the folding transition state ensembles (TSE). A key question remains, concerning the role of hydration of the hydrophobic core in determining folding mechanisms. To address this we probed the state of hydration of the TSE of staphylococcal nuclease (SNase) by examining the fluorescence-detected pressure-jump relaxation behavior of six SNase variants in which a residue in the hydrophobic core, Val-66, was replaced with polar or ionizable residues (Lys, Arg, His, Asp, Glu, Asn). Owing to a large positive activation volume for folding, the major effect of pressure on the wild type protein is to decrease the folding rate. By the time wild type SNase reaches the folding transition state, most water has already been expelled from its hydrophobic core. In contrast, the major effect of pressure on the variant proteins is an increase of the unfolding rate due to a large negative activation volume for unfolding. This results from a significant increase in the hydration of the TSE when an internal ionizable group is present. These data confirm that the role of water in the folding reaction can differ from protein to protein, and that even a single substitution in a critical position can modulate significantly the properties of the TSE. PMID:16533028

  18. Modulating energy arriving at photochemical reaction centers: orange carotenoid protein-related photoprotection and state transitions.

    PubMed

    Kirilovsky, Diana

    2015-10-01

    Photosynthetic organisms tightly regulate the energy arriving to the reaction centers in order to avoid photodamage or imbalance between the photosystems. To this purpose, cyanobacteria have developed mechanisms involving relatively rapid (seconds to minutes) changes in the photosynthetic apparatus. In this review, two of these processes will be described: orange carotenoid protein(OCP)-related photoprotection and state transitions which optimize energy distribution between the two photosystems. The photoactive OCP is a light intensity sensor and an energy dissipater. Photoactivation depends on light intensity and only the red-active OCP form, by interacting with phycobilisome cores, increases thermal energy dissipation at the level of the antenna. A second protein, the "fluorescence recovery protein", is needed to recover full antenna capacity under low light conditions. This protein accelerates OCP conversion to the inactive orange form and plays a role in dislodging the red OCP protein from the phycobilisome. The mechanism of state transitions is still controversial. Changes in the redox state of the plastoquinone pool induce movement of phycobilisomes and/or photosystems leading to redistribution of energy absorbed by phycobilisomes between PSII and PSI and/or to changes in excitation energy spillover between photosystems. The different steps going from the induction of redox changes to movement of phycobilisomes or photosystems remain to be elucidated. PMID:25139327

  19. Effect of surface attractive strength on structural transitions of a confined HP lattice protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattanasiri, Busara; Li, Ying Wai; Wust, Thomas; Landau, David P.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the influence of surface attractive strength on structural transitions of a hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice protein confined in a slit formed by two parallel, attractive walls. We apply Wang-Landau sampling together with efficient Monte Carlo updates to estimate the density of states of the system. The conformational transitions, namely, the debridging process and hydrophobic core formation, can be identified by analyzing the specific heat together with several structural observables, such as the numbers of surface contacts, the number of hydrophobic pairs, and radii of gyration in different directions. As temperature decreases, we find that the occurrence of the debridging process is conditional depending on the surface attractive strength. This, in turn, affects the nature of the hydrophobic core formation that takes place at a lower temperature. We illustrate these observations with the aid of a HP protein chain with 48 monomers.

  20. Effect of surface attractive strength on structural transitions of a confined HP lattice protein

    SciTech Connect

    Pattanasiri, Busara; Li, Ying Wai; Wuest, Thomas; Landau, David P

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the influence of surface attractive strength on structural transitions of a hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice protein confined in a slit formed by two parallel, attractive walls. We apply Wang-Landau sampling together with efficient Monte Carlo updates to estimate the density of states of the system. The conformational transitions, namely, the debridging process and hydrophobic core formation, can be identified by analyzing the specific heat together with several structural observables, such as the numbers of surface contacts, the number of hydrophobic pairs, and radii of gyration in different directions. As temperature decreases, we find that the occurrence of the debridging process is conditional depending on the surface attractive strength. This, in turn, affects the nature of the hydrophobic core formation that takes place at a lower temperature. We illustrate these observations with the aid of a HP protein chain with 48 monomers.

  1. Thermal Transitions and Extrusion of Glycerol-Plasticized Whey Protein Mixtures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of glycerol and moisture contents on the thermal transitions of whey protein isolate (WPI) powder-glycerol-water mixtures were studied. Mixtures with ratios of 100:0, 70:30, 60:40 and 50:50 WPI:glycerol on a dry basis (db) were pre-conditioned to 0.34+/-0.01 (25.4±0.4ºC) and 0.48+/-0.02...

  2. Identifying intrinsically disordered protein regions likely to undergo binding-induced helical transitions.

    PubMed

    Glover, Karen; Mei, Yang; Sinha, Sangita C

    2016-10-01

    Many proteins contain intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) lacking stable secondary and ordered tertiary structure. IDRs are often implicated in macromolecular interactions, and may undergo structural transitions upon binding to interaction partners. However, as binding partners of many protein IDRs are unknown, these structural transitions are difficult to verify and often are poorly understood. In this study we describe a method to identify IDRs that are likely to undergo helical transitions upon binding. This method combines bioinformatics analyses followed by circular dichroism spectroscopy to monitor 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE)-induced changes in secondary structure content of these IDRs. Our results demonstrate that there is no significant change in the helicity of IDRs that are not predicted to fold upon binding. IDRs that are predicted to fold fall into two groups: one group does not become helical in the presence of TFE and includes examples of IDRs that form β-strands upon binding, while the other group becomes more helical and includes examples that are known to fold into helices upon binding. Therefore, we propose that bioinformatics analyses combined with experimental evaluation using TFE may provide a general method to identify IDRs that undergo binding-induced disorder-to-helix transitions. PMID:27179590

  3. Solvation thermodynamics of amino acid side chains on a short peptide backbone

    SciTech Connect

    Hajari, Timir; Vegt, Nico F. A. van der

    2015-04-14

    The hydration process of side chain analogue molecules differs from that of the actual amino acid side chains in peptides and proteins owing to the effects of the peptide backbone on the aqueous solvent environment. A recent molecular simulation study has provided evidence that all nonpolar side chains, attached to a short peptide backbone, are considerably less hydrophobic than the free side chain analogue molecules. In contrast to this, the hydrophilicity of the polar side chains is hardly affected by the backbone. To analyze the origin of these observations, we here present a molecular simulation study on temperature dependent solvation free energies of nonpolar and polar side chains attached to a short peptide backbone. The estimated solvation entropies and enthalpies of the various amino acid side chains are compared with existing side chain analogue data. The solvation entropies and enthalpies of the polar side chains are negative, but in absolute magnitude smaller compared with the corresponding analogue data. The observed differences are large; however, owing to a nearly perfect enthalpy-entropy compensation, the solvation free energies of polar side chains remain largely unaffected by the peptide backbone. We find that a similar compensation does not apply to the nonpolar side chains; while the backbone greatly reduces the unfavorable solvation entropies, the solvation enthalpies are either more favorable or only marginally affected. This results in a very small unfavorable free energy cost, or even free energy gain, of solvating the nonpolar side chains in strong contrast to solvation of small hydrophobic or nonpolar molecules in bulk water. The solvation free energies of nonpolar side chains have been furthermore decomposed into a repulsive cavity formation contribution and an attractive dispersion free energy contribution. We find that cavity formation next to the peptide backbone is entropically favored over formation of similar sized nonpolar side

  4. Long-range conformational transition of a photoswitchable allosteric protein: molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Buchenberg, Sebastian; Knecht, Volker; Walser, Reto; Hamm, Peter; Stock, Gerhard

    2014-11-26

    A local perturbation of a protein may lead to functional changes at some distal site. An example is the PDZ2 domain of human tyrosine phosphatase 1E, which shows an allosteric transition upon binding to a peptide ligand. Recently Buchli et al. presented a time-resolved study of this transition by covalently linking an azobenzene photoswitch across the binding groove and using a femtosecond laser pulse that triggers the cis-trans photoisomerization of azobenzene. To aid the interpretation of these experiments, in this work seven microsecond runs of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations each for the wild-type PDZ2 in the ligand-bound and -free state, as well as the photoswitchable protein (PDZ2S) in the cis and trans states of the photoswitch, in explicit water were conducted. First the theoretical model is validated by recalculating the available NMR data from the simulations. By comparing the results for PDZ2 and PDZ2S, it is analyzed to what extent the photoswitch indeed mimics the free-bound transition. A detailed description of the conformational rearrangement following the cis-trans photoisomerization of PDZ2S reveals a series of photoinduced structural changes that propagate from the anchor residues of the photoswitch via intermediate secondary structure segments to the C-terminus of PDZ2S. The changes of the conformational distribution of the C-terminal region is considered as the distal response of the isolated allosteric protein. PMID:25365469

  5. Histidine-Directed Arylation/Alkenylation of Backbone N-H Bonds Mediated by Copper(II).

    PubMed

    Ohata, Jun; Minus, Matthew B; Abernathy, Morgan E; Ball, Zachary T

    2016-06-22

    Chemical modification of proteins and peptides represents a challenge of reaction design as well as an important biological tool. In contrast to side-chain modification, synthetic methods to alter backbone structure are extremely limited. In this communication, copper-mediated backbone N-alkenylation or N-arylation of peptides and proteins by direct modification of natural sequences is described. Histidine residues direct oxidative coupling of boronic acids at the backbone NH of a neighboring amino acid. The mild reaction conditions in common physiological buffers, at ambient temperature, are compatible with proteins and biological systems. This simple reaction demonstrates the potential for directed reactions in complex systems to allow modification of N-H bonds that directly affect polypeptide structure, stability, and function. PMID:27249339

  6. Extracting the Information Backbone in Online System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian-Ming; Zeng, An; Shang, Ming-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Information overload is a serious problem in modern society and many solutions such as recommender system have been proposed to filter out irrelevant information. In the literature, researchers have been mainly dedicated to improving the recommendation performance (accuracy and diversity) of the algorithms while they have overlooked the influence of topology of the online user-object bipartite networks. In this paper, we find that some information provided by the bipartite networks is not only redundant but also misleading. With such “less can be more” feature, we design some algorithms to improve the recommendation performance by eliminating some links from the original networks. Moreover, we propose a hybrid method combining the time-aware and topology-aware link removal algorithms to extract the backbone which contains the essential information for the recommender systems. From the practical point of view, our method can improve the performance and reduce the computational time of the recommendation system, thus improving both of their effectiveness and efficiency. PMID:23690946

  7. Toward future IP optical backbone networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urushidani, Shigeo

    2005-11-01

    The rapid and aggressive penetration of broadband access services such as fiber to the home (FTTH) has been accelerating the increase in IP traffic volume and new networking technologies are required in order to accommodate future traffic in a cost-effective manner. This paper overviews the advanced IP optical network architecture and technologies for very-large-scale IP backbone networks. These technologies are the key to accommodate the huge volumes of IP traffic expected and control network resources in an effective and dynamic manner. We describe advanced IP optical networking technologies which accommodate multiple service networks using multi-instance technologies, and enable multi-layer traffic engineering using virtual network topology technologies. The migration scenario is described from the existing networks to GMPLS networks; reference is made to the advanced Path Computation Element (PCE) which enables multi-layer traffic engineering and MPLS/GMPLS migration. New network concepts such as Layer 1 Virtual Private Network (L1VPN) and GMPLS interoperability issues, which are being discussed in IETF, are also described.

  8. Extracting the information backbone in online system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian-Ming; Zeng, An; Shang, Ming-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Information overload is a serious problem in modern society and many solutions such as recommender system have been proposed to filter out irrelevant information. In the literature, researchers have been mainly dedicated to improving the recommendation performance (accuracy and diversity) of the algorithms while they have overlooked the influence of topology of the online user-object bipartite networks. In this paper, we find that some information provided by the bipartite networks is not only redundant but also misleading. With such "less can be more" feature, we design some algorithms to improve the recommendation performance by eliminating some links from the original networks. Moreover, we propose a hybrid method combining the time-aware and topology-aware link removal algorithms to extract the backbone which contains the essential information for the recommender systems. From the practical point of view, our method can improve the performance and reduce the computational time of the recommendation system, thus improving both of their effectiveness and efficiency. PMID:23690946

  9. F-box proteins: Keeping the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in check.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Víctor M; de Herreros, Antonio García

    2016-02-01

    F-box proteins are the key recognition subunit of multimeric E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes that participate in the proteasome degradation of specific substrates. In the last years, a discrete number of F-box proteins have been shown to regulate the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process defined by a rapid change of cell phenotype, the loss of epithelial characteristics and the acquisition of a more invasive phenotype. Specific EMT transcription factors (EMT-TFs), such as Snail, Slug, Twist and Zeb, control EMT induction both during development and in cancer. These EMT-TFs are short-lived proteins that are targeted to the proteasome system by specific F-box proteins, keeping them at low levels. F-box proteins also indirectly regulate the EMT process by controlling EMT inducers, such as Notch, c-Myc or mTOR. Here we summarize the role that these F-box proteins (Fbxw1, Fbxw7, Fbxl14, Fbxl5, Fbxo11 and Fbxo45) play in controlling EMT during development and cancer progression, a process dependent on post-translational modifications that govern their interaction with target proteins. PMID:26506454

  10. Transition fibre protein FBF1 is required for the ciliary entry of assembled intraflagellar transport complexes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qing; Xu, Qingwen; Zhang, Yuxia; Li, Yujie; Zhang, Qing; Hu, Zeng; Harris, Peter C; Torres, Vicente E; Ling, Kun; Hu, Jinghua

    2013-01-01

    Sensory organelle cilia have critical roles in mammalian embryonic development and tissue homeostasis. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) machinery is required for the assembly and maintenance of cilia. Yet, how this large complex passes through the size-dependent barrier at the ciliary base remains enigmatic. Here we report that FBF1, a highly conserved transition fibre protein, is required for the ciliary import of assembled IFT particles at the ciliary base. We cloned dyf-19, the Caenorhabditis elegans homologue of human FBF1, in a whole-genome screen for ciliogenesis mutants. DYF-19 localizes specifically to transition fibres and interacts directly with the IFT-B component DYF-11/IFT54. Although not a structural component of transition fibres, DYF-19 is required for the transit of assembled IFT particles through the ciliary base. Furthermore, we found that human FBF1 shares conserved localization and function with its worm counterpart. We conclude that FBF1 is a key functional transition fibre component that actively facilitates the ciliary entry of assembled IFT machinery. PMID:24231678

  11. A New Secondary Structure Assignment Algorithm Using Cα Backbone Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Chen; Wang, Guishen; Liu, An; Xu, Shutan; Wang, Lincong; Zou, Shuxue

    2016-01-01

    The assignment of secondary structure elements in proteins is a key step in the analysis of their structures and functions. We have developed an algorithm, SACF (secondary structure assignment based on Cα fragments), for secondary structure element (SSE) assignment based on the alignment of Cα backbone fragments with central poses derived by clustering known SSE fragments. The assignment algorithm consists of three steps: First, the outlier fragments on known SSEs are detected. Next, the remaining fragments are clustered to obtain the central fragments for each cluster. Finally, the central fragments are used as a template to make assignments. Following a large-scale comparison of 11 secondary structure assignment methods, SACF, KAKSI and PROSS are found to have similar agreement with DSSP, while PCASSO agrees with DSSP best. SACF and PCASSO show preference to reducing residues in N and C cap regions, whereas KAKSI, P-SEA and SEGNO tend to add residues to the terminals when DSSP assignment is taken as standard. Moreover, our algorithm is able to assign subtle helices (310-helix, π-helix and left-handed helix) and make uniform assignments, as well as to detect rare SSEs in β-sheets or long helices as outlier fragments from other programs. The structural uniformity should be useful for protein structure classification and prediction, while outlier fragments underlie the structure–function relationship. PMID:26978354

  12. A New Secondary Structure Assignment Algorithm Using Cα Backbone Fragments.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chen; Wang, Guishen; Liu, An; Xu, Shutan; Wang, Lincong; Zou, Shuxue

    2016-01-01

    The assignment of secondary structure elements in proteins is a key step in the analysis of their structures and functions. We have developed an algorithm, SACF (secondary structure assignment based on Cα fragments), for secondary structure element (SSE) assignment based on the alignment of Cα backbone fragments with central poses derived by clustering known SSE fragments. The assignment algorithm consists of three steps: First, the outlier fragments on known SSEs are detected. Next, the remaining fragments are clustered to obtain the central fragments for each cluster. Finally, the central fragments are used as a template to make assignments. Following a large-scale comparison of 11 secondary structure assignment methods, SACF, KAKSI and PROSS are found to have similar agreement with DSSP, while PCASSO agrees with DSSP best. SACF and PCASSO show preference to reducing residues in N and C cap regions, whereas KAKSI, P-SEA and SEGNO tend to add residues to the terminals when DSSP assignment is taken as standard. Moreover, our algorithm is able to assign subtle helices (310-helix, π-helix and left-handed helix) and make uniform assignments, as well as to detect rare SSEs in β-sheets or long helices as outlier fragments from other programs. The structural uniformity should be useful for protein structure classification and prediction, while outlier fragments underlie the structure-function relationship. PMID:26978354

  13. Bond distances in polypeptide backbones depend on the local conformation.

    PubMed

    Improta, Roberto; Vitagliano, Luigi; Esposito, Luciana

    2015-06-01

    By combining quantum-mechanical analysis of small model peptides and statistical surveys of high-resolution protein structures, a systematic conformational dependence of bond lengths in polypeptide backbones has been unveiled which involves both the peptide bond (C-O and C-N) and those bonds centred on the C(α) atom. All of these bond lengths indeed display a systematic variability in the ψ angle according to both calculations and surveys of protein structures. The overall agreement between the computed and the statistical data suggests that these trends are essentially driven by local effects. The dependence of C(α) distances on ψ is governed by interactions between the σ system of the C(α) moiety and the C-O π system of the peptide bond. Maximum and minimum values for each bond distance are found for conformations with the specific bond perpendicular and parallel to the adjacent CONH peptide plane, respectively. On the other hand, the variability of the C-O and C-N distances is related to the strength of the interactions between the lone pair of the N atom and the C-O π* system, which is modulated by the ψ angle. The C-O and C-N distances are related but their trends are not strictly connected to peptide-bond planarity, although a correlation amongst all of these parameters is expected on the basis of the classical resonance model. PMID:26057667

  14. Data on structural transitions in domains of hordeivirus TGB1 protein forming ribonucleoprotein complex.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Valentin V; Makarova, Svetlana S; Kalinina, Natalia O

    2016-09-01

    This data article is related to the research article entitled "in vitro properties of hordeivirus TGB1 protein forming ribonucleoprotein complexes" (Makarov et al., 2015 [1]), demonstrating that upon incubation with viral RNA the poa semilatent hordeivirus (PSLV) TGB1 protein (the movement 63 K protein encoded by the first gene of the triple gene block) in vitro forms RNP structures resembling filamentous virus-like particles and its internal domain (ID) performs a major structural role in this process. This article reports the additional results on the structural lability of ID and the structural transitions in the C-terminal NTPase/helicase domain (HELD) induced by interaction with tRNA and phosphorylation. PMID:27331098

  15. Phase transition of spindle-associated protein regulate spindle apparatus assembly.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Wang, Shusheng; Huang, Yuejia; He, Xiaonan; Cui, Honggang; Zhu, Xueliang; Zheng, Yixian

    2015-09-24

    Spindle assembly required during mitosis depends on microtubule polymerization. We demonstrate that the evolutionarily conserved low-complexity protein, BuGZ, undergoes phase transition or coacervation to promote assembly of both spindles and their associated components. BuGZ forms temperature-dependent liquid droplets alone or on microtubules in physiological buffers. Coacervation in vitro or in spindle and spindle matrix depends on hydrophobic residues in BuGZ. BuGZ coacervation and its binding to microtubules and tubulin are required to promote assembly of spindle and spindle matrix in Xenopus egg extract and in mammalian cells. Since several previously identified spindle-associated components also contain low-complexity regions, we propose that coacervating proteins may be a hallmark of proteins that comprise a spindle matrix that functions to promote assembly of spindles by concentrating its building blocks. PMID:26388440

  16. Structural transitions in the intrinsically disordered Parkinson's protein alpha-synuclein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliezer, David

    2013-03-01

    The protein alpha-synuclein is genetically and histopathologically associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease. Although considered to belong to the category of intrinsically disordered proteins for well over a decade, recent reports have suggested that synuclein may actually exist predominantly in a native, well-structured, tetrameric form. Experiments using in-cell NMR, which bypass potential structural perturbations caused by purification protocols, conclusively demonstrate that recombinant synuclein is in fact highly disordered and monomeric. In the presence of membranes, however, the protein undergoes a coil-to-helix transition to adopt several highly helical conformations, which are proposed to mediate both its normal function and its membrane-induced aggregation into amyloid fibrils. Supported by NIH grant R37AG019391

  17. A Liquid-to-Solid Phase Transition of the ALS Protein FUS Accelerated by Disease Mutation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Avinash; Lee, Hyun O; Jawerth, Louise; Maharana, Shovamayee; Jahnel, Marcus; Hein, Marco Y; Stoynov, Stoyno; Mahamid, Julia; Saha, Shambaditya; Franzmann, Titus M; Pozniakovski, Andrej; Poser, Ina; Maghelli, Nicola; Royer, Loic A; Weigert, Martin; Myers, Eugene W; Grill, Stephan; Drechsel, David; Hyman, Anthony A; Alberti, Simon

    2015-08-27

    Many proteins contain disordered regions of low-sequence complexity, which cause aging-associated diseases because they are prone to aggregate. Here, we study FUS, a prion-like protein containing intrinsically disordered domains associated with the neurodegenerative disease ALS. We show that, in cells, FUS forms liquid compartments at sites of DNA damage and in the cytoplasm upon stress. We confirm this by reconstituting liquid FUS compartments in vitro. Using an in vitro "aging" experiment, we demonstrate that liquid droplets of FUS protein convert with time from a liquid to an aggregated state, and this conversion is accelerated by patient-derived mutations. We conclude that the physiological role of FUS requires forming dynamic liquid-like compartments. We propose that liquid-like compartments carry the trade-off between functionality and risk of aggregation and that aberrant phase transitions within liquid-like compartments lie at the heart of ALS and, presumably, other age-related diseases. PMID:26317470

  18. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase 3 Is Required for Regulation during Dark-Light Transition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Horim

    2015-07-01

    Plant growth and development are coordinately orchestrated by environmental cues and phytohormones. Light acts as a key environmental factor for fundamental plant growth and physiology through photosensory phytochromes and underlying molecular mechanisms. Although phytochromes are known to possess serine/threonine protein kinase activities, whether they trigger a signal transduction pathway via an intracellular protein kinase network remains unknown. In analyses of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK, also called MKK) mutants, the mkk3 mutant has shown both a hypersensitive response in plant hormone gibberellin (GA) and a less sensitive response in red light signaling. Surprisingly, light-induced MAPK activation in wild-type (WT) seedlings and constitutive MAPK phosphorylation in dark-grown mkk3 mutant seedlings have also been found, respectively. Therefore, this study suggests that MKK3 acts in negative regulation in darkness and in light-induced MAPK activation during dark-light transition. PMID:26082029

  19. Altered expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition proteins in extraprostatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Verrill, Clare; Cerundolo, Lucia; Mckee, Chad; White, Michael; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Fryer, Eve; Morris, Emma; Brewster, Simon; Ratnayaka, Indrika; Marsden, Luke; Lilja, Hans; Muschel, Ruth; Lu, Xin; Hamdy, Freddie; Bryant, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of cancer cells involves loss of epithelial polarity and adhesiveness, and gain of invasive and migratory mesenchymal behaviours. EMT occurs in prostate cancer (PCa) but it is unknown whether this is in specific areas of primary tumours. We examined whether any of eleven EMT-related proteins have altered expression or subcellular localisation within the extraprostatic extension component of locally advanced PCa compared with other localisations, and whether similar changes may occur in in vitro organotypic PCa cell cultures and in vivo PCa models. Expression profiles of three proteins (E-cadherin, Snail, and α-smooth muscle actin) were significantly different in extraprostatic extension PCa compared with intra-prostatic tumour, and 18/27 cases had an expression change of at least one of these three proteins. Of the three significantly altered EMT proteins in pT3 samples, one showed similar significantly altered expression patterns in in vitro organotypic culture models, and two in in vivo Pten−/− model samples. These results suggest that changes in EMT protein expression can be observed in the extraprostatic extension component of locally invasive PCa. The biology of some of these changes in protein expression may be studied in certain in vitro and in vivo PCa models. PMID:26701730

  20. Developmental Staging of Maize Microspores Reveals a Transition in Developing Microspore Proteins 1

    PubMed Central

    Bedinger, Patricia A.; Edgerton, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    A method for the preparation of developmentally staged microspores and young pollen from maize (Zea mays) has been devised. The preparations are of sufficient purity and quantity for biochemical analysis, including the analysis of steady-state protein and RNA populations associated with each stage. A major transition in protein populations occurs during the developmental period that encompasses microspore mitosis, the asymmetric nuclear division producing the vegetative and generative nuclei. Several differences between early and late stage proteins can be detected by one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of proteins reveals that over half of the steady-state proteins differ between the younger and older stages, either quantitative or qualitative. One protein that increases in relative abundance about fourfold is actin. In vitro translation of RNA isolated from staged microspores demonstrates changes in microspore gene expression during the same developmental period. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:16667300

  1. Cataloging proteins putatively secreted during the biotrophy-necrotrophy transition of the anthracnose pathogen Colletotrichum truncatum.

    PubMed

    Bhadauria, Vijai; Banniza, Sabine; Vandenberg, Albert; Selvaraj, Gopalan; Wei, Yangdou

    2011-10-01

    Hemibiotrophic phytopathogenic fungi cause devastating diseases in agronomically important crops. These fungal pathogens exploit a stealth bi-phasic infection strategy to colonize host plants. Their morphological and nutritional transition from biotrophy (characterized by voluminous intracellular primary hyphae) to necrotrophy (characterized by thin secondary hyphae) known as the biotrophy-necrotrophy switch (hemibiotrophy) is critical in symptom and disease development. To establish successful hemibiotrophic parasitism, pathogens likely secrete suites of proteins at the switch that constitute the biotrophy-necrotrophy switch secretome. To catalogue such proteins, a directional cDNA library was constructed from mRNA isolated from infected Lens culinaris leaflet tissues displaying the switch of Colletotrichum truncatum, and 5000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were generated. Four potential groups (hydrolytic enzymes, cell envelope-associated proteins [CEAPs], candidate effectors and proteins with diverse functions) were identified from pathogen-derived ESTs. Expression profiling of transcripts encoding CEAPs and candidate effectors in an infection time-course revealed that the majority of these transcripts were expressed or induced during the necrotrophic phase and repressed during the biotrophic phase of in planta colonization, indicating the massive accumulation of proteins at the switch. Taken together, our data suggest that the hemibiotrophic mode of fungal proliferation entails complex interactions of a pathogen with its host wherein the pathogen requires live host cells prior to switching to the necrotrophic phase. The microbial proteins employed during pathogenesis are likely to have defined roles at specific stages of pathogenesis. PMID:21897125

  2. Structural basis of conformational transitions in the active site and 80′s loop in the FK506-binding protein FKBP12

    PubMed Central

    Mustafi, Sourajit M.; Brecher, Matthew; Zhang, Jing; Li, Hongmin; Lemaster, David M.; Hernández, Griselda

    2014-01-01

    The extensive set of NMR doublings exhibited by the immunophilin FKBP12 (FK506-binding protein 12) arose from a slow transition to the cis-peptide configuration at Gly89 near the tip of the 80′s loop, the site for numerous protein-recognition interactions for both FKBP12 and other FKBP domain proteins. The 80′s loop also exhibited linebroadening, indicative of microsecond to millisecond conformational dynamics, but only in the trans-peptide state. The G89A variant shifted the trans–cis peptide equilibrium from 88:12 to 33:67, whereas a proline residue substitution induced fully the cis-peptide configuration. The 80′s loop conformation in the G89P crystal structure at 1.50 Å resolution differed from wild-type FKBP12 primarily at residues 88, 89 and 90, and it closely resembled that reported for FKBP52. Structure-based chemical-shift predictions indicated that the microsecond to millisecond dynamics in the 80′s loop probably arose from a concerted main chain (ψ88 and ϕ89) torsion angle transition. The indole side chain of Trp59 at the base of the active-site cleft was reoriented ~90o and the adjacent backbone was shifted in the G89P crystal structure. NOE analysis of wild-type FKBP12 demonstrated that this indole populates the perpendicular orientation at 20%. The 15N relaxation analysis was consistent with the indole reorientation occurring in the nanosecond timeframe. Recollection of the G89P crystal data at 1.20 Å resolution revealed a weaker wild-type-like orientation for the indole ring. Differences in the residues that underlie the Trp59 indole ring and altered interactions linking the 50′s loop to the active site suggested that reorientation of this ring may be disfavoured in the other six members of the FKBP domain family that bear this active-site tryptophan residue. PMID:24405377

  3. Backbone and side chain NMR assignments for the ribosome assembly factor Nop6 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Jan Philip; Lioutikov, Anatoli; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Wöhnert, Jens

    2014-10-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nop6 protein is involved in the maturation of the small ribosomal subunit. It contains a central RNA binding domain and a predicted C-terminal coiled-coil domain. Here we report the almost complete (>90%) (1)H,(13)C,(15)N backbone and side chain NMR assignment of a 15 kDa Nop6 construct comprising the RNA binding and coiled-coil domains. PMID:23921755

  4. Transition state analogues in structures of ricin and saporin ribosome-inactivating proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Meng-Chiao; Sturm, Matthew B.; Almo, Steven C.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2010-01-12

    Ricin A-chain (RTA) and saporin-L1 (SAP) catalyze adenosine depurination of 28S rRNA to inhibit protein synthesis and cause cell death. We present the crystal structures of RTA and SAP in complex with transition state analogue inhibitors. These tight-binding inhibitors mimic the sarcin-ricin recognition loop of 28S rRNA and the dissociative ribocation transition state established for RTA catalysis. RTA and SAP share unique purine-binding geometry with quadruple {pi}-stacking interactions between adjacent adenine and guanine bases and 2 conserved tyrosines. An arginine at one end of the {pi}-stack provides cationic polarization and enhanced leaving group ability to the susceptible adenine. Common features of these ribosome-inactivating proteins include adenine leaving group activation, a remarkable lack of ribocation stabilization, and conserved glutamates as general bases for activation of the H{sub 2}O nucleophile. Catalytic forces originate primarily from leaving group activation evident in both RTA and SAP in complex with transition state analogues.

  5. Radiation safety system (RSS) backbones: Design, engineering, fabrication and installation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, J.E.; Sturrock, J.C.; Gallegos, F.R.

    1998-12-01

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) Backbones are part of an electrical/electronic/mechanical system insuring safe access and exclusion of personnel to areas at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator. The RSS Backbones control the safety fusible beam plugs which terminate transmission of accelerated ion beams in response to predefined conditions. Any beam or access fault of the backbone inputs will cause insertion of the beam plugs in the low energy beam transport. The Backbones serve the function of tying the beam plugs to the access control systems, beam spill monitoring systems and current-level limiting systems. In some ways the Backbones may be thought of as a spinal column with beam plugs at the head and nerve centers along the spinal column. The two Linac Backbone segments and experimental area segments form a continuous cable plant over 3,500 feet from beam plugs to the tip on the longest tail. The Backbones were installed in compliance with current safety standards, such as installation of the two segments in separate conduits or tray. Monitoring for ground-faults and input wiring verification was an added enhancement to the system. The system has the capability to be tested remotely.

  6. Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones: Design, engineering, fabrication, and installation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, J. E.; Sturrock, J. C.; Gallegos, F. R.

    1998-12-10

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones are part of an electrical/electronic/mechanical system ensuring safe access and exclusion of personnel to areas at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator. The RSS backbones control the safety-fusible beam plugs which terminate transmission of accelerated ion beams in response to predefined conditions. Any beam or access fault of the backbone inputs will cause insertion of the beam plugs in the low-energy beam transport. The backbones serve the function of tying the beam plugs to the access control systems, beam spill monitoring systems and current-level limiting systems. In some ways the backbones may be thought of as a spinal column with beam plugs at the head and nerve centers along the spinal column. The two linac backbone segments and the experimental area segments form a continuous cable plant over 3500 feet from the beam plugs to the tip on the longest tail. The backbones were installed in compliance with current safety standards, such as installation of the two segments in separate conduits or tray. Monitoring for ground-faults and input wiring verification was an added enhancement to the system. The system has the capability to be tested remotely.

  7. Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones: Design, engineering, fabrication, and installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmarth, J. E.; Sturrock, J. C.; Gallegos, F. R.

    1998-12-01

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones are part of an electrical/electronic/mechanical system ensuring safe access and exclusion of personnel to areas at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator. The RSS backbones control the safety-fusible beam plugs which terminate transmission of accelerated ion beams in response to predefined conditions. Any beam or access fault of the backbone inputs will cause insertion of the beam plugs in the low-energy beam transport. The backbones serve the function of tying the beam plugs to the access control systems, beam spill monitoring systems and current-level limiting systems. In some ways the backbones may be thought of as a spinal column with beam plugs at the head and nerve centers along the spinal column. The two linac backbone segments and the experimental area segments form a continuous cable plant over 3500 feet from the beam plugs to the tip on the longest tail. The backbones were installed in compliance with current safety standards, such as installation of the two segments in separate conduits or tray. Monitoring for ground-faults and input wiring verification was an added enhancement to the system. The system has the capability to be tested remotely.

  8. Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones: Design, engineering, fabrication, and installation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, J.E.; Sturrock, J.C.; Gallegos, F.R.

    1998-12-01

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones are part of an electrical/electronic/mechanical system ensuring safe access and exclusion of personnel to areas at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator. The RSS backbones control the safety-fusible beam plugs which terminate transmission of accelerated ion beams in response to predefined conditions. Any beam or access fault of the backbone inputs will cause insertion of the beam plugs in the low-energy beam transport. The backbones serve the function of tying the beam plugs to the access control systems, beam spill monitoring systems and current-level limiting systems. In some ways the backbones may be thought of as a spinal column with beam plugs at the head and nerve centers along the spinal column. The two linac backbone segments and the experimental area segments form a continuous cable plant over 3500 feet from the beam plugs to the tip on the longest tail. The backbones were installed in compliance with current safety standards, such as installation of the two segments in separate conduits or tray. Monitoring for ground-faults and input wiring verification was an added enhancement to the system. The system has the capability to be tested remotely. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Growth Kinetics of Intracellular RNA/Protein Droplets: Signature of a Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Joel; Weber, Stephanie C.; Vaidya, Nilesh; Zhu, Lian; Haataja, Mikko; Brangwynne, Clifford P.

    2015-03-01

    Nonmembrane-bound organelles are functional, dynamic assemblies of RNA and/or protein that can self-assemble and disassemble within the cytoplasm or nucleoplasm. The possibility that underlying intracellular phase transitions may drive and mediate the morphological evolution of some membrane-less organelles has been supported by several recent studies. In this talk, results from a collaborative experimental-theoretical study of the growth and dissolution kinetics of nucleoli and extranucleolar droplets (ENDs) in C. elegans embryos will be presented. We have employed Flory-Huggins solution theory, reaction-diffusion kinetics, and quantitative statistical dynamic scaling analysis to characterize the specific growth mechanisms at work. Our findings indicate that both in vivo and in vitro droplet scaling and growth kinetics are consistent with those resulting from an equilibrium liquid-liquid phase transition mediated by passive nonequilibrium growth mechanisms - simultaneous Brownian coalescence and Ostwald ripening. This supports a view in which cells can employ phase transitions to drive structural organization, while utilizing active processes, such as local transcriptional activity, to fine tune the kinetics of these phase transitions in response to given conditions.

  10. Alteration of protein synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae caused by transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, E.C.; Willsky, G.R.; Kosman, D.J.

    1986-05-01

    The effects of transition metals and metal oxides (Co/sup 2 +/, Cu/sup 2 +/, Ni/sup 2 +/, Zn/sup 2 +/, arsenite (AsO/sub 2//sup -/), arsenate (AsO/sub 4//sup 3 -/) and vanadate (VO/sub 4//sup 3 -/)) on protein synthesis and cellular thermotolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been examined. Arsenate and vanadate differ in that they are known to be physiologic phosphate analogues, e.g. in yeast, arsenate is a competitive inhibitor of phosphate transport and is incorporated into phosphoinositide, while vanadate inhibits the formation of various phosphoproteins and phosphoprotein intermediates. Arsenite and arsenate at concentrations above 0.5 mM and 5 mM, respectively, in minimal glucose media inhibited growth. These two oxides at 1 mM induced 4 of the 6 major heat shock proteins (Hsps): 105, 78, 74 and 36 Kd. The 36 Kd protein as not induced by arsenite at 0.1 mM. Vanadate induced no known Hsp but did induce one polypeptide of 155 Kd. These metal-induced proteins did not confer cellular thermotolerance. No protein induction was observed after 45 min preincubation with 0.5 mM divalent Co, Cu, Ni or Zn despite the fact that as with the metal oxides a significant inhibition of growth and over-all protein synthesis was caused by Co/sup 2 +/, Cu/sup 2 +/ and Ni/sup 2 +/ at that concentration. Thus, among this group of metals the induction of specific proteins appears to be unique to those species which mimic the phosphate group. Stress which alters the growth to cells does not always trigger a specific alteration of protein synthesis.