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Sample records for protein complex formed

  1. Magnetic Resonance Access to Transiently Formed Protein Complexes**

    PubMed Central

    Sára, Tomáš; Schwarz, Thomas C; Kurzbach, Dennis; Wunderlich, Christoph H; Kreutz, Christoph; Konrat, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions are of utmost importance to an understanding of biological phenomena since non-covalent and therefore reversible couplings between basic proteins leads to the formation of complex regulatory and adaptive molecular systems. Such systems are capable of maintaining their integrity and respond to external stimuli, processes intimately related to living organisms. These interactions, however, span a wide range of dissociation constants, from sub-nanomolar affinities in tight complexes to high-micromolar or even millimolar affinities in weak, transiently formed protein complexes. Herein, we demonstrate how novel NMR and EPR techniques can be used for the characterization of weak protein–protein (ligand) complexes. Applications to intrinsically disordered proteins and transiently formed protein complexes illustrate the potential of these novel techniques to study hitherto unobserved (and unobservable) higher-order structures of proteins. PMID:25050230

  2. Antifreeze Proteins in Winter Rye Leaves Form Oligomeric Complexes1

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiao-Ming; Griffith, Marilyn

    1999-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) similar to three pathogenesis-related proteins, a glucanase-like protein (GLP), a chitinase-like protein (CLP), and a thaumatin-like protein (TLP), accumulate during cold acclimation in winter rye (Secale cereale) leaves, where they are thought to modify the growth of intercellular ice during freezing. The objective of this study was to characterize the rye AFPs in their native forms, and our results show that these proteins form oligomeric complexes in vivo. Nine proteins were separated by native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis from apoplastic extracts of cold-acclimated winter rye leaves. Seven of these proteins exhibited multiple polypeptides when denatured and separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. After isolation of the individual proteins, six were shown by immunoblotting to contain various combinations of GLP, CLP, and TLP in addition to other unidentified proteins. Antisera produced against individual cold-induced winter rye GLP, CLP, and TLP all dramatically inhibited glucanase activity in apoplastic extracts from cold-acclimated winter rye leaves, and each antiserum precipitated all three proteins. These results indicate that each of the polypeptides may be exposed on the surface of the protein complexes. By forming oligomeric complexes, AFPs may form larger surfaces to interact with ice, or they may simply increase the mass of the protein bound to ice. In either case, the complexes of AFPs may inhibit ice growth and recrystallization more effectively than the individual polypeptides. PMID:10198095

  3. SVP-like MADS-box protein from Carya cathayensis forms higher-order complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Hou, Chuanming; Huang, Jianqin; Wang, Zhengjia; Xu, Yingwu

    2015-03-01

    To properly regulate plant flowering time and construct floral pattern, MADS-domain containing transcription factors must form multimers including homo- and hetero-dimers. They are also active in forming hetero-higher-order complexes with three to five different molecules. However, it is not well known if a MADS-box protein can also form homo-higher-order complex. In this study a biochemical approach is utilized to provide insight into the complex formation for an SVP-like MADS-box protein cloned from hickory. The results indicated that the protein is a heterogeneous higher-order complex with the peak population containing over 20 monomers. Y2H verified the protein to form homo-complex in yeast cells. Western blot of the hickory floral bud sample revealed that the protein exists in higher-order polymers in native. Deletion assays indicated that the flexible C-terminal residues are mainly responsible for the higher-order polymer formation and the heterogeneity. Current results provide direct biochemical evidences for an active MADS-box protein to be a high order complex, much higher than a quartermeric polymer. Analysis suggests that a MADS-box subset may be able to self-assemble into large complexes, and thereby differentiate one subfamily from the other in a higher-order structural manner. Present result is a valuable supplement to the action of mechanism for MADS-box proteins in plant development. PMID:25602439

  4. LINC Complexes Form by Binding of Three KASH Peptides to Domain Interfaces of Trimeric SUN Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sosa, Brian A.; Rothballer, Andrea; Kutay, Ulrike; Schwartz, Thomas U.

    2012-08-31

    Linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complexes span the nuclear envelope and are composed of KASH and SUN proteins residing in the outer and inner nuclear membrane, respectively. LINC formation relies on direct binding of KASH and SUN in the perinuclear space. Thereby, molecular tethers are formed that can transmit forces for chromosome movements, nuclear migration, and anchorage. We present crystal structures of the human SUN2-KASH1/2 complex, the core of the LINC complex. The SUN2 domain is rigidly attached to a trimeric coiled coil that prepositions it to bind three KASH peptides. The peptides bind in three deep and expansive grooves formed between adjacent SUN domains, effectively acting as molecular glue. In addition, a disulfide between conserved cysteines on SUN and KASH covalently links both proteins. The structure provides the basis of LINC complex formation and suggests a model for how LINC complexes might arrange into higher-order clusters to enhance force-coupling.

  5. Comparison of tertiary structures of proteins in protein-protein complexes with unbound forms suggests prevalence of allostery in signalling proteins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Most signalling and regulatory proteins participate in transient protein-protein interactions during biological processes. They usually serve as key regulators of various cellular processes and are often stable in both protein-bound and unbound forms. Availability of high-resolution structures of their unbound and bound forms provides an opportunity to understand the molecular mechanisms involved. In this work, we have addressed the question “What is the nature, extent, location and functional significance of structural changes which are associated with formation of protein-protein complexes?” Results A database of 76 non-redundant sets of high resolution 3-D structures of protein-protein complexes, representing diverse functions, and corresponding unbound forms, has been used in this analysis. Structural changes associated with protein-protein complexation have been investigated using structural measures and Protein Blocks description. Our study highlights that significant structural rearrangement occurs on binding at the interface as well as at regions away from the interface to form a highly specific, stable and functional complex. Notably, predominantly unaltered interfaces interact mainly with interfaces undergoing substantial structural alterations, revealing the presence of at least one structural regulatory component in every complex. Interestingly, about one-half of the number of complexes, comprising largely of signalling proteins, show substantial localized structural change at surfaces away from the interface. Normal mode analysis and available information on functions on some of these complexes suggests that many of these changes are allosteric. This change is largely manifest in the proteins whose interfaces are altered upon binding, implicating structural change as the possible trigger of allosteric effect. Although large-scale studies of allostery induced by small-molecule effectors are available in literature, this is, to our

  6. Data on structural transitions in domains of hordeivirus TGB1 protein forming ribonucleoprotein complex.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Valentin V; Makarova, Svetlana S; Kalinina, Natalia O

    2016-09-01

    This data article is related to the research article entitled "in vitro properties of hordeivirus TGB1 protein forming ribonucleoprotein complexes" (Makarov et al., 2015 [1]), demonstrating that upon incubation with viral RNA the poa semilatent hordeivirus (PSLV) TGB1 protein (the movement 63 K protein encoded by the first gene of the triple gene block) in vitro forms RNP structures resembling filamentous virus-like particles and its internal domain (ID) performs a major structural role in this process. This article reports the additional results on the structural lability of ID and the structural transitions in the C-terminal NTPase/helicase domain (HELD) induced by interaction with tRNA and phosphorylation. PMID:27331098

  7. The membrane attack complex, perforin and cholesterol-dependent cytolysin superfamily of pore-forming proteins.

    PubMed

    Lukoyanova, Natalya; Hoogenboom, Bart W; Saibil, Helen R

    2016-06-01

    The membrane attack complex and perforin proteins (MACPFs) and bacterial cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs) are two branches of a large and diverse superfamily of pore-forming proteins that function in immunity and pathogenesis. During pore formation, soluble monomers assemble into large transmembrane pores through conformational transitions that involve extrusion and refolding of two α-helical regions into transmembrane β-hairpins. These transitions entail a dramatic refolding of the protein structure, and the resulting assemblies create large holes in cellular membranes, but they do not use any external source of energy. Structures of the membrane-bound assemblies are required to mechanistically understand and modulate these processes. In this Commentary, we discuss recent advances in the understanding of assembly mechanisms and molecular details of the conformational changes that occur during MACPF and CDC pore formation. PMID:27179071

  8. Amylopectin biosynthetic enzymes from developing rice seed form enzymatically active protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Crofts, Naoko; Abe, Natsuko; Oitome, Naoko F; Matsushima, Ryo; Hayashi, Mari; Tetlow, Ian J; Emes, Michael J; Nakamura, Yasunori; Fujita, Naoko

    2015-08-01

    Amylopectin is a highly branched, organized cluster of glucose polymers, and the major component of rice starch. Synthesis of amylopectin requires fine co-ordination between elongation of glucose polymers by soluble starch synthases (SSs), generation of branches by branching enzymes (BEs), and removal of misplaced branches by debranching enzymes (DBEs). Among the various isozymes having a role in amylopectin biosynthesis, limited numbers of SS and BE isozymes have been demonstrated to interact via protein-protein interactions in maize and wheat amyloplasts. This study investigated whether protein-protein interactions are also found in rice endosperm, as well as exploring differences between species. Gel permeation chromatography of developing rice endosperm extracts revealed that all 10 starch biosynthetic enzymes analysed were present at larger molecular weights than their respective monomeric sizes. SSIIa, SSIIIa, SSIVb, BEI, BEIIb, and PUL co-eluted at mass sizes >700kDa, and SSI, SSIIa, BEIIb, ISA1, PUL, and Pho1 co-eluted at 200-400kDa. Zymogram analyses showed that SSI, SSIIIa, BEI, BEIIa, BEIIb, ISA1, PUL, and Pho1 eluted in high molecular weight fractions were active. Comprehensive co-immunoprecipitation analyses revealed associations of SSs-BEs, and, among BE isozymes, BEIIa-Pho1, and pullulanase-type DBE-BEI interactions. Blue-native-PAGE zymogram analyses confirmed the glucan-synthesizing activity of protein complexes. These results suggest that some rice starch biosynthetic isozymes are physically associated with each other and form active protein complexes. Detailed analyses of these complexes will shed light on the mechanisms controlling the unique branch and cluster structure of amylopectin, and the physicochemical properties of starch. PMID:25979995

  9. Thymidylate synthase protein and p53 mRNA form an in vivo ribonucleoprotein complex.

    PubMed

    Chu, E; Copur, S M; Ju, J; Chen, T M; Khleif, S; Voeller, D M; Mizunuma, N; Patel, M; Maley, G F; Maley, F; Allegra, C J

    1999-02-01

    A thymidylate synthase (TS)-ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex composed of TS protein and the mRNA of the tumor suppressor gene p53 was isolated from cultured human colon cancer cells. RNA gel shift assays confirmed a specific interaction between TS protein and the protein-coding region of p53 mRNA, and in vitro translation studies demonstrated that this interaction resulted in the specific repression of p53 mRNA translation. To demonstrate the potential biological role of the TS protein-p53 mRNA interaction, Western immunoblot analysis revealed nearly undetectable levels of p53 protein in TS-overexpressing human colon cancer H630-R10 and rat hepatoma H35(F/F) cell lines compared to the levels in their respective parent H630 and H35 cell lines. Polysome analysis revealed that the p53 mRNA was associated with higher-molecular-weight polysomes in H35 cells compared to H35(F/F) cells. While the level of p53 mRNA expression was identical in parent and TS-overexpressing cell lines, the level of p53 RNA bound to TS in the form of RNP complexes was significantly higher in TS-overexpressing cells. The effect of TS on p53 expression was also investigated with human colon cancer RKO cells by use of a tetracycline-inducible system. Treatment of RKO cells with a tetracycline derivative, doxycycline, resulted in 15-fold-induced expression of TS protein and nearly complete suppression of p53 protein expression. However, p53 mRNA levels were identical in transfected RKO cells in the absence and presence of doxycycline. Taken together, these findings suggest that TS regulates the expression of p53 at the translational level. This study identifies a novel pathway for regulating p53 gene expression and expands current understanding of the potential role of TS as a regulator of cellular gene expression. PMID:9891091

  10. Thymidylate Synthase Protein and p53 mRNA Form an In Vivo Ribonucleoprotein Complex

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Edward; Copur, Sitki M.; Ju, Jingfang; Chen, Tian-men; Khleif, Samir; Voeller, Donna M.; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Patel, Mahendra; Maley, Gladys F.; Maley, Frank; Allegra, Carmen J.

    1999-01-01

    A thymidylate synthase (TS)-ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex composed of TS protein and the mRNA of the tumor suppressor gene p53 was isolated from cultured human colon cancer cells. RNA gel shift assays confirmed a specific interaction between TS protein and the protein-coding region of p53 mRNA, and in vitro translation studies demonstrated that this interaction resulted in the specific repression of p53 mRNA translation. To demonstrate the potential biological role of the TS protein-p53 mRNA interaction, Western immunoblot analysis revealed nearly undetectable levels of p53 protein in TS-overexpressing human colon cancer H630-R10 and rat hepatoma H35(F/F) cell lines compared to the levels in their respective parent H630 and H35 cell lines. Polysome analysis revealed that the p53 mRNA was associated with higher-molecular-weight polysomes in H35 cells compared to H35(F/F) cells. While the level of p53 mRNA expression was identical in parent and TS-overexpressing cell lines, the level of p53 RNA bound to TS in the form of RNP complexes was significantly higher in TS-overexpressing cells. The effect of TS on p53 expression was also investigated with human colon cancer RKO cells by use of a tetracycline-inducible system. Treatment of RKO cells with a tetracycline derivative, doxycycline, resulted in 15-fold-induced expression of TS protein and nearly complete suppression of p53 protein expression. However, p53 mRNA levels were identical in transfected RKO cells in the absence and presence of doxycycline. Taken together, these findings suggest that TS regulates the expression of p53 at the translational level. This study identifies a novel pathway for regulating p53 gene expression and expands current understanding of the potential role of TS as a regulator of cellular gene expression. PMID:9891091

  11. Crystal Structures of Protein Glutaminase and Its Pro Forms Converted into Enzyme-Substrate Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Hashizume, Ryota; Maki, Yukiko; Mizutani, Kimihiko; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Matsubara, Hiroyuki; Sugita, Akiko; Sato, Kimihiko; Yamaguchi, Shotaro; Mikami, Bunzo

    2011-01-01

    Protein glutaminase, which converts a protein glutamine residue to a glutamate residue, is expected to be useful as a new food-processing enzyme. The crystal structures of the mature and pro forms of the enzyme were refined at 1.15 and 1.73 Å resolution, respectively. The overall structure of the mature enzyme has a weak homology to the core domain of human transglutaminase-2. The catalytic triad (Cys-His-Asp) common to transglutaminases and cysteine proteases is located in the bottom of the active site pocket. The structure of the recombinant pro form shows that a short loop between S2 and S3 in the proregion covers and interacts with the active site of the mature region, mimicking the protein substrate of the enzyme. Ala-47 is located just above the pocket of the active site. Two mutant structures (A47Q-1 and A47Q-2) refined at 1.5 Å resolution were found to correspond to the enzyme-substrate complex and an S-acyl intermediate. Based on these structures, the catalytic mechanism of protein glutaminase is proposed. PMID:21926168

  12. Amylopectin biosynthetic enzymes from developing rice seed form enzymatically active protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Crofts, Naoko; Abe, Natsuko; Oitome, Naoko F.; Matsushima, Ryo; Hayashi, Mari; Tetlow, Ian J.; Emes, Michael J.; Nakamura, Yasunori; Fujita, Naoko

    2015-01-01

    Amylopectin is a highly branched, organized cluster of glucose polymers, and the major component of rice starch. Synthesis of amylopectin requires fine co-ordination between elongation of glucose polymers by soluble starch synthases (SSs), generation of branches by branching enzymes (BEs), and removal of misplaced branches by debranching enzymes (DBEs). Among the various isozymes having a role in amylopectin biosynthesis, limited numbers of SS and BE isozymes have been demonstrated to interact via protein–protein interactions in maize and wheat amyloplasts. This study investigated whether protein–protein interactions are also found in rice endosperm, as well as exploring differences between species. Gel permeation chromatography of developing rice endosperm extracts revealed that all 10 starch biosynthetic enzymes analysed were present at larger molecular weights than their respective monomeric sizes. SSIIa, SSIIIa, SSIVb, BEI, BEIIb, and PUL co-eluted at mass sizes >700kDa, and SSI, SSIIa, BEIIb, ISA1, PUL, and Pho1 co-eluted at 200–400kDa. Zymogram analyses showed that SSI, SSIIIa, BEI, BEIIa, BEIIb, ISA1, PUL, and Pho1 eluted in high molecular weight fractions were active. Comprehensive co-immunoprecipitation analyses revealed associations of SSs–BEs, and, among BE isozymes, BEIIa–Pho1, and pullulanase-type DBE–BEI interactions. Blue-native-PAGE zymogram analyses confirmed the glucan-synthesizing activity of protein complexes. These results suggest that some rice starch biosynthetic isozymes are physically associated with each other and form active protein complexes. Detailed analyses of these complexes will shed light on the mechanisms controlling the unique branch and cluster structure of amylopectin, and the physicochemical properties of starch. PMID:25979995

  13. Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 in the Pro-Mature Complex Form Enhances Bovine Oocyte Developmental Competence

    PubMed Central

    Sudiman, Jaqueline; Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L.; Ritter, Lesley J.; White, Melissa A.; Mottershead, David G.; Thompson, Jeremy G.; Gilchrist, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental competence of in vitro matured (IVM) oocytes needs to be improved and this can potentially be achieved by adding recombinant bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) or growth differentiation factor (GDF9) to IVM. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a purified pro-mature complex form of recombinant human BMP15 versus the commercially available bioactive forms of BMP15 and GDF9 (both isolated mature regions) during IVM on bovine embryo development and metabolic activity. Bovine cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) were matured in vitro in control medium or treated with 100 ng/ml pro-mature BMP15, mature BMP15 or mature GDF9 +/− FSH. Metabolic measures of glucose uptake and lactate production from COCs and autofluorescence of NAD(P)H, FAD and GSH were measured in oocytes after IVM. Following in vitro fertilisation and embryo culture, day 8 blastocysts were stained for cell numbers. COCs matured in medium +/− FSH containing pro-mature BMP15 displayed significantly improved blastocyst development (57.7±3.9%, 43.5±4.2%) compared to controls (43.3±2.4%, 28.9±3.7%) and to mature GDF9+FSH (36.1±3.0%). The mature form of BMP15 produced intermediate levels of blastocyst development; not significantly different to control or pro-mature BMP15 levels. Pro-mature BMP15 increased intra-oocyte NAD(P)H, and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels were increased by both forms of BMP15 in the absence of FSH. Exogenous BMP15 in its pro-mature form during IVM provides a functional source of oocyte-secreted factors to improve bovine blastocyst development. This form of BMP15 may prove useful for improving cattle and human artificial reproductive technologies. PMID:25058588

  14. Cellular COPII Proteins Are Involved in Production of the Vesicles That Form the Poliovirus Replication Complex

    PubMed Central

    Rust, René C.; Landmann, Lukas; Gosert, Rainer; Tang, Bor Luen; Hong, Wanjin; Hauri, Hans-Peter; Egger, Denise; Bienz, Kurt

    2001-01-01

    Poliovirus (PV) replicates its genome in association with membranous vesicles in the cytoplasm of infected cells. To elucidate the origin and mode of formation of PV vesicles, immunofluorescence labeling with antibodies against the viral vesicle marker proteins 2B and 2BC, as well as cellular markers of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), anterograde transport vesicles, and the Golgi complex, was performed in BT7-H cells. Optical sections obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy were subjected to a deconvolution process to enhance resolution and signal-to-noise ratio and to allow for a three-dimensional representation of labeled membrane structures. The mode of formation of the PV vesicles was, on morphological grounds, similar to the formation of anterograde membrane traffic vesicles in uninfected cells. ER-resident membrane markers were excluded from both types of vesicles, and the COPII components Sec13 and Sec31 were both found to be colocalized on the vesicular surface, indicating the presence of a functional COPII coat. PV vesicle formation during early time points of infection did not involve the Golgi complex. The expression of PV protein 2BC or the entire P2 and P3 genomic region led to the production of vesicles carrying a COPII coat and showing the same mode of formation as vesicles produced after PV infection. These results indicate that PV vesicles are formed at the ER by the cellular COPII budding mechanism and thus are homologous to the vesicles of the anterograde membrane transport pathway. PMID:11559814

  15. Gadd45a Protein Promotes Skeletal Muscle Atrophy by Forming a Complex with the Protein Kinase MEKK4.

    PubMed

    Bullard, Steven A; Seo, Seongjin; Schilling, Birgit; Dyle, Michael C; Dierdorff, Jason M; Ebert, Scott M; DeLau, Austin D; Gibson, Bradford W; Adams, Christopher M

    2016-08-19

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a serious and highly prevalent condition that remains poorly understood at the molecular level. Previous work found that skeletal muscle atrophy involves an increase in skeletal muscle Gadd45a expression, which is necessary and sufficient for skeletal muscle fiber atrophy. However, the direct mechanism by which Gadd45a promotes skeletal muscle atrophy was unknown. To address this question, we biochemically isolated skeletal muscle proteins that associate with Gadd45a as it induces atrophy in mouse skeletal muscle fibers in vivo We found that Gadd45a interacts with multiple proteins in skeletal muscle fibers, including, most prominently, MEKK4, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase that was not previously known to play a role in skeletal muscle atrophy. Furthermore, we found that, by forming a complex with MEKK4 in skeletal muscle fibers, Gadd45a increases MEKK4 protein kinase activity, which is both sufficient to induce skeletal muscle fiber atrophy and required for Gadd45a-mediated skeletal muscle fiber atrophy. Together, these results identify a direct biochemical mechanism by which Gadd45a induces skeletal muscle atrophy and provide new insight into the way that skeletal muscle atrophy occurs at the molecular level. PMID:27358404

  16. The PBX-regulating protein PREP1 is present in different PBX-complexed forms in mouse.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, E; Schulz, H; Talarico, D; Blasi, F; Berthelsen, J

    1999-05-01

    Human PREP1, a novel homeodomain protein of the TALE super-family, forms a stable DNA-binding complex with PBX proteins in solution, a ternary complex with PBX and HOXB1 on DNA, and is able to act as a co-activator in the transcription of PBX-HOXB1 activated promoters (Berthelsen, J., Zappavigna, V., Ferretti, E., Mavilio, F., Blasi, F. , 1998b. The novel homeoprotein Prep1 modulates Pbx-Hox protein cooperatity. EMBO J. 17, 1434-1445; Berthelsen, J., Zappavigna, V., Mavilio, F., Blasi, F., 1998c. Prep1, a novel functional partner of Pbx proteins. EMBO J. 17, 1423-1433). Here we demonstrate the presence of DNA-binding PREP1-PBX complexes also in murine cells. In vivo, PREP1 is a predominant partner of PBX proteins in various murine tissues. However, the choice of PBX family member associated with PREP1 is largely tissue-type specific. We report the cloning and expression domain of murine Prep1 gene. Murine PREP1 shares 100% identity with human PREP1 in the homeodomain and 95% similarity throughout the whole protein. In the adult mouse, PREP1 is expressed ubiquitously, with peaks in testis and thymus. We further demonstrate the presence of murine Prep1 mRNA and protein, and of different DNA-binding PREP1-PBX complexes, in mouse embryos from at least 9.5 days p.c. Moreover, we show that PREP1 is present in all embryonic tissues from at least 7.5-17.5 days p.c with a predominantly nuclear staining. PREP1 is able to super-activate the PBX-HOXB-1 autoregulated Hoxb-1 promoter, and we show that all three proteins, PREP1, PBX and HOXB-1, are present together in the mouse rhombomere 4 domain in vivo, compatible with a role of PREP1 as a regulator of PBX and HOXB-1 proteins activity during development. PMID:10381567

  17. Geometry of a complex formed by double strand break repair proteins at a single DNA end: recruitment of DNA-PKcs induces inward translocation of Ku protein.

    PubMed

    Yoo, S; Dynan, W S

    1999-12-15

    Ku protein and the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) are essential components of the double-strand break repair machinery in higher eukaryotic cells. Ku protein binds to broken DNA ends and recruits DNA-PKcs to form an enzymatically active complex. To characterize the arrangement of proteins in this complex, we developed a set of photocross-linking probes, each with a single free end. We have previously used this approach to characterize the contacts in an initial Ku-DNA complex, and we have now applied the same technology to define the events that occur when Ku recruits DNA-PKcs. The new probes allow the binding of one molecule of Ku protein and one molecule of DNA-PKcs in a defined position and orientation. Photocross-linking reveals that DNA-PKcs makes direct contact with the DNA termini, occupying an approximately 10 bp region proximal to the free end. Characterization of the Ku protein cross-linking pattern in the presence and absence of DNA-PKcs suggests that Ku binds to form an initial complex at the DNA ends, and that recruitment of DNA-PKcs induces an inward translocation of this Ku molecule by about one helical turn. The presence of ATP had no effect on protein-DNA contacts, suggesting that neither DNA-PK-mediated phosphorylation nor a putative Ku helicase activity plays a role in modulating protein conformation under the conditions tested. PMID:10572166

  18. Whirlin and PDZ domain-containing 7 (PDZD7) proteins are both required to form the quaternary protein complex associated with Usher syndrome type 2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Zou, Junhuang; Shen, Zuolian; Zhang, Weiping; Yang, Jun

    2014-12-26

    Usher syndrome (USH) is the leading genetic cause of combined hearing and vision loss. Among the three USH clinical types, type 2 (USH2) occurs most commonly. USH2A, GPR98, and WHRN are three known causative genes of USH2, whereas PDZD7 is a modifier gene found in USH2 patients. The proteins encoded by these four USH genes have been proposed to form a multiprotein complex, the USH2 complex, due to interactions found among some of these proteins in vitro, their colocalization in vivo, and mutual dependence of some of these proteins for their normal in vivo localizations. However, evidence showing the formation of the USH2 complex is missing, and details on how this complex is formed remain elusive. Here, we systematically investigated interactions among the intracellular regions of the four USH proteins using colocalization, yeast two-hybrid, and pull-down assays. We show that multiple domains of the four USH proteins interact among one another. Importantly, both WHRN and PDZD7 are required for the complex formation with USH2A and GPR98. In this USH2 quaternary complex, WHRN prefers to bind to USH2A, whereas PDZD7 prefers to bind to GPR98. Interaction between WHRN and PDZD7 is the bridge between USH2A and GPR98. Additionally, the USH2 quaternary complex has a variable stoichiometry. These findings suggest that a non-obligate, short term, and dynamic USH2 quaternary protein complex may exist in vivo. Our work provides valuable insight into the physiological role of the USH2 complex in vivo and informs possible reconstruction of the USH2 complex for future therapy. PMID:25406310

  19. Drosophila Torsin Protein Regulates Motor Control and Stress Sensitivity and Forms a Complex with Fragile-X Mental Retardation Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Hyo-Min; Koh, Young Ho

    2016-01-01

    We investigated unknown in vivo functions of Torsin by using Drosophila as a model. Downregulation of Drosophila Torsin (DTor) by DTor-specific inhibitory double-stranded RNA (RNAi) induced abnormal locomotor behavior and increased susceptibility to H2O2. In addition, altered expression of DTor significantly increased the numbers of synaptic boutons. One important biochemical consequence of DTor-RNAi expression in fly brains was upregulation of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Altered expression of ADH has also been reported in Drosophila Fragile-X mental retardation protein (DFMRP) mutant flies. Interestingly, expression of DFMRP was altered in DTor mutant flies, and DTor and DFMRP were present in the same protein complexes. In addition, DTor and DFMRP immunoreactivities were partially colocalized in several cellular organelles in larval muscles. Furthermore, there were no significant differences between synaptic morphologies of dfmrp null mutants and dfmrp mutants expressing DTor-RNAi. Taken together, our evidences suggested that DTor and DFMRP might be present in the same signaling pathway regulating synaptic plasticity. In addition, we also found that human Torsin1A and human FMRP were present in the same protein complexes, suggesting that this phenomenon is evolutionarily conserved. PMID:27313903

  20. Two proteins that form a complex are required for 7-methylguanosine modification of yeast tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Andrei; Martzen, Mark R; Phizicky, Eric M

    2002-01-01

    7-methylguanosine (m7G) modification of tRNA occurs widely in eukaryotes and bacteria, is nearly always found at position 46, and is one of the few modifications that confers a positive charge to the base. Screening of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomic library of purified GST-ORF fusion proteins reveals two previously uncharacterized proteins that copurify with m7G methyltransferase activity on pre-tRNA(Phe). ORF YDL201w encodes Trm8, a protein that is highly conserved in prokaryotes and eukaryotes and that contains an S-adenosylmethionine binding domain. ORF YDR165w encodes Trm82, a less highly conserved protein containing putative WD40 repeats, which are often implicated in macromolecular interactions. Neither protein has significant sequence similarity to yeast Abd1, which catalyzes m7G modification of the 5' cap of mRNA, other than the methyltransferase motif shared by Trm8 and Abd1. Several lines of evidence indicate that both Trm8 and Trm82 proteins are required for tRNA m7G-methyltransferase activity: Extracts derived from strains lacking either gene have undetectable m7G methyltransferase activity, RNA from strains lacking either gene have much reduced m7G, and coexpression of both proteins is required to overproduce activity. Aniline cleavage mapping shows that Trm8/Trm82 proteins modify pre-tRNAPhe at G46, the site that is modified in vivo. Trm8 and Trm82 proteins form a complex, as affinity purification of Trm8 protein causes copurification of Trm82 protein in approximate equimolar yield. This functional two-protein family appears to be retained in eukaryotes, as expression of both corresponding human proteins, METTL1 and WDR4, is required for m7G-methyltransferase activity. PMID:12403464

  1. Development of a long-acting, protein-loaded, redox-active, injectable gel formed by a polyion complex for local protein therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Shiro; Kaneko, Junya; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2016-04-01

    Although cancer immunotherapies are attracting much attention, it is difficult to develop bioactive proteins owing to the severe systemic toxicity. To overcome the issue, we designed new local protein delivery system by using a protein-loaded, redox-active, injectable gel (RIG), which is formed by a polyion complex (PIC) comprising three components, viz., cationic polyamine-poly(ethylene glycol)-polyamine triblock copolymer possessing ROS-scavenging moieties as side chains; anionic poly(acrylic acid); and a protein. The mixture formed the protein-loaded PIC flower micelles at room temperature, which immediately converted to a gel with high mechanical strength upon exposure to physiological conditions. Because the protein electrostatically interacts with the PIC gel network, RIG provided a sustained release of the protein without a significant initial burst, regardless of the types of proteins in vitro, and much longer retention of the protein at the local injection site in mice than that of the naked protein. Subcutaneous injections of IL-12@RIG in the vicinity of tumor tissue showed remarkable tumor growth inhibition in tumor-bearing mice, compared to that observed with injection of IL-12 alone, suppressing adverse events caused by IL-12-induced ROS. Our results indicate that RIG has potential as a platform technology for an injectable sustained-release carrier for proteins. PMID:26828685

  2. Parkin, PINK1, and DJ-1 form a ubiquitin E3 ligase complex promoting unfolded protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Hui; Wang, Danling; Chen, Linan; Choo, Yeun Su; Ma, Hong; Tang, Chengyuan; Xia, Kun; Jiang, Wei; Ronai, Ze’ev; Zhuang, Xiaoxi; Zhang, Zhuohua

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in PARKIN, pten-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1), and DJ-1 are individually linked to autosomal recessive early-onset familial forms of Parkinson disease (PD). Although mutations in these genes lead to the same disease state, the functional relationships between them and how their respective disease-associated mutations cause PD are largely unknown. Here, we show that Parkin, PINK1, and DJ-1 formed a complex (termed PPD complex) to promote ubiquitination and degradation of Parkin substrates, including Parkin itself and Synphilin-1 in neuroblastoma cells and human brain lysates. Genetic ablation of either Pink1 or Dj-1 resulted in reduced ubiquitination of endogenous Parkin as well as decreased degradation and increased accumulation of aberrantly expressed Parkin substrates. Expression of PINK1 enhanced Parkin-mediated degradation of heat shock–induced misfolded protein. In contrast, PD-pathogenic Parkin and PINK1 mutations showed reduced ability to promote degradation of Parkin substrates. This study identified a functional ubiquitin E3 ligase complex consisting of PD-associated Parkin, PINK1, and DJ-1 to promote degradation of un-/misfolded proteins and suggests that their PD-pathogenic mutations impair E3 ligase activity of the complex, which may constitute a mechanism underlying PD pathogenesis. PMID:19229105

  3. Iron-regulatory proteins DmdR1 and DmdR2 of Streptomyces coelicolor form two different DNA-protein complexes with iron boxes.

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Francisco J; Martín, Juan F

    2004-01-01

    In high G+C Gram-positive bacteria, the control of expression of genes involved in iron metabolism is exerted by a DmdR [divalent (bivalent) metal-dependent regulatory protein] in the presence of Fe2+ or other bivalent ions. The dmdR1 and dmdR2 genes of Streptomyces coelicolor were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and the DmdR1 and DmdR2 proteins were purified to homogeneity. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays showed that both DmdR1 and DmdR2 bind to the 19-nt tox and desA iron boxes forming two different complexes in each case. Increasing the concentrations of DmdR1 or DmdR2 protein shifted these complexes from their low-molecular-mass form to the high-molecular-mass complexes. Formation of the DNA-protein complexes was prevented by the bivalent metal chelating agent 2,2'-dipyridyl and by antibodies specific against the DmdR proteins. Cross-linking with glutaraldehyde of pure DmdR1 or DmdR2 proteins showed that DmdR1 forms dimers, whereas DmdR2 is capable of forming dimers and probably tetramers. Ten different iron boxes were found in a search for iron boxes in the genome of S. coelicolor. Most of them correspond to putative genes involved in siderophore biosynthesis. Since the nucleotide sequence of these ten boxes is identical (or slightly different) with the synthetic DNA fragment containing the desA box used in the present study, it is proposed that DmdR1 and DmdR2 bind to the iron boxes upstream of at least ten different genes in S. coelicolor. PMID:14960152

  4. BHMP39 PROTEINS OF B. HYODYSENTERIAE FORM HIGH MOLECULAR WEIGHT COMPLEXES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brachyspira hyodysenteriae is the aetiological agent of swine dysentery, a severe mucohaemorrhagic diarrhoeal disease of pigs, with economic significance for the global pork industry. The most abundant outer membrane proteins of B. hyodysenteriae are from the Bhmp39 family of proteins. Eight bhmp39 ...

  5. The RNA-Protein Complexes of E. coli Hfq: Form and Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taewoo; Feig, Andrew L.

    E. coli Hfq is an RNA binding protein that has received significant attention due to its role in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Hfq facilitates the base-pairing between mRNAs and ncRNAs leading to translational activation, translational repression and/or degradation of mRNAs — the bacterial analog of the RNA interference pathway. Hfq is the bacterial homolog of the Sm and Lsm proteins and has a similar doughnut-shaped structure. This review summarizes what is known about the diverse physiological roles of Hfq and how its structure facilitates a diverse array of RNA—protein and protein—protein interactions. These interactions are put into context to explain the models of how Hfq is thought to help facilitate post-transcriptional gene regulation by non-coding RNAs in bacteria.

  6. The Usher syndrome proteins cadherin 23 and harmonin form a complex by means of PDZ-domain interactions

    PubMed Central

    Siemens, Jan; Kazmierczak, Piotr; Reynolds, Anna; Sticker, Melanie; Littlewood-Evans, Amanda; Müller, Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    Usher syndrome type 1 (USH1) patients suffer from sensorineuronal deafness, vestibular dysfunction, and visual impairment. Several genetic loci have been linked to USH1, and four of the relevant genes have been identified. They encode the unconventional myosin VIIa, the PDZ-domain protein harmonin, and the putative adhesion receptors cadherin 23 (CDH23) and protocadherin 15 (PCDH15). We show here that CDH23 and harmonin form a protein complex. Two PDZ domains in harmonin interact with two complementary binding surfaces in the CDH23 cytoplasmic domain. One of the binding surfaces is disrupted by sequences encoded by an alternatively spliced CDH23 exon that is expressed in the ear, but not the retina. In the ear, CDH23 and harmonin are expressed in the stereocilia of hair cells, and in the retina within the photoreceptor cell layer. Because CDH23-deficient mice have splayed stereocilia, our data suggest that CDH23 and harmonin are part of a transmembrane complex that connects stereocilia into a bundle. Defects in the formation of this complex are predicted to disrupt stereocilia bundles and cause deafness in USH1 patients. PMID:12407180

  7. Discovery of a novel periplasmic protein that forms a complex with a trimeric autotransporter adhesin and peptidoglycan.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Masahito; Yoshimoto, Shogo; Hayashi, Ayumi; Kanie, Junichi; Hori, Katsutoshi

    2016-08-01

    Trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs), fibrous proteins on the cell surface of Gram-negative bacteria, have attracted attention as virulence factors. However, little is known about the mechanism of their biogenesis. AtaA, a TAA of Acinetobacter sp. Tol 5, confers nonspecific, high adhesiveness to bacterial cells. We identified a new gene, tpgA, which forms a single operon with ataA and encodes a protein comprising two conserved protein domains identified by Pfam: an N-terminal SmpA/OmlA domain and a C-terminal OmpA_C-like domain with a peptidoglycan (PGN)-binding motif. Cell fractionation and a pull-down assay showed that TpgA forms a complex with AtaA, anchoring it to the outer membrane (OM). Isolation of total PGN-associated proteins showed TpgA binding to PGN. Disruption of tpgA significantly decreased the adhesiveness of Tol 5 because of a decrease in surface-displayed AtaA, suggesting TpgA involvement in AtaA secretion. This is reminiscent of SadB, which functions as a specific chaperone for SadA, a TAA in Salmonella species; however, SadB anchors to the inner membrane, whereas TpgA anchors to the OM through AtaA. The genetic organization encoding the TAA-TpgA-like protein cassette can be found in diverse Gram-negative bacteria, suggesting a common contribution of TpgA homologues to TAA biogenesis. PMID:27074146

  8. A novel scaffold protein, TANC, possibly a rat homolog of Drosophila rolling pebbles (rols), forms a multiprotein complex with various postsynaptic density proteins.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tatsuo; Li, Weidong; Zhang, Jing-Ping; Tian, Qing-Bao; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Usuda, Nobuteru; Usada, Nobuteru; Kondo, Hisatake; Fujii, Toshihiro; Endo, Shogo

    2005-01-01

    We cloned from the rat brain a novel gene, tanc (GenBank Accession No. AB098072), which encoded a protein containing three tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs), ten ankyrin repeats and a coiled-coil region, and is possibly a rat homolog of Drosophila rolling pebbles (rols). The tanc gene was expressed widely in the adult rat brain. Subcellular distribution, immunohistochemical study of the brain and immunocytochemical studies of cultured neuronal cells indicated the postsynaptic localization of TANC protein of 200 kDa. Pull-down experiments showed that TANC protein bound PSD-95, SAP97, and Homer via its C-terminal PDZ-binding motif, -ESNV, and fodrin via both its ankyrin repeats and the TPRs together with the coiled-coil domain. TANC also bound the alpha subunit of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. An immunoprecipitation study showed TANC association with various postsynaptic proteins, including guanylate kinase-associated protein (GKAP), alpha-internexin, and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptor 2B and AMPA-type glutamate receptor (GluR1) subunits. These results suggest that TANC protein may work as a postsynaptic scaffold component by forming a multiprotein complex with various postsynaptic density proteins. PMID:15673434

  9. A Targeted Oligonucleotide Enhancer of SMN2 Exon 7 Splicing Forms Competing Quadruplex and Protein Complexes in Functional Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lindsay D.; Dickinson, Rachel L.; Lucas, Christian M.; Cousins, Alex; Malygin, Alexey A.; Weldon, Carika; Perrett, Andrew J.; Bottrill, Andrew R.; Searle, Mark S.; Burley, Glenn A.; Eperon, Ian C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The use of oligonucleotides to activate the splicing of selected exons is limited by a poor understanding of the mechanisms affected. A targeted bifunctional oligonucleotide enhancer of splicing (TOES) anneals to SMN2 exon 7 and carries an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) sequence. We show that it stimulates splicing specifically of intron 6 in the presence of repressing sequences in intron 7. Complementarity to the 5′ end of exon 7 increases U2AF65 binding, but the ESE sequence is required for efficient recruitment of U2 snRNP. The ESE forms at least three coexisting discrete states: a quadruplex, a complex containing only hnRNP F/H, and a complex enriched in the activator SRSF1. Neither hnRNP H nor quadruplex formation contributes to ESE activity. The results suggest that splicing limited by weak signals can be rescued by rapid exchange of TOES oligonucleotides in various complexes and raise the possibility that SR proteins associate transiently with ESEs. PMID:25263560

  10. Human Cytomegalovirus gH/gL Forms a Stable Complex with the Fusion Protein gB in Virions

    PubMed Central

    Vanarsdall, Adam L.; Howard, Paul W.; Wisner, Todd W.; Johnson, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous virus that is a major pathogen in newborns and immunocompromised or immunosuppressed patients. HCMV infects a wide variety of cell types using distinct entry pathways that involve different forms of the gH/gL glycoprotein: gH/gL/gO and gH/gL/UL128-131 as well as the viral fusion glycoprotein, gB. However, the minimal or core fusion machinery (sufficient for cell-cell fusion) is just gH/gL and gB. Here, we demonstrate that HCMV gB and gH/gL form a stable complex early after their synthesis and in the absence of other viral proteins. gH/gL can interact with gB mutants that are unable to mediate cell-cell fusion. gB-gH/gL complexes included as much as 16–50% of the total gH/gL in HCMV virus particles. In contrast, only small amounts of gH/gL/gO and gH/gL/UL128-131 complexes were found associated with gB. All herpesviruses express gB and gH/gL molecules and most models describing herpesvirus entry suggest that gH/gL interacts with gB to mediate membrane fusion, although there is no direct evidence for this. For herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) it has been suggested that after receptor binding gH/gL binds to gB either just before, or coincident with membrane fusion. Therefore, our results have major implications for these models, demonstrating that HCMV gB and gH/gL forms stable gB-gH/gL complexes that are incorporated virions without receptor binding or membrane fusion. Moreover, our data is the best support to date for the proposal that gH/gL interacts with gB. PMID:27082872

  11. Artistic forms and complexity.

    PubMed

    Boon, J-P; Casti, J; Taylor, R P

    2011-04-01

    We discuss the inter-relationship between various concepts of complexity by introducing a complexity 'triangle' featuring objective complexity, subjective complexity and social complexity. Their connections are explored using visual and musical compositions of art. As examples, we quantify the complexity embedded within the paintings of the Jackson Pollock and the musical works of Johann Sebastian Bach. We discuss the challenges inherent in comparisons of the spatial patterns created by Pollock and the sonic patterns created by Bach, including the differing roles that time plays in these investigations. Our results draw attention to some common intriguing characteristics suggesting 'universality' and conjecturing that the fractal nature of art might have an intrinsic value of more general significance. PMID:21382264

  12. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Kelch Proteins and Bud14 Protein Form a Stable 520-kDa Formin Regulatory Complex That Controls Actin Cable Assembly and Cell Morphogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Christopher J.; Chesarone-Cataldo, Melissa; Alioto, Salvatore L.; Salin, Bénédicte; Sagot, Isabelle; Goode, Bruce L.

    2014-01-01

    Formins perform essential roles in actin assembly and organization in vivo, but they also require tight regulation of their activities to produce properly functioning actin structures. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bud14 is one member of an emerging class of formin regulators that target the FH2 domain to inhibit actin polymerization, but little is known about how these regulators are themselves controlled in vivo. Kelch proteins are critical for cell polarity and morphogenesis in a wide range of organisms, but their mechanistic roles in these processes are still largely undefined. Here, we report that S. cerevisiae Kelch proteins, Kel1 and Kel2, associate with Bud14 in cell extracts to form a stable 520-kDa complex with an apparent stoichiometry of 2:2:1 Bud14/Kel1/Kel2. Using pairwise combinations of GFP- and red fluorescent protein-tagged proteins, we show that Kel1, Kel2, and Bud14 interdependently co-localize at polarity sites. By analyzing single, double, and triple mutants, we show that Kel1 and Kel2 function in the same pathway as Bud14 in regulating Bnr1-mediated actin cable formation. Loss of any component of the complex results in long, bent, and hyper-stable actin cables, accompanied by defects in secretory vesicle traffic during polarized growth and septum formation during cytokinesis. These observations directly link S. cerevisiae Kelch proteins to the control of formin activity, and together with previous observations made for S. pombe homologues tea1p and tea3p, they have broad implications for understanding Kelch function in other systems. PMID:24828508

  13. Zfrp8 forms a complex with fragile-X mental retardation protein and regulates its localization and function.

    PubMed

    Tan, William; Schauder, Curtis; Naryshkina, Tatyana; Minakhina, Svetlana; Steward, Ruth

    2016-02-15

    Fragile-X syndrome is the most commonly inherited cause of autism and mental disabilities. The Fmr1 (Fragile-X Mental Retardation 1) gene is essential in humans and Drosophila for the maintenance of neural stem cells, and Fmr1 loss results in neurological and reproductive developmental defects in humans and flies. FMRP (Fragile-X Mental Retardation Protein) is a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein, involved in mRNA silencing and translational repression. Both Zfrp8 and Fmr1 have essential functions in the Drosophila ovary. In this study, we identified FMRP, Nufip (Nuclear Fragile-X Mental Retardation Protein-interacting Protein) and Tral (Trailer Hitch) as components of a Zfrp8 protein complex. We show that Zfrp8 is required in the nucleus, and controls localization of FMRP in the cytoplasm. In addition, we demonstrate that Zfrp8 genetically interacts with Fmr1 and tral in an antagonistic manner. Zfrp8 and FMRP both control heterochromatin packaging, also in opposite ways. We propose that Zfrp8 functions as a chaperone, controlling protein complexes involved in RNA processing in the nucleus. PMID:26772998

  14. Di-Ras2 Protein Forms a Complex with SmgGDS Protein in Brain Cytosol in Order to Be in a Low Affinity State for Guanine Nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Ogita, Yoshitaka; Egami, Sachiko; Ebihara, Arisa; Ueda, Nami; Katada, Toshiaki; Kontani, Kenji

    2015-08-14

    The Ras family of small GTPases function in a wide variety of biological processes as "molecular switches" by cycling between inactive GDP-bound and active GTP-bound forms. Di-Ras1 and Di-Ras2 were originally identified as small GTPases forming a distinct subgroup of the Ras family. Di-Ras1/Di-Ras2 mRNAs are detected predominantly in brain and heart tissues. Biochemical analysis of Di-Ras1/Di-Ras2 has revealed that they have little GTPase activity and that their intrinsic guanine-nucleotide exchange rates are much faster than that of H-Ras. Yet little is known about the biological role(s) of Di-Ras1/Di-Ras2 or of how their activities are regulated. In the present study we found that endogenous Di-Ras2 co-purifies with SmgGDS from rat brain cytosol. Size-exclusion chromatography of purified recombinant proteins showed that Di-Ras2 forms a high affinity complex with SmgGDS. SmgGDS is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor with multiple armadillo repeats and has recently been shown to specifically activate RhoA and RhoC. In contrast to the effect on RhoA, SmgGDS does not act as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Di-Ras2 but instead tightly associates with Di-Ras2 to reduce its binding affinity for guanine nucleotides. Finally, pulse-chase analysis revealed that Di-Ras2 binds, in a C-terminal CAAX motif-dependent manner, to SmgGDS immediately after its synthesis. This leads to increased Di-Ras2 stability. We thus propose that isoprenylated Di-Ras2 forms a tight complex with SmgGDS in cytosol immediately after its synthesis, which lowers its affinity for guanine nucleotides. PMID:26149690

  15. Three RNA Binding Proteins Form a Complex to Promote Differentiation of Germline Stem Cell Lineage in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shaowei; Geng, Qing; Gao, Yu; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Zhaohui

    2014-01-01

    In regenerative tissues, one of the strategies to protect stem cells from genetic aberrations, potentially caused by frequent cell division, is to transiently expand the stem cell daughters before further differentiation. However, failure to exit the transit amplification may lead to overgrowth, and the molecular mechanism governing this regulation remains vague. In a Drosophila mutagenesis screen for factors involved in the regulation of germline stem cell (GSC) lineage, we isolated a mutation in the gene CG32364, which encodes a putative RNA-binding protein (RBP) and is designated as tumorous testis (tut). In tut mutant, spermatogonia fail to differentiate and over-amplify, a phenotype similar to that in mei-P26 mutant. Mei-P26 is a TRIM-NHL tumor suppressor homolog required for the differentiation of GSC lineage. We found that Tut binds preferentially a long isoform of mei-P26 3′UTR, and is essential for the translational repression of mei-P26 reporter. Bam and Bgcn are both RBPs that have also been shown to repress mei-P26 expression. Our genetic analyses indicate that tut, bam, or bgcn is required to repress mei-P26 and to promote the differentiation of GSCs. Biochemically, we demonstrate that Tut, Bam, and Bgcn can form a physical complex in which Bam holds Tut on its N-terminus and Bgcn on its C-terminus. Our in vivo and in vitro evidence illustrate that Tut acts with Bam, Bgcn to accurately coordinate proliferation and differentiation in Drosophila germline stem cell lineage. PMID:25412508

  16. SMN, the Spinal Muscular Atrophy Protein, Forms a Pre-Import Snrnp Complex with Snurportin1 and Importin β

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Usha; Ospina, Jason K.; Frey, Mark R.; Hebert, Michael D.; Matera, A. Gregory

    2006-01-01

    The survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein is mutated in patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). SMN is part of a multiprotein complex required for biogenesis of the Sm class of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs). Following assembly of the Sm core domain, snRNPs are transported to the nucleus via importin β. Sm snRNPs contain a nuclear localization signal (NLS) consisting of a 2,2,7-trimethylguanosine (TMG) cap and the Sm core. Snurportin1 (SPN) is the adaptor protein that recognizes both the TMG cap and importin β. Here, we report that a mutant SPN construct lacking the importin β binding domain (IBB), but containing an intact TMG cap-binding domain, localizes primarily to the nucleus, whereas full-length SPN localizes to the cytoplasm. The nuclear localization of the mutant SPN was not a result of passive diffusion through the nuclear pores. Importantly, we found that SPN interacts with SMN, Gemin3, Sm snRNPs and importin β. In the presence of ribonucleases, the interactions with SMN and Sm proteins were abolished, indicating that snRNAs mediate this interplay. Cell fractionation studies showed that SPN binds preferentially to cytoplasmic SMN complexes. Notably, we found that SMN directly interacts with importin β in a GST-pulldown assay, suggesting that the SMN complex might represent the Sm core NLS receptor predicted by previous studies. Therefore, we conclude that, following Sm protein assembly, the SMN complex persists until the final stages of cytoplasmic snRNP maturation and may provide somatic cell RNPs with an alternative NLS. PMID:12095920

  17. Dynamics of water around the complex structures formed between the KH domains of far upstream element binding protein and single-stranded DNA molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Kaushik; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2015-07-28

    Single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) binding proteins specifically bind to the single-stranded regions of the DNA and protect it from premature annealing, thereby stabilizing the DNA structure. We have carried out atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the aqueous solutions of two DNA binding K homology (KH) domains (KH3 and KH4) of the far upstream element binding protein complexed with two short ss-DNA segments. Attempts have been made to explore the influence of the formation of such complex structures on the microscopic dynamics and hydrogen bond properties of the interfacial water molecules. It is found that the water molecules involved in bridging the ss-DNA segments and the protein domains form a highly constrained thin layer with extremely retarded mobility. These water molecules play important roles in freezing the conformational oscillations of the ss-DNA oligomers and thereby forming rigid complex structures. Further, it is demonstrated that the effect of complexation on the slow long-time relaxations of hydrogen bonds at the interface is correlated with hindered motions of the surrounding water molecules. Importantly, it is observed that the highly restricted motions of the water molecules bridging the protein and the DNA components in the complexed forms originate from more frequent hydrogen bond reformations.

  18. Dynamics of water around the complex structures formed between the KH domains of far upstream element binding protein and single-stranded DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Kaushik; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2015-07-01

    Single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) binding proteins specifically bind to the single-stranded regions of the DNA and protect it from premature annealing, thereby stabilizing the DNA structure. We have carried out atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the aqueous solutions of two DNA binding K homology (KH) domains (KH3 and KH4) of the far upstream element binding protein complexed with two short ss-DNA segments. Attempts have been made to explore the influence of the formation of such complex structures on the microscopic dynamics and hydrogen bond properties of the interfacial water molecules. It is found that the water molecules involved in bridging the ss-DNA segments and the protein domains form a highly constrained thin layer with extremely retarded mobility. These water molecules play important roles in freezing the conformational oscillations of the ss-DNA oligomers and thereby forming rigid complex structures. Further, it is demonstrated that the effect of complexation on the slow long-time relaxations of hydrogen bonds at the interface is correlated with hindered motions of the surrounding water molecules. Importantly, it is observed that the highly restricted motions of the water molecules bridging the protein and the DNA components in the complexed forms originate from more frequent hydrogen bond reformations.

  19. Pigment-protein complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Siegelman, H W

    1980-01-01

    The photosynthetically-active pigment protein complexes of procaryotes and eucaryotes include chlorophyll proteins, carotenochlorophyll proteins, and biliproteins. They are either integral components or attached to photosynthetic membranes. Detergents are frequently required to solubilize the pigment-protein complexes. The membrane localization and detergent solubilization strongly suggest that the pigment-protein complexes are bound to the membranes by hydrophobic interactions. Hydrophobic interactions of proteins are characterized by an increase in entropy. Their bonding energy is directly related to temperature and ionic strength. Hydrophobic-interaction chromatography, a relatively new separation procedure, can furnish an important method for the purification of pigment-protein complexes. Phycobilisome purification and properties provide an example of the need to maintain hydrophobic interactions to preserve structure and function.

  20. Surface-Induced Dissociation Mass Spectra as a Tool for Distinguishing Different Structural Forms of Gas-Phase Multimeric Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Quintyn, Royston S; Zhou, Mowei; Yan, Jing; Wysocki, Vicki H

    2015-12-01

    One attractive feature of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) lies in its ability to provide experimental collision cross section (CCS) measurements, which can be used to distinguish different conformations that a protein complex may adopt during its gas-phase unfolding. However, CCS values alone give no detailed information on subunit structure within the complex. Consequently, structural characterization typically requires molecular modeling, which can have uncertainties without experimental support. One method of obtaining direct experimental evidence on the structures of these intermediates is utilizing gas-phase activation techniques that can effectively dissociate the complexes into substructures while preserving the native topological information. The most commonly used activation method, collision-induced dissociation (CID) with low-mass target gases, typically leads to unfolding of monomers of a protein complex. Here, we describe a method that couples IM-MS and surface-induced dissociation (SID) to dissociate the source-activated precursors of three model protein complexes: C-reactive protein (CRP), transthyretin (TTR), and concanavalin A (Con A). The results of this study confirm that CID involves the unfolding of the protein complex via several intermediates. More importantly, our experiments also indicate that retention of similar CCS between different intermediates does not guarantee retention of structure. Although CID spectra (at a given collision energy) of source-activated, mass-selected precursors do not distinguish between native-like, collapsed, and expanded forms of a protein complex, dissociation patterns and/or average charge states of monomer products in SID of each of these forms are unique. PMID:26499904

  1. The Ribosome-Sec61 Translocon Complex Forms a Cytosolically Restricted Environment for Early Polytopic Membrane Protein Folding.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Melissa A; Bandyopadhyay, Anannya; Devaraneni, Prasanna K; Woodward, Josha; Rooney, LeeAnn; Yang, Zhongying; Skach, William R

    2015-11-27

    Transmembrane topology of polytopic membrane proteins (PMPs) is established in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by the ribosome Sec61-translocon complex (RTC) through iterative cycles of translocation initiation and termination. It remains unknown, however, whether tertiary folding of transmembrane domains begins after the nascent polypeptide integrates into the lipid bilayer or within a proteinaceous environment proximal to translocon components. To address this question, we used cysteine scanning mutagenesis to monitor aqueous accessibility of stalled translation intermediates to determine when, during biogenesis, hydrophilic peptide loops of the aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channel are delivered to cytosolic and lumenal compartments. Results showed that following ribosome docking on the ER membrane, the nascent polypeptide was shielded from the cytosol as it emerged from the ribosome exit tunnel. Extracellular loops followed a well defined path through the ribosome, the ribosome translocon junction, the Sec61-translocon pore, and into the ER lumen coincident with chain elongation. In contrast, intracellular loops (ICLs) and C-terminalresidues exited the ribosome into a cytosolically shielded environment and remained inaccessible to both cytosolic and lumenal compartments until translation was terminated. Shielding of ICL1 and ICL2, but not the C terminus, became resistant to maneuvers that disrupt electrostatic ribosome interactions. Thus, the early folding landscape of polytopic proteins is shaped by a spatially restricted environment localized within the assembled ribosome translocon complex. PMID:26254469

  2. A model of EcoRII restriction endonuclease action: the active complex is most likely formed by one protein subunit and one DNA recognition site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpova, E. A.; Kubareva, E. A.; Shabarova, Z. A.

    1999-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of interaction of restriction endonuclease EcoRII with DNA, we studied by native gel electrophoresis the binding of this endonuclease to a set of synthetic DNA-duplexes containing the modified or canonical recognition sequence 5'-d(CCA/TGG)-3'. All binding substrate or substrate analogues tested could be divided into two major groups: (i) duplexes that, at the interaction with endonuclease EcoRII, form two types of stable complexes on native gel in the absence of Mg2+ cofactor; (ii) duplexes that form only one type of complex, observed both in the presence and absence of Mg2+. Unlike the latter, duplexes under the first group can be hydrolyzed by endonuclease. Data obtained suggest that the active complex is most likely formed by one protein subunit and one DNA recognition sequence. A model of EcoRII endonuclease action is presented.

  3. Diphosphoryl lipid A from Rhodobacter sphaeroides inhibits complexes that form in vitro between lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein, soluble CD14, and spectrally pure LPS.

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, B W; Lichenstein, H; Qureshi, N

    1997-01-01

    An early event in septic shock is the activation of macrophages by a complex consisting of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), LPS-binding protein (LBP), and the cell surface antigen CD14. The complexes that form between [3H]ReLPS (ReLPS is deep-rough-chemotype hexacyl LPS from E. coli D31m4), soluble CD14 (sCD14), and LBP were analyzed by two independent methods, native (nondenaturing) gel electrophoresis and size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This is the first reported use of HPLC to purify and study LPS-protein complexes. The binding of [3H]ReLPS to LBP and sCD14 was inhibited by preincubation with diphosphoryl lipid A from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RsDPLA), a potent LPS antagonist. In addition, [3H]ReLPS bound to LBP and to a truncated form of sCD14 [sCD14(1-152)] that contained the LPS binding domain. Binding to both proteins was blocked by RsDPLA. Thus, RsDPLA competes in a 1:1 ratio for the same or nearby binding sites on ReLPS complexes. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of aggregated ReLPS eluting from the HPLC indicated that only LBP, not sCD14, was bound to the aggregated ReLPS. This finding supports the binary model of LPS complex formation with LBP and sCD14. PMID:9234747

  4. The eye-specification proteins So and Eya form a complex and regulate multiple steps in Drosophila eye development.

    PubMed

    Pignoni, F; Hu, B; Zavitz, K H; Xiao, J; Garrity, P A; Zipursky, S L

    1997-12-26

    Sine oculis (so) and eyes absent (eya) are required for Drosophila eye development and are founding members of the mammalian Six and Eya gene families. These genes have been proposed to act with eyeless (Pax6) to regulate eye development in vertebrates and invertebrates. so encodes a highly diverged homeobox transcription factor and eya encodes a novel nuclear protein. We demonstrate that So and Eya (1) regulate common steps in eye development including cell proliferation, patterning, and neuronal development; (2) synergize in inducing ectopic eyes; and (3) interact in yeast and in vitro through evolutionarily conserved domains. We propose that an So/Eya complex regulates multiple steps in eye development and functions within the context of a network of genes to specify eye tissue identity. PMID:9428512

  5. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Porin Pore Forms Complexes with Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteins Om14p and Om45p

    PubMed Central

    Lauffer, Susann; Mäbert, Katrin; Czupalla, Cornelia; Pursche, Theresia; Hoflack, Bernard; Rödel, Gerhard; Krause-Buchholz, Udo

    2012-01-01

    Numerous transport processes occur between the two mitochondrial (mt) membranes due to the diverse functions and metabolic processes of the mt organelle. The metabolite and ion transport through the mt outer membrane (OM) is widely assumed to be mediated by the porin pore, whereas in the mt inner membrane (IM) specific carriers are responsible for transport processes. Here, we provide evidence by means of Blue Native (BN)-PAGE analysis, co-immunoprecipitation, and tandem affinity purification that the two mt OM proteins Om14p and Om45p associate with the porin pore. Porin molecules seem to assemble independently to build the core unit. A subpopulation of these core units interacts with Om14p and Om45p. With preparative tandem affinity purification followed by MS analysis, we could identify interaction partners of this OM complex, which are mainly localized within the mt IM and function as carriers for diverse molecules. We propose a model for the role of the two OM proteins in addressing the porin pore to bind to specific channels in the mt IM to facilitate transport of metabolites. PMID:22461620

  6. Escherichia coli low-copy-number plasmid R1 centromere parC forms a U-shaped complex with its binding protein ParR

    PubMed Central

    Hoischen, C.; Bussiek, M.; Langowski, J.; Diekmann, S.

    2008-01-01

    The Escherichia coli low-copy-number plasmid R1 contains a segregation machinery composed of parC, ParR and parM. The R1 centromere-like site parC contains two separate sets of repeats. By atomic force microscopy (AFM) we show here that ParR molecules bind to each of the 5-fold repeated iterons separately with the intervening sequence unbound by ParR. The two ParR protein complexes on parC do not complex with each other. ParR binds with a stoichiometry of about one ParR dimer per each single iteron. The measured DNA fragment lengths agreed with B-form DNA and each of the two parC 5-fold interon DNA stretches adopts a linear path in its complex with ParR. However, the overall parC/ParR complex with both iteron repeats bound by ParR forms an overall U-shaped structure: the DNA folds back on itself nearly completely, including an angle of ∼150°. Analysing linear DNA fragments, we never observed dimerized ParR complexes on one parC DNA molecule (intramolecular) nor a dimerization between ParR complexes bound to two different parC DNA molecules (intermolecular). This bacterial segrosome is compared to other bacterial segregation complexes. We speculate that partition complexes might have a similar overall structural organization and, at least in part, common functional properties. PMID:18056157

  7. Yeast Integral Membrane Proteins Apq12, Brl1, and Brr6 Form a Complex Important for Regulation of Membrane Homeostasis and Nuclear Pore Complex Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lone, Museer A; Atkinson, Aaron E; Hodge, Christine A; Cottier, Stéphanie; Martínez-Montañés, Fernando; Maithel, Shelley; Mène-Saffrané, Laurent; Cole, Charles N; Schneiter, Roger

    2015-12-01

    Proper functioning of intracellular membranes is critical for many cellular processes. A key feature of membranes is their ability to adapt to changes in environmental conditions by adjusting their composition so as to maintain constant biophysical properties, including fluidity and flexibility. Similar changes in the biophysical properties of membranes likely occur when intracellular processes, such as vesicle formation and fusion, require dramatic changes in membrane curvature. Similar modifications must also be made when nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are constructed within the existing nuclear membrane, as occurs during interphase in all eukaryotes. Here we report on the role of the essential nuclear envelope/endoplasmic reticulum (NE/ER) protein Brl1 in regulating the membrane composition of the NE/ER. We show that Brl1 and two other proteins characterized previously-Brr6, which is closely related to Brl1, and Apq12-function together and are required for lipid homeostasis. All three transmembrane proteins are localized to the NE and can be coprecipitated. As has been shown for mutations affecting Brr6 and Apq12, mutations in Brl1 lead to defects in lipid metabolism, increased sensitivity to drugs that inhibit enzymes involved in lipid synthesis, and strong genetic interactions with mutations affecting lipid metabolism. Mutations affecting Brl1 or Brr6 or the absence of Apq12 leads to hyperfluid membranes, because mutant cells are hypersensitive to agents that increase membrane fluidity. We suggest that the defects in nuclear pore complex biogenesis and mRNA export seen in these mutants are consequences of defects in maintaining the biophysical properties of the NE. PMID:26432634

  8. Yeast Integral Membrane Proteins Apq12, Brl1, and Brr6 Form a Complex Important for Regulation of Membrane Homeostasis and Nuclear Pore Complex Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lone, Museer A.; Atkinson, Aaron E.; Hodge, Christine A.; Cottier, Stéphanie; Martínez-Montañés, Fernando; Maithel, Shelley; Mène-Saffrané, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Proper functioning of intracellular membranes is critical for many cellular processes. A key feature of membranes is their ability to adapt to changes in environmental conditions by adjusting their composition so as to maintain constant biophysical properties, including fluidity and flexibility. Similar changes in the biophysical properties of membranes likely occur when intracellular processes, such as vesicle formation and fusion, require dramatic changes in membrane curvature. Similar modifications must also be made when nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are constructed within the existing nuclear membrane, as occurs during interphase in all eukaryotes. Here we report on the role of the essential nuclear envelope/endoplasmic reticulum (NE/ER) protein Brl1 in regulating the membrane composition of the NE/ER. We show that Brl1 and two other proteins characterized previously—Brr6, which is closely related to Brl1, and Apq12—function together and are required for lipid homeostasis. All three transmembrane proteins are localized to the NE and can be coprecipitated. As has been shown for mutations affecting Brr6 and Apq12, mutations in Brl1 lead to defects in lipid metabolism, increased sensitivity to drugs that inhibit enzymes involved in lipid synthesis, and strong genetic interactions with mutations affecting lipid metabolism. Mutations affecting Brl1 or Brr6 or the absence of Apq12 leads to hyperfluid membranes, because mutant cells are hypersensitive to agents that increase membrane fluidity. We suggest that the defects in nuclear pore complex biogenesis and mRNA export seen in these mutants are consequences of defects in maintaining the biophysical properties of the NE. PMID:26432634

  9. The 90-kDa junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum protein forms an integral part of a supramolecular triad complex in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Froemming, G R; Pette, D; Ohlendieck, K

    1999-08-11

    Although it is well established that voltage-sensing of the alpha(1)-dihydropyridine receptor triggers Ca(2+)-release via the ryanodine receptor during excitation-contraction coupling in skeletal muscle fibers, it remains to be determined which junctional components are responsible for the assembly, maintenance, and stabilization of triads. Here, we analyzed the expression pattern and neighborhood relationship of a novel 90-kDa sarcoplasmic reticulum protein. This protein is highly enriched in the triad fraction and is predominantly expressed in fast-twitching muscle fibers. Chronic low-frequency electro-stimulation induced a drastic decrease in the relative abundance of this protein. Chemical crosslinking showed a potential overlap between the 90-kDa junctional face membrane protein and the ryanodine receptor Ca(2+)-release channel, suggesting tight protein-protein interactions between these two triad components. Hence, Ca(2+)-regulatory muscle proteins have a strong tendency to oligomerize and the triad region of skeletal muscle fibers forms supramolecular membrane complexes involved in the regulation of Ca(2+)-homeostasis and signal transduction. PMID:10441473

  10. Characterization of the complex formed by β-glucocerebrosidase and the lysosomal integral membrane protein type-2.

    PubMed

    Zunke, Friederike; Andresen, Lisa; Wesseler, Sophia; Groth, Johann; Arnold, Philipp; Rothaug, Michelle; Mazzulli, Joseph R; Krainc, Dimitri; Blanz, Judith; Saftig, Paul; Schwake, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The lysosomal integral membrane protein type-2 (LIMP-2) plays a pivotal role in the delivery of β-glucocerebrosidase (GC) to lysosomes. Mutations in GC result in Gaucher's disease (GD) and are the major genetic risk factor for the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). Variants in the LIMP-2 gene cause action myoclonus-renal failure syndrome and also have been linked to PD. Given the importance of GC and LIMP-2 in disease pathogenesis, we studied their interaction sites in more detail. Our previous data demonstrated that the crystal structure of LIMP-2 displays a hydrophobic three-helix bundle composed of helices 4, 5, and 7, of which helix 5 and 7 are important for ligand binding. Here, we identified a similar helical motif in GC through surface potential analysis. Coimmunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence studies revealed a triple-helical interface region within GC as critical for LIMP-2 binding and lysosomal transport. Based on these findings, we generated a LIMP-2 helix 5-derived peptide that precipitated and activated recombinant wild-type and GD-associated N370S mutant GC in vitro. The helix 5 peptide fused to a cell-penetrating peptide also activated endogenous lysosomal GC and reduced α-synuclein levels, suggesting that LIMP-2-derived peptides can be used to activate endogenous as well as recombinant wild-type or mutant GC efficiently. Our data also provide a structural model of the LIMP-2/GC complex that will facilitate the development of GC chaperones and activators as potential therapeutics for GD, PD, and related synucleinopathies. PMID:27001828

  11. A human Polycomb isoform lacking the Pc box does not participate to PRC1 complexes but forms protein assemblies and represses transcription.

    PubMed

    Völkel, Pamela; Le Faou, Perrine; Vandamme, Julien; Pira, Dorcas; Angrand, Pierre-Olivier

    2012-05-01

    Polycomb repression controls the expression of hundreds of genes involved in development and is mediated by essentially two classes of chromatin-associated protein complexes. The Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) trimethylates histone H3 at lysine 27, an epigenetic mark that serves as a docking site for the PRC1 protein complex. Drosophila core PRC1 is composed of four subunits: Polycomb (Pc), Posterior sex combs (Psc), Polyhomeotic (Ph) and Sex combs extra (Sce). Each of these proteins has multiple orthologs in vertebrates, thus generating an enormous scope for potential combinatorial diversity. In particular, mammalian genomes encode five Pc family members: CBX2, CBX4, CBX6, CBX7 and CBX8. To complicate matters further, distinct isoforms might arise from single genes. Here, we address the functional role of the two human CBX2 isoforms. Owing to different polyadenylation sites and alternative splicing events, the human CBX2 locus produces two transcripts: a 5-exon transcript that encodes the 532-amino acid CBX2-1 isoform that contains the conserved chromodomain and Pc box and a 4-exon transcript encoding a shorter isoform, CBX2-2, lacking the Pc box but still possessing a chromodomain. Using biochemical approaches and a novel in vivo imaging assay, we show that the short CBX2-2 isoform lacking the Pc box, does not participate in PRC1 protein complexes, but self-associates in vivo and forms complexes of high molecular weight. Furthermore, the CBX2 short isoform is still able to repress transcription, suggesting that Polycomb repression might occur in the absence of PRC1 formation. PMID:22419124

  12. A Specific Form of Phospho Protein Phosphatase 2 Regulates Anaphase-promoting Complex/Cyclosome Association with Spindle Poles

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Kenneth H.

    2010-01-01

    In early mitosis, the END (Emi1/NuMA/Dynein-dynactin) network anchors the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) to the mitotic spindle and poles. Spindle anchoring restricts APC/C activity, thereby limiting the destruction of spindle-associated cyclin B and ensuring maintenance of spindle integrity. Emi1 binds directly to hypophosphorylated APC/C, linking the APC/C to the spindle via NuMA. However, whether the phosphorylation state of the APC/C is important for its association with the spindle and what kinases and phosphatases are necessary for regulating this event remain unknown. Here, we describe the regulation of APC/C-mitotic spindle pole association by phosphorylation. We find that only hypophosphorylated APC/C associates with microtubule asters, suggesting that phosphatases are important. Indeed, a specific form of PPP2 (CA/R1A/R2B) binds APC/C, and PPP2 activity is necessary for Cdc27 dephosphorylation. Screening by RNA interference, we find that inactivation of CA, R1A, or R2B leads to delocalization of APC/C from spindle poles, early mitotic spindle defects, a failure to congress chromosomes, and decreased levels of cyclin B on the spindle. Consistently, inhibition of cyclin B/Cdk1 activity increased APC/C binding to microtubules. Thus, cyclin B/Cdk1 and PPP2 regulate the dynamic association of APC/C with spindle poles in early mitosis, a step necessary for proper spindle formation. PMID:20089842

  13. Export of a Toxoplasma gondii Rhoptry Neck Protein Complex at the Host Cell Membrane to Form the Moving Junction during Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Poncet, Joël; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Lebrun, Maryse

    2009-01-01

    One of the most conserved features of the invasion process in Apicomplexa parasites is the formation of a moving junction (MJ) between the apex of the parasite and the host cell membrane that moves along the parasite and serves as support to propel it inside the host cell. The MJ was, up to a recent period, completely unknown at the molecular level. Recently, proteins originated from two distinct post-Golgi specialised secretory organelles, the micronemes (for AMA1) and the neck of the rhoptries (for RON2/RON4/RON5 proteins), have been shown to form a complex. AMA1 and RON4 in particular, have been localised to the MJ during invasion. Using biochemical approaches, we have identified RON8 as an additional member of the complex. We also demonstrated that all RON proteins are present at the MJ during invasion. Using metabolic labelling and immunoprecipitation, we showed that RON2 and AMA1 were able to interact in the absence of the other members. We also discovered that all MJ proteins are subjected to proteolytic maturation during trafficking to their respective organelles and that they could associate as non-mature forms in vitro. Finally, whereas AMA1 has previously been shown to be inserted into the parasite membrane upon secretion, we demonstrated, using differential permeabilization and loading of RON-specific antibodies into the host cell, that the RON complex is targeted to the host cell membrane, where RON4/5/8 remain associated with the cytoplasmic face. Globally, these results point toward a model of MJ organization where the parasite would be secreting and inserting interacting components on either side of the MJ, both at the host and at its own plasma membranes. PMID:19247437

  14. Schip1 Is a Novel Podocyte Foot Process Protein that Mediates Actin Cytoskeleton Rearrangements and Forms a Complex with Nherf2 and Ezrin

    PubMed Central

    Perisic, Ljubica; Rodriguez, Patricia Q.; Hultenby, Kjell; Sun, Ying; Lal, Mark; Betsholtz, Christer; Uhlén, Mathias; Wernerson, Annika; Hedin, Ulf; Pikkarainen, Timo; Tryggvason, Karl; Patrakka, Jaakko

    2015-01-01

    Background Podocyte foot process effacement accompanied by actin cytoskeleton rearrangements is a cardinal feature of many progressive human proteinuric diseases. Results By microarray profiling of mouse glomerulus, SCHIP1 emerged as one of the most highly enriched transcripts. We detected Schip1 protein in the kidney glomerulus, specifically in podocytes foot processes. Functionally, Schip1 inactivation in zebrafish by morpholino knock-down results in foot process disorganization and podocyte loss leading to proteinuria. In cultured podocytes Schip1 localizes to cortical actin-rich regions of lamellipodia, where it forms a complex with Nherf2 and ezrin, proteins known to participate in actin remodeling stimulated by PDGFβ signaling. Mechanistically, overexpression of Schip1 in vitro causes accumulation of cortical F-actin with dissolution of transversal stress fibers and promotes cell migration in response to PDGF-BB stimulation. Upon actin disassembly by latrunculin A treatment, Schip1 remains associated with the residual F-actin-containing structures, suggesting a functional connection with actin cytoskeleton possibly via its interaction partners. A similar assay with cytochalasin D points to stabilization of cortical actin cytoskeleton in Schip1 overexpressing cells by attenuation of actin depolymerisation. Conclusions Schip1 is a novel glomerular protein predominantly expressed in podocytes, necessary for the zebrafish pronephros development and function. Schip1 associates with the cortical actin cytoskeleton network and modulates its dynamics in response to PDGF signaling via interaction with the Nherf2/ezrin complex. Its implication in proteinuric diseases remains to be further investigated. PMID:25807495

  15. PTPN14 Forms a Complex with Kibra and LATS1 Proteins and Negatively Regulates the YAP Oncogenic Function*

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kayla E.; Li, Ying-Wei; Yang, Nuo; Shen, He; Orillion, Ashley R.; Zhang, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway regulates cellular proliferation and survival, thus exerting profound effects on normal cell fate and tumorigenesis. Pivotal effectors of this pathway are YAP/TAZ, transcriptional co-activators whose dysfunction contributes to epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and malignant transformation. Therefore, it is of great importance to decipher the mechanisms underlying the regulations of YAP/TAZ at various levels. Here we report that non-receptor tyrosine phosphatase 14 (PTPN14) interacts with the Kibra protein. The interaction between PTPN14 and Kibra is through the PPXY domain of PTPN14 and WW domain of Kibra. PTPN14 and Kibra can induce the LATS1 activation independently and cooperatively. Interestingly, activation of LATS1 by PTPN14 is dependent on the C terminus of PTPN14 and independent of the upstream mammalian STE20-like kinase (MST) proteins. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PTPN14 increases the LAST1 protein stability. Last, overexpression of Kibra rescues the increased cell migration and aberrant three-dimensional morphogenesis induced by knockdown of PTPN14, and this rescue is mediated through the activation of the upstream LATS1 kinase and subsequent cytoplasmic sequestration of YAP. In summary, our results indicate a potential regulatory role of PTPN14 in the Hippo pathway and demonstrate another layer of regulation in the YAP oncogenic function. PMID:25023289

  16. The Arabidopsis acetylated histone-binding protein BRAT1 forms a complex with BRP1 and prevents transcriptional silencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cui-Jun; Hou, Xiao-Mei; Tan, Lian-Mei; Shao, Chang-Rong; Huang, Huan-Wei; Li, Yong-Qiang; Li, Lin; Cai, Tao; Chen, She; He, Xin-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements and other repetitive DNA sequences are usually subject to DNA methylation and transcriptional silencing. However, anti-silencing mechanisms that promote transcription in these regions are not well understood. Here, we describe an anti-silencing factor, Bromodomain and ATPase domain-containing protein 1 (BRAT1), which we identified by a genetic screen in Arabidopsis thaliana. BRAT1 interacts with an ATPase domain-containing protein, BRP1 (BRAT1 Partner 1), and both prevent transcriptional silencing at methylated genomic regions. Although BRAT1 mediates DNA demethylation at a small set of loci targeted by the 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylase ROS1, the involvement of BRAT1 in anti-silencing is largely independent of DNA demethylation. We also demonstrate that the bromodomain of BRAT1 binds to acetylated histone, which may facilitate the prevention of transcriptional silencing. Thus, BRAT1 represents a potential link between histone acetylation and transcriptional anti-silencing at methylated genomic regions, which may be conserved in eukaryotes. PMID:27273316

  17. Intraflagellar transport proteins 172, 80, 57, 54, 38, and 20 form a stable tubulin-binding IFT-B2 complex.

    PubMed

    Taschner, Michael; Weber, Kristina; Mourão, André; Vetter, Melanie; Awasthi, Mayanka; Stiegler, Marc; Bhogaraju, Sagar; Lorentzen, Esben

    2016-04-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) relies on the IFT complex and is required for ciliogenesis. The IFT-B complex consists of 9-10 stably associated core subunits and six "peripheral" subunits that were shown to dissociate from the core structure at moderate salt concentration. We purified the six "peripheral"IFT-B subunits of Chlamydomonas reinhardtiias recombinant proteins and show that they form a stable complex independently of the IFT-B core. We suggest a nomenclature of IFT-B1 (core) and IFT-B2 (peripheral) for the two IFT-B subcomplexes. We demonstrate that IFT88, together with the N-terminal domain of IFT52, is necessary to bridge the interaction between IFT-B1 and B2. The crystal structure of IFT52N reveals highly conserved residues critical for IFT-B1/IFT-B2 complex formation. Furthermore, we show that of the three IFT-B2 subunits containing a calponin homology (CH) domain (IFT38, 54, and 57), only IFT54 binds αβ-tubulin as a potential IFT cargo, whereas the CH domains of IFT38 and IFT57 mediate the interaction with IFT80 and IFT172, respectively. Crystal structures of IFT54 CH domains reveal that tubulin binding is mediated by basic surface-exposed residues. PMID:26912722

  18. Identification of a non-covalent ternary complex formed by PIAS1, SUMO1, and UBC9 proteins involved in transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Mascle, Xavier H; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Cappadocia, Laurent; Estephan, Patricia; Raiola, Luca; Omichinski, James G; Aubry, Muriel

    2013-12-20

    Post-translational modifications with ubiquitin-like proteins require three sequentially acting enzymes (E1, E2, and E3) that must unambiguously recognize each other in a coordinated fashion to achieve their functions. Although a single E2 (UBC9) and few RING-type E3s (PIAS) operate in the SUMOylation system, the molecular determinants regulating the interactions between UBC9 and the RING-type E3 enzymes are still not well defined. In this study we use biochemical and functional experiments to characterize the interactions between PIAS1 and UBC9. Our results reveal that UBC9 and PIAS1 are engaged both in a canonical E2·E3 interaction as well as assembled into a previously unidentified non-covalent ternary complex with SUMO as evidenced by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and isothermal titration calorimetry studies. In this ternary complex, SUMO functions as a bridge by forming non-overlapping interfaces with UBC9 and PIAS1. Moreover, our data suggest that phosphorylation of serine residues adjacent to the PIAS1 SUMO-interacting motif favors formation of the non covalent PIAS1·SUMO·UBC9 ternary complex. Finally, our results also indicate that the non-covalent ternary complex is required for the known transcriptional repression activities mediated by UBC9 and SUMO1. Taken together, the data enhance our knowledge concerning the mode of interaction of enzymes of the SUMOylation machinery as well as their role in transcriptional regulation and establishes a framework for investigations of other ubiquitin-like protein systems. PMID:24174529

  19. Identification of a Non-covalent Ternary Complex Formed by PIAS1, SUMO1, and UBC9 Proteins Involved in Transcriptional Regulation*

    PubMed Central

    Mascle, Xavier H.; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Cappadocia, Laurent; Estephan, Patricia; Raiola, Luca; Omichinski, James G.; Aubry, Muriel

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modifications with ubiquitin-like proteins require three sequentially acting enzymes (E1, E2, and E3) that must unambiguously recognize each other in a coordinated fashion to achieve their functions. Although a single E2 (UBC9) and few RING-type E3s (PIAS) operate in the SUMOylation system, the molecular determinants regulating the interactions between UBC9 and the RING-type E3 enzymes are still not well defined. In this study we use biochemical and functional experiments to characterize the interactions between PIAS1 and UBC9. Our results reveal that UBC9 and PIAS1 are engaged both in a canonical E2·E3 interaction as well as assembled into a previously unidentified non-covalent ternary complex with SUMO as evidenced by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and isothermal titration calorimetry studies. In this ternary complex, SUMO functions as a bridge by forming non-overlapping interfaces with UBC9 and PIAS1. Moreover, our data suggest that phosphorylation of serine residues adjacent to the PIAS1 SUMO-interacting motif favors formation of the non covalent PIAS1·SUMO·UBC9 ternary complex. Finally, our results also indicate that the non-covalent ternary complex is required for the known transcriptional repression activities mediated by UBC9 and SUMO1. Taken together, the data enhance our knowledge concerning the mode of interaction of enzymes of the SUMOylation machinery as well as their role in transcriptional regulation and establishes a framework for investigations of other ubiquitin-like protein systems. PMID:24174529

  20. Ergothioneine prevents copper-induced oxidative damage to DNA and protein by forming a redox-inactive ergothioneine-copper complex.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ben-Zhan; Mao, Li; Fan, Rui-Mei; Zhu, Jun-Ge; Zhang, Ying-Nan; Wang, Jing; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Frei, Balz

    2011-01-14

    Ergothioneine (2-mercaptohistidine trimethylbetaine) is a naturally occurring amino acid analogue found in up to millimolar concentrations in several tissues and biological fluids. However, the biological functions of ergothioneine remain incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the role of ergothioneine in copper-induced oxidative damage to DNA and protein, using two copper-containing systems: Cu(II) with ascorbate and Cu(II) with H(2)O(2) [0.1 mM Cu(II), 1 mM ascorbate, and 1 mM H(2)O(2)]. Oxidative damage to DNA and bovine serum albumin was measured as strand breakage and protein carbonyl formation, respectively. Ergothioneine (0.1-1.0 mM) provided strong, dose-dependent protection against oxidation of DNA and protein in both copper-containing systems. In contrast, only limited protection was observed with the purported hydroxyl radical scavengers, dimethyl sulfoxide and mannitol, even at concentrations as high as 100 mM. Ergothioneine also significantly inhibited copper-catalyzed oxidation of ascorbate and competed effectively with histidine and 1,10-phenanthroline for binding of cuprous copper, but not cupric copper, as demonstrated by UV-visible and low-temperature electron spin resonance techniques. We conclude that ergothioneine is a potent, natural sulfur-containing antioxidant that prevents copper-dependent oxidative damage to biological macromolecules by forming a redox-inactive ergothioneine-copper complex. PMID:21047085

  1. Major vault protein forms complexes with hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha and reduces HIF-1alpha level in ACHN human renal adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Iwashita, Ken-ichi; Ikeda, Ryuji; Takeda, Yasuo; Sumizawa, Tomoyuki; Furukawa, Tatsuhiko; Yamaguchi, Tatsuya; Akiyama, Shin-ichi; Yamada, Katsushi

    2010-04-01

    Vaults are evolutionarily highly conserved ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles with a hollow barrel-like structure. Although roles in multidrug resistance and innate immunity have been suggested, the physiological function of vaults remains unclear. Major vault protein (MVP), the main component of the vault particle, has been reported to be induced by hypoxia. However, there are no reports about the effect of vaults on cellular responses to hypoxia. We thus examined whether vaults are implicated in cellular responses to hypoxia. In this study, we focused on hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha), which is a master regulator of hypoxic responses, and found that: (i) MVP knockdown by RNA interference increases HIF-1alpha protein levels induced by hypoxia and hypoxia mimetics; (ii) MVP knockdown does not affect HIF-1alpha mRNA levels, but decreases the ubiquitination and degradation of HIF-1alpha protein; and (iii) vaults form complexes with HIF-1alpha, PHD2, and pVHL. Taken together, these results suggest that vaults function as scaffolds in HIF-1alpha degradation pathway and promote the ubiquitination and degradation of HIF-1alpha. PMID:20175781

  2. The shortest isoform of dystrophin (Dp40) interacts with a group of presynaptic proteins to form a presumptive novel complex in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Tozawa, Takenori; Itoh, Kyoko; Yaoi, Takeshi; Tando, So; Umekage, Masafumi; Dai, Hongmei; Hosoi, Hajime; Fushiki, Shinji

    2012-04-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) causes cognitive impairment in one third of the patients, although the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Recent studies showed that mutations in the distal part of the dystrophin gene correlate well with the cognitive impairment in DMD patients, which is attributed to Dp71. The study on the expression of the shortest isoform, Dp40, has not been possible due to the lack of an isoform specific antibody. Dp40 has the same promoter as that found in Dp71 and lacks the normal C-terminal end of Dp427. In the present study, we have raised polyclonal antibody against the N-terminal sequence common to short isoforms of dystrophin, including Dp40, and investigated the expression pattern of Dp40 in the mouse brain. Affinity chromatography with this antibody and the consecutive LC-MS/MS analysis on the interacting proteins revealed that Dp40 was abundantly expressed in synaptic vesicles and interacted with a group of presynaptic proteins, including syntaxin1A and SNAP25, which are involved in exocytosis of synaptic vesicles in neurons. We thus suggest that Dp40 may form a novel protein complex and play a crucial role in presynaptic function. Further studies on these aspects of Dp40 function might provide more insight into the molecular mechanisms of cognitive impairment found in patients with DMD. PMID:22258561

  3. The Yeast Iron Regulatory Proteins Grx3/4 and Fra2 Form Heterodimeric Complexes Containing a [2Fe-2S] Cluster with Cysteinyl and Histidyl Ligation†

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haoran; Mapolelo, Daphne T.; Dingra, Nin N.; Naik, Sunil G.; Lees, Nicolas S.; Hoffman, Brian M.; Riggs-Gelasco, Pamela J.; Huynh, Boi Hanh; Johnson, Michael K.; Outten, Caryn E.

    2009-01-01

    The transcription of iron uptake and storage genes in S. cerevisiae is primarily regulated by the transcription factor Aft1. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Aft1 is dependent upon mitochondrial Fe-S cluster biosynthesis via a signaling pathway that includes the cytosolic monothiol glutaredoxins (Grx3 and Grx4) and the BolA homologue Fra2. However the interactions between these proteins and the iron-dependent mechanism by which they control Aft1 localization are unclear. To reconstitute and characterize components of this signaling pathway in vitro, we have overexpressed yeast Fra2 and Grx3/4 in E. coli. We have shown that co-expression of recombinant Fra2 with Grx3 or Grx4 allows purification of a stable [2Fe-2S]2+ cluster-containing Fra2-Grx3 or Fra2-Grx4 heterodimeric complex. Reconstitution of a [2Fe-2S] cluster on Grx3 or Grx4 without Fra2 produces a [2Fe-2S]-bridged homodimer. UV-visible absorption and CD, resonance Raman, EPR, ENDOR, Mössbauer, and EXAFS studies of [2Fe-2S] Grx3/4 homodimers and the [2Fe-2S] Fra2-Grx3/4 heterodimers indicate that inclusion of Fra2 in the Grx3/4 Fe-S complex causes a change in the cluster stability and coordination environment. Taken together, our analytical, spectroscopic, and mutagenesis data indicate that Grx3/4 and Fra2 form a Fe-S-bridged heterodimeric complex with Fe ligands provided by the active site cysteine of Grx3/4, glutathione, and a histidine residue. Overall, these results suggest that the ability of the Fra2-Grx3/4 complex to assemble a [2Fe-2S] cluster may act as a signal to control the iron regulon in response to cellular iron status in yeast. PMID:19715344

  4. Regulator of G protein signaling 8 inhibits protease-activated receptor 1/Gi/o signaling by forming a distinct G protein-dependent complex in live cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinyong; Ghil, Sungho

    2016-05-01

    Activation of seven-transmembrane-domain-possessing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) by extracellular stimuli elicits intracellular responses. One class of GPCRs-protease-activated receptors (PARs)-is activated by endogenous proteases, such as thrombin and trypsin. Members of the regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) family stimulate GTP hydrolysis of G protein alpha (Gα) subunits, thereby inhibiting GPCR/Gα-mediated signaling. We previously reported that RGS2 and RGS4 inhibit PAR1/Gα-mediated signaling by interacting with PAR1 in a Gα-dependent manner. Here, employing the bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) technique, we identified RGS8 as a novel PAR1-interacting protein. Very little BRET activity was observed between PAR1-Venus (PAR1-Ven) and RGS8-Luciferase (RGS8-Luc) in the absence of Gα. However, in the presence of Gαo, BRET activity was specifically and significantly increased. This interaction was confirmed by biochemical and immunofluorescence assays. Notably, RGS8 inhibited PAR1/Gαi/o-mediated adenylyl cyclase and ERK activation, and prevented Gαo-induced neurite outgrowth and activation of Necdin protein, a downstream target of Gαo. Our findings suggest a novel function of RGS8 and reveal cellular mechanisms by which RGS8 mediates PAR1 inhibition. PMID:26829215

  5. Pax-5 (BSAP) recruits Ets proto-oncogene family proteins to form functional ternary complexes on a B-cell-specific promoter.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimmons, D; Hodsdon, W; Wheat, W; Maira, S M; Wasylyk, B; Hagman, J

    1996-09-01

    The paired box transcription factor Pax-5 (B-cell-specific activator protein) is a key regulator of lineage-specific gene expression and differentiation in B-lymphocytes. We show that Pax-5 functions as a cell type-specific docking protein that facilitates binding of the early B-cell-specific mb-1 promoter by proteins of the Ets proto-oncogene family. Transcriptional activity of the mb-1 promoter in pre-B-cells is critically dependent on binding sites for Pax-5:Ets complexes. Ternary complex assembly requires only the Pax-5 paired box and ETS DNA-binding domains. Mutation of a single base pair in the ternary complex binding site allows for independent binding by Ets proteins but, conversely, inhibits the binding of Pax-5 by itself. Strikingly, the mutation reverses the pattern of complex assembly: Ets proteins recruit Pax-5 to bind the mutated sequence. Recruitment of Net and Elk-1, but not SAP1a, by Pax-5 defines a functional difference between closely related Ets proteins. Replacement of a valine (V68) in the ETS domain of SAP1a by aspartic acid (as found in c-Ets-1, Elk-1, and Net) enhanced ternary complex formation by more than 60-fold. Together, these observations define novel transcription factor interactions that regulate gene expression in B cells. PMID:8804314

  6. Length, protein protein interactions, and complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Taison; Frenkel, Daan; Gupta, Vishal; Deem, Michael W.

    2005-05-01

    The evolutionary reason for the increase in gene length from archaea to prokaryotes to eukaryotes observed in large-scale genome sequencing efforts has been unclear. We propose here that the increasing complexity of protein-protein interactions has driven the selection of longer proteins, as they are more able to distinguish among a larger number of distinct interactions due to their greater average surface area. Annotated protein sequences available from the SWISS-PROT database were analyzed for 13 eukaryotes, eight bacteria, and two archaea species. The number of subcellular locations to which each protein is associated is used as a measure of the number of interactions to which a protein participates. Two databases of yeast protein-protein interactions were used as another measure of the number of interactions to which each S. cerevisiae protein participates. Protein length is shown to correlate with both number of subcellular locations to which a protein is associated and number of interactions as measured by yeast two-hybrid experiments. Protein length is also shown to correlate with the probability that the protein is encoded by an essential gene. Interestingly, average protein length and number of subcellular locations are not significantly different between all human proteins and protein targets of known, marketed drugs. Increased protein length appears to be a significant mechanism by which the increasing complexity of protein-protein interaction networks is accommodated within the natural evolution of species. Consideration of protein length may be a valuable tool in drug design, one that predicts different strategies for inhibiting interactions in aberrant and normal pathways.

  7. Studying how protein crystals form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Watching molecules of the iron-storing protein apoferritin come together to form a nucleus reveals some interesting behavior. In this series of images, researchers observed clusters of four molecules at the corners of a diamond shape (top). As more molecules attach to the cluster, they arrange themselves into rods (second from top), and a raft-like configuration of molecules forms the critical nucleus (third from top), suggesting that crystal growth is much slower than it could be were the molecules arranged in a more compact formation. In the final image, a crystallite consisting of three layers containing approximately 60 to 70 molecules each is formed. Atomic force microscopy made visualizing the process of nucleation possible for the first time. The principal investigator is Peter Vekilov, of the University of Alabama in Huntsville. Vekilov's team at UAH studies protein solutions as they change phases from liquids to crystalline solids. They want to know if the molecules in the solution interact with one another, and if so, how, from the perspectives of thermodynamics and kinetics. They want to understand which forces -- electrical, electrostatic, hydrodynamic, or other kinds of forces -- are responsible for the interactions. They also study nucleation, the begirning stage of crystallization. This process is important to understand because it sets the stage for crystal growth in all kinds of solutions and liquid melts that are important in such diverse fields as agriculture, medicine, and the fabrication of metal components. Nucleation can determine the rate of crystal growth, the number of crystals that will be formed, and the quality and size of the crystals.

  8. Thermodynamics of complex structures formed between single-stranded DNA oligomers and the KH domains of the far upstream element binding protein.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Kaushik; Sinha, Sudipta Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2016-05-28

    The noncovalent interaction between protein and DNA is responsible for regulating the genetic activities in living organisms. The most critical issue in this problem is to understand the underlying driving force for the formation and stability of the complex. To address this issue, we have performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of two DNA binding K homology (KH) domains (KH3 and KH4) of the far upstream element binding protein (FBP) complexed with two single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) oligomers in aqueous media. Attempts have been made to calculate the individual components of the net entropy change for the complexation process by adopting suitable statistical mechanical approaches. Our calculations reveal that translational, rotational, and configurational entropy changes of the protein and the DNA components have unfavourable contributions for this protein-DNA association process and such entropy lost is compensated by the entropy gained due to the release of hydration layer water molecules. The free energy change corresponding to the association process has also been calculated using the Free Energy Perturbation (FEP) method. The free energy gain associated with the KH4-DNA complex formation has been found to be noticeably higher than that involving the formation of the KH3-DNA complex. PMID:27250333

  9. Thermodynamics of complex structures formed between single-stranded DNA oligomers and the KH domains of the far upstream element binding protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Kaushik; Sinha, Sudipta Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2016-05-01

    The noncovalent interaction between protein and DNA is responsible for regulating the genetic activities in living organisms. The most critical issue in this problem is to understand the underlying driving force for the formation and stability of the complex. To address this issue, we have performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of two DNA binding K homology (KH) domains (KH3 and KH4) of the far upstream element binding protein (FBP) complexed with two single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) oligomers in aqueous media. Attempts have been made to calculate the individual components of the net entropy change for the complexation process by adopting suitable statistical mechanical approaches. Our calculations reveal that translational, rotational, and configurational entropy changes of the protein and the DNA components have unfavourable contributions for this protein-DNA association process and such entropy lost is compensated by the entropy gained due to the release of hydration layer water molecules. The free energy change corresponding to the association process has also been calculated using the Free Energy Perturbation (FEP) method. The free energy gain associated with the KH4-DNA complex formation has been found to be noticeably higher than that involving the formation of the KH3-DNA complex.

  10. The PhoU Protein from Escherichia coli Interacts with PhoR, PstB, and Metals To Form a Phosphate-Signaling Complex at the Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Stewart G.; Johns, Kristine D.; Tanner, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Robust growth in many bacteria is dependent upon proper regulation of the adaptive response to phosphate (Pi) limitation. This response enables cells to acquire Pi with high affinity and utilize alternate phosphorous sources. The molecular mechanisms of Pi signal transduction are not completely understood. PhoU, along with the high-affinity, Pi-specific ATP-binding cassette transporter PstSCAB and the two-component proteins PhoR and PhoB, is absolutely required for Pi signaling in Escherichia coli. Little is known about the role of PhoU and its function in regulation. We have demonstrated using bacterial two-hybrid analysis and confirmatory coelution experiments that PhoU interacts with PhoR through its PAS (Per-ARNT-Sim) domain and that it also interacts with PstB, the cytoplasmic component of the transporter. We have also shown that the soluble form of PhoU is a dimer that binds manganese and magnesium. Alteration of highly conserved residues in PhoU by site-directed mutagenesis shows that these sites play a role in binding metals. Analysis of these phoU mutants suggests that metal binding may be important for PhoU membrane interactions. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that PhoU is involved in the formation of a signaling complex at the cytoplasmic membrane that responds to environmental Pi levels. PMID:24563032

  11. Complex Reconstitution from Individual Protein Modules.

    PubMed

    Basquin, Jérôme; Taschner, Michael; Lorentzen, Esben

    2016-01-01

    Cellular function relies on protein complexes that work as nano-machines. The structure and function of protein complexes is an outcome of the specific combination of protein subunits, or modules, within the complex. A major focus of molecular biology is thus to understand how protein subunits assemble to form complexes with distinct biological function. To this end, in vitro reconstitution of complexes from individual subunits to study their assembly, structure and activity is of central importance. With purified individual subunits and sub-modules at hand one can systematically dissect the hierarchical assembly of larger complexes using direct protein-protein interaction assays. Furthermore, activity assays can be carried out with individual subunits or smaller sub-complexes and compared to those of the fully assembled complex to precisely map functional sites and provide a molecular basis for in vivo observations. In this chapter we review methods for protein complex assembly from individual subunits and provide examples of advantages and potential pitfalls to this approach. PMID:27165333

  12. Algorithmic complexity of a protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewey, T. Gregory

    1996-07-01

    The information contained in a protein's amino acid sequence dictates its three-dimensional structure. To quantitate the transfer of information that occurs in the protein folding process, the Kolmogorov information entropy or algorithmic complexity of the protein structure is investigated. The algorithmic complexity of an object provides a means of quantitating its information content. Recent results have indicated that the algorithmic complexity of microstates of certain statistical mechanical systems can be estimated from the thermodynamic entropy. In the present work, it is shown that the algorithmic complexity of a protein is given by its configurational entropy. Using this result, a quantitative estimate of the information content of a protein's structure is made and is compared to the information content of the sequence. Additionally, the mutual information between sequence and structure is determined. It is seen that virtually all the information contained in the protein structure is shared with the sequence.

  13. Proteins, fluctuations and complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Frauenfelder, Hans; Chen, Guo; Fenimore, Paul W

    2008-01-01

    Glasses, supercooled liquids, and proteins share common properties, in particular the existence of two different types of fluctuations, {alpha} and {beta}. While the effect of the {alpha} fluctuations on proteins has been known for a few years, the effect of {beta} fluctuations has not been understood. By comparing neutron scattering data on the protein myoglobin with the {beta} fluctuations in the hydration shell measured by dielectric spectroscopy we show that the internal protein motions are slaved to these fluctuations. We also show that there is no 'dynamic transition' in proteins near 200 K. The rapid increase in the mean square displacement with temperature in many neutron scattering experiments is quantitatively predicted by the {beta} fluctuations in the hydration shell.

  14. Decameric GTP cyclohydrolase I forms complexes with two pentameric GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory proteins in the presence of phenylalanine or of a combination of tetrahydrobiopterin and GTP.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, T; Hatakeyama, K

    1998-08-01

    The activity of GTP cyclohydrolase I is inhibited by (6R)-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and stimulated by phenylalanine through complex formation with GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). Gel filtration experiments as well as enzyme activity measurements showed that the number of subunits of GFRP in both the inhibitory and stimulatory complexes is equal to that of GTP cyclohydrolase I. Because GFRP is a pentamer and GTP cyclohydrolase I was shown here by cross-linking experiments to be a decamer, the results indicate that two molecules of a pentameric GFRP associate with one molecule of GTP cyclohydrolase I. Gel filtration analysis suggested that the complex has a radius of gyration similar to that of the enzyme itself. These observations support our model that one molecule of GFRP binds to each of the two outer faces of the torus-shaped GTP cyclohydrolase I. For formation of the inhibitory protein complex, both BH4 and GTP were required; the median effective concentrations of BH4 and GTP were 2 and 26 microM, respectively. BH4 was the most potent of biopterins with different oxidative states. Among GTP analogues, dGTP as well as guanosine 5'-O-(3'-thiotriphosphate) exhibited similar inducibility compared with GTP, whereas other nucleotide triphosphates had no effect. On the other hand, phenylalanine alone was enough for formation of the stimulatory protein complex, and positive cooperativity was found for the phenylalanine-induced protein complex formation. Phenylalanine was the most potent of the aromatic amino acids. PMID:9685352

  15. The Arabidopsis glutamyl-tRNA reductase (GluTR) forms a ternary complex with FLU and GluTR-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ying; Zhao, Shun; Zhang, Feilong; Zhao, Aiguo; Zhang, Wenxia; Zhang, Min; Liu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Tetrapyrrole biosynthesis is an essential and tightly regulated process, and glutamyl-tRNA reductase (GluTR) is a key target for multiple regulatory factors at the post-translational level. By binding to the thylakoid membrane protein FLUORESCENT (FLU) or the soluble stromal GluTR-binding protein (GBP), the activity of GluTR is down- or up-regulated. Here, we reconstructed a ternary complex composed of the C-terminal tetratricopepetide-repeat domain of FLU, GBP, and GluTR, crystallized and solved the structure of the complex at 3.2 Å. The overall structure resembles the shape of merged two binary complexes as previously reported, and shows a large conformational change within GluTR. We also demonstrated that GluTR binds tightly with GBP but does not bind to GSAM under the same condition. These findings allow us to suggest a biological role of the ternary complex for the regulation of plant GluTR. PMID:26794057

  16. The Arabidopsis glutamyl-tRNA reductase (GluTR) forms a ternary complex with FLU and GluTR-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ying; Zhao, Shun; Zhang, Feilong; Zhao, Aiguo; Zhang, Wenxia; Zhang, Min; Liu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Tetrapyrrole biosynthesis is an essential and tightly regulated process, and glutamyl-tRNA reductase (GluTR) is a key target for multiple regulatory factors at the post-translational level. By binding to the thylakoid membrane protein FLUORESCENT (FLU) or the soluble stromal GluTR-binding protein (GBP), the activity of GluTR is down- or up-regulated. Here, we reconstructed a ternary complex composed of the C-terminal tetratricopepetide-repeat domain of FLU, GBP, and GluTR, crystallized and solved the structure of the complex at 3.2 Å. The overall structure resembles the shape of merged two binary complexes as previously reported, and shows a large conformational change within GluTR. We also demonstrated that GluTR binds tightly with GBP but does not bind to GSAM under the same condition. These findings allow us to suggest a biological role of the ternary complex for the regulation of plant GluTR. PMID:26794057

  17. Protein Recognition of Gold-Based Drugs: 3D Structure of the Complex Formed When Lysozyme Reacts with Aubipy(c.).

    PubMed

    Messori, Luigi; Cinellu, Maria Agostina; Merlino, Antonello

    2014-10-01

    The structure of the adduct formed in the reaction between Aubipy(c), a cytotoxic organogold(III) compound, and the model protein hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) has been solved by X-ray crystallography. It emerges that Aubipy(c), after interaction with HEWL, undergoes reduction of the gold(III) center followed by detaching of the cyclometalated ligand; the resulting naked gold(I) ion is found bound to the protein at Gln121. A direct comparison between the present structure and those previously solved for the lysozyme adducts with other gold(III) compounds demonstrates that coordinated ligands play a key role in the protein-metallodrug recognition process. Structural data support the view that gold(III)-based antitumor prodrugs are activated through metal reduction. PMID:25313321

  18. The acidic transcription activator Gcn4 binds the mediator subunit Gal11/Med15 using a simple protein interface forming a fuzzy complex.

    PubMed

    Brzovic, Peter S; Heikaus, Clemens C; Kisselev, Leonid; Vernon, Robert; Herbig, Eric; Pacheco, Derek; Warfield, Linda; Littlefield, Peter; Baker, David; Klevit, Rachel E; Hahn, Steven

    2011-12-23

    The structural basis for binding of the acidic transcription activator Gcn4 and one activator-binding domain of the Mediator subunit Gal11/Med15 was examined by NMR. Gal11 activator-binding domain 1 has a four-helix fold with a small shallow hydrophobic cleft at its center. In the bound complex, eight residues of Gcn4 adopt a helical conformation, allowing three Gcn4 aromatic/aliphatic residues to insert into the Gal11 cleft. The protein-protein interface is dynamic and surprisingly simple, involving only hydrophobic interactions. This allows Gcn4 to bind Gal11 in multiple conformations and orientations, an example of a "fuzzy" complex, where the Gcn4-Gal11 interface cannot be described by a single conformation. Gcn4 uses a similar mechanism to bind two other unrelated activator-binding domains. Functional studies in yeast show the importance of residues at the protein interface, define the minimal requirements for a functional activator, and suggest a mechanism by which activators bind to multiple unrelated targets. PMID:22195967

  19. Binding Efficiency of Protein-Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Day, Eric S.; Cote, Shaun M.; Whitty, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    We examine the relationship between binding affinity and interface size for reversible protein-protein interactions (PPI), using cytokines from the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily and their receptors as a test case. Using surface plasmon resonance, we measured single-site binding affinities for the large receptor TNFR1 binding to its ligands TNFα (KD = 1.4 ± 0.4 nM) and lymphotoxin-α (KD = 50 ± 10 nM), and also for the small receptor Fn14 binding to TWEAK (KD = 70 ± 10 nM). We additionally assembled data for all other TNF/TNFR family complexes for which reliable single site binding affinities have been reported. We used these values to calculate the binding efficiency – defined as binding energy per Å2 of surface area buried at the contact interface – for the nine of these complexes for which co-crystal structures are available, and compared the results to those for a set of 144 protein-protein complexes with published affinity values. The results show that the most efficient PPI complexes generate ~20 cal.mol−1/Å2 of binding energy. A minimum contact area of ~500 Å2 is required for a stable complex, required to generate sufficient interaction energy to pay the entropic cost of co-localizing two proteins from 1 M solution. The most compact and efficient TNF/TNFR complex was BAFF/BR3, which achieved ~80% of the maximum achievable binding efficiency. Other small receptors also gave high binding efficiencies, while the larger receptors generated only 44-49% of this limit despite interacting primarily through just a single small domain. The results provide new insight into how much binding energy can be generated by a PPI interface of a given size, and establish a quantitative method to predict how large a natural or engineered contact interface must be to achieve a given level of binding affinity. PMID:23088250

  20. Helicase assembly protein Gp59 of bacteriophage T4: fluorescence anisotropy and sedimentation studies of complexes formed with derivatives of Gp32, the phage ssDNA binding protein.

    PubMed

    Xu, H; Wang, Y; Bleuit, J S; Morrical, S W

    2001-06-26

    The gene 59 protein (gp59) of bacteriophage T4 performs a vital function in phage DNA replication by directing the assembly of gp41, the DNA helicase component of the T4 primosome, onto lagging strand ssDNA at nascent replication forks. The helicase assembly activity of gp59 is required for optimum efficiency of helicase acquisition by the replication fork during strand displacement DNA synthesis and is essential for helicase and primosome assembly during T4 recombination-dependent DNA replication transactions. Of central importance is the ability of gp59 to load the gp41 helicase onto ssDNA previously coated with cooperatively bound molecules of gp32, the T4 ssDNA binding protein. Gp59 heteroassociations with ssDNA, gp32, and gp41 all appear to be essential for this loading reaction. Previous studies demonstrated that a tripartite complex containing gp59 and gp32 simultaneously cooccupying ssDNA is an essential intermediate in gp59-dependent helicase loading; however, the biochemical and structural parameters of gp59-gp32 complexes with or without ssDNA are currently unknown. To better understand gp59-gp32 interactions, we performed fluorescence anisotropy and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments employing native or rhodamine-labeled gp59 species in combination with altered forms of gp32, allowing us to determine their binding parameters, shape parameters, and other hydrodynamic properties. Two truncated forms of gp32 were used: gp32-B, which lacks the N-terminal B-domain required for cooperative binding to ssDNA and for stable self-association, and A-domain fragment, which is the C-terminal peptide of gp32 lacking ssDNA binding ability. Results indicate that gp59 binds with high affinity to either gp32 derivative to form a 1:1 heterodimer. In both cases, heterodimer formation is accompanied by a conformational change in gp59 which correlates with decreased gp59-DNA binding affinity. Hydrodynamic modeling suggests an asymmetric prolate ellipsoid shape for gp

  1. Neutron scattering with deuterium labeling reveals the nature of complexes formed by Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins and their regulatory targets

    SciTech Connect

    Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering with deuterium labeling is extremely useful for studying the structures of complex biomolecular assemblies in solution. The different neutron scattering properties of their isotopes of hydrogen combines with the ability to uniformly label biomolecules with deuterium allow one to characterize the structures and relative dispositions of the individual components of an assembly using methods of {open_quotes}contrast variation.{close_quotes} We have applied these techniques to studies of the evolutionarily related dumbbell-shaped Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins calmodulin and troponin C and their interactions with the target proteins whose activities they regulate. Ca{sup 2+} is one of the simplest of nature`s messengers used in the communication pathways between physiological stimulus and cellular response. The signaling mechanism generally involves Ca{sup 2+} binding to a protein and inducing a conformational change that transmits a signal to modify the activity of a specific target protein. Ca{sup 2+} is thus important in the regulation of a diverse array of intracellular responses, including neurotransmitter release, muscle contraction, the degradation of glycogen to glucose to generate energy, microtubule assembly, membrane phosphorylation, etc. It is the conformational language of the Ca{sup 2+} induced signal transduction that we have sought to understand because of its central importance to biochemical regulation and, hence, to healthy cellular function.

  2. The three mitochondrial encoded CcmF proteins form a complex that interacts with CCMH and c-type apocytochromes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rayapuram, Naganand; Hagenmuller, Jérémie; Grienenberger, Jean Michel; Bonnard, Géraldine; Giegé, Philippe

    2008-09-12

    Three reading frames called ccmF(N1), ccmF(N2), and ccmF(c) are found in the mitochondrial genome of Arabidopsis. These sequences are similar to regions of the bacterial gene ccmF involved in cytochrome c maturation. ccmF genes are always absent from animal and fungi genomes but are found in mitochondrial genomes of land plant and several evolutionary distant eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis, ccmF(N2) despite the absence of a classical initiation codon is not a pseudo gene. The 3 ccmF genes of Arabidopsis are expressed at the protein level. Their products are integral proteins of the mitochondrial inner membrane with in total 11 to 13 predicted transmembrane helices. The conserved WWD domain of CcmF(N2) is localized in the inter membrane space. The 3 CcmF proteins are all detected in a high molecular mass complex of 500 kDa by Blue Native PAGE. Direct interaction between CcmF(N2) and both CcmF(N1) and CcmF(C) is shown with the yeast two-hybrid split ubiquitin system, but no interaction is observed between CcmF(N1) and CcmF(C). Similarly, interaction is detected between CcmF(N2) and apocytochrome c but also with apocytochrome c(1). Finally, CcmF(N1) and CcmF(N2) both interact with CCMH previously shown to interact as well with cytochrome c. This strengthens the hypothesis that CcmF and CCMH make a complex that performs the assembly of heme with c-type apocytochromes in plant mitochondria. PMID:18644794

  3. Ruthenium metalation of proteins: the X-ray structure of the complex formed between NAMI-A and hen egg white lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Messori, Luigi; Merlino, Antonello

    2014-04-28

    A crystallographic study of the adduct formed between hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and NAMI-A, an established ruthenium(III) anticancer agent in clinical trials, is presented here. The X-ray structure reveals that NAMI-A coordinates the protein, as a naked ruthenium ion, at two distinct sites (namely Asp101 or Asp119) after releasing all its original ligands (DMSO, imidazole and Cl(-)). Structural data of the HEWL/NAMI-A adduct are compared with those previously obtained for the HEWL adduct of AziRu, a NAMI-A analogue bearing a pyridine in place of imidazole. The present results further support the view that NAMI-A exerts its biological effects acting as a classical "prodrug" first undergoing activation and then causing extensive metalation of relevant protein targets. It is also proposed that the original Ru-ligands, although absent in the final adduct, play a major role in directing the ruthenium center to its ultimate anchoring site on the protein surface. PMID:24553967

  4. Membrane Protein Solubilization and Composition of Protein Detergent Complexes.

    PubMed

    Duquesne, Katia; Prima, Valérie; Sturgis, James N

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are typically expressed in heterologous systems with a view to in vitro characterization. A critical step in the preparation of membrane proteins after expression in any system is the solubilization of the protein in aqueous solution, typically using detergents and lipids, to obtain the protein in a form suitable for purification, structural or functional analysis. This process is particularly difficult as the objective is to prepare the protein in an unnatural environment, a protein detergent complex, separating it from its natural lipid partners while causing the minimum destabilization or modification of the structure. Although the process is difficult, and relatively hard to master, an increasing number of membrane proteins have been successfully isolated after expression in a wide variety of systems. In this chapter we give a general protocol for preparing protein detergent complexes that is aimed at guiding the reader through the different critical steps. In the second part of the chapter we illustrate how to analyze the composition of protein detergent complexes; this analysis is important as it has been found that compositional variation often causes irreproducible results. PMID:27485340

  5. The soluble form of Alzheimer's amyloid beta protein is complexed to high density lipoprotein 3 and very high density lipoprotein in normal human plasma.

    PubMed

    Koudinov, A; Matsubara, E; Frangione, B; Ghiso, J

    1994-12-15

    The amyloid fibrils of Alzheimer's neuritic plaques and cerebral blood vessels are mainly composed of aggregated forms of a 39 to 44 amino acids peptide, named amyloid beta (A beta). A similar although soluble form of A beta (sA beta) has been identified in plasma, cerebrospinal fluid and cell culture supernatants, indicating that it is produced under physiologic conditions. We report here that sA beta in normal human plasma is associated with lipoprotein particles, in particular to the HDL3 and VHDL fractions where it is complexed to ApoJ and, to a lesser extent, to ApoAI. This was assessed by immunoprecipitation experiments of purified plasma lipoproteins and lipoprotein-depleted plasma and confirmed by means of amino acid sequence analysis. Moreover, biotinylated synthetic peptide A beta 1-40 was traced in normal human plasma in in vitro experiments. As in the case of sA beta, biotinylated A beta 1-40 was specifically recovered in the HDL3 and VHDL fractions. This data together with the previous demonstration that A beta 1-40 is taken up into the brain via a specific mechanism and possibly as an A beta 1-40-ApoJ complex indicate a role for HDL3- and VHDL-containing ApoJ in the transport of the peptide in circulation and suggest their involvement in the delivery of sA beta across the blood-brain barrier. PMID:7802646

  6. An Atypical psbA Gene Encodes a Sentinel D1 Protein to Form a Physiologically Relevant Inactive Photosystem II Complex in Cyanobacteria*

    PubMed Central

    Wegener, Kimberly M.; Nagarajan, Aparna; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II, a large membrane-bound enzyme complex in cyanobacteria and chloroplasts, mediates light-induced oxidation of water to molecular oxygen. The D1 protein of PSII, encoded by the psbA gene, provides multiple ligands for cofactors crucial to this enzymatic reaction. Cyanobacteria contain multiple psbA genes that respond to various physiological cues and environmental factors. Certain unicellular cyanobacterial cells, such as Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, are capable of nitrogen fixation, a highly oxygen-sensitive process, by separating oxygen evolution from nitrogen fixation using a day-night cycle. We have shown that c-psbA4, one of the five psbA orthologs in this cyanobacterium, is exclusively expressed during nighttime. Remarkably, the corresponding D1 isoform has replacements of a number of amino acids that are essential ligands for the catalytic Mn4CaO5 metal center for water oxidation by PSII. At least 30 cyanobacterial strains, most of which are known to have nitrogen fixing abilities, have similar psbA orthologs. We expressed the c-psbA4 gene from Cyanothece 51142 in a 4E-3 mutant strain of the model non-nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, which lacks any psbA gene. The resultant strain could not grow photoautotrophically. Moreover, these Synechocystis 6803 cells were incapable of PSII-mediated oxygen evolution. Based on our findings, we have named this physiologically relevant, unusual D1 isoform sentinel D1. Sentinel D1 represents a new class of D1 protein that, when incorporated in a PSII complex, ensures that PSII cannot mediate water oxidation, thus allowing oxygen-sensitive processes such as nitrogen fixation to occur in cyanobacterial cells. PMID:25525275

  7. Probing nanoparticle effect in protein-surfactant complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2015-06-01

    SANS experiments have been carried to probe the role of anionic silica nanoparticles in the anionic BSA protein-cationic DTAB surfactant complexes. In protein-surfactant complex, surfactant molecules aggregate to form micelle-like clusters along the unfolded polypeptide chains of the protein. The nanoparticle aggregation mediated by oppositely charged protein-surfactant complex coexists with the free protein-surfactant complexes in the nanoparticle-protein-surfactant system. There is rearrangement of micelles in adsorbed protein-surfactant complex on nanoparticles in leading to their (nanoparticle) aggregation. On the other hand, the unfolding of protein in free protein-surfactant complex is found to be significantly enhanced in presence of nanoparticles.

  8. Assembly reflects evolution of protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Levy, Emmanuel D; Boeri Erba, Elisabetta; Robinson, Carol V; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2008-06-26

    A homomer is formed by self-interacting copies of a protein unit. This is functionally important, as in allostery, and structurally crucial because mis-assembly of homomers is implicated in disease. Homomers are widespread, with 50-70% of proteins with a known quaternary state assembling into such structures. Despite their prevalence, their role in the evolution of cellular machinery and the potential for their use in the design of new molecular machines, little is known about the mechanisms that drive formation of homomers at the level of evolution and assembly in the cell. Here we present an analysis of over 5,000 unique atomic structures and show that the quaternary structure of homomers is conserved in over 70% of protein pairs sharing as little as 30% sequence identity. Where quaternary structure is not conserved among the members of a protein family, a detailed investigation revealed well-defined evolutionary pathways by which proteins transit between different quaternary structure types. Furthermore, we show by perturbing subunit interfaces within complexes and by mass spectrometry analysis, that the (dis)assembly pathway mimics the evolutionary pathway. These data represent a molecular analogy to Haeckel's evolutionary paradigm of embryonic development, where an intermediate in the assembly of a complex represents a form that appeared in its own evolutionary history. Our model of self-assembly allows reliable prediction of evolution and assembly of a complex solely from its crystal structure. PMID:18563089

  9. Saccharomyces cerevisiae putative G protein, Gtr1p, which forms complexes with itself and a novel protein designated as Gtr2p, negatively regulates the Ran/Gsp1p G protein cycle through Gtr2p.

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, N; Noguchi, E; Nishimoto, T

    1999-01-01

    Prp20p and Rna1p are GDP/GTP exchanging and GTPase-activating factors of Gsp1p, respectively, and their mutations, prp20-1 and rna1-1, can both be suppressed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae gtr1-11. We found that gtr1-11 caused a single amino acid substitution in Gtr1p, forming S20L, which is a putative GDP-bound mutant protein, while Gtr1p has been reported to bind to GTP alone. Consistently, gtr1-S20N, another putative GDP-bound mutant, suppressed both prp20-1 and rna1-1. On the other hand, gtr1-Q65L, a putative GTP-bound mutant, was inhibitory to prp20-1 and rna1-1. Thus, the role that Gtr1p plays in vivo appears to depend upon the nucleotide bound to it. Our data suggested that the GTP-bound Gtr1p, but not the GDP-bound Gtr1p, interacts with itself through its C-terminal tail. S. cerevisiae possesses a novel gene, GTR2, which is homologous to GTR1. Gtr2p interacts with itself in the presence of Gtr1p. The disruption of GTR2 suppressed prp20-1 and abolished the inhibitory effect of gtr1-Q65L on prp20-1. This finding, taken together with the fact that Gtr1p-S20L is a putative, inactive GDP-bound mutant, implies that Gtr1p negatively regulates the Ran/Gsp1p GTPase cycle through Gtr2p. PMID:10388807

  10. A Least Square Method Based Model for Identifying Protein Complexes in Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Qiguo; Guo, Maozu; Guo, Yingjie; Liu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yang; Teng, Zhixia

    2014-01-01

    Protein complex formed by a group of physical interacting proteins plays a crucial role in cell activities. Great effort has been made to computationally identify protein complexes from protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. However, the accuracy of the prediction is still far from being satisfactory, because the topological structures of protein complexes in the PPI network are too complicated. This paper proposes a novel optimization framework to detect complexes from PPI network, named PLSMC. The method is on the basis of the fact that if two proteins are in a common complex, they are likely to be interacting. PLSMC employs this relation to determine complexes by a penalized least squares method. PLSMC is applied to several public yeast PPI networks, and compared with several state-of-the-art methods. The results indicate that PLSMC outperforms other methods. In particular, complexes predicted by PLSMC can match known complexes with a higher accuracy than other methods. Furthermore, the predicted complexes have high functional homogeneity. PMID:25405206

  11. PARC and CUL7 form atypical cullin RING ligase complexes.

    PubMed

    Skaar, Jeffrey R; Florens, Laurence; Tsutsumi, Takeya; Arai, Takehiro; Tron, Adriana; Swanson, Selene K; Washburn, Michael P; DeCaprio, James A

    2007-03-01

    CUL7 and the p53-associated, PARkin-like cytoplasmic protein (PARC) were previously reported to form homodimers and heterodimers, the first demonstration of cullin dimerization. Although a CUL7-based SKP1/CUL1/F-box (SCF)-like complex has been observed, little is known about the existence of a PARC-based SCF-like complex and how PARC interacts with CUL7-based complexes. To further characterize PARC-containing complexes, we examined the ability of PARC to form an SCF-like complex. PARC binds RBX1 and is covalently modified by NEDD8, defining PARC as a true cullin. However, PARC fails to bind SKP1 or F-box proteins, including the CUL7-associated FBXW8. To examine the assembly of PARC- and CUL7-containing complexes, tandem affinity purification followed by multidimensional protein identification technology were used. Multidimensional protein identification technology analysis revealed that the CUL7 interaction with FBXW8 was mutually exclusive of CUL7 binding to PARC or p53. Notably, although heterodimers of CUL7 and PARC bind p53, p53 is not required for the dimerization of CUL7 and PARC. The observed physical separation of FBXW8 and PARC is supported functionally by the generation of Parc-/-, Fbxw8-/- mice, which do not show exacerbation of the Fbxw8-/- phenotype. Finally, all of the PARC and CUL7 subcomplexes examined exhibit E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in vitro. Together, these findings indicate that the intricate assembly of PARC- and CUL7-containing complexes is highly regulated, and multiple subcomplexes may exhibit ubiquitin ligase activity. PMID:17332328

  12. GECluster: a novel protein complex prediction method

    PubMed Central

    Su, Lingtao; Liu, Guixia; Wang, Han; Tian, Yuan; Zhou, Zhihui; Han, Liang; Yan, Lun

    2014-01-01

    Identification of protein complexes is of great importance in the understanding of cellular organization and functions. Traditional computational protein complex prediction methods mainly rely on the topology of protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks but seldom take biological information of proteins (such as Gene Ontology (GO)) into consideration. Meanwhile, the environment relevant analysis of protein complex evolution has been poorly studied, partly due to the lack of high-precision protein complex datasets. In this paper, a combined PPI network is introduced to predict protein complexes which integrate both GO and expression value of relevant protein-coding genes. A novel protein complex prediction method GECluster (Gene Expression Cluster) was proposed based on a seed node expansion strategy, in which a combined PPI network was utilized. GECluster was applied to a training combined PPI network and it predicted more credible complexes than peer methods. The results indicate that using a combined PPI network can efficiently improve protein complex prediction accuracy. In order to study protein complex evolution within cells due to changes in the living environment surrounding cells, GECluster was applied to seven combined PPI networks constructed using the data of a test set including yeast response to stress throughout a wine fermentation process. Our results showed that with the rise of alcohol concentration, protein complexes within yeast cells gradually evolve from one state to another. Besides this, the number of core and attachment proteins within a protein complex both changed significantly. PMID:26019559

  13. COG complexes form spatial landmarks for distinct SNARE complexes

    PubMed Central

    Willett, Rose; Kudlyk, Tetyana; Pokrovskaya, Irina; Schönherr, Robert; Ungar, Daniel; Duden, Rainer; Lupashin, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular tethers and SNAREs are two key protein components of the intracellular membrane trafficking machinery. The COG (conserved oligomeric Golgi) complex has been implicated in the tethering of retrograde intra-Golgi vesicles. Here, using yeast two hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation approaches, we show that three COG subunits, namely COG4, 6, and 8, are capable of interacting with defined Golgi SNAREs, namely STX5, STX6, STX16, GS27, and SNAP29. Comparative analysis of COG8-STX16 and COG4-STX5 interactions by a COG-based mitochondrial re-localization assay reveals that the COG8 and COG4 proteins initiate the formation of two different tethering platforms that can facilitate the redirection of two populations of Golgi transport intermediates to the mitochondrial vicinity. Our results uncover a role for COG subcomplexes in defining the specificity of vesicular sorting within the Golgi. PMID:23462996

  14. Tumor suppressor protein Lgl mediates G1 cell cycle arrest at high cell density by forming an Lgl-VprBP-DDB1 complex

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Kazunari; Ide, Mariko; Furukawa, Kana T.; Suzuki, Atsushi; Hirano, Hisashi; Ohno, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Lethal giant larvae (Lgl) is an evolutionarily conserved tumor suppressor whose loss of function causes disrupted epithelial architecture with enhanced cell proliferation and defects in cell polarity. A role for Lgl in the establishment and maintenance of cell polarity via suppression of the PAR-aPKC polarity complex is established; however, the mechanism by which Lgl regulates cell proliferation is not fully understood. Here we show that depletion of Lgl1 and Lgl2 in MDCK epithelial cells results in overproliferation and overproduction of Lgl2 causes G1 arrest. We also show that Lgl associates with the VprBP-DDB1 complex independently of the PAR-aPKC complex and prevents the VprBP-DDB1 subunits from binding to Cul4A, a central component of the CRL4 [VprBP] ubiquitin E3 ligase complex implicated in G1- to S-phase progression. Consistently, depletion of VprBP or Cul4 rescues the overproliferation of Lgl-depleted cells. In addition, the affinity between Lgl2 and the VprBP-DDB1 complex increases at high cell density. Further, aPKC-mediated phosphorylation of Lgl2 negatively regulates the interaction between Lgl2 and VprBP-DDB1 complex. These results suggest a mechanism protecting overproliferation of epithelial cells in which Lgl plays a critical role by inhibiting formation of the CRL4 [VprBP] complex, resulting in G1 arrest. PMID:25947136

  15. The peptide carrier Pep-1 forms biologically efficient nanoparticle complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz-Morris, Maria A.; Heitz, Frederic; Divita, Gilles . E-mail: gilles.divita@crbm.cnrs.fr; Morris, May C.

    2007-04-20

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) constitute a family of peptides whose unique characteristic is their ability to insert into and cross biological membranes. Cell-penetrating peptide carriers of the Pep family are amphipathic peptides which have been shown to deliver peptides and proteins into a wide variety of cells through formation of non-covalent complexes with their cargo. In this study, we have investigated the morphological features of different Pep-1/cargo complexes by scanning electron microscopy and light scattering measurements. We provide first-time evidence that biologically efficient complexes of Pep-1/p27Kip tumour suppressor physically exist in the form of discrete nanoparticles. Moreover, we have characterized the relationship between the Pep-1/cargo ratio, the size and homogeneity of the nanoparticles formed, and their efficiency in delivering the cargo into cells, and report that particle size and homogeneity is both directly dependent on the ratio of Pep-1/cargo formulations, and responsible for their biological efficiency.

  16. Maize homologs of CCoAOMT and HCT, two key enzymes in lignin biosynthesis, form complexes with the NLR Rp1 protein to modulate the defense response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease resistance (R) genes encode nucleotide binding leucine-rich-repeat (NLR) proteins that confer resistance to specific pathogens. Upon pathogen recognition they trigger a defense response that usually includes a so-called hypersensitive response (HR), a rapid localized cell death at the site o...

  17. Architecture of the Yeast Mitochondrial Iron-Sulfur Cluster Assembly Machinery: THE SUB-COMPLEX FORMED BY THE IRON DONOR, Yfh1 PROTEIN, AND THE SCAFFOLD, Isu1 PROTEIN.

    PubMed

    Ranatunga, Wasantha; Gakh, Oleksandr; Galeano, Belinda K; Smith, Douglas Y; Söderberg, Christopher A G; Al-Karadaghi, Salam; Thompson, James R; Isaya, Grazia

    2016-05-01

    The biosynthesis of Fe-S clusters is a vital process involving the delivery of elemental iron and sulfur to scaffold proteins via molecular interactions that are still poorly defined. We reconstituted a stable, functional complex consisting of the iron donor, Yfh1 (yeast frataxin homologue 1), and the Fe-S cluster scaffold, Isu1, with 1:1 stoichiometry, [Yfh1]24·[Isu1]24 Using negative staining transmission EM and single particle analysis, we obtained a three-dimensional reconstruction of this complex at a resolution of ∼17 Å. In addition, via chemical cross-linking, limited proteolysis, and mass spectrometry, we identified protein-protein interaction surfaces within the complex. The data together reveal that [Yfh1]24·[Isu1]24 is a roughly cubic macromolecule consisting of one symmetric Isu1 trimer binding on top of one symmetric Yfh1 trimer at each of its eight vertices. Furthermore, molecular modeling suggests that two subunits of the cysteine desulfurase, Nfs1, may bind symmetrically on top of two adjacent Isu1 trimers in a manner that creates two putative [2Fe-2S] cluster assembly centers. In each center, conserved amino acids known to be involved in sulfur and iron donation by Nfs1 and Yfh1, respectively, are in close proximity to the Fe-S cluster-coordinating residues of Isu1. We suggest that this architecture is suitable to ensure concerted and protected transfer of potentially toxic iron and sulfur atoms to Isu1 during Fe-S cluster assembly. PMID:26941001

  18. Interaction graph mining for protein complexes using local clique merging.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Li; Tan, Soon-Heng; Foo, Chuan-Sheng; Ng, See-Kiong

    2005-01-01

    While recent technological advances have made available large datasets of experimentally-detected pairwise protein-protein interactions, there is still a lack of experimentally-determined protein complex data. To make up for this lack of protein complex data, we explore the mining of existing protein interaction graphs for protein complexes. This paper proposes a novel graph mining algorithm to detect the dense neighborhoods (highly connected regions) in an interaction graph which may correspond to protein complexes. Our algorithm first locates local cliques for each graph vertex (protein) and then merge the detected local cliques according to their affinity to form maximal dense regions. We present experimental results with yeast protein interaction data to demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed method. Compared with other existing techniques, our predicted complexes can match or overlap significantly better with the known protein complexes in the MIPS benchmark database. Novel protein complexes were also predicted to help biologists in their search for new protein complexes. PMID:16901108

  19. The Shc-related adaptor protein, Sck, forms a complex with the vascular-endothelial-growth-factor receptor KDR in transfected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Warner, A J; Lopez-Dee, J; Knight, E L; Feramisco, J R; Prigent, S A

    2000-01-01

    Despite much progress in recent years, the precise signalling events triggered by the vascular-endothelial-growth-factor (VEGF) receptors, fms-like tyrosine kinase (Flt1) and kinase insert domain-containing receptor (KDR), are incompletely defined. Results obtained when Flt1 and KDR are individually expressed in fibroblasts or porcine aortic endothelial cells have not been entirely consistent with those observed in other endothelial cells expressing both receptors endogenously. It has also been difficult to demonstrate VEGF-induced phosphorylation of Flt1, which has led to speculation that KDR may be the more important receptor for the mitogenic action of VEGF on endothelial cells. In an attempt to identify physiologically important effectors which bind to KDR, we have screened a yeast two-hybrid mouse embryo library with the cytoplasmic domain of KDR. Here we describe the identification of the adaptor protein, Shc-like protein (Sck), as a binding partner for KDR. We demonstrate that this interaction requires phosphorylation of KDR, and identify the binding site for the Src-homology 2 (SH2) domain as tyrosine-1175 of KDR. We have also shown that the SH2 domain of Sck, but not that of Src-homology collagen protein (Shc), can precipitate phosphorylated KDR from VEGF-stimulated porcine aortic endothelial cells expressing KDR, and that an N-terminally truncated Sck protein can associate with KDR, in a phosphorylation-dependent fashion, when co-expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in the two-hybrid assay, both Shc and Sck SH2 domains can associate with the related receptor Flt1. PMID:10749680

  20. Structure Prediction of Protein Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Brian; Weng, Zhiping

    Protein-protein interactions are critical for biological function. They directly and indirectly influence the biological systems of which they are a part. Antibodies bind with antigens to detect and stop viruses and other infectious agents. Cell signaling is performed in many cases through the interactions between proteins. Many diseases involve protein-protein interactions on some level, including cancer and prion diseases.

  1. Kv4.2 and accessory dipeptidyl peptidase-like protein 10 (DPP10) subunit preferentially form a 4:2 (Kv4.2:DPP10) channel complex.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Masahiro; Kubo, Yoshihiro; Nakajo, Koichi

    2015-09-11

    Kv4 is a member of the voltage-gated K(+) channel family and forms a complex with various accessory subunits. Dipeptidyl aminopeptidase-like protein (DPP) is one of the auxiliary subunits for the Kv4 channel. Although DPP has been well characterized and is known to increase the current amplitude and accelerate the inactivation and recovery from inactivation of Kv4 current, it remains to be determined how many DPPs bind to one Kv4 channel. To examine whether the expression level of DPP changes the biophysical properties of Kv4, we expressed Kv4.2 and DPP10 in different ratios in Xenopus oocytes and analyzed the currents under two-electrode voltage clamp. The current amplitude and the speed of recovery from inactivation of Kv4.2 changed depending on the co-expression level of DPP10. This raised the possibility that the stoichiometry of the Kv4.2-DPP10 complex is variable and affects the biophysical properties of Kv4.2. We next determined the stoichiometry of DPP10 alone by subunit counting using single-molecule imaging. Approximately 70% of the DPP10 formed dimers in the plasma membrane, and the rest existed as monomers in the absence of Kv4.2. We next determined the stoichiometry of the Kv4.2-DPP10 complex; Kv4.2-mCherry and mEGFP-DPP10 were co-expressed in different ratios and the stoichiometries of Kv4.2-DPP10 complexes were evaluated by the subunit counting method. The stoichiometry of the Kv4.2-DPP10 complex was variable depending on the relative expression level of each subunit, with a preference for 4:2 stoichiometry. This preference may come from the bulky dimeric structure of the extracellular domain of DPP10. PMID:26209633

  2. Immunoisolation of Protein Complexes from Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, Frank L.; Miteva, Yana; Kaltenbrun, Erin; Waldron, Lauren; Greco, Todd M.; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2013-01-01

    The immunoaffinity isolation of protein complexes is an essential technique for the purification and concentration of protein complexes from cells and tissues. In this chapter we present the methodologies for the purification of proteins and protein complexes from Xenopus laev is and Xenopus tropical is. Specific to this protocol are the techniques for the cryolysis of Xenopus cells and tissues, a procedure that limits contamination from yolk proteins while preserving endogenous protein complexes, the methodologies for immunoaffinity purification of proteins using magnetic beads, and the protocols for western blot analysis. In addition, the procedures in this chapter can be extended to use with proteomic analysis of protein complexes as presented in the following chapter. PMID:22956099

  3. Two-domain MHC class II molecules form stable complexes with myelin basic protein 69-89 peptide that detect and inhibit rat encephalitogenic T cells and treat experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Burrows, G G; Bebo, B F; Adlard, K L; Vandenbark, A A; Offner, H

    1998-12-01

    We designed and expressed in bacteria a single-chain two-domain MHC class II molecule capable of binding and forming stable complexes with antigenic peptide. The prototype "beta1alpha1" molecule included the beta1 domain of the rat RT1.B class II molecule covalently linked to the amino terminus of the alpha1 domain. In association with the encephalitogenic myelin basic protein (MBP) 69-89 peptide recognized by Lewis rat T cells, the beta1alpha1/MBP-69-89 complex specifically labeled and inhibited activation of MBP-69-89 reactive T cells in an IL-2-reversible manner. Moreover, this complex both suppressed and treated clinical signs of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and inhibited delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions and lymphocyte proliferation in an Ag-specific manner. These data indicate that the beta1alpha1/MBP-69-89 complex functions as a simplified natural TCR ligand with potent inhibitory activity that does not require additional signaling from the beta2 and alpha2 domains. This new class of small soluble polypeptide may provide a template for designing human homologues useful in detecting and regulating potentially autopathogenic T cells. PMID:9834080

  4. Bacterial pore-forming proteins as anthelmintics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Crystal (Cry) proteins are made by the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Cry proteins are pore-forming proteins and are the most widely used biological insecticides in the world. Our laboratory found some Cry proteins are highly effective against a broad range of nematodes (roundworms). Here, we discuss our results of Cry protein activity against intestinal roundworms. Both Cry5B and Cry21A have therapeutic activities against infections of the roundworm Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri in mice. Cry5B also shows highly therapeutic activity against Ancylostoma ceylanicum infection in hamsters. A. ceylanicum is a minor hookworm parasite of humans, and it is closely related to the more prevalent Ancylostoma duodenale. In addition, Cry proteins show excellent combinatorial therapeutic properties with nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists, one of the two classes of compounds approved by the World Health Organization for the treatment for intestinal roundworms in humans. Given their non-toxicity to humans and their broad spectrum of nematicidal action, Cry proteins show great potential as next-generation anthelmintics. PMID:22562659

  5. Oligomeric forms of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs)

    PubMed Central

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    Oligomerization is a general characteristic of cell membrane receptors that is shared by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) together with their G protein partners. Recent studies of these complexes, both in vivo and in purified reconstituted forms, unequivocally support this contention for GPCRs, perhaps with only rare exceptions. As evidence has evolved from experimental cell lines to more relevant in vivo studies and from indirect biophysical approaches to well defined isolated complexes of dimeric receptors alone and complexed with G proteins, there is an expectation that the structural basis of oligomerization and the functional consequences for membrane signaling will be elucidated. Oligomerization of cell membrane receptors is fully supported by both thermodynamic calculations and the selectivity and duration of signaling required to reach targets located in various cellular compartments. PMID:20538466

  6. Crystal structure of a Fab complex formed with PfMSP1-19, the C-terminal fragment of merozoite surface protein 1 from Plasmodium falciparum: a malaria vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Pizarro, J C; Chitarra, V; Verger, D; Holm, I; Pêtres, S; Dartevelle, S; Nato, F; Longacre, S; Bentley, G A

    2003-05-16

    Merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) is the major protein component on the surface of the merozoite, the erythrocyte-invasive form of the malaria parasite Plasmodium. Present in all species of Plasmodium, it undergoes two distinct proteolytic maturation steps during the course of merozoite development that are essential for invasion of the erythrocyte. Antibodies specific for the C-terminal maturation product, MSP1-19, can inhibit erythrocyte invasion and parasite growth. This polypeptide is therefore considered to be one of the more promising malaria vaccine candidates. We describe here the crystal structure of recombinant MSP1-19 from P.falciparum (PfMSP1-19), the most virulent species of the parasite in humans, as a complex with the Fab fragment of the monoclonal antibody G17.12. This antibody recognises a discontinuous epitope comprising 13 residues on the first epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain of PfMSP1-19. Although G17.12 was raised against the recombinant antigen expressed in an insect cell/baculovirus system, it binds uniformly to the surface of merozoites from the late schizont stage, showing that the cognate epitope is exposed on the naturally occurring MSP1 polypeptide complex. Although the epitope includes residues that have been mapped to regions recognised by invasion-inhibiting antibodies studied by other workers, G17.12 does not inhibit erythrocyte invasion or MSP1 processing. PMID:12729744

  7. Mass Spectrometry of Intact Membrane Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Reading, Eamonn; Hopper, Jonathan T.S.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry of intact soluble protein complexes has emerged as a powerful technique to study the stoichiometry, structure-function and dynamics of protein assemblies. Recent developments have extended this technique to the study of membrane protein complexes where it has already revealed subunit stoichiometries and specific phospholipid interactions. Here, we describe a protocol for mass spectrometry of membrane protein complexes. The protocol begins with preparation of the membrane protein complex enabling not only the direct assessment of stoichiometry, delipidation, and quality of the target complex, but also evaluation of the purification strategy. A detailed list of compatible non-ionic detergents is included, along with a protocol for screening detergents to find an optimal one for mass spectrometry, biochemical and structural studies. This protocol also covers the preparation of lipids for protein-lipid binding studies and includes detailed settings for a Q-ToF mass spectrometer after introduction of complexes from gold-coated nanoflow capillaries. PMID:23471109

  8. Investigation of a protein complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashaghi, A. R.; Ramezanpour, A.; Karimipour, V.

    2004-09-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the first eukaryote whose genome has been completely sequenced. It is also the first eukaryotic cell whose proteome (the set of all proteins) and interactome (the network of all mutual interactions between proteins) has been analyzed. In this paper we study the structure of the yeast protein complex network in which weighted edges between complexes represent the number of shared proteins. It is found that the network of protein complexes is a small world network with scale free behavior for many of its distributions. However we find that there are no strong correlations between the weights and degrees of neighboring complexes. To reveal non-random features of the network we also compare it with a null model in which the complexes randomly select their proteins. Finally we propose a simple evolutionary model based on duplication and divergence of proteins.

  9. Hysteresis as a Marker for Complex, Overlapping Landscapes in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Benjamin T.; Capraro, Dominique T.; Sulkowska, Joanna I.; Onuchic, José N.; Jennings, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Topologically complex proteins fold by multiple routes as a result of hard-to-fold regions of the proteins. Oftentimes these regions are introduced into the protein scaffold for function and increase frustration in the otherwise smooth-funneled landscape. Interestingly, while functional regions add complexity to folding landscapes, they may also contribute to a unique behavior referred to as hysteresis. While hysteresis is predicted to be rare, it is observed in various proteins, including proteins containing a unique peptide cyclization to form a fluorescent chromophore as well as proteins containing a knotted topology in their native fold. Here, hysteresis is demonstrated to be a consequence of the decoupling of unfolding events from the isomerization or hula-twist of a chromophore in one protein and the untying of the knot in a second protein system. The question now is- can hysteresis be a marker for the interplay of landscapes where complex folding and functional regions overlap? PMID:23525263

  10. Trapping mammalian protein complexes in viral particles

    PubMed Central

    Eyckerman, Sven; Titeca, Kevin; Van Quickelberghe, Emmy; Cloots, Eva; Verhee, Annick; Samyn, Noortje; De Ceuninck, Leentje; Timmerman, Evy; De Sutter, Delphine; Lievens, Sam; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Gevaert, Kris; Tavernier, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Cell lysis is an inevitable step in classical mass spectrometry–based strategies to analyse protein complexes. Complementary lysis conditions, in situ cross-linking strategies and proximal labelling techniques are currently used to reduce lysis effects on the protein complex. We have developed Virotrap, a viral particle sorting approach that obviates the need for cell homogenization and preserves the protein complexes during purification. By fusing a bait protein to the HIV-1 GAG protein, we show that interaction partners become trapped within virus-like particles (VLPs) that bud from mammalian cells. Using an efficient VLP enrichment protocol, Virotrap allows the detection of known binary interactions and MS-based identification of novel protein partners as well. In addition, we show the identification of stimulus-dependent interactions and demonstrate trapping of protein partners for small molecules. Virotrap constitutes an elegant complementary approach to the arsenal of methods to study protein complexes. PMID:27122307

  11. Improved method for protein complex detection using bottleneck proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Detecting protein complexes is one of essential and fundamental tasks in understanding various biological functions or processes. Therefore accurate identification of protein complexes is indispensable. Methods For more accurate detection of protein complexes, we propose an algorithm which detects dense protein sub-networks of which proteins share closely located bottleneck proteins. The proposed algorithm is capable of finding protein complexes which allow overlapping with each other. Results We applied our algorithm to several PPI (Protein-Protein Interaction) networks of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Homo sapiens, and validated our results using public databases of protein complexes. The prediction accuracy was even more improved over our previous work which used also bottleneck information of the PPI network, but showed limitation when predicting small-sized protein complex detection. Conclusions Our algorithm resulted in overlapping protein complexes with significantly improved F1 score over existing algorithms. This result comes from high recall due to effective network search, as well as high precision due to proper use of bottleneck information during the network search. PMID:23566214

  12. Metabolic Adaptation and Protein Complexes in Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Beate; Liang, Chunguang; Prell, Florian; Fieselmann, Astrid; Moya, Andres; Schuster, Stefan; Völker, Uwe; Dandekar, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Protein complexes are classified and have been charted in several large-scale screening studies in prokaryotes. These complexes are organized in a factory-like fashion to optimize protein production and metabolism. Central components are conserved between different prokaryotes; major complexes involve carbohydrate, amino acid, fatty acid and nucleotide metabolism. Metabolic adaptation changes protein complexes according to environmental conditions. Protein modification depends on specific modifying enzymes. Proteins such as trigger enzymes display condition-dependent adaptation to different functions by participating in several complexes. Several bacterial pathogens adapt rapidly to intracellular survival with concomitant changes in protein complexes in central metabolism and optimize utilization of their favorite available nutrient source. Regulation optimizes protein costs. Master regulators lead to up- and downregulation in specific subnetworks and all involved complexes. Long protein half-life and low level expression detaches protein levels from gene expression levels. However, under optimal growth conditions, metabolite fluxes through central carbohydrate pathways correlate well with gene expression. In a system-wide view, major metabolic changes lead to rapid adaptation of complexes and feedback or feedforward regulation. Finally, prokaryotic enzyme complexes are involved in crowding and substrate channeling. This depends on detailed structural interactions and is verified for specific effects by experiments and simulations. PMID:24957769

  13. Predicting Physical Interactions between Protein Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Clancy, Trevor; Rødland, Einar Andreas; Nygard, Ståle; Hovig, Eivind

    2013-01-01

    Protein complexes enact most biochemical functions in the cell. Dynamic interactions between protein complexes are frequent in many cellular processes. As they are often of a transient nature, they may be difficult to detect using current genome-wide screens. Here, we describe a method to computationally predict physical interactions between protein complexes, applied to both humans and yeast. We integrated manually curated protein complexes and physical protein interaction networks, and we designed a statistical method to identify pairs of protein complexes where the number of protein interactions between a complex pair is due to an actual physical interaction between the complexes. An evaluation against manually curated physical complex-complex interactions in yeast revealed that 50% of these interactions could be predicted in this manner. A community network analysis of the highest scoring pairs revealed a biologically sensible organization of physical complex-complex interactions in the cell. Such analyses of proteomes may serve as a guide to the discovery of novel functional cellular relationships. PMID:23438732

  14. A Protein Complex Map of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Vaibhav; Najafabadi, Hamed S.; Moshiri, Houtan; Jardim, Armando; Salavati, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The functions of the majority of trypanosomatid-specific proteins are unknown, hindering our understanding of the biology and pathogenesis of Trypanosomatida. While protein-protein interactions are highly informative about protein function, a global map of protein interactions and complexes is still lacking for these important human parasites. Here, benefiting from in-depth biochemical fractionation, we systematically interrogated the co-complex interactions of more than 3354 protein groups in procyclic life stage of Trypanosoma brucei, the protozoan parasite responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. Using a rigorous methodology, our analysis led to identification of 128 high-confidence complexes encompassing 716 protein groups, including 635 protein groups that lacked experimental annotation. These complexes correlate well with known pathways as well as for proteins co-expressed across the T. brucei life cycle, and provide potential functions for a large number of previously uncharacterized proteins. We validated the functions of several novel proteins associated with the RNA-editing machinery, identifying a candidate potentially involved in the mitochondrial post-transcriptional regulation of T. brucei. Our data provide an unprecedented view of the protein complex map of T. brucei, and serve as a reliable resource for further characterization of trypanosomatid proteins. The presented results in this study are available at: www.TrypsNetDB.org. PMID:26991453

  15. Sterols as Complex-forming Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioffe, D. V.

    1986-02-01

    The formation of complexes of sterols with different compounds determines the biological properties of both sterols and various natural substances such as saponins and polyene antibiotics. Complex formation by sterols with phospholipids, steroid saponins, and polyene antibiotics is determined by the same characteristic features of the structure of the sterol molecule. The principal role in complex formation is played by the hydrophobic reaction of the cyclopentanoperhydrophenanthrene ring. The formation of a hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl group of the sterol and a proton acceptor, which is assumed in most complexes, has been proved only in the complexes of sterols with water and acids. The bibliography contains 122 references.

  16. Proteins as paradigms of complex systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Fenimore, P. W.; Frauenfelder, Hans,; Young, R. D.

    2003-03-26

    The science of complexity has moved to center stage within the past few decades. Complex systems range from glasses to the immune system and the brain. Glasses are too simple to possess all aspects of complexity; brains are too complex to expose common concepts and laws of complexity. Proteins, however, are systems where many concepts and laws of complexity can be explored experimentally, theoretically, and computationally. Such studies have elucidated crucial aspects. The energy landscape has emerged as one central concept; it describes the free energy of a system as a function of temperature and the coordinates of all relevant atoms. A second concept is that of fluctuations. Without fluctuations, proteins would be dead and life impossible. A third concept is slaving. Proteins are not isolated systems; they are embedded in cells and membranes. Slaving arises when the fluctuations in the surroundings of a protein dominate many of the motions of the protein proper.

  17. Protein Complex Purification by Affinity Capture.

    PubMed

    LaCava, John; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Rout, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Affinity capture has become a powerful technique for consistently purifying endogenous protein complexes, facilitating biochemical and biophysical assays on otherwise inaccessible biological assemblies, and enabling broader interactomic exploration. For this procedure, cells are broken and their contents separated and extracted into a solvent, permitting access to target macromolecular complexes thus released in solution. The complexes are specifically enriched from the extract onto a solid medium coupled with an affinity reagent-usually an antibody-that recognizes the target either directly or through an appended affinity tag, allowing subsequent characterization of the complex. Here, we discuss approaches and considerations for purifying endogenous yeast protein complexes by affinity capture. PMID:27371601

  18. Systematic Characterization of Human Protein Complexes Identifies Chromosome Segregation Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, James R.A.; Toyoda, Yusuke; Hegemann, Björn; Poser, Ina; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Sykora, Martina M.; Augsburg, Martina; Hudecz, Otto; Buschhorn, Bettina A.; Bulkescher, Jutta; Conrad, Christian; Comartin, David; Schleiffer, Alexander; Sarov, Mihail; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Slabicki, Mikolaj Michal; Schloissnig, Siegfried; Steinmacher, Ines; Leuschner, Marit; Ssykor, Andrea; Lawo, Steffen; Pelletier, Laurence; Stark, Holger; Nasmyth, Kim; Ellenberg, Jan; Durbin, Richard; Buchholz, Frank; Mechtler, Karl; Hyman, Anthony A.; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2010-01-01

    Chromosome segregation and cell division are essential, highly ordered processes that depend on numerous protein complexes. Results from recent RNA interference (RNAi) screens indicate that the identity and composition of these protein complexes is incompletely understood. Using gene tagging on bacterial artificial chromosomes, protein localization and tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry, the MitoCheck consortium has analyzed about 100 human protein complexes, many of which had not or only incompletely been characterized. This work has led to the discovery of previously unknown, evolutionarily conserved subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C) and the γ-tubulin ring complex (γ-TuRC), large complexes which are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. The approaches we describe here are generally applicable to high throughput follow-up analyses of phenotypic screens in mammalian cells. PMID:20360068

  19. Systematic analysis of human protein complexes identifies chromosome segregation proteins.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, James R A; Toyoda, Yusuke; Hegemann, Björn; Poser, Ina; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Sykora, Martina M; Augsburg, Martina; Hudecz, Otto; Buschhorn, Bettina A; Bulkescher, Jutta; Conrad, Christian; Comartin, David; Schleiffer, Alexander; Sarov, Mihail; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Slabicki, Mikolaj Michal; Schloissnig, Siegfried; Steinmacher, Ines; Leuschner, Marit; Ssykor, Andrea; Lawo, Steffen; Pelletier, Laurence; Stark, Holger; Nasmyth, Kim; Ellenberg, Jan; Durbin, Richard; Buchholz, Frank; Mechtler, Karl; Hyman, Anthony A; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2010-04-30

    Chromosome segregation and cell division are essential, highly ordered processes that depend on numerous protein complexes. Results from recent RNA interference screens indicate that the identity and composition of these protein complexes is incompletely understood. Using gene tagging on bacterial artificial chromosomes, protein localization, and tandem-affinity purification-mass spectrometry, the MitoCheck consortium has analyzed about 100 human protein complexes, many of which had not or had only incompletely been characterized. This work has led to the discovery of previously unknown, evolutionarily conserved subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex and the gamma-tubulin ring complex--large complexes that are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. The approaches we describe here are generally applicable to high-throughput follow-up analyses of phenotypic screens in mammalian cells. PMID:20360068

  20. Recording information on protein complexes in an information management system

    PubMed Central

    Savitsky, Marc; Diprose, Jonathan M.; Morris, Chris; Griffiths, Susanne L.; Daniel, Edward; Lin, Bill; Daenke, Susan; Bishop, Benjamin; Siebold, Christian; Wilson, Keith S.; Blake, Richard; Stuart, David I.; Esnouf, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    The Protein Information Management System (PiMS) is a laboratory information management system (LIMS) designed for use with the production of proteins in a research environment. The software is distributed under the CCP4 licence, and so is available free of charge to academic laboratories. Like most LIMS, the underlying PiMS data model originally had no support for protein–protein complexes. To support the SPINE2-Complexes project the developers have extended PiMS to meet these requirements. The modifications to PiMS, described here, include data model changes, additional protocols, some user interface changes and functionality to detect when an experiment may have formed a complex. Example data are shown for the production of a crystal of a protein complex. Integration with SPINE2-Complexes Target Tracker application is also described. PMID:21605682

  1. Eukaryotic LYR Proteins Interact with Mitochondrial Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Angerer, Heike

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, mitochondria host ancient essential bioenergetic and biosynthetic pathways. LYR (leucine/tyrosine/arginine) motif proteins (LYRMs) of the Complex1_LYR-like superfamily interact with protein complexes of bacterial origin. Many LYR proteins function as extra subunits (LYRM3 and LYRM6) or novel assembly factors (LYRM7, LYRM8, ACN9 and FMC1) of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) core complexes. Structural insights into complex I accessory subunits LYRM6 and LYRM3 have been provided by analyses of EM and X-ray structures of complex I from bovine and the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, respectively. Combined structural and biochemical studies revealed that LYRM6 resides at the matrix arm close to the ubiquinone reduction site. For LYRM3, a position at the distal proton-pumping membrane arm facing the matrix space is suggested. Both LYRMs are supposed to anchor an acyl-carrier protein (ACPM) independently to complex I. The function of this duplicated protein interaction of ACPM with respiratory complex I is still unknown. Analysis of protein-protein interaction screens, genetic analyses and predicted multi-domain LYRMs offer further clues on an interaction network and adaptor-like function of LYR proteins in mitochondria. PMID:25686363

  2. Development of a Split SNAP-CLIP Double Labeling System for Tracking Proteins Following Dissociation from Protein-Protein Complexes in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Mie, Masayasu; Naoki, Tatsuhiko; Kobatake, Eiry

    2016-08-16

    The split SNAP-tag protein-fragment complementation assay (PCA) is a useful tool for imaging protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in living cells. In contrast to conventional methods employed for imaging PPIs, the split SNAP-tag PCA enables tracking of proteins following dissociation from protein-protein complexes. A limitation of this system, however, is that it only allows for labeling and tracking of one of the proteins forming the protein-protein complex. To track both proteins forming a protein-protein complex, each protein needs to be appropriately labeled. In this study, a split SNAP-CLIP double labeling system is developed and applied for tracking of each protein forming a protein-protein complex. As a proof-of concept, FM protein for PPIs and protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) for translocation are introduced to a split SNAP-CLIP double labeling system. The results show a split SNAP-CLIP double labeling system enables labeling of both proteins in a protein-protein complex and subsequent tracking of each of the proteins following dissociation from the protein-protein complexes in living cells. PMID:27448142

  3. Building a Hierarchical Organization of Protein Complexes Out of Protein Association Data

    PubMed Central

    Stojmirović, Aleksandar; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2014-01-01

    Organizing experimentally determined protein associations as a hierarchy can be a good approach to elucidating the content of protein complexes and the modularity of subcomplexes. Several challenges exist. First, intrinsically sticky proteins, such as chaperones, are often falsely assigned to many functionally unrelated complexes. Second, the reported collections of proteins may not be true “complexes” in the sense that they bind together and perform a joint cellular function. Third, due to imperfect sensitivity of protein detection methods, both false positive and false negative assignments of a protein to complexes may occur. We mitigate the first issue by down-weighting sticky proteins by their occurrence frequencies. We approach the other two problems by merging nearly identical complexes and by constructing a directed acyclic graph (DAG) based on the relationship of partial inclusion. The constructed DAG, within which smaller complexes form parts of the larger, can reveal how different complexes are joined. By merging almost identical complexes one can deemphasize the influence of false positives, while allowing false negatives to be rescued by other nearly identical association data. We investigate several protein weighting schemes and compare their corresponding DAGs using yeast and human complexes. We find that the scheme incorporating weights based on information flow in the network of direct protein–protein interactions produces biologically most meaningful DAGs. In either yeast or human, isolated nodes form a large proportion of the final hierarchy. While most connected components encompass very few nodes, the largest one for each species contains a sizable portion of all nodes. By considering examples of subgraphs composed of nodes containing a specified protein, we illustrate that the graphs' topological features can correctly suggest the biological roles of protein complexes. The input data, final results and the source code are available at ftp

  4. A-Kinase Anchoring Proteins: From protein complexes to physiology and disease

    PubMed Central

    Carnegie, Graeme K.; Means, Christopher K.; Scott, John D.

    2009-01-01

    Protein scaffold complexes are a key mechanism by which a common signaling pathway can serve many different functions. Sequestering a signaling enzyme to a specific subcellular environment not only ensures that the enzyme is near its relevant targets, but also segregates this activity to prevent indiscriminate phosphorylation of other substrates. One family of diverse, well-studied scaffolding proteins are the A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). These anchoring proteins form multi-protein complexes that integrate cAMP signaling with other pathways and signaling events. In this review we focus on recent advances in the elucidation of AKAP function. PMID:19319965

  5. Skp1p and the F-Box Protein Rcy1p Form a Non-SCF Complex Involved in Recycling of the SNARE Snc1p in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Galan, Jean-Marc; Wiederkehr, Andreas; Seol, Jae Hong; Haguenauer-Tsapis, Rosine; Deshaies, Raymond J.; Riezman, Howard; Peter, Matthias

    2001-01-01

    Skp1p–cullin–F-box protein (SCF) complexes are ubiquitin-ligases composed of a core complex including Skp1p, Cdc53p, Hrt1p, the E2 enzyme Cdc34p, and one of multiple F-box proteins which are thought to provide substrate specificity to the complex. Here we show that the F-box protein Rcy1p is required for recycling of the v-SNARE Snc1p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Rcy1p localized to areas of polarized growth, and this polarized localization required its CAAX box and an intact actin cytoskeleton. Rcy1p interacted with Skp1p in vivo in an F-box-dependent manner, and both deletion of its F box and loss of Skp1p function impaired recycling. In contrast, cells deficient in Cdc53p, Hrt1p, or Cdc34p did not exhibit recycling defects. Unlike the case for F-box proteins that are known to participate in SCF complexes, degradation of Rcy1p required neither its F box nor functional 26S proteasomes or other SCF core subunits. Importantly, Skp1p was the only major partner that copurified with Rcy1p. Our results thus suggest that a complex composed of Rcy1p and Skp1p but not other SCF components may play a direct role in recycling of internalized proteins. PMID:11287615

  6. Structure of the ternary complex formed by a chemotaxis receptor signaling domain, the CheA histidine kinase and the coupling protein CheW as determined by pulsed dipolar ESR spectroscopy†

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Jaya; Borbat, Peter P.; Pollard, Abiola M.; Bilwes, Alexandrine M.; Freed, Jack H.; Crane, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    The signaling apparatus that controls bacterial chemotaxis is composed of a core complex containing chemoreceptors, the histidine auto-kinase CheA, and the coupling protein CheW. Site-specific spin labeling and pulsed-dipolar ESR spectroscopy (PDS) have been applied to investigate the structure of a soluble ternary complex formed by T. maritima CheA (TmCheA), CheW, and receptor signaling domains. Thirty-five symmetric spin-labels sites (SLSs) were engineered into the five domains of the CheA dimer and CheW to provide distance restraints within the CheA:CheW complex in the absence and presence of a soluble receptor that inhibits kinase activity (Tm14). Additional PDS restraints between spin-labeled CheA, CheW and an engineered single-chain receptor labeled at six different sites allows docking of the receptor structure relative to the CheA:CheW complex. Disulfide cross-linking between selectively incorporated Cys residues finds two pairs of positions that provide further constraints within the ternary complex: one involving Tm14 and CheW, and another involving Tm14 and CheA. The derived structure of the ternary complex indicates a primary site of interaction between CheW and Tm14 that agrees well with previous biochemical and genetic data on transmembrane chemoreceptors. The PDS distance distributions are most consistent with only one CheW directly engaging one dimeric Tm14. The CheA dimerization domain (P3) aligns roughly antiparallel to the receptor conserved signaling tip, but does not interact strongly with it. The angle of the receptor axis with respect to P3 and the CheW-binding P5 domains is bound by two limits differing by ~20°. In one limit, Tm14 aligns roughly along P3 and may interact to some extent with the hinge region near the P3 hairpin loop. In the other limit, Tm14 tilts to interact with the P5 domain of the opposite subunit in an interface that mimics that observed with the P5 homolog CheW. The time-domain ESR data can be simulated from the model

  7. Engineering of complex protein sialylation in plants.

    PubMed

    Kallolimath, Somanath; Castilho, Alexandra; Strasser, Richard; Grünwald-Gruber, Clemens; Altmann, Friedrich; Strubl, Sebastian; Galuska, Christina Elisabeth; Zlatina, Kristina; Galuska, Sebastian Peter; Werner, Stefan; Thiesler, Hauke; Werneburg, Sebastian; Hildebrandt, Herbert; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Steinkellner, Herta

    2016-08-23

    Sialic acids (Sias) are abundant terminal modifications of protein-linked glycans. A unique feature of Sia, compared with other monosaccharides, is the formation of linear homo-polymers, with its most complex form polysialic acid (polySia). Sia and polySia mediate diverse biological functions and have great potential for therapeutic use. However, technological hurdles in producing defined protein sialylation due to the enormous structural diversity render their precise investigation a challenge. Here, we describe a plant-based expression platform that enables the controlled in vivo synthesis of sialylated structures with different interlinkages and degree of polymerization (DP). The approach relies on a combination of stably transformed plants with transient expression modules. By the introduction of multigene vectors carrying the human sialylation pathway into glycosylation-destructed mutants, transgenic plants that sialylate glycoproteins in α2,6- or α2,3-linkage were generated. Moreover, by the transient coexpression of human α2,8-polysialyltransferases, polySia structures with a DP >40 were synthesized in these plants. Importantly, plant-derived polySia are functionally active, as demonstrated by a cell-based cytotoxicity assay and inhibition of microglia activation. This pathway engineering approach enables experimental investigations of defined sialylation and facilitates a rational design of glycan structures with optimized biotechnological functions. PMID:27444013

  8. Engineering of complex protein sialylation in plants

    PubMed Central

    Kallolimath, Somanath; Castilho, Alexandra; Strasser, Richard; Grünwald-Gruber, Clemens; Altmann, Friedrich; Strubl, Sebastian; Galuska, Christina Elisabeth; Zlatina, Kristina; Galuska, Sebastian Peter; Werner, Stefan; Thiesler, Hauke; Werneburg, Sebastian; Hildebrandt, Herbert; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Steinkellner, Herta

    2016-01-01

    Sialic acids (Sias) are abundant terminal modifications of protein-linked glycans. A unique feature of Sia, compared with other monosaccharides, is the formation of linear homo-polymers, with its most complex form polysialic acid (polySia). Sia and polySia mediate diverse biological functions and have great potential for therapeutic use. However, technological hurdles in producing defined protein sialylation due to the enormous structural diversity render their precise investigation a challenge. Here, we describe a plant-based expression platform that enables the controlled in vivo synthesis of sialylated structures with different interlinkages and degree of polymerization (DP). The approach relies on a combination of stably transformed plants with transient expression modules. By the introduction of multigene vectors carrying the human sialylation pathway into glycosylation-destructed mutants, transgenic plants that sialylate glycoproteins in α2,6- or α2,3-linkage were generated. Moreover, by the transient coexpression of human α2,8-polysialyltransferases, polySia structures with a DP >40 were synthesized in these plants. Importantly, plant-derived polySia are functionally active, as demonstrated by a cell-based cytotoxicity assay and inhibition of microglia activation. This pathway engineering approach enables experimental investigations of defined sialylation and facilitates a rational design of glycan structures with optimized biotechnological functions. PMID:27444013

  9. Electrophoresis of proteins and protein-protein complexes in native polyacrylamide gels using a horizontal gel apparatus.

    PubMed

    Su, C; Wang, F; Ciolek, D; Pan, Y C

    1994-11-15

    Electrophoresis of proteins and protein-protein complexes in polyacrylamide gels under native conditions using a horizontal gel apparatus is described. The advantage of this system is that it permits the detection of both negatively and positively charged proteins as well as protein-protein complexes in the same gel. During electrophoresis, a continuous gel sandwiched between two glass plates is placed horizontally on the platform and submerged in a reservoir buffer. The sample wells are made along the center of the gel, allowing positively and negatively charged proteins to migrate toward the cathode and anode, respectively. Several proteins with varying molecular weights and isoelectric point (pI) values and pairs of proteins capable of forming protein-protein complexes were chosen as model systems to illustrate the methodology. The effects of several parameters on the performance of the gel system including protein molecular weight, pI, and gel concentration were also examined and the results obtained by this method are comparable to those obtained by the vertical system. Following electrophoresis, both negatively and positively charged proteins as well as protein-protein complexes can be transferred by electroblotting onto polyvinylidene difluoride membranes for further analyses. PMID:7695108

  10. Fungal MACPF-like proteins and aegerolysins: bi-component pore-forming proteins?

    PubMed

    Ota, Katja; Butala, Matej; Viero, Gabriella; Dalla Serra, Mauro; Sepčić, Kristina; Maček, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Proteins with membrane-attack complex/perforin (MACPF) domains are found in almost all kingdoms of life, and they have a variety of biological roles, including defence and attack, organism development, and cell adhesion and signalling. The distribution of these proteins in fungi appears to be restricted to some Pezizomycotina and Basidiomycota species only, in correlation with another group of proteins with unknown biological function, known as aegerolysins. These two protein groups coincide in only a few species, and they might operate in concert as cytolytic bi-component pore-forming agents. Representative proteins here include pleurotolysin B, which has a MACPF domain, and the aegerolysin-like protein pleurotolysin A, and the very similar ostreolysin A, which have been purified from oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus). These have been shown to act in concert to perforate natural and artificial lipid membranes with high cholesterol and sphingomyelin content. The aegerolysin-like proteins provide the membrane cholesterol/sphingomyelin selectivity and recruit oligomerised pleurotolysin B molecules, to create a membrane-inserted pore complex. The resulting protein structure has been imaged with electron microscopy, and it has a 13-meric rosette-like structure, with a central lumen that is ~4-5 nm in diameter. The opened transmembrane pore is non-selectively permeable for ions and smaller neutral solutes, and is a cause of cytolysis of a colloid-osmotic type. The biological significance of these proteins for the fungal life-style is discussed. PMID:24798017

  11. PEGylated Albumin-Based Polyion Complex Micelles for Protein Delivery.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanyan; Lu, Hongxu; Chen, Fan; Callari, Manuela; Pourgholami, Mohammad; Morris, David L; Stenzel, Martina H

    2016-03-14

    An increasing amount of therapeutic agents are based on proteins. However, proteins as drug have intrinsic problems such as their low hydrolytic stability. Delivery of proteins using nanoparticles has increasingly been the focus of interest with polyion complex micelles, prepared from charged block copolymer and the oppositely charged protein, as an example of an attractive carrier for proteins. Inspired by this approach, a more biocompatible pathway has been developed here, which replaces the charged synthetic polymer with an abundant protein, such as albumin. Although bovine serum albumin (BSA) was observed to form complexes with positively charged proteins directly, the resulting protein nanoparticle were not stable and aggregated to large precipitates over the course of a day. Therefore, maleimide functionalized poly(oligo (ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (MI-POEGMEMA) (Mn = 26000 g/mol) was synthesized to generate a polymer-albumin conjugate, which was able to condense positively charged proteins, here lysozyme (Lyz) as a model. The PEGylated albumin polyion complex micelle with lysozyme led to nanoparticles between 15 and 25 nm in size depending on the BSA to Lyz ratio. The activity of the encapsulated protein was tested using Sprouty 1 (C-12; Spry1) proteins, which can act as an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor. Condensation of Spry1 with the PEGylated albumin could improve the anticancer efficacy of Spry1 against the breast cancer cells lowering the IC50 value of the protein. Furthermore, the high anticancer efficacy of the POEGMEMA-BSA/Spry1 complex micelle was verified by effectively inhibiting the growth of three-dimensional MCF-7 multicellular tumor spheroids. The PEGylated albumin complex micelle has great potential as a drug delivery vehicle for a new generation of cancer pharmaceuticals. PMID:26809948

  12. Protein-protein interaction networks (PPI) and complex diseases

    PubMed Central

    Safari-Alighiarloo, Nahid; Taghizadeh, Mohammad; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa; Goliaei, Bahram

    2014-01-01

    The physical interaction of proteins which lead to compiling them into large densely connected networks is a noticeable subject to investigation. Protein interaction networks are useful because of making basic scientific abstraction and improving biological and biomedical applications. Based on principle roles of proteins in biological function, their interactions determine molecular and cellular mechanisms, which control healthy and diseased states in organisms. Therefore, such networks facilitate the understanding of pathogenic (and physiologic) mechanisms that trigger the onset and progression of diseases. Consequently, this knowledge can be translated into effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Furthermore, the results of several studies have proved that the structure and dynamics of protein networks are disturbed in complex diseases such as cancer and autoimmune disorders. Based on such relationship, a novel paradigm is suggested in order to confirm that the protein interaction networks can be the target of therapy for treatment of complex multi-genic diseases rather than individual molecules with disrespect the network. PMID:25436094

  13. Graph theory and stability analysis of protein complex interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Hung; Chen, Teng-Hung; Ng, Ka-Lok

    2016-04-01

    Protein complexes play an essential role in many biological processes. Complexes can interact with other complexes to form protein complex interaction network (PCIN) that involves in important cellular processes. There are relatively few studies on examining the interaction topology among protein complexes; and little is known about the stability of PCIN under perturbations. We employed graph theoretical approach to reveal hidden properties and features of four species PCINs. Two main issues are addressed, (i) the global and local network topological properties, and (ii) the stability of the networks under 12 types of perturbations. According to the topological parameter classification, we identified some critical protein complexes and validated that the topological analysis approach could provide meaningful biological interpretations of the protein complex systems. Through the Kolmogorov-Smimov test, we showed that local topological parameters are good indicators to characterise the structure of PCINs. We further demonstrated the effectiveness of the current approach by performing the scalability and data normalization tests. To measure the robustness of PCINs, we proposed to consider eight topological-based perturbations, which are specifically applicable in scenarios of targeted, sustained attacks. We found that the degree-based, betweenness-based and brokering-coefficient-based perturbations have the largest effect on network stability. PMID:26997661

  14. Solid-phase preparation of protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Pengo, Paolo; Veggiani, Gianluca; Rattanamanee, Kwanchai; Gallotta, Andrea; Beneduce, Luca; Fassina, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    Protein-protein conjugation is usually achieved by solution phase methods requiring concentrated protein solution and post-synthetic purification steps. In this report we describe a novel continuous-flow solid-phase approach enabling the assembly of protein complexes minimizing the amount of material needed and allowing the repeated use of the same solid phase. The method exploits an immunoaffinity matrix as solid support; the matrix reversibly binds the first of the complex components while the other components are sequentially introduced, thus allowing the complex to grow while immobilized. The tethering technique employed relies on the use of the very mild synthetic conditions and fast association rates allowed by the avidin-biotin system. At the end of the assembly, the immobilized complexes can be removed from the solid support and recovered by lowering the pH of the medium. Under the conditions used for the sequential complexation and recovery, the solid phase was not damaged or irreversibly modified and could be reused without loss of binding capacity. The method was specifically designed to prepare protein complexes to be used in immunometric methods of analysis, where the immunoreactivity of each component needs to be preserved. The approach was successfully exploited for the preparation of two different immunoaffinity reagents with immunoreactivity mimicking native squamous cell carcinoma antigen-immunoglobulin M (SCCA-IgM) and alphafetoprotein-immunoglobulin M (AFP-IgM) immune complexes, which were characterized by dedicated sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblot. Besides the specific application described in the paper, the method is sufficiently general to be used for the preparation of a broad range of protein assemblies. PMID:21038355

  15. Drosophila IAP antagonists form multimeric complexes to promote cell death

    PubMed Central

    Sandu, Cristinel; Ryoo, Hyung Don

    2010-01-01

    Apoptosis is a specific form of cell death that is important for normal development and tissue homeostasis. Caspases are critical executioners of apoptosis, and living cells prevent their inappropriate activation through inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). In Drosophila, caspase activation depends on the IAP antagonists, Reaper (Rpr), Head involution defective (Hid), and Grim. These proteins share a common motif to bind Drosophila IAP1 (DIAP1) and have partially redundant functions. We now show that IAP antagonists physically interact with each other. Rpr is able to self-associate and also binds to Hid and Grim. We have defined the domain involved in self-association and demonstrate that it is critical for cell-killing activity in vivo. In addition, we show that Rpr requires Hid for recruitment to the mitochondrial membrane and for efficient induction of cell death in vivo. Both targeting of Rpr to mitochondria and forced dimerization strongly promotes apoptosis. Our results reveal the functional importance of a previously unrecognized multimeric IAP antagonist complex for the induction of apoptosis. PMID:20837774

  16. Solvation dynamics in a protein surfactant complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Partha; Sen, Pratik; Halder, Arnab; Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Sen, Sobhan; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2003-08-01

    Solvation dynamics in the denatured state of a protein, lysozyme (denatured by sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) is markedly slower than that in the native state. For coumarin 153 bound to lysozyme, the average solvation time, < τs> is 330 ps. In the lysozyme-SDS complex, the solvation dynamics is markedly slower with < τs>=7250 ps. On addition of dithiothreitol (DTT) to the lysozyme-SDS complex, when the di-sulfide bonds are destroyed, < τs> is found to be 1140 ps. The slow dynamics in the denatured protein is attributed to the polymer chain dynamics and the exchange of bound and free water molecules.

  17. Peroxisome protein import: a complex journey

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Alison; Hogg, Thomas Lanyon; Warriner, Stuart L.

    2016-01-01

    The import of proteins into peroxisomes possesses many unusual features such as the ability to import folded proteins, and a surprising diversity of targeting signals with differing affinities that can be recognized by the same receptor. As understanding of the structure and function of many components of the protein import machinery has grown, an increasingly complex network of factors affecting each step of the import pathway has emerged. Structural studies have revealed the presence of additional interactions between cargo proteins and the PEX5 receptor that affect import potential, with a subtle network of cargo-induced conformational changes in PEX5 being involved in the import process. Biochemical studies have also indicated an interdependence of receptor–cargo import with release of unloaded receptor from the peroxisome. Here, we provide an update on recent literature concerning mechanisms of protein import into peroxisomes. PMID:27284042

  18. Metal complexes as "protein surface mimetics".

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Sarah H; Wilson, Andrew J

    2016-07-28

    A key challenge in chemical biology is to identify small molecule regulators for every single protein. However, protein surfaces are notoriously difficult to recognise with synthetic molecules, often having large flat surfaces that are poorly matched to traditional small molecules. In the surface mimetic approach, a supramolecular scaffold is used to project recognition groups in such a manner as to make multivalent non-covalent contacts over a large area of protein surface. Metal based supramolecular scaffolds offer unique advantages over conventional organic molecules for protein binding, including greater stereochemical and geometrical diversity conferred through the metal centre and the potential for direct assessment of binding properties and even visualisation in cells without recourse to further functionalisation. This feature article will highlight the current state of the art in protein surface recognition using metal complexes as surface mimetics. PMID:27353704

  19. On protein abundance distributions in complex mixtures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry, an analytical technique that measures the mass-to-charge ratio of ionized atoms or molecules, dates back more than 100 years, and has both qualitative and quantitative uses for determining chemical and structural information. Quantitative proteomic mass spectrometry on biological samples focuses on identifying the proteins present in the samples, and establishing the relative abundances of those proteins. Such protein inventories create the opportunity to discover novel biomarkers and disease targets. We have previously introduced a normalized, label-free method for quantification of protein abundances under a shotgun proteomics platform (Griffin et al., 2010). The introduction of this method for quantifying and comparing protein levels leads naturally to the issue of modeling protein abundances in individual samples. We here report that protein abundance levels from two recent proteomics experiments conducted by the authors can be adequately represented by Sichel distributions. Mathematically, Sichel distributions are mixtures of Poisson distributions with a rather complex mixing distribution, and have been previously and successfully applied to linguistics and species abundance data. The Sichel model can provide a direct measure of the heterogeneity of protein abundances, and can reveal protein abundance differences that simpler models fail to show. PMID:23360617

  20. Deciphering preferential interactions within supramolecular protein complexes: the proteasome case

    PubMed Central

    Fabre, Bertrand; Lambour, Thomas; Garrigues, Luc; Amalric, François; Vigneron, Nathalie; Menneteau, Thomas; Stella, Alexandre; Monsarrat, Bernard; Van den Eynde, Benoît; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Bousquet-Dubouch, Marie-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, intracellular protein breakdown is mainly performed by the ubiquitin–proteasome system. Proteasomes are supramolecular protein complexes formed by the association of multiple sub-complexes and interacting proteins. Therefore, they exhibit a very high heterogeneity whose function is still not well understood. Here, using a newly developed method based on the combination of affinity purification and protein correlation profiling associated with high-resolution mass spectrometry, we comprehensively characterized proteasome heterogeneity and identified previously unknown preferential associations within proteasome sub-complexes. In particular, we showed for the first time that the two main proteasome subtypes, standard proteasome and immunoproteasome, interact with a different subset of important regulators. This trend was observed in very diverse human cell types and was confirmed by changing the relative proportions of both 20S proteasome forms using interferon-γ. The new method developed here constitutes an innovative and powerful strategy that could be broadly applied for unraveling the dynamic and heterogeneous nature of other biologically relevant supramolecular protein complexes. PMID:25561571

  1. Izumo is part of a multiprotein family whose members form large complexes on mammalian sperm

    PubMed Central

    Ellerman, Diego A; Pei, Jimin; Gupta, Surabhi; Snell, William J; Myles, Diana; Primakoff, Paul

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Izumo, a sperm membrane protein, is essential for gamete fusion in the mouse. It has an Ig (Immunoglobulin) domain and an N-terminal domain for which neither the functions nor homologous sequences are known. In the present work we identified three novel proteins showing an N-terminal domain with significant homology to the N-terminal domain of Izumo. We named this region "Izumo domain", and the novel proteins “Izumo 2”,”Izumo 3” and “Izumo 4”, retaining “Izumo 1” for the first described member of the family. Izumo 1, 2 and 3 are transmembrane proteins expressed specifically in the testis, and Izumo 4 is a soluble protein expressed in the testis and in other tissues. Electrophoresis under mildly denaturing conditions, followed by Western blot analysis, showed that Izumo 1, 3 and 4 formed protein complexes on sperm, Izumo 1 forming several larger complexes and Izumo 3 and 4 forming a single larger complex. Studies using different recombinant Izumo constructs suggested the Izumo domain possesses the ability to form dimers, whereas the transmembrane domain or the cytoplasmic domain or both of Izumo 1 are required for the formation of multimers of higher order. Co-immunoprecipitation studies showed the presence of other sperm proteins associated with Izumo-1, suggesting Izumo 1 forms a multi-protein membrane complex. Our results raise the possibility that Izumo 1 might be involved in organizing or stabilizing a multi-protein complex essential for the function of the membrane fusion machinery. PMID:19658160

  2. The sorption of thiocyanate ions on complex-forming ionites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononova, O. N.; Goryaeva, N. G.; Kononov, Yu. S.

    2011-06-01

    The ligand sorption of thiocyanate ions on several complex-forming ionites was studied. The ionites were preliminarily transformed into metal forms by saturation with copper(II) ions. ANKB-2 amphoteric ionite in the Cu form had the strongest affinity for thiocyanate ions. The optimum conditions for their extraction were pH ˜ 2 and solution ionic strength 1. IR spectroscopy was used to study the ligand sorption of SCN- ions by ANKB-2 ionite in the Cu form. The stability constants of thiocyanate ionite copper complexes were calculated from formation function bar n.

  3. HIRES Dust Imaging of the NGC 6334 Star Forming Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, James M.

    1997-01-01

    We present here our final report for the NASA grant "HIRES Dust Imaging of the NGC 6334 Star Forming Complex." This project was designed to study the photodissociation regions surrounding several OB stars in this cloud complex. NGC 6334 is unique in having at least seven distinct massive star forming regions in the same molecular cloud complex. The obvious advantage of studying young stars in the same molecular complex is that the stars all formed in the same global environment. Consequently, global factors like density waves, abundances, global magnetic field strength, and age of the parental molecular cloud cannot contribute to the differences among the star forming regions. Instead, the differences must arise only from local effects such as the mass, age, and UV fields of the individual stars. A study of NGC 6334 will greatly simplify the general problem of comparing different star formation regions by eliminating global effects.

  4. A secretory kinase complex regulates extracellular protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jixin; Xiao, Junyu; Tagliabracci, Vincent S; Wen, Jianzhong; Rahdar, Meghdad; Dixon, Jack E

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous extracellular phosphoproteins have been identified, the protein kinases within the secretory pathway have only recently been discovered, and their regulation is virtually unexplored. Fam20C is the physiological Golgi casein kinase, which phosphorylates many secreted proteins and is critical for proper biomineralization. Fam20A, a Fam20C paralog, is essential for enamel formation, but the biochemical function of Fam20A is unknown. Here we show that Fam20A potentiates Fam20C kinase activity and promotes the phosphorylation of enamel matrix proteins in vitro and in cells. Mechanistically, Fam20A is a pseudokinase that forms a functional complex with Fam20C, and this complex enhances extracellular protein phosphorylation within the secretory pathway. Our findings shed light on the molecular mechanism by which Fam20C and Fam20A collaborate to control enamel formation, and provide the first insight into the regulation of secretory pathway phosphorylation. PMID:25789606

  5. Closed form evaluation of symmetric two-sided complex integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkelstein, R.

    1981-01-01

    Evaluation of two-sided complex integrals is often required when analyzing linear systems to determine signal variances resulting from stochastic inputs and system noise bandwidths. Algebraic solutions of integrals in a closed matrix equation form, using coefficients of the numerator and denominator polynomials, are presented. The closed forms provide the possibility of obtaining some insight into parameter sensitivity in addition to greatly reducing the computational complexity required by the normal method of evaluation by residues.

  6. Design and characterization of complex protein films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Holt P.

    Once a biomaterial is implanted into biological system, a layer of protein is immediately deposited on the surface of that material. The newly formed protein film will dictate how the implanted material will interact with the surrounding biological environment and lead to either the acceptance or rejection of the biomaterial. One method to enhance performance involves the activation the surface of the biomaterial with one or more proteins to direct specific interactions with the host environment. The focus of my dissertation was to develop and characterize model biomaterials surfaces that are activated with one or more proteins to help understand how the protein films may affect biological processes and a biomaterial's performance. One model system consisted of a patterned film of two proteins on a gold surface. Characterization of this protein pattern indicated that patterning protein films with a focused ion beam produced protein patterns with high biological contrast and high spatial control. The second model protein film involved the adsorption of fibronectin on surfaces with different surface energies. The characterization of the adsorbed fibronectin films suggest that fibronectin adsorbed on a hydrophilic surface is in an orientation that projects hydrophilic amino acid residues towards surface of the protein and dehydration causes reorientation to project hydrophobic amino acids towards the surface. In contrast, fibronectin is adsorbed onto a hydrophobic surface in a manner that resulted in dehydration and denaturation during the adsorption process. The last model protein film studied in this work consisted of fibronectin patterned in a manner so that the film consisted of spatially controlled domains of fibronectin adsorbed onto a hydrophilic surface as well as a hydrophobic surface. Lateral characterization of this pattern demonstrated a difference in secondary structure of fibronectin adsorbed on the two domains with varying surface energies.

  7. The Tumor Suppressor DiRas3 Forms a Complex with H-Ras and C-RAF Proteins and Regulates Localization, Dimerization, and Kinase Activity of C-RAF*

    PubMed Central

    Baljuls, Angela; Beck, Matthias; Oenel, Ayla; Robubi, Armin; Kroschewski, Ruth; Hekman, Mirko; Rudel, Thomas; Rapp, Ulf R.

    2012-01-01

    The maternally imprinted Ras-related tumor suppressor gene DiRas3 is lost or down-regulated in more than 60% of ovarian and breast cancers. The anti-tumorigenic effect of DiRas3 is achieved through several mechanisms, including inhibition of cell proliferation, motility, and invasion, as well as induction of apoptosis and autophagy. Re-expression of DiRas3 in cancer cells interferes with the signaling through Ras/MAPK and PI3K. Despite intensive research, the mode of interference of DiRas3 with the Ras/RAF/MEK/ERK signal transduction is still a matter of speculation. In this study, we show that DiRas3 associates with the H-Ras oncogene and that activation of H-Ras enforces this interaction. Furthermore, while associated with DiRas3, H-Ras is able to bind to its effector protein C-RAF. The resulting multimeric complex consisting of DiRas3, C-RAF, and active H-Ras is more stable than the two protein complexes H-Ras·C-RAF or H-Ras·DiRas3, respectively. The consequence of this complex formation is a DiRas3-mediated recruitment and anchorage of C-RAF to components of the membrane skeleton, suppression of C-RAF/B-RAF heterodimerization, and inhibition of C-RAF kinase activity. PMID:22605333

  8. Dynamical complexity changes during two forms of meditation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin; Hu, Jing; Zhang, Yinhong; Zhang, Xiaofeng

    2011-06-01

    Detection of dynamical complexity changes in natural and man-made systems has deep scientific and practical meaning. We use the base-scale entropy method to analyze dynamical complexity changes for heart rate variability (HRV) series during specific traditional forms of Chinese Chi and Kundalini Yoga meditation techniques in healthy young adults. The results show that dynamical complexity decreases in meditation states for two forms of meditation. Meanwhile, we detected changes in probability distribution of m-words during meditation and explained this changes using probability distribution of sine function. The base-scale entropy method may be used on a wider range of physiologic signals.

  9. Secondary Teachers' Conception of Various Forms of Complex Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karakok, Gulden; Soto-Johnson, Hortensia; Dyben, Stephenie Anderson

    2015-01-01

    This study explores in-service high school mathematics teachers' conception of various forms of complex numbers and ways in which they transition between different representations of these forms. One 90-min interview was conducted with three high school mathematics teachers after they completed three professional development sessions, each 4 h, on…

  10. Encountering Productive Forms of Complexity in Learning Modern Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levrini, Olivia; Fantini, Paola

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims at supporting the claim that some forms of hyper-simplification, by making physics seem easy, are at risk of dangerously distorting the content as well as the process of learning physics. The paper presents examples of dangerous simplifications in the teaching of quantum physics. Then, examples of productive forms of complexity are…

  11. Myeloperoxidase, paraoxonase-1, and HDL form a functional ternary complex.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Wu, Zhiping; Riwanto, Meliana; Gao, Shengqiang; Levison, Bruce S; Gu, Xiaodong; Fu, Xiaoming; Wagner, Matthew A; Besler, Christian; Gerstenecker, Gary; Zhang, Renliang; Li, Xin-Min; DiDonato, Anthony J; Gogonea, Valentin; Tang, W H Wilson; Smith, Jonathan D; Plow, Edward F; Fox, Paul L; Shih, Diana M; Lusis, Aldons J; Fisher, Edward A; DiDonato, Joseph A; Landmesser, Ulf; Hazen, Stanley L

    2013-09-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) and paraoxonase 1 (PON1) are high-density lipoprotein-associated (HDL-associated) proteins mechanistically linked to inflammation, oxidant stress, and atherosclerosis. MPO is a source of ROS during inflammation and can oxidize apolipoprotein A1 (APOA1) of HDL, impairing its atheroprotective functions. In contrast, PON1 fosters systemic antioxidant effects and promotes some of the atheroprotective properties attributed to HDL. Here, we demonstrate that MPO, PON1, and HDL bind to one another, forming a ternary complex, wherein PON1 partially inhibits MPO activity, while MPO inactivates PON1. MPO oxidizes PON1 on tyrosine 71 (Tyr71), a modified residue found in human atheroma that is critical for HDL binding and PON1 function. Acute inflammation model studies with transgenic and knockout mice for either PON1 or MPO confirmed that MPO and PON1 reciprocally modulate each other's function in vivo. Further structure and function studies identified critical contact sites between APOA1 within HDL, PON1, and MPO, and proteomics studies of HDL recovered from acute coronary syndrome (ACS) subjects revealed enhanced chlorotyrosine content, site-specific PON1 methionine oxidation, and reduced PON1 activity. HDL thus serves as a scaffold upon which MPO and PON1 interact during inflammation, whereupon PON1 binding partially inhibits MPO activity, and MPO promotes site-specific oxidative modification and impairment of PON1 and APOA1 function. PMID:23908111

  12. Mextli proteins use both canonical bipartite and novel tripartite binding modes to form eIF4E complexes that display differential sensitivity to 4E-BP regulation.

    PubMed

    Peter, Daniel; Weber, Ramona; Köne, Carolin; Chung, Min-Yi; Ebertsch, Linda; Truffault, Vincent; Weichenrieder, Oliver; Igreja, Cátia; Izaurralde, Elisa

    2015-09-01

    The eIF4E-binding proteins (4E-BPs) are a diverse class of translation regulators that share a canonical eIF4E-binding motif (4E-BM) with eIF4G. Consequently, they compete with eIF4G for binding to eIF4E, thereby inhibiting translation initiation. Mextli (Mxt) is an unusual 4E-BP that promotes translation by also interacting with eIF3. Here we present the crystal structures of the eIF4E-binding regions of the Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) and Caenorhabditis elegans (Ce) Mxt proteins in complex with eIF4E in the cap-bound and cap-free states. The structures reveal unexpected evolutionary plasticity in the eIF4E-binding mode, with a classical bipartite interface for Ce Mxt and a novel tripartite interface for Dm Mxt. Both interfaces comprise a canonical helix and a noncanonical helix that engage the dorsal and lateral surfaces of eIF4E, respectively. Remarkably, Dm Mxt contains a C-terminal auxiliary helix that lies anti-parallel to the canonical helix on the eIF4E dorsal surface. In contrast to the eIF4G and Ce Mxt complexes, the Dm eIF4E-Mxt complexes are resistant to competition by bipartite 4E-BPs, suggesting that Dm Mxt can bind eIF4E when eIF4G binding is inhibited. Our results uncovered unexpected diversity in the binding modes of 4E-BPs, resulting in eIF4E complexes that display differential sensitivity to 4E-BP regulation. PMID:26294658

  13. Mextli proteins use both canonical bipartite and novel tripartite binding modes to form eIF4E complexes that display differential sensitivity to 4E-BP regulation

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Daniel; Weber, Ramona; Köne, Carolin; Chung, Min-Yi; Ebertsch, Linda; Truffault, Vincent; Weichenrieder, Oliver; Igreja, Cátia; Izaurralde, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    The eIF4E-binding proteins (4E-BPs) are a diverse class of translation regulators that share a canonical eIF4E-binding motif (4E-BM) with eIF4G. Consequently, they compete with eIF4G for binding to eIF4E, thereby inhibiting translation initiation. Mextli (Mxt) is an unusual 4E-BP that promotes translation by also interacting with eIF3. Here we present the crystal structures of the eIF4E-binding regions of the Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) and Caenorhabditis elegans (Ce) Mxt proteins in complex with eIF4E in the cap-bound and cap-free states. The structures reveal unexpected evolutionary plasticity in the eIF4E-binding mode, with a classical bipartite interface for Ce Mxt and a novel tripartite interface for Dm Mxt. Both interfaces comprise a canonical helix and a noncanonical helix that engage the dorsal and lateral surfaces of eIF4E, respectively. Remarkably, Dm Mxt contains a C-terminal auxiliary helix that lies anti-parallel to the canonical helix on the eIF4E dorsal surface. In contrast to the eIF4G and Ce Mxt complexes, the Dm eIF4E–Mxt complexes are resistant to competition by bipartite 4E-BPs, suggesting that Dm Mxt can bind eIF4E when eIF4G binding is inhibited. Our results uncovered unexpected diversity in the binding modes of 4E-BPs, resulting in eIF4E complexes that display differential sensitivity to 4E-BP regulation. PMID:26294658

  14. Analytical applications for pore-forming proteins.

    PubMed

    Kasianowicz, John J; Balijepalli, Arvind K; Ettedgui, Jessica; Forstater, Jacob H; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Huisheng; Robertson, Joseph W F

    2016-03-01

    Proteinaceous nanometer-scale pores are ubiquitous in biology. The canonical ionic channels (e.g., those that transport Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), and Cl(-) across cell membranes) play key roles in many cellular processes, including nerve and muscle activity. Another class of channels includes bacterial pore-forming toxins, which disrupt cell function, and can lead to cell death. We describe here the recent development of these toxins for a wide range of biological sensing applications. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Pore-Forming Toxins edited by Mauro Dalla Serra and Franco Gambale. PMID:26431785

  15. Dynamic interactions of proteins in complex networks

    SciTech Connect

    Appella, E.; Anderson, C.

    2009-10-01

    Recent advances in techniques such as NMR and EPR spectroscopy have enabled the elucidation of how proteins undergo structural changes to act in concert in complex networks. The three minireviews in this series highlight current findings and the capabilities of new methodologies for unraveling the dynamic changes controlling diverse cellular functions. They represent a sampling of the cutting-edge research presented at the 17th Meeting of Methods in Protein Structure Analysis, MPSA2008, in Sapporo, Japan, 26-29 August, 2008 (http://www.iapsap.bnl.gov). The first minireview, by Christensen and Klevit, reports on a structure-based yeast two-hybrid method for identifying E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes that interact with the E3 BRCA1/BARD1 heterodimer ligase to generate either mono- or polyubiquitinated products. This method demonstrated for the first time that the BRCA1/BARD1 E3 can interact with 10 different E2 enzymes. Interestingly, the interaction with multiple E2 enzymes displayed unique ubiquitin-transfer properties, a feature expected to be common among other RING and U-box E3s. Further characterization of new E3 ligases and the E2 enzymes that interact with them will greatly enhance our understanding of ubiquitin transfer and facilitate studies of roles of ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins in protein processing and trafficking. Stein et al., in the second minireview, describe recent progress in defining the binding specificity of different peptide-binding domains. The authors clearly point out that transient peptide interactions mediated by both post-translational modifications and disordered regions ensure a high level of specificity. They postulate that a regulatory code may dictate the number of combinations of domains and post-translational modifications needed to achieve the required level of interaction specificity. Moreover, recognition alone is not enough to obtain a stable complex, especially in a complex cellular environment. Increasing

  16. HOXA9 Forms Triple Complexes with PBX2 and MEIS1 in Myeloid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wei-Fang; Rozenfeld, Sophia; Kwong, Angela; Kömüves, Laszlo G.; Lawrence, H. Jeffrey; Largman, Corey

    1999-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the HOX, MEIS, and PBX homeodomain protein families is associated with leukemias, and retrovirally driven coexpression of HOXA9 and MEIS1 is sufficient to induce myeloid leukemia in mice. Previous studies have demonstrated that HOX-9 and HOX-10 paralog proteins are unique among HOX homeodomain proteins in their capacity to form in vitro cooperative DNA binding complexes with either the PBX or MEIS protein. Furthermore, PBX and MEIS proteins have been shown to form in vivo heterodimeric DNA binding complexes with each other. We now show that in vitro DNA site selection for MEIS1 in the presence of HOXA9 and PBX yields a consensus PBX-HOXA9 site. MEIS1 enhances in vitro HOXA9-PBX protein complex formation in the absence of DNA and forms a trimeric electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) complex with these proteins on an oligonucleotide containing a PBX-HOXA9 site. Myeloid cell nuclear extracts produce EMSA complexes which appear to contain HOXA9, PBX2, and MEIS1, while immunoprecipitation of HOXA9 from these extracts results in coprecipitation of PBX2 and MEIS1. In myeloid cells, HOXA9, MEIS1, and PBX2 are all strongly expressed in the nucleus, where a portion of their signals are colocalized within nuclear speckles. However, cotransfection of HOXA9 and PBX2 with or without MEIS1 minimally influences transcription of a reporter gene containing multiple PBX-HOXA9 binding sites. Taken together, these data suggest that in myeloid leukemia cells MEIS1 forms trimeric complexes with PBX and HOXA9, which in turn can bind to consensus PBX-HOXA9 DNA targets. PMID:10082572

  17. Protein structures in SDS micelle-protein complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, W; Song, P S

    1992-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is used more often than any other detergent as an excellent denaturing or "unfolding" detergent. However, formation of ordered structure (alpha-helix or beta-sheet) in certain peptides is known to be induced by interaction with SDS micelles. The SDS-induced structures formed by these peptides are amphiphilic, having both a hydrophobic and a hydrophilic face. Previous work in this area has revealed that SDS induces helical folding in a wide variety of non-helical proteins. Here, we describe the interaction of several structurally unrelated proteins with SDS micelles and the correlation of these structures to helical amphiphilic regions present in the primary sequence. It is likely that the ability of native nonordered protein structures to form induced amphiphilic ordered structures is rather common. PMID:1600087

  18. PqqD is a novel peptide chaperone that forms a ternary complex with the radical S-adenosylmethionine protein PqqE in the pyrroloquinoline quinone biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Latham, John A; Iavarone, Anthony T; Barr, Ian; Juthani, Prerak V; Klinman, Judith P

    2015-05-15

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is a product of a ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified pathway consisting of five conserved genes, pqqA-E. PqqE is a radical S-adenosylmethionine (RS) protein with a C-terminal SPASM domain, and is proposed to catalyze the formation of a carbon-carbon bond between the glutamate and tyrosine side chains of the peptide substrate PqqA. PqqD is a 10-kDa protein with an unknown function, but is essential for PQQ production. Recently, in Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kp), PqqD and PqqE were shown to interact; however, the stoichiometry and KD were not obtained. Here, we show that the PqqE and PqqD interaction transcends species, also occurring in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 (Me). The stoichiometry of the MePqqD and MePqqE interaction is 1:1 and the KD, determined by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR), was found to be ∼12 μm. Moreover, using SPR and isothermal calorimetry techniques, we establish for the first time that MePqqD binds MePqqA tightly (KD ∼200 nm). The formation of a ternary MePqqA-D-E complex was captured by native mass spectrometry and the KD for the MePqqAD-MePqqE interaction was found to be ∼5 μm. Finally, using a bioinformatic analysis, we found that PqqD orthologues are associated with the RS-SPASM family of proteins (subtilosin, pyrroloquinoline quinone, anaerobic sulfatase maturating enzyme, and mycofactocin), all of which modify either peptides or proteins. In conclusion, we propose that PqqD is a novel peptide chaperone and that PqqD orthologues may play a similar role in peptide modification pathways that use an RS-SPASM protein. PMID:25817994

  19. PqqD Is a Novel Peptide Chaperone That Forms a Ternary Complex with the Radical S-Adenosylmethionine Protein PqqE in the Pyrroloquinoline Quinone Biosynthetic Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Latham, John A.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Barr, Ian; Juthani, Prerak V.; Klinman, Judith P.

    2015-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is a product of a ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified pathway consisting of five conserved genes, pqqA-E. PqqE is a radical S-adenosylmethionine (RS) protein with a C-terminal SPASM domain, and is proposed to catalyze the formation of a carbon-carbon bond between the glutamate and tyrosine side chains of the peptide substrate PqqA. PqqD is a 10-kDa protein with an unknown function, but is essential for PQQ production. Recently, in Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kp), PqqD and PqqE were shown to interact; however, the stoichiometry and KD were not obtained. Here, we show that the PqqE and PqqD interaction transcends species, also occurring in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 (Me). The stoichiometry of the MePqqD and MePqqE interaction is 1:1 and the KD, determined by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR), was found to be ∼12 μm. Moreover, using SPR and isothermal calorimetry techniques, we establish for the first time that MePqqD binds MePqqA tightly (KD ∼200 nm). The formation of a ternary MePqqA-D-E complex was captured by native mass spectrometry and the KD for the MePqqAD-MePqqE interaction was found to be ∼5 μm. Finally, using a bioinformatic analysis, we found that PqqD orthologues are associated with the RS-SPASM family of proteins (subtilosin, pyrroloquinoline quinone, anaerobic sulfatase maturating enzyme, and mycofactocin), all of which modify either peptides or proteins. In conclusion, we propose that PqqD is a novel peptide chaperone and that PqqD orthologues may play a similar role in peptide modification pathways that use an RS-SPASM protein. PMID:25817994

  20. Architecture and function of IFT complex proteins in ciliogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Taschner, Michael; Bhogaraju, Sagar; Lorentzen, Esben

    2014-01-01

    Cilia and flagella (interchangeable terms) are evolutionarily conserved organelles found on many different types of eukaryotic cells where they fulfill important functions in motility, sensory reception and signaling. The process of Intraflagellar Transport (IFT) is of central importance for both the assembly and maintenance of cilia, as it delivers building blocks from their site of synthesis in the cell body to the ciliary assembly site at the tip of the cilium. A key player in this process is the multi-subunit IFT-complex, which acts as an adapter between the motor proteins required for movement and the ciliary cargo proteins. Since the discovery of IFT more than 15 years ago, considerable effort has gone into the purification and characterization of the IFT complex proteins. Even though this has led to very interesting findings and has greatly improved our knowledge of the IFT process, we still know very little about the overall architecture of the IFT complex and the specific functions of the various subunits. In this review we will give an update on the knowledge of the structure and function of individual IFT proteins, and the way these proteins interact to form the complex that facilitates IFT. PMID:22118932

  1. Radiolysis of DNA-protein complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Běgusová, Marie; Gillard, Nathalie; Sy, Denise; Castaing, Bertrand; Charlier, Michel; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie

    2005-02-01

    We discuss here modifications of DNA and protein radiolysis due to the interaction of these two partners in specific complexes. Experimental patterns of frank strand breaks (FSB) and alkali revealed breaks (ARB) obtained for DNA lac operator bound to the lac repressor and for a DNA containing an abasic site analog bound to the formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase are reported. Experimental data are compared to predicted damage distribution obtained using the theoretical model RADACK.

  2. The TCP1γ subunit of Leishmania donovani forms a biologically active homo-oligomeric complex.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar; Mitra, Kalyan; Kuldeep, Jitendra; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Goyal, Neena

    2015-12-01

    Chaperonins are a class of molecular chaperons that encapsulate nascent or stress-denatured proteins and assist their intracellular assembly and folding in an ATP-dependent manner. The ubiquitous eukaryotic chaperonin, TCP1 ring complex is a hetero-oligomeric complex comprising two rings, each formed of eight subunits that may have distinct substrate recognition and ATP hydrolysis properties. In Leishmania, only the TCP1γ subunit has been cloned and characterized. It exhibited differential expression at various growth stages of promastigotes. In the present study, we expressed the TCP1γ subunit in Escherichia coli to investigate whether it forms chaperonin-like complexes and plays a role in protein folding. LdTCP1γ formed high-molecular-weight complexes within E. coli cells as well as in Leishmania cell lysates. The recombinant protein is arranged into two back-to-back rings of seven subunits each, as predicted by homology modelling and observed by negative staining electron microscopy. This morphology is consistent with that of the oligomeric double-ring group I chaperonins found in mitochondria. The LdTCP1γ homo-oligomeric complex hydrolysed ATP, and was active as assayed by luciferase refolding. Thus, the homo-oligomer performs chaperonin reactions without partner subunit(s). Further, co-immunoprecipitation studies revealed that LdTCP1γ interacts with actin and tubulin proteins, suggesting that the complex may have a role in maintaining the structural dynamics of the cytoskeleton of parasites. PMID:26395202

  3. Folding Behaviors of Protein (Lysozyme) Confined in Polyelectrolyte Complex Micelle.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fu-Gen; Jiang, Yao-Wen; Chen, Zhan; Yu, Zhi-Wu

    2016-04-19

    The folding/unfolding behavior of proteins (enzymes) in confined space is important for their properties and functions, but such a behavior remains largely unexplored. In this article, we reported our finding that lysozyme and a double hydrophilic block copolymer, methoxypoly(ethylene glycol)5K-block-poly(l-aspartic acid sodium salt)10 (mPEG(5K)-b-PLD10), can form a polyelectrolyte complex micelle with a particle size of ∼30 nm, as verified by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The unfolding and refolding behaviors of lysozyme molecules in the presence of the copolymer were studied by microcalorimetry and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Upon complex formation with mPEG(5K)-b-PLD10, lysozyme changed from its initial native state to a new partially unfolded state. Compared with its native state, this copolymer-complexed new folding state of lysozyme has different secondary and tertiary structures, a decreased thermostability, and significantly altered unfolding/refolding behaviors. It was found that the native lysozyme exhibited reversible unfolding and refolding upon heating and subsequent cooling, while lysozyme in the new folding state (complexed with the oppositely charged PLD segments of the polymer) could unfold upon heating but could not refold upon subsequent cooling. By employing the heating-cooling-reheating procedure, the prevention of complex formation between lysozyme and polymer due to the salt screening effect was observed, and the resulting uncomplexed lysozyme regained its proper unfolding and refolding abilities upon heating and subsequent cooling. Besides, we also pointed out the important role the length of the PLD segment played during the formation of micelles and the monodispersity of the formed micelles. Furthermore, the lysozyme-mPEG(5K)-b-PLD10 mixtures prepared in this work were all transparent, without the formation of large aggregates or precipitates in solution as frequently observed in other protein

  4. The Ndc80 kinetochore complex forms oligomeric arrays along microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Alushin, Gregory M.; Ramey, Vincent H.; Pasqualato, Sebastiano; Ball, David A.; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Musacchio, Andrea; Nogales, Eva

    2010-01-01

    The Ndc80 complex is a key site of regulated kinetochore-microtubule attachment, but the molecular mechanism underlying its function remains unknown. Here we present a subnanometer resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the human Ndc80 complex bound to microtubules, sufficient for precise docking of crystal structures of the component proteins. We find that Ndc80 binds the microtubule with a tubulin monomer repeat, recognizing α- and β-tubulin at both intra- and inter-dimer interfaces in a manner that is sensitive to tubulin conformation. Furthermore, Ndc80 complexes self-associate along protofilaments via interactions mediated by the amino-terminal tail of the Ndc80 protein, the site of phospho-regulation by the Aurora B kinase. Ndc80's mode of interaction with the microtubule and its oligomerization suggest a mechanism by which Aurora B could regulate the stability of load-bearing Ndc80-microtubule attachments. PMID:20944740

  5. Exploration of the dynamic properties of protein complexes predicted from spatially constrained protein-protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Yen, Eric A; Tsay, Aaron; Waldispuhl, Jerome; Vogel, Jackie

    2014-05-01

    Protein complexes are not static, but rather highly dynamic with subunits that undergo 1-dimensional diffusion with respect to each other. Interactions within protein complexes are modulated through regulatory inputs that alter interactions and introduce new components and deplete existing components through exchange. While it is clear that the structure and function of any given protein complex is coupled to its dynamical properties, it remains a challenge to predict the possible conformations that complexes can adopt. Protein-fragment Complementation Assays detect physical interactions between protein pairs constrained to ≤8 nm from each other in living cells. This method has been used to build networks composed of 1000s of pair-wise interactions. Significantly, these networks contain a wealth of dynamic information, as the assay is fully reversible and the proteins are expressed in their natural context. In this study, we describe a method that extracts this valuable information in the form of predicted conformations, allowing the user to explore the conformational landscape, to search for structures that correlate with an activity state, and estimate the abundance of conformations in the living cell. The generator is based on a Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation that uses the interaction dataset as input and is constrained by the physical resolution of the assay. We applied this method to an 18-member protein complex composed of the seven core proteins of the budding yeast Arp2/3 complex and 11 associated regulators and effector proteins. We generated 20,480 output structures and identified conformational states using principle component analysis. We interrogated the conformation landscape and found evidence of symmetry breaking, a mixture of likely active and inactive conformational states and dynamic exchange of the core protein Arc15 between core and regulatory components. Our method provides a novel tool for prediction and visualization of the hidden

  6. PCDq: human protein complex database with quality index which summarizes different levels of evidences of protein complexes predicted from H-Invitational protein-protein interactions integrative dataset

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Proteins interact with other proteins or biomolecules in complexes to perform cellular functions. Existing protein-protein interaction (PPI) databases and protein complex databases for human proteins are not organized to provide protein complex information or facilitate the discovery of novel subunits. Data integration of PPIs focused specifically on protein complexes, subunits, and their functions. Predicted candidate complexes or subunits are also important for experimental biologists. Description Based on integrated PPI data and literature, we have developed a human protein complex database with a complex quality index (PCDq), which includes both known and predicted complexes and subunits. We integrated six PPI data (BIND, DIP, MINT, HPRD, IntAct, and GNP_Y2H), and predicted human protein complexes by finding densely connected regions in the PPI networks. They were curated with the literature so that missing proteins were complemented and some complexes were merged, resulting in 1,264 complexes comprising 9,268 proteins with 32,198 PPIs. The evidence level of each subunit was assigned as a categorical variable. This indicated whether it was a known subunit, and a specific function was inferable from sequence or network analysis. To summarize the categories of all the subunits in a complex, we devised a complex quality index (CQI) and assigned it to each complex. We examined the proportion of consistency of Gene Ontology (GO) terms among protein subunits of a complex. Next, we compared the expression profiles of the corresponding genes and found that many proteins in larger complexes tend to be expressed cooperatively at the transcript level. The proportion of duplicated genes in a complex was evaluated. Finally, we identified 78 hypothetical proteins that were annotated as subunits of 82 complexes, which included known complexes. Of these hypothetical proteins, after our prediction had been made, four were reported to be actual subunits of the

  7. Protein corona – from molecular adsorption to physiological complexity

    PubMed Central

    Docter, Dominic; Maskos, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Summary In biological environments, nanoparticles are enshrouded by a layer of biomolecules, predominantly proteins, mediating its subsequent interactions with cells. Detecting this protein corona, understanding its formation with regards to nanoparticle (NP) and protein properties, and elucidating its biological implications were central aims of bio-related nano-research throughout the past years. Here, we discuss the mechanistic parameters that are involved in the protein corona formation and the consequences of this corona formation for both, the particle, and the protein. We review consequences of corona formation for colloidal stability and discuss the role of functional groups and NP surface functionalities in shaping NP–protein interactions. We also elaborate the recent advances demonstrating the strong involvement of Coulomb-type interactions between NPs and charged patches on the protein surface. Moreover, we discuss novel aspects related to the complexity of the protein corona forming under physiological conditions in full serum. Specifically, we address the relation between particle size and corona composition and the latest findings that help to shed light on temporal evolution of the full serum corona for the first time. Finally, we discuss the most recent advances regarding the molecular-scale mechanistic role of the protein corona in cellular uptake of NPs. PMID:25977856

  8. A Bacillus megaterium System for the Production of Recombinant Proteins and Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Biedendieck, Rebekka

    2016-01-01

    For many years the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus megaterium has been used for the production and secretion of recombinant proteins. For this purpose it was systematically optimized. Plasmids with different inducible promoter systems, with different compatible origins, with small tags for protein purification and with various specific signals for protein secretion were combined with genetically improved host strains. Finally, the development of appropriate cultivation conditions for the production strains established this organism as a bacterial cell factory even for large proteins. Along with the overproduction of individual proteins the organism is now also used for the simultaneous coproduction of up to 14 recombinant proteins, multiple subsequently interacting or forming protein complexes. Some of these recombinant strains are successfully used for bioconversion or the biosynthesis of valuable components including vitamins. The titers in the g per liter scale for the intra- and extracellular recombinant protein production prove the high potential of B. megaterium for industrial applications. It is currently further enhanced for the production of recombinant proteins and multi-subunit protein complexes using directed genetic engineering approaches based on transcriptome, proteome, metabolome and fluxome data. PMID:27165321

  9. High-resolution diffraction from crystals of a membrane-protein complex: bacterial outer membrane protein OmpC complexed with the antibacterial eukaryotic protein lactoferrin

    SciTech Connect

    Sundara Baalaji, N.; Acharya, K. Ravi; Singh, T. P.; Krishnaswamy, S. E-mail: mkukrishna@rediffmail.com

    2005-08-01

    Crystals of the complex formed between the bacterial membrane protein OmpC and the antibacterial protein lactoferrin suitable for high-resolution structure determination have been obtained. The crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 116.3, c = 152.4 Å. Crystals of the complex formed between the outer membrane protein OmpC from Escherichia coli and the eukaryotic antibacterial protein lactoferrin from Camelus dromedarius (camel) have been obtained using a detergent environment. Initial data processing suggests that the crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 116.3, c = 152.4 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. This indicated a Matthews coefficient (V{sub M}) of 3.3 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}, corresponding to a possible molecular complex involving four molecules of lactoferrin and two porin trimers in the unit cell (4832 amino acids; 533.8 kDa) with 63% solvent content. A complete set of diffraction data was collected to 3 Å resolution at 100 K. Structure determination by molecular replacement is in progress. Structural study of this first surface-exposed membrane-protein complex with an antibacterial protein will provide insights into the mechanism of action of OmpC as well as lactoferrin.

  10. Quality Control of a Cytoplasmic Protein Complex

    PubMed Central

    Scazzari, Mario; Amm, Ingo; Wolf, Dieter H.

    2015-01-01

    For the assembly of protein complexes in the cell, the presence of stoichiometric amounts of the respective protein subunits is of utmost importance. A surplus of any of the subunits may trigger unspecific and harmful protein interactions and has to be avoided. A stoichiometric amount of subunits must finally be reached via transcriptional, translational, and/or post-translational regulation. Synthesis of saturated 16 and 18 carbon fatty acids is carried out by fatty acid synthase: in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a 2.6-MDa molecular mass assembly containing six protomers each of two different subunits, Fas1 (β) and Fas2 (α). The (α)6(β)6 complex carries six copies of all eight enzymatic activities required for fatty acid synthesis. The FAS1 and FAS2 genes in yeast are unlinked and map on two different chromosomes. Here we study the fate of the α-subunit of the complex, Fas2, when its partner, the β-subunit Fas1, is absent. Individual subunits of fatty acid synthase are proteolytically degraded when the respective partner is missing. Elimination of Fas2 is achieved by the proteasome. Here we show that a ubiquitin transfer machinery is required for Fas2 elimination. The major ubiquitin ligase targeting the superfluous Fas2 subunit to the proteasome is Ubr1. The ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes Ubc2 and Ubc4 assist the degradation process. The AAA-ATPase Cdc48 and the Hsp70 chaperone Ssa1 are crucially involved in the elimination of Fas2. PMID:25564609

  11. Spatial Complexity of Soil Organic Matter Forms at Nanometre Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann,J.; Solomon, D.; Kinyangi, J.; Dathe, L.; Wirick, S.; Jacobsen, C.

    2008-01-01

    Organic matter in soil has been suggested to be composed of a complex mixture of identifiable biopolymers1 rather than a chemically complex humic material2. Despite the importance of the spatial arrangement of organic matter forms in soil3, its characterization has been hampered by the lack of a method for analysis at fine scales. X-ray spectromicroscopy has enabled the identification of spatial variability of organic matter forms, but was limited to extracted soil particles4 and individual micropores within aggregates5, 6. Here, we use synchrotron-based near-edge X-ray spectromicroscopy7 of thin sections of entire and intact free microaggregates6 to demonstrate that on spatial scales below 50 nm resolution, highly variable yet identifiable organic matter forms, such as plant or microbial biopolymers, can be found in soils at distinct locations of the mineral assemblage. Organic carbon forms detected at this spatial scale had no similarity to organic carbon forms of total soil. In contrast, we find that organic carbon forms of total soil were remarkably similar between soils from several temperate and tropical forests with very distinct vegetation composition and soil mineralogy. Spatial information on soil organic matter forms at the scale provided here could help to identify processes of organic matter cycling in soil, such as carbon stability or sequestration and responses to a changing climate.

  12. Algodystrophy: complex regional pain syndrome and incomplete forms

    PubMed Central

    Giannotti, Stefano; Bottai, Vanna; Dell’Osso, Giacomo; Bugelli, Giulia; Celli, Fabio; Cazzella, Niki; Guido, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Summary The algodystrophy, also known as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), is a painful disease characterized by erythema, edema, functional impairment, sensory and vasomotor disturbance. The diagnosis of CRPS is based solely on clinical signs and symptoms, and for exclusion compared to other forms of chronic pain. There is not a specific diagnostic procedure; careful clinical evaluation and additional test should lead to an accurate diagnosis. There are similar forms of chronic pain known as bone marrow edema syndrome, in which is absent the history of trauma or triggering events and the skin dystrophic changes and vasomotor alterations. These incomplete forms are self-limited, and surgical treatment is generally not needed. It is still controversial, if these forms represent a distinct self-limiting entity or an incomplete variant of CRPS. In painful unexplained conditions such as frozen shoulder, post-operative stiff shoulder or painful knee prosthesis, the algodystrophy, especially in its incomplete forms, could represent the cause. PMID:27252736

  13. Algodystrophy: complex regional pain syndrome and incomplete forms.

    PubMed

    Giannotti, Stefano; Bottai, Vanna; Dell'Osso, Giacomo; Bugelli, Giulia; Celli, Fabio; Cazzella, Niki; Guido, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    The algodystrophy, also known as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), is a painful disease characterized by erythema, edema, functional impairment, sensory and vasomotor disturbance. The diagnosis of CRPS is based solely on clinical signs and symptoms, and for exclusion compared to other forms of chronic pain. There is not a specific diagnostic procedure; careful clinical evaluation and additional test should lead to an accurate diagnosis. There are similar forms of chronic pain known as bone marrow edema syndrome, in which is absent the history of trauma or triggering events and the skin dystrophic changes and vasomotor alterations. These incomplete forms are self-limited, and surgical treatment is generally not needed. It is still controversial, if these forms represent a distinct self-limiting entity or an incomplete variant of CRPS. In painful unexplained conditions such as frozen shoulder, post-operative stiff shoulder or painful knee prosthesis, the algodystrophy, especially in its incomplete forms, could represent the cause. PMID:27252736

  14. Heterodimeric protein complex identification by naïve Bayes classifiers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein complexes are basic cellular entities that carry out the functions of their components. It can be found that in databases of protein complexes of yeast like CYC2008, the major type of known protein complexes is heterodimeric complexes. Although a number of methods for trying to predict sets of proteins that form arbitrary types of protein complexes simultaneously have been proposed, it can be found that they often fail to predict heterodimeric complexes. Results In this paper, we have designed several features characterizing heterodimeric protein complexes based on genomic data sets, and proposed a supervised-learning method for the prediction of heterodimeric protein complexes. This method learns the parameters of the features, which are embedded in the naïve Bayes classifier. The log-likelihood ratio derived from the naïve Bayes classifier with the parameter values obtained by maximum likelihood estimation gives the score of a given pair of proteins to predict whether the pair is a heterodimeric complex or not. A five-fold cross-validation shows good performance on yeast. The trained classifiers also show higher predictability than various existing algorithms on yeast data sets with approximate and exact matching criteria. Conclusions Heterodimeric protein complex prediction is a rather harder problem than heteromeric protein complex prediction because heterodimeric protein complex is topologically simpler. However, it turns out that by designing features specialized for heterodimeric protein complexes, predictability of them can be improved. Thus, the design of more sophisticate features for heterodimeric protein complexes as well as the accumulation of more accurate and useful genome-wide data sets will lead to higher predictability of heterodimeric protein complexes. Our tool can be downloaded from http://imi.kyushu-u.ac.jp/~om/. PMID:24299017

  15. Isotopically coded cleavable cross-linker for studying protein-protein interaction and protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V; Olkhovik, Vyacheslav K; Borchers, Christoph H

    2005-08-01

    An emerging approach for studying protein-protein interaction in complexes is the combination of chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometric analysis of the cross-linked peptides (cross-links) obtained after proteolysis of the complex. This approach, however, has several challenges and limitations, including the difficulty of detecting the cross-links, the potential interference from non-informative "cross-linked peptides" (dead end and intrapeptide cross-links), and unambiguous identification of the cross-links by mass spectrometry. Thus, we have synthesized an isotopically coded ethylene glycol bis(succinimidylsuccinate) derivate (D12-EGS), which contains 12 deuterium atoms for easy detection of cross-links when applied in a 1:1 mixture with its H12 counterpart and is also cleavable for releasing the cross-linked peptides allowing unambiguous identification by MS sequencing. Moreover, hydrolytic cleavage permits rapid distinguishing between different types of cross-links. Cleavage of a dead end cross-link produces a doublet with peaks 4.03 Da apart, with the lower peak appearing at a molecular mass 162 Da lower than the mass of the H12 form of the original cross-linked peptide. Cleavage of an intrapeptide cross-link leads to a doublet 8.05 Da apart and 62 Da lower than the molecular mass of the H12 form of the original cross-linked peptide. Cleavage of an interpeptide cross-link forms a pair of 4.03-Da doublets, with the lower mass member of each pair each shifted up from its unmodified molecular weight by 82 Da because of the attached portion of the cross-linker. All of this information has been incorporated into a software algorithm allowing automatic screening and detection of cross-links and cross-link types in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectra. In summary, the ease of detection of these species through the use of an isotopically coded cleavable cross-linker and our software algorithm, followed by mass spectrometric sequencing of the

  16. Theory of polyelectrolyte adsorption on heterogeneously charged surfaces applied to soluble protein-polyelectrolyte complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, R.; Weinbreck, F.; de Kruif, C. G.

    2003-03-01

    Existing theoretical approaches to polymer adsorption on heterogeneous surfaces are applied to the problems of polyelectrolyte and polyampholyte adsorption on randomly charged surfaces. Also, analytical estimates are developed for the critical pH at which weakly charged polyelectrolytes and globular proteins start forming soluble complexes. Below a critical salt concentration, soluble complexes form "on the wrong side" of the protein isoelectric point due to the heterogeneity of the protein surface charge distribution. The analytical estimates are consistent with experimental data on soluble complexes in mixtures of gum arabic and whey protein isolate.

  17. GalaxyRefineComplex: Refinement of protein-protein complex model structures driven by interface repacking

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Lim; Lee, Hasup; Seok, Chaok

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein docking methods have been widely used to gain an atomic-level understanding of protein interactions. However, docking methods that employ low-resolution energy functions are popular because of computational efficiency. Low-resolution docking tends to generate protein complex structures that are not fully optimized. GalaxyRefineComplex takes such low-resolution docking structures and refines them to improve model accuracy in terms of both interface contact and inter-protein orientation. This refinement method allows flexibility at the protein interface and in the overall docking structure to capture conformational changes that occur upon binding. Symmetric refinement is also provided for symmetric homo-complexes. This method was validated by refining models produced by available docking programs, including ZDOCK and M-ZDOCK, and was successfully applied to CAPRI targets in a blind fashion. An example of using the refinement method with an existing docking method for ligand binding mode prediction of a drug target is also presented. A web server that implements the method is freely available at http://galaxy.seoklab.org/refinecomplex. PMID:27535582

  18. GalaxyRefineComplex: Refinement of protein-protein complex model structures driven by interface repacking.

    PubMed

    Heo, Lim; Lee, Hasup; Seok, Chaok

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein docking methods have been widely used to gain an atomic-level understanding of protein interactions. However, docking methods that employ low-resolution energy functions are popular because of computational efficiency. Low-resolution docking tends to generate protein complex structures that are not fully optimized. GalaxyRefineComplex takes such low-resolution docking structures and refines them to improve model accuracy in terms of both interface contact and inter-protein orientation. This refinement method allows flexibility at the protein interface and in the overall docking structure to capture conformational changes that occur upon binding. Symmetric refinement is also provided for symmetric homo-complexes. This method was validated by refining models produced by available docking programs, including ZDOCK and M-ZDOCK, and was successfully applied to CAPRI targets in a blind fashion. An example of using the refinement method with an existing docking method for ligand binding mode prediction of a drug target is also presented. A web server that implements the method is freely available at http://galaxy.seoklab.org/refinecomplex. PMID:27535582

  19. Optimized Affinity Capture of Yeast Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    LaCava, John; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Rout, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe an affinity isolation protocol. It uses cryomilled yeast cell powder for producing cell extracts and antibody-conjugated paramagnetic beads for affinity capture. Guidelines for determining the optimal extraction solvent composition are provided. Captured proteins are eluted in a denaturing solvent (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis sample buffer) for gel-based proteomic analyses. Although the procedures can be modified to use other sources of cell extract and other forms of affinity media, to date we have consistently obtained the best results with the method presented. PMID:27371596

  20. Neighborhood Walkable Urban Form and C-Reactive Protein

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Walkable urban form predicts physical activity and lower body mass index, which lower C-reactive protein (CRP). However, urban form is also related to pollution, noise, social and health behavior, crowding, and other stressors, which may complement or contravene walka...

  1. Characterization of Protein Complexes and Subcomplexes in Protein-Protein Interaction Databases

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Nazar; Mohamed, Elfadil A.; Mora, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The identification and characterization of protein complexes implicated in protein-protein interaction data are crucial to the understanding of the molecular events under normal and abnormal physiological conditions. This paper provides a novel characterization of subcomplexes in protein interaction databases, stressing definition and representation issues, quantification, biological validation, network metrics, motifs, modularity, and gene ontology (GO) terms. The paper introduces the concept of “nested group” as a way to represent subcomplexes and estimates that around 15% of those nested group with the higher Jaccard index may be a result of data artifacts in protein interaction databases, while a number of them can be found in biologically important modular structures or dynamic structures. We also found that network centralities, enrichment in essential proteins, GO terms related to regulation, imperfect 5-clique motifs, and higher GO homogeneity can be used to identify proteins in nested complexes. PMID:25722891

  2. Identification and analysis of multi-protein complexes in placenta.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuqiang; Wang, Ling; Xu, Zhiyang; Liang, Gaolin

    2013-01-01

    Placental malfunction induces pregnancy disorders which contribute to life-threatening complications for both the mother and the fetus. Identification and characterization of placental multi-protein complexes is an important step to integratedly understand the protein-protein interaction networks in placenta which determine placental function. In this study, blue native/sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN/SDS-PAGE) and Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) were used to screen the multi-protein complexes in placenta. 733 unique proteins and 34 known and novel heterooligomeric multi-protein complexes including mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, integrin complexes, proteasome complexes, histone complex, and heat shock protein complexes were identified. A novel protein complex, which involves clathrin and small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channel protein 2, was identified and validated by antibody based gel shift assay, co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence staining. These results suggest that BN/SDS-PAGE, when integrated with LC-MS/MS, is a very powerful and versatile tool for the investigation of placental protein complexes. This work paves the way for deeper functional characterization of the placental protein complexes associated with pregnancy disorders. PMID:23638173

  3. Retinal Cone Photoreceptors Require Phosducin-Like Protein 1 for G Protein Complex Assembly and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Christopher M.; Kolesnikov, Alexander V.; Blake, Devon R.; Chen, Ching-Kang; Baehr, Wolfgang; Kefalov, Vladimir J.; Willardson, Barry M.

    2015-01-01

    G protein β subunits (Gβ) play essential roles in phototransduction as part of G protein βγ (Gβγ) and regulator of G protein signaling 9 (RGS9)-Gβ5 heterodimers. Both are obligate dimers that rely on the cytosolic chaperone CCT and its co-chaperone PhLP1 to form complexes from their nascent polypeptides. The importance of PhLP1 in the assembly process was recently demonstrated in vivo in a retinal rod-specific deletion of the Phlp1 gene. To test whether this is a general mechanism that also applies to other cell types, we disrupted the Phlp1 gene specifically in mouse cones and measured the effects on G protein expression and cone visual signal transduction. In PhLP1-deficient cones, expression of cone transducin (Gt2) and RGS9-Gβ5 subunits was dramatically reduced, resulting in a 27-fold decrease in sensitivity and a 38-fold delay in cone photoresponse recovery. These results demonstrate the essential role of PhLP1 in cone G protein complex formation. Our findings reveal a common mechanism of Gβγ and RGS9-Gβ5 assembly in rods and cones, highlighting the importance of PhLP1 and CCT-mediated Gβ complex formation in G protein signaling. PMID:25659125

  4. Characterization of human glucocorticoid receptor complexes formed with DNA fragments containing or lacking glucocorticoid response elements

    SciTech Connect

    Tully, D.B.; Cidlowski, J.A. )

    1989-03-07

    Sucrose density gradient shift assays were used to study the interactions of human glucocorticoid receptors (GR) with small DNA fragments either containing or lacking glucocorticoid response element (GRE) DNA consensus sequences. When crude cytoplasmic extracts containing ({sup 3}H)triamcinolone acetonide (({sup 3}H)TA) labeled GR were incubated with unlabeled DNA under conditions of DNA excess, a GRE-containing DNA fragment obtained from the 5' long terminal repeat of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV LTR) formed a stable 12-16S complex with activated, but not nonactivated, ({sup 3}H)TA receptor. By contrast, if the cytosols were treated with calf thymus DNA-cellulose to deplete non-GR-DNA-binding proteins prior to heat activation, a smaller 7-10S complex was formed with the MMTV LTR DNA fragment. Activated ({sup 3}H)TA receptor from DNA-cellulose pretreated cytosols also interacted with two similarly sized fragments from pBR322 DNA. Stability of the complexes formed between GR and these three DNA fragments was strongly affected by even moderate alterations in either the salt concentration or the pH of the gradient buffer. Under all conditions tested, the complex formed with the MMTV LTR DNA fragment was more stable than the complexes formed with either of the pBR322 DNA fragments. Together these observations indicate that the formation of stable complexes between activated GR and isolated DNA fragments requires the presence of GRE consensus sequences in the DNA.

  5. The Network Organization of Cancer-associated Protein Complexes in Human Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing; Lee, Sang Hoon; Huss, Mikael; Holme, Petter

    2013-04-01

    Differential gene expression profiles for detecting disease genes have been studied intensively in systems biology. However, it is known that various biological functions achieved by proteins follow from the ability of the protein to form complexes by physically binding to each other. In other words, the functional units are often protein complexes rather than individual proteins. Thus, we seek to replace the perspective of disease-related genes by disease-related complexes, exemplifying with data on 39 human solid tissue cancers and their original normal tissues. To obtain the differential abundance levels of protein complexes, we apply an optimization algorithm to genome-wide differential expression data. From the differential abundance of complexes, we extract tissue- and cancer-selective complexes, and investigate their relevance to cancer. The method is supported by a clustering tendency of bipartite cancer-complex relationships, as well as a more concrete and realistic approach to disease-related proteomics.

  6. HKC: an algorithm to predict protein complexes in protein-protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomin; Wang, Zhengzhi; Ye, Jun

    2011-01-01

    With the availability of more and more genome-scale protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks, research interests gradually shift to Systematic Analysis on these large data sets. A key topic is to predict protein complexes in PPI networks by identifying clusters that are densely connected within themselves but sparsely connected with the rest of the network. In this paper, we present a new topology-based algorithm, HKC, to detect protein complexes in genome-scale PPI networks. HKC mainly uses the concepts of highest k-core and cohesion to predict protein complexes by identifying overlapping clusters. The experiments on two data sets and two benchmarks show that our algorithm has relatively high F-measure and exhibits better performance compared with some other methods. PMID:22174556

  7. Detecting overlapping protein complexes by rough-fuzzy clustering in protein-protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Gao, Lin; Dong, Jihua; Yang, Xiaofei

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel rough-fuzzy clustering (RFC) method to detect overlapping protein complexes in protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. RFC focuses on fuzzy relation model rather than graph model by integrating fuzzy sets and rough sets, employs the upper and lower approximations of rough sets to deal with overlapping complexes, and calculates the number of complexes automatically. Fuzzy relation between proteins is established and then transformed into fuzzy equivalence relation. Non-overlapping complexes correspond to equivalence classes satisfying certain equivalence relation. To obtain overlapping complexes, we calculate the similarity between one protein and each complex, and then determine whether the protein belongs to one or multiple complexes by computing the ratio of each similarity to maximum similarity. To validate RFC quantitatively, we test it in Gavin, Collins, Krogan and BioGRID datasets. Experiment results show that there is a good correspondence to reference complexes in MIPS and SGD databases. Then we compare RFC with several previous methods, including ClusterONE, CMC, MCL, GCE, OSLOM and CFinder. Results show the precision, sensitivity and separation are 32.4%, 42.9% and 81.9% higher than mean of the five methods in four weighted networks, and are 0.5%, 11.2% and 66.1% higher than mean of the six methods in five unweighted networks. Our method RFC works well for protein complexes detection and provides a new insight of network division, and it can also be applied to identify overlapping community structure in social networks and LFR benchmark networks. PMID:24642838

  8. Detecting Overlapping Protein Complexes by Rough-Fuzzy Clustering in Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Gao, Lin; Dong, Jihua; Yang, Xiaofei

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel rough-fuzzy clustering (RFC) method to detect overlapping protein complexes in protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. RFC focuses on fuzzy relation model rather than graph model by integrating fuzzy sets and rough sets, employs the upper and lower approximations of rough sets to deal with overlapping complexes, and calculates the number of complexes automatically. Fuzzy relation between proteins is established and then transformed into fuzzy equivalence relation. Non-overlapping complexes correspond to equivalence classes satisfying certain equivalence relation. To obtain overlapping complexes, we calculate the similarity between one protein and each complex, and then determine whether the protein belongs to one or multiple complexes by computing the ratio of each similarity to maximum similarity. To validate RFC quantitatively, we test it in Gavin, Collins, Krogan and BioGRID datasets. Experiment results show that there is a good correspondence to reference complexes in MIPS and SGD databases. Then we compare RFC with several previous methods, including ClusterONE, CMC, MCL, GCE, OSLOM and CFinder. Results show the precision, sensitivity and separation are 32.4%, 42.9% and 81.9% higher than mean of the five methods in four weighted networks, and are 0.5%, 11.2% and 66.1% higher than mean of the six methods in five unweighted networks. Our method RFC works well for protein complexes detection and provides a new insight of network division, and it can also be applied to identify overlapping community structure in social networks and LFR benchmark networks. PMID:24642838

  9. Assembly and solution structure of the core retromer protein complex.

    PubMed

    Norwood, Suzanne J; Shaw, Daniel J; Cowieson, Nathan P; Owen, David J; Teasdale, Rohan D; Collins, Brett M

    2011-01-01

    Retromer is a peripheral membrane protein complex that has pleiotropic roles in endosomal membrane trafficking. The core of retromer possesses three subunits, VPS35, VPS29 and VPS26, that play different roles in binding to cargo, regulatory proteins and complex stabilization. We have performed an investigation of the thermodynamics of core retromer assembly using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) demonstrating that VPS35 acts as the central subunit to which VPS29 and VPS26 bind independently. Furthermore, we confirm that the conserved PRLYL motif of the large VPS35 subunit is critical for direct VPS26 interaction. Heat capacity measurements of VPS29 and VPS26 binding to VPS35 indicate extensive binding interfaces and suggest conformational alterations in VPS29 or VPS35 upon complex formation. Solution studies of the retromer core using small-angle X-ray scattering allow us to propose a model whereby VPS35 forms an extended platform with VPS29 and VPS26 bound at distal ends, with the potential for forming dimeric assemblies. PMID:20875039

  10. A secretory kinase complex regulates extracellular protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jixin; Xiao, Junyu; Tagliabracci, Vincent S; Wen, Jianzhong; Rahdar, Meghdad; Dixon, Jack E

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous extracellular phosphoproteins have been identified, the protein kinases within the secretory pathway have only recently been discovered, and their regulation is virtually unexplored. Fam20C is the physiological Golgi casein kinase, which phosphorylates many secreted proteins and is critical for proper biomineralization. Fam20A, a Fam20C paralog, is essential for enamel formation, but the biochemical function of Fam20A is unknown. Here we show that Fam20A potentiates Fam20C kinase activity and promotes the phosphorylation of enamel matrix proteins in vitro and in cells. Mechanistically, Fam20A is a pseudokinase that forms a functional complex with Fam20C, and this complex enhances extracellular protein phosphorylation within the secretory pathway. Our findings shed light on the molecular mechanism by which Fam20C and Fam20A collaborate to control enamel formation, and provide the first insight into the regulation of secretory pathway phosphorylation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06120.001 PMID:25789606

  11. Supercharging Protein Complexes from Aqueous Solution Disrupts their Native Conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, Harry J.; Kintzer, Alexander F.; Feld, Geoffrey K.; Cassou, Catherine A.; Krantz, Bryan A.; Williams, Evan R.

    2012-02-01

    The effects of aqueous solution supercharging on the solution- and gas-phase structures of two protein complexes were investigated using traveling-wave ion mobility-mass spectrometry (TWIMS-MS). Low initial concentrations of m-nitrobenzyl alcohol ( m-NBA) in the electrospray ionization (ESI) solution can effectively increase the charge of concanavalin A dimers and tetramers, but at higher m-NBA concentrations, the increases in charge are accompanied by solution-phase dissociation of the dimers and up to a ~22% increase in the collision cross section (CCS) of the tetramers. With just 0.8% m-NBA added to the ESI solution of a ~630 kDa anthrax toxin octamer complex, the average charge is increased by only ~4% compared with the "native" complex, but it is sufficiently destabilized so that extensive gas-phase fragmentation occurs in the relatively high pressure regions of the TWIMS device. Anthrax toxin complexes exist in either a prechannel or a transmembrane channel state. With m-NBA, the prechannel state of the complex has the same CCS/charge ratio in the gas phase as the transmembrane channel state of the same complex formed without m-NBA, yet undergoes extensive dissociation, indicating that destabilization from supercharging occurs in the ESI droplet prior to ion formation and is not a result of Coulombic destabilization in the gas phase as a result of higher charging. These results demonstrate that the supercharging of large protein complexes is the result of conformational changes induced by the reagents in the ESI droplets, where enrichment of the supercharging reagent during droplet evaporation occurs.

  12. Extracellular matrix-associated proteins form an integral and dynamic system during Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weipeng; Sun, Jin; Ding, Wei; Lin, Jinshui; Tian, Renmao; Lu, Liang; Liu, Xiaofen; Shen, Xihui; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Though the essential role of extracellular matrix in biofilm development has been extensively documented, the function of matrix-associated proteins is elusive. Determining the dynamics of matrix-associated proteins would be a useful way to reveal their functions in biofilm development. Therefore, we applied iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics to evaluate matrix-associated proteins isolated from different phases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC27853 biofilms. Among the identified 389 proteins, 54 changed their abundance significantly. The increased abundance of stress resistance and nutrient metabolism-related proteins over the period of biofilm development was consistent with the hypothesis that biofilm matrix forms micro-environments in which cells are optimally organized to resist stress and use available nutrients. Secreted proteins, including novel putative effectors of the type III secretion system were identified, suggesting that the dynamics of pathogenesis-related proteins in the matrix are associated with biofilm development. Interestingly, there was a good correlation between the abundance changes of matrix-associated proteins and their expression. Further analysis revealed complex interactions among these modulated proteins, and the mutation of selected proteins attenuated biofilm development. Collectively, this work presents the first dynamic picture of matrix-associated proteins during biofilm development, and provides evidences that the matrix-associated proteins may form an integral and well regulated system that contributes to stress resistance, nutrient acquisition, pathogenesis and the stability of the biofilm. PMID:26029669

  13. Modeling and fitting protein-protein complexes to predict change of binding energy

    PubMed Central

    Dourado, Daniel F.A.R.; Flores, Samuel Coulbourn

    2016-01-01

    It is possible to accurately and economically predict change in protein-protein interaction energy upon mutation (ΔΔG), when a high-resolution structure of the complex is available. This is of growing usefulness for design of high-affinity or otherwise modified binding proteins for therapeutic, diagnostic, industrial, and basic science applications. Recently the field has begun to pursue ΔΔG prediction for homology modeled complexes, but so far this has worked mostly for cases of high sequence identity. If the interacting proteins have been crystallized in free (uncomplexed) form, in a majority of cases it is possible to find a structurally similar complex which can be used as the basis for template-based modeling. We describe how to use MMB to create such models, and then use them to predict ΔΔG, using a dataset consisting of free target structures, co-crystallized template complexes with sequence identify with respect to the targets as low as 44%, and experimental ΔΔG measurements. We obtain similar results by fitting to a low-resolution Cryo-EM density map. Results suggest that other structural constraints may lead to a similar outcome, making the method even more broadly applicable. PMID:27173910

  14. RNA and protein complexes of trp RNA-binding attenuation protein characterized by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Akashi, Satoko; Watanabe, Masahiro; Heddle, Jonathan G; Unzai, Satoru; Park, Sam-Yong; Tame, Jeremy R H

    2009-03-15

    We have characterized both wild-type and mutant TRAP (trp RNA-binding attenuation protein) from Bacillus stearothermophilus , and their complexes with RNA or its regulator anti-TRAP protein (AT), by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Wild-type TRAP mainly forms homo-11mer rings. The mutant used carries three copies of the TRAP monomer on a single polypeptide chain so that it associates to form a 12mer ring with four polypeptide molecules. Mass spectra showed that both the wild-type TRAP 11mer and the mutant TRAP 12mer can bind a cognate single-stranded RNA molecule with a molar ratio of 1:1. The crystal structure of wild-type TRAP complexed with AT shows a TRAP 12mer ring surrounded by six AT trimers. However, nanoESI-MS of wild-type TRAP mixed with AT shows four species with different binding stoichiometries, and the complex observed by crystallography represents only a minor species in solution; most of the TRAP remains in an 11mer ring form. Mass spectra of mutant TRAP showed only a single species, TRAP 12mer + six copies of AT trimer, which is observed by crystallography. These results suggest that crystallization selects only the most symmetrical TRAP-AT complex from the solution, whereas ESI-MS can take a "snapshot" of all the species in solution. PMID:19219981

  15. Observation of two different fractal structures in nanoparticle, protein and surfactant complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Mehan, Sumit Kumar, Sugam Aswal, V. K.

    2014-04-24

    Small angle neutron scattering has been carried out from a complex of nanoparticle, protein and surfactant. Although all the components are similarly (anionic) charged, we have observed strong interactions in their complex formation. It is characterized by the coexistence of two different mass fractal structures. The first fractal structure is originated from the protein and surfactant interaction and second from the depletion effect of first fractal structure leading the nanoparticle aggregation. The fractal structure of protein-surfactant complex represents to bead necklace structure of micelle-like clusters of surfactant formed along the unfolded protein chain. Its fractal dimension depends on the surfactant to protein ratio (r) and decreases with the increase in r. However, fractal dimension of nanoparticle aggregates in nanoparticle-protein complex is found to be independent of protein concentration and governed by the diffusion limited aggregation like morphology.

  16. Observation of two different fractal structures in nanoparticle, protein and surfactant complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehan, Sumit; Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, V. K.

    2014-04-01

    Small angle neutron scattering has been carried out from a complex of nanoparticle, protein and surfactant. Although all the components are similarly (anionic) charged, we have observed strong interactions in their complex formation. It is characterized by the coexistence of two different mass fractal structures. The first fractal structure is originated from the protein and surfactant interaction and second from the depletion effect of first fractal structure leading the nanoparticle aggregation. The fractal structure of protein-surfactant complex represents to bead necklace structure of micelle-like clusters of surfactant formed along the unfolded protein chain. Its fractal dimension depends on the surfactant to protein ratio (r) and decreases with the increase in r. However, fractal dimension of nanoparticle aggregates in nanoparticle-protein complex is found to be independent of protein concentration and governed by the diffusion limited aggregation like morphology.

  17. Using contrast patterns between true complexes and random subgraphs in PPI networks to predict unknown protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Quanzhong; Song, Jiangning; Li, Jinyan

    2016-01-01

    Most protein complex detection methods utilize unsupervised techniques to cluster densely connected nodes in a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network, in spite of the fact that many true complexes are not dense subgraphs. Supervised methods have been proposed recently, but they do not answer why a group of proteins are predicted as a complex, and they have not investigated how to detect new complexes of one species by training the model on the PPI data of another species. We propose a novel supervised method to address these issues. The key idea is to discover emerging patterns (EPs), a type of contrast pattern, which can clearly distinguish true complexes from random subgraphs in a PPI network. An integrative score of EPs is defined to measure how likely a subgraph of proteins can form a complex. New complexes thus can grow from our seed proteins by iteratively updating this score. The performance of our method is tested on eight benchmark PPI datasets and compared with seven unsupervised methods, two supervised and one semi-supervised methods under five standards to assess the quality of the predicted complexes. The results show that in most cases our method achieved a better performance, sometimes significantly. PMID:26868667

  18. Qualitative and Quantitative Protein Complex Prediction Through Proteome-Wide Simulations.

    PubMed

    Rizzetto, Simone; Priami, Corrado; Csikász-Nagy, Attila

    2015-10-01

    Despite recent progress in proteomics most protein complexes are still unknown. Identification of these complexes will help us understand cellular regulatory mechanisms and support development of new drugs. Therefore it is really important to establish detailed information about the composition and the abundance of protein complexes but existing algorithms can only give qualitative predictions. Herein, we propose a new approach based on stochastic simulations of protein complex formation that integrates multi-source data--such as protein abundances, domain-domain interactions and functional annotations--to predict alternative forms of protein complexes together with their abundances. This method, called SiComPre (Simulation based Complex Prediction), achieves better qualitative prediction of yeast and human protein complexes than existing methods and is the first to predict protein complex abundances. Furthermore, we show that SiComPre can be used to predict complexome changes upon drug treatment with the example of bortezomib. SiComPre is the first method to produce quantitative predictions on the abundance of molecular complexes while performing the best qualitative predictions. With new data on tissue specific protein complexes becoming available SiComPre will be able to predict qualitative and quantitative differences in the complexome in various tissue types and under various conditions. PMID:26492574

  19. Nanoarrays for the generation of complex optical wave-forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, David L.; Williams, Mathew D.; Bradshaw, David S.; Lui, Ruifeng; Phillips, David B.; Franke-Arnold, Sonja; Padgett, Miles J.

    2014-09-01

    Light beams with unusual forms of wavefront offer a host of useful features to extend the repertoire of those developing new optical techniques. Complex, non-uniform wavefront structures offer a wide range of optomechanical applications, from microparticle rotation, traction and sorting, through to contactless microfluidic motors. Beams combining transverse nodal structures with orbital angular momentum, or vector beams with novel polarization profiles, also present new opportunities for imaging and the optical transmission of information, including quantum entanglement effects. Whilst there are numerous well-proven methods for generating light with complex wave-forms, most current methods work on the basis of modifying a conventional Hermite-Gaussian beam, by passage through suitably tailored optical elements. It has generally been considered impossible to directly generate wave-front structured beams either by spontaneous or stimulated emission from individual atoms, ions or molecules. However, newly emerged principles have shown that emitter arrays, cast in an appropriately specified geometry, can overcome the obstacles: one possibility is a construct based on the electronic excitation of nanofabricated circular arrays. Recent experimental work has extended this concept to a phase-imprinted ring of apertures holographically encoded in a diffractive mask, generated by a programmed spatial light modulator. These latest advances are potentially paving the way for creating new sources of structured light.

  20. Interfacial layers of complex-forming ionic surfactants with gelatin.

    PubMed

    Derkach, Svetlana R

    2015-08-01

    This review is devoted to discussing the results of studies of the influence of low-molecular weight surfactant additions on the composition and properties of gelatin adsorbed layers which are spontaneously created at water/air and water/non-polar-liquid interfaces. The interaction of surfactant with gelatin leads to the formation of complexes of variable content in the bulk of the aqueous phase. The composition content is determined by the component ratio and concentration of the added surfactant. The role of surfactants (anionic, cationic, non-ionic) capable of forming complexes with gelatin due to electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions is considered. Analysis of the interfacial layer properties is based on literature information, as well as the own author's data. These data include the results of measuring thermodynamic properties (interface tension), laws of formation (adsorption kinetics and thickness), and rheological properties of the layers, which are considered to be dependent on gelatin and surfactant concentration, pH, and temperature. The evolution of the interfacial layers' properties (with increasing surfactant concentration) is discussed in connection with the properties and content of gelatin-surfactant complexes appearing in the aqueous phase. Such an approach allows us to explain the main peculiarities of the layers' behavior including their stabilizing activity in relation to bilateral foam and emulsion films. PMID:24970019

  1. Perforin-2/Mpeg1 and other pore-forming proteins throughout evolution.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Ryan; Podack, Eckhard R

    2015-11-01

    Development of the ancient innate immune system required not only a mechanism to recognize foreign organisms from self but also to destroy them. Pore-forming proteins containing the membrane attack complex Perforin domain were one of the first triumphs of an innate immune system needing to eliminate microbes and virally infected cells. Membrane attack complex of complement and Perforin domain proteins is unique from other immune effector molecules in that the mechanism of attack is strictly physical and unspecific. The large water-filled holes created by membrane attack complex of complement and Perforin domain pore formation allow access for additional effectors to complete the destruction of the foreign organism via chemical or enzymatic attack. Perforin-2/macrophage-expressed protein 1 is one of the oldest membrane attack complexes of complement and Perforin domain protein involved in immune defense, and it is still functional today in vertebrates. Here, we trace the impact of Perforin-2/macrophage-expressed protein 1 from the earliest multicellular organisms to modern vertebrates, as well as review the development of other membrane attack complexes of complement and Perforin domain member proteins. PMID:26307549

  2. Inclusion bodies and purification of proteins in biologically active forms.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, A

    1997-01-01

    Even though recombinant DNA technology has made possible the production of valuable therapeutic proteins, its accumulation in the host cell as inclusion body poses serious problems in the recovery of functionally active proteins. In the last twenty years, alternative techniques have been evolved to purify biologically active proteins from inclusion bodies. Most of these remain only as inventions and very few are commercially exploited. This review summarizes the developments in isolation, refolding and purification of proteins from inclusion bodies that could be used for vaccine and non-vaccine applications. The second section involves a discussion on inclusion bodies, how they are formed, and their physicochemical properties. In vivo protein folding in Escherichia coli and kinetics of in vitro protein folding are the subjects of the third and fourth sections respectively. The next section covers the recovery of bioactive protein from inclusion bodies: it includes isolation of inclusion body from host cell debris, purification in denatured state alternate refolding techniques, and final purification of active molecules. Since purity and safety are two important issues in therapeutic grade proteins, the following three sections are devoted to immunological and biological characterization of biomolecules, nature, and type of impurities normally encountered, and their detection. Lastly, two case studies are discussed to demonstrate the sequence of process steps involved. PMID:8939059

  3. An overview of the structures of protein-DNA complexes

    PubMed Central

    Luscombe, Nicholas M; Austin, Susan E; Berman , Helen M; Thornton, Janet M

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of a structural analysis of 240 protein-DNA complexes contained in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), we have classified the DNA-binding proteins involved into eight different structural/functional groups, which are further classified into 54 structural families. Here we present this classification and review the functions, structures and binding interactions of these protein-DNA complexes. PMID:11104519

  4. The PIN-FORMED (PIN) protein family of auxin transporters

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Summary The PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins are secondary transporters acting in the efflux of the plant signal molecule auxin from cells. They are asymmetrically localized within cells and their polarity determines the directionality of intercellular auxin flow. PIN genes are found exclusively in the genomes of multicellular plants and play an important role in regulating asymmetric auxin distribution in multiple developmental processes, including embryogenesis, organogenesis, tissue differentiation and tropic responses. All PIN proteins have a similar structure with amino- and carboxy-terminal hydrophobic, membrane-spanning domains separated by a central hydrophilic domain. The structure of the hydrophobic domains is well conserved. The hydrophilic domain is more divergent and it determines eight groups within the protein family. The activity of PIN proteins is regulated at multiple levels, including transcription, protein stability, subcellular localization and transport activity. Different endogenous and environmental signals can modulate PIN activity and thus modulate auxin-distribution-dependent development. A large group of PIN proteins, including the most ancient members known from mosses, localize to the endoplasmic reticulum and they regulate the subcellular compartmentalization of auxin and thus auxin metabolism. Further work is needed to establish the physiological importance of this unexpected mode of auxin homeostasis regulation. Furthermore, the evolution of PIN-based transport, PIN protein structure and more detailed biochemical characterization of the transport function are important topics for further studies. PMID:20053306

  5. The multifaceted roles of intrinsic disorder in protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2015-09-14

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDPRs) are important constituents of many protein complexes, playing various structural, functional, and regulatory roles. In such disorder-based protein complexes, functional disorder is used both internally (for assembly, movement, and functional regulation of the different parts of a given complex) and externally (for interactions of a complex with its external regulators). In complex assembly, IDPs/IDPRs serve as the molecular glue that cements complexes or as highly flexible scaffolds. Disorder defines the order of complex assembly and the ability of a protein to be involved in polyvalent interactions. It is at the heart of various binding mechanisms and interaction modes ascribed to IDPs. Disorder in protein complexes is related to multifarious applications of induced folding and induced functional unfolding, or defines the entropic chain activities, such as stochastic machines and binding rheostats. This review opens a FEBS Letters Special Issue on Dynamics, Flexibility, and Intrinsic Disorder in protein assemblies and represents a brief overview of intricate roles played by IDPs and IDPRs in various aspects of protein complexes. PMID:26073257

  6. Chlorophyll-Protein Complexes of the Cyanophyte, Nostoc sp. 1

    PubMed Central

    Rusckowski, Mary; Zilinskas, Barbara A.

    1980-01-01

    Four chlorophyll-protein complexes have been resolved from the cyanophyte, Nostoc sp., by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at 4 C. Complexes solubilized by SDS from Spinacia oleracea were run for comparison. As has been well documented, the P700-chlorophyll a-protein complex from the higher plant and blue-green algal samples are similar, and the light-harvesting pigment protein complex is present only in the former. Most noteworthy are two closely migrating chlorophyll proteins in Nostoc sp. which have approximately the same mobility as a single chlorophyll-protein band resolvable from spinach. The absorption maximum of the complex from spinach is at 667 nanometers, and those of the two complexes from Nostoc sp. are at 667 and 669 nanometers; the fluorescence emission maximum at −196 C is at 685 nanometers, and the 735 nanometer fluorescence peak, characteristic of the P700-chlorophyll a-protein complex, is absent. The apoproteins of these new complexes from Nostoc sp. and spinach are in the kilodalton range. It appears that at least one of these two chlorophyll-protein complexes from Nostoc sp. compares with those recently described by others from higher plants and green algae as likely photosystem II complexes, perhaps containing P680, although no photochemical data are yet available. Images PMID:16661198

  7. Towards a Hierarchical Strategy to Explore Multi-Scale IP/MS Data for Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kutzera, Joachim; Smilde, Age K.; Wilderjans, Tom F.; Hoefsloot, Huub C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein interaction in cells can be described at different levels. At a low interaction level, proteins function together in small, stable complexes and at a higher level, in sets of interacting complexes. All interaction levels are crucial for the living organism, and one of the challenges in proteomics is to measure the proteins at their different interaction levels. One common method for such measurements is immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry (IP/MS), which has the potential to probe the different protein interaction forms. However, IP/MS data are complex because proteins, in their diverse interaction forms, manifest themselves in different ways in the data. Numerous bioinformatic tools for finding protein complexes in IP/MS data are currently available, but most tools do not provide information about the interaction level of the discovered complexes, and no tool is geared specifically to unraveling and visualizing these different levels. We present a new bioinformatic tool to explore IP/MS datasets for protein complexes at different interaction levels and show its performance on several real–life datasets. Our tool creates clusters that represent protein complexes, but unlike previous methods, it arranges them in a tree–shaped structure, reporting why specific proteins are predicted to build a complex and where it can be divided into smaller complexes. In every data analysis method, parameters have to be chosen. Our method can suggest values for its parameters and comes with adapted visualization tools that display the effect of the parameters on the result. The tools provide fast graphical feedback and allow the user to interact with the data by changing the parameters and examining the result. The tools also allow for exploring the different organizational levels of the protein complexes in a given dataset. Our method is available as GNU-R source code and includes examples at www.bdagroup.nl. PMID:26448546

  8. Legionella pneumophila Type IV Effectors YlfA and YlfB Are SNARE-Like Proteins that Form Homo- and Heteromeric Complexes and Enhance the Efficiency of Vacuole Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Campodonico, Eva M; Roy, Craig R; Ninio, Shira

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative bacterium that can colonize both freshwater protozoa and human alveolar macrophages, the latter infection resulting in Legionnaires' disease. The intracellular lifecycle of L. pneumophila requires extensive manipulation of its host cell, which is carried out by effector proteins that are translocated into the host cell through the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system. This study focuses on a pair of highly similar type IV substrates called YlfA/LegC7 and YlfB/LegC2 that were initially identified in a screen for proteins that cause growth inhibition in yeast. Analysis of truncation mutants revealed that the hydrophobic residues in the Ylf amino termini were required for localization of each protein to the membranes of host cells. Central and carboxy terminal coiled coil domains were found to mediate binding of YlfA and YlfB to themselves and to each other. In vivo, a ΔylfA ΔylfB double mutant strain of L. pneumophila was shown to be defective in establishing a vacuole that supports bacterial replication. This phenotype was subsequently correlated with a decrease in the association of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived vesicles with vacuoles containing ΔylfA ΔylfB mutant bacteria. These data suggest that the Ylf proteins are membrane-associated effectors that enhance remodeling of the L. pneumophila -containing vacuole by promoting association and possibly fusion of ER-derived membrane vesicles with the bacterial compartment. PMID:27459495

  9. Legionella pneumophila Type IV Effectors YlfA and YlfB Are SNARE-Like Proteins that Form Homo- and Heteromeric Complexes and Enhance the Efficiency of Vacuole Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Campodonico, Eva M.; Roy, Craig R.; Ninio, Shira

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative bacterium that can colonize both freshwater protozoa and human alveolar macrophages, the latter infection resulting in Legionnaires’ disease. The intracellular lifecycle of L. pneumophila requires extensive manipulation of its host cell, which is carried out by effector proteins that are translocated into the host cell through the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system. This study focuses on a pair of highly similar type IV substrates called YlfA/LegC7 and YlfB/LegC2 that were initially identified in a screen for proteins that cause growth inhibition in yeast. Analysis of truncation mutants revealed that the hydrophobic residues in the Ylf amino termini were required for localization of each protein to the membranes of host cells. Central and carboxy terminal coiled coil domains were found to mediate binding of YlfA and YlfB to themselves and to each other. In vivo, a ΔylfA ΔylfB double mutant strain of L. pneumophila was shown to be defective in establishing a vacuole that supports bacterial replication. This phenotype was subsequently correlated with a decrease in the association of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived vesicles with vacuoles containing ΔylfA ΔylfB mutant bacteria. These data suggest that the Ylf proteins are membrane-associated effectors that enhance remodeling of the L. pneumophila -containing vacuole by promoting association and possibly fusion of ER-derived membrane vesicles with the bacterial compartment. PMID:27459495

  10. Plant gamma-tubulin interacts with alphabeta-tubulin dimers and forms membrane-associated complexes.

    PubMed

    Dryková, Denisa; Cenklová, Vēra; Sulimenko, Vadym; Volc, Jindrich; Dráber, Pavel; Binarová, Pavla

    2003-02-01

    gamma-Tubulin is assumed to participate in microtubule nucleation in acentrosomal plant cells, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are still unknown. Here, we show that gamma-tubulin is present in protein complexes of various sizes and different subcellular locations in Arabidopsis and fava bean. Immunoprecipitation experiments revealed an association of gamma-tubulin with alphabeta-tubulin dimers. gamma-Tubulin cosedimented with microtubules polymerized in vitro and localized along their whole length. Large gamma-tubulin complexes resistant to salt treatment were found to be associated with a high-speed microsomal fraction. Blue native electrophoresis of detergent-solubilized microsomes showed that the molecular mass of the complexes was >1 MD. Large gamma-tubulin complexes were active in microtubule nucleation, but nucleation activity was not observed for the smaller complexes. Punctate gamma-tubulin staining was associated with microtubule arrays, accumulated with short kinetochore microtubules interacting in polar regions with membranes, and localized in the vicinity of nuclei and in the area of cell plate formation. Our results indicate that the association of gamma-tubulin complexes with dynamic membranes might ensure the flexibility of noncentrosomal microtubule nucleation. Moreover, the presence of other molecular forms of gamma-tubulin suggests additional roles for this protein species in microtubule organization. PMID:12566585

  11. The tumour suppressor CHD5 forms a NuRD-type chromatin remodelling complex.

    PubMed

    Kolla, Venkatadri; Naraparaju, Koumudi; Zhuang, Tiangang; Higashi, Mayumi; Kolla, Sriharsha; Blobel, Gerd A; Brodeur, Garrett M

    2015-06-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression is developmentally regulated, in part by chromatin remodelling, and its dysregulation has been linked to cancer. CHD5 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 5) is a tumour suppressor gene (TSG) that maps to a region of consistent deletion on 1p36.31 in neuroblastomas (NBs) and other tumour types. CHD5 encodes a protein with chromatin remodelling, helicase and DNA-binding motifs that is preferentially expressed in neural and testicular tissues. CHD5 is highly homologous to CHD3 and CHD4, which are the core subunits of nucleosome remodelling and deacetylation (NuRD) complexes. To determine if CHD5 forms a similar complex, we performed studies on nuclear extracts from NBLS, SY5Y (both with endogenous CHD5 expression), NLF (CHD5 null) and NLF cells stably transfected with CHD5 cDNA (wild-type and V5-histidine-tagged). Immunoprecipitation (IP) was performed with either CHD5 antibody or antibody to V5/histidine-tagged protein. We identified NuRD components both by GST-FOG1 (Friend Of GATA1) pull-down and by IP. We also performed MS/MS analysis to confirm the presence of CHD5 or other protein components of the NuRD complex, as well as to identify other novel proteins. CHD5 was clearly associated with all canonical NuRD components, including metastasis-associated protein (MTA)1/2, GATA zinc finger domain containing 2A (GATAD2A), histone deacetylase (HDAC)1/2, retinoblastoma-binding protein (RBBP)4/7 and methyl DNA-binding domain protein (MBD)2/3, as determined by Western blotting and MS/MS. Our data suggest CHD5 forms a NuRD complex similar to CHD4. However, CHD5-NuRD may also have unique protein associations that confer functional specificity and may contribute to normal development and to tumour suppression in NB and other cancers. PMID:25825869

  12. Advances in protein complex analysis using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gingras, Anne-Claude; Aebersold, Ruedi; Raught, Brian

    2005-02-15

    Proteins often function as components of larger complexes to perform a specific function, and formation of these complexes may be regulated. For example, intracellular signalling events often require transient and/or regulated protein-protein interactions for propagation, and protein binding to a specific DNA sequence, RNA molecule or metabolite is often regulated to modulate a particular cellular function. Thus, characterizing protein complexes can offer important insights into protein function. This review describes recent important advances in mass spectrometry (MS)-based techniques for the analysis of protein complexes. Following brief descriptions of how proteins are identified using MS, and general protein complex purification approaches, we address two of the most important issues in these types of studies: specificity and background protein contaminants. Two basic strategies for increasing specificity and decreasing background are presented: whereas (1) tandem affinity purification (TAP) of tagged proteins of interest can dramatically improve the signal-to-noise ratio via the generation of cleaner samples, (2) stable isotopic labelling of proteins may be used to discriminate between contaminants and bona fide binding partners using quantitative MS techniques. Examples, as well as advantages and disadvantages of each approach, are presented. PMID:15611014

  13. A complex of three related membrane proteins is conserved on malarial merozoites

    PubMed Central

    Rayavara, Kempaiah; Rajapandi, Thavamani; Wollenberg, Kurt; Kabat, Juraj; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Desai, Sanjay A.

    2009-01-01

    Invasion of human red blood cells by the malaria parasite P. falciparum is a coordinated, multi-step process. Here, we describe three novel integral membrane proteins that colocalize on the inner membrane complex immediately beneath the merozoite plasma membrane. Each has 6 predicted transmembrane domains and is conserved in diverse apicomplexan parasites. Immunoprecipitation studies using specific antibodies reveal that these proteins assemble into a heteromeric complex. Each protein was also expressed on insect cells using the baculovirus vector system with a truncated SUMO tag that facilitates maximal expression and protein purification while permitting cleavage with SUMO protease to release unmodified parasite protein. The expressed proteins were successfully reconstituted into artificial liposomes, but were not recognized by human immune sera. Because all three genes are highly conserved in apicomplexan parasites, the complex formed by their encoded proteins likely serves an essential role for invasive merozoites. PMID:19465059

  14. Understanding the nanoparticle-protein corona complexes using computational and experimental methods.

    PubMed

    Kharazian, B; Hadipour, N L; Ejtehadi, M R

    2016-06-01

    Nanoparticles (NP) have capability to adsorb proteins from biological fluids and form protein layer, which is called protein corona. As the cell sees corona coated NPs, the protein corona can dictate biological response to NPs. The composition of protein corona is varied by physicochemical properties of NPs including size, shape, surface chemistry. Processing of protein adsorption is dynamic phenomena; to that end, a protein may desorb or leave a surface vacancy that is rapidly filled by another protein and cause changes in the corona composition mainly by the Vroman effect. In this review, we discuss the interaction between NP and proteins and the available techniques for identification of NP-bound proteins. Also we review current developed computational methods for understanding the NP-protein complex interactions. PMID:26873405

  15. Mycobacterial RNA polymerase forms unstable open promoter complexes that are stabilized by CarD

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Elizabeth; Chen, James; Leon, Katherine; Darst, Seth A.; Campbell, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli has served as the archetypal organism on which the overwhelming majority of biochemical characterizations of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) have been focused; the properties of E. coli RNAP have been accepted as generally representative for all bacterial RNAPs. Here, we directly compare the initiation properties of a mycobacterial transcription system with E. coli RNAP on two different promoters. The detailed characterizations include abortive transcription assays, RNAP/promoter complex stability assays and DNAse I and KMnO4 footprinting. Based on footprinting, we find that promoter complexes formed by E. coli and mycobacterial RNAPs use very similar protein/DNA interactions and generate the same transcription bubbles. However, we find that the open promoter complexes formed by E. coli RNAP on the two promoters tested are highly stable and essentially irreversible (with lifetimes much greater than 1 h), while the open promoter complexes on the same two promoters formed by mycobacterial RNAP are very unstable (lifetimes of about 2 min or less) and readily reversible. We show here that CarD, an essential mycobacterial transcription activator that is not found in E. coli, stabilizes the mycobacterial RNAP/open promoter complexes considerably by preventing transcription bubble collapse. PMID:25510492

  16. Protein-protein binding affinities by pulse proteolysis: application to TEM-1/BLIP protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Hanes, Melinda S; Ratcliff, Kathleen; Marqusee, Susan; Handel, Tracy M

    2010-10-01

    Efficient methods for quantifying dissociation constants have become increasingly important for high-throughput mutagenesis studies in the postgenomic era. However, experimentally determining binding affinity is often laborious, requires large amounts of purified protein, and utilizes specialized equipment. Recently, pulse proteolysis has been shown to be a robust and simple method to determine the dissociation constants for a protein-ligand pair based on the increase in thermodynamic stability upon ligand binding. Here, we extend this technique to determine binding affinities for a protein-protein complex involving the β-lactamase TEM-1 and various β-lactamase inhibitor protein (BLIP) mutants. Interaction with BLIP results in an increase in the denaturation curve midpoint, C(m), of TEM-1, which correlates with the rank order of binding affinities for several BLIP mutants. Hence, pulse proteolysis is a simple, effective method to assay for mutations that modulate binding affinity in protein-protein complexes. From a small set (n = 4) of TEM-1/BLIP mutant complexes, a linear relationship between energy of stabilization (dissociation constant) and ΔC(m) was observed. From this "calibration curve," accurate dissociation constants for two additional BLIP mutants were calculated directly from proteolysis-derived ΔC(m) values. Therefore, in addition to qualitative information, armed with knowledge of the dissociation constants from the WT protein and a limited number of mutants, accurate quantitation of binding affinities can be determined for additional mutants from pulse proteolysis. Minimal sample requirements and the suitability of impure protein preparations are important advantages that make pulse proteolysis a powerful tool for high-throughput mutagenesis binding studies. PMID:20669180

  17. Discrimination of complex form by simple oscillator networks.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yoshinori; Taylor, Ryan R L; Loh, Yik-Wen; Maddess, Ted

    2009-01-01

    Natural images are rich in higher order spatial correlations. Brain scanning, psychophysics and electrophysiology indicate that humans are sensitive to these image properties. A useful tool for exploring this sense is the set of isotrigon textures. Like natural images these textures have low dimensionality relative to random images, but like random images contain no average structure in their first to third order correlation functions. Thus, the structured appearance of these textures results from higher order correlations. One way to generate the higher order products inherent in higher order correlations is recursive nonlinear processing. We therefore decided to examine if very small oscillator networks could produce a profile of activity that matches human isotrigon discrimination performance across 53 isotrigon texture types. Human performance was measured in 23 subjects. The two best network types found contained as few as 4 oscillators. The input oscillators are of a novel cubic form and the final readout oscillator was a logistic oscillator. Mean readout oscillator activity matched human performance reasonably well even though the network parameters were fixed for all 53 texture types. Overall it appears that relatively simple, short range, and biologically plausible, recursive processing could provide the basis for discrimination of complex form. PMID:19919282

  18. Global landscape of protein complexes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Krogan, Nevan J; Cagney, Gerard; Yu, Haiyuan; Zhong, Gouqing; Guo, Xinghua; Ignatchenko, Alexandr; Li, Joyce; Pu, Shuye; Datta, Nira; Tikuisis, Aaron P; Punna, Thanuja; Peregrín-Alvarez, José M; Shales, Michael; Zhang, Xin; Davey, Michael; Robinson, Mark D; Paccanaro, Alberto; Bray, James E; Sheung, Anthony; Beattie, Bryan; Richards, Dawn P; Canadien, Veronica; Lalev, Atanas; Mena, Frank; Wong, Peter; Starostine, Andrei; Canete, Myra M; Vlasblom, James; Wu, Samuel; Orsi, Chris; Collins, Sean R; Chandran, Shamanta; Haw, Robin; Rilstone, Jennifer J; Gandi, Kiran; Thompson, Natalie J; Musso, Gabe; St Onge, Peter; Ghanny, Shaun; Lam, Mandy H Y; Butland, Gareth; Altaf-Ul, Amin M; Kanaya, Shigehiko; Shilatifard, Ali; O'Shea, Erin; Weissman, Jonathan S; Ingles, C James; Hughes, Timothy R; Parkinson, John; Gerstein, Mark; Wodak, Shoshana J; Emili, Andrew; Greenblatt, Jack F

    2006-03-30

    Identification of protein-protein interactions often provides insight into protein function, and many cellular processes are performed by stable protein complexes. We used tandem affinity purification to process 4,562 different tagged proteins of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Each preparation was analysed by both matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to increase coverage and accuracy. Machine learning was used to integrate the mass spectrometry scores and assign probabilities to the protein-protein interactions. Among 4,087 different proteins identified with high confidence by mass spectrometry from 2,357 successful purifications, our core data set (median precision of 0.69) comprises 7,123 protein-protein interactions involving 2,708 proteins. A Markov clustering algorithm organized these interactions into 547 protein complexes averaging 4.9 subunits per complex, about half of them absent from the MIPS database, as well as 429 additional interactions between pairs of complexes. The data (all of which are available online) will help future studies on individual proteins as well as functional genomics and systems biology. PMID:16554755

  19. Protein complexes and functional modules in molecular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spirin, Victor; Mirny, Leonid A.

    2003-10-01

    Proteins, nucleic acids, and small molecules form a dense network of molecular interactions in a cell. Molecules are nodes of this network, and the interactions between them are edges. The architecture of molecular networks can reveal important principles of cellular organization and function, similarly to the way that protein structure tells us about the function and organization of a protein. Computational analysis of molecular networks has been primarily concerned with node degree [Wagner, A. & Fell, D. A. (2001) Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. B 268, 1803-1810; Jeong, H., Tombor, B., Albert, R., Oltvai, Z. N. & Barabasi, A. L. (2000) Nature 407, 651-654] or degree correlation [Maslov, S. & Sneppen, K. (2002) Science 296, 910-913], and hence focused on single/two-body properties of these networks. Here, by analyzing the multibody structure of the network of protein-protein interactions, we discovered molecular modules that are densely connected within themselves but sparsely connected with the rest of the network. Comparison with experimental data and functional annotation of genes showed two types of modules: (i) protein complexes (splicing machinery, transcription factors, etc.) and (ii) dynamic functional units (signaling cascades, cell-cycle regulation, etc.). Discovered modules are highly statistically significant, as is evident from comparison with random graphs, and are robust to noise in the data. Our results provide strong support for the network modularity principle introduced by Hartwell et al. [Hartwell, L. H., Hopfield, J. J., Leibler, S. & Murray, A. W. (1999) Nature 402, C47-C52], suggesting that found modules constitute the "building blocks" of molecular networks.

  20. Profiling of Protein Interaction Networks of Protein Complexes Using Affinity Purification and Quantitative Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Kaake, Robyn M.; Wang, Xiaorong; Huang, Lan

    2010-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are important for nearly all biological processes, and it is known that aberrant protein-protein interactions can lead to human disease and cancer. Recent evidence has suggested that protein interaction interfaces describe a new class of attractive targets for drug development. Full characterization of protein interaction networks of protein complexes and their dynamics in response to various cellular cues will provide essential information for us to understand how protein complexes work together in cells to maintain cell viability and normal homeostasis. Affinity purification coupled with quantitative mass spectrometry has become the primary method for studying in vivo protein interactions of protein complexes and whole organism proteomes. Recent developments in sample preparation and affinity purification strategies allow the capture, identification, and quantification of protein interactions of protein complexes that are stable, dynamic, transient, and/or weak. Current efforts have mainly focused on generating reliable, reproducible, and high confidence protein interaction data sets for functional characterization. The availability of increasing amounts of information on protein interactions in eukaryotic systems and new bioinformatics tools allow functional analysis of quantitative protein interaction data to unravel the biological significance of the identified protein interactions. Existing studies in this area have laid a solid foundation toward generating a complete map of in vivo protein interaction networks of protein complexes in cells or tissues. PMID:20445003

  1. Hydrophobic Surfactant Proteins Induce a Phosphatidylethanolamine to Form Cubic Phases

    PubMed Central

    Chavarha, Mariya; Khoojinian, Hamed; Schulwitz, Leonard E.; Biswas, Samares C.; Rananavare, Shankar B.; Hall, Stephen B.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The hydrophobic surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C promote rapid adsorption of pulmonary surfactant to an air/water interface. Previous evidence suggests that they achieve this effect by facilitating the formation of a rate-limiting negatively curved stalk between the vesicular bilayer and the interface. To determine whether the proteins can alter the curvature of lipid leaflets, we used x-ray diffraction to investigate how the physiological mixture of these proteins affects structures formed by 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine, which by itself undergoes the lamellar-to-inverse hexagonal phase transition at 71°C. In amounts as low as 0.03% (w:w) and at temperatures as low as 57°C, the proteins induce formation of bicontinuous inverse cubic phases. The proteins produce a dose-related shift of diffracted intensity to the cubic phases, with minimal evidence of other structures above 0.1% and 62°C, but no change in the lattice-constants of the lamellar or cubic phases. The induction of the bicontinuous cubic phases, in which the individual lipid leaflets have the same saddle-shaped curvature as the hypothetical stalk-intermediate, supports the proposed model of how the surfactant proteins promote adsorption. PMID:20409474

  2. Structural Environment and Stability of the Complexes Formed Between Calmodulin and Actinyl Ions.

    PubMed

    Brulfert, Florian; Safi, Samir; Jeanson, Aurélie; Martinez-Baez, Ernesto; Roques, Jérôme; Berthomieu, Catherine; Solari, Pier-Lorenzo; Sauge-Merle, Sandrine; Simoni, Éric

    2016-03-21

    Because of their presence in the nuclear fuel cycle, neptunium and uranium are two actinides of main interest in case of internal contamination. Complexation of U(VI) and Np(V) by the target protein calmodulin (CaM(WT)) was therefore studied herein. Both actinides have two axial oxygen atoms, which, charge aside, makes them very similar structurally wise. This work combines spectroscopy and theoretical density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Structural characterization was performed by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) at the L(III)-edge for each studied actinide. Models for the binding site of the protein were developed and then refined by using DFT to fit the obtained experimental EXAFS data. The effect of hydrolysis was also considered for both actinides (the uranyl experiment was performed at pH 3 and 6, while the neptunyl experiment was conducted at pH 7 and 9). The effect of the pH variation was apparent on the coordination sphere of the uranyl complexes, while the neptunyl complex characteristics remained stable under both studied conditions. The DFT calculations showed that at near physiological pH the complex formed by CaM(WT) with the neptunium ion is more stable than the one formed with uranyl. PMID:26954703

  3. Tor forms a dimer through an N-terminal helical solenoid with a complex topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baretić, Domagoj; Berndt, Alex; Ohashi, Yohei; Johnson, Christopher M.; Williams, Roger L.

    2016-04-01

    The target of rapamycin (Tor) is a Ser/Thr protein kinase that regulates a range of anabolic and catabolic processes. Tor is present in two complexes, TORC1 and TORC2, in which the Tor-Lst8 heterodimer forms a common sub-complex. We have determined the cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structure of Tor bound to Lst8. Two Tor-Lst8 heterodimers assemble further into a dyad-symmetry dimer mediated by Tor-Tor interactions. The first 1,300 residues of Tor form a HEAT repeat-containing α-solenoid with four distinct segments: a highly curved 800-residue N-terminal 'spiral', followed by a 400-residue low-curvature 'bridge' and an extended `railing' running along the bridge leading to the 'cap' that links to FAT region. This complex topology was verified by domain insertions and offers a new interpretation of the mTORC1 structure. The spiral of one TOR interacts with the bridge of another, which together form a joint platform for the Regulatory Associated Protein of TOR (RAPTOR) regulatory subunit.

  4. Tor forms a dimer through an N-terminal helical solenoid with a complex topology

    PubMed Central

    Baretić, Domagoj; Berndt, Alex; Ohashi, Yohei; Johnson, Christopher M.; Williams, Roger L.

    2016-01-01

    The target of rapamycin (Tor) is a Ser/Thr protein kinase that regulates a range of anabolic and catabolic processes. Tor is present in two complexes, TORC1 and TORC2, in which the Tor–Lst8 heterodimer forms a common sub-complex. We have determined the cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structure of Tor bound to Lst8. Two Tor–Lst8 heterodimers assemble further into a dyad-symmetry dimer mediated by Tor–Tor interactions. The first 1,300 residues of Tor form a HEAT repeat-containing α-solenoid with four distinct segments: a highly curved 800-residue N-terminal 'spiral', followed by a 400-residue low-curvature 'bridge' and an extended ‘railing' running along the bridge leading to the 'cap' that links to FAT region. This complex topology was verified by domain insertions and offers a new interpretation of the mTORC1 structure. The spiral of one TOR interacts with the bridge of another, which together form a joint platform for the Regulatory Associated Protein of TOR (RAPTOR) regulatory subunit. PMID:27072897

  5. Tor forms a dimer through an N-terminal helical solenoid with a complex topology.

    PubMed

    Baretić, Domagoj; Berndt, Alex; Ohashi, Yohei; Johnson, Christopher M; Williams, Roger L

    2016-01-01

    The target of rapamycin (Tor) is a Ser/Thr protein kinase that regulates a range of anabolic and catabolic processes. Tor is present in two complexes, TORC1 and TORC2, in which the Tor-Lst8 heterodimer forms a common sub-complex. We have determined the cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structure of Tor bound to Lst8. Two Tor-Lst8 heterodimers assemble further into a dyad-symmetry dimer mediated by Tor-Tor interactions. The first 1,300 residues of Tor form a HEAT repeat-containing α-solenoid with four distinct segments: a highly curved 800-residue N-terminal 'spiral', followed by a 400-residue low-curvature 'bridge' and an extended 'railing' running along the bridge leading to the 'cap' that links to FAT region. This complex topology was verified by domain insertions and offers a new interpretation of the mTORC1 structure. The spiral of one TOR interacts with the bridge of another, which together form a joint platform for the Regulatory Associated Protein of TOR (RAPTOR) regulatory subunit. PMID:27072897

  6. Principles of assembly reveal a periodic table of protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Ahnert, Sebastian E; Marsh, Joseph A; Hernández, Helena; Robinson, Carol V; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2015-12-11

    Structural insights into protein complexes have had a broad impact on our understanding of biological function and evolution. In this work, we sought a comprehensive understanding of the general principles underlying quaternary structure organization in protein complexes. We first examined the fundamental steps by which protein complexes can assemble, using experimental and structure-based characterization of assembly pathways. Most assembly transitions can be classified into three basic types, which can then be used to exhaustively enumerate a large set of possible quaternary structure topologies. These topologies, which include the vast majority of observed protein complex structures, enable a natural organization of protein complexes into a periodic table. On the basis of this table, we can accurately predict the expected frequencies of quaternary structure topologies, including those not yet observed. These results have important implications for quaternary structure prediction, modeling, and engineering. PMID:26659058

  7. Multi-LZerD: Multiple protein docking for asymmetric complexes

    PubMed Central

    Esquivel-Rodríguez, Juan; Yang, Yifeng David; Kihara, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    The tertiary structures of protein complexes provide a crucial insight about the molecular mechanisms that regulate their functions and assembly. However, solving protein complex structures by experimental methods is often more difficult than single protein structures. Here, we have developed a novel computational multiple protein docking algorithm, Multi-LZerD, that builds models of multimeric complexes by effectively reusing pairwise docking predictions of component proteins. A genetic algorithm is applied to explore the conformational space followed by a structure refinement procedure. Benchmark on eleven hetero-multimeric complexes resulted in near native conformations for all but one of them (a root mean square deviation smaller than 2.5Å). We also show that our method copes with unbound docking cases well, outperforming the methodology that can be directly compared to our approach. Multi-LZerD was able to predict near native structures for multimeric complexes of various topologies. PMID:22488467

  8. LINC complex proteins in cardiac structure, function, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Stroud, Matthew J; Banerjee, Indroneal; Lowe, Jennifer; Chen, Ju

    2014-01-01

    The LINC (LInker of Nucleoskeleton and Cytoskeleton) complex, composed of proteins within the inner and the outer nuclear membranes, connects the nuclear lamina to the cytoskeleton. The importance of this complex has been highlighted by the discovery of mutations in genes encoding LINC complex proteins, which are causative for skeletal or cardiac myopathies. Herein, this review summarizes structure, function, and interactions of major components of the LINC complex, highlights how mutations in these proteins may lead to cardiac disease, and outlines future challenges in the field. PMID:24481844

  9. Supramolecular Ensembles Formed between Charged Conjugated Polymers and Glycoprobes for the Fluorogenic Recognition of Receptor Proteins.

    PubMed

    Dou, Wei-Tao; Zeng, Ya-Li; Lv, Ying; Wu, Jiatao; He, Xiao-Peng; Chen, Guo-Rong; Tan, Chunyan

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the simple construction of a unique class of supramolecular ensembles formed by electrostatic self-assembly between charged conjugated polymers and fluorophore-coupled glycoligands (glycoprobes) for the selective fluorogenic detection of receptor proteins at both the molecular and cellular levels. We show that positively and negatively charged diazobenzene-containing poly(p-phenylethynylenes) (PPEs) can be used to form stable fluorogenic probes with fluorescein-based (negatively charged) and rhodamine B based (positively charged) glycoprobes by electrostatic interaction. The structures of the ensembles have been characterized by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The supramolecular probes formed show quenched fluorescence in an aqueous buffer solution, which can be specifically recovered, in a concentration-dependent manner, through competitive complexation with a selective protein receptor, over a range of other unselective proteins. The ensembles also show selective fluorescence enhancement with a live cell that expresses the glycoligand receptor but not a control cell without receptor expression. PMID:27159586

  10. Single-molecule observation of protein folding in symmetric GroEL-(GroES)2 complexes.

    PubMed

    Takei, Yodai; Iizuka, Ryo; Ueno, Taro; Funatsu, Takashi

    2012-11-30

    The chaperonin, GroEL, is an essential molecular chaperone that mediates protein folding together with its cofactor, GroES, in Escherichia coli. It is widely believed that the two rings of GroEL alternate between the folding active state coupled to GroES binding during the reaction cycle. In other words, an asymmetric GroEL-GroES complex (the bullet-shaped complex) is formed throughout the cycle, whereas a symmetric GroEL-(GroES)(2) complex (the football-shaped complex) is not formed. We have recently shown that the football-shaped complex coexists with the bullet-shaped complex during the reaction cycle. However, how protein folding proceeds in the football-shaped complex remains poorly understood. Here, we used GFP as a substrate to visualize protein folding in the football-shaped complex by single-molecule fluorescence techniques. We directly showed that GFP folding occurs in both rings of the football-shaped complex. Remarkably, the folding was a sequential two-step reaction, and the kinetics were in excellent agreement with those in the bullet-shaped complex. These results demonstrate that the same reactions take place independently in both rings of the football-shaped complex to facilitate protein folding. PMID:23048033

  11. Single-molecule Observation of Protein Folding in Symmetric GroEL-(GroES)2 Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Takei, Yodai; Iizuka, Ryo; Ueno, Taro; Funatsu, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    The chaperonin, GroEL, is an essential molecular chaperone that mediates protein folding together with its cofactor, GroES, in Escherichia coli. It is widely believed that the two rings of GroEL alternate between the folding active state coupled to GroES binding during the reaction cycle. In other words, an asymmetric GroEL-GroES complex (the bullet-shaped complex) is formed throughout the cycle, whereas a symmetric GroEL-(GroES)2 complex (the football-shaped complex) is not formed. We have recently shown that the football-shaped complex coexists with the bullet-shaped complex during the reaction cycle. However, how protein folding proceeds in the football-shaped complex remains poorly understood. Here, we used GFP as a substrate to visualize protein folding in the football-shaped complex by single-molecule fluorescence techniques. We directly showed that GFP folding occurs in both rings of the football-shaped complex. Remarkably, the folding was a sequential two-step reaction, and the kinetics were in excellent agreement with those in the bullet-shaped complex. These results demonstrate that the same reactions take place independently in both rings of the football-shaped complex to facilitate protein folding. PMID:23048033

  12. High-throughput Isolation and Characterization of Untagged Membrane Protein Complexes: Outer Membrane Complexes of Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cell membranes represent the “front line” of cellular defense and the interface between a cell and its environment. To determine the range of proteins and protein complexes that are present in the cell membranes of a target organism, we have utilized a “tagless” process for the system-wide isolation and identification of native membrane protein complexes. As an initial subject for study, we have chosen the Gram-negative sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris. With this tagless methodology, we have identified about two-thirds of the outer membrane- associated proteins anticipated. Approximately three-fourths of these appear to form homomeric complexes. Statistical and machine-learning methods used to analyze data compiled over multiple experiments revealed networks of additional protein–protein interactions providing insight into heteromeric contacts made between proteins across this region of the cell. Taken together, these results establish a D. vulgaris outer membrane protein data set that will be essential for the detection and characterization of environment-driven changes in the outer membrane proteome and in the modeling of stress response pathways. The workflow utilized here should be effective for the global characterization of membrane protein complexes in a wide range of organisms. PMID:23098413

  13. Multiscale Model for the Assembly Kinetics of Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhong-Ru; Chen, Jiawen; Wu, Yinghao

    2016-02-01

    The assembly of proteins into high-order complexes is a general mechanism for these biomolecules to implement their versatile functions in cells. Natural evolution has developed various assembling pathways for specific protein complexes to maintain their stability and proper activities. Previous studies have provided numerous examples of the misassembly of protein complexes leading to severe biological consequences. Although the research focusing on protein complexes has started to move beyond the static representation of quaternary structures to the dynamic aspect of their assembly, the current understanding of the assembly mechanism of protein complexes is still largely limited. To tackle this problem, we developed a new multiscale modeling framework. This framework combines a lower-resolution rigid-body-based simulation with a higher-resolution Cα-based simulation method so that protein complexes can be assembled with both structural details and computational efficiency. We applied this model to a homotrimer and a heterotetramer as simple test systems. Consistent with experimental observations, our simulations indicated very different kinetics between protein oligomerization and dimerization. The formation of protein oligomers is a multistep process that is much slower than dimerization but thermodynamically more stable. Moreover, we showed that even the same protein quaternary structure can have very diverse assembly pathways under different binding constants between subunits, which is important for regulating the functions of protein complexes. Finally, we revealed that the binding between subunits in a complex can be synergistically strengthened during assembly without considering allosteric regulation or conformational changes. Therefore, our model provides a useful tool to understand the general principles of protein complex assembly. PMID:26738810

  14. SnapShot: SMC Protein Complexes Part II.

    PubMed

    Haering, Christian H; Gruber, Stephan

    2016-02-11

    This second of two SnapShots on SMC proteins depicts their roles at different stages of the eukaryotic cell cycle. The composition and architecture of SMC protein complexes and their regulators appear in SMC Protein Complexes Part I (available at http://www.cell.com/cell/pdf/S0092-8674%2815%2901690-6.pdf). To view this SnapShot, open or download the PDF. PMID:26871638

  15. Modifications in structure and interaction of nanoparticle-protein-surfactant complexes in electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehan, Sumit; Kumar, S.; Aswal, V. K.; Schweins, R.

    2016-05-01

    SANS experiments of three-component system of anionic silica nanoparticles, anionic BSA protein and anionic SDS surfactants have been carried out without and with electrolyte in aqueous solution. In both the cases, the interaction of surfactant with protein results in formation of bead-necklace structure of protein-surfactant complexes in solution. These protein-surfactant complexes interact very differently with nanoparticles in absence and presence of electrolyte. In absence of electrolyte, nanoparticles remain in dispersed phase in solution, whereas with the addition of electrolyte the nanoparticles fractal aggregates are formed. SANS describes the phase behavior to be governed by competition of electrostatic and depletion interactions among the components solution.

  16. Identifying protein complexes in protein-protein interaction networks by using clique seeds and graph entropy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bolin; Shi, Jinhong; Zhang, Shenggui; Wu, Fang-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    The identification of protein complexes plays a key role in understanding major cellular processes and biological functions. Various computational algorithms have been proposed to identify protein complexes from protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. In this paper, we first introduce a new seed-selection strategy for seed-growth style algorithms. Cliques rather than individual vertices are employed as initial seeds. After that, a result-modification approach is proposed based on this seed-selection strategy. Predictions generated by higher order clique seeds are employed to modify results that are generated by lower order ones. The performance of this seed-selection strategy and the result-modification approach are tested by using the entropy-based algorithm, which is currently the best seed-growth style algorithm to detect protein complexes from PPI networks. In addition, we investigate four pairs of strategies for this algorithm in order to improve its accuracy. The numerical experiments are conducted on a Saccharomyces cerevisiae PPI network. The group of best predictions consists of 1711 clusters, with the average f-score at 0.68 after removing all similar and redundant clusters. We conclude that higher order clique seeds can generate predictions with higher accuracy and that our improved entropy-based algorithm outputs more reasonable predictions than the original one. PMID:23112006

  17. Response to ICRF-159 in cell lines resistant to cleavable complex-forming topoisomerase II inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, S. L.; Bergh, J.; Harris, A. L.; Hickson, I. D.

    1997-01-01

    We have studied the relationship between expression of genes implicated in mediating resistance to cleavable complex-forming topoisomerase II (topo II) inhibitors and cellular sensitivity to ICRF-159, a 'catalytic' inhibitor of topo II. Overexpression of the membrane transporters, P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-related protein (MRP), or down-regulation of topo IIalpha and/or -beta, did not confer ICRF-159 resistance. Indeed, marked topo IIalpha down-regulation appeared to be associated with collateral sensitivity to ICRF-159. Our results indicate that the resistance mechanisms that pertain to cleavable complex-forming topo II inhibitors and ICRF-159 are distinct. The evidence presented here suggests that topo IIalpha, not topo IIbeta, is more likely to be the major in vivo target for ICRF-159. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9062401

  18. Trimeric forms of the photosystem I reaction center complex pre-exist in the membranes of the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis.

    PubMed

    Shubin, V V; Tsuprun, V L; Bezsmertnaya, I N; Karapetyan, N V

    1993-11-01

    Oligomeric and monomeric forms of chlorophyll-protein complexes of photosystem I (PSI) have been isolated from the mesophilic cyanobacterium Spirulina [(1992) FEBS Lett. 309, 340-342]. Electron microscopic analysis of the complexes showed that the oligomeric form is a trimer of the shape and dimensions similar to those of the trimer from thermophilic cyanobacteria. The chlorophyl ratio in the isolated trimer and monomer was found to be 7:3. The trimeric form of PSI complex in contrast to the monomeric one contains the chlorophyll emitting at 760 nm (77K), which is also found in Spirulina membranes and therefore could be used as an intrinsic probe for the trimeric complex. The 77K circular dichroism spectrum of the trimeric form is much more similar to that of Spirulina membranes than the spectrum of the monomer. Thus, the trimeric PSI complexes exist and dominate in the Spirulina membranes. PMID:8224233

  19. Four crystal forms of a Bence-Jones protein

    SciTech Connect

    Makino, Debora L.; Henschen-Edman, Agnes H.; McPherson, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Four crystal forms have been grown and characterized by X-ray diffraction of a Bence-Jones protein collected from the urine of a multiple myeloma patient more than 40 y ago. The trigonal crystal form may shed some light on the formation of fibrils common to certain storage diseases. Four crystal forms have been grown and characterized by X-ray diffraction of a Bence-Jones protein collected from the urine of a multiple myeloma patient more than 40 years ago. Closely related tetragonal and orthorhombic forms belonging to space groups P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 and P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 68.7, c = 182.1 and a = 67.7, b = 69.4, c = 87.3 Å, diffract to 1.5 and 1.9 Å, respectively. Two closely related trigonal forms, both belonging to space group P3{sub 1}21 with unit-cell parameters a = b = 154.3 Å but differing by a doubling of the c axis, one 46.9 Å and the other 94.0 Å, diffract to 2.9 and 2.6 Å resolution, respectively. The trigonal crystal of short c-axis length shows a positive indication of twinning. The trigonal crystal of longer c axis, which appeared only after eight months of incubation at room temperature, is likely to be composed of proteolytically degraded molecules and unlike the other crystal forms contains two entire Bence-Jones dimers in the asymmetric unit. This latter crystal form may shed some light on the formation of fibrils common to certain storage diseases.

  20. Immersion freezing of ice nucleating active protein complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, S.; Augustin, S.; Clauss, T.; Voigtländer, J.; Niedermeier, D.; Wex, H.; Stratmann, F.

    2012-08-01

    Biological particles, e.g. bacteria and their Ice Nucleating Active (INA) protein complexes, might play an important role for the ice formation in atmospheric mixed-phase clouds. Therefore, the immersion freezing behavior of INA protein complexes generated from a SnomaxTM solution/suspension was investigated as function of temperature in a range of -5 °C to -38 °C at the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS). The immersion freezing of droplets containing small numbers of INA protein complexes occurs in a temperature range of -7 °C and -10 °C. The experiments performed in the lower temperature range, where all droplets freeze which contain at least one INA protein complex, are used to determine the average number of INA protein complexes present, assuming that the INA protein complexes are Poisson distributed over the droplet ensemble. Knowing the average number of INA protein complexes, the heterogeneous ice nucleation rate and rate coefficient of a single INA protein complex is determined by using the newly-developed CHESS model (stoCHastic model of idEntical poiSSon distributed ice nuclei). Therefore, we assume the ice nucleation process to be of stochastic nature, and a parameterization of the INA protein complex's nucleation rate. Analyzing the results of immersion freezing experiments from literature (SnomaxTM and Pseudomonas syringae bacteria), to results gained in this study, demonstrates that first, a similar temperature dependence of the heterogeneous ice nucleation rate for a single INA protein complex was found in all experiments, second, the shift of the ice fraction curves to higher temperatures can be explained consistently by a higher average number of INA protein complexes being present in the droplet ensemble, and finally the heterogeneous ice nucleation rate of one single INA protein complex might be also applicable for intact Pseudomonas syringae bacteria cells. The results obtained in this study allow a new perspective on the

  1. A RIAM/lamellipodin–talin–integrin complex forms the tip of sticky fingers that guide cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Lagarrigue, Frederic; Vikas Anekal, Praju; Lee, Ho-Sup; Bachir, Alexia I.; Ablack, Jailal N.; Horwitz, Alan F.; Ginsberg, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    The leading edge of migrating cells contains rapidly translocating activated integrins associated with growing actin filaments that form ‘sticky fingers' to sense extracellular matrix and guide cell migration. Here we utilized indirect bimolecular fluorescence complementation to visualize a molecular complex containing a Mig-10/RIAM/lamellipodin (MRL) protein (Rap1-GTP-interacting adaptor molecule (RIAM) or lamellipodin), talin and activated integrins in living cells. This complex localizes at the tips of growing actin filaments in lamellipodial and filopodial protrusions, thus corresponding to the tips of the ‘sticky fingers.' Formation of the complex requires talin to form a bridge between the MRL protein and the integrins. Moreover, disruption of the MRL protein–integrin–talin (MIT) complex markedly impairs cell protrusion. These data reveal the molecular basis of the formation of ‘sticky fingers' at the leading edge of migrating cells and show that an MIT complex drives these protrusions. PMID:26419705

  2. Spectroscopic study on uranyl carboxylate complexes formed at the surface layer of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    Reitz, Thomas; Rossberg, Andre; Barkleit, Astrid; Steudtner, Robin; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja; Merroun, Mohamed L

    2015-02-14

    The complexation of U(vi) at the proteinaceous surface layer (S-layer) of the archaeal strain Sulfolobus acidocaldarius was investigated over a pH range from pH 1.5 to 6 at the molecular scale using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and U L(III)-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The S-layer, which represents the interface between the cell and its environment, is very stable against high temperatures, proteases, and detergents. This allowed the isolation and purification of S-layer ghosts (= empty cells) that maintain the size and shape of the cells. In contrast to many other microbial cell envelope compounds the studied S-layer is not phosphorylated, enabling the investigation of uranyl carboxylate complexes formed at microbial surfaces. The latter are usually masked by preferentially formed uranyl phosphate complexes. We demonstrated that at highly acidic conditions (pH 1.5 to 3) no uranium was bound by the S-layer. In contrast to that, at moderate acidic pH conditions (pH 4.5 and 6) a complexation of U(vi) at the S-layer via deprotonated carboxylic groups was stimulated. Titration studies revealed dissociation constants for the carboxylic groups of glutamic and aspartic acid residues of pK(a) = 4.78 and 6.31. The uranyl carboxylate complexes formed at the S-layer did not show luminescence properties at room temperature, but only under cryogenic conditions. The obtained luminescence maxima are similar to those of uranyl acetate. EXAFS spectroscopy demonstrated that U(vi) in these complexes is mainly coordinated to carboxylate groups in a bidentate binding mode. The elucidation of the molecular structure of these complexes was facilitated by the absence of phosphate groups in the studied S-layer protein. PMID:25387060

  3. Protein composition of 6K2-induced membrane structures formed during Potato virus A infection.

    PubMed

    Lõhmus, Andres; Varjosalo, Markku; Mäkinen, Kristiina

    2016-08-01

    The definition of the precise molecular composition of membranous replication compartments is a key to understanding the mechanisms of virus multiplication. Here, we set out to investigate the protein composition of the potyviral replication complexes. We purified the potyviral 6K2 protein-induced membranous structures from Potato virus A (PVA)-infected Nicotiana benthamiana plants. For this purpose, the 6K2 protein, which is the main inducer of potyviral membrane rearrangements, was expressed in fusion with an N-terminal Twin-Strep-tag and Cerulean fluorescent protein (SC6K) from the infectious PVA cDNA. A non-tagged Cerulean-6K2 (C6K) virus and the SC6K protein alone in the absence of infection were used as controls. A purification scheme exploiting discontinuous sucrose gradient centrifugation followed by Strep-tag-based affinity chromatography was developed. Both (+)- and (-)-strand PVA RNA and viral protein VPg were co-purified specifically with the affinity tagged PVA-SC6K. The purified samples, which contained individual vesicles and membrane clusters, were subjected to mass spectrometry analysis. Data analysis revealed that many of the detected viral and host proteins were either significantly enriched or fully specifically present in PVA-SC6K samples when compared with the controls. Eight of eleven potyviral proteins were identified with high confidence from the purified membrane structures formed during PVA infection. Ribosomal proteins were identified from the 6K2-induced membranes only in the presence of a replicating virus, reinforcing the tight coupling between replication and translation. A substantial number of proteins associating with chloroplasts and several host proteins previously linked with potyvirus replication complexes were co-purified with PVA-derived SC6K, supporting the conclusion that the host proteins identified in this study may have relevance in PVA replication. PMID:26574906

  4. In vivo protein complex topologies: Sights through a cross-linking lens

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Proteins are a remarkable class of molecules that exhibit wide diversity of shapes or topological features that underpin protein interactions and give rise to biological function. In addition to quantitation of abundance levels of proteins in biological systems under a variety of conditions, the field of proteome research has as a primary mission the assignment of function for proteins and if possible, illumination of factors that enable function. For many years, chemical cross-linking methods have been used to provide structural data on single purified proteins and purified protein complexes. However, these methods also offer the alluring possibility to extend capabilities to complex biological samples such as cell lysates or intact living cells where proteins may exhibit native topological features that do not exist in purified form. Recent efforts are beginning to provide glimpses of protein complexes and topologies in cells that suggest continued development will yield novel capabilities to view functional topological features of many protein and complexes as they exist in cells, tissues or other complex samples. This review will describe rationale, challenges and a few success stories along the path of development of cross-linking technologies for measurement of in vivo protein interaction topologies. PMID:22610688

  5. Dynamin Forms a Src Kinase–sensitive Complex with Cbl and Regulates Podosomes and Osteoclast Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bruzzaniti, Angela; Neff, Lynn; Sanjay, Archana; Horne, William C.; De Camilli, Pietro; Baron, Roland

    2005-01-01

    Podosomes are highly dynamic actin-containing adhesion structures found in osteoclasts, macrophages, and Rous sarcoma virus (RSV)-transformed fibroblasts. After integrin engagement, Pyk2 recruits Src and the adaptor protein Cbl, forming a molecular signaling complex that is critical for cell migration, and deletion of any molecule in this complex disrupts podosome ring formation and/or decreases osteoclast migration. Dynamin, a GTPase essential for endocytosis, is also involved in actin cytoskeleton remodeling and is localized to podosomes where it has a role in actin turnover. We found that dynamin colocalizes with Cbl in the actin-rich podosome belt of osteoclasts and that dynamin forms a complex with Cbl in osteoclasts and when overexpressed in 293VnR or SYF cells. The association of dynamin with Cbl in osteoclasts was decreased by Src tyrosine kinase activity and we found that destabilization of the dynamin-Cbl complex involves the recruitment of Src through the proline-rich domain of Cbl. Overexpression of dynamin increased osteoclast bone resorbing activity and migration, whereas overexpression of dynK44A decreased osteoclast resorption and migration. These studies suggest that dynamin, Cbl, and Src coordinately participate in signaling complexes that are important in the assembly and remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, leading to changes in osteoclast adhesion, migration, and resorption. PMID:15872089

  6. Dynamin forms a Src kinase-sensitive complex with Cbl and regulates podosomes and osteoclast activity.

    PubMed

    Bruzzaniti, Angela; Neff, Lynn; Sanjay, Archana; Horne, William C; De Camilli, Pietro; Baron, Roland

    2005-07-01

    Podosomes are highly dynamic actin-containing adhesion structures found in osteoclasts, macrophages, and Rous sarcoma virus (RSV)-transformed fibroblasts. After integrin engagement, Pyk2 recruits Src and the adaptor protein Cbl, forming a molecular signaling complex that is critical for cell migration, and deletion of any molecule in this complex disrupts podosome ring formation and/or decreases osteoclast migration. Dynamin, a GTPase essential for endocytosis, is also involved in actin cytoskeleton remodeling and is localized to podosomes where it has a role in actin turnover. We found that dynamin colocalizes with Cbl in the actin-rich podosome belt of osteoclasts and that dynamin forms a complex with Cbl in osteoclasts and when overexpressed in 293VnR or SYF cells. The association of dynamin with Cbl in osteoclasts was decreased by Src tyrosine kinase activity and we found that destabilization of the dynamin-Cbl complex involves the recruitment of Src through the proline-rich domain of Cbl. Overexpression of dynamin increased osteoclast bone resorbing activity and migration, whereas overexpression of dynK44A decreased osteoclast resorption and migration. These studies suggest that dynamin, Cbl, and Src coordinately participate in signaling complexes that are important in the assembly and remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, leading to changes in osteoclast adhesion, migration, and resorption. PMID:15872089

  7. Single-molecule study of protein-DNA target search mechanisms for dimer-active protein complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Markita; Huang, Wai Mun; Chemla, Yann

    2012-02-01

    Protein-DNA interactions are essential to cellular processes, many of which require proteins to recognize a specific DNA target-site. This search process is well-documented for monomeric proteins, but not as well understood for systems that require dimerization at the target site for activity. We present a single-molecule study of the target-search mechanism of Protelomerase TelK, a recombinase-like protein that is only active as a dimer. We observe that TelK undergoes 1D diffusion on non-target DNA as a monomer, as expected, but becomes immobile on DNA as a dimer or oligomer despite the absence of its target site. We further show that TelK condenses non-target DNA upon dimerization, forming a tightly bound nucleo-protein complex. Together with simulations, our results suggest a search model whereby monomers diffuse along DNA, and subsequently dimerize to form an active complex on target DNA. These results show that target-finding occurs faster than nonspecific dimerization at biologically relevant protein concentrations. This model may provide insights into the search mechanisms of proteins that are active as multimeric complexes for a more accurate and comprehensive model for the target-search process by sequence specific proteins.

  8. Comprehensive analysis of heterotrimeric G-protein complex diversity and their interactions with GPCRs in solution

    PubMed Central

    Hillenbrand, Matthias; Schori, Christian; Schöppe, Jendrik; Plückthun, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Agonist binding to G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) triggers signal transduction cascades involving heterotrimeric G proteins as key players. A major obstacle for drug design is the limited knowledge of conformational changes upon agonist binding, the details of interaction with the different G proteins, and the transmission to movements within the G protein. Although a variety of different GPCR/G protein complex structures would be needed, the transient nature of this complex and the intrinsic instability against dissociation make this endeavor very challenging. We have previously evolved GPCR mutants that display higher stability and retain their interaction with G proteins. We aimed at finding all G-protein combinations that preferentially interact with neurotensin receptor 1 (NTR1) and our stabilized mutants. We first systematically analyzed by coimmunoprecipitation the capability of 120 different G-protein combinations consisting of αi1 or αsL and all possible βγ-dimers to form a heterotrimeric complex. This analysis revealed a surprisingly unrestricted ability of the G-protein subunits to form heterotrimeric complexes, including βγ-dimers previously thought to be nonexistent, except for combinations containing β5. A second screen on coupling preference of all G-protein heterotrimers to NTR1 wild type and a stabilized mutant indicated a preference for those Gαi1βγ combinations containing γ1 and γ11. Heterotrimeric G proteins, including combinations believed to be nonexistent, were purified, and complexes with the GPCR were prepared. Our results shed new light on the combinatorial diversity of G proteins and their coupling to GPCRs and open new approaches to improve the stability of GPCR/G-protein complexes. PMID:25733868

  9. Quantitative assessment of complex formation of nuclear-receptor accessory proteins.

    PubMed

    Graumann, K; Jungbauer, A

    2000-02-01

    Like other nuclear receptors, steroid hormone receptors form large protein hetero-complexes in their inactive, ligand-friendly state. Several heat-shock proteins, immunophilins and others have been identified as members of these highly dynamic complexes. The interaction kinetics and dynamics of hsp90, hsp70, p60 (Hop), FKBP52, FKBP51, p48 (Hip) and p23 have been assessed by a biosensor approach measuring the complex formation in real time. A core chaperone complex has been reconstituted from p60, hsp90 and hsp70. p60 forms a molecular bridge between hsp90 and hsp70 with an affinity in the range of 10(5) M(-1). Dynamics of hsp90-p60 complex formation is modulated by ATP through changes in the co-operativity of interaction. At low protein concentrations ATP stabilizes the complex. Binding of p23 to hsp90 did not change the affinity of the hsp90-p60 complex and the stabilizing effect of ATP. Saturation of the p48-hsp70 interaction could not be achieved, suggesting multiple binding sites. A picture of the protein complex, including stoichiometric coefficients, co-operativity of interaction and equilibrium-binding constants, has been formed. PMID:10642522

  10. Mass Spectrometry of Protein Complexes: From Origins to Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmood, Shahid; Allison, Timothy M.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2015-04-01

    Now routine is the ability to investigate soluble and membrane protein complexes in the gas phase of a mass spectrometer while preserving folded structure and ligand-binding properties. Several recent transformative developments have occurred to arrive at this point. These include advances in mass spectrometry instrumentation, particularly with respect to resolution; the ability to study intact membrane protein complexes released from detergent micelles; and the use of protein unfolding in the gas phase to obtain stability parameters. Together, these discoveries are providing unprecedented information on the compositional heterogeneity of biomacromolecules, the unfolding trajectories of multidomain proteins, and the stability imparted by ligand binding to both soluble and membrane-embedded protein complexes. We review these recent breakthroughs, highlighting the challenges that had to be overcome and the physicochemical insight that can now be gained from studying proteins and their assemblies in the gas phase.

  11. The multidrug resistance efflux complex, EmrAB from Escherichia coli forms a dimer in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, Mikio; Szakonyi, Gerda; Brown, Katherine A.; Henderson, Peter J.F.; Nield, Jon; Byrne, Bernadette

    2009-03-06

    Tripartite efflux systems are responsible for the export of toxins across both the inner and outer membranes of Gram negative bacteria. Previous work has indicated that EmrAB-TolC from Escherichia coli is such a tripartite system, comprised of EmrB an MFS transporter, EmrA, a membrane fusion protein and TolC, an outer membrane channel. The whole complex is predicted to form a continuous channel allowing direct export from the cytoplasm to the exterior of the cell. Little is known, however, about the interactions between the individual components of this system. Reconstitution of EmrA + EmrB resulted in co-elution of the two proteins from a gel filtration column indicating formation of the EmrAB complex. Electron microscopic single particle analysis of the reconstituted EmrAB complex revealed the presence of particles approximately 240 x 140 A, likely to correspond to two EmrAB dimers in a back-to-back arrangement, suggesting the dimeric EmrAB form is the physiological state contrasting with the trimeric arrangement of the AcrAB-TolC system.

  12. Is It Beneficial for the Major Photosynthetic Antenna Complex of Plants To Form Trimers?

    PubMed

    Janik, Ewa; Bednarska, Joanna; Zubik, Monika; Sowinski, Karol; Luchowski, Rafal; Grudzinski, Wojciech; Gruszecki, Wieslaw I

    2015-07-01

    The process of primary electric charge separation in photosynthesis takes place in the reaction centers, but photosynthesis can operate efficiently and fluently due to the activity of several pigment-protein complexes called antenna, which absorb light quanta and transfer electronic excitations toward the reaction centers. LHCII is the major photosynthetic pigment-protein antenna complex of plants and appears in the trimeric form. Several recent reports point to trimeric organization of LHCII as a key factor responsible for the chloroplast architecture via stabilization of granal organization of the thylakoid membranes. In the present work, we address the question of whether such an organization could also directly influence the antenna properties of this pigment-protein complex. Chlorophyll fluorescence analysis reveals that excitation energy transfer in LHCII is substantially more efficient in trimers and dissipative energy losses are higher in monomers. It could be concluded that trimers are exceptionally well suited to perform the antenna function. Possibility of fine regulation of the photosynthetic antenna function via the LHCII trimer-monomer transition is also discussed, based on the fluorescence lifetime analysis in a single chloroplast. PMID:26085037

  13. Proteomic comparison of etioplast and chloroplast protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Plöscher, Matthias; Reisinger, Veronika; Eichacker, Lutz A

    2011-08-12

    Angiosperms grown in darkness develop etioplasts during skotomorphogenesis. It is well known that etioplasts accumulate large quantities of protochlorophyllideoxidoreductase, are devoid of chlorophyll and are the site to assemble the photosynthetic machinery during photomorphogenesis. Proteomic investigation of the membrane protein complexes by Native PAGE, in combination with CyDye labelling and mass spectrometric analysis revealed that etioplasts and chloroplasts share a number of membrane protein complexes characteristic for electron transport, chlorophyll and protein synthesis as well as fatty acid biosynthesis. The complex regulatory function in both developmental states is discussed. PMID:21440687

  14. Resonance assignment of DVU2108 that is part of the Orange Protein complex in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    PubMed

    Neca, António J; Soares, Rui; Carepo, Marta S P; Pauleta, Sofia R

    2016-04-01

    We report the 94 % assignment of DVU2108, a protein belonging to the Orange Protein family, that in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough forms a protein complex named the Orange Protein complex. This complex has been shown to be implicated in the cell division of this organism. DVU2108 is a conserved protein in anaerobic microorganisms and in Desulfovibrio gigas the homologous protein was isolated with a novel Mo-Cu cluster non-covalently attached to the polypeptide chain. However, the heterologously produced DVU2108 did not contain any bound metal. These assignments provide the means to characterize the interaction of DVU2108 with the proteins that form the Orange Protein complex using NMR methods. PMID:26373427

  15. Mechanistic insights into the first Lygus-active β-pore forming protein.

    PubMed

    Jerga, Agoston; Chen, Danqi; Zhang, Chunfen; Fu, Jinping; Kouadio, Jean-Louis K; Wang, Yanfei; Duff, Stephen M G; Howard, Jennifer E; Rydel, Timothy J; Evdokimov, Artem G; Ramaseshadri, Parthasarathy; Evans, Adam; Bolognesi, Renata; Park, Yoonseong; Haas, Jeffrey A

    2016-06-15

    The cotton pests Lygus hesperus and Lygus lineolaris can be controlled by expressing Cry51Aa2.834_16 in cotton. Insecticidal activity of pore-forming proteins is generally associated with damage to the midgut epithelium due to pores, and their biological specificity results from a set of key determinants including proteolytic activation and receptor binding. We conducted mechanistic studies to gain insight into how the first Lygus-active β-pore forming protein variant functions. Biophysical characterization revealed that the full-length Cry51Aa2.834_16 was a stable dimer in solution, and when exposed to Lygus saliva or to trypsin, the protein underwent proteolytic cleavage at the C-terminus of each of the subunits, resulting in dissociation of the dimer to two separate monomers. The monomer showed tight binding to a specific protein in Lygus brush border membranes, and also formed a membrane-associated oligomeric complex both in vitro and in vivo. Chemically cross-linking the β-hairpin to the Cry51Aa2.834_16 body rendered the protein inactive, but still competent to compete for binding sites with the native protein in vivo. Our study suggests that disassociation of the Cry51Aa2.834_16 dimer into monomeric units with unoccupied head-region and sterically unhindered β-hairpin is required for brush border membrane binding, oligomerization, and the subsequent steps leading to insect mortality. PMID:27001423

  16. Protein camouflage in cytochrome c-calixarene complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGovern, Róise E.; Fernandes, Humberto; Khan, Amir R.; Power, Nicholas P.; Crowley, Peter B.

    2012-07-01

    Small molecules that recognize protein surfaces are important tools for modifying protein interaction properties. Since the 1980s, several thousand studies concerning calixarenes and host-guest interactions have been published. Although there is growing interest in protein-calixarene interactions, only limited structural information has been available to date. We now report the crystal structure of a protein-calixarene complex. The water-soluble p-sulfonatocalix[4]arene is shown to bind the lysine-rich cytochrome c at three different sites. Binding curves obtained from NMR titrations reveal an interaction process that involves two or more binding sites. Together, the data indicate a dynamic complex in which the calixarene explores the surface of cytochrome c. In addition to providing valuable information on protein recognition, the data also indicate that the calixarene is a mediator of protein-protein interactions, with potential applications in generating assemblies and promoting crystallization.

  17. Sizing Large Proteins and Protein Complexes by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Ion Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Kaddis, Catherine S.; Lomeli, Shirley H.; Yin, Sheng; Berhane, Beniam; Apostol, Marcin I.; Kickhoefer, Valerie A.; Rome, Leonard H.; Loo, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility with electrospray ionization (ESI) have the capability to measure and detect large noncovalent protein-ligand and protein-protein complexes. Using an ion mobility method termed GEMMA (Gas-Phase Electrophoretic Mobility Molecular Analysis), protein particles representing a range of sizes can be separated by their electrophoretic mobility in air. Highly charged particles produced from a protein complex solution using electrospray can be manipulated to produce singly charged ions which can be separated and quantified by their electrophoretic mobility. Results from ESI-GEMMA analysis from our laboratory and others were compared to other experimental and theoretically determined parameters, such as molecular mass and cryoelectron microscopy and x-ray crystal structure dimensions. There is a strong correlation between the electrophoretic mobility diameter determined from GEMMA analysis and the molecular mass for protein complexes up to 12 MDa, including the 93 kDa enolase dimer, the 480 kDa ferritin 24-mer complex, the 4.6 MDa cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV), and the 9 MDa MVP-vault assembly. ESI-GEMMA is used to differentiate a number of similarly sized vault complexes that are composed of different N-terminal protein tags on the MVP subunit. The average effective density of the proteins and protein complexes studied was 0.6 g/cm3. Moreover, there is evidence that proteins and protein complexes collapse or become more compact in the gas phase in the absence of water. PMID:17434746

  18. Simple Protein Complex Purification and Identification Method Suitable for High- throughput Mapping of Protein Interaction Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Markillie, Lye Meng; Lin, Chiann Tso; Adkins, Joshua N.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Hill, Eric A.; Hooker, Brian S.; Moore, Priscilla A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Shi, Liang; Wiley, H. S.; Kery, Vladimir

    2005-04-11

    Most of the current methods for purification and identification of protein complexes use endogenous expression of affinity tagged bait, tandem affinity tag purification of protein complexes followed by specific elution of complexes from beads, gel separation, in-gel digestion and mass spectrometric analysis of protein interactors. We propose a single affinity tag in vitro pulldown assay with denaturing elution, trypsin digestion in organic solvent and LC ESI MS/MS protein identification using SEQUEST analysis. Our method is simple, easy to scale up and automate thus suitable for high throughput mapping of protein interaction networks and functional proteomics.

  19. Embracing proteins: structural themes in aptamer-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Gelinas, Amy D; Davies, Douglas R; Janjic, Nebojsa

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the structural rules that govern specific, high-affinity binding characteristic of aptamer-protein interactions is important in view of the increasing use of aptamers across many applications. From the modest number of 16 aptamer-protein structures currently available, trends are emerging. The flexible phosphodiester backbone allows folding into precise three-dimensional structures using known nucleic acid motifs as scaffolds that orient specific functional groups for target recognition. Still, completely novel motifs essential for structure and function are found in modified aptamers with diversity-enhancing side chains. Aptamers and antibodies, two classes of macromolecules used as affinity reagents with entirely different backbones and composition, recognize protein epitopes of similar size and with comparably high shape complementarity. PMID:26919170

  20. Reconciling the regulatory role of Munc18 proteins in SNARE-complex assembly

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Asma; Archbold, Julia K.; Hu, Shu-Hong; Norwood, Suzanne J.; Collins, Brett M.; Martin, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane fusion is essential for human health, playing a vital role in processes as diverse as neurotransmission and blood glucose control. Two protein families are key: (1) the Sec1p/Munc18 (SM) and (2) the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins. Whilst the essential nature of these proteins is irrefutable, their exact regulatory roles in membrane fusion remain controversial. In particular, whether SM proteins promote and/or inhibit the SNARE-complex formation required for membrane fusion is not resolved. Crystal structures of SM proteins alone and in complex with their cognate SNARE proteins have provided some insight, however, these structures lack the transmembrane spanning regions of the SNARE proteins and may not accurately reflect the native state. Here, we review the literature surrounding the regulatory role of mammalian Munc18 SM proteins required for exocytosis in eukaryotes. Our analysis suggests that the conflicting roles reported for these SM proteins may reflect differences in experimental design. SNARE proteins appear to require C-terminal immobilization or anchoring, for example through a transmembrane domain, to form a functional fusion complex in the presence of Munc18 proteins. PMID:25485130

  1. Chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry targeting acidic residues in proteins and protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Alexander; Joachimiak, Lukasz A; Unverdorben, Pia; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Frydman, Judith; Förster, Friedrich; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-07-01

    The study of proteins and protein complexes using chemical cross-linking followed by the MS identification of the cross-linked peptides has found increasingly widespread use in recent years. Thus far, such analyses have used almost exclusively homobifunctional, amine-reactive cross-linking reagents. Here we report the development and application of an orthogonal cross-linking chemistry specific for carboxyl groups. Chemical cross-linking of acidic residues is achieved using homobifunctional dihydrazides as cross-linking reagents and a coupling chemistry at neutral pH that is compatible with the structural integrity of most protein complexes. In addition to cross-links formed through insertion of the dihydrazides with different spacer lengths, zero-length cross-link products are also obtained, thereby providing additional structural information. We demonstrate the application of the reaction and the MS identification of the resulting cross-linked peptides for the chaperonin TRiC/CCT and the 26S proteasome. The results indicate that the targeting of acidic residues for cross-linking provides distance restraints that are complementary and orthogonal to those obtained from lysine cross-linking, thereby expanding the yield of structural information that can be obtained from cross-linking studies and used in hybrid modeling approaches. PMID:24938783

  2. Chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry targeting acidic residues in proteins and protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Alexander; Joachimiak, Lukasz A.; Unverdorben, Pia; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Frydman, Judith; Förster, Friedrich; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-01-01

    The study of proteins and protein complexes using chemical cross-linking followed by the MS identification of the cross-linked peptides has found increasingly widespread use in recent years. Thus far, such analyses have used almost exclusively homobifunctional, amine-reactive cross-linking reagents. Here we report the development and application of an orthogonal cross-linking chemistry specific for carboxyl groups. Chemical cross-linking of acidic residues is achieved using homobifunctional dihydrazides as cross-linking reagents and a coupling chemistry at neutral pH that is compatible with the structural integrity of most protein complexes. In addition to cross-links formed through insertion of the dihydrazides with different spacer lengths, zero-length cross-link products are also obtained, thereby providing additional structural information. We demonstrate the application of the reaction and the MS identification of the resulting cross-linked peptides for the chaperonin TRiC/CCT and the 26S proteasome. The results indicate that the targeting of acidic residues for cross-linking provides distance restraints that are complementary and orthogonal to those obtained from lysine cross-linking, thereby expanding the yield of structural information that can be obtained from cross-linking studies and used in hybrid modeling approaches. PMID:24938783

  3. Chromatographic resolution of altered forms of protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Ashendel, C.L.; Minor, P.L.; Baudoin, P.A.; Carlos, M.

    1987-05-01

    Rapid chromatographic resolution of protein kinase C (PKC) in extracts of rat brain on DEAE-cellulose yielded two major peaks of activity. These fractions bound phorbol esters with identical affinity and specificity and had similar ratios of PKC to phorbol ester-binding activities. Chicken egg yolk antibodies raised to PKC in the first fraction reacted with 74 to 76 kilodalton peptides in the second fraction. Chromatography of each fraction on hydroxylapatite yielded similar distributions of three PKC isozymes. Rechromatography of the DEAE-cellulose fractions on DEAE-cellulose confirmed that these forms of PKC were not rapidly interconvertible. Results of experiments in which extracts or fractions were incubated with MgATP and phosphatase inhibitors were consistent with elution of dephospho-PKC in the first fraction while the second fraction contained phospho-PKC. If confirmed, this suggests that a substantial fraction of PKC in rat and mouse tissues exists in the phosphorylated form.

  4. Pore-forming protein toxins: from structure to function.

    PubMed

    Parker, Michael W; Feil, Susanne C

    2005-05-01

    Pore-forming protein toxins (PFTs) are one of Nature's most potent biological weapons. An essential feature of their toxicity is the remarkable property that PFTs can exist either in a stable water-soluble state or as an integral membrane pore. In order to convert from the water-soluble to the membrane state, the toxin must undergo large conformational changes. There are now more than a dozen PFTs for which crystal structures have been determined and the nature of the conformational changes they must undergo is beginning to be understood. Although they differ markedly in their primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures, nearly all can be classified into one of two families based on the types of pores they are thought to form: alpha-PFTs or beta-PFTs. Recent work suggests a number of common features in the mechanism of membrane insertion may exist for each class. PMID:15561302

  5. Biopolymer nanoparticles from heat-treated electrostatic protein-polysaccharide complexes: factors affecting particle characteristics.

    PubMed

    Jones, Owen Griffith; McClements, David Julian

    2010-03-01

    Biopolymer nanoparticles can be formed by heating globular protein-ionic polysaccharide electrostatic complexes above the thermal denaturation temperature of the protein. This study examined how the size and concentration of biopolymer particles formed by heating beta-lactoglobulin-pectin complexes could be manipulated by controlling preparation conditions: pH, ionic strength, protein concentration, holding time, and holding temperature. Biopolymer particle size and concentration increased with increasing holding time (0 to 30 min), decreasing holding temperature (90 to 70 degrees C), increasing protein concentration (0 to 2 wt/wt%), increasing pH (4.5 to 5), and increasing salt concentration (0 to 50 mol/kg). The influence of these factors on biopolymer particle size was attributed to their impact on protein-polysaccharide interactions, and on the kinetics of nucleation and particle growth. The knowledge gained from this study will facilitate the rational design of biopolymer particles with specific physicochemical and functional attributes. PMID:20492252

  6. The biological activities of protein/oleic acid complexes reside in the fatty acid.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Angelo; Spolaore, Barbara; Polverino de Laureto, Patrizia

    2013-06-01

    A complex formed by human α-lactalbumin (α-LA) and oleic acid (OA), named HAMLET, has been shown to have an apoptotic activity leading to the selective death of tumor cells. In numerous publications it has been reported that in the complex α-LA is monomeric and adopts a partly folded or "molten globule" state, leading to the idea that partly folded proteins can have "beneficial effects". The protein/OA molar ratio initially has been reported to be 1:1, while recent data have indicated that the OA-complex is given by an oligomeric protein capable of binding numerous OA molecules per protein monomer. Proteolytic fragments of α-LA, as well as other proteins unrelated to α-LA, can form OA-complexes with biological activities similar to those of HAMLET, thus indicating that a generic protein can form a cytotoxic complex under suitable experimental conditions. Moreover, even the selective tumoricidal activity of HAMLET-like complexes has been questioned. There is recent evidence that the biological activity of long chain unsaturated fatty acids, including OA, can be ascribed to their effect of perturbing the structure of biological membranes and consequently the function of membrane-bound proteins. In general, it has been observed that the cytotoxic effects exerted by HAMLET-like complexes are similar to those reported for OA alone. Overall, these findings can be interpreted by considering that the protein moiety does not have a toxic effect on its own, but merely acts as a solubilising agent for the inherently toxic fatty acid. PMID:23499846

  7. Assembling the puzzle: Oligomerization of α-pore forming proteins in membranes☆

    PubMed Central

    García-Sáez, Ana J.

    2016-01-01

    Pore forming proteins (PFPs) share the ability of creating pores that allow the passage of ions, proteins or other constituents through a wide variety of target membranes, ranging from bacteria to humans. They often cause cell death, as pore formation disrupts the membrane permeability barrier required for maintaining cell homeostasis. The organization into supramolecular complexes or oligomers that pierce the membrane is a common feature of PFPs. However, the molecular pathway of self-assembly and pore opening remains unclear. Here, we review the most recent discoveries in the mechanism of membrane oligomerization and pore formation of a subset of PFPs, the α-PFPs, whose pore-forming domains are formed by helical segments. Only now we are starting to grasp the molecular details of their function, mainly thanks to the introduction of single molecule microscopy and nanoscopy techniques. PMID:26375417

  8. Protein Connectivity in Chemotaxis Receptor Complexes.

    PubMed

    Eismann, Stephan; Endres, Robert G

    2015-12-01

    The chemotaxis sensory system allows bacteria such as Escherichia coli to swim towards nutrients and away from repellents. The underlying pathway is remarkably sensitive in detecting chemical gradients over a wide range of ambient concentrations. Interactions among receptors, which are predominantly clustered at the cell poles, are crucial to this sensitivity. Although it has been suggested that the kinase CheA and the adapter protein CheW are integral for receptor connectivity, the exact coupling mechanism remains unclear. Here, we present a statistical-mechanics approach to model the receptor linkage mechanism itself, building on nanodisc and electron cryotomography experiments. Specifically, we investigate how the sensing behavior of mixed receptor clusters is affected by variations in the expression levels of CheA and CheW at a constant receptor density in the membrane. Our model compares favorably with dose-response curves from in vivo Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements, demonstrating that the receptor-methylation level has only minor effects on receptor cooperativity. Importantly, our model provides an explanation for the non-intuitive conclusion that the receptor cooperativity decreases with increasing levels of CheA, a core signaling protein associated with the receptors, whereas the receptor cooperativity increases with increasing levels of CheW, a key adapter protein. Finally, we propose an evolutionary advantage as explanation for the recently suggested CheW-only linker structures. PMID:26646441

  9. Protein Connectivity in Chemotaxis Receptor Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Eismann, Stephan; Endres, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    The chemotaxis sensory system allows bacteria such as Escherichia coli to swim towards nutrients and away from repellents. The underlying pathway is remarkably sensitive in detecting chemical gradients over a wide range of ambient concentrations. Interactions among receptors, which are predominantly clustered at the cell poles, are crucial to this sensitivity. Although it has been suggested that the kinase CheA and the adapter protein CheW are integral for receptor connectivity, the exact coupling mechanism remains unclear. Here, we present a statistical-mechanics approach to model the receptor linkage mechanism itself, building on nanodisc and electron cryotomography experiments. Specifically, we investigate how the sensing behavior of mixed receptor clusters is affected by variations in the expression levels of CheA and CheW at a constant receptor density in the membrane. Our model compares favorably with dose-response curves from in vivo Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements, demonstrating that the receptor-methylation level has only minor effects on receptor cooperativity. Importantly, our model provides an explanation for the non-intuitive conclusion that the receptor cooperativity decreases with increasing levels of CheA, a core signaling protein associated with the receptors, whereas the receptor cooperativity increases with increasing levels of CheW, a key adapter protein. Finally, we propose an evolutionary advantage as explanation for the recently suggested CheW-only linker structures. PMID:26646441

  10. Electrophoretic behavior of DNA-methyl-CpG-binding domain protein complexes revealed by capillary electrophoreses laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shangwei; Zou, Dandan; Zhao, Bailin; Zhang, Dapeng; Li, Xiangjun; Wang, Hailin

    2015-12-01

    The free solution electrophoretic behavior of DNA-protein complexes depends on their charge and mass in a certain experimental condition, which are two fundamental properties of DNA-protein complexes in free solution. Here, we used CE LIF to study the free solution behavior of DNA-methyl-CpG-binding domain protein (MBD2b) complexes through exploring the relationship between the mobilities, charge, and mass of DNA-protein complexes. This method is based on the effective separation of free DNA and DNA-protein complexes because of their different electrophoretic mobility in a certain electric field. In order to avoid protein adsorption, a polyacrylamide-coated capillary was used. Based on the evaluation of the electrophoretic behavior of formed DNA-MBD2b complexes, we found that the values of (μ0 /μ)-1 were directly proportional to the charge-to-mass ratios of formed complexes, where the μ0 and μ are the mobility of free DNA probe and DNA-protein complex, respectively. The models were further validated by the complex mobilities of protein with various lengths of DNA probes. The deviation of experimental and calculated charge-to-mass ratios of formed complexes from the theoretical data was less than 10%, suggesting that our models are useful to analyze the DNA-binding properties of the purified MBD2b protein and help to analyze other DNA-protein complexes. Additionally, this study enhances the understanding of the influence of the charge-to-mass ratios of formed DNA-protein complexes on their separation and electrophoretic behaviors. PMID:26377303

  11. Identification of Post-translational Modifications of Plant Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Piquerez, Sophie J. M.; Balmuth, Alexi L.; Sklenář, Jan; Jones, Alexandra M.E.; Rathjen, John P.; Ntoukakis, Vardis

    2014-01-01

    Plants adapt quickly to changing environments due to elaborate perception and signaling systems. During pathogen attack, plants rapidly respond to infection via the recruitment and activation of immune complexes. Activation of immune complexes is associated with post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins, such as phosphorylation, glycosylation, or ubiquitination. Understanding how these PTMs are choreographed will lead to a better understanding of how resistance is achieved. Here we describe a protein purification method for nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR)-interacting proteins and the subsequent identification of their post-translational modifications (PTMs). With small modifications, the protocol can be applied for the purification of other plant protein complexes. The method is based on the expression of an epitope-tagged version of the protein of interest, which is subsequently partially purified by immunoprecipitation and subjected to mass spectrometry for identification of interacting proteins and PTMs. This protocol demonstrates that: i). Dynamic changes in PTMs such as phosphorylation can be detected by mass spectrometry; ii). It is important to have sufficient quantities of the protein of interest, and this can compensate for the lack of purity of the immunoprecipitate; iii). In order to detect PTMs of a protein of interest, this protein has to be immunoprecipitated to get a sufficient quantity of protein. PMID:24637539

  12. Coupling protein complex analysis to peptide based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiang; Madian, Ashraf G; Liu, Xiuping; Adamec, Jiri; Regnier, Fred E

    2010-12-01

    Proteolysis is a central component of most proteomics methods. Unfortunately much of the information relating to the structural diversity of proteins is lost during digestion. This paper describes a method in which the native proteome of yeast was subjected to preliminary fractionation by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) prior to trypsin digestion of SEC fractions and reversed phase chromatography-mass spectral analysis to identify tryptic peptides thus generated. Through this approach proteins associated with other proteins in high molecular mass complexes were recognized and identified. A focus of this work was on the identification of Hub proteins that associate with multiple interaction partners. A critical component of this strategy is to choose methods and conditions that maximize retention of native structure during the various stages of analysis prior to proteolysis, especially during cell lysis. Maximum survival of protein complexes during lysis was obtained with the French press and bead-beater methods of cell disruption at approximately pH 8 with 200 mM NaCl in the lysis buffer. Structure retention was favored by higher ionic strength, suggesting that hydrophobic effects are important in maintaining the structure of protein complexes. Recovery of protein complexes declined substantially with storage at any temperature, but storage at -20°C was best when low temperature storage was necessary. Slightly lower recovery was obtained with storage at -80°C while lowest recovery was achieved at 4°C. It was concluded that initial fractionation of native proteins in cell lysates by SEC prior to RPC-MS/MS of tryptic digests can be used to recognize and identify proteins in complexes along with their interaction partners in known protein complexes. PMID:21036361

  13. Fractionation of Thylakoid Membranes with the Nonionic Detergent Octyl-beta-d-glucopyranoside: RESOLUTION OF CHLOROPHYLL-PROTEIN COMPLEX II INTO TWO CHLOROPHYLL-PROTEIN COMPLEXES.

    PubMed

    Camm, E L; Green, B R

    1980-09-01

    The detergent octyl-beta-d-glucopyranoside (30 millimolar in 2 millimolar Tris-maleate, pH 7.0) preferentially extracts complexes containing protein and chlorophylls a plus b (CP) from spinach, leaving a residue highly enriched in CP I (P700-chlorophyll a protein). Use of the detergent results in a relatively gentle extraction since little free chlorophyll is formed and since sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis (on 10% acrylamide) of the extract also reveals the presence of two minor chlorophyll a complexes (apparent molecular weight, 47,000 and 43,000) instead of the usual single complex. The major complex preserved is CP 64, a chlorophyll a/b complex (apparent molecular weight, 64,000) which is an oligomer of another chlorophyll a/b complex, CP 27, the light-harvesting complex (apparent molecular weight, 27,000). Dissociation of each complex reveals two polypeptides (molecular weight, 32,000 and 28,000) and limited proteolysis confirms that those of CP 64 have the same structure as those of CP 27. An additional chlorophyll a/b complex (apparent molecular weight, 29,000) is clearly separable from CP 27, and differs from it and CP 64 in having a higher chlorophyll a/b ratio and a single polypeptide (molecular weight, 29,000) which differs structurally from those of the other complexes. PMID:16661449

  14. Ordered nanoparticle arrays formed on engineered chaperonin protein templates.

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, R. A.; Paavola, C. D.; Howard, J.; Chan, S. L.; Zaluzec, N. J.; Trent, J. D.; Materials Science Division; NASA Ames Research Center; SETI Inst.

    2002-12-01

    Traditional methods for fabricating nanoscale arrays are usually based on lithographic techniques. Alternative new approaches rely on the use of nanoscale templates made of synthetic or biological materials. Some proteins, for example, have been used to form ordered two-dimensional arrays. Here, we fabricated nanoscale ordered arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots by binding preformed nanoparticles onto crystalline protein templates made from genetically engineered hollow double-ring structures called chaperonins. Using structural information as a guide, a thermostable recombinant chaperonin subunit was modified to assemble into chaperonins with either 3 nm or 9 nm apical pores surrounded by chemically reactive thiols. These engineered chaperonins were crystallized into two-dimensional templates up to 20 m in diameter. The periodic solvent-exposed thiols within these crystalline templates were used to size-selectively bind and organize either gold (1.4, 5 or 10nm) or CdSe-ZnS semiconductor (4.5 nm) quantum dots into arrays. The order within the arrays was defined by the lattice of the underlying protein crystal. By combining the self-assembling properties of chaperonins with mutations guided by structural modelling, we demonstrate that quantum dots can be manipulated using modified chaperonins and organized into arrays for use in next-generation electronic and photonic devices.

  15. Ordered nanoparticle arrays formed on engineered chaperonin protein templates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillan, R. Andrew; Paavola, Chad D.; Howard, Jeanie; Chan, Suzanne L.; Zaluzec, Nestor J.; Trent, Jonathan D.

    2002-01-01

    Traditional methods for fabricating nanoscale arrays are usually based on lithographic techniques. Alternative new approaches rely on the use of nanoscale templates made of synthetic or biological materials. Some proteins, for example, have been used to form ordered two-dimensional arrays. Here, we fabricated nanoscale ordered arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots by binding preformed nanoparticles onto crystalline protein templates made from genetically engineered hollow double-ring structures called chaperonins. Using structural information as a guide, a thermostable recombinant chaperonin subunit was modified to assemble into chaperonins with either 3 nm or 9 nm apical pores surrounded by chemically reactive thiols. These engineered chaperonins were crystallized into two-dimensional templates up to 20 microm in diameter. The periodic solvent-exposed thiols within these crystalline templates were used to size-selectively bind and organize either gold (1.4, 5 or 10nm) or CdSe-ZnS semiconductor (4.5 nm) quantum dots into arrays. The order within the arrays was defined by the lattice of the underlying protein crystal. By combining the self-assembling properties of chaperonins with mutations guided by structural modelling, we demonstrate that quantum dots can be manipulated using modified chaperonins and organized into arrays for use in next-generation electronic and photonic devices.

  16. Cross-linking Measurements of In Vivo Protein Complex Topologies*

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Chunxiang; Yang, Li; Hoopmann, Michael R.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Tang, Xiaoting; Weisbrod, Chad R.; Bruce, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Identification and measurement of in vivo protein interactions pose critical challenges in the goal to understand biological systems. The measurement of structures and topologies of proteins and protein complexes as they exist in cells is particularly challenging, yet critically important to improve understanding of biological function because proteins exert their intended function only through the structures and interactions they exhibit in vivo. In the present study, protein interactions in E. coli cells were identified in our unbiased cross-linking approach, yielding the first in vivo topological data on many interactions and the largest set of identified in vivo cross-linked peptides produced to date. These data show excellent agreement with protein and complex crystal structures where available. Furthermore, our unbiased data provide novel in vivo topological information that can impact understanding of biological function, even for cases where high resolution structures are not yet available. PMID:21697552

  17. Form and stability of aluminum hydroxide complexes in dilute solution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hem, John David; Roberson, Charles Elmer

    1967-01-01

    size and orderliness of the polymeric aggregates and was accompanied by a decrease in the pH of the solution. The kinetic experiments and stoichiometric data for solutions aged for long periods provided a means of determining activities of polymerized aluminum. From these values the solubility product for microcrystalline gibbsite was determined to be 2.24 x 10 -3, and its free energy of formation, -? 272.3 0.4 kcal per mole. Where polymerization was observed, the process did not stop with small polynuclear complexes containing a few aluminum ions, but proceeded with aging until macromolecules or colloidal-sized particles were formed.

  18. Biochemical isolation of Argonaute protein complexes by Ago-APP

    PubMed Central

    Hauptmann, Judith; Schraivogel, Daniel; Bruckmann, Astrid; Manickavel, Sudhir; Jakob, Leonhard; Eichner, Norbert; Pfaff, Janina; Urban, Marc; Sprunck, Stefanie; Hafner, Markus; Tuschl, Thomas; Deutzmann, Rainer; Meister, Gunter

    2015-01-01

    During microRNA (miRNA)-guided gene silencing, Argonaute (Ago) proteins interact with a member of the TNRC6/GW protein family. Here we used a short GW protein-derived peptide fused to GST and demonstrate that it binds to Ago proteins with high affinity. This allows for the simultaneous isolation of all Ago protein complexes expressed in diverse species to identify associated proteins, small RNAs, or target mRNAs. We refer to our method as “Ago protein Affinity Purification by Peptides“ (Ago-APP). Furthermore, expression of this peptide competes for endogenous TNRC6 proteins, leading to global inhibition of miRNA function in mammalian cells. PMID:26351695

  19. SnapShot: SMC Protein Complexes Part I.

    PubMed

    Haering, Christian H; Gruber, Stephan

    2016-01-14

    This first of two SnapShots on SMC proteins depicts the composition and architecture of SMC protein complexes and their regulators. Their roles at different stages of the cell cycle will appear in Part II. To view this SnapShot, open or download the PDF. PMID:26771499

  20. Linking structural features of protein complexes and biological function.

    PubMed

    Sowmya, Gopichandran; Breen, Edmond J; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2015-09-01

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) establishes the central basis for complex cellular networks in a biological cell. Association of proteins with other proteins occurs at varying affinities, yet with a high degree of specificity. PPIs lead to diverse functionality such as catalysis, regulation, signaling, immunity, and inhibition, playing a crucial role in functional genomics. The molecular principle of such interactions is often elusive in nature. Therefore, a comprehensive analysis of known protein complexes from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) is essential for the characterization of structural interface features to determine structure-function relationship. Thus, we analyzed a nonredundant dataset of 278 heterodimer protein complexes, categorized into major functional classes, for distinguishing features. Interestingly, our analysis has identified five key features (interface area, interface polar residue abundance, hydrogen bonds, solvation free energy gain from interface formation, and binding energy) that are discriminatory among the functional classes using Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test. Significant correlations between these PPI interface features amongst functional categories are also documented. Salt bridges correlate with interface area in regulator-inhibitors (r = 0.75). These representative features have implications for the prediction of potential function of novel protein complexes. The results provide molecular insights for better understanding of PPIs and their relation to biological functions. PMID:26131659

  1. The tandem affinity purification method: an efficient system for protein complex purification and protein interaction identification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoli; Song, Yuan; Li, Yuhua; Chang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Hua; An, Lizhe

    2010-08-01

    Isolation and identification of protein partners in multi-protein complexes are important in gaining further insights into the cellular roles of proteins and determining the possible mechanisms by which proteins have an effect in the molecular environment. The tandem affinity purification (TAP) method was originally developed in yeast for the purification of protein complexes and identification of protein-protein interactions. With modifications to this method and many variations in the original tag made over the past few years, the TAP system could be applied in mammalian, plant, bacteria and other systems for protein complex analysis. In this review, we describe the application of the TAP method in various organisms, the modification in the tag, the disadvantages, the developments and the future prospects of the TAP method. PMID:20399864

  2. Technical tip: high-resolution isolation of nanoparticle-protein corona complexes from physiological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Silvio, Desirè; Rigby, Neil; Bajka, Balazs; Mayes, Andrew; Mackie, Alan; Baldelli Bombelli, Francesca

    2015-07-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) in contact with biological fluids are generally coated with environmental proteins, forming a stronger layer of proteins around the NP surface called the hard corona. Protein corona complexes provide the biological identity of the NPs and their isolation and characterization are essential to understand their in vitro and in vivo behaviour. Here we present a one-step methodology to recover NPs from complex biological media in a stable non-aggregated form without affecting the structure or composition of the corona. This method allows NPs to be separated from complex fluids containing biological particulates and in a form suitable for use in further experiments. The study has been performed systematically comparing the new proposed methodology to standard approaches for a wide panel of NPs. NPs were first incubated in the biological fluid and successively recovered by sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation in order to separate the NPs and their protein corona from the loosely bound proteins. The isolated NP-protein complexes were characterized by size and protein composition through Dynamic Light Scattering, Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis, SDS-PAGE and LC-MS. The protocol described is versatile and can be applied to diverse nanomaterials and complex fluids. It is shown to have higher resolution in separating the multiple protein corona complexes from a biological environment with a much lower impact on their in situ structure compared to conventional centrifugal approaches.Nanoparticles (NPs) in contact with biological fluids are generally coated with environmental proteins, forming a stronger layer of proteins around the NP surface called the hard corona. Protein corona complexes provide the biological identity of the NPs and their isolation and characterization are essential to understand their in vitro and in vivo behaviour. Here we present a one-step methodology to recover NPs from complex biological media in a stable non-aggregated form without

  3. Rapamycin-binding FKBP25 associates with diverse proteins that form large intracellular entities

    SciTech Connect

    Galat, Andrzej Thai, Robert

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • The hFKBP25 interacts with diverse components of macromolecular entities. • We show that the endogenous human FKBP25 is bound to polyribosomes. • The endogenous hFKBP25 co-immunoprecipitated with nucleosomal proteins. • FKBP25 could induce conformational switch in macromolecular complexes. - Abstract: In this paper, we show some evidence that a member of the FK506-binding proteins, FKBP25 is associated to diverse components that are part of several different intracellular large-molecular mass entities. The FKBP25 is a high-affinity rapamycin-binding immunophilin, which has nuclear translocation signals present in its PPIase domain but it was detected both in the cytoplasm compartment and in the nuclear proteome. Analyses of antiFKBP25-immunoprecipitated proteins have revealed that the endogenous FKBP25 is associated to the core histones of the nucleosome, and with several proteins forming spliceosomal complexes and ribosomal subunits. Using polyclonal antiFKBP25 we have detected FKBP25 associated with polyribosomes. Added RNAs or 0.5 M NaCl release FKBP25 that was associated with the polyribosomes indicating that the immunophilin has an intrinsic capacity to form complexes with polyribonucleotides via its charged surface patches. Rapamycin or FK506 treatments of the polyribosomes isolated from porcine brain, HeLa and K568 cells caused a residual release of the endogenous FKBP25, which suggests that the immunophilin also binds to some proteins via its PPIase cavity. Our proteomics study indicates that the nuclear pool of the FKBP25 targets various nuclear proteins that are crucial for packaging of DNA, chromatin remodeling and pre-mRNA splicing whereas the cytosolic pool of this immunophilin is bound to some components of the ribosome.

  4. Long-lived reactive species formed on proteins induce changes in protein and lipid turnover.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Proteins are major targets for oxidative damage in vivo due to their high abundance and rapid rates of reaction with both one-electron (radical) and two-electron oxidants (e.g. singlet oxygen, hypochlorous acid, peroxynitrous acid, reactive aldehydes). The turnover of both native and modified proteins is critical for maintenance of cell homeostasis, with this occurring via multiple pathways including proteasomes (for cytosolic species), the Lon protease (in mitochondria), and the endo-lysosomal systems (both extra- and intra-cellular species). Evidence has been presented for both enhanced and diminished rates of catabolism of modified proteins, as well as altered turnover of native (unmodified) proteins as a result of damage to these systems, potentially as a result of the accumulation of damaged proteins. In recent studies we have shown that long-lived reactive species forms on proteins (hydroperoxides, chloramines and aldehydes) can modify the activity of proteasomal and lysosomal enzymes. Some of the above species are efficient inhibitors of the tryptic and chymotryptic activities of the 26S proteasome, as well as lysosomal cathepsin and acid lipase activities. These are key species in the turnover of both proteins and lipoproteins. The loss of enzyme activity is accompanied in many cases, by oxidation of critical thiol residues via molecular reactions. For reactive aldehydes (either free or protein-bound) direct enzyme inhibition can occur as well as modulation of protein levels and, in the case of lysosomes, changes in lysosomal numbers. Overall, these data indicate that the formation of reactive species on proteins can modulate cell function by multiple pathways including interference with the turnover of native proteins (including critical cell signalling molecules) and alterations in the rate of clearance of modified proteins. Both pathways may contribute to the development of a number of human pathologies associated with oxidative damage. PMID:26461411

  5. Complex Formed between Intramembrane Metalloprotease SpoIVFB and Its Substrate, Pro-σK.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Halder, Sabyasachi; Kerr, Richard A; Parrell, Daniel; Ruotolo, Brandon; Kroos, Lee

    2016-05-01

    Intramembrane metalloproteases (IMMPs) are conserved from bacteria to humans and control many important signaling pathways, but little is known about how IMMPs interact with their substrates. SpoIVFB is an IMMP that cleaves Pro-σ(K) during Bacillus subtilis endospore formation. When catalytically inactive SpoIVFB was coexpressed with C-terminally truncated Pro-σ(K)(1-126) (which can be cleaved by active SpoIVFB) in Escherichia coli, the substrate dramatically improved solubilization of the enzyme from membranes with mild detergents. Both the Pro(1-20) and σ(K)(21-126) parts contributed to improving SpoIVFB solubilization from membranes, but only the σ(K) part was needed to form a stable complex with SpoIVFB in a pulldown assay. The last 10 residues of SpoIVFB were required for improved solubilization from membranes by Pro-σ(K)(1-126) and for normal interaction with the substrate. The inactive SpoIVFB·Pro-σ(K)(1-126)-His6 complex was stable during affinity purification and gel filtration chromatography. Disulfide cross-linking of the purified complex indicated that it resembled the complex formed in vivo Ion mobility-mass spectrometry analysis resulted in an observed mass consistent with a 4:2 SpoIVFB·Pro-σ(K)(1-126)-His6 complex. Stepwise photobleaching of SpoIVFB fused to a fluorescent protein supported the notion that the enzyme is tetrameric during B. subtilis sporulation. The results provide the first evidence that an IMMP acts as a tetramer, give new insights into how SpoIVFB interacts with its substrate, and lay the foundation for further biochemical analysis of the enzyme·substrate complex and future structural studies. PMID:26953342

  6. Mutant forms of growth factor-binding protein-2 reverse BCR-ABL-induced transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Gishizky, M L; Cortez, D; Pendergast, A M

    1995-01-01

    Growth factor-binding protein 2 (Grb2) is an adaptor protein that links tyrosine kinases to Ras. BCR-ABL is a tyrosine kinase oncoprotein that is implicated in the pathogenesis of Philadelphia chromosome (Ph1)-positive leukemias. Grb2 forms a complex with BCR-ABL and the nucleotide exchange factor Sos that leads to the activation of the Ras protooncogene. In this report we demonstrate that Grb2 mutant proteins lacking amino- or carboxyl-terminal src homology SH3 domains suppress BCR-ABL-induced Ras activation and reverse the oncogenic phenotype. The Grb2 SH3-deletion mutant proteins bind to BCR-ABL and do not impair tyrosine kinase activity. Expression of the Grb2 SH3-deletion mutant proteins in BCR-ABL-transformed Rat-1 fibroblasts and in the human Ph1-positive leukemic cell line K562 inhibits their ability to grow as foci in soft agar and form tumors in nude mice. Furthermore, expression of the Grb2 SH3-deletion mutants in K562 cells induced their differentiation. Because Ras plays an important role in signaling by receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases, the use of interfering mutant Grb2 proteins may be applied to block the proliferation of other cancers that depend in part on activated tyrosine kinases for growth. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7479904

  7. Bringing single-molecule spectroscopy to macromolecular protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Chirlmin; Fareh, Mohamed; Kim, V. Narry

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy offers real-time, nanometer-resolution information. Over the past two decades, this emerging single-molecule technique has been rapidly adopted to investigate the structural dynamics and biological functions of proteins. Despite this remarkable achievement, single-molecule fluorescence techniques must be extended to macromolecular protein complexes that are physiologically more relevant for functional studies. In this review, we present recent major breakthroughs for investigating protein complexes within cell extracts using single-molecule fluorescence. We outline the challenges, future prospects and potential applications of these new single-molecule fluorescence techniques in biological and clinical research. PMID:23200186

  8. Restricted dynamics of water around a protein-carbohydrate complex: Computer simulation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Madhurima; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2012-08-01

    Water-mediated protein-carbohydrate interaction is a complex phenomenon responsible for different biological processes in cellular environment. One of the unexplored but important issues in this area is the role played by water during the recognition process and also in controlling the microscopic properties of the complex. In this study, we have carried out atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of a protein-carbohydrate complex formed between the hyaluronan binding domain of the murine Cd44 protein and the octasaccharide hyaluronan in explicit water. Efforts have been made to explore the heterogeneous influence of the complex on the dynamic properties of water present in different regions around it. It is revealed from our analyses that the heterogeneous dynamics of water around the complex are coupled with differential time scales of formation and breaking of hydrogen bonds at the interface. Presence of a highly rigid thin layer of motionally restricted water molecules bridging the protein and the carbohydrate in the common region of the complex has been identified. Such water molecules are expected to play a crucial role in controlling properties of the complex. Importantly, it is demonstrated that the formation of the protein-carbohydrate complex affects the transverse and longitudinal degrees of freedom of the interfacial water molecules in a heterogeneous manner.

  9. Task Complexity, Focus on Form, and Second Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revesz, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Tasks have received increased attention in SLA research for the past decade, as has the role of focus on form. However, few empirical studies have investigated the relationship among tasks, focus-on-form techniques, and second language (L2) learning outcomes. To help address this gap, the present study examined how the task variable +/- contextual…

  10. Fabrication and morphological characterization of biopolymer particles formed by electrostatic complexation of heat treated lactoferrin and anionic polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Peinado, Irene; Lesmes, Uri; Andrés, Ana; McClements, Julian D

    2010-06-15

    Biopolymer particles fabricated from proteins and/or polysaccharides can be used to encapsulate functional components or to modify various functional properties of materials. In this study, sub-micrometer biopolymer particles were fabricated by electrostatic complexation of heat-denatured protein (lactoferrin, LF) particles with anionic polysaccharides (alginate, carrageenan, or pectin). The aim of the study was to exploit macromolecular electrostatic interactions to form sub-micrometer sized particles and study their stability and morphological characteristics. Initially, protein particles were formed by heat treatment (91 degrees C, 20 min) of a lactoferrin solution (0.2% LF, pH 7), which led to a suspension of protein particles with mean diameter of 200-400 nm and isoelectric point of pI approximately 8.5. Biopolymer particles were then formed by mixing the protein particles with anionic polysaccharides at pH 8 and then lowering the pH to promote electrostatic deposition of polysaccharides onto the protein particle surfaces. The influence of pH (2-11) and ionic strength (0-200 mM NaCl) on the properties and stability of the complexes was studied using turbidity, dynamic light scattering, and electrophoresis measurements. Relatively stable particles could be formed from pH 5 to 8, but appreciable aggregation occurred at lower pH which was attributed to charge neutralization and bridging effects. LF-pectin complexes were relatively stable to salt addition, but LF-carrageenan and LF-alginate complexes exhibited aggregation at higher salt concentrations. These results have important implications for the application of lactoferrin-polysaccharide complexes as functional components in commercial products, such as pharmaceuticals, personal care products, and foods. PMID:20229991

  11. Proteins associated with RNase E in a multicomponent ribonucleolytic complex.

    PubMed Central

    Miczak, A; Kaberdin, V R; Wei, C L; Lin-Chao, S

    1996-01-01

    The Escherichia coli endoribonuclease RNase E is essential for RNA processing and degradation. Earlier work provided evidence that RNase E exists intracellularly as part of a multicomponent complex and that one of the components of this complex is a 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease, polynucleotide phosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.8). To isolate and identify other components of the RNase E complex, FLAG-epitope-tagged RNase E (FLAG-Rne) fusion protein was purified on a monoclonal antibody-conjugated agarose column. The FLAG-Rne fusion protein, eluted by competition with the synthetic FLAG peptide, was found to be associated with other proteins. N-terminal sequencing of these proteins revealed the presence in the RNase E complex not only of polynucleotide phosphorylase but also of DnaK, RNA helicase, and enolase (EC 4.2.1.11). Another protein associated only with epitope-tagged temperature-sensitive (Rne-3071) mutant RNase E but not with the wild-type enzyme is GroEL. The FLAG-Rne complex has RNase E activity in vivo and in vitro. The relative amount of proteins associated with wild-type and Rne-3071 expressed at an elevated temperature differed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8632981

  12. Capillary Isoelectric Focusing-Mass Spectrometry of Proteins and Protein Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Martinovic, Suzana; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Smith, Richard D.

    2004-10-01

    Complex proteome samples require efficient separation and detection methods in order to characterize their protein components. On-line combination of capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF) with electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) is shown as an effective method to analyze complex protein mixtures. Our experience with several microorganisms allowed us to establish successful experimental protocol. Here we use the example of E. coli whole cell lysate for the CIEF separation and MS detection on the intact protein level. The protocol was further adapted for the analysis of the mixture of non-covalent complexes on the intact complex level.

  13. Exposing the subunit diversity within protein complexes: a mass spectrometry approach.

    PubMed

    Rozen, Shelly; Tieri, Alessandra; Ridner, Gabriela; Stark, Ann-Kathrin; Schmaler, Tilo; Ben-Nissan, Gili; Dubiel, Wolfgang; Sharon, Michal

    2013-03-01

    Identifying the list of subunits that make up protein complexes constitutes an important step towards understanding their biological functions. However, such knowledge alone does not reveal the full complexity of protein assemblies, as each subunit can take on multiple forms. Proteins can be post-translationally modified or cleaved, multiple products of alternative splicing can exist, and a single subunit may be encoded by more than one gene. Thus, for a complete description of a protein complex, it is necessary to expose the diversity of its subunits. Adding this layer of information is an important step towards understanding the mechanisms that regulate the activity of protein assemblies. Here, we describe a mass spectrometry-based approach that exposes the array of protein variants that comprise protein complexes. Our method relies on denaturing the protein complex, and separating its constituent subunits on a monolithic column prepared in-house. Following the subunit elution from the column, the flow is split into two fractions, using a Triversa NanoMate robot. One fraction is directed straight into an on-line ESI-QToF mass spectrometer for intact protein mass measurements, while the rest of the flow is fractionated into a 96-well plate for subsequent proteomic analysis. The heterogeneity of subunit composition is then exposed by correlating the subunit sequence identity with the accurate mass. Below, we describe in detail the methodological setting of this approach, its application on the endogenous human COP9 signalosome complex, and the significance of the method for structural mass spectrometry analysis of intact protein complexes. PMID:23296018

  14. Interactions in the TonB-Dependent Energy Transduction Complex: ExbB and ExbD Form Homomultimers

    PubMed Central

    Higgs, Penelope I.; Myers, Paul S.; Postle, Kathleen

    1998-01-01

    The cytoplasmic membrane proteins ExbB and ExbD support TonB-dependent active transport of iron siderophores and vitamin B12 across the essentially unenergized outer membrane of Escherichia coli. In this study, in vivo formaldehyde cross-linking analysis was used to investigate the interactions of T7 epitope-tagged ExbB or ExbD proteins. ExbB and ExbD each formed two unique cross-linked complexes which were not dependent on the presence of TonB, the outer membrane receptor protein FepA, or the other Exb protein. Cross-linking analysis of ExbB- and ExbD-derived size variants demonstrated instead that these ExbB and ExbD complexes were homodimers and homotrimers and suggested that ExbB also interacted with an unidentified protein(s). Cross-linking analysis of epitope-tagged ExbB and ExbD proteins with TonB antisera afforded detection of a previously unrecognized TonB-ExbD cross-linked complex and confirmed the composition of the TonB-ExbB cross-linked complex. The implications of these findings for the mechanism of TonB-dependent energy transduction are discussed. PMID:9811664

  15. Negative Ions Enhance Survival of Membrane Protein Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liko, Idlir; Hopper, Jonathan T. S.; Allison, Timothy M.; Benesch, Justin L. P.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2016-06-01

    Membrane protein complexes are commonly introduced to the mass spectrometer solubilized in detergent micelles. The collisional activation used to remove the detergent, however, often causes protein unfolding and dissociation. As in the case for soluble proteins, electrospray in the positive ion mode is most commonly used for the study of membrane proteins. Here we show several distinct advantages of employing the negative ion mode. Negative polarity can yield lower average charge states for membrane proteins solubilized in saccharide detergents, with enhanced peak resolution and reduced adduct formation. Most importantly, we demonstrate that negative ion mode electrospray ionization (ESI) minimizes subunit dissociation in the gas phase, allowing access to biologically relevant oligomeric states. Together, these properties mean that intact membrane protein ions can be generated in a greater range of solubilizing detergents. The formation of negative ions, therefore, greatly expands the possibilities of using mass spectrometry on this intractable class of protein.

  16. Negative Ions Enhance Survival of Membrane Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Liko, Idlir; Hopper, Jonathan T S; Allison, Timothy M; Benesch, Justin L P; Robinson, Carol V

    2016-06-01

    Membrane protein complexes are commonly introduced to the mass spectrometer solubilized in detergent micelles. The collisional activation used to remove the detergent, however, often causes protein unfolding and dissociation. As in the case for soluble proteins, electrospray in the positive ion mode is most commonly used for the study of membrane proteins. Here we show several distinct advantages of employing the negative ion mode. Negative polarity can yield lower average charge states for membrane proteins solubilized in saccharide detergents, with enhanced peak resolution and reduced adduct formation. Most importantly, we demonstrate that negative ion mode electrospray ionization (ESI) minimizes subunit dissociation in the gas phase, allowing access to biologically relevant oligomeric states. Together, these properties mean that intact membrane protein ions can be generated in a greater range of solubilizing detergents. The formation of negative ions, therefore, greatly expands the possibilities of using mass spectrometry on this intractable class of protein. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27106602

  17. Negative Ions Enhance Survival of Membrane Protein Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liko, Idlir; Hopper, Jonathan T. S.; Allison, Timothy M.; Benesch, Justin L. P.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2016-04-01

    Membrane protein complexes are commonly introduced to the mass spectrometer solubilized in detergent micelles. The collisional activation used to remove the detergent, however, often causes protein unfolding and dissociation. As in the case for soluble proteins, electrospray in the positive ion mode is most commonly used for the study of membrane proteins. Here we show several distinct advantages of employing the negative ion mode. Negative polarity can yield lower average charge states for membrane proteins solubilized in saccharide detergents, with enhanced peak resolution and reduced adduct formation. Most importantly, we demonstrate that negative ion mode electrospray ionization (ESI) minimizes subunit dissociation in the gas phase, allowing access to biologically relevant oligomeric states. Together, these properties mean that intact membrane protein ions can be generated in a greater range of solubilizing detergents. The formation of negative ions, therefore, greatly expands the possibilities of using mass spectrometry on this intractable class of protein.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation strategies for protein-micelle complexes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xi; Kim, Jin-Kyoung; Kim, Yangmee; Bowie, James U; Im, Wonpil

    2016-07-01

    The structure and stability of membrane proteins can vary widely in different detergents and this variability has great practical consequences for working with membrane proteins. Nevertheless, the mechanisms that operate to alter the behavior of proteins in micelles are poorly understood and not predictable. Atomic simulations could provide considerable insight into these mechanisms. Building protein-micelle complexes for simulation is fraught with uncertainty, however, in part because it is often unknown how many detergent molecules are present in the complex. Here, we describe several convenient ways to employ Micelle Builder in CHARMM-GUI to rapidly construct protein-micelle complexes and performed simulations of the isolated voltage-sensor domain of voltage-dependent potassium-selective channel and an antimicrobial peptide papiliocin with varying numbers of detergents. We found that once the detergent number exceeds a threshold, protein-detergent interactions change very little and remain very consistent with experimental observations. Our results provide a platform for future studies of the interplays between protein structure and detergent properties at the atomic level. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov. PMID:26679426

  19. Identifying hierarchical and overlapping protein complexes based on essential protein-protein interactions and "seed-expanding" method.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Many evidences have demonstrated that protein complexes are overlapping and hierarchically organized in PPI networks. Meanwhile, the large size of PPI network wants complex detection methods have low time complexity. Up to now, few methods can identify overlapping and hierarchical protein complexes in a PPI network quickly. In this paper, a novel method, called MCSE, is proposed based on λ-module and "seed-expanding." First, it chooses seeds as essential PPIs or edges with high edge clustering values. Then, it identifies protein complexes by expanding each seed to a λ-module. MCSE is suitable for large PPI networks because of its low time complexity. MCSE can identify overlapping protein complexes naturally because a protein can be visited by different seeds. MCSE uses the parameter λ_th to control the range of seed expanding and can detect a hierarchical organization of protein complexes by tuning the value of λ_th. Experimental results of S. cerevisiae show that this hierarchical organization is similar to that of known complexes in MIPS database. The experimental results also show that MCSE outperforms other previous competing algorithms, such as CPM, CMC, Core-Attachment, Dpclus, HC-PIN, MCL, and NFC, in terms of the functional enrichment and matching with known protein complexes. PMID:25143945

  20. Identifying Hierarchical and Overlapping Protein Complexes Based on Essential Protein-Protein Interactions and “Seed-Expanding” Method

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jun; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Many evidences have demonstrated that protein complexes are overlapping and hierarchically organized in PPI networks. Meanwhile, the large size of PPI network wants complex detection methods have low time complexity. Up to now, few methods can identify overlapping and hierarchical protein complexes in a PPI network quickly. In this paper, a novel method, called MCSE, is proposed based on λ-module and “seed-expanding.” First, it chooses seeds as essential PPIs or edges with high edge clustering values. Then, it identifies protein complexes by expanding each seed to a λ-module. MCSE is suitable for large PPI networks because of its low time complexity. MCSE can identify overlapping protein complexes naturally because a protein can be visited by different seeds. MCSE uses the parameter λ_th to control the range of seed expanding and can detect a hierarchical organization of protein complexes by tuning the value of λ_th. Experimental results of S. cerevisiae show that this hierarchical organization is similar to that of known complexes in MIPS database. The experimental results also show that MCSE outperforms other previous competing algorithms, such as CPM, CMC, Core-Attachment, Dpclus, HC-PIN, MCL, and NFC, in terms of the functional enrichment and matching with known protein complexes. PMID:25143945

  1. Detecting Protein Complexes in Protein Interaction Networks Modeled as Gene Expression Biclusters

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Eileen Marie; Zaki, Nazar; Amin, Amr

    2015-01-01

    Developing suitable methods for the detection of protein complexes in protein interaction networks continues to be an intriguing area of research. The importance of this objective originates from the fact that protein complexes are key players in most cellular processes. The more complexes we identify, the better we can understand normal as well as abnormal molecular events. Up till now, various computational methods were designed for this purpose. However, despite their notable performance, questions arise regarding potential ways to improve them, in addition to ameliorative guidelines to introduce novel approaches. A close interpretation leads to the assent that the way in which protein interaction networks are initially viewed should be adjusted. These networks are dynamic in reality and it is necessary to consider this fact to enhance the detection of protein complexes. In this paper, we present “DyCluster”, a framework to model the dynamic aspect of protein interaction networks by incorporating gene expression data, through biclustering techniques, prior to applying complex-detection algorithms. The experimental results show that DyCluster leads to higher numbers of correctly-detected complexes with better evaluation scores. The high accuracy achieved by DyCluster in detecting protein complexes is a valid argument in favor of the proposed method. DyCluster is also able to detect biologically meaningful protein groups. The code and datasets used in the study are downloadable from https://github.com/emhanna/DyCluster. PMID:26641660

  2. Detecting Protein Complexes in Protein Interaction Networks Modeled as Gene Expression Biclusters.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Eileen Marie; Zaki, Nazar; Amin, Amr

    2015-01-01

    Developing suitable methods for the detection of protein complexes in protein interaction networks continues to be an intriguing area of research. The importance of this objective originates from the fact that protein complexes are key players in most cellular processes. The more complexes we identify, the better we can understand normal as well as abnormal molecular events. Up till now, various computational methods were designed for this purpose. However, despite their notable performance, questions arise regarding potential ways to improve them, in addition to ameliorative guidelines to introduce novel approaches. A close interpretation leads to the assent that the way in which protein interaction networks are initially viewed should be adjusted. These networks are dynamic in reality and it is necessary to consider this fact to enhance the detection of protein complexes. In this paper, we present "DyCluster", a framework to model the dynamic aspect of protein interaction networks by incorporating gene expression data, through biclustering techniques, prior to applying complex-detection algorithms. The experimental results show that DyCluster leads to higher numbers of correctly-detected complexes with better evaluation scores. The high accuracy achieved by DyCluster in detecting protein complexes is a valid argument in favor of the proposed method. DyCluster is also able to detect biologically meaningful protein groups. The code and datasets used in the study are downloadable from https://github.com/emhanna/DyCluster. PMID:26641660

  3. Detecting protein complexes in protein interaction networks using a ranking algorithm with a refined merging procedure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Developing suitable methods for the identification of protein complexes remains an active research area. It is important since it allows better understanding of cellular functions as well as malfunctions and it consequently leads to producing more effective cures for diseases. In this context, various computational approaches were introduced to complement high-throughput experimental methods which typically involve large datasets, are expensive in terms of time and cost, and are usually subject to spurious interactions. Results In this paper, we propose ProRank+, a method which detects protein complexes in protein interaction networks. The presented approach is mainly based on a ranking algorithm which sorts proteins according to their importance in the interaction network, and a merging procedure which refines the detected complexes in terms of their protein members. ProRank + was compared to several state-of-the-art approaches in order to show its effectiveness. It was able to detect more protein complexes with higher quality scores. Conclusions The experimental results achieved by ProRank + show its ability to detect protein complexes in protein interaction networks. Eventually, the method could potentially identify previously-undiscovered protein complexes. The datasets and source codes are freely available for academic purposes at http://faculty.uaeu.ac.ae/nzaki/Research.htm. PMID:24944073

  4. Improved wax mold technique forms complex passages in solid structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellbaum, R. F.; Page, A. D.; Phillips, A. R.

    1971-01-01

    Low-cost fabricating technique produces minute, complex air passages in fluidic devices. Air jet interactions in these function as electronic and electromechanical control systems. Wax cores are fabricated without distortion by two-wax process using nonsoluble pattern-wax and water-soluble wax. Significant steps in fabrication process are discussed.

  5. Structure of haze forming proteins in white wines: Vitis vinifera thaumatin-like proteins.

    PubMed

    Marangon, Matteo; Van Sluyter, Steven C; Waters, Elizabeth J; Menz, Robert I

    2014-01-01

    Grape thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs) play roles in plant-pathogen interactions and can cause protein haze in white wine unless removed prior to bottling. Different isoforms of TLPs have different hazing potential and aggregation behavior. Here we present the elucidation of the molecular structures of three grape TLPs that display different hazing potential. The three TLPs have very similar structures despite belonging to two different classes (F2/4JRU is a thaumatin-like protein while I/4L5H and H2/4MBT are VVTL1), and having different unfolding temperatures (56 vs. 62°C), with protein F2/4JRU being heat unstable and forming haze, while I/4L5H does not. These differences in properties are attributable to the conformation of a single loop and the amino acid composition of its flanking regions. PMID:25463627

  6. Structure of Haze Forming Proteins in White Wines: Vitis vinifera Thaumatin-Like Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Marangon, Matteo; Van Sluyter, Steven C.; Waters, Elizabeth J.; Menz, Robert I.

    2014-01-01

    Grape thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs) play roles in plant-pathogen interactions and can cause protein haze in white wine unless removed prior to bottling. Different isoforms of TLPs have different hazing potential and aggregation behavior. Here we present the elucidation of the molecular structures of three grape TLPs that display different hazing potential. The three TLPs have very similar structures despite belonging to two different classes (F2/4JRU is a thaumatin-like protein while I/4L5H and H2/4MBT are VVTL1), and having different unfolding temperatures (56 vs. 62°C), with protein F2/4JRU being heat unstable and forming haze, while I/4L5H does not. These differences in properties are attributable to the conformation of a single loop and the amino acid composition of its flanking regions. PMID:25463627

  7. Hepatitis delta virus antigen forms dimers and multimeric complexes in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J G; Lemon, S M

    1993-01-01

    Although the hepatitis delta virus genome contains multiple open reading frames, only one of these reading frames is known to be expressed during replication of the virus. This open reading frame encodes two distinct molecular species of hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg), p24 delta and p27 delta, depending on the location of the stop codon which terminates translation. We found antibody specific for p27 delta to be capable of precipitating p24 delta in extracts of infected liver, indicating that p27 delta and p24 delta form heterologous complexes in vivo. After cross-linking with 0.05% glutaraldehyde, specific HDAg dimers were detected in antigen prepared from both the liver and serum of an HDV-infected woodchuck carrier of woodchuck hepatitis virus. Guanidine HCl-denatured HDAg extracted from liver and dialyzed against phosphate-buffered saline sedimented in rate-zonal sucrose density gradients as 15S multimeric complexes. These 15S multimers were stable in the presence of 1.2% Nonidet P-40. After RNase digestion, the 15S complex was reduced to a 12S complex without associated RNA, while boiling for 3 min in 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate-0.5% 2-mercaptoethanol further reduced the 15S complex to 3S HDAg monomers. In the absence of glutaraldehyde cross-linking, HDAg extracted from liver migrated as monomer species in reducing and nonreducing gels, suggesting that the conserved cysteine residue present in p27 delta does not play a role in the formation of either dimers or multimers. On the other hand, an amino-terminal chymotrypsin-digested HDAg fragment, with a predicted length of 81 or less amino acids, retained the ability to form dimers, consistent with the hypothesis that a coiled-coil motif present between residues 27 and 58 may play a role in HDAg protein interactions in vivo. Images PMID:7677957

  8. Protein Labelling with Versatile Phosphorescent Metal Complexes for Live Cell Luminescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Connell, Timothy U; James, Janine L; White, Anthony R; Donnelly, Paul S

    2015-09-28

    To take advantage of the luminescent properties of d(6) transition metal complexes to label proteins, versatile bifunctional ligands were prepared. Ligands that contain a 1,2,3-triazole heterocycle were synthesised using Cu(I) catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition "click" chemistry and were used to form phosphorescent Ir(III) and Ru(II) complexes. Their emission properties were readily tuned, by changing either the metal ion or the co-ligands. The complexes were tethered to the metalloprotein transferrin using several conjugation strategies. The Ir(III)/Ru(II)-protein conjugates could be visualised in cancer cells using live cell imaging for extended periods without significant photobleaching. These versatile phosphorescent protein-labelling agents could be widely applied to other proteins and biomolecules and are useful alternatives to conventional organic fluorophores for several applications. PMID:26264214

  9. Expression of a kinase-dead form of CPK33 involved in florigen complex formation causes delayed flowering

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Nozomi; Endo, Motomu; Araki, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of flowering time is crucial for reproductive success of plants. FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) protein is a central component of florigen and forms a ternary complex with 14-3-3 and FD, a basic leucine zipper transcription factor, in the shoot apex and promotes flowering. This complex formation requires phosphorylation of threonine residue at position 282 of FD. A calcium-dependent protein kinase CPK33 is responsible for the phosphorylation. However, possibly due to functional redundancy among calcium-dependent protein kinases, impact of the loss of CPK33 reported in the previous study was rather limited. Here, we report that expression of a kinase-dead form of CPK33 caused a clear delayed-flowering phenotype, supporting for an important role of CPK33 in florigen function through FD phosphorylation. PMID:26440648

  10. Crystal structure of the stimulatory complex of GTP cyclohydrolase I and its feedback regulatory protein GFRP.

    PubMed

    Maita, Nobuo; Okada, Kengo; Hatakeyama, Kazuyuki; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2002-02-01

    In the presence of phenylalanine, GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) forms a stimulatory 360-kDa complex with GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCHI), which is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin. The crystal structure of the stimulatory complex reveals that the GTPCHI decamer is sandwiched by two GFRP homopentamers. Each GFRP pentamer forms a symmetrical five-membered ring similar to beta-propeller. Five phenylalanine molecules are buried inside each interface between GFRP and GTPCHI, thus enhancing the binding of these proteins. The complex structure suggests that phenylalanine-induced GTPCHI x GFRP complex formation enhances GTPCHI activity by locking the enzyme in the active state. PMID:11818540

  11. Rapid purification of protein complexes from mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Dan; Moskowitz, Neal; Khan, Subarna; Christopher, Scott; Germino, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    The evaluation of the protein binding partner(s) of biologically important proteins is currently an area of intense research, especially since the development of the yeast two-hybrid assay. However, not all protein–protein interactions uncovered by this assay are biologically relevant and another confirmatory assay must be performed. Ideally, this assay should be rapid, versatile and performed under conditions which mimic the ‘normal’ physiological state as closely as possible. Towards this goal, we have constructed two eukaryotic expression vectors that facilitate the purification of a protein of interest, along with any associated proteins, from mammalian cells. These vectors incorporate the following features: (i) a tetracycline-responsive promoter so that the level of protein production can be regulated; (ii) an N-terminal glutathione S-transferase tag or a triple repeat of the HA1 epitope, to facilitate purification of the protein either by glutathione affinity chromatography or immunoprecipitation, respectively, followed by a multiple cloning site; (iii) the gene for the enhanced green fluorescent protein (for detection of the presence of the fusion protein and subcellular localization); (iv) a puromycin marker for the selection of stable transformants; (v) a truncated EBNA protein and oriP sequence for episomal replication of the vector. These latter two features permit expansion of small cultures of transfected cells under puromycin selection, thereby increasing the amount of tagged protein that can be purified. We show that these vectors can be used to direct the doxycycline-inducible expresssion of tagged proteins and to recover tagged CIP1–p21 protein complexes from HeLa cells. Furthermore, we show that these tagged p21-purified complexes contain both cyclin A and Cdk2, which are known to interact with p21, but not β-actin. PMID:10871384

  12. Luminescent Alkyne-Bearing Terbium(III) Complexes and Their Application to Bioorthogonal Protein Labeling.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, William I; Abdelkader, Elwy H; Aulsebrook, Margaret L; Rubbiani, Riccardo; Loh, Choy-Theng; Grace, Michael R; Spiccia, Leone; Gasser, Gilles; Otting, Gottfried; Tuck, Kellie L; Graham, Bim

    2016-02-15

    Two new bifunctional macrocyclic chelate ligands that form luminescent terbium(III) complexes featuring an alkyne group for conjugation to (bio)molecules via the Cu(I)-catalyzed "click" reaction were synthesized. Upon ligation, the complexes exhibit a significant luminescent enhancement when excited at the λ(max) of the "clicked" products. To demonstrate the utility of the complexes for luminescent labeling, they were conjugated in vitro to E. coli aspartate/glutamate-binding protein incorporating a genetically encoded p-azido-L-phenylalanine or p-(azidomethyl)-L-phenylalanine residue. The complexes may prove useful for time-gated assay applications. PMID:26821062

  13. Novel Cul3 binding proteins function to remodel E3 ligase complexes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cullins belong to a family of scaffold proteins that assemble multi-subunit ubiquitin ligase complexes to recruit protein substrates for ubiquitination via unique sets of substrate adaptor, such as Skp1 or Elongin B, and a substrate-binding protein with a conserved protein-protein interacting domain, such as leucine-rich repeats (LRR), a WD40 domain, or a zinc-finger domain. In the case of the Cullin3 (Cul3), it forms a BTB-Cul3-Rbx1 (BCR) ubiquitin ligase complex where it is believed that a BTB domain-containing protein performs dual functions where it serves as both the substrate adaptor and the substrate recognition protein. Results Tandem affinity purification and LC/MS-MS analysis of the BCR complex led to the identification of 10,225 peptides. After the SEQUEST algorithm and CDART program were used for protein identification and domain prediction, we discovered a group of Cul3-bound proteins that contain either the LRR or WD40 domain (CLWs). Further biochemical analysis revealed that the LRR domain-containing CLWs could bind both Cul3 and BTB domain-containing proteins. The dual binding role for the LRR domain-containing CLWs results in causing the BTB-domain protein to become a substrate instead of an adaptor. To further distinguish potential substrates from other components that are part of the BCR ubiquitin ligase complex, we altered the parameters in the SEQUEST algorithm to select for peptide fragments with a modified lysine residue. This method not only identifies the potential substrates of the BCR ubiquitin ligase complex, but it also pinpoints the lysine residue in which the post-translational modification occurs. Interestingly, none of the CLWs were identified by this method, supporting our hypothesis that CLWs were not potential substrates but rather additional components of the BCR ubiquitin ligase complex. Conclusion Our study identified a new set of Cul3-binding proteins known as CLWs via tandem affinity purification and LC

  14. Binding Linkage in a Telomere DNA–Protein Complex at the Ends of Oxytricha nova Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Buczek, Pawel; Orr, Rochelle S.; Pyper, Sean R.; Shum, Mili; Ota, Emily Kimmel Irene; Gerum, Shawn E.; Horvath, Martin P.

    2005-01-01

    Alpha and beta protein subunits of the telomere end binding protein from Oxytricha nova (OnTEBP) combine with telomere single strand DNA to form a protective cap at the ends of chromosomes. We tested how protein–protein interactions seen in the co-crystal structure relate to DNA binding through use of fusion proteins engineered as different combinations of domains and subunits derived from OnTEBP. Joining alpha and beta resulted in a protein that bound single strand telomere DNA with high affinity (KD-DNA=1.4 nM). Another fusion protein, constructed without the C-terminal protein–protein interaction domain of alpha, bound DNA with 200-fold diminished affinity (KD-DNA=290 nM) even though the DNA-binding domains of alpha and beta were joined through a peptide linker. Adding back the alpha C-terminal domain as a separate protein restored high-affinity DNA binding. The binding behaviors of these fusion proteins and the native protein subunits are consistent with cooperative linkage between protein-association and DNA-binding equilibria. Linking DNA–protein stability to protein–protein contacts at a remote site may provide a trigger point for DNA–protein disassembly during telomere replication when the single strand telomere DNA must exchange between a very stable OnTEBP complex and telomerase. PMID:15967465

  15. Analyzing Large Protein Complexes by Structural Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kirshenbaum, Noam; Michaelevski, Izhak; Sharon, Michal

    2010-01-01

    Living cells control and regulate their biological processes through the coordinated action of a large number of proteins that assemble themselves into an array of dynamic, multi-protein complexes1. To gain a mechanistic understanding of the various cellular processes, it is crucial to determine the structure of such protein complexes, and reveal how their structural organization dictates their function. Many aspects of multi-protein complexes are, however, difficult to characterize, due to their heterogeneous nature, asymmetric structure, and dynamics. Therefore, new approaches are required for the study of the tertiary levels of protein organization. One of the emerging structural biology tools for analyzing macromolecular complexes is mass spectrometry (MS)2-5. This method yields information on the complex protein composition, subunit stoichiometry, and structural topology. The power of MS derives from its high sensitivity and, as a consequence, low sample requirement, which enables examination of protein complexes expressed at endogenous levels. Another advantage is the speed of analysis, which allows monitoring of reactions in real time. Moreover, the technique can simultaneously measure the characteristics of separate populations co-existing in a mixture. Here, we describe a detailed protocol for the application of structural MS to the analysis of large protein assemblies. The procedure begins with the preparation of gold-coated capillaries for nanoflow electrospray ionization (nESI). It then continues with sample preparation, emphasizing the buffer conditions which should be compatible with nESI on the one hand, and enable to maintain complexes intact on the other. We then explain, step-by-step, how to optimize the experimental conditions for high mass measurements and acquire MS and tandem MS spectra. Finally, we chart the data processing and analyses that follow. Rather than attempting to characterize every aspect of protein assemblies, this protocol

  16. Modified bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay to study the inhibition of transcription complex formation by JAZ proteins.

    PubMed

    Qi, Tiancong; Song, Susheng; Xie, Daoxin

    2013-01-01

    The jasmonate (JA) ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana repress JA signaling and negatively regulate the JA responses. Recently, JAZ proteins have been found to inhibit the transcriptional function of several transcription factors, among which the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) (GLABRA3 [GL3], ENHANCER OF GLABRA3 [EGL3], and TRANSPARENT TESTA8 [TT8]) and R2R3-MYB (GL1 and MYB75) that can interact with each other to form bHLH-MYB complexes and further control gene expression. The bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay is a widely used technique to study protein-protein interactions in living cells. Here we describe a modified BiFC experimental procedure to study the inhibition of the formation of the bHLH (GL3)-MYB (GL1) complex by JAZ proteins. PMID:23615997

  17. Crystal Structures of the Tryptophan Repressor binding Protein WrbA and complexes with Flavin Mononucleotide

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman,J.; Shapiro, L.

    2005-01-01

    The tryptophan repressor binding protein WrbA binds to the tryptophan repressor protein TrpR. Although the biological role of WrbA remains unclear, it has been proposed to function in enhancing the stability of TrpR-DNA complexes. Sequence database analysis has identified WrbA as a founding member of a flavodoxin-like family of proteins. Here we present crystal structures of WrbA from Deinococcus radiodurans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and their complexes with flavin mononucleotide. The protomer structure is similar to that of previously determined long-chain flavodoxins; however, each contains a conserved inserted region unique to the WrbA family. Interestingly, each WrbA protein forms a homotetramer with 222 symmetry, unique among flavodoxin-like proteins, in which each protomer binds one flavin mononucleotide cofactor molecule.

  18. Human-chromatin-related protein interactions identify a demethylase complex required for chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Marcon, Edyta; Ni, Zuyao; Pu, Shuye; Turinsky, Andrei L; Trimble, Sandra Smiley; Olsen, Jonathan B; Silverman-Gavrila, Rosalind; Silverman-Gavrila, Lorelei; Phanse, Sadhna; Guo, Hongbo; Zhong, Guoqing; Guo, Xinghua; Young, Peter; Bailey, Swneke; Roudeva, Denitza; Zhao, Dorothy; Hewel, Johannes; Li, Joyce; Gräslund, Susanne; Paduch, Marcin; Kossiakoff, Anthony A; Lupien, Mathieu; Emili, Andrew; Wodak, Shoshana J; Greenblatt, Jack

    2014-07-10

    Chromatin regulation is driven by multicomponent protein complexes, which form functional modules. Deciphering the components of these modules and their interactions is central to understanding the molecular pathways these proteins are regulating, their functions, and their relation to both normal development and disease. We describe the use of affinity purifications of tagged human proteins coupled with mass spectrometry to generate a protein-protein interaction map encompassing known and predicted chromatin-related proteins. On the basis of 1,394 successful purifications of 293 proteins, we report a high-confidence (85% precision) network involving 11,464 protein-protein interactions among 1,738 different human proteins, grouped into 164 often overlapping protein complexes with a particular focus on the family of JmjC-containing lysine demethylases, their partners, and their roles in chromatin remodeling. We show that RCCD1 is a partner of histone H3K36 demethylase KDM8 and demonstrate that both are important for cell-cycle-regulated transcriptional repression in centromeric regions and accurate mitotic division. PMID:24981860

  19. Emergence of Complexity in Protein Functions and Metabolic Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andzej

    2009-01-01

    In modern organisms proteins perform a majority of cellular functions, such as chemical catalysis, energy transduction and transport of material across cell walls. Although great strides have been made towards understanding protein evolution, a meaningful extrapolation from contemporary proteins to their earliest ancestors is virtually impossible. In an alternative approach, the origin of water-soluble proteins was probed through the synthesis of very large libraries of random amino acid sequences and subsequently subjecting them to in vitro evolution. In combination with computer modeling and simulations, these experiments allow us to address a number of fundamental questions about the origins of proteins. Can functionality emerge from random sequences of proteins? How did the initial repertoire of functional proteins diversify to facilitate new functions? Did this diversification proceed primarily through drawing novel functionalities from random sequences or through evolution of already existing proto-enzymes? Did protein evolution start from a pool of proteins defined by a frozen accident and other collections of proteins could start a different evolutionary pathway? Although we do not have definitive answers to these questions, important clues have been uncovered. Considerable progress has been also achieved in understanding the origins of membrane proteins. We will address this issue in the example of ion channels - proteins that mediate transport of ions across cell walls. Remarkably, despite overall complexity of these proteins in contemporary cells, their structural motifs are quite simple, with -helices being most common. By combining results of experimental and computer simulation studies on synthetic models and simple, natural channels, I will show that, even though architectures of membrane proteins are not nearly as diverse as those of water-soluble proteins, they are sufficiently flexible to adapt readily to the functional demands arising during

  20. Two modular forms of the mitochondrial sorting and assembly machinery are involved in biogenesis of alpha-helical outer membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Nicolas; Stroud, David A; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Guiard, Bernard; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Becker, Thomas

    2010-02-26

    The mitochondrial outer membrane contains two translocase machineries for precursor proteins--the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM complex) and the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM complex). The TOM complex functions as the main mitochondrial entry gate for nuclear-encoded proteins, whereas the SAM complex was identified according to its function in the biogenesis of beta-barrel proteins of the outer membrane. The SAM complex is required for the assembly of precursors of the TOM complex, including not only the beta-barrel protein Tom40 but also a subset of alpha-helical subunits. While the interaction of beta-barrel proteins with the SAM complex has been studied in detail, little is known about the interaction between the SAM complex and alpha-helical precursor proteins. We report that the SAM is not static but that the SAM core complex can associate with different partner proteins to form two large SAM complexes with different functions in the biogenesis of alpha-helical Tom proteins. We found that a subcomplex of TOM, Tom5-Tom40, associates with the SAM core complex to form a new large SAM complex. This SAM-Tom5/Tom40 complex binds the alpha-helical precursor of Tom6 after the precursor has been inserted into the outer membrane in an Mim1 (mitochondrial import protein 1)-dependent manner. The second large SAM complex, SAM-Mdm10 (mitochondrial distribution and morphology protein), binds the alpha-helical precursor of Tom22 and promotes its membrane integration. We suggest that the modular composition of the SAM complex provides a flexible platform to integrate the sorting pathways of different precursor proteins and to promote their assembly into oligomeric complexes. PMID:20026336

  1. Integrating Mass Spectrometry of Intact Protein Complexes into Structural Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Hyung, Suk-Joon; Ruotolo, Brandon T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Mass spectrometry analysis of intact protein complexes has emerged as an established technology for assessing the composition and connectivity within dynamic, heterogeneous multiprotein complexes at low concentrations and in the context of mixtures. As this technology continues to move forward, one of the main challenges is to integrate the information content of such intact protein complex measurements with other mass spectrometry approaches in structural biology. Methods such as H/D exchange, oxidative foot-printing, chemical cross-linking, affinity purification, and ion mobility separation add complementary information that allows access to every level of protein structure and organization. Here, we survey the structural information that can be retrieved by such experiments, demonstrate the applicability of integrative mass spectrometry approaches in structural proteomics, and look to the future to explore upcoming innovations in this rapidly-advancing area. PMID:22611037

  2. Towards the development of Bacillus subtilis as a cell factory for membrane proteins and protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Zweers, Jessica C; Barák, Imrich; Becher, Dörte; Driessen, Arnold JM; Hecker, Michael; Kontinen, Vesa P; Saller, Manfred J; Vavrová, L'udmila; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2008-01-01

    Background The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis is an important producer of high quality industrial enzymes and a few eukaryotic proteins. Most of these proteins are secreted into the growth medium, but successful examples of cytoplasmic protein production are also known. Therefore, one may anticipate that the high protein production potential of B. subtilis can be exploited for protein complexes and membrane proteins to facilitate their functional and structural analysis. The high quality of proteins produced with B. subtilis results from the action of cellular quality control systems that efficiently remove misfolded or incompletely synthesized proteins. Paradoxically, cellular quality control systems also represent bottlenecks for the production of various heterologous proteins at significant concentrations. Conclusion While inactivation of quality control systems has the potential to improve protein production yields, this could be achieved at the expense of product quality. Mechanisms underlying degradation of secretory proteins are nowadays well understood and often controllable. It will therefore be a major challenge for future research to identify and modulate quality control systems of B. subtilis that limit the production of high quality protein complexes and membrane proteins, and to enhance those systems that facilitate assembly of these proteins. PMID:18394159

  3. Protein tyrosine phosphatase σ targets apical junction complex proteins in the intestine and regulates epithelial permeability

    PubMed Central

    Murchie, Ryan; Guo, Cong-Hui; Persaud, Avinash; Muise, Aleixo; Rotin, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)σ (PTPRS) was shown previously to be associated with susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). PTPσ−/− mice exhibit an IBD-like phenotype in the intestine and show increased susceptibility to acute models of murine colitis. However, the function of PTPσ in the intestine is uncharacterized. Here, we show an intestinal epithelial barrier defect in the PTPσ−/− mouse, demonstrated by a decrease in transepithelial resistance and a leaky intestinal epithelium that was determined by in vivo tracer analysis. Increased tyrosine phosphorylation was observed at the plasma membrane of epithelial cells lining the crypts of the small bowel and colon of the PTPσ−/− mouse, suggesting the presence of PTPσ substrates in these regions. Using mass spectrometry, we identified several putative PTPσ intestinal substrates that were hyper–tyrosine-phosphorylated in the PTPσ−/− mice relative to wild type. Among these were proteins that form or regulate the apical junction complex, including ezrin. We show that ezrin binds to and is dephosphorylated by PTPσ in vitro, suggesting it is a direct PTPσ substrate, and identified ezrin-Y353/Y145 as important sites targeted by PTPσ. Moreover, subcellular localization of the ezrin phosphomimetic Y353E or Y145 mutants were disrupted in colonic Caco-2 cells, similar to ezrin mislocalization in the colon of PTPσ−/− mice following induction of colitis. Our results suggest that PTPσ is a positive regulator of intestinal epithelial barrier, which mediates its effects by modulating epithelial cell adhesion through targeting of apical junction complex-associated proteins (including ezrin), a process impaired in IBD. PMID:24385580

  4. Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shangjin; Han, Yun; Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Yan, Si; Siglin, Amanda E.; Williams, John C.; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Polenova, Tatyana

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are vital for many biological processes. These interactions often result in the formation of protein assemblies that are large in size, insoluble and difficult to crystallize, and therefore are challenging to study by structure biology techniques, such as single crystal X-ray diffraction and solution NMR spectroscopy. Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy is emerging as a promising technique for studies of such protein assemblies because it is not limited by molecular size, solubility or lack of long-range order. In the past several years, we have applied magic angle spinning SSNMR based methods to study several protein complexes. In this chapter, we discuss the general solid-state NMR methodologies employed for structural and dynamics analyses of protein complexes with specific examples from our work on thioredoxin reassemblies, HIV-1 capsid protein assemblies and microtubule-associated protein assemblies. We present protocols for sample preparation and characterization, pulse sequences, SSNMR spectra collection and data analysis. PMID:22167681

  5. Displacement affinity chromatography of protein phosphatase one (PP1) complexes

    PubMed Central

    Moorhead, Greg BG; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Nimick, Mhairi; De Wever, Veerle; Campbell, David G; Gourlay, Robert; Lam, Yun Wah; Lamond, Angus I

    2008-01-01

    Background Protein phosphatase one (PP1) is a ubiquitously expressed, highly conserved protein phosphatase that dephosphorylates target protein serine and threonine residues. PP1 is localized to its site of action by interacting with targeting or regulatory proteins, a majority of which contains a primary docking site referred to as the RVXF/W motif. Results We demonstrate that a peptide based on the RVXF/W motif can effectively displace PP1 bound proteins from PP1 retained on the phosphatase affinity matrix microcystin-Sepharose. Subsequent co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed that each identified binding protein was either a direct PP1 interactor or was in a complex that contains PP1. Our results have linked PP1 to numerous new nuclear functions and proteins, including Ki-67, Rif-1, topoisomerase IIα, several nuclear helicases, NUP153 and the TRRAP complex. Conclusion This modification of the microcystin-Sepharose technique offers an effective means of purifying novel PP1 regulatory subunits and associated proteins and provides a simple method to uncover a link between PP1 and additional cellular processes. PMID:19000314

  6. Conformal Nanopatterning of Extracellular Matrix Proteins onto Topographically Complex Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Jallerat, Quentin; Szymanski, John M.

    2015-01-01

    We report a method for conformal nanopatterning of extracellular matrix proteins onto engineered surfaces independent of underlying microtopography. This enables fibronectin, laminin, and other proteins to be applied to biomaterial surfaces in complex geometries inaccessible using traditional soft lithography techniques. Engineering combinatorial surfaces that integrate topographical and biochemical micropatterns enhances control of the biotic-abiotic interface, used here to understand cardiomyocyte response to competing physical and chemical cues in the microenvironment. PMID:25506720

  7. Biclustering Protein Complex Interactions with a Biclique FindingAlgorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Chris; Zhang, Anne Ya; Holbrook, Stephen

    2006-12-01

    Biclustering has many applications in text mining, web clickstream mining, and bioinformatics. When data entries are binary, the tightest biclusters become bicliques. We propose a flexible and highly efficient algorithm to compute bicliques. We first generalize the Motzkin-Straus formalism for computing the maximal clique from L{sub 1} constraint to L{sub p} constraint, which enables us to provide a generalized Motzkin-Straus formalism for computing maximal-edge bicliques. By adjusting parameters, the algorithm can favor biclusters with more rows less columns, or vice verse, thus increasing the flexibility of the targeted biclusters. We then propose an algorithm to solve the generalized Motzkin-Straus optimization problem. The algorithm is provably convergent and has a computational complexity of O(|E|) where |E| is the number of edges. It relies on a matrix vector multiplication and runs efficiently on most current computer architectures. Using this algorithm, we bicluster the yeast protein complex interaction network. We find that biclustering protein complexes at the protein level does not clearly reflect the functional linkage among protein complexes in many cases, while biclustering at protein domain level can reveal many underlying linkages. We show several new biologically significant results.

  8. Economy of operon formation: cotranscription minimizes shortfall in protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Sneppen, Kim; Pedersen, Steen; Krishna, Sandeep; Dodd, Ian; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2010-01-01

    Genes of prokaryotes and Archaea are often organized in cotranscribed groups, or operons. In contrast, eukaryotic genes are generally transcribed independently. Here we show that there is a substantial economic gain for the cell to cotranscribe genes encoding protein complexes because it synchronizes the fluctuations, or noise, in the levels of the different components. This correlation substantially reduces the shortfall in production of the complex. This benefit is relatively large in small cells such as bacterial cells, in which there are few mRNAs and proteins per cell, and is diminished in larger cells such as eukaryotic cells. PMID:20877578

  9. Discovery of host-viral protein complexes during infection

    PubMed Central

    Rowles, Daniell L.; Terhune, Scott S.; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Viruses have co-evolved with their hosts, developing effective approaches for hijacking and manipulating host cellular processes. Therefore, for their efficient replication and spread, viruses depend on dynamic and temporally-regulated interactions with host proteins. The rapid identification of host proteins targeted by viral proteins during infection provides significant insights into mechanisms of viral protein function. The resulting discoveries often lead to unique and innovative hypotheses on viral protein function. Here, we describe a robust method for identifying virus-host protein interactions and protein complexes, which we have successfully utilized to characterize spatial-temporal protein interactions during infections with either DNA or RNA viruses, including human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), pseudorabies virus (PRV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), Sindbis, and West Nile virus (WNV). This approach involves cryogenic cell lysis, rapid immunoaffinity purification targeting a virus or host protein, followed by identification of associated proteins using mass spectrometry. Like most proteomic approaches, this methodology has evolved over the past few years and continues to evolve. We are presenting here the updated approaches for each step, and discuss alternative strategies allowing for the protocol to be optimized for different biological systems. PMID:23996249

  10. Temperature Sensitive Nanocapsule of Complex Structural Form for Methane Storage

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The processes of methane adsorption, storage and desorption by the nanocapsule are investigated with molecular-dynamic modeling method. The specific nanocapsule shape defines its functioning uniqueness: methane is adsorbed under 40 MPa and at normal temperature with further blocking of methane molecules the K@C601+ endohedral complex in the nanocapsule by external electric field, the storage is performed under normal external conditions, and methane desorption is performed at 350 K. The methane content in the nanocapsule during storage reaches 11.09 mass%. The nanocapsule consists of tree parts: storage chamber, junction and blocking chamber. The storage chamber comprises the nanotube (20,20). The blocking chamber is a short nanotube (20,20) with three holes. The junction consists of the nanotube (10,10) and nanotube (8,8); moreover, the nanotube (8,8) is connected with the storage chamber and nanotube (10,10) with the blocking chamber. The blocking chamber is opened and closed by the transfer of the K@C601+ endohedral complex under electrostatic field action. PMID:20652146

  11. Native Elution of Yeast Protein Complexes Obtained by Affinity Capture.

    PubMed

    LaCava, John; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Rout, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes two options for the native (nondenaturing) elution of protein complexes obtained by affinity capture. The first approach involves the elution of complexes purified through a tag that includes a human rhinovirus 3C protease (PreScission protease) cleavage site sequence between the protein of interest and the tag. Incubation with the protease cleaves immobilized complexes from the affinity medium. The second approach involves the release of protein A-tagged protein complexes using a competitive elution reagent called PEGylOx. The degree of purity of the native assemblies eluted is sample dependent and strongly influenced by the affinity capture. It should be noted that the efficiency of native elution is commonly lower than that of elution by a denaturing agent (e.g., SDS) and the release of the complex will be limited by the activity of the protease or the inhibition constant (Ki) of the competitive release agent. However, an advantage of native release is that some nonspecifically bound materials tend to stay adsorbed to the affinity medium, providing an eluted fraction of higher purity. Finally, keep in mind that the presence of the protease or elution peptide could potentially affect downstream applications; thus, their removal should be considered. PMID:27371597

  12. Substrate Binding Promotes Formation of the Skp1-Cul1-Fbxl3 (SCFFbxl3) Protein Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Yumimoto, Kanae; Muneoka, Tetsuya; Tsuboi, Tomohiro; Nakayama, Keiichi I.

    2013-01-01

    The Skp1–Cul1–F-box protein (SCF) complex is one of the most well characterized types of ubiquitin ligase (E3), with the E3 activity of the complex being regulated in part at the level of complex formation. Fbxl3 is an F-box protein that is responsible for the ubiquitylation and consequent degradation of cryptochromes (Crys) and thus regulates oscillation of the circadian clock. Here we show that formation of the SCFFbxl3 complex is regulated by substrate binding in vivo. Fbxl3 did not associate with Skp1 and Cul1 to a substantial extent in transfected mammalian cells. Unexpectedly, however, formation of the SCFFbxl3 complex was markedly promoted by forced expression of its substrate Cry1 in these cells. A mutant form of Fbxl3 that does not bind to Cry1 was unable to form an SCF complex, suggesting that interaction of Cry1 with Fbxl3 is essential for formation of SCFFbxl3. In contrast, recombinant Fbxl3 associated with recombinant Skp1 and Cul1 in vitro even in the absence of recombinant Cry1. Domain-swap analysis revealed that the COOH-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain of Fbxl3 attenuates the interaction of Skp1, suggesting that a yet unknown protein associated with the COOH-terminal domain of Fbxl3 and inhibited SCF complex formation. Our results thus provide important insight into the regulation of both SCF ubiquitin ligase activity and circadian rhythmicity. PMID:24085301

  13. p300 Forms a Stable, Template-Committed Complex with Chromatin: Role for the Bromodomain

    PubMed Central

    Manning, E. Tory; Ikehara, Tsuyoshi; Ito, Takashi; Kadonaga, James T.; Kraus, W. Lee

    2001-01-01

    The nature of the interaction of coactivator proteins with transcriptionally active promoters in chromatin is a fundamental question in transcriptional regulation by RNA polymerase II. In this study, we used a biochemical approach to examine the functional association of the coactivator p300 with chromatin templates. Using in vitro transcription template competition assays, we observed that p300 forms a stable, template-committed complex with chromatin during the transcription process. The template commitment is dependent on the time of incubation of p300 with the chromatin template and occurs independently of the presence of a transcriptional activator protein. In studies examining interactions between p300 and chromatin, we found that p300 binds directly to chromatin and that the binding requires the p300 bromodomain, a conserved 110-amino-acid sequence found in many chromatin-associated proteins. Furthermore, we observed that the isolated p300 bromodomain binds directly to histones, preferentially to histone H3. However, the isolated p300 bromodomain does not bind to nucleosomal histones under the same assay conditions, suggesting that free histones and nucleosomal histones are not equivalent as binding substrates. Collectively, our results suggest that the stable association of p300 with chromatin is mediated, at least in part, by the bromodomain and is critically important for p300 function. Furthermore, our results suggest a model for p300 function that involves distinct activator-dependent targeting and activator-independent chromatin binding activities. PMID:11359896

  14. Influence of pea protein aggregates on the structure and stability of pea protein/soybean polysaccharide complex emulsions.

    PubMed

    Yin, Baoru; Zhang, Rujing; Yao, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The applications of plant proteins in the food and beverage industry have been hampered by their precipitation in acidic solution. In this study, pea protein isolate (PPI) with poor dispersibility in acidic solution was used to form complexes with soybean soluble polysaccharide (SSPS), and the effects of PPI aggregates on the structure and stability of PPI/SSPS complex emulsions were investigated. Under acidic conditions, high pressure homogenization disrupts the PPI aggregates and the electrostatic attraction between PPI and SSPS facilitates the formation of dispersible PPI/SSPS complexes. The PPI/SSPS complex emulsions prepared from the PPI containing aggregates prove to possess similar droplet structure and similar stability compared with the PPI/SSPS emulsions produced from the PPI in which the aggregates have been previously removed by centrifugation. The oil droplets are protected by PPI/SSPS complex interfacial films and SSPS surfaces. The emulsions show long-term stability against pH and NaCl concentration changes. This study demonstrates that PPI aggregates can also be used to produce stable complex emulsions, which may promote the applications of plant proteins in the food and beverage industry. PMID:25803397

  15. The Effects of Focus on Forms and Focus on Form in Teaching Complex Grammatical Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawlak, Miroslaw

    2012-01-01

    The classroom-based study reported in the present paper sought to compare the effectiveness of the focus on forms (FonFs) and focus on form (FonF) approach in teaching English third conditional to Polish high school students. It involved three intact classes, randomly designated as FonF (n = 34), FonFs (n = 36), and Control (n = 35) with a pretest…

  16. Information-driven modeling of protein-peptide complexes.

    PubMed

    Trellet, Mikael; Melquiond, Adrien S J; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2015-01-01

    Despite their biological importance in many regulatory processes, protein-peptide recognition mechanisms are difficult to study experimentally at the structural level because of the inherent flexibility of peptides and the often transient interactions on which they rely. Complementary methods like biomolecular docking are therefore required. The prediction of the three-dimensional structure of protein-peptide complexes raises unique challenges for computational algorithms, as exemplified by the recent introduction of protein-peptide targets in the blind international experiment CAPRI (Critical Assessment of PRedicted Interactions). Conventional protein-protein docking approaches are often struggling with the high flexibility of peptides whose short sizes impede protocols and scoring functions developed for larger interfaces. On the other side, protein-small ligand docking methods are unable to cope with the larger number of degrees of freedom in peptides compared to small molecules and the typically reduced available information to define the binding site. In this chapter, we describe a protocol to model protein-peptide complexes using the HADDOCK web server, working through a test case to illustrate every steps. The flexibility challenge that peptides represent is dealt with by combining elements of conformational selection and induced fit molecular recognition theories. PMID:25555727

  17. Structures of Lysenin Reveal a Shared Evolutionary Origin for Pore-Forming Proteins And Its Mode of Sphingomyelin Recognition

    PubMed Central

    De Colibus, Luigi; Sonnen, Andreas F.-P.; Morris, Keith J.; Siebert, C. Alistair; Abrusci, Patrizia; Plitzko, Jürgen; Hodnik, Vesna; Leippe, Matthias; Volpi, Emanuela; Anderluh, Gregor; Gilbert, Robert J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Pore-forming proteins insert from solution into membranes to create lesions, undergoing a structural rearrangement often accompanied by oligomerization. Lysenin, a pore-forming toxin from the earthworm Eisenia fetida, specifically interacts with sphingomyelin (SM) and may confer innate immunity against parasites by attacking their membranes to form pores. SM has important roles in cell membranes and lysenin is a popular SM-labeling reagent. The structure of lysenin suggests common ancestry with other pore-forming proteins from a diverse set of eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The complex with SM shows the mode of its recognition by a protein in which both the phosphocholine headgroup and one acyl tail are specifically bound. Lipid interaction studies and assays using viable target cells confirm the functional reliance of lysenin on this form of SM recognition. PMID:22819216

  18. Protein Ligand Complex Guided Approach for Virtual Screening.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Muthukumarasamy; Pandit, Deepak; Vyas, Renu

    2015-01-01

    The target ligand association data is a rich source of information which is not exploited enough for drug design efforts in virtual screening. A java based open-source toolkit for Protein Ligand Network Extraction (J-ProLiNE) focused on protein-ligand complex analysis with several features integrated in a distributed computing network has been developed. Sequence alignment and similarity search components have been automated to yield local, global alignment scores along with similarity and distance scores. 10000 proteins with co-crystallized ligands from pdb and MOAD databases were extracted and analyzed for revealing relationships between targets, ligands and scaffolds. Through this analysis, we could generate a protein ligand network to identify the promiscuous and selective scaffolds for multiple classes of proteins targets. Using J-ProLiNE we created a 507 x 507 matrix of protein targets and native ligands belonging to six enzyme classes and analyzed the results to elucidate the protein-protein, protein-ligand and ligand-ligand interactions. In yet another application of the J-ProLiNE software, we were able to process kinase related information stored in US patents to construct disease-gene-ligand-scaffold networks. It is hoped that the studies presented here will enable target ligand knowledge based virtual screening for inhibitor design. PMID:26138572

  19. Factorial combinations of protein interactions generate a multiplicity of florigen activation complexes in wheat and barley.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengxia; Lin, Huiqiong; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2015-10-01

    The FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) protein is a central component of a mobile flowering signal (florigen) that is transported from leaves to the shoot apical meristem (SAM). Two FT monomers and two DNA-binding bZIP transcription factors interact with a dimeric 14-3-3 protein bridge to form a hexameric protein complex. This complex, designated as the 'florigen activation complex' (FAC), plays a critical role in flowering. The wheat homologue of FT, designated FT1 (= VRN3), activates expression of VRN1 in the leaves and the SAM, promoting flowering under inductive long days. In this study, we show that FT1, other FT-like proteins, and different FD-like proteins, can interact with multiple wheat and barley 14-3-3 proteins. We also identify the critical amino acid residues in FT1 and FD-like proteins required for their interactions, and demonstrate that 14-3-3 proteins are necessary bridges to mediate the FT1-TaFDL2 interaction. Using in vivo bimolecular fluorescent complementation (BiFC) assays, we demonstrate that the interaction between FT1 and 14-3-3 occurs in the cytoplasm, and that this complex is then translocated to the nucleus, where it interacts with TaFDL2 to form a FAC. We also demonstrate that a FAC including FT1, TaFDL2 and Ta14-3-3C can bind to the VRN1 promoter in vitro. Finally, we show that relative transcript levels of FD-like and 14-3-3 genes vary among tissues and developmental stages. Since FD-like proteins determine the DNA specificity of the FACs, variation in FD-like gene expression can result in spatial and temporal modulation of the effects of mobile FT-like signals. PMID:26252567

  20. Pigment Analysis of Chloroplast Pigment-Protein Complexes in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Eskins, Kenneth; Duysen, Murray E.; Olson, Linda

    1983-01-01

    Pigment-protein complexes separated from wheat (Triticum aestivum L. selection ND96-25 by two gel electrophoresis techniques were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography for chlorophylls and carotenoids. The two techniques are compared, and pigment analyses are given for the major reaction centers and light-harvesting complexes. Reaction centers contain mostly chlorophyll a, carotene, and lutein, whereas light-harvesting complexes contain chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, lutein, and neoxanthin. The amounts of violaxanthin are variable. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16662906

  1. Cardiac mitochondrial matrix and respiratory complex protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Covian, Raul

    2012-01-01

    It has become appreciated over the last several years that protein phosphorylation within the cardiac mitochondrial matrix and respiratory complexes is extensive. Given the importance of oxidative phosphorylation and the balance of energy metabolism in the heart, the potential regulatory effect of these classical signaling events on mitochondrial function is of interest. However, the functional impact of protein phosphorylation and the kinase/phosphatase system responsible for it are relatively unknown. Exceptions include the well-characterized pyruvate dehydrogenase and branched chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase regulatory system. The first task of this review is to update the current status of protein phosphorylation detection primarily in the matrix and evaluate evidence linking these events with enzymatic function or protein processing. To manage the scope of this effort, we have focused on the pathways involved in energy metabolism. The high sensitivity of modern methods of detecting protein phosphorylation and the low specificity of many kinases suggests that detection of protein phosphorylation sites without information on the mole fraction of phosphorylation is difficult to interpret, especially in metabolic enzymes, and is likely irrelevant to function. However, several systems including protein translocation, adenine nucleotide translocase, cytochrome c, and complex IV protein phosphorylation have been well correlated with enzymatic function along with the classical dehydrogenase systems. The second task is to review the current understanding of the kinase/phosphatase system within the matrix. Though it is clear that protein phosphorylation occurs within the matrix, based on 32P incorporation and quantitative mass spectrometry measures, the kinase/phosphatase system responsible for this process is ill-defined. An argument is presented that remnants of the much more labile bacterial protein phosphoryl transfer system may be present in the matrix and that the

  2. Stellar Clusters in the NGC 6334 Star-Forming Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.; Martin, Amanda L.; McNeill, Collin J.; Broos, Patrick S.; Garmire, Gordon P.

    2009-07-01

    The full stellar population of NGC 6334, one of the most spectacular regions of massive star formation in the nearby Galaxy, has not been well sampled in past studies. We analyze here a mosaic of two Chandra X-ray Observatory images of the region using sensitive data analysis methods, giving a list of 1607 faint X-ray sources with arcsecond positions and approximate line-of-sight absorption. About 95% of these are expected to be cluster members, most lower mass pre-main-sequence stars. Extrapolating to low X-ray levels, the total stellar population is estimated to be 20,000-30,000 pre-main-sequence stars. The X-ray sources show a complicated spatial pattern with ~10 distinct star clusters. The heavily obscured clusters are mostly associated with previously known far-infrared sources and radio H II regions. The lightly obscured clusters are mostly newly identified in the X-ray images. Dozens of likely OB stars are found, both in clusters and dispersed throughout the region, suggesting that star formation in the complex has proceeded over millions of years. A number of extraordinarily heavily absorbed X-ray sources are associated with the active regions of star formation.

  3. STELLAR CLUSTERS IN THE NGC 6334 STAR-FORMING COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Feigelson, Eric D.; Martin, Amanda L.; McNeill, Collin J.; Broos, Patrick S.; Garmire, Gordon P.

    2009-07-15

    The full stellar population of NGC 6334, one of the most spectacular regions of massive star formation in the nearby Galaxy, has not been well sampled in past studies. We analyze here a mosaic of two Chandra X-ray Observatory images of the region using sensitive data analysis methods, giving a list of 1607 faint X-ray sources with arcsecond positions and approximate line-of-sight absorption. About 95% of these are expected to be cluster members, most lower mass pre-main-sequence stars. Extrapolating to low X-ray levels, the total stellar population is estimated to be 20,000-30,000 pre-main-sequence stars. The X-ray sources show a complicated spatial pattern with {approx}10 distinct star clusters. The heavily obscured clusters are mostly associated with previously known far-infrared sources and radio H II regions. The lightly obscured clusters are mostly newly identified in the X-ray images. Dozens of likely OB stars are found, both in clusters and dispersed throughout the region, suggesting that star formation in the complex has proceeded over millions of years. A number of extraordinarily heavily absorbed X-ray sources are associated with the active regions of star formation.

  4. Forming Stable Complex Communities: Random vs. Evolved Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, David

    We examine the problem of constructing a stable complex community of competing species. We first investigate the case of a randomly generated set of interactions and investigate the different regimes. Here, May showed that if the interactions are not very weak, the system typically does not a steady-state with all species present. We show from simulation that the system typically goes to a non-steady state for interaction strengths above an order 1 multiple of the critical May strength. When demographic stochasticity is added, the system typically jumps from one invadable state to another. For extremely strong competition however, the system does revert to one of a number of steady state. Our model contains, as special cases, the celebrated neutral island theories of Wilson-MacArthur and Hubbell. Moreover, we show that slight deviations from perfect neutrality may lead to each of the phases, as the Hubbell point appears to be quadracritical. If, however, the system is allowed to evolve its set of interactions, each new species inheriting its interactions from its parent species, then the system can produce an interaction matrix which is capable of supporting a large number (> 100) of coexisting species. The key to evolutionary success turns out to be how the child species interacts with its parent.

  5. Study of protein complexes via homology modeling, applied to cysteine proteases and their protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tastan Bishop, Ozlem; Kroon, Matthys

    2011-12-01

    This paper develops and evaluates large-scale calculation of 3D structures of protein complexes by homology modeling as a promising new approach for protein docking. The complexes investigated were papain-like cysteine proteases and their protein inhibitors, which play numerous roles in human and parasitic metabolisms. The structural modeling was performed in two parts. For the first part (evaluation set), nine crystal structure complexes were selected, 1325 homology models of known complexes were rebuilt by various templates including hybrids, allowing an analysis of the factors influencing the accuracy of the models. The important considerations for modeling the interface were protease coverage and inhibitor sequence identity. In the second part (study set), the findings of the evaluation set were used to select appropriate templates to model novel cysteine protease-inhibitor complexes from human and malaria parasites Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. The energy scores, considering the evaluation set, indicate that the models are of high accuracy. PMID:21365221

  6. Macromolecular Composition Dictates Receptor and G Protein Selectivity of Regulator of G Protein Signaling (RGS) 7 and 9-2 Protein Complexes in Living Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Masuho, Ikuo; Xie, Keqiang; Martemyanov, Kirill A.

    2013-01-01

    Regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins play essential roles in the regulation of signaling via G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). With hundreds of GPCRs and dozens of G proteins, it is important to understand how RGS regulates selective GPCR-G protein signaling. In neurons of the striatum, two RGS proteins, RGS7 and RGS9-2, regulate signaling by μ-opioid receptor (MOR) and dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) and are implicated in drug addiction, movement disorders, and nociception. Both proteins form trimeric complexes with the atypical G protein β subunit Gβ5 and a membrane anchor, R7BP. In this study, we examined GTPase-accelerating protein (GAP) activity as well as Gα and GPCR selectivity of RGS7 and RGS9-2 complexes in live cells using a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based assay that monitors dissociation of G protein subunits. We showed that RGS9-2/Gβ5 regulated both Gi and Go with a bias toward Go, but RGS7/Gβ5 could serve as a GAP only for Go. Interestingly, R7BP enhanced GAP activity of RGS7 and RGS9-2 toward Go and Gi and enabled RGS7 to regulate Gi signaling. Neither RGS7 nor RGS9-2 had any activity toward Gz, Gs, or Gq in the absence or presence of R7BP. We also observed no effect of GPCRs (MOR and D2R) on the G protein bias of R7 RGS proteins. However, the GAP activity of RGS9-2 showed a strong receptor preference for D2R over MOR. Finally, RGS7 displayed an four times greater GAP activity relative to RGS9-2. These findings illustrate the principles involved in establishing G protein and GPCR selectivity of striatal RGS proteins. PMID:23857581

  7. Immunoprecipitation and Characterization of Membrane Protein Complexes from Yeast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parra-Belky, Karlett; McCulloch, Kathryn; Wick, Nicole; Shircliff, Rebecca; Croft, Nicolas; Margalef, Katrina; Brown, Jamie; Crabill, Todd; Jankord, Ryan; Waldo, Eric

    2005-01-01

    In this undergraduate biochemistry laboratory experiment, the vacuolar ATPase protein complex is purified from yeast cell extracts by doing immunoprecipitations under nondenaturing conditions. Immunoprecipitations are performed using monoclonal antibodies to facilitate data interpretation, and subunits are separated on the basis of their molecular…

  8. Chloroplast isolation and affinity chromatography for enrichment of low-abundant proteins in complex proteomes.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Roman G; Stael, Simon; Teige, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the proteome is crucial to advance the biological sciences. Low-abundant proteins are of particular interest to many biologists as they include, for example those proteins involved in signal transduction. Recent technological advances resulted in a tremendous increase in protein identification sensitivity by mass spectrometry (MS). However, the dynamic range in protein abundance still forms a fundamental problem that limits the detection of low-abundant proteins in complex proteomes. These proteins will typically escape detection in shotgun MS experiments due to the presence of other proteins at an abundance several-fold higher in order of magnitude. Therefore, specific enrichment strategies are required to overcome this technical limitation of MS-based protein discovery. We have searched for novel signal transduction proteins, more specifically kinases and calcium-binding proteins, and here we describe different approaches for enrichment of these low-abundant proteins from isolated chloroplasts from pea and Arabidopsis for subsequent proteomic analysis by MS. These approaches could be extended to include other signal transduction proteins and target different organelles. PMID:25820724

  9. Protein import and the origin of red complex plastids.

    PubMed

    Gould, Sven B; Maier, Uwe-G; Martin, William F

    2015-06-15

    The number and nature of endosymbioses involving red algal endosymbionts are debated. Gene phylogenies have become the most popular tool to untangle this issue, but they deliver conflicting results. As gene and lineage sampling has increased, so have both the number of conflicting trees and the number of suggestions in the literature for multiple tertiary, and even quaternary, symbioses that might reconcile the tree conflicts. Independent lines of evidence that can address the issue are needed. Here we summarize the mechanism and machinery of protein import into complex red plastids. The process involves protein translocation machinery, known as SELMA, that arose once in evolution, that facilitates protein import across the second outermost of the four plastid membranes, and that is always targeted specifically to that membrane, regardless of where it is encoded today. It is widely accepted that the unity of protein import across the two membranes of primary plastids is strong evidence for their single cyanobacterial origin. Similarly, the unity of SELMA-dependent protein import across the second outermost plastid membrane constitutes strong evidence for the existence of a single red secondary endosymbiotic event at the common origin of all red complex plastids. We furthermore propose that the two outer membranes of red complex plastids are derived from host endoplasmic reticulum in the initial red secondary endosymbiotic event. PMID:26079086

  10. Bovine lactoferrin binds oleic acid to form an anti-tumor complex similar to HAMLET.

    PubMed

    Fang, Bing; Zhang, Ming; Tian, Mai; Jiang, Lu; Guo, Hui Yuan; Ren, Fa Zheng

    2014-04-01

    α-Lactalbumin (α-LA) can bind oleic acid (OA) to form HAMLET-like complexes, which exhibited highly selective anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Considering the structural similarity to α-LA, we conjectured that lactoferrin (LF) could also bind OA to obtain a complex with anti-tumor activity. In this study, LF-OA was prepared and its activity and structural changes were compared with α-LA-OA. The anti-tumor activity was evaluated by methylene blue assay, while the apoptosis mechanism was analyzed using flow cytometry and Western blot. Structural changes of LF-OA were measured by fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism. The interactions of OA with LF and α-LA were evaluated by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). LF-OA was obtained by heat-treatment at pH8.0 with LD50 of 4.88, 4.95 and 4.62μM for HepG2, HT29, and MCF-7 cells, respectively, all of which were 10 times higher than those of α-LA-OA. Similar to HAMLET, LF-OA induced apoptosis in tumor cells through both death receptor- and mitochondrial-mediated pathways. Exposure of tryptophan residues and the hydrophobic regions as well as the loss of tertiary structure were observed in LF-OA. Besides these similarities, LF showed different secondary structure changes when compared with α-LA, with a decrease of α-helix and β-turn and an increase of β-sheet and random coil. ITC results showed that there was a higher binding number of OA to LF than to α-LA, while both of the proteins interacted with OA through van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds. This study provides a theoretical basis for further exploration of protein-OA complexes. PMID:24368211

  11. Properties of protein-chlorophyll complexes from pea (Pisum sativum L.) leaves. The organization of chlorophyll.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, B; Gregory, R P

    1975-01-01

    Chlorophyll-protein-detergent complexes were prepared from pea chloroplasts by using sodium dodecylbenzenesulphonate and polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. Circular-dichroism spectra showed that complex CPI has a dimeric arrangement of chlorophyll a, with additional weaker interactions. Ellipticities were determined for both complexes and for purified chlorophylls in solution, and it is argued that the circular dichroism of complex CPII is derived from chlorophyll-protein interaction rather than from interaction between chlorophylls a and b. The detergent could be removed from the complexes by using urea and gel filtration, leaving the chlorophyll-protein in solution, although in each case a diminished ellipticity indicated some loss of organization. Three-peaked circular-dichroism spectra of chloroplast fragments before and after addition of detergent were compared with a curve obtained by summing graphically the spectra of complexes CPI, CPII and the free-pigment fraction. There was good correspondence at 650 nm, and the longer-wavelength peaks agreed in form and magnitude, but with discrepancies in position. It was concluded that complexes CPI and CPII pre-exist in the original material, but that there is an environmental effect which is destroyed when the complexes are extracted. PMID:1180902

  12. LRRC8 Proteins Form Volume-Regulated Anion Channels that Sense Ionic Strength.

    PubMed

    Syeda, Ruhma; Qiu, Zhaozhu; Dubin, Adrienne E; Murthy, Swetha E; Florendo, Maria N; Mason, Daniel E; Mathur, Jayanti; Cahalan, Stuart M; Peters, Eric C; Montal, Mauricio; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2016-01-28

    The volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) is activated when a cell swells, and it plays a central role in maintaining cell volume in response to osmotic challenges. SWELL1 (LRRC8A) was recently identified as an essential component of VRAC. However, the identity of the pore-forming subunits of VRAC and how the channel is gated by cell swelling are unknown. Here, we show that SWELL1 and up to four other LRRC8 subunits assemble into heterogeneous complexes of ∼800 kDa. When reconstituted into bilayers, LRRC8 complexes are sufficient to form anion channels activated by osmolality gradients. In bilayers, as well as in cells, the single-channel conductance of the complexes depends on the LRRC8 composition. Finally, low ionic strength (Γ) in the absence of an osmotic gradient activates the complexes in bilayers. These data demonstrate that LRRC8 proteins together constitute the VRAC pore and that hypotonic stress can activate VRAC through a decrease in cytoplasmic Γ. PMID:26824658

  13. Structure of the JmjC domain-containing protein NO66 complexed with ribosomal protein Rpl8

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chengliang; Zhang, Qiongdi; Hang, Tianrong; Tao, Yue; Ma, Xukai; Wu, Minhao; Zhang, Xuan Zang, Jianye

    2015-08-28

    The structure of the complex of NO66 and Rpl8 was solved in the native state and NO66 recognizes the consensus motif NHXH . Tetramerization is required for efficient substrate binding and catalysis by NO66. The JmjC domain-containing proteins belong to a large family of oxygenases possessing distinct substrate specificities which are involved in the regulation of different biological processes, such as gene transcription, RNA processing and translation. Nucleolar protein 66 (NO66) is a JmjC domain-containing protein which has been reported to be a histone demethylase and a ribosome protein 8 (Rpl8) hydroxylase. The present biochemical study confirmed the hydroxylase activity of NO66 and showed that oligomerization is required for NO66 to efficiently catalyze the hydroxylation of Rpl8. The structures of NO66{sup 176–C} complexed with Rpl8{sup 204–224} in a tetrameric form and of the mutant protein M2 in a dimeric form were solved. Based on the results of structural and biochemical analyses, the consensus sequence motif NHXH recognized by NO66 was confirmed. Several potential substrates of NO66 were found by a BLAST search according to the consensus sequence motif. When binding to substrate, the relative positions of each subunit in the NO66 tetramer shift. Oligomerization may facilitate the motion of each subunit in the NO66 tetramer and affect the catalytic activity.

  14. Chemical synthesis and X-ray structure of a heterochiral {D-protein antagonist plus vascular endothelial growth factor} protein complex by racemic crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Uppalapati, Maruti; Ault-Riché, Dana; Kenney, John; Lowitz, Joshua; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Kent, Stephen B.H.

    2012-10-23

    Total chemical synthesis was used to prepare the mirror image (D-protein) form of the angiogenic protein vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A). Phage display against D-VEGF-A was used to screen designed libraries based on a unique small protein scaffold in order to identify a high affinity ligand. Chemically synthesized D- and L- forms of the protein ligand showed reciprocal chiral specificity in surface plasmon resonance binding experiments: The L-protein ligand bound only to D-VEGF-A, whereas the D-protein ligand bound only to L-VEGF-A. The D-protein ligand, but not the L-protein ligand, inhibited the binding of natural VEGF{sub 165} to the VEGFR1 receptor. Racemic protein crystallography was used to determine the high resolution X-ray structure of the heterochiral complex consisting of {l_brace}D-protein antagonist + L-protein form of VEGF-A{r_brace}. Crystallization of a racemic mixture of these synthetic proteins in appropriate stoichiometry gave a racemic protein complex of more than 73 kDa containing six synthetic protein molecules. The structure of the complex was determined to a resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}. Detailed analysis of the interaction between the D-protein antagonist and the VEGF-A protein molecule showed that the binding interface comprised a contact surface area of approximately 800 {angstrom}{sup 2} in accord with our design objectives, and that the D-protein antagonist binds to the same region of VEGF-A that interacts with VEGFR1-domain 2.

  15. Chemical synthesis and X-ray structure of a heterochiral {D-protein antagonist plus vascular endothelial growth factor} protein complex by racemic crystallography.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Uppalapati, Maruti; Ault-Riché, Dana; Kenney, John; Lowitz, Joshua; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Kent, Stephen B H

    2012-09-11

    Total chemical synthesis was used to prepare the mirror image (D-protein) form of the angiogenic protein vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A). Phage display against D-VEGF-A was used to screen designed libraries based on a unique small protein scaffold in order to identify a high affinity ligand. Chemically synthesized D- and L- forms of the protein ligand showed reciprocal chiral specificity in surface plasmon resonance binding experiments: The L-protein ligand bound only to D-VEGF-A, whereas the D-protein ligand bound only to L-VEGF-A. The D-protein ligand, but not the L-protein ligand, inhibited the binding of natural VEGF(165) to the VEGFR1 receptor. Racemic protein crystallography was used to determine the high resolution X-ray structure of the heterochiral complex consisting of {D-protein antagonist + L-protein form of VEGF-A}. Crystallization of a racemic mixture of these synthetic proteins in appropriate stoichiometry gave a racemic protein complex of more than 73 kDa containing six synthetic protein molecules. The structure of the complex was determined to a resolution of 1.6 Å. Detailed analysis of the interaction between the D-protein antagonist and the VEGF-A protein molecule showed that the binding interface comprised a contact surface area of approximately 800 Å(2) in accord with our design objectives, and that the D-protein antagonist binds to the same region of VEGF-A that interacts with VEGFR1-domain 2. PMID:22927390

  16. Interactions of cullin3/KCTD5 complexes with both cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins: Evidence for a role in protein stabilization.

    PubMed

    Rutz, Natalja; Heilbronn, Regine; Weger, Stefan

    2015-08-28

    Based on its specific interaction with cullin3 mediated by an N-terminal BTB/POZ homologous domain, KCTD5 has been proposed to function as substrate adapter for cullin3 based ubiquitin E3 ligases. In the present study we tried to validate this hypothesis through identification and characterization of additional KCTD5 interaction partners. For the replication protein MCM7, the zinc finger protein ZNF711 and FAM193B, a yet poorly characterized cytoplasmic protein, we could demonstrate specific interaction with KCTD5 both in yeast two-hybrid and co-precipitation studies in mammalian cells. Whereas trimeric complexes of cullin3 and KCTD5 with the respective KCTD5 binding partner were formed, KCTD5/cullin3 induced polyubiquitylation and/or proteasome-dependent degradation of these binding partners could not be demonstrated. On the contrary, KCTD5 or Cullin3 overexpression increased ZNF711 protein stability. PMID:26188516

  17. Subunit Interactions and Organization of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Intraflagellar Transport Complex A Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Behal, Robert H.; Miller, Mark S.; Qin, Hongmin; Lucker, Ben F.; Jones, Alexis; Cole, Douglas G.

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii intraflagellar transport (IFT) particles can be biochemically resolved into two smaller assemblies, complexes A and B, that contain up to six and 15 protein subunits, respectively. We provide here the proteomic and immunological analyses that verify the identity of all six Chlamydomonas A proteins. Using sucrose density gradient centrifugation and antibody pulldowns, we show that all six A subunits are associated in a 16 S complex in both the cell bodies and flagella. A significant fraction of the cell body IFT43, however, exhibits a much slower sedimentation of ∼2 S and is not associated with the IFT A complex. To identify interactions between the six A proteins, we combined exhaustive yeast-based two-hybrid analysis, heterologous recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli, and analysis of the newly identified complex A mutants, ift121 and ift122. We show that IFT121 and IFT43 interact directly and provide evidence for additional interactions between IFT121 and IFT139, IFT121 and IFT122, IFT140 and IFT122, and IFT140 and IFT144. The mutant analysis further allows us to propose that a subset of complex A proteins, IFT144/140/122, can form a stable 12 S subcomplex that we refer to as the IFT A core. Based on these results, we propose a model for the spatial arrangement of the six IFT A components. PMID:22170070

  18. Interactions of cullin3/KCTD5 complexes with both cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins: Evidence for a role in protein stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Rutz, Natalja; Heilbronn, Regine; Weger, Stefan

    2015-08-28

    Based on its specific interaction with cullin3 mediated by an N-terminal BTB/POZ homologous domain, KCTD5 has been proposed to function as substrate adapter for cullin3 based ubiquitin E3 ligases. In the present study we tried to validate this hypothesis through identification and characterization of additional KCTD5 interaction partners. For the replication protein MCM7, the zinc finger protein ZNF711 and FAM193B, a yet poorly characterized cytoplasmic protein, we could demonstrate specific interaction with KCTD5 both in yeast two-hybrid and co-precipitation studies in mammalian cells. Whereas trimeric complexes of cullin3 and KCTD5 with the respective KCTD5 binding partner were formed, KCTD5/cullin3 induced polyubiquitylation and/or proteasome-dependent degradation of these binding partners could not be demonstrated. On the contrary, KCTD5 or Cullin3 overexpression increased ZNF711 protein stability. - Highlights: • KCTD5 nuclear translocation depends upon M phase and protein oligomerization. • Identification of MCM7, ZNF711 and FAM193 as KCTD5 interaction partners. • Formation of trimeric complexes of KCTD5/cullin3 with MCM7, ZNF711 and FAM193B. • KCTD5 is not involved in polyubiquitylation of MCM7 replication factor. • The KCTD5/cullin3 complex stabilizes ZNF711 transcription factor.

  19. Characterization of a novel meiosis-specific protein within the central element of the synaptonemal complex.

    PubMed

    Hamer, Geert; Gell, Katarina; Kouznetsova, Anna; Novak, Ivana; Benavente, Ricardo; Höög, Christer

    2006-10-01

    During the first meiotic prophase, alignment and synapsis of the homologous chromosomes are mediated by the synaptonemal complex. Incorrect assembly of this complex results in cell death, impaired meiotic recombination and formation of aneuploid germ cells. We have identified a novel mouse meiosis-specific protein, TEX12, and shown it to be a component of the central element structure of the synaptonemal complex at synapsed homologous chromosomes. Only two other central element proteins, SYCE1 and SYCE2, have been identified to date and, using several mouse knockout models, we show that these proteins and TEX12 specifically depend on the synaptonemal transverse filament protein SYCP1 for localization to the meiotic chromosomes. Additionally, we show that TEX12 exactly co-localized with SYCE2, having the same, often punctate, localization pattern. SYCE1, on the other hand, co-localized with SYCP1 and these proteins displayed the same more continuous expression pattern. These co-localization studies were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation experiments that showed that TEX12 specifically co-precipitated with SYCE2. Our results suggest a molecular network within the central elements, in which TEX12 and SYCE2 form a complex that interacts with SYCE1. SYCE1 interacts more directly with SYCP1 and could thus anchor the central element proteins to the transverse filaments. PMID:16968740

  20. Structural Reconstruction of Protein-Protein Complexes Involved in Intracellular Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Klára; Sok, Péter; Reményi, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Signaling complexes within the cell convert extracellular cues into physiological outcomes. Their assembly involves signaling enzymes, allosteric regulators and scaffold proteins that often contain long stretches of disordered protein regions, display multi-domain architectures, and binding affinity between individual components is low. These features are indispensable for their central roles as dynamic information processing hubs, on the other hand they also make reconstruction of structurally homogeneous complex samples highly challenging. In this present chapter we discuss protein machinery which influences extracellular signal reception, intracellular pathway activity, and cytoskeletal or transcriptional activity. PMID:27165334

  1. 21 CFR 520.1802 - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms. 520.1802 Section 520.1802 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... § 520.1802 Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms....

  2. 21 CFR 520.1802 - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms. 520.1802 Section 520.1802 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... § 520.1802 Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms....

  3. 21 CFR 520.1802 - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms. 520.1802 Section 520.1802 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... § 520.1802 Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms....

  4. 21 CFR 520.1802 - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms. 520.1802 Section 520.1802 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... § 520.1802 Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms....

  5. 21 CFR 520.1802 - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms. 520.1802 Section 520.1802 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... § 520.1802 Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms....

  6. Modeling of protein binary complexes using structural mass spectrometry data

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, J.K. Amisha; Chance, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we describe a general approach to modeling the structure of binary protein complexes using structural mass spectrometry data combined with molecular docking. In the first step, hydroxyl radical mediated oxidative protein footprinting is used to identify residues that experience conformational reorganization due to binding or participate in the binding interface. In the second step, a three-dimensional atomic structure of the complex is derived by computational modeling. Homology modeling approaches are used to define the structures of the individual proteins if footprinting detects significant conformational reorganization as a function of complex formation. A three-dimensional model of the complex is constructed from these binary partners using the ClusPro program, which is composed of docking, energy filtering, and clustering steps. Footprinting data are used to incorporate constraints—positive and/or negative—in the docking step and are also used to decide the type of energy filter—electrostatics or desolvation—in the successive energy-filtering step. By using this approach, we examine the structure of a number of binary complexes of monomeric actin and compare the results to crystallographic data. Based on docking alone, a number of competing models with widely varying structures are observed, one of which is likely to agree with crystallographic data. When the docking steps are guided by footprinting data, accurate models emerge as top scoring. We demonstrate this method with the actin/gelsolin segment-1 complex. We also provide a structural model for the actin/cofilin complex using this approach which does not have a crystal or NMR structure. PMID:18042684

  7. From Nonspecific DNA–Protein Encounter Complexes to the Prediction of DNA–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Mu; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    DNA–protein interactions are involved in many essential biological activities. Because there is no simple mapping code between DNA base pairs and protein amino acids, the prediction of DNA–protein interactions is a challenging problem. Here, we present a novel computational approach for predicting DNA-binding protein residues and DNA–protein interaction modes without knowing its specific DNA target sequence. Given the structure of a DNA-binding protein, the method first generates an ensemble of complex structures obtained by rigid-body docking with a nonspecific canonical B-DNA. Representative models are subsequently selected through clustering and ranking by their DNA–protein interfacial energy. Analysis of these encounter complex models suggests that the recognition sites for specific DNA binding are usually favorable interaction sites for the nonspecific DNA probe and that nonspecific DNA–protein interaction modes exhibit some similarity to specific DNA–protein binding modes. Although the method requires as input the knowledge that the protein binds DNA, in benchmark tests, it achieves better performance in identifying DNA-binding sites than three previously established methods, which are based on sophisticated machine-learning techniques. We further apply our method to protein structures predicted through modeling and demonstrate that our method performs satisfactorily on protein models whose root-mean-square Cα deviation from native is up to 5 Å from their native structures. This study provides valuable structural insights into how a specific DNA-binding protein interacts with a nonspecific DNA sequence. The similarity between the specific DNA–protein interaction mode and nonspecific interaction modes may reflect an important sampling step in search of its specific DNA targets by a DNA-binding protein. PMID:19343221

  8. Two Clathrin Adaptor Protein Complexes Instruct Axon-Dendrite Polarity.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengpeng; Merrill, Sean A; Jorgensen, Erik M; Shen, Kang

    2016-05-01

    The cardinal feature of neuronal polarization is the establishment and maintenance of axons and dendrites. How axonal and dendritic proteins are sorted and targeted to different compartments is poorly understood. Here, we identified distinct dileucine motifs that are necessary and sufficient to target transmembrane proteins to either the axon or the dendrite through direct interactions with the clathrin-associated adaptor protein complexes (APs) in C. elegans. Axonal targeting requires AP-3, while dendritic targeting is mediated by AP-1. The axonal dileucine motif binds to AP-3 with higher efficiency than to AP-1. Both AP-3 and AP-1 are localized to the Golgi but occupy adjacent domains. We propose that AP-3 and AP-1 directly select transmembrane proteins and target them to axon and dendrite, respectively, by sorting them into distinct vesicle pools. PMID:27151641

  9. A New Look on Protein-Polyphenol Complexation during Honey Storage: Is This a Random or Organized Event with the Help of Dirigent-Like Proteins?

    PubMed Central

    Brudzynski, Katrina; Sjaarda, Calvin; Maldonado-Alvarez, Liset

    2013-01-01

    Honey storage initiates melanoidin formation that involves a cascade of seemingly unguided redox reactions between amino acids/proteins, reducing sugars and polyphenols. In the process, high molecular weight protein-polyphenol complexes are formed, but the mechanism involved remains unknown. The objective of this study was twofold: to determine quantitative and qualitative changes in proteins in honeys stored for prolonged times and in different temperatures and to relate these changes to the formation of protein-polyphenol complexes. Six -month storage decreased the protein content by 46.7% in all tested honeys (t-test, p<0.002) with the rapid reduction occurring during the first three month. The changes in protein levels coincided with alterations in molecular size and net charge of proteins on SDS –PAGE. Electro-blotted proteins reacted with a quinone-specific nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) on nitrocellulose membranes indicating that quinones derived from oxidized polyphenols formed covalent bonds with proteins. Protein-polyphenol complexes isolated by size-exclusion chromatography differed in size and stoichiometry and fall into two categories: (a) high molecular weight complexes (230–180 kDa) enriched in proteins but possessing a limited reducing activity toward the NBT and (b) lower molecular size complexes (110–85 kDa) enriched in polyphenols but strongly reducing the dye. The variable stoichiometry suggest that the large, “protein-type” complexes were formed by protein cross-linking, while in the smaller, “polyphenol-type” complexes polyphenols were first polymerized prior to protein binding. Quinones preferentially bound a 31 kDa protein which, by the electrospray quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (ESI-Qtof-MS) analysis, showed homology to dirigent-like proteins known for assisting in radical coupling and polymerization of phenolic compounds. These findings provide a new look on protein-polyphenol interaction in honey where the

  10. Desiccation enhances phosphorylation of PSII and affects the distribution of protein complexes in the thylakoid membrane.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan; Gu, Wenhui; Xiong, Qian; Ge, Feng; Xie, Xiujun; Li, Jian; Chen, Weizhou; Pan, Guanghua; Wang, Guangce

    2015-03-01

    Desiccation has significant effects on photosynthetic processes in intertidal macro-algae. We studied an intertidal macro-alga, Ulva sp., which can tolerate desiccation, to investigate changes in photosynthetic performance and the components and structure of thylakoid membrane proteins in response to desiccation. Our results demonstrate that photosystem II (PSII) is more sensitive to desiccation than photosystem I (PSI) in Ulva sp. Comparative proteomics of the thylakoid membrane proteins at different levels of desiccation suggested that there were few changes in the content of proteins involved in photosynthesis during desiccation. Interestingly, we found that both the PSII subunit, PsbS (Photosystem II S subunit) (a four-helix protein in the LHC superfamily), and light-harvesting complex stress-related (LHCSR) proteins, which are required for non-photochemical quenching in land plants and algae, respectively, were present under both normal and desiccation conditions and both increased slightly during desiccation. In addition, the results of immunoblot analysis suggested that the phosphorylation of PSII and LHCII increases during desiccation. To investigate further, we separated out a supercomplex formed during desiccation by blue native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and identified the components by mass spectrometry analysis. Our results show that phosphorylation of the complex increases slightly with decreased water content. All the results suggest that during the course of desiccation, few changes occur in the content of thylakoid membrane proteins, but a rearrangement of the protein complex occurs in the intertidal macro-alga Ulva sp. PMID:25132456

  11. Over-producing soluble protein complex and validating protein-protein interaction through a new bacterial co-expression system.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jumei; Zhang, Lei; Li, Yuqing; Wang, Yi; Wang, Mingchao; Duan, Xin; He, Zheng-Guo

    2010-01-01

    Many proteins exert their functions through a protein complex and protein-protein interactions. However, the study of these types of interactions is complicated when dealing with toxic or hydrophobic proteins. It is difficult to use the popular Escherichia coli host for their expression, as these proteins in all likelihood require a critical partner protein to ensure their proper folding and stability. In the present study, we have developed a novel co-expression vector, pHEX, which is compatible with, and thus can be partnered with, many commercially available E. coli vectors, such as pET, pGEX and pMAL. The pHEX contains the p15A origin of replication and a T7 promoter, which can over-produce a His-tagged recombinant protein. The new co-expression system was demonstrated to efficiently co-produce and co-purify heterodimeric protein complexes, for example PE25/PPE41 (Rv2430c/Rv2431c) and ESAT6/CFP10 (Rv3874/Rv3875), from the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. Furthermore, the system was also effectively used to characterize protein-protein interactions through convenient affinity tags. Using an in vivo pull-down assay, for the first time we have confirmed the presence of three pairs of PE/PPE-related novel protein interactions in this pathogen. In summary, a convenient and efficient co-expression vector system has been successfully developed. The new system should be applicable to any protein complex or any protein-protein interaction of interest in a wide range of biological organisms. PMID:19747546

  12. Molecular Signatures of Membrane Protein Complexes Underlying Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Turk, Rolf; Hsiao, Jordy J; Smits, Melinda M; Ng, Brandon H; Pospisil, Tyler C; Jones, Kayla S; Campbell, Kevin P; Wright, Michael E

    2016-06-01

    Mutations in genes encoding components of the sarcolemmal dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) are responsible for a large number of muscular dystrophies. As such, molecular dissection of the DGC is expected to both reveal pathological mechanisms, and provides a biological framework for validating new DGC components. Establishment of the molecular composition of plasma-membrane protein complexes has been hampered by a lack of suitable biochemical approaches. Here we present an analytical workflow based upon the principles of protein correlation profiling that has enabled us to model the molecular composition of the DGC in mouse skeletal muscle. We also report our analysis of protein complexes in mice harboring mutations in DGC components. Bioinformatic analyses suggested that cell-adhesion pathways were under the transcriptional control of NFκB in DGC mutant mice, which is a finding that is supported by previous studies that showed NFκB-regulated pathways underlie the pathophysiology of DGC-related muscular dystrophies. Moreover, the bioinformatic analyses suggested that inflammatory and compensatory mechanisms were activated in skeletal muscle of DGC mutant mice. Additionally, this proteomic study provides a molecular framework to refine our understanding of the DGC, identification of protein biomarkers of neuromuscular disease, and pharmacological interrogation of the DGC in adult skeletal muscle https://www.mda.org/disease/congenital-muscular-dystrophy/research. PMID:27099343

  13. Models for the Binary Complex of Bacteriophage T4 Gp59 Helicase Loading Protein. GP32 Single-Stranded DNA-Binding Protein and Ternary Complex with Pseudo-Y Junction DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hinerman, Jennifer M.; Dignam, J. David; Mueser, Timothy C.

    2012-04-05

    The bacteriophage T4 gp59 helicase assembly protein (gp59) is required for loading of gp41 replicative helicase onto DNA protected by gp32 single-stranded DNA-binding protein. The gp59 protein recognizes branched DNA structures found at replication and recombination sites. Binding of gp32 protein (full-length and deletion constructs) to gp59 protein measured by isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrates that the gp32 protein C-terminal A-domain is essential for protein-protein interaction in the absence of DNA. Sedimentation velocity experiments with gp59 protein and gp32ΔB protein (an N-terminal B-domain deletion) show that these proteins are monomers but form a 1:1 complex with a dissociation constant comparable with that determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) studies indicate that the gp59 protein is a prolate monomer, consistent with the crystal structure and hydrodynamic properties determined from sedimentation velocity experiments. SAXS experiments also demonstrate that gp32ΔB protein is a prolate monomer with an elongated A-domain protruding from the core. Moreover, fitting structures of gp59 protein and the gp32 core into the SAXS-derived molecular envelope supports a model for the gp59 protein-gp32ΔB protein complex. Our earlier work demonstrated that gp59 protein attracts full-length gp32 protein to pseudo-Y junctions. A model of the gp59 protein-DNA complex, modified to accommodate new SAXS data for the binary complex together with mutational analysis of gp59 protein, is presented in the accompanying article (Dolezal, D., Jones, C. E., Lai, X., Brister, J. R., Mueser, T. C., Nossal, N. G., and Hinton, D. M. (2012) J. Biol. Chem. 287, 18596–18607).

  14. The role of plasma proteins in formation of obstructive protamine complexes

    SciTech Connect

    De Paulis, R.; Mohammad, S.F.; Chiariello, L.; Morea, M.; Olsen, D.B. )

    1991-06-01

    Formation of complexes between heparin and protamine (in saline), or heparin, plasma proteins, and protamine (in plasma) was assessed by measurements of light transmission through different test solutions. To examine the formation of these complexes, 125I-labeled protamine was used. Addition of 125I-protamine to plasma or blood resulted in the sedimentation of 125I-protamine in the form of insoluble complexes. This complex formation was not affected by the presence of heparin, suggesting that protamine-plasma protein interaction may be primarily responsible for precipitation of 125I-protamine. To assess the capability of these complexes to obstruct the pulmonary circulation, an in vitro experimental model was developed. Citrated serum, plasma, blood, or saline were allowed to flow through a glass bead column with the help of a peristaltic pump. A pressure transducer positioned before the column allowed pressure measurements at a constant flow rate during the experiment. Mixing of protamine with plasma or blood prior to their passage through the glass bead column resulted in a significant increase in pressure suggesting that the column was being clogged with insoluble complexes. The increase in pressure occurred both in the presence and absence of heparin in plasma or blood. Under identical experimental conditions, the increase in pressure was insignificant when protamine was added to saline or serum regardless of whether heparin was present or absent. This was further confirmed by the use of 125I-protamine. These observations suggest that protamine forms insoluble complexes with certain plasma proteins. Based on these observations, it is hypothesized that following intravenous administration, protamine immediately forms complexes in circulating blood.

  15. Membrane protein complexes catalyze both 4- and 3-hydroxylation of cinnamic acid derivatives in monolignol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsi-Chuan; Li, Quanzi; Shuford, Christopher M; Liu, Jie; Muddiman, David C; Sederoff, Ronald R; Chiang, Vincent L

    2011-12-27

    The hydroxylation of 4- and 3-ring carbons of cinnamic acid derivatives during monolignol biosynthesis are key steps that determine the structure and properties of lignin. Individual enzymes have been thought to catalyze these reactions. In stem differentiating xylem (SDX) of Populus trichocarpa, two cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylases (PtrC4H1 and PtrC4H2) and a p-coumaroyl ester 3-hydroxylase (PtrC3H3) are the enzymes involved in these reactions. Here we present evidence that these hydroxylases interact, forming heterodimeric (PtrC4H1/C4H2, PtrC4H1/C3H3, and PtrC4H2/C3H3) and heterotrimeric (PtrC4H1/C4H2/C3H3) membrane protein complexes. Enzyme kinetics using yeast recombinant proteins demonstrated that the enzymatic efficiency (V(max)/k(m)) for any of the complexes is 70-6,500 times greater than that of the individual proteins. The highest increase in efficiency was found for the PtrC4H1/C4H2/C3H3-mediated p-coumaroyl ester 3-hydroxylation. Affinity purification-quantitative mass spectrometry, bimolecular fluorescence complementation, chemical cross-linking, and reciprocal coimmunoprecipitation provide further evidence for these multiprotein complexes. The activities of the recombinant and SDX plant proteins demonstrate two protein-complex-mediated 3-hydroxylation paths in monolignol biosynthesis in P. trichocarpa SDX; one converts p-coumaric acid to caffeic acid and the other converts p-coumaroyl shikimic acid to caffeoyl shikimic acid. Cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylation is also mediated by the same protein complexes. These results provide direct evidence for functional involvement of membrane protein complexes in monolignol biosynthesis. PMID:22160716

  16. Effect of mitochondrial complex I inhibition on Fe-S cluster protein activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mena, Natalia P.; Bulteau, Anne Laure; Salazar, Julio; Hirsch, Etienne C.; Nunez, Marco T.

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} Mitochondrial complex I inhibition resulted in decreased activity of Fe-S containing enzymes mitochondrial aconitase and cytoplasmic aconitase and xanthine oxidase. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in the loss of Fe-S clusters in cytoplasmic aconitase and of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase. {yields} Consistent with loss of cytoplasmic aconitase activity, an increase in iron regulatory protein 1 activity was found. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in an increase in the labile cytoplasmic iron pool. -- Abstract: Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are small inorganic cofactors formed by tetrahedral coordination of iron atoms with sulfur groups. Present in numerous proteins, these clusters are involved in key biological processes such as electron transfer, metabolic and regulatory processes, DNA synthesis and repair and protein structure stabilization. Fe-S clusters are synthesized mainly in the mitochondrion, where they are directly incorporated into mitochondrial Fe-S cluster-containing proteins or exported for cytoplasmic and nuclear cluster-protein assembly. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of mitochondrial complex I by rotenone decreases Fe-S cluster synthesis and cluster content and activity of Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes. Inhibition of complex I resulted in decreased activity of three Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes: mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitases and xanthine oxidase. In addition, the Fe-S cluster content of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase and mitochondrial aconitase was dramatically decreased. The reduction in cytosolic aconitase activity was associated with an increase in iron regulatory protein (IRP) mRNA binding activity and with an increase in the cytoplasmic labile iron pool. Since IRP activity post-transcriptionally regulates the expression of iron import proteins, Fe-S cluster inhibition may result in a false iron deficiency signal. Given that

  17. Plasmid-protein relaxation complexes in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Novick, R

    1976-09-01

    Protein-deoxyribonucleic acid relaxation complexes have been demonstrated for six Staphylococcus aureus plasmids out of sixteen examined. Four of these encode stretomycin resistence, have molecular weights of about 2.7 x 10(6), and are isolated as supercoiled molecules that are virtally 100% relaxable by treatment with sodium dodecyl sulfate. It is probable that these four isolates represent a single widely disseminated plasmid species. The other two plasmids showing relaxation complexes have molecular weights of about 3 x 10(6) and encode chloramphenicol resistance. The complexes in these cases are unstable, and it has not been possible to induce more than 50% relaxation by any of the standard treatments. Ten other plasmids do not show detectable complexes. These include three penicillinase plasmids, four tetracycline-resistance plasmids, one plasmid carrying kanamycin-neomycin resistance, and finally, two chloramphenicol-resistance plasmids. PMID:956124

  18. Bromodomain Proteins Contribute to Maintenance of Bloodstream Form Stage Identity in the African Trypanosome

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Danae; Mugnier, Monica R.; Paulsen, Eda-Margaret; Kim, Hee-Sook; Chung, Chun-wa W.; Tough, David F.; Rioja, Inmaculada; Prinjha, Rab K.; Papavasiliou, F. Nina; Debler, Erik W.

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness, is transmitted to its mammalian host by the tsetse. In the fly, the parasite’s surface is covered with invariant procyclin, while in the mammal it resides extracellularly in its bloodstream form (BF) and is densely covered with highly immunogenic Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG). In the BF, the parasite varies this highly immunogenic surface VSG using a repertoire of ~2500 distinct VSG genes. Recent reports in mammalian systems point to a role for histone acetyl-lysine recognizing bromodomain proteins in the maintenance of stem cell fate, leading us to hypothesize that bromodomain proteins may maintain the BF cell fate in trypanosomes. Using small-molecule inhibitors and genetic mutants for individual bromodomain proteins, we performed RNA-seq experiments that revealed changes in the transcriptome similar to those seen in cells differentiating from the BF to the insect stage. This was recapitulated at the protein level by the appearance of insect-stage proteins on the cell surface. Furthermore, bromodomain inhibition disrupts two major BF-specific immune evasion mechanisms that trypanosomes harness to evade mammalian host antibody responses. First, monoallelic expression of the antigenically varied VSG is disrupted. Second, rapid internalization of antibodies bound to VSG on the surface of the trypanosome is blocked. Thus, our studies reveal a role for trypanosome bromodomain proteins in maintaining bloodstream stage identity and immune evasion. Importantly, bromodomain inhibition leads to a decrease in virulence in a mouse model of infection, establishing these proteins as potential therapeutic drug targets for trypanosomiasis. Our 1.25Å resolution crystal structure of a trypanosome bromodomain in complex with I-BET151 reveals a novel binding mode of the inhibitor, which serves as a promising starting point for rational drug design. PMID:26646171

  19. Bromodomain Proteins Contribute to Maintenance of Bloodstream Form Stage Identity in the African Trypanosome.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Danae; Mugnier, Monica R; Paulsen, Eda-Margaret; Kim, Hee-Sook; Chung, Chun-wa W; Tough, David F; Rioja, Inmaculada; Prinjha, Rab K; Papavasiliou, F Nina; Debler, Erik W

    2015-12-01

    Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness, is transmitted to its mammalian host by the tsetse. In the fly, the parasite's surface is covered with invariant procyclin, while in the mammal it resides extracellularly in its bloodstream form (BF) and is densely covered with highly immunogenic Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG). In the BF, the parasite varies this highly immunogenic surface VSG using a repertoire of ~2500 distinct VSG genes. Recent reports in mammalian systems point to a role for histone acetyl-lysine recognizing bromodomain proteins in the maintenance of stem cell fate, leading us to hypothesize that bromodomain proteins may maintain the BF cell fate in trypanosomes. Using small-molecule inhibitors and genetic mutants for individual bromodomain proteins, we performed RNA-seq experiments that revealed changes in the transcriptome similar to those seen in cells differentiating from the BF to the insect stage. This was recapitulated at the protein level by the appearance of insect-stage proteins on the cell surface. Furthermore, bromodomain inhibition disrupts two major BF-specific immune evasion mechanisms that trypanosomes harness to evade mammalian host antibody responses. First, monoallelic expression of the antigenically varied VSG is disrupted. Second, rapid internalization of antibodies bound to VSG on the surface of the trypanosome is blocked. Thus, our studies reveal a role for trypanosome bromodomain proteins in maintaining bloodstream stage identity and immune evasion. Importantly, bromodomain inhibition leads to a decrease in virulence in a mouse model of infection, establishing these proteins as potential therapeutic drug targets for trypanosomiasis. Our 1.25Å resolution crystal structure of a trypanosome bromodomain in complex with I-BET151 reveals a novel binding mode of the inhibitor, which serves as a promising starting point for rational drug design. PMID:26646171

  20. Efficient Prediction of Co-Complexed Proteins Based on Coevolution

    PubMed Central

    de Vienne, Damien M.; Azé, Jérôme

    2012-01-01

    The prediction of the network of protein-protein interactions (PPI) of an organism is crucial for the understanding of biological processes and for the development of new drugs. Machine learning methods have been successfully applied to the prediction of PPI in yeast by the integration of multiple direct and indirect biological data sources. However, experimental data are not available for most organisms. We propose here an ensemble machine learning approach for the prediction of PPI that depends solely on features independent from experimental data. We developed new estimators of the coevolution between proteins and combined them in an ensemble learning procedure. We applied this method to a dataset of known co-complexed proteins in Escherichia coli and compared it to previously published methods. We show that our method allows prediction of PPI with an unprecedented precision of 95.5% for the first 200 sorted pairs of proteins compared to 28.5% on the same dataset with the previous best method. A close inspection of the best predicted pairs allowed us to detect new or recently discovered interactions between chemotactic components, the flagellar apparatus and RNA polymerase complexes in E. coli. PMID:23152796

  1. N epsilon,N epsilon-dimethyl-lysine cytochrome c as an NMR probe for lysine involvement in protein-protein complex formation.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, G R; Cox, M C; Crowe, D; Osborne, M J; Rosell, F I; Bujons, J; Barker, P D; Mauk, M R; Mauk, A G

    1998-01-01

    The reductively dimethylated derivatives of horse and yeast iso-1-ferricytochromes c have been prepared and characterized for use as NMR probes of the complexes formed by cytochrome c with bovine liver cytochrome b5 and yeast cytochrome c peroxidase. The electrostatic properties and structures of the derivatized cytochromes are not significantly perturbed by the modifications; neither are the electrostatics of protein-protein complex formation or rates of interprotein electron transfer. Two-dimensional 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy of the complexes formed by the derivatized cytochromes with cytochrome b5 and cytochrome c peroxidase has been used to investigate the number and identity of lysine residues of cytochrome c that are involved in interprotein interactions of cytochrome c. The NMR data are incompatible with simple static models proposed previously for the complexes formed by these proteins, but are consistent with the presence of multiple, interconverting complexes of comparable stability, consistent with studies employing Brownian dynamics to model the complexes. The NMR characteristics of the Nepsilon,Nepsilon-dimethyl-lysine groups, their chemical shift dispersion, oxidation state and temperature dependences and the possibility of chemical exchange phenomena are discussed with relevance to the utility of Nepsilon, Nepsilon-dimethyl-lysine's being a generally useful derivative for characterizing protein-protein complexes. PMID:9601073

  2. Mini-chromosome maintenance complexes form a filament to remodel DNA structure and topology

    PubMed Central

    Slaymaker, Ian M.; Fu, Yang; Toso, Daniel B.; Ranatunga, Nimna; Brewster, Aaron; Forsburg, Susan L.; Zhou, Z. Hong; Chen, Xiaojiang S.

    2013-01-01

    Deregulation of mini-chromosome maintenance (MCM) proteins is associated with genomic instability and cancer. MCM complexes are recruited to replication origins for genome duplication. Paradoxically, MCM proteins are in excess than the number of origins and are associated with chromatin regions away from the origins during G1 and S phases. Here, we report an unusually wide left-handed filament structure for an archaeal MCM, as determined by X-ray and electron microscopy. The crystal structure reveals that an α-helix bundle formed between two neighboring subunits plays a critical role in filament formation. The filament has a remarkably strong electro-positive surface spiraling along the inner filament channel for DNA binding. We show that this MCM filament binding to DNA causes dramatic DNA topology change. This newly identified function of MCM to change DNA topology may imply a wider functional role for MCM in DNA metabolisms beyond helicase function. Finally, using yeast genetics, we show that the inter-subunit interactions, important for MCM filament formation, play a role for cell growth and survival. PMID:23361460

  3. Dissociation of a Dynamic Protein Complex Studied by All-Atom Molecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liqun; Borthakur, Susmita; Buck, Matthias

    2016-02-23

    The process of protein complex dissociation remains to be understood at the atomic level of detail. Computers now allow microsecond timescale molecular-dynamics simulations, which make the visualization of such processes possible. Here, we investigated the dissociation process of the EphA2-SHIP2 SAM-SAM domain heterodimer complex using unrestrained all-atom molecular-dynamics simulations. Previous studies on this system have shown that alternate configurations are sampled, that their interconversion can be fast, and that the complex is dynamic by nature. Starting from different NMR-derived structures, mutants were designed to stabilize a subset of configurations by swapping ion pairs across the protein-protein interface. We focused on two mutants, K956D/D1235K and R957D/D1223R, with attenuated binding affinity compared with the wild-type proteins. In contrast to calculations on the wild-type complexes, the majority of simulations of these mutants showed protein dissociation within 2.4 μs. During the separation process, we observed domain rotation and pivoting as well as a translation and simultaneous rolling, typically to alternate and weaker binding interfaces. Several unsuccessful recapturing attempts occurred once the domains were moderately separated. An analysis of protein solvation suggests that the dissociation process correlates with a progressive loss of protein-protein contacts. Furthermore, an evaluation of internal protein dynamics using quasi-harmonic and order parameter analyses indicates that changes in protein internal motions are expected to contribute significantly to the thermodynamics of protein dissociation. Considering protein association as the reverse of the separation process, the initial role of charged/polar interactions is emphasized, followed by changes in protein and solvent dynamics. The trajectories show that protein separation does not follow a single distinct pathway, but suggest that the mechanism of dissociation is common in

  4. Chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay using ProteinA-bacterial magnetite complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Tadashi; Sato, Rika; Kamiya, Shinji; Tanaka, Tsuyosi; Takeyama, Haruko

    1999-04-01

    Bacterial magnetic particles (BMPs) which have ProteinA expressed on their surface were constructed using magA which is a key gene in BMP biosynthesis in the magnetic bacterium Magnetospirillum sp. AMB-1. Homogenous chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay using antibody bound ProteinA-BMP complexes was developed for detection of human IgG. A good correlation between the luminescence yield and the concentration of human IgG was obtained in the range of 1-10 3 ng/ml.

  5. The mammalian autophagy initiator complex contains 2 HORMA domain proteins

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Max; Schwarten, Melanie; Decker, Christina; Nagel-Steger, Luitgard; Willbold, Dieter; Weiergräber, Oliver H

    2015-01-01

    ATG101 is an essential component of the ULK complex responsible for initiating cellular autophagy in mammalian cells; its 3-dimensional structure and molecular function, however, are currently unclear. Here we present the X-ray structure of human ATG101. The protein displays an open HORMA domain fold. Both structural properties and biophysical evidence indicate that ATG101 is locked in this conformation, in contrast to the prototypical HORMA domain protein MAD2. Moreover, we discuss a potential mode of dimerization with ATG13 as a fundamental aspect of ATG101 function. PMID:26236954

  6. Protein fragment bimolecular fluorescence complementation analyses for the in vivo study of protein-protein interactions and cellular protein complex localizations.

    PubMed

    Waadt, Rainer; Schlücking, Kathrin; Schroeder, Julian I; Kudla, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    The analyses of protein-protein interactions are crucial for understanding cellular processes including signal transduction, protein trafficking, and movement. Protein fragment complementation assays are based on the reconstitution of protein function when non-active protein fragments are brought together by interacting proteins that were genetically fused to these protein fragments. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) relies on the reconstitution of fluorescent proteins and enables both the analysis of protein-protein interactions and the visualization of protein complex formations in vivo. Transient expression of proteins is a convenient approach to study protein functions in planta or in other organisms and minimizes the need for time-consuming generation of stably expressing transgenic organisms. Here we describe protocols for BiFC analyses in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana leaves transiently transformed by Agrobacterium infiltration. Further, we discuss different BiFC applications and provide examples for proper BiFC analyses in planta. PMID:24057390

  7. Protein Configuration Landscape Fluctuations Revealed by Exciton Transition Polarizations in Single Light Harvesting Complexes.

    PubMed

    Tubasum, Sumera; Torbjörnsson, Magne; Yadav, Dheerendra; Camacho, Rafael; Söderlind, Gustaf; Scheblykin, Ivan G; Pullerits, Tõnu

    2016-02-01

    Protein is a flexible material with broad distribution of conformations forming an energy landscape of quasi-stationary states. Disentangling the system dynamics along this landscape is the key for understanding the functioning of the protein. Here we studied a photosynthetic antenna pigment-protein complex LH2 with single molecule two-dimensional polarization imaging. Modeling based on the Redfield relaxation theory well describes the observed polarization properties of LH2 fluorescence and fluorescence excitation, strongly suggesting that at 77 K the conformational subspace of the LH2 is limited to about three configurations with relatively frequent switching among each other. At room temperature the next level of fluctuations determines the conformational dynamics. The results support the multitier model of the energy landscape of proteins and demonstrate the potential of the method for the studies of structural dynamics in proteins. PMID:26741912

  8. Regulator of G Protein Signaling 7 (RGS7) Can Exist in a Homo-oligomeric Form That Is Regulated by Gαo and R7-binding Protein.

    PubMed

    Tayou, Junior; Wang, Qiang; Jang, Geeng-Fu; Pronin, Alexey N; Orlandi, Cesare; Martemyanov, Kirill A; Crabb, John W; Slepak, Vladlen Z

    2016-04-22

    RGS (regulator of G protein signaling) proteins of the R7 subfamily (RGS6, -7, -9, and -11) are highly expressed in neurons where they regulate many physiological processes. R7 RGS proteins contain several distinct domains and form obligatory dimers with the atypical Gβ subunit, Gβ5 They also interact with other proteins such as R7-binding protein, R9-anchoring protein, and the orphan receptors GPR158 and GPR179. These interactions facilitate plasma membrane targeting and stability of R7 proteins and modulate their activity. Here, we investigated RGS7 complexes using in situ chemical cross-linking. We found that in mouse brain and transfected cells cross-linking causes formation of distinct RGS7 complexes. One of the products had the apparent molecular mass of ∼150 kDa on SDS-PAGE and did not contain Gβ5 Mass spectrometry analysis showed no other proteins to be present within the 150-kDa complex in the amount close to stoichiometric with RGS7. This finding suggested that RGS7 could form a homo-oligomer. Indeed, co-immunoprecipitation of differentially tagged RGS7 constructs, with or without chemical cross-linking, demonstrated RGS7 self-association. RGS7-RGS7 interaction required the DEP domain but not the RGS and DHEX domains or the Gβ5 subunit. Using transfected cells and knock-out mice, we demonstrated that R7-binding protein had a strong inhibitory effect on homo-oligomerization of RGS7. In contrast, our data indicated that GPR158 could bind to the RGS7 homo-oligomer without causing its dissociation. Co-expression of constitutively active Gαo prevented the RGS7-RGS7 interaction. These results reveal the existence of RGS protein homo-oligomers and show regulation of their assembly by R7 RGS-binding partners. PMID:26895961

  9. Cytochrome c Complexes with Cardiolipin Monolayer Formed under Different Surface Pressure.

    PubMed

    Marchenkova, Margarita A; Dyakova, Yulia A; Tereschenko, Elena Yu; Kovalchuk, Mikhail V; Vladimirov, Yury A

    2015-11-17

    The formation of the complex of cytochrome c (Cytc) with a phospholipid cardiolipin (CL) in mitochondria is a crucial event in apoptosis development. There are two viewpoints on the structure of the complex. (1) Cytc is bound on the surface of the lipid bilayer. (2) The complex is a hydrophobic nanoparticle Cytc-CL formed by Cytc molten globule, covered by CL monolayer.1 In the present work, we attempted to bridge the gap between these two structures. We investigated the interaction between Cytc and Langmuir monolayers of CL. The surface pressure increase during incorporation of Cytc into CL monolayer obeys the equation: π = π0 + Δπ∞[1 - exp(-βt)], where β is pseudo-first-order rate constant of Cytc binding, directly proportional to the initial Cytc concentration c0. Parameters Δπ∞ and the rate β measured in different conditions were virtually equal for natural bovine CL and peroxidation-resistant tetraoleoyl CL in all experiments. Surface area-surface pressure isotherms of Cytc alone and in combination with a CL monolayer were similar in shape. Apparently, the protein exposes hydrophilic groups to the water phase and hydrophobic to the air or to the hydrocarbon chains of CL. The 30% ethanol dramatically accelerated the adsorption of Cytc on the water surface. The protein-lipid surface films showed, in compression-expansion cycles, that hysteresis loops were observed always when Cytc present, reproducible in repeating cycles. Taken together, our data show that when incorporated in a lipid monolayer or after adsorption on the water-air interface, Cytc undergoes conformational transition. In that, one part of the globule sphere becomes predominantly hydrophobic and the other, hydrophilic and charged ("stratified" Cytc). We hypothesize that in CL-containing bilayer membranes, Cytc incorporation into the lipid monolayer would result in membrane folding with subsequent formation of either catalytically reactive "bubbles" inside the bilayer, formed by Cytc

  10. Intestinal peptidases form functional complexes with the neutral amino acid transporter B0AT1

    PubMed Central

    Fairweather, Stephen J.; Bröer, Angelika; O'Mara, Megan L.; Bröer, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The brush-border membrane of the small intestine and kidney proximal tubule are the major sites for the absorption and re-absorption of nutrients in the body respectively. Transport of amino acids is mediated through the action of numerous secondary active transporters. In the mouse, neutral amino acids are transported by B0AT1 [broad neutral (0) amino acid transporter 1; SLC6A19 (solute carrier family 6 member 19)] in the intestine and by B0AT1 and B0AT3 (SLC6A18) in the kidney. Immunoprecipitation and Blue native electrophoresis of intestinal brush-border membrane proteins revealed that B0AT1 forms complexes with two peptidases, APN (aminopeptidase N/CD13) and ACE2 (angiotensin-converting enzyme 2). Physiological characterization of B0AT1 expressed together with these peptidases in Xenopus laevis oocytes revealed that APN increased the substrate affinity of the transporter up to 2.5-fold and also increased its surface expression (Vmax). Peptide competition experiments, in silico modelling and site-directed mutagenesis of APN suggest that the catalytic site of the peptidase is involved in the observed changes of B0AT1 apparent substrate affinity, possibly by increasing the local substrate concentration. These results provide evidence for the existence of B0AT1-containing digestive complexes in the brush-border membrane, interacting differentially with various peptidases, and responding to the dynamic needs of nutrient absorption in the intestine and kidney. PMID:22677001

  11. Protein complex formation and intranuclear dynamics of NAC1 in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Naomi; Kato, Hiroaki; Sakashita, Gyosuke; Nariai, Yuko; Nakayama, Kentaro; Kyo, Satoru; Urano, Takeshi

    2016-09-15

    Nucleus accumbens-associated protein 1 (NAC1) is a cancer-related transcription regulator protein that is also involved in the pluripotency and differentiation of embryonic stem cells. NAC1 is overexpressed in various carcinomas including ovarian, cervical, breast, and pancreatic carcinomas. NAC1 knock-down was previously shown to result in the apoptosis of ovarian cancer cell lines and to rescue their sensitivity to chemotherapy, suggesting that NAC1 may be a potential therapeutic target, but protein complex formation and the dynamics of intranuclear NAC1 in cancer cells remain poorly understood. In this study, analysis of HeLa cell lysates by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) on a sizing column showed that the NAC1 peak corresponded to an apparent molecular mass of 300-500 kDa, which is larger than the estimated molecular mass (58 kDa) of the protein. Furthermore, live cell photobleaching analyses with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused NAC1 proteins revealed the intranuclear dynamics of NAC1. Collectively our results demonstrate that NAC1 forms a protein complex to function as a transcriptional regulator in cancer cells. PMID:27424155

  12. Size-dependent leak of soluble and membrane proteins through the yeast nuclear pore complex

    PubMed Central

    Popken, Petra; Ghavami, Ali; Onck, Patrick R.; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) allow selective import and export while forming a barrier for untargeted proteins. Using fluorescence microscopy, we measured in vivo the permeability of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae NPC for multidomain proteins of different sizes and found that soluble proteins of 150 kDa and membrane proteins with an extralumenal domain of 90 kDa were still partly localized in the nucleus on a time scale of hours. The NPCs thus form only a weak barrier for the majority of yeast proteins, given their monomeric size. Using FGΔ-mutant strains, we showed that specific combinations of Nups, especially with Nup100, but not the total mass of FG-nups per pore, were important for forming the barrier. Models of the disordered phase of wild-type and mutant NPCs were generated using a one bead per amino acid molecular dynamics model. The permeability measurements correlated with the density predictions from coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations in the center of the NPC. The combined in vivo and computational approach provides a framework for elucidating the structural and functional properties of the permeability barrier of nuclear pore complexes. PMID:25631821

  13. Characterization of known protein complexes using k-connectivity and other topological measures

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Suzanne R; Goldberg, Debra S

    2015-01-01

    Many protein complexes are densely packed, so proteins within complexes often interact with several other proteins in the complex. Steric constraints prevent most proteins from simultaneously binding more than a handful of other proteins, regardless of the number of proteins in the complex. Because of this, as complex size increases, several measures of the complex decrease within protein-protein interaction networks. However, k-connectivity, the number of vertices or edges that need to be removed in order to disconnect a graph, may be consistently high for protein complexes. The property of k-connectivity has been little used previously in the investigation of protein-protein interactions. To understand the discriminative power of k-connectivity and other topological measures for identifying unknown protein complexes, we characterized these properties in known Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein complexes in networks generated both from highly accurate X-ray crystallography experiments which give an accurate model of each complex, and also as the complexes appear in high-throughput yeast 2-hybrid studies in which new complexes may be discovered. We also computed these properties for appropriate random subgraphs.We found that clustering coefficient, mutual clustering coefficient, and k-connectivity are better indicators of known protein complexes than edge density, degree, or betweenness. This suggests new directions for future protein complex-finding algorithms. PMID:26913183

  14. A profile of protein-protein interaction: Crystal structure of a lectin-lectin complex.

    PubMed

    Surya, Sukumaran; Abhilash, Joseph; Geethanandan, Krishnan; Sadasivan, Chittalakkottu; Haridas, Madhathilkovilakathu

    2016-06-01

    Proteins may utilize complex networks of interactions to create/proceed signaling pathways of highly adaptive responses such as programmed cell death. Direct binary interactions study of proteins may help propose models for protein-protein interaction. Towards this goal we applied a combination of thermodynamic kinetics and crystal structure analyses to elucidate the complexity and diversity in such interactions. By determining the heat change on the association of two galactose-specific legume lectins from Butea monosperma (BML) and Spatholobus parviflorus (SPL) belonging to Fabaceae family helped to compute the binding equilibrium. It was extended further by X-ray structural analysis of BML-SPL binary complex. In order to chart the proteins interacting mainly through their interfaces, identification of the nature of forces which stabilized the association of the lectin-lectin complex was examined. Comprehensive analysis of the BMLSPL complex by isothermal titration calorimetry and X-ray crystal structure threw new light on the lectin-lectin interactions suggesting of their use in diverse areas of glycobiology. PMID:26945504

  15. Analysis of secondary structural and physicochemical changes in protein-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Saranya, N; Saravanan, K M; Michael Gromiha, M; Selvaraj, S

    2016-03-01

    Conformation switching in protein-protein complexes is considered important for the molecular recognition process. Overall analysis of 123 protein-protein complexes in a benchmark data-set showed that 6.8% of residues switched over their secondary structure conformation upon complex formation. Amino acid residue-wise preference for conformation change has been analyzed in binding and non-binding site residues separately. In this analysis, residues such as Ser, Leu, Glu, and Lys had higher frequency of secondary structural conformation change. The change of helix to coil and sheet to coil conformation and vice versa has been observed frequently, whereas the conformation change of helix to extended sheet occurred rarely in the studied complexes. Influence of conformation change toward the N and C terminal on either side of the binding site residues has been analyzed. Further, analysis on φ and ψ angle variation, conservation, stability, and solvent accessibility have been performed on binding site residues. Knowledge obtained from the present study could be effectively employed in the protein-protein modeling and docking studies. PMID:25990569

  16. Conformational flexibility of the oncogenic protein LMO2 primes the formation of the multi-protein transcription complex

    PubMed Central

    Sewell, H.; Tanaka, T.; Omari, K. El; Mancini, E. J.; Cruz, A.; Fernandez-Fuentes, N.; Chambers, J.; Rabbitts, T. H.

    2014-01-01

    LMO2 was discovered via chromosomal translocations in T-cell leukaemia and shown normally to be essential for haematopoiesis. LMO2 is made up of two LIM only domains (thus it is a LIM-only protein) and forms a bridge in a multi-protein complex. We have studied the mechanism of formation of this complex using a single domain antibody fragment that inhibits LMO2 by sequestering it in a non-functional form. The crystal structure of LMO2 with this antibody fragment has been solved revealing a conformational difference in the positioning and angle between the two LIM domains compared with its normal binding. This contortion occurs by bending at a central helical region of LMO2. This is a unique mechanism for inhibiting an intracellular protein function and the structural contusion implies a model in which newly synthesized, intrinsically disordered LMO2 binds to a partner protein nucleating further interactions and suggests approaches for therapeutic targeting of LMO2. PMID:24407558

  17. Complex architecture of major histocompatibility complex class II promoters: reiterated motifs and conserved protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Jabrane-Ferrat, N; Fontes, J D; Boss, J M; Peterlin, B M

    1996-01-01

    The S box (also known as at the H, W, or Z box) is the 5'-most element of the conserved upstream sequences in promoters of major histocompatibility complex class II genes. It is important for their B-cell-specific and interferon gamma-inducible expression. In this study, we demonstrate that the S box represents a duplication of the downstream X box. First, RFX, which is composed of the RFX5-p36 heterodimer that binds to the X box, also binds to the S box and its 5'-flanking sequence. Second, NF-Y, which binds to the Y box and increases interactions between RFX and the X box, also increases the binding of RFX to the S box. Third, RFXs bound to S and X boxes interact with each other in a spatially constrained manner. Finally, we confirmed these protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions by expressing a hybrid RFX5-VP16 protein in cells. We conclude that RFX binds to S and X boxes and that complex interactions between RFX and NF-Y direct B-cell-specific and interferon gamma-inducible expression or major histocompatibility complex class II genes. PMID:8756625

  18. Size dependent complexity of sequences in protein families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, W.

    2005-10-01

    The size dependent complexity of protein sequences in various families in the FSSP database is characterized by sequence entropy, sequence similarity and sequence identity. As the average length Lf of sequences in the family increases, an increasing trend of the sequence entropy and a decreasing trend of the sequence similarity and sequence identity are found. As Lf increases beyond 250, a saturation of the sequence entropy, the sequence similarity and the sequence identity is observed. Such a saturated behavior of complexity is attributed to the saturation of the probability Pg of global (long-range) interactions in protein structures when Lf >250. It is also found that the alphabet size of residue types describing the sequence diversity depends on the value of Lf, and becomes saturated at 12.

  19. Immersion freezing of ice nucleation active protein complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, S.; Augustin, S.; Clauss, T.; Wex, H.; Šantl-Temkiv, T.; Voigtländer, J.; Niedermeier, D.; Stratmann, F.

    2013-06-01

    Utilising the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS), the immersion freezing behaviour of droplet ensembles containing monodisperse particles, generated from a Snomax™ solution/suspension, was investigated. Thereto ice fractions were measured in the temperature range between -5 °C to -38 °C. Snomax™ is an industrial product applied for artificial snow production and contains Pseudomonas syringae} bacteria which have long been used as model organism for atmospheric relevant ice nucleation active (INA) bacteria. The ice nucleation activity of such bacteria is controlled by INA protein complexes in their outer membrane. In our experiments, ice fractions increased steeply in the temperature range from about -6 °C to about -10 °C and then levelled off at ice fractions smaller than one. The plateau implies that not all examined droplets contained an INA protein complex. Assuming the INA protein complexes to be Poisson distributed over the investigated droplet populations, we developed the CHESS model (stoCHastic modEl of similar and poiSSon distributed ice nuclei) which allows for the calculation of ice fractions as function of temperature and time for a given nucleation rate. Matching calculated and measured ice fractions, we determined and parameterised the nucleation rate of INA protein complexes exhibiting class III ice nucleation behaviour. Utilising the CHESS model, together with the determined nucleation rate, we compared predictions from the model to experimental data from the literature and found good agreement. We found that (a) the heterogeneous ice nucleation rate expression quantifying the ice nucleation behaviour of the INA protein complex is capable of describing the ice nucleation behaviour observed in various experiments for both, Snomax™ and P. syringae bacteria, (b) the ice nucleation rate, and its temperature dependence, seem to be very similar regardless of whether the INA protein complexes inducing ice nucleation are attached

  20. Protein-protein complex structure predictions by multimeric threading and template recombination

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Srayanta; Zhang, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Summary The number of protein-protein complex structures is nearly 6-times smaller than that of tertiary structures in PDB which limits the power of homology-based approaches to complex structure modeling. We present a new threading-recombination approach, COTH, to boost the protein complex structure library by combining tertiary structure templates with complex alignments. The query sequences are first aligned to complex templates using a modified dynamic programming algorithm, guided by ab initio binding-site predictions. The monomer alignments are then shifted to the multimeric template framework by structural alignments. COTH was tested on 500 non-homologous dimeric proteins, which can successfully detect correct templates for half of the cases after homologous templates are excluded, which significantly outperforms conventional homology modeling algorithms. It also shows a higher accuracy in interface modeling than rigid-body docking of unbound structures from ZDOCK although with lower coverage. These data demonstrate new avenues to model complex structures from non-homologous templates. PMID:21742262

  1. Human Diseases Associated with Form and Function of the Golgi Complex

    PubMed Central

    Bexiga, Mariana G.; Simpson, Jeremy C.

    2013-01-01

    The Golgi complex lies at the heart of the secretory pathway and is responsible for modifying proteins and lipids, as well as sorting newly synthesized molecules to their correct destination. As a consequence of these important roles, any changes in its proteome can negatively affect its function and in turn lead to disease. Recently, a number of proteins have been identified, which when either depleted or mutated, result in diseases that affect various organ systems. Here we describe how these proteins have been linked to the Golgi complex, and specifically how they affect either the morphology, membrane traffic or glycosylation ability of this organelle. PMID:24025425

  2. Evolution of complex symbiotic relationships in a morphologically derived family of lichen-forming fungi.

    PubMed

    Divakar, Pradeep K; Crespo, Ana; Wedin, Mats; Leavitt, Steven D; Hawksworth, David L; Myllys, Leena; McCune, Bruce; Randlane, Tiina; Bjerke, Jarle W; Ohmura, Yoshihito; Schmitt, Imke; Boluda, Carlos G; Alors, David; Roca-Valiente, Beatriz; Del-Prado, Ruth; Ruibal, Constantino; Buaruang, Kawinnat; Núñez-Zapata, Jano; Amo de Paz, Guillermo; Rico, Víctor J; Molina, M Carmen; Elix, John A; Esslinger, Theodore L; Tronstad, Inger Kristin K; Lindgren, Hanna; Ertz, Damien; Gueidan, Cécile; Saag, Lauri; Mark, Kristiina; Singh, Garima; Dal Grande, Francesco; Parnmen, Sittiporn; Beck, Andreas; Benatti, Michel Navarro; Blanchon, Dan; Candan, Mehmet; Clerc, Philippe; Goward, Trevor; Grube, Martin; Hodkinson, Brendan P; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kantvilas, Gintaras; Kirika, Paul M; Lendemer, James; Mattsson, Jan-Eric; Messuti, María Inés; Miadlikowska, Jolanta; Nelsen, Matthew; Ohlson, Jan I; Pérez-Ortega, Sergio; Saag, Andres; Sipman, Harrie J M; Sohrabi, Mohammad; Thell, Arne; Thor, Göran; Truong, Camille; Yahr, Rebecca; Upreti, Dalip K; Cubas, Paloma; Lumbsch, H Thorsten

    2015-12-01

    We studied the evolutionary history of the Parmeliaceae (Lecanoromycetes, Ascomycota), one of the largest families of lichen-forming fungi with complex and variable morphologies, also including several lichenicolous fungi. We assembled a six-locus data set including nuclear, mitochondrial and low-copy protein-coding genes from 293 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). The lichenicolous lifestyle originated independently three times in lichenized ancestors within Parmeliaceae, and a new generic name is introduced for one of these fungi. In all cases, the independent origins occurred c. 24 million yr ago. Further, we show that the Paleocene, Eocene and Oligocene were key periods when diversification of major lineages within Parmeliaceae occurred, with subsequent radiations occurring primarily during the Oligocene and Miocene. Our phylogenetic hypothesis supports the independent origin of lichenicolous fungi associated with climatic shifts at the Oligocene-Miocene boundary. Moreover, diversification bursts at different times may be crucial factors driving the diversification of Parmeliaceae. Additionally, our study provides novel insight into evolutionary relationships in this large and diverse family of lichen-forming ascomycetes. PMID:26299211

  3. How to Build a Complex, Functional Propeller Protein, From Parts.

    PubMed

    Clark, Patricia L

    2016-04-01

    By combining ancestral sequence reconstruction and in vitro evolution, Smock et al. identified single motifs that assemble into a functional five-bladed β-propeller, and a likely route for conversion into the more complex, extant single chain fusion. Interestingly, although sequence diversification destabilized five-motif fusions, it also destabilized aggregation-prone intermediates, increasing the level of functional protein in vivo. PMID:26971075

  4. Rational stabilization of complex proteins: a divide and combine approach

    PubMed Central

    Lamazares, Emilio; Clemente, Isabel; Bueno, Marta; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Sancho, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the thermostability of proteins is often crucial for their successful use as analytic, synthetic or therapeutic tools. Most rational thermostabilization strategies were developed on small two-state proteins and, unsurprisingly, they tend to fail when applied to the much more abundant, larger, non-fully cooperative proteins. We show that the key to stabilize the latter is to know the regions of lower stability. To prove it, we have engineered apoflavodoxin, a non-fully cooperative protein on which previous thermostabilizing attempts had failed. We use a step-wise combination of structure-based, rationally-designed, stabilizing mutations confined to the less stable structural region, and obtain variants that, according to their van't Hoff to calorimetric enthalpy ratios, exhibit fully-cooperative thermal unfolding with a melting temperature of 75°C, 32 degrees above the lower melting temperature of the non-cooperative wild type protein. The ideas introduced here may also be useful for the thermostabilization of complex proteins through formulation or using specific stabilizing ligands (e.g. pharmacological chaperones). PMID:25774740

  5. Conserved S-Layer-Associated Proteins Revealed by Exoproteomic Survey of S-Layer-Forming Lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brant R; Hymes, Jeffrey; Sanozky-Dawes, Rosemary; Henriksen, Emily DeCrescenzo; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2016-01-01

    The Lactobacillus acidophilus homology group comprises Gram-positive species that include L. acidophilus, L. helveticus, L. crispatus, L. amylovorus, L. gallinarum, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, L. gasseri, and L. johnsonii. While these bacteria are closely related, they have varied ecological lifestyles as dairy and food fermenters, allochthonous probiotics, or autochthonous commensals of the host gastrointestinal tract. Bacterial cell surface components play a critical role in the molecular dialogue between bacteria and interaction signaling with the intestinal mucosa. Notably, the L. acidophilus complex is distinguished in two clades by the presence or absence of S-layers, which are semiporous crystalline arrays of self-assembling proteinaceous subunits found as the outermost layer of the bacterial cell wall. In this study, S-layer-associated proteins (SLAPs) in the exoproteomes of various S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species were proteomically identified, genomically compared, and transcriptionally analyzed. Four gene regions encoding six putative SLAPs were conserved in the S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species but not identified in the extracts of the closely related progenitor, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, which does not produce an S-layer. Therefore, the presence or absence of an S-layer has a clear impact on the exoproteomic composition of Lactobacillus species. This proteomic complexity and differences in the cell surface properties between S-layer- and non-S-layer-forming lactobacilli reveal the potential for SLAPs to mediate intimate probiotic interactions and signaling with the host intestinal mucosa. PMID:26475115

  6. Conserved S-Layer-Associated Proteins Revealed by Exoproteomic Survey of S-Layer-Forming Lactobacilli

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brant R.; Hymes, Jeffrey; Sanozky-Dawes, Rosemary; Henriksen, Emily DeCrescenzo

    2015-01-01

    The Lactobacillus acidophilus homology group comprises Gram-positive species that include L. acidophilus, L. helveticus, L. crispatus, L. amylovorus, L. gallinarum, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, L. gasseri, and L. johnsonii. While these bacteria are closely related, they have varied ecological lifestyles as dairy and food fermenters, allochthonous probiotics, or autochthonous commensals of the host gastrointestinal tract. Bacterial cell surface components play a critical role in the molecular dialogue between bacteria and interaction signaling with the intestinal mucosa. Notably, the L. acidophilus complex is distinguished in two clades by the presence or absence of S-layers, which are semiporous crystalline arrays of self-assembling proteinaceous subunits found as the outermost layer of the bacterial cell wall. In this study, S-layer-associated proteins (SLAPs) in the exoproteomes of various S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species were proteomically identified, genomically compared, and transcriptionally analyzed. Four gene regions encoding six putative SLAPs were conserved in the S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species but not identified in the extracts of the closely related progenitor, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, which does not produce an S-layer. Therefore, the presence or absence of an S-layer has a clear impact on the exoproteomic composition of Lactobacillus species. This proteomic complexity and differences in the cell surface properties between S-layer- and non-S-layer-forming lactobacilli reveal the potential for SLAPs to mediate intimate probiotic interactions and signaling with the host intestinal mucosa. PMID:26475115

  7. Intermolecular interactions during complex coacervation of pea protein isolate and gum arabic.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuanghui; Cao, Yuan-Long; Ghosh, Supratim; Rousseau, Dérick; Low, Nicholas H; Nickerson, Michael T

    2010-01-13

    The nature of intermolecular interactions during complexation between pea protein isolate (PPI) and gum arabic (GA) was investigated as a function of pH (4.30-2.40) by turbidimetric analysis and confocal scanning microscopy in the presence of destabilizing agents (100 mM NaCl or 100 mM urea) and at different temperatures (6-60 degrees C). Complex formation followed two pH-dependent structure-forming events associated with the formation of soluble and insoluble complexes and involved interactions between GA and PPI aggregates. Complex formation was driven by electrostatic attractive forces between complementary charged biopolymers, with secondary stabilization by hydrogen bonding. Hydrophobic interactions were found to enhance complex stability at lower pH (pH 3.10), but not with its formation. PMID:19938857

  8. Assembly of the Cysteine Synthase Complex and the Regulatory Role of Protein-Protein Interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macromolecular assemblies play critical roles in regulating cellular functions. The cysteine synthase complex (CSC), which is formed by association of serine O-acetyltransferase (SAT) and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS), functions as a multienzyme complex that responds to changes in intracellul...

  9. Understanding the interaction of an antitumoral platinum(II) 7-azaindolate complex with proteins and DNA.

    PubMed

    Samper, Katia G; Rodríguez, Venancio; Ortega-Carrasco, Elisabeth; Atrian, Sílvia; Maréchal, Jean Didier; Cutillas, Natalia; Zamora, Ana; de Haro, Concepción; Capdevila, Mercè; Ruiz, José; Palacios, Òscar

    2014-12-01

    The reactivity of the [Pt(dmba)(aza-N1)(dmso)] complex 1, (a potential antitumoral drug with lower IC50 than cisplatin in several tumoral cell lines) with different proteins and oligonucleotides is investigated by means of mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF MS). The results obtained show a particular binding behaviour of this platinum(II) complex. The interaction of 1 with the assayed proteins apparently takes place by Pt-binding to the most accessible coordinating amino acids, presumably at the surface of the protein -this avoiding protein denaturation or degradation- with the subsequent release of one or two ligands of 1. The specific reactivity of 1 with distinct proteins allows to conclude that the substituted initial ligand (dmso or azaindolate) is indicative of the nature of the protein donor atom finally bound to the platinum(II) centre, i.e. N- or S-donor amino acid. Molecular modeling calculations suggest that the release of the azaindolate ligand is promoted by a proton transfer to the non-coordinating N present in the azaindolate ring, while the release of the dmso ligand is mainly favoured by the binding of a deprotonated Cys. The interaction of complex 1 with DNA takes always place through the release of the azaindolate ligand. Interestingly, the interaction of 1 with DNA only proceeds when the oligonucleotides are annealed forming a double strand. Complex 1 is also capable to displace ethidium bromide from DNA and it also weakly binds to DNA at the minor groove, as shown by Hoechst 33258 displacement experiments. Furthermore, complex 1 is also a good inhibitor of cathepsin B (an enzyme implicated in a number of cancer related events). Therefore, although compound 1 is definitely able to bind proteins that can hamper its arrival to the nuclear target, it should be taken into consideration as a putative anticancer drug due to its strong interaction with oligonucleotides and its effective inhibition of cat B. PMID:25106460

  10. Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering From RNA, Proteins, And Protein Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Lipfert, Jan; Doniach, Sebastian; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-09-18

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is increasingly used to characterize the structure and interactions of biological macromolecules and their complexes in solution. Although still a low-resolution technique, the advent of high-flux synchrotron sources and the development of algorithms for the reconstruction of 3-D electron density maps from 1-D scattering profiles have made possible the generation of useful low-resolution molecular models from SAXS data. Furthermore, SAXS is well suited for the study of unfolded or partially folded conformational ensembles as a function of time or solution conditions. Here, we review recently developed algorithms for 3-D structure modeling and applications to protein complexes. Furthermore, we discuss the emerging use of SAXS as a tool to study membrane protein-detergent complexes. SAXS is proving useful to study the folding of functional RNA molecules, and finally we discuss uses of SAXS to study ensembles of denatured proteins.

  11. NMR techniques in drug delivery: application to zein protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Sousa, F F O; Luzardo-Álvarez, Asteria; Blanco-Méndez, José; Martín-Pastor, Manuel

    2012-12-15

    Zein is a protein containing a large amount of nonpolar amino acids, which has shown the ability to form aggregates and entrap solutes, such as drugs and amino acids. NMR techniques were used to detect binding interactions and measure affinity between zein and three different drugs: tetracycline, amoxicillin and indomethacin. The release study of zein microparticle formulations containing any of these drugs was confronted with the affinity results, showing a remarkable correlation. The feasible methodology employed, focused in the functionality of the protein-drug interaction, can be very promising for the rational design of appropriate drug vehicles for drug delivery. PMID:23041651

  12. Evidence for two interconverting protein isomers in the methotrexate complex of dihydrofolate reductase from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Falzone, C.J.; Benkovic, S.J. ); Wright, P.E. )

    1991-02-26

    Two-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR methods and a knowledge of the X-ray crystal structure have been used to make resonance assignments for the amino acid side chains of dihydrofolate reductase from Escherichia coli complexed with methotrexate. The H7 proton on the pteridine ring of methotrexate was found to have NOEs to the methyl protons of Leu-28 which were assigned by using the L28F mutant. These NOEs indicated that the orientation of the methotrexate pteridine ring is similar in both solution and crystal structures. During the initial assignment process, it became evident that many of the resonances in this complex, unlike those of the folate complex, are severally broadened or doubled. The observation of two distinct sets of resonances in a ratio of approximately 2:1 was attributed to the presence of two protein isomers. Many of the side chains with clearly doubled resonances were located in the {beta}-sheet and the active site. Preliminary studies on the apoprotein also revealed doubled resonances in the absence of the inhibitor, indicating the existence of the protein isomers prior to methotrexate binding. In contrast to the methotrexate complex, the binary complex with folate and the ternary MTX-NADPH-DHFR complex presented a single enzyme form. These results are proposed to reflect the ability of folate and NADPH to bind predominantly to one protein isomer.

  13. Radioprotection by polyethylene glycol-protein complexes in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, B.H.; Stull, R.W.

    1983-03-01

    Polyethylene glycol of about 5000 D was activated with cyanuric chloride, and the activated compound was complexed to each of three proteins. Polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase and polyethylene glycol-catalase were each radioprotectants when administered prophylactically to female B6CBF1 mice before irradiation. The dose reduction factor for these mice was 1.2 when 5000 units of polyethylene glycol-catalase was administered before /sup 60/Co irradiation. Female B6CBF1 mice administered prophylactic intravenous injections of catalase, polyethylene glycol-albumin, or heat-denatured polyethylene glycol-catalase had survival rates similar to phosphate-buffered saline-injected control mice following /sup 60/Co irradiation. Polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase and polyethylene glycol-catalase have radioprotective activity in B6CBF1 mice, which appears to depend in part on enzymatic activities of the complex. However, no radioprotective effect was observed in male C57BL/6 mice injected with each polyethylene glycol-protein complex at either 3 or 24 hr before irradiation. The mechanism for radioprotection by these complexes may depend in part on other factors.

  14. Complexation of bovine beta-lactoglobulin with 11S protein fractions of soybean (Glycine max) and sesame (Sesamum indicum).

    PubMed

    Anuradha, S N; Prakash, V

    2009-01-01

    Beta-lactoglobulin (beta-Lg) comprises 50% of the whey component of bovine milk. Protein-protein interactions between bovine beta-Lg and 11S protein fractions of soybean and sesame were investigated by turbidity, solubility behaviour and by evaluation of functional properties in the mixed systems. In this work, the aggregation behaviour of soybean and the whey protein (beta-Lg) showed the formation of soluble complexes. Turbidity and solubility studies showed that the proteins interacted at temperatures between 60 and 90+/-5 degrees C. Heating a mixture of beta-Lg and 11S proteins of soybean at higher temperatures formed soluble complexes with beta-Lg. It also reduced the self aggregation behaviour, especially that of 11S protein fraction of soybean. This reduced the precipitation of soybean proteins at higher temperature. The complex formed was resolved by gel filtration using high-performance liquid chromatography. Upon heating beta-Lg at neutral pH, native dimer starts to dissociate into monomers leading to the exposure of previously buried hydrophobic amino acids and the free thiol group. The soluble complex is formed by the exposed thiol groups. But interaction of beta-Lg with sesame 11S protein fractions did not form any soluble complexes. The mechanism of interaction indicates that hydrophobic interactions were preferred over disulfide linkages at the high salt concentrations of the buffer used. During thermal treatment the molecules are unfolded, leading to an exposure of the hydrophobic groups that further enhance the protein-protein interactions that are entropically driven hydrophobic interactions. PMID:19330636

  15. Taking advantage of local structure descriptors to analyze interresidue contacts in protein structures and protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Juliette; Regad, Leslie; Etchebest, Catherine; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2008-11-15

    Interresidue protein contacts in proteins structures and at protein-protein interface are classically described by the amino acid types of interacting residues and the local structural context of the contact, if any, is described using secondary structures. In this study, we present an alternate analysis of interresidue contact using local structures defined by the structural alphabet introduced by Camproux et al. This structural alphabet allows to describe a 3D structure as a sequence of prototype fragments called structural letters, of 27 different types. Each residue can then be assigned to a particular local structure, even in loop regions. The analysis of interresidue contacts within protein structures defined using Voronoï tessellations reveals that pairwise contact specificity is greater in terms of structural letters than amino acids. Using a simple heuristic based on specificity score comparison, we find that 74% of the long-range contacts within protein structures are better described using structural letters than amino acid types. The investigation is extended to a set of protein-protein complexes, showing that the similar global rules apply as for intraprotein contacts, with 64% of the interprotein contacts best described by local structures. We then present an evaluation of pairing functions integrating structural letters to decoy scoring and show that some complexes could benefit from the use of structural letter-based pairing functions. PMID:18491388

  16. Formation and fate of a complete 31-protein RNA polymerase II transcription preinitiation complex.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kenji; Calero, Guillermo; Brown, Christopher R; Liu, Xin; Davis, Ralph E; Boeger, Hinrich; Kornberg, Roger D

    2013-03-01

    Whereas individual RNA polymerase II (pol II)-general transcription factor (GTF) complexes are unstable, an assembly of pol II with six GTFs and promoter DNA could be isolated in abundant homogeneous form. The resulting complete pol II transcription preinitiation complex (PIC) contained equimolar amounts of all 31 protein components. An intermediate in assembly, consisting of four GTFs and promoter DNA, could be isolated and supplemented with the remaining components for formation of the PIC. Nuclease digestion and psoralen cross-linking mapped the PIC between positions -70 and -9, centered on the TATA box. Addition of ATP to the PIC resulted in quantitative conversion to an open complex, which retained all 31 proteins, contrary to expectation from previous studies. Addition of the remaining NTPs resulted in run-off transcription, with an efficiency that was promoter-dependent and was as great as 17.5% with the promoters tested. PMID:23303183

  17. pyDockSAXS: protein-protein complex structure by SAXS and computational docking.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-García, Brian; Pons, Carles; Svergun, Dmitri I; Bernadó, Pau; Fernández-Recio, Juan

    2015-07-01

    Structural characterization of protein-protein interactions at molecular level is essential to understand biological processes and identify new therapeutic opportunities. However, atomic resolution structural techniques cannot keep pace with current advances in interactomics. Low-resolution structural techniques, such as small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), can be applied at larger scale, but they miss atomic details. For efficient application to protein-protein complexes, low-resolution information can be combined with theoretical methods that provide energetic description and atomic details of the interactions. Here we present the pyDockSAXS web server (http://life.bsc.es/pid/pydocksaxs) that provides an automatic pipeline for modeling the structure of a protein-protein complex from SAXS data. The method uses FTDOCK to generate rigid-body docking models that are subsequently evaluated by a combination of pyDock energy-based scoring function and their capacity to describe SAXS data. The only required input files are structural models for the interacting partners and a SAXS curve. The server automatically provides a series of structural models for the complex, sorted by the pyDockSAXS scoring function. The user can also upload a previously computed set of docking poses, which opens the possibility to filter the docking solutions by potential interface residues or symmetry restraints. The server is freely available to all users without restriction. PMID:25897115

  18. Unfolded Protein Response Pathways in Bloodstream-Form Trypanosoma brucei?

    PubMed

    Tiengwe, Calvin; Brown, Abigail E N A; Bangs, James D

    2015-11-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a stress mechanism to cope with misfolded proteins in the early secretory pathway, the hallmark being transcriptional upregulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) molecular chaperones such as BiP and protein disulfide isomerase. Despite the lack of transcriptional regulation and the absence of the classical UPR machinery, African trypanosomes apparently respond to persistent ER stress by a UPR-like response, including upregulation of BiP, and a related spliced leader silencing (SLS) response whereby SL RNA transcription is shut down. Initially observed by knockdown of the secretory protein translocation machinery, both responses are also induced by chemical agents known to elicit UPR in mammalian cells (H. Goldshmidt, D. Matas, A. Kabi, A. Carmi, R. Hope, S. Michaeli, PLoS Pathog 6:e1000731, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1000731). As these findings were generated primarily in procyclic-stage trypanosomes, we have investigated both responses in pathogenic bloodstream-stage parasites. RNA interference (RNAi) silencing of the core translocon subunit Trypanosoma brucei Sec61α (TbSec61α) failed to induce either response. Interestingly, cell growth halted within 16 h of silencing, but sufficient TbSec61α remained to allow full competence for translocation of nascent secretory proteins for up to 24 h, indicating that replication is finely coupled with the capacity to synthesize and transport secretory cargo. Tunicamycin and thapsigargin at concentrations compatible with short-term (4 h) and long-term (24 h) viability also failed to induce any of the indicators of UPR-like or SLS responses. Dithiothreitol (DTT) was lethal at all concentrations tested. These results indicate that UPR-like and SLS responses to persistent ER stress do not occur in bloodstream-stage trypanosomes. PMID:26318397

  19. Unfolded Protein Response Pathways in Bloodstream-Form Trypanosoma brucei?

    PubMed Central

    Tiengwe, Calvin; Brown, Abigail E. N. A.

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a stress mechanism to cope with misfolded proteins in the early secretory pathway, the hallmark being transcriptional upregulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) molecular chaperones such as BiP and protein disulfide isomerase. Despite the lack of transcriptional regulation and the absence of the classical UPR machinery, African trypanosomes apparently respond to persistent ER stress by a UPR-like response, including upregulation of BiP, and a related spliced leader silencing (SLS) response whereby SL RNA transcription is shut down. Initially observed by knockdown of the secretory protein translocation machinery, both responses are also induced by chemical agents known to elicit UPR in mammalian cells (H. Goldshmidt, D. Matas, A. Kabi, A. Carmi, R. Hope, S. Michaeli, PLoS Pathog 6:e1000731, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1000731). As these findings were generated primarily in procyclic-stage trypanosomes, we have investigated both responses in pathogenic bloodstream-stage parasites. RNA interference (RNAi) silencing of the core translocon subunit Trypanosoma brucei Sec61α (TbSec61α) failed to induce either response. Interestingly, cell growth halted within 16 h of silencing, but sufficient TbSec61α remained to allow full competence for translocation of nascent secretory proteins for up to 24 h, indicating that replication is finely coupled with the capacity to synthesize and transport secretory cargo. Tunicamycin and thapsigargin at concentrations compatible with short-term (4 h) and long-term (24 h) viability also failed to induce any of the indicators of UPR-like or SLS responses. Dithiothreitol (DTT) was lethal at all concentrations tested. These results indicate that UPR-like and SLS responses to persistent ER stress do not occur in bloodstream-stage trypanosomes. PMID:26318397

  20. Encounter complexes and dimensionality reduction in protein–protein association

    PubMed Central

    Kozakov, Dima; Li, Keyong; Hall, David R; Beglov, Dmitri; Zheng, Jiefu; Vakili, Pirooz; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Paschalidis, Ioannis Ch; Clore, G Marius; Vajda, Sandor

    2014-01-01

    An outstanding challenge has been to understand the mechanism whereby proteins associate. We report here the results of exhaustively sampling the conformational space in protein–protein association using a physics-based energy function. The agreement between experimental intermolecular paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) data and the PRE profiles calculated from the docked structures shows that the method captures both specific and non-specific encounter complexes. To explore the energy landscape in the vicinity of the native structure, the nonlinear manifold describing the relative orientation of two solid bodies is projected onto a Euclidean space in which the shape of low energy regions is studied by principal component analysis. Results show that the energy surface is canyon-like, with a smooth funnel within a two dimensional subspace capturing over 75% of the total motion. Thus, proteins tend to associate along preferred pathways, similar to sliding of a protein along DNA in the process of protein-DNA recognition. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01370.001 PMID:24714491

  1. Proteomic identification of dysferlin-interacting protein complexes in human vascular endothelium

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Cleo; Utokaparch, Soraya; Sharma, Arpeeta; Yu, Carol; Abraham, Thomas; Borchers, Christoph; Bernatchez, Pascal

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bi-directional (inward and outward) movement of GFP-dysferlin in COS-7 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dysferlin interacts with key signaling proteins for transcytosis in EC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dysferlin mediates trafficking of vesicles carrying protein cargos in EC. -- Abstract: Dysferlin is a membrane-anchored protein known to facilitate membrane repair in skeletal muscles following mechanical injury. Mutations of dysferlin gene impair sarcolemma integrity, a hallmark of certain forms of muscular dystrophy in patients. Dysferlin contains seven calcium-dependent C2 binding domains, which are required to promote fusion of intracellular membrane vesicles. Emerging evidence reveal the unexpected expression of dysferlin in non-muscle, non-mechanically active tissues, such as endothelial cells, which cast doubts over the belief that ferlin proteins act exclusively as membrane repair proteins. We and others have shown that deficient trafficking of membrane bound proteins in dysferlin-deficient cells, suggesting that dysferlin might mediate trafficking of client proteins. Herein, we describe the intracellular trafficking and movement of GFP-dysferlin positive vesicles in unfixed reconstituted cells using live microscopy. By performing GST pull-down assays followed by mass spectrometry, we identified dysferlin binding protein complexes in human vascular endothelial cells. Together, our data further support the claims that dysferlin not only mediates membrane repair but also trafficking of client proteins, ultimately, help bridging dysferlinopathies to aberrant membrane signaling.

  2. Prediction of membrane protein structures with complex topologies using limited constraints

    PubMed Central

    Barth, P.; Wallner, B.; Baker, D.

    2009-01-01

    Reliable structure-prediction methods for membrane proteins are important because the experimental determination of high-resolution membrane protein structures remains very difficult, especially for eukaryotic proteins. However, membrane proteins are typically longer than 200 aa and represent a formidable challenge for structure prediction. We have developed a method for predicting the structures of large membrane proteins by constraining helix–helix packing arrangements at particular positions predicted from sequence or identified by experiments. We tested the method on 12 membrane proteins of diverse topologies and functions with lengths ranging between 190 and 300 residues. Enforcing a single constraint during the folding simulations enriched the population of near-native models for 9 proteins. In 4 of the cases in which the constraint was predicted from the sequence, 1 of the 5 lowest energy models was superimposable within 4 Å on the native structure. Near-native structures could also be selected for heme-binding and pore-forming domains from simulations in which pairs of conserved histidine-chelating hemes and one experimentally determined salt bridge were constrained, respectively. These results suggest that models within 4 Å of the native structure can be achieved for complex membrane proteins if even limited information on residue-residue interactions can be obtained from protein structure databases or experiments. PMID:19190187

  3. Complexes as the main agents of transport for amphoteric and complex-forming elements in the lithosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Beus, A.A.

    1987-04-01

    Geochemical studies of the association of metals with halogens (particularly fluorine), carbonates, and sulfur indicate an important role for complexes in the transport of amphoteric and complex-forming elements in hot solutions, especially because theory clearly indicates that most of these metals cannot be transported as simple halides, carbonates, and sulfides in natural hydrothermal solutions. The author has considered the implications of complexing for a much broader range of transport processes, reaching the scale of differentiation of the earth's shells. This paper reviews his work. 24 references.

  4. Ensemble Structure of the Highly Flexible Complex Formed between Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Unassembled Nucleoprotein and its Phosphoprotein Chaperone.

    PubMed

    Yabukarski, Filip; Leyrat, Cedric; Martinez, Nicolas; Communie, Guillaume; Ivanov, Ivan; Ribeiro, Euripedes A; Buisson, Marlyse; Gerard, Francine C; Bourhis, Jean-Marie; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Bernadó, Pau; Blackledge, Martin; Jamin, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Nucleocapsid assembly is an essential process in the replication of the non-segmented, negative-sense RNA viruses (NNVs). Unassembled nucleoprotein (N(0)) is maintained in an RNA-free and monomeric form by its viral chaperone, the phosphoprotein (P), forming the N(0)-P complex. Our earlier work solved the structure of vesicular stomatitis virus complex formed between an N-terminally truncated N (NΔ21) and a peptide of P (P60) encompassing the N(0)-binding site, but how the full-length P interacts with N(0) remained unknown. Here, we combine several experimental biophysical methods including size exclusion chromatography with detection by light scattering and refractometry, small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with molecular dynamics simulation and computational modeling to characterize the NΔ21(0)-PFL complex formed with dimeric full-length P. We show that for multi-molecular complexes, simultaneous multiple-curve fitting using small-angle neutron scattering data collected at varying contrast levels provides additional information and can help refine structural ensembles. We demonstrate that (a) vesicular stomatitis virus PFL conserves its high flexibility within the NΔ21(0)-PFL complex and interacts with NΔ21(0) only through its N-terminal extremity; (b) each protomer of P can chaperone one N(0) client protein, leading to the formation of complexes with stoichiometries 1N:P2 and 2N:P2; and (c) phosphorylation of residues Ser60, Thr62 and Ser64 provides no additional interactions with N(0) but creates a metal binding site in PNTR. A comparison with the structures of Nipah virus and Ebola virus N(0)-P core complex suggests a mechanism for the control of nucleocapsid assembly that is common to all NNVs. PMID:27107640

  5. Biodegradation of the chitin-protein complex in crustacean cuticle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Artur, Stankiewicz B.; Mastalerz, Maria; Hof, C.H.J.; Bierstedt, A.; Flannery, M.B.; Briggs, D.E.G.; Evershed, R.P.

    1998-01-01

    Arthropod cuticles consist predominantly of chitin cross-linked with proteins. While there is some experimental evidence that this chitin-protein complex may resist decay, the chemical changes that occur during degradation have not been investigated in detail. The stomatopod crustacean Neogonodactylus oerstedii was decayed in the laboratory under anoxic conditions. A combination of pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and FTIR revealed extensive chemical changes after just 2 weeks that resulted in a cuticle composition dominated by chitin. Quantitative analysis of amino acids (by HPLC) and chitin showed that the major loss of proteins and chitin occurred between weeks 1 and 2. After 8 weeks tyrosine, tryptophan and valine are the most prominent amino acid moieties, showing their resistance to degradation. The presence of cyclic ketones in the pyrolysates indicates that mucopolysaccharides or other bound non-chitinous carbohydrates are also resistant to decay. There is no evidence of structural degradation of chitin prior to 8 weeks when FTIR revealed a reduction in chitin-specific bands. The chemical changes are paralleled by structural changes in the cuticle, which becomes an increasingly open structure consisting of loose chitinous fibres. The rapid rate of decay in the experiments suggests that where chitin and protein are preserved in fossil cuticles degradation must have been inhibited.Arthropod cuticles consist predominantly of chitin cross-linked with proteins. While there is some experimental evidence that this chitin-protein complex may resist decay, the chemical changes that occur during degradation have not been investigated in detail. The stomatopod crustacean Neogonodactylus oerstedii was decayed in the laboratory under anoxic conditions. A combination of pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and FTIR revealed extensive chemical changes after just 2 weeks that resulted in a cuticle composition dominated by chitin. Quantitative

  6. The Trypanosome Flagellar Pocket Collar and Its Ring Forming Protein-TbBILBO1.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, Doranda; Bonhivers, Mélanie; Robinson, Derrick R

    2016-01-01

    Sub-species of Trypanosoma brucei are the causal agents of human African sleeping sickness and Nagana in domesticated livestock. These pathogens have developed an organelle-like compartment called the flagellar pocket (FP). The FP carries out endo- and exocytosis and is the only structure this parasite has evolved to do so. The FP is essential for parasite viability, making it an interesting structure to evaluate as a drug target, especially since it has an indispensible cytoskeleton component called the flagellar pocket collar (FPC). The FPC is located at the neck of the FP where the flagellum exits the cell. The FPC has a complex architecture and division cycle, but little is known concerning its organization. Recent work has focused on understanding how the FP and the FPC are formed and as a result of these studies an important calcium-binding, polymer-forming protein named TbBILBO1 was identified. Cellular biology analysis of TbBILBO1 has demonstrated its uniqueness as a FPC component and until recently, it was unknown what structural role it played in forming the FPC. This review summarizes the recent data on the polymer forming properties of TbBILBO1 and how these are correlated to the FP cytoskeleton. PMID:26950156

  7. Model of a DNA-protein complex of the architectural monomeric protein MC1 from Euryarchaea.

    PubMed

    Paquet, Françoise; Delalande, Olivier; Goffinont, Stephane; Culard, Françoise; Loth, Karine; Asseline, Ulysse; Castaing, Bertrand; Landon, Celine

    2014-01-01

    In Archaea the two major modes of DNA packaging are wrapping by histone proteins or bending by architectural non-histone proteins. To supplement our knowledge about the binding mode of the different DNA-bending proteins observed across the three domains of life, we present here the first model of a complex in which the monomeric Methanogen Chromosomal protein 1 (MC1) from Euryarchaea binds to the concave side of a strongly bent DNA. In laboratory growth conditions MC1 is the most abundant architectural protein present in Methanosarcina thermophila CHTI55. Like most proteins that strongly bend DNA, MC1 is known to bind in the minor groove. Interaction areas for MC1 and DNA were mapped by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) data. The polarity of protein binding was determined using paramagnetic probes attached to the DNA. The first structural model of the DNA-MC1 complex we propose here was obtained by two complementary docking approaches and is in good agreement with the experimental data previously provided by electron microscopy and biochemistry. Residues essential to DNA-binding and -bending were highlighted and confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. It was found that the Arg25 side-chain was essential to neutralize the negative charge of two phosphates that come very close in response to a dramatic curvature of the DNA. PMID:24558431

  8. Electrostatic Rate Enhancement and Transient Complex of Protein-Protein Association

    PubMed Central

    Alsallaq, Ramzi; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    The association of two proteins is bounded by the rate at which they, via diffusion, find each other while in appropriate relative orientations. Orientational constraints restrict this rate to ~105 – 106 M−1s−1. Proteins with higher association rates generally have complementary electrostatic surfaces; proteins with lower association rates generally are slowed down by conformational changes upon complex formation. Previous studies (Zhou, Biophys. J. 1997;73:2441–2445) have shown that electrostatic enhancement of the diffusion-limited association rate can be accurately modeled by kD = kD0 exp(−*/ kBT), where kD and kD0 are the rates in the presence and absence of electrostatic interactions, respectively, * is the average electrostatic interaction energy in a “transient-complex” ensemble, and kBT is thermal energy. The transient-complex ensemble separates the bound state from the unbound state. Predictions of the transient-complex theory on four protein complexes were found to agree well with experiment when the electrostatic interaction energy was calculated with the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation (Alsallaq and Zhou, Structure 2007, 15:215–224). Here we show that the agreement is further improved when the nonlinear PB equation is used. These predictions are obtained with the dielectric boundary defined as the protein van der Waals surface. When the dielectric boundary is instead specified as the molecular surface, electrostatic interactions in the transient complex become repulsive and are thus predicted to retard association. Together these results demonstrate that the transient-complex theory is predictive of electrostatic rate enhancement and can help parameterize PB calculations. PMID:17932929

  9. Retrograde Intraflagellar Transport Mutants Identify Complex A Proteins With Multiple Genetic Interactions in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Iomini, Carlo; Li, Linya; Esparza, Jessica M.; Dutcher, Susan K.

    2009-01-01

    The intraflagellar transport machinery is required for the assembly of cilia. It has been investigated by biochemical, genetic, and computational methods that have identified at least 21 proteins that assemble into two subcomplexes. It has been hypothesized that complex A is required for retrograde transport. Temperature-sensitive mutations in FLA15 and FLA17 show defects in retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) in Chlamydomonas. We show that IFT144 and IFT139, two complex A proteins, are encoded by FLA15 and FLA17, respectively. The fla15 allele is a missense mutation in a conserved cysteine and the fla17 allele is an in-frame deletion of three exons. The flagellar assembly defect of each mutant is rescued by the respective transgenes. In fla15 and fla17 mutants, bulges form in the distal one-third of the flagella at the permissive temperature and this phenotype is also rescued by the transgenes. These bulges contain the complex B component IFT74/72, but not α-tubulin or p28, a component of an inner dynein arm, which suggests specificity with respect to the proteins that accumulate in these bulges. IFT144 and IFT139 are likely to interact with each other and other proteins on the basis of three distinct genetic tests: (1) Double mutants display synthetic flagellar assembly defects at the permissive temperature, (2) heterozygous diploid strains exhibit second-site noncomplemention, and (3) transgenes confer two-copy suppression. Since these tests show different levels of phenotypic sensitivity, we propose they illustrate different gradations of gene interaction between complex A proteins themselves and with a complex B protein (IFT172). PMID:19720863

  10. TMEM115 is an integral membrane protein of the Golgi complex involved in retrograde transport

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Yan Shan; Tran, Ton Hoai Thi; Gounko, Natalia V.; Hong, Wanjin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Searching and evaluating the Human Protein Atlas for transmembrane proteins enabled us to identify an integral membrane protein, TMEM115, that is enriched in the Golgi complex. Biochemical and cell biological analysis suggested that TMEM115 has four candidate transmembrane domains located in the N-terminal region. Both the N- and C-terminal domains are oriented towards the cytoplasm. Immunofluorescence analysis supports that TMEM115 is enriched in the Golgi cisternae. Functionally, TMEM115 knockdown or overexpression delays Brefeldin-A-induced Golgi-to-ER retrograde transport, phenocopying cells with mutations or silencing of the conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex. Co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro binding experiments reveals that TMEM115 interacts with the COG complex, and might self-interact to form dimers or oligomers. A short region (residues 206–229) immediately to the C-terminal side of the fourth transmembrane domain is both necessary and sufficient for Golgi targeting. Knockdown of TMEM115 also reduces the binding of the lectins peanut agglutinin (PNA) and Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA), suggesting an altered O-linked glycosylation profile. These results establish that TMEM115 is an integral membrane protein of the Golgi stack regulating Golgi-to-ER retrograde transport and is likely to be part of the machinery of the COG complex. PMID:24806965

  11. How does the TOM complex mediate insertion of precursor proteins into the mitochondrial outer membrane?

    PubMed Central

    Rapaport, Doron

    2005-01-01

    A multisubunit translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM complex) mediates both the import of mitochondrial precursor proteins into the internal compartments of the organelle and the insertion of proteins residing in the mitochondrial outer membrane. The proposed β-barrel structure of Tom40, the pore-forming component of the translocase, raises the question of how the apparent uninterrupted β-barrel topology can be compatible with a role of Tom40 in releasing membrane proteins into the lipid core of the bilayer. In this review, I discuss insertion mechanisms of proteins into the outer membrane and present alternative models based on the opening of a multisubunit β-barrel TOM structure or on the interaction of outer membrane precursors with the outer face of the Tom40 β-barrel structure. PMID:16260501

  12. Contractile vacuole complex--its expanding protein inventory.

    PubMed

    Plattner, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    The contractile vacuole complex (CVC) of some protists serves for the osmotic equilibration of water and ions, notably Ca(2+), by chemiosmotic exploitation of a H(+) gradient generated by the organelle-resident V-type H(+)-ATPase. Ca(2+) is mostly extruded, but there is also some reflux into the cytosol via Ca(2+)-release channels. Most data available are from Dictyostelium and Paramecium. In Paramecium, the major parts of CVC contain several v-/R-SNARE (synaptobrevins) and t-/Q-SNARE (syntaxins) proteins. This is complemented by Rab-type GTPases (shown in Tetrahymena) and exocyst components (Chlamydomonas). All this reflects a multitude of membrane interactions and fusion processes. Ca(2+)/H(+) and other exchangers are to be postulated, as are aquaporins and mechanosensitive Ca(2+) channels. From the complexity of the organelle, many more proteins may be expected. For instance, the pore is endowed with its own set of proteins. We may now envisage the regulation of membrane dynamics (reversible tubulation) and the epigenetic control of organelle shape, size and positioning. New aspects about organelle function and biogenesis are sketched in Section 7. The manifold regulators currently known from CVC suggest the cooperation of widely different mechanisms to maintain its dynamic function and to drive its biogenesis. PMID:24016530

  13. Function and structure of lipid storage droplet protein 1 studied in lipoprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Arrese, Estela L; Rivera, Laticia; Hamada, Masakazu; Mirza, Saima; Hartson, Steve D; Weintraub, Susan; Soulages, Jose L

    2008-05-01

    Triglycerides (TG) stored in lipid droplets (LDs) are the main energy reserve in all animals. The mechanism by which animals mobilize TG is complex and not fully understood. Several proteins surrounding the LDs have been implicated in TG homeostasis such as mammalian perilipin A and insect lipid storage proteins (Lsd). Most of the knowledge on LD-associated proteins comes from studies using cells or LDs leaving biochemical properties of these proteins uncharacterized. Here we describe the purification of recombinant Lsd1 and its reconstitution with lipids to form lipoprotein complexes suitable for functional and structural studies. Lsd1 in the lipid bound state is a predominately alpha-helical protein. Using lipoprotein complexes containing triolein it is shown that PKA mediated phosphorylation of Lsd1 promoted a 1.7-fold activation of the main fat body lipase demonstrating the direct link between Lsd1 phosphorylation and activation of lipolysis. Serine 20 was identified as the Lsd1-phosphorylation site triggering this effect. PMID:18342616

  14. The Effect of the Form Complexity of Television on the Identification/Recognition Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Sylvia E.

    To measure how the complexity of a television image affects the viewer's ability to identify or recognize visual details within the image, two coders rated the form complexity of 30 public service announcements, basing their evaluation on the familiarity of the images in the announcements, the rate at which they presented new information, and the…

  15. Killing machines: three pore-forming proteins of the immune system.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Ryan; de Armas, Lesley; Shiratsuchi, Motoaki; Podack, Eckhard R

    2013-12-01

    The evolution of early multicellular eukaryotes 400-500 million years ago required a defensive strategy against microbial invasion. Pore-forming proteins containing the membrane-attack-complex-perforin (MACPF) domain were selected as the most efficient means to destroy bacteria or virally infected cells. The mechanism of pore formation by the MACPF domain is distinctive in that pore formation is purely physical and unspecific. The MACPF domain polymerizes, refolds, and inserts itself into bilayer membranes or bacterial outer cell walls. The displacement of surface lipid/carbohydrate molecules by the polymerizing MACPF domain creates clusters of large, water-filled holes that destabilize the barrier function and provide access for additional anti-bacterial or anti-viral effectors to sensitive sites that complete the destruction of the invader via enzymatic or chemical attack. The highly efficient mechanism of anti-microbial defense by a combined physical and chemical strategy using pore-forming MACPF-proteins has been retargeted during evolution of vertebrates and mammals for three purposes: (1) to kill extracellular bacteria C9/polyC9 evolved in conjunction with complement, (2) to kill virus infected and cancer cells perforin-1/polyperforin-1 CTL evolved targeted by NK and CTL, and (3) to kill intracellular bacteria transmembrane perforin-2/putative polyperforin-2 evolved targeted by phagocytic and nonphagocytic cells. Our laboratory has been involved in the discovery and description of each of the three pore-formers that will be reviewed here. PMID:24293008

  16. Inferring drug-disease associations based on known protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Inferring drug-disease associations is critical in unveiling disease mechanisms, as well as discovering novel functions of available drugs, or drug repositioning. Previous work is primarily based on drug-gene-disease relationship, which throws away many important information since genes execute their functions through interacting others. To overcome this issue, we propose a novel methodology that discover the drug-disease association based on protein complexes. Firstly, the integrated heterogeneous network consisting of drugs, protein complexes, and disease are constructed, where we assign weights to the drug-disease association by using probability. Then, from the tripartite network, we get the indirect weighted relationships between drugs and diseases. The larger the weight, the higher the reliability of the correlation. We apply our method to mental disorders and hypertension, and validate the result by using comparative toxicogenomics database. Our ranked results can be directly reinforced by existing biomedical literature, suggesting that our proposed method obtains higher specificity and sensitivity. The proposed method offers new insight into drug-disease discovery. Our method is publicly available at http://1.complexdrug.sinaapp.com/Drug_Complex_Disease/Data_Download.html. PMID:26044949

  17. Proteomics-Based Analysis of Protein Complexes in Pluripotent Stem Cells and Cancer Biology.

    PubMed

    Sudhir, Putty-Reddy; Chen, Chung-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    A protein complex consists of two or more proteins that are linked together through protein-protein interactions. The proteins show stable/transient and direct/indirect interactions within the protein complex or between the protein complexes. Protein complexes are involved in regulation of most of the cellular processes and molecular functions. The delineation of protein complexes is important to expand our knowledge on proteins functional roles in physiological and pathological conditions. The genetic yeast-2-hybrid method has been extensively used to characterize protein-protein interactions. Alternatively, a biochemical-based affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry (AP-MS) approach has been widely used to characterize the protein complexes. In the AP-MS method, a protein complex of a target protein of interest is purified using a specific antibody or an affinity tag (e.g., DYKDDDDK peptide (FLAG) and polyhistidine (His)) and is subsequently analyzed by means of MS. Tandem affinity purification, a two-step purification system, coupled with MS has been widely used mainly to reduce the contaminants. We review here a general principle for AP-MS-based characterization of protein complexes and we explore several protein complexes identified in pluripotent stem cell biology and cancer biology as examples. PMID:27011181

  18. Analysis of the interface variability in NMR structure ensembles of protein-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Calvanese, Luisa; D'Auria, Gabriella; Vangone, Anna; Falcigno, Lucia; Oliva, Romina

    2016-06-01

    NMR structures consist in ensembles of conformers, all satisfying the experimental restraints, which exhibit a certain degree of structural variability. We analyzed here the interface in NMR ensembles of protein-protein heterodimeric complexes and found it to span a wide range of different conservations. The different exhibited conservations do not simply correlate with the size of the systems/interfaces, and are most probably the result of an interplay between different factors, including the quality of experimental data and the intrinsic complex flexibility. In any case, this information is not to be missed when NMR structures of protein-protein complexes are analyzed; especially considering that, as we also show here, the first NMR conformer is usually not the one which best reflects the overall interface. To quantify the interface conservation and to analyze it, we used an approach originally conceived for the analysis and ranking of ensembles of docking models, which has now been extended to directly deal with NMR ensembles. We propose this approach, based on the conservation of the inter-residue contacts at the interface, both for the analysis of the interface in whole ensembles of NMR complexes and for the possible selection of a single conformer as the best representative of the overall interface. In order to make the analyses automatic and fast, we made the protocol available as a web tool at: https://www.molnac.unisa.it/BioTools/consrank/consrank-nmr.html. PMID:26968364

  19. Identification of short peptide sequences in complex milk protein hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Martina B; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    Numerous low molecular mass bioactive peptides (BAPs) can be generated during the hydrolysis of bovine milk proteins. Low molecular mass BAP sequences are less likely to be broken down by digestive enzymes and are thus more likely to be active in vivo. However, the identification of short peptides remains a challenge during mass spectrometry (MS) analysis due to issues with the transfer and over-fragmentation of low molecular mass ions. A method is described herein using time-of-flight ESI-MS/MS to effectively fragment and identify short peptides. This includes (a) short synthetic peptides, (b) short peptides within a defined hydrolysate sample, i.e. a prolyl endoproteinase hydrolysate of β-casein and (c) short peptides within a complex hydrolysate, i.e. a Corolase PP digest of sodium caseinate. The methodology may find widespread utilisation in the efficient identification of low molecular mass peptide sequences in food protein hydrolysates. PMID:25872436

  20. GeLC-MS/MS Analysis of Complex Protein Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Hill, Ryan; Hansen, Kirk C.

    2015-01-01

    Discovery-based proteomics has found its place in nearly every facet of biological research. A key objective of this approach is to maximize sequence coverage for proteins across a wide concentration range. Fractionating samples at the protein level is one of the most common ways to circumvent challenges due to sample complexity and improve proteome coverage. Of the available methods, one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS/MS) is a robust and reproducible method for qualitative and quantitative proteomic analysis. Here we describe a general GeLC-MS/MS protocol and include technical advice and outline caveats to increase the probability of a successful analysis. PMID:24791981

  1. Force-induced remodelling of proteins and their complexes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Radford, Sheena E; Brockwell, David J

    2015-01-01

    Force can drive conformational changes in proteins, as well as modulate their stability and the affinity of their complexes, allowing a mechanical input to be converted into a biochemical output. These properties have been utilised by nature and force is now recognised to be widely used at the cellular level. The effects of force on the biophysical properties of biological systems can be large and varied. As these effects are only apparent in the presence of force, studies on the same proteins using traditional ensemble biophysical methods can yield apparently conflicting results. Where appropriate, therefore, force measurements should be integrated with other experimental approaches to understand the physiological context of the system under study. PMID:25710390

  2. Purification and characterization of HIV–human protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Stefanie; Gulbahce, Natali; Cimermancic, Peter; Kane, Joshua; He, Nanhai; Chou, Seemay; D’Orso, Iván; Fernandes, Jason; Jang, Gwendolyn; Frankel, Alan D.; Alber, Tom; Zhou, Qiang; Krogan, Nevan J.

    2011-01-01

    To fully understand how pathogens infect their host and hijack key biological processes, systematic mapping of intra-pathogenic and pathogen–host protein–protein interactions (PPIs) is crucial. Due to the relatively small size of viral genomes (usually around 10–100 proteins), generation of comprehensive host–virus PPI maps using different experimental platforms, including affinity tag purification-mass spectrometry (AP-MS) and yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) approaches, can be achieved. Global maps such as these provide unbiased insight into the molecular mechanisms of viral entry, replication and assembly. However, to date, only two-hybrid methodology has been used in a systematic fashion to characterize viral–host protein–protein interactions, although a deluge of data exists in databases that manually curate from the literature individual host–pathogen PPIs. We will summarize this work and also describe an AP-MS platform that can be used to characterize viral-human protein complexes and discuss its application for the HIV genome. PMID:20708689

  3. Simulating evolution of protein complexes through gene duplication and co-option.

    PubMed

    Haarsma, Loren; Nelesen, Serita; VanAndel, Ethan; Lamine, James; VandeHaar, Peter

    2016-06-21

    We present a model of the evolution of protein complexes with novel functions through gene duplication, mutation, and co-option. Under a wide variety of input parameters, digital organisms evolve complexes of 2-5 bound proteins which have novel functions but whose component proteins are not independently functional. Evolution of complexes with novel functions happens more quickly as gene duplication rates increase, point mutation rates increase, protein complex functional probability increases, protein complex functional strength increases, and protein family size decreases. Evolution of complexity is inhibited when the metabolic costs of making proteins exceeds the fitness gain of having functional proteins, or when point mutation rates get so large the functional proteins undergo deleterious mutations faster than new functional complexes can evolve. PMID:27038665

  4. An affibody in complex with a target protein: Structure and coupled folding

    PubMed Central

    Wahlberg, Elisabet; Lendel, Christofer; Helgstrand, Magnus; Allard, Peter; Dincbas-Renqvist, Vildan; Hedqvist, Anders; Berglund, Helena; Nygren, Per-Åke; Härd, Torleif

    2003-01-01

    Combinatorial protein engineering provides powerful means for functional selection of novel binding proteins. One class of engineered binding proteins, denoted affibodies, is based on the three-helix scaffold of the Z domain derived from staphylococcal protein A. The ZSPA-1 affibody has been selected from a phage-displayed library as a binder to protein A. ZSPA-1 also binds with micromolar affinity to its own ancestor, the Z domain. We have characterized the ZSPA-1 affibody in its uncomplexed state and determined the solution structure of a Z:ZSPA-1 protein–protein complex. Uncomplexed ZSPA-1 behaves as an aggregation-prone molten globule, but folding occurs on binding, and the original (Z) three-helix bundle scaffold is fully formed in the complex. The structural basis for selection and strong binding is a large interaction interface with tight steric and polar/nonpolar complementarity that directly involves 10 of 13 mutated amino acid residues on ZSPA-1. We also note similarities in how the surface of the Z domain responds by induced fit to binding of ZSPA-1 and Ig Fc, respectively, suggesting that the ZSPA-1 affibody is capable of mimicking the morphology of the natural binding partner for the Z domain. PMID:12594333

  5. Nucleocapsid Protein from Fig Mosaic Virus Forms Cytoplasmic Agglomerates That Are Hauled by Endoplasmic Reticulum Streaming

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Kazuya; Miura, Chihiro; Maejima, Kensaku; Komatsu, Ken; Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Tomomitsu, Tatsuya; Fukuoka, Misato; Yusa, Akira; Yamaji, Yasuyuki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although many studies have demonstrated intracellular movement of viral proteins or viral replication complexes, little is known about the mechanisms of their motility. In this study, we analyzed the localization and motility of the nucleocapsid protein (NP) of Fig mosaic virus (FMV), a negative-strand RNA virus belonging to the recently established genus Emaravirus. Electron microscopy of FMV-infected cells using immunogold labeling showed that NPs formed cytoplasmic agglomerates that were predominantly enveloped by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, while nonenveloped NP agglomerates also localized along the ER. Likewise, transiently expressed NPs formed agglomerates, designated NP bodies (NBs), in close proximity to the ER, as was the case in FMV-infected cells. Subcellular fractionation and electron microscopic analyses of NP-expressing cells revealed that NBs localized in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, we found that NBs moved rapidly with the streaming of the ER in an actomyosin-dependent manner. Brefeldin A treatment at a high concentration to disturb the ER network configuration induced aberrant accumulation of NBs in the perinuclear region, indicating that the ER network configuration is related to NB localization. Dominant negative inhibition of the class XI myosins, XI-1, XI-2, and XI-K, affected both ER streaming and NB movement in a similar pattern. Taken together, these results showed that NBs localize in the cytoplasm but in close proximity to the ER membrane to form enveloped particles and that this causes passive movements of cytoplasmic NBs by ER streaming. IMPORTANCE Intracellular trafficking is a primary and essential step for the cell-to-cell movement of viruses. To date, many studies have demonstrated the rapid intracellular movement of viral factors but have failed to provide evidence for the mechanism or biological significance of this motility. Here, we observed that agglomerates of nucleocapsid protein (NP) moved rapidly

  6. Rictor forms a complex with Cullin-1 to promote SGK1 ubiquitination and destruction.

    PubMed

    Gao, Daming; Wan, Lixin; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Berg, Anders H; Tseng, Alan; Zhai, Bo; Shaik, Shavali; Bennett, Eric; Tron, Adriana E; Gasser, Jessica A; Lau, Alan; Gygi, Steven P; Harper, J Wade; DeCaprio, James A; Toker, Alex; Wei, Wenyi

    2010-09-10

    The Rictor/mTOR complex (also known as mTORC2) plays a critical role in cellular homeostasis by phosphorylating AGC kinases such as Akt and SGK at their hydrophobic motifs to activate downstream signaling. However, the regulation of mTORC2 and whether it has additional function(s) remain largely unknown. Here, we report that Rictor associates with Cullin-1 to form a functional E3 ubiquitin ligase. Rictor, but not Raptor or mTOR alone, promotes SGK1 ubiquitination. Loss of Rictor/Cullin-1-mediated ubiquitination leads to increased SGK1 protein levels as detected in Rictor null cells. Moreover, as part of a feedback mechanism, phosphorylation of Rictor at T1135 by multiple AGC kinases disrupts the interaction between Rictor and Cullin-1 to impair SGK1 ubiquitination. These findings indicate that the Rictor/Cullin-1 E3 ligase activity is regulated by a specific signal relay cascade and that misregulation of this mechanism may contribute to the frequent overexpression of SGK1 in various human cancers. PMID:20832730

  7. Odontoblasts: Specialized hard-tissue-forming cells in the dentin-pulp complex.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Nobuyuki; Okiji, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Odontoblasts are specialized cells that produce dentin and exhibit unique morphological characteristics; i.e., they extend cytoplasmic processes into dentinal tubules. While osteoblasts, which are typical hard-tissue-forming cells, are generated from mesenchymal stem cells during normal and pathological bone metabolism, the induction of odontoblasts only occurs once during tooth development, and odontoblasts survive throughout the lives of healthy teeth. During the differentiation of odontoblasts, signaling molecules from the inner enamel epithelium are considered necessary for the differentiation of odontoblast precursors, i.e., peripheral dental papilla cells. If odontoblasts are destroyed by severe external stimuli, such as deep caries, the differentiation of dental pulp stem cells into odontoblast-like cells is induced. Various bioactive molecules, such as non-collagenous proteins, might be involved in this process, although the precise mechanisms responsible for odontoblast differentiation have not been fully elucidated. Recently, our knowledge about the other functional activities of odontoblasts (apart from dentin formation) has increased. For example, it has been suggested that odontoblasts might act as nociceptive receptors, and surveillance cells that detect the invasion of exogenous pathogens. The regeneration of the dentin-pulp complex has recently gained much attention as a promising future treatment modality that could increase the longevity of pulpless teeth. Finally, congenital dentin anomalies, which are concerned with the disturbance of odontoblast functions, are summarized. PMID:27131345

  8. Structural analysis of Der p 1-antibody complexes and comparison with complexes of proteins or peptides with monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Osinski, Tomasz; Pomés, Anna; Majorek, Karolina A.; Glesner, Jill; Offermann, Lesa R.; Vailes, Lisa D.; Chapman, Martin D.; Minor, Wladek; Chruszcz, Maksymilian

    2015-01-01

    Der p 1 is a major allergen from the house dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus that belongs to the papain-like cysteine protease family. To investigate the antigenic determinants of Der p 1, we determined two crystal structures of Der p 1 in complex with the Fab fragments of mAbs 5H8 or 10B9. Epitopes for these two Der p 1-specific antibodies are located in different, non-overlapping parts of the Der p 1 molecule. Nevertheless, surface area and identity of the amino acid residues involved in hydrogen bonds between allergen and antibody are similar. The epitope for mAb 10B9 only, showed a partial overlap with the previously reported epitope for mAb 4C1, a cross-reactive mAb that binds Der p 1 and its homolog Der f 1 from D. farinae. Upon binding to Der p 1, the Fab fragment of mAb 10B9 was found to form a very rare alpha-helix in its third CDR of the heavy chain. In order to provide an overview of the surface properties of the interfaces formed by the complexes of Der p 1-10B9 and Der p 1-5H8, along with the complexes of 4C1 with Der p 1 and Der f 1, a broad analysis of the surfaces and hydrogen bonds of all complexes of Fab-protein or Fab-peptide was performed. This work provides detailed insight into the cross-reactive and specific allergen-antibody interactions in Group 1 mite allergens. The surface data of Fab-protein and Fab-peptide interfaces can be used in the design of less potent conformational epitopes for immunotherapy. PMID:26026055

  9. Two functionally distinct forms of the RSC nucleosome-remodeling complex, containing essential AT hook, BAH, and bromodomains.

    PubMed

    Cairns, B R; Schlichter, A; Erdjument-Bromage, H; Tempst, P; Kornberg, R D; Winston, F

    1999-11-01

    RSC is an essential 15 protein nucleosome-remodeling complex from S. cerevisiae. We have identified two closely related RSC members, Rsc1 and Rsc2. Biochemical analysis revealed Rsc1 and Rsc2 in distinct complexes, defining two forms of RSC. Genetic analysis has shown that Rsc1 and Rsc2 possess shared and unique functions. Rsc1 and Rsc2 each contain two bromodomains, a bromo-adjacent homology (BAH) domain, and an AT hook. One of the bromodomains, the BAH domain, and the AT hook are each essential for Rsc1 and Rsc2 functions, although they are not required for assembly into RSC complexes. Therefore, these domains are required for RSC function. Additional genetic analysis provides further evidence that RSC function is related to transcriptional control. PMID:10619019

  10. Cripto forms a complex with activin and type II activin receptors and can block activin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Peter C.; Harrison, Craig A.; Vale, Wylie

    2003-01-01

    Activin, nodal, Vg1, and growth and differentiation factor 1 are members of the transforming growth factor β superfamily and signal via the activin type II (ActRII/IIB) and type I (ALK4) serine/threonine kinase receptors. Unlike activins, however, signaling by nodal, Vg1, and growth and differentiation factor 1 requires a coreceptor from the epidermal growth factor-Cripto-FRL1-Cryptic protein family such as Cripto. Cripto has important roles during development and oncogenesis and binds nodal or related ligands and ALK4 to facilitate assembly of type I and type II receptor signaling complexes. Because Cripto mediates signaling via activin receptors and binds directly to ALK4, we tested whether transfection with Cripto would affect the ability of activin to signal and/or interact with its receptors. Here we show that Cripto can form a complex with activin and ActRII/IIB. We were unable to detect activin binding to Cripto in the absence of ActRII/IIB, indicating that unlike nodal, activin requires type II receptors to bind Cripto. If cotransfected with ActRII/IIB and ALK4, Cripto inhibited crosslinking of activin to ALK4 and the association of ALK4 with ActRII/IIB. In addition, Cripto blocked activin signaling when transfected into either HepG2 cells or 293T cells. We have also shown that under conditions in which Cripto facilitates nodal signaling, it antagonizes activin. Inhibition of activin signaling provides an additional example of a Cripto effect on the regulation of signaling by transforming growth factor-β superfamily members. Because activin is a potent inhibitor of cell growth in multiple cell types, these results provide a mechanism that may partially explain the oncogenic action of Cripto. PMID:12682303

  11. The Complex Energy Landscape of the Protein IscU

    PubMed Central

    Bothe, Jameson R.; Tonelli, Marco; Ali, Ibrahim K.; Dai, Ziqi; Frederick, Ronnie O.; Westler, William M.; Markley, John L.

    2015-01-01

    IscU, the scaffold protein for iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biosynthesis in Escherichia coli, traverses a complex energy landscape during Fe-S cluster synthesis and transfer. Our previous studies showed that IscU populates two interconverting conformational states: one structured (S) and one largely disordered (D). Both states appear to be functionally important because proteins involved in the assembly or transfer of Fe-S clusters have been shown to interact preferentially with either the S or D state of IscU. To characterize the complex structure-energy landscape of IscU, we employed NMR spectroscopy, small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), and differential scanning calorimetry. Results obtained for IscU at pH 8.0 show that its S state is maximally populated at 25°C and that heating or cooling converts the protein toward the D state. Results from NMR and DSC indicate that both the heat- and cold-induced S→D transitions are cooperative and two-state. Low-resolution structural information from NMR and SAXS suggests that the structures of the cold-induced and heat-induced D states are similar. Both states exhibit similar 1H-15N HSQC spectra and the same pattern of peptidyl-prolyl peptide bond configurations by NMR, and both appear to be similarly expanded compared with the S state based on analysis of SAXS data. Whereas in other proteins the cold-denatured states have been found to be slightly more compact than the heat-denatured states, these two states occupy similar volumes in IscU. PMID:26331259

  12. Alternative function for the mitochondrial SAM complex in biogenesis of alpha-helical TOM proteins.

    PubMed

    Stojanovski, Diana; Guiard, Bernard; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Meisinger, Chris

    2007-12-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane contains two preprotein translocases: the general translocase of outer membrane (TOM) and the beta-barrel-specific sorting and assembly machinery (SAM). TOM functions as the central entry gate for nuclear-encoded proteins. The channel-forming Tom40 is a beta-barrel protein, whereas all Tom receptors and small Tom proteins are membrane anchored by a transmembrane alpha-helical segment in their N- or C-terminal portion. Synthesis of Tom precursors takes place in the cytosol, and their import occurs via preexisting TOM complexes. The precursor of Tom40 is then transferred to SAM for membrane insertion and assembly. Unexpectedly, we find that the biogenesis of alpha-helical Tom proteins with a membrane anchor in the C-terminal portion is SAM dependent. Each SAM protein is necessary for efficient membrane integration of the receptor Tom22, whereas assembly of the small Tom proteins depends on Sam37. Thus, the substrate specificity of SAM is not restricted to beta-barrel proteins but also includes the majority of alpha-helical Tom proteins. PMID:18039934

  13. Mapping energy transfer channels in fucoxanthin-chlorophyll protein complex.

    PubMed

    Gelzinis, Andrius; Butkus, Vytautas; Songaila, Egidijus; Augulis, Ramūnas; Gall, Andrew; Büchel, Claudia; Robert, Bruno; Abramavicius, Darius; Zigmantas, Donatas; Valkunas, Leonas

    2015-02-01

    Fucoxanthin-chlorophyll protein (FCP) is the key molecular complex performing the light-harvesting function in diatoms, which, being a major group of algae, are responsible for up to one quarter of the total primary production on Earth. These photosynthetic organisms contain an unusually large amount of the carotenoid fucoxanthin, which absorbs the light in the blue-green spectral region and transfers the captured excitation energy to the FCP-bound chlorophylls. Due to the large number of fucoxanthins, the excitation energy transfer cascades in these complexes are particularly tangled. In this work we present the two-color two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy experiments on FCP. Analysis of the data using the modified decay associated spectra permits a detailed mapping of the excitation frequency dependent energy transfer flow with a femtosecond time resolution. PMID:25445318

  14. The coat protein complex II, COPII, protein Sec13 directly interacts with presenilin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Anders Lade

    2009-10-23

    Mutations in the human gene encoding presenilin-1, PS1, account for most cases of early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease. PS1 has nine transmembrane domains and a large loop orientated towards the cytoplasm. PS1 locates to cellular compartments as endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi apparatus, vesicular structures, and plasma membrane, and is an integral member of {gamma}-secretase, a protein protease complex with specificity for intra-membranous cleavage of substrates such as {beta}-amyloid precursor protein. Here, an interaction between PS1 and the Sec13 protein is described. Sec13 takes part in coat protein complex II, COPII, vesicular trafficking, nuclear pore function, and ER directed protein sequestering and degradation control. The interaction maps to the N-terminal part of the large hydrophilic PS1 loop and the first of the six WD40-repeats present in Sec13. The identified Sec13 interaction to PS1 is a new candidate interaction for linking PS1 to secretory and protein degrading vesicular circuits.

  15. Neurophysiological evidence for whole form retrieval of complex derived words: a mismatch negativity study

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Jeff; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2014-01-01

    Complex words can be seen as combinations of elementary units, decomposable into stems and affixes according to morphological rules. Alternatively, complex forms may be stored as single lexical entries and accessed as whole forms. This study uses an event-related potential brain response capable of indexing both whole-form retrieval and combinatorial processing, the Mismatch Negativity (MMN), to investigate early brain activity elicited by morphologically complex derived words in German. We presented complex words consisting of stems “sicher” (secure), or “sauber” (clean) combined with abstract nominalizing derivational affixes -heit or -keit, to form either congruent derived words: “Sicherheit” (security) and “Sauberkeit” (cleanliness), or incongruent derived pseudowords: *“Sicherkeit”, and *“Sauberheit”. Using this orthogonal design, it was possible to record brain responses for -heit and -keit in both congruent and incongruent contexts, therefore balancing acoustic variance. Previous research has shown that incongruent combinations of symbols elicit a stronger MMN than congruent combinations, but that single words or constructions stored as whole forms elicit a stronger MMN than pseudowords or non-existent constructions. We found that congruent derived words elicited a stronger MMN than incongruent derived words, beginning about 150 ms after perception of the critical morpheme. This pattern of results is consistent with whole-form storage of morphologically complex derived words as lexical units, or mini-constructions. Using distributed source localization methods, the MMN enhancement for well-formed derivationally complex words appeared to be most prominent in the left inferior anterior-temporal, bilateral superior parietal and bilateral post-central, supra-marginal areas. In addition, neurophysiological results reflected the frequency of derived forms, thus providing further converging evidence for whole form storage and against a

  16. Golgi complex localization of the Punta Toro virus G2 protein requires its association with the G1 protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, S Y; Matsuoka, Y; Compans, R W

    1991-07-01

    The glycoproteins of bunyaviruses accumulate in membranes of the Golgi complex, where virus maturation occurs by budding. In this study we have constructed a series of full length or truncated mutants of the G2 glycoprotein of Punta Toro virus (PTV), a member of the Phlebovirus genus of the Bunyaviridae, and investigated their transport properties. The results indicate that the hydrophobic domain preceding the G2 glycoprotein can function as a translocational signal peptide, and that the hydrophobic domain near the C-terminus serves as a membrane anchor. A G2 glycoprotein construct with an extra hydrophobic sequence derived from the N-terminal NSM region was stably retained in the ER, and was unable to be transported to the Golgi complex. The full-length G2 glycoprotein, when expressed on its own, was transported out of the ER and expressed on the cell surface, whereas the G1 and G2 proteins when expressed together are retained in the Golgi complex. A truncated anchor-minus form of the G2 glycoprotein was found to be secreted into the culture medium, but was retained in the Golgi complex when coexpressed with the G1 glycoprotein. These results indicate that the G2 membrane glycoprotein is a class I membrane protein which does not contain a signal sufficient for Golgi retention, and suggest that its Golgi localization is a result of association with the G1 glycoprotein. PMID:1905078

  17. Auxin efflux by PIN-FORMED proteins is activated by two different protein kinases, D6 PROTEIN KINASE and PINOID

    PubMed Central

    Zourelidou, Melina; Absmanner, Birgit; Weller, Benjamin; Barbosa, Inês CR; Willige, Björn C; Fastner, Astrid; Streit, Verena; Port, Sarah A; Colcombet, Jean; de la Fuente van Bentem, Sergio; Hirt, Heribert; Kuster, Bernhard; Schulze, Waltraud X; Hammes, Ulrich Z; Schwechheimer, Claus

    2014-01-01

    The development and morphology of vascular plants is critically determined by synthesis and proper distribution of the phytohormone auxin. The directed cell-to-cell distribution of auxin is achieved through a system of auxin influx and efflux transporters. PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins are proposed auxin efflux transporters, and auxin fluxes can seemingly be predicted based on the—in many cells—asymmetric plasma membrane distribution of PINs. Here, we show in a heterologous Xenopus oocyte system as well as in Arabidopsis thaliana inflorescence stems that PIN-mediated auxin transport is directly activated by D6 PROTEIN KINASE (D6PK) and PINOID (PID)/WAG kinases of the Arabidopsis AGCVIII kinase family. At the same time, we reveal that D6PKs and PID have differential phosphosite preferences. Our study suggests that PIN activation by protein kinases is a crucial component of auxin transport control that must be taken into account to understand auxin distribution within the plant. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02860.001 PMID:24948515

  18. Auxin efflux by PIN-FORMED proteins is activated by two different protein kinases, D6 PROTEIN KINASE and PINOID.

    PubMed

    Zourelidou, Melina; Absmanner, Birgit; Weller, Benjamin; Barbosa, Inês C R; Willige, Björn C; Fastner, Astrid; Streit, Verena; Port, Sarah A; Colcombet, Jean; de la Fuente van Bentem, Sergio; Hirt, Heribert; Kuster, Bernhard; Schulze, Waltraud X; Hammes, Ulrich Z; Schwechheimer, Claus

    2014-01-01

    The development and morphology of vascular plants is critically determined by synthesis and proper distribution of the phytohormone auxin. The directed cell-to-cell distribution of auxin is achieved through a system of auxin influx and efflux transporters. PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins are proposed auxin efflux transporters, and auxin fluxes can seemingly be predicted based on the--in many cells--asymmetric plasma membrane distribution of PINs. Here, we show in a heterologous Xenopus oocyte system as well as in Arabidopsis thaliana inflorescence stems that PIN-mediated auxin transport is directly activated by D6 PROTEIN KINASE (D6PK) and PINOID (PID)/WAG kinases of the Arabidopsis AGCVIII kinase family. At the same time, we reveal that D6PKs and PID have differential phosphosite preferences. Our study suggests that PIN activation by protein kinases is a crucial component of auxin transport control that must be taken into account to understand auxin distribution within the plant. PMID:24948515

  19. Proteomics-Based Analysis of Protein Complexes in Pluripotent Stem Cells and Cancer Biology

    PubMed Central

    Sudhir, Putty-Reddy; Chen, Chung-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    A protein complex consists of two or more proteins that are linked together through protein–protein interactions. The proteins show stable/transient and direct/indirect interactions within the protein complex or between the protein complexes. Protein complexes are involved in regulation of most of the cellular processes and molecular functions. The delineation of protein complexes is important to expand our knowledge on proteins functional roles in physiological and pathological conditions. The genetic yeast-2-hybrid method has been extensively used to characterize protein-protein interactions. Alternatively, a biochemical-based affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry (AP-MS) approach has been widely used to characterize the protein complexes. In the AP-MS method, a protein complex of a target protein of interest is purified using a specific antibody or an affinity tag (e.g., DYKDDDDK peptide (FLAG) and polyhistidine (His)) and is subsequently analyzed by means of MS. Tandem affinity purification, a two-step purification system, coupled with MS has been widely used mainly to reduce the contaminants. We review here a general principle for AP-MS-based characterization of protein complexes and we explore several protein complexes identified in pluripotent stem cell biology and cancer biology as examples. PMID:27011181

  20. Crystal Structure of Hyp-1, a Hypericum perforatum PR-10 Protein, in Complex with Melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Sliwiak, Joanna; Dauter, Zbigniew; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Hyp-1, a PR-10-fold protein from Hypericum perforatum, was crystallized in complex with melatonin (MEL). The structure confirms the conserved protein fold and the presence of three unusual ligand binding sites, two of which are internal chambers (1,2), while the third one (3) is formed as an invagination of the protein surface. The MEL ligand in site 1 is well defined while that in site 3 seems to be rotating between the side chains of Lys33 and Tyr150 that act as a molecular vise. The patch of electron density in site 2 does not allow unambiguous modeling of a melatonin molecule but suggests a possible presence of its degradation product. This pattern of ligand occupation is reproducible in repeated crystallization/structure determination experiments. Although the binding of melatonin by Hyp-1 does not appear to be very strong (for example, MEL cannot displace the artificial fluorescence probe ANS), it is strong enough to suggest a physiological role of this interaction. For example, trans-zeatin, which is a common ligand of PR-10 proteins, does not overcompete melatonin for binding to Hyp-1 as it does not affect the crystallization process of the Hyp-1/MEL complex, and among a number of potential natural mediators tested, melatonin was the only one to form a crystalline complex with Hyp-1 with the use of standard crystallization screens. Hyp-1 is the second protein in the Protein Data Bank for which melatonin binding has been demonstrated crystallographically, the first one being human quinone reductase. PMID:27242869