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Sample records for protein degradation pathway

  1. Protein/Protein Interactions in the Mammalian Heme Degradation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Andrea L. M.; Bagai, Ireena; Becker, Donald F.; Zuiderweg, Erik R. P.; Ragsdale, Stephen W.

    2014-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the O2-dependent degradation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and iron with electrons delivered from NADPH via cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR). Biliverdin reductase (BVR) then catalyzes conversion of biliverdin to bilirubin. We describe mutagenesis combined with kinetic, spectroscopic (fluorescence and NMR), surface plasmon resonance, cross-linking, gel filtration, and analytical ultracentrifugation studies aimed at evaluating interactions of HO-2 with CPR and BVR. Based on these results, we propose a model in which HO-2 and CPR form a dynamic ensemble of complex(es) that precede formation of the productive electron transfer complex. The 1H-15N TROSY NMR spectrum of HO-2 reveals specific residues, including Leu-201, near the heme face of HO-2 that are affected by the addition of CPR, implicating these residues at the HO/CPR interface. Alanine substitutions at HO-2 residues Leu-201 and Lys-169 cause a respective 3- and 22-fold increase in Km values for CPR, consistent with a role for these residues in CPR binding. Sedimentation velocity experiments confirm the transient nature of the HO-2·CPR complex (Kd = 15.1 μm). Our results also indicate that HO-2 and BVR form a very weak complex that is only captured by cross-linking. For example, under conditions where CPR affects the 1H-15N TROSY NMR spectrum of HO-2, BVR has no effect. Fluorescence quenching experiments also suggest that BVR binds HO-2 weakly, if at all, and that the previously reported high affinity of BVR for HO is artifactual, resulting from the effects of free heme (dissociated from HO) on BVR fluorescence. PMID:25196843

  2. Exploring the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Protein Degradation Pathway in Yeast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Will, Tamara J.; McWatters, Melissa K.; McQuade, Kristi L.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory investigating the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in yeast. In this exercise, the enzyme beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) is expressed in yeast under the control of a stress response promoter. Following exposure to heat stress to induce beta-gal expression, cycloheximide is added to halt…

  3. Ribosomal Protein Mutations Result in Constitutive p53 Protein Degradation through Impairment of the AKT Pathway.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Ana T; Goos, Yvonne J; Pereboom, Tamara C; Hermkens, Dorien; Wlodarski, Marcin W; Da Costa, Lydie; MacInnes, Alyson W

    2015-07-01

    Mutations in ribosomal protein (RP) genes can result in the loss of erythrocyte progenitor cells and cause severe anemia. This is seen in patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), a pure red cell aplasia and bone marrow failure syndrome that is almost exclusively linked to RP gene haploinsufficiency. While the mechanisms underlying the cytopenia phenotype of patients with these mutations are not completely understood, it is believed that stabilization of the p53 tumor suppressor protein may induce apoptosis in the progenitor cells. In stark contrast, tumor cells from zebrafish with RP gene haploinsufficiency are unable to stabilize p53 even when exposed to acute DNA damage despite transcribing wild type p53 normally. In this work we demonstrate that p53 has a limited role in eliciting the anemia phenotype of zebrafish models of DBA. In fact, we find that RP-deficient embryos exhibit the same normal p53 transcription, absence of p53 protein, and impaired p53 response to DNA damage as RP haploinsufficient tumor cells. Recently we reported that RP mutations suppress activity of the AKT pathway, and we show here that this suppression results in proteasomal degradation of p53. By re-activating the AKT pathway or by inhibiting GSK-3, a downstream modifier that normally represses AKT signaling, we are able to restore the stabilization of p53. Our work indicates that the anemia phenotype of zebrafish models of DBA is dependent on factors other than p53, and may hold clinical significance for both DBA and the increasing number of cancers revealing spontaneous mutations in RP genes. PMID:26132763

  4. Ribosomal Protein Mutations Result in Constitutive p53 Protein Degradation through Impairment of the AKT Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hermkens, Dorien; Wlodarski, Marcin W.; Da Costa, Lydie; MacInnes, Alyson W.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in ribosomal protein (RP) genes can result in the loss of erythrocyte progenitor cells and cause severe anemia. This is seen in patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), a pure red cell aplasia and bone marrow failure syndrome that is almost exclusively linked to RP gene haploinsufficiency. While the mechanisms underlying the cytopenia phenotype of patients with these mutations are not completely understood, it is believed that stabilization of the p53 tumor suppressor protein may induce apoptosis in the progenitor cells. In stark contrast, tumor cells from zebrafish with RP gene haploinsufficiency are unable to stabilize p53 even when exposed to acute DNA damage despite transcribing wild type p53 normally. In this work we demonstrate that p53 has a limited role in eliciting the anemia phenotype of zebrafish models of DBA. In fact, we find that RP-deficient embryos exhibit the same normal p53 transcription, absence of p53 protein, and impaired p53 response to DNA damage as RP haploinsufficient tumor cells. Recently we reported that RP mutations suppress activity of the AKT pathway, and we show here that this suppression results in proteasomal degradation of p53. By re-activating the AKT pathway or by inhibiting GSK-3, a downstream modifier that normally represses AKT signaling, we are able to restore the stabilization of p53. Our work indicates that the anemia phenotype of zebrafish models of DBA is dependent on factors other than p53, and may hold clinical significance for both DBA and the increasing number of cancers revealing spontaneous mutations in RP genes. PMID:26132763

  5. Unfolded Protein Response and Activated Degradative Pathways Regulation in GNE Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Honghao; Chen, Qi; Liu, Fuchen; Zhang, Xuemei; Li, Wei; Liu, Shuping; Zhao, Yuying; Gong, Yaoqin; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2013-01-01

    Although intracellular beta amyloid (Aβ) accumulation is known as an early upstream event in the degenerative course of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase (GNE) myopathy, the process by which Aβdeposits initiate various degradative pathways, and their relationship have not been fully clarified. We studied the possible secondary responses after amyloid beta precursor protein (AβPP) deposition including unfolded protein response (UPR), ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) activation and its correlation with autophagy system. Eight GNE myopathy patients and five individuals with normal muscle morphology were included in this study. We performed immunofluorescence and immunoblotting to investigate the expression of AβPP, phosphorylated tau (p-tau) and endoplasmic reticulum molecular chaperones. Proteasome activities were measured by cleavage of fluorogenic substrates. The expression of proteasome subunits and linkers between proteasomal and autophagy systems were also evaluated by immunoblotting and relative quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Four molecular chaperones, glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94), glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), calreticulin and calnexin and valosin containing protein (VCP) were highly expressed in GNE myopathy. 20S proteasome subunits, three main proteasome proteolytic activities, and the factors linking UPS and autophagy system were also increased. Our study suggests that AβPP deposition results in endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) and highly expressed VCP deliver unfolded proteins from endoplasmic reticulum to proteosomal system which is activated in endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation (ERAD) in GNE myopathy. Excessive ubiquitinated unfolded proteins are exported by proteins that connect UPS and autophagy to autophagy system, which is activated as an alternative pathway for degradation. PMID:23472144

  6. The Role of the Ubiquitin Proteasome Pathway in Keratin Intermediate Filament Protein Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Rogel, Micah R.; Jaitovich, Ariel; Ridge, Karen M.

    2010-01-01

    Lung injury, whether caused by hypoxic or mechanical stresses, elicits a variety of responses at the cellular level. Alveolar epithelial cells respond and adapt to such injurious stimuli by reorganizing the cellular cytoskeleton, mainly accomplished through modification of the intermediate filament (IF) network. The structural and mechanical integrity in epithelial cells is maintained through this adaptive reorganization response. Keratin, the predominant IF expressed in epithelial cells, displays highly dynamic properties in response to injury, sometimes in the form of degradation of the keratin IF network. Post-translational modification, such as phosphorylation, targets keratin proteins for degradation in these circumstances. As with other structural and regulatory proteins, turnover of keratin is regulated by the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome pathway. The degradation process begins with activation of Ub by the Ub-activating enzyme (E1), followed by the exchange of Ub to the Ub-conjugating enzyme (E2). E2 shuttles the Ub molecule to the substrate-specific Ub ligase (E3), which then delivers the Ub to the substrate protein, thereby targeting it for degradation. In some cases of injury and IF-related disease, aggresomes form in epithelial cells. The mechanisms that regulate aggresome formation are currently unknown, although proteasome overload may play a role. Therefore, a more complete understanding of keratin degradation—causes, mechanisms, and consequences—will allow for a greater understanding of epithelial cell biology and lung pathology alike. PMID:20160151

  7. Structural basis of lentiviral subversion of a cellular protein degradation pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwefel, David; Groom, Harriet C. T.; Boucherit, Virginie C.; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Walker, Philip A.; Stoye, Jonathan P.; Bishop, Kate N.; Taylor, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Lentiviruses contain accessory genes that have evolved to counteract the effects of host cellular defence proteins that inhibit productive infection. One such restriction factor, SAMHD1, inhibits human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection of myeloid-lineage cells as well as resting CD4+ T cells by reducing the cellular deoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphate (dNTP) concentration to a level at which the viral reverse transcriptase cannot function. In other lentiviruses, including HIV-2 and related simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs), SAMHD1 restriction is overcome by the action of viral accessory protein x (Vpx) or the related viral protein r (Vpr) that target and recruit SAMHD1 for proteasomal degradation. The molecular mechanism by which these viral proteins are able to usurp the host cell's ubiquitination machinery to destroy the cell's protection against these viruses has not been defined. Here we present the crystal structure of a ternary complex of Vpx with the human E3 ligase substrate adaptor DCAF1 and the carboxy-terminal region of human SAMHD1. Vpx is made up of a three-helical bundle stabilized by a zinc finger motif, and wraps tightly around the disc-shaped DCAF1 molecule to present a new molecular surface. This adapted surface is then able to recruit SAMHD1 via its C terminus, making it a competent substrate for the E3 ligase to mark for proteasomal degradation. The structure reported here provides a molecular description of how a lentiviral accessory protein is able to subvert the cell's normal protein degradation pathway to inactivate the cellular viral defence system.

  8. Structural basis of lentiviral subversion of a cellular protein degradation pathway

    PubMed Central

    Schwefel, David; Groom, Harriet C. T.; Boucherit, Virginie C.; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Walker, Philip A.; Stoye, Jonathan P.; Bishop, Kate N.; Taylor, Ian A.

    2013-01-01

    Lentiviruses contain accessory genes that have evolved to counteract the effects of host cellular defence proteins that inhibit productive infection. One such restriction factor, SAMHD1, inhibits HIV-1 infection of myeloid-lineage cells 1,2 as well as resting CD4+ T cells 3,4 by reducing the cellular dNTP concentration to a level where the viral reverse transcriptase cannot function 5,6. In other lentiviruses, including HIV-2 and related SIVs, SAMHD1 restriction is overcome by the action of viral accessory protein x (Vpx) or the related viral protein r (Vpr) that target and recruit SAMHD1 for proteasomal degradation 7,8. The molecular mechanism by which these viral proteins are able to usurp the host cell’s ubiquitination machinery to destroy the cell’s protection against these viruses has not been defined. We present here the crystal structure of a ternary complex of Vpx with the host cell’s E3 ligase substrate adaptor DCAF1 and the C-terminal region of SAMHD1. Vpx is made up of a three-helical bundle, stabilised by a zinc finger motif and wraps tightly around the disc-shaped DCAF1 molecule to present a new molecular surface. This adapted surface is then able to recruit SAMHD1 via its C-terminus making it a competent substrate for the E3 ligase to mark for proteasomal degradation. The structure provides the first description of how a lentiviral accessory protein is able to subvert the cell’s normal protein degradation pathway to inactivate the cellular viral defence system. PMID:24336198

  9. Amyloid-beta protein clearance and degradation (ABCD) pathways and their role in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Baranello, Robert J; Bharani, Krishna L; Padmaraju, Vasudevaraju; Chopra, Nipun; Lahiri, Debomoy K; Greig, Nigel H; Pappolla, Miguel A; Sambamurti, Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid-β proteins (Aβ) of 42 (Aβ42) and 40 aa (Aβ40) accumulate as senile plaques (SP) and cerebrovascular amyloid protein deposits that are defining diagnostic features of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A number of rare mutations linked to familial AD (FAD) on the Aβ precursor protein (APP), Presenilin-1 (PS1), Presenilin- 2 (PS2), Adamalysin10, and other genetic risk factors for sporadic AD such as the ε4 allele of Apolipoprotein E (ApoE-ε4) foster the accumulation of Aβ and also induce the entire spectrum of pathology associated with the disease. Aβ accumulation is therefore a key pathological event and a prime target for the prevention and treatment of AD. APP is sequentially processed by β-site APP cleaving enzyme (BACE1) and γ-secretase, a multisubunit PS1/PS2-containing integral membrane protease, to generate Aβ. Although Aβ accumulates in all forms of AD, the only pathways known to be affected in FAD increase Aβ production by APP gene duplication or via base substitutions on APP and γ-secretase subunits PS1 and PS2 that either specifically increase the yield of the longer Aβ42 or both Aβ40 and Aβ42. However, the vast majority of AD patients accumulate Aβ without these known mutations. This led to proposals that impairment of Aβ degradation or clearance may play a key role in AD pathogenesis. Several candidate enzymes, including Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), Neprilysin (NEP), Endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE), Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), Plasmin, and Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been identified and some have even been successfully evaluated in animal models. Several studies also have demonstrated the capacity of γ-secretase inhibitors to paradoxically increase the yield of Aβ and we have recently established that the mechanism is by skirting Aβ degradation. This review outlines major cellular pathways of Aβ degradation to provide a basis for future efforts to fully characterize the panel of pathways responsible for A

  10. The molecular components of the extracellular protein-degradation pathways of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Firoz; Rineau, Francois; Canbäck, Björn; Johansson, Tomas; Tunlid, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Proteins contribute to a major part of the organic nitrogen (N) in forest soils. This N is mobilized and becomes available to trees as a result of the depolymerizing activities of symbiotic ectomycorrhizal fungi. The mechanisms by which these fungi depolymerize proteins and assimilate the released N are poorly characterized. Biochemical analysis and transcriptome profiling were performed to examine the proteolytic machinery and the uptake system of the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Paxillus involutus during the assimilation of organic N from various protein sources and extracts of organic matter. All substrates induced secretion of peptidase activity with an acidic pH optimum, mostly contributed by aspartic peptidases. The peptidase activity was transiently repressed by ammonium. Transcriptional analysis revealed a large number of extracellular endo- and exopeptidases. The expression levels of these peptidases were regulated in parallel with transporters and enzymes involved in the assimilation and metabolism of the released peptides and amino acids. For the first time the molecular components of the protein degradation pathways of an ectomycorrhizal fungus are described. The data suggest that the transcripts encoding these components are regulated in response to the chemical properties and the availability of the protein substrates. PMID:23902518

  11. Involvement of Two Latex-Clearing Proteins during Rubber Degradation and Insights into the Subsequent Degradation Pathway Revealed by the Genome Sequence of Gordonia polyisoprenivorans Strain VH2

    PubMed Central

    Hiessl, Sebastian; Schuldes, Jörg; Thürmer, Andrea; Halbsguth, Tobias; Bröker, Daniel; Angelov, Angel; Liebl, Wolfgang; Daniel, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    The increasing production of synthetic and natural poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) rubber leads to huge challenges in waste management. Only a few bacteria are known to degrade rubber, and little is known about the mechanism of microbial rubber degradation. The genome of Gordonia polyisoprenivorans strain VH2, which is one of the most effective rubber-degrading bacteria, was sequenced and annotated to elucidate the degradation pathway and other features of this actinomycete. The genome consists of a circular chromosome of 5,669,805 bp and a circular plasmid of 174,494 bp with average GC contents of 67.0% and 65.7%, respectively. It contains 5,110 putative protein-coding sequences, including many candidate genes responsible for rubber degradation and other biotechnically relevant pathways. Furthermore, we detected two homologues of a latex-clearing protein, which is supposed to be a key enzyme in rubber degradation. The deletion of these two genes for the first time revealed clear evidence that latex-clearing protein is essential for the microbial utilization of rubber. Based on the genome sequence, we predict a pathway for the microbial degradation of rubber which is supported by previous and current data on transposon mutagenesis, deletion mutants, applied comparative genomics, and literature search. PMID:22327575

  12. The N-end rule pathway catalyzes a major fraction of the protein degradation in skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, V.; Lecker, S. H.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, overall protein degradation involves the ubiquitin-proteasome system. One property of a protein that leads to rapid ubiquitin-dependent degradation is the presence of a basic, acidic, or bulky hydrophobic residue at its N terminus. However, in normal cells, substrates for this N-end rule pathway, which involves ubiquitin carrier protein (E2) E214k and ubiquitin-protein ligase (E3) E3alpha, have remained unclear. Surprisingly, in soluble extracts of rabbit muscle, we found that competitive inhibitors of E3alpha markedly inhibited the 125I-ubiquitin conjugation and ATP-dependent degradation of endogenous proteins. These inhibitors appear to selectively inhibit E3alpha, since they blocked degradation of 125I-lysozyme, a model N-end rule substrate, but did not affect the degradation of proteins whose ubiquitination involved other E3s. The addition of several E2s or E3alpha to the muscle extracts stimulated overall proteolysis and ubiquitination, but only the stimulation by E3alpha or E214k was sensitive to these inhibitors. A similar general inhibition of ubiquitin conjugation to endogenous proteins was observed with a dominant negative inhibitor of E214k. Certain substrates of the N-end rule pathway are degraded after their tRNA-dependent arginylation. We found that adding RNase A to muscle extracts reduced the ATP-dependent proteolysis of endogenous proteins, and supplying tRNA partially restored this process. Finally, although in muscle extracts the N-end rule pathway catalyzes most ubiquitin conjugation, it makes only a minor contribution to overall protein ubiquitination in HeLa cell extracts.

  13. Protein Degradation Pathways Regulate the Functions of Helicases in the DNA Damage Response and Maintenance of Genomic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Sommers, Joshua A.; Suhasini, Avvaru N.; Brosh, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Degradation of helicases or helicase-like proteins, often mediated by ubiquitin-proteasomal pathways, plays important regulatory roles in cellular mechanisms that respond to DNA damage or replication stress. The Bloom’s syndrome helicase (BLM) provides an example of how helicase degradation pathways, regulated by post-translational modifications and protein interactions with components of the Fanconi Anemia (FA) interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair pathway, influence cell cycle checkpoints, DNA repair, and replication restart. The FANCM DNA translocase can be targeted by checkpoint kinases that exert dramatic effects on FANCM stability and chromosomal integrity. Other work provides evidence that degradation of the F-box DNA helicase (FBH1) helps to balance translesion synthesis (TLS) and homologous recombination (HR) repair at blocked replication forks. Degradation of the helicase-like transcription factor (HLTF), a DNA translocase and ubiquitylating enzyme, influences the choice of post replication repair (PRR) pathway. Stability of the Werner syndrome helicase-nuclease (WRN) involved in the replication stress response is regulated by its acetylation. Turning to transcription, stability of the Cockayne Syndrome Group B DNA translocase (CSB) implicated in transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is regulated by a CSA ubiquitin ligase complex enabling recovery of RNA synthesis. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that helicases can be targeted for degradation to maintain genome homeostasis. PMID:25906194

  14. Regulation of protein degradation pathways by amino acids and insulin in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rapid gain in lean mass in neonates requires greater rates of protein synthesis than degradation. We previously delineated the molecular mechanisms by which insulin and amino acids, especially leucine, modulate skeletal muscle protein synthesis and how this changes with development. In the curre...

  15. Regulation of protein degradation pathways by amino acids and insulin in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The rapid gain in lean mass in neonates requires greater rates of protein synthesis than degradation. We previously delineated the molecular mechanisms by which insulin and amino acids, especially leucine, modulate skeletal muscle protein synthesis and how this changes with development. In the current study, we identified mechanisms involved in protein degradation regulation. In experiment 1, 6- and 26-d-old pigs were studied during 1) euinsulinemic-euglycemic-euaminoacidemic, 2) euinsulinemic-euglycemic-hyperaminoacidemic, and 3) hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic-euaminoacidemic clamps for 2 h. In experiment 2, 5-d-old pigs were studied during 1) euinsulinemic-euglycemic-euaminoacidemic-euleucinemic, 2) euinsulinemic-euglycemic-hypoaminoacidemic-hyperleucinemic, and 3) euinsulinemic-euglycemic-euaminoacidemic-hyperleucinemic clamps for 24 h. We determined in muscle indices of ubiquitin-proteasome, i.e., atrogin-1 (MAFbx) and muscle RING-finger protein-1 (MuRF1) and autophagy-lysosome systems, i.e., unc51-like kinase 1 (UKL1), microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3), and lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2 (Lamp-2). For comparison, we measured ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) activation, components of translation initiation. Results Abundance of atrogin-1, but not MuRF1, was greater in 26- than 6-d-old pigs and was not affected by insulin, amino acids, or leucine. Abundance of ULK1 and LC3 was higher in younger pigs and not affected by treatment. The LC3-II/LC3-I ratio was reduced and ULK1 phosphorylation increased by insulin, amino acids, and leucine. These responses were more profound in younger pigs. Abundance of Lamp-2 was not affected by treatment or development. Abundance of eIF4E, but not rpS6, was higher in 6- than 26-d-old-pigs but unaffected by treatment. Phosphorylation of eIF4E was not affected by treatment, however, insulin, amino acids, and leucine stimulated rpS6 phosphorylation, and the

  16. Anaerobic degradation of p-ethylphenol by "Aromatoleum aromaticum" strain EbN1: pathway, regulation, and involved proteins.

    PubMed

    Wöhlbrand, Lars; Wilkes, Heinz; Halder, Thomas; Rabus, Ralf

    2008-08-01

    The denitrifying "Aromatoleum aromaticum" strain EbN1 was demonstrated to utilize p-ethylphenol under anoxic conditions and was suggested to employ a degradation pathway which is reminiscent of known anaerobic ethylbenzene degradation in the same bacterium: initial hydroxylation of p-ethylphenol to 1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-ethanol followed by dehydrogenation to p-hydroxyacetophenone. Possibly, subsequent carboxylation and thiolytic cleavage yield p-hydroxybenzoyl-coenzyme A (CoA), which is channeled into the central benzoyl-CoA pathway. Substrate-specific formation of three of the four proposed intermediates was confirmed by gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis and also by applying deuterated p-ethylphenol. Proteins suggested to be involved in this degradation pathway are encoded in a single large operon-like structure ( approximately 15 kb). Among them are a p-cresol methylhydroxylase-like protein (PchCF), two predicted alcohol dehydrogenases (ChnA and EbA309), a biotin-dependent carboxylase (XccABC), and a thiolase (TioL). Proteomic analysis (two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis) revealed their specific and coordinated upregulation in cells adapted to anaerobic growth with p-ethylphenol and p-hydroxyacetophenone (e.g., PchF up to 29-fold). Coregulated proteins of currently unknown function (e.g., EbA329) are possibly involved in p-ethylphenol- and p-hydroxyacetophenone-specific solvent stress responses and related to other aromatic solvent-induced proteins of strain EbN1. PMID:18539747

  17. Amyloid-Beta Protein Clearance and Degradation (ABCD) Pathways and their Role in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Baranello, Robert J.; Bharani, Krishna L.; Padmaraju, Vasudevaraju; Chopra, Nipun; Lahiri, Debomoy K.; Greig, Nigel H.; Pappolla, Miguel A.; Sambamurti, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β proteins (Aβ) of 42 (Aβ42) and 40 aa (Aβ40) accumulate as senile plaques (SP) and cerebrovascular amyloid protein deposits that are defining diagnostic features of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A number of rare mutations linked to familial AD (FAD) on the Aβ precursor protein (APP), Presenilin-1 (PS1), Presenilin-2 (PS2), Adamalysin10, and other genetic risk factors for sporadic AD such as the ε4 allele of Apolipoprotein E (ApoE-ε4) foster the accumulation of Aβ and also induce the entire spectrum of pathology associated with the disease. Aβ accumulation is therefore a key pathological event and a prime target for the prevention and treatment of AD. APP is sequentially processed by β-site APP cleaving enzyme (BACE1) and γ-secretase, a multisubunit PS1/PS2-containing integral membrane protease, to generate Aβ. Although Aβ accumulates in all forms of AD, the only pathways known to be affected in FAD increase Aβ production by APP gene duplication or via base substitutions on APP and γ-secretase subunits PS1 and PS2 that either specifically increase the yield of the longer Aβ42 or both Aβ40 and Aβ42. However, the vast majority of AD patients accumulate Aβ without these known mutations. This led to proposals that impairment of Aβ degradation or clearance may play a key role in AD pathogenesis. Several candidate enzymes, including Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), Neprilysin (NEP), Endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE), Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), Plasmin, and Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been identified and some have even been successfully evaluated in animal models. Several studies also have demonstrated the capacity of γ-secretase inhibitors to paradoxically increase the yield of Aβ and we have recently established that the mechanism is by skirting Aβ degradation. This review outlines major cellular pathways of Aβ degradation to provide a basis for future efforts to fully characterize the panel of pathways responsible for

  18. Cellular senescence and protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Deschênes-Simard, Xavier; Lessard, Frédéric; Gaumont-Leclerc, Marie-France; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Ferbeyre, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy and the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway (UPP) are the major protein degradation systems in eukaryotic cells. Whereas the former mediate a bulk nonspecific degradation, the UPP allows a rapid degradation of specific proteins. Both systems have been shown to play a role in tumorigenesis, and the interest in developing therapeutic agents inhibiting protein degradation is steadily growing. However, emerging data point to a critical role for autophagy in cellular senescence, an established tumor suppressor mechanism. Recently, a selective protein degradation process mediated by the UPP was also shown to contribute to the senescence phenotype. This process is tightly regulated by E3 ubiquitin ligases, deubiquitinases, and several post-translational modifications of target proteins. Illustrating the complexity of UPP, more than 600 human genes have been shown to encode E3 ubiquitin ligases, a number which exceeds that of the protein kinases. Nevertheless, our knowledge of proteasome-dependent protein degradation as a regulated process in cellular contexts such as cancer and senescence remains very limited. Here we discuss the implications of protein degradation in senescence and attempt to relate this function to the protein degradation pattern observed in cancer cells. PMID:24866342

  19. Dysregulation of protein degradation pathways may mediate the liver injury and phospholipidosis associated with a cationic amphiphilic antibiotic drug

    SciTech Connect

    Mosedale, Merrie; Wu, Hong; Kurtz, C. Lisa; Schmidt, Stephen P.; Adkins, Karissa; Harrill, Alison H.

    2014-10-01

    A large number of antibiotics are known to cause drug-induced liver injury in the clinic; however, interpreting clinical risk is not straightforward owing to a lack of predictivity of the toxicity by standard preclinical species and a poor understanding of the mechanisms of toxicity. An example is PF-04287881, a novel ketolide antibiotic that caused elevations in liver function tests in Phase I clinical studies. In this study, a mouse diversity panel (MDP), comprised of 34 genetically diverse, inbred mouse strains, was utilized to model the toxicity observed with PF-04287881 treatment and investigate potential mechanisms that may mediate the liver response. Significant elevations in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels in PF-04287881-treated animals relative to vehicle-treated controls were observed in the majority (88%) of strains tested following a seven day exposure. The average fold elevation in ALT varied by genetic background and correlated with microscopic findings of hepatocellular hypertrophy, hepatocellular single cell necrosis, and Kupffer cell vacuolation (confirmed as phospholipidosis) in the liver. Global liver mRNA expression was evaluated in a subset of four strains to identify transcript and pathway differences that distinguish susceptible mice from resistant mice in the context of PF-04287881 treatment. The protein ubiquitination pathway was highly enriched among genes associated with PF-04287881-induced hepatocellular necrosis. Expression changes associated with PF-04287881-induced phospholipidosis included genes involved in drug transport, phospholipid metabolism, and lysosomal function. The findings suggest that perturbations in genes involved in protein degradation leading to accumulation of oxidized proteins may mediate the liver injury induced by this drug. - Highlights: • Identified susceptible and resistant mouse strains to liver injury induced by a CAD • Liver injury characterized by single cell necrosis, and phospholipidosis

  20. Gingipain-dependent degradation of mTOR pathway proteins by the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis during invasion

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, Prachi; Higham, Jon; Pinnock, Abigail; Murdoch, Craig; Douglas, C. W. Ian; Stafford, Graham P; Lambert, Daniel W

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia are Gram-negative pathogens strongly associated with periodontitis. Their abilities to interact, invade and persist within host cells are considered crucial to their pathogenicity, but the mechanisms by which they subvert host defences are not well understood. In this study, we set out to investigate whether P. gingivalis and T. forsythia directly target key signalling molecules which may modulate the host cell phenotype to favour invasion and persistence. Our data identify, for the first time, that P. gingivalis, but not T. forsythia, reduces levels of intracellular mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in oral epithelial cells following invasion over a 4 hour time course, via the action of gingipains. The ability of cytochalasin D to abrogate P. gingivalis-mediated mTOR degradation suggests that this effect is dependent upon cellular invasion. We also show that levels of several other proteins in the mTOR signalling pathway are modulated by gingipains, either directly or as a consequence of mTOR degradation including p-4E-BP1. Taken together, our data suggests that P. gingivalis manipulates the mTOR pathway, providing evidence for a potentially novel mechanism by which P. gingivalis mediates its effects on host cell responses to infection. PMID:23714361

  1. Ubiquitin proteasome pathway-mediated degradation of proteins: effects due to site-specific substrate deamidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The accumulation, aggregation, and precipitation of proteins are etiologic for age-related diseases, particularly cataract, because the precipitates cloud the lens. Deamidation of crystallins is associated with protein precipitation, aging, and cataract. Among the roles of the ubiquitin proteasome p...

  2. Protein Degradation and Iron Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Joel W.; Bruick, Richard K.

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of both systemic and cellular iron homeostasis requires the capacity to sense iron levels and appropriately modify the expression of iron metabolism genes. These responses are coordinated through the efforts of several key regulatory factors including F-box and Leucine-rich Repeat Protein 5 (FBXL5), Iron Regulatory Proteins (IRPs), Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF), and ferroportin. Notably, the stability of each of these proteins is regulated in response to iron. Recent discoveries have greatly advanced our understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing iron-sensing and protein degradation within these pathways. It has become clear that iron’s privileged roles in both enzyme catalysis and protein structure contribute to its regulation of protein stability. Moreover, these multiple pathways intersect with one another in larger regulatory networks to maintain iron homeostasis. PMID:22349011

  3. Protein degradation and iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Joel W; Bruick, Richard K

    2012-09-01

    Regulation of both systemic and cellular iron homeostasis requires the capacity to sense iron levels and appropriately modify the expression of iron metabolism genes. These responses are coordinated through the efforts of several key regulatory factors including F-box and Leucine-rich Repeat Protein 5 (FBXL5), Iron Regulatory Proteins (IRPs), Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF), and ferroportin. Notably, the stability of each of these proteins is regulated in response to iron. Recent discoveries have greatly advanced our understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing iron-sensing and protein degradation within these pathways. It has become clear that iron's privileged roles in both enzyme catalysis and protein structure contribute to its regulation of protein stability. Moreover, these multiple pathways intersect with one another in larger regulatory networks to maintain iron homeostasis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cell Biology of Metals. PMID:22349011

  4. Small heat shock proteins target mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator for degradation via a small ubiquitin-like modifier-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Ahner, Annette; Gong, Xiaoyan; Schmidt, Bela Z; Peters, Kathryn W; Rabeh, Wael M; Thibodeau, Patrick H; Lukacs, Gergely L; Frizzell, Raymond A

    2013-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsps) bind destabilized proteins during cell stress and disease, but their physiological functions are less clear. We evaluated the impact of Hsp27, an sHsp expressed in airway epithelial cells, on the common protein misfolding mutant that is responsible for most cystic fibrosis. F508del cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a well-studied protein that is subject to cytosolic quality control, selectively associated with Hsp27, whose overexpression preferentially targeted mutant CFTR to proteasomal degradation. Hsp27 interacted physically with Ubc9, the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) E2 conjugating enzyme, implying that F508del SUMOylation leads to its sHsp-mediated degradation. Enhancing or disabling the SUMO pathway increased or blocked Hsp27's ability to degrade mutant CFTR. Hsp27 promoted selective SUMOylation of F508del NBD1 in vitro and of full-length F508del CFTR in vivo, which preferred endogenous SUMO-2/3 paralogues that form poly-chains. The SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) RNF4 recognizes poly-SUMO chains to facilitate nuclear protein degradation. RNF4 overexpression elicited F508del degradation, whereas Hsp27 knockdown blocked RNF4's impact on mutant CFTR. Similarly, the ability of Hsp27 to degrade F508del CFTR was lost during overexpression of dominant-negative RNF4. These findings link sHsp-mediated F508del CFTR degradation to its SUMOylation and to STUbL-mediated targeting to the ubiquitin-proteasome system and thereby implicate this pathway in the disposal of an integral membrane protein. PMID:23155000

  5. Interaction of structural core protein of Classical Swine Fever Virus with endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathway protein OS9

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) Core protein is involved in virus RNA protection, transcription regulation and virus virulence. To discover additional Core protein functions a yeast two-hybrid system was used to identify host proteins that interact with Core. Among the identified host proteins, t...

  6. The Arabidopsis F-Box Protein CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 Is Stabilized by SCFCOI1 and Degraded via the 26S Proteasome Pathway[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jianbin; Li, Haiou; Li, Shuhua; Yao, Ruifeng; Deng, Haiteng; Xie, Qi; Xie, Daoxin

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonate regulates critical aspects of plant development and defense. The F-box protein CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 (COI1) functions as a jasmonate receptor and forms Skp1/Cullin1/F-box protein COI1 (SCFCOI1) complexes with Arabidopsis thaliana Cullin1 and Arabidopsis Skp1-like1 (ASK1) to recruit its substrate jasmonate ZIM-domain proteins for ubiquitination and degradation. Here, we reveal a mechanism regulating COI1 protein levels in Arabidopsis. Genetic and biochemical analysis and in vitro degradation assays demonstrated that the COI1 protein was initially stabilized by interacting with ASK1 and further secured by assembly into SCFCOI1 complexes, suggesting a function for SCFCOI1 in the stabilization of COI1 in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, we show that dissociated COI1 is degraded through the 26S proteasome pathway, and we identified the 297th Lys residue as an active ubiquitination site in COI1. Our data suggest that the COI1 protein is strictly regulated by a dynamic balance of SCFCOI1-mediated stabilization and 26S proteasome–mediated degradation and thus maintained at a protein level essential for proper biological functions in Arabidopsis development and defense responses. PMID:23386265

  7. Degradation of oxidized proteins by the proteasome: Distinguishing between the 20S, 26S, and immunoproteasome proteolytic pathways.

    PubMed

    Raynes, Rachel; Pomatto, Laura C D; Davies, Kelvin J A

    2016-08-01

    The proteasome is a ubiquitous and highly plastic multi-subunit protease with multi-catalytic activity that is conserved in all eukaryotes. The most widely known function of the proteasome is protein degradation through the 26S ubiquitin-proteasome system, responsible for the vast majority of protein degradation during homeostasis. However, the proteasome also plays an important role in adaptive immune responses and adaptation to oxidative stress. The unbound 20S proteasome, the core common to all proteasome conformations, is the main protease responsible for degrading oxidized proteins. During periods of acute stress, the 19S regulatory cap of the 26S proteasome disassociates from the proteolytic core, allowing for immediate ATP/ubiquitin-independent protein degradation by the 20S proteasome. Despite the abundance of unbound 20S proteasome compared to other proteasomal conformations, many publications fail to distinguish between the two proteolytic systems and often regard the 26S proteasome as the dominant protease. Further confounding the issue are the differential roles these two proteolytic systems have in adaptation and aging. In this review, we will summarize the increasing evidence that the 20S core proteasome constitutes the major conformation of the proteasome system and that it is far from a latent protease requiring activation by binding regulators. PMID:27155164

  8. Exchange Factor TBL1 and Arginine Methyltransferase PRMT6 Cooperate in Protecting G Protein Pathway Suppressor 2 (GPS2) from Proteasomal Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiawen; Cardamone, M. Dafne; Johnson, Holly E.; Neault, Mathieu; Chan, Michelle; Floyd, Z. Elizabeth; Mallette, Frédérick A.; Perissi, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    G protein pathway suppressor 2 (GPS2) is a multifunctional protein involved in the regulation of a number of metabolic organs. First identified as part of the NCoR-SMRT corepressor complex, GPS2 is known to play an important role in the nucleus in the regulation of gene transcription and meiotic recombination. In addition, we recently reported a non-transcriptional role of GPS2 as an inhibitor of the proinflammatory TNFα pathway in the cytosol. Although this suggests that the control of GPS2 localization may be an important determinant of its molecular functions, a clear understanding of GPS2 differential targeting to specific cellular locations is still lacking. Here we show that a fine balance between protein stabilization and degradation tightly regulates GPS2 nuclear function. Our findings indicate that GPS2 is degraded upon polyubiquitination by the E3 ubiquitin ligase Siah2. Unexpectedly, interaction with the exchange factor TBL1 is required to protect GPS2 from degradation, with methylation of GPS2 by arginine methyltransferase PRMT6 regulating the interaction with TBL1 and inhibiting proteasome-dependent degradation. Overall, our findings indicate that regulation of GPS2 by posttranslational modifications provides an effective strategy for modulating its molecular function within the nuclear compartment. PMID:26070566

  9. High mTORC1 signaling is maintained, while protein degradation pathways are perturbed in old murine skeletal muscles in the fasted state.

    PubMed

    White, Zoe; White, Robert B; McMahon, Christopher; Grounds, Miranda D; Shavlakadze, Tea

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated age-associated changes to protein synthesis and degradation pathways in the quadriceps muscles of male C57BL/6J mice at 5 ages, between 4 and 24 months (m). Sarcopenia was evident by 18m and was accompanied by hyper-phosphorylation of S6K1, indicating increased mTORC1 signaling. Proteasomal and autophagosomal degradation pathways were also impacted by aging. In the 1% NP40 insoluble protein fraction, the abundance of MuRF1 increased at 24m, while p62 increased at 15m, and remained elevated at older ages. In addition, we investigated how protein synthesis and degradation pathways are modulated by fasting in young (4m) and old (24m) muscles, and showed that old mice respond to fasting less robustly compared with young. Overnight fasting for 16h caused de-phosphorylation of AKT and molecules downstream of mTORC1 (S6K1, rpS6 and 4E-BP1) in young, but not old muscles. A longer time of fasting (24h) was required to reduce phosphorylation of these molecules in old mice. Induction of MuRF1 and Fbxo32 mRNA was also more robust in young compared with old muscles following fasting for 16h. In addition, a 16h fast reduced ULK1 phosphorylation at the mTORC1 specific site Ser757 only in young muscles. The striking accumulation of insoluble p62 protein in muscles of all old male mice (fed or fasted), suggests age-related dysregulation of autophagy and protein aggregation. These data provide an insight into the mechanisms of metabolic responses that affect protein homeostasis in old skeletal muscles, with applications to design of clinical interventions that target sarcopenia. PMID:27343428

  10. Vitamin C Degradation Products and Pathways in the Human Lens*

    PubMed Central

    Nemet, Ina; Monnier, Vincent M.

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin C and its degradation products participate in chemical modifications of proteins in vivo through non-enzymatic glycation (Maillard reaction) and formation of different products called advanced glycation end products. Vitamin C levels are particularly high in selected tissues, such as lens, brain and adrenal gland, and its degradation products can inflict substantial protein damage via formation of advanced glycation end products. However, the pathways of in vivo vitamin C degradation are poorly understood. Here we have determined the levels of vitamin C oxidation and degradation products dehydroascorbic acid, 2,3-diketogulonic acid, 3-deoxythreosone, xylosone, and threosone in the human lens using o-phenylenediamine to trap both free and protein-bound adducts. In the protein-free fraction and water-soluble proteins (WSP), all five listed degradation products were identified. Dehydroascorbic acid, 2,3-diketogulonic acid, and 3-deoxythreosone were the major products in the protein-free fraction, whereas in the WSP, 3-deoxythreosone was the most abundant measured dicarbonyl. In addition, 3-deoxythreosone in WSP showed positive linear correlation with age (p < 0.05). In water-insoluble proteins, only 3-deoxythreosone and threosone were detected, whereby the level of 3-deoxythreosone was ∼20 times higher than the level of threosone. The identification of 3-deoxythreosone as the major degradation product bound to human lens proteins provides in vivo evidence for the non-oxidative pathway of dehydroascorbate degradation into erythrulose as a major pathway for vitamin C degradation in vivo. PMID:21885436

  11. The co-chaperone carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) mediates alpha-synuclein degradation decisions between proteasomal and lysosomal pathways.

    PubMed

    Shin, Youngah; Klucken, Jochen; Patterson, Cam; Hyman, Bradley T; McLean, Pamela J

    2005-06-24

    Alpha-synuclein is a major component of Lewy bodies, the pathological hallmark of Parkinson disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and related disorders. Misfolding and aggregation of alpha-synuclein is thought to be a critical cofactor in the pathogenesis of certain neurodegenerative diseases. In the current study, we investigate the role of the carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) in alpha-synuclein aggregation. We demonstrate that CHIP is a component of Lewy bodies in the human brain, where it colocalizes with alpha-synuclein and Hsp70. In a cell culture model, endogenous CHIP colocalizes with alpha-synuclein and Hsp70 in intracellular inclusions, and overexpression of CHIP inhibits alpha-synuclein inclusion formation and reduces alpha-synuclein protein levels. We demonstrate that CHIP can mediate alpha-synuclein degradation by two discrete mechanisms that can be dissected using deletion mutants; the tetratricopeptide repeat domain is critical for proteasomal degradation, whereas the U-box domain is sufficient to direct alpha-synuclein toward the lysosomal degradation pathway. Furthermore, alpha-synuclein, synphilin-1, and Hsp70 all coimmunoprecipitate with CHIP, raising the possibility of a direct alpha-synuclein-CHIP interaction. The fact that the tetratricopeptide repeat domain is required for the effects of CHIP on alpha-synuclein inclusion morphology, number of inclusions, and proteasomal degradation as well as the direct interaction of CHIP with Hsp70 implicates a cooperation of CHIP and Hsp70 in these processes. Taken together, these data suggest that CHIP acts a molecular switch between proteasomal and lysosomal degradation pathways. PMID:15845543

  12. The Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus ORF34 Protein Binds to HIF-1α and Causes Its Degradation via the Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kousoulas, Konstantin G.

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent for Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and two other lymphoproliferative disorders, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD). Kaposi's sarcoma is a highly vascular tumor, and recently both hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and HIF-2α were detected in KS samples, indicating a role of HIFs in the KSHV life cycle. Previously, we showed that ORF34, a lytic gene of unassigned function, was activated by hypoxia and that ORF34 transcription was upregulated by both HIFs (M. Haque, D. A. Davis, V. Wang, I. Widmer, and R. Yarchoan, J Virol. 77:6761–6768, 2003). In the present study, we show that coexpression of ORF34 with HIF-1αm (degradation-resistant HIF-1α) caused substantial reduction in HIF-1α-dependent transcription, as evidenced by reporter assays. Two-way immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that ORF34 physically interacted with HIF-1αm in transient expression experiments. Deletion analysis revealed that three different ORF34 domains interacted with the amino-terminal domain of HIF-1α. Also, purified HIF-1α and ORF34 proteins interacted with each other. The observed transcriptional inhibition of HIF-1α-dependent promoters was attributed to degradation of HIF-1α after binding with ORF34, since the overall amount of wild-type HIF-1α but not the degradation-resistant one (HIF-1αm) was reduced in the presence of ORF34. Moreover, ORF34 caused degradation of HIF-1α in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of the ubiquitin-dependent pathway by the chemical proteasome inhibitor MG132 prevented HIF-1α degradation in the presence of ORF34. These results show that ORF34 binds to HIF-1α, leading to its degradation via the proteasome-dependent pathway. PMID:23221556

  13. The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus ORF34 protein binds to HIF-1α and causes its degradation via the proteasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Haque, Muzammel; Kousoulas, Konstantin G

    2013-02-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent for Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and two other lymphoproliferative disorders, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD). Kaposi's sarcoma is a highly vascular tumor, and recently both hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and HIF-2α were detected in KS samples, indicating a role of HIFs in the KSHV life cycle. Previously, we showed that ORF34, a lytic gene of unassigned function, was activated by hypoxia and that ORF34 transcription was upregulated by both HIFs (M. Haque, D. A. Davis, V. Wang, I. Widmer, and R. Yarchoan, J Virol. 77:6761-6768, 2003). In the present study, we show that coexpression of ORF34 with HIF-1αm (degradation-resistant HIF-1α) caused substantial reduction in HIF-1α-dependent transcription, as evidenced by reporter assays. Two-way immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that ORF34 physically interacted with HIF-1αm in transient expression experiments. Deletion analysis revealed that three different ORF34 domains interacted with the amino-terminal domain of HIF-1α. Also, purified HIF-1α and ORF34 proteins interacted with each other. The observed transcriptional inhibition of HIF-1α-dependent promoters was attributed to degradation of HIF-1α after binding with ORF34, since the overall amount of wild-type HIF-1α but not the degradation-resistant one (HIF-1αm) was reduced in the presence of ORF34. Moreover, ORF34 caused degradation of HIF-1α in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of the ubiquitin-dependent pathway by the chemical proteasome inhibitor MG132 prevented HIF-1α degradation in the presence of ORF34. These results show that ORF34 binds to HIF-1α, leading to its degradation via the proteasome-dependent pathway. PMID:23221556

  14. Simvastatin and atorvastatin facilitates amyloid β-protein degradation in extracellular spaces by increasing neprilysin secretion from astrocytes through activation of MAPK/Erk1/2 pathways.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naoki; Fujii, Yoko; Kasahara, Rika; Tanida, Mamoru; Ohora, Kentaro; Ono, Yoko; Suzuki, Kenji; Sobue, Kazuya

    2016-06-01

    One of the major neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the deposition of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) in the brain. Aβ accumulation seems to arise from an imbalance between Aβ production and clearance. Neprilysin (NEP) and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) are the important Aβ-degrading enzymes in the brain, and deficits in their expression may promote Aβ deposition in patients with sporadic late-onset AD. Statins, which are used clinically for reducing cholesterol levels, can exert beneficial effects on AD. Therefore, we examined whether various statins are associated with Aβ degradation by inducing NEP and IDE expression, and then evaluating the relation between activation of intracellular signaling transduction, inhibition of cholesterol production, and morphological changes to astrocytes. Treating cultured rat astrocytes with simvastatin and atorvastatin significantly decreased the expression of NEP but not IDE in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The decrease in NEP expression was a result of activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) but not the reduction of cholesterol synthesis pathway. This NEP reduction was achieved by the release to the extracellular space of cultured astrocytes. Furthermore, the cultured medium prepared from simvastatin- and atorvastatin-treated astrocytes significantly induced the degradation of exogenous Aβ. These results suggest that simvastatin and atorvastatin induce the increase of Aβ degradation of NEP on the extracellular of astrocytes by inducing ERK-mediated pathway activity and that these reagents regulate the differential mechanisms between the secretion of NEP, the induction of cholesterol reduction, and the morphological changes in the cultured astrocytes. GLIA 2016;64:952-962. PMID:26875818

  15. Inhibition of PCSK9 Transcription by Berberine Involves Down-regulation of Hepatic HNF1α Protein Expression through the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Degradation Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Bin; Li, Hai; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Cao, Aiqin; Liu, Jingwen

    2015-01-01

    Our previous in vitro studies have identified hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF1α) as an obligated trans-activator for PCSK9 gene expression and demonstrated its functional involvement in the suppression of PCSK9 expression by berberine (BBR), a natural cholesterol-lowering compound. In this study, we investigated the mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect of BBR on HNF1α-mediated PCSK9 transcription. Administration of BBR to hyperlipidemic mice and hamsters lowered circulating PCSK9 concentrations and hepatic PCSK9 mRNA levels without affecting the gene expression of HNF1α. However, hepatic HNF1α protein levels were markedly reduced in BBR-treated animals as compared with the control. Using HepG2 cells as a model system, we obtained evidence that BBR treatment let to accelerated degradation of HNF1α protein. By applying inhibitors to selectively block the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy-lysosomal pathway, we show that HNF1α protein content in HepG2 cells was not affected by bafilomycin A1 treatment, but it was dose-dependently increased by UPS inhibitors bortezomib and MG132. Bortezomib treatment elevated HNF1α and PCSK9 cellular levels with concomitant reductions of LDL receptor protein. Moreover, HNF1α protein displayed a multiubiquitination ladder pattern in cells treated with BBR or overexpressing ubiquitin. By expressing GFP-HNF1α fusion protein in cells, we observed that blocking UPS resulted in accumulation of GFP-HNF1α in cytoplasm. Importantly, we show that the BBR reducing effects on HNF1α protein and PCSK9 gene transcription can be eradicated by proteasome inhibitors. Altogether, our studies using BBR as a probe uncovered a new aspect of PCSK9 regulation by ubiquitin-induced proteasomal degradation of HNF1α. PMID:25540198

  16. ESCRT-0 dysfunction compromises autophagic degradation of protein aggregates and facilitates ER stress-mediated neurodegeneration via apoptotic and necroptotic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Ryuji; Hasegawa, Takafumi; Tamai, Keiichi; Sugeno, Naoto; Yoshida, Shun; Kobayashi, Junpei; Kikuchi, Akio; Baba, Toru; Futatsugi, Akira; Sato, Ikuro; Satoh, Kennichi; Takeda, Atsushi; Aoki, Masashi; Tanaka, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Endosomal sorting required for transport (ESCRT) complexes orchestrate endo-lysosomal sorting of ubiquitinated proteins, multivesicular body formation and autophagic degradation. Defects in the ESCRT pathway have been implicated in many neurodegenerative diseases, but the underlying molecular mechanisms that link them to neurodegeneration remain unknown. In this study, we showed that forebrain-specific ablation of ESCRT-0/Hrs induced marked hippocampal neuronal cell loss accompanied by the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins, including α-synuclein, TDP-43 and huntingtin as well as the autophagic substrate SQSTM1/p62. Consistent with this, silencing of Hrs in cultured cells not only led to α-synuclein and TDP-43 accumulation in addition to impaired autophagic flux but also suppressed cell viability through the induction of ER stress followed by the activation of JNK and RIPK1, a key regulator of necroptosis. Moreover, necrostatin-1, a specific inhibitor of RIPK1, and pan-caspase inhibitors partially reduced the neurotoxicity in the Hrs-silenced cells. Altogether, these findings suggest that the disruption of ESCRT-0/Hrs in the nervous system compromises autophagic/lysosomal degradation of neurodegenerative disease-related proteins, which thereby triggers ER stress-mediated apoptotic and necroptotic cell death. PMID:27112194

  17. OS9 Protein Interacts with Na-K-2Cl Co-transporter (NKCC2) and Targets Its Immature Form for the Endoplasmic Reticulum-associated Degradation Pathway.

    PubMed

    Seaayfan, Elie; Defontaine, Nadia; Demaretz, Sylvie; Zaarour, Nancy; Laghmani, Kamel

    2016-02-26

    Mutations in the renal specific Na-K-2Cl co-transporter (NKCC2) lead to type I Bartter syndrome, a life-threatening kidney disease featuring arterial hypotension along with electrolyte abnormalities. We have previously shown that NKCC2 and its disease-causing mutants are subject to regulation by endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD). The aim of the present study was to identify the protein partners specifically involved in ERAD of NKCC2. To this end, we screened a kidney cDNA library through a yeast two-hybrid assay using NKCC2 C terminus as bait. We identified OS9 (amplified in osteosarcomas) as a novel and specific binding partner of NKCC2. Co-immunoprecipitation assays in renal cells revealed that OS9 association involves mainly the immature form of NKCC2. Accordingly, immunocytochemistry analysis showed that NKCC2 and OS9 co-localize at the endoplasmic reticulum. In cells overexpressing OS9, total cellular NKCC2 protein levels were markedly decreased, an effect blocked by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Pulse-chase and cycloheximide-chase assays demonstrated that the marked reduction in the co-transporter protein levels was essentially due to increased protein degradation of the immature form of NKCC2. Conversely, knockdown of OS9 by small interfering RNA increased NKCC2 expression by increasing the co-transporter stability. Inactivation of the mannose 6-phosphate receptor homology domain of OS9 had no effect on its action on NKCC2. In contrast, mutations of NKCC2 N-glycosylation sites abolished the effects of OS9, indicating that OS9-induced protein degradation is N-glycan-dependent. In summary, our results demonstrate the presence of an OS9-mediated ERAD pathway in renal cells that degrades immature NKCC2 proteins. The identification and selective modulation of ERAD components specific to NKCC2 and its disease-causing mutants might provide novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of type I Bartter syndrome. PMID:26721884

  18. Celastrol induces apoptosis in gefitinib-resistant non-small cell lung cancer cells via caspases-dependent pathways and Hsp90 client protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xing-Xing; Li, Na; Wu, Jian-Lin; Zhou, Yan-Ling; He, Jian-Xing; Liu, Liang; Leung, Elaine Lai-Han

    2014-01-01

    Celastrol, a triterpene extracted from the Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii, has been shown to have multiple bioactivities. Although among these activities, its anti-cancer effects have attracted the most attention, the effect of celastrol on gefitinib-resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells is not clearly known. Here, we examined the potency of celastrol in three different NSCLC cell lines. We explored its treatment mechanism in two gefitinib-resistant NSCLC cell lines (H1650 and H1975). Our data demonstrated that celastrol exerted its apoptotic effect in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Also, the mitochondria membrane potential was gradually lost and the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 increased after the treatment of celastrol, both of which are indicators of mitochondria membrane integrity. Although the caspases were activated, the treatment with pan-caspase inhibitor could partially inhibit the level of apoptosis. Moreover, the protein level of Hsp90 client proteins, EGFR and AKT, was measured. Interestingly, both client proteins were remarkably down-regulated after the treatment of celastrol. Taken together, our data showed that celastrol may be developed as a promising agent for treating gefitinib-resistant NSCLCs by inducing apoptosis through caspase-dependent pathways and Hsp90 client protein degradation. PMID:24662070

  19. Degradation of cAMP-Responsive Element–Binding Protein by the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway Contributes to Glucotoxicity in β-Cells and Human Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Costes, Safia; Vandewalle, Brigitte; Tourrel-Cuzin, Cécile; Broca, Christophe; Linck, Nathalie; Bertrand, Gyslaine; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Portha, Bernard; Pattou, François; Bockaert, Joel; Dalle, Stéphane

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In type 2 diabetes, chronic hyperglycemia is detrimental to β-cells, causing apoptosis and impaired insulin secretion. The transcription factor cAMP-responsive element–binding protein (CREB) is crucial for β-cell survival and function. We investigated whether prolonged exposure of β-cells to high glucose affects the functional integrity of CREB. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS INS-1E cells and rat and human islets were used. Gene expression was analyzed by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Apoptosis was detected by cleaved caspase-3 emergence, DNA fragmentation, and electron microscopy. RESULTS Chronic exposure of INS-1E cells and rat and human islets to high glucose resulted in decreased CREB protein expression, phosphorylation, and transcriptional activity associated with apoptosis and impaired β-cell function. High-glucose treatment increased CREB polyubiquitination, while treatment of INS-1E cells with the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 prevented the decrease in CREB content. The emergence of apoptosis in INS-1E cells with decreased CREB protein expression knocked down by small interfering RNA suggested that loss of CREB protein content induced by high glucose contributes to β-cell apoptosis. Loading INS-1E cells or human islets with a cell-permeable peptide mimicking the proteasomal targeting sequence of CREB blocked CREB degradation and protected INS-1E cells and human islets from apoptosis induced by high glucose. The insulin secretion in response to glucose and the insulin content were preserved in human islets exposed to high glucose and loaded with the peptide. CONCLUSIONS These studies demonstrate that the CREB degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway contributes to β-cell dysfunction and death upon glucotoxicity and provide new insight into the cellular mechanisms of glucotoxicity. PMID:19223597

  20. Redox control of protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Pajares, Marta; Jiménez-Moreno, Natalia; Dias, Irundika H.K.; Debelec, Bilge; Vucetic, Milica; Fladmark, Kari E.; Basaga, Huveyda; Ribaric, Samo; Milisav, Irina; Cuadrado, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular proteolysis is critical to maintain timely degradation of altered proteins including oxidized proteins. This review attempts to summarize the most relevant findings about oxidant protein modification, as well as the impact of reactive oxygen species on the proteolytic systems that regulate cell response to an oxidant environment: the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), autophagy and the unfolded protein response (UPR). In the presence of an oxidant environment, these systems are critical to ensure proteostasis and cell survival. An example of altered degradation of oxidized proteins in pathology is provided for neurodegenerative diseases. Future work will determine if protein oxidation is a valid target to combat proteinopathies. PMID:26381917

  1. The Mos/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway regulates the size and degradation of the first polar body in maturing mouse oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Choi, T; Fukasawa, K; Zhou, R; Tessarollo, L; Borror, K; Resau, J; Vande Woude, G F

    1996-01-01

    Mos is an upstream activator of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and, in mouse oocytes, is responsible for metaphase II arrest. This activity has been likened to its function in Xenopus oocytes as a component of cytostatic factor. Thus, Mos-deficient female mice (MOS-/-) are less fertile and oocytes derived from these animals fail to arrest at metaphase II and undergo parthenogenetic activation [Colledge, W. H., Carlton, M. B. L., Udy, C. B. & Evans, M. J. (1994) Nature (London) 370, 65-68 and Hashimoto, N., Watanabe, N., Furuta. Y., Tamemoto, B., Sagata, N., Yokoyama, M., Okazaki, K., Nagayoshi, M., Takeda, N., Ikawa, Y. & Aizawa, S. (1994) Nature (London) 370, 68-71]. Here we show that maturing MOS-/- oocytes fail to activate MAPK throughout meiosis, while p34cdc2 kinase activity is normal until late in metaphase II when it decreases prematurely. Phenotypically, the first meiotic division of MOS-/- oocytes frequently resembles mitotic cleavage or produces an abnormally large polar body. In these oocytes, the spindle shape is altered and the spindle fails to translocate to the cortex, leading to the establishment of an altered cleavage plane. Moreover, the first polar body persists instead of degrading and sometimes undergoes an additional cleavage, thereby providing conditions for parthenogenesis. These studies identify meiotic spindle formation and programmed degradation of the first polar body as new and important roles for the Mos/MAPK pathway. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8692939

  2. Tunable protein degradation in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cameron, D Ewen; Collins, James J

    2014-12-01

    Tunable control of protein degradation in bacteria would provide a powerful research tool. Here we use components of the Mesoplasma florum transfer-messenger RNA system to create a synthetic degradation system that provides both independent control of steady-state protein level and inducible degradation of targeted proteins in Escherichia coli. We demonstrate application of this system in synthetic circuit development and control of core bacterial processes and antibacterial targets, and we transfer the system to Lactococcus lactis to establish its broad functionality in bacteria. We create a 238-member library of tagged essential proteins in E. coli that can serve as both a research tool to study essential gene function and an applied system for antibiotic discovery. Our synthetic protein degradation system is modular, does not require disruption of host systems and can be transferred to diverse bacteria with minimal modification. PMID:25402616

  3. Murrayafoline A attenuates the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway by promoting the degradation of intracellular {beta}-catenin proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hyuk; Gwak, Jungsug; Cho, Munju; Ryu, Min-Jung; Lee, Jee-Hyun; Kim, Sang Kyum; Kim, Young Ho; Lee, Gye Won; Yun, Mi-Young; Cuong, Nguyen Manh; Shin, Jae-Gook; Song, Gyu-Yong; Oh, Sangtaek

    2010-01-01

    Molecular lesions in Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling and subsequent up-regulation of {beta}-catenin response transcription (CRT) occur frequently during the development of colon cancer. To identify small molecules that suppress CRT, we screened natural compounds in a cell-based assay for detection of TOPFalsh reporter activity. Murrayafoline A, a carbazole alkaloid isolated from Glycosmis stenocarpa, antagonized CRT that was stimulated by Wnt3a-conditioned medium (Wnt3a-CM) or LiCl, an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}), and promoted the degradation of intracellular {beta}-catenin without altering its N-terminal phosphorylation at the Ser33/37 residues, marking it for proteasomal degradation, or the expression of Siah-1, an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Murrayafoline A repressed the expression of cyclin D1 and c-myc, which is known {beta}-catenin/T cell factor (TCF)-dependent genes and thus inhibited the proliferation of various colon cancer cells. These findings indicate that murrayafoline A may be a potential chemotherapeutic agent for use in the treatment of colon cancer.

  4. The virulence of the opportunistic fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus requires cooperation between the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathway (ERAD) and the unfolded protein response (UPR)

    PubMed Central

    Richie, Daryl L; Feng, Xizhi; Hartl, Lukas; Aimanianda, Vishukumar; Krishnan, Karthik; Powers-Fletcher, Margaret V; Watson, Douglas S; Galande, Amit K; White, Stephanie M; Willett, Taryn; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Rhodes, Judith C

    2011-01-01

    The filamentous fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus secretes hydrolytic enzymes to acquire nutrients from host tissues. The production of these enzymes exerts stress on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which is alleviated by two stress responses: the unfolded protein response (UPR), which adjusts the protein folding capacity of the ER, and ER-associated degradation (ERAD), which disposes of proteins that fail to fold correctly. In this study, we examined the contribution of these integrated pathways to the growth and virulence of A. fumigatus, focusing on the ERAD protein DerA and the master regulator of the UPR, HAcA. A ΔderA mutant grew normally and showed no increase in sensitivity to ER stress. However, expression of the UPR target gene bipA was constitutively elevated in this strain, suggesting that the UPR was compensating for the absence of DerA function. To test this, the UPR was disrupted by deleting the hacA gene. The combined loss of derA and hacA caused a more severe reduction in hyphal growth, antifungal drug resistance and protease secretion than the loss of either gene alone, suggesting that DerA and HacA cooperate to support these functions. Moreover, the ΔderA/ΔhacA mutant was avirulent in a mouse model of invasive aspergillosis, which contrasted the wild-type virulence of ΔderA and the reduced virulence of the ΔhacA mutant. Taken together, these data demonstrate that DerA cooperates with the UPR to support the expression of virulence-related attributes of A. fumigatus. PMID:21217201

  5. IL-1-induced ERK1/2 activation up-regulates p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} protein by inhibition of degradation via ubiquitin-independent pathway in human melanoma cells A375

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, Tomohiro; Hayashi, Hidetoshi; Itoh, Saotomo; Takii, Takemasa; Onozaki, Kikuo

    2010-02-12

    IL-1 inhibits the proliferation of human melanoma cells A375 by arresting the cell cycle at G0/G1 phase, which accompanies the increase of p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} (p21) protein. Here, we demonstrate that IL-1 induces the stabilization of p21 protein via ERK1/2 pathway. The degradation of p21 was inhibited by IL-1, however the ubiquitination level of p21 was not affected. In addition, the degradation of non-ubiquitinated form of lysine less mutant p21-K6R was also inhibited by IL-1, suggesting that IL-1 stabilized p21 protein via ubiquitin-independent pathway. Furthermore, the inhibition of p21 protein degradation was prevented by a selective inhibitor of ERK1/2 pathway, PD98059. These results suggest that IL-1-induced ERK1/2 activation leads to the up-regulation of p21 by inhibiting degradation via ubiquitin-independent pathway in human melanoma cells A375.

  6. Overexpression of alpha-synuclein at non-toxic levels increases dopaminergic cell death induced by copper exposure via modulation of protein degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Anandhan, Annadurai; Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Bohovych, Iryna; Griggs, Amy M; Zavala-Flores, Laura; Reyes-Reyes, Elsa M; Seravalli, Javier; Stanciu, Lia A; Lee, Jaekwon; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Franco, Rodrigo

    2015-09-01

    Gene multiplications or point mutations in alpha (α)-synuclein are associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). An increase in copper (Cu) levels has been reported in the cerebrospinal fluid and blood of PD patients, while occupational exposure to Cu has been suggested to augment the risk to develop PD. We aimed to elucidate the mechanisms by which α-synuclein and Cu regulate dopaminergic cell death. Short-term overexpression of wild type (WT) or mutant A53T α-synuclein had no toxic effect in human dopaminergic cells and primary midbrain cultures, but it exerted a synergistic effect on Cu-induced cell death. Cell death induced by Cu was potentiated by overexpression of the Cu transporter protein 1 (Ctr1) and depletion of intracellular glutathione (GSH) indicating that the toxic effects of Cu are linked to alterations in its intracellular homeostasis. Using the redox sensor roGFP, we demonstrated that Cu-induced oxidative stress was primarily localized in the cytosol and not in the mitochondria. However, α-synuclein overexpression had no effect on Cu-induced oxidative stress. WT or A53T α-synuclein overexpression exacerbated Cu toxicity in dopaminergic and yeast cells in the absence of α-synuclein aggregation. Cu increased autophagic flux and protein ubiquitination. Impairment of autophagy by overexpression of a dominant negative Atg5 form or inhibition of the ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS) with MG132 enhanced Cu-induced cell death. However, only inhibition of the UPS stimulated the synergistic toxic effects of Cu and α-synuclein overexpression. Our results demonstrate that α-synuclein stimulates Cu toxicity in dopaminergic cells independent from its aggregation via modulation of protein degradation pathways. PMID:25497688

  7. A d-Amino Acid at the N-Terminus of a Protein Abrogates Its Degradation by the N-End Rule Pathway

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotes have evolved the ubiquitin (Ub)/proteasome system to degrade polypeptides. The Ub/proteasome system is one way that cells regulate cytosolic protein and amino acids levels through the recognition and ubiquitination of a protein’s N-terminus via E1, E2, and E3 enzymes. The process by which the N-terminus stimulates intracellular protein degradation is referred to as the N-end rule. Characterization of the N-end rule has been limited to only the natural l-amino acids. Using a cytosolic delivery platform derived from anthrax lethal toxin, we probed the stability of mixed chirality proteins, containing one d-amino acid on the N-terminus of otherwise all l-proteins. In all cases, we observed that one N-terminal d-amino acid stabilized the cargo protein to proteasomal degradation with respect to the N-end rule. We found that since the mixed chirality proteins were not polyubiquitinated, they evaded N-end-mediated proteasomal degradation. Evidently, a subtle change on the N-terminus of a natural protein can enhance its intracellular lifetime. PMID:26807441

  8. Autophagy as a Regulated Pathway of Cellular Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Klionsky, Daniel J.; Emr, Scott D.

    2009-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a dynamic process involving the rearrangement of subcellular membranes to sequester cytoplasm and organelles for delivery to the lysosome or vacuole where the sequestered cargo is degraded and recycled. This process takes place in all eukaryotic cells. It is highly regulated through the action of various kinases, phosphatases, and guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases). The core protein machinery that is necessary to drive formation and consumption of intermediates in the macroautophagy pathway includes a ubiquitin-like protein conjugation system and a protein complex that directs membrane docking and fusion at the lysosome or vacuole. Macroautophagy plays an important role in developmental processes, human disease, and cellular response to nutrient deprivation. PMID:11099404

  9. Disulfiram/copper-disulfiram Damages Multiple Protein Degradation and Turnover Pathways and Cytotoxicity is Enhanced by Metformin in Oesophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Jivan, Rupal; Damelin, Leonard Howard; Birkhead, Monica; Rousseau, Amanda Louise; Veale, Robin Bruce; Mavri-Damelin, Demetra

    2015-10-01

    Disulfiram (DSF), used since the 1950s in the treatment of alcoholism, is reductively activated to diethyldithiocarbamate and both compounds are thiol-reactive and readily complex copper. More recently DSF and copper-DSF (Cu-DSF) have been found to exhibit potent anticancer activity. We have previously shown that the anti-diabetic drug metformin is anti-proliferative and induces an intracellular reducing environment in oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines. Based on these observations, we investigated the effects of Cu-DSF and DSF, with and without metformin, in this present study. We found that Cu-DSF and DSF caused considerable cytotoxicity across a panel of OSCC cells, and metformin significantly enhanced the effects of DSF. Elevated copper transport contributes to DSF and metformin-DSF-induced cytotoxicity since the cell-impermeable copper chelator, bathocuproinedisulfonic acid, partially reversed the cytotoxic effects of these drugs, and interestingly, metformin-treated OSCC cells contained higher intracellular copper levels. Furthermore, DSF may target cancer cells preferentially due to their high dependence on protein degradation/turnover pathways, and we found that metformin further enhances the role of DSF as a proteasome inhibitor. We hypothesized that the lysosome could be an additional, novel, target of DSF. Indeed, this acid-labile compound decreased lysosomal acidification, and DSF-metformin co-treatment interfered with the progression of autophagy in these cells. In summary, this is the first such report identifying the lysosome as a target of DSF and based on the considerable cytotoxic effects of DSF either alone or in the presence of metformin, in vitro, and we propose these as novel potential chemotherapeutic approaches for OSCC. PMID:25846272

  10. Targeting the Autophagy/Lysosomal Degradation Pathway in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Rivero-Ríos, Pilar; Madero-Pérez, Jesús; Fernández, Belén; Hilfiker, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular quality control mechanism crucial for neuronal homeostasis. Defects in autophagy are critically associated with mechanisms underlying Parkinson's disease (PD), a common and debilitating neurodegenerative disorder. Autophagic dysfunction in PD can occur at several stages of the autophagy/lysosomal degradative machinery, contributing to the formation of intracellular protein aggregates and eventual neuronal cell death. Therefore, autophagy inducers may comprise a promising new therapeutic approach to combat neurodegeneration in PD. Several currently available FDA-approved drugs have been shown to enhance autophagy, which may allow for their repurposing for use in novel clinical conditions including PD. This review summarizes our current knowledge of deficits in the autophagy/lysosomal degradation pathways associated with PD, and highlight current approaches which target this pathway as possible means towards novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26517050

  11. Curcumin inhibits HIV-1 by promoting Tat protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Ali, Amjad; Banerjea, Akhil C

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat is an intrinsically unfolded protein playing a pivotal role in viral replication by associating with TAR region of viral LTR. Unfolded proteins are degraded by 20S proteasome in an ubiquitin independent manner. Curcumin is known to activate 20S proteasome and promotes the degradation of intrinsically unfolded p53 tumor suppressor protein. Since HIV-1 Tat protein is largerly unfolded, we hypothesized that Tat may also be targeted through this pathway. Curcumin treated Tat transfected HEK-293T cells showed a dose and time dependent degradation of Tat protein. Contrary to this HIV-1 Gag which is a properly folded protein, remained unaffected with curcumin. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that curcumin treatment did not affect Tat gene transcription. Curcumin increased the rate of Tat protein degradation as shown by cycloheximide (CHX) chase assay. Degradation of the Tat protein is accomplished through proteasomal pathway as proteasomal inhibitor MG132 blocked Tat degradation. Curcumin also decreased Tat mediated LTR promoter transactivation and inhibited virus production from HIV-1 infected cells. Taken together our study reveals a novel observation that curcumin causes potent degradation of Tat which may be one of the major mechanisms behind its anti HIV activity. PMID:27283735

  12. Curcumin inhibits HIV-1 by promoting Tat protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Amjad; Banerjea, Akhil C.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat is an intrinsically unfolded protein playing a pivotal role in viral replication by associating with TAR region of viral LTR. Unfolded proteins are degraded by 20S proteasome in an ubiquitin independent manner. Curcumin is known to activate 20S proteasome and promotes the degradation of intrinsically unfolded p53 tumor suppressor protein. Since HIV-1 Tat protein is largerly unfolded, we hypothesized that Tat may also be targeted through this pathway. Curcumin treated Tat transfected HEK-293T cells showed a dose and time dependent degradation of Tat protein. Contrary to this HIV-1 Gag which is a properly folded protein, remained unaffected with curcumin. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that curcumin treatment did not affect Tat gene transcription. Curcumin increased the rate of Tat protein degradation as shown by cycloheximide (CHX) chase assay. Degradation of the Tat protein is accomplished through proteasomal pathway as proteasomal inhibitor MG132 blocked Tat degradation. Curcumin also decreased Tat mediated LTR promoter transactivation and inhibited virus production from HIV-1 infected cells. Taken together our study reveals a novel observation that curcumin causes potent degradation of Tat which may be one of the major mechanisms behind its anti HIV activity. PMID:27283735

  13. PATHWAYS - ELECTRON TUNNELING PATHWAYS IN PROTEINS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beratan, D. N.

    1994-01-01

    The key to understanding the mechanisms of many important biological processes such as photosynthesis and respiration is a better understanding of the electron transfer processes which take place between metal atoms (and other groups) fixed within large protein molecules. Research is currently focused on the rate of electron transfer and the factors that influence it, such as protein composition and the distance between metal atoms. Current models explain the swift transfer of electrons over considerable distances by postulating bridge-mediated tunneling, or physical tunneling pathways, made up of interacting bonds in the medium around and between donor and acceptor sites. The program PATHWAYS is designed to predict the route along which electrons travel in the transfer processes. The basic strategy of PATHWAYS is to begin by recording each possible path element on a connectivity list, including in each entry which two atoms are connected and what contribution the connection would make to the overall rate if it were included in a pathway. The list begins with the bonded molecular structure (including the backbone sequence and side chain connectivity), and then adds probable hydrogen bond links and through-space contacts. Once this list is completed, the program runs a tree search from the donor to the acceptor site to find the dominant pathways. The speed and efficiency of the computer search offers an improvement over manual techniques. PATHWAYS is written in FORTRAN 77 for execution on DEC VAX series computers running VMS. The program inputs data from four data sets and one structure file. The software was written to input BIOGRAF (old format) structure files based on x-ray crystal structures and outputs ASCII files listing the best pathways and BIOGRAF vector files containing the paths. Relatively minor changes could be made in the input format statements for compatibility with other graphics software. The executable and source code are included with the

  14. Foot-and-mouth disease virus structural protein VP3 degrades Janus kinase 1 to inhibit IFN-γ signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Wei, Jin; Yang, Fan; Liu, Hua-Nan; Zhu, Zi-Xiang; Cao, Wei-Jun; Li, Shu; Liu, Xiang-Tao; Zheng, Hai-Xue; Shu, Hong-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease is a highly contagious viral disease of cloven-hoofed animals that is caused by foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). To replicate efficiently in vivo, FMDV has evolved methods to circumvent host antiviral defense mechanisms, including those induced by interferons (IFNs). Previous research has focused on the effect of FMDV L(pro) and 3C(pro) on type I IFNs. In this study, FMDV VP3 was found to inhibit type II IFN signaling pathways. The overexpression of FMDV VP3 inhibited the IFN-γ-triggered phosphorylation of STAT1 at Tyr701 and the subsequent expression of downstream genes. Mechanistically, FMDV VP3 interacted with JAK1/2 and inhibited the tyrosine phosphorylation, dimerization and nuclear accumulation of STAT1. FMDV VP3 also disrupted the assembly of the JAK1 complex and degraded JAK1 but not JAK2 via a lysosomal pathway. Taken together, the results reveal a novel mechanism used by which FMDV VP3 counteracts the type II IFN signaling pathways. PMID:26901336

  15. Clipping or Extracting: Two Ways to Membrane Protein Degradation.

    PubMed

    Avci, Dönem; Lemberg, Marius K

    2015-10-01

    Protein degradation is a fundamentally important process that allows cells to recognize and remove damaged protein species and to regulate protein abundance according to functional need. A fundamental challenge is to understand how membrane proteins are recognized and removed from cellular organelles. While most of our understanding of this mechanism comes from studies on p97/Cdc48-mediated protein dislocation along the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway, recent studies have revealed intramembrane proteolysis to be an additional mechanism that can extract transmembrane segments. Here, we review these two principles in membrane protein degradation and discuss how intramembrane proteolysis, which introduces an irreversible step in protein dislocation, is used to drive regulated protein turnover. PMID:26410407

  16. Protein Design for Pathway Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Eriksen, Dawn T.; Lian, Jiazhang; Zhao, Huimin

    2013-01-01

    Design and construction of biochemical pathways has increased the complexity of biosynthetically-produced compounds when compared to single enzyme biocatalysis. However, the coordination of multiple enzymes can introduce a complicated set of obstacles to overcome in order to achieve a high titer and yield of the desired compound. Metabolic engineering has made great strides in developing tools to optimize the flux through a target pathway, but the inherent characteristics of a particular enzyme within the pathway can still limit the productivity. Thus, judicious protein design is critical for metabolic and pathway engineering. This review will describe various strategies and examples of applying protein design to pathway engineering to optimize the flux through the pathway. The proteins can be engineered for altered substrate specificity/selectivity, increased catalytic activity, reduced mass transfer limitations through specific protein localization, and reduced substrate/product inhibition. Protein engineering can also be expanded to design biosensors to enable high through-put screening and to customize cell signaling networks. These strategies have successfully engineered pathways for significantly increased productivity of the desired product or in the production of novel compounds. PMID:23558037

  17. Protein design for pathway engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksen, DT; Lian, JZ; Zhao, HM

    2014-02-01

    Design and construction of biochemical pathways has increased the complexity of biosynthetically-produced compounds when compared to single enzyme biocatalysis. However, the coordination of multiple enzymes can introduce a complicated set of obstacles to overcome in order to achieve a high titer and yield of the desired compound. Metabolic engineering has made great strides in developing tools to optimize the flux through a target pathway, but the inherent characteristics of a particular enzyme within the pathway can still limit the productivity. Thus, judicious protein design is critical for metabolic and pathway engineering. This review will describe various strategies and examples of applying protein design to pathway engineering to optimize the flux through the pathway. The proteins can be engineered for altered substrate specificity/selectivity, increased catalytic activity, reduced mass transfer limitations through specific protein localization, and reduced substrate/product inhibition. Protein engineering can also be expanded to design biosensors to enable high through-put screening and to customize cell signaling networks. These strategies have successfully engineered pathways for significantly increased productivity of the desired product or in the production of novel compounds. (C) 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cadmium-induced activation of stress signaling pathways, disruption of ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation and apoptosis in primary rat Sertoli cell-gonocyte cocultures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaozhong; Hong, Sungwoo; Faustman, Elaine M

    2008-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant that has been associated with male reproductive toxicity in both humans and animal models. The underlying mechanism of this response, however, is still uncharacterized. To address this issue, we employed a recently developed and optimized three-dimensional primary Sertoli cell-gonocyte coculture system and examined the time- and dose-dependent effects of Cd on morphological alterations, cell viability, activation of stress signaling pathway proteins, and the disruption of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Our results demonstrated that Cd exposure lead to time- and dose-dependent morphological changes that are associated with the induction of apoptosis. In response to Cd, we also saw a disruption of the UPS as evaluated through the accumulation of high-molecular weight polyubiquitinated proteins (HMW-polyUb) as well as alterations in proteasome activity. Robust activation of cellular stress response, measured through the increased phosphorylation of stress-activated protein kinase/c-jun N-terminal kinase and p38, paralleled the accumulation of HMW-polyUb. In addition, p53, a key regulatory protein, was upregulated and underwent increased ubiquitination in response to Cd. To further characterize the role of the UPS in Cd cellular response, we compared the above changes with two classic proteasomal inhibitors, lactacystin, and MG132. The stress response and the accumulation of HWM-polyUb induced by Cd were consistent with the response seen with MG132 but not with lactacystin. In addition, Cd treatment resulted in a dose- and time-dependent effect on proteasome activity, but the overall Cd-induced proteasomal inhibition was unique as compared to MG132 and lactacystin. Taken together, our studies further characterize Cd-induced in vitro testicular toxicity and highlight the potential role of the UPS in this response. PMID:18463101

  19. Protein Degradation and the Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Flick, Karin; Kaiser, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Environmental stresses are manifold and so are the responses they elicit. This is particularly true for higher eukaryotes where various tissues and cell types are differentially affected by the insult. Type and scope of the stress response can therefore differ greatly among cell types. Given the importance of the Ubiquitin Proteasome System (UPS) for most cellular processes, it comes as no surprise that the UPR plays a pivotal role in counteracting the effects of stressors. Here we outline contributions of the UPS to stress sensing, signaling, and response pathways. We make no claim to comprehensiveness but choose selected examples to illustrate concepts and mechanisms by which protein modification with ubiquitin and proteasomal degradation of key regulators ensures cellular integrity during stress situations. PMID:22414377

  20. Modeling Protein Expression and Protein Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Telesca, Donatello; Müller, Peter; Kornblau, Steven M.; Suchard, Marc A.; Ji, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput functional proteomic technologies provide a way to quantify the expression of proteins of interest. Statistical inference centers on identifying the activation state of proteins and their patterns of molecular interaction formalized as dependence structure. Inference on dependence structure is particularly important when proteins are selected because they are part of a common molecular pathway. In that case, inference on dependence structure reveals properties of the underlying pathway. We propose a probability model that represents molecular interactions at the level of hidden binary latent variables that can be interpreted as indicators for active versus inactive states of the proteins. The proposed approach exploits available expert knowledge about the target pathway to define an informative prior on the hidden conditional dependence structure. An important feature of this prior is that it provides an instrument to explicitly anchor the model space to a set of interactions of interest, favoring a local search approach to model determination. We apply our model to reverse-phase protein array data from a study on acute myeloid leukemia. Our inference identifies relevant subpathways in relation to the unfolding of the biological process under study. PMID:26246646

  1. Global Subcellular Characterization of Protein Degradation Using Quantitative Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Larance, Mark; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Kirkwood, Kathryn J.; Ly, Tony; Lamond, Angus I.

    2013-01-01

    Protein degradation provides an important regulatory mechanism used to control cell cycle progression and many other cellular pathways. To comprehensively analyze the spatial control of protein degradation in U2OS osteosarcoma cells, we have combined drug treatment and SILAC-based quantitative mass spectrometry with subcellular and protein fractionation. The resulting data set analyzed more than 74,000 peptides, corresponding to ∼5000 proteins, from nuclear, cytosolic, membrane, and cytoskeletal compartments. These data identified rapidly degraded proteasome targets, such as PRR11 and highlighted a feedback mechanism resulting in translation inhibition, induced by blocking the proteasome. We show this is mediated by activation of the unfolded protein response. We observed compartment-specific differences in protein degradation, including proteins that would not have been characterized as rapidly degraded through analysis of whole cell lysates. Bioinformatic analysis of the entire data set is presented in the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics, a web-based resource, with proteins annotated for stability and subcellular distribution. PMID:23242552

  2. Degradation of the antiviral component ARGONAUTE1 by the autophagy pathway

    PubMed Central

    Derrien, Benoît; Baumberger, Nicolas; Schepetilnikov, Mikhail; Viotti, Corrado; De Cillia, Julia; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique; Isono, Erika; Schumacher, Karin; Genschik, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    Posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) mediated by siRNAs is an evolutionarily conserved antiviral defense mechanism in higher plants and invertebrates. In this mechanism, viral-derived siRNAs are incorporated into the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) to guide degradation of the corresponding viral RNAs. In Arabidopsis, a key component of RISC is ARGONAUTE1 (AGO1), which not only binds to siRNAs but also carries the RNA slicer activity. At present little is known about posttranslational mechanisms regulating AGO1 turnover. Here we report that the viral suppressor of RNA silencing protein P0 triggers AGO1 degradation by the autophagy pathway. Using a P0-inducible transgenic line, we observed that AGO1 degradation is blocked by inhibition of autophagy. The engineering of a functional AGO1 fluorescent reporter protein further indicated that AGO1 colocalizes with autophagy-related (ATG) protein 8a (ATG8a) positive bodies when degradation is impaired. Moreover, this pathway also degrades AGO1 in a nonviral context, especially when the production of miRNAs is impaired. Our results demonstrate that a selective process such as ubiquitylation can lead to the degradation of a key regulatory protein such as AGO1 by a degradation process generally believed to be unspecific. We anticipate that this mechanism will not only lead to degradation of AGO1 but also of its associated proteins and eventually small RNAs. PMID:23019378

  3. The different roles of selective autophagic protein degradation in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Da-wei; Peng, Zhen-ju; Ren, Guang-fang; Wang, Guang-xin

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular pathway for bulk protein degradation and the removal of damaged organelles by lysosomes. Autophagy was previously thought to be unselective; however, studies have increasingly confirmed that autophagy-mediated protein degradation is highly regulated. Abnormal autophagic protein degradation has been associated with multiple human diseases such as cancer, neurological disability and cardiovascular disease; therefore, further elucidation of protein degradation by autophagy may be beneficial for protein-based clinical therapies. Macroautophagy and chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) can both participate in selective protein degradation in mammalian cells, but the process is quite different in each case. Here, we summarize the various types of macroautophagy and CMA involved in determining protein degradation. For this summary, we divide the autophagic protein degradation pathways into four categories: the post-translational modification dependent and independent CMA pathways and the ubiquitin dependent and independent macroautophagy pathways, and describe how some non-canonical pathways and modifications such as phosphorylation, acetylation and arginylation can influence protein degradation by the autophagy lysosome system (ALS). Finally, we comment on why autophagy can serve as either diagnostics or therapeutic targets in different human diseases. PMID:26415220

  4. Understanding Degradation Pathways in Organic Photovoltaics (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, M. T.; Olson, D. C.; Garcia, A.; Kauvar, I.; Kopidakis, N.; Reese, M. O.; Berry, J. J.; Ginley, D. S.

    2011-02-01

    Organic Photovoltaics (OPVs) recently attained power conversion efficiencies that are of interest for commercial production. Consequently, one of the most important unsolved issues facing a new industry is understanding what governs lifetime in organic devices and discovering solutions to mitigate degradation mechanisms. Historically, the active organic components are considered vulnerable to photo-oxidation and represent the primary degradation channel. However, we present several (shelf life and light soaking) studies pointing the relative stability of the active layers and instabilities in commonly used electrode materials. We show that engineering of the hole/electron layer at the electrode can lead to environmentally stable devices even without encapsulation.

  5. Alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreatment of softwood: hemicellulose degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Vasco, Carlos; Zhang, Xiao

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated softwood hemicelluloses degradation pathways during alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) pretreatment of Douglas fir. It was found that glucomannan is much more susceptible to alkaline pretreatment than xylan. Organic acids, including lactic, succinic, glycolic and formic acid are the predominant products from glucomannan degradation. At low treatment temperature (90°C), a small amount of formic acid is produced from glucomannan, whereas glucomannan degradation to lactic acid and succinic acid becomes the main reactions at 140°C and 180°C. The addition of H2O2 during alkaline pretreatment of D. fir led to a significant removal of lignin, which subsequently facilitated glucomannan solubilization. However, H2O2 has little direct effect on the glucomannan degradation reaction. The main degradation pathways involved in glucomannan conversion to organics acids are elucidated. The results from this study demonstrate the potential to optimize pretreatment conditions to maximize the value of biomass hemicellulose. PMID:24185034

  6. The Cdc48 machine in endoplasmic reticulum associated protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Dieter H; Stolz, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    The AAA-type ATPase Cdc48 (named p97/VCP in mammals) is a molecular machine in all eukaryotic cells that transforms ATP hydrolysis into mechanic power to unfold and pull proteins against physical forces, which make up a protein's structure and hold it in place. From the many cellular processes, Cdc48 is involved in, its function in endoplasmic reticulum associated protein degradation (ERAD) is understood best. This quality control process for proteins of the secretory pathway scans protein folding and discovers misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the organelle, destined for folding of these proteins and their further delivery to their site of action. Misfolded lumenal and membrane proteins of the ER are detected by chaperones and lectins and retro-translocated out of the ER for degradation. Here the Cdc48 machinery, recruited to the ER membrane, takes over. After polyubiquitylation of the protein substrate, Cdc48 together with its dimeric co-factor complex Ufd1-Npl4 pulls the misfolded protein out and away from the ER membrane and delivers it to down-stream components for degradation by a cytosolic proteinase machine, the proteasome. The known details of the Cdc48-Ufd1-Npl4 motor complex triggered process are subject of this review article. PMID:21945179

  7. Degradation-mediated protein quality control at the inner nuclear membrane

    PubMed Central

    Boban, Mirta; Foisner, Roland

    2016-01-01

    abstract An intricate machinery protects cells from the accumulation of misfolded, non-functional proteins and protein aggregates. Protein quality control pathways have been best described in the cytoplasm and the endoplasmic reticulum, however, recent findings indicate that the nucleus is also an important compartment for protein quality control. Several nuclear ubiquitinylation pathways target soluble and membrane proteins in the nucleus and mediate their degradation through nuclear proteasomes. In addition, emerging data suggest that nuclear envelope components are also degraded by autophagy, although the mechanisms by which cytoplasmic autophagy machineries get access to nuclear targets remain unclear. In this minireview we summarize the nuclear ubiquitin-proteasome pathways in yeast, focusing on pathways involved in the protein degradation at the inner nuclear membrane. In addition, we discuss potential mechanisms how nuclear targets at the nuclear envelope may be delivered to the cytoplasmic autophagy pathways in yeast and mammals. PMID:26760377

  8. α-Synuclein and protein degradation systems: a reciprocal relationship.

    PubMed

    Xilouri, Maria; Brekk, Oystein Rod; Stefanis, Leonidas

    2013-04-01

    An increasing wealth of data indicates a close relationship between the presynaptic protein alpha-synuclein and Parkinson's disease (PD) pathogenesis. Alpha-synuclein protein levels are considered as a major determinant of its neurotoxic potential, whereas secreted extracellular alpha-synuclein has emerged as an additional important factor in this regard. However, the manner of alpha-synuclein degradation in neurons remains contentious. Both the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP)-mainly macroautophagy and chaperone-mediated autophagy-have been suggested to contribute to alpha-synuclein turnover. Additionally, other proteases such as calpains, neurosin, and metalloproteinases have been also proposed to have a role in intracellular and extracellular alpha-synuclein processing. Both UPS and ALP activity decline with aging and such decline may play a pivotal role in many neurodegenerative conditions. Alterations in these major proteolytic pathways may result in alpha-synuclein accumulation due to impaired clearance. Conversely, increased alpha-synuclein protein burden promotes the generation of aberrant species that may impair further UPS or ALP function, generating thus a bidirectional positive feedback loop leading to neuronal death. In the current review, we summarize the recent findings related to alpha-synuclein degradation, as well as to alpha-synuclein-mediated aberrant effects on protein degradation systems. Identifying the factors that regulate alpha-synuclein association to cellular proteolytic pathways may represent potential targets for therapeutic interventions in PD and related synucleinopathies. PMID:22941029

  9. A synthetic defect in protein degradation caused by loss of Ufd4 and Rad23

    SciTech Connect

    Ju Donghong; Xie Youming . E-mail: xiey@karmanos.org

    2006-03-10

    The UFD (ubiquitin fusion degradation) pathway is responsible for multiubiquitination of the fusion proteins that bear a 'non-removable' N-terminal ubiquitin moiety. Previous reports have shown that the UFD pathway is conserved from yeast to human. The essential elements of the UFD pathway have also been identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These studies, however, are limited to use of engineered UFD substrates. The biological significance of the UFD pathway remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that Ufd4, the E3 component of the UFD pathway, is involved in controlling the degradation of Rad4, a nucleotide excision repair protein. Moreover, simultaneous loss of Ufd4 and Rad23 exhibits a synthetic inhibitory effect on Rad4 degradation, presenting First example that a UBA/UBL-domain protein functionally overlaps with a ubiquitin ligase in determining the turnover rate of a protein substrate. The current work also provides a direction for further investigation of the physiological functions of the UFD pathway.

  10. Degradation of Akt Using Protein Catalyzed Capture Agents

    PubMed Central

    Das, Samir; Nag, Arundhati; Tang, Grace; Tang, Kevin; Sutherland, Alexander M.; Heath, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal signaling of the protein kinase Akt has been shown to contribute to human diseases such as diabetes and cancer, but Akt has proven to be a challenging target for drugging. Using iterative in situ click chemistry we recently developed multiple protein catalyzed capture (PCC) agents that allosterically modulate Akt enzymatic activity in a protein based assay. Here we utilize similar PCCs to exploit endogenous protein degradation pathways. We use the modularity of the anti-Akt PCCs to prepare Proteolysis Targeting Chimeric molecules (PROTACs) that are shown to promote the rapid degradation of Akt in live cancer cells. These novel PROTACs demonstrate that the epitope targeting selectivity of PCCs can be coupled with non-traditional drugging moieties to inhibit challenging targets. PMID:26880702

  11. Degradable PEGylated Protein Conjugates Utilizing RAFT Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Caitlin G.; Maynard, Heather D.

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-protein therapeutics exhibit enhanced pharmacokinetics, but have drawbacks including decreased protein activities and polymer accumulation in the body. Therefore a major aim for second-generation polymer therapeutics is to introduce degradability into the backbone. Herein we describe the synthesis of poly(poly(ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate)) (pPEGMA) degradable polymers with protein-reactive end-groups via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, and the subsequent covalent attachment to lysozyme through a reducible disulfide linkage. RAFT copolymerization of cyclic ketene acetal (CKA) monomer 5,6-benzo-2-methylene-1,3-dioxepane (BMDO) with PEGMA yielded two polymers with number-average molecular weight (Mn) (GPC) of 10.9 and 20.9 kDa and molecular weight dispersities (Ð) of 1.34 and 1.71, respectively. Hydrolytic degradation of the polymers was analyzed by 1H-NMR and GPC under basic and acidic conditions. The reversible covalent attachment of these polymers to lysozyme, as well as the hydrolytic and reductive cleavage of the polymer from the protein, was analyzed by gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Following reductive cleavage of the polymer, an increase in activity was observed for both conjugates, with the released protein having full activity. This represents a method to prepare PEGylated proteins, where the polymer is readily cleaved from the protein and the main chain of the polymer is degradable. PMID:25937643

  12. Protein engineering strategies with potential applications for altering clinically relevant cellular pathways at the protein level.

    PubMed

    Regan, Lynne; Hinrichsen, Michael R; Oi, Curran

    2016-05-01

    All diseases can be fundamentally viewed as the result of malfunctioning cellular pathways. Protein engineering offers the potential to develop new tools that will allow these dysfunctional pathways to be better understood, in addition to potentially providing new routes to restore proper function. Here we discuss different approaches that can be used to change the intracellular activity of a protein by intervening at the protein level: targeted protein sequestration, protein recruitment, protein degradation, and selective inhibition of binding interfaces. The potential of each of these tools to be developed into effective therapeutic treatments will also be discussed, along with any major barriers that currently block their translation into the clinic. PMID:27031866

  13. Cathodic degradation of antibiotics: characterization and pathway analysis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Deyong; Liang, Bin; Yun, Hui; Cheng, Haoyi; Ma, Jincai; Cui, Minhua; Wang, Aijie; Ren, Nanqi

    2015-04-01

    Antibiotics in wastewaters must be degraded to eliminate their antibacterial activity before discharging into the environment. A cathode can provide continuous electrons for the degradation of refractory pollutants, however the cathodic degradation feasibility, efficiency and pathway for different kinds of antibiotics is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the degradation of four antibiotics, namely nitrofurazone (NFZ), metronidazole (MNZ), chloramphenicol (CAP), and florfenicol (FLO) by a poised cathode in a dual chamber electrochemical reactor. The cyclic voltammetry preliminarily proved the feasibility of the cathodic degradation of these antibiotics. The cathodic reducibility of these antibiotics followed the order of NFZ > MNZ > CAP > FLO. A decreased phosphate buffered solution (PBS) concentration as low as 2 mM or utilization of NaCl buffer solution as catholyte had significant influence on antibiotics degradation rate and efficiency for CAP and FLO but not for NFZ and MNZ. PBS could be replaced by Na2CO3-NaHCO3 buffer solution as catholyte for the degradation of these antibiotics. Reductive dechlorination of CAP proceeded only after the reduction of the nitro group to aromatic amine. The composition of the degradation products depended on the cathode potential except for MNZ. The cathodic degradation process could eliminate the antibacterial activity of these antibiotics. The current study suggests that the electrochemical reduction could serve as a potential pretreatment or advanced treatment unit for the treatment of antibiotics containing wastewaters. PMID:25660806

  14. ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDE DEGRADATION PATHWAYS DURING DRINKING WATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Free chlorine has been found to react with organophosphate (OP) pesticides resulting in the more toxic oxon products. We will discuss OP pesticide degradation pathways and modeling in the presence of chlorine and chloramines, as well as present a relationship between structure a...

  15. Complete and Integrated Pyrene Degradation Pathway in Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1 Based on Systems Biology▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Jae; Kweon, Ohgew; Jones, Richard C.; Freeman, James P.; Edmondson, Ricky D.; Cerniglia, Carl E.

    2007-01-01

    Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1 was the first bacterium isolated by virtue of its ability to metabolize the high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) pyrene. We used metabolic, genomic, and proteomic approaches in this investigation to construct a complete and integrated pyrene degradation pathway for M. vanbaalenii PYR-1. Genome sequence analyses identified genes involved in the pyrene degradation pathway that we have proposed for this bacterium. To identify proteins involved in the degradation, we conducted a proteome analysis of cells exposed to pyrene using one-dimensional gel electrophoresis in combination with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Database searching performed with the M. vanbaalenii PYR-1 genome resulted in identification of 1,028 proteins with a protein false discovery rate of <1%. Based on both genomic and proteomic data, we identified 27 enzymes necessary for constructing a complete pathway for pyrene degradation. Our analyses indicate that this bacterium degrades pyrene to central intermediates through o-phthalate and the β-ketoadipate pathway. Proteomic analysis also revealed that 18 enzymes in the pathway were upregulated more than twofold, as indicated by peptide counting when the organism was grown with pyrene; three copies of the terminal subunits of ring-hydroxylating oxygenase (NidAB2, MvanDraft_0817/0818, and PhtAaAb), dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (MvanDraft_0815), and ring cleavage dioxygenase (MvanDraft_3242) were detected only in pyrene-grown cells. The results presented here provide a comprehensive picture of pyrene metabolism in M. vanbaalenii PYR-1 and a useful framework for understanding cellular processes involved in PAH degradation. PMID:17085566

  16. Complete and integrated pyrene degradation pathway in Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1 based on systems biology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Jae; Kweon, Ohgew; Jones, Richard C; Freeman, James P; Edmondson, Ricky D; Cerniglia, Carl E

    2007-01-01

    Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1 was the first bacterium isolated by virtue of its ability to metabolize the high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) pyrene. We used metabolic, genomic, and proteomic approaches in this investigation to construct a complete and integrated pyrene degradation pathway for M. vanbaalenii PYR-1. Genome sequence analyses identified genes involved in the pyrene degradation pathway that we have proposed for this bacterium. To identify proteins involved in the degradation, we conducted a proteome analysis of cells exposed to pyrene using one-dimensional gel electrophoresis in combination with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Database searching performed with the M. vanbaalenii PYR-1 genome resulted in identification of 1,028 proteins with a protein false discovery rate of <1%. Based on both genomic and proteomic data, we identified 27 enzymes necessary for constructing a complete pathway for pyrene degradation. Our analyses indicate that this bacterium degrades pyrene to central intermediates through o-phthalate and the beta-ketoadipate pathway. Proteomic analysis also revealed that 18 enzymes in the pathway were upregulated more than twofold, as indicated by peptide counting when the organism was grown with pyrene; three copies of the terminal subunits of ring-hydroxylating oxygenase (NidAB2, MvanDraft_0817/0818, and PhtAaAb), dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (MvanDraft_0815), and ring cleavage dioxygenase (MvanDraft_3242) were detected only in pyrene-grown cells. The results presented here provide a comprehensive picture of pyrene metabolism in M. vanbaalenii PYR-1 and a useful framework for understanding cellular processes involved in PAH degradation. PMID:17085566

  17. A Non-canonical RNA Silencing Pathway Promotes mRNA Degradation in Basal Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Nicolás, Francisco E.; Vila, Ana; Moxon, Simon; Dalmay, Tamas; Torres-Martínez, Santiago; Garre, Victoriano; Ruiz-Vázquez, Rosa M.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing knowledge on the functional relevance of endogenous small RNAs (esRNAs) as riboregulators has stimulated the identification and characterization of these molecules in numerous eukaryotes. In the basal fungus Mucor circinelloides, an emerging opportunistic human pathogen, esRNAs that regulate the expression of many protein coding genes have been described. These esRNAs share common machinery for their biogenesis consisting of an RNase III endonuclease Dicer, a single Argonaute protein and two RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. We show in this study that, besides participating in this canonical dicer-dependent RNA interference (RNAi) pathway, the rdrp genes are involved in a novel dicer-independent degradation process of endogenous mRNAs. The analysis of esRNAs accumulated in wild type and silencing mutants demonstrates that this new rdrp-dependent dicer-independent regulatory pathway, which does not produce sRNA molecules of discrete sizes, controls the expression of target genes promoting the specific degradation of mRNAs by a previously unknown RNase. This pathway mainly regulates conserved genes involved in metabolism and cellular processes and signaling, such as those required for heme biosynthesis, and controls responses to specific environmental signals. Searching the Mucor genome for candidate RNases to participate in this pathway, and functional analysis of the corresponding knockout mutants, identified a new protein, R3B2. This RNase III-like protein presents unique domain architecture, it is specifically found in basal fungi and, besides its relevant role in the rdrp-dependent dicer-independent pathway, it is also involved in the canonical dicer-dependent RNAi pathway, highlighting its crucial role in the biogenesis and function of regulatory esRNAs. The involvement of RdRPs in RNA degradation could represent the first evolutionary step towards the development of an RNAi mechanism and constitutes a genetic link between mRNA degradation and post

  18. THE DELICATE BALANCE BETWEEN SECRETED PROTEIN FOLDING AND ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM-ASSOCIATED DEGRADATION IN HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Christopher J.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Protein folding is a complex, error-prone process that often results in an irreparable protein by-product. These by-products can be recognized by cellular quality control machineries and targeted for proteasome-dependent degradation. The folding of proteins in the secretory pathway adds another layer to the protein folding “problem,” as the endoplasmic reticulum maintains a unique chemical environment within the cell. In fact, a growing number of diseases are attributed to defects in secretory protein folding, and many of these by-products are targeted for a process known as endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD). Since its discovery, research on the mechanisms underlying the ERAD pathway has provided new insights into how ERAD contributes to human health during both normal and diseases states. Links between ERAD and disease are evidenced from the loss of protein function as a result of degradation, chronic cellular stress when ERAD fails to keep up with misfolded protein production, and the ability of some pathogens to coopt the ERAD pathway. The growing number of ERAD substrates has also illuminated the differences in the machineries used to recognize and degrade a vast array of potential clients for this pathway. Despite all that is known about ERAD, many questions remain, and new paradigms will likely emerge. Clearly, the key to successful disease treatment lies within defining the molecular details of the ERAD pathway and in understanding how this conserved pathway selects and degrades an innumerable cast of substrates. PMID:22535891

  19. Molecular characterization of the Akt-TOR signaling pathway in rainbow trout: potential role in muscle growth/degradation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Akt-TOR signaling pathway plays a key role in cellular metabolism and muscle growth. Hormone, nutrition and stress factors affect the Akt-TOR pathway by regulating gene transcription, protein synthesis and degradation. In addition, we previously showed that energetic demands elevate during vit...

  20. Aerobic degradation of dinitrotoluenes and pathway for bacterial degradation of 2,6-dinitrotoluene

    SciTech Connect

    Nishino, S.F.; Paoli, G.C.; Spain, J.C.

    2000-05-01

    An oxidative pathway for the mineralization of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) by Burkholderia sp. strain DNT has been reported previously. The authors report here the isolation of additional strains with the ability to mineralize 2,4-DNT by the same pathway and the isolation and characterization of bacterial strains that mineralize 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,6-DNT) by a different pathway. Burkholderia cepacia strain JS850 and Hydrogenophaga palleronii strain JS863 grew on 2,6-DNT as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. The initial steps in the pathway for degradation of 2,6-DNT were determined by simultaneous induction, enzyme assays, and identification of metabolites through mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance. 2,6-DNT was converted to 3-methyl-4-nitrocatechol by a dioxygenation reaction accompanied by the release of nitrite. 3-Methyl-4-nitrocatechol was the substrate for extradiol ring cleavage yielding 2-hydroxy-5-nitro-6-oxohepta-2,4-dienoic acid. 2,4-DNT-degrading strains also converted 2,6-DNT to 3-methyl-4-nitrocatechol but did not metabolize the 3-methyl-4-nitrocatechol. Although 2,6-DNT prevented the degradation of 2,4-DNT by 2,4-DNT-degrading strains, the effect was not the result of inhibition of 2,4-DNT dioxygenase by 2,6-DNT or of 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol monooxygenase by 3-methyl-4-nitrocatechol.

  1. Identification of the major degradation pathways of ticagrelor.

    PubMed

    Sadou Yaye, Hassane; Secrétan, Philippe-Henri; Henriet, Théo; Bernard, Mélisande; Amrani, Fatma; Akrout, Wiem; Tilleul, Patrick; Yagoubi, Najet; Do, Bernard

    2015-02-01

    Ticagrelor is a direct-acting and reversible P2Y12-adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor blocker used as antiplatelet drug. Forced degradation under various stress conditions was carried out. The degradation products have been detected and identified by high-pressure liquid chromatography multistage mass spectrometry (LC-MS(n)) along with high-resolution mass spectrometry. C18 XTerra MS column combined with a linear gradient mobile phase composed of a mixture of 10 mM acetate ammonium/acetonitrile was shown suitable for drug and impurity determinations and validated as a stability indicating method. Structural elucidation of the degradation products relied on MS(n) studies and accurate mass measurements giving access to elemental compositions. Up to nine degradation products resulting from oxidation/auto-oxidation, S-dealkylation and N-dealkylation have been identified, covering a range of possible degradation pathways for derivatives with such functional groups. Kinetics was also studied in order to assess the molecule's shelf-life and to identify the most important degradation factors. PMID:25543285

  2. Degradation of misfolded proteins in neurodegenerative diseases: therapeutic targets and strategies

    PubMed Central

    Ciechanover, Aaron; Kwon, Yong Tae

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cells remove misfolded proteins using various proteolytic systems, including the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome system (UPS), chaperone mediated autophagy (CMA) and macroautophagy. The majority of misfolded proteins are degraded by the UPS, in which Ub-conjugated substrates are deubiquitinated, unfolded and cleaved into small peptides when passing through the narrow chamber of the proteasome. The substrates that expose a specific degradation signal, the KFERQ sequence motif, can be delivered to and degraded in lysosomes via the CMA. Aggregation-prone substrates resistant to both the UPS and the CMA can be degraded by macroautophagy, in which cargoes are segregated into autophagosomes before degradation by lysosomal hydrolases. Although most misfolded and aggregated proteins in the human proteome can be degraded by cellular protein quality control, some native and mutant proteins prone to aggregation into β-sheet-enriched oligomers are resistant to all known proteolytic pathways and can thus grow into inclusion bodies or extracellular plaques. The accumulation of protease-resistant misfolded and aggregated proteins is a common mechanism underlying protein misfolding disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease (HD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), prion diseases and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). In this review, we provide an overview of the proteolytic pathways in neurons, with an emphasis on the UPS, CMA and macroautophagy, and discuss the role of protein quality control in the degradation of pathogenic proteins in neurodegenerative diseases. Additionally, we examine existing putative therapeutic strategies to efficiently remove cytotoxic proteins from degenerating neurons. PMID:25766616

  3. Hydroxide Degradation Pathways for Substituted Trimethylammonium Cations: A DFT Study

    SciTech Connect

    Long, H.; Kim, K.; Pivovar, B. S.

    2012-05-03

    Substituted trimethylammonium cations serve as small molecule analogues for tetherable cations in anion exchange membranes. In turn, these membranes serve as the basis for alkaline membrane fuel cells by allowing facile conduction of hydroxide. As these cations are susceptible to hydroxide attack, they degrade over time and greatly limit the lifetime of the fuel cell. In this research, we performed density functional theory calculations to investigate the degradation pathways of substituted trimethylammonium cations to probe the relative durability of cation tethering strategies in alkyl and aromatic tethers. Our results show that significant changes in calculated energy barriers occur when substitution groups change. Specifically, we have found that, when available, the Hofmann elimination pathway is the most vulnerable pathway for degradation; however, this barrier is also found to depend on the carbon chain length and number of hydrogens susceptible to Hofmann elimination. S{sub N}2 barriers were also investigated for both methyl groups and substitution groups. The reported findings give important insight into potential tethering strategies for trimethylammonium cations in anion exchange membranes.

  4. Protein degradation and protection against misfolded or damaged proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Alfred L.

    2003-12-01

    The ultimate mechanism that cells use to ensure the quality of intracellular proteins is the selective destruction of misfolded or damaged polypeptides. In eukaryotic cells, the large ATP-dependent proteolytic machine, the 26S proteasome, prevents the accumulation of non-functional, potentially toxic proteins. This process is of particular importance in protecting cells against harsh conditions (for example, heat shock or oxidative stress) and in a variety of diseases (for example, cystic fibrosis and the major neurodegenerative diseases). A full understanding of the pathogenesis of the protein-folding diseases will require greater knowledge of how misfolded proteins are recognized and selectively degraded.

  5. Effectiveness and pathways of electrochemical degradation of pretilachlor herbicides.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jinzhi; Feng, Yujie; Sun, Xiaojun; Liu, Junfeng; Zhu, Limin

    2011-05-15

    Pretilachlor used as one kind of acetanilide herbicides is potentially dangerous and biorefractory. In this work, electrochemical degradation of lab-synthetic pretilachlor wastewater was carried out with Sb doped Ti/SnO(2) electrode as anode and stainless steel as cathode. The effect of current density on pretilachlor degradation was investigated, and the degradation pathway of pretilachlor was inferred by analyzing its main degradation intermediates. The results showed that the removal of pretilachlor and TOC in treatment time of 60 min were 98.8% and 43.1% under the conditions of current density of 20 mA cm(-2), initial concentration of pretilachlor of 60 mg L(-1), Na(2)SO(4) dosage of 0.1 mol L(-1), pH of 7.2, respectively, while the energy consumption was 15.8 kWhm(-3). The main reactions for electrochemical degradation of pretilachlor included hydroxylation, oxidation, dechlorination, C-O bond and C-N bond cleavage, resulting in the formation of nine main intermediates. PMID:21382661

  6. Degradation of toluene-2,4-diamine by persulphate: kinetics, intermediates and degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yong-hai; Zhang, Jin-bao; Xi, Bei-dou; An, Da; Yang, Yu; Li, Ming-xiao

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the degradation of toluene-2,4-diamine (TDA) by persulphate (PS) in an aqueous solution at near-neutral pH was examined. The result showed that the degradation rate of TDA increased with increasing PS concentrations. The optimal dosage of PS in the reaction system was determined by efficiency indicator (I) coupling in the consumption of PS and decay half-life of TDA. Calculation showed that 0.74 mM of PS was the most effective dosage for TDA degradation, at that level the maximum I of 24.51 was obtained. PS can oxidize TDA for an extended reaction time period. Under neutral condition without activation, four degradation intermediates, 2,4-diamino-3-hydroxy-5-sulfonicacidtoluene, 2,4-diaminobenzaldehyde, 2,4-bis(vinylamino)benzaldehyde and 3,5-diamino-4-hydroxy-2-pentene, were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The tentative degradation pathway of TDA was proposed as well. It was found that hydroxyl radical played an important role in degradation of TDA with the activation of Fe2+, whereas PS anion and sulphate radicals were responsible for the degradation without activation of Fe2+. PMID:25442404

  7. It's all about talking: two-way communication between proteasomal and lysosomal degradation pathways via ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Liebl, Martina P; Hoppe, Thorsten

    2016-08-01

    Selective degradation of proteins requires a fine-tuned coordination of the two major proteolytic pathways, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy. Substrate selection and proteolytic activity are defined by a plethora of regulatory cofactors influencing each other. Both proteolytic pathways are initiated by ubiquitylation to mark substrate proteins for degradation, although the size and/or topology of the modification are different. In this context E3 ubiquitin ligases, ensuring the covalent attachment of activated ubiquitin to the substrate, are of special importance. The regulation of E3 ligase activity, competition between different E3 ligases for binding E2 conjugation enzymes and substrates, as well as their interplay with deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) represent key events in the cross talk between the UPS and autophagy. The coordination between both degradation routes is further influenced by heat shock factors and ubiquitin-binding proteins (UBPs) such as p97, p62, or optineurin. Mutations in enzymes and ubiquitin-binding proteins or a general decline of both proteolytic systems during aging result in accumulation of damaged and aggregated proteins. Thus further mechanistic understanding of how UPS and autophagy communicate might allow therapeutic intervention especially against age-related diseases. PMID:27225656

  8. New Hydrocarbon Degradation Pathways in the Microbial Metagenome from Brazilian Petroleum Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Sierra-García, Isabel Natalia; Correa Alvarez, Javier; Pantaroto de Vasconcellos, Suzan; Pereira de Souza, Anete; dos Santos Neto, Eugenio Vaz; de Oliveira, Valéria Maia

    2014-01-01

    Current knowledge of the microbial diversity and metabolic pathways involved in hydrocarbon degradation in petroleum reservoirs is still limited, mostly due to the difficulty in recovering the complex community from such an extreme environment. Metagenomics is a valuable tool to investigate the genetic and functional diversity of previously uncultured microorganisms in natural environments. Using a function-driven metagenomic approach, we investigated the metabolic abilities of microbial communities in oil reservoirs. Here, we describe novel functional metabolic pathways involved in the biodegradation of aromatic compounds in a metagenomic library obtained from an oil reservoir. Although many of the deduced proteins shared homology with known enzymes of different well-described aerobic and anaerobic catabolic pathways, the metagenomic fragments did not contain the complete clusters known to be involved in hydrocarbon degradation. Instead, the metagenomic fragments comprised genes belonging to different pathways, showing novel gene arrangements. These results reinforce the potential of the metagenomic approach for the identification and elucidation of new genes and pathways in poorly studied environments and contribute to a broader perspective on the hydrocarbon degradation processes in petroleum reservoirs. PMID:24587220

  9. New hydrocarbon degradation pathways in the microbial metagenome from Brazilian petroleum reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Sierra-García, Isabel Natalia; Correa Alvarez, Javier; de Vasconcellos, Suzan Pantaroto; Pereira de Souza, Anete; dos Santos Neto, Eugenio Vaz; de Oliveira, Valéria Maia

    2014-01-01

    Current knowledge of the microbial diversity and metabolic pathways involved in hydrocarbon degradation in petroleum reservoirs is still limited, mostly due to the difficulty in recovering the complex community from such an extreme environment. Metagenomics is a valuable tool to investigate the genetic and functional diversity of previously uncultured microorganisms in natural environments. Using a function-driven metagenomic approach, we investigated the metabolic abilities of microbial communities in oil reservoirs. Here, we describe novel functional metabolic pathways involved in the biodegradation of aromatic compounds in a metagenomic library obtained from an oil reservoir. Although many of the deduced proteins shared homology with known enzymes of different well-described aerobic and anaerobic catabolic pathways, the metagenomic fragments did not contain the complete clusters known to be involved in hydrocarbon degradation. Instead, the metagenomic fragments comprised genes belonging to different pathways, showing novel gene arrangements. These results reinforce the potential of the metagenomic approach for the identification and elucidation of new genes and pathways in poorly studied environments and contribute to a broader perspective on the hydrocarbon degradation processes in petroleum reservoirs. PMID:24587220

  10. Prefoldin Promotes Proteasomal Degradation of Cytosolic Proteins with Missense Mutations by Maintaining Substrate Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Young, Barry P.; Loewen, Christopher J.; Mayor, Thibault

    2016-01-01

    Misfolded proteins challenge the ability of cells to maintain protein homeostasis and can accumulate into toxic protein aggregates. As a consequence, cells have adopted a number of protein quality control pathways to prevent protein aggregation, promote protein folding, and target terminally misfolded proteins for degradation. In this study, we employed a thermosensitive allele of the yeast Guk1 guanylate kinase as a model misfolded protein to investigate degradative protein quality control pathways. We performed a flow cytometry based screen to identify factors that promote proteasomal degradation of proteins misfolded as the result of missense mutations. In addition to the E3 ubiquitin ligase Ubr1, we identified the prefoldin chaperone subunit Gim3 as an important quality control factor. Whereas the absence of GIM3 did not impair proteasomal function or the ubiquitination of the model substrate, it led to the accumulation of the poorly soluble model substrate in cellular inclusions that was accompanied by delayed degradation. We found that Gim3 interacted with the Guk1 mutant allele and propose that prefoldin promotes the degradation of the unstable model substrate by maintaining the solubility of the misfolded protein. We also demonstrated that in addition to the Guk1 mutant, prefoldin can stabilize other misfolded cytosolic proteins containing missense mutations. PMID:27448207

  11. Prefoldin Promotes Proteasomal Degradation of Cytosolic Proteins with Missense Mutations by Maintaining Substrate Solubility.

    PubMed

    Comyn, Sophie A; Young, Barry P; Loewen, Christopher J; Mayor, Thibault

    2016-07-01

    Misfolded proteins challenge the ability of cells to maintain protein homeostasis and can accumulate into toxic protein aggregates. As a consequence, cells have adopted a number of protein quality control pathways to prevent protein aggregation, promote protein folding, and target terminally misfolded proteins for degradation. In this study, we employed a thermosensitive allele of the yeast Guk1 guanylate kinase as a model misfolded protein to investigate degradative protein quality control pathways. We performed a flow cytometry based screen to identify factors that promote proteasomal degradation of proteins misfolded as the result of missense mutations. In addition to the E3 ubiquitin ligase Ubr1, we identified the prefoldin chaperone subunit Gim3 as an important quality control factor. Whereas the absence of GIM3 did not impair proteasomal function or the ubiquitination of the model substrate, it led to the accumulation of the poorly soluble model substrate in cellular inclusions that was accompanied by delayed degradation. We found that Gim3 interacted with the Guk1 mutant allele and propose that prefoldin promotes the degradation of the unstable model substrate by maintaining the solubility of the misfolded protein. We also demonstrated that in addition to the Guk1 mutant, prefoldin can stabilize other misfolded cytosolic proteins containing missense mutations. PMID:27448207

  12. Non-degradative Ubiquitination of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ball, K. Aurelia; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Lewinski, Mary K.; Guatelli, John; Verschueren, Erik; Krogan, Nevan J.; Jacobson, Matthew P.

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence supports other regulatory roles for protein ubiquitination in addition to serving as a tag for proteasomal degradation. In contrast to other common post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, little is known about how non-degradative ubiquitination modulates protein structure, dynamics, and function. Due to the wealth of knowledge concerning protein kinase structure and regulation, we examined kinase ubiquitination using ubiquitin remnant immunoaffinity enrichment and quantitative mass spectrometry to identify ubiquitinated kinases and the sites of ubiquitination in Jurkat and HEK293 cells. We find that, unlike phosphorylation, ubiquitination most commonly occurs in structured domains, and on the kinase domain, ubiquitination is concentrated in regions known to be important for regulating activity. We hypothesized that ubiquitination, like other post-translational modifications, may alter the conformational equilibrium of the modified protein. We chose one human kinase, ZAP-70, to simulate using molecular dynamics with and without a monoubiquitin modification. In Jurkat cells, ZAP-70 is ubiquitinated at several sites that are not sensitive to proteasome inhibition and thus may have other regulatory roles. Our simulations show that ubiquitination influences the conformational ensemble of ZAP-70 in a site-dependent manner. When monoubiquitinated at K377, near the C-helix, the active conformation of the ZAP-70 C-helix is disrupted. In contrast, when monoubiquitinated at K476, near the kinase hinge region, an active-like ZAP-70 C-helix conformation is stabilized. These results lead to testable hypotheses that ubiquitination directly modulates kinase activity, and that ubiquitination is likely to alter structure, dynamics, and function in other protein classes as well. PMID:27253329

  13. Degradation of ciprofloxacin in water by advanced oxidation process: kinetics study, influencing parameters and degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Murtaza; Ismail, M; Khan, Sanaullah; Tabassum, Safia; Khan, Hasan M

    2016-03-01

    Gamma-radiation-induced degradation of ciprofloxacin (CIP) in aqueous solution and the factors affecting the degradation process have been investigated. The results showed that CIP (4.6 mg/L) was almost completely degraded at an absorbed dose of 870 Gy. The kinetic studies of aqueous solutions containing 4.6, 10, 15 and 17.9 mg/L indicated that the decomposition of CIP by gamma irradiation followed pseudo-first-order kinetics and the decay constant (k) decreased from 5.9  ×  10(-3) to 1.6  ×  10(-3) Gy(-1) with an increase in CIP initial concentration from 4.6 to 17.9 mg/L. The effect of saturation of CIP solution with N2, N2O or air on radiation-induced degradation of CIP was also investigated. The effects of radical scavengers, such as t-BuOH and i-PrOH, showed the role of reactive radicals towards degradation of CIP in the order of [Formula: see text]. The apparent second-order rate constant of [Formula: see text] with CIP was calculated to be 2.64 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). The effects of solution pH as well as natural water contaminants, such as [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], on CIP degradation by gamma-irradiation were also investigated. Major degradation products, including organic acids, were identified using UPLC-MS/MS and IC, and degradation pathways have been proposed. PMID:26208491

  14. Interactions of Bacterial Proteins with Host Eukaryotic Ubiquitin Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Perrett, Charlotte Averil; Lin, David Yin-Wei; Zhou, Daoguo

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a post-translational modification in which one or more 76 amino acid polypeptide ubiquitin molecules are covalently linked to the lysine residues of target proteins. Ubiquitination is the main pathway for protein degradation that governs a variety of eukaryotic cellular processes, including the cell-cycle, vesicle trafficking, antigen presentation, and signal transduction. Not surprisingly, aberrations in the system have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases including inflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. Recent studies have revealed that viruses and bacterial pathogens exploit the host ubiquitination pathways to gain entry and to aid their survival/replication inside host cells. This review will summarize recent developments in understanding the biochemical and structural mechanisms utilized by bacterial pathogens to interact with the host ubiquitination pathways. PMID:21772834

  15. A second pathway to degrade pyrimidine nucleic acid precursors in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Gorm; Björnberg, Olof; Polakova, Silvia; Pynyaha, Yuriy; Rasmussen, Anna; Møller, Kasper; Hofer, Anders; Moritz, Thomas; Sandrini, Michael Paolo Bastner; Merico, Anna-Maria; Compagno, Concetta; Akerlund, Hans-Erik; Gojković, Zoran; Piskur, Jure

    2008-07-18

    Pyrimidine bases are the central precursors for RNA and DNA, and their intracellular pools are determined by de novo, salvage and catabolic pathways. In eukaryotes, degradation of uracil has been believed to proceed only via the reduction to dihydrouracil. Using a yeast model, Saccharomyces kluyveri, we show that during degradation, uracil is not reduced to dihydrouracil. Six loci, named URC1-6 (for uracil catabolism), are involved in the novel catabolic pathway. Four of them, URC3,5, URC6, and URC2 encode urea amidolyase, uracil phosphoribosyltransferase, and a putative transcription factor, respectively. The gene products of URC1 and URC4 are highly conserved proteins with so far unknown functions and they are present in a variety of prokaryotes and fungi. In bacteria and in some fungi, URC1 and URC4 are linked on the genome together with the gene for uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (URC6). Urc1p and Urc4p are therefore likely the core components of this novel biochemical pathway. A combination of genetic and analytical chemistry methods demonstrates that uridine monophosphate and urea are intermediates, and 3-hydroxypropionic acid, ammonia and carbon dioxide the final products of degradation. The URC pathway does not require the presence of an active respiratory chain and is therefore different from the oxidative and rut pathways described in prokaryotes, although the latter also gives 3-hydroxypropionic acid as the end product. The genes of the URC pathway are not homologous to any of the eukaryotic or prokaryotic genes involved in pyrimidine degradation described to date. PMID:18550080

  16. Proton Pathways in Green Fluorescence Protein

    PubMed Central

    Agmon, Noam

    2005-01-01

    Proton pathways in green fluorescent protein (GFP) are more extended than previously reported. In the x-ray data of wild-type GFP, a two-step exit pathway exists from the active site to the protein surface, controlled by a threonine switch. A proton entry pathway begins at a glutamate-lysine cluster around Glu-5, and extends all the way to the buried Glu-222 near the active site. This structural evidence suggests that GFP may function as a portable light-driven proton-pump, with proton emitted in the excited state through the switchable exit pathway, and replenished from Glu-222 and the Glu-5 entry pathway in the ground state. PMID:15681647

  17. Degradation properties of protein and carbohydrate during sludge anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Zhang, Panyue; Zhang, Guangming; Wang, Yuanyuan; Yang, Anqi

    2015-09-01

    Degradation of protein and carbohydrate is vital for sludge anaerobic digestion performance. However, few studies focused on degradation properties of protein and carbohydrate. This study investigated detailed degradation properties of sludge protein and carbohydrate in order to gain insight into organics removal during anaerobic digestion. Results showed that carbohydrate was more efficiently degraded than protein and was degraded prior to protein. The final removal efficiencies of carbohydrate and protein were 49.7% and 32.2%, respectively. The first 3 days were a lag phase for protein degradation since rapid carbohydrate degradation in this phase led to repression of protease formation. Kinetics results showed that, after initial lag phase, protein degradation followed the first-order kinetic with rate constants of 0.0197 and 0.0018 d(-1) during later rapid degradation phase and slow degradation phase, respectively. Carbohydrate degradation also followed the first-order kinetics with a rate constant of 0.007 d(-1) after initial quick degradation phase. PMID:26025350

  18. Combination of degradation pathways for naphthalene utilization in Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB.

    PubMed

    Tomás-Gallardo, Laura; Gómez-Álvarez, Helena; Santero, Eduardo; Floriano, Belén

    2014-03-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB is a metabolic versatile bacterium able to grow on naphthalene as the only carbon and energy source. Applying proteomic, genetic and biochemical approaches, we propose in this paper that, at least, three coordinated but independently regulated set of genes are combined to degrade naphthalene in TFB. First, proteins involved in tetralin degradation are also induced by naphthalene and may carry out its conversion to salicylaldehyde. This is the only part of the naphthalene degradation pathway showing glucose catabolite repression. Second, a salicylaldehyde dehydrogenase activity that converts salicylaldehyde to salicylate is detected in naphthalene-grown cells but not in tetralin- or salicylate-grown cells. Finally, we describe the chromosomally located nag genes, encoding the gentisate pathway for salicylate conversion into fumarate and pyruvate, which are only induced by salicylate and not by naphthalene. This work shows how biodegradation pathways in Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB could be assembled using elements from different pathways mainly because of the laxity of the regulatory systems and the broad specificity of the catabolic enzymes. PMID:24325207

  19. Degradation of Ionic Pathway in PEM Fuel Cell Cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seh Kyu; Shao, Yuyan; Wan, Haiying; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Towne, Silas A.; Rieke, Peter C.; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong

    2011-11-12

    The degradation of the ionic pathway throughout the catalyst layer in proton exchange membrane fuel cells was studied under an accelerated stress test of catalyst support (potential hold at 1.2 V). Electrochemical behaviors of the cathode based on graphitic mesoporous carbon supported Pt catalyst were examined using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Impedance data were plotted and expressed in the complex capacitance form to determine useful parameters in the transmission line model: the double-layer capacitance, peak frequency, and ionic resistance. Electrochemical surface area and hydrogen crossover current through the membrane were estimated from cyclic voltammogram, while cathode Faradaic resistance was compared with ionic resistance as a function of test time. It was observed that during an accelerated stress test of catalyst support, graphitic mesoporous carbon becomes hydrophilic which increases interfacial area between the ionomer and the catalyst up to 100 h. However, the ionic resistance in the catalyst layer drastically increases after 100 h with further carbon support oxidation. The underlying mechanism has been studied and it was found that significant degradation of ionic pathway throughout the catalyst layer due to catalyst support corrosion induces uneven hydration and mechanical stress in the ionomer.

  20. Multiple degradation pathways of phenanthrene by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia C6

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shumei; Seo, Jong-Su; Wang, Jun; Keum, Young-Soo; Li, Jianqiang; Li, Qing X.

    2013-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strain C6, capable of utilizing phenanthrene as a sole source of carbon and energy, was isolated from creosote-contaminated sites at Hilo, Hawaii. Twenty-two metabolites of phenanthrene, covering from dihydrodiol to protocatechuic acid, were isolated and characterized. Phenanthrene was degraded via an initial dioxygenation on 1,2-, 3,4-, and 9,10-C, where the 3,4-dioxygenation and subsequent metabolisms were most dominant. The metabolic pathways were further branched by ortho- and meta-cleavage of phenanthrenediols to produce 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid, 2-hydroxy-1-naphthoic acid, and naphthalene-1,2-dicarboxylic acid. These intermediates were then transformed to naphthalene-1,2-diol. 1-Hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid was also degraded via a direct ring cleavage. Naphthalene-1,2-diol underwent primarily ortho-cleavage to produce trans-2-carboxycinnamic acid and then to form phthalic acid, 4,5-dihydroxyphthalic acid and protocatechuic acid. Accumulation of salicylic acid in prolonged incubation indicated that a limited extent of meta-cleavage of naphthalene-1, 2-diol also occurred. This is the first study of detailed phenanthrene metabolic pathways by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. PMID:23539472

  1. The trans-anethole degradation pathway in an Arthrobacter sp.

    PubMed

    Shimoni, Eyal; Baasov, Timor; Ravid, Uzi; Shoham, Yuval

    2002-04-01

    A bacterial strain (TA13) capable of utilizing t-anethole as the sole carbon source was isolated from soil. The strain was identified as Arthrobacter aurescens based on its 16 S rRNA gene sequence. Key steps of the degradation pathway of t-anethole were identified by the use of t-anethole-blocked mutants and specific inducible enzymatic activities. In addition to t-anethole, strain TA13 is capable of utilizing anisic acid, anisaldehyde, and anisic alcohol as the sole carbon source. t-Anethole-blocked mutants were obtained following mutagenesis and penicillin enrichment. Some of these blocked mutants, accumulated in the presence of t-anethole quantitative amounts of t-anethole-diol, anisic acid, and 4,6-dicarboxy-2-pyrone and traces of anisic alcohol and anisaldehyde. Enzymatic activities induced by t-anethole included: 4-methoxybenzoate O-demethylase, p-hydroxybenzoate 3-hydroxylase, and protocatechuate-4,5-dioxygenase. These findings indicate that t-anethole is metabolized to protocatechuic acid through t-anethole-diol, anisaldehyde, anisic acid, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid. The protocatechuic acid is then cleaved by protocatechuate-4,5-dioxygenase to yield 2-hydroxy-4-carboxy muconate-semialdehyde. Results from inducible uptake ability and enzymatic assays indicate that at least three regulatory units are involved in the t-anethole degradation pathway. These findings provide new routes for environmental friendly production processes of valuable aromatic chemicals via bioconversion of phenylpropenoids. PMID:11805095

  2. Arabidopsis DELLA Protein Degradation Is Controlled by a Type-One Protein Phosphatase, TOPP4

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Qianqian; Wang, Wei; Guo, Xiaola; Yue, Jing; Huang, Yan; Xu, Xiufei; Li, Jia; Hou, Suiwen

    2014-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are a class of important phytohormones regulating a variety of physiological processes during normal plant growth and development. One of the major events during GA-mediated growth is the degradation of DELLA proteins, key negative regulators of GA signaling pathway. The stability of DELLA proteins is thought to be controlled by protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Up to date, no phosphatase involved in this process has been identified. We have identified a dwarfed dominant-negative Arabidopsis mutant, named topp4-1. Reduced expression of TOPP4 using an artificial microRNA strategy also resulted in a dwarfed phenotype. Genetic and biochemical analyses indicated that TOPP4 regulates GA signal transduction mainly via promoting DELLA protein degradation. The severely dwarfed topp4-1 phenotypes were partially rescued by the DELLA deficient mutants rga-t2 and gai-t6, suggesting that the DELLA proteins RGA and GAI are required for the biological function of TOPP4. Both RGA and GAI were greatly accumulated in topp4-1 but significantly decreased in 35S-TOPP4 transgenic plants compared to wild-type plants. Further analyses demonstrated that TOPP4 is able to directly bind and dephosphorylate RGA and GAI, confirming that the TOPP4-controlled phosphorylation status of DELLAs is associated with their stability. These studies provide direct evidence for a crucial role of protein dephosphorylation mediated by TOPP4 in the GA signaling pathway. PMID:25010794

  3. Proteogenomic Characterization of Monocyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Degradation Pathways in the Aniline-Degrading Bacterium Burkholderia sp. K24

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Sung Ho; Choi, Chi-Won; Yi, Yoon-Sun; Kim, Jonghyun; Chung, Young-Ho; Park, Edmond Changkyun; Kim, Seung Il

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. K24, formerly known as Acinetobacter lwoffii K24, is a soil bacterium capable of utilizing aniline as its sole carbon and nitrogen source. Genomic sequence analysis revealed that this bacterium possesses putative gene clusters for biodegradation of various monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs), including benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX), as well as aniline. We verified the proposed MAH biodegradation pathways by dioxygenase activity assays, RT-PCR, and LC/MS-based quantitative proteomic analyses. This proteogenomic approach revealed four independent degradation pathways, all converging into the citric acid cycle. Aniline and p-hydroxybenzoate degradation pathways converged into the β-ketoadipate pathway. Benzoate and toluene were degraded through the benzoyl-CoA degradation pathway. The xylene isomers, i.e., o-, m-, and p-xylene, were degraded via the extradiol cleavage pathways. Salicylate was degraded through the gentisate degradation pathway. Our results show that Burkholderia sp. K24 possesses versatile biodegradation pathways, which may be employed for efficient bioremediation of aniline and BTX. PMID:27124467

  4. Multiple Pathways for Protein Transport to Peroxisomes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, P.K.; Hettema, E.H.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisomes are unique among the organelles of the endomembrane system. Unlike other organelles that derive most if not all of their proteins from the ER (endoplasmic reticulum), peroxisomes contain dedicated machineries for import of matrix proteins and insertion of membrane proteins. However, peroxisomes are also able to import a subset of their membrane proteins from the ER. One aspect of peroxisome biology that has remained ill defined is the role the various import pathways play in peroxisome maintenance. In this review, we discuss the available data on matrix and membrane protein import into peroxisomes. PMID:25681696

  5. The Arabidopsis CROWDED NUCLEI genes regulate seed germination by modulating degradation of ABI5 protein.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenming; Guan, Chunmei; Feng, Jian; Liang, Yan; Zhan, Ni; Zuo, Jianru; Ren, Bo

    2016-07-01

    In Arabidopsis, the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a vital role in inhibiting seed germination and in post-germination seedling establishment. In the ABA signaling pathway, ABI5, a basic Leu zipper transcription factor, has important functions in the regulation of seed germination. ABI5 protein localizes in nuclear bodies, along with AFP, COP1, and SIZ1, and was degraded through the 26S proteasome pathway. However, the mechanisms of ABI5 nuclear body formation and ABI5 protein degradation remain obscure. In this study, we found that the Arabidopsis CROWDED NUCLEI (CRWN) proteins, predicted nuclear matrix proteins essential for maintenance of nuclear morphology, also participate in ABA-controlled seed germination by regulating the degradation of ABI5 protein. During seed germination, the crwn mutants are hypersensitive to ABA and have higher levels of ABI5 protein compared to wild type. Genetic analysis suggested that CRWNs act upstream of ABI5. The observation that CRWN3 colocalizes with ABI5 in nuclear bodies indicates that CRWNs might participate in ABI5 protein degradation in nuclear bodies. Moreover, we revealed that the extreme C-terminal of CRWN3 protein is necessary for its function in the response to ABA in germination. Our results suggested important roles of CRWNs in ABI5 nuclear body organization and ABI5 protein degradation during seed germination. PMID:26564029

  6. Pathways of Transport Protein Evolution: Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Vincent H.; Lee, Jong-Hoon; Silverio, Abe; Chan, Henry; Gomolplitinant, Kenny M.; Povolotsky, Tatyana L.; Orlova, Ekaterina; Sun, Eric I.; Welliver, Carl H.; Saier, Milton H.

    2014-01-01

    We herein report recent advances in our understanding of transport protein evolution. The Drug-Metabolite Transporter (DMT) superfamily (TC# 2.A.7) arose from a 2TMS precursor to give 4TMS proteins which then added one and duplicated to give 10. The proposed pathway is 2 –> 4 –> 5 –> 10. This superfamily provides a rare example where all proposed topological intermediates in this evolutionary pathway have been identified in current protein databases. Another family, the Oligopeptide Transporter (OPT) family (TC# 2.A.67), also started with a 2 TMS peptide precursor, but it followed the pathway: Only 16 and 17 TMS OPT family members have been identified in current databases. The TRIC family of K+ channels, characterized in animals, arose via the pathway: where the seventh TMS was added c-terminally to the 6 TMS precursor that resulted from a 3 TMS duplication. Surprisingly, animal TRIC channels proved to have numerous 7 TMS homologues in prokaryotes, none of which had been identified previously. We found that two families of integral membrane proteins gave rise to multiple current topological types. Members of the SdpC killer factor immunity protein family, SdpI (TC# 9.A.32) probably arose via the pathway: while members of the Heme Handling Protein (HHP) Family (TC# 9.B.14) arose via the pathway: Predictions are also made for an evolutionary pathway giving rise to the seven topological types of P-type ATPases so far identified in the P-ATPase superfamily. Finally, the ubiquitous CDF carriers (TC# 1.A.4) of 6TMSs probably gave rise to CRAC channels of 4TMSs by loss of the first two TMSs an unusual example of retroevolution. PMID:21194372

  7. Pathway of degradation of nitrilotriacetate by a Pseudomonas species.

    PubMed Central

    Firestone, M K; Tiedje, J M

    1978-01-01

    The pathway of degradation of nitrilotriacetate (NTA) was determined by using cell-free extracts and a 35-fold purification of NTA monooxygenase. The first step in the breakdown was an oxidative cleavage of the tertiary amine by the monooxygenase to form the aldo acid, glyoxylate, and the secondary amine, iminodiacetate (IDA). NTA N-oxide acted as a substrate analog for induction of the monooxygenase and was slowly metabolized by the enzyme, but was not an intermediate in the pathway. No intermediate before IDA was found, but an unstable alpha-hydroxy-NTA intermediate was postulated. IDA did undergo cleavage in the presence of the purified monooxygenase to give glyoxylate and glycine, but was not metabolized in cell-free extracts. Glyoxylate was further metabolized by cell-free extracts to yield CO2 and glycerate or glycine, products also found from NTA metabolism. Of the three bacterial isolates in which the NTA pathway has been studied, two strains, one isolated from a British soil and ours from a Michigan soil, appear to be almost identical. Images PMID:655711

  8. Hydrolytic and oxidative degradation of electrospun supramolecular biomaterials: In vitro degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Brugmans, M C P; Sӧntjens, S H M; Cox, M A J; Nandakumar, A; Bosman, A W; Mes, T; Janssen, H M; Bouten, C V C; Baaijens, F P T; Driessen-Mol, A

    2015-11-01

    The emerging field of in situ tissue engineering (TE) of load bearing tissues places high demands on the implanted scaffolds, as these scaffolds should provide mechanical stability immediately upon implantation. The new class of synthetic supramolecular biomaterial polymers, which contain non-covalent interactions between the polymer chains, thereby forming complex 3D structures by self assembly. Here, we have aimed to map the degradation characteristics of promising (supramolecular) materials, by using a combination of in vitro tests. The selected biomaterials were all polycaprolactones (PCLs), either conventional and unmodified PCL, or PCL with supramolecular hydrogen bonding moieties (either 2-ureido-[1H]-pyrimidin-4-one or bis-urea units) incorporated into the backbone. As these materials are elastomeric, they are suitable candidates for cardiovascular TE applications. Electrospun scaffold strips of these materials were incubated with solutions containing enzymes that catalyze hydrolysis, or solutions containing oxidative species. At several time points, chemical, morphological, and mechanical properties were investigated. It was demonstrated that conventional and supramolecular PCL-based polymers respond differently to enzyme-accelerated hydrolytic or oxidative degradation, depending on the morphological and chemical composition of the material. Conventional PCL is more prone to hydrolytic enzymatic degradation as compared to the investigated supramolecular materials, while, in contrast, the latter materials are more susceptible to oxidative degradation. Given the observed degradation pathways of the examined materials, we are able to tailor degradation characteristics by combining selected PCL backbones with additional supramolecular moieties. The presented combination of in vitro test methods can be employed to screen, limit, and select biomaterials for pre-clinical in vivo studies targeted to different clinical applications. PMID:26316031

  9. Iodinated contrast media electro-degradation: process performance and degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Del Moro, Guido; Pastore, Carlo; Di Iaconi, Claudio; Mascolo, Giuseppe

    2015-02-15

    The electrochemical degradation of six of the most widely used iodinated contrast media was investigated. Batch experiments were performed under constant current conditions using two DSA® electrodes (titanium coated with a proprietary and patented mixed metal oxide solution of precious metals such as iridium, ruthenium, platinum, rhodium and tantalum). The degradation removal never fell below 85% (at a current density of 64 mA/cm(2) with a reaction time of 150 min) when perchlorate was used as the supporting electrolyte; however, when sulphate was used, the degradation performance was above 80% (at a current density of 64 mA/cm(2) with a reaction time of 150 min) for all of the compounds studied. Three main degradation pathways were identified, namely, the reductive de-iodination of the aromatic ring, the reduction of alkyl aromatic amides to simple amides and the de-acylation of N-aromatic amides to produce aromatic amines. However, as amidotrizoate is an aromatic carboxylate, this is added via the decarboxylation reaction. The investigation did not reveal toxicity except for the lower current density used, which has shown a modest toxicity, most likely for some reaction intermediates that are not further degraded. In order to obtain total removal of the contrast media, it was necessary to employ a current intensity between 118 and 182 mA/cm(2) with energy consumption higher than 370 kWh/m(3). Overall, the electrochemical degradation was revealed to be a reliable process for the treatment of iodinated contrast media that can be found in contaminated waters such as hospital wastewater or pharmaceutical waste-contaminated streams. PMID:25433384

  10. Characterization of a novel oxyfluorfen-degrading bacterial strain Chryseobacterium aquifrigidense and its biochemical degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huanhuan; Xu, Jun; Dong, Fengshou; Liu, Xingang; Wu, Yanbing; Wu, Xiaohu; Zheng, Yongquan

    2016-08-01

    Persistent use of the diphenyl ether herbicides oxyfluorfen may seriously increase the health risks and ecological safety problems. A newly bacterium R-21 isolated from active soil was able to degrade and utilize oxyfluorfen as the sole carbon source. R-21 was identified as Chryseobacterium aquifrigidense by morphology, physiobiochemical characteristics, and genetic analysis. Under the optimum cultural conditions (pH 6.9, temperature 33.4 °C, and inoculum size 0.2 g L(-1)), R-21 could degrade 92.1 % of oxyfluorfen at 50 mg L(-1) within 5 days. During oxyfluorfen degradation, six metabolites were detected and identified by atmospheric pressure gas chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry and ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry, and a plausible degradation pathway was deduced. Strain R-21 is a promising potential in bioremediation of oxyfluorfen-contaminated environments. PMID:27079576

  11. The nature of protein folding pathways.

    PubMed

    Englander, S Walter; Mayne, Leland

    2014-11-11

    How do proteins fold, and why do they fold in that way? This Perspective integrates earlier and more recent advances over the 50-y history of the protein folding problem, emphasizing unambiguously clear structural information. Experimental results show that, contrary to prior belief, proteins are multistate rather than two-state objects. They are composed of separately cooperative foldon building blocks that can be seen to repeatedly unfold and refold as units even under native conditions. Similarly, foldons are lost as units when proteins are destabilized to produce partially unfolded equilibrium molten globules. In kinetic folding, the inherently cooperative nature of foldons predisposes the thermally driven amino acid-level search to form an initial foldon and subsequent foldons in later assisted searches. The small size of foldon units, ∼ 20 residues, resolves the Levinthal time-scale search problem. These microscopic-level search processes can be identified with the disordered multitrack search envisioned in the "new view" model for protein folding. Emergent macroscopic foldon-foldon interactions then collectively provide the structural guidance and free energy bias for the ordered addition of foldons in a stepwise pathway that sequentially builds the native protein. These conclusions reconcile the seemingly opposed new view and defined pathway models; the two models account for different stages of the protein folding process. Additionally, these observations answer the "how" and the "why" questions. The protein folding pathway depends on the same foldon units and foldon-foldon interactions that construct the native structure. PMID:25326421

  12. NP1EC Degradation Pathways Under Oxic and Microxic Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery-Brown, John; Li, Yongmei; Ding, Wang-Hsien; Mong, Gary M.; Campbell, James A.; Reinhard, Martin

    2008-03-22

    The degradation pathway of nonylphenol ethoxyacetic acid (NP1EC) and the conditions favoring CAP1EC formation were studied in aerobic microcosms constructed with soil from the Mesa soil aquifer treatment (SAT) facility (Arizona, USA) and pristine sediments from Coyote Creek (California, USA). In the Mesa microcosms, para-NP1EC was transformed to para-NP, before being rapidly transformed to nonyl alcohols via ipso-hydroxylation. While the formation of NP from APEMs has been observed by several researchers under anaerobic conditions, this is the first time the transient formation of NP from APEMs has been observed under aerobic conditions. Unlike the Mesa microcosms, large quantities of CAP1ECs were observed in the Coyote Creek microcosms. Initially, CA8P1ECs were the dominant metabolites, but as biodegradation continued, CA6P1ECs became the dominant metabolites. Compared to the CA8P1ECs, the number of CA6P1ECs peaks observed was small (<6) even though their concentrations were high. This suggests that several CA8P1ECs are degraded to only a few CA6P1EC isomers (i.e., the degradation pathway converges) or that some CA6P1EC metabolites are significantly more recalcitrant than others. The different biodegradation pathways observed in the Mesa and Coyote Creek microcosms result from the limited availability of dissolved oxygen in the Coyote Creek microcosms. In both sets of microcosms, the ortho isomers were transformed more slowly than the para isomers and in the Coyote Creek microcosms several ortho-CAP1ECs were observed. In addition, several unknown metabolites were observed in the Coyote Creek microcosms that were not seen in the abiotic or Mesa microcosms; these metabolites appear to be CAP1EC metabolites, have a -CH2-C6H4- fragment, and contain one carboxylic acid. Nitro-nonylphenol was observed in the Mesa microcosms, however, further experimentation illustrated that it was the product of an abiotic reaction between nitrite and nonylphenol under acidic conditions.

  13. Ubiquitin-protein ligases in muscle wasting: multiple parallel pathways?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecker, Stewart H.; Goldberg, A. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Studies in a wide variety of animal models of muscle wasting have led to the concept that increased protein breakdown via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is responsible for the loss of muscle mass seen as muscle atrophy. The complexity of the ubiquitination apparatus has hampered our understanding of how this pathway is activated in atrophying muscles and which ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes in muscle are responsible. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent experiments have shown that two newly identified ubiquitin-protein ligases (E3s), atrogin-1/MAFbx and MURF-1, are critical in the development of muscle atrophy. Other in-vitro studies also implicated E2(14k) and E3alpha, of the N-end rule pathway, as playing an important role in the process. SUMMARY: It seems likely that multiple pathways of ubiquitin conjugation are activated in parallel in atrophying muscle, perhaps to target for degradation specific classes of muscle proteins. The emerging challenge will be to define the protein targets for, as well as inhibitors of, these E3s.

  14. Comparative Proteomics Analysis Reveals L-Arginine Activates Ethanol Degradation Pathways in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Guokai; Lestari, Retno; Long, Baisheng; Fan, Qiwen; Wang, Zhichang; Guo, Xiaozhen; Yu, Jie; Hu, Jun; Yang, Xingya; Chen, Changqing; Liu, Lu; Li, Xiuzhi; Purnomoadi, Agung; Achmadi, Joelal; Yan, Xianghua

    2016-01-01

    L-Arginine (Arg) is a versatile amino acid that plays crucial roles in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. In this study, to investigate the alteration induced by Arg supplementation in proteome scale, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) based proteomic approach was employed to comparatively characterize the differentially expressed proteins between Arg deprivation (Ctrl) and Arg supplementation (+Arg) treated human liver hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. A total of 21 proteins were identified as differentially expressed proteins and these 21 proteins were all up-regulated by Arg supplementation. Six amino acid metabolism-related proteins, mostly metabolic enzymes, showed differential expressions. Intriguingly, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) based pathway analysis suggested that the three ethanol degradation pathways were significantly altered between Ctrl and +Arg. Western blotting and enzymatic activity assays validated that the key enzymes ADH1C, ALDH1A1, and ALDH2, which are mainly involved in ethanol degradation pathways, were highly differentially expressed, and activated between Ctrl and +Arg in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, 10 mM Arg significantly attenuated the cytotoxicity induced by 100 mM ethanol treatment (P < 0.0001). This study is the first time to reveal that Arg activates ethanol degradation pathways in HepG2 cells. PMID:26983598

  15. Biotransformation of nitrobenzene by bacteria containing toluene degradative pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Haigler, B.E.; Spain, J.C. )

    1991-11-01

    Nonpolar nitroaromatic compounds have been considered resistant to attack by oxygenases because of the electron withdrawing properties of the nitro group. The authors have investigate the ability of seven bacterial strains containing toluene degradative pathways to oxidize nitrobenzene. Cultures were induced with toluene vapor prior to incubation with nitrobenzene, and products were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Pseudomonas cepacia G4 and a strain of Pseudomonas harboring the TOL plasmid (pTN2) did not transform nitrobenzene. Cells of Pseudomonas putida F1 and Pseudomonas sp. strain JS150 converted nitrobenzene to 3-nitrocatechol. Transformation of nitrobenzene in the presence of {sup 18}O{sub 2} indicated that the reaction in JS150 involved the incorporation of both atoms of oxygen in the 3-nitrocatechol, which suggests a dioxygenase mechanism. P. putida 39/D, a mutant strain of P. putida F1, converted nitrobenzene to a compound tentatively identified as cis-1, 2-dihydroxy-3-nitrocyclohexa-3, 5-diene. This compound was rapidly converted to 3-nitrocatechol by cells of strain JS150. Cultures of Pseudomonas mendocina KR-1 converted nitrobenzene to a mixture of 3- and 4-nitrophenol (10 and 63%, respectively). Pseudomonas pickettii PKO1 converted nitrobenzene to 3- and 4-nitrocatechol via 3- and 4-nitrophenol. The nitrocatechols were slowly degraded to unidentified metabolites. Nitrobenzene did not serve as an inducer for the enzymes that catalyzed its oxidation.

  16. Induced oligomerization targets Golgi proteins for degradation in lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Ritika; Bachert, Collin; Linstedt, Adam D.

    2015-01-01

    Manganese protects cells against forms of Shiga toxin by down-regulating the cycling Golgi protein GPP130. Down-regulation occurs when Mn binding causes GPP130 to oligomerize and traffic to lysosomes. To determine how GPP130 is redirected to lysosomes, we tested the role of GGA1 and clathrin, which mediate sorting in the canonical Golgi-to-lysosome pathway. GPP130 oligomerization was induced using either Mn or a self-interacting version of the FKBP domain. Inhibition of GGA1 or clathrin specifically blocked GPP130 redistribution, suggesting recognition of the aggregated GPP130 by the GGA1/clathrin-sorting complex. Unexpectedly, however, GPP130’s cytoplasmic domain was not required, and redistribution also occurred after removal of GPP130 sequences needed for its normal cycling. Therefore, to test whether aggregate recognition might be a general phenomenon rather than one involving a specific GPP130 determinant, we induced homo-oligomerization of two unrelated Golgi-targeted constructs using the FKBP strategy. These were targeted to the cis- and trans-Golgi, respectively, using domains from mannosidase-1 and galactosyltransferase. Significantly, upon oligomerization, each redistributed to peripheral punctae and was degraded. This occurred in the absence of detectable UPR activation. These findings suggest the unexpected presence of quality control in the Golgi that recognizes aggregated Golgi proteins and targets them for degradation in lysosomes. PMID:26446839

  17. Induced oligomerization targets Golgi proteins for degradation in lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Ritika; Bachert, Collin; Linstedt, Adam D

    2015-12-01

    Manganese protects cells against forms of Shiga toxin by down-regulating the cycling Golgi protein GPP130. Down-regulation occurs when Mn binding causes GPP130 to oligomerize and traffic to lysosomes. To determine how GPP130 is redirected to lysosomes, we tested the role of GGA1 and clathrin, which mediate sorting in the canonical Golgi-to-lysosome pathway. GPP130 oligomerization was induced using either Mn or a self-interacting version of the FKBP domain. Inhibition of GGA1 or clathrin specifically blocked GPP130 redistribution, suggesting recognition of the aggregated GPP130 by the GGA1/clathrin-sorting complex. Unexpectedly, however, GPP130's cytoplasmic domain was not required, and redistribution also occurred after removal of GPP130 sequences needed for its normal cycling. Therefore, to test whether aggregate recognition might be a general phenomenon rather than one involving a specific GPP130 determinant, we induced homo-oligomerization of two unrelated Golgi-targeted constructs using the FKBP strategy. These were targeted to the cis- and trans-Golgi, respectively, using domains from mannosidase-1 and galactosyltransferase. Significantly, upon oligomerization, each redistributed to peripheral punctae and was degraded. This occurred in the absence of detectable UPR activation. These findings suggest the unexpected presence of quality control in the Golgi that recognizes aggregated Golgi proteins and targets them for degradation in lysosomes. PMID:26446839

  18. Degradation of sulphonated azo dye Red HE7B by Bacillus sp. and elucidation of degradative pathways.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Jyoti Kumar; Paul, Sangeeta; Dureja, Prem; Annapurna, K; Padaria, Jasdeep C; Gopal, Madhuban

    2014-08-01

    Bacteria capable of degrading the sulfonated azo dye Red HE7B were isolated from textile mill effluent contaminated soil. The most efficient isolate was identified as Bacillus sp. Azo1 and the isolate could successfully decolorize up to 89% of the dye. The decolorized cultural extract analyzed by HPLC confirmed degradation. Enzymatic analysis showed twofold and fourfold increase in the activity of azoreductase and laccase enzymes, respectively, indicating involvement of both reductive and oxidative enzymes in biodegradation of Red HE7B. Degraded products which were identified by GC/MS analysis included various metabolites like 8-nitroso 1-naphthol, 2-diazonium naphthalene. Mono azo dye intermediate was initially generated from the parent molecule. This mono azo dye was further degraded by the organism, into additional products, depending on the site of cleavage of R-N=N-R molecule. Based on the degradation products identified, three different pathways have been proposed. The mechanism of degradation in two of these pathways is different from that of the previously reported pathway for azo dye degradation. This is the first report of a microbial isolate following multiple pathways for azo dye degradation. Azo dye Red HE7B was observed to be phytotoxic, leading to decrease in root development, shoot length and seedling fresh weight. However, after biotreatment the resulting degradation products were non-phytotoxic. PMID:24682261

  19. Aqueous photodegradation of antibiotic florfenicol: kinetics and degradation pathway studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya; Li, Jianhua; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Guoqing; Feng, Yanhong; Wang, Zunyao; Yang, Xi

    2016-04-01

    The occurrence of antibacterial agents in natural environment was of scientific concern in recent years. As endocrine disrupting chemicals, they had potential risk on ecology system and human beings. In the present study, the photodegradation kinetics and pathways of florfenicol were investigated under solar and xenon lamp irradiation in aquatic systems. Direct photolysis half-lives of florfenicol were determined as 187.29 h under solar irradiation and 22.43 h under xenon lamp irradiation, respectively. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hydroxyl radical (·OH) and singlet oxygen ((1)O2) were found to play an important role in indirect photolysis process. The presence of nitrate and dissolved organic matters (DOMs) could affect photolysis of florfenicol in solutions through light screening effect, quenching effect, and photoinduced oxidization process. Photoproducts of florfenicol in DOMs solutions were identified by solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-MS) analysis techniques, and degradation pathways were proposed, including photoinduced hydrolysis, oxidation by (1)O2 and ·OH, dechlorination, and cleavage of the side chain. PMID:26705756

  20. Degradation of SsrA-tagged proteins in streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Liang

    2015-01-01

    In prokaryotes, a conserved small RNA molecule, called tmRNA, rescues ribosomes from proteins that are abnormally truncated due to the presence of rare codons or degraded mRNA. During the rescue process, a peptide tag (SsrA) encoded by tmRNA is cotranslationally added to the truncated polypeptides, thereby targeting these proteins for proteolytic degradation. In Escherichia coli, ClpXP and ClpAP proteases primarily degrade SsrA-tagged proteins. Other proteases such as Lon and FtsH also participate in the degradation in E. coli. However, in Bacillus subtilis, ClpXP is the major protease that degrades the SsrA-tagged proteins. Degradation of SsrA-tagged protein in streptococci is not well understood except that ClpXP is responsible for the majority of the degradation. Here we show that in Streptococcus mutans, in addition to ClpXP, two other Clp complexes, ClpCP and ClpEP, are also involved in the degradation. We also found that ClpCP- and ClpEP-mediated proteolysis of SsrA-tagged substrates is induced by heat stress. As ClpCP and ClpEP proteins are highly conserved in streptococci, we predicted that ClpEP- and ClpCP-mediated degradation of SsrA-tagged proteins might be operational in other streptococci. PMID:25645948

  1. Degradation of SsrA-tagged proteins in streptococci.

    PubMed

    Tao, Liang; Biswas, Indranil

    2015-04-01

    In prokaryotes, a conserved small RNA molecule, called tmRNA, rescues ribosomes from proteins that are abnormally truncated due to the presence of rare codons or degraded mRNA. During the rescue process, a peptide tag (SsrA) encoded by tmRNA is cotranslationally added to the truncated polypeptides, thereby targeting these proteins for proteolytic degradation. In Escherichia coli, ClpXP and ClpAP proteases primarily degrade SsrA-tagged proteins. Other proteases such as Lon and FtsH also participate in the degradation in E. coli. However, in Bacillus subtilis, ClpXP is the major protease that degrades the SsrA-tagged proteins. Degradation of SsrA-tagged protein in streptococci is not well understood except that ClpXP is responsible for the majority of the degradation. Here we show that in Streptococcus mutans, in addition to ClpXP, two other Clp complexes, ClpCP and ClpEP, are also involved in the degradation. We also found that ClpCP- and ClpEP-mediated proteolysis of SsrA-tagged substrates is induced by heat stress. As ClpCP and ClpEP proteins are highly conserved in streptococci, we predicted that ClpEP- and ClpCP-mediated degradation of SsrA-tagged proteins might be operational in other streptococci. PMID:25645948

  2. Redox modulation of cellular metabolism through targeted degradation of signaling proteins by the proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-02-01

    Under conditions of oxidative stress, the 20S proteasome plays a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis through the selective degradation of oxidized and damaged proteins. This adaptive stress response is distinct from ubiquitin-dependent pathways in that oxidized proteins are recognized and degraded in an ATP-independent mechanism, which can involve the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Like the regulatory complexes 19S and 11S REG, Hsp90 tightly associates with the 20S proteasome to mediate the recognition of aberrant proteins for degradation. In the case of the calcium signaling protein calmodulin, proteasomal degradation results from the oxidation of a single surface exposed methionine (i.e., Met145); oxidation of the other eight methionines has a minimal effect on the recognition and degradation of calmodulin by the proteasome. Since cellular concentrations of calmodulin are limiting, the targeted degradation of this critical signaling protein under conditions of oxidative stress will result in the downregulation of cellular metabolism, serving as a feedback regulation to diminish the generation of reactive oxygen species. The targeted degradation of critical signaling proteins, such as calmodulin, can function as sensors of oxidative stress to downregulate global rates of metabolism and enhance cellular survival.

  3. Degradation of diclofenac by ultrasonic irradiation: kinetic studies and degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Nie, Er; Yang, Mo; Wang, Dong; Yang, Xiaoying; Luo, Xingzhang; Zheng, Zheng

    2014-10-01

    Diclofenac (DCF) is a widely used anti-inflammatory drug found in various water bodies, posing threats to human health. In this research, the effects of ultrasonic irradiation at 585kHz on the degradation of DCF were studied under the air, oxygen, argon, and nitrogen saturated conditions. First, the dechlorination efficiencies under the air, oxygen, argon, and nitrogen saturated conditions were calculated to be 67%, 60%, 53% and 59%. Second, there was full mineralization of nitrogen during DCF degradation under the air, oxygen, and argon saturated conditions, but no mineralization of nitrogen under the nitrogen-saturated condition. Different from nitrogen, only partial mineralization of carbon occurred under the four gas-saturated conditions. Third, OH scavengers were added to derive the rate constants in the three reaction zones: cavitation bubble, supercritical interface, and bulk solution. Comparison of the constants indicated that DCF degradation was not limited to the bulk solution as conventionally assumed. Oxidation in the supercritical interface played a dominant role under the air and oxygen saturated conditions, while OH reactions in the cavitation bubble and/or bulk solution were dominant under the nitrogen and argon saturated conditions. After the addition of H2O2, reactions in the cavitation bubble and bulk solution kept their dominant roles under the nitrogen and argon saturated conditions, while reaction in the supercritical interface decreased under the air and oxygen saturated conditions. Finally, LC-MS analysis was used to derive the by-products and propose the main pathways of DCF degradation by ultrasonic irradiation. PMID:25065805

  4. Alteration of Dynein Function Affects α-Synuclein Degradation via the Autophagosome-Lysosome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Da; Shi, Ji-Jun; Mao, Cheng-Jie; Liu, Sha; Wang, Jian-Da; Chen, Jing; Wang, Fen; Yang, Ya-Ping; Hu, Wei-Dong; Hu, Li-Fang; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that dynein dysfunction may be implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration. It plays a central role in aggresome formation, the delivery of autophagosome to lysosome for fusion and degradation, which is a pro-survival mechanism essential for the bulk degradation of misfolded proteins and damaged organells. Previous studies reported that dynein dysfuntion was associated with aberrant aggregation of α-synuclein, which is a major component of inclusion bodies in Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, it remains unclear what roles dynein plays in α-synuclein degradation. Our study demonstrated a decrease of dynein expression in neurotoxin-induced PD models in vitro and in vivo, accompanied by an increase of α-synuclein protein level. Dynein down-regulation induced by siRNA resulted in a prolonged half-life of α-synuclein and its over-accumulation in A53T overexpressing PC12 cells. Dynein knockdown also prompted the increase of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3-II) and sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1, p62) expression, and the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles. Moreover, dynein suppression impaired the autophagosome fusion with lysosome. In summary, our findings indicate that dynein is critical for the clearance of aberrant α-synuclein via autophagosome-lysosome pathway. PMID:24351814

  5. The nature of protein folding pathways

    PubMed Central

    Englander, S. Walter; Mayne, Leland

    2014-01-01

    How do proteins fold, and why do they fold in that way? This Perspective integrates earlier and more recent advances over the 50-y history of the protein folding problem, emphasizing unambiguously clear structural information. Experimental results show that, contrary to prior belief, proteins are multistate rather than two-state objects. They are composed of separately cooperative foldon building blocks that can be seen to repeatedly unfold and refold as units even under native conditions. Similarly, foldons are lost as units when proteins are destabilized to produce partially unfolded equilibrium molten globules. In kinetic folding, the inherently cooperative nature of foldons predisposes the thermally driven amino acid-level search to form an initial foldon and subsequent foldons in later assisted searches. The small size of foldon units, ∼20 residues, resolves the Levinthal time-scale search problem. These microscopic-level search processes can be identified with the disordered multitrack search envisioned in the “new view” model for protein folding. Emergent macroscopic foldon–foldon interactions then collectively provide the structural guidance and free energy bias for the ordered addition of foldons in a stepwise pathway that sequentially builds the native protein. These conclusions reconcile the seemingly opposed new view and defined pathway models; the two models account for different stages of the protein folding process. Additionally, these observations answer the “how” and the “why” questions. The protein folding pathway depends on the same foldon units and foldon–foldon interactions that construct the native structure. PMID:25326421

  6. Biotransformation of nitrobenzene by bacteria containing toluene degradative pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Haigler, B E; Spain, J C

    1991-01-01

    Nonpolar nitroaromatic compounds have been considered resistant to attack by oxygenases because of the electron withdrawing properties of the nitro group. We have investigated the ability of seven bacterial strains containing toluene degradative pathways to oxidize nitrobenzene. Cultures were induced with toluene vapor prior to incubation with nitrobenzene, and products were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Pseudomonas cepacia G4 and a strain of Pseudomonas harboring the TOL plasmid (pTN2) did not transform nitrobenzene. Cells of Pseudomonas putida F1 and Pseudomonas sp. strain JS150 converted nitrobenzene to 3-nitrocatechol. Transformation of nitrobenzene in the presence of 18O2 indicated that the reaction in JS150 involved the incorporation of both atoms of oxygen in the 3-nitrocatechol, which suggests a dioxygenase mechanism. P. putida 39/D, a mutant strain of P. putida F1, converted nitrobenzene to a compound tentatively identified as cis-1,2-dihydroxy-3-nitrocyclohexa-3,5-diene. This compound was rapidly converted to 3-nitrocatechol by cells of strain JS150. Cultures of Pseudomonas mendocina KR-1 converted nitrobenzene to a mixture of 3- and 4-nitrophenol (10 and 63%, respectively). Pseudomonas pickettii PKO1 converted nitrobenzene to 3- and 4-nitrocatechol via 3- and 4-nitrophenol. The nitrocatechols were slowly degraded to unidentified metabolites. Nitrobenzene did not serve as an inducer for the enzymes that catalyzed its oxidation. These results indicate that the nitrobenzene ring is subject to initial attack by both mono- and dioxygenase enzymes. PMID:1781679

  7. Pathway Analysis Incorporating Protein-Protein Interaction Networks Identified Candidate Pathways for the Seven Common Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peng-Lin; Yu, Ya-Wen; Chung, Ren-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Pathway analysis has become popular as a secondary analysis strategy for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Most of the current pathway analysis methods aggregate signals from the main effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes within a pathway without considering the effects of gene-gene interactions. However, gene-gene interactions can also have critical effects on complex diseases. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks have been used to define gene pairs for the gene-gene interaction tests. Incorporating the PPI information to define gene pairs for interaction tests within pathways can increase the power for pathway-based association tests. We propose a pathway association test, which aggregates the interaction signals in PPI networks within a pathway, for GWAS with case-control samples. Gene size is properly considered in the test so that genes do not contribute more to the test statistic simply due to their size. Simulation studies were performed to verify that the method is a valid test and can have more power than other pathway association tests in the presence of gene-gene interactions within a pathway under different scenarios. We applied the test to the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium GWAS datasets for seven common diseases. The most significant pathway is the chaperones modulate interferon signaling pathway for Crohn's disease (p-value = 0.0003). The pathway modulates interferon gamma, which induces the JAK/STAT pathway that is involved in Crohn's disease. Several other pathways that have functional implications for the seven diseases were also identified. The proposed test based on gene-gene interaction signals in PPI networks can be used as a complementary tool to the current existing pathway analysis methods focusing on main effects of genes. An efficient software implementing the method is freely available at http://puppi.sourceforge.net. PMID:27622767

  8. Genetic immunization based on the ubiquitin-fusion degradation pathway against Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Bin; Hiromatsu, Kenji; Hisaeda, Hajime; Duan, Xuefeng; Imai, Takashi; Murata, Shigeo; Tanaka, Keiji; Himeno, Kunisuke

    2010-02-12

    Cytotoxic CD8{sup +} T cells are particularly important to the development of protective immunity against the intracellular protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. We have developed a new effective strategy of genetic immunization by activating CD8{sup +} T cells through the ubiquitin-fusion degradation (UFD) pathway. We constructed expression plasmids encoding the amastigote surface protein-2 (ASP-2) of T. cruzi. To induce the UFD pathway, a chimeric gene encoding ubiquitin fused to ASP-2 (pUB-ASP-2) was constructed. Mice immunized with pUB-ASP-2 presented lower parasitemia and longer survival period, compared with mice immunized with pASP-2 alone. Depletion of CD8{sup +} T cells abolished protection against T. cruzi in mice immunized with pUB-ASP-2 while depletion of CD4{sup +} T cells did not influence the effective immunity. Mice deficient in LMP2 or LMP7, subunits of immunoproteasomes, were not able to develop protective immunity induced. These results suggest that ubiquitin-fused antigens expressed in antigen-presenting cells were effectively degraded via the UFD pathway, and subsequently activated CD8{sup +} T cells. Consequently, immunization with pUB-ASP-2 was able to induce potent protective immunity against infection of T. cruzi.

  9. Quantitating protein synthesis, degradation, and endogenous antigen processing.

    PubMed

    Princiotta, Michael F; Finzi, Diana; Qian, Shu-Bing; Gibbs, James; Schuchmann, Sebastian; Buttgereit, Frank; Bennink, Jack R; Yewdell, Jonathan W

    2003-03-01

    Using L929 cells, we quantitated the macroeconomics of protein synthesis and degradation and the microeconomics of producing MHC class I associated peptides from viral translation products. To maintain a content of 2.6 x 10(9) proteins, each cell's 6 x 10(6) ribosomes produce 4 x 10(6) proteins min(-1). Each of the cell's 8 x 10(5) proteasomes degrades 2.5 substrates min(-1), creating one MHC class I-peptide complex for each 500-3000 viral translation products degraded. The efficiency of complex formation is similar in dendritic cells and macrophages, which play a critical role in activating T cells in vivo. Proteasomes create antigenic peptides at different efficiencies from two distinct substrate pools: rapidly degraded newly synthesized proteins that clearly represent defective ribosomal products (DRiPs) and a less rapidly degraded pool in which DRiPs may also predominate. PMID:12648452

  10. The exoribonuclease Dis3L2 defines a novel eukaryotic RNA degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Malecki, Michal; Viegas, Sandra C; Carneiro, Tiago; Golik, Pawel; Dressaire, Clémentine; Ferreira, Miguel G; Arraiano, Cecília M

    2013-07-01

    The final step of cytoplasmic mRNA degradation proceeds in either a 5'-3' direction catalysed by Xrn1 or in a 3'-5' direction catalysed by the exosome. Dis3/Rrp44, an RNase II family protein, is the catalytic subunit of the exosome. In humans, there are three paralogues of this enzyme: DIS3, DIS3L, and DIS3L2. In this work, we identified a novel Schizosaccharomyces pombe exonuclease belonging to the conserved family of human DIS3L2 and plant SOV. Dis3L2 does not interact with the exosome components and localizes in the cytoplasm and in cytoplasmic foci, which are docked to P-bodies. Deletion of dis3l2(+) is synthetically lethal with xrn1Δ, while deletion of dis3l2(+) in an lsm1Δ background results in the accumulation of transcripts and slower mRNA degradation rates. Accumulated transcripts show enhanced uridylation and in vitro Dis3L2 displays a preference for uridylated substrates. Altogether, our results suggest that in S. pombe, and possibly in most other eukaryotes, Dis3L2 is an important factor in mRNA degradation. Therefore, this novel 3'-5' RNA decay pathway represents an alternative to degradation by Xrn1 and the exosome. PMID:23503588

  11. Protein degradation in bovine milk caused by Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Åkerstedt, Maria; Wredle, Ewa; Lam, Vo; Johansson, Monika

    2012-08-01

    Streptococcus (Str.) agalactiae is a contagious mastitis bacterium, often associated with cases of subclinical mastitis. Different mastitis bacteria have been evaluated previously from a diagnostic point of view, but there is a lack of knowledge concerning their effect on milk composition. Protein composition is important in achieving optimal yield and texture when milk is processed to fermented products, such as cheese and yoghurt, and is thus of great economic value. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate protein degradation mainly caused by exogenous proteases originating from naturally occurring Str. agalactiae. The samples were incubated at 37°C to imitate degradation caused by the bacteria in the udder. Protein degradation caused by different strains of Str. agalactiae was also investigated. Protein degradation was observed to occur when Str. agalactiae was added to milk, but there were variations between strains of the bacteria. Caseins, the most economically important proteins in milk, were degraded up to 75% in milk inoculated with Str. agalactiae in relation to sterile ultra-high temperature (UHT) milk, used as control milk. The major whey proteins, α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin, were degraded up to 21% in relation to the sterile control milk. These results suggest that different mastitis bacteria but also different strains of mastitis bacteria should be evaluated from a milk quality perspective to gain knowledge about their ability to degrade the economically important proteins in milk. PMID:22850579

  12. Senescence-Associated Vacuoles, a Specific Lytic Compartment for Degradation of Chloroplast Proteins?

    PubMed Central

    Carrión, Cristian A.; Martínez, Dana E.; Costa, M. Lorenza; Guiamet, Juan José

    2014-01-01

    Degradation of chloroplasts and chloroplast components is a distinctive feature of leaf senescence. In spite of its importance in the nutrient economy of plants, knowledge about the mechanism(s) involved in the breakdown of chloroplast proteins is incomplete. A novel class of vacuoles, “senescence-associated vacuoles” (SAVs), characterized by intense proteolytic activity appear during senescence in chloroplast-containing cells of leaves. Since SAVs contain some chloroplast proteins, they are candidate organelles to participate in chloroplast breakdown. In this review we discuss the characteristics of SAVs, and their possible involvement in the degradation of Rubisco, the most abundant chloroplast protein. Finally, SAVs are compared with other extra-plastidial protein degradation pathways operating in senescing leaves. PMID:27135516

  13. POLYPHENOL AND CONDITIONING EFFECTS ON FORAGE PROTEIN SOLUBILITY AND DEGRADABILITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing the degree of tissue disruption during mechanical harvesting of forages may augment protein interactions with polyphenols and other cellular constituents, enhancing protein utilization by reducing protein solubility and shifting its degradation from the rumen to the intestine. In 2002 and...

  14. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator degradation: cross-talk between the ubiquitylation and SUMOylation pathways.

    PubMed

    Ahner, Annette; Gong, Xiaoyan; Frizzell, Raymond A

    2013-09-01

    Defining the significant checkpoints in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) biogenesis should identify targets for therapeutic intervention with CFTR folding mutants such as F508del. Although the role of ubiquitylation and the ubiquitin proteasome system is well established in the degradation of this common CFTR mutant, the part played by SUMOylation is a novel aspect of CFTR biogenesis/quality control. We identified this post-translational modification of CFTR as resulting from its interaction with small heat shock proteins (Hsps), which were found to selectively facilitate the degradation of F508del through a physical interaction with the SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) E2 enzyme, Ubc9. Hsp27 promoted the SUMOylation of mutant CFTR by the SUMO-2 paralogue, which can form poly-chains. Poly-SUMO chains are then recognized by the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase, RNF4, which elicited F508del degradation in a Hsp27-dependent manner. This work identifies a sequential connection between the SUMO and ubiquitin modifications of the CFTR mutant: Hsp27-mediated SUMO-2 modification, followed by ubiquitylation via RNF4 and degradation of the mutant via the proteasome. Other examples of the intricate cross-talk between the SUMO and ubiquitin pathways are discussed with reference to other substrates; many of these are competitive and lead to different outcomes. It is reasonable to anticipate that further research on SUMO-ubiquitin pathway interactions will identify additional layers of complexity in the process of CFTR biogenesis and quality control. PMID:23809253

  15. RFP tags for labeling secretory pathway proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Liyang; Zhao, Yanhua; Xu, Pingyong; Huan, Shuangyan

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • Membrane protein Orai1 can be used to report the fusion properties of RFPs. • Artificial puncta are affected by dissociation constant as well as pKa of RFPs. • Among tested RFPs mOrange2 is the best choice for secretory protein labeling. - Abstract: Red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) are useful tools for live cell and multi-color imaging in biological studies. However, when labeling proteins in secretory pathway, many RFPs are prone to form artificial puncta, which may severely impede their further uses. Here we report a fast and easy method to evaluate RFPs fusion properties by attaching RFPs to an environment sensitive membrane protein Orai1. In addition, we revealed that intracellular artificial puncta are actually colocalized with lysosome, thus besides monomeric properties, pKa value of RFPs is also a key factor for forming intracellular artificial puncta. In summary, our current study provides a useful guide for choosing appropriate RFP for labeling secretory membrane proteins. Among RFPs tested, mOrange2 is highly recommended based on excellent monomeric property, appropriate pKa and high brightness.

  16. Three degradation pathways of 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium cation by activated sludge from wastewater treatment process.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chul-Woong; Pham, Thi Phuong Thuy; Kim, Sok; Song, Myung-Hee; Chung, Yun-Jo; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2016-03-01

    The biodegradability and degradation pathways of 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium cation [OMIM](+) by microbial community of wastewater treatment plant in Jeonju city, Korea were investigated. It was found that [OMIM](+) could be easily degraded by the microbial community. New degradation products and pathways of [OMIM](+) were identified, which are partially different from previous results (Green Chem. 2008, 10, 214-224). For the analysis of the degradation pathways and intermediates, the mass peaks observed in the range m/z of 50-300 were screened by using a tandem mass spectrometer (MS), and their fragmentation patterns were investigated by MS/MS. Surprisingly, we found three different degradation pathways of [OMIM](+), which were separated according to the initially oxidized position i.e. middle of the long alkyl chain, end of the long alkyl chain, and end of the short alkyl chain. The degradation pathways showed that the long and short alkyl chains of [OMIM](+) gradually degraded by repeating oxidation and carbon release. The results presented here shows that [OMIM](+) can be easily biodegraded through three different degradation pathways in wastewater treatment plants. PMID:26748207

  17. Enzymes involved in a novel anaerobic cyclohexane carboxylic acid degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Kung, Johannes W; Meier, Anne-Katrin; Mergelsberg, Mario; Boll, Matthias

    2014-10-01

    The anaerobic degradation of cyclohexane carboxylic acid (CHC) has so far been studied only in Rhodopseudomonas palustris, in which CHC is activated to cyclohexanoyl coenzyme A (cyclohexanoyl-CoA [CHCoA]) and then dehydrogenated to cyclohex-1-ene-1-carboxyl-CoA (CHeneCoA). This intermediate is further degraded by reactions of the R. palustris-specific benzoyl-CoA degradation pathway of aromatic compounds. However, CHeneCoA is not an intermediate in the degradation of aromatic compounds in all other known anaerobic bacteria; consequently, degradation of CHC was mostly unknown in anaerobic bacteria. We identified a previously unknown CHC degradation pathway in the Fe(III)-reducing Geobacter metallireducens by determining the following CHC-induced in vitro activities: (i) the activation of CHC to CHCoA by a succinyl-CoA:CHC CoA transferase, (ii) the 1,2-dehydrogenation of CHCoA to CHeneCoA by CHCoA dehydrogenase, and (iii) the unusual 1,4-dehydrogenation of CHeneCoA to cyclohex-1,5-diene-1-carboxyl-CoA. This last represents a previously unknown joint intermediate of the CHC and aromatic compound degradation pathway in bacteria other than R. palustris. The enzymes catalyzing the three reactions were purified and characterized as specific enzymes after heterologous expression of the encoding genes. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR revealed that expression of these genes was highly induced during growth with CHC but not with benzoate. The newly identified CHC degradation pathway is suggested to be present in nearly all CHC-degrading anaerobic bacteria, including denitrifying, Fe(III)-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and fermenting bacteria. Remarkably, all three CHC degradation pathways always link CHC catabolism to the catabolic pathways of aromatic compounds. We propose that the capacity to use CHC as a carbon source evolved from already-existing aromatic compound degradation pathways. PMID:25112478

  18. Degradation versus aggregation of misfolded maltose-binding protein in the periplasm of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Betton, J M; Sassoon, N; Hofnung, M; Laurent, M

    1998-04-10

    The periplasmic fates of misfolded MalE31, a defective folding mutant of the maltose-binding protein, were determined by manipulating two cellular activities affecting the protein folding pathway in host cells: (i) the malEp promoter activity, which is controlled by the transcriptional activator MalT, and (ii) the DegP and Protease III periplasmic proteolytic activity. At a low level of expression, the degradation of misfolded MalE31 was partially impaired in cells lacking DegP or Protease III. At a high level of expression, misfolded MalE31 rapidly formed periplasmic inclusion bodies and thus escaped degradation. However, the manipulated host cell activities did not enhance the production of periplasmic, soluble MalE31. A kinetic competition between folding, aggregation, and degradation is proposed as a general model for the biogenesis of periplasmic proteins. PMID:9535871

  19. Cycloheximide Chase Analysis of Protein Degradation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Bryce W; Lloyd, Michael E; Engle, Sarah M; Rubenstein, Eric M

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of protein abundance is crucial to virtually every cellular process. Protein abundance reflects the integration of the rates of protein synthesis and protein degradation. Many assays reporting on protein abundance (e.g., single-time point western blotting, flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, or growth-based reporter assays) do not allow discrimination of the relative effects of translation and proteolysis on protein levels. This article describes the use of cycloheximide chase followed by western blotting to specifically analyze protein degradation in the model unicellular eukaryote, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast). In this procedure, yeast cells are incubated in the presence of the translational inhibitor cycloheximide. Aliquots of cells are collected immediately after and at specific time points following addition of cycloheximide. Cells are lysed, and the lysates are separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for western blot analysis of protein abundance at each time point. The cycloheximide chase procedure permits visualization of the degradation kinetics of the steady state population of a variety of cellular proteins. The procedure may be used to investigate the genetic requirements for and environmental influences on protein degradation. PMID:27167179

  20. SIAH-1 interacts with alpha-tubulin and degrades the kinesin Kid by the proteasome pathway during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Germani, A; Bruzzoni-Giovanelli, H; Fellous, A; Gisselbrecht, S; Varin-Blank, N; Calvo, F

    2000-12-01

    SIAH-1, a human homologue of the Drosophila seven in absentia (Sina), has been implicated in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of different target proteins through its N-terminal RING finger domain. SIAH-1 is also induced during p53-mediated apoptosis. Furthermore, SIAH-1-transfected breast cancer cell line MCF-7 exhibits an altered mitotic process resulting in multinucleated giant cells. Now, using the two-hybrid system, we identified two new SIAH interacting proteins: Kid (kinesin like DNA binding protein) and alpha-tubulin. We demonstrate that SIAH is involved in the degradation of Kid via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Our results suggest that SIAH-1 but not its N-terminal deletion mutant, affects the mitosis by an enhanced reduction of kinesin levels. Our results imply, for the first time, SIAH-1 in regulating the degradation of proteins directly implicated in the mitotic process. PMID:11146551

  1. A vacuolar carboxypeptidase mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana is degraded by the ERAD pathway independently of its N-glycan

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Masaya; Kawanabe, Mitsuyoshi; Hayashi, Yoko; Endo, Toshiya; Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi

    2010-03-12

    Misfolded proteins produced in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are degraded by a mechanism, the ER-associated degradation (ERAD). Here we report establishment of the experimental system to analyze the ERAD in plant cells. Carboxypeptidase Y (CPY) is a vacuolar enzyme and its mutant CPY* is degraded by the ERAD in yeast. Since Arabidopsis thaliana has AtCPY, an ortholog of yeast CPY, we constructed and expressed fusion proteins consisting of AtCPY and GFP and of AtCPY*, which carries a mutation homologous to yeast CPY*, and GFP in A. thaliana cells. While AtCPY-GFP was efficiently transported to the vacuole, AtCPY*-GFP was retained in the ER to be degraded in proteasome- and Cdc48-dependent manners. We also found that AtCPY*-GFP was degraded by the ERAD in yeast cells, but that its single N-glycan did not function as a degradation signal in yeast or plant cells. Therefore, AtCPY*-GFP can be used as a marker protein to analyze the ERAD pathway, likely for nonglycosylated substrates, in plant cells.

  2. Small-molecule control of protein degradation using split adaptors

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Joseph H.; Baker, Tania A.; Sauer, Robert T.

    2011-01-01

    Targeted intracellular degradation provides a method to study the biological function of proteins and has numerous applications in biotechnology. One promising approach uses adaptor proteins to target substrates with genetically encoded degradation tags for proteolysis. Here, we describe an engineered split-adaptor system, in which adaptor assembly and delivery of substrates to the ClpXP protease depends on a small molecule (rapamycin). This degradation system does not require modification of endogenous proteases, functions robustly over a wide range of adaptor concentrations, and does not require new synthesis of adaptors or proteases to initiate degradation. We demonstrate the efficacy of this system in E. coli by degrading tagged variants of LacI repressor and FtsA, an essential cell-division protein. In the latter case, addition of rapamycin causes pronounced filamentation because daughter cells cannot divide. Strikingly, washing rapamycin away reverses this phenotype. Our system is highly modular, with clearly-defined interfaces for substrate binding, protease binding, and adaptor assembly, providing a clear path to extend this system to other degradation tags, proteases, or induction systems. Together, these new reagents should be useful in controlling protein degradation in bacteria. PMID:21866931

  3. Small-molecule control of protein degradation using split adaptors.

    PubMed

    Davis, Joseph H; Baker, Tania A; Sauer, Robert T

    2011-11-18

    Targeted intracellular degradation provides a method to study the biological function of proteins and has numerous applications in biotechnology. One promising approach uses adaptor proteins to target substrates with genetically encoded degradation tags for proteolysis. Here, we describe an engineered split-adaptor system, in which adaptor assembly and delivery of substrates to the ClpXP protease depends on a small molecule (rapamycin). This degradation system does not require modification of endogenous proteases, functions robustly over a wide range of adaptor concentrations, and does not require new synthesis of adaptors or proteases to initiate degradation. We demonstrate the efficacy of this system in E. coli by degrading tagged variants of LacI repressor and FtsA, an essential cell-division protein. In the latter case, addition of rapamycin causes pronounced filamentation because daughter cells cannot divide. Strikingly, washing rapamycin away reverses this phenotype. Our system is highly modular, with clearly defined interfaces for substrate binding, protease binding, and adaptor assembly, providing a clear path to extend this system to other degradation tags, proteases, or induction systems. Together, these new reagents should be useful in controlling protein degradation in bacteria. PMID:21866931

  4. Protein-Linked Glycan Degradation in Infants Fed Human Milk

    PubMed Central

    Dallas, David C.; Sela, David; Underwood, Mark A.; German, J. Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito

    2014-01-01

    Many human milk proteins are glycosylated. Glycosylation is important in protecting bioactive proteins and peptide fragments from digestion. Protein-linked glycans have a variety of functions; however, there is a paucity of information on protein-linked glycan degradation in either the infant or the adult digestive system. Human digestive enzymes can break down dietary disaccharides and starches, but most of the digestive enzymes required for complex protein-linked glycan degradation are absent from both human digestive secretions and the external brush border membrane of the intestinal lining. Indeed, complex carbohydrates remain intact throughout their transit through the stomach and small intestine, and are undegraded by in vitro incubation with either adult pancreatic secretions or intact intestinal brush border membranes. Human gastrointestinal bacteria, however, produce a wide variety of glycosidases with regio- and anomeric specificities matching those of protein-linked glycan structures. These bacteria degrade a wide array of complex carbohydrates including various protein-linked glycans. That bacteria possess glycan degradation capabilities, whereas the human digestive system, perse, does not, suggests that most dietary protein-linked glycan breakdown will be of bacterial origin. In addition to providing a food source for specific bacteria in the colon, protein-linked glycans from human milk may act as decoys for pathogenic bacteria to prevent invasion and infection of the host. The composition of the intestinal microbiome may be particularly important in the most vulnerable humans-the elderly, the immunocompromised, and infants (particularly premature infants). PMID:24533224

  5. Hydrolytically degradable thiol–ene hydrogels for protein release

    PubMed Central

    Rehmann, Matthew S.; Garibian, Andrew C.; Kloxin, April M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A new degradable PEG-diester-dinorbornene/PEG-triester-trithiol hydrogel was evaluated for protein release. The hydrogel polymerized rapidly with seconds of UV irradiation and subsequently hydrolytically degraded in aqueous buffer over the course of approximately 3 weeks. Further, the hydrogel enabled the encapsulation and release of a model protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), over 7 days with ~ 90% released at 48 h. This study serves as a proof-of-concept for the creation of hydrolytically degradable, PEG-ester-thiol-based hydrogels by a photoinitiated step growth mechanism for protein release. With this approach, degradation and release rates could be tuned by varying the monomer molecular weight and functionality in future studies. PMID:25309103

  6. Degradation of microinjected proteins: the role of substrate flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    Rote, K.V.

    1985-01-01

    RB-mediated microinjection was used to introduce radioiodinated proteins of similar structure, but diverse flexibilities, into HeLa cells. Rates of intracellular degradation were then measured by release of /sup 125/I-tyrosine into the media. Ribonuclease-A was much more stable to degradation by trypsin, pepsin, or papain than its relatively flexible derivatives ribonuclease-S and S-protein. Likewise, ribonuclease-S and S-protein were degraded more quickly in reticulocyte lysates than ribonuclease-A. In contrast, all three proteins displayed similar, if not identical, half-lives in vivo. Similarly, intracellular half-lives of anhydrotrypsin and various proteinaceous trypsin inhibitors were in the same range whether they were measured in the free state or following complex formation, which drastically decreases flexibility. Trypsinogen, which contains a relatively flexible activation domain, was degraded more slowly than anhydrotrypsin. Nondenaturing agarose or polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of microinjected cell lysates revealed that complexes of trypsin and its inhibitors remained intact following radioiodination and introduction into cells, and are therefore degraded as a unit. All microinjected proteins remained in their unbound, unprocessed forms prior to degradation.

  7. Hydroxide Degradation Pathways for Substituted Benzyltrimethyl Ammonium: A DFT Study

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Hai; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2014-11-01

    The stability of cations used in the alkaline exchange membranes has been a major challenge. In this paper, degradation energy barriers were investigated by density functional theory for substituted benzyltrimethyl ammonium (BTMA+) cations. Findings show that electron-donating substituent groups at meta-position(s) of the benzyl ring could result in increased degradation barriers. However, after investigating more than thirty substituted BTMA+ cations, the largest improvement in degradation barrier found was only 6.7 kJ/mol. This suggests a modest (8×) improvement in stability for this type of approach may be possible, but for anything greater other approaches will need to be pursued.

  8. Identification of Genes and Pathways Related to Phenol Degradation in Metagenomic Libraries from Petroleum Refinery Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Cynthia C.; Hayden, Helen; Sawbridge, Tim; Mele, Pauline; De Paula, Sérgio O.; Silva, Lívia C. F.; Vidigal, Pedro M. P.; Vicentini, Renato; Sousa, Maíra P.; Torres, Ana Paula R.; Santiago, Vânia M. J.; Oliveira, Valéria M.

    2013-01-01

    Two fosmid libraries, totaling 13,200 clones, were obtained from bioreactor sludge of petroleum refinery wastewater treatment system. The library screening based on PCR and biological activity assays revealed more than 400 positive clones for phenol degradation. From these, 100 clones were randomly selected for pyrosequencing in order to evaluate the genetic potential of the microorganisms present in wastewater treatment plant for biodegradation, focusing mainly on novel genes and pathways of phenol and aromatic compound degradation. The sequence analysis of selected clones yielded 129,635 reads at an estimated 17-fold coverage. The phylogenetic analysis showed Burkholderiales and Rhodocyclales as the most abundant orders among the selected fosmid clones. The MG-RAST analysis revealed a broad metabolic profile with important functions for wastewater treatment, including metabolism of aromatic compounds, nitrogen, sulphur and phosphorus. The predicted 2,276 proteins included phenol hydroxylases and cathecol 2,3- dioxygenases, involved in the catabolism of aromatic compounds, such as phenol, byphenol, benzoate and phenylpropanoid. The sequencing of one fosmid insert of 33 kb unraveled the gene that permitted the host, Escherichia coli EPI300, to grow in the presence of aromatic compounds. Additionally, the comparison of the whole fosmid sequence against bacterial genomes deposited in GenBank showed that about 90% of sequence showed no identity to known sequences of Proteobacteria deposited in the NCBI database. This study surveyed the functional potential of fosmid clones for aromatic compound degradation and contributed to our knowledge of the biodegradative capacity and pathways of microbial assemblages present in refinery wastewater treatment system. PMID:23637911

  9. Coupling caspase cleavage and proteasomal degradation of proteins carrying PEST motif.

    PubMed

    Belizario, José E; Alves, Juliano; Garay-Malpartida, Miguel; Occhiucci, João Marcelo

    2008-06-01

    The degradation is critical to activation and deactivation of regulatory proteins involved in signaling pathways to cell growth, differentiation, stress responses and physiological cell death. Proteins carry domains and sequence motifs that function as prerequisite for their proteolysis by either individual proteases or the 26S multicomplex proteasomes. Two models for entry of substrates into the proteasomes have been considered. In one model, it is proposed that the ubiquitin chain attached to the protein serves as recognition element to drag them into the 19S regulatory particle, which promotes the unfolding required to its access into the 20S catalytic chamber. In second model, it is proposed that an unstructured tail located at amino or carboxyl terminus directly track proteins into the 26S/20S proteasomes. Caspases are cysteinyl aspartate proteases that control diverse signaling pathways, promoting the cleavage at one or two sites of hundreds of structural and regulatory protein substrates. Caspase cleavage sites are commonly found within PEST motifs, which are segments rich in proline (P), glutamic acid (D), aspartic acid (E) and serine (S) or threonine (T) residues. Considering that N- and C- terminal peptide carrying PEST motifs form disordered loops in the globular proteins after caspase cleavage, it is postulated here that these exposed termini serve as unstructured initiation site, coupling caspase cleavage and ubiquitin-proteasome dependent and independent degradation of short-lived proteins. This could explain the inherent susceptibility to proteolysis among proteins containing PEST motif. PMID:18537676

  10. Cleavage by signal peptide peptidase is required for the degradation of selected tail-anchored proteins

    PubMed Central

    Boname, Jessica M.; Bloor, Stuart; Wandel, Michal P.; Nathan, James A.; Antrobus, Robin; Dingwell, Kevin S.; Thurston, Teresa L.; Smith, Duncan L.; Smith, James C.; Randow, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The regulated turnover of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)–resident membrane proteins requires their extraction from the membrane lipid bilayer and subsequent proteasome-mediated degradation. Cleavage within the transmembrane domain provides an attractive mechanism to facilitate protein dislocation but has never been shown for endogenous substrates. To determine whether intramembrane proteolysis, specifically cleavage by the intramembrane-cleaving aspartyl protease signal peptide peptidase (SPP), is involved in this pathway, we generated an SPP-specific somatic cell knockout. In a stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture–based proteomics screen, we identified HO-1 (heme oxygenase-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the degradation of heme to biliverdin, as a novel SPP substrate. Intramembrane cleavage by catalytically active SPP provided the primary proteolytic step required for the extraction and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation of HO-1, an ER-resident tail-anchored protein. SPP-mediated proteolysis was not limited to HO-1 but was required for the dislocation and degradation of additional tail-anchored ER-resident proteins. Our study identifies tail-anchored proteins as novel SPP substrates and a specific requirement for SPP-mediated intramembrane cleavage in protein turnover. PMID:24958774

  11. Numerous proteins with unique characteristics are degraded by the 26S proteasome following monoubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Braten, Ori; Livneh, Ido; Ziv, Tamar; Admon, Arie; Kehat, Izhak; Caspi, Lilac H; Gonen, Hedva; Bercovich, Beatrice; Godzik, Adam; Jahandideh, Samad; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Sommer, Thomas; Kwon, Yong Tae; Guharoy, Mainak; Tompa, Peter; Ciechanover, Aaron

    2016-08-01

    The "canonical" proteasomal degradation signal is a substrate-anchored polyubiquitin chain. However, a handful of proteins were shown to be targeted following monoubiquitination. In this study, we established-in both human and yeast cells-a systematic approach for the identification of monoubiquitination-dependent proteasomal substrates. The cellular wild-type polymerizable ubiquitin was replaced with ubiquitin that cannot form chains. Using proteomic analysis, we screened for substrates that are nevertheless degraded under these conditions compared with those that are stabilized, and therefore require polyubiquitination for their degradation. For randomly sampled representative substrates, we confirmed that their cellular stability is in agreement with our screening prediction. Importantly, the two groups display unique features: monoubiquitinated substrates are smaller than the polyubiquitinated ones, are enriched in specific pathways, and, in humans, are structurally less disordered. We suggest that monoubiquitination-dependent degradation is more widespread than assumed previously, and plays key roles in various cellular processes. PMID:27385826

  12. Protein Quality Control and Degradation in Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuejun; Su, Huabo; Ranek, Mark J.

    2008-01-01

    The heart is constantly under stress and cardiomyocytes face enormous challenges to correctly fold nascent polypeptides and keep mature proteins from denaturing. To meet the challenge, cardiomyocytes have developed multi-layered protein quality control (PQC) mechanisms which are carried out primarily by chaperones and ubiquitin-proteasome system mediated proteolysis. Autophagy may also participate in PQC in cardiomyocytes, especially under pathological conditions. Cardiac PQC often becomes inadequate in heart disease, which may play an important role in the development of congestive heart failure. PMID:18495153

  13. Proteins involved in the degradation of cytoplasmic mRNA in the major eukaryotic model systems

    PubMed Central

    Siwaszek, Aleksandra; Ukleja, Marta; Dziembowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The process of mRNA decay and surveillance is considered to be one of the main posttranscriptional gene expression regulation platforms in eukaryotes. The degradation of stable, protein-coding transcripts is normally initiated by removal of the poly(A) tail followed by 5’-cap hydrolysis and degradation of the remaining mRNA body by Xrn1. Alternatively, the exosome complex degrades mRNA in the 3’>5’direction. The newly discovered uridinylation-dependent pathway, which is present in many different organisms, also seems to play a role in bulk mRNA degradation. Simultaneously, to avoid the synthesis of incorrect proteins, special cellular machinery is responsible for the removal of faulty transcripts via nonsense-mediated, no-go, non-stop or non-functional 18S rRNA decay. This review is focused on the major eukaryotic cytoplasmic mRNA degradation pathways showing many similarities and pointing out main differences between the main model-species: yeast, Drosophila, plants and mammals. PMID:25483043

  14. ORGANOPHOSPHORUS PESTICIDE DEGRADATION PATHWAYS DURING DRINKING WATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this work was to investigate organophosphorus (OP) pesticide transformation pathways as a class in the presence of aqueous chlorine. Seven priority OP pesticides were examined for their reactivity with aqueous chlorine: chlorpyrifos (CP), parathion (PA), diazino...

  15. Regulation of protein degradation in muscle by calcium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, Richard J.; Kameyama, Tsuneo; Matsumoto, Kazue; Bernstein, Paul; Etlinger, Joseph D.

    1985-01-01

    Calcium-dependent regulation of intracellular protein degradation was studied in isolated rat skeletal muscles incubated in vitro in the presence of a large variety of agents known to affect calcium movement and distribution. The effect of different classes of protease inhibitors was tested to determine the responsible proteolytic systems involved in calcium-dependent degradation. The results suggest that nonlysosomal leupetin- and E-64-c-sensitive proteases are resposible for calcium-dependent proteolysis in muscle.

  16. LON is the master protease that protects against protein aggregation in human mitochondria through direct degradation of misfolded proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bezawork-Geleta, Ayenachew; Brodie, Erica J.; Dougan, David A.; Truscott, Kaye N.

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of mitochondrial protein homeostasis is critical for proper cellular function. Under normal conditions resident molecular chaperones and proteases maintain protein homeostasis within the organelle. Under conditions of stress however, misfolded proteins accumulate leading to the activation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt). While molecular chaperone assisted refolding of proteins in mammalian mitochondria has been well documented, the contribution of AAA+ proteases to the maintenance of protein homeostasis in this organelle remains unclear. To address this gap in knowledge we examined the contribution of human mitochondrial matrix proteases, LONM and CLPXP, to the turnover of OTC-∆, a folding incompetent mutant of ornithine transcarbamylase, known to activate UPRmt. Contrary to a model whereby CLPXP is believed to degrade misfolded proteins, we found that LONM, and not CLPXP is responsible for the turnover of OTC-∆ in human mitochondria. To analyse the conformational state of proteins that are recognised by LONM, we examined the turnover of unfolded and aggregated forms of malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and OTC. This analysis revealed that LONM specifically recognises and degrades unfolded, but not aggregated proteins. Since LONM is not upregulated by UPRmt, this pathway may preferentially act to promote chaperone mediated refolding of proteins. PMID:26627475

  17. Prion protein degradation by lichens of the genus Cladonia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, James P.; Rodriguez, Cynthia M.; Johnson, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    It has recently been discovered that lichens contain a serine protease capable of degrading the pathogenic prion protein, the etiological agent of prion diseases such as sheep scrapie and cervid chronic wasting disease. Limited methods are available to degrade or inactivate prion disease agents, especially in the environment, and lichens or their serine protease could prove important for management of these diseases. Scant information is available regarding the presence or absence of the protease responsible for degrading prion protein (PrP) in lichen species and, in this study, we tested the hypothesis that PrP degradation activity in lichens is phylogenetically-based by testing 44 species of Cladonia lichens, a genus for which a significant portion of the phylogeny is well established. We categorized PrP degradation activity among the 44 species (high, moderate, low or none) and found that activity in Cladonia species did not correspond with phylogenetic position of the species. Degradation of PrP did correspond, however, with three classical taxonomic characters within the genus: species with brown apothecia, no usnic acid, and the presence of a cortex. Of the 44 species studied, 18 (41%) had either high or moderate PrP degradation activity, suggesting the protease may be frequent in this genus of lichens.

  18. PathwayMatrix: visualizing binary relationships between proteins in biological pathways

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Molecular activation pathways are inherently complex, and understanding relations across many biochemical reactions and reaction types is difficult. Visualizing and analyzing a pathway is a challenge due to the network size and the diversity of relations between proteins and molecules. Results In this paper, we introduce PathwayMatrix, a visualization tool that presents the binary relations between proteins in the pathway via the use of an interactive adjacency matrix. We provide filtering, lensing, clustering, and brushing and linking capabilities in order to present relevant details about proteins within a pathway. Conclusions We evaluated PathwayMatrix by conducting a series of in-depth interviews with domain experts who provided positive feedback, leading us to believe that our visualization technique could be helpful for the larger community of researchers utilizing pathway visualizations. PathwayMatrix is freely available at https://github.com/CreativeCodingLab/PathwayMatrix. PMID:26361499

  19. Testing the importance of p27 degradation by the SCFskp2 pathway in murine models of lung and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Timmerbeul, Inke; Garrett-Engele, Carrie M; Kossatz, Uta; Chen, Xueyan; Firpo, Eduardo; Grünwald, Viktor; Kamino, Kenji; Wilkens, Ludwig; Lehmann, Ulrich; Buer, Jan; Geffers, Robert; Kubicka, Stefan; Manns, Michael P; Porter, Peggy L; Roberts, James M; Malek, Nisar P

    2006-09-19

    Decreased expression of the CDK inhibitor p27kip1 in human tumors directly correlates with increased resistance to chemotherapies, increased rates of metastasis, and an overall increased rate of patient mortality. It is thought that decreased p27 expression in tumors is caused by increased proteasomal turnover, in particular activation of the pathway governed by the SCFskp2 E3 ubiquitin protein ligase. We have directly tested the importance of the SCFskp-mediated degradation of p27 in tumorigenesis by analyzing the tumor susceptibility of mice that express a form of p27 that cannot be ubiquitinated and degraded by this pathway (p27T187A). In mouse models of both lung and colon cancer down-regulation of p27 promotes tumorigenesis. However, we found that preventing p27 degradation by the SCFskp2 pathway had no impact on tumor incidence or overall survival in either tumor model. Our study unveiled a previously unrecognized role for the control of p27 mRNA abundance in the development of non-small cell lung cancers. In the colon cancer model, the frequency of intestinal adenomas was similarly unaffected by the p27T187A mutation, but, unexpectedly, we found that it inhibited progression of intestinal adenomas to carcinomas. These studies may guide the choice of clinical settings in which pharmacologic inhibitors of the Skp2 pathway might be of therapeutic value. PMID:16966613

  20. Heat Shock Proteins Regulate Activation-induced Proteasomal Degradation of the Mature Phosphorylated Form of Protein Kinase C*

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Michelle A.; Balaburski, Gregor M.; Murphy, Maureen E.; Black, Adrian R.; Black, Jennifer D.

    2013-01-01

    Although alterations in stimulus-induced degradation of PKC have been implicated in disease, mechanistic understanding of this process remains limited. Evidence supports the existence of both proteasomal and lysosomal mechanisms of PKC processing. An established pathway involves rate-limiting priming site dephosphorylation of the activated enzyme and proteasomal clearance of the dephosphorylated protein. However, here we show that agonists promote down-regulation of endogenous PKCα with minimal accumulation of a nonphosphorylated species in multiple cell types. Furthermore, proteasome and lysosome inhibitors predominantly protect fully phosphorylated PKCα, pointing to this form as a substrate for degradation. Failure to detect substantive dephosphorylation of activated PKCα was not due to rephosphorylation because inhibition of Hsp70/Hsc70, which is required for re-priming, had only a minor effect on agonist-induced accumulation of nonphosphorylated protein. Thus, PKC degradation can occur in the absence of dephosphorylation. Further analysis revealed novel functions for Hsp70/Hsc70 and Hsp90 in the control of agonist-induced PKCα processing. These chaperones help to maintain phosphorylation of activated PKCα but have opposing effects on degradation of the phosphorylated protein; Hsp90 is protective, whereas Hsp70/Hsc70 activity is required for proteasomal processing of this species. Notably, down-regulation of nonphosphorylated PKCα shows little Hsp70/Hsc70 dependence, arguing that phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated species are differentially targeted for proteasomal degradation. Finally, lysosomal processing of activated PKCα is not regulated by phosphorylation or Hsps. Collectively, these data demonstrate that phosphorylated PKCα is a direct target for agonist-induced proteasomal degradation via an Hsp-regulated mechanism, and highlight the existence of a novel pathway of PKC desensitization in cells. PMID:23900841

  1. M2-like macrophages are responsible for collagen degradation through a mannose receptor–mediated pathway

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Daniel H.; Leonard, Daniel; Masedunskas, Andrius; Moyer, Amanda; Jürgensen, Henrik Jessen; Peters, Diane E.; Amornphimoltham, Panomwat; Selvaraj, Arul; Yamada, Susan S.; Brenner, David A.; Burgdorf, Sven; Engelholm, Lars H.; Behrendt, Niels; Holmbeck, Kenn; Weigert, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Tissue remodeling processes critically depend on the timely removal and remodeling of preexisting collagen scaffolds. Nevertheless, many aspects related to the turnover of this abundant extracellular matrix component in vivo are still incompletely understood. We therefore took advantage of recent advances in optical imaging to develop an assay to visualize collagen turnover in situ and identify cell types and molecules involved in this process. Collagen introduced into the dermis of mice underwent cellular endocytosis in a partially matrix metalloproteinase–dependent manner and was subsequently routed to lysosomes for complete degradation. Collagen uptake was predominantly executed by a quantitatively minor population of M2-like macrophages, whereas more abundant Col1a1-expressing fibroblasts and Cx3cr1-expressing macrophages internalized collagen at lower levels. Genetic ablation of the collagen receptors mannose receptor (Mrc1) and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor–associated protein (Endo180 and Mrc2) impaired this intracellular collagen degradation pathway. This study demonstrates the importance of receptor-mediated cellular uptake to collagen turnover in vivo and identifies a key role of M2-like macrophages in this process. PMID:24019537

  2. The unique degradation pathway of the PTS2 receptor, Pex7, is dependent on the PTS receptor/coreceptor, Pex5 and Pex20

    PubMed Central

    Hagstrom, Danielle; Ma, Changle; Guha-Polley, Soumi; Subramani, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisomal matrix protein import uses two peroxisomal targeting signals (PTSs). Most matrix proteins use the PTS1 pathway and its cargo receptor, Pex5. The PTS2 pathway is dependent on another receptor, Pex7, and its coreceptor, Pex20. We found that during the matrix protein import cycle, the stability and dynamics of Pex7 differ from those of Pex5 and Pex20. In Pichia pastoris, unlike Pex5 and Pex20, Pex7 is constitutively degraded in wild-type cells but is stabilized in pex mutants affecting matrix protein import. Degradation of Pex7 is more prevalent in cells grown in methanol, in which the PTS2 pathway is nonessential, in comparison with oleate, suggesting regulation of Pex7 turnover. Pex7 must shuttle into and out of peroxisomes before it is polyubiquitinated and degraded by the proteasome. The shuttling of Pex7, and consequently its degradation, is dependent on the receptor recycling pathways of Pex5 and Pex20 and relies on an interaction between Pex7 and Pex20. We also found that blocking the export of Pex20 from peroxisomes inhibits PTS1-mediated import, suggesting sharing of limited components in the export of PTS receptors/coreceptors. The shuttling and stability of Pex7 are divergent from those of Pex5 and Pex20, exemplifying a novel interdependence of the PTS1 and PTS2 pathways. PMID:25009284

  3. Lipopolysaccharide Induces Degradation of Connexin43 in Rat Astrocytes via the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Proteolytic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chih-Kai; Jeng, Chung-Jiuan; Wang, Hwai-Shi; Wang, Shu-Huei; Wu, Jiahn-Chun

    2013-01-01

    The astrocytic syncytium plays a critical role in maintaining the homeostasis of the brain through the regulation of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC). Changes to GJIC in response to inflammatory stimuli in astrocytes may have serious effects on the brain. We have previously shown that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reduces connexin43 (Cx43) expression and GJIC in cultured rat astrocytes via a toll-like receptor 4-mediated signaling pathway. In the present study, treatment of astrocytes with LPS resulted in a significant increase in levels of the phosphorylated forms of stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) -1, -2, and -3 for up to 18 h. An increase in nuclear transcription factor NF-κB levels was also observed after 8 h of LPS treatment and was sustained for up to 18 h. The LPS-induced decrease in Cx43 protein levels and inhibition of GJIC were blocked by the SAPK/JNK inhibitor SP600125, but not by the NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082. Following blockade of de novo protein synthesis by cycloheximide, LPS accelerated Cx43 degradation. Moreover, the LPS-induced downregulation of Cx43 was blocked following inhibition of 26S proteasome activity using the reversible proteasome inhibitor MG132 or the irreversible proteasome inhibitor lactacystin. Immunoprecipitation analyses revealed an increased association of Cx43 with both ubiquitin and E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4 in astrocytes after LPS stimulation for 6 h and this effect was prevented by SP600125. Taken together, these results suggest that LPS stimulation leads to downregulation of Cx43 expression and GJIC in rat astrocytes by activation of SAPK/JNK and the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway. PMID:24236122

  4. PHOSPHOLIPIDS OF FIVE PSEUDOMONAD ARCHETYPES FOR DIFFERENT TOLUENE DEGRADATION PATHWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (LC/ESI/MS) was used to determine phospholipid profiles for five reference pseudomonad strains harboring distinct toluene catabolic pathways: Pseudomonas putida mt-2, Pseudomonas putida F1, Burkholderia cepacia G4, B...

  5. Dual degradation signals control Gli protein stability and tumor formation

    PubMed Central

    Huntzicker, Erik G.; Estay, Ivette S.; Zhen, Hanson; Lokteva, Ludmila A.; Jackson, Peter K.; Oro, Anthony E.

    2006-01-01

    Regulated protein destruction controls many key cellular processes with aberrant regulation increasingly found during carcinogenesis. Gli proteins mediate the transcriptional effects of the Sonic hedgehog pathway, which is implicated in up to 25% of human tumors. Here we show that Gli is rapidly destroyed by the proteasome and that mouse basal cell carcinoma induction correlates with Gli protein accumulation. We identify two independent destruction signals in Gli1, DN and DC, and show that removal of these signals stabilizes Gli1 protein and rapidly accelerates tumor formation in transgenic animals. These data argue that control of Gli protein accumulation underlies tumorigenesis and suggest a new avenue for antitumor therapy. PMID:16421275

  6. SCFβ-TRCP-mediated degradation of NEDD4 inhibits tumorigenesis through modulating the PTEN/Akt signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Liu, Jiankang; Wang, Zhiwei; Wei, Wenyi

    2014-01-01

    The HECT domain-containing ubiquitin E3 ligase NEDD4 is widely expressed in mammalian tissues and plays a crucial role in governing a wide spectrum of cellular processes including cell growth, tissue development and homeostasis. Recent reports have indicated that NEDD4 might facilitate tumorigenesis through targeted degradation of multiple tumor suppressor proteins including PTEN. However, the molecular mechanism by which NEDD4 stability is regulated has not been fully elucidated. Here we report that SCFβ-TRCP governs NEDD4 protein stability by targeting it for ubiquitination and subsequent degradation in a Casein Kinase-I (CKI) phosphorylation-dependent manner. Specifically, depletion of β-TRCP, or inactivation of CKI, stabilized NEDD4, leading to down-regulation of its ubiquitin target PTEN and subsequent activation of the mTOR/Akt oncogenic pathway. Furthermore, we found that CKIδ-mediated phosphorylation of Ser347 and Ser348 on NEDD4 promoted its interaction with SCFβ-TRCP for subsequent ubiquitination and degradation. As a result, compared to ectopic expression of wild-type NEDD4, introducing a non-degradable NEDD4 (S347A/S348A-NEDD4) promoted cancer cell growth and migration. Hence, our findings revealed the CKI/SCFβ-TRCP signaling axis as the upstream negative regulator of NEDD4, and further suggested that enhancing NEDD4 degradation, presumably with CKI or SCFβ-TRCP agonists, could be a promising strategy for treating human cancers. PMID:24657926

  7. AEROBIC DEGRADATION OF DINITROTOLUENES AND PATHWAY FOR BACTERIAL DEGRADATION OF 2,6-DINITROTOLUENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An oxidative pathway for the mineralization of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) by Burkhoderia sp. strain DNT has been reported previously. We report here the isolation of additional strains with the ability to mineralize dinitrotoluene (2,6-DNT) by a different pathway. Burkhoderia ...

  8. Pathways for degradation of plastic polymers floating in the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Gewert, Berit; Plassmann, Merle M; MacLeod, Matthew

    2015-09-01

    Each year vast amounts of plastic are produced worldwide. When released to the environment, plastics accumulate, and plastic debris in the world's oceans is of particular environmental concern. More than 60% of all floating debris in the oceans is plastic and amounts are increasing each year. Plastic polymers in the marine environment are exposed to sunlight, oxidants and physical stress, and over time they weather and degrade. The degradation processes and products must be understood to detect and evaluate potential environmental hazards. Some attention has been drawn to additives and persistent organic pollutants that sorb to the plastic surface, but so far the chemicals generated by degradation of the plastic polymers themselves have not been well studied from an environmental perspective. In this paper we review available information about the degradation pathways and chemicals that are formed by degradation of the six plastic types that are most widely used in Europe. We extrapolate that information to likely pathways and possible degradation products under environmental conditions found on the oceans' surface. The potential degradation pathways and products depend on the polymer type. UV-radiation and oxygen are the most important factors that initiate degradation of polymers with a carbon-carbon backbone, leading to chain scission. Smaller polymer fragments formed by chain scission are more susceptible to biodegradation and therefore abiotic degradation is expected to precede biodegradation. When heteroatoms are present in the main chain of a polymer, degradation proceeds by photo-oxidation, hydrolysis, and biodegradation. Degradation of plastic polymers can lead to low molecular weight polymer fragments, like monomers and oligomers, and formation of new end groups, especially carboxylic acids. PMID:26216708

  9. From start to finish: amino-terminal protein modifications as degradation signals in plants.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Daniel J; Bailey, Mark; Tedds, Hannah M; Holdsworth, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Contents 1188 I. 1188 II. 1189 III. 1190 IV. 1191 V. 1192 1192 References 1192 SUMMARY: The amino- (N-) terminus (Nt) of a protein can undergo a diverse array of co- and posttranslational modifications. Many of these create degradation signals (N-degrons) that mediate protein destruction via the N-end rule pathway of ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. In plants, the N-end rule pathway has emerged as a major system for regulated control of protein stability. Nt-arginylation-dependent degradation regulates multiple growth, development and stress responses, and recently identified functions of Nt-acetylation can also be linked to effects on the in vivo half-lives of Nt-acetylated proteins. There is also increasing evidence that N-termini could act as important protein stability determinants in plastids. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the relationship between the nature of protein N-termini, Nt-processing events and proteolysis in plants. PMID:27439310

  10. Different pathways of degradation of SP-A and saturated phosphatidylcholine by alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Baritussio, A; Alberti, A; Armanini, D; Meloni, F; Bruttomesso, D

    2000-07-01

    Alveolar macrophages degrade surfactant protein (SP) A and saturated phosphatidycholine [dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)]. To clarify this process, using rabbit alveolar macrophages, we analyzed the effect of drugs known to affect phagocytosis, pinocytosis, clathrin-mediated uptake, caveolae, the cytoskeleton, lysosomal pH, protein kinase C, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) on the degradation of SP-A and DPPC. We found the following: 1) SP-A binds to the plasma membrane, is rapidly internalized, and then moves toward degradative compartments. Uptake could be clathrin mediated, whereas phagocytosis, pinocytosis, or the use of caveolae are less likely. An intact cytoskeleton and an acidic milieu are necessary for the degradation of SP-A. 2) Stimulation of protein kinase C increases the degradation of SP-A. 3) PI3K influences the degradation of SP-A by regulating both the speed of internalization and subsequent intracellular steps, but its inhibition does not prevent SP-A from reaching the lysosomal compartment. 4) The degradation of DPPC is unaffected by most of the treatments able to influence the degradation of SP-A. Thus it appears that DPPC is degraded by alveolar macrophages through mechanisms very different from those utilized for the degradation of SP-A. PMID:10893207

  11. Wnt Signaling Translocates Lys48-Linked Polyubiquitinated Proteins to the Lysosomal Pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunjoon; Vick, Philipp; Hedtke, Joshua; Ploper, Diego; De Robertis, Edward M

    2015-05-26

    Cellular proteins are degraded in either proteasomes or lysosomes depending on the types of ubiquitin chains that covalently modify them. It is not known whether the choice between these two pathways is physiologically regulated. The Lys48-polyubiquitin chain is the major signal directing proteins for degradation in proteasomes. Here, we report the unexpected finding that canonical Wnt signaling translocates some K48-linked polyubiquitinated proteins to the endolysosomal pathway. Proteasomal target proteins, such as b-catenin, Smad1, and Smad4, were targeted into endolysosomes in a process dependent on GSK3 activity. Relocalization was also dependent on Axin1 and the multivesicular body (MVB) proteins HRS/Vps27 and Vps4. The Wnt-induced accumulation of K48-linked polyubiquitinated proteins in endolysosomal organelles was accompanied by a transient decrease in cellular levels of free mono-ubiquitin, which may contribute to Wnt-regulated stabilization of proteins (Wnt/ STOP). We conclude that Wnt redirects Lys48-polyubiquitinated proteins that are normally degraded in proteasomes to endolysosomes. PMID:26004177

  12. Proteomic and SAGE profiling of murine melanoma progression indicates the reduction of proteins responsible for ROS degradation.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Gustavo A; Godoy, Lyris M F; Teixeira, Veronica R; Otake, Andreia H; Sabino, Adão; Rosa, José C; Dinarte, Anemari R; Pinheiro, Daniel G; Silva, Wilson A; Eberlin, Marcos N; Chammas, Roger; Greene, Lewis J

    2006-03-01

    Using 2-DE of total cell protein extracts, we compared soluble proteins from murine melanoma lines Tm1 and Tm5 with proteins from the nontumoral cell melan-a from which they were derived. Seventy-one of the 452 spots (average) detected with CBB were differentially accumulated, i.e., increased or decreased twofold. Forty-four spots were identified by PMF/MALDI-TOF, 15 with increased and 29 with decreased protein levels. SAGE showed that 17/34 (50%) of the differentially accumulated proteins, pI range 4-7, presented similar differences at the mRNA level. Major reductions in protein were observed in tumor cells of proteins that degrade reactive oxygen species (ROS). Decreases of > or = twofold in GST, superoxide dismutase, aldehyde dehydrogenase, thioredoxin, peroxiredoxin 2, and peroxiredoxin 6 protein were observed. SAGE indicated the reduction of other proteins involved in ROS degradation. As expected, the accumulation of exogenous peroxides was significantly higher in the tumor cells while the levels of glutathionylation were two times lower in the tumor cells compared to melan-a. The differential accumulation of proteins involved in oncogene/tumor suppressor pathways was observed. Melanoma cells can favor survival pathways activated by ROS by inhibiting p53 pathways and activation of Ras and c-myc pathways. PMID:16429458

  13. Protein unfolding and degradation by the AAA+ Lon protease.

    PubMed

    Gur, Eyal; Vishkautzan, Marina; Sauer, Robert T

    2012-02-01

    AAA+ proteases employ a hexameric ring that harnesses the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis to unfold native substrates and translocate the unfolded polypeptide into an interior compartment for degradation. What determines the ability of different AAA+ enzymes to unfold and thus degrade different native protein substrates is currently uncertain. Here, we explore the ability of the E. coli Lon protease to unfold and degrade model protein substrates beginning at N-terminal, C-terminal, or internal degrons. Lon has historically been viewed as a weak unfoldase, but we demonstrate robust and processive unfolding/degradation of some substrates with very stable protein domains, including mDHFR and titin(I27) . For some native substrates, Lon is a more active unfoldase than related AAA+ proteases, including ClpXP and ClpAP. For other substrates, this relationship is reversed. Thus, unfolding activity does not appear to be an intrinsic enzymatic property. Instead, it depends on the specific protease and substrate, suggesting that evolution has diversified rather than optimized the protein unfolding activities of different AAA+ proteases. PMID:22162032

  14. Ubiquitin ligase gp78 targets unglycosylated prion protein PrP for ubiquitylation and degradation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jia; Choe, Vitnary; Cheng, Haili; Tsai, Yien Che; Weissman, Allan M; Luo, Shiwen; Rao, Hai

    2014-01-01

    Prion protein PrP is a central player in several devastating neurodegenerative disorders, including mad cow disease and Creutzfeltd-Jacob disease. Conformational alteration of PrP into an aggregation-prone infectious form PrPSc can trigger pathogenic events. How levels of PrP are regulated is poorly understood. Human PrP is known to be degraded by the proteasome, but the specific proteolytic pathway responsible for PrP destruction remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that the ubiquitin ligase gp78, known for its role in protein quality control, is critical for unglycosylated PrP ubiquitylation and degradation. Furthermore, C-terminal sequences of PrP protein are crucial for its ubiquitylation and degradation. Our study reveals the first ubiquitin ligase specifically involved in prion protein PrP degradation and PrP sequences crucial for its turnover. Our data may lead to a new avenue to control PrP level and pathogenesis. PMID:24714645

  15. REGγ regulates ERα degradation via ubiquitin–proteasome pathway in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, Fan; Liang, Yan; Bi, Jiong; Chen, Li; Zhang, Fan; Cui, Youhong; Jiang, Jun

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • High expression of REGγ is correlated with ERα status and poor clinical features. • Cell growth, mobility and invasion are significantly impaired by REGγ knockdown. • REGγ indirectly regulates ERα protein expression. - Abstract: REGγ is a proteasome coactivator which regulates proteolytic activity in eukaryotic cells. Abundant lines of evidence have showed that REGγ is over expressed in a number of human carcinomas. However, its precise role in the pathogenesis of cancer is still unclear. In this study, by examining 200 human breast cancer specimens, we demonstrated that REGγ was highly expressed in breast cancers, and the expression of REGγ was positively correlated with breast cancer patient estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) status. Moreover, the expression of REGγ was found positively associated with poor clinical features and low survival rates in ERα positive breast cancer patients. Further cell culture studies using MCF7 and BT474 breast cancer cell lines showed that cell proliferation, motility, and invasion capacities were decreased significantly by REGγ knockdown. Lastly, we demonstrated that REGγ indirectly regulates the degradation of ERα protein via ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. In conclusion, our findings provide the evidence that REGγ expression was positively correlated with ERα status and poor clinical prognosis in ERα positive breast cancer patients. As well, we disclose a new connection between the two molecules that are both highly expressed in most breast cancer cases.

  16. Quorum sensing controls hyphal initiation in Candida albicans through Ubr1-mediated protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yang; Su, Chang; Unoje, Ohimai; Liu, Haoping

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common cause of invasive fungal infections in humans. Its ability to undergo the morphological transition from yeast to hyphal growth forms is critical for its pathogenesis. Hyphal initiation requires the activation of the cAMP-PKA pathway, which down-regulates the expression of NRG1, the major repressor of hyphal development. Hyphal initiation also requires inoculation of a small amount of C. albicans cells from overnight culture to fresh medium. This inoculation releases the inhibition from farnesol, a quorum-sensing molecule of C. albicans, that accumulated in the spent medium. Here, we show that farnesol inhibits hyphal initiation mainly through blocking the protein degradation of Nrg1. Through screening a kinase mutant library, we identified Sok1 as the kinase required for Nrg1 degradation during inoculation. SOK1 expression is transiently activated on inoculation during hyphal initiation, and overexpression of SOK1 overcomes the farnesol-mediated inhibition of hyphal initiation. Screening a collection of transcription factor mutants, the homeodomain-containing transcription repressor Cup9 is found to be responsible for the repression of SOK1 expression in response to farnesol inhibition. Interestingly, farnesol inhibits Cup9 degradation mediated by the N-end rule E3 ubiquitin ligase, Ubr1. Therefore, hyphal initiation requires both the cAMP-PKA pathway-dependent transcriptional down-regulation of NRG1 and Sok1-mediated degradation of Nrg1 protein. The latter is triggered by the release from farnesol inhibition of Cup9 degradation and consequently, derepression of SOK1 transcription. Neither pathway alone is sufficient for hyphal initiation. PMID:24449897

  17. Degradation of sulfonamide antibiotics by Microbacterium sp. strain BR1 - elucidating the downstream pathway.

    PubMed

    Ricken, Benjamin; Fellmann, Oliver; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Schäffer, Andreas; Corvini, Philippe François-Xavier; Kolvenbach, Boris Alexander

    2015-12-25

    Microbacterium sp. strain BR1 is among the first bacterial isolates which were proven to degrade sulfonamide antibiotics. The degradation is initiated by an ipso-substitution, initiating the decay of the molecule into sulfur dioxide, the substrate specific heterocyclic moiety as a stable metabolite and benzoquinone imine. The latter appears to be instantaneously reduced to p-aminophenol, as that in turn was detected as the first stable intermediate. This study investigated the downstream pathway of sulfonamide antibiotics by testing the strain's ability to degrade suspected intermediates of this pathway. While p-aminophenol was degraded, degradation products could not be identified. Benzoquinone was shown to be degraded to hydroquinone and hydroquinone in turn was shown to be degraded to 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene. The latter is assumed to be the potential substrate for aromatic ring cleavage. However, no products from the degradation of 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene could be identified. There are no signs of accumulation of intermediates causing oxidative stress, which makes Microbacterium sp. strain BR1 an interesting candidate for industrial waste water treatment. PMID:25796473

  18. Phenol degradation by Sulfobacillus acidophilus TPY via the meta-pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wengen; Guo, Wenbin; Zhou, Hongbo; Chen, Xinhua

    2016-09-01

    Due to its toxicity and volatility, phenol must be cleared from the environment. Sulfobacillus acidophilus TPY, which was isolated from a hydrothermal vent in the Pacific Ocean as a moderately thermoacidophilic Gram-positive bacterium, was capable of aerobically degrading phenol. This bacterium could tolerate up to 1300mg/L phenol and degrade 100mg/L phenol in 40h completely at 45°C and pH 1.8 with a maximal degradation rate of 2.32mg/L/h at 38h. Genome-wide search revealed that one gene (TPY_3176) and 14 genes clustered together in two regions with locus tags of TPY_0628-0634 and TPY_0640-0646 was proposed to be involved in phenol degradation via the meta-pathway with both the 4-oxalocrotonate branch and the hydrolytic branch. Real-time PCR analysis of S. acidophilus TPY under phenol cultivation condition confirmed the transcription of proposed genes involved in the phenol degradation meta-pathway. Degradation of 3-methylphenol and 2-methylphenol confirmed that the hydrolytic branch was utilised by S. acidophilus TPY. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that S. acidophilus TPY was closely related to sulphate-reducing bacteria and some Gram-positive phenol-degrading bacteria. This was the first report demonstrating the ability of S. acidophilus to degrade phenol and characterising the putative genes involved in phenol metabolism in S. acidophilus TPY. PMID:27393997

  19. Degradation pathways of PCBs upon UV irradiation in hexane.

    PubMed

    Miao, X S; Chu, S G; Xu, X B

    1999-10-01

    The photodegradations of eight individual PCB congeners (5, 31, 52, 77, 87, 126, 138, 169) in hexane have been investigated employing a mercury lamp. All degradation reactions of the above mentioned PCB congeners are of the pseudo first order. The principal products of PCB decomposition are the less chlorinated biphenyls, and no PCB-solvent adducts are found. Symmetrical and coplanar PCB congeners show lower photoreactivities. The reactivities of the chlorine atoms at various positions of PCB rings are generally in the order: ortho > meta > para. Photodechlorinations occur mainly on the more substituted rings, when the numbers of chlorine atoms on the two phenyl rings are unequal. During photodegradation, some coplanar PCB congeners are formed, which make the TEQ of solutions to decrease slowly or even to increase. PMID:10520484

  20. Haloarchaeal Protein Translocation via the Twin Arginine Translocation Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Pohlschroder Mechthild

    2009-02-03

    Protein transport across hydrophobic membranes that partition cellular compartments is essential in all cells. The twin arginine translocation (Tat) pathway transports proteins across the prokaryotic cytoplasmic membranes. Distinct from the universally conserved Sec pathway, which secretes unfolded proteins, the Tat machinery is unique in that it secretes proteins in a folded conformation, making it an attractive pathway for the transport and secretion of heterologously expressed proteins that are Sec-incompatible. During the past 7 years, the DOE-supported project has focused on the characterization of the diversity of bacterial and archaeal Tat substrates as well as on the characterization of the Tat pathway of a model archaeon, Haloferax volcanii, a member of the haloarchaea. We have demonstrated that H. volcanii uses this pathway to transport most of its secretome.

  1. Temperature compensation via cooperative stability in protein degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yuanyuan; Hasegawa, Yoshihiko; Noman, Nasimul; Iba, Hitoshi

    2015-08-01

    Temperature compensation is a notable property of circadian oscillators that indicates the insensitivity of the oscillator system's period to temperature changes; the underlying mechanism, however, is still unclear. We investigated the influence of protein dimerization and cooperative stability in protein degradation on the temperature compensation ability of two oscillators. Here, cooperative stability means that high-order oligomers are more stable than their monomeric counterparts. The period of an oscillator is affected by the parameters of the dynamic system, which in turn are influenced by temperature. We adopted the Repressilator and the Atkinson oscillator to analyze the temperature sensitivity of their periods. Phase sensitivity analysis was employed to evaluate the period variations of different models induced by perturbations to the parameters. Furthermore, we used experimental data provided by other studies to determine the reasonable range of parameter temperature sensitivity. We then applied the linear programming method to the oscillatory systems to analyze the effects of protein dimerization and cooperative stability on the temperature sensitivity of their periods, which reflects the ability of temperature compensation in circadian rhythms. Our study explains the temperature compensation mechanism for circadian clocks. Compared with the no-dimer mathematical model and linear model for protein degradation, our theoretical results show that the nonlinear protein degradation caused by cooperative stability is more beneficial for realizing temperature compensation of the circadian clock.

  2. ATP-dependent degradation of ubiquitin-protein conjugates.

    PubMed Central

    Hershko, A; Leshinsky, E; Ganoth, D; Heller, H

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the ATP-requiring conjugation of ubiquitin with proteins plays a role in the energy-dependent degradation of intracellular proteins. To examine whether such conjugates are indeed intermediates in protein breakdown, conjugates of 125I-labeled lysozyme with ubiquitin were isolated and incubated with a fraction of reticulocyte extract that lacks the enzymes that carry out ubiquitin-protein conjugation. ATP markedly stimulated degradation of the lysozyme moiety of ubiquitin conjugates to products soluble in trichloroacetic acid. By contrast, free 125I-labeled lysozyme was not degraded under these conditions, unless ubiquitin and the three enzymes required for ubiquitin conjugation were supplemented. Mg2+ was absolutely required for conjugate breakdown. Of various nucleotides, only CTP replaced ATP. Nonhydrolyzable analogs of ATP were not effective. In the absence of ATP, free lysozyme is released from ubiquitin-lysozyme conjugates by isopeptidases present in the extract. Thus, ATP is involved in both the formation and the breakdown of ubiquitin-protein conjugates. Images PMID:6324208

  3. Ubiquilins Chaperone and Triage Mitochondrial Membrane Proteins for Degradation.

    PubMed

    Itakura, Eisuke; Zavodszky, Eszter; Shao, Sichen; Wohlever, Matthew L; Keenan, Robert J; Hegde, Ramanujan S

    2016-07-01

    We investigated how mitochondrial membrane proteins remain soluble in the cytosol until their delivery to mitochondria or degradation at the proteasome. We show that Ubiquilin family proteins bind transmembrane domains in the cytosol to prevent aggregation and temporarily allow opportunities for membrane targeting. Over time, Ubiquilins recruit an E3 ligase to ubiquitinate bound clients. The attached ubiquitin engages Ubiquilin's UBA domain, normally bound to an intramolecular UBL domain, and stabilizes the Ubiquilin-client complex. This conformational change precludes additional chances at membrane targeting for the client, while simultaneously freeing Ubiquilin's UBL domain for targeting to the proteasome. Loss of Ubiquilins by genetic ablation or sequestration in polyglutamine aggregates leads to accumulation of non-inserted mitochondrial membrane protein precursors. These findings define Ubiquilins as a family of chaperones for cytosolically exposed transmembrane domains and explain how they use ubiquitin to triage clients for degradation via coordinated intra- and intermolecular interactions. PMID:27345149

  4. Characterization of the novel dimethyl sulfide-degrading bacterium Alcaligenes sp. SY1 and its biochemical degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yiming; Qiu, Jiguo; Chen, Dongzhi; Ye, Jiexu; Chen, Jianmeng

    2016-03-01

    Recently, the biodegradation of volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs) has become a burgeoning field, with a growing focus on the reduction of VOSCs. The reduction of VOSCs encompasses both organic emission control and odor control. Herein, Alcaligenes sp. SY1 was isolated from active sludge and found to utilize dimethyl sulfide (DMS) as a growth substrate in a mineral salt medium. Response surface methodology (RSM) analysis was applied to optimize the incubation conditions. The following conditions for optimal degradation were identified: temperature 27.03°C; pH 7.80; inoculum salinity 0.84%; and initial DMS concentration 1585.39 μM. Under these conditions, approximately 99% of the DMS was degraded within 30 h of incubation. Two metabolic compounds were detected and identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS): dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) and dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS). The DMS degradation kinetics for different concentrations were evaluated using the Haldane-Andrews model and the pseudo first-order model. The maximum specific growth rate and degradation rate of Alcaligenes sp. SY1 were 0.17 h(-1) and 0.63 gs gx(-1)h(-1). A possible degradation pathway is proposed, and the results suggest that Alcaligenes sp. SY1 has the potential to control odor emissions under aerobic conditions. PMID:26623933

  5. Stress-Regulated Translational Attenuation Adapts Mitochondrial Protein Import Through Tim17A Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Rainbolt, T. Kelly; Atanassova, Neli; Genereux, Joseph C.; Wiseman, R. Luke

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Stress-regulated signaling pathways protect mitochondrial proteostasis, and thus mitochondrial function, from pathologic insults. Despite the importance of stress-regulated signaling pathways in mitochondrial proteome maintenance, the molecular mechanisms by which these pathways maintain mitochondrial proteostasis remain largely unknown. Here, we identify Tim17A as a stress-regulated subunit of the Translocase of the Inner Membrane 23 (TIM23) mitochondrial protein import complex. We show that Tim17A protein levels are decreased downstream of stress-regulated translational attenuation induced by eIF2α phosphorylation through a mechanism dependent on the mitochondrial protease YME1L. Furthermore, we demonstrate that decreasing Tim17A protein levels attenuates TIM23-dependent protein import, promotes the induction of mitochondrial Unfolded Protein Response-associated proteostasis genes, and confers stress-resistance in C. elegans and mammalian cells. Thus, our results indicate that Tim17A degradation is a stress-responsive mechanism by which cells adapt mitochondrial protein import efficiency and promote mitochondrial proteostasis in response to the numerous pathologic insults that induce stress-regulated translation attenuation. PMID:24315374

  6. Unveiling New Degradation Intermediates/Pathways from the Photocatalytic Degradation of Microcystin-LR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study focuses on the identification of reaction intermediates formed during the photocatalytic degradation of the cyanotoxin microcystin-LR with immobilized TiO2 Tphotocatalysts at neutral pH. To differentiate between impurities already existing in the MC-LR stand...

  7. Long noncoding RNA NRON contributes to HIV-1 latency by specifically inducing tat protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Chen, Cancan; Ma, Xiancai; Geng, Guannan; Liu, Bingfeng; Zhang, Yijun; Zhang, Shaoyang; Zhong, Fudi; Liu, Chao; Yin, Yue; Cai, Weiping; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play multiple key regulatory roles in various cellular pathways. However, their functions in HIV-1 latent infection remain largely unknown. Here we show that a lncRNA named NRON, which is highly expressed in resting CD4+ T lymphocytes, could be involved in HIV-1 latency by specifically inducing Tat protein degradation. Our results suggest that NRON lncRNA potently suppresses the viral transcription by decreasing the cellular abundance of viral transactivator protein Tat. NRON directly links Tat to the ubiquitin/proteasome components including CUL4B and PSMD11, thus facilitating Tat degradation. Depletion of NRON, especially in combination with a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, significantly reactivates the viral production from the HIV-1-latently infected primary CD4+ T lymphocytes. Our data indicate that lncRNAs play a role in HIV-1 latency and their manipulation could be a novel approach for developing latency-reversing agents. PMID:27291871

  8. Stuxnet Facilitates the Degradation of Polycomb Protein during Development.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Zhang, Junzheng; He, Tao; Li, Yajuan; Su, Ying; Tie, Feng; Liu, Min; Harte, Peter J; Zhu, Alan Jian

    2016-06-20

    Polycomb-group (PcG) proteins function to ensure correct deployment of developmental programs by epigenetically repressing target gene expression. Despite the importance, few studies have been focused on the regulation of PcG activity itself. Here, we report a Drosophila gene, stuxnet (stx), that controls Pc protein stability. We find that heightened stx activity leads to homeotic transformation, reduced Pc activity, and de-repression of PcG targets. Conversely, stx mutants, which can be rescued by decreased Pc expression, display developmental defects resembling hyperactivation of Pc. Our biochemical analyses provide a mechanistic basis for the interaction between stx and Pc; Stx facilitates Pc degradation in the proteasome, independent of ubiquitin modification. Furthermore, this mode of regulation is conserved in vertebrates. Mouse stx promotes degradation of Cbx4, an orthologous Pc protein, in vertebrate cells and induces homeotic transformation in Drosophila. Our results highlight an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of regulated protein degradation on PcG homeostasis and epigenetic activity. PMID:27326929

  9. Elucidation of pathways of ribosomal RNA degradation: an essential role for RNase E.

    PubMed

    Sulthana, Shaheen; Basturea, Georgeta N; Deutscher, Murray P

    2016-08-01

    Although normally stable in growing cells, ribosomal RNAs are degraded under conditions of stress, such as starvation, and in response to misassembled or otherwise defective ribosomes in a process termed RNA quality control. Previously, our laboratory found that large fragments of 16S and 23S rRNA accumulate in strains lacking the processive exoribonucleases RNase II, RNase R, and PNPase, implicating these enzymes in the later steps of rRNA breakdown. Here, we define the pathways of rRNA degradation in the quality control process and during starvation, and show that the essential endoribonuclease, RNase E, is required to make the initial cleavages in both degradative processes. We also present evidence that explains why the exoribonuclease, RNase PH, is required to initiate the degradation of rRNA during starvation. The data presented here provide the first detailed description of rRNA degradation in bacterial cells. PMID:27298395

  10. Photolysis of chlorantraniliprole and cyantraniliprole in water and soil: verification of degradation pathways via kinetics modeling.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashok K; Zimmerman, William T; Singles, Suzanne K; Malekani, Kalumbu; Swain, Scott; Ryan, David; Mcquorcodale, Gordon; Wardrope, Laura

    2014-07-16

    Photodegradation of [(14)C]-chlorantraniliprole (CLAP) and [(14)C]-cyantraniliprole (CNAP) was investigated in sterile buffer solutions, in natural water, and on soil surfaces. Both compounds displayed rapid degradation in aqueous buffers when exposed to light at concentrations which could result from direct overspray to a shallow water body. While the main products observed had analogous structures, a substantial difference was noted in the rate of degradation of the two compounds despite minimal differences in their structures. Transformations observed were primarily intramolecular rearrangements and degradations resulting from addition of hydroxyl radicals leading to molecular cleavage. Some of the degradation products were transient, and several degradates had isomeric molecular compositions. The sequence of transformations was established definitively with the help of kinetics modeling. Utility of kinetics analysis in verification of the proposed pathways is illustrated. PMID:24971760

  11. Control of protein function through regulated protein degradation: biotechnological and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Jyotsna; Tan, Ju Lin; Truscott, Kaye N; Heras, Begoña; Dougan, David A

    2013-01-01

    Targeted protein degradation is crucial for the correct function and maintenance of a cell. In bacteria, this process is largely performed by a handful of ATP-dependent machines, which generally consist of two components - an unfoldase and a peptidase. In some cases, however, substrate recognition by the protease may be regulated by specialized delivery factors (known as adaptor proteins). Our detailed understanding of how these machines are regulated to prevent uncontrolled degradation within a cell has permitted the identification of novel antimicrobials that dysregulate these machines, as well as the development of tunable degradation systems that have applications in biotechnology. Here, we focus on the physiological role of the ClpP peptidase in bacteria, its role as a novel antibiotic target and the use of protein degradation as a biotechnological approach to artificially control the expression levels of a protein of interest. PMID:23920496

  12. Aerobic Degradation of Sulfadiazine by Arthrobacter spp.: Kinetics, Pathways, and Genomic Characterization.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yu; Mao, Yanping; Li, Bing; Yang, Chao; Zhang, Tong

    2016-09-01

    Two aerobic sulfadiazine (SDZ) degrading bacterial strains, D2 and D4, affiliated with the genus Arthrobacter, were isolated from SDZ-enriched activated sludge. The degradation of SDZ by the two isolates followed first-order decay kinetics. The half-life time of complete SDZ degradation was 11.3 h for strain D2 and 46.4 h for strain D4. Degradation kinetic changed from nongrowth to growth-linked when glucose was introduced as the cosubstrate, and accelerated biodegradation rate was observed after the adaption period. Both isolates could degrade SDZ into 12 biodegradation products via 3 parallel pathways, of which 2-amino-4-hydroxypyrimidine was detected as the principal intermediate product toward the pyrimidine ring cleavage. Compared with five Arthrobacter strains reported previously, D2 and D4 were the only Arthrobacter strains which could degrade SDZ as the sole carbon source. The draft genomes of D2 and D4, with the same completeness of 99.7%, were compared to other genomes of related species. Overall, these two isolates shared high genomic similarities with the s-triazine-degrading Arthrobacter sp. AK-YN10 and the sulfonamide-degrading bacteria Microbacterium sp. C448. In addition, the two genomes contained a few significant regions of difference which may carry the functional genes involved in sulfonamide degradation. PMID:27477918

  13. Mechanochemical degradation of tetrabromobisphenol A: performance, products and pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kunlun; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Wang; Yu, Yunfei; Deng, Shubo; Yu, Gang

    2012-12-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is the most widely used brominated flame retardant (BFR), which has received more and more concerns due to its high lipophilicity, persistency and endocrine disrupting property in the environment. Considering the possible need for the safe disposal of TBBPA containing wastes in the future, the potential of mechanochemical (MC) destruction as a promising non-combustion technology was investigated in this study. TBBPA was co-ground with calcium oxide (CaO) or the mixture of iron powder and quartz sand (Fe+SiO(2)) in a planetary ball mill at room temperature. The method of Fe+SiO(2) destructed over 98% of initial TBBPA after 3h and acquired 95% debromination rate after 5h, which showed a better performance than the CaO method. Raman spectra and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) demonstrated the generation of inorganic carbon with the disappearance of benzene ring and CBr bond, indicating the carbonization and debromination process during mechanochemical reaction. LC-MS-MS screening showed that the intermediates of the treatment with Fe+SiO(2) were tri-, bi-, mono-brominated BPA, BPA and other fragments. Finally all the intermediates were also destroyed after 5h grinding. The bromine balance was calculated and a possible reaction pathway was proposed. PMID:23158692

  14. Terrestrial and marine perspectives on modeling organic matter degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Burd, Adrian B; Frey, Serita; Cabre, Anna; Ito, Takamitsu; Levine, Naomi M; Lønborg, Christian; Long, Matthew; Mauritz, Marguerite; Thomas, R Quinn; Stephens, Brandon M; Vanwalleghem, Tom; Zeng, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Organic matter (OM) plays a major role in both terrestrial and oceanic biogeochemical cycles. The amount of carbon stored in these systems is far greater than that of carbon dioxide (CO2 ) in the atmosphere, and annual fluxes of CO2 from these pools to the atmosphere exceed those from fossil fuel combustion. Understanding the processes that determine the fate of detrital material is important for predicting the effects that climate change will have on feedbacks to the global carbon cycle. However, Earth System Models (ESMs) typically utilize very simple formulations of processes affecting the mineralization and storage of detrital OM. Recent changes in our view of the nature of this material and the factors controlling its transformation have yet to find their way into models. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of the role and cycling of detrital OM in terrestrial and marine systems and examine how this pool of material is represented in ESMs. We include a discussion of the different mineralization pathways available as organic matter moves from soils, through inland waters to coastal systems and ultimately into open ocean environments. We argue that there is strong commonality between aspects of OM transformation in both terrestrial and marine systems and that our respective scientific communities would benefit from closer collaboration. PMID:26015089

  15. Finding gas migration pathways in proteins using implicit ligand sampling.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jordi; Olsen, Kenneth W; Schulten, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Implicit ligand sampling is a practical, efficient, and accurate method for finding the gas migration pathways for small hydrophobic gas molecules, such as oxygen, inside proteins. The method infers the gas migration pathways by calculating the potential of mean force for the gas molecule everywhere inside the protein by means of a molecular dynamics simulation of the protein in the absence of the gas molecule. Pathways can be constructed by connecting the areas of the protein that are favorable to the presence of gas. This method has the advantage of providing a comprehensive overview of all possible gas migration pathways and barriers in a given protein from a single simulation run. Implicit ligand sampling has been applied to a large number of hemoproteins. The example of the truncated hemoglobin from Paramecium caudatum is given to illustrate the method. PMID:18433641

  16. Strain-Dependent Effect of Macroautophagy on Abnormally Folded Prion Protein Degradation in Infected Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Daisuke; Homma, Takujiro; Nakagaki, Takehiro; Fuse, Takayuki; Sano, Kazunori; Takatsuki, Hanae; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases are neurodegenerative disorders caused by the accumulation of abnormal prion protein (PrPSc) in the central nervous system. With the aim of elucidating the mechanism underlying the accumulation and degradation of PrPSc, we investigated the role of autophagy in its degradation, using cultured cells stably infected with distinct prion strains. The effects of pharmacological compounds that inhibit or stimulate the cellular signal transduction pathways that mediate autophagy during PrPSc degradation were evaluated. The accumulation of PrPSc in cells persistently infected with the prion strain Fukuoka-1 (FK), derived from a patient with Gerstmann–Sträussler–Scheinker syndrome, was significantly increased in cultures treated with the macroautophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3MA) but substantially reduced in those treated with the macroautophagy inducer rapamycin. The decrease in FK-derived PrPSc levels was mediated, at least in part, by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/MEK signalling pathway. By contrast, neither rapamycin nor 3MA had any apparently effect on PrPSc from either the 22L or the Chandler strain, indicating that the degradation of PrPSc in host cells might be strain-dependent. PMID:26368533

  17. Delaying aging and the aging-associated decline in protein homeostasis by inhibition of tryptophan degradation.

    PubMed

    van der Goot, Annemieke T; Zhu, Wentao; Vázquez-Manrique, Rafael P; Seinstra, Renée I; Dettmer, Katja; Michels, Helen; Farina, Francesca; Krijnen, Jasper; Melki, Ronald; Buijsman, Rogier C; Ruiz Silva, Mariana; Thijssen, Karen L; Kema, Ido P; Neri, Christian; Oefner, Peter J; Nollen, Ellen A A

    2012-09-11

    Toxicity of aggregation-prone proteins is thought to play an important role in aging and age-related neurological diseases like Parkinson and Alzheimer's diseases. Here, we identify tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (tdo-2), the first enzyme in the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation, as a metabolic regulator of age-related α-synuclein toxicity in a Caenorhabditis elegans model. Depletion of tdo-2 also suppresses toxicity of other heterologous aggregation-prone proteins, including amyloid-β and polyglutamine proteins, and endogenous metastable proteins that are sensors of normal protein homeostasis. This finding suggests that tdo-2 functions as a general regulator of protein homeostasis. Analysis of metabolite levels in C. elegans strains with mutations in enzymes that act downstream of tdo-2 indicates that this suppression of toxicity is independent of downstream metabolites in the kynurenine pathway. Depletion of tdo-2 increases tryptophan levels, and feeding worms with extra L-tryptophan also suppresses toxicity, suggesting that tdo-2 regulates proteotoxicity through tryptophan. Depletion of tdo-2 extends lifespan in these worms. Together, these results implicate tdo-2 as a metabolic switch of age-related protein homeostasis and lifespan. With TDO and Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase as evolutionarily conserved human orthologs of TDO-2, intervening with tryptophan metabolism may offer avenues to reducing proteotoxicity in aging and age-related diseases. PMID:22927396

  18. Delaying aging and the aging-associated decline in protein homeostasis by inhibition of tryptophan degradation

    PubMed Central

    van der Goot, Annemieke T.; Zhu, Wentao; Vázquez-Manrique, Rafael P.; Seinstra, Renée I.; Dettmer, Katja; Michels, Helen; Farina, Francesca; Krijnen, Jasper; Melki, Ronald; Buijsman, Rogier C.; Ruiz Silva, Mariana; Thijssen, Karen L.; Kema, Ido P.; Neri, Christian; Oefner, Peter J.; Nollen, Ellen A. A.

    2012-01-01

    Toxicity of aggregation-prone proteins is thought to play an important role in aging and age-related neurological diseases like Parkinson and Alzheimer’s diseases. Here, we identify tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (tdo-2), the first enzyme in the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation, as a metabolic regulator of age-related α-synuclein toxicity in a Caenorhabditis elegans model. Depletion of tdo-2 also suppresses toxicity of other heterologous aggregation-prone proteins, including amyloid-β and polyglutamine proteins, and endogenous metastable proteins that are sensors of normal protein homeostasis. This finding suggests that tdo-2 functions as a general regulator of protein homeostasis. Analysis of metabolite levels in C. elegans strains with mutations in enzymes that act downstream of tdo-2 indicates that this suppression of toxicity is independent of downstream metabolites in the kynurenine pathway. Depletion of tdo-2 increases tryptophan levels, and feeding worms with extra l-tryptophan also suppresses toxicity, suggesting that tdo-2 regulates proteotoxicity through tryptophan. Depletion of tdo-2 extends lifespan in these worms. Together, these results implicate tdo-2 as a metabolic switch of age-related protein homeostasis and lifespan. With TDO and Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase as evolutionarily conserved human orthologs of TDO-2, intervening with tryptophan metabolism may offer avenues to reducing proteotoxicity in aging and age-related diseases. PMID:22927396

  19. Degradable thermoresponsive nanogels for protein encapsulation and controlled release.

    PubMed

    Bhuchar, Neha; Sunasee, Rajesh; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Thundat, Thomas; Narain, Ravin

    2012-01-18

    Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization technique was used for the fabrication of stable core cross-linked micelles (CCL) with thermoresponsive and degradable cores. Well-defined poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine), poly(MPC) macroRAFT agent, was first synthesized with narrow molecular weight distribution via the RAFT process. These CCL micelles (termed as nanogels) with hydrophilic poly(MPC) shell and thermoresponsive core consisting of poly(methoxydiethylene glycol methacrylate) (poly(MeODEGM) and poly(2-aminoethyl methacrylamide hydrochloride) (poly(AEMA) were then obtained in a one-pot process by RAFT polymerization in the presence of an acid degradable cross-linker. These acid degradable nanogels were efficiently synthesized with tunable sizes and low polydispersities. The encapsulation efficiencies of the nanogels with different proteins such as insulin, BSA, and β-galactosidase were studied and found to be dependent of the cross-linker concentration, size of protein, and the cationic character of the nanogels imparted by the presence of AEMA in the core. The thermoresponsive nature of the synthesized nanogels plays a vital role in protein encapsulation: the hydrophilic core and shell of the nanogels at low temperature allow easy diffusion of the proteins inside out and, with an increase in temperature, the core becomes hydrophobic and the nanogels are easily separated out with entrapped protein. The release profile of insulin from nanogels at low pH was studied and results were analyzed using bicinchoninic assay (BCA). Controlled release of protein was observed over 48 h. PMID:22171688

  20. Homeodomain protein Dlx3 induces phosphorylation-dependent p63 degradation

    PubMed Central

    Di Costanzo, Antonella; Festa, Luisa; Duverger, Olivier; Vivo, Maria; Guerrlal, Luisa; La Mantia, Girolama; Morasso, Marla I.; Calabro, Viola

    2009-01-01

    The epidermis is a stratified epithelium which develops depending on the transcription factor p63, a member of the p53 family of transcription factors. p63 is strongly expressed in the innermost basal layer where highly proliferative epithelial cells reside. p63 functions as a molecular switch that initiates epithelial stratification or cell fate determination while regulating proliferation and differentiation of developmentally mature keratinocytes. p63 acts upstream of Dlx3 homeobox gene in a transcriptional regulatory pathway relevant to ectodermal dysplasia. Here we show that Dlx3 triggers p63 protein degradation by a proteasome-dependent pathway. Mutant ΔNp63α in which Threonine397 and Serine383 were replaced with Alanine as well as C-terminal truncated versions of ΔNp63α are resistant to Dlx3-mediated degradation. Transient expression of Dlx3 is associated with Raft phosphorylation. Dlx3 is unable to promote p63 degradation in Raft depleted MEF cells or upon pharmacological knockdown of Raft. Our data support a previously unrecognized role for Dlx3 in posttranslational regulation of ΔNp63α protein level, a mechanism that may contribute to reduce the abundance of ΔNp63α during differentiation of stratified epithelia. PMID:19282665

  1. Homeodomain protein Dlx3 induces phosphorylation-dependent p63 degradation.

    PubMed

    Di Costanzo, Antonella; Festa, Luisa; Duverger, Olivier; Vivo, Maria; Guerrini, Luisa; La Mantia, Girolama; Morasso, Maria I; Calabrò, Viola

    2009-04-15

    The epidermis is a stratified epithelium which develops depending on the transcription factor p63, a member of the p53 family of transcription factors. p63 is strongly expressed in the innermost basal layer where highly proliferative epithelial cells reside. p63 functions as a molecular switch that initiates epithelial stratification or cell fate determination while regulating proliferation and differentiation of developmentally mature keratinocytes. p63 acts upstream of Dlx3 homeobox gene in a transcriptional regulatory pathway relevant to ectodermal dysplasia. Here we show that Dlx3 triggers p63 protein degradation by a proteasome-dependent pathway. Mutant DeltaNp63alpha in which Threonine397 and Serine383 were replaced with Alanine as well as C-terminal truncated versions of DeltaNp63alpha are resistant to Dlx3-mediated degradation. Transient expression of Dlx3 is associated with Raf1 phosphorylation. Dlx3 is unable to promote p63 degradation in Raf1 depleted MEF cells or upon pharmacological knockdown of Raf1. Our data support a previously unrecognized role for Dlx3 in posttranslational regulation of DeltaNp63alpha protein level, a mechanism that may contribute to reduce the abundance of DeltaNp63alpha during differentiation of stratified epithelia. PMID:19282665

  2. Degradation of endocytosed gap junctions by autophagosomal and endo-/lysosomal pathways: a perspective

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Matthias M.; Fong, John T.; Kells, Rachael M.; O’Laughlin, Michael C.; Kowal, Tia J.; Thévenin, Anastasia F.

    2012-01-01

    Gap junctions (GJs) are composed of tens to many thousands of double-membrane spanning GJ channels that cluster together to form densely packed channel arrays (termed GJ plaques) in apposing plasma membranes of neighboring cells. In addition to providing direct intercellular communication (GJIC, their hallmark function), GJs, based on their characteristic double-membrane-spanning configuration, likely also significantly contribute to physical cell-to-cell adhesion. Clearly, modulation (up-/down-regulation) of GJIC and of physical cell-to-cell adhesion is as vitally important as the basic ability of GJ formation itself. Others and we have previously described that GJs can be removed from the plasma membrane via the internalization of entire GJ plaques (or portions thereof) in a cellular process that resembles clathrin-mediated endocytosis. GJ endocytosis results in the formation of double-membrane vesicles (termed annular gap junctions [AGJs] or connexosomes) in the cytoplasm of one of the coupled cells. Four recent independent studies, consistent with earlier ultrastructural analyses, demonstrate the degradation of endocytosed AGJ vesicles via autophagy. However, in TPA-treated cells others report degradation of AGJs via the endo-/lysosomal degradation pathway. Here we summarize evidence that supports the concept that autophagy serves as the cellular default pathway for the degradation of internalized GJs. Furthermore, we highlight and discuss structural criteria that seem required for an alternate degradation via the endo-/lysosomal pathway. PMID:22825714

  3. Discovering pathways by orienting edges in protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Gitter, Anthony; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Gupta, Anupam; Bar-Joseph, Ziv

    2011-01-01

    Modern experimental technology enables the identification of the sensory proteins that interact with the cells’ environment or various pathogens. Expression and knockdown studies can determine the downstream effects of these interactions. However, when attempting to reconstruct the signaling networks and pathways between these sources and targets, one faces a substantial challenge. Although pathways are directed, high-throughput protein interaction data are undirected. In order to utilize the available data, we need methods that can orient protein interaction edges and discover high-confidence pathways that explain the observed experimental outcomes. We formalize the orientation problem in weighted protein interaction graphs as an optimization problem and present three approximation algorithms based on either weighted Boolean satisfiability solvers or probabilistic assignments. We use these algorithms to identify pathways in yeast. Our approach recovers twice as many known signaling cascades as a recent unoriented signaling pathway prediction technique and over 13 times as many as an existing network orientation algorithm. The discovered paths match several known signaling pathways and suggest new mechanisms that are not currently present in signaling databases. For some pathways, including the pheromone signaling pathway and the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway, our method suggests interesting and novel components that extend current annotations. PMID:21109539

  4. Reconstructing metabolic pathways of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    PubMed

    Dombrowski, Nina; Donaho, John A; Gutierrez, Tony; Seitz, Kiley W; Teske, Andreas P; Baker, Brett J

    2016-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, one of the largest marine oil spills(1), changed bacterial communities in the water column and sediment as they responded to complex hydrocarbon mixtures(2-4). Shifts in community composition have been correlated to the microbial degradation and use of hydrocarbons(2,5,6), but the full genetic potential and taxon-specific metabolisms of bacterial hydrocarbon degraders remain unresolved. Here, we have reconstructed draft genomes of marine bacteria enriched from sea surface and deep plume waters of the spill that assimilate alkane and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons during stable-isotope probing experiments, and we identify genes of hydrocarbon degradation pathways. Alkane degradation genes were ubiquitous in the assembled genomes. Marinobacter was enriched with n-hexadecane, and uncultured Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria populations were enriched in the polycyclic-aromatic-hydrocarbon-degrading communities and contained a broad gene set for degrading phenanthrene and naphthalene. The repertoire of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon use varied among different bacterial taxa and the combined capabilities of the microbial community exceeded those of its individual components, indicating that the degradation of complex hydrocarbon mixtures requires the non-redundant capabilities of a complex oil-degrading community. PMID:27572965

  5. Degradation of oxcarbazepine by UV-activated persulfate oxidation: kinetics, mechanisms, and pathways.

    PubMed

    Bu, Lingjun; Zhou, Shiqing; Shi, Zhou; Deng, Lin; Li, Guangchao; Yi, Qihang; Gao, Naiyun

    2016-02-01

    The degradation kinetics and mechanism of the antiepileptic drug oxcarbazepine (OXC) by UV-activated persulfate oxidation were investigated in this study. Results showed that UV/persulfate (UV/PS) process appeared to be more effective in degrading OXC than UV or PS alone. The OXC degradation exhibited a pseudo-first order kinetics pattern and the degradation rate constants (k obs) were affected by initial OXC concentration, PS dosage, initial pH, and humic acid concentration to different degrees. It was found that low initial OXC concentration, high persulfate dosage, and initial pH enhanced the OXC degradation. Additionally, the presence of humic acid in the solution could greatly inhibit the degradation of OXC. Moreover, hydroxyl radical (OH•) and sulfate radical (SO4 (-)••) were identified to be responsible for OXC degradation and SO4 (-)• made the predominant contribution in this study. Finally, major intermediate products were identified and a preliminary degradation pathway was proposed. Results demonstrated that UV/PS system is a potential technology to control the water pollution caused by emerging contaminants such as OXC. PMID:26452660

  6. Heat shock transcription factor δ³² is targeted for degradation via an ubiquitin-like protein ThiS in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xibing; Niu, Yulong; Liang, Ke; Wang, Jianmei; Li, Xufeng; Yang, Yi

    2015-04-01

    The posttranslational modification of proteins with ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins (UBLs) plays an important role in eukaryote biology, through which substrate proteins are targeted for degradation by the proteasome. Prokaryotes have been thought to degrade proteins by an ubiquitin independent pathway. Here, we show that ThiS, an ubiquitin-like protein, is covalently attached to δ(32) and at least 27 other proteins, leading to their subsequent degradation by proteases, in a similar manner to the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in eukaryotes. Molecular biology and biochemical studies confirm that specific lysine sites in δ(32) can be modified by ThiS. The results presented here establish a new model for δ(32) degradation and show that Escherichia coli uses a small-protein modifier to control protein stability. PMID:25721662

  7. Kinetic models and pathways of ronidazole degradation by chlorination, UV irradiation and UV/chlorine processes.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lang; Lin, Yi-Li; Xu, Bin; Hu, Chen-Yan; Tian, Fu-Xiang; Zhang, Tian-Yang; Zhu, Wen-Qian; Huang, He; Gao, Nai-Yun

    2014-11-15

    Degradation kinetics and pathways of ronidazole (RNZ) by chlorination (Cl2), UV irradiation and combined UV/chlorine processes were investigated in this paper. The degradation kinetics of RNZ chlorination followed a second-order behavior with the rate constants calculated as (2.13 ± 0.15) × 10(2) M(-2) s(-1), (0.82 ± 0.52) × 10(-2) M(-1) s(-1) and (2.06 ± 0.09) × 10(-1) M(-1) s(-1) for the acid-catalyzed reaction, as well as the reactions of RNZ with HOCl and OCl(-), respectively. Although UV irradiation degraded RNZ more effectively than chlorination did, very low quantum yield of RNZ at 254 nm was obtained as 1.02 × 10(-3) mol E(-1). RNZ could be efficiently degraded and mineralized in the UV/chlorine process due to the generation of hydroxyl radicals. The second-order rate constant between RNZ and hydroxyl radical was determined as (2.92 ± 0.05) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). The degradation intermediates of RNZ during the three processes were identified with Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography - Electrospray Ionization - mass spectrometry and the degradation pathways were then proposed. Moreover, the variation of chloropicrin (TCNM) and chloroform (CF) formation after the three processes were further evaluated. Enhanced formation of CF and TCNM precursors during UV/chlorine process deserves extensive attention in drinking water treatment. PMID:25141357

  8. TRC8-dependent degradation of hepatitis C virus immature core protein regulates viral propagation and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Aizawa, Sayaka; Okamoto, Toru; Sugiyama, Yukari; Kouwaki, Takahisa; Ito, Ayano; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Ono, Chikako; Fukuhara, Takasuke; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Okochi, Masayasu; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Imamura, Michio; Chayama, Kazuaki; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Shoji, Ikuo; Moriishi, Kohji; Moriya, Kyoji; Koike, Kazuhiko; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Signal-peptide peptidase (SPP) is an intramembrane protease that participates in the production of the mature core protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Here we show that SPP inhibition reduces the production of infectious HCV particles and pathogenesis. The immature core protein produced in SPP-knockout cells or by treatment with an SPP inhibitor is quickly degraded by the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. Oral administration of the SPP inhibitor to transgenic mice expressing HCV core protein (CoreTg) reduces the expression of core protein and ameliorates insulin resistance and liver steatosis. Moreover, the haploinsufficiency of SPP in CoreTg has similar effects. TRC8, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is required for the degradation of the immature core protein. The expression of the HCV core protein alters endoplasmic reticulum (ER) distribution and induces ER stress in SPP/TRC8 double-knockout cells. These data suggest that HCV utilizes SPP cleavage to circumvent the induction of ER stress in host cells. PMID:27142248

  9. TRC8-dependent degradation of hepatitis C virus immature core protein regulates viral propagation and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Sayaka; Okamoto, Toru; Sugiyama, Yukari; Kouwaki, Takahisa; Ito, Ayano; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Ono, Chikako; Fukuhara, Takasuke; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Okochi, Masayasu; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Imamura, Michio; Chayama, Kazuaki; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Shoji, Ikuo; Moriishi, Kohji; Moriya, Kyoji; Koike, Kazuhiko; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Signal-peptide peptidase (SPP) is an intramembrane protease that participates in the production of the mature core protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Here we show that SPP inhibition reduces the production of infectious HCV particles and pathogenesis. The immature core protein produced in SPP-knockout cells or by treatment with an SPP inhibitor is quickly degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Oral administration of the SPP inhibitor to transgenic mice expressing HCV core protein (CoreTg) reduces the expression of core protein and ameliorates insulin resistance and liver steatosis. Moreover, the haploinsufficiency of SPP in CoreTg has similar effects. TRC8, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is required for the degradation of the immature core protein. The expression of the HCV core protein alters endoplasmic reticulum (ER) distribution and induces ER stress in SPP/TRC8 double-knockout cells. These data suggest that HCV utilizes SPP cleavage to circumvent the induction of ER stress in host cells. PMID:27142248

  10. Substrate-Dependent Regulation of Anaerobic Degradation Pathways for Toluene and Ethylbenzene in a Denitrifying Bacterium, Strain EbN1

    PubMed Central

    Kühner, Simon; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Fritz, Ingo; Wruck, Wasco; Hultschig, Claus; Hufnagel, Peter; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Rabus, Ralf

    2005-01-01

    Anaerobic biodegradation of toluene and ethylbenzene is of environmental concern and biochemical interest due to toxicity and novel reactions, respectively. The denitrifying strain EbN1 is unique in anaerobically degrading both alkylbenzenes via different pathways which converge at benzoyl coenzyme A. The organization of genes involved in both pathways was only recently determined for strain EbN1. In the present study, global expression analysis (DNA microarray and proteomics) indicated involvement of several thus-far-unknown proteins in the degradation of both alkylbenzenes. For example, orf68 and orf57, framing the ebd operon, are implicated in ethylbenzene degradation, and the ebA1932 and ebA1936 genes, located 7.2 kb upstream of the bbs operon, are implicated in toluene degradation. In addition, expression studies were now possible on the level of the complete pathways. Growth experiments demonstrated that degradative capacities for toluene and ethylbenzene could be simultaneously induced, regardless of the substrate used for adaptation. Regulation was studied at the RNA (real-time reverse transcription-PCR and DNA microarray) and protein (two-dimensional-difference gel electrophoresis) level by using cells adapted to anaerobic growth with benzoate, toluene, ethylbenzene, or a mixture of toluene and ethylbenzene. Expression of the two toluene-related operons (bss and bbs) was specifically induced in toluene-adapted cells. In contrast, genes involved in anaerobic ethylbenzene degradation were induced in ethylbenzene- and toluene-adapted cells, suggesting that toluene may act as a gratuitous inducer. In agreement with the predicted sequential regulation of the ethylbenzene pathway, Ebd proteins (encoding subunits of ethylbenzene dehydrogenase) were formed in ethylbenzene- but not in acetophenone-adapted cells, while Apc proteins (subunits of predicted acetophenone carboxylase) were formed under both conditions. PMID:15687214

  11. Cooperative catabolic pathways within an atrazine-degrading enrichment culture isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Smith, Daniel; Alvey, Sam; Crowley, David E

    2005-07-01

    Atrazine degradation previously has been shown to be carried out by individual bacterial species or by relatively simple consortia that have been isolated using enrichment cultures. Here, the degradative pathway for atrazine was examined for a complex 8-membered enrichment culture. The species composition of the culture was determined by PCR-DGGE. The bacterial species included Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Caulobacter crescentus, Pseudomonas putida, Sphingomonas yaniokuyae, Nocardia sp., Rhizobium sp., Flavobacterium oryzihabitans, and Variovorax paradoxus. All of the isolates were screened for the presence of known genes that function for atrazine degradation including atzA,-B,-C,-D,-E,-F and trzD,-N. Dechlorination of atrazine, which was obligatory for complete mineralization, was carried out exclusively by Nocardia sp., which contained the trzN gene. Following dechlorination, the resulting product, hydroxyatrazine was further degraded via two separate pathways. In one pathway Nocardia converted hydroxyatrazine to N-ethylammelide via an unidentified gene product. In the second pathway, hydroxyatrazine generated by Nocardia sp. was hydrolyzed to N-isopropylammelide by Rhizobium sp., which contained the atzB gene. Each member of the enrichment culture contained atzC, which is responsible for ring cleavage, but none of the isolates carried the atzD,-E, or -F genes. Each member further contained either trzD or exhibited urease activity. The enrichment culture was destabilized by loss of Nocardia sp. when grown on ethylamine, ethylammelide, and cyanuric acid, after which the consortium was no longer able to degrade atrazine. The analysis of this enrichment culture highlights the broad level bacterial community interactions that may be involved in atrazine degradation in nature. PMID:16329946

  12. Impact of degrading permafrost on subsurface solute transport pathways and travel times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Andrew; Destouni, Georgia

    2015-09-01

    Subsurface solute transport under surface warming and degrading permafrost conditions is studied using a physically based model of coupled cryotic and hydrogeological flow processes combined with a particle tracking method. Changes in the subsurface water and inert solute pathways and travel times are analyzed for different modeled geological configurations. For all simulated cases, the minimum and mean travel times increase nonlinearly with warming irrespective of geological configuration and heterogeneity structure. The timing of the start of increase in travel time depends on heterogeneity structure, combined with the rate of permafrost degradation that also depends on material thermal and hydrogeological properties. The travel time changes depend on combined warming effects of: i) increase in pathway length due to deepening of the active layer, ii) reduced transport velocities due to a shift from horizontal saturated groundwater flow near the surface to vertical water percolation deeper into the subsurface, and iii) pathway length increase and temporary immobilization caused by cryosuction-induced seasonal freeze cycles.

  13. Acute ER stress regulates amyloid precursor protein processing through ubiquitin-dependent degradation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eun Sun; Hong, HyunSeok; Kim, Chaeyoung; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2015-01-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ), a major pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is derived from amyloid precursor protein (APP) through sequential cleavage by β-secretase and γ-secretase enzymes. APP is an integral membrane protein, and plays a key role in the pathogenesis of AD; however, the biological function of APP is still unclear. The present study shows that APP is rapidly degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in the CHO cell line in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, such as calcium ionophore, A23187, induced calcium influx. Increased levels of intracellular calcium by A23187 induces polyubiquitination of APP, causing its degradation. A23187-induced reduction of APP is prevented by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Furthermore, an increase in levels of the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) marker, E3 ubiquitin ligase HRD1, proteasome activity, and decreased levels of the deubiquitinating enzyme USP25 were observed during ER stress. In addition, we found that APP interacts with USP25. These findings suggest that acute ER stress induces degradation of full-length APP via the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway. PMID:25740315

  14. Tripartite degrons confer diversity and specificity on regulated protein degradation in the ubiquitin-proteasome system

    PubMed Central

    Guharoy, Mainak; Bhowmick, Pallab; Sallam, Mohamed; Tompa, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Specific signals (degrons) regulate protein turnover mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here we systematically analyse known degrons and propose a tripartite model comprising the following: (1) a primary degron (peptide motif) that specifies substrate recognition by cognate E3 ubiquitin ligases, (2) secondary site(s) comprising a single or multiple neighbouring ubiquitinated lysine(s) and (3) a structurally disordered segment that initiates substrate unfolding at the 26S proteasome. Primary degron sequences are conserved among orthologues and occur in structurally disordered regions that undergo E3-induced folding-on-binding. Posttranslational modifications can switch primary degrons into E3-binding-competent states, thereby integrating degradation with signalling pathways. Degradation-linked lysines tend to be located within disordered segments that also initiate substrate degradation by effective proteasomal engagement. Many characterized mutations and alternative isoforms with abrogated degron components are implicated in disease. These effects result from increased protein stability and interactome rewiring. The distributed nature of degrons ensures regulation, specificity and combinatorial control of degradation. PMID:26732515

  15. Degradation of Serotonin N-Acetyltransferase, a Circadian Regulator, by the N-end Rule Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wadas, Brandon; Borjigin, Jimo; Huang, Zheping; Oh, Jang-Hyun; Hwang, Cheol-Sang; Varshavsky, Alexander

    2016-08-12

    Serotonin N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) converts serotonin to N-acetylserotonin (NAS), a distinct biological regulator and the immediate precursor of melatonin, a circulating hormone that influences circadian processes, including sleep. N-terminal sequences of AANAT enzymes vary among vertebrates. Mechanisms that regulate the levels of AANAT are incompletely understood. Previous findings were consistent with the possibility that AANAT may be controlled through its degradation by the N-end rule pathway. By expressing the rat and human AANATs and their mutants not only in mammalian cells but also in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and by taking advantage of yeast genetics, we show here that two "complementary" forms of rat AANAT are targeted for degradation by two "complementary" branches of the N-end rule pathway. Specifically, the N(α)-terminally acetylated (Nt-acetylated) Ac-AANAT is destroyed through the recognition of its Nt-acetylated N-terminal Met residue by the Ac/N-end rule pathway, whereas the non-Nt-acetylated AANAT is targeted by the Arg/N-end rule pathway, which recognizes the unacetylated N-terminal Met-Leu sequence of rat AANAT. We also show, by constructing lysine-to-arginine mutants of rat AANAT, that its degradation is mediated by polyubiquitylation of its Lys residue(s). Human AANAT, whose N-terminal sequence differs from that of rodent AANATs, is longer-lived than its rat counterpart and appears to be refractory to degradation by the N-end rule pathway. Together, these and related results indicate both a major involvement of the N-end rule pathway in the control of rodent AANATs and substantial differences in the regulation of rodent and human AANATs that stem from differences in their N-terminal sequences. PMID:27339900

  16. Ciliopathy proteins regulate paracrine signaling by modulating proteasomal degradation of mediators

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yangfan P.; Tsai, I-Chun; Morleo, Manuela; Oh, Edwin C.; Leitch, Carmen C.; Massa, Filomena; Lee, Byung-Hoon; Parker, David S.; Finley, Daniel; Zaghloul, Norann A.; Franco, Brunella; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Cilia are critical mediators of paracrine signaling; however, it is unknown whether proteins that contribute to ciliopathies converge on multiple paracrine pathways through a common mechanism. Here, we show that loss of cilopathy-associated proteins Bardet-Biedl syndrome 4 (BBS4) or oral-facial-digital syndrome 1 (OFD1) results in the accumulation of signaling mediators normally targeted for proteasomal degradation. In WT cells, several BBS proteins and OFD1 interacted with proteasomal subunits, and loss of either BBS4 or OFD1 led to depletion of multiple subunits from the centrosomal proteasome. Furthermore, overexpression of proteasomal regulatory components or treatment with proteasomal activators sulforaphane (SFN) and mevalonolactone (MVA) ameliorated signaling defects in cells lacking BBS1, BBS4, and OFD1, in morphant zebrafish embryos, and in induced neurons from Ofd1-deficient mice. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that other proteasome-dependent pathways not known to be associated with ciliopathies are defective in the absence of ciliopathy proteins. We found that loss of BBS1, BBS4, or OFD1 led to decreased NF-κB activity and concomitant IκBβ accumulation and that these defects were ameliorated with SFN treatment. Taken together, our data indicate that basal body proteasomal regulation governs paracrine signaling pathways and suggest that augmenting proteasomal function might benefit ciliopathy patients. PMID:24691443

  17. Calpain-2-mediated PTEN degradation contributes to BDNF-induced stimulation of dendritic protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Briz, Victor; Hsu, Yu-Tien; Li, Yi; Lee, Erin; Bi, Xiaoning; Baudry, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Memory consolidation has been suggested to be protein synthesis-dependent. Recent data indicate that BDNF-induced dendritic protein synthesis is a key event in memory formation through activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. BDNF also activates calpain, a calcium-dependent cysteine protease, which has been shown to play a critical role in learning and memory. This study was therefore directed at testing the hypothesis that calpain activity is required for BDNF-stimulated local protein synthesis, and at identifying the underlying molecular mechanism. In rat hippocampal slices, cortical synaptoneurosomes, and cultured neurons, BDNF-induced mTOR pathway activation and protein translation were blocked by calpain inhibition. BDNF treatment rapidly reduced levels of hamartin and tuberin, negative regulators of mTOR, in a calpain-dependent manner. Treatment of brain homogenates with purified calpain-1 and calpain-2 truncated both proteins. BDNF treatment increased phosphorylation of both Akt and ERK, but only the effect on Akt was blocked by calpain inhibition. Levels of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten), a phosphatase that inactivates Akt, were decreased following BDNF treatment, and calpain inhibition reversed this effect. Calpain-2 but not calpain-1 treatment of brain homogenates resulted in PTEN degradation. In cultured cortical neurons, knock-down of calpain-2 but not calpain-1 by siRNA completely suppressed the effect of BDNF on mTOR activation. Our results reveal a critical role for calpain-2 in BDNF-induced mTOR signaling and dendritic protein synthesis via PTEN, hamartin and tuberin degradation. This mechanism therefore provides a link between proteolysis and protein synthesis that might contribute to synaptic plasticity. PMID:23467348

  18. A macromolecular delivery vehicle for protein-based vaccines: Acid-degradable protein-loaded microgels

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Niren; Xu, Mingcheng; Schuck, Stephany; Kunisawa, Jun; Shastri, Nilabh; Fréchet, Jean M. J.

    2003-01-01

    The development of protein-based vaccines remains a major challenge in the fields of immunology and drug delivery. Although numerous protein antigens have been identified that can generate immunity to infectious pathogens, the development of vaccines based on protein antigens has had limited success because of delivery issues. In this article, an acid-sensitive microgel material is synthesized for the development of protein-based vaccines. The chemical design of these microgels is such that they degrade under the mildly acidic conditions found in the phagosomes of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). The rapid cleavage of the microgels leads to phagosomal disruption through a colloid osmotic mechanism, releasing protein antigens into the APC cytoplasm for class I antigen presentation. Ovalbumin was encapsulated in microgel particles, 200–500 nm in diameter, prepared by inverse emulsion polymerization with a synthesized acid-degradable crosslinker. Ovalbumin is released from the acid-degradable microgels in a pH-dependent manner; for example, microgels containing ovalbumin release 80% of their encapsulated proteins after 5 h at pH 5.0, but release only 10% at pH 7.4. APCs that phagocytosed the acid-degradable microgels containing ovalbumin were capable of activating ovalbumin-specific cytoxic T lymphocytes. The acid-degradable microgels developed in this article should therefore find applications as delivery vehicles for vaccines targeted against viruses and tumors, where the activation of cytoxic T lymphocytes is required for the development of immunity. PMID:12704236

  19. Mechanism and Reaction Pathways for Microcystin-LR Degradation through UV/H2O2 Treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yafeng; Ren, Jing; Wang, Xiangrong; Fan, Zhengqiu

    2016-01-01

    Microcystin-LR (MCLR) is the most common cyanotoxin in contaminated aquatic systems. MCLR inhibits protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, leading to liver damage and tumor formation. MCLR is relatively stable owing to its cyclic structures. The combined UV/H2O2 technology can degrade MCLR efficiently. The second-order rate constant of the reaction between MCLR and hydroxyl radical (·OH) is 2.79(±0.23)×1010 M-1 s-1 based on the competition kinetics model using nitrobenzene as reference compound. The probable degradation pathway was analyzed through liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Results suggested that the major destruction pathways of MCLR were initiated by ·OH attack on the benzene ring and diene of the Adda side chain. The corresponding aldehyde or ketone peptide residues were formed through further oxidation. Another minor destruction pathway involved ·OH attack on the methoxy group of the Adda side chain, followed by complete removal of the methoxy group. The combined UV/H2O2 system is a promising technology for MCLR removal in contaminated aquatic systems. PMID:27281173

  20. Mechanism and Reaction Pathways for Microcystin-LR Degradation through UV/H2O2 Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yafeng; Ren, Jing; Wang, Xiangrong; Fan, Zhengqiu

    2016-01-01

    Microcystin-LR (MCLR) is the most common cyanotoxin in contaminated aquatic systems. MCLR inhibits protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, leading to liver damage and tumor formation. MCLR is relatively stable owing to its cyclic structures. The combined UV/H2O2 technology can degrade MCLR efficiently. The second-order rate constant of the reaction between MCLR and hydroxyl radical (·OH) is 2.79(±0.23)×1010 M−1 s−1 based on the competition kinetics model using nitrobenzene as reference compound. The probable degradation pathway was analyzed through liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Results suggested that the major destruction pathways of MCLR were initiated by ·OH attack on the benzene ring and diene of the Adda side chain. The corresponding aldehyde or ketone peptide residues were formed through further oxidation. Another minor destruction pathway involved ·OH attack on the methoxy group of the Adda side chain, followed by complete removal of the methoxy group. The combined UV/H2O2 system is a promising technology for MCLR removal in contaminated aquatic systems. PMID:27281173

  1. Phytoferritin association induced by EGCG inhibits protein degradation by proteases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aidong; Zhou, Kai; Qi, Xin; Zhao, Guanghua

    2014-12-01

    Phytoferritin is a promising resource of non-heme iron supplementation, but it is not stable against degradation by proteases in the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, how to improve the stability of ferritin in the presence of proteases is a challenge. Since (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is rich in phenolic-hydroxyl groups, it could interact with ferritin through hydrogen bonds, thereby preventing protein from degradation. To confirm this idea, we focus on the interaction between EGCG and phytoferritin, and the consequence of such interaction. Results demonstrated that EGCG did interact with ferritin, and such interaction induced the change in the tertiary/quaternary structure of protein but not in its secondary structure. Furthermore, stopped-flow and dynamic light scattering (DLS) results showed that EGCG could trigger ferritin association. Consequently, such protein association markedly inhibited protein digestion by pepsin at pH 4.0 and by trypsin at pH 7.5. These findings raise the possibility to improve the stability of phytoferritin in the presence of proteases. PMID:25384342

  2. Protein degradation in a LAMP-2-deficient B-lymphoblastoid cell line from a patient with Danon disease.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Lanzas, Raul; Alvarez-Castelao, Beatriz; Bermejo, Teresa; Ayuso, Teresa; Tuñón, Teresa; Castaño, José G

    2016-08-01

    Danon disease, a condition characterized by cardiomyopathy, myopathy, and intellectual disability, is caused by mutations in the LAMP-2 gene. Lamp-2A protein, generated by alternative splicing from the Lamp-2 pre-mRNA, is reported to be the lysosomal membrane receptor essential for the chaperone-mediated autophagic pathway (CMA) aimed to selective protein targeting and translocation into the lysosomal lumen for degradation. To study the relevance of Lamp-2 in protein degradation, a lymphoblastoid cell line was obtained by EBV transformation of B-cells from a Danon patient. The derived cell line showed no significant expression of Lamp-2 protein. The steady-state mRNA and protein levels of alpha-synuclein, IΚBα, Rcan1, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, four proteins reported to be selective substrates of the CMA pathway, were similar in control and Lamp-2-deficient cells. Inhibition of protein synthesis showed that the half-life of alpha-synuclein, IΚBα, and Rcan1 was similar in control and Lamp-2-deficient cells, and its degradation prevented by proteasome inhibitors. Both in control and Lamp-2-deficient cells, induction of CMA and macroautophagy by serum and aminoacid starvation of cells for 8h produced a similar decrease in IΚBα and Rcan1 protein levels and was prevented by the addition of lysosome and autophagy inhibitors. In conclusion, the results presented here showed that Lamp-2 deficiency in human lymphoblastoid cells did not modify the steady-state levels or the degradation of several protein substrates reported as selective substrates of the CMA pathway. PMID:27130438

  3. Design Principles of a Universal Protein Degradation Machine

    PubMed Central

    Matyskiela, Mary E.; Martin, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a 2.5 MDa, 32-subunit ATP-dependent protease that is responsible for the degradation of ubiquitinated protein targets in all eukaryotic cells. This proteolytic machine consists of a barrel-shaped peptidase capped by a large regulatory particle, which contains a heterohexameric AAA+ unfoldase as well as several structural modules of previously unknown function. Recent electron microscopy studies have allowed major breakthroughs in understanding the architecture of the regulatory particle, revealing that the additional modules provide a structural framework to position critical, ubiquitin-interacting subunits and thus allow the 26S proteasome to function as a universal degradation machine for a wide variety of protein substrates. The electron microscopy studies have also uncovered surprising asymmetries in the spatial arrangement of proteasome subunits, yet the functional significance of these architectural features remains unclear. This review will summarize the recent findings on 26S proteasome structure and discuss the mechanistic implications for substrate binding, deubiquitination, unfolding, and degradation. PMID:23147216

  4. Degradation kinetics and pathway of phenol by Pseudomonas and Bacillus species

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Syed Adnan; Jabeen, Suraiya

    2015-01-01

    This article elucidates that strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa (IES-Ps-1) is a versatile toxic organic compound degrader. With the degradation of malathion and cypermethrin (studied by other researchers previously), this strain was able to degrade phenol. Two other indigenous soil flora (i.e., Pseudomonas sp. (IES-S) and Bacillus subtilis (IES-B)) were also found to be potential phenol degraders. Phenol was degraded with Monod kinetics during growth in nutrient broth and mineral salts medium. Before entering into the growth inhibition phase, strains IES-Ps-1, IES-S and IES-B could tolerate up to 400, 700 and 500 mg/L phenol, respectively, when contained in nutrient broth. However, according to the Luong–Levenspiel model, the growth of strains IES-Ps-1, IES-S and IES-B would cease at 2000, 2174 and 2190 mg/L phenol, respectively. Strain IES-Ps-1 degraded 700, 900 and 1050 mg/L phenol contained in mineral salts medium with the specific rates of 0.034, 0.075 and 0.021 h−1, respectively. All these strains grew by making clusters when exposed to phenol in order to prevent damages due to high substrate concentration. These strains transformed phenol into catechol, which was then degraded via ortho-cleavage pathway. PMID:26740787

  5. Synthesis and protein degradation capacity of photoactivated enediynes.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Farid S; Wright, Justin M; Plourde, Gary; Purohit, Ajay D; Wyatt, Justin K; El-Shafey, Ahmed; Hynd, George; Crasto, Curtis F; Lin, Yiqing; Jones, Graham B

    2005-11-25

    [structure: see text] The viability of proteins as targets of thermally and photoactivated enediynes has been confirmed at the molecular level. Model studies using a labeled substrate confirmed the efficacy of atom transfer from diyl radicals produced from enediynes to form captodatively stabilized carbon centered aminoacyl radicals, which then undergo either fragmentation or dimerization. To exploit this finding, a family of enediynes was developed using an intramolecular coupling strategy. Derivatives were prepared and used to target specific proteins, showing good correlation between affinity and photoinduced protein degrading activity. The findings have potential applications in the design of artificial chemical proteases and add to our understanding of the mechanism of action of the clinically important enediyne antitumor antibiotics. PMID:16292807

  6. Intracellular protein degradation in mammalian cells: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Erwin; Aguado, Carmen; Cárcel, Jaime; Esteban, Inmaculada; Esteve, Juan Miguel; Ghislat, Ghita; Moruno, José Félix; Vidal, José Manuel; Sáez, Rosana

    2009-08-01

    In higher organisms, dietary proteins are broken down into amino acids within the digestive tract but outside the cells, which incorporate the resulting amino acids into their metabolism. However, under certain conditions, an organism loses more nitrogen than is assimilated in the diet. This additional loss was found in the past century to come from intracellular proteins and started an intensive research that produced an enormous expansion of the field and a dispersed literature. Therefore, our purpose is to provide an updated summary of the current knowledge on the proteolytic machinery involved in intracellular protein degradation and its physiological and pathological relevance, especially addressed to newcomers in the field who may find further details in more specialized reviews. However, even providing a general overview, this is an extremely wide field and, therefore, we mainly focus on mammalian cells, while other cells will be mentioned only for comparison purposes. PMID:19399586

  7. Characterization of Two Novel Propachlor Degradation Pathways in Two Species of Soil Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Margarita; Mengs, Gerardo; Allende, Jose Luis; Fernandez, Javier; Alonso, Ramon; Ferrer, Estrella

    1999-01-01

    Propachlor (2-chloro-N-isopropylacetanilide) is an acetamide herbicide used in preemergence. In this study, we isolated and characterized a soil bacterium, Acinetobacter strain BEM2, that was able to utilize this herbicide as the sole and limiting carbon source. Identification of the intermediates of propachlor degradation by this strain and characterization of new metabolites in the degradation of propachlor by a previously reported strain of Pseudomonas (PEM1) support two different propachlor degradation pathways. Washed-cell suspensions of strain PEM1 with propachlor accumulated N-isopropylacetanilide, acetanilide, acetamide, and catechol. Pseudomonas strain PEM1 grew on propachlor with a generation time of 3.4 h and a Ks of 0.17 ± 0.04 mM. Acinetobacter strain BEM2 grew on propachlor with a generation time of 3.1 h and a Ks of 0.3 ± 0.07 mM. Incubations with strain BEM2 resulted in accumulation of N-isopropylacetanilide, N-isopropylaniline, isopropylamine, and catechol. Both degradative pathways were inducible, and the principal product of the carbon atoms in the propachlor ring was carbon dioxide. These results and biodegradation experiments with the identified metabolites indicate that metabolism of propachlor by Pseudomonas sp. strain PEM1 proceeds through a different pathway from metabolism by Acinetobacter sp. strain BEM2. PMID:9925619

  8. A Polyomic Approach To Elucidate the Fluoranthene-Degradative Pathway in Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kweon, Ohgew; Kim, Seong-Jae; Jones, Richard C.; Freeman, James P.; Adjei, Michael D.; Edmondson, Ricky D.; Cerniglia, Carl E.

    2007-01-01

    Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1 is capable of degrading a wide range of high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), including fluoranthene. We used a combination of metabolomic, genomic, and proteomic technologies to investigate fluoranthene degradation in this strain. Thirty-seven fluoranthene metabolites including potential isomers were isolated from the culture medium and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and UV-visible absorption. Total proteins were separated by one-dimensional gel and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in conjunction with the M. vanbaalenii PYR-1 genome sequence (http://jgi.doe.gov), which resulted in the identification of 1,122 proteins. Among them, 53 enzymes were determined to be likely involved in fluoranthene degradation. We integrated the metabolic information with the genomic and proteomic results and proposed pathways for the degradation of fluoranthene. According to our hypothesis, the oxidation of fluoranthene is initiated by dioxygenation at the C-1,2, C-2,3, and C-7,8 positions. The C-1,2 and C-2,3 dioxygenation routes degrade fluoranthene via fluorene-type metabolites, whereas the C-7,8 routes oxidize fluoranthene via acenaphthylene-type metabolites. The major site of dioxygenation is the C-2,3 dioxygenation route, which consists of 18 enzymatic steps via 9-fluorenone-1-carboxylic acid and phthalate with the initial ring-hydroxylating oxygenase, NidA3B3, oxidizing fluoranthene to fluoranthene cis-2,3-dihydrodiol. Nonspecific monooxygenation of fluoranthene with subsequent O methylation of dihydroxyfluoranthene also occurs as a detoxification reaction. PMID:17449607

  9. Protein synthesis and degradation are essential to regulate germline stem cell homeostasis in Drosophila testes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun; Lan, Xiang; Chen, Xia; Yu, Chao; Xu, Yiwen; Liu, Yujuan; Xu, Lingna; Fan, Heng-Yu; Tong, Chao

    2016-08-15

    The homeostasis of self-renewal and differentiation in stem cells is controlled by intrinsic signals and their niche. We conducted a large-scale RNA interference (RNAi) screen in Drosophila testes and identified 221 genes required for germline stem cell (GSC) maintenance or differentiation. Knockdown of these genes in transit-amplifying spermatogonia and cyst cells further revealed various phenotypes. Complex analysis uncovered that many of the identified genes are involved in key steps of protein synthesis and degradation. A group of genes that are required for mRNA splicing and protein translation contributes to both GSC self-renewal and early germ cell differentiation. Loss of genes in the protein degradation pathway in cyst cells leads to testis tumors consisting of overproliferated germ cells. Importantly, in the Cullin 4-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase (CRL4) complex, we identified multiple proteins that are crucial to GSC self-renewal: pic/DDB1, a CRL4 linker protein, is not only required for GSC self-renewal in flies but also for maintenance of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) in mice. PMID:27471256

  10. APC/CCdh1 Targets Brain-Specific Kinase 2 (BRSK2) for Degradation via the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Wang, Yingli; Luo, Ting; Gu, Xiuting; Chen, Fang; Yu, Long

    2012-01-01

    Studies of brain-specific kinase 2 (BRSK2), an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-related kinase, and its homologs suggest that they are multifunctional regulators of cell-cycle progression. BRSK2, which contains a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain, is polyubiquitinated in cells. However, the regulatory mechanisms and exact biological function of BRSK2 remain unclear. Herein, we show that BRSK2 co-localizes with the centrosomes during mitosis. We also demonstrate that BRSK2 protein levels fluctuate during the cell cycle, peaking during mitosis and declining in G1 phase. Furthermore, Cdh1, rather than Cdc20, promotes the degradation of BRSK2 in vivo. Consistent with this finding, knock-down of endogenous Cdh1 blocks BRSK2 degradation during the G1 phase. The conserved KEN box of BRSK2 is required for anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome-Cdh1 (APC/CCdh1)-dependent degradation. Additionally, overexpression of either BRSK2(WT) or BRSK2(ΔKEN) increases the percentage of cells in G2/M. Thus, our results provide the first evidence that BRSK2 regulates cell-cycle progression controlled by APC/CCdh1 through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. PMID:23029325

  11. Protein folding: independent unrelated pathways or predetermined pathway with optional errors.

    PubMed

    Bédard, Sabrina; Krishna, Mallela M G; Mayne, Leland; Englander, S Walter

    2008-05-20

    The observation of heterogeneous protein folding kinetics has been widely interpreted in terms of multiple independent unrelated pathways (IUP model), both experimentally and in theoretical calculations. However, direct structural information on folding intermediates and their properties now indicates that all of a protein population folds through essentially the same stepwise pathway, determined by cooperative native-like foldon units and the way that the foldons fit together in the native protein. It is essential to decide between these fundamentally different folding mechanisms. This article shows, contrary to previous supposition, that the heterogeneous folding kinetics observed for the staphylococcal nuclease protein (SNase) does not require alternative parallel pathways. SNase folding kinetics can be fit equally well by a single predetermined pathway that allows for optional misfolding errors, which are known to occur ubiquitously in protein folding. Structural, kinetic, and thermodynamic information for the folding intermediates and pathways of many proteins is consistent with the predetermined pathway-optional error (PPOE) model but contrary to the properties implied in IUP models. PMID:18480257

  12. Reaction pathways of the diketonitrile degradate of isoxaflutole with hypochlorite in water.

    PubMed

    Lerch, R N; Lin, C H; Leigh, N D

    2007-03-01

    Isoxaflutole (IXF; Balance) belongs to a new class of isoxazole herbicides. Isoxaflutole has a very short half-life in soil and rapidly degrades to a stable and phytotoxic degradate, diketonitrile (DKN). DKN was previously discovered to rapidly react with hypochlorite (OCl-) in tap water, yielding the benzoic acid (BA) degradate as a major product, but the complete reaction pathway and mechanism have not been elucidated. Thus, the objectives of this work were to (1) determine the stoichiometry of the reaction between DKN and OCl-; (2) identify products in addition to BA; and (3) propose a complete pathway and reaction mechanism for oxidation of DKN by OCl-. Stoichiometry of the reaction showed a molar ratio of OCl-/DKN of 2. In addition, two previously uncharacterized chlorinated intermediates were identified under conditions in which OCl- was the limiting reactant. The proposed chemical structure of a chlorinated benzoyl intermediate was inferred from a series of HPLC/MS and HPLC/MS/MS experiments and the use of mass spectral simulation software. A chlorinated ketone intermediate was also identified using ion trap GC/MS. Two additional end products were also identified: cyclopropanecarboxylic acid (CPCA) and dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN). On the basis of the reaction stoichiometry, the structure of the chlorinated intermediates, and the identification of the products, two reaction pathways are proposed. Both pathways involve a two-step nucleophilic attack and oxidation of the diketone structure of DKN, leading to formation of BA, DCAN, and CPCA. PMID:17284050

  13. Degradation of ibuprofen by hydrodynamic cavitation: Reaction pathways and effect of operational parameters.

    PubMed

    Musmarra, Dino; Prisciandaro, Marina; Capocelli, Mauro; Karatza, Despina; Iovino, Pasquale; Canzano, Silvana; Lancia, Amedeo

    2016-03-01

    Ibuprofen (IBP) is an anti-inflammatory drug whose residues can be found worldwide in natural water bodies resulting in harmful effects to aquatic species even at low concentrations. This paper deals with the degradation of IBP in water by hydrodynamic cavitation in a convergent-divergent nozzle. Over 60% of ibuprofen was degraded in 60 min with an electrical energy per order (EEO) of 10.77 kWh m(-3) at an initial concentration of 200 μg L(-1) and a relative inlet pressure pin=0.35 MPa. Five intermediates generated from different hydroxylation reactions were identified; the potential mechanisms of degradation were sketched and discussed. The reaction pathways recognized are in line with the relevant literature, both experimental and theoretical. By varying the pressure upstream the constriction, different degradation rates were observed. This effect was discussed according to a numerical simulation of the hydroxyl radical production identifying a clear correspondence between the maximum kinetic constant kOH and the maximum calculated OH production. Furthermore, in the investigated experimental conditions, the pH parameter was found not to affect the extent of degradation; this peculiar feature agrees with a recently published kinetic insight and has been explained in the light of the intermediates of the different reaction pathways. PMID:26584987

  14. Metagenomic identification of bacterioplankton taxa and pathways involved in microcystin degradation in lake erie.

    PubMed

    Mou, Xiaozhen; Lu, Xinxin; Jacob, Jisha; Sun, Shulei; Heath, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacterial harmful blooms (CyanoHABs) that produce microcystins are appearing in an increasing number of freshwater ecosystems worldwide, damaging quality of water for use by human and aquatic life. Heterotrophic bacteria assemblages are thought to be important in transforming and detoxifying microcystins in natural environments. However, little is known about their taxonomic composition or pathways involved in the process. To address this knowledge gap, we compared the metagenomes of Lake Erie free-living bacterioplankton assemblages in laboratory microcosms amended with microcystins relative to unamended controls. A diverse array of bacterial phyla were responsive to elevated supply of microcystins, including Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria of the alpha, beta, gamma, delta and epsilon subdivisions and Verrucomicrobia. At more detailed taxonomic levels, Methylophilales (mainly in genus Methylotenera) and Burkholderiales (mainly in genera Bordetella, Burkholderia, Cupriavidus, Polaromonas, Ralstonia, Polynucleobacter and Variovorax) of Betaproteobacteria were suggested to be more important in microcystin degradation than Sphingomonadales of Alphaproteobacteria. The latter taxa were previously thought to be major microcystin degraders. Homologs to known microcystin-degrading genes (mlr) were not overrepresented in microcystin-amended metagenomes, indicating that Lake Erie bacterioplankton might employ alternative genes and/or pathways in microcystin degradation. Genes for xenobiotic metabolism were overrepresented in microcystin-amended microcosms, suggesting they are important in bacterial degradation of microcystin, a phenomenon that has been identified previously only in eukaryotic systems. PMID:23637924

  15. A functional 4-hydroxybenzoate degradation pathway in the phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris is required for full pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia-Yuan; Zhou, Lian; Chen, Bo; Sun, Shuang; Zhang, Wei; Li, Ming; Tang, Hongzhi; Jiang, Bo-Le; Tang, Ji-Liang; He, Ya-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Plants contain significant levels of natural phenolic compounds essential for reproduction and growth, as well as defense mechanisms against pathogens. Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) is the causal agent of crucifers black rot. Here we showed that genes required for the synthesis, utilization, transportation, and degradation of 4-hydroxybenzoate (4-HBA) are present in Xcc. Xcc rapidly degrades 4-HBA, but has no effect on 2-hydroxybenzoate and 3-hydroxybenzoate when grown in XOLN medium. The genes for 4-HBA degradation are organized in a superoperonic cluster. Bioinformatics, biochemical, and genetic data showed that 4-HBA is hydroxylated by 4-HBA 3-hydroxylase (PobA), which is encoded by Xcc0356, to yield PCA. The resulting PCA is further metabolized via the PCA branches of the β-ketoadipate pathway, including Xcc0364, Xcc0365, and PcaFHGBDCR. Xcc0364 and Xcc0365 encode a new form of β-ketoadipate succinyl-coenzyme A transferase that is required for 4-HBA degradation. pobA expression was induced by 4-HBA via the transcriptional activator, PobR. Radish and cabbage hydrolysates contain 2-HBA, 3-HBA, 4-HBA, and other phenolic compounds. Addition of radish and cabbage hydrolysates to Xcc culture significantly induced the expression of pobA via PobR. The 4-HBA degradation pathway is required for full pathogenicity of Xcc in radish. PMID:26672484

  16. Degradation kinetics and pathways of three calcium channel blockers under UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bing; Zonja, Bozo; Gonzalez, Oscar; Sans, Carme; Pérez, Sandra; Barceló, Damia; Esplugas, Santiago; Xu, Ke; Qiang, Zhimin

    2015-12-01

    Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are a group of pharmaceuticals widely prescribed to lower blood pressure and treat heart diseases. They have been frequently detected in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents and downstream river waters, thus inducing a potential risk to aquatic ecosystems. However, little is known about the behavior and fate of CCBs under UV irradiation, which has been adopted as a primary disinfection method for WWTP effluents. This study investigated the degradation kinetics and pathways of three commonly-used CCBs, including amlodipine (AML), diltiazem (DIL), and verapamil (VER), under UV (254 nm) irradiation. The chemical structures of transformation byproducts (TBPs) were first identified to assess the potential ecological hazards. On that basis, a generic solid-phase extraction method, which simultaneously used four different cartridges, was adopted to extract and enrich the TBPs. Thereafter, the photo-degradation of target CCBs was performed under UV fluences typical for WWTP effluent disinfection. The degradation of all three CCBs conformed to the pseudo-first-order kinetics, with rate constants of 0.031, 0.044 and 0.011 min(-1) for AML, DIL and VER, respectively. By comparing the MS(2) fragments and the evolution (i.e., formation or decay) trends of identified TBPs, the degradation pathways were proposed. In the WWTP effluent, although the target CCBs could be degraded, several TBPs still contained the functional pharmacophores and reached peak concentrations under UV fluences of 40-100 mJ cm(-2). PMID:26003333

  17. Metagenomic Identification of Bacterioplankton Taxa and Pathways Involved in Microcystin Degradation in Lake Erie

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Xiaozhen; Lu, Xinxin; Jacob, Jisha; Sun, Shulei; Heath, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacterial harmful blooms (CyanoHABs) that produce microcystins are appearing in an increasing number of freshwater ecosystems worldwide, damaging quality of water for use by human and aquatic life. Heterotrophic bacteria assemblages are thought to be important in transforming and detoxifying microcystins in natural environments. However, little is known about their taxonomic composition or pathways involved in the process. To address this knowledge gap, we compared the metagenomes of Lake Erie free-living bacterioplankton assemblages in laboratory microcosms amended with microcystins relative to unamended controls. A diverse array of bacterial phyla were responsive to elevated supply of microcystins, including Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria of the alpha, beta, gamma, delta and epsilon subdivisions and Verrucomicrobia. At more detailed taxonomic levels, Methylophilales (mainly in genus Methylotenera) and Burkholderiales (mainly in genera Bordetella, Burkholderia, Cupriavidus, Polaromonas, Ralstonia, Polynucleobacter and Variovorax) of Betaproteobacteria were suggested to be more important in microcystin degradation than Sphingomonadales of Alphaproteobacteria. The latter taxa were previously thought to be major microcystin degraders. Homologs to known microcystin-degrading genes (mlr) were not overrepresented in microcystin-amended metagenomes, indicating that Lake Erie bacterioplankton might employ alternative genes and/or pathways in microcystin degradation. Genes for xenobiotic metabolism were overrepresented in microcystin-amended microcosms, suggesting they are important in bacterial degradation of microcystin, a phenomenon that has been identified previously only in eukaryotic systems. PMID:23637924

  18. A functional 4-hydroxybenzoate degradation pathway in the phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris is required for full pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Yuan; Zhou, Lian; Chen, Bo; Sun, Shuang; Zhang, Wei; Li, Ming; Tang, Hongzhi; Jiang, Bo-Le; Tang, Ji-Liang; He, Ya-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Plants contain significant levels of natural phenolic compounds essential for reproduction and growth, as well as defense mechanisms against pathogens. Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) is the causal agent of crucifers black rot. Here we showed that genes required for the synthesis, utilization, transportation, and degradation of 4-hydroxybenzoate (4-HBA) are present in Xcc. Xcc rapidly degrades 4-HBA, but has no effect on 2-hydroxybenzoate and 3-hydroxybenzoate when grown in XOLN medium. The genes for 4-HBA degradation are organized in a superoperonic cluster. Bioinformatics, biochemical, and genetic data showed that 4-HBA is hydroxylated by 4-HBA 3-hydroxylase (PobA), which is encoded by Xcc0356, to yield PCA. The resulting PCA is further metabolized via the PCA branches of the β-ketoadipate pathway, including Xcc0364, Xcc0365, and PcaFHGBDCR. Xcc0364 and Xcc0365 encode a new form of β-ketoadipate succinyl-coenzyme A transferase that is required for 4-HBA degradation. pobA expression was induced by 4-HBA via the transcriptional activator, PobR. Radish and cabbage hydrolysates contain 2-HBA, 3-HBA, 4-HBA, and other phenolic compounds. Addition of radish and cabbage hydrolysates to Xcc culture significantly induced the expression of pobA via PobR. The 4-HBA degradation pathway is required for full pathogenicity of Xcc in radish. PMID:26672484

  19. Catalytic thermolysis in treating Cibacron Blue in aqueous solution: Kinetics and degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Su, Claire Xin-Hui; Teng, Tjoon-Tow; Wong, Yee-Shian; Morad, Norhashimah; Rafatullah, Mohd

    2016-03-01

    A thermal degradation pathway of the decolourisation of Reactive Cibacron Blue F3GA (RCB) in aqueous solution through catalytic thermolysis is established. Catalytic thermolysis is suitable for the removal of dyes from wastewater as it breaks down the complex dye molecules instead of only transferring them into another phase. RCB is a reactive dye that consists of three main groups, namely anthraquinone, benzene and triazine groups. Through catalytic thermolysis, the bonds that hold the three groups together were effectively broken and at the same time, the complex molecules degraded to form simple molecules of lower molecular weight. The degradation pathway and products were characterized and determined through UV-Vis, FT-IR and GCMS analysis. RCB dye molecule was successfully broken down into simpler molecules, namely, benzene derivatives, amines and triazine. The addition of copper sulphate, CuSO4, as a catalyst, hastens the thermal degradation of RCB by aiding in the breakdown of large, complex molecules. At pH 2 and catalyst mass loading of 5 g/L, an optimum colour removal of 66.14% was observed. The degradation rate of RCB is well explained by first order kinetics model. PMID:26741557

  20. Degradation of fluorescent and radiolabelled sphingomyelins in intact cells by a non-lysosomal pathway.

    PubMed

    Levade, T; Vidal, F; Vermeersch, S; Andrieu, N; Gatt, S; Salvayre, R

    1995-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the entitled neutral, sphingomyelinase in the non-lysosomal pathway of sphingomyelin degradation by intact cells (Spence et al. (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 8595-8600; Levade et al. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 13519-13529). The uptake and degradation of sphingomyelin by intact living cells was studied using cell lines exhibiting a wide range of activity levels of acid, lysosomal and neutral sphingomyelinases as determined in vitro on cell homogenates by their respective standard assays. For this purpose, neuroblastoma, skin fibroblasts, lymphoid and leukemic cell lines, some of them derived from patients with Niemann-Pick disease (deficient in the acid, lysosomal sphingomyelinase) were incubated with radioactive, [oleoyl-3H]sphingomyelin or fluorescent, pyrene-sulfonylaminoundecanoyl-sphingomyelin. Either compound was taken up by a pathway which was not receptor-mediated and hydrolyzed by all intact cells, including those derived from Niemann-Pick disease patients. Moreover, their degradation by the intact cells was not inhibited by treatment with chloroquine, indicating hydrolysis by a non-lysosomal sphingomyelinase. The intracellular sphingomyelin degradation rates showed no correlation with the activity of the 'classical' neutral sphingomyelinase as determined in vitro. In particular, fibroblasts derived from Niemann-Pick patients lacking the lysosomal sphingomyelinase, and having no detectable in vitro activity of the 'classical' neutral sphingomyelinase, were able to degrade the exogenously supplied sphingomyelins. Indeed, in vitro these cells were shown to exhibit neutral, magnesium- and dithiothreitol-dependent sphingomyelinase activities, that might contribute to the non-lysosomal pathway for sphingomyelin degradation to ceramide in intact cells. PMID:7548198

  1. Electron tunneling through covalent and noncovalent pathways in proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beratan, David N.; Onuchic, Jose Nelson; Hopfield, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    A model is presented for electron tunneling in proteins which allows the donor-acceptor interaction to be mediated by the covalent bonds between amino acids and noncovalent contacts between amino acid chains. The important tunneling pathways are predicted to include mostly bonded groups with less favorable nonbonded interactions being important when the through bond pathway is prohibitively long. In some cases, vibrational motion of nonbonded groups along the tunneling pathway strongly influences the temperature dependence of the rate. Quantitative estimates for the sizes of these noncovalent interactions are made and their role in protein mediated electron transport is discussed.

  2. An Armadillo Motif in Ufd3 Interacts with Cdc48 and is Involved in Ubiquitin Homeostasis and Protein Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, G.; Li, G; Schindelin, H; Lennarz, W

    2009-01-01

    The yeast AAA-ATPase Cdc48 and the ubiquitin fusion degradation (UFD) proteins play important, evolutionarily conserved roles in ubiquitin dependent protein degradation. The N-terminal domain of Cdc48 interacts with substrate-recruiting cofactors, whereas the C terminus of Cdc48 binds to proteins such as Ufd3 that process substrates. Ufd3 is essential for efficient protein degradation and for maintaining cellular ubiquitin levels. This protein contains an N-terminal WD40 domain, a central ubiquitin-binding domain, and a C-terminal Cdc48-binding PUL domain. The crystal structure of the PUL domain reveals an Armadillo repeat with high structural similarity to importin-a, and the Cdc48-binding site could be mapped to the concave surface of the PUL domain by biochemical studies. Alterations of the Cdc48 binding site of Ufd3 by site-directed mutagenesis resulted in a depletion of cellular ubiquitin pools and reduced activity of the ubiquitin fusion degradation pathway. Therefore, our data provide direct evidence that the functions of Ufd3 in ubiquitin homeostasis and protein degradation depend on its interaction with the C terminus of Cdc48.

  3. The role of local protein synthesis and degradation in axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gumy, Laura F.; Tan, Chin Lik; Fawcett, James W.

    2010-01-01

    In axotomised regenerating axons, the first step toward successful regeneration is the formation of a growth cone. This requires a variety of dynamic morphological and biochemical changes in the axon, including the appearance of many new cytoskeletal, cell surface and signalling molecules. These changes suggest the activation of coordinated complex cellular processes. A recent development has been the demonstration that the regenerative ability of some axons depends on their capacity to locally synthesise new proteins and degrade others at the injury site autonomously from the cell body. There are also events involving the degradation of cytoskeletal and other molecules, and activation of signalling pathways, with axotomy-induced calcium changes probably being an initiating event. A future challenge will be to understand how this complex network of processes interacts in order to find therapeutic ways of promoting the regeneration of CNS axons. PMID:19520073

  4. Incomplete proteasomal degradation of green fluorescent proteins in the context of tandem fluorescent protein timers.

    PubMed

    Khmelinskii, Anton; Meurer, Matthias; Ho, Chi-Ting; Besenbeck, Birgit; Füller, Julia; Lemberg, Marius K; Bukau, Bernd; Mogk, Axel; Knop, Michael

    2016-01-15

    Tandem fluorescent protein timers (tFTs) report on protein age through time-dependent change in color, which can be exploited to study protein turnover and trafficking. Each tFT, composed of two fluorescent proteins (FPs) that differ in maturation kinetics, is suited to follow protein dynamics within a specific time range determined by the maturation rates of both FPs. So far, tFTs have been constructed by combining slower-maturing red fluorescent proteins (redFPs) with the faster-maturing superfolder green fluorescent protein (sfGFP). Toward a comprehensive characterization of tFTs, we compare here tFTs composed of different faster-maturing green fluorescent proteins (greenFPs) while keeping the slower-maturing redFP constant (mCherry). Our results indicate that the greenFP maturation kinetics influences the time range of a tFT. Moreover, we observe that commonly used greenFPs can partially withstand proteasomal degradation due to the stability of the FP fold, which results in accumulation of tFT fragments in the cell. Depending on the order of FPs in the timer, incomplete proteasomal degradation either shifts the time range of the tFT toward slower time scales or precludes its use for measurements of protein turnover. We identify greenFPs that are efficiently degraded by the proteasome and provide simple guidelines for the design of new tFTs. PMID:26609072

  5. Incomplete proteasomal degradation of green fluorescent proteins in the context of tandem fluorescent protein timers

    PubMed Central

    Khmelinskii, Anton; Meurer, Matthias; Ho, Chi-Ting; Besenbeck, Birgit; Füller, Julia; Lemberg, Marius K.; Bukau, Bernd; Mogk, Axel; Knop, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Tandem fluorescent protein timers (tFTs) report on protein age through time-dependent change in color, which can be exploited to study protein turnover and trafficking. Each tFT, composed of two fluorescent proteins (FPs) that differ in maturation kinetics, is suited to follow protein dynamics within a specific time range determined by the maturation rates of both FPs. So far, tFTs have been constructed by combining slower-maturing red fluorescent proteins (redFPs) with the faster-maturing superfolder green fluorescent protein (sfGFP). Toward a comprehensive characterization of tFTs, we compare here tFTs composed of different faster-maturing green fluorescent proteins (greenFPs) while keeping the slower-maturing redFP constant (mCherry). Our results indicate that the greenFP maturation kinetics influences the time range of a tFT. Moreover, we observe that commonly used greenFPs can partially withstand proteasomal degradation due to the stability of the FP fold, which results in accumulation of tFT fragments in the cell. Depending on the order of FPs in the timer, incomplete proteasomal degradation either shifts the time range of the tFT toward slower time scales or precludes its use for measurements of protein turnover. We identify greenFPs that are efficiently degraded by the proteasome and provide simple guidelines for the design of new tFTs. PMID:26609072

  6. Eosinophil granule cationic proteins regulate the classical pathway of complement.

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, J M; Edens, R E; Bell, C S; Gleich, G J

    1995-01-01

    Major basic protein, the primary constituent of eosinophil granules, regulates the alternative and classical pathways of complement. Major basic protein and other eosinophil granule cationic proteins, which are important in mediating tissue damage in allergic disease, regulate the alternative pathway by interfering with C3b interaction with factor B to assemble an alternative pathway C3 convertase. In the present study, eosinophil peroxidase, eosinophil cationic protein and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, as well as major basic protein, were examined for capacity to regulate the classical pathway. Eosinophil peroxidase, eosinophil cationic protein and major basic protein inhibited formation of cell-bound classical pathway C3 convertase (EAC1,4b,2a), causing 50% inhibition of complement-mediated lysis at about 0.19, 0.75 and 0.5 micrograms/10(7) cellular intermediates, respectively. Eosinophil-derived neurotoxin had no activity on this pathway of complement. The eosinophil granule proteins were examined for activity on the formation of the membrane attack complex. Major basic protein and eosinophil cationic protein had no activity on terminal lysis. In contrast, eosinophil peroxidase inhibited lysis of EAC1,4b,2a,3b,5b, but had only minimal activity on later events in complement lysis. These polycations were then examined to determine the site(s) at which they regulated the early classical pathway. Eosinophil granule polycationic proteins: (1) reduced the Zmax at all time points but had only minimal effect on the Tmax during the formation of the classical pathway C3 convertase (EAC1,4b,2a); (2) inhibited formation of EAC1,4b,2a proportional to C4 but independent of C2 concentration; (3) inhibited fluid phase formation of C1,4b,2a, as reflected by a decrease in C1-induced consumption of C2 over time; and (4) inhibited C1 activity over time without a direct effect on either C4 or C2. These observations suggest that polycations regulate the early classical pathway by

  7. Distinct protein degradation profiles are induced by different disuse models of skeletal muscle atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bialek, Peter; Morris, Carl; Parkington, Jascha; St. Andre, Michael; Owens, Jane; Yaworsky, Paul; Seeherman, Howard

    2011-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy can be a consequence of many diseases, environmental insults, inactivity, age, and injury. Atrophy is characterized by active degradation, removal of contractile proteins, and a reduction in muscle fiber size. Animal models have been extensively used to identify pathways that lead to atrophic conditions. We used genome-wide expression profiling analyses and quantitative PCR to identify the molecular changes that occur in two clinically relevant mouse models of muscle atrophy: hindlimb casting and Achilles tendon laceration (tenotomy). Gastrocnemius muscle samples were collected 2, 7, and 14 days after casting or injury. The total amount of muscle loss, as measured by wet weight and muscle fiber size, was equivalent between models on day 14, although tenotomy resulted in a more rapid induction of muscle atrophy. Furthermore, tenotomy resulted in the regulation of significantly more mRNA transcripts then did casting. Analysis of the regulated genes and pathways suggest that the mechanisms of atrophy are distinct between these models. The degradation following casting was ubiquitin-proteasome mediated, while degradation following tenotomy was lysosomal and matrix-metalloproteinase mediated, suggesting a possible role for autophagy. These data suggest that there are multiple mechanisms leading to muscle atrophy and that specific therapeutic agents may be necessary to combat atrophy resulting from different conditions. PMID:21791639

  8. Quantitative proteomics analysis of the Arg/N-end rule pathway of targeted degradation in Arabidopsis roots

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongtao; Gannon, Lucy; Powers, Stephen J; Lilley, Kathryn S; Theodoulou, Frederica L

    2015-01-01

    According to the Arg/N-end rule pathway, proteins with basic N-termini are targeted for degradation by the Arabidopsis thaliana E3 ligase, PROTEOLYSIS6 (PRT6). Proteins can also become PRT6 substrates following post-translational arginylation by arginyltransferases ATE1 and 2. Here, we undertook a quantitative proteomics study of Arg/N-end rule mutants, ate1/2 and prt6, to investigate the impact of this pathway on the root proteome. Tandem mass tag labelling identified a small number of proteins with increased abundance in the mutants, some of which represent downstream targets of transcription factors known to be N-end rule substrates. Isolation of N-terminal peptides using terminal amine isotope labelling of samples (TAILS) combined with triple dimethyl labelling identified 1465 unique N-termini. Stabilising residues were over-represented among the free neo-N-termini, but destabilising residues were not markedly enriched in N-end rule mutants. The majority of free neo-N-termini were revealed following cleavage of organellar targeting signals, thus compartmentation may account in part for the presence of destabilising residues in the wild-type N-terminome. Our data suggest that PRT6 does not have a marked impact on the global proteome of Arabidopsis roots and is likely involved in the controlled degradation of relatively few regulatory proteins. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001719 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001719). PMID:25728785

  9. Non-oxygen-forming pathways of hydrogen peroxide degradation by bovine liver catalase at low hydrogen peroxide fluxes.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Herbert; Auferkamp, Oliver; Bramey, Thorsten; de Groot, Klaus; Kirsch, Michael; Korth, Hans-Gert; Petrat, Frank; Sustmann, Reiner

    2006-01-01

    Heme catalases are considered to degrade two molecules of H(2)O(2) to two molecules of H(2)O and one molecule of O(2) employing the catalatic cycle. We here studied the catalytic behaviour of bovine liver catalase at low fluxes of H(2)O(2) (relative to catalase concentration), adjusted by H(2)O(2)-generating systems. At a ratio of a H(2)O(2) flux (given in microM/min(- 1)) to catalase concentration (given in microM) of 10 min(- 1) and above, H(2)O(2) degradation occurred via the catalatic cycle. At lower ratios, however, H(2)O(2) degradation proceeded with increasingly diminished production of O(2). At a ratio of 1 min(- 1), O(2) formation could no longer be observed, although the enzyme still degraded H(2)O(2). These results strongly suggest that at low physiological H(2)O(2) fluxes H(2)O(2) is preferentially metabolised reductively to H(2)O, without release of O(2). The pathways involved in the reductive metabolism of H(2)O(2) are presumably those previously reported as inactivation and reactivation pathways. They start from compound I and are operative at low and high H(2)O(2) fluxes but kinetically outcompete the reaction of compound I with H(2)O(2) at low H(2)O(2) production rates. In the absence of NADPH, the reducing equivalents for the reductive metabolism of H(2)O(2) are most likely provided by the protein moiety of the enzyme. In the presence of NADPH, they are at least in part provided by the coenzyme. PMID:16298761

  10. Sodium persulfate-assisted mechanochemical degradation of tetrabromobisphenol A: Efficacy, products and pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xitao; Zhang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Kunlun; Qi, Chengdu

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, activated persulfate (PS) oxidation has been developed as a new advanced oxidation process for the degradation of organic pollutants. On the other hand, the mechanochemical method has exhibited a unique advantage in dealing with chemical wastes. The degradation of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), a widely used brominated flame retardant (BFR), in wastes has attracted considerable attention. In this study, the efficacy of a CaO-mechanochemical (CaO-MC) treatment system assisted by the addition of PS for the degradation of TBBPA was investigated. Under the optimum reaction conditions with a mole ratio of PS:CaO = 1:4 and less than 12.5% of TBBPA by mass, the degradation and debromination of TBBPA were completed within 2 h, while the mineralization was completed within 4 h. Characterization of the milled sample by XRD revealed that CaSO4 crystallization occurred. The TG results illustrate that there was little organic matter left after 4 h of milling. Raman and FT-IR spectra exhibited the TBBPA destruction process and disappearance of the organic groups. Through analysis by LC/MS/MS, seventeen intermediates were identified. The mechanism of TBBPA degradation by the PS-assisted CaO-MC treatment system was explained from two aspects, the course of crystallization and the degradation of TBBPA by activated PS, and two parallel initiation pathways were proposed. PMID:26359264